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Sample records for astatine 192

  1. Radiochemistry of astatine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruth, T.J.; Dombsky, M.; D'Auria, J.M.; Ward, T.E.

    1988-01-01

    This monograph is a review of the literature through 1987 and covers the methods of producing the radioisotopes of astatine and the inorganic, nuclear, and organic chemistry of astatine. The discussion is limited to chemical and physical chemical properties of astatine. The monograph, after the introduction, is divided into chapters titled: production methods, nuclear spectroscopy, chemistry of astatine, separation and isolation (dry and wet), and selected procedures. 209 refs., 15 figs., 7 tabs

  2. Formation and decomposition of astatine molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Naruto; Ishikuro, Mituhiro; Baba Hiroshi

    1989-01-01

    A method determining the boiling points of elementary astatine and astatine iodide has been developed (K. Otozai and N. Takahashi, Radio. Chim. Acta 31, (1982) 201). Further, it was concluded from the simple rule among the boiling point of elementary halogens and interhalogen compounds that elementary astatine might exist in diatomic molecules as the other halogens. In the present work the reaction mechanisms of elementary astatine with radioactive iodine and organic solvents were studied by means of radiogaschromatography in order to obtain further experimental evidences for diatomic astaine molecules. The following conclusions were obtained by the analysis of reaction kinetics. Two astatine atoms are lost from the elementary astatine fraction per each radioactive decay of astatine. The astatine radical or hot atom liberated by the decay of the complementary astatine atom immediately reacts with iodine or organic solvents. Thus formed astatine compounds decompose in turn due to the decay of astatine

  3. Organic astatine compounds, their preparation and properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasaros, L; Berei, K

    1985-01-01

    Aromatic astatine compounds of possible medical application were prepared by high energy substitutions, by astatine-halogen, and by electrophil astatine-hydrogen substitutions at the Joint Institute of Nuclear Researches, Dubna. Physico-chemical properties of organic astatine compounds such as boiling point and evaporation heat, and the refraction and dissociation energy of carbon-astatine bonds were determined experimentally by gas chromatography. The results are compared with extrapolated data. (V.N.). 41 refs.; 7 figs.; 5 tables.

  4. Bibliography of astatine chemistry and biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berei, K.; Vasaros, L.

    1992-02-01

    An overall bibliography is presented on astatine chemistry and on the biomedical applications of its 211 At isotope. The references were grouped in the following chapters: General reviews; Discovery, Natural Occurence; Nuclear Data; Preparation, Handling, Radiation Risk; Physico-chemical Properties; Astatine Compounds and Chemical Reactions; Biological Effects and Applications. Entries are sorted alphabetically by authors name in each chapter, and cross-references to other chapters are provided if appropriate. (R.P.)

  5. Recent advances in the organic chemistry of astatine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berei, K.; Vasaros, L.

    1994-03-01

    Investigation on the chemical behaviour of astatine in the last decade are surveyed. The survey covers the physical and chemical properties of astatine, synthesis and identification of organic astatine compounds, their physicochemical properties. A special chapter is devoted to biomedical applications, including inorganic 211 At species, 211 At-labelled proteins and drugs. An extensive bibliography of the related literature is given. (N.T.) 129 refs.; 12 figs.; 14 tabs

  6. Experimental and computational evidence of halogen bonds involving astatine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ning; Maurice, Rémi; Teze, David; Graton, Jérôme; Champion, Julie; Montavon, Gilles; Galland, Nicolas

    2018-03-01

    The importance of halogen bonds—highly directional interactions between an electron-deficient σ-hole moiety in a halogenated compound and an acceptor such as a Lewis base—is being increasingly recognized in a wide variety of fields from biomedicinal chemistry to materials science. The heaviest halogens are known to form stronger halogen bonds, implying that if this trend continues down the periodic table, astatine should exhibit the highest halogen-bond donating ability. This may be mitigated, however, by the relativistic effects undergone by heavy elements, as illustrated by the metallic character of astatine. Here, the occurrence of halogen-bonding interactions involving astatine is experimentally evidenced. The complexation constants of astatine monoiodide with a series of organic ligands in cyclohexane solution were derived from distribution coefficient measurements and supported by relativistic quantum mechanical calculations. Taken together, the results show that astatine indeed behaves as a halogen-bond donor—a stronger one than iodine—owing to its much more electrophilic σ-hole.

  7. The reaction of astatine with aromatic diazonium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visser, G.W.M.; Diemer, E.L.

    1982-01-01

    Astatine reacts prefrentially with that type of aromatic diazonium salt that decomposes via a radical reaction channel (homolytic breakage of the C-N bond). The dediazonation with p-aminobenzoic acid and p-toluidine as model compounds was investigated through estatin produced in the 209 Bi(α,2n) 211 At reaction. (author)

  8. Measurement of the first ionization potential of astatine by laser ionization spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothe, S.; Andreyev, A. N.; Antalic, S.; Borschevsky, A.; Capponi, L.; Cocolios, T. E.; De Witte, H.; Eliav, E.; Fedorov, D. V.; Fedosseev, V. N.; Fink, D. A.; Fritzsche, S.; Ghys, L.; Huyse, M.; Imai, N.; Kaldor, U.; Kudryavtsev, Yuri; Köster, U.; Lane, J. F. W.; Lassen, J.; Liberati, V.; Lynch, K. M.; Marsh, B. A.; Nishio, K.; Pauwels, D.; Pershina, V.; Popescu, L.; Procter, T. J.; Radulov, D.; Raeder, S.; Rajabali, M. M.; Rapisarda, E.; Rossel, R. E.; Sandhu, K.; Seliverstov, M. D.; Sjödin, A. M.; Van den Bergh, P.; Van Duppen, P.; Venhart, M.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Wendt, K. D. A.

    2013-01-01

    The radioactive element astatine exists only in trace amounts in nature. Its properties can therefore only be explored by study of the minute quantities of artificially produced isotopes or by performing theoretical calculations. One of the most important properties influencing the chemical behaviour is the energy required to remove one electron from the valence shell, referred to as the ionization potential. Here we use laser spectroscopy to probe the optical spectrum of astatine near the ionization threshold. The observed series of Rydberg states enabled the first determination of the ionization potential of the astatine atom, 9.31751(8) eV. New ab initio calculations are performed to support the experimental result. The measured value serves as a benchmark for quantum chemistry calculations of the properties of astatine as well as for the theoretical prediction of the ionization potential of superheavy element 117, the heaviest homologue of astatine. PMID:23673620

  9. Automated astatination of biomolecules - a stepping stone towards multicenter clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aneheim, Emma; Albertsson, Per; Bäck, Tom

    2015-01-01

    To facilitate multicentre clinical studies on targeted alpha therapy, it is necessary to develop an automated, on-site procedure for conjugating rare, short-lived, alpha-emitting radionuclides to biomolecules. Astatine-211 is one of the few alpha-emitting nuclides with appropriate chemical...... vector, which can guide the radiation to the cancer cells. Consequently, an appropriate method is required for coupling the nuclide to the vector. To increase the availability of astatine-211 radiopharmaceuticals for targeted alpha therapy, their production should be automated. Here, we present a method...... challenging, alpha-emitting radionuclide. In this work, we describe the process platform, and we demonstrate the production of both astaine-211, for preclinical use, and astatine-211 labelled antibodies....

  10. Synthesis and Evaluation of Astatinated N-[2-(Maleimido)ethyl]-3-(trimethylstannyl)benzamide Immunoconjugates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aneheim, Emma; Gustafsson, Anna; Albertsson, Per

    2016-01-01

    Effective treatment of metastasis is a great challenge in the treatment of different types of cancers. Targeted alpha therapy utilizes the short tissue range (50-100 μm) of α particles, making the method suitable for treatment of disseminated occult cancers in the form of microtumors or even single...... to the antibody arbitrarily on lysine residues. By instead coupling astatine to disulfide bridges in the antibody structure, the immunoreactivity of the antibody conjugates could possibly be increased. Here, the disulfide-based conjugation was performed using a new coupling reagent, maleimidoethyl 3......-(trimethylstannyl)benzamide (MSB), and evaluated for chemical stability in vitro. The immunoconjugates were subsequently astatinated, resulting in both high radiochemical yield and high specific activity. The MSB-conjugate was shown to be stable with a long shelf life prior to the astatination. In a comparison...

  11. Some aspects of the organic, biological and inorganic chemistry of astatine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visser, G.W.M.

    1982-01-01

    Astatine has no stable isotopes and the radioactive isotopes with half-lives sufficiently long for chemical experiments ( 209 At, 210 At, 211 At) must be produced artificially with a cyclotron or with a high energy accelerator by spallation of Th. This thesis deals with the synthesis and chemistry of At-compounds and the determination of some of their properties. (C.F.)

  12. Direct astatination of a tumour-binding protein, human epidermal growth factor, using nido-carborane as a prosthetic group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sjoestroem, A.; Carlsson, J.; Lundqvist, H.; Koziorowski, J.

    2003-01-01

    A method for direct astatine labeling of proteins has been investigated. Binding sites for astatine were created by coupling of a nido-carborane derivative to a protein, the human epidermal growth factor (hEGF), using two different conjugation methods - by glutaraldehyde cross-linking or by introduction of sulfohydryl groups by Traut's reagent with subsequent linking of ANC-1 with m-maleimidobenzoyl-N-hydroxysulfosuccinimide ester. The conjugates were astatinated using the Chloramine-T method in high yield. The best labeling was obtained by the glutaraldehyde conjugate with an average yield of 68 ± 9%. In vitro stability tests indicated that the glutaraldehyde conjugated label was as stable as hEGF labeled with astatobenzoate. (author)

  13. Estimation of the chemical form and the boiling point of elementary astatine by radiogas-chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otozai, K.; Takahashi, N.

    1982-01-01

    After astatine (0) was mixed with 131 I 2 containing carrier I 2 , the sample was analyzed by means of radiogaschromatography and the peaks due to I 2 , AtI and At 2 were observed. Further, the boiling points were estimated from the retention volume in terms of the semi-empirical theory on gas chromatography. The boiling points of I 2 , AtI and At 2 were 457 +- 2,486 +- 2 and 503 +- 3K, respectively. The boiling point of At 2 obtained in the present work is far smaller than that expected by the extrapolation of lighter halogens. (orig.)

  14. Direct astatination of a tumour-binding protein, human epidermal growth factor, using nido-carborane as a prosthetic group

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sjostrom, A.; Tolmachev, V.; Lebeda, Ondřej; Koziorowski, J.; Carlsson, J.; Lundqvist, H.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 256, č. 7 (2003), s. 191-197 ISSN 0236-5731 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KSK4055109 Keywords : neutron-capture therapy * astatine-211 Subject RIV: CH - Nuclear ; Quantum Chemistry Impact factor: 0.472, year: 2003

  15. 211At-Rh(16-S4-diol) complex as a precursor for astatine radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pruszynski, M.; Bilewicz, A.

    2006-01-01

    211 At is one of the most promising radionuclides in α-radioimmunotherapy (α-RIT). Unfortunately, biomolecules labeled by direct electrophilic astatination are unstable due to the rapid loss of 211 At under both in vitro and in vivo conditions. The present paper describes the results of our studies on attaching At - to the rhodium(III) complex with thioether ligand: 1,5,9,13-etrathiacyclohexadecane-3,11-diol (16-S4-diol). Rh 3+ was chosen as a moderately soft metal cation which should form very strong bonds with soft At - anions, but first of all because of the kinetic inertness of low spin rhodium(III) d 6 complexes. The 16-S4-diol ligand was selected due to formation of stable complexes with Rh 3+ . The experiments related to optimization of the reaction conditions were performed with the 131 I, basing on a chemical similarity of I - to At - . The experiments with 211 At were then carried out under the conditions found optimal for I - . The preliminary results are promising, and indicate a possibility for astatination of biomolecules by using the 211 At-Rh(16-S4-diol) complex

  16. Complexation study on no-carrier-added astatine with insulin: A candidate radiopharmaceutical

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lahiri, Susanta [Chemical Sciences Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700 064 (India)], E-mail: susanta.lahiri@saha.ac.in; Roy, Kamalika [Chemical Sciences Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700 064 (India); Sen, Souvik [Berhampur Sadar Hospital, Berhampur, Murshidabad 742 101 (India)

    2008-12-15

    No-carrier-added astatine radionuclides produced in the {sup 7}Li-irradiated lead matrix were separated from bulk lead nitrate target by complexing At with insulin, followed by dialysis. The method offers simultaneous separation of At from lead as well as its complexation with insulin. The At-insulin complex might be a potential radiopharmaceutical in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma. The stability of At-insulin complex was checked by dialysis against deionized water and Ringer lactate (RL) solution. It has been found that the half-life of At-insulin complex is about {approx}12 h, when dialyzed against deionized water and is only 6 h, when dialyzed against RL solution having the same composition as blood serum. The 6 h half-life of this Insulin-At complex is perfect for killing cancer cells from external cell surfaces as the half-life of internalization of insulin molecule inside the cell is 7-12 h.

  17. Laser photodetachment of radioactive ions: towards the determination of the electronegativity of astatine

    CERN Multimedia

    Rothe, Sebastian; Welander, Jakob Emanuel; Chrysalidis, Katerina; Day Goodacre, Thomas; Fedosseev, Valentine; Fiotakis, Spyridon; Forstner, Oliver; Heinke, Reinhard Matthias; Johnston, Karl; Kron, Tobias; Koester, Ulli; Liu, Yuan; Marsh, Bruce; Ringvall Moberg, Annie; Rossel, Ralf Erik; Seiffert, Christoph; Studer, Dominik; Wendt, Klaus; Hanstorp, Dag

    2017-01-01

    Negatively charged ions are mainly stabilized through the electron correlation effect. A measure of the stability of a negative ion is the electron affinity, which the energy gain by attaching an electron to a neutral atom. This fundamental quantity is, due to the almost general lack of bound excited states, the only atomic property that can be determined with high accuracy for negative ions. We will present the results of the first laser photodetachment studies of radioactive negative ions at CERN-ISOLDE. The photodetachment threshold for the radiogenic iodine isotope 128I was measured successfully, demonstrating the performance of the upgraded GANDALPH experimental beam line. The first detection of photo-detached astatine atoms marks a milestone towards the determination of the EA of this radioactive element.

  18. Thermogravimetric determination of the enthalpy of astatine and radon adsorption on palladium surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichler, B.; Son Chun, K.

    1985-01-01

    In order to investigate the adsorption of astatine and radon on a palladium surface some on- and off-line thermochromatographic experiments were carried out with 210 At and 220 Rn tracers. The partial molar adsorption enthalpy for zero covering was found to be ΔH/sub a//sup 0, loc./(At) = -(15S +- 10) kJ mole -1 and ΔH/sub a//sup 0, mob./(Rn) = -(37 +- 4) kJ mole -1 . The results are compared with theoretical and experimental values for other elements of the sixth period. The adsorption behaviour of At is in conformity with that of the p-metals on a palladium surface. (author)

  19. Determination of the electron affinity of astatine and polonium by laser photodetachment

    CERN Multimedia

    We propose to conduct the first electron affinity (EA) measurements of the two elements astatine (At) and polonium (Po). Collinear photo-detachment spectroscopy will allow us to measure these quantities with an uncertainty limited only by the spectral line width of the laser. We plan to use negative ion beams of the two radioactive elements At and Po, which are only accessible on-line and at ISOLDE. The feasibility of our proposed method and the functionality of the experimental setup have been demonstrated at ISOLDE in off-line tests by the clear observation of the photo-detachment threshold for stable iodine. This proposal is based on our Letter of Intent I-148.

  20. Complexation study on no-carrier-added astatine with insulin: A candidate radiopharmaceutical

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahiri, Susanta; Roy, Kamalika; Sen, Souvik

    2008-01-01

    No-carrier-added astatine radionuclides produced in the 7 Li-irradiated lead matrix were separated from bulk lead nitrate target by complexing At with insulin, followed by dialysis. The method offers simultaneous separation of At from lead as well as its complexation with insulin. The At-insulin complex might be a potential radiopharmaceutical in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma. The stability of At-insulin complex was checked by dialysis against deionized water and Ringer lactate (RL) solution. It has been found that the half-life of At-insulin complex is about ∼12 h, when dialyzed against deionized water and is only 6 h, when dialyzed against RL solution having the same composition as blood serum. The 6 h half-life of this Insulin-At complex is perfect for killing cancer cells from external cell surfaces as the half-life of internalization of insulin molecule inside the cell is 7-12 h

  1. Comment: 192 [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Grey heron Ardea cinerea Ardea_cinerea_L.png 192.png Takeru Nakazato (Database Center for Life Science...zato (Database Center for Life Science) nakazato 2009/11/04 17:28:11 2010/01/14 20:04:35 ...

  2. Astatine-211 Radiochemistry: The Development Of Methodologies For High Activity Level Radiosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zalutsky, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Targeted radionuclide therapy is emerging as a viable approach for cancer treatment because of its potential for delivering curative doses of radiation to malignant cell populations while sparing normal tissues. Alpha particles such as those emitted by 211At are particularly attractive for this purpose because of their short path length in tissue and high energy, making them highly effective in killing cancer cells. The current impact of targeted radiotherapy in the clinical domain remains limited despite the fact that in many cases, potentially useful molecular targets and labeled compounds have already been identified. Unfortunately, putting these concepts into practice has been impeded by limitations in radiochemistry methodologies. A critical problem is that the synthesis of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals provides additional challenges in comparison to diagnostic reagents because of the need to perform radio-synthesis at high levels of radioactivity. This is particularly important for α-particle emitters such as 211At because they deposit large amounts of energy in a highly focal manner. The overall objective of this project is to develop convenient and reproducible radiochemical methodologies for the radiohalogenation of molecules with the α-particle emitter 211At at the radioactivity levels needed for clinical studies. Our goal is to address two problems in astatine radiochemistry: First, a well known characteristic of 211At chemistry is that yields for electrophilic astatination reactions decline as the time interval after radionuclide isolation from the cyclotron target increases. This is a critical problem that must be addressed if cyclotrons are to be able to efficiently supply 211At to remote users. And second, when the preparation of high levels of 211At-labeled compounds is attempted, the radiochemical yields can be considerably lower than those encountered at tracer dose. For these reasons, clinical evaluation of promising 211At-labeled targeted

  3. ASTATINE-211 RADIOCHEMISTRY: THE DEVELOPMENT OF METHODOLOGIES FOR HIGH ACTIVITY LEVEL RADIOSYNTHESIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MICHAEL R. ZALUTSKY

    2012-08-08

    Targeted radionuclide therapy is emerging as a viable approach for cancer treatment because of its potential for delivering curative doses of radiation to malignant cell populations while sparing normal tissues. Alpha particles such as those emitted by 211At are particularly attractive for this purpose because of their short path length in tissue and high energy, making them highly effective in killing cancer cells. The current impact of targeted radiotherapy in the clinical domain remains limited despite the fact that in many cases, potentially useful molecular targets and labeled compounds have already been identified. Unfortunately, putting these concepts into practice has been impeded by limitations in radiochemistry methodologies. A critical problem is that the synthesis of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals provides additional challenges in comparison to diagnostic reagents because of the need to perform radio-synthesis at high levels of radioactivity. This is particularly important for {alpha}-particle emitters such as 211At because they deposit large amounts of energy in a highly focal manner. The overall objective of this project is to develop convenient and reproducible radiochemical methodologies for the radiohalogenation of molecules with the {alpha}-particle emitter 211At at the radioactivity levels needed for clinical studies. Our goal is to address two problems in astatine radiochemistry: First, a well known characteristic of 211At chemistry is that yields for electrophilic astatination reactions decline as the time interval after radionuclide isolation from the cyclotron target increases. This is a critical problem that must be addressed if cyclotrons are to be able to efficiently supply 211At to remote users. And second, when the preparation of high levels of 211At-labeled compounds is attempted, the radiochemical yields can be considerably lower than those encountered at tracer dose. For these reasons, clinical evaluation of promising 211At

  4. Part I: $\\beta$-delayed fission, laser spectroscopy and shape-coexistence studies with astatine beams; Part II: Delineating the island of deformation in the light gold isotopes by means of laser spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Andreyev, Andrei

    2013-01-01

    Part I: $\\beta$-delayed fission, laser spectroscopy and shape-coexistence studies with astatine beams; Part II: Delineating the island of deformation in the light gold isotopes by means of laser spectroscopy

  5. In vitro evaluation of the astatinated chimeric monoclonal antibody U36, a potential candidate for treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nestor, M.; Anniko, M. [Uppsala University, Unit of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden); Persson, M. [Uppsala University, Unit of Urology, Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden); Uppsala University, Unit of Biomedical Radiation Science, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Uppsala (Sweden); Dongen, G.A.M.S. van [Vrije Universiteit Medical Center, Department of Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Jensen, H.J. [Righshospitalet, PET and Cyclotron Unit, Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Copenhagen (Denmark); Lundqvist, H.; Tolmachev, V. [Uppsala University, Unit of Biomedical Radiation Science, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2005-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the properties of the astatinated chimeric MAb (cMAb) U36 as a conjugate to selectively target and eradicate head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). cMAb U36 was labelled with {sup 211}At via the linker N-succinimidyl 4-(trimethylstannyl)benzoate (SPMB). The quality of the conjugate was extensively evaluated for binding and internalisation capacity, and compared with {sup 125}I-SPMB-cMAb U36. The cellular toxicity of the astatinated conjugate was assessed in two types of in vitro growth assay and compared with {sup 131}I-labelled cMAb U36 (directly labelled). Comparisons between {sup 211}At-cMAb U36 and {sup 125}I-cMAb U36 demonstrated an optimal functional capacity of the labelled products. Immunoreactivity and affinity assays showed high immunoreactive fractions (>93%), and an affinity in good agreement between the astatinated and iodinated antibodies. For both conjugates, specific binding to HNSCC cells could be demonstrated, as well as some internalisation. Retention of the astatinated conjugate was just slightly lower than for the iodinated conjugate and still reasonable for therapeutic use (31{+-}2% vs 42.6{+-}1.0% at 22 h), demonstrating no adverse effects from astatination of the antibody. Studies on cellular toxicity demonstrated a dose-dependent and antigen-specific cellular toxicity for {sup 211}At-cMAb U36, with about 10% cell survival at 50 decays per cell. The {sup 131}I-labelled conjugate was not as efficient, with a surviving cell fraction of about 50% at 55 decays per cell. (orig.)

  6. In vitro evaluation of the astatinated chimeric monoclonal antibody U36, a potential candidate for treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nestor, M.; Anniko, M.; Persson, M.; Dongen, G.A.M.S. van; Jensen, H.J.; Lundqvist, H.; Tolmachev, V.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the properties of the astatinated chimeric MAb (cMAb) U36 as a conjugate to selectively target and eradicate head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). cMAb U36 was labelled with 211 At via the linker N-succinimidyl 4-(trimethylstannyl)benzoate (SPMB). The quality of the conjugate was extensively evaluated for binding and internalisation capacity, and compared with 125 I-SPMB-cMAb U36. The cellular toxicity of the astatinated conjugate was assessed in two types of in vitro growth assay and compared with 131 I-labelled cMAb U36 (directly labelled). Comparisons between 211 At-cMAb U36 and 125 I-cMAb U36 demonstrated an optimal functional capacity of the labelled products. Immunoreactivity and affinity assays showed high immunoreactive fractions (>93%), and an affinity in good agreement between the astatinated and iodinated antibodies. For both conjugates, specific binding to HNSCC cells could be demonstrated, as well as some internalisation. Retention of the astatinated conjugate was just slightly lower than for the iodinated conjugate and still reasonable for therapeutic use (31±2% vs 42.6±1.0% at 22 h), demonstrating no adverse effects from astatination of the antibody. Studies on cellular toxicity demonstrated a dose-dependent and antigen-specific cellular toxicity for 211 At-cMAb U36, with about 10% cell survival at 50 decays per cell. The 131 I-labelled conjugate was not as efficient, with a surviving cell fraction of about 50% at 55 decays per cell. (orig.)

  7. Laser welding parameters for manufacturing iridium-192 (Ir-192) source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anung Pujiyanto; Moch Subechi; Hotman Lubis; Diandono KY

    2013-01-01

    Number of cervical cancer patients in Indonesia is growing every year. One of cervical cancer treatment was fairly effective use brachytherapy treatment with radioisotope sources of iridium-192. Manufacturing of iridium sources for brachytherapy can be done by incorporating the iridium-192 into stainless steel microcapsules then welding using laser welder which the quality of the welding of iridium source (Ir-192) was determined by the welding parameters such as full power, energy frequency, average power and speed. Based on the result of leakage test using pressure -20 inch Hg and tensile test 2.5 bar showed the welding parameters III and IV did not have leakage and damaged. So that parameters III and IV are recommended to be applied to Ir-192 HDR's source. (author)

  8. High-efficiency astatination of antibodies using N-iodosuccinimide as the oxidising agent in labelling of N-succinimidyl 3-(trimethylstannyl)benzoate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindegren, S.; Andersson, H.; Baeck, T.; Jacobsson, L.; Karlsson, B.; Skarnemark, G.

    2001-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies C215, reactive with colorectal carcinomas, and MOv18, reactive with most of the ovarian carcinomas, were radiohalogenated with [ 211 At]astatine. The radiohalogen was conjugate coupled to antibodies via the intermediate labelling reagent N-succinimidyl-3-(trimethylstannyl)benzoate (m-MeATE) in a two-step, single-pot reaction. Optimisation of the labelling of the reagent was achieved using N-iodosuccinimide, NIS, as the oxidising agent. The yields ranged from 69-95% in the labelling of 0.1-1.0 nmole of the m-MeATE precursor. Subsequent conjugation to antibodies resulted in yields of 58±7%. In vitro binding to tumour cells showed that the immunoreactivity of both antibodies was retained after astatine labelling

  9. An all-solid state laser system for the laser ion source RILIS and in-source laser spectroscopy of astatine at ISOLDE, CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Rothe, Sebastian; Nörtershäuser, W

    This doctoral thesis describes the extension of the resonance ionization laser ion source RILIS at ISOLDE, CERN, by the addition of an all-solid state tuneable titanium: sapphire (Ti:Sa) laser system to complement the well-established system of dye lasers. Synchronous operation of the so called Dual RILIS system of Ti:Sa and dye lasers was investigated and the potential for increased ion beam intensity, reliability, and reduced setup time has been demonstrated. In-source resonance ionization spectroscopy was performed at ISOLDE, CERN, and at ISAC, TRIUMF, radioactive ion beam facilities to develop an efficient and selective three-colour ionization scheme for the purely radioactive element astatine. A LabVIEW based monitoring, control and measurement system was conceived which enabled, in conjunction with Dual RILIS operation, the spectroscopy of high lying Rydberg states, from which the ionization potential of the astatine atom was determined for the first time experimentally.

  10. An all-solid state laser system for the laser ion sources RILIS and in-source laser spectroscopy of astatine at ISOLDE/CERN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothe, Sebastian

    2012-01-01

    This doctoral thesis describes the extension of the resonance ionization laser ion source RILIS at CERN/ISOLDE by the addition of an all-solid state tunable titanium:sapphire (Ti:Sa) laser system to complement the well-established system of dye lasers. Synchronous operation of the so called Dual RILIS system of Ti:Sa and dye lasers was investigated and the potential for increased ion beam intensity, reliability, and reduced setup time has been demonstrated. In-source resonance ionization spectroscopy was performed at ISOLDE/CERN and at ISAC/TRIUMF radioactive ion beam facilities to develop an efficient and selective three-colour ionization scheme for the purely radioactive element astatine. A LabVIEW based monitoring, control and measurement system was conceived which enabled, in conjunction with Dual RILIS operation, the spectroscopy of high lying Rydberg states, from which the ionization potential of the astatine atom was determined for the first time experimentally.

  11. An all-solid state laser system for the laser ion sources RILIS and in-source laser spectroscopy of astatine at ISOLDE/CERN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothe, Sebastian

    2012-09-24

    This doctoral thesis describes the extension of the resonance ionization laser ion source RILIS at CERN/ISOLDE by the addition of an all-solid state tunable titanium:sapphire (Ti:Sa) laser system to complement the well-established system of dye lasers. Synchronous operation of the so called Dual RILIS system of Ti:Sa and dye lasers was investigated and the potential for increased ion beam intensity, reliability, and reduced setup time has been demonstrated. In-source resonance ionization spectroscopy was performed at ISOLDE/CERN and at ISAC/TRIUMF radioactive ion beam facilities to develop an efficient and selective three-colour ionization scheme for the purely radioactive element astatine. A LabVIEW based monitoring, control and measurement system was conceived which enabled, in conjunction with Dual RILIS operation, the spectroscopy of high lying Rydberg states, from which the ionization potential of the astatine atom was determined for the first time experimentally.

  12. Radiobiological Effects of Alpha-Particles from Astatine-211: From DNA Damage to Cell Death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claesson, Kristina

    2011-05-15

    In recent years, the use of high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation for radiotherapeutic applications has gained increased interest. Astatine-211 (211At) is an alpha-particle emitting radionuclide, promising for targeted radioimmunotherapy of isolated tumor cells and microscopic clusters. To improve development of safe radiotherapy using 211At it is important to increase our knowledge of the radiobiological effects in cells. During radiotherapy, both tumors and adjacent normal tissue will be irradiated and therefore, it is of importance to understand differences in the radio response between proliferating and resting cells. The aim of this thesis was to investigate effects in fibroblasts with different proliferation status after irradiation with alpha-particles from 211At or X-rays, from inflicted DNA damage, to cellular responses and biological consequences. Throughout this work, irradiation was performed with alpha-particles from 211A or X-rays. The induction and repair of double-strand breaks (DSBs) in human normal fibroblasts were investigated using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and fragment analysis. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of 211At for DSB induction varied between 1.4 and 3.1. A small increase of DSBs was observed in cycling cells compared to stationary cells. The repair kinetics was slower after 211At and more residual damage was found after 24 h. Comparison between cells with different proliferation status showed that the repair was inefficient in cycling cells with more residual damage, regardless of radiation quality. Activation of cell cycle arrests was investigated using immunofluorescent labeling of the checkpoint kinase Chk2 and by measuring cell cycle distributions with flow cytometry analysis. After alpha-particle irradiation, the average number of Chk2-foci was larger and the cells had a more affected cell cycle progression for several weeks compared with X-irradiated cells, indicating a more powerful arrest after 211At

  13. 22 CFR 192.52 - Disability benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Disability benefits. 192.52 Section 192.52... Disability or Death § 192.52 Disability benefits. (a) Principals who qualify for benefits under § 192.1 and... benefits may not be received from both OWCP and the local organizational authority for the same claim...

  14. 49 CFR 192.243 - Nondestructive testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Nondestructive testing. 192.243 Section 192.243... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Welding of Steel in Pipelines § 192.243 Nondestructive testing. (a) Nondestructive testing of welds must be performed by any process, other than trepanning, that...

  15. 49 CFR 192.225 - Welding procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding procedures. 192.225 Section 192.225... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Welding of Steel in Pipelines § 192.225 Welding procedures. (a) Welding must be performed by a qualified welder in accordance with welding procedures...

  16. 22 CFR 192.51 - Death benefit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Death benefit. 192.51 Section 192.51 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE HOSTAGE RELIEF VICTIMS OF TERRORISM COMPENSATION Compensation for Disability or Death § 192.51 Death benefit. (a) The Secretary of State or Agency Head may provide for payment...

  17. 40 CFR 192.03 - Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Monitoring. 192.03 Section 192.03... of Residual Radioactive Materials from Inactive Uranium Processing Sites § 192.03 Monitoring. A groundwater monitoring plan shall be implemented, to be carried out over a period of time commencing upon...

  18. 49 CFR 192.16 - Customer notification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Customer notification. 192.16 Section 192.16... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS General § 192.16 Customer notification. (a) This section applies to each operator of a service line who does not maintain the customer's buried piping up...

  19. 49 CFR 192.151 - Tapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Tapping. 192.151 Section 192.151 Transportation... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Design of Pipeline Components § 192.151 Tapping. (a) Each mechanical fitting used to make a hot tap must be designed for at least the operating pressure of...

  20. 22 CFR 192.31 - Applicable benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Applicable benefits. 192.31 Section 192.31 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE HOSTAGE RELIEF VICTIMS OF TERRORISM COMPENSATION Medical Benefits for Captive Situations § 192.31 Applicable benefits. A person eligible for benefits under this part...

  1. 22 CFR 192.21 - Applicable benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Applicable benefits. 192.21 Section 192.21... Soldiers' and Sailors' Civil Relief Act to Captive Situations § 192.21 Applicable benefits. (a) Eligible persons are entitled to the benefits provided by the Soldiers' and Sailors' Civil Relief Act of 1940 (50 U...

  2. 22 CFR 192.11 - Applicable benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Applicable benefits. 192.11 Section 192.11 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE HOSTAGE RELIEF VICTIMS OF TERRORISM COMPENSATION Payment of Salary and Other Benefits for Captive Situations § 192.11 Applicable benefits. (a) Captives are entitled to...

  3. Dicty_cDB: SFK192 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 2F (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >SFK192 (SFK192Q) /CSM/SF/SFK1-D/SFK192Q.Seq.d/ CTTATCCACATANA... 4.0 %: vesicles of secretory system >> prediction for SFK192 is nuc 5' end seq. ID SFK192F 5' end seq. >SFK192F.Seq CTTATCCACATANA

  4. Final Report for research grant "Development of Methods for High Specific Activity Labeling of Biomolecules Using Astatine-211 in Different Oxidation States"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilbur, D. Scott [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2011-12-14

    The overall objective of this research effort was to develop methods for labeling biomolecules with higher oxidation state species of At-211. This was to be done in an effort to develop reagents that had higher in vivo stability than the present carbon-bonded At-211-labeled compounds. We were unsuccessful in that effort, as none of the approaches studied provided reagents that were stable to in vivo deastatination. However, we gained a lot of information about At-211 in higher oxidation states. The studies proved to be very difficult as small changes in pH and other conditions appeared to change the nature of the species that obtained (by HPLC retention time analyses), with many of the species being unidentifiable. The fact that there are no stable isotopes of astatine, and the chemistry of the nearest halogen iodine is quite different, made it very difficult to interpret results of some experiments. With that said, we believe that a lot of valuable information was obtained from the studies. The research effort evaluated: (1) methods for chemical oxidation of At-211, (2) approaches to chelation of oxidized At-211, and (3) approaches to oxidation of astatophenyl compounds. A major hurdle that had to be surmounted to conduct the research was the development of HPLC conditions to separate and identify the various oxidized species formed. Attempts to develop conditions for separation of iodine and astatine species by normal and reversed-phase TLC and ITLC were not successful. However, we were successful in developing conditions (from a large number of attempts) to separate oxidized forms of iodine ([I-125]iodide, [I-125]iodate and [I-125]periodate) and astatine ([At-211]astatide, [At-211]astatate, [At-211]perastatate, and several unidentified At-211 species). Information on the basic oxidation and characterization of At-211 species is provided under Objective 1. Conditions were developed to obtain new At-211 labeling method where At-211 is chelated with the DOTA and

  5. 22 CFR 192.33 - Dispute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dispute. 192.33 Section 192.33 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE HOSTAGE RELIEF VICTIMS OF TERRORISM COMPENSATION Medical Benefits for Captive... Director, Department of State, for a determination. If the person bringing the claim is not satisfied with...

  6. Activity uniformity of Ir-192 seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ling, C.C.; Gromadzki, Z.C.

    1981-01-01

    A simple device that uses materials and apparatus commonly available in a radiotherapy department has been designed, fabricated and used in routine quality control relative to the activity uniformity of clinical Ir-192 seeds in ribbons. Detailed evaluation indicated that this system is easy to use and can yield relative activity measurements of individual Ir-192 seeds accurate to within 2%. With this device, activity uniformity of commercial Ir-192 seeds from two manufacturers has been assessed. For the seven shipments of Ir-192 seeds studied, the root mean square variations of individual seed strength from the average of each shipment ranged from 3.4 to 7.1%. Variation in seed activity by more than +- 10% from the average is not uncommon

  7. 49 CFR 192.57 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Materials § 192.57 [Reserved] ...

  8. 49 CFR 192.53 - General.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Materials § 192.53 General. Materials for pipe and...

  9. 49 CFR 192.61 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Materials § 192.61 [Reserved] ...

  10. 49 CFR 192.311 - Repair of plastic pipe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Repair of plastic pipe. 192.311 Section 192.311... Lines and Mains § 192.311 Repair of plastic pipe. Each imperfection or damage that would impair the serviceability of plastic pipe must be repaired or removed. [Amdt. 192-93, 68 FR 53900, Sept. 15, 2003] ...

  11. 49 CFR 192.121 - Design of plastic pipe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Design of plastic pipe. 192.121 Section 192.121... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Pipe Design § 192.121 Design of plastic pipe. Subject to the limitations of § 192.123, the design pressure for plastic pipe is determined by either of the...

  12. Quasiparticle excitations in superdeformed {sup 192}Hg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauritsen, T.; Carpenter, M.P.; Janssens, R.V.F. [and others

    1995-08-01

    The nucleus {sup 192}Hg plays a pivotal role for superdeformation in the mass 190 region, since calculations of single-particle levels show large shell-gaps for the superdeformed (SD) shape at N = 112 and Z = 80. As a result, {sup 192}Hg is referred to as the doubly magic SD nucleus for the A = 190 region. In previous studies, only one superdeformed band was observed in this nucleus, and this fact was cited as indirect evidence that large shell gaps do indeed exist at the proposed particle numbers.

  13. 22 CFR 192.3 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE HOSTAGE RELIEF VICTIMS OF TERRORISM COMPENSATION General § 192.3 Definitions. When used in this subchapter, unless otherwise specified, the terms— (a) Secretary of State includes any person to whom the Secretary of State has delegated the responsibilities of carrying out this...

  14. 49 CFR 192.271 - Scope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Joining of Materials Other Than by Welding § 192.271...

  15. 49 CFR 192.279 - Copper pipe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Joining of Materials Other Than by Welding § 192.279...

  16. 49 CFR 192.281 - Plastic pipe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Joining of Materials Other Than by Welding § 192.281...

  17. 49 CFR 192.273 - General.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Joining of Materials Other Than by Welding § 192.273...

  18. 49 CFR 192.59 - Plastic pipe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Materials § 192.59 Plastic pipe. (a) New plastic pipe...

  19. 49 CFR 192.55 - Steel pipe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Materials § 192.55 Steel pipe. (a) New steel pipe is...

  20. 49 CFR 19.2 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... WITH INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION, HOSPITALS, AND OTHER NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS General § 19.2... acquired. Other charges, such as the cost of installation, transportation, taxes, duty or protective in... higher education, public and private hospitals, and other quasi-public and private non-profit...

  1. 49 CFR 192.287 - Plastic pipe: Inspection of joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Plastic pipe: Inspection of joints. 192.287... Than by Welding § 192.287 Plastic pipe: Inspection of joints. No person may carry out the inspection of joints in plastic pipes required by §§ 192.273(c) and 192.285(b) unless that person has been qualified by...

  2. 49 CFR 192.235 - Preparation for welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Preparation for welding. 192.235 Section 192.235... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Welding of Steel in Pipelines § 192.235 Preparation for welding. Before beginning any welding, the welding surfaces must be clean and free of any material that...

  3. 22 CFR 192.41 - Applicable family benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Applicable family benefits. 192.41 Section 192.41 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE HOSTAGE RELIEF VICTIMS OF TERRORISM COMPENSATION Educational... circumstances and within the limitation of § 192.44, the Secretary of State, under the criteria and procedures...

  4. 22 CFR 192.5 - Relationships among agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... inform the head of any agency whenever an employee of that agency, or Family Member of such employee, is... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Relationships among agencies. 192.5 Section 192... § 192.5 Relationships among agencies. (a) To assist in ensuring that eligible persons receive...

  5. 49 CFR 192.321 - Installation of plastic pipe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Installation of plastic pipe. 192.321 Section 192... Transmission Lines and Mains § 192.321 Installation of plastic pipe. (a) Plastic pipe must be installed below ground level except as provided by paragraphs (g) and (h) of this section. (b) Plastic pipe that is...

  6. 49 CFR 192.375 - Service lines: Plastic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Service lines: Plastic. 192.375 Section 192.375... § 192.375 Service lines: Plastic. (a) Each plastic service line outside a building must be installed... terminate above ground level and outside the building, if— (i) The above ground level part of the plastic...

  7. 49 CFR 192.191 - Design pressure of plastic fittings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Design pressure of plastic fittings. 192.191... Components § 192.191 Design pressure of plastic fittings. (a) Thermosetting fittings for plastic pipe must conform to ASTM D 2517, (incorporated by reference, see § 192.7). (b) Thermoplastic fittings for plastic...

  8. 49 CFR 192.377 - Service lines: Copper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Service lines: Copper. 192.377 Section 192.377 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... § 192.377 Service lines: Copper. Each copper service line installed within a building must be protected...

  9. 50 CFR 19.2 - Scope of regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Scope of regulations. 19.2 Section 19.2... PLANTS (CONTINUED) AIRBORNE HUNTING Introduction § 19.2 Scope of regulations. The regulations contained... United States citizens whether within the territorial jurisdiction of the United States or on the high...

  10. 49 CFR 192.125 - Design of copper pipe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Design of copper pipe. 192.125 Section 192.125... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Pipe Design § 192.125 Design of copper pipe. (a) Copper... hard drawn. (b) Copper pipe used in service lines must have wall thickness not less than that indicated...

  11. 49 CFR 192.11 - Petroleum gas systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Petroleum gas systems. 192.11 Section 192.11... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS General § 192.11 Petroleum gas systems. (a) Each plant that supplies petroleum gas by pipeline to a natural gas distribution system must meet the requirements...

  12. Study of transition probabilities in 192Pt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roulet, C.; Sergolle, H.; Hubert, P.P.; Lindblad, T.

    1978-01-01

    The nucleus 192 Pt is Coulomb excited with 370 MeV 84 Kr projectiles. Levels up to spin 8 + (10 + ) in the ground band and up to 6 + in the γ-band are observed. The B(E2) values implied by the observed yields are compared with predictions of different nuclear models. Particular attention is paid to the ground band transition rates and the rotation-alignment model

  13. Computer dosimetry of 192Ir wire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kline, R.W.; Gillin, M.T.; Grimm, D.F.; Niroomand-Rad, A.

    1985-01-01

    The dosimetry of 192 Ir linear sources with a commercial treatment planning computer system has been evaluated. Reference dose rate data were selected from the literature and normalized in a manner consistent with our clinical and dosimetric terminology. The results of the computer calculations are compared to the reference data and good agreement is shown at distances within about 7 cm from a linear source. The methodology of translating source calibration in terms of exposure rate for use in the treatment planning computer is developed. This may be useful as a practical guideline for users of similar computer calculation programs for iridium as well as other sources

  14. Problems associated with iridium-192 wire implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnott, S.J.; Law, J.; Ash, D.; Flynn, A.; Paine, C.H.; Durrant, K.R.; Barber, C.D.; Dixon-Brown, A.

    1985-01-01

    Three incidents are reported, from different radiotherapy centres, in which an implanted iridium-192 wire remained in the tissues of a patient after withdrawal of the plastic tubing in which it was contained. In each case the instrument used to cut the wire had probably formed a hook on the end of the wire which caused it to catch in the tissues. Detailed recommendations are made for avoiding such incidents in the future, the most important of which is that the patient should be effectively monitored after the supposed removal of all radioactive sources. (author)

  15. Iridium-192 sources production for brachytherapy use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rostelato, Maria Elisa Chuery Martins

    1997-01-01

    The incidence of cancer increases every year in Brazil and turns out to be one of the most important causes of mortality. Some of the patients are treated with brachytherapy, a form of lesion treatment which is based on the insertion of sources into tumors, in this particular case, activated iridium wires. During this process, the ionizing radiation efficiently destroys the malignant cells. These iridium wires have a nucleus made out of an iridium-platinum alloy 20-30/70-80 of 0,1 mm in diameter either coated by platinum or encased in a platinum tube. The technique consists in irradiating the wire in the reactor neutron flux in order to produce iridium-192. The linear activity goes from 1 mCi/cm to 4 mCi/cm and the basic characteristic, which is required, is the homogeneity of the activation along the wire. It should not present a dispersion exceeding 5% on a wire measuring 50 cm in length, 0.5 mm or 0.3 mm in diameter. Several experiments were carried out in order to define the activation parameters. Wires from different origins were analyzed. It was concluded that United States of America and France wires were found to be perfectly adequate for brachytherapy purposes and have therefore been sent to specialized hospitals and successfully applied to cancer patients. Considering that the major purpose of this work is to make this product more accessible in Brazil, at a cost reflecting the Brazilian reality, the IPEN is promoting the preparation of iridium-192 sources to be used in brachytherapy, on a national level. (author)

  16. 22 CFR 192.4 - Notification of eligible persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Notification of eligible persons. 192.4 Section 192.4 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE HOSTAGE RELIEF VICTIMS OF TERRORISM COMPENSATION General... of State, or other Agency Head in domestic situations, shall be responsible for notifying each...

  17. 22 CFR 192.40 - Eligibility for benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Eligibility for benefits. 192.40 Section 192.40 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE HOSTAGE RELIEF VICTIMS OF TERRORISM COMPENSATION Educational... programs of the Department of Veterans' Affairs under chapter 35 of title 38, United States Code). (b) A...

  18. 22 CFR 192.2 - Application for determination of eligibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    .... 192.2 Section 192.2 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE HOSTAGE RELIEF VICTIMS OF TERRORISM... addressed to the Director General of the Foreign Service, Department of State, Washington, DC 20520... State there is good cause for the late filing. Applications in connection with hostile action in...

  19. 22 CFR 192.1 - Declarations of hostile action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 192.1 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE HOSTAGE RELIEF VICTIMS OF TERRORISM COMPENSATION General § 192.1 Declarations of hostile action. (a)(1) The Secretary of State shall declare when and where individuals in the Civil Service of the United States, including members of the Foreign Service and foreign...

  20. 49 CFR 192.357 - Customer meters and regulators: Installation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Customer meters and regulators: Installation. 192... SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Customer Meters, Service Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.357 Customer meters and regulators: Installation. (a...

  1. 49 CFR 192.627 - Tapping pipelines under pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Tapping pipelines under pressure. 192.627 Section... NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Operations § 192.627 Tapping pipelines under pressure. Each tap made on a pipeline under pressure must be performed by a crew qualified to make...

  2. 49 CFR 192.231 - Protection from weather.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Protection from weather. 192.231 Section 192.231 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... weather. The welding operation must be protected from weather conditions that would impair the quality of...

  3. 49 CFR 192.477 - Internal corrosion control: Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Internal corrosion control: Monitoring. 192.477... Control § 192.477 Internal corrosion control: Monitoring. If corrosive gas is being transported, coupons... internal corrosion. Each coupon or other means of monitoring internal corrosion must be checked two times...

  4. 49 CFR 192.475 - Internal corrosion control: General.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Internal corrosion control: General. 192.475... Control § 192.475 Internal corrosion control: General. (a) Corrosive gas may not be transported by... taken to minimize internal corrosion. (b) Whenever any pipe is removed from a pipeline for any reason...

  5. 49 CFR 192.283 - Plastic pipe: Qualifying joining procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Plastic pipe: Qualifying joining procedures. 192... Materials Other Than by Welding § 192.283 Plastic pipe: Qualifying joining procedures. (a) Heat fusion... for making plastic pipe joints by a heat fusion, solvent cement, or adhesive method, the procedure...

  6. 49 CFR 192.193 - Valve installation in plastic pipe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Valve installation in plastic pipe. 192.193... Components § 192.193 Valve installation in plastic pipe. Each valve installed in plastic pipe must be designed so as to protect the plastic material against excessive torsional or shearing loads when the valve...

  7. 49 CFR 192.513 - Test requirements for plastic pipelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Test requirements for plastic pipelines. 192.513 Section 192.513 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND... Test requirements for plastic pipelines. (a) Each segment of a plastic pipeline must be tested in...

  8. 49 CFR 192.277 - Ductile iron pipe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ductile iron pipe. 192.277 Section 192.277 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Ductile iron pipe. (a) Ductile iron pipe may not be joined by threaded joints. (b) Ductile iron pipe may...

  9. 7 CFR 3015.192 - Institutions of higher education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Institutions of higher education. 3015.192 Section....192 Institutions of higher education. (a) OMB Circular No. A-21, including any amendments to the... activities conducted by institutions of higher education (other than for-profit institutions). (b) Additional...

  10. 47 CFR 0.192 - Emergency Response Interoperability Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Emergency Response Interoperability Center. 0.192 Section 0.192 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION ORGANIZATION..., industry representatives, and service providers. [75 FR 28207, May 20, 2010] ...

  11. Experimental study and nuclear model calculations on the $^{192}Os (p, n)^{192}$Ir reaction Comparison of reactor and cyclotron production of the therapeutic radionuclide $^{192}$Ir

    CERN Document Server

    Hilgers, K; Sudar, S; 10.1016/j.apradiso.2004.12.010

    2005-01-01

    In a search for an alternative route of production of the important therapeutic radionuclide /sup 192/Ir (T/sub 1/2/=78.83 d), the excitation function of the reaction /sup 192/Os(p, n)/sup 192/Ir was investigated from its threshold up to 20MeV. Thin samples of enriched /sup 192/Os were obtained by electrodeposition on Ni, and the conventional stacked-foil technique was used for cross section measurements. The experimental data were compared with the results of theoretical calculations using the codes EMPIRE-II and ALICE-IPPE. Good agreement was found with EMPIRE-II, but slightly less with the ALICE-IPPE calculations. The theoretical thick target yield of /sup 192/Ir over the energy range E/sub p/=16 to 8MeV amounts to only 0.16MBq/ mu A.h. A comparison of the reactor and cyclotron production methods is given. In terms of yield and radionuclidic purity of /sup 192/Ir the reactor method appears to be superior; the only advantage of the cyclotron method could be the higher specific activity of the product.

  12. 49 CFR Appendix B to Part 192 - Qualification of Pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., “Standard Specification for Carbon and Alloy Steel Pipe, Electric-Fusion-Welded for High Pressure Service at... by reference, see § 192.7). ASTM D2517—Thermosetting plastic pipe and tubing, “Standard Specification...

  13. Low dose rate Ir-192 interstitial brachytherapy for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oki, Yosuke; Dokiya, Takushi; Yorozu, Atsunori; Suzuki, Takayuki; Saito, Shiro; Monma, Tetsuo; Ohki, Takahiro [National Tokyo Medical Center (Japan); Murai, Masaru; Kubo, Atsushi

    2000-04-01

    From December 1997 through January 1999, fifteen prostatic cancer patients were treated with low dose rate Ir-192 interstitial brachytherapy using TRUS and perineal template guidance without external radiotherapy. Up to now, as no apparent side effects were found, the safety of this treatment is suggested. In the future, in order to treat prostatic cancer patients with interstitial brachytherapy using I-125 or Pd-103, more investigation for this low dose rate Ir-192 interstitial brachytherapy is needed. (author)

  14. Radiation Parameters of High Dose Rate Iridium -192 Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podgorsak, Matthew B.

    A lack of physical data for high dose rate (HDR) Ir-192 sources has necessitated the use of basic radiation parameters measured with low dose rate (LDR) Ir-192 seeds and ribbons in HDR dosimetry calculations. A rigorous examination of the radiation parameters of several HDR Ir-192 sources has shown that this extension of physical data from LDR to HDR Ir-192 may be inaccurate. Uncertainty in any of the basic radiation parameters used in dosimetry calculations compromises the accuracy of the calculated dose distribution and the subsequent dose delivery. Dose errors of up to 0.3%, 6%, and 2% can result from the use of currently accepted values for the half-life, exposure rate constant, and dose buildup effect, respectively. Since an accuracy of 5% in the delivered dose is essential to prevent severe complications or tumor regrowth, the use of basic physical constants with uncertainties approaching 6% is unacceptable. A systematic evaluation of the pertinent radiation parameters contributes to a reduction in the overall uncertainty in HDR Ir-192 dose delivery. Moreover, the results of the studies described in this thesis contribute significantly to the establishment of standardized numerical values to be used in HDR Ir-192 dosimetry calculations.

  15. 41 CFR 102-192.30 - What types of mail does this part apply to?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 192-MAIL MANAGEMENT Introduction to this Part § 102-192.30 What types of mail does this part apply to... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What types of mail does this part apply to? 102-192.30 Section 102-192.30 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal...

  16. 41 CFR 102-192.170 - What are GSA's responsibilities in mail management?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are GSA's responsibilities in mail management? 102-192.170 Section 102-192.170 Public Contracts and Property Management... PROGRAMS 192-MAIL MANAGEMENT GSA's Responsibilities and Services § 102-192.170 What are GSA's...

  17. 41 CFR 102-192.130 - What are your general responsibilities as an agency mail manager?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... responsibilities as an agency mail manager? 102-192.130 Section 102-192.130 Public Contracts and Property... ADMINISTRATIVE PROGRAMS 192-MAIL MANAGEMENT Agency Mail Manager Requirements § 102-192.130 What are your general responsibilities as an agency mail manager? In addition to carrying out the responsibilities in Subparts B, C, D...

  18. 41 CFR 102-192.120 - Must we have an agency mail manager?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... mail manager? 102-192.120 Section 102-192.120 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property... MANAGEMENT Agency Mail Manager Requirements § 102-192.120 Must we have an agency mail manager? Yes, every Federal agency as defined in § 102-192.35 must have an agency mail manager. Agencies that are not “large...

  19. 41 CFR 102-192.135 - Must we have a mail center manager at our facility?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... center manager at our facility? 102-192.135 Section 102-192.135 Public Contracts and Property Management... PROGRAMS 192-MAIL MANAGEMENT Mail Center Manager Requirements § 102-192.135 Must we have a mail center manager at our facility? Yes, every facility that has more than two full time people dedicated to...

  20. SSR Analysis of Genetic Diversity Among 192 Diploid Potato Cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyan Song

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In potato breeding, it is difficult to improve the traits of interest at the tetraploid level due to the tetrasomic inheritance. A promising alternative is diploid breeding. Thus it is necessary to assess the genetic diversity of diploid potato germplasm for efficient exploration and deployment of desirable traits. In this study, we used SSR markers to evaluate the genetic diversity of diploid potato cultivars. To screen polymorphic SSR markers, 55 pairs of SSR primers were employed to amplify 39 cultivars with relatively distant genetic relationships. Among them, 12 SSR markers with high polymorphism located at 12 chromosomes were chosen to evaluate the genetic diversity of 192 diploid potato cultivars. The primers produced 6 to 18 bands with an average of 8.2 bands per primer. In total, 98 bands were amplified from 192 cultivars, and 97 of them were polymorphic. Cluster analysis using UPGMA showed the genetic relationships of all accessions tested: 186 of the 192 accessions could be distinguished by only 12 pairs of SSR primers, and the 192 diploid cultivars were divided into 11 groups, and 83.3% constituted the first group. Clustering results showed relatively low genetic diversity among 192 diploid cultivars, with closer relationship at the molecular level. The results can provide molecular basis for diploid potato breeding.

  1. Paraoxonase 1 192 and 55 polymorphisms in osteosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergen, Arzu; Kılıcoglu, Onder; Ozger, Harzem; Agachan, Bedia; Isbir, Turgay

    2011-08-01

    Paraoxonase is an HDL-associated enzyme that plays a preventive role against oxidative stres. Previous studies suggested that involved an amino acid substitution at position 192 gives rise to two alloenzymes with a low activity (Q allele) and a high activity (R allele) towards paraoxon. There also exists a second polymorphism of the human PON1 gene affecting amino acid 55, giving rise to a leucine (L-allele) substitution for methionine (M-allele). PON1 gene polymorphisms were studied in 50 patients with osteosarcoma and 50 healthy controls. Paraoxonase genotypes were determined by PCR-RFLP. We found a reduction in the frequency of PON1 192 R allele in patients (P=0.015). Besides, PON1 192 wild type QQ genotype (P=0.015) and PON1 55 wild type L allele (P=0.001) were higher in patients compared to healthy controls. PON1 192 QQ genotype was associated with osteosarcoma in multivariate logistic regression analysis. Our findings have suggested that PON1 192 wild type genotypes may be associated with a risk of developing osteosarcoma.

  2. Calibration of {sup 192}Ir high dose rate brachytherapy sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marechal, M H [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dozimetria, Rio de Jainero (Brazil); Almeida, C.E. de [Laboratorio de Ciencias Radiologicas, UERL, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Sibata, C H [Roswell Park Cancer Inst., Buffalo, NY (United States)

    1996-08-01

    A method for calibration of high dose rate sources used in afterloading brachytherapy systems is described. The calibration for {sup 192}Ir is determined by interpolating {sup 60}Co gamma-rays and 250 kV x-rays calibration factors. All measurements were done using the same build up caps as described by Goetsch et al and recommended by AAPM. The attenuation correction factors were determined to be 0.9903, 0.9928 and 0.9993 for {sup 192}Ir, {sup 60}Co and 250 kV x-ray, respectively. A wall + cap thickness of 0.421 g.cm{sup -2} is recommended for all measurements to ensure electronic equilibrium for {sup 60}Co and {sup 192}Ir gamma-ray beams. A mathematical formalism is described for determination of (N{sub x}){sub Ir}. (author). 5 refs, 1 fig.

  3. 49 CFR 192.229 - Limitations on welders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Welding of Steel in Pipelines § 192.229 Limitations on welders. (a) No welder whose qualification is based on nondestructive testing may weld compressor station pipe and components. (b) No welder may weld with a particular welding process unless, within the...

  4. 49 CFR 192.241 - Inspection and test of welds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Welding of Steel in Pipelines § 192.241 Inspection and test of welds. (a) Visual inspection of welding must be conducted by an individual qualified by appropriate training and experience to ensure that: (1) The welding is performed in accordance...

  5. 49 CFR 192.719 - Transmission lines: Testing of repairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... pipe before it is installed. (b) Testing of repairs made by welding. Each repair made by welding in... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Transmission lines: Testing of repairs. 192.719... Transmission lines: Testing of repairs. (a) Testing of replacement pipe. If a segment of transmission line is...

  6. 49 CFR 192.153 - Components fabricated by welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Components fabricated by welding. 192.153 Section....153 Components fabricated by welding. (a) Except for branch connections and assemblies of standard... welding, whose strength cannot be determined, must be established in accordance with paragraph UG-101 of...

  7. 22 CFR 192.32 - Administration of benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ....32 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE HOSTAGE RELIEF VICTIMS OF TERRORISM COMPENSATION Medical... behalf thereof, shall submit an application to the Office of Medical Services, Department of State..., on behalf of the Secretary of State, whether the care in question is authorized under § 192.31 of...

  8. 49 CFR 192.359 - Customer meter installations: Operating pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Customer meter installations: Operating pressure... SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Customer Meters, Service Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.359 Customer meter installations: Operating pressure...

  9. 49 CFR 192.461 - External corrosion control: Protective coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false External corrosion control: Protective coating... for Corrosion Control § 192.461 External corrosion control: Protective coating. (a) Each external protective coating, whether conductive or insulating, applied for the purpose of external corrosion control...

  10. 49 CFR 192.65 - Transportation of pipe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Materials § 192.65 Transportation of pipe. (a) Railroad...

  11. 49 CFR 192.63 - Marking of materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Materials § 192.63 Marking of materials. (a) Except as...

  12. 49 CFR 192.123 - Design limitations for plastic pipe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Design limitations for plastic pipe. 192.123... Design limitations for plastic pipe. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (e) and paragraph (f) of this section, the design pressure may not exceed a gauge pressure of 100 psig (689 kPa) for plastic pipe used...

  13. 27 CFR 479.192 - Commerce in firearms and ammunition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Commerce in firearms and..., AND CERTAIN OTHER FIREARMS Other Laws Applicable § 479.192 Commerce in firearms and ammunition. For provisions relating to commerce in firearms and ammunition, including the movement of destructive devices...

  14. Dose determination in breast tumor in brachytherapy using Iridium-192

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuno, S.F.

    1984-01-01

    Thermoluminescent dosimetry studies in vivo and in vitro aiming to determing radiation dose in the breast tumor, in brachytherapy using Iridium-192 was done. The correlation between radiation doses in tumor and external surface of the breast was investigated for correcting the time interval of radiation source implantation. (author) [pt

  15. Traceable calibration of hospital 192Ir HDR sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Govinda Rajan, K.N.; Bhatt, B.C.; Pendse, A.M.; Kannan, V.

    2002-01-01

    Presently, no primary standard exists for the standardization of remote afterloading 192 Ir HDR sources. These sources are, therefore, being standardized by a few Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratories (SSDLs), in terms of Air Kerma Strength (AKS) or Reference Air Kerma Rate (RAKR) using a 0.6 cc Farmer type chamber, set up as an Interim Standard. These SSDLs offer calibration to well type of ionization chambers that are normally used by the hospitals for calibrating the 192 lr HDR source. Presently, in many countries, including India, well chambers are not commercially available. Nor do these countries offer any calibration service for 192 lr HDR source. With the result users make use of well chambers imported from different countries with their calibration traceable to the country of origin. Since no intercomparisons between these countries have been reported, the measurement consistency between hospitals becomes questionable. The problem is compounded by the fact that these chambers are used for several years without re-calibration since no calibration service is locally available. For instance, in India, the chambers have been in use in hospitals, since 1994, without a second calibration. Not all hospitals use the well chamber for the calibration of the 192 lr HDR source. Many hospitals make use of 0.6 cc chambers, in air, at short source to chamber distances, for measuring the AKS of the source. The latter method is prone to much larger inaccuracy due to the use of very short source to chamber distances without proper calibration jigs, use of 60 Co calibration factor for 192 Ir HDR source calibrations, neglecting correction factors for room scatter, fluence non-uniformity, use of arbitrary buildup factors for the buildup cap of the chamber etc. A comparison of the procedures used at hospitals revealed that various arbitrary methods are in use at hospitals. An indigenously developed well chamber was calibrated against a Reference Standard traceable to the

  16. 27 CFR 25.192 - Removal of sour or damaged beer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... beer. 25.192 Section 25.192 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Removals Without Payment of Tax Removal of Beer Unfit for Beverage Use § 25.192 Removal of sour or damaged beer. (a) Containers. The brewer shall remove sour or...

  17. 41 CFR 102-192.5 - What does this part cover?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What does this part cover? 102-192.5 Section 102-192.5 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION ADMINISTRATIVE PROGRAMS 192-MAIL MANAGEMENT...

  18. 41 CFR 102-192.25 - Does this part apply to me?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... MANAGEMENT Introduction to this Part § 102-192.25 Does this part apply to me? Yes, this part applies to you... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Does this part apply to me? 102-192.25 Section 102-192.25 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property...

  19. 41 CFR 102-192.10 - What authority governs this part?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... MANAGEMENT Introduction to this Part § 102-192.10 What authority governs this part? This part is governed by... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What authority governs this part? 102-192.10 Section 102-192.10 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property...

  20. 34 CFR 222.192 - What local funds may be considered as available for this project?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... § 222.192 What local funds may be considered as available for this project? To determine the amount of... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What local funds may be considered as available for this project? 222.192 Section 222.192 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of...

  1. 49 CFR 192.619 - Maximum allowable operating pressure: Steel or plastic pipelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... plastic pipelines. 192.619 Section 192.619 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... Operations § 192.619 Maximum allowable operating pressure: Steel or plastic pipelines. (a) No person may operate a segment of steel or plastic pipeline at a pressure that exceeds a maximum allowable operating...

  2. Advantages of using 192Ir γ-ray flaw detector for some products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin Xiqi

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the advantages of 192 Ir γ-ray flaw detector made in China in welding seam testings. The authors made a comparison between 192 Ir γ-ray and X-ray machine. 192 Ir γ-ray machine showed many advantages, such as shorter working hours and less labour intensity

  3. High dose rate 192Ir calibration: Indonesia experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasukha; Tjiptanto, D.; Darmasyah, R.; Kurniawan, B.

    2002-01-01

    Indonesia with a population of more than 200 Million people which spread on about 5000 islands, up to now only has 23 radiotherapy centers and some not active anymore. As mention by Parkin et al that Cervix/Utery and breast cancer are the most estimated numbers of new cases of cancers in women for developing countries, stomach and lung cancers in men. Indonesia as a developing country is likely similar to other developing countries on numbers of new cases of cancers in women. But quite different in men, in Indonesia the most common cancers are nasopharynx and thyroid cancers. The use of lr-192 sources in high dose-rate (HDR) remotely afterloaded brachytherapy treatments have greatly increased in recent years and variety of such sources are commercially available. Nine radiotherapy centers in Indonesia installed Nucletron microSelectron HDR remote afterloader. Based on the data of CiptoMangunkusurno Hospital, Jakarta that the most common cancers are the cervix, breast, nasopharynx and thyroid cancers which of percentage are about 31%, 25 %, 13%, and 6 % respectively. It means that the use of HDR 192 Ir brachytherapy has to be an effective tool in the treatments. Two methods have been studied and applied to calibrate HDR 192 Ir brachytherapy in Indonesia, especially for Nucletron microSelectron HDR 192 lr remote afterloader brachytherapy. Calibration of HDR 192 Ir brachytherapy source has been done by Cavity lonization Chamber and with Well Type lonization Chamber. First, 0.6 cc of NE Farmer type dosimeter that was calibrated to 60 Co and 250 kV of x-rays in air kerma was used in this experiment. Position of measurement (detector and source) at the center of the room and about 1 meter from the floor. Eight variation of distances from 10 cm to 40 cms have been carried out measurement as recommended by IAEA-TECDOC-1079. Correction have been given for scatters, non-uniformity, and attenuation. To solve the problem of scatter correction factor was used Matlab programming

  4. A projector of iridium 192 wires: motivations and preliminary studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cosset, J.M.; Gerbaulet, A.; Chassagne, D.

    1979-01-01

    Though the majority of procedures involved in curietherapy with Iridium 192 wires cause very few problems concerning radiation protection, this is not true in all cases: in elderly of debilitated patients, young children, or when using special techniques (curietherapy for prostate of bladder cancers for example). In these cases, the need for frequent treatment exposes the therapists to increased doses. The projector of Iridium 192 wires was conceived in order to reduce this irradiated hazard. A simple manipulation places the radioactive wires in a lead container during treatment, and then replaces them in the right position after therapy. This apparatus appears to offer the possibility of: an almost total protection of the therapists, and thus an opportunity for enlarging the indications for curietherapy; an improved quality of treatment to the patient during the application [fr

  5. Traceable calibration of hospital 192Ir HDR sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Govinda Rajan, K.N.; Sharma, S.D.; Palaniselvam, T.; Vandana, S.; Bhatt, B.C.; Vinatha, S.; Patki, V.S.; Pendse, A.M.; Kannan, V.

    2004-01-01

    A HDR 1000 PLUS well type ionization chamber, procured from Standard Imaging, USA, and maintained by medical Physics and Safety Section (MPSS), Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), India, as a reference well chamber 1 (RWCH1), was traceably calibrated against the primary standard established by Radiological Standards Laboratory (RSL), BARC for 192 Ir HDR source, in terms of air kerma strength (AKS). An indigenously developed well-type ionization chamber, reference well chamber 2 (RWCH2) and electrometer system, fabricated by CD High Tech (CDHT) Instruments Private Ltd., Bangalore, India, was in turn calibrated against RWCH1. The CDHT system (i.e. RWCH2 and CDHT electrometer system) was taken to several hospitals, in different regions of the country, to check the calibration status of 192 Ir HDR sources. The result of this calibration audit work is reported here. (author)

  6. Industrial radiography with Ir-192 using computed radiographic technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngernvijit, Narippawaj; Punnachaiya, Suvit; Chankow, Nares; Sukbumperng, Ampai; Thong-Aram, Decho

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this research is to study the utilization of a low activity Ir-192 gamma source for industrial radiographic testing using the Computed Radiography (CR) system. Due to a photo-salbutamol Imaging Plate (I P) using in CR is much more radiation sensitive than a type II film with lead foil intensifying screen, the exposure time with CR can be significantly reduced. For short-lived gamma-ray source like Ir-192 source, the exposure time must be proportionally increased until it is not practical particularly for thick specimens. Generally, when the source decays to an activity of about 5 Ci or less, it will be returned to the manufacturer as a radioactive waste. In this research, the optimum conditions for radiography of a 20 mm thick welded steel sample with 2.4 Ci Ir-192 was investigated using the CR system with high resolution image plate, i.e. type Bas-SR of the Fuji Film Co. Ltd. The I P was sandwiched by a pair of 0.25 mm thick Pb intensifying sere en. Low energy scattered radiations was filtered by placing another Pb sheet with a thickness of 3 mm under the cassette. It was found that the CR image could give a contrast sensitivity of 2.5 % using only 3-minute exposure time which was comparable to the image taken by the type II film with Pb intensifying screen using the exposure time of 45 minutes

  7. Dose calculation for iridium-192 sources by a personal computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Kenichi; Ishigaki, Hideyo; Udagawa, Kimio; Saito, Masami; Yamaguchi, Kyoko

    1988-01-01

    Recently Ir-192 sources have been used for interstitial radiotherapy instead of Ra-226 needles. One end of Ir-192 (single-pin) is formed with circlet and implanted Ir-192 sources are not always straight line. So the authors have developed a new dose calculation system, in which the authers employed conventional method considering oblique filteration for linear source and multi-point source method for curved source. Conventionally the positions of sources in three dimensions are determined from projections of the implanted sources on orthogonal or stereo radiographs. But it is frequentry impossible to define the end of sources on account of overlap. Then the authers have devised a method to determine the positions of sources from two radiographs which were taken with arbitrary directions. For tongue cancer injuries of mandibula so frequently occur after interstitial radiotherapy that the calculation of gingival dose is necessary. The positions of the gingival line are determined from two directional radiographs too. Further the three dimensional dose distributions can be displayed on the cathod ray tube. These calculations are performed by using a personal computer because of its distinctive features such as superiority in cost performance and flexibility for development and modification of programs. (author)

  8. Production of iridium-192 radiation sources: Indian Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sastry, K.V.S.; Kolhe, O.T.; Nagarja, P.S.; Paramr, Y.D.

    2002-01-01

    Board of Radiation and Isotope Technology (BRIT), a unit under the Department of Atomic Energy is fabricating and supplying Ir-192 industrial radiography sources for various models of radiography cameras for use in the industry for non-destructive testing. Basically these sources are fabricated by encapsulating the required quantity of the activity in stainless steel 316 L capsules using Tungsten Inert gas welding process and crimping/attaching to the respective pigtail assemblies of the radiography cameras. The inactive iridium pellets are irradiated in the DHRUVA reactor at a flux on 1.8 X 10 14 n/cm 2 /sec. The performance classification of these source encapsulation for various conditions of normal and accidental nature are tested by subjecting the prototype sources as per the standard laid down by the regulatory authority, Atomic Energy Regulatory Board, in India. The sources are fabricated as per the national and international standards. Activity of the sources varies from 37O GBq (10 Ci ) to 2.96 TBq (80 Ci ) source strength depending on the requirement of the user. The specific activity of the Ir-192 sources supplied is around 7.4 TBq/gm (200 Ci/gm ). Quality control /Assurance for the manufacture of the source begins from the procurement of the raw material and ends with the finished source. Ir- 192 in the form of -0.3 mm diameter (0.1 mm dia wire of Ir-25 % and Pt-75% sheathed in pure platinum of 0.1 mm thick) is being supplied for use in the treatment of cancer of cervix, tongue etc. by brachytherapy. This is supplied in lengths of 50 cm / 100 cm with 37 - 185 GBq/cm ( 1-5 mCi/cm) activity. Annually 925 TBq (25 kCi) of Ir-192 for industrial radiography and about 60 meters of wire for brachytherapy are being fabricated and supplied. Because of the quality of these sources BRIT not only caters to the Indian industry but also is able to export sources to the third world countries. (Author)

  9. Recovery of Ir-192 sources during emergency situations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quadros, C.L.; Conceicao, M.A. da

    1988-01-01

    During operations for the carrying out of services through the utilization of Ir-192 radio sources in radiographic tests of equipment, emergency situations may occur due to various causes and which bring radiologic accidents with doses exceeding the maximum alloewd. This work has the purpose to submit and analyze the major types of radiological accidents and its consequences for the installations and the procedures for the recuperation of sources during such situations. Another aspect to be mentioned shall be the interruption of services - such as production - and which is to be the lowest possible during the emergency. (author) [pt

  10. Double blocking in the superdeformed {sup 192}Tl nucleus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Y; Carpenter, M P; Janssens, R V.F.; Ahmad, I; Henry, R; Khoo, T L; Lauritsen, T [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Soramel, F [Padova University, Padova (Italy); Pilotte, S [Ottawa Univ., ON (Canada); Lewis, J M; Riedinger, L L; Yu, C H [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States); Garg, U; Reviol, W [Notre Dame Univ., IN (United States); Bearden, I G [Purdue Univ., Lafayette, IN (United States)

    1992-08-01

    Six superdeformed bands have been found in the nucleus {sup 192}Tl. For two of the bands, the dynamic moment of inertia J{sup (2)} is found to be constant with the rotational frequency {Dirac_h}{omega}. This result can be understood in terms of Pauli blocking of quasiparticle alignments in intruder orbitals, and represents the first experimental evidence that the alignment of these intruders is responsible for the smooth rise in J{sup (2)} seen in other superdeformed nuclei of this mass region. (author). 18 refs., 2 figs.

  11. 41 CFR 102-192.40 - Where can we obtain more information about the classes of mail?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS 192-MAIL MANAGEMENT Introduction to this Part § 102-192.40 Where can we obtain more information... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Where can we obtain more information about the classes of mail? 102-192.40 Section 102-192.40 Public Contracts and Property Management...

  12. 41 CFR 102-192.155 - What should our agency-wide mail management policy statement cover?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What should our agency-wide mail management policy statement cover? 102-192.155 Section 102-192.155 Public Contracts and... REGULATION ADMINISTRATIVE PROGRAMS 192-MAIL MANAGEMENT Other Agency Responsibilities § 102-192.155 What...

  13. 41 CFR 102-192.140 - What are your general responsibilities as a Federal mail center manager?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... responsibilities as a Federal mail center manager? 102-192.140 Section 102-192.140 Public Contracts and Property... ADMINISTRATIVE PROGRAMS 192-MAIL MANAGEMENT Mail Center Manager Requirements § 102-192.140 What are your general responsibilities as a Federal mail center manager? A Federal mail center manager should— (a) Implement policies and...

  14. 41 CFR 102-192.125 - What is the appropriate managerial level for an agency mail manager?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... managerial level for an agency mail manager? 102-192.125 Section 102-192.125 Public Contracts and Property... ADMINISTRATIVE PROGRAMS 192-MAIL MANAGEMENT Agency Mail Manager Requirements § 102-192.125 What is the appropriate managerial level for an agency mail manager? The agency mail manager should be at a managerial...

  15. Iridium-192 implants in the treatment of tonsillar region malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puthawala, A.A.; Syed, A.M.; Gates, T.C.

    1985-01-01

    A total of 127 patients with histologically proved diagnosis of carcinoma of the tonsillar region and soft palate were treated over the past ten years utilizing interstitial iridium-192 implants. Eighty patients were treated for primary tumors and 47 patients for either recurrent or persistent tumors after definitive irradiation and/or surgery. All patients with primary tumors were treated by a combination of external megavoltage irradiation and interstitial iridium-192 implants, whereas patients with recurrent tumors were treated by interstitial implants alone. In the primary group, 95% of patients with T1 and T2 lesions and 79% with T3 and T4 lesions achieved complete local tumor control. The three-year absolute disease-free survival rate was 72%. Seventy-five percent local tumor control was obtained in patients with recurrent disease, with two-year absolute disease-free survival of 42%. Treatment-related complications such as soft-tissue necrosis or osteoradionecrosis occurred in 6% of patients in the primary group and 23% in recurrent group. This treatment regimen offers an excellent locoregional control with no significant functional or esthetic impairment. Most patients with primary lesions who fail this regimen can be salvaged by surgery or reirradiation using interstitial implants

  16. Radiation accident caused by an iridium-192 radiographic source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumatori, T.; Hirashima, K.; Ishihara, T.; Kurisu, A.; Sugiyama, H.; Hashizume, T.

    1977-01-01

    Owing to the carelessness of a radiographer, six construction workers, aged from twenty to thirty, were accidentally exposed to gamma rays of a 192 Ir source for a non-destructive radiography. These exposed persons were not directly involved with radiographic work. One case revealed severe leucopenia and thrombopenia accompanied by moderate anaemia. In three cases including the case considered, skin lesions were observed on hands and hips, arising from close contact with a 192 Ir rod. The effects to the gonads consisted of impaired spermatogenesis in all cases and elevation of follicle-stimulating hormone in the sera of four cases. The ratio of one metabolite to another seemed to be more indicative of the injuries than the level of any given metabolite itself. In the physical estimate of the dose, the thermoluminescence intensity of rubies in the wrist watches of the exposed persons was measured, which was useful for the determination of the location of the source. The mean whole-body absorbed doses ranged from 10 to 133 rads. Local radiation doses were approximately 3000 to 9000 rads to the skin and 175 rads to the gonads of one case, respectively. The biological dose estimates were made by using the dose-response relations for 60 Co gamma rays and for Linac X-rays on the basis of the yields of dicentrics and rings. The doses were in the range of about 10 to 150 rads. Skin lesions and chromosome aberrations are still observed. (author)

  17. Cep192 controls the balance of centrosome and non-centrosomal microtubules during interphase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian P O'Rourke

    Full Text Available Cep192 is a centrosomal protein that contributes to the formation and function of the mitotic spindle in mammalian cells. Cep192's mitotic activities stem largely from its role in the recruitment to the centrosome of numerous additional proteins such as gamma-tubulin and Pericentrin. Here, we examine Cep192's function in interphase cells. Our data indicate that, as in mitosis, Cep192 stimulates the nucleation of centrosomal microtubules thereby regulating the morphology of interphase microtubule arrays. Interestingly, however, cells lacking Cep192 remain capable of generating normal levels of MTs as the loss of centrosomal microtubules is augmented by MT nucleation from other sites, most notably the Golgi apparatus. The depletion of Cep192 results in a significant decrease in the level of centrosome-associated gamma-tubulin, likely explaining its impact on centrosome microtubule nucleation. However, in stark contrast to mitosis, Cep192 appears to maintain an antagonistic relationship with Pericentrin at interphase centrosomes. Interphase cells depleted of Cep192 display significantly higher levels of centrosome-associated Pericentrin while overexpression of Cep192 reduces the levels of centrosomal Pericentrin. Conversely, depletion of Pericentrin results in elevated levels of centrosomal Cep192 and enhances microtubule nucleation at centrosomes, at least during interphase. Finally, we show that depletion of Cep192 negatively impacts cell motility and alters normal cell polarization. Our current working hypothesis is that the microtubule nucleating capacity of the interphase centrosome is determined by an antagonistic balance of Cep192, which promotes nucleation, and Pericentrin, which inhibits nucleation. This in turn determines the relative abundance of centrosomal and non-centrosomal microtubules that tune cell movement and shape.

  18. Radioactivity measurements of metallic 192Ir sources by calorimetric methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genka, Tsuguo; Iwamoto, Seikichi; Takeuchi, Norio

    1992-01-01

    The necessity of establishing the traceability of dose measurement in brachytherapy 192 Ir sources is realized by physicians and researchers in the medical field. Standard sources of various shapes such as open-quotes hairpin,close quotes open-quotes single pin,close quotes open-quotes thin wire,close quotes and open-quotes seedclose quotes for calibrating ionization chambers in hospitals are being demanded. Nominal activities of not only these source products but also the standard sources have been so far specified by open-quotes apparentclose quotes values. Determination of open-quotes absoluteclose quotes activity by an established means such as 4pi-beta-gamma coincidence counting is not practical because quantitative dissolution of metallic iridium is very difficult. We tried to determine the open-quotes absoluteclose quotes activity by a calorimetric method in a fully nondestructive way

  19. Influence of the 192Ir source decay on biological effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Shunbao; Feng Ningyuan; Niu Wenzhe; Yang Yuhui; Guo Lei

    1994-01-01

    Biological effect of the 192 Ir high activity source on LA 795 tumor of mice and HCT-8 cells have been investigated when decay of the source power from 340.4 GBq to 81.4 GBq no marked difference was found between the two cell survival curves of HCT-8 cells and both of them compared with that of the X-ray irradiation the value of relative biological effect (0.1 survival) was 0.43. On the experiment of tumor LA 795 of mice, when the source power was 293.3 GBq and 96.2 GBq, no different biological effect can be seen between the two series of figures. The relative biological effect was 0.55-0.60 (tumor growth delay) comparing with those of X-ray irradiation

  20. Lifetimes of an excited superdeformed band in {sup 192}Hg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, I.; Blumenthal, D.; Carpenter, M.P. [and others

    1995-08-01

    An excited superdeformed band was identified in {sup 192}Hg and the lifetimes of its levels measured with the Doppler-shift attenuation method from data taken with the Eurogam spectrometer. The band is proposed to be based on the two-quasineutron (v[642]3/2 [512]5/2) configuration, which after a band crossing, becomes the (v[642]3/2 [752]5/2) configuration. The transition quadrupole moment Q{sub t} of the excited band is the same as that of the yrast SD band, within experimental errors. This suggests that the deformation of the SD minimum is robust with respect to quasiparticle excitation, despite the occupation of the deformation-driving v[752]5/2 level (from the j{sub 15/2} shell) after the band crossing.

  1. 192Ir high dose rate (HDR) interstitial brain implant: optimisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyagi, Anuj; Singh, Dinesh; Chitra, S.; Gupta, J.P.

    2001-01-01

    The new modality of stepping source dosimetry system (SSDs) illustrates a remarkable improvement in attaining the uniform and homogeneous dose distribution within the target volume. The technique enables the physicist to correct for a certain amount of misplacement or curvature of implant geometry. The short course of brachytherapy provides good palliation in terms of functional improvements with low and acceptable toxicity in high-grade glioma. With continual refinements of the technique, brachytherapy performed by a skilled brachytherapy team offers an opportunity to improve patient survival and quality of life. Since 1997, micro selectron HDR 192 Ir treatments are done including gynecological, oesophageal, breast, surface mould, soft tissue sarcoma (STS) and brain in our hospital. In this paper, procedure of interstitial brain implant in glioma as implant technique, simulation and treatment planning will be discussed

  2. Descriptive study of 192 adults with speech and language disturbances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letícia Lessa Mansur

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Aphasia is a very disabling condition caused by neurological diseases. In Brazil, we have little data on the profile of aphasics treated in rehabilitation centers. OBJECTIVE: To present a descriptive study of 192 patients, providing a reference sample of speech and language disturbances among Brazilians. DESIGN: Retrospective study. SETTING: Speech Pathology Unit linked to the Neurology Division of the Hospital das Clínicas of the Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo. SAMPLE: All patients (192 referred to our Speech Pathology service from 1995 to 2000. PROCEDURES: We collected data relating to demographic variables, etiology, language evaluation (functional evaluation, Boston Diagnostic Aphasia Examination, Boston Naming and Token Test, and neuroimaging studies. MAIN MEASUREMENTS: The results obtained in language tests and the clinical and neuroimaging data were organized and classified. Seventy aphasics were chosen for constructing a profile. Fourteen subjects with left single-lobe dysfunction were analyzed in detail. Seventeen aphasics were compared with 17 normal subjects, all performing the Token Test. RESULTS: One hundred subjects (52% were men and 92 (48% women. Their education varied from 0 to 16 years (average: 6.5; standard deviation: 4.53. We identified the lesion sites in 104 patients: 89% in the left hemisphere and 58% due to stroke. The incidence of aphasia was 70%; dysarthria and apraxia, 6%; functional alterations in communication, 17%; and 7% were normal. Statistically significant differences appeared when comparing the subgroup to controls in the Token Test. CONCLUSIONS: We believe that this sample contributes to a better understanding of neurological patients with speech and language disturbances and may be useful as a reference for health professionals involved in the rehabilitation of such disorders.

  3. 49 CFR 192.373 - Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. 192.373... Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.373 Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. (a) Cast or ductile iron... cast iron pipe or ductile iron pipe is installed for use as a service line, the part of the service...

  4. 49 CFR 192.369 - Service lines: Connections to cast iron or ductile iron mains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Service lines: Connections to cast iron or ductile iron mains. 192.369 Section 192.369 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... ductile iron mains. (a) Each service line connected to a cast iron or ductile iron main must be connected...

  5. 41 CFR 102-192.145 - Which program levels should have a mail manager?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... should have a mail manager? 102-192.145 Section 102-192.145 Public Contracts and Property Management... have a mail manager? Every program level within a Federal agency that generates a significant quantity of outgoing mail should have its own mail manager. Each agency must decide which programs will have a...

  6. Reagents for Astatination of Biomolecules. 5. Evaluation of hydrazone linkers in 211At- and 125I-labeled closo-decaborate(2-) conjugates of Fab′ as a means of decreasing kidney retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilbur, D. Scott; Chyan, Ming-Kuan; Hamlin, Donald K.; Nguyen, Holly; Vessella, Robert L.

    2011-01-01

    Evaluation of monoclonal antibody (MAb) fragments (e.g. Fab′, Fab or engineered fragments) as cancer-targeting reagents for therapy with the α-particle emitting radionuclide astatine-211 (211At) has been hampered by low in vivo stability of the label and a propensity of these proteins localize to kidneys. Fortunately, our group has shown that the low stability of the 211At label, generally a meta- or para-[211At]astatobenzoyl conjugate, on MAb Fab′ fragments can be dramatically improved by use of closo-decaborate(2-) conjugates. However, the higher stability of radiolabeled MAb Fab′ conjugates appears to result in retention of the radioactivity in kidneys. This investigation was conducted to evaluate whether the retention of radioactivity in kidney might be decreased by the use of acid-cleavable hydrazone between the Fab′ and the radiolabeled closo-decaborate(2-) moiety. Five conjugation reagents containing sulfhydryl-reactive maleimide groups, a hydrazone functionality and a closo-decaborate(2-) moiety were prepared. In four of the five conjugation reagents, a discrete polyethylene glycol (PEG) linker was used, and one substituent adjacent to the hydrazone was varied (phenyl, benzoate, anisole or methyl) to provide varying acid-sensitivity. In the initial studies, the five maleimido-closo-decaborate(2-) conjugation reagents were radioiodinated (125I or 131I), then conjugated with an anti-PSMA Fab′ (107-1A4 Fab′). Biodistributions of the five radioiodinated Fab′ conjugates were obtained in nude mice at 1, 4 and 24 h post injection (pi). In contrast to closo-decaborate(2-) conjugated to 107-1A4 Fab′ through a non-cleavable linker, two conjugates containing either a benzoate or a methyl substituent on the hydrazone functionality displayed clearance rates from kidney, liver and spleen that were similar to those obtained with directly radioiodinated Fab′ (i.e. no conjugate). The maleimido-closo-decaborate(2-) conjugation reagent containing a benzoate

  7. Influence of source geometry and materials on the transverse axis dosimetry of 192Ir brachytherapy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Ruqing; Sloboda, Ron S.

    1998-01-01

    Monte Carlo dose rates on the transverse axis in water and air kerma strengths normalized to unit source activity were calculated for a low dose rate steel-clad 192 Ir source, MicroSelectron high dose rate and pulsed dose rate 192 Ir sources, and a VariSource high dose rate 192 Ir source, as well as five other hypothetical cylindrical 192 Ir source designs. Based on these results, the dependence of dose rate and air kerma strength on source geometry and materials was analysed. Source geometry and attenuation in the core material are the important factors determining basic dosimetric characteristics. Core length, h, only affects the dose rate on the transverse axis at radial distances r 192 Ir sources is suggested, and similarities and differences in the dose rate constant and radial dose function between these sources are explained. (author)

  8. Dosimetry of iridium-192 sources used in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henn, Keli Cristina

    1999-09-01

    The use of high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR) has been increasing in recent years, due to several advantages relative to conventional low dose rate brachytherapy, such as: shorter treatment times, the ability to fractionate treatment (and thus perform many treatments on an outpatient basis) and reduced worker exposures. Most HDR equipment uses small, high activity 192 Ir sources, which are introduced into the patient using a remote system. The dose distribution around these sources is strongly dependent on the size and shape of the active volume and on the encapsulation of the source. The objective of this work is to compare two methods of calibrating sources of 192 Ir, mamely, measurements in air with an ionization thimble chamber or with a well-type ionization chamber. In addition, we measured the anisotropy of the sources and made comparisons with values supplied by the manufacturer, since this factor is taken into account in the planning system algorithm when dose distributions are calculated. The dose was also evaluated at points of clinical interest (i.e. in the rectum and bladder) and compared to values obtained with the Nucletron PLATO-BPS planning system. The use of lead for rectal protection was evaluated in a cylindrical applicator, aiming the further development of a gynecological applicator. The results of the calibration of seven sources showed that the uncertainty in the calibration in a 'jig' system is smaller than 1%, compared to the value supplied by the source manufacturer. The differences between the results obtained with the well-type ionization camera and the 'jig' system were around 2%. The anisotropy showed good agreement with the values supplied by the manufacturer. The results show that the anisotropy factors, in air and water, are approximately constant and equal to 1.0, for angles between 70 deg and 150 deg. For angles smaller than 70 deg the anisotropy factor in water is larger than in air. Results are also presented for 180 deg, which

  9. Homogeneous Ir-192 afterloading-flab-irradiation of plane surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bratengeier, K.; Krieger, T.

    2002-01-01

    Homogeneous irradiation of plane targets bt Ir-192 afterloading flabs made by a parallel series of linear applicators can be time-consuming even with modern planning systems. The aim of the present study was to develop an algorithm that supplies homogeneous dose distributions in an arbitrary given plane in parallel to the equipped plane of a flab. The edge and corner positions of the flab are of particular importance. The identity of the dose in the optimisation distance above the flab centre, corners, and middle of the flab edges, leads to a strict relation of the respective dwell weights. Formulas can be derived that allow the calculation of the dwell times. The dimensioning of the flab can be rapidly adapted to new conditions. A comparison with the results of Nucletron PLATO-BPS for applicator-applicator distances and step sizes of 1 cm at optimisation distances of 10, 20, 30, and 40 mm and various flab sizes (3 x 3, 9 x 9, and 15 x 15 cm 2 ) shows the following results: The standard deviation of the proposed algorithm is sometimes slightly higher than the results of the commercial planning system, whereas the underdosage at the flab edges is usually smaller. The effort for planning and preparation of the irradiation, for example using a Nucletron HDR, is below 5 minutes - a considerable reduction of planning time. (orig.) [de

  10. [New calculation algorithms in brachytherapy for iridium 192 treatments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, C; Dumas, I; Martinetti, F; Chargari, C; Haie-Meder, C; Lefkopoulos, D

    2018-05-18

    Since 1995, the brachytherapy dosimetry protocols follow the methodology recommended by the Task Group 43. This methodology, which has the advantage of being fast, is based on several approximations that are not always valid in clinical conditions. Model-based dose calculation algorithms have recently emerged in treatment planning stations and are considered as a major evolution by allowing for consideration of the patient's finite dimensions, tissue heterogeneities and the presence of high atomic number materials in applicators. In 2012, a report from the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Radiation Therapy Task Group 186 reviews these models and makes recommendations for their clinical implementation. This review focuses on the use of model-based dose calculation algorithms in the context of iridium 192 treatments. After a description of these algorithms and their clinical implementation, a summary of the main questions raised by these new methods is performed. Considerations regarding the choice of the medium used for the dose specification and the recommended methodology for assigning materials characteristics are especially described. In the last part, recent concrete examples from the literature illustrate the capabilities of these new algorithms on clinical cases. Copyright © 2018 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. 41 CFR 102-192.20 - How are “must” and “should” used in this part?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 192-MAIL MANAGEMENT Introduction to this Part § 102-192.20 How are “must” and “should” used in this... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How are âmustâ and âshouldâ used in this part? 102-192.20 Section 102-192.20 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal...

  12. 41 CFR 102-192.100 - How do we submit our annual mail management report to GSA?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... management report to GSA? If your agency is a large agency, as defined in § 102-192.35, you must submit... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How do we submit our annual mail management report to GSA? 102-192.100 Section 102-192.100 Public Contracts and Property...

  13. 15 CFR 19.2 - Why has the Commerce Department issuing these regulations and what do they cover?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Why has the Commerce Department issuing these regulations and what do they cover? 19.2 Section 19.2 Commerce and Foreign Trade Office of the Secretary of Commerce COMMERCE DEBT COLLECTION General Provisions § 19.2 Why has the Commerce...

  14. 49 CFR 192.197 - Control of the pressure of gas delivered from high-pressure distribution systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Control of the pressure of gas delivered from high-pressure distribution systems. 192.197 Section 192.197 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... STANDARDS Design of Pipeline Components § 192.197 Control of the pressure of gas delivered from high...

  15. Spins of superdeformed band in {sup 192}Hg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauritsen, T.; Khoo, T.L.; Henry, R.G. [and others

    1995-08-01

    Determination of the spins of SD states is the most important challenge in the study of superdeformation. Knowledge of the spin will provide crucial information on SD bands, in particular on the fascinating phenomenon of bands with identical energies and moments of inertia. Angular distribution coefficients of the {gamma}rays decaying out of the {sup 192}Hg SD band were determined using Eurogam data. These coefficients, as well as the spectral shape and multiplicity of the spectrum, are compared with the results of calculations, thereby providing a check on these calculations. From the measured decay multiplicity and the calculated average spin removed per photon (0.3 h), we deduce the average spin {bar I}{sub decay} removed by the {gamma} rays connecting SD and normal states. The spin I{sub SD} of the SD band from which the decay occurs is given by I{sub SD} = {bar I} decay + {bar I} ND, where {bar I} ND is the average spin removed by the normal yrast states. The state from which the major decay out of the SD band occurs is found to have spin 9.5 {plus_minus} 0.8 h. Since angular momentum is (quantized), this leads to a spin assignment of 9 or 10 h. The latter value is favored since the yrast band in the SD well must have only even spin values. This constitutes the first deduction of spin from data in the mass 150 and 190 regions. The spin of 10 h agrees with the spin which is inferred from a model, using the observed moment of inertia (Im){sup (2)}{omega}.

  16. Effect of the lead screen in the radiographic image using iridium 192 as a source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garate Rojas, M.

    1983-01-01

    It's presented the effect of the lead screen in the image obtained on an impressionable film used in industrial gammagraphy. The source used was Iridium 192 and the tests were simulated like a real inspection. (E.G.) [pt

  17. 49 CFR 192.111 - Design factor (F) for steel pipe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Pipe Design § 192.111 Design factor (F... street, or a railroad; (3) Is supported by a vehicular, pedestrian, railroad, or pipeline bridge; or (4...

  18. 49 CFR 192.947 - What records must an operator keep?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Section 192.947 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Gas Transmission Pipeline...

  19. 49 CFR 192.949 - How does an operator notify PHMSA?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 192.949 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Gas Transmission Pipeline Integrity...

  20. 49 CFR 192.939 - What are the required reassessment intervals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ....939 Section 192.939 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Gas...

  1. 49 CFR 192.935 - What additional preventive and mitigative measures must an operator take?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Gas Transmission Pipeline Integrity Management § 192.935 What additional preventive and mitigative...

  2. 49 CFR 192.919 - What must be in the baseline assessment plan?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ....919 Section 192.919 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Gas...

  3. 49 CFR 192.1011 - What records must an operator keep?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Section 192.1011 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Gas Distribution Pipeline...

  4. 49 CFR 192.112 - Additional design requirements for steel pipe using alternative maximum allowable operating...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... (incorporated by reference, see § 192.7); or (ii) American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) B31.8.... Certification must address material properties such as chemistry, minimum yield strength and minimum wall...

  5. Radiation control in the intensive care unit for high intensity iridium-192 brain implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sewchand, W.; Drzymala, R.E.; Amin, P.P.; Salcman, M.; Salazar, O.M.

    1987-01-01

    A bedside lead cubicle was designed to minimize the radiation exposure of intensive care unit staff during routine interstitial brain irradiation by removable, high intensity iridium-192. The cubicle shields the patient without restricting intensive care routines. The design specifications were confirmed by exposure measurements around the shield with an implanted anthropomorphic phantom simulating the patient situation. The cubicle reduces the exposure rate around an implant patient by as much as 90%, with the exposure level not exceeding 0.1 mR/hour/mg of radium-equivalent 192 Ir. Evaluation of data accumulated for the past 3 years has shown that the exposure levels of individual attending nurses are 0.12 to 0.36 mR/mg of radium-equivalent 192 Ir per 12-hour shift. The corresponding range for entire nursing teams varies between 0.18 and 0.26. A radiation control index (exposure per mg of radium-equivalent 192 Ir per nurse-hour) is thus defined for individual nurses and nursing teams; this index is a significant guide to the planning of nurse rotations for brain implant patients with various 192 Ir loads. The bedside shield reduces exposure from 192 Ir implants by a factor of about 20, as expected, and the exposure from the lower energy radioisotope iodine-125 is barely detectable

  6. Patient effective dose from endovascular brachytherapy with 192Ir Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perna, L.; Bianchi, C.; Novario, R.; Nicolini, G.; Tanzi, F.; Conte, L.

    2002-01-01

    The growing use of endovascular brachytherapy has been accompanied by the publication of a large number of studies in several fields, but few studies on patient dose have been found in the literature. Moreover, these studies were carried out on the basis of Monte Carlo simulation. The aim of the present study was to estimate the effective dose to the patient undergoing endovascular brachytherapy treatment with 192 Ir sources, by means of experimental measurements. Two standard treatments were taken into account: an endovascular brachytherapy of the coronary artery corresponding to the activity x time product of 184 GBq.min and an endovascular brachytherapy of the renal artery (898 GBq.min). Experimental assessment was accomplished by thermoluminescence dosemeters positioned in more than 300 measurement points in a properly adapted Rando phantom. A method has been developed to estimate the mean organ doses for all tissues and organs concerned in order to calculate the effective dose associated with intravascular brachytherapy. The normalised organ doses resulting from coronary treatment were 2.4x10 -2 mSv.GBq -1 .min -1 for lung, 0.9x10 -2 mSv.GBq -1 .min -1 for oesophagus and 0.48x10 -2 mSv.GBq -1 .min -1 for bone marrow. During brachytherapy of the renal artery, the corresponding normalised doses were 4.2x10 -2 mSv.GBq -1 .min -1 for colon, 7.8x10 -2 mSv.GBq -1 .min -1 for stomach and 1.7x10 -2 mSv.GBq -1 .min -1 for liver. Coronary treatment involved an effective dose of 0.046 mSv.GBq -1 .min -1 , whereas the treatment of the renal artery resulted in an effective dose of 0.15 mSv.GBq -1 .min -1 ; there were many similarities with data from former studies. Based on these results it can be concluded that the dose level of patients exposed during brachytherapy treatment is low. (author)

  7. [Relationship between Q192R polymorphisms in paraoxonase 1 gene and young ischemic stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing-li; Li, Jin-pin; Wang, Xiao-ling; Yang, Yi

    2010-04-06

    To investigate the relationship between polymorphisms in paraoxonase1 (PON1) gene Gln192Arg (Q192R) and arterial ischemic stroke in young adults. The Q192R genotype was analyzed by polymerase chain reaction in 131 young adults with ischemic stroke and 135 age- and gender-matched controls. The plasma lipids were also determined in patients and controls respectively. Furthermore, carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) in patients were measured by carotid ultrasonography. The distributions of Q192R genotype frequency were significantly different between patients with ischemic stroke and control individuals. And the patients had more RR genotypes than control individuals (P stroke were 1.743 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.032-2.943) in subjects with RR genotype. We also studied the relationship between the polymorphisms and the lipid concentration in patients and control individuals. However, no significant association was detected between Q/R192 genotype and any of lipid measurements. Further, the prevalence of cigarette smoking, hypertension and diabetes showed no significant difference between RR and non-RR genotypes in patients. Body mass index (BMI) in two groups did not differ significantly. But IMT of patients with RR genotype obviously increased in comparison to those without RR genotype (P ischemic stroke in young adults. RR genotype is a genetic risk for young adults with ischemic stroke through an increased carotid artery intima-media thickness and an accelerated atherosclerotic process.

  8. Evaluation of the Radiological Safety of 192 Ir Apparatus for Industrial Gamma Radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aquino, J. O.; Silva, F. C. A. da; Ramalho, A. T.; Godoy, J. M. O.

    2004-01-01

    The majority of the 192Ir apparatus for industrial gamma radiography have been in usage in Brazil for more than 20 years. They are portable, and almost all operate according to category II. The main objective of this work was to assess the radiological safety of the 11 models of 192Ir apparatus most used in Brazil. The 11 models of 192Ir apparatus were studied with respect to compliance with the main safety requirements of three editions of international Standards ISO 3999. Six models were already manufactured incorporating the safety devices specified in the first edition of ISO 3999, issued in 1977. However, five models were not. The validity of their type B certificates for transport packages was also evaluated. (Author) 8 refs

  9. Comparison of 60Cobalt and 192Iridium sources in high dose rate afterloading brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, J.; Baier, K.; Flentje, M.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: 60 Co sources with dimensions identical to those of 192 Ir have recently been made available in clinical brachytherapy. A longer half time reduces demands on logistics and quality assurance and perhaps costs. Material and Methods: Comparison of the physical properties of 60 Co and 192 Ir with regard to brachytherapy. Results: Required activities for the same air kerma rate are lower by a factor of 2.8 for 60 Co. Differential absorption in tissues of different densities can be neglected. Monte Carlo calculations demonstrate that integral dose due to radial dose fall off is higher for 192 Ir in comparison to 60 Co within the first 22 cm from the source (normalization at 1 cm). At larger distances this relationship is reversed. Conclusion: Clinical examples for intracavitary and interstitial applications however, show practically identical dose distributions in the treatment volume. (orig.)

  10. Template-guided interstitial implants: Cs-137 reusable sources as a substitute for Ir-192

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, J.F.; Seminoff, T.

    1987-01-01

    Template-guided implantation of rigid steel or plastic guide needles for afterloading of radioactive sources is widely used in the treatment of gynecologic, rectal, and urologic malignant neoplasms. Iridium-192 is used almost universally, despite the high cost per implant, due to its short half-life and limited need for a flexible, trimmable source. A reusable afterloading system containing cesium-137 was developed. Each source has an effective active length of 6.8 cm and is encapsulated at the distal end of a 21-cm-long stainless steel tube. The sources can be afterloaded into the same plastic guide needles normally used for Ir-192 ribbons. Physical and dosimetric aspects of these sources are compared with those of Ir-192, and radiation protection and cost effectiveness are also discussed

  11. Study and development of an Iridium-192 seed for use in ophthalmic cancer; Estudo e desenvolvimento de uma semente de iridio-192 para aplicacao em cancer oftalmico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattos, Fabio Rodrigues de

    2013-07-01

    Even ocular tumors are not among the cases with a higher incidence, they affect the population, especially children. The Institute of Energy and Nuclear Research (IPEN-CNEN/SP) in partnership with Escola Paulista de Medicina (UNIFESP), created a project to develop and implement a alternative treatment for ophthalmic cancer that use brachytherapy iridium-192 seeds. The project arose by reason of the Escola Paulista treat many cancer cases within the Unified Health System (SUS) and the research experience of sealed radioactive sources group at IPEN. The methodology was developed from the available infrastructure and the experience of researchers. The prototype seed presents with a core (192-iridium alloy of iridium-platinum) of 3.0 mm long sealed by a capsule of titanium of 0.8 mm outside diameter, 0.05 mm wall thickness and 4,5mm long. This work aims to study and develop a seed of iridium-192 from a platinum-iridium alloy. No study on the fabrication of these seeds was found in available literature. It was created a methodology that involved: characterization of the material used in the core, creation of device for neutron activation irradiation and and seed sealing tests. As a result, proved the feasibility of the method. As a suggestion for future work, studies regarding metrology and dosimetry of these sources and improvement of the methodology should be carried out, for future implementation in national scope. (author)

  12. In vivo dosimetry thermoluminescence dosimeters during brachytherapy with a 370 GBq 192Ir source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuepers, S.; Piessens, M.; Verbeke, L.; Roelstraete, A.

    1995-01-01

    When using LiF thermoluminescence dosimeters in brachytherapy, we have to take into account the properties of a high dose rate 192 Ir source (energy spectrum ranging form 9 to 885 keV, steep dose gradient in the vicinity of the source) and these of the dosimeters themselves (supralinearity, reproducibility, size). All these characteristics combine into a set of correction factors which have been determined during in phantom measurements. These results have then been used to measure the dose delivered to organs at risk (e.g. rectum, bladder, etc.) during high dose rate brachytherapy with a 370 GBq 192 Ir source for patients with gynaecological tumors

  13. In vivo dosimetry thermoluminescence dosimeters during brachytherapy with a 370 GBq {sup 192}Ir source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuepers, S; Piessens, M; Verbeke, L; Roelstraete, A [Onze-Lieve-Vrouw Hospitaal, Aalst (Belgium). Dept. of Radiotherapy and Oncology

    1995-12-01

    When using LiF thermoluminescence dosimeters in brachytherapy, we have to take into account the properties of a high dose rate {sup 192}Ir source (energy spectrum ranging form 9 to 885 keV, steep dose gradient in the vicinity of the source) and these of the dosimeters themselves (supralinearity, reproducibility, size). All these characteristics combine into a set of correction factors which have been determined during in phantom measurements. These results have then been used to measure the dose delivered to organs at risk (e.g. rectum, bladder, etc.) during high dose rate brachytherapy with a 370 GBq {sup 192}Ir source for patients with gynaecological tumors.

  14. Determination of the chemical yield on the Fricke dosimetry for 192Ir sources used in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, M.G.; Albuquerque, M.A.G.; Almeida, C.E. de; Rosado, P.H.

    2015-01-01

    With the aim of developing a primary standard for the absorbed dose to water, for the 192 Ir sources used in high dose rate brachytherapy, this work focuses on the determination of the chemical yield, G(Fe +3 ), using Fricke dosimetry, for the energy of those sources . The G(Fe +3 ) were determined the for three qualities of x-ray beams (150, 250 and 300 kV ) and for 60 Co energy. The G(Fe +3 ) value for the average energy of 192 Ir was obtained by linear fit, the found value was 1,555 ± 0,015 μmol/J. (author)

  15. Astatine-211 labeling. A study towards automatic production of astatinated antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emma Aneheim; Per Albertsson; Sture Lindegren; Holger Jensen

    2015-01-01

    Targeted alpha therapy is especially interesting for therapy of microscopic cancer tumors due to short path length and high linear energy transfer of the alpha particles. One of the most promising nuclides for targeted alpha therapy is 211 At. To facilitate larger clinical studies using 211 At, the current manual synthesis of radiolabeled antibodies would benefit from being transferred into an automated method. In this work, successful modifications of the manual synthesis have been performed in order to adapt it to automation. The automatic synthesis has also been tested using the modified synthesis method. (author)

  16. 192Ir Intraluminal brachytherapy for the prevention of urethral re-stricture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Changuo; Guo Hui; Du Chun; Yang Keqiang

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of 192 Ir intraluminal brachytherapy for the prevention of urethral restricture after transurethral incision or transurethral resection of scar. Methods: From Mar. 2004 to Jun. 2006, 48 patients aging 18-81 years were treated by 192 Ir intraluminal brachytherapy. The length of stricture(0.5-5.5 cm) was ≤3.0 cm in 90% of the patients. The stricture was caused by trauma in 23 patients and prostate hyperplasia operation in 19 patients. The cause of remaining 6 patients was unclear. All patients were diagnosed by urethra photograph or endoscopy. Radiotherapy was the initial treatment in 26 patients and the second time treatment in 22. The irradiation dose was from 14 Gy to 18 Gy. Results: The median follow up was 10 months, and the total response rate was 98%. Only one patient recurred and received transurethral incision again. The uresis was fluency in 47 patients and the maximum flow rate was 13.9-36.4 (19.2 ± 10.3) ml/s. No secondary urethral bleeding or urethral cancer was observed. Conclusions: Being a safe and feasible treatment, 192 Ir intraluminal brachytherapy following transurethral incision or transurethral resection of scar can effectively prevent urethral re-stricture. (authors)

  17. Studies on 192Ir afterloading irradiation of the canine prostate with special consideration of thermoluminescent dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reuter, M.

    1986-01-01

    A method for high dose rate afterloading irradiation of the prostate with iridium 192 was developed. The isodoses of the urethra and rectum, which were measured by means of thermoluminescent dosimetry, showed deviations from the doses pre-calculated by computer (BRACHY), because this calculation is based on an anatomically ideal condition. (MBC) [de

  18. Calculation of radiation production of high specific activity isotopes 192Ir and 60Co

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Quan; Zhong Wenfa; Xu Xiaolin

    1997-01-01

    The high specific activity isotopes: 192 Ir and 60 Co in the high neutron flux reactor are calculated with the method of reactor physics. The results of calculation are analyzed in two aspects: the production of isotopes and the influence to parameters of the reactor, and hence a better case is proposed as a reference to the production

  19. 37 CFR 2.192 - Business to be conducted with decorum and courtesy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Correspondence in Trademark Cases § 2.192 Business to be conducted with decorum and courtesy. Trademark... attorneys or agents are required to conduct their business with decorum and courtesy. Documents presented in... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Business to be conducted with...

  20. 41 CFR 102-192.35 - What definitions apply to this part?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... MANAGEMENT Introduction to this Part § 102-192.35 What definitions apply to this part? The following... responsible for mail policy implementation, operations, and financial management; the program level... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What definitions apply...

  1. 49 CFR 192.945 - What methods must an operator use to measure program effectiveness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Gas Transmission Pipeline Integrity Management § 192.945 What methods must an operator use to measure program...

  2. 49 CFR 192.1009 - What must an operator report when compression couplings fail?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Gas Distribution Pipeline Integrity Management (IM) § 192.1009 What must an operator report when compression...

  3. 49 CFR 192.925 - What are the requirements for using External Corrosion Direct Assessment (ECDA)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Gas Transmission Pipeline Integrity Management § 192.925 What are the requirements for using...

  4. 49 CFR 192.943 - When can an operator deviate from these reassessment intervals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Gas Transmission Pipeline Integrity Management § 192.943 When can an operator deviate from these reassessment...

  5. 49 CFR 192.931 - How may Confirmatory Direct Assessment (CDA) be used?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Gas Transmission Pipeline Integrity Management § 192.931 How may Confirmatory Direct Assessment (CDA) be used? An...

  6. 49 CFR 192.907 - What must an operator do to implement this subpart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Gas Transmission Pipeline Integrity Management § 192.907 What must an operator do to implement this subpart? (a...

  7. 49 CFR 192.923 - How is direct assessment used and for what threats?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Gas Transmission Pipeline Integrity Management § 192.923 How is direct assessment used and for what threats? (a...

  8. 49 CFR 192.927 - What are the requirements for using Internal Corrosion Direct Assessment (ICDA)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Gas Transmission Pipeline Integrity Management § 192.927 What are the requirements for using...

  9. 49 CFR 192.909 - How can an operator change its integrity management program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Gas Transmission Pipeline Integrity Management § 192.909 How can an operator change its integrity management...

  10. 49 CFR 192.905 - How does an operator identify a high consequence area?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Gas Transmission Pipeline Integrity Management § 192.905 How does an operator identify a high consequence area? (a...

  11. 49 CFR 192.933 - What actions must be taken to address integrity issues?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Gas Transmission Pipeline Integrity Management § 192.933 What actions must be taken to address integrity issues? (a...

  12. 49 CFR 192.911 - What are the elements of an integrity management program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Gas Transmission Pipeline Integrity Management § 192.911 What are the elements of an integrity management program...

  13. 49 CFR 192.476 - Internal corrosion control: Design and construction of transmission line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Internal corrosion control: Design and... STANDARDS Requirements for Corrosion Control § 192.476 Internal corrosion control: Design and construction... the risk of internal corrosion. At a minimum, unless it is impracticable or unnecessary to do so, each...

  14. 49 CFR 192.621 - Maximum allowable operating pressure: High-pressure distribution systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... STANDARDS Operations § 192.621 Maximum allowable operating pressure: High-pressure distribution systems. (a) No person may operate a segment of a high pressure distribution system at a pressure that exceeds the... segment of a distribution system otherwise designed to operate at over 60 p.s.i. (414 kPa) gage, unless...

  15. 49 CFR 192.285 - Plastic pipe: Qualifying persons to make joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Plastic pipe: Qualifying persons to make joints... Materials Other Than by Welding § 192.285 Plastic pipe: Qualifying persons to make joints. (a) No person may make a plastic pipe joint unless that person has been qualified under the applicable joining procedure...

  16. Measurement of the electromagnetic lifetimes of the first four excited states of /sup 192/Pt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butt, D K; Raoof, M A; Raoof, S A [Birkbeck Coll., London (UK)

    1976-11-01

    Measurements of the electromagnetic lifetimes of the first four excited states of /sup 192/Pt have been made by the self-comparison method using electron-electron coincidences. The partial lifetimes of the gamma transitions involved have been interpreted in terms of the pairing-plus-quadrupole model of Kumar and Baranger.

  17. 49 CFR 192.489 - Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron pipelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron... for Corrosion Control § 192.489 Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron pipelines. (a) General graphitization. Each segment of cast iron or ductile iron pipe on which general graphitization is found to a...

  18. Radial dose distribution of 192Ir and 137Cs seed sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomason, C.; Higgins, P.

    1989-01-01

    The radial dose distributions in water around /sup 192/ Ir seed sources with both platinum and stainless steel encapsulation have been measured using LiF thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) for distances of 1 to 12 cm along the perpendicular bisector of the source to determine the effect of source encapsulation. Similar measurements also have been made around a /sup 137/ Cs seed source of comparable dimensions. The data were fit to a third order polynomial to obtain an empirical equation for the radial dose factor which then can be used in dosimetry. The coefficients of this equation for each of the three sources are given. The radial dose factor of the stainless steel encapsulated /sup 192/ Ir and that of the platinum encapsulated /sup 192/ Ir agree to within 2%. The radial dose distributions measured here for /sup 192/ Ir with either type of encapsulation and for /sup 137/ Cs are indistinguishable from those of other authors when considering uncertainties involved. For clinical dosimetry based on isotropic point or line source models, any of these equations may be used without significantly affecting accuracy

  19. 49 CFR 192.620 - Alternative maximum allowable operating pressure for certain steel pipelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... (SCADA) system, other leak detection system, or an alternative method of control. (iii) Remote valve... outs, leakage, or other activities or conditions affecting the safety operation of the pipeline. (ii... requirements of § 192.707(d) except in agricultural areas, large water crossings or swamp, steep terrain, or...

  20. Determination of air kerma standard of high dose rate 192Ir brachytherapy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pires, E.J.; Alves, C.F.E.; Leite, S.P.; Magalhaes, L.A.G.; David, M.G.; Almeida, C.E. de

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the methodology developed by the Laboratorio de Ciencias Radiologicas and presently in use for determining of the air kerma standard of 192 Ir high dose rate sources to calibrate well-type chambers. Uncertainty analysis involving the measurements procedure are presented. (author)

  1. 41 CFR 102-192.65 - What features must our finance systems have to keep track of mail costs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... finance systems have to keep track of mail costs? 102-192.65 Section 102-192.65 Public Contracts and... What features must our finance systems have to keep track of mail costs? All agencies must have an... requirement, because the level at which it is cost-beneficial differs widely. The agency's finance system(s...

  2. 30 CFR 250.192 - What reports and statistics must I submit relating to a hurricane, earthquake, or other natural...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... relating to a hurricane, earthquake, or other natural occurrence? 250.192 Section 250.192 Mineral Resources... statistics must I submit relating to a hurricane, earthquake, or other natural occurrence? (a) You must... tropical storm, or an earthquake. Statistics include facilities and rigs evacuated and the amount of...

  3. 41 CFR 102-192.45 - How can we request a deviation from these requirements, and who can approve it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION ADMINISTRATIVE PROGRAMS 192-MAIL MANAGEMENT Introduction to this Part § 102-192.45 How can we... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How can we request a...

  4. 49 CFR 192.487 - Remedial measures: Distribution lines other than cast iron or ductile iron lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... cast iron or ductile iron lines. 192.487 Section 192.487 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... iron or ductile iron lines. (a) General corrosion. Except for cast iron or ductile iron pipe, each... the purpose of this paragraph. (b) Localized corrosion pitting. Except for cast iron or ductile iron...

  5. 41 CFR 102-192.150 - What are your general responsibilities as a program level mail manager?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... responsibilities as a program level mail manager? 102-192.150 Section 102-192.150 Public Contracts and Property... general responsibilities as a program level mail manager? Your responsibilities at the program level include— (a) Working closely with the agency mail manager and mail center managers who handle significant...

  6. 41 CFR 102-192.175 - What types of support does GSA offer to Federal agency mail management programs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... in mail management and mail operations; (b) Identifying better business practices and sharing them... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What types of support does GSA offer to Federal agency mail management programs? 102-192.175 Section 102-192.175 Public...

  7. Calibration procedure for thermoluminescent dosemeters in water absorbed doses for Iridium-192 high dose rate sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyes Cac, Franky Eduardo

    2004-10-01

    Thermoluminescent dosimeters are used in brachytherapy services quality assurance programs, with the aim of guaranteeing the correct radiation dose supplied to cancer patients, as well as with the purpose of evaluating new clinical procedures. This work describes a methodology for thermoluminescent dosimeters calibration in terms of absorbed dose to water for 192 Ir high dose rate sources. The reference dose used is measured with an ionization chamber previously calibrated for 192 Ir energy quality, applying the methodology proposed by Toelli. This methodology aims to standardizing the procedure, in a similar form to that used for external radiotherapy. The work evolves the adaptation of the TRS-277 Code of the International Atomic Energy Agency, for small and big cavities, through the introduction for non-uniform experimental factor, for the absorbed dose in the neighborhood of small brachytherapy sources. In order to simulate a water medium around the source during the experimental work, an acrylic phantom was used. It guarantees the reproducibility of the ionization chamber and the thermoluminescent dosimeter's location in relation to the radiation source. The values obtained with the ionization chamber and the thermoluminescent dosimeters, exposed to a 192 Ir high dose rate source, were compared and correction factors for different source-detector distances were determined for the thermoluminescent dosimeters. A numeric function was generated relating the correction factors and the source-detector distance. These correction factors are in fact the thermoluminescent dosimeter calibration factors for the 192 Ir source considered. As a possible application of this calibration methodology for thermoluminescent dosimeters, a practical range of source-detector distances is proposed for quality control of 192 Ir high dose rate sources. (author)

  8. Comparison of radiation shielding requirements for HDR brachytherapy using 169Yb and 192Ir sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lymperopoulou, G.; Papagiannis, P.; Sakelliou, L.; Georgiou, E.; Hourdakis, C. J.; Baltas, D.

    2006-01-01

    169 Yb has received a renewed focus lately as an alternative to 192 Ir sources for high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Following the results of a recent work by our group which proved 169 Yb to be a good candidate for HDR prostate brachytherapy, this work seeks to quantify the radiation shielding requirements for 169 Yb HDR brachytherapy applications in comparison to the corresponding requirements for the current 192 Ir HDR brachytherapy standard. Monte Carlo simulation (MC) is used to obtain 169 Yb and 192 Ir broad beam transmission data through lead and concrete. Results are fitted to an analytical equation which can be used to readily calculate the barrier thickness required to achieve a given dose rate reduction. Shielding requirements for a HDR brachytherapy treatment room facility are presented as a function of distance, occupancy, dose limit, and facility workload, using analytical calculations for both 169 Yb and 192 Ir HDR sources. The barrier thickness required for 169 Yb is lower than that for 192 Ir by a factor of 4-5 for lead and 1.5-2 for concrete. Regarding 169 Yb HDR brachytherapy applications, the lead shielding requirements do not exceed 15 mm, even in highly conservative case scenarios. This allows for the construction of a lead door in most cases, thus avoiding the construction of a space consuming, specially designed maze. The effects of source structure, attenuation by the patient, and scatter conditions within an actual treatment room on the above-noted findings are also discussed using corresponding MC simulation results

  9. Dosimetric intercomparison of permanent Ho-166 seed's implants and HDR Ir-192 brachytherapy in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Campos, Tarcisio Passos Ribeiro; Nogueira, Luciana Batista; Trindade, Bruno; Cuperschmid, Ethel Mizrahy

    2016-01-01

    To provide a comparative dosimetric analysis of permanent implants of Ho(166)-seeds and temporary HDR Ir(192)-brachytherapy through computational simulation. Brachytherapy with Ir(192)-HDR or LDR based on temporary wires or permanent radioactive seed implants can be used as dose reinforcement for breast radiation therapy. Permanent breast implants have not been a practical clinical routine; although, I(125) and Pd(103)-seeds have already been reported. Biodegradable Ho(166)-ceramic-seeds have been addressed recently. Simulations of implants of nine Ho(166)-seeds and equivalent with HDR Ir(192)-brachytherapy were elaborated in MCNP5, shaped in a computational multivoxel simulator which reproduced a female thorax phantom. Spatial dose rate distributions and dose-volume histograms were generated. Protocol's analysis involving exposure time, seed's activities and dose were performed. Permanent Ho(166)-seed implants presented a maximum dose rate per unit of contained activity (MDR) of 1.1601 μGy h(-1) Bq(-1); and, a normalized MDR in standard points (8 mm, equidistant to 03-seeds - SP1, 10 mm - SP2) of 1.0% (SP1) and 0.5% (SP2), respectively. Ir(192)-brachytherapy presented MDR of 4.3945 × 10(-3) μGy h(-1) Bq(-1); and, 30% (SP1), and 20% (SP2). Therefore, seed's implant activities of 333 MBq (Ho(166)) and 259 GBq (Ir(192)) produced prescribed doses of 58 Gy (SP1; 5d) and 56 Gy (SP1, 5 fractions, 6 min), respectively. Breast Ho(166)-implants of 37-111 MBq are attractive due to the high dose rate near 6-10 mm from seeds, equivalent to Ir(192)-brachytherapy of 259 GBq (3 fractions, 6 min) providing similar dose in standard points at a week; however, with spatial dose distribution better confined. The seed positioning can be adjusted for controlling the breast tumor, in stages I and II, in flat and deep tumors, without any breast volumetric limitation.

  10. Development of an Iridium-192 seed for use in ophthalmic brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattos, Fabio R.; Rostelato, Maria Elisa C.M.; Zeituni, Carlos; Moura, Joao A.; Costa, Osvaldo L.; Feher, Anselmo; Moura, Eduardo S.; Souza, Carla D.; Peleias Junior, Fernando S.

    2011-01-01

    The Institute for Energy and Nuclear Research (IPEN), in partnership with the School or Medicine (UNIFESP), created a project that aims to develop and implement an ophthalmic therapeutic treatment for cancer with Iridium-192 seeds. The School of Medicine treats many cancer cases in the SUS (Brazilian Public Health System), and brachytherapy group of IPEN has extensive experience in prototype sources. The seed to be manufactured will perform as follows: a core of Iridium-192 is packaged inside small cylindrical seeds consist of a titanium capsule of 0.8 mm outer diameter, 0.05 mm wall thickness and 4 5 mm in length. The core is an alloy of platinum-iridium (20/80) of 3.0 mm in length and 0.3 mm in diameter. Material analysis, neutron activation and activity measurements were carried out. (author)

  11. High-spin states in the 192Pb and 193Pb isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagrange, J.M.; Pautrat, M.

    1991-01-01

    The 193 Pb and 192 Pb isotopes are produced through the 182 W( 16 O, 5n, 6n) reactions. The de-excitation γ-ray and conversion electron spectra lead to the conversion coefficients for most transitions. With the results of the γ-γ and e - -γ coincidences, the half-lives measured for several states, the angular distribution coefficients for the odd isotope and the transition multipolarities, the data on the 192 Pb level scheme has been much enhanced and the 193 Pb one studied for the first time. The experimental schemes are compared to those given by microscopic calculations, in a two or three quasi-particle approximation using a surface delta interaction with a reduced pairing component. The discrepancies between theory and experiment are attributed to the increasing influence of proton configurations

  12. Water equivalency evaluation of PRESAGE® dosimeters for dosimetry of Cs-137 and Ir-192 brachytherapy sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorjiara, Tina; Hill, Robin; Kuncic, Zdenka; Baldock, Clive

    2010-11-01

    A major challenge in brachytherapy dosimetry is the measurement of steep dose gradients. This can be achieved with a high spatial resolution three dimensional (3D) dosimeter. PRESAGE® is a polyurethane based dosimeter which is suitable for 3D dosimetry. Since an ideal dosimeter is radiologically water equivalent, we have investigated the relative dose response of three different PRESAGE® formulations, two with a lower chloride and bromide content than original one, for Cs-137 and Ir-192 brachytherapy sources. Doses were calculated using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo package. Our results indicate that PRESAGE® dosimeters are suitable for relative dose measurement of Cs-137 and Ir-192 brachytherapy sources and the lower halogen content PRESAGE® dosimeters are more water equivalent than the original formulation.

  13. Extrahepatic bile duct carcinoma treated by intraluminal irradiation with iridium-192 wire. Report of a case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, H; Kuroda, T; Uchida, H [Osaka Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1980-08-01

    A 57-year-old male with obstructive jaundice was diagnosed extrahepatic bile duct carcinoma at bifurcation by percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTC). He was treated 3,300 rad of external irradiation and then intraluminal irradiation using the Iridium-192 wire by two times with the aid of PTC internal drainage, each was given by the dose of 1,600 rad at 5 mm inside the tumor from the PTC-tube. He had been well for about 1 year and then died because of ascites and cachexia. Autopsy revealed only microscopic tumor cells remaining around the common duct below the cystic junction. It was confirmed that intraluminal irradiation using the Iridium-192 wire was potentially curable and easily applicable to the bile duct carcinoma.

  14. Extrahepatic bile duct carcinoma treated by intraluminal irradiation with iridium-192 wire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Hiro; Kuroda, Tomosumi; Uchida, Hideo

    1980-01-01

    A 57-year-old male with obstructive jaundice was diagnosed extrahepatic bile duct carcinoma at bifurcation by percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTC). He was treated 3,300 rad of external irradiation and then intraluminal irradiation using the Iridium-192 wire by two times with the aid of PTC internal drainage, each was given by the dose of 1,600 rad at 5 mm inside the tumor from the PTC-tube. He had been well for about 1 year and then died because of ascites and cachexia. Autopsy revealed only microscopic tumor cells remaining around the common duct below the cystic junction. It was confirmed that intraluminal irradiation using the Iridium-192 wire was potentially curable and easily applicable to the bile duct carcinoma. (author)

  15. The dose distribution surrounding sup 192 Ir and sup 137 Cs seed sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomason, C [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (USA). Dept. of Medical Physics; Mackie, T R [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (USA). Dept. of Medical Physics Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (USA). Dept. of Human Oncology; Lindstrom, M J [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (USA). Biostatistics Center; Higgins, P D [Cleveland Clinic Foundation, OH (USA). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    1991-04-01

    Dose distributions in water were measured using LiF thermoluminescent dosemeters for {sup 192}Ir seed sources with stainless steel and with platinum encapsulation to determine the effect of differing encapsulation. Dose distribution was measured for a {sup 137}Cs seed source. In addition, dose distributions surrounding these sources were calculated using the EGS4 Monte Carlo code and were compared to measured data. The two methods are in good agreement for all three sources. Tables are given describing dose distribution surrounding each source as a function of distance and angle. Specific dose constants were also determined from results of Monte Carlo simulation. This work confirms the use of the EGS4 Monte Carlo code in modelling {sup 192}Ir and {sup 137}Cs seed sources to obtain brachytherapy dose distributions. (author).

  16. The dose distribution surrounding 192Ir and 137Cs seed sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomason, C.; Mackie, T.R.; Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI; Lindstrom, M.J.; Higgins, P.D.

    1991-01-01

    Dose distributions in water were measured using LiF thermoluminescent dosemeters for 192 Ir seed sources with stainless steel and with platinum encapsulation to determine the effect of differing encapsulation. Dose distribution was measured for a 137 Cs seed source. In addition, dose distributions surrounding these sources were calculated using the EGS4 Monte Carlo code and were compared to measured data. The two methods are in good agreement for all three sources. Tables are given describing dose distribution surrounding each source as a function of distance and angle. Specific dose constants were also determined from results of Monte Carlo simulation. This work confirms the use of the EGS4 Monte Carlo code in modelling 192 Ir and 137 Cs seed sources to obtain brachytherapy dose distributions. (author)

  17. Effect of source encapsulation on the energy spectra of sup 192 Ir and sup 137 Cs seed sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomason, C [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (USA). Dept. of Medical Physics; Mackie, T R [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (USA). Dept. of Medical Physics Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (USA). Dept. of Human Oncology; Lindstrom, M J [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (USA). Biostatistics Center

    1991-04-01

    The effect of source encapsulation on the energy spectra of {sup 192}Ir and {sup 137}Cs seed sources, both with stainless steel and with platinum encapsulation, was determined from results of Monte Carlo simulation. The fractional scatter dose around these sources has also been determined from Monte Carlo simulation. The platinum-encapsulated {sup 192}Ir source exhibited greater attenuation of the primary spectrum, as expected, and, consistent with this greater attenuation, exhibited more scattered radiation. Significantly less scatter was seen with the {sup 137}Cs source than with either {sup 192}Ir source, as is consistent with the higher-energy photons from {sup 137}Cs. (author).

  18. Comparison of the hypothetical (57)Co brachytherapy source with the (192)Ir source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toossi, Mohammad Taghi Bahreyni; Ghorbani, Mahdi; Rostami, Atefeh; Khosroabadi, Mohsen; Khademi, Sara; Knaup, Courtney

    2016-01-01

    The (57)Co radioisotope has recently been proposed as a hypothetical brachytherapy source due to its high specific activity, appropriate half-life (272 days) and medium energy photons (114.17 keV on average). In this study, Task Group No. 43 dosimetric parameters were calculated and reported for a hypothetical (57)Co source. A hypothetical (57)Co source was simulated in MCNPX, consisting of an active cylinder with 3.5 mm length and 0.6 mm radius encapsulated in a stainless steel capsule. Three photon energies were utilized (136 keV [10.68%], 122 keV [85.60%], 14 keV [9.16%]) for the (57)Co source. Air kerma strength, dose rate constant, radial dose function, anisotropy function, and isodose curves for the source were calculated and compared to the corresponding data for a (192)Ir source. The results are presented as tables and figures. Air kerma strength per 1 mCi activity for the (57)Co source was 0.46 cGyh(-1) cm 2 mCi(-1). The dose rate constant for the (57)Co source was determined to be 1.215 cGyh(-1)U(-1). The radial dose function for the (57)Co source has an increasing trend due to multiple scattering of low energy photons. The anisotropy function for the (57)Co source at various distances from the source is more isotropic than the (192)Ir source. The (57)Co source has advantages over (192)Ir due to its lower energy photons, longer half-life, higher dose rate constant and more isotropic anisotropic function. However, the (192)Ir source has a higher initial air kerma strength and more uniform radial dose function. These properties make (57)Co a suitable source for use in brachytherapy applications.

  19. Variable-temperature sample system for ion implantation at -192 to +5000C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuller, C.T.

    1978-04-01

    A variable-temperature sample system based on exchange-gas coupling was developed for ion-implantation use. The sample temperature can be controlled from -192 0 C to +500 0 C with rapid cooling. The system also has provisions for focusing and alignment of the ion beam, electron suppression, temperature monitoring, sample current measuring, and cryo-shielding. Design considerations and operating characteristics are discussed. 5 figures

  20. Quality control of 192Ir high dose rate after loading brachytherapy dose veracity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Zhongsu; Xu Xiao; Liu Fen

    2008-01-01

    Recently, 192 Ir high dose rate (HDR) afterloading are widely used in brachytherapy. The advantage of using HDR systems over low dose rate systems are shorter treatment time and higher fraction dose. To guarantee the veracity of the delivery dose, several quality control methods are deseribed in this work. With these we can improve the position precision, time precision and dose precision of the brachytherapy. (authors)

  1. Iridium-192 curietherapy for T1 and T2 epidermoid carcinomas of the floor of mouth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazeron, J.J.; Grimard, L.; Raynal, M.; Haddad, E.; Piedbois, P.; Martin, M.; Marinello, G.; Nair, R.C.; Le Bourgeois, J.P.; Pierquin, B.

    1990-01-01

    From 1970 to 1986, 117 patients with T1 (47) or T2 (70) epidermoid carcinomas of the floor of the mouth (SCC) were treated by iridium-192 implantation (192 Ir). The dose was prescribed according to the Paris System and varied over those years. Follow-up information was available on 116 patients. There were 46 T1N0, 47 T2N0, and 23 T2N1-3. Neck management varied for the 93 N0 patients consisting of surveillance (24 T1, 17 T2) or elective neck dissection (22 T1:all pN-, 30 T2: 20 pN-, 10 pN+). Cause specific survival rates were 94% for T1N0, 61.5% for T2N0, and 28% for T2N1-3 at 5 years. Primary local control was 93.5%, 74.5%, and 65%, respectively, and 98%, 79%, and 65% after salvage. Patients with gingival extension or a tumor size over 3 cm (T2b) had a local control of 50% (9/18) and 58% (15/26), respectively. Nodal control was 93.5% for Stage I, 85% for Stage II, and 48% for T2N1-3 patients. There was no difference in nodal control with regard to treatment policy for Stage I-II patients. There were few complications including three deaths: two from surgery and one from 192 Ir. Nodal status, tumor size defined as T1, T2a (less than or equal to 3 cm), T2b (greater than 3 cm), and gingival extension were the only independent prognostic factors. The management of T1N0 and T2N0 SCC by 192 Ir to a dose of 65 or 70 Gy, using the Paris System, is recommended for lesions 3 cm or less and without gingival extension

  2. Development of the double encapsulated sources of Ir 192 for industrial applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munoz, C; Sabio Calvete, M; Bianchi, D; Banchik, D; Gonzalez, A; Mender, A

    2004-01-01

    The steps are described that were followed for carrying out the scientific and technological development of the double encapsulated sources for the Iridium-192 to be used in industrial gammagraphy. This development arises from an agreement between INVAP and the CNEA as part of the EGIPTO Project. Each step is outlined in the development together with the different experiences undertaken to obtain the source, whose construction meets the local and international standards for safety and radiological protection (ARN, IRAM, ISO standards) (Cw)

  3. Study and development of an Iridium-192 seed for use in ophthalmic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattos, Fabio Rodrigues de

    2013-01-01

    Even ocular tumors are not among the cases with a higher incidence, they affect the population, especially children. The Institute of Energy and Nuclear Research (IPEN-CNEN/SP) in partnership with Escola Paulista de Medicina (UNIFESP), created a project to develop and implement a alternative treatment for ophthalmic cancer that use brachytherapy iridium-192 seeds. The project arose by reason of the Escola Paulista treat many cancer cases within the Unified Health System (SUS) and the research experience of sealed radioactive sources group at IPEN. The methodology was developed from the available infrastructure and the experience of researchers. The prototype seed presents with a core (192-iridium alloy of iridium-platinum) of 3.0 mm long sealed by a capsule of titanium of 0.8 mm outside diameter, 0.05 mm wall thickness and 4,5mm long. This work aims to study and develop a seed of iridium-192 from a platinum-iridium alloy. No study on the fabrication of these seeds was found in available literature. It was created a methodology that involved: characterization of the material used in the core, creation of device for neutron activation irradiation and and seed sealing tests. As a result, proved the feasibility of the method. As a suggestion for future work, studies regarding metrology and dosimetry of these sources and improvement of the methodology should be carried out, for future implementation in national scope. (author)

  4. Differential Fault Analysis on CLEFIA with 128, 192, and 256-Bit Keys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Junko; Fukunaga, Toshinori

    This paper describes a differential fault analysis (DFA) attack against CLEFIA. The proposed attack can be applied to CLEFIA with all supported keys: 128, 192, and 256-bit keys. DFA is a type of side-channel attack. This attack enables the recovery of secret keys by injecting faults into a secure device during its computation of the cryptographic algorithm and comparing the correct ciphertext with the faulty one. CLEFIA is a 128-bit blockcipher with 128, 192, and 256-bit keys developed by the Sony Corporation in 2007. CLEFIA employs a generalized Feistel structure with four data lines. We developed a new attack method that uses this characteristic structure of the CLEFIA algorithm. On the basis of the proposed attack, only 2 pairs of correct and faulty ciphertexts are needed to retrieve the 128-bit key, and 10.78 pairs on average are needed to retrieve the 192 and 256-bit keys. The proposed attack is more efficient than any previously reported. In order to verify the proposed attack and estimate the calculation time to recover the secret key, we conducted an attack simulation using a PC. The simulation results show that we can obtain each secret key within three minutes on average. This result shows that we can obtain the entire key within a feasible computational time.

  5. Preparation and determination of kerma for Iridium 192 sources of low dose rate for brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tendilla, J.I.; Tovar M, V.; Mitsoura, E.; Aguilar H, F.; Alanis M, J.

    2000-01-01

    The practice of Brachytherapy with Iridium-192 sources of low dose rate (0.4 - 0.8 Gy/h) is a technique used in the treatment of diverse illnesses. in this work the preparation, quality control and calibration are presented in terms of kerma in air of Iridium-192 using as target these recycled Iridium-Platinum wires. The targets were obtained as decayed sources of different radio therapeutical centers in the country and they were characterized by Scanning electron microscopy in order to determine their chemical composition. Subsequently it was developed an experimental design to establish the effect of neutron flux, geometrical array and irradiation time over the activity and percentage of the sources homogeneity. The homogeneity was determined by auto radiography and by Gamma spectroscopy. Once the optimal irradiation conditions were established, it is determined the apparent activity and kerma in air using a well type ionization chamber with traceability to a primary laboratory. Iridium-192 sources were obtained with an average homogeneity 96 %, apparent activity 282.129 ± 0.531 M Bq and kerma in air 0.03200 ± 0.00006 m Gy m/h A. (Author)

  6. Recovery from Iridium-192 flakes of a radioactive source for industrial use after a radiation incident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz, W.H.; Zapata, L.A.

    2013-01-01

    The Iridium-192 ( 192 Ir) is the most used and ideal for industrial radiography applications, especially in petrochemical plants and pipelines and provides better contrast sensitivity for thick (25.4 mm). This source has constructive sealed double encapsulation, the internal capsule containing stainless steel to radioactive material in the form of flakes and welded with TIG process. The radiological incident happened at a gas station fuel sales in circumstances in which there was a homogeneity test welds a tank, the flakes or Ir-192 fell off his ponytail and left scattered over an area of 2 m 2 , some fell flat areas and other land so collected in lead shielding and metal container and ground source. Full recovery of the leaflets was performed at the Division of radioactive waste management (GRRA) gaining a total of 22 flakes with no radiation risk to staff performance and installation and the conclusion was reached that the misapplicaion of TIG welding was the main cause the incident. (author)

  7. Decision model support of severity of injury traffic accident victims care by SAMU 192

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rackynelly Alves Sarmento Soares

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Traffic accidents produce high morbidity and mortality in several countries, including Brazil. The initial care to victims of accidents, by a specialized team, has tools for evaluating the severity of trauma, which guide the priorities. This study aimed to develop a decision model applied to pre-hospital care, using the Abbreviated Injury Scale, to define the severity of the injury caused by the AT, as well to describe the features of accidents and their victims, occurred in Joao Pessoa, Paraiba. This is a descriptive epidemiological investigation, sectional, which analyzed all victims of traffic accidents attended by the SAMU 192, João Pessoa-PB, in January, April and June 2010. Data were collected in the medical regulation sheets of SAMU 192. Most of victims were male (76%, aged between 20 and 39 years (60%. Most injuries were classified as AIS1 (62.5%. The model of decision support implemented was the decision tree that managed to correctly classify 95.98% of the severity of injuries. By this model, it was possible to extract 29 rules of gravity classification of injury, which may be used for decision-making teams of the SAMU 192.

  8. Toward endobronchial Ir-192 high-dose-rate brachytherapy therapeutic optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay, H A; Allison, R R; Downie, G H; Mota, H C; Austerlitz, C; Jenkins, T; Sibata, C H

    2007-01-01

    A number of patients with lung cancer receive either palliative or curative high-dose-rate (HDR) endobronchial brachytherapy. Up to a third of patients treated with endobronchial HDR die from hemoptysis. Rather than accept hemoptysis as an expected potential consequence of HDR, we have calculated the radial dose distribution for an Ir-192 HDR source, rigorously examined the dose and prescription points recommended by the American Brachytherapy Society (ABS), and performed a radiobiological-based analysis. The radial dose rate of a commercially available Ir-192 source was calculated with a Monte Carlo simulation. Based on the linear quadratic model, the estimated palliative, curative and blood vessel rupture radii from the center of an Ir-192 source were obtained for the ABS recommendations and a series of customized HDR prescriptions. The estimated radius at risk for blood vessel perforation for the ABS recommendations ranges from 7 to 9 mm. An optimized prescription may in some situations reduce this radius to 4 mm. The estimated blood perforation radius is generally smaller than the palliative radius. Optimized and individualized endobronchial HDR prescriptions are currently feasible based on our current understanding of tumor and normal tissue radiobiology. Individualized prescriptions could minimize complications such as fatal hemoptysis without sacrificing efficacy. Fiducial stents, HDR catheter centering or spacers and the use of CT imaging to better assess the relationship between the catheter and blood vessels promise to be useful strategies for increasing the therapeutic index of this treatment modality. Prospective trials employing treatment optimization algorithms are needed

  9. Dosimetry experience of 192IR sources used In HDR brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daci, Lulzime; Myrku, Rodina Cela

    2013-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The 192IR Sources are the most commonly used in radiotherapy treatments HDR worldwide. According to international recommendations on quality assurance in HDR brachytherapy, an acceptance test based on the determination of the source strength of any new source shall be carried out before first application to verify the manufacturer’s calibration data. The present paper gives the experimental determination of the source strength for our brachytherapy sources used until now in brachytherapy treatments. Materials/Methods: At Mother Teresa University Hospital we have a cost-effective gynecological brachytherapy unit from Eckert & Ziegler BEBIG named GyneSource® that is a five channel HDR after loader equipped with an 192IR source. The software used is HDR plus™ 2.5 that delivers an optimized treatment plan and makes the process especially fast and we use intracavitary BEBIG applicators. From April 2009 up to December 2012, we have imported nine HDR 192IR Sources. The exchange of the source and acceptance test is done by the physicist of the clinic once the source is imported. The measurements are done with a Well-type ionization chamber HDR1000 Plus and the electrometer used is MAX4000. Only seven sources are compared as we miss the dosimetry data of the first source, and the forth source was not measured and not used because the machine was not working in that time. Results/Conclusions: Eight sources were accepted for clinically use as the measurement were within the tolerance. The source number four with e deviation of -1.92% has been double checked compared with a free in-air measurement with farmer type chamber that gave a deviation to source certificate of 4% that is still inside the tolerance to accept a source for clinical use. The deviations of measured Air Kerma rate to the value of the sources certificates of all our used 192IR sources are less than 2%, which are within the tolerance. The checked value of updated source strength in

  10. 49 CFR 192.917 - How does an operator identify potential threats to pipeline integrity and use the threat...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Gas Transmission Pipeline Integrity Management § 192...

  11. 49 CFR 192.929 - What are the requirements for using Direct Assessment for Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCCDA)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Gas Transmission Pipeline Integrity Management § 192.929 What are the...

  12. 49 CFR 192.937 - What is a continual process of evaluation and assessment to maintain a pipeline's integrity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Gas Transmission Pipeline Integrity Management § 192.937 What is a...

  13. 49 CFR 192.915 - What knowledge and training must personnel have to carry out an integrity management program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Gas Transmission Pipeline Integrity Management § 192.915 What knowledge...

  14. Zambia's participation in past CTBTO activities and the upgrading of AS119 and N192: Experiences and the way forward

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lombe, D.K.

    2002-01-01

    This presentation briefly describes the Zambian Seisimic Network (ZSN), Zambia's participation in past CTBTO activities and upgrading of AS119 and N192. It goes on to describe various experiences encountered and makes some suggestions for future considerations

  15. Toxicity of chlorpyrifos and chlorpyrifos oxon in a transgenic mouse model of the human paraoxonase (PON1) Q192R polymorphism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, Toby B.; Walter, Betsy J.; Shih, Diana M.; Tward, Aaron D.; Lusis, Aldons J.; Timchalk, Chuck; Richter, Rebecca J.; Costa, Lucio G.; Furlong, Clement E.

    2005-08-01

    The Q192R polymorphism of paraoxonase (PON1) has been shown to affect hydrolysis of organophosphorus compounds. The Q192 and R192 alloforms exhibit equivalent catalytic efficiencies of hydrolysis for diazoxon, the oxon form of the pesticide (DZ). However, the R192 alloform has a higher catalytic efficiency of hydrolysis than does the Q192 alloform for chlorpyrifos oxon (CPO), the oxon form of the pesticide chlorpyrifos (CPS). The current study examined the relevance of these observations for in-vivo exposures to chlorpyrifos and chlorpyrifos oxon. Methods Using a transgenic mouse model we examined the relevance of the Q192R polymorphism for exposure to CPS and CPO in vivo. Transgenic mice were generated that expressed either human PON1Q192 or PON1R192 at equivalent levels, in the absence of endogenous mouse PON1. Dose-response and time course experiments were performed on adult mice exposed dermally to CPS or CPO. Morbidity and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in the brain and diaphragm were determined in the first 24 h following exposure. Results Mice expressing PON1Q192 were significantly more sensitive to CPO, and to a lesser extent CPS, than were mice expressing PON1R192. The time course of inhibition following exposure to 1.2 mg/kg CPO revealed maximum inhibition of brain AChE at 6?12 h, with PON1R192, PON1Q192, and PON1? /? mice exhibiting 40, 70 and 85% inhibition, respectively, relative to control mice. The effect of PON1 removal on the dose?response curve for CPS exposure was remarkably consistent with a PBPK/PD model of CPS exposure. Conclusion These results indicate that individuals expressing only the PON1Q192 allele would be more sensitive to the adverse effects of CPO or CPS exposure, especially if they are expressing a low level of plasma PON1Q192.

  16. Radiation levels in Cath Lab and occupational exposures during manual 192Ir intracoronary brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, S.D.; Shanta, A.; Tripathi, U.B.; Bhatt, B.C.

    2001-01-01

    Intracoronary brachytherapy is a new modality of radiation therapy and is being used to reduce the rate of restenosis after angioplasty. Clinical trials for evaluation of safety and efficacy of manually implanted 192 Ir seed ribbons are underway at various cardiology centres in India. 192 Ir emits high energy gamma rays (0.136 -1.06 MeV), which causes concern regarding safety of the personnel when these sources are manually used in the cardiac catheterization laboratory (Cath Lab) for intracoronary irradiation. Radiation levels in Cath Lab and exposures to personnel have been measured at 6 different cardiology centres in the country during 8 different clinical trials using radiation survey meter, personnel monitoring badges and pocket dosimeters. Activities of 192 Ir seed ribbons used in these clinical trials were in the range of 5.55 - 14.8 GBq. Measured radiation levels behind the mobile lead shields, at the top of lead shields, near the patient head, near the patient toes and at the main door of the Cath Lab were in the range of 2.6-20, 50-256, 385-450, 22-225 and 2-16 μSv/hr/3.7GBq, respectively. Measured effective doses to occupational workers were in range of 14-100 μSv/procedure/3.7GBq. Based on these measurements, user institutions have been advised to use lead glass mounted L-shaped mobile lead shields with proper orientation during clinical trials, avoid unwanted occupancy in the Cath Lab and around the patient during irradiation and use conveniently long forceps or tongs for implantation and removal of sources. (author)

  17. Dosimetry audit on the accuracy of 192Ir brachytherapy source strength determinations in Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlsson Tedgren, Aasa

    2007-11-15

    The absorbed dose delivered to the patient in brachytherapy is directly proportional to the source strength in terms of the reference air-kerma rate (RAKR). Verification of this quantity by the hospitals is widely recognized as an important part of a quality assurance program. An external audit was performed on behalf of the Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory at the Swedish Radiation Protection Authority (SSI). The aim was to investigate how accurately the source-strength in 192Ir brachytherapy is determined at Swedish hospitals. The SSI reference well-type ion chamber and calibrated equipment were used to measure the RAKR of an 192Ir source in each of the 14 Swedish afterloading units. Comparisons with values determined by vendors and hospitals were made. Agreement in values of RAKR as determined by SSI, hospitals and vendors were in all cases within the +-3% uncertainty (at a coverage factor of k=2), typically guaranteed by the vendors. The good agreement reflects the robustness and easy handling of well-type chambers designed for brachytherapy in use by all Swedish hospitals. The 192Ir calibration service planned at SSI will solve the hospitals current problem with recalibration of equipment. SSI can also advise hospitals to follow the IAEA recommendations for measurement techniques and maintenance of equipment. It is worthwhile for the hospitals to establish their own ratio (or deviation) with the vendor and follow it as function of time. Such a mean-ratio embeds systematic differences of various origins and have a lower uncertainty than has the RAKR alone, making it useful for early detection of problems with equipment or routines. SSI could also define requirements for the agreement between source strengths as determined by hospitals and vendors and couple this to an action plan, dependent on level of disagreement, and some kind of reporting to SSI

  18. Dosimetry audit on the accuracy of 192Ir brachytherapy source strength determinations in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsson Tedgren, Aasa

    2007-11-01

    The absorbed dose delivered to the patient in brachytherapy is directly proportional to the source strength in terms of the reference air-kerma rate (RAKR). Verification of this quantity by the hospitals is widely recognized as an important part of a quality assurance program. An external audit was performed on behalf of the Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory at the Swedish Radiation Protection Authority (SSI). The aim was to investigate how accurately the source-strength in 192 Ir brachytherapy is determined at Swedish hospitals. The SSI reference well-type ion chamber and calibrated equipment were used to measure the RAKR of an 192 Ir source in each of the 14 Swedish afterloading units. Comparisons with values determined by vendors and hospitals were made. Agreement in values of RAKR as determined by SSI, hospitals and vendors were in all cases within the ±3% uncertainty (at a coverage factor of k=2), typically guaranteed by the vendors. The good agreement reflects the robustness and easy handling of well-type chambers designed for brachytherapy in use by all Swedish hospitals. The 192 Ir calibration service planned at SSI will solve the hospitals current problem with recalibration of equipment. SSI can also advise hospitals to follow the IAEA recommendations for measurement techniques and maintenance of equipment. It is worthwhile for the hospitals to establish their own ratio (or deviation) with the vendor and follow it as function of time. Such a mean-ratio embeds systematic differences of various origins and have a lower uncertainty than has the RAKR alone, making it useful for early detection of problems with equipment or routines. SSI could also define requirements for the agreement between source strengths as determined by hospitals and vendors and couple this to an action plan, dependent on level of disagreement, and some kind of reporting to SSI

  19. Dosimetry audit on the accuracy of {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy source strength determinations in Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlsson Tedgren, Aasa

    2007-11-15

    The absorbed dose delivered to the patient in brachytherapy is directly proportional to the source strength in terms of the reference air-kerma rate (RAKR). Verification of this quantity by the hospitals is widely recognized as an important part of a quality assurance program. An external audit was performed on behalf of the Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory at the Swedish Radiation Protection Authority (SSI). The aim was to investigate how accurately the source-strength in {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy is determined at Swedish hospitals. The SSI reference well-type ion chamber and calibrated equipment were used to measure the RAKR of an {sup 192}Ir source in each of the 14 Swedish afterloading units. Comparisons with values determined by vendors and hospitals were made. Agreement in values of RAKR as determined by SSI, hospitals and vendors were in all cases within the {+-}3% uncertainty (at a coverage factor of k=2), typically guaranteed by the vendors. The good agreement reflects the robustness and easy handling of well-type chambers designed for brachytherapy in use by all Swedish hospitals. The {sup 192}Ir calibration service planned at SSI will solve the hospitals current problem with recalibration of equipment. SSI can also advise hospitals to follow the IAEA recommendations for measurement techniques and maintenance of equipment. It is worthwhile for the hospitals to establish their own ratio (or deviation) with the vendor and follow it as function of time. Such a mean-ratio embeds systematic differences of various origins and have a lower uncertainty than has the RAKR alone, making it useful for early detection of problems with equipment or routines. SSI could also define requirements for the agreement between source strengths as determined by hospitals and vendors and couple this to an action plan, dependent on level of disagreement, and some kind of reporting to SSI.

  20. Determination of the reference air kerma rate for 192Ir brachytherapy sources and the related uncertainty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dijk, Eduard van; Kolkman-Deurloo, Inger-Karine K.; Damen, Patricia M. G.

    2004-01-01

    Different methods exist to determine the air kerma calibration factor of an ionization chamber for the spectrum of a 192 Ir high-dose-rate (HDR) or pulsed-dose-rate (PDR) source. An analysis of two methods to obtain such a calibration factor was performed: (i) the method recommended by [Goetsch et al., Med. Phys. 18, 462-467 (1991)] and (ii) the method employed by the Dutch national standards institute NMi [Petersen et al., Report S-EI-94.01 (NMi, Delft, The Netherlands, 1994)]. This analysis showed a systematic difference on the order of 1% in the determination of the strength of 192 Ir HDR and PDR sources depending on the method used for determining the air kerma calibration factor. The definitive significance of the difference between these methods can only be addressed after performing an accurate analysis of the associated uncertainties. For an NE 2561 (or equivalent) ionization chamber and an in-air jig, a typical uncertainty budget of 0.94% was found with the NMi method. The largest contribution in the type-B uncertainty is the uncertainty in the air kerma calibration factor for isotope i, N k i , as determined by the primary or secondary standards laboratories. This uncertainty is dominated by the uncertainties in the physical constants for the average mass-energy absorption coefficient ratio and the stopping power ratios. This means that it is not foreseeable that the standards laboratories can decrease the uncertainty in the air kerma calibration factors for ionization chambers in the short term. When the results of the determination of the 192 Ir reference air kerma rates in, e.g., different institutes are compared, the uncertainties in the physical constants are the same. To compare the applied techniques, the ratio of the results can be judged by leaving out the uncertainties due to these physical constants. In that case an uncertainty budget of 0.40% (coverage factor=2) should be taken into account. Due to the differences in approach between the

  1. Interstitial brachytherapy with 192-IR in treatment of recurrent malignant primary brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardenes, R.; Martinez, R.; Victoria, C.; Nunez, L.; Clavo, B.; Sancedo, G.

    1994-01-01

    Seven patients with recurrent malignant primary brain tumors after surgery and radiation therapy were treated at the Clinica Puerta de Hierro (Madrid) by interstitial brachytherapy with 192-Ir sources. Implantations were performed using computerized tomography and dose prescription were determined following the Paris system rules for interstitial implants. The means dose deliberated was 50 to 65 Gy to the reference isodoses. At the last follow-up all patients except for one are alive and without evidence of progression of the disease. (Author) 35 refs

  2. The Search for High Spin State Isomers in the Atomic Mass Region 178-192

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellahrah, M.S.; Arfa, N.S.

    2007-01-01

    Isomers for elements far a way from line of stability are a new field for research to produce artificial isomers that can store considerable amount of energy in small amount of mass without the dangerous hazards on life and environment. These isomers could have very short life time or very long one 10th and 100th of years. It will be possible to get the stored energy by stimulated emission . The purpose of this work to use a theorical model based on Bcs method to find out the possible isomers in the mass reg on 178-192 even -even isotopes so that experimentalists can concentrate their research on these predicted isomers.

  3. Determination of factors through Monte Carlo method for Fricke dosimetry from 192Ir sources for brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, Mariano Gazineu; Salata, Camila; Almeida, Carlos Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    The Laboratorio de Ciencias Radiologicas develops a methodology for the determination of the absorbed dose to water by Fricke chemical dosimetry method for brachytherapy sources of 192 Ir high dose rate and have compared their results with the laboratory of the National Research Council Canada. This paper describes the determination of the correction factors by Monte Carlo method, with the Penelope code. Values for all factors are presented, with a maximum difference of 0.22% for their determination by an alternative way. (author)

  4. 192Ir Preservation, radiation protection and its application in the Hermanos Ameijeiras Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Guevara, A.; Leonard Valhuerdi, M.; Silvestre Patallo, I.; Bernal Rodriguez, M.; Gonzalez Quintana, J.

    1996-01-01

    Since the beginning of 1990 the first steps were taken in our Hospital for the use of the 192I r radioisotope in the treatment of malignant tumors. In order to use this radioisotope it has been necessary tomanufacture different instruments to manipulate it as the building the place for its storage preservation and preparation ( HOT ROOM). The radiation protection prerequisites established by standards and decrees issued were taken into account for the design and construction thus allowing to obtain the license granted by the Regulations Organization (Centro Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear)

  5. Dosimetric evaluation of a new OneDose MOSFET for Ir-192 energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinhikar, Rajesh A; Sharma, Pramod K; Tambe, Chandrashekhar M; Deshpande, Deepak D

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate dosimetry (reproducibility, energy correction, relative response with distance from source, linearity with threshold dose, rate of fading, temperature and angular dependence) of a newly designed OneDose TM MOSFET patient dosimetry system for use in HDR brachytherapy with Ir-192 energy. All measurements were performed with a MicroSelectron HDR unit and OneDose MOSFET detectors. All dosimeters were normalized to 3 min post-irradiation to minimize fading effects. All dosimeters gave reproducible readings with mean deviation of 1.8% (SD 0.4) and 2.4% (SD 0.6) for 0 0 and 180 0 incidences, respectively. The mean energy correction factor was found to be 1.1 (range 1.06-1.12). Overall, there was 60% and 40% mean response of the MOSFET at 2 and 3 cm, respectively, from the source. MOSFET results showed good agreement with TLD and parallel plate ion chamber. Linear dose response with threshold voltage shift was observed with applied doses of 0.3 Gy-5 Gy with Ir-192 energy. Linearity (R 2 = 1) was observed in the MOSFET signal with the applied dose range of 0.3 Gy-5 Gy with Ir-192 energy. Fading effects were less than 1% after 10 min and the MOSFET detectors stayed stable (within 5%) over a period of 1 month. The MOSFET response was found to be decreased by approximately 1.5% at 37 deg. C compared to 20 deg. C. The isotropic response of the MOSFET was found to be within ±6%. A maximum deviation of 5.5% was obtained between 0 deg. and 180 deg. for both the axes and this should be considered in clinical applications. The small size, cable-less, instant readout, permanent storage of dose and ease of use make the MOSFET a novel dosimeter and beneficial to patients for skin dose measurements with HDRBT using an Ir-192 source compared to the labour demanding and time-consuming TLDs

  6. Superdeformation studies in the odd-odd nucleus {sup 192}Tl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, S.; Carpenter, M.P.; Janssens, R.V.F. [and others

    1995-08-01

    The study of yrast and near-yrast structures of odd-odd nuclei to high spins is somewhat limited due to the complexity of the spectra resulting from the many proton-neutron couplings near the Fermi surface. In superdeformed nuclei, the number of available protons and neutrons near the Fermi surface is somewhat limited due to the presence of large-shell gaps which stabilize the nuclear shape. A relatively small number of available neutron and proton configurations can lead to fragmentation of the SD intensity into a number of different bands. Two good examples of this phenomenon were found in {sup 192}Tl and {sup 194}Tl where the presence of six superdeformed bands were reported in both nuclei. We reexamined {sup 192}Tl at Gammasphere using the {sup 160}Gd({sup 37}Cl,5n) reaction at 178 MeV to populate states in the superdeformed well of this nucleus. While our previous study on {sup 192}Tl at ATLAS was very successful, a number of questions remained which formed the basis of our objectives in this experiment: obtain better {gamma}-ray energies for the known transitions and identify higher spin members in each band; determine how the bands feed the known yrast states in {sup 192}Tl as well as determine the complete spectrum in coincidence with the SD bands; look for M1 transitions connecting proposed signature partners; and attempt to identify other excitations in the superdeformed well. Analysis is underway and four of the six bands were confirmed. The reasons that two of the reported bands were not observed in this latest work is still under investigation. As of this time, no other superdeformed bands were identified in the data. Two of the confirmed SD bands have a constant moment of inertia and show indications of cross-talk between each other. This observation is not unexpected since the calculated M1 rates for the proposed configuration of the band, {pi}{sub 13/2} x {upsilon}j{sub 15/2}, indicate that M1 transitions linking the two SD bands should be observed.

  7. The Expression of miR-192 and Its Significance in Diabetic Nephropathy Patients with Different Urine Albumin Creatinine Ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyu Ma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate the expression of miR-192 and its significance in diabetic nephropathy (DN patients. Methods. 464 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM were divided into normal albuminuria group (NA, n=157, microalbuminuria group (MA, n=159, and large amount of albuminuria group (LA, n=148. 127 healthy persons were selected as the control group (NC, n=127. The serum miR-192 levels were detected by Real-Time PCR and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1 and fibronectin (FN were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The relationships among these parameters were analyzed by Pearson correlation analysis and multiple linear regression analysis. Results. The miR-192 in the LA group was significantly lower than other groups, which was lower in the MA group than in the NA group (P<0.01. The TGF-β1 and FN in the LA group were significantly higher than other groups, which were higher in the MA group than in the NA group (P<0.01. The expression of miR-192 was negatively correlated with TGF-β1, FN, and Ln (UACR and miR-192, TGF-β1, and FN were independent relevant factors affecting Ln (UACR in T2DM (P<0.01. Conclusions. These findings indicate that the levels of miR-192 were lower accompanied by the decrease of urine albumin creatinine ratio (UACR and the association between miR-192 and nephritic fibrosis in DN.

  8. Monte Carlo dosimetry of the IRAsource high dose rate 192Ir brachytherapy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarabiasl, Akbar; Ayoobian, Navid; Jabbari, Iraj; Poorbaygi, Hossein; Javanshir, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy is a common method for cancer treatment in clinical brachytherapy. Because of the different source designs, there is a need for specific dosimetry data set for each HDR model. The purpose of this study is to obtain detailed dose rate distributions in water phantom for a first prototype HDR 192 Ir brachytherapy source model, IRAsource, and compare with the other published works. In this study, Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP version 4C) code was used to simulate the dose rate distributions around the HDR source. A full set of dosimetry parameters reported by the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group No. 43U1 was evaluated. Also, the absorbed dose rate distributions in water, were obtained in an along-away look-up table. The dose rate constant, Λ, of the IRAsource was evaluated to be equal to 1.112 ± 0.005 cGy h −1 U −1 . The results of dosimetry parameters are presented in tabulated and graphical formats and compared with those reported from other commercially available HDR 192 Ir sources, which are in good agreement. This justifies the use of specific data sets for this new source. The results obtained in this study can be used as input data in the conventional treatment planning systems.

  9. Quality assurance of HDR 192Ir sources using a Fricke dosimeter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austerlitz, C; Mota, H; Almeida, C E; Allison, R; Sibata, C

    2007-04-01

    A prototype of a Fricke dosimetry system consisting of a 15 x 15 x 15 cm3 water phantom made of Plexiglas and a 11.3-ml Pyrex balloon fitted with a 0.2 cm thick Pyrex sleeve in its center was created to assess source strength and treatment planning algorithms for use in high dose rate (HDR) 192Ir afterloading units. In routine operation, the radioactive source is positioned at the end of a sleeve, which coincides with the center of the spherical balloon that is filled with Fricke solution, so that the solution is nearly isotropically irradiated. The Fricke system was calibrated in terms of source strength against a reference well-type ionization chamber, and in terms of radial dose by means of an existing algorithm from the HDR's treatment planning system. Because the system is based on the Fricke dosimeter itself, for a given type and model of 192Ir source, the system needs initial calibration but no recalibration. The results from measurements made over a 10 month period, including source decay and source substitutions, have shown the feasibility of using such a system for quality control (QC) of HDR afterloading equipment, including both the source activity and treatment planning parameters. The benefit of a large scale production and the use of this device for clinical HDR QC audits via mail are also discussed.

  10. Novel Approaches to Extraction Methods in Recovery of Capsaicin from Habanero Pepper (CNPH 15.192).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Frederico S; Borges, Leonardo L; Ribeiro, Claudia S C; Reifschneider, Francisco J B; Conceição, Edemilson C

    2017-07-01

    The objective of this study was to compare three capsaicin extraction methods: Shoxlet, Ultrasound-assisted Extraction (UAE), and Shaker-assisted Extraction (SAE) from Habanero pepper, CNPH 15.192. The different parameters evaluated were alcohol degree, time extraction, and solid-solvent ratio using response surface methodology (RSM). The three parameters found significant ( p Soxhlet increased the extraction in 10-25%; however, long extraction times (45 minutes) degraded 2% capsaicin. The extraction of capsaicin was influenced by extraction method and by the operating conditions chosen. The optimized conditions provided savings of time, solvent, and herbal material. Prudent choice of the extraction method is essential to ensure optimal yield of extract, thereby making the study relevant and the knowledge gained useful for further exploitation and application of this resource. Habanero pepper , line CNPH 15.192, possess capsaicin in higher levels when compared with others speciesHigher levels of ethanolic strength are more suitable to obtain a higher levels of capsaicinBox-Behnken design indicates to be useful to explore the best conditions of ultrasound assisted extraction of capsaicin. Abbreviations used: Nomenclature UAE: Ultrasound-assisted Extraction; SAE: Shaker-assisted Extraction.

  11. Determination of the tissue inhomogeneity correction in high dose rate Brachytherapy for Iridium-192 source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barlanka Ravikumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In Brachytherapy treatment planning, the effects of tissue heterogeneities are commonly neglected due to lack of accurate, general and fast three-dimensional (3D dose-computational algorithms. In performing dose calculations, it is assumed that the tumor and surrounding tissues constitute a uniform, homogeneous medium equivalent to water. In the recent past, three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT based treatment planning for Brachytherapy applications has been popularly adopted. However, most of the current commercially available planning systems do not provide the heterogeneity corrections for Brachytherapy dosimetry. In the present study, we have measured and quantified the impact of inhomogeneity caused by different tissues with a 0.015 cc ion chamber. Measurements were carried out in wax phantom which was employed to measure the heterogeneity. Iridium-192 (192 Ir source from high dose rate (HDR Brachytherapy machine was used as the radiation source. The reduction of dose due to tissue inhomogeneity was measured as the ratio of dose measured with different types of inhomogeneity (bone, spleen, liver, muscle and lung to dose measured with homogeneous medium for different distances. It was observed that different tissues attenuate differently, with bone tissue showing maximum attenuation value and lung tissue resulting minimum value and rest of the tissues giving values lying in between those of bone and lung. It was also found that inhomogeneity at short distance is considerably more than that at larger distances.

  12. Development and characterisation of iridium-192 seeds for brachytherapy treatment of ocular tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peleias Jr, F.S.; Zeituni, C.A.; Souza, C.D.; Rostelato, M.E.CM.; Mattos, F.R.; Banega, M.A.G.; Rodrigues, B.T.; Tiezzi, R.; Oliveira, T.B.; Feher, A.; Moura, J.A.; Costa, O.L.

    2014-01-01

    Even ocular tumors are not amongst the cases with a high incidence, they affect the population, particularly children. The Institute of Energy and Nuclear Research (IPEN-CNEN/SP) in partnership with Escola Paulista de Medicina (UNIFESP), created a project to develop an alternative treatment for ophthalmic cancer that uses iridium-192 seeds in brachytherapy. This work aims to study and develop a seed of iridium-192 from a platinum-iridium alloy The prototype seed has a 3.0 mm long core sealed by a titanium capsule of 0.8 mm of outer diameter, 0.05 mm of wall thickness and 4.5 mm long. We developed a methodology that covered: characterisation of the material used in the core, creation of a device for neutron activation of the cores and leakage tests. The results show that this methodology is feasible. As a suggestion for future work, studies regarding metrology and dosimetry of these sources should be carried out. (authors)

  13. An experimental MOSFET approach to characterize (192)Ir HDR source anisotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toye, W C; Das, K R; Todd, S P; Kenny, M B; Franich, R D; Johnston, P N

    2007-09-07

    The dose anisotropy around a (192)Ir HDR source in a water phantom has been measured using MOSFETs as relative dosimeters. In addition, modeling using the EGSnrc code has been performed to provide a complete dose distribution consistent with the MOSFET measurements. Doses around the Nucletron 'classic' (192)Ir HDR source were measured for a range of radial distances from 5 to 30 mm within a 40 x 30 x 30 cm(3) water phantom, using a TN-RD-50 MOSFET dosimetry system with an active area of 0.2 mm by 0.2 mm. For each successive measurement a linear stepper capable of movement in intervals of 0.0125 mm re-positioned the MOSFET at the required radial distance, while a rotational stepper enabled angular displacement of the source at intervals of 0.9 degrees . The source-dosimeter arrangement within the water phantom was modeled using the standardized cylindrical geometry of the DOSRZnrc user code. In general, the measured relative anisotropy at each radial distance from 5 mm to 30 mm is in good agreement with the EGSnrc simulations, benchmark Monte Carlo simulation and TLD measurements where they exist. The experimental approach employing a MOSFET detection system of small size, high spatial resolution and fast read out capability allowed a practical approach to the determination of dose anisotropy around a HDR source.

  14. Empirical model with independent variable moments of inertia for triaxial nuclei applied to 76Ge and 192Os

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugawara, M.

    2018-05-01

    An empirical model with independent variable moments of inertia for triaxial nuclei is devised and applied to 76Ge and 192Os. Three intrinsic moments of inertia, J1, J2, and J3, are varied independently as a particular function of spin I within a revised version of the triaxial rotor model so as to reproduce the energy levels of the ground-state, γ , and (in the case of 192Os) Kπ=4+ bands. The staggering in the γ band is well reproduced in both phase and amplitude. Effective γ values are extracted as a function of spin I from the ratios of the three moments of inertia. The eigenfunctions and the effective γ values are subsequently used to calculate the ratios of B (E 2 ) values associated with these bands. Good agreement between the model calculation and the experimental data is obtained for both 76Ge and 192Os.

  15. Dosimetric measurements of an 192Ir HDR source with a diamond detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rustgi, Surendra N.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To study the feasibility of using a diamond detector for the dosimetry of a high dose rate (HDR) 192 Ir source and to compare the measurement results with published data and calculations from a commercial treatment planning system. Materials and methods: The sensitive volume of the diamond detector consists of a disk of 0.26 mm thickness and 3 mm diameter. The detector was applied an external bias of +100 V and was preirradiated to a dose of 500 cGy to stabilize its response. The 192 Ir source from the Nucletron microSelectron unit has an active diameter of 0.6 mm and a length of 3.5 mm. Photon fluence anisotropy factors in air were measured at distances of 5 and 10 cm from two sources and compared with TLD measurements. Dose profiles and isodose distributions were measured at several distances from the source and compared with calculations from a Nucletron treatment planning system. These dose calculations in water use a point source approximation with the anisotropy factors independent of the radial distance from the source. Results: The photon fluence around the 192 Ir HDR source, measured with a diamond detector at distances of 5 and 10 cm from the source, is very anisotropic. Compared to the source transverse direction, the photon fluence intensity along the source axis reduces to approximately 60%. Measurements performed on two sources indicate that the photon anisotropy does not change with distance in air. Within experimental uncertainty, similar results were obtained with TLD rods and are in excellent agreement with published anisotropy factors 1 . Dose profiles, measured with the diamond detector in a water phantom, at distances of 1,2,3 and 5 cm from the source, are found to be in excellent agreement with the Nucletron planning system calculations. Similar excellent agreement is observed between the measured and calculated isodose curves in planes parallel to the source plane. Conclusion: The diamond detector has been demonstrated to be suitable

  16. Comparison of air-kerma strength determinations for HDR {sup 192}Ir sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, Brian E.; Davis, Stephen D.; Schmidt, Cal R.; Micka, John A.; DeWerd, Larry A. [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: To perform a comparison of the interim air-kerma strength standard for high dose rate (HDR) {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy sources maintained by University of Wisconsin Accredited Dosimetry Calibration Laboratory (UWADCL) with measurements of the various source models using modified techniques from the literature. The current interim standard was established by Goetsch et al. in 1991 and has remained unchanged to date. Methods: The improved, laser-aligned seven-distance apparatus of University of Wisconsin Medical Radiation Research Center (UWMRRC) was used to perform air-kerma strength measurements of five different HDR {sup 192}Ir source models. The results of these measurements were compared with those from well chambers traceable to the original standard. Alternative methodologies for interpolating the {sup 192}Ir air-kerma calibration coefficient from the NIST air-kerma standards at {sup 137}Cs and 250 kVp x rays (M250) were investigated and intercompared. As part of the interpolation method comparison, the Monte Carlo code EGSnrc was used to calculate updated values of A{sub wall} for the Exradin A3 chamber used for air-kerma strength measurements. The effects of air attenuation and scatter, room scatter, as well as the solution method were investigated in detail. Results: The average measurements when using the inverse N{sub K} interpolation method for the Classic Nucletron, Nucletron microSelectron, VariSource VS2000, GammaMed Plus, and Flexisource were found to be 0.47%, -0.10%, -1.13%, -0.20%, and 0.89% different than the existing standard, respectively. A further investigation of the differences observed between the sources was performed using MCNP5 Monte Carlo simulations of each source model inside a full model of an HDR 1000 Plus well chamber. Conclusions: Although the differences between the source models were found to be statistically significant, the equally weighted average difference between the seven-distance measurements and the well

  17. Comparison of air-kerma strength determinations for HDR 192Ir sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmussen, Brian E.; Davis, Stephen D.; Schmidt, Cal R.; Micka, John A.; DeWerd, Larry A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To perform a comparison of the interim air-kerma strength standard for high dose rate (HDR) 192 Ir brachytherapy sources maintained by University of Wisconsin Accredited Dosimetry Calibration Laboratory (UWADCL) with measurements of the various source models using modified techniques from the literature. The current interim standard was established by Goetsch et al. in 1991 and has remained unchanged to date. Methods: The improved, laser-aligned seven-distance apparatus of University of Wisconsin Medical Radiation Research Center (UWMRRC) was used to perform air-kerma strength measurements of five different HDR 192 Ir source models. The results of these measurements were compared with those from well chambers traceable to the original standard. Alternative methodologies for interpolating the 192 Ir air-kerma calibration coefficient from the NIST air-kerma standards at 137 Cs and 250 kVp x rays (M250) were investigated and intercompared. As part of the interpolation method comparison, the Monte Carlo code EGSnrc was used to calculate updated values of A wall for the Exradin A3 chamber used for air-kerma strength measurements. The effects of air attenuation and scatter, room scatter, as well as the solution method were investigated in detail. Results: The average measurements when using the inverse N K interpolation method for the Classic Nucletron, Nucletron microSelectron, VariSource VS2000, GammaMed Plus, and Flexisource were found to be 0.47%, -0.10%, -1.13%, -0.20%, and 0.89% different than the existing standard, respectively. A further investigation of the differences observed between the sources was performed using MCNP5 Monte Carlo simulations of each source model inside a full model of an HDR 1000 Plus well chamber. Conclusions: Although the differences between the source models were found to be statistically significant, the equally weighted average difference between the seven-distance measurements and the well chambers was 0.01%, confirming that

  18. Comparison of air-kerma strength determinations for HDR (192)Ir sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Brian E; Davis, Stephen D; Schmidt, Cal R; Micka, John A; Dewerd, Larry A

    2011-12-01

    To perform a comparison of the interim air-kerma strength standard for high dose rate (HDR) (192)Ir brachytherapy sources maintained by the University of Wisconsin Accredited Dosimetry Calibration Laboratory (UWADCL) with measurements of the various source models using modified techniques from the literature. The current interim standard was established by Goetsch et al. in 1991 and has remained unchanged to date. The improved, laser-aligned seven-distance apparatus of the University of Wisconsin Medical Radiation Research Center (UWMRRC) was used to perform air-kerma strength measurements of five different HDR (192)Ir source models. The results of these measurements were compared with those from well chambers traceable to the original standard. Alternative methodologies for interpolating the (192)Ir air-kerma calibration coefficient from the NIST air-kerma standards at (137)Cs and 250 kVp x rays (M250) were investigated and intercompared. As part of the interpolation method comparison, the Monte Carlo code EGSnrc was used to calculate updated values of A(wall) for the Exradin A3 chamber used for air-kerma strength measurements. The effects of air attenuation and scatter, room scatter, as well as the solution method were investigated in detail. The average measurements when using the inverse N(K) interpolation method for the Classic Nucletron, Nucletron microSelectron, VariSource VS2000, GammaMed Plus, and Flexisource were found to be 0.47%, -0.10%, -1.13%, -0.20%, and 0.89% different than the existing standard, respectively. A further investigation of the differences observed between the sources was performed using MCNP5 Monte Carlo simulations of each source model inside a full model of an HDR 1000 Plus well chamber. Although the differences between the source models were found to be statistically significant, the equally weighted average difference between the seven-distance measurements and the well chambers was 0.01%, confirming that it is not necessary to

  19. Shapes of the $^{192,190}$Pb ground states from beta decay studies using the total absorption technique

    CERN Document Server

    Estevez Aguado, M.E.; Agramunt, J.; Rubio, B.; Tain, J.L.; Jordan, D.; Fraile, L.M.; Gelletly, W.; Frank, A.; Csatlos, M.; Csige, L.; Dombradi, Zs.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Nacher, E.; Sarriguren, P.; Borge, M.J.G.; Briz, J.A.; Tengblad, O.; Molina, F.; Moreno, O.; Kowalska, M.; Fedosseev, V.N.; Marsh, B.A.; Fedorov, D.V.; Molkanov, P.L.; Andreyev, A.N.; Seliverstov, M.D.; Burkard, K.; Huller, W.

    2015-01-01

    The beta decay of $^{192,190}$Pb has been studied using the total absorption technique at the ISOLDE(CERN) facility. The beta-decay strength deduced from the measurements, combined with QRPA theoretical calculations, allow us to infer that the ground states of the $^{192,190}$Pb isotopes are spherical. These results represent the first application of the shape determination method using the total absorption technique for heavy nuclei and in a region where there is considerable interest in nuclear shapes and shape effects.

  20. CYP2C19*2 status in patients with Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laska AJ

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Amanda J Laska,1 Marie J Han,1 Josh A Lospinoso,2 Patrick J Brown,1 Thomas M Beachkofsky1 1Department of Dermatology, San Antonio Uniformed Services Health Education Consortium, San Antonio, TX, 2780th Military Intelligence Brigade, Ft Meade, MD, USA Purpose: Genetic polymorphisms have been linked to an increased predisposition to developing certain diseases. For example, patients of Han-Chinese descent carrying the HLA-B*1502 allele are at an increased risk of developing Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN if given carbamazepine. Given the complexity of in vivo drug metabolism, it is plausible that the activity of enzyme systems unrelated to specific drug metabolism may be important. Although multiple biomarkers have been identified in unique ethnic groups, there has yet to be a study investigating the presence of the slow metabolizing allele of CYP2C19, denoted CYP2C19*2, in diverse groups and the risk of developing SJS/TEN. Patients and methods: This study looked into the carrier status of CYP2C19*2, a poor metabolizing variant of CYP2C19, in patients diagnosed with SJS/TEN. We looked at its status in our series as a whole and when patients were divided by ethnicity. Genomic DNA was extracted from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue of patients with biopsy-proven SJS/TEN and real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to assess for the presence of CYP2C19*2. Results: CYP2C19*2 status was determined in 47 patients. Twenty-nine of these 47 patients had a single medication implicated as causing their disease, and eight of these patients were heterozygous or homozygous for CYP2C19*2. There was insufficient evidence to conclude that the presence of CYP2C19*2 is an independent predictor of risk for developing SJS/TEN in our series as a whole. This analysis also confirmed that the frequency of the CYP2C19*2 polymorphism within the different ethnicities in our series did not vary statistically from reported ethnic

  1. Influence of paraoxonase-1 Q192R and cytochrome P450 2C19 polymorphisms on clopidogrel response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li L

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Rolf P Kreutz1,2, Perry Nystrom2, Yvonne Kreutz2, Jia Miao2, Zeruesenay Desta2, Jeffrey A Breall1, Lang Li2, ChienWei Chiang2, Richard Kovacs1, David A Flockhart2, Yan Jin21Krannert Institute of Cardiology, 2Division of Clinical Pharmacology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN, USABackground: The metabolic activation of clopidogrel is a two-step process. It has been suggested that paraoxonase-1 (PON1 is a rate-limiting enzyme in the conversion of 2-oxo-clopidogrel to an active thiol metabolite. Conflicting results have been reported in regard to (1 the association of a common polymorphism of PON1 (Q192R with reduced rates of coronary stent thrombosis in patients taking clopidogrel and (2 its effects on platelet inhibition in patient populations of European descent. Methods: Blood samples from 151 subjects of mixed racial background with established coronary artery disease and who received clopidogrel were analyzed. Platelet aggregation was determined with light transmittance aggregometry and VerifyNow® P2Y12 assay. Genotyping for cytochrome P450 2C19 (CYP2C19*2 and *3 and PON1 (Q192R polymorphisms was performed.Results: Carriers of CYP2C19*2 alleles exhibited lower levels of platelet inhibition and higher on-treatment platelet aggregation than noncarriers. There was no significant difference in platelet aggregation among PON1 Q192R genotypes. Homozygous carriers of the wild-type variant of PON1 (QQ192 had similar on-treatment platelet reactivity to carriers of increased-function variant alleles during maintenance clopidogrel dosing, as well as after administration of a clopidogrel 600 mg loading dose.Conclusion: CYP2C19*2 allele is associated with impaired platelet inhibition by clopidogrel and high on-treatment platelet aggregation. PON1 (Q192R polymorphism does not appear to be a significant determinant of clopidogrel response.Keywords: PON1, platelet, aggregation, cytochrome P450 enzymes

  2. Dosimetric advancement of high-dose-rate after-loading 192Ir source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Shuxu; Li Wenhua; Xu Hairong

    2004-01-01

    High-dose-rate (HDR) 192 Ir source is a nuclide commonly used in the brachytherapy system. The basic dosimetry data of the near source area is usually measured by pin ion chambers or TLD techniques, but these methods have a lower spatial resolution than Electron spin resonance (ESR) dosimetry which has a spatial resolution of 156 μm, and the Monte Carlo photon transport simulations are taken as the golden standard of those measures. The precision in two-dimensional dose distribution measured by GafChromic film is reported to be 1.0%. In vivo dosimetry using TLD during HDR intracavitary after-loading brachytherapy is a good predictor of late rectal complications. The accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) Fricke-gel dosimetry for three-dimensional dose distribution is about 2.5% with a spatial resolution of 1.56 mm. The optical computed tomography polymer gel dosimetry has a unique advance than MRI gel dosimetry

  3. Radiation dose evaluation for hypothetical accident with transport package containing Iridium-192 source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trontl, K.; Bace, M.; Pevec, D.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to evaluate dose rates for a hypothetical accident with transport package containing Iridium-192 source and to design additional shielding necessary for the safe unloading of the container, assuming that during the unloading process the whole contents of a radioactive source is unshielded and that the operation is going to take place at the site where a working area exists in the vicinity of the unloading location. Based on the calculated radiation dose rates, a single arrangement of the additional concrete shields necessary for reduction of the gamma dose rates to the permitted level is proposed. The proposed solution is optimal considering safety on one hand and costs on the other.(author)

  4. Leach test of six 192-iridium pellets based on the IAEA 'special form' test procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, G.; Gerdingh, R.

    1981-07-01

    The designation 'special form' may be applied to indispersible solid radioactive material if the material meets the requirements of the tests described in the International Atomic Energy Agency Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Type Materials. This report presents the procedures and results of a leach test performed as specified in the regulations on 6 'as received' active 192-iridium pellets. Mechanical tests were not carried out prior to or following the leach test. The activity of each of the first 6 water baths was found to be between 2.3 and 12.6 μCi, (8.5 x 10 4 and 4.7 x 10 5 Bq) and of the second 6, between 1.3 to 6.0 μCi, (4.8 x 10 4 to 2.2 x 10 5 Bq) thus exceeding the allowable limit

  5. Preliminary results of interstitial [sup 192]Ir brachytherapy for malignant gliomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, Kengo; Nakagawa, Minoru; Higashi, Hisato [Okayama Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine; and others

    1992-09-01

    Twenty-six patients with recurrent or unremovable malignant gliomas were treated by interstitial brachytherapy with iridium-192 seeds. Stereotactic implantation of the afterloading catheters using the Brown-Roberts-Wells computed tomography (CT)-guided stereotactic system was performed in 24 patients and surgical CT, magnetic resonance imaging, and clinical examination. Tumor regression was seen in 17 patients 1-3 months after implantation. Tumor progression was seen in only three patients. After interstitial brachytherapy, the most commonly observed CT finding was central low density. Median survival time was 18 months after implantation. Autopsies in five patients revealed the delayed effects of radiation injury such as typical vascular changes, microcalcification, and coagulative necrosis in the implant area and tumor recurrence at the periphery. The results suggest that brachytherapy is not curative but prolonged the median survival time by 6 months. (author).

  6. Wall Thickness Measurement Of Insulated Pipe By Tangential Radiography Technique Using Ir 192

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soedarjo

    2000-01-01

    Insulation pipe wall thickness by tangential radiography technique has been carried out using 41 Curie Iridium 192 source has activity for two carbon steel pipes. The outer diameter of the first pipe is 90 mm, wall thickness is 75.0 mm, source film film distance is 609.5 mm, source tangential point of insulation is 489.5 mm and exposure time 3 minute and 25 second. From the calculation, the first pipe thickness is found to be 12.54 mm and for the second pipe is 8.42 mm. The thickness is due to inaccuracy in reading the pipe thickness on radiography film and the geometry distortion radiation path

  7. Applicability of a prototype for determination of absorbed dose using brachytherapy equipment with Ir-192 sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Vivianne Lucia Bormann; Almeida, Mayara Gabriella Oliveira de; Vieira, Rafaela Etelvina de Amorim; Silva, Waldecy Ananias da; Nascimento, Rizia Keila

    2014-01-01

    This work aims at the development and improvement of a device to perform the absolute dosimetry sources of Ir-192 using the Fricke solution contained in a flask. The Fricke solution used was prepared using amounts of ferrous ammonium sulfate, sodium chloride and sulfuric acid, diluted with water tri distilled pre-established in the literature. The spectrophotometer used was a UV-VIS spectrophotometer (Beckman DU-640 Counter) for measuring the optical density at wavelength 304 nm. The calculation for determining the radial dose takes into account the radial distance and the angle formed with the transverse axis of the source. As the results obtained can be seen that the states of Pernambuco, Ceara, Paraiba e Piaui are in accordance with the recommendations of international standards of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), which considers not acceptable a difference greater than 5% of prescribed dose and measured dose

  8. Use of Ir192 interstitial brachytherapy for an equine malignant dermal schwannoma : clinical communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.N. Saulez

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available A 10-year-old Hanoverian mare was evaluated for a right buccal swelling that recurred 3 months following surgical resection. Ultrasonographic examination showed a broadly pedunculated subcutaneous mass at the level of 106-109 and 406-409 cheek teeth associated with an erosive mucosal lesion on the inside of the cheek. Histological examination of a biopsy specimen revealed a well-demarcated, malignant, dermal schwannoma. Following subcutaneous placement of platinum coated Ir192 wires under general anaesthesia, low-dose radiation of 5 gray per day was delivered for 14 days. Short-term complications included loss of patency of the right nasolacrimal duct, erythema, dermatitis, leukotrichia and left-sided deviation of the muzzle. Ten months later, there has been no tumour recurrence. Findings suggest that the use of interstitial brachytherapy should be considered for a malignant, dermal schwannoma that has recurred or is not amenable to surgery.

  9. Transpapillary iridium-192 wire in the treatment of malignant bile duct obstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levitt, M.D.; Laurence, B.H.; Cameron, F.; Klemp, P.F.B.

    1988-01-01

    Twenty four patients with malignant bile duct obstruction were treated with intraluminal radiotherapy using iridium-192 wire inserted through an endoscopically placed nasobiliary catheter. Biliary drainage after treatment was maintained by an endoprosthesis. The median dose of intraluminal radiotherapy was 6000 cGy; two patients with cholangiocarcinoma were given a second course because of disease extension; four patients with pancreatic carcinoma received additional external irradiation (3000 cGy). There was one early death from a cerebrovascular accident (30 day mortality, 4.2%). Cholangitis (30%) was the major early complication and stent blockage (40%) the major late complication; there were no complications directly attributable to radiotherapy. The median survival for patients with pancreatic carcinoma was 250 days and for cholangiocarcinoma, 300 days. This method is technically feasible and may prove safer than the transhepatic technique. The ability of intraluminal irradiation to improve palliation or lengthen survival in patients with malignant bile duct obstruction remains uncertain. (author)

  10. Safety Analysis Report for Primary Capsule of Ir-192 Radiation Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J. C.; Bang, K. S.; Choi, W. S.; Seo, K. S.; Son, K. J.; Park, W. J.

    2008-12-01

    All of the source capsules to transport a special form radioactive material should be designed and fabricated in accordance with the design criteria prescribed in IAEA standards and domestic regulations. The objective of this project is to prove the safety of a primary capsule for Ir-192 radiation source which produced in the HANARO. The safety tests of primary capsules were carried out for the impact, percussion and heat conditions. And leakage tests were carried out before and after the each tests. The capsule showed slight scratches and their deformations were not found after each tests. It also met the allowable limits of leakage rate after each test. Therefore, it has been verified that the capsule was designed and fabricated to meet all requirements for the special form radioactive materials

  11. Limits of Gaussian fluctuations in the cosmic microwave background at 19.2 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boughn, S. P.; Cheng, E. S.; Cottingham, D. A.; Fixsen, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    The Northern Hemisphere data from the 19.2 GHz full sky survey are analyzed to place limits on the magnitude of Gaussian fluctuations in the cosmic microwave background implied by a variety of correlation functions. Included among the models tested are the monochromatic and Gaussian-shaped families, and those with power-law spectra for n values between -2 and 1. An upper bound is placed on the quadrupole anisotropy of Delta T/T less than 3.2 x 10 exp -5 rms, and an upper bound on scale-invariant (n = 1) fluctuations of a2 less than 4.5 x 10 exp -5 (95 percent confidence level). There is significant contamination of these data from Galactic emission, and improvement of the modeling of the Galaxy could yield a significant reduction of these upper bounds.

  12. Standardization of iridium-192 coiled source in terms of air kerma output

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shanta, A.; Unnikrishnan, K.; Tripathi, U.B.; Kannan, A.; Iyer, P.S.

    1996-01-01

    ICRU (1985) recommended that the output of gamma ray brachytherapy sources should be specified in terms of reference air kerma rate, defined as the kerma rate to air in air at a reference distance of 1 meter, perpendicular to the long axis of the source, corrected for air attenuation and scattering. As these measurements are difficult to carry out in the routine clinical use, it is the common practice to calibrate the re-entrant ionization chamber with respect to open air measurements and use the re-entrant chamber for routine measurements. This paper reports on the measurements carried out to correlate the nominal activity and air kerma rate of 192 Ir wire sources supplied by the Board of Radiation and Isotope Technology, Department of Atomic Energy. (author). 3 refs, 1 tab

  13. Standardization of iridium-192 coiled source in terms of air kerma output

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shanta, A; Unnikrishnan, K; Tripathi, U B; Kannan, A; Iyer, P S [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India)

    1996-08-01

    ICRU (1985) recommended that the output of gamma ray brachytherapy sources should be specified in terms of reference air kerma rate, defined as the kerma rate to air in air at a reference distance of 1 meter, perpendicular to the long axis of the source, corrected for air attenuation and scattering. As these measurements are difficult to carry out in the routine clinical use, it is the common practice to calibrate the re-entrant ionization chamber with respect to open air measurements and use the re-entrant chamber for routine measurements. This paper reports on the measurements carried out to correlate the nominal activity and air kerma rate of {sup 192}Ir wire sources supplied by the Board of Radiation and Isotope Technology, Department of Atomic Energy. (author). 3 refs, 1 tab.

  14. Transpapillary iridium-192 wire in the treatment of malignant bile duct obstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levitt, M D; Laurence, B H; Cameron, F; Klemp, P F.B.

    1988-02-01

    Twenty four patients with malignant bile duct obstruction were treated with intraluminal radiotherapy using iridium-192 wire inserted through an endoscopically placed nasobiliary catheter. Biliary drainage after treatment was maintained by an endoprosthesis. The median dose of intraluminal radiotherapy was 6000 cGy; two patients with cholangiocarcinoma were given a second course because of disease extension; four patients with pancreatic carcinoma received additional external irradiation (3000 cGy). There was one early death from a cerebrovascular accident (30 day mortality, 4.2%). Cholangitis (30%) was the major early complication and stent blockage (40%) the major late complication; there were no complications directly attributable to radiotherapy. The median survival for patients with pancreatic carcinoma was 250 days and for cholangiocarcinoma, 300 days. This method is technically feasible and may prove safer than the transhepatic technique. The ability of intraluminal irradiation to improve palliation or lengthen survival in patients with malignant bile duct obstruction remains uncertain.

  15. Fusion and quasifission studies for the 40Ca+186W,192Os reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, E.; Hinde, D. J.; Williams, E.; Dasgupta, M.; Carter, I. P.; Cook, K. J.; Jeung, D. Y.; Luong, D. H.; Palshetkar, C. S.; Rafferty, D. C.; Ramachandran, K.; Simenel, C.; Wakhle, A.

    2017-09-01

    Background: All elements above atomic number 113 have been synthesized using hot fusion reactions with calcium beams on statically deformed actinide target nuclei. Quasifission and fusion-fission are the two major mechanisms responsible for the very low production cross sections of superheavy elements. Purpose: To achieve a quantitative measurement of capture and quasifission characteristics as a function of beam energy in reactions forming heavy compound systems using calcium beams as projectiles. Methods: Fission fragment mass-angle distributions were measured for the two reactions 40Ca+186W and 40C+192Os, populating 226Pu and 232Cm compound nuclei, respectively, using the Heavy Ion Accelerator Facility and CUBE spectrometer at the Australian National University. Mass ratio distributions, angular distributions, and total fission cross sections were obtained from the experimental data. Simulations to match the features of the experimental mass-angle distributions were performed using a classical phenomenological approach. Results: Both 40Ca+186W and 40C+192Os reactions show strong mass-angle correlations at all energies measured. A maximum fusion probability of 60 -70 % is estimated for the two reactions in the energy range of the present study. Coupled-channels calculations assuming standard Woods-Saxon potential parameters overpredict the capture cross sections. Large nuclear potential diffuseness parameters ˜1.5 fm are required to fit the total capture cross sections. The presence of a weak mass-asymmetric quasifission component attributed to the higher angular momentum events can be reproduced with a shorter average sticking time but longer mass-equilibration time constant. Conclusions: The deduced above-barrier capture cross sections suggest that the dissipative processes are already occurring outside the capture barrier. The mass-angle correlations indicate that a compact shape is not achieved for deformation aligned collisions with lower capture barriers

  16. In-water calibration of PDR 192Ir brachytherapy sources with an NE2571 ionization chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynaert, N.; Verhaegen, F.; Thierens, H.

    1998-01-01

    An ionometric calibration procedure for 192 Ir PDR brachytherapy sources in terms of dose rate to water is presented. The calibration of the source is performed directly in a water phantom at short distances (1.0, 2.5 and 5.0 cm) using an NE2571 Farmer type ion chamber. To convert the measured air-kerma rate in water to dose rate to water a conversion factor (CF) was calculated by adapting the medium-energy x-ray dosimetry protocol for a point source geometry (diverging beam). The obtained CF was verified using two different methods. Firstly, the CF was calculated by Monte Carlo simulations, where the source-ionization chamber geometry was modelled accurately. In a second method, a combination of Monte Carlo simulations and measurements of the air-kerma rate in water (at 1.0, 2.5 and 5.0 cm distance) and in air (1 m distance) was used to determine the CF. The obtained CFs were also compared with conversion factors calculated with the adapted dosimetry protocol for high-energy photons introduced by Toelli. All calculations were done for a Gammamed PDR 192 Ir source-NE2571 chamber geometry. The conversion factors obtained with the four different methods agree to within 1% at the three distances of interest. We obtained the following values (medium-energy x-ray protocol): CF(1 cm) = 1.458; CF(2.5 cm) = 1.162; CF(5.0 cm) = 1.112 (1σ=0.7% for the three distances of interest). The obtained results were checked with TLD measurements. The values of the specific dose rate constant and the radial dose function calculated in this work are in accordance with the literature data. (author)

  17. HDR 192Ir source speed measurements using a high speed video camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonseca, Gabriel P.; Viana, Rodrigo S. S.; Yoriyaz, Hélio; Podesta, Mark; Rubo, Rodrigo A.; Sales, Camila P. de; Reniers, Brigitte; Verhaegen, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The dose delivered with a HDR 192 Ir afterloader can be separated into a dwell component, and a transit component resulting from the source movement. The transit component is directly dependent on the source speed profile and it is the goal of this study to measure accurate source speed profiles. Methods: A high speed video camera was used to record the movement of a 192 Ir source (Nucletron, an Elekta company, Stockholm, Sweden) for interdwell distances of 0.25–5 cm with dwell times of 0.1, 1, and 2 s. Transit dose distributions were calculated using a Monte Carlo code simulating the source movement. Results: The source stops at each dwell position oscillating around the desired position for a duration up to (0.026 ± 0.005) s. The source speed profile shows variations between 0 and 81 cm/s with average speed of ∼33 cm/s for most of the interdwell distances. The source stops for up to (0.005 ± 0.001) s at nonprogrammed positions in between two programmed dwell positions. The dwell time correction applied by the manufacturer compensates the transit dose between the dwell positions leading to a maximum overdose of 41 mGy for the considered cases and assuming an air-kerma strength of 48 000 U. The transit dose component is not uniformly distributed leading to over and underdoses, which is within 1.4% for commonly prescribed doses (3–10 Gy). Conclusions: The source maintains its speed even for the short interdwell distances. Dose variations due to the transit dose component are much lower than the prescribed treatment doses for brachytherapy, although transit dose component should be evaluated individually for clinical cases

  18. Fungal endocarditis in paediatrics: a review of 192 cases (1971-2016).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesan, Vithiya; Ponnusamy, Shunmuga Sundaram; Sundaramurthy, Raja

    2017-10-01

    The aims of this article were to review the published literature on fungal endocarditis in children and to discuss the aetiology and diagnosis, with emphasis on non-invasive methods and various treatment regimes. We systematically reviewed published cases and case series of fungal endocarditis in children. We searched the literature, including PubMed and individual references for publications of original articles, single cases, or case series of paediatric fungal endocarditis, with the following keywords: "fungal endocarditis", "neonates", "infants", "child", and "cardiac vegetation". There have been 192 documented cases of fungal endocarditis in paediatrics. The highest number of cases was reported in infants (93/192, 48%) including 60 in neonates. Of the neonatal cases, 57 were premature with a median gestational age of 27 weeks and median birth weight of 860 g. Overall, 120 yeast - fungus that grows as a single cell - infections and 43 mould - fungus that grows in multicellular filaments, hyphae - infections were reported. With increasing age, there was an increased infection rate with moulds. All the yeast infections were detected by blood culture. In cases with mould infection, diagnosis was mainly established by culture or histology of emboli or infected valves after invasive surgical procedures. There have been a few recent cases of successful early diagnosis by non-invasive methods such as blood polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for moulds. The overall mortality for paediatric fungal endocarditis was 56.25%. The most important cause of death was cardiac complications due to heart failure. Among the various treatment regimens used, none of them was significantly associated with better outcome. Non-invasive methods such as PCR tests can be used to improve the chances of detecting and identifying the aetiological agent in a timely manner. Delays in the diagnosis of these infections may result in high mortality and morbidity. No significant difference was noted

  19. Development of the doubly sealed Ir192 sources for industrial applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munoz, C.; Sabio Calvett, Manuel; Bianchi, Daniel R.; Banchik, Abraham D.; Mender, Alberto; Gonzalez, Alfredo J.

    2003-01-01

    A Program for Developing Double Sealed Irradiation Sources for industrial and medical applications is in progress at the Argentine Atomic Energy Commission. The present work describes the mechanical and metallurgical procedures for designing and welding dummy capsules of the two types that are required for making double sealed Ir 192 industrial sources with the designation ISO/98/C43515 according to ISO 2919 and leak tight according to ISO/98/9978 standards. That is part of a Project with INVAP company. Four different models, including the typical international model, were designed, machined and TIG-welded. Both the internal and external capsules and the end caps were made from AISI 316L stainless steel. Two types of welding station were made. In the first one the 'end cap' was welded to the capsule keeping the torch and the capsule fixed (stationary process), while in the second type the capsule rotates around its own axes during the process (out of cell dynamic semiautomatic controlled process). The welding parameters for the second welding process were selected from the different parameters used to process 120 'international type' capsules. All the processed units were subject to a visual inspection, 85% of them were considered acceptable, while the rest were rejected because of having, at naked eyes and/or under magnification glasses, different types of welding defects. Metallographic examination of the microstructure at the welding seam and the matrix were made in welded unit selected at random from different lots of all processed units in order to determine the penetration of the weld and the microstructure of the weld seam. Present results are encouraging enough to consider to start with the next step, where the capsules are process inside a 'hot cell' and with a Ir 192 foil inside the inner capsule to reproduce actual fabrication conditions. (author)

  20. Paraoxonase 1 Q192R (PON1-192) polymorphism is associated with reduced lipid peroxidation in healthy young men on a low-carotenoid diet supplemented with tomato juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bub, Achim; Barth, Stephan W; Watzl, Bernhard; Briviba, Karlis; Rechkemmer, Gerhard

    2005-03-01

    The HDL-bound enzyme paraoxonase (PON) protects LDL from oxidation and may therefore attenuate the development of atherosclerosis. We examined the effect of tomato and carrot juice consumption on PON1 activity and lipid peroxidation in healthy young volunteers with different PON1-192 genotypes (Q/R substitution at position 192). In this randomized cross-over study twenty-two healthy, non-smoking men on a low-carotenoid diet received 330 ml/d tomato juice (37.0 mg lycopene, 1.6 mg beta-carotene) or carrot juice (27.1 mg beta-carotene, 13.1 mg alpha-carotene) for 2 weeks. Intervention periods were preceded by 2-week low-carotenoid intake. We determined the PON1-192 genotype by restriction fragment length polymorphism-polymerase chain reaction (RFLP-PCR) and measured ex vivo LDL oxidation (lag time), plasma malondialdehyde and PON1 activity at the beginning and end of each intervention period. At baseline, lag time was higher (Pjuice consumption had significant effects on PON1 activity. However, tomato juice consumption reduced (Pjuice had no significant effect on malondialdehyde irrespective of the PON1-192 genotype. Male volunteers with the QR/RR genotype showed an increased lipid peroxidation at baseline. Although tomato and carrot juice fail to affect PON1 activity, tomato juice intake reduced lipid peroxidation in healthy volunteers carrying the R-allele of the PON1-192 genotype and could thus contribute to CVD risk reduction in these individuals.

  1. Muscle invasive bladder cancer treated by transurethral resection, followed by external beam radiation and interstitial iridium-192

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Wijnmaalen (Arendjan); P.A. Helle (Peter); P.C.M. Koper (Peter); P.P. Jansen (Peter); P. Hanssens (Patrick); C.G.G. Boeken Kruger (Cornelis); W.L.J. van Putten (Wim)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: To evaluate the results of transurethral resection (TUR), external beam radiotherapy (EBRT), and interstitial radiation (IRT) with iridium-192, using the afterloading technique in patients with muscle invasive bladder cancer. Methods and Materials: From May 1989 until September

  2. 49 CFR 192.7 - What documents are incorporated by reference partly or wholly in this part?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... “Recommended Practice 1165 “Recommended Practice for Pipeline SCADA Displays,” (API RP 1165) (First edition..., effective March 1, 1997) § 192.65(b). (4) ANSI/API Specification 6D, “Specification for Pipeline Valves..., Appendix B. (7) API Recommended Practice 1162, “Public Awareness Programs for Pipeline Operators,” (1st...

  3. 49 CFR 192.913 - When may an operator deviate its program from certain requirements of this subpart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Gas Transmission Pipeline Integrity Management § 192.913 When may an operator deviate its program...

  4. 49 CFR 192.1013 - When may an operator deviate from required periodic inspections under this part?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Gas Distribution Pipeline Integrity Management (IM) § 192.1013 When may an operator...

  5. Maternal exposure to floricultural work during pregnancy, PON1 Q192R polymorphisms and the risk of low birth weight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno-Banda, G.; Blanco-Munoz, J. [Population Health Research Center, National Institute of Public Health, Avenida Universidad 655, Colonia Santa Maria Ahuacatitlan, 62508 Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Lacasana, M., E-mail: marina.lacasana.easp@juntadeandalucia.es [Andalusian School of Public Health, Campus Universitario de la Cartuja, Cuesta del Observatorio, 4, 18080 Granada (Spain); CIBER of Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBERESP) (Spain); Rothenberg, S.J. [Population Health Research Center, National Institute of Public Health, Avenida Universidad 655, Colonia Santa Maria Ahuacatitlan, 62508 Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Center of Research and Advanced Studies, National Institute Polytechnic, Department of Toxicology, Av, Instituto Politecnico Nacional No. 2508, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, Deleg. Gustavo A. Madero, 07360 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Aguilar-Garduno, C. [Andalusian School of Public Health, Campus Universitario de la Cartuja, Cuesta del Observatorio, 4, 18080 Granada (Spain); Andalusian Observatory of Environmental Health, Campus Universitario de la Cartuja, Cuesta del Observatorio, 4, 18080 Granada (Spain); Gamboa, R. [Department of Physiology, National Institute of Cardiology ' Ignacio Chavez' , Juan Badiano 4, Section XVI, 14080, Mexico DF (Mexico); Perez-Mendez, O. [Department of Molecular Biology and cardiovascular Diseases Genomic and Proteomic, National Institute of Cardiology ' Ignacio Chavez' , Juan Badiano 4, Section XVI, 14080, Mexico DF (Mexico)

    2009-10-15

    Background: Although there is evidence from animal studies of impaired reproductive function by exposure to organophosphates (OP), the effects on birth weight have not been sufficiently evaluated in epidemiological studies. Paraoxonase (PON1) detoxifies organophosphates by cleavage of active oxons. Some PON1 gene polymorphisms could reduce the enzyme activity and increase susceptibility to OP toxicity. Objective: To assess the association between maternal exposure to floriculture during pregnancy and the risk of low birth weight (< 2500 g) in their offspring, as well as to evaluate the interaction between this exposure and maternal genotype for PON1 Q192R polymorphisms. Materials and methods: A cross sectional study was carried out in two Mexican states (States of Mexico and Morelos) with high frequencies of greenhouse activity. We interviewed and collected blood samples from 264 females (floriculturists or partners of floricultural workers) who became pregnant during the 10 years prior to the interview. The questionnaire measured socioeconomic characteristics, tobacco and alcohol consumption, diseases and occupational and reproductive history. We also applied a food frequency questionnaire. Information was obtained pertaining to 467 pregnancies. DNA was extracted from white cells, and PON1 genotype was determined by Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism for Q192R polymorphisms. Results were analyzed with generalized estimating equations models. Results: After adjusting for potential confounders, we detected a statistically significant interaction between maternal exposure to flower growing work during pregnancy and PON1 Q192R polymorphisms on risk of low birth weight. The risk of having a baby with LBW is nearly six times higher if a mother is a floriculture worker during pregnancy and has PON1 192RR genotype (OR 5.93, 95% CI 1.28, 27.5). Conclusion: These results suggest that the interaction between maternal floriculture work during pregnancy and 192RR PON1

  6. Balloon-based adjuvant radiotherapy in breast cancer: comparison between {sup 99m}Tc and HDR {sup 192}Ir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, Tarcisio Passos Ribeiro de; Lima, Carla Flavia de; Cuperschmid, Ethel Mizrahy, E-mail: tprcampos@pq.cnpq.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2016-03-15

    Objective: To perform a comparative dosimetric analysis, based on computer simulations, of temporary balloon implants with {sup 99m}Tc and balloon brachytherapy with high-dose-rate (HDR) {sup 192}Ir, as boosts to radiotherapy. We hypothesized that the two techniques would produce equivalent doses under pre-established conditions of activity and exposure time. Materials and methods: simulations of implants with {sup 99m}Tc-filled and HDR {sup 192}Ir-filled balloons were performed with the Siscodes/MCNP5, modeling in voxels a magnetic resonance imaging set related to a young female. Spatial dose rate distributions were determined. In the dosimetric analysis of the protocols, the exposure time and the level of activity required were specified. Results: the {sup 99m}Tc balloon presented a weighted dose rate in the tumor bed of 0.428 cGy.h{sup -1}.mCi{sup -1} and 0.190 cGyh{sup -1} at the balloon surface and at 8-10 mm from the surface, respectively, compared with 0.499 and 0.150 cGyh{sup -1}.mCi{sup -1}, respectively, for the HDR {sup 192}Ir balloon. An exposure time of 24 hours was required for the {sup 99m}Tc balloon to produce a boost of 10.14 Gy with 1.0 Ci, whereas only 24 minutes with 10.0 Ci segments were required for the HDR {sup 192}Ir balloon to produce a boost of 5.14 Gy at the same reference point, or 10.28 Gy in two 24-minutes fractions. Conclusion: temporary {sup 99m}Tc balloon implantation is an attractive option for adjuvant radiotherapy in breast cancer, because of its availability, economic viability, and similar dosimetry in comparison with the use of HDR {sup 192}Ir balloon implantation, which is the current standard in clinical practice. (author)

  7. Balloon-based adjuvant radiotherapy in breast cancer: comparison between 99mTc and HDR 192Ir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarcísio Passos Ribeiro de Campos

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To perform a comparative dosimetric analysis, based on computer simulations, of temporary balloon implants with 99mTc and balloon brachytherapy with high-dose-rate (HDR 192Ir, as boosts to radiotherapy. We hypothesized that the two techniques would produce equivalent doses under pre-established conditions of activity and exposure time. Materials and Methods: Simulations of implants with 99mTc-filled and HDR 192Ir-filled balloons were performed with the Siscodes/MCNP5, modeling in voxels a magnetic resonance imaging set related to a young female. Spatial dose rate distributions were determined. In the dosimetric analysis of the protocols, the exposure time and the level of activity required were specified. Results: The 99mTc balloon presented a weighted dose rate in the tumor bed of 0.428 cGy.h-1.mCi-1 and 0.190 cGyh-1.mCi-1 at the balloon surface and at 8-10 mm from the surface, respectively, compared with 0.499 and 0.150 cGyh-1.mCi-1, respectively, for the HDR 192Ir balloon. An exposure time of 24 hours was required for the 99mTc balloon to produce a boost of 10.14 Gy with 1.0 Ci, whereas only 24 minutes with 10.0 Ci segments were required for the HDR 192Ir balloon to produce a boost of 5.14 Gy at the same reference point, or 10.28 Gy in two 24-minutes fractions. Conclusion: Temporary 99mTc balloon implantation is an attractive option for adjuvant radiotherapy in breast cancer, because of its availability, economic viability, and similar dosimetry in comparison with the use of HDR 192Ir balloon implantation, which is the current standard in clinical practice.

  8. Maternal exposure to floricultural work during pregnancy, PON1 Q192R polymorphisms and the risk of low birth weight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno-Banda, G.; Blanco-Munoz, J.; Lacasana, M.; Rothenberg, S.J.; Aguilar-Garduno, C.; Gamboa, R.; Perez-Mendez, O.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Although there is evidence from animal studies of impaired reproductive function by exposure to organophosphates (OP), the effects on birth weight have not been sufficiently evaluated in epidemiological studies. Paraoxonase (PON1) detoxifies organophosphates by cleavage of active oxons. Some PON1 gene polymorphisms could reduce the enzyme activity and increase susceptibility to OP toxicity. Objective: To assess the association between maternal exposure to floriculture during pregnancy and the risk of low birth weight (< 2500 g) in their offspring, as well as to evaluate the interaction between this exposure and maternal genotype for PON1 Q192R polymorphisms. Materials and methods: A cross sectional study was carried out in two Mexican states (States of Mexico and Morelos) with high frequencies of greenhouse activity. We interviewed and collected blood samples from 264 females (floriculturists or partners of floricultural workers) who became pregnant during the 10 years prior to the interview. The questionnaire measured socioeconomic characteristics, tobacco and alcohol consumption, diseases and occupational and reproductive history. We also applied a food frequency questionnaire. Information was obtained pertaining to 467 pregnancies. DNA was extracted from white cells, and PON1 genotype was determined by Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism for Q192R polymorphisms. Results were analyzed with generalized estimating equations models. Results: After adjusting for potential confounders, we detected a statistically significant interaction between maternal exposure to flower growing work during pregnancy and PON1 Q192R polymorphisms on risk of low birth weight. The risk of having a baby with LBW is nearly six times higher if a mother is a floriculture worker during pregnancy and has PON1 192RR genotype (OR 5.93, 95% CI 1.28, 27.5). Conclusion: These results suggest that the interaction between maternal floriculture work during pregnancy and 192RR PON1

  9. Vascular brachytherapy with 90Sr/Y versus 192Ir: A health physics perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elder, E.S.; Butker, E.K.; Miner, M.S.; Wang, C.K.; Crocker, I.R.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Currently there are two ongoing trials of catheter based radiation therapy in the United States, the BERT Trial (Emory University, Atlanta, GA) and the SCRIPPS Trial (Scripps Clinic, La Jolla, CA). The BERT method involved the use of a treatment system to manually deliver a source train consisting of 12, encapsulated 90 Sr/Y seeds of 3 cm total active length. The total activity of the source train was approximately 3.7 GBq. The SCRIPPS trial involved the use of a hand delivered 192 Ir (BEST Industries) source train of either 5 or 9 sources with 1 mm spacing between the sources. The average total activity of the source train was 3.6 GBq ± 1.08 GBq. It is the purpose of this study to compare the patient dose and staff exposures from the above source trains. A comparison with exposures from use of fluoroscopy in the catheterization laboratory will also be made. Materials and Methods: Measurements made with a GM meter at specified locations around the BERT patients during the insertion of the seeds were compared with published information from the SCRIPPS Trial. Monte Carlo modeled measurements of the equivalent dose in humans from insertion of the source trains were also compared for both methods. The above were contrasted with GM measurements from use of fluoroscopy in the catheterization laboratory. Results: Average exposure rates recorded at the patient's chest and groin from the BERT method were 4.9x10 -4 and 1.29x10 -4 C/kg·hr respectively. Average exposures to the operator from the BERT method and the SCRIPPS method were 8.6x10 -6 and 1.03x10 -3 C/kg respectively. A typical exposure rate for conventional cardiac fluoroscopy is 3.9x10 -3 C/kg·hr. Monte Carlo modeled calculations of patient dose equivalent for the BERT method and the SCRIPPS method were 0.43 μSv and 6.41 mSv respectively. Conclusions: Vascular brachytherapy performed with 90 Sr/Y sources resulted in staff exposures of at least a factor of 120 less and patient doses of a factor of

  10. Paraoxonase polymorphisms PON1 192 and 55 and longevity in Italian centenarians and Irish nonagenarians. A pooled analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rea, Irene M; McKeown, Pascal P; McMaster, Dorothy; Young, Ian S; Patterson, Chris; Savage, Maurice J; Belton, Christine; Marchegiani, Francesca; Olivieri, Fabiola; Bonafe, Massimiliano; Franceschi, Claudio

    2004-04-01

    PON1, an arylesterase, associated with high density lipoprotein (HDL), protects low density lipoprotein (LDL) against oxidative modification. Common polymorphisms PON1 55 (L/M) and 192 (Q/R) in the PON1 gene associate with atherosclerosis and heart disease. Because long-lived people seem protected from premature vascular death, we conducted a pooled statistical analysis to assess any association between these polymorphisms and longevity in a large combined group of Italian centenarians and octo/nonagenarians from Northern Ireland (NI). Separated DNA was available from 1479 subjects from Italy and Northern Ireland (NI). In Italy 308 centenarians (males 67, females 241, mean age 100.8, SD2.1 years) and 579 young controls (males 347, females 232, mean age 40.7, SD 12.7 years) were included in the study. In NI, 296 octo/nonagenarians (males 92, females 204, mean age 89.8, SD 5.7 years) and 296 young sex-matched subjects (mean age 13.0, SD 1.4 years) had available DNA. PON1 55 (L/M) and 192 (Q/R) polymorphisms were studied using a PCR-RFLP approach. There was a significant difference in PON1 192 genotypes in Italian centenarians compared to younger controls (X(2)= 6.8, df = 2 p= 0.03) and a similar but non significant trend between octo/nonagenarian and young subjects in NI (X(2) = 4.0, df=2, p=0.14). Using logistic regression analysis on the combined Italian and Irish datasets, there was a small survival advantage for centenarian and octo/nonagenarian subjects who were heterozygous for PON1 192 R allele, (OR 1.3, CI 1-1.6; p=0.04 with a stepwise increase for RR homozygous subjects (OR 1.7, CI 1.1-2.6; p = 0.02) compared to QQ subjects. Comparing R and Q alleles there was a survival advantage for octo/nonagenarian/centenarian subjects who carried the R allele (OR 1.3, CI 1.1-1.5; p = 0.007) but there was no sex-specific effect p =0.77) LL, LM and MM genotypes of PON 55 polymorphisms showed similar frequencies in Italy (39.9, 47.0, 13.1%) and Ireland (39.5, 48.6, 11

  11. Limitations of Ir{sup 192} as a Radiographic Source for the Control of Reactor Pressure-Vessels; Limitations de {sup 192}Ir en Tant que Source pour l'Examen Radiographique des Caissons Etanches de Reacteurs; Nedostatki Iridiya-192 v kachestveradiograficheskogo istochnika dlya kontrolya za korpusami reaktorov vysokogodavleniya; Limitaciones del {sup 192}Ir como Fuente Radiografica en el Control de Recipientes de Presion para Reactores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horvat, D. [Nuclear Institute ' ' J. Stefan' ' Ljubljana, Yugoslavia (Slovenia)

    1965-09-15

    Published data and the results of our own investigations have shown that the advantage of Ir{sup 192} with regard to the quality of radiographs is obvious when comparing it with Co{sup 60} even with thicknesses over 80 mm of irradiated steel. The application of Ir{sup 192} in practice is limited by the alternative: either a very long exposure time or a source of very high activity. Where the exposure (Ci. min) for 1 m of radiographed weld is plotted against the specific activity of the source, diagrams show that, for practically attainable specific activities kilo-curie sources must be used for greater thicknesses. For such sources, self-absorption may become an important factor. An analysis of the influence of self-absorption causing a reduction of the source effectiveness and the filtration effect in the source is made by determining an equivalent increase of thickness of irradiated steel and by calculating the effective linear absorption coefficient as a function of the source dimensions and the thickness of the irradiated steel. Even in cases of relatively large source dimensions the filtration effect does not diminish the effective linear absorption coefficient to such an extent that the advantage in quality against Co{sup 60} would be lost. Possibilities of improvement due to a new shape of radiographic sources are discussed. In the case of narrow primary beams these new sources give smaller effective dimensions and allow shorter source-to-film distances. A further advantage of Ir{sup 192} is obvious from the diagrams of the weight of the exposure equipment for Ir{sup 192} and Coso taking in account equivalent activities of both sources regarding the same exposure time. The economic disadvantages, because of the short half-life,of Ir{sup 192} are discussed and a rough economical comparison between Co{sup 60} and Ir{sup 192} at different extensiveness and densities of the radiographic control is given. (author) [French] Les donnees publiees et les resultats

  12. Astatine-211 labelled proteins and their stability in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi Changhou; Jin Jannan; Zhang Shuyuan; Wang Ketai; Zhang Dayuan; Zhou Maolun

    1989-01-01

    211 At or 131 I labelled proteins, e.g. 211 At-IgG or 211 At-BSA (bovine serum albumin) were prepared by 211 At reaction with the diazo-compound of para-aminobenzoic acid, which is then conjugated with IgG or BSA via an acylation reaction. The 211 At-carbon bond was found metabolically stable under in vivo conditions. For the labelling of proteins with 211 At or 131 I, other methods of direct oxidation are also described. The results show that for the labelling of proteins with 211 At, high rate of incorporation can be obtained with hydrogen peroxide as oxidant, but the labelling of proteins with 131 I is more favourable with the strong oxidant Chloramine-T. (author) 12 refs.; 6 figs

  13. The alpha-branching ratios of the 188,190,192Pb isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wauters, J.; Dendooven, P.; Decrock, P.; Huyse, M.; Reusen, G.; Duppen, P. van

    1992-01-01

    The α-branching ratios (b α ) of 192,190,188 Pb are measured using mass-separated sources. Different experimental set-ups are used - one detector as well as two detector set-ups - thereby detecting the α particles from the parent and/or via α decay formed daughter nuclei, the β-delayed gamma radiation from the parent and/or via β decay formed daughter nuclei in the Tl KX Rays from electron capture decay. Values for b α of 6.2(6) 10 -5 and 4.0(4) 10 -3 were found for 191,190 Pb respectively. For 188 Pb, limits on the b α values were obtained: 0.03 α α values showed that the discrepancies in the b α values were not due to inadequate correction procedures, as was suggested, but to experimental uncertainties in the efficiency determination of the different detection set-ups and to an unreliable β-decay scheme for 188 Pb. The b α obtained in this work show that the lead α decay is not faster than the Hg α decay and that there is no need to assume a disappearance of the Z=82 shell closure halfway between N=82 and N=126. (orig.)

  14. Dose Distributions of an 192Ir Brachytherapy Source in Different Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. H. Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study used MCNPX code to investigate the brachytherapy 192Ir dose distributions in water, bone, and lung tissue and performed radiophotoluminescent glass dosimeter measurements to verify the obtained MCNPX results. The results showed that the dose-rate constant, radial dose function, and anisotropy function in water were highly consistent with data in the literature. However, the lung dose near the source would be overestimated by up to 12%, if the lung tissue is assumed to be water, and, hence, if a tumor is located in the lung, the tumor dose will be overestimated, if the material density is not taken into consideration. In contrast, the lung dose far from the source would be underestimated by up to 30%. Radial dose functions were found to depend not only on the phantom size but also on the material density. The phantom size affects the radial dose function in bone more than those in the other tissues. On the other hand, the anisotropy function in lung tissue was not dependent on the radial distance. Our simulation results could represent valid clinical reference data and be used to improve the accuracy of the doses delivered during brachytherapy applied to patients with lung cancer.

  15. Monte Carlo characterization of the Gamma-Med Hdr plus Ir-192 brachytherapy source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes, E.; Sosa, M. A.; Gil V, A. [Universidad de Guanajuato, Division de Ciencias e Ingenierias, Av. Insurgentes 2354, 37150 Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico); Monzon, E., E-mail: eric_1985@fisica.ugto.mx [IMSS, Unidad Medica de Alta Especialidad No. 1, Av. Adolfo Lopez Mateos 1813, 37340 Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: The MCNP4C Monte Carlo code was used to simulate the dosimetry around the Gamma-Med Hdr Plus iridium-192 brachytherapy source in both air/vacuum and water environments. Dosimetry data in water was calculated and are presented into an away-along table. All dosimetric quantities recommended by the AAPM Task Group 43 report have been also calculated. These quantities are air kerma strength, dose rate constant, radial dose function and anisotropy function. The obtained data are compared to this source reference data, finding results in good agreement with them. In this study, recommendations of the AAPM TG-43U1 report have been followed and comply with the most recent AAPM and ESTRO physics committee recommendations about Monte Carlo techniques. The data in the present study complement published data and can be used as input in the Tps or as benchmark data to verify the results of the treatment planning systems as well as a means of comparison with other datasets from this source. (Author)

  16. Monte Carlo characterization of the Gamma-Med Hdr plus Ir-192 brachytherapy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyes, E.; Sosa, M. A.; Gil V, A.; Monzon, E.

    2015-10-01

    Full text: The MCNP4C Monte Carlo code was used to simulate the dosimetry around the Gamma-Med Hdr Plus iridium-192 brachytherapy source in both air/vacuum and water environments. Dosimetry data in water was calculated and are presented into an away-along table. All dosimetric quantities recommended by the AAPM Task Group 43 report have been also calculated. These quantities are air kerma strength, dose rate constant, radial dose function and anisotropy function. The obtained data are compared to this source reference data, finding results in good agreement with them. In this study, recommendations of the AAPM TG-43U1 report have been followed and comply with the most recent AAPM and ESTRO physics committee recommendations about Monte Carlo techniques. The data in the present study complement published data and can be used as input in the Tps or as benchmark data to verify the results of the treatment planning systems as well as a means of comparison with other datasets from this source. (Author)

  17. Intraoperative Ir-192 implantation for early breast cancer. Techniques and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansfield, C.M.

    1990-01-01

    Patients with early breast cancer (T1-2 N0-1) can be treated by lumpectomy and irradiation with a local control and survival equal to more radical surgery. Between 1982 and 1988, 323 patients with early breast cancer were treated, when possible, with Ir-192 implants at the time of lumpectomy to a local dose of 2000 cGy in 40-50 hours. Ten to 14 days later, the whole breast was treated to 4500 cGy at 180 per fraction in 5 weeks. The 6-year actuarial survival for stages I and II disease was 98% and 91%, respectively, and the recurrence-free survival was 96% and 98%, respectively. When these 323 patients were evaluated by T status, a local control of 97% was the same for T1 and T2 lesions. The cosmetic results were good to excellent in 95% of the patients. This approach has improved our ability to accurately place the boost dose in the breast

  18. Quality control and enhancement of microwelds for Ir-192 sample holders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, Alcides; Medina, Max; Cavero, Luis

    2013-01-01

    This study shows the micro quality results of tungsten inert gas welds on stainless steel AISI 304 of 5 sample holders for 30 discs by 3 mm diameter and 0.5 mm thick of Ir-192 sources produced in the Radioisotope Production Plant (RPP) of IPEN, generally used in industrial gammagraphy. Macrographic and conventional metallographic analysis were performed to measure the amplitude, thickness and centering parameters of the weld bead, centered data have helped to determine the parameters for welds with good quality, showing defects due to the misaligned glass lens, low magnification image and high visual angle of incidence across the 200 mm security leaded glass giving a low quality weld image due to the low magnification, large chromatic aberration resulting in a weld outside the seam, this problem was solved by changing the old optical visualization system by an external telescope specially designed for this purpose and raising the workbench so that the optical telescope axis and the weld are horizontally, achieving more rapid processes, reliable and reproducible, this new system has proved more convenient, reliable and reproducible. (authors).

  19. Chemical constituents of marine mangrove-derived endophytic fungus Alternaria tenuissima EN-192

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hong; Gao, Shushan; Li, Xiaoming; Li, Chunshun; Wang, Bingui

    2013-03-01

    A chemical investigation of the ethyl acetate extract of the fermentation broth of Alternaria tenuissima EN-192, an endophytic fungus obtained from the stems of the marine mangrove plant Rhizophora stylosa, resulted in the isolation of nine known secondary metabolites, including four indole-diterpenoids: penijanthine A ( 1), paspaline ( 2), paspalinine ( 3), and penitrem A ( 4); three tricycloalternarene derivatives: tricycloalternarene 3a ( 5), tricycloalternarene 1b ( 6), and tricycloalternarene 2b ( 7); and two alternariol congeners: djalonensone ( 8) and alternariol ( 9). The chemical structures of these metabolites were characterized through a combination of detailed spectroscopic analyses and their comparison with reports from the literature. The inhibitory activities of each isolated compound against four bacteria were evaluated and compounds 5 and 8 displayed moderate activity against the aquaculture pathogenic bacterium Vibrio anguillarum, with inhibition zone diameters of 8 and 9 mm, respectively, at 100 μg/disk. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the secondary metabolites of mangrove-derived A lternaria tenuissima and also the first report of the isolation of indole-diterpenoids from fungal genus A lternaria.

  20. Preparation and determination of kerma for Iridium 192 sources of low dose rate for brachytherapy; Preparacion y determinacion del kerma de fuentes de iridio-192 de baja tasa de dosis para braquiterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tendilla, J.I.; Tovar M, V.; Mitsoura, E.; Aguilar H, F.; Alanis M, J. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, C.P. 52045-1, Salazar, Esrado de Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    The practice of Brachytherapy with Iridium-192 sources of low dose rate (0.4 - 0.8 Gy/h) is a technique used in the treatment of diverse illnesses. in this work the preparation, quality control and calibration are presented in terms of kerma in air of Iridium-192 using as target these recycled Iridium-Platinum wires. The targets were obtained as decayed sources of different radio therapeutical centers in the country and they were characterized by Scanning electron microscopy in order to determine their chemical composition. Subsequently it was developed an experimental design to establish the effect of neutron flux, geometrical array and irradiation time over the activity and percentage of the sources homogeneity. The homogeneity was determined by auto radiography and by Gamma spectroscopy. Once the optimal irradiation conditions were established, it is determined the apparent activity and kerma in air using a well type ionization chamber with traceability to a primary laboratory. Iridium-192 sources were obtained with an average homogeneity 96 %, apparent activity 282.129 {+-} 0.531 M Bq and kerma in air 0.03200 {+-} 0.00006 m Gy m/h A. (Author)

  1. Recovery from Iridium-192 flakes of a radioactive source for industrial use after a radiation incident; Recuperacion de hojuelas de Iridio-192 provenientes de una fuente radiactivas de uso industrial despues de un incidente radiologico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz, W.H.; Zapata, L.A., E-mail: wcruz@ipen.gob.pe, E-mail: lzapata@ipen.gob.pe [Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear (GRRA/IPEN), Lima (Peru). Division de Gestion de Residuos Radiactivos

    2013-07-01

    The Iridium-192 ({sup 192}Ir) is the most used and ideal for industrial radiography applications, especially in petrochemical plants and pipelines and provides better contrast sensitivity for thick (25.4 mm). This source has constructive sealed double encapsulation, the internal capsule containing stainless steel to radioactive material in the form of flakes and welded with TIG process. The radiological incident happened at a gas station fuel sales in circumstances in which there was a homogeneity test welds a tank, the flakes or Ir-192 fell off his ponytail and left scattered over an area of 2 m{sup 2}, some fell flat areas and other land so collected in lead shielding and metal container and ground source. Full recovery of the leaflets was performed at the Division of radioactive waste management (GRRA) gaining a total of 22 flakes with no radiation risk to staff performance and installation and the conclusion was reached that the misapplicaion of TIG welding was the main cause the incident. (author)

  2. Intercomparison of calibration procedures of high dose rate 192 Ir sources in Brazil and a proposal of a new methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marechal, M.H.; Almeida, C.E. de

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to report the results of an intercomparison of the calibration procedures for 192 Ir sources presently in use in Brazil and to proposal a calibration procedure to derive the N k for a Farmer type ionization chamber for 192 Ir energy by interpolating from a 60 Co gamma-rays and 250 kV x-rays calibration factors. the intercomparison results were all within ± 3.0 % except one case where 4.6 % was observed and latter identified as a problem with N-k value for X-rays. The method proposed by the present work make possible the improvement of the metrological coherence among the calibration laboratories and their users once the N k values could then provided by any of the members of SSDL network. (Author)

  3. Evaluation of radiation dose on people adjacent to implant patients during brachytherapy for prostate cancer using {sup 192}Ir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Hoon; Ko, Seong Jin; Kang, Se Sik; Kim, Chang Soo [Catholic University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-10-15

    The incidence of prostate cancer is rapidly increasing due to aging of the population and westernization of dietary habits, etc. As a result, the frequency of prostate cancer has become the fifth highest among all male cancers and the first among urological cancers. Brachytherapy is commonly used for locally progressing prostate cancers. Since the mid 1980s, therapies using radio-isotopes, such as low-invasive {sup 125}I, {sup 103}Pd and {sup 192}Ir, have been widely performed in the U.S. and Europe. However, brachytherapy involves implanting radio-isotopes into the human body which is of concern because it may expose the health care professionals administering the therapy to unnecessary radiation. Accordingly, this study intends to predict the radiation dose that people adjacent to patients implanted with a radio-isotope are exposed to during prostate cancer radiation therapy by using a mathematical anthropomorphic phantom and {sup 192}Ir.

  4. Flushing-free film test of "1"9"2Ir accuracy of position and step distance for afterloading systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Feng; Chen Rui; Shang Yunying; Chen Yue; Min Nan; Chen Yingmin; Deng Daping

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To study the method of measuring the position accuracy and the step distance accuracy of afterloading system with "1"9"2Ir source by using flushing-free film. Methods: The position accuracy and the step distance accuracy of a China-made afterloading system with "1"9"2Ir source was measured by using GAFCHROMIC"® EBT"3 flushing-free film. The film was scanned to proper image format, required by dose analysis software, by EPSON PREFACTION V700 PHOTO scanner. Then images are analyzed by using film dose analysis software in SNC Patient 5.2. Results: With focus on the center of active section of source, the position accuracy of this afterloading system with "1"9"2Ir source was -0.75 mm. Using film analysis could make the step point to tell apart if the step distance was 5 mm away by the method of film analysis, but couldnot make it to tell apart if the step distance was 2.5 mm away. The 2.5 mm step distance accuracy could be judged if the distance between the 1"s"t point and the 3"r"d point was 5 mm, then the 2.5 mm step distance could be deemed to no deviation. The 5 mm step distance of this afterloading system had no deviation in continuous 9 step points measured by flushing-free film. The indirect measuring results of the 2.5 mm step distance had no deviation as well. The position accuracy of this afterloading system measured with the flushing-free film accorded with the national standards. Conclusions: The method of measuring the position accuracy and the step distance accuracy of the afterloading system with "1"9"2Ir source by using flushing-free film is technically feasible. (authors)

  5. Dosimetric study of a brachytherapy treatment of esophagus with Brazilian 192Ir sources using an anthropomorphic phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Lucio P.; Santos, William S.; Gorski, Ronan; Perini, Ana P.; Maia, Ana F.; Caldas, Linda V. E.; Orengo, Gilberto

    2014-11-01

    Several radioisotopes are produced at Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares for the use in medical treatments, including the activation of 192Ir sources. These sources are suitable for brachytherapy treatments, due to their low or high activity, depending on the concentration of 192Ir, easiness to manufacture, small size, stable daughter products and the possibility of re-utilization. They may be used for the treatment of prostate, cervix, head and neck, skin, breast, gallbladder, uterus, vagina, lung, rectum, and eye cancer treatment. In this work, the use of some 192Ir sources was studied for the treatment of esophagus cancer, especially the dose determination of important structures, such as those on the mediastinum. This was carried out utilizing a FASH anthropomorphic phantom and the MCNP5 Monte Carlo code to transport the radiation through matter. It was possible to observe that the doses at lungs, breast, esophagus, thyroid and heart were the highest, which was expected due to their proximity to the source. Therefore, the data are useful to assess the representative dose specific to brachytherapy treatments on the esophagus for radiation protection purposes. The use of brachytherapy sources was studied for the treatment of esophagus cancer. FASH anthropomorphic phantom and MCNP5 Monte Carlo code were employed. The doses at lungs, breast, esophagus, thyroid and heart were the highest. The data is useful to assess the representative doses of treatments on the esophagus.

  6. Study of an accidental exposition of three workers during a gammagraphy with 192Ir source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellintani, S.A.; Sahyun, A.; Graciotti, M.E.; Santos, O.R.; Alvares, R.

    1992-01-01

    'Full Text:' This paper is concerned with an accident occurred in an industrial gammagraphy unit located in Sao Paulo, Brazil, on 2nd of July, 1988. A work team, composed of three workers, was engaged on a routine operation with a 192 Ir source of 3,299 TBq, when the flexible cable of the holder broke, giving rise to an accidental exposure. The evaluation of the dose received by the three workers was carried out by three different methods: the film badge measurement, the biological dosimetry and the reconstitution of the accident taking into account the exposition time and the distance between the source and the workers. In the film badge evaluation the dose obtained was around 300 mSv, whereas for the biological dosimetry doses of 370 mSv, 290 mSv and 110 mSv was achieved. In the accident reconstitution the doses obtained where: 200 mSv (whole body), 131,000 mSv (left hand) for the first worker; 232 mSv (whole body), 25,000 mSv (left hand), 99,000 mSv (right hand), for the second one and finally 232 mSv (whole body) for the last one. It was concluded, by the evaluation for the doses, that the irradiation was not uniform, being the hand the more severely irradiated organ. From 18th of July, 1988, the victims were treated by the medical staff, together with the radiological protection group, both from the IPEN. In this paper the clinical and laboratorial exams carried out for the evaluation of the extension of the deleterious effects are described. By that time, the victims presented already radiodermatitis in their hands, and the clinical treatment pursued is also described. (author)

  7. Dose volume assessment of high dose rate 192IR endobronchial implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, B. Saw; Korb, Leroy J.; Pawlicki, Todd; Wu, Andrew

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To study the dose distributions of high dose rate (HDR) endobronchial implants using the dose nonuniformity ratio (DNR) and three volumetric irradiation indices. Methods and Materials: Multiple implants were configured by allowing a single HDR 192 Ir source to step through a length of 6 cm along an endobronchial catheter. Dwell times were computed to deliver a dose of 5 Gy to points 1 cm away from the catheter axis. Five sets of source configurations, each with different dwell position spacings from 0.5 to 3.0 cm, were evaluated. Three-dimensional (3D) dose distributions were then generated for each source configuration. Differential and cumulative dose-volume curves were generated to quantify the degree of target volume coverage, dose nonuniformity within the target volume, and irradiation of tissues outside the target volume. Evaluation of the implants were made using the DNR and three volumetric irradiation indices. Results: The observed isodose distributions were not able to satisfy all the dose constraints. The ability to optimally satisfy the dose constraints depended on the choice of dwell position spacing and the specification of the dose constraint points. The DNR and irradiation indices suggest that small dwell position spacing does not result in a more homogeneous dose distribution for the implant. This study supports the existence of a relationship between the dwell position spacing and the distance from the catheter axis to the reference dose or dose constraint points. Better dose homogeneity for an implant can be obtained if the spacing of the dwell positions are about twice the distance from the catheter axis to the reference dose or dose constraint points

  8. Proposal of a postal system for Ir-192 sources calibration used in high dose rate brachytherapy with LiF:Mn:Ti thermoluminescent dosemeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, W.S.; Borges, J.C.; Almeida, C.E.V.

    1998-01-01

    A proposal in order to improve the brachytherapy quality control and to allow postal intercomparison of Ir-192 sources used in high dose rate brachytherapy has been presented. The LiF: Mn: Ti (TLD 100) detector has been selected for such purpose. The experimental array and the TLDs irradiation and calibration techniques, at the treatment units, have been specified in the light of more recent methodology of Ir-192 calibration sources. (Author)

  9. PON1 L55M and Q192R gene polymorphisms and CAD risks in patients with hyperlipidemia : Clinical study of possible associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H; Ding, S; Zhou, M; Wu, X; Liu, X; Liu, J; Wu, Y; Liu, D

    2017-08-23

    A decreased plasma high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol level is a strong risk factor for coronary artery disease (CAD). Antioxidant activity of HDL mainly lies in the activity of paraoxonase (PON). This study aimed to investigate the relationships between PON1 L55M and Q192R polymorphisms, and the risks of CAD in patients with hyperlipidemia. From January 2014 to January 2016, 244 patients were divided into hyperlipidemia, hyperlipidemia + CAD, and control groups. The hyperlipidemia and hyperlipidemia + CAD groups were designated as the case group. Serum PON1 concentrations were measured using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. After isolating genomic DNA, the PON1 L55M and Q192R genes were amplified by polymerase chain reaction and sequenced. In the case group, the genotypes LM and LL were detected significantly more often than in the control group, as were the alleles R (33.33%, 42.12%) and L (22.78%, 29.11%). The frequency of QR and RR genotypes was significantly higher in the hyperlipidemia + CAD group than in the hyperlipidemia group; the allele R in the hyperlipidemia + CAD group (42.77%) was more frequent than in the hyperlipidemia group (23.78%). The Q192R polymorphism was associated with low serum PON1 concentrations, and the lowest concentration was observed in the 192QR + 192RR genotype (P = 0.03). Logistic regression analysis showed a significant correlation between the 192R allele and smoking (P = 0.03), body mass index (P = 0.02), systolic blood pressure (P = 0.004), total cholesterol (P = 0.03), triglycerides (P = 0.01), HDL (P = 0.004), and low density lipoprotein (P = 0.02). The PON1 alleles 192R and 55L are associated with CAD, and the Q192R polymorphism may be a risk factor for CAD.

  10. 41 CFR 102-192.15 - How are “I”, “you”, “me”, “we”, and “us” used in this part?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION ADMINISTRATIVE PROGRAMS 192-MAIL MANAGEMENT Introduction to this Part § 102-192.15 How are “I”, “you”, “me”, “we... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How are âIâ, âyouâ, âmeâ...

  11. PON1Q192R genetic polymorphism modifies organophosphorous pesticide effects on semen quality and DNA integrity in agricultural workers from southern Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Herrera, N.; Polanco-Minaya, H.; Salazar-Arredondo, E.; Solis-Heredia, M.J.; Hernandez-Ochoa, I.; Rojas-Garcia, E.; Alvarado-Mejia, J.; Borja-Aburto, V.H.; Quintanilla-Vega, B.

    2008-01-01

    Pesticide exposure, including organophosphorous (OP) insecticides, has been associated with poor semen quality, and paraoxonase (PON1), an enzyme involved in OP deactivation, may have a role on their susceptibility, due to PON1 polymorphisms. Our objective was to evaluate the role of PON1Q192R polymorphism on the susceptibility to OP toxicity on semen quality and DNA integrity in agricultural workers. A cross-sectional study was conducted in farmers with Mayan ascendancy from southeastern Mexico chronically exposed to pesticides; mostly OP. Fifty four agricultural workers (18-55 years old) were included, who provided semen and blood samples. Semen quality was evaluated according to WHO, sperm DNA damage by in situ-nick translation (NT-positive cells), PON1Q192R polymorphism by real-time PCR and serum PON1 activity by using phenylacetate and paraoxon. Two OP exposure indexes were created: at the month of sampling and during 3 months before sampling, representing the exposure to spermatids-spermatozoa and to cells at one spermatogenic cycle, respectively. PON1 192R and 192Q allele frequencies were 0.54 and 0.46, respectively. Significant associations were found between OP exposure at the month of sampling and NT-positive cells and sperm viability in homozygote 192RR subjects, and dose-effect relationships were observed between OP exposure during 3 months before sampling and sperm quality parameters and NT-positive cells in homozygote 192RR farmers. This suggests that cells at all stages of spermatogenesis are target of OP, and that there exists an interaction between OP exposure and PON1Q192R polymorphism on these effects; farmers featuring the 192RR genotype were more susceptible to develop reproductive toxic effects by OP exposure

  12. Association of Paraoxonase-1 Q192R (rs662 Single Nucleotide Variation with Cardiovascular Risk in Coffee Harvesters of Central Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Siller-López

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Paraoxonase 1 (PON1, a high-density lipoprotein-associated antioxidant enzyme, hydrolyzes several organophosphate pesticides and oxidized lipids. The PON1 Q192R polymorphism affects the catalytic efficiency and is considered a risk factor for pesticide intoxication and cardiovascular disease (CVD but the association is not consistent between individuals or populations. We aimed to study the association of PON1 Q192R polymorphism with CVD risk in coffee harvesters of central Colombia. Demographics were collected from 205 subjects via standardized questionnaires. Lipid profiles and serum butyrylcholinesterase (BChE were measured by standard procedures. The calculated 10-year atherosclerotic CVD (ASCVD risk was used as the cardiovascular risk estimate. Q192R genotype was determined by real-time PCR. Prevalence of hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, and the 10-year ASCVD risk was 33%, 62%, and 22%, respectively. BChE levels were no indicative of recent pesticide exposure, although a positive correlation was observed with BChE and hypercholesterolemia. The Q192R genotype frequencies were 38% (QQ, 44% (QR, and 18% (RR. We found an association of the 192Q genotype with hypertension. The results of this study signal the importance to evaluate the influence and potential interactions of BChE and PON1 192Q allele with known genetic and environmental factors implicated in the pathogenesis of CVD.

  13. Patient effective dose from endovascular brachytherapy with {sup 192}Ir Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perna, L.; Bianchi, C.; Novario, R.; Nicolini, G.; Tanzi, F.; Conte, L

    2002-07-01

    The growing use of endovascular brachytherapy has been accompanied by the publication of a large number of studies in several fields, but few studies on patient dose have been found in the literature. Moreover, these studies were carried out on the basis of Monte Carlo simulation. The aim of the present study was to estimate the effective dose to the patient undergoing endovascular brachytherapy treatment with {sup 192}Ir sources, by means of experimental measurements. Two standard treatments were taken into account: an endovascular brachytherapy of the coronary artery corresponding to the activity x time product of 184 GBq.min and an endovascular brachytherapy of the renal artery (898 GBq.min). Experimental assessment was accomplished by thermoluminescence dosemeters positioned in more than 300 measurement points in a properly adapted Rando phantom. A method has been developed to estimate the mean organ doses for all tissues and organs concerned in order to calculate the effective dose associated with intravascular brachytherapy. The normalised organ doses resulting from coronary treatment were 2.4x10{sup -2} mSv.GBq{sup -1}.min{sup -1} for lung, 0.9x10{sup -2} mSv.GBq{sup -1}.min{sup -1} for oesophagus and 0.48x10{sup -2} mSv.GBq{sup -1}.min{sup -1} for bone marrow. During brachytherapy of the renal artery, the corresponding normalised doses were 4.2x10{sup -2} mSv.GBq{sup -1}.min{sup -1} for colon, 7.8x10{sup -2} mSv.GBq{sup -1}.min{sup -1} for stomach and 1.7x10{sup -2} mSv.GBq{sup -1}.min{sup -1} for liver. Coronary treatment involved an effective dose of 0.046 mSv.GBq{sup -1}.min{sup -1}, whereas the treatment of the renal artery resulted in an effective dose of 0.15 mSv.GBq{sup -1}.min{sup -1}; there were many similarities with data from former studies. Based on these results it can be concluded that the dose level of patients exposed during brachytherapy treatment is low. (author)

  14. Fitting and benchmarking of Monte Carlo output parameters for iridium-192 high dose rate brachytherapy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acquah, F.G.

    2011-01-01

    Brachytherapy, the use of radioactive sources for the treatment of tumours is an important tool in radiation oncology. Accurate calculations of dose delivered to malignant and normal tissues are the main responsibility of the Medical Physics staff. With the use of Treatment Planning System (TPS) computers now becoming a standard practice in the Radiation Oncology Departments, Independent calculations to certify the results of these commercial TPSs are important part of a good quality management system for brachytherapy implants. There are inherent errors in the dose distributions produced by these TPSs due to its failure to account for heterogeneity in the calculation algorithms and Monte Carlo (MC) method seems to be the panacea for these corrections. In this study, a fit functional form using MC output parameters was performed to reduce dose calculation uncertainty using the Matlab software curve fitting applications. This includes the modification of the AAPM TG-43 parameters to accommodate the new developments for a rapid brachytherapy dose rate calculation. Analytical computations were performed to hybridize the anisotropy function, F(r,θ) and radial dose function, g(r) into a single new function f(r,θ) for the Nucletron microSelectron High Dose Rate 'new or v2' (mHDRv2) 192 Ir brachytherapy source. In order to minimize computation time and to improve the accuracy of manual calculations, the dosimetry function f(r,θ) used fewer parameters and formulas for the fit. Using MC outputs as the standard, the percentage errors for the fits were calculated and used to evaluate the average and maximum uncertainties. Dose rate deviation between the MC data and fit were also quantified as errors(E), which showed minimal values. These results showed that the dosimetry parameters from this study as compared to those of MC outputs parameters were in good agreement and better than the results obtained from literature. The work confirms a lot of promise in building robust

  15. Interstitial brachytherapy with 192-IR in treatment of recurrent malignant primary brain tumors. Braquiterapia intersticial con iridio-192 en el tratamiento de recidivas de tumores cerebrales tras cirugia y radioterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardenes, R.; Martinez, R.; Victoria, C.; Nuez, L.; Clavo, B.; Sancedo, G. (Clinica Puerta de Hierro. Madrid (Spain))

    1994-01-01

    Seven patients with recurrent malignant primary brain tumors after surgery and radiation therapy were treated at the Clinica Puerta de Hierro (Madrid) by interstitial brachytherapy with 192-Ir sources. Implantations were performed using computerized tomography and dose prescription were determined following the Paris system rules for interstitial implants. The means dose deliberated was 50 to 65 Gy to the reference isodoses. At the last follow-up all patients except for one are alive and without evidence of progression of the disease. (Author) 35 refs.

  16. Identification of {sup 192}Ir seeds in localization images using a novel statistical pattern recognition approach and a priori information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bird, William F; Chaney, Edward L; Coggins, James M

    1995-07-01

    Purpose / Objective: Manual labeling of individual {sup 192}Ir seeds in localization images for dosimetry of multi-strand low-dose-rate (LDR) implants is labor intensive, tedious and prone to error. The objective of this investigation is to develop computer-based methods that analyze digitized localization images, improve dosimetric efficiency, and reduce labeling errors. Materials and Methods: {sup 192}Ir localization films were digitized with a scanned-laser system and analyzed using Multiscale, Geometric, Statistical Pattern Recognition (MGSPR), a technique that recognizes and classifies pixels in gray-scale images based on their surrounding, neighborhood geometry. To 'teach' MGSPR how to recognize specific objects, a Gaussian-based mathematical filter set is applied to training images containing user-labeled examples of the desired objects. The filters capture a broad range of descriptive geometric information at multiple spatial scales. Principled mathematical analysis is used to determine the linear combination of filters from a large base set that yields the best discrimination between object types. Thus the sensitivity of the filters can be 'tuned' to detect specific objects such as{sup 192} Ir seeds. For a given pixel, the output of the filter is a multi-component feature vector that uniquely describes the pixel's geometric characteristics. Pixels with similar geometric attributes have feature vectors that naturally 'cluster', or group, in the multidimensional space called 'feature space'. After statistically quantifying the training-set clusters in feature space, pixels found in new images are automatically labeled by correlation with the nearest cluster, e.g., the cluster representing {sup 192}Ir seeds. One of the greatest challenges in statistical pattern recognition is to determine which filters result in the best labeling. Good discrimination is achieved when clusters are compact and well isolated from one another in feature space. The filters used in

  17. Identification of 192Ir seeds in localization images using a novel statistical pattern recognition approach and a priori information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bird, William F.; Chaney, Edward L.; Coggins, James M.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose / Objective: Manual labeling of individual 192 Ir seeds in localization images for dosimetry of multi-strand low-dose-rate (LDR) implants is labor intensive, tedious and prone to error. The objective of this investigation is to develop computer-based methods that analyze digitized localization images, improve dosimetric efficiency, and reduce labeling errors. Materials and Methods: 192 Ir localization films were digitized with a scanned-laser system and analyzed using Multiscale, Geometric, Statistical Pattern Recognition (MGSPR), a technique that recognizes and classifies pixels in gray-scale images based on their surrounding, neighborhood geometry. To 'teach' MGSPR how to recognize specific objects, a Gaussian-based mathematical filter set is applied to training images containing user-labeled examples of the desired objects. The filters capture a broad range of descriptive geometric information at multiple spatial scales. Principled mathematical analysis is used to determine the linear combination of filters from a large base set that yields the best discrimination between object types. Thus the sensitivity of the filters can be 'tuned' to detect specific objects such as 192 Ir seeds. For a given pixel, the output of the filter is a multi-component feature vector that uniquely describes the pixel's geometric characteristics. Pixels with similar geometric attributes have feature vectors that naturally 'cluster', or group, in the multidimensional space called 'feature space'. After statistically quantifying the training-set clusters in feature space, pixels found in new images are automatically labeled by correlation with the nearest cluster, e.g., the cluster representing 192 Ir seeds. One of the greatest challenges in statistical pattern recognition is to determine which filters result in the best labeling. Good discrimination is achieved when clusters are compact and well isolated from one another in feature space. The filters used in this study are

  18. Human Paraoxonase1 Hydrolysis of Nanomolar Chlorpyrifos-oxon Concentrations is Unaffected by Phenotype or Q192R Genotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombes, R. Hunter; Meek, Edward C.; Dail, Mary Beth; Chambers, Howard W.; Chambers, Janice E.

    2016-01-01

    The organophosphorus insecticide chlorpyrifos has been widely used. Its active metabolite chlorpyrifos-oxon (CPO) is a potent anticholinesterase and is detoxified by paraoxonase-1 (PON1). PON1 activity is influenced by numerous factors including a Q192R polymorphism. Using forty human blood samples bearing homozygous genotypes and either high or low activity phenotypes (as determined by high concentration assays of paraoxon and diazoxon hydrolysis) the serum PON1 hydrolysis of high (320 μM) and low (178 nM) CPO concentrations was assessed using direct or indirect spectrophotometric methods, respectively. PON1 activity at high CPO concentration reflected the phenotype and genotype differences; subjects with the high activity phenotype and homozygous for the PON1R192 alloform hydrolyzed significantly more CPO than subjects with the low activity phenotype and/or PON1Q192 alloform (High RR=11023±722, Low RR=9467±798, High QQ=8809±672, Low QQ=6030±1015 μmoles CPO hydrolyzed/min/L serum). However, PON1 hydrolysis of CPO at the lower, more environmentally relevant concentration showed no significant differences between the PON1192 genotypes and/or between high and low activity phenotypes (High RR=231±27, Low RR=219±52, High QQ=193±59, Low QQ=185±43 nmoles CPO/min/L serum). Low CPO concentrations were probably not saturating, so PON1 did not display maximal velocity and the PON1 genotype/phenotype might not influence the extent of metabolism at environmental exposures. PMID:25093614

  19. Estimation of distance error by fuzzy set theory required for strength determination of HDR (192)Ir brachytherapy sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sudhir; Datta, D; Sharma, S D; Chourasiya, G; Babu, D A R; Sharma, D N

    2014-04-01

    Verification of the strength of high dose rate (HDR) (192)Ir brachytherapy sources on receipt from the vendor is an important component of institutional quality assurance program. Either reference air-kerma rate (RAKR) or air-kerma strength (AKS) is the recommended quantity to specify the strength of gamma-emitting brachytherapy sources. The use of Farmer-type cylindrical ionization chamber of sensitive volume 0.6 cm(3) is one of the recommended methods for measuring RAKR of HDR (192)Ir brachytherapy sources. While using the cylindrical chamber method, it is required to determine the positioning error of the ionization chamber with respect to the source which is called the distance error. An attempt has been made to apply the fuzzy set theory to estimate the subjective uncertainty associated with the distance error. A simplified approach of applying this fuzzy set theory has been proposed in the quantification of uncertainty associated with the distance error. In order to express the uncertainty in the framework of fuzzy sets, the uncertainty index was estimated and was found to be within 2.5%, which further indicates that the possibility of error in measuring such distance may be of this order. It is observed that the relative distance li estimated by analytical method and fuzzy set theoretic approach are consistent with each other. The crisp values of li estimated using analytical method lie within the bounds computed using fuzzy set theory. This indicates that li values estimated using analytical methods are within 2.5% uncertainty. This value of uncertainty in distance measurement should be incorporated in the uncertainty budget, while estimating the expanded uncertainty in HDR (192)Ir source strength measurement.

  20. Search for Excited Leptons in $e^+ e^-$ Interactions at $\\sqrt{s}$=192 - 202 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M.; Adriani, O.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Alcaraz, J.; Alemanni, G.; Allaby, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alviggi, M.G.; Ambrosi, G.; Anderhub, H.; Andreev, Valery P.; Angelescu, T.; Anselmo, F.; Arefev, A.; Azemoon, T.; Aziz, T.; Bagnaia, P.; Bajo, A.; Baksay, L.; Balandras, A.; Baldew, S.V.; Banerjee, S.; Banerjee, Sw.; Barczyk, A.; Barillere, R.; Bartalini, P.; Basile, M.; Batalova, N.; Battiston, R.; Bay, A.; Becattini, F.; Becker, U.; Behner, F.; Bellucci, L.; Berbeco, R.; Berdugo, J.; Berges, P.; Bertucci, B.; Betev, B.L.; Bhattacharya, S.; Biasini, M.; Biland, A.; Blaising, J.J.; Blyth, S.C.; Bobbink, G.J.; Bohm, A.; Boldizsar, L.; Borgia, B.; Bourilkov, D.; Bourquin, M.; Braccini, S.; Branson, J.G.; Brochu, F.; Buffini, A.; Buijs, A.; Burger, J.D.; Burger, W.J.; Cai, X.D.; Capell, M.; Cara Romeo, G.; Carlino, G.; Cartacci, A.M.; Casaus, J.; Castellini, G.; Cavallari, F.; Cavallo, N.; Cecchi, C.; Cerrada, M.; Cesaroni, F.; Chamizo, M.; Chang, Y.H.; Chaturvedi, U.K.; Chemarin, M.; Chen, A.; Chen, G.; Chen, G.M.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, H.S.; Chiefari, G.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Civinini, C.; Clare, I.; Clare, R.; Coignet, G.; Colino, N.; Costantini, S.; Cotorobai, F.; de la Cruz, B.; Csilling, A.; Cucciarelli, S.; Dai, T.S.; van Dalen, J.A.; D'Alessandro, R.; de Asmundis, R.; Deglon, P.; Degre, A.; Deiters, K.; della Volpe, D.; Delmeire, E.; Denes, P.; DeNotaristefani, F.; De Salvo, A.; Diemoz, M.; Dierckxsens, M.; van Dierendonck, D.; Dionisi, C.; Dittmar, M.; Dominguez, A.; Doria, A.; Dova, M.T.; Duchesneau, D.; Dufournaud, D.; Duinker, P.; Duran, I.; El Mamouni, H.; Engler, A.; Eppling, F.J.; Erne, F.C.; Ewers, A.; Extermann, P.; Fabre, M.; Falagan, M.A.; Falciano, S.; Favara, A.; Fay, J.; Fedin, O.; Felcini, M.; Ferguson, T.; Fesefeldt, H.; Fiandrini, E.; Field, J.H.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, P.H.; Fisk, I.; Forconi, G.; Freudenreich, K.; Furetta, C.; Galaktionov, Iouri; Ganguli, S.N.; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gataullin, M.; Gau, S.S.; Gentile, S.; Gheordanescu, N.; Giagu, S.; Gong, Z.F.; Grenier, Gerald Jean; Grimm, O.; Gruenewald, M.W.; Guida, M.; van Gulik, R.; Gupta, V.K.; Gurtu, A.; Gutay, L.J.; Haas, D.; Hasan, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hebbeker, T.; Herve, Alain; Hidas, P.; Hirschfelder, J.; Hofer, H.; Holzner, G.; Hoorani, H.; Hou, S.R.; Hu, Y.; Iashvili, I.; Jin, B.N.; Jones, Lawrence W.; de Jong, P.; Josa-Mutuberria, I.; Khan, R.A.; Kafer, D.; Kaur, M.; Kienzle-Focacci, M.N.; Kim, D.; Kim, J.K.; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D.; Kittel, W.; Klimentov, A.; Konig, A.C.; Kopal, M.; Kopp, A.; Koutsenko, V.; Kraber, M.; Kraemer, R.W.; Krenz, W.; Kruger, A.; Kunin, A.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Laktineh, I.; Landi, G.; Lebeau, M.; Lebedev, A.; Lebrun, P.; Lecomte, P.; Lecoq, P.; Le Coultre, P.; Lee, H.J.; Le Goff, J.M.; Leiste, R.; Levtchenko, P.; Li, C.; Likhoded, S.; Lin, C.H.; Lin, W.T.; Linde, F.L.; Lista, L.; Liu, Z.A.; Lohmann, W.; Longo, E.; Lu, Y.S.; Lubelsmeyer, K.; Luci, C.; Luckey, David; Lugnier, L.; Luminari, L.; Lustermann, W.; Ma, W.G.; Maity, M.; Malgeri, L.; Malinin, A.; Mana, C.; Mangeol, D.; Mans, J.; Marian, G.; Martin, J.P.; Marzano, F.; Mazumdar, K.; McNeil, R.R.; Mele, S.; Merola, L.; Meschini, M.; Metzger, W.J.; von der Mey, M.; Mihul, A.; Milcent, H.; Mirabelli, G.; Mnich, J.; Mohanty, G.B.; Moulik, T.; Muanza, G.S.; Muijs, A.J.M.; Musicar, B.; Musy, M.; Napolitano, M.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Newman, H.; Niessen, T.; Nisati, A.; Kluge, Hannelies; Ofierzynski, R.; Organtini, G.; Oulianov, A.; Palomares, C.; Pandoulas, D.; Paoletti, S.; Paolucci, P.; Paramatti, R.; Park, H.K.; Park, I.H.; Passaleva, G.; Patricelli, S.; Paul, Thomas Cantzon; Pauluzzi, M.; Paus, C.; Pauss, F.; Pedace, M.; Pensotti, S.; Perret-Gallix, D.; Petersen, B.; Piccolo, D.; Pierella, F.; Pieri, M.; Piroue, P.A.; Pistolesi, E.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Pojidaev, V.; Postema, H.; Pothier, J.; Prokofev, D.O.; Prokofiev, D.; Quartieri, J.; Rahal-Callot, G.; Rahaman, M.A.; Raics, P.; Raja, N.; Ramelli, R.; Rancoita, P.G.; Ranieri, R.; Raspereza, A.; Raven, G.; Razis, P.; Ren, D.; Rescigno, M.; Reucroft, S.; Riemann, S.; Riles, Keith; Rodin, J.; Roe, B.P.; Romero, L.; Rosca, A.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Roth, Stefan; Rosenbleck, C.; Rubio, J.A.; Ruggiero, G.; Rykaczewski, H.; Saremi, S.; Sarkar, S.; Salicio, J.; Sanchez, E.; Sanders, M.P.; Schafer, C.; Schegelsky, V.; Schmidt-Kaerst, S.; Schmitz, D.; Schopper, H.; Schotanus, D.J.; Schwering, G.; Sciacca, C.; Seganti, A.; Servoli, L.; Shevchenko, S.; Shivarov, N.; Shoutko, V.; Shumilov, E.; Shvorob, A.; Siedenburg, T.; Son, D.; Smith, B.; Spillantini, P.; Steuer, M.; Stickland, D.P.; Stone, A.; Stoyanov, B.; Straessner, A.; Sudhakar, K.; Sultanov, G.; Sun, L.Z.; Sushkov, S.; Suter, H.; Swain, J.D.; Szillasi, Z.; Sztaricskai, T.; Tang, X.W.; Tauscher, L.; Taylor, L.; Tellili, B.; Timmermans, Charles; Ting, Samuel C.C.; Ting, S.M.; Tonwar, S.C.; Toth, J.; Tully, C.; Tung, K.L.; Uchida, Y.; Ulbricht, J.; Valente, E.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vetlitsky, I.; Vicinanza, D.; Viertel, G.; Villa, S.; Vivargent, M.; Vlachos, S.; Vodopianov, I.; Vogel, H.; Vogt, H.; Vorobev, I.; Vorobyov, A.A.; Vorvolakos, A.; Wadhwa, M.; Wallraff, W.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.L.; Wang, Z.M.; Weber, A.; Weber, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wilkens, H.; Wu, S.X.; Wynhoff, S.; Xia, L.; Xu, Z.Z.; Yamamoto, J.; Yang, B.Z.; Yang, C.G.; Yang, H.J.; Yang, M.; Ye, J.B.; Yeh, S.C.; Zalite, An.; Zalite, Yu.; Zhang, Z.P.; Zhu, G.Y.; Zhu, R.Y.; Zichichi, A.; Zilizi, G.; Zimmermann, B.; Zoller, M.

    2001-01-01

    Excited leptons are searched for using the L3 detector at LEP. The data collected at centre-of-mass energies in the range from 192 up to 202 GeV correspond to a total luminosity of 233 $\\rm pb^{-1}$. No evidence of either pair production of excited leptons, nor of single production is found. From the searches for pair produced excited leptons, lower mass limits close to the kinematic limit are set. From the searches for singly produced excited leptons, upper limits on their couplings are derived in the mass range up to 200 GeV.

  1. Limited external irradiation and interstitial 192iridium implant in the treatment of squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsillar region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puthawala, A.A.; Syed, A.M.; Eads, D.L.; Neblett, D.; Gillin, L.; Gates, T.C.

    1985-01-01

    Between January 1976 and March 1982, 80 patients with histologically proven diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsillar region were treated with definitive radiotherapy. Sixty-five (81%) of these patients had locally advanced tumors (Stage III and IV); 49% of patients had clinically palpable cervical lymphadenopathy. All patients received a combined external megavoltage and interstitial irradiation. The dose of external irradiation was limited to 4500-5000 cGy over 41/2 to 51/2 weeks. This was followed by interstitial 192 iridium implants to doses of 2000-2500 cGy in 50-60 hours for T1, T2 lesions and 3000-4000 cGy in 60-100 hours for T3, T4 lesions. The neck masses were also separately implanted to deliver additional doses of 2000-4000 cGy in 50-80 hours. Overall local tumor control was observed in 84% of patients with a minimum follow-up period of 2 years. An absolute 3-year disease free survival of the entire group was 72%. Treatment related complications such as soft tissue necrosis or osteoradionecrosis occurred in 6% (5/80) of patients. The salvage of neck failures and local failures was possible in 78 and 38% of patients, respectively, either by surgery or by re-irradiation employing interstitial 192 iridium implants. Functional and esthetic integrity was well preserved in most cases

  2. Oncologic and functional outcome of base of tongue cancer treated with external-beam radiation and I-192 implant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, L.B.; Sessions, R.B.; Strong, E.W.; Fass, D.E.; Armstrong, J.G.; Zelefsky, M.J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper assesses tumor control and functional outcome for squamous cancer of the base of the tongue managed with external irradiation plus Ir-192 implant. Between January 1981 and June 1990, 36 previously untreated patients were treated with 5,000-5,400 cGy of external-beam radiation plus a 2,000-3,000 cGy boost to the base of tongue with an Ir-192 implant. Negative necks were irradiated alone, and positive necks were treated with irradiation followed by neck dissection. Crude local control by T stage are as follows: T1, 10 of 11; T2, 13 of 14; T3, 8 of 10; and T4 1 of 1. Actuarial local control is 87.5%. Of the four local failures, two were salvaged by surgery. Neck control was achieved in 35 of 36 patients. Complications occurred in 25%. When implantation was done with the nonlooping technique, the injury rate was statistically higher than when done with the looping technique (6 of 12 = 50% vs 3 of 24 = 12.5%, P = .02)

  3. The 257 MeV 19/2/sup -/ two-phonon octupole state in /sup 147/Gd

    CERN Document Server

    Kleinheinz, P; Kortelahti, M; Piiparinen, M; Styczen, J

    1981-01-01

    The half-life of the (vf/sub 7/2/*3/sup -/*3/sup -/)/sub 19/2-/ two- phonon octupole states at 2.572 MeV in /sup 147/Gd was measured as T /sub 1/2/=0.37(8) ns, which gives a transition strength of 52(15) WU for the 1525 keV E3 transition to the 0.997 MeV (vf/sub 7/2/*3/sup -/) /sub 13/2+/ one transition to the 0.997 MeV ( nu f/sub 7/2/*3/sup -/) /sub 13/2+/ one phonon excitation. The nu i/sub 13/2/ admixture in the 13/2/sup +/ one-phonon state, as well as the dominant pi h/sub 11/2/d /sub 5//sup -1/2/ component of the /sup 146/Gd 3/sup -/ state give rise to large anharmonicities for the two-phonon excitation. An estimate of the energy shifts based on empirical coupling matrix elements gives 2.66 MeV excitation for the 19/2/sup -/ two-phonon state, in good agreement with the observed energy of that state. (9 refs).

  4. Orthopedic infections in equine long bone fractures and arthrodeses treated by internal fixation: 192 cases (1990-2006).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahern, Benjamin J; Richardson, Dean W; Boston, Raymond C; Schaer, Thomas P

    2010-07-01

    To determine the rate of postoperative infection (POI) for internal fixation repaired equine long bone fractures and arthrodeses and identify associated risk factors. Case series. Horses (n=192) with fracture repair of the third metacarpal and metatarsal bones, radius, ulna, humerus, tibia, and femur, or arthrodesis with internal fixation. Medical records (1990-2006) were reviewed for signalment, anatomic location, fracture classification and method of repair, technique and surgical duration, bacterial species isolated, postoperative care, onset of POI, and outcome. Of 192 horses (171 [89%] closed, 21 [11%] open fractures), 157 (82%) were discharged from the hospital. Infection occurred in 53 (28% horses), of which 31 (59%) were discharged. Repairs without POI were 7.25 times more likely to be discharged from the hospital. Closed fractures were 4.23 times more likely to remain uninfected and 4.59 times more likely to be discharged from the hospital compared with open fractures. Closed reduction and internal fixation was associated with a 2.5-fold reduction in rate of POI and a 5.9 times greater chance for discharge from the hospital compared with open reduction and internal fixation. Females had a strong trend for increased POI when compared with colts and stallion but not geldings. Overall rate of POI was 28%. Fracture classification, method of repair, gender, and surgical duration were significant risk factors.

  5. Anomalous second ferromagnetic phase transition in Co{sub 0.08}Bi{sub 1.92}Se{sub 3} topological insulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Min, E-mail: zmzmi1987@163.com; Liu, Ligang; Yang, Hui

    2016-09-05

    We report the observation of ferromagnetism in topological insulator Co{sub 0.08}Bi{sub 1.92}Se{sub 3} single crystal. The structural, magnetic, and microstructure properties of Co{sub 0.08}Bi{sub 1.92}Se{sub 3} are investigated. The existence of complicated ferromagnetic ordering, indicates the anomalous second ferromagnetic phase transition below 30 K. Well-defined ferromagnetic hysteresis in the magnetization was found in the sample. The origin of bulk ferromagnetism in Co{sub 0.08}Bi{sub 1.92}Se{sub 3} is concerned with three aspects: Co cluster, RKKY interactions, and the spin texture of Co impurities. - Highlights: • The bulk ferromagnetism have been found in the C{sub o0.08}Bi{sub 1.92}Se{sub 3} single crystal. • The anomalous second ferromagnetic phase transition is found below 30 K. • The origin of bulk ferromagnetism in Co{sub 0.08}Bi{sub 1.92}Se{sub 3} is concerned with three aspects.

  6. Interstitial hyperthermia and iridium-192 treatment alone vs. interstitial iridium-192 treatment/hyperthermia and low dose cisplatinum infusion in the treatment of locally advanced head and neck malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiber, David P.; Overett, Thomas K.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether the addition of low dose platinum infusional chemotherapy adds to the effectiveness of interstitial hyperthermia/iridium-192 management of locally advanced head and neck malignancies. Methods and Materials: From 1987 to 1993, 36 patients with locally advanced head and neck malignancies were treated locally with interstitial hyperthermia and iridium-192 as part or all of their management. Twenty-two of the above-mentioned patients also received low dose infusional cisplatinum chemotherapy at 20 mg/M 2 per day during the time of the implant. No patient received greater than 100 mg/M 2 total dose. Implant times ranged from 38.5 to 134 h and total doses delivered with the radiation implants ranged from 15 to 39.9 Gy. Average implant volume was 50 cc. Twenty-three patients received external beam irradiation supplementation in a dose range from 25.2 to 64 Gy. Results: Median follow-up for the entire group was 8, months with 7 months for the chemotherapy group vs. 12 months for the no-chemotherapy group. Freedom from relapse rates for the chemotherapy group vs. the no-chemotherapy group were 70% at 41 months vs. 63% at 60 months, p not significant (p = NS). Overall survival by Life Table Analysis was 28% for the chemotherapy group at 41 months vs. 31% for the no-chemotherapy group at 60 months (p = NS). Complete response (CR) rates were 93% for the chemotherapy group vs. 86% for the no-chemotherapy group. Seven patients in the chemotherapy group had recurrent disease and four patients in the no-chemotherapy group were being treated for recurrent disease. Complication rates were similar in both groups, with two patients in the chemotherapy arm requiring hyperbaric oxygen treatments and one patient in the no-chemotherapy arm requiring hyperbaric oxygen treatments (for soft tissue necrosis). Conclusion: It appears that low dose platinum infusional chemotherapy can be added safely to patients receiving interstitial iridium-192 implants along with

  7. Proposal of a postal system for Ir-192 sources calibration used in high dose rate brachytherapy with LiF:Mn:Ti thermoluminescent dosemeters; Proposta de um sistema postal para a calibracao de fontes de {sup 192} Ir, utilizadas em braquiterapia de alta taxa de dose, com dosimetros termoluminescentes de LiF: Mn: Ti

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, W.S.; Borges, J.C.; Almeida, C.E.V. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria. CNEN Caixa Postal 37750, 22780-160, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    1998-12-31

    A proposal in order to improve the brachytherapy quality control and to allow postal intercomparison of Ir-192 sources used in high dose rate brachytherapy has been presented. The LiF: Mn: Ti (TLD 100) detector has been selected for such purpose. The experimental array and the TLDs irradiation and calibration techniques, at the treatment units, have been specified in the light of more recent methodology of Ir-192 calibration sources. (Author)

  8. Medium-spin levels and a 360 ns Isup(π)=19-/2 isomer in the N=80 nucleus 137La

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kortelahti, M.; Pakkanen, A.; Piiparinen, M.; Komppa, T.; Komu, R.

    1981-03-01

    The level structure of 137 La has been studied using the 138 Ba(p,2n) reaction and methods of in-beam γ-ray and conversion-electron spectroscopy. The 137 La level scheme has been established with 21 new levels with spins up to (19/2) - . A 360 ns (19/2) - isomer at 1870 keV has been identified and a (πgsub(7/2)(νhsub(11/2)sup(-1)dsub(3/2)sup(-1)sub(7 - ))sub(19/2) - configuration is suggested for it. The level ordering of the πhsub(11/2)x2 + multiplet has been discussed on the basis of the triaxial rotor-plus-particle model which suggests a slightly oblate triaxial shape to the 137 La nucleus. (author)

  9. Applicability of a prototype for determination of absorbed dose using brachytherapy equipment with Ir-192 sources; Aplicabilidade de um prototipo para determinacao da dose absorvida utilizando equipamentos de braquiterapia com fontes de IR-192

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Vivianne Lucia Bormann; Almeida, Mayara Gabriella Oliveira de; Vieira, Rafaela Etelvina de Amorim; Silva, Waldecy Ananias da; Nascimento, Rizia Keila, E-mail: vlsouza@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: mayaradqf@hotmail.com, E-mail: rodriguesss@hootmail.com, E-mail: waldecy@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: riziakeila@hotmail.com [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    This work aims at the development and improvement of a device to perform the absolute dosimetry sources of Ir-192 using the Fricke solution contained in a flask. The Fricke solution used was prepared using amounts of ferrous ammonium sulfate, sodium chloride and sulfuric acid, diluted with water tri distilled pre-established in the literature. The spectrophotometer used was a UV-VIS spectrophotometer (Beckman DU-640 Counter) for measuring the optical density at wavelength 304 nm. The calculation for determining the radial dose takes into account the radial distance and the angle formed with the transverse axis of the source. As the results obtained can be seen that the states of Pernambuco, Ceara, Paraiba e Piaui are in accordance with the recommendations of international standards of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), which considers not acceptable a difference greater than 5% of prescribed dose and measured dose.

  10. Development of a TLD mailed system for remote dosimetry audit for 192Ir HDR and PDR sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roue, Amelie; Venselaar, Jack L.M.; Ferreira, Ivaldo H.; Bridier, Andre; Dam, Jan van

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: In the framework of an ESTRO ESQUIRE project, the BRAPHYQS Physics Network and the EQUAL-ESTRO laboratory have developed a procedure for checking the absorbed dose to water in the vicinity of HDR or PDR sources using a mailed TLD system. The methodology and the materials used in the procedure are based on the existing EQUAL-ESTRO external radiotherapy dose checks. Materials and methods: A phantom for TLD postal dose assurance service, adapted to accept catheters from different HDR afterloaders, has been developed. The phantom consists of three PMMA tubes supporting catheters placed at 120 degrees around a central TLD holder. A study on the use of LiF powder type DTL 937 (Philitech) has been performed in order to establish the TLD calibration in dose-to-water at a given distance from 192 Ir source, as well as to determine all correction factors to convert the TLD reading into absorbed dose to water. The dosimetric audit is based on the comparison between the dose to water measured with the TL dosimeter and the dose calculated by the clinical TPS. Results of the audits are classified in four different levels depending on the ratio of the measured dose to the stated dose. The total uncertainty budget in the measurement of the absorbed dose to water using TLD near an 192 Ir HDR source, including TLD reading, correction factors and TLD calibration coefficient, is determined as 3.27% (1 s). Results: To validate the procedures, the external audit was first tested among the members of the BRAPHYQS Network. Since November 2004, the test has been made available for use by all European brachytherapy centres. To date, 11 centres have participated in the checks and the results obtained are very encouraging. Nevertheless, one error detected has shown the usefulness of this audit. Conclusion: A method of absorbed dose to water determination in the vicinity of an 192 Ir brachytherapy source was developed for the purpose of a mailed TL dosimetry system. The

  11. Influence of the profile of Iridium-192 wire in measurements of quality control for use in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Osvaldo L.; Zeituni, Carlos A.; Rostelato, Maria Elisa C.M.; Moura, Joao A.; Feher, Anselmo; Moura, Eduardo S.; Souza, Carla D.; Somessari, Samir L.; Peleias Junior, Fernando S.; Mattos, Fabio R.

    2013-01-01

    Brachytherapy is a method used in the treatment of cancerous tumors, by ionizing radiation produced by sources, introduced into the tumor area, this method seeks a more direct to the tumor, thereby maximizing the radiation dose to diseased tissue, while minimizing the dose to healthy tissues. One of the radionuclides used in brachytherapy is iridium-192. The Radiation Technology Center (CTR), of the Nuclear and Energy Research Institute (IPEN), has produced commercially, since 1998, iridium-192 wires used in low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy. To produce this radionuclides, firstly an iridium-platinum wire is irradiated in the nuclear reactor IEA-R1 for 30 hours, with a neutron flux of 5x 10 13 n cm -2 s -1 , the wire is left to decay by 30 days to remove the main contaminants, and then goes through a quality control, before being sent to the hospital. In this quality control is checked the radiation homogeneity along each centimeter of the wire. To implement this procedure, is used a device, consisting of an ionization chamber, surrounded by a lead shield, with a samol 1 cm wide slit, linked to the ionization chamber is a voltage source, and a Keithley 617 electrometer, 2 minutes is the range used to measure the charge by the electrometer. The iridium wire is considered in accordance, when there is no variation higher than 5%, between the average measures and the maximum and minimum values. However, due to design features of the measurement system, the wire may appear to the detector through the slit in larger sizes than the ideal, improperly influencing the final quality control. This paper calculates the difference in size of these variations in profile, and their influence on the final count, it compares the actual values obtained, and describes the improvements, made in quality control procedures, that provided more accurate measurement data, analyzes the results, and suggests changes in devices, aimed at further improving the quality control of iridium-192

  12. Development of a TLD mailed system for remote dosimetry audit for (192)Ir HDR and PDR sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roué, Amélie; Venselaar, Jack L M; Ferreira, Ivaldo H; Bridier, André; Van Dam, Jan

    2007-04-01

    In the framework of an ESTRO ESQUIRE project, the BRAPHYQS Physics Network and the EQUAL-ESTRO laboratory have developed a procedure for checking the absorbed dose to water in the vicinity of HDR or PDR sources using a mailed TLD system. The methodology and the materials used in the procedure are based on the existing EQUAL-ESTRO external radiotherapy dose checks. A phantom for TLD postal dose assurance service, adapted to accept catheters from different HDR afterloaders, has been developed. The phantom consists of three PMMA tubes supporting catheters placed at 120 degrees around a central TLD holder. A study on the use of LiF powder type DTL 937 (Philitech) has been performed in order to establish the TLD calibration in dose-to-water at a given distance from (192)Ir source, as well as to determine all correction factors to convert the TLD reading into absorbed dose to water. The dosimetric audit is based on the comparison between the dose to water measured with the TL dosimeter and the dose calculated by the clinical TPS. Results of the audits are classified in four different levels depending on the ratio of the measured dose to the stated dose. The total uncertainty budget in the measurement of the absorbed dose to water using TLD near an (192)Ir HDR source, including TLD reading, correction factors and TLD calibration coefficient, is determined as 3.27% (1s). To validate the procedures, the external audit was first tested among the members of the BRAPHYQS Network. Since November 2004, the test has been made available for use by all European brachytherapy centres. To date, 11 centres have participated in the checks and the results obtained are very encouraging. Nevertheless, one error detected has shown the usefulness of this audit. A method of absorbed dose to water determination in the vicinity of an (192)Ir brachytherapy source was developed for the purpose of a mailed TL dosimetry system. The accuracy of the procedure was determined. This method allows a

  13. Measurement of disintegration rate and decay branching ratio for nuclide 192Ir with β-, EC mixing decays by using 4πβ-γ coincidence counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Chunguang; Pei Wulang; Li Wei; Qu Decheng; Xiong Jing; Chang Yongfu

    1995-01-01

    The absolute disintegration rates for nuclide 192 Ir were measured with a 4πβ-γ (HPGe) coincidence apparatus by using parameter method and extrapolation method. The final uncertainties obtained were 0.4% and 0.5% respectively for a confidence level of 99.7%. The method with which both the disintegration rate and the decay branching ratio can be measured for nuclides with β - and EC mixing decays was proposed and described. The β - branching ratio in 192 Ir decays was measured being 0.9572. The final uncertainties of disintegration rates and β - decay branching ratio with this method were 1.5% and 1.8% respectively

  14. Comparison of the cost between 60Co and 192Ir, as the sources for high-dose-rate remote control afterloading systems (HDR-RALS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogata, Hitoshi

    1994-01-01

    High-Dose-Rate remote control afterloading systems (HDR-RALS) installing 60 Co sources have been prevailing currently in Japan. The survey conducted by Japan Isotope Association (JIA) reports that 180 machines are at working condition. Although the wide prevalence of the HDR-RALS, the stable supply of 60 Co is becoming difficult because of the short availability of raw materials. The supply of 60 Co is planned to be terminated in March 1996. In place of 60 Co, 192 Ir is going to be produced in 1996. The size of 192 Ir, which is much smaller than that of 60 Co, may facilitate broader clinical usability. On the other hand, for the reason that the half life of 192 Ir (73.8 days) is much shorter than that of 60 Co (5.27 years), several exchanges of the sources in a year are necessary. This report analyses the difference of the cost between 60 Co and 192 Ir as the sources for HDR-RALS. As the cost of the 60 Co sources is dependent on the distance from Tokyo. Radiation activity, etc., the cost-calculation was done on the basis the 60 Co sources were installed for the HDR-RALS systems in Yamanashi Central Hospital. The total cost of 60 Co is 3,377,000 yen on the data from JIA. According to the half life of 5.27 years, the available duration can be thought as 7 years and the monthly cost be calculated as about 40,000 yen. In case of 192 Ir, the prices for Buchler' system and Nucletron's system are 800,000 yen and 990,000 yen respectively. Concerning the shortness of the half life, an exchange in every 3 months is ideal. Therefore the monthly cost of 192 Ir would be 260,000-330,000 yen. Consequently the cost-ratio for 192 Ir and 60 Co would become 6.7-8.3. The cost of intracavitary irradiation is controlled by the government as 10,000 yen per treatment in Japan. If this setting remains the same for HDR-RALS installing 192 Ir, almost all the facilities of radiation therapy would suffer from the cost-income inbalance in the near future. (author)

  15. Unexpected Modulation of Recall B and T Cell Responses after Immunization with Rotavirus-like Particles in the Presence of LT-R192G

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christelle Basset

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available LT-R192G, a mutant of the thermolabile enterotoxin of E. coli, is a potent adjuvant of immunization. Immune responses are generally analyzed at the end of protocols including at least 2 administrations, but rarely after a prime. To investigate this point, we compared B and T cell responses in mice after one and two intrarectal immunizations with 2/6 rotavirus-like particles (2/6-VLP and LT-R192G. After a boost, we found, an unexpected lower B cell expansion measured by flow cytometry, despite a secondary antibody response. We then analyzed CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs and CD4+CD25+Foxp3− helper T cells after in vitro (restimulation of mesenteric lymph node cells with the antigen (2/6-VLP, the adjuvant (LT-R192G or both. 2/6-VLP did not activate CD4+CD25+Foxp3− nor Foxp3+ T cells from non-immunized and 2/6-VLP immunized mice, whereas they did activate both subsets from mice immunized with 2/6-VLP in the presence of adjuvant. LT-R192G dramatically decreased CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T cells from non-immunized and 2/6-VLP immunized mice but not from mice immunized with 2/6-VLP and adjuvant. Moreover, in this case, LT-R192G increased Foxp3 expression on CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ cells, suggesting specific Treg activation during the recall. Finally, when both 2/6-VLP and LT-R192G were used for restimulation, LT-R192G clearly suppressed both 2/6-VLP-specific CD4+CD25+Foxp3− and Foxp3+ T cells. All together, these results suggest that LT-R192G exerts different effects on CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T cells, depending on a first or a second contact. The unexpected immunomodulation observed during the recall should be considered in designing vaccination protocols.

  16. 19.2% Efficient InP Heterojunction Solar Cell with Electron-Selective TiO2 Contact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xingtian; Battaglia, Corsin; Lin, Yongjing; Chen, Kevin; Hettick, Mark; Zheng, Maxwell; Chen, Cheng-Ying; Kiriya, Daisuke; Javey, Ali

    2014-12-17

    We demonstrate an InP heterojunction solar cell employing an ultrathin layer (∼10 nm) of amorphous TiO 2 deposited at 120 °C by atomic layer deposition as the transparent electron-selective contact. The TiO 2 film selectively extracts minority electrons from the conduction band of p-type InP while blocking the majority holes due to the large valence band offset, enabling a high maximum open-circuit voltage of 785 mV. A hydrogen plasma treatment of the InP surface drastically improves the long-wavelength response of the device, resulting in a high short-circuit current density of 30.5 mA/cm 2 and a high power conversion efficiency of 19.2%.

  17. Vaginal bacterial flora of patients with operated endometrial carcinoma prior to and following intracavitary vaginal irradiation (Ir-192, afterloading)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerstner, G.; Kucera, H.; Weghaupt, K.; Rotter, M.; Vienna Univ.; Vienna Univ.

    1982-01-01

    In a prospective bacteriological and clinical study the vaginal bacterial flora of 35 patients with endometrial carcinoma, who underwent surgery 4 to 6 weeks earlier, was investigated prior to and following intracavitary vaginal irradiation with 10 Gy in 0,75 cm (Ir-192, afterloading device, Buchler). Bacteriological swabs were taken prior to and following the insertion of a tube applicator. Anaerobic transport-media were used and cultures were performed aerobically and anaerobically. The mean number of aerobic species per patient increased slightly from 3.26 to 3.60 (n.s.), anaerobic species remained constant (1.36 before and 1.30 after irradiation). Also the frequency of isolation of most aerobic and of all anaerobic species was statistically not altered following irradiation. Staphylococcus epidermidis decreased from 51.4% to 22.8% significantly (2p [de

  18. Charged Particle Momentum Spectra in $e^+ e^-$ annihilation at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 192-209 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Amaral, P.; Anagnostou, G.; Anderson, K.J.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Bailey, I.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, R.J.; Batley, R.J.; Bechtle, P.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bell, P.J.; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Benelli, G.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Boeriu, O.; Bock, P.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Buesser, K.; Burckhart, H.J.; Campana, S.; Carnegie, R.K.; Caron, B.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Csilling, A.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Dallison, S.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Donkers, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Elfgren, E.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Feld, L.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Furtjes, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, John William; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giunta, Marina; Goldberg, J.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gunther, P.O.; Gupta, A.; Hajdu, C.; Hamann, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Harin-Dirac, M.; Hauschild, M.; Hauschildt, J.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Hensel, C.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Homer, R.J.; Horvath, D.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jeremie, H.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanaya, N.; Kanzaki, J.; Karapetian, G.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kim, D.H.; Klein, K.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kormos, Laura L.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Kramer, T.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Krop, D.; Kruger, K.; Kupper, M.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Layter, J.G.; Leins, A.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Lillich, J.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, J.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Marcellini, S.; Marchant, T.E.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Masetti, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.J.; McKenna, J.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Mendez-Lorenzo, P.; Menges, W.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Moed, S.; Mohr, W.; Mori, T.; Mutter, A.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oh, A.; Okpara, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pahl, C.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poli, B.; Polok, J.; Pooth, O.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rabbertz, K.; Rembser, C.; Renkel, P.; Rick, H.; Roney, J.M.; Rosati, S.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sarkisyan, E.K.G.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spagnolo, S.; Spano, F.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Tarem, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Taylor, R.J.; Teuscher, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Toya, D.; Tran, P.; Trefzger, T.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Ujvari, B.; Vachon, B.; Vollmer, C.F.; Vannerem, P.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Waller, D.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wetterling, D.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zer-Zion, D.; Zivkovic, Lidija

    2003-01-01

    Charged particle momentum distributions are studied in the reaction e+e- -> hadrons, using data collected with the OPAL detector at centre-of-mass energies from 192 GeV to 209 GeV. The data correspond to an average centre-of- mass energy of 201.7 GeV and a total integrated luminosity of 433 pb-1. The measured distributions and derived quantities, in combination with corresponding results obtained at lower centre-of-mass energies, are compared to QCD predictions in various theoretical approaches to study the energy dependence of the strong interaction and to test QCD as the theory describing it. In general, a good agreement is found between the measurements and the corresponding QCD predictions.

  19. Assessment of Absorbed Dose in Persons close to the Patients during 192Ir brachytherapy for Cervical Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Joo Young; Kang, Se Sik

    2010-01-01

    According to the 2007 Annual Report of the National Cancer Registry, cervical cancer showed an occurring frequency of 7th in female cancers and 4rd in females with an age of 35-64 years. Both radiotherapy and chemotherapy are mainly used for the treatment of cervical cancer. In case of radiotherapy, brachytherapy using radioisotopes in conjunction with external-beam radiation therapy (EBRT) using a linear accelerator is used in most cases to improve the outcome of cancer treatment. Brachytherapy, one of the cervical cancer radiotherapies, is a method that can minimize the damage of normal tissues restricting absorbed dose to uterus. It is, however, necessary to conduct a quantitative assessment on brachytherapy because it may cause radiation exposure to medical care providers during the radiotherapy. Therefore, the study provides the basic research data regarding brachytherapy for cervical cancer, estimating the absorbed dose in persons close to the patients using a mathematical phantom during 192Ir brachytherapy for cervical cancer

  20. Microdosimetric evaluation of relative biological effectiveness for 103PD, 125I, 241AM, and 192IR brachytherapy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuu, C.S.; Kliauga, P.; Zaider, M.; Amols, H.I.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the microdosimetric-derived relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of 103 Pd, 125 I, 241 Am, and 192 Ir brachytherapy sources at low doses and/or low dose rates. Methods and Materials: The Theory of Dual Radiation Action can be used to predict expected RBE values based on the spatial distribution of energy deposition at microscopic levels from these sources. Single-event lineal energy spectra for these isotopes have been obtained both experimentally and theoretically. A grid-defined wall-less proportional counter was used to measure the lineal energy distributions. Unlike conventional Rossi proportional counters, the counter used in these measurements has a conducting nylon fiber as the central collecting anode and has no metal parts. Thus, the Z-dependence of the photoelectric effect is eliminated as a source of measurement error. Single-event spectra for these brachytherapy sources have been also calculated by: (a) the Monte Carlo code MCNP to generate the electron slowing down spectrum, (b) transport of monoenergetic electron tracks, event by event, with our Monte Carlo code DELTA, (c) using the concept of associated volume to obtain the lineal energy distribution f(y) for each monoenergetic electron, and (d) obtaining the composite lineal energy spectrum for a given brachytherapy source based on the electron spectrum calculated at step (a). Results: Relative to 60 Co, the RBE values obtained from this study are: 2.3 for 103 Pd, 2.1 for 125 I, 2.1 for 241 Am, and 1.3 for 192 Ir. Conclusions: These values are consistent with available data from in vitro cell survival experiments. We suggest that, at least for these brachytherapy sources, microdosimetry may be used as a credible alternative to time-consuming (and often uncertain) radiobiological experiments to obtain information on radition quality and make reliable predictions of RBE in low dose rate brachytherapy

  1. Accuracy of applicator tip reconstruction in MRI-guided interstitial 192Ir-high-dose-rate brachytherapy of liver tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wybranski, Christian; Eberhardt, Benjamin; Fischbach, Katharina; Fischbach, Frank; Walke, Mathias; Hass, Peter; Röhl, Friedrich-Wilhelm; Kosiek, Ortrud; Kaiser, Mandy; Pech, Maciej; Lüdemann, Lutz; Ricke, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose: To evaluate the reconstruction accuracy of brachytherapy (BT) applicators tips in vitro and in vivo in MRI-guided 192 Ir-high-dose-rate (HDR)-BT of inoperable liver tumors. Materials and methods: Reconstruction accuracy of plastic BT applicators, visualized by nitinol inserts, was assessed in MRI phantom measurements and in MRI 192 Ir-HDR-BT treatment planning datasets of 45 patients employing CT co-registration and vector decomposition. Conspicuity, short-term dislocation, and reconstruction errors were assessed in the clinical data. The clinical effect of applicator reconstruction accuracy was determined in follow-up MRI data. Results: Applicator reconstruction accuracy was 1.6 ± 0.5 mm in the phantom measurements. In the clinical MRI datasets applicator conspicuity was rated good/optimal in ⩾72% of cases. 16/129 applicators showed not time dependent deviation in between MRI/CT acquisition (p > 0.1). Reconstruction accuracy was 5.5 ± 2.8 mm, and the average image co-registration error was 3.1 ± 0.9 mm. Vector decomposition revealed no preferred direction of reconstruction errors. In the follow-up data deviation of planned dose distribution and irradiation effect was 6.9 ± 3.3 mm matching the mean co-registration error (6.5 ± 2.5 mm; p > 0.1). Conclusion: Applicator reconstruction accuracy in vitro conforms to AAPM TG 56 standard. Nitinol-inserts are feasible for applicator visualization and yield good conspicuity in MRI treatment planning data. No preferred direction of reconstruction errors were found in vivo

  2. Paraoxonase 1 (Q192R) gene polymorphism, coronary heart disease and the risk of a new acute coronary event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Quintana, Efrén; Rodríguez-González, Fayna; Medina-Gil, José María; Garay-Sánchez, Paloma; Tugores, Antonio

    Paraoxonase 1 (PON1) plays a major role in the oxidation of low density lipoprotein and in the prevention of coronary atherogenesis. In this context, coding region polymorphisms of PON1 gene, responsible for the enzyme activity, has become of interest as a marker for atherogenesis. A study and follow-up was conducted on 529 patients with an acute coronary event in order to assess the association between the PON1 Q192R (rs662;A/G) polymorphism, the type of acute coronary syndrome, cardiovascular risk factors (arterial hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidaemia, and smoking), the extent and severity of coronary atherosclerosis, and the medium-term clinical follow-up. The QQ genotype was found in 245 (46.3%) patients, with 218 (41.2%) patients showing the QR genotype, and 66 (14.5%) patients had the RR genotype. No significant differences were found between the QQ and QR/RR genotypes as regards the clinical characteristics, the analytical data, and the angiographic variables. Similarly, Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed no significant differences in presenting with a new acute coronary event (p=0.598), cardiac mortality (p=0.701), stent thrombosis (p=0.508), or stent re-stenosis (p=0.598) between QQ and QR/RR genotypes during the follow-up period (3.3±2.2 years). In patients with an acute coronary syndrome, the PON1 Q192R genotypes did not influence the risk of suffering a new acute coronary event during the medium-term follow-up. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Information needs for demonstrating compliance with groundwater aspects of 40 CFR 192 for uranium mill tailings remedial action programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logsdon, M.J.; Verma, T.R.; Martin, D.E.

    1984-01-01

    Public Law 95-604, the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978, provides the Department of Energy with authority to perform remedial actions at designated inactive uranium-mill sites. The Environmental Protection Agency promulgated radiological and non-radiological standards (40 CFR 192) for remedial actions at inactive uranium-mill sites. All remedial actions require the concurrence of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Subpart C of 40 CFR 192 addresses the control of pollutants in groundwater at sites for which remedial action is proposed pursuant to P.L 95-604. As the authors interpret the regulation, it is essentially an admonition to carefully evaluate what is useful and practicable to deal with existing contamination and to control potential future contamination. In reviewing groundwater aspects of Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action documents, current NRC experience shows that the reports should address the following information needs: (1) The need to identify the physical and chemical nature of the present groundwater flow system in sufficient detail to provide a reasonable expectation that the extent and value of the groundwater resource to be protected is understood adequately; (2) The need to identify reasonable foreseeable events, both natural and man-made, that could alter the present groundwater flow system and the effects of such changes on the definition of the protected zone; (3) The need to identify current groundwater use within the protected zone; (4) The need to identify site-specific models, boundary conditions, and representative values of system parameters to predict with reasonable assurance that the proposed actions will protect groundwater and surface water resources for the design period of 200 - 1000 years

  4. 49 CFR 192.505 - Strength test requirements for steel pipeline to operate at a hoop stress of 30 percent or more...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Strength test requirements for steel pipeline to...: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Test Requirements § 192.505 Strength test requirements for steel pipeline... as provided in paragraph (e) of this section, the strength test must be conducted by maintaining the...

  5. Measurement of the g factor of the 3.1232 MeV 19/2- level in 43Sc by perturbed angular distribution method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Shengyun; Li Anli; Gou Zhenghui; Zheng Shengnan; Li Guangsheng

    1994-01-01

    The g-factor hence the magnetic moment, of the isomeric state 43 Sc(19/2 - , 3.1232 MeV) has been measured by the time differential perturbed angular distribution method. The measured values are g = 0.3279(19) and μ/μN = 3.108(18) nm

  6. Paraoxonase 1 gene (Gln192–Arg polymorphism and the risk of coronary artery disease in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Fahmy Elnoamany

    2012-06-01

    Conclusion: Arg allele of PON1 192 gene polymorphism is an independent risk factor for CAD and is associated not only with the presence of CAD but also with its extent and severity and its impact is clearly more pronounced in diabetic patients.

  7. 49 CFR 192.1015 - What must a master meter or small liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) operator do to implement this...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Gas Distribution Pipeline Integrity Management (IM) § 192.1015 What must...

  8. Comparison BIPM.RI(I)-K8 of high dose-rate Ir-192 brachytherapy standards for reference air kerma rate of the VSL and the BIPM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alvarez, J.T.; De Pooter, J.A.; Andersen, Claus E.

    2014-01-01

    An indirect comparison of the standards for reference air kerma rate for 192Ir high dose rate brachytherapy sources of the Dutch Metrology Institute (VSL), The Netherlands, and of the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) was carried out at the VSL in November 2009. The comparison resu...

  9. Evaluation of Wall Correction Factor of INER's Air-Kerma Primary Standard Chamber and Dose Variation by Source Displacement for HDR 192Ir Brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H. Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to estimate the wall effect of the self-made spherical graphite-walled cavity chamber with the Monte Carlo method for establishing the air-kerma primary standard of high-dose-rate (HDR 192Ir brachytherapy sources at the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER, Taiwan. The Monte Carlo method established in this paper was also employed to respectively simulate wall correction factors of the 192Ir air-kerma standard chambers used at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST, USA and the National Physical Laboratory (NPL, UK for comparisons and verification. The chamber wall correction calculation results will be incorporated into INER's HDR 192Ir primary standard in the future. For the brachytherapy treatment in the esophagus or in the bronchi, the position of the isotope may have displacement in the cavity. Thus the delivered dose would differ from the prescribed dose in the treatment plan. We also tried assessing dose distribution due to the position displacement of HDR 192Ir brachytherapy source in a phantom with a central cavity by the Monte Carlo method. The calculated results could offer a clinical reference for the brachytherapy within the human organs with cavity.

  10. Production of the sealed gamma-radiation sources of with iridium-192 radionuclide at the WWR-K research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petukhov, V.K.; Chernayev, V.P.; Chabeyev, N.T.; Ermakov, E.L.; Chakrov, P.V.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Conversion orientation of the WWR-K research reactor activity was established after renewal of its operation in 1997. A priority in reactor works was determined in the decision of tasks of practical use of nuclear technologies in a national economy in the next directions: in an industry, public health services and agriculture. The items of prime tasks: development and introduction of radiation technologies and manufacturing of radioisotopes for industry. This task included both scientific and technical program in the list of works of the Republican goals. At the WWR-K reactor within the framework of the this task solution the works on pilot production of the sealed sources of radioactive radiations (SSRR) with Ir-192 radionuclide for an industry of Republic of Kazakhstan were made. Organizational questions related to the Kazakhstan authority body and the regulating documentation were solved the first of all. The second stage was the development of the techniques of creating of devices providing an samples irradiation in reactor, control of sources sealing, measurements of the equivalent radiation doze from sources and high-quality support of SSRR manufacture over all technological way. At the third stage was made a little quantity SSRR with Ir-192 radionuclide, such as GIID-A1 (G6), for 'TEKOPS-660' Gammaray Projectors. This work served as experimental check of the decisions correctness, and has allowed to remove those lacks, to find out which it was possible only during direct manufacturing of radioactive sources. During performance of all these works the following was carried out: development and release of the documents and specifications regulating work on SSRR manufacture at the Institute of Nuclear Physics; personnel preparation and certification; preparation and equipment providing of reactor hot chambers by additional devices for work with irradiated iridium samples; development and manufacturing of the devices for iridium samples irradiation in

  11. Experimental 3D dosimetry around a high-dose-rate clinical 192Ir source using a polyacrylamide gel (PAG) dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McJury, M.; Tapper, P.D.; Griffin, S.; Cosgrove, V.P.; Webb, S.; Murphy, P.S.; Leach, M.O.; Oldham, M.

    1999-01-01

    It is well known that the experimental dosimetry of brachytherapy sources presents a challenge. Depending on the particular dosimeter used, measurements can suffer from poor spatial resolution (ion chambers), lack of 3D information (film) or errors due to the presence of the dosimeter itself distorting the radiation flux. To avoid these problems, we have investigated the dosimetry of a clinical 192 Ir source using a polyacrylamide gel (PAG) dosimeter. Experimental measurements of dose versus radial distance from the centre of the source (cross-line plots) were compared with calculations produced with a Nucletron NPS planning system. Good agreement was found between the planning system and gel measurements in planes selected for analysis. Gel dosimeter measurements in a coronal plane through the phantom showed a mean difference between measured absorbed dose and calculated dose of 0.17 Gy with SD=0.13Gy. Spatially, the errors at the reference point remain within one image pixel (1.0 mm). The use of polymer gel dosimetry shows promise for brachytherapy applications, offering complete, three-dimensional dose information, good spatial resolution and small measurement errors. Measurements close to the source, however, are difficult, due to some of the limiting properties of the polyacrylamide gel. (author)

  12. A CMOS RF-to-DC Power Converter With 86% Efficiency and -19.2-dBm Sensitivity

    KAUST Repository

    Almansouri, Abdullah Saud Mohammed

    2018-01-09

    This paper proposes an RF-to-dc power converter for ambient wireless powering that is efficient, highly sensitive, and less dependent on the load resistance with an extended dynamic range. The proposed rectifier utilizes a variable biasing technique to control the conduction of the rectifying transistors selectively, hence minimizing the leakage current; unlike the prior work that has a fixed feedback resistors, which limits the efficient operation to a relatively high RF power and causes a drop in the peak power conversion efficiency (PCE). The proposed design is fabricated using a 0.18-μm standard CMOS technology and occupies an area of 8800 μm². The measurement results show an 86% PCE and -19.2-dBm (12 μW) sensitivity when operating at the medical band 433 MHz with a 100-kΩ load. Furthermore, the PCE is 66%, and the sensitivity is -18.2 dBm (15.1 μW) when operating at UHF 900 MHz with a 100-kΩ load.

  13. Determination of non-uniformity correction factors for cylindrical ionization chambers close to 192Ir brachytherapy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toelli, H.; Bielajew, A. F.; Mattsson, O.; Sernbo, G.

    1995-01-01

    When ionization chambers are used in brachytherapy dosimetry, the measurements must be corrected for the non-uniformity of the incident photon fluence. The theory for determination of non-uniformity correction factors, developed by Kondo and Randolph (Rad. Res. 1960) assumes that the electron fluence within the air cavity is isotropic and does not take into account material differences in the chamber wall. The theory was extended by Bielajew (PMB 1990) using an anisotropic electron angular fluence in the cavity. In contrast to the theory by Kondo and Randolph, the anisotropic theory predicts a wall material dependence in the non-uniformity correction factors. This work presents experimental determination of non-uniformity correction factors at distances between 10 and 140 mm from an Ir-192 source. The experimental work makes use of a PTW23331-chamber and Farmer-type chambers (NE2571 and NE2581) with different materials in the walls. The results of the experiments agree well with the anisotropic theory. Due to the geometrical shape of the NE-type chambers, it is shown that the full length of the these chambers, 24.1mm, is not an appropriate input parameter when theoretical non-uniformity correction factors are evaluated

  14. Value of palliation and improvement in quality of life in oesophageal cancer patients treated with iridium - 192 HDR fractionated brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biaias, B.; Kaleta, R.; Fijaikowski, M.

    1996-01-01

    During December 1992 - November 1995 twenty-two patients with oesophageal cancer were treated with palliative HDR brachytherapy. Sixteen patients had local recurrence or progression after external radiotherapy and the remaining six patients were treated with brachytherapy alone. All patients received fractions of 7.5 Gy at the reference point 2 - 4 time weekly. Reference point was calculated at 0.5 cm distance from applicator surface. Microselectron HDR device with Iridium-192 source were used. Criteria for palliative effect were as follow: relive of symptoms time of occurrence and duration of palliative effect. Quality of life during and after treatment were evaluated by patients and staff independently. In majority of patients both palliative effect and significant improvement of quality of life were noted. Detail results include: - improvement in swallowing in 63,6% ((14(22))); - increase in body weight in 45% ((10(22))); - pain relive 70% ((12(17))); - appearance of palliation 1 hour - 8 days; - duration of palliation - 3-12 mo. (median 5 mo.); Quality of live - improvement - 59% ((13(22))); - no improvement - 27.3% ((6(22))); - worsening - 13.7% ((3(22))); No improvement or worsening in quality of life were observed only in patients who obtained radical radiotherapy previously. Brachytherapy is an effective method of palliative treatment for as well primary and recurrent oesophageal cancer

  15. A CMOS RF-to-DC Power Converter With 86% Efficiency and -19.2-dBm Sensitivity

    KAUST Repository

    Almansouri, Abdullah Saud Mohammed; Ouda, Mahmoud H.; Salama, Khaled N.

    2018-01-01

    This paper proposes an RF-to-dc power converter for ambient wireless powering that is efficient, highly sensitive, and less dependent on the load resistance with an extended dynamic range. The proposed rectifier utilizes a variable biasing technique to control the conduction of the rectifying transistors selectively, hence minimizing the leakage current; unlike the prior work that has a fixed feedback resistors, which limits the efficient operation to a relatively high RF power and causes a drop in the peak power conversion efficiency (PCE). The proposed design is fabricated using a 0.18-μm standard CMOS technology and occupies an area of 8800 μm². The measurement results show an 86% PCE and -19.2-dBm (12 μW) sensitivity when operating at the medical band 433 MHz with a 100-kΩ load. Furthermore, the PCE is 66%, and the sensitivity is -18.2 dBm (15.1 μW) when operating at UHF 900 MHz with a 100-kΩ load.

  16. What is the value of emission tomography studies in patients with a primary glioblastoma multiforme treated by 192Ir brachytherapy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koot, R.W.; Bosch, D.A.; Habraken, J.B.A.; Hulshof, M.C.C.M.; Paans, A.M.J.; Pruim, J.

    2008-01-01

    We studied the use of 201 thallium SPECT and L-[1- 11 C]-tyrosine PET in patients with a primary glioblastoma multiforme treated with 192 Ir brachytherapy after surgery and external beam radiation therapy. We hypothesised that the patients most likely to benefit from further surgery after deterioration would be those with radiation necrosis and would be recognised by a negative emission tomography scan. Twenty-one patients underwent 201 thallium SPECT performed before brachytherapy, and this was repeated in 19 patients when recurrence was suspected. Nine patients also underwent a PET scan at the same time. Nine patients underwent a second operation. SPECT and PET were highly concordant concerning the prediction of radionecrosis and/or tumor recurrence. Repeat surgery did not lead to a significant increase in survival. There was no significant association between the duration of survival and tumor-to-background ratio but the number studied was small. Both SPECT and PET showed highly active lesions, which were proved to be recurrent tumor by clinical and histological follow-up. Although PET and SPECT are both highly sensitive in detecting active tumor tissue, emission tomography was not clinically valuable in the investigation of patients with a primary glioblastoma treated with brachytherapy. (author)

  17. Identification of ensuremath J^{π = 19/2^+} and ensuremath 23/2^+ isomeric states in 127Sb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, H.; Lane, G. J.; Dracoulis, G. D.; Byrne, A. P.; Nieminen, P.; Kondev, F. G.; Ogawa, K.; Carpenter, M. P.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Lauritsen, T.; Seweryniak, D.; Zhu, S.; Chowdhury, P.

    2009-11-01

    The nucleus ensuremath ^{127Sb} , which is on the neutron-rich periphery of the ensuremath β -stability region, has been populated in complex nuclear reactions involving deep-inelastic and fusion-fission processes with ensuremath {^{136}Xe} beams incident on thick targets. The previously known isomer at 2325 keV in ensuremath {^{127}Sb} has been assigned spin and parity ensuremath 23/2^+ , based on the measured ensuremath γ - ensuremath γ angular correlations and total internal conversion coefficients. The half-life has been determined to be 234(12) ns, somewhat longer than the value reported previously. The 2194 keV state has been assigned ensuremath J^{π} = 19/2^+ and identified as an isomer with ensuremath T_{1/2} = 14(1) ns , decaying by two ensuremath E2 branches. The observed level energies and transition strengths are compared with the predictions of a shell model calculation. Two ensuremath 15/2^+ states have been identified close in energy, and their properties are discussed in terms of mixing between vibrational and three-quasiparticle configurations.

  18. Refresher course title: human health effects abstract title: Case Report: Iridium 192 - Health effects during 20 years after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snezana, Milacica; Jadranko, Simic

    2006-01-01

    Case Report has presented health effects of high level of irradiation with gamma rays from 192 Ir on the patient M. L. during 21 years after an incident. The main purpose was to investigate long time consequences of partial high level irradiation on human health. Locally, short-term irradiation with high, deadly dose, caused acute radiation syndrome with reversible disorder of function of the individual, most exposed, organs. Frequency of chromosomal aberrations (dicentric), characteristic for direct irradiation, was increased. However, dicentric analyzes did not give expected result for an acute radioactivity illness. Radio-dermatitis had begun already after the incident, while changes on the heart began gradually, not earlier than six months, up to two years after the incident. Irradiated parts of the patient skin have been changed with auto-transplanted skin and appropriate therapy had been taken. More than two decades after the irradiation, system (leukemia) nor solitary tumor on near organs (liver, heart, lungs, bones) did not happened. Radiation illness did not happened in spite of very large dose, because impacts were local and body was uneven irradiated. Also, an appropriate therapy was organized and potential illness did not happen. (authors)

  19. Refresher course title: human health effects abstract title: Case Report: Iridium 192 - Health effects during 20 years after irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snezana, Milacica [Belgrade Univ. of Institute of Occupational Medicine and Radiological Protection, Faculty of Medicine, Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro); Jadranko, Simic [South East Europe Consultants, Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)

    2006-07-01

    Case Report has presented health effects of high level of irradiation with gamma rays from {sup 192}Ir on the patient M. L. during 21 years after an incident. The main purpose was to investigate long time consequences of partial high level irradiation on human health. Locally, short-term irradiation with high, deadly dose, caused acute radiation syndrome with reversible disorder of function of the individual, most exposed, organs. Frequency of chromosomal aberrations (dicentric), characteristic for direct irradiation, was increased. However, dicentric analyzes did not give expected result for an acute radioactivity illness. Radio-dermatitis had begun already after the incident, while changes on the heart began gradually, not earlier than six months, up to two years after the incident. Irradiated parts of the patient skin have been changed with auto-transplanted skin and appropriate therapy had been taken. More than two decades after the irradiation, system (leukemia) nor solitary tumor on near organs (liver, heart, lungs, bones) did not happened. Radiation illness did not happened in spite of very large dose, because impacts were local and body was uneven irradiated. Also, an appropriate therapy was organized and potential illness did not happen. (authors)

  20. Search for Chargino and Neutralino Production at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 192-209 GeV at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Amaral, P.; Anagnostou, G.; Anderson, K.J.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Bailey, I.; Barberio, E.; Barillari, T.; Barlow, R.J.; Batley, R.J.; Bechtle, P.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bell, P.J.; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Benelli, G.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Boeriu, O.; Bock, P.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Buesser, K.; Burckhart, H.J.; Campana, S.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, D.G.; Ciocca, C.; Couchman, J.; Csilling, A.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Donkers, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Feld, L.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, John William; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giunta, Marina; Goldberg, J.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gunther, P.O.; Gupta, A.; Hajdu, C.; Hamann, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Harel, A.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Horvath, D.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jeremie, H.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanaya, N.; Kanzaki, J.; Karlen, D.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Klein, K.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kramer, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kruger, K.; Kuhl, T.; Kupper, M.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Layter, J.G.; Lellouch, D.; Lettso, J.; Levinson, L.; Lillich, J.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, A.; Ludwig, J.; Mader, W.; Marcellini, S.; Martin, A.J.; Masetti, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McKenna, J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menges, W.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Moed, S.; Mohr, W.; Mori, T.; Mutter, A.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Nanjo, H.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oh, A.; Okpara, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pahl, C.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poli, B.; Pooth, O.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rabbertz, K.; Rembser, C.; Renkel, P.; Roney, J.M.; Rosati, S.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sarkisyan, E.K.G.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Sherwood, P.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spano, F.; Stahl, A.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Tarem, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Teuscher, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Toya, D.; Tran, P.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Ujvari, B.; Vollmer, C.F.; Vannerem, P.; Vertesi, R.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Waller, D.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wetterling, D.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zer-Zion, D.; Zivkovic, Lidija

    2004-01-01

    Approximately 438 pb-1 of e+e- data from the OPAL detector, taken with the LEP collider running at centre-of-mass energies of 192-209 Gev, are analyzed to search for evidence of chargino pair production, e+e- -> tilde chi^+_1 tilde chi^-_1, or neutralino associated production, e+e- -> tilde chi^0_2 tilde chi^0_1. Limits are set at the 95% confidence level on the product of the cross-section for the process e+e- -> tilde chi^+_1 tilde chi^-_1 and its branching ratios to topologies containing jets and missing energy, of jest with a lepton and missing energy, and on the product of the cross-section for e+e- -> tilde chi^0_2 tilde chi^0_1 and its branching ratio to jets. R-parity conservation is assumed throughout this paper. When these results are interpreted in the context of the Constrained Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model, limits are also set on the masses of the tilde chi^+-_1, tilde chi^0_1 and tilde chi^0_2, and regions of the parameter space of the model are ruled out. Nearly model-independent limits...

  1. Chemonuclear studies for identification for new production routes for the therapeutically useful radionuclides {sup 140}Nd, {sup 192}Ir, {sup 191}Pt, {sup 193m}Pt, und {sup 195m}Pt; Kernchemische Studien zur Entwicklung neuerer Produktionsverfahren fuer die therapierelevanten Radionuklide {sup 140}Nd, {sup 192}Ir, {sup 191}Pt, {sup 193m}Pt, und {sup 195m}Pt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilgers, K.

    2005-12-15

    New production routes for the therapeutically useful radionuclides {sup 140}Nd, {sup 192}Ir, {sup 191}Pt, {sup 193m}Pt and {sup 195m}Pt were investigated. Cross section data were measured using the stacked-foil technique and compared with theoretical calculations. A production method for the platinum nuclides was developed. The {sup 141}Pr(p, 2n){sup 140}Nd and {sup nat}Ce({sup 3}He, xn){sup 140}Nd reactions were investigated for production of {sup 140}Nd. Cross section data of nuclear reactions leading to the side products {sup 141}Nd, {sup 139}Nd and {sup 139}Ce could also be achieved. The experimental data were compared with theoretical calculations using the code ALICE-IPPE. A comparison of the calculated thick target yields showed that the {sup 141}Pr(p, 2n){sup 140}Nd reaction gives a higher yield. The {sup 192}Os(p, n){sup 192}Ir reaction was examined in the context of the production of {sup 192}Ir. Cross section data were determined and compared with theoretical calculations using the codes ALICE-IPPE and EMPIRE II. The yield of this reaction was compared with the yield of the reactor production of this nuclide. The reactor production seems to be more suitable because of a higher purity and yield. Cross section data were measured for the {sup 192}Os({alpha}, n){sup 195m}Pt, {sup 192}Os({alpha}, 3n){sup 193m}Pt and {sup 192}Os({sup 3}He, 4n){sup 191}Pt reactions. The activity of {sup 193m}Pt and {sup 195m}Pt was determined by X-ray spectroscopy after a chemical separation procedure. The ALICE-IPPE code was found to be inappropriate to reproduce the experimental values. The calculated yields were compared with the yields of other reactions, especially the reactor production of {sup 195m}Pt. The yield of the {sup 192}Os({alpha}, n){sup 195m}Pt reaction is lower compared to the yield of the reactor production, but offers lower target costs and higher specific activity. A production method for {sup 193m}Pt and {sup 195m}Pt was developed. Batch yields of 0.9 MBq

  2. The IPEM code of practice for determination of the reference air kerma rate for HDR 192Ir brachytherapy sources based on the NPL air kerma standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bidmead, A M; Sander, T; Nutbrown, R F; Locks, S M; Lee, C D; Aird, E G A; Flynn, A

    2010-01-01

    This paper contains the recommendations of the high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy working party of the UK Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (IPEM). The recommendations consist of a Code of Practice (COP) for the UK for measuring the reference air kerma rate (RAKR) of HDR 192 Ir brachytherapy sources. In 2004, the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) commissioned a primary standard for the realization of RAKR of HDR 192 Ir brachytherapy sources. This has meant that it is now possible to calibrate ionization chambers directly traceable to an air kerma standard using an 192 Ir source (Sander and Nutbrown 2006 NPL Report DQL-RD 004 (Teddington: NPL) http://publications.npl.co.uk). In order to use the source specification in terms of either RAKR, .K R (ICRU 1985 ICRU Report No 38 (Washington, DC: ICRU); ICRU 1997 ICRU Report No 58 (Bethesda, MD: ICRU)), or air kerma strength, S K (Nath et al 1995 Med. Phys. 22 209-34), it has been necessary to develop algorithms that can calculate the dose at any point around brachytherapy sources within the patient tissues. The AAPM TG-43 protocol (Nath et al 1995 Med. Phys. 22 209-34) and the 2004 update TG-43U1 (Rivard et al 2004 Med. Phys. 31 633-74) have been developed more fully than any other protocol and are widely used in commercial treatment planning systems. Since the TG-43 formalism uses the quantity air kerma strength, whereas this COP uses RAKR, a unit conversion from RAKR to air kerma strength was included in the appendix to this COP. It is recommended that the measured RAKR determined with a calibrated well chamber traceable to the NPL 192 Ir primary standard is used in the treatment planning system. The measurement uncertainty in the source calibration based on the system described in this COP has been reduced considerably compared to other methods based on interpolation techniques.

  3. The Q192R polymorphism of the paraoxonase-1 (PON1) gene is associated with susceptibility to gestational diabetes mellitus in the Greek population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappa, Kalliopi I; Gazouli, Maria; Anastasiou, Eleni; Loutradis, Dimitrios; Anagnou, Nicholas P

    2017-08-01

    A key factor protecting from oxidative stress in gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and in type 2 diabetes (T2D) is paraoxonase-1 (PON1). Inconclusive and limited data exist regarding the effect of a coding polymorphism (Q192R) of the PON1 gene in conferring susceptibility to both states. In the present study, we investigated the association between the PON1 gene and the risk for GDM in the Greek population and assessed for the first time its transcriptional efficiency. We studied 185 women with GDM and 104 non-diabetic controls for the PON1 polymorphism. For PON1 mRNA expression, peripheral leucocytes were harvested from 20 GDM and 20 control women, harboring different genotypes for the polymorphism, using real-time quantitative PCR. The RR genotype and the R allele of the PON1 Q192R polymorphism were significantly associated with an increased risk for GDM (p = 0.012 and p < 0.0001, respectively). Furthermore, there was no statistical correlation between the individual metabolic parameters tested and the three genotypes. Finally, the expression levels of PON1 mRNA in GDM patients did not exhibit any statistical difference compared with normal controls (p = 0.138). These data independently document that the Q192R polymorphism is closely associated with GDM susceptibility, while the PON1 gene expression is not impaired in GDM.

  4. p.Q192R SNP of PON1 seems not to be Associated with Carotid Atherosclerosis Risk Factors in an Asymptomatic and Normolipidemic Brazilian Population Sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Zanetti Scherrer

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background:Evidences suggest that paraoxonase 1 (PON1 confers important antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties when associated with high-density lipoprotein (HDL.Objective:To investigate the relationships between p.Q192R SNP of PON1, biochemical parameters and carotid atherosclerosis in an asymptomatic, normolipidemic Brazilian population sample.Methods:We studied 584 volunteers (females n = 326, males n = 258; 19-75 years of age. Total genomic DNA was extracted and SNP was detected in the TaqMan® SNP OpenArray® genotyping platform (Applied Biosystems, Foster City, CA. Plasma lipoproteins and apolipoproteins were determined and PON1 activity was measured using paraoxon as a substrate. High-resolution β-mode ultrasonography was used to measure cIMT and the presence of carotid atherosclerotic plaques in a subgroup of individuals (n = 317.Results:The presence of p.192Q was associated with a significant increase in PON1 activity (RR = 12.30 (11.38; RQ = 46.96 (22.35; QQ = 85.35 (24.83 μmol/min; p Conclusion:In low-risk individuals, the presence of the p.192Q variant of PON1 is associated with a beneficial plasma lipid profile but not with carotid atherosclerosis.

  5. Cochlear Implant Electrode Localization Using an Ultra-High Resolution Scan Mode on Conventional 64-Slice and New Generation 192-Slice Multi-Detector Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Matthew L; Leng, Shuai; Diehn, Felix E; Witte, Robert J; Krecke, Karl N; Grimes, Josh; Koeller, Kelly K; Bruesewitz, Michael R; McCollough, Cynthia H; Lane, John I

    2017-08-01

    A new generation 192-slice multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) clinical scanner provides enhanced image quality and superior electrode localization over conventional MDCT. Currently, accurate and reliable cochlear implant electrode localization using conventional MDCT scanners remains elusive. Eight fresh-frozen cadaveric temporal bones were implanted with full-length cochlear implant electrodes. Specimens were subsequently scanned with conventional 64-slice and new generation 192-slice MDCT scanners utilizing ultra-high resolution modes. Additionally, all specimens were scanned with micro-CT to provide a reference criterion for electrode position. Images were reconstructed according to routine temporal bone clinical protocols. Three neuroradiologists, blinded to scanner type, reviewed images independently to assess resolution of individual electrodes, scalar localization, and severity of image artifact. Serving as the reference standard, micro-CT identified scalar crossover in one specimen; imaging of all remaining cochleae demonstrated complete scala tympani insertions. The 192-slice MDCT scanner exhibited improved resolution of individual electrodes (p implant imaging compared with conventional MDCT. This technology provides important feedback regarding electrode position and course, which may help in future optimization of surgical technique and electrode design.

  6. Surface dose characterisation of the Varian Ir-192 HDR conical surface applicator set with a vertically orientated source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchauer, Konrad; Henke, Guido; Schiefer, Hans; Plasswilm, Ludwig [Kantonsspital St. Gallen, Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Gallen (Switzerland)

    2014-12-15

    Conical surface applicators with an Ir-192 high-dose-rate brachytherapy source are a common modality for the treatment of non-melanomatous skin cancer with high tumour control rates. Surface dose characterisation of the Varian Varisource GammaMed+ IX afterloader vertical type surface applicators is performed two dimensionally using high-resolution film dosimetry. The focus of this study was to determine if Varian surface applicators with a vertical source suffer from the dose distribution irregularities reported for comparable applicators. Our goal was to evaluate if the irregularities found affected treatment and dose output verification procedures. Ionisation chamber-based verification of applicator output was established according to guidelines provided by the manufacturer. For additional measurement of surface dose Gafchromic EBT3 film dosimetry was used. The term ''therapeutic dose'' was defined as 85 % of the prescribed dose level. For the 10 different applicator inserts evaluated, cold spots were observed. Mean cold spot size was 2.0 mm x 3.6 mm (± 0.6 mm). The cold spots were dosimetrically well below 85 % of the prescribed dose. The cold spot was situated 2.2 mm (1.4-2.7 mm) unilaterally from the central axis and caused general asymmetry in the dose profiles intersecting the cold spot area. A source tilt of approximately 8 (± 1 ) was determined for the source used for irradiation. A central underdosed area exceeding 15 % of the prescribed dose has not been previously reported. Source tilt was observed and found to affect clinical use and possibly treatment outcome in applicators using a vertically arranged source. Surface applicators with a vertically orientated source were subject to dose irregularities that could impact on chamber-based applicator output verification procedures. We recommend film dosimetry-backed applicator commissioning to avoid systematic errors. (orig.) [German] Konische Oberflaechenapplikatoren sind ein

  7. SU-E-T-457: Design and Characterization of An Economical 192Ir Hemi-Brain Small Animal Irradiator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grams, M; Wilson, Z; Sio, T; Beltran, C; Tryggestad, E; Gupta, S; Blackwell, C; McCollough, K; Sarkaria, J; Furutani, K

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the design and dosimetric characterization of a simple and economical small animal irradiator. Methods: A high dose rate 192Ir brachytherapy source from a commercially available afterloader was used with a 1.3 centimeter thick tungsten collimator to provide sharp beam penumbra suitable for hemi-brain irradiation of mice. The unit is equipped with continuous gas anesthesia to allow robust animal immobilization. Dosimetric characterization of the device was performed with Gafchromic film. The penumbra from the small animal irradiator was compared under similar collimating conditions to the penumbra from 6 MV photons, 6 MeV electrons, and 20 MeV electrons from a linear accelerator as well as 300 kVp photons from an orthovoltage unit and Monte Carlo simulated 90 MeV protons. Results: The tungsten collimator provides a sharp penumbra suitable for hemi-brain irradiation, and dose rates on the order of 200 cGy/minute were achieved. The sharpness of the penumbra attainable with this device compares favorably to those measured experimentally for 6 MV photons, and 6 and 20 MeV electron beams from a linear accelerator. Additionally, the penumbra was comparable to those measured for a 300 kVp orthovoltage beam and a Monte Carlo simulated 90 MeV proton beam. Conclusions: The small animal irradiator described here can be built for under $1,000 and used in conjunction with any commercial brachytherapy afterloader to provide a convenient and cost-effective option for small animal irradiation experiments. The unit offers high dose rate delivery and sharp penumbra, which is ideal for hemi-brain irradiation of mice. With slight modifications to the design, irradiation of sites other than the brain could be accomplished easily. Due to its simplicity and low cost, the apparatus described is an attractive alternative for small animal irradiation experiments requiring a sharp penumbra

  8. Loss of an iridium-192 source and therapy misadministration at Indiana Regional Cancer Center, Indiana, Pennsylvania, on November 16, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-02-01

    On December 1, 1992, the Indiana Regional Cancer Center reported to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) Region I that they believed a 1.37 E + 11 becquerel (3.7-curie) iridium-192 source from their Omnitron 2000 high dose rate remote brachytherapy afterloader had been found at a biohazard waste transfer station in Carnegie, Pennsylvania. After notifying the NRC, this cancer center, one of several operated by the licensee, Oncology Services Corporation, retrieved the source, and Region I dispatched an inspector and a supervisor to investigate the event. The source was first detected when it triggered radiation alarms at a waste incinerator facility in. Warren, Ohio. The licensee informed the NRC that the source wire had apparently broken during treatment of a patient on November 16, 1992, leaving the source in the patient. On the basis of the seriousness of the incident, the NRC elevated its response to an Incident Investigation. The Incident Investigation Team initiated its investigation on December 3, 1992. The investigation team concluded that the patient received a serious misadministration and died on November 21, 1992, and that over 90 individuals were exposed to radiation from November 16 to December 1, 1992. In a press release dated January 26, 1993, the Indiana County Coroner stated that the cause of death listed in the official autopsy report was ''Acute Radiational Exposure and Consequences Thereof'' An almost identical source wire failure occurred with an afterloader in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, on December 7, 1992, but with minimal radiological consequences. This incident was included in the investigation. This report discusses the Omnitron 2000 high dose rate afterloader source-wire failure, the reasons why the failure was not detected by Indiana Regional Cancer Center, the potential consequences to the patient, the estimated radiological doses to workers and the public, and regulatory aspects associated with this incident

  9. Dosimetric and radiobiological comparison of TG-43 and Monte Carlo calculations in 192Ir breast brachytherapy applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peppa, V; Pappas, E P; Karaiskos, P; Major, T; Polgár, C; Papagiannis, P

    2016-10-01

    To investigate the clinical significance of introducing model based dose calculation algorithms (MBDCAs) as an alternative to TG-43 in 192 Ir interstitial breast brachytherapy. A 57 patient cohort was used in a retrospective comparison between TG-43 based dosimetry data exported from a treatment planning system and Monte Carlo (MC) dosimetry performed using MCNP v. 6.1 with plan and anatomy information in DICOM-RT format. Comparison was performed for the target, ipsilateral lung, heart, skin, breast and ribs, using dose distributions, dose-volume histograms (DVH) and plan quality indices clinically used for plan evaluation, as well as radiobiological parameters. TG-43 overestimation of target DVH parameters is statistically significant but small (less than 2% for the target coverage indices and 4% for homogeneity indices, on average). Significant dose differences (>5%) were observed close to the skin and at relatively large distances from the implant leading to a TG-43 dose overestimation for the organs at risk. These differences correspond to low dose regions (<50% of the prescribed dose), being less than 2% of the prescribed dose. Detected dosimetric differences did not induce clinically significant differences in calculated tumor control probabilities (mean absolute difference <0.2%) and normal tissue complication probabilities. While TG-43 shows a statistically significant overestimation of most indices used for plan evaluation, differences are small and therefore not clinically significant. Improved MBDCA dosimetry could be important for re-irradiation, technique inter-comparison and/or the assessment of secondary cancer induction risk, where accurate dosimetry in the whole patient anatomy is of the essence. Copyright © 2016 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. EME 192 Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mora, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pascall, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dudoff, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Moran, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-03-15

    I spent the quarter working in Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory’s (LLNL) Materials Engineering Division. The group I have been working with (I’ve been here for two summers already) focuses on advanced manufacturing techniques such as stereolithography, electrophoretic deposition, and the printing of silicon based inks. Part of the goal of what is done in our group is to create designer materials not by altering the composition but by altering the micro-architecture. Our technology can create shapes that are not possible with traditional manufacturing techniques. This allows us to create structures that are light, yet very strong and stiff. It also allows us to create materials with property gradients. In other words, we can make structures and parts that are stronger in some locations than others. I have been working with electrophoretic deposition for the duration of my stay and have focused on advancing the technology from a thin-film technique to a true additive manufacturing paradigm. Put succinctly, electrophoretic deposition is the deposition of particles in suspension with electric fields. Particles have a potential on the surface which allows them to be driven to an electrode using an electric field. The particles then deposit onto the conductive regions of the substrate, traditionally, the entire surface. Electrophoretic deposition is powerful in that it can handle a wide variety of materials (ceramics, metals, bacteria), create material gradients in the deposits, and create layered deposition of multiple materials. A drawback of traditional electrophoretic deposition is that patterned deposits are only possible with a non-reconfigurable patterned electrode. A technique was developed at LLNL that allows for the arbitrary patterning of the electric field using photoconductive electrodes and light. This way, you can create interesting shapes and reconfigure the pattern of the deposit using the same electrode. A photoconductive electrode is made by hydrothermally growing titania nanorods onto a transparent current collector. A photomask is used to block incoming some light and only allow the desired pattern of light through. The photoconductive electrode then activates when and where the light hits, once an electric field is applied. Particles will migrate to the areas of illumation and deposit.

  11. p.Q192R SNP of PON1 seems not to be Associated with Carotid Atherosclerosis Risk Factors in an Asymptomatic and Normolipidemic Brazilian Population Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherrer, Daniel Zanetti; Zago, Vanessa Helena de Souza; Vieira, Isabela Calanca; Parra, Eliane Soler; Panzoldo, Natália Baratella; Alexandre, Fernanda; Secolin, Rodrigo; Baracat, Jamal; Quintão, Eder Carlos Rocha; de Faria, Eliana Cotta

    2015-01-01

    Background Evidences suggest that paraoxonase 1 (PON1) confers important antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties when associated with high-density lipoprotein (HDL). Objective To investigate the relationships between p.Q192R SNP of PON1, biochemical parameters and carotid atherosclerosis in an asymptomatic, normolipidemic Brazilian population sample. Methods We studied 584 volunteers (females n = 326, males n = 258; 19-75 years of age). Total genomic DNA was extracted and SNP was detected in the TaqMan® SNP OpenArray® genotyping platform (Applied Biosystems, Foster City, CA). Plasma lipoproteins and apolipoproteins were determined and PON1 activity was measured using paraoxon as a substrate. High-resolution β-mode ultrasonography was used to measure cIMT and the presence of carotid atherosclerotic plaques in a subgroup of individuals (n = 317). Results The presence of p.192Q was associated with a significant increase in PON1 activity (RR = 12.30 (11.38); RQ = 46.96 (22.35); QQ = 85.35 (24.83) μmol/min; p < 0.0001), HDL-C (RR= 45 (37); RQ = 62 (39); QQ = 69 (29) mg/dL; p < 0.001) and apo A-I (RR = 140.76 ± 36.39; RQ = 147.62 ± 36.92; QQ = 147.49 ± 36.65 mg/dL; p = 0.019). Stepwise regression analysis revealed that heterozygous and p.192Q carriers influenced by 58% PON1 activity towards paraoxon. The univariate linear regression analysis demonstrated that p.Q192R SNP was not associated with mean cIMT; as a result, in the multiple regression analysis, no variables were selected with 5% significance. In logistic regression analysis, the studied parameters were not associated with the presence of carotid plaques. Conclusion In low-risk individuals, the presence of the p.192Q variant of PON1 is associated with a beneficial plasma lipid profile but not with carotid atherosclerosis. PMID:26039660

  12. Downregulation of miR-192 causes hepatic steatosis and lipid accumulation by inducing SREBF1: Novel mechanism for bisphenol A-triggered non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi; Ding, Dongxiao; Huang, Qiansheng; Liu, Qiong; Lu, Haoyang; Lu, Yanyang; Chi, Yulang; Sun, Xia; Ye, Guozhu; Zhu, Huimin; Wei, Jie; Dong, Sijun

    2017-09-01

    Exposure to Bisphenol A (BPA) has been associated with the development of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Given that microRNA (miRNA) is recognized as a key regulator of lipid metabolism and a potential mediator of environmental cues, this study was designed to explore whether exposure to BPA-triggered abnormal steatosis and lipid accumulation in the liver could be modulated by miR-192. We showed that male post-weaning C57BL/6 mice exposed to 50μg/kg/day of BPA by oral gavage for 90days displayed a NAFLD-like phenotype. In addition, we found in mouse liver and human HepG2 cells that BPA-induced hepatic steatosis and lipid accumulation were associated with decreased expression of miR-192, upregulation of SREBF1 and a series of genes involved in de novo lipogenesis. Downregulation of miR-192 in BPA-exposed hepatocytes could be due to defective pre-miR-192 processing by DROSHA. Using HepG2 cells, we further confirmed that miR-192 directly acted on the 3'UTR of SREBF1, contributing to dysregulation of lipid homeostasis in hepatocytes. MiR-192 mimic and lentivirus-mediated overexpression of miR-192 improved BPA-induced hepatic steatosis by suppressing SREBF1. Lastly, we noted that lipid accumulation was not a strict requirement for developing insulin resistance in mice after BPA treatment. In conclusion, this study demonstrated a novel mechanism in which NAFLD associated with BPA exposure arose from alterations in the miR-192-SREBF1 axis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Worldwide burden of disease from exposure to second-hand smoke: a retrospective analysis of data from 192 countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberg, Mattias; Jaakkola, Maritta S; Woodward, Alistair; Peruga, Armando; Prüss-Ustün, Annette

    2011-01-08

    Exposure to second-hand smoke is common in many countries but the magnitude of the problem worldwide is poorly described. We aimed to estimate the worldwide exposure to second-hand smoke and its burden of disease in children and adult non-smokers in 2004. The burden of disease from second-hand smoke was estimated as deaths and disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) for children and adult non-smokers. The calculations were based on disease-specific relative risk estimates and area-specific estimates of the proportion of people exposed to second-hand smoke, by comparative risk assessment methods, with data from 192 countries during 2004. Worldwide, 40% of children, 33% of male non-smokers, and 35% of female non-smokers were exposed to second-hand smoke in 2004. This exposure was estimated to have caused 379,000 deaths from ischaemic heart disease, 165,000 from lower respiratory infections, 36,900 from asthma, and 21,400 from lung cancer. 603,000 deaths were attributable to second-hand smoke in 2004, which was about 1·0% of worldwide mortality. 47% of deaths from second-hand smoke occurred in women, 28% in children, and 26% in men. DALYs lost because of exposure to second-hand smoke amounted to 10·9 million, which was about 0·7% of total worldwide burden of diseases in DALYs in 2004. 61% of DALYs were in children. The largest disease burdens were from lower respiratory infections in children younger than 5 years (5,939,000), ischaemic heart disease in adults (2,836,000), and asthma in adults (1,246,000) and children (651,000). These estimates of worldwide burden of disease attributable to second-hand smoke suggest that substantial health gains could be made by extending effective public health and clinical interventions to reduce passive smoking worldwide. Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare and Bloomberg Philanthropies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. AAPM and GEC-ESTRO guidelines for image-guided robotic brachytherapy: Report of Task Group 192

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podder, Tarun K., E-mail: tarun.podder@uhhospitals.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44122 (United States); Beaulieu, Luc [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier Univ de Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Caldwell, Barrett [Schools of Industrial Engineering and Aeronautics and Astronautics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Cormack, Robert A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Crass, Jostin B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37232 (United States); Dicker, Adam P.; Yu, Yan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19107 (United States); Fenster, Aaron [Department of Imaging Research, Robarts Research Institute, London, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada); Fichtinger, Gabor [School of Computer Science, Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario K7L 3N6 (Canada); Meltsner, Michael A. [Philips Radiation Oncology Systems, Fitchburg, Wisconsin 53711 (United States); Moerland, Marinus A. [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, 3508 GA (Netherlands); Nath, Ravinder [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); Rivard, Mark J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States); Salcudean, Tim [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z4 (Canada); Song, Danny Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21231 (United States); Thomadsen, Bruce R. [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States)

    2014-10-15

    In the last decade, there have been significant developments into integration of robots and automation tools with brachytherapy delivery systems. These systems aim to improve the current paradigm by executing higher precision and accuracy in seed placement, improving calculation of optimal seed locations, minimizing surgical trauma, and reducing radiation exposure to medical staff. Most of the applications of this technology have been in the implantation of seeds in patients with early-stage prostate cancer. Nevertheless, the techniques apply to any clinical site where interstitial brachytherapy is appropriate. In consideration of the rapid developments in this area, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) commissioned Task Group 192 to review the state-of-the-art in the field of robotic interstitial brachytherapy. This is a joint Task Group with the Groupe Européen de Curiethérapie-European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (GEC-ESTRO). All developed and reported robotic brachytherapy systems were reviewed. Commissioning and quality assurance procedures for the safe and consistent use of these systems are also provided. Manual seed placement techniques with a rigid template have an estimated in vivo accuracy of 3–6 mm. In addition to the placement accuracy, factors such as tissue deformation, needle deviation, and edema may result in a delivered dose distribution that differs from the preimplant or intraoperative plan. However, real-time needle tracking and seed identification for dynamic updating of dosimetry may improve the quality of seed implantation. The AAPM and GEC-ESTRO recommend that robotic systems should demonstrate a spatial accuracy of seed placement ≤1.0 mm in a phantom. This recommendation is based on the current performance of existing robotic brachytherapy systems and propagation of uncertainties. During clinical commissioning, tests should be conducted to ensure that this level of accuracy is achieved. These tests

  15. Muscle invasive bladder cancer treated by transurethral resection, followed by external beam radiation and interstitial iridium-192

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wijnmaalen, Arendjan; Helle, Peter A.; Koper, Peter C.M.; Jansen, Peter P.; Hanssens, Patrick E.J.; Boeken Kruger, Cornelis G.G.; Putten, Wim L.J. van

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: In our center interstitial radiation has played an important role in the treatment of bladder cancer patients for over 40 years. Radium needles, that were initially used, were replaced by caesium needles in 1983, whereas the afterloading iridium wire technique was adopted in 1989. Patients with solitary tumors (T1, T2 and T3) with a surface diameter of < 5 cm are considered for interstitial radiation. In this study we report on the results of the afterloading iridium wire technique in patients with muscle invasive bladder cancer. Materials and Methods: From May 1989 to September 1993 interstitial radiation using iridium wires was part of the treatment in 46 patients with muscle invasive bladder cancer (37 T2, 9 T3). The mean age was 67 years. After transurethral resection of all visible tumor (if possible), in most cases 40 Gy (20 x 2.0 Gy, midplane dose) external beam radiation was delivered to the true pelvis, followed by 30 Gy interstitial radiation using iridium-192 wires covering the tumor area in the bladder. Results: After a median follow-up of 26 months, bladder relapses occurred in 7 patients. In 5 of them the tumor relapsed in the initial area, in 1 patient elsewhere in the bladder and in 1 patient tumor recurred in and outside the initial site. Recurrence was superficial (T1) in 4 patients. A relapse in the urethra was found once. Metastases developed in 13 patients, in 8 without bladder relapse. During the observation period 17 patients died, 13 due to bladder cancer. The actuarial bladder relapse-free survival at 4 years was 74% and 82% for T2 and T3 tumors, respectively. The actuarial distant metastases-free survival was 65% for both categories. No serious toxicity was recorded. Conclusion: In a selected group of patients with muscle invasive bladder cancer transurethral resection in combination with external beam and interstitial radiation provides an excellent opportunity to preserve the bladder with a high chance of success. Development of

  16. Muscle invasive bladder cancer treated by transurethral resection, followed by external beam radiation and interstitial iridium-192

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wijnmaalen, Arendjan; Helle, Peter A.; Koper, Peter C.M.; Jansen, Peter P.; Hanssen, Patrick E.; Kruger, Cornelis G.G. Boeken; Putten, Wim L.J. van

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the results of transurethral resection (TUR), external beam radiotherapy (EBRT), and interstitial radiation (IRT) with iridium-192, using the afterloading technique in patients with muscle invasive bladder cancer. Methods and Materials: From May 1989 until September 1995, 66 patients with primary, solitary muscle invasive bladder cancer were treated with TUR, EBRT, and IRT, aiming at bladder preservation. According to the protocol, in three patients low-dose EBRT was applied, whereas 63 patients received high-dose EBRT. Immediately prior to IRT, 42 patients underwent a lymphnode dissection, and in 16 cases a partial cystectomy was performed. For IRT, two to five catheters were used and IRT was started within 24 h after surgery. The majority of patients received 30 Gy of IRT, with a mean dose rate of .58 Gy/h. In three patients, additional EBRT was applied following IRT. Follow-up consisted of regular cystoscopies, mostly done during joint clinics of urologist and radiation oncologist, with urine cytology routinely performed. The median follow-up period was 26 months. The Kaplan-Meier method was used for the determination of survival rates. Results: In seven patients, a bladder relapse developed. The probability of remaining bladder relapse free at 5 years was 88%. The bladder was preserved in 98% of the surviving patients. Metastases developed in 16 patients, and the probability of remaining metastasis free at 5 years was 66%. The cumulative 5-year overall and bladder and distant relapse free survival were 48% and 69%, respectively. Acute toxicity was not serious in the majority of cases; surgical correction of a persisting vesicocutaneous fistula was necessary in two patients, whereas a wound toilet had to be performed in another patient. Serious late toxicity (bladder, RTOG Grade 3) was experienced by only one patient. Conclusions: Interstitial radiation preceded by TUR and EBRT, in a selected group of patients with muscle invasive bladder

  17. AAPM and GEC-ESTRO guidelines for image-guided robotic brachytherapy: Report of Task Group 192

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podder, Tarun K.; Beaulieu, Luc; Caldwell, Barrett; Cormack, Robert A.; Crass, Jostin B.; Dicker, Adam P.; Yu, Yan; Fenster, Aaron; Fichtinger, Gabor; Meltsner, Michael A.; Moerland, Marinus A.; Nath, Ravinder; Rivard, Mark J.; Salcudean, Tim; Song, Danny Y.; Thomadsen, Bruce R.

    2014-01-01

    In the last decade, there have been significant developments into integration of robots and automation tools with brachytherapy delivery systems. These systems aim to improve the current paradigm by executing higher precision and accuracy in seed placement, improving calculation of optimal seed locations, minimizing surgical trauma, and reducing radiation exposure to medical staff. Most of the applications of this technology have been in the implantation of seeds in patients with early-stage prostate cancer. Nevertheless, the techniques apply to any clinical site where interstitial brachytherapy is appropriate. In consideration of the rapid developments in this area, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) commissioned Task Group 192 to review the state-of-the-art in the field of robotic interstitial brachytherapy. This is a joint Task Group with the Groupe Européen de Curiethérapie-European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (GEC-ESTRO). All developed and reported robotic brachytherapy systems were reviewed. Commissioning and quality assurance procedures for the safe and consistent use of these systems are also provided. Manual seed placement techniques with a rigid template have an estimated in vivo accuracy of 3–6 mm. In addition to the placement accuracy, factors such as tissue deformation, needle deviation, and edema may result in a delivered dose distribution that differs from the preimplant or intraoperative plan. However, real-time needle tracking and seed identification for dynamic updating of dosimetry may improve the quality of seed implantation. The AAPM and GEC-ESTRO recommend that robotic systems should demonstrate a spatial accuracy of seed placement ≤1.0 mm in a phantom. This recommendation is based on the current performance of existing robotic brachytherapy systems and propagation of uncertainties. During clinical commissioning, tests should be conducted to ensure that this level of accuracy is achieved. These tests

  18. An investigation into the accuracy of Acuros(TM) BV in heterogeneous phantoms for a (192)Ir HDR source using LiF TLDs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Siobhan; Nyathi, Thulani

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of the new Acuros(TM) BV algorithm using well characterized LiF:Mg,Ti TLD 100 in heterogeneous phantoms. TLDs were calibrated using an (192)Ir source and the AAPM TG-43 calculated dose. The Tölli and Johansson Large Cavity principle and Modified Bragg Gray principle methods confirm the dose calculated by TG-43 at a distance of 5 cm from the source to within 4 %. These calibrated TLDs were used to measure the dose in heterogeneous phantoms containing air, stainless steel, bone and titanium. The TLD results were compared with the AAPM TG-43 calculated dose and the Acuros calculated dose. Previous studies by other authors have shown a change in TLD response with depth when irradiated with an (192)Ir source. This TLD depth dependence was assessed by performing measurements at different depths in a water phantom with an (192)Ir source. The variation in the TLD response with depth in a water phantom was not found to be statistically significant for the distances investigated. The TLDs agreed with Acuros(TM) BV within 1.4 % in the air phantom, 3.2 % in the stainless steel phantom, 3 % in the bone phantom and 5.1 % in the titanium phantom. The TLDs showed a larger discrepancy when compared to TG-43 with a maximum deviation of 9.3 % in the air phantom, -11.1 % in the stainless steel phantom, -14.6 % in the bone phantom and -24.6 % in the titanium phantom. The results have shown that Acuros accounts for the heterogeneities investigated with a maximum deviation of -5.1 %. The uncertainty associated with the TLDs calibrated in the PMMA phantom is ±8.2 % (2SD).

  19. Radial dose functions for 103Pd, 125I, 169Yb and 192Ir brachytherapy sources: an EGS4 Monte Carlo study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mainegra, E.

    2000-01-01

    Radial dose functions g(r) in water around 103 Pd, 125 I, 169 Yb and 192 Ir brachytherapy sources were estimated by means of the EGS4 simulation system and extensively compared with experimental as well as with theoretical results. The DLC-136/PHOTX cross section library, water molecular form factors, bound Compton scattering and Doppler broadening of the Compton-scattered photon energy were considered in the calculations. Use of the point source approach produces reasonably accurate values of the radial dose function only at distances beyond 0.5 cm for 103 Pd sources. It is shown that binding corrections for Compton scattering have a negligible effect on radial dose function for 169 Yb and 192 Ir seeds and for 103 Pd seeds under 5.0 cm from the source centre and for the 125 I seed model 6702 under 8.0 cm. Beyond those limits there is an increasing influence of binding corrections on radial dose function for 103 Pd and 125 I sources. Results in solid water medium underestimate radial dose function for low-energy sources by as much as 6% for 103 Pd and 2.5% for 125 I already at 2 cm from source centre resulting in a direct underestimation of absolute dose rate values. It was found necessary to consider medium boundaries when comparing results for the radial dose function of 169 Yb and 192 Ir sources to avoid discrepancies due to the backscattering contribution in the phantom medium. Values of g(r) for all source types studied are presented. Uncertainties lie under 1% within one standard deviation. (author)

  20. An Investigation of the Dose Distribution from LDR Ir-192 Wires in the Triangular Implants of the Paris System using Polymer Gel Dosimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azizollah Rahimi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Polymer gels are modern dosimeters providing three dimensional dose distributions. These dosimeters can be used in brachytherapy in which the tumor dimension is relatively small and the dose gradient is high. In this study, the ability of the MAGICA polymer gel was investigated for assessing the absolute dose values as well as the dose distribution of low dose rate (LDR Ir-192 wires in interstitial brachytherapy based in triangular implants of the Paris system. Material and Methods: A suitable phantom was made from Perspex. Glass tubes were used as the external tubes for holding the Ir-192 wires in the phantom. The MAGICA polymer gel was made and placed in the phantom. The phantom and the calibration tubes were irradiated using LDR Ir-192 wires and a Co-60 teletherapy unit respectively. They were subsequently imaged using an MRI scanner. The R2 (=1/T2 maps were extracted from several sequential T2-weighted MRI images. The dose values resulting from the polymer gel measurements at the reference points were compared with those from the common calculation method at the same points. In addition, the isodose curves resulting from gel dosimetry were compared with those from a brachytherapy treatment planning system (Flexiplan. Results: The average of the dose values measured with the gel at the reference points was 62.75% higher than those calculated at the same points. Investigating the isodose curves revealed that the maximum distance to agreement (DTAmax between the isodoses resulting from the gel and those obtained from the treatment planning system was less than 3 mm at different dose levels. Discussion and Conclusion: Although the MAGICA gel indicates a higher absolute dose value than those calculated commonly, it can give the relative dose values accurately. Therefore, it can be recommended to be used for the assessment of dose distributions for the treatment of tissues as well as quality control of the treatment planning systems.

  1. A Genetic Biomarker of Oxidative Stress, the Paraoxonase-1 Q192R Gene Variant, Associates with Cardiomyopathy in CKD: A Longitudinal Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Dounousi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Oxidative stress is a hallmark of CKD and this alteration is strongly implicated in LV hypertrophy and in LV dysfunction. Methods and Patients. We resorted to the strongest genetic biomarker of paraoxonase-1 (PON1 activity, the Q192R variant in the PON1 gene, to unbiasedly assess (Mendelian randomization the cross-sectional and longitudinal association of this gene-variant with LV mass and function in 206 CKD patients with a 3-year follow-up. Results. The R allele of Q192R polymorphism associated with oxidative stress as assessed by plasma 8-isoPGF2α (P=0.03 and was dose-dependently related in a direct fashion to LVMI (QQ: 131.4 ± 42.6 g/m2; RQ: 147.7 ± 51.1 g/m2; RR: 167.3 ± 41.9 g/m2; P=0.001 and in an inverse fashion to systolic function (LV Ejection Fraction (QQ: 79 ± 12%; RQ: 69 ± 9%; RR: 65 ± 10% P=0.002. On longitudinal observation, this gene variant associated with the evolution of the same echocardiographic indicators [LVMI: 13.40 g/m2 per risk allele, P=0.005; LVEF: −2.96% per risk allele, P=0.001]. Multivariate analyses did not modify these associations. Conclusion. In CKD patients, the R allele of the Q192R variant in the PON1 gene is dose-dependently related to the severity of LVH and LV dysfunction and associates with the longitudinal evolution of these cardiac alterations. These results are compatible with the hypothesis that oxidative stress is implicated in cardiomyopathy in CKD patients.

  2. Experience of using MOSFET detectors for dose verification measurements in an end-to-end 192Ir brachytherapy quality assurance system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Maria; Nilsson, Josef; Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa

    Establishment of an end-to-end system for the brachytherapy (BT) dosimetric chain could be valuable in clinical quality assurance. Here, the development of such a system using MOSFET (metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor) detectors and experience gained during 2 years of use are reported with focus on the performance of the MOSFET detectors. A bolus phantom was constructed with two implants, mimicking prostate and head & neck treatments, using steel needles and plastic catheters to guide the 192 Ir source and house the MOSFET detectors. The phantom was taken through the BT treatment chain from image acquisition to dose evaluation. During the 2-year evaluation-period, delivered doses were verified a total of 56 times using MOSFET detectors which had been calibrated in an external 60 Co beam. An initial experimental investigation on beam quality differences between 192 Ir and 60 Co is reported. The standard deviation in repeated MOSFET measurements was below 3% in the six measurement points with dose levels above 2 Gy. MOSFET measurements overestimated treatment planning system doses by 2-7%. Distance-dependent experimental beam quality correction factors derived in a phantom of similar size as that used for end-to-end tests applied on a time-resolved measurement improved the agreement. MOSFET detectors provide values stable over time and function well for use as detectors for end-to-end quality assurance purposes in 192 Ir BT. Beam quality correction factors should address not only distance from source but also phantom dimensions. Copyright © 2017 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The electron-dose distribution surrounding an 192Ir wire bracytherapy source investigated using EGS4 simulations and GafChromic film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, Y.C.; Yu, P.K.N.; Young, E.C.M.; Wong, T.P.Y.

    1997-01-01

    The steep dose gradient around 192 Ir brachytherapy wire implants is predicted by the EGS4 (PRESTA version) Monte Carlo simulation. When considering radiation absorbing regions close to the wire source, the accurate dose distribution cannot be calculated by the GE Target II Sun Sparc treatment-planning system. Experiments using GafChromic TM film have been performed to prove the validity of the EGS4 user code when calculating the dose close to the wire source in a low energy range. (Author)

  4. Search for Neutral Higgs Bosons of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model in $e^+ e^-$ Interactions at $\\sqrt{s}$=192-202 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M.; Adriani, O.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Alcaraz, J.; Alemanni, G.; Allaby, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alviggi, M.G.; Ambrosi, G.; Anderhub, H.; Andreev, Valery P.; Angelescu, T.; Anselmo, F.; Arefev, A.; Azemoon, T.; Aziz, T.; Bagnaia, P.; Bajo, A.; Baksay, L.; Balandras, A.; Baldew, S.V.; Banerjee, S.; Banerjee, Sw.; Barczyk, A.; Barillere, R.; Bartalini, P.; Basile, M.; Batalova, N.; Battiston, R.; Bay, A.; Becattini, F.; Becker, U.; Behner, F.; Bellucci, L.; Berbeco, R.; Berdugo, J.; Berges, P.; Bertucci, B.; Betev, B.L.; Bhattacharya, S.; Biasini, M.; Biland, A.; Blaising, J.J.; Blyth, S.C.; Bobbink, G.J.; Bohm, A.; Boldizsar, L.; Borgia, B.; Bourilkov, D.; Bourquin, M.; Braccini, S.; Branson, J.G.; Brochu, F.; Buffini, A.; Buijs, A.; Burger, J.D.; Burger, W.J.; Cai, X.D.; Capell, M.; Cara Romeo, G.; Carlino, G.; Cartacci, A.M.; Casaus, J.; Castellini, G.; Cavallari, F.; Cavallo, N.; Cecchi, C.; Cerrada, M.; Cesaroni, F.; Chamizo, M.; Chang, Y.H.; Chaturvedi, U.K.; Chemarin, M.; Chen, A.; Chen, G.; Chen, G.M.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, H.S.; Chiefari, G.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Civinini, C.; Clare, I.; Clare, R.; Coignet, G.; Colino, N.; Costantini, S.; Cotorobai, F.; de la Cruz, B.; Csilling, A.; Cucciarelli, S.; Dai, T.S.; van Dalen, J.A.; D'Alessandro, R.; de Asmundis, R.; Deglon, P.; Degre, A.; Deiters, K.; della Volpe, D.; Delmeire, E.; Denes, P.; DeNotaristefani, F.; De Salvo, A.; Diemoz, M.; Dierckxsens, M.; van Dierendonck, D.; Dionisi, C.; Dittmar, M.; Dominguez, A.; Doria, A.; Dova, M.T.; Duchesneau, D.; Dufournaud, D.; Duinker, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Engler, A.; Eppling, F.J.; Erne, F.C.; Ewers, A.; Extermann, P.; Fabre, M.; Falagan, M.A.; Falciano, S.; Favara, A.; Fay, J.; Fedin, O.; Felcini, M.; Ferguson, T.; Fesefeldt, H.; Fiandrini, E.; Field, J.H.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, P.H.; Fisk, I.; Forconi, G.; Freudenreich, K.; Furetta, C.; Galaktionov, Iouri; Ganguli, S.N.; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gataullin, M.; Gau, S.S.; Gentile, S.; Gheordanescu, N.; Giagu, S.; Gong, Z.F.; Grenier, Gerald Jean; Grimm, O.; Gruenewald, M.W.; Guida, M.; van Gulik, R.; Gupta, V.K.; Gurtu, A.; Gutay, L.J.; Haas, D.; Hasan, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hebbeker, T.; Herve, Alain; Hidas, P.; Hirschfelder, J.; Hofer, H.; Holzner, G.; Hoorani, H.; Hou, S.R.; Hu, Y.; Iashvili, I.; Jin, B.N.; Jones, Lawrence W.; de Jong, P.; Josa-Mutuberria, I.; Khan, R.A.; Kafer, D.; Kaur, M.; Kienzle-Focacci, M.N.; Kim, D.; Kim, J.K.; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D.; Kittel, W.; Klimentov, A.; Konig, A.C.; Kopal, M.; Kopp, A.; Koutsenko, V.; Kraber, M.; Kraemer, R.W.; Krenz, W.; Kruger, A.; Kunin, A.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Laktineh, I.; Landi, G.; Lebeau, M.; Lebedev, A.; Lebrun, P.; Lecomte, P.; Lecoq, P.; Le Coultre, P.; Lee, H.J.; Le Goff, J.M.; Leiste, R.; Levtchenko, P.; Li, C.; Likhoded, S.; Lin, C.H.; Lin, W.T.; Linde, F.L.; Lista, L.; Liu, Z.A.; Lohmann, W.; Longo, E.; Lu, Y.S.; Lubelsmeyer, K.; Luci, C.; Luckey, David; Lugnier, L.; Luminari, L.; Lustermann, W.; Ma, W.G.; Maity, M.; Malgeri, L.; Malinin, A.; Mana, C.; Mangeol, D.; Mans, J.; Marian, G.; Martin, J.P.; Marzano, F.; Mazumdar, K.; McNeil, R.R.; Mele, S.; Merola, L.; Meschini, M.; Metzger, W.J.; von der Mey, M.; Mihul, A.; Milcent, H.; Mirabelli, G.; Mnich, J.; Mohanty, G.B.; Moulik, T.; Muanza, G.S.; Muijs, A.J.M.; Musicar, B.; Musy, M.; Napolitano, M.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Newman, H.; Niessen, T.; Nisati, A.; Kluge, Hannelies; Ofierzynski, R.; Organtini, G.; Oulianov, A.; Palomares, C.; Pandoulas, D.; Paoletti, S.; Paolucci, P.; Paramatti, R.; Park, H.K.; Park, I.H.; Passaleva, G.; Patricelli, S.; Paul, Thomas Cantzon; Pauluzzi, M.; Paus, C.; Pauss, F.; Pedace, M.; Pensotti, S.; Perret-Gallix, D.; Petersen, B.; Piccolo, D.; Pierella, F.; Pieri, M.; Piroue, P.A.; Pistolesi, E.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Pojidaev, V.; Postema, H.; Pothier, J.; Prokofev, D.O.; Prokofiev, D.; Quartieri, J.; Rahal-Callot, G.; Rahaman, M.A.; Raics, P.; Raja, N.; Ramelli, R.; Rancoita, P.G.; Ranieri, R.; Raspereza, A.; Raven, G.; Razis, P.; Ren, D.; Rescigno, M.; Reucroft, S.; Riemann, S.; Riles, Keith; Rodin, J.; Roe, B.P.; Romero, L.; Rosca, A.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Roth, Stefan; Rosenbleck, C.; Roux, B.; Rubio, J.A.; Ruggiero, G.; Rykaczewski, H.; Saremi, S.; Sarkar, S.; Salicio, J.; Sanchez, E.; Sanders, M.P.; Schafer, C.; Schegelsky, V.; Schmidt-Kaerst, S.; Schmitz, D.; Schopper, H.; Schotanus, D.J.; Schwering, G.; Sciacca, C.; Seganti, A.; Servoli, L.; Shevchenko, S.; Shivarov, N.; Shoutko, V.; Shumilov, E.; Shvorob, A.; Siedenburg, T.; Son, D.; Smith, B.; Spillantini, P.; Steuer, M.; Stickland, D.P.; Stone, A.; Stoyanov, B.; Straessner, A.; Sudhakar, K.; Sultanov, G.; Sun, L.Z.; Sushkov, S.; Suter, H.; Swain, J.D.; Szillasi, Z.; Sztaricskai, T.; Tang, X.W.; Tauscher, L.; Taylor, L.; Tellili, B.; Teyssier, D.; Timmermans, Charles; Ting, Samuel C.C.; Ting, S.M.; Tonwar, S.C.; Toth, J.; Tully, C.; Tung, K.L.; Uchida, Y.; Ulbricht, J.; Valente, E.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vetlitsky, I.; Vicinanza, D.; Viertel, G.; Villa, S.; Vivargent, M.; Vlachos, S.; Vodopianov, I.; Vogel, H.; Vogt, H.; Vorobev, I.; Vorobov, A.A.; Vorvolakos, A.; Wadhwa, M.; Wallraff, W.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.L.; Wang, Z.M.; Weber, A.; Weber, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wilkens, H.; Wu, S.X.; Wynhoff, S.; Xia, L.; Xu, Z.Z.; Yamamoto, J.; Yang, B.Z.; Yang, C.G.; Yang, H.J.; Yang, M.; Ye, J.B.; Yeh, S.C.; Zalite, A.; Zalite, Yu.; Zhang, Z.P.; Zhu, G.Y.; Zhu, R.Y.; Zichichi, A.; Zilizi, G.; Zimmermann, B.; Zoller, M.

    2001-01-01

    A search for the lightest neutral CP-even and the neutral CP-odd Higgs bosons of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model is performed using 233.2 pb-1 of integrated luminosity collected with the L3 detector at LEP at centre-of-mass energies 192-202 GeV. No signal is observed and lower mass limits are given as a function of tan(beta) for two scalar top mixing hypotheses. For tan(beta) greater than 0.8, they are mh > 83.4 GeV and mA > 83.8 GeV at 95 % confidence level.

  5. Final environmental impact statement for standards for the control of byproduct materials from uranium ore processing (40 CFR 192). Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-09-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency is establishing public health and environmental standards (40 CFR 192) for uranium and thorium mill tailings at licensed mill sites under the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (PL. 95-604). Mills are currently located in Colorado, New Mexico, South Dakota, Texas, Utah, Washington and Wyoming. These standards are issued to reduce and control the hazards associated with uranium and thorium mill Tailings. Controls are required both during the operational period of mills and for disposal of the tailings piles, to assure environmentally sound, long-term protection of public health and stabilization of the tailings

  6. Comparison BIPM.RI(I)-K8 of high dose-rate Ir-192 brachytherapy standards for reference air kerma rate of the PTB and the BIPM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kessler, C.; Allisy-Roberts, P.J.; Selbach, H.J.

    2015-01-01

    An indirect comparison of the standards for reference air kerma rate (RAKR) for 192 Ir high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy sources of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Germany, and of the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) was carried out at the PTB in September 2011. The comparison result, based on the calibration coefficients for a transfer standard and expressed as a ratio of the PTB and the BIPM standards for reference air kerma rate, is 1.0003 with a combined standard uncertainty of 0.0099. (authors)

  7. Does inverse planning applied to Iridium192 high dose rate prostate brachytherapy improve the optimization of the dose afforded by the Paris system?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickers, Philippe; Lenaerts, Eric; Thissen, Benedicte; Deneufbourg, Jean-Marie

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: The purpose of the work is to analyse for 192 Ir prostate brachytherapy (BT) some of the different steps in optimizing the dose delivered to the CTV, urethra and rectum. Materials and methods: Between 07/1998 and 12/2001, 166 patients were treated with 192 Ir wires providing a low dose rate, according to the Paris system philosophy and with the 2D version of the treatment planning Isis R . 40-45 Gy were delivered after an external beam radiotherapy of 40 Gy. The maximum tolerable doses for BT were 25 Gy to the anterior third of the rectum on the whole length of the implant (R dose) and 52 Gy to the urethra on a 1 cm length (U max ). A U max /CTV dose ratio >1.3 represented a pejorative value as the planned dose of 40-45 Gy could not be achieved. On the other side a ratio ≤1.25 was considered optimal and the intermediate values satisfactory. A R/CTV dose ratio 192 Ir sources. Results: At the end of a learning curve reaching a plateau after the first 71 patients, 90% of the implants with 192 Ir wires were stated at least satisfactory for a total rate of 82% for the whole population. When the 3D dosimetry for SST was used, the initial values >1.25 decreased significantly with optimization required on CTV contours and additional constraints on urethra while the R/CTV ratio was maintained under 0.55. For initial U max /CTV >1.3 or >1.25 but ≤1.3 indeed, the mean respective values of 1.41±0.16 and 1.28±0.01 decreased to 1.28±0.24 and 1.17±0.09 (P<0.001), allowing to increase the total dose to the CTV by 4 Gy. Conclusions: The Paris system which assumes a homogeneous distribution of a minimum number of catheters inside the CTV allowed to anticipate a satisfactory dosimetry in 82% of cases. However, this precision rate could be improved until 95% with an optimization approach based on an inverse planning philosophy. These new 3D optimization methods, ideally based on good quality implants at first allow to deliver the highest doses with

  8. Shape effects along the Z=82 line: study of the $\\beta$- decay of $^{188,190,192}$Pb using total absorption spectroscopy

    CERN Multimedia

    Caballero ontanaya, L; Garcia borge, M J; Malbrunot, S

    2002-01-01

    This proposal is aimed at the study of the $\\beta$- decay of the neutron-deficient $^{188,190,192}$Pb nuclei. The main motivation of the proposed experiment is to determine the Gamow-Teller strength distribution in the daughter nuclei using the Total Absorption Spectrometer "Lucrecia". Recent theoretical results show that from this measurement the shapes of the ground states of the decaying Pb nuclei can be inferred. This study offers an independent way to study the phenomenon of shape co-existence in a region of particular interest.

  9. Development and implementation of a remote audit tool for high dose rate (HDR) Ir-192 brachytherapy using optically stimulated luminescence dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casey, Kevin E.; Kry, Stephen F.; Howell, Rebecca M.; Followill, David [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 and The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Alvarez, Paola; Lawyer, Ann [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: The aim of this work was to create a mailable phantom with measurement accuracy suitable for Radiological Physics Center (RPC) audits of high dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy sources at institutions participating in National Cancer Institute-funded cooperative clinical trials. Optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLDs) were chosen as the dosimeter to be used with the phantom.Methods: The authors designed and built an 8 × 8 × 10 cm{sup 3} prototype phantom that had two slots capable of holding Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C OSLDs (nanoDots; Landauer, Glenwood, IL) and a single channel capable of accepting all {sup 192}Ir HDR brachytherapy sources in current clinical use in the United States. The authors irradiated the phantom with Nucletron and Varian {sup 192}Ir HDR sources in order to determine correction factors for linearity with dose and the combined effects of irradiation energy and phantom characteristics. The phantom was then sent to eight institutions which volunteered to perform trial remote audits.Results: The linearity correction factor was k{sub L}= (−9.43 × 10{sup −5}× dose) + 1.009, where dose is in cGy, which differed from that determined by the RPC for the same batch of dosimeters using {sup 60}Co irradiation. Separate block correction factors were determined for current versions of both Nucletron and Varian {sup 192}Ir HDR sources and these vendor-specific correction factors differed by almost 2.6%. For the Nucletron source, the correction factor was 1.026 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.023–1.028], and for the Varian source, it was 1.000 (95% CI = 0.995–1.005). Variations in lateral source positioning up to 0.8 mm and distal/proximal source positioning up to 10 mm had minimal effect on dose measurement accuracy. The overall dose measurement uncertainty of the system was estimated to be 2.4% and 2.5% for the Nucletron and Varian sources, respectively (95% CI). This uncertainty was sufficient to establish a ±5% acceptance

  10. Development and implementation of a remote audit tool for high dose rate (HDR) Ir-192 brachytherapy using optically stimulated luminescence dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casey, Kevin E.; Kry, Stephen F.; Howell, Rebecca M.; Followill, David; Alvarez, Paola; Lawyer, Ann

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this work was to create a mailable phantom with measurement accuracy suitable for Radiological Physics Center (RPC) audits of high dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy sources at institutions participating in National Cancer Institute-funded cooperative clinical trials. Optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLDs) were chosen as the dosimeter to be used with the phantom.Methods: The authors designed and built an 8 × 8 × 10 cm 3 prototype phantom that had two slots capable of holding Al 2 O 3 :C OSLDs (nanoDots; Landauer, Glenwood, IL) and a single channel capable of accepting all 192 Ir HDR brachytherapy sources in current clinical use in the United States. The authors irradiated the phantom with Nucletron and Varian 192 Ir HDR sources in order to determine correction factors for linearity with dose and the combined effects of irradiation energy and phantom characteristics. The phantom was then sent to eight institutions which volunteered to perform trial remote audits.Results: The linearity correction factor was k L = (−9.43 × 10 −5 × dose) + 1.009, where dose is in cGy, which differed from that determined by the RPC for the same batch of dosimeters using 60 Co irradiation. Separate block correction factors were determined for current versions of both Nucletron and Varian 192 Ir HDR sources and these vendor-specific correction factors differed by almost 2.6%. For the Nucletron source, the correction factor was 1.026 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.023–1.028], and for the Varian source, it was 1.000 (95% CI = 0.995–1.005). Variations in lateral source positioning up to 0.8 mm and distal/proximal source positioning up to 10 mm had minimal effect on dose measurement accuracy. The overall dose measurement uncertainty of the system was estimated to be 2.4% and 2.5% for the Nucletron and Varian sources, respectively (95% CI). This uncertainty was sufficient to establish a ±5% acceptance criterion for source strength audits under a

  11. The atomic structure of protons and hydrides in Sm1.92Ca0.08Sn2O7-δ pyrochlore from DFT calculations and FTIR spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bork, Nicolai Christian; Eurenius, K. E. J.; Rossmeisl, Jan

    2012-01-01

    A combined density functional theory and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy study of the structure and specific site preference of protons and hydrides in the pyrochlore Sm1.92Ca0.08Sn2O7-δ is presented. Two protonic sites of particular high stability are identified, both located on O(1......) oxygen atoms closely associated with a Ca dopant. Further, the unexpected presence of Ho hydride defects in undoped, oxygen deficient Sm2Sn2O7 is reported. Finally, the stretching frequencies and relative intensities for these and other sites are calculated. The main features of the Fourier transform...

  12. Intercomparison of calibration procedures of high dose rate {sup 192} Ir sources in Brazil and a proposal of a new methodology; Intercomparacao de procedimientos de calibracao de fontes de {sup 192} Ir de alta taxa de dose no Brasil e proposta de uma nova metodologia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marechal, M.H.; Almeida, C.E. de [Laboratorio Nacional de Metrologia das Radiacoes Ionizantes IRD/CNEN. Caixa Postal 37750 CEP 22780-160 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    1998-12-31

    The objective of this paper is to report the results of an intercomparison of the calibration procedures for {sup 192} Ir sources presently in use in Brazil and to proposal a calibration procedure to derive the N{sub k} for a Farmer type ionization chamber for {sup 192} Ir energy by interpolating from a {sup 60} Co gamma-rays and 250 kV x-rays calibration factors. the intercomparison results were all within {+-} 3.0 % except one case where 4.6 % was observed and latter identified as a problem with N-k value for X-rays. The method proposed by the present work make possible the improvement of the metrological coherence among the calibration laboratories and their users once the N{sub k} values could then provided by any of the members of SSDL network. (Author)

  13. Monte Carlo calculated microdosimetric spread for cell nucleus-sized targets exposed to brachytherapy 125I and 192Ir sources and 60Co cell irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villegas, Fernanda; Tilly, Nina; Ahnesjö, Anders

    2013-09-07

    The stochastic nature of ionizing radiation interactions causes a microdosimetric spread in energy depositions for cell or cell nucleus-sized volumes. The magnitude of the spread may be a confounding factor in dose response analysis. The aim of this work is to give values for the microdosimetric spread for a range of doses imparted by (125)I and (192)Ir brachytherapy radionuclides, and for a (60)Co source. An upgraded version of the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE was used to obtain frequency distributions of specific energy for each of these radiation qualities and for four different cell nucleus-sized volumes. The results demonstrate that the magnitude of the microdosimetric spread increases when the target size decreases or when the energy of the radiation quality is reduced. Frequency distributions calculated according to the formalism of Kellerer and Chmelevsky using full convolution of the Monte Carlo calculated single track frequency distributions confirm that at doses exceeding 0.08 Gy for (125)I, 0.1 Gy for (192)Ir, and 0.2 Gy for (60)Co, the resulting distribution can be accurately approximated with a normal distribution. A parameterization of the width of the distribution as a function of dose and target volume of interest is presented as a convenient form for the use in response modelling or similar contexts.

  14. Dose rate constants for 125I, 103Pd, 192Ir and 169Yb brachytherapy sources: an EGS4 Monte Carlo study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mainegra, Ernesto; Capote, Roberto; Lopez, Ernesto

    1998-01-01

    An exhaustive revision of dosimetry data for 192 Ir, 125 I, 103 Pd and 169 Yb brachytherapy sources has been performed by means of the EGS4 simulation system. The DLC-136/PHOTX cross section library, water molecular form factors, bound Compton scattering and Doppler broadening of the Compton-scattered photon energy were considered in the calculations. The absorbed dose rate per unit contained activity in a medium at 1 cm in water and air-kerma strength per unit contained activity for each seed model were calculated, allowing the dose rate constant (DRC) Λ to be estimated. The influence of the calibration procedure on source strength for low-energy brachytherapy seeds is discussed. Conversion factors for 125 I and 103 Pd seeds to obtain the dose rate in liquid water from the dose rate measured in a solid water phantom with a detector calibrated for dose to water were calculated. A theoretical estimate of the DRC for a 103 Pd model 200 seed equal to 0.669±0.002 cGy h -1 U -1 is obtained. Comparison of obtained DRCs with measured and calculated published results shows agreement within 1.5% for 192 Ir, 169 Yb and 125 I sources. (author)

  15. Attitudes and treatment outcome of breast conservation therapy for stage I and II breast cancer using peroperative iridium-192 implant boost to the tumour bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deo, S.V.S.; Shukla, N.K.; Mohanti, B.K.; Chawla, S.; Julka, P.K.; Rath, G.K.; Raina, V.

    2001-01-01

    Breast conservation therapy for early breast cancer is an established but grossly under-utilized treatment option in India for various reasons. Breast conservation therapy was offered to 200 suitable breast cancer patients between June 1993 and June 1998. Fifty-one patients (25%) opted for breast conservation and the remaining preferred mastectomy. In patients agreeing to conservation therapy, surgery was performed first along with peroperative implantation of iridium-192 to deliver a boost. Whole breast irradiation of 45 Gy was delivered 3-4 weeks after the boost. Cosmesis was assessed at the end of 6 months from completion of therapy. The main reason for refusal of breast conservation therapy was fear of recurrence in the remaining breast (60%). There were no loco-regional failures in our study at a median follow up of 42 months; one patient experienced a systemic relapse. Cosmesis was good to excellent in 80% of patients. Breast conservation therapy using peroperative iridium-192 implant provides excellent loco-regional disease control and cosmesis. The results of our study indicate that patient preference for mastectomy is an important reason for the under-utilization of breast conservation therapy in India. Copyright (2001) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  16. Gyromagnetic ratios of low-lying excited states in the even 192-198Pt isotopes; experimental measurements and theoretical predictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuchbery, A.E.; Ryan, C.G.; Morrison, I.; Bolotin, H.H.

    1981-01-01

    The gyromagnetic ratios of the 2 2 + and 4 1 + states in 196 Pt were measured relative to that of its 2 1 + level. The thin-foil IMPAC technique was employed utilizing the enhanced transient hyperfine magnetic field present at the nuclei of swiftly recoiling ions traversing magnetized ferromagetic materials. The states of interest were populated by Coulomb excitation using beams of 220-MeV 58 Ni ions. For g(2 1 + ) taken as 0.326+-0.014, the present measurements yielded g(2 2 + ) = 0.30+-0.06 and g(4 1 + ) 0.30+-0.05. These results and those reported by prior workers for the g-factors of corresponding levels in 192 Pt, 194 Pt, 198 Pt are used to trace the systematics of the magnetic moments of these low-lying levels in the even 192 - 198 Pt isotopes. Interacting Boson Approximation model-based calculations of the g-factors of these states were also carried out. The experimental theoretical results are compared

  17. Radiological protection on interstitial brachytherapy and dose determination and exposure rate of an Ir-192 source through the MCNP-4B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales L, M.E.

    2006-01-01

    The present work was carried out in the Neurological Sciences Institute having as objective to determine the dose and the rate of exhibition of the sources of Iridium 192, Iodine 125 and Palladium 103; which are used to carry out implant in the Interstitial Brachytherapy according to the TG43. For it we carry out a theoretical calculation, its are defined in the enter file: the geometry, materials of the problem and the radiation source, etc; in the MCNP-4B Monte Carlo code, considering a punctual source and for the dose determination we simulate thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLD): at 5 cm, 50 cm, 100 cm and 200 cm of the source. Our purpose is to analyze the radioprotection measures that should take into account in this Institute in which are carried out brain biopsies using a Micro mar stereotactic mark, and in a near future with the collaboration of a doctor and a cuban physique seeks to be carried out the Interstitial Brachytherapy technique with sources of Ir-192 for patient with tumors like glioblastoma, astrocytoma, etc. (Author)

  18. High-dose rate iridium-192 brachytherapy with flexible applicator. A trial toward decrease of stress during treatment and improvement of quality of life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Keiji; Kasahara, Kotaro; Karashima, Takashi; Inoue, Yuichiro; Kariya, Shinji; Inomata, Taisuke; Yoshida, Shoji; Shuin, Taro

    2001-01-01

    We tried to improve the materials and methods of high-dose rate Iridium-192 brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer and evaluated the stress during the treatment in 20 patients with whom the therapy was performed. Rigid applicators made of stainless steel of 1.6 mm in diameter were indwelt with a template as usual for 30 hours in 14 patients (group A). Flexible applicators made of polyoxymethylene rosin (POM) of 2.0 mm in diameter were indwelt without a template for 30 hours after the applicator insertion in 6 patients (group B). We made inquiries about lumbago, inconvenience and necessity of assistant help and sleep in the course of therapy, and urinary incontinence and erectile function after the course of therapy as the QOL. The stress during the course of therapy in the patients of group B was obviously less than that of group A. There were no significant differences in urinary incontinence and erectile function after the course of therapy between group A and B. In this study, our trial successfully reduced the stress during the course of therapy in the patients with localized prostate cancer in the course of high-dose rate Iridium-192 brachytherapy. (author)

  19. High-dose rate iridium-192 brachytherapy with flexible applicator. A trial toward decrease of stress during treatment and improvement of quality of life

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Keiji; Kasahara, Kotaro; Karashima, Takashi; Inoue, Yuichiro; Kariya, Shinji; Inomata, Taisuke; Yoshida, Shoji; Shuin, Taro [Kochi Medical School, Nankoku (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    We tried to improve the materials and methods of high-dose rate Iridium-192 brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer and evaluated the stress during the treatment in 20 patients with whom the therapy was performed. Rigid applicators made of stainless steel of 1.6 mm in diameter were indwelt with a template as usual for 30 hours in 14 patients (group A). Flexible applicators made of polyoxymethylene rosin (POM) of 2.0 mm in diameter were indwelt without a template for 30 hours after the applicator insertion in 6 patients (group B). We made inquiries about lumbago, inconvenience and necessity of assistant help and sleep in the course of therapy, and urinary incontinence and erectile function after the course of therapy as the QOL. The stress during the course of therapy in the patients of group B was obviously less than that of group A. There were no significant differences in urinary incontinence and erectile function after the course of therapy between group A and B. In this study, our trial successfully reduced the stress during the course of therapy in the patients with localized prostate cancer in the course of high-dose rate Iridium-192 brachytherapy. (author)

  20. Real-Time Verification of a High-Dose-Rate Iridium 192 Source Position Using a Modified C-Arm Fluoroscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nose, Takayuki, E-mail: nose-takayuki@nms.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Nippon Medical School Tamanagayama Hospital, Tama (Japan); Chatani, Masashi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka Rosai Hospital, Sakai (Japan); Otani, Yuki [Department of Radiology, Kaizuka City Hospital, Kaizuka (Japan); Teshima, Teruki [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Osaka (Japan); Kumita, Shinichirou [Department of Radiology, Nippon Medical School Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)

    2017-03-15

    Purpose: High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy misdeliveries can occur at any institution, and they can cause disastrous results. Even a patient's death has been reported. Misdeliveries could be avoided with real-time verification methods. In 1996, we developed a modified C-arm fluoroscopic verification of an HDR Iridium 192 source position prevent these misdeliveries. This method provided excellent image quality sufficient to detect errors, and it has been in clinical use at our institutions for 20 years. The purpose of the current study is to introduce the mechanisms and validity of our straightforward C-arm fluoroscopic verification method. Methods and Materials: Conventional X-ray fluoroscopic images are degraded by spurious signals and quantum noise from Iridium 192 photons, which make source verification impractical. To improve image quality, we quadrupled the C-arm fluoroscopic X-ray dose per pulse. The pulse rate was reduced by a factor of 4 to keep the average exposure compliant with Japanese medical regulations. The images were then displayed with quarter-frame rates. Results: Sufficient quality was obtained to enable observation of the source position relative to both the applicators and the anatomy. With this method, 2 errors were detected among 2031 treatment sessions for 370 patients within a 6-year period. Conclusions: With the use of a modified C-arm fluoroscopic verification method, treatment errors that were otherwise overlooked were detected in real time. This method should be given consideration for widespread use.

  1. A generic high-dose rate {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy source for evaluation of model-based dose calculations beyond the TG-43 formalism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballester, Facundo, E-mail: Facundo.Ballester@uv.es [Department of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, Burjassot 46100 (Spain); Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa [Department of Medical and Health Sciences (IMH), Radiation Physics, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping SE-581 85, Sweden and Department of Medical Physics, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm SE-171 76 (Sweden); Granero, Domingo [Department of Radiation Physics, ERESA, Hospital General Universitario, Valencia E-46014 (Spain); Haworth, Annette [Department of Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre and Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, Melbourne, Victoria 3000 (Australia); Mourtada, Firas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Helen F. Graham Cancer Center, Christiana Care Health System, Newark, Delaware 19713 (United States); Fonseca, Gabriel Paiva [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares – IPEN-CNEN/SP, São Paulo 05508-000, Brazil and Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW, School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht 6201 BN (Netherlands); Zourari, Kyveli; Papagiannis, Panagiotis [Medical Physics Laboratory, Medical School, University of Athens, 75 MikrasAsias, Athens 115 27 (Greece); Rivard, Mark J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States); Siebert, Frank-André [Clinic of Radiotherapy, University Hospital of Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Kiel 24105 (Germany); Sloboda, Ron S. [Department of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2, Canada and Department of Oncology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2R3 (Canada); and others

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In order to facilitate a smooth transition for brachytherapy dose calculations from the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Task Group No. 43 (TG-43) formalism to model-based dose calculation algorithms (MBDCAs), treatment planning systems (TPSs) using a MBDCA require a set of well-defined test case plans characterized by Monte Carlo (MC) methods. This also permits direct dose comparison to TG-43 reference data. Such test case plans should be made available for use in the software commissioning process performed by clinical end users. To this end, a hypothetical, generic high-dose rate (HDR) {sup 192}Ir source and a virtual water phantom were designed, which can be imported into a TPS. Methods: A hypothetical, generic HDR {sup 192}Ir source was designed based on commercially available sources as well as a virtual, cubic water phantom that can be imported into any TPS in DICOM format. The dose distribution of the generic {sup 192}Ir source when placed at the center of the cubic phantom, and away from the center under altered scatter conditions, was evaluated using two commercial MBDCAs [Oncentra{sup ®} Brachy with advanced collapsed-cone engine (ACE) and BrachyVision ACUROS{sup TM}]. Dose comparisons were performed using state-of-the-art MC codes for radiation transport, including ALGEBRA, BrachyDose, GEANT4, MCNP5, MCNP6, and PENELOPE2008. The methodologies adhered to recommendations in the AAPM TG-229 report on high-energy brachytherapy source dosimetry. TG-43 dosimetry parameters, an along-away dose-rate table, and primary and scatter separated (PSS) data were obtained. The virtual water phantom of (201){sup 3} voxels (1 mm sides) was used to evaluate the calculated dose distributions. Two test case plans involving a single position of the generic HDR {sup 192}Ir source in this phantom were prepared: (i) source centered in the phantom and (ii) source displaced 7 cm laterally from the center. Datasets were independently produced by

  2. Characterization of TLD-100 in powders for dosimetric quality control of 192 Ir sources used in brachytherapy of high dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loaiza C, S.P.

    2007-01-01

    The Secondary Standard Dosimetric at the National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ) calibrated a lot of powdered TLD-100 (LiF:Mg,Ti) in terms of absorbed dose to water D w for the energy of: 60 Co, 137C s, X rays of 250 and 50 kVp. Later on, it is carried out an interpolation of the calibration for the energy of the 192 Ir. This calibration is part of a dosimetric quality control program, to solve the problems of traceability for the measurements carried out by the users of 192 Ir sources employed in the treatments of High Dose Rate Brachytherapy (HDR) at the Mexican Republic. The calibrations of the radiation beams are made with the following protocols: IAEA TRS-398 for the 60 Co for D w , using a secondary standard ionization chamber PTW N30013 calibrated in D w by the National Research Council (NRC, Canada). AAPM TG-43 for D w in terms of the strength kerma Sk, calibrating this last one quantity for the 137 Cs radioactive source, with a well chamber HDR 1000 PLUS traceable to the University of Wisconsin (US). AAPM TG-61 for X ray of 250 and 50 kVp for D w start to Ka using field standard a Farmer chamber PTW 30001 traceable to K for the Central Laboratory of Electric Industries (CLEI, France). The calibration curves (CC) they built for the response of the powder TLD: R TLD vs D w : For the energy of 60 Co, 137 Cs, X rays of 250 and 50 kVp. Fitting them with the least square method weighed by means of a polynomial of second grade that corrects the supra linearity of the response. iii. Each one of the curves was validated with a test by lack of fitting and for the Anderson Darling normality test, using the software MINITAB in both cases. iv. The sensibility factor (F s ) for each energy corresponds to the slope of the CC, v. The F s for the two 192 Ir sources used are interpolated: one for a Micro Selectron source and the other one a Vari Source source. Finally, a couple of capsules were sent to two hospitals that have the HDR Brachytherapy with sources of 192

  3. Dosimetric characterization of low dose rate Iridium 192 wires used in interstitial brachytherapy, produced by Brachytherapy Sources Laboratory the CTRS/IPEN/CNEN-SP, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Marco Antonio da

    2003-01-01

    In this work they were some dosimetric parameters established by the dosimetry protocol AAPM TG-43 for the thread of 192 Ir with the purpose of complementing the dosimetric specifications of an original source produced at the country. For so much quantities such as the constant of dose rate, A , function of radial dose, g(r), and anisotropy function, F(r,θ), they were experimentally determined and the geometry function, G(r,θ), it was calculated. Measurements with TLD of LiF, with dimensions of 1 mm X 1 mm X 1 mm, was made in a phantom made of 5 plates of solid water RW3 material with dimensions of 300 mm X 300 mm X 10 mm, where it was obtained values of dose rate for some radial distances of the source, between 10 and 100 mm, to for an angle of 90 deg, for g(r), and also for other angles between 0 deg and 180 deg for F(r,θ). Threads of 192 Ir were studied in the lengths of 10 mm, 20 mm, 30 mm, 50 mm and 100 mm. The stored energy on the thermoluminescent dosimeters was integrated by means of a TLD reader Harshaw 2000 meantime into a cycle of thermal treatment to which the thermoluminescent dosimeters was submitted being, 400 C in an interval of time of 1 hour proceeded immediately for more 2 hours to 105 C, after this treatment the thermoluminescent dosimeters was irradiated; even so, before the reading the detectors was still warm to 105 deg C for 10 minutes. The constant of dose rate for the threads of 192 Ir of 10 mm, 20 mm, 30 mm, 50 mm and 100 mm are (1,076 =- 3,7%); (0,931 =- 3,7%); (0,714 =- 3,7%); (0,589 =-3,7%) and (0,271 =- 3,7%) cGyh -1 U -1 , respectively (1U = unit of kerma intensity in the air = 1mGy m 2 h -1 = 1cGy cm 2 h -1 ). The results obtained for g(r) and F(r,θ) have uncertainties of (=- 4,5%) and they are compared with values obtained by Monte Carlo simulation and also for other values presented in the literature. (author)

  4. Application of the Cavity theory in the calibration of the powder TLD-100 for energies of 60 Co, 137 Cs, 192 Ir and RX 50, 250 k Vp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loaiza C, S.P.; Alvarez R, J.T.

    2006-01-01

    A powder lot TLD-100 (LiF:Mg,Ti) in absorbed dose terms in water D w for the following radiation sources: 60 Co, 137 Cs and RX 50 and 250 k Vp is calibrated; to continuation is made a lineal interpolation of the TLD response in function of the effective energy of the sources to calibrate a source of 192 Ir. The calibration of those fields in D w are carried out with aid of the Bragg-Gray cavity theory, the one which finds implicit in the following protocols: IAEA-TRS 398 for the 60 Co and the AAPM TG61 for X Rays of 50 and 250 k Vp. Additionally the AAPM protocol TG43 to determine the D w in function of the kerma intensity S k in the case of the 137 Cs is used. The calibration curves for the response of the TLD-100 R TLD vs D w , corresponding to each one of the sources already mentioned are constructed. The R TLD vs D w by least heavy square by means of a second order polynomial that corrects the supralineality of the response is adjusted. The curves are validated by lack of LOF adjustment and by the Anderson Darling normality test. Later the factors of sensitivity (F s ) for the sources of 192 Ir: Micro Selectron and Vari Source are interpolated, used respectively in the A and B hospitals for treatments of brachytherapy of high dose rate (HDR), the expanded uncertainties associated to the D w and F s are also determined. Finally, an acrylic phantom and a couple of capsules are already sent to the hospitals mentioned, to verify a nominal D w of 2 Gy, in a case an underestimate in 5.5% in the imparted D w and in other an overestimation in a range of -1.5 to -8.0% was obtained. The obtained results in this work establish the bases for the development of a national dosimetric quality control program for brachytherapy of HDR with sources of 192 Ir. (Author)

  5. Influence on serum asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) concentrations of human paraoxonase 1 polymorphism (Q192R) and exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in Mexican women, a gene-environment interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa-Martínez, Ángeles C; Ruíz-Vera, Tania; Almendarez-Reyna, Claudia I; Orta-García, Sandra T; Pérez-Maldonado, Iván N

    2017-11-01

    It has been demonstrated that Cardiovascular Diseases (CVD) are a consequence of the combination of genetic and environmental factors and/or the interaction between them. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAHs) exposure and PON1 Q192R polymorphism (genetic susceptibility) on serum asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) levels in Mexican women (n = 206). Urinary 1-hydroxypyrene concentrations (1-OHP; exposure biomarker for PAHs) were quantified using a high-performance liquid chromatography technique, PON1 Q192R polymorphism was genotyped using TaqMan probes and serum ADMA concentrations were evaluated using a commercially available ELISA kit. Urinary 1-OHP levels detected in this study ranged from 0.07 to 9.37 μmol/mol of creatinine (0.13-18.0 μg/g of creatinine). Regarding allele frequency (PON1 Q192R polymorphism), the 192Q-allele frequency was 0.43 and for the 192R-allele it was 0.57. In relation to serum ADMA levels, the levels ranged from 0.06 to 1.46 μmol/L. Moreover, multiple linear regression analysis was performed and associations between urinary 1-OHP levels (β = 0.05, p = 0.002), PON1 Q192R polymorphism (β = 0.04, p = 0.003) and serum ADMA concentrations were found. Besides, an interaction (gene-environment interaction) of both independent variables (1-OHP and PON1 polymorphism) on serum ADMA levels was found (β = 0.04, p = 0.02) in the constructed multiple linear model. Therefore, according to the significance of this research, it is necessary to execute health programs to reduce cardiovascular risk in the assessed population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Rotavirus 2/6 Viruslike Particles Administered Intranasally with Cholera Toxin, Escherichia coli Heat-Labile Toxin (LT), and LT-R192G Induce Protection from Rotavirus Challenge

    OpenAIRE

    O’Neal, Christine M.; Clements, John D.; Estes, Mary K.; Conner, Margaret E.

    1998-01-01

    We have shown that rotavirus 2/6 viruslike particles composed of proteins VP2 and VP6 (2/6-VLPs) administered to mice intranasally with cholera toxin (CT) induced protection from rotavirus challenge, as measured by virus shedding. Since it is unclear if CT will be approved for human use, we evaluated the adjuvanticity of Escherichia coli heat-labile toxin (LT) and LT-R192G. Mice were inoculated intranasally with 10 μg of 2/6-VLPs combined with CT, LT, or LT-R192G. All three adjuvants induced ...

  7. Determination of $\\alpha_s$ from Hadronic Event Shapes in $e^+ e^-$ Annihilation at $192 \\le \\sqrt{s} \\le 208$ GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Achard, P.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Alcaraz, J.; Alemanni, G.; Allaby, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alviggi, M.G.; Anderhub, H.; Andreev, Valery P.; Anselmo, F.; Arefev, A.; Azemoon, T.; Aziz, T.; Bagnaia, P.; Bajo, A.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Baldew, S.V.; Banerjee, S.; Banerjee, Sw.; Barczyk, A.; Barillere, R.; Bartalini, P.; Basile, M.; Batalova, N.; Battiston, R.; Bay, A.; Becattini, F.; Becker, U.; Behner, F.; Bellucci, L.; Berbeco, R.; Berdugo, J.; Berges, P.; Bertucci, B.; Betev, B.L.; Biasini, M.; Biglietti, M.; Biland, A.; Blaising, J.J.; Blyth, S.C.; Bobbink, G.J.; Bohm, A.; Boldizsar, L.; Borgia, B.; Bottai, S.; Bourilkov, D.; Bourquin, M.; Braccini, S.; Branson, J.G.; Brochu, F.; Burger, J.D.; Burger, W.J.; Cai, X.D.; Capell, M.; Cara Romeo, G.; Carlino, G.; Cartacci, A.; Casaus, J.; Cavallari, F.; Cavallo, N.; Cecchi, C.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo, M.; Chang, Y.H.; Chemarin, M.; Chen, A.; Chen, G.; Chen, G.M.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, H.S.; Chiefari, G.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Clare, I.; Clare, R.; Coignet, G.; Colino, N.; Costantini, S.; de la Cruz, B.; Cucciarelli, S.; van Dalen, J.A.; de Asmundis, R.; Deglon, P.; Debreczeni, J.; Degre, A.; Deiters, K.; Della Volpe, D.; Delmeire, E.; Denes, P.; De Notaristefani, F.; De Salvo, A.; Diemoz, M.; Dierckxsens, M.; Dionisi, C.; Dittmar, M.; Doria, A.; Dova, M.T.; Duchesneau, D.; Echenard, B.; Eline, A.; El Mamouni, H.; Engler, A.; Eppling, F.J.; Ewers, A.; Extermann, P.; Falagan, M.A.; Falciano, S.; Favara, A.; Fay, J.; Fedin, O.; Felcini, M.; Ferguson, T.; Fesefeldt, H.; Fiandrini, E.; Field, J.H.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, P.H.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, I.; Forconi, G.; Freudenreich, K.; Furetta, C.; Galaktionov, Iouri; Ganguli, S.N.; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gataullin, M.; Gentile, S.; Giagu, S.; Gong, Z.F.; Grenier, Gerald Jean; Grimm, O.; Gruenewald, M.W.; Guida, M.; van Gulik, R.; Gupta, V.K.; Gurtu, A.; Gutay, L.J.; Haas, D.; Hakobian, R.Sh.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hebbeker, T.; Herve, Alain; Hirschfelder, J.; Hofer, H.; Hohlmann, M.; Holzner, G.; Hou, S.R.; Hu, Y.; Jin, B.N.; Jones, Lawrence W.; de Jong, P.; Josa-Mutuberria, I.; Kafer, D.; Kaur, M.; Kienzle-Focacci, M.N.; Kim, J.K.; Kirkby, Jasper; Kittel, W.; Klimentov, A.; Konig, A.C.; Kopal, M.; Koutsenko, V.; Kraber, M.; Kraemer, R.W.; Krenz, W.; Kruger, A.; Kunin, A.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Laktineh, I.; Landi, G.; Lebeau, M.; Lebedev, A.; Lebrun, P.; Lecomte, P.; Lecoq, P.; Le Coultre, P.; Le Goff, J.M.; Leiste, R.; Levtchenko, M.; Levchenko, P.; Li, C.; Likhoded, S.; Lin, C.H.; Lin, W.T.; Linde, F.L.; Lista, L.; Liu, Z.A.; Lohmann, W.; Longo, E.; Lu, Y.S.; Lubelsmeyer, K.; Luci, C.; Luminari, L.; Lustermann, W.; Ma, W.G.; Malgeri, L.; Malinin, A.; Mana, C.; Mangeol, D.; Mans, J.; Martin, J.P.; Marzano, F.; Mazumdar, K.; McNeil, R.R.; Mele, S.; Merola, L.; Meschini, M.; Metzger, W.J.; Mihul, A.; Milcent, H.; Mirabelli, G.; Mnich, J.; Mohanty, G.B.; Muanza, G.S.; Muijs, A.J.M.; Musicar, B.; Musy, M.; Nagy, S.; Natale, S.; Napolitano, M.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Newman, H.; Niessen, T.; Nisati, A.; Kluge, Hannelies; Ofierzynski, R.; Organtini, G.; Palomares, C.; Pandoulas, D.; Paolucci, P.; Paramatti, R.; Passaleva, G.; Patricelli, S.; Paul, Thomas Cantzon; Pauluzzi, M.; Paus, C.; Pauss, F.; Pedace, M.; Pensotti, S.; Perret-Gallix, D.; Petersen, B.; Piccolo, D.; Pierella, F.; Pioppi, M.; Piroue, P.A.; Pistolesi, E.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Pozhidaev, V.; Pothier, J.; Prokofev, D.O.; Prokofev, D.; Quartieri, J.; Rahal-Callot, G.; Rahaman, M.A.; Raics, P.; Raja, N.; Ramelli, R.; Rancoita, P.G.; Ranieri, R.; Raspereza, A.; Razis, P.; Ren, D.; Rescigno, M.; Reucroft, S.; Riemann, S.; Riles, Keith; Roe, B.P.; Romero, L.; Rosca, A.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Roth, Stefan; Rosenbleck, C.; Roux, B.; Rubio, J.A.; Ruggiero, G.; Rykaczewski, H.; Sakharov, A.; Saremi, S.; Sarkar, S.; Salicio, J.; Sanchez, E.; Sanders, M.P.; Schafer, C.; Shchegelsky, V.; Schmidt-Kaerst, S.; Schmitz, D.; Schopper, H.; Schotanus, D.J.; Schwering, G.; Sciacca, C.; Servoli, L.; Shevchenko, S.; Shivarov, N.; Shoutko, V.; Shumilov, E.; Shvorob, A.; Siedenburg, T.; Son, D.; Spillantini, P.; Steuer, M.; Stickland, D.P.; Stoyanov, B.; Straessner, A.; Sudhakar, K.; Sultanov, G.; Sun, L.Z.; Sushkov, S.; Suter, H.; Swain, J.D.; Szillasi, Z.; Tang, X.W.; Tarjan, P.; Tauscher, L.; Taylor, L.; Tellili, B.; Teyssier, D.; Timmermans, Charles; Ting, S.C.C.; Ting, S.M.; Tonwar, S.C.; Toth, J.; Tully, C.; Tung, K.L.; Ulbricht, J.; Valente, E.; Van de Walle, R.T.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vetlitsky, I.; Vicinanza, D.; Viertel, G.; Villa, S.; Vivargent, M.; Vlachos, S.; Vodopyanov, I.; Vogel, H.; Vogt, H.; Vorobev, I.; Vorobov, A.A.; Wadhwa, M.; Wallraff, W.; Wang, X.L.; Wang, Z.M.; Weber, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wilkens, H.; Wynhoff, S.; Xia, L.; Xu, Z.Z.; Yamamoto, J.; Yang, B.Z.; Yang, C.G.; Yang, H.J.; Yang, M.; Yeh, S.C.; Zalite, A.; Zalite, Yu.; Zhang, Z.P.; Zhao, J.; Zhu, G.Y.; Zhu, R.Y.; Zhuang, H.L.; Zichichi, A.; Zilizi, G.; Zimmermann, B.; Zoller, M.

    2002-01-01

    Results are presented from a study of the structure of high energy hadronic events recorded by the L3 detector at sqrt(s)>192 GeV. The distributions of several event shape variables are compared to resummed O(alphaS^2) QCD calculations. We determine the strong coupling constant at three average centre-of-mass energies: 194.4, 200.2 and 206.2 GeV. These measurements, combined with previous L3 measurements at lower energies demonstrate the running of alphaS as expected in QCD and yield alphaS(mZ) = 0.1227 +- 0.0012 +- 0.0058, where the first uncertainty is experimental and the second is theoretical.

  8. Revitalizing genetically-modified mouse strains using frozen-thawed sperm after up to 192 h of refrigerated epididymis transportation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Del Val, Gonzalo; Muñoz-Robledano, Patricia

    2017-10-01

    In the scientific interchange of genetically-modified mouse strains the transportation of refrigerated epididymis has several advantages over the transportation of live animals, especially with regard to the 3R (replacement, reduction and refinement) principles. The major limiting factor is the duration of the transportation. Previous reports have shown that sperm collected from transported epididymis maintained their fertility for around 72 h, but there are no published data with longer transportation times, and this window of time may be too short, especially for international shipments and where locations are not well connected. In this study live pups were born using frozen-thawed sperm after up to 192 h (8 days) of transportation, using a special in vitro fertilization design which resulted in a fertilization rate of 10.5%.

  9. Phase Transition Enthalpy Measurements of Organic and Organometallic Compounds and Ionic Liquids. Sublimation, Vaporization, and Fusion Enthalpies from 1880 to 2015. Part 2. C11-C192

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acree, William; Chickos, James S.

    2017-03-01

    The second part of this compendium concludes with a collection of phase change enthalpies of organic molecules inclusive of C11-C192 reported over the period 1880-2015. Also included are phase change enthalpies including fusion, vaporization, and sublimation enthalpies for organometallic, ionic liquids, and a few inorganic compounds. Paper I of this compendium, published separately, includes organic compounds from C1 to C10 and describes a group additivity method for evaluating solid, liquid, and gas phase heat capacities as well as temperature adjustments of phase changes. Paper II of this compendium also includes an updated version of a group additivity method for evaluating total phase change entropies which together with the fusion temperature can be useful in estimating total phase change enthalpies. Other uses include application in identifying potential substances that either form liquid or plastic crystals or exhibit additional phase changes such as undetected solid-solid transitions or behave anisotropically in the liquid state.

  10. Measurement of hadron and lepton-pair production in $e^{+}e^{-}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 192 - 208 GeV$ at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Achard, P.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Alcaraz, J.; Alemanni, G.; Allaby, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alviggi, M.G.; Anderhub, H.; Andreev, Valery P.; Anselmo, F.; Arefiev, A.; Azemoon, T.; Aziz, T.; Bagnaia, P.; Bajo, A.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Baldew, S.V.; Banerjee, S.; Banerjee, Sw.; Barczyk, A.; Barillere, R.; Bartalini, P.; Basile, M.; Batalova, N.; Battiston, R.; Bay, A.; Becattini, F.; Becker, U.; Behner, F.; Bellucci, L.; Berbeco, R.; Berdugo, J.; Berges, P.; Bertucci, B.; Betev, B.L.; Biasini, M.; Biglietti, M.; Biland, A.; Blaising, J.J.; Blyth, S.C.; Bobbink, G.J.; Bohm, A.; Boldizsar, L.; Borgia, B.; Bottai, S.; Bourilkov, D.; Bourquin, M.; Braccini, S.; Branson, J.G.; Brochu, F.; Burger, J.D.; Burger, W.J.; Cai, X.D.; Capell, M.; Cara Romeo, G.; Carlino, G.; Cartacci, A.; Casaus, J.; Cavallari, F.; Cavallo, N.; Cecchi, C.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo, M.; Chang, Y.H.; Chemarin, M.; Chen, A.; Chen, G.; Chen, G.M.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, H.S.; Chiefari, G.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Clare, I.; Clare, R.; Coignet, G.; Colino, N.; Costantini, S.; de la Cruz, B.; Cucciarelli, S.; de Asmundis, R.; Deglon, P.; Debreczeni, J.; Degre, A.; Dehmelt, K.; Deiters, K.; della Volpe, D.; Delmeire, E.; Denes, P.; DeNotaristefani, F.; De Salvo, A.; Diemoz, M.; Dierckxsens, M.; Dionisi, C.; Dittmar, M.; Doria, A.; Dova, M.T.; Duchesneau, D.; Duda, M.; Echenard, B.; Eline, A.; El Hage, A.; El Mamouni, H.; Engler, A.; Eppling, F.J.; Extermann, P.; Falagan, M.A.; Falciano, S.; Favara, A.; Fay, J.; Fedin, O.; Felcini, M.; Ferguson, T.; Fesefeldt, H.; Fiandrini, E.; Field, J.H.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, P.H.; Fisher, W.; Forconi, G.; Freudenreich, K.; Furetta, C.; Galaktionov, Iouri; Ganguli, S.N.; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gataullin, M.; Gentile, S.; Giagu, S.; Gong, Z.F.; Grenier, Gerald Jean; Grimm, O.; Gruenewald, M.W.; Guida, M.; Gupta, V.K.; Gurtu, A.; Gutay, L.J.; Haas, D.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hebbeker, T.; Herve, Alain; Hirschfelder, J.; Hofer, H.; Hohlmann, M.; Holzner, G.; Hou, S.R.; Jin, B.N.; Jindal, P.; Jones, Lawrence W.; de Jong, P.; Josa-Mutuberria, I.; Kaur, M.; Kienzle-Focacci, M.N.; Kim, J.K.; Kirkby, J.; Kittel, W.; Klimentov, A.; Konig, A.C.; Kopal, M.; Koutsenko, V.; Kraber, M.; Kraemer, R.W.; Kruger, A.; Kunin, A.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Laktineh, I.; Landi, G.; Lebeau, M.; Lebedev, A.; Lebrun, P.; Lecomte, P.; Lecoq, P.; Le Coultre, P.; Le Goff, J.M.; Leiste, R.; Levtchenko, M.; Levtchenko, P.; Li, C.; Likhoded, S.; Lin, C.H.; Lin, W.T.; Linde, F.L.; Lista, L.; Liu, Z.A.; Lohmann, W.; Longo, E.; Lu, Y.S.; Luci, C.; Luminari, L.; Lustermann, W.; Ma, W.G.; Malgeri, L.; Malinin, A.; Mana, C.; Mans, J.; Martin, J.P.; Marzano, F.; Mazumdar, K.; McNeil, R.R.; Mele, S.; Merola, L.; Meschini, M.; Metzger, W.J.; Mihul, A.; Milcent, H.; Mirabelli, G.; Mnich, J.; Mohanty, G.B.; Muanza, G.S.; Muijs, A.J.M.; Musy, M.; Nagy, S.; Natale, S.; Napolitano, M.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Newman, H.; Nisati, A.; Novak, T.; Kluge, Hannelies; Ofierzynski, R.; Organtini, G.; Pal, I.; Palomares, C.; Paolucci, P.; Paramatti, R.; Passaleva, G.; Patricelli, S.; Paul, Thomas Cantzon; Pauluzzi, M.; Paus, C.; Pauss, F.; Pedace, M.; Pensotti, S.; Perret-Gallix, D.; Piccolo, D.; Pierella, F.; Pieri, M.; Pioppi, M.; Piroue, P.A.; Pistolesi, E.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Pojidaev, V.; Pothier, J.; Prokofiev, D.; Rahal-Callot, G.; Rahaman, Mohammad Azizur; Raics, P.; Raja, N.; Ramelli, R.; Rancoita, P.G.; Ranieri, R.; Raspereza, A.; Razis, P.; Rembeczki, S.; Ren, D.; Rescigno, M.; Reucroft, S.; Riemann, S.; Riles, Keith; Roe, B.P.; Romero, L.; Rosca, A.; Rosemann, C.; Rosenbleck, C.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Roth, Stefan; Rubio, J.A.; Ruggiero, G.; Rykaczewski, H.; Sakharov, A.; Saremi, S.; Sarkar, S.; Salicio, J.; Sanchez, E.; Schafer, C.; Schegelsky, V.; Schopper, H.; Schotanus, D.J.; Sciacca, C.; Servoli, L.; Shevchenko, S.; Shivarov, N.; Shoutko, V.; Shumilov, E.; Shvorob, A.; Son, D.; Souga, C.; Spillantini, P.; Steuer, M.; Stickland, D.P.; Stoyanov, B.; Straessner, A.; Sudhakar, K.; Sultanov, G.; Sun, L.Z.; Sushkov, S.; Suter, H.; Swain, J.D.; Szillasi, Z.; Tang, X.W.; Tarjan, P.; Tauscher, L.; Taylor, L.; Tellili, B.; Teyssier, D.; Timmermans, Charles; Ting, Samuel C.C.; Ting, S.M.; Tonwar, S.C.; Toth, J.; Tully, C.; Tung, K.L.; Ulbricht, J.; Valente, E.; Van de Walle, R.T.; Vasquez, R.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vetlitsky, I.; Viertel, G.; Villa, S.; Vivargent, M.; Vlachos, S.; Vodopianov, I.; Vogel, H.; Vogt, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Vorobyov, A.A.; Wadhwa, M.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X.L.; Wang, Z.M.; Weber, M.; Wynhoff, S.; Xia, L.; Xu, Z.Z.; Yamamoto, J.; Yang, B.Z.; Yang, C.G.; Yang, H.J.; Yang, M.; Yeh, S.C.; Zalite, An.; Zalite, Yu.; Zhang, Z.P.; Zhao, J.; Zhu, G.Y.; Zhu, R.Y.; Zhuang, H.L.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, B.; Zoller, M.

    2006-01-01

    Hadron production and lepton-pair production in e+e- collisions are studied with data collected with the L3 detector at LEP at centre-of-mass energies sqrt{s}=192-208GeV. Using a total integrated luminosity of 453/pb, 36057 hadronic events and 12863 lepton-pair events are selected. The cross sections for hadron production and lepton-pair production are measured for the full sample and for events where no high-energy initial-state-radiation photon is emitted prior to the collisions. Lepton-pair events are further investigated and forward-backward asymmetries are measured. Finally, the differential cross sections for electron-positron pair-production is determined as a function of the scattering angle. An overall good agreement is found with Standard Model predictions.

  11. Search for shape coexistence in {sup 188,190}Pb via fine structure in the alpha decay of {sup 192,194}Po

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, I.; Davids, C.; Janssens, R.V.F. [and others

    1995-08-01

    The interaction between coexisting shapes in nuclei near closed shells was of great interest in the past decade. Excited 0{sup +} states at low energy can often be identified as the bandheads of structures with differing shapes built on those states, These structures were identified in {sup 190-198}Pb via beta decay and alpha decay {open_quotes}fine structure{close_quotes} studies. Coexistence of different shapes in Pb nuclei was predicted by Nilsson-Strutinsky calculations, in which both the oblate and prolate minima were predicted to have excitation energies near 1 MeV. It was our intention to continue the systematic study of the Pb nuclides by searching for excited O{sup +} states in {sup 188}Pb by observing the fine structure in the alpha decay of {sup 192}Po.

  12. Measurement of hadron and lepton-pair production in e+e- collisions at √(s)=192-208 GeV at LEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Achard, P.; Adriani, O.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.

    2006-01-01

    Hadron production and lepton-pair production in e + e - collisions are studied with data collected with the L3 detector at LEP at centre-of-mass energies √(s)=192-208 GeV. Using a total integrated luminosity of 453 pb -1 , 36057 hadronic events and 12863 lepton-pair events are selected. The cross sections for hadron production and lepton-pair production are measured for the full sample and for events where no high-energy initial-state-radiation photon is emitted prior to the collisions. Lepton-pair events are further investigated and forward-backward asymmetries are measured. Finally, the differential cross sections for electron-positron pair-production is determined as a function of the scattering angle. An overall good agreement is found with Standard Model predictions. (orig.)

  13. Experimental determination of the radial dose distribution in high gradient regions around 192Ir wires: Comparison of electron paramagnetic resonance imaging, films, and Monte Carlo simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolbun, N.; Leveque, Ph.; Abboud, F.; Bol, A.; Vynckier, S.; Gallez, B.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The experimental determination of doses at proximal distances from radioactive sources is difficult because of the steepness of the dose gradient. The goal of this study was to determine the relative radial dose distribution for a low dose rate 192 Ir wire source using electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) and to compare the results to those obtained using Gafchromic EBT film dosimetry and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Methods: Lithium formate and ammonium formate were chosen as the EPR dosimetric materials and were used to form cylindrical phantoms. The dose distribution of the stable radiation-induced free radicals in the lithium formate and ammonium formate phantoms was assessed by EPRI. EBT films were also inserted inside in ammonium formate phantoms for comparison. MC simulation was performed using the MCNP4C2 software code. Results: The radical signal in irradiated ammonium formate is contained in a single narrow EPR line, with an EPR peak-to-peak linewidth narrower than that of lithium formate (∼0.64 and 1.4 mT, respectively). The spatial resolution of EPR images was enhanced by a factor of 2.3 using ammonium formate compared to lithium formate because its linewidth is about 0.75 mT narrower than that of lithium formate. The EPRI results were consistent to within 1% with those of Gafchromic EBT films and MC simulations at distances from 1.0 to 2.9 mm. The radial dose values obtained by EPRI were about 4% lower at distances from 2.9 to 4.0 mm than those determined by MC simulation and EBT film dosimetry. Conclusions: Ammonium formate is a suitable material under certain conditions for use in brachytherapy dosimetry using EPRI. In this study, the authors demonstrated that the EPRI technique allows the estimation of the relative radial dose distribution at short distances for a 192 Ir wire source.

  14. Brachytherapy source calibration, reviews, and consistency of 192Ir high-dose rate afterloading sources supplied over the period of 10 years: a retrospective analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagappan, Balasubramanian; Kumar, Yogesh; Patel, Narayan P.; Dhull, Anil Kumar; Kaushal, Vivek

    2015-01-01

    Measurement and verification of strength of monomodal high-dose rate (mHDR) 192 Ir source supplied by the vendor is a major part of quality assurance program. Reference air kerma rate (RAKR) or air kerma strength (AKS) is the recommended quantity to specify the strength of gamma emitting brachytherapy sources. Physicist in our institution performed the source calibration as soon as each 192 Ir new source was loaded on the mHDR afterloading machine. The AKS accurately measured using a physikalisch technische werkstatten (PTW) re-entrant chamber-electrometer system in a scatter-free geometry was used to compute the air kerma rate (AKR) at one-meter distance in the air. To ensure accurate dose delivery to brachytherapy patients, measured AKS or RAKR should be entered correctly in both HDR treatment console station (TCS) as well as treatment planning system (TPS) associated with it. The clinical outcome mainly depends not only on the accuracy of the source strength measurement in the hospital but also on the correct source strength entered into both TCS and TPS software. A retrospective study on 22 mHDR V2 sources supplied by the vendor for the period of 10 years was taken up to access the accuracy of source strength supplied to the Radiotherapy department. The results are analyzed and reported. The accuracy in measured RAKR of all 22 sources supplied by vendor was well within the tolerance limits set by the national regulatory body and international recommendations. The deviations observed between measured RAKR versus manufacturer's quoted RAKR were in the range from -1.71% to +1.15%. In conclusion, the measured RAKR have good agreement with vendor quoted RAKR values. (author)

  15. SU-F-19A-10: Recalculation and Reporting Clinical HDR 192-Ir Head and Neck Dose Distributions Using Model Based Dose Calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlsson Tedgren, A [Linkoping University, Linkoping, Linkoping (Sweden); Persson, M; Nilsson, J [Karolinska hospital, Stockholm, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively re-calculate dose distributions for selected head and neck cancer patients, earlier treated with HDR 192Ir brachytherapy, using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations and compare results to distributions from the planning system derived using TG43 formalism. To study differences between dose to medium (as obtained with the MC code) and dose to water in medium as obtained through (1) ratios of stopping powers and (2) ratios of mass energy absorption coefficients between water and medium. Methods: The MC code Algebra was used to calculate dose distributions according to earlier actual treatment plans using anonymized plan data and CT images in DICOM format. Ratios of stopping power and mass energy absorption coefficients for water with various media obtained from 192-Ir spectra were used in toggling between dose to water and dose to media. Results: Differences between initial planned TG43 dose distributions and the doses to media calculated by MC are insignificant in the target volume. Differences are moderate (within 4–5 % at distances of 3–4 cm) but increase with distance and are most notable in bone and at the patient surface. Differences between dose to water and dose to medium are within 1-2% when using mass energy absorption coefficients to toggle between the two quantities but increase to above 10% for bone using stopping power ratios. Conclusion: MC predicts target doses for head and neck cancer patients in close agreement with TG43. MC yields improved dose estimations outside the target where a larger fraction of dose is from scattered photons. It is important with awareness and a clear reporting of absorbed dose values in using model based algorithms. Differences in bone media can exceed 10% depending on how dose to water in medium is defined.

  16. MiR-192-Mediated Positive Feedback Loop Controls the Robustness of Stress-Induced p53 Oscillations in Breast Cancer Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Moore

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The p53 tumor suppressor protein plays a critical role in cellular stress and cancer prevention. A number of post-transcriptional regulators, termed microRNAs, are closely connected with the p53-mediated cellular networks. While the molecular interactions among p53 and microRNAs have emerged, a systems-level understanding of the regulatory mechanism and the role of microRNAs-forming feedback loops with the p53 core remains elusive. Here we have identified from literature that there exist three classes of microRNA-mediated feedback loops revolving around p53, all with the nature of positive feedback coincidentally. To explore the relationship between the cellular performance of p53 with the microRNA feedback pathways, we developed a mathematical model of the core p53-MDM2 module coupled with three microRNA-mediated positive feedback loops involving miR-192, miR-34a, and miR-29a. Simulations and bifurcation analysis in relationship to extrinsic noise reproduce the oscillatory behavior of p53 under DNA damage in single cells, and notably show that specific microRNA abrogation can disrupt the wild-type cellular phenotype when the ubiquitous cell-to-cell variability is taken into account. To assess these in silico results we conducted microRNA-perturbation experiments in MCF7 breast cancer cells. Time-lapse microscopy of cell-population behavior in response to DNA double-strand breaks, together with image classification of single-cell phenotypes across a population, confirmed that the cellular p53 oscillations are compromised after miR-192 perturbations, matching well with the model predictions. Our study via modeling in combination with quantitative experiments provides new evidence on the role of microRNA-mediated positive feedback loops in conferring robustness to the system performance of stress-induced response of p53.

  17. Circulating miR-192 and miR-193b are markers of prediabetes and are modulated by an exercise intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Párrizas, Marcelina; Brugnara, Laura; Esteban, Yaiza; González-Franquesa, Alba; Canivell, Sílvia; Murillo, Serafín; Gordillo-Bastidas, Elizabeth; Cussó, Roser; Cadefau, Joan A; García-Roves, Pablo M; Servitja, Joan-Marc; Novials, Anna

    2015-03-01

    Diabetes is frequently diagnosed late, when the development of complications is almost inevitable, decreasing the quality of life of patients. However, early detection of affected individuals would allow the implementation of timely and effective therapies. Here we set to describe the profile of circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) in prediabetic patients with the intention of identifying novel diagnostic and therapeutic tools. We used real-time RT-PCR to measure the abundance of 176 miRNAs in serum of a cohort of 92 control and prediabetic individuals with either impaired fasting glucose or impaired glucose tolerance, as well as newly diagnosed diabetic patients. We validated the results in a second cohort of control and prediabetic subjects undergoing a therapeutic exercise intervention, as well as in a mouse model of glucose intolerance. We identified two miRNAs, miR-192 and miR-193b, whose abundance is significantly increased in the prediabetic state but not in diabetic patients. Strikingly, these miRNAs are also increased in plasma of glucose-intolerant mice. Moreover, circulating levels of miR-192 and miR-193b return to baseline in both prediabetic humans and glucose-intolerant mice undergoing a therapeutic intervention consisting in chronic exercise, which succeeded in normalizing metabolic parameters. Our data show that the pattern of circulating miRNAs is modified by defects in glucose metabolism in a similar manner in mice and humans. This circulating miRNA signature for prediabetes could be used as a new diagnostic tool, as well as to monitor response to intervention.

  18. Cluster pattern analysis of energy deposition sites for the brachytherapy sources 103Pd, 125I, 192Ir, 137Cs, and 60Co.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villegas, Fernanda; Tilly, Nina; Bäckström, Gloria; Ahnesjö, Anders

    2014-09-21

    Analysing the pattern of energy depositions may help elucidate differences in the severity of radiation-induced DNA strand breakage for different radiation qualities. It is often claimed that energy deposition (ED) sites from photon radiation form a uniform random pattern, but there is indication of differences in RBE values among different photon sources used in brachytherapy. The aim of this work is to analyse the spatial patterns of EDs from 103Pd, 125I, 192Ir, 137Cs sources commonly used in brachytherapy and a 60Co source as a reference radiation. The results suggest that there is both a non-uniform and a uniform random component to the frequency distribution of distances to the nearest neighbour ED. The closest neighbouring EDs show high spatial correlation for all investigated radiation qualities, whilst the uniform random component dominates for neighbours with longer distances for the three higher mean photon energy sources (192Ir, 137Cs, and 60Co). The two lower energy photon emitters (103Pd and 125I) present a very small uniform random component. The ratio of frequencies of clusters with respect to 60Co differs up to 15% for the lower energy sources and less than 2% for the higher energy sources when the maximum distance between each pair of EDs is 2 nm. At distances relevant to DNA damage, cluster patterns can be differentiated between the lower and higher energy sources. This may be part of the explanation to the reported difference in RBE values with initial DSB yields as an endpoint for these brachytherapy sources.

  19. Effect of Gold Nanoparticles on Prostate Dose Distribution under Ir-192 Internal and 18 MV External Radiotherapy Procedures Using Gel Dosimetry and Monte Carlo Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khosravi H.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gel polymers are considered as new dosimeters for determining radiotherapy dose distribution in three dimensions. Objective: The ability of a new formulation of MAGIC-f polymer gel was assessed by experimental measurement and Monte Carlo (MC method for studying the effect of gold nanoparticles (GNPs in prostate dose distributions under the internal Ir-192 and external 18MV radiotherapy practices. Method: A Plexiglas phantom was made representing human pelvis. The GNP shaving 15 nm in diameter and 0.1 mM concentration were synthesized using chemical reduction method. Then, a new formulation of MAGIC-f gel was synthesized. The fabricated gel was poured in the tubes located at the prostate (with and without the GNPs and bladder locations of the phantom. The phantom was irradiated to an Ir-192 source and 18 MV beam of a Varian linac separately based on common radiotherapy procedures used for prostate cancer. After 24 hours, the irradiated gels were read using a Siemens 1.5 Tesla MRI scanner. The absolute doses at the reference points and isodose curves resulted from the experimental measurement of the gels and MC simulations following the internal and external radiotherapy practices were compared. Results: The mean absorbed doses measured with the gel in the presence of the GNPs in prostate were 15% and 8 % higher than the corresponding values without the GNPs under the internal and external radiation therapies, respectively. MC simulations also indicated a dose increase of 14 % and 7 % due to presence of the GNPs, for the same experimental internal and external radiotherapy practices, respectively. Conclusion: There was a good agreement between the dose enhancement factors (DEFs estimated with MC simulations and experiment gel measurements due to the GNPs. The results indicated that the polymer gel dosimetry method as developed and used in this study, can be recommended as a reliable method for investigating the DEF of GNPs in internal

  20. Effect of Gold Nanoparticles on Prostate Dose Distribution under Ir-192 Internal and 18 MV External Radiotherapy Procedures Using Gel Dosimetry and Monte Carlo Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosravi, H; Hashemi, B; Mahdavi, S R; Hejazi, P

    2015-03-01

    Gel polymers are considered as new dosimeters for determining radiotherapy dose distribution in three dimensions. The ability of a new formulation of MAGIC-f polymer gel was assessed by experimental measurement and Monte Carlo (MC) method for studying the effect of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) in prostate dose distributions under the internal Ir-192 and external 18MV radiotherapy practices. A Plexiglas phantom was made representing human pelvis. The GNP shaving 15 nm in diameter and 0.1 mM concentration were synthesized using chemical reduction method. Then, a new formulation of MAGIC-f gel was synthesized. The fabricated gel was poured in the tubes located at the prostate (with and without the GNPs) and bladder locations of the phantom. The phantom was irradiated to an Ir-192 source and 18 MV beam of a Varian linac separately based on common radiotherapy procedures used for prostate cancer. After 24 hours, the irradiated gels were read using a Siemens 1.5 Tesla MRI scanner. The absolute doses at the reference points and isodose curves resulted from the experimental measurement of the gels and MC simulations following the internal and external radiotherapy practices were compared. The mean absorbed doses measured with the gel in the presence of the GNPs in prostate were 15% and 8 % higher than the corresponding values without the GNPs under the internal and external radiation therapies, respectively. MC simulations also indicated a dose increase of 14 % and 7 % due to presence of the GNPs, for the same experimental internal and external radiotherapy practices, respectively. There was a good agreement between the dose enhancement factors (DEFs) estimated with MC simulations and experiment gel measurements due to the GNPs. The results indicated that the polymer gel dosimetry method as developed and used in this study, can be recommended as a reliable method for investigating the DEF of GNPs in internal and external radiotherapy practices.

  1. SU-F-19A-10: Recalculation and Reporting Clinical HDR 192-Ir Head and Neck Dose Distributions Using Model Based Dose Calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsson Tedgren, A; Persson, M; Nilsson, J

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively re-calculate dose distributions for selected head and neck cancer patients, earlier treated with HDR 192Ir brachytherapy, using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations and compare results to distributions from the planning system derived using TG43 formalism. To study differences between dose to medium (as obtained with the MC code) and dose to water in medium as obtained through (1) ratios of stopping powers and (2) ratios of mass energy absorption coefficients between water and medium. Methods: The MC code Algebra was used to calculate dose distributions according to earlier actual treatment plans using anonymized plan data and CT images in DICOM format. Ratios of stopping power and mass energy absorption coefficients for water with various media obtained from 192-Ir spectra were used in toggling between dose to water and dose to media. Results: Differences between initial planned TG43 dose distributions and the doses to media calculated by MC are insignificant in the target volume. Differences are moderate (within 4–5 % at distances of 3–4 cm) but increase with distance and are most notable in bone and at the patient surface. Differences between dose to water and dose to medium are within 1-2% when using mass energy absorption coefficients to toggle between the two quantities but increase to above 10% for bone using stopping power ratios. Conclusion: MC predicts target doses for head and neck cancer patients in close agreement with TG43. MC yields improved dose estimations outside the target where a larger fraction of dose is from scattered photons. It is important with awareness and a clear reporting of absorbed dose values in using model based algorithms. Differences in bone media can exceed 10% depending on how dose to water in medium is defined

  2. Direct reconstruction and associated uncertainties of 192Ir source dwell positions in ring applicators using gafchromic film in the treatment planning of HDR brachytherapy cervix patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awunor, O. A.; Dixon, B.; Walker, C.

    2013-05-01

    This paper details a practical method for the direct reconstruction of high dose rate 192Ir source dwell positions in ring applicators using gafchromic film in the treatment planning of brachytherapy cervix patients. It also details the uncertainties associated with such a process. Eight Nucletron interstitial ring applicators—Ø26 mm (×4), Ø30 mm (×3) and Ø34 mm (×1), and one 60 mm intrauterine tube were used in this study. RTQA2 and XRQA2 gafchromic films were irradiated at pre-programmed dwell positions with three successive 192Ir sources and used to derive the coordinates of the source dwell positions. The source was observed to deviate significantly from its expected position by up to 6.1 mm in all ring sizes. Significant inter applicator differences of up to 2.6 mm were observed between a subset of ring applicators. Also, the measured data were observed to differ significantly from commercially available source path models provided by Nucletron with differences of up to 3.7 mm across all ring applicator sizes. The total expanded uncertainty (k = 2) averaged over all measured dwell positions in the rings was observed to be 1.1 ± 0.1 mm (Ø26 mm and Ø30 mm rings) and 1.0 ± 0.3 mm (Ø34 mm ring) respectively, and when transferred to the treatment planning system, equated to maximum %dose changes of 1.9%, 13.2% and 1.5% at regions representative of the parametrium, lateral fornix and organs at risk respectively.

  3. Pathological characteristics of extremely severe acute radiation injury in a patient's legs and hands after a very uneven accidental exposure to an extremely high dose of 192Ir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Qing; Li Guomin; Liu Shujun; Yang Yijing; Li Fumeng; Yang Junhua

    1997-01-01

    The pathological characteristics of an extremely high dose radiation in the legs and hands of a patient is reported. the patient was exposed to 192 Ir γ-rays for 9 hours and 20 minutes, the activity of which was 2.76 TBq. The amputations of the right thigh and left forearm had to be performed 8 days after the irradiation and the debridements and skin graftings were performed on the right hand and the inner side of left knee 55 days after the radiation. Microscopically, massive necrosis of cells of the epidermis, cutaneous appendages, hypodermics and skeletal muscles, and hemorrhage in the dermis, hypodermics and skeletal muscles were seen in the local irradiated parts of the right shank. But the arrector pili muscles in the dermis of the right shank remained. On the fingers and the palm of the left hand, vacuolar degeneration and massive necrosis of the cells of epidermis were present with extensive neutrophil infiltration. Cysts of large or small size were formed from the necrotic cells, separating epidermis from dermis. There were degeneration and necrosis of glandular epithelium cells of sweat glands. Hemorrhage was present in dermis and hypodermics. All the hematopoietic tissues in the bone marrow in the upper ends of the tibia and fibula and in the lower ends of the femur, the radius and the ulna disappeared. Acute radiation ulcers were present on the skin of the left knee and on the skin of the thumb, index finger and middle finger of the right hand. The extremely severe acute radiation injury caused by extremely high dose of 192 Ir led to the necrosis of the extensive soft tissues deep to skeletal muscles and the disappearance of the hematopoietic tissues in the bone marrow

  4. Rotavirus 2/6 Viruslike Particles Administered Intranasally with Cholera Toxin, Escherichia coli Heat-Labile Toxin (LT), and LT-R192G Induce Protection from Rotavirus Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Neal, Christine M.; Clements, John D.; Estes, Mary K.; Conner, Margaret E.

    1998-01-01

    We have shown that rotavirus 2/6 viruslike particles composed of proteins VP2 and VP6 (2/6-VLPs) administered to mice intranasally with cholera toxin (CT) induced protection from rotavirus challenge, as measured by virus shedding. Since it is unclear if CT will be approved for human use, we evaluated the adjuvanticity of Escherichia coli heat-labile toxin (LT) and LT-R192G. Mice were inoculated intranasally with 10 μg of 2/6-VLPs combined with CT, LT, or LT-R192G. All three adjuvants induced equivalent geometric mean titers of rotavirus-specific serum antibody and intestinal immunoglobulin G (IgG). Mice inoculated with 2/6-VLPs with LT produced significantly higher titers of intestinal IgA than mice given CT as the adjuvant. All mice inoculated with 2/6-VLPs mixed with LT and LT-R192G were totally protected (100%) from rotavirus challenge, while mice inoculated with 2/6-VLPs mixed with CT showed a mean 91% protection from challenge. The availability of a safe, effective mucosal adjuvant such as LT-R192G will increase the practicality of administering recombinant vaccines mucosally. PMID:9525668

  5. Final Report for grant entitled "Production of Astatine-211 for U.S. Investigators"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilbur, Daniel Scott

    2012-12-12

    Alpha-particle emitting radionuclides hold great promise in the therapy of cancer, but few alpha-emitters are available to investigators to evaluate. Of the alpha-emitters that have properties amenable for use in humans, 211At is of particular interest as it does not have alpha-emitting daughter radionuclides. Thus, there is a high interest in having a source of 211At for sale to investigators in the US. Production of 211At is accomplished on a cyclotron using an alpha-particle beam irradiation of bismuth metal. Unfortunately, there are few cyclotrons available that can produce an alpha particle beam for that production. The University of Washington has a cyclotron, one of three in the U.S., that is currently producing 211At. In the proposed studies, the things necessary for production and shipment of 211At to other investigators will be put into place at UW. Of major importance is the efficient production and isolation of 211At in a form that can be readily used by other investigators. In the studies, production of 211At on the UW cyclotron will be optimized by determining the best beam energy and the highest beam current to maximize 211At production. As it would be very difficult for most investigators to isolate the 211At from the irradiated target, the 211At-isolation process will be optimized and automated to more safely and efficiently obtain the 211At for shipment. Additional tasks to make the 211At available for distribution include obtaining appropriate shipping vials and containers, putting into place the requisite standard operating procedures for Radiation Safety compliance at the levels of 211At activity to be produced / shipped, and working with the Department of Energy, Isotope Development and Production for Research and Applications Program, to take orders, make shipments and be reimbursed for costs of production and shipment.

  6. Reaction of aromatic diazonium salts with carrier-free radioiodine and astatine, evidence for complex formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, G.J.; Roessler, K.; Stoecklin, G.

    1979-01-01

    Systematic studies of the astatodiazoniation reaction and a comparison with iododediazoniation under comparable conditions are reported. The yields for all astatohalobenzenes and -toluenes were nearly constant and unaffected by the nature of the diazonium compound, its isomeric form, and the number of isomers used at the same time. Only astatofluorobenzenes were obtained at higher yields. An electron-transfer mechanism is proposed for dediazoniation at these low halide concentration levels. At sufficient thermal excitation levels the electron transfer leads to the dissociation of nitrogen, while the phenyl and halogen radicals recombine. The isomer distribution found for some of the derivatives from dediazoniation may also be due to steric effects

  7. Astatine-211-labeled biotin conjugates resistant to biotinidase for use in pretargeted radioimmunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foulon, Catherine F.; Alston, Kevin L.; Zalutsky, Michael R.

    1998-01-01

    We report herein the preparation and biological evaluation of two radioastatinated biotin conjugates, (3-[ 211 At]astatobenzoyl)norbiotinamide and ((5-[ 211 At]astato-3-pyridinyl)carbonyl)norbiotinamide. Both conjugates were stable in the presence of human serum and cerebrospinal fluid as well as murine serum, indicating a resistance to degradation to biotinidase. The normal tissue clearance of (3-[ 211 At]astatobenzoyl)norbiotinamide and ((5-[ 211 At]astato-3-pyridinyl)carbonyl)norbiotinamide was rapid, as observed previously with their iodo analogues. Also reported are the first syntheses of N-succinimidyl 5-[ 211 At]astato-3-pyridinecarboxylate and 3-[ 211 At]astatoaniline, two reagents of potential utility for labeling proteins and peptides with 211 At

  8. Microdosimetry of astatine-211 and comparison with that of iodine-125

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unak, T.

    2001-01-01

    211 At is an alpha and Auger emitter radionuclide and has been frequently used for labeling of different kind of chemical agents. 125 I is also known as an effective Auger emitter. The radionuclides which emit short range and high LET radiations such as alpha particles and Auger electrons have high radiotoxic effectiveness on the living systems. The microdosimetric data are suitable to clarify the real radiotoxic effectiveness and to get the detail of diagnostic and therapeutic application principles of these radionuclides. In this study, the energy and dose absorptions by cell nucleus from alpha particles and Auger electrons emitted by 211 At have been calculated using a Monte Carlo calculation program (code: UNMOC). For these calculations two different model corresponding to the cell nucleus have been used and the data obtained were compared with the data earlier obtained for 125 I. As a result, the radiotoxicity of 211 At is in the competition with 125 I. In the case of a specific agent labelled with 211 At or 125 I is incorporated into the cell or cell nucleus, but non-bound to DNA or not found very close to it, 211 At should considerably be much more radiotoxic than 125 I, but in the case of the labelled agent is bound to DNA or take a place very close to it, the radiotoxicity of 125 I should considerably be higher than 211 At. (author)

  9. Evaluation of Novel Wet Chemistry Separation and Purification Methods to Facilitate Automation of Astatine-211 Isolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilbur, Daniel Scott

    2016-01-01

    This research is a collaborative effort between the research groups of the PIs, Dr. D. Scott Wilbur in the Department of Radiation Oncology at the University of Washington (UW) and Matthew O'Hara at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). In this report only those studies conducted at UW and the budget information from UW will be reported. A separate progress and financial report will be provided by PNNL. This final report outlines the experiments (Tasks) conducted and results obtained at UW from July 1, 2013 thru June 30, 2016 (2-year project with 1 year no-cost extension). The report divides the information on the experiments and results obtained into the 5 specific objectives of the research efforts and the Tasks within those objectives. This format is used so that it is easy to see what has been accomplished in each area. A brief summary of the major findings from the studies is provided below. Summary of Major Findings from Research/Training Activities at UW: Anion and cation exchange columns did not provide adequate 211 At capture and/or extraction results under conditions studied to warrant further evaluation; PEG-Merrifield resins containing mPEG350, mPEG750, mPEG2000 and mPEG5000 were synthesized and evaluated; All of the mPEG resins with different sized mPEG moieties conjugated gave similar 211 At capture (>95%) from 8M HCl solutions and release with conc. NH 4 OH (~50-80%), but very low quantities were released when NaOH was used as an eluent; Capture and release of 211 At when loading [ 211 At]astatate appeared to be similar to that of [ 211 At]astatide on PEG columns, but further studies need to be conducted to confirm that; Capture of 211 At on PEG columns was lower (e.g. 80-90%) from solutions of 8M HNO 3 , but higher capture rates (e.g. 99%) can be obtained when 10M HNO 3 is mixed with an equal quantity of 8M HCl; Addition of reductants to the 211 At solutions did not appear to change the percent capture, but may have an effect on the % extracted; There was some indication that the PEG-Merrifield resins could be saturated (perhaps with Bi) resulting in lower capture percentages, but more studies need to be done to confirm that; A target dissolution chamber, designed and built at PNNL, works well with syringe pumps so it can be used in an automated system; Preliminary semi-automated 211 At isolation studies have been conducted with full-scale target dissolution and 211 At isolation using a PEG column on the Hamilton automated system gave low overall recoveries, but HNO 3 was used (rather than HCl) for loading the 211 At and flow rates were not optimized; Results obtained using PEG columns are high enough to warrant further development on a fully automated system; Results obtained also indicate that additional studies are warranted to evaluate other types of columns for 211 At separation from bismuth, which allow use of HNO 3 /HCl mixtures for loading and NaOH for eluting 211 At. Such a column could greatly simplify the overall isolation process and make it easier to automate.

  10. The potential of 211Astatine for NIS-mediated radionuclide therapy in prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willhauck, Michael J.; Sharif Samani, Bibi-Rana; Goeke, Burkhard; Wolf, Ingo; Senekowitsch-Schmidtke, Reingard; Stark, Hans-Juergen; Meyer, Geerd J.; Knapp, Wolfram H.; Morris, John C.; Spitzweg, Christine

    2008-01-01

    We reported recently the induction of selective iodide uptake in prostate cancer cells (LNCaP) by prostate-specific antigen (PSA) promoter-directed sodium iodide symporter (NIS) expression that allowed a significant therapeutic effect of 131 I. In the current study, we studied the potential of the high-energy alpha-emitter 211 At, also transported by NIS, as an alternative radionuclide after NIS gene transfer in tumors with limited therapeutic efficacy of 131 I due to rapid iodide efflux. We investigated uptake and therapeutic efficacy of 211 At in LNCaP cells stably expressing NIS under the control of the PSA promoter (NP-1) in vitro and in vivo. NP-1 cells concentrated 211 At in a perchlorate-sensitive manner, which allowed a dramatic therapeutic effect in vitro. After intrapertoneal injection of 211 At (1 MBq), NP-1 tumors accumulated approximately 16% ID/g 211 At (effective half-life 4.6 h), which resulted in a tumor-absorbed dose of 1,580 ± 345 mGy/MBq and a significant tumor volume reduction of up to 82 ± 19%, while control tumors continued their growth exponentially. A significant therapeutic effect of 211 At has been demonstrated in prostate cancer after PSA promoter-directed NIS gene transfer in vitro and in vivo suggesting a potential role for 211 At as an attractive alternative radioisotope for NIS-targeted radionuclide therapy, in particular in smaller tumors with limited radionuclide retention time. (orig.)

  11. Sci-Thur AM: YIS – 01: New technologies for astatine-211 targeted alpha therapy research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, Jason; Yang, Hua; Schaffer, Paul; Ruth, Thomas [University of Victoria, Victoria, BC (Canada); TRIUMF, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: The short-range, densely ionizing α-particles emitted by {sup 211}At (t{sub 1/2}=7.2h) are well suited for the treatment of diffuse microscopic disease, using cancer targeting biomolecules. {sup 211}At availability is limited by the rarity of α-cyclotrons required for standard production. Image-based dosimetry is also limited for {sup 211}At, which emits low intensity X-rays. Our goal was to leverage state-of-the-art infrastructure at TRIUMF to produce and evaluate two related isotopes, {sup 211}Rn (t{sub 1/2}=14.6h, 73% decay to {sup 211}At) as a generator for {sup 211}At, and {sup 209}At (t{sub 1/2}=5.4h, X-ray/gamma-ray emitter) as a novel 211At surrogate for preclinical imaging studies. Methods: Produced by spallation of uranium with 480 MeV protons, mass separated ion beams of short-lived francium isotopes were implanted into NaCl targets where {sup 211}Rn or {sup 209}At were produced by radioactive decay, in situ. {sup 211}Rn was transferred to dodecane from which {sup 211}At was efficiently extracted and evaluated for clinical applicability. High energy SPECT/CT was evaluated for measuring {sup 209}At activity distributions in mice and phantoms. Results: Our small scale {sup 211}Rn/{sup 211}At generator system provided high purity {sup 211}At samples. The methods are immediately scalable to the level of radioactivity required for in vivo experiments with {sup 211}At. {sup 209}At-based high energy SPECT imaging was determined suitable for pursuing image-based dosimetry in mouse tumour models. In the future, we will utilize quantitative {sup 209}At-SPECT for image-based dose calculations. Conclusion: These early studies provided a foundation for future endeavours with {sup 211}At-based α-therapy. Canada is now significantly closer to clinical targeted α-therapy of cancer.

  12. Targeted radionuclide therapy with astatine-211: Oxidative dehalogenation of astatobenzoate conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teze, David; Sergentu, Dumitru-Claudiu; Kalichuk, Valentina; Barbet, Jacques; Deniaud, David; Galland, Nicolas; Maurice, Rémi; Montavon, Gilles

    2017-05-31

    211 At is a most promising radionuclide for targeted alpha therapy. However, its limited availability and poorly known basic chemistry hamper its use. Based on the analogy with iodine, labelling is performed via astatobenzoate conjugates, but in vivo deastatination occurs, particularly when the conjugates are internalized in cells. Actually, the chemical or biological mechanism responsible for deastatination is unknown. In this work, we show that the C-At "organometalloid" bond can be cleaved by oxidative dehalogenation induced by oxidants such as permanganates, peroxides or hydroxyl radicals. Quantum mechanical calculations demonstrate that astatobenzoates are more sensitive to oxidation than iodobenzoates, and the oxidative deastatination rate is estimated to be about 6 × 10 6 faster at 37 °C than the oxidative deiodination one. Therefore, we attribute the "internal" deastatination mechanism to oxidative dehalogenation in biological compartments, in particular lysosomes.

  13. Production of Astatine-211 at the Duke University Medical Center for its regional distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zalutsky, Michael [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Systemic targeted radiation therapy and radioimmunotherapy continue to be important tools in the treatment of certain cancers. Because of their high energy and short path length, alpha particle emitters such as 211At are more effective than either external beam x- ray or in vivo beta radiation in delivering potentially curative doses of radiation. The limited clinical trials that have been conducted to date have yielded encouraging responses in some patients, e.g., malignant brain tumors. In order to escalate the additional necessary research and development in radiochemistry, radiobiology and efficacy evaluation of alpha particle radiotherapeutics, it is universally agreed that access to an affordable, reliable supply of 211At is warranted. In conjunction with the Department of Energy's intent to enhance stable and radioactive isotope availability for research applications, it is the primary objective of this project to improve 211At production and purification capabilities at Duke so that this radionuclide can be supplied to researchers at other institutions throughout the US.The most widely used 211At production method involves the α,2n reaction on Bismuth using a cyclotron with beams ≤ 28 MeV. Yields can be enhanced with use of an internal target that allows for a higher alpha fluence plus efficient heat dissipation in the target. Both of these items are in place at Duke; however, in order to support production for multi-institutional use, irradiation campaigns in excess of 50 µAp and four hours duration will be needed. Further, post-irradiation processing equipment is lacking that will enable the distribution process. Financial support is sought for i) a shielded, ventilated processing/containment hood; ii) development of a post-irradiation target retrieval system; iii) fabrication of a 211At distillation and recovery module and iv) a performance review and, where needed, an enhancement of seven major subsystems that comprise the CS-30 Cyclotron. With these modifications in place, routine production of ≥200 mCi of At-211 should be readily achievable, given our methodological development of At-211 target preparation, internal target irradiation and dry distillation to recover the radionuclide.

  14. Use of interhalogen exchange for preparation of astatine-benzene and iodo-benzene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolachkovski, A.; Khalkin, V.A.

    1976-01-01

    Experimental testing of interhalogen exchange between the solid and liquid phases has been carried out at 155 deg C with particular reference to a NaOH-Na 131 I-BrPh system. Iodine transition rate is dependent on the process duration and alkali amount. The relative amounts of 131 IPh resultant from the reaction of interhalogen exchange is evaluated by paper chromatography. The results obtained may be considered as those which provide experimental support for the assumed efficiency of the production of 131 IPh based on the reaction of interhalogen exchange to yield 70-80% 131 IPh

  15. Preparation and evaluation of an astatine-211-labeled sigma receptor ligand for alpha radionuclide therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Kazuma; Mizuno, Yoshiaki; Washiyama, Kohshin; Shiba, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Naruto; Kozaka, Takashi; Watanabe, Shigeki; Shinohara, Atsushi; Odani, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Sigma receptors are overexpressed in a variety of human tumors, making them potential targets for radionuclide receptor therapy. We have previously synthesized and evaluated 131 I-labeled (+)-2-[4-(4-iodophenyl)piperidino]cyclohexanol [(+)-[ 131 I]pIV], which has a high affinity for sigma receptors. Therefore, (+)-[ 131 I]pIV significantly inhibited tumor cell proliferation in tumor-bearing mice. In the present study, we report the synthesis and the in vitro and in vivo characterization of (+)-[ 211 At]pAtV, an 211 At-labeled sigma receptor ligand, that has potential use in alpha-radionuclide receptor therapy. Methods: The radiolabeled sigma receptor ligand (+)-[ 211 At]pAtV was prepared using a standard halogenation reaction generating a 91% radiochemical yield with 98% purity after HPLC purification. The partition coefficient of (+)-[ 211 At]pAtV was measured. Cellular uptake experiments and in vivo biodistribution experiments were performed using a mixed solution of (+)-[ 211 At]pAtV and (+)-[ 125 I]pIV; the human prostate cancer cell line DU-145, which expresses high levels of the sigma receptors, and DU-145 tumor-bearing mice. Results: The lipophilicity of (+)-[ 211 At]pAtV was similar to that of (+)-[ 125 I]pIV. DU-145 cellular uptake and the biodistribution patterns in DU-145 tumor-bearing mice at 1 h post-injection were also similar between (+)-[ 211 At]pAtV and (+)-[ 125 I]pIV. Namely, (+)-[ 211 At]pAtV demonstrated high uptake and retention in tumor via binding to sigma receptors. Conclusion: These results indicate that (+)-[ 211 At]pAtV could function as an new agent for alpha-radionuclide receptor therapy.

  16. Preparation and evaluation of an astatine-211-labeled sigma receptor ligand for alpha radionuclide therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Kazuma; Mizuno, Yoshiaki; Washiyama, Kohshin; Shiba, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Naruto; Kozaka, Takashi; Watanabe, Shigeki; Shinohara, Atsushi; Odani, Akira

    2015-11-01

    Sigma receptors are overexpressed in a variety of human tumors, making them potential targets for radionuclide receptor therapy. We have previously synthesized and evaluated (131)I-labeled (+)-2-[4-(4-iodophenyl)piperidino]cyclohexanol [(+)-[(131)I]pIV], which has a high affinity for sigma receptors. Therefore, (+)-[(131)I]pIV significantly inhibited tumor cell proliferation in tumor-bearing mice. In the present study, we report the synthesis and the in vitro and in vivo characterization of (+)-[(211)At]pAtV, an (211)At-labeled sigma receptor ligand, that has potential use in alpha-radionuclide receptor therapy. The radiolabeled sigma receptor ligand (+)-[(211)At]pAtV was prepared using a standard halogenation reaction generating a 91% radiochemical yield with 98% purity after HPLC purification. The partition coefficient of (+)-[(211)At]pAtV was measured. Cellular uptake experiments and in vivo biodistribution experiments were performed using a mixed solution of (+)-[(211)At]pAtV and (+)-[(125)I]pIV; the human prostate cancer cell line DU-145, which expresses high levels of the sigma receptors, and DU-145 tumor-bearing mice. The lipophilicity of (+)-[(211)At]pAtV was similar to that of (+)-[(125)I]pIV. DU-145 cellular uptake and the biodistribution patterns in DU-145 tumor-bearing mice at 1h post-injection were also similar between (+)-[(211)At]pAtV and (+)-[(125)I]pIV. Namely, (+)-[(211)At]pAtV demonstrated high uptake and retention in tumor via binding to sigma receptors. These results indicate that (+)-[(211)At]pAtV could function as an new agent for alpha-radionuclide receptor therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Radiological protection on interstitial brachytherapy and dose determination and exposure rate of an Ir-192 source through the MCNP-4B; Proteccion radiologica en braquiterapia intersticial y determinacion de la dosis y tasa de exposicion de una fuente de Ir-192 mediante el MCNP-4B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales L, M.E. [INEN, Av. Angamos Este 2520- Surquillo, Lima (Peru)

    2006-07-01

    The present work was carried out in the Neurological Sciences Institute having as objective to determine the dose and the rate of exhibition of the sources of Iridium 192, Iodine 125 and Palladium 103; which are used to carry out implant in the Interstitial Brachytherapy according to the TG43. For it we carry out a theoretical calculation, its are defined in the enter file: the geometry, materials of the problem and the radiation source, etc; in the MCNP-4B Monte Carlo code, considering a punctual source and for the dose determination we simulate thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLD): at 5 cm, 50 cm, 100 cm and 200 cm of the source. Our purpose is to analyze the radioprotection measures that should take into account in this Institute in which are carried out brain biopsies using a Micro mar stereotactic mark, and in a near future with the collaboration of a doctor and a cuban physique seeks to be carried out the Interstitial Brachytherapy technique with sources of Ir-192 for patient with tumors like glioblastoma, astrocytoma, etc. (Author)

  18. Characterization of TLD-100 in powders for dosimetric quality control of {sup 192} Ir sources used in brachytherapy of high dose rate; Caracterizacion de TLD-100 en polvo para control de calidad dosimetrico de fuentes de Ir{sup 192} usadas en braquiterapia de alta tasa de dosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loaiza C, S.P

    2007-07-01

    The Secondary Standard Dosimetric at the National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ) calibrated a lot of powdered TLD-100 (LiF:Mg,Ti) in terms of absorbed dose to water D{sub w} for the energy of: {sup 60}Co, {sup 137C}s, X rays of 250 and 50 kVp. Later on, it is carried out an interpolation of the calibration for the energy of the {sup 192}Ir. This calibration is part of a dosimetric quality control program, to solve the problems of traceability for the measurements carried out by the users of {sup 192}Ir sources employed in the treatments of High Dose Rate Brachytherapy (HDR) at the Mexican Republic. The calibrations of the radiation beams are made with the following protocols: IAEA TRS-398 for the {sup 60}Co for D{sub w}, using a secondary standard ionization chamber PTW N30013 calibrated in D{sub w} by the National Research Council (NRC, Canada). AAPM TG-43 for D{sub w} in terms of the strength kerma Sk, calibrating this last one quantity for the {sup 137}Cs radioactive source, with a well chamber HDR 1000 PLUS traceable to the University of Wisconsin (US). AAPM TG-61 for X ray of 250 and 50 kVp for D{sub w} start to Ka using field standard a Farmer chamber PTW 30001 traceable to K for the Central Laboratory of Electric Industries (CLEI, France). The calibration curves (CC) they built for the response of the powder TLD: R{sub TLD} vs D{sub w}: For the energy of {sup 60}Co, {sup 137}Cs, X rays of 250 and 50 kVp. Fitting them with the least square method weighed by means of a polynomial of second grade that corrects the supra linearity of the response. iii. Each one of the curves was validated with a test by lack of fitting and for the Anderson Darling normality test, using the software MINITAB in both cases. iv. The sensibility factor (F{sub s}) for each energy corresponds to the slope of the CC, v. The F{sub s} for the two {sup 192}Ir sources used are interpolated: one for a Micro Selectron source and the other one a Vari Source source. Finally, a couple of

  19. Combined modality therapy for localized prostate carcinoma using Iridium-192 brachytherapy and external beam radiotherapy: results, morbidity, and the lack of value of surgical lymph node staging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baird, Michael; Ordorica, Edward; Dawson, Anne

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: (1) To quantitate the morbidity and 5 and 10 year bNED survival of Ir-192 temporary implant combined with external beam radiotherapy in the treatment of clinically localized Prostate Carcinoma. (2) To determine the need for nodal staging prior to implant. Materials and Methods: 335 consecutively treated patients seen between 8/17/84 and 8/13/93 were analyzed. All patents had retropertoneal nodal dissection and were implanted with Ir-192 using the Syed-Neblett template. Thirteen percent who completed treatment per protocol were found to have microscopically involved nodes on permanent section. 277 patients had completed the entire treatment protocol and had at least 2 years follow-up with DRE and serial serum PSAs. All patients were evaluated for morbidity using the standard RTOG morbidity scales. The bNED survival was determined using Kaplan-Meier methods with a non-rising PSA value of < 1.0 used as an indicator of disease control. All patients received 30 Gy in 50 hrs. to the implant volume, followed in two weeks by 34.2 Gy external beam (19 fx/ 25 days). The median follow up for the group is 55 months. Results: Morbidity: 69.2% of the patients experienced no reportable morbidity. Urinary morbidity was usually transient and mild (Grade 1 or 2 in 9.7%). 4.9 % experienced grade 3 urinary complaints (6.6% stress incontinence) and the incidence of grade 4 urinary complaints was 0.6%. Urinary complications were 2.5 times more common in patients who had previously undergone a TURP. Rectal complications were mild or moderate in 10.5% and usually consisted of asymptomatic rectal bleeding (6.9%). Severe rectal ulcer requiring temporary colostomy occurred in 1.4% and always healed after colostomy. Other morbidity consisted of mild, self-limited edema (2.1%). One patient had persistent edema post treatment, and there was one death from a CVA perioperatively (0.3%). 75% of patients who were potent prior to treatment maintained useful sexual function post

  20. Volume and dose rate dependent (MDR-LDR Ir-192 afterloading interstitial brachytherapy) treatment optimisation, for squamouscell carcinoma of the lip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stas, Nathalie; Goncalves, Julieta; Pinho, Eliana; Trigo, Lurdes; Fernandes, Tome; Vieira, Elio

    1996-01-01

    Introduction: From 1/1/90 to 1/1/95, 53 patients with squamouscell carcinoma of the lip were treated by MDR or LDR Ir-192 afterloading interstitital brachytherapy. We compare the oncological and aesthetical results and sequelae depending on the volume and the dose rate. Material and methods: 53 patients, 41 men and 12 women, median age = 66y; 48 primary tumors (T1 = 26; T2 = 16; T3 = 6; N0 = 47; N1 = 1; M0 = 48) and 5 recurrencies; squamouscell carcinoma (grade 1 =45, g2 =6, g3 =2); clinical extension: buccal comissure=3, check =2, muscular =15, skin =7, lower and upper lip =1. Before radiotherapy, 28 biopsies and 25 excisional surgeries (19 with positive margins, 6 with negative margins) were performed. Brachytherapy was performed alone (dose 60-75 Gy BD85%) or as a boost (dose 10-30 Gy BD85%) associated with external beam (dose 46-50 Gy). MDR or LDR microselectron's afterloading was done after a computerised dosimetry (Paris System): treatment mean time = 30, 98 hours; mean volume = 10,2 cc (T1-T2 8, 61cc); Ir - 192 activity = range 0,7 - 4,792 mCi/cm; reference dose rate 45,6 - 290, 1 cGy/h. Results: 46 patients are alive without cancer, 1 died without responding, 6 died from non oncological diseases; 8 patients had recurrences (5 local, 3 nodal) but are alive. Mean follow-up 30,83 months (range 3-60m), mean DFS = 22,49 m (range 5-57m). Acute secondary effects: 30 radioepithelyties (grade 1 = 7, g2=23, g3=14), and 39 radiomucitis (g1=3; g2=23; g3=13); mean time for complete healing = 21, 66 days. Sequelae: moderate sclerosis of the skin =11, skin retraction = 1, hyperpigmentation2, depigmentation= 10, edema= 6, gingivitis= 7. Aesthetical results: good32; moderate= 18; bad= 2, very bad= 1 (uncontrolled tumor). Conclusions: The sequelae and aesthetical results are closely dependent on the treated volume and the dose rate, less dependent on the total dose, and independent on the Iridium activity. Complete healing time does not influence the late aesthetical results

  1. Dose specification for 192Ir high dose rate brachytherapy in terms of dose-to-water-in-medium and dose-to-medium-in-medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonseca, Gabriel Paiva; Yoriyaz, Hélio; Tedgren, Åsa Carlsson; Nilsson, Josef; Persson, Maria; Reniers, Brigitte; Verhaegen, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Dose calculation in high dose rate brachytherapy with 192 Ir is usually based on the TG-43U1 protocol where all media are considered to be water. Several dose calculation algorithms have been developed that are capable of handling heterogeneities with two possibilities to report dose: dose-to-medium-in-medium (D m,m ) and dose-to-water-in-medium (D w,m ). The relation between D m,m and D w,m for 192 Ir is the main goal of this study, in particular the dependence of D w,m on the dose calculation approach using either large cavity theory (LCT) or small cavity theory (SCT). A head and neck case was selected due to the presence of media with a large range of atomic numbers relevant to tissues and mass densities such as air, soft tissues and bone interfaces. This case was simulated using a Monte Carlo (MC) code to score: D m,m, D w,m (LCT), mean photon energy and photon fluence. D w,m (SCT) was derived from MC simulations using the ratio between the unrestricted collisional stopping power of the actual medium and water. Differences between D m,m and D w,m (SCT or LCT) can be negligible (<1%) for some tissues e.g. muscle and significant for other tissues with differences of up to 14% for bone. Using SCT or LCT approaches leads to differences between D w,m (SCT) and D w,m (LCT) up to 29% for bone and 36% for teeth. The mean photon energy distribution ranges from 222 keV up to 356 keV. However, results obtained using mean photon energies are not equivalent to the ones obtained using the full, local photon spectrum. This work concludes that it is essential that brachytherapy studies clearly report the dose quantity. It further shows that while differences between D m,m and D w,m (SCT) mainly depend on tissue type, differences between D m,m and D w,m (LCT) are, in addition, significantly dependent on the local photon energy fluence spectrum which varies with distance to implanted sources. (paper)

  2. Handling of radiation emergency involving accidental detachment of 20 Ci iridium-192 source in a guide tube of a radiographic equipment in industrial radiography site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaparde, S.P.; Murthy, B.K.S.; Vora, V.B.; Subramanian, G.

    1979-01-01

    The source capsule containing about 17.2 Ci of iridium-192 got accidently unscrewed in a guide tube of a gamma radiography equipment while carrying out the radiography of the spiral casing at construction site of a Hydroelectric Power Station. Immediately after the incident about 10 meter distance all around the spiral casing was cordoned off. The unscrewed capsule along with the source pellet was transferred to a lead container by raising the closed end of the guide tube of about 1/2 meters in length. The source pencil cable and cap of source capsule were separated from the source pellet. The source pellet was further shielded by a steel container and lead sheets. The source pellet was reloaded in the source capsule with limited facilities available at the work site. The source capsule cap was perfectly screwed by standing behind the L bench temporarily constructed out of lead sheets for the above jobs. During the above operation, the person received a whole body dose of 2000 mR and extrimety dose of 3000 mR. Handling of one more radiation emergency of similar type is described. A few appliances designed and fabricated for use in such emergencies are briefly described. (auth.)

  3. Measurement of the Total Cross Section of Uranium-Uranium Collisions at √{sNN} = 192 . 8 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltz, A. J.; Fischer, W.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Gassner, D.; Drees, K. A.; Luo, Y.; Minty, M.; Thieberger, P.; Wilinski, M.; Pshenichnov, I. A.

    2014-03-01

    The total cross section of Uranium-Uranium at √{sNN} = 192 . 8 GeV has been measured to be 515 +/-13stat +/-22sys barn, which agrees with the calculated theoretical value of 487.3 barn within experimental error. That this total cross section is more than an order of magnitude larger than the geometric ion-ion cross section is primarily due to Bound-Free Pair Production (BFPP) and Electro-Magnetic Dissociation (EMD). Nearly all beam losses were due to geometric, BFPP and EMD collisions. This allowed the determination of the total cross section from the measured beam loss rates and luminosity. The beam loss rate is calculated from a time-dependent measurement of the total beam intensity. The luminosity is measured via the detection of neutron pairs in time-coincidence in the Zero Degree Calorimeters. Apart from a general interest in verifying the calculations experimentally, an accurate prediction of the losses created in the heavy ion collisions is of practical interest for the LHC, where collision products have the potential to quench cryogenically cooled magnets.

  4. Dose calculation in eye brachytherapy with Ir-192 threads using the Sievert integral and corrected by attenuation and scattering with the Meisberg polynomials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vivanco, M.G. Bernui de; Cardenas R, A.

    2006-01-01

    The ocular brachytherapy many times unique alternative to conserve the visual organ in patients of ocular cancer, one comes carrying out in the National Institute of Neoplastic Illnesses (INEN) using threads of Iridium 192; those which, they are placed in radial form on the interior surface of a spherical cap of gold of 18 K; the cap remains in the eye until reaching the prescribed dose by the doctor. The main objective of this work is to be able to calculate in a correct and practical way the one time that the treatment of ocular brachytherapy should last to reach the dose prescribed by the doctor. To reach this objective I use the Sievert integral corrected by attenuation effects and scattering (Meisberg polynomials); calculating it by the Simpson method. In the calculations by means of the Sievert integral doesn't take into account the scattering produced by the gold cap neither the variation of the constant of frequency of exposure with the distance. The calculations by means of Sievert integral are compared with those obtained using the Monte Carlo Penelope simulation code, where it is observed that they agree at distances of the surface of the cap greater or equal to 2mm. (Author)

  5. Development of methods for activity determination for radionuclides with double decay emission β- β+ / electron capture - application to the standardization of 192Ir, 152Eu and 186 Re

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilario, Katia Aparecida Fonseca

    2002-01-01

    In the present work alternative procedures have been developed for standardization of radionuclides with double decay, β - β + / electron capture using the 4πβ-γ coincidence technique, applying different systems. Two 4πβ-γ coincidence systems were used: one with a 4π gas-flow proportional counter coupled to a pair of NaI(Tl) scintillators and the other one with the same type of proportional counter coupled to HPGe detector. The radionuclides selected for this standardization, due to great interest in nuclear medicine, detector calibration and industrial radiography, were 192 Ir, 152 Eu and 186 Re. The first and the second were part of international comparisons sponsored by the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM), France, who supplied the radioactive solution. For 186 Re, the gamma-ray emission probability per decay was measured by means REGe spectrometer system, previously calibrated with standard ampoules. All the uncertainties involved were treated rigorously, by means of covariance analysis. (author)

  6. Air kerma standard for calibration of well-type chambers in Brazil using {sup 192}Ir HDR sources and its traceability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Prinzio, Renato; Almeida, Carlos Eduardo de [Laboratorio de Ciencias Radiologicas-Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (LCR/UERJ), R. Sao Francisco Xavier, 524, Pavilhao Haroldo Lisboa da Cunha, Terreo, Sala 136-Maracana, CEP 20550-900-Rio de Janeiro/RJ-Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil) and Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria-Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (IRD/CNEN), Av. Salvador Allende, s/n, Jacarepagua-CE22780-160-Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Laboratorio de Ciencias Radiologicas-Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (LCR/UERJ), R. Sao Francisco Xavier, 524, Pavilhao Haroldo Lisboa da Cunha, Terreo, Sala 136-Maracana, CEP 20550-900-Rio de Janeiro/RJ-Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-03-15

    In Brazil there are over 100 high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy facilities using well-type chambers for the determination of the air kerma rate of {sup 192}Ir sources. This paper presents the methodology developed and extensively tested by the Laboratorio de Ciencias Radiologicas (LCR) and presently in use to calibrate those types of chambers. The system was initially used to calibrate six well-type chambers of brachytherapy services, and the maximum deviation of only 1.0% was observed between the calibration coefficients obtained and the ones in the calibration certificate provided by the UWADCL. In addition to its traceability to the Brazilian National Standards, the whole system was taken to University of Wisconsin Accredited Dosimetry Calibration Laboratory (UWADCL) for a direct comparison and the same formalism to calculate the air kerma was used. The comparison results between the two laboratories show an agreement of 0.9% for the calibration coefficients. Three Brazilian well-type chambers were calibrated at the UWADCL, and by LCR, in Brazil, using the developed system and a clinical HDR machine. The results of the calibration of three well chambers have shown an agreement better than 1.0%. Uncertainty analyses involving the measurements made both at the UWADCL and LCR laboratories are discussed.

  7. What is the value of emission tomography studies in patients with a primary glioblastoma multiforme treated by {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koot, R W; Bosch, D A [Academic Medical Center, Department of Neurosurgery, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Habraken, J B.A. [Academic Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Academic Medical Center, Department of Radiology, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hulshof, M C.C.M. [Academic Medical Center, Department of Radiotherapy, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Paans, A M.J.; Pruim, J. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University Medical Centre Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)], e-mail: r.w.koot@lumc.nl

    2008-07-01

    We studied the use of {sup 201}thallium SPECT and L-[1-{sup 11}C]-tyrosine PET in patients with a primary glioblastoma multiforme treated with {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy after surgery and external beam radiation therapy. We hypothesised that the patients most likely to benefit from further surgery after deterioration would be those with radiation necrosis and would be recognised by a negative emission tomography scan. Twenty-one patients underwent {sup 201}thallium SPECT performed before brachytherapy, and this was repeated in 19 patients when recurrence was suspected. Nine patients also underwent a PET scan at the same time. Nine patients underwent a second operation. SPECT and PET were highly concordant concerning the prediction of radionecrosis and/or tumor recurrence. Repeat surgery did not lead to a significant increase in survival. There was no significant association between the duration of survival and tumor-to-background ratio but the number studied was small. Both SPECT and PET showed highly active lesions, which were proved to be recurrent tumor by clinical and histological follow-up. Although PET and SPECT are both highly sensitive in detecting active tumor tissue, emission tomography was not clinically valuable in the investigation of patients with a primary glioblastoma treated with brachytherapy. (author)

  8. Use of morphine and 6-monoacetylmorphine in blood for the evaluation of possible risk factors for sudden death in 192 heroin users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fugelstad, Anna; Ahlner, Johan; Brandt, Lena; Ceder, Gunnel; Eksborg, Staffan; Rajs, Jovan; Beck, Olof

    2003-04-01

    To detect risk factors for sudden death from heroin injection. Evaluation of data from forensic investigations of all fatal cases of suspected heroin death in a metropolitan area. Only cases with detectable morphine and 6-monoacetylmorphine (6-MAM) in blood were included in order to select heroin intoxication cases. Stockholm, Sweden. Autopsy investigation and toxicological analysis of blood and urine; and police reports. In two-thirds of the 192 cases, death occurred in public places, and mostly without any time delay. Blood concentrations of morphine ranged from 50 to 1200 ng/g, and of 6-MAM from 1 to 80 ng/g. Codeine was detected in 96% of the subjects. In the majority of cases the forensic investigation indicated polydrug use, the most common additional findings being alcohol and benzodiazepines. However, in one-quarter of the cases other drug combinations were found. Previous abstinence from heroin and use of alcohol were identified as risk factors. For 6-MAM there was also a correlation with the presence of THC and benzodiazepines. Despite a high frequency of heart abnormalities (e.g. myocarditis and focal myocardial fibrosis), these conditions did not correlate with morphine or 6-MAM blood concentrations. We confirm that alcohol intake and loss of tolerance are risk factors for death from heroin use, whereas no connection to heart pathology was observed. Further, prospective, studies should focus on other possible risk factors.

  9. Ratio of ellipticities between 192 and 208 nm (R1 ): An effective electronic circular dichroism parameter for characterization of the helical components of proteins and peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Raja; Sheet, Tridip

    2017-11-01

    Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy represents an important tool for characterization of the peptide and protein secondary structures that mainly arise from the conformational disposition of the peptide backbone in solution. In 1991 Manning and Woody proposed that, in addition to the signal intensity, the ratio between [θ]nπ* and [θ]ππ*ǁ ((R 2 ) ≅ [θ] 222 /[θ] 208 ), along with [θ]ππ*⊥ and [θ]ππ*ǁ ((R 1 ) ≅ [θ] 192 /[θ] 208 ), may be utilized towards identifying the peptide/protein conformation (especially 3 10 - and α-helices). However, till date the use of the ratiometric ellipticity component for helical structure analysis of peptides and proteins has not been reported. We studied a series of temperature dependent CD spectra of a thermally stable, model helical peptide and its related analogs in water as a function of added 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (TFE) in order to explore their landscape of helicity. For the first time, we have experimentally shown here that the R 1 parameter can characterize better the individual helices, while the other parameter R 2 and the signal intensity do not always converge. We emphasize the use of the R 1 ratio of ellipticities for helical characterization because of the common origin of these two bands (exciton splitting of the amide π→ π* transition in a helical polypeptide). This approach may become worthwhile and timely with the increasing accessibility of CD synchrotron sources. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Crystal structure of the catalytic core domain of the family 6 cellobiohydrolase II, Cel6A, from Humicola insolens, at 1.92 A resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varrot, A; Hastrup, S; Schülein, M; Davies, G J

    1999-01-15

    The three-dimensional structure of the catalytic core of the family 6 cellobiohydrolase II, Cel6A (CBH II), from Humicola insolens has been determined by X-ray crystallography at a resolution of 1.92 A. The structure was solved by molecular replacement using the homologous Trichoderma reesei CBH II as a search model. The H. insolens enzyme displays a high degree of structural similarity with its T. reesei equivalent. The structure features both O- (alpha-linked mannose) and N-linked glycosylation and a hexa-co-ordinate Mg2+ ion. The active-site residues are located within the enclosed tunnel that is typical for cellobiohydrolase enzymes and which may permit a processive hydrolysis of the cellulose substrate. The close structural similarity between the two enzymes implies that kinetics and chain-end specificity experiments performed on the H. insolens enzyme are likely to be applicable to the homologous T. reesei enzyme. These cast doubt on the description of cellobiohydrolases as exo-enzymes since they demonstrated that Cel6A (CBH II) shows no requirement for non-reducing chain-ends, as had been presumed. There is no crystallographic evidence in the present structure to support a mechanism involving loop opening, yet preliminary modelling experiments suggest that the active-site tunnel of Cel6A (CBH II) is too narrow to permit entry of a fluorescenyl-derivatized substrate, known to be a viable substrate for this enzyme.

  11. Multiphoton events with large missing energy in $e^{+}e^{-}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=192-209 GeV$

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G; Åkesson, P F; Alexander, G; Allison, J; Amaral, P; Anagnostou, G; Anderson, K J; Arcelli, S; Asai, S; Axen, D; Azuelos, Georges; Bailey, I; Barberio, E; Barillari, T; Barlow, R J; Batley, J Richard; Bechtle, P; Behnke, T; Bell, K W; Bell, P J; Bella, G; Bellerive, A; Benelli, G; Bethke, Siegfried; Biebel, O; Bock, P; Boeriu, O; Boutemeur, M; Braibant, S; Brigliadori, L; Brown, R M; Büsser, K; Burckhart, H J; Campana, S; Carnegie, R K; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Chang, C Y; Charlton, D G; Ciocca, C; Csilling, A; Cuffiani, M; Dado, S; de Roeck, A; De Wolf, E A; Desch, Klaus; Dienes, B; Donkers, M; Dubbert, J; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Duerdoth, I P; Etzion, E; Fabbri, F L; Feld, L; Ferrari, P; Fiedler, F; Fleck, I; Ford, M; Frey, A; Gagnon, P; Gary, J W; Gaycken, G; Geich-Gimbel, C; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, P; Giunta, M; Goldberg, J; Gross, E; Grunhaus, Jacob; Gruwé, M; Günther, P O; Sen-Gupta, A; Hajdu, C; Hamann, M; Hanson, G G; Harel, A; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R; Hemingway, R J; Herten, G; Heuer, R D; Hill, J C; Hoffman, K; Horváth, D; Igo-Kemenes, P; Ishii, K; Jeremie, H; Jovanovic, P; Junk, T R; Kanaya, N; Kanzaki, J; Karlen, D; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Keeler, R K; Kellogg, R G; Kennedy, B W; Kluth, S; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Komamiya, S; Kramer, T; Krieger, P; Krüger, K; Kühl, T; Kupper, M; Lafferty, G D; Landsman, H; Lanske, D; Layter, J G; Lellouch, D; Letts, J; Levinson, L; Lillich, J; Lloyd, S L; Loebinger, F K; Lü, J; Ludwig, A; Ludwig, J; Mader, W; Marcellini, S; Martin, A J; Masetti, G; Mashimo, T; Mättig, P; McKenna, J; McPherson, R A; Meijers, F; Menges, W; Merritt, F S; Mes, H; Meyer, N; Michelini, A; Mihara, S; Mikenberg, G; Miller, D J; Moed, S; Mohr, W; Mori, T; Mutter, A; Nagai, K; Nakamura, I; Nanjo, H; Neal, H A; Nisius, R; O'Neale, S W; Oh, A; Oreglia, M J; Orito, S; Pahl, C; Pásztor, G; Pater, J R; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, J L; Plane, D E; Poli, B; Pooth, O; Przybycien, M B; Quadt, A; Rabbertz, K; Rembser, C; Renkel, P; Roney, J M; Rozen, Y; Runge, K; Sachs, K; Saeki, T; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Schaile, A D; Schaile, O; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schieck, J; Schörner-Sadenius, T; Schröder, M; Schumacher, M; Scott, W G; Seuster, R; Shears, T G; Shen, B C; Sherwood, P; Skuja, A; Smith, A M; Sobie, R J; Söldner-Rembold, S; Spanó, F; Stahl, A; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Tarem, S; Tasevsky, M; Teuscher, R; Thomson, M A; Torrence, E; Toya, D; Tran, P; Trigger, I; Trócsányi, Z L; Tsur, E; Turner-Watson, M F; Ueda, I; Ujvári, B; Vannerem, P; Vertesi, R; Verzocchi, M; Vollmer, C F; Voss, H; Vossebeld, Joost Herman; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Wells, P S; Wengler, T; Wermes, N; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J A; Wolf, G; Wyatt, T R; Yamashita, S; Zer-Zion, D; Zivkovic, L; Von Krogh, J

    2004-01-01

    Events with a final state consisting of two or more photons and large missing transverse energy have been observed in e^{+}e^{-} collisions at centre-of-mass energies in the range 192-209 GeV using the OPAL detector at LEP. Cross-section measurements are performed within the kinematic acceptance of the selection and compared with the expectations from the standard model process e^{+}e^{-} to nu nu gamma gamma ( gamma ). No evidence for new physics contributions to this final state is observed. Upper limits on sigma (e^{+}e^{-} to XX).BR/sup 2/(X to Y gamma ) are derived for the case of stable and invisible Y. In the case of massive Y the combined limits obtained from all the data range from 10 to 60 fb, while for the special case of massless Y the range is 20 to 40 fb. The limits apply to pair production of excited neutrinos (X= nu *, Y= nu ), to neutralino production (X= chi /sub 2//sup 0/, Y= chi /sub 1//sup 0/ and to supersymmetric models in which X= chi /sub 1//sup 0/ and Y=G is a light gravitino.

  12. Multi-Photon Events with Large Missing Energy in $e^{+}e^{-}$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=192-209 GeV$

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G; Åkesson, P F; Alexander, G; Allison, J; Amaral, P; Anagnostou, G; Anderson, K J; Arcelli, S; Asai, S; Axen, D A; Azuelos, Georges; Bailey, I; Barberio, E; Barillari, T; Barlow, R J; Batley, J Richard; Bechtle, P; Behnke, T; Bell, K W; Bell, P J; Bella, G; Bellerive, A; Benelli, G; Bethke, Siegfried; Biebel, O; Boeriu, O; Bock, P; Boutemeur, M; Braibant, S; Brigliadori, L; Brown, R M; Büsser, K; Burckhart, H J; Campana, S; Carnegie, R K; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Chang, C Y; Charlton, D G; Ciocca, C; Csilling, A; Cuffiani, M; Dado, S; de Roeck, A; De Wolf, E A; Desch, Klaus; Dienes, B; Donkers, M; Dubbert, J; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Duerdoth, I P; Etzion, E; Fabbri, Franco Luigi; Feld, L; Ferrari, P; Fiedler, F; Fleck, I; Ford, M; Frey, A; Gagnon, P; Gary, J W; Gaycken, G; Geich-Gimbel, C; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, P; Giunta, M; Goldberg, J; Gross, E; Grunhaus, Jacob; Gruwé, M; Günther, P O; Sen-Gupta, A; Hajdu, C; Hamann, M; Hanson, G G; Harel, A; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R; Hemingway, R J; Herten, G; Heuer, R D; Hill, J C; Hoffman, K; Horváth, D; Igo-Kemenes, P; Ishii, K; Jeremie, H; Jovanovic, P; Junk, T R; Kanaya, N; Kanzaki, J; Karlen, Dean A; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Keeler, R K; Kellogg, R G; Kennedy, B W; Kluth, S; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Komamiya, S; Kramer, T; Krieger, P; Von Krogh, J; Krüger, K; Kühl, T; Kupper, M; Lafferty, G D; Landsman, Hagar Yaël; Lanske, D; Layter, J G; Lellouch, D; Letts, J; Levinson, L; Lillich, J; Lloyd, S L; Loebinger, F K; Lü, J; Ludwig, A; Ludwig, J; Mader, W; Marcellini, S; Martin, A J; Masetti, G; Mashimo, T; Mättig, P; McKenna, J A; McPherson, R A; Meijers, F; Menges, W; Merritt, F S; Mes, H; Meyer, N; Michelini, A; Mihara, S; Mikenberg, G; Miller, D J; Moed, S; Mohr, W; Mori, T; Mutter, A; Nagai, K; Nakamura, I; Nanjo, H; Neal, H A; Nisius, R; O'Neale, S W; Oh, A; Oreglia, M J; Orito, S; Pahl, C; Pásztor, G; Pater, J R; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, J L; Plane, D E; Poli, B; Pooth, O; Przybycien, M B; Quadt, A; Rabbertz, K; Rembser, C; Renkel, P; Roney, J M; Rozen, Y; Runge, K; Sachs, K; Saeki, T; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Schaile, A D; Schaile, O; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schieck, J; Schörner-Sadenius, T; Schröder, M; Schumacher, M; Scott, W G; Seuster, R; Shears, T G; Shen, B C; Sherwood, P; Skuja, A; Smith, A M; Sobie, R J; Söldner-Rembold, S; Spanó, F; Stahl, A; Strom, D; Ströhmer, R; Tarem, S; Tasevsky, M; Teuscher, R; Thomson, M A; Torrence, E; Toya, D; Tran, P; Trigger, I; Trócsányi, Z L; Tsur, E; Turner-Watson, M F; Ueda, I; Ujvári, B; Vollmer, C F; Vannerem, P; Vertesi, R; Verzocchi, M; Voss, H; Vossebeld, Joost Herman; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Wells, P S; Wengler, T; Wermes, N; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J A; Wolf, G; Wyatt, T R; Yamashita, S; Zer-Zion, D; Zivkovic, L

    2004-01-01

    Events with a final state consisting of two or more photons and large missing transverse energy have been observed in e+e- collisions at centre-of-mass energies in the range 192 - 209 GeV using the OPAL detector at LEP. Cross-section measurements are performed within the kinematic acceptance of the selection and compared with the expectation from the Standard Model process e+e- -> nu nu gamma gamma(gamma). No evidence for new physics contributions to this final state is observed. Upper limits on sigma (e+e- -> XX) BR^2(X -> Ygamma) are derived for the case of stable and invisible Y. In the case of massive Y the combined limits obtained from all the data range from 10 fb to 60 fb, while for the special case of massless Y the range is 20 fb to 40 fb. The limits apply to pair production of excited neutrions (X=nu^*,Y=nu), to neutralino production (X=~chi^0_2, Y=~chi^0_1) and to supersymmetric models in which X=~chi^0_1 and Y=~G is a light gravitino.

  13. Metal stent and endoluminal high-dose rate [sup 192]iridium brachytherapy in palliative treatment of malignant biliary tract obstruction. First experiences. Metallgeflecht-Endoprothese und intraluminare High-dose-rate-[sup 192]Iridium-Brachytherapie zur palliativen Behandlung maligner Gallengangsobstruktionen. Erste Erfahrungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pakisch, B; Stuecklschweiger, G; Poier, E; Leitner, H; Poschauko, J; Hackl, A [Universitaets-Klinik fuer Radiologie, Abt. fuer Strahlentherapie, Graz (Austria); Klein, G E; Lammer, J; Hausegger, K A [Universitaets-Klinik fuer Radiologie, Abt. fuer Spezielle Roentgendiagnostik und Digitale Bilddiagnostische Verfahren, Graz (Austria)

    1992-06-01

    Since December 1989, 9 patients with inoperable malignant biliary tract obstruction were treated palliatively by a combined modality treatment consisting of placement of a permanent biliary endoprosthesis followed by intraluminal high dose-rate [sup 192]Ir brachytherapy. A dose of 10 Gy was delivered in a hyperfractionated schedule at the point of reference in a distance of 7.5 mm of centre of the source. External small field radiotherapy (50.4 Gy, 1.8 Gy per day, 5 fractions per week) was also given in six cases (M/O, Karnofsky >60%). In 9/9 cases an unrestrained bile flow and an interruption of pruritus was achieved, in 78% (7/9) of cases the duration of palliation was as long as the survival time (median survival time 7.5 months). (orig.).

  14. A novel -192c/g mutation in the proximal P2 promoter of the hepatocyte nuclear factor-4 alpha gene (HNF4A) associates with late-onset diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ek, Jakob; Hansen, Sara P; Lajer, Maria

    2006-01-01

    Recently, it has been shown that mutations in the P2 promoter of the hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF)-4 alpha gene (HNF4A) cause maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY), while single nucleotide polymorphisms in this locus are associated with type 2 diabetes. In this study, we examined 1,189 bp...... of the P2 promoter and the associated exon 1D of HNF4A for variations associated with diabetes in 114 patients with type 2 diabetes, 72 MODYX probands, and 85 women with previous gestational diabetes mellitus. A -192c/g mutation was found in five patients. We screened 1,587 diabetic subjects and 4......,812 glucose-tolerant subjects for the -192c/g mutation and identified 5 diabetic and 1 glucose-tolerant mutation carriers (P=0.004). Examination of the families showed that carriers of the -192c/g mutation had a significantly impaired glucose-stimulated insulin release and lower levels of serum total...

  15. Validating Fricke dosimetry for the measurement of absorbed dose to water for HDR 192Ir brachytherapy: a comparison between primary standards of the LCR, Brazil, and the NRC, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salata, Camila; Gazineu David, Mariano; de Almeida, Carlos Eduardo; El Gamal, Islam; Cojocaru, Claudiu; Mainegra-Hing, Ernesto; McEwen, Malcom

    2018-04-01

    Two Fricke-based absorbed dose to water standards for HDR Ir-192 dosimetry, developed independently by the LCR in Brazil and the NRC in Canada have been compared. The agreement in the determination of the dose rate from a HDR Ir-192 source at 1 cm in a water phantom was found to be within the k  =  1 combined measurement uncertainties of the two standards: D NRC/D LCR  =  1.011, standard uncertainty  =  2.2%. The dose-based standards also agreed within the uncertainties with the manufacturer’s stated dose rate value, which is traceable to a national standard of air kerma. A number of possible influence quantities were investigated, including the specific method for producing the ferrous-sulphate Fricke solution, the geometry of the holder, and the Monte Carlo code used to determine correction factors. The comparison highlighted the lack of data on the determination of G(Fe3+) in this energy range and the possibilities for further development of the holders used to contain the Fricke solution. The comparison also confirmed the suitability of Fricke dosimetry for Ir-192 primary standard dose rate determinations at therapy dose levels.

  16. miR-192, miR-194 and miR-215: a convergent microRNA network suppressing tumor progression in renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khella, H W Z; Bakhet, M; Allo, G; Jewett, M A S; Girgis, A H; Latif, A; Girgis, H; Von Both, I; Bjarnason, G A; Yousef, G M

    2013-10-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play a crucial role in tumor progression and metastasis. We, and others, recently identified a number of miRNAs that are dysregulated in metastatic renal cell carcinoma compared with primary renal cell carcinoma. Here, we investigated three miRNAs that are significantly downregulated in metastatic tumors: miR-192, miR-194 and miR-215. Gain-of-function analyses showed that restoration of their expression decreases cell migration and invasion in renal cell carcinoma cell line models, whereas knockdown of these miRNAs resulted in enhancing cellular migration and invasion abilities. We identified three targets of these miRNAs with potential role in tumor aggressiveness: murine double minute 2, thymidylate synthase, and Smad Interacting protein 1/zinc finger E-box binding homeobox 2. We observed a convergent effect (the same molecule can be targeted by all three miRNAs) and a divergent effect (the same miRNA can control multiple targets) for these miRNAs. We experimentally validated these miRNA-target interactions using three independent approaches. First, we observed that miRNA overexpression significantly reduces the mRNA and protein levels of their targets. In the second, we observed significant reduction of the luciferase signal of a vector containing the 3'UTR of the target upon miRNA overexpression. Finally, we show the presence of inverse correlation between miRNA changes and the expression levels of their targets in patient specimens. We also examined the prognostic significance of miR-215 in renal cell carcinoma. Lower expression of miR-215 is associated with significantly reduced disease-free survival time. These findings were validated on an independent data set from The Cancer Genome Atlas. These results can pave the way to the clinical use of miRNAs as prognostic markers and therapeutic targets.

  17. SU-G-201-13: Investigation of Dose Variation Induced by HDR Ir-192 Source Global Shift Within the Varian Ring Applicator Using Monte Carlo Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Y; Cai, J; Meltsner, S; Chang, Z; Craciunescu, O [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The Varian tandem and ring applicators are used to deliver HDR Ir-192 brachytherapy for cervical cancer. The source path within the ring is hard to predict due to the larger interior ring lumen. Some studies showed the source could be several millimeters different from planned positions, while other studies demonstrated minimal dosimetric impact. A global shift can be applied to limit the effect of positioning offsets. The purpose of this study was to assess the necessities of implementing a global source shift using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Methods: The MCNP5 radiation transport code was used for all MC simulations. To accommodate TG-186 guidelines and eliminate inter-source attenuation, a BrachyVision plan with 10 dwell positions (0.5cm step sizes) was simulated as the summation of 10 individual sources with equal dwell times for simplification. To simplify the study, the tandem was also excluded from the MC model. Global shifts of ±0.1, ±0.3, ±0.5 cm were then simulated as distal and proximal from the reference positions. Dose was scored in water for all MC simulations and was normalized to 100% at the normalization point 0.5 cm from the cap in the ring plane. For dose comparison, Point A was 2 cm caudal from the buildup cap and 2 cm lateral on either side of the ring axis. With seventy simulations, 108 photon histories gave a statistical uncertainties (k=1) <2% for (0.1 cm)3 voxels. Results: Compared to no global shift, average Point A doses were 0.0%, 0.4%, and 2.2% higher for distal global shifts, and 0.4%, 2.8%, and 5.1% higher for proximal global shifts, respectively. The MC Point A doses differed by < 1% when compared to BrachyVision. Conclusion: Dose variations were not substantial for ±0.3 cm global shifts, which is common in clinical practice.

  18. SU-G-201-13: Investigation of Dose Variation Induced by HDR Ir-192 Source Global Shift Within the Varian Ring Applicator Using Monte Carlo Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Y; Cai, J; Meltsner, S; Chang, Z; Craciunescu, O

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The Varian tandem and ring applicators are used to deliver HDR Ir-192 brachytherapy for cervical cancer. The source path within the ring is hard to predict due to the larger interior ring lumen. Some studies showed the source could be several millimeters different from planned positions, while other studies demonstrated minimal dosimetric impact. A global shift can be applied to limit the effect of positioning offsets. The purpose of this study was to assess the necessities of implementing a global source shift using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Methods: The MCNP5 radiation transport code was used for all MC simulations. To accommodate TG-186 guidelines and eliminate inter-source attenuation, a BrachyVision plan with 10 dwell positions (0.5cm step sizes) was simulated as the summation of 10 individual sources with equal dwell times for simplification. To simplify the study, the tandem was also excluded from the MC model. Global shifts of ±0.1, ±0.3, ±0.5 cm were then simulated as distal and proximal from the reference positions. Dose was scored in water for all MC simulations and was normalized to 100% at the normalization point 0.5 cm from the cap in the ring plane. For dose comparison, Point A was 2 cm caudal from the buildup cap and 2 cm lateral on either side of the ring axis. With seventy simulations, 108 photon histories gave a statistical uncertainties (k=1) <2% for (0.1 cm)3 voxels. Results: Compared to no global shift, average Point A doses were 0.0%, 0.4%, and 2.2% higher for distal global shifts, and 0.4%, 2.8%, and 5.1% higher for proximal global shifts, respectively. The MC Point A doses differed by < 1% when compared to BrachyVision. Conclusion: Dose variations were not substantial for ±0.3 cm global shifts, which is common in clinical practice.

  19. Possible impact of iridium-192 source centering on restenosis rate after femoro-popliteal angioplasty and endovascular brachytherapy in Vienna-2 study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pokrajac, Boris; Schmid, Rainer; Kirisits, Christian; Mock, Ulrike; Fellner, Claudia; Wambersie, Andre; Poetter, Richard; Minar, Erich

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Endovascular brachytherapy (EVBT) has been proven to significantly reduce restenosis after percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA). The object of this analysis was to assess the possible correlation between iridium-192 source non-centering and angiographic-determined restenosis. Materials and methods: A total of 113 patients with long-segment lesions of the superficial femoro-popliteal artery (SFA) were randomized to receive either PTA alone or PTA followed by EVBT in the Vienna-2 study. This analysis was performed on a subgroup of 34 out of 57 patients, who received PTA+EVBT. Angiographic restenosis was defined as lumen reduction of more than 50%. Angiograms taken immediately after PTA (34 patients) and at follow-up (25 patients) were analyzed. The distance between the vessel wall and the actual position of the source at the time of EVBT was measured (in mm) and correlated with the follow-up vessel lumen diameter. Measurements were performed at points at a distance of 10 mm from each other. The dose was determined at the luminal surface and at the reference depth of 2 mm into the vessel wall for different distances from the source. Results: Among the 622 measured points, 62 (10.0%) were within restenotic areas; 560 (90.0%) were in arterial segments without proven angiographic restenosis. As far as source centering is concerned, 7.9% of restenotic points were observed when the maximum distance to the arterial wall was 5 mm. Conclusions: The proportion of restenotic points significantly increased with source non-centering. This observation was interpreted as being related to a decrease in dose at the target. When the maximum distance between the source and the vessel surface was >5 mm, the dose at the reference depth (2 mm into the vessel wall) decreased to values lower than 5 Gy

  20. Nuclear Factor κB is required for tumor growth inhibition mediated by enavatuzumab (PDL192, a humanized monoclonal antibody to TweakR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James W. Purcell

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available TweakR is a TNF receptor family member, whose natural ligand is the multifunctional cytokine TWEAK. The growth inhibitory activity observed following TweakR stimulation in certain cancer cell lines and the overexpression of TweakR in many solid tumor types led to the development of enavatuzumab (PDL192, a humanized IgG1 monoclonal antibody to TweakR. The purpose of this study was to determine the mechanism of action of enavatuzumab’s tumor growth inhibition and to provide insight into the biology behind TweakR as a cancer therapeutic target. A panel of 105 cancer lines was treated with enavatuzumab in vitro; and 29 cell lines of varying solid tumor backgrounds had >25% growth inhibition in response to the antibody. Treatment of sensitive cell lines with enavatuzumab resulted in the in vitro and in vivo (xenograft activation of both classical (p50, p65 and non-classical (p52, RelB NFκB pathways. Using NFκB DNA binding functional ELISAs and microarray analysis, we observed increased activation of NFκB subunits and NFκB regulated genes in sensitive cells over that observed in resistant cell lines. Inhibiting NFκB subunits (p50, p65, RelB, p52 and upstream kinases (IKK1, IKK2 with siRNA and chemical inhibitors consistently blocked enavatuzumab’s activity. Furthermore, enavatuzumab treatment resulted in NFκB-dependent reduction in cell-division as seen by the activation of the cell cycle inhibitor p21 both in vitro and in vivo. The finding that NFκB drives the growth inhibitory activity of enavatuzumab suggests that targeting TweakR with enavatuzumab may represent a novel cancer treatment strategy.

  1. Dosimetric comparison between the microSelectron HDR 192Ir v2 source and the BEBIG 60Co source for HDR brachytherapy using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo transport code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anwarul Islam, M.; Akramuzzaman, M.M.; Zakaria, G.A.

    2012-01-01

    Manufacturing of miniaturized high activity 192 Ir sources have been made a market preference in modern brachytherapy. The smaller dimensions of the sources are flexible for smaller diameter of the applicators and it is also suitable for interstitial implants. Presently, miniaturized 60 Co HDR sources have been made available with identical dimensions to those of 192 Ir sources. 60 Co sources have an advantage of longer half life while comparing with 192 Ir source. High dose rate brachytherapy sources with longer half life are logically pragmatic solution for developing country in economic point of view. This study is aimed to compare the TG-43U1 dosimetric parameters for new BEBIG 60 Co HDR and new microSelectron 192 Ir HDR sources. Dosimetric parameters are calculated using EGSnrc-based Monte Carlo simulation code accordance with the AAPM TG-43 formalism for microSelectron HDR 192 Ir v2 and new BEBIG 60 Co HDR sources. Air-kerma strength per unit source activity, calculated in dry air are 9.698x10 -8 ± 0.55% U Bq -1 and 3.039x10 -7 ± 0.41% U Bq -1 for the above mentioned two sources, respectively. The calculated dose rate constants per unit air-kerma strength in water medium are 1.116±0.12% cGy h -1 U -1 and 1.097±0.12% cGy h -1 U -1 , respectively, for the two sources. The values of radial dose function for distances up to 1 cm and more than 22 cm for BEBIG 60 Co HDR source are higher than that of other source. The anisotropic values are sharply increased to the longitudinal sides of the BEBIG 60 Co source and the rise is comparatively sharper than that of the other source. Tissue dependence of the absorbed dose has been investigated with vacuum phantom for breast, compact bone, blood, lung, thyroid, soft tissue, testis, and muscle. No significant variation is noted at 5 cm of radial distance in this regard while comparing the two sources except for lung tissues. The true dose rates are calculated with considering photon as well as electron transport using

  2. SU-F-T-15: Evaluation of 192Ir, 60Co and 169Yb Sources for High Dose Rate Prostate Brachytherapy Inverse Planning Using An Interior Point Constraint Generation Algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mok Tsze Chung, E; Aleman, D [University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Safigholi, H; Nicolae, A; Davidson, M; Ravi, A; Song, W [Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The effectiveness of using a combination of three sources, {sup 60}Co, {sup 192}Ir and {sup 169}Yb, is analyzed. Different combinations are compared against a single {sup 192}Ir source on prostate cancer cases. A novel inverse planning interior point algorithm is developed in-house to generate the treatment plans. Methods: Thirteen prostate cancer patients are separated into two groups: Group A includes eight patients with the prostate as target volume, while group B consists of four patients with a boost nodule inside the prostate that is assigned 150% of the prescription dose. The mean target volume is 35.7±9.3cc and 30.6±8.5cc for groups A and B, respectively. All patients are treated with each source individually, then with paired sources, and finally with all three sources. To compare the results, boost volume V150 and D90, urethra Dmax and D10, and rectum Dmax and V80 are evaluated. For fair comparison, all plans are normalized to a uniform V100=100. Results: Overall, double- and triple-source plans were better than single-source plans. The triple-source plans resulted in an average decrease of 21.7% and 1.5% in urethra Dmax and D10, respectively, and 8.0% and 0.8% in rectum Dmax and V80, respectively, for group A. For group B, boost volume V150 and D90 increased by 4.7% and 3.0%, respectively, while keeping similar dose delivered to the urethra and rectum. {sup 60}Co and {sup 192}Ir produced better plans than their counterparts in the double-source category, whereas {sup 60}Co produced more favorable results than the remaining individual sources. Conclusion: This study demonstrates the potential advantage of using a combination of two or three sources, reflected in dose reduction to organs-at-risk and more conformal dose to the target. three sources, reflected in dose reduction to organs-at-risk and more conformal dose to the target. Our results show that {sup 60}Co, {sup 192}Ir and {sup 169}Yb produce the best plans when used simultaneously and

  3. Experimental characterization of the 192 channel Clear-PEM frontend ASIC coupled to a multi-pixel APD readout of LYSO:Ce crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albuquerque, Edgar; Bexiga, Vasco; Bugalho, Ricardo; Carrico, Bruno; Ferreira, Claudia S.; Ferreira, Miguel; Godinho, Joaquim; Goncalves, Fernando; Leong, Carlos; Lousa, Pedro; Machado, Pedro; Moura, Rui; Neves, Pedro; Ortigao, Catarina; Piedade, Fernando; Pinheiro, Joao F.; Rego, Joel; Rivetti, Angelo; Rodrigues, Pedro; Silva, Jose C.

    2009-01-01

    In the framework of the Clear-PEM project for the construction of a high-resolution scanner for breast cancer imaging, a very compact and dense frontend electronics system has been developed for readout of multi-pixel S8550 Hamamatsu APDs. The frontend electronics are instrumented with a mixed-signal Application-Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC), which incorporates 192 low-noise charge pre-amplifiers, shapers, analog memory cells and digital control blocks. Pulses are continuously stored in memory cells at clock frequency. Channels above a common threshold voltage are readout for digitization by off-chip free-sampling ADCs. The ASIC has a size of 7.3x9.8mm 2 and was implemented in a AMS 0.35μm CMOS technology. In this paper the experimental characterization of the Clear-PEM frontend ASIC, reading out multi-pixel APDs coupled to LYSO:Ce crystal matrices, is presented. The chips were mounted on a custom test board connected to six APD arrays and to the data acquisition system. Six 32-pixel LYSO:Ce crystal matrices coupled on both sides to APD arrays were readout by two test boards. All 384 channels were operational. The chip power consumption is 660 mW (3.4 mW per channel). A very stable behavior of the chip was observed, with an estimated ENC of 1200-1300e - at APD gain 100. The inter-channel noise dispersion and mean baseline variation is less than 8% and 0.5%, respectively. The spread in the gain between different channels is found to be 1.5%. Energy resolution of 16.5% at 511 keV and 12.8% at 662 keV has been measured. Timing measurements between the two APDs that readout the same crystal is extracted and compared with detailed Monte Carlo simulations. At 511 keV the measured single photon time RMS resolution is 1.30 ns, in very good agreement with the expected value of 1.34 ns.

  4. Performance evaluation of a direct-conversion flat-panel detector system in imaging and quality assurance for a high-dose-rate 192Ir source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyahara, Yoshinori; Hara, Yuki; Nakashima, Hiroto; Nishimura, Tomonori; Itakura, Kanae; Inomata, Taisuke; Kitagaki, Hajime

    2018-03-01

    In high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy, a direct-conversion flat-panel detector (d-FPD) clearly depicts a 192Ir source without image halation, even under the emission of high-energy gamma rays. However, it was unknown why iridium is visible when using a d-FPD. The purpose of this study was to clarify the reasons for visibility of the source core based on physical imaging characteristics, including the modulation transfer functions (MTF), noise power spectral (NPS), contrast transfer functions, and linearity of d-FPD to high-energy gamma rays. The acquired data included: x-rays, [X]; gamma rays, [γ] dual rays (X  +  γ), [D], and subtracted data for depicting the source ([D]  -  [γ]). In the quality assurance (QA) test for the positional accuracy of a source core, the coordinates of each dwelling point were compared between the planned and actual source core positions using a CT/MR-compatible ovoid applicator and a Fletcher-Williamson applicator. The profile curves of [X] and ([D]  -  [γ]) matched well on MTF and NPS. The contrast resolutions of [D] and [X] were equivalent. A strongly positive linear correlation was found between the output data of [γ] and source strength (r 2  >  0.99). With regard to the accuracy of the source core position, the largest coordinate difference (3D distance) was noted at the maximum curvature of the CT/MR-compatible ovoid and Fletcher-Williamson applicators, showing 1.74  ±  0.02 mm and 1.01  ±  0.01 mm, respectively. A d-FPD system provides high-quality images of a source, even when high-energy gamma rays are emitted to the detector, and positional accuracy tests with clinical applicators are useful in identifying source positions (source movements) within the applicator for QA.

  5. In vivo assessment of catheter positioning accuracy and prolonged irradiation time on liver tolerance dose after single-fraction 192Ir high-dose-rate brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kropf Siegfried

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To assess brachytherapy catheter positioning accuracy and to evaluate the effects of prolonged irradiation time on the tolerance dose of normal liver parenchyma following single-fraction irradiation with 192 Ir. Materials and methods Fifty patients with 76 malignant liver tumors treated by computed tomography (CT-guided high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT were included in the study. The prescribed radiation dose was delivered by 1 - 11 catheters with exposure times in the range of 844 - 4432 seconds. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI datasets for assessing irradiation effects on normal liver tissue, edema, and hepatocyte dysfunction, obtained 6 and 12 weeks after HDR-BT, were merged with 3D dosimetry data. The isodose of the treatment plan covering the same volume as the irradiation effect was taken as a surrogate for the liver tissue tolerance dose. Catheter positioning accuracy was assessed by calculating the shift between the 3D center coordinates of the irradiation effect volume and the tolerance dose volume for 38 irradiation effects in 30 patients induced by catheters implanted in nearly parallel arrangement. Effects of prolonged irradiation were assessed in areas where the irradiation effect volume and tolerance dose volume did not overlap (mismatch areas by using a catheter contribution index. This index was calculated for 48 irradiation effects induced by at least two catheters in 44 patients. Results Positioning accuracy of the brachytherapy catheters was 5-6 mm. The orthogonal and axial shifts between the center coordinates of the irradiation effect volume and the tolerance dose volume in relation to the direction vector of catheter implantation were highly correlated and in first approximation identically in the T1-w and T2-w MRI sequences (p = 0.003 and p p = 0.001 and p = 0.004, respectively. There was a significant shift of the irradiation effect towards the catheter entry site compared with the planned dose

  6. The Need to Increase Regulatory Controls on Imports and Exports came from the Detection of an Argentine Import Containing Exceeding Pellets of Ir-192

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samsolo, N.A.; Vidal, D.N.

    2011-01-01

    In Argentina, radioactive sources for application in Industrial Gamma radiography are manufactured using small metallic discs called pellets of radioactive isotope Ir-192, that are imported. They have to be shipped in specially sealed recipients according to their high radioactive levels. These recipients are large enough to contain activities as high as 296 TBq and are therefore approved as Type B(U) packages. This paper thoroughly describes a particular import of this material in which an exceeding 220 ± 2 Pellets (75,62 TBq) was found. The total amount of activity had not been declared adequately by the consignor. The corresponding notification to the Argentine Nuclear Regulatory Authority (NRA) was made by the importer and national manufacturer at the moment these particular Pellets were to be used for source production. The exceeding material doubled that which had been authorized to be imported. After the notification and since the material had entered to the country illicitly, customs legislations were applied in a legal process in which the Nuclear Regulatory Authority participated as well. The decision of the judge was to ship the exceeding cargo again to its proceeding country. However, a significant time had passed since the cargo arrived and the pellets had stuck to each other due to high temperature. This made them impossible to handle in order to encapsulate them as special form radioactive material again for their shipment in the available Type B(U) package. In the outcome, the material was retained at the manufacturer facilities, in its original packaging, with suitable radiological and physical conditions to guarantee safety and security, waiting until its activity had decayed to acceptable levels for its shipment as Type A package. As a result, a need to require further technical specifications from the vendor was detected. These specifications should warn about the period in which these Pellets may be utilized for source production before

  7. Do high-risk infants have a poorer outcome from primary repair of coarctation? Analysis of 192 infants over 20 years.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGuinness, Jonathan G

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Balloon angioplasty for infant coarctation is associated with a high recurrence rate, making operative repair the gold standard for low-risk infants. Debate exists as to whether high-risk infants might be better served with primary angioplasty. We compared the outcome in high-risk versus low-risk infants over 20 years, in a center that always used surgical repair as the primary intervention. METHODS: Of 192 infants from 1986 to 2005, 56 were considered "high-risk," defined as requiring prostaglandin infusion together with either epinephrine infusion for 24 hours preoperatively, or ventilation and milrinone infusion for 24 hours preoperatively. All high-risk patients had a period of ventricular dysfunction prior to surgery, ranging from mild to severe. Outcomes were compared using Bonferroni comparison of means or the Fischer exact test as appropriate. RESULTS: Although the high-risk patients were smaller (3.3 +\\/- 0.1 vs 4.2 +\\/- 0.2 kg, p < 0.01), younger (18 +\\/- 4 vs 57 +\\/- 7 days, p < 0.01), and more often required a concomitant pulmonary artery band (25% vs 15%, p = 0.05), their cross-clamp times were the same as the low-risk patients (18.9 +\\/- 0.9 vs 18.0 +\\/- 0.4 minutes, p = 0.27) and there was no difference in postoperative morbidity (7% vs 3%, p = 0.11). However, there was a trend toward higher perioperative mortality (7% vs 2%, p = 0.07). When compared with the published studies of primary angioplasty in comparable high-risk infants, the mortality rate in our surgically treated high-risk group is much lower. Additionally, only 11% of our high-risk group required reintervention, with two-thirds treated successfully with a single angioplasty at 3.8 +\\/- 2.2 years later, far lower than recurrence rates with primary angioplasty. CONCLUSIONS: We propose that primary surgical repair of coarctation in infants who are high risk should be the primary treatment, with angioplasty reserved for recurrent coarctation.

  8. SU-E-T-580: On the Significance of Model Based Dosimetry for Breast and Head and Neck 192Ir HDR Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peppa, V; Pappas, E; Pantelis, E; Papagiannis, P [Medical Physics Laboratory, Medical School, University of Athens, Athens (Greece); Major, T; Polgar, C [National Institute of Oncology, Budapest (Hungary)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To assess the dosimetric and radiobiological differences between TG43-based and model-based dosimetry in the treatment planning of {sup 192}Ir HDR brachytherapy for breast and head and neck cancer. Methods: Two cohorts of 57 Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation (APBI) and 22 head and neck (H&N) patients with oral cavity carcinoma were studied. Dosimetry for the treatment plans was performed using the TG43 algorithm of the Oncentra Brachy v4.4 treatment planning system (TPS). Corresponding Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were performed using MCNP6 with input files automatically prepared by the BrachyGuide software tool from DICOM RT plan data. TG43 and MC data were compared in terms of % dose differences, Dose Volume Histograms (DVHs) and related indices of clinical interest for the Planning Target Volume (PTV) and the Organs-At-Risk (OARs). A radiobiological analysis was also performed using the Equivalent Uniform Dose (EUD), mean survival fraction (S) and Tumor Control Probability (TCP) for the PTV, and the Normal Tissue Control Probability (N TCP) and the generalized EUD (gEUD) for the OARs. Significance testing of the observed differences performed using the Wilcoxon paired sample test. Results: Differences between TG43 and MC DVH indices, associated with the increased corresponding local % dose differences observed, were statistically significant. This is mainly attributed to their consistency however, since TG43 agrees closely with MC for the majority of DVH and radiobiological parameters in both patient cohorts. Differences varied considerably among patients only for the ipsilateral lung and ribs in the APBI cohort, with a strong correlation to target location. Conclusion: While the consistency and magnitude of differences in the majority of clinically relevant DVH indices imply that no change is needed in the treatment planning practice, individualized dosimetry improves accuracy and addresses instances of inter-patient variability observed. Research

  9. Hippocampal N-methyl-d-aspartate and kainate binding in response to entorhinal cortex aspiration or 192 IgG-saporin lesions of the basal forebrain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallagher, M.; Gill, T.M.; Shivers, A.; Nicolle, M.M.

    1997-01-01

    Lesion models in the rat were used to examine the effects of removing innervation of the hippocampal formation on glutamate receptor binding in that system. Bilateral aspiration of the entorhinal cortex was used to remove the cortical innervation of the hippocampal formation and the dentate gyrus. The subcortical input to the hippocampus from cholinergic neurons of the basal forebrain was lesioned by microinjection of the immunotoxin 192 IgG-saporin into the medial septum and vertical limb of diagonal band. After a 30-day postlesion survival, the effects of these lesions on N-methyl-d-aspartate-displaceable [ 3 H]glutamate and [ 3 H]kainate binding in the hippocampus were quantified using in vitro autoradiography. The bilateral entorhinal lesion induced a sprouting response in the dentate gyrus, measured by an increase in the width of [ 3 H]kainate binding. It also induced an increase in the density of [ 3 H]kainate binding in CA3 stratum lucidum and an increase in N-methyl-d-aspartate binding throughout the hippocampus proper and the dentate gyrus. The selective lesion of cholinergic septal input did not have any effect on hippocampal [ 3 H]kainate binding and induced only a moderate decrease in N-methyl-d-aspartate binding that was not statistically reliable.The entorhinal and cholinergic lesions were used as in vivo models of the degeneration of hippocampal input that occurs in normal aging and Alzheimer's disease. The results from the present lesion study suggest that some, but not all, of the effects on hippocampal [ 3 H]kainate and N-methyl-d-aspartate binding induced by the lesions are consistent with the status of binding to these receptors in aging and Alzheimer's disease. Consistent with the effects of aging and Alzheimer's disease is an altered topography of [ 3 H]kainate binding after entorhinal cortex lesion and a modest decline in N-methyl-d-aspartate binding after lesions of the cholinergic septal input to the hippocampus. (Copyright (c) 1997

  10. The need to increase regulatory controls on imports and exports came from the detection of an Argentine import containing exceeding pellets of Ir-192

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samsolo, Nicolas; Vidal, Dora

    2008-01-01

    In Argentina, radioactive sources for application in industrial gamma radiography are manufactured using small metallic discs called pellets of radioactive isotope Ir-192, that are imported. They are to be shipped in specially sealed recipients according to their high radioactive levels. These recipients are large enough to contain activities as high as 296 TBq and are therefore approved as type B (U) packages. This paper thoroughly describes a particular import of this material in which an exceeding 220±2 pellets (75,62 TBq) was found. The total amount of activity had not been declared adequately by the consignor. The corresponding notification to the Argentine Nuclear Regulatory Authority (NRA) was made by the importer and national manufacturer at the moment these particular pellets were to be used for source production. The exceeding material doubled that which had been authorized to be imported. After the notification and since the material had entered to the country Illicitly, customs legislation were applied in a legal process in which the Nuclear regulatory Authority participated as well. The decision of the judge was to ship the exceeding cargo again to its proceeding country. However, a significant time had passed since the cargo arrived and the pellets has struck to each other due to high temperature. This made them impossible to handle in order to encapsulate them as special form radioactive material again for their shipment in the available Type B (U) package. In the outcome, the material was retained at the manufacturer facilities, in its original packaging, with suitable radiological and physical conditions to guarantee safety and security, waiting until its activity had decayed to acceptable levels for its shipments as type A package. As a result, a need to require further technical specifications from the vendor was detected. These specifications should warn about the period in which these pellets may be utilized for source production before

  11. SU-E-T-580: On the Significance of Model Based Dosimetry for Breast and Head and Neck 192Ir HDR Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peppa, V; Pappas, E; Pantelis, E; Papagiannis, P; Major, T; Polgar, C

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the dosimetric and radiobiological differences between TG43-based and model-based dosimetry in the treatment planning of 192 Ir HDR brachytherapy for breast and head and neck cancer. Methods: Two cohorts of 57 Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation (APBI) and 22 head and neck (H&N) patients with oral cavity carcinoma were studied. Dosimetry for the treatment plans was performed using the TG43 algorithm of the Oncentra Brachy v4.4 treatment planning system (TPS). Corresponding Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were performed using MCNP6 with input files automatically prepared by the BrachyGuide software tool from DICOM RT plan data. TG43 and MC data were compared in terms of % dose differences, Dose Volume Histograms (DVHs) and related indices of clinical interest for the Planning Target Volume (PTV) and the Organs-At-Risk (OARs). A radiobiological analysis was also performed using the Equivalent Uniform Dose (EUD), mean survival fraction (S) and Tumor Control Probability (TCP) for the PTV, and the Normal Tissue Control Probability (N TCP) and the generalized EUD (gEUD) for the OARs. Significance testing of the observed differences performed using the Wilcoxon paired sample test. Results: Differences between TG43 and MC DVH indices, associated with the increased corresponding local % dose differences observed, were statistically significant. This is mainly attributed to their consistency however, since TG43 agrees closely with MC for the majority of DVH and radiobiological parameters in both patient cohorts. Differences varied considerably among patients only for the ipsilateral lung and ribs in the APBI cohort, with a strong correlation to target location. Conclusion: While the consistency and magnitude of differences in the majority of clinically relevant DVH indices imply that no change is needed in the treatment planning practice, individualized dosimetry improves accuracy and addresses instances of inter-patient variability observed. Research co

  12. Dose calculation in eye brachytherapy with Ir-192 threads using the Sievert integral and corrected by attenuation and scattering with the Meisberg polynomials; Calculo de dosis en braquiterapia ocular con hilos de Ir-192 utilizando la integral de Sievert y cooregida por atenuacion y dispersion con los polinomios de Meisberg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vivanco, M.G. Bernui de; Cardenas R, A. [Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Neoplasicas, Universidad Nacional de Ingenieria, Av. Angamos No. 2520, Surquillo, Lima (Peru)]. e-mail: gisellebdv@hotmail.com

    2006-07-01

    The ocular brachytherapy many times unique alternative to conserve the visual organ in patients of ocular cancer, one comes carrying out in the National Institute of Neoplastic Illnesses (INEN) using threads of Iridium 192; those which, they are placed in radial form on the interior surface of a spherical cap of gold of 18 K; the cap remains in the eye until reaching the prescribed dose by the doctor. The main objective of this work is to be able to calculate in a correct and practical way the one time that the treatment of ocular brachytherapy should last to reach the dose prescribed by the doctor. To reach this objective I use the Sievert integral corrected by attenuation effects and scattering (Meisberg polynomials); calculating it by the Simpson method. In the calculations by means of the Sievert integral doesn't take into account the scattering produced by the gold cap neither the variation of the constant of frequency of exposure with the distance. The calculations by means of Sievert integral are compared with those obtained using the Monte Carlo Penelope simulation code, where it is observed that they agree at distances of the surface of the cap greater or equal to 2mm. (Author)

  13. The Val{sup 192}Leu mutation in the {alpha}-subunit of {beta}-hexosaminidase A is not associated with the B1-variant form of Tay-Sachs disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Y.; Vavougios, G.; Hinek, A. [Univ. of Toronto (Canada)] [and others

    1996-07-01

    Substitution mutations adversely affecting the {alpha}-subunit of {beta}-hexosaminidase A ({alpha}{beta}) (EC 3.2.1.52) result in Tay-Sachs disease. The majority affect the initial folding of the pro-{alpha} chain in the endoplasmic reticulum, resulting in its retention and degradation. A much less common occurrence is a mutation that specifically affects an {open_quotes}active-site{close_quotes} residue necessary for substrate binding and/or catalysis. In this case, hexosaminidase A is present in the lysosome, but it lacks all {alpha}-specific activity. This biochemical phenotype is referred to as the {open_quotes}B1-variant form{close_quotes} of Tay-Sachs disease. Kinetic analysis of suspected B1-variant mutations is complex because hexosaminidase A is heterodimeric and both subunits possess similar active sites. In this report, we examine a previously identified B1-variant mutation, {alpha}-Val{sup 192}Leu. Chinese hamster ovary cells were permanently cotransfected with an {alpha}-cDNA-construct encoding the substitution and a mutant {beta}-cDNA ({beta}-Arg{sup 211}Lys), encoding a {beta}-subunit that is inactive but normal in all other respects. We were surprised to find that the Val{sup 192}Leu substitution produced a pro-{alpha} chain that did not form {alpha}-{beta} dimers and was not transported to the lysosome. Finally, we reexamined the hexosaminidase activity and protein levels in the fibroblasts from the original patient. These data were also not consistent with the biochemical phenotype of the B1 variant of Tay-Sachs disease previously reported to be present. Thus, we conclude that the Val{sup 192}Leu substitution does not specifically affect the {alpha}-active site. 23 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. SU-F-T-32: Evaluation of the Performance of a Multiple-Array-Diode Detector for Quality Assurance Tests in High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy with Ir-192 Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harpool, K; De La Fuente Herman, T; Ahmad, S; Ali, I [University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the performance of a two-dimensional (2D) array-diode- detector for geometric and dosimetric quality assurance (QA) tests of high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy with an Ir-192-source. Methods: A phantom setup was designed that encapsulated a two-dimensional (2D) array-diode-detector (MapCheck2) and a catheter for the HDR brachytherapy Ir-192 source. This setup was used to perform both geometric and dosimetric quality assurance for the HDR-Ir192 source. The geometric tests included: (a) measurement of the position of the source and (b) spacing between different dwell positions. The dosimteric tests include: (a) linearity of output with time, (b) end effect and (c) relative dose verification. The 2D-dose distribution measured with MapCheck2 was used to perform the previous tests. The results of MapCheck2 were compared with the corresponding quality assurance testes performed with Gafchromic-film and well-ionization-chamber. Results: The position of the source and the spacing between different dwell-positions were reproducible within 1 mm accuracy by measuring the position of maximal dose using MapCheck2 in contrast to the film which showed a blurred image of the dwell positions due to limited film sensitivity to irradiation. The linearity of the dose with dwell times measured from MapCheck2 was superior to the linearity measured with ionization chamber due to higher signal-to-noise ratio of the diode readings. MapCheck2 provided more accurate measurement of the end effect with uncertainty < 1.5% in comparison with the ionization chamber uncertainty of 3%. Although MapCheck2 did not provide absolute calibration dosimeter for the activity of the source, it provided accurate tool for relative dose verification in HDR-brachytherapy. Conclusion: The 2D-array-diode-detector provides a practical, compact and accurate tool to perform quality assurance for HDR-brachytherapy with an Ir-192 source. The diodes in MapCheck2 have high radiation sensitivity and

  15. The mean photon energy anti E{sub F} at the point of measurement determines the detector-specific radiation quality correction factor k{sub Q,M} in {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chofor, Ndimofor; Harder, Dietrich; Selbach, Hans-Joachim; Poppe, Bjoern [University of Oldenburg and Pius-Hospital Oldenburg (Germany). Medical Radiation Physics Group

    2016-11-01

    The application of various radiation detectors for brachytherapy dosimetry has motivated this study of the energy dependence of radiation quality correction factor k{sub Q,M}, the quotient of the detector responses under calibration conditions at a {sup 60}Co unit and under the given non-reference conditions at the point of measurement, M, occurring in photon brachytherapy. The investigated detectors comprise TLD, radiochromic film, ESR, Si diode, plastic scintillator and diamond crystal detectors as well as ionization chambers of various sizes, whose measured response-energy relationships, taken from the literature, served as input data. Brachytherapy photon fields were Monte-Carlo simulated for an ideal isotropic {sup 192}Ir point source, a model spherical {sup 192}Ir source with steel encapsulation and a commercial HDR GammaMed Plus source. The radial source distance was varied within cylindrical water phantoms with outer radii ranging from 10 to 30 cm and heights from 20 to 60 cm. By application of this semiempirical method - originally developed for teletherapy dosimetry - it has been shown that factor k{sub Q,M} is closely correlated with a single variable, the fluence-weighted mean photon energy anti E{sub F} at the point of measurement. The radial profiles of anti E{sub F} obtained with either the commercial {sup 192}Ir source or the two simplified source variants show little variation. The observed correlations between parameters k{sub Q,M} and anti E{sub F} are represented by fitting formulae for all investigated detectors, and further variation of the detector type is foreseen. The herewith established close correlation of radiation quality correction factor k{sub Q,M} with local mean photon energy anti E{sub F} can be regarded as a simple regularity, facilitating the practical application of correction factor k{sub Q,M} for in-phantom dosimetry around {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy sources. anti E{sub F} values can be assessed by Monte Carlo simulation or

  16. Production techniques and quality control of sealed radioactive sources of palladium-103, iodine-125, iridium-192 and ytterbium-169. Final report of a coordinated research project 2001-2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-06-01

    Radioisotopes have been used extensively for many years for several medical and industrial applications either in the form of an open source or encapsulated in an appropriate metallic container (sealed source). The design and technology for the preparation of radioactive sealed sources is an area of continuous development to satisfy an ever increasing demand for a larger variety of shapes, sizes, type of radioisotope and levels of radioactivity required for newer and specialized applications. In medicine, sealed sources using the radioisotopes of 125 I, 192 Ir and 103 Pd are commonly used for brachytherapy for the treatment of malignant diseases, and for bone density measurements. In industry, they are widely used for non-destructive testing (NDT), radiation processing, 'on-line' process control systems and on-line elemental analysis of mineral resources. Some well-known examples of such sources are 60 Co for industrial nucleonic gauges, 192 Ir sources for industrial radiography, 241 Am sources for smoke detectors and chemical analysers and, more recently, 169 Yb for NDT measurements of thin metallic tubes and plates. The current challenges in development include the production of miniature size sources with a high level of activity, a high degree of uniformity in the distribution of the radioactivity and the highest degree of safety, requiring stringent quality control methods. The IAEA has been promoting and supporting activities designed to increase the utilization of radiation and radioisotopes in several areas. In particular, in view of the proven benefits of, and an increasing demand for radioactive sealed sources for medical and industrial applications, upon the recommendation of several experts, a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Development of Radioactive Sources for Emerging Therapeutic and Industrial Applications was begun in 2002. The aim of the CRP was the optimization and testing of procedures and methods for the fabrication and quality control

  17. Association between paraoxonase-1 gene Q192R and L55M polymorphisms in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and anti-phospholipid syndrome (APS) in a population from Cairo of Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Alshaymaa Ahmed; El-Lebedy, Dalia; Ashmawy, Ingy; Hady, Maha Abdel

    2017-06-01

    Paraoxonase-1 (PON1) is involved in the oxidative stress process that cause tissue damage observed in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and anti-phospholipid syndrome (APS). The aim of the present study was to investigate the association of PON1 Q192R and L55M polymorphisms with risk of SLE and associated APS among Egyptian sample. The study included 120 SLE patients (45 without APS and 75 with APS) and 120 healthy subjects. PON1 Q192R and L55M polymorphisms were genotyped by real-time PCR. No significant differences in Q192R genotypes or allele frequencies were found between patients and controls (p = 0.5 and 0.1, respectively). The frequency of the 55M allele was significantly higher in SLE patients than in controls (66.6 vs. 43.3%), while the 55L allele was more frequent in controls (56.6%) than in patients (33.3%) (p = 0.03). The LL genotype was more frequent in controls (21.6%) than in patients (10%) while M allele carrier genotypes (LM + MM) were more frequent among patients (90%) than controls (78.3%), p = 0.04. Also, the 55M allele was more frequent in APS patients (73.3%) than in patients without APS (55.6%), p = 0.004. M allele carrier genotypes (LM + MM) was significantly higher among APS patients (95.4%) than in non-APS patients (80%), p = 0.008. Our results indicated that the PON1 L55M polymorphism associated with SLE and associated APS in a population from Cairo of Egypt, while the Q192R polymorphism plays no role in disease susceptibility. A large scale study to assess PON1 polymorphisms, PON1 activity, and markers of oxidative stress interaction is needed to clarify the role of PON-1 polymorphisms in the pathogenesis of SLE and associated APS.

  18. Effective treatment of Stage I uterine papillary serous carcinoma with high dose-rate vaginal apex radiation (192Ir) and chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, Bruce C.; Knisely, Jonathan P. S.; Kacinski, Barry M.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Gumbs, Andrew A.; Roberts, Kenneth B.; Frank, Alex H.; Peschel, Richard E.; Rutherford, Thomas J.; Edraki, Babak; Kohorn, Ernest I.; Chambers, Setsuko K.; Schwartz, Peter E.; Wilson, Lynn D.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Uterine papillary serous carcinoma (UPSC) is a morphologically distinct variant of endometrial carcinoma that is associated with a poor prognosis, high recurrence rate, frequent clinical understaging, and poor response to salvage treatment. We retrospectively analyzed local control, actuarial overall survival (OS), actuarial disease-free survival (DFS), salvage rate, and complications for patients with Federation International of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) (1988) Stage I UPSC. Methods and Materials: This retrospective analysis describes 38 patients with FIGO Stage I UPSC who were treated with the combinations of radiation therapy, chemotherapy, total abdominal hysterectomy, and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (TAH/BSO), with or without a surgical staging procedure. Twenty of 38 patients were treated with a combination of low dose-rate (LDR) uterine/vaginal brachytherapy using 226 Ra or 137 Cs and conventional whole-abdomen radiation therapy (WART) or whole-pelvic radiation therapy (WPRT). Of 20 patients (10%) in this treatment group, 2 received cisplatin chemotherapy. Eighteen patients were treated with high dose-rate (HDR) vaginal apex brachytherapy using 192 Ir with an afterloading device and cisplatin, doxorubicin, and cyclophosphamide (CAP) chemotherapy (5 of 18 patients). Only 6 of 20 UPSC patients treated with combination LDR uterine/vaginal brachytherapy and conventional external beam radiotherapy underwent complete surgical staging, consisting of TAH/BSO, pelvic/para-aortic lymph node sampling, omentectomy, and peritoneal fluid analysis, compared to 15 of 18 patients treated with HDR vaginal apex brachytherapy. Results: The 5-year actuarial OS for patients with complete surgical staging and adjuvant radiation/chemotherapy treatment was 100% vs. 61% for patients without complete staging (p = 0.002). The 5-year actuarial OS for all Stage I UPSC patients treated with postoperative HDR vaginal apex brachytherapy and systemic chemotherapy was 94

  19. Study of link transitions between superdeformed well and normally deformed well in Hg{sup 192} and research and development for a new concept of {gamma} photons detection: the Agata array; Etude des liens entre puits superdeforme et puits normalement deforme dans {sup 192}Hg et recherche et developpement pour un nouveau concept de detection de photons {gamma}: le multidetecteur AGATA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roccaz, J

    2006-07-15

    The atomic nucleus can adopt a very elongated shape with an axis ratio 2:1, this is the superdeformation phenomenon. Nowadays more than 300 superdeformed bands have been identified at high spin, but the determination of excitation energies, spins and parities of the associated states have been established for only one tenth of these bands. The former quantities (E{sup *}, I, {pi}) can only be determined via the linking gamma-transitions between the superdeformed (sd) and the normally deformed (nd) states. Within the framework of this thesis, we have investigated the Hg{sup 192} nucleus in order to establish E{sup *}, I and {pi}. This nucleus is predicted to be doubly magic at superdeformation and hence is taken as a reference in the mass {approx} 190 region. The experiment was carried out at Strasbourg using the Euroball-IV array and the vivitron accelerator. The obtained results are not convincing and seem to be at the limit of the performances of Euroball. Next generation of arrays will abandon the Compton-shields and use tracking concept to reconstruct the trajectories of incident photons, and therefore we expect a huge increase of efficiency. The second part of this work was focused on the research and development work for the AGATA (Advanced GAmma Tracking Array) project. We have performed simulations with the GEANT-4 code and developed tracking methods to reconstruct pair-creation events. The full AGATA will be operational around 2015 and will enhance by around two orders of magnitude the observational limits. (author)

  20. Mutated CaV2.1 channels dysregulate CASK/P2X3 signaling in mouse trigeminal sensory neurons of R192Q Cacna1a knock-in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnanasekaran, Aswini; Bele, Tanja; Hullugundi, Swathi; Simonetti, Manuela; Ferrari, Michael D; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M; Nistri, Andrea; Fabbretti, Elsa

    2013-12-02

    ATP-gated P2X3 receptors of sensory ganglion neurons are important transducers of pain as they adapt their expression and function in response to acute and chronic nociceptive signals. The present study investigated the role of calcium/calmodulin-dependent serine protein kinase (CASK) in controlling P2X3 receptor expression and function in trigeminal ganglia from Cacna1a R192Q-mutated knock-in (KI) mice, a genetic model for familial hemiplegic migraine type-1. KI ganglion neurons showed more abundant CASK/P2X3 receptor complex at membrane level, a result that likely originated from gain-of-function effects of R192Q-mutated CaV2.1 channels and downstream enhanced CaMKII activity. The selective CaV2.1 channel blocker ω-Agatoxin IVA and the CaMKII inhibitor KN-93 were sufficient to return CASK/P2X3 co-expression to WT levels. After CASK silencing, P2X3 receptor expression was decreased in both WT and KI ganglia, supporting the role of CASK in P2X3 receptor stabilization. This process was functionally observed as reduced P2X3 receptor currents. We propose that, in trigeminal sensory neurons, the CASK/P2X3 complex has a dynamic nature depending on intracellular calcium and related signaling, that are enhanced in a transgenic mouse model of genetic hemiplegic migraine.

  1. Measurement of the Ir-191,193(n,2n)Ir-190,192 Reaction Cross Section Between 9.0 and 16.5 MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildenhain, Elizabeth; Finch, Sean; Tornow, Werner; Krishichayan, F.

    2017-09-01

    Iridium is one of the elements prioritized by Nonproliferation and Homeland Security agencies. In addition, Ir-192 is being used in various medical treatments. Improved data and corresponding evaluations of neutron-induced reactions on the iridium isotopes are required to meet the demands of several applications of societal interest. This study measured the cross section of the Ir-191,193(n, 2n)Ir-190,192 reactions at energies from 9.0 to 16.5 MeV using the activation technique. Natural Ir samples [Ir-191 37.3%, Ir-193 62.7%] were sandwiched between Au-197 monitor foils and irradiated with monoenergetic neutron beams at the tandem facility of the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL). Gamma rays from the irradiated samples were counted in TUNL's low background facility using high-efficient HPGe detectors. Measured cross-section data are compared to previous data and to predictions from nuclear data libraries (e.g. ENDF). Research at TUNL funded by the NSF.

  2. The association of the PON1 Q192R polymorphism with coronary heart disease: findings from the British Women's Heart and Health cohort study and a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiessling Matthew

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There have been inconsistent results from case-control studies assessing the association of the PON1 Q192R polymorphism with coronary heart disease (CHD. Most studies have included predominantly men and the association in women is unclear. Since lipid levels vary between the sexes the antioxidant effect of PON1 and any genes associated with it may also vary by sex. We have examined the association of the PON1 Q192R polymorphism with CHD in a large cohort of British women and combined the results from our cohort study with those from all other published studies. Results The distribution of genotypes was the same among women with CHD and those without disease. The odds ratio (95% confidence interval of having CHD comparing those with either the QR or RR genotype to those with QQ genotype (dominant model of association was 1.03 (0.89, 1.21 and the per allele odds ratio was 0.98 (0.95, 1.01. In a meta-analysis of this and 38 other published studies (10,738 cases and 17,068 controls the pooled odds ratio for the dominant effect was 1.14 (1.08, 1.20 and for the per allele effect was 1.10 (1.06, 1.13. There was evidence of small study bias in the meta-analyses and the dominant effect among those studies with 500 or more cases was 1.05 (0.96, 1.15. Ethnicity and reporting of whether the genotyping was done blind to the participants clinical status also contributed to heterogeneity between studies, but there was no difference in effect between studies with 50% or more women compared to those with fewer women and no difference between studies of healthy populations compared to those at high risk (with diabetes, renal disease of familial hypercholesterolaemia. Conclusion There is no robust evidence that the PON1 Q192R polymorphism is associated with CHD risk in Caucasian women or men.

  3. Sodium temperature/wind lidar based on laser-diode-pumped Nd:YAG lasers deployed at Tromsø, Norway (69.6°N, 19.2°E).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahara, T D; Nozawa, S; Saito, N; Kawabata, T; Tsuda, T T; Wada, S

    2017-06-12

    An Nd:YAG laser-based sodium temperature/wind lidar was developed for the measurement of the northern polar mesosphere and lower thermosphere at Tromsø (69.6N, 19.2E), Norway. Coherent light at 589 nm is produced by sum frequency generation of 1064 nm and 1319 nm from two diode laser end-pumped pulsed Nd:YAG lasers. The output power is as high as 4W, with 4 mJ/pulse at 1000 Hz repetition rate. Five tilting Cassegrain telescopes enable us to make five-direction (zenith, north, south, east, west) observation for temperature and wind simultaneously. This highly stable laser system is first of its kind to operate virtually maintenance-free during the observation season (from late September to March) since 2010.

  4. Toxicity and immunogenicity of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli heat-labile and heat-stable toxoid fusion 3xSTa(A14Q-LT(S63K/R192G/L211A in a murine model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengxian Zhang

    Full Text Available Diarrhea is the second leading cause of death to young children. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC are the most common bacteria causing diarrhea. Adhesins and enterotoxins are the virulence determinants in ETEC diarrhea. Adhesins mediate bacterial attachment and colonization, and enterotoxins including heat-labile (LT and heat-stable type Ib toxin (STa disrupt fluid homeostasis in host cells that leads to fluid hyper-secretion and diarrhea. Thus, adhesins and enterotoxins have been primarily targeted in ETEC vaccine development. A recent study reported toxoid fusions with STa toxoid (STa(P13F fused at the N- or C-terminus, or inside the A subunit of LT(R192G elicited neutralizing antitoxin antibodies, and suggested application of toxoid fusions in ETEC vaccine development (Liu et al., Infect. Immun. 79:4002-4009, 2011. In this study, we generated a different STa toxoid (STa(A14Q and a triple-mutant LT toxoid (LT(S63K/R192G/L211A, tmLT, constructed a toxoid fusion (3xSTa(A14Q-tmLT that carried 3 copies of STa(A14Q for further facilitation of anti-STa immunogenicity, and assessed antigen safety and immunogenicity in a murine model to explore its potential for ETEC vaccine development. Mice immunized with this fusion antigen showed no adverse effects, and developed antitoxin antibodies particularly through the IP route. Anti-LT antibodies were detected and were shown neutralizing against CT in vitro. Anti-STa antibodies were also detected in the immunized mice, and serum from the IP immunized mice neutralized STa toxin in vitro. Data from this study indicated that toxoid fusion 3xSTa(A14Q-tmLT is safe and can induce neutralizing antitoxin antibodies, and provided helpful information for vaccine development against ETEC diarrhea.

  5. 211 At-labeled agents for alpha-immunotherapy: On the in vivo stability of astatine-agent bonds

    OpenAIRE

    Ayed , Tahra ,; Pilmé , Julien; Tézé , David; Bassal , Fadel ,; Barbet , Jacques ,; Chérel , Michel; Champion , Julie ,; Maurice , Rémi; Montavon , Gilles ,; Galland , Nicolas ,

    2016-01-01

    International audience; The application of 211 At to targeted cancer therapy is currently hindered by the rapid deastatination that occurs in vivo. As the deastatination mechanism is unknown, we tackled this issue from the viewpoint of the intrinsic properties of At-involving chemical bonds. An apparent correlation has been evidenced between in vivo stability of 211 At-labeled compounds and the AtÀR (R ¼ C, B) bond enthalpies obtained from relativistic quantum mechanical calculations. Further...

  6. Preparation and biological evaluation of an astatine-211 labeled biotin conjugate: Biotinyl-3-[211At]astatoanilide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foulon, Catherine F.; Schoultz, Bent W.; Zalutsky, Michael R.

    1997-01-01

    Biotinyl-3-[ 211 At]astatoanilide ([ 211 At]AtBA) was prepared in more than 80% yield by destannylation. In vitro, [ 211 At]AtBA exhibited a high affinity for streptavidin, and was stable after incubation in human serum, cerebrospinal fluid and distilled water, whereas it was rapidly degraded in mouse serum. HPLC analysis showed that the main degradation pathway in mouse serum was the cleavage of [ 211 At]astatoaniline. In mice, [ 211 At]AtBA and its 125 I-labeled analogue cleared rapidly from most tissues; however, there was some evidence for dehalogenation of both tracers

  7. Evaluation of Novel Wet Chemistry Separation and Purification Methods to Facilitate Automation of Astatine-­211 Isolation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilbur, Daniel Scott [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2016-07-19

    This research is a collaborative effort between the research groups of the PIs, Dr. D. Scott Wilbur in the Department of Radiation Oncology at the University of Washington (UW) and Matthew O’Hara at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). In this report only those studies conducted at UW and the budget information from UW will be reported. A separate progress and financial report will be provided by PNNL. This final report outlines the experiments (Tasks) conducted and results obtained at UW from July 1, 2013 thru June 30, 2016 (2-­year project with 1 year no-­cost extension). The report divides the information on the experiments and results obtained into the 5 specific objectives of the research efforts and the Tasks within those objectives. This format is used so that it is easy to see what has been accomplished in each area. A brief summary of the major findings from the studies is provided below. Summary of Major Findings from Research/Training Activities at UW: Anion and cation exchange columns did not provide adequate 211At capture and/or extraction results under conditions studied to warrant further evaluation; PEG-­Merrifield resins containing mPEG350, mPEG750, mPEG2000 and mPEG5000 were synthesized and evaluated; All of the mPEG resins with different sized mPEG moieties conjugated gave similar 211At capture (>95%) from 8M HCl solutions and release with conc. NH4OH (~50-­80%), but very low quantities were released when NaOH was used as an eluent; Capture and release of 211At when loading [211At]astatate appeared to be similar to that of [211At]astatide on PEG columns, but further studies need to be conducted to confirm that; Capture of 211At on PEG columns was lower (e.g. 80-­90%) from solutions of 8M HNO3, but higher capture rates (e.g. 99%) can be obtained when 10M HNO3 is mixed with an equal quantity of 8M HCl; Addition of reductants to the 211At solutions did not appear to change the percent capture, but may have an effect on the % extracted; There was some indication that the PEG-­Merrifield resins could be saturated (perhaps with Bi) resulting in lower capture percentages, but more studies need to be done to confirm that; A target dissolution chamber, designed and built at PNNL, works well with syringe pumps so it can be used in an automated system; Preliminary semi-­automated 211At isolation studies have been conducted with full-scale target dissolution and 211At isolation using a PEG column on the Hamilton automated system gave low overall recoveries, but HNO3 was used (rather than HCl) for loading the 211At and flow rates were not optimized; Results obtained using PEG columns are high enough to warrant further development on a fully automated system; Results obtained also indicate that additional studies are warranted to evaluate other types of columns for 211At separation from bismuth, which allow use of HNO3/HCl mixtures for loading and NaOH for eluting 211At. Such a column could greatly simplify the overall isolation process and make it easier to automate.

  8. SU-F-T-16: Experimental Determination of Ionization Chamber Correction Factors for In-Phantom Measurements of Reference Air Kerma Rate and Absorbed Water Dose Rate of Brachytherapy 192Ir Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, M; Lee, V; Wong, M; Leung, R; Law, G; Lee, K; Cheung, S; Tung, S

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Following the method of in-phantom measurements of reference air kerma rate (Ka) at 100cm and absorbed water dose rate (Dw1) at 1cm of high-dose-rate 192Ir brachytherapy source using 60Co absorbed-dose-to-water calibrated (ND,w,60Co) ionization chamber (IC), we experimentally determined the in-phantom correction factors (kglob) of the PTW30013 (PTW, Freiburg, Germany) IC by comparing the Monte Carlo (MC)-calculated kglob of the other PTW30016 IC. Methods: The Dw1 formalism of in-phantom measurement is: M*ND,w,60Co*(kglob)Dw1, where M is the collected charges, and (kglob)Dw1 the in-phantom Dw1 correction factor. Similarly, Ka is determined by M*ND,w,60Co*(kglob)ka, where (kglob)ka the in-phantom Ka correction factor. Two thimble ICs PTW30013 and another PTW30016 having a ND,w,60Co from the German primary standard laboratory (PTB) were simultaneously exposed to the microselectron 192Ir v2 source at 8cm in a PMMA phantom. A reference well chamber (PTW33004) with a PTB transfer Ka calibration Nka was used for comparing the in-phantom measurements to derive the experimental (kglob)ka factors. We determined the experimental (kglob)Dw1 of the PTW30013 by comparing the PTW30016 measurements with MC-calculated (kglob)Dw1. Results: Ka results of the PTW30016 based on ND,w,60Co and MC-calculated (kglob)ka differ from the well chamber results based on Nka by 1.6% and from the manufacturer by 1.0%. Experimental (kglob)ka factors for the PTW30016 and two other PTW30013 are 0.00683, 0.00681 and 0.00679, and vary <0.5% with 1mm source positioning uncertainty. Experimental (kglob)Dw1 of the PTW30013 ICs are 75.3 and 75.6, and differ by 1.6% from the conversion by dose rate constant from the AAPM report 229. Conclusion: The 1.7% difference between MC and experimental (kglob)ka for the PTW30016 IC is within the PTB 2.5% expanded uncertainty in Ka calibration standard. Using a single IC with ND,w,60Co to calibrate the brachytherapy source and dose output in external

  9. Rescue treatment with interstitial brachytherapy irradiation re very low dose rate iridium-192 (UBT) in inoperable tumors of the oral cavity, oropharynx and nodal: experience of 28 cases in the Gustave-Roussy Institute in Paris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quarneti, A.; Cordova, A.; Barrios, E.; Bonomi, M.; Haie-Meder, C.; Gerbaulet, A.; Eschwege, F.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: A retrospective analysis of the evolution of 28 patients was performed local recurrences, second tumors and advanced disease in neck nodes in territory previously irradiated, which were re-irradiated using interstitial brachytherapy Ir-192 at very low dose rate (UBT) in the Gustave-Roussy Institute in Paris. Material and Methods: A series of 28 who had received radiation therapy is reported as part of heir initial treatment. 17 patients were treated for local recurrences or second tumors while 11 patients had presented nodal disease. All of them were inoperable. So were treated with interstitial brachytherapy with Ir-192 wires at very low rate dose (UBT), plastic tube technique, re-irradiation regime between 1978 and 1988 Gustave Roussy Institute. Two groups were considered. Group 1 included 17 patients with local recurrences, lesion progression and second tumors. Group 2 included 11 patients with metastatic nodal disease. The mean treatment volume was 45.25 cc, the average dose was 65 Gy, and the average treatment time between the first treatment and re irradiation was 56 months. The average duration of treatment was 14.6 days with a average dose rate of 0.18 Gy / h. After loading technique was used in plastic tubes. They were previously performed to load the simulation with orthogonal plates, false sources and provisional dosimetry. Late toxicity was assessed according to the RTOG score. Local control rates were studied complications and survive on some factors of possible prognostic significance. The statistical analysis of significance was performed by the method and log rank test were prepared survival curves and disease-free survival by Kaplan-Meier. Results: 2 groups were analyzed separately. In group 1, procedures were performed 17 UBTD and method of low dose rate (LDR). 10 of 17 patients achieved complete responses. The patient that the procedure was performed at low dose rate also achieved a complete response. In 3 cases, no response is not

  10. Rescue mastectomy in 192 breast cancer patients with T2 tumors larger than 3 cm or T3 tumors first treated by breast conservation protocols and followed-up for at least ten years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khayat, D.; Baillet, F.; Simon, J.M.; Sahraoui, S.; Voican, D.; Housset, M.

    1997-01-01

    Breast conservation therapy was used in 192 breast cancer patients treated between 1980 and 1986 for T2 tumors larger than 3 cm or T3 tumors. Primary chemotherapy was followed by external beam radiation therapy then by boost brachytherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy. Locoregional recurrences were treated whenever possible by tumor-ectomy and/or axillary node clearance. Median follow-up was 13 years. Of the three patients with local therapeutic failures at completion of the locoregional treatment, two were treated by tumor-ectomy and one by mastectomy. Subsequently, 21 mastectomies were performed, for oncological reasons in 20 cases. Overall survival was 55 % after five years, 60 % after ten years, and 56 % after 15 years. Local control rates were 82 %, 77 %, and 75 % after five, ten, and 15 years, respectively. After exclusion of the patients who required mastectomy, cosmetic results were satisfactory in 68 % of patients overall, 67 % of five-year survivors, and 73 % of ten-year survivors. These results show that the conventional approach involving routine initial mastectomy is no longer appropriate in patients with T3 or large T2 breast cancers. (authors)

  11. ESTABLISHMENT OF PARAOXONASE AND ARYLESTERASE ACTIVITY OF PARAOXONASE 1 (PON1 IN DEPENDENCE ON 55(L/M AND 192(Q/R DNA POLYMORPHISM IN ADULT PEOPLE WITH DOWN SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel SÝKORA

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Human serum paraoxonase 1 is a calcium-dependent esterase located on high density lipoproteins (HDL. It inhibits LDL peroxidation and hydrolysis of oxide forms of phospholipides and therefore significantly affects the development of ateroscletosis. The aim of this study was to establish the paraoxonase and arylesterase activity of PON1 in adult people with Down syndrome (DS. Adults with DS (10 men and 10 women ages 16 to 37 years participated and were compared to a control group (10 men and 10 women age ranging from 17 to 45 years. The 55(L/M and 192(Q/R DNA polymorphism (PCR-RFLP method and paraoxonase and arylesterase activity was investigated in every patient. The results showed the reduction of PON1 activity in people with DS, in contrast to the decreased development of atherosclerosis in DS. Therefore it can be concluded, that PON1 does not have a direct effect on the lower prevalence of atherosclerosis in people with DS.

  12. Structure of neutron-rich nuclei around the N = 126 closed shell; the yrast structure of {sup 205}Au{sub 126} up to spin-parity I{sup {pi}} = (19/2{sup +})

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podolyak, Zs.; Steer, S.J.; Pietri, S.; Regan, P.H.; Brandau, C.; Catford, W.N.; Cullen, I.J.; Gelletly, W.; Jones, G.A.; Liu, Z.; Walker, P.M. [University of Surrey, Department of Physics, Guildford (United Kingdom); Gorska, M.; Gerl, J.; Wollersheim, H.J.; Grawe, H.; Becker, F.; Geissel, H.; Kelic, A.; Kojouharov, I.; Kurz, N.; Montes, F.; Prokopowicz, W.; Saito, T.; Schaffner, H.; Tashenov, S.; Werner-Malento, E. [GSI, Darmstadt (Germany); Rudolph, D.; Hoischen, R. [Lund University, Department of Physics, Lund (Sweden); Garnsworthy, A.B. [University of Surrey, Department of Physics, Guildford (United Kingdom); Yale University, WNSL, New Haven, CT (United States); Maier, K.H. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Krakow (Poland); University of the West of Scotland, Dept. of Physics, Paisley (United Kingdom); Bednarczyk, P.; Grebosz, J. [GSI, Darmstadt (Germany); Institute of Nuclear Physics, Krakow (Poland); Caceres, L. [GSI, Darmstadt (Germany); Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Dept. de Fisica Teorica, Madrid (Spain); Doornenbal, P. [GSI, Darmstadt (Germany); Universitaet zu Koeln, IKP, Koeln (Germany); Heinz, A. [Yale University, WNSL, New Haven, CT (United States); Kurtukian-Nieto, T. [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Campostela (Spain); Benzoni, G.; Wieland, O. [Universita degli Studi di Milano (Italy); INFN, Milano (Italy); Pfuetzner, M. [Warsaw University, IEP, Warsaw (Poland); Jungclaus, A. [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Dept. de Fisica Teorica, Madrid (Spain); Balabanski, D.L. [Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, INRNE, Sofia (Bulgaria); Brown, B.A. [Univ. of Surrey, Dept. of Physics, Guildford (United Kingdom); Michigan State Univ., NSCL, East Lansing, MI (United States); Bruce, A.M.; Lalkovski, S. [Univ. of Brighton, School of Environment and Technology, Brighton (United Kingdom); Dombradi, Zs. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Debrecen (Hungary); Estevez, M.E. [Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, Valencia (Spain)] [and others

    2009-12-15

    Heavy neutron-rich nuclei have been populated through the relativistic fragmentation of a {sup 208}{sub 82} Pb beam at E/A = 1 GeV on a 2.5 g/cm{sup 2} thick Be target. The synthesised nuclei were selected and identified in-flight using the fragment separator at GSI. Approximately 300 ns after production, the selected nuclei were implanted in an {proportional_to}8 mm thick perspex stopper, positioned at the centre of the RISING {gamma} -ray detector spectrometer array. A previously unreported isomer with a half-life T{sub 1/2} = 163(5) ns has been observed in the N=126 closed-shell nucleus {sup 205}{sub 79} Au. Through {gamma}-ray singles and {gamma}-{gamma} coincidence analysis a level scheme was established. The comparison with a shell model calculation tentatively identifies the spin-parity of the excited states, including the isomer itself, which is found to be I{sup {pi}} = (19/2{sup +}). (orig.)

  13. SU-E-T-263: Point Dose Variation Using a Single Ir-192 HDR Brachytherapy Plan for Two Treatments with a Single Tandem-Ovoid Insertion for Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, X; Morrill, S; Hardee, M; Han, E; Penagaricano, J; Zhang, X; Vaneerat, R [University of Arkansas Medical Science, Little Rock, AR (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the point dose variations between Ir-192 HDR treatments on two consecutive days using a single tandem-ovoid insertion without replanning in cervical cancer patients. Methods: This study includes eleven cervical cancer patients undergoing HDR brachytherapy with a prescribed dose of 28 Gy in 4 fractions. Each patient had two tandemovoid insertions one week apart. Each insertion was treated on consecutive days with rescanning and replanning prior to each treatment. To study the effect of no replanning for day 2 treatments, the day 1 plan dwell position and dwell time with decay were applied to the day 2 CT dataset. The point dose variations on the prescription point H (defined according to American Brachytherapy Society), and normal tissue doses at point B, bladder, rectum and vaginal mucosa (based on ICRU Report 38) were obtained. Results: Without replanning, the mean point H dose variation was 4.6 ± 10.7% on the left; 2.3 ± 2.9% on the right. The mean B point variation was 3.8 ± 4.9% on the left; 3.6 ± 4.7% on the right. The variation in the left vaginal mucosal point was 12.2 ± 10.7%; 9.5 ± 12.5% on the right; the bladder point 5.5 ± 7.4%; and the rectal point 7.9 ± 9.1%. Conclusion: Without replanning, there are variations both in the prescription point and the normal tissue point doses. The latter can vary as much as 10% or more. This is likely due to the steep dose gradient from brachytherapy compounded by shifts in the positions of the applicator in relationship to the patients anatomy. Imaging prior to each treatment and replanning ensure effective and safe brachytherapy are recommended.

  14. 49 CFR 192.51 - Scope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE... for the selection and qualification of pipe and components for use in pipelines. ...

  15. 49 CFR 192.327 - Cover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... locations 36 (914) 24 (610) Drainage ditches of public roads and railroad crossings 36 (914) 24 (610) (b... least 24 inches (610 millimeters) of cover. (c) Where an underground structure prevents the installation...

  16. 10 CFR 431.192 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... transformer that operates at the fundamental frequency of an alternating-current system and that is designed... transformer intended primarily to provide a neutral point for system-grounding purposes, either by means of... constructed so as to prevent external air circulation through the coils of the transformer while operating at...

  17. 23 CFR 192.3 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., manufacture, cultivation, sale, transfer, or the attempt or conspiracy to possess, distribute, manufacture... Substances Act, or (2) The operation of a motor vehicle under the influence of such a substance. (d...

  18. 40 CFR 192.01 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... supply a public water system; and (A) Currently supplies drinking water for human consumption; or (B... form of tailings resulting from the processing of ores for the extraction of uranium and other valuable constituents of the ores; and (2) Other wastes (which the Secretary determines to be radioactive) at a...

  19. Search Results | Page 192 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2011-01-01

    Manitoba universities and project partners awarded $6.4-Million from Canadian International Food Security Research Fund for international research. Canadian agricultural research in international food security receives financial support through the IDRC, CIFSRF and other partnerships. Published date. January 1, 2011 ...

  20. 49 CFR 192.803 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... malfunction of a component or deviation from normal operations that may: (a) Indicate a condition exceeding... covered task by any of the following: (a) Written examination; (b) Oral examination; (c) Work performance history review; (d) Observation during: (1) Performance on the job, (2) On the job training, or (3...