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Sample records for astar 811c

  1. Failure Analysis of Cracked FS-85 Tubing and ASTAR-811C End Caps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ME Petrichek

    2006-01-01

    Failure analyses were performed on cracked FS-85 tubing and ASTAR-811C and caps which had been fabricated as components of biaxial creep specimens meant to support materials testing for the NR Space program. During the failure analyses of cracked FS-85 tubing, it was determined that the failure potentially could be due to two effects: possible copper contamination from the EDM (electro-discharge machined) recast layer and/or an insufficient solution anneal. to prevent similar failures in the future, a more formal analysis should be done after each processing step to ensure the quality of the material before further processing. During machining of the ASTAR-811FC rod to form end caps for biaxial creep specimens, linear defects were observed along the center portion of the end caps. These defects were only found in material that was processed from the top portion of the ingot. The linear defects were attributed to a probable residual ingot pipe that was not removed from the ingot. During the subsequent processing of the ingot to rod, the processing temperatures were not high enough to allow self healing of the ingot's residual pipe defect. To prevent this from occurring in the future, it is necessary to ensure that complete removal of the as-melted ingot pipe is verified by suitable non-destructive evaluation (NDE)

  2. Development of advanced high strength tantalum base alloys. Phase 3: Influence of metallurgical condition on the mechanical properties of ASTAR-811C sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammon, R. L.; Buckman, R. W., Jr.; Harrod, D. L.

    1972-01-01

    Metallurgical condition was shown to have a significant effect on the creep properties of ASTAR-811C (Ta-8W-1Re-0.7Hf-0.025C) sheet. Cold worked material exhibited creep rates 30 times higher than solution annealed material and 10 times greater than for recrystallized material. Both grain size and the carbide morphology changes as the final annealing temperature was raised from 3000 F to 3600 F. However, the lowest creep rates were achieved for material which retained the high temperature form of the Ta2C precipitate. Samples with GTA weldments had essentially identical properties as recrystallized base metal. Cooling rates from 3600 F of 5, 50, and 800 F deg/min. had little effect on the 2000 and 2400 F creep behavior of ASTAR-811C.

  3. US EPA - A*Star Partnership - Accelerating the Acceptance of ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The path for incorporating new alternative methods and technologies into quantitative chemical risk assessment poses a diverse set of scientific challenges. Some of these challenges include development of relevant and predictive test systems and computational models to integrate and extrapolate experimental data, and rapid characterization and acceptance of these systems and models. The series of presentations will highlight a collaborative effort between the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR) that is focused on developing and applying experimental and computational models for predicting chemical-induced liver and kidney toxicity, brain angiogenesis, and blood-brain-barrier formation. In addressing some of these challenges, the U.S. EPA and A*STAR collaboration will provide a glimpse of what chemical risk assessments could look like in the 21st century. Presentation on US EPA – A*STAR Partnership at international symposium on Accelerating the acceptance of next-generation sciences and their application to regulatory risk assessment in Singapore.

  4. Non-invasive perfusion imaging by modified STAR using asymmetric inversion slabs (ASTAR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Tokunori

    2000-01-01

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) such as STAR, EPISTAR, and FAIR have been used as imaging techniques of tissue perfusion and blood vessels (in MRA). We have developed 'ASTAR', a modified version of STAR by using asymmetric inversion slabs. ASTAR solves the problems of suppression of venous inflow and subtraction error of stationary tissue signal caused by the imbalance of signal variations. The signal variations are dependent on MT effects. In order to avoid overlapping the control slab to the tissue (including large veins), the control and tag slabs are arranged asymmetrically to preserve the same offset of modulation frequency. We evaluated both the subtraction error caused by the MT effects, and the imperfection of an IR slab using a stationary phantom. We then measured the vessel signal on the brain of a volunteer, using the above methods. Two indexes were used for the evaluation: ASL signal to control signal ratio (ASLR [%]=100*deltaS/S cont ) and ASL signal to noise ratio (ASLNR=delatS/Noise) where deltaS=|S cont -S tag |. Phantom study: each ASLR and ASLNR between ASTAR and EPISTAR was comparable and showed a decrease in noise signal level. This means that the ASL signal from the stationary tissue with an imbalance in MT effects and the imperfection in inversion slab profiles were cancelled out almost perfectly. When calculating CBF, ASLR for zero perfusion stationary tissue should be below 0.1%. We were able to satisfy this requirement in our ASTAR experiment. ASLR and ASLNR in FAIR were 40% larger than in EPISTAR and ASTAR. Volunteer brain study: compared with each ASL image, the MT effects were cancelled out in EPISTAR and ASTAR. Veins (sagittal sinus etc) disappeared in STAR and ASTAR, but were visible in EPISTAR and FAIR. Perfusion signals were similar in ASTAR and EPISTAR, indicating that both cancellation of MT effects and venous inflow from the opposite side of the tag were suppressed in ASTAR. In conclusion, ASTAR is a practical method to image blood

  5. CAF: Cluster algorithm and a-star with fuzzy approach for lifetime enhancement in wireless sensor networks

    KAUST Repository

    Yuan, Y.; Li, C.; Yang, Y.; Zhang, Xiangliang; Li, L.

    2014-01-01

    Energy is a major factor in designing wireless sensor networks (WSNs). In particular, in the real world, battery energy is limited; thus the effective improvement of the energy becomes the key of the routing protocols. Besides, the sensor nodes are always deployed far away from the base station and the transmission energy consumption is index times increasing with the increase of distance as well. This paper proposes a new routing method for WSNs to extend the network lifetime using a combination of a clustering algorithm, a fuzzy approach, and an A-star method. The proposal is divided into two steps. Firstly, WSNs are separated into clusters using the Stable Election Protocol (SEP) method. Secondly, the combined methods of fuzzy inference and A-star algorithm are adopted, taking into account the factors such as the remaining power, the minimum hops, and the traffic numbers of nodes. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed method has significant effectiveness in terms of balancing energy consumption as well as maximizing the network lifetime by comparing the performance of the A-star and fuzzy (AF) approach, cluster and fuzzy (CF)method, cluster and A-star (CA)method, A-star method, and SEP algorithm under the same routing criteria. 2014 Yali Yuan et al.

  6. CAF: Cluster algorithm and a-star with fuzzy approach for lifetime enhancement in wireless sensor networks

    KAUST Repository

    Yuan, Y.

    2014-04-28

    Energy is a major factor in designing wireless sensor networks (WSNs). In particular, in the real world, battery energy is limited; thus the effective improvement of the energy becomes the key of the routing protocols. Besides, the sensor nodes are always deployed far away from the base station and the transmission energy consumption is index times increasing with the increase of distance as well. This paper proposes a new routing method for WSNs to extend the network lifetime using a combination of a clustering algorithm, a fuzzy approach, and an A-star method. The proposal is divided into two steps. Firstly, WSNs are separated into clusters using the Stable Election Protocol (SEP) method. Secondly, the combined methods of fuzzy inference and A-star algorithm are adopted, taking into account the factors such as the remaining power, the minimum hops, and the traffic numbers of nodes. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed method has significant effectiveness in terms of balancing energy consumption as well as maximizing the network lifetime by comparing the performance of the A-star and fuzzy (AF) approach, cluster and fuzzy (CF)method, cluster and A-star (CA)method, A-star method, and SEP algorithm under the same routing criteria. 2014 Yali Yuan et al.

  7. APLIKASI PENCARIAN JALUR TERPENDEK PADA RUMAH SAKIT UMUM BAHTERAMAS MENGGUNAKAN ALGORITMA A* (A-STAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muh. Yamin

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Pencarian jalur terpendek merupakan suatu permasalahan yang sering terjadi pada pengunjung rumah sakit untuk menemukan gedung atau ruangan yang dicari. Salah satu contohnya adalah pada Rumah Sakit Umum Bahteramas. Karena banyaknya gedung dan ruangan yang ada pada rumah sakit tersebut, mengakibatkan pengunjung kesulitan menemukan gedung dan ruangan yang dicari. Oleh karena itu dibutuhkan sistem yang dapat menunjukkan lokasi gedung dan ruangan beserta jalur terpendeknya, agar waktu pencarian lebih efisien. Terdapat beberapa algoritma pencarian jalur terpendek, salah satunya adalah algoritma A* (A-Star. Algoritma A* menggunakan estimasi jarak terdekat untuk mencapai tujuan (goal dan memiliki nilai heuristik yang digunakan sebagai dasar pertimbangan. Heuristik adalah kriteria, metoda, atau prinsip-prinsip untuk menentukan  pilihan sejumlah alternatif untuk mencapai sasaran dengan efektif. Hasil pada penelitian ini adalah aplikasi yang dapat menentukan jalur terpendek antara gedung dan antara ruangan yang diimplementasikan pada Operating System Android dan dibangun dengan menggunakan bahasa pemrograman Actionscript 3.Kata kunci : algoritma A* (A-Star, android, actionscript 3, jalur terpendek.

  8. Standalone Mobile Application for Shipping Services Based on Geographic Information System and A-Star Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawan, D.; Marzuki, I.; Candra, A.

    2018-03-01

    Geographic Information Systems (GIS) plays an essential role in shipping service related application. By utilizing GIS, the courier can find the route to deliver goods for its customer. This research proposes a standalone mobile application to provide the shortest route to the destinations by utilizing geographic information systems with A-Star algorithm. This application is intended to be used although the area has no Internet network available. The developed application can handle several drop off points then calculates the shortest route that passes through all the drop off points. According to the conducted testing, the number of drop off points that can be calculated is influenced by the specification of the smartphone. More destinations require more smartphone resources and time to process.

  9. Ground-based lidar measurements from Ny-Ålesund during ASTAR 2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Herber

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available During the Arctic Study of Tropospheric Aerosol, Clouds and Radiation (ASTAR in March and April 2007, measurements obtained at the AWIPEV Arctic Research Base in Ny-Ålesund, Spitsbergen at 78.9° N, 11.9° E (operated by the Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research – AWI and the Institut polaire français Paul-Emile Victor – IPEV, supported the airborne campaign. This included lidar data from the Koldewey Aerosol Raman Lidar (KARL and the Micro Pulse Lidar (MPL, located in the atmospheric observatory as well as photometer data and the daily launched radiosonde. The MPL features nearly continuous measurements; the KARL was switched on whenever weather conditions allowed observations (145 h in 61 days. From 1 March to 30 April, 71 meteorological balloon soundings were performed and compared with the concurrent MPL measurements; photometer measurements are available from 18 March. For the KARL data, a statistical overview of particle detection based on their optical properties backscatter ratio and volume depolarization can be given. The altitudes of the occurrence of the named features (subvisible and visible ice and water as well as mixed-phase clouds, aerosol layers as well as their dependence on different air mass origins are analyzed. Although the spring 2007 was characterized by rather clean conditions, diverse case studies of cloud and aerosol occurrence during March and April 2007 are presented in more detail, including temporal development and main optical properties as depolarization, backscatter and extinction coefficients. Links between air mass origins and optical properties can be presumed but need further evidence.

  10. EFSA NDA Panel (EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies), 2014. Scientific Opinion on the safety of astaxanthin-rich ingredients (AstaREAL A1010 and AstaREAL L10) as novel food ingredients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge; Poulsen, Morten

    2014-01-01

    /day. Mean and high-level (95th percentile) daily intakes of 0.106 mg/kg bw and 0.256 mg/kg bw astaxanthin from the NFIs were estimated, based on European consumption data of the proposed food categories. The consumption of the NFIs is not considered to be nutritionally disadvantageous. There are no safety....... The Panel notes that the maximum recommended intake of 4 mg astaxanthin per day (0.06 mg/kg bw) and the estimated mean intake based on the use levels in the proposed food categories (0.106 mg/kg bw per day) exceed the ADI by approximately two- and three-fold, respectively. The Panel therefore concludes......Following a request from the European Commission, the EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA) was asked to deliver a scientific opinion on the safety of astaxanthin-rich ingredients AstaREAL A1010 and AstaREAL L10 as novel food ingredients (NFIs) in the context of Regulation...

  11. Spectral Evidence for an Inner Carbon-rich Circumstellar Belt in the Young HD 36546 A-star System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisse, C. M. [JHU-APL, 11100 Johns Hopkins Road, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States); Sitko, M. L. [Department of Physics, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221-0011 and Space Science Institute, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States); Russell, R. W. [The Aerospace Corporation, Los Angeles, CA 90009 (United States); Marengo, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, 12 Physics Hall, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50010 (United States); Currie, T. [Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, National Institutes of Natural Sciences, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Melis, C. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, University of California, San Diego, CA 92093-0424 (United States); Mittal, T. [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, McCone Hall, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Song, I., E-mail: carey.lisse@jhuapl.edu, E-mail: ron.vervack@jhuapl.edu, E-mail: sitkoml@ucmail.uc.edu, E-mail: ray.russell@aero.org, E-mail: mmarengo@iastate.edu, E-mail: currie@naoj.org, E-mail: cmelis@ucsd.edu, E-mail: tmittal2@berkeley.edu, E-mail: song@physast.uga.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602-2451 (United States)

    2017-05-10

    Using the NASA/IRTF SpeX and BASS spectrometers we have obtained 0.7–13 μ m observations of the newly imaged 3–10 Myr old HD 36546 disk system. The SpeX spectrum is most consistent with the photospheric emission expected from an L {sub *} ∼ 20 L {sub ⊙}, solar abundance A1.5V star with little to no extinction, and excess emission from circumstellar dust detectable beyond 4.5 μ m. Non-detections of CO emission lines and accretion signatures point to the gas-poor circumstellar environment of a very old transition disk. Combining the SpeX + BASS spectra with archival WISE / AKARI / IRAS / Herschel photometry, we find an outer cold dust belt at ∼135 K and 20–40 au from the primary, likely coincident with the disk imaged by Subaru, and a new second inner belt with a temperature ∼570 K and an unusual, broad SED maximum in the 6–9 μ m region, tracing dust at 1.1–2.2 au. An SED maximum at 6–9 μ m has been reported in just two other A-star systems, HD 131488 and HD 121191, both of ∼10 Myr age. From Spitzer , we have also identified the ∼12 Myr old A7V HD 148657 system as having similar 5–35 μ m excess spectral features. The Spitzer data allows us to rule out water emission and rule in carbonaceous materials—organics, carbonates, SiC—as the source of the 6–9 μ m excess. Assuming a common origin for the four young A-star systems’ disks, we suggest they are experiencing an early era of carbon-rich planetesimal processing.

  12. Passive Infrared (PIR)-Based Indoor Position Tracking for Smart Homes Using Accessibility Maps and A-Star Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dan; Xu, Bin; Rao, Kaiyou; Sheng, Weihua

    2018-01-24

    Indoor occupants' positions are significant for smart home service systems, which usually consist of robot service(s), appliance control and other intelligent applications. In this paper, an innovative localization method is proposed for tracking humans' position in indoor environments based on passive infrared (PIR) sensors using an accessibility map and an A-star algorithm, aiming at providing intelligent services. First the accessibility map reflecting the visiting habits of the occupants is established through the integral training with indoor environments and other prior knowledge. Then the PIR sensors, which placement depends on the training results in the accessibility map, get the rough location information. For more precise positioning, the A-start algorithm is used to refine the localization, fused with the accessibility map and the PIR sensor data. Experiments were conducted in a mock apartment testbed. The ground truth data was obtained from an Opti-track system. The results demonstrate that the proposed method is able to track persons in a smart home environment and provide a solution for home robot localization.

  13. Passive Infrared (PIR-Based Indoor Position Tracking for Smart Homes Using Accessibility Maps and A-Star Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Yang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Indoor occupants’ positions are significant for smart home service systems, which usually consist of robot service(s, appliance control and other intelligent applications. In this paper, an innovative localization method is proposed for tracking humans’ position in indoor environments based on passive infrared (PIR sensors using an accessibility map and an A-star algorithm, aiming at providing intelligent services. First the accessibility map reflecting the visiting habits of the occupants is established through the integral training with indoor environments and other prior knowledge. Then the PIR sensors, which placement depends on the training results in the accessibility map, get the rough location information. For more precise positioning, the A-start algorithm is used to refine the localization, fused with the accessibility map and the PIR sensor data. Experiments were conducted in a mock apartment testbed. The ground truth data was obtained from an Opti-track system. The results demonstrate that the proposed method is able to track persons in a smart home environment and provide a solution for home robot localization.

  14. KONYA İLİNDEN ALINAN ÜÇ FARKLI KİL ÖRNEĞİNİN SERAMİK ASTAR YAPIMINDA KULLANILMASININ ARAŞTIRILMASI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mezahir Avsar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Bu çalışmasında; günümüz seramik teknolojisinden yararlanılarak, toprağın doğadan alındığı hali ile astar üretiminde kullanılmasının araştırılması ve bu araştırma sonuçlarının sanatsal seramiğe uygulamasının gerçekleştirilmesi amaçlanmıştır. Bu amaçtan yola çıkılarak, Konya yöresinden alınan üç farklı kil üzerinde çalışılmıştır. Killer pişme rengi beyaz olan düşük dereceli döküm çamurundan yapılan plakalar üzerine astar şeklinde uygulanmıştır. Killere aynı zamanda %30-60 arasında ergitici (Sülyen ve Boraks ilave edilerek bir miktar sırsı özellik kazanmaları sağlanmıştır. Astarlanan plakalar elektrikli fırın ortamında pişirilerek gözlenmiş, olumlu sonuç verenlere raku pişirimi ve sagar pişirimi teknikleri uygulanmıştır. Doku ve renk skalasını genişletmek amacıyla killere %1-3 arasında renklendirici oksit ilave edilmiş ve aynı pişirim şartlarında denenmiştir.

  15. Swelling and tensile properties of EBR-II-irradiated tantalum alloys for space reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossbeck, M.L.; Wiffen, F.W.

    1985-01-01

    The tantalum alloys T-111, ASTAR-811C, Ta-10 W, and unalloyed tantalum were examined following EBR-II irradiation to a fluence of 1.7 x 10 26 neutrons/m 2 (E > 0.1 MeV) at temperatures from 650 to 950 K. Swelling was found to be negligible for all alloys; only tantalum was found to exhibit swelling, 0.36%. Tensile testing revealed that irradiated T-111 and Ta-10 W are susceptible to plastic instability, but ASTAR-811C and tantalum were not. The tensile properties of ASTAR-811C appeared adequate for current SP-100 space nuclear reactor designs. Irradiated, oxygen-doped T-111 exhibited no plastic deformation, and the abrupt failure was intergranular in nature. The absence of plastic instability in ASTAR-811C is encouraging for alloys containing carbide precipitates. These fine precipitates might prevent dislocation channeling, which leads to plastic instability in many bcc metals after irradiation. 10 refs., 13 figs., 8 tabs

  16. Closeout of JOYO-1 Specimen Fabrication Efforts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ME Petrichek; JL Bump; RF Luther

    2005-01-01

    Fabrication was well under way for the JOYO biaxial creep and tensile specimens when the NR Space program was canceled. Tubes of FS-85, ASTAR-811C, and T-111 for biaxial creep specimens had been drawn at True Tube (Paso Robles, CA), while tubes of Mo-47.5 Re were being drawn at Rhenium Alloys (Cleveland, OH). The Mo-47.5 Re tubes are now approximately 95% complete. Their fabrication and the quantities produced will be documented at a later date. End cap material for FS-85, ASTAR-811C, and T-111 had been swaged at Pittsburgh Materials Technology, Inc. (PMTI) (Large, PA) and machined at Vangura (Clairton, PA). Cutting of tubes, pickling, annealing, and laser engraving were in process at PMTI. Several biaxial creep specimen sets of FS-85, ASTAR-811C, and T-111 had already been sent to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for weld development. In addition, tensile specimens of FS-85, ASTAR-811C, T-111, and Mo-47.5 Re had been machined at Kin-Tech (North Huntington, PA). Actual machining of the other specimen types had not been initiated. Flowcharts 1-3 detail the major processing steps each piece of material has experienced. A more detailed description of processing will be provided in a separate document [B-MT(SRME)-51]. Table 1 lists the in-process materials and finished specimens. Also included are current metallurgical condition of these materials and specimens. The available chemical analyses for these alloys at various points in the process are provided in Table 2

  17. Aircraft Route Optimization using the A-Star Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-27

    Map Cost array allows a search for a route that not only seeks to minimize the distance travelled, but also considers other factors that may impact ...Rules (VFR) flight profile requires aviators to plan a 20-minute fuel reserve into the flight while an Instrument Flight Rules ( IFR ) flight profile

  18. US EPA - A*Star Partnership - Accelerating the Acceptance of Next-Generation Sciences and Their Application to Regulatory Risk Assessment (A*Star Symposium, Singapore)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The path for incorporating new alternative methods and technologies into quantitative chemical risk assessment poses a diverse set of scientific challenges. Some of these challenges include development of relevant and predictive test systems and computational models to integrate...

  19. Biaxial Creep Specimen Fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JL Bump; RF Luther

    2006-01-01

    This report documents the results of the weld development and abbreviated weld qualification efforts performed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for refractory metal and superalloy biaxial creep specimens. Biaxial creep specimens were to be assembled, electron beam welded, laser-seal welded, and pressurized at PNNL for both in-pile (JOYO reactor, O-arai, Japan) and out-of-pile creep testing. The objective of this test campaign was to evaluate the creep behavior of primary cladding and structural alloys under consideration for the Prometheus space reactor. PNNL successfully developed electron beam weld parameters for six of these materials prior to the termination of the Naval Reactors program effort to deliver a space reactor for Project Prometheus. These materials were FS-85, ASTAR-811C, T-111, Alloy 617, Haynes 230, and Nirnonic PE16. Early termination of the NR space program precluded the development of laser welding parameters for post-pressurization seal weldments

  20. Biaxial Creep Specimen Fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JL Bump; RF Luther

    2006-02-09

    This report documents the results of the weld development and abbreviated weld qualification efforts performed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for refractory metal and superalloy biaxial creep specimens. Biaxial creep specimens were to be assembled, electron beam welded, laser-seal welded, and pressurized at PNNL for both in-pile (JOYO reactor, O-arai, Japan) and out-of-pile creep testing. The objective of this test campaign was to evaluate the creep behavior of primary cladding and structural alloys under consideration for the Prometheus space reactor. PNNL successfully developed electron beam weld parameters for six of these materials prior to the termination of the Naval Reactors program effort to deliver a space reactor for Project Prometheus. These materials were FS-85, ASTAR-811C, T-111, Alloy 617, Haynes 230, and Nirnonic PE16. Early termination of the NR space program precluded the development of laser welding parameters for post-pressurization seal weldments.

  1. A Socially Inclusive A-Star Is Only Possible through the Understanding of Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draper, Ciara; Houghton, Jack; Read, Beth; Bird, Danny; Tatten, J. J.

    2016-01-01

    This article is written by young people who attend an open-access youth project in the city centre of Hull. Although they describe themselves as "educational failures" (the "black holes"), they argue that they have a significant contribution to make to discussions about how to develop socially just education in schools. In the…

  2. EXTENSION PGROUTING A-STAR UNTUK MENAMPILKAN KEMIRINGAN JALAN KENDARAAN ANGKUT DI TAMBANG TERBUKA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuri Rahmawati

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Dalam perkembangan Sistem Informasi Geografis (SIG dapat dijadikan sebagai alat bantu dalam menentukan rute jalur jalan dari suatu lokasi menuju lokasi lain, seperti penentuan rute dengan menggunakan extension pgRouting. Extension pgRouting ini dapat memecahkan masalah dari kelemahan penggambaran, perhitungan, dan penganalisa kemiringan dan jarak jalur jalan kendaraan angkut tambang terbukayang digunakan pada seksi survei tambang (Mine Survey Section Distrik Anugerah Bara Kaltim Loa Janan (ABKL PT Pamapersada Nusantara (PAMA. Pada penelitian ini extension pgRouting akan diterapkan untuk menganalisa jalur jalan kendaraan angkut yang lebih otomatis. Metode yang digunakan pada extension pgRouting penelitian ini adalah algoritmaa-star (A*. Extension pgRouting dapat menampilkan kemiringan dan jarak jalur jalan kendaraan angkut secara otomatis yang memiliki kemiringan diatas 8% jalur jalan yang dilalui kendaraan angkut. Tetapi pgRouting memiliki kelemahan pada parameter yang digunakan koordinat X dan Y saja, sementara untuk mendapatkan nilai kemiringan jalur jalan kendaraan angkut dibutuhkan parameter koordinat Z. Memodifikasi pgRouting 2D menjadi pgRouting 3D adalah metode yang dapat digunakan untuk memecahkan kelemahan metode extension pgRouting tersebut untuk membantu membaca parameter koordinat Z. Hasil penelitian ini adalah profil melintang rute jalur jalan kendaraan angkut dan update kolom geometri rute jalur kendaraan angkut tiap-tiap jenis kendaraan.

  3. Polarized light from Sagittarius A(star) in the near-infrared K-s-band

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Shahzamanian, B.; Eckart, A.; Valencia-S, M.; Witzel, G.; Zamaninasab, M.; Sabha, N.; García-Marín, M.; Karas, Vladimír; Karssen, G.; Borkar, A.; Dovčiak, Michal; Kunneriath, Devaky; Bursa, Michal; Buchholz, R. M.; Moultaka, J.; Straubmeier, C.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 576, April (2015), A20/1-A20/18 ISSN 0004-6361 Grant - others:EU(XE) COST Action MP0905; EU(XE) COST action MP1104 Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : black hole physics * accretion disks * galaxy center Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 4.378, year: 2014

  4. ATM Technology Demonstration 1 (ATD-1): EcoDemonstrator ASTAR Guided Arrival Research (EAGAR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roper, Roy

    2015-01-01

    In Spring 2013, high level NASA and Boeing management were seeking opportunities to collaborate on a flight test activity involving the ecoDemonstrator. The Airspace Systems Program Office identified FIM as a viable candidate. ATD-1 accepted the challenge. Work began in July for a December 2013 flight test.

  5. Algorithm for Surface of Translation Attached Radiators (A-STAR). Volume III. Computer Codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-05-01

    MULTR t SPORT ONFRBP K8 BPP ALP TEt M;M: III ::CSoSPIII 111448C CAP-WIRE. 440 78 (KeQ 1l) REAMI) IY(I)oIllLCWI 44 ML ZE O(LCZ.LECCTO 14 CLL ZER0(LC 24...PI6O SPTZ" 160) 4 ON11 K11 T61 EpKUI fAu 5,495 NM f.M PTvBAN0 IDA 藉 NP49 FuRNA 311 48 FORMS ~I NMDE PTADN NBAND NPPIP4181 N1111 13 46 3’.8o WRITE(6

  6. CLEM1-LUN/EAR/SKY-ASTAR/BSTAR/UVVIS/HRES/LWIR/NIR-2-EDR-V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Clementine EDR (Engineering Data Record) Image Archive contains 88 CD-ROM volumes with more than 1.9 million images. Each volume contains approximately 3 lunar...

  7. ESTAR, PSTAR, ASTAR. A PC package for calculating stopping powers and ranges of electrons, protons and helium ions. Version 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, M.J.

    1993-01-01

    A PC package is documented for calculating stopping powers and ranges of electrons, protons and helium ions in matter for energies from 1 keV up to 10 GeV. Stopping powers and ranges for electrons can be calculated for any element, compound or mixture. Stopping powers and ranges of protons and helium ions can be calculated for 74 materials (26 elements and 48 compounds and mixtures). The files are stored on two HD diskettes in compressed form. Both executable files for IBM PC and Fortran-77 source files are provided. All three programs require 5.2 Mb of disk space. This set of two diskettes with detailed documentation is available upon request, cost free, from the IAEA Nuclear Data Section. (author). 25 refs, 4 tabs

  8. MASCARA-2 b. A hot Jupiter transiting the mV = 7.6 A-star HD 185603

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talens, G. J. J.; Justesen, A. B.; Albrecht, S.; McCormac, J.; Van Eylen, V.; Otten, G. P. P. L.; Murgas, F.; Palle, E.; Pollacco, D.; Stuik, R.; Spronck, J. F. P.; Lesage, A.-L.; Grundahl, F.; Fredslund Andersen, M.; Antoci, V.; Snellen, I. A. G.

    2018-04-01

    In this paper we present MASCARA-2 b, a hot Jupiter transiting the mV = 7.6 A2 star HD 185603. Since early 2015, MASCARA has taken more than 1.6 million flux measurements of the star, corresponding to a total of almost 3000 h of observations, revealing a periodic dimming in the flux with a depth of 1.3%. Photometric follow-up observations were performed with the NITES and IAC80 telescopes and spectroscopic measurements were obtained with the Hertzsprung SONG telescope. We find MASCARA-2 b orbits HD 185603 with a period of 3.4741119-0.000006+0.000005 at a distance of 0.057 ± 0.006 au, has a radius of 1.83 ± 0.07 RJ and place a 99% upper limit on the mass of http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/612/A57

  9. Processing of Refractory Metal Alloys for JOYO Irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RF Luther; ME Petrichek

    2006-01-01

    This is a summary of the refractory metal processing experienced by candidate Prometheus materiats as they were fabricated into specimens destined for testing within the JOYO test reactor, ex-reactor testing at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), or testing within the NRPCT. The processing is described for each alloy from the point of inception to the point where processing was terminated due to the cancellation of Naval Reactor's involvement in the Prometheus Project. The alloys included three tantalum-base alloys (T-111, Ta-10W, and ASTAR-811C), a niobium-base alloy, (FS-85), and two molybdenum-rhenium alloys, one containing 44.5 w/o rhenium, and the other 47.5 w/o rhenium. Each of these alloys was either a primary candidate or back-up candidate for cladding and structural applications within the space reactor. Their production was intended to serve as a forerunner for large scale production ingots that were to be procured from commercial refractory metal vendors such as Wah Chang

  10. Technology for Bayton-cycle powerplants using solar and nuclear energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, R. E.

    1986-01-01

    Brayton cycle gas turbines have the potential to use either solar heat or nuclear reactors for generating from tens of kilowatts to tens of megawatts of power in space, all this from a single technology for the power generating system. Their development for solar energy dynamic power generation for the space station could be the first step in an evolution of such powerplants for a very wide range of applications. At the low power level of only 10 kWe, a power generating system has already demonstrated overall efficiency of 0.29 and operated 38 000 hr. Tests of improved components show that these components would raise that efficiency to 0.32, a value twice that demonstrated by any alternate concept. Because of this high efficiency, solar Brayton cycle power generators offer the potential to increase power per unit of solar collector area to levels exceeding four times that from photovoltaic powerplants using present technology for silicon solar cells. The technologies for solar mirrors and heat receivers are reviewed and assessed. This Brayton technology for solar powerplants is equally suitable for use with the nuclear reactors. The available long time creep data on the tantalum alloy ASTAR-811C show that such Brayton cycles can evolve to cycle peak temperatures of 1500 K (2240 F). And this same technology can be extended to generate 10 to 100 MW in space by exploiting existing technology for terrestrial gas turbines in the fields of both aircraft propulsion and stationary power generation.

  11. Interdiffusion behavior of tungsten or rhenium and group 5 and 6 elements and alloys of the periodic table, part 1. [at dissimilar metal joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcella, F. G.

    1974-01-01

    Arc cast W, CVD W, CVD Re, and powder metallurgy Re materials were hot isostatically pressure welded to ten different refractory metals and alloys (Cb, Cb-1Zr, Ta, Ta-10W, T-111, ASTAR-811C, W-25Re, Mo-50Re, W-30Re-20Mo, ect.) and thermally aged at 10 to the minus 8th power torr at 1200, 1500, 1630, 1800, and 2000 C for 100 to 2000 hours. Electron beam microprobe analysis was used to characterize the interdiffusion zone width of each couple system as a function of age time and temperature. Extrapolations of interdiffusion zone thickness to 10,000 hours were made. Classic interdiffusion analysis was performed for several of the systems by Boltzmann-Matano analysis. A method of inhibiting Kirkendall voids from forming during thermal ageing of dissimilar metal junctions was devised and experimentally demonstrated. An electron beam weld study of Cb-1Zr to Re and W-25Re demonstrated the limited acceptability of these welds.

  12. Load-carrying capabilities of refractory alloys for space reactor power applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horak, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    To achieve sufficient thermodynamic efficiency, space nuclear power systems must operate above 1000 0 C. A quantitative evaluation of the existing mechanical properties data for the refractory alloys relevant to space nuclear power systems design lifetimes up to seven years at temperatures up to 1400 0 C is being conducted. The most important properties for space nuclear power systems are long-term high-temperature (>1000 0 C) creep strength and ductility, low-temperature ( 0 C) fracture toughness [including ductile-to-brittle transition temperature, (DBTT)], and ductility at high strain rates; of special concern are the above properties for weldments of refractory alloys, composition, applied stress, test temperature, test environment (e.g., vacuum, lithium), and thermomechanical treatment (TMT) history. Currently being evaluated are, in order of ascending mp, selected alloys of niobium (e.g., Nb-1% Zr, Nb-1% Zr-0.1% C), molybdenum (e.g., Mo-13% Re), tantalum (e.g., ASTAR-811C), and tungsten (e.g., CVD W and W-25% Re). Creep properties of these alloys have been correlated via Larson-Miller, Manson-Hafered, and other empirical parameters; creep equations have been developed from these correlations. 12 figs., 8 tabs

  13. MASCARA-1 b. A hot Jupiter transiting a bright mV = 8.3 A-star in a misaligned orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talens, G. J. J.; Albrecht, S.; Spronck, J. F. P.; Lesage, A.-L.; Otten, G. P. P. L.; Stuik, R.; Van Eylen, V.; Van Winckel, H.; Pollacco, D.; McCormac, J.; Grundahl, F.; Fredslund Andersen, M.; Antoci, V.; Snellen, I. A. G.

    2017-10-01

    We report the discovery of MASCARA-1 b, which is the first exoplanet discovered with the Multi-site All-Sky CAmeRA (MASCARA). This exoplanet is a hot Jupiter orbiting a bright mV = 8.3, rapidly rotating (vsini⋆ > 100 km s-1) A8 star with a period of 2.148780 ± 8 × 10-6 days. The planet has a mass and radius of 3.7 ± 0.9 MJup and 1.5 ± 0.3 RJup, respectively. As with most hot Jupiters transiting early-type stars, we find a misalignment between the planet orbital axis and the stellar spin axis, which may be a signature of the formation and migration histories of this family of planets. MASCARA-1 b has a mean density of 1.5 ± 0.9 g cm-3 and an equilibrium temperature of 2570+50-30K, that is one of the highest temperatures known for a hot Jupiter to date. The system is reminiscent of WASP-33, but the host star lacks apparent delta-scuti variations, making the planet an ideal target for atmospheric characterization. We expect this to be the first of a series of hot Jupiters transiting bright early-type stars that will be discovered by MASCARA. Tables of the photometry and the reduced spectra as FITS files are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/606/A73

  14. 75 FR 57544 - Notice of Applications for Certificates of Public Convenience and Necessity and Foreign Air...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-21

    ... Public Convenience and Necessity and Foreign Air Carrier Permits Filed under Subpart B (Formerly Subpart... Convenience and Necessity and Foreign Air Carrier Permits were filed under Subpart B (formerly Subpart Q) of... the transfer from ASTAR to AUSA of ASTAR's certificates of public convenience and necessity...

  15. Functional characterization of the dual allatostatin-A receptors in mosquitoes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christ, Peter; Hill, Sharon R.; Schachtner, Joachim

    2018-01-01

    , there are two copies of AstAR, contrasting with the single copy found in other insects. In this study, we identified and cloned the dual AstAR system of two important disease vectors Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus, and compared them with those previously described, including those in Anopheles...

  16. Novikov-Jordan algebras

    OpenAIRE

    Dzhumadil'daev, A. S.

    2002-01-01

    Algebras with identity $(a\\star b)\\star (c\\star d) -(a\\star d)\\star(c\\star b)$ $=(a,b,c)\\star d-(a,d,c)\\star b$ are studied. Novikov algebras under Jordan multiplication and Leibniz dual algebras satisfy this identity. If algebra with such identity has unit, then it is associative and commutative.

  17. Airborne Precision Spacing (APS) Dependent Parallel Arrivals (DPA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Colin L.

    2012-01-01

    The Airborne Precision Spacing (APS) team at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) has been developing a concept of operations to extend the current APS concept to support dependent approaches to parallel or converging runways along with the required pilot and controller procedures and pilot interfaces. A staggered operations capability for the Airborne Spacing for Terminal Arrival Routes (ASTAR) tool was developed and designated as ASTAR10. ASTAR10 has reached a sufficient level of maturity to be validated and tested through a fast-time simulation. The purpose of the experiment was to identify and resolve any remaining issues in the ASTAR10 algorithm, as well as put the concept of operations through a practical test.

  18. Experimental Design for Evaluation of Co-extruded Refractory Metal/Nickel Base Superalloy Joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ME Petrichek

    2005-01-01

    Prior to the restructuring of the Prometheus Program, the NRPCT was tasked with delivering a nuclear space reactor. Potential NRPCT nuclear space reactor designs for the Prometheus Project required dissimilar materials to be in contact with each other while operating at extreme temperatures under irradiation. As a result of the high reactor core temperatures, refractory metals were the primary candidates for many of the reactor structural and cladding components. They included the tantalum-base alloys ASTAR-811C and Ta-10W, the niobium-base alloy FS-85, and the molybdenum base alloys Moly 41-47.5 Rhenium. The refractory metals were to be joined to candidate nickel base alloys such as Haynes 230, Alloy 617, or Nimonic PE 16 either within the core if the nickel-base alloys were ultimately selected to form the outer core barrel, or at a location exterior to the core if the nickel-base alloys were limited to components exterior to the core. To support the need for dissimilar metal joints in the Prometheus Project, a co-extrusion experiment was proposed. There are several potential methods for the formation of dissimilar metal joints, including explosive bonding, friction stir welding, plasma spray, inertia welding, HIP, and co-extrusion. Most of these joining methods are not viable options because they result in the immediate formation of brittle intermetallics. Upon cooling, intermetallics form in the weld fusion zone between the joined metals. Because brittle intermetallics do not form during the initial bonding process associated with HIP, co-extrusion, and explosive bonding, these three joining procedures are preferred for forming dissimilar metal joints. In reference to a Westinghouse Astronuclear Laboratory report done under a NASA sponsored program, joints that were fabricated between similar materials via explosive bonding had strengths that were directly affected by the width of the diffusion barrier. It was determined that the diffusion zone should not exceed

  19. Design and performance analysis of global path planning techniques for autonomous mobile robots in grid environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imen Chaari

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the results of the 2-year iroboapp research project that aims at devising path planning algorithms for large grid maps with much faster execution times while tolerating very small slacks with respect to the optimal path. We investigated both exact and heuristic methods. We contributed with the design, analysis, evaluation, implementation and experimentation of several algorithms for grid map path planning for both exact and heuristic methods. We also designed an innovative algorithm called relaxed A-star that has linear complexity with relaxed constraints, which provides near-optimal solutions with an extremely reduced execution time as compared to A-star. We evaluated the performance of the different algorithms and concluded that relaxed A-star is the best path planner as it provides a good trade-off among all the metrics, but we noticed that heuristic methods have good features that can be exploited to improve the solution of the relaxed exact method. This led us to design new hybrid algorithms that combine our relaxed A-star with heuristic methods which improve the solution quality of relaxed A-star at the cost of slightly higher execution time, while remaining much faster than A* for large-scale problems. Finally, we demonstrate how to integrate the relaxed A-star algorithm in the robot operating system as a global path planner and show that it outperforms its default path planner with an execution time 38% faster on average.

  20. A propósito de la anastylosis infográfica del Carambolo. Diálogo teórico y metodológico sobre la Arqueología Virtual

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ángeles Hernández-Barahona

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The virtual reconstruction of the adobe building located in El Carambolo (Camas, Seville, a complex sanctuary devoted to the goddess Astaré, has meant a methodological and theoretical reflection about how to carry out the most suitable reconstruction proposal. This paper shows briefly this scientific experience, developed by experts on both infography and virtual reality, and Phoenician archaeology.

  1. SwissProt search result: AK242832 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242832 J090067L13 (Q811C2) Cysteine protease APG4C (EC 3.4.22.-) (Autophagy 4 homolog C) (Auto...phagin-3) (Autophagy-related cysteine endopeptidase 3) (AUT-like 3 cysteine endopeptidase) APG4C_MOUSE 4e-37 ...

  2. Blackjack

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    astar (C++) path finding algorithms.  bwaves (Fortran) simulation of blast waves in 3D transonic transient laminar viscous flow.  bzip2 (C) in...search based on Profile Hidden Markov Models.  lbm (C) implementation of Lattice Boltzman Method for simulation of incompressible fluids in 3D...to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE

  3. Atomic and molecular data for radiotherapy and radiation research. Final report of a co-ordinated research programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-05-01

    The report includes 9 chapters and an appendix: Development of particle therapy in cancer management. Expectations and justification of the heavy-ion therapy programs; Ionization by fast charged particles; Electron collision cross sections; Low energy electron interaction with condensed matter; Photoabsorption, photoionization, and photodissociation cross sections; Collision processes between ions and excited neutrals and surrounding molecules; Stopping powers, ranges, and straggling; Yields of ionization and excitation in irradiated matter; Track structure quantities; ESTAR, PSTAR, and ASTAR: computer programs for calculating stopping powers and ranges for electrons, protons, and helium ions (appendix). A separate abstract was prepared for each chapter. Refs, figs and tabs.

  4. Atomic and molecular data for radiotherapy and radiation research. Final report of a co-ordinated research programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-05-01

    The report includes 9 chapters and an appendix: Development of particle therapy in cancer management. Expectations and justification of the heavy-ion therapy programs; Ionization by fast charged particles; Electron collision cross sections; Low energy electron interaction with condensed matter; Photoabsorption, photoionization, and photodissociation cross sections; Collision processes between ions and excited neutrals and surrounding molecules; Stopping powers, ranges, and straggling; Yields of ionization and excitation in irradiated matter; Track structure quantities; ESTAR, PSTAR, and ASTAR: computer programs for calculating stopping powers and ranges for electrons, protons, and helium ions (appendix). A separate abstract was prepared for each chapter. Refs, figs and tabs

  5. Stroemgren and BV photometry of potential halo blue horizontal branch field stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flynn, C; Sommer-Larsen, J

    1988-11-01

    Stroemgren four-colour and broadband BV photoelectric photometry has been obtained for a sample of potential halo blue horizontal branch stars in two high galactic latitude fields. The large majority of the stars observed are classified as blue horizontal branch stars on the basis of two different surface gravity indicators. Measurements of Ca K-line equivalent widths from medium-dispersion spectra of the stars confirm that most are Population II objects. No metal-rich A-stars were found beyond a few kpc from the galactic disc in the study of faint blue stars.

  6. Neighboring and Connectivity-Aware Routing in VANETs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huma Ghafoor

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel position-based routing protocol anchor-based connectivity-aware routing (ACAR for vehicular ad hoc networks (VANETs is proposed in this paper to ensure connectivity of routes with more successfully delivered packets. Both buses and cars are considered as vehicular nodes running in both clockwise and anticlockwise directions in a city scenario. Both directions are taken into account for faster communication. ACAR is a hybrid protocol, using both the greedy forwarding approach and the store-carry-and-forward approach to minimize the packet drop rate on the basis of certain assumptions. Our solution to situations that occur when the network is sparse and when any (source or intermediate node has left its initial position makes this protocol different from those existing in the literature. We consider only vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V communication in which both the source and destination nodes are moving vehicles. Also, no road-side units are considered. Finally, we compare our protocol with A-STAR (a plausible connectivity-aware routing protocol for city environments, and simulation results in NS-2 show improvement in the number of packets delivered to the destination using fewer hops. Also, we show that ACAR has more successfully-delivered long-distance packets with reasonable packet delay than A-STAR.

  7. Random Fill Cache Architecture (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    h264ref sjeng milc hmmer lbm libquantum M P K I [0,0] [0,1] [0,3] [0,7] [0,15] [0,31] [-1,0] [-2,1] [-4,3] [-8,7] [-16,15](a) 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1 1.1 1.2 1.3...1.4 1.5 1.6 astar bzip2 h264ref sjeng milc hmmer lbm libquantum N o rm al iz e d IP C [0,0] [0,1] [0,3] [0,7] [0,15] [0,31] [-1,0] [-2,1] [-4,3...perform well under demand fetch. For example, lots of irregular streaming access patterns can be found in libquantum and lbm , which shows wider spatial

  8. A Variational Statistical-Field Theory for Polar Liquid Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Bilin; Wang, Zhen-Gang

    Using a variational field-theoretic approach, we derive a molecularly-based theory for polar liquid mixtures. The resulting theory consists of simple algebraic expressions for the free energy of mixing and the dielectric constant as functions of mixture composition. Using only the dielectric constants and the molar volumes of the pure liquid constituents, the theory evaluates the mixture dielectric constants in good agreement with the experimental values for a wide range of liquid mixtures, without using adjustable parameters. In addition, the theory predicts that liquids with similar dielectric constants and molar volumes dissolve well in each other, while sufficient disparity in these parameters result in phase separation. The calculated miscibility map on the dielectric constant-molar volume axes agrees well with known experimental observations for a large number of liquid pairs. Thus the theory provides a quantification for the well-known empirical ``like-dissolves-like'' rule. Bz acknowledges the A-STAR fellowship for the financial support.

  9. ESHOPPS: A COMPUTATIONAL TOOL TO AID THE TEACHING OF SHORTEST PATH ALGORITHMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. J. de A. LIMA

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The development of a computational tool called EShoPPS – Environment for Shortest Path Problem Solving, which is used to assist students in understanding the working of Dijkstra, Greedy search and A*(star algorithms is presented in this paper. Such algorithms are commonly taught in graduate and undergraduate courses of Engineering and Informatics and are used for solving many optimization problems that can be characterized as Shortest Path Problem. The EShoPPS is an interactive tool that allows students to create a graph representing the problem and also helps in developing their knowledge of each specific algorithm. Experiments performed with 155 students of undergraduate and graduate courses such as Industrial Engineering, Computer Science and Information Systems have shown that by using the EShoPPS tool students were able to improve their interpretation of investigated algorithms.

  10. A Shear Strain Route Dependency of Martensite Formation in 316L Stainless Steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Suk Hoon; Kim, Tae Kyu; Jang, Jinsung; Oh, Kyu Hwan

    2015-06-01

    In this study, the effect of simple shearing on microstructure evolution and mechanical properties of 316L austenitic stainless steel were investigated. Two different shear strain routes were obtained by twisting cylindrical specimens in the forward and backward directions. The strain-induced martensite phase was effectively obtained by alteration of the routes. Formation of the martensite phase clearly resulted in significant hardening of the steel. Grain-size reduction and strain-induced martensitic transformation within the deformed structures of the strained specimens were characterized by scanning electron microscopy - electron back-scattered diffraction, X-ray diffraction, and the TEM-ASTAR (transmission electron microscopy - analytical scanning transmission atomic resolution, automatic crystal orientation/phase mapping for TEM) system. Significant numbers of twin networks were formed by alteration of the shear strain routes, and the martensite phases were nucleated at the twin interfaces.

  11. Design and synthesis of enantiomerically enriched, radiolabeled MK-801 analogs as potential radiotracers for imaging and autoradiographic studies of the NMDA receptor-ion channel complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eng, W.S.; Burns, H.D.; Gibson, R.E.; Ransom, R.W.; Thorpe, H.; Fioravanit, C.; Britcher, S.F.; Magill, C.A.; Solomon, H.F.; Dannals, R.F.; Wilson, A.A.; Ravert, H.T.; Wagner, H.N.

    1989-01-01

    MK-801 is a potent, non-competitive antagonist for the N-methyl-D-asspartate (NMDA) receptor-ion channel complex. This complex is though to be involved in nerve cell damage in stroke patients when excess calcium is released through the activated channel. A thorough understanding of drug interactions with the NMDA receptor complex could lead to improved therapy for reducing hypoxic-ischemic neuronal injuries in stroke patients. Based on the results of extensive structure-activity studies, the authors have developed several enantiomerically enriched, radiolabeled analogs of MK-801, including: 3-1231-MK-801 for Single Photon Emission Computed tomography (SPECT); 3-1251-MK-801 for in-vivo and in-vitro autoradiography; 8-11C-MeO-MK-801 for Positron Emission Tomography (PET). Details of the synthesis of these radiotracers and their application to both in-vitro and in-vivo studies are described

  12. Trace metal analysis in arctic aerosols by an inductively coupled plasma-time of flight-mass spectrometer combined with an inductively heated vaporizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luedke, Christian; Skole, Jochen; Taubner, Kerstin; Kriews, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Two newly developed instruments were combined to analyze the trace metal content in size separated arctic aerosols during the measurement campaign ASTAR 2004 (Arctic Study of Tropospheric Aerosols, Clouds and Radiation 2004) at Spitsbergen in May-June 2004. The aim of this extensive aerosol measurement campaign was to obtain a database for model-calculations of arctic aerosol, which play an important role in the global climate change. The ASTAR project was centered on two aircraft measurement campaigns, scheduled from 2004 to 2005, addressing both aerosol and cloud measurements, combined with ground-based and satellite observations. In the present paper one example for the analysis of ground-based aerosol particles is described. The sampling of aerosol particles was performed in a well-known manner by impaction of the particles on cleaned graphite targets. By means of a cascade impactor eight size classes between 0.35 and 16.6 μm aerodynamic diameters were separated. To analyze the metal content in the aerosol particles the targets were rapidly heated up to 2700 deg. C in an inductively heated vaporizer system (IHVS). An argon flow transports the vaporized sample material into the inductively coupled plasma (ICP) used as ionization source for the time of flight-mass spectrometer (TOF-MS). The simultaneous extraction of the ions from the plasma, as realized in the TOF instrument, allows to obtain the full mass spectrum of the sample during the vaporization pulse without any limitation in the number of elements detected. With optimized experimental parameters the element content in arctic aerosol particles was determined in a mass range between 7 Li and 209 Bi. Comparing the size distribution of the elemental content of the aerosol particles, two different meteorological situations were verified. For calibration acidified reference solutions were placed on the cleaned target inside the IHVS. The limits of detection (LOD) for the element mass on the target range

  13. Cloud phase identification of Arctic boundary-layer clouds from airborne spectral reflection measurements: test of three approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ehrlich

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Arctic boundary-layer clouds were investigated with remote sensing and in situ instruments during the Arctic Study of Tropospheric Aerosol, Clouds and Radiation (ASTAR campaign in March and April 2007. The clouds formed in a cold air outbreak over the open Greenland Sea. Beside the predominant mixed-phase clouds pure liquid water and ice clouds were observed. Utilizing measurements of solar radiation reflected by the clouds three methods to retrieve the thermodynamic phase of the cloud are introduced and compared. Two ice indices IS and IP were obtained by analyzing the spectral pattern of the cloud top reflectance in the near infrared (1500–1800 nm wavelength spectral range which is characterized by ice and water absorption. While IS analyzes the spectral slope of the reflectance in this wavelength range, IS utilizes a principle component analysis (PCA of the spectral reflectance. A third ice index IA is based on the different side scattering of spherical liquid water particles and nonspherical ice crystals which was recorded in simultaneous measurements of spectral cloud albedo and reflectance.

    Radiative transfer simulations show that IS, IP and IA range between 5 to 80, 0 to 8 and 1 to 1.25 respectively with lowest values indicating pure liquid water clouds and highest values pure ice clouds. The spectral slope ice index IS and the PCA ice index IP are found to be strongly sensitive to the effective diameter of the ice crystals present in the cloud. Therefore, the identification of mixed-phase clouds requires a priori knowledge of the ice crystal dimension. The reflectance-albedo ice index IA is mainly dominated by the uppermost cloud layer (τ<1.5. Therefore, typical boundary-layer mixed-phase clouds with a liquid cloud top layer will

  14. BEER ANALYSIS OF KEPLER AND CoRoT LIGHT CURVES. IV. DISCOVERY OF FOUR NEW LOW-MASS WHITE DWARF COMPANIONS IN THE KEPLER DATA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faigler, S.; Kull, I.; Mazeh, T.; Kiefer, F. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Raymond and Beverly Sackler Faculty of Exact Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Latham, D. W. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Bloemen, S. [Department of Astrophysics, IMAPP, Radboud University Nijmegen, P.O. BOX 9010, NL-6500 GL Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2015-12-10

    We report the discovery of four short-period eclipsing systems in the Kepler light curves, consisting of an A-star primary and a low-mass white dwarf (WD) secondary (dA+WD)—KIC 4169521, KOI-3818, KIC 2851474, and KIC 9285587. The systems show BEaming, Ellipsoidal and Reflection (BEER) phase modulations together with primary and secondary eclipses. These add to the 6 Kepler and 18 WASP short-period eclipsing dA+WD binaries that were previously known. The light curves, together with follow-up spectroscopic observations, allow us to derive the masses, radii, and effective temperatures of the two components of the four systems. The orbital periods, of 1.17–3.82 days, and WD masses, of 0.19–0.22 M{sub ⊙}, are similar to those of the previously known systems. The WD radii of KOI-3818, KIC 2851474, and KIC 9285587 are 0.026, 0.035, and 0.026 R{sub ⊙}, respectively, the smallest WD radii derived so far for short-period eclipsing dA+WD binaries. These three binaries extend the previously known population to older systems with cooler and smaller WD secondaries. KOI-3818 displays evidence for a fast-rotating primary and a minute but significant eccentricity, ∼1.5 × 10{sup −3}. These features are probably the outcome of the mass-transfer process.

  15. Status of development and verification of the CTFD code FLUBOX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graf, U.; Paradimitriou, P.

    2004-01-01

    The Computational Two-Fluid Dynamics (CTFD) code FLUBOX is developed at GRS for the multidimensional simulation of two-phase flows. FLUBOX will also be used as a multidimensional module for the German system code ATHLET. The Benchmark test cases of the European ASTAR project were used to verify the ability of the code FLUBOX to calculate typical two-phase flow phenomena and conditions: void and pressure wave propagation, phase transitions, countercurrent flows, sharp interface movements, compressible (vapour) and nearly incompressible (water) conditions, thermal and mechanical non-equilibrium, stiff source terms due to mass and heat transfer between the phases. Realistic simulations of two-phase require beside the pure conservation equations additional transport equations for the interfacial area, turbulent energy and dissipation. A transport equation for the interfacial area density covering the whole two-phase flow range is in development. First validation calculations are presented in the paper. Turbulent shear stress for two-phase flows will be modelled by the development of transport equations for the turbulent kinetic energy and the turbulent dissipation rate. The development of the transport equations is mainly based on first principles on bubbles or drops and is largely free from empiricism. (author)

  16. TWO NEW TIDALLY DISTORTED WHITE DWARFS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermes, J. J.; Montgomery, M. H.; Winget, D. E. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Kilic, Mukremin [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, 440 W. Brooks St., Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Brown, Warren R., E-mail: jjhermes@astro.as.utexas.edu [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden St, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2012-04-10

    We identify two new tidally distorted white dwarfs (WDs), SDSS J174140.49+652638.7 and J211921.96-001825.8 (hereafter J1741 and J2119). Both stars are extremely low mass (ELM, {<=} 0.2 M{sub Sun }) WDs in short-period, detached binary systems. High-speed photometric observations obtained at the McDonald Observatory reveal ellipsoidal variations and Doppler beaming in both systems; J1741, with a minimum companion mass of 1.1 M{sub Sun }, has one of the strongest Doppler beaming signals ever observed in a binary system (0.59% {+-} 0.06% amplitude). We use the observed ellipsoidal variations to constrain the radius of each WD. For J1741, the star's radius must exceed 0.074 R{sub Sun }. For J2119, the radius exceeds 0.10 R{sub Sun }. These indirect radius measurements are comparable to the radius measurements for the bloated WD companions to A-stars found by the Kepler spacecraft, and they constitute some of the largest radii inferred for any WD. Surprisingly, J1741 also appears to show a 0.23% {+-} 0.06% reflection effect, and we discuss possible sources for this excess heating. Both J1741 and J2119 are strong gravitational wave sources, and the time-of-minimum of the ellipsoidal variations can be used to detect the orbital period decay. This may be possible on a timescale of a decade or less.

  17. Route Generation for a Synthetic Character (BOT) Using a Partial or Incomplete Knowledge Route Generation Algorithm in UT2004 Virtual Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanold, Gregg T.; Hanold, David T.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a new Route Generation Algorithm that accurately and realistically represents human route planning and navigation for Military Operations in Urban Terrain (MOUT). The accuracy of this algorithm in representing human behavior is measured using the Unreal Tournament(Trademark) 2004 (UT2004) Game Engine to provide the simulation environment in which the differences between the routes taken by the human player and those of a Synthetic Agent (BOT) executing the A-star algorithm and the new Route Generation Algorithm can be compared. The new Route Generation Algorithm computes the BOT route based on partial or incomplete knowledge received from the UT2004 game engine during game play. To allow BOT navigation to occur continuously throughout the game play with incomplete knowledge of the terrain, a spatial network model of the UT2004 MOUT terrain is captured and stored in an Oracle 11 9 Spatial Data Object (SOO). The SOO allows a partial data query to be executed to generate continuous route updates based on the terrain knowledge, and stored dynamic BOT, Player and environmental parameters returned by the query. The partial data query permits the dynamic adjustment of the planned routes by the Route Generation Algorithm based on the current state of the environment during a simulation. The dynamic nature of this algorithm more accurately allows the BOT to mimic the routes taken by the human executing under the same conditions thereby improving the realism of the BOT in a MOUT simulation environment.

  18. From Porous to Dense Nanostructured β-Ti alloys through High-Pressure Torsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afonso, Conrado R M; Amigó, Angelica; Stolyarov, Vladimir; Gunderov, Dmitri; Amigó, Vicente

    2017-10-19

    β-Ti alloys have low elastic modulus, good specific strength and high corrosion resistance for biomaterial applications. Noble elements, such as Nb, Ta and Mo, are used to obtain β-Ti due to their chemical biocompatibility. However, due to their refractory nature, β-Ti requires specific processing routes. Powder metallurgy (P/M) allows for the development of new β-Ti alloys with decreasing costs, but dealing with high-elemental-content alloys can lead to a lack of diffusion and grain growth. One method to refine the structure and improve mechanical properties is a severe plastic deformation technique through high-pressure torsion (HPT). The aim of this work was to evaluate the conversion of P/M porous β-Ti-35Nb-10Ta-xFe alloys to dense nanostructures through high-pressure torsion in one deformation step and the influence of the structure variation on the properties and microstructure. TEM analysis and ASTAR crystallographic mapping was utilized to characterize the nanostructures, and the properties of P/M β Ti-35Nb-10Ta-xFe alloys processed by HPT were compared. The initial microstructure consisted mainly by the β-Ti phase with some α-Ti phase at the grain boundaries. The HPT process refined the microstructure from 50 µm (P/M) down to nanostructured grains of approximately 50 nm.

  19. French Society of Microscopies, 11. Colloquium. SFM Paris 2009. Compilation of summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-06-01

    The 11. conference of the SFM (French Society of Microscopies), held in Paris in 2009, was divided into 14 symposiums, 4 GN-MEBA symposiums, and 10 workshops. The titles of the symposiums are: homage to Nicolas Boisset, advanced microscopies, alternative microscopies, new optical and plasmonic imaging microscopies, dynamic and quantitative microscopy of the living matter, photonic and correlative electronic microscopy, near field microscopy, molecular and cellular electronic cryo-microscopy, cellular compartmentation and dynamics (CFPU), microscopy and materials, dynamical microscopy in materials science, minerals/bio-minerals and environment, structure and properties of nano-materials, sub-eV and sub-nm chemical bonds imaging. The titles of the GN-MEBA symposiums are: microscopy and metals, microscopy and minerals, microscopy and living beings, microscopy and new materials. The titles of the workshops are: Correlative Light and Electron Microscopy (CLEM), Cryo and electronic tomography in cellular biology, Cryo electronic microscopy of vitreous sections (CEMOVIS), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), ULTRASTEM, Digital Micrograph programming, Cryo-Microscopy and molecular tomography, Cryo-ultra-microtomy and immuno-marking, FIB, ASTAR(EBSD-MET) - rapid mapping of crystalline orientations and phases

  20. Orientation and phase mapping in the transmission electron microscope using precession-assisted diffraction spot recognition: state-of-the-art results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viladot, D; Véron, M; Gemmi, M; Peiró, F; Portillo, J; Estradé, S; Mendoza, J; Llorca-Isern, N; Nicolopoulos, S

    2013-10-01

    A recently developed technique based on the transmission electron microscope, which makes use of electron beam precession together with spot diffraction pattern recognition now offers the possibility to acquire reliable orientation/phase maps with a spatial resolution down to 2 nm on a field emission gun transmission electron microscope. The technique may be described as precession-assisted crystal orientation mapping in the transmission electron microscope, precession-assisted crystal orientation mapping technique-transmission electron microscope, also known by its product name, ASTAR, and consists in scanning the precessed electron beam in nanoprobe mode over the specimen area, thus producing a collection of precession electron diffraction spot patterns, to be thereafter indexed automatically through template matching. We present a review on several application examples relative to the characterization of microstructure/microtexture of nanocrystalline metals, ceramics, nanoparticles, minerals and organics. The strengths and limitations of the technique are also discussed using several application examples. ©2013 The Authors. Journal of Microscopy published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Royal Microscopical Society.

  1. Integrated flight path planning system and flight control system for unmanned helicopters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan, Shau Shiun; Lin, Yu Hsiang

    2011-01-01

    This paper focuses on the design of an integrated navigation and guidance system for unmanned helicopters. The integrated navigation system comprises two systems: the Flight Path Planning System (FPPS) and the Flight Control System (FCS). The FPPS finds the shortest flight path by the A-Star (A*) algorithm in an adaptive manner for different flight conditions, and the FPPS can add a forbidden zone to stop the unmanned helicopter from crossing over into dangerous areas. In this paper, the FPPS computation time is reduced by the multi-resolution scheme, and the flight path quality is improved by the path smoothing methods. Meanwhile, the FCS includes the fuzzy inference systems (FISs) based on the fuzzy logic. By using expert knowledge and experience to train the FIS, the controller can operate the unmanned helicopter without dynamic models. The integrated system of the FPPS and the FCS is aimed at providing navigation and guidance to the mission destination and it is implemented by coupling the flight simulation software, X-Plane, and the computing software, MATLAB. Simulations are performed and shown in real time three-dimensional animations. Finally, the integrated system is demonstrated to work successfully in controlling the unmanned helicopter to operate in various terrains of a digital elevation model (DEM).

  2. Alpha Beam Energy Determination Using a Range Measuring Device for Radioisotope Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jun Yong; Kim, Byeon Gil; Hong, Seung Pyo; Kim, Ran Young; Chun, Kwon Soo [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The threshold energy of the {sup 209}Bi(α,3n){sup 210} At reaction is at about 30MeV. Our laboratory suggested an energy measurement method to confirm the proton-beam's energy by using a range measurement device. The experiment was performed energy measurement of alpha beam. The alpha beam of energy 29 MeV has been extracted from the cyclotron for the production of {sup 211}At. This device was composed of four parts: an absorber, a drive shaft, and a servo motor and a Faraday cup. The drive shaft was mounted on the absorber and connects with the axis of the servo motor and rotates linearly and circularly by this servo motor. A Faraday cup is for measuring the beam flux. As this drive shaft rotates, the thickness of the absorber varies depending on the rotation angle of the absorber. The energy of the alpha particle accelerated and extracted from MC-50 cyclotron was calculated with the measurement of the particle range in Al foil and using ASTAR, SRIM, MCNPX software. There were a little discrepancy between the expected energy and the calculated energy within the 0.5MeV error range. We have a plan to make an experiment with various alpha particle energies and another methodology, for example, the cross section measurement of the nuclear reaction.

  3. Cluster analysis of the impact of air back-trajectories on aerosol optical properties at Hornsund, Spitsbergen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rozwadowska

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, spectra of aerosol optical thickness from the AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork station at Hornsund in the southern part of Spitsbergen were employed to study the impact of air mass history on aerosol optical thickness for wavelength λ=500 nm – AOT(500 – and the Ångström exponent. Backward trajectories computed, using the NOAA HYSPLIT model, were used to trace air history. It was found that in spring, the changes in AOT values over the Hornsund station were strongly influenced by air mass trajectories 8 days or longer in duration, arriving both in the free troposphere and at an altitude of 1 km above sea level. Nevertheless, free tropospheric advection was dominant. AOT variability in summer was best explained by the local direction and speed of advection (1-day trajectories and was dominated by the effectiveness of cleansing processes. During the ASTAR 2007 campaign, the aerosols near Hornsund displayed low AOT values ranging from 0.06 to 0.09, which is lower than the mean AOT(500 for spring seasons from 2005 to 2007 (0.110±0.007; mean ± standard deviation of mean. 9 April 2007 with AOT(500=0.147 was exceptional. The back-trajectories belonged to clusters with low and average cluster mean AOT. Apart from the maximum AOT of 9 April 2007, the observed AOT values were close to or lower than the means for the clusters to which they belonged.

  4. Modeling the HD 32297 Debris Disk With Far-Infrared Herschel Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, J.K.; Lebreton, J.; Roberge, A.; Augereau, J.-C.; Krivov, A. V.

    2013-01-01

    HD 32297 is a young A-star (approx. 30 Myr) 112 pc away with a bright edge-on debris disk that has been resolved in scattered light. We observed the HD 32297 debris disk in the far-infrared and sub-millimeter with the Herschel Space Observatory PACS and SPIRE instruments, populating the spectral energy distribution (SED) from 63 to 500 micron..We aimed to determine the composition of dust grains in the HD 32297 disk through SED modeling, using geometrical constraints from the resolved imaging to break the degeneracies inherent in SED modeling. We found the best fitting SED model has two components: an outer ring centered around 110 AU, seen in the scattered light images, and an inner disk near the habitable zone of the star. The outer disk appears to be composed of grains>2 micron consisting of silicates, carbonaceous material, and water ice with an abundance ratio of 1:2:3 respectively and 90% porosity. These grains appear consistent with cometary grains, implying the underlying planetesimal population is dominated by comet-like bodies. We also discuss the 3.7 sigma detection of [C ii] emission at 158 micron with the Herschel PACS instrument, making HD 32297 one of only a handful of debris disks with circumstellar gas detected

  5. Integrated Flight Path Planning System and Flight Control System for Unmanned Helicopters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan, Shau Shiun; Lin, Yu Hsiang

    2011-01-01

    This paper focuses on the design of an integrated navigation and guidance system for unmanned helicopters. The integrated navigation system comprises two systems: the Flight Path Planning System (FPPS) and the Flight Control System (FCS). The FPPS finds the shortest flight path by the A-Star (A*) algorithm in an adaptive manner for different flight conditions, and the FPPS can add a forbidden zone to stop the unmanned helicopter from crossing over into dangerous areas. In this paper, the FPPS computation time is reduced by the multi-resolution scheme, and the flight path quality is improved by the path smoothing methods. Meanwhile, the FCS includes the fuzzy inference systems (FISs) based on the fuzzy logic. By using expert knowledge and experience to train the FIS, the controller can operate the unmanned helicopter without dynamic models. The integrated system of the FPPS and the FCS is aimed at providing navigation and guidance to the mission destination and it is implemented by coupling the flight simulation software, X-Plane, and the computing software, MATLAB. Simulations are performed and shown in real time three-dimensional animations. Finally, the integrated system is demonstrated to work successfully in controlling the unmanned helicopter to operate in various terrains of a digital elevation model (DEM). PMID:22164029

  6. Numerical Modelling of Three-Fluid Flow Using The Level-set Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongying; Lou, Jing; Shang, Zhi

    2014-11-01

    This work presents a numerical model for simulation of three-fluid flow involving two different moving interfaces. These interfaces are captured using the level-set method via two different level-set functions. A combined formulation with only one set of conservation equations for the whole physical domain, consisting of the three different immiscible fluids, is employed. Numerical solution is performed on a fixed mesh using the finite volume method. Surface tension effect is incorporated using the Continuum Surface Force model. Validation of the present model is made against available results for stratified flow and rising bubble in a container with a free surface. Applications of the present model are demonstrated by a variety of three-fluid flow systems including (1) three-fluid stratified flow, (2) two-fluid stratified flow carrying the third fluid in the form of drops and (3) simultaneous rising and settling of two drops in a stationary third fluid. The work is supported by a Thematic and Strategic Research from A*STAR, Singapore (Ref. #: 1021640075).

  7. Monte Carlo modeling of ion beam induced secondary electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huh, U., E-mail: uhuh@vols.utk.edu [Biochemistry & Cellular & Molecular Biology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-0840 (United States); Cho, W. [Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-2100 (United States); Joy, D.C. [Biochemistry & Cellular & Molecular Biology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-0840 (United States); Center for Nanophase Materials Science, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2016-09-15

    Ion induced secondary electrons (iSE) can produce high-resolution images ranging from a few eV to 100 keV over a wide range of materials. The interpretation of such images requires knowledge of the secondary electron yields (iSE δ) for each of the elements and materials present and as a function of the incident beam energy. Experimental data for helium ions are currently limited to 40 elements and six compounds while other ions are not well represented. To overcome this limitation, we propose a simple procedure based on the comprehensive work of Berger et al. Here we show that between the energy range of 10–100 keV the Berger et al. data for elements and compounds can be accurately represented by a single universal curve. The agreement between the limited experimental data that is available and the predictive model is good, and has been found to provide reliable yield data for a wide range of elements and compounds. - Highlights: • The Universal ASTAR Yield Curve was derived from data recently published by NIST. • IONiSE incorporated with the Curve will predict iSE yield for elements and compounds. • This approach can also handle other ion beams by changing basic scattering profile.

  8. STARCODES, Stopping Power and Ranges for Electrons, Protons, He

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: The 'STAR CODES', ESTAR, PSTAR, and ASTAR, calculate stopping-power and range tables for electrons, protons, and helium ions (alphas), according to methods described in ICRU Reports 37 and 39. 2 - Method of solution: Collision stopping powers are calculated from the theory of Bethe (1930, 1932), with a density-effect correction evaluated according to Sternheimer (1952, 1982). The stopping-power formula contains an important parameter, the mean excitation energy (I-value), which characterizes the stopping properties of a material. The codes provide output for electrons in any stopping material (279 provided) and for protons and helium ions in 74 materials. The calculations include the 1) Collision stopping power, 2) Radiative stopping power (electrons only), 3) Nuclear stopping power (protons and helium ions), 4) Total stopping power, 5) CSDA range, 6) Projected range (protons and helium ions), 7) Density effect parameter (electrons), 8) Radiation yield (electrons), and 9) Detour factor (protons and helium ions). Standard energy grids and files of elements w/ionization-excitation information are included with lookup table capabilities. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The minimum energies used in the calculations are at 1 KeV (protons and helium ions) and 10 KeV (electrons), and the maximum are 1 GeV. The standard energy grids are set at 81 for electrons, equally spaced (logarithmically), 133 for protons, and 122 for helium ions. The lower energy electron calculations (< 10 KeV) have up to 5-10% errors and are considered too fallable

  9. HOW TO DIFFERENTIATE FRONTOTEMPORAL FROMALZHEIMER’S DEMENTIA? RECENT DEVELOPMENTS INMOLECULAR GENETICS AND NEUROPATHOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajko Liščić

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Frontotemporal dementia is a major cause of non-Alzheimer dementia (AD. Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD is used here as an umbrella term for both clinical andneuropathological entities starting before age of 65 years. FTLD differs clinically from ADbecause memory loss is rarely an early symptom. Instead, the dementia of FTLD is usuallydenoted by behavioral and language difficulties, although clinical and cognitive featuresof FTLD may overlap with AD. Aphasia may be prominent, either fluent or nonfluent.Clinical FTLD is associated with a variety of different neuropathological entities, whichshare common feature of preferential degeneration of the frontal and temporal lobes. Whereas, in the past, most attention focused on FTLD pathology associated with tau-positive inclusions and microtubule associated protein tau gene (MAPT mutations (tauopathies,there has recently been greater attention paid to non-tau, ubiquitin positive inclusions(FTLD-U or non-tauopathies. It is now recognized that FTLD-U is the most common pathology associated with clinical FTLD. Clinically, cases with FTLD-U may additionally presentwith or without motor neuron disease and parkinsonism. Majority of familial cases ofFTLD-U have mutations in the progranulin (PRGN gene. Some families of FTLD-U withPGRN mutation (hereditary dysphasic disinhibition dementia 1 and 2 are characterized,besides behavior and language difficulties, by additional memory loss and AD-type pathology. Recently, the ubiquitinated pathological protein in FTLD-U has been identified asTAR DNA binding protein (TDP 43 and found in an increasing number of neurodegenerative diseases, including AD. The overlap between FTLD-U and AD is important since asmany as 20 % of AD cases show some FTLD-U type TDP-43 pathology. Recent developmentshave helped to clarify the relationship between different types of FTLD and related conditions. Understanding and differentiating between FTLD and AD is very important for

  10. Implementing the Mars Science Laboratory Terminal Descent Sensor Field Test Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, James F.; Bodie, James H.; Brown, Joseph D.; Chen, Allen; Chen, Curtis W.; Essmiller, John C.; Fisher, Charles D.; Goldberg, Hannah R.; Lee, Steven W.; Shaffer, Scott J.

    2012-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) will deliver a 900 kg rover to the surface of Mars in August 2012. MSL will utilize a new pulse-Doppler landing radar, the Terminal Descent Sensor (TDS). The TDS employs six narrow-beam antennas to provide unprecedented slant range and velocity performance at Mars to enable soft touchdown of the MSL rover using a unique sky crane Entry, De-scent, and Landing (EDL) technique. Prior to use on MSL, the TDS was put through a rigorous verification and validation (V&V) process. A key element of this V&V was operating the TDS over a series of field tests, using flight-like profiles expected during the descent and landing of MSL over Mars-like terrain on Earth. Limits of TDS performance were characterized with additional testing meant to stress operational modes outside of the expected EDL flight profiles. The flight envelope over which the TDS must operate on Mars encompasses such a large range of altitudes and velocities that a variety of venues were neces-sary to cover the test space. These venues included an F/A-18 high performance aircraft, a Eurocopter AS350 AStar helicopter and 100-meter tall Echo Towers at the China Lake Naval Air Warfare Center. Testing was carried out over a five year period from July 2006 to June 2011. TDS performance was shown, in gen-eral, to be excellent over all venues. This paper describes the planning, design, and implementation of the field test campaign plus results and lessons learned.

  11. Shocked POststarburst Galaxy Survey. II. The Molecular Gas Content and Properties of a Subset of SPOGs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alatalo, Katherine; Lisenfeld, Ute; Lanz, Lauranne; Appleton, Philip N.; Ardila, Felipe; Cales, Sabrina L.; Kewley, Lisa J.; Lacy, Mark; Medling, Anne M.; Nyland, Kristina; Rich, Jeffrey A.; Urry, C. Meg

    2016-08-01

    We present CO(1-0) observations of objects within the Shocked POststarburst Galaxy Survey taken with the Institut de Radioastronomie Millimétrique 30 m single dish and the Combined Array for Research for Millimeter Astronomy interferometer. Shocked poststarburst galaxies (SPOGs) represent a transitioning population of galaxies, with deep Balmer absorption ({{EW}}{{H}δ }\\gt 5 {\\mathring{{A}}} ), consistent with an intermediate-age (A-star) stellar population, and ionized gas line ratios inconsistent with pure star formation. The CO(1-0) subsample was selected from SPOGs detected by the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer with 22 μm flux detected at a signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) > 3. Of the 52 objects observed in CO(1-0), 47 are detected with S/N > 3. A large fraction (37%-46% ± 7%) of our CO-SPOG sample were visually classified as morphologically disrupted. The H2 masses detected were between {10}8.7-10.8 {M}⊙ , consistent with the gas masses found in normal galaxies, though approximately an order of magnitude larger than the range seen in poststarburst galaxies. When comparing the 22 μm and CO(1-0) fluxes, SPOGs diverge from the normal star-forming relation, having 22 μm fluxes in excess of the relation by a factor of ={4.91}-0.39+0.42, suggestive of the presence of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). The Na I D characteristics of CO-SPOGs show that it is likely that many of these objects host interstellar winds. Objects with large Na I D enhancements also tend to emit in the radio, suggesting possible AGN driving of neutral winds.

  12. Improvements in the stopping power library libdEdx and release of the web GUI dedx.au.dk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toftegaard, J; Lühr, A; Bassler, N; Sobolevsky, N

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In ion beam therapy electronic stopping power data enter in different disciplines, e.g., dose planning, dosimetry, and radiobiology. However, relevant stopping power data are only known within an accuracy of 2%-10%. We started the software library project libdEdx to unify data from several well-known stopping power sources into one ready-to-use package being 1) freely available and 2) easy accessible via a web-based front end. Methods: Currently, stopping power data from PSTAR, ASTAR, MSTAR and ICRU49+73 are implemented along with a version of the Bethe formula. The library is programmed in the language C to provide broad portability and high performance. A clean API provides full access to the underlying functions and thread safety in multi-threaded applications. The possibility to define arbitrary materials complements the list of predefined ICRU materials. Furthermore, we introduced a collection of tools, e.g., inverse stopping power look-up as well as CSDA range calculation and its inverse. Results: On a standard desktop PC libdEdx calculates 22 million look-ups/sec. A web GUI (available at http://dedx.au.dk) provides easy access to libdEdx and download of stopping data and graphs. For compounds, we observe that stopping power data are robust for variations in the mean excitation potential of the constituents as long as the total mean excitation potential is fixated. Conclusion: We released libdEdx (version number 1.2.1: http://sf.net/projects/libdedx/) with a web-based GUI. Future development will focus on implementing further stopping powers sources (e.g., for electrons and nuclear stopping) and relativistic effects.

  13. The 10. anniversary of the 'Cercle des Microscopistes' JEOL - CMJ Days at Camogli (Italy), 5-7 october 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, Duncan; Barges, Patrick; Boulogne, Claire; Brau, Henri-Pierre; Bron, Patrick; Brunet, Loic; Bruyere, Stephanie; Chemelle, Pierre; Demaille, Dominique; Devaux, Xavier; Dhenin, Jean-Francois; Domenges, Bernadette; Donnadieu, Patricia; Epicier, Thierry; Ersen, Ovidiu; Haghi Ashtiani, Paul; Ihiawakrim, Dris; Lai Kee Him, Josephine; Largeau, Ludovic; Le Goff, Xavier; Lefebvre, Williams; Marco Garrido, Sergio; Menguy, Nicolas; Michel, Jean; Moldovan, Simona; Monville, Daniel; Musik, Celine; Pailloux, Frederic; Patriarche, Gilles; Potin, Valerie; Prevost, Marie-Christine; Rapenne, Laetitia; Renou, Gilles; Ricolleau, Christian; Trepout, Sylvain; Vennegues, Philippe

    2015-10-01

    This conference included 4 sessions and 5 training workshops. Titles of the various papers in Session 1 are: Contribution of low voltage STEM to the structural determination of carbon nano-tubes and to the study of their chemical functionalization; Chemical and structural characterization of periodic metal/oxide nano-metric layers using STEM-EELS; state-of-the-art of electron tomography, instrument and method developments; study by quantitative METHR of polymorphism in BiFeO_3 thin films under heavy epitaxy strains; new developments in transmission electron microscopy. Session 2: Simplified in line electron microscopy; Structural and chemical study of colloidal II-VI semiconductor quantum dots by aberration-corrected STEM; Cellular water and elemental content during stages of apoptosis: investigation by a cryo-correlative nano-imaging approach (Fluorescence/STEM); Combining MET approaches at 120 kV to study stress responses in plant cells: MET, STEM, and CLEM; Contribution of transmission electron microscopy using a JEOL 2010 FEG to the development of III-Nitrides semiconductors. Session 3: Monolithic integration of ferroelectric oxides on GaAs; 7. anniversary of JEOL 2200FS at Institut Curie: achievements and prospects; Automated crystal orientation mapping of polycrystalline thin-films with the ASTAR; 'operando' electron microscopy for in-situ monitoring of catalyst activation and catalytic reactions; MET cameras. Session 4: EFTEM mapping at magic angle conditions; Crystal growth of bullet-shaped magnetite in magneto-tactic bacteria of the Nitrospirae phylum; Mass transfer at nanometer scale by using a STM-TEM probing approach; discovering nano-material synthesis through electron microscopy in liquid media. Titles of the five workshops are: preparation of tripode samples; initiation to the Fiji image processing software; image processing of icosahedral particles; STEM simulations; TEM (JEMS) simulations

  14. The final fate of planetary systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaensicke, Boris

    2015-12-01

    The discovery of the first extra-solar planet around a main-sequence star in 1995 has changed the way we think about the Universe: our solar system is not unique. Twenty years later, we know that planetary systems are ubiquitous, orbit stars spanning a wide range in mass, and form in an astonishing variety of architectures. Yet, one fascinating aspect of planetary systems has received relatively little attention so far: their ultimate fate.Most planet hosts will eventually evolve into white dwarfs, Earth-sized stellar embers, and the outer parts of their planetary systems (in the solar system, Mars and beyond) can survive largely intact for billions of years. While scattered and tidally disrupted planetesimals are directly detected at a small number of white dwarfs in the form infrared excess, the most powerful probe for detecting evolved planetary systems is metal pollution of the otherwise pristine H/He atmospheres.I will present the results of a multi-cycle HST survey that has obtained COS observations of 136 white dwarfs. These ultraviolet spectra are exquisitely sensitive to the presence of metals contaminating the white atmosphere. Our sophisticated model atmosphere analysis demonstrates that at least 27% of all targets are currently accreting planetary debris, and an additional 29% have very likely done so in the past. These numbers suggest that planet formation around A-stars (the dominant progenitors of today's white dwarf population) is similarly efficient as around FGK stars.In addition to post-main sequence planetary system demographics, spectroscopy of the debris-polluted white dwarf atmospheres provides a direct window into the bulk composition of exo-planetesimals, analogous to the way we use of meteorites to determine solar-system abundances. Our ultraviolet spectroscopy is particularly sensitive to the detection of Si, a dominant rock-forming species, and we identify up to ten additional volatile and refractory elements in the most strongly

  15. beta Phase Growth and Precipitation in the 5xxx Series Aluminum Alloy System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotto D'Antuono, Daniel

    The 5xxx series aluminum alloys are commonly used for structural applications due to their high strength to weight ratio, corrosion resistance, and weldability. This material system is a non-heat treatable aluminum and derives its strength from a super saturation of magnesium (3%>), and from cold rolling. While these materials have many admiral properties, they can undergo a process known as sensitization when exposed to elevated temperatures (50-280°C) for extended periods of time. During this process, magnesium segregates toward the grain boundaries and forms the secondary precipitate β phase (Al3Mg2). When exposed to harsh environments such as sea water, a galvanic couple is formed between the Al matrix and the β phase precipitates. The precipitates become anodic to the matrix and preferentially dissolve leaving gaps along the boundary network, ultimately leading to stress corrosion cracking. While this problem has been known to occur for some time now, questions relating to nucleation sites, misorientation dependence, effect of prior strain, and preferred temperature regimes remain unanswered. The work contained in this thesis attempted to better understand the kinetics, growth, and misorientation dependence, of β phase precipitation using in situ transmission electron microscopy experiments which allowed for direct visualization of the precipitation process. Orientation imaging using a Nanomegas/ASTAR system (OIM in TEM) coupled with the in situ experiments, along with elemental STEM EELs mapping were used to better understand the diffusion of Mg and found low angle boundaries as potential sites for nucleation. The resulting STEM EELs experiments also showed that Mg is much more stable at the grain boundaries than previously thought. Concurrent bulk ex-situ studies were used to compare various heat treatments, as well as to failed in service material showing that the low temperature treatments yield the metastable β’ phase more readily than the

  16. Novos sedativos hipnóticos The newer sedative-hypnotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Sukys-Claudino

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Nas últimas décadas houve um esforço para o desenvolvimento de hipnóticos mais seguros e eficazes. Zolpidem, zaleplona, zopiclona, eszopiclona (drogas-z e indiplona são moduladores do receptor GABA-A, os quais agem de forma seletiva na subunidade α1, exibindo, desta forma, mecanismos similares de ação, embora evidências recentes sugiram que a eszopiclona não seja tão seletiva para a subunidade α1 quanto o zolpidem. Ramelteon e tasimelteon são novos agentes crono-hipnóticos seletivos para os receptores de melatonina MT1 e MT2. Por outro lado, nos últimos anos, o consumo de drogas antidepressivas sedativas tem aumentado significativamente no tratamento da insônia. Como droga experimental, a eplivanserina tem sido testada como um potente agonista inverso do subtipo 5-HT2A da serotonina, com um uso potencial na dificuldade da manutenção do sono. Outro agente farmacológico para o tratamento da insônia é o almorexant, o qual apresenta um novo mecanismo de ação envolvendo antagonismo do sistema hipocretinérgico, desta forma levando à indução do sono. Finalmente, também discutiremos o potencial papel de outras drogas gabaérgicas no tratamento da insônia.There has been a search for more effective and safe hypnotic drugs in the last decades. Zolpidem, zaleplon, zopiclone, eszopiclone (the z-drugs and indiplon are GABA-A modulators which bind selectively α1 subunits, thus, exhibiting similar mechanisms of action, although recent evidence suggests that eszopiclone is not as selective for α1 subunit as zolpidem is. Ramelteon and tasimelteon are new chrono-hypnotic agents, selective for melatonin MT1 and MT2 receptors. On the other hand, the consumption of sedative antidepressant drugs is significantly increasing for the treatment of insomnia, in the last years. As an experimental drug, eplivanserin is being tested as a potent antagonist of serotonin 2-A receptors (ASTAR with a potential use in sleep maintenance difficulty

  17. Cadmium nanoparticles citrullinate cytokeratins within lung epithelial cells: cadmium as a potential cause of citrullination in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hutchinson D

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available David Hutchinson,1,2 Judith Müller,3 Joseph E McCarthy,4 Yurii K Gun’ko,4,5 Navin Kumar Verma,6 Xuezhi Bi,7 Luisana Di Cristo,8 Laura Kickham,8 Dania Movia,8 Adriele Prina-Mello,5,8 Yuri Volkov5,8,9 1Royal Cornwall Hospital NHS Trust, Treliske, 2University of Exeter Medical School Cornwall, UK; 3University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland; 4School of Chemistry, 5Advanced Materials for BioEngineering Research Centre (AMBER, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland; 6Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, Nanyang Technological University, 7Bioprocessing Technology Institute, A*STAR Graduate Academy, Singapore; 8Department of Clinical Medicine, School of Medicine, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland; 9International Laboratory of Magnetically Controlled Nanosystems for Theranostics of Oncological and Cardiovascular Diseases, ITMO University, St. Petersburg, Russia Objective: The objective of the study was to determine whether the cadmium-derived materials induce intracellular protein citrullination. Methods: Human A549 lung epithelial cells were exposed to cadmium in soluble and nanoparticulate forms represented by cadmium chloride (CdCl2 and cadmium oxide (CdO, respectively, and their combinations with ultrafine carbon black (ufCB produced by high temperature combustion, imitating cigarette burning. Protein citrullination in cell lysates was analyzed by Western immunoblotting and verified by immunofluorescent confocal microscopy. Target citrullinated proteins were identified by proteomic analysis. Results: CdO, ufCB and its combination with CdCl2 and CdO after high temperature combustion induced protein citrullination in cultured human lung epithelial cells, as detected by immunoblotting with anti-citrullinated protein antibody. Cytokeratins of type II (1, 2, 5, 6A, 6B and 77 and type I (9, 10 were identified as major intracellular citrullination targets. Immunofluorescent staining confirmed the localization of citrullinated proteins both in the

  18. Interaction of gelatin with polyenes modulates antifungal activity and biocompatibility of electrospun fiber mats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshminarayanan R

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Rajamani Lakshminarayanan,1,2 Radhakrishnan Sridhar,3,4 Xian Jun Loh,5 Muruganantham Nandhakumar,1 Veluchamy Amutha Barathi,1,6 Madhaiyan Kalaipriya,3,4 Jia Lin Kwan,1 Shou Ping Liu,1,2 Roger Wilmer Beuerman,1,2 Seeram Ramakrishna3,4,7 1Singapore Eye Research Institute, 2Signature Research Program in Neuroscience and Behavioral Disorders, Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School, 3Department of Mechanical Engineering, National University of Singapore, 4Center for Nanofibers and Nanotechnology, National University of Singapore, 5Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, A*STAR (Agency for Science, Technology and Research, 3 Research Link, Singapore, 6Department of Ophthalmology, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, 7NUS Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Initiative, Singapore Abstract: Topical application of antifungals does not have predictable or well-controlled release characteristics and requires reapplication to achieve therapeutic local concentration in a reasonable time period. In this article, the efficacy of five different US Food and Drug Administration-approved antifungal-loaded (amphotericin B, natamycin, terbinafine, fluconazole, and itraconazole electrospun gelatin fiber mats were compared. Morphological studies show that incorporation of polyenes resulted in a two-fold increase in fiber diameter and the mats inhibit the growth of yeasts and filamentous fungal pathogens. Terbinafine-loaded mats were effective against three filamentous fungal species. Among the two azole antifungals compared, the itraconazole-loaded mat was potent against Aspergillus strains. However, activity loss was observed for fluconazole-loaded mats against all of the test organisms. The polyene-loaded mats displayed rapid candidacidal activities as well. Biophysical and rheological measurements indicate strong interactions between polyene antifungals and gelatin matrix. As a result, the polyenes stabilized the triple helical

  19. Genetic Linkage Map Construction and QTL Analysis of Two Interspecific Reproductive Isolation Traits in Sponge Gourd.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Haibin; He, Xiaoli; Gong, Hao; Luo, Shaobo; Li, Mingzhu; Chen, Junqiu; Zhang, Changyuan; Yu, Ting; Huang, Wangping; Luo, Jianning

    2016-01-01

    The hybrids between Luffa acutangula (L.) Roxb. and L.cylindrica (L.) Roem. have strong heterosis effects. However, some reproductive isolation traits hindered their normal hybridization and fructification, which was mainly caused by the flowering time and hybrid pollen sterility. In order to study the genetic basis of two interspecific reproductive isolation traits, we constructed a genetic linkage map using an F2 population derived from a cross between S1174 [L. acutangula (L.) Roxb.] and 93075 [L. cylindrica (L.) Roem.]. The map spans 1436.12 CentiMorgans (cM), with an average of 8.11 cM among markers, and consists of 177 EST-SSR markers distributed in 14 linkage groups (LG) with an average of 102.58 cM per LG. Meanwhile, we conducted colinearity analysis between the sequences of EST-SSR markers and the genomic sequences of cucumber, melon and watermelon. On the basis of genetic linkage map, we conducted QTL mapping of two reproductive isolation traits in sponge gourd, which were the flowering time and hybrid male sterility. Two putative QTLs associated with flowering time (FT) were both detected on LG 1. The accumulated contribution of these two QTLs explained 38.07% of the total phenotypic variance (PV), and each QTL explained 15.36 and 22.71% of the PV respectively. Four QTLs for pollen fertility (PF) were identified on LG 1 (qPF1.1 and qPF1.2), LG 3 (qPF3) and LG 7 (qPF7), respectively. The percentage of PF explained by these QTLs varied from 2.91 to 16.79%, and all together the four QTLs accounted for 39.98% of the total PV. Our newly developed EST-SSR markers and linkage map are very useful for gene mapping, comparative genomics and molecular marker-assisted breeding. These QTLs for interspecific reproductive isolation will also contribute to the cloning of genes relating to interspecific reproductive isolation and the utilization of interspecific heterosis in sponge gourd in further studies.

  20. Molecular pathways reflecting poor intrauterine growth are found in Wharton's jelly-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukarieh, Rami; Joseph, Roy; Leow, Shi Chi; Li, Ying; Löffler, Mona; Aris, Izzuddin M; Tan, Jun Hao; Teh, Ai Ling; Chen, Li; Holbrook, Joanna D; Ng, Kai Lyn; Lee, Yung Seng; Chong, Yap Seng; Summers, Scott A; Gluckman, Peter D; Stünkel, Walter

    2014-10-10

    reflect the physiology of the host and patient follow-up studies will be necessary for further clinical validation. Our study suggests that Wharton's jelly-derived MSCs are useful in identifying pathways specific for fetal growth restriction. This work is supported by the Translational Clinical Research (TCR) Flagship Program on Developmental Pathways to Metabolic Disease funded by the National Research Foundation (NRF) and administered by the National Medical Research Council (NMRC), Singapore- NMRC/TCR/004-NUS/2008'. SICS Investigators are supported through the Agency for Science Technology and Research (A*STAR) funding. No potential conflicts of interest relevant to this article were reported. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Avionics Configuration Assessment for Flightdeck Interval Management: A Comparison of Avionics and Notification Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latorella, Kara A.

    2015-01-01

    present IM information to crews: (1) Integrated (IM information is embedded in extant PFD (Primary Flight Display), ND (Navigation Display), EICAS (Engine Indicating and Crew Alerting System) displays); (2) EFB_Aft (IM information is only supplied in an EFB and mounted in location similar to that for MITRE's UPS work); (3) EFB_Fore (IM information is only supplied in an EFB which is mounted more forward, under the side window), and (4) EFB_Aft plus use of an AGD (the same IM information is supplied in an EFB and on an AGD, both mounted in locations similar to that in MITRE's UPS work ). Twelve commercial pilot crews flew descent scenarios (VNAV Speed with the mode control panel (MCP) speed window open until flaps extended, then VNAV Path) in a commercial transport flight simulator with realistic visual scene and communications. The results of this study serve three practical aims: (1) contribute to the down-select of avionics configuration for future assessment of the ASTAR spacing algorithm at NASA; (2) provide information useful to the FAA Human Factors Division (ANG-C1)'s mission to identify issues pertinent to flight certification of, and flight standards; (3) identify methodological considerations in support of future FIM human-in-the-loop (HITL) investigations.

  2. Air Traffic Management Technology Demostration Phase 1 (ATD) Interval Management for Near-Term Operations Validation of Acceptability (IM-NOVA) Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibler, Jennifer L.; Wilson, Sara R.; Hubbs, Clay E.; Smail, James W.

    2015-01-01

    The Interval Management for Near-term Operations Validation of Acceptability (IM-NOVA) experiment was conducted at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center (LaRC) in support of the NASA Airspace Systems Program's Air Traffic Management Technology Demonstration-1 (ATD-1). ATD-1 is intended to showcase an integrated set of technologies that provide an efficient arrival solution for managing aircraft using Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) surveillance, navigation, procedures, and automation for both airborne and ground-based systems. The goal of the IMNOVA experiment was to assess if procedures outlined by the ATD-1 Concept of Operations were acceptable to and feasible for use by flight crews in a voice communications environment when used with a minimum set of Flight Deck-based Interval Management (FIM) equipment and a prototype crew interface. To investigate an integrated arrival solution using ground-based air traffic control tools and aircraft Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) tools, the LaRC FIM system and the Traffic Management Advisor with Terminal Metering and Controller Managed Spacing tools developed at the NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) were integrated into LaRC's Air Traffic Operations Laboratory (ATOL). Data were collected from 10 crews of current 757/767 pilots asked to fly a high-fidelity, fixed-based simulator during scenarios conducted within an airspace environment modeled on the Dallas-Fort Worth (DFW) Terminal Radar Approach Control area. The aircraft simulator was equipped with the Airborne Spacing for Terminal Area Routes (ASTAR) algorithm and a FIM crew interface consisting of electronic flight bags and ADS-B guidance displays. Researchers used "pseudo-pilot" stations to control 24 simulated aircraft that provided multiple air traffic flows into the DFW International Airport, and recently retired DFW air traffic controllers served as confederate Center, Feeder, Final

  3. Outbreak of Zika virus infection in Singapore: an epidemiological, entomological, virological, and clinical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    . The lineage showed little diversity and was distinct from other Asian lineages. The estimated most recent common ancestor of the outbreak lineage was from May, 2016. With the deployment of vector control and community engagement measures, the estimated reproductive number fell from 3·62 (95% CI 3·48-3·77) for July 31 to Sept 1, 2016, to 1·22 (95% CI 1·19-1·24) 4 weeks later (Sept 1 to Nov 24, 2016). The outbreak shows the ease with which Zika virus can be introduced and spread despite good baseline vector control. Disease surveillance, enhanced vector control, and community awareness and engagement helped to quickly curb further spread of the virus. These intensive measures might be useful for other countries facing the same threat. National Medical Research Council Singapore, Centre for Infectious Disease Epidemiology and Research, and A*STAR Biomedical Research Council. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Which of Kepler's Stars Flare?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-12-01

    The habitability of distant exoplanets is dependent upon many factors one of which is the activity of their host stars. To learn about which stars are most likely to flare, a recent study examines tens of thousands of stellar flares observed by Kepler.Need for a Broader SampleArtists rendering of a flaring dwarf star. [NASAs Goddard Space Flight Center/S. Wiessinger]Most of our understanding of what causes a star to flare is based on observations of the only star near enough to examine in detail the Sun. But in learning from a sample size of one, a challenge arises: we must determine which conclusions are unique to the Sun (or Sun-like stars), and which apply to other stellar types as well.Based on observations and modeling, astronomers think that stellar flares result from the reconnection of magnetic field lines in a stars outer atmosphere, the corona. The magnetic activity is thought to be driven by a dynamo caused by motions in the stars convective zone.HR diagram of the Kepler stars, with flaring main-sequence (yellow), giant (red) and A-star (green) stars in the authors sample indicated. [Van Doorsselaere et al. 2017]To test whether these ideas are true generally, we need to understand what types of stars exhibit flares, and what stellar properties correlate with flaring activity. A team of scientists led by Tom Van Doorsselaere (KU Leuven, Belgium) has now used an enormous sample of flares observed by Kepler to explore these statistics.Intriguing TrendsVan Doorsselaere and collaborators used a new automated flare detection and characterization algorithm to search through the raw light curves from Quarter 15 of the Kepler mission, building a sample of 16,850 flares on 6,662 stars. They then used these to study the dependence of the flare occurrence rate, duration, energy, and amplitude on the stellar spectral type and rotation period.This large statistical study led the authors to several interesting conclusions, including:Flare star incidence rate as a a

  5. PREFACE: Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Qingming; Wang, Lihong V.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2011-02-01

    Qingming LuoLihong V WangValery V TuchinConference Chairs 9th International Conference on Photonics and Imaging in Biology and Medicine (PIBM 2010)2-5 November 2010Wuhan, China EditorsQingming Luo, Huazhong University of Science and Technology (China)Lihong V Wang , Washington University in St. Louis (USA)Valery V Tuchin, Saratov State University (Russia) Sponsored and Organized byHuazhong University of Science and Technology (China)Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics (China)Britton Chance Center for Biomedical Photonics (China) Technical Co-sponsored byIBOS-International Biomedical Optics SocietyThe Chinese Optical SocietyThe Biophysical Society of China Co-organized byKey Laboratory of Biomedical Photonics, Ministry of Education (China)Virtual Research Center of Biomedical Photonics, Ministry of Education (China)Hubei Bioinformatics and Molecular Imaging Key Laboratory (China) CONFERENCE COMMITTEES Honorary ChairsBritton Chance, University of Pennsylvania (USA)Bingkun Zhou, Tsinghua University (China) Conference ChairsQingming Luo, Huazhong University of Science and Technology (China)Lihong V Wang , Washington University in St. Louis (USA)Valery V Tuchin, Saratov State University (Russia) Advisory CommitteeSydney Brenner, The Salk Institute in La Jolla, California (USA)Howard Chen, K&L Gates (USA)Jing Cheng, Tsinghua University (China)Shu Chien, University of California, San Diego (USA)Paul Ching-Wu Chu, University of Houston (USA)Aaron Ciechanover, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa (Israel)A Stephen Dahms, Alfred E Mann Foundation for Biomedical Engineering (USA)Da Hsuan Feng, National Cheng Kung University (Taiwan, China)Steven R Goodman, SUNY Upstate Medical University (USA)Barry Halliwell, National University of Singapore (Singapore)John Hart, The University of Texas at Dallas (USA)George Radda, Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR) (Singapore)Zihe Rao, Nankai University (China)Brian M Salzberg, University of Pennsylvania (USA

  6. Chandra Discovers Light Echo from the Milky Way's Black Hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Like cold case investigators, astronomers have used NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory to uncover evidence of a powerful outburst from the giant black hole at the Milky Way's center. A light echo was produced when X-ray light generated by gas falling into the Milky Way's supermassive black hole, known as Sagittarius A* (pronounced "A-star"), was reflected off gas clouds near the black hole. While the primary X-rays from the outburst would have reached Earth about 50 years ago, the reflected X-rays took a longer path and arrived in time to be recorded by Chandra. Variability in Chandra Images of Light Echo Variability in Chandra Images of Light Echo "This dramatic event happened before we had satellites in space that could detect it," said Michael Muno of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena. "So, it's remarkable that we can use Chandra to dig into the past and see this monster black hole's capacity for destruction." Previously, scientists have used Chandra to directly detect smaller and more recent outbursts from the black hole. This latest outburst revealed by the X-ray echo was about 1,000 times brighter and lasted well over 1,000 times longer than any of the recent outbursts observed by Chandra. Theory predicts that an outburst from Sagittarius A* would cause X-ray emission from the clouds to vary in both intensity and shape. Muno and his team found these changes for the first time, thus ruling out other interpretations. The latest results corroborate other independent, but indirect, evidence for light echoes generated by the black hole in the more distant past. Illustrations of Light Echo Illustrations of Light Echo Scientists have long known that Sagittarius A*, with a mass of about 3 million suns, lurked at the center for Milky Way. However, the black hole is incredibly faint at all wavelengths, especially in X-rays. "This faintness implies that stars and gas rarely get close enough to the black hole to be in any danger," said co-author Frederick

  7. Astronomers Get Closest Look Yet At Milky Way's Mysterious Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-11-01

    Astronomers have gotten their deepest glimpse into the heart of our Milky Way Galaxy, peering closer to the supermassive black hole at the Galaxy's core then ever before. Using the National Science Foundation's continent-wide Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA), they found that a radio-wave-emitting object at the Galaxy's center would nearly fit between the Earth and the Sun. This is half the size measured in any previous observation. "We're getting tantalizingly close to being able to see an unmistakable signature that would provide the first concrete proof of a supermassive black hole at a galaxy's center," said Zhi-Qiang Shen, of the Shanghai Astronomical Observatory and the Chinese Academy of Sciences. A black hole is a concentration of mass so dense that not even light can escape its powerful gravitational pull. Milky Way Nucleus The Milky Way's nucleus, as seen with the VLA. Sagittarius A* is the bright white dot at center. CREDIT: NRAO/AUI/NSF, Jun-Hui Zhao, W.M. Goss (Click on Image for Larger Version) The astronomers used the VLBA to measure the size of an object called Sagittarius A* (pronounced "A-star") that marks the exact center of our Galaxy. Last year, a different team announced that their measurements showed the object would fit inside the complete circle of Earth's orbit around the Sun. Shen and his team, by observing at a higher radio frequency, measured Sagittarius A* as half that size. A mass equal to four million Suns is known to lie within Sagittarius A*, and the new measurement makes the case for a black hole even more compelling than it was previously. Scientists simply don't know of any long-lasting object other than a black hole that could contain this much mass in such a small area. However, they would like to see even stronger proof of a black hole. "The extremely strong gravitational pull of a black hole has several effects that would produce a distinctive 'shadow' that we think we could see if we can image details about half as small as

  8. VLBA Detects Earth's Motion Around the Milky Way's Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-06-01

    It takes our Solar System more than 200 million years to orbit the center of the Milky Way Galaxy, 26,000 light-years away. Despite that tremendously long time span, astronomers using the National Science Foundation's (NSF) powerful Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) radio telescope have shown they can detect this orbital motion in ten days! In addition, they have made a new and more accurate determination of just how long it takes us to circle our Galaxy -- 226 million years. "Not only is this a tremendous technical achievement, but it also has allowed us to greatly strengthen the scientific case for a supermassive black hole at the Galaxy's center -- definitely ruling out a multiple-star system," said Mark Reid of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. Reid, along with Anthony Readhead and Rene Vermuelen of Caltech and Robert Treuhaft of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, announced their discovery at the American Astronomical Society's meeting in Chicago. The scientists used the continent-wide VLBA, part of the NSF's National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), to observe a radio-wave-emitting object called Sagittarius A* (pronounced "A-star"), that has been thought to mark the exact center of the Milky Way since its discovery more than two decades ago. They were able to measure its position on the sky within nearly one ten-thousandth of a second of arc -- a precision 600,000 times greater than that of the human eye and more than 500 times greater than that of the Hubble Space Telescope. With this precision, the astronomers were able to detect the slight apparent shift in position of Sagittarius A* compared to the positions of much more-distant quasars behind it. That apparent shift was caused by the motion of the Solar System around the Galaxy's center. "From these measurements, we estimate that we are moving at about 135 miles per second in our orbit around the center of the Milky Way," Reid said. "Even though it takes more than 200 million years for us to

  9. Radio Astronomers Lift "Fog" on Milky Way's Dark Heart: Black Hole Fits Inside Earth's Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-04-01

    Thirty years after astronomers discovered the mysterious object at the exact center of our Milky Way Galaxy, an international team of scientists has finally succeeded in directly measuring the size of that object, which surrounds a black hole nearly four million times more massive than the Sun. This is the closest telescopic approach to a black hole so far and puts a major frontier of astrophysics within reach of future observations. The scientists used the National Science Foundation's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) radio telescope to make the breakthrough. Milky Way Nucleus The Milky Way's nucleus, as seen with the VLA. Sagittarius A* is the bright white dot at center. CREDIT: NRAO/AUI/NSF, Jun-Hui Zhao, W.M. Goss (Click on Image for Larger Version) "This is a big step forward," said Geoffrey Bower, of the University of California-Berkeley. "This is something that people have wanted to do for 30 years," since the Galactic center object, called Sagittarius A* (pronounced "A-star"), was discovered in 1974. The astronomers reported their research in the April 1 edition of Science Express. "Now we have a size for the object, but the mystery about its exact nature still remains," Bower added. The next step, he explained, is to learn its shape, "so we can tell if it is jets, a thin disk, or a spherical cloud." The Milky Way's center, 26,000 light-years from Earth, is obscured by dust, so visible-light telescopes cannot study the object. While radio waves from the Galaxy's central region can penetrate the dust, they are scattered by turbulent charged plasma in the space along the line of sight to Earth. This scattering had frustrated earlier attempts to measure the size of the central object, just as fog blurs the glare of distant lighthouses. "After 30 years, radio telescopes finally have lifted the fog and we can see what is going on," said Heino Falcke, of the Westerbork Radio Observatory in the Netherlands, another member of the research team. The bright, radio