WorldWideScience

Sample records for astatine 192

  1. Radiochemistry of astatine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruth, T J; Dombsky, M; D' Auria, J M; Ward, T E

    1988-01-01

    This monograph is a review of the literature through 1987 and covers the methods of producing the radioisotopes of astatine and the inorganic, nuclear, and organic chemistry of astatine. The discussion is limited to chemical and physical chemical properties of astatine. The monograph, after the introduction, is divided into chapters titled: production methods, nuclear spectroscopy, chemistry of astatine, separation and isolation (dry and wet), and selected procedures. 209 refs., 15 figs., 7 tabs. (DLC)

  2. Discovery of the astatine, radon, francium, and radium isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fry, C.; Thoennessen, M., E-mail: thoennessen@nscl.msu.edu

    2013-09-15

    Thirty-nine astatine, thirty-nine radon, thirty-five francium, and thirty-four radium isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is described. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  3. Discovery of the astatine, radon, francium, and radium isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Fry, C

    2012-01-01

    Currently, thirty-nine astatine, thirty-nine radon, thirty-five francium, and thirty-four radium isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  4. Discovery of the astatine, radon, francium, and radium isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, C.; Thoennessen, M.

    2013-09-01

    Thirty-nine astatine, thirty-nine radon, thirty-five francium, and thirty-four radium isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is described. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  5. Delayed and In-beam Spectroscopy on Francium and Astatine Nuclei at the Proton Drip Line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uusitalo, J.; Jakobsson, U. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Collaboration: RITU-Gamma Gollaboration

    2011-11-30

    Delayed and in-beam spectroscopy on francium and astatine nuclei at and beyond the proton drip line has been performed. In neutron deficient astatine nuclei a shift to deformed shapes as a function of decreasing neutron has been obtained. In neutron deficient francium isotope the same shift is evident.

  6. Delayed and In-beam Spectroscopy on Francium and Astatine Nuclei at the Proton Drip Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uusitalo, J.; Jakobsson, U.

    2011-11-01

    Delayed and in-beam spectroscopy on francium and astatine nuclei at and beyond the proton drip line has been performed. In neutron deficient astatine nuclei a shift to deformed shapes as a function of decreasing neutron has been obtained. In neutron deficient francium isotope the same shift is evident.

  7. Measurement of the first ionization potential of astatine by laser ionization spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Rothe, S; Antalic, S; Borschevsky, A; Capponi, L; Cocolios, T E; De Witte, H; Eliav, E; Fedorov, D V; Fedosseev, V N; Fink, D A; Fritzsche, S; Ghys, L; Huyse, M; Imai, N; Kaldor, U; Kudryavtsev, Yu; Köster, U; Lane, J; Lassen, J; Liberati, V; Lynch, K M; Marsh, B A; Nishio, K; Pauwels, D; Pershina, V; Popescu, L; Procter, T J; Radulov, D; Raeder, S; Rajabali, M M; Rapisarda, E; Rossel, R E; Sandhu, K; Seliverstov, M D; Sjödin, A M; Van den Bergh, P; Van Duppen, P; Venhart, M; Wakabayashi, Y; Wendt K D A

    2013-01-01

    The radioactive element astatine exists only in trace amounts in nature. Its properties can therefore only be explored by study of smallest quantities of artificially produced isotopes or by performing theoretical calculations. One of the most important properties influencing the chemical behaviour is the energy required to remove one electron from the valence shell, referred to as the ionization potential. Here we use laser spectroscopy to probe the optical spectrum of astatine near the ionization threshold. The observed series of Rydberg states enabled the first determination of the ionization potential of the astatine atom, 9.317510(8) eV. New ab initio calculations were performed to support the experimental result. The measured value serves as a benchmark for quantum chemistry calculations of the properties of astatine as well as for the theoretical prediction of the ionization potential of super-heavy element 117, the heaviest homologue of astatine.

  8. Measurement of the first ionization potential of astatine by laser ionization spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothe, S; Andreyev, A N; Antalic, S; Borschevsky, A; Capponi, L; Cocolios, T E; De Witte, H; Eliav, E; Fedorov, D V; Fedosseev, V N; Fink, D A; Fritzsche, S; Ghys, L; Huyse, M; Imai, N; Kaldor, U; Kudryavtsev, Yuri; Köster, U; Lane, J F W; Lassen, J; Liberati, V; Lynch, K M; Marsh, B A; Nishio, K; Pauwels, D; Pershina, V; Popescu, L; Procter, T J; Radulov, D; Raeder, S; Rajabali, M M; Rapisarda, E; Rossel, R E; Sandhu, K; Seliverstov, M D; Sjödin, A M; Van den Bergh, P; Van Duppen, P; Venhart, M; Wakabayashi, Y; Wendt, K D A

    2013-01-01

    The radioactive element astatine exists only in trace amounts in nature. Its properties can therefore only be explored by study of the minute quantities of artificially produced isotopes or by performing theoretical calculations. One of the most important properties influencing the chemical behaviour is the energy required to remove one electron from the valence shell, referred to as the ionization potential. Here we use laser spectroscopy to probe the optical spectrum of astatine near the ionization threshold. The observed series of Rydberg states enabled the first determination of the ionization potential of the astatine atom, 9.31751(8) eV. New ab initio calculations are performed to support the experimental result. The measured value serves as a benchmark for quantum chemistry calculations of the properties of astatine as well as for the theoretical prediction of the ionization potential of superheavy element 117, the heaviest homologue of astatine.

  9. Spectroscopy of low-lying states in neutron-deficient astatine and francium nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakobsson, U., E-mail: ulrjak@kth.se; Cederwall, B. [KTH, The Division of Nuclear Physics, AlbaNova University Center, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Uusitalo, J.; Auranen, K.; Badran, H.; Cox, D. M.; Grahn, T.; Greenlees, P. T.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Herzáň, A.; Konki, J.; Leino, M.; Mallaburn, M.; Pakarinen, J.; Papadakis, P.; Partanen, J.; Rahkila, P.; Sandzelius, M.; Sarén, J. [University of Jyvaskyla, Department of Physics, P.O. Box 35, FI-40014 University of Jyvaskyla (Finland); and others

    2015-10-15

    Low-lying states in neutron-deficient astatine and francium nuclei have been studied by means of in-beam and delayed spectroscopy. The 13/2{sup +} state has been observed in francium nuclei with a similar down-sloping trend as in neighbouring astatine and bismuth isotopes, as a function of decreasing neutron number. A systematic trend can also now be seen for the 1/2{sup +} state both in astatine and francium nuclei, where the level energy decreases steeply as a function of neutron number when moving further away from the neutron shell closure. This trend is very similar between astatine nuclei and their francium isotones. Moreover, shape coexistence has been observed between the 13/2{sup +} state and the spherical 9/2{sup −} ground state in {sup 203}Fr and {sup 205}Fr.

  10. Spectroscopy of low-lying states in neutron-deficient astatine and francium nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsson, U.; Uusitalo, J.; Auranen, K.; Badran, H.; Cederwall, B.; Cox, D. M.; Grahn, T.; Greenlees, P. T.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; HerzáÅ, A.; Konki, J.; Leino, M.; Mallaburn, M.; Pakarinen, J.; Papadakis, P.; Partanen, J.; Rahkila, P.; Sandzelius, M.; Sarén, J.; Scholey, C.; Sorri, J.; Stolze, S.

    2015-10-01

    Low-lying states in neutron-deficient astatine and francium nuclei have been studied by means of in-beam and delayed spectroscopy. The 13/2+ state has been observed in francium nuclei with a similar down-sloping trend as in neighbouring astatine and bismuth isotopes, as a function of decreasing neutron number. A systematic trend can also now be seen for the 1/2+ state both in astatine and francium nuclei, where the level energy decreases steeply as a function of neutron number when moving further away from the neutron shell closure. This trend is very similar between astatine nuclei and their francium isotones. Moreover, shape coexistence has been observed between the 13/2+ state and the spherical 9/2- ground state in 203Fr and 205Fr.

  11. Automated astatination of biomolecules - a stepping stone towards multicenter clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aneheim, Emma; Albertsson, Per; Bäck, Tom

    2015-01-01

    To facilitate multicentre clinical studies on targeted alpha therapy, it is necessary to develop an automated, on-site procedure for conjugating rare, short-lived, alpha-emitting radionuclides to biomolecules. Astatine-211 is one of the few alpha-emitting nuclides with appropriate chemical...

  12. Measurement of the first ionization potential of astatine by laser ionization spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rothe, S.; Andreyev, A. N.; Antalic, S.; Borschevsky, A.; Capponi, L.; Cocolios, T. E.; De Witte, H.; Eliav, E.; Fedorov, D. V.; Fedosseev, V. N.; Fink, D. A.; Fritzsche, S.; Ghys, L.; Huyse, M.; Imai, N.; Kaldor, U.; Kudryavtsev, Yuri; Koester, U.; Lane, J. F. W.; Lassen, J.; Liberati, V.; Lynch, K. M.; Marsh, B. A.; Nishio, K.; Pauwels, D.; Pershina, V.; Popescu, L.; Procter, T. J.; Radulov, D.; Raeder, S.; Rajabali, M. M.; Rapisarda, E.; Rossel, R. E.; Sandhu, K.; Seliverstov, M. D.; Sjoedin, A. M.; Van den Bergh, P.; Van Duppen, P.; Venhart, M.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Wendt, K. D. A.

    The radioactive element astatine exists only in trace amounts in nature. Its properties can therefore only be explored by study of the minute quantities of artificially produced isotopes or by performing theoretical calculations. One of the most important properties influencing the chemical

  13. An attempt to explore the production routes of Astatine radionuclides: Theoretical approach

    OpenAIRE

    Maiti, Moumita; Lahiri, Susanta

    2008-01-01

    In order to fulfil the recent thrust of Astatine radionuclides in the field of nuclear medicine various production routes have been explored in the present work. The possible production routes of $^{209-211}$At comprise both light and heavy ion induced reactions at the bombarding energy range starting from threshold to maximum 100 MeV energy. For this purpose, we have used the nuclear reaction model codes TALYS, ALICE91 and PACE-II. Excitation functions of those radionuclides, produced throug...

  14. Synthesis and Evaluation of Astatinated N-[2-(Maleimido)ethyl]-3-(trimethylstannyl)benzamide Immunoconjugates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aneheim, Emma; Gustafsson, Anna; Albertsson, Per

    2016-01-01

    Effective treatment of metastasis is a great challenge in the treatment of different types of cancers. Targeted alpha therapy utilizes the short tissue range (50-100 μm) of α particles, making the method suitable for treatment of disseminated occult cancers in the form of microtumors or even sing...... of the in vivo distribution of the new immunoconjugate with other tin-based immunoconjugates in tumor-bearing mice, the MSB conjugation method was found to be a viable option for successful astatine labeling of different monoclonal antibodies....

  15. Laser photodetachment of radioactive ions: towards the determination of the electronegativity of astatine

    CERN Multimedia

    Rothe, Sebastian; Welander, Jakob Emanuel; Chrysalidis, Katerina; Day Goodacre, Thomas; Fedosseev, Valentine; Fiotakis, Spyridon; Forstner, Oliver; Heinke, Reinhard Matthias; Johnston, Karl; Kron, Tobias; Koester, Ulli; Liu, Yuan; Marsh, Bruce; Ringvall Moberg, Annie; Rossel, Ralf Erik; Seiffert, Christoph; Studer, Dominik; Wendt, Klaus; Hanstorp, Dag

    2017-01-01

    Negatively charged ions are mainly stabilized through the electron correlation effect. A measure of the stability of a negative ion is the electron affinity, which the energy gain by attaching an electron to a neutral atom. This fundamental quantity is, due to the almost general lack of bound excited states, the only atomic property that can be determined with high accuracy for negative ions. We will present the results of the first laser photodetachment studies of radioactive negative ions at CERN-ISOLDE. The photodetachment threshold for the radiogenic iodine isotope 128I was measured successfully, demonstrating the performance of the upgraded GANDALPH experimental beam line. The first detection of photo-detached astatine atoms marks a milestone towards the determination of the EA of this radioactive element.

  16. Complexation study on no-carrier-added astatine with insulin: A candidate radiopharmaceutical

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lahiri, Susanta [Chemical Sciences Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700 064 (India)], E-mail: susanta.lahiri@saha.ac.in; Roy, Kamalika [Chemical Sciences Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700 064 (India); Sen, Souvik [Berhampur Sadar Hospital, Berhampur, Murshidabad 742 101 (India)

    2008-12-15

    No-carrier-added astatine radionuclides produced in the {sup 7}Li-irradiated lead matrix were separated from bulk lead nitrate target by complexing At with insulin, followed by dialysis. The method offers simultaneous separation of At from lead as well as its complexation with insulin. The At-insulin complex might be a potential radiopharmaceutical in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma. The stability of At-insulin complex was checked by dialysis against deionized water and Ringer lactate (RL) solution. It has been found that the half-life of At-insulin complex is about {approx}12 h, when dialyzed against deionized water and is only 6 h, when dialyzed against RL solution having the same composition as blood serum. The 6 h half-life of this Insulin-At complex is perfect for killing cancer cells from external cell surfaces as the half-life of internalization of insulin molecule inside the cell is 7-12 h.

  17. Determination of the electron affinity of astatine and polonium by laser photodetachment

    CERN Multimedia

    We propose to conduct the first electron affinity (EA) measurements of the two elements astatine (At) and polonium (Po). Collinear photo-detachment spectroscopy will allow us to measure these quantities with an uncertainty limited only by the spectral line width of the laser. We plan to use negative ion beams of the two radioactive elements At and Po, which are only accessible on-line and at ISOLDE. The feasibility of our proposed method and the functionality of the experimental setup have been demonstrated at ISOLDE in off-line tests by the clear observation of the photo-detachment threshold for stable iodine. This proposal is based on our Letter of Intent I-148.

  18. Adsorption of the astatine species on a gold surface: A relativistic density functional theory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demidov, Yuriy; Zaitsevskii, Andréi

    2018-01-01

    We report first-principle based studies of the adsorption interaction of astatine species on a gold surface. These studies are aimed primarily at the support and interpretation of gas chromatographic experiments with superheavy elements, tennessine (Ts, Z = 117), a heavier homologue of At, and possibly its pseudo-homologue nihonium (Nh, Z = 113). We use gold clusters with up to 69 atoms to simulate the adsorption sites and estimate the desorption energies of At & AtOH from a stable gold (1 1 1) surface. To describe the electronic structure of At -Aun and AtOH -Aun complexes, we combine accurate shape-consistent relativistic pseudopotentials and non-collinear two-component relativistic density functional theory. The predicted desorption energies of At and AtOH on gold are 130 ± 10 kJ/mol and 90 ± 10 kJ/mol, respectively. These results confirm the validity of the estimates derived from chromatographic data (147 ± 15 kJ/mol for At, and 100-10+20 kJ/mol for AtOH).

  19. ASTATINE-211 RADIOCHEMISTRY: THE DEVELOPMENT OF METHODOLOGIES FOR HIGH ACTIVITY LEVEL RADIOSYNTHESIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MICHAEL R. ZALUTSKY

    2012-08-08

    Targeted radionuclide therapy is emerging as a viable approach for cancer treatment because of its potential for delivering curative doses of radiation to malignant cell populations while sparing normal tissues. Alpha particles such as those emitted by 211At are particularly attractive for this purpose because of their short path length in tissue and high energy, making them highly effective in killing cancer cells. The current impact of targeted radiotherapy in the clinical domain remains limited despite the fact that in many cases, potentially useful molecular targets and labeled compounds have already been identified. Unfortunately, putting these concepts into practice has been impeded by limitations in radiochemistry methodologies. A critical problem is that the synthesis of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals provides additional challenges in comparison to diagnostic reagents because of the need to perform radio-synthesis at high levels of radioactivity. This is particularly important for {alpha}-particle emitters such as 211At because they deposit large amounts of energy in a highly focal manner. The overall objective of this project is to develop convenient and reproducible radiochemical methodologies for the radiohalogenation of molecules with the {alpha}-particle emitter 211At at the radioactivity levels needed for clinical studies. Our goal is to address two problems in astatine radiochemistry: First, a well known characteristic of 211At chemistry is that yields for electrophilic astatination reactions decline as the time interval after radionuclide isolation from the cyclotron target increases. This is a critical problem that must be addressed if cyclotrons are to be able to efficiently supply 211At to remote users. And second, when the preparation of high levels of 211At-labeled compounds is attempted, the radiochemical yields can be considerably lower than those encountered at tracer dose. For these reasons, clinical evaluation of promising 211At

  20. Comment: 192 [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Grey heron Ardea cinerea Ardea_cinerea_L.png 192.png Takeru Nakazato (Database Center for Life...zato (Database Center for Life Science) nakazato 2009/11/04 17:28:11 2010/01/14 20:04:35 ...

  1. An all-solid state laser system for the laser ion sources RILIS and in-source laser spectroscopy of astatine at ISOLDE/CERN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothe, Sebastian

    2012-09-24

    This doctoral thesis describes the extension of the resonance ionization laser ion source RILIS at CERN/ISOLDE by the addition of an all-solid state tunable titanium:sapphire (Ti:Sa) laser system to complement the well-established system of dye lasers. Synchronous operation of the so called Dual RILIS system of Ti:Sa and dye lasers was investigated and the potential for increased ion beam intensity, reliability, and reduced setup time has been demonstrated. In-source resonance ionization spectroscopy was performed at ISOLDE/CERN and at ISAC/TRIUMF radioactive ion beam facilities to develop an efficient and selective three-colour ionization scheme for the purely radioactive element astatine. A LabVIEW based monitoring, control and measurement system was conceived which enabled, in conjunction with Dual RILIS operation, the spectroscopy of high lying Rydberg states, from which the ionization potential of the astatine atom was determined for the first time experimentally.

  2. An all-solid state laser system for the laser ion source RILIS and in-source laser spectroscopy of astatine at ISOLDE, CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Rothe, Sebastian; Nörtershäuser, W

    This doctoral thesis describes the extension of the resonance ionization laser ion source RILIS at ISOLDE, CERN, by the addition of an all-solid state tuneable titanium: sapphire (Ti:Sa) laser system to complement the well-established system of dye lasers. Synchronous operation of the so called Dual RILIS system of Ti:Sa and dye lasers was investigated and the potential for increased ion beam intensity, reliability, and reduced setup time has been demonstrated. In-source resonance ionization spectroscopy was performed at ISOLDE, CERN, and at ISAC, TRIUMF, radioactive ion beam facilities to develop an efficient and selective three-colour ionization scheme for the purely radioactive element astatine. A LabVIEW based monitoring, control and measurement system was conceived which enabled, in conjunction with Dual RILIS operation, the spectroscopy of high lying Rydberg states, from which the ionization potential of the astatine atom was determined for the first time experimentally.

  3. Nuclear Data Sheets for A = 192

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baglin, Coral M.

    2012-08-01

    Experimental structure and decay data for all nuclei with mass A=192 (Ta, W, Re, Os, Ir, Pt, Au, Hg, Tl, Pb, Bi, Po, At) have been evaluated. This evaluation, covering data received by 15 June 2012, supersedes the 1998 evaluation by C. M. Baglin (Nuclear Data Sheets84, 717 (1998), literature cutoff August 1998) and the subsequent inclusion in the ENSDF database of the new nuclide 192At (C. M. Baglin, literature cutoff 16 May 2006). It also incorporates the current evaluation of superdeformed-band information by B. Singh. Since the last publication, 192Ta, 192W and 192At have been observed, and an isomeric state has been identified in 192Re. The ɛ decay of 192Au has been studied using a multidetector array resulting in an extensively revised level scheme for 192Pt.

  4. 49 CFR 192.59 - Plastic pipe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Plastic pipe. 192.59 Section 192.59 Transportation... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Materials § 192.59 Plastic pipe. (a) New plastic pipe... specification; and (2) It is resistant to chemicals with which contact may be anticipated. (b) Used plastic pipe...

  5. 49 CFR 192.749 - Vault maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Vault maintenance. 192.749 Section 192.749 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 192.749 Vault maintenance. (a) Each vault...

  6. 49 CFR 192.3 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS General § 192.3 Definitions. As used in this part... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Definitions. 192.3 Section 192.3 Transportation... or transmission line. Electrical survey means a series of closely spaced pipe-to-soil readings over...

  7. 49 CFR 192.615 - Emergency plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Emergency plans. 192.615 Section 192.615... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Operations § 192.615 Emergency plans. (a) Each operator shall establish written procedures to minimize the hazard resulting from a gas pipeline emergency. At a...

  8. 49 CFR 192.55 - Steel pipe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Steel pipe. 192.55 Section 192.55 Transportation... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Materials § 192.55 Steel pipe. (a) New steel pipe is... in accordance with paragraph (c) or (d) of this section. (b) Used steel pipe is qualified for use...

  9. 49 CFR 192.16 - Customer notification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Customer notification. 192.16 Section 192.16... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS General § 192.16 Customer notification. (a) This section applies to each operator of a service line who does not maintain the customer's buried piping up...

  10. 49 CFR 192.616 - Public awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Public awareness. 192.616 Section 192.616... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Operations § 192.616 Public awareness. (a) Except for... meter or petroleum gas system is not required to develop a public awareness program as prescribed in...

  11. 40 CFR 192.42 - Substitute provisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Substitute provisions. 192.42 Section 192.42 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) RADIATION PROTECTION... § 192.42 Substitute provisions. The regulatory agency may, with the concurrence of EPA, substitute for...

  12. 49 CFR 192.225 - Welding procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... qualified under section 5 of API 1104 (incorporated by reference, see § 192.7) or section IX of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code “ Welding and Brazing Qualifications” (incorporated by reference, see... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding procedures. 192.225 Section 192.225...

  13. 49 CFR 192.159 - Flexibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Flexibility. 192.159 Section 192.159... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Design of Pipeline Components § 192.159 Flexibility. Each pipeline must be designed with enough flexibility to prevent thermal expansion or contraction from...

  14. 49 CFR 192.233 - Miter joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Miter joints. 192.233 Section 192.233... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Welding of Steel in Pipelines § 192.233 Miter joints. (a) A miter joint on steel pipe to be operated at a pressure that produces a hoop stress of 30...

  15. 34 CFR 75.192 - Dissemination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dissemination. 75.192 Section 75.192 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education DIRECT GRANT PROGRAMS How To Apply for a Grant Development of Curricula Or Instructional Materials § 75.192 Dissemination. If an applicant proposes to publish...

  16. 49 CFR 572.192 - Head assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Head assembly. 572.192 Section 572.192... Dummy, Small Adult Female § 572.192 Head assembly. (a) The head assembly consists of the head (180-1000...) of this section, the head assembly shall meet performance requirements specified in paragraph (c) of...

  17. Final Report for research grant "Development of Methods for High Specific Activity Labeling of Biomolecules Using Astatine-211 in Different Oxidation States"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilbur, D. Scott [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2011-12-14

    The overall objective of this research effort was to develop methods for labeling biomolecules with higher oxidation state species of At-211. This was to be done in an effort to develop reagents that had higher in vivo stability than the present carbon-bonded At-211-labeled compounds. We were unsuccessful in that effort, as none of the approaches studied provided reagents that were stable to in vivo deastatination. However, we gained a lot of information about At-211 in higher oxidation states. The studies proved to be very difficult as small changes in pH and other conditions appeared to change the nature of the species that obtained (by HPLC retention time analyses), with many of the species being unidentifiable. The fact that there are no stable isotopes of astatine, and the chemistry of the nearest halogen iodine is quite different, made it very difficult to interpret results of some experiments. With that said, we believe that a lot of valuable information was obtained from the studies. The research effort evaluated: (1) methods for chemical oxidation of At-211, (2) approaches to chelation of oxidized At-211, and (3) approaches to oxidation of astatophenyl compounds. A major hurdle that had to be surmounted to conduct the research was the development of HPLC conditions to separate and identify the various oxidized species formed. Attempts to develop conditions for separation of iodine and astatine species by normal and reversed-phase TLC and ITLC were not successful. However, we were successful in developing conditions (from a large number of attempts) to separate oxidized forms of iodine ([I-125]iodide, [I-125]iodate and [I-125]periodate) and astatine ([At-211]astatide, [At-211]astatate, [At-211]perastatate, and several unidentified At-211 species). Information on the basic oxidation and characterization of At-211 species is provided under Objective 1. Conditions were developed to obtain new At-211 labeling method where At-211 is chelated with the DOTA and

  18. Dicty_cDB: SLF192 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SL (Link to library) SLF192 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U00294-1 SLF192P (Link to Original site) SLF...192F 335 SLF192Z 544 SLF192P 879 - - Show SLF192 Library SL (Link to library) Clone ID SLF... URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/SL/SLF1-D/SLF192Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID SLF...192P (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >SLF192 (SLF192Q) /CSM/SL/SLF1-D/SLF1...KIFHNGVDWNNVEKYWDKTPSLQELSIQSAICIPAPNSTLYL PFTITGYATSGGGRKVERVDISLDGGETWDYAELMGEDKGVCNKYWSWVLF

  19. 49 CFR 192.281 - Plastic pipe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Plastic pipe. 192.281 Section 192.281... Plastic pipe. (a) General. A plastic pipe joint that is joined by solvent cement, adhesive, or heat fusion may not be disturbed until it has properly set. Plastic pipe may not be joined by a threaded joint or...

  20. 49 CFR 192.279 - Copper pipe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Copper pipe. 192.279 Section 192.279 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Copper pipe. Copper pipe may not be threaded except that copper pipe used for joining screw fittings or...

  1. 49 CFR 192.490 - Direct assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Direct assessment. 192.490 Section 192.490 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL...

  2. Dicty_cDB: SLJ192 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SL (Link to library) SLJ192 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U14096-1 SLJ192P (Link to Original site) SLJ...192F 262 SLJ192Z 265 SLJ192P 527 - - Show SLJ192 Library SL (Link to library) Clone ID SLJ... URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/SL/SLJ1-D/SLJ192Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID SLJ...192P (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >SLJ192 (SLJ192Q) /CSM/SL/SLJ1-D/SLJ1...SS/SSD3-A/SSD307Q.Seq.d/ 519 e-146 SSA335 (SSA335Q) /CSM/SS/SSA3-B/SSA335Q.Seq.d/ 519 e-146 SLJ192 (SLJ192Q) /CSM/SL/SLJ1-D/SLJ

  3. 49 CFR 192.121 - Design of plastic pipe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Design of plastic pipe. 192.121 Section 192.121... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Pipe Design § 192.121 Design of plastic pipe. Subject to the limitations of § 192.123, the design pressure for plastic pipe is determined by either of the...

  4. 49 CFR 192.311 - Repair of plastic pipe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Repair of plastic pipe. 192.311 Section 192.311... Lines and Mains § 192.311 Repair of plastic pipe. Each imperfection or damage that would impair the serviceability of plastic pipe must be repaired or removed. [Amdt. 192-93, 68 FR 53900, Sept. 15, 2003] ...

  5. 49 CFR 192.105 - Design formula for steel pipe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Design formula for steel pipe. 192.105 Section 192... for steel pipe. (a) The design pressure for steel pipe is determined in accordance with the following... § 192.113. T=Temperature derating factor determined in accordance with § 192.115. (b) If steel pipe that...

  6. An automated flow system incorporating in-line acid dissolution of bismuth metal from a cyclotron irradiated target assembly for use in the isolation of astatine-211

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O’Hara, Matthew J.; Krzysko, Anthony J.; Niver, Cynthia M.; Morrison, Samuel S.; Owsley, Stanley L.; Hamlin, Donald K.; Dorman, Eric F.; Scott Wilbur, D.

    2017-04-01

    Astatine-211 (211At) is a promising cyclotron-produced radionuclide being investigated for use in targeted alpha therapy of blood borne and metastatic cancers, as well as treatment of tumor remnants after surgical resections. The isolation of trace quantities of 211At, produced within several grams of a Bi metal cyclotron target, involves a complex, multi-step procedure: (1) Bi metal dissolution in strong HNO3, (2) distillation of the HNO3 to yield Bi salts containing 211At, (3) dissolution of the salts in strong HCl, (4) solvent extraction of 211At from bismuth salts with diisopropyl ether (DIPE), and (5) back-extraction of 211At from DIPE into NaOH, leading to a purified 211At product. Step (1) has been addressed first to begin the process of automating the onerous 211At isolation process. A computer-controlled Bi target dissolution system has been designed. The system performs in-line dissolution of Bi metal from the target assembly using an enclosed target dissolution block, routing the resulting solubilized 211At/Bi mixture to the subsequent process step. The primary parameters involved in Bi metal solubilization (HNO3 concentration and influent flow rate) were optimized prior to evaluation of the system performance on replicate cyclotron irradiated targets. The results indicate that the system performs reproducibly, having nearly quantitative release of 211At from irradiated targets, with cumulative 211At recoveries that follow a sigmoidal function. The predictable nature of the 211At release profile allows the user to tune the system to meet target processing requirements.

  7. Reagents for astatination of biomolecules. 2. Conjugation of anionic boron cage pendant groups to a protein provides a method for direct labeling that is stable to in vivo deastatination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilbur, D Scott; Chyan, Ming-Kuan; Hamlin, Donald K; Vessella, Robert L; Wedge, Timothy J; Hawthorne, M Frederick

    2007-01-01

    Cancer-targeting biomolecules labeled with 211At must be stable to in vivo deastatination, as control of the 211At distribution is critical due to the highly toxic nature of alpha-particle emission. Unfortunately, no astatinated aryl conjugates have shown in vivo stability toward deastatination when (relatively) rapidly metabolized proteins, such as monoclonal antibody Fab' fragments, are labeled. As a means of increasing the in vivo stability of 211At-labeled proteins, we have been investigating antibody conjugates of boron cage moieties. In this investigation, protein-reactive derivatives containing a nido-carborane (2), a bis-nido-carborane derivative (Venus Flytrap Complex, 3), and four 2-nonahydro-closo-decaborate(2-) derivatives (4-7) were prepared and conjugated with an antibody Fab' fragment such that subsequent astatination and in vivo tissue distributions could be obtained. To aid in determination of stability toward in vivo deastatination, the Fab'-borane conjugates were also labeled with 125I, and that material was coinjected with the 211At-labeled Fab'. For comparison, direct labeling of the Fab' with 125I and 211At was conducted. Direct labeling with Na[125I]I and Chloramine-T gave an 89% radiochemical yield. However, direct labeling of the Fab' with Na[211At]At and Chloramine-T resulted in a yield of Studies to optimize the closo-decaborate(2-) conjugates for protein labeling are underway.

  8. 27 CFR 20.192 - Manufacturing record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Manufacturing record. 20... and Users of Specially Denatured Spirits Operations by Users § 20.192 Manufacturing record. For each manufacturing process in which specially denatured spirits are used, the user shall record: (a) Quantity and...

  9. Iridium-192 Production for Cancer Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rostelato, M.E.C.M.; Silva, C.P.G.; Rela, P.R.; Zeituni, C.A.; Lepki, V.; Feher, A.

    2004-10-05

    The purpose of this work is to settle a laboratory for Iridium -192 sources production, that is, to determine a wire activation method and to build a hot cell for the wires manipulation, quality control and packaging. The paper relates, mainly, the wire activation method and its quality control. The wire activation is carried out in our nuclear reactor, IEA- R1m.

  10. 32 CFR 192.5 - Responsibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS... members. 2 See footnote 1 to § 192.4. (c) Ensure that an office and staff required by DoD 4165.63-M are... compliance with this part. (Appendix A to this part is a checklist to help commanders with this review.) (e...

  11. 49 CFR 192.287 - Plastic pipe: Inspection of joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Plastic pipe: Inspection of joints. 192.287... Than by Welding § 192.287 Plastic pipe: Inspection of joints. No person may carry out the inspection of joints in plastic pipes required by §§ 192.273(c) and 192.285(b) unless that person has been qualified by...

  12. 49 CFR 192.235 - Preparation for welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Preparation for welding. 192.235 Section 192.235... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Welding of Steel in Pipelines § 192.235 Preparation for welding. Before beginning any welding, the welding surfaces must be clean and free of any material that...

  13. 49 CFR 192.375 - Service lines: Plastic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Service lines: Plastic. 192.375 Section 192.375... § 192.375 Service lines: Plastic. (a) Each plastic service line outside a building must be installed... terminate above ground level and outside the building, if— (i) The above ground level part of the plastic...

  14. 49 CFR 192.321 - Installation of plastic pipe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Installation of plastic pipe. 192.321 Section 192... Transmission Lines and Mains § 192.321 Installation of plastic pipe. (a) Plastic pipe must be installed below ground level except as provided by paragraphs (g) and (h) of this section. (b) Plastic pipe that is...

  15. 49 CFR 192.191 - Design pressure of plastic fittings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Design pressure of plastic fittings. 192.191... Components § 192.191 Design pressure of plastic fittings. (a) Thermosetting fittings for plastic pipe must conform to ASTM D 2517, (incorporated by reference, see § 192.7). (b) Thermoplastic fittings for plastic...

  16. 1 CFR 19.2 - Routing and approval of drafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Routing and approval of drafts. 19.2 Section 19.2 General Provisions ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER PREPARATION, TRANSMITTAL, AND PROCESSING OF DOCUMENTS EXECUTIVE ORDERS AND PRESIDENTIAL PROCLAMATIONS § 19.2 Routing and approval of drafts...

  17. 21 CFR 211.192 - Production record review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Production record review. 211.192 Section 211.192 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED PHARMACEUTICALS Records and Reports § 211.192...

  18. 49 CFR 192.377 - Service lines: Copper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Service lines: Copper. 192.377 Section 192.377 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... § 192.377 Service lines: Copper. Each copper service line installed within a building must be protected...

  19. 49 CFR 192.625 - Odorization of gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Odorization of gas. 192.625 Section 192.625... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Operations § 192.625 Odorization of gas. (a) A...

  20. 49 CFR 192.309 - Repair of steel pipe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Repair of steel pipe. 192.309 Section 192.309... Lines and Mains § 192.309 Repair of steel pipe. (a) Each imperfection or damage that impairs the serviceability of a length of steel pipe must be repaired or removed. If a repair is made by grinding, the...

  1. 49 CFR 192.371 - Service lines: Steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Service lines: Steel. 192.371 Section 192.371 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... § 192.371 Service lines: Steel. Each steel service line to be operated at less than 100 p.s.i. (689 kPa...

  2. 49 CFR 192.227 - Qualification of welders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... of welders. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, each welder must be qualified in accordance with section 6 of API 1104 (incorporated by reference, see § 192.7) or section IX of the ASME... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Qualification of welders. 192.227 Section 192.227...

  3. 49 CFR 192.631 - Control room management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Control room management. 192.631 Section 192.631... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Operations § 192.631 Control room management. (a... operator must have and follow written control room management procedures that implement the requirements of...

  4. 32 CFR Appendix A to Part 192 - Checklist for Commanders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Checklist for Commanders A Appendix A to Part 192 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS EQUAL OPPORTUNITY IN OFF-BASE HOUSING Pt. 192, App. A Appendix A to Part 192—Checklist for...

  5. 49 CFR 192.491 - Corrosion control records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Corrosion control records. 192.491 Section 192.491... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Requirements for Corrosion Control § 192.491 Corrosion... detail to demonstrate the adequacy of corrosion control measures or that a corrosive condition does not...

  6. Ir-192 Plesiocurietherapy using silicone elastomer plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michel-Langlet, P.; Housset, M.; Alapetite, C.; Boisserie, G.; Dessard-Diana, B.; Baillet, F.

    1989-01-01

    Corrective treatment of certain superficial lesions (permeation nodules, budding or ulcerated tumor recurrences, etc.) is sometimes difficult and may, in certain cases, benefit from plesiocurietherapy. A device intended for this purpose which is easy to handle, easy to use and inexpensive is presented: it consists of silicone elastomer plates in which are inserted vector plastic tubes which, like any type of curietherapy, can be used with estimated dosimetry and delayed loading (Ir 192). These flexible plates can be adapted to all anatomical variations and very accurately inserted.

  7. 49 CFR 192.315 - Wrinkle bends in steel pipe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Wrinkle bends in steel pipe. 192.315 Section 192... Transmission Lines and Mains § 192.315 Wrinkle bends in steel pipe. (a) A wrinkle bend may not be made on steel... wrinkle bend on steel pipe must comply with the following: (1) The bend must not have any sharp kinks. (2...

  8. 49 CFR 192.283 - Plastic pipe: Qualifying joining procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Plastic pipe: Qualifying joining procedures. 192... Materials Other Than by Welding § 192.283 Plastic pipe: Qualifying joining procedures. (a) Heat fusion... for making plastic pipe joints by a heat fusion, solvent cement, or adhesive method, the procedure...

  9. 49 CFR 192.513 - Test requirements for plastic pipelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Test requirements for plastic pipelines. 192.513 Section 192.513 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND... Test requirements for plastic pipelines. (a) Each segment of a plastic pipeline must be tested in...

  10. 49 CFR 192.193 - Valve installation in plastic pipe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Valve installation in plastic pipe. 192.193... Components § 192.193 Valve installation in plastic pipe. Each valve installed in plastic pipe must be designed so as to protect the plastic material against excessive torsional or shearing loads when the valve...

  11. 38 CFR 19.2 - Composition of the Board; Titles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Composition of the Board; Titles. 19.2 Section 19.2 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS....2 Composition of the Board; Titles. (a) The Board consists of a Chairman, Vice Chairman, Deputy Vice...

  12. 49 CFR 192.65 - Transportation of pipe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Transportation of pipe. 192.65 Section 192.65 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS...

  13. 9 CFR 381.192 - Penalties inapplicable to carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... receipt, carriage, holding, or delivery, in the usual course of business, as a carrier, of poultry or.... 381.192 Section 381.192 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... copies of all documents, if any there be, pertaining to the delivery of the poultry or poultry products...

  14. 42 CFR 460.192 - Ongoing monitoring after trial period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ongoing monitoring after trial period. 460.192... FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Federal/State Monitoring § 460.192 Ongoing monitoring after trial period. (a) At the conclusion of the trial period, CMS, in cooperation with the State administering agency...

  15. 7 CFR 3015.192 - Institutions of higher education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Institutions of higher education. 3015.192 Section....192 Institutions of higher education. (a) OMB Circular No. A-21, including any amendments to the... activities conducted by institutions of higher education (other than for-profit institutions). (b) Additional...

  16. 49 CFR 192.181 - Distribution line valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Distribution line valves. 192.181 Section 192.181 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... line valves. (a) Each high-pressure distribution system must have valves spaced so as to reduce the...

  17. 27 CFR 24.192 - Process and materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Process and materials. 24.192 Section 24.192 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU... the kinds and within the limitations prescribed in § 24.182 may be added with yeast or yeast culture...

  18. 49 CFR 192.353 - Customer meters and regulators: Location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Customer meters and regulators: Location. 192.353... TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Customer Meters, Service Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.353 Customer meters and regulators: Location. (a) Each meter and service...

  19. 49 CFR 192.357 - Customer meters and regulators: Installation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Customer meters and regulators: Installation. 192... SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Customer Meters, Service Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.357 Customer meters and regulators: Installation. (a...

  20. 49 CFR 192.477 - Internal corrosion control: Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Internal corrosion control: Monitoring. 192.477... Control § 192.477 Internal corrosion control: Monitoring. If corrosive gas is being transported, coupons... internal corrosion. Each coupon or other means of monitoring internal corrosion must be checked two times...

  1. 49 CFR 192.475 - Internal corrosion control: General.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Internal corrosion control: General. 192.475... Control § 192.475 Internal corrosion control: General. (a) Corrosive gas may not be transported by... taken to minimize internal corrosion. (b) Whenever any pipe is removed from a pipeline for any reason...

  2. 27 CFR 31.192 - Photographic copies of records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Photographic copies of records. 31.192 Section 31.192 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS ALCOHOL BEVERAGE DEALERS Records and Reports Retention of...

  3. 49 CFR 192.485 - Remedial measures: Transmission lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Remedial measures: Transmission lines. 192.485... Control § 192.485 Remedial measures: Transmission lines. (a) General corrosion. Each segment of transmission line with general corrosion and with a remaining wall thickness less than that required for the...

  4. 49 CFR 192.709 - Transmission lines: Record keeping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Transmission lines: Record keeping. 192.709... TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 192.709 Transmission lines: Record keeping. Each operator shall maintain the following records for transmission lines...

  5. 49 CFR 192.719 - Transmission lines: Testing of repairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Transmission lines: Testing of repairs. 192.719... TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 192.719 Transmission lines: Testing of repairs. (a) Testing of replacement pipe. If a segment of transmission line is...

  6. 49 CFR 192.745 - Valve maintenance: Transmission lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Valve maintenance: Transmission lines. 192.745... TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 192.745 Valve maintenance: Transmission lines. (a) Each transmission line valve that might be required during any emergency...

  7. 49 CFR 192.705 - Transmission lines: Patrolling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Transmission lines: Patrolling. 192.705 Section... NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 192.705 Transmission... adjacent to the transmission line right-of-way for indications of leaks, construction activity, and other...

  8. 49 CFR 192.721 - Distribution systems: Patrolling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Distribution systems: Patrolling. 192.721 Section... NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 192.721 Distribution... places or on structures where anticipated physical movement or external loading could cause failure or...

  9. 49 CFR 192.471 - External corrosion control: Test leads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false External corrosion control: Test leads. 192.471... Control § 192.471 External corrosion control: Test leads. (a) Each test lead wire must be connected to the pipeline so as to remain mechanically secure and electrically conductive. (b) Each test lead wire must be...

  10. Experimental study and nuclear model calculations on the 192Os(p,n)192Ir reaction: Comparison of reactor and cyclotron production of the therapeutic radionuclide 192Ir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilgers, K; Sudár, S; Qaim, S M

    2005-07-01

    In a search for an alternative route of production of the important therapeutic radionuclide (192)Ir (T(1/2)=78.83 d), the excitation function of the reaction (192)Os(p,n)(192)Ir was investigated from its threshold up to 20 MeV. Thin samples of enriched (192)Os were obtained by electrodeposition on Ni, and the conventional stacked-foil technique was used for cross section measurements. The experimental data were compared with the results of theoretical calculations using the codes EMPIRE-II and ALICE-IPPE. Good agreement was found with EMPIRE-II, but slightly less with the ALICE-IPPE calculations. The theoretical thick target yield of (192)Ir over the energy range E(p)=16-->8 MeV amounts to only 0.16MBq/muA.h. A comparison of the reactor and cyclotron production methods is given. In terms of yield and radionuclidic purity of (192)Ir the reactor method appears to be superior; the only advantage of the cyclotron method could be the higher specific activity of the product.

  11. Experimental study and nuclear model calculations on the $^{192}Os (p, n)^{192}$Ir reaction Comparison of reactor and cyclotron production of the therapeutic radionuclide $^{192}$Ir

    CERN Document Server

    Hilgers, K; Sudar, S; 10.1016/j.apradiso.2004.12.010

    2005-01-01

    In a search for an alternative route of production of the important therapeutic radionuclide /sup 192/Ir (T/sub 1/2/=78.83 d), the excitation function of the reaction /sup 192/Os(p, n)/sup 192/Ir was investigated from its threshold up to 20MeV. Thin samples of enriched /sup 192/Os were obtained by electrodeposition on Ni, and the conventional stacked-foil technique was used for cross section measurements. The experimental data were compared with the results of theoretical calculations using the codes EMPIRE-II and ALICE-IPPE. Good agreement was found with EMPIRE-II, but slightly less with the ALICE-IPPE calculations. The theoretical thick target yield of /sup 192/Ir over the energy range E/sub p/=16 to 8MeV amounts to only 0.16MBq/ mu A.h. A comparison of the reactor and cyclotron production methods is given. In terms of yield and radionuclidic purity of /sup 192/Ir the reactor method appears to be superior; the only advantage of the cyclotron method could be the higher specific activity of the product.

  12. 50 CFR 19.2 - Scope of regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... PLANTS (CONTINUED) AIRBORNE HUNTING Introduction § 19.2 Scope of regulations. The regulations contained... seas or on board aircraft in flight over the high seas, and to all persons on board aircraft belonging...

  13. VOYAGER 1 SATURN MAGNETOMETER RESAMPLED DATA 1.92 SEC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes Voyager 1 Saturn encounter magnetometer data that have been resampled at a 1.92 second sample rate. The data set is composed of 6 columns: 1)...

  14. VOYAGER 2 JUPITER MAGNETOMETER RESAMPLED DATA 1.92 SEC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes Voyager 2 Jupiter encounter magnetometer data that have been resampled at a 1.92 second sample rate. The data set is composed of 6 columns: 1)...

  15. VOYAGER 2 SATURN MAGNETOMETER RESAMPLED DATA 1.92 SEC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes Voyager 2 Saturn encounter magnetometer data that have been resampled at a 1.92 second sample rate. The data set is composed of 6 columns: 1)...

  16. VOYAGER 1 JUPITER MAGNETOMETER RESAMPLED DATA 1.92 SEC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes Voyager 1 Jupiter encounter magnetometer data that have been resampled at a 1.92 second sample rate. The data set is composed of 6 columns: 1)...

  17. 40 CFR 60.192 - Standard for fluorides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for fluorides. 60.192 Section... Plants § 60.192 Standard for fluorides. (a) On and after the date on which the initial performance test... total fluorides, as measured according to § 60.195, in excess of: (1) 1.0 kg/Mg (2.0 lb/ton) of aluminum...

  18. Excitation functions of 186,187,188,189,190,192Ir formed in proton-induced reactions on highly enriched 192Os up to 66 MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szelecsényi, F.; Vermeulen, C.; Steyn, G. F.; Kovács, Z.; Aardaneh, K.; van der Walt, T. N.

    2010-10-01

    Cross sections of proton-induced nuclear reactions on highly enriched 192Os were measured up to 66 MeV by using the stacked-foil irradiation technique. Excitation functions are presented for the reactions 192Os(p,n) 192Ir, 192Os(p,3n) 190Ir, 192Os(p,4n) 189Ir, 192Os(p,5n) 188Ir, 192Os(p,6n) 187Ir and 192Os(p,7n) 186Ir. No earlier experimental cross-section data could be found in the literature except for the 192Os(p,n) 192Ir process. Our new experimental results are compared with theoretical predictions by means of the theoretical model code ALICE/ASH. Integral thick-target yield calculations were also performed for the 192Os(p,n) 192Ir and 192Os(p,3n) 190Ir reactions to evaluate the 190Ir contamination level, as a function of energy, in the case of 192Ir productions.

  19. 41 CFR 102-192.95 - Why does GSA require annual mail management reports?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS 192-MAIL MANAGEMENT Reporting Requirements § 102-192.95 Why does GSA require annual mail... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Why does GSA require annual mail management reports? 102-192.95 Section 102-192.95 Public Contracts and Property Management...

  20. 41 CFR 102-192.120 - Must we have an agency mail manager?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... mail manager? 102-192.120 Section 102-192.120 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property... MANAGEMENT Agency Mail Manager Requirements § 102-192.120 Must we have an agency mail manager? Yes, every Federal agency as defined in § 102-192.35 must have an agency mail manager. Agencies that are not “large...

  1. 41 CFR 102-192.130 - What are your general responsibilities as an agency mail manager?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... responsibilities as an agency mail manager? 102-192.130 Section 102-192.130 Public Contracts and Property... ADMINISTRATIVE PROGRAMS 192-MAIL MANAGEMENT Agency Mail Manager Requirements § 102-192.130 What are your general responsibilities as an agency mail manager? In addition to carrying out the responsibilities in Subparts B, C, D...

  2. 41 CFR 102-192.30 - What types of mail does this part apply to?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 192-MAIL MANAGEMENT Introduction to this Part § 102-192.30 What types of mail does this part apply to... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What types of mail does this part apply to? 102-192.30 Section 102-192.30 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal...

  3. SSR Analysis of Genetic Diversity Among 192 Diploid Potato Cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyan Song

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In potato breeding, it is difficult to improve the traits of interest at the tetraploid level due to the tetrasomic inheritance. A promising alternative is diploid breeding. Thus it is necessary to assess the genetic diversity of diploid potato germplasm for efficient exploration and deployment of desirable traits. In this study, we used SSR markers to evaluate the genetic diversity of diploid potato cultivars. To screen polymorphic SSR markers, 55 pairs of SSR primers were employed to amplify 39 cultivars with relatively distant genetic relationships. Among them, 12 SSR markers with high polymorphism located at 12 chromosomes were chosen to evaluate the genetic diversity of 192 diploid potato cultivars. The primers produced 6 to 18 bands with an average of 8.2 bands per primer. In total, 98 bands were amplified from 192 cultivars, and 97 of them were polymorphic. Cluster analysis using UPGMA showed the genetic relationships of all accessions tested: 186 of the 192 accessions could be distinguished by only 12 pairs of SSR primers, and the 192 diploid cultivars were divided into 11 groups, and 83.3% constituted the first group. Clustering results showed relatively low genetic diversity among 192 diploid cultivars, with closer relationship at the molecular level. The results can provide molecular basis for diploid potato breeding.

  4. 49 CFR 192.153 - Components fabricated by welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Components fabricated by welding. 192.153 Section....153 Components fabricated by welding. (a) Except for branch connections and assemblies of standard... welding, whose strength cannot be determined, must be established in accordance with paragraph UG-101 of...

  5. 49 CFR 192.245 - Repair or removal of defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Welding of Steel in Pipelines § 192... weld must be removed if it has a crack that is more than 8 percent of the weld length. (b) Each weld...) Repair of a crack, or of any defect in a previously repaired area must be in accordance with written weld...

  6. 49 CFR 192.123 - Design limitations for plastic pipe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Design limitations for plastic pipe. 192.123... Design limitations for plastic pipe. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (e) and paragraph (f) of this section, the design pressure may not exceed a gauge pressure of 100 psig (689 kPa) for plastic pipe used...

  7. 49 CFR 192.359 - Customer meter installations: Operating pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Customer meter installations: Operating pressure... SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Customer Meters, Service Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.359 Customer meter installations: Operating pressure...

  8. 49 CFR Appendix B to Part 192 - Qualification of Pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... carbon and manganese, and proceeding in accordance with section IX of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (ibr, see 192.7). The same number of chemical tests must be made as are required for testing a... later edition is listed in section I of this appendix, is qualified for use under this part if the...

  9. 49 CFR 192.463 - External corrosion control: Cathodic protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false External corrosion control: Cathodic protection... for Corrosion Control § 192.463 External corrosion control: Cathodic protection. (a) Each cathodic protection system required by this subpart must provide a level of cathodic protection that complies with one...

  10. 49 CFR 192.461 - External corrosion control: Protective coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false External corrosion control: Protective coating... for Corrosion Control § 192.461 External corrosion control: Protective coating. (a) Each external protective coating, whether conductive or insulating, applied for the purpose of external corrosion control...

  11. 27 CFR 479.192 - Commerce in firearms and ammunition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION MACHINE GUNS, DESTRUCTIVE DEVICES, AND CERTAIN OTHER FIREARMS Other Laws Applicable § 479.192 Commerce in firearms and ammunition. For..., machine guns, short-barreled shotguns, or short-barreled rifles, see 18 U.S.C. Chapter 44, and Part 478 of...

  12. 49 CFR 192.706 - Transmission lines: Leakage surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Transmission lines: Leakage surveys. 192.706... Transmission lines: Leakage surveys. Leakage surveys of a transmission line must be conducted at intervals not exceeding 15 months, but at least once each calendar year. However, in the case of a transmission line which...

  13. 49 CFR 192.619 - Maximum allowable operating pressure: Steel or plastic pipelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... plastic pipelines. 192.619 Section 192.619 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... Operations § 192.619 Maximum allowable operating pressure: Steel or plastic pipelines. (a) No person may operate a segment of steel or plastic pipeline at a pressure that exceeds a maximum allowable operating...

  14. 49 CFR 192.909 - How can an operator change its integrity management program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Transmission Pipeline Integrity Management § 192.909 How can an operator change its integrity management... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How can an operator change its integrity management program? 192.909 Section 192.909 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation...

  15. 49 CFR 192.113 - Longitudinal joint factor (E) for steel pipe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Longitudinal joint factor (E) for steel pipe. 192.113 Section 192.113 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE... § 192.113 Longitudinal joint factor (E) for steel pipe. The longitudinal joint factor to be used in the...

  16. 49 CFR 192.935 - What additional preventive and mitigative measures must an operator take?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What additional preventive and mitigative measures must an operator take? 192.935 Section 192.935 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... STANDARDS Gas Transmission Pipeline Integrity Management § 192.935 What additional preventive and mitigative...

  17. 27 CFR 25.192 - Removal of sour or damaged beer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... beer. 25.192 Section 25.192 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Removals Without Payment of Tax Removal of Beer Unfit for Beverage Use § 25.192 Removal of sour or damaged beer. (a) Containers. The brewer shall remove sour or...

  18. 41 CFR 102-192.35 - What definitions apply to this part?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... MANAGEMENT Introduction to this Part § 102-192.35 What definitions apply to this part? The following... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What definitions apply to this part? 102-192.35 Section 102-192.35 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property...

  19. 41 CFR 102-192.25 - Does this part apply to me?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... MANAGEMENT Introduction to this Part § 102-192.25 Does this part apply to me? Yes, this part applies to you... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Does this part apply to me? 102-192.25 Section 102-192.25 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property...

  20. 41 CFR 102-192.5 - What does this part cover?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What does this part cover? 102-192.5 Section 102-192.5 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION ADMINISTRATIVE PROGRAMS 192-MAIL MANAGEMENT...

  1. Automatic land use classification using Skylab S-192 multispectral data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirvida, L.; Cheung, M.

    1974-01-01

    Investigation of the accuracy attainable in automatic land use classification using 13 bands of multispectral data from the Skylab S-192 scanner. Classification to levels containing seven urban classes, five agricultural, and three water classes is shown to be achievable. With 17 classes, a classification accuracy of 72% was obtained. A wide spectral range, including the thermal band, appears to be most useful for distinguishing urban classes. Agricultural and water classes can be separated using spectral bands covering the visible to far IR.

  2. Disintegration rate measurement of a 192Ir solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, K A; Koskinas, M F; Dias, M S

    2001-01-01

    The disintegration rate of 192Ir has been measured using the 4pibeta-gamma coincidence technique. This radionuclide decays by electron capture (EC) and beta-emission. Since the EC contribution is low (4.5%), it has been corrected using decay scheme data taken from the literature. This measurement has been performed in collaboration with the Laboratório Nacional de Metrologia das Radiações Ionizantes (IRDDM), in Rio de Janeiro. The results, which were obtained independently and employed different techniques, are compared with the Systéme International Reference (SIR) maintained at the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures.

  3. 41 CFR 102-192.125 - What is the appropriate managerial level for an agency mail manager?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... managerial level for an agency mail manager? 102-192.125 Section 102-192.125 Public Contracts and Property... ADMINISTRATIVE PROGRAMS 192-MAIL MANAGEMENT Agency Mail Manager Requirements § 102-192.125 What is the appropriate managerial level for an agency mail manager? The agency mail manager should be at a managerial...

  4. Nuclear collective states in 110Cd, 192Pt, 192Os and 166Er

    OpenAIRE

    Eid, Elie Said

    1984-01-01

    The properties of the low-lying energy states of 110Cd, 192Pt, 192Pt and 166Er following the radioactive decays of 110mAg, 192Ir and 166mHo were investigated. Two high resolution Ge(Li) detectors, one intrinsic germanium detector and a Compton suppression system were employed for the measurements of the gamma-ray energies and relative intensities, gamma-gamma coincidence measurements using a conventional fast-slow coincidence technique were performed by coupling the Ge(Li) detectors to a ...

  5. Descriptive study of 192 adults with speech and language disturbances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansur, Letícia Lessa; Radanovic, Márcia; Rüegg, Danielle; Zanotto de Mendonça, Lúcia Iracema; Scaff, Milberto

    2002-11-01

    Aphasia is a very disabling condition caused by neurological diseases. In Brazil, we have little data on the profile of aphasics treated in rehabilitation centers. To present a descriptive study of 192 patients, providing a reference sample of speech and language disturbances among Brazilians. Retrospective study. Speech Pathology Unit linked to the Neurology Division of the Hospital das Clínicas of the Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo. All patients (192) referred to our Speech Pathology service from 1995 to 2000. We collected data relating to demographic variables, etiology, language evaluation (functional evaluation, Boston Diagnostic Aphasia Examination, Boston Naming and Token Test), and neuroimaging studies. The results obtained in language tests and the clinical and neuroimaging data were organized and classified. Seventy aphasics were chosen for constructing a profile. Fourteen subjects with left single-lobe dysfunction were analyzed in detail. Seventeen aphasics were compared with 17 normal subjects, all performing the Token Test. One hundred subjects (52%) were men and 92 (48%) women. Their education varied from 0 to 16 years (average: 6.5; standard deviation: 4.53). We identified the lesion sites in 104 patients: 89% in the left hemisphere and 58% due to stroke. The incidence of aphasia was 70%; dysarthria and apraxia, 6%; functional alterations in communication, 17%; and 7% were normal. Statistically significant differences appeared when comparing the subgroup to controls in the Token Test. We believe that this sample contributes to a better understanding of neurological patients with speech and language disturbances and may be useful as a reference for health professionals involved in the rehabilitation of such disorders.

  6. Descriptive study of 192 adults with speech and language disturbances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letícia Lessa Mansur

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Aphasia is a very disabling condition caused by neurological diseases. In Brazil, we have little data on the profile of aphasics treated in rehabilitation centers. OBJECTIVE: To present a descriptive study of 192 patients, providing a reference sample of speech and language disturbances among Brazilians. DESIGN: Retrospective study. SETTING: Speech Pathology Unit linked to the Neurology Division of the Hospital das Clínicas of the Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo. SAMPLE: All patients (192 referred to our Speech Pathology service from 1995 to 2000. PROCEDURES: We collected data relating to demographic variables, etiology, language evaluation (functional evaluation, Boston Diagnostic Aphasia Examination, Boston Naming and Token Test, and neuroimaging studies. MAIN MEASUREMENTS: The results obtained in language tests and the clinical and neuroimaging data were organized and classified. Seventy aphasics were chosen for constructing a profile. Fourteen subjects with left single-lobe dysfunction were analyzed in detail. Seventeen aphasics were compared with 17 normal subjects, all performing the Token Test. RESULTS: One hundred subjects (52% were men and 92 (48% women. Their education varied from 0 to 16 years (average: 6.5; standard deviation: 4.53. We identified the lesion sites in 104 patients: 89% in the left hemisphere and 58% due to stroke. The incidence of aphasia was 70%; dysarthria and apraxia, 6%; functional alterations in communication, 17%; and 7% were normal. Statistically significant differences appeared when comparing the subgroup to controls in the Token Test. CONCLUSIONS: We believe that this sample contributes to a better understanding of neurological patients with speech and language disturbances and may be useful as a reference for health professionals involved in the rehabilitation of such disorders.

  7. Study of the 192Os(d,2n) reaction for production of the therapeutic radionuclide 192Ir in no-carrier added form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tárkányi, F; Hermanne, A; Takács, S; Hilgers, K; Kovalev, S F; Ignatyuk, A V; Qaim, S M

    2007-11-01

    In the frame of an IAEA coordinated research project (CRP) on nuclear data for production of therapeutic radionuclides, the production of 192Ir via deuteron-induced reactions on enriched 192Os was investigated up to 21 MeV deuteron energy. Cross sections were measured using the conventional stacked-foil irradiation technique and high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy of the activation products. No earlier experimental data were found in the literature. The excitation functions of the 192Os(d,2n)192m1+gIr and 192Os(d,p)193Os reactions were compared with the results of nuclear model calculations using the standard and presently upgraded versions (D-version) of ALICE-IPPE, EMPIRE-II and GNASH codes, while for the (d,2n) channel the GNASH and EMPIRE-II codes reproduced the data in an acceptable way; in both cases for the (d,p) reaction the very large discrepancy observed between the experimental data and standard codes results is vanishing when the upgraded versions of ALICE and EMPIRE-II are used. A comparison of the reactor and cyclotron production routes of 192Ir is given.

  8. 41 CFR 102-192.145 - Which program levels should have a mail manager?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... should have a mail manager? 102-192.145 Section 102-192.145 Public Contracts and Property Management... have a mail manager? Every program level within a Federal agency that generates a significant quantity of outgoing mail should have its own mail manager. Each agency must decide which programs will have a...

  9. 19 CFR 192.14 - Electronic information for outward cargo required in advance of departure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    .... Specifically, to effect the advance electronic transmission of the required cargo information to CBP, the USPPI... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Electronic information for outward cargo required in advance of departure. 192.14 Section 192.14 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION...

  10. 49 CFR 192.373 - Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. 192.373... Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.373 Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. (a) Cast or ductile iron... cast iron pipe or ductile iron pipe is installed for use as a service line, the part of the service...

  11. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YDR091C, YLR192C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available t as prey (0) YLR192C HCR1 Dual function protein involved in translation initiation as a substoic... (0) Prey ORF YLR192C Prey gene name HCR1 Prey description Dual function protein involved in translation initiation as a substoic

  12. 49 CFR 192.109 - Nominal wall thickness (t) for steel pipe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Nominal wall thickness (t) for steel pipe. 192.109 Section 192.109 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND... Nominal wall thickness (t) for steel pipe. (a) If the nominal wall thickness for steel pipe is not known...

  13. 49 CFR 192.111 - Design factor (F) for steel pipe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Design factor (F) for steel pipe. 192.111 Section...) for steel pipe. (a) Except as otherwise provided in paragraphs (b), (c), and (d) of this section, the... less must be used in the design formula in § 192.105 for steel pipe in Class 1 locations that: (1...

  14. 49 CFR 192.107 - Yield strength (S) for steel pipe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Yield strength (S) for steel pipe. 192.107 Section 192.107 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS... (S) for steel pipe. (a) For pipe that is manufactured in accordance with a specification listed in...

  15. Tumor suppressive function of microRNA-192 in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahtab Sayadi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Non-coding RNAs play a critical role in gene regulation in cancer cells. Reduced expression of microRNA-192 (miR-192 has been detected in many cancers. In this study, we investigated the role of miR-192 in cell proliferation and cell cycle control in NALM-6 cell line, a model of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL. Cell cycle analysis by DNA content using propidium iodide staining and cell apoptosis analysis using Annexin V assay were carried out. Cell proliferation changes were monitored using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. In addition, the relative changes in P53, BAX, CASP3, and BCL-2 gene expression were determined by quantitative reverse transcription PCR. Overexpression of miR-192 resulted in cell proliferation arrest in ALL cells. After 72 and 96 hours of transduction, apoptosis was significantly increased in the cells transduced with miR-192-overexpressing virus compared with control cells. The expression of P53, BAX, and CASP3 increased after 48 hours of transduction in miR-192-overexpressing cells, but no change was observed in BCL-2 expression. The G0/S and G1/S ratio changed to 7.5 and 4.5, respectively, in the cells overexpressing miR-192 compared with controls. The results of our study suggest, for the first time, tumor suppressive effects of miR-192 in ALL cells.

  16. 49 CFR 192.715 - Transmission lines: Permanent field repair of welds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Transmission lines: Permanent field repair of... § 192.715 Transmission lines: Permanent field repair of welds. Each weld that is unacceptable under § 192.241(c) must be repaired as follows: (a) If it is feasible to take the segment of transmission line...

  17. 49 CFR 192.707 - Line markers for mains and transmission lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Line markers for mains and transmission lines. 192... § 192.707 Line markers for mains and transmission lines. (a) Buried pipelines. Except as provided in... buried main and transmission line: (1) At each crossing of a public road and railroad; and (2) Wherever...

  18. 49 CFR 192.911 - What are the elements of an integrity management program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What are the elements of an integrity management... Transmission Pipeline Integrity Management § 192.911 What are the elements of an integrity management program? An operator's initial integrity management program begins with a framework (see § 192.907) and...

  19. 41 CFR 102-192.20 - How are “must” and “should” used in this part?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 192-MAIL MANAGEMENT Introduction to this Part § 102-192.20 How are “must” and “should” used in this... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How are âmustâ and âshouldâ used in this part? 102-192.20 Section 102-192.20 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal...

  20. 15 CFR 19.2 - Why has the Commerce Department issuing these regulations and what do they cover?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Why has the Commerce Department issuing these regulations and what do they cover? 19.2 Section 19.2 Commerce and Foreign Trade Office of the Secretary of Commerce COMMERCE DEBT COLLECTION General Provisions § 19.2 Why has the Commerce...

  1. 41 CFR 102-192.175 - What types of support does GSA offer to Federal agency mail management programs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What types of support does GSA offer to Federal agency mail management programs? 102-192.175 Section 102-192.175 Public...-192.175 What types of support does GSA offer to Federal agency mail management programs? GSA supports...

  2. Radiation control in the intensive care unit for high intensity iridium-192 brain implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sewchand, W.; Drzymala, R.E.; Amin, P.P.; Salcman, M.; Salazar, O.M.

    1987-04-01

    A bedside lead cubicle was designed to minimize the radiation exposure of intensive care unit staff during routine interstitial brain irradiation by removable, high intensity iridium-192. The cubicle shields the patient without restricting intensive care routines. The design specifications were confirmed by exposure measurements around the shield with an implanted anthropomorphic phantom simulating the patient situation. The cubicle reduces the exposure rate around an implant patient by as much as 90%, with the exposure level not exceeding 0.1 mR/hour/mg of radium-equivalent /sup 192/Ir. Evaluation of data accumulated for the past 3 years has shown that the exposure levels of individual attending nurses are 0.12 to 0.36 mR/mg of radium-equivalent /sup 192/Ir per 12-hour shift. The corresponding range for entire nursing teams varies between 0.18 and 0.26. A radiation control index (exposure per mg of radium-equivalent /sup 192/Ir per nurse-hour) is thus defined for individual nurses and nursing teams; this index is a significant guide to the planning of nurse rotations for brain implant patients with various /sup 192/Ir loads. The bedside shield reduces exposure from /sup 192/Ir implants by a factor of about 20, as expected, and the exposure from the lower energy radioisotope iodine-125 is barely detectable.

  3. On the character of three 8{sup +} states in {sup 192}Pb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, A.N.; Byrne, A.P. [Australian National University, Department of Nuclear Physics, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Canberra (Australia); Australian National University, Department of Physics, Canberra (Australia); East, M.C.; Dracoulis, G.D.; Davidson, P.M.; Lane, G.J. [Australian National University, Department of Nuclear Physics, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Canberra (Australia); Clark, R.M.; Fallon, P.; Goergen, A.; Macchiavelli, A.O.; Ward, D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Nuclear Science Division, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2010-02-15

    Three low-lying 8{sup +} states have been identified in {sup 192}Pb. A newly observed cascade of {gamma} -rays built directly on the 8{sup +} {sub 1} state is compared to the previously identified, weakly rotational band above the 11{sup -}{pi} i{sub 13/2}, h{sub 9/2} isomer in the same nucleus, and to analogous structures in {sup 194}Pb. The similarity of all four structures lends support to the suggestion that the 8{sup +} {sub 1} configurations are of a similar oblate deformation to the 11{sup -} isomers. The excitation energies of all three 8{sup +} states in {sup 192}Pb and {sup 190}Pb are compared to systematics. The possibility that one of the 8{sup +} states in {sup 192}Pb is associated with a prolate shape is discounted. (orig.)

  4. Study and development of an Iridium-192 seed for use in ophthalmic cancer; Estudo e desenvolvimento de uma semente de iridio-192 para aplicacao em cancer oftalmico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattos, Fabio Rodrigues de

    2013-07-01

    Even ocular tumors are not among the cases with a higher incidence, they affect the population, especially children. The Institute of Energy and Nuclear Research (IPEN-CNEN/SP) in partnership with Escola Paulista de Medicina (UNIFESP), created a project to develop and implement a alternative treatment for ophthalmic cancer that use brachytherapy iridium-192 seeds. The project arose by reason of the Escola Paulista treat many cancer cases within the Unified Health System (SUS) and the research experience of sealed radioactive sources group at IPEN. The methodology was developed from the available infrastructure and the experience of researchers. The prototype seed presents with a core (192-iridium alloy of iridium-platinum) of 3.0 mm long sealed by a capsule of titanium of 0.8 mm outside diameter, 0.05 mm wall thickness and 4,5mm long. This work aims to study and develop a seed of iridium-192 from a platinum-iridium alloy. No study on the fabrication of these seeds was found in available literature. It was created a methodology that involved: characterization of the material used in the core, creation of device for neutron activation irradiation and and seed sealing tests. As a result, proved the feasibility of the method. As a suggestion for future work, studies regarding metrology and dosimetry of these sources and improvement of the methodology should be carried out, for future implementation in national scope. (author)

  5. Implications of dynamic changes in miR-192 expression in ischemic acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lulu; Xu, Yuan; Xue, Song; Wang, Xudong; Dai, Huili; Qian, Jiaqi; Ni, Zhaohui; Yan, Yucheng

    2017-03-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) is a major cause of acute kidney injury (AKI) with poor outcomes. While many important functions of microRNAs (miRNAs) have been identified in various diseases, few studies reported miRNAs in acute kidney IRI, especially the dynamic changes in their expression and their implications during disease progression. The expression of miR-192, a specific kidney-enriched miRNA, was assessed in both the plasma and kidney of IRI rats at different time points after kidney injury and compared to renal function and kidney histological changes. The results were validated in the plasma of the selected patients with AKI after cardiac surgery compared with those matched patients without AKI. The performance characteristics of miR-192 were summarized using area under the receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves (AUC-ROC). MiRNA profiling in plasma led to the identification of 42 differentially expressed miRNAs in the IRI group compared to the sham group. MiR-192 was kidney-enriched and chosen for further validation. Real-time PCR showed that miR-192 levels increased by fourfold in the plasma and decreased by about 40% in the kidney of IRI rats. Plasma miR-192 expression started increasing at 3 h and peaked at 12 h, while kidney miR-192 expression started decreasing at 6 h and remained at a low level for 7 days after reperfusion. Plasma miR-192 level in patients with AKI increased at the time of ICU admission, was stable for 2 h and decreased after 24 h. AUC-ROC was 0.673 (95% CI: 0.540-0.806, p = 0.014). Plasma miR-192 expression was induced in a time-dependent manner after IRI in rats and patients with AKI after cardiac surgery, comparably to the kidney injury development and recovery process, and may be useful for the detection of AKI.

  6. In vivo dosimetry thermoluminescence dosimeters during brachytherapy with a 370 GBq {sup 192}Ir source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuepers, S.; Piessens, M.; Verbeke, L.; Roelstraete, A. [Onze-Lieve-Vrouw Hospitaal, Aalst (Belgium). Dept. of Radiotherapy and Oncology

    1995-12-01

    When using LiF thermoluminescence dosimeters in brachytherapy, we have to take into account the properties of a high dose rate {sup 192}Ir source (energy spectrum ranging form 9 to 885 keV, steep dose gradient in the vicinity of the source) and these of the dosimeters themselves (supralinearity, reproducibility, size). All these characteristics combine into a set of correction factors which have been determined during in phantom measurements. These results have then been used to measure the dose delivered to organs at risk (e.g. rectum, bladder, etc.) during high dose rate brachytherapy with a 370 GBq {sup 192}Ir source for patients with gynaecological tumors.

  7. 49 CFR 192.285 - Plastic pipe: Qualifying persons to make joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Plastic pipe: Qualifying persons to make joints... Materials Other Than by Welding § 192.285 Plastic pipe: Qualifying persons to make joints. (a) No person may make a plastic pipe joint unless that person has been qualified under the applicable joining procedure...

  8. 49 CFR 192.927 - What are the requirements for using Internal Corrosion Direct Assessment (ICDA)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...—Methodology,” (incorporated by reference, see § 192.7). An operator may use another model if the operator... monitoring and liquid analysis on results from all integrity assessments that have been conducted in accordance with the requirements of this subpart, and risk factors specific to the covered segment. If an...

  9. 20 CFR 1002.192 - How is the specific reemployment position determined?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... reemployment position is the escalator position, which is the job position that the employee would have... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How is the specific reemployment position... REEMPLOYMENT RIGHTS ACT OF 1994 Reemployment Rights and Benefits Reemployment Position § 1002.192 How is the...

  10. Assessment of dose uniformity around high dose rate 192Ir and 60Co stepping sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhood, Bagher; Ghorbani, Mahdi

    2017-12-01

    This study aimed to evaluate dose uniformity for 192Ir and 60Co stepping sources. High dose rate 192Ir and 60Co stepping sources were simulated by the MCNPX Monte Carlo code. To investigate dose uniformity, treatment lengths of 30, 50, 100, and 150 mm with stepping distances of 3, 5, 7, and 10 mm were considered. Finally, dose uniformity for the 192Ir and 60Co stepping sources with increasing distances from the source were assessed at these treatment lengths and steps. The findings showed that the dose distribution was non-uniform for regions in close vicinity of the source, especially in the high source steps, but for most points at distances >10 mm from the center of the source, the dose distribution was uniform. For most points, the dose uniformity increased with reduction of the source steps and increments of the transverse distance from the source. The dose non-uniformity was similar for most of the corresponding points of 60Co and 192Ir sources with the same treatment lengths and source steps, except at the distance of 150 mm. When using stepping technique for the treatment of tumors, more attention should be focused on treatment planning, especially with higher stepping distances and lower transverse distances from the source.

  11. 49 CFR 192.355 - Customer meters and regulators: Protection from damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Customer meters and regulators: Protection from... SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Customer Meters, Service Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.355 Customer meters and regulators: Protection from...

  12. 49 CFR 192.476 - Internal corrosion control: Design and construction of transmission line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Internal corrosion control: Design and... STANDARDS Requirements for Corrosion Control § 192.476 Internal corrosion control: Design and construction... the risk of internal corrosion. At a minimum, unless it is impracticable or unnecessary to do so, each...

  13. 49 CFR 192.621 - Maximum allowable operating pressure: High-pressure distribution systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... STANDARDS Operations § 192.621 Maximum allowable operating pressure: High-pressure distribution systems. (a) No person may operate a segment of a high pressure distribution system at a pressure that exceeds the... segment of a distribution system otherwise designed to operate at over 60 p.s.i. (414 kPa) gage, unless...

  14. 37 CFR 2.192 - Business to be conducted with decorum and courtesy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... TRADEMARK OFFICE, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE RULES OF PRACTICE IN TRADEMARK CASES General Information and Correspondence in Trademark Cases § 2.192 Business to be conducted with decorum and courtesy. Trademark... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Business to be conducted with...

  15. 49 CFR 192.605 - Procedural manual for operations, maintenance, and emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... maintenance activities and for emergency response. For transmission lines, the manual must also include... control room management procedures required by § 192.631. (c) Abnormal operation. For transmission lines... gas distribution operators that are operating transmission lines in connection with their distribution...

  16. 49 CFR 192.713 - Transmission lines: Permanent field repair of imperfections and damages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Maintenance § 192.713 Transmission lines: Permanent field repair of imperfections and damages. (a) Each imperfection or damage that impairs the serviceability of pipe in a steel transmission line operating at or... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Transmission lines: Permanent field repair of...

  17. 49 CFR 192.717 - Transmission lines: Permanent field repair of leaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Transmission lines: Permanent field repair of... § 192.717 Transmission lines: Permanent field repair of leaks. Each permanent field repair of a leak on a transmission line must be made by— (a) Removing the leak by cutting out and replacing a...

  18. 49 CFR 192.711 - Transmission lines: General requirements for repair procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Maintenance § 192.711 Transmission lines: General requirements for repair procedures. (a) Temporary repairs... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Transmission lines: General requirements for..., imperfection, or damage that impairs its serviceability is found in a segment of steel transmission line...

  19. High dose rate 192Ir source calibration: A single institution experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, R.; Abdullah, N. H.; Mohamed, M.; Idris, N. R. N.; Yusoff, A. L.; Chen, S. C.; Zakaria, A.

    2017-05-01

    Measurement of source strength of new high dose rate (HDR) 192Ir supplied by the manufacturer is part of quality assurance recommended by Radiation Safety Section, Ministry of Health of Malaysia. The source strength is determined in reference air kerma rate (RAKR). The purpose of this study was to evaluate RAKR measurement of 192Ir using well-type ionisation chamber with RAKR stated in the certificate provided by the manufacturer. A retrospective study on 19 MicroSelectron HDR 192Ir Classic from 2001 to 2009 and 12 MicroSelectron HDR 192Ir V2 sources from 2009 to 2016 supplied by manufacturer were compared. From the study, the agreement between measured RAKR and RAKR stated in the certificate by manufacturer for all 32 sources supplied were within ±2.5%. As a conclusion, a threshold level of ±2.5% can be used as suitable indicator to spot problems of the brachytherapy system in Department of Nuclear Medicine Radiotherapy and Oncology, Hospital USM.

  20. 78 FR 54569 - Special Local Regulation, Cumberland River, Mile 190.0 to 192.0; Nashville, TN

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-05

    ... beginning at mile marker 190.0 and ending at mile marker 192.0, extending bank to bank. This zone is... ground floor of the Department of Transportation West Building, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE., Washington... Cumberland River from mile marker 190.0 to 192.0. The Coast Guard determined that a temporary special local...

  1. 41 CFR 102-192.65 - What features must our finance systems have to keep track of mail costs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... What features must our finance systems have to keep track of mail costs? All agencies must have an... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What features must our finance systems have to keep track of mail costs? 102-192.65 Section 102-192.65 Public Contracts and...

  2. 41 CFR 102-192.150 - What are your general responsibilities as a program level mail manager?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... responsibilities as a program level mail manager? 102-192.150 Section 102-192.150 Public Contracts and Property... general responsibilities as a program level mail manager? Your responsibilities at the program level include— (a) Working closely with the agency mail manager and mail center managers who handle significant...

  3. 49 CFR 192.7 - What documents are incorporated by reference partly or wholly in this part?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...)(1)(ii); 192.939(a)(3); 192.945(a). (6) 2007 ASME Boiler & Pressure Vessel Code, Section I, “Rules... Code, Section IX, “Welding and Brazing Procedures, Welders, Brazers, and Welding and Brazing Operators... Boiler & Pressure Vessel Code, Section VIII, Division 1, “Rules for Construction of Pressure Vessels 2...

  4. 30 CFR 250.192 - What reports and statistics must I submit relating to a hurricane, earthquake, or other natural...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... relating to a hurricane, earthquake, or other natural occurrence? 250.192 Section 250.192 Mineral Resources... statistics must I submit relating to a hurricane, earthquake, or other natural occurrence? (a) You must... tropical storm, or an earthquake. Statistics include facilities and rigs evacuated and the amount of...

  5. 49 CFR 192.929 - What are the requirements for using Direct Assessment for Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCCDA)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Assessment for Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCCDA)? 192.929 Section 192.929 Transportation Other Regulations... requirements for using Direct Assessment for Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCCDA)? (a) Definition. Stress Corrosion Cracking Direct Assessment (SCCDA) is a process to assess a covered pipe segment for the presence...

  6. 41 CFR 102-192.45 - How can we request a deviation from these requirements, and who can approve it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION ADMINISTRATIVE PROGRAMS 192-MAIL MANAGEMENT Introduction to this Part § 102-192.45 How can we... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How can we request a...

  7. SU-F-T-13: Transit Dose Comparisons for Co-60 and Ir-192 HDR Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gimenez-Alventosa, V; Ballester, F [University of Valencia, Burjassot (Spain); Vijande, J [University of Valencia and IFIC(CSIC-UV), Burjassot (Spain); Perez-Calatayud, J [Hospital Clinica Benidorm, Benidorm, and Hospital Universitari i Politecnic La Fe, Valencia (Spain)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to compare the transit dose due to the movement of high dose rate (HDR) Ir-192 and Co-60 sources along the transfer tube. This is performed by evaluating air-kerma differences in the vicinity of the transfer tube when both sources are moved with the same velocity from a HDR brachytherapy afterloader into a patient. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations have been performed using PENELOPE2014. mHDR-v2 and Flexisource sources have been considered. Collisional kerma has been scored. The sources were simulated within a plastic catheter located in an infinite air phantom. The movement of the seed was included by displacing their positions along the connecting catheter from z=−75 cm to z=+75 cm and combining them. Backscatter from the afterloader and the patient was not considered. Since modern afterloaders like Flexitron (Elekta) or Saginova (Bebig) are able to use equally Ir-192 and Co-60 sources it was assumed that both sources are displaced with equal speed. Typical content activity values were provided by the manufacturer (460 GBq for Ir-192 and 75 GBq for Co-60). Results: 2D distributions were obtained with type-A uncertainties (k=2) less than 0.01%. From those, the air kerma ratio Co-60/Ir-192 was evaluated weighted by their corresponding activities. It was found that it varies slowly with distance (less than 10% variation) but strongly in time due to the shorter half-life of the Ir-192 (73.83 days). The maximum ratio is located close to the catheter with a value of 0.57 when both sources are installed by the manufacturer, while increasing up to 1.25 at the end of the recommended working life (90 days) of the Ir-192 source. Conclusion: Air-kerma ratios are almost constant (0.51–0.57) in the vicinity of the source. Nevertheless, air-kerma ratios increase rapidly whenever the Ir-192 is approaching the end of its life.

  8. Highly efficient oscillator for an optically pumped 192-μm far-infrared laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chuang; Qu, Yanchen; Zhao, Weijiang; Zhang, Ruiliang

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrate an efficient CH3F oscillator based on an anti-reflection coated Ge dichroic beam splitter. When pumped by the 10R32 line of a CO2 laser (10.17 μm), 0.81-mJ far-infrared laser is obtained with the wavelength of 192 μm. The energy conversion efficiency of 0.16 % is the highest for an optically pumped 192-μm laser system to our knowledge. The beam quality factor of Mx2 and My2 is 1.53 and 1.57, respectively. Further, this oscillator can be extended to optically pumped far-infrared lasers with various wavelengths.

  9. 49 CFR 192.115 - Temperature derating factor (T) for steel pipe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Temperature derating factor (T) for steel pipe... § 192.115 Temperature derating factor (T) for steel pipe. The temperature derating factor to be used in... (Celsius) Temperature derating factor (T) 250 °F (121 °C) or less 1.000 300 °F (149 °C) 0.967 350 °F (177...

  10. Decision model support of severity of injury traffic accident victims care by SAMU 192

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rackynelly Alves Sarmento Soares

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Traffic accidents produce high morbidity and mortality in several countries, including Brazil. The initial care to victims of accidents, by a specialized team, has tools for evaluating the severity of trauma, which guide the priorities. This study aimed to develop a decision model applied to pre-hospital care, using the Abbreviated Injury Scale, to define the severity of the injury caused by the AT, as well to describe the features of accidents and their victims, occurred in Joao Pessoa, Paraiba. This is a descriptive epidemiological investigation, sectional, which analyzed all victims of traffic accidents attended by the SAMU 192, João Pessoa-PB, in January, April and June 2010. Data were collected in the medical regulation sheets of SAMU 192. Most of victims were male (76%, aged between 20 and 39 years (60%. Most injuries were classified as AIS1 (62.5%. The model of decision support implemented was the decision tree that managed to correctly classify 95.98% of the severity of injuries. By this model, it was possible to extract 29 rules of gravity classification of injury, which may be used for decision-making teams of the SAMU 192.

  11. Toxicity of chlorpyrifos and chlorpyrifos oxon in a transgenic mouse model of the human paraoxonase (PON1) Q192R polymorphism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, Toby B.; Walter, Betsy J.; Shih, Diana M.; Tward, Aaron D.; Lusis, Aldons J.; Timchalk, Chuck; Richter, Rebecca J.; Costa, Lucio G.; Furlong, Clement E.

    2005-08-01

    The Q192R polymorphism of paraoxonase (PON1) has been shown to affect hydrolysis of organophosphorus compounds. The Q192 and R192 alloforms exhibit equivalent catalytic efficiencies of hydrolysis for diazoxon, the oxon form of the pesticide (DZ). However, the R192 alloform has a higher catalytic efficiency of hydrolysis than does the Q192 alloform for chlorpyrifos oxon (CPO), the oxon form of the pesticide chlorpyrifos (CPS). The current study examined the relevance of these observations for in-vivo exposures to chlorpyrifos and chlorpyrifos oxon. Methods Using a transgenic mouse model we examined the relevance of the Q192R polymorphism for exposure to CPS and CPO in vivo. Transgenic mice were generated that expressed either human PON1Q192 or PON1R192 at equivalent levels, in the absence of endogenous mouse PON1. Dose-response and time course experiments were performed on adult mice exposed dermally to CPS or CPO. Morbidity and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in the brain and diaphragm were determined in the first 24 h following exposure. Results Mice expressing PON1Q192 were significantly more sensitive to CPO, and to a lesser extent CPS, than were mice expressing PON1R192. The time course of inhibition following exposure to 1.2 mg/kg CPO revealed maximum inhibition of brain AChE at 6?12 h, with PON1R192, PON1Q192, and PON1? /? mice exhibiting 40, 70 and 85% inhibition, respectively, relative to control mice. The effect of PON1 removal on the dose?response curve for CPS exposure was remarkably consistent with a PBPK/PD model of CPS exposure. Conclusion These results indicate that individuals expressing only the PON1Q192 allele would be more sensitive to the adverse effects of CPO or CPS exposure, especially if they are expressing a low level of plasma PON1Q192.

  12. Verification of High Dose Rate 192Ir Source Position During Brachytherapy Treatment Using Silicon Pixel Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batic, Matej; Burger, Janez; Cindro, Vladimir; Kramberger, Gregor; Mandic, Igor; Mikuz, Marko; Studen, Andrej; Zavrtanik, Marko

    2011-10-01

    A system for in-vivo tracking of 192Ir source during high dose rate or pulsed dose rate brachytherapy treatment was built using 1 mm thick silicon pad detectors as image sensors and knife-edge lead pinholes as collimators. With source self-images obtained from a dual-pinhole system, location of the source could be reconstructed in three dimensions in real time. The system was tested with 192Ir clinical source (kerma rate in air at 1 m 2.38 Gy/h) in air and plexi-glass phantom. The locations of the source were tracked from a distance of 40 cm in a field of view of 20 × 20 × 20 cm3. Reconstruction precision, defined as the average distance between true and reconstructed source positions, with data collected in less than 1 s with 22 GBq 192Ir source was about 5 mm. The reconstruction precision was in our case mainly limited by imperfect alignment of detectors and pinholes. With perfect alignment the statistical error would allow precision of about 1 mm which could further be improved with larger detector placed at larger distance from the pinhole. However already the modest precision of few millimeters is sufficient for in-vivo detection of larger deviations from planned treatment caused by various misadministrations or malfunctioning of the brachytherapy treatment apparatus. Usage of silicon detectors offers a possibility for building a compact device which could be used as an independent online quality assurance system. In this paper details about sensors, readout system and reconstruction algorithm are described. Results from measurements with clinical source are presented.

  13. Dosimetry audit on the accuracy of 192Ir brachytherapy source strength determinations in Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlsson Tedgren, Aasa

    2007-11-15

    The absorbed dose delivered to the patient in brachytherapy is directly proportional to the source strength in terms of the reference air-kerma rate (RAKR). Verification of this quantity by the hospitals is widely recognized as an important part of a quality assurance program. An external audit was performed on behalf of the Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory at the Swedish Radiation Protection Authority (SSI). The aim was to investigate how accurately the source-strength in 192Ir brachytherapy is determined at Swedish hospitals. The SSI reference well-type ion chamber and calibrated equipment were used to measure the RAKR of an 192Ir source in each of the 14 Swedish afterloading units. Comparisons with values determined by vendors and hospitals were made. Agreement in values of RAKR as determined by SSI, hospitals and vendors were in all cases within the +-3% uncertainty (at a coverage factor of k=2), typically guaranteed by the vendors. The good agreement reflects the robustness and easy handling of well-type chambers designed for brachytherapy in use by all Swedish hospitals. The 192Ir calibration service planned at SSI will solve the hospitals current problem with recalibration of equipment. SSI can also advise hospitals to follow the IAEA recommendations for measurement techniques and maintenance of equipment. It is worthwhile for the hospitals to establish their own ratio (or deviation) with the vendor and follow it as function of time. Such a mean-ratio embeds systematic differences of various origins and have a lower uncertainty than has the RAKR alone, making it useful for early detection of problems with equipment or routines. SSI could also define requirements for the agreement between source strengths as determined by hospitals and vendors and couple this to an action plan, dependent on level of disagreement, and some kind of reporting to SSI

  14. [Immunophenotypes, cytogenetics and clinical features of 192 patients with acute myeloid leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Hai-Xia; Wang, Hui-Han; Zhang, Ji-Hong; Liu, Zhuo-Gang; Zheng, Ying-Chun; Wang, Yun-Xiu

    2009-10-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the immunophenotypic subtype profiles of 192 patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and its association to cytogenetics and clinical features. Immunophenotyping of 192 patients was performed by flow cytometry using a panel of monoclonal antibodies. The karyotypes in 125 out of 192 cases were analyzed by G-banding technology. The results showed that CD33, CD13, myeloperoxidase (MPO) and CD117 were the most commonly expressed antigens in AML. CD117 expressed in 84.6% of AML-M3 cases. A combination of intensive autofluorescence, both CD34- and HLA-DR-, and high expression of CD13, CD33 and MPO had significant value for AML-M3 diagnosis. CD14 expressed only in AML-M4 and AML-M5, and both intensive positivity of CD64 and CD15 with high expression of HLA-DR may suggest great possibility for diagnosis of AML-M5. Lymphoid marker expression was documented in 47.9% of the 192 AML cases. CD56 (26.0%) and CD7 (20.8%) were the most commonly expressed lymphoid markers in AML patients, followed by CD19 (9.9%) and CD2 (7.3%). Abnormal karyotypes were detected in 76 out of 125 cases (60.8%). Correlation test showed that t(8;21) was found only in 17 cases of AML-M2 and strongly associated with the individual or combinational expressions of CD15/CD19/CD56. And 28 cases of t(15;17) were found in AML-M3; 2 cases of inv(16) were found in AML-M4EO. Higher CD34 positivity was found in LymAg+ group (77.2%) than that in LymAg- group (48.0%). It is concluded that immunophenotype analysis is useful for AML diagnosis and classification, and the immunophenotype has close relevance to the abnormal cytogenetic changes and clinical features in AML. The results suggested that a new prognostic scoring system that integrated the morphology, cytogenetic abnormalities and immunophenotype parameters would benefit the diagnosis, classification, and estimation of prognosis in AML patients.

  15. Dosimetric evaluation of a new OneDose MOSFET for Ir-192 energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinhikar, Rajesh A.; Sharma, Pramod K.; Tambe, Chandrashekhar M.; Deshpande, Deepak D.

    2006-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate dosimetry (reproducibility, energy correction, relative response with distance from source, linearity with threshold dose, rate of fading, temperature and angular dependence) of a newly designed OneDose™ MOSFET patient dosimetry system for use in HDR brachytherapy with Ir-192 energy. All measurements were performed with a MicroSelectron HDR unit and OneDose MOSFET detectors. All dosimeters were normalized to 3 min post-irradiation to minimize fading effects. All dosimeters gave reproducible readings with mean deviation of 1.8% (SD 0.4) and 2.4% (SD 0.6) for 0° and 180° incidences, respectively. The mean energy correction factor was found to be 1.1 (range 1.06-1.12). Overall, there was 60% and 40% mean response of the MOSFET at 2 and 3 cm, respectively, from the source. MOSFET results showed good agreement with TLD and parallel plate ion chamber. Linear dose response with threshold voltage shift was observed with applied doses of 0.3 Gy-5 Gy with Ir-192 energy. Linearity (R2 = 1) was observed in the MOSFET signal with the applied dose range of 0.3 Gy-5 Gy with Ir-192 energy. Fading effects were less than 1% after 10 min and the MOSFET detectors stayed stable (within 5%) over a period of 1 month. The MOSFET response was found to be decreased by approximately 1.5% at 37 °C compared to 20 °C. The isotropic response of the MOSFET was found to be within ±6%. A maximum deviation of 5.5% was obtained between 0° and 180° for both the axes and this should be considered in clinical applications. The small size, cable-less, instant readout, permanent storage of dose and ease of use make the MOSFET a novel dosimeter and beneficial to patients for skin dose measurements with HDRBT using an Ir-192 source compared to the labour demanding and time-consuming TLDs.

  16. The Expression of miR-192 and Its Significance in Diabetic Nephropathy Patients with Different Urine Albumin Creatinine Ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyu Ma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate the expression of miR-192 and its significance in diabetic nephropathy (DN patients. Methods. 464 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM were divided into normal albuminuria group (NA, n=157, microalbuminuria group (MA, n=159, and large amount of albuminuria group (LA, n=148. 127 healthy persons were selected as the control group (NC, n=127. The serum miR-192 levels were detected by Real-Time PCR and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1 and fibronectin (FN were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The relationships among these parameters were analyzed by Pearson correlation analysis and multiple linear regression analysis. Results. The miR-192 in the LA group was significantly lower than other groups, which was lower in the MA group than in the NA group (P<0.01. The TGF-β1 and FN in the LA group were significantly higher than other groups, which were higher in the MA group than in the NA group (P<0.01. The expression of miR-192 was negatively correlated with TGF-β1, FN, and Ln (UACR and miR-192, TGF-β1, and FN were independent relevant factors affecting Ln (UACR in T2DM (P<0.01. Conclusions. These findings indicate that the levels of miR-192 were lower accompanied by the decrease of urine albumin creatinine ratio (UACR and the association between miR-192 and nephritic fibrosis in DN.

  17. Treatment of carcinoma of the penis by iridium 192 wire implant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daly, N.J.; Douchez, J.; Combes, P.F.

    1982-07-01

    Since 1971, a group of 22 adult patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the penis have been treated by iridium 192 wire implants. There were 6 T1 tumors, 14 T2 tumors and 2 T3; only one patient (T3) presented with local failure after implant. Local necrosis occurred in 2 patients without local tumoral recurrence, but was sufficient enough to warrant amputation. Thus 19/22 (86%) patients were locally cured with penile conservation. In these patients the most frequent posttherapeutic complication is chronic urethral stenosis (9/19 patients, 47%) requiring repeated instrumental dilations. Four patients presented with initial inguinal mestastatic nodes; only one was cured by radiosurgical treatment. Among patients without metastatic nodes at the time of diagnosis, none had delayed metastatic nodes. Three patients died of nodal evolution, 5 patients died of intercurrent disease without evidence of disease and 14 are now alive and NED. It appears that iridium 192 wire implant is the most effective conservative treatment of invasive squamous cell carcinoma of the penis; however, these results confirm that no particular treatment is required for inguinal nodal areas for patients who initially present with no disease.

  18. Novel Approaches to Extraction Methods in Recovery of Capsaicin from Habanero Pepper (CNPH 15.192).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Frederico S; Borges, Leonardo L; Ribeiro, Claudia S C; Reifschneider, Francisco J B; Conceição, Edemilson C

    2017-07-01

    The objective of this study was to compare three capsaicin extraction methods: Shoxlet, Ultrasound-assisted Extraction (UAE), and Shaker-assisted Extraction (SAE) from Habanero pepper, CNPH 15.192. The different parameters evaluated were alcohol degree, time extraction, and solid-solvent ratio using response surface methodology (RSM). The three parameters found significant ( p extraction time for SAE. The optimum conditions for the capsaicin UAE and SAE were similar 95% alcohol degree, 30 minutes and solid-liquid ratio 2 mg/mL. The Soxhlet increased the extraction in 10-25%; however, long extraction times (45 minutes) degraded 2% capsaicin. The extraction of capsaicin was influenced by extraction method and by the operating conditions chosen. The optimized conditions provided savings of time, solvent, and herbal material. Prudent choice of the extraction method is essential to ensure optimal yield of extract, thereby making the study relevant and the knowledge gained useful for further exploitation and application of this resource. Habanero pepper , line CNPH 15.192, possess capsaicin in higher levels when compared with others speciesHigher levels of ethanolic strength are more suitable to obtain a higher levels of capsaicinBox-Behnken design indicates to be useful to explore the best conditions of ultrasound assisted extraction of capsaicin. Abbreviations used: Nomenclature UAE: Ultrasound-assisted Extraction; SAE: Shaker-assisted Extraction.

  19. An experimental MOSFET approach to characterize (192)Ir HDR source anisotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toye, W C; Das, K R; Todd, S P; Kenny, M B; Franich, R D; Johnston, P N

    2007-09-07

    The dose anisotropy around a (192)Ir HDR source in a water phantom has been measured using MOSFETs as relative dosimeters. In addition, modeling using the EGSnrc code has been performed to provide a complete dose distribution consistent with the MOSFET measurements. Doses around the Nucletron 'classic' (192)Ir HDR source were measured for a range of radial distances from 5 to 30 mm within a 40 x 30 x 30 cm(3) water phantom, using a TN-RD-50 MOSFET dosimetry system with an active area of 0.2 mm by 0.2 mm. For each successive measurement a linear stepper capable of movement in intervals of 0.0125 mm re-positioned the MOSFET at the required radial distance, while a rotational stepper enabled angular displacement of the source at intervals of 0.9 degrees . The source-dosimeter arrangement within the water phantom was modeled using the standardized cylindrical geometry of the DOSRZnrc user code. In general, the measured relative anisotropy at each radial distance from 5 mm to 30 mm is in good agreement with the EGSnrc simulations, benchmark Monte Carlo simulation and TLD measurements where they exist. The experimental approach employing a MOSFET detection system of small size, high spatial resolution and fast read out capability allowed a practical approach to the determination of dose anisotropy around a HDR source.

  20. Absorbed dose simulations in near-surface regions using high dose rate Iridium-192 sources applied for brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, E. S.; Zeituni, C. A.; Sakuraba, R. K.; Gonçalves, V. D.; Cruz, J. C.; Júnior, D. K.; Souza, C. D.; Rostelato, M. E. C. M.

    2014-02-01

    Brachytherapy treatment with Iridium-192 high dose rate (HDR) sources is widely used for various tumours and it could be developed in many anatomic regions. Iridium-192 sources are inserted inside or close to the region that will be treated. Usually, the treatment is performed in prostate, gynaecological, lung, breast and oral cavity regions for a better clinical dose coverage compared with other techniques, such as, high energy photons and Cobalt-60 machines. This work will evaluate absorbed dose distributions in near-surface regions around Ir-192 HDR sources. Near-surface dose measurements are a complex task, due to the contribution of beta particles in the near-surface regions. These dose distributions should be useful for non-tumour treatments, such as keloids, and other non-intracavitary technique. For the absorbed dose distribution simulations the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE with the general code penEasy was used. Ir-192 source geometry and a Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) tube, for beta particles shield were modelled to yield the percentage depth dose (PDD) on a cubic water phantom. Absorbed dose simulations were realized at the central axis to yield the Ir-192 dose fall-off along central axis. The results showed that more than 99.2% of the absorbed doses (relative to the surface) are deposited in 5 cm depth but with slower rate at higher distances. Near-surface treatments with Ir-192 HDR sources yields achievable measurements and with proper clinical technique and accessories should apply as an alternative for treatment of lesions where only beta sources were used.

  1. Computed Tomography Angiography with a 192-slice Dual-source Computed Tomography System: Improvements in Image Quality and Radiation Dose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip V M Linsen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study aims to compare image quality, radiation dose, and the influence of the heart rate on image quality of high-pitch spiral coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA using 128-slice (second generation dual-source CT (DSCT and a 192-slice DSCT (third generation scanner. Materials and Methods: Two consecutive cohorts of fifty patients underwent CCTA by high-pitch spiral scan mode using 128 or 192-slice DSCT. The 192-slice DSCT system has a more powerful roentgen tube (2 × 120 kW that allows CCTA acquisition at lower tube voltages, wider longitudinal coverage for faster table speed (732 m/s, and the use of iterative reconstruction. Objective image quality was measured as the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR. Subjective image quality was evaluated using a Likert scale. Results: While the effective dose was lower with 192-slice DSCT (1.2 ± 0.5 vs. 0.6 ± 0.3 mSv; P < 0.001, the SNR (18.9 ± 4.3 vs. 11.0 ± 2.9; P < 0.001 and CNR (23.5 ± 4.8 vs. 14.3 ± 4.1; P < 0.001 were superior to 128-slice DSCT. Although patients scanned with 192-slice DSCT had a faster heart rate (59 ± 7 vs. 56 ± 6; P = 0.045, subjective image quality was scored higher (4.2 ± 0.8 vs. 3.0 ± 0.7; P < 0.001 compared to 128-slice DSCT. Conclusions: High-pitch spiral CCTA by 192-slice DSCT provides better image quality, despite a higher average heart rate, at lower radiation doses compared to 128-slice DSCT.

  2. Mutation screening of the TPO gene in a cohort of 192 Chinese patients with congenital hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Chunyun; Xie, Bobo; Zhang, Shujie; Wang, Jin; Luo, Shiyu; Zheng, Haiyang; Su, Jiasun; Hu, Xuyun; Chen, Rongyu; Fan, Xin; Luo, Jingsi; Gu, Xuefan; Chen, Shaoke

    2016-05-12

    Defects in the human thyroid peroxidase (TPO) gene are reported to be one of the causes of congenital hypothyroidism (CH) due to dyshormonogenesis. The aim of this study was to examine the TPO mutation spectrum and prevalence among patients with CH in the Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region of China and to define the relationships between TPO genotypes and clinical phenotypes. Blood samples were collected from 192 patients with CH in the Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, China and genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood leucocytes. All exons of the 10 common CH-associated genes including TPO together with their exon-intron boundaries were screened by next-generation sequencing (NGS). The effect of the novel TPO mutation was investigated by 'in silico' studies. NGS analysis of TPO in 192 patients with CH revealed 3 different variations in 2 individuals (2/192, 1%). Sequencing other CH candidate genes in the patients with TPO variants revealed that patient 1 was homozygous for c.2422delT TPO mutation combined with double heterozygous DUOX2 pathogenic variants (p.R683L/p.L1343F) and patient 2 was triallelic for TPO pathogenic variants (p.R648Q/p.T561M/p.T561M). The present study identified a novel TPO variation c.1682C>T/p.T561M; and four known mutations: c.2422delT/p.C808Afs×24 and c.1943C>T/p.R648Q in TPO, c.2048G>T/p.R683L and c.4027C>T/p.L1343F in DUOX2. Our study indicated that the prevalence of TPO mutations was 1% among studied Chinese patients with CH. More than two variations in one or more CH-associated genes can be found in a single patient, and may, in combination, affect the phenotype of the individual. A novel TPO variation c.1682C>T/p.T561M was found, thereby expanding the mutational spectrum of the gene. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  3. Patient-specific dose calculation methods for high-dose-rate iridium-192 brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Emily S.

    In high-dose-rate 192Ir brachytherapy, the radiation dose received by the patient is calculated according to the AAPM Task Group 43 (TG-43) formalism. This table-based dose superposition method uses dosimetry parameters derived with the radioactive 192Ir source centered in a water phantom. It neglects the dose perturbations caused by inhomogeneities, such as the patient anatomy, applicators, shielding, and radiographic contrast solution. In this work, we evaluated the dosimetric characteristics of a shielded rectal applicator with an endocavitary balloon injected with contrast solution. The dose distributions around this applicator were calculated by the GEANT4 Monte Carlo (MC) code and measured by ionization chamber and GAFCHROMIC EBT film. A patient-specific dose calculation study was then carried out for 40 rectal treatment plans. The PTRAN_CT MC code was used to calculate the dose based on computed tomography (CT) images. This study involved the development of BrachyGUI, an integrated treatment planning tool that can process DICOM-RT data and create PTRAN_CT input initialization files. BrachyGUI also comes with dose calculation and evaluation capabilities. We proposed a novel scatter correction method to account for the reduction in backscatter radiation near tissue-air interfaces. The first step requires calculating the doses contributed by primary and scattered photons separately, assuming a full scatter environment. The scatter dose in the patient is subsequently adjusted using a factor derived by MC calculations, which depends on the distances between the point of interest, the 192Ir source, and the body contour. The method was validated for multicatheter breast brachytherapy, in which the target and skin doses for 18 patient plans agreed with PTRAN_CT calculations better than 1%. Finally, we developed a CT-based analytical dose calculation method. It corrects for the photon attenuation and scatter based upon the radiological paths determined by ray tracing

  4. Shapes of the $^{192,190}$Pb ground states from beta decay studies using the total absorption technique

    CERN Document Server

    Estevez Aguado, M.E.; Agramunt, J.; Rubio, B.; Tain, J.L.; Jordan, D.; Fraile, L.M.; Gelletly, W.; Frank, A.; Csatlos, M.; Csige, L.; Dombradi, Zs.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Nacher, E.; Sarriguren, P.; Borge, M.J.G.; Briz, J.A.; Tengblad, O.; Molina, F.; Moreno, O.; Kowalska, M.; Fedosseev, V.N.; Marsh, B.A.; Fedorov, D.V.; Molkanov, P.L.; Andreyev, A.N.; Seliverstov, M.D.; Burkard, K.; Huller, W.

    2015-01-01

    The beta decay of $^{192,190}$Pb has been studied using the total absorption technique at the ISOLDE(CERN) facility. The beta-decay strength deduced from the measurements, combined with QRPA theoretical calculations, allow us to infer that the ground states of the $^{192,190}$Pb isotopes are spherical. These results represent the first application of the shape determination method using the total absorption technique for heavy nuclei and in a region where there is considerable interest in nuclear shapes and shape effects.

  5. CYP2C19*2 status in patients with Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laska AJ

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Amanda J Laska,1 Marie J Han,1 Josh A Lospinoso,2 Patrick J Brown,1 Thomas M Beachkofsky1 1Department of Dermatology, San Antonio Uniformed Services Health Education Consortium, San Antonio, TX, 2780th Military Intelligence Brigade, Ft Meade, MD, USA Purpose: Genetic polymorphisms have been linked to an increased predisposition to developing certain diseases. For example, patients of Han-Chinese descent carrying the HLA-B*1502 allele are at an increased risk of developing Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN if given carbamazepine. Given the complexity of in vivo drug metabolism, it is plausible that the activity of enzyme systems unrelated to specific drug metabolism may be important. Although multiple biomarkers have been identified in unique ethnic groups, there has yet to be a study investigating the presence of the slow metabolizing allele of CYP2C19, denoted CYP2C19*2, in diverse groups and the risk of developing SJS/TEN. Patients and methods: This study looked into the carrier status of CYP2C19*2, a poor metabolizing variant of CYP2C19, in patients diagnosed with SJS/TEN. We looked at its status in our series as a whole and when patients were divided by ethnicity. Genomic DNA was extracted from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue of patients with biopsy-proven SJS/TEN and real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to assess for the presence of CYP2C19*2. Results: CYP2C19*2 status was determined in 47 patients. Twenty-nine of these 47 patients had a single medication implicated as causing their disease, and eight of these patients were heterozygous or homozygous for CYP2C19*2. There was insufficient evidence to conclude that the presence of CYP2C19*2 is an independent predictor of risk for developing SJS/TEN in our series as a whole. This analysis also confirmed that the frequency of the CYP2C19*2 polymorphism within the different ethnicities in our series did not vary statistically from reported ethnic

  6. Influence of paraoxonase-1 Q192R and cytochrome P450 2C19 polymorphisms on clopidogrel response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li L

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Rolf P Kreutz1,2, Perry Nystrom2, Yvonne Kreutz2, Jia Miao2, Zeruesenay Desta2, Jeffrey A Breall1, Lang Li2, ChienWei Chiang2, Richard Kovacs1, David A Flockhart2, Yan Jin21Krannert Institute of Cardiology, 2Division of Clinical Pharmacology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN, USABackground: The metabolic activation of clopidogrel is a two-step process. It has been suggested that paraoxonase-1 (PON1 is a rate-limiting enzyme in the conversion of 2-oxo-clopidogrel to an active thiol metabolite. Conflicting results have been reported in regard to (1 the association of a common polymorphism of PON1 (Q192R with reduced rates of coronary stent thrombosis in patients taking clopidogrel and (2 its effects on platelet inhibition in patient populations of European descent. Methods: Blood samples from 151 subjects of mixed racial background with established coronary artery disease and who received clopidogrel were analyzed. Platelet aggregation was determined with light transmittance aggregometry and VerifyNow® P2Y12 assay. Genotyping for cytochrome P450 2C19 (CYP2C19*2 and *3 and PON1 (Q192R polymorphisms was performed.Results: Carriers of CYP2C19*2 alleles exhibited lower levels of platelet inhibition and higher on-treatment platelet aggregation than noncarriers. There was no significant difference in platelet aggregation among PON1 Q192R genotypes. Homozygous carriers of the wild-type variant of PON1 (QQ192 had similar on-treatment platelet reactivity to carriers of increased-function variant alleles during maintenance clopidogrel dosing, as well as after administration of a clopidogrel 600 mg loading dose.Conclusion: CYP2C19*2 allele is associated with impaired platelet inhibition by clopidogrel and high on-treatment platelet aggregation. PON1 (Q192R polymorphism does not appear to be a significant determinant of clopidogrel response.Keywords: PON1, platelet, aggregation, cytochrome P450 enzymes

  7. High-dose rate Ir-192 interstitial brachytherapy for recurrent pelvic tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukiyama, Iwao; Katano, Susumu; Kotake, Kenjiro; Yamamoto, Seiichiro; Kamata, Hiroyuki; Sekiguchi, Isao [Tochigi Cancer Center, (Japan); Furuta, Masaya; Ohno, Tatsuya

    1999-06-01

    Recurrent pelvic tumors are difficult to control with external irradiation alone. We have conducted phase I and II clinical trials against recurrent pelvic tumors. From January 1995 through March 1997, 13 recurrent pelvic tumors in 10 patients were treated with high-dose rate Ir-192 interstitial brachytherapy. Complete responses were achieved for 2 tumors, partial responses for 5 tumors, and no response for 6 tumors; therefore, the response rate was 61% (8 of 13 tumors). Treatment-related morbidity was noted in 5 patients and included one case each of skin ulcer, rectovaginal fistula, sacral abscess, rectal bleeding, and vesicovaginal fistula. In January 1999, four patients were alive and had survived for 17, 18, 28, and 46 months. Six patients had died but had survived 4, 13, 15, 16, and 27 months. (author)

  8. Transpapillary iridium-192 wire in the treatment of malignant bile duct obstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levitt, M.D.; Laurence, B.H.; Cameron, F.; Klemp, P.F.B.

    1988-02-01

    Twenty four patients with malignant bile duct obstruction were treated with intraluminal radiotherapy using iridium-192 wire inserted through an endoscopically placed nasobiliary catheter. Biliary drainage after treatment was maintained by an endoprosthesis. The median dose of intraluminal radiotherapy was 6000 cGy; two patients with cholangiocarcinoma were given a second course because of disease extension; four patients with pancreatic carcinoma received additional external irradiation (3000 cGy). There was one early death from a cerebrovascular accident (30 day mortality, 4.2%). Cholangitis (30%) was the major early complication and stent blockage (40%) the major late complication; there were no complications directly attributable to radiotherapy. The median survival for patients with pancreatic carcinoma was 250 days and for cholangiocarcinoma, 300 days. This method is technically feasible and may prove safer than the transhepatic technique. The ability of intraluminal irradiation to improve palliation or lengthen survival in patients with malignant bile duct obstruction remains uncertain.

  9. Limits of Gaussian fluctuations in the cosmic microwave background at 19.2 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boughn, S. P.; Cheng, E. S.; Cottingham, D. A.; Fixsen, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    The Northern Hemisphere data from the 19.2 GHz full sky survey are analyzed to place limits on the magnitude of Gaussian fluctuations in the cosmic microwave background implied by a variety of correlation functions. Included among the models tested are the monochromatic and Gaussian-shaped families, and those with power-law spectra for n values between -2 and 1. An upper bound is placed on the quadrupole anisotropy of Delta T/T less than 3.2 x 10 exp -5 rms, and an upper bound on scale-invariant (n = 1) fluctuations of a2 less than 4.5 x 10 exp -5 (95 percent confidence level). There is significant contamination of these data from Galactic emission, and improvement of the modeling of the Galaxy could yield a significant reduction of these upper bounds.

  10. Safety Analysis Report for Primary Capsule of Ir-192 Radiation Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J. C.; Bang, K. S.; Choi, W. S.; Seo, K. S.; Son, K. J.; Park, W. J

    2008-12-15

    All of the source capsules to transport a special form radioactive material should be designed and fabricated in accordance with the design criteria prescribed in IAEA standards and domestic regulations. The objective of this project is to prove the safety of a primary capsule for Ir-192 radiation source which produced in the HANARO. The safety tests of primary capsules were carried out for the impact, percussion and heat conditions. And leakage tests were carried out before and after the each tests. The capsule showed slight scratches and their deformations were not found after each tests. It also met the allowable limits of leakage rate after each test. Therefore, it has been verified that the capsule was designed and fabricated to meet all requirements for the special form radioactive materials.

  11. Quality control for cervical cancer treatments on Hdr brachytherapy with Ir-192

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarino B, G.; Cogollo P, R.; Paez M, M., E-mail: lvarinog@hotmail.com [Universidad de Cordoba, Physics and Electronics Department, Carrera 6 No. 76-103, Monteria, Cordoba (Colombia)

    2013-10-01

    This work, developed at the National Cancer Institute in partnership with Universidad Nacional de Colombia located in Bogota, Colombia, presents the results of simulations of cervical cancer treatments, on Hdr brachytherapy with Ir-192, using as a physical simulator a natural female pelvis bone with soft tissue elaborated with the experimental material JJT. The doses were measured experimentally, prior to dosimetric characterization, with crystal thermoluminescence 100 LiF: Mg, Ti, located in the organs at risk: rectum and bladder. On the other hand, these treatments were planned and calculated theoretically by the system Micro-Selectron Hdr, with Plato brachytherapy software V 14.1 from the Netherlands Nucletron, and doses obtained in the same organs were compared with experimental results using dosimeters. The comparison of these results shows the correlation degree between the planning of dosimetric treatments and the experimental results, making the process in a form of quality control in vivo, of this type of procedure. (Author)

  12. Dosimetry revisited for the HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy source model mHDR-v2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granero, Domingo; Vijande, Javier; Ballester, Facundo; Rivard, Mark J. [Radiation Physics Department, ERESA, Hospital General Universitario, E-46014 Valencia (Spain); Department of Atomic, Molecular, and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, E-46100 Burjassot (Spain) and IFIC, CSIC-University of Valencia, E-46100 Burjassot (Spain); Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States)

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: Recently, the manufacturer of the HDR {sup 192}Ir mHDR-v2 brachytherapy source reported small design changes (referred to herein as mHDR-v2r) that are within the manufacturing tolerances but may alter the existing dosimetric data for this source. This study aimed to (1) check whether these changes affect the existing dosimetric data published for this source; (2) obtain new dosimetric data in close proximity to the source, including the contributions from {sup 192}Ir electrons and considering the absence of electronic equilibrium; and (3) obtain scatter dose components for collapsed cone treatment planning system implementation. Methods: Three different Monte Carlo (MC) radiation transport codes were used: MCNP5, PENELOPE2008, and GEANT4. The source was centrally positioned in a 40 cm radius water phantom. Absorbed dose and collision kerma were obtained using 0.1 mm (0.5 mm) thick voxels to provide high-resolution dosimetry near (far from) the source. Dose-rate distributions obtained with the three MC codes were compared. Results: Simulations of mHDR-v2 and mHDR-v2r designs performed with three radiation transport codes showed agreement typically within 0.2% for r{>=}0.25 cm. Dosimetric contributions from source electrons were significant for r<0.25 cm. The dose-rate constant and radial dose function were similar to those from previous MC studies of the mHDR-v2 design. The 2D anisotropy function also coincided with that of the mHDR-v2 design for r{>=}0.25 cm. Detailed results of dose distributions and scatter components are presented for the modified source design. Conclusions: Comparison of these results to prior MC studies showed agreement typically within 0.5% for r{>=}0.25 cm. If dosimetric data for r<0.25 cm are not needed, dosimetric results from the prior MC studies will be adequate.

  13. HDR {sup 192}Ir source speed measurements using a high speed video camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonseca, Gabriel P. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares—IPEN-CNEN/SP, São Paulo 05508-000, Brazil and Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht 6201 BN (Netherlands); Viana, Rodrigo S. S.; Yoriyaz, Hélio [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares—IPEN-CNEN/SP, São Paulo 05508-000 (Brazil); Podesta, Mark [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht 6201 BN (Netherlands); Rubo, Rodrigo A.; Sales, Camila P. de [Hospital das Clínicas da Universidade de São Paulo—HC/FMUSP, São Paulo 05508-000 (Brazil); Reniers, Brigitte [Department of Radiation Oncology - MAASTRO, GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht 6201 BN (Netherlands); Research Group NuTeC, CMK, Hasselt University, Agoralaan Gebouw H, Diepenbeek B-3590 (Belgium); Verhaegen, Frank, E-mail: frank.verhaegen@maastro.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology - MAASTRO, GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht 6201 BN (Netherlands); Medical Physics Unit, Department of Oncology, McGill University, Montréal, Québec H3G 1A4 (Canada)

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: The dose delivered with a HDR {sup 192}Ir afterloader can be separated into a dwell component, and a transit component resulting from the source movement. The transit component is directly dependent on the source speed profile and it is the goal of this study to measure accurate source speed profiles. Methods: A high speed video camera was used to record the movement of a {sup 192}Ir source (Nucletron, an Elekta company, Stockholm, Sweden) for interdwell distances of 0.25–5 cm with dwell times of 0.1, 1, and 2 s. Transit dose distributions were calculated using a Monte Carlo code simulating the source movement. Results: The source stops at each dwell position oscillating around the desired position for a duration up to (0.026 ± 0.005) s. The source speed profile shows variations between 0 and 81 cm/s with average speed of ∼33 cm/s for most of the interdwell distances. The source stops for up to (0.005 ± 0.001) s at nonprogrammed positions in between two programmed dwell positions. The dwell time correction applied by the manufacturer compensates the transit dose between the dwell positions leading to a maximum overdose of 41 mGy for the considered cases and assuming an air-kerma strength of 48 000 U. The transit dose component is not uniformly distributed leading to over and underdoses, which is within 1.4% for commonly prescribed doses (3–10 Gy). Conclusions: The source maintains its speed even for the short interdwell distances. Dose variations due to the transit dose component are much lower than the prescribed treatment doses for brachytherapy, although transit dose component should be evaluated individually for clinical cases.

  14. Fusion and quasifission studies for the 40Ca+186W,192Os reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, E.; Hinde, D. J.; Williams, E.; Dasgupta, M.; Carter, I. P.; Cook, K. J.; Jeung, D. Y.; Luong, D. H.; Palshetkar, C. S.; Rafferty, D. C.; Ramachandran, K.; Simenel, C.; Wakhle, A.

    2017-09-01

    Background: All elements above atomic number 113 have been synthesized using hot fusion reactions with calcium beams on statically deformed actinide target nuclei. Quasifission and fusion-fission are the two major mechanisms responsible for the very low production cross sections of superheavy elements. Purpose: To achieve a quantitative measurement of capture and quasifission characteristics as a function of beam energy in reactions forming heavy compound systems using calcium beams as projectiles. Methods: Fission fragment mass-angle distributions were measured for the two reactions 40Ca+186W and 40C+192Os, populating 226Pu and 232Cm compound nuclei, respectively, using the Heavy Ion Accelerator Facility and CUBE spectrometer at the Australian National University. Mass ratio distributions, angular distributions, and total fission cross sections were obtained from the experimental data. Simulations to match the features of the experimental mass-angle distributions were performed using a classical phenomenological approach. Results: Both 40Ca+186W and 40C+192Os reactions show strong mass-angle correlations at all energies measured. A maximum fusion probability of 60 -70 % is estimated for the two reactions in the energy range of the present study. Coupled-channels calculations assuming standard Woods-Saxon potential parameters overpredict the capture cross sections. Large nuclear potential diffuseness parameters ˜1.5 fm are required to fit the total capture cross sections. The presence of a weak mass-asymmetric quasifission component attributed to the higher angular momentum events can be reproduced with a shorter average sticking time but longer mass-equilibration time constant. Conclusions: The deduced above-barrier capture cross sections suggest that the dissipative processes are already occurring outside the capture barrier. The mass-angle correlations indicate that a compact shape is not achieved for deformation aligned collisions with lower capture barriers

  15. Multi-wavelength imaging of the peculiar Vela Molecular Ridge nebula BBW 192E

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkert, A.; Stecklum, B.; Henning, Th.; Fischer, O.

    2000-01-01

    We present the first images of the nebula BBW 192E at near- and mid-infrared wavelengths as well as a 1.3 mm continuum map. The nebula BBW 192E is associated with the IRAS point source 08513-4201 which has a luminosity of about 1400 L_sun and a strongly rising spectral energy distribution towards mid-infrared wavelengths. The infrared images show a pronounced bipolar nebula, which is offset by about 10arcsec from the known optical emission, as well as several point sources. We interpret this morphology as evidence for an inclined disk-like structure and scattered light emerging from the lobes. This is supported by our near-infrared imaging polarimetry at sub-arcsecond resolution which furthermore indicates that the central energy source is seen directly at near-infrared wavelengths. At 1.3 millimetre, we detected a cometary shaped source in the dust continuum radiation, 151arcsec x 55arcsec in size, with a total mass of 180 M_sun as well as average hydrogen column and number densities of 4.5x1022 cm-2 and 2.6x105 cm-3, respectively. This dust cloud is also responsible for the strong spatial variation of the extinction across the nebula. We discuss the physical properties of the infrared point sources and conclude that some might be young, low-mass pre-main sequence stars. The main energy source of the nebula is an embedded intermediate-mass young stellar object. These observations are among the first infrared detections of a disk-like system associated with a bipolar nebula surrounding an intermediate-mass young stellar object. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, La Silla, Chile (Proposal-IDs: 57.B-0392, 52.7-0086, 57.D-0260, 58.D-0213, and 63.I-0173)

  16. Comparison of (192) Ir, (169) Yb, and (60) Co high-dose rate brachytherapy sources for skin cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safigholi, Habib; Meigooni, Ali S; Song, William Y

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the possibility of utilizing the high-dose rate (HDR) (169) Yb and (60) Co sources, in addition to (192) Ir, for the treatment of skin malignancies with conical applicators. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were used to benchmark the dosimetric parameters of single (169) Yb (4140), (60) Co (Co0.A86), and (192) Ir (mHDR-V2) brachytherapy sources in a water phantom and compared their results against published data. A standard conical tungsten alloy Leipzig-style applicator (Stand.Appl) was used for determination of the dose distributions at various depths with a single dwell position of the HDR sources. The HDR sources were modeled with its long axis parallel to the treatment plane within the opening section of the applicator. The source-to-surface distance (SSD) was 1.6 cm, which included a 0.1 cm thick removable plastic end-cap used for clinical applications. The prescription depth was considered to be 0.3 cm in a water phantom following the definitions in the literature for this treatment technique. Dose distributions generated with the Stand.Appl and the (169) Yb and (60) Co sources have been compared with those of the (192) Ir source, for the same geometry. Then, applicator wall thickness for the (60) Co source was increased (doubled) in MC simulations in order to minimize the leakage dose and penumbra to levels that were comparable to that from the (192) Ir source. For each source-applicator combination, the optimized plastic end-cap dimensions were determined in order to avoid over-dosage to the skin surface. The normalized dose profiles at the prescription depth for the (169) Yb-Stand.Appl and the (60) Co-double-wall applicator were found to be similar to that of the (192) Ir-Stand.Appl, with differences percentage depth doses (PDD) for the (192) Ir-, (169) Yb- and (60) Co-Stand.Appl were found to be comparable to the values with the (60) Co-double-walled applicator, with differences depth were also comparable at 0.309, 0.316, and 0.298 (cGy/hU) for

  17. Determination of air kerma standard of high dose rate {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy source; Determinacao da taxa de kerma no ar de referencia para {sup 192}Ir de alta taxa de dose para braquiterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pires, E.J.; Alves, C.F.E.; Leite, S.P.; Magalhaes, L.A.G.; David, M.G.; Almeida, C.E. de, E-mail: cfealves@gmail.com [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Ciencias Radiologicas; Di Prinzio, R. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents the methodology developed by the Laboratorio de Ciencias Radiologicas and presently in use for determining of the air kerma standard of {sup 192}Ir high dose rate sources to calibrate well-type chambers. Uncertainty analysis involving the measurements procedure are presented. (author)

  18. A Feasibility Study of Fricke Dosimetry as an Absorbed Dose to Water Standard for 192Ir HDR Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    deAlmeida, Carlos Eduardo; Ochoa, Ricardo; de Lima, Marilene Coelho; David, Mariano Gazineu; Pires, Evandro Jesus; Peixoto, José Guilherme; Salata, Camila; Bernal, Mario Antônio

    2014-01-01

    High dose rate brachytherapy (HDR) using 192Ir sources is well accepted as an important treatment option and thus requires an accurate dosimetry standard. However, a dosimetry standard for the direct measurement of the absolute dose to water for this particular source type is currently not available. An improved standard for the absorbed dose to water based on Fricke dosimetry of HDR 192Ir brachytherapy sources is presented in this study. The main goal of this paper is to demonstrate the potential usefulness of the Fricke dosimetry technique for the standardization of the quantity absorbed dose to water for 192Ir sources. A molded, double-walled, spherical vessel for water containing the Fricke solution was constructed based on the Fricke system. The authors measured the absorbed dose to water and compared it with the doses calculated using the AAPM TG-43 report. The overall combined uncertainty associated with the measurements using Fricke dosimetry was 1.4% for k = 1, which is better than the uncertainties reported in previous studies. These results are promising; hence, the use of Fricke dosimetry to measure the absorbed dose to water as a standard for HDR 192Ir may be possible in the future. PMID:25521914

  19. What is the value of emission tomography studies in patients with a primary glioblastoma multiforme treated by Ir-192 brachytherapy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koot, R. W.; Habraken, J. B. A.; Paans, A. M. J.; Bosch, D. A.; Pruim, J.; Hulshof, M.C.C.M.

    Background. We studied the use of (201)Thallium SPECT and L-[1-C-11]-tyrosine PET in patients with a primary glioblastoma multiforme treated with Ir-192 brachytherapy after surgery and external beam radiation therapy. We hypothesised that the patients most likely to benefit from further surgery

  20. Stem signal suppression in fiber-coupled Al2O3:C dosimetry for 192Ir brachytherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kertzscher Schwencke, Gustavo Adolfo Vladimir; Andersen, Claus Erik; Edmund, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    range 0.05–50 Gy, as needed under high dose rate (HDR) conditions. The dosimeter was irradiated in a water phantom using a 37 GBq 192Ir source at source-to-crystal distances ranging from 0.5 cm to 6.7 cm. For irradiation conditions that generated a stem component in the range 4%–15% in the unfiltered...

  1. Stereospecific hydrolysis of a phosphoramidate used as an OPIDP model by human sera with PON1 192 alloforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroy-Noyola, Antonio; Trujillo, Bertín; Yescas, Petra; Martínez-Salazar, Fernanda; García-Jiménez, Sara; Ríos, Camilo; Vilanova, Eugenio

    2015-10-01

    O-hexyl 2,5-dichlorophenyl phosphoramidate (HDCP) is a racemic organophosphate compound (OP) that induces delayed neuropathy in vivo. The O-hexyl 2,5-dichlorophenyl phosphoramidate R (R-HDCP) isomer inhibits and ages neuropathic target esterase (NTE) in hen brain. Moreover, human serum paraoxonase-1 (PON1) is a Ca(2+)-dependent enzyme capable of hydrolyzing OPs. The enzymatic activity of PON1 against OPs depends on the genetic polymorphisms present at position 192 (glutamine or arginine). The catalytic efficiency of PON1 is an important factor that determines neurotoxic susceptibility to some OPs. In the present study, we characterized the stereospecific hydrolysis of HDCP by alloforms PON1 Q192R human serum by chiral chromatography. Forty-seven human samples were characterized for the PON1 192 polymorphism. The hydrolysis data demonstrate that the three alloforms of PON1 show an exclusive and significant stereospecific Ca(2+)-dependent hydrolysis of O-hexyl 2,5-dichlorophenyl phosphoramidate S isomer (S-HDCP) at 19-127 µM at the concentrations that remain in all the samples. This stereoselective Ca(2+)-dependent hydrolysis of S-HDCP is inhibited by EDTA and is independent of the PON1 Q192R alloform. The present research reinforces the hypothesis that R-HDCP (an isomer that inhibits and causes NTE aging) is the enantiomer that induces delayed neuropathy by this chiral phosphoramidate due to the low hydrolysis level of the R-HDCP observed in this study.

  2. New Cross Section Data for Production of the Therapeutic Radionuclides 64Cu, 140Nd, and 192Ir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilgers, K.; Qaim, S. M.; Coenen, H. H.

    2005-05-01

    For production of the therapeutic radionuclides 64Cu, 140Nd and 192Ir new cross section data are reported, all measured using the stacked-foil technique. In the case of 64Cu, the 66Zn(d,α)64Cu reaction was investigated radiochemically over the energy range of 5 to 14 MeV using highly enriched target material. From the measured excitation function the thick target yield of 64Cu was calculated as 6.6 MBq/μAṡh. A comparison with other production routes is given. For production of 140Nd, both natCe(3He,xn)140Nd and 141Pr(p,2n)140Nd processes were studied. For the 141Pr(p,2n)140Nd reaction the results are consistent with the literature data in the early rising part of the excitation function; at higher energies, however, our values differ considerably. The yields of 140Nd via these reactions amount to 22 and 128 MBq/μAṡh, respectively. The excitation function of the 192Os(p,n)192Ir reaction was measured from 6 to 20 MeV and the yield of 192Ir was calculated to be 0.16 MBq/μAṡh.

  3. 49 CFR 192.457 - External corrosion control: Buried or submerged pipelines installed before August 1, 1971.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false External corrosion control: Buried or submerged... SAFETY STANDARDS Requirements for Corrosion Control § 192.457 External corrosion control: Buried or... areas in which active corrosion is found: (1) Bare or ineffectively coated transmission lines. (2) Bare...

  4. 49 CFR 192.455 - External corrosion control: Buried or submerged pipelines installed after July 31, 1971.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false External corrosion control: Buried or submerged... SAFETY STANDARDS Requirements for Corrosion Control § 192.455 External corrosion control: Buried or... against external corrosion, including the following: (1) It must have an external protective coating...

  5. 40 CFR 436.192 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS MINERAL MINING AND PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Frasch Sulfur Subcategory § 436.192 Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent... section for operations mining anhydrite deposits, any existing point source subject to this subpart shall...

  6. 49 CFR 192.915 - What knowledge and training must personnel have to carry out an integrity management program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Gas Transmission Pipeline Integrity Management § 192.915 What knowledge... to the integrity management program possesses and maintains a thorough knowledge of the integrity... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What knowledge and training must personnel have to...

  7. 20 CFR 411.192 - What choices do I have if I am unable to make timely progress toward self-supporting employment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... timely progress toward self-supporting employment? 411.192 Section 411.192 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL... unable to make timely progress toward self-supporting employment? (a) If you report to the PM that you are temporarily or otherwise unable to make timely progress toward self-supporting employment during a...

  8. 49 CFR 192.555 - Uprating to a pressure that will produce a hoop stress of 30 percent or more of SMYS in steel...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... stress of 30 percent or more of SMYS in steel pipelines. 192.555 Section 192.555 Transportation Other... of 30 percent or more of SMYS in steel pipelines. (a) Unless the requirements of this section have been met, no person may subject any segment of a steel pipeline to an operating pressure that will...

  9. Maternal exposure to floricultural work during pregnancy, PON1 Q192R polymorphisms and the risk of low birth weight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno-Banda, G.; Blanco-Munoz, J. [Population Health Research Center, National Institute of Public Health, Avenida Universidad 655, Colonia Santa Maria Ahuacatitlan, 62508 Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Lacasana, M., E-mail: marina.lacasana.easp@juntadeandalucia.es [Andalusian School of Public Health, Campus Universitario de la Cartuja, Cuesta del Observatorio, 4, 18080 Granada (Spain); CIBER of Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBERESP) (Spain); Rothenberg, S.J. [Population Health Research Center, National Institute of Public Health, Avenida Universidad 655, Colonia Santa Maria Ahuacatitlan, 62508 Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Center of Research and Advanced Studies, National Institute Polytechnic, Department of Toxicology, Av, Instituto Politecnico Nacional No. 2508, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, Deleg. Gustavo A. Madero, 07360 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Aguilar-Garduno, C. [Andalusian School of Public Health, Campus Universitario de la Cartuja, Cuesta del Observatorio, 4, 18080 Granada (Spain); Andalusian Observatory of Environmental Health, Campus Universitario de la Cartuja, Cuesta del Observatorio, 4, 18080 Granada (Spain); Gamboa, R. [Department of Physiology, National Institute of Cardiology ' Ignacio Chavez' , Juan Badiano 4, Section XVI, 14080, Mexico DF (Mexico); Perez-Mendez, O. [Department of Molecular Biology and cardiovascular Diseases Genomic and Proteomic, National Institute of Cardiology ' Ignacio Chavez' , Juan Badiano 4, Section XVI, 14080, Mexico DF (Mexico)

    2009-10-15

    Background: Although there is evidence from animal studies of impaired reproductive function by exposure to organophosphates (OP), the effects on birth weight have not been sufficiently evaluated in epidemiological studies. Paraoxonase (PON1) detoxifies organophosphates by cleavage of active oxons. Some PON1 gene polymorphisms could reduce the enzyme activity and increase susceptibility to OP toxicity. Objective: To assess the association between maternal exposure to floriculture during pregnancy and the risk of low birth weight (< 2500 g) in their offspring, as well as to evaluate the interaction between this exposure and maternal genotype for PON1 Q192R polymorphisms. Materials and methods: A cross sectional study was carried out in two Mexican states (States of Mexico and Morelos) with high frequencies of greenhouse activity. We interviewed and collected blood samples from 264 females (floriculturists or partners of floricultural workers) who became pregnant during the 10 years prior to the interview. The questionnaire measured socioeconomic characteristics, tobacco and alcohol consumption, diseases and occupational and reproductive history. We also applied a food frequency questionnaire. Information was obtained pertaining to 467 pregnancies. DNA was extracted from white cells, and PON1 genotype was determined by Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism for Q192R polymorphisms. Results were analyzed with generalized estimating equations models. Results: After adjusting for potential confounders, we detected a statistically significant interaction between maternal exposure to flower growing work during pregnancy and PON1 Q192R polymorphisms on risk of low birth weight. The risk of having a baby with LBW is nearly six times higher if a mother is a floriculture worker during pregnancy and has PON1 192RR genotype (OR 5.93, 95% CI 1.28, 27.5). Conclusion: These results suggest that the interaction between maternal floriculture work during pregnancy and 192RR PON1

  10. Balloon-based adjuvant radiotherapy in breast cancer: comparison between (99m)Tc and HDR (192)Ir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Campos, Tarcísio Passos Ribeiro; de Lima, Carla Flavia; Cuperschmid, Ethel Mizrahy

    2016-01-01

    To perform a comparative dosimetric analysis, based on computer simulations, of temporary balloon implants with (99m)Tc and balloon brachytherapy with high-dose-rate (HDR) (192)Ir, as boosts to radiotherapy. We hypothesized that the two techniques would produce equivalent doses under pre-established conditions of activity and exposure time. Simulations of implants with (99m)Tc-filled and HDR (192)Ir-filled balloons were performed with the Siscodes/MCNP5, modeling in voxels a magnetic resonance imaging set related to a young female. Spatial dose rate distributions were determined. In the dosimetric analysis of the protocols, the exposure time and the level of activity required were specified. The (99m)Tc balloon presented a weighted dose rate in the tumor bed of 0.428 cGy.h(-1).mCi(-1) and 0.190 cGyh(-1).mCi(-1) at the balloon surface and at 8-10 mm from the surface, respectively, compared with 0.499 and 0.150 cGyh(-1).mCi(-1), respectively, for the HDR (192)Ir balloon. An exposure time of 24 hours was required for the (99m)Tc balloon to produce a boost of 10.14 Gy with 1.0 Ci, whereas only 24 minutes with 10.0 Ci segments were required for the HDR (192)Ir balloon to produce a boost of 5.14 Gy at the same reference point, or 10.28 Gy in two 24-minutes fractions. Temporary (99m)Tc balloon implantation is an attractive option for adjuvant radiotherapy in breast cancer, because of its availability, economic viability, and similar dosimetry in comparison with the use of HDR (192)Ir balloon implantation, which is the current standard in clinical practice.

  11. Balloon-based adjuvant radiotherapy in breast cancer: comparison between {sup 99m}Tc and HDR {sup 192}Ir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, Tarcisio Passos Ribeiro de; Lima, Carla Flavia de; Cuperschmid, Ethel Mizrahy, E-mail: tprcampos@pq.cnpq.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2016-03-15

    Objective: To perform a comparative dosimetric analysis, based on computer simulations, of temporary balloon implants with {sup 99m}Tc and balloon brachytherapy with high-dose-rate (HDR) {sup 192}Ir, as boosts to radiotherapy. We hypothesized that the two techniques would produce equivalent doses under pre-established conditions of activity and exposure time. Materials and methods: simulations of implants with {sup 99m}Tc-filled and HDR {sup 192}Ir-filled balloons were performed with the Siscodes/MCNP5, modeling in voxels a magnetic resonance imaging set related to a young female. Spatial dose rate distributions were determined. In the dosimetric analysis of the protocols, the exposure time and the level of activity required were specified. Results: the {sup 99m}Tc balloon presented a weighted dose rate in the tumor bed of 0.428 cGy.h{sup -1}.mCi{sup -1} and 0.190 cGyh{sup -1} at the balloon surface and at 8-10 mm from the surface, respectively, compared with 0.499 and 0.150 cGyh{sup -1}.mCi{sup -1}, respectively, for the HDR {sup 192}Ir balloon. An exposure time of 24 hours was required for the {sup 99m}Tc balloon to produce a boost of 10.14 Gy with 1.0 Ci, whereas only 24 minutes with 10.0 Ci segments were required for the HDR {sup 192}Ir balloon to produce a boost of 5.14 Gy at the same reference point, or 10.28 Gy in two 24-minutes fractions. Conclusion: temporary {sup 99m}Tc balloon implantation is an attractive option for adjuvant radiotherapy in breast cancer, because of its availability, economic viability, and similar dosimetry in comparison with the use of HDR {sup 192}Ir balloon implantation, which is the current standard in clinical practice. (author)

  12. Methods for measuring serum activity levels of the 192 Q and R isoenzymes of paraoxonase 1 in QR heterozygous individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teiber, John F; Kramer, Gerald L; Haley, Robert W

    2013-08-01

    Paraoxonase 1 (PON1), an esterase that hydrolyzes toxic organophosphates and has antioxidative and antiatherogenic properties, contains a common polymorphism at position 192: glutamine (Q) or arginine (R). The Q and R isoenzymes exhibit different physical and protective properties. We describe 2 methods for quantifying their serum activity levels. We measured serum hydrolytic activity with paraoxon [paraoxonase (PXN) activity], phenylacetate [arylesterase (AE) activity], and diazoxon [diazoxonase (DZN) activity] with standard automated assays. We determined PON1 Q192R genotypes with PCR and Q192R phenotypes using the PXN/AE and PXN/DZN ratios. Interpolation equations were empirically derived to predict the percentage of total PON1 hydrolytic activity due to the Q isoenzyme (%Q) from the PXN/AE and PXN/DZN ratios; %R is 100 - %Q. We estimated Q and R isoenzyme activity levels in sera from 2095 veterans by multiplying AE activity, a measure of total PON1 hydrolytic activity, by %Q and %R. In all 2095 samples, the PXN/AE and PXN/DZN ratios predicted Q192R phenotypes with nearly identical accuracy (κ = 0.997). In the 925 QR heterozygotes, the 2 interpolation methods predicted Q and R isoenzyme activity levels with excellent agreement (intraclass correlation 0.94). After excluding a few genotype/phenotype-discordant samples, the percentage of total PON1 activity due to the Q isoenzyme ranged from 22% to 70%. These new interpolation methods allow accurate estimation of PON1 192 Q and R isoenzyme activity levels, increasing specificity and power for studying susceptibility to disease.

  13. p192mb.m77t and p192mb.h77t: MGD77T data and header files for single-beam bathymetry data for field activity P-1-92-MB in Monterey Bay from 03/20/1992 to 03/22/1992

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Single-beam bathymetry data along with SINS navigation data was collected as part of the U.S. Geological Survey cruise P-1-92-MB. The cruise was conducted in...

  14. p192sc.m77t and p192sc.h77t: MGD77T data and header files for single-beam bathymetry data for field activity P-1-92-SC in Santa Monica Basin, Southern California from 01/30/1992 to 02/04/1992

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Single-beam bathymetry data along with Loran-C and GPS navigation data was collected as part of the U.S. Geological Survey cruise P-1-92-SC. The cruise was conducted...

  15. Monte Carlo characterization of the Gamma-Med Hdr plus Ir-192 brachytherapy source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes, E.; Sosa, M. A.; Gil V, A. [Universidad de Guanajuato, Division de Ciencias e Ingenierias, Av. Insurgentes 2354, 37150 Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico); Monzon, E., E-mail: eric_1985@fisica.ugto.mx [IMSS, Unidad Medica de Alta Especialidad No. 1, Av. Adolfo Lopez Mateos 1813, 37340 Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: The MCNP4C Monte Carlo code was used to simulate the dosimetry around the Gamma-Med Hdr Plus iridium-192 brachytherapy source in both air/vacuum and water environments. Dosimetry data in water was calculated and are presented into an away-along table. All dosimetric quantities recommended by the AAPM Task Group 43 report have been also calculated. These quantities are air kerma strength, dose rate constant, radial dose function and anisotropy function. The obtained data are compared to this source reference data, finding results in good agreement with them. In this study, recommendations of the AAPM TG-43U1 report have been followed and comply with the most recent AAPM and ESTRO physics committee recommendations about Monte Carlo techniques. The data in the present study complement published data and can be used as input in the Tps or as benchmark data to verify the results of the treatment planning systems as well as a means of comparison with other datasets from this source. (Author)

  16. Transperineal low-dose rate iridium-192 interstitial brachytherapy in cervical carcinoma stage IIB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budrukkar, A.N.; Shrivastava, S.K.; Jalali, R.; Agarwal, J.P.; Dinshaw, K.A. [Tata Memorial Hospital, Parel, Mumbai (India). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Deshpande, D.D.; Nehru, R.M. [Tata Memorial Hospital, Parel, Mumbai (India). Dept. of Medical Physics

    2001-10-01

    Purpose: To assess local control, survival and complications in patients with cervical carcinoma Stage IIB treated radically with transperineal Iridium-192 low-dose rate interstitial brachytherapy following external beam radiotherapy. Patients and Methods: 65 women (age 25-70 years, mean 47 years) with cervical carcinoma Stage IIB were initially treated with external beam radiotherapy on a telecobalt or 6 MW linear accelerator to a dose of 50 Gy delivered in 5-6 weeks. After 2-3 weeks of completing external radiation, patients received interstitial brachytherapy with Iridium-192 (activity 0.5-1 mCi/cm) using a Syed-Neblett perineal template. The median dose delivered to the implant volume was 24 Gy (range 20-32 Gy) delivered at an average dose rate of 0.70 Gy/h (range 0.40-1.20 Gy/h). A point defined at 1.5 cm lateral to the central uterine tandem at the level of os was taken as a representative for assessing the dose to the cervix. Mean doses delivered by interstitial brachytherapy to point A, cervix, point B and rectum were 38 Gy, 34 Gy, 16 Gy and 16 Gy, respectively. Results: At a median follow-up of 53 months, the actuarial disease free survival and overall survival for 65 patients at both 5 and 10 years was 64% and 44%, respectively. Response to radiotherapy was a strong predictor of local control with 82% of patients continuing to have pelvic control after initial complete response. Overall, nine (14%) patients had persistent disease, ten (15%) developed a central recurrence after initial control and three patients developed distant metastasis on follow-up. No patient had any immediate treatment-related complication. Late toxicity included grade I-II rectal reactions in five patients and grade IV bladder complication (vesico-vaginal fistula) in two patients. 5 years after treatment, one patient developed intestinal obstruction, which was relieved after conservative management. Two patients developed vaginal stenosis. The 5- and 10-year disease free survival

  17. Specific gamma-ray constant and exposure rate constant of 192Ir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasgow, G P; Dillman, L T

    1979-01-01

    Calculated values of the 192Ir specific gamma-ray constant, Gamma range from the low value of 3.948 R cm2h-1mCi-1 recommended in NCRP No. 41 to a high of 4.89 R cm2h-1mCi-1. Measured values of Gamma range only from 4.85 to 5.0 Rcm2h-1mCi-1. Discrepancies in reported calculated values exist because the isotope decay scheme and other nuclear spectroscopy data pertinent to these calculations were not well known. Using the 28 gamma rays and relative intensities from the most recent Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF), Gamma is calculated to be 4.62 +/- 0.05 Rcm2h-1mCi-1 and the exposure rate constant Gamma delta is 4.69 +/- 0.05 Rcm2h-1mCi-1. These new calculations are presented and previously reported values of Gamma and Gamma delta are reviewed.

  18. Chemical constituents of marine mangrove-derived endophytic fungus Alternaria tenuissima EN-192

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hong; Gao, Shushan; Li, Xiaoming; Li, Chunshun; Wang, Bingui

    2013-03-01

    A chemical investigation of the ethyl acetate extract of the fermentation broth of Alternaria tenuissima EN-192, an endophytic fungus obtained from the stems of the marine mangrove plant Rhizophora stylosa, resulted in the isolation of nine known secondary metabolites, including four indole-diterpenoids: penijanthine A ( 1), paspaline ( 2), paspalinine ( 3), and penitrem A ( 4); three tricycloalternarene derivatives: tricycloalternarene 3a ( 5), tricycloalternarene 1b ( 6), and tricycloalternarene 2b ( 7); and two alternariol congeners: djalonensone ( 8) and alternariol ( 9). The chemical structures of these metabolites were characterized through a combination of detailed spectroscopic analyses and their comparison with reports from the literature. The inhibitory activities of each isolated compound against four bacteria were evaluated and compounds 5 and 8 displayed moderate activity against the aquaculture pathogenic bacterium Vibrio anguillarum, with inhibition zone diameters of 8 and 9 mm, respectively, at 100 μg/disk. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the secondary metabolites of mangrove-derived A lternaria tenuissima and also the first report of the isolation of indole-diterpenoids from fungal genus A lternaria.

  19. A study on the dose distributions in various materials from an Ir-192 HDR brachytherapy source.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Ming Hsu

    Full Text Available Dose distributions of (192Ir HDR brachytherapy in phantoms simulating water, bone, lung tissue, water-lung and bone-lung interfaces using the Monte Carlo codes EGS4, FLUKA and MCNP4C are reported. Experiments were designed to gather point dose measurements to verify the Monte Carlo results using Gafchromic film, radiophotoluminescent glass dosimeter, solid water, bone, and lung phantom. The results for radial dose functions and anisotropy functions in solid water phantom were consistent with previously reported data (Williamson and Li. The radial dose functions in bone were affected more by depth than those in water. Dose differences between homogeneous solid water phantoms and solid water-lung interfaces ranged from 0.6% to 14.4%. The range between homogeneous bone phantoms and bone-lung interfaces was 4.1% to 15.7%. These results support the understanding in dose distribution differences in water, bone, lung, and their interfaces. Our conclusion is that clinical parameters did not provide dose calculation accuracy for different materials, thus suggesting that dose calculation of HDR treatment planning systems should take into account material density to improve overall treatment quality.

  20. Monthly Deaths Number And Concomitant Environmental Physical Activity: 192 Months Observation (1990-2005)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoupel, E.; Kalediene, R.; Petrauskiene, J.; Starkuviene, S.; Abramson, E.; Israelevich, P.; Sulkes, J.

    2007-12-01

    Human life and health state are dependent on many endogenous and exogenous influence factors. The aim of this study is to check the possible links between monthly deaths distribution and concomitant activity of three groups of cosmophysical factors: solar (SA), geomagnetic (GMA) and cosmic ray (CRA) activities. 192 months death number in years 1990-2005 (n=674004) at the Republic of Lithuania were analyzed. Total and both gender data were considered. In addition to the total death numbers, groups of ischemic heart disease (IHD), stroke (CVA), non-cardiovascular (NCV), accident, traffic accident and suicide-related deaths were studied. Sunspot number and solar radio flux (for SA), Ap, Cp and Am indices (for GMA) and neutron activity on the Earth s surface (for CRA) were the environmental physical activity parameters used in this study. Yearly and monthly deaths distributions were also studied. Pearson correlation coefficients (r) and their probabilities (p) were calculated. Multivariate analysis was conducted. Results revealed: 1) significant correlation of monthly deaths number with CRA (total, stroke, NCV and suicides) and inverse with SA and GMA; 2) significant correlation of monthly number of traffic accidents number with SA and GMA, and inverse with CRA; 3) a strong negative relationship between year and IHD/CVA victims number (an evidence for growing role of stroke in cardiovascular mortality); 4) significant links of rising cardiovascular deaths number at the beginning of the year and traffic accidents victims at the end of the year. It is concluded that CRA is related to monthly deaths distribution.

  1. Determination of the chemical yield on the Fricke dosimetry for {sup 192}Ir sources used in brachytherapy; Determinacao do rendimento quimico na dosimetria Fricke para fontes de {sup 192}Ir usadas em braquiterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David, M.G.; Albuquerque, M.A.G.; Almeida, C.E. de, E-mail: marianogd08@gmail.com [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (LCR/UERJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Ciencias Radiologicas; Salata, C. [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Rosado, P.H. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    With the aim of developing a primary standard for the absorbed dose to water, for the {sup 192}Ir sources used in high dose rate brachytherapy, this work focuses on the determination of the chemical yield, G(Fe{sup +3}), using Fricke dosimetry, for the energy of those sources . The G(Fe{sup +3}) were determined the for three qualities of x-ray beams (150, 250 and 300 kV ) and for {sup 60}Co energy. The G(Fe{sup +3}) value for the average energy of {sup 192}Ir was obtained by linear fit, the found value was 1,555 ± 0,015 μmol/J. (author)

  2. Recovery from Iridium-192 flakes of a radioactive source for industrial use after a radiation incident; Recuperacion de hojuelas de Iridio-192 provenientes de una fuente radiactivas de uso industrial despues de un incidente radiologico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz, W.H.; Zapata, L.A., E-mail: wcruz@ipen.gob.pe, E-mail: lzapata@ipen.gob.pe [Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear (GRRA/IPEN), Lima (Peru). Division de Gestion de Residuos Radiactivos

    2013-07-01

    The Iridium-192 ({sup 192}Ir) is the most used and ideal for industrial radiography applications, especially in petrochemical plants and pipelines and provides better contrast sensitivity for thick (25.4 mm). This source has constructive sealed double encapsulation, the internal capsule containing stainless steel to radioactive material in the form of flakes and welded with TIG process. The radiological incident happened at a gas station fuel sales in circumstances in which there was a homogeneity test welds a tank, the flakes or Ir-192 fell off his ponytail and left scattered over an area of 2 m{sup 2}, some fell flat areas and other land so collected in lead shielding and metal container and ground source. Full recovery of the leaflets was performed at the Division of radioactive waste management (GRRA) gaining a total of 22 flakes with no radiation risk to staff performance and installation and the conclusion was reached that the misapplicaion of TIG welding was the main cause the incident. (author)

  3. Preparation and determination of kerma for Iridium 192 sources of low dose rate for brachytherapy; Preparacion y determinacion del kerma de fuentes de iridio-192 de baja tasa de dosis para braquiterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tendilla, J.I.; Tovar M, V.; Mitsoura, E.; Aguilar H, F.; Alanis M, J. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, C.P. 52045-1, Salazar, Esrado de Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    The practice of Brachytherapy with Iridium-192 sources of low dose rate (0.4 - 0.8 Gy/h) is a technique used in the treatment of diverse illnesses. in this work the preparation, quality control and calibration are presented in terms of kerma in air of Iridium-192 using as target these recycled Iridium-Platinum wires. The targets were obtained as decayed sources of different radio therapeutical centers in the country and they were characterized by Scanning electron microscopy in order to determine their chemical composition. Subsequently it was developed an experimental design to establish the effect of neutron flux, geometrical array and irradiation time over the activity and percentage of the sources homogeneity. The homogeneity was determined by auto radiography and by Gamma spectroscopy. Once the optimal irradiation conditions were established, it is determined the apparent activity and kerma in air using a well type ionization chamber with traceability to a primary laboratory. Iridium-192 sources were obtained with an average homogeneity 96 %, apparent activity 282.129 {+-} 0.531 M Bq and kerma in air 0.03200 {+-} 0.00006 m Gy m/h A. (Author)

  4. Production of the therapeutic radionuclides 193mPt and 195mPt with high specific activity via alpha-particle-induced reactions on 192Os.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilgers, K; Coenen, H H; Qaim, S M

    2008-04-01

    For the production of therapy-relevant radionuclides (193m)Pt (T(1/2)=4.33 d) and (195m)Pt (T(1/2)=4.03 d) with a high specific activity, the (192)Os(alpha,n)(195m)Pt and (192)Os(alpha,3n)(193m)Pt nuclear reactions were investigated for the first time from their respective thresholds up to 28 MeV. Thin samples of enriched (192)Os were prepared by electrodeposition on Ni, and the conventional stacked-foil technique was used for cross-section measurements. The calculated thick target yields were found to be 0.013 MBq/microA h for the (192)Os(alpha,n)(195m)Pt reaction in the energy range of E(alpha)=24-->18 MeV, and 0.25 MBq/microA h for the (192)Os(alpha,3n)(193m)Pt reaction in the energy range of E(alpha)=28-->24 MeV. The two radionuclides could not be detected in the interactions of (3)He particles with (192)Os. A production method involving high-current alpha-particle irradiation of enriched (192)Os and efficient chemical separation of radioplatinum was developed. Batch yields of about 1 MBq (195m)Pt and 8.7 MBq (193m)Pt were achieved. Compared to the reactor production these batch yields are very low, but the (192)Os(alpha,n)(195m)Pt and (192)Os(alpha,3n)(193m)Pt reactions are superior with respect to the specific activity of the products which is higher by two orders of magnitude.

  5. Automatic categorization of land-water cover types of the Green Swamp, Florida, using Skylab multispectral scanner (S-192) data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coker, A. E.; Higer, A. L.; Rogers, R. H.; Shah, N. J.; Reed, L. E.; Walker, S.

    1975-01-01

    The techniques used and the results achieved in the successful application of Skylab Multispectral Scanner (EREP S-192) high-density digital tape data for the automatic categorizing and mapping of land-water cover types in the Green Swamp of Florida were summarized. Data was provided from Skylab pass number 10 on 13 June 1973. Significant results achieved included the automatic mapping of a nine-category and a three-category land-water cover map of the Green Swamp. The land-water cover map was used to make interpretations of a hydrologic condition in the Green Swamp. This type of use marks a significant breakthrough in the processing and utilization of EREP S-192 data.

  6. On the experimental validation of model-based dose calculation algorithms for 192Ir HDR brachytherapy treatment planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, Eleftherios P.; Zoros, Emmanouil; Moutsatsos, Argyris; Peppa, Vasiliki; Zourari, Kyveli; Karaiskos, Pantelis; Papagiannis, Panagiotis

    2017-05-01

    There is an acknowledged need for the design and implementation of physical phantoms appropriate for the experimental validation of model-based dose calculation algorithms (MBDCA) introduced recently in 192Ir brachytherapy treatment planning systems (TPS), and this work investigates whether it can be met. A PMMA phantom was prepared to accommodate material inhomogeneities (air and Teflon), four plastic brachytherapy catheters, as well as 84 LiF TLD dosimeters (MTS-100M 1  ×  1  ×  1 mm3 microcubes), two radiochromic films (Gafchromic EBT3) and a plastic 3D dosimeter (PRESAGE). An irradiation plan consisting of 53 source dwell positions was prepared on phantom CT images using a commercially available TPS and taking into account the calibration dose range of each detector. Irradiation was performed using an 192Ir high dose rate (HDR) source. Dose to medium in medium, Dmm , was calculated using the MBDCA option of the same TPS as well as Monte Carlo (MC) simulation with the MCNP code and a benchmarked methodology. Measured and calculated dose distributions were spatially registered and compared. The total standard (k  =  1) spatial uncertainties for TLD, film and PRESAGE were: 0.71, 1.58 and 2.55 mm. Corresponding percentage total dosimetric uncertainties were: 5.4-6.4, 2.5-6.4 and 4.85, owing mainly to the absorbed dose sensitivity correction and the relative energy dependence correction (position dependent) for TLD, the film sensitivity calibration (dose dependent) and the dependencies of PRESAGE sensitivity. Results imply a LiF over-response due to a relative intrinsic energy dependence between 192Ir and megavoltage calibration energies, and a dose rate dependence of PRESAGE sensitivity at low dose rates (required for the full characterization of dosimeter response for 192Ir and the reduction of experimental uncertainties.

  7. Dosimetric study of a brachytherapy treatment of esophagus with Brazilian 192Ir sources using an anthropomorphic phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Lucio P.; Santos, William S.; Gorski, Ronan; Perini, Ana P.; Maia, Ana F.; Caldas, Linda V. E.; Orengo, Gilberto

    2014-11-01

    Several radioisotopes are produced at Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares for the use in medical treatments, including the activation of 192Ir sources. These sources are suitable for brachytherapy treatments, due to their low or high activity, depending on the concentration of 192Ir, easiness to manufacture, small size, stable daughter products and the possibility of re-utilization. They may be used for the treatment of prostate, cervix, head and neck, skin, breast, gallbladder, uterus, vagina, lung, rectum, and eye cancer treatment. In this work, the use of some 192Ir sources was studied for the treatment of esophagus cancer, especially the dose determination of important structures, such as those on the mediastinum. This was carried out utilizing a FASH anthropomorphic phantom and the MCNP5 Monte Carlo code to transport the radiation through matter. It was possible to observe that the doses at lungs, breast, esophagus, thyroid and heart were the highest, which was expected due to their proximity to the source. Therefore, the data are useful to assess the representative dose specific to brachytherapy treatments on the esophagus for radiation protection purposes. The use of brachytherapy sources was studied for the treatment of esophagus cancer. FASH anthropomorphic phantom and MCNP5 Monte Carlo code were employed. The doses at lungs, breast, esophagus, thyroid and heart were the highest. The data is useful to assess the representative doses of treatments on the esophagus.

  8. Excitation function of the 192Os(3He,4n)-reaction for production of 191Pt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qaim, S M; Hilgers, K; Sudár, S; Coenen, H H

    2009-06-01

    In search of an alternative production route of the therapeutically and environmentally interesting radionuclide (191)Pt (T(1/2)=2.8 d), excitation function of the (192)Os((3)He,4n)(191)Pt reaction was measured from its threshold up to 36 MeV. Thin samples of enriched (192)Os were prepared by electrodeposition on Ni-foils, and the conventional stacked-foil technique was used for cross-section measurements. The experimental data were compared with the results of theoretical calculations using the codes ALICE-IPPE and TALYS. Good agreement was found with TALYS. The theoretical thick target yield of (191)Pt over the energy range E(3He)=36-->25 MeV amounts to 6.7 MBq/microA h. A comparison of various investigated production methods of (191)Pt is given. The here investigated (192)Os((3)He,4n)-process leads to very high-purity (191)Pt (>99.5%).

  9. Evaluation of PC-ISO for customized, 3D Printed, gynecologic 192-Ir HDR brachytherapy applicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, J Adam M; Mellis, Katherine; Sethi, Rajni; Siauw, Timmy; Sudhyadhom, Atchar; Garg, Animesh; Goldberg, Ken; Hsu, I-Chow; Pouliot, Jean

    2015-01-08

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the radiation attenuation properties of PC-ISO, a commercially available, biocompatible, sterilizable 3D printing material, and its suitability for customized, single-use gynecologic (GYN) brachytherapy applicators that have the potential for accurate guiding of seeds through linear and curved internal channels. A custom radiochromic film dosimetry apparatus was 3D-printed in PC-ISO with a single catheter channel and a slit to hold a film segment. The apparatus was designed specifically to test geometry pertinent for use of this material in a clinical setting. A brachytherapy dose plan was computed to deliver a cylindrical dose distribution to the film. The dose plan used an 192Ir source and was normalized to 1500 cGy at 1 cm from the channel. The material was evaluated by comparing the film exposure to an identical test done in water. The Hounsfield unit (HU) distributions were computed from a CT scan of the apparatus and compared to the HU distribution of water and the HU distribution of a commercial GYN cylinder applicator. The dose depth curve of PC-ISO as measured by the radiochromic film was within 1% of water between 1 cm and 6 cm from the channel. The mean HU was -10 for PC-ISO and -1 for water. As expected, the honeycombed structure of the PC-ISO 3D printing process created a moderate spread of HU values, but the mean was comparable to water. PC-ISO is sufficiently water-equivalent to be compatible with our HDR brachytherapy planning system and clinical workflow and, therefore, it is suitable for creating custom GYN brachytherapy applicators. Our current clinical practice includes the use of custom GYN applicators made of commercially available PC-ISO when doing so can improve the patient's treatment. 

  10. [HDR 192Ir brachytherapy in treatment of basal cell carcinoma of the lower eyelid and inner angle - our experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furdová, A; Lukačko, P; Lederleitner, D

    2013-06-01

    First experience and evaluation of relapses in group of patients after surgery with applied adjuvant HDR brachytherapy for recurrent tumor after incomplete excision of basal cell carcinoma of the lower eyelid and inner angle. Patients with recurrent basal cell carcinoma of the lower eyelid in year 2010. In 3 male patients with recurrent finding of basal cell after surgery we applied adjuvant HDR 192Ir brachytherapy. The isodose curve chosen to prescribe the dose was 5 mm away from the skin surface. In the year 2010 we applied adjuvant HDR 192Ir brachytherapy in 3 male patients with recurrent basal cell carcinoma. The average age was 58 years (52 to 75 years). From group of 41 patients with non melanotic malignant tumors of the eyelids in 3 patients (7.3 %) with relapse after incomplete excision of the basal cell carcinoma of the lower eyelid we applied after removal of stitches after surgery adjuvant HDR 192Ir brachytherapy. For each patient was made individual orfit mask that bore plastic applicators. Tungsten eye shield applicator was applied to protect the eye globe. Treatment of 10 fractions of 4.5 Gy single dose (5 times weekly) were scheduled within 2 weeks. Patients received outpatient treatment. Acute toxicity postradiation erythema of eyelid and skin around relieved by standard symptomatic treatment within a few days after completion of radiation therapy. In 2 year interval after HDR 192Ir brachytherapy we did not record the occurrence of late complications such as corneal ulcers. Our preliminary experience shows excellent early skin tolerance. After 2 years of follow-up at 6 month interval we did not recognize relapse in our group of patients. The proposed technique of HDR 192Ir brachytherapy after surgery should be considered a new clinical treatment in patients with recurrent non melanotic eyelid cancer. Its main advantage lies in the usefulness in all types of basal cell and squamous cell carcinoma and sebaceous carcinoma of the eyelids, without

  11. PON1 L55M and Q192R gene polymorphisms and CAD risks in patients with hyperlipidemia : Clinical study of possible associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H; Ding, S; Zhou, M; Wu, X; Liu, X; Liu, J; Wu, Y; Liu, D

    2017-08-23

    A decreased plasma high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol level is a strong risk factor for coronary artery disease (CAD). Antioxidant activity of HDL mainly lies in the activity of paraoxonase (PON). This study aimed to investigate the relationships between PON1 L55M and Q192R polymorphisms, and the risks of CAD in patients with hyperlipidemia. From January 2014 to January 2016, 244 patients were divided into hyperlipidemia, hyperlipidemia + CAD, and control groups. The hyperlipidemia and hyperlipidemia + CAD groups were designated as the case group. Serum PON1 concentrations were measured using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. After isolating genomic DNA, the PON1 L55M and Q192R genes were amplified by polymerase chain reaction and sequenced. In the case group, the genotypes LM and LL were detected significantly more often than in the control group, as were the alleles R (33.33%, 42.12%) and L (22.78%, 29.11%). The frequency of QR and RR genotypes was significantly higher in the hyperlipidemia + CAD group than in the hyperlipidemia group; the allele R in the hyperlipidemia + CAD group (42.77%) was more frequent than in the hyperlipidemia group (23.78%). The Q192R polymorphism was associated with low serum PON1 concentrations, and the lowest concentration was observed in the 192QR + 192RR genotype (P = 0.03). Logistic regression analysis showed a significant correlation between the 192R allele and smoking (P = 0.03), body mass index (P = 0.02), systolic blood pressure (P = 0.004), total cholesterol (P = 0.03), triglycerides (P = 0.01), HDL (P = 0.004), and low density lipoprotein (P = 0.02). The PON1 alleles 192R and 55L are associated with CAD, and the Q192R polymorphism may be a risk factor for CAD.

  12. 41 CFR 102-192.15 - How are “I”, “you”, “me”, “we”, and “us” used in this part?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION ADMINISTRATIVE PROGRAMS 192-MAIL MANAGEMENT Introduction to this Part § 102-192.15 How are “I”, “you”, “me”, “we... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How are âIâ, âyouâ, âmeâ...

  13. miR-192 suppresses leptomeningeal dissemination of medulloblastoma by modulating cell proliferation and anchoring through the regulation of DHFR, integrins, and CD47.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Seung Yeob; Choi, Seung Ah; Lee, Ji Yeoun; Park, Ae-Kyung; Wang, Kyu-Chang; Phi, Ji Hoon; Koh, Eun Jung; Park, Woong-Yang; Park, Sung-Hye; Hwang, Do Won; Jung, Hee Won; Kim, Seung-Ki

    2015-12-22

    The main cause of death in medulloblastoma is recurrence associated with leptomeningeal dissemination. During this process, the role of microRNAs (miRs) in the acquisition of metastatic phenotype remains poorly understood. This study aimed to identify the miR involved in leptomeningeal dissemination and to elucidate its biological functional mechanisms. We analyzed the miR expression profiles of 29 medulloblastomas according to the presence of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) seeding. Differentially expressed miRs (DEmiRs) were validated in 29 medulloblastoma tissues and three medulloblastoma cell lines. The biological functions of the selected miRs were evaluated using in vitro and in vivo studies. A total of 12 DEmiRs were identified in medulloblastoma with seeding, including miR-192. The reduced expression of miR-192 was confirmed in the tumor seeding group and in the medulloblastoma cells. Overexpression of miR-192 inhibited cellular proliferation by binding DHFR. miR-192 decreased cellular anchoring via the repression of ITGAV, ITGB1, ITGB3, and CD47. Animals in the miR-192-treated group demonstrated a reduction of spinal seeding (P Medulloblastoma with seeding showed specific DEmiRs compared with those without. miR-192 suppresses leptomeningeal dissemination of medulloblastoma by modulating cell proliferation and anchoring ability.

  14. The Spiral Host Galaxy of the Double Radio Source 0313-192

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keel, William C.; White, Raymond E., III; Owen, Frazer N.; Ledlow, Michael J.

    2006-12-01

    We present new Hubble Space Telescope (HST), Gemini South, and Chandra observations of the radio galaxy 0313-192, which hosts a 350 kpc double source and jets, even though previous data have suggested that it is a spiral galaxy. We measure the bulge scale and the luminosity, radial, and vertical profiles of disk starlight and consider the distributions of H II regions and absorbing dust. In each case the HST data confirm its classification as an edge-on spiral galaxy, the only such system known to produce such an extended radio source of this kind. The Gemini near-IR images and Chandra spectral fit reveal a strongly obscured central active galactic nucleus (AGN), seen through the entire interstellar medium path length of the disk and showing X-ray evidence of additional absorption from warm or dense material close to the central object. We consider several possible mechanisms for producing such a rare combination of AGN and host properties, some combination of which may be at work. These include an unusually luminous bulge (suggesting a black hole of mass ~8×108 Msolar), the orientation of the jets near the pole of the gas-rich disk, and some evidence of a weak gravitational interaction that has warped the disk and could have enhanced fueling of the central engine. We detect an X-ray counterpart of the kiloparsec-scale radio jet emerging to the south; jet/counterjet limits on both radio and X-ray regimes allow them to be symmetric if seen more than 15° from the plane of the sky, still consistent with the jet axes being within ~30° of the poles of the gas-rich galaxy disk. A linear or disklike emission-line structure is seen around the nucleus, inclined by ~20° to the stellar disk but nearly perpendicular to the jets; this may represent the aftermath of a galaxy encounter, in which gas is photoionized by a direct view of the nuclear continuum. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute

  15. Inorganic scintillation detectors based on Eu-activated phosphors for 192Ir brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kertzscher, Gustavo; Beddar, Sam

    2017-06-01

    The availability of real-time treatment verification during high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy is currently limited. Therefore, we studied the luminescence properties of the widely commercially available scintillators using the inorganic materials Eu-activated phosphors Y2O3:Eu, YVO4:Eu, Y2O2S:Eu, and Gd2O2S:Eu to determine whether they could be used to accurately and precisely verify HDR brachytherapy doses in real time. The suitability for HDR brachytherapy of inorganic scintillation detectors (ISDs) based on the 4 Eu-activated phosphors in powder form was determined based on experiments with a 192Ir HDR brachytherapy source. The scintillation intensities of the phosphors were 16-134 times greater than that of the commonly used organic plastic scintillator BCF-12. High signal intensities were achieved with an optimized packing density of the phosphor mixture and with a shortened fiber-optic cable. The influence of contaminating Cerenkov and fluorescence light induced in the fiber-optic cable (stem signal) was adequately suppressed by inserting between the fiber-optic cable and the photodetector a 25 nm band-pass filter centered at the emission peak. The spurious photoluminescence signal induced by the stem signal was suppressed by placing a long-pass filter between the scintillation detector volume and the fiber-optic cable. The time-dependent luminescence properties of the phosphors were quantified by measuring the non-constant scintillation during irradiation and the afterglow after the brachytherapy source had retracted. We demonstrated that a mixture of Y2O3:Eu and YVO4:Eu suppressed the time-dependence of the ISDs and that the time-dependence of Y2O2S:Eu and Gd2O2S:Eu introduced large measurement inaccuracies. We conclude that ISDs based on a mixture of Y2O3:Eu and YVO4:Eu are promising candidates for accurate and precise real-time verification technology for HDR BT that is cost effective and straightforward to manufacture. Widespread dissemination of this

  16. Interstitial brachytherapy with 192-IR in treatment of recurrent malignant primary brain tumors. Braquiterapia intersticial con iridio-192 en el tratamiento de recidivas de tumores cerebrales tras cirugia y radioterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardenes, R.; Martinez, R.; Victoria, C.; Nuez, L.; Clavo, B.; Sancedo, G. (Clinica Puerta de Hierro. Madrid (Spain))

    1994-01-01

    Seven patients with recurrent malignant primary brain tumors after surgery and radiation therapy were treated at the Clinica Puerta de Hierro (Madrid) by interstitial brachytherapy with 192-Ir sources. Implantations were performed using computerized tomography and dose prescription were determined following the Paris system rules for interstitial implants. The means dose deliberated was 50 to 65 Gy to the reference isodoses. At the last follow-up all patients except for one are alive and without evidence of progression of the disease. (Author) 35 refs.

  17. Determination of factors through Monte Carlo method for Fricke dosimetry from {sup 192}Ir sources for brachytherapy; Determinacao por Monte Carlo de fatores para dosimetria Fricke de fontes de {sup 192}Ir para braquiterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David, Mariano Gazineu; Salata, Camila; Almeida, Carlos Eduardo, E-mail: marianogd08@gmail.com [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ/LCR), Rio de Janeiro (Brazil). Lab. de Ciencias Radiologicas

    2014-07-01

    The Laboratorio de Ciencias Radiologicas develops a methodology for the determination of the absorbed dose to water by Fricke chemical dosimetry method for brachytherapy sources of {sup 192}Ir high dose rate and have compared their results with the laboratory of the National Research Council Canada. This paper describes the determination of the correction factors by Monte Carlo method, with the Penelope code. Values for all factors are presented, with a maximum difference of 0.22% for their determination by an alternative way. (author)

  18. Search for Excited Leptons in $e^+ e^-$ Interactions at $\\sqrt{s}$=192 - 202 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M.; Adriani, O.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Alcaraz, J.; Alemanni, G.; Allaby, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alviggi, M.G.; Ambrosi, G.; Anderhub, H.; Andreev, Valery P.; Angelescu, T.; Anselmo, F.; Arefev, A.; Azemoon, T.; Aziz, T.; Bagnaia, P.; Bajo, A.; Baksay, L.; Balandras, A.; Baldew, S.V.; Banerjee, S.; Banerjee, Sw.; Barczyk, A.; Barillere, R.; Bartalini, P.; Basile, M.; Batalova, N.; Battiston, R.; Bay, A.; Becattini, F.; Becker, U.; Behner, F.; Bellucci, L.; Berbeco, R.; Berdugo, J.; Berges, P.; Bertucci, B.; Betev, B.L.; Bhattacharya, S.; Biasini, M.; Biland, A.; Blaising, J.J.; Blyth, S.C.; Bobbink, G.J.; Bohm, A.; Boldizsar, L.; Borgia, B.; Bourilkov, D.; Bourquin, M.; Braccini, S.; Branson, J.G.; Brochu, F.; Buffini, A.; Buijs, A.; Burger, J.D.; Burger, W.J.; Cai, X.D.; Capell, M.; Cara Romeo, G.; Carlino, G.; Cartacci, A.M.; Casaus, J.; Castellini, G.; Cavallari, F.; Cavallo, N.; Cecchi, C.; Cerrada, M.; Cesaroni, F.; Chamizo, M.; Chang, Y.H.; Chaturvedi, U.K.; Chemarin, M.; Chen, A.; Chen, G.; Chen, G.M.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, H.S.; Chiefari, G.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Civinini, C.; Clare, I.; Clare, R.; Coignet, G.; Colino, N.; Costantini, S.; Cotorobai, F.; de la Cruz, B.; Csilling, A.; Cucciarelli, S.; Dai, T.S.; van Dalen, J.A.; D'Alessandro, R.; de Asmundis, R.; Deglon, P.; Degre, A.; Deiters, K.; della Volpe, D.; Delmeire, E.; Denes, P.; DeNotaristefani, F.; De Salvo, A.; Diemoz, M.; Dierckxsens, M.; van Dierendonck, D.; Dionisi, C.; Dittmar, M.; Dominguez, A.; Doria, A.; Dova, M.T.; Duchesneau, D.; Dufournaud, D.; Duinker, P.; Duran, I.; El Mamouni, H.; Engler, A.; Eppling, F.J.; Erne, F.C.; Ewers, A.; Extermann, P.; Fabre, M.; Falagan, M.A.; Falciano, S.; Favara, A.; Fay, J.; Fedin, O.; Felcini, M.; Ferguson, T.; Fesefeldt, H.; Fiandrini, E.; Field, J.H.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, P.H.; Fisk, I.; Forconi, G.; Freudenreich, K.; Furetta, C.; Galaktionov, Iouri; Ganguli, S.N.; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gataullin, M.; Gau, S.S.; Gentile, S.; Gheordanescu, N.; Giagu, S.; Gong, Z.F.; Grenier, Gerald Jean; Grimm, O.; Gruenewald, M.W.; Guida, M.; van Gulik, R.; Gupta, V.K.; Gurtu, A.; Gutay, L.J.; Haas, D.; Hasan, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hebbeker, T.; Herve, Alain; Hidas, P.; Hirschfelder, J.; Hofer, H.; Holzner, G.; Hoorani, H.; Hou, S.R.; Hu, Y.; Iashvili, I.; Jin, B.N.; Jones, Lawrence W.; de Jong, P.; Josa-Mutuberria, I.; Khan, R.A.; Kafer, D.; Kaur, M.; Kienzle-Focacci, M.N.; Kim, D.; Kim, J.K.; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D.; Kittel, W.; Klimentov, A.; Konig, A.C.; Kopal, M.; Kopp, A.; Koutsenko, V.; Kraber, M.; Kraemer, R.W.; Krenz, W.; Kruger, A.; Kunin, A.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Laktineh, I.; Landi, G.; Lebeau, M.; Lebedev, A.; Lebrun, P.; Lecomte, P.; Lecoq, P.; Le Coultre, P.; Lee, H.J.; Le Goff, J.M.; Leiste, R.; Levtchenko, P.; Li, C.; Likhoded, S.; Lin, C.H.; Lin, W.T.; Linde, F.L.; Lista, L.; Liu, Z.A.; Lohmann, W.; Longo, E.; Lu, Y.S.; Lubelsmeyer, K.; Luci, C.; Luckey, David; Lugnier, L.; Luminari, L.; Lustermann, W.; Ma, W.G.; Maity, M.; Malgeri, L.; Malinin, A.; Mana, C.; Mangeol, D.; Mans, J.; Marian, G.; Martin, J.P.; Marzano, F.; Mazumdar, K.; McNeil, R.R.; Mele, S.; Merola, L.; Meschini, M.; Metzger, W.J.; von der Mey, M.; Mihul, A.; Milcent, H.; Mirabelli, G.; Mnich, J.; Mohanty, G.B.; Moulik, T.; Muanza, G.S.; Muijs, A.J.M.; Musicar, B.; Musy, M.; Napolitano, M.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Newman, H.; Niessen, T.; Nisati, A.; Kluge, Hannelies; Ofierzynski, R.; Organtini, G.; Oulianov, A.; Palomares, C.; Pandoulas, D.; Paoletti, S.; Paolucci, P.; Paramatti, R.; Park, H.K.; Park, I.H.; Passaleva, G.; Patricelli, S.; Paul, Thomas Cantzon; Pauluzzi, M.; Paus, C.; Pauss, F.; Pedace, M.; Pensotti, S.; Perret-Gallix, D.; Petersen, B.; Piccolo, D.; Pierella, F.; Pieri, M.; Piroue, P.A.; Pistolesi, E.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Pojidaev, V.; Postema, H.; Pothier, J.; Prokofev, D.O.; Prokofiev, D.; Quartieri, J.; Rahal-Callot, G.; Rahaman, M.A.; Raics, P.; Raja, N.; Ramelli, R.; Rancoita, P.G.; Ranieri, R.; Raspereza, A.; Raven, G.; Razis, P.; Ren, D.; Rescigno, M.; Reucroft, S.; Riemann, S.; Riles, Keith; Rodin, J.; Roe, B.P.; Romero, L.; Rosca, A.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Roth, Stefan; Rosenbleck, C.; Rubio, J.A.; Ruggiero, G.; Rykaczewski, H.; Saremi, S.; Sarkar, S.; Salicio, J.; Sanchez, E.; Sanders, M.P.; Schafer, C.; Schegelsky, V.; Schmidt-Kaerst, S.; Schmitz, D.; Schopper, H.; Schotanus, D.J.; Schwering, G.; Sciacca, C.; Seganti, A.; Servoli, L.; Shevchenko, S.; Shivarov, N.; Shoutko, V.; Shumilov, E.; Shvorob, A.; Siedenburg, T.; Son, D.; Smith, B.; Spillantini, P.; Steuer, M.; Stickland, D.P.; Stone, A.; Stoyanov, B.; Straessner, A.; Sudhakar, K.; Sultanov, G.; Sun, L.Z.; Sushkov, S.; Suter, H.; Swain, J.D.; Szillasi, Z.; Sztaricskai, T.; Tang, X.W.; Tauscher, L.; Taylor, L.; Tellili, B.; Timmermans, Charles; Ting, Samuel C.C.; Ting, S.M.; Tonwar, S.C.; Toth, J.; Tully, C.; Tung, K.L.; Uchida, Y.; Ulbricht, J.; Valente, E.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vetlitsky, I.; Vicinanza, D.; Viertel, G.; Villa, S.; Vivargent, M.; Vlachos, S.; Vodopianov, I.; Vogel, H.; Vogt, H.; Vorobev, I.; Vorobyov, A.A.; Vorvolakos, A.; Wadhwa, M.; Wallraff, W.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.L.; Wang, Z.M.; Weber, A.; Weber, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wilkens, H.; Wu, S.X.; Wynhoff, S.; Xia, L.; Xu, Z.Z.; Yamamoto, J.; Yang, B.Z.; Yang, C.G.; Yang, H.J.; Yang, M.; Ye, J.B.; Yeh, S.C.; Zalite, An.; Zalite, Yu.; Zhang, Z.P.; Zhu, G.Y.; Zhu, R.Y.; Zichichi, A.; Zilizi, G.; Zimmermann, B.; Zoller, M.

    2001-01-01

    Excited leptons are searched for using the L3 detector at LEP. The data collected at centre-of-mass energies in the range from 192 up to 202 GeV correspond to a total luminosity of 233 $\\rm pb^{-1}$. No evidence of either pair production of excited leptons, nor of single production is found. From the searches for pair produced excited leptons, lower mass limits close to the kinematic limit are set. From the searches for singly produced excited leptons, upper limits on their couplings are derived in the mass range up to 200 GeV.

  19. Study of Z Boson Pair Production in $e^+ e^-$ Interactions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 192-202 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M.; Adriani, O.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Alcaraz, J.; Alemanni, G.; Allaby, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alviggi, M.G.; Ambrosi, G.; Anderhub, H.; Andreev, Valery P.; Angelescu, T.; Anselmo, F.; Arefev, A.; Azemoon, T.; Aziz, T.; Bagnaia, P.; Bajo, A.; Baksay, L.; Balandras, A.; Baldew, S.V.; Banerjee, S.; Barczyk, A.; Barillere, R.; Bartalini, P.; Basile, M.; Battiston, R.; Bay, A.; Becattini, F.; Becker, U.; Behner, F.; Bellucci, L.; Berbeco, R.; Berdugo, J.; Berges, P.; Bertucci, B.; Betev, B.L.; Bhattacharya, S.; Biasini, M.; Biland, A.; Blaising, J.J.; Blyth, S.C.; Bobbink, G.J.; Bohm, A.; Boldizsar, L.; Borgia, B.; Bourilkov, D.; Bourquin, M.; Braccini, S.; Branson, J.G.; Brochu, F.; Buffini, A.; Buijs, A.; Burger, J.D.; Burger, W.J.; Cai, X.D.; Capell, M.; Cara Romeo, G.; Carlino, G.; Cartacci, A.M.; Casaus, J.; Castellini, G.; Cavallari, F.; Cavallo, N.; Cecchi, C.; Cerrada, M.; Cesaroni, F.; Chamizo, M.; Chang, Y.H.; Chaturvedi, U.K.; Chemarin, M.; Chen, A.; Chen, G.; Chen, G.M.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, H.S.; Chiefari, G.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Civinini, C.; Clare, I.; Clare, R.; Coignet, G.; Colino, N.; Conventi, F.; Costantini, S.; Cotorobai, F.; de la Cruz, B.; Csilling, A.; Cucciarelli, S.; Dai, T.S.; van Dalen, J.A.; D'Alessandro, R.; de Asmundis, R.; Deglon, P.; Degre, A.; Deiters, K.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmeire, E.; Denes, P.; DeNotaristefani, F.; De Salvo, A.; Diemoz, M.; Dierckxsens, M.; van Dierendonck, D.; Dionisi, C.; Dittmar, M.; Dominguez, A.; Doria, A.; Dova, M.T.; Duchesneau, D.; Dufournaud, D.; Duinker, P.; Duran, I.; El Mamouni, H.; Engler, A.; Eppling, F.J.; Erne, F.C.; Extermann, P.; Fabre, M.; Falagan, M.A.; Falciano, S.; Favara, A.; Fay, J.; Fedin, O.; Felcini, M.; Ferguson, T.; Fesefeldt, H.; Fiandrini, E.; Field, J.H.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, P.H.; Fisk, I.; Forconi, G.; Freudenreich, K.; Furetta, C.; Galaktionov, Iouri; Ganguli, S.N.; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gataullin, M.; Gau, S.S.; Gentile, S.; Gheordanescu, N.; Giagu, S.; Gong, Z.F.; Grenier, Gerald Jean; Grimm, O.; Gruenewald, M.W.; Guida, M.; van Gulik, R.; Gupta, V.K.; Gurtu, A.; Gutay, L.J.; Haas, D.; Hasan, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hebbeker, T.; Herve, Alain; Hidas, P.; Hirschfelder, J.; Hofer, H.; Holzner, G.; Hoorani, H.; Hou, S.R.; Hu, Y.; Iashvili, I.; Jin, B.N.; Jones, Lawrence W.; de Jong, P.; Josa-Mutuberria, I.; Khan, R.A.; Kaur, M.; Kienzle-Focacci, M.N.; Kim, D.; Kim, J.K.; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D.; Kittel, W.; Klimentov, A.; Konig, A.C.; Kopal, M.; Kopp, A.; Koutsenko, V.; Kraber, M.; Kraemer, R.W.; Krenz, W.; Kruger, A.; Kunin, A.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Laktineh, I.; Landi, G.; Lebeau, M.; Lebedev, A.; Lebrun, P.; Lecomte, P.; Lecoq, P.; Le Coultre, P.; Lee, H.J.; Le Goff, J.M.; Leiste, R.; Levtchenko, P.; Li, C.; Likhoded, S.; Lin, C.H.; Lin, W.T.; Linde, F.L.; Lista, L.; Liu, Z.A.; Lohmann, W.; Longo, E.; Lu, Y.S.; Lubelsmeyer, K.; Luci, C.; Luckey, David; Lugnier, L.; Luminari, L.; Lustermann, W.; Ma, W.G.; Maity, M.; Malgeri, L.; Malinin, A.; Mana, C.; Mangeol, D.; Mans, J.; Marian, G.; Martin, J.P.; Marzano, F.; Mazumdar, K.; McNeil, R.R.; Mele, S.; Merola, L.; Meschini, M.; Metzger, W.J.; von der Mey, M.; Mihul, A.; Milcent, H.; Mirabelli, G.; Mnich, J.; Mohanty, G.B.; Moulik, T.; Muanza, G.S.; Muijs, A.J.M.; Musicar, B.; Musy, M.; Napolitano, M.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Newman, H.; Niessen, T.; Nisati, A.; Kluge, Hannelies; Ofierzynski, R.; Organtini, G.; Oulianov, A.; Palomares, C.; Pandoulas, D.; Paoletti, S.; Paolucci, P.; Paramatti, R.; Park, H.K.; Park, I.H.; Passaleva, G.; Patricelli, S.; Paul, Thomas Cantzon; Pauluzzi, M.; Paus, C.; Pauss, F.; Pedace, M.; Pensotti, S.; Perret-Gallix, D.; Petersen, B.; Piccolo, D.; Pierella, F.; Pieri, M.; Piroue, P.A.; Pistolesi, E.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Pojidaev, V.; Postema, H.; Pothier, J.; Prokofev, D.O.; Prokofev, D.; Quartieri, J.; Rahal-Callot, G.; Rahaman, M.A.; Raics, P.; Raja, N.; Ramelli, R.; Rancoita, P.G.; Ranieri, R.; Raspereza, A.; Raven, G.; Razis, P.; Ren, D.; Rescigno, M.; Reucroft, S.; Riemann, S.; Riles, Keith; Rodin, J.; Roe, B.P.; Romero, L.; Rosca, A.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rubio, J.A.; Ruggiero, G.; Rykaczewski, H.; Saremi, S.; Sarkar, S.; Salicio, J.; Sanchez, E.; Sanders, M.P.; Sarakinos, M.E.; Schafer, C.; Schegelsky, V.; Schmidt-Kaerst, S.; Schmitz, D.; Schopper, H.; Schotanus, D.J.; Schwering, G.; Sciacca, C.; Seganti, A.; Servoli, L.; Shevchenko, S.; Shivarov, N.; Shoutko, V.; Shumilov, E.; Shvorob, A.; Siedenburg, T.; Son, D.; Smith, B.; Spillantini, P.; Steuer, M.; Stickland, D.P.; Stone, A.; Stoyanov, B.; Straessner, A.; Sudhakar, K.; Sultanov, G.; Sun, L.Z.; Suter, H.; Swain, J.D.; Szillasi, Z.; Sztaricskai, T.; Tang, X.W.; Tauscher, L.; Taylor, L.; Tellili, B.; Timmermans, Charles; Ting, Samuel C.C.; Ting, S.M.; Tonwar, S.C.; Toth, J.; Tully, C.; Tung, K.L.; Uchida, Y.; Ulbricht, J.; Valente, E.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vetlitsky, I.; Vicinanza, D.; Viertel, G.; Villa, S.; Vivargent, M.; Vlachos, S.; Vodopianov, I.; Vogel, H.; Vogt, H.; Vorobev, I.; Vorobov, A.A.; Vorvolakos, A.; Wadhwa, M.; Wallraff, W.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.L.; Wang, Z.M.; Weber, A.; Weber, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wilkens, H.; Wu, S.X.; Wynhoff, S.; Xia, L.; Xu, Z.Z.; Yamamoto, J.; Yang, B.Z.; Yang, C.G.; Yang, H.J.; Yang, M.; Ye, J.B.; Yeh, S.C.; Zalite, A.; Zalite, Yu.; Zhang, Z.P.; Zhu, G.Y.; Zhu, R.Y.; Zichichi, A.; Zilizi, G.; Zimmermann, B.; Zoller, M.

    2001-01-01

    The cross section for the production of Z boson pairs is measured using the data collected by the L3 detector at LEP in 1999 in $\\rm e^+e^-$ collisions at centre--of--mass energies ranging from 192 GeV up to 202 GeV. Events in all the visible final states are selected, measuring the cross section of this process. The special case of final states containing b quarks is also investigated. All results are in agreement with the Standard Model predictions.

  20. Orthopedic infections in equine long bone fractures and arthrodeses treated by internal fixation: 192 cases (1990-2006).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahern, Benjamin J; Richardson, Dean W; Boston, Raymond C; Schaer, Thomas P

    2010-07-01

    To determine the rate of postoperative infection (POI) for internal fixation repaired equine long bone fractures and arthrodeses and identify associated risk factors. Case series. Horses (n=192) with fracture repair of the third metacarpal and metatarsal bones, radius, ulna, humerus, tibia, and femur, or arthrodesis with internal fixation. Medical records (1990-2006) were reviewed for signalment, anatomic location, fracture classification and method of repair, technique and surgical duration, bacterial species isolated, postoperative care, onset of POI, and outcome. Of 192 horses (171 [89%] closed, 21 [11%] open fractures), 157 (82%) were discharged from the hospital. Infection occurred in 53 (28% horses), of which 31 (59%) were discharged. Repairs without POI were 7.25 times more likely to be discharged from the hospital. Closed fractures were 4.23 times more likely to remain uninfected and 4.59 times more likely to be discharged from the hospital compared with open fractures. Closed reduction and internal fixation was associated with a 2.5-fold reduction in rate of POI and a 5.9 times greater chance for discharge from the hospital compared with open reduction and internal fixation. Females had a strong trend for increased POI when compared with colts and stallion but not geldings. Overall rate of POI was 28%. Fracture classification, method of repair, gender, and surgical duration were significant risk factors.

  1. Interstitial radiation therapy for carcinoma of the penis using iridium 192 wires: the Henri Mondor experience (1970-1979)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazeron, J.J.; Langlois, D.; Lobo, P.A.; Huart, J.A.; Calitchi, E.; Lusinchi, A.; Raynal, M.; Le Bourgeois, J.P.; Abbou, C.C.; Pierquin, B.

    1984-10-01

    From 1970 to 1979, a group of 50 patients was treated for squamous cell carcinoma of the penis by interstitial irradiation using an afterloading technique and iridium 192 wires. The group included 9 patients with T1 tumors, 27 with T2 tumors, and 14 with T3 tumors. Forty-five patients presented with no metastatic inguinal nodes (NO), 3 patients with N1 nodes, and 2 patients had N3 nodes. After treatment, 11 patients (1 T1, 6 T2 and 4 T3) developed local recurrences. Three patients developed post-therapeutic necrosis which necessitated partial amputation in 2 cases. Eight patients developed post-therapeutic urethral stenosis, which required surgical treatment in three of the cases. Twenty-one percent of the patients died of their disease. The authors advocate interstitial irradiation using iridium 192 wires for the treatment of non-infiltrating or moderately infiltrating squamous cell carcinoma of the penis in which the largest dimension does no exceed 4 cm. When regular follow-up can be assurred, it is reasonable to forgo prophylactic treatment of the inguinal nodes in patients presenting without groin metastasis.

  2. The relationship of PON1 QR 192 and LM 55 polymorphisms with serum paraoxonase activities of Turkish diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altuner, Durdu; Ates, Ilker; Suzen, Sinan H; Koc, Gonul Varan; Aral, Yalcin; Karakaya, Asuman

    2011-11-01

    Paraoxonase (PON1) is a serum esterase responsible for the protection against xenobiotics toxicity such as paraoxon. Alterations in PON1 concentrations have been reported in a variety of diseases including diabetes mellitus (DM). It has been shown that the serum PON1 concentration and activity are decreased in patients with both type 1 and type 2 DM. This study aimed to investigate the lipid profiles and the relationship between PON1 activity and PON1, QR192 and LM55 polymorphisms in Turkish type 2 diabetic patients and non-diabetic control subjects. According to our results, RR variant had significantly higher PON activity than QQ and QR variants (p < 0.01) and LL variant had significantly higher PON activity than MM variant in both control and patient groups (p < 0.05). In conclusion, we found that PON1 192RR and 55LL genotypes are associated with higher PON activity than QQ and MM genotypes. This may be more protective to lipid peroxidation.

  3. Investigation of Dosimetric Parameters of $^{192}$Ir MicroSelectron v2 HDR Brachytherapy Source Using EGSnrc Monte Carlo Code

    CERN Document Server

    Naeem, Hamza; Zheng, Huaqing; Cao, Ruifen; Pei, Xi; Hu, Liqin; Wu, Yican

    2016-01-01

    The $^{192}$Ir sources are widely used for high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatments. The aim of this study is to simulate $^{192}$Ir MicroSelectron v2 HDR brachytherapy source and calculate the air kerma strength, dose rate constant, radial dose function and anisotropy function established in the updated AAPM Task Group 43 protocol. The EGSnrc Monte Carlo (MC) code package is used to calculate these dosimetric parameters, including dose contribution from secondary electron source and also contribution of bremsstrahlung photons to air kerma strength. The Air kerma strength, dose rate constant and radial dose function while anisotropy functions for the distance greater than 0.5 cm away from the source center are in good agreement with previous published studies. Obtained value from MC simulation for air kerma strength is $9.762\\times 10^{-8} \\textrm{UBq}^{-1}$and dose rate constant is $1.108\\pm 0.13\\%\\textrm{cGyh}^{-1} \\textrm{U}^{-1}$.

  4. Comparison of treatment planning on dosimetric differences between 192Ir sources for high-dose rate brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Oh Nam [Dept. of Radiology, Mokpo Science University, Mokpo (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Seong Soo; Ahn, Woo Sang; KIm, Dae Yong; Choi, Won Sik [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Gangenung Asan Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Gangenung (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Kyung Tae [Dept. of Radiologic Technology, Dongam Health University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Cheong Hwan [Dept. of Radiological Science, Hanseo University, Seosan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Ho [Dept. of Radiological Science, Seonam University, Namwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    To evaluate whether the difference in geometrical characteristics between high-dose-rate (HDR) 192Ir sources would influence the dose distributions of intracavitary brachytherapy. Two types of microSelectron HDR 192Ir sources (classic and new models) were selected in this study. Two-dimensional (2D) treatment plans for classic and new sources were generated by using PLATO treatment planning system. We compared the point A, point B, and bladder and rectum reference points based on ICRU 38 recommendation. The radial dose function of the new source agrees with that of the classic source except difference of up to 2.6% at the nearest radial distance. The differences of anisotropy functions agree within 2% for r=1, 3, and 5 cm and 20°<θ<165°. The largest discrepancies of anisotropy functions reached up to 27% for θ<20° at r=0.25 cm and were up to 13%, 10%, and 7% at r=1, 3, and 5 cm for θ>170°, respectively. There were no significant differences in doses of point A, point B, and bladder point for the treatment plans between the new and classic sources. For the ICRU rectum point, the percent dose difference was on average 0.65% and up to 1.0%. The dose discrepancies between two treatment plans are mainly affected due to the geometrical difference of the source and the sealed capsule.

  5. Prevalence and significance of CYP2C19*2 and CYP2C19*17 alleles in a New Zealand acute coronary syndrome population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, P D; Johnston, L R; Holley, A; La Flamme, A C; Smyth, L; Chua, E W; Kennedy, M A; Harding, S A

    2015-05-01

    High on-treatment platelet reactivity has been associated with poor outcomes following acute coronary syndromes (ACS). Both the loss of function CYP2C19*2 allele and the gain of function CYP2C19*17 allele along with a range of clinical characteristics have been associated with variation in the response to clopidogrel. The study aims to examine the frequency of CYP2C19 variants and understand the factors associated with on-treatment platelet reactivity in a New Zealand ACS population. We prospectively enrolled 312 ACS patients. We collected clinical characteristics and measured on-treatment platelet reactivity using two validated point-of-care assays, VerifyNow and Multiplate. DNA was extracted and CYP2C19*2 and *17 alleles were identified using real-time polymerase chain reaction. CYP2C19*2 or CYP2C19*17 alleles were observed in 101 (32%) and 106 (34%) of patients, respectively, with significant differences in distribution by ethnicity. In Maori and Pacific Island patients, 47% (confidence interval (CI) 31-63%) had CYP2C19*2 and 11% (CI 4-19%) CYP2C19*17 compared with 26% (CI 19-32%) and 41% (CI 32-49%) in white people. Carriage of CYP2C19*2 alleles was associated with higher levels of platelet reactivity measured by either assay, but we observed no relationship between platelet reactivity and CYP2C19*17. In multivariate analysis diabetes, clopidogrel dose and CYP2C19*2 status were all significant independent predictors of platelet reactivity. Both CYP2C19*2 and *17 were common in a New Zealand ACS population, with CYP2C19*2 observed in almost half the Maori and Pacific Island patients. CYP2C19*2, diabetes and clopidogrel dose were independent contributors to on-treatment platelet reactivity. © 2015 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  6. Induction of differentiation and apoptosis in leukaemic cell lines by the novel benzamide family histone deacetylase 2 and 3 inhibitor MI-192.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boissinot, Marjorie; Inman, Martyn; Hempshall, Aiden; James, Sally R; Gill, Jason H; Selby, Peter; Bowen, David T; Grigg, Ronald; Cockerill, Peter N

    2012-10-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) are in advanced clinical development as cancer therapeutic agents. However, first generation HDACIs such as butyrate and valproate are simple short chain aliphatic compounds with moieties resembling acetyl groups, and have a broad spectrum of activity against HDACs. More complex second generation HDACIs undergoing clinical trials, such as the benzamide group compounds MS-275 and MGCD0103, are specific primarily for HDAC1 and HDAC2. To expand the repertoire of available HDACIs and HDAC specificities we created a novel benzamide-based compound named MI-192. When tested against purified recombinant HDACs, MI-192 had marked selectivity for the class I enzymes, HDAC2 and HDAC3. Screening in the NCI60 screen demonstrated that MI-192 had greatly enhanced efficacy against cells of leukaemic origin. When tested in culture against the acute myeloid leukaemic cell lines U937, HL60 and Kasumi-1, MI-192 induced differentiation and was cytotoxic through promotion of apoptosis. MI-192 therefore justifies further investigation and development as a potential therapeutic agent for use in leukaemia. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Proposal of a postal system for Ir-192 sources calibration used in high dose rate brachytherapy with LiF:Mn:Ti thermoluminescent dosemeters; Proposta de um sistema postal para a calibracao de fontes de {sup 192} Ir, utilizadas em braquiterapia de alta taxa de dose, com dosimetros termoluminescentes de LiF: Mn: Ti

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, W.S.; Borges, J.C.; Almeida, C.E.V. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria. CNEN Caixa Postal 37750, 22780-160, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    1998-12-31

    A proposal in order to improve the brachytherapy quality control and to allow postal intercomparison of Ir-192 sources used in high dose rate brachytherapy has been presented. The LiF: Mn: Ti (TLD 100) detector has been selected for such purpose. The experimental array and the TLDs irradiation and calibration techniques, at the treatment units, have been specified in the light of more recent methodology of Ir-192 calibration sources. (Author)

  8. Applicability of a prototype for determination of absorbed dose using brachytherapy equipment with Ir-192 sources; Aplicabilidade de um prototipo para determinacao da dose absorvida utilizando equipamentos de braquiterapia com fontes de IR-192

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Vivianne Lucia Bormann; Almeida, Mayara Gabriella Oliveira de; Vieira, Rafaela Etelvina de Amorim; Silva, Waldecy Ananias da; Nascimento, Rizia Keila, E-mail: vlsouza@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: mayaradqf@hotmail.com, E-mail: rodriguesss@hootmail.com, E-mail: waldecy@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: riziakeila@hotmail.com [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    This work aims at the development and improvement of a device to perform the absolute dosimetry sources of Ir-192 using the Fricke solution contained in a flask. The Fricke solution used was prepared using amounts of ferrous ammonium sulfate, sodium chloride and sulfuric acid, diluted with water tri distilled pre-established in the literature. The spectrophotometer used was a UV-VIS spectrophotometer (Beckman DU-640 Counter) for measuring the optical density at wavelength 304 nm. The calculation for determining the radial dose takes into account the radial distance and the angle formed with the transverse axis of the source. As the results obtained can be seen that the states of Pernambuco, Ceara, Paraiba e Piaui are in accordance with the recommendations of international standards of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), which considers not acceptable a difference greater than 5% of prescribed dose and measured dose.

  9. Synthesis and redox properties of triarylmethane dye cation salts of anions [M6O19]2- (M = Mo, W).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Si-Xuan; Xie, Jingli; Gilbert-Wilson, Ryan; Birkett, Stephen L; Bond, Alan M; Wedd, Anthony G

    2011-01-14

    Four salts have been isolated combining the triarylmethane dye cations pararosaniline (PR(+)) and crystal violet (CV(+)) with the hexametalates [M(6)O(19)](2-) (M = Mo, W). A new hexatungstic acid H(2)[W(6)O(19)]·4dma (dma = dimethylacetamide) was isolated and is a useful synthon for hexatungstate salts. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction confirmed the presence of PR(+) and [Mo(6)O(19)](2-) ions in [PR](2)[Mo(6)O(19)]·6dmf (dmf = dimethylformamide). A number of charge-assisted hydrogen bonds N-H···O exist between the cation -NH(2) functions and the anion oxygen atoms. Comparative cyclic voltammetry of salts [A]Cl (A = PR, CV), [Bu(4)N](2)[M(6)O(19)](2-) and A(2)[M(6)O(19)] was established in MeCN and Me(2)SO solutions and of solids in contact with the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide [emim][tfsa]. In the molecular solvents, the reversible potential for the process [Mo(6)O(19)](2-/3-) is less negative than the first reduction processes of the dye cations. In contrast, that for [W(6)O(19)](2-/3-) is more negative. Spectro-electrochemistry and bulk electrolysis experiments reveal significantly different pathways in the two cases. In contrast, in the [emim][tfsa] medium, a positive shift in reduction potential of at least 400 mV is seen for the anion processes but relatively little change for the dye cation processes. This means that initial reduction of the anions always precedes that of the dyes, providing significant simplification of the complex voltammetric data. Chemically modified electrodes can be used in the ionic liquid because of slow dissolution kinetics. However, reduced anion salts dissolve rapidly, allowing dissolved phase electrochemistry to be examined. The electrochemistries of the oxidized salts A(2)[M(6)O(19)] are essentially those of the individual ions, although low level interaction of A(+) with reduced anions [M(6)O(19)](3-,4-) is evident. The work establishes protocols for synthesis and handling of

  10. Unexpected Modulation of Recall B and T Cell Responses after Immunization with Rotavirus-like Particles in the Presence of LT-R192G

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christelle Basset

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available LT-R192G, a mutant of the thermolabile enterotoxin of E. coli, is a potent adjuvant of immunization. Immune responses are generally analyzed at the end of protocols including at least 2 administrations, but rarely after a prime. To investigate this point, we compared B and T cell responses in mice after one and two intrarectal immunizations with 2/6 rotavirus-like particles (2/6-VLP and LT-R192G. After a boost, we found, an unexpected lower B cell expansion measured by flow cytometry, despite a secondary antibody response. We then analyzed CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs and CD4+CD25+Foxp3− helper T cells after in vitro (restimulation of mesenteric lymph node cells with the antigen (2/6-VLP, the adjuvant (LT-R192G or both. 2/6-VLP did not activate CD4+CD25+Foxp3− nor Foxp3+ T cells from non-immunized and 2/6-VLP immunized mice, whereas they did activate both subsets from mice immunized with 2/6-VLP in the presence of adjuvant. LT-R192G dramatically decreased CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T cells from non-immunized and 2/6-VLP immunized mice but not from mice immunized with 2/6-VLP and adjuvant. Moreover, in this case, LT-R192G increased Foxp3 expression on CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ cells, suggesting specific Treg activation during the recall. Finally, when both 2/6-VLP and LT-R192G were used for restimulation, LT-R192G clearly suppressed both 2/6-VLP-specific CD4+CD25+Foxp3− and Foxp3+ T cells. All together, these results suggest that LT-R192G exerts different effects on CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T cells, depending on a first or a second contact. The unexpected immunomodulation observed during the recall should be considered in designing vaccination protocols.

  11. Unexpected Modulation of Recall B and T Cell Responses after Immunization with Rotavirus-like Particles in the Presence of LT-R192G

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiam, Fatou; Martino, Cyrille Di; Bon, Fabienne; Charpilienne, Annie; Cachia, Claire; Poncet, Didier; Clements, John D.; Basset, Christelle; Kohli, Evelyne

    2010-01-01

    LT-R192G, a mutant of the thermolabile enterotoxin of E. coli, is a potent adjuvant of immunization. Immune responses are generally analyzed at the end of protocols including at least 2 administrations, but rarely after a prime. To investigate this point, we compared B and T cell responses in mice after one and two intrarectal immunizations with 2/6 rotavirus-like particles (2/6-VLP) and LT-R192G. After a boost, we found, an unexpected lower B cell expansion measured by flow cytometry, despite a secondary antibody response. We then analyzed CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) and CD4+CD25+Foxp3− helper T cells after in vitro (re)stimulation of mesenteric lymph node cells with the antigen (2/6-VLP), the adjuvant (LT-R192G) or both. 2/6-VLP did not activate CD4+CD25+Foxp3− nor Foxp3+ T cells from non-immunized and 2/6-VLP immunized mice, whereas they did activate both subsets from mice immunized with 2/6-VLP in the presence of adjuvant. LT-R192G dramatically decreased CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T cells from non-immunized and 2/6-VLP immunized mice but not from mice immunized with 2/6-VLP and adjuvant. Moreover, in this case, LT-R192G increased Foxp3 expression on CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ cells, suggesting specific Treg activation during the recall. Finally, when both 2/6-VLP and LT-R192G were used for restimulation, LT-R192G clearly suppressed both 2/6-VLP-specific CD4+CD25+Foxp3− and Foxp3+ T cells. All together, these results suggest that LT-R192G exerts different effects on CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T cells, depending on a first or a second contact. The unexpected immunomodulation observed during the recall should be considered in designing vaccination protocols. PMID:22069670

  12. Unexpected modulation of recall B and T cell responses after immunization with rotavirus-like particles in the presence of LT-R192G.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiam, Fatou; Martino, Cyrille Di; Bon, Fabienne; Charpilienne, Annie; Cachia, Claire; Poncet, Didier; Clements, John D; Basset, Christelle; Kohli, Evelyne

    2010-08-01

    LT-R192G, a mutant of the thermolabile enterotoxin of E. coli, is a potent adjuvant of immunization. Immune responses are generally analyzed at the end of protocols including at least 2 administrations, but rarely after a prime. To investigate this point, we compared B and T cell responses in mice after one and two intrarectal immunizations with 2/6 rotavirus-like particles (2/6-VLP) and LT-R192G. After a boost, we found, an unexpected lower B cell expansion measured by flow cytometry, despite a secondary antibody response. We then analyzed CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) and CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(-) helper T cells after in vitro (re)stimulation of mesenteric lymph node cells with the antigen (2/6-VLP), the adjuvant (LT-R192G) or both. 2/6-VLP did not activate CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(-) nor Foxp3(+) T cells from non-immunized and 2/6-VLP immunized mice, whereas they did activate both subsets from mice immunized with 2/6-VLP in the presence of adjuvant. LT-R192G dramatically decreased CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) T cells from non-immunized and 2/6-VLP immunized mice but not from mice immunized with 2/6-VLP and adjuvant. Moreover, in this case, LT-R192G increased Foxp3 expression on CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) cells, suggesting specific Treg activation during the recall. Finally, when both 2/6-VLP and LT-R192G were used for restimulation, LT-R192G clearly suppressed both 2/6-VLP-specific CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(-) and Foxp3(+) T cells. All together, these results suggest that LT-R192G exerts different effects on CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) T cells, depending on a first or a second contact. The unexpected immunomodulation observed during the recall should be considered in designing vaccination protocols.

  13. Measurement of absorbed dose-to-water for an HDR {sup 192}Ir source with ionization chambers in a sandwich setup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araki, Fujio; Kouno, Tomohiro; Ohno, Takeshi [Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, 4-24-1 Kuhonji, Kumamoto 862-0976 (Japan); Kakei, Kiyotaka; Yoshiyama, Fumiaki [Department of Radiotherapy, Kumamoto University Hospital, 1-1-1 Honjyo, Kumamoto 860-8556 (Japan); Kawamura, Shinji [Department of Radiotherapy, Miyazaki University Hospital, 5200 Kihara Ohaza Kiyotake-Machi, Miyazaki 889-1692 (Japan)

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: In this study, a dedicated device for ion chamber measurements of absorbed dose-to-water for a Nucletron microSelectron-v2 HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy source is presented. The device uses two ionization chambers in a so-called sandwich assembly. Using this setup and by taking the average reading of the two chambers, any dose error due to difficulties in absolute positioning (centering) of the source in between the chambers is cancelled to first order. The method's accuracy was examined by comparing measurements with absorbed dose-to-water determination based on the AAPM TG-43 protocol.Methods: The optimal source-to-chamber distance (SCD) for {sup 192}Ir dosimetry was determined from ion chamber measurements in a water phantom. The {sup 192}Ir source was sandwiched between two Exradin A1SL chambers (0.057 cm{sup 3}) at the optimal SCD separation. The measured ionization was converted to the absorbed dose-to-water using a {sup 60}Co calibration factor and a Monte Carlo-calculated beam quality conversion factor, k{sub Q}, for {sup 60}Co to {sup 192}Ir. An uncertainty estimate of the proposed method was determined based on reproducibility of measurements at different institutions for the same type of source.Results: The optimal distance for the A1SL chamber measurements was determined to be 5 cm from the {sup 192}Ir source center, considering the depth dependency of k{sub Q} for {sup 60}Co to {sup 192}Ir and the chamber positioning. The absorbed dose to water measured at (5 cm, 90°) on the transverse axis was 1.3% lower than TG-43 values and its reproducibility and overall uncertainty were 0.8% and 1.7%, respectively. The measurement doses at anisotropic points agreed within 1.5% with TG-43 values.Conclusions: The ion chamber measurement of absorbed dose-to-water with a sandwich method for the {sup 192}Ir source provides a more accurate, direct, and reference dose compared to the dose-to-water determination based on air-kerma strength in the TG-43

  14. Iridium-192 implants for primary breast cancer: experience with placement at the time of wide local excision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCormick, B.; Wesson, M.F.; Cox, L.; Osborne, M.P.; Petrek, J.A.; Kinne, D.W.

    1988-09-01

    An Ir-192 boost is a technique frequently used to deliver an additional dose of radiation therapy to the tumor bed following breast conserving surgery and combined with external beam radiation therapy to the entire breast for patients with early breast cancer. Traditionally these catheters are placed following completion of 4500-5000 cGy, as a separate procedure. This paper described a Pilot Study identifying placement of the catheters at the time of primary wide local excision, or re-excision in 52 patients. The key to the success of this technique is the achievement of complete hemostasis in the primary cavity, the presence of the radiation oncologist during the surgical procedure itself, and closure of the wound prior to placement of the catheters. Details of the technique, and preliminary patient results are presented.

  15. Charged Particle Momentum Spectra in $e^+ e^-$ annihilation at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 192-209 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Amaral, P.; Anagnostou, G.; Anderson, K.J.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Bailey, I.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, R.J.; Batley, R.J.; Bechtle, P.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bell, P.J.; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Benelli, G.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Boeriu, O.; Bock, P.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Buesser, K.; Burckhart, H.J.; Campana, S.; Carnegie, R.K.; Caron, B.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Csilling, A.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Dallison, S.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Donkers, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Elfgren, E.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Feld, L.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Furtjes, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, John William; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giunta, Marina; Goldberg, J.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gunther, P.O.; Gupta, A.; Hajdu, C.; Hamann, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Harin-Dirac, M.; Hauschild, M.; Hauschildt, J.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Hensel, C.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Homer, R.J.; Horvath, D.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jeremie, H.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanaya, N.; Kanzaki, J.; Karapetian, G.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kim, D.H.; Klein, K.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kormos, Laura L.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Kramer, T.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Krop, D.; Kruger, K.; Kupper, M.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Layter, J.G.; Leins, A.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Lillich, J.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, J.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Marcellini, S.; Marchant, T.E.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Masetti, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.J.; McKenna, J.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Mendez-Lorenzo, P.; Menges, W.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Moed, S.; Mohr, W.; Mori, T.; Mutter, A.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oh, A.; Okpara, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pahl, C.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poli, B.; Polok, J.; Pooth, O.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rabbertz, K.; Rembser, C.; Renkel, P.; Rick, H.; Roney, J.M.; Rosati, S.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sarkisyan, E.K.G.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spagnolo, S.; Spano, F.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Tarem, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Taylor, R.J.; Teuscher, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Toya, D.; Tran, P.; Trefzger, T.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Ujvari, B.; Vachon, B.; Vollmer, C.F.; Vannerem, P.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Waller, D.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wetterling, D.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zer-Zion, D.; Zivkovic, Lidija

    2003-01-01

    Charged particle momentum distributions are studied in the reaction e+e- -> hadrons, using data collected with the OPAL detector at centre-of-mass energies from 192 GeV to 209 GeV. The data correspond to an average centre-of- mass energy of 201.7 GeV and a total integrated luminosity of 433 pb-1. The measured distributions and derived quantities, in combination with corresponding results obtained at lower centre-of-mass energies, are compared to QCD predictions in various theoretical approaches to study the energy dependence of the strong interaction and to test QCD as the theory describing it. In general, a good agreement is found between the measurements and the corresponding QCD predictions.

  16. Interstitial brachytherapy for carcinoma of the base of tongue using a high dose rate {sup 192}Ir remote afterloader

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Tetsuo; Imai, Michiko; Iijima, Mitsuharu; Suzuki, Kazunori; Nozue, Masashi; Kaneko, Masao; Mukodaka, Hiroyuki; Asai, Yoshihiro [Hamamatsu Univ., Shizuoka (Japan). School of Medicine

    1996-11-01

    We have applied an interstitial brachytherapy employing a high dose rate {sup 192}Ir remote afterloader to five patients with cancer of the base of tongue since December 1994. Insertion of applicators was carried out with tracheotomy under general anesthesia. Brachytherapy was delivered twice a day with a 6-hour interval. Irradiation dose was estimated at the point of 5 mm from outer applicators. HDR brachytherapy was well tolerated for 4-5 days in all patients and acute radiation reaction was minimal. Local control were observed in two cases. In conclusion, our preliminary experience suggests that HDR brachytherapy may be an option in the radiotherapy for carcinoma of the base of tongue. Optimal dose-fractionation protocol should be established. (author)

  17. Paraoxonase 1 gene (Gln192–Arg polymorphism and the risk of coronary artery disease in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Fahmy Elnoamany

    2012-06-01

    Conclusion: Arg allele of PON1 192 gene polymorphism is an independent risk factor for CAD and is associated not only with the presence of CAD but also with its extent and severity and its impact is clearly more pronounced in diabetic patients.

  18. Comparison BIPM.RI(I)-K8 of high dose-rate Ir-192 brachytherapy standards for reference air kerma rate of the VSL and the BIPM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alvarez, J.T.; De Pooter, J.A.; Andersen, Claus E.

    2014-01-01

    An indirect comparison of the standards for reference air kerma rate for 192Ir high dose rate brachytherapy sources of the Dutch Metrology Institute (VSL), The Netherlands, and of the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) was carried out at the VSL in November 2009. The comparison resu...

  19. Temporo-spatial cell-cycle kinetics in HeLa cells irradiated by Ir-192 high dose-rate remote afterloading system (HDR-RALS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asahina, Taito; Kaida, Atsushi; Goto, Tatsuaki; Yoshimura, Ryo-Ichi; Sasai, Keisuke; Miura, Masahiko

    2016-07-29

    Intracavitary irradiation plays a pivotal role in definitive radiotherapy for cervical cancer, and the Ir-192 high dose-rate remote afterloading system (HDR-RALS) is often used for this purpose. Under this condition, tumor tissues receive remarkably different absorption doses, with a steep gradient, depending on distance from the radiation source. To obtain temporo-spatial information regarding cell-cycle kinetics in cervical cancer following irradiation by Ir-192 HDR-RALS, we examined HeLa cells expressing the fluorescence ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator (Fucci), which allowed us to visualize cell-cycle progression. HeLa-Fucci cells, which emit red and green fluorescence in G1 and S/G2/M phases, respectively, were grown on 35-mm dishes and irradiated by Ir-192 HDR-RALS under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. A 6 French (Fr) catheter was used as an applicator. A radiation dose of 6 Gy was prescribed at hypothetical treatment point A, located 20 mm from the radiation source. Changes in Fucci fluorescence after irradiation were visualized for cells from 5 to 20 mm from the Ir-192 source. Several indices, including first green phase duration after irradiation (FGPD), were measured by analysis of time-lapse images. Cells located 5 to 20 mm from the Ir-192 source became green, reflecting arrest in G2, in a similar manner up to 12 h after irradiation; at more distant positions, however, cells were gradually released from the G2 arrest and became red. This could be explained by the observation that the FGPD was longer for cells closer to the radiation source. Detailed observation revealed that FGPD was significantly longer in cells irradiated in the green phase than in the red phase at positions closer to the Ir-192 source. Unexpectedly, the FGPD was significantly longer after irradiation under hypoxia than normoxia, due in large part to the elongation of FGPD in cells irradiated in the red phase. Using HeLa-Fucci cells, we obtained the first temporo

  20. Search for Chargino and Neutralino Production at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 192-209 GeV at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Amaral, P.; Anagnostou, G.; Anderson, K.J.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Bailey, I.; Barberio, E.; Barillari, T.; Barlow, R.J.; Batley, R.J.; Bechtle, P.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bell, P.J.; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Benelli, G.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Boeriu, O.; Bock, P.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Buesser, K.; Burckhart, H.J.; Campana, S.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, D.G.; Ciocca, C.; Couchman, J.; Csilling, A.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Donkers, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Feld, L.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, John William; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giunta, Marina; Goldberg, J.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gunther, P.O.; Gupta, A.; Hajdu, C.; Hamann, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Harel, A.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Horvath, D.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jeremie, H.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanaya, N.; Kanzaki, J.; Karlen, D.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Klein, K.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kramer, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kruger, K.; Kuhl, T.; Kupper, M.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Layter, J.G.; Lellouch, D.; Lettso, J.; Levinson, L.; Lillich, J.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, A.; Ludwig, J.; Mader, W.; Marcellini, S.; Martin, A.J.; Masetti, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McKenna, J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menges, W.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Moed, S.; Mohr, W.; Mori, T.; Mutter, A.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Nanjo, H.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oh, A.; Okpara, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pahl, C.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poli, B.; Pooth, O.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rabbertz, K.; Rembser, C.; Renkel, P.; Roney, J.M.; Rosati, S.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sarkisyan, E.K.G.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Sherwood, P.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spano, F.; Stahl, A.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Tarem, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Teuscher, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Toya, D.; Tran, P.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Ujvari, B.; Vollmer, C.F.; Vannerem, P.; Vertesi, R.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Waller, D.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wetterling, D.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zer-Zion, D.; Zivkovic, Lidija

    2004-01-01

    Approximately 438 pb-1 of e+e- data from the OPAL detector, taken with the LEP collider running at centre-of-mass energies of 192-209 Gev, are analyzed to search for evidence of chargino pair production, e+e- -> tilde chi^+_1 tilde chi^-_1, or neutralino associated production, e+e- -> tilde chi^0_2 tilde chi^0_1. Limits are set at the 95% confidence level on the product of the cross-section for the process e+e- -> tilde chi^+_1 tilde chi^-_1 and its branching ratios to topologies containing jets and missing energy, of jest with a lepton and missing energy, and on the product of the cross-section for e+e- -> tilde chi^0_2 tilde chi^0_1 and its branching ratio to jets. R-parity conservation is assumed throughout this paper. When these results are interpreted in the context of the Constrained Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model, limits are also set on the masses of the tilde chi^+-_1, tilde chi^0_1 and tilde chi^0_2, and regions of the parameter space of the model are ruled out. Nearly model-independent limits...

  1. Treatment of malignant biliary obstruction by endoscopic implantation of iridium 192 using a new double lumen endoprosthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegel, J.H.; Lichtenstein, J.L.; Pullano, W.E.; Ramsey, W.H.; Rosenbaum, A.; Halpern, G.; Nonkin, R.; Jacob, H.

    1988-07-01

    Iridium 192 seeds contained in a ribbon were preloaded into a new double lumen 11 Fr endoprosthesis which was then inserted into malignant strictures of the bile duct and ampulla and left in place for 48 hours until 5000 rads were delivered to the tumor. The procedure was carried out in 14 patients (7 women, 7 men; mean age, 63.2 years; range, 46 to 86 years). Six patients were treated for cholangiocarcinomas, four with pancreatic carcinomas, and four with ampullary carcinomas. No complications occurred. The mean survival of the group was 7 months (range, 3 days to 27 months). This new technique provides both intraluminal brachytherapy and biliary drainage and is inserted intraduodenally across the papilla of Vater avoiding puncture of the liver and external hardware required by the percutaneous technique and hardware necessitated with a nasobiliary tube. Following removal of the iridium prosthesis, a large caliber endoprosthesis is inserted for continued decompression. Because of proven efficacy of endoprostheses, this new technique should be considered when intraluminal irradiation is indicated.

  2. Refresher course title: human health effects abstract title: Case Report: Iridium 192 - Health effects during 20 years after irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snezana, Milacica [Belgrade Univ. of Institute of Occupational Medicine and Radiological Protection, Faculty of Medicine, Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro); Jadranko, Simic [South East Europe Consultants, Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)

    2006-07-01

    Case Report has presented health effects of high level of irradiation with gamma rays from {sup 192}Ir on the patient M. L. during 21 years after an incident. The main purpose was to investigate long time consequences of partial high level irradiation on human health. Locally, short-term irradiation with high, deadly dose, caused acute radiation syndrome with reversible disorder of function of the individual, most exposed, organs. Frequency of chromosomal aberrations (dicentric), characteristic for direct irradiation, was increased. However, dicentric analyzes did not give expected result for an acute radioactivity illness. Radio-dermatitis had begun already after the incident, while changes on the heart began gradually, not earlier than six months, up to two years after the incident. Irradiated parts of the patient skin have been changed with auto-transplanted skin and appropriate therapy had been taken. More than two decades after the irradiation, system (leukemia) nor solitary tumor on near organs (liver, heart, lungs, bones) did not happened. Radiation illness did not happened in spite of very large dose, because impacts were local and body was uneven irradiated. Also, an appropriate therapy was organized and potential illness did not happen. (authors)

  3. A CMOS RF-to-DC Power Converter With 86% Efficiency and -19.2-dBm Sensitivity

    KAUST Repository

    Almansouri, Abdullah Saud Mohammed

    2018-01-09

    This paper proposes an RF-to-dc power converter for ambient wireless powering that is efficient, highly sensitive, and less dependent on the load resistance with an extended dynamic range. The proposed rectifier utilizes a variable biasing technique to control the conduction of the rectifying transistors selectively, hence minimizing the leakage current; unlike the prior work that has a fixed feedback resistors, which limits the efficient operation to a relatively high RF power and causes a drop in the peak power conversion efficiency (PCE). The proposed design is fabricated using a 0.18-μm standard CMOS technology and occupies an area of 8800 μm². The measurement results show an 86% PCE and -19.2-dBm (12 μW) sensitivity when operating at the medical band 433 MHz with a 100-kΩ load. Furthermore, the PCE is 66%, and the sensitivity is -18.2 dBm (15.1 μW) when operating at UHF 900 MHz with a 100-kΩ load.

  4. Chemonuclear studies for identification for new production routes for the therapeutically useful radionuclides {sup 140}Nd, {sup 192}Ir, {sup 191}Pt, {sup 193m}Pt, und {sup 195m}Pt; Kernchemische Studien zur Entwicklung neuerer Produktionsverfahren fuer die therapierelevanten Radionuklide {sup 140}Nd, {sup 192}Ir, {sup 191}Pt, {sup 193m}Pt, und {sup 195m}Pt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilgers, K.

    2005-12-15

    New production routes for the therapeutically useful radionuclides {sup 140}Nd, {sup 192}Ir, {sup 191}Pt, {sup 193m}Pt and {sup 195m}Pt were investigated. Cross section data were measured using the stacked-foil technique and compared with theoretical calculations. A production method for the platinum nuclides was developed. The {sup 141}Pr(p, 2n){sup 140}Nd and {sup nat}Ce({sup 3}He, xn){sup 140}Nd reactions were investigated for production of {sup 140}Nd. Cross section data of nuclear reactions leading to the side products {sup 141}Nd, {sup 139}Nd and {sup 139}Ce could also be achieved. The experimental data were compared with theoretical calculations using the code ALICE-IPPE. A comparison of the calculated thick target yields showed that the {sup 141}Pr(p, 2n){sup 140}Nd reaction gives a higher yield. The {sup 192}Os(p, n){sup 192}Ir reaction was examined in the context of the production of {sup 192}Ir. Cross section data were determined and compared with theoretical calculations using the codes ALICE-IPPE and EMPIRE II. The yield of this reaction was compared with the yield of the reactor production of this nuclide. The reactor production seems to be more suitable because of a higher purity and yield. Cross section data were measured for the {sup 192}Os({alpha}, n){sup 195m}Pt, {sup 192}Os({alpha}, 3n){sup 193m}Pt and {sup 192}Os({sup 3}He, 4n){sup 191}Pt reactions. The activity of {sup 193m}Pt and {sup 195m}Pt was determined by X-ray spectroscopy after a chemical separation procedure. The ALICE-IPPE code was found to be inappropriate to reproduce the experimental values. The calculated yields were compared with the yields of other reactions, especially the reactor production of {sup 195m}Pt. The yield of the {sup 192}Os({alpha}, n){sup 195m}Pt reaction is lower compared to the yield of the reactor production, but offers lower target costs and higher specific activity. A production method for {sup 193m}Pt and {sup 195m}Pt was developed. Batch yields of 0.9 MBq

  5. An absorbed dose to water standard for HDR 192Ir brachytherapy sources based on water calorimetry: numerical and experimental proof-of-principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarfehnia, Arman; Stewart, Kristin; Seuntjens, Jan

    2007-12-01

    Water calorimetry is an established technique for absorbed dose to water measurements in external beams. In this paper, the feasibility of direct absorbed dose measurements for high dose rate (HDR) iridium-192 (192Ir) sources using water calorimetry is established. Feasibility is determined primarily by a balance between the need to obtain sufficient signal to perform a reproducible measurement, the effect of heat loss on the measured signal, and the positioning uncertainty affecting the source-detector distance. The heat conduction pattern generated in water by the Nucletron microSelectron-HDR 192Ir brachytherapy source was simulated using COMSOL MULTIPHYSICS software. Source heating due to radiation self-absorption was calculated using EGSnrcMP. A heat-loss correction k(c) was calculated as the ratio of the temperature rise under ideal conditions to temperature rise under realistic conditions. The calorimeter setup used a parallel-plate calorimeter vessel of 79 mm diameter and 1.12 mm thick front and rear glass windows located 24 mm apart. Absorbed dose was measured with two sources with nominal air kerma strengths of 38 000 and 21 000 U, at source-detector separations ranging from 24.7 to 27.6 mm and irradiation times of 36.0 to 80.0 s. The preliminary measured dose rate per unit air kerma strength of (0.502 +/- 0.007) microGy/(s U) compares well with the TG-43 derived 0.505 microGy/(s U). This work shows that combined dose uncertainties of significantly less than 5% can be achieved with only modest modifications of current water calorimetry techniques and instruments. This work forms the basis of a potential future absolute dose to water standard for HDR 192Ir brachytherapy.

  6. p.Q192R SNP of PON1 seems not to be Associated with Carotid Atherosclerosis Risk Factors in an Asymptomatic and Normolipidemic Brazilian Population Sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Zanetti Scherrer

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background:Evidences suggest that paraoxonase 1 (PON1 confers important antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties when associated with high-density lipoprotein (HDL.Objective:To investigate the relationships between p.Q192R SNP of PON1, biochemical parameters and carotid atherosclerosis in an asymptomatic, normolipidemic Brazilian population sample.Methods:We studied 584 volunteers (females n = 326, males n = 258; 19-75 years of age. Total genomic DNA was extracted and SNP was detected in the TaqMan® SNP OpenArray® genotyping platform (Applied Biosystems, Foster City, CA. Plasma lipoproteins and apolipoproteins were determined and PON1 activity was measured using paraoxon as a substrate. High-resolution β-mode ultrasonography was used to measure cIMT and the presence of carotid atherosclerotic plaques in a subgroup of individuals (n = 317.Results:The presence of p.192Q was associated with a significant increase in PON1 activity (RR = 12.30 (11.38; RQ = 46.96 (22.35; QQ = 85.35 (24.83 μmol/min; p Conclusion:In low-risk individuals, the presence of the p.192Q variant of PON1 is associated with a beneficial plasma lipid profile but not with carotid atherosclerosis.

  7. Excitation function of the {sup 192}Os({sup 3}He,4n)-reaction for production of {sup 191}Pt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qaim, S.M. [Institut fuer Neurowissenschaften und Biophysik, INB-4: Nuklearchemie, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, D-52425 Juelich (Germany)], E-mail: s.m.qaim@fz-juelich.de; Hilgers, K.; Sudar, S.; Coenen, H.H. [Institut fuer Neurowissenschaften und Biophysik, INB-4: Nuklearchemie, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, D-52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2009-06-15

    In search of an alternative production route of the therapeutically and environmentally interesting radionuclide {sup 191}Pt (T{sub 1/2}=2.8 d), excitation function of the {sup 192}Os({sup 3}He,4n){sup 191}Pt reaction was measured from its threshold up to 36 MeV. Thin samples of enriched {sup 192}Os were prepared by electrodeposition on Ni-foils, and the conventional stacked-foil technique was used for cross-section measurements. The experimental data were compared with the results of theoretical calculations using the codes ALICE-IPPE and TALYS. Good agreement was found with TALYS. The theoretical thick target yield of {sup 191}Pt over the energy range E{sub 3{sub H}{sub e}}=36{yields}25MeV amounts to 6.7 MBq/{mu}A h. A comparison of various investigated production methods of {sup 191}Pt is given. The here investigated {sup 192}Os({sup 3}He,4n)-process leads to very high-purity {sup 191}Pt (>99.5%)

  8. Surface dose characterisation of the Varian Ir-192 HDR conical surface applicator set with a vertically orientated source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchauer, Konrad; Henke, Guido; Schiefer, Hans; Plasswilm, Ludwig [Kantonsspital St. Gallen, Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Gallen (Switzerland)

    2014-12-15

    Conical surface applicators with an Ir-192 high-dose-rate brachytherapy source are a common modality for the treatment of non-melanomatous skin cancer with high tumour control rates. Surface dose characterisation of the Varian Varisource GammaMed+ IX afterloader vertical type surface applicators is performed two dimensionally using high-resolution film dosimetry. The focus of this study was to determine if Varian surface applicators with a vertical source suffer from the dose distribution irregularities reported for comparable applicators. Our goal was to evaluate if the irregularities found affected treatment and dose output verification procedures. Ionisation chamber-based verification of applicator output was established according to guidelines provided by the manufacturer. For additional measurement of surface dose Gafchromic EBT3 film dosimetry was used. The term ''therapeutic dose'' was defined as 85 % of the prescribed dose level. For the 10 different applicator inserts evaluated, cold spots were observed. Mean cold spot size was 2.0 mm x 3.6 mm (± 0.6 mm). The cold spots were dosimetrically well below 85 % of the prescribed dose. The cold spot was situated 2.2 mm (1.4-2.7 mm) unilaterally from the central axis and caused general asymmetry in the dose profiles intersecting the cold spot area. A source tilt of approximately 8 (± 1 ) was determined for the source used for irradiation. A central underdosed area exceeding 15 % of the prescribed dose has not been previously reported. Source tilt was observed and found to affect clinical use and possibly treatment outcome in applicators using a vertically arranged source. Surface applicators with a vertically orientated source were subject to dose irregularities that could impact on chamber-based applicator output verification procedures. We recommend film dosimetry-backed applicator commissioning to avoid systematic errors. (orig.) [German] Konische Oberflaechenapplikatoren sind ein

  9. The effect of patient inhomogeneities in oesophageal 192Ir HDR brachytherapy: a Monte Carlo and analytical dosimetry study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anagnostopoulos, G.; Baltas, D.; Pantelis, E.; Papagiannis, P.; Sakelliou, L.

    2004-06-01

    The effect of patient inhomogeneities surrounding the oesophagus on the dosimetry planning of an upper thoracic oesophageal 192Ir HDR brachytherapy treatment is studied. The MCNPX Monte Carlo code is used for dosimetry in a patient-equivalent phantom geometry and results are compared in terms of isodose contours as well as dose volume histograms with corresponding calculations by a contemporary treatment planning system software featuring a full TG-43 dose calculation algorithm (PLATO BPS version 14.2.4). It is found that the presence of patient inhomogeneities does not alter the delivery of the planned dose distribution to the planning treatment volume. Regarding the organs at risk, the common practice of current treatment planning systems (TPSs) to consider the patient geometry as a homogeneous water medium leads to a dose overestimation of up to 13% to the spinal cord and an underestimation of up to 15% to the sternum bone. These findings which correspond to the dose region of about 5-10% of the prescribed dose could only be of significance when brachytherapy is used as a boost to external beam therapy. Additionally, an analytical dosimetry model, which is efficient in calculating dose in mathematical phantoms containing inhomogeneity shells of materials of radiobiological interest, is utilized for dosimetry in the patient-equivalent inhomogeneous phantom geometry. Analytical calculations in this work are in good agreement with corresponding Monte Carlo results within the bone inhomogeneities of spinal cord and sternum bone but, like treatment planning system calculations, the model fails to predict the dose distribution in the proximal lung surface as well as within the lungs just as the TPS does, due to its inherent limitation in treating lateral scatter and backscatter radiation.

  10. Dosimetric and radiobiological comparison of TG-43 and Monte Carlo calculations in (192)Ir breast brachytherapy applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peppa, V; Pappas, E P; Karaiskos, P; Major, T; Polgár, C; Papagiannis, P

    2016-10-01

    To investigate the clinical significance of introducing model based dose calculation algorithms (MBDCAs) as an alternative to TG-43 in (192)Ir interstitial breast brachytherapy. A 57 patient cohort was used in a retrospective comparison between TG-43 based dosimetry data exported from a treatment planning system and Monte Carlo (MC) dosimetry performed using MCNP v. 6.1 with plan and anatomy information in DICOM-RT format. Comparison was performed for the target, ipsilateral lung, heart, skin, breast and ribs, using dose distributions, dose-volume histograms (DVH) and plan quality indices clinically used for plan evaluation, as well as radiobiological parameters. TG-43 overestimation of target DVH parameters is statistically significant but small (less than 2% for the target coverage indices and 4% for homogeneity indices, on average). Significant dose differences (>5%) were observed close to the skin and at relatively large distances from the implant leading to a TG-43 dose overestimation for the organs at risk. These differences correspond to low dose regions (<50% of the prescribed dose), being less than 2% of the prescribed dose. Detected dosimetric differences did not induce clinically significant differences in calculated tumor control probabilities (mean absolute difference <0.2%) and normal tissue complication probabilities. While TG-43 shows a statistically significant overestimation of most indices used for plan evaluation, differences are small and therefore not clinically significant. Improved MBDCA dosimetry could be important for re-irradiation, technique inter-comparison and/or the assessment of secondary cancer induction risk, where accurate dosimetry in the whole patient anatomy is of the essence. Copyright © 2016 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Performance of Serum microRNAs -122, -192 and -21 as Biomarkers in Patients with Non-Alcoholic Steatohepatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip P Becker

    Full Text Available Liver biopsies are the current gold standard in non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH diagnosis. Their invasive nature, however, still carries an increased risk for patients' health. The development of non-invasive diagnostic tools to differentiate between bland steatosis (NAFL and NASH remains crucial. The aim of this study is the evaluation of investigated circulating microRNAs in combination with new targets in order to optimize the discrimination of NASH patients by non-invasive serum biomarkers.Serum profiles of four microRNAs were evaluated in two cohorts consisting of 137 NAFLD patients and 61 healthy controls. In a binary logistic regression model microRNAs of relevance were detected. Correlation of microRNA appearance with known biomarkers like ALT and CK18-Asp396 was evaluated. A simplified scoring model was developed, combining the levels of microRNA in circulation and CK18-Asp396 fragments. Receiver operating characteristics were used to evaluate the potential of discriminating NASH.The new finding of our study is the different profile of circulating miR-21 in NASH patients (p<0.0001. Also, it validates recently published results of miR-122 and miR-192 to be differentially regulated in NAFL and NASH. Combined microRNA expression profiles with CK18-Asp396 fragment level scoring model had a higher potential of NASH prediction compared to other risk biomarkers (AUROC = 0.83, 95% CI = 0.754-0.908; p<0.001. Evaluation of score model for NAFL (Score = 0 and NASH (Score = 4 had shown high rates of sensitivity (91% and specificity (83%.Our study defines candidates for a combined model of miRNAs and CK18-Asp396 levels relevant as a promising expansion for diagnosis and in turn treatment of NASH.

  12. Quality control for thermoluminescent dosemeters TLD-100 de Li F: Mg, Ti for high dose rate treatments using Ir-192 sources in breast, esophagus and bronchus; Control de calidad con dosimetros thermoluminiscentes TLD-100 de Li F: Mg, Ti para tratamientos de alta tasa de dosis com fuentes de Ir-192 en canceres de seno, esofago y bronchio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, F. [Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogota (Colombia)]. E-mail: franciscotorreshoyos@yahoo.com; Plazas, M.C. [Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia, Bogota (Colombia); Cavadia, W. [Universidad de Cordoba (Colombia)

    2004-07-01

    Rods - shaped, TLD - 100, LiF: Mg,Ti thermoluminescence dosimeters are used to check duality control during breast, esophagus and bronchus cancer treatments with high rate dose and Ir -192 source. We conclude that the specificity dose in prescription points is in agreement with parameters given in international protocols. (author)

  13. EME 192 Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mora, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pascall, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dudoff, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Moran, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-03-15

    I spent the quarter working in Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory’s (LLNL) Materials Engineering Division. The group I have been working with (I’ve been here for two summers already) focuses on advanced manufacturing techniques such as stereolithography, electrophoretic deposition, and the printing of silicon based inks. Part of the goal of what is done in our group is to create designer materials not by altering the composition but by altering the micro-architecture. Our technology can create shapes that are not possible with traditional manufacturing techniques. This allows us to create structures that are light, yet very strong and stiff. It also allows us to create materials with property gradients. In other words, we can make structures and parts that are stronger in some locations than others. I have been working with electrophoretic deposition for the duration of my stay and have focused on advancing the technology from a thin-film technique to a true additive manufacturing paradigm. Put succinctly, electrophoretic deposition is the deposition of particles in suspension with electric fields. Particles have a potential on the surface which allows them to be driven to an electrode using an electric field. The particles then deposit onto the conductive regions of the substrate, traditionally, the entire surface. Electrophoretic deposition is powerful in that it can handle a wide variety of materials (ceramics, metals, bacteria), create material gradients in the deposits, and create layered deposition of multiple materials. A drawback of traditional electrophoretic deposition is that patterned deposits are only possible with a non-reconfigurable patterned electrode. A technique was developed at LLNL that allows for the arbitrary patterning of the electric field using photoconductive electrodes and light. This way, you can create interesting shapes and reconfigure the pattern of the deposit using the same electrode. A photoconductive electrode is made by hydrothermally growing titania nanorods onto a transparent current collector. A photomask is used to block incoming some light and only allow the desired pattern of light through. The photoconductive electrode then activates when and where the light hits, once an electric field is applied. Particles will migrate to the areas of illumation and deposit.

  14. SU-E-T-102: Determination of Dose Distributions and Water-Equivalence of MAGIC-F Polymer Gel for 60Co and 192Ir Brachytherapy Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quevedo, A; Nicolucci, P [University of Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Analyse the water-equivalence of MAGIC-f polymer gel for {sup 60}Co and {sup 192}Ir clinical brachytherapy sources, through dose distributions simulated with PENELOPE Monte Carlo code. Methods: The real geometry of {sup 60} (BEBIG, modelo Co0.A86) and {sup 192}192Ir (Varian, model GammaMed Plus) clinical brachytherapy sources were modelled on PENELOPE Monte Carlo simulation code. The most probable emission lines of photons were used for both sources: 17 emission lines for {sup 192}Ir and 12 lines for {sup 60}. The dose distributions were obtained in a cubic water or gel homogeneous phantom (30 × 30 × 30 cm{sup 3}), with the source positioned in the middle of the phantom. In all cases the number of simulation showers remained constant at 10{sup 9} particles. A specific material for gel was constructed in PENELOPE using weight fraction components of MAGIC-f: wH = 0,1062, wC = 0,0751, wN = 0,0139, wO = 0,8021, wS = 2,58×10{sup −6} e wCu = 5,08 × 10{sup −6}. The voxel size in the dose distributions was 0.6 mm. Dose distribution maps on the longitudinal and radial direction through the centre of the source were used to analyse the water-equivalence of MAGIC-f. Results: For the {sup 60} source, the maximum diferences in relative doses obtained in the gel and water were 0,65% and 1,90%, for radial and longitudinal direction, respectively. For {sup 192}Ir, the maximum difereces in relative doses were 0,30% and 1,05%, for radial and longitudinal direction, respectively. The materials equivalence can also be verified through the effective atomic number and density of each material: Zef-MAGIC-f = 7,07 e .MAGIC-f = 1,060 g/cm{sup 3} and Zef-water = 7,22. Conclusion: The results showed that MAGIC-f is water equivalent, consequently being suitable to simulate soft tissue, for Cobalt and Iridium energies. Hence, gel can be used as a dosimeter in clinical applications. Further investigation to its use in a clinical protocol is needed.

  15. Downregulation of miR-192 causes hepatic steatosis and lipid accumulation by inducing SREBF1: Novel mechanism for bisphenol A-triggered non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi; Ding, Dongxiao; Huang, Qiansheng; Liu, Qiong; Lu, Haoyang; Lu, Yanyang; Chi, Yulang; Sun, Xia; Ye, Guozhu; Zhu, Huimin; Wei, Jie; Dong, Sijun

    2017-09-01

    Exposure to Bisphenol A (BPA) has been associated with the development of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Given that microRNA (miRNA) is recognized as a key regulator of lipid metabolism and a potential mediator of environmental cues, this study was designed to explore whether exposure to BPA-triggered abnormal steatosis and lipid accumulation in the liver could be modulated by miR-192. We showed that male post-weaning C57BL/6 mice exposed to 50μg/kg/day of BPA by oral gavage for 90days displayed a NAFLD-like phenotype. In addition, we found in mouse liver and human HepG2 cells that BPA-induced hepatic steatosis and lipid accumulation were associated with decreased expression of miR-192, upregulation of SREBF1 and a series of genes involved in de novo lipogenesis. Downregulation of miR-192 in BPA-exposed hepatocytes could be due to defective pre-miR-192 processing by DROSHA. Using HepG2 cells, we further confirmed that miR-192 directly acted on the 3'UTR of SREBF1, contributing to dysregulation of lipid homeostasis in hepatocytes. MiR-192 mimic and lentivirus-mediated overexpression of miR-192 improved BPA-induced hepatic steatosis by suppressing SREBF1. Lastly, we noted that lipid accumulation was not a strict requirement for developing insulin resistance in mice after BPA treatment. In conclusion, this study demonstrated a novel mechanism in which NAFLD associated with BPA exposure arose from alterations in the miR-192-SREBF1 axis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Long-term follow-up after accidental gamma irradiation from a {sup 192}Ir source in Bangladesh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mollah, A.S.; Begum, A.; Begum, R. [Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission, Dhaka (Bangladesh)

    2006-07-01

    A industrial radiographer was accidentally over -exposed to high dose of ionizing radiation from an {sup 192}Ir source pellet during radiograph y of weld-joints in gas pipe-lines on June 10, 1985 in Bangladesh. The source, housed in a portable exposure assembly, had an activity of about 1850 GBq. A guide -tube was used to control the transfer of the source from safe storage position to the exposure position and vice versa. For radiography, the ti p of the guide tube was to be fixed to the weld -joint while the source was cranked to the exposure position. Following the elapse of the preset exposure time the source had to be cranked back to the safe stor age position. This procedure was to be repeated for each radiographic exposure. Symptoms of high radiation exposure occurred immediately after the accident and skin erythema developed leading to progressive tissue deteriorations. Biological effects such as mild vomiting, malaise, nausea and diarrhea occurred within a short period after the accident. Skin erythema, swelling and tenderness of the palmar surfaces and the tips of the thumbs, index fingers and middle fingers of the both hands accompanied by severe pain and inflammation developed within 7 days of the mishap. The inflammatory changes characterized by redness and bullae spread over the affected fingers with severe pain and agony within a few days. The finger -tips developed abscesses with enormous pus formation and the affected finger nails fell off. He also developed toothache. At this stage a medical practitioner made some surgical dressings and prescribed antibiotics. During the first six months the most serious health disorder was local necroses of the skin and the deep layers of the palmar side of the affected fingers with sharply delineated injuries. The clinical findings were consistent with those reported elsewhere under similar accident conditions. The consequences of this over-exposure are being followed up to assess the long-term effects of

  17. Characteristics of infective endocarditis in a developing country-clinical profile and outcome in 192 Indian patients, 1992-2001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Naveen; Kandpal, Bhuwanesh; Garg, Nitish; Tewari, Satendra; Kapoor, Aditya; Goel, Praveen; Sinha, Nakul

    2005-02-15

    Total 198 episodes of Duke "definite" infective endocarditis (IE) in 192 patients observed over last 10 years were studied [141 males and 51 females, mean age 27.6+/-12.7 years (range 4-68 years)]. Majorities of patients (76.5%) were below 40 years of age. Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) was the commonest underlying heart disease (present in 46.9% patients). Probable source of infection could be identified in only 16.6% episodes. None of our patient was intravenous drug abuser. Fever (90.0%), anemia (81.0%), clubbing (58.1%), splenomegaly (60.6%), changing/new murmur (22.7%) were the common clinical findings. Vegetations were present in 89.9% episodes. Blood cultures were positive in 134 (67.7%) episodes (streptococci in 23.2%, staphylococci in 19.7%, gram negative in 13.6%, enterococci in 8.1%, polymicrobial and fungal in 1.5% episodes each). Complications were cardiovascular [congestive heart failure (CHF) in 41.9%, atrioventricular block in 1.5%, cardiac temponade and acute myocardial infarction in 0.5% each), neurological in 16.6%, renal in 13.1% and embolisms in total 21.7% episodes. Total 182 (91.9%) episodes in 176 patients were managed completely [(medical in 140 (76.9%) and surgical in 42 (23.1%) episodes] while patients in remaining 16 (8.1%) episodes left against medical advises before completion of therapy. Total 21% patients (37 out of 176 completely treated patients) died during therapy (cause of deaths; CHF in 11, septicemia in 10, cerebral embolism in 7, post cardiac surgery in 5, ruptured cerebral mycotic aneurysm in 2, ventricular tachycardia in 2 patients). On stepwise logistic regression analysis; cardiac abscess and CHF were independent predictors of cardiac surgery. Similarly, CHF, renal failure and prosthetic valve dysfunction were independent predictors of mortality. To conclude, spectrum of IE in our country is different from the west, but quite similar as reported from developed countries about 40 years ago. IE in our country occurs in

  18. INTRAVITREOUS CHEMOTHERAPY FOR ACTIVE VITREOUS SEEDING FROM RETINOBLASTOMA: Outcomes After 192 Consecutive Injections. The 2015 Howard Naquin Lecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Carol L; Douglass, Alexzandra M; Beggache, Meriem; Say, Emil Anthony T; Shields, Jerry A

    2016-06-01

    To investigate on the safety and efficacy of intravitreous chemotherapy for retinoblastoma seeding in a relatively large cohort and provide information on the necessary number of injections and long-term control. Retrospective interventional case series of 40 consecutive eyes with viable vitreous seeding after standard treatment of retinoblastoma. All eyes received intravitreal melphalan injection (20-30 μg) and additional topotecan (20 μg) as needed using the trans pars plana route with triple freeze-thaw cryotherapy at needle withdrawal for prevention of extraocular seeding for planned six cycles. The mean patient age at presentation was 36 months, and interval to need for vitreous injection was 14 months. Viable vitreous (n = 40 eyes) and additional subretinal (n = 2 eyes) seeds were documented. There was a total of 192 injections using melphalan (n = 148) and/or topotecan (n = 44) with mean number of injections per eye of melphalan at 4 (median, 4; range, 1-6) and topotecan at 3 (median, 3; range, 1-5). Fewer than six planned melphalan injections (n = 31 cases, 78%) were necessary because of rapid and complete vitreous seed control (n = 30 eyes) or melphalan allergy (n = 1 eye). Fewer than six planned topotecan injections (n = 14 cases, 100%) were necessary because of rapid and complete vitreous seed control in all cases. At median 3-year follow-up, therapeutic success with continued seed regression was observed in all 40 eyes (100%). Globe salvage was attained in 35 cases (88%), and enucleation (n = 5) was necessary for extensive recurrent subretinal seeds (n = 2), neovascular glaucoma with vitreous hemorrhage (n = 2), and hemorrhagic retinal necrosis (n = 1). Side effects included focal retinal pigment epithelial mottling at the site of injection (n = 12), minor focal paraxial lens opacity (not requiring cataract surgery) (n = 11), transient focal vitreous hemorrhage (n = 5), transient hypotony (n = 3), transient retinal hemorrhage (n = 2), optic disc edema

  19. Worldwide burden of disease from exposure to second-hand smoke: a retrospective analysis of data from 192 countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberg, Mattias; Jaakkola, Maritta S; Woodward, Alistair; Peruga, Armando; Prüss-Ustün, Annette

    2011-01-08

    Exposure to second-hand smoke is common in many countries but the magnitude of the problem worldwide is poorly described. We aimed to estimate the worldwide exposure to second-hand smoke and its burden of disease in children and adult non-smokers in 2004. The burden of disease from second-hand smoke was estimated as deaths and disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) for children and adult non-smokers. The calculations were based on disease-specific relative risk estimates and area-specific estimates of the proportion of people exposed to second-hand smoke, by comparative risk assessment methods, with data from 192 countries during 2004. Worldwide, 40% of children, 33% of male non-smokers, and 35% of female non-smokers were exposed to second-hand smoke in 2004. This exposure was estimated to have caused 379,000 deaths from ischaemic heart disease, 165,000 from lower respiratory infections, 36,900 from asthma, and 21,400 from lung cancer. 603,000 deaths were attributable to second-hand smoke in 2004, which was about 1·0% of worldwide mortality. 47% of deaths from second-hand smoke occurred in women, 28% in children, and 26% in men. DALYs lost because of exposure to second-hand smoke amounted to 10·9 million, which was about 0·7% of total worldwide burden of diseases in DALYs in 2004. 61% of DALYs were in children. The largest disease burdens were from lower respiratory infections in children younger than 5 years (5,939,000), ischaemic heart disease in adults (2,836,000), and asthma in adults (1,246,000) and children (651,000). These estimates of worldwide burden of disease attributable to second-hand smoke suggest that substantial health gains could be made by extending effective public health and clinical interventions to reduce passive smoking worldwide. Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare and Bloomberg Philanthropies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. AAPM and GEC-ESTRO guidelines for image-guided robotic brachytherapy: Report of Task Group 192

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podder, Tarun K., E-mail: tarun.podder@uhhospitals.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44122 (United States); Beaulieu, Luc [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier Univ de Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Caldwell, Barrett [Schools of Industrial Engineering and Aeronautics and Astronautics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Cormack, Robert A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Crass, Jostin B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37232 (United States); Dicker, Adam P.; Yu, Yan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19107 (United States); Fenster, Aaron [Department of Imaging Research, Robarts Research Institute, London, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada); Fichtinger, Gabor [School of Computer Science, Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario K7L 3N6 (Canada); Meltsner, Michael A. [Philips Radiation Oncology Systems, Fitchburg, Wisconsin 53711 (United States); Moerland, Marinus A. [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, 3508 GA (Netherlands); Nath, Ravinder [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); Rivard, Mark J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States); Salcudean, Tim [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z4 (Canada); Song, Danny Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21231 (United States); Thomadsen, Bruce R. [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States)

    2014-10-15

    In the last decade, there have been significant developments into integration of robots and automation tools with brachytherapy delivery systems. These systems aim to improve the current paradigm by executing higher precision and accuracy in seed placement, improving calculation of optimal seed locations, minimizing surgical trauma, and reducing radiation exposure to medical staff. Most of the applications of this technology have been in the implantation of seeds in patients with early-stage prostate cancer. Nevertheless, the techniques apply to any clinical site where interstitial brachytherapy is appropriate. In consideration of the rapid developments in this area, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) commissioned Task Group 192 to review the state-of-the-art in the field of robotic interstitial brachytherapy. This is a joint Task Group with the Groupe Européen de Curiethérapie-European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (GEC-ESTRO). All developed and reported robotic brachytherapy systems were reviewed. Commissioning and quality assurance procedures for the safe and consistent use of these systems are also provided. Manual seed placement techniques with a rigid template have an estimated in vivo accuracy of 3–6 mm. In addition to the placement accuracy, factors such as tissue deformation, needle deviation, and edema may result in a delivered dose distribution that differs from the preimplant or intraoperative plan. However, real-time needle tracking and seed identification for dynamic updating of dosimetry may improve the quality of seed implantation. The AAPM and GEC-ESTRO recommend that robotic systems should demonstrate a spatial accuracy of seed placement ≤1.0 mm in a phantom. This recommendation is based on the current performance of existing robotic brachytherapy systems and propagation of uncertainties. During clinical commissioning, tests should be conducted to ensure that this level of accuracy is achieved. These tests

  1. A Genetic Biomarker of Oxidative Stress, the Paraoxonase-1 Q192R Gene Variant, Associates with Cardiomyopathy in CKD: A Longitudinal Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Dounousi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Oxidative stress is a hallmark of CKD and this alteration is strongly implicated in LV hypertrophy and in LV dysfunction. Methods and Patients. We resorted to the strongest genetic biomarker of paraoxonase-1 (PON1 activity, the Q192R variant in the PON1 gene, to unbiasedly assess (Mendelian randomization the cross-sectional and longitudinal association of this gene-variant with LV mass and function in 206 CKD patients with a 3-year follow-up. Results. The R allele of Q192R polymorphism associated with oxidative stress as assessed by plasma 8-isoPGF2α (P=0.03 and was dose-dependently related in a direct fashion to LVMI (QQ: 131.4 ± 42.6 g/m2; RQ: 147.7 ± 51.1 g/m2; RR: 167.3 ± 41.9 g/m2; P=0.001 and in an inverse fashion to systolic function (LV Ejection Fraction (QQ: 79 ± 12%; RQ: 69 ± 9%; RR: 65 ± 10% P=0.002. On longitudinal observation, this gene variant associated with the evolution of the same echocardiographic indicators [LVMI: 13.40 g/m2 per risk allele, P=0.005; LVEF: −2.96% per risk allele, P=0.001]. Multivariate analyses did not modify these associations. Conclusion. In CKD patients, the R allele of the Q192R variant in the PON1 gene is dose-dependently related to the severity of LVH and LV dysfunction and associates with the longitudinal evolution of these cardiac alterations. These results are compatible with the hypothesis that oxidative stress is implicated in cardiomyopathy in CKD patients.

  2. An Investigation of the Dose Distribution from LDR Ir-192 Wires in the Triangular Implants of the Paris System using Polymer Gel Dosimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azizollah Rahimi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Polymer gels are modern dosimeters providing three dimensional dose distributions. These dosimeters can be used in brachytherapy in which the tumor dimension is relatively small and the dose gradient is high. In this study, the ability of the MAGICA polymer gel was investigated for assessing the absolute dose values as well as the dose distribution of low dose rate (LDR Ir-192 wires in interstitial brachytherapy based in triangular implants of the Paris system. Material and Methods: A suitable phantom was made from Perspex. Glass tubes were used as the external tubes for holding the Ir-192 wires in the phantom. The MAGICA polymer gel was made and placed in the phantom. The phantom and the calibration tubes were irradiated using LDR Ir-192 wires and a Co-60 teletherapy unit respectively. They were subsequently imaged using an MRI scanner. The R2 (=1/T2 maps were extracted from several sequential T2-weighted MRI images. The dose values resulting from the polymer gel measurements at the reference points were compared with those from the common calculation method at the same points. In addition, the isodose curves resulting from gel dosimetry were compared with those from a brachytherapy treatment planning system (Flexiplan. Results: The average of the dose values measured with the gel at the reference points was 62.75% higher than those calculated at the same points. Investigating the isodose curves revealed that the maximum distance to agreement (DTAmax between the isodoses resulting from the gel and those obtained from the treatment planning system was less than 3 mm at different dose levels. Discussion and Conclusion: Although the MAGICA gel indicates a higher absolute dose value than those calculated commonly, it can give the relative dose values accurately. Therefore, it can be recommended to be used for the assessment of dose distributions for the treatment of tissues as well as quality control of the treatment planning systems.

  3. Experience of using MOSFET detectors for dose verification measurements in an end-to-end 192Ir brachytherapy quality assurance system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Maria; Nilsson, Josef; Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa

    2017-10-27

    Establishment of an end-to-end system for the brachytherapy (BT) dosimetric chain could be valuable in clinical quality assurance. Here, the development of such a system using MOSFET (metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor) detectors and experience gained during 2 years of use are reported with focus on the performance of the MOSFET detectors. A bolus phantom was constructed with two implants, mimicking prostate and head & neck treatments, using steel needles and plastic catheters to guide the 192Ir source and house the MOSFET detectors. The phantom was taken through the BT treatment chain from image acquisition to dose evaluation. During the 2-year evaluation-period, delivered doses were verified a total of 56 times using MOSFET detectors which had been calibrated in an external 60Co beam. An initial experimental investigation on beam quality differences between 192Ir and 60Co is reported. The standard deviation in repeated MOSFET measurements was below 3% in the six measurement points with dose levels above 2 Gy. MOSFET measurements overestimated treatment planning system doses by 2-7%. Distance-dependent experimental beam quality correction factors derived in a phantom of similar size as that used for end-to-end tests applied on a time-resolved measurement improved the agreement. MOSFET detectors provide values stable over time and function well for use as detectors for end-to-end quality assurance purposes in 192Ir BT. Beam quality correction factors should address not only distance from source but also phantom dimensions. Copyright © 2017 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Search for supersymmetric particles assuming R-parity non-conservation in $e^+e^-$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 192 to 208 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abdallah, J.; Adam, W.; Adzic, P.; Albrecht, T.; Alderweireld, T.; Alemany-Fernandez, R.; Allmendinger, T.; Allport, P.P.; Amaldi, U.; Amapane, N.; Amato, S.; Anashkin, E.; Andreazza, A.; Andringa, S.; Anjos, N.; Antilogus, P.; Apel, W.D.; Arnoud, Y.; Ask, S.; Asman, B.; Augustin, J.E.; Augustinus, A.; Baillon, P.; Ballestrero, A.; Bambade, P.; Barbier, R.; Bardin, D.; Barker, G.J.; Baroncelli, A.; Battaglia, M.; Baubillier, M.; Becks, K.H.; Begalli, M.; Behrmann, A.; Ben-Haim, E.; Benekos, N.; Benvenuti, A.; Berat, C.; Berggren, M.; Berntzon, L.; Bertrand, D.; Besancon, M.; Besson, N.; Bloch, D.; Blom, M.; Bluj, M.; Bonesini, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, P.S.L.; Borisov, G.; Botner, O.; Bouquet, B.; Bowcock, T.J.V.; Boyko, I.; Bracko, M.; Brenner, R.; Brodet, E.; Bruckman, P.; Brunet, J.M.; Bugge, L.; Buschmann, P.; Calvi, M.; Camporesi, T.; Canale, V.; Carena, F.; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Cavallo, F.; Chapkin, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Checchia, P.; Chierici, R.; Chliapnikov, P.; Chudoba, J.; Chung, S.U.; Cieslik, K.; Collins, P.; Contri, R.; Cosme, G.; Cossutti, F.; Costa, M.J.; Crennell, D.; Cuevas, J.; D'Hondt, J.; Dalmau, J.; da Silva, T.; Da Silva, W.; Della Ricca, G.; De Angelis, A.; De Boer, W.; De Clercq, C.; De Lotto, B.; De Maria, N.; De Min, A.; de Paula, L.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Simone, A.; Doroba, K.; Drees, J.; Dris, M.; Eigen, G.; Ekelof, T.; Ellert, M.; Elsing, M.; Espirito Santo, M.C.; Fanourakis, G.; Fassouliotis, D.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J.; Ferrer, A.; Ferro, F.; Flagmeyer, U.; Foeth, H.; Fokitis, E.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Fuster, J.; Gandelman, M.; Garcia, C.; Gavillet, Ph.; Gazis, Evangelos; Gokieli, R.; Golob, B.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncalves, P.; Graziani, E.; Grosdidier, G.; Grzelak, K.; Guy, J.; Haag, C.; Hallgren, A.; Hamacher, K.; Hamilton, K.; Haug, S.; Hauler, F.; Hedberg, V.; Hennecke, M.; Herr, H.; Hoffman, J.; Holmgren, S.O.; Holt, P.J.; Houlden, M.A.; Hultqvist, K.; Jackson, John Neil; Jarlskog, G.; Jarry, P.; Jeans, D.; Johansson, Erik Karl; Johansson, P.D.; Jonsson, P.; Joram, C.; Jungermann, L.; Kapusta, Frederic; Katsanevas, S.; Katsoufis, E.; Kernel, G.; Kersevan, B.P.; Kerzel, U.; Kiiskinen, A.; King, B.T.; Kjaer, N.J.; Kluit, P.; Kokkinias, P.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krumstein, Z.; Kucharczyk, M.; Lamsa, J.; Leder, G.; Ledroit, Fabienne; Leinonen, L.; Leitner, R.; Lemonne, J.; Lepeltier, V.; Lesiak, T.; Liebig, W.; Liko, D.; Lipniacka, A.; Lopes, J.H.; Lopez, J.M.; Loukas, D.; Lutz, P.; Lyons, L.; MacNaughton, J.; Malek, A.; Maltezos, S.; Mandl, F.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Marechal, B.; Margoni, M.; Marin, J.C.; Mariotti, C.; Markou, A.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Masik, J.; Mastroyiannopoulos, N.; Matorras, F.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazzucato, F.; Mazzucato, M.; McNulty, R.; Meroni, C.; Migliore, E.; Mitaroff, W.; Mjoernmark, U.; Moa, T.; Moch, M.; Monig, Klaus; Monge, R.; Montenegro, J.; Moraes, D.; Moreno, S.; Morettini, P.; Mueller, U.; Muenich, K.; Mulders, M.; Mundim, L.; Murray, W.; Muryn, B.; Myatt, G.; Myklebust, T.; Nassiakou, M.; Navarria, F.; Nawrocki, K.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nikolenko, M.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Olshevski, A.; Onofre, A.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Ouraou, A.; Oyanguren, A.; Paganoni, M.; Paiano, S.; Palacios, J.P.; Palka, H.; Papadopoulou, Th.D.; Pape, L.; Parkes, C.; Parodi, F.; Parzefall, U.; Passeri, A.; Passon, O.; Peralta, L.; Perepelitsa, V.; Perrotta, A.; Petrolini, A.; Piedra, J.; Pieri, L.; Pierre, F.; Pimenta, M.; Piotto, E.; Podobnik, T.; Poireau, V.; Pol, M.E.; Polok, G.; Pozdniakov, V.; Pukhaeva, N.; Pullia, A.; Rames, J.; Read, Alexander L.; Rebecchi, P.; Rehn, J.; Reid, D.; Reinhardt, R.; Renton, P.; Richard, F.; Ridky, J.; Rivero, M.; Rodriguez, D.; Romero, A.; Ronchese, P.; Roudeau, P.; Rovelli, T.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Ryabtchikov, D.; Sadovsky, A.; Salmi, L.; Salt, J.; Sander, C.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schwickerath, U.; Segar, A.; Sekulin, R.; Siebel, M.; Sisakian, A.; Smadja, G.; Smirnova, O.; Sokolov, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sosnowski, R.; Spassov, T.; Stanitzki, M.; Stocchi, A.; Strauss, J.; Stugu, B.; Szczekowski, M.; Szeptycka, M.; Szumlak, T.; Tabarelli, T.; Taffard, A.C.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Timmermans, Jan; Tkatchev, L.; Tobin, M.; Todorovova, S.; Tome, B.; Tonazzo, A.; Tortosa, P.; Travnicek, P.; Treille, D.; Tristram, G.; Trochimczuk, M.; Troncon, C.; Turluer, M.L.; Tyapkin, I.A.; Tyapkin, P.; Tzamarias, S.; Uvarov, V.; Valenti, G.; Van Dam, Piet; Van Eldik, J.; Van Lysebetten, A.; van Remortel, N.; Van Vulpen, I.; Vegni, G.; Veloso, F.; Venus, W.; Verdier, P.; Verzi, V.; Vilanova, D.; Vitale, L.; Vrba, V.; Wahlen, H.; Washbrook, A.J.; Weiser, C.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Winter, M.; Witek, M.; Yushchenko, O.; Zalewska, A.; Zalewski, P.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zimine, N.I.; Zintchenko, A.; Zupan, M.

    2004-01-01

    Searches for pair-production of supersymmetric particles under the assumption of non-conservation of R-parity with a dominant LLEbar or UbarDbarDbar term have been performed using the data collected by the DELPHI experiment at LEP in e+e- collisions at centre-of-mass energies from 192 up to 208 GeV. No excess of data above Standard Model expectations was observed. The results were used to constrain the MSSM parameter space and to derive limits on the masses of supersymmetric particles.

  5. Search for Neutral Higgs Bosons of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model in $e^+ e^-$ Interactions at $\\sqrt{s}$=192-202 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M.; Adriani, O.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Alcaraz, J.; Alemanni, G.; Allaby, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alviggi, M.G.; Ambrosi, G.; Anderhub, H.; Andreev, Valery P.; Angelescu, T.; Anselmo, F.; Arefev, A.; Azemoon, T.; Aziz, T.; Bagnaia, P.; Bajo, A.; Baksay, L.; Balandras, A.; Baldew, S.V.; Banerjee, S.; Banerjee, Sw.; Barczyk, A.; Barillere, R.; Bartalini, P.; Basile, M.; Batalova, N.; Battiston, R.; Bay, A.; Becattini, F.; Becker, U.; Behner, F.; Bellucci, L.; Berbeco, R.; Berdugo, J.; Berges, P.; Bertucci, B.; Betev, B.L.; Bhattacharya, S.; Biasini, M.; Biland, A.; Blaising, J.J.; Blyth, S.C.; Bobbink, G.J.; Bohm, A.; Boldizsar, L.; Borgia, B.; Bourilkov, D.; Bourquin, M.; Braccini, S.; Branson, J.G.; Brochu, F.; Buffini, A.; Buijs, A.; Burger, J.D.; Burger, W.J.; Cai, X.D.; Capell, M.; Cara Romeo, G.; Carlino, G.; Cartacci, A.M.; Casaus, J.; Castellini, G.; Cavallari, F.; Cavallo, N.; Cecchi, C.; Cerrada, M.; Cesaroni, F.; Chamizo, M.; Chang, Y.H.; Chaturvedi, U.K.; Chemarin, M.; Chen, A.; Chen, G.; Chen, G.M.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, H.S.; Chiefari, G.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Civinini, C.; Clare, I.; Clare, R.; Coignet, G.; Colino, N.; Costantini, S.; Cotorobai, F.; de la Cruz, B.; Csilling, A.; Cucciarelli, S.; Dai, T.S.; van Dalen, J.A.; D'Alessandro, R.; de Asmundis, R.; Deglon, P.; Degre, A.; Deiters, K.; della Volpe, D.; Delmeire, E.; Denes, P.; DeNotaristefani, F.; De Salvo, A.; Diemoz, M.; Dierckxsens, M.; van Dierendonck, D.; Dionisi, C.; Dittmar, M.; Dominguez, A.; Doria, A.; Dova, M.T.; Duchesneau, D.; Dufournaud, D.; Duinker, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Engler, A.; Eppling, F.J.; Erne, F.C.; Ewers, A.; Extermann, P.; Fabre, M.; Falagan, M.A.; Falciano, S.; Favara, A.; Fay, J.; Fedin, O.; Felcini, M.; Ferguson, T.; Fesefeldt, H.; Fiandrini, E.; Field, J.H.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, P.H.; Fisk, I.; Forconi, G.; Freudenreich, K.; Furetta, C.; Galaktionov, Iouri; Ganguli, S.N.; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gataullin, M.; Gau, S.S.; Gentile, S.; Gheordanescu, N.; Giagu, S.; Gong, Z.F.; Grenier, Gerald Jean; Grimm, O.; Gruenewald, M.W.; Guida, M.; van Gulik, R.; Gupta, V.K.; Gurtu, A.; Gutay, L.J.; Haas, D.; Hasan, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hebbeker, T.; Herve, Alain; Hidas, P.; Hirschfelder, J.; Hofer, H.; Holzner, G.; Hoorani, H.; Hou, S.R.; Hu, Y.; Iashvili, I.; Jin, B.N.; Jones, Lawrence W.; de Jong, P.; Josa-Mutuberria, I.; Khan, R.A.; Kafer, D.; Kaur, M.; Kienzle-Focacci, M.N.; Kim, D.; Kim, J.K.; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D.; Kittel, W.; Klimentov, A.; Konig, A.C.; Kopal, M.; Kopp, A.; Koutsenko, V.; Kraber, M.; Kraemer, R.W.; Krenz, W.; Kruger, A.; Kunin, A.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Laktineh, I.; Landi, G.; Lebeau, M.; Lebedev, A.; Lebrun, P.; Lecomte, P.; Lecoq, P.; Le Coultre, P.; Lee, H.J.; Le Goff, J.M.; Leiste, R.; Levtchenko, P.; Li, C.; Likhoded, S.; Lin, C.H.; Lin, W.T.; Linde, F.L.; Lista, L.; Liu, Z.A.; Lohmann, W.; Longo, E.; Lu, Y.S.; Lubelsmeyer, K.; Luci, C.; Luckey, David; Lugnier, L.; Luminari, L.; Lustermann, W.; Ma, W.G.; Maity, M.; Malgeri, L.; Malinin, A.; Mana, C.; Mangeol, D.; Mans, J.; Marian, G.; Martin, J.P.; Marzano, F.; Mazumdar, K.; McNeil, R.R.; Mele, S.; Merola, L.; Meschini, M.; Metzger, W.J.; von der Mey, M.; Mihul, A.; Milcent, H.; Mirabelli, G.; Mnich, J.; Mohanty, G.B.; Moulik, T.; Muanza, G.S.; Muijs, A.J.M.; Musicar, B.; Musy, M.; Napolitano, M.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Newman, H.; Niessen, T.; Nisati, A.; Kluge, Hannelies; Ofierzynski, R.; Organtini, G.; Oulianov, A.; Palomares, C.; Pandoulas, D.; Paoletti, S.; Paolucci, P.; Paramatti, R.; Park, H.K.; Park, I.H.; Passaleva, G.; Patricelli, S.; Paul, Thomas Cantzon; Pauluzzi, M.; Paus, C.; Pauss, F.; Pedace, M.; Pensotti, S.; Perret-Gallix, D.; Petersen, B.; Piccolo, D.; Pierella, F.; Pieri, M.; Piroue, P.A.; Pistolesi, E.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Pojidaev, V.; Postema, H.; Pothier, J.; Prokofev, D.O.; Prokofiev, D.; Quartieri, J.; Rahal-Callot, G.; Rahaman, M.A.; Raics, P.; Raja, N.; Ramelli, R.; Rancoita, P.G.; Ranieri, R.; Raspereza, A.; Raven, G.; Razis, P.; Ren, D.; Rescigno, M.; Reucroft, S.; Riemann, S.; Riles, Keith; Rodin, J.; Roe, B.P.; Romero, L.; Rosca, A.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Roth, Stefan; Rosenbleck, C.; Roux, B.; Rubio, J.A.; Ruggiero, G.; Rykaczewski, H.; Saremi, S.; Sarkar, S.; Salicio, J.; Sanchez, E.; Sanders, M.P.; Schafer, C.; Schegelsky, V.; Schmidt-Kaerst, S.; Schmitz, D.; Schopper, H.; Schotanus, D.J.; Schwering, G.; Sciacca, C.; Seganti, A.; Servoli, L.; Shevchenko, S.; Shivarov, N.; Shoutko, V.; Shumilov, E.; Shvorob, A.; Siedenburg, T.; Son, D.; Smith, B.; Spillantini, P.; Steuer, M.; Stickland, D.P.; Stone, A.; Stoyanov, B.; Straessner, A.; Sudhakar, K.; Sultanov, G.; Sun, L.Z.; Sushkov, S.; Suter, H.; Swain, J.D.; Szillasi, Z.; Sztaricskai, T.; Tang, X.W.; Tauscher, L.; Taylor, L.; Tellili, B.; Teyssier, D.; Timmermans, Charles; Ting, Samuel C.C.; Ting, S.M.; Tonwar, S.C.; Toth, J.; Tully, C.; Tung, K.L.; Uchida, Y.; Ulbricht, J.; Valente, E.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vetlitsky, I.; Vicinanza, D.; Viertel, G.; Villa, S.; Vivargent, M.; Vlachos, S.; Vodopianov, I.; Vogel, H.; Vogt, H.; Vorobev, I.; Vorobov, A.A.; Vorvolakos, A.; Wadhwa, M.; Wallraff, W.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.L.; Wang, Z.M.; Weber, A.; Weber, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wilkens, H.; Wu, S.X.; Wynhoff, S.; Xia, L.; Xu, Z.Z.; Yamamoto, J.; Yang, B.Z.; Yang, C.G.; Yang, H.J.; Yang, M.; Ye, J.B.; Yeh, S.C.; Zalite, A.; Zalite, Yu.; Zhang, Z.P.; Zhu, G.Y.; Zhu, R.Y.; Zichichi, A.; Zilizi, G.; Zimmermann, B.; Zoller, M.

    2001-01-01

    A search for the lightest neutral CP-even and the neutral CP-odd Higgs bosons of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model is performed using 233.2 pb-1 of integrated luminosity collected with the L3 detector at LEP at centre-of-mass energies 192-202 GeV. No signal is observed and lower mass limits are given as a function of tan(beta) for two scalar top mixing hypotheses. For tan(beta) greater than 0.8, they are mh > 83.4 GeV and mA > 83.8 GeV at 95 % confidence level.

  6. Development and implementation of a remote audit tool for high dose rate (HDR) Ir-192 brachytherapy using optically stimulated luminescence dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Kevin E; Alvarez, Paola; Kry, Stephen F; Howell, Rebecca M; Lawyer, Ann; Followill, David

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this work was to create a mailable phantom with measurement accuracy suitable for Radiological Physics Center (RPC) audits of high dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy sources at institutions participating in National Cancer Institute-funded cooperative clinical trials. Optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLDs) were chosen as the dosimeter to be used with the phantom. The authors designed and built an 8 × 8 × 10 cm(3) prototype phantom that had two slots capable of holding Al2O3:C OSLDs (nanoDots; Landauer, Glenwood, IL) and a single channel capable of accepting all (192)Ir HDR brachytherapy sources in current clinical use in the United States. The authors irradiated the phantom with Nucletron and Varian (192)Ir HDR sources in order to determine correction factors for linearity with dose and the combined effects of irradiation energy and phantom characteristics. The phantom was then sent to eight institutions which volunteered to perform trial remote audits. The linearity correction factor was kL = (-9.43 × 10(-5) × dose) + 1.009, where dose is in cGy, which differed from that determined by the RPC for the same batch of dosimeters using (60)Co irradiation. Separate block correction factors were determined for current versions of both Nucletron and Varian (192)Ir HDR sources and these vendor-specific correction factors differed by almost 2.6%. For the Nucletron source, the correction factor was 1.026 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.023-1.028], and for the Varian source, it was 1.000 (95% CI = 0.995-1.005). Variations in lateral source positioning up to 0.8 mm and distal∕proximal source positioning up to 10 mm had minimal effect on dose measurement accuracy. The overall dose measurement uncertainty of the system was estimated to be 2.4% and 2.5% for the Nucletron and Varian sources, respectively (95% CI). This uncertainty was sufficient to establish a ± 5% acceptance criterion for source strength audits under a formal RPC audit program. Trial

  7. Shape effects along the Z=82 line: study of the $\\beta$- decay of $^{188,190,192}$Pb using total absorption spectroscopy

    CERN Multimedia

    Caballero ontanaya, L; Garcia borge, M J; Malbrunot, S

    2002-01-01

    This proposal is aimed at the study of the $\\beta$- decay of the neutron-deficient $^{188,190,192}$Pb nuclei. The main motivation of the proposed experiment is to determine the Gamow-Teller strength distribution in the daughter nuclei using the Total Absorption Spectrometer "Lucrecia". Recent theoretical results show that from this measurement the shapes of the ground states of the decaying Pb nuclei can be inferred. This study offers an independent way to study the phenomenon of shape co-existence in a region of particular interest.

  8. Intercomparison of calibration procedures of high dose rate {sup 192} Ir sources in Brazil and a proposal of a new methodology; Intercomparacao de procedimientos de calibracao de fontes de {sup 192} Ir de alta taxa de dose no Brasil e proposta de uma nova metodologia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marechal, M.H.; Almeida, C.E. de [Laboratorio Nacional de Metrologia das Radiacoes Ionizantes IRD/CNEN. Caixa Postal 37750 CEP 22780-160 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    1998-12-31

    The objective of this paper is to report the results of an intercomparison of the calibration procedures for {sup 192} Ir sources presently in use in Brazil and to proposal a calibration procedure to derive the N{sub k} for a Farmer type ionization chamber for {sup 192} Ir energy by interpolating from a {sup 60} Co gamma-rays and 250 kV x-rays calibration factors. the intercomparison results were all within {+-} 3.0 % except one case where 4.6 % was observed and latter identified as a problem with N-k value for X-rays. The method proposed by the present work make possible the improvement of the metrological coherence among the calibration laboratories and their users once the N{sub k} values could then provided by any of the members of SSDL network. (Author)

  9. Real-Time Verification of a High-Dose-Rate Iridium 192 Source Position Using a Modified C-Arm Fluoroscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nose, Takayuki, E-mail: nose-takayuki@nms.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Nippon Medical School Tamanagayama Hospital, Tama (Japan); Chatani, Masashi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka Rosai Hospital, Sakai (Japan); Otani, Yuki [Department of Radiology, Kaizuka City Hospital, Kaizuka (Japan); Teshima, Teruki [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Osaka (Japan); Kumita, Shinichirou [Department of Radiology, Nippon Medical School Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)

    2017-03-15

    Purpose: High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy misdeliveries can occur at any institution, and they can cause disastrous results. Even a patient's death has been reported. Misdeliveries could be avoided with real-time verification methods. In 1996, we developed a modified C-arm fluoroscopic verification of an HDR Iridium 192 source position prevent these misdeliveries. This method provided excellent image quality sufficient to detect errors, and it has been in clinical use at our institutions for 20 years. The purpose of the current study is to introduce the mechanisms and validity of our straightforward C-arm fluoroscopic verification method. Methods and Materials: Conventional X-ray fluoroscopic images are degraded by spurious signals and quantum noise from Iridium 192 photons, which make source verification impractical. To improve image quality, we quadrupled the C-arm fluoroscopic X-ray dose per pulse. The pulse rate was reduced by a factor of 4 to keep the average exposure compliant with Japanese medical regulations. The images were then displayed with quarter-frame rates. Results: Sufficient quality was obtained to enable observation of the source position relative to both the applicators and the anatomy. With this method, 2 errors were detected among 2031 treatment sessions for 370 patients within a 6-year period. Conclusions: With the use of a modified C-arm fluoroscopic verification method, treatment errors that were otherwise overlooked were detected in real time. This method should be given consideration for widespread use.

  10. Treatment of squamous cell carcinomas of the floor of the mouth and tongue by interstitial high-dose-rate irradiation using iridium-192

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, M.; Menneking, H.; Langford, A. [Humboldt Univ. of Berlin, Clinic for Maxillofacial Surgery, Berlin (Germany); Koch, K. [Clinic Ernst von Bergman, Clinic for Radiation Therapy, Potsdam (Germany); Stahl, H. [Humboldt Univ. of Berlin, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Berlin (Germany)

    1998-02-01

    The results are presented of afterloading high-dose-rate-radiation with iridium-192 in 34 patients with squamous cell carcinomas of the floor of the mouth and tongue. Some patients were also treated surgically or given percutaneous radio- or chemotherapy. At the time of diagnosis, 28.0% had a T2 tumour, 41.9% a T3 tumour and 30.1% a T4 tumour. 41.2% had positive lymph nodes and 2.9% distant metastases. The response rate was 64.7%, 26.5% of which were complete remissions and 38.2% partial remissions. In 61.8% of cases, the tumour was recurrent and responded with a rate as high as 57.2%, 23.9% of which were complete remissions and 33.3% partial remissions. Survival times were dependent upon therapy results. The mean survival of patients with complete remission was 40.3 months, with partial remission 16.1 months as opposed to 7.2 and 3.5 months respectively in patients showing no change or progressive disease. It can be concluded that afterloading therapy using high-dose-rate-radiation with iridium-192 achieves good palliative results and should be looked at as a supplementary treatment modality for squamous cell carcinomas of the floor of the mouth and tongue. (au). 12 refs.

  11. Real-Time Verification of a High-Dose-Rate Iridium 192 Source Position Using a Modified C-Arm Fluoroscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nose, Takayuki; Chatani, Masashi; Otani, Yuki; Teshima, Teruki; Kumita, Shinichirou

    2017-03-15

    High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy misdeliveries can occur at any institution, and they can cause disastrous results. Even a patient's death has been reported. Misdeliveries could be avoided with real-time verification methods. In 1996, we developed a modified C-arm fluoroscopic verification of an HDR Iridium 192 source position prevent these misdeliveries. This method provided excellent image quality sufficient to detect errors, and it has been in clinical use at our institutions for 20 years. The purpose of the current study is to introduce the mechanisms and validity of our straightforward C-arm fluoroscopic verification method. Conventional X-ray fluoroscopic images are degraded by spurious signals and quantum noise from Iridium 192 photons, which make source verification impractical. To improve image quality, we quadrupled the C-arm fluoroscopic X-ray dose per pulse. The pulse rate was reduced by a factor of 4 to keep the average exposure compliant with Japanese medical regulations. The images were then displayed with quarter-frame rates. Sufficient quality was obtained to enable observation of the source position relative to both the applicators and the anatomy. With this method, 2 errors were detected among 2031 treatment sessions for 370 patients within a 6-year period. With the use of a modified C-arm fluoroscopic verification method, treatment errors that were otherwise overlooked were detected in real time. This method should be given consideration for widespread use. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. High-dose rate iridium-192 brachytherapy with flexible applicator. A trial toward decrease of stress during treatment and improvement of quality of life

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Keiji; Kasahara, Kotaro; Karashima, Takashi; Inoue, Yuichiro; Kariya, Shinji; Inomata, Taisuke; Yoshida, Shoji; Shuin, Taro [Kochi Medical School, Nankoku (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    We tried to improve the materials and methods of high-dose rate Iridium-192 brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer and evaluated the stress during the treatment in 20 patients with whom the therapy was performed. Rigid applicators made of stainless steel of 1.6 mm in diameter were indwelt with a template as usual for 30 hours in 14 patients (group A). Flexible applicators made of polyoxymethylene rosin (POM) of 2.0 mm in diameter were indwelt without a template for 30 hours after the applicator insertion in 6 patients (group B). We made inquiries about lumbago, inconvenience and necessity of assistant help and sleep in the course of therapy, and urinary incontinence and erectile function after the course of therapy as the QOL. The stress during the course of therapy in the patients of group B was obviously less than that of group A. There were no significant differences in urinary incontinence and erectile function after the course of therapy between group A and B. In this study, our trial successfully reduced the stress during the course of therapy in the patients with localized prostate cancer in the course of high-dose rate Iridium-192 brachytherapy. (author)

  13. Final Report for grant entitled "Production of Astatine-211 for U.S. Investigators"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilbur, Daniel Scott

    2012-12-12

    Alpha-particle emitting radionuclides hold great promise in the therapy of cancer, but few alpha-emitters are available to investigators to evaluate. Of the alpha-emitters that have properties amenable for use in humans, 211At is of particular interest as it does not have alpha-emitting daughter radionuclides. Thus, there is a high interest in having a source of 211At for sale to investigators in the US. Production of 211At is accomplished on a cyclotron using an alpha-particle beam irradiation of bismuth metal. Unfortunately, there are few cyclotrons available that can produce an alpha particle beam for that production. The University of Washington has a cyclotron, one of three in the U.S., that is currently producing 211At. In the proposed studies, the things necessary for production and shipment of 211At to other investigators will be put into place at UW. Of major importance is the efficient production and isolation of 211At in a form that can be readily used by other investigators. In the studies, production of 211At on the UW cyclotron will be optimized by determining the best beam energy and the highest beam current to maximize 211At production. As it would be very difficult for most investigators to isolate the 211At from the irradiated target, the 211At-isolation process will be optimized and automated to more safely and efficiently obtain the 211At for shipment. Additional tasks to make the 211At available for distribution include obtaining appropriate shipping vials and containers, putting into place the requisite standard operating procedures for Radiation Safety compliance at the levels of 211At activity to be produced / shipped, and working with the Department of Energy, Isotope Development and Production for Research and Applications Program, to take orders, make shipments and be reimbursed for costs of production and shipment.

  14. Production of Astatine-211 at the Duke University Medical Center for its regional distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zalutsky, Michael [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Systemic targeted radiation therapy and radioimmunotherapy continue to be important tools in the treatment of certain cancers. Because of their high energy and short path length, alpha particle emitters such as 211At are more effective than either external beam x- ray or in vivo beta radiation in delivering potentially curative doses of radiation. The limited clinical trials that have been conducted to date have yielded encouraging responses in some patients, e.g., malignant brain tumors. In order to escalate the additional necessary research and development in radiochemistry, radiobiology and efficacy evaluation of alpha particle radiotherapeutics, it is universally agreed that access to an affordable, reliable supply of 211At is warranted. In conjunction with the Department of Energy's intent to enhance stable and radioactive isotope availability for research applications, it is the primary objective of this project to improve 211At production and purification capabilities at Duke so that this radionuclide can be supplied to researchers at other institutions throughout the US.The most widely used 211At production method involves the α,2n reaction on Bismuth using a cyclotron with beams ≤ 28 MeV. Yields can be enhanced with use of an internal target that allows for a higher alpha fluence plus efficient heat dissipation in the target. Both of these items are in place at Duke; however, in order to support production for multi-institutional use, irradiation campaigns in excess of 50 µAp and four hours duration will be needed. Further, post-irradiation processing equipment is lacking that will enable the distribution process. Financial support is sought for i) a shielded, ventilated processing/containment hood; ii) development of a post-irradiation target retrieval system; iii) fabrication of a 211At distillation and recovery module and iv) a performance review and, where needed, an enhancement of seven major subsystems that comprise the CS-30 Cyclotron. With these modifications in place, routine production of ≥200 mCi of At-211 should be readily achievable, given our methodological development of At-211 target preparation, internal target irradiation and dry distillation to recover the radionuclide.

  15. A generic high-dose rate {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy source for evaluation of model-based dose calculations beyond the TG-43 formalism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballester, Facundo, E-mail: Facundo.Ballester@uv.es [Department of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, Burjassot 46100 (Spain); Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa [Department of Medical and Health Sciences (IMH), Radiation Physics, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping SE-581 85, Sweden and Department of Medical Physics, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm SE-171 76 (Sweden); Granero, Domingo [Department of Radiation Physics, ERESA, Hospital General Universitario, Valencia E-46014 (Spain); Haworth, Annette [Department of Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre and Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, Melbourne, Victoria 3000 (Australia); Mourtada, Firas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Helen F. Graham Cancer Center, Christiana Care Health System, Newark, Delaware 19713 (United States); Fonseca, Gabriel Paiva [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares – IPEN-CNEN/SP, São Paulo 05508-000, Brazil and Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW, School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht 6201 BN (Netherlands); Zourari, Kyveli; Papagiannis, Panagiotis [Medical Physics Laboratory, Medical School, University of Athens, 75 MikrasAsias, Athens 115 27 (Greece); Rivard, Mark J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States); Siebert, Frank-André [Clinic of Radiotherapy, University Hospital of Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Kiel 24105 (Germany); Sloboda, Ron S. [Department of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2, Canada and Department of Oncology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2R3 (Canada); and others

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In order to facilitate a smooth transition for brachytherapy dose calculations from the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Task Group No. 43 (TG-43) formalism to model-based dose calculation algorithms (MBDCAs), treatment planning systems (TPSs) using a MBDCA require a set of well-defined test case plans characterized by Monte Carlo (MC) methods. This also permits direct dose comparison to TG-43 reference data. Such test case plans should be made available for use in the software commissioning process performed by clinical end users. To this end, a hypothetical, generic high-dose rate (HDR) {sup 192}Ir source and a virtual water phantom were designed, which can be imported into a TPS. Methods: A hypothetical, generic HDR {sup 192}Ir source was designed based on commercially available sources as well as a virtual, cubic water phantom that can be imported into any TPS in DICOM format. The dose distribution of the generic {sup 192}Ir source when placed at the center of the cubic phantom, and away from the center under altered scatter conditions, was evaluated using two commercial MBDCAs [Oncentra{sup ®} Brachy with advanced collapsed-cone engine (ACE) and BrachyVision ACUROS{sup TM}]. Dose comparisons were performed using state-of-the-art MC codes for radiation transport, including ALGEBRA, BrachyDose, GEANT4, MCNP5, MCNP6, and PENELOPE2008. The methodologies adhered to recommendations in the AAPM TG-229 report on high-energy brachytherapy source dosimetry. TG-43 dosimetry parameters, an along-away dose-rate table, and primary and scatter separated (PSS) data were obtained. The virtual water phantom of (201){sup 3} voxels (1 mm sides) was used to evaluate the calculated dose distributions. Two test case plans involving a single position of the generic HDR {sup 192}Ir source in this phantom were prepared: (i) source centered in the phantom and (ii) source displaced 7 cm laterally from the center. Datasets were independently produced by

  16. Comparison of 3D dose distributions for HDR 192Ir brachytherapy sources with normoxic polymer gel dosimetry and treatment planning system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senkesen, Oznur; Tezcanli, Evrim; Buyuksarac, Bora; Ozbay, Ismail

    2014-01-01

    Radiation fluence changes caused by the dosimeter itself and poor spatial resolution may lead to lack of 3-dimensional (3D) information depending on the features of the dosimeter and quality assurance of dose distributions for high-dose rate (HDR) iridium-192 ((192)Ir) brachytherapy sources is challenging and experimental dosimetry methods used for brachytherapy sources are limited. In this study, we investigated 3D dose distributions of (192)Ir brachytherapy sources for irradiation with single and multiple dwell positions using a normoxic gel dosimeter and compared them with treatment planning system (TPS) calculations. For dose calibration purposes, 100-mL gel-containing vials were irradiated at predefined doses and then scanned in an magnetic resonance (MR) imaging unit. Gel phantoms prepared in 2 spherical glasses were irradiated with (192)Ir for the calculated dwell positions, and MR scans of the phantoms were obtained. The images were analyzed with MATLAB software. Dose distributions and profiles derived with 1-mm resolution were compared with TPS calculations. Linearity was observed between the delivered dose and the reciprocal of the T2 relaxation time constant of the gel. The x-, y-, and z-axes were defined as the sagittal, coronal, and axial planes, respectively, the sagittal and axial planes were defined parallel to the long axis of the source while the coronal plane was defined horizontally to the long axis of the source. The differences between measured and calculated profile widths of 3-cm source length and point source for 70%, 50%, and 30% isodose lines were evaluated at 3 dose levels using 18 profiles of comparison. The calculations for 3-cm source length revealed a difference of > 3mm in 1 coordinate at 50% profile width on the sagittal plane and 3 coordinates at 70% profile width and 2 coordinates at 50% and 30% profile widths on the axial plane. Calculations on the coronal plane for 3-cm source length showed > 3-mm difference in 1 coordinate at

  17. A generic high-dose rate (192)Ir brachytherapy source for evaluation of model-based dose calculations beyond the TG-43 formalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballester, Facundo; Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa; Granero, Domingo; Haworth, Annette; Mourtada, Firas; Fonseca, Gabriel Paiva; Zourari, Kyveli; Papagiannis, Panagiotis; Rivard, Mark J; Siebert, Frank-André; Sloboda, Ron S; Smith, Ryan L; Thomson, Rowan M; Verhaegen, Frank; Vijande, Javier; Ma, Yunzhi; Beaulieu, Luc

    2015-06-01

    In order to facilitate a smooth transition for brachytherapy dose calculations from the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Task Group No. 43 (TG-43) formalism to model-based dose calculation algorithms (MBDCAs), treatment planning systems (TPSs) using a MBDCA require a set of well-defined test case plans characterized by Monte Carlo (MC) methods. This also permits direct dose comparison to TG-43 reference data. Such test case plans should be made available for use in the software commissioning process performed by clinical end users. To this end, a hypothetical, generic high-dose rate (HDR) (192)Ir source and a virtual water phantom were designed, which can be imported into a TPS. A hypothetical, generic HDR (192)Ir source was designed based on commercially available sources as well as a virtual, cubic water phantom that can be imported into any TPS in DICOM format. The dose distribution of the generic (192)Ir source when placed at the center of the cubic phantom, and away from the center under altered scatter conditions, was evaluated using two commercial MBDCAs [Oncentra(®) Brachy with advanced collapsed-cone engine (ACE) and BrachyVision ACUROS™ ]. Dose comparisons were performed using state-of-the-art MC codes for radiation transport, including ALGEBRA, BrachyDose, GEANT4, MCNP5, MCNP6, and PENELOPE2008. The methodologies adhered to recommendations in the AAPM TG-229 report on high-energy brachytherapy source dosimetry. TG-43 dosimetry parameters, an along-away dose-rate table, and primary and scatter separated (PSS) data were obtained. The virtual water phantom of (201)(3) voxels (1 mm sides) was used to evaluate the calculated dose distributions. Two test case plans involving a single position of the generic HDR (192)Ir source in this phantom were prepared: (i) source centered in the phantom and (ii) source displaced 7 cm laterally from the center. Datasets were independently produced by different investigators. MC results were then

  18. Inside/outside Pt nanoparticles decoration of functionalised carbon nanofibers (Pt(19.2)/f-CNF(80.8)) for sensitive non-enzymatic electrochemical glucose detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Baljit; Dempsey, Eithne; Dickinson, Calum; Laffir, Fathima

    2012-04-07

    A highly efficient and reproducible approach for effective Pt nanoparticles dispersion and excellent decoration (inside/outside) of functionalised carbon nanofibers (f-CNF) is presented. The surface morphological, compositional and structural characterisations of the synthesised Pt(19.2)/f-CNF(80.8) material were examined using transmission electron microscopy (TEM/STEM/DF-STEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA/DTG), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Cyclic voltammetry (CV) was employed in order to confirm the typical electrochemical response for Pt. The aim of the work was to improve the utility of both the supporting matrix (via the use of both inner/outer surfaces of nanofibers) and precious Pt, together with the sensitive glucose determination. TEM data indicated successful nanoparticle decoration with average Pt particle size 2.4 nm. The studies demonstrated that utilisation of the inner surface of the nanofibers, together with the modified outer surface characteristics using chemical treatment, enables excellent decoration, effective dispersion and efficient impregnation of Pt nanoparticles on carbon nanofibers. Pt(19.2)/f-CNF(80.8) exhibited excellent amperometric response (sensitivity = 22.7 μAmM(-1)cm(-2) and LoD = 0.42 μM) towards direct glucose sensing, over the range 0-10 mM glucose, in neutral conditions (pH 7.4). The improved carbon surface area for nanoparticle decoration, inner surface structure and morphology of nanofibers together with the presence of functional groups provided strong interactions and stability. These features together with the effective nanoparticle dispersion and decoration resulted in excellent catalytic response. The decorated nanoscaled material (Pt(19.2)/f-CNF(80.8)) is capable of large scale production, providing sensing capability in neutral conditions, while eliminating the temperature sensitivity, pH and lifetime issues associated with

  19. A novel -192c/g mutation in the proximal P2 promoter of the hepatocyte nuclear factor-4 alpha gene (HNF4A) associates with late-onset diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ek, Jakob; Hansen, Sara P; Lajer, Maria

    2006-01-01

    Recently, it has been shown that mutations in the P2 promoter of the hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF)-4 alpha gene (HNF4A) cause maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY), while single nucleotide polymorphisms in this locus are associated with type 2 diabetes. In this study, we examined 1,189 bp......,812 glucose-tolerant subjects for the -192c/g mutation and identified 5 diabetic and 1 glucose-tolerant mutation carriers (P=0.004). Examination of the families showed that carriers of the -192c/g mutation had a significantly impaired glucose-stimulated insulin release and lower levels of serum total...

  20. Determination of $\\alpha_s$ from Hadronic Event Shapes in $e^+ e^-$ Annihilation at $192 \\le \\sqrt{s} \\le 208$ GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Achard, P.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Alcaraz, J.; Alemanni, G.; Allaby, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alviggi, M.G.; Anderhub, H.; Andreev, Valery P.; Anselmo, F.; Arefev, A.; Azemoon, T.; Aziz, T.; Bagnaia, P.; Bajo, A.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Baldew, S.V.; Banerjee, S.; Banerjee, Sw.; Barczyk, A.; Barillere, R.; Bartalini, P.; Basile, M.; Batalova, N.; Battiston, R.; Bay, A.; Becattini, F.; Becker, U.; Behner, F.; Bellucci, L.; Berbeco, R.; Berdugo, J.; Berges, P.; Bertucci, B.; Betev, B.L.; Biasini, M.; Biglietti, M.; Biland, A.; Blaising, J.J.; Blyth, S.C.; Bobbink, G.J.; Bohm, A.; Boldizsar, L.; Borgia, B.; Bottai, S.; Bourilkov, D.; Bourquin, M.; Braccini, S.; Branson, J.G.; Brochu, F.; Burger, J.D.; Burger, W.J.; Cai, X.D.; Capell, M.; Cara Romeo, G.; Carlino, G.; Cartacci, A.; Casaus, J.; Cavallari, F.; Cavallo, N.; Cecchi, C.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo, M.; Chang, Y.H.; Chemarin, M.; Chen, A.; Chen, G.; Chen, G.M.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, H.S.; Chiefari, G.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Clare, I.; Clare, R.; Coignet, G.; Colino, N.; Costantini, S.; de la Cruz, B.; Cucciarelli, S.; van Dalen, J.A.; de Asmundis, R.; Deglon, P.; Debreczeni, J.; Degre, A.; Deiters, K.; Della Volpe, D.; Delmeire, E.; Denes, P.; De Notaristefani, F.; De Salvo, A.; Diemoz, M.; Dierckxsens, M.; Dionisi, C.; Dittmar, M.; Doria, A.; Dova, M.T.; Duchesneau, D.; Echenard, B.; Eline, A.; El Mamouni, H.; Engler, A.; Eppling, F.J.; Ewers, A.; Extermann, P.; Falagan, M.A.; Falciano, S.; Favara, A.; Fay, J.; Fedin, O.; Felcini, M.; Ferguson, T.; Fesefeldt, H.; Fiandrini, E.; Field, J.H.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, P.H.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, I.; Forconi, G.; Freudenreich, K.; Furetta, C.; Galaktionov, Iouri; Ganguli, S.N.; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gataullin, M.; Gentile, S.; Giagu, S.; Gong, Z.F.; Grenier, Gerald Jean; Grimm, O.; Gruenewald, M.W.; Guida, M.; van Gulik, R.; Gupta, V.K.; Gurtu, A.; Gutay, L.J.; Haas, D.; Hakobian, R.Sh.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hebbeker, T.; Herve, Alain; Hirschfelder, J.; Hofer, H.; Hohlmann, M.; Holzner, G.; Hou, S.R.; Hu, Y.; Jin, B.N.; Jones, Lawrence W.; de Jong, P.; Josa-Mutuberria, I.; Kafer, D.; Kaur, M.; Kienzle-Focacci, M.N.; Kim, J.K.; Kirkby, Jasper; Kittel, W.; Klimentov, A.; Konig, A.C.; Kopal, M.; Koutsenko, V.; Kraber, M.; Kraemer, R.W.; Krenz, W.; Kruger, A.; Kunin, A.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Laktineh, I.; Landi, G.; Lebeau, M.; Lebedev, A.; Lebrun, P.; Lecomte, P.; Lecoq, P.; Le Coultre, P.; Le Goff, J.M.; Leiste, R.; Levtchenko, M.; Levchenko, P.; Li, C.; Likhoded, S.; Lin, C.H.; Lin, W.T.; Linde, F.L.; Lista, L.; Liu, Z.A.; Lohmann, W.; Longo, E.; Lu, Y.S.; Lubelsmeyer, K.; Luci, C.; Luminari, L.; Lustermann, W.; Ma, W.G.; Malgeri, L.; Malinin, A.; Mana, C.; Mangeol, D.; Mans, J.; Martin, J.P.; Marzano, F.; Mazumdar, K.; McNeil, R.R.; Mele, S.; Merola, L.; Meschini, M.; Metzger, W.J.; Mihul, A.; Milcent, H.; Mirabelli, G.; Mnich, J.; Mohanty, G.B.; Muanza, G.S.; Muijs, A.J.M.; Musicar, B.; Musy, M.; Nagy, S.; Natale, S.; Napolitano, M.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Newman, H.; Niessen, T.; Nisati, A.; Kluge, Hannelies; Ofierzynski, R.; Organtini, G.; Palomares, C.; Pandoulas, D.; Paolucci, P.; Paramatti, R.; Passaleva, G.; Patricelli, S.; Paul, Thomas Cantzon; Pauluzzi, M.; Paus, C.; Pauss, F.; Pedace, M.; Pensotti, S.; Perret-Gallix, D.; Petersen, B.; Piccolo, D.; Pierella, F.; Pioppi, M.; Piroue, P.A.; Pistolesi, E.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Pozhidaev, V.; Pothier, J.; Prokofev, D.O.; Prokofev, D.; Quartieri, J.; Rahal-Callot, G.; Rahaman, M.A.; Raics, P.; Raja, N.; Ramelli, R.; Rancoita, P.G.; Ranieri, R.; Raspereza, A.; Razis, P.; Ren, D.; Rescigno, M.; Reucroft, S.; Riemann, S.; Riles, Keith; Roe, B.P.; Romero, L.; Rosca, A.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Roth, Stefan; Rosenbleck, C.; Roux, B.; Rubio, J.A.; Ruggiero, G.; Rykaczewski, H.; Sakharov, A.; Saremi, S.; Sarkar, S.; Salicio, J.; Sanchez, E.; Sanders, M.P.; Schafer, C.; Shchegelsky, V.; Schmidt-Kaerst, S.; Schmitz, D.; Schopper, H.; Schotanus, D.J.; Schwering, G.; Sciacca, C.; Servoli, L.; Shevchenko, S.; Shivarov, N.; Shoutko, V.; Shumilov, E.; Shvorob, A.; Siedenburg, T.; Son, D.; Spillantini, P.; Steuer, M.; Stickland, D.P.; Stoyanov, B.; Straessner, A.; Sudhakar, K.; Sultanov, G.; Sun, L.Z.; Sushkov, S.; Suter, H.; Swain, J.D.; Szillasi, Z.; Tang, X.W.; Tarjan, P.; Tauscher, L.; Taylor, L.; Tellili, B.; Teyssier, D.; Timmermans, Charles; Ting, S.C.C.; Ting, S.M.; Tonwar, S.C.; Toth, J.; Tully, C.; Tung, K.L.; Ulbricht, J.; Valente, E.; Van de Walle, R.T.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vetlitsky, I.; Vicinanza, D.; Viertel, G.; Villa, S.; Vivargent, M.; Vlachos, S.; Vodopyanov, I.; Vogel, H.; Vogt, H.; Vorobev, I.; Vorobov, A.A.; Wadhwa, M.; Wallraff, W.; Wang, X.L.; Wang, Z.M.; Weber, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wilkens, H.; Wynhoff, S.; Xia, L.; Xu, Z.Z.; Yamamoto, J.; Yang, B.Z.; Yang, C.G.; Yang, H.J.; Yang, M.; Yeh, S.C.; Zalite, A.; Zalite, Yu.; Zhang, Z.P.; Zhao, J.; Zhu, G.Y.; Zhu, R.Y.; Zhuang, H.L.; Zichichi, A.; Zilizi, G.; Zimmermann, B.; Zoller, M.

    2002-01-01

    Results are presented from a study of the structure of high energy hadronic events recorded by the L3 detector at sqrt(s)>192 GeV. The distributions of several event shape variables are compared to resummed O(alphaS^2) QCD calculations. We determine the strong coupling constant at three average centre-of-mass energies: 194.4, 200.2 and 206.2 GeV. These measurements, combined with previous L3 measurements at lower energies demonstrate the running of alphaS as expected in QCD and yield alphaS(mZ) = 0.1227 +- 0.0012 +- 0.0058, where the first uncertainty is experimental and the second is theoretical.

  1. Measurement of hadron and lepton-pair production in $e^{+}e^{-}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 192 - 208 GeV$ at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Achard, P.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Alcaraz, J.; Alemanni, G.; Allaby, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alviggi, M.G.; Anderhub, H.; Andreev, Valery P.; Anselmo, F.; Arefiev, A.; Azemoon, T.; Aziz, T.; Bagnaia, P.; Bajo, A.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Baldew, S.V.; Banerjee, S.; Banerjee, Sw.; Barczyk, A.; Barillere, R.; Bartalini, P.; Basile, M.; Batalova, N.; Battiston, R.; Bay, A.; Becattini, F.; Becker, U.; Behner, F.; Bellucci, L.; Berbeco, R.; Berdugo, J.; Berges, P.; Bertucci, B.; Betev, B.L.; Biasini, M.; Biglietti, M.; Biland, A.; Blaising, J.J.; Blyth, S.C.; Bobbink, G.J.; Bohm, A.; Boldizsar, L.; Borgia, B.; Bottai, S.; Bourilkov, D.; Bourquin, M.; Braccini, S.; Branson, J.G.; Brochu, F.; Burger, J.D.; Burger, W.J.; Cai, X.D.; Capell, M.; Cara Romeo, G.; Carlino, G.; Cartacci, A.; Casaus, J.; Cavallari, F.; Cavallo, N.; Cecchi, C.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo, M.; Chang, Y.H.; Chemarin, M.; Chen, A.; Chen, G.; Chen, G.M.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, H.S.; Chiefari, G.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Clare, I.; Clare, R.; Coignet, G.; Colino, N.; Costantini, S.; de la Cruz, B.; Cucciarelli, S.; de Asmundis, R.; Deglon, P.; Debreczeni, J.; Degre, A.; Dehmelt, K.; Deiters, K.; della Volpe, D.; Delmeire, E.; Denes, P.; DeNotaristefani, F.; De Salvo, A.; Diemoz, M.; Dierckxsens, M.; Dionisi, C.; Dittmar, M.; Doria, A.; Dova, M.T.; Duchesneau, D.; Duda, M.; Echenard, B.; Eline, A.; El Hage, A.; El Mamouni, H.; Engler, A.; Eppling, F.J.; Extermann, P.; Falagan, M.A.; Falciano, S.; Favara, A.; Fay, J.; Fedin, O.; Felcini, M.; Ferguson, T.; Fesefeldt, H.; Fiandrini, E.; Field, J.H.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, P.H.; Fisher, W.; Forconi, G.; Freudenreich, K.; Furetta, C.; Galaktionov, Iouri; Ganguli, S.N.; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gataullin, M.; Gentile, S.; Giagu, S.; Gong, Z.F.; Grenier, Gerald Jean; Grimm, O.; Gruenewald, M.W.; Guida, M.; Gupta, V.K.; Gurtu, A.; Gutay, L.J.; Haas, D.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hebbeker, T.; Herve, Alain; Hirschfelder, J.; Hofer, H.; Hohlmann, M.; Holzner, G.; Hou, S.R.; Jin, B.N.; Jindal, P.; Jones, Lawrence W.; de Jong, P.; Josa-Mutuberria, I.; Kaur, M.; Kienzle-Focacci, M.N.; Kim, J.K.; Kirkby, J.; Kittel, W.; Klimentov, A.; Konig, A.C.; Kopal, M.; Koutsenko, V.; Kraber, M.; Kraemer, R.W.; Kruger, A.; Kunin, A.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Laktineh, I.; Landi, G.; Lebeau, M.; Lebedev, A.; Lebrun, P.; Lecomte, P.; Lecoq, P.; Le Coultre, P.; Le Goff, J.M.; Leiste, R.; Levtchenko, M.; Levtchenko, P.; Li, C.; Likhoded, S.; Lin, C.H.; Lin, W.T.; Linde, F.L.; Lista, L.; Liu, Z.A.; Lohmann, W.; Longo, E.; Lu, Y.S.; Luci, C.; Luminari, L.; Lustermann, W.; Ma, W.G.; Malgeri, L.; Malinin, A.; Mana, C.; Mans, J.; Martin, J.P.; Marzano, F.; Mazumdar, K.; McNeil, R.R.; Mele, S.; Merola, L.; Meschini, M.; Metzger, W.J.; Mihul, A.; Milcent, H.; Mirabelli, G.; Mnich, J.; Mohanty, G.B.; Muanza, G.S.; Muijs, A.J.M.; Musy, M.; Nagy, S.; Natale, S.; Napolitano, M.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Newman, H.; Nisati, A.; Novak, T.; Kluge, Hannelies; Ofierzynski, R.; Organtini, G.; Pal, I.; Palomares, C.; Paolucci, P.; Paramatti, R.; Passaleva, G.; Patricelli, S.; Paul, Thomas Cantzon; Pauluzzi, M.; Paus, C.; Pauss, F.; Pedace, M.; Pensotti, S.; Perret-Gallix, D.; Piccolo, D.; Pierella, F.; Pieri, M.; Pioppi, M.; Piroue, P.A.; Pistolesi, E.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Pojidaev, V.; Pothier, J.; Prokofiev, D.; Rahal-Callot, G.; Rahaman, Mohammad Azizur; Raics, P.; Raja, N.; Ramelli, R.; Rancoita, P.G.; Ranieri, R.; Raspereza, A.; Razis, P.; Rembeczki, S.; Ren, D.; Rescigno, M.; Reucroft, S.; Riemann, S.; Riles, Keith; Roe, B.P.; Romero, L.; Rosca, A.; Rosemann, C.; Rosenbleck, C.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Roth, Stefan; Rubio, J.A.; Ruggiero, G.; Rykaczewski, H.; Sakharov, A.; Saremi, S.; Sarkar, S.; Salicio, J.; Sanchez, E.; Schafer, C.; Schegelsky, V.; Schopper, H.; Schotanus, D.J.; Sciacca, C.; Servoli, L.; Shevchenko, S.; Shivarov, N.; Shoutko, V.; Shumilov, E.; Shvorob, A.; Son, D.; Souga, C.; Spillantini, P.; Steuer, M.; Stickland, D.P.; Stoyanov, B.; Straessner, A.; Sudhakar, K.; Sultanov, G.; Sun, L.Z.; Sushkov, S.; Suter, H.; Swain, J.D.; Szillasi, Z.; Tang, X.W.; Tarjan, P.; Tauscher, L.; Taylor, L.; Tellili, B.; Teyssier, D.; Timmermans, Charles; Ting, Samuel C.C.; Ting, S.M.; Tonwar, S.C.; Toth, J.; Tully, C.; Tung, K.L.; Ulbricht, J.; Valente, E.; Van de Walle, R.T.; Vasquez, R.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vetlitsky, I.; Viertel, G.; Villa, S.; Vivargent, M.; Vlachos, S.; Vodopianov, I.; Vogel, H.; Vogt, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Vorobyov, A.A.; Wadhwa, M.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X.L.; Wang, Z.M.; Weber, M.; Wynhoff, S.; Xia, L.; Xu, Z.Z.; Yamamoto, J.; Yang, B.Z.; Yang, C.G.; Yang, H.J.; Yang, M.; Yeh, S.C.; Zalite, An.; Zalite, Yu.; Zhang, Z.P.; Zhao, J.; Zhu, G.Y.; Zhu, R.Y.; Zhuang, H.L.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, B.; Zoller, M.

    2006-01-01

    Hadron production and lepton-pair production in e+e- collisions are studied with data collected with the L3 detector at LEP at centre-of-mass energies sqrt{s}=192-208GeV. Using a total integrated luminosity of 453/pb, 36057 hadronic events and 12863 lepton-pair events are selected. The cross sections for hadron production and lepton-pair production are measured for the full sample and for events where no high-energy initial-state-radiation photon is emitted prior to the collisions. Lepton-pair events are further investigated and forward-backward asymmetries are measured. Finally, the differential cross sections for electron-positron pair-production is determined as a function of the scattering angle. An overall good agreement is found with Standard Model predictions.

  2. ASSOCIATION OF POLYMORPHISMS GLN192ARG PON1 AND S3238G APOC3 IN WOMEN WITH CORONARY HEART DISEASE AND DIABETES MELLITUS TYPE 2 AND HYPOTHYROIDISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Fyodorova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to determine the frequency of alleles and genotypes of gene polymorphism PON1 — Gln192Arg A> G and ApoC3 — 3238C> G in women with coronary heart disease (CHD and diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM 2 and hypothyroidism, to determine the odds ratio (OR andrelative risk (RR of CHD depending on the genetic characteristics in this group of patients. Material and Methods: the studied 108 patients with stable angina II-III functional class, 35 of which have a combination of type 2 diabetes and hypothyroidism — 1 comparison group,36 women were with type 2 diabetes — 2 comparison group, 37 women with hypothyroidism — Group 3 comparison. The control group included 42 patients with stable angina II-III functional class without pathology of carbohydrate metabolism and the normal function of the thyroidgland. In addition, to eliminate the influence of hypothyroidism factor 4 comparison group was created (1 + 2 group, to avoid the influence of diabetes factor — 5 comparison group (1 + 3 group. Determined PON1 polymorphisms — Gln192Arg A> G and ApoC3 — 3238C> G bypolymerase chain reaction.Results: in women with coronary heart disease combined with type 2 diabetes is more common homozygous carriers of AA genotype polymorphism Gln192Arg PON1 (p = 0.03 for group 2, P = 0.04 for the 4 groups, respectively, while OR was 9.8 ( 95% CI,1,15-84,8 2 group and 7.5 (95% CI, 0,9-60,4 for group 4, respectively. OR CHD was 2.11 (95% CI, 1.4-3.0 and 1.54 (95% CI, 1,2-1,95 2 and group 4, respectively. In patients with coronary artery disease combined with type 2 diabetes showed more frequent carriers of the allele C (p = 0.02 and CG genotype polymorphism S3238G APOC3 (p = 0.01. OR 2 groups was 2.8 (95% CI, 1,0-7,8 for 4 groups — 2.7 (95% CI, 1,18-6,4. OR for CHD patients 4 groups was 1.5 (95% CI, 1,0-2,3.Conclusion: the association of genotype polymorphisms Gln192Arg PON1 and S3238G APOC3 in women with coronary heart disease in the background

  3. Evaluation of thermal X/5-detector Skylab S-192 data for estimating evapotranspiration and thermal properties of soils for irrigation management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, D. G.; Horton, M. L.; Russell, M. J.; Myers, V. I.

    1975-01-01

    An energy budget approach to evaluating the SKYLAB X/5-detector S-192 data for prediction of soil moisture and evapotranspiration rate was pursued. A test site which included both irrigated and dryland agriculture in Southern Texas was selected for the SL-4 SKYLAB mission. Both vegetated and fallow fields were included. Data for a multistage analysis including ground, NC-130B aircraft, RB-57F aircraft, and SKYLAB altitudes were collected. The ground data included such measurements as gravimetric soil moisture, percent of the ground covered by green vegetation, soil texture, net radiation, soil temperature gradients, surface emittance, soil heat flux, air temperature and humidity gradients, and cultural practices. Ground data were used to characterize energy budgets and to evaluate the utility of an energy budget approach for determining soil moisture differences among twelve specific agricultural fields.

  4. Intraluminal hyperthermia and radiotherapy using {sup 192}Ir remote after loading system in the treatment of unresectable hilar bile duct cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuchida, Akira; Itoh, Masaki; Fujii, Tohru [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine] [and others

    1995-10-01

    The efficacy of combined therapy of intraluminal hyperthermia and radiotherapy using remote after loading system (RALS) was compared with that of percutaneous transhepatic biliary endoprosthesis (PTBE) alone. The subjects were 60 patients having unresectable hilar bile duct cancer. Percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) was performed in the all patients, and additionally PTBE in 39, local infusion of bleomycin and intraluminal hyperthermia in 11, and internal irradiation (RALS) in 10. Four fractionated irradiation (4 Gy x 4) was performed on the site 10 mm from the source using {sup 192}Ir high dose RALS, and subsequently two fractionated brachytherapy of 10 Gy and 20 fractionated external irradiation of 40 Gy. The outcome was significantly improved in the RALS group, showing 50% survival time of 444.8 days (PTBE group, 228.7 days; hyperthermia group, 472 days). (S.Y.).

  5. A generic TG-186 shielded applicator for commissioning model-based dose calculation algorithms for high-dose-rate 192 Ir brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yunzhi; Vijande, Javier; Ballester, Facundo; Tedgren, Åsa Carlsson; Granero, Domingo; Haworth, Annette; Mourtada, Firas; Fonseca, Gabriel Paiva; Zourari, Kyveli; Papagiannis, Panagiotis; Rivard, Mark J; Siebert, Frank André; Sloboda, Ron S; Smith, Ryan; Chamberland, Marc J P; Thomson, Rowan M; Verhaegen, Frank; Beaulieu, Luc

    2017-11-01

    A joint working group was created by the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), the European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (ESTRO), and the Australasian Brachytherapy Group (ABG) with the charge, among others, to develop a set of well-defined test case plans and perform calculations and comparisons with model-based dose calculation algorithms (MBDCAs). Its main goal is to facilitate a smooth transition from the AAPM Task Group No. 43 (TG-43) dose calculation formalism, widely being used in clinical practice for brachytherapy, to the one proposed by Task Group No. 186 (TG-186) for MBDCAs. To do so, in this work a hypothetical, generic high-dose rate (HDR) 192 Ir shielded applicator has been designed and benchmarked. A generic HDR 192 Ir shielded applicator was designed based on three commercially available gynecological applicators as well as a virtual cubic water phantom that can be imported into any DICOM-RT compatible treatment planning system (TPS). The absorbed dose distribution around the applicator with the TG-186 192 Ir source located at one dwell position at its center was computed using two commercial TPSs incorporating MBDCAs (Oncentra® Brachy with Advanced Collapsed-cone Engine, ACE™, and BrachyVision ACUROS™) and state-of-the-art Monte Carlo (MC) codes, including ALGEBRA, BrachyDose, egs_brachy, Geant4, MCNP6, and Penelope2008. TPS-based volumetric dose distributions for the previously reported "source centered in water" and "source displaced" test cases, and the new "source centered in applicator" test case, were analyzed here using the MCNP6 dose distribution as a reference. Volumetric dose comparisons of TPS results against results for the other MC codes were also performed. Distributions of local and global dose difference ratios are reported. The local dose differences among MC codes are comparable to the statistical uncertainties of the reference datasets for the "source centered in water" and "source displaced" test

  6. Intermediate temperature ionic conductivity of Sm1.92Ca0.08Ti2O7–δ pyrochlore

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eurenius, Karinh E. J.; Bentzer, Henrik Karnøe; Bonanos, Nikolaos

    2011-01-01

    The results of concentration cell electromotive force methods (EMF) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements on the pyrochlore system Sm1.92Ca0.08Ti2O7–δ are presented. The data have been used to estimate total and partial conductivities and determine transport numbers for protons...... and oxide ions under various conditions. The EMF techniques employed include corrections for electrode polarisation resistance. The measurements were performed using wet and dry atmospheres in a wide range using mixtures of H2, N2, O2, and H2O in the temperature region where proton conductivity was expected...... (500–300 °C). The impedance measurements revealed the conductivity to be mainly ionic under all conditions, with the highest total conductivity measured being 0.045 S/m under wet oxygen at 500 °C. Both bulk and grain boundary conductivity was predominantly ionic, but electronic conductivity appeared...

  7. Mass attenuation coefficients of clear-Pb for photons from 125I, 103Pd, 99mTc, 192Ir, 137Cs and 60Co.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivard, M J; Waid, D S; Wierzbicki, J G

    1999-11-01

    The mass attenuation coefficients, mu/rho, for Clear-Pb for photon energies ranging from 10 keV to 10 MeV were determined using Monte Carlo methods and simple equations used to manipulate elemental mass attenuation coefficients. It was determined that the effectiveness of Clear-Pb as a radiation shielding material was greater than plain acrylic for all photon energies, especially those less than 150 keV, and for deep penetration problems where the differences in mu/rho between Clear-Pb and acrylic became more significant. Finally, the usefulness of Clear-Pb as a shielding material when compared with acrylic was determined for the following commonly used radionuclides: 125I, 103Pd, 99mTc, 192Ir, 137Cs, and 60Co.

  8. Cluster pattern analysis of energy deposition sites for the brachytherapy sources 103Pd, 125I, 192Ir, 137Cs, and 60Co.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villegas, Fernanda; Tilly, Nina; Bäckström, Gloria; Ahnesjö, Anders

    2014-09-21

    Analysing the pattern of energy depositions may help elucidate differences in the severity of radiation-induced DNA strand breakage for different radiation qualities. It is often claimed that energy deposition (ED) sites from photon radiation form a uniform random pattern, but there is indication of differences in RBE values among different photon sources used in brachytherapy. The aim of this work is to analyse the spatial patterns of EDs from 103Pd, 125I, 192Ir, 137Cs sources commonly used in brachytherapy and a 60Co source as a reference radiation. The results suggest that there is both a non-uniform and a uniform random component to the frequency distribution of distances to the nearest neighbour ED. The closest neighbouring EDs show high spatial correlation for all investigated radiation qualities, whilst the uniform random component dominates for neighbours with longer distances for the three higher mean photon energy sources (192Ir, 137Cs, and 60Co). The two lower energy photon emitters (103Pd and 125I) present a very small uniform random component. The ratio of frequencies of clusters with respect to 60Co differs up to 15% for the lower energy sources and less than 2% for the higher energy sources when the maximum distance between each pair of EDs is 2 nm. At distances relevant to DNA damage, cluster patterns can be differentiated between the lower and higher energy sources. This may be part of the explanation to the reported difference in RBE values with initial DSB yields as an endpoint for these brachytherapy sources.

  9. Dose error from deviation of dwell time and source position for high dose-rate 192Ir in remote afterloading system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Hiroyuki; Aikawa, Ako; Wakita, Akihisa; Yoshio, Kotaro; Murakami, Naoya; Nakamura, Satoshi; Hamada, Minoru; Abe, Yoshihisa; Itami, Jun

    2014-07-01

    The influence of deviations in dwell times and source positions for (192)Ir HDR-RALS was investigated. The potential dose errors for various kinds of brachytherapy procedures were evaluated. The deviations of dwell time ΔT of a (192)Ir HDR source for the various dwell times were measured with a well-type ionization chamber. The deviations of source position ΔP were measured with two methods. One is to measure actual source position using a check ruler device. The other is to analyze peak distances from radiographic film irradiated with 20 mm gap between the dwell positions. The composite dose errors were calculated using Gaussian distribution with ΔT and ΔP as 1σ of the measurements. Dose errors depend on dwell time and distance from the point of interest to the dwell position. To evaluate the dose error in clinical practice, dwell times and point of interest distances were obtained from actual treatment plans involving cylinder, tandem-ovoid, tandem-ovoid with interstitial needles, multiple interstitial needles, and surface-mold applicators. The ΔT and ΔP were 32 ms (maximum for various dwell times) and 0.12 mm (ruler), 0.11 mm (radiographic film). The multiple interstitial needles represent the highest dose error of 2%, while the others represent less than approximately 1%. Potential dose error due to dwell time and source position deviation can depend on kinds of brachytherapy techniques. In all cases, the multiple interstitial needles is most susceptible. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  10. Approaches to calculating AAPM TG-43 brachytherapy dosimetry parameters for 137Cs, 125I, 192Ir, 103Pd, and 169Yb sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melhus, Christopher S; Rivard, Mark J

    2006-06-01

    Underlying characteristics in brachytherapy dosimetry parameters for medical radionuclides 137Cs, 125I, 192Ir, 103Pd, and 169Yb were examined using Monte Carlo methods. Sources were modeled as unencapsulated point or line sources in liquid water to negate variations due to materials and construction. Importance of phantom size, mode of radiation transport physics--i.e., photon transport only or coupled photon:electron transport, phantom material, volume averaging, and Monte Carlo tally type were studied. For noninfinite media, g(r) was found to degrade as r approached R, the phantom radius. MCNP5 results were in agreement with those published using GEANT4. Brachytherapy dosimetry parameters calculated using coupled photon:electron radiation transport simulations did not differ significantly from those using photon transport only. Dose distributions from low-energy photon-emitting radionuclides 125I and 103Pd were sensitive to phantom material by upto a factor of 1.4 and 2.0, respectively, between tissue-equivalent materials and water at r =9 cm. In comparison, high-energy photons from 137Cs, 192Ir, and 169Yb demonstrated +/- 5% differences in dose distributions between water and tissue substitutes at r=20 cm. Similarly, volume-averaging effects were found to be more significant for low-energy radionuclides. When modeling line sources with L F4 track-length estimators were employed to determine brachytherapy dosimetry parameters. F6 was found to be necessary for g(r), while both tallies provided equivalent results for F(r, theta).

  11. Radiological protection on interstitial brachytherapy and dose determination and exposure rate of an Ir-192 source through the MCNP-4B; Proteccion radiologica en braquiterapia intersticial y determinacion de la dosis y tasa de exposicion de una fuente de Ir-192 mediante el MCNP-4B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales L, M.E. [INEN, Av. Angamos Este 2520- Surquillo, Lima (Peru)

    2006-07-01

    The present work was carried out in the Neurological Sciences Institute having as objective to determine the dose and the rate of exhibition of the sources of Iridium 192, Iodine 125 and Palladium 103; which are used to carry out implant in the Interstitial Brachytherapy according to the TG43. For it we carry out a theoretical calculation, its are defined in the enter file: the geometry, materials of the problem and the radiation source, etc; in the MCNP-4B Monte Carlo code, considering a punctual source and for the dose determination we simulate thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLD): at 5 cm, 50 cm, 100 cm and 200 cm of the source. Our purpose is to analyze the radioprotection measures that should take into account in this Institute in which are carried out brain biopsies using a Micro mar stereotactic mark, and in a near future with the collaboration of a doctor and a cuban physique seeks to be carried out the Interstitial Brachytherapy technique with sources of Ir-192 for patient with tumors like glioblastoma, astrocytoma, etc. (Author)

  12. Characterization of TLD-100 in powders for dosimetric quality control of {sup 192} Ir sources used in brachytherapy of high dose rate; Caracterizacion de TLD-100 en polvo para control de calidad dosimetrico de fuentes de Ir{sup 192} usadas en braquiterapia de alta tasa de dosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loaiza C, S.P

    2007-07-01

    The Secondary Standard Dosimetric at the National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ) calibrated a lot of powdered TLD-100 (LiF:Mg,Ti) in terms of absorbed dose to water D{sub w} for the energy of: {sup 60}Co, {sup 137C}s, X rays of 250 and 50 kVp. Later on, it is carried out an interpolation of the calibration for the energy of the {sup 192}Ir. This calibration is part of a dosimetric quality control program, to solve the problems of traceability for the measurements carried out by the users of {sup 192}Ir sources employed in the treatments of High Dose Rate Brachytherapy (HDR) at the Mexican Republic. The calibrations of the radiation beams are made with the following protocols: IAEA TRS-398 for the {sup 60}Co for D{sub w}, using a secondary standard ionization chamber PTW N30013 calibrated in D{sub w} by the National Research Council (NRC, Canada). AAPM TG-43 for D{sub w} in terms of the strength kerma Sk, calibrating this last one quantity for the {sup 137}Cs radioactive source, with a well chamber HDR 1000 PLUS traceable to the University of Wisconsin (US). AAPM TG-61 for X ray of 250 and 50 kVp for D{sub w} start to Ka using field standard a Farmer chamber PTW 30001 traceable to K for the Central Laboratory of Electric Industries (CLEI, France). The calibration curves (CC) they built for the response of the powder TLD: R{sub TLD} vs D{sub w}: For the energy of {sup 60}Co, {sup 137}Cs, X rays of 250 and 50 kVp. Fitting them with the least square method weighed by means of a polynomial of second grade that corrects the supra linearity of the response. iii. Each one of the curves was validated with a test by lack of fitting and for the Anderson Darling normality test, using the software MINITAB in both cases. iv. The sensibility factor (F{sub s}) for each energy corresponds to the slope of the CC, v. The F{sub s} for the two {sup 192}Ir sources used are interpolated: one for a Micro Selectron source and the other one a Vari Source source. Finally, a couple of

  13. Measurement of the absorbed dose distribution near an 192Ir intravascular brachytherapy seed using a high-spatial-resolution gel dosimetry system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massillon-JL, G.; Minniti, R.; Mitch, M. G.; Soares, C. G.

    2012-06-01

    The absorbed dose distribution at sub-millimeter distances from the Best single 192Ir intravascular brachytherapy seed was measured using a high-spatial-resolution gel dosimetry system. Two gel phantoms from the same batch were used; one for the seed irradiation and one for calibration. Since the response of this gel is energy independent for photons between 20 and 1250 keV, the gel was calibrated using a narrowly collimated 60Co gamma-ray beam (cross-sectional area ˜1 cm2). A small format laser computed tomography scanner was used to acquire the data. The measurements were carried out with a spatial resolution of 100 µm in all dimensions. The seed was calibrated at NIST in terms of air-kerma strength. The absorbed dose rate as well as the radial dose function, gL(r), was measured for radial distances between 0.6 and 12.6 mm from the seed center. The dose rate constant was measured, yielding a value of Λ = (1.122 ± 0.032) cGy h-1 U-1, which agrees with published data within the measurement uncertainty. For distances between 0.6 and 1.5 mm, gL(r) decreases from a maximum value of 1.06 down to 1.00; between 1.5 and 6.7 mm, an enhancement is clearly observed with a maximum value around 1.24 and beyond 6.7 mm, gL(r) has an approximately constant value around 1.0, which suggests that this seed can be considered as a point source only at distances larger than 6.7 mm. This latter observation agrees with data for the same seed reported previously using Gafchromic film MD-55-2. Additionally, published Monte Carlo (MC) calculations have predicted the observed behavior of the radial dose function resulting from the absorbed dose contributions of beta particles and electrons emitted by the 192Ir seed. Nonetheless, in the enhancement region, MC underestimates the dose by approximately 20%. This work suggests that beta particles and electrons emitted from the seed make a significant contribution to the total absorbed dose delivered at distances near the seed center (less

  14. Application of the Cavity theory in the calibration of the powder TLD-100 for energies of {sup 60} Co, {sup 137} Cs, {sup 192} Ir and RX 50, 250 k Vp; Aplicacion de la Teoria de la Cavidad en la calibracion de polvo TLD-100 para energias de {sup 60} Co, {sup 137} Cs, {sup 192} Ir y RX 50, 250 kVp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loaiza C, S.P. [UAEM, Programa de Maestria en Fisica Medica, 50180, Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Alvarez R, J.T. [ININ, 52750, Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: sandraplc_04@yahoo.com.mx

    2006-07-01

    A powder lot TLD-100 (LiF:Mg,Ti) in absorbed dose terms in water D{sub w} for the following radiation sources: {sup 60} Co, {sup 137} Cs and RX 50 and 250 k Vp is calibrated; to continuation is made a lineal interpolation of the TLD response in function of the effective energy of the sources to calibrate a source of {sup 192} Ir. The calibration of those fields in D{sub w} are carried out with aid of the Bragg-Gray cavity theory, the one which finds implicit in the following protocols: IAEA-TRS 398 for the {sup 60} Co and the AAPM TG61 for X Rays of 50 and 250 k Vp. Additionally the AAPM protocol TG43 to determine the D{sub w} in function of the kerma intensity S{sub k} in the case of the {sup 137} Cs is used. The calibration curves for the response of the TLD-100 R{sub TLD} vs D{sub w}, corresponding to each one of the sources already mentioned are constructed. The R{sub TLD} vs D{sub w} by least heavy square by means of a second order polynomial that corrects the supralineality of the response is adjusted. The curves are validated by lack of LOF adjustment and by the Anderson Darling normality test. Later the factors of sensitivity (F{sub s}) for the sources of {sup 192} Ir: Micro Selectron and Vari Source are interpolated, used respectively in the A and B hospitals for treatments of brachytherapy of high dose rate (HDR), the expanded uncertainties associated to the D{sub w} and F{sub s} are also determined. Finally, an acrylic phantom and a couple of capsules are already sent to the hospitals mentioned, to verify a nominal D{sub w} of 2 Gy, in a case an underestimate in 5.5% in the imparted D{sub w} and in other an overestimation in a range of -1.5 to -8.0% was obtained. The obtained results in this work establish the bases for the development of a national dosimetric quality control program for brachytherapy of HDR with sources of {sup 192} Ir. (Author)

  15. Characterization of a fiber-coupled Al2O3:C luminescence dosimetry system for online in vivo dose verification during Ir-192 brachytherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Claus Erik; Nielsen, Søren Kynde; Greilich, Steffen

    2009-01-01

    that fit into applicators such as standard needles or catheters. The system measures the absorbed dose rate (0.1 s time resolution) and total absorbed dose on the basis of radioluminescence (RL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) from aluminum oxide crystals attached to optical fiber cables (1 mm...... outer diameter). The system was tested in the range from 0 to 4 Gy using a solid-water phantom, a Varian GammaMed Plus Ir-192 PDR afterloader, and dosimetry probes inserted into stainless-steel brachytherapy needles. The calibrated system was found to be linear in the tested dose range......-to-probe distances in the range of 2-50 mm. Under certain conditions, the RL signal could be greatly disturbed by the so-called stem signal (i.e., unwanted light generated in the fiber cable upon irradiation). The OSL signal is not subject to this source of error. The tested system appears to be adequate for in vivo...

  16. Multiphoton events with large missing energy in $e^{+}e^{-}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=192-209 GeV$

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G; Åkesson, P F; Alexander, G; Allison, J; Amaral, P; Anagnostou, G; Anderson, K J; Arcelli, S; Asai, S; Axen, D; Azuelos, Georges; Bailey, I; Barberio, E; Barillari, T; Barlow, R J; Batley, J Richard; Bechtle, P; Behnke, T; Bell, K W; Bell, P J; Bella, G; Bellerive, A; Benelli, G; Bethke, Siegfried; Biebel, O; Bock, P; Boeriu, O; Boutemeur, M; Braibant, S; Brigliadori, L; Brown, R M; Büsser, K; Burckhart, H J; Campana, S; Carnegie, R K; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Chang, C Y; Charlton, D G; Ciocca, C; Csilling, A; Cuffiani, M; Dado, S; de Roeck, A; De Wolf, E A; Desch, Klaus; Dienes, B; Donkers, M; Dubbert, J; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Duerdoth, I P; Etzion, E; Fabbri, F L; Feld, L; Ferrari, P; Fiedler, F; Fleck, I; Ford, M; Frey, A; Gagnon, P; Gary, J W; Gaycken, G; Geich-Gimbel, C; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, P; Giunta, M; Goldberg, J; Gross, E; Grunhaus, Jacob; Gruwé, M; Günther, P O; Sen-Gupta, A; Hajdu, C; Hamann, M; Hanson, G G; Harel, A; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R; Hemingway, R J; Herten, G; Heuer, R D; Hill, J C; Hoffman, K; Horváth, D; Igo-Kemenes, P; Ishii, K; Jeremie, H; Jovanovic, P; Junk, T R; Kanaya, N; Kanzaki, J; Karlen, D; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Keeler, R K; Kellogg, R G; Kennedy, B W; Kluth, S; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Komamiya, S; Kramer, T; Krieger, P; Krüger, K; Kühl, T; Kupper, M; Lafferty, G D; Landsman, H; Lanske, D; Layter, J G; Lellouch, D; Letts, J; Levinson, L; Lillich, J; Lloyd, S L; Loebinger, F K; Lü, J; Ludwig, A; Ludwig, J; Mader, W; Marcellini, S; Martin, A J; Masetti, G; Mashimo, T; Mättig, P; McKenna, J; McPherson, R A; Meijers, F; Menges, W; Merritt, F S; Mes, H; Meyer, N; Michelini, A; Mihara, S; Mikenberg, G; Miller, D J; Moed, S; Mohr, W; Mori, T; Mutter, A; Nagai, K; Nakamura, I; Nanjo, H; Neal, H A; Nisius, R; O'Neale, S W; Oh, A; Oreglia, M J; Orito, S; Pahl, C; Pásztor, G; Pater, J R; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, J L; Plane, D E; Poli, B; Pooth, O; Przybycien, M B; Quadt, A; Rabbertz, K; Rembser, C; Renkel, P; Roney, J M; Rozen, Y; Runge, K; Sachs, K; Saeki, T; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Schaile, A D; Schaile, O; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schieck, J; Schörner-Sadenius, T; Schröder, M; Schumacher, M; Scott, W G; Seuster, R; Shears, T G; Shen, B C; Sherwood, P; Skuja, A; Smith, A M; Sobie, R J; Söldner-Rembold, S; Spanó, F; Stahl, A; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Tarem, S; Tasevsky, M; Teuscher, R; Thomson, M A; Torrence, E; Toya, D; Tran, P; Trigger, I; Trócsányi, Z L; Tsur, E; Turner-Watson, M F; Ueda, I; Ujvári, B; Vannerem, P; Vertesi, R; Verzocchi, M; Vollmer, C F; Voss, H; Vossebeld, Joost Herman; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Wells, P S; Wengler, T; Wermes, N; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J A; Wolf, G; Wyatt, T R; Yamashita, S; Zer-Zion, D; Zivkovic, L; Von Krogh, J

    2004-01-01

    Events with a final state consisting of two or more photons and large missing transverse energy have been observed in e^{+}e^{-} collisions at centre-of-mass energies in the range 192-209 GeV using the OPAL detector at LEP. Cross-section measurements are performed within the kinematic acceptance of the selection and compared with the expectations from the standard model process e^{+}e^{-} to nu nu gamma gamma ( gamma ). No evidence for new physics contributions to this final state is observed. Upper limits on sigma (e^{+}e^{-} to XX).BR/sup 2/(X to Y gamma ) are derived for the case of stable and invisible Y. In the case of massive Y the combined limits obtained from all the data range from 10 to 60 fb, while for the special case of massless Y the range is 20 to 40 fb. The limits apply to pair production of excited neutrinos (X= nu *, Y= nu ), to neutralino production (X= chi /sub 2//sup 0/, Y= chi /sub 1//sup 0/ and to supersymmetric models in which X= chi /sub 1//sup 0/ and Y=G is a light gravitino.

  17. Multi-Photon Events with Large Missing Energy in $e^{+}e^{-}$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=192-209 GeV$

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G; Åkesson, P F; Alexander, G; Allison, J; Amaral, P; Anagnostou, G; Anderson, K J; Arcelli, S; Asai, S; Axen, D A; Azuelos, Georges; Bailey, I; Barberio, E; Barillari, T; Barlow, R J; Batley, J Richard; Bechtle, P; Behnke, T; Bell, K W; Bell, P J; Bella, G; Bellerive, A; Benelli, G; Bethke, Siegfried; Biebel, O; Boeriu, O; Bock, P; Boutemeur, M; Braibant, S; Brigliadori, L; Brown, R M; Büsser, K; Burckhart, H J; Campana, S; Carnegie, R K; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Chang, C Y; Charlton, D G; Ciocca, C; Csilling, A; Cuffiani, M; Dado, S; de Roeck, A; De Wolf, E A; Desch, Klaus; Dienes, B; Donkers, M; Dubbert, J; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Duerdoth, I P; Etzion, E; Fabbri, Franco Luigi; Feld, L; Ferrari, P; Fiedler, F; Fleck, I; Ford, M; Frey, A; Gagnon, P; Gary, J W; Gaycken, G; Geich-Gimbel, C; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, P; Giunta, M; Goldberg, J; Gross, E; Grunhaus, Jacob; Gruwé, M; Günther, P O; Sen-Gupta, A; Hajdu, C; Hamann, M; Hanson, G G; Harel, A; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R; Hemingway, R J; Herten, G; Heuer, R D; Hill, J C; Hoffman, K; Horváth, D; Igo-Kemenes, P; Ishii, K; Jeremie, H; Jovanovic, P; Junk, T R; Kanaya, N; Kanzaki, J; Karlen, Dean A; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Keeler, R K; Kellogg, R G; Kennedy, B W; Kluth, S; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Komamiya, S; Kramer, T; Krieger, P; Von Krogh, J; Krüger, K; Kühl, T; Kupper, M; Lafferty, G D; Landsman, Hagar Yaël; Lanske, D; Layter, J G; Lellouch, D; Letts, J; Levinson, L; Lillich, J; Lloyd, S L; Loebinger, F K; Lü, J; Ludwig, A; Ludwig, J; Mader, W; Marcellini, S; Martin, A J; Masetti, G; Mashimo, T; Mättig, P; McKenna, J A; McPherson, R A; Meijers, F; Menges, W; Merritt, F S; Mes, H; Meyer, N; Michelini, A; Mihara, S; Mikenberg, G; Miller, D J; Moed, S; Mohr, W; Mori, T; Mutter, A; Nagai, K; Nakamura, I; Nanjo, H; Neal, H A; Nisius, R; O'Neale, S W; Oh, A; Oreglia, M J; Orito, S; Pahl, C; Pásztor, G; Pater, J R; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, J L; Plane, D E; Poli, B; Pooth, O; Przybycien, M B; Quadt, A; Rabbertz, K; Rembser, C; Renkel, P; Roney, J M; Rozen, Y; Runge, K; Sachs, K; Saeki, T; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Schaile, A D; Schaile, O; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schieck, J; Schörner-Sadenius, T; Schröder, M; Schumacher, M; Scott, W G; Seuster, R; Shears, T G; Shen, B C; Sherwood, P; Skuja, A; Smith, A M; Sobie, R J; Söldner-Rembold, S; Spanó, F; Stahl, A; Strom, D; Ströhmer, R; Tarem, S; Tasevsky, M; Teuscher, R; Thomson, M A; Torrence, E; Toya, D; Tran, P; Trigger, I; Trócsányi, Z L; Tsur, E; Turner-Watson, M F; Ueda, I; Ujvári, B; Vollmer, C F; Vannerem, P; Vertesi, R; Verzocchi, M; Voss, H; Vossebeld, Joost Herman; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Wells, P S; Wengler, T; Wermes, N; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J A; Wolf, G; Wyatt, T R; Yamashita, S; Zer-Zion, D; Zivkovic, L

    2004-01-01

    Events with a final state consisting of two or more photons and large missing transverse energy have been observed in e+e- collisions at centre-of-mass energies in the range 192 - 209 GeV using the OPAL detector at LEP. Cross-section measurements are performed within the kinematic acceptance of the selection and compared with the expectation from the Standard Model process e+e- -> nu nu gamma gamma(gamma). No evidence for new physics contributions to this final state is observed. Upper limits on sigma (e+e- -> XX) BR^2(X -> Ygamma) are derived for the case of stable and invisible Y. In the case of massive Y the combined limits obtained from all the data range from 10 fb to 60 fb, while for the special case of massless Y the range is 20 fb to 40 fb. The limits apply to pair production of excited neutrions (X=nu^*,Y=nu), to neutralino production (X=~chi^0_2, Y=~chi^0_1) and to supersymmetric models in which X=~chi^0_1 and Y=~G is a light gravitino.

  18. Development of a new flexible electrode for interstitial hyperthermia compatible with a high dose rate {sup 192}Ir remote after-loading system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchida, Nobue; Moriyama, Masahiro; Kitagaki, Hajime [Shimane Medical Univ., Izumo (Japan); Kato, Hirokazu; Kasai, Toshifumi; Sugimura, Kazuro

    1999-09-01

    We developed a new electrode for induction of RF interstitial hyperthermia combined with a high dose rate (HDR) {sup 192}Ir remote after-loading system (RALS), and studied the heating characteristics of using an agar phantom. This hyperthermia induction system consists of two types of electrodes: a flexible internal electrode made of coil-spring (1.14 mm in diameter, 5 or 10-cm in length) which can be inserted into a 5-Fr. nylon RALS catheter; and a rectangular external electrode made of copper plate. The results from computer simulation showed that overheating does not occur in proximity to the external electrode. Experiments using the phantom showed that with application of a 5 W at 13.56 MHz RF signal for 2 min, the temperature rose uniformly along the electrode, while no overheating around the outer electrode was observed. The specific absorption rate (SAR) values at 1-cm and 1.5-cm distance were about 25% and 7%, respectively, with 100% defined as the value at the electrode. The electrodes we developed efficiently provide a uniform distribution of increasing temperature, suggesting that their use may make it possible to avoid the trauma of catheter re-insertion. (author)

  19. Ratio of ellipticities between 192 and 208 nm (R1): An effective electronic circular dichroism parameter for characterization of the helical components of proteins and peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Raja; Sheet, Tridip

    2017-11-01

    Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy represents an important tool for characterization of the peptide and protein secondary structures that mainly arise from the conformational disposition of the peptide backbone in solution. In 1991 Manning and Woody proposed that, in addition to the signal intensity, the ratio between [θ]nπ* and [θ]ππ*ǁ ((R 2 ) ≅ [θ] 222 /[θ] 208 ), along with [θ]ππ*⊥ and [θ]ππ*ǁ ((R 1 ) ≅ [θ] 192 /[θ] 208 ), may be utilized towards identifying the peptide/protein conformation (especially 3 10 - and α-helices). However, till date the use of the ratiometric ellipticity component for helical structure analysis of peptides and proteins has not been reported. We studied a series of temperature dependent CD spectra of a thermally stable, model helical peptide and its related analogs in water as a function of added 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (TFE) in order to explore their landscape of helicity. For the first time, we have experimentally shown here that the R 1 parameter can characterize better the individual helices, while the other parameter R 2 and the signal intensity do not always converge. We emphasize the use of the R 1 ratio of ellipticities for helical characterization because of the common origin of these two bands (exciton splitting of the amide π→ π* transition in a helical polypeptide). This approach may become worthwhile and timely with the increasing accessibility of CD synchrotron sources. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Metal stent and endoluminal high-dose rate [sup 192]iridium brachytherapy in palliative treatment of malignant biliary tract obstruction. First experiences. Metallgeflecht-Endoprothese und intraluminare High-dose-rate-[sup 192]Iridium-Brachytherapie zur palliativen Behandlung maligner Gallengangsobstruktionen. Erste Erfahrungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pakisch, B.; Stuecklschweiger, G.; Poier, E.; Leitner, H.; Poschauko, J.; Hackl, A. (Universitaets-Klinik fuer Radiologie, Abt. fuer Strahlentherapie, Graz (Austria)); Klein, G.E.; Lammer, J.; Hausegger, K.A. (Universitaets-Klinik fuer Radiologie, Abt. fuer Spezielle Roentgendiagnostik und Digitale Bilddiagnostische Verfahren, Graz (Austria))

    1992-06-01

    Since December 1989, 9 patients with inoperable malignant biliary tract obstruction were treated palliatively by a combined modality treatment consisting of placement of a permanent biliary endoprosthesis followed by intraluminal high dose-rate [sup 192]Ir brachytherapy. A dose of 10 Gy was delivered in a hyperfractionated schedule at the point of reference in a distance of 7.5 mm of centre of the source. External small field radiotherapy (50.4 Gy, 1.8 Gy per day, 5 fractions per week) was also given in six cases (M/O, Karnofsky >60%). In 9/9 cases an unrestrained bile flow and an interruption of pruritus was achieved, in 78% (7/9) of cases the duration of palliation was as long as the survival time (median survival time 7.5 months). (orig.).

  1. Mice Develop Effective but Delayed Protective Immune Responses When Immunized as Neonates either Intranasally with Nonliving VP6/LT(R192G) or Orally with Live Rhesus Rotavirus Vaccine Candidates

    OpenAIRE

    VanCott, John L.; Prada, Anne E.; McNeal, Monica M.; Stone, Susan C.; Basu, Mitali; Huffer, Bert; Smiley, Kristi L.; Shao, Mingyuan; Bean, Judy A.; Clements, John D.; Choi, Anthony H.-C.; Ward, Richard L.

    2006-01-01

    Rotavirus vaccines are delivered early in life, when the immune system is immature. To determine the effects of immaturity on responses to candidate vaccines, neonatal (7 days old) and adult mice were immunized with single doses of either Escherichia coli-expressed rotavirus VP6 protein and the adjuvant LT(R192G) or live rhesus rotavirus (RRV), and protection against fecal rotavirus shedding following challenge with the murine rotavirus strain EDIM was determined. Neonatal mice immunized intr...

  2. Cytochrome P450 CYP 2C19*2 Associated with Adverse 1-Year Cardiovascular Events in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You-Quan Wei

    Full Text Available The cytochrome P450 (CYP450 2C19 681 genotypes affect the antiplatelet activity of clopidogrel. We investigated the correlation of CYP 2C19 681G > A mutation with clopidogrel resistance (CR. Additionally, we studied the effect of CR on clinical prognosis of patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS.One hundred ten ACS patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention, who were followed-up for 1 year, were included in the study. The patients were co-administered aspirin 100 mg/d and clopidogrel 75mg/d following a loading dose of 300 mg. CR was assessed on the basis of polymorphism observed in the CYP2C19 subgroup.Patients in GG genotype group exhibited greater inhibition of platelet aggregation than patients in GA and AA genotype groups (16.2 ± 10.1%; 10.2 ± 9.9%; 8.0 ± 5.9%, respectively, p < 0.01. CYP2C19 681GG genotype group was associated with lower CR than CYP2C19 681A allele (GA + AA group (9/59 vs. (12+5/51; p = 0.009. Over a follow-up of 12 months, the incidence of recurrent angina, acute myocardial infarction, and intra-stent thrombosis in CYP2C19 681 GG carriers was significantly lower than that in CYP2C19 681A allele (GA + AA group (2/59 vs. 8/51, 1/59 vs. 6/51, 0 vs. 4/51, respectively, p < 0.05.CYP 2C19*2 is associated with reduced clopidogrel antiplatelet activity and might be an important marker for poor prognosis of ACS.

  3. Characterization of a fiber-coupled Al2O3:C luminescence dosimetry system for online in vivo dose verification during 192Ir brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Claus E; Nielsen, Søren Kynde; Greilich, Steffen; Helt-Hansen, Jakob; Lindegaard, Jacob Christian; Tanderup, Kari

    2009-03-01

    A prototype of a new dose-verification system has been developed to facilitate prevention and identification of dose delivery errors in remotely afterloaded brachytherapy. The system allows for automatic online in vivo dosimetry directly in the tumor region using small passive detector probes that fit into applicators such as standard needles or catheters. The system measures the absorbed dose rate (0.1 s time resolution) and total absorbed dose on the basis of radioluminescence (RL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) from aluminum oxide crystals attached to optical fiber cables (1 mm outer diameter). The system was tested in the range from 0 to 4 Gy using a solid-water phantom, a Varian GammaMed Plus 192Ir PDR afterloader, and dosimetry probes inserted into stainless-steel brachytherapy needles. The calibrated system was found to be linear in the tested dose range. The reproducibility (one standard deviation) for RL and OSL measurements was 1.3%. The measured depth-dose profiles agreed well with the theoretical expectations computed with the EGSNRC Monte Carlo code, suggesting that the energy dependence for the dosimeter probes (relative to water) is less than 6% for source-to-probe distances in the range of 2-50 mm. Under certain conditions, the RL signal could be greatly disturbed by the so-called stem signal (i.e., unwanted light generated in the fiber cable upon irradiation). The OSL signal is not subject to this source of error. The tested system appears to be adequate for in vivo brachytherapy dosimetry.

  4. SU-G-201-13: Investigation of Dose Variation Induced by HDR Ir-192 Source Global Shift Within the Varian Ring Applicator Using Monte Carlo Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Y; Cai, J; Meltsner, S; Chang, Z; Craciunescu, O [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The Varian tandem and ring applicators are used to deliver HDR Ir-192 brachytherapy for cervical cancer. The source path within the ring is hard to predict due to the larger interior ring lumen. Some studies showed the source could be several millimeters different from planned positions, while other studies demonstrated minimal dosimetric impact. A global shift can be applied to limit the effect of positioning offsets. The purpose of this study was to assess the necessities of implementing a global source shift using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Methods: The MCNP5 radiation transport code was used for all MC simulations. To accommodate TG-186 guidelines and eliminate inter-source attenuation, a BrachyVision plan with 10 dwell positions (0.5cm step sizes) was simulated as the summation of 10 individual sources with equal dwell times for simplification. To simplify the study, the tandem was also excluded from the MC model. Global shifts of ±0.1, ±0.3, ±0.5 cm were then simulated as distal and proximal from the reference positions. Dose was scored in water for all MC simulations and was normalized to 100% at the normalization point 0.5 cm from the cap in the ring plane. For dose comparison, Point A was 2 cm caudal from the buildup cap and 2 cm lateral on either side of the ring axis. With seventy simulations, 108 photon histories gave a statistical uncertainties (k=1) <2% for (0.1 cm)3 voxels. Results: Compared to no global shift, average Point A doses were 0.0%, 0.4%, and 2.2% higher for distal global shifts, and 0.4%, 2.8%, and 5.1% higher for proximal global shifts, respectively. The MC Point A doses differed by < 1% when compared to BrachyVision. Conclusion: Dose variations were not substantial for ±0.3 cm global shifts, which is common in clinical practice.

  5. GAS KINEMATICS AND THE DRAGGED MAGNETIC FIELD IN THE HIGH-MASS MOLECULAR OUTFLOW SOURCE G192.16-3.84: AN SMA VIEW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Hauyu Baobab; Ho, Paul T. P. [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Qiu Keping [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Zhang Qizhou [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Girart, Josep M. [Institut de Ciencies de l' Espai, (CSIC-IEEC), Campus UAB, Facultat de Ciencies, C5p 2, E-08193 Bellaterra, Catalonia (Spain)

    2013-07-01

    We report Submillimeter Array (SMA) observations of polarized 0.88 mm thermal dust emission and various molecular line transitions toward the early B-type (L{sub *} {approx} 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3} L{sub Sun }) star-forming region G192.16-3.84 (IRAS 05553+1631). The peak of the continuum Stokes-I emission coincides with a hot rotating disk/envelope (SO{sub 2} rotational temperature T{sub rot}{sup SO{sub 2}}{approx}84{sup +18}{sub -13} K), with a north-south velocity gradient. Joint analysis of the rotation curve traced by HCO{sup +} 4-3 and SO{sub 2} 19{sub 1,19}-18{sub 0,18} suggests that the dense molecular gas is undergoing a spinning-up rotation, marginally bound by the gravitational force of an enclosed mass M{sub *+gas+dust} {approx} 11.2-25.2 M{sub Sun }. Perpendicular to the rotational plane, a {approx}>100/cos (i) km s{sup -1} (i {approx} 63 Degree-Sign ) high velocity molecular jet and a {approx}15-20 km s{sup -1} expanding biconical cavity were revealed in the CO 3-2 emission. The polarization percentage of the 0.88 mm continuum emission decreases toward the central rotating disk/envelope. The polarization angle in the inner {approx}2'' (0.015 pc) disk/envelope is perpendicular to the plane of the rotation. The magnetic field lines, which are predominantly in the toroidal direction along the disk plane, are likely to be dragged by the gravitationally accelerated rotation.

  6. Pharmacodynamic and cytogenetic evaluation in CYP2C19*2 and CYP2C19*3 allelomorphism in South Indian population with clopidogrel therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantray, Javeed Ahmad; Reddy, K Pratap; Jamil, Kaiser; Kumar, Y Shiva

    2017-02-15

    Genetic factors play a significant role in pathogenesis of most diseases of heart. The present study was undertaken to correlate coronary artery disease with demographical, biochemical alterations, SNPs, gene expression and chromosomal abnormalities and for further enlightening the investigation in this field. 150 patients taking clopidogrel drug were selected and single nucleotide polymorphism was done by PCR-RFLP techniques. With the same patients cytogenetic analysis was carried out on leukocyte cultures by karyotyping. Gene expression studies for 20 CAD patients and normal controls were done by RT-PCR techniques. In this study of patients with coronary artery disease the frequencies of the Extreme Metabolizers, Intermediate Metabolizers in CYP2C19*2 (rs4244285) were present in 90% and 10% but no Poor Metabolizers were found in this allele. The frequencies of Extreme Metabolizer, Intermediate Metabolizer and Poor Metabolizer in CYP2C19*3 (rs4986893) were present in 41%, 50% and 9% respectively. Among 20 CAD samples, 13 of 20 (65%) showed CYP2C19 gene over expression in CAD patients and all controls showed normal expression. Among the 150 CAD patients, 145 had normal karyotype, only five patients showed change in normal karyogram carried out by leukocyte culture. Genetic testing of CYP2C19 may help in prescribing a dose according to genetic makeup and represent the initial steps towards the development of diagnostic tests and therapeutic strategies that will substantially improve human health. This study highlights the progress that has been made in using pharmacogenomic and gene expression analysis, cardiovascular genomic research and the potential for applying these findings in clinical medicine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Pre-chemotherapy risk factors for invasive fungal diseases: prospective analysis of 1,192 patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (SEIFEM 2010-a multicenter study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caira, Morena; Candoni, Anna; Verga, Luisa; Busca, Alessandro; Delia, Mario; Nosari, Annamaria; Caramatti, Cecilia; Castagnola, Carlo; Cattaneo, Chiara; Fanci, Rosa; Chierichini, Anna; Melillo, Lorella; Mitra, Maria Enza; Picardi, Marco; Potenza, Leonardo; Salutari, Prassede; Vianelli, Nicola; Facchini, Luca; Cesarini, Monica; De Paolis, Maria Rosaria; Di Blasi, Roberta; Farina, Francesca; Venditti, Adriano; Ferrari, Antonella; Garzia, Mariagrazia; Gasbarrino, Cristina; Invernizzi, Rosangela; Lessi, Federica; Manna, Annunziata; Martino, Bruno; Nadali, Gianpaolo; Offidani, Massimo; Paris, Laura; Pavone, Vincenzo; Rossi, Giuseppe; Spadea, Antonio; Specchia, Giorgina; Trecarichi, Enrico Maria; Vacca, Adriana; Cesaro, Simone; Perriello, Vincenzo; Aversa, Franco; Tumbarello, Mario; Pagano, Livio

    2015-02-01

    Correct definition of the level of risk of invasive fungal infections is the first step in improving the targeting of preventive strategies. We investigated the potential relationship between pre-hospitalization exposure to sources of fungi and the development of invasive fungal infections in adult patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia after their first course of chemotherapy. From January 2010 to April 2012, all consecutive acute myeloid leukemia patients in 33 Italian centers were prospectively registered. Upon first admission, information about possible pre-chemotherapy risk factors and environmental exposure was collected. We recorded data regarding comorbid conditions, employment, hygienic habits, working and living environment, personal habits, hobbies, and pets. All invasive fungal infections occurring within 30 days after the first course of chemotherapy were recorded. Of the 1,192 patients enrolled in this study, 881 received intensive chemotherapy and were included in the present analysis. Of these, 214 developed an invasive fungal infection, including 77 proven/probable cases (8.7%). Of these 77 cases, 54 were proven/probable invasive mold infections (6.1%) and 23 were proven yeast infections (2.6%). Upon univariate analysis, a significant association was found between invasive mold infections and age, performance status, diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, smoking, cocaine use, job, hobbies, and a recent house renovation. Higher body weight resulted in a reduced risk of invasive mold infections. Multivariate analysis confirmed the role of performance status, job, body weight, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and house renovation. In conclusion, several hospital-independent variables could potentially influence the onset of invasive mold infections in patients with acute myeloid leukemia. Investigation of these factors upon first admission may help to define a patient's risk category and improve targeted prophylactic

  8. SU-F-T-15: Evaluation of 192Ir, 60Co and 169Yb Sources for High Dose Rate Prostate Brachytherapy Inverse Planning Using An Interior Point Constraint Generation Algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mok Tsze Chung, E; Aleman, D [University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Safigholi, H; Nicolae, A; Davidson, M; Ravi, A; Song, W [Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The effectiveness of using a combination of three sources, {sup 60}Co, {sup 192}Ir and {sup 169}Yb, is analyzed. Different combinations are compared against a single {sup 192}Ir source on prostate cancer cases. A novel inverse planning interior point algorithm is developed in-house to generate the treatment plans. Methods: Thirteen prostate cancer patients are separated into two groups: Group A includes eight patients with the prostate as target volume, while group B consists of four patients with a boost nodule inside the prostate that is assigned 150% of the prescription dose. The mean target volume is 35.7±9.3cc and 30.6±8.5cc for groups A and B, respectively. All patients are treated with each source individually, then with paired sources, and finally with all three sources. To compare the results, boost volume V150 and D90, urethra Dmax and D10, and rectum Dmax and V80 are evaluated. For fair comparison, all plans are normalized to a uniform V100=100. Results: Overall, double- and triple-source plans were better than single-source plans. The triple-source plans resulted in an average decrease of 21.7% and 1.5% in urethra Dmax and D10, respectively, and 8.0% and 0.8% in rectum Dmax and V80, respectively, for group A. For group B, boost volume V150 and D90 increased by 4.7% and 3.0%, respectively, while keeping similar dose delivered to the urethra and rectum. {sup 60}Co and {sup 192}Ir produced better plans than their counterparts in the double-source category, whereas {sup 60}Co produced more favorable results than the remaining individual sources. Conclusion: This study demonstrates the potential advantage of using a combination of two or three sources, reflected in dose reduction to organs-at-risk and more conformal dose to the target. three sources, reflected in dose reduction to organs-at-risk and more conformal dose to the target. Our results show that {sup 60}Co, {sup 192}Ir and {sup 169}Yb produce the best plans when used simultaneously and

  9. Comparison of organ doses for patients undergoing balloon brachytherapy of the breast with HDR {sup 192}Ir or electronic sources using Monte Carlo simulations in a heterogeneous human phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mille, Matthew M.; Xu, X. George; Rivard, Mark J. [Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics Program, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States)

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: Accelerated partial breast irradiation via interstitial balloon brachytherapy is a fast and effective treatment method for certain early stage breast cancers. The radiation can be delivered using a conventional high-dose rate (HDR) {sup 192}Ir gamma-emitting source or a novel electronic brachytherapy (eBx) source which uses lower energy x rays that do not penetrate as far within the patient. A previous study [A. Dickler, M. C. Kirk, N. Seif, K. Griem, K. Dowlatshahi, D. Francescatti, and R. A. Abrams, ''A dosimetric comparison of MammoSite high-dose-rate brachytherapy and Xoft Axxent electronic brachytherapy,'' Brachytherapy 6, 164-168 (2007)] showed that the target dose is similar for HDR {sup 192}Ir and eBx. This study compares these sources based on the dose received by healthy organs and tissues away from the treatment site. Methods: A virtual patient with left breast cancer was represented by a whole-body, tissue-heterogeneous female voxel phantom. Monte Carlo methods were used to calculate the dose to healthy organs in a virtual patient undergoing balloon brachytherapy of the left breast with HDR {sup 192}Ir or eBx sources. The dose-volume histograms for a few organs which received large doses were also calculated. Additional simulations were performed with all tissues in the phantom defined as water to study the effect of tissue inhomogeneities. Results: For both HDR {sup 192}Ir and eBx, the largest mean organ doses were received by the ribs, thymus gland, left lung, heart, and sternum which were close to the brachytherapy source in the left breast. eBx yielded mean healthy organ doses that were more than a factor of {approx}1.4 smaller than for HDR {sup 192}Ir for all organs considered, except for the three closest ribs. Excluding these ribs, the average and median dose-reduction factors were {approx}28 and {approx}11, respectively. The volume distribution of doses in nearby soft tissue organs that were outside the PTV were also

  10. Do high-risk infants have a poorer outcome from primary repair of coarctation? Analysis of 192 infants over 20 years.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGuinness, Jonathan G

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Balloon angioplasty for infant coarctation is associated with a high recurrence rate, making operative repair the gold standard for low-risk infants. Debate exists as to whether high-risk infants might be better served with primary angioplasty. We compared the outcome in high-risk versus low-risk infants over 20 years, in a center that always used surgical repair as the primary intervention. METHODS: Of 192 infants from 1986 to 2005, 56 were considered "high-risk," defined as requiring prostaglandin infusion together with either epinephrine infusion for 24 hours preoperatively, or ventilation and milrinone infusion for 24 hours preoperatively. All high-risk patients had a period of ventricular dysfunction prior to surgery, ranging from mild to severe. Outcomes were compared using Bonferroni comparison of means or the Fischer exact test as appropriate. RESULTS: Although the high-risk patients were smaller (3.3 +\\/- 0.1 vs 4.2 +\\/- 0.2 kg, p < 0.01), younger (18 +\\/- 4 vs 57 +\\/- 7 days, p < 0.01), and more often required a concomitant pulmonary artery band (25% vs 15%, p = 0.05), their cross-clamp times were the same as the low-risk patients (18.9 +\\/- 0.9 vs 18.0 +\\/- 0.4 minutes, p = 0.27) and there was no difference in postoperative morbidity (7% vs 3%, p = 0.11). However, there was a trend toward higher perioperative mortality (7% vs 2%, p = 0.07). When compared with the published studies of primary angioplasty in comparable high-risk infants, the mortality rate in our surgically treated high-risk group is much lower. Additionally, only 11% of our high-risk group required reintervention, with two-thirds treated successfully with a single angioplasty at 3.8 +\\/- 2.2 years later, far lower than recurrence rates with primary angioplasty. CONCLUSIONS: We propose that primary surgical repair of coarctation in infants who are high risk should be the primary treatment, with angioplasty reserved for recurrent coarctation.

  11. Predictive factors for the local recurrence and distant metastasis of phyllodes tumors of the breast: a retrospective analysis of 192 cases at a single center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jing; Tan, Yu-Ting; Cai, Yu-Cen; Yuan, Zhong-Yu; Yang, Dong; Wang, Shu-Sen; Peng, Rou-Jun; Teng, Xiao-Yu; Liu, Dong-Geng; Shi, Yan-Xia

    2014-01-01

    The local recurrence rate of phyllodes tumors of the breast varies widely among different subtypes, and distant metastasis is associated with poor survival. This study aimed to identify factors that are predictive of local recurrence-free survival (LRFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), and overall survival (OS) in patients with phyllodes tumors of the breast. Clinical data of all patients with a phyllodes tumor of the breast (n = 192) treated at Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center between March 1997 and December 2012 were reviewed. The Pearson χ2 test was used to investigate the relationship between clinical features of patients and histotypes of tumors. Univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses were performed to identify factors that are predictive of LRFS, DMFS, and OS. In total, 31 (16.1%) patients developed local recurrence, and 12 (6.3%) developed distant metastasis. For the patients who developed local recurrence, the median age at the diagnosis of primary tumor was 33 years (range, 17-56 years), and the median size of primary tumor was 6.0 cm (range, 0.8-18 cm). For patients who developed distant metastasis, the median age at the diagnosis of primary tumor was 46 years (range, 24-68 years), and the median size of primary tumor was 5.0 cm (range, 0.8-18 cm). In univariate analysis, age, size, hemorrhage, and margin status were found to be predictive factors for LRFS (P = 0.009, 0.024, 0.004, and 0.001, respectively), whereas histotype, epithelial hyperplasia, margin status, and local recurrence were predictors of DMFS (P = 0.001, 0.007, 0.007, and tumor size (HR = 2.668, P = 0.013), histotype (HR = 1.715, P = 0.017), and margin status (HR = 4.530, Ptumor size, a higher tumor grade, and positive margins were associated with lower rates of LRFS. Histotype and margin status were found to be independent predictors of DMFS and OS. PMID:25104281

  12. SU-E-T-580: On the Significance of Model Based Dosimetry for Breast and Head and Neck 192Ir HDR Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peppa, V; Pappas, E; Pantelis, E; Papagiannis, P [Medical Physics Laboratory, Medical School, University of Athens, Athens (Greece); Major, T; Polgar, C [National Institute of Oncology, Budapest (Hungary)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To assess the dosimetric and radiobiological differences between TG43-based and model-based dosimetry in the treatment planning of {sup 192}Ir HDR brachytherapy for breast and head and neck cancer. Methods: Two cohorts of 57 Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation (APBI) and 22 head and neck (H&N) patients with oral cavity carcinoma were studied. Dosimetry for the treatment plans was performed using the TG43 algorithm of the Oncentra Brachy v4.4 treatment planning system (TPS). Corresponding Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were performed using MCNP6 with input files automatically prepared by the BrachyGuide software tool from DICOM RT plan data. TG43 and MC data were compared in terms of % dose differences, Dose Volume Histograms (DVHs) and related indices of clinical interest for the Planning Target Volume (PTV) and the Organs-At-Risk (OARs). A radiobiological analysis was also performed using the Equivalent Uniform Dose (EUD), mean survival fraction (S) and Tumor Control Probability (TCP) for the PTV, and the Normal Tissue Control Probability (N TCP) and the generalized EUD (gEUD) for the OARs. Significance testing of the observed differences performed using the Wilcoxon paired sample test. Results: Differences between TG43 and MC DVH indices, associated with the increased corresponding local % dose differences observed, were statistically significant. This is mainly attributed to their consistency however, since TG43 agrees closely with MC for the majority of DVH and radiobiological parameters in both patient cohorts. Differences varied considerably among patients only for the ipsilateral lung and ribs in the APBI cohort, with a strong correlation to target location. Conclusion: While the consistency and magnitude of differences in the majority of clinically relevant DVH indices imply that no change is needed in the treatment planning practice, individualized dosimetry improves accuracy and addresses instances of inter-patient variability observed. Research

  13. Dose calculation in eye brachytherapy with Ir-192 threads using the Sievert integral and corrected by attenuation and scattering with the Meisberg polynomials; Calculo de dosis en braquiterapia ocular con hilos de Ir-192 utilizando la integral de Sievert y cooregida por atenuacion y dispersion con los polinomios de Meisberg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vivanco, M.G. Bernui de; Cardenas R, A. [Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Neoplasicas, Universidad Nacional de Ingenieria, Av. Angamos No. 2520, Surquillo, Lima (Peru)]. e-mail: gisellebdv@hotmail.com

    2006-07-01

    The ocular brachytherapy many times unique alternative to conserve the visual organ in patients of ocular cancer, one comes carrying out in the National Institute of Neoplastic Illnesses (INEN) using threads of Iridium 192; those which, they are placed in radial form on the interior surface of a spherical cap of gold of 18 K; the cap remains in the eye until reaching the prescribed dose by the doctor. The main objective of this work is to be able to calculate in a correct and practical way the one time that the treatment of ocular brachytherapy should last to reach the dose prescribed by the doctor. To reach this objective I use the Sievert integral corrected by attenuation effects and scattering (Meisberg polynomials); calculating it by the Simpson method. In the calculations by means of the Sievert integral doesn't take into account the scattering produced by the gold cap neither the variation of the constant of frequency of exposure with the distance. The calculations by means of Sievert integral are compared with those obtained using the Monte Carlo Penelope simulation code, where it is observed that they agree at distances of the surface of the cap greater or equal to 2mm. (Author)

  14. Mice develop effective but delayed protective immune responses when immunized as neonates either intranasally with nonliving VP6/LT(R192G) or orally with live rhesus rotavirus vaccine candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanCott, John L; Prada, Anne E; McNeal, Monica M; Stone, Susan C; Basu, Mitali; Huffer, Bert; Smiley, Kristi L; Shao, Mingyuan; Bean, Judy A; Clements, John D; Choi, Anthony H-C; Ward, Richard L

    2006-05-01

    Rotavirus vaccines are delivered early in life, when the immune system is immature. To determine the effects of immaturity on responses to candidate vaccines, neonatal (7 days old) and adult mice were immunized with single doses of either Escherichia coli-expressed rotavirus VP6 protein and the adjuvant LT(R192G) or live rhesus rotavirus (RRV), and protection against fecal rotavirus shedding following challenge with the murine rotavirus strain EDIM was determined. Neonatal mice immunized intranasally with VP6/LT(R192G) were unprotected at 10 days postimmunization (dpi) and had no detectable rotavirus B-cell (antibody) or CD4(+) CD8(+) T-cell (rotavirus-inducible, Th1 [gamma interferon and interleukin-2 {IL-2}]-, Th2 [IL-5 and IL-4]-, or ThIL-17 [IL-17]-producing spleen cells) responses. However, by 28 and 42 dpi, these mice were significantly (P >or= 0.003) protected and contained memory rotavirus-specific T cells but produced no rotavirus antibody. In contrast, adult mice were nearly fully protected by 10 dpi and contained both rotavirus immunoglobulin G and memory T cells. Neonates immunized orally with RRV were also less protected (P=0.01) than adult mice by 10 dpi and produced correspondingly less rotavirus antibody. Both groups contained few rotavirus-specific memory T cells. Protection levels by 28 dpi for neonates or adults were equal, as were rotavirus antibody levels. This report introduces a neonatal mouse model for active protection studies with rotavirus vaccines. It indicates that, with time, neonatal mice develop full protection after intranasal immunization with VP6/LT(R192G) or oral immunization with a live heterologous rotavirus and supports reports that protection depends on CD4(+) T cells or antibody, respectively.

  15. Circulating miR-150, miR-192, miR-200b, and miR-423-3p as Non-invasive Biomarkers of Chronic Allograft Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zununi Vahed, Sepideh; Poursadegh Zonouzi, Ahmad; Mahmoodpoor, Fariba; Samadi, Nasser; Ardalan, Mohammadreza; Omidi, Yadollah

    2017-01-01

    Chronic allograft dysfunction (CAD) is the major cause of renal allograft loss and can only be diagnosed by invasive histological examinations. The current study aimed to determine whether or not the circulating miR-125a, miR-150, miR-192, miR-200b, miR-423-3p and miR-433 could serve as predictors of graft outcome in the renal transplant recipients with CAD. To evaluate the expression levels of miRNAs, we used quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) and analyzed the plasma samples of 53 renal transplant recipients, including: 27 recipients with stable graft function (SGF), 26 recipients with biopsy-proven interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy (IFTA) and 15 healthy controls. Possible correlation between the clinicopathological parameters and the studied circulating miRNAs was also evaluated. miR-150 (p <0.001), miR-192 (p = 0.003), miR-200b (p = 0.048) and miR-423-3p (p <0.001) were differentially expressed between IFTA and SGF plasma samples. Creatinine correlated with miR-192 (r = 0.414, p = 0.036) and miR-423-3p (r = -0.431, p = 0.028). Moreover, the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) significantly correlated with the circulating miR-192 (r = -0.390, p = 0.049) and miR-423 (r = 0.432, p = 0.028). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis indicated that four miRNAs possessed the best diagnostic value for discriminating IFTA from SGF recipients with the areas under the curve (AUC) of 0.87 and high sensitivity and specificity values of 78% and 91%, respectively. The results suggest that aberrant plasma levels of these miRNAs are associated with the renal allograft dysfunction. Therefore, they are proposed to be considered as potential diagnostic biomarkers for monitoring of renal graft function. Copyright © 2017 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. 1.92 Tb/s coherent DWDM-OFDMA-PON with no high-speed ONU-side electronics over 100 km SSMF and 1:64 passive split.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvijetic, Neda; Huang, Ming-Fang; Ip, Ezra; Shao, Yin; Huang, Yue-Kai; Cvijetic, Milorad; Wang, Ting

    2011-11-21

    Record 1.92-Tb/s (40λ × 48 Gb/s/λ) coherent DWDM-OFDMA-PON without high-speed ONU-side ADCs/DACs/DSP/RF clock sources is demonstrated over 100 km straight SSMF with a 1:64 passive split. Novel optical-domain OFDMA sub-band selection, coherent detection, and simple RF components are exploited. As the first experimental verification of a next-generation optical platform capable of delivering 1 Gb/s to 1000(+) users over 100 km, the new architecture is promising for future optical access/metro systems. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  17. SU-F-T-32: Evaluation of the Performance of a Multiple-Array-Diode Detector for Quality Assurance Tests in High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy with Ir-192 Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harpool, K; De La Fuente Herman, T; Ahmad, S; Ali, I [University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the performance of a two-dimensional (2D) array-diode- detector for geometric and dosimetric quality assurance (QA) tests of high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy with an Ir-192-source. Methods: A phantom setup was designed that encapsulated a two-dimensional (2D) array-diode-detector (MapCheck2) and a catheter for the HDR brachytherapy Ir-192 source. This setup was used to perform both geometric and dosimetric quality assurance for the HDR-Ir192 source. The geometric tests included: (a) measurement of the position of the source and (b) spacing between different dwell positions. The dosimteric tests include: (a) linearity of output with time, (b) end effect and (c) relative dose verification. The 2D-dose distribution measured with MapCheck2 was used to perform the previous tests. The results of MapCheck2 were compared with the corresponding quality assurance testes performed with Gafchromic-film and well-ionization-chamber. Results: The position of the source and the spacing between different dwell-positions were reproducible within 1 mm accuracy by measuring the position of maximal dose using MapCheck2 in contrast to the film which showed a blurred image of the dwell positions due to limited film sensitivity to irradiation. The linearity of the dose with dwell times measured from MapCheck2 was superior to the linearity measured with ionization chamber due to higher signal-to-noise ratio of the diode readings. MapCheck2 provided more accurate measurement of the end effect with uncertainty < 1.5% in comparison with the ionization chamber uncertainty of 3%. Although MapCheck2 did not provide absolute calibration dosimeter for the activity of the source, it provided accurate tool for relative dose verification in HDR-brachytherapy. Conclusion: The 2D-array-diode-detector provides a practical, compact and accurate tool to perform quality assurance for HDR-brachytherapy with an Ir-192 source. The diodes in MapCheck2 have high radiation sensitivity and

  18. The mean photon energy anti E{sub F} at the point of measurement determines the detector-specific radiation quality correction factor k{sub Q,M} in {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chofor, Ndimofor; Harder, Dietrich; Selbach, Hans-Joachim; Poppe, Bjoern [University of Oldenburg and Pius-Hospital Oldenburg (Germany). Medical Radiation Physics Group

    2016-11-01

    The application of various radiation detectors for brachytherapy dosimetry has motivated this study of the energy dependence of radiation quality correction factor k{sub Q,M}, the quotient of the detector responses under calibration conditions at a {sup 60}Co unit and under the given non-reference conditions at the point of measurement, M, occurring in photon brachytherapy. The investigated detectors comprise TLD, radiochromic film, ESR, Si diode, plastic scintillator and diamond crystal detectors as well as ionization chambers of various sizes, whose measured response-energy relationships, taken from the literature, served as input data. Brachytherapy photon fields were Monte-Carlo simulated for an ideal isotropic {sup 192}Ir point source, a model spherical {sup 192}Ir source with steel encapsulation and a commercial HDR GammaMed Plus source. The radial source distance was varied within cylindrical water phantoms with outer radii ranging from 10 to 30 cm and heights from 20 to 60 cm. By application of this semiempirical method - originally developed for teletherapy dosimetry - it has been shown that factor k{sub Q,M} is closely correlated with a single variable, the fluence-weighted mean photon energy anti E{sub F} at the point of measurement. The radial profiles of anti E{sub F} obtained with either the commercial {sup 192}Ir source or the two simplified source variants show little variation. The observed correlations between parameters k{sub Q,M} and anti E{sub F} are represented by fitting formulae for all investigated detectors, and further variation of the detector type is foreseen. The herewith established close correlation of radiation quality correction factor k{sub Q,M} with local mean photon energy anti E{sub F} can be regarded as a simple regularity, facilitating the practical application of correction factor k{sub Q,M} for in-phantom dosimetry around {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy sources. anti E{sub F} values can be assessed by Monte Carlo simulation or

  19. The mean photon energy ĒF at the point of measurement determines the detector-specific radiation quality correction factor kQ,M in (192)Ir brachytherapy dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chofor, Ndimofor; Harder, Dietrich; Selbach, Hans-Joachim; Poppe, Björn

    2016-09-01

    The application of various radiation detectors for brachytherapy dosimetry has motivated this study of the energy dependence of radiation quality correction factor kQ,M, the quotient of the detector responses under calibration conditions at a (60)Co unit and under the given non-reference conditions at the point of measurement, M, occurring in photon brachytherapy. The investigated detectors comprise TLD, radiochromic film, ESR, Si diode, plastic scintillator and diamond crystal detectors as well as ionization chambers of various sizes, whose measured response-energy relationships, taken from the literature, served as input data. Brachytherapy photon fields were Monte-Carlo simulated for an ideal isotropic (192)Ir point source, a model spherical (192)Ir source with steel encapsulation and a commercial HDR GammaMed Plus source. The radial source distance was varied within cylindrical water phantoms with outer radii ranging from 10 to 30cm and heights from 20 to 60cm. By application of this semiempirical method - originally developed for teletherapy dosimetry - it has been shown that factor kQ,M is closely correlated with a single variable, the fluence-weighted mean photon energy ĒF at the point of measurement. The radial profiles of ĒF obtained with either the commercial (192)Ir source or the two simplified source variants show little variation. The observed correlations between parameters kQ,M and ĒF are represented by fitting formulae for all investigated detectors, and further variation of the detector type is foreseen. The herewith established close correlation of radiation quality correction factor kQ,M with local mean photon energy ĒF can be regarded as a simple regularity, facilitating the practical application of correction factor kQ,M for in-phantom dosimetry around (192)Ir brachytherapy sources. ĒF values can be assessed by Monte Carlo simulation or measurement. A technique describing the local measurement of ĒF will be published separately. Copyright

  20. Evaluation of Novel Wet Chemistry Separation and Purification Methods to Facilitate Automation of Astatine-­211 Isolation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilbur, Daniel Scott [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2016-07-19

    This research is a collaborative effort between the research groups of the PIs, Dr. D. Scott Wilbur in the Department of Radiation Oncology at the University of Washington (UW) and Matthew O’Hara at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). In this report only those studies conducted at UW and the budget information from UW will be reported. A separate progress and financial report will be provided by PNNL. This final report outlines the experiments (Tasks) conducted and results obtained at UW from July 1, 2013 thru June 30, 2016 (2-­year project with 1 year no-­cost extension). The report divides the information on the experiments and results obtained into the 5 specific objectives of the research efforts and the Tasks within those objectives. This format is used so that it is easy to see what has been accomplished in each area. A brief summary of the major findings from the studies is provided below. Summary of Major Findings from Research/Training Activities at UW: Anion and cation exchange columns did not provide adequate 211At capture and/or extraction results under conditions studied to warrant further evaluation; PEG-­Merrifield resins containing mPEG350, mPEG750, mPEG2000 and mPEG5000 were synthesized and evaluated; All of the mPEG resins with different sized mPEG moieties conjugated gave similar 211At capture (>95%) from 8M HCl solutions and release with conc. NH4OH (~50-­80%), but very low quantities were released when NaOH was used as an eluent; Capture and release of 211At when loading [211At]astatate appeared to be similar to that of [211At]astatide on PEG columns, but further studies need to be conducted to confirm that; Capture of 211At on PEG columns was lower (e.g. 80-­90%) from solutions of 8M HNO3, but higher capture rates (e.g. 99%) can be obtained when 10M HNO3 is mixed with an equal quantity of 8M HCl; Addition of reductants to the 211At solutions did not appear to change the percent capture, but may have an effect on the % extracted; There was some indication that the PEG-­Merrifield resins could be saturated (perhaps with Bi) resulting in lower capture percentages, but more studies need to be done to confirm that; A target dissolution chamber, designed and built at PNNL, works well with syringe pumps so it can be used in an automated system; Preliminary semi-­automated 211At isolation studies have been conducted with full-scale target dissolution and 211At isolation using a PEG column on the Hamilton automated system gave low overall recoveries, but HNO3 was used (rather than HCl) for loading the 211At and flow rates were not optimized; Results obtained using PEG columns are high enough to warrant further development on a fully automated system; Results obtained also indicate that additional studies are warranted to evaluate other types of columns for 211At separation from bismuth, which allow use of HNO3/HCl mixtures for loading and NaOH for eluting 211At. Such a column could greatly simplify the overall isolation process and make it easier to automate.

  1. Study of link transitions between superdeformed well and normally deformed well in Hg{sup 192} and research and development for a new concept of {gamma} photons detection: the Agata array; Etude des liens entre puits superdeforme et puits normalement deforme dans {sup 192}Hg et recherche et developpement pour un nouveau concept de detection de photons {gamma}: le multidetecteur AGATA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roccaz, J

    2006-07-15

    The atomic nucleus can adopt a very elongated shape with an axis ratio 2:1, this is the superdeformation phenomenon. Nowadays more than 300 superdeformed bands have been identified at high spin, but the determination of excitation energies, spins and parities of the associated states have been established for only one tenth of these bands. The former quantities (E{sup *}, I, {pi}) can only be determined via the linking gamma-transitions between the superdeformed (sd) and the normally deformed (nd) states. Within the framework of this thesis, we have investigated the Hg{sup 192} nucleus in order to establish E{sup *}, I and {pi}. This nucleus is predicted to be doubly magic at superdeformation and hence is taken as a reference in the mass {approx} 190 region. The experiment was carried out at Strasbourg using the Euroball-IV array and the vivitron accelerator. The obtained results are not convincing and seem to be at the limit of the performances of Euroball. Next generation of arrays will abandon the Compton-shields and use tracking concept to reconstruct the trajectories of incident photons, and therefore we expect a huge increase of efficiency. The second part of this work was focused on the research and development work for the AGATA (Advanced GAmma Tracking Array) project. We have performed simulations with the GEANT-4 code and developed tracking methods to reconstruct pair-creation events. The full AGATA will be operational around 2015 and will enhance by around two orders of magnitude the observational limits. (author)

  2. Measurement of the Ir-191,193(n,2n)Ir-190,192 Reaction Cross Section Between 9.0 and 16.5 MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildenhain, Elizabeth; Finch, Sean; Tornow, Werner; Krishichayan, F.

    2017-09-01

    Iridium is one of the elements prioritized by Nonproliferation and Homeland Security agencies. In addition, Ir-192 is being used in various medical treatments. Improved data and corresponding evaluations of neutron-induced reactions on the iridium isotopes are required to meet the demands of several applications of societal interest. This study measured the cross section of the Ir-191,193(n, 2n)Ir-190,192 reactions at energies from 9.0 to 16.5 MeV using the activation technique. Natural Ir samples [Ir-191 37.3%, Ir-193 62.7%] were sandwiched between Au-197 monitor foils and irradiated with monoenergetic neutron beams at the tandem facility of the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL). Gamma rays from the irradiated samples were counted in TUNL's low background facility using high-efficient HPGe detectors. Measured cross-section data are compared to previous data and to predictions from nuclear data libraries (e.g. ENDF). Research at TUNL funded by the NSF.

  3. Polymorphisms at the paraoxonase 1 L55M and Q192R loci affect the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease: emphasis on the cholinergic system and beta-amyloid levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leduc, Valerie; Poirier, Judes

    2008-01-01

    Paraoxonase 1 (PON1) functions to protect the cholinergic system against nerve gases and the organophosphate family of pesticides. Recent studies have shown that polymorphisms at the PON1 L55M and Q192R loci might affect individual susceptibility to experience-derived and environmental events such as the exposure to inhibitors of cholinesterase (ChEIs). ChEI therapy being the treatment of choice for mild-to-moderate Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients, we determined whether genetic variations in the PON1 loci are associated with AD risk and whether they affect brain choline acetyltransferase (CHAT) activity, nicotinic receptor density, and beta-amyloid (Abeta) levels in different regions of AD and age-matched control subjects. This pilot genetic study used a small cohort of brains from autopsy-confirmed AD patients and age-matched controls from the Douglas Hospital Brain Bank, Quebec, Canada. The frequency of the M55M genotype at the PON1 L55M locus was found to be significantly increased in AD patients relative to age-matched controls (p < 0.05). Significant associations were observed between the PON1 L55M and Q192R polymorphisms and frontal cortex Abeta levels as well as CHAT activity and nicotinic receptor density in the temporal cortex. Our results suggest a prominent role for PON1 in the pathophysiology of common AD with a marked impact on the cholinergic system and Abeta levels in the brain. 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel

  4. Mutated CaV2.1 channels dysregulate CASK/P2X3 signaling in mouse trigeminal sensory neurons of R192Q Cacna1a knock-in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnanasekaran, Aswini; Bele, Tanja; Hullugundi, Swathi; Simonetti, Manuela; Ferrari, Michael D; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M; Nistri, Andrea; Fabbretti, Elsa

    2013-12-02

    ATP-gated P2X3 receptors of sensory ganglion neurons are important transducers of pain as they adapt their expression and function in response to acute and chronic nociceptive signals. The present study investigated the role of calcium/calmodulin-dependent serine protein kinase (CASK) in controlling P2X3 receptor expression and function in trigeminal ganglia from Cacna1a R192Q-mutated knock-in (KI) mice, a genetic model for familial hemiplegic migraine type-1. KI ganglion neurons showed more abundant CASK/P2X3 receptor complex at membrane level, a result that likely originated from gain-of-function effects of R192Q-mutated CaV2.1 channels and downstream enhanced CaMKII activity. The selective CaV2.1 channel blocker ω-Agatoxin IVA and the CaMKII inhibitor KN-93 were sufficient to return CASK/P2X3 co-expression to WT levels. After CASK silencing, P2X3 receptor expression was decreased in both WT and KI ganglia, supporting the role of CASK in P2X3 receptor stabilization. This process was functionally observed as reduced P2X3 receptor currents. We propose that, in trigeminal sensory neurons, the CASK/P2X3 complex has a dynamic nature depending on intracellular calcium and related signaling, that are enhanced in a transgenic mouse model of genetic hemiplegic migraine.

  5. Structural and Electrochemical Investigation of Li1.02Mn1.92Al0.02Fe0.02Cr0.02O4 - x Fx (x=0, 0.08 Synthesized by Solid-State Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Lang Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To improve the cycle performance of spinel LiMn2O4 as the cathode of 4-V-class lithium secondary batteries, spinel phases Li1.02Mn1.92Al0.02Fe0.02Cr0.02O4 - xFx (x=0, 0.08 have been successfully prepared by a conventional solid-state method. The structure and physicochemical properties of this as-prepared powder were investigated by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS, and galvanostatic charge-discharge test in detail. The results reveal that the multiple doping spinel Li1.02Mn1.92Al0.02Fe0.02Cr0.02O4F0.08 have better electrochemical performance than the undoped or only metal-element doped material, which may be contributed to the multiple cation and anion doping to lead to a more stable spinel framework with good capacity retention rate.

  6. The association of the PON1 Q192R polymorphism with coronary heart disease: findings from the British Women's Heart and Health cohort study and a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiessling Matthew

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There have been inconsistent results from case-control studies assessing the association of the PON1 Q192R polymorphism with coronary heart disease (CHD. Most studies have included predominantly men and the association in women is unclear. Since lipid levels vary between the sexes the antioxidant effect of PON1 and any genes associated with it may also vary by sex. We have examined the association of the PON1 Q192R polymorphism with CHD in a large cohort of British women and combined the results from our cohort study with those from all other published studies. Results The distribution of genotypes was the same among women with CHD and those without disease. The odds ratio (95% confidence interval of having CHD comparing those with either the QR or RR genotype to those with QQ genotype (dominant model of association was 1.03 (0.89, 1.21 and the per allele odds ratio was 0.98 (0.95, 1.01. In a meta-analysis of this and 38 other published studies (10,738 cases and 17,068 controls the pooled odds ratio for the dominant effect was 1.14 (1.08, 1.20 and for the per allele effect was 1.10 (1.06, 1.13. There was evidence of small study bias in the meta-analyses and the dominant effect among those studies with 500 or more cases was 1.05 (0.96, 1.15. Ethnicity and reporting of whether the genotyping was done blind to the participants clinical status also contributed to heterogeneity between studies, but there was no difference in effect between studies with 50% or more women compared to those with fewer women and no difference between studies of healthy populations compared to those at high risk (with diabetes, renal disease of familial hypercholesterolaemia. Conclusion There is no robust evidence that the PON1 Q192R polymorphism is associated with CHD risk in Caucasian women or men.

  7. Effect of CYP2C19*2 and *3 loss-of-function alleles on platelet reactivity and adverse clinical events in East Asian acute myocardial infarction survivors treated with clopidogrel and aspirin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Young-Hoon; Tantry, Udaya S; Kim, In-Suk; Koh, Jin-Sin; Kwon, Tae Jung; Park, Yongwhi; Hwang, Seok-Jae; Bliden, Kevin P; Kwak, Choong Hwan; Hwang, Jin-Yong; Gurbel, Paul A

    2011-12-01

    As compared with whites, East Asians more often carry the cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2C19 loss-of-function (LOF) allele with the CYP2C19*3 variant. The influence of the CYP2C19 LOF alleles (*2 and *3) on clopidogrel response and clinical outcomes in East Asians with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) has not been reported. We sought to evaluate the effect of the CYP2C19 variants on clopidogrel pharmacodynamics and long-term prognosis in these patients. Patients who survived an AMI (n=266) were enrolled in a single-center registry. Predischarge platelet reactivity was assessed with light transmittance aggregometry and the VerifyNow P2Y12 assay; the CYP2C19*2, *3, *17 and ABCB1 3435C>T variants were determined. The primary clinical end point was the composite of cardiovascular death, nonfatal MI, and ischemic stroke. The median exposure to clopidogrel was 21 months (interquartile range, 13-29). The ABCB1 3435C>T was not related to clopidogrel response or cardiovascular events. Carriage of the CYP2C19 LOF variant allele was relatively high (60.9%, n=162; *2/*17=2, *3/*17=1, *1/*2=96, *1/*3=29, *2/*2=20, and *2/*3=14). Platelet reactivity increased proportionally according to the number of the CYP2C19 LOF alleles. In a multivariate regression analysis, the risk of high on-treatment platelet reactivity (HPR) increased depending on the number of CYP2C19 LOF allele [1 LOF allele; odds ratio (OR), 1.8; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.8 to 4.2, P=0.152; and 2 LOF alleles; OR, 2.8; 95% CI, 1.2 to 6.5; P=0.016]; platelet reactivity and the rate of HPR did not differ between the CYP2C19*2 versus *3 allele carriage. In addition, cardiovascular event occurrence increased according to the number of the CYP2C19 LOF allele; compared with noncarriers, carriers of 1 [hazard ratio (HR), 3.1; 95% CI, 0.8 to 11.6; P=0.089] and 2 CYP2C19 LOF allele(s) (HR, 10.1; 95% CI, 1.8-58.8; P=0.008) were associated with clinical end point. The clinical impact of the CYP2C19*2 versus *3 allele carriage

  8. Sodium temperature/wind lidar based on laser-diode-pumped Nd:YAG lasers deployed at Tromsø, Norway (69.6°N, 19.2°E).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahara, T D; Nozawa, S; Saito, N; Kawabata, T; Tsuda, T T; Wada, S

    2017-06-12

    An Nd:YAG laser-based sodium temperature/wind lidar was developed for the measurement of the northern polar mesosphere and lower thermosphere at Tromsø (69.6N, 19.2E), Norway. Coherent light at 589 nm is produced by sum frequency generation of 1064 nm and 1319 nm from two diode laser end-pumped pulsed Nd:YAG lasers. The output power is as high as 4W, with 4 mJ/pulse at 1000 Hz repetition rate. Five tilting Cassegrain telescopes enable us to make five-direction (zenith, north, south, east, west) observation for temperature and wind simultaneously. This highly stable laser system is first of its kind to operate virtually maintenance-free during the observation season (from late September to March) since 2010.

  9. Spin-alignment and g-factor measurement of the I{sup {pi}}=12{sup +} isomer in {sup 192}Pb produced in the relativistic-energy fragmentation of a {sup 238}U beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kmiecik, M.; Maj, A.; Ciemala, M.; Grebosz, J.; Lach, M.; Maier, K.H.; Mazurek, K.; Meczynski, W.; Myalski, S.; Styczen, J.; Zieblinski, M. [H. Niewodniczanski Inst. of Nuclear Physics PAN, Krakow (Poland); Gerl, J.; Becker, F.; Caceres, L.; Doornenbal, P.; Gorska, M.; Grawe, H.; Kojuharov, I.; Prokopowicz, W.; Saito, N.; Saito, T.R.; Wollersheim, H.J. [GSI, Darmstadt (Germany); Neyens, G.; Mallion, S.; Vermeulen, N. [Inst. voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica, K.U. Leuven (Belgium); Atanasova, L.; Detistov, P. [Univ. of Sofia ' St. Kl. Ohridski' (Bulgaria). Faculty of Physics; Balabanski, D.L. [Univ. degli Studi di Camerino (Italy); INFN sez. Perugia, Dipt. di Fisica, Camerino (Italy); Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Inst. for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Sofia (Bulgaria); Bednarczyk, P. [H. Niewodniczanski Inst. of Nuclear Physics PAN, Krakow (Poland); GSI, Darmstadt (Germany); Benzoni, G.; Blasi, N.; Brambilla, S.; Million, B.; Wieland, O. [INFN Sez. di Milano (Italy); Bracco, A.; Camera, F.; Crespi, F.C.L.; Leoni, S.; Montanari, D. [INFN Sez. di Milano (Italy); Univ. degli Studi di Milano (Italy); Chamoli, S.K.; Hass, M.; Lakshmi, S. [Weizman Inst. of Science, Rehovot (Israel); Chmel, S. [Fraunhofer INT, Euskirchen (Germany); Daugas, J.M. [CEA, DAM, DIF, Arpajon Cedex (France); Georgiev, G. [Univ. Paris-Sud 11, CNRS/IN2P3, CSNSM, Orsay-Campus (France); Gladnishki, K. [Univ. of Sofia ' St. Kl. Ohridski' (Bulgaria). Faculty of Physics; Univ. degli Studi di Camerino (Italy); INFN sez. Perugia, Dipt. di Fisica, Camerino (Italy); Hoischen, R.; Rudolph, D. [Lund Univ., Dept. of Physics, Lund (Sweden); Ilie, G. [Univ. zu Koeln, Inst. fuer Kernphysik, Koeln (Germany); National Inst. for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest (Romania); Ionescu-Bujor, M. [National Inst. for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest (Romania); Jolie, J. [Univ. zu Koeln, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Koeln (Germany)] [and others

    2010-08-15

    The feasibility of measuring g -factors using the TDPAD method applied to high-energy, heavy fragmentation products is explored. The 2623keV I{sup {pi}}=12{sup +} isomer in {sup 192}Pb with {tau}=1.57{mu}s has been produced using the fragmentation of a 1A GeV {sup 238}U beam. The results presented demonstrate for the first time that such heavy nuclei produced in a fragmentation reaction with a relativistic beam are sufficiently well spin-aligned. Moreover, the rather large value of the alignment, 28(10)% of the maximum possible, is preserved during the separation process allowing the determination of magnetic moments. The measured values of the lifetime, {tau}=1.54(9) {mu}s, and the g-factor, g=-0.175(20), agree with the results of previous investigations using fusion-evaporation reactions. (orig.)

  10. Dosimetric accuracy of a deterministic radiation transport based {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy treatment planning system. Part II: Monte Carlo and experimental verification of a multiple source dwell position plan employing a shielded applicator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrokokkinos, L.; Zourari, K.; Pantelis, E.; Moutsatsos, A.; Karaiskos, P.; Sakelliou, L.; Seimenis, I.; Georgiou, E.; Papagiannis, P. [Medical Physics Laboratory, Medical School, University of Athens, 75 Mikras Asias, 115 27 Athens (Greece); Department of Physics, Nuclear and Particle Physics Section, University of Athens, Panepistimioupolis, Ilisia, 157 71 Athens (Greece); Medical Physics Laboratory, Medical School, Democritus University of Thrace, 2nd Building of Preclinical Section, University Campus, Alexandroupolis 68100 (Greece); Medical Physics Laboratory, Medical School, University of Athens, 75 Mikras Asias, 115 27 Athens (Greece)

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: The aim of this work is the dosimetric validation of a deterministic radiation transport based treatment planning system (BRACHYVISION v. 8.8, referred to as TPS in the following) for multiple {sup 192}Ir source dwell position brachytherapy applications employing a shielded applicator in homogeneous water geometries. Methods: TPS calculations for an irradiation plan employing seven VS2000 {sup 192}Ir high dose rate (HDR) source dwell positions and a partially shielded applicator (GM11004380) were compared to corresponding Monte Carlo (MC) simulation results, as well as experimental results obtained using the VIP polymer gel-magnetic resonance imaging three-dimensional dosimetry method with a custom made phantom. Results: TPS and MC dose distributions were found in agreement which is mainly within {+-}2%. Considerable differences between TPS and MC results (greater than 2%) were observed at points in the penumbra of the shields (i.e., close to the edges of the ''shielded'' segment of the geometries). These differences were experimentally verified and therefore attributed to the TPS. Apart from these regions, experimental and TPS dose distributions were found in agreement within 2 mm distance to agreement and 5% dose difference criteria. As shown in this work, these results mark a significant improvement relative to dosimetry algorithms that disregard the presence of the shielded applicator since the use of the latter leads to dosimetry errors on the order of 20%-30% at the edge of the ''unshielded'' segment of the geometry and even 2%-6% at points corresponding to the potential location of the target volume in clinical applications using the applicator (points in the unshielded segment at short distances from the applicator). Conclusions: Results of this work attest the capability of the TPS to accurately account for the scatter conditions and the increased attenuation involved in HDR brachytherapy applications

  11. Dedicated high dose rate 192Ir brachytherapy radiation fields for in vitro cell exposures at variable source-target cell distances: killing of mammalian cells depends on temporal dose rate fluctuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veigel, Cornelia; Hartmann, Günther H.; Fritz, Peter; Debus, Jürgen; Weber, Klaus-Josef

    2017-02-01

    Afterloading brachytherapy is conducted by the stepwise movement of a radioactive source through surgically implanted applicator tubes where at predefined dwell positions calculated dwell times optimize spatial dose delivery with respect to a planned dose level. The temporal exposure pattern exhibits drastic fluctuations in dose rate at a given coordinate and within a single treatment session because of the discontinuous and repeated source movement into the target volume. This could potentially affect biological response. Therefore, mammalian cells were exposed as monolayers to a high dose rate 192Ir source by utilizing a dedicated irradiation device where the distance between a planar array of radioactive source positions and the plane of the cell monolayer could be varied from 2.5 mm to 40 mm, thus varying dose rate pattern for any chosen total dose. The Gammamed IIi afterloading system equipped with a nominal 370 GBq (10 Ci) 192-Ir source was used to irradiate V79 Chinese hamster lung fibroblasts from both confluent and from exponential growth phase with dose up to 12 Gy (at room temperature, total exposure not exceeding 1 h). For comparison, V79 cells were also exposed to 6 MV x-rays from a clinical linear accelerator (dose rate of 2.5 Gy min-1). As biological endpoint, cell survival was determined by standard colony forming assay. Dose measurements were conducted with a diamond detector (sensitive area 7.3 mm2), calibrated by means of 60Co radiation. Additionally, dose delivery was simulated by Monte Carlo calculations using the EGSnrc code system. The calculated secondary electron fluence spectra at the cell location did not indicate a significant change of radiation quality (i.e. higher linear energy transfer) at the lower distances. Clonogenic cell survival curves obtained after brachytherapy exhibited an altered biological response compared to x-rays which was characterized by a significant reduction of the survival curve shoulder when dose rate

  12. Calibration of a {sup 19} {sup 2}Ir source for high dose brachytherapy using various techniques; Calibracion de una fuente de {sup 192} Ir para braquiterapia de alta tasa de dosis mediante diversas tecnicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montilla Prieto, Tedicel C., E-mail: tcdicel@gmaiLcam [Instituto de Oncologia Dr. Miguel Perez Carreno, Barbula (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of). Departamento de Fisica y Dosimetria; Padron Rivero, Alvaro D., E-mail: alvarodpadronr@yahoo.com.ve [Universidad de Carabobo, Barbula (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of). Facultad de Ciencias de la Salud. Departamento de Ciencias Fisiologicas

    2013-10-01

    In this research we studied three experimental procedures for calibration of a source of {sup 192}Ir to high dose rate for clinical brachytherapy use, and thus were compared and analysis of the advantages and disadvantages of each. For this study we quantified the value of the current kerma rate reference in air by three procedures: source calibration using a well chamber, with an cylindrical ionization chamber in air, and a cylindrical ionization chamber on a phantom, and this magnitude was compared with the value provided by the manufacturer of the source and thereby obtaining the deviation corresponding . Thus, it was found that the deviation corresponding to the source calibration making use of a well chamber, remained within tolerance, while the cylindrical ionization chamber in air and on phantom exceeded the standards established in some documents. However, although both the measurement in air and in the phantom are the procedures for the final calibration source, these can be used to verify that the delivered dose are in tolerance.

  13. Structure of neutron-rich nuclei around the N = 126 closed shell; the yrast structure of {sup 205}Au{sub 126} up to spin-parity I{sup {pi}} = (19/2{sup +})

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podolyak, Zs.; Steer, S.J.; Pietri, S.; Regan, P.H.; Brandau, C.; Catford, W.N.; Cullen, I.J.; Gelletly, W.; Jones, G.A.; Liu, Z.; Walker, P.M. [University of Surrey, Department of Physics, Guildford (United Kingdom); Gorska, M.; Gerl, J.; Wollersheim, H.J.; Grawe, H.; Becker, F.; Geissel, H.; Kelic, A.; Kojouharov, I.; Kurz, N.; Montes, F.; Prokopowicz, W.; Saito, T.; Schaffner, H.; Tashenov, S.; Werner-Malento, E. [GSI, Darmstadt (Germany); Rudolph, D.; Hoischen, R. [Lund University, Department of Physics, Lund (Sweden); Garnsworthy, A.B. [University of Surrey, Department of Physics, Guildford (United Kingdom); Yale University, WNSL, New Haven, CT (United States); Maier, K.H. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Krakow (Poland); University of the West of Scotland, Dept. of Physics, Paisley (United Kingdom); Bednarczyk, P.; Grebosz, J. [GSI, Darmstadt (Germany); Institute of Nuclear Physics, Krakow (Poland); Caceres, L. [GSI, Darmstadt (Germany); Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Dept. de Fisica Teorica, Madrid (Spain); Doornenbal, P. [GSI, Darmstadt (Germany); Universitaet zu Koeln, IKP, Koeln (Germany); Heinz, A. [Yale University, WNSL, New Haven, CT (United States); Kurtukian-Nieto, T. [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Campostela (Spain); Benzoni, G.; Wieland, O. [Universita degli Studi di Milano (Italy); INFN, Milano (Italy); Pfuetzner, M. [Warsaw University, IEP, Warsaw (Poland); Jungclaus, A. [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Dept. de Fisica Teorica, Madrid (Spain); Balabanski, D.L. [Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, INRNE, Sofia (Bulgaria); Brown, B.A. [Univ. of Surrey, Dept. of Physics, Guildford (United Kingdom); Michigan State Univ., NSCL, East Lansing, MI (United States); Bruce, A.M.; Lalkovski, S. [Univ. of Brighton, School of Environment and Technology, Brighton (United Kingdom); Dombradi, Zs. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Debrecen (Hungary); Estevez, M.E. [Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, Valencia (Spain)] [and others

    2009-12-15

    Heavy neutron-rich nuclei have been populated through the relativistic fragmentation of a {sup 208}{sub 82} Pb beam at E/A = 1 GeV on a 2.5 g/cm{sup 2} thick Be target. The synthesised nuclei were selected and identified in-flight using the fragment separator at GSI. Approximately 300 ns after production, the selected nuclei were implanted in an {proportional_to}8 mm thick perspex stopper, positioned at the centre of the RISING {gamma} -ray detector spectrometer array. A previously unreported isomer with a half-life T{sub 1/2} = 163(5) ns has been observed in the N=126 closed-shell nucleus {sup 205}{sub 79} Au. Through {gamma}-ray singles and {gamma}-{gamma} coincidence analysis a level scheme was established. The comparison with a shell model calculation tentatively identifies the spin-parity of the excited states, including the isomer itself, which is found to be I{sup {pi}} = (19/2{sup +}). (orig.)

  14. Serine 192 in the tiny RS repeat of the adenoviral L4-33K splicing enhancer protein is essential for function and reorganization of the protein to the periphery of viral replication centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oestberg, Sara, E-mail: sara.ostberg@imbim.uu.se [Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology, Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala University, 75123 Uppsala (Sweden); Toermaenen Persson, Heidi, E-mail: heidi.tormanen.persson@imbim.uu.se [Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology, Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala University, 75123 Uppsala (Sweden); Akusjaervi, Goeran, E-mail: goran.akusjarvi@imbim.uu.se [Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology, Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala University, 75123 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2012-11-25

    The adenovirus L4-33K protein is a key regulator involved in the temporal shift from early to late pattern of mRNA expression from the adenovirus major late transcription unit. L4-33K is a virus-encoded alternative splicing factor, which enhances processing of 3 Prime splice sites with a weak sequence context. Here we show that L4-33K expressed from a plasmid is localized at the nuclear margin of uninfected cells. During an infection L4-33K is relocalized to the periphery of E2A-72K containing viral replication centers. We also show that serine 192 in the tiny RS repeat of the conserved carboxy-terminus of L4-33K, which is critical for the splicing enhancer function of L4-33K, is necessary for the nuclear localization and redistribution of the protein to viral replication sites. Collectively, our results show a good correlation between the activity of L4-33K as a splicing enhancer protein and its localization to the periphery of viral replication centers.

  15. ESTABLISHMENT OF PARAOXONASE AND ARYLESTERASE ACTIVITY OF PARAOXONASE 1 (PON1 IN DEPENDENCE ON 55(L/M AND 192(Q/R DNA POLYMORPHISM IN ADULT PEOPLE WITH DOWN SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel SÝKORA

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Human serum paraoxonase 1 is a calcium-dependent esterase located on high density lipoproteins (HDL. It inhibits LDL peroxidation and hydrolysis of oxide forms of phospholipides and therefore significantly affects the development of ateroscletosis. The aim of this study was to establish the paraoxonase and arylesterase activity of PON1 in adult people with Down syndrome (DS. Adults with DS (10 men and 10 women ages 16 to 37 years participated and were compared to a control group (10 men and 10 women age ranging from 17 to 45 years. The 55(L/M and 192(Q/R DNA polymorphism (PCR-RFLP method and paraoxonase and arylesterase activity was investigated in every patient. The results showed the reduction of PON1 activity in people with DS, in contrast to the decreased development of atherosclerosis in DS. Therefore it can be concluded, that PON1 does not have a direct effect on the lower prevalence of atherosclerosis in people with DS.

  16. Instability and growth of nanoscale Ce0.8Gd0.2O1.9/NiO infiltrate in Sr0.94Ti0.9Nb0.1O3-Zr0.84Y0.16O1.92 anodes for solid oxide fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Wei; Kuhn, Luise Theil; Jørgensen, Peter Stanley

    2014-01-01

    Microstructural evolution of Ce0.8Gd0.2O 1.9/NiO (CGO/NiO) co-infiltrated nanoparticles in Sr 0.94Ti0.9Nb0.1O3-Zr 0.84Y0.16O1.92 (STN94-YSZ) anodes for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) is investigated during electrochemical testing in a symmetric cell setup. The CGO/NiO infiltrated symmetric cells...

  17. Characterization of a fiber-coupled Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C luminescence dosimetry system for online in vivo dose verification during {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, Claus E.; Nielsen, Soeren Kynde; Greilich, Steffen; Helt-Hansen, Jakob; Lindegaard, Jacob Christian; Tanderup, Kari [Department of Radiation Research, Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Department of Medical Physics, Aarhus University Hospital, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Department of Radiation Research, Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Department of Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Department of Medical Physics, Aarhus University Hospital, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark)

    2009-03-15

    A prototype of a new dose-verification system has been developed to facilitate prevention and identification of dose delivery errors in remotely afterloaded brachytherapy. The system allows for automatic online in vivo dosimetry directly in the tumor region using small passive detector probes that fit into applicators such as standard needles or catheters. The system measures the absorbed dose rate (0.1 s time resolution) and total absorbed dose on the basis of radioluminescence (RL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) from aluminum oxide crystals attached to optical fiber cables (1 mm outer diameter). The system was tested in the range from 0 to 4 Gy using a solid-water phantom, a Varian GammaMed Plus {sup 192}Ir PDR afterloader, and dosimetry probes inserted into stainless-steel brachytherapy needles. The calibrated system was found to be linear in the tested dose range. The reproducibility (one standard deviation) for RL and OSL measurements was 1.3%. The measured depth-dose profiles agreed well with the theoretical expectations computed with the EGSNRC Monte Carlo code, suggesting that the energy dependence for the dosimeter probes (relative to water) is less than 6% for source-to-probe distances in the range of 2-50 mm. Under certain conditions, the RL signal could be greatly disturbed by the so-called stem signal (i.e., unwanted light generated in the fiber cable upon irradiation). The OSL signal is not subject to this source of error. The tested system appears to be adequate for in vivo brachytherapy dosimetry.

  18. 22 CFR 19.2 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) Court Order means any court decree of divorce or annulment, or any court approved property settlement agreement incident to any court decree of divorce or annulment. (h) Department means the Department of State. (i) Divorce means the dissolution of a marriage by a final decree of divorce or annulment. (j...

  19. 32 CFR 192.4 - Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... discrimination in housing in the United States against any person because of race, color, religion, sex, age... activities in support of fair housing. (3) Title 42 U.S.C. 1982 prohibits discrimination in housing in the... discrimination against DoD personnel in off-base housing. That objective is not achieved simply by finding a...

  20. 32 CFR 192.1 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... requirement for each Military Department to submit a semi-annual housing discrimination report to the... Service to report to the ASD(FM&P) any housing discrimination cases and their results in their Annual... maintain all completed or resolved housing discrimination cases. (g) Emphasizes liaison with other...

  1. 40 CFR 63.192 - Standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... in § 63.190(b) of this subpart. (2) The owner or operator of a pharmaceutical production process... section. (1) Retain information, data, and analysis used to determine that the process unit does not have..., analyses of process stream composition, engineering calculations, or process knowledge. (2) When requested...

  2. 19 CFR 192.0 - Scope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... exportation of used self-propelled vehicles, vessels and aircraft, and the penalties and liabilities incurred... provision for the Automated Export System (AES), implemented by the Census Regulations at part 30, subpart E...

  3. 10 CFR 431.192 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... sags, over voltage, switching transients, line noise, and other power quality factors. Waveform.... Welding transformer means a transformer designed for use in arc welding equipment or resistance welding...

  4. Reference: 192 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available riko et al. 2005 Apr. Plant Cell 17(4):1105-19. Abscisic acid (ABA) is important in seed maturation, seed do...have been identified. However, most important signaling molecules involved in the

  5. 32 CFR 192.3 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...). Area outside the United States. Foreign countries where DoD personnel reside. Commander. The military... discrimination under this part. Discrimination. An act, policy, or procedure that arbitrarily denies equal... origin), Hispanic, Asian or Pacific Islander, or American Indian or Alaskan native. Relief for the...

  6. 49 CFR 192.151 - Tapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... need for the use of outside-sealing service connections, tapping saddles, or other fixtures must be... climate, soil, and service conditions may create unusual external stresses on cast iron pipe, unreinforced...

  7. 43 CFR 19.2 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... public travel by means of four-wheeled, motorized vehicles intended primarily for highway use. (f... distinguished from surrounding lands by topographical or ecological features such as precipices, canyons...

  8. Publications | Page 192 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    A paper by IDRC partner the International Network for Bamboo and Rattan assesses the potential of bamboo to meet East Africa's urgent housing needs. In this region, the supply of houses in rural and urban areas has failed to keep up with demand, leading to severe shortages of safe and affordable housing.

  9. 49 CFR 19.2 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... procurement laws and regulations. (f) Cash contributions means the recipient's cash outlay, including the.... (s) Intangible property and debt instruments means, but is not limited to, trademarks, copyrights... tier subrecipient. The term includes financial assistance when provided by any legal agreement, even if...

  10. 49 CFR 192.327 - Cover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... locations 36 (914) 24 (610) Drainage ditches of public roads and railroad crossings 36 (914) 24 (610) (b... least 24 inches (610 millimeters) of cover. (c) Where an underground structure prevents the installation...

  11. Immunization with a Double-Mutant (R192G/L211A) of the Heat-Labile Enterotoxin of Escherichia coli Offers Partial Protection against Campylobacter jejuni in an Adult Mouse Intestinal Colonization Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, M John; Haridas, Shilpa; Ebenezer, Mathew; Raghupathy, Raj; Khan, Islam

    2015-01-01

    We have previously shown that antibodies to cholera toxin (CT) reacted with the major outer membrane proteins (MOMPs) from Campylobacter jejuni strains on Western blot. Further, oral immunization with CT significantly protected against challenge with C. jejuni in an adult mouse colonization model of infection. CT and the heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli are structurally and functionally related. LT and its mutants including the double-mutant LT (R192G/L211A) (dmLT), are powerful mucosal adjuvants. Unlike LT which is reactogenic, dmLT has been shown to be safe for human use. In the current study, we determined whether rabbit anti-dmLT antibodies reacted with MOMPs from C. jejuni strains and whether immunization with dmLT would afford protection against C. jejuni. On Western blot, the MOMPs from C. jejuni 48 (Penner serotype O:19), C. jejuni 75 (O:3) and C. jejuni 111 (O:1,44) were probed with rabbit antibodies to dmLT or LT-E112K (a non-toxic LT mutant), which showed a lack of reaction. Adult BALB/c mice were orally immunized with dmLT and orally challenged with C. jejuni 48 or 111. Protection from colonization with the challenge bacteria was studied by enumerating Campylobacter colonies in feces daily for 9 days. Vaccination produced robust serum and stool antibody responses to dmLT and no antibody responses to C. jejuni MOMP. Vaccinated mice showed reduced colonization and excretion of both challenge strains compared to control mice. However, the differences were not statistically significant. The protective efficacy of the dmLT vaccine varied from 9.1% to 54.5%. The lack of cross-reaction between the MOMP and dmLT suggests that protection is not mediated by cross-reacting antibodies, but may be due to activation of innate immunity. As dmLT is safe for humans, it could be incorporated into a C. jejuni vaccine to enhance its efficacy.

  12. Immunization with a Double-Mutant (R192G/L211A of the Heat-Labile Enterotoxin of Escherichia coli Offers Partial Protection against Campylobacter jejuni in an Adult Mouse Intestinal Colonization Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M John Albert

    Full Text Available We have previously shown that antibodies to cholera toxin (CT reacted with the major outer membrane proteins (MOMPs from Campylobacter jejuni strains on Western blot. Further, oral immunization with CT significantly protected against challenge with C. jejuni in an adult mouse colonization model of infection. CT and the heat-labile enterotoxin (LT of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli are structurally and functionally related. LT and its mutants including the double-mutant LT (R192G/L211A (dmLT, are powerful mucosal adjuvants. Unlike LT which is reactogenic, dmLT has been shown to be safe for human use. In the current study, we determined whether rabbit anti-dmLT antibodies reacted with MOMPs from C. jejuni strains and whether immunization with dmLT would afford protection against C. jejuni. On Western blot, the MOMPs from C. jejuni 48 (Penner serotype O:19, C. jejuni 75 (O:3 and C. jejuni 111 (O:1,44 were probed with rabbit antibodies to dmLT or LT-E112K (a non-toxic LT mutant, which showed a lack of reaction. Adult BALB/c mice were orally immunized with dmLT and orally challenged with C. jejuni 48 or 111. Protection from colonization with the challenge bacteria was studied by enumerating Campylobacter colonies in feces daily for 9 days. Vaccination produced robust serum and stool antibody responses to dmLT and no antibody responses to C. jejuni MOMP. Vaccinated mice showed reduced colonization and excretion of both challenge strains compared to control mice. However, the differences were not statistically significant. The protective efficacy of the dmLT vaccine varied from 9.1% to 54.5%. The lack of cross-reaction between the MOMP and dmLT suggests that protection is not mediated by cross-reacting antibodies, but may be due to activation of innate immunity. As dmLT is safe for humans, it could be incorporated into a C. jejuni vaccine to enhance its efficacy.

  13. Calibration of TLD-100 powder for energies of {sup 60} Co, {sup 137} Cs, {sup 192} Ir and RX of 250, 50 kV{sub p} in absorbed dose in water with dosimetric quality control purposes for brachytherapy of high dose rate; Calibracion de polvo TLD-100 para energias de {sup 60} Co, {sup 137} Cs, {sup 192} Ir y RX de 250, 50 kVp en dosis absorbida en agua con fines de control de calidad dosimetrico para braquiterapia de alta tasa de dosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loaiza C, S.P. [Programa de Maestria en Fisica Medica, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Paseo Tollocan S/N, esquina con Jesus Carranza, Colonia Moderna de la Cruz, 50180 Toluca, Edo. de Mexico (Mexico); Alvarez R, J.T. [Laboratorio Secundario de Calibracion Dosimetrica LSCD, Departamento de Metrologia, ININ, Carretera Federal Mexico Toluca S/N, La Marquesa, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Edo. de Mexico (Mexico)

    2006-07-01

    To help solve the traceability and quality control dosimetric problems for the users of {sup 192} Ir sources in the Mexican Republic, the Secondary Standard Dosimetric Laboratory at ININ to calibrated a batch of powder TLD- 100 (LiF: Mg,Ti) in terms of absorbed dose to water D{sub w} for the following radiation sources: {sup 60} Co, {sup 137C}s and RX 250 and 50 k Vp. Later on, the calibration is interpolated to obtain the {sup 192} Ir. The calibration radiation field is carried out with the following protocols: For the {sup 60} Co, IAEA TRS 398 protocol employing a secondary standard Farmer chamber PTW N30013, calibrated on D{sub w} at the NRC (Canada). For {sup 137} Cs the AAPM TG 43 protocol is used, in terms of air kerma strength S{sub k} determined by the air kerma K{sub a}, measured with a secondary standard chamber type thimble NE2611 traceable to the NIST (USA). For Rays X 250 and 50 k Vp, the protocol AAPM TG 61 using a tertiary standard Farmer chamber PTW 30001, with traceability to the LCIE (France) on air kerma K{sub a}. The calibration curves are built for the TLD response R{sub TLD} vs D{sub w}, they are fitted by means of a least squares fit technique with a second degree polynomial that corrects the supra linearity response. The curves are validated by the lack of fit test, and the Anderson Darling normality test. Later on, the sensibility factors are interpolated for the sources of {sup 192} Ir: Micro Selectron and Vari Source. Two capsules are sent to two hospitals to verify a nominal D{sub w} = 2 Gy, in the first one an underestimate of the D{sub w} is obtained, and in other one an overestimation is presented. Finally, the expanded uncertainty associated to D{sub w} and the F{sub s} are calculated. (Author)

  14. Enhancing the Oxygen Permeation Rate of Zr0.84Y0.16O1.92 - La0.8Sr0.2Cr0.5Fe0.5O3-δ Dual-Phase Hollow Fiber Membrane by Coating with Ce0.8Sm0.2O1.9 Nanoparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Tong; Wang, Yao; Yuan, Ronghua; Gao, Jianfeng; Chen, Chusheng; Bouwmeester, Henricus J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Zr0.84Y0.16O1.92−La0.8Sr0.2Cr0.5Fe0.5O3−δ (YSZ-LSCrF) dual-phase composite hollow fiber membranes were prepared by a combined phase-inversion and sintering method. The shell surface of the hollow fiber membrane was modified with Ce0.8Sm0.2O1.9 (SDC) via a drop−coating method. As the rate of oxygen

  15. Astatine-211 conjugated to an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody eradicates disseminated B-cell lymphoma in a mouse model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, Damian J.; Shadman, Mazyar; Jones, Jon C.; Frayo, Shani; Kenoyer, Aimee L.; Hylarides, Mark; Hamlin, Donald K.; Wilbur, D. Scott; Balkan, Ethan R.; Lin, Yukang; Miller, Brian W.; Frost, Sophia; Gopal, Ajay K.; Orozco, Johnnie J.; Gooley, Ted; Laird, Kelley L.; Till, B. G.; Back, Tom; Sandmaier, B. M.; Pagel, John M.; Press, Oliver W.

    2015-03-26

    Alpha emitting radionuclides release a large amount of energy within a few cell diameters and may be particularly effective for radioimmunotherapy targeting minimal residual disease (MRD) conditions in which micrometastatic disease satellites are broadly distributed. To evaluate this hypothesis, 211At conjugated 1F5 mAb (anti-CD20) was studied in both bulky lymphoma tumor xenograft and MRD animal models. Superior treatment responses to 211At conjugated 1F5 mAb were evident in the MRD setting. Lymphoma xenograft tumor bearing animals treated with doses of up to 48µCi of anti-CD20 211At-decaborate [211At-B10-1F5] experienced modest responses (0% cures but 2-3-fold prolongation of survival compared to negative controls). In contrast, 70% of animals in the MRD lymphoma model demonstrated complete eradication of disease when treated with 211At-B10-1F5 at a radiation dose that was less than one-third (15 µCi) of the highest dose given to xenograft animals. Tumor progression among untreated control animals in both models was uniformly lethal. After 130 days, no significant renal or hepatic toxicity is observed in the cured animals receiving 15 µCi of 211At-B10-1F5. These findings suggest that in a MRD lymphoma model, where isolated cells and tumor microclusters prevail, α-emitters may be uniquely efficacious.

  16. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) adhesin-toxoid MEFA (multiepitope fusion antigen) CFA/I/II/IV-3xSTaN12S-mnLTG192G/L211A derived antibodies inhibit adherence of seven adhesins (CFA/I, CFA/II & CFA/IV), neutralize enterotoxicity of both toxins (LT & STa), and protect piglets against diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandre, Rahul; Ruan, Xiaosai; Lu, Ti; Duan, Qiangde; Sack, David; Zhang, Weiping

    2017-12-20

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are a leading cause of children's diarrhea and travelers' diarrhea. Vaccines inducing antibodies to broadly inhibit bacterial adherence and to neutralize toxin enterotoxicity are expected effective against ETEC-associated diarrhea. 6xHis-tagged adhesin-toxoid fusion proteins were shown to induce neutralizing antibodies to several adhesins and LT and STa toxins (X. Ruan, DA Sack, W. Zhang, PLoS ONE, 10:e0121623, 2015). However, antibodies derived from his-tagged CFA/I/II/IV-2xSTaA14Q-dmLT or CFA/I/II/IV-2xSTaN12S-dmLT protein were less effective in neutralizing STa enterotoxicity and were not evaluated in vivo for efficacy against ETEC diarrhea. Additionally, his-tagged proteins are considered less desirable for human vaccines. In this study, we produced a tag-less adhesin-toxoid MEFA (multiepitope fusion antigen) protein, enhanced anti-STa immunogenicity by including a third copy of STa toxoid STaN12S, and examined antigen immunogenicity in a murine model. Moreover, we immunized pregnant pigs with the tag-less adhesin-toxoid MEFA protein and evaluated passive antibody protection against STa+ or LT+ ETEC infection in a pig challenge model. Results showed that tag-less adhesin-toxoid MEFA CFA/I/II/IV-3xSTaN12S-mnLTR192G/L211A induced broad anti-adhesin and antitoxin antibody responses in the intraperitoneally immunized mice and the intramuscularly immunized pigs. Mouse and pig serum antibodies significantly inhibited adherence of seven CFA adhesins (CFA/I, CS1 to CS6) and effectively neutralized both toxins. More importantly, suckling piglets born to the immunized mothers acquired antibodies and were protected against STa+ ETEC and LT+ ETEC diarrhea. These results indicated tag-less CFA/I/II/IV-3xSTaN12S-mnLTR192G/L211A induced broadly protective anti-adhesin and antitoxin antibodies and suggested this adhesin-toxoid MEFA a potential antigen for developing broadly protective ETEC vaccines. Copyright © 2017 American Society for

  17. 22 CFR 192.22 - Description of benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... obligation may be waived in writing. (b) Written agreements. Section 107 (50 U.S.C. App. 517) provides that... contracts and obligations, but requires that such arrangements be in writing. (c) Protection in court... civil right by taking advantage of the Act. (k) Further relief. Section 700 (50 U.S.C. App. 590...

  18. 49 CFR 192.313 - Bends and elbows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... serviceability of the pipe. (2) Each bend must have a smooth contour and be free from buckling, cracks, or any... tested either before or after the bending process. (c) Wrought-steel welding elbows and transverse...

  19. 40 CFR Appendix I to Part 192 - Listed Constituents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (Propanedinitrile) Melphalan (L-Phenylalanine, 4- -) Mercury and compounds, N.O.S. Mercury fulminate (Fulminic acid, mercury(2+) salt) Methacrylonitrile (2-Propenenitrile, 2-methyl-) Methapyrilene (1,2-Ethanediamine, N,N...) Phenylmercury acetate (Mercury, (acetato-O)phenyl-) Phenylthiourea (Thiourea, phenyl-) Phosgene (Carbonic...

  20. 192-IJBCS-Article-Dr M C Fonkoua

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RHUMSIKI

    The prevalence of various pathotypes of Escherichia coli was investigated during a case-control study conducted in children diarrhoea in Yaoundé. Isolates obtained from the stools samples of children aged 6 months to 5 years were selected on phenotypic basis, and identified by virulence genes detection using.

  1. Dicty_cDB: AFF192 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available LGVLISRSSLQFVKIKHI GVITILQGINMVFWIIQAKYKMVTSVWVLFILMVYCGLLGGASYVNVFYLILHQKNIPNE DRELCINYAALLVTVGITLA...LGVLISRSSLQFVKIKHI GVITILQGINMVFWIIQAKYKMVTSVWVLFILMVYCGLLGGASYVNVFYLILHQKNIPNE DRELCINYAALLVTVGITLA

  2. 192 Tourism: A Promoter of Human Development Aniekan Etim ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    is to promote the sustainable development of the tourism industry through capacity building of the government in the area ... sustainable tourism and human development. Tourism represent nowadays one of the most dynamic .... facilities, including resorts, hotels, restaurants, shop, folk course and marinas to name but a few.

  3. 32 CFR Appendix B to Part 192 - Procedures and Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... from sources other than the HRS to conduct a formal inquiry or investigation, as the situation warrants... the complainant of the provisions and procedures in this Instruction and of the right to pursue... possible source for identifying individuals to be used as verifiers.) (3) The purpose of verification is to...

  4. Dicty_cDB: CHP192 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available WVALDRGLRLADRRSFPA PRDKWTKITQFYGSKALDASTLIMSLVFFMAPSDPRNLATLEAILKPVEEGGLVANSLVF RYNLTHGHDDHIATDGLDGE...WVALDRGLRLADRRSFPA PRDKWTKITQFYGSKALDASTLIMSLVFFMAPSDPRNLATLEAILKPVEEGGLVANSLVF RYNLTHGHDDHIATDGLDGE

  5. 19 CFR 19.2 - Applications to bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... agent of each of two insurance companies stating that the building is acceptable for fire-insurance... laws and regulations. If the application is for a Class 9 warehouse (duty-free store), the applicant... respect to the port of entry and distances to all exit points of purchasers of conditionally duty-free...

  6. Dicty_cDB: SSJ192 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ktfikikiinfk*ikr*KKMTDNWDKEKLAKKAAEGLKNARNTASSYASGINASKDQLNS NFKNIKENISSNLNNAKHTIEENVHNAQRTGYPPKVPAPGSNKFIGFLALGVFGLFAWKF...ktfikikiinfk*ikr*KKMTDNWDKEKLAKKAAEGLKNARNTASSYASGINASKDQLNS NFKNIKENISSNLNNAKHTIEENVHNAQRTGYPPKVPAPGSNKFIGFLALGVFGLFAWKF

  7. PCR cloning protocols [Methods in molecular biology, v. 192

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Janes, Harry W; Chen, Bing-Yuan

    2002-01-01

    .... The techniques bring to both new and established researchers the power to apply PCR-based methodology to the cloning and modification of DNA, either through innovative protocols or by fostering individual creativity to modify and customize the protocols to best fit their own needs" [publisher's web site].

  8. All projects related to | Page 192 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2017-09-08

    Food Insecurity and Under-Nutrition in Guatemala. Project. Guatemala experiences significant food security problems and has one of the highest levels of chronic infant under-nutrition in the Western hemisphere. End Date: September 8, 2017. Topic: FOOD RESOURCES, EARLY CHILDHOOD, DISADVANTAGED GROUPS ...

  9. 192 RE-INTERPRETING GENESIS 34 IN THE LIGHT OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    Abstract. Religion plays significant roles in social harmony, yet it also serves as a motivation for violence. In Nigeria, religion has been at the centre of most violent conflicts, thereby gaining notoriety as one of the prime security challenges confronting the country. Genesis 34 is an important chapter in the Old. Testament Bible ...

  10. 192 RE-INTERPRETING GENESIS 34 IN THE LIGHT OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    gives the causes of religious violence in both Israelite and. Nigerian societies. ... another, respect for sanctity of human life, forgiveness and ... Indeed, the level of violence and atrocities being perpetuated ... causes of violence in Genesis 34.

  11. Dicty_cDB: SFK192 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available GIXEAXNXKHFAYANGVLNCVTWFYPKYDYETMYGAPPV LCCGYSFWMTFLNVTI*lmknysivlksmkiy*xsgkxsliyxkx*i**ldsixxilxni...GIXEAXNXKHFAYANGVLNCVTWFYPKYDYETMYGAPPV LCCGYSFWMTFLNVTI*lmknysivlksmkiy*xsgkxsliyxkx*i**ldsixxilxni

  12. 49 CFR 192.383 - Excess flow valve installation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Customer Meters, Service Regulators... psig or greater throughout the year; (2) The operator has prior experience with contaminants in the gas...

  13. 10 CFR 205.192A - Burden of proof.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Remedial Order proceeding the ERA has the burden of establishing a prima facie case as to the validity of... supplemental information that may be made available under § 205.193A. (b) Once a prima facie case has been...

  14. 49 CFR 192.179 - Transmission line valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... atmosphere without hazard and, if the transmission line is adjacent to an overhead electric line, so that the gas is directed away from the electrical conductors. (d) Offshore segments of transmission lines must...

  15. 19 CFR 192.2 - Requirements for exportation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... provides satisfactory proof of ownership (with an English translation of the text if the original language... original. (ii) Where title evidences third-party ownership/claims. If the used, self-propelled vehicle is... establish that the jurisdiction from where the vehicle comes does not have any ownership documentation...

  16. Phenotype-gene: 192 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available itivity during process named vernalization for AT4G22950 Sch旦nrock Nicole et al. 2006 Jun. Genes Dev. 20(12)...:1667-78. http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria224i/cria224u4ria224u16778081i decreased sensitivity during process named vernal

  17. Dicty_cDB: AFL192 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YNLSKLQDPRIEKLPYSIRILLESAVRNCDNFEVH EKDVENILNWENTANKVEIPFKPARVLLQDFTGVPAVVDLAAMRDAMKRLGGDPAKINPL VPVDLVIDHSVQVDV---...YNLSKLQDPRIEKLPYSIRILLESAVRNCDNFEVH EKDVENILNWENTANKVEIPFKPARVLLQDFTGVPAVVDLAAMRDAMKRLGGDPAKINPL VPVDLVIDHSVQVDV---

  18. Ruby-based inorganic scintillation detectors for 192Ir brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kertzscher, Gustavo; Beddar, Sam

    2016-11-01

    We tested the potential of ruby inorganic scintillation detectors (ISDs) for use in brachytherapy and investigated various unwanted luminescence properties that may compromise their accuracy. The ISDs were composed of a ruby crystal coupled to a poly(methyl methacrylate) fiber-optic cable and a charge-coupled device camera. The ISD also included a long-pass filter that was sandwiched between the ruby crystal and the fiber-optic cable. The long-pass filter prevented the Cerenkov and fluorescence background light (stem signal) induced in the fiber-optic cable from striking the ruby crystal, which generates unwanted photoluminescence rather than the desired radioluminescence. The relative contributions of the radioluminescence signal and the stem signal were quantified by exposing the ruby detectors to a high-dose-rate brachytherapy source. The photoluminescence signal was quantified by irradiating the fiber-optic cable with the detector volume shielded. Other experiments addressed time-dependent luminescence properties and compared the ISDs to commonly used organic scintillator detectors (BCF-12, BCF-60). When the brachytherapy source dwelled 0.5 cm away from the fiber-optic cable, the unwanted photoluminescence was reduced from  >5% to  5% within 10 s from the onset of irradiation and after the source had retracted. The ruby-based ISDs generated signals of up to 20 times that of BCF-12-based detectors. The study presents solutions to unwanted luminescence properties of ruby-based ISDs for high-dose-rate brachytherapy. An optic filter should be sandwiched between the ruby crystal and the fiber-optic cable to suppress the photoluminescence. Furthermore, we recommend avoiding ruby crystals that exhibit significant time-dependent luminescence.

  19. Dicty_cDB: VHE192 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available |DY893926.1 CeleSEQ13391 Cunninghamella elegans pBluescript (EcoRI-XhoI) Cunninghamella elegans cDNA clone...|DY886427.1 CeleSEQ2079 Cunninghamella elegans pBluescript (EcoRI-XhoI) Cunninghamella elegans cDNA clone...|DY892961.1 CeleSEQ12104 Cunninghamella elegans pBluescript (EcoRI-XhoI) Cunninghamella elegans cDNA clone...|DY895351.1 CeleSEQ15152 Cunninghamella elegans pBluescript (EcoRI-XhoI) Cunninghamella elegans cDNA clone...DY885896 |DY885896.1 CeleSEQ991 Cunninghamella elegans pBluescript (EcoRI-XhoI) Cunninghamella elegans cDNA clone

  20. 49 CFR 192.317 - Protection from hazards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... protect each transmission line or main from washouts, floods, unstable soil, landslides, or other hazards that may cause the pipeline to move or to sustain abnormal loads. In addition, the operator must take... or other similar causes, either by being placed at a safe distance from the traffic or by installing...

  1. 49 CFR 192.465 - External corrosion control: Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... other impressed current power source must be inspected six times each calendar year, but with intervals not exceeding 21/2 months, to insure that it is operating. (c) Each reverse current switch, each diode... intervals are impractical for separately protected short sections of mains or transmission lines, not in...

  2. 40 CFR 192.20 - Guidance for implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... the final cover; and the design and engineering specifications for a cover to manage the migration of... transit to receptors, results of statistical evaluations of data trends, and modeling of the dynamics of...

  3. 192 Tourism: A Promoter of Human Development Aniekan Etim ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    world employment. The sustained demand for travel and tourism, together with its ability to generate high levels of employment continues to prove the importance and value of the sector as a ... Tourism today has become one of the engines of growth for ... sector has attracted limited attention in terms of empirical research.

  4. What we do | Page 192 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Browse our project library. We've funded over 1,000 projects over the past decade and you can find them all here. Keyword(s). Topics. - All -, Development, Economics, Environment, Evaluation, Food and Agriculture, Governance, Health, Information and Communication, Miscellaneous, Natural Resources, Science and ...

  5. 49 CFR 192.629 - Purging of pipelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... formation of a hazardous mixture of gas and air, a slug of inert gas must be released into the line before... quantity to prevent the formation of a hazardous mixture of gas and air, a slug of inert gas must be...

  6. [Clinical analysis of 192 pregnant women infected by syphilis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-min; Zhang, Rong-na; Lin, Shu-qin; Chen, Shui-xian; Zheng, Li-ying

    2004-10-01

    To investigate the clinical characteristics of pregnant women with syphilis, their pregnant outcomes, perinatal and neonatal prognosis and the incidence of congenital syphilis. One hundred and ninety-two pregnant women with syphilis by serological assays were divided into two groups, group A (n = 93): treated with a full course anti-syphilis therapy and group B (n = 99): untreated group. Meanwhile, they were divided into groups C and D according to maternal serum rapid plasma reagin (RPR) test: RPR titer or = 1:16 (group D). The pregnant outcomes and congenital syphilis were compared between two groups. (1) Perinatal outcomes: Term delivery reached 93.6% (87/93) in group A and only 28.3% (28/99) in group B; the rate of premature birth and fetal intrauterine death were 5.4% (5/93) and 1.1% (1/93) in group A, obviously lower than 28.3% (28/99) and 32.3% (32/99) in group B (P syphilis and neonatal death in group A were significantly lower than those in group B (P syphilis, perinatal death and neonatal death in group C were lower than those in group D (P Gestational week and drug treatment: The earlier the treatment started during pregnancy, the lower the rate of congenital syphilis was (P syphilis were similar between penicillin and dibenzyl penicillin groups (P syphilis therapy is the key to improving the outcomes of pregnancy with syphilis, prognosis of neonates and reducing incidence of congenital syphilis. (2) Maternal serum RPR titer, the starting time of anti-syphilis treatment as well as the choice of therapeutical drugs are important influence factors on the outcomes of pregnancy with syphilis.

  7. Dicty_cDB: AFN192 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FQLTEKKSNKRIKSNESSDEDFEENKNKK KKTSGPGRKKGSTSMQQSTINYGSSRRNRGASIENDDDFNDGYDEDLYKDDNDRYELSLL PEIDRENIL...FQLTEKKSNKRIKSNESSDEDFEENKNKK KKTSGPGRKKGSTSMQQSTINYGSSRRNRGASIENDDDFNDGYDEDLYKDDNDRYELSLL PEIDRENIL...gvisin*keik*kn*ik*ik**rf*rk*k*kk enirtr*kerfninatinyklw**s*e*rcin*e***f**wl**rfi*r****i*tfiit rn**rk

  8. Publications | Page 192 | CRDI - Centre de recherches pour le ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Le CRDI collabore avec les chercheurs et les établissements des pays en développement au renforcement des capacités locales par le truchement du financement, de la mise en commun des connaissances et de la formation. Avec nos livres, nos articles, nos publications de recherche et nos études, nous visons à ...

  9. Southern Forests: a Journal of Forest Science - Vol 192 (2001)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Quantifying the geographic range of Pinus patula var. longipedunculata in Southern Mexico using morphologic and RAPD marker data: scientific paper · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL ... The wood quality of Pinus chiapensis (Mart.) Andresen grown in the Mpumalanga ...

  10. Dicty_cDB: SLA192 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available (bits) Value N CB893745 |CB893745.1 EST646537 HOGA Medicago truncatula cDNA clone HOGA-28J20, mRNAsequence...105 5e-25 2 BG649115 |BG649115.1 EST510734 HOGA Medicago truncatula cDNA clone pHOGA-24N6 5' end, mRNA...105 5e-25 2 CA921148 |CA921148.1 EST638866 MTUS Medicago truncatula cDNA clone MTUS-36E12, mRNA sequence...105 5e-25 2 BG588836 |BG588836.1 EST490645 MHRP- Medicago truncatula cDNA clone pMHRP-57N3, mRNA sequence...105 5e-25 2 BG646968 |BG646968.1 EST508587 HOGA Medicago truncatula cDNA clone pHOGA-15E22 5' end, mRNA

  11. 49 CFR 192.361 - Service lines: Installation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... millimeters) of cover in streets and roads. However, where an underground structure prevents installation at... drainage. Where condensate in the gas might cause interruption in the gas supply to the customer, the... buildings. Each underground service line installed below grade through the outer foundation wall of a...

  12. 192 inventory and economic evaluation of seedling species

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-09-02

    Sep 2, 2010 ... This was accomplished through questionnaire administration and interviews with respondents. Descriptive statistics were utilized in analyzing the socio-economic variables, while Gross Income (GI), Net Income (NI), and Rate of Return on Investment (RORI) were adapted for economic analysis. The result.

  13. Dosimetry of wires and single ribbons of Iridium 192; Dosimetria de alambres y ribbons individuales de Iridio-192

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazzucco, L.D. [Centro Medico Nuclear S.R.L. San Juan (Argentina)

    1998-12-31

    The objective of this work is in order to present in table formats the dosimetry of wires and single ribbons of Iridium with lengths 1-12 cm for each one linear source along the bisector which is perpendicular at tissue sources (water) computed for linear activity 1 mCi/cm in the case of wires, and 1 mCi/seed for ribbons. The above tables are of direct use, adaptable at particular cases so they facilitate logarithmic graphics of doses in function of the distance for interpolation and use in the treatments planning. It was shown that for two sources with identical linear activity and total length, one of the equidistant seeds at 1 cm (ribbon) and one wire on the other hand, the differences in dose rates in near positions can be about the 15% so corroborating that it is not possible to use wire tables for seeds neither vice versa. Moreover it was elaborated tables of practical direct use for dose rate in water at c Gy/hr for wires and Ribbons 1-12 cm length and from 0.5-10 cm of distance in the perpendicular bisector at the Iridium implant. (Author)

  14. Multiple Nonconformities in Ice-Walled Lake Successions Indicate Periods with Cold Summers (24.4 - 22.5 ka, 21.1 - 19.2 ka, 18.5 - 18.1 ka) during the Last Deglaciation in Northeastern Illinois, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, B. B.

    2014-12-01

    Unprecedented age control on many last glacial stratigraphic units and morainal ice-margin positions are interpreted from AMS radiocarbon ages of tundra plant macrofossils archived in low-relief ice-walled lake plain (IWLP) deposits the Lake Michigan Lobe (south-central Laurentide Ice Sheet). IWLPs are periglacial features that formed on morainal dead-ice permafrost. Lacustrine sediment, and the fossils contained therein, had physical and temporal proximity to the glacier which formed the underlying moraine. In modern ice-walled lakes, as the lake's ice cover begins to melt, moats form which allows access of sloughing tundra-mantled active layer sediment (soil) into the lakes. Multiple AMS ages from two sites with proglacial sediment buried by glacial max LIS diamicton, and IWLPs reveal evidence of episodic plant growth and sedimentation including ca. 24.0 to 24.4 ka (post Shelby Phase), 22.5 to 21.1 ka (post Livingston Phase), 18.1 to 17.4 ka (post Woodstock Phase). Although presently based on negative evidence, the associated nonconformities (listed in title) indicate periods when cold conditions did not promote development of the estival moat. Although the evidence does not preclude tundra growth during the cold summers, there was little landscape modification due to limited thawing of the active layer. At approximately the onset of the 19.2-18.5 "warm" period, at least two large deglacial discharge events flooded the Fox and Kankakee tributary valleys of the Illinois River. The latter, known as the Kankakee Torrent, occurred at 19.05 - 18.85 ka (σ1 range) at the Oswego channel complex. The temporal coincidence of the torrents and sedimentation in ice-walled lakes suggests that the post-Livingston Phase nonconformity (21.1 - 19.2 ka) was a period of lessened meltwater discharge through subglacial conduits (tunnel valleys) as the frozen toe promoted formation of subglacial lakes, buildup of pore-water pressures, and the release of subglacial water as "torrents

  15. KN192L01: WHOI cruise 192 leg 01 aboard the R/V Knorr from 2007-09-18 - 2007-09-28 (NODC Accession 0071437)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Post-cruise download of raw data from shipboard computer(s) as furnished by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Shipboard Scientific Support Group and archived...

  16. KN192L05: WHOI cruise 192 leg 05 aboard the R/V Knorr from 2007-11-12 - 2007-12-14 (NODC Accession 0070539)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Post-cruise download of raw data from shipboard computer(s) as furnished by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Shipboard Scientific Support Group and archived...

  17. KN192L03: WHOI cruise 192 leg 03 aboard the R/V Knorr from 2007-10-22 - 2007-10-26 (NODC Accession 0071819)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Post-cruise download of raw data from shipboard computer(s) as furnished by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Shipboard Scientific Support Group and archived...

  18. Large-scale survey to estimate the prevalence of disorders for 192 Kennel Club registered breeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiles, B M; Llewellyn-Zaidi, A M; Evans, K M; O'Neill, D G; Lewis, T W

    2017-01-01

    Pedigree or purebred dogs are often stated to have high prevalence of disorders which are commonly assumed to be a consequence of inbreeding and selection for exaggerated features. However, few studies empirically report and rank the prevalence of disorders across breeds although such data are of critical importance in the prioritisation of multiple health concerns, and to provide a baseline against which to explore changes over time. This paper reports an owner survey that gathered disorder information on Kennel Club registered pedigree dogs, regardless of whether these disorders received veterinary care. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of disorders among pedigree dogs overall and, where possible, determine any variation among breeds. This study included morbidity data on 43,005 live dogs registered with the Kennel Club. Just under two thirds of live dogs had no reported diseases/conditions. The most prevalent diseases/conditions overall were lipoma (4.3%; 95% confidence interval 4.13-4.52%), skin (cutaneous) cyst (3.1%; 2.94-3.27%) and hypersensitivity (allergic) skin disorder (2.7%; 2.52-2.82%). For the most common disorders in the most represented breeds, 90 significant differences between the within breed prevalence and the overall prevalence are reported. The results from this study have added vital epidemiological data on disorders in UK dogs. It is anticipated that these results will contribute to the forthcoming Breed Health & Conservation Plans, a Kennel Club initiative aiming to assist in the identification and prioritisation of breeding selection objectives for health and provide advice to breeders/owners regarding steps that may be taken to minimise the risk of the disease/disorders. Future breed-specific studies are recommended to report more precise prevalence estimates within more breeds.

  19. Tank 241-T-201, core 192 analytical results for the final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuzum, J.L.

    1997-08-07

    This document is the final laboratory report for Tank 241-T-201. Push mode core segments were removed from Riser 3 between April 24, 1997, and April 25, 1997. Segments were received and extruded at 222-S Laboratory. Analyses were performed in accordance with Tank 241-T-201 Push Mode Core Sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) (Hu, 1997), Letter of Instruction for Core Sample Analysis of Tanks 241-T-201, 241-T-202, 241-T-203, and 241-T-204 (LOI) (Bell, 1997), Additional Core Composite Sample from Drainable Liquid Samples for Tank 241-T-2 01 (ACC) (Hall, 1997), and Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (DQO) (Dukelow, et al., 1995). None of the subsamples submitted for total alpha activity (AT) or differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analyses exceeded the notification limits stated in DQO. The statistical results of the 95% confidence interval on the mean calculations are provided by the Tank Waste Remediation Systems Technical Basis Group, and are not considered in this report.

  20. S. Afr. J. Anim Sci. 3, 183-192 (1973) Congunqs' pefuence The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dioxide stunnirg which ir in agreement with ths results of Bendall et al (1966) but in. Tlbh I. Musle chaructqistics of rqidly cvold vs nuttully coold bon sides ..... Condition and mut quality of p$s, ed. J.CJrl. Hessel-de Hccr, G.R. Schmidt, W. Sybcrrne & P.G. van der Wal. Wageningen: Pudoc. MARKET RESEARCH AFRICA GTn ...

  1. 40 CFR 265.192 - Design and installation of new tank systems or components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... or sacrificial anodes); and (C) Electrical isolation devices such as insulating joints and flanges... within a seismic fault zone; and (iii) Tank systems will withstand the effects of frost heave. (b) The...

  2. 49 CFR Appendix C to Part 192 - Qualification of Welders for Low Stress Level Pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... position welding. The beveling, root opening, and other details must conform to the specifications of the procedure under which the welder is being qualified. Upon completion, the test weld is cut into four coupons...

  3. 49 CFR 192.112 - Additional design requirements for steel pipe using alternative maximum allowable operating...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... control plans and manufacturing procedure specifications, (c) equipment maintenance and records of... than 0.42 percent by weight, the qualified welding procedures must include a pre-heat procedure. (3... formula) or 0.43 percent by weight, as calculated by the International Institute of Welding (IIW) formula...

  4. HEMANGIOMAS E HEMANGIOSSARCOMAS EM CÃES: ESTUDO RETROSPECTIVO DE 192 CASOS (2002-2014)

    OpenAIRE

    Soares, Nicolle Pereira; Medeiros, Alessandra Aparecida; Szabó, Matias Pablo Juan; Guimarães, Ednaldo Carvalho; Fernandes, Lígia Gundim; Santos, Thaísa Reis dos

    2017-01-01

    Resumo O hemangioma e o hemangiossarcoma são neoplasias mesenquimais originárias do endotélio vascular e o cão é o animal doméstico mais frequentemente acometido. Os registros do Laboratório de Patologia Animal do Hospital Veterinário da Universidade Federal de Uberlândia de 2002 a 2014 foram revisados. Os dados epidemiológicos e a frequência de cães com diagnóstico de hemangioma e hemangiossarcoma foram verificados e estatisticamente comparados. Foram identificados 64 casos de hemangioma e 1...

  5. Characterization of HDR Ir-192 source for 3D planning system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonseca, Gabriel P.; Yoriyaz, Helio; Antunes, Paula C.G.; Siqueira, Paulo T.D., E-mail: gabriel.fonseca@usp.b, E-mail: hyoriyaz@ipen.b, E-mail: ptsiquei@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Rubo, Rodrigo [Universidade de Sao Paulo (HC/FMUSP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Servico de Radioterapia; Minamisawa, Renato A., E-mail: renato.minamisawa@psi.c [Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Ferreira, Louise A. [Universidade Estadual de Maringa (UEM), PR (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina

    2011-07-01

    Brachytherapy treatment involves surgical or cavitary insertion of radioactive sources for diseases treatments, such as: lung, gynecologic or prostate cancer. This technique has great ability to administer high doses to the tumor, with adjacent normal tissue preservation equal or better than external beam radiation therapy. Several innovations have been incorporated in this treatment technique, such as, 3D treatment planning system and computer guided sources. In detriment to scientific advances there are no protocols that relate dose with tumor volume, organs or A point, established by ICRU38 and used to prescribe dose in treatment planning system. Several international studies, like as EMBRACE, the multicentre international study, has been trying to correlate the dose volume using 3D planning systems and medical images, as those obtained by CT or MRI, to establish treatment protocols. With the objective of analyzing the 3D dose distribution, a micro Selectron-HDR remote afterloading device for high dose-rate (HDR) was characterized in the present work. Through the data provided by the manufacturer the source was simulated, using the MCNP5 code to calculate American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group No. 43 report (AAPM TG43) specified parameters. The simulations have shown great agreement when compared to the ONCENTRA planning system results and those provided by literature. The micro Selectron-HDR remote afterloading device will be utilized to simulate 3D dose distribution through CT images processed by an auxiliary software which process DICOM images. (author)

  6. Page 1 192 K. C. Sreedharan Pillai intervals (Fig. 2). It consists of a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A movable plat- form to hold the graph paper on which is plotted the observed points fits into the space between the horizontal bars. The working of the apparatus is simple. The observed values are plotted on a graph paper (scale 4 inch as unit). The graph paper is fixed to the platform so that the points lie along the vertical ...

  7. 49 CFR 192.925 - What are the requirements for using External Corrosion Direct Assessment (ECDA)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... External Corrosion Direct Assessment (ECDA)? (a) Definition. ECDA is a four-step process that combines... corrosion to the integrity of a pipeline. (b) General requirements. An operator that uses direct assessment... to be used for decreasing the physical spacing of indirect assessment tool readings when the presence...

  8. : tous les projets | Page 192 | CRDI - Centre de recherches pour le ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Projet. L'Éthiopie présente l'un des plus hauts taux de malnutrition au monde. Date de début : 1 mars 2012. End Date: 1 septembre 2014. Sujet: AGRICULTURAL INNOVATIONS, PLANT BREEDING, NUTRITION, Farming Systems, RURAL COMMUNITIES, MATERNAL AND CHILD HEALTH, AFRICA SOUTH OF SAHARA.

  9. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YNL189W, YGR192C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available dehydrogenase, isozyme 3, involved in glycolysis and gluconeogenesis; tetramer that catalyzes the reaction of...dehydrogenase, isozyme 3, involved in glycolysis and gluconeogenesis; tetramer that catalyzes the reaction of

  10. 49 CFR 192.319 - Installation of pipe in a ditch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS General Construction Requirements for... pipe coating from equipment or from the backfill material. (c) All offshore pipe in water at least 12..., held in place by anchors or heavy concrete coating, or protected by an equivalent means. Pipe in the...

  11. SU-E-J-192: Comparative Effect of Different Respiratory Motion Management Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakajima, Y; Kadoya, N; Ito, K; Kanai, T; Jingu, K [Tohoku University School of Medicine, Sendai, Miyagi (Japan); Kida, S [Tohoku University Hospital, Sendai City, Miyagi (Japan); Kishi, K; Sato, K [Tohoku University Hospital, Sendai, Miyagi (Japan); Dobashi, S; Takeda, K [Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi (Japan)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Irregular breathing can influence the outcome of four-dimensional computed tomography imaging for causing artifacts. Audio-visual biofeedback systems associated with patient-specific guiding waveform are known to reduce respiratory irregularities. In Japan, abdomen and chest motion self-control devices (Abches), representing simpler visual coaching techniques without guiding waveform are used instead; however, no studies have compared these two systems to date. Here, we evaluate the effectiveness of respiratory coaching to reduce respiratory irregularities by comparing two respiratory management systems. Methods: We collected data from eleven healthy volunteers. Bar and wave models were used as audio-visual biofeedback systems. Abches consisted of a respiratory indicator indicating the end of each expiration and inspiration motion. Respiratory variations were quantified as root mean squared error (RMSE) of displacement and period of breathing cycles. Results: All coaching techniques improved respiratory variation, compared to free breathing. Displacement RMSEs were 1.43 ± 0.84, 1.22 ± 1.13, 1.21 ± 0.86, and 0.98 ± 0.47 mm for free breathing, Abches, bar model, and wave model, respectively. Free breathing and wave model differed significantly (p < 0.05). Period RMSEs were 0.48 ± 0.42, 0.33 ± 0.31, 0.23 ± 0.18, and 0.17 ± 0.05 s for free breathing, Abches, bar model, and wave model, respectively. Free breathing and all coaching techniques differed significantly (p < 0.05). For variation in both displacement and period, wave model was superior to free breathing, bar model, and Abches. The average reduction in displacement and period RMSE compared with wave model were 27% and 47%, respectively. Conclusion: The efficacy of audio-visual biofeedback to reduce respiratory irregularity compared with Abches. Our results showed that audio-visual biofeedback combined with a wave model can potentially provide clinical benefits in respiratory management, although all techniques could reduce respiratory irregularities.

  12. 49 CFR 192.903 - What definitions apply to this subpart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... hospitals, prisons, schools, day-care facilities, retirement facilities or assisted-living facilities... operator takes on a covered segment to limit or reduce the probability of an undesired event occurring or...

  13. 49 CFR 192.623 - Maximum and minimum allowable operating pressure; Low-pressure distribution systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... distribution systems. (a) No person may operate a low-pressure distribution system at a pressure high enough to...) No person may operate a low pressure distribution system at a pressure lower than the minimum... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Maximum and minimum allowable operating pressure...

  14. VG2 SAT CRS RESAMPLED SUMMARY D1 RATE ELEC 192SEC V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set describes the counting rate data from detectors D1 and D2 in the Cosmic Ray System (CRS) electron telescope (TET) on Voyager 2 during the Saturn...

  15. 49 CFR 192.381 - Service lines: Excess flow valve performance standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Customer... prior experience with contaminants in the gas stream, where these contaminants could be expected to...

  16. Ir-192 HDR transit dose and radial dose function determination using alanine/EPR dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calcina, Carmen S Guzman [Departamento de FIsica e Matematica, FFCLRP, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av Bandeirantes 3900, 14040-901, Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil); Almeida, Adelaide de [Departamento de FIsica e Matematica, FFCLRP, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av Bandeirantes 3900, 14040-901, Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil); Rocha, Jose R Oliveira [Setor de FIsica Medica-CEB-UNICAMP e Setor de Radioterapia-CAISM-UNICAMP (Brazil); Abrego, Felipe Chen [Departamento de FIsica e Matematica, FFCLRP, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av Bandeirantes 3900, 14040-901, Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil); Baffa, Oswaldo [Departamento de FIsica e Matematica, FFCLRP, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av Bandeirantes 3900, 14040-901, Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2005-03-21

    Source positioning close to the tumour in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy is not instantaneous. An increment of dose will be delivered during the movement of the source in the trajectory to its static position. This increment is the transit dose, often not taken into account in brachytherapeutic treatment planning. The transit dose depends on the prescribed dose, number of treatment fractions, velocity and activity of the source. Combining all these factors, the transit dose can be 5% higher than the prescribed absorbed dose value (Sang-Hyun and Muller-Runkel, 1994 Phys. Med. Biol. 39 1181-8, Nath et al 1995 Med. Phys. 22 209-34). However, it cannot exceed this percentage (Nath et al 1995). In this work, we use the alanine-EPR (electron paramagnetic resonance) dosimetric system using analysis of the first derivative of the signal. The transit dose was evaluated for an HDR system and is consistent with that already presented for TLD dosimeters (Bastin et al 1993 Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 26 695-702). Also using the same dosimetric system, the radial dose function, used to evaluate the geometric dose degradation around the source, was determined and its behaviour agrees better with those obtained by Monte Carlo simulations (Nath et al 1995, Williamson and Nath 1991 Med. Phys. 18 434-48, Ballester et al 1997 Med. Phys. 24 1221-8, Ballester et al 2001 Phys. Med. Biol. 46 N79-90) than with TLD measurements (Nath et al 1990 Med. Phys. 17 1032-40)

  17. VG2 NEP MAG RESAMP RDR HELIOGRAPHIC COORDINATES 1.92SEC V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes data from the Low Field Magnetometer (LFM) during the inbound Neptune encounter beginning in the solar wind and continuing until the first...

  18. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YCL055W, YGL192W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available required during meiosis; exists in two forms, a slower-migrating form more abundant during vegetative...required during meiosis; exists in two forms, a slower-migrating form more abundant during vegetative

  19. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YER081W, YDR192C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available exclusively to the cytoplasmic side; involved in RNA export, most likely at a terminal step; interacts with...exclusively to the cytoplasmic side; involved in RNA export, most likely at a terminal step; interacts with

  20. Page 1 192 PKSen and SV Weeravalli entire range of unstable cyt is ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    As a final word in conclusion, it may be stated that the present work keeps alive the question of a possible connection between stability theory and actual turbulence, in Wall- bounded turbulent flows. 7. Dedication. We wish to dedicate this paper to Professor Peter Bradshaw FRS (somewhat belatedly) on the occasion of his ...

  1. 49 CFR 192.9 - What requirements apply to gathering lines?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... gathering line must comply with requirements of this part applicable to transmission lines, except the... onshore gathering line must comply with the requirements of this part applicable to transmission lines... maintenance tasks. (d) Type B lines. An operator of a Type B regulated onshore gathering line must comply with...

  2. 49 CFR Appendix D to Part 192 - Criteria for Cathodic Protection and Determination of Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... I. Criteria for cathodic protection— A. Steel, cast iron, and ductile iron structures. (1) A... cathodic protection to stop pitting attack on aluminum structures in environments with a natural pH in...

  3. 49 CFR 192.620 - Alternative maximum allowable operating pressure for certain steel pipelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... pressure upstream and downstream. (iv) A line break valve control system using differential pressure, rate...) Perform the following when evaluating an anomaly: (A) Use the most conservative calculation for determining remaining strength or an alternative validated calculation based on pipe diameter, wall thickness...

  4. Mecacci, L. (1999. Psicología moderna e postmoderna. Roma - Bari: Editori Laterza, 192 p.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramón León

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Libro de denso contenido, pero de estilo accesible al lector medianamente informado; obra de pequeño formato y dedicada a temas de amplio alcance: esas son apreciaciones que surgen tras la lectura de Psicología moderna e postmodema.Su autor, Luciano Mecacci, poco conocido en el mundo de habla hispana, es probablemente el más prolífico autor de la psicología italianade nuestros días. Su último libro - posterior al que comentamos,dedicado a los "desastres del psicoanálisis"- , es una ácida pero muybien fundamentada crítica a las ideas de Freud como práctica psicoterapéutica 

  5. 25 CFR 900.192 - What employees are covered by FTCA for medical-related claims?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES CONTRACTS UNDER THE INDIAN SELF-DETERMINATION AND...) Temporary employees; (c) Persons providing services without compensation in carrying out a contract; (d... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What employees are covered by FTCA for medical-related...

  6. 40 CFR 264.192 - Design and installation of new tank systems or components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... pressure controls (if applicable) are adequately designed and that the tank system has sufficient... moisture content; (B) Soil pH; (C) Soil sulfides level; (D) Soil resistivity; (E) Structure to soil... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Design and installation of new tank...

  7. some aspects of fisheries ecology in thomas dam, kano nigeria 192

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    userpc

    SOME ASPECTS OF FISHERIES ECOLOGY IN THOMAS DAM, KANO NIGERIA. 1*Nafiu, S. A., 1Badamasi, I., 2Ahmad, M. K., 1Abdullahi, M. T., 3Yelwa, S. I. and 1Ibrahim,. B.A.. 1Department of Science Laboratory Technology, Kano State Polytechnic, Kano. 2Department of Biological Sciences, Bayero University Kano.

  8. Proposed methodology for estimating the in HDR brachytherapy facilities Ir-192; Propuesta de metodologia para estimar la dosis absorbida en la entrada del laberinto en instalaciones de braquiterapia HDR con Ir-192

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pujades-Clamarchirant, M. C.; Perez-Calatayud, J.; Ballester, F.; Gimeno, J.; Granero, D.; Camacho, C.; Lliso, F.; Carmona, V.; Vijande, J.

    2011-07-01

    In the absence of procedures for assessing the design of a room brachytherapy (BT) with maze, usually adopting the formalism of external irradiation with different variations, The purpose of this study is to adapt the methodology of NCRP151 [1] to estimate the absorbed dose at the entrance to a room of ET and compare with the corresponding dosimetry data obtained with Monte Carlo (MC) in a previous work.

  9. Study of the workload to be applied in the shielding calculation in HDR brachytherapy facilities with IR-192; Estudio de la carga de trabajo a aplicar en el calculo de blindajes en instalaciones de braquiterapia HDR con IR-192

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pujades-Clamarchirant, M. C.; Perez-Calatayud, J.; Ballester, F.; Gimeno, J.; Granero, D.; Camacho, C.; Carmona, V.; Lliso, F.; Vijande, J.

    2011-07-01

    The design of shielding facilities high rate brachytherapy (HDR) requires an estimate of the workload (w) . The aim of this study was to evaluate the W typical service HDR BT with a high number of applications and their impact on the final thickness the shielding of the room. To do this, a review of patients treated in our center HDR W has been evaluated and studied their impact on the shielding design of the facility.

  10. s Alr .l Anim Sci. 9, l85 192 ( l97cl THE SYNCHRONISA'I'ION OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sleutehvoorde: Sinkronisasic. cs/nrs, skape, prog(stog(ett, L)r()stuglandien, progesteroon, LH). OPSOMMIJV(;. S I N K R O N I S A S I I . V A N I . S T R I . l S I ] Y S K A P I . - , I . D I I , I N V L O I . , D V A N D O S I S I . N T Y D V A N P R O S T A ( ...

  11. Measuring the Implementation Fidelity of the Response to Intervention Framework in Milwaukee Public Schools. Stated Briefly. REL 2017-192

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffini, Steffen J.; Lindsay, Jim; Miskell, Ryan; Proger, Amy

    2016-01-01

    Regional Educational Laboratory Midwest assisted Milwaukee Public Schools in developing a fidelity monitoring system for measuring schools' progress in implementing Response to Intervention (RTI). The study examined the ratings produced by that system to determine the system's reliability, schools' progress in implementing RTI, and whether ratings…

  12. FCJ-192 Sand in the Information Society Machine: How Digital Technologies Change and Challenge the Paradigms of Civil Disobedience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa Züger

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Digital technologies have fostered the rise of new forms of civil disobedience that change and challenge established notions of this form of political action. This paper examines digital civil disobedience using the concept of friction to explore contested entanglements of this kind of protest and its new technological adaptations, as well as tensions on the conceptual level of civil disobedience. The paper is split into in three sections which offer analyses of (a the historical dimension of this form of protest, (b seven factors that represent some of the features of contemporary digital forms of civil disobedience, and (c the recurring motif of power of information within digital civil disobedience. The paper is centered on the notion that transformations of civil disobedience demand a reconsideration of traditional understandings of civil disobedience to meet the conditions of our current society.

  13. Bayesian Filtering for Phase Noise Characterization and Carrier Synchronization of up to 192 Gb/s PDM 64-QAM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zibar, Darko; Carvalho, L.; Piels, Molly

    2014-01-01

    We show that phase noise estimation based on Bayesian filtering outperforms conventional time-domain approaches in the presence of moderate measurement noise. Additionally, carrier synchronization based on Bayesian filtering, in combination with expectation maximization, is demonstrated for the f...

  14. 41 CFR 102-192.140 - What are your general responsibilities as a Federal mail center manager?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... tools such as ancillary endorsements, CASS-certified software, Move Update, and NCOAlink® (more..., based on need for service as established through study of mail volumes and service requirements; (q...

  15. s Alr .l Anim Sci. 9, l85 192 ( l97cl THE SYNCHRONISA'I'ION OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    day l4 of thc oesltous cyele), c\\,!cs were treatecl u'rth rntravatrnal proge\\lagen sponges lbr eight days and tnlc(tcd wrth crthe r .l 1.25. 62,5 or l25pg cloprostcncll on the day of sponge witltdraual . A dosage ot'31,25pg provt'd adequate to inducc lutcolvsrs. but con(eption. r a t e s w c r e s i g n i t i c a n t l y l o u , e r ( P < 0 , 0 5 ) ...

  16. 41 CFR 102-192.90 - What must we include in our annual mail management report to GSA?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... service provider to ship parts and supplies from a materiel distribution center (see the definition of... accomplishments and plans to improve the economy and efficiency of mail operations in the current and future years...

  17. Installation Restoration Program. Preliminary Assessment: 192nd Tactical Fighter Group, Virginia Air National Guard, Richmond International Airport, Sandston, Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-02-01

    Atmospheric Administration. The climate at the Base consists of humid summers and mild winters. Average mean annual temperatures range from 55 to 600F...Current 1987 climatological data illustrates a seasonal temperature extreme which varies from a winter low of 1F to a summer high of 1010F. Precipitation is...formations may, be Triassic age sedimentary rocks or Paleozoic crystalline formations. Surface stratigraphy at the Base underlying the soil overburden is the

  18. The collapsed cone algorithm for 192Ir dosimetry using phantom-size adaptive multiple-scatter point kernels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa; Plamondon, Mathieu; Beaulieu, Luc

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate how dose distributions calculated with the collapsed cone (CC) algorithm depend on the size of the water phantom used in deriving the point kernel for multiple scatter. A research version of the CC algorithm equipped with a set of selectable point kernels for multiple-scatter dose that had initially been derived in water phantoms of various dimensions was used. The new point kernels were generated using EGSnrc in spherical water phantoms of radii 5 cm, 7.5 cm, 10 cm, 15 cm, 20 cm, 30 cm and 50 cm. Dose distributions derived with CC in water phantoms of different dimensions and in a CT-based clinical breast geometry were compared to Monte Carlo (MC) simulations using the Geant4-based brachytherapy specific MC code Algebra. Agreement with MC within 1% was obtained when the dimensions of the phantom used to derive the multiple-scatter kernel were similar to those of the calculation phantom. Doses are overestimated at phantom edges when kernels are derived in larger phantoms and underestimated when derived in smaller phantoms (by around 2% to 7% depending on distance from source and phantom dimensions). CC agrees well with MC in the high dose region of a breast implant and is superior to TG43 in determining skin doses for all multiple-scatter point kernel sizes. Increased agreement between CC and MC is achieved when the point kernel is comparable to breast dimensions. The investigated approximation in multiple scatter dose depends on the choice of point kernel in relation to phantom size and yields a significant fraction of the total dose only at distances of several centimeters from a source/implant which correspond to volumes of low doses. The current implementation of the CC algorithm utilizes a point kernel derived in a comparatively large (radius 20 cm) water phantom. A fixed point kernel leads to predictable behaviour of the algorithm with the worst case being a source/implant located well within a patient/phantom for which low doses at phantom edges can be overestimated by 2-5 %. It would be possible to improve the situation by using a point kernel for multiple-scatter dose adapted to the patient/phantom dimensions at hand.

  19. Effectiveness of Prepared Instruction Units in Teaching the Principles of Internal Combustion Engine Operation and Maintenance. Technical Bulletin No. 192.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Clinton O.

    The report is an evaluation of the effectiveness of the 12 instructional units developed around the use of the Briggs-Stratton Model 80302, 3HP, 8 cu. in. displacement engine having a fuel induction system similar in construction to farm tractor types. The evaluation procedure used was the "one-group Pre-test and Post-test" research method. The…

  20. Kepler Observations of Rapid Optical Variability in the BL Lac Object W2r192+42

    Science.gov (United States)

    R.Edelson; Mushotzky, R.; Vaughn, S.; Scargle, J.; Gandhi, P.; Malkan, M.; Baumgartner, W.

    2013-01-01

    We present the first Kepler monitoring of a strongly variable BL Lac, W2R1926+42. The light curve covers 181 days with approx. 0.2% errors, 30 minute sampling and >90% duty cycle, showing numerous delta-I/I > 25% flares over timescales as short as a day. The flux distribution is highly skewed and non-Gaussian. The variability shows a strong rms-flux correlation with the clearest evidence to date for non-linearity in this relation. We introduce a method to measure periodograms from the discrete autocorrelation function, an approach that may be well-suited to a wide range of Kepler data. The periodogram is not consistent with a simple power-law, but shows a flattening at frequencies below 7x10(exp -5) Hz. Simple models of the power spectrum, such as a broken power law, do not produce acceptable fits, indicating that the Kepler blazar light curve requires more sophisticated mathematical and physical descriptions than currently in use.

  1. Page 1 192 9. 10. ł 1. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17, 18. 19. Howes, G. B., and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    “Die in Deutschland lebenden Arten der Saurier,” 1872. “Muskein des Rumpfes,” Handb, d. vergl. Anat., herausgeg. v. Bolk. Göppert, Kallius, u. Lubosch, 1937, 5, 387–406. “Wirbelsäule und ihre Abkömmlige,” ibid., 1936, 4, 120. “Entwicklung der Wirbelsäule,” Handb. d. vergl, u. exper. Entwicklungslehre d. Wirbeltiere, 1906 ...

  2. 41 CFR 102-192.155 - What should our agency-wide mail management policy statement cover?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... billings, are considered to be “incidental expenses” covered by the traveler's “per diem allowance,” as... out of the employee's per diem allowance. Note (3) to § 102-92.155 (l) and (m): Every reasonable attempt must be made to deliver first class mail, priority mail, and express mail (regardless of carrier...

  3. 17 CFR 270.2a19-2 - Investment company general partners not deemed interested persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... or a business development company that is organized as a limited partnership under state law. (3... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Investment company general... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) RULES AND REGULATIONS, INVESTMENT COMPANY ACT OF 1940 § 270...

  4. Derivation of Soil Screening Guidelines for Gross Alpha/Beta Radioactivity for United States Air Force Deployment Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-04-19

    the emission of 7 alpha particles and 4 beta particles. Three radionuclides ( francium -223, astatine-215, and polonium-211) are not listed below...no no Uranium-233 159,200 y alpha yes no Thorium-229 7,300 y alpha yes no Radium-225 14.9 d beta no no Actinium-225 10.0 d alpha no no Francium

  5. δ37Cl : the geochemistry of chlorine isotopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eggenkamp, H.G.M.

    1994-01-01

    In this thesis the geochemistry of the stable isotopes of chlorine will be examined. Chlorine is one of the halogens, the seventh group in the periodic system of elements. This group consists of five elements, fluorine, chlorine, bromine, iodine, and astatine.

  6. δ³⁷Cl : the geochemistry of chlorine isotopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eggenkamp, H.G.M.

    1994-01-01

    In this thesis the geochemistry of the stable isotopes of chlorine will be examined. Chlorine is one of the halogens, the seventh group in the periodic system of elements. This group consists of five elements, fluorine, chlorine, bromine, iodine, and astatine. This thesis presents the first chlorine

  7. SPECT assay of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies. Final performance report, March 1992--November 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaszczak, R.J.

    1995-12-01

    Research is described in the following areas: development and evaluation quantitatively of reconstruction algorithms with improved compensations for attenuation, scatter, and geometric collimator response; evaluation of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) quantification of iodine 123 and astatine 211; and the development and evaluation of SPECT pinhole imaging for low and medium energy photons.

  8. O processo comunicativo no serviço de atendimento móvel de urgência (SAMU-192 Proceso de comunicación en el servicio de emergencia móvil (SAMU/192 Communicative process in the mobile emergency service (SAMU/192

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Claudia dos Santos

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho objetiva caracterizar o processo comunicativo entre os auxiliares de enfermagem das viaturas de Suporte Básico de Vida do Serviço de Atendimento Móvel de Urgência, a coordenação deste serviço e a Central Única de Regulação Médica de um município do Estado de São Paulo. Trata-se de uma pesquisa descritivo-qualitativa que utilizou a análise temática de conteúdo para a análise dos dados. Usou-se entrevista semi-estruturada para a coleta de dados que foi realizada em janeiro de 2010. Os resultados obtidos mostram dificuldades de comunicação tanto com a Central de Regulação Médica quanto com a coordenação. Os aspectos que mais se destacaram foram as falhas durante a transmissão via rádio, falta de capacitação dos operadores de rádio, acesso à coordenação dificultado e ausência da supervisão dos enfermeiros. No entanto, foi possível detectar soluções que visam à melhoria da comunicação e, consequentemente, do atendimento ofertado pelo Serviço de Atendimento Móvel de Urgência.Este estudio objetivó caracterizar la comunicación entre los auxiliares de enfermería que trabajan en los vehículos de Soporte Básico de Vida del Servicio de Emergencia Móvil, la coordinación del servicio y la Central Única de Reglamento Médico en un municipio de São Paulo, Brasil. Este estudio descriptivo-cualitativo utilizó el análisis temático de contenido para el análisis de datos. Se utilizaron entrevistas semi-estructuradas para recopilar los datos que se realizaron en enero de 2010. Los resultados muestran las dificultades en la comunicación tanto con la Central de Reglamento Médico como con la coordinación. Entre los aspectos que más se destacaron están los errores durante la transmisión de radio, falta de capacitación de los peradores de radio, acceso dificultado a la coordinación y falta de supervisión de los enfermeros. Sin embargo, fue posible detectar soluciones que tienen como objetivo mejorar la comunicación y, en consecuencia, el servicio ofrecido por el Servicio de Emergencia Móvil.This study aims to characterize the communication process among nursing assistants who work in vehicles of the Basic Life Support of the Mobile Emergency Service, in the coordination of this service, and in the Unified Medical Regulation Service in a city of the state of São Paulo, Brazil. This descriptive and qualitative research used the thematic content analysis for data analysis. Semi-structured interviews were used for the data collection, which was held in January, 2010. Results show difficulties in communication with both the Medical Regulation Service and the coordination. Among the most highlighted aspects are failures during the radio transmission, lack of qualified radio operators, difficult access to the coordination and lack of supervision by nurses. However, it was possible to detect solutions that aim to improve the communication and, consequently, the service offered by the Mobile Emergency Service.

  9. $\\beta$-delayed fission, laser spectroscopy and shape-coexistence studies with radioactive At beams

    CERN Multimedia

    We propose to study the $\\beta$-delayed fission, laser spectroscopy and radioactive decay of the newly available pure beams of neutron-deficient and neutron-rich astatine (Z=85) isotopes. The fission probability and the fission fragment distribution of the even-even isotopes $^{194,196}$Po following the $\\beta$-decay of the isotopes $^{194,196}$At will be studied with the Windmill setup. In-source laser spectroscopy will be performed on the entire astatine isotopic chain, using a combination of the Windmill setup, ISOLTRAP MR-ToF and ISOLDE Faraday. Radioactive decay data will be acquired at the Windmill setup throughout those studies and contribute to the global understanding of the phenomenon of shape coexistence in the neutron-deficient lead region.

  10. Production cross section of At radionuclides from $^{7}$Li+$^{\\textrm{nat}}$Pb and $^{9}$Be+$^{\\textrm{nat}}$Tl reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Maiti, Moumita

    2011-01-01

    Earlier we reported theoretical studies on the probable production of astatine radionuclides from $^{6,7}$Li and $^{9}$Be-induced reactions on natural lead and thalliun targets, respectively. For the first time, in this report, production of astatine radionuclides has been investigated experimentally with two heavy ion induced reactions: $^{9}$Be+$^{\\textrm{nat}}$Tl and $^{7}$Li+$^{\\textrm{nat}}$Pb. Formation cross sections of the evaporation residues, $^{207,208,209,210}$At, produced in (HI, xn) channel, have been measured by the stacked-foil technique followed by the off-line $\\gamma$-spectrometry at the low incident energies ($<$50 MeV). Measured excitation functions have been explained in terms of compound nuclear reaction mechanism using Weisskopf-Ewing and Hauser-Feshbach model. Absolute cross section values are lower than the respective theoretical predictions.

  11. Production cross section of At radionuclides from 7Li+natPb and 9Be+natTl reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiti, Moumita; Lahiri, Susanta

    2011-12-01

    Earlier we reported theoretical studies on the probable production of astatine radionuclides from 6,7Li- and 9Be-induced reactions on natural lead and thallium targets, respectively. The production of astatine radionuclides were investigated experimentally with two heavy-ion-induced reactions: 9Be + natTl and 7Li + natPb. Formation cross sections of the evaporation residues, 207,208,209,210At, produced in the (HI,xn) channel, were measured by the stacked-foil technique followed by off-line γ spectrometry at low incident energies (<50 MeV). Measured excitation functions were interpreted in terms of a compound nuclear reaction mechanism using Weisskopf-Ewing and Hauser-Feshbach models. Measured cross-section values are lower than the respective theoretical predictions.

  12. Jean-Pierre Famose et Jean Bertsch, L’estime de soi : une controverse éducative, Paris, PUF, 2009, 192 p

    OpenAIRE

    Benamar, Aïcha

    2015-01-01

    L’ouvrage porte sur l’estime de soi, dans la sphère sociale en général et le monde éducatif en particulier. L’estime de soi est au cœur du comportement individuel, apportant confiance et assurance, permettant de progresser et in fine de réussir. Une faible estime de soi est fréquemment à l’origine de difficultés pour un individu : doutes, hésitations, ou à l’inverse vanité et arrogance. Un bon niveau d’estime de soi confère à la personnalité : capacité à s’affirmer et respect des autres. Cent...

  13. Frequencies of two CYP2C19 defective alleles (CYP2C19*2, and *3 among Iranian population in Mazandaran Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naghi Shahabi-Majd

    2013-02-01

    Conclusion: The result of the present study showed that the two inactive alleles of CYP2C19 accounted for 9.0% of CYP2C19 alleles in our sample versus 8.8 - 40.1% reported in other populations. The frequencies of the studied alleles resulted significant differences between our sample and African and Eastern Asian populations.

  14. Technique for Resolving Low-lying Isomers in the Experimental Storage Ring (ESR) and the Occurrence of an Isomeric State in Re192

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Heidelberg, Germany 3 GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, 64291 Darmstadt, Germany 4 Physik-Department E12, Technische Universität München...Conference Series 381 (2012) 012058 doi:10.1088/1742-6596/381/1/012058 4 time that the single ions were observed in the ESR. Errors were analysed

  15. Effect of CYP2C19*2 and *17 mutations on pharmacodynamics and kinetics of proton pump inhibitors in Caucasians

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hunfeld, Nicole G.; Mathot, Ron A.; Touw, Daan J.; Van Schaik, Ron H.; Mulder, Paul G.; Franck, Paul F.; Kuipers, Ernst J.; Geus, William P.

    2008-01-01

    WHAT IS ALREADY KNOWN ABOUT THIS SUBJECT: The influence of CYP2C19 on the kinetics and dynamics of omeprazole, lansoprazole and rabeprazole has been studied in Japanese subjects. * It has been suggested that subjects with *1/*1 genotype might need stronger acid suppression than *1/*2 and *2/*2

  16. Lessons Learned Through the Follow-up of the Long-Term Effects of Over-Exposure to an Ir192 Industrial Radiography Source in Bangladesh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jalil, A.; Rabbani, G.; Hossain, M. K.; Alam, M. K.; Koddus, A.

    2003-02-24

    An industrial radiographer was accidentally over-exposed while taking the radiograph of weld-joints of gas pipe-lines in 1985 in Bangladesh. Symptoms of high radiation exposure occurred immediately after the accident and skin erythema developed leading to progressive tissue deterioration. The consequences of this over-exposure is being followed up to assess the long-term effects of ionizing radiation on the victim. Progressive tissue deteriorations have already led to multiple surgeries and successive amputations of the finger-tips so far. Lessons learned from this accident are also reported in this paper.

  17. Extending the IEEE 802.15.4 Security Suite with a Compact Implementation of the NIST P-192/B-163 Elliptic Curves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdellah Touhafi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Typically, commercial sensor nodes are equipped with MCUsclocked at a low-frequency (i.e., within the 4–12 MHz range. Consequently, executing cryptographic algorithms in those MCUs generally requires a huge amount of time. In this respect, the required energy consumption can be higher than using a separate accelerator based on a Field-programmable Gate Array (FPGA that is switched on when needed. In this manuscript, we present the design of a cryptographic accelerator suitable for an FPGA-based sensor node and compliant with the IEEE802.15.4 standard. All the embedded resources of the target platform (Xilinx Artix-7 have been maximized in order to provide a cost-effective solution. Moreover, we have added key negotiation capabilities to the IEEE 802.15.4 security suite based on Elliptic Curve Cryptography (ECC. Our results suggest that tailored accelerators based on FPGA can behave better in terms of energy than contemporary software solutions for motes, such as the TinyECC and NanoECC libraries. In this regard, a point multiplication (PM can be performed between 8.58- and 15.4-times faster, 3.40- to 23.59-times faster (Elliptic Curve Diffie-Hellman, ECDH and between 5.45- and 34.26-times faster (Elliptic Curve Integrated Encryption Scheme, ECIES. Moreover, the energy consumption was also improved with a factor of 8.96 (PM.

  18. Extending the IEEE 802.15.4 security suite with a compact implementation of the NIST P-192/B-163 elliptic curves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Piedra, Antonio; Braeken, An; Touhafi, Abdellah

    2013-07-29

    Typically, commercial sensor nodes are equipped with MCUsclocked at a low-frequency (i.e., within the 4-12 MHz range). Consequently, executing cryptographic algorithms in those MCUs generally requires a huge amount of time. In this respect, the required energy consumption can be higher than using a separate accelerator based on a Field-programmable Gate Array (FPGA) that is switched on when needed. In this manuscript, we present the design of a cryptographic accelerator suitable for an FPGA-based sensor node and compliant with the IEEE802.15.4 standard. All the embedded resources of the target platform (Xilinx Artix-7) have been maximized in order to provide a cost-effective solution. Moreover, we have added key negotiation capabilities to the IEEE 802.15.4 security suite based on Elliptic Curve Cryptography (ECC). Our results suggest that tailored accelerators based on FPGA can behave better in terms of energy than contemporary software solutions for motes, such as the TinyECC and NanoECC libraries. In this regard, a point multiplication (PM) can be performed between 8.58- and 15.4-times faster, 3.40- to 23.59-times faster (Elliptic Curve Diffie-Hellman, ECDH) and between 5.45- and 34.26-times faster (Elliptic Curve Integrated Encryption Scheme, ECIES). Moreover, the energy consumption was also improved with a factor of 8.96 (PM).

  19. Circulating miR-192 and miR-193b are markers of prediabetes and are modulated by an exercise intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Párrizas, Marcelina; Brugnara, Laura; Esteban, Yaiza

    2015-01-01

    CONTEXT: Diabetes is frequently diagnosed late, when the development of complications is almost inevitable, decreasing the quality of life of patients. However, early detection of affected individuals would allow the implementation of timely and effective therapies. OBJECTIVE: Here we set to desc...

  20. “A princesa que tudo via”: cognitive and creative processes in the literacy doi:10.5007/1807-1384.2010v7n2p192

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisélia Oliveira de Sá Neves

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The article reflects theoretical foundations on the cognitive processes in literacy. 'A princesa que tudo via' is a metaphor, a tool that facilitates the understanding of the human cognition and the acquisition of literacy. It is a procedure that allows us to consider the narrative elements of the text in analogy to recent studies on human cognition and creativity. Such narratives configure themselves in guiding principles for the creation of strategies for literacy, in triggering and operating, within the same tune, the bio-cultural dimensions of human cognition. The principle of recursion allows thinking of both the autonomy and creativity of the subject activated by the culture, by its symbolic, imaginary and cultural dimensions, which pervade the experience of the human being, triggering in him, the subjective states that make the cognition possible. In a complex perspective, the principles abstracted from the tale allow to see the eco-self-dependent feature of the constitution of the subject of knowledge. The creativity emerges from the dynamic dependence-autonomy implicit in learning that must be considered by the teacher in the strategies for literacy teaching.

  1. CYP2C19*2 and CYP2C19*17 variants and effect of tamoxifen on breast cancer recurrence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damkier, Per; Kjærsgaard, Anders; Barker, Kimberly A

    2017-01-01

    and recurrence of breast cancer. We used outcome and genotyping data from the large publicly available International Tamoxifen Pharmacogenomics Consortium (ITPC) dataset. Cox regression was used to compute the hazard ratios (HRs) for recurrence. CYP2C19 genotype data was available for 2 423 patients...

  2. UMTRA Project remedial action planning and disposal cell design to comply with the proposed EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) standards (40 CFR Part 192)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-01-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project involves stabilizing 24 inactive uranium mill tailings piles in 10 states. Remedial work must meet standards established by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Remedial action must be designed and constructed to prevent dispersion of the tailings and other contaminated materials, and must prevent the inadvertent use of the tailings by man. This report is prepared primarily for distribution to parties involved in the UMTRA Project, including the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and states and tribes. It is intended to record the work done by the DOE since publication of the proposed EPA groundwater protection standards, and to show how the DOE has attempted to respond and react in a positive way to the new requirements that result from the proposed standards. This report discusses the groundwater compliance strategies now being defined and implemented by the DOE, and details the changes in disposal cell designs that result from studies to evaluate ways to facilitate compliance with the proposed EPA groundwater protection standards. This report also serves to record the technical advances, planning, and progress made on the UMTRA Project since the appearance of the proposed EPA groundwater protection standards. The report serves to establish, document, and disseminate technical approaches and engineering and groundwater information to people who may be interested or involved in similar or related projects. 24 refs., 27 figs., 8 tabs.

  3. Epidemiology and etiology of childhood pneumonia in 2010: estimates of incidence, severe morbidity, mortality, underlying risk factors and causative pathogens for 192 countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Rudan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The recent series of reviews conducted within the Global Action Plan for Pneumonia and Diarrhoea (GAPPD addressed epidemiology of the two deadly diseases at the global and regional level; it also estimated the effectiveness of interventions, barriers to achieving high coverage and the main implications for health policy. The aim of this paper is to provide the estimates of childhood pneumonia at the country level. This should allow national policy–makers and stakeholders to implement proposed policies in the World Health Organization (WHO and UNICEF member countries.

  4. Zachary-Fort Lauderdale pipeline construction and conversion project: final supplement to final environmental impact statement. Docket No. CP74-192

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-05-01

    This Final Supplement to the Final Environmental Impact Statement (Final Supplement) evaluates the economic, engineering, and environmental aspects of newly developed alternatives to an abandonment/conversion project proposed by Florida Gas Transmission Company (Florida Gas). It also updates the staff's previous FEIS and studies revisions to the original proposal. Wherever possible, the staff has adopted portions of its previous FEIS in lieu of reprinting portions of that analysis which require no change. 60 references, 8 figures, 35 tables.

  5. Regulación redox de la Rubisco: Contribución estructural y funcional del par de residuos conservados Cys172 y Cys192.

    OpenAIRE

    García Murria, María Jesús

    2006-01-01

    RESUMEN La Ribulosa 1,5-bisfosfato carboxilasa oxigenasa (Rubisco) cataliza el primer paso en la fijación fotosintética del CO2 a través del ciclo de Calvin. La estructura del holoenzima activo en organismos eucariotas es un hexadecámero compuesto por 8 subunidades grandes (de 51-58KDa) y 8 subunidades pequeñas (de 12-18KDa). En condiciones de senescencia natural o inducida por estrés la Rubisco sufre una degradación rápida y selectiva. Una de las respuestas más generalizadas ante diferent...

  6. The Art of Counselling R May The Art of Counselling Souvenir 192pp £7.99 0-285-65099-8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-06-23

    Rollo May's The Art of Counselling is an established textbook in the US which has recently been distributed in a British edition. The text is rooted firmly in May's considerable experiences as a counsellor and teacher, and is organised in three parts.

  7. Patrick Criqui, Benoît Faraco, Alain Grandjean, 2009, Les États et le carbone, Presses Universitaires de France, France, 192 p.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertrand Zuindeau

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available À quelques semaines du Sommet de Copenhague, paraissait cet ouvrage traitant du changement climatique et des politiques susceptibles d’être mises en œuvre pour y faire face. Au regard d’une production intellectuelle assez significative dans ce domaine, depuis quelques années déjà, ce nouvel ouvrage se distingue surtout par l’attention portée aux outils économiques – notamment taxes et quotas –  visant la réduction des émissions. Écrit par trois spécialistes des questions climatiques et énergé...

  8. Searches for neutral Higgs bosons in $e^{+}e^{-}$ collisions at centre-of-mass energies from 192 to 202 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Barate, R.; Ghez, Philippe; Goy, C.; Jezequel, S.; Lees, J.P.; Martin, F.; Merle, E.; Minard, M.N.; Pietrzk, B.; Bravo, S.; Casado, M.P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J.M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, J.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll.M.; Pacheco, A.; Paneque, D.; Ruiz, H.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; De Filippis, N.; de Palma, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Azzurri, P.; Boix, G.; Buchmuller, O.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Clerbaux, B.; Dissertori, G.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R.W.; Frank, M.; Gianotti, F.; Greening, T.C.; Hansen, J.B.; Harvey, John; Hutchcroft, D.E.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kado, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Maley, P.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Moutoussi, A.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, Gigi; Schlatter, D.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Spagnolo, P.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Tournefier, E.; Valassi, A.; Ward, J.J.; Wright, A.E.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Badaud, F.; Dessagne, S.; Falvard, A.; Fayolle, D.; Gay, P.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.C.; Pallin, D.; Pascolo, J.M.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Hansen, J.D.; Hansen, J.R.; Hansen, P.H.; Nilsson, B.S.; Waananen, A.; Daskalakis, G.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J.C.; Machefert, F.; Rouge, A.; Swynghedauw, M.; Tanaka, R.; Videau, H.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Zachariadou, K.; Antonelli, A.; Antonelli, M.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Chiarella, V.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G.P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Chalmers, M.; Halley, A.W.; Kennedy, J.; Lynch, J.G.; Negus, P.; O'Shea, V.; Raeven, B.; Smith, D.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A.S.; Cavanaugh, R.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E.E.; Leibenguth, G.; Putzer, A.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D.M.; Cameron, W.; Davies, G.; Dornan, P.J.; Girone, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nowell, J.; Przysiezniak, H.; Sedgbeer, J.K.; Thompson, J.C.; Thomson, Evelyn J.; White, R.; Ghete, V.M.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bouhova-Thacker, E.; Bowdery, C.K.; Buck, P.G.; Clarke, D.P.; Ellis, G.; Finch, A.J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R.W.L.; Robertson, N.A.; Smizanska, M.; Giehl, I.; Holldorfer, F.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Krocker, M.; Muller, A.S.; Nurnberger, H.A.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.G.; Schmeling, S.; Wachsmuth, H.; Zeitnitz, C.; Ziegler, T.; Bonissent, A.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Curtil, C.; Ealet, A.; Fouchez, D.; Leroy, O.; Kachelhoffer, T.; Payre, P.; Rousseau, D.; Tilquin, A.; Aleppo, M.; Gilardoni, Simone S.; Ragusa, F.; David, A.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Huttmann, K.; Lutjens, G.; Mannert, C.; Manner, W.; Moser, H.G.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.F.; Heusse, Ph.; Jacholkowska, A.; Serin, L.; Veillet, J.J.; Videau, I.; de Vivie de Regie, J.B.; Yuan, C.; Zerwas, D.; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Boccali, T.; Calderini, G.; Ciulli, V.; Foa, L.; Giammanco, A.; Giassi, A.; Ligabue, F.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciaba, A.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tenchini, R.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P.G.; Blair, G.A.; Coles, J.; Cowan, G.; Green, M.G.; Jones, L.T.; Medcalf, T.; Strong, J.A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J.H.; Clifft, R.W.; Edgecock, T.R.; Norton, P.R.; Tomalin, I.R.; Bloch-Devaux, Brigitte; Boumediene, D.; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Lancon, E.; Lemaire, M.-C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Rosowsky, A.; Seager, P.; Trabelsi, A.; Tuchming, B.; Vallage, B.; Konstantinidis, N.; Loomis, C.; Litke, A.M.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C.N.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Hodgson, P.N.; Lehto, M.; Thompson, L.F.; Affholderbach, K.; Boehrer, Armin; Brandt, S.; Grupen, C.; Hess, J.; Misiejuk, A.; Prange, G.; Sieler, U.; Borean, C.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; He, H.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Armstrong, S.R.; Cranmer, K.; Elmer, P.; Ferguson, D.P.S.; Gao, Y.; Gonzalez, S.; Hayes, O.J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; Kile, J.; McNamara, P.A., III; Nielsen, J.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y.B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I.J.; Walsh, J.; Wu, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Zobernig, G.

    2001-01-01

    Searches for neutral Higgs bosons are performed with the 237 pb^-1 of data collected in 1999 by the ALEPH detector at LEP, for centre-of-mass energies between 191.6 and 201.6 GeV. These searches apply to Higgs bosons within the context of the Standard Model and its minimal supersymmetric extension (MSSM) as well as to invisibly decaying Higgs bosons. No evidence of a signal is seen. A lower limit on the mass of the Standard Model Higgs boson of 107.7 GeV/c^2 at 95% confidence level is set. In the MSSM, lower limits of 91.2 and 91.6 GeV/c^2 are derived for the masses of the neutral Higgs bosons h and A, respectively. For a Higgs boson decaying invisibly and produced with the Standard Model cross section, masses below 106.4 GeV/c^2 are excluded.

  9. Estimated VO2max and its corresponding velocity predict performance of amateur runners. DOI:10.5007/1980-0037.2012v14n2p192

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Meireles Santos

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, there has been a substantial increase in the number of runners, with a proportional increase in their involvement in amateur street competition. Identification of the determinants of performance in this population appears necessary for optimization of time devoted to training. The objective of this study was to ascertain the association between estimated maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max, critical velocity (CV and VO2max velocity (VVO2max and athletic performance in the 3.6 km (uphill and 10 and 21.1 km (flatland events. Twelve amateur runners (nine male, mean age 36 ± 5 years underwent five tests: 1 and 5 km race on level ground, 3.6 km race with slope (≈8%, and indirect VO2max measurement. CV was determined from the linear relationship between distance and run time on the first two tests. The subjects then took part in two official 10 km and 21.1 km (half marathon races. VVO2max was calculated from the VO2max through a metabolic equation. VO2max showed the best association with running performance in the 10 and 21.1 km events. For the uphill race, VVO2max showed a better association. Overall, the variable with the highest average association was VO2max (0.91±0.07, followed by VVO2max (0.90±0.04 and VC (0.87±0.06. This study showed strong associations between physiological variables established by low-cost, user-friendly indirect methods and running performance in the 10 and 21.1 km (flatland and 3.6 km (uphill running events.

  10. NODC Standard Format Meteorological and Oceanographic (F192) Data from the Gulf Offshore Weather Observing Network (GOWON) (1980-1984) (NODC Accession 0014204)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data type contains time series of meteorological and ocean wave data measured by instruments deployed on offshore oil rigs in the Gulf of Mexico in 1981-1982....

  11. Absolute activity measurement of the electron-capture-based radionuclides Ce-139, I-125, Ir-192 and Zn-65 by liquid scintillation coincidence counting

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Wyngaardt, WM

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Wyngaardt, B.R.S. Simpson / Applied Radiation and Isotopes 64 (2006) 1454?1458 1457 References Eldridge, J.S., Crowther, P., 1964. Absolute determination of 125I. Nucleonics 22 (6), 56. Funck, E., Larsen, A.N., 1983. The influence from low energy X...

  12. Multibeam collection for KN192-07: Multibeam data collected aboard Knorr from 2007-12-31 to 2008-01-17, Natal, Brazil to Ascension Island

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  13. Multibeam collection for KN192-04: Multibeam data collected aboard Knorr from 2007-10-29 to 2007-11-11, St. John's, Canada to Natal, Brazil

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  14. Therapeutic analysis of high-dose-rate {sup 192}Ir vaginal cuff brachytherapy for endometrial cancer using a cylindrical target volume model and varied cancer cell distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hualin, E-mail: hualin.zhang@northwestern.edu; Donnelly, Eric D.; Strauss, Jonathan B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, Illinois 60611 (United States); Qi, Yujin [Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: To evaluate high-dose-rate (HDR) vaginal cuff brachytherapy (VCBT) in the treatment of endometrial cancer in a cylindrical target volume with either a varied or a constant cancer cell distributions using the linear quadratic (LQ) model. Methods: A Monte Carlo (MC) technique was used to calculate the 3D dose distribution of HDR VCBT over a variety of cylinder diameters and treatment lengths. A treatment planning system (TPS) was used to make plans for the various cylinder diameters, treatment lengths, and prescriptions using the clinical protocol. The dwell times obtained from the TPS were fed into MC. The LQ model was used to evaluate the therapeutic outcome of two brachytherapy regimens prescribed either at 0.5 cm depth (5.5 Gy × 4 fractions) or at the vaginal mucosal surface (8.8 Gy × 4 fractions) for the treatment of endometrial cancer. An experimentally determined endometrial cancer cell distribution, which showed a varied and resembled a half-Gaussian distribution, was used in radiobiology modeling. The equivalent uniform dose (EUD) to cancer cells was calculated for each treatment scenario. The therapeutic ratio (TR) was defined by comparing VCBT with a uniform dose radiotherapy plan in term of normal cell survival at the same level of cancer cell killing. Calculations of clinical impact were run twice assuming two different types of cancer cell density distributions in the cylindrical target volume: (1) a half-Gaussian or (2) a uniform distribution. Results: EUDs were weakly dependent on cylinder size, treatment length, and the prescription depth, but strongly dependent on the cancer cell distribution. TRs were strongly dependent on the cylinder size, treatment length, types of the cancer cell distributions, and the sensitivity of normal tissue. With a half-Gaussian distribution of cancer cells which populated at the vaginal mucosa the most, the EUDs were between 6.9 Gy × 4 and 7.8 Gy × 4, the TRs were in the range from (5.0){sup 4} to (13.4){sup 4} for the radiosensitive normal tissue depending on the cylinder size, treatment lengths, prescription depth, and dose as well. However, for a uniform cancer cell distribution, the EUDs were between 6.3 Gy × 4 and 7.1 Gy × 4, and the TRs were found to be between (1.4){sup 4} and (1.7){sup 4}. For the uniformly interspersed cancer and radio-resistant normal cells, the TRs were less than 1. The two VCBT prescription regimens were found to be equivalent in terms of EUDs and TRs. Conclusions: HDR VCBT strongly favors cylindrical target volume with the cancer cell distribution following its dosimetric trend. Assuming a half-Gaussian distribution of cancer cells, the HDR VCBT provides a considerable radiobiological advantage over the external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in terms of sparing more normal tissues while maintaining the same level of cancer cell killing. But for the uniform cancer cell distribution and radio-resistant normal tissue, the radiobiology outcome of the HDR VCBT does not show an advantage over the EBRT. This study strongly suggests that radiation therapy design should consider the cancer cell distribution inside the target volume in addition to the shape of target.

  15. The atomic structure of protons and hydrides in Sm1.92Ca0.08Sn2O7-δ pyrochlore from DFT calculations and FTIR spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bork, Nicolai Christian; Eurenius, K. E. J.; Rossmeisl, Jan

    2012-01-01

    ) oxygen atoms closely associated with a Ca dopant. Further, the unexpected presence of Ho hydride defects in undoped, oxygen deficient Sm2Sn2O7 is reported. Finally, the stretching frequencies and relative intensities for these and other sites are calculated. The main features of the Fourier transform...

  16. Search for supersymmetric particles assuming R-parity non-conservation in e(+)e(-) collisions at root s=192 to 208 GeV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdallah, J.; Blom, M.R.; Drees, J.; Siebel, M.; van Dam, P.A.; Zupan, M.

    2004-01-01

    Searches for pair-production of supersymmetric particles under the assumption of non-conservation of R-parity with a dominant LLĒ or ŪD̄D̄ term have been performed using the data collected by the DELPHI experiment at LEP in e

  17. Radiohalogenation of biomolecules. An experimental study on radiohalogen preparation, precursor synthesis, radiolabeling and biodistribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koziorowski, J

    1998-10-01

    Radiohalogens are widely used in nuclear medicine, both as tool for diagnostic in vivo imaging, and in radionuclide therapy. This study deals with the use of radiohalogens; separation, precursor synthesis, labeling and biological behavior. The focus is on {sup 211}At and {sup 124}I, the former being a candidate for nuclide therapy and the latter potentially useful for diagnostic imaging and Auger-electron based radiotherapy. For astatine the separation, labeling and some biological behavior is described, and for iodine the latter two. Astatine was separated from an irradiated bismuth target by dry distillation. A novel cryotrap was developed for the isolation of astatine and subsequent synthesis of radiolabeled compounds. 5-[{sup 211}At]astato-2`-deoxyuridine (AUdR) and N-succinimidyl-4-[{sup 211}At]astatobenzoate (SAB) were synthesized in 95% respectively 90% radiochemical yields. The former is incorporated into DNA of proliferating cells and can therefore be used as an endoradiotherapeutic agent. The latter is a conjugate for the astatination of proteins. Human epidermal growth factor (hEGF) was tagged with astatine using three approaches: a) direct labeling of native hEGF, b) conjugation with SAB, and c) direct labeling of an hEGF - 7-(3-aminopropyl)-7,8-dicarba-nido-undecaborate(1-) conjugate. The overall labeling yields were 3.5% for direct labeling, 44% for SAB and 70% for the hEGF-nido-carborane conjugate. A new route to N-succinimidyl 3- and 4- [{sup 124}I]iodobenzoate, two reagents for radioiodination of proteins is described affording 90% radiochemical yield. Three radioiodinated analogs of PK11195, 1-(2-chlorophenyl)-N-methyl-N-(1-methylpropyl)isoquinoline-3-carboxyam ide, a peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor antagonist, were synthesized. All three analogs were obtained in >90% radiochemical yield. Synthesis and application of 5-[{sup 124}I]iodo-2`-deoxyuridine (IUdR) is presented. The closo-dodecaborate anion was evaluated as prosthetic group for

  18. Simulation of a terrorist attack with intent to a source of Iridium-192 and Radium Sulphate-226: procedures for radiation emergency actions; Simulacao de uma intencao de atentado terrorista com uma fonte de Iridio-192 e Sulfato de Radio-226: procedimentos para acoes de emergencia radiologica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguiar, Bruno Dias de

    2013-07-01

    The accomplishment of major public events comprises a previous radiological safety planning network, since both public safety and safeguards criteria are based upon risk factors, to which individuals and even the environment may be exposed to, moreover in radiological, nuclear and/or terrorist threats. Therefore, a preventive and extensive local radiological survey must be performed, aiming the detection of unexpected radioactive material, being it a sealed or unsealed source or even in the dispersed form. Once confirmed its presence, protective actions must be started up, with monitoring and restraint of the source/material, followed by dose and dose rate assessment in environment, as well as contamination in air and in surfaces in general. As a consequence, such measures must be carried out at once, according to specific protocols adopted by the responding team, as soon as the incident is confirmed. Aiming a better qualification in the attendance of major events, a simulated scenario is proposed in this study, comprising an incident with the malicious presence of a radioactive source in the Mario Filho Stadium (Maracana). (author)

  19. The methodology proposed to estimate the absorbed dose at the entrance of the labyrinth in HDR brachytherapy facilities with IR-192; Propuesta de metodologia para estimar la dosis absorbida en la entrada del laberinto en instalaciones de braquiterapia HDR con Ir-192

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pujades, M. C.; Perez-Calatayud, J.; Ballester, F.

    2012-07-01

    In the absence of procedure for evaluating the design of a brachytherapy (BT) vault with maze from the point of view of radiation protection, usually formalism of external radiation is adapted. The purpose of this study is to adapt the methodology described by the National council on Radiological Protection and Measurements Report 151 (NCRP 151). Structural Shielding Design for megavoltage X-and Gamma-Ray Radiotherapy facilities, for estimating dose at the door in BT and its comparison with the results megavoltage X-and Gamma-Ray Radiotherapy Facilities, for estimating dose at the door in BT and its comparison with the results obtained by the method of Monte Carlo (MC) for a special case of bunker. (Author) 17 refs.

  20. Attainment of dose distributions produced by different arrangements of Ir-192 wires in ocular brachytherapy treatments using the Monte Carlo method; Obtencion de distribuciones de dosis producida por diferentes arreglos de alambres de Ir-192 en tratamientos de braquiterapia ocular utilizando el metodo de Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vivanco, M.G. Bernui de [Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear (IPEN), Lima (Peru)

    2004-07-01

    This paper has two aims: to use The Monte Carlo Simulation to find the dose distributions of brachytherapy treatment and to discover the best way to generate dose distributions for each individual ocular brachytherapy treatment. To achieve these objectives a Monte Carlo Simulation program was developed, which is referred as 'Alternativo', which specifically simulates ocular brachytherapy treatments of the type used in Peru. The results obtained using the Alternativo program are compared with those of the Penelope program, where it is found that the simulation coincide within one standard deviation. The time spent in the simulation using the Alternativo program is an average 30% less, depending on the characteristics of the simulated treatment. The simulation model is confirmed experimentally. Finally a study is made of the variation in dose occasioned by treatment characteristics (source dimensions, number of sources and their placement on the gold plate, characteristics of the plate: thickness, radius of the ophthalmic plate). The conclusion reached in this paper is that is possible to significantly reduce the time needed for ocular brachytherapy treatment simulations by creating a specific program, without significantly lowering the quality of the results. In addition ways were found that give adequate dose distributions for each individual ocular brachytherapy treatment. (author)