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Sample records for association study reveals

  1. Identification of Promising Mutants Associated with Egg Production Traits Revealed by Genome-Wide Association Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jingwei; Sun, Congjiao; Dou, Taocun; Yi, Guoqiang; Qu, LuJiang; Qu, Liang; Wang, Kehua; Yang, Ning

    2015-01-01

    Egg number (EN), egg laying rate (LR) and age at first egg (AFE) are important production traits related to egg production in poultry industry. To better understand the knowledge of genetic architecture of dynamic EN during the whole laying cycle and provide the precise positions of associated variants for EN, LR and AFE, laying records from 21 to 72 weeks of age were collected individually for 1,534 F2 hens produced by reciprocal crosses between White Leghorn and Dongxiang Blue-shelled chicken, and their genotypes were assayed by chicken 600 K Affymetrix high density genotyping arrays. Subsequently, pedigree and SNP-based genetic parameters were estimated and a genome-wide association study (GWAS) was conducted on EN, LR and AFE. The heritability estimates were similar between pedigree and SNP-based estimates varying from 0.17 to 0.36. In the GWA analysis, we identified nine genome-wide significant loci associated with EN of the laying periods from 21 to 26 weeks, 27 to 36 weeks and 37 to 72 weeks. Analysis of GTF2A1 and CLSPN suggested that they influenced the function of ovary and uterus, and may be considered as relevant candidates. The identified SNP rs314448799 for accumulative EN from 21 to 40 weeks on chromosome 5 created phenotypic differences of 6.86 eggs between two homozygous genotypes, which could be potentially applied to the molecular breeding for EN selection. Moreover, our finding showed that LR was a moderate polygenic trait. The suggestive significant region on chromosome 16 for AFE suggested the relationship between sex maturity and immune in the current population. The present study comprehensively evaluates the role of genetic variants in the development of egg laying. The findings will be helpful to investigation of causative genes function and future marker-assisted selection and genomic selection in chickens.

  2. Identification of Promising Mutants Associated with Egg Production Traits Revealed by Genome-Wide Association Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingwei Yuan

    Full Text Available Egg number (EN, egg laying rate (LR and age at first egg (AFE are important production traits related to egg production in poultry industry. To better understand the knowledge of genetic architecture of dynamic EN during the whole laying cycle and provide the precise positions of associated variants for EN, LR and AFE, laying records from 21 to 72 weeks of age were collected individually for 1,534 F2 hens produced by reciprocal crosses between White Leghorn and Dongxiang Blue-shelled chicken, and their genotypes were assayed by chicken 600 K Affymetrix high density genotyping arrays. Subsequently, pedigree and SNP-based genetic parameters were estimated and a genome-wide association study (GWAS was conducted on EN, LR and AFE. The heritability estimates were similar between pedigree and SNP-based estimates varying from 0.17 to 0.36. In the GWA analysis, we identified nine genome-wide significant loci associated with EN of the laying periods from 21 to 26 weeks, 27 to 36 weeks and 37 to 72 weeks. Analysis of GTF2A1 and CLSPN suggested that they influenced the function of ovary and uterus, and may be considered as relevant candidates. The identified SNP rs314448799 for accumulative EN from 21 to 40 weeks on chromosome 5 created phenotypic differences of 6.86 eggs between two homozygous genotypes, which could be potentially applied to the molecular breeding for EN selection. Moreover, our finding showed that LR was a moderate polygenic trait. The suggestive significant region on chromosome 16 for AFE suggested the relationship between sex maturity and immune in the current population. The present study comprehensively evaluates the role of genetic variants in the development of egg laying. The findings will be helpful to investigation of causative genes function and future marker-assisted selection and genomic selection in chickens.

  3. Evolutionary Meta-Analysis of Association Studies Reveals Ancient Constraints Affecting Disease Marker Discovery

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    Dudley, Joel T.; Chen, Rong; Sanderford, Maxwell; Butte, Atul J.; Kumar, Sudhir

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide disease association studies contrast genetic variation between disease cohorts and healthy populations to discover single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and other genetic markers revealing underlying genetic architectures of human diseases. Despite scores of efforts over the past decade, many reproducible genetic variants that explain substantial proportions of the heritable risk of common human diseases remain undiscovered. We have conducted a multispecies genomic analysis of 5,831 putative human risk variants for more than 230 disease phenotypes reported in 2,021 studies. We find that the current approaches show a propensity for discovering disease-associated SNPs (dSNPs) at conserved genomic positions because the effect size (odds ratio) and allelic P value of genetic association of an SNP relates strongly to the evolutionary conservation of their genomic position. We propose a new measure for ranking SNPs that integrates evolutionary conservation scores and the P value (E-rank). Using published data from a large case-control study, we demonstrate that E-rank method prioritizes SNPs with a greater likelihood of bona fide and reproducible genetic disease associations, many of which may explain greater proportions of genetic variance. Therefore, long-term evolutionary histories of genomic positions offer key practical utility in reassessing data from existing disease association studies, and in the design and analysis of future studies aimed at revealing the genetic basis of common human diseases. PMID:22389448

  4. Meta-analysis of Dense Genecentric Association Studies Reveals Common and Uncommon Variants Associated with Height

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lanktree, Matthew B.; Guo, Yiran; Murtaza, Muhammed; Glessner, Joseph T.; Bailey, Swneke D.; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; Lettre, Guillaume; Ongen, Halit; Rajagopalan, Ramakrishnan; Johnson, Toby; Shen, Haiqing; Nelson, Christopher P.; Klopp, Norman; Baumert, Jens; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Pankratz, Nathan; Pankow, James S.; Shah, Sonia; Taylor, Kira; Barnard, John; Peters, Bas J.; Maloney, Cliona M.; Lobmeyer, Maximilian T.; Stanton, Alice; Zafarmand, M. Hadi; Romaine, Simon P. R.; Mehta, Amar; van Iperen, Erik P. A.; Gong, Yan; Price, Tom S.; Smith, Erin N.; Kim, Cecilia E.; Li, Yun R.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Atwood, Larry D.; Bailey, Kristian M.; Bhatt, Deepak; Bauer, Florianne; Behr, Elijah R.; Bhangale, Tushar; Boer, Jolanda M. A.; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Bradfield, Jonathan P.; Brown, Morris; Braund, Peter S.; Burton, Paul R.; Carty, Cara; Chandrupatla, Hareesh R.; Chen, Wei; Connell, John; Dalgeorgou, Chrysoula; de Boer, Anthonius; Drenos, Fotios; Elbers, Clara C.; Fang, James C.; Fox, Caroline S.; Frackelton, Edward C.; Fuchs, Barry; Furlong, Clement E.; Gibson, Quince; Gieger, Christian; Goe, Anuj; Grobbee, Diederik E.; Hastie, Claire; Howard, Philip J.; Huang, Guan-Hua; Johnson, W. Craig; Li, Qing; Kleber, Marcus E.; Klein, Barbara E. K.; Klein, Ronald; Kooperberg, Charles; Ky, Bonnie; LaCroix, Andrea; Lanken, Paul; Lathrop, Mark; Li, Mingyao; Marshal, Vanessa; Melander, Olle; Mentch, Frank D.; Meyer, Nuala J.; Monda, Keri L.; Montpetit, Alexandre; Murugesan, Gurunathan; Nakayama, Karen; Nondah, Dave; Onipinla, Abiodun; Rafelt, Suzanne; Newhouse, Stephen J.; Otieno, F. George; Patel, Sanjey R.; Putt, Mary E.; Rodriguez, Santiago; Safa, Radwan N.; Sawyer, Douglas B.; Schreiner, Pamela J.; Simpson, Claire; Sivapalaratnam, Suthesh; Srinivasan, Sathanur R.; Suver, Christine; Swergold, Gary; Sweitzer, Nancy K.; Thomas, Kelly A.; Thorand, Barbara; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Tischfield, Sam; Tobin, Martin; Tomaszweski, Maciej; Verschuren, W. M. Monique; Wallace, Chris; Winkelmann, Bernhard; Zhang, Haitao; Zheng, Dongling; Zhang, Li; Zmuda, Joseph M.; Clarke, Robert; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Danesh, John; Day, Ian N.; Schork, Nicholas J.; de Bakker, Paul I. W.; Delles, Christian; Duggan, David; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Hofker, Marten H.; Humphries, Steve E.; Kivimaki, Mika; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Kottke-Marchant, Kandice; Mega, Jessica L.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Morrow, David A.; Palmen, Jutta; Redline, Susan; Shields, Denis C.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Sleiman, Patrick M.; Smith, George Davey; Farrall, Martin; Jamshidi, Yalda; Christiani, David C.; Casas, Juan P.; Hall, Alistair S.; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Christie, Jason D.; Berenson, Gerald S.; Murray, Sarah S.; Illig, Thomas; Dorn, Gerald W.; Cappola, Thomas P.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Sever, Peter; Rader, Daniel J.; Reilly, Muredach P.; Caulfield, Mark; Talmud, Philippa J.; Topol, Eric; Engert, James C.; Wang, Kai; Dominiczak, Anna; Hamsten, Anders; Curtis, Sean P.; Silverstein, Roy L.; Lange, Leslie A.; Sabatine, Marc S.; Trip, Mieke; Saleheen, Danish; Peden, John F.; Cruickshanks, Karen J.; Maerz, Winfried; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Klungel, Olaf H.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Maitland-van der Zee, Anke Hilse; Schadt, Eric E.; Johnson, Julie A.; Jarvik, Gail P.; Papanicolaou, George J.; Watkins, Hugh; Grant, Struan F. A.; Munroe, Patricia B.; North, Kari E.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Koenig, Wolfgang; Gaunt, Tom R.; Anand, Sonia S.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Kumari, Meena; Soranzo, Nicole; FitzGerald, Garret A.; Reiner, Alex; Hegele, Robert A.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Keating, Brendan J.

    2011-01-01

    Height is a classic complex trait with common variants in a growing list of genes known to contribute to the phenotype. Using a genecentric genotyping array targeted toward cardiovascular-related loci, comprising 49,320 SNPs across approximately 2000 loci, we evaluated the association of common and

  5. Genome-wide association study (GWAS) reveals the genetic architecture of four husk traits in maize.

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    Cui, Zhenhai; Luo, Jinhong; Qi, Chuangye; Ruan, Yanye; Li, Jing; Zhang, Ao; Yang, Xiaohong; He, Yan

    2016-11-21

    Maize (Zea mays) husk referring to the leafy outer enclosing the ear, plays an important role in grain production by directly contributing photosynthate and protecting ear from pathogen infection. Although the physiological functions related to husk have been extensively studied, little is known about its morphological variation and genetic basis in natural population. Here we utilized a maize association panel including 508 inbred lines with tropical, subtropical and temperate backgrounds to decipher the genetic architecture attributed to four husk traits, i.e. number of layers, length, width and thickness. Evaluating the phenotypic diversity at two different environments showed that four traits exhibit broadly natural variations and moderate levels of heritability with 0.64, 0.74, 0.49 and 0.75 for number, length, width and thickness, respectively. Diversity analysis indicated that different traits have dissimilar responses to subpopulation effects. A series of significantly positive or negative correlations between husk phenotypes and other agronomic traits were identified, indicating that husk growth is coordinated with other developmental processes. Combining husk traits with about half of a million of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) via genome-wide association study revealed a total of 9 variants significantly associated with traits at P husk development, and further studies on identified candidate genes facilitate to illuminate molecular pathways regulating maize husk growth.

  6. Genome-wide association study reveals putative regulators of bioenergy traits in Populus deltoides.

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    Fahrenkrog, Annette M; Neves, Leandro G; Resende, Márcio F R; Vazquez, Ana I; de Los Campos, Gustavo; Dervinis, Christopher; Sykes, Robert; Davis, Mark; Davenport, Ruth; Barbazuk, William B; Kirst, Matias

    2017-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been used extensively to dissect the genetic regulation of complex traits in plants. These studies have focused largely on the analysis of common genetic variants despite the abundance of rare polymorphisms in several species, and their potential role in trait variation. Here, we conducted the first GWAS in Populus deltoides, a genetically diverse keystone forest species in North America and an important short rotation woody crop for the bioenergy industry. We searched for associations between eight growth and wood composition traits, and common and low-frequency single-nucleotide polymorphisms detected by targeted resequencing of 18 153 genes in a population of 391 unrelated individuals. To increase power to detect associations with low-frequency variants, multiple-marker association tests were used in combination with single-marker association tests. Significant associations were discovered for all phenotypes and are indicative that low-frequency polymorphisms contribute to phenotypic variance of several bioenergy traits. Our results suggest that both common and low-frequency variants need to be considered for a comprehensive understanding of the genetic regulation of complex traits, particularly in species that carry large numbers of rare polymorphisms. These polymorphisms may be critical for the development of specialized plant feedstocks for bioenergy. © 2016 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  7. Genome-wide association study of metabolic traits reveals novel gene-metabolite-disease links.

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    Rico Rueedi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic traits are molecular phenotypes that can drive clinical phenotypes and may predict disease progression. Here, we report results from a metabolome- and genome-wide association study on (1H-NMR urine metabolic profiles. The study was conducted within an untargeted approach, employing a novel method for compound identification. From our discovery cohort of 835 Caucasian individuals who participated in the CoLaus study, we identified 139 suggestively significant (P<5×10(-8 and independent associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP and metabolome features. Fifty-six of these associations replicated in the TasteSensomics cohort, comprising 601 individuals from São Paulo of vastly diverse ethnic background. They correspond to eleven gene-metabolite associations, six of which had been previously identified in the urine metabolome and three in the serum metabolome. Our key novel findings are the associations of two SNPs with NMR spectral signatures pointing to fucose (rs492602, P = 6.9×10(-44 and lysine (rs8101881, P = 1.2×10(-33, respectively. Fine-mapping of the first locus pinpointed the FUT2 gene, which encodes a fucosyltransferase enzyme and has previously been associated with Crohn's disease. This implicates fucose as a potential prognostic disease marker, for which there is already published evidence from a mouse model. The second SNP lies within the SLC7A9 gene, rare mutations of which have been linked to severe kidney damage. The replication of previous associations and our new discoveries demonstrate the potential of untargeted metabolomics GWAS to robustly identify molecular disease markers.

  8. Metabolomics study of cereal grains reveals the discriminative metabolic markers associated with anatomical compartments

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    A.A. Moazzami

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study used NMR-based metabolomics to compare the metabolic profile of different anatomical compartments of cereal grains i.e. bran and endosperm in order to gain further insightsinto their possible role in the beneficial health effects of whole grain products (WG. Polar watersoluble metabolites in 64 bran and endosperm, samples from rye and wheat were observed using600 MHz NMR. Bran samples had higher contents of 12 metabolites than endosperm samples. A comparative approach revealed higher contents of azelaic acid and sebacic acid in bran than in endosperm. In a pilot study, the consumption of WG rye bread (485 g caused NMR signals in 24h urine corresponding to azelaic acid. The relatively high abundance, anatomical specificity, patternof metabolism, urinary excretion in human, antibacterial, and anticancer activities suggest further studying of azelaic acid when exposure to WG or beneficial effects of WG are investigated.

  9. Identification of Pleiotropic Cancer Susceptibility Variants from Genome-Wide Association Studies Reveals Functional Characteristics.

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    Wu, Yi-Hsuan; Graff, Rebecca E; Passarelli, Michael N; Hoffman, Joshua D; Ziv, Elad; Hoffmann, Thomas J; Witte, John S

    2018-01-01

    Background: There exists compelling evidence that some genetic variants are associated with the risk of multiple cancer sites (i.e., pleiotropy). However, the biological mechanisms through which the pleiotropic variants operate are unclear.Methods: We obtained all cancer risk associations from the National Human Genome Research Institute-European Bioinformatics Institute GWAS Catalog, and correlated cancer risk variants were clustered into groups. Pleiotropic variant groups and genes were functionally annotated. Associations of pleiotropic cancer risk variants with noncancer traits were also obtained.Results: We identified 1,431 associations between variants and cancer risk, comprised of 989 unique variants associated with 27 unique cancer sites. We found 20 pleiotropic variant groups (2.1%) composed of 33 variants (3.3%), including novel pleiotropic variants rs3777204 and rs56219066 located in the ELL2 gene. Relative to single-cancer risk variants, pleiotropic variants were more likely to be in genes (89.0% vs. 65.3%, P = 2.2 × 10-16), and to have somewhat larger risk allele frequencies (median RAF = 0.49 versus 0.39, P = 0.046). The 27 genes to which the pleiotropic variants mapped were suggestive for enrichment in response to radiation and hypoxia, alpha-linolenic acid metabolism, cell cycle, and extension of telomeres. In addition, we observed that 8 of 33 pleiotropic cancer risk variants were associated with 16 traits other than cancer.Conclusions: This study identified and functionally characterized genetic variants showing pleiotropy for cancer risk.Impact: Our findings suggest biological pathways common to different cancers and other diseases, and provide a basis for the study of genetic testing for multiple cancers and repurposing cancer treatments. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 27(1); 75-85. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  10. A genome-wide association study reveals variants in ARL15 that influence adiponectin levels.

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    J Brent Richards

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The adipocyte-derived protein adiponectin is highly heritable and inversely associated with risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D and coronary heart disease (CHD. We meta-analyzed 3 genome-wide association studies for circulating adiponectin levels (n = 8,531 and sought validation of the lead single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in 5 additional cohorts (n = 6,202. Five SNPs were genome-wide significant in their relationship with adiponectin (P< or =5x10(-8. We then tested whether these 5 SNPs were associated with risk of T2D and CHD using a Bonferroni-corrected threshold of P< or =0.011 to declare statistical significance for these disease associations. SNPs at the adiponectin-encoding ADIPOQ locus demonstrated the strongest associations with adiponectin levels (P-combined = 9.2x10(-19 for lead SNP, rs266717, n = 14,733. A novel variant in the ARL15 (ADP-ribosylation factor-like 15 gene was associated with lower circulating levels of adiponectin (rs4311394-G, P-combined = 2.9x10(-8, n = 14,733. This same risk allele at ARL15 was also associated with a higher risk of CHD (odds ratio [OR] = 1.12, P = 8.5x10(-6, n = 22,421 more nominally, an increased risk of T2D (OR = 1.11, P = 3.2x10(-3, n = 10,128, and several metabolic traits. Expression studies in humans indicated that ARL15 is well-expressed in skeletal muscle. These findings identify a novel protein, ARL15, which influences circulating adiponectin levels and may impact upon CHD risk.

  11. Genome-wide association study of facial morphology reveals novel associations with FREM1 and PARK2.

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    Lee, Myoung Keun; Shaffer, John R; Leslie, Elizabeth J; Orlova, Ekaterina; Carlson, Jenna C; Feingold, Eleanor; Marazita, Mary L; Weinberg, Seth M

    2017-01-01

    Several studies have now shown evidence of association between common genetic variants and quantitative facial traits in humans. The reported associations generally involve simple univariate measures and likely represent only a small fraction of the genetic loci influencing facial morphology. In this study, we applied factor analysis to a set of 276 facial linear distances derived from 3D facial surface images of 2187 unrelated individuals of European ancestry. We retained 23 facial factors, which we then tested for genetic associations using a genome-wide panel of 10,677,593 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). In total, we identified genome-wide significant (p associations in three regions, including two that are novel: one involving measures of midface height at 6q26 within an intron of PARK2 (lead SNP rs9456748; p = 4.99 × 10-8) and another involving measures of central upper lip height at 9p22 within FREM1 (lead SNP rs72713618; p = 2.02 × 10-8). In both cases, the genetic association was stronger with the composite facial factor phenotype than with any of the individual linear distances that comprise those factors. While the biological role of PARK2 in the craniofacial complex is currently unclear, there is evidence from both mouse models and Mendelian syndromes that FREM1 may influence facial variation. These results highlight the potential value of data-driven multivariate phenotyping for genetic studies of human facial morphology.

  12. Genome-wide Association Study and Admixture Mapping Reveal New Loci Associated with Total IgE Levels in Latinos

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    Pino-Yanes, Maria; Gignoux, Christopher R.; Galanter, Joshua M.; Levin, Albert M.; Campbell, Catarina D.; Eng, Celeste; Huntsman, Scott; Nishimura, Katherine K.; Gourraud, Pierre-Antoine; Mohajeri, Kiana; O'Roak, Brian J.; Hu, Donglei; Mathias, Rasika A.; Nguyen, Elizabeth A.; Roth, Lindsey A.; Padhukasahasram, Badri; Moreno-Estrada, Andres; Sandoval, Karla; Winkler, Cheryl A.; Lurmann, Fred; Davis, Adam; Farber, Harold J.; Meade, Kelley; Avila, Pedro C.; Serebrisky, Denise; Chapela, Rocio; Ford, Jean G.; Lenoir, Michael A.; Thyne, Shannon M.; Brigino-Buenaventura, Emerita; Borrell, Luisa N.; Rodriguez-Cintron, William; Sen, Saunak; Kumar, Rajesh; Rodriguez-Santana, Jose R.; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Martinez, Fernando D.; Raby, Benjamin A.; Weiss, Scott T.; Nicolae, Dan L.; Ober, Carole; Meyers, Deborah A.; Bleecker, Eugene R.; Mack, Steven J.; Hernandez, Ryan D.; Eichler, Evan E.; Barnes, Kathleen C.; Williams, L. Keoki; Torgerson, Dara G.; Burchard, Esteban G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Immunoglobulin E (IgE) is a key mediator of allergic inflammation and is frequently elevated in allergic disorders. Objective To identify genetic variants associated with IgE levels in Latinos. Methods We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) and admixture mapping of total IgE levels in 3,334 Latinos from the Genes-environments & Admixture in Latino Americans (GALA II) study. Replication was evaluated in 454 Latinos, 1,564 European Americans, and 3,187 African Americans from independent studies. Results We confirmed associations of six genes identified by previous GWAS and identified a novel genome-wide significant association of a polymorphism in ZNF365 with total IgE (rs200076616, p=2.3x10−8). We next identified four admixture mapping peaks (6p21.32-p22.1, 13p22-31, 14q23.2, and 22q13.1) where local African, European, and/or Native American ancestry was significantly associated with IgE levels. The most significant peak was 6p21.32-p22.1, where Native American ancestry was associated with lower levels of IgE (p=4.95x10−8). All but 22q13.1 were replicated in an independent sample of Latinos, and two of the peaks were replicated in African Americans (6p21.32-p22.1 and 14q23.2). Fine mapping of 6p21.32-p22.1 identified six genome-wide significant single nucleotide polymorphisms in Latinos, two of which replicated in European Americans. Another SNP was peak-wide significant within 14q23.2 in African Americans (rs1741099, p=3.7x10−6), and replicated in non-African American samples (p=0.011). Conclusion We confirmed genetic associations at six genes, and identified novel associations within ZNF365, HLA-DQA1, and 14q23.2. Our results highlight the importance of studying diverse, multi-ethnic populations to uncover novel loci associated with total IgE levels. PMID:25488688

  13. Genome-Wide Association Study Reveals Novel Genes Associated with Culm Cellulose Content in Bread Wheat (Triticum aestivum, L.

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    Simerjeet Kaur

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Plant cell wall formation is a complex, coordinated and developmentally regulated process. Cellulose is the most dominant constituent of plant cell walls. Because of its paracrystalline structure, cellulose is the main determinant of mechanical strength of plant tissues. As the most abundant polysaccharide on earth, it is also the focus of cellulosic biofuel industry. To reduce culm lodging in wheat and for improved ethanol production, delineation of the variation for stem cellulose content could prove useful. We present results on the analysis of the stem cellulose content of 288 diverse wheat accessions and its genome-wide association study (GWAS. Cellulose concentration ranged from 35 to 52% (w/w. Cellulose content was normally distributed in the accessions around a mean and median of 45% (w/w. Genome-wide marker-trait association study using 21,073 SNPs helped identify nine SNPs that were associated (p < 1E-05 with cellulose content. Four strongly associated (p < 8.17E-05 SNP markers were linked to wheat unigenes, which included β-tubulin, Auxin-induced protein 5NG4, and a putative transmembrane protein of unknown function. These genes may be directly or indirectly involved in the formation of cellulose in wheat culms. GWAS results from this study have the potential for genetic manipulation of cellulose content in bread wheat and other small grain cereals to enhance culm strength and improve biofuel production.

  14. Genome-wide association study reveals two new risk loci for bipolar disorder.

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    Mühleisen, Thomas W; Leber, Markus; Schulze, Thomas G; Strohmaier, Jana; Degenhardt, Franziska; Treutlein, Jens; Mattheisen, Manuel; Forstner, Andreas J; Schumacher, Johannes; Breuer, René; Meier, Sandra; Herms, Stefan; Hoffmann, Per; Lacour, André; Witt, Stephanie H; Reif, Andreas; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Lucae, Susanne; Maier, Wolfgang; Schwarz, Markus; Vedder, Helmut; Kammerer-Ciernioch, Jutta; Pfennig, Andrea; Bauer, Michael; Hautzinger, Martin; Moebus, Susanne; Priebe, Lutz; Czerski, Piotr M; Hauser, Joanna; Lissowska, Jolanta; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Brennan, Paul; McKay, James D; Wright, Adam; Mitchell, Philip B; Fullerton, Janice M; Schofield, Peter R; Montgomery, Grant W; Medland, Sarah E; Gordon, Scott D; Martin, Nicholas G; Krasnow, Valery; Chuchalin, Alexander; Babadjanova, Gulja; Pantelejeva, Galina; Abramova, Lilia I; Tiganov, Alexander S; Polonikov, Alexey; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Alda, Martin; Grof, Paul; Rouleau, Guy A; Turecki, Gustavo; Laprise, Catherine; Rivas, Fabio; Mayoral, Fermin; Kogevinas, Manolis; Grigoroiu-Serbanescu, Maria; Propping, Peter; Becker, Tim; Rietschel, Marcella; Nöthen, Markus M; Cichon, Sven

    2014-03-11

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a common and highly heritable mental illness and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have robustly identified the first common genetic variants involved in disease aetiology. The data also provide strong evidence for the presence of multiple additional risk loci, each contributing a relatively small effect to BD susceptibility. Large samples are necessary to detect these risk loci. Here we present results from the largest BD GWAS to date by investigating 2.3 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a sample of 24,025 patients and controls. We detect 56 genome-wide significant SNPs in five chromosomal regions including previously reported risk loci ANK3, ODZ4 and TRANK1, as well as the risk locus ADCY2 (5p15.31) and a region between MIR2113 and POU3F2 (6q16.1). ADCY2 is a key enzyme in cAMP signalling and our finding provides new insights into the biological mechanisms involved in the development of BD.

  15. A genome wide association study of mathematical ability reveals an association at chromosome 3q29, a locus associated with autism and learning difficulties: a preliminary study.

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    Simon Baron-Cohen

    Full Text Available Mathematical ability is heritable, but few studies have directly investigated its molecular genetic basis. Here we aimed to identify specific genetic contributions to variation in mathematical ability. We carried out a genome wide association scan using pooled DNA in two groups of U.K. samples, based on end of secondary/high school national academic exam achievement: high (n = 419 versus low (n = 183 mathematical ability while controlling for their verbal ability. Significant differences in allele frequencies between these groups were searched for in 906,600 SNPs using the Affymetrix GeneChip Human Mapping version 6.0 array. After meeting a threshold of p<1.5×10(-5, 12 SNPs from the pooled association analysis were individually genotyped in 542 of the participants and analyzed to validate the initial associations (lowest p-value 1.14 ×10(-6. In this analysis, one of the SNPs (rs789859 showed significant association after Bonferroni correction, and four (rs10873824, rs4144887, rs12130910 rs2809115 were nominally significant (lowest p-value 3.278 × 10(-4. Three of the SNPs of interest are located within, or near to, known genes (FAM43A, SFT2D1, C14orf64. The SNP that showed the strongest association, rs789859, is located in a region on chromosome 3q29 that has been previously linked to learning difficulties and autism. rs789859 lies 1.3 kbp downstream of LSG1, and 700 bp upstream of FAM43A, mapping within the potential promoter/regulatory region of the latter. To our knowledge, this is only the second study to investigate the association of genetic variants with mathematical ability, and it highlights a number of interesting markers for future study.

  16. A genome wide association study of mathematical ability reveals an association at chromosome 3q29, a locus associated with autism and learning difficulties: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron-Cohen, Simon; Murphy, Laura; Chakrabarti, Bhismadev; Craig, Ian; Mallya, Uma; Lakatošová, Silvia; Rehnstrom, Karola; Peltonen, Leena; Wheelwright, Sally; Allison, Carrie; Fisher, Simon E; Warrier, Varun

    2014-01-01

    Mathematical ability is heritable, but few studies have directly investigated its molecular genetic basis. Here we aimed to identify specific genetic contributions to variation in mathematical ability. We carried out a genome wide association scan using pooled DNA in two groups of U.K. samples, based on end of secondary/high school national academic exam achievement: high (n = 419) versus low (n = 183) mathematical ability while controlling for their verbal ability. Significant differences in allele frequencies between these groups were searched for in 906,600 SNPs using the Affymetrix GeneChip Human Mapping version 6.0 array. After meeting a threshold of p<1.5×10(-5), 12 SNPs from the pooled association analysis were individually genotyped in 542 of the participants and analyzed to validate the initial associations (lowest p-value 1.14 ×10(-6)). In this analysis, one of the SNPs (rs789859) showed significant association after Bonferroni correction, and four (rs10873824, rs4144887, rs12130910 rs2809115) were nominally significant (lowest p-value 3.278 × 10(-4)). Three of the SNPs of interest are located within, or near to, known genes (FAM43A, SFT2D1, C14orf64). The SNP that showed the strongest association, rs789859, is located in a region on chromosome 3q29 that has been previously linked to learning difficulties and autism. rs789859 lies 1.3 kbp downstream of LSG1, and 700 bp upstream of FAM43A, mapping within the potential promoter/regulatory region of the latter. To our knowledge, this is only the second study to investigate the association of genetic variants with mathematical ability, and it highlights a number of interesting markers for future study.

  17. A Genome-wide Association Study of Dupuytren Disease Reveals 17 Additional Variants Implicated in Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Michael; Thakkar, Dipti; Southam, Lorraine; Werker, Paul; Ophoff, Roel; Becker, Kerstin; Nothnagel, Michael; Franke, Andre; Nürnberg, Peter; Espirito-Santo, Ana Isabel; Izadi, David; Hennies, Hans Christian; Nanchahal, Jagdeep; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Furniss, Dominic

    2017-09-07

    Individuals with Dupuytren disease (DD) are commonly seen by physicians and surgeons across multiple specialties. It is an increasingly common and disabling fibroproliferative disorder of the palmar fascia, which leads to flexion contractures of the digits, and is associated with other tissue-specific fibroses. DD affects between 5% and 25% of people of European descent and is the most common inherited disease of connective tissue. We undertook the largest GWAS to date in individuals with a surgically validated diagnosis of DD from the UK, with replication in British, Dutch, and German individuals. We validated association at all nine previously described signals and discovered 17 additional variants with p ≤ 5 × 10(-8). As a proof of principle, we demonstrated correlation of the high-risk genotype at the statistically most strongly associated variant with decreased secretion of the soluble WNT-antagonist SFRP4, in surgical specimen-derived DD myofibroblasts. These results highlight important pathways involved in the pathogenesis of fibrosis, including WNT signaling, extracellular matrix modulation, and inflammation. In addition, many associated loci contain genes that were hitherto unrecognized as playing a role in fibrosis, opening up new avenues of research that may lead to novel treatments for DD and fibrosis more generally. DD represents an ideal human model disease for fibrosis research. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Genome-Wide Association Study Reveals the Genetic Architecture Underlying Salt Tolerance-Related Traits in Rapeseed (Brassica napus L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinxiong Shen

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Soil salinity is a serious threat to agriculture sustainability worldwide. Salt tolerance at the seedling stage is crucial for plant establishment and high yield in saline soils; however, little information is available on rapeseed (Brassica napus L. salt tolerance. We evaluated salt tolerance in different rapeseed accessions and conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS to identify salt tolerance-related quantitative trait loci (QTL. A natural population comprising 368 B. napus cultivars and inbred lines was genotyped with a Brassica 60K Illumina Infinium SNP array. The results revealed that 75 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs distributed across 14 chromosomes were associated with four salt tolerance-related traits. These SNPs integrated into 25 QTLs that explained 4.21–9.23% of the phenotypic variation in the cultivars. Additionally, 38 possible candidate genes were identified in genomic regions associated with salt tolerance indices. These genes fell into several functional groups that are associated with plant salt tolerance, including transcription factors, aquaporins, transporters, and enzymes. Thus, salt tolerance in rapeseed involves complex molecular mechanisms. Our results provide valuable information for studying the genetic control of salt tolerance in B. napus seedlings and may facilitate marker-based breeding for rapeseed salt tolerance.

  19. Genome-Wide Association Study Reveals the Genetic Architecture Underlying Salt Tolerance-Related Traits in Rapeseed (Brassica napus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Heping; Chen, Lunlin; Guo, Jianbin; Li, Qun; Wen, Jing; Yi, Bin; Ma, Chaozhi; Tu, Jinxing; Fu, Tingdong; Shen, Jinxiong

    2017-01-01

    Soil salinity is a serious threat to agriculture sustainability worldwide. Salt tolerance at the seedling stage is crucial for plant establishment and high yield in saline soils; however, little information is available on rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) salt tolerance. We evaluated salt tolerance in different rapeseed accessions and conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to identify salt tolerance-related quantitative trait loci (QTL). A natural population comprising 368 B. napus cultivars and inbred lines was genotyped with a Brassica 60K Illumina Infinium SNP array. The results revealed that 75 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) distributed across 14 chromosomes were associated with four salt tolerance-related traits. These SNPs integrated into 25 QTLs that explained 4.21-9.23% of the phenotypic variation in the cultivars. Additionally, 38 possible candidate genes were identified in genomic regions associated with salt tolerance indices. These genes fell into several functional groups that are associated with plant salt tolerance, including transcription factors, aquaporins, transporters, and enzymes. Thus, salt tolerance in rapeseed involves complex molecular mechanisms. Our results provide valuable information for studying the genetic control of salt tolerance in B. napus seedlings and may facilitate marker-based breeding for rapeseed salt tolerance.

  20. Hepatitis C virus in Mexican Americans: a population-based study reveals relatively high prevalence and negative association with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, G P; Vatcheva, K P; Beretta, L; Pan, J J; Fallon, M B; McCormick, J B; Fisher-Hoch, S P

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to estimate the prevalence and risk factors for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in Mexican Americans living in South Texas. We tested plasma for the presence of HCV antibody from the Cameron County Hispanic Cohort (CCHC), a randomized, population-based cohort in an economically disadvantaged Mexican American community on the United States/Mexico border with high rates of chronic disease. A weighted prevalence of HCV antibody of 2·3% [n = 1131, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1·2-3·4] was found. Participants with diabetes had low rates of HCV antibody (0·4%, 95% CI 0·0-0·9) and logistic regression revealed a statistically significant negative association between HCV and diabetes (OR 0·20, 95% CI 0·05-0·77) after adjusting for sociodemographic and clinical factors. This conflicts with reported positive associations of diabetes and HCV infection. No classic risk factors were identified, but important differences between genders emerged in analysis. This population-based study of HCV in Mexican Americans suggests that national studies do not adequately describe the epidemiology of HCV in this border community and that unique risk factors may be involved.

  1. Study of Associated Genetic Variants in Indian Subjects Reveals the Basis of Ethnicity Related Differences in Susceptibility to Venous Thromboembolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babita Kumari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The genetic variants linked with the susceptibility of individuals to VTE are well known; however, the studies explaining the ethnicity based difference in susceptibility to VTE are limited. Present study assesses mutations in six candidate genes contributing to the etiology of VTE in Indian subjects. The study comprised 93 VTE patients and 102 healthy controls. A PCR-RFLP based analysis was performed for nine mutations in the following genes associated with VTE: favtor V Leiden (FVL, prothrombin, tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI, fibrinogen-beta, plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1, and methylene tetrahydrofolatereductase (MTHFR. All the subjects were found to be monomorphic for FVL 1691G/A, prothrombin 20210G/A and TFPI −536C/T mutations. The mutation in the MTHFR gene (677C/T was observed only in patients. Contrarily, higher frequency of mutation in the PAI-1 −844G/A and the fibrinogen-β −455G/A was observed in controls in comparison to the patients. This study suggests that the PAI-1 −844G/A and fibrinogen-β −455G/A could be protective variants against VTE in Indians. While MTHFR 677C/T mutation was found to be associated, in contrast to other populations, the established genetic variants FVL 1691G/A, prothrombin 20210G/A, and TFPI −536C/T may not be associated with VTE in Indians thus revealing the basis of ethnicity related differences in susceptibility of Indians to VTE.

  2. Genetic Architecture of Natural Variation in Rice Nonphotochemical Quenching Capacity Revealed by Genome-Wide Association Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quanxiu Wang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The photoprotective processes conferred by nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ serve fundamental roles in maintaining plant fitness and sustainable yield. So far, few loci have been reported to be involved in natural variation of NPQ capacity in rice (Oryza sativa, and the extents of variation explored are very limited. Here we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS for NPQ capacity using a diverse worldwide collection of 529 O. sativa accessions. A total of 33 significant association loci were identified. To check the validity of the GWAS signals, three F2 mapping populations with parents selected from the association panel were constructed and assayed. All QTLs detected in mapping populations could correspond to at least one GWAS signal, indicating the GWAS results were quite reliable. OsPsbS1 was repeatedly detected and explained more than 40% of the variation in the whole association population in two years, and demonstrated to be a common major QTL in all three mapping populations derived from inter-group crosses. We revealed 43 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and 7 insertions and deletions (InDels within a 6,997-bp DNA fragment of OsPsbS1, but found no non-synonymous SNPs or InDels in the coding region, indicating the PsbS1 protein sequence is highly conserved. Haplotypes with the 2,674-bp insertion in the promoter region exhibited significantly higher NPQ values and higher expression levels of OsPsbS1. The OsPsbS1 RNAi plants and CRISPR/Cas9 mutants exhibited drastically decreased NPQ values. OsPsbS1 had specific and high-level expression in green tissues of rice. However, we didn't find significant function for OsPsbS2, the other rice PsbS homologue. Manipulation of the significant loci or candidate genes identified may enhance photoprotection and improve photosynthesis and yield in rice.

  3. Genome-wide association study reveals the genetic architecture of flowering time in rapeseed (Brassica napus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Liping; Hu, Kaining; Zhang, Zhenqian; Guan, Chunyun; Chen, Song; Hua, Wei; Li, Jiana; Wen, Jing; Yi, Bin; Shen, Jinxiong; Ma, Chaozhi; Tu, Jinxing; Fu, Tingdong

    2016-02-01

    Flowering time adaptation is a major breeding goal in the allopolyploid species Brassica napus. To investigate the genetic architecture of flowering time, a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of flowering time was conducted with a diversity panel comprising 523 B. napus cultivars and inbred lines grown in eight different environments. Genotyping was performed with a Brassica 60K Illumina Infinium SNP array. A total of 41 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) distributed on 14 chromosomes were found to be associated with flowering time, and 12 SNPs located in the confidence intervals of quantitative trait loci (QTL) identified in previous researches based on linkage analyses. Twenty-five candidate genes were orthologous to Arabidopsis thaliana flowering genes. To further our understanding of the genetic factors influencing flowering time in different environments, GWAS was performed on two derived traits, environment sensitivity and temperature sensitivity. The most significant SNPs were found near Bn-scaff_16362_1-p380982, just 13 kb away from BnaC09g41990D, which is orthologous to A. thaliana CONSTANS (CO), an important gene in the photoperiod flowering pathway. These results provide new insights into the genetic control of flowering time in B. napus and indicate that GWAS is an effective method by which to reveal natural variations of complex traits in B. napus. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Kazusa DNA Research Institute.

  4. A GWAS follow-up study reveals the association of the IL12RB2 gene with systemic sclerosis in Caucasian populations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bossini-Castillo, L.; Martin, J.E.; Broen, J.; Gorlova, O.; Simeon, C.P.; Beretta, L.; Vonk, M.C.; Callejas, J.L.; Castellvi, I.; Carreira, P.; Garcia-Hernandez, F.J.; Fernandez Castro, M.; Coenen, M.J.H.; Riemekasten, G.; Witte, T.; Hunzelmann, N.; Kreuter, A.; Distler, J.H.; Koeleman, B.P.; Voskuyl, A.E.; Schuerwegh, A.J.; Palm, O.; Hesselstrand, R.; Nordin, A.; Airo, P.; Lunardi, C.; Scorza, R.; Shiels, P.; Laar, J.M. van; Herrick, A.; Worthington, J.; Denton, C.; Tan, F.K.; Arnett, F.C.; Agarwal, S.K.; Assassi, S.; Fonseca, C.; Mayes, M.D.; Radstake, T.R.D.J.; Martin, J.

    2012-01-01

    A single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) at the IL12RB2 locus showed a suggestive association signal in a previously published genome-wide association study (GWAS) in systemic sclerosis (SSc). Aiming to reveal the possible implication of the IL12RB2 gene in SSc, we conducted a follow-up study of this

  5. Genome-Wide Association Studies Reveal New Genetic Targets for Five Panicle Traits of International Rice Varieties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Ya-fang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Narrow genetic background is a key limiting factor in breeding stable high-yielding rice. The introduction and utilization of international rice core germplasm is an important way to increase the genetic diversity of domestic rice varieties. We conducted a genome-wide association study on 5 panicle traits of 315 rice accessions introduced from the international rice micro-core germplasm bank. Based on the tests from Yangzhou of China and Arkansas of American, environment exhibited a significant impacts on panicle length and primary branch number, while grain length, grain width and grain length/width ratio were insensitive to environment changes. We discovered a total of 7, 5, 10, 8 and 6 chromosomal regions or single nucleotide polymorphism marker loci that were significantly associated with primary branch number, panicle length, grain length, grain width and grain length/width ratio, respectively. Among them, eleven regions were associated with grain shape and one region associated with primary branch number, showing the good consistence in two different environments. Significant linear correlation was discovered between the average trait value and the number of favorable alleles carried by the varieties in all associated loci. Among the associated loci, varieties in aromatic and tropical japonica sub-groups possessed most favorable alleles, while those in temperate japonica sub-group contained the least. The domestic varieties mainly harbored unfavorable alleles in six of the associated loci being detected. On the contrary, 15 varieties from 11 different countries harbored more favorable alleles (as many as 30 or more than the others. Remarkably, all these 15 varieties belonged to the tropical japonica sub-group. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that varieties in the tropical japonica sub-group had high potentials for breeding stable high-yielding rice. Based on this discovery, we proposed a new approach for improving the panicle traits

  6. Systematic review of observational studies reveals no association between low back pain and lumbar spondylolysis with or without isthmic spondylolisthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Nicholas S; Ashton, Carol M; Wray, Nelda P; Brown, Curtis; Bartanusz, Viktor

    2015-06-01

    The hypothesis that spondylolysis (SL) and/or isthmic spondylolisthesis (IS) cause low back pain (LBP) is widely accepted representing surgical indication in symptomatic cases. If SL/IS cause LBP, individuals with these conditions should be more prone to LBP than those without SL/IS. Therefore, the goal of the study was to assess whether the published primary data demonstrate an association between SL/IS and LBP in the general adult population. Systematic review of published observational studies to identify any association between SL/IS and LBP in adults. The methodological quality of the cohort and case-control studies was evaluated using the Newcastle-Ottawa scale. Fifteen studies met inclusion criteria (one cohort, seven case-control, seven cross-sectional). Neither the cohort study nor the two highest-quality case-control studies detected an association between SL/IS and LBP; the same is true for the remaining studies. There is no strong or consistent association between SL/IS and LBP in epidemiological studies of the general adult population that would support a hypothesis of causation. It is possible that SL/IS coexist with LBP, and observed effects of surgery and other treatment modalities are primarily due to benign natural history and nonspecific treatment effects. We conclude that traditional surgical practice for the adult general population, in which SL/IS is assumed to be the cause of non-radicular LBP whenever the two coexist, should be reconsidered in light of epidemiological data accumulated in recent decades.

  7. Combining high-throughput phenotyping and genome-wide association studies to reveal natural genetic variation in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wanneng; Guo, Zilong; Huang, Chenglong; Duan, Lingfeng; Chen, Guoxing; Jiang, Ni; Fang, Wei; Feng, Hui; Xie, Weibo; Lian, Xingming; Wang, Gongwei; Luo, Qingming; Zhang, Qifa; Liu, Qian; Xiong, Lizhong

    2014-10-08

    Even as the study of plant genomics rapidly develops through the use of high-throughput sequencing techniques, traditional plant phenotyping lags far behind. Here we develop a high-throughput rice phenotyping facility (HRPF) to monitor 13 traditional agronomic traits and 2 newly defined traits during the rice growth period. Using genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of the 15 traits, we identify 141 associated loci, 25 of which contain known genes such as the Green Revolution semi-dwarf gene, SD1. Based on a performance evaluation of the HRPF and GWAS results, we demonstrate that high-throughput phenotyping has the potential to replace traditional phenotyping techniques and can provide valuable gene identification information. The combination of the multifunctional phenotyping tools HRPF and GWAS provides deep insights into the genetic architecture of important traits.

  8. Genome-Wide Association Study Reveals the Genetic Architecture Underlying Salt Tolerance-Related Traits in Rapeseed (Brassica napus L.)

    OpenAIRE

    Wan, Heping; Chen, Lunlin; Guo, Jianbin; Li, Qun; Wen, Jing; Yi, Bin; Ma, Chaozhi; Tu, Jinxing; Fu, Tingdong; Shen, Jinxiong

    2017-01-01

    Soil salinity is a serious threat to agriculture sustainability worldwide. Salt tolerance at the seedling stage is crucial for plant establishment and high yield in saline soils; however, little information is available on rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) salt tolerance. We evaluated salt tolerance in different rapeseed accessions and conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to identify salt tolerance-related quantitative trait loci (QTL). A natural population comprising 368 B. napus cult...

  9. A Voxel-Based Morphometry Study Reveals Local Brain Structural Alterations associated With Ambient Fine Particles in older women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramon Casanova

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Exposure to ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5: PM with aerodynamic diameters <2.5µm has been linked with cognitive deficits in older adults. Using fine-grained voxel-wise analyses, we examined whether PM2.5 exposure also affects brain structure.Methods: Brain MRI data were obtained from 1,365 women (aged 71-89 in the Women’s Health Initiative Memory Study and local brain volumes were estimated using RAVENS (regional analysis of volumes in normalized space. Based on geocoded residential locations and air monitoring data from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, we employed a spatiotemporal model to estimate long-term (3-year average exposure to ambient PM2.5 preceding MRI scans. Voxel-wise linear regression models were fit separately to gray matter (GM and white matter (WM maps to analyze associations between brain structure and PM2.5 exposure, with adjustment for potential confounders. Results: Increased PM2.5 exposure was associated with smaller volumes in both cortical GM and subcortical WM areas. For GM, associations were clustered in the bilateral superior, middle, and medial frontal gyri. For WM, the largest clusters were in the frontal lobe, with smaller clusters in the temporal, parietal, and occipital lobes. No statistically significant associations were observed between PM2.5 exposure and hippocampal volumes. Conclusions: Long-term PM2.5 exposures may accelerate loss of both GM and WM in older women. While our previous work linked WM decreased volumes to PM2.5 air pollution, this is the first neuroimaging study reporting associations between air pollution exposure and smaller volumes of cortical GM. Our data support the hypothesized synaptic neurotoxicity of airborne particles.

  10. Genetic architecture of growth traits in Populus revealed by integrated quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis and association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Qingzhang; Gong, Chenrui; Wang, Qingshi; Zhou, Daling; Yang, Haijiao; Pan, Wei; Li, Bailian; Zhang, Deqiang

    2016-02-01

    Deciphering the genetic architecture underlying polygenic traits in perennial species can inform molecular marker-assisted breeding. Recent advances in high-throughput sequencing have enabled strategies that integrate linkage-linkage disequilibrium (LD) mapping in Populus. We used an integrated method of quantitative trait locus (QTL) dissection with a high-resolution linkage map and multi-gene association mapping to decipher the nature of genetic architecture (additive, dominant, and epistatic effects) of potential QTLs for growth traits in a Populus linkage population (1200 progeny) and a natural population (435 individuals). Seventeen QTLs for tree height, diameter at breast height, and stem volume mapped to 11 linkage groups (logarithm of odds (LOD) ≥ 2.5), and explained 2.7-18.5% of the phenotypic variance. After comparative mapping and transcriptome analysis, 187 expressed genes (10 046 common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)) were selected from the segmental homology regions (SHRs) of 13 QTLs. Using multi-gene association models, we observed 202 significant SNPs in 63 promising genes from 10 QTLs (P ≤ 0.0001; FDR ≤ 0.10) that exhibited reproducible associations with additive/dominant effects, and further determined 11 top-ranked genes tightly linked to the QTLs. Epistasis analysis uncovered a uniquely interconnected gene-gene network for each trait. This study opens up opportunities to uncover the causal networks of interacting genes in plants using an integrated linkage-LD mapping approach. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  11. Color-shape associations revealed with implicit association tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Na; Tanaka, Kanji; Watanabe, Katsumi

    2015-01-01

    Kandinsky proposed a correspondence theory that suggests associations between specific colors and shapes (i.e., circle-blue, square-red, triangle-yellow). Makin and Wuerger tested the theory using the Implicit Association Test (IAT) and did not find clear evidence for Kandinsky's color-shape associations among British participants. In the present study, we first replicated the previous study among Japanese participants and found similar results to those of Makin and Wuerger, showing little support for Kandinsky's theory. In the subsequent experiment, we tested another set of color-shape associations that had been revealed by using an explicit matching method (circle-red, square-blue, triangle-yellow) in Japanese participants. The IAT tests showed that response times were significantly faster when circle-red, square-blue, and triangle-yellow combinations were mapped onto the same response key, rather than different key combinations, indicating that these color-shape combinations were encoded. These results provide the first empirical evidence that color-shape associations can be measured by indirect behavioral methods, and in particular, Japanese people's color-shape associations (circle-red, square-blue, triangle-yellow) can be observed by both direct and indirect experimental methods.

  12. Color-shape associations revealed with implicit association tests.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Chen

    Full Text Available Kandinsky proposed a correspondence theory that suggests associations between specific colors and shapes (i.e., circle-blue, square-red, triangle-yellow. Makin and Wuerger tested the theory using the Implicit Association Test (IAT and did not find clear evidence for Kandinsky's color-shape associations among British participants. In the present study, we first replicated the previous study among Japanese participants and found similar results to those of Makin and Wuerger, showing little support for Kandinsky's theory. In the subsequent experiment, we tested another set of color-shape associations that had been revealed by using an explicit matching method (circle-red, square-blue, triangle-yellow in Japanese participants. The IAT tests showed that response times were significantly faster when circle-red, square-blue, and triangle-yellow combinations were mapped onto the same response key, rather than different key combinations, indicating that these color-shape combinations were encoded. These results provide the first empirical evidence that color-shape associations can be measured by indirect behavioral methods, and in particular, Japanese people's color-shape associations (circle-red, square-blue, triangle-yellow can be observed by both direct and indirect experimental methods.

  13. Genome-wide association study of borderline personality disorder reveals genetic overlap with bipolar disorder, major depression and schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Witt, S H; Streit, F; Jungkunz, M

    2017-01-01

    overlap between BIP, major depression (MDD) and schizophrenia (SCZ) and a high comorbidity of BOR and MDD, we also analyzed the genetic overlap of BOR with SCZ and MDD. GWAS, gene-based tests and gene-set analyses were performed in 998 BOR patients and 1545 controls. Linkage disequilibrium score......Borderline personality disorder (BOR) is determined by environmental and genetic factors, and characterized by affective instability and impulsivity, diagnostic symptoms also observed in manic phases of bipolar disorder (BIP). Up to 20% of BIP patients show comorbidity with BOR. This report...... describes the first case-control genome-wide association study (GWAS) of BOR, performed in one of the largest BOR patient samples worldwide. The focus of our analysis was (i) to detect genes and gene sets involved in BOR and (ii) to investigate the genetic overlap with BIP. As there is considerable genetic...

  14. Genome-wide association study reveals greater polygenic loading for schizophrenia in cases with a family history of illness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bigdeli, Tim B.; Ripke, Stephan; Bacanu, Silviu-Alin

    2016-01-01

    history subgroup. Comparison of genome-wide polygenic risk scores based on GWAS summary statistics indicated a significant enrichment for SNP effects among family history positive compared to family history negative cases (Nagelkerke's R2=0.0021; P=0.00331; P-value threshold ... of inherited rather than environmental factors. We investigated the extent to which familiality of schizophrenia is associated with enrichment for common risk variants detectable in a large GWAS. We analyzed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data for cases reporting a family history of psychotic illness (N......=978), cases reporting no such family history (N=4,503), and unscreened controls (N=8,285) from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium (PGC1) study of schizophrenia. We used a multinomial logistic regression approach with model-fitting to detect allelic effects specific to either family history subgroup...

  15. A Genome-Wide Association Study Reveals New Loci for Resistance to Clubroot Disease in Brassica napus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lixia; Luo, Yujie; Chen, Biyun; Xu, Kun; Zhang, Fugui; Li, Hao; Huang, Qian; Xiao, Xin; Zhang, Tianyao; Hu, Jihong; Li, Feng; Wu, Xiaoming

    2016-01-01

    Rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) is one of the most important oil crops in the world. However, the yield and quality of rapeseed were largely decreased by clubroot (Plasmodiophora brassicae Woronin). Therefore, it is of great importance for screening more resistant germplasms or genes and improving the resistance to P. brassicae in rapeseed breeding. In this study, a massive resistant identification for a natural global population was conducted in two environments with race/pathotype 4 of P. brassicae which was the most predominant in China, and a wide range of phenotypic variation was found in the population. In addition, a genome-wide association study of 472 accessions for clubroot resistance (CR) was performed with 60K Brassica Infinium SNP arrays for the first time. In total, nine QTLs were detected, seven of which were novel through integrative analysis. Furthermore, additive effects in genetic control of CR in rapeseed among the above loci were found. By bioinformatic analyses, the candidate genes of these loci were predicted, which indicated that TIR-NBS gene family might play an important role in CR. It is believable that the results presented in our study could provide valuable information for understanding the genetic mechanism and molecular regulation of CR. PMID:27746804

  16. A Genome-Wide Association Study Reveals New Loci for Resistance to Clubroot Disease in Brassica napus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lixia; Luo, Yujie; Chen, Biyun; Xu, Kun; Zhang, Fugui; Li, Hao; Huang, Qian; Xiao, Xin; Zhang, Tianyao; Hu, Jihong; Li, Feng; Wu, Xiaoming

    2016-01-01

    Rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) is one of the most important oil crops in the world. However, the yield and quality of rapeseed were largely decreased by clubroot (Plasmodiophora brassicae Woronin). Therefore, it is of great importance for screening more resistant germplasms or genes and improving the resistance to P. brassicae in rapeseed breeding. In this study, a massive resistant identification for a natural global population was conducted in two environments with race/pathotype 4 of P. brassicae which was the most predominant in China, and a wide range of phenotypic variation was found in the population. In addition, a genome-wide association study of 472 accessions for clubroot resistance (CR) was performed with 60K Brassica Infinium SNP arrays for the first time. In total, nine QTLs were detected, seven of which were novel through integrative analysis. Furthermore, additive effects in genetic control of CR in rapeseed among the above loci were found. By bioinformatic analyses, the candidate genes of these loci were predicted, which indicated that TIR-NBS gene family might play an important role in CR. It is believable that the results presented in our study could provide valuable information for understanding the genetic mechanism and molecular regulation of CR.

  17. A genome-wide association study reveals new loci for resistance to clubroot disease in Brassica napus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lixia Li

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Rapeseed (Brassica napus L. is one of the most important oil crops in the world. However, the yield and quality of rapeseed were largely decreased by clubroot (Plasmodiophora brassicae Woronin. Therefore, it is of great importance for screening more resistant germplasms or genes and improving the resistance to P. brassicae in rapeseed breeding. In this study, a massive resistant identification for a natural global population was conducted in two environments with race/pathotype 4 of P. brassicae which was the most predominant in China, and a wide range of phenotypic variation was found in the population. In addition, a genome-wide association study of 472 accessions for clubroot resistance (CR was performed with 60K Brassica Infinium SNP arrays for the first time. In total, 9 QTLs were detected, 7 of which were novel through integrative analysis. Furthermore, additive effects in genetic control of CR in rapeseed among the above loci were found. By bioinformatic analyses, the candidate genes of these loci were predicted, which indicated that TIR-NBS gene family might play an important role in CR. It is believable that the results presented in our study could provide valuable information for understanding the genetic mechanism and molecular regulation of CR.

  18. GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION STUDY META-ANALYSIS REVEALS TRANS-ETHNIC REPLICATION OF MEAN ARTERIAL AND PULSE PRESSURE LOCI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Tanika N.; Takeuchi, Fumihiko; Tabara, Yasuharu; Edwards, Todd L.; Kim, Young Jin; Chen, Peng; Li, Huaixing; Wu, Ying; Yang, Chi-Fan; Zhang, Yonghong; Gu, Dongfeng; Katsuya, Tomohiro; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Gao, Yu-Tang; Go, Min Jin; Teo, Yik Ying; Lu, Ling; Lee, Nanette R.; Chang, Li-Ching; Peng, Hao; Zhao, Qi; Nakashima, Eitaro; Kita, Yoshikuni; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Kim, Nam Hee; Tai, E Shyong; Wang, Yiqin; Adair, Linda S.; Chen, Chien-Hsiun; Zhang, Shihiu; Li, Changwei; Nabika, Toru; Umemura, Satoshi; Cai, Qiuyin; Cho, Yoon Shin; Wong, Tien Yin; Zhu, Jingwen; Wu, Jer-Yuarn; Gao, Xin; Hixson, James E.; Cai, Hui; Lee, Juyoung; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Rao, Dabeeru C.; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Cho, Myeong-Chan; Han, Bok-Ghee; Wang, Aili; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Mohlke, Karen; Lin, Xu; Ikram, Mohammad Kamran; Lee, Jong-Young; Zheng, Wei; Tetsuro, Miki; Kato, Norihiro; He, Jiang

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a genome-wide association study meta-analysis of mean arterial pressure and pulse pressure among 26,600 East Asian participants (stage-1) followed by replication study of up to 28,783 participants (stage-2). For novel loci, statistical significance was determined by a P<5.0×10−8 in joint analysis of stage-1 and stage-2 data. For loci reported by the previous mean arterial and pulse pressure genome-wide association study meta-analysis in Europeans, evidence of trans-ethnic replication was determined by consistency in effect direction and a Bonferroni-corrected P<1.4×10−3. No novel loci were identified by the current study. Five independent mean arterial pressure variants demonstrated robust evidence for trans-ethnic replication including rs17249754 at ATP2B1 (P=7.5×10−15), rs2681492 at ATP2B1 (P=3.4×10−7), rs11191593 at NT5C2 (1.1×10−6), rs3824755 at CYP17A1 (P=1.2×10−6), and rs13149993 at FGF5 (P=2.4×10−4). Two additional variants showed suggestive evidence of trans-ethnic replication (consistency in effect direction and P<0.05), including rs319690 at MAP4 (P=0.014) and rs1173771 at NPR3 (P=0.018). For pulse pressure, robust evidence of replication was identified for 2 independent variants, including rs17249754 at ATP2B1 (P=1.2×10−5) and rs11191593 at NT5C2 (P=1.1×10−3), with suggestive evidence of replication among an additional 2 variants including rs3824755 at CYP17A1 (P=6.1×10−3) and rs2681492 at ATP2B1 (P=9.0×10−3). Replicated variants demonstrated consistency in effect sizes between East Asian and European samples, with effect size differences ranging from 0.03 to 0.24 mmHg for mean arterial pressure and from 0.03 to 0.21 mmHg for pulse pressure. In conclusion, we present the first evidence of trans-ethnic replication of several mean arterial and pulse pressure loci in an East Asian population. PMID:24001895

  19. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies reveals genetic overlap between Hodgkin lymphoma and multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khankhanian, Pouya; Cozen, Wendy; Himmelstein, Daniel S.; Madireddy, Lohith; Din, Lennox; van den Berg, Anke; Matsushita, Takuya; Glaser, Sally L.; More, Jayaji M.; Smedby, Karin E.; Baranzini, Sergio E.; Mack, Thomas M.; Lizee, Antoine; de Sanjose, Silvia; Gourraud, Pierre-Antoine; Nieters, Alexandra; Hauser, Stephen L.; Cocco, Pierluigi; Maynadie, Marc; Foretova, Lenka; Staines, Anthony; Delahaye-Sourdeix, Manon; Li, Dalin; Bhatia, Smita; Melbye, Mads; Onel, Kenan; Jarrett, Ruth; McKay, James D.; Oksenberg, Jorge R.; Hjalgrim, Henrik

    Background: Based on epidemiological commonalities, multiple sclerosis (MS) and Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), two clinically distinct conditions, have long been suspected to be aetiologically related. MS and HL occur in roughly the same age groups, both are associated with Epstein-Barr virus infection and

  20. Genome-Wide Association Study Reveals Candidate Genes for Control of Plant Height, Branch Initiation Height and Branch Number in Rapeseed (Brassica napus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ming; Peng, Cheng; Liu, Hongfang; Tang, Min; Yang, Hongli; Li, Xiaokang; Liu, Jinglin; Sun, Xingchao; Wang, Xinfa; Xu, Junfeng; Hua, Wei; Wang, Hanzhong

    2017-01-01

    Plant architecture is crucial for rapeseed yield and is determined by plant height (PH), branch initiation height (BIH), branch number (BN) and leaf and inflorescence morphology. In this study, we measured three major factors (PH, BIH, and BN) in a panel of 333 rapeseed accessions across 4 years. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) was performed via Q + K model and the panel was genotyped using the 60 k Brassica Infinium SNP array. We identified seven loci for PH, four for BIH, and five for BN. Subsequently, by determining linkage disequilibrium (LD) decay associated with 38 significant SNPs, we gained 31, 15, and 17 candidate genes for these traits, respectively. We also showed that PH is significantly correlated with BIH, while no other correlation was revealed. Notably, a GA signaling gene (BnRGA) and a flowering gene (BnFT) located on chromosome A02 were identified as the most likely candidate genes associated with PH regulation. Furthermore, a meristem initiation gene (BnLOF2) and a NAC domain transcriptional factor (BnCUC3) that may be associated with BN were identified on the chromosome A07. This study reveals novel insight into the genetic control of plant architecture and may facilitate marker-based breeding for rapeseed.

  1. Genome-Wide Association Study Reveals Candidate Genes for Control of Plant Height, Branch Initiation Height and Branch Number in Rapeseed (Brassica napus L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Zheng

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Plant architecture is crucial for rapeseed yield and is determined by plant height (PH, branch initiation height (BIH, branch number (BN and leaf and inflorescence morphology. In this study, we measured three major factors (PH, BIH, and BN in a panel of 333 rapeseed accessions across 4 years. A genome-wide association study (GWAS was performed via Q + K model and the panel was genotyped using the 60 k Brassica Infinium SNP array. We identified seven loci for PH, four for BIH, and five for BN. Subsequently, by determining linkage disequilibrium (LD decay associated with 38 significant SNPs, we gained 31, 15, and 17 candidate genes for these traits, respectively. We also showed that PH is significantly correlated with BIH, while no other correlation was revealed. Notably, a GA signaling gene (BnRGA and a flowering gene (BnFT located on chromosome A02 were identified as the most likely candidate genes associated with PH regulation. Furthermore, a meristem initiation gene (BnLOF2 and a NAC domain transcriptional factor (BnCUC3 that may be associated with BN were identified on the chromosome A07. This study reveals novel insight into the genetic control of plant architecture and may facilitate marker-based breeding for rapeseed.

  2. A Genome-Wide Association Study Reveals That Genes with Functions for Bone Development Are Associated with Body Conformation in Catfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Xin; Liu, Shikai; Yuan, Zihao; Jiang, Yanliang; Zhi, Degui; Liu, Zhanjiang

    2017-12-01

    Body conformation is of great scientific and commercial interest for aquaculture fish species because it affects biological adaptation of the organism to environments, and is of economic importance to the aquaculture industry considering its direct effect on fillet yield. Catfish is the primary aquaculture species in the USA. Two major species used in the aquaculture industry, channel catfish and blue catfish, differ in body shape and therefore the backcross progenies serve as a good model for quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis. Here, a genome-wide association study (GWAS) with hybrid catfish was conducted to identify the QTL for body conformation, including deheaded body length (DBL), body length (BL), body depth (BD), and body breadth (BB), which were all standardized by cubic root of body weight. Overall, the results indicate that the traits are polygenic. For DBL, linkage group (LG) 2 and LG 24 contain significant QTL, and LG 13 and LG 26 contain suggestively associated QTL (-log10(P value) > 4.5). Compared with DBL, additional SNPs were identified to be associated with body length on LG 2, LG 7, and LG 18. Although no significant QTL for body depth was found, three suggestively associated QTLs were identified on LG 5, LG 13, and LG 14. No SNP for body breadth reached the threshold for suggestive association. Genes close to the associated SNPs were determined, many of which are known to be involved in bone development. This work therefore provides the basis for future identification of causal genes for the control of body conformation.

  3. Genome-wide association study reveals novel quantitative trait Loci associated with resistance to multiple leaf spot diseases of spring wheat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suraj Gurung

    Full Text Available Accelerated wheat development and deployment of high-yielding, climate resilient, and disease resistant cultivars can contribute to enhanced food security and sustainable intensification. To facilitate gene discovery, we assembled an association mapping panel of 528 spring wheat landraces of diverse geographic origin for a genome-wide association study (GWAS. All accessions were genotyped using an Illumina Infinium 9K wheat single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP chip and 4781 polymorphic SNPs were used for analysis. To identify loci underlying resistance to the major leaf spot diseases and to better understand the genomic patterns, we quantified population structure, allelic diversity, and linkage disequilibrium. Our results showed 32 loci were significantly associated with resistance to the major leaf spot diseases. Further analysis identified QTL effective against major leaf spot diseases of wheat which appeared to be novel and others that were previously identified by association analysis using Diversity Arrays Technology (DArT and bi-parental mapping. In addition, several identified SNPs co-localized with genes that have been implicated in plant disease resistance. Future work could aim to select the putative novel loci and pyramid them in locally adapted wheat cultivars to develop broad-spectrum resistance to multiple leaf spot diseases of wheat via marker-assisted selection (MAS.

  4. Genome wide association studies using a new nonparametric model reveal the genetic architecture of 17 agronomic traits in an enlarged maize association panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ning; Lu, Yanli; Yang, Xiaohong; Huang, Juan; Zhou, Yang; Ali, Farhan; Wen, Weiwei; Liu, Jie; Li, Jiansheng; Yan, Jianbing

    2014-09-01

    Association mapping is a powerful approach for dissecting the genetic architecture of complex quantitative traits using high-density SNP markers in maize. Here, we expanded our association panel size from 368 to 513 inbred lines with 0.5 million high quality SNPs using a two-step data-imputation method which combines identity by descent (IBD) based projection and k-nearest neighbor (KNN) algorithm. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) were carried out for 17 agronomic traits with a panel of 513 inbred lines applying both mixed linear model (MLM) and a new method, the Anderson-Darling (A-D) test. Ten loci for five traits were identified using the MLM method at the Bonferroni-corrected threshold -log10 (P) >5.74 (α=1). Many loci ranging from one to 34 loci (107 loci for plant height) were identified for 17 traits using the A-D test at the Bonferroni-corrected threshold -log10 (P) >7.05 (α=0.05) using 556809 SNPs. Many known loci and new candidate loci were only observed by the A-D test, a few of which were also detected in independent linkage analysis. This study indicates that combining IBD based projection and KNN algorithm is an efficient imputation method for inferring large missing genotype segments. In addition, we showed that the A-D test is a useful complement for GWAS analysis of complex quantitative traits. Especially for traits with abnormal phenotype distribution, controlled by moderate effect loci or rare variations, the A-D test balances false positives and statistical power. The candidate SNPs and associated genes also provide a rich resource for maize genetics and breeding.

  5. Genome-wide association study reveals class I MHC-restricted T cell-associated molecule gene (CRTAM) variants interact with vitamin D levels to affect asthma exacerbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Rose; Litonjua, Augusto A; Tantisira, Kelan G; Lasky-Su, Jessica; Sunyaev, Shamil R; Klanderman, Barbara J; Celedón, Juan C; Avila, Lydiana; Soto-Quiros, Manuel E; Weiss, Scott T

    2012-02-01

    It has recently been shown that vitamin D deficiency can increase asthma development and severity and that variations in vitamin D receptor genes are associated with asthma susceptibility. We sought to find genetic factors that might interact with vitamin D levels to affect the risk of asthma exacerbation. We conducted a genome-wide study of gene-vitamin D interaction on asthma exacerbations using population-based and family-based approaches on 403 subjects and trios from the Childhood Asthma Management Program. Twenty-three polymorphisms with significant interactions were studied in a replication analysis in 584 children from a Costa Rican cohort. We identified 3 common variants in the class I MHC-restricted T cell-associated molecule gene (CRTAM) that were associated with an increased rate of asthma exacerbations based on the presence of a low circulating vitamin D level. These results were replicated in a second independent population (unadjusted combined interaction, P = .00028-.00097; combined odds ratio, 3.28-5.38). One variant, rs2272094, is a nonsynonymous coding polymorphism of CRTAM. Functional studies on cell lines confirmed the interaction of vitamin D and rs2272094 on CRTAM expression. CRTAM is highly expressed in activated human CD8(+) and natural killer T cells, both of which have been implicated in asthmatic patients. The findings highlight an important gene-environment interaction that elucidates the role of vitamin D and CD8(+) and natural killer T cells in asthma exacerbation in a genome-wide gene-environment interaction study that has been replicated in an independent population. The results suggest the potential importance of maintaining adequate vitamin D levels in subsets of high-risk asthmatic patients. Copyright © 2011 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Extensive Field Survey, Laboratory and Greenhouse Studies Reveal Complex Nature of Pseudomonas syringae-Associated Hazelnut Decline in Central Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamichhane, Jay Ram; Bartoli, Claudia; Varvaro, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas avellanae (Pav) has been reported as the causal agent of bacterial decline and bacterial canker of hazelnut in Italy and Greece, respectively. Both hazelnut diseases were reported to be similar in terms of symptoms, severity and persistence. In this study, we found that both symptomatic and asymptomatic trees in the field were colonized by Pav. Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST) analysis showed that Pav strains isolated during this study in Italy belong to the P. syringae phylogroup 1 and they are closely related to Pav strains previously isolated in Greece from hazelnut bacterial canker. On the other hand, strains isolated in earlier studies from hazelnut decline in Italy belong to both phylogroup 1 and 2 of P. syringae. Both phylogroup 1 strains of P. syringae from Greece and Italy are different than strains isolated in this study in terms of their capacity to excrete fluorescent pigments on different media. Despite the same plant genotype and cropping practices adopted, the incidence of hazelnut decline ranged from nearly 0 to 91% across our study sites. No disease developed on plants inoculated with Pav through wounding while leaf scar inoculations produced only mild disease symptoms. Based on our results and the previously reported correlation between pedo-climatic conditions and hazelnut decline, we conclude that hazelnut decline in central Italy could be incited by a combination of predisposing (adverse pedo-climatic conditions) and contributing factors (Pav). Because this is a true decline different from "bacterial canker" described in Greece, we refer to it as hazelnut decline (HD).

  7. Extensive Field Survey, Laboratory and Greenhouse Studies Reveal Complex Nature of Pseudomonas syringae-Associated Hazelnut Decline in Central Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamichhane, Jay Ram; Bartoli, Claudia; Varvaro, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas avellanae (Pav) has been reported as the causal agent of bacterial decline and bacterial canker of hazelnut in Italy and Greece, respectively. Both hazelnut diseases were reported to be similar in terms of symptoms, severity and persistence. In this study, we found that both symptomatic and asymptomatic trees in the field were colonized by Pav. Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST) analysis showed that Pav strains isolated during this study in Italy belong to the P. syringae phylogroup 1 and they are closely related to Pav strains previously isolated in Greece from hazelnut bacterial canker. On the other hand, strains isolated in earlier studies from hazelnut decline in Italy belong to both phylogroup 1 and 2 of P. syringae. Both phylogroup 1 strains of P. syringae from Greece and Italy are different than strains isolated in this study in terms of their capacity to excrete fluorescent pigments on different media. Despite the same plant genotype and cropping practices adopted, the incidence of hazelnut decline ranged from nearly 0 to 91% across our study sites. No disease developed on plants inoculated with Pav through wounding while leaf scar inoculations produced only mild disease symptoms. Based on our results and the previously reported correlation between pedo-climatic conditions and hazelnut decline, we conclude that hazelnut decline in central Italy could be incited by a combination of predisposing (adverse pedo-climatic conditions) and contributing factors (Pav). Because this is a true decline different from “bacterial canker” described in Greece, we refer to it as hazelnut decline (HD). PMID:26840951

  8. Extensive Field Survey, Laboratory and Greenhouse Studies Reveal Complex Nature of Pseudomonas syringae-Associated Hazelnut Decline in Central Italy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay Ram Lamichhane

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas avellanae (Pav has been reported as the causal agent of bacterial decline and bacterial canker of hazelnut in Italy and Greece, respectively. Both hazelnut diseases were reported to be similar in terms of symptoms, severity and persistence. In this study, we found that both symptomatic and asymptomatic trees in the field were colonized by Pav. Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST analysis showed that Pav strains isolated during this study in Italy belong to the P. syringae phylogroup 1 and they are closely related to Pav strains previously isolated in Greece from hazelnut bacterial canker. On the other hand, strains isolated in earlier studies from hazelnut decline in Italy belong to both phylogroup 1 and 2 of P. syringae. Both phylogroup 1 strains of P. syringae from Greece and Italy are different than strains isolated in this study in terms of their capacity to excrete fluorescent pigments on different media. Despite the same plant genotype and cropping practices adopted, the incidence of hazelnut decline ranged from nearly 0 to 91% across our study sites. No disease developed on plants inoculated with Pav through wounding while leaf scar inoculations produced only mild disease symptoms. Based on our results and the previously reported correlation between pedo-climatic conditions and hazelnut decline, we conclude that hazelnut decline in central Italy could be incited by a combination of predisposing (adverse pedo-climatic conditions and contributing factors (Pav. Because this is a true decline different from "bacterial canker" described in Greece, we refer to it as hazelnut decline (HD.

  9. A Genome-Wide Association Study Reveals New Loci for Resistance to Clubroot Disease in Brassica napus

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Lixia; Luo, Yujie; Chen, Biyun; Xu, Kun; Zhang, Fugui; Li, Hao; Huang, Qian; Xiao, Xin; Zhang, Tianyao; Hu, Jihong; Li, Feng; Wu, Xiaoming

    2016-01-01

    Rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) is one of the most important oil crops in the world. However, the yield and quality of rapeseed were largely decreased by clubroot (Plasmodiophora brassicae Woronin). Therefore, it is of great importance for screening more resistant germplasms or genes and improving the resistance to P. brassicae in rapeseed breeding. In this study, a massive resistant identification for a natural global population was conducted in two environments with race/pathotype 4 of P. bras...

  10. A GWAS follow-up study reveals the association of the IL12RB2 gene with systemic sclerosis in Caucasian populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossini-Castillo, Lara; Martin, Jose-Ezequiel; Broen, Jasper; Gorlova, Olga; Simeón, Carmen P.; Beretta, Lorenzo; Vonk, Madelon C.; Luis Callejas, Jose; Castellví, Ivan; Carreira, Patricia; José García-Hernández, Francisco; Fernández Castro, Mónica; Coenen, Marieke J.H.; Riemekasten, Gabriela; Witte, Torsten; Hunzelmann, Nicolas; Kreuter, Alexander; Distler, Jörg H.W.; Koeleman, Bobby P.; Voskuyl, Alexandre E.; Schuerwegh, Annemie J.; Palm, Øyvind; Hesselstrand, Roger; Nordin, Annika; Airó, Paolo; Lunardi, Claudio; Scorza, Raffaella; Shiels, Paul; van Laar, Jacob M.; Herrick, Ariane; Worthington, Jane; Denton, Christopher; Tan, Filemon K.; Arnett, Frank C.; Agarwal, Sandeep K.; Assassi, Shervin; Fonseca, Carmen; Mayes, Maureen D.; Radstake, Timothy R.D.J.; Martin, Javier

    2012-01-01

    A single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) at the IL12RB2 locus showed a suggestive association signal in a previously published genome-wide association study (GWAS) in systemic sclerosis (SSc). Aiming to reveal the possible implication of the IL12RB2 gene in SSc, we conducted a follow-up study of this locus in different Caucasian cohorts. We analyzed 10 GWAS-genotyped SNPs in the IL12RB2 region (2309 SSc patients and 5161 controls). We then selected three SNPs (rs3790567, rs3790566 and rs924080) based on their significance level in the GWAS, for follow-up in an independent European cohort comprising 3344 SSc and 3848 controls. The most-associated SNP (rs3790567) was further tested in an independent cohort comprising 597 SSc patients and 1139 controls from the USA. After conditional logistic regression analysis of the GWAS data, we selected rs3790567 [PMH= 1.92 × 10−5 odds ratio (OR) = 1.19] as the genetic variant with the firmest independent association observed in the analyzed GWAS peak of association. After the first follow-up phase, only the association of rs3790567 was consistent (PMH= 4.84 × 10−3 OR = 1.12). The second follow-up phase confirmed this finding (Pχ2 = 2.82 × 10−4 OR = 1.34). After performing overall pooled-analysis of all the cohorts included in the present study, the association found for the rs3790567 SNP in the IL12RB2 gene region reached GWAS-level significant association (PMH= 2.82 × 10−9 OR = 1.17). Our data clearly support the IL12RB2 genetic association with SSc, and suggest a relevant role of the interleukin 12 signaling pathway in SSc pathogenesis. PMID:22076442

  11. Twin studies reveal specific imbalances in the mucosa-associated microbiota of patients with ileal Crohn's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willing, B.; Halfvarson, J.; Dicksved, J.; Rosenquist, M.; Jarnerot, G.; Engstrand, L.; Tysk, C.; Jansson, J. K

    2008-08-15

    Large inter-individual variation in the composition of the intestinal microbiota between unrelated individuals has made it challenging to identify specific aspects of dysbiosis that lead to Crohn's disease. To reduce variations in exposure during establishment of the gut flora and influence of genotype, we studied the mucosaassociated microbiota of monozygotic twin pairs that were discordant (n=6) or concordant (n=4) for Crohn's disease. DNA was extracted from biopsies collected from 5 locations between the ileum and rectum. Bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA genes were amplified and community composition assessed by terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism, cloning and sequencing and quantitative real-time PCR. The microbial compositions at all biopsy locations for each individual were similar, regardless of disease state, but there were differences between individuals. In particular, individuals with predominantly ileal Crohn's had a dramatically lower abundance (P<0.001) of Faecalibacterium prausnitzii and increased abundance (P<0.03) of Escherichia coli compared to healthy co-twins and those with Crohn's localized in the colon. This dysbiosis was significantly correlated to the disease phenotype rather than genotype. The reduced abundance of F. prausnitzii and increased abundance of E. coli are indicative of an ileal Crohn's disease phenotype, distinct from colonic Crohn's disease and the relative abundances of these specific bacterial populations are promising biomarker candidates for differential diagnosis of Crohn's and eventually customized treatment.

  12. A diversity study of Saccharomycopsis fibuligera in rice wine starter nuruk, reveals the evolutionary process associated with its interspecies hybrid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farh, Mohamed El-Agamy; Cho, Yunjoo; Lim, Jae Yun; Seo, Jeong-Ah

    2017-05-01

    The amylolytic yeast Saccharomycopsis fibuligera is the predominant yeast in the starter product, nuruk, which is utilized for rice wine production in South Korea. Latest molecular studies explore a recently developed interspecific hybridization among stains of S. fibuligera with a unique genetic feature. However, the origin of the natural hybridization occurrence is still unclear. Thus, to respectively distinguish parental and hybrid strains, specific primer sets were applied on 141 yeast strains isolated from different nuruk samples fermented in different provinces. Sixty-seven strains were defined accordingly as parental species with genome A while 8 strains were defined as hybrid strains. Unexpectedly, another parental species with genome B could not be found among the strain pools yet. Furthermore, it was observed that hybrid strains are phenotypically different from A genome strains; asci containing tetrad ascospores were observed in A genome strains more frequent than in hybrid strains. Nevertheless, hybrid strains were slightly more thermotolerant than A genome strains. Interestingly, all hybrid strains were located only in Jeju province. Based on these sets of data, we speculated that the unique climate of Jeju province might play an evolutionary role in the interspecific hybridization between A genome strains, as well as the unculturable allopatric B genome strains.

  13. A method for gene-based pathway analysis using genomewide association study summary statistics reveals nine new type 1 diabetes associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelou, Marina; Smyth, Deborah J; Fortune, Mary D; Burren, Oliver S; Walker, Neil M; Guo, Hui; Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Chen, Wei-Min; Concannon, Patrick; Rich, Stephen S; Todd, John A; Wallace, Chris

    2014-12-01

    Pathway analysis can complement point-wise single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis in exploring genomewide association study (GWAS) data to identify specific disease-associated genes that can be candidate causal genes. We propose a straightforward methodology that can be used for conducting a gene-based pathway analysis using summary GWAS statistics in combination with widely available reference genotype data. We used this method to perform a gene-based pathway analysis of a type 1 diabetes (T1D) meta-analysis GWAS (of 7,514 cases and 9,045 controls). An important feature of the conducted analysis is the removal of the major histocompatibility complex gene region, the major genetic risk factor for T1D. Thirty-one of the 1,583 (2%) tested pathways were identified to be enriched for association with T1D at a 5% false discovery rate. We analyzed these 31 pathways and their genes to identify SNPs in or near these pathway genes that showed potentially novel association with T1D and attempted to replicate the association of 22 SNPs in additional samples. Replication P-values were skewed (P=9.85×10-11) with 12 of the 22 SNPs showing Passociated variants in genes ITGB7 (rs11170466, P=7.86×10-9), NRP1 (rs722988, 4.88×10-8), BAD (rs694739, 2.37×10-7), CTSB (rs1296023, 2.79×10-7), FYN (rs11964650, P=5.60×10-7), UBE2G1 (rs9906760, 5.08×10-7), MAP3K14 (rs17759555, 9.67×10-7), ITGB1 (rs1557150, 1.93×10-6), and IL7R (rs1445898, 2.76×10-6). The proposed methodology can be applied to other GWAS datasets for which only summary level data are available. © 2014 The Authors. ** Genetic Epidemiology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. A genome-wide association study of a global rice panel reveals resistance in Oryza sativa to root-knot nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimkpa, Stanley O N; Lahari, Zobaida; Shrestha, Roshi; Douglas, Alex; Gheysen, Godelieve; Price, Adam H

    2016-02-01

    The root-knot nematode Meloidogyne graminicola is one of the most serious nematode pests worldwide and represents a major constraint on rice production. While variation in the susceptibility of Asian rice (Oryza sativa) exists, so far no strong and reliable resistance has been reported. Quantitative trait loci for partial resistance have been reported but no underlying genes have been tagged or cloned. Here, 332 accessions of the Rice Diversity Panel 1 were assessed for gall formation, revealing large variation across all subpopulations of rice and higher susceptibility in temperate japonica accessions. Accessions Khao Pahk Maw and LD 24 appeared to be resistant, which was confirmed in large pot experiments where no galls were observed. Detailed observations on these two accessions revealed no nematodes inside the roots 2 days after inoculation and very few females after 17 days (5 in Khao Pahk Maw and 100 in the susceptible controls). These two cultivars appear ideal donors for breeding root-knot nematode resistance. A genome-wide association study revealed 11 quantitative trait loci, two of which are close to epistatic loci detected in the Bala x Azucena population. The discussion highlights a small number of candidate genes worth exploring further, in particular many genes with lectin domains and genes on chromosome 11 with homology to the Hordeum Mla locus. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  15. Genome-wide association study in a high-risk isolate for multiple sclerosis reveals associated variants in STAT3 gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakkula, Eveliina; Leppä, Virpi; Sulonen, Anna-Maija

    2010-01-01

    Genetic risk for multiple sclerosis (MS) is thought to involve both common and rare risk alleles. Recent GWAS and subsequent meta-analysis have established the critical role of the HLA locus and identified new common variants associated to MS. These variants have small odds ratios (ORs) and explain...... in 711 cases and 1029 controls from Finland, and the top two findings were validated in 3859 cases and 9110 controls from more heterogeneous populations. SNP (rs744166) within the STAT3 gene was associated to MS (p = 2.75 x 10(-10), OR 0.87, confidence interval 0.83-0.91). The protective haplotype for MS...

  16. A Deep Phenotype Association Study Reveals Specific Phenotype Associations with Genetic Variants in Age-related Macular Degeneration: Age-Related Eye Disease Study 2 (AREDS2) Report No. 14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Asten, Freekje; Simmons, Michael; Singhal, Ayush; Keenan, Tiarnan D; Ratnapriya, Rinki; Agrón, Elvira; Clemons, Traci E; Swaroop, Anand; Lu, Zhiyong; Chew, Emily Y

    2017-10-30

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a multifactorial disease with variable phenotypic presentation, was associated with 52 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 34 loci in a genome-wide association study (GWAS). These genetic variants could modulate different biological pathways involved in AMD, contributing to phenotypic variability. To better understand the effects of these SNPs, we performed a deep phenotype association study (DeePAS) in the Age-Related Eye Disease Study 2 (AREDS2), followed by replication using AREDS participants, to identify genotype associations with AMD and non-AMD ocular and systemic phenotypes. Cohort study. AREDS and AREDS2 participants. AREDS2 participants (discovery cohort) had detailed phenotyping for AMD; other eye conditions; cardiovascular, neurologic, gastrointestinal, and endocrine disease; cognitive function; serum nutrient levels; and others (total of 139 AMD and non-AMD phenotypes). Genotypes of the 52 GWAS SNPs were obtained. The DeePAS was performed by correlating the 52 SNPs to all phenotypes using logistic and linear regression models. Associations that reached Bonferroni-corrected statistical significance were replicated in AREDS. Genotype-phenotype associations. A total of 1776 AREDS2 participants had 5 years follow-up; 1435 AREDS participants had 10 years. The DeePAS revealed a significant association of the rs3750846 SNP at the ARMS2/HTRA1 locus with subretinal/sub-retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) hemorrhage related to neovascular AMD (odds ratio 1.55 [95% confidence interval 1.31-1.84], P = 2.67 × 10(-7)). This novel association remained significant after conditioning on participants with neovascular AMD (P = 2.42 × 10(-4)). Carriers of rs3750846 had poorer visual acuity during follow-up (P = 6.82 × 10(-7)) and were more likely to have a first-degree relative with AMD (P = 5.38 × 10(-6)). Two SNPs at the CFH locus, rs10922109 and rs570618, were associated with the drusen area in the Early Treatment

  17. A genome-wide association study for equine recurrent airway obstruction in European Warmblood horses reveals a suggestive new quantitative trait locus on chromosome 13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnider, D; Rieder, S; Leeb, T; Gerber, V; Neuditschko, M

    2017-12-01

    Recurrent airway obstruction (RAO), also known as heaves, is an asthma-like respiratory disease. Its development is strongly influenced by environmental risk factors such as sensitization and exposure to moldy hay, straw bedding and stabling indoors. A hereditary component has been documented in previous studies; however, so far no causative genetic variant that influences the risk of developing RAO has been identified. In this study, we revised an existing dataset and selected 384 horses for genotyping on the Affymetrix high-density equine SNP array. We performed an allelic case-control genome-wide association study, which revealed a suggestively significant association on equine chromosome 13 at 32 843 309 bp. This SNP is located in the protein-coding gene TXNDC11, which is possibly involved in the folding process of the multiprotein complexes DUOX1 and DUOX2. In humans, these proteins are known to take part in regulating the production of H2 O2 in the respiratory tract epithelium as well as in MUC5AC mucin expression. Therefore, TXNDC11 may be considered a functional candidate gene, and further research is needed to explore its potential role in RAO-affected horses. © 2017 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  18. A Novel QTL for Powdery Mildew Resistance in Nordic Spring Barley (Hordeum vulgare L. ssp. vulgare Revealed by Genome-Wide Association Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Therése Bengtsson

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The powdery mildew fungus, Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei is a worldwide threat to barley (Hordeum vulgare L. ssp. vulgare production. One way to control the disease is by the development and deployment of resistant cultivars. A genome-wide association study was performed in a Nordic spring barley panel consisting of 169 genotypes, to identify marker-trait associations significant for powdery mildew. Powdery mildew was scored during three years (2012–2014 in four different locations within the Nordic region. There were strong correlations between data from all locations and years. In total four QTLs were identified, one located on chromosome 4H in the same region as the previously identified mlo locus and three on chromosome 6H. Out of these three QTLs identified on chromosome 6H, two are in the same region as previously reported QTLs for powdery mildew resistance, whereas one QTL appears to be novel. The top NCBI BLASTn hit of the SNP markers within the novel QTL predicted the responsible gene to be the 26S proteasome regulatory subunit, RPN1, which is required for innate immunity and powdery mildew-induced cell death in Arabidopsis. The results from this study have revealed SNP marker candidates that can be exploited for use in marker-assisted selection and stacking of genes for powdery mildew resistance in barley.

  19. A Novel QTL for Powdery Mildew Resistance in Nordic Spring Barley (Hordeum vulgare L. ssp. vulgare) Revealed by Genome-Wide Association Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengtsson, Therése; Åhman, Inger; Manninen, Outi; Reitan, Lars; Christerson, Therese; Due Jensen, Jens; Krusell, Lene; Jahoor, Ahmed; Orabi, Jihad

    2017-01-01

    The powdery mildew fungus, Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei is a worldwide threat to barley (Hordeum vulgare L. ssp. vulgare) production. One way to control the disease is by the development and deployment of resistant cultivars. A genome-wide association study was performed in a Nordic spring barley panel consisting of 169 genotypes, to identify marker-trait associations significant for powdery mildew. Powdery mildew was scored during three years (2012–2014) in four different locations within the Nordic region. There were strong correlations between data from all locations and years. In total four QTLs were identified, one located on chromosome 4H in the same region as the previously identified mlo locus and three on chromosome 6H. Out of these three QTLs identified on chromosome 6H, two are in the same region as previously reported QTLs for powdery mildew resistance, whereas one QTL appears to be novel. The top NCBI BLASTn hit of the SNP markers within the novel QTL predicted the responsible gene to be the 26S proteasome regulatory subunit, RPN1, which is required for innate immunity and powdery mildew-induced cell death in Arabidopsis. The results from this study have revealed SNP marker candidates that can be exploited for use in marker-assisted selection and stacking of genes for powdery mildew resistance in barley. PMID:29184565

  20. Biophysical Studies on BEX3, the p75NTR-Associated Cell Death Executor, Reveal a High-Order Oligomer with Partially Folded Regions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katia M S Cabral

    Full Text Available BEX3 (Brain Expressed X-linked protein 3 is a member of a mammal-specific placental protein family. Several studies have found the BEX proteins to be associated with neurodegeneration, the cell cycle and cancer. BEX3 has been predicted to be intrinsically disordered and also to represent an intracellular hub for cell signaling. The pro-apoptotic activity of BEX3 in association with a number of additional proteins has been widely supported; however, to the best of our knowledge, very limited data are available on the conformation of any of the members of the BEX family. In this study, we structurally characterized BEX3 using biophysical experimental data. Small angle X-ray scattering and atomic force microscopy revealed that BEX3 forms a specific higher-order oligomer that is consistent with a globular molecule. Solution nuclear magnetic resonance, partial proteinase K digestion, circular dichroism spectroscopy, and fluorescence techniques that were performed on the recombinant protein indicated that the structure of BEX3 is composed of approximately 31% α-helix and 20% β-strand, contains partially folded regions near the N- and C-termini, and a core which is proteolysis-resistant around residues 55-120. The self-oligomerization of BEX3 has been previously reported in cell culture and is consistent with our in vitro data.

  1. Genome-wide association study in a high-risk isolate for multiple sclerosis reveals associated variants in STAT3 gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakkula, Eveliina; Leppä, Virpi; Sulonen, Anna-Maija

    2010-01-01

    only a fraction of the genetic risk. To expose potentially rare, high-impact alleles, we conducted a GWAS of 68 distantly related cases and 136 controls from a high-risk internal isolate of Finland with increased prevalence and familial occurrence of MS. The top 27 loci with p ... in STAT3 is a risk allele for Crohn disease, implying that STAT3 represents a shared risk locus for at least two autoimmune diseases. This study also demonstrates the potential of special isolated populations in search for variants contributing to complex traits....

  2. A large cohort study reveals the association of elevated peripheral blood lymphocyte-to-monocyte ratio with favorable prognosis in nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC is an endemic neoplasm in southern China. Although NPC sufferers are sensitive to radiotherapy, 20-30% of patients finally progress with recurrence and metastases. Elevated lymphocyte-to-monocyte ratio (LMR has been reported to be associated with favorable prognosis in some hematology malignancies, but has not been studied in NPC. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether LMR could predict the prognosis of NPC patients. METHODS: A retrospective cohort of 1,547 non-metastatic NPC patients was recruited between January 2005 and June 2008. The counts for peripheral lymphocyte and monocyte were retrieved, and the LMR was calculated. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, univariate and multivariate COX proportional hazards analyses were applied to evaluate the associations of LMR with overall survival (OS, disease-free survival (DFS, distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS and loco-regional recurrence-free survival (LRRFS, respectively. RESULTS: Univariate analysis revealed that higher LMR level (≥ 5.220 was significantly associated with superior OS, DFS and DMFS (P values <0.001. The higher lymphocyte count (≥ 2.145 × 10(9/L was significantly associated with better OS (P = 0.002 and DMFS (P = 0.031, respectively, while the lower monocyte count (<0.475 × 10(9/L was associated with better OS (P = 0.012, DFS (P = 0.011 and DMFS (P = 0.003, respectively. Multivariate Cox proportional hazard analysis showed that higher LMR level was a significantly independent predictor for superior OS (hazard ratio or HR = 0.558, 95% confidence interval or 95% CI = 0.417-0.748; P<0.001, DFS (HR = 0.669, 95% CI = 0.535-0.838; P<0.001 and DMFS (HR = 0.543, 95% CI = 0.403-0.732; P<0.001, respectively. The advanced T and N stages were also independent indicators for worse OS, DFS, and DMFS, except that T stage showed borderline statistical significance for DFS (P = 0.053 and DMFS (P = 0.080. CONCLUSIONS: The

  3. A brain-wide association study of DISC1 genetic variants reveals a relationship with the structure and functional connectivity of the precuneus in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Xiaohong; Lu, Wenlian; Kendrick, Keith M; Pu, Weidan; Wang, Chu; Jin, Li; Lu, Guangmin; Liu, Zhening; Liu, Haihong; Feng, Jianfeng

    2014-11-01

    The Disrupted in Schizophrenia Gene 1 (DISC1) plays a role in both neural signaling and development and is associated with schizophrenia, although its links to altered brain structure and function in this disorder are not fully established. Here we have used structural and functional MRI to investigate links with six DISC1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We employed a brain-wide association analysis (BWAS) together with a Jacknife internal validation approach in 46 schizophrenia patients and 24 matched healthy control subjects. Results from structural MRI showed significant associations between all six DISC1 variants and gray matter volume in the precuneus, post-central gyrus and middle cingulate gyrus. Associations with specific SNPs were found for rs2738880 in the left precuneus and right post-central gyrus, and rs1535530 in the right precuneus and middle cingulate gyrus. Using regions showing structural associations as seeds a resting-state functional connectivity analysis revealed significant associations between all 6 SNPS and connectivity between the right precuneus and inferior frontal gyrus. The connection between the right precuneus and inferior frontal gyrus was also specifically associated with rs821617. Importantly schizophrenia patients showed positive correlations between the six DISC-1 SNPs associated gray matter volume in the left precuneus and right post-central gyrus and negative symptom severity. No correlations with illness duration were found. Our results provide the first evidence suggesting a key role for structural and functional connectivity associations between DISC1 polymorphisms and the precuneus in schizophrenia. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Genome-wide association study reveals genetic architecture of eating behavior in pigs and its implications for humans obesity by comparative mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Do, Duy Ngoc; Strathe, Anders Bjerring; Ostersen, Tage

    2013-01-01

    1, PTPN4, MTMR4 and RNGTT) and positive regulation of peptide secretion genes (GHRH, NNAT and TCF7L2) were highly significantly associated with feeding behavior traits. This is the first GWAS to identify genetic variants and biological mechanisms for eating behavior in pigs and these results...... are important for genetic improvement of pig feed efficiency. We have also conducted pig-human comparative gene mapping to reveal key genomic regions and/or genes on the human genome that may influence eating behavior in human beings and consequently affect the development of obesity and metabolic syndrome...

  5. All SNPs are not created equal: genome-wide association studies reveal a consistent pattern of enrichment among functionally annotated SNPs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schork, Andrew J; Thompson, Wesley K; Pham, Phillip

    2013-01-01

    Recent results indicate that genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have the potential to explain much of the heritability of common complex phenotypes, but methods are lacking to reliably identify the remaining associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We applied stratified False Discov...

  6. All SNPs Are Not Created Equal: Genome-Wide Association Studies Reveal a Consistent Pattern of Enrichment among Functionally Annotated SNPs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schork, Andrew J.; Thompson, Wesley K.; Pham, Phillip; Torkamani, Ali; Roddey, J. Cooper; Sullivan, Patrick F.; Kelsoe, John R.; O'Donovan, Michael C.; Furberg, Helena; Schork, Nicholas J.; Andreassen, Ole A.; Dale, Anders M.; Absher, Devin; Agudo, Antonio; Almgren, Peter; Ardissino, Diego; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Bandinelli, Stephania; Barzan, Luigi; Bencko, Vladimir; Benhamou, Simone; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Bernardinelli, Luisa; Bis, Joshua; Boehnke, Michael; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Brennan, Paul; Canova, Cristina; Castellsagué, Xavier; Chanock, Stephen; Chasman, Daniel; Conway, David I.; Dackor, Jennifer; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Duan, Jubao; Elosua, Roberto; Everett, Brendan; Fabianova, Eleonora; Ferrucci, Luigi; Foretova, Lenka; Fortmann, Stephen P.; Franceschini, Nora; Frayling, Timothy; Furberg, Curt; Gejman, Pablo V.; Groop, Leif; Gu, Fangyi; Guralnik, Jack; Hankinson, Susan E.; Haritunians, Talin; Healy, Claire; Hofman, Albert; Holcátová, Ivana; Hunter, David J.; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Ioannidis, John P. A.; Iribarren, Carlos; Jackson, Anne U.; Janout, Vladimir; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kim, Yunjung; Kjaerheim, Kristina; Knowles, Joshua W.; Kraft, Peter; Ladenvall, Claes; Lagiou, Pagona; Lanthrop, Mark; Lerman, Caryn; Levinson, Douglas F.; Levy, Daniel; Li, Ming D.; Lin, Dan Yu; Lips, Esther H.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lowry, Ray; Lucas, Gavin; Macfarlane, Tatiana V.; Maes, Hermine; Mannucci, Pier Mannuccio; Mates, Dana; Mauri, Francesco; McGovern, Janet Audrain; McKay, James D.; McKnight, Barbara; Melander, Olle; Merlini, Piera Angelica; Milaneschi, Yuri; Mohlke, Karen L.; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Pare, Guillaume; Penninx, Brenda W.; Perry, John; Posthuma, Danielle; Preis, Sarah Rosner; Psaty, Bruce; Quertermous, Thomas; Ramachandran, Vasan S.; Richiardi, Lorenzo; Ridker, Paul; Rose, Jed; Rudnai, Peter; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanders, Alan R.; Schwartz, Stephen M.; Shi, Jianxin; Smit, Johannes H.; Stringham, Heather M.; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonilia; Tanaka, Toshiko; Taylor, Kent; Thacker, Evan; Thornton, Laura; Tiemeier, Henning; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Vink, Jacqueline M.; Vogelzangs, Nicole; Voight, Benjamin F.; Walter, Stefan; Willemsen, Gonneke; Zaridze, David; Znaor, Ariana; Akil, Huda; Anjorin, Adebayo; Backlund, Lena; Badner, Judith A.; Barchas, Jack D.; Barrett, Thomas B.; Bass, Nick; Bauer, Michael; Bellivier, Frank; Bergen, Sarah E.; Berrettini, Wade; Blackwood, Douglas; Bloss, Cinnamon S.; Breen, Gerome; Breuer, René; Bunner, William E.; Burmeister, Margit; Byerley, William; Caesar, Sian; Chambert, Kim; Cichon, Sven; St Clair, David; Collier, David A.; Corvin, Aiden; Coryell, William H.; Craddock, Nicholas; Craig, David W.; Daly, Mark; Day, Richard; Degenhardt, Franziska; Djurovic, Srdjan; Dudbridge, Frank; Edenberg, Howard J.; Elkin, Amanda; Etain, Bruno; Farmer, Anne E.; Ferreira, Manuel A.; Ferrier, I. Nicol; Flickinger, Matthew; Foroud, Tatiana; Frank, Josef; Fraser, Christine; Frisén, Louise; Gershon, Elliot S.; Gill, Michael; Gordon-Smith, Katherine; Green, Elaine K.; Greenwood, Tiffany A.; Grozeva, Detelina; Guan, Weihua; Gurling, Hugh; Gustafsson, Ómar; Hamshere, Marian L.; Hautzinger, Martin; Herms, Stefan; Hipolito, Maria; Holmans, Peter A.; Hultman, Christina M.; Jamain, Stéphane; Jones, Edward G.; Jones, Ian; Jones, Lisa; Kandaswamy, Radhika; Kennedy, James L.; Kirov, George K.; Koller, Daniel L.; Kwan, Phoenix; Landén, Mikael; Langstrom, Niklas; Lathrop, Mark; Lawrence, Jacob; Lawson, William B.; Leboyer, Marion; Lee, Phil H.; Li, Jun; Lichtenstein, Paul; Lin, Danyu; Liu, Chunyu; Lohoff, Falk W.; Lucae, Susanne; Mahon, Pamela B.; Maier, Wolfgang; Martin, Nicholas G.; Mattheisen, Manuel; Matthews, Keith; Mattingsdal, Morten; McGhee, Kevin A.; McGuffin, Peter; McInnis, Melvin G.; McIntosh, Andrew; McKinney, Rebecca; McLean, Alan W.; McMahon, Francis J.; McQuillin, Andrew; Meier, Sandra; Melle, Ingrid; Meng, Fan; Mitchell, Philip B.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Moran, Jennifer; Morken, Gunnar; Morris, Derek W.; Moskvina, Valentina; Muglia, Pierandrea; Mühleisen, Thomas W.; Muir, Walter J.; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Myers, Richard M.; Nievergelt, Caroline M.; Nikolov, Ivan; Nimgaonkar, Vishwajit; Nöthen, Markus M.; Nurnberger, John I.; Nwulia, Evaristus A.; O'Dushlaine, Colm; Osby, Urban; Óskarsson, Högni; Owen, Michael J.; Petursson, Hannes; Pickard, Benjamin S.; Porgeirsson, Porgeir; Potash, James B.; Propping, Peter; Purcell, Shaun M.; Quinn, Emma; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Rice, John; Rietschel, Marcella; Ruderfer, Douglas; Schalling, Martin; Schatzberg, Alan F.; Scheftner, William A.; Schofield, Peter R.; Schulze, Thomas G.; Schumacher, Johannes; Schwarz, Markus M.; Scolnick, Ed; Scott, Laura J.; Shilling, Paul D.; Sigurdsson, Engilbert; Sklar, Pamela; Smith, Erin N.; Stefansson, Hreinn; Stefansson, Kari; Steffens, Michael; Steinberg, Stacy; Strauss, John; Strohmaier, Jana; Szelinger, Szabocls; Thompson, Robert C.; Tozzi, Federica; Treutlein, Jens; Vincent, John B.; Watson, Stanley J.; Wienker, Thomas F.; Williamson, Richard; Witt, Stephanie H.; Wright, Adam; Xu, Wei; Young, Allan H.; Zandi, Peter P.; Zhang, Peng; Zöllner, Sebastian; Agartz, Ingrid; Albus, Margot; Alexander, Madeline; Amdur, Richard L.; Amin, Farooq; Bass, Nicholas; Bitter, István; Black, Donald W.; Børglum, Anders D.; Brown, Matthew A.; Bruggeman, Richard; Buccola, Nancy G.; Byerley, William F.; Cahn, Wiepke; Cantor, Rita M.; Carr, Vaughan J.; Catts, Stanley V.; Choudhury, Khalid; Cloninger, C. Robert; Cormican, Paul; Danoy, Patrick A.; Datta, Susmita; DeHert, Marc; Demontis, Ditte; Dikeos, Dimitris; Donnelly, Peter; Donohoe, Gary; Duong, Linh; Dwyer, Sarah; Fanous, Ayman; Fink-Jensen, Anders; Freedman, Robert; Freimer, Nelson B.; Friedl, Marion; Georgieva, Lyudmila; Giegling, Ina; Glenthøj, Birte; Godard, Stephanie; Golimbet, Vera; de Haan, Lieuwe; Hansen, Mark; Hansen, Thomas; Hartmann, Annette M.; Henskens, Frans A.; Hougaard, David M.; Ingason, Andrés; Jablensky, Assen V.; Jakobsen, Klaus D.; Jay, Maurice; Jönsson, Erik G.; Jürgens, Gesche; Kahn, René S.; Keller, Matthew C.; Kendler, Kenneth S.; Kenis, Gunter; Kenny, Elaine; Konnerth, Heike; Konte, Bettina; Krabbendam, Lydia; Krasucki, Robert; Lasseter, Virginia K.; Laurent, Claudine; Lencz, Todd; Lerer, F. Bernard; Liang, Kung-Yee; Lieberman, Jeffrey A.; Linszen, Don H.; Lönnqvist, Jouko; Loughland, Carmel M.; Maclean, Alan W.; Maher, Brion S.; Malhotra, Anil K.; Mallet, Jacques; Malloy, Pat; McGrath, John J.; McLean, Duncan E.; Michie, Patricia T.; Milanova, Vihra; Mors, Ole; Mortensen, Preben B.; Mowry, Bryan J.; Myin-Germeys, Inez; Neale, Benjamin; Nertney, Deborah A.; Nestadt, Gerald; Nielsen, Jimmi; Nordentoft, Merete; Norton, Nadine; O'Neill, F. Anthony; Olincy, Ann; Olsen, Line; Ophoff, Roel A.; Ørntoft, Torben F.; van Os, Jim; Pantelis, Christos; Papadimitriou, George; Pato, Carlos N.; Pato, Michele T.; Peltonen, Leena; Pickard, Ben; Pietiläinen, Olli P. H.; Pimm, Jonathan; Pulver, Ann E.; Puri, Vinay; Quested, Digby; Rasmussen, Henrik B.; Réthelyi, János M.; Ribble, Robert; Riley, Brien P.; Rossin, Lizzy; Ruggeri, Mirella; Rujescu, Dan; Schall, Ulrich; Schwab, Sibylle G.; Scolnick, Edward; Scott, Rodney J.; Silverman, Jeremy M.; Spencer, Chris C. A.; Strange, Amy; Strengman, Eric; Stroup, T. Scott; Suvisaari, Jaana; Terenius, Lars; Thirumalai, Srinivasa; Timm, Sally; Toncheva, Draga; Tosato, Sarah; van den Oord, Edwin J. C. G.; Veldink, Jan; Visscher, Peter M.; Walsh, Dermot; Wang, August G.; Werge, Thomas; Wiersma, Durk; Wildenauer, Dieter B.; Williams, Hywel J.; Williams, Nigel M.; van Winkel, Ruud; Wormley, Brandon; Zammit, Stan

    2013-01-01

    Recent results indicate that genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have the potential to explain much of the heritability of common complex phenotypes, but methods are lacking to reliably identify the remaining associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We applied stratified False Discovery

  7. Genome-wide association study for refractive astigmatism reveals genetic co-determination with spherical equivalent refractive error: the CREAM consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Q. Li (Qing); R. Wojciechowski (Robert); C.L. Simpson (Claire); P.G. Hysi (Pirro); V.J.M. Verhoeven (Virginie); M.K. Ikram (Kamran); R. Höhn (René); V. Vitart (Veronique); A.W. Hewit (Alex); K. Oexle (Konrad); K.M. Makela (Kari Matti); S. MacGregor (Stuart); M. Pirastu (Mario); Q. Fan (Qiao); C-Y. Cheng (Ching-Yu); B. St Pourcain (Beate); G. Mcmahon (George); J.P. Kemp (John); K. Northstone (Kate); J.S. Rahi (Jugnoo); P. Cumberland (Phillippa); N.G. Martin (Nicholas); P.G. Sanfilippo (Paul G.); Y. Lu (Yi); Y. Wang (Ying); C. Hayward (Caroline); O. Polasek (Ozren); H. Campbell (Harry); G. Bencic (Goran); A. Wright (Alan); J. Wedenoja (Juho); T. Zeller (Tanja); A. Schillert (Arne); A. Mirshahi (Alireza); K.J. Lackner (Karl); S.P. Yip (Shea Ping); M.K.H. Yap (Maurice K. H.); J.S. Ried (Janina); C. Gieger (Christian); D. Murgia (Daniela); J.F. Wilson (James F); B.W. Fleck (Brian W.); S. Yazar (Seyhan); J.R. Vingerling (Hans); A. Hofman (Albert); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); N. Amin (Najaf); L.C. Karssen (Lennart); B.A. Oostra (Ben); X. Zhou (Xin); Y.Y. Teo (Yik Ying); E.S. Tai (Shyong); E.N. Vithana (Eranga); V.A. Barathi (Veluchamy); Y. Zheng (Yingfeng); R. Siantar (Rosalynn); K. Neelam (Kumari); Y. Shin (Youchan); J. Lam (Janice); E. Yonova-Doing (Ekaterina); C. Venturini (Cristina); S.M. Hosseini (S Mohsen); H.-S. Wong (Hoi-Suen); T. Lehtimäki (Terho); M. Kähönen (Mika); O. Raitakari (Olli); N.J. Timpson (Nicholas); D.M. Evans (David M.); C.C. Khor; T. Aung (Tin); T.L. Young (Terri); P. Mitchell (Paul); B.E.K. Klein (Barbara); C.M. van Duijn (Cornelia); T. Meitinger (Thomas); J.B. Jonas (Jost B.); P.N. Baird (Paul); D.A. Mackey (David); T.Y. Wong (Tien Yin); S-M. Saw (Seang-Mei); O. Pärssinen (Olavi); D.E. Stambolian (Dwight); C.J. Hammond (Christopher); C.C.W. Klaver (Caroline); C. Williams (Cathy); A.D. Paterson (Andrew); J.E. Bailey-Wilson (Joan E.); J. Guggenheim (Jean)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractTo identify genetic variants associated with refractive astigmatism in the general population, meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies were performed for: White Europeans aged at least 25 years (20 cohorts, N = 31,968); Asian subjects aged at least 25 years (7 cohorts,

  8. All SNPs are not created equal: Genome-wide association studies reveal a consistent pattern of enrichment among functionally annotated SNPs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schork, A.J.; Thompson, W.K.; Pham, P.; Torkamani, A.; Roddey, J.C.; Sullivan, P.F.; Kelsoe, J.; O'Donovan, M.C.; Furberg, H.; Absher, D.; Agudo, A.; Almgren, P.; Ardissino, D.; Assimes, T.L.; Bandinelli, S.; Barzan, L.; Bencko, V.; Benhamou, S.; Benjamin, E.J.; Bernardinelli, L.; Bis, J.; Boehnke, M.; Boerwinkle, E.; Boomsma, D.I.; Brennan, P.; Canova, C.; Castellsagué, X.; Chanock, S.; Chasman, D.I.; Conway, D.I.; Dackor, J.; de Geus, E.J.C.; Duan, J.; Elosua, R.; Everett, B.; Fabianova, E.; Ferrucci, L.; Foretova, L.; Fortmann, S.P.; Franceschini, N.; Frayling, T.M.; Furberg, C.; Gejman, P.V.; Groop, L.; Gu, F.; Guralnik, J.; Hankinson, S.E.; Haritunians, T.; Healy, C.; Hofman, A.; Holcátová, I.; Hunter, D.J.; Hwang, S.J.; Ioannidis, J.P.A.; Iribarren, C.; Jackson, A.U.; Janout, V.; Kaprio, J.; Kim, Y.; Kjaerheim, K.; Knowles, J.W.; Kraft, P.; Ladenvall, C.; Lagiou, P.; Lanthrop, M.; Lerman, C.; Levinson, D.F.; Levy, D.; Li, M.D.; Lin, D.Y.; Lips, E.H.; Lissowska, J.; Lowry, R.B.; Lucas, G.; Macfarlane, T.V.; Maes, H.H.M.; Mannucci, P.M.; Mates, D.; Mauri, F.; McGovern, J.A.; McKay, J.D.; McKnight, B.; Melander, O.; Merlini, P.A.; Milaneschi, Y.; Mohlke, K.L.; O'Donnell, C.J.; Pare, G.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.; Perry, J.R.B.; Posthuma, D.; Preis, S.R.; Psaty, B.; Quertermous, T.; Ramachandran, V.S.; Richiardi, L.; Ridker, P.M.; Rose, J.; Rudnai, P.; Salomaa, V.; Sanders, A.R.; Schwartz, S.M.; Shi, J.; Smit, J.H.; Stringham, H.M.; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, N.; Tanaka, T.; Taylor, K.; Thacker, E.E.; Thornton, L.; Tiemeier, H.; Tuomilehto, J.; Uitterlinden, A.G.; van Duijn, C.M.; Vink, J.M.; Vogelzangs, N.; Voight, B.F.; Walter, S.; Willemsen, G.; Zaridze, D.; Znaor, A.; Akil, H.; Anjorin, A.; Backlund, L.; Badner, J.A.; Barchas, J.D.; Barrett, T.; Bass, N.; Bauer, M.; Bellivier, F.; Bergen, S.E.; Berrettini, W.; Blackwood, D.; Bloss, C.S.; Breen, G.; Breuer, R.; Bunner, W.E.; Burmeister, M.; Byerley, W. F.; Caesar, S.; Chambert, K.; Cichon, S.; St Clair, D.; Collier, D.A.; Corvin, A.; Coryell, W.H.; Craddock, N.; Craig, D.W.; Daly, M.; Day, R.; Degenhardt, F.; Djurovic, S.; Dudbridge, F.; Edenberg, H.J.; Elkin, A.; Etain, B.; Farmer, A.E.; Ferreira, M.A.; Ferrier, I.; Flickinger, M.; Foroud, T.; Frank, J.; Fraser, C.; Frisén, L.; Gershon, E.S.; Gill, M.; Gordon-Smith, K.; Green, E.K.; Greenwood, T.A.; Grozeva, D.; Guan, W.; Gurling, H.; Gustafsson, O.; Hamshere, M.L.; Hautzinger, M.; Herms, S.; Hipolito, M.; Holmans, P.A.; Hultman, C. M.; Jamain, S.; Jones, E.G.; Jones, I.; Jones, L.; Kandaswamy, R.; Kennedy, J.L.; Kirov, G. K.; Koller, D.L.; Kwan, P.; Landén, M.; Langstrom, N.; Lathrop, M.; Lawrence, J.; Lawson, W.B.; Leboyer, M.; Lee, P.H.; Li, J.; Lichtenstein, P.; Lin, D.; Liu, C.; Lohoff, F.W.; Lucae, S.; Mahon, P.B.; Maier, W.; Martin, N.G.; Mattheisen, M.; Matthews, K.; Mattingsdal, M.; McGhee, K.A.; McGuffin, P.; McInnis, M.G.; McIntosh, A.; McKinney, R.; McLean, A.W.; McMahon, F.J.; McQuillin, A.; Meier, S.; Melle, I.; Meng, F.; Mitchell, P.B.; Montgomery, G.W.; Moran, J.; Morken, G.; Morris, D.W.; Moskvina, V.; Muglia, P.; Mühleisen, T.W.; Muir, W.J.; Müller-Myhsok, B.; Myers, R.M.; Nievergelt, C.M.; Nikolov, I.; Nimgaonkar, V.L.; Nöthen, M.M.; Nurnberger, J.I.; Nwulia, E.A.; O'Dushlaine, C.; Osby, U.; Óskarsson, H.; Owen, M.J.; Petursson, H.; Pickard, B.S.; Porgeirsson, P.; Potash, J.B.; Propping, P.; Purcell, S.M.; Quinn, E.; Raychaudhuri, S.; Rice, J.; Rietschel, M.; Ruderfer, D.; Schalling, M.; Schatzberg, A.F.; Scheftner, W.A.; Schofield, P.R.; Schulze, T.G.; Schumacher, J.; Schwarz, M.M.; Scolnick, E.; Scott, L.J.; Shilling, P.D.; Sigurdsson, E.; Sklar, P.; Smith, E.N.; Stefansson, H.; Stefansson, K.; Steffens, M; Steinberg, S.; Strauss, J.; Strohmaier, J.; Szelinger, S.; Thompson, R.C.; Tozzi, F.; Treutlein, J.; Vincent, J.B.; Watson, S.J.; Wienker, T.F.; Williamson, R.; Witt, S.H.; Wright, A.; Xu, W.; Young, A.H.; Zandi, P.P.; Zhang, P.; Zöllner, S.; Agartz, I.; Albus, M.; Alexander, M.; Amdur, R. L.; Amin, F.; Bitter, I.; Black, D.W.; Børglum, A.D.; Brown, M.A.; Bruggeman, R.; Buccola, N.G.; Cahn, W.; Cantor, R.M.; Carr, V.J.; Catts, S. V.; Choudhury, K.; Cloninger, C. R.; Cormican, P.; Danoy, P. A.; Datta, S.; DeHert, M.; Demontis, D.; Dikeos, D.; Donnelly, P.; Donohoe, G.; Duong, L.; Dwyer, S.; Fanous, A.; Fink-Jensen, A.; Freedman, R.; Freimer, N.B.; Friedl, M.; Georgieva, L.; Giegling, I.; Glenthoj, B.; Godard, S.; Golimbet, V.; de Haan, L.; Hansen, M.; Hansen, T.; Hartmann, A.M.; Henskens, F. A.; Hougaard, D. M.; Ingason, A.; Jablensky, A. V.; Jakobsen, K.D.; Jay, M.; Jönsson, E.G.; Jürgens, G.; Kahn, R.S.; Keller, M.C.; Kendler, K.S.; Kenis, G.; Kenny, E.; Konnerth, H.; Konte, B.; Krabbendam, L.; Krasucki, R.; Lasseter, V. K.; Laurent, C.; Lencz, T.; Lerer, F. B.; Liang, K. Y.; Lieberman, J. A.; Linszen, D.H.; Lönnqvist, J.; Loughland, C. M.; Maclean, A. W.; Maher, B.S.; Malhotra, A.K.; Mallet, J.; Malloy, P.; McGrath, J. J.; McLean, D. E.; Michie, P. T.; Milanova, V.; Mors, O.; Mortensen, P.B.; Mowry, B. J.; Myin-Germeys, I.; Neale, B.; Nertney, D. A.; Nestadt, G.; Nielsen, J.; Nordentoft, M.; Norton, N.; O'Neill, F.; Olincy, A.; Olsen, L.; Ophoff, R.A.; Orntoft, T. F.; van Os, J.; Pantelis, C.; Papadimitriou, G.; Pato, C.N.; Peltonen, L.; Pickard, B.; Pietilainen, O.P.; Pimm, J.; Pulver, A. E.; Puri, V.; Quested, D.; Rasmussen, H.B.; Rethelyi, J.M.; Ribble, R.; Riley, B.P.; Rossin, L.; Ruggeri, M.; Rujescu, D.; Schall, U.; Schwab, S. G.; Scott, R.J.; Silverman, J.M.; Spencer, C. C.; Strange, A.; Strengman, E.; Stroup, T.S.; Suvisaari, J.; Terenius, L.; Thirumalai, S.; Timm, S.; Toncheva, D.; Tosato, S.; van den Oord, E.J.; Veldink, J.; Visscher, P.M.; Walsh, D.; Wang, A. G.; Werge, T.; Wiersma, D.; Wildenauer, D. B.; Williams, H.J.; Williams, N.M.; van Winkel, R.; Wormley, B.; Zammit, S.; Schork, N.J.; Andreassen, O.A.; Dale, A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Recent results indicate that genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have the potential to explain much of the heritability of common complex phenotypes, but methods are lacking to reliably identify the remaining associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We applied stratified False Discovery

  9. Genome-wide association study in an admixed case series reveals IL12A as a new candidate in Behçet Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H. Kappen (Jasper); M.C. Medina-Gomez (Carolina); P.M. van Hagen (Martin); L. Stolk (Lisette); K. Estrada Gil (Karol); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); Stanford, M.R. (Miles R.); Ben-Chetrit, E. (Eldat); Wallace, G.R. (Graham R.); Soylu, M. (Merih); J.A.M. van Laar (Jan)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: The etiology of Behçet's disease (BD) is unknown, but widely considered an excessive T-cell mediated inflammatory response in a genetically susceptible host. Recent genomewide association studies (GWAS) have shown limited number of novel loci-associations. The rarity and

  10. Genome-wide association reveals genetic effects on human Aβ42 and τ protein levels in cerebrospinal fluids: a case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schellenberg Gerard D

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alzheimer's disease (AD is common and highly heritable with many genes and gene variants associated with AD in one or more studies, including APOE ε2/ε3/ε4. However, the genetic backgrounds for normal cognition, mild cognitive impairment (MCI and AD in terms of changes in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF levels of Aβ1-42, T-tau, and P-tau181P, have not been clearly delineated. We carried out a genome-wide association study (GWAS in order to better define the genetic backgrounds to these three states in relation to CSF levels. Methods Subjects were participants in the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI. The GWAS dataset consisted of 818 participants (mainly Caucasian genotyped using the Illumina Human Genome 610 Quad BeadChips. This sample included 410 subjects (119 Normal, 115 MCI and 176 AD with measurements of CSF Aβ1-42, T-tau, and P-tau181P Levels. We used PLINK to find genetic associations with the three CSF biomarker levels. Association of each of the 498,205 SNPs was tested using additive, dominant, and general association models while considering APOE genotype and age. Finally, an effort was made to better identify relevant biochemical pathways for associated genes using the ALIGATOR software. Results We found that there were some associations with APOE genotype although CSF levels were about the same for each subject group; CSF Aβ1-42 levels decreased with APOE gene dose for each subject group. T-tau levels tended to be higher among AD cases than among normal subjects. From adjusted result using APOE genotype and age as covariates, no SNP was associated with CSF levels among AD subjects. CYP19A1 'aromatase' (rs2899472, NCAM2, and multiple SNPs located on chromosome 10 near the ARL5B gene demonstrated the strongest associations with Aβ1-42 in normal subjects. Two genes found to be near the top SNPs, CYP19A1 (rs2899472, p = 1.90 × 10-7 and NCAM2 (rs1022442, p = 2.75 × 10-7 have been reported as genetic

  11. Bio-functions and molecular carbohydrate structure association study in forage with different source origins revealed using non-destructive vibrational molecular spectroscopy techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Cuiying; Zhang, Xuewei; Yan, Xiaogang; Mostafizar Rahman, M.; Prates, Luciana L.; Yu, Peiqiang

    2017-08-01

    The objectives of this study were to: 1) investigate forage carbohydrate molecular structure profiles; 2) bio-functions in terms of CHO rumen degradation characteristics and hourly effective degradation ratio of N to OM (HEDN/OM), and 3) quantify interactive association between molecular structures, bio-functions and nutrient availability. The vibrational molecular spectroscopy was applied to investigate the structure feature on a molecular basis. Two sourced-origin alfalfa forages were used as modeled forages. The results showed that the carbohydrate molecular structure profiles were highly linked to the bio-functions in terms of rumen degradation characteristics and hourly effective degradation ratio. The molecular spectroscopic technique can be used to detect forage carbohydrate structure features on a molecular basis and can be used to study interactive association between forage molecular structure and bio-functions.

  12. Bio-functions and molecular carbohydrate structure association study in forage with different source origins revealed using non-destructive vibrational molecular spectroscopy techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Cuiying; Zhang, Xuewei; Yan, Xiaogang; Mostafizar Rahman, M; Prates, Luciana L; Yu, Peiqiang

    2017-08-05

    The objectives of this study were to: 1) investigate forage carbohydrate molecular structure profiles; 2) bio-functions in terms of CHO rumen degradation characteristics and hourly effective degradation ratio of N to OM (HEDN/OM), and 3) quantify interactive association between molecular structures, bio-functions and nutrient availability. The vibrational molecular spectroscopy was applied to investigate the structure feature on a molecular basis. Two sourced-origin alfalfa forages were used as modeled forages. The results showed that the carbohydrate molecular structure profiles were highly linked to the bio-functions in terms of rumen degradation characteristics and hourly effective degradation ratio. The molecular spectroscopic technique can be used to detect forage carbohydrate structure features on a molecular basis and can be used to study interactive association between forage molecular structure and bio-functions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Hardy-Weinberg analysis of a large set of published association studies reveals genotyping error and a deficit of heterozygotes across multiple loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Srijan; Burmeister, Margit

    2008-09-01

    In genetic association studies, deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWD) can be due to recent admixture or selection at a locus, but is most commonly due to genotyping errors. In addition to its utility for identifying potential genotyping errors in individual studies, here we report that HWD can be useful in detecting the presence, magnitude and direction of genotyping error across multiple studies. If there is a consistent genotyping error at a given locus, larger studies, in general, will show more evidence for HWD than small studies. As a result, for loci prone to genotyping errors, there will be a correlation between HWD and the study sample size. By contrast, in the absence of consistent genotyping errors, there will be a chance distribution of p- values among studies without correlation with sample size. We calculated the evidence for HWD at 17 separate polymorphic loci investigated in 325 published genetic association studies. In the full set of studies, there was a significant correlation between HWD and locus-standardised sample size ( p = 0.001). For 14/17 of the individual loci, there was a positive correlation between extent of HWD and sample size, with the evidence for two loci ( 5-HTTLPR and CTSD ) rising to the level of statistical significance. Among single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), 15/23 studies that deviated significantly from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) did so because of a deficit of heterozygotes. The inbreeding coefficient (F(is)) is a measure of the degree and direction of deviation from HWE. Among studies investigating SNPs, there was a significant correlation between F(is) and HWD ( R = 0.191; p = 0.002), indicating that the greater the deviation from HWE, the greater the deficit of heterozygotes. By contrast, for repeat variants, only one in five studies that deviated significantly from HWE showed a deficit of heterozygotes and there was no significant correlation between F(is) and HWD. These results indicate the

  14. Cross-disease Meta-analysis of Genome-wide Association Studies for Systemic Sclerosis and Rheumatoid Arthritis Reveals IRF4 as a New Common Susceptibility Locus

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Isac, Elena; Martín, Jose-Ezequiel; Assassi, Shervin; Simeón, Carmen P; Carreira, Patricia; Ortego-Centeno, Norberto; Freire, Mayka; Beltrán, Emma; Narváez, Javier; Alegre-Sancho, Juan J; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Benjamín; Balsa, Alejandro; Ortiz, Ana M; González-Gay, Miguel A; Beretta, Lorenzo; Santaniello, Alessandro; Bellocchi, Chiara; Lunardi, Claudio; Moroncini, Gianluca; Gabrielli, Armando; Witte, Torsten; Hunzelmann, Nicolas; Distler, Jörg HW; Riekemasten, Gabriella; van der Helm-van Mil, Annete H; de Vries-Bouwstra, Jeska; Magro-Checa, Cesar; Voskuyl, Alexandre E; Vonk, Madelon C; Molberg, Øyvind; Merriman, Tony; Hesselstrand, Roger; Nordin, Annika; Padyukov, Leonid; Herrick, Ariane; Eyre, Steve; Koeleman, Bobby PC; Denton, Christopher P; Fonseca, Carmen; Radstake, Timothy RDJ; Worthington, Jane; Mayes, Maureen D; Martín, Javier

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Systemic sclerosis (SSc) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are autoimmune diseases that share clinical and immunological characteristics. To date, several shared SSc-RA loci have been identified independently. In this study, we aimed to systematically search for new common SSc-RA loci through an inter-disease meta-GWAS strategy. Methods We performed a meta-analysis combining GWAS datasets of SSc and RA using a strategy that allowed identification of loci with both same-direction and opposing-direction allelic effects. The top single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were followed-up in independent SSc and RA case-control cohorts. This allowed us to increase the sample size to a total of 8,830 SSc patients, 16,870 RA patients and 43,393 controls. Results The cross-disease meta-analysis of the GWAS datasets identified several loci with nominal association signals (P-value < 5 × 10-6), which also showed evidence of association in the disease-specific GWAS scan. These loci included several genomic regions not previously reported as shared loci, besides risk factors associated with both diseases in previous studies. The follow-up of the putatively new SSc-RA loci identified IRF4 as a shared risk factor for these two diseases (Pcombined = 3.29 × 10-12). In addition, the analysis of the biological relevance of the known SSc-RA shared loci pointed to the type I interferon and the interleukin 12 signaling pathways as the main common etiopathogenic factors. Conclusions Our study has identified a novel shared locus, IRF4, for SSc and RA and highlighted the usefulness of cross-disease GWAS meta-analysis in the identification of common risk loci. PMID:27111665

  15. Association of environmental markers with childhood type 1 diabetes mellitus revealed by a long questionnaire on early life exposures and lifestyle in a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balazard, F; Le Fur, S; Valtat, S; Valleron, A J; Bougnères, P; Thevenieau, Dominique; Chatel, Corinne Fourmy; Desailloud, Rachel; Bony-Trifunovic, Hélène; Ducluzeau, Pierre-Henri; Coutant, Régis; Caudrelier, Sophie; Pambou, Armelle; Dubosclard, Emmanuelle; Joubert, Florence; Jan, Philippe; Marcoux, Estelle; Bertrand, Anne-Marie; Mignot, Brigitte; Penformis, Alfred; Stuckens, Chantal; Piquemal, Régis; Barat, Pascal; Rigalleau, Vincent; Stheneur, Chantal; Fournier, Sylviane; Kerlan, Véronique; Metz, Chantal; Fargeot-Espaliat, Anne; Reznic, Yves; Olivier, Frédérique; Gueorguieva, Iva; Monier, Arnaud; Radet, Catherine; Gajdos, Vincent; Terral, Daniel; Vervel, Christine; Bendifallah, Djamel; Signor, Candace Ben; Dervaux, Daniel; Benmahammed, Abdelkader; Loeuille, Guy-André; Popelard, Françoise; Guillou, Agnès; Benhamou, Pierre-Yves; Khoury, Jamil; Brossier, Jean-Pierre; Bassil, Joachim; Clavel, Sylvaine; Le Luyer, Bernard; Bougnères, Pierre; Labay, Françoise; Guemas, Isabelle; Weill, Jacques; Cappoen, Jean-Pierre; Nadalon, Sylvie; Lienhardt-Roussie, Anne; Paoli, Anne; Kerouedan, Claudie; Yollin, Edwige; Nicolino, Marc; Simonin, Gilbert; Cohen, Jacques; Atlan, Catherine; Tamboura, Agnès; Dubourg, Hervé; Pignol, Marie-Laure; Talon, Philippe; Jellimann, Stéphanie; Chaillous, Lucy; Baron, Sabine; Bortoluzzi, Marie-Noëlle; Baechler, Elisabeth; Salet, Randa; Zelinsky-Gurung, Ariane; Dallavale, Fabienne; Larger, Etienne; Laloi-Michelin, Marie; Gautier, Jean-François; Guérin, Bénédicte; Oilleau, Laure; Pantalone, Laetitia; Lukas, Céline; Guilhem, Isabelle; De Kerdanet, Marc; Wielickzo, Marie-Claire; Priou-Guesdon, Mélanie; Richard, Odile; Kurtz, François; Laisney, Norbert; Ancelle, Déborah; Parlier, Guilhem; Boniface, Catherine; Bockel, Dominique Paris; Dufillot, Denis; Razafimahefa, Berthe; Gourdy, Pierre; Lecomte, Pierre; Pepin-Donat, Myriam; Combes-Moukhovsky, Marie-Emmanuelle; Zymmermann, Brigitte; Raoulx, Marina; Dumont, Anne Gourdin Et Catherine

    2016-09-29

    The incidence of childhood type 1 diabetes (T1D) incidence is rising in many countries, supposedly because of changing environmental factors, which are yet largely unknown. The purpose of the study was to unravel environmental markers associated with T1D. Cases were children with T1D from the French Isis-Diab cohort. Controls were schoolmates or friends of the patients. Parents were asked to fill a 845-item questionnaire investigating the child's environment before diagnosis. The analysis took into account the matching between cases and controls. A second analysis used propensity score methods. We found a negative association of several lifestyle variables, gastroenteritis episodes, dental hygiene, hazelnut cocoa spread consumption, wasp and bee stings with T1D, consumption of vegetables from a farm and death of a pet by old age. The found statistical association of new environmental markers with T1D calls for replication in other cohorts and investigation of new environmental areas. Clinical-Trial.gov NCT02212522 . Registered August 6, 2014.

  16. Association of environmental markers with childhood type 1 diabetes mellitus revealed by a long questionnaire on early life exposures and lifestyle in a case–control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Balazard

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The incidence of childhood type 1 diabetes (T1D incidence is rising in many countries, supposedly because of changing environmental factors, which are yet largely unknown. The purpose of the study was to unravel environmental markers associated with T1D. Methods Cases were children with T1D from the French Isis-Diab cohort. Controls were schoolmates or friends of the patients. Parents were asked to fill a 845-item questionnaire investigating the child’s environment before diagnosis. The analysis took into account the matching between cases and controls. A second analysis used propensity score methods. Results We found a negative association of several lifestyle variables, gastroenteritis episodes, dental hygiene, hazelnut cocoa spread consumption, wasp and bee stings with T1D, consumption of vegetables from a farm and death of a pet by old age. Conclusions The found statistical association of new environmental markers with T1D calls for replication in other cohorts and investigation of new environmental areas. Trial registration Clinical-Trial.gov NCT02212522 . Registered August 6, 2014. 

  17. Genome-wide association study of N370S homozygous Gaucher disease reveals the candidacy of CLN8 gene as a genetic modifier contributing to extreme phenotypic variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Clarence K; Stein, Philip B; Liu, Jun; Wang, Zuoheng; Yang, Ruhua; Cho, Judy H; Gregersen, Peter K; Aerts, Johannes M F G; Zhao, Hongyu; Pastores, Gregory M; Mistry, Pramod K

    2012-04-01

    Mutations in GBA1 gene result in defective acid β-glucosidase and the complex phenotype of Gaucher disease (GD) related to the accumulation of glucosylceramide-laden macrophages. The phenotype is highly variable even among patients harboring identical GBA1 mutations. We hypothesize that modifier gene(s) underlie phenotypic diversity in GD and performed a GWAS study in Ashkenazi Jewish patients with type 1 GD (GD1), homozygous for N370S mutation. Patients were assigned to mild, moderate, or severe disease categories using composite disease severity scoring systems. Whole-genome genotyping for >500,000 SNPs was performed to search for association signals using OQLS algorithm in 139 eligible patients. Several SNPs in linkage disequilibrium within the CLN8 gene locus were associated with the GD1 severity: SNP rs11986414 was associated with GD1 severity at P value 1.26 × 10(-6) . Compared to mild disease, risk allele A at rs11986414 conferred an odds ratio of 3.72 for moderate/severe disease. Loss of function mutations in CLN8 causes neuronal ceroid-lipofuscinosis, but our results indicate that its increased expression may protect against severe GD1. In cultured skin fibroblasts, the relative expression of CLN8 was higher in mild GD compared to severely affected patients, in whom CLN8 risk alleles were overrepresented. In an in vitro cell model of GD, CLN8 expression was increased, which was further enhanced in the presence of bioactive substrate, glucosylsphingosine. Taken together, CLN8 is a candidate modifier gene for GD1 that may function as a protective sphingolipid sensor and/or in glycosphingolipid trafficking. Future studies should explore the role of CLN8 in pathophysiology of GD. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. A Genome-Wide Association Study for Culm Cellulose Content in Barley Reveals Candidate Genes Co-Expressed with Members of the CELLULOSE SYNTHASE A Gene Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Kelly; Burton, Rachel A.; Sznajder, Beata; Rafalski, Antoni J.; Dhugga, Kanwarpal S.; Mather, Diane E.; Taylor, Jillian; Steffenson, Brian J.; Waugh, Robbie; Fincher, Geoffrey B.

    2015-01-01

    Cellulose is a fundamentally important component of cell walls of higher plants. It provides a scaffold that allows the development and growth of the plant to occur in an ordered fashion. Cellulose also provides mechanical strength, which is crucial for both normal development and to enable the plant to withstand both abiotic and biotic stresses. We quantified the cellulose concentration in the culm of 288 two – rowed and 288 six – rowed spring type barley accessions that were part of the USDA funded barley Coordinated Agricultural Project (CAP) program in the USA. When the population structure of these accessions was analysed we identified six distinct populations, four of which we considered to be comprised of a sufficient number of accessions to be suitable for genome-wide association studies (GWAS). These lines had been genotyped with 3072 SNPs so we combined the trait and genetic data to carry out GWAS. The analysis allowed us to identify regions of the genome containing significant associations between molecular markers and cellulose concentration data, including one region cross-validated in multiple populations. To identify candidate genes we assembled the gene content of these regions and used these to query a comprehensive RNA-seq based gene expression atlas. This provided us with gene annotations and associated expression data across multiple tissues, which allowed us to formulate a supported list of candidate genes that regulate cellulose biosynthesis. Several regions identified by our analysis contain genes that are co-expressed with CELLULOSE SYNTHASE A (HvCesA) across a range of tissues and developmental stages. These genes are involved in both primary and secondary cell wall development. In addition, genes that have been previously linked with cellulose synthesis by biochemical methods, such as HvCOBRA, a gene of unknown function, were also associated with cellulose levels in the association panel. Our analyses provide new insights into the

  19. A Pathway Proteomic Profile of Ischemic Stroke Survivors Reveals Innate Immune Dysfunction in Association with Mild Symptoms of Depression – A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Vinh A.; Carey, Leeanne M.; Giummarra, Loretta; Faou, Pierre; Cooke, Ira; Howells, David W.; Tse, Tamara; Macaulay, S. Lance; Ma, Henry; Davis, Stephen M.; Donnan, Geoffrey A.; Crewther, Sheila G.

    2016-01-01

    Depression after stroke is a common occurrence, raising questions as to whether depression could be a long-term biological and immunological sequela of stroke. Early explanations for post-stroke depression (PSD) focused on the neuropsychological/psychosocial effects of stroke on mobility and quality of life. However, recent investigations have revealed imbalances of inflammatory cytokine levels in association with PSD, though to date, there is only one published proteomic pathway analysis testing this hypothesis. Thus, we examined the serum proteome of stroke patients (n = 44, mean age = 63.62 years) and correlated these with the Montgomery–Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) scores at 3 months post-stroke. Overall, the patients presented with mild depression symptoms on the MADRS, M = 6.40 (SD = 7.42). A discovery approach utilizing label-free relative quantification was employed utilizing an LC-ESI–MS/MS coupled to a LTQ-Orbitrap Elite (Thermo-Scientific). Identified peptides were analyzed using the gene set enrichment approach on several different genomic databases that all indicated significant downregulation of the complement and coagulation systems with increasing MADRS scores. Complement and coagulation systems are traditionally thought to play a key role in the innate immune system and are established precursors to the adaptive immune system through pro-inflammatory cytokine signaling. Both systems are known to be globally affected after ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke. Thus, our results suggest that lowered complement expression in the periphery in conjunction with depressive symptoms post-stroke may be a biomarker for incomplete recovery of brain metabolic needs, homeostasis, and inflammation following ischemic stroke damage. Further proteomic investigations are now required to construct the temporal profile, leading from acute lesion damage to manifestation of depressive symptoms. Overall, the findings provide support for the

  20. A brain-wide association study of DISC1 genetic variants reveals a relationship with the structure and functional connectivity of the precuneus in schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Gong, Xiaohong; Lu, Wenlian; Kendrick, Keith M.; Pu, Weidan; Wang, Chu; Jin, Li; Lu, Guangmin; Liu, Zhening; LIU Haihong(The United Graduate School of Education, Tokyo Gakugei University); Feng, Jianfeng

    2014-01-01

    The Disrupted in Schizophrenia Gene 1 (DISC1) plays a role in both neural signalling and development and is associated with schizophrenia, although its links to altered brain structure and function in this disorder are not fully established. Here we have used structural and functional MRI to investigate links with six DISC1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We employed a brain-wide association analysis (BWAS) together with a Jacknife internal validation approach in 46 schizophrenia pati...

  1. Function of cancer associated genes revealed by modern univariate and multivariate association tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorfine, Malka; Goldstein, Boaz; Fishman, Alla; Heller, Ruth; Heller, Yair; Lamm, Ayelet T

    2015-01-01

    Copy number variation (CNV) plays a role in pathogenesis of many human diseases, especially cancer. Several whole genome CNV association studies have been performed for the purpose of identifying cancer associated CNVs. Here we undertook a novel approach to whole genome CNV analysis, with the goal being identification of associations between CNV of different genes (CNV-CNV) across 60 human cancer cell lines. We hypothesize that these associations point to the roles of the associated genes in cancer, and can be indicators of their position in gene networks of cancer-driving processes. Recent studies show that gene associations are often non-linear and non-monotone. In order to obtain a more complete picture of all CNV associations, we performed omnibus univariate analysis by utilizing dCov, MIC, and HHG association tests, which are capable of detecting any type of association, including non-monotone relationships. For comparison we used Spearman and Pearson association tests, which detect only linear or monotone relationships. Application of dCov, MIC and HHG tests resulted in identification of twice as many associations compared to those found by Spearman and Pearson alone. Interestingly, most of the new associations were detected by the HHG test. Next, we utilized dCov's and HHG's ability to perform multivariate analysis. We tested for association between genes of unknown function and known cancer-related pathways. Our results indicate that multivariate analysis is much more effective than univariate analysis for the purpose of ascribing biological roles to genes of unknown function. We conclude that a combination of multivariate and univariate omnibus association tests can reveal significant information about gene networks of disease-driving processes. These methods can be applied to any large gene or pathway dataset, allowing more comprehensive analysis of biological processes.

  2. Metabolomics reveals insect metabolic responses associated with fungal infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yong-Jiang; Luo, Feifei; Gao, Qiang; Shang, Yanfang; Wang, Chengshu

    2015-06-01

    The interactions between insects and pathogenic fungi are complex. We employed metabolomic techniques to profile insect metabolic dynamics upon infection by the pathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana. Silkworm larvae were infected with fungal spores and microscopic observations demonstrated that the exhaustion of insect hemocytes was coupled with fungal propagation in the insect body cavity. Metabolomic analyses revealed that fungal infection could significantly alter insect energy and nutrient metabolisms as well as the immune defense responses, including the upregulation of carbohydrates, amino acids, fatty acids, and lipids, but the downregulation of eicosanoids and amines. The insect antifeedant effect of the fungal infection was evident with the reduced level of maclurin (a component of mulberry leaves) in infected insects but elevated accumulations in control insects. Insecticidal and cytotoxic mycotoxins like oosporein and beauveriolides were also detected in insects at the later stages of infection. Taken together, the metabolomics data suggest that insect immune responses are energy-cost reactions and the strategies of nutrient deprivation, inhibition of host immune responses, and toxin production would be jointly employed by the fungus to kill insects. The data obtained in this study will facilitate future functional studies of genes and pathways associated with insect-fungus interactions.

  3. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies in five cohorts reveals common variants in RBFOX1, a regulator of tissue-specific splicing, associated with refractive error

    OpenAIRE

    Stambolian, Dwight; Wojciechowski, Robert; Oexle, Konrad; Pirastu, Mario; Li, Xiaohui; Raffel, Leslie J.; Cotch, Mary Frances; Chew, Emily Y; Klein, Barbara; Klein, Ronald; Wong, Tien Y.; Simpson, Claire L; Klaver, Caroline C W; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Verhoeven, Virginie J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Visual refractive errors (REs) are complex genetic traits with a largely unknown etiology. To date, genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of moderate size have identified several novel risk markers for RE, measured here as mean spherical equivalent (MSE). We performed a GWAS using a total of 7280 samples from five cohorts: the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS); the KORA study (‘Cooperative Health Research in the Region of Augsburg’); the Framingham Eye Study (FES); the Ogliastra Genetic...

  4. A genomics-informed, SNP association study reveals FBLN1 and FABP4 as contributing to resistance to fleece rot in Australian Merino sheep

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Fleece rot (FR) and body-strike of Merino sheep by the sheep blowfly Lucilia cuprina are major problems for the Australian wool industry, causing significant losses as a result of increased management costs coupled with reduced wool productivity and quality. In addition to direct effects on fleece quality, fleece rot is a major predisposing factor to blowfly strike on the body of sheep. In order to investigate the genetic drivers of resistance to fleece rot, we constructed a combined ovine-bovine cDNA microarray of almost 12,000 probes including 6,125 skin expressed sequence tags and 5,760 anonymous clones obtained from skin subtracted libraries derived from fleece rot resistant and susceptible animals. This microarray platform was used to profile the gene expression changes between skin samples of six resistant and six susceptible animals taken immediately before, during and after FR induction. Mixed-model equations were employed to normalize the data and 155 genes were found to be differentially expressed (DE). Ten DE genes were selected for validation using real-time PCR on independent skin samples. The genomic regions of a further 5 DE genes were surveyed to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) that were genotyped across three populations for their associations with fleece rot resistance. Results The majority of the DE genes originated from the fleece rot subtracted libraries and over-representing gene ontology terms included defense response to bacterium and epidermis development, indicating a role of these processes in modulating the sheep's response to fleece rot. We focused on genes that contribute to the physical barrier function of skin, including keratins, collagens, fibulin and lipid proteins, to identify SNPs that were associated to fleece rot scores. Conclusions We identified FBLN1 (fibulin) and FABP4 (fatty acid binding protein 4) as key factors in sheep's resistance to fleece rot. Validation of these markers in other populations

  5. Genetic and functional studies reveal a novel noncoding variant in GALT associated with a false positive newborn screening result for galactosemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Sidhu, Alpa; Bean, Lora H; Conway, Robert L; Fridovich-Keil, Judith L

    2015-06-15

    Classic galactosemia (CG) is a potentially lethal genetic disorder that results from profound loss of galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT). CG is detected by newborn screening (NBS) in many countries; however, conclusive diagnosis can be complex due to broad and overlapping ranges of GALT activity. Molecular studies can also be complex due to allelic heterogeneity at the GALT locus. We conducted both biochemical and molecular follow-up studies for an infant flagged by NBS for possible galactosemia. To clarify the diagnosis we also conducted biochemical and RNA studies of lymphoblasts prepared from the child and one parent. We identified a novel noncoding GALT variant, c.377+17C>T, that was homozygous in the child and heterozygous in both parents. The child and both parents also showed diminished GALT activity in red blood cells, and transformed lymphoblasts from the child and one parent further showed diminished GALT activity. However, qRT-PCR studies demonstrated apparently normal GALT mRNA levels in lymphoblasts, and Gal-1P values measured in the child following galactose exposure in infancy and at 1 year were normal. These results highlight the existence of rare but apparently benign variants in GALT and underscore the need for functional studies to distinguish pathogenic from benign variants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Ultra-high-resolution C-arm flat-detector CT angiography evaluation reveals 3-fold higher association rate for sporadic intracranial cavernous malformations and developmental venous anomalies: a retrospective study in consecutive 58 patients with 60 cavernous malformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocak, Burak [Aksaray State Hospital, Department of Radiology, Aksaray (Turkey); Kizilkilic, Osman; Kocer, Naci; Islak, Civan [Istanbul University, Department of Radiology, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Istanbul (Turkey); Oz, Buge; Bakkaloglu, Dogu Vuralli [Istanbul University, Department of Pathology, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Istanbul (Turkey); Isler, Cihan [Istanbul University, Department of Neurosurgery, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2017-06-15

    The imaging and surgical literature has confusing association rates for the association between sporadic intracranial cavernous malformations (CMs) and developmental venous anomalies (DVAs). In this study, our purpose was to determine the association rate using ultra-high-resolution C-arm flat-detector CT angiography (FDCTA) and compare it with literature. Fifty-eight patients with 60 sporadic intracranial CMs that underwent an FDCTA study were included in our retrospective study. Re-evaluation of radiological data was performed based on the criteria defined by authors. Isotropic volumetric reconstructions with ultra-high resolution (voxel size of 102 μm{sup 3} for initial; 67 μm{sup 3} and 32 μm{sup 3} for further evaluation) were used for assessment. Sixteen patients underwent surgery for excision of their CMs. Fifty-one of all patients (87.9 %) were associated with a DVA. Undefined local venous structures (UD-LVSs) were observed in the remaining 7 patients (12.1 %). The strength of interobserver agreement was excellent [kappa(k) coefficient = 0.923]. Ultra-high-resolution FDCTA evaluation of CMs and DVAs reveals 3-fold higher association rate compared to the literature. FDCTA for patients with sporadic CMs could help identify the associated DVAs that remained undetected or unclear with other imaging modalities, which can be useful in decision-making processes, planning surgery, and during operation. (orig.)

  7. Genome-Wide Association Study Reveals Genetic Architecture of Eating Behaviors in Pigs and its Implications for Humans Obesity by Comparative Genome Mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Do, Duy Ngoc; Strathe, Anders Bjerring; Ostersen, Tage

    2013-01-01

    This study was aimed at identifying genomic regions controlling feeding behaviors inDanish Duroc boars and its potential implications for eating behaviors in humans.Individual daily feed intake (DFI), total daily time spent in feeder (TPD), number of dailyvisits to feeder (NVD), time spent to eat...

  8. CNV-association meta-analysis in 191,161 European adults reveals new loci associated with anthropometric traits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Macé, Aurélien; Tuke, Marcus A; Deelen, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    There are few examples of robust associations between rare copy number variants (CNVs) and complex continuous human traits. Here we present a large-scale CNV association meta-analysis on anthropometric traits in up to 191,161 adult samples from 26 cohorts. The study reveals five CNV associations ...

  9. CNV-association meta-analysis in 191,161 European adults reveals new loci associated with anthropometric traits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Macé, Aurélien; Tuke, Marcus A; Deelen, Patrick; Kristiansson, Kati; Mattsson, Hannele; Nõukas, Margit; Sapkota, Yadav; Schick, Ursula; Porcu, Eleonora; Rüeger, Sina; McDaid, Aaron F; Porteous, David; Winkler, Thomas W; Salvi, Erika; Shrine, Nick; Liu, Xueping; Ang, Wei Q; Zhang, Weihua; Feitosa, Mary F; Venturini, Cristina; van der Most, Peter J; Rosengren, Anders; Wood, Andrew R; Beaumont, Robin N; Jones, Samuel E; Ruth, Katherine S; Yaghootkar, Hanieh; Tyrrell, Jessica; Havulinna, Aki S; Boers, Harmen; Mägi, Reedik; Kriebel, Jennifer; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Perola, Markus; Nieminen, Markku; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma S; Geller, Frank; Lahti, Jari; Palotie, Aarno; Koponen, Päivikki; Lundqvist, Annamari; Rissanen, Harri; Bottinger, Erwin P; Afaq, Saima; Wojczynski, Mary K; Lenzini, Petra; Nolte, Ilja M; Sparsø, Thomas; Schupf, Nicole; Christensen, Kaare; Perls, Thomas T; Newman, Anne B; Werge, Thomas; Snieder, Harold; Spector, Timothy D; Chambers, John C; Koskinen, Seppo; Melbye, Mads; Raitakari, Olli T; Lehtimäki, Terho; Tobin, Martin D; Wain, Louise V; Sinisalo, Juha; Peters, Annette; Meitinger, Thomas; Martin, Nicholas G; Wray, Naomi R; Montgomery, Grant W; Medland, Sarah E; Swertz, Morris A; Vartiainen, Erkki; Borodulin, Katja; Männistö, Satu; Murray, Anna; Bochud, Murielle; Jacquemont, Sébastien; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Hansen, Thomas F; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Mangino, Massimo; Province, Michael A; Deloukas, Panos; Kooner, Jaspal S; Freathy, Rachel M; Pennell, Craig; Feenstra, Bjarke; Strachan, David P; Lettre, Guillaume; Hirschhorn, Joel; Cusi, Daniele; Heid, Iris M; Hayward, Caroline; Männik, Katrin; Beckmann, Jacques S; Loos, Ruth J F; Nyholt, Dale R; Metspalu, Andres; Eriksson, Johan G; Weedon, Michael N; Salomaa, Veikko; Franke, Lude; Reymond, Alexandre; Frayling, Timothy M; Kutalik, Zoltán

    2017-01-01

    There are few examples of robust associations between rare copy number variants (CNVs) and complex continuous human traits. Here we present a large-scale CNV association meta-analysis on anthropometric traits in up to 191,161 adult samples from 26 cohorts. The study reveals five CNV associations at

  10. Genome-wide association study reveals a locus for nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus in Danish crossbred pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skallerup, Per; Gongora, Carmen Espinosa; Jørgensen, Claus Bøttcher

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Staphylococcus aureus is an important human opportunistic pathogen residing on skin and mucosae of healthy people. Pigs have been identified as a source of human colonization and infection with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and novel measures are needed to control...... of S. aureus in Danish crossbred pigs (Danish Landrace/Yorkshire/Duroc). RESULTS: Fifty-six persistent carriers and 65 non-carriers selected from 15 farms surveyed in the previous longitudinal study were genotyped using Illumina's Porcine SNP60 beadchip. In addition, spa typing was performed on 126 S...

  11. Cross-sectional and longitudinal lipid determination studies in pregnant women reveal an association between increased maternal LDL cholesterol concentrations and reduced human umbilical vein relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiva, A; Salsoso, R; Sáez, T; Sanhueza, C; Pardo, F; Sobrevia, L

    2015-08-01

    Maternal hypercholesterolemia and hypertriglyceridemia during pregnancy is correlated with fetoplacental endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerotic lesions in fetal arteries. Few studies have reported the distribution of the concentrations of maternal total cholesterol (TCh), lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides during pregnancy. Therefore, we determined maternal lipid concentration during pregnancy and established the percentiles over which fetoplacental endothelial dysfunction is observed. A lipoprotein profile was determined for 249 pregnant Chilean women in each trimester of pregnancy in cross-sectional and longitudinal lipid determination studies. Distribution percentiles for TCh, high-, low- and very-low-density lipoprotein (HDL, LDL, and vLDL, respectively) cholesterol and triglycerides were estimated. The reactivity of human umbilical vein rings to the calcitonin gene-related peptide (0.1-1000 nmol/L, 5 min) and sodium nitroprusside (10 μmol/L, 5 min) was measured (wire myography) in KCl-preconstricted vessels. Maternal lipoproteins and triglyceride concentrations increased over time from preconception to the 3rd trimester of pregnancy. Newborn umbilical blood lipoprotein and triglyceride concentrations were lower than those in maternal circulation. Changes in maternal HDL correlated with newborn HDL concentration; however, no correlation between maternal lipoprotein concentrations and newborn weight was found. Maternal TCh and LDL concentrations were inversely correlated with the maximal dilation, but the >75th percentile of maternal TCh and LDL concentrations (>291 and >169 mg/dL, respectively) correlated with reduced calcitonin gene-related peptide sensitivity of the vein rings. We identified percentiles for maternal TCh and LDL concentrations over which abnormal endothelium-dependent human fetoplacental vascular response is observed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Phylogeny of the Botryosphaeriaceae reveals patterns of host association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Wet, Juanita; Slippers, Bernard; Preisig, Oliver; Wingfield, Brenda D; Wingfield, Michael J

    2008-01-01

    Three anamorph genera of the Botryosphaeriaceae namely Diplodia, Lasiodiplodia and Dothiorella have typically dark, ovoid conidia with thick walls, and are consequently difficult to distinguish from each other. These genera are well-known pathogens of especially pine species. We generated a multiple gene genealogy to resolve the phylogenetic relationships of Botryosphaeriaceae with dark conidial anamorphs, and mapped host associations based on this phylogeny. The multiple gene genealogy separated Diplodia, Lasiodiplodia and Dothiorella and it revealed trends in the patterns of host association. The data set was expanded to include more lineages of the Botryosphaeriaceae, and included all isolates from different host species for which ITS sequence data are available. Results indicate that Diplodia species occur mainly on gymnosperms, with a few species on both gymnosperms and angiosperms. Lasiodiplodia species occur equally on both gymnosperms and angiosperms, Dothiorella species are restricted to angiosperms and Neofusicoccum species occur mainly on angiosperms with rare reports on Southern Hemisphere gymnosperms. Botryosphaeria species with Fusicoccum anamorphs occur mostly on angiosperms with rare reports on gymnosperms. Ancestral state reconstruction suggests that a putative ancestor of the Botryosphaeriaceae most likely evolved on the angiosperms. Another interesting observation was that both host generalist and specialist species were observed in all the lineages of the Botryosphaeriaceae, with little evidence of host associated co-evolution.

  13. Association Mapping Reveals Genetic Loci Associated with Important Agronomic Traits in Lentinula edodes, Shiitake Mushroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chuang; Gong, Wenbing; Zhang, Lin; Yang, Zhiquan; Nong, Wenyan; Bian, Yinbing; Kwan, Hoi-Shan; Cheung, Man-Kit; Xiao, Yang

    2017-01-01

    Association mapping is a robust approach for the detection of quantitative trait loci (QTLs). Here, by genotyping 297 genome-wide molecular markers of 89 Lentinula edodes cultivars in China, the genetic diversity, population structure and genetic loci associated with 11 agronomic traits were examined. A total of 873 alleles were detected in the tested strains with a mean of 2.939 alleles per locus, and the Shannon's information index was 0.734. Population structure analysis revealed two robustly differentiated groups among the Chinese L. edodes cultivars (FST = 0.247). Using the mixed linear model, a total of 43 markers were detected to be significantly associated with four traits. The number of markers associated with traits ranged from 9 to 26, and the phenotypic variations explained by each marker varied from 12.07% to 31.32%. Apart from five previously reported markers, the remaining 38 markers were newly reported here. Twenty-one markers were identified as simultaneously linked to two to four traits, and five markers were associated with the same traits in cultivation tests performed in two consecutive years. The 43 traits-associated markers were related to 97 genes, and 24 of them were related to 10 traits-associated markers detected in both years or identified previously, 13 of which had a >2-fold expression change between the mycelium and primordium stages. Our study has provided candidate markers for marker-assisted selection (MAS) and useful clues for understanding the genetic architecture of agronomic traits in the shiitake mushroom.

  14. Metabolomics Approach Reveals Integrated Metabolic Network Associated with Serotonin Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Rui; Shen, Sensen; Tian, Yonglu; Burton, Casey; Xu, Xinyuan; Liu, Yi; Chang, Cuilan; Bai, Yu; Liu, Huwei

    2015-07-01

    Serotonin is an important neurotransmitter that broadly participates in various biological processes. While serotonin deficiency has been associated with multiple pathological conditions such as depression, schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease, the serotonin-dependent mechanisms remain poorly understood. This study therefore aimed to identify novel biomarkers and metabolic pathways perturbed by serotonin deficiency using metabolomics approach in order to gain new metabolic insights into the serotonin deficiency-related molecular mechanisms. Serotonin deficiency was achieved through pharmacological inhibition of tryptophan hydroxylase (Tph) using p-chlorophenylalanine (pCPA) or genetic knockout of the neuronal specific Tph2 isoform. This dual approach improved specificity for the serotonin deficiency-associated biomarkers while minimizing nonspecific effects of pCPA treatment or Tph2 knockout (Tph2-/-). Non-targeted metabolic profiling and a targeted pCPA dose-response study identified 21 biomarkers in the pCPA-treated mice while 17 metabolites in the Tph2-/- mice were found to be significantly altered compared with the control mice. These newly identified biomarkers were associated with amino acid, energy, purine, lipid and gut microflora metabolisms. Oxidative stress was also found to be significantly increased in the serotonin deficient mice. These new biomarkers and the overall metabolic pathways may provide new understanding for the serotonin deficiency-associated mechanisms under multiple pathological states.

  15. Consanguinity and late fertility: spatial analysis reveals positive association patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisa, Antonella; Astolfi, Paola; Zei, Gianna; Tentoni, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    The role of consanguinity on human complex traits is an important and controversial issue. In this work we focused on the Sardinian population and examined the effect of consanguineous unions on late female fertility. During the last century the island has been characterized by a high incidence of marriages between relatives, favoured by socio economic conditions and geographical isolation, and by high fertility despite a widespread tendency to delay reproduction. Through spatial analysis techniques, we explored the geographical heterogeneity of consanguinity and late fertility, and identified in Central-Eastern Sardinia a common area with an excess of both traits, where the traits are positively associated. We found that their association did not significantly affect women's fertility in the area, despite the expected negative role of both traits. Intriguingly, this critical zone corresponds well to areas reported by previous studies as being peculiar for a high frequency of centenarians and for lower risk in pregnancy outcome. The proposed approach can be generally exploited to identify target populations on which socioeconomic, biodemographic and genetic data can be collected at the individual level, and deeper analyses carried out to disentangle the determinants of complex biological traits and to investigate their association. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/University College London.

  16. Combining image analysis, genome wide association studies and different field trials to reveal stable genetic regions related to panicle architecture and the number of spikelets per panicle in rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Camila Rebolledo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Number of spikelets per panicle (NSP is a key trait to increase yield potential in rice (O. sativa. The architecture of the rice inflorescence which is mainly determined by the length and number of primary (PBL and PBN and secondary (SBL and SBN branches can influence NSP. Although several genes controlling panicle architecture and NSP in rice have been identified, there is little evidence of (i the genetic control of panicle architecture and NSP in different environments and (ii the presence of stable genetic associations with panicle architecture across environments. This study combines image phenotyping of 225 accessions belonging to a genetic diversity array of indica rice grown under irrigated field condition in two different environments and Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS based on the genotyping of the diversity panel, providing 83,374 SNPs.Accessions sown under direct seeding in one environement had reduced Panicle Length (PL, NSP, PBN, PBL, SBN and SBL compared to those established under transplanting in the second environment. Across environments, NSP was significantly and positively correlated with PBN, SBN and PBL. However, the length of branches (PBL and SBL was not significantly correlated with variables related to number of branches (PBN and SBN , suggesting independent genetic control.Twenty- three GWAS sites were detected with P-values ≤ 1.0E-04 and 27 GWAS sites with p ≤ 5.9E-04. We found 17 GWAS sites related to NSP, 10 for PBN and 11 for SBN, 7 for PBL and 11 for SBL. This study revealed new regions related to NSP, but only three associations were related to both branching number (PBN and SBN and NSP. Two GWAS sites associated with SBL and SBN were stable across contrasting environments and were not related to genes previously reported.The new regions reported in this study can help improving NSP in rice for both direct seeded and transplanted conditions. The integrated approach of high-throughput phenotyping, multi

  17. Metabolomics reveals distinct neurochemical profiles associated with stress resilience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brooke N. Dulka

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Acute social defeat represents a naturalistic form of conditioned fear and is an excellent model in which to investigate the biological basis of stress resilience. While there is growing interest in identifying biomarkers of stress resilience, until recently, it has not been feasible to associate levels of large numbers of neurochemicals and metabolites to stress-related phenotypes. The objective of the present study was to use an untargeted metabolomics approach to identify known and unknown neurochemicals in select brain regions that distinguish susceptible and resistant individuals in two rodent models of acute social defeat. In the first experiment, male mice were first phenotyped as resistant or susceptible. Then, mice were subjected to acute social defeat, and tissues were immediately collected from the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC, basolateral/central amygdala (BLA/CeA, nucleus accumbens (NAc, and dorsal hippocampus (dHPC. Ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with high resolution mass spectrometry (UPLC-HRMS was used for the detection of water-soluble neurochemicals. In the second experiment, male Syrian hamsters were paired in daily agonistic encounters for 2 weeks, during which they formed stable dominant-subordinate relationships. Then, 24 h after the last dominance encounter, animals were exposed to acute social defeat stress. Immediately after social defeat, tissue was collected from the vmPFC, BLA/CeA, NAc, and dHPC for analysis using UPLC-HRMS. Although no single biomarker characterized stress-related phenotypes in both species, commonalities were found. For instance, in both model systems, animals resistant to social defeat stress also show increased concentration of molecules to protect against oxidative stress in the NAc and vmPFC. Additionally, in both mice and hamsters, unidentified spectral features were preliminarily annotated as potential targets for future experiments. Overall, these findings

  18. Plasmodium falciparum transcriptome analysis reveals pregnancy malaria associated gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuikue Ndam, Nicaise; Bischoff, Emmanuel; Proux, Caroline

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pregnancy-associated malaria (PAM) causing maternal anemia and low birth weight is among the multiple manifestations of Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Infected erythrocytes (iEs) can acquire various adhesive properties that mediate the clinical severity of malaria. Recent advances...

  19. Curved Saccade Trajectories Reveal Conflicting Predictions in Associative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Stephan; Lachnit, Harald

    2011-01-01

    We report how the trajectories of saccadic eye movements are affected by memory interference acquired during associative learning. Human participants learned to perform saccadic choice responses based on the presentation of arbitrary central cues A, B, AC, BC, AX, BY, X, and Y that were trained to predict the appearance of a peripheral target…

  20. Systematic Epigenomic Analysis Reveals Chromatin States Associated with Melanoma Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petko Fiziev

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The extent and nature of epigenomic changes associated with melanoma progression is poorly understood. Through systematic epigenomic profiling of 35 epigenetic modifications and transcriptomic analysis, we define chromatin state changes associated with melanomagenesis by using a cell phenotypic model of non-tumorigenic and tumorigenic states. Computation of specific chromatin state transitions showed loss of histone acetylations and H3K4me2/3 on regulatory regions proximal to specific cancer-regulatory genes in important melanoma-driving cell signaling pathways. Importantly, such acetylation changes were also observed between benign nevi and malignant melanoma human tissues. Intriguingly, only a small fraction of chromatin state transitions correlated with expected changes in gene expression patterns. Restoration of acetylation levels on deacetylated loci by histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitors selectively blocked excessive proliferation in tumorigenic cells and human melanoma cells, suggesting functional roles of observed chromatin state transitions in driving hyperproliferative phenotype. Through these results, we define functionally relevant chromatin states associated with melanoma progression.

  1. Systematic Epigenomic Analysis Reveals Chromatin States Associated with Melanoma Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiziev, Petko; Akdemir, Kadir C; Miller, John P; Keung, Emily Z; Samant, Neha S; Sharma, Sneha; Natale, Christopher A; Terranova, Christopher J; Maitituoheti, Mayinuer; Amin, Samirkumar B; Martinez-Ledesma, Emmanuel; Dhamdhere, Mayura; Axelrad, Jacob B; Shah, Amiksha; Cheng, Christine S; Mahadeshwar, Harshad; Seth, Sahil; Barton, Michelle C; Protopopov, Alexei; Tsai, Kenneth Y; Davies, Michael A; Garcia, Benjamin A; Amit, Ido; Chin, Lynda; Ernst, Jason; Rai, Kunal

    2017-04-25

    The extent and nature of epigenomic changes associated with melanoma progression is poorly understood. Through systematic epigenomic profiling of 35 epigenetic modifications and transcriptomic analysis, we define chromatin state changes associated with melanomagenesis by using a cell phenotypic model of non-tumorigenic and tumorigenic states. Computation of specific chromatin state transitions showed loss of histone acetylations and H3K4me2/3 on regulatory regions proximal to specific cancer-regulatory genes in important melanoma-driving cell signaling pathways. Importantly, such acetylation changes were also observed between benign nevi and malignant melanoma human tissues. Intriguingly, only a small fraction of chromatin state transitions correlated with expected changes in gene expression patterns. Restoration of acetylation levels on deacetylated loci by histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors selectively blocked excessive proliferation in tumorigenic cells and human melanoma cells, suggesting functional roles of observed chromatin state transitions in driving hyperproliferative phenotype. Through these results, we define functionally relevant chromatin states associated with melanoma progression. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Metagenomic sequencing reveals microbiota and its functional potential associated with periodontal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinfeng; Qi, Ji; Zhao, Hui; He, Shu; Zhang, Yifei; Wei, Shicheng; Zhao, Fangqing

    2013-01-01

    Although attempts have been made to reveal the relationships between bacteria and human health, little is known about the species and function of the microbial community associated with oral diseases. In this study, we report the sequencing of 16 metagenomic samples collected from dental swabs and plaques representing four periodontal states. Insights into the microbial community structure and the metabolic variation associated with periodontal health and disease were obtained. We observed a strong correlation between community structure and disease status, and described a core disease-associated community. A number of functional genes and metabolic pathways including bacterial chemotaxis and glycan biosynthesis were over-represented in the microbiomes of periodontal disease. A significant amount of novel species and genes were identified in the metagenomic assemblies. Our study enriches the understanding of the oral microbiome and sheds light on the contribution of microorganisms to the formation and succession of dental plaques and oral diseases.

  3. Genome-Wide Association Analysis Reveals Different Genetic Control in Panicle Architecture Between and Rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xufeng; Zhao, Hu; Huang, Yong; Xie, Weibo; Han, Zhongmin; Zhang, Bo; Guo, Zilong; Yang, Lin; Dong, Haijiao; Xue, Weiya; Li, Guangwei; Hu, Gang; Hu, Yong; Xing, Yongzhong

    2016-07-01

    Panicle architecture determines the number of spikelets per panicle (SPP) and is highly associated with grain yield in rice ( L.). Understanding the genetic basis of panicle architecture is important for improving the yield of rice grain. In this study, we dissected panicle architecture traits into eight components, which were phenotyped from a germplasm collection of 529 cultivars. Multiple regression analysis revealed that the number of secondary branch (NSB) was the major factor that contributed to SPP. Genome-wide association analysis was performed independently for the eight particle architecture traits observed in the and rice subpopulations compared with the whole rice population. In total, 30 loci were associated with these traits. Of these, 13 loci were closely linked to known panicle architecture genes, and 17 novel loci were repeatedly identified in different environments. An association signal cluster was identified for NSB and number of spikelets per secondary branch (NSSB) in the region of 31.6 to 31.7 Mb on chromosome 4. In addition to the common associations detected in both and subpopulations, many associated loci were unique to one subpopulation. For example, and were specifically associated with panicle length (PL) in and rice, respectively. Moreover, the -mediated flowering genes and were associated with the formation of panicle architecture in rice. These results suggest that different gene networks regulate panicle architecture in and rice. Copyright © 2016 Crop Science Society of America.

  4. Type-based associations in grapheme-color synaesthesia revealed by response time distribution analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiki, Jun; Yoshioka, Ayako; Yamamoto, Hiroki

    2011-12-01

    Determining the nature of binding in grapheme-color synaesthesia has consequences for understanding the neural basis of synaesthesia and visual awareness in general. We evaluated type- and token-based letter-color binding using a synaesthetic version of the object-reviewing paradigm. Although mean response times failed to reveal any significant differences between synaesthetes and control participants, RT analyses with ex-Gaussian distributions revealed that the response facilitation in the synaesthesia group reflected type representations exclusively, while response facilitation in the control group, who learned letter-color associations, was dominated by token representations. Thus, letter-color associations in associator synaesthetes are type-based, and do not involve binding to object tokens, consistent with their subjective reports. Contrary to recent studies that failed to find differences between synaesthetes and non-synaesthetes with behavioral measures, response time distribution analyses indicate that color sensations in synaesthetes are not simply the extreme form of normal letter-color associations, and cannot be attributed to demand characteristics. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Pharmacogenomic study reveals new variants of drug metabolizing enzyme and transporter genes associated with steady-state plasma concentrations of risperidone and 9-hydroxyrisperidone in Thai autism spectrum disorder patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadeep Medhasi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study sought to investigate the genetic variants in drug metabolizing enzyme and transporter (DMET genes associated with steady-state plasma concentrations of risperidone among Thai autism spectrum disorder (ASD patients. ASD patients taking risperidone for at least one month were enrolled for this pharmacogenomic study. Genotyping profile was obtained using Affymetrix DMET Plus array interrogating 1931 variants in 231 genes. Steady-state plasma risperidone and 9-hydroxyrisperidone were measured using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS assay. The final analysis included 483 markers for 167 genes. Six variants, ABCB11 (c.3084A>G, c.*420A>G, c.*368G>A, and c.*236G>A and ADH7 (c.690G>A and c.-5360G>A, were found to be associated with plasma concentrations of risperidone. 9-Hydroxyrisperidone and the total active-moiety levels were associated with six gene variants, SCLO1B1 (c.-11187G>A and c.521T>C, SLCO1B3 (c.334G>T, c.699A>G, and c.1557G>A, and SLC7A5 c.*438C>G. Polymorphisms in UGT2B4 c.*448A>G and CYP2D6 (c.1661G>C, c.4180G>C, and c.-2178G>A showed considerable but not significant associations with metabolic ratio. This pharmacogenomic study identifies new genetic variants of DMET genes in monitoring risperidone therapy.

  6. Proteomic analysis reveals novel proteins associated with progression and differentiation of colorectal carcinoma

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    Yi Gan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The objective of this study is to characterize differential proteomic expression among well-differentiation and poor-differentiation colorectal carcinoma tissues and normal mucous epithelium. Materials and Methods: The study is based on quantitative 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis and analyzed by PDquest. Results: Excluding redundancies due to proteolysis and posttranslational modified isoforms of over 600 protein spots, 11 proteins were revealed as regulated with statistical variance being within the 95 th confidence level and were identified by peptide mass fingerprinting in matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Progression-associated proteins belong to the functional complexes of tumorigenesis, proliferation, differentiation, metabolism, and the regulation of major histocompatibility complex processing and other functions. Partial but significant overlap was revealed with previous proteomics and transcriptomics studies in CRC. Among various differentiation stage of CRC tissues, we identified calreticulin precursor, MHC class I antigen (human leukocyte antigen A , glutathione S-transferase pi1, keratin 8, heat shock protein 27, tubulin beta chain, triosephosphate, fatty acid-binding protein, hemoglobin (deoxy mutant with val b 1 replaced by met (HBB, and zinc finger protein 312 (FEZF2. Conclusions: Their functional networks were analyzed by Ingenuity systems Ingenuity Pathways Analysis and revealed the potential roles as novel biomarkers for progression in various differentiation stages of CRC.

  7. Revealing genes associated with vitellogenesis in the liver of the zebrafish (Danio rerio by transcriptome profiling

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    Hyslop Terry

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In oviparous vertebrates, including fish, vitellogenesis consists of highly regulated pathways involving 17β-estradiol (E2. Previous studies focused on a relatively small number of hepatic expressed genes during vitellogenesis. This study aims to identify hepatic genes involved in vitellogenesis and regulated by E2, by using zebrafish microarray gene expression profiling, and to provide information on functional distinctive genes expressed in the liver of a vitellogenic female, using zebrafish as a model fish. Results Genes associated with vitellogenesis were revealed by the following paired t-tests (SAM comparisons: a two-month old vitellogenic (Vit2 females were compared with non-vitellogenic (NV females, showing 825 differentially expressed transcripts during early stages of vitellogenesis, b four-month old vitellogenic (Vit4 females were compared with NV females, showing 1,046 differentially expressed transcripts during vitellogenesis and c E2-treated males were compared with control males, showing 1,828 differentially expressed transcripts regulated by E2. A Venn diagram revealed 822 common transcripts in the three groups, indicating that these transcripts were involved in vitellogenesis and putatively regulated by E2. In addition, 431 transcripts were differentially expressed in Vit2 and Vit4 females but not in E2-treated males, indicating that they were putatively not up-regulated by E2. Correspondence analysis showed high similarity in expression profiles of Vit2 with Vit4 and of NV females with control males. The E2-treated males differed from the other groups. The repertoire of genes putatively regulated by E2 in vitellogenic females included genes associated with protein synthesis and reproduction. Genes associated with the immune system processes and biological adhesion, were among the genes that were putatively not regulated by E2. E2-treated males expressed a large array of transcripts that were not associated

  8. The Hidden Diversity of Zanclea Associated with Scleractinians Revealed by Molecular Data

    KAUST Repository

    Montano, Simone

    2015-07-24

    Scleractinian reef corals have recently been acknowledged as the most numerous host group found in association with hydroids belonging to the Zanclea genus. However, knowledge of the molecular phylogenetic relationships among Zanclea species associated with scleractinians is just beginning. This study, using the nuclear 28S rDNA region and the fast-evolving mitochondrial 16S rRNA and COI genes, provides the most comprehensive phylogenetic reconstruction of the genus Zanclea with a particular focus on the genetic diversity among Zanclea specimens associated with 13 scleractinian genera. The monophyly of Zanclea associated with scleractinians was strongly supported in all nuclear and mitochondrial phylogenetic reconstructions. Furthermore, a combined mitochondrial 16S and COI phylogenetic tree revealed a multitude of hidden molecular lineages within this group (Clades I, II, III, V, VI, VII, and VIII), suggesting the existence of both host-generalist and genus-specific lineages of Zanclea associated with scleractinians. In addition to Z. gallii living in association with the genus Acropora, we discovered four well-supported lineages (Clades I, II, III, and VII), each one forming a strict association with a single scleractinian genus, including sequences of Zanclea associated with Montipora from two geographically separated areas (Maldives and Taiwan). Two host-generalist Zanclea lineages were also observed, and one of them was formed by Zanclea specimens symbiotic with seven scleractinian genera (Clade VIII). We also found that the COI gene allows the recognition of separated hidden lineages in agreement with the commonly recommended mitochondrial 16S as a DNA barcoding gene for Hydrozoa and shows reasonable potential for phylogenetic and evolutionary analyses in the genus Zanclea. Finally, as no DNA sequences are available for the majority of the nominal Zanclea species known, we note that they will be necessary to elucidate the diversity of the Zanclea

  9. The Hidden Diversity of Zanclea Associated with Scleractinians Revealed by Molecular Data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Montano

    Full Text Available Scleractinian reef corals have recently been acknowledged as the most numerous host group found in association with hydroids belonging to the Zanclea genus. However, knowledge of the molecular phylogenetic relationships among Zanclea species associated with scleractinians is just beginning. This study, using the nuclear 28S rDNA region and the fast-evolving mitochondrial 16S rRNA and COI genes, provides the most comprehensive phylogenetic reconstruction of the genus Zanclea with a particular focus on the genetic diversity among Zanclea specimens associated with 13 scleractinian genera. The monophyly of Zanclea associated with scleractinians was strongly supported in all nuclear and mitochondrial phylogenetic reconstructions. Furthermore, a combined mitochondrial 16S and COI phylogenetic tree revealed a multitude of hidden molecular lineages within this group (Clades I, II, III, V, VI, VII, and VIII, suggesting the existence of both host-generalist and genus-specific lineages of Zanclea associated with scleractinians. In addition to Z. gallii living in association with the genus Acropora, we discovered four well-supported lineages (Clades I, II, III, and VII, each one forming a strict association with a single scleractinian genus, including sequences of Zanclea associated with Montipora from two geographically separated areas (Maldives and Taiwan. Two host-generalist Zanclea lineages were also observed, and one of them was formed by Zanclea specimens symbiotic with seven scleractinian genera (Clade VIII. We also found that the COI gene allows the recognition of separated hidden lineages in agreement with the commonly recommended mitochondrial 16S as a DNA barcoding gene for Hydrozoa and shows reasonable potential for phylogenetic and evolutionary analyses in the genus Zanclea. Finally, as no DNA sequences are available for the majority of the nominal Zanclea species known, we note that they will be necessary to elucidate the diversity of the

  10. Association mapping in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) reveals independent control of apical vs. basal branching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambeesan, Savithri U; Mandel, Jennifer R; Bowers, John E; Marek, Laura F; Ebert, Daniel; Corbi, Jonathan; Rieseberg, Loren H; Knapp, Steven J; Burke, John M

    2015-03-11

    Shoot branching is an important determinant of plant architecture and influences various aspects of growth and development. Selection on branching has also played an important role in the domestication of crop plants, including sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.). Here, we describe an investigation of the genetic basis of variation in branching in sunflower via association mapping in a diverse collection of cultivated sunflower lines. Detailed phenotypic analyses revealed extensive variation in the extent and type of branching within the focal population. After correcting for population structure and kinship, association analyses were performed using a genome-wide collection of SNPs to identify genomic regions that influence a variety of branching-related traits. This work resulted in the identification of multiple previously unidentified genomic regions that contribute to variation in branching. Genomic regions that were associated with apical and mid-apical branching were generally distinct from those associated with basal and mid-basal branching. Homologs of known branching genes from other study systems (i.e., Arabidopsis, rice, pea, and petunia) were also identified from the draft assembly of the sunflower genome and their map positions were compared to those of associations identified herein. Numerous candidate branching genes were found to map in close proximity to significant branching associations. In sunflower, variation in branching is genetically complex and overall branching patterns (i.e., apical vs. basal) were found to be influenced by distinct genomic regions. Moreover, numerous candidate branching genes mapped in close proximity to significant branching associations. Although the sunflower genome exhibits localized islands of elevated linkage disequilibrium (LD), these non-random associations are known to decay rapidly elsewhere. The subset of candidate genes that co-localized with significant associations in regions of low LD represents the most

  11. An association network analysis among microeukaryotes and bacterioplankton reveals algal bloom dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Shangjin; Zhou, Jin; Zhu, Xiaoshan; Yu, Shichen; Zhan, Wugen; Wang, Bo; Cai, Zhonghua

    2015-02-01

    Algal blooms are a worldwide phenomenon and the biological interactions that underlie their regulation are only just beginning to be understood. It is established that algal microorganisms associate with many other ubiquitous, oceanic organisms, but the interactions that lead to the dynamics of bloom formation are currently unknown. To address this gap, we used network approaches to investigate the association patterns among microeukaryotes and bacterioplankton in response to a natural Scrippsiella trochoidea bloom. This is the first study to apply network approaches to bloom dynamics. To this end, terminal restriction fragment (T-RF) length polymorphism analysis showed dramatic changes in community compositions of microeukaryotes and bacterioplankton over the blooming period. A variance ratio test revealed significant positive overall associations both within and between microeukaryotic and bacterioplankton communities. An association network generated from significant correlations between T-RFs revealed that S. trochoidea had few connections to other microeukaryotes and bacterioplankton and was placed on the edge. This lack of connectivity allowed for the S. trochoidea sub-network to break off from the overall network. These results allowed us to propose a conceptual model for explaining how changes in microbial associations regulate the dynamics of an algal bloom. In addition, key T-RFs were screened by principal components analysis, correlation coefficients, and network analysis. Dominant T-RFs were then identified through 18S and 16S rRNA gene clone libraries. Results showed that microeukaryotes clustered predominantly with Dinophyceae and Perkinsea while the majority of bacterioplankton identified were Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and Bacteroidetes. The ecologi-cal roles of both were discussed in the context of these findings. © 2014 Phycological Society of America.

  12. Genome-wide association and functional follow-up reveals new loci for kidney function.

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    Cristian Pattaro

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD is an important public health problem with a genetic component. We performed genome-wide association studies in up to 130,600 European ancestry participants overall, and stratified for key CKD risk factors. We uncovered 6 new loci in association with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR, the primary clinical measure of CKD, in or near MPPED2, DDX1, SLC47A1, CDK12, CASP9, and INO80. Morpholino knockdown of mpped2 and casp9 in zebrafish embryos revealed podocyte and tubular abnormalities with altered dextran clearance, suggesting a role for these genes in renal function. By providing new insights into genes that regulate renal function, these results could further our understanding of the pathogenesis of CKD.

  13. Single-base methylome analysis reveals dynamic epigenomic differences associated with water deficit in apple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jidi; Zhou, Shasha; Gong, Xiaoqing; Song, Yi; van Nocker, Steve; Ma, Fengwang; Guan, Qingmei

    2018-02-01

    Cytosine methylation is an essential feature of epigenetic regulation and is involved in various biological processes. Although cytosine methylation has been analysed at the genomic scale for several plant species, there is a general lack of understanding of the dynamics of global and genic DNA methylation in plants growing in environments challenged with biotic and abiotic stresses. In this study, we mapped cytosine methylation at single-base resolution in the genome of commercial apple (Malus x domestica), and analysed changes in methylation patterns associated with water deficit in representative drought-sensitive and drought-tolerant cultivars. We found that the apple genome exhibits ~54%, ~38% and ~8.5% methylation at CG, CHG and CHH sequence contexts, respectively. We additionally documented changes in gene expression associated with water deficit in an attempt to link methylation and gene expression changes. Global methylation and transcription analysis revealed that promoter-unmethylated genes showed higher expression levels than promoter-methylated genes. Gene body methylation appears to be positively correlated with gene expression. Water deficit stress was associated with changes in methylation at a multitude of genes, including those encoding transcription factors (TFs) and transposable elements (TEs). These results present a methylome map of the apple genome and reveal widespread DNA methylation alterations in response to water deficit stress. These data will be helpful for understanding potential linkages between DNA methylation and gene expression in plants growing in natural environments and challenged with abiotic and biotic stresses. © 2017 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. MHC class II DRB diversity in raccoons (Procyon lotor) reveals associations with raccoon rabies virus (Lyssavirus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srithayakumar, Vythegi; Castillo, Sarrah; Rosatte, Rick C; Kyle, Christopher J

    2011-02-01

    In North America, the raccoon rabies virus (RRV) is an endemic wildlife disease which causes acute encephalopathies and is a strong selective force on raccoons (Procyon lotor), with estimates of ∼85% of the population succumbing to the disease when epizootic. RRV is regarded as a lethal disease if untreated; therefore, no evolutionary response would be expected of raccoon populations. However, variable immune responses to RRV have been observed in raccoons indicating a potential for evolutionary adaptation. Studies of variation within the immunologically important major histocompatibility complex (MHC) have revealed relationships between MHC alleles and diseases in humans and other wildlife species. This enhances our understanding of how hosts and pathogens adapt and co-evolve. In this study, we used RRV as a model system to study host-pathogen interaction in raccoons from a challenge study and from four wild populations that differ in exposure times and viral lineages. We investigated the potential role of Prlo-DRB polymorphism in relation to susceptibility/resistance to RRV in 113 RRV positive and 143 RRV negative raccoons. Six alleles were found to be associated with RRV negative status and five alleles with RRV positive animals. We found variable patterns of MHC associations given the relative number of selective RRV sweeps in the studied regions and correlations between MHC diversity and RRV lineages. The allelic associations established provide insight into how the genetic variation of raccoons may affect the disease outcome and this can be used to examine similar associations between other rabies variants and their hosts.

  15. Identification of unstable network modules reveals disease modules associated with the progression of Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masataka Kikuchi

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD, the most common cause of dementia, is associated with aging, and it leads to neuron death. Deposits of amyloid β and aberrantly phosphorylated tau protein are known as pathological hallmarks of AD, but the underlying mechanisms have not yet been revealed. A high-throughput gene expression analysis previously showed that differentially expressed genes accompanying the progression of AD were more down-regulated than up-regulated in the later stages of AD. This suggested that the molecular networks and their constituent modules collapsed along with AD progression. In this study, by using gene expression profiles and protein interaction networks (PINs, we identified the PINs expressed in three brain regions: the entorhinal cortex (EC, hippocampus (HIP and superior frontal gyrus (SFG. Dividing the expressed PINs into modules, we examined the stability of the modules with AD progression and with normal aging. We found that in the AD modules, the constituent proteins, interactions and cellular functions were not maintained between consecutive stages through all brain regions. Interestingly, the modules were collapsed with AD progression, specifically in the EC region. By identifying the modules that were affected by AD pathology, we found the transcriptional regulation-associated modules that interact with the proteasome-associated module via UCHL5 hub protein, which is a deubiquitinating enzyme. Considering PINs as a system made of network modules, we found that the modules relevant to the transcriptional regulation are disrupted in the EC region, which affects the ubiquitin-proteasome system.

  16. Ecoinformatics can reveal yield gaps associated with crop-pest interactions: a proof-of-concept.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay A Rosenheim

    Full Text Available Farmers and private consultants execute a vast, decentralized data collection effort with each cropping cycle, as they gather pest density data to make real-time pest management decisions. Here we present a proof of concept for an ecoinformatics approach to pest management research, which attempts to harness these data to answer questions about pest-crop interactions. The impact of herbivory by Lygus hesperus on cotton is explored as a case study. Consultant-derived data satisfied a 'positive control' test for data quality by clearly resolving the expected negative relationship between L. hesperus density and retention of flower buds. The enhanced statistical power afforded by the large ecoinformatics dataset revealed an early-season window of crop sensitivity, during which L. hesperus densities as low as 1-2 per sample were associated with yield loss. In contrast, during the mid-season insecticide use by farmers was often unnecessary, as cotton compensated fully for moderate L. hesperus densities. Because the dataset emerged from the commercial production setting, it also revealed the limited degree to which farmers were willing to delay crop harvest to provide opportunities for compensatory fruiting. Observational approaches to pest management research have strengths and weaknesses that complement those of traditional, experimental approaches; combining these methods can contribute to enhanced agricultural productivity.

  17. Association analyses of 249,796 individuals reveal eighteen new loci associated with body mass index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speliotes, Elizabeth K.; Willer, Cristen J.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Monda, Keri L.; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Jackson, Anne U.; Allen, Hana Lango; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Luan, Jian’an; Mägi, Reedik; Randall, Joshua C.; Vedantam, Sailaja; Winkler, Thomas W.; Qi, Lu; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Heid, Iris M.; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Stringham, Heather M.; Weedon, Michael N.; Wheeler, Eleanor; Wood, Andrew R.; Ferreira, Teresa; Weyant, Robert J.; Segré, Ayellet V.; Estrada, Karol; Liang, Liming; Nemesh, James; Park, Ju-Hyun; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O.; Yang, Jian; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Esko, Tõnu; Feitosa, Mary F.; Kutalik, Zoltán; Mangino, Massimo; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Scherag, Andre; Smith, Albert Vernon; Welch, Ryan; Zhao, Jing Hua; Aben, Katja K.; Absher, Devin M.; Amin, Najaf; Dixon, Anna L.; Fisher, Eva; Glazer, Nicole L.; Goddard, Michael E.; Heard-Costa, Nancy L.; Hoesel, Volker; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Johansson, Åsa; Johnson, Toby; Ketkar, Shamika; Lamina, Claudia; Li, Shengxu; Moffatt, Miriam F.; Myers, Richard H.; Narisu, Narisu; Perry, John R.B.; Peters, Marjolein J.; Preuss, Michael; Ripatti, Samuli; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Sandholt, Camilla; Scott, Laura J.; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; van Wingerden, Sophie; Watanabe, Richard M.; White, Charles C.; Wiklund, Fredrik; Barlassina, Christina; Chasman, Daniel I.; Cooper, Matthew N.; Jansson, John-Olov; Lawrence, Robert W.; Pellikka, Niina; Prokopenko, Inga; Shi, Jianxin; Thiering, Elisabeth; Alavere, Helene; Alibrandi, Maria T. S.; Almgren, Peter; Arnold, Alice M.; Aspelund, Thor; Atwood, Larry D.; Balkau, Beverley; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Bennett, Amanda J.; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Bergman, Richard N.; Bergmann, Sven; Biebermann, Heike; Blakemore, Alexandra I.F.; Boes, Tanja; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Brown, Morris J.; Buchanan, Thomas A.; Busonero, Fabio; Campbell, Harry; Cappuccio, Francesco P.; Cavalcanti-Proença, Christine; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Chen, Chih-Mei; Chines, Peter S.; Clarke, Robert; Coin, Lachlan; Connell, John; Day, Ian N.M.; den Heijer, Martin; Duan, Jubao; Ebrahim, Shah; Elliott, Paul; Elosua, Roberto; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Erdos, Michael R.; Eriksson, Johan G.; Facheris, Maurizio F.; Felix, Stephan B.; Fischer-Posovszky, Pamela; Folsom, Aaron R.; Friedrich, Nele; Freimer, Nelson B.; Fu, Mao; Gaget, Stefan; Gejman, Pablo V.; Geus, Eco J.C.; Gieger, Christian; Gjesing, Anette P.; Goel, Anuj; Goyette, Philippe; Grallert, Harald; Gräßler, Jürgen; Greenawalt, Danielle M.; Groves, Christopher J.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Guiducci, Candace; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hassanali, Neelam; Hall, Alistair S.; Havulinna, Aki S.; Hayward, Caroline; Heath, Andrew C.; Hengstenberg, Christian; Hicks, Andrew A.; Hinney, Anke; Hofman, Albert; Homuth, Georg; Hui, Jennie; Igl, Wilmar; Iribarren, Carlos; Isomaa, Bo; Jacobs, Kevin B.; Jarick, Ivonne; Jewell, Elizabeth; John, Ulrich; Jørgensen, Torben; Jousilahti, Pekka; Jula, Antti; Kaakinen, Marika; Kajantie, Eero; Kaplan, Lee M.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Kettunen, Johannes; Kinnunen, Leena; Knowles, Joshua W.; Kolcic, Ivana; König, Inke R.; Koskinen, Seppo; Kovacs, Peter; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kraft, Peter; Kvaløy, Kirsti; Laitinen, Jaana; Lantieri, Olivier; Lanzani, Chiara; Launer, Lenore J.; Lecoeur, Cecile; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lettre, Guillaume; Liu, Jianjun; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Lorentzon, Mattias; Luben, Robert N.; Ludwig, Barbara; Manunta, Paolo; Marek, Diana; Marre, Michel; Martin, Nicholas G.; McArdle, Wendy L.; McCarthy, Anne; McKnight, Barbara; Meitinger, Thomas; Melander, Olle; Meyre, David; Midthjell, Kristian; Montgomery, Grant W.; Morken, Mario A.; Morris, Andrew P.; Mulic, Rosanda; Ngwa, Julius S.; Nelis, Mari; Neville, Matt J.; Nyholt, Dale R.; O’Donnell, Christopher J.; O’Rahilly, Stephen; Ong, Ken K.; Oostra, Ben; Paré, Guillaume; Parker, Alex N.; Perola, Markus; Pichler, Irene; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H.; Platou, Carl G.P.; Polasek, Ozren; Pouta, Anneli; Rafelt, Suzanne; Raitakari, Olli; Rayner, Nigel W.; Ridderstråle, Martin; Rief, Winfried; Ruokonen, Aimo; Robertson, Neil R.; Rzehak, Peter; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanders, Alan R.; Sandhu, Manjinder S.; Sanna, Serena; Saramies, Jouko; Savolainen, Markku J.; Scherag, Susann; Schipf, Sabine; Schreiber, Stefan; Schunkert, Heribert; Silander, Kaisa; Sinisalo, Juha; Siscovick, David S.; Smit, Jan H.; Soranzo, Nicole; Sovio, Ulla; Stephens, Jonathan; Surakka, Ida; Swift, Amy J.; Tammesoo, Mari-Liis; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Teder-Laving, Maris; Teslovich, Tanya M.; Thompson, John R.; Thomson, Brian; Tönjes, Anke; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; van Meurs, Joyce B.J.; van Ommen, Gert-Jan; Vatin, Vincent; Viikari, Jorma; Visvikis-Siest, Sophie; Vitart, Veronique; Vogel, Carla I. G.; Voight, Benjamin F.; Waite, Lindsay L.; Wallaschofski, Henri; Walters, G. Bragi; Widen, Elisabeth; Wiegand, Susanna; Wild, Sarah H.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Witte, Daniel R.; Witteman, Jacqueline C.; Xu, Jianfeng; Zhang, Qunyuan; Zgaga, Lina; Ziegler, Andreas; Zitting, Paavo; Beilby, John P.; Farooqi, I. Sadaf; Hebebrand, Johannes; Huikuri, Heikki V.; James, Alan L.; Kähönen, Mika; Levinson, Douglas F.; Macciardi, Fabio; Nieminen, Markku S.; Ohlsson, Claes; Palmer, Lyle J.; Ridker, Paul M.; Stumvoll, Michael; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Boeing, Heiner; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Collins, Francis S.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Smith, George Davey; Erdmann, Jeanette; Froguel, Philippe; Grönberg, Henrik; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hall, Per; Hansen, Torben; Harris, Tamara B.; Hattersley, Andrew T.; Hayes, Richard B.; Heinrich, Joachim; Hu, Frank B.; Hveem, Kristian; Illig, Thomas; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Kaprio, Jaakko; Karpe, Fredrik; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Krude, Heiko; Laakso, Markku; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Metspalu, Andres; Munroe, Patricia B.; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Pedersen, Oluf; Penninx, Brenda W.; Peters, Annette; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Quertermous, Thomas; Reinehr, Thomas; Rissanen, Aila; Rudan, Igor; Samani, Nilesh J.; Schwarz, Peter E.H.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Spector, Timothy D.; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uda, Manuela; Uitterlinden, André; Valle, Timo T.; Wabitsch, Martin; Waeber, Gérard; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Watkins, Hugh; Wilson, James F.; Wright, Alan F.; Zillikens, M. Carola; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; McCarroll, Steven A.; Purcell, Shaun; Schadt, Eric E.; Visscher, Peter M.; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Deloukas, Panos; Fox, Caroline S.; Groop, Leif C.; Haritunians, Talin; Hunter, David J.; Kaplan, Robert C.; Mohlke, Karen L.; O’Connell, Jeffrey R.; Peltonen, Leena; Schlessinger, David; Strachan, David P.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Frayling, Timothy M.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Barroso, Inês; Boehnke, Michael; Stefansson, Kari; North, Kari E.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Ingelsson, Erik; Loos, Ruth J.F.

    2010-01-01

    Obesity is globally prevalent and highly heritable, but the underlying genetic factors remain largely elusive. To identify genetic loci for obesity-susceptibility, we examined associations between body mass index (BMI) and ~2.8 million SNPs in up to 123,865 individuals, with targeted follow-up of 42 SNPs in up to 125,931 additional individuals. We confirmed 14 known obesity-susceptibility loci and identified 18 new loci associated with BMI (P<5×10−8), one of which includes a copy number variant near GPRC5B. Some loci (MC4R, POMC, SH2B1, BDNF) map near key hypothalamic regulators of energy balance, and one is near GIPR, an incretin receptor. Furthermore, genes in other newly-associated loci may provide novel insights into human body weight regulation. PMID:20935630

  18. Association analyses of 249,796 individuals reveal 18 new loci associated with body mass index

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Speliotes, Elizabeth K.; Willer, Cristen J.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Monda, Keri L.; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Jackson, Anne U.; Allen, Hana Lango; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Luan, Jian'an; Maegi, Reedik; Randall, Joshua C.; Vedantam, Sailaja; Winkler, Thomas W.; Qi, Lu; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Heid, Iris M.; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Stringham, Heather M.; Weedon, Michael N.; Wheeler, Eleanor; Wood, Andrew R.; Ferreira, Teresa; Weyant, Robert J.; Segre, Ayellet V.; Estrada, Karol; Liang, Liming; Nemesh, James; Park, Ju-Hyun; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kilpelaenen, Tuomas O.; Yang, Jian; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Esko, Tonu; Feitosa, Mary F.; Kutalik, Zoltan; Mangino, Massimo; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Scherag, Andre; Smith, Albert Vernon; Welch, Ryan; Zhao, Jing Hua; Aben, Katja K.; Absher, Devin M.; Amin, Najaf; Dixon, Anna L.; Fisher, Eva; Glazer, Nicole L.; Goddard, Michael E.; Heard-Costa, Nancy L.; Hoesel, Volker; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Johansson, Asa; Johnson, Toby; Ketkar, Shamika; Lamina, Claudia; Li, Shengxu; Moffatt, Miriam F.; Myers, Richard H.; Narisu, Narisu; Perry, John R. B.; Peters, Marjolein J.; Preuss, Michael; Ripatti, Samuli; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Sandholt, Camilla; Scott, Laura J.; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; van Wingerden, Sophie; Watanabe, Richard M.; White, Charles C.; Wiklund, Fredrik; Barlassina, Christina; Chasman, Daniel I.; Cooper, Matthew N.; Jansson, John-Olov; Lawrence, Robert W.; Pellikka, Niina; Prokopenko, Inga; Shi, Jianxin; Thiering, Elisabeth; Alavere, Helene; Alibrandi, Maria T. S.; Almgren, Peter; Arnold, Alice M.; Aspelund, Thor; Atwood, Larry D.; Balkau, Beverley; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Bennett, Amanda J.; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Bergman, Richard N.; Bergmann, Sven; Biebermann, Heike; Blakemore, Alexandra I. F.; Boes, Tanja; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Brown, Morris J.; Buchanan, Thomas A.; Busonero, Fabio; Campbell, Harry; Cappuccio, Francesco P.; Cavalcanti-Proenca, Christine; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Chen, Chih-Mei; Chines, Peter S.; Clarke, Robert; Coin, Lachlan; Connell, John; Day, Ian N. M.; den Heijer, Martin; Duan, Jubao; Ebrahim, Shah; Elliott, Paul; Elosua, Roberto; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Erdos, Michael R.; Eriksson, Johan G.; Facheris, Maurizio F.; Felix, Stephan B.; Fischer-Posovszky, Pamela; Folsom, Aaron R.; Friedrich, Nele; Freimer, Nelson B.; Fu, Mao; Gaget, Stefan; Gejman, Pablo V.; Geus, Eco J. C.; Gieger, Christian; Gjesing, Anette P.; Goel, Anuj; Goyette, Philippe; Grallert, Harald; Graessler, Juergen; Greenawalt, Danielle M.; Groves, Christopher J.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Guiducci, Candace; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hassanali, Neelam; Hall, Alistair S.; Havulinna, Aki S.; Hayward, Caroline; Heath, Andrew C.; Hengstenberg, Christian; Hicks, Andrew A.; Hinney, Anke; Hofman, Albert; Homuth, Georg; Hui, Jennie; Igl, Wilmar; Iribarren, Carlos; Isomaa, Bo; Jacobs, Kevin B.; Jarick, Ivonne; Jewell, Elizabeth; John, Ulrich; Jorgensen, Torben; Jousilahti, Pekka; Jula, Antti; Kaakinen, Marika; Kajantie, Eero; Kaplan, Lee M.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Kettunen, Johannes; Kinnunen, Leena; Knowles, Joshua W.; Kolcic, Ivana; Koenig, Inke R.; Koskinen, Seppo; Kovacs, Peter; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kraft, Peter; Kvaloy, Kirsti; Laitinen, Jaana; Lantieri, Olivier; Lanzani, Chiara; Launer, Lenore J.; Lecoeur, Cecile; Lehtimaeki, Terho; Lettre, Guillaume; Liu, Jianjun; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Lorentzon, Mattias; Luben, Robert N.; Ludwig, Barbara; Manunta, Paolo; Marek, Diana; Marre, Michel; Martin, Nicholas G.; McArdle, Wendy L.; McCarthy, Anne; McKnight, Barbara; Meitinger, Thomas; Melander, Olle; Meyre, David; Midthjell, Kristian; Montgomery, Grant W.; Morken, Mario A.; Morris, Andrew P.; Mulic, Rosanda; Ngwa, Julius S.; Nelis, Mari; Neville, Matt J.; Nyholt, Dale R.; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Ong, Ken K.; Oostra, Ben; Pare, Guillaume; Parker, Alex N.; Perola, Markus; Pichler, Irene; Pietilaeinen, Kirsi H.; Platou, Carl G. P.; Polasek, Ozren; Pouta, Anneli; Rafelt, Suzanne; Raitakari, Olli; Rayner, Nigel W.; Ridderstrale, Martin; Rief, Winfried; Ruokonen, Aimo; Robertson, Neil R.; Rzehak, Peter; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanders, Alan R.; Sandhu, Manjinder S.; Sanna, Serena; Saramies, Jouko; Savolainen, Markku J.; Scherag, Susann; Schipf, Sabine; Schreiber, Stefan; Schunkert, Heribert; Silander, Kaisa; Sinisalo, Juha; Siscovick, David S.; Smit, Jan H.; Soranzo, Nicole; Sovio, Ulla; Stephens, Jonathan; Surakka, Ida; Swift, Amy J.; Tammesoo, Mari-Liis; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Teder-Laving, Maris; Teslovich, Tanya M.; Thompson, John R.; Thomson, Brian; Toenjes, Anke; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; van Meurs, Joyce B. J.; van Ommen, Gert-Jan; Vatin, Vincent; Viikari, Jorma; Visvikis-Siest, Sophie; Vitart, Veronique; Vogel, Carla I. G.; Voight, Benjamin F.; Waite, Lindsay L.; Wallaschofski, Henri; Walters, G. Bragi; Widen, Elisabeth; Wiegand, Susanna; Wild, Sarah H.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Witte, Daniel R.; Witteman, Jacqueline C.; Xu, Jianfeng; Zhang, Qunyuan; Zgaga, Lina; Ziegler, Andreas; Zitting, Paavo; Beilby, John P.; Farooqi, I. Sadaf; Hebebrand, Johannes; Huikuri, Heikki V.; James, Alan L.; Kaehoenen, Mika; Levinson, Douglas F.; Macciardi, Fabio; Nieminen, Markku S.; Ohlsson, Claes; Palmer, Lyle J.; Ridker, Paul M.; Stumvoll, Michael; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Boeing, Heiner; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Collins, Francis S.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Smith, George Davey; Erdmann, Jeanette; Froguel, Philippe; Greonberg, Henrik; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hall, Per; Hansen, Torben; Harris, Tamara B.; Hattersley, Andrew T.; Hayes, Richard B.; Heinrich, Joachim; Hu, Frank B.; Hveem, Kristian; Illig, Thomas; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Kaprio, Jaakko; Karpe, Fredrik; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Krude, Heiko; Laakso, Markku; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Metspalu, Andres; Munroe, Patricia B.; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Pedersen, Oluf; Penninx, Brenda W.; Peters, Annette; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Quertermous, Thomas; Reinehr, Thomas; Rissanen, Aila; Rudan, Igor; Samani, Nilesh J.; Schwarz, Peter E. H.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Spector, Timothy D.; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uda, Manuela; Uitterlinden, Andre; Valle, Timo T.; Wabitsch, Martin; Waeber, Gerard; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Watkins, Hugh; Wilson, James F.; Wright, Alan F.; Zillikens, M. Carola; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; McCarroll, Steven A.; Purcell, Shaun; Schadt, Eric E.; Visscher, Peter M.; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Deloukas, Panos; Fox, Caroline S.; Groop, Leif C.; Haritunians, Talin; Hunter, David J.; Kaplan, Robert C.; Mohlke, Karen L.; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Peltonen, Leena; Schlessinger, David; Strachan, David P.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Wichmann, H-Erich; Frayling, Timothy M.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Barroso, Ines; Boehnke, Michael; Stefansson, Kari; North, Kari E.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Ingelsson, Erik; Loos, Ruth J. F.

    2010-01-01

    Obesity is globally prevalent and highly heritable, but its underlying genetic factors remain largely elusive. To identify genetic loci for obesity susceptibility, we examined associations between body mass index and similar to 2.8 million SNPs in up to 123,865 individuals with targeted follow up of

  19. Association analyses of 249,796 individuals reveal 18 new loci associated with body mass index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Speliotes, Elizabeth K; Willer, Cristen J; Berndt, Sonja I

    2010-01-01

    Obesity is globally prevalent and highly heritable, but its underlying genetic factors remain largely elusive. To identify genetic loci for obesity susceptibility, we examined associations between body mass index and ~ 2.8 million SNPs in up to 123,865 individuals with targeted follow up of 42 SN...

  20. Functional Coding Variation in Recombinant Inbred Mouse Lines Reveals Novel Serotonin Transporter-Associated Phenotypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carneiro, Ana [Vanderbilt University; Airey, David [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis; Thompson, Brent [Vanderbilt University; Zhu, C [Vanderbilt University; Rinchik, Eugene M [ORNL; Lu, Lu [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis; Chesler, Elissa J [ORNL; Erikson, Keith [University of North Carolina; Blakely, Randy [Vanderbilt University

    2009-01-01

    The human serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) transporter (hSERT, SLC6A4) figures prominently in the etiology or treatment of many prevalent neurobehavioral disorders including anxiety, alcoholism, depression, autism and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Here we utilize naturally occurring polymorphisms in recombinant inbred (RI) lines to identify novel phenotypes associated with altered SERT function. The widely used mouse strain C57BL/6J, harbors a SERT haplotype defined by two nonsynonymous coding variants (Gly39 and Lys152 (GK)). At these positions, many other mouse lines, including DBA/2J, encode Glu39 and Arg152 (ER haplotype), assignments found also in hSERT. Synaptosomal 5-HT transport studies revealed reduced uptake associated with the GK variant. Heterologous expression studies confirmed a reduced SERT turnover rate for the GK variant. Experimental and in silico approaches using RI lines (C57Bl/6J X DBA/2J=BXD) identifies multiple anatomical, biochemical and behavioral phenotypes specifically impacted by GK/ER variation. Among our findings are multiple traits associated with anxiety and alcohol consumption, as well as of the control of dopamine (DA) signaling. Further bioinformatic analysis of BXD phenotypes, combined with biochemical evaluation of SERT knockout mice, nominates SERT-dependent 5-HT signaling as a major determinant of midbrain iron homeostasis that, in turn, dictates ironregulated DA phenotypes. Our studies provide a novel example of the power of coordinated in vitro, in vivo and in silico approaches using murine RI lines to elucidate and quantify the system-level impact of gene variation.

  1. Kinase Inhibitor Profiling Reveals Unexpected Opportunities to Inhibit Disease-Associated Mutant Kinases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krisna C. Duong-Ly

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Small-molecule kinase inhibitors have typically been designed to inhibit wild-type kinases rather than the mutant forms that frequently arise in diseases such as cancer. Mutations can have serious clinical implications by increasing kinase catalytic activity or conferring therapeutic resistance. To identify opportunities to repurpose inhibitors against disease-associated mutant kinases, we conducted a large-scale functional screen of 183 known kinase inhibitors against 76 recombinant mutant kinases. The results revealed lead compounds with activity against clinically important mutant kinases, including ALK, LRRK2, RET, and EGFR, as well as unexpected opportunities for repurposing FDA-approved kinase inhibitors as leads for additional indications. Furthermore, using T674I PDGFRα as an example, we show how single-dose screening data can provide predictive structure-activity data to guide subsequent inhibitor optimization. This study provides a resource for the development of inhibitors against numerous disease-associated mutant kinases and illustrates the potential of unbiased profiling as an approach to compound-centric inhibitor development.

  2. Comparative Transcriptomics Reveals Jasmonic Acid-Associated Metabolism Related to Cotton Fiber Initiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liman Wang

    Full Text Available Analysis of mutants and gene expression patterns provides a powerful approach for investigating genes involved in key stages of plant fiber development. In this study, lintless-fuzzless XinWX and linted-fuzzless XinFLM with a single genetic locus difference for lint were used to identify differentially expressed genes. Scanning electron microscopy showed fiber initiation in XinFLM at 0 days post anthesis (DPA. Fiber transcriptional profiling of the lines at three initiation developmental stages (-1, 0, 1 DPA was performed using an oligonucleotide microarray. Loop comparisons of the differentially expressed genes within and between the lines was carried out, and functional classification and enrichment analysis showed that gene expression patterns during fiber initiation were heavily associated with hormone metabolism, transcription factor regulation, lipid transport, and asparagine biosynthetic processes, as previously reported. Further, four members of the allene-oxide cyclase (AOC family that function in jasmonate biosynthesis were parallel up-regulation in fiber initiation, especially at -1 DPA, compared to other tissues and organs in linted-fuzzed TM-1. Real time-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR analysis in different fiber mutant lines revealed that AOCs were up-regulated higher at -1 DPA in lintless-fuzzless than that in linted-fuzzless and linted-fuzzed materials, and transcription of the AOCs was increased under jasmonic acid (JA treatment. Expression analysis of JA biosynthesis-associated genes between XinWX and XinFLM showed that they were up-regulated during fiber initiation in the fuzzless-lintless mutant. Taken together, jasmonic acid-associated metabolism was related to cotton fiber initiation. Parallel up-regulation of AOCs expression may be important for normal fiber initiation development, while overproduction of AOCs might disrupt normal fiber development.

  3. Comparative Transcriptomics Reveals Jasmonic Acid-Associated Metabolism Related to Cotton Fiber Initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liman; Zhu, Youmin; Hu, Wenjing; Zhang, Xueying; Cai, Caiping; Guo, Wangzhen

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of mutants and gene expression patterns provides a powerful approach for investigating genes involved in key stages of plant fiber development. In this study, lintless-fuzzless XinWX and linted-fuzzless XinFLM with a single genetic locus difference for lint were used to identify differentially expressed genes. Scanning electron microscopy showed fiber initiation in XinFLM at 0 days post anthesis (DPA). Fiber transcriptional profiling of the lines at three initiation developmental stages (-1, 0, 1 DPA) was performed using an oligonucleotide microarray. Loop comparisons of the differentially expressed genes within and between the lines was carried out, and functional classification and enrichment analysis showed that gene expression patterns during fiber initiation were heavily associated with hormone metabolism, transcription factor regulation, lipid transport, and asparagine biosynthetic processes, as previously reported. Further, four members of the allene-oxide cyclase (AOC) family that function in jasmonate biosynthesis were parallel up-regulation in fiber initiation, especially at -1 DPA, compared to other tissues and organs in linted-fuzzed TM-1. Real time-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) analysis in different fiber mutant lines revealed that AOCs were up-regulated higher at -1 DPA in lintless-fuzzless than that in linted-fuzzless and linted-fuzzed materials, and transcription of the AOCs was increased under jasmonic acid (JA) treatment. Expression analysis of JA biosynthesis-associated genes between XinWX and XinFLM showed that they were up-regulated during fiber initiation in the fuzzless-lintless mutant. Taken together, jasmonic acid-associated metabolism was related to cotton fiber initiation. Parallel up-regulation of AOCs expression may be important for normal fiber initiation development, while overproduction of AOCs might disrupt normal fiber development.

  4. NMR spectroscopy reveals the presence and association of lipids and keratin in adhesive gecko setae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Dharamdeep; Stark, Alyssa Y; Niewiarowski, Peter H; Miyoshi, Toshikazu; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2015-04-22

    Lipid and protein aggregates are one of the fundamental materials of biological systems. Examples include cell membranes, insect cuticle, vertebrate epidermis, feathers, hair and adhesive structures known as 'setae' on gecko toes. Until recently gecko setae were assumed to be composed entirely of keratin, but analysis of footprints left behind by geckos walking on surfaces revealed that setae include various kinds of lipids. However, the arrangement and molecular-level behavior of lipids and keratin in the setae is still not known. In the present study we demonstrate, for the first time, the use of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy techniques to confirm the presence of lipids and investigate their association with keratin in 'pristine' sheds, or natural molts of the adhesive toe pad and non-adhesive regions of the skin. Analysis was also carried on the sheds after they were 'delipidized' to remove surface lipids. Our results show a distribution of similar lipids in both the skin and toe shed but with different dynamics at a molecular level. The present study can help us understand the gecko system both biologically and for design of synthetic adhesives, but the findings may be relevant to the characteristics of lipid-protein interactions in other biological systems.

  5. NMR spectroscopy reveals the presence and association of lipids and keratin in adhesive gecko setae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Dharamdeep; Stark, Alyssa Y.; Niewiarowski, Peter H.; Miyoshi, Toshikazu; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Lipid and protein aggregates are one of the fundamental materials of biological systems. Examples include cell membranes, insect cuticle, vertebrate epidermis, feathers, hair and adhesive structures known as ‘setae’ on gecko toes. Until recently gecko setae were assumed to be composed entirely of keratin, but analysis of footprints left behind by geckos walking on surfaces revealed that setae include various kinds of lipids. However, the arrangement and molecular-level behavior of lipids and keratin in the setae is still not known. In the present study we demonstrate, for the first time, the use of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy techniques to confirm the presence of lipids and investigate their association with keratin in ‘pristine' sheds, or natural molts of the adhesive toe pad and non-adhesive regions of the skin. Analysis was also carried on the sheds after they were ‘delipidized’ to remove surface lipids. Our results show a distribution of similar lipids in both the skin and toe shed but with different dynamics at a molecular level. The present study can help us understand the gecko system both biologically and for design of synthetic adhesives, but the findings may be relevant to the characteristics of lipid-protein interactions in other biological systems. PMID:25902194

  6. Conserved S-Layer-Associated Proteins Revealed by Exoproteomic Survey of S-Layer-Forming Lactobacilli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Brant R.; Hymes, Jeffrey; Sanozky-Dawes, Rosemary; Henriksen, Emily DeCrescenzo

    2015-01-01

    The Lactobacillus acidophilus homology group comprises Gram-positive species that include L. acidophilus, L. helveticus, L. crispatus, L. amylovorus, L. gallinarum, L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, L. gasseri, and L. johnsonii. While these bacteria are closely related, they have varied ecological lifestyles as dairy and food fermenters, allochthonous probiotics, or autochthonous commensals of the host gastrointestinal tract. Bacterial cell surface components play a critical role in the molecular dialogue between bacteria and interaction signaling with the intestinal mucosa. Notably, the L. acidophilus complex is distinguished in two clades by the presence or absence of S-layers, which are semiporous crystalline arrays of self-assembling proteinaceous subunits found as the outermost layer of the bacterial cell wall. In this study, S-layer-associated proteins (SLAPs) in the exoproteomes of various S-layer-forming Lactobacillus species were proteomically identified, genomically compared, and transcriptionally analyzed. Four gene regions encoding six putative SLAPs were conserved in the S-layer-forming Lactobacillus species but not identified in the extracts of the closely related progenitor, L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, which does not produce an S-layer. Therefore, the presence or absence of an S-layer has a clear impact on the exoproteomic composition of Lactobacillus species. This proteomic complexity and differences in the cell surface properties between S-layer- and non-S-layer-forming lactobacilli reveal the potential for SLAPs to mediate intimate probiotic interactions and signaling with the host intestinal mucosa. PMID:26475115

  7. Metabolomic profiling reveals mitochondrial-derived lipid biomarkers that drive obesity-associated inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampey, Brante P; Freemerman, Alex J; Zhang, Jimmy; Kuan, Pei-Fen; Galanko, Joseph A; O'Connell, Thomas M; Ilkayeva, Olga R; Muehlbauer, Michael J; Stevens, Robert D; Newgard, Christopher B; Brauer, Heather A; Troester, Melissa A; Makowski, Liza

    2012-01-01

    Obesity has reached epidemic proportions worldwide. Several animal models of obesity exist, but studies are lacking that compare traditional lard-based high fat diets (HFD) to "Cafeteria diets" (CAF) consisting of nutrient poor human junk food. Our previous work demonstrated the rapid and severe obesogenic and inflammatory consequences of CAF compared to HFD including rapid weight gain, markers of Metabolic Syndrome, multi-tissue lipid accumulation, and dramatic inflammation. To identify potential mediators of CAF-induced obesity and Metabolic Syndrome, we used metabolomic analysis to profile serum, muscle, and white adipose from rats fed CAF, HFD, or standard control diets. Principle component analysis identified elevations in clusters of fatty acids and acylcarnitines. These increases in metabolites were associated with systemic mitochondrial dysfunction that paralleled weight gain, physiologic measures of Metabolic Syndrome, and tissue inflammation in CAF-fed rats. Spearman pairwise correlations between metabolites, physiologic, and histologic findings revealed strong correlations between elevated markers of inflammation in CAF-fed animals, measured as crown like structures in adipose, and specifically the pro-inflammatory saturated fatty acids and oxidation intermediates laurate and lauroyl carnitine. Treatment of bone marrow-derived macrophages with lauroyl carnitine polarized macrophages towards the M1 pro-inflammatory phenotype through downregulation of AMPK and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Results presented herein demonstrate that compared to a traditional HFD model, the CAF diet provides a robust model for diet-induced human obesity, which models Metabolic Syndrome-related mitochondrial dysfunction in serum, muscle, and adipose, along with pro-inflammatory metabolite alterations. These data also suggest that modifying the availability or metabolism of saturated fatty acids may limit the inflammation associated with obesity leading to Metabolic

  8. Metabolomic profiling reveals mitochondrial-derived lipid biomarkers that drive obesity-associated inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brante P Sampey

    Full Text Available Obesity has reached epidemic proportions worldwide. Several animal models of obesity exist, but studies are lacking that compare traditional lard-based high fat diets (HFD to "Cafeteria diets" (CAF consisting of nutrient poor human junk food. Our previous work demonstrated the rapid and severe obesogenic and inflammatory consequences of CAF compared to HFD including rapid weight gain, markers of Metabolic Syndrome, multi-tissue lipid accumulation, and dramatic inflammation. To identify potential mediators of CAF-induced obesity and Metabolic Syndrome, we used metabolomic analysis to profile serum, muscle, and white adipose from rats fed CAF, HFD, or standard control diets. Principle component analysis identified elevations in clusters of fatty acids and acylcarnitines. These increases in metabolites were associated with systemic mitochondrial dysfunction that paralleled weight gain, physiologic measures of Metabolic Syndrome, and tissue inflammation in CAF-fed rats. Spearman pairwise correlations between metabolites, physiologic, and histologic findings revealed strong correlations between elevated markers of inflammation in CAF-fed animals, measured as crown like structures in adipose, and specifically the pro-inflammatory saturated fatty acids and oxidation intermediates laurate and lauroyl carnitine. Treatment of bone marrow-derived macrophages with lauroyl carnitine polarized macrophages towards the M1 pro-inflammatory phenotype through downregulation of AMPK and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Results presented herein demonstrate that compared to a traditional HFD model, the CAF diet provides a robust model for diet-induced human obesity, which models Metabolic Syndrome-related mitochondrial dysfunction in serum, muscle, and adipose, along with pro-inflammatory metabolite alterations. These data also suggest that modifying the availability or metabolism of saturated fatty acids may limit the inflammation associated with obesity

  9. Fine Mapping and Transcriptome Analysis Reveal Candidate Genes Associated with Hybrid Lethality in Cabbage (Brassica Oleracea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zhiliang; Hu, Yang; Zhang, Xiaoli; Xue, Yuqian; Fang, Zhiyuan; Yang, Limei; Zhang, Yangyong; Liu, Yumei; Li, Zhansheng; Liu, Xing; Liu, Zezhou; Lv, Honghao; Zhuang, Mu

    2017-06-05

    Hybrid lethality is a deleterious phenotype that is vital to species evolution. We previously reported hybrid lethality in cabbage (Brassica oleracea) and performed preliminary mapping of related genes. In the present study, the fine mapping of hybrid lethal genes revealed that BoHL1 was located on chromosome C1 between BoHLTO124 and BoHLTO130, with an interval of 101 kb. BoHL2 was confirmed to be between insertion-deletion (InDels) markers HL234 and HL235 on C4, with a marker interval of 70 kb. Twenty-eight and nine annotated genes were found within the two intervals of BoHL1 and BoHL2, respectively. We also applied RNA-Seq to analyze hybrid lethality in cabbage. In the region of BoHL1, seven differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and five resistance (R)-related genes (two in common, i.e., Bo1g153320 and Bo1g153380) were found, whereas in the region of BoHL2, two DEGs and four R-related genes (two in common, i.e., Bo4g173780 and Bo4g173810) were found. Along with studies in which R genes were frequently involved in hybrid lethality in other plants, these interesting R-DEGs may be good candidates associated with hybrid lethality. We also used SNP/InDel analyses and quantitative real-time PCR to confirm the results. This work provides new insight into the mechanisms of hybrid lethality in cabbage.

  10. Plant-insect interactions: double-dating associated insect and plant lineages reveals asynchronous radiations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percy, Diana M; Page, Roderic D M; Cronk, Quentin C B

    2004-02-01

    An increasing number of plant-insect studies using phylogenetic analysis suggest that cospeciation events are rare in plant-insect systems. Instead, nonrandom patterns of phylogenetic congruence are produced by phylogenetically conserved host switching (to related plants) or tracking of particular resources or traits (e.g., chemical). The dominance of host switching in many phytophagous insect groups may make the detection of genuine cospeciation events difficult. One important test of putative cospeciation events is to verify whether reciprocal speciation is temporally plausible. We explored techniques for double-dating of both plant and insect phylogenies. We use dated molecular phylogenies of a psyllid (Hemiptera)-Genisteae (Fabaceae) system, a predominantly monophagous insect-plant association widespread on the Atlantic Macaronesian islands. Phylogenetic reconciliation analysis suggests high levels of parallel cladogenesis between legumes and psyllids. However, dating using molecular clocks calibrated on known geological ages of the Macaronesian islands revealed that the legume and psyllid radiations were not contemporaneous but sequential. Whereas the main plant radiation occurred some 8 million years ago, the insect radiation occurred about 3 million years ago. We estimated that >60% of the psyllid speciation has resulted from host switching between related hosts. The only evidence for true cospeciation is in the much more recent and localized radiation of genistoid legumes in the Canary Islands, where the psyllid and legume radiations have been partially contemporaneous. The identification of specific cospeciation events over this time period, however, is hindered by the phylogenetic uncertainty in both legume and psyllid phylogenies due to the apparent rapidity of the species radiations.

  11. Genome-wide association mapping revealed a diverse genetic basis of seed dormancy across subpopulations in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magwa, Risper Auma; Zhao, Hu; Xing, Yongzhong

    2016-01-25

    Seed dormancy is an adaptive trait employed by flowering plants to avoid harsh environmental conditions for the continuity of their next generations. In cereal crops, moderate seed dormancy could help prevent pre-harvest sprouting and improve grain yield and quality. We performed a genome wide association study (GWAS) for dormancy, based on seed germination percentage (GP) in freshly harvested seeds (FHS) and after-ripened seeds (ARS) in 350 worldwide accessions that were characterized with strong population structure of indica, japonica and Aus subpopulations. The germination tests revealed that Aus and indica rice had stronger seed dormancy than japonica rice in FHS. Association analysis revealed 16 loci significantly associated with GP in FHS and 38 in ARS. Three out of the 38 loci detected in ARS were also detected in FHS and 13 of the ARS loci were detected near previously mapped dormancy QTL. In FHS, three of the association loci were located within 100 kb around previously cloned GA/IAA inactivation genes such as GA2ox3, EUI1 and GH3-2 and one near dormancy gene, Sdr4. In ARS, an association signal was detected near ABA signaling gene ABI5. No association peaks were commonly detected among the sub-populations in FHS and only one association peak was detected in both indica and japonica populations in ARS. Sdr4 and GA2OX3 haplotype analysis showed that Aus and indica II (IndII) varieties had stronger dormancy alleles whereas indica I (IndI) and japonica had weak or non-dormancy alleles. The association study and haplotype analysis together, indicate an involvement of independent genes and alleles contributing towards regulation and natural variation of seed dormancy among the rice sub-populations.

  12. Faecal microbiota study reveals specific dysbiosis in spondyloarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breban, Maxime; Tap, Julien; Leboime, Ariane; Said-Nahal, Roula; Langella, Philippe; Chiocchia, Gilles; Furet, Jean-Pierre; Sokol, Harry

    2017-09-01

    Altered microbiota composition or dysbiosis is suspected to be implicated in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory diseases, such as spondyloarthritis (SpA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing was performed on faecal DNA isolated from stool samples in two consecutive cross-sectional cohorts, each comprising three groups of adult volunteers: SpA, RA and healthy controls (HCs). In the second study, HCs comprised a majority of aged-matched siblings of patients with known HLA-B27 status. Alpha and beta diversities were assessed using QIIME, and comparisons were performed using linear discriminant analysis effect size to examine differences between groups. In both cohorts, dysbiosis was evidenced in SpA and RA, as compared with HCs, and was disease specific. A restriction of microbiota biodiversity was detected in both disease groups. The most striking change was a twofold to threefold increased abundance of Ruminococcus gnavus in SpA, as compared with both RA and HCs that was significant in both studies and positively correlated with disease activity in patients having a history of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Among HCs, significant difference in microbiota composition were also detected between HLA-B27+ and HLA-B27 negative siblings, suggesting that genetic background may influence gut microbiota composition. Our results suggest that distinctive dysbiosis characterise both SpA and RA and evidence a reproducible increase in R. gnavus that appears specific for SpA and a marker of disease activity. This observation is consistent with the known proinflammatory role of this bacteria and its association with IBD. It may provide an explanation for the link that exists between SpA and IBD. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  13. Genome-wide association and functional follow-up reveals new loci for kidney function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Pattaro (Cristian); A. Köttgen (Anna); A. Teumer (Alexander); C.A. Böger (Carsten); C. Fuchsberger (Christian); M. Olden (Matthias); M-H. Chen (Ming-Huei); M. Li (Man); X. Gao (Xiaoyi); M. Gorski (Mathias); Q. Yang (Qiong Fang); C.M. O'Seaghdha (Conall); N.L. Glazer (Nicole); A.J. Isaacs (Aaron); C.-T. Liu (Ching-Ti); A.V. Smith (Albert Vernon); J.R. O´Connell; M.V. Struchalin (Maksim); T. Tanaka (Toshiko); A.D. Johnson (Andrew); M.F. Feitosa (Mary Furlan); S.J. Hwang; K. Lohman (Kurt); M. Cornelis (Marilyn); A. Johansson (Åsa); A. Tönjes (Anke); A. Dehghan (Abbas); V. Chouraki (Vincent); E.G. Holliday (Elizabeth); R. Sorice; Z. Kutalik (Zoltán); T. Lehtimäki (Terho); T. Esko (Tõnu); S. Ulivi (Shelia); S. Trompet (Stella); M. Imboden (Medea); B. Kollerits (Barbara); G. Pistis (Giorgio); T.B. Harris (Tamara); L.J. Launer (Lenore); T. Aspelund (Thor); G. Eiriksdottir (Gudny); B.D. Mitchell (Braxton); E.A. Boerwinkle (Eric); R. Schmidt (Reinhold); M. Cavalieri (Margherita); F.B. Hu (Frank); A. Demirkan (Ayşe); B.A. Oostra (Ben); M. de Andrade (Mariza); J.S. Andrews (Jeanette); W. Koenig (Wolfgang); T. Illig (Thomas); A. Döring (Angela); H.E. Wichmann (Erich); I. Kolcic (Ivana); T. Zemunik (Tatijana); M. Boban (Mladen); W. Igl (Wilmar); G. Zaboli (Ghazal); S.H. Wild (Sarah); A.F. Wright (Alan); H. Campbell (Harry); R. Biffar (Reiner); F.D.J. Ernst (Florian); G. Homuth (Georg); H.K. Kroemer (Heyo); M. Nauck (Matthias); P. Kovacs (Peter); M. Stumvoll (Michael); R. Mägi (Reedik); A. Hofman (Albert); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); Y.S. Aulchenko (Yurii); O. Polasek (Ozren); N. Hastie (Nick); V. Vitart (Veronique); J.J. Wang (Jie Jin); S.M. Bergmann (Sven); M. Kähönen (Mika); J. Viikari (Jorma); M.A. Province (Mike); S. Ketkar (Shamika); A.S.F. Doney (Alex); I. Ford (Ian); B.M. Buckley (Brendan M.); B. Paulweber (Bernhard); M. Haun (Margot); C. Sala (Cinzia); M. Ciullo; P. Vollenweider (Peter); O. Raitakari (Olli); A. Metspalu (Andres); C.N.A. Palmer (Colin); P. Gasparini (Paolo); J.W. Jukema (Jan Wouter); F. Kronenberg (Florian); D. Toniolo (Daniela); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); A.R. Shuldiner (Alan); J. Coresh (Josef); L. Ferrucci (Luigi); D.S. Siscovick (David); P. Tikka-Kleemola (Päivi); I.B. Borecki (Ingrid); S.L.R. Kardia (Sharon); G.C. Curhan (Gary); I. Rudan (Igor); U. Gyllensten (Ulf); J.F. Wilson (James); A. Franke (Andre); P.P. Pramstaller (Peter Paul); R. Rettig (Rainer); I. Prokopenko (Inga); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); C. Hayward (Caroline); P.M. Ridker (Paul); A. Parsa (Afshin); M. Bochud (Murielle); I.M. Heid (Iris); W. Goessling (Wolfram); D.I. Chasman (Daniel); W.H.L. Kao (Wen); C.S. Fox (Caroline)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractChronic kidney disease (CKD) is an important public health problem with a genetic component. We performed genome-wide association studies in up to 130,600 European ancestry participants overall, and stratified for key CKD risk factors. We uncovered 6 new loci in association with

  14. Association genetics and transcriptome analysis reveal a gibberellin-responsive pathway involved in regulating photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jianbo; Tian, Jiaxing; Du, Qingzhang; Chen, Jinhui; Li, Ying; Yang, Xiaohui; Li, Bailian; Zhang, Deqiang

    2016-05-01

    Gibberellins (GAs) regulate a wide range of important processes in plant growth and development, including photosynthesis. However, the mechanism by which GAs regulate photosynthesis remains to be understood. Here, we used multi-gene association to investigate the effect of genes in the GA-responsive pathway, as constructed by RNA sequencing, on photosynthesis, growth, and wood property traits, in a population of 435 Populus tomentosa By analyzing changes in the transcriptome following GA treatment, we identified many key photosynthetic genes, in agreement with the observed increase in measurements of photosynthesis. Regulatory motif enrichment analysis revealed that 37 differentially expressed genes related to photosynthesis shared two essential GA-related cis-regulatory elements, the GA response element and the pyrimidine box. Thus, we constructed a GA-responsive pathway consisting of 47 genes involved in regulating photosynthesis, including GID1, RGA, GID2, MYBGa, and 37 photosynthetic differentially expressed genes. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based association analysis showed that 142 SNPs, representing 40 candidate genes in this pathway, were significantly associated with photosynthesis, growth, and wood property traits. Epistasis analysis uncovered interactions between 310 SNP-SNP pairs from 37 genes in this pathway, revealing possible genetic interactions. Moreover, a structural gene-gene matrix based on a time-course of transcript abundances provided a better understanding of the multi-gene pathway affecting photosynthesis. The results imply a functional role for these genes in mediating photosynthesis, growth, and wood properties, demonstrating the potential of combining transcriptome-based regulatory pathway construction and genetic association approaches to detect the complex genetic networks underlying quantitative traits. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights

  15. Parental diabetes status reveals association of mitochondrial DNA haplogroup J1 with type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wainstein Julio

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although mitochondrial dysfunction is consistently manifested in patients with Type 2 Diabetes mellitus (T2DM, the association of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA sequence variants with T2DM varies among populations. These differences might stem from differing environmental influences among populations. However, other potentially important considerations emanate from the very nature of mitochondrial genetics, namely the notable high degree of partitioning in the distribution of human mtDNA variants among populations, as well as the interaction of mtDNA and nuclear DNA-encoded factors working in concert to govern mitochondrial function. We hypothesized that association of mtDNA genetic variants with T2DM could be revealed while controlling for the effect of additional inherited factors, reflected in family history information. Methods To test this hypothesis we set out to investigate whether mtDNA genetic variants will be differentially associated with T2DM depending on the diabetes status of the parents. To this end, association of mtDNA genetic backgrounds (haplogroups with T2DM was assessed in 1055 Jewish patients with and without T2DM parents ('DP' and 'HP', respectively. Results Haplogroup J1 was found to be 2.4 fold under-represented in the 'HP' patients (p = 0.0035. These results are consistent with a previous observation made in Finnish T2DM patients. Moreover, assessing the haplogroup distribution in 'DP' versus 'HP' patients having diabetic siblings revealed that haplogroup J1 was virtually absent in the 'HP' group. Conclusion These results imply the involvement of inherited factors, which modulate the susceptibility of haplogroup J1 to T2DM.

  16. Medication-wide association studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.B. Ryan (Patrick); D. Madigan (David); P.E. Stang (Paul); M.J. Schuemie (Martijn); G. Hripcsak (G.)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractUndiscovered side effects of drugs can have a profound effect on the health of the nation, and electronic health-care databases offer opportunities to speed up the discovery of these side effects. We applied a "medication-wide association study" approach that combined multivariate

  17. Historical data reveal 30-year persistence of benthic fauna associations in heavily modified waterbody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Callaway

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Baseline surveys form the cornerstone of coastal impact studies where altered conditions, for example through new infrastructure development, are assessed against a temporal reference state. They are snapshots taken before construction. Due to scarcity of relevant data prior to baseline surveys long-term trends can often not be taken into account. Particularly in heavily modified waterbodies this would however be desirable to control for changes in anthropogenic use over time as well as natural ecological variation. Here, the benthic environment of an industrialized embayment was investigated (Swansea Bay, Wales, UK where it is proposed to build a tidal lagoon that would generate marine renewable energy from the tidal range. Since robust long-term baseline data was not available, the value of unpublished historical benthos information from 1984 by a regional water company was assessed with the aim to improve certainty about the persistence of current benthic community patterns. A survey of 101 positions in 2014 identified spatially discrete benthic communities with areas of high and low diversity. Habitat characteristics including sediment properties and the proximity to a sewage outfall explained 17-35% of the variation in the community structure. Comparing the historical information from 1984 with 2014 revealed striking similarity in the benthic communities between those years, not just in their spatial distribution but also to a large extent in the species composition. The 30-year-old information confirmed spatial boundaries of discrete species associations and pinpointed a similar diversity hotspot. A group of five common species was found to be particularly persistent over time (Nucula nitidosa, Spisula elliptica, Spiophanes bombyx, Nephtys hombergii, Diastylis rathkei. According to the Infauna Quality Index (IQI linked to the EU Water Framework Directive (WFD the average ecological status for 2014 was ‘moderate’, but eleven samples

  18. Transcriptome sequencing of Mycosphaerella fijiensis during association with Musa acuminata reveals candidate pathogenicity genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noar, Roslyn D; Daub, Margaret E

    2016-08-30

    genes with higher expression in infected leaf tissue, suggesting that they may play a role in pathogenicity. For two other scaffolds, no transcripts were detected in either condition, and PCR assays support the hypothesis that at least one of these scaffolds corresponds to a dispensable chromosome that is not required for survival or pathogenicity. Our study revealed major changes in the transcriptome of Mycosphaerella fijiensis, when associating with its host compared to during saprophytic growth in medium. This analysis identified putative pathogenicity genes and also provides support for the existence of dispensable chromosomes in this fungus.

  19. COI and ITS2 sequences delimit species, reveal cryptic taxa and host specificity of fig-associated Sycophila (Hymenoptera, Eurytomidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanwei; Zhou, Xin; Feng, Gui; Hu, Haoyuan; Niu, Liming; Hebert, Paul D N; Huang, Dawei

    2010-01-01

    Although the genus Sycophila has broad host preferences, some species are specifically associated with figs as nonpollinator wasps. Because of their sexual dimorphism, morphological plasticity, cryptic mating behaviour and poorly known biology, species identifications are often uncertain. It is particularly difficult to match conspecific females and males. In this study, we employed two molecular markers, mitochondrial COI and nuclear ITS2, to identify Sycophila from six Chinese fig species. Morphological studies revealed 25 female and male morphs, while sequence results for both genes were consistent in supporting the presence of 15 species, of which 13 were host specialists and two used dual hosts. A single species of Sycophila was respectively found on four fig species, but six species were isolated from Ficus benjamina and a same number was reared from Ficus microcarpa. Sequence results revealed three male morphs in one species and detected two species that were overlooked by morphological analysis. © 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Genetic Analysis Reveals a Longevity-Associated Protein Modulating Endothelial Function and Angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Francesco; Carrizzo, Albino; Spinelli, Chiara C; Ferrario, Anna; Malovini, Alberto; Maciąg, Anna; Damato, Antonio; Auricchio, Alberto; Spinetti, Gaia; Sangalli, Elena; Dang, Zexu; Madonna, Michele; Ambrosio, Mariateresa; Sitia, Leopoldo; Bigini, Paolo; Calì, Gaetano; Schreiber, Stefan; Perls, Thomas; Fucile, Sergio; Mulas, Francesca; Nebel, Almut; Bellazzi, Riccardo; Madeddu, Paolo; Vecchione, Carmine; Puca, Annibale A

    2015-07-31

    Long living individuals show delay of aging, which is characterized by the progressive loss of cardiovascular homeostasis, along with reduced endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity, endothelial dysfunction, and impairment of tissue repair after ischemic injury. Exploit genetic analysis of long living individuals to reveal master molecular regulators of physiological aging and new targets for treatment of cardiovascular disease. We show that the polymorphic variant rs2070325 (Ile229Val) in bactericidal/permeability-increasing fold-containing-family-B-member-4 (BPIFB4) associates with exceptional longevity, under a recessive genetic model, in 3 independent populations. Moreover, the expression of BPIFB4 is instrumental to maintenance of cellular and vascular homeostasis through regulation of protein synthesis. BPIFB4 phosphorylation/activation by protein-kinase-R-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase induces its complexing with 14-3-3 and heat shock protein 90, which is facilitated by the longevity-associated variant. In isolated vessels, BPIFB4 is upregulated by mechanical stress, and its knock-down inhibits endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation. In hypertensive rats and old mice, gene transfer of longevity-associated variant-BPIFB4 restores endothelial nitric oxide synthase signaling, rescues endothelial dysfunction, and reduces blood pressure levels. Furthermore, BPIFB4 is implicated in vascular repair. BPIFB4 is abundantly expressed in circulating CD34(+) cells of long living individuals, and its knock-down in endothelial progenitor cells precludes their capacity to migrate toward the chemoattractant SDF-1. In a murine model of peripheral ischemia, systemic gene therapy with longevity-associated variant-BPIFB4 promotes the recruitment of hematopoietic stem cells, reparative vascularization, and reperfusion of the ischemic muscle. Longevity-associated variant-BPIFB4 may represent a novel therapeutic tool to fight endothelial dysfunction and promote vascular

  1. Genome-wide association analyses reveal complex genetic architecture underlying natural variation for flowering time in canola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, H; Raman, R; Coombes, N; Song, J; Prangnell, R; Bandaranayake, C; Tahira, R; Sundaramoorthi, V; Killian, A; Meng, J; Dennis, E S; Balasubramanian, S

    2016-06-01

    Optimum flowering time is the key to maximize canola production in order to meet global demand of vegetable oil, biodiesel and canola-meal. We reveal extensive variation in flowering time across diverse genotypes of canola under field, glasshouse and controlled environmental conditions. We conduct a genome-wide association study and identify 69 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers associated with flowering time, which are repeatedly detected across experiments. Several associated SNPs occur in clusters across the canola genome; seven of them were detected within 20 Kb regions of a priori candidate genes; FLOWERING LOCUS T, FRUITFUL, FLOWERING LOCUS C, CONSTANS, FRIGIDA, PHYTOCHROME B and an additional five SNPs were localized within 14 Kb of a previously identified quantitative trait loci for flowering time. Expression analyses showed that among FLC paralogs, BnFLC.A2 accounts for ~23% of natural variation in diverse accessions. Genome-wide association analysis for FLC expression levels mapped not only BnFLC.C2 but also other loci that contribute to variation in FLC expression. In addition to revealing the complex genetic architecture of flowering time variation, we demonstrate that the identified SNPs can be modelled to predict flowering time in diverse canola germplasm accurately and hence are suitable for genomic selection of adaptative traits in canola improvement programmes. ©2015 The Authors. Plant, Cell & Environment published by JohnWiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Associations between common intestinal parasites and bacteria in humans as revealed by qPCR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Brien Andersen, L.; Karim, A. B.; Roager, Henrik Munch

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have shown associations between groups of intestinal bacterial or specific ratios between bacterial groups and various disease traits. Meanwhile, little is known about interactions and associations between eukaryotic and prokaryotic microorganisms in the human gut. In this work, we...... set out to investigate potential associations between common single-celled parasites such as Blastocystis spp. and Dientamoeba fragilis and intestinal bacteria. Stool DNA from patients with intestinal symptoms were selected based on being Blastocystis spp.-positive (B+)/negative (B-) and D. fragilis...

  3. Aneurysmal angiosarcoma associated with vascular graft revealed by 18F-FDG-PET imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chetouani, Ahmed; Perrin, Mathieu; Drouet, Clément; Marie, Pierre-Yves; Verger, Antoine

    2017-06-01

    We report a rare case of vascular graft-associated aneurysmal angiosarcoma by 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET). An 81-year-old male patient, with a prior history of graft interposition 1 year previously, was referred to 18F-FDG-PET because of an inflammatory syndrome of unknown origin. FDG-PET images revealed a particular pattern of intense circular uptake within the arterial wall (SUVmax = 10) in a popliteal aneurysm and, additionally, a large hypermetabolic mass centered by the graft. Remote hypermetabolisms in lung nodules and pleural thickenings were also detected. The diagnosis of angiosarcoma was ascertained through histopathological analysis of surgical samples. Development of an aneurysmal angiosarcoma at the site of a vascular graft is a rare entity, often misdiagnosed. 18F-FDG-PET appears to be useful in its detection with a PET pattern of intense circular uptake within the arterial wall. Such finding should lead to the search for distant metastasis.

  4. Genome-wide DNA methylation profiling reveals parity-associated hypermethylation of FOXA1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Sagar; Gu, Fei; Wang, Chou-Miin; Lin, Chun-Lin; Liu, Joseph; Wang, Howard; Ravdin, Peter; Hu, Yanfen; Huang, Tim H M; Li, Rong

    2014-10-01

    Early pregnancy in women by the age of 20 is known to have a profound effect on reduction of lifelong breast cancer risk as compared to their nulliparous counterparts. Additional pregnancies further enhance the protection against breast cancer development. Nationwide trend of delayed pregnancy may contribute to the recently reported increase in the incidence of advanced breast cancer among young women in this country. The underlying mechanism for the parity-associated reduction of breast cancer risk is not clearly understood. The purpose of the current study is to use whole-genome DNA methylation profiling to explore a potential association between parity and epigenetic changes in breast tissue from women with early parity and nulliparity. Breast tissue was collected from age-matched cancer-free women with early parity (age parity-associated hypermethylated genes were further verified by locus-specific pyrosequencing, using an expanded cohort of parous (n = 19) and nulliparous (n = 16) women that included the initial samples used in the global analysis. Our study identified six genes that are hypermethylated in the parous group (P parity-associated hypermethylation at multiple CpG islands of the FOXA1 gene, which encodes a pioneer factor that facilitates chromatin binding of estrogen receptor α. Our work identifies several potential methylation biomarkers for parity-associated breast cancer risk assessment. In addition, the results are consistent with the notion that parity-associated epigenetic silencing of FOXA1 contributes to long-term attenuation of the estrogenic impact on breast cancer development.

  5. Genetic Dissection of Acute Anterior Uveitis Reveals Similarities and Differences in Associations observed with Ankylosing Spondylitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Philip C.; Claushuis, Theodora A.M.; Cortes, Adrian; Martin, Tammy M.; Evans, David M.; Leo, Paul; Mukhopadhyay, Pamela; Bradbury, Linda A.; Cremin, Katie; Harris, Jessica; Maksymowych, Walter P.; Inman, Robert D.; Rahman, Proton; Haroon, Nigil; Gensler, Lianne; Powell, Joseph E.; van der Horst-Bruinsma, Irene E.; Hewitt, Alex W.; Craig, Jamie E.; Lim, Lyndell L.; Wakefield, Denis; McCluskey, Peter; Voigt, Valentina; Fleming, Peter; Degli-Esposti, Mariapia; Pointon, Jennifer J.; Weisman, Michael H.; Wordsworth, B. Paul; Reveille, John D.; Rosenbaum, James T.; Brown, Matthew A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To use high density genotyping to investigate the genetic associations of acute anterior uveitis (AAU) in patients both with and without ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Method We genotyped 1,711 patients with AAU (either primary or with AAU and AS), 2,339 AS patients without AAU, and 10,000 controls on the Illumina Immunochip Infinium microarray. We also used data on AS patients from previous genomewide association studies to investigate the AS risk locus ANTXR2 for its putative effect in AAU. ANTXR2 expression in mouse eyes was investigated by RT-PCR. Results Comparing all AAU cases with HC, strong association was seen over HLA-B corresponding to the HLA-B27 tag SNP rs116488202. Three non-MHC loci IL23R, the intergenic region 2p15 and ERAP1 were associated at genome-wide significance (P < 5×10−8). Five loci harboring the immune-related genes IL10-IL19, IL18R1-IL1R1, IL6R, the chromosome 1q32 locus harboring KIF21B, as well as the eye related gene EYS, were also associated at a suggestive level of significance (P < 5×10−6). A number of previously confirmed AS associations demonstrated significant differences in effect size between AS patients with AAU and AS patients without AAU. ANTXR2 expression was found to vary across eye compartments. Conclusion These findings, with both novel AAU specific associations, and associations shared with AS demonstrate overlapping but also distinct genetic susceptibility loci for AAU and AS. The associations in IL10 and IL18R1 are shared with inflammatory bowel disease, suggesting common etiologic pathways. PMID:25200001

  6. Pattern changes of EEG oscillations and BOLD signals associated with temporal lobe epilepsy as revealed by a working memory task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozelo, Helka F B; Alessio, Andréa; Sercheli, Maurício S; Bilevicius, Elizabeth; Pedro, Tatiane; Pereira, Fabrício R S; Rondina, Jane M; Damasceno, Benito P; Cendes, Fernando; Covolan, Roberto J M

    2014-04-25

    It is known that the abnormal neural activity in epilepsy may be associated to the reorganization of neural circuits and brain plasticity in various ways. On that basis, we hypothesized that changes in neuronal circuitry due to epilepsy could lead to measurable variations in patterns of both EEG and BOLD signals in patients performing some cognitive task as compared to what would be obtained in normal condition. Thus, the aim of this study was to compare the cerebral areas involved in EEG oscillations versus fMRI signal patterns during a working memory (WM) task in normal controls and patients with refractory mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) associated with hippocampal sclerosis (HS). The study included six patients with left MTLE-HS (left-HS group) and seven normal controls (control group) matched to the patients by age and educational level, both groups undergoing a blocked design paradigm based on Sternberg test during separated EEG and fMRI sessions. This test consisted of encoding and maintenance of a variable number of consonant letters on WM. EEG analysis for the encoding period revealed the presence of theta and alpha oscillations in the frontal and parietal areas, respectively. Likewise, fMRI showed the co-occurrence of positive and negative BOLD signals in both brain regions. As for the maintenance period, whereas EEG analysis revealed disappearance of theta oscillation, fMRI showed decrease of positive BOLD in frontal area and increase of negative BOLD in the posterior part of the brain. Generally speaking, these patterns of electrophysiological and hemodynamic signals were observed for both control and left-HS groups. However, the data also revealed remarkable differences between these groups that are consistent with the hypothesis of reorganization of brain circuitry associated with epilepsy.

  7. Genome-wide association mapping reveals a rich genetic architecture of complex traits in Oryza sativa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Keyan; Tung, Chih-Wei; Eizenga, Georgia C.; Wright, Mark H.; Ali, M. Liakat; Price, Adam H.; Norton, Gareth J.; Islam, M. Rafiqul; Reynolds, Andy; Mezey, Jason; McClung, Anna M.; Bustamante, Carlos D.; McCouch, Susan R.

    2011-01-01

    Asian rice, Oryza sativa is a cultivated, inbreeding species that feeds over half of the world's population. Understanding the genetic basis of diverse physiological, developmental, and morphological traits provides the basis for improving yield, quality and sustainability of rice. Here we show the results of a genome-wide association study based on genotyping 44,100 SNP variants across 413 diverse accessions of O. sativa collected from 82 countries that were systematically phenotyped for 34 traits. Using cross-population-based mapping strategies, we identified dozens of common variants influencing numerous complex traits. Significant heterogeneity was observed in the genetic architecture associated with subpopulation structure and response to environment. This work establishes an open-source translational research platform for genome-wide association studies in rice that directly links molecular variation in genes and metabolic pathways with the germplasm resources needed to accelerate varietal development and crop improvement. PMID:21915109

  8. Study Reveals Brain Biology behind Self-Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, Sarah D.

    2011-01-01

    A new neuroscience twist on a classic psychology study offers some clues to what makes one student able to buckle down for hours of homework before a test while his classmates party. The study published in the September 2011 edition of "Proceedings of the National Academy of Science," suggests environmental cues may "hijack" the brain's mechanisms…

  9. Highlight: Pioneering study reveals importance of land tenure in ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-04-14

    Apr 14, 2016 ... The findings of a pioneering study linking services to justice and land tenure were presented in Nairobi on February 5, 2015. The study, carried out by multiple stakeholders, shows that land tenure is critical to improving basic services and access to justice in informal settlements in Nairobi, Kenya.

  10. Implementing Japanese Lesson Study in Foreign Countries: Misconceptions Revealed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Toshiakira

    2014-01-01

    This paper is based on data gathered during visits to Uganda and Malawi, conducted by the International Math-teacher Professionalization Using Lesson Study (IMPULS) project and the Japanese International Cooperation Agency (JICA). The author's observations and experiences highlighted misconceptions about lesson study. The paper concludes that some…

  11. Spatial analysis of Cdc42 activity reveals a role for plasma membrane–associated Cdc42 in centrosome regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrington, Kari A.; Trinh, Andrew L.; Dang, Carolyn; O’Shaughnessy, Ellen; Hahn, Klaus M.; Gratton, Enrico; Digman, Michelle A.; Sütterlin, Christine

    2017-01-01

    The ability of the small GTPase Cdc42 to regulate diverse cellular processes depends on tight spatial control of its activity. Cdc42 function is best understood at the plasma membrane (PM), where it regulates cytoskeletal organization and cell polarization. Active Cdc42 has also been detected at the Golgi, but its role and regulation at this organelle are only partially understood. Here we analyze the spatial distribution of Cdc42 activity by moni­toring the dynamics of the Cdc42 FLARE biosensor using the phasor approach to FLIM-FRET. Phasor analysis revealed that Cdc42 is active at all Golgi cisternae and that this activity is controlled by Tuba and ARHGAP10, two Golgi-associated Cdc42 regulators. To our surprise, FGD1, another Cdc42 GEF at the Golgi, was not required for Cdc42 regulation at the Golgi, although its depletion decreased Cdc42 activity at the PM. Similarly, changes in Golgi morphology did not affect Cdc42 activity at the Golgi but were associated with a substantial reduction in PM-associated Cdc42 activity. Of interest, cells with reduced Cdc42 activity at the PM displayed altered centrosome morphology, suggesting that centrosome regulation may be mediated by active Cdc42 at the PM. Our study describes a novel quantitative approach to determine Cdc42 activity at specific subcellular locations and reveals new regulatory principles and functions of this small GTPase. PMID:28539409

  12. Genome-Wide Association and Transcriptome Analyses Reveal Candidate Genes Underlying Yield-determining Traits in Brassica napus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Kun; Peng, Liu; Zhang, Chao; Lu, Junhua; Yang, Bo; Xiao, Zhongchun; Liang, Ying; Xu, Xingfu; Qu, Cunmin; Zhang, Kai; Liu, Liezhao; Zhu, Qinlong; Fu, Minglian; Yuan, Xiaoyan; Li, Jiana

    2017-01-01

    Yield is one of the most important yet complex crop traits. To improve our understanding of the genetic basis of yield establishment, and to identify candidate genes responsible for yield improvement in Brassica napus, we performed genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for seven yield-determining traits [main inflorescence pod number (MIPN), branch pod number (BPN), pod number per plant (PNP), seed number per pod (SPP), thousand seed weight, main inflorescence yield (MIY), and branch yield], using data from 520 diverse B. napus accessions from two different yield environments. In total, we detected 128 significant single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), 93 of which were revealed as novel by integrative analysis. A combination of GWAS and transcriptome sequencing on 21 haplotype blocks from samples pooled by four extremely high-yielding or low-yielding accessions revealed the differential expression of 14 crucial candiate genes (such as Bna.MYB83, Bna.SPL5, and Bna.ROP3) associated with multiple traits or containing multiple SNPs associated with the same trait. Functional annotation and expression pattern analyses further demonstrated that these 14 candiate genes might be important in developmental processes and biomass accumulation, thus affecting the yield establishment of B. napus. These results provide valuable information for understanding the genetic mechanisms underlying the establishment of high yield in B. napus, and lay the foundation for developing high-yielding B. napus varieties.

  13. Revealing phenotype-associated functional differences by genome-wide scan of ancient haplotype blocks.

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    Ritsuko Onuki

    Full Text Available Genome-wide scans for positive selection have become important for genomic medicine, and many studies aim to find genomic regions affected by positive selection that are associated with risk allele variations among populations. Most such studies are designed to detect recent positive selection. However, we hypothesize that ancient positive selection is also important for adaptation to pathogens, and has affected current immune-mediated common diseases. Based on this hypothesis, we developed a novel linkage disequilibrium-based pipeline, which aims to detect regions associated with ancient positive selection across populations from single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP data. By applying this pipeline to the genotypes in the International HapMap project database, we show that genes in the detected regions are enriched in pathways related to the immune system and infectious diseases. The detected regions also contain SNPs reported to be associated with cancers and metabolic diseases, obesity-related traits, type 2 diabetes, and allergic sensitization. These SNPs were further mapped to biological pathways to determine the associations between phenotypes and molecular functions. Assessments of candidate regions to identify functions associated with variations in incidence rates of these diseases are needed in the future.

  14. Discovery analysis of TCGA data reveals association between germline genotype and survival in ovarian cancer patients.

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    Rosemary Braun

    Full Text Available Ovarian cancer remains a significant public health burden, with the highest mortality rate of all the gynecological cancers. This is attributable to the late stage at which the majority of ovarian cancers are diagnosed, coupled with the low and variable response of advanced tumors to standard chemotherapies. To date, clinically useful predictors of treatment response remain lacking. Identifying the genetic determinants of ovarian cancer survival and treatment response is crucial to the development of prognostic biomarkers and personalized therapies that may improve outcomes for the late-stage patients who comprise the majority of cases.To identify constitutional genetic variations contributing to ovarian cancer mortality, we systematically investigated associations between germline polymorphisms and ovarian cancer survival using data from The Cancer Genome Atlas Project (TCGA. Using stage-stratified Cox proportional hazards regression, we examined >650,000 SNP loci for association with survival. We additionally examined whether the association of significant SNPs with survival was modified by somatic alterations.Germline polymorphisms at rs4934282 (AGAP11/C10orf116 and rs1857623 (DNAH14 were associated with stage-adjusted survival (p= 1.12e-07 and 1.80e-07, FDR q= 1.2e-04 and 2.4e-04, respectively. A third SNP, rs4869 (C10orf116, was additionally identified as significant in the exome sequencing data; it is in near-perfect LD with rs4934282. The associations with survival remained significant when somatic alterations.Discovery analysis of TCGA data reveals germline genetic variations that may play a role in ovarian cancer survival even among late-stage cases. The significant loci are located near genes previously reported as having a possible relationship to platinum and taxol response. Because the variant alleles at the significant loci are common (frequencies for rs4934282 A/C alleles = 0.54/0.46, respectively; rs1857623 A/G alleles = 0

  15. Global metabolomic profiling reveals an association of metal fume exposure and plasma unsaturated fatty acids.

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    Yongyue Wei

    Full Text Available Welding-associated air pollutants negatively affect the health of exposed workers; however, their molecular mechanisms in causing disease remain largely unclear. Few studies have systematically investigated the systemic toxic effects of welding fumes on humans.To explore the effects of welding fumes on the plasma metabolome, and to identify biomarkers for risk assessment of welding fume exposure.The two-stage, self-controlled exploratory study included 11 boilermakers from a 2011 discovery panel and 8 boilermakers from a 2012 validation panel. Plasma samples were collected pre- and post-welding fume exposure and analyzed by chromatography/mass spectrometry.Eicosapentaenoic or docosapentaenoic acid metabolic changes post-welding were significantly associated with particulate (PM2.5 exposure (p<0.05. The combined analysis by linear mixed-effects model showed that exposure was associated with a statistically significant decline in metabolite change of eicosapentaenoic acid [β(95% CI = -0.013(-0.022 ≈ -0.004; p = 0.005], docosapentaenoic acid n3 [β(95% CI = -0.010(-0.018 ≈ -0.002; p = 0.017], and docosapentaenoic acid n6 [β(95% CI = -0.007(-0.013 ≈ -0.001; p = 0.021]. Pathway analysis identified an association of the unsaturated fatty acid pathway with exposure (p Study-2011 = 0.025; p Study-2012 = 0.021; p Combined = 0.009. The functional network built by these fatty acids and their interactive genes contained significant enrichment of genes associated with various diseases, including neoplasms, cardiovascular diseases, and lipid metabolism disorders.High-dose exposure of metal welding fumes decreases unsaturated fatty acids with an exposure-response relationship. This alteration in fatty acids is a potential biological mediator and biomarker for exposure-related health disorders.

  16. Developmental palaeontology of Reptilia as revealed by histological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheyer, Torsten M; Klein, Nicole; Sander, P Martin

    2010-06-01

    Among the fossilized ontogenetic series known for tetrapods, only more basal groups like temnospondyl amphibians have been used extensively in developmental studies, whereas reptilian and synapsid data have been largely neglected so far. However, before such ontogenetic series can be subject to study, the relative age and affiliation of putative specimens within a series has to be verified. Bone histology has a long-standing tradition as being a source of palaeobiological and growth history data in fossil amniotes and indeed, the analysis of bone microstructures still remains the most important and most reliable tool for determining the absolute ontogenetic age of fossil vertebrates. It is also the only direct way to reconstruct life histories and growth strategies for extinct animals. Herein the record of bone histology among Reptilia and its application to elucidate and expand fossilized ontogenies as a source of developmental data are reviewed. (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A phylogenomic study of birds reveals their evolutionary history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackett, Shannon J; Kimball, Rebecca T; Reddy, Sushma; Bowie, Rauri C K; Braun, Edward L; Braun, Michael J; Chojnowski, Jena L; Cox, W Andrew; Han, Kin-Lan; Harshman, John; Huddleston, Christopher J; Marks, Ben D; Miglia, Kathleen J; Moore, William S; Sheldon, Frederick H; Steadman, David W; Witt, Christopher C; Yuri, Tamaki

    2008-06-27

    Deep avian evolutionary relationships have been difficult to resolve as a result of a putative explosive radiation. Our study examined approximately 32 kilobases of aligned nuclear DNA sequences from 19 independent loci for 169 species, representing all major extant groups, and recovered a robust phylogeny from a genome-wide signal supported by multiple analytical methods. We documented well-supported, previously unrecognized interordinal relationships (such as a sister relationship between passerines and parrots) and corroborated previously contentious groupings (such as flamingos and grebes). Our conclusions challenge current classifications and alter our understanding of trait evolution; for example, some diurnal birds evolved from nocturnal ancestors. Our results provide a valuable resource for phylogenetic and comparative studies in birds.

  18. Selective genotyping reveals association between the epithelial sodium channel gamma-subunit and systolic blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büsst, Cara J; Scurrah, Katrina J; Ellis, Justine A; Harrap, Stephen B

    2007-10-01

    Systolic blood pressure is determined in large part by genes. Six independent studies have reported evidence of linkage between systolic pressure and chromosome 16p12 that incorporates SCNN1G, the gene encoding the gamma-subunit of the epithelial sodium channel. We undertook the first comprehensive association analysis of SCNN1G and systolic pressure. To achieve genetic contrast, we sampled unrelated subjects within the upper (mean: 166 mm Hg; n=96) and lower (mean: 98 mm Hg; n=94) 10% of the systolic pressure distribution of 2911 subjects from the Victorian Family Heart Study. We examined genotypes and haplotypes related to 26 single nucleotide polymorphisms across SCNN1G and its promoter. Each of 3 single nucleotide polymorphisms (rs13331086, rs11074553, and rs4299163) in introns 5 and 6 showed evidence of association with systolic pressure in logistic regression analyses adjusted for age, sex, and body mass index. Considered as a haplotype block, these single nucleotide polymorphisms were significantly associated with systolic pressure (haplo.score global: P=0.0001). In permutation analyses to account for multiple testing, a result such as this was observed only once in 10,000 permutations. The estimated frequency of 1 haplotype (TGC) was substantially greater in high (13.3%) than low (0.6%) systolic pressure subjects (P=0.0001). Three other haplotypes (TGG, TAC, and GGC) showed associations with high or low systolic pressure consistent with the observed associations of their composite alleles. These findings identify relatively common polymorphisms in the SCNN1G gene that are associated with high systolic blood pressure in the general Australian white population.

  19. Genome-wide association mapping reveals novel sources of resistance to northern corn leaf blight in maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Junqiang; Ali, Farhan; Chen, Gengshen; Li, Huihui; Mahuku, George; Yang, Ning; Narro, Luis; Magorokosho, Cosmos; Makumbi, Dan; Yan, Jianbing

    2015-08-20

    Northern corn leaf blight (NCLB) caused by Exserohilum turcicum is a destructive disease in maize. Using host resistance to minimize the detrimental effects of NCLB on maize productivity is the most cost-effective and appealing disease management strategy. However, this requires the identification and use of stable resistance genes that are effective across different environments. We evaluated a diverse maize population comprised of 999 inbred lines across different environments for resistance to NCLB. To identify genomic regions associated with NCLB resistance in maize, a genome-wide association analysis was conducted using 56,110 single-nucleotide polymorphism markers. Single-marker and haplotype-based associations, as well as Anderson-Darling tests, identified alleles significantly associated with NCLB resistance. The single-marker and haplotype-based association mappings identified twelve and ten loci (genes), respectively, that were significantly associated with resistance to NCLB. Additionally, by dividing the population into three subgroups and performing Anderson-Darling tests, eighty one genes were detected, and twelve of them were related to plant defense. Identical defense genes were identified using the three analyses. An association panel including 999 diverse lines was evaluated for resistance to NCLB in multiple environments, and a large number of resistant lines were identified and can be used as reliable resistance resource in maize breeding program. Genome-wide association study reveals that NCLB resistance is a complex trait which is under the control of many minor genes with relatively low effects. Pyramiding these genes in the same background is likely to result in stable resistance to NCLB.

  20. Immunohistochemistry for PrPSc in natural scrapie reveals patterns which are associated with the PrP genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiropoulos, J; Casalone, C; Caramelli, M; Simmons, M M

    2007-08-01

    Immunohistochemistry for PrPSc is used widely in scrapie diagnosis. In natural scrapie cases the use of immunohistochemistry (IHC) has revealed the existence of up to 12 different morphological types of immunostained deposits. The significance of this pattern variability in relation to genotype has not been studied extensively in natural disease. In this study we recorded in detail PrPSc patterns at the obex level of the medulla oblongata from 163 animals derived from 55 flocks which presented through passive surveillance in the UK and Italy. A strong association was seen between PrPSc patterns and PrP genotype, particularly in relation to codon 136. In a blind assessment of this association we were able to predict, with over 80% accuracy, the genotype of 151 scrapie cases which were presented through passive surveillance from 13 farms. The genotype of these cases was ARQ/ARQ or VRQ/VRQ. The association of PrPsc patterns with genotype was generally stronger in those farms where all the affected animals belonged to a single genotype compared with farms where both genotypes were identified, with the exception of one farm in which the genotype of all affected sheep was ARQ/ARQ and the PrPSc patterns were of the VRQ/VRQ type. Our observations support the hypothesis that the observed association between specific IHC patterns and genotypes may in fact be strain driven but in natural disease individual scrapie strains may demonstrate a genotypic tropism.

  1. Pubertal control mechanisms as revealed from human studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipman, J J

    1980-05-15

    Human puberty is thought to be regulated by a central nervous system (CNS) program. Strong presumptive evidence for this thesis has been drawn from the augmented gonadotropin secretion that occurs synchronously with sleep in early puberty and serves as a biologic index to CNS puberty. In response to wake/sleep gonadotropin patterns, sex steroids are also secreted in circadian-like patterns during puberty. In disorders such as precocious puberty, anorexia nervosa, and gonadal dysgenesis, the physiological mechanisms that control wake/sleep differences in gonadotropin secretion appear to be intact. Studies in such patients suggest that the primary sex hormones have a quantitative but not qualitative modulating effect on the CNS program. Possible additional control mechanisms include adrenal androgen secretion and body composition.

  2. An integrated multi-omics study revealed metabolic alterations underlying the effects of coffee consumption.

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    Shoko Takahashi

    Full Text Available Many epidemiological studies have indicated that coffee consumption may reduce the risks of developing obesity and diabetes, but the underlying mechanisms of these effects are poorly understood. Our previous study revealed the changes on gene expression profiles in the livers of C57BL/6J mice fed a high-fat diet containing three types of coffee (caffeinated, decaffeinated and green unroasted coffee, using DNA microarrays. The results revealed remarkable alterations in lipid metabolism-related molecules which may be involved in the anti-obesity effects of coffee. We conducted the present study to further elucidate the metabolic alterations underlying the effects of coffee consumption through comprehensive proteomic and metabolomic analyses. Proteomics revealed an up-regulation of isocitrate dehydrogenase (a key enzyme in the TCA cycle and its related proteins, suggesting increased energy generation. The metabolomics showed an up-regulation of metabolites involved in the urea cycle, with which the transcriptome data were highly consistent, indicating accelerated energy expenditure. The TCA cycle and the urea cycle are likely be accelerated in a concerted manner, since they are directly connected by mutually providing each other's intermediates. The up-regulation of these pathways might result in a metabolic shift causing increased ATP turnover, which is related to the alterations of lipid metabolism. This mechanism may play an important part in the suppressive effects of coffee consumption on obesity, inflammation, and hepatosteatosis. This study newly revealed global metabolic alterations induced by coffee intake, providing significant insights into the association between coffee intake and the prevention of type 2 diabetes, utilizing the benefits of multi-omics analyses.

  3. An integrated multi-omics study revealed metabolic alterations underlying the effects of coffee consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Shoko; Saito, Kenji; Jia, Huijuan; Kato, Hisanori

    2014-01-01

    Many epidemiological studies have indicated that coffee consumption may reduce the risks of developing obesity and diabetes, but the underlying mechanisms of these effects are poorly understood. Our previous study revealed the changes on gene expression profiles in the livers of C57BL/6J mice fed a high-fat diet containing three types of coffee (caffeinated, decaffeinated and green unroasted coffee), using DNA microarrays. The results revealed remarkable alterations in lipid metabolism-related molecules which may be involved in the anti-obesity effects of coffee. We conducted the present study to further elucidate the metabolic alterations underlying the effects of coffee consumption through comprehensive proteomic and metabolomic analyses. Proteomics revealed an up-regulation of isocitrate dehydrogenase (a key enzyme in the TCA cycle) and its related proteins, suggesting increased energy generation. The metabolomics showed an up-regulation of metabolites involved in the urea cycle, with which the transcriptome data were highly consistent, indicating accelerated energy expenditure. The TCA cycle and the urea cycle are likely be accelerated in a concerted manner, since they are directly connected by mutually providing each other's intermediates. The up-regulation of these pathways might result in a metabolic shift causing increased ATP turnover, which is related to the alterations of lipid metabolism. This mechanism may play an important part in the suppressive effects of coffee consumption on obesity, inflammation, and hepatosteatosis. This study newly revealed global metabolic alterations induced by coffee intake, providing significant insights into the association between coffee intake and the prevention of type 2 diabetes, utilizing the benefits of multi-omics analyses.

  4. Genetic analysis of hyperemesis gravidarum reveals association with intracellular calcium release channel (RYR2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fejzo, Marlena Schoenberg; Myhre, Ronny; Colodro-Conde, Lucía; MacGibbon, Kimber W; Sinsheimer, Janet S; Reddy, M V Prasad Linga; Pajukanta, Päivi; Nyholt, Dale R; Wright, Margaret J; Martin, Nicholas G; Engel, Stephanie M; Medland, Sarah E; Magnus, Per; Mullin, Patrick M

    2017-01-05

    Hyperemesis Gravidarum (HG), severe nausea/vomiting in pregnancy (NVP), can cause poor maternal/fetal outcomes. Genetic predisposition suggests the genetic component is essential in discovering an etiology. We performed whole-exome sequencing of 5 families followed by analysis of variants in 584 cases/431 controls. Variants in RYR2 segregated with disease in 2 families. The novel variant L3277R was not found in any case/control. The rare variant, G1886S was more common in cases (p = 0.046) and extreme cases (p = 0.023). Replication of G1886S using Norwegian/Australian data was supportive. Common variants rs790899 and rs1891246 were significantly associated with HG and weight loss. Copy-number analysis revealed a deletion in a patient. RYR2 encodes an intracellular calcium release channel involved in vomiting, cyclic-vomiting syndrome, and is a thyroid hormone target gene. Additionally, RYR2 is a downstream drug target of Inderal, used to treat HG and CVS. Thus, herein we provide genetic evidence for a pathway and therapy for HG. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Aneurysmal angiosarcoma associated with vascular graft revealed by 18F-FDG-PET imaging

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    Ahmed Chetouani, MD

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We report a rare case of vascular graft-associated aneurysmal angiosarcoma by 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG positron emission tomography (PET. An 81-year-old male patient, with a prior history of graft interposition 1 year previously, was referred to 18F-FDG-PET because of an inflammatory syndrome of unknown origin. FDG-PET images revealed a particular pattern of intense circular uptake within the arterial wall (SUVmax = 10 in a popliteal aneurysm and, additionally, a large hypermetabolic mass centered by the graft. Remote hypermetabolisms in lung nodules and pleural thickenings were also detected. The diagnosis of angiosarcoma was ascertained through histopathological analysis of surgical samples. Development of an aneurysmal angiosarcoma at the site of a vascular graft is a rare entity, often misdiagnosed. 18F-FDG-PET appears to be useful in its detection with a PET pattern of intense circular uptake within the arterial wall. Such finding should lead to the search for distant metastasis.

  6. LC-MS-MS quantitative analysis reveals the association between FTO and DNA methylation.

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    Yuting Zhu

    Full Text Available Fat mass and obesity-associated protein (FTO is α-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase and responsible for demethylating N6-methyladenosine (m6A in mRNA, 3-methylthymine (m3T in single-stranded DNA (ssDNA and 3-methyluracil (m3U in single-stranded RNA (ssRNA. Its other function remains unknown but thousands of mammalian DNA show 5-methyl-2'-deoxycytidine (5mdC modification and 5mdC demethylases are required for mammalian energy homeostasis and fertility. Here, we aimed to confirm whether FTO proteins can demethylate 5mdC in DNA. However, we found that FTO exhibits no potent demethylation activity against 5mdC in vitro and in vivo by using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS. The result showed FTO demethylase has the characteristics of high substrates specificity and selectivity. In addition, we also used immunofluorescence technique to demonstrate overexpression of wild type TET2, but not FTO and mutant TET2 in Hela cells results in higher levels of 5-hydroxymethyl-2'-deoxycytidine (5hmdC generated from 5mdC. In conclusion, our results not only reveal the enzymatic activity of FTO, but also may facilitate the future discovery of proteins involved in epigenetic modification function.

  7. LC-MS-MS quantitative analysis reveals the association between FTO and DNA methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yuting; Zhou, Guangyu; Yu, Xuebin; Xu, Qiang; Wang, Kai; Xie, Dan; Yang, Qingkai; Wang, Lina

    2017-01-01

    Fat mass and obesity-associated protein (FTO) is α-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase and responsible for demethylating N6-methyladenosine (m6A) in mRNA, 3-methylthymine (m3T) in single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and 3-methyluracil (m3U) in single-stranded RNA (ssRNA). Its other function remains unknown but thousands of mammalian DNA show 5-methyl-2'-deoxycytidine (5mdC) modification and 5mdC demethylases are required for mammalian energy homeostasis and fertility. Here, we aimed to confirm whether FTO proteins can demethylate 5mdC in DNA. However, we found that FTO exhibits no potent demethylation activity against 5mdC in vitro and in vivo by using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS). The result showed FTO demethylase has the characteristics of high substrates specificity and selectivity. In addition, we also used immunofluorescence technique to demonstrate overexpression of wild type TET2, but not FTO and mutant TET2 in Hela cells results in higher levels of 5-hydroxymethyl-2'-deoxycytidine (5hmdC) generated from 5mdC. In conclusion, our results not only reveal the enzymatic activity of FTO, but also may facilitate the future discovery of proteins involved in epigenetic modification function.

  8. Revealing the association between cerebrovascular accidents and ambient temperature: a meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorrilla-Vaca, Andrés; Healy, Ryan Jacob; Silva-Medina, Melissa M.

    2017-05-01

    The association between cerebrovascular accidents (CVA) and weather has been described across several studies showing multiple conflicting results. In this paper, we aim to conduct a meta-analysis to further clarify this association, as well as to find the potential sources of heterogeneity. PubMed, EMBASE, and Google Scholar were searched from inception through 2015, for articles analyzing the correlation between the incidence of CVA and temperature. A pooled effect size (ES) was estimated using random effects model and expressed as absolute values. Subgroup analyses by type of CVA were also performed. Heterogeneity and influence of covariates—including geographic latitude of the study site, male percentage, average temperature, and time interval—were assessed by meta-regression analysis. Twenty-six articles underwent full data extraction and scoring. A total of 19,736 subjects with CVA from 12 different countries were included and grouped as ischemic strokes (IS; n = 14,199), intracerebral hemorrhages (ICH; n = 3798), and subarachnoid hemorrhages (SAH; n = 1739). Lower ambient temperature was significantly associated with increase in incidence of overall CVA when using unadjusted (pooled ES = 0.23, P < 0.001) and adjusted data (pooled ES = 0.03, P = 0.003). Subgroup analyses showed that lower temperature has higher impact on the incidence of ICH (pooled ES = 0.34, P < 0.001), than that of IS (pooled ES = 0.22, P < 0.001) and SAH (pooled ES = 0.11, P = 0.012). In meta-regression analysis, the geographic latitude of the study site was the most influencing factor on this association ( Z-score = 8.68). Synthesis of the existing data provides evidence supporting that a lower ambient temperature increases the incidence of CVA. Further population-based studies conducted at negative latitudes are needed to clarify the influence of this factor.

  9. Electrophysiological signals associated with fluency of different levels of processing reveal multiple contributions to recognition memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bingbing; Taylor, Jason R; Wang, Wei; Gao, Chuanji; Guo, Chunyan

    2017-08-01

    Processing fluency appears to influence recognition memory judgements, and the manipulation of fluency, if misattributed to an effect of prior exposure, can result in illusory memory. Although it is well established that fluency induced by masked repetition priming leads to increased familiarity, manipulations of conceptual fluency have produced conflicting results, variously affecting familiarity or recollection. Some recent studies have found that masked conceptual priming increases correct recollection (Taylor & Henson, 2012), and the magnitude of this behavioural effect correlates with analogous fMRI BOLD priming effects in brain regions associated with recollection (Taylor, Buratto, & Henson, 2013). However, the neural correlates and time-courses of masked repetition and conceptual priming were not compared directly in previous studies. The present study used event-related potentials (ERPs) to identify and compare the electrophysiological correlates of masked repetition and conceptual priming and investigate how they contribute to recognition memory. Behavioural results were consistent with previous studies: Repetition primes increased familiarity, whereas conceptual primes increased correct recollection. Masked repetition and conceptual priming also decreased the latency of late parietal component (LPC). Masked repetition priming was associated with an early P200 effect and a later parietal maximum N400 effect, whereas masked conceptual priming was only associated with a central-parietal maximum N400 effect. In addition, the topographic distributions of the N400 repetition priming and conceptual priming effects were different. These results suggest that fluency at different levels of processing is associated with different ERP components, and contributes differentially to subjective recognition memory experiences. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Comprehensive genotyping in two homogeneous Graves' disease samples reveals major and novel HLA association alleles.

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    Pei-Lung Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Graves' disease (GD is the leading cause of hyperthyroidism and thyroid eye disease inherited as a complex trait. Although geoepidemiology studies showed relatively higher prevalence of GD in Asians than in Caucasians, previous genetic studies were contradictory concerning whether and/or which human leukocyte antigen (HLA alleles are associated with GD in Asians. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We conducted a case-control association study (499 unrelated GD cases and 504 controls and a replication in an independent family sample (419 GD individuals and their 282 relatives in 165 families. To minimize genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity, we included only ethnic Chinese Han population in Taiwan and excluded subjects with hypothyroidism. We performed direct and comprehensive genotyping of six classical HLA loci (HLA-A, -B, -C, -DPB1, -DQB1 and -DRB1 to 4-digit resolution. Combining the data of two sample populations, we found that B*46:01 (odds ratio under dominant model [OR]  = 1.33, Bonferroni corrected combined P [P(Bc]  = 1.17 x 10⁻², DPB1*05:01 (OR  = 2.34, P(Bc = 2.58 x 10⁻¹⁰, DQB1*03:02 (OR  = 0.62, P(Bc  = 1.97 x 10⁻², DRB1*15:01 (OR  = 1.68, P(Bc = 1.22 x 10⁻² and DRB1*16:02 (OR  = 2.63, P(Bc  = 1.46 x 10⁻⁵ were associated with GD. HLA-DPB1*05:01 is the major gene of GD in our population and singly accounts for 48.4% of population-attributable risk. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These GD-associated alleles we identified in ethnic Chinese Hans, and those identified in other Asian studies, are totally distinct from the known associated alleles in Caucasians. Identification of population-specific association alleles is the critical first step for individualized medicine. Furthermore, comparison between different susceptibility/protective alleles across populations could facilitate generation of novel hypothesis about GD pathophysiology and indicate a new direction for future

  11. Associations between common intestinal parasites and bacteria in humans as revealed by qPCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien Andersen, L; Karim, A B; Roager, H M; Vigsnæs, L K; Krogfelt, K A; Licht, T R; Stensvold, C R

    2016-09-01

    Several studies have shown associations between groups of intestinal bacterial or specific ratios between bacterial groups and various disease traits. Meanwhile, little is known about interactions and associations between eukaryotic and prokaryotic microorganisms in the human gut. In this work, we set out to investigate potential associations between common single-celled parasites such as Blastocystis spp. and Dientamoeba fragilis and intestinal bacteria. Stool DNA from patients with intestinal symptoms were selected based on being Blastocystis spp.-positive (B+)/negative (B-) and D. fragilis-positive (D+)/negative (D-), and split into four groups of 21 samples (B+ D+, B+ D-, B- D+, and B- D-). Quantitative PCR targeting the six bacterial taxa Bacteroides, Prevotella, the butyrate-producing clostridial clusters IV and XIVa, the mucin-degrading Akkermansia muciniphila, and the indigenous group of Bifidobacterium was subsequently performed, and the relative abundance of these bacteria across the four groups was compared. The relative abundance of Bacteroides in B- D- samples was significantly higher compared with B+ D- and B+ D+ samples (P Blastocystis alone or combined with D. fragilis is associated with gut microbiota characterized by low relative abundances of Bacteroides and Clostridial cluster XIVa and high levels of Prevotella.

  12. Targeted resequencing of candidate genes reveals novel variants associated with severe Behçet's uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang Jin; Lee, Seungbok; Park, Changho; Seo, Jeong-Sun; Kim, Jong-Il; Yu, Hyeong Gon

    2013-10-18

    Behçet's disease (BD) is a chronic systemic inflammatory disorder characterized by four major manifestations: recurrent uveitis, oral and genital ulcers and skin lesions. To identify some pathogenic variants associated with severe Behçet's uveitis, we used targeted and massively parallel sequencing methods to explore the genetic diversity of target regions. A solution-based target enrichment kit was designed to capture whole-exonic regions of 132 candidate genes. Using a multiplexing strategy, 32 samples from patients with a severe type of Behçet's uveitis were sequenced with a Genome Analyzer IIx. We compared the frequency of each variant with that of 59 normal Korean controls, and selected five rare and eight common single-nucleotide variants as the candidates for a replication study. The selected variants were genotyped in 61 cases and 320 controls and, as a result, two rare and seven common variants showed significant associations with severe Behçet's uveitis (PMTFHR and MICA also replicated the previous reports at the gene level. The KIR3DL3 and KIR2DL4 genes are novel susceptibility genes that have not been reported in association with BD. In conclusion, this study showed that target enrichment and next-generation sequencing technologies can provide valuable information on the genetic predisposition for Behçet's uveitis.

  13. Spatial and species variations in bacterial communities associated with corals from the Red Sea as revealed by pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, On On; Yang, Jiangke; Bougouffa, Salim; Wang, Yong; Batang, Zenon; Tian, Renmao; Al-Suwailem, Abdulaziz; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2012-10-01

    Microbial associations with corals are common and are most likely symbiotic, although their diversity and relationships with environmental factors and host species remain unclear. In this study, we adopted a 16S rRNA gene tag-pyrosequencing technique to investigate the bacterial communities associated with three stony Scleractinea and two soft Octocorallia corals from three locations in the Red Sea. Our results revealed highly diverse bacterial communities in the Red Sea corals, with more than 600 ribotypes detected and up to 1,000 species estimated from a single coral species. Altogether, 21 bacterial phyla were recovered from the corals, of which Gammaproteobacteria was the most dominant group, and Chloroflexi, Chlamydiae, and the candidate phylum WS3 were reported in corals for the first time. The associated bacterial communities varied greatly with location, where environmental conditions differed significantly. Corals from disturbed areas appeared to share more similar bacterial communities, but larger variations in community structures were observed between different coral species from pristine waters. Ordination methods identified salinity and depth as the most influential parameters affecting the abundance of Vibrio, Pseudoalteromonas, Serratia, Stenotrophomonas, Pseudomonas, and Achromobacter in the corals. On the other hand, bacteria such as Chloracidobacterium and Endozoicomonas were more sensitive to the coral species, suggesting that the host species type may be influential in the associated bacterial community, as well. The combined influences of the coral host and environmental factors on the associated microbial communities are discussed. This study represents the first comparative study using tag-pyrosequencing technology to investigate the bacterial communities in Red Sea corals.

  14. Spatial and Species Variations in Bacterial Communities Associated with Corals from the Red Sea as Revealed by Pyrosequencing

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, O. O.

    2012-08-03

    Microbial associations with corals are common and are most likely symbiotic, although their diversity and relationships with environmental factors and host species remain unclear. In this study, we adopted a 16S rRNA gene tag-pyrosequencing technique to investigate the bacterial communities associated with three stony Scleractinea and two soft Octocorallia corals from three locations in the Red Sea. Our results revealed highly diverse bacterial communities in the Red Sea corals, with more than 600 ribotypes detected and up to 1,000 species estimated from a single coral species. Altogether, 21 bacterial phyla were recovered from the corals, of which Gammaproteobacteria was the most dominant group, and Chloroflexi, Chlamydiae, and the candidate phylum WS3 were reported in corals for the first time. The associated bacterial communities varied greatly with location, where environmental conditions differed significantly. Corals from disturbed areas appeared to share more similar bacterial communities, but larger variations in community structures were observed between different coral species from pristine waters. Ordination methods identified salinity and depth as the most influential parameters affecting the abundance of Vibrio, Pseudoalteromonas, Serratia, Stenotrophomonas, Pseudomonas, and Achromobacter in the corals. On the other hand, bacteria such as Chloracidobacterium and Endozoicomonas were more sensitive to the coral species, suggesting that the host species type may be influential in the associated bacterial community, as well. The combined influences of the coral host and environmental factors on the associated microbial communities are discussed. This study represents the first comparative study using tag-pyrosequencing technology to investigate the bacterial communities in Red Sea corals.

  15. Using a Concept Inventory to Reveal Student Thinking Associated with Common Misconceptions about Antibiotic Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Ann M; Smith, Ann C; Marbach-Ad, Gili; Balcom, Sarah A; Buchner, John; Daniel, Sandra L; DeStefano, Jeffrey J; El-Sayed, Najib M; Frauwirth, Kenneth; Lee, Vincent T; McIver, Kevin S; Melville, Stephen B; Mosser, David M; Popham, David L; Scharf, Birgit E; Schubot, Florian D; Seyler, Richard W; Shields, Patricia Ann; Song, Wenxia; Stein, Daniel C; Stewart, Richard C; Thompson, Katerina V; Yang, Zhaomin; Yarwood, Stephanie A

    2017-04-01

    Misconceptions, also known as alternate conceptions, about key concepts often hinder the ability of students to learn new knowledge. Concept inventories (CIs) are designed to assess students' understanding of key concepts, especially those prone to misconceptions. Two-tiered CIs include prompts that ask students to explain the logic behind their answer choice. Such two-tiered CIs afford an opportunity for faculty to explore the student thinking behind the common misconceptions represented by their choice of a distractor. In this study, we specifically sought to probe the misconceptions that students hold prior to beginning an introductory microbiology course (i.e., preconceptions). Faculty-learning communities at two research-intensive universities used the validated Host-Pathogen Interaction Concept Inventory (HPI-CI) to reveal student preconceptions. Our method of deep analysis involved communal review and discussion of students' explanations for their CI answer choice. This approach provided insight valuable for curriculum development. Here the process is illustrated using one question from the HPI-CI related to the important topic of antibiotic resistance. The frequencies with which students chose particular multiple-choice responses for this question were highly correlated between institutions, implying common underlying misconceptions. Examination of student explanations using our analysis approach, coupled with group discussions within and between institutions, revealed patterns in student thinking to the participating faculty. Similar application of a two-tiered concept inventory by general microbiology instructors, either individually or in groups, at other institutions will allow them to better understand student thinking related to key concepts in their curriculum.

  16. Integrated Systems Approach Reveals Sphingolipid Metabolism Pathway Dysregulation in Association with Late-Onset Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Stephen Malamon

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (LOAD and age are significantly correlated such that one-third of Americans beyond 85 years of age are afflicted. We have designed and implemented a pilot study that combines systems biology approaches with traditional next-generation sequencing (NGS analysis techniques to identify relevant regulatory pathways, infer functional relationships and confirm the dysregulation of these biological pathways in LOAD. Our study design is a most comprehensive systems approach combining co-expression network modeling derived from RNA-seq data, rigorous quality control (QC standards, functional ontology, and expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL derived from whole exome (WES single nucleotide variant (SNV genotype data. Our initial results reveal several statistically significant, biologically relevant genes involved in sphingolipid metabolism. To validate these findings, we performed a gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA. The GSEA revealed the sphingolipid metabolism pathway and regulation of autophagy in association with LOAD cases. In the execution of this study, we have successfully tested an integrative approach to identify both novel and known LOAD drivers in order to develop a broader and more detailed picture of the highly complex transcriptional and regulatory landscape of age-related dementia.

  17. Window of implantation transcriptomic stratification reveals different endometrial subsignatures associated with live birth and biochemical pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Gimeno, Patricia; Ruiz-Alonso, Maria; Sebastian-Leon, Patricia; Pellicer, Antonio; Valbuena, Diana; Simón, Carlos

    2017-10-01

    To refine the endometrial window of implantation (WOI) transcriptomic signature by defining new subsignatures associated to live birth and biochemical pregnancy. Retrospective cohort study. University-affiliated in vitro fertilization clinic and reproductive genetics laboratory. Healthy fertile oocyte donors (n = 79) and patients with infertility diagnosed by Endometrial Receptivity Analysis (n = 771). None. WOI transcriptomic signatures associated with specific reproductive outcomes. The retrospective cohort study was designed to perform a prediction model based on transcriptomic clusters for endometrial classification (training set, n = 529). The clinical follow-up set in the expected WOI (n = 321) was tested with the transcriptomic predictor to detect WOI variability and the pregnancy outcomes associated with these subsignatures (n = 228). The endometrial receptivity signature was redefined into four WOI transcriptomic profiles. This stratification identified an optimal endometrial receptivity (RR) signature resulting in an ongoing pregnancy rate (OPR) of 80% in terms of live birth, as well as a late receptive-stage (LR) signature with a potential high risk of 50% biochemical pregnancy. Abnormal down-regulation of the cell cycle was the main dysregulated function among the 22 genes associated with biochemical pregnancy. The major differences between the WOI transcriptomic stratification were in the OPR and biochemical pregnancy rate. The OPR ranged from 76.9% and 80% in the late prereceptive (LPR) and RR signatures, respectively, versus 33.3% in the LR. The biochemical pregnancy rate was 7.7% and 6.6% in LPR and RR, respectively, but 50% in LR, which highlights the relevance of endometrial status in the progression of embryonic implantation. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Oncogene mutation profiling reveals poor prognosis associated with FGFR1/3 mutation in liposarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chengfang; Shen, Yaoyuan; Ren, Yan; Liu, Wei; Li, Man; Liang, Weihua; Liu, Chunxia; Li, Feng

    2016-09-01

    Liposarcoma (LPS) is one of the most prevalent soft tissue sarcomas. LPS shows a poor response to radiation and chemotherapy. The causes of death in patients with LPS include locally recurrent and metastatic disease. We sought to examine novel gene mutations and pathways in primary and matched recurrent LPSs to identify potential therapeutic targets. We conducted a high-throughput analysis of 238 known mutations in 19 oncogenes using Sequenom MassARRAY technology. Nucleic acids were extracted from 19 primary and recurrent LPS samples, encompassing 9 dedifferentiated LPSs (DDLPS), 9 myxoid/round cell LPSs, and 1 pleomorphic LPS. Mutation screening revealed missense mutations in 21.1% (4/19) of the LPS specimens, including 4 different genes (FGFR1, FGFR3, PIK3CA, and KIT). Based on histologic subtypes, 22.2% DDLPS (2/9) and 22.2% myxoid cell LPS (2/9) contained gene mutations. Specifically, 3 (23.1%) of 13 primary tumors harbored mutations. Furthermore, although gene mutations were identified in 1 (11.1%) of 9 recurrent LPS samples, the difference between the primary and the recurrence was not statistically significant. Analysis of patient survival data indicated that patients harboring FGFR1/3 mutations experienced reduced overall survival (P<.05). Despite the limited number of samples, our findings provide the first evidence of FGFR1/3 mutations in DDLPS, which were associated with poor clinical outcomes. The FGFR pathway may play an important role in the development and progression of DDLPS and warrants further investigation; moreover, PIK3CA mutation is a common event (11.1%) in myxoid cell LPS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Quantitative protein localization signatures reveal an association between spatial and functional divergences of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loo, Lit-Hsin; Laksameethanasan, Danai; Tung, Yi-Ling

    2014-03-01

    Protein subcellular localization is a major determinant of protein function. However, this important protein feature is often described in terms of discrete and qualitative categories of subcellular compartments, and therefore it has limited applications in quantitative protein function analyses. Here, we present Protein Localization Analysis and Search Tools (PLAST), an automated analysis framework for constructing and comparing quantitative signatures of protein subcellular localization patterns based on microscopy images. PLAST produces human-interpretable protein localization maps that quantitatively describe the similarities in the localization patterns of proteins and major subcellular compartments, without requiring manual assignment or supervised learning of these compartments. Using the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system, we show that PLAST is more accurate than existing, qualitative protein localization annotations in identifying known co-localized proteins. Furthermore, we demonstrate that PLAST can reveal protein localization-function relationships that are not obvious from these annotations. First, we identified proteins that have similar localization patterns and participate in closely-related biological processes, but do not necessarily form stable complexes with each other or localize at the same organelles. Second, we found an association between spatial and functional divergences of proteins during evolution. Surprisingly, as proteins with common ancestors evolve, they tend to develop more diverged subcellular localization patterns, but still occupy similar numbers of compartments. This suggests that divergence of protein localization might be more frequently due to the development of more specific localization patterns over ancestral compartments than the occupation of new compartments. PLAST enables systematic and quantitative analyses of protein localization-function relationships, and will be useful to elucidate protein

  20. Phenotypic and transcriptional profiling in Entamoeba histolytica reveal costs to fitness and adaptive responses associated with metronidazole resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gil M Penuliar

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial chemotherapy is critical in the fight against infectious diseases caused by Entamoeba histolytica. Among the drugs available for the treatment of amebiasis, metronidazole (MTZ is considered the drug of choice. Recently, in vitro studies have described MTZ resistance and the potential mechanisms involved. Costs to fitness and adaptive responses associated with resistance, however, have not been investigated. In this study we generated an HM-1 derived strain resistant to 12 µM MTZ (MTZR. We examined its phenotypic and transcriptional profile to determine the consequences and mRNA level changes associated with MTZ resistance. Our results indicated increased cell size and granularity, and decreased rates in cell division, adhesion, phagocytosis, cytopathogenicity, and glucose consumption. Transcriptome analysis revealed 142 differentially expressed genes in MTZR. In contrast to other MTZ resistant parasites, MTZR did not down-regulate pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase, but showed increased expression of genes for a hypothetical protein (HP1 and several iron-sulfur flavoproteins, and downregulation of genes for leucine-rich proteins. Fisher’s exact test showed 24 significantly enriched GO terms in MTZR, and a 3-way comparison of modulated genes in MTZR against those of MTZR cultured without MTZ and HM-1 cultured with MTZ, showed that 88 genes were specific to MTZR. Overall, our findings suggested that MTZ resistance is associated with specific transcriptional changes and decreased parasite virulence.

  1. Sequence-based analysis of the genus Ruminococcus resolves its phylogeny and reveals strong host association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Reau, Alex J; Meier-Kolthoff, Jan P; Suen, Garret

    2016-12-01

    It has become increasingly clear that the composition of mammalian gut microbial communities is substantially diet driven. These microbiota form intricate mutualisms with their hosts, which have profound implications on overall health. For example, many gut microbes are involved in the conversion of host-ingested dietary polysaccharides into host-usable nutrients. One group of important gut microbial symbionts are bacteria in the genus Ruminococcus. Originally isolated from the bovine rumen, ruminococci have been found in numerous mammalian hosts, including other ruminants, and non-ruminants such as horses, pigs and humans. All ruminococci require fermentable carbohydrates for growth, and their substrate preferences appear to be based on the diet of their particular host. Most ruminococci that have been studied are those capable of degrading cellulose, much less is known about non-cellulolytic non-ruminant-associated species, and even less is known about the environmental distribution of ruminococci as a whole. Here, we capitalized on the wealth of publicly available 16S rRNA gene sequences, genomes and large-scale microbiota studies to both resolve the phylogenetic placement of described species in the genus Ruminococcus, and further demonstrate that this genus has largely unexplored diversity and a staggering host distribution. We present evidence that ruminococci are predominantly associated with herbivores and omnivores, and our data supports the hypothesis that very few ruminococci are found consistently in non-host-associated environments. This study not only helps to resolve the phylogeny of this important genus, but also provides a framework for understanding its distribution in natural systems.

  2. Chemical analyses of wasp-associated streptomyces bacteria reveal a prolific potential for natural products discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Poulsen

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Identifying new sources for small molecule discovery is necessary to help mitigate the continuous emergence of antibiotic-resistance in pathogenic microbes. Recent studies indicate that one potentially rich source of novel natural products is Actinobacterial symbionts associated with social and solitary Hymenoptera. Here we test this possibility by examining two species of solitary mud dauber wasps, Sceliphron caementarium and Chalybion californicum. We performed enrichment isolations from 33 wasps and obtained more than 200 isolates of Streptomyces Actinobacteria. Chemical analyses of 15 of these isolates identified 11 distinct and structurally diverse secondary metabolites, including a novel polyunsaturated and polyoxygenated macrocyclic lactam, which we name sceliphrolactam. By pairing the 15 Streptomyces strains against a collection of fungi and bacteria, we document their antifungal and antibacterial activity. The prevalence and anti-microbial properties of Actinobacteria associated with these two solitary wasp species suggest the potential role of these Streptomyces as antibiotic-producing symbionts, potentially helping defend their wasp hosts from pathogenic microbes. Finding phylogenetically diverse and chemically prolific Actinobacteria from solitary wasps suggests that insect-associated Actinobacteria can provide a valuable source of novel natural products of pharmaceutical interest.

  3. Variation in canopy duration in the perennial biofuel crop Miscanthus reveals complex associations with yield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, Paul R.H.; Farrar, Kerrie; Gay, Alan P.; Jensen, Elaine F.; Clifton-Brown, John C.; Donnison, Iain S.

    2013-01-01

    Energy crops can provide a sustainable source of power and fuels, and mitigate the negative effects of CO2 emissions associated with fossil fuel use. Miscanthus is a perennial C4 energy crop capable of producing large biomass yields whilst requiring low levels of input. Miscanthus is largely unimproved and therefore there could be significant opportunities to increase yield. Further increases in yield will improve the economics, energy balance, and carbon mitigation of the crop, as well as reducing land-take. One strategy to increase yield in Miscanthus is to maximize the light captured through an extension of canopy duration. In this study, canopy duration was compared among a diverse collection of 244 Miscanthus genotypes. Canopy duration was determined by calculating the number of days between canopy establishment and senescence. Yield was positively correlated with canopy duration. Earlier establishment and later senescence were also both separately correlated with higher yield. However, although genotypes with short canopy durations were low yielding, not all genotypes with long canopy durations were high yielding. Differences of yield between genotypes with long canopy durations were associated with variation in stem and leaf traits. Different methodologies to assess canopy duration traits were investigated, including visual assessment, image analysis, light interception, and different trait thresholds. The highest correlation coefficients were associated with later assessments of traits and the use of quantum sensors for canopy establishment. A model for trait optimization to enable yield improvement in Miscanthus and other bioenergy crops is discussed. PMID:23599277

  4. Differences in cardiovascular toxicities associated with cigarette smoking and snuff use revealed using novel zebrafish models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folkesson, Maggie; Sadowska, Natalia; Vikingsson, Svante; Karlsson, Matts; Carlhäll, Carl-Johan; Länne, Toste; Wågsäter, Dick; Jensen, Lasse

    2016-07-15

    Tobacco use is strongly associated with cardiovascular disease and the only avoidable risk factor associated with development of aortic aneurysm. While smoking is the most common form of tobacco use, snuff and other oral tobacco products are gaining popularity, but research on potentially toxic effects of oral tobacco use has not kept pace with the increase in its use. Here, we demonstrate that cigarette smoke and snuff extracts are highly toxic to developing zebrafish embryos. Exposure to such extracts led to a palette of toxic effects including early embryonic mortality, developmental delay, cerebral hemorrhages, defects in lymphatics development and ventricular function, and aneurysm development. Both cigarette smoke and snuff were more toxic than pure nicotine, indicating that other compounds in these products are also associated with toxicity. While some toxicities were found following exposure to both types of tobacco product, other toxicities, including developmental delay and aneurysm development, were specifically observed in the snuff extract group, whereas cerebral hemorrhages were only found in the group exposed to cigarette smoke extract. These findings deepen our understanding of the pathogenic effects of cigarette smoking and snuff use on the cardiovascular system and illustrate the benefits of using zebrafish to study mechanisms involved in aneurysm development. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  5. Aspirin exposure reveals novel genes associated with platelet function and cardiovascular events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voora, Deepak; Cyr, Derek; Lucas, Joseph; Chi, Jen-Tsan; Dungan, Jennifer; McCaffrey, Timothy A; Katz, Richard; Newby, L Kristin; Kraus, William E; Becker, Richard C; Ortel, Thomas L; Ginsburg, Geoffrey S

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to develop ribonucleic acid (RNA) profiles that could serve as novel biomarkers for the response to aspirin. Aspirin reduces death and myocardial infarction (MI), suggesting that aspirin interacts with biological pathways that may underlie these events. Aspirin was administered, followed by whole-blood RNA microarray profiling, in a discovery cohort of healthy volunteers (HV1) (n = 50) and 2 validation cohorts of healthy volunteers (HV2) (n = 53) and outpatient cardiology patients (OPC) (n = 25). Platelet function was assessed using the platelet function score (PFS) in HV1 and HV2 and the VerifyNow Aspirin Test (Accumetrics, Inc., San Diego, California) in OPC. Bayesian sparse factor analysis identified sets of coexpressed transcripts, which were examined for associations with PFS in HV1 and validated in HV2 and OPC. Proteomic analysis confirmed the association of validated transcripts in platelet proteins. Validated gene sets were tested for association with death or MI in 2 patient cohorts (n = 587 total) from RNA samples collected at cardiac catheterization. A set of 60 coexpressed genes named the "aspirin response signature" (ARS) was associated with PFS in HV1 (r = -0.31, p = 0.03), HV2 (r = -0.34, Bonferroni p = 0.03), and OPC (p = 0.046). Corresponding proteins for the 17 ARS genes were identified in the platelet proteome, of which 6 were associated with PFS. The ARS was associated with death or MI in both patient cohorts (odds ratio: 1.2 [p = 0.01]; hazard ratio: 1.5 [p = 0.001]), independent of cardiovascular risk factors. Compared with traditional risk factors, reclassification (net reclassification index = 31% to 37%, p ≤ 0.0002) was improved by including the ARS or 1 of its genes, ITGA2B. RNA profiles of platelet-specific genes are novel biomarkers for identifying patients who do not respond adequately to aspirin and who are at risk for death or MI. Copyright © 2013 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by

  6. Comparative Genomics of Campylobacter fetus from Reptilesand Mammals Reveals Divergent Evolution in Host-Associated Lineages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gilbert, Maarten J.; Miller, William G.; Yee, Emma; Zomer, Aldert; Graaf-Van Bloois, Van Der Linda; Fitzgerald, C.; Forbes, Ken J.; Méric, Guillaume; Sheppard, S.; Wagenaar, J.A.; Duim, Birgitta

    2016-01-01

    Campylobacter fetus currently comprises three recognized subspecies, which display distinct host association. Campylobacter fetus subsp. fetus and C. fetus subsp. venerealis are both associated with endothermic mammals, primarily ruminants, whereas C. fetus subsp. testudinum is primarily associated

  7. Analysis of NHANES 1999-2002 data reveals noteworthy association of alcohol consumption with obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Subhankar

    2014-01-01

    With the obesity pandemic sweeping the globe and alcohol use on the rise worldwide, there is growing interest in how the two might be linked epidemiologically. The aim of the study was to use data from the NHANES registry from 1999-2002 to analyze the association between obesity and alcohol use. Multivariate logistic regression was used to assess the relationship between alcohol use and obesity. Risk was assessed separately for men and women. Of the 9,193 individuals (49% males), 26.8% of males and 33.6% of females were obese. About 17% of males and 12% of females were never drinkers (less than 12 drinks in their lifetime). After adjusting for age, race, marital status, highest level of education of the individual and spouse, country of origin, annual household income and duration of physical activity in the past 30 days, the odds of obesity were higher in never drinkers compared to ever drinkers in both men and women. Consumption of alcohol for more than 45 days, binge drinking (>5 drinks/day) for more than 90 days and being "ever binge drinker" were associated with significantly higher odds of obesity (in both genders) than those who drank for shorter duration or were "never binge drinkers". Consumption of alcohol more than the recommended limit for moderate drinking (3 drinks/day in females and 4 drinks/day in males) was associated with increased (OR 1.074, 95% CI 1.072-1.076) and decreased (OR 0.970, 95%CI 0.968-0.972) obesity in females and males respectively. Frequent or heavy alcohol consumption is associated with greater odds of being obese.

  8. Single cell sequencing reveals heterogeneity within ovarian cancer epithelium and cancer associated stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterhoff, Boris J; Maile, Makayla; Mitra, Amit Kumar; Sebe, Attila; Bazzaro, Martina; Geller, Melissa A; Abrahante, Juan E; Klein, Molly; Hellweg, Raffaele; Mullany, Sally A; Beckman, Kenneth; Daniel, Jerry; Starr, Timothy K

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the level of heterogeneity in high grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC) by analyzing RNA expression in single epithelial and cancer associated stromal cells. In addition, we explored the possibility of identifying subgroups based on pathway activation and pre-defined signatures from cancer stem cells and chemo-resistant cells. A fresh, HGSOC tumor specimen derived from ovary was enzymatically digested and depleted of immune infiltrating cells. RNA sequencing was performed on 92 single cells and 66 of these single cell datasets passed quality control checks. Sequences were analyzed using multiple bioinformatics tools, including clustering, principle components analysis, and geneset enrichment analysis to identify subgroups and activated pathways. Immunohistochemistry for ovarian cancer, stem cell and stromal markers was performed on adjacent tumor sections. Analysis of the gene expression patterns identified two major subsets of cells characterized by epithelial and stromal gene expression patterns. The epithelial group was characterized by proliferative genes including genes associated with oxidative phosphorylation and MYC activity, while the stromal group was characterized by increased expression of extracellular matrix (ECM) genes and genes associated with epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Neither group expressed a signature correlating with published chemo-resistant gene signatures, but many cells, predominantly in the stromal subgroup, expressed markers associated with cancer stem cells. Single cell sequencing provides a means of identifying subpopulations of cancer cells within a single patient. Single cell sequence analysis may prove to be critical for understanding the etiology, progression and drug resistance in ovarian cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Genome-wide association for abdominal subcutaneous and visceral adipose reveals a novel locus for visceral fat in women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline S Fox

    Full Text Available Body fat distribution, particularly centralized obesity, is associated with metabolic risk above and beyond total adiposity. We performed genome-wide association of abdominal adipose depots quantified using computed tomography (CT to uncover novel loci for body fat distribution among participants of European ancestry. Subcutaneous and visceral fat were quantified in 5,560 women and 4,997 men from 4 population-based studies. Genome-wide genotyping was performed using standard arrays and imputed to ~2.5 million Hapmap SNPs. Each study performed a genome-wide association analysis of subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT, visceral adipose tissue (VAT, VAT adjusted for body mass index, and VAT/SAT ratio (a metric of the propensity to store fat viscerally as compared to subcutaneously in the overall sample and in women and men separately. A weighted z-score meta-analysis was conducted. For the VAT/SAT ratio, our most significant p-value was rs11118316 at LYPLAL1 gene (p = 3.1 × 10E-09, previously identified in association with waist-hip ratio. For SAT, the most significant SNP was in the FTO gene (p = 5.9 × 10E-08. Given the known gender differences in body fat distribution, we performed sex-specific analyses. Our most significant finding was for VAT in women, rs1659258 near THNSL2 (p = 1.6 × 10-08, but not men (p = 0.75. Validation of this SNP in the GIANT consortium data demonstrated a similar sex-specific pattern, with observed significance in women (p = 0.006 but not men (p = 0.24 for BMI and waist circumference (p = 0.04 [women], p = 0.49 [men]. Finally, we interrogated our data for the 14 recently published loci for body fat distribution (measured by waist-hip ratio adjusted for BMI; associations were observed at 7 of these loci. In contrast, we observed associations at only 7/32 loci previously identified in association with BMI; the majority of overlap was observed with SAT. Genome-wide association for visceral and subcutaneous fat revealed a

  10. Adjustments with running speed reveal neuromuscular adaptations during landing associated with high mileage running training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verheul, Jasper; Clansey, Adam C; Lake, Mark J

    2017-03-01

    It remains to be determined whether running training influences the amplitude of lower limb muscle activations before and during the first half of stance and whether such changes are associated with joint stiffness regulation and usage of stored energy from tendons. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate neuromuscular and movement adaptations before and during landing in response to running training across a range of speeds. Two groups of high mileage (HM; >45 km/wk, n = 13) and low mileage (LM; running speed. HM runners also demonstrated higher initial knee stiffness during the impact phase compared with LM runners, which was associated with an earlier peak knee flexion velocity, and both were relatively unchanged by running speed. In contrast, LM runners had higher knee stiffness during the slightly later weight acceptance phase and the disparity was amplified with increases in speed. It was concluded that initial knee joint stiffness might predominantly be governed by tendon stiffness rather than muscular activations before landing. Estimated elastic work about the ankle was found to be higher in the HM runners, which might play a role in reducing weight acceptance phase muscle activation levels and improve muscle activation efficiency with running training. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Although neuromuscular factors play a key role during running, the influence of high mileage training on neuromuscular function has been poorly studied, especially in relation to running speed. This study is the first to demonstrate changes in neuromuscular conditioning with high mileage training, mainly characterized by lower thigh muscle activation after touch down, higher initial knee stiffness, and greater estimates of energy return, with adaptations being increasingly evident at faster running speeds. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  11. Stable isotopes reveal rail-associated behavior in a threatened carnivore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, John B; Whittington, Jesse; Clevenger, Anthony P; Sawaya, Michael A; St Clair, Colleen Cassady

    2014-01-01

    Human-wildlife conflict is a leading cause of adult mortality for large carnivores worldwide. Train collision is the primary cause of mortality for threatened grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) in Banff National Park. We investigated the use of stable isotope analysis as a tool for identifying bears that use the railway in Banff. Rail-associated bears had higher δ(15)N and δ(34)S values than bears sampled away from the rail, but similar δ(13)C values. Because elevated δ(15)N values are indicative of higher animal protein consumption, rail-associated bears likely preyed on ungulates that foraged along the rail or scavenged on train-killed animals. The higher δ(34)S values in bear hair could have resulted from bears consuming sulfur pellets spilled on the rail or through the uptake of sulfur in the plants bears or animals consumed. Similar δ(13)C values suggest that the two types of bears had generally similar plant-based diets. Results from this study suggest that stable isotopes analysis could be used as a non-invasive, affordable, and efficient technique to identify and monitor bears that forage on the railway in Banff and potentially other transportation corridors worldwide.

  12. Endozoicomonas genomes reveal functional adaptation and plasticity in bacterial strains symbiotically associated with diverse marine hosts

    KAUST Repository

    Neave, Matthew J.

    2017-01-17

    Endozoicomonas bacteria are globally distributed and often abundantly associated with diverse marine hosts including reef-building corals, yet their function remains unknown. In this study we generated novel Endozoicomonas genomes from single cells and metagenomes obtained directly from the corals Stylophora pistillata, Pocillopora verrucosa, and Acropora humilis. We then compared these culture-independent genomes to existing genomes of bacterial isolates acquired from a sponge, sea slug, and coral to examine the functional landscape of this enigmatic genus. Sequencing and analysis of single cells and metagenomes resulted in four novel genomes with 60–76% and 81–90% genome completeness, respectively. These data also confirmed that Endozoicomonas genomes are large and are not streamlined for an obligate endosymbiotic lifestyle, implying that they have free-living stages. All genomes show an enrichment of genes associated with carbon sugar transport and utilization and protein secretion, potentially indicating that Endozoicomonas contribute to the cycling of carbohydrates and the provision of proteins to their respective hosts. Importantly, besides these commonalities, the genomes showed evidence for differential functional specificity and diversification, including genes for the production of amino acids. Given this metabolic diversity of Endozoicomonas we propose that different genotypes play disparate roles and have diversified in concert with their hosts.

  13. A Simple Test of Class-Level Genetic Association Can Reveal Novel Cardiometabolic Trait Loci.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Qian

    Full Text Available Characterizing the genetic determinants of complex diseases can be further augmented by incorporating knowledge of underlying structure or classifications of the genome, such as newly developed mappings of protein-coding genes, epigenetic marks, enhancer elements and non-coding RNAs.We apply a simple class-level testing framework, termed Genetic Class Association Testing (GenCAT, to identify protein-coding gene association with 14 cardiometabolic (CMD related traits across 6 publicly available genome wide association (GWA meta-analysis data resources. GenCAT uses SNP-level meta-analysis test statistics across all SNPs within a class of elements, as well as the size of the class and its unique correlation structure, to determine if the class is statistically meaningful. The novelty of findings is evaluated through investigation of regional signals. A subset of findings are validated using recently updated, larger meta-analysis resources. A simulation study is presented to characterize overall performance with respect to power, control of family-wise error and computational efficiency. All analysis is performed using the GenCAT package, R version 3.2.1.We demonstrate that class-level testing complements the common first stage minP approach that involves individual SNP-level testing followed by post-hoc ascribing of statistically significant SNPs to genes and loci. GenCAT suggests 54 protein-coding genes at 41 distinct loci for the 13 CMD traits investigated in the discovery analysis, that are beyond the discoveries of minP alone. An additional application to biological pathways demonstrates flexibility in defining genetic classes.We conclude that it would be prudent to include class-level testing as standard practice in GWA analysis. GenCAT, for example, can be used as a simple, complementary and efficient strategy for class-level testing that leverages existing data resources, requires only summary level data in the form of test statistics, and

  14. Expression Profiling of Glucosinolate Biosynthetic Genes in Brassica oleracea L. var. capitata Inbred Lines Reveals Their Association with Glucosinolate Content

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    Arif Hasan Khan Robin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Glucosinolates are the biochemical compounds that provide defense to plants against pathogens and herbivores. In this study, the relative expression level of 48 glucosinolate biosynthesis genes was explored in four morphologically-different cabbage inbred lines by qPCR analysis. The content of aliphatic and indolic glucosinolate molecules present in those cabbage lines was also estimated by HPLC analysis. The possible association between glucosinolate accumulation and related gene expression level was explored by principal component analysis (PCA. The genotype-dependent variation in the relative expression level of different aliphatic and indolic glucosinolate biosynthesis genes is the novel result of this study. A total of eight different types of glucosinolates, including five aliphatic and three indolic glucosinolates, was detected in four cabbage lines. Three inbred lines BN3383, BN4059 and BN4072 had no glucoraphanin, sinigrin and gluconapin detected, but the inbred line BN3273 had these three aliphatic glucosinolate compounds. PCA revealed that a higher expression level of ST5b genes and lower expression of GSL-OH was associated with the accumulation of these three aliphatic glucosinolate compounds. PCA further revealed that comparatively higher accumulation of neoglucobrassicin in the inbred line, BN4072, was associated with a high level of expression of MYB34 (Bol017062 and CYP81F1 genes. The Dof1 and IQD1 genes probably trans-activated the genes related to biosynthesis of glucoerucin and methoxyglucobrassicin for their comparatively higher accumulation in the BN4059 and BN4072 lines compared to the other two lines, BN3273 and BN3383. A comparatively higher progoitrin level in BN3273 was probably associated with the higher expression level of the GSL-OH gene. The cabbage inbred line BN3383 accounted for the significantly higher relative expression level for the 12 genes out of 48, but this line had comparatively lower total

  15. Shotgun Metagenomic Sequencing Reveals Functional Genes and Microbiome Associated with Bovine Digital Dermatitis.

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    Martin Zinicola

    Full Text Available Metagenomic methods amplifying 16S ribosomal RNA genes have been used to describe the microbial diversity of healthy skin and lesion stages of bovine digital dermatitis (DD and to detect critical pathogens involved with disease pathogenesis. In this study, we characterized the microbiome and for the first time, the composition of functional genes of healthy skin (HS, active (ADD and inactive (IDD lesion stages using a whole-genome shotgun approach. Metagenomic sequences were annotated using MG-RAST pipeline. Six phyla were identified as the most abundant. Firmicutes and Actinobacteria were the predominant bacterial phyla in the microbiome of HS, while Spirochetes, Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria were highly abundant in ADD and IDD. T. denticola-like, T. vincentii-like and T. phagedenis-like constituted the most abundant species in ADD and IDD. Recruitment plots comparing sequences from HS, ADD and IDD samples to the genomes of specific Treponema spp., supported the presence of T. denticola and T. vincentii in ADD and IDD. Comparison of the functional composition of HS to ADD and IDD identified a significant difference in genes associated with motility/chemotaxis and iron acquisition/metabolism. We also provide evidence that the microbiome of ADD and IDD compared to that of HS had significantly higher abundance of genes associated with resistance to copper and zinc, which are commonly used in footbaths to prevent and control DD. In conclusion, the results from this study provide new insights into the HS, ADD and IDD microbiomes, improve our understanding of the disease pathogenesis and generate unprecedented knowledge regarding the functional genetic composition of the digital dermatitis microbiome.

  16. Diversity of Pseudomonas Genomes, Including Populus-Associated Isolates, as Revealed by Comparative Genome Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Se-Ran; Wassenaar, Trudy M.; Nookaew, Intawat; Hauser, Loren; Wanchai, Visanu; Land, Miriam; Timm, Collin M.; Lu, Tse-Yuan S.; Schadt, Christopher W.; Doktycz, Mitchel J.; Pelletier, Dale A.

    2015-01-01

    The Pseudomonas genus contains a metabolically versatile group of organisms that are known to occupy numerous ecological niches, including the rhizosphere and endosphere of many plants. Their diversity influences the phylogenetic diversity and heterogeneity of these communities. On the basis of average amino acid identity, comparative genome analysis of >1,000 Pseudomonas genomes, including 21 Pseudomonas strains isolated from the roots of native Populus deltoides (eastern cottonwood) trees resulted in consistent and robust genomic clusters with phylogenetic homogeneity. All Pseudomonas aeruginosa genomes clustered together, and these were clearly distinct from other Pseudomonas species groups on the basis of pangenome and core genome analyses. In contrast, the genomes of Pseudomonas fluorescens were organized into 20 distinct genomic clusters, representing enormous diversity and heterogeneity. Most of our 21 Populus-associated isolates formed three distinct subgroups within the major P. fluorescens group, supported by pathway profile analysis, while two isolates were more closely related to Pseudomonas chlororaphis and Pseudomonas putida. Genes specific to Populus-associated subgroups were identified. Genes specific to subgroup 1 include several sensory systems that act in two-component signal transduction, a TonB-dependent receptor, and a phosphorelay sensor. Genes specific to subgroup 2 contain hypothetical genes, and genes specific to subgroup 3 were annotated with hydrolase activity. This study justifies the need to sequence multiple isolates, especially from P. fluorescens, which displays the most genetic variation, in order to study functional capabilities from a pangenomic perspective. This information will prove useful when choosing Pseudomonas strains for use to promote growth and increase disease resistance in plants. PMID:26519390

  17. Why Are Home Literacy Environment and Children's Reading Skills Associated? What Parental Skills Reveal

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bergen, Elsje; van Zuijen, Titia; Bishop, Dorothy; de Jong, Peter F.

    2017-01-01

    Associations between home literacy environment and children's reading ability are often assumed to reflect a direct influence. However, heritability could account for the association between parent and child literacy-related measures. We used data from 101 mother/father/child triads to consider the extent to which associations between home…

  18. Urinary metabolomics reveals glycemic and coffee associated signatures of thyroid function in two population-based cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Nele; Pietzner, Maik; Cannet, Claire; Thuesen, Betina H; Hansen, Torben; Wallaschofski, Henri; Grarup, Niels; Skaaby, Tea; Budde, Kathrin; Pedersen, Oluf; Nauck, Matthias; Linneberg, Allan

    2017-01-01

    Triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4) as the main secretion products of the thyroid affect nearly every human tissue and are involved in a broad range of processes ranging from energy expenditure and lipid metabolism to glucose homeostasis. Metabolomics studies outside the focus of clinical manifest thyroid diseases are rare. The aim of the present investigation was to analyze the cross-sectional and longitudinal associations of urinary metabolites with serum free T4 (FT4) and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH). Urine Metabolites of participants of the population-based studies Inter99 (n = 5620) and Health2006/Health2008 (n = 3788) were analyzed by 1H-NMR spectroscopy. Linear or mixed linear models were used to detect associations between urine metabolites and thyroid function. Cross-sectional analyses revealed positive relations of alanine, trigonelline and lactic acid with FT4 and negative relations of dimethylamine, glucose, glycine and lactic acid with log(TSH). In longitudinal analyses, lower levels of alanine, dimethylamine, glycine, lactic acid and N,N-dimethylglycine were linked to a higher decline in FT4 levels over time, whereas higher trigonelline levels were related to a higher FT4 decline. Moreover, the risk of hypothyroidism was higher in subjects with high baseline trigonelline or low lactic acid, alanine or glycine values. The detected associations mainly emphasize the important role of thyroid hormones in glucose homeostasis. In addition, the predictive character of these metabolites might argue for a potential feedback of the metabolic state on thyroid function. Besides known metabolic consequences of TH, the link to the urine excretion of trigonelline, a marker of coffee consumption, represents a novel finding of this study and given the ubiquitous consumption of coffee requires further research.

  19. Urinary metabolomics reveals glycemic and coffee associated signatures of thyroid function in two population-based cohorts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nele Friedrich

    Full Text Available Triiodothyronine (T3 and thyroxine (T4 as the main secretion products of the thyroid affect nearly every human tissue and are involved in a broad range of processes ranging from energy expenditure and lipid metabolism to glucose homeostasis. Metabolomics studies outside the focus of clinical manifest thyroid diseases are rare. The aim of the present investigation was to analyze the cross-sectional and longitudinal associations of urinary metabolites with serum free T4 (FT4 and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH.Urine Metabolites of participants of the population-based studies Inter99 (n = 5620 and Health2006/Health2008 (n = 3788 were analyzed by 1H-NMR spectroscopy. Linear or mixed linear models were used to detect associations between urine metabolites and thyroid function.Cross-sectional analyses revealed positive relations of alanine, trigonelline and lactic acid with FT4 and negative relations of dimethylamine, glucose, glycine and lactic acid with log(TSH. In longitudinal analyses, lower levels of alanine, dimethylamine, glycine, lactic acid and N,N-dimethylglycine were linked to a higher decline in FT4 levels over time, whereas higher trigonelline levels were related to a higher FT4 decline. Moreover, the risk of hypothyroidism was higher in subjects with high baseline trigonelline or low lactic acid, alanine or glycine values.The detected associations mainly emphasize the important role of thyroid hormones in glucose homeostasis. In addition, the predictive character of these metabolites might argue for a potential feedback of the metabolic state on thyroid function. Besides known metabolic consequences of TH, the link to the urine excretion of trigonelline, a marker of coffee consumption, represents a novel finding of this study and given the ubiquitous consumption of coffee requires further research.

  20. Serological examination of fattening pigs reveals associations between Ascaris suum, lung pathogens and technical performance parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlaminck, Johnny; Düsseldorf, Simon; Heres, Lourens; Geldhof, Peter

    2015-06-15

    Diagnosing the presence of the highly prevalent and economically important pig parasite Ascaris suum on fattening farms has so far been challenging. Currently, only the number of livers affected at slaughter is routinely used to measure parasite exposure. However, recently, a new serological test was developed based on the detection of antibodies to the A. suum haemoglobin molecule. The test showed to be highly sensitive for the detection of exposure to A. suum in fattening pigs. In this study we first compared the performance of A. suum serology versus the percentage of affected livers at slaughter, subsequently we investigated potential associations between A. suum infection levels and exposure to important lung pathogens and finally we identified correlations between serological data and technical performance parameters (TPIs) from 20 Belgian and 20 German pig fattening farms. In both Belgian and German farms, a significant relationship was detected between elevated average Ascaris serology and percentages of affected livers (ρ=0.63 and ρ=0.75, respectively). On the Belgian farms, both Ascaris serology and the percentage of affected livers were negatively correlated with average daily gain (ADG) (ρ=-0.69 and ρ=-0.56, respectively). Using the German dataset, only a borderline negative association was detected between the percentage of affected livers and the ADG (ρ=-0.44, P=0.053). In contrast, only in the German farms, correlations between the percentage of affected lungs at slaughter and elevated presence of A. suum and several other airway pathogens were detected. To conclude, this study indicates that serological screening for A. suum on fattening farms is an attractive new diagnostic tool that can be used to indicate the presence of roundworm infection by measuring infection intensity. Furthermore the results of this study also add weight to the evidence that both roundworm infections as well as herd exposure to airway pathogens have a significant

  1. Detection of copy number variants reveals association of cilia genes with neural tube defects.

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    Xiaoli Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neural tube defects (NTDs are one of the most common birth defects caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Currently, little is known about the genetic basis of NTDs although up to 70% of human NTDs were reported to be attributed to genetic factors. Here we performed genome-wide copy number variants (CNVs detection in a cohort of Chinese NTD patients in order to exam the potential role of CNVs in the pathogenesis of NTDs. METHODS: The genomic DNA from eighty-five NTD cases and seventy-five matched normal controls were subjected for whole genome CNVs analysis. Non-DGV (the Database of Genomic Variants CNVs from each group were further analyzed for their associations with NTDs. Gene content in non-DGV CNVs as well as participating pathways were examined. RESULTS: Fifty-five and twenty-six non-DGV CNVs were detected in cases and controls respectively. Among them, forty and nineteen CNVs involve genes (genic CNV. Significantly more non-DGV CNVs and non-DGV genic CNVs were detected in NTD patients than in control (41.2% vs. 25.3%, p<0.05 and 37.6% vs. 20%, p<0.05. Non-DGV genic CNVs are associated with a 2.65-fold increased risk for NTDs (95% CI: 1.24-5.87. Interestingly, there are 41 cilia genes involved in non-DGV CNVs from NTD patients which is significantly enriched in cases compared with that in controls (24.7% vs. 9.3%, p<0.05, corresponding with a 3.19-fold increased risk for NTDs (95% CI: 1.27-8.01. Pathway analyses further suggested that two ciliogenesis pathways, tight junction and protein kinase A signaling, are top canonical pathways implicated in NTD-specific CNVs, and these two novel pathways interact with known NTD pathways. CONCLUSIONS: Evidence from the genome-wide CNV study suggests that genic CNVs, particularly ciliogenic CNVs are associated with NTDs and two ciliogenesis pathways, tight junction and protein kinase A signaling, are potential pathways involved in NTD pathogenesis.

  2. Gene expression changes in HLA mismatched mixed lymphocyte cultures reveal genes associated with allorecognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolaidou, V; Stylianou, C; Koumas, L; Vassiliou, G S; Bodman-Smith, K B; Costeas, P

    2015-04-01

    Human leucocyte antigen (HLA) compatibility is the main factor determining the occurrence of graft-vs-host disease (GVHD) in patients. It has also been shown that minor histocompatibility antigen differences as well as genetic polymorphisms that are not sequenced by standard methodology for HLA typing can play a role. We used mixed lymphocyte cultures (MLCs) as a functional cellular test and investigated gene expression changes driven by HLA incompatibility in an effort to better understand the mechanisms involved in the disease. Gene expression profile of HLA matched and HLA mismatched MLC identified differentially regulated genes and pathways. We found that a great number of genes related to immune function were differentially regulated; these genes were also found to be associated with GVHD and graft rejection. The majority of differentially regulated genes were interferon-gamma (IFNγ)-inducible genes and IFNγ neutralisation in MLCs abrogated their induction. The microRNA-155, a recently identified target for acute GVHD (aGVHD), was also found to be significantly induced in HLA mismatched MLC but not in the matched setting and its induction was not diminished by blocking IFNγ. In this proof-of-principle study we show gene expression changes in mismatched MLC that represent alloreactive responses, correlate with markers involved in GVHD and can potentially be useful in the study of the biological processes involved in this disease. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping Reveals an Association between Brain Iron Load and Depression Severity

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    Shun Yao

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have detected abnormal serum ferritin levels in patients with depression; however, the results have been inconsistent. This study used quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM for the first time to examine brain iron concentration in depressed patients and evaluated whether it is related to severity. We included three groups of age- and gender-matched participants: 30 patients with mild-moderate depression (MD, 14 patients with major depression disorder (MDD and 20 control subjects. All participants underwent MR scans with a 3D gradient-echo sequence reconstructing for QSM and performed the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS test. In MDD, the susceptibility value in the bilateral putamen was significantly increased compared with MD or control subjects. In addition, a significant difference was also observed in the left thalamus in MDD patients compared with controls. However, the susceptibility values did not differ between MD patients and controls. The susceptibility values positively correlated with the severity of depression as indicated by the HDRS scores. Our results provide evidence that brain iron deposition may be associated with depression and may even be a biomarker for investigating the pathophysiological mechanism of depression.

  4. Seahorse Brood Pouch Transcriptome Reveals Common Genes Associated with Vertebrate Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittington, Camilla M; Griffith, Oliver W; Qi, Weihong; Thompson, Michael B; Wilson, Anthony B

    2015-12-01

    Viviparity (live birth) has evolved more than 150 times in vertebrates, and represents an excellent model system for studying the evolution of complex traits. There are at least 23 independent origins of viviparity in fishes, with syngnathid fishes (seahorses and pipefish) unique in exhibiting male pregnancy. Male seahorses and pipefish have evolved specialized brooding pouches that provide protection, gas exchange, osmoregulation, and limited nutrient provisioning to developing embryos. Pouch structures differ widely across the Syngnathidae, offering an ideal opportunity to study the evolution of reproductive complexity. However, the physiological and genetic changes facilitating male pregnancy are largely unknown. We used transcriptome profiling to examine pouch gene expression at successive gestational stages in a syngnathid with the most complex brood pouch morphology, the seahorse Hippocampus abdominalis. Using a unique time-calibrated RNA-seq data set including brood pouch at key stages of embryonic development, we identified transcriptional changes associated with brood pouch remodeling, nutrient and waste transport, gas exchange, osmoregulation, and immunological protection of developing embryos at conception, development and parturition. Key seahorse transcripts share homology with genes of reproductive function in pregnant mammals, reptiles, and other live-bearing fish, suggesting a common toolkit of genes regulating pregnancy in divergent evolutionary lineages. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Expression and activity analysis reveal that heme oxygenase (decycling) 1 is associated with blue egg formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z P; Liu, R F; Wang, A R; Li, J Y; Deng, X M

    2011-04-01

    Biliverdin is responsible for the coloration of blue eggs and is secreted onto the eggshell by the shell gland. Previous studies confirmed that a significant difference exists in biliverdin content between blue eggs and brown eggs, although the reasons are still unknown. Because the pigment is derived from oxidative degradation of heme catalyzed by heme oxygenase (HO), this study compared heme oxygenase (decycling) 1 (HMOX1), the gene encoding HO expression and HO activity, in the shell glands of the Dongxiang blue-shelled chicken (n = 12) and the Dongxiang brown-shelled chicken (n = 12). Results showed that HMOX1 was highly expressed at the mRNA (1.58-fold; P 0.05). Taken together, these results show that blue egg formation is associated with high expression of HMOX1 in the shell gland of Dongxiang blue-shelled chickens, and suggest that differential expression of HMOX1 in the 2 groups of chickens is most likely to arise from an alteration in the trans-acting factor.

  6. Genome Wide Association Analysis Reveals New Production Trait Genes in a Male Duroc Population.

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    Kejun Wang

    Full Text Available In this study, 796 male Duroc pigs were used to identify genomic regions controlling growth traits. Three production traits were studied: food conversion ratio, days to 100 KG, and average daily gain, using a panel of 39,436 single nucleotide polymorphisms. In total, we detected 11 genome-wide and 162 chromosome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism trait associations. The Gene ontology analysis identified 14 candidate genes close to significant single nucleotide polymorphisms, with growth-related functions: six for days to 100 KG (WT1, FBXO3, DOCK7, PPP3CA, AGPAT9, and NKX6-1, seven for food conversion ratio (MAP2, TBX15, IVL, ARL15, CPS1, VWC2L, and VAV3, and one for average daily gain (COL27A1. Gene ontology analysis indicated that most of the candidate genes are involved in muscle, fat, bone or nervous system development, nutrient absorption, and metabolism, which are all either directly or indirectly related to growth traits in pigs. Additionally, we found four haplotype blocks composed of suggestive single nucleotide polymorphisms located in the growth trait-related quantitative trait loci and further narrowed down the ranges, the largest of which decreased by ~60 Mb. Hence, our results could be used to improve pig production traits by increasing the frequency of favorable alleles via artificial selection.

  7. In silico studies revealed multiple neurological targets for the antidepressant molecule ursolic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singla, Rajeev K; Scotti, Luciana; Dubey, Ashok K

    2016-12-29

    Ursolic acid, a bioactive pentacyclic triterpenoid had been evaluated for its interaction with the neurological targets associated with antidepressant drugs. Current study was to mechanistically analyze the probable site of action for ursolic acid on the target proteins. Ursolic acid has been docked with monoamine oxidase isoforms: MAO-A and MAO-B, LeuT (homologue of SERT, NET, DAT) and Human C-terminal CAP1 using GRIP docking methodology. Results revealed its non-selective antidepressant action with strong binding affinity towards LeuT and MAO-A proteins, which was found to be comparable with the reference ligands like chlorgyline, clomipramine, sertraline and deprenyl / selegiline. Significant binding affinity of ursolic acid was seen with MAO-A, which indicated its potential role in other neurological disorders, for example, Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson disease besides depression.

  8. Abnormal affective decision making revealed in adolescent binge drinkers using a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Lin; Bechara, Antoine; Gong, Qiyong; Huang, Xiaoqi; Li, Xiangrui; Xue, Gui; Wong, Savio; Lu, Zhong-Lin; Palmer, Paula; Wei, Yonglan; Jia, Yong; Johnson, C Anderson

    2013-06-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the neural correlates of affective decision making, as measured by the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT), which are associated with adolescent binge drinking. Fourteen adolescent binge drinkers (16-18 years of age) and 14 age-matched adolescents who had never consumed alcohol--never drinkers--were recruited from local high schools in Chengdu, China. Questionnaires were used to assess academic performance, drinking experience, and urgency. Brain regions activated by the IGT performance were identified with functional magnetic resonance imaging. Results showed that, compared to never drinkers, binge drinkers performed worse on the IGT and showed higher activity in the subcomponents of the decision-making neural circuitry implicated in the execution of emotional and incentive-related behaviors, namely, the left amygdala and insula bilaterally. Moreover, measures of the severity of drinking problems in real life, as well as high urgency scores, were associated with increased activity within the insula, combined with decreased activity within the orbitofrontal cortex. These results suggest that hyperreactivity of a neural system implicated in the execution of emotional and incentive-related behaviors can be associated with socially undesirable behaviors, such as binge drinking, among adolescents. These findings have social implications because they potentially reveal underlying neural mechanisms for making poor decisions, which may increase an individual's risk and vulnerability for alcoholism. 2013 APA, all rights reserved

  9. Mechanisms of skeletal muscle injury and repair revealed by gene expression studies in mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Gordon L; Summan, Mukesh; Gao, Xin; Chapman, Rebecca; Hulderman, Tracy; Simeonova, Petia P

    2007-07-15

    Common acute injuries to skeletal muscle can lead to significant pain and disability. The current therapeutic approaches for treating muscle injuries are dependent on the clinical severity but not on the type of injury. In the present studies, the pathophysiology and molecular pathways associated with two different types of skeletal muscle injury, one induced by direct destruction of muscle tissue (i.e. FI) and the other induced by a contractile overload (more specifically high-force eccentric contractions, i.e. CI) were compared side by side. Histopathological evaluation and measurements of muscle strength were accompanied by analyses of expression for 12 488 known genes at four time points ranging from 6 h to 7 days after injury. Real-time RT-PCR was used to confirm some of the injury type differences in the temporal profiles of gene expression. Our data revealed several pools of genes, including early induction of transcription, myogenic and stress-responsive factors, common for both types of injury as well as pools of genes expressed specifically with one of the injury types. Only CI activated a set of genes associated with the repair of impaired proteins and structures including genes related to apoptosis, whereas FI uniquely activated gene sets involved in extensive inflammatory responses, tissue remodelling, angiogenesis and myofibre/extracellular matrix synthesis. In conclusion, knowledge of the sets of genes associated specifically with the nature of the injury may have application for development of new strategies for acceleration of the recovery process in injured skeletal muscle.

  10. Functional proteomic analyses of Bothrops atrox venom reveals phenotypes associated with habitat variation in the Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Leijiane F; Portes-Junior, José A; Nicolau, Carolina A; Bernardoni, Juliana L; Nishiyama-Jr, Milton Y; Amazonas, Diana R; Freitas-de-Sousa, Luciana A; Mourão, Rosa Hv; Chalkidis, Hipócrates M; Valente, Richard H; Moura-da-Silva, Ana M

    2017-04-21

    Venom variability is commonly reported for venomous snakes including Bothrops atrox. Here, we compared the composition of venoms from B. atrox snakes collected at Amazonian conserved habitats (terra-firme upland forest and várzea) and human modified areas (pasture and degraded areas). Venom samples were submitted to shotgun proteomic analysis as a whole or compared after fractionation by reversed-phase chromatography. Whole venom proteomes revealed a similar composition among the venoms with predominance of SVMPs, CTLs, and SVSPs and intermediate amounts of PLA2s and LAAOs. However, when distribution of particular isoforms was analyzed by either method, the venom from várzea snakes showed a decrease in hemorrhagic SVMPs and an increase in SVSPs, and procoagulant SVMPs and PLA2s. These differences were validated by experimental approaches including both enzymatic and in vivo assays, and indicated restrictions in respect to antivenom efficacy to variable components. Thus, proteomic analysis at the isoform level combined to in silico prediction of functional properties may indicate venom biological activity. These results also suggest that the prevalence of functionally distinct isoforms contributes to the variability of the venoms and could reflect the adaptation of B. atrox to distinct prey communities in different Amazon habitats. In this report, we compared isoforms present in venoms from snakes collected at different Amazonian habitats. By means of a species venom gland transcriptome and the in silico functional prediction of each isoform, we were able to predict the principal venom activities in vitro and in animal models. We also showed remarkable differences in the venom pools from snakes collected at the floodplain (várzea habitat) compared to other habitats. Not only was this venom less hemorrhagic and more procoagulant, when compared to the venom pools from the other three habitats studied, but also this enhanced procoagulant activity was not efficiently

  11. Analysis of Complete Genomes of Propionibacterium acnes Reveals a Novel Plasmid and Increased Pseudogenes in an Acne Associated Strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Kasimatis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The human skin harbors a diverse community of bacteria, including the Gram-positive, anaerobic bacterium Propionibacterium acnes. P. acnes has historically been linked to the pathogenesis of acne vulgaris, a common skin disease affecting over 80% of all adolescents in the US. To gain insight into potential P. acnes pathogenic mechanisms, we previously sequenced the complete genome of a P. acnes strain HL096PA1 that is highly associated with acne. In this study, we compared its genome to the first published complete genome KPA171202. HL096PA1 harbors a linear plasmid, pIMPLE-HL096PA1. This is the first described P. acnes plasmid. We also observed a five-fold increase of pseudogenes in HL096PA1, several of which encode proteins in carbohydrate transport and metabolism. In addition, our analysis revealed a few island-like genomic regions that are unique to HL096PA1 and a large genomic inversion spanning the ribosomal operons. Together, these findings offer a basis for understanding P. acnes virulent properties, host adaptation mechanisms, and its potential role in acne pathogenesis at the strain level. Furthermore, the plasmid identified in HL096PA1 may potentially provide a new opportunity for P. acnes genetic manipulation and targeted therapy against specific disease-associated strains.

  12. Phylogenetic Analysis of Staphylococcus aureus CC398 Reveals a Sub-Lineage Epidemiologically Associated with Infections in Horses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdelbary, Mohamed M. H.; Wittenberg, Anne; Cuny, Christiane

    2014-01-01

    -allelic polymorphisms, and phylogenetic analyses revealed that an epidemic sub-clone within CC398 (dubbed 'clade (C)') has spread within and between equine hospitals, where it causes nosocomial infections in horses and colonises the personnel. While clade (C) was strongly associated with S. aureus from horses...

  13. A Social Network Approach Reveals Associations between Mouse Social Dominance and Brain Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Nina; Franks, Becca; Lim, Sean; Curley, James P.

    2015-01-01

    Modelling complex social behavior in the laboratory is challenging and requires analyses of dyadic interactions occurring over time in a physically and socially complex environment. In the current study, we approached the analyses of complex social interactions in group-housed male CD1 mice living in a large vivarium. Intensive observations of social interactions during a 3-week period indicated that male mice form a highly linear and steep dominance hierarchy that is maintained by fighting and chasing behaviors. Individual animals were classified as dominant, sub-dominant or subordinate according to their David’s Scores and I& SI ranking. Using a novel dynamic temporal Glicko rating method, we ascertained that the dominance hierarchy was stable across time. Using social network analyses, we characterized the behavior of individuals within 66 unique relationships in the social group. We identified two individual network metrics, Kleinberg’s Hub Centrality and Bonacich’s Power Centrality, as accurate predictors of individual dominance and power. Comparing across behaviors, we establish that agonistic, grooming and sniffing social networks possess their own distinctive characteristics in terms of density, average path length, reciprocity out-degree centralization and out-closeness centralization. Though grooming ties between individuals were largely independent of other social networks, sniffing relationships were highly predictive of the directionality of agonistic relationships. Individual variation in dominance status was associated with brain gene expression, with more dominant individuals having higher levels of corticotropin releasing factor mRNA in the medial and central nuclei of the amygdala and the medial preoptic area of the hypothalamus, as well as higher levels of hippocampal glucocorticoid receptor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA. This study demonstrates the potential and significance of combining complex social housing and intensive

  14. A Social Network Approach Reveals Associations between Mouse Social Dominance and Brain Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Nina; Franks, Becca; Lim, Sean; Curley, James P

    2015-01-01

    Modelling complex social behavior in the laboratory is challenging and requires analyses of dyadic interactions occurring over time in a physically and socially complex environment. In the current study, we approached the analyses of complex social interactions in group-housed male CD1 mice living in a large vivarium. Intensive observations of social interactions during a 3-week period indicated that male mice form a highly linear and steep dominance hierarchy that is maintained by fighting and chasing behaviors. Individual animals were classified as dominant, sub-dominant or subordinate according to their David's Scores and I& SI ranking. Using a novel dynamic temporal Glicko rating method, we ascertained that the dominance hierarchy was stable across time. Using social network analyses, we characterized the behavior of individuals within 66 unique relationships in the social group. We identified two individual network metrics, Kleinberg's Hub Centrality and Bonacich's Power Centrality, as accurate predictors of individual dominance and power. Comparing across behaviors, we establish that agonistic, grooming and sniffing social networks possess their own distinctive characteristics in terms of density, average path length, reciprocity out-degree centralization and out-closeness centralization. Though grooming ties between individuals were largely independent of other social networks, sniffing relationships were highly predictive of the directionality of agonistic relationships. Individual variation in dominance status was associated with brain gene expression, with more dominant individuals having higher levels of corticotropin releasing factor mRNA in the medial and central nuclei of the amygdala and the medial preoptic area of the hypothalamus, as well as higher levels of hippocampal glucocorticoid receptor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA. This study demonstrates the potential and significance of combining complex social housing and intensive

  15. A Social Network Approach Reveals Associations between Mouse Social Dominance and Brain Gene Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina So

    Full Text Available Modelling complex social behavior in the laboratory is challenging and requires analyses of dyadic interactions occurring over time in a physically and socially complex environment. In the current study, we approached the analyses of complex social interactions in group-housed male CD1 mice living in a large vivarium. Intensive observations of social interactions during a 3-week period indicated that male mice form a highly linear and steep dominance hierarchy that is maintained by fighting and chasing behaviors. Individual animals were classified as dominant, sub-dominant or subordinate according to their David's Scores and I& SI ranking. Using a novel dynamic temporal Glicko rating method, we ascertained that the dominance hierarchy was stable across time. Using social network analyses, we characterized the behavior of individuals within 66 unique relationships in the social group. We identified two individual network metrics, Kleinberg's Hub Centrality and Bonacich's Power Centrality, as accurate predictors of individual dominance and power. Comparing across behaviors, we establish that agonistic, grooming and sniffing social networks possess their own distinctive characteristics in terms of density, average path length, reciprocity out-degree centralization and out-closeness centralization. Though grooming ties between individuals were largely independent of other social networks, sniffing relationships were highly predictive of the directionality of agonistic relationships. Individual variation in dominance status was associated with brain gene expression, with more dominant individuals having higher levels of corticotropin releasing factor mRNA in the medial and central nuclei of the amygdala and the medial preoptic area of the hypothalamus, as well as higher levels of hippocampal glucocorticoid receptor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA. This study demonstrates the potential and significance of combining complex social housing

  16. Analysis of mitochondrial DNA sequences in childhood encephalomyopathies reveals new disease-associated variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aijaz A Wani

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mitochondrial encephalomyopathies are a heterogeneous group of clinical disorders generally caused due to mutations in either mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA or nuclear genes encoding oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS. We analyzed the mtDNA sequences from a group of 23 pediatric patients with clinical and morphological features of mitochondrial encephalopathies and tried to establish a relationship of identified variants with the disease. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPLE FINDINGS: Complete mitochondrial genomes were amplified by PCR and sequenced by automated DNA sequencing. Sequencing data was analyzed by SeqScape software and also confirmed by BLASTn program. Nucleotide sequences were compared with the revised Cambridge reference sequence (CRS and sequences present in mitochondrial databases. The data obtained shows that a number of known and novel mtDNA variants were associated with the disease. Most of the non-synonymous variants were heteroplasmic (A4136G, A9194G and T11916A suggesting their possibility of being pathogenic in nature. Some of the missense variants although homoplasmic were showing changes in highly conserved amino acids (T3394C, T3866C, and G9804A and were previously identified with diseased conditions. Similarly, two other variants found in tRNA genes (G5783A and C8309T could alter the secondary structure of Cys-tRNA and Lys-tRNA. Most of the variants occurred in single cases; however, a few occurred in more than one case (e.g. G5783A and A10149T. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: The mtDNA variants identified in this study could be the possible cause of mitochondrial encephalomyopathies with childhood onset in the patient group. Our study further strengthens the pathogenic score of known variants previously reported as provisionally pathogenic in mitochondrial diseases. The novel variants found in the present study can be potential candidates for further investigations to establish the relationship between their incidence and role

  17. Repetitive sequence analysis and karyotyping reveals centromere-associated DNA sequences in radish (Raphanus sativus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qunyan; Cai, Zexi; Hu, Tianhua; Liu, Huijun; Bao, Chonglai; Mao, Weihai; Jin, Weiwei

    2015-04-18

    Radish (Raphanus sativus L., 2n = 2x = 18) is a major root vegetable crop especially in eastern Asia. Radish root contains various nutritions which play an important role in strengthening immunity. Repetitive elements are primary components of the genomic sequence and the most important factors in genome size variations in higher eukaryotes. To date, studies about repetitive elements of radish are still limited. To better understand genome structure of radish, we undertook a study to evaluate the proportion of repetitive elements and their distribution in radish. We conducted genome-wide characterization of repetitive elements in radish with low coverage genome sequencing followed by similarity-based cluster analysis. Results showed that about 31% of the genome was composed of repetitive sequences. Satellite repeats were the most dominating elements of the genome. The distribution pattern of three satellite repeat sequences (CL1, CL25, and CL43) on radish chromosomes was characterized using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). CL1 was predominantly located at the centromeric region of all chromosomes, CL25 located at the subtelomeric region, and CL43 was a telomeric satellite. FISH signals of two satellite repeats, CL1 and CL25, together with 5S rDNA and 45S rDNA, provide useful cytogenetic markers to identify each individual somatic metaphase chromosome. The centromere-specific histone H3 (CENH3) has been used as a marker to identify centromere DNA sequences. One putative CENH3 (RsCENH3) was characterized and cloned from radish. Its deduced amino acid sequence shares high similarities to those of the CENH3s in Brassica species. An antibody against B. rapa CENH3, specifically stained radish centromeres. Immunostaining and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) tests with anti-BrCENH3 antibody demonstrated that both the centromere-specific retrotransposon (CR-Radish) and satellite repeat (CL1) are directly associated with RsCENH3 in radish. Proportions

  18. Why Are Home Literacy Environment and Children's Reading Skills Associated? What Parental Skills Reveal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bergen, Elsje; Van Zuijen, Titia L.; Bishop, Dorothy; de Jong, Peter F.

    2017-01-01

    Associations between home literacy environment and children's reading ability are often assumed to reflect a direct influence. However, heritability could account for the association between parent and child literacy-related measures. We used data from 101 mother/father/child triads to consider the

  19. Quantitative Multiplex Immunohistochemistry Reveals Myeloid-Inflamed Tumor-Immune Complexity Associated with Poor Prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Tsujikawa

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Here, we describe a multiplexed immunohistochemical platform with computational image processing workflows, including image cytometry, enabling simultaneous evaluation of 12 biomarkers in one formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue section. To validate this platform, we used tissue microarrays containing 38 archival head and neck squamous cell carcinomas and revealed differential immune profiles based on lymphoid and myeloid cell densities, correlating with human papilloma virus status and prognosis. Based on these results, we investigated 24 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas from patients who received neoadjuvant GVAX vaccination and revealed that response to therapy correlated with degree of mono-myelocytic cell density and percentages of CD8+ T cells expressing T cell exhaustion markers. These data highlight the utility of in situ immune monitoring for patient stratification and provide digital image processing pipelines to the community for examining immune complexity in precious tissue sections, where phenotype and tissue architecture are preserved to improve biomarker discovery and assessment.

  20. On combining revealed and stated preferences to forecast customer behaviour: three case studies

    OpenAIRE

    Franses, Philip Hans; Verhoef, Peter

    2002-01-01

    textabstractMany companies collect stated preference data (SP) like intentions and satisfaction as well as revealed preference data (RP) like actual purchasing behavior. It seems relevant to examine the predictive usefulness of this information for future revealed preferences, that is, customer behavior. In this paper we address this issue by considering three case studies.

  1. Feather corticosterone reveals stress associated with dietary changes in a breeding seabird.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will, Alexis; Watanuki, Yutaka; Kikuchi, Dale M; Sato, Nobuhiko; Ito, Motohiro; Callahan, Matt; Wynne-Edwards, Katherine; Hatch, Scott; Elliott, Kyle; Slater, Leslie; Takahashi, Akinori; Kitaysky, Alexander

    2015-10-01

    Changes in climate and anthropogenic pressures might affect the composition and abundance of forage fish in the world's oceans. The junk-food hypothesis posits that dietary shifts that affect the quality (e.g., energy content) of food available to marine predators may impact their physiological state and consequently affect their fitness. Previously, we experimentally validated that deposition of the adrenocortical hormone, corticosterone, in feathers is a sensitive measure of nutritional stress in seabirds. Here, we use this method to examine how changes in diet composition and prey quality affect the nutritional status of free-living rhinoceros auklets (Cerorhinca monocerata). Our study sites included the following: Teuri Is. Japan, Middleton Is. central Gulf of Alaska, and St. Lazaria Is. Southeast Alaska. In 2012 and 2013, we collected "bill loads" delivered by parents to feed their chicks (n = 758) to document dietary changes. We deployed time-depth-temperature recorders on breeding adults (n = 47) to evaluate whether changes in prey coincided with changes in foraging behavior. We measured concentrations of corticosterone in fledgling (n = 71) and adult breeders' (n = 82) feathers to determine how birds were affected by foraging conditions. We found that seasonal changes in diet composition occurred on each colony, adults dove deeper and engaged in longer foraging bouts when capturing larger prey and that chicks had higher concentrations of corticosterone in their feathers when adults brought back smaller and/or lower energy prey. Corticosterone levels in feathers of fledglings (grown during the breeding season) and those in feathers of adult breeders (grown during the postbreeding season) were positively correlated, indicating possible carryover effects. These results suggest that seabirds might experience increased levels of nutritional stress associated with moderate dietary changes and that physiological responses to changes in prey composition

  2. Ovarian endometriosis-associated stromal cells reveal persistently high affinity for iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Masahiko; Ito, Fumiya; Shi, Lei; Wang, Yue; Ishida, Chiharu; Hattori, Yuka; Niwa, Masato; Hirayama, Tasuku; Nagasawa, Hideko; Iwase, Akira; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Toyokuni, Shinya

    2015-12-01

    Ovarian endometriosis is a recognized risk for infertility and epithelial ovarian cancer, presumably due to iron overload resulting from repeated hemorrhage. To find a clue for early detection and prevention of ovarian endometriosis-associated cancer, it is mandatory to evaluate catalytic (labile) ferrous iron (catalytic Fe(II)) and to study iron manipulation in ovarian endometriotic lesions. By the use of tissues from women of ovarian endometriosis as well as endometrial tissue from women with and without endometriosis, we for the first time performed histological analysis and cellular detection of catalytic Fe(II) with a specific fluorescent probe (HMRhoNox-M), and further evaluated iron transport proteins in the human specimens and in co-culture experiments using immortalized human eutopic/ectopic endometrial stromal cells (ESCs) in the presence or absence of epithelial cells (EpCs). The amounts of catalytic Fe(II) were higher in ectopic endometrial stromal cells (ecESCs) than in normal eutopic endometrial stromal cells (n-euESCs) both in the tissues and in the corresponding immortalized ESCs. ecESCs exhibited higher transferrin receptor 1 expression both in vivo and in vitro and lower ferroportin expression in vivo than n-euESCs, leading to sustained iron uptake. In co-culture experiments of ESCs with iron-loaded EpCs, ecESCs received catalytic ferrous iron from EpCs, but n-euESCs did not. These data suggest that ecESC play a protective role for cancer-target epithelial cells by collecting excess iron, and that these characteristics are retained in the immortalized ecESCs. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Ribosome profiling reveals features of normal and disease-associated mitochondrial translation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rooijers, K.; Loayza-Puch, F.; Nijtmans, L.G.J.; Agami, R.

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondria are essential cellular organelles for generation of energy and their dysfunction may cause diabetes, Parkinson's disease and multi-systemic failure marked by failure to thrive, gastrointestinal problems, lactic acidosis and early lethality. Disease-associated mitochondrial mutations

  4. Ribosome profiling reveals features of normal and disease-associated mitochondrial translation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Rooijers (Koos); F. Loayza-Puch (Fabricio); L.G.J. Nijtmans (Leo); R. Agami (Reuven)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractMitochondria are essential cellular organelles for generation of energy and their dysfunction may cause diabetes, Parkinson's disease and multi-systemic failure marked by failure to thrive, gastrointestinal problems, lactic acidosis and early lethality. Disease-associated mitochondrial

  5. PrP-C1 fragment in cattle brains reveals features of the transmissible spongiform encephalopathy associated PrPsc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra, Fabienne; Müller, Joachim; Gray, John; Lüthi, Ramona; Dudas, Sandor; Czub, Stefanie; Seuberlich, Torsten

    2017-03-15

    Three different types of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) are known and supposedly caused by distinct prion strains: the classical (C-) BSE type that was typically found during the BSE epidemic, and two relatively rare atypical BSE types, termed H-BSE and L-BSE. The three BSE types differ in the molecular phenotype of the disease associated prion protein, namely the N-terminally truncated proteinase K (PK) resistant prion protein fragment (PrP res ). In this study, we report and analyze yet another PrP res type (PrP res-2011 ), which was found in severely autolytic brain samples of two cows in the framework of disease surveillance in Switzerland in 2011. Analysis of brain tissues from these animals by PK titration and PK inhibitor assays ruled out the process of autolysis as the cause for the aberrant PrP res profile. Immunochemical characterization of the PrP fragments present in the 2011 cases by epitope mapping indicated that PrP res-2011 corresponds in its primary sequence to the physiologically occurring PrP-C1 fragment. However, high speed centrifugation, sucrose gradient assay and NaPTA precipitation revealed biochemical similarities between PrP res-2011 and the disease-associated prion protein found in BSE affected cattle in terms of detergent insolubility, PK resistance and PrP aggregation. Although it remains to be established whether PrP res-2011 is associated with a transmissible disease, our results point out the need of further research on the role the PrP-C1 aggregation and misfolding in health and disease. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Metagenomic systems biology of the human gut microbiome reveals topological shifts associated with obesity and inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenblum, Sharon; Turnbaugh, Peter J; Borenstein, Elhanan

    2012-01-10

    The human microbiome plays a key role in a wide range of host-related processes and has a profound effect on human health. Comparative analyses of the human microbiome have revealed substantial variation in species and gene composition associated with a variety of disease states but may fall short of providing a comprehensive understanding of the impact of this variation on the community and on the host. Here, we introduce a metagenomic systems biology computational framework, integrating metagenomic data with an in silico systems-level analysis of metabolic networks. Focusing on the gut microbiome, we analyze fecal metagenomic data from 124 unrelated individuals, as well as six monozygotic twin pairs and their mothers, and generate community-level metabolic networks of the microbiome. Placing variations in gene abundance in the context of these networks, we identify both gene-level and network-level topological differences associated with obesity and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We show that genes associated with either of these host states tend to be located at the periphery of the metabolic network and are enriched for topologically derived metabolic "inputs." These findings may indicate that lean and obese microbiomes differ primarily in their interface with the host and in the way they interact with host metabolism. We further demonstrate that obese microbiomes are less modular, a hallmark of adaptation to low-diversity environments. We additionally link these topological variations to community species composition. The system-level approach presented here lays the foundation for a unique framework for studying the human microbiome, its organization, and its impact on human health.

  7. The tell-tale heart: population-based surveillance reveals an association of rofecoxib and celecoxib with myocardial infarction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John S Brownstein

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available COX-2 selective inhibitors are associated with myocardial infarction (MI. We sought to determine whether population health monitoring would have revealed the effect of COX-2 inhibitors on population-level patterns of MI.We conducted a retrospective study of inpatients at two Boston hospitals, from January 1997 to March 2006. There was a population-level rise in the rate of MI that reached 52.0 MI-related hospitalizations per 100,000 (a two standard deviation exceedence in January of 2000, eight months after the introduction of rofecoxib and one year after celecoxib. The exceedence vanished within one month of the withdrawal of rofecoxib. Trends in inpatient stay due to MI were tightly coupled to the rise and fall of prescriptions of COX-2 inhibitors, with an 18.5% increase in inpatient stays for MI when both rofecoxib and celecoxib were on the market (P<0.001. For every million prescriptions of rofecoxib and celecoxib, there was a 0.5% increase in MI (95%CI 0.1 to 0.9 explaining 50.3% of the deviance in yearly variation of MI-related hospitalizations. There was a negative association between mean age at MI and volume of prescriptions for celecoxib and rofecoxib (Spearman correlation, -0.67, P<0.05.The strong relationship between prescribing and outcome time series supports a population-level impact of COX-2 inhibitors on MI incidence. Further, mean age at MI appears to have been lowered by use of these medications. Use of a population monitoring approach as an adjunct to pharmacovigilence methods might have helped confirm the suspected association, providing earlier support for the market withdrawal of rofecoxib.

  8. Biogeographic comparison of Lophelia-associated bacterial communities in the Western Atlantic reveals conserved core microbiome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, Christina A.; Goldsmith, Dawn; Gray, Michael A.

    2017-01-01

    Over the last decade, publications on deep-sea corals have tripled. Most attention has been paid to Lophelia pertusa, a globally distributed scleractinian coral that creates critical three-dimensional habitat in the deep ocean. The bacterial community associated with L. pertusa has been previously described by a number of studies at sites in the Mediterranean Sea, Norwegian fjords, off Great Britain, and in the Gulf of Mexico (GOM). However, use of different methodologies prevents direct comparisons in most cases. Our objectives were to address intra-regional variation and to identify any conserved bacterial core community. We collected samples from three distinct colonies of L. pertusa at each of four locations within the western Atlantic: three sites within the GOM and one off the east coast of the United States. Amplicon libraries of 16S rRNA genes were generated using primers targeting the V4–V5 hypervariable region and 454 pyrosequencing. The dominant phylum was Proteobacteria (75–96%). At the family level, 80–95% of each sample was comprised of five groups: Pirellulaceae, Pseudonocardiaceae, Rhodobacteraceae, Sphingomonadaceae, and unclassified Oceanospirillales. Principal coordinate analysis based on weighted UniFrac distances showed a clear distinction between the GOM and Atlantic samples. Interestingly, the replicate samples from each location did not always cluster together, indicating there is not a strong site-specific influence. The core bacterial community, conserved in 100% of the samples, was dominated by the operational taxonomic units of genera Novosphingobium and Pseudonocardia, both known degraders of aromatic hydrocarbons. The sequence of another core member, Propionibacterium, was also found in prior studies of L. pertusa from Norway and Great Britain, suggesting a role as a conserved symbiont. By examining more than 40,000 sequences per sample, we found that GOM samples were dominated by the identified conserved core sequences, whereas

  9. Progress of genome-wide association studies of ankylosing spondylitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhixiu; Brown, Matthew A

    2017-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is an immune-mediated arthritis which primarily affects the spine and sacroiliac joints. Significant progress has been made in discovery of genetic associations with AS by genome-wide association studies (GWAS) over past decade. These findings have uncovered novel pathways involved pathogenesis of the disease and have led to introduction of novel therapeutic treatments for AS. In this Review, we discuss the genetic variations associated with AS identified by GWAS, the major pathways revealed by these AS-associated variations and critical cell types involved in AS development. PMID:29333268

  10. Genomic analysis using high-resolution single-nucleotide polymorphism arrays reveals novel microdeletions associated with premature ovarian failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Megan M; Bowden, Wayne; Engel, Natalie J; Ahn, Hyo Won; Kovanci, Ertug; Rajkovic, Aleksandar

    2011-04-01

    To analyze DNA from women with premature ovarian failure (POF) for genome-wide copy-number variations (CNVs), focusing on novel autosomal microdeletions. Case-control genetic association study. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas. Of 89 POF patients, eight experienced primary amenorrhea and 81 exhibited secondary amenorrhea before age 40 years. Genomic DNA from peripheral blood samples was analyzed for CNVs using high-resolution single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays. Identification of novel CNVs in 89 POF cases, using the Database of Genomic Variants as a control population. A total of 198 autosomal CNVs were detected by SNP arrays, ranging in size from 0.1 Mb to 3.4 Mb. These CNVs (>0.1 Mb) included 17 novel microduplications and seven novel microdeletions, six of which contained the coding regions 8q24.13, 10p15-p14, 10q23.31, 10q26.3, 15q25.2, and 18q21.32. Most of the novel CNVs were derived from autosomes rather than the X chromosome. The present pilot study revealed novel microdeletions/microduplications in women with POF. Two novel microdeletions caused haploinsufficiency for SYCE1 and CPEB1, genes known to cause ovarian failure in knockout mouse models. Chromosomal microarrays may be a useful adjunct to conventional karyotyping when evaluating genomic imbalances in women with POF. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Quantitative proteome analysis reveals the correlation between endocytosis-associated proteins and hepatocellular carcinoma dedifferentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naboulsi, Wael; Bracht, Thilo; Megger, Dominik A; Reis, Henning; Ahrens, Maike; Turewicz, Michael; Eisenacher, Martin; Tautges, Stephanie; Canbay, Ali E; Meyer, Helmut E; Weber, Frank; Baba, Hideo A; Sitek, Barbara

    2016-11-01

    The majority of poorly differentiated hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) develop from well-differentiated tumors. Endocytosis is a cellular function which is likely to take part in this development due to its important role in regulating the abundances of vital signaling receptors. Here, we aimed to investigate the abundance of endocytosis-associated proteins in HCCs with various differentiation grades. Therefore, we analyzed 36 tissue specimens from HCC patients via LC-MS/MS-based label-free quantitative proteomics including 19 HCC tissue samples with different degrees of histological grades and corresponding non-tumorous tissue controls. As a result, 277 proteins were differentially regulated between well-differentiated tumors and controls. In moderately and poorly differentiated tumors, 278 and 1181 proteins, respectively, were significantly differentially regulated compared to non-tumorous tissue. We explored the regulated proteins based on their functions and identified thirty endocytosis-associated proteins, mostly overexpressed in poorly differentiated tumors. These included proteins that have been shown to be up-regulated in HCC like clathrin heavy chain-1 (CLTC) as well as unknown proteins, such as secretory carrier-associated membrane protein 3 (SCAMP3). The abundances of SCAMP3 and CLTC were immunohistochemically examined in tissue sections of 84 HCC patients. We demonstrate the novel association of several endocytosis-associated proteins, in particular, SCAMP3 with HCC progression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Complete protein-protein association kinetics in atomic detail revealed by molecular dynamics simulations and Markov modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plattner, Nuria; Doerr, Stefan; de Fabritiis, Gianni; Noé, Frank

    2017-10-01

    Protein-protein association is fundamental to many life processes. However, a microscopic model describing the structures and kinetics during association and dissociation is lacking on account of the long lifetimes of associated states, which have prevented efficient sampling by direct molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Here we demonstrate protein-protein association and dissociation in atomistic resolution for the ribonuclease barnase and its inhibitor barstar by combining adaptive high-throughput MD simulations and hidden Markov modelling. The model reveals experimentally consistent intermediate structures, energetics and kinetics on timescales from microseconds to hours. A variety of flexibly attached intermediates and misbound states funnel down to a transition state and a native basin consisting of the loosely bound near-native state and the tightly bound crystallographic state. These results offer a deeper level of insight into macromolecular recognition and our approach opens the door for understanding and manipulating a wide range of macromolecular association processes.

  13. Epigenomic analysis of lung adenocarcinoma reveals novel DNA methylation patterns associated with smoking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Q

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Qiang Tan,1,* Guan Wang,1,* Jia Huang,1 Zhengping Ding,1 Qingquan Luo,1 Tony Mok,2 Qian Tao,2 Shun Lu1 1Department of Shanghai Lung Cancer Center, Shanghai Chest Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; 2Cancer Epigenetics Laboratory, Department of Clinical Oncology, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Sir YK Pao Center for Cancer and Li Ka Shing Institute of Health Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong *These authors contributed equally to this paper Abstract: The importance of epigenetic regulation has been increasingly recognized in the development of cancer. In this study, we investigated the impact of smoking, a major risk factor of lung cancer, on DNA methylation by comparing the genome-wide DNA methylation patterns between lung adenocarcinoma samples from six smokers and six nonsmokers. We identified that smoking-induced DNA methylations were enriched in the calcium signaling and neuroactive ligand receptor signaling pathways, which are closely related to smoking-induced lung cancers. Interestingly, we discovered that two genes in the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway (RPS6KA3 and ARAF were hypomethylated in smokers but not in nonsmokers. In addition, we found that the smoking-induced lung cancer-specific DNA methylations were mostly enriched in nuclear activities, including regulation of gene expression and chromatin remodeling. Moreover, the smoking-induced hypermethylation could only be seen in lung adenocarcinoma tissue but not in adjacent normal lung tissue. We also used differentially methylated DNA loci to construct a diagnostic model to distinguish smoking-associated lung cancer from nonsmoking lung cancer with a sensitivity of 88.9% and specificity of 83.2%. Our results provided novel evidence to support that smoking can cause dramatic changes in the DNA methylation landscape of lung cancer, suggesting that epigenetic

  14. Aspirin Exposure Reveals Novel Genes Associated with Platelet Function and Cardiovascular Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voora, Deepak; Cyr, Derek; Lucas, Joseph; Chi, Jen-Tsan; Dungan, Jennifer; McCaffrey, Timothy A.; Katz, Richard; Newby, L. Kristin; Kraus, William E; Becker, Richard C.; Ortel, Thomas L.; Ginsburg, Geoffrey S.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To develop RNA profiles that could serve as novel biomarkers for the response to aspirin. Background Aspirin reduces death and myocardial infarction (MI) suggesting that aspirin interacts with biological pathways that may underlie these events. Methods We administered aspirin, followed by whole blood RNA microarray profiling, in a discovery cohort of healthy volunteers (HV1,n=50), and two validation cohorts of volunteers (HV2,n=53) or outpatient cardiology patients (OPC, n=25). Platelet function was assessed by platelet function score (PFS; HV1/HV2) or VerifyNow Aspirin (OPC). Bayesian sparse factor analysis identified sets of coexpressed transcripts, which were examined for association with PFS in HV1 and validated in HV2 and OPC. Proteomic analysis confirmed the association of validated transcripts in platelet proteins. Validated gene sets were tested for association with death/MI in two patient cohorts (n=587, total) from RNA samples collected at cardiac catheterization. Results A set of 60 co-expressed genes named the “aspirin response signature” (ARS) was associated with PFS in HV1 (r = −0.31, p = 0.03), HV2 (r = −0.34, Bonferroni p = 0.03), and OPC (p = 0.046). Corresponding proteins for 17 ARS genes were identified in the platelet proteome, of which, six were associated with PFS. The ARS was associated with death/MI in both patient cohorts (odds ratio = 1.2, p = 0.01 and hazard ratio = 1.5, p = 0.001), independent of cardiovascular risk factors. Compared with traditional risk factors, reclassification (net reclassification index = 31 - 37%, p ≤ 0.0002) was improved by including the ARS or one of its genes, ITGA2B. Conclusions RNA profiles of platelet-specific genes are novel biomarkers for identifying those do not response adequately to aspirin and who are at risk for death/MI. PMID:23831034

  15. Comparative Assessment of Mediterranean Gorgonian-Associated Microbial Communities Reveals Conserved Core and Locally Variant Bacteria

    KAUST Repository

    van de Water, Jeroen A J M

    2016-10-10

    Gorgonians are key habitat-forming species of Mediterranean benthic communities, but their populations have suffered from mass mortality events linked to high summer seawater temperatures and microbial disease. However, our knowledge on the diversity, dynamics and function of gorgonian-associated microbial communities is limited. Here, we analysed the spatial variability of the microbiomes of five sympatric gorgonian species (Eunicella singularis, Eunicella cavolini, Eunicella verrucosa, Leptogorgia sarmentosa and Paramuricea clavata), collected from the Mediterranean Sea over a scale of ∼1100 km, using next-generation amplicon sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. The microbiomes of all gorgonian species were generally dominated by members of the genus Endozoicomonas, which were at very low abundance in the surrounding seawater. Although the composition of the core microbiome (operational taxonomic units consistently present in a species) was found to be unique for each host species, significant overlap was observed. These spatially consistent associations between gorgonians and their core bacteria suggest intricate symbiotic relationships and regulation of the microbiome composition by the host. At the same time, local variations in microbiome composition were observed. Functional predictive profiling indicated that these differences could be attributed to seawater pollution. Taken together, our data indicate that gorgonian-associated microbiomes are composed of spatially conserved bacteria (core microbiome members) and locally variant members, and that local pollution may influence these local associations, potentially impacting gorgonian health.

  16. XTACC3-XMAP215 association reveals an asymmetric interaction promoting microtubule elongation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortuza, Gulnahar B; Cavazza, Tommaso; Garcia-Mayoral, Maria Flor

    2014-01-01

    chTOG is a conserved microtubule polymerase that catalyses the addition of tubulin dimers to promote microtubule growth. chTOG interacts with TACC3, a member of the transforming acidic coiled-coil (TACC) family. Here we analyse their association using the Xenopus homologues, XTACC3 (TACC3) and XM...

  17. Face-name association task reveals memory networks in patients with left and right hippocampal sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silke Klamer

    2017-01-01

    The face-name association task can be employed to examine functional alterations of hippocampal activation during encoding of both verbal and non-verbal material in one fMRI paradigm. Further, the left SFG seems to be a convergence region for encoding of verbal and non-verbal material.

  18. Rhabdovirus matrix protein structures reveal a novel mode of self-association.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen C Graham

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The matrix (M proteins of rhabdoviruses are multifunctional proteins essential for virus maturation and budding that also regulate the expression of viral and host proteins. We have solved the structures of M from the vesicular stomatitis virus serotype New Jersey (genus: Vesiculovirus and from Lagos bat virus (genus: Lyssavirus, revealing that both share a common fold despite sharing no identifiable sequence homology. Strikingly, in both structures a stretch of residues from the otherwise-disordered N terminus of a crystallographically adjacent molecule is observed binding to a hydrophobic cavity on the surface of the protein, thereby forming non-covalent linear polymers of M in the crystals. While the overall topology of the interaction is conserved between the two structures, the molecular details of the interactions are completely different. The observed interactions provide a compelling model for the flexible self-assembly of the matrix protein during virion morphogenesis and may also modulate interactions with host proteins.

  19. Proteomic analysis of MG132-treated germinating pollen reveals expression signatures associated with proteasome inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Candida Vannini

    Full Text Available Chemical inhibition of the proteasome has been previously found to effectively impair pollen germination and tube growth in vitro. However, the mediators of these effects at the molecular level are unknown. By performing 2DE proteomic analysis, 24 differentially expressed protein spots, representing 14 unique candidate proteins, were identified in the pollen of kiwifruit (Actinidia deliciosa germinated in the presence of the MG132 proteasome inhibitor. qPCR analysis revealed that 11 of these proteins are not up-regulated at the mRNA level, but are most likely stabilized by proteasome inhibition. These differentially expressed proteins are predicted to function in various pathways including energy and lipid metabolism, cell wall synthesis, protein synthesis/degradation and stress responses. In line with this evidence, the MG132-induced changes in the proteome were accompanied by an increase in ATP and ROS content and by an alteration in fatty acid composition.

  20. Untargeted metabolite profiling of murine embryos to reveal metabolic perturbations associated with neural tube closure defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansler, Alex; Chen, Qiuying; Gray, Jason D; Ross, M Elizabeth; Finnell, Richard H; Gross, Steven S

    2014-08-01

    Neural tube closure defects (NTDs) are among the most common congenital malformation in human, typically presenting in liveborns as spina bifida. At least 240 gene mutations in mouse are known to increase the risk of NTD. There is a growing appreciation that environmental factors significantly contribute to NTD expression, and that NTDs likely arise from complex gene-environment interactions. Because maternal folic acid supplementation reduces human NTD risk in some populations by 60 to 70%, it is likely that NTD predisposition is often associated with a defect in folate-dependent one-carbon metabolism. A comprehensive, untargeted metabolic survey of NTD-associated changes in embryo metabolism would provide a valuable test of this assumption. We sought to establish a metabolic profiling platform that is capable of broadly assessing metabolic aberrations associated with NTD-promoting gene mutations in early-stage mouse embryos. A liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry-based untargeted metabolite profiling platform was used to broadly identify significant differences in small molecule levels (50-1000 Da) in NTD-affected embryonic day (E) 9.5 mouse embryos (Lrp6(-) (/) (-) ) versus unaffected (Lrp6(+/+) ) control embryos. Results provide proof-of-principal feasibility for the broad survey of the metabolome of individual E9.5 mouse embryos and identification of metabolic changes associated with NTDs and gene mutations. Levels of 30 different metabolites were altered in association with Lrp6 gene deletion. Some metabolites link to folate-dependent one-carbon transfer reactions, as anticipated, while others await structure elucidation and pathway integration. Whole-embryo metabolomics offers the potential to identify metabolic changes in genetically determined NTD-prone embryos. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Chemical analyses of wasp-associated streptomyces bacteria reveal a prolific potential for natural products discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Michael; Oh, Dong-Chan; Clardy, Jon

    2011-01-01

    and solitary Hymenoptera. Here we test this possibility by examining two species of solitary mud dauber wasps, Sceliphron caementarium and Chalybion californicum. We performed enrichment isolations from 33 wasps and obtained more than 200 isolates of Streptomyces Actinobacteria. Chemical analyses of 15...... and antibacterial activity. The prevalence and anti-microbial properties of Actinobacteria associated with these two solitary wasp species suggest the potential role of these Streptomyces as antibiotic-producing symbionts, potentially helping defend their wasp hosts from pathogenic microbes. Finding...

  2. Targeted resequencing of candidate genes reveals novel variants associated with severe Beh?et's uveitis

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Sang Jin; Lee, Seungbok; Park, Changho; Seo, Jeong-Sun; Kim, Jong-Il; Yu, Hyeong Gon

    2013-01-01

    Beh?et's disease (BD) is a chronic systemic inflammatory disorder characterized by four major manifestations: recurrent uveitis, oral and genital ulcers and skin lesions. To identify some pathogenic variants associated with severe Beh?et's uveitis, we used targeted and massively parallel sequencing methods to explore the genetic diversity of target regions. A solution-based target enrichment kit was designed to capture whole-exonic regions of 132 candidate genes. Using a multiplexing strategy...

  3. A global analysis of bird plumage patterns reveals no association between habitat and camouflage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Somveille

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Evidence suggests that animal patterns (motifs function in camouflage. Irregular mottled patterns can facilitate concealment when stationary in cluttered habitats, whereas regular patterns typically prevent capture during movement in open habitats. Bird plumage patterns have predominantly converged on just four types—mottled (irregular, scales, bars and spots (regular—and habitat could be driving convergent evolution in avian patterning. Based on sensory ecology, we therefore predict that irregular patterns would be associated with visually noisy closed habitats and that regular patterns would be associated with open habitats. Regular patterns have also been shown to function in communication for sexually competing males to stand-out and attract females, so we predict that male breeding plumage patterns evolved in both open and closed habitats. Here, taking phylogenetic relatedness into account, we investigate ecological selection for bird plumage patterns across the class Aves. We surveyed plumage patterns in 80% of all avian species worldwide. Of these, 2,756 bird species have regular and irregular plumage patterns as well as habitat information. In this subset, we tested whether adult breeding/non-breeding plumages in each sex, and juvenile plumages, were associated with the habitat types found within the species’ geographical distributions. We found no evidence for an association between habitat and plumage patterns across the world’s birds and little phylogenetic signal. We also found that species with regular and irregular plumage patterns were distributed randomly across the world’s eco-regions without being affected by habitat type. These results indicate that at the global spatial and taxonomic scale, habitat does not predict convergent evolution in bird plumage patterns, contrary to the camouflage hypothesis.

  4. Deep sequencing reveals a novel class of bidirectional promoters associated with neuronal genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hai Yang; He, Liu; Khaitovich, Philipp

    2014-06-10

    Comprehensive annotation of transcripts expressed in a given tissue is a critical step towards the understanding of regulatory and functional pathways that shape the transcriptome. Here, we reconstructed a cumulative transcriptome of the human prefrontal cortex (PFC) based on approximately 300 million strand-specific RNA sequence (RNA-seq) reads collected at different stages of postnatal development. We find that more than 50% of reconstructed transcripts represent novel transcriptome elements, including 8,343 novel exons and exon extensions of annotated coding genes, 11,217 novel antisense transcripts and 29,541 novel intergenic transcripts or their fragments showing canonical features of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). Our analysis further led to a surprising discovery of a novel class of bidirectional promoters (NBiPs) driving divergent transcription of mRNA and novel lncRNA pairs and displaying a distinct set of sequence and epigenetic features. In contrast to known bidirectional and unidirectional promoters, NBiPs are strongly associated with genes involved in neuronal functions and regulated by neuron-associated transcription factors. Taken together, our results demonstrate that large portions of the human transcriptome remain uncharacterized. The distinct sequence and epigenetic features of NBiPs, as well as their specific association with neuronal genes, further suggest existence of regulatory pathways specific to the human brain.

  5. Palaeo leaf economics reveal a shift in ecosystem function associated with the end-Triassic mass extinction event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soh, W K; Wright, I J; Bacon, K L; Lenz, T I; Steinthorsdottir, M; Parnell, A C; McElwain, J C

    2017-07-17

    Climate change is likely to have altered the ecological functioning of past ecosystems, and is likely to alter functioning in the future; however, the magnitude and direction of such changes are difficult to predict. Here we use a deep-time case study to evaluate the impact of a well-constrained CO2-induced global warming event on the ecological functioning of dominant plant communities. We use leaf mass per area (LMA), a widely used trait in modern plant ecology, to infer the palaeoecological strategy of fossil plant taxa. We show that palaeo-LMA can be inferred from fossil leaf cuticles based on a tight relationship between LMA and cuticle thickness observed among extant gymnosperms. Application of this new palaeo-LMA proxy to fossil gymnosperms from East Greenland reveals significant shifts in the dominant ecological strategies of vegetation found across the Triassic-Jurassic transition. Late Triassic forests, dominated by low-LMA taxa with inferred high transpiration rates and short leaf lifespans, were replaced in the Early Jurassic by forests dominated by high-LMA taxa that were likely to have slower metabolic rates. We suggest that extreme CO2-induced global warming selected for taxa with high LMA associated with a stress-tolerant strategy and that adaptive plasticity in leaf functional traits such as LMA contributed to post-warming ecological success.

  6. A further look at porcine chromosome 7 reveals VRTN variants associated with vertebral number in Chinese and Western pigs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin Fan

    Full Text Available The number of vertebrae is an economically important trait that affects carcass length and meat production in pigs. A major quantitative trait locus (QTL for thoracic vertebral number has been repeatedly identified on pig chromosome (SSC 7. To dissect the genetic basis of the major locus, we herein genotyped a large sample of animals from 3 experimental populations of Chinese and Western origins using 60K DNA chips. Genome-wide association studies consistently identified the locus across the 3 populations and mapped the locus to a 947-Kb region on SSC7. An identical-by-descent sharing assay refined the locus to a 100-Kb segment that harbors only two genes including VRTN and SYNDIG1L. Of them, VRNT has been proposed as a strong candidate of the major locus in Western modern breeds. Further, we resequenced the VRTN gene using DNA samples of 35 parental animals with known QTL genotypes by progeny testing. Concordance tests revealed 4 candidate causal variants as their genotypes showed the perfect segregation with QTL genotypes of the tested animals. An integrative analysis of evolutional constraints and functional elements supported two VRTN variants in a complete linkage disequilibrium phase as the most likely causal mutations. The promising variants significantly affect the number of thoracic vertebrae (one vertebra in large scale outbred animals, and are segregating at rather high frequencies in Western pigs and at relatively low frequencies in a number of Chinese breeds. Altogether, we show that VRTN variants are significantly associated with the number of thoracic vertebrae in both Chinese and Western pigs. The finding advances our understanding of the genetic architecture of the vertebral number in pigs. Furthermore, our finding is of economical importance as it provides a robust breeding tool for the improvement of vertebral number and meat production in both Chinese indigenous pigs and Western present-day commercial pigs.

  7. A Quantitative Profiling Tool for Diverse Genomic Data Types Reveals Potential Associations between Chromatin and Pre-mRNA Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremsky, Isaac; Bellora, Nicolás; Eyras, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing, and genome-based datasets in general, are often represented as profiles centered at reference points to study the association of protein binding and other signals to particular regulatory mechanisms. Although these profiles often provide compelling evidence of these associations, they do not provide a quantitative assessment of the enrichment, which makes the comparison between signals and conditions difficult. In addition, a number of biases can confound profiles, but are rarely accounted for in the tools currently available. We present a novel computational method, ProfileSeq, for the quantitative assessment of biological profiles to provide an exact, nonparametric test that specific regions of the test profile have higher or lower signal densities than a control set. The method is applicable to high-throughput sequencing data (ChIP-Seq, GRO-Seq, CLIP-Seq, etc.) and to genome-based datasets (motifs, etc.). We validate ProfileSeq by recovering and providing a quantitative assessment of several results reported before in the literature using independent datasets. We show that input signal and mappability have confounding effects on the profile results, but that normalizing the signal by input reads can eliminate these biases while preserving the biological signal. Moreover, we apply ProfileSeq to ChIP-Seq data for transcription factors, as well as for motif and CLIP-Seq data for splicing factors. In all examples considered, the profiles were robust to biases in mappability of sequencing reads. Furthermore, analyses performed with ProfileSeq reveal a number of putative relationships between transcription factor binding to DNA and splicing factor binding to pre-mRNA, adding to the growing body of evidence relating chromatin and pre-mRNA processing. ProfileSeq provides a robust way to quantify genome-wide coordinate-based signal. Software and documentation are freely available for academic use at https://bitbucket.org/regulatorygenomicsupf/profileseq/.

  8. Microsporidia-nematode associations in methane seeps reveal basal fungal parasitism in the deep sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir eSapir

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The deep sea is Earth’s largest habitat but little is known about the nature of deep-sea parasitism. In contrast to a few characterized cases of bacterial and protistan parasites, the existence and biological significance of deep-sea parasitic fungi is yet to be understood. Here we report the discovery of a fungus-related parasitic microsporidium, Nematocenator marisprofundi n. gen. n. sp. that infects benthic nematodes at Pacific Ocean methane seeps on the Pacific Ocean floor. This infection is species-specific and has been temporally and spatially stable over two years of sampling, indicating an ecologically consistent host-parasite interaction. A high distribution of spores in the reproductive tracts of infected males and females and their absence from host nematodes’ intestines suggests a sexual transmission strategy in contrast to the fecal-oral transmission of most microsporidia. N. marisprofundi targets the host’s body wall muscles causing cell lysis, and in severe infection even muscle filament degradation. Phylogenetic analyses placed N. marisprofundi in a novel and basal clade not closely related to any described microsporidia clade, suggesting either that microsporidia-nematode parasitism occurred early in microsporidia evolution or that host specialization occurred late in an ancient deep-sea microsporidian lineage. Our findings reveal that methane seeps support complex ecosystems involving interkingdom interactions between bacteria, nematodes, and parasitic fungi and that microsporidia parasitism exists also in the deep sea biosphere.

  9. Active sensing associated with spatial learning reveals memory-based attention in an electric fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, James J; Longtin, André; Maler, Leonard

    2016-05-01

    Active sensing behaviors reveal what an animal is attending to and how it changes with learning. Gymnotus sp, a gymnotiform weakly electric fish, generates an electric organ discharge (EOD) as discrete pulses to actively sense its surroundings. We monitored freely behaving gymnotid fish in a large dark "maze" and extracted their trajectories and EOD pulse pattern and rate while they learned to find food with electrically detectable landmarks as cues. After training, they more rapidly found food using shorter, more stereotyped trajectories and spent more time near the food location. We observed three forms of active sensing: sustained high EOD rates per unit distance (sampling density), transient large increases in EOD rate (E-scans) and stereotyped scanning movements (B-scans) were initially strong at landmarks and food, but, after learning, intensified only at the food location. During probe (no food) trials, after learning, the fish's search area and intense active sampling was still centered on the missing food location, but now also increased near landmarks. We hypothesize that active sensing is a behavioral manifestation of attention and essential for spatial learning; the fish use spatial memory of landmarks and path integration to reach the expected food location and confine their attention to this region. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  10. Fish gut-liver immunity during homeostasis or inflammation revealed by integrative transcriptome and proteome studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Nan; Song, Yu-Long; Wang, Bei; Zhang, Xiang-Yang; Zhang, Xu-Jie; Wang, Ya-Li; Cheng, Ying-Yin; Chen, Dan-Dan; Xia, Xiao-Qin; Lu, Yi-Shan; Zhang, Yong-An

    2016-11-01

    The gut-associated lymphoid tissue, connected with liver via bile and blood, constructs a local immune environment of both defense and tolerance. The gut-liver immunity has been well-studied in mammals, yet in fish remains largely unknown, even though enteritis as well as liver and gallbladder syndrome emerged as a limitation in aquaculture. In this study, we performed integrative bioinformatic analysis for both transcriptomic (gut and liver) and proteomic (intestinal mucus and bile) data, in both healthy and infected tilapias. We found more categories of immune transcripts in gut than liver, as well as more adaptive immune in gut meanwhile more innate in liver. Interestingly reduced differential immune transcripts between gut and liver upon inflammation were also revealed. In addition, more immune proteins in bile than intestinal mucus were identified. And bile probably providing immune effectors to intestinal mucus upon inflammation was deduced. Specifically, many key immune transcripts in gut or liver as well as key immune proteins in mucus or bile were demonstrated. Accordingly, we proposed a hypothesized profile of fish gut-liver immunity, during either homeostasis or inflammation. Current data suggested that fish gut and liver may collaborate immunologically while keep homeostasis using own strategies, including potential unique mechanisms.

  11. Multifactor dimensionality reduction reveals a three-locus epistatic interaction associated with susceptibility to pulmonary tuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Collins, Ryan L; Hu, Ting; Wejse, Christian

    2013-01-01

    for this problem. The goal of the present study was to apply MDR to mining high-order epistatic interactions in a population-based genetic study of tuberculosis (TB). Results The study used a previously published data set consisting of 19 candidate single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 321 pulmonary TB cases...

  12. Autoantigen microarrays reveal autoantibodies associated with proliferative nephritis and active disease in pediatric systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddon, D James; Diep, Vivian K; Price, Jordan V; Limb, Cindy; Utz, Paul J; Balboni, Imelda

    2015-06-17

    Pediatric systemic lupus erythematosus (pSLE) patients often initially present with more active and severe disease than adults, including a higher frequency of lupus nephritis. Specific autoantibodies, including anti-C1q, anti-DNA and anti-alpha-actinin, have been associated with kidney involvement in SLE, and DNA antibodies are capable of initiating early-stage lupus nephritis in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice. Over 100 different autoantibodies have been described in SLE patients, highlighting the need for comprehensive autoantibody profiling. Knowledge of the antibodies associated with pSLE and proliferative nephritis will increase the understanding of SLE pathogenesis, and may aid in monitoring patients for renal flare. We used autoantigen microarrays composed of 140 recombinant or purified antigens to compare the serum autoantibody profiles of new-onset pSLE patients (n = 45) to healthy controls (n = 17). We also compared pSLE patients with biopsy-confirmed class III or IV proliferative nephritis (n = 23) and without significant renal involvement (n = 18). We performed ELISA with selected autoantigens to validate the microarray findings. We created a multiple logistic regression model, based on the ELISA and clinical information, to predict whether a patient had proliferative nephritis, and used a validation cohort (n = 23) and longitudinal samples (88 patient visits) to test its accuracy. Fifty autoantibodies were at significantly higher levels in the sera of pSLE patients compared to healthy controls, including anti-B cell-activating factor (BAFF). High levels of anti-BAFF were associated with active disease. Thirteen serum autoantibodies were present at significantly higher levels in pSLE patients with proliferative nephritis than those without, and we confirmed five autoantigens (dsDNA, C1q, collagens IV and X and aggrecan) by ELISA. Our model, based on ELISA measurements and clinical variables, correctly identified patients with proliferative

  13. Comparative genomics reveals genes significantly associated with woody hosts in the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowell, Reuben W; Laue, Bridget E; Sharp, Paul M; Green, Sarah

    2016-12-01

    The diversification of lineages within Pseudomonas syringae has involved a number of adaptive shifts from herbaceous hosts onto various species of tree, resulting in the emergence of highly destructive diseases such as bacterial canker of kiwi and bleeding canker of horse chestnut. This diversification has involved a high level of gene gain and loss, and these processes are likely to play major roles in the adaptation of individual lineages onto their host plants. In order to better understand the evolution of P. syringae onto woody plants, we have generated de novo genome sequences for 26 strains from the P. syringae species complex that are pathogenic on a range of woody species, and have looked for statistically significant associations between gene presence and host type (i.e. woody or herbaceous) across a phylogeny of 64 strains. We have found evidence for a common set of genes associated with strains that are able to colonize woody plants, suggesting that divergent lineages have acquired similarities in genome composition that may form the genetic basis of their adaptation to woody hosts. We also describe in detail the gain, loss and rearrangement of specific loci that may be functionally important in facilitating this adaptive shift. Overall, our analyses allow for a greater understanding of how gene gain and loss may contribute to adaptation in P. syringae. © 2016 The Authors. Molecular Plant Pathology published by British Society for Plant Pathology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. An elusive ectomycorrhizal fungus reveals itself: a new species of Geopora (Pyronemataceae) associated with Pinus edulis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Rentería, Lluvia; Lau, Matthew K; Lamit, Louis J; Gehring, Catherine A

    2014-01-01

    Species of the genus Geopora are important ectomycorrhizal associates that can dominate the communities of some plant taxa, such as pinyon pine (Pinus edulis), a widespread tree of the western United States. Several members of the genus Geopora are known only from ectomycorrhizal root tips and thus have not been described formally. The sporocarps of some Geopora species occur infrequently because they depend on wet years for sporulation. In addition, Geopora sporocarps can be small and may be hypogeous at some developmental stage, limiting the opportunities for describing their morphology. Using molecular and morphological data, we have described a new species of fungus, Geopora pinyonensis, which produced ascocarps after unusually high precipitation at a northern Arizona site in summer 2012. Based on analysis of the ITS and nuLSU regions of the rDNA, G pinyonensis is a new species of Geopora. It has small sporocarps and ascospores relative to other members of the genus; however, these morphological features overlap with other species. Using rDNA data from sporocarps and ectomycorrhizal root tips, we show that the sporocarps correspond to an abundant species of ectomycorrhizal fungus associated with pinyon pines that is increasing in abundance in drought-affected landscapes and may promote drought tolerance. © 2014 by The Mycological Society of America.

  15. Comparative Genomics of Facultative Bacterial Symbionts Isolated from European Orius Species Reveals an Ancestral Symbiotic Association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaorui Chen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Pest control in agriculture employs diverse strategies, among which the use of predatory insects has steadily increased. The use of several species within the genus Orius in pest control is widely spread, particularly in Mediterranean Europe. Commercial mass rearing of predatory insects is costly, and research efforts have concentrated on diet manipulation and selective breeding to reduce costs and improve efficacy. The characterisation and contribution of microbial symbionts to Orius sp. fitness, behaviour, and potential impact on human health has been neglected. This paper provides the first genome sequence level description of the predominant culturable facultative bacterial symbionts associated with five Orius species (O. laevigatus, O. niger, O. pallidicornis, O. majusculus, and O. albidipennis from several geographical locations. Two types of symbionts were broadly classified as members of the genera Serratia and Leucobacter, while a third constitutes a new genus within the Erwiniaceae. These symbionts were found to colonise all the insect specimens tested, which evidenced an ancestral symbiotic association between these bacteria and the genus Orius. Pangenome analyses of the Serratia sp. isolates offered clues linking Type VI secretion system effector–immunity proteins from the Tai4 sub-family to the symbiotic lifestyle.

  16. Age-associated changes in head jerk while walking reveal altered dynamic stability in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodie, Matthew A D; Menz, Hylton B; Lord, Stephen R

    2014-01-01

    Many older people have impaired dynamic stability, and up to one in three people over 65 fall each year. It is thought that older people walk more slowly to compensate for reduced capabilities. Here, we investigate whether head jerk, the first time derivative of acceleration, can further our understanding of age-associated changes in dynamic stability while walking. Gait parameters including cadence, step length, walking speed, harmonic ratios, step time variability, and jerk were measured in 43 young and 100 older people using accelerometers securely attached to the head and pelvis. Older people presented significantly (p ≤ 0.004) more mediolateral (ML) head jerk, but significantly less vertical (VT) head jerk. The dimensionless ratio, ML/VT jerk, demonstrated superior ability (89 % accuracy) in differentiating older from younger people. Principal component analysis indicated that ML/VT jerk was a distinct gait construct. ML/VT jerk was highly reliable, normally distributed, independent of stature or gender, and relatively unaffected by walking speed. In older people, reduced VT head jerk may indicate reduced gait vigour, and increased ML head jerk may indicate age-associated changes to dynamic stability. The smoother head movements evident in our younger group may be because they were more able to rely on automatic control and the dynamic (pendulum-like) stability of their systems.

  17. Co-expression network analysis reveals transcription factors associated to cell wall biosynthesis in sugarcane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Savio Siqueira; Hotta, Carlos Takeshi; Poelking, Viviane Guzzo de Carli; Leite, Debora Chaves Coelho; Buckeridge, Marcos Silveira; Loureiro, Marcelo Ehlers; Barbosa, Marcio Henrique Pereira; Carneiro, Monalisa Sampaio; Souza, Glaucia Mendes

    2016-05-01

    Sugarcane is a hybrid of Saccharum officinarum and Saccharum spontaneum, with minor contributions from other species in Saccharum and other genera. Understanding the molecular basis of cell wall metabolism in sugarcane may allow for rational changes in fiber quality and content when designing new energy crops. This work describes a comparative expression profiling of sugarcane ancestral genotypes: S. officinarum, S. spontaneum and S. robustum and a commercial hybrid: RB867515, linking gene expression to phenotypes to identify genes for sugarcane improvement. Oligoarray experiments of leaves, immature and intermediate internodes, detected 12,621 sense and 995 antisense transcripts. Amino acid metabolism was particularly evident among pathways showing natural antisense transcripts expression. For all tissues sampled, expression analysis revealed 831, 674 and 648 differentially expressed genes in S. officinarum, S. robustum and S. spontaneum, respectively, using RB867515 as reference. Expression of sugar transporters might explain sucrose differences among genotypes, but an unexpected differential expression of histones were also identified between high and low Brix° genotypes. Lignin biosynthetic genes and bioenergetics-related genes were up-regulated in the high lignin genotype, suggesting that these genes are important for S. spontaneum to allocate carbon to lignin, while S. officinarum allocates it to sucrose storage. Co-expression network analysis identified 18 transcription factors possibly related to cell wall biosynthesis while in silico analysis detected cis-elements involved in cell wall biosynthesis in their promoters. Our results provide information to elucidate regulatory networks underlying traits of interest that will allow the improvement of sugarcane for biofuel and chemicals production.

  18. Structural analysis of coxsackievirus A7 reveals conformational changes associated with uncoating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitsonen, Jani J T; Shakeel, Shabih; Susi, Petri; Pandurangan, Arun P; Sinkovits, Robert S; Hyvönen, Heini; Laurinmäki, Pasi; Ylä-Pelto, Jani; Topf, Maya; Hyypiä, Timo; Butcher, Sarah J

    2012-07-01

    Coxsackievirus A7 (CAV7) is a rarely detected and poorly characterized serotype of the Enterovirus species Human enterovirus A (HEV-A) within the Picornaviridae family. The CAV7-USSR strain has caused polio-like epidemics and was originally thought to represent the fourth poliovirus type, but later evidence linked this strain to the CAV7-Parker prototype. Another isolate, CAV7-275/58, was also serologically similar to Parker but was noninfectious in a mouse model. Sequencing of the genomic region encoding the capsid proteins of the USSR and 275/58 strains and subsequent comparison with the corresponding amino acid sequences of the Parker strain revealed that the Parker and USSR strains are nearly identical, while the 275/58 strain is more distant. Using electron cryomicroscopy and three-dimensional image reconstruction, the structures of the CAV7-USSR virion and empty capsid were resolved to 8.2-Å and 6.1-Å resolutions, respectively. This is one of the first detailed structural analyses of the HEV-A species. Using homology modeling, reconstruction segmentation, and flexible fitting, we constructed a pseudoatomic T = 1 (pseudo T = 3) model incorporating the three major capsid proteins (VP1 to VP3), addressed the conformational changes of the capsid and its constituent viral proteins occurring during RNA release, and mapped the capsid proteins' variable regions to the structure. During uncoating, VP4 and RNA are released analogously to poliovirus 1, the interfaces of VP2 and VP3 are rearranged, and VP1 rotates. Variable regions in the capsid proteins were predicted to map mainly to the surface of VP1 and are thus likely to affect the tropism and pathogenicity of CAV7.

  19. Computational Characterization of Osteoporosis Associated SNPs and Genes Identified by Genome-Wide Association Studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Longjuan Qin

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWASs have revealed many SNPs and genes associated with osteoporosis. However, influence of these SNPs and genes on the predisposition to osteoporosis is not fully understood. We aimed to identify osteoporosis GWASs-associated SNPs potentially influencing the binding affinity of transcription factors and miRNAs, and reveal enrichment signaling pathway and "hub" genes of osteoporosis GWAS-associated genes.We conducted multiple computational analyses to explore function and mechanisms of osteoporosis GWAS-associated SNPs and genes, including SNP conservation analysis and functional annotation (influence of SNPs on transcription factors and miRNA binding, gene ontology analysis, pathway analysis and protein-protein interaction analysis.Our results suggested that a number of SNPs potentially influence the binding affinity of transcription factors (NFATC2, MEF2C, SOX9, RUNX2, ESR2, FOXA1 and STAT3 and miRNAs. Osteoporosis GWASs-associated genes showed enrichment of Wnt signaling pathway, basal cell carcinoma and Hedgehog signaling pathway. Highly interconnected "hub" genes revealed by interaction network analysis are RUNX2, SP7, TNFRSF11B, LRP5, DKK1, ESR1 and SOST.Our results provided the targets for further experimental assessment and further insight on osteoporosis pathophysiology.

  20. Feasibility study of spectral pattern recognition reveals distinct classes of volcanic tremor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unglert, K.; Jellinek, A. M.

    2017-04-01

    Systematic investigations of the similarities and differences among volcanic tremor at a range of volcano types may hold crucial information about the plausibility of inferred source mechanisms, which, in turn, may be important for eruption forecasting. However, such studies are rare, in part because of an intrinsic difficulty with identifying tremor signals within very long time series of volcano seismic data. Accordingly, we develop an efficient tremor detection algorithm and identify over 12,000h of volcanic tremor on 24 stations at Kīlauea, Okmok, Pavlof, and Redoubt volcanoes. We estimate spectral content over 5-minute tremor windows, and apply a novel combination of Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and hierarchical clustering to identify patterns in the tremor spectra. Analyzing several stations from a given volcano together reveals different styles of tremor within individual volcanic settings. In addition to identifying tremor properties common to all stations in a given network, we find localized tremor signals including those related to processes such as lahars or dike intrusions that are only observed on some of the stations within a network. Subsequent application of our analysis to a combination of stations from the different volcanoes reveals that at least three main tremor classes can be detected across all settings. Whereas a regime with a ridge of high power distributed over 1-2Hz and a gradual decay of spectral power towards higher frequencies is observed dominantly at three volcanoes (Kīlauea, Okmok, Redoubt) with magma reservoirs centered at less than 5km below sea level (b.s.l.), a spectrum with a steeper slope and a narrower peak at 1-2Hz is observed only in association with open vents (Kīlauea and Pavlof). A third regime with a peak at approximately 3Hz is confined to two stratovolcanoes (Pavlof and Redoubt). These observations suggest generic relationships between the spectral character of the observed signals and volcano

  1. Deep sequencing reveals a novel closterovirus associated with wild rose leaf rosette disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yan; Yang, Zuokun; Hong, Ni; Wang, Guoping; Ning, Guogui; Xu, Wenxing

    2015-06-01

    A bizarre virus-like symptom of a leaf rosette formed by dense small leaves on branches of wild roses (Rosa multiflora Thunb.), designated as 'wild rose leaf rosette disease' (WRLRD), was observed in China. To investigate the presumed causal virus, a wild rose sample affected by WRLRD was subjected to deep sequencing of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) for a complete survey of the infecting viruses and viroids. The assembly of siRNAs led to the reconstruction of the complete genomes of three known viruses, namely Apple stem grooving virus (ASGV), Blackberry chlorotic ringspot virus (BCRV) and Prunus necrotic ringspot virus (PNRSV), and of a novel virus provisionally named 'rose leaf rosette-associated virus' (RLRaV). Phylogenetic analysis clearly placed RLRaV alongside members of the genus Closterovirus, family Closteroviridae. Genome organization of RLRaV RNA (17,653 nucleotides) showed 13 open reading frames (ORFs), except ORF1 and the quintuple gene block, most of which showed no significant similarities with known viral proteins, but, instead, had detectable identities to fungal or bacterial proteins. Additional novel molecular features indicated that RLRaV seems to be the most complex virus among the known genus members. To our knowledge, this is the first report of WRLRD and its associated closterovirus, as well as two ilarviruses and one capilovirus, infecting wild roses. Our findings present novel information about the closterovirus and the aetiology of this rose disease which should facilitate its control. More importantly, the novel features of RLRaV help to clarify the molecular and evolutionary features of the closterovirus. © 2014 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  2. Comparative analysis of gene expression data reveals novel targets of senescence-associated microRNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Napolitano

    Full Text Available In the last decades, cellular senescence is viewed as a complex mechanism involved in different processes, ranging from tumor suppression to induction of age-related degenerative alterations. Senescence-inducing stimuli are myriad and, recently, we and others have demonstrated the role exerted by microRNAs in the induction and maintenance of senescence, by the identification of a subset of Senescence-Associated microRNAs (SAmiRs up-regulated during replicative or stress-induced senescence and able to induce a premature senescent phenotype when over-expressed in human primary cells. With the intent to find novel direct targets of two specific SAmiRs, SAmiR-494 and -486-5p, and cellular pathways which they are involved in, we performed a comparative analysis of gene expression profiles available in literature to select genes down-regulated upon replicative senescence of human primary fibroblasts. Among them, we searched for SAmiR's candidate targets by analyzing with different target prediction algorithms their 3'UTR for the presence of SAmiR-binding sites. The expression profiles of selected candidates have been validated on replicative and stress-induced senescence and the targeting of the 3'UTRs was assessed by luciferase assay. Results allowed us to identify Cell Division Cycle Associated 2 (CDCA2 and Inhibitor of DNA binding/differentiation type 4 (ID4 as novel targets of SAmiR-494 and SAmiR-486-5p, respectively. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the over-expression of CDCA2 in human primary fibroblasts was able to partially counteract etoposide-induced senescence by mitigating the activation of DNA Damage Response.

  3. Mapping of PARK2 and PACRG overlapping regulatory region reveals LD structure and functional variants in association with leprosy in unrelated indian population groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Rupali; Ali, Shafat; Srivastava, Amit K; Aggarwal, Shweta; Kumar, Bhupender; Manvati, Siddharth; Kalaiarasan, Ponnusamy; Jena, Mamta; Garg, Vijay K; Bhattacharya, Sambit N; Bamezai, Rameshwar N K

    2013-01-01

    Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium Leprae, where the host genetic background plays an important role toward the disease pathogenesis. Various studies have identified a number of human genes in association with leprosy or its clinical forms. However, non-replication of results has hinted at the heterogeneity among associations between different population groups, which could be due to differently evolved LD structures and differential frequencies of SNPs within the studied regions of the genome. A need for systematic and saturated mapping of the associated regions with the disease is warranted to unravel the observed heterogeneity in different populations. Mapping of the PARK2 and PACRG gene regulatory region with 96 SNPs, with a resolution of 1 SNP per 1 Kb for PARK2 gene regulatory region in a North Indian population, showed an involvement of 11 SNPs in determining the susceptibility towards leprosy. The association was replicated in a geographically distinct and unrelated population from Orissa in eastern India. In vitro reporter assays revealed that the two significantly associated SNPs, located 63.8 kb upstream of PARK2 gene and represented in a single BIN of 8 SNPs, influenced the gene expression. A comparison of BINs between Indian and Vietnamese populations revealed differences in the BIN structures, explaining the heterogeneity and also the reason for non-replication of the associated genomic region in different populations.

  4. Quantitative proteomics reveals that enzymes of the ketogenic pathway are associated with prostate cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraon, Punit; Cretu, Daniela; Musrap, Natasha; Karagiannis, George S; Batruch, Ihor; Drabovich, Andrei P; van der Kwast, Theodorus; Mizokami, Atsushi; Morrissey, Colm; Jarvi, Keith; Diamandis, Eleftherios P

    2013-06-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy and the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in men. One common treatment is androgen-deprivation therapy, which reduces symptoms in most patients. However, over time, patients develop tumors that are androgen-independent and ultimately fatal. The mechanisms that cause this transition remain largely unknown, and as a result, there are no effective treatments against androgen-independent prostate cancer. As a model platform, we used the LNCaP cell line and its androgen-independent derivative, LNCaP-SF. Utilizing stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture coupled to mass spectrometry, we assessed the differential global protein expression of the two cell lines. Our proteomic analysis resulted in the quantification of 3355 proteins. Bioinformatic prioritization resulted in 42 up-regulated and 46 down-regulated proteins in LNCaP-SF cells relative to LNCaP cells. Our top candidate, HMGCS2, an enzyme involved in ketogenesis, was found to be 9-fold elevated in LNCaP-SF cells, based on peptide ratios. After analyzing the remaining enzymes of this pathway (ACAT1, BDH1, HMGCL, and OXCT1), we observed increased expression of these proteins in the LNCaP-SF cells, which was further verified using Western blotting. To determine whether these enzymes were up-regulated in clinical samples, we performed quantitative PCR and immunohistochemistry on human prostate cancer tissues, from which we observed significantly increased transcript and protein levels in high-grade cancer (Gleason grade ≥ 8). In addition, we observed significant elevation of these enzymes in the LuCaP 96AI castration-resistant xenograft. Further assessment of ACAT1 on human castration-resistant metastatic prostate cancer tissues revealed substantially elevated expression of ACAT1 in these specimens. Taken together, our results indicate that enzymes of the ketogenic pathway are up-regulated in high-grade prostate cancer and could serve as

  5. Quantitative Proteomics Reveals That Enzymes of the Ketogenic Pathway Are Associated with Prostate Cancer Progression*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraon, Punit; Cretu, Daniela; Musrap, Natasha; Karagiannis, George S.; Batruch, Ihor; Drabovich, Andrei P.; van der Kwast, Theodorus; Mizokami, Atsushi; Morrissey, Colm; Jarvi, Keith; Diamandis, Eleftherios P.

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy and the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in men. One common treatment is androgen-deprivation therapy, which reduces symptoms in most patients. However, over time, patients develop tumors that are androgen-independent and ultimately fatal. The mechanisms that cause this transition remain largely unknown, and as a result, there are no effective treatments against androgen-independent prostate cancer. As a model platform, we used the LNCaP cell line and its androgen-independent derivative, LNCaP-SF. Utilizing stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture coupled to mass spectrometry, we assessed the differential global protein expression of the two cell lines. Our proteomic analysis resulted in the quantification of 3355 proteins. Bioinformatic prioritization resulted in 42 up-regulated and 46 down-regulated proteins in LNCaP-SF cells relative to LNCaP cells. Our top candidate, HMGCS2, an enzyme involved in ketogenesis, was found to be 9-fold elevated in LNCaP-SF cells, based on peptide ratios. After analyzing the remaining enzymes of this pathway (ACAT1, BDH1, HMGCL, and OXCT1), we observed increased expression of these proteins in the LNCaP-SF cells, which was further verified using Western blotting. To determine whether these enzymes were up-regulated in clinical samples, we performed quantitative PCR and immunohistochemistry on human prostate cancer tissues, from which we observed significantly increased transcript and protein levels in high-grade cancer (Gleason grade ≥ 8). In addition, we observed significant elevation of these enzymes in the LuCaP 96AI castration-resistant xenograft. Further assessment of ACAT1 on human castration-resistant metastatic prostate cancer tissues revealed substantially elevated expression of ACAT1 in these specimens. Taken together, our results indicate that enzymes of the ketogenic pathway are up-regulated in high-grade prostate cancer and could serve as

  6. Genetic association studies in lumbar disc degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskola, Pasi J; Lemmelä, Susanna; Kjaer, Per

    2012-01-01

    Low back pain is associated with lumbar disc degeneration, which is mainly due to genetic predisposition. The objective of this study was to perform a systematic review to evaluate genetic association studies in lumbar disc degeneration as defined on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in humans....

  7. Large-Scale Phylogenomics of the Lactobacillus casei Group Highlights Taxonomic Inconsistencies and Reveals Novel Clade-Associated Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuyts, Sander; Wittouck, Stijn; De Boeck, Ilke; Allonsius, Camille N; Pasolli, Edoardo; Segata, Nicola; Lebeer, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    Although the genotypic and phenotypic properties of the Lactobacillus casei group have been studied extensively, the taxonomic structure has been the subject of debate for a long time. Here, we performed a large-scale comparative analysis by using 183 publicly available genomes supplemented with a Lactobacillus strain isolated from the human upper respiratory tract. On the basis of this analysis, we identified inconsistencies in the taxonomy and reclassified all of the genomes according to their most closely related type strains. This led to the identification of a catalase-encoding gene in all 10 L. casei sensu stricto strains, making it the first described catalase-positive species in the Lactobacillus genus. Moreover, we found that 6 of 10 L. casei genomes contained a SecA2/SecY2 gene cluster with two putative glycosylated surface adhesin proteins. Altogether, our results highlight current inconsistencies in the taxonomy of the L. casei group and reveal new clade-associated functional features. IMPORTANCE The closely related species of the Lactobacillus casei group are extensively studied because of their applications in food fermentations and as probiotics. Our results show that many strains in this group are incorrectly classified and that reclassifying them to their most closely related species type strain improves the functional predictive power of their taxonomy. In addition, our findings may spark increased interest in the L. casei species. We find that after reclassification, only 10 genomes remain classified as L. casei. These strains show some interesting properties. First, they all appear to be catalase positive. This suggests that they have increased oxidative stress resistance. Second, we isolated an L. casei strain from the human upper respiratory tract and discovered that it and multiple other L. casei strains harbor one or even two large, glycosylated putative surface adhesins. This might inspire further exploration of this species as a

  8. CNV-association meta-analysis in 191,161 European adults reveals new loci associated with anthropometric traits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Macé, Aurélien; Tuke, Marcus A; Deelen, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    )). Burden analysis shows a 0.41 cm decrease in height, a 0.003 increase in waist-to-hip ratio and increase in BMI by 0.14 kg/m(2) for each Mb of total deletion burden (P = 2.5 × 10(-10), 6.0 × 10(-5), and 2.9 × 10(-3)). Our study provides evidence that the same genes (e.g., MC4R, FIBIN, and FMO5) harbor...

  9. Comparative genome analysis of filamentous fungi reveals gene family expansions associated with fungal pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darren M Soanes

    Full Text Available Fungi and oomycetes are the causal agents of many of the most serious diseases of plants. Here we report a detailed comparative analysis of the genome sequences of thirty-six species of fungi and oomycetes, including seven plant pathogenic species, that aims to explore the common genetic features associated with plant disease-causing species. The predicted translational products of each genome have been clustered into groups of potential orthologues using Markov Chain Clustering and the data integrated into the e-Fungi object-oriented data warehouse (http://www.e-fungi.org.uk/. Analysis of the species distribution of members of these clusters has identified proteins that are specific to filamentous fungal species and a group of proteins found only in plant pathogens. By comparing the gene inventories of filamentous, ascomycetous phytopathogenic and free-living species of fungi, we have identified a set of gene families that appear to have expanded during the evolution of phytopathogens and may therefore serve important roles in plant disease. We have also characterised the predicted set of secreted proteins encoded by each genome and identified a set of protein families which are significantly over-represented in the secretomes of plant pathogenic fungi, including putative effector proteins that might perturb host cell biology during plant infection. The results demonstrate the potential of comparative genome analysis for exploring the evolution of eukaryotic microbial pathogenesis.

  10. Ribosome profiling reveals features of normal and disease-associated mitochondrial translation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooijers, Koos; Loayza-Puch, Fabricio; Nijtmans, Leo G.; Agami, Reuven

    2013-12-01

    Mitochondria are essential cellular organelles for generation of energy and their dysfunction may cause diabetes, Parkinson’s disease and multi-systemic failure marked by failure to thrive, gastrointestinal problems, lactic acidosis and early lethality. Disease-associated mitochondrial mutations often affect components of the mitochondrial translation machinery. Here we perform ribosome profiling to measure mitochondrial translation at nucleotide resolution. Using a protocol optimized for the retrieval of mitochondrial ribosome protected fragments (RPFs) we show that the size distribution of wild-type mitochondrial RPFs follows a bimodal distribution peaking at 27 and 33 nucleotides, which is distinct from the 30-nucleotide peak of nuclear RPFs. Their cross-correlation suggests generation of mitochondrial RPFs during ribosome progression. In contrast, RPFs from patient-derived mitochondria mutated in tRNA-Tryptophan are centered on tryptophan codons and reduced downstream, indicating ribosome stalling. Intriguingly, long RPFs are enriched in mutated mitochondria, suggesting they characterize stalled ribosomes. Our findings provide the first model for translation in wild-type and disease-triggering mitochondria.

  11. Comparative Genome Analysis of Filamentous Fungi Reveals Gene Family Expansions Associated with Fungal Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soanes, Darren M.; Alam, Intikhab; Cornell, Mike; Wong, Han Min; Hedeler, Cornelia; Paton, Norman W.; Rattray, Magnus; Hubbard, Simon J.; Oliver, Stephen G.; Talbot, Nicholas J.

    2008-01-01

    Fungi and oomycetes are the causal agents of many of the most serious diseases of plants. Here we report a detailed comparative analysis of the genome sequences of thirty-six species of fungi and oomycetes, including seven plant pathogenic species, that aims to explore the common genetic features associated with plant disease-causing species. The predicted translational products of each genome have been clustered into groups of potential orthologues using Markov Chain Clustering and the data integrated into the e-Fungi object-oriented data warehouse (http://www.e-fungi.org.uk/). Analysis of the species distribution of members of these clusters has identified proteins that are specific to filamentous fungal species and a group of proteins found only in plant pathogens. By comparing the gene inventories of filamentous, ascomycetous phytopathogenic and free-living species of fungi, we have identified a set of gene families that appear to have expanded during the evolution of phytopathogens and may therefore serve important roles in plant disease. We have also characterised the predicted set of secreted proteins encoded by each genome and identified a set of protein families which are significantly over-represented in the secretomes of plant pathogenic fungi, including putative effector proteins that might perturb host cell biology during plant infection. The results demonstrate the potential of comparative genome analysis for exploring the evolution of eukaryotic microbial pathogenesis. PMID:18523684

  12. Genomic analyses of Neisseria gonorrhoeae reveal an association of the gonococcal genetic island with antimicrobial resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Odile B; Clemence, Marianne; Dillard, Joseph P; Tang, Christoph M; Trees, David; Grad, Yonatan H; Maiden, Martin C J

    2016-12-01

    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) threatens our ability to treat the sexually transmitted bacterial infection gonorrhoea. The increasing availability of whole genome sequence (WGS) data from Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates, however, provides us with an opportunity in which WGS can be mined for AMR determinants. Chromosomal and plasmid genes implicated in AMR were catalogued on the PubMLST Neisseria database (http://pubmlst.org/neisseria). AMR genotypes were identified in WGS from 289 gonococci for which MICs against several antimicrobial compounds had been determined. Whole genome comparisons were undertaken using whole genome MLST (wgMLST). Clusters of isolates with distinct AMR genotypes were apparent following wgMLST analysis consistent with the occurrence of genome wide genetic variation. This included the presence of the gonococcal genetic island (GGI), a type 4 secretion system shown to increase recombination and for which possession was significantly associated with AMR to multiple antimicrobials. Evolution of the gonococcal genome occurs in response to antimicrobial selective pressure resulting in the formation of distinct N. gonorrhoeae populations evidenced by the wgMLST clusters seen here. Genomic islands offer selective advantages to host bacteria and possession of the GGI may, not only facilitate the spread of AMR in gonococcal populations, but may also confer fitness advantages. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Systems biology approaches reveal a specific interferon-inducible signature in HTLV-1 associated myelopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Tattermusch

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1 is a retrovirus that persists lifelong in the host. In ∼4% of infected people, HTLV-1 causes a chronic disabling neuroinflammatory disease known as HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP. The pathogenesis of HAM/TSP is unknown and treatment remains ineffective. We used gene expression microarrays followed by flow cytometric and functional assays to investigate global changes in blood transcriptional profiles of HTLV-1-infected and seronegative individuals. We found that perturbations of the p53 signaling pathway were a hallmark of HTLV-1 infection. In contrast, a subset of interferon (IFN-stimulated genes was over-expressed in patients with HAM/TSP but not in asymptomatic HTLV-1 carriers or patients with the clinically similar disease multiple sclerosis. The IFN-inducible signature was present in all circulating leukocytes and its intensity correlated with the clinical severity of HAM/TSP. Leukocytes from patients with HAM/TSP were primed to respond strongly to stimulation with exogenous IFN. However, while type I IFN suppressed expression of the HTLV-1 structural protein Gag it failed to suppress the highly immunogenic viral transcriptional transactivator Tax. We conclude that over-expression of a subset of IFN-stimulated genes in chronic HTLV-1 infection does not constitute an efficient host response but instead contributes to the development of HAM/TSP.

  14. Spearfishing data reveals the littoral fish communities' association to coastal configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boada, Jordi; Sagué, Oscar; Gordoa, Ana

    2017-12-01

    Increasing the knowledge about littoral fish communities is important for ecological sciences, fisheries and the sustainability of human communities. The scarcity of baseline data at large spatial scales in a fast-changing world makes it necessary to implement special programs to monitor natural ecosystems. In the present study, we evaluate littoral fish communities using data from spearfishing contests. The Catalan Federation of Underwater Activities (FECDAS) regularly organizes fishing contests across ca. 600 km of coast. Catch records made over the last sixteen years were used to study the fish communities along the coastline. We found two different communities that are closely related to the habitat configuration at a regional level. Interestingly, contests held on the northern coast were mainly grouped together and were characterized by species that inhabit complex rocky habitats, and contests held on the southern coast were grouped together and were mainly determined by soft bottoms species (i.e. mugilids and Sarpa salpa). In the south group the white sea bream was also very abundant compared to the north group. No significant changes in the community composition were found in the studied period and we successfully set descriptive baselines. Finally, based on these results we propose that studying the data from fishing contest records can be used to complement the available tools for monitoring fish communities.

  15. Metagenomic Analysis Revealed Methylamine and Ureide Utilization of Soybean-Associated Methylobacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Tomoyuki; Anda, Misue; Mitsui, Hisayuki; Sugawara, Masayuki; Kaneko, Takakazu; Sato, Shusei; Ikeda, Seishi; Okubo, Takashi; Tsurumaru, Hirohito; Minamisawa, Kiwamu

    2016-09-29

    Methylobacterium inhabits the phyllosphere of a large number of plants. We herein report the results of comparative metagenome analyses on methylobacterial communities of soybean plants grown in an experimental field in Tohoku University (Kashimadai, Miyagi, Japan). Methylobacterium was identified as the most dominant genus (33%) among bacteria inhabiting soybean stems. We classified plant-derived Methylobacterium species into Groups I, II, and III based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, and found that Group I members (phylogenetically close to M. extorquens) were dominant in soybean-associated Methylobacterium. By comparing 29 genomes, we found that all Group I members possessed a complete set of genes for the N-methylglutamate pathway for methylamine utilization, and genes for urea degradation (urea carboxylase, urea amidolyase, and conventional urease). Only Group I members and soybean methylobacterial isolates grew in a culture supplemented with methylamine as the sole carbon source. They utilized urea or allantoin (a urea-related compound in legumes) as the sole nitrogen source; however, group III also utilized these compounds. The utilization of allantoin may be crucial in soybean-bacterial interactions because allantoin is a transported form of fixed nitrogen in legume plants. Soybean-derived Group I strain AMS5 colonized the model legume Lotus japonicus well. A comparison among the 29 genomes of plant-derived and other strains suggested that several candidate genes are involved in plant colonization such as csgG (curli fimbriae). Genes for the N-methylglutamate pathway and curli fimbriae were more abundant in soybean microbiomes than in rice microbiomes in the field. Based on these results, we discuss the lifestyle of Methylobacterium in the legume phyllosphere.

  16. Gene Expression Profiling of Dendritic Cells Reveals Important Mechanisms Associated with Predisposition to Staphylococcus Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toufeer, Mehdi; Bonnefont, Cécile M. D.; Foulon, Eliane; Caubet, Cécile; Tasca, Christian; Aurel, Marie-Rose; Robert-Granié, Christèle; Rupp, Rachel; Foucras, Gilles

    2011-01-01

    Background Staphylococcus aureus is a major pathogen of humans and animals and emerging antibiotic-resistant strains have further increased the concern of this health issue. Host genetics influence susceptibility to S. aureus infections, and the genes determining the outcome of infections should be identified to find alternative therapies to treatment with antibiotics. Here, we used outbred animals from a divergent selection based on susceptibility towards Staphylococcus infection to explore host immunogenetics. Methodology/Principal Findings We investigated how dendritic cells respond to heat-inactivated S. aureus and whether dendritic cells from animals showing different degrees of susceptibility had distinct gene expression profiles. We measured gene expression levels of in vitro S. aureus-stimulated bone marrow-derived dendritic cells at three different time points (0, 3 and 8 hrs) by using 15 k ovine Agilent microarrays. Furthermore, differential expression of a selected number of genes was confirmed by RT-qPCR. Gene signatures of stimulated DCs were obtained and showed that genes involved in the inflammatory process and T helper cell polarization were highly up-regulated upon stimulation. Moreover, a set of 204 genes were statistically differentially expressed between susceptible and resistant animals, and grouped them according to their predisposition to staphylococcal infection. Interestingly, over-expression of the C1q and Ido1 genes was observed in the resistant line and suggested a role of classical pathway of complement and early regulation of inflammation pathways, respectively. On the contrary, over expression of genes involved in the IL1R pathway was observed in susceptible animals. Furthermore, the leucocyte extravasation pathway was also found to be dominant in the susceptible line. Conclusion/Significance We successfully obtained Staphylococcus aureus associated gene expression of ovine BM-DC in an 8-hour kinetics experiment. The distinct

  17. Integrative genomics reveals hypoxia inducible genes that are associated with a poor prognosis in neuroblastoma patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Clara; Hernandez, Kyle M.; DeWane, Gillian; Salwen, Helen R.; Chlenski, Alexandre; Dobratic, Marija; Mariani, Christopher J.; Godley, Lucy A.; Prabhakar, Nanduri; White, Kevin; Stranger, Barbara E.; Cohn, Susan L.

    2016-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is notable for its broad spectrum of clinical behavior ranging from spontaneous regression to rapidly progressive disease. Hypoxia is well known to confer a more aggressive phenotype in neuroblastoma. We analyzed transcriptome data from diagnostic neuroblastoma tumors and hypoxic neuroblastoma cell lines to identify genes whose expression levels correlate with poor patient outcome and are involved in the hypoxia response. By integrating a diverse set of transcriptome datasets, including those from neuroblastoma patients and neuroblastoma derived cell lines, we identified nine genes (SLCO4A1, ENO1, HK2, PGK1, MTFP1, HILPDA, VKORC1, TPI1, and HIST1H1C) that are up-regulated in hypoxia and whose expression levels are correlated with poor patient outcome in three independent neuroblastoma cohorts. Analysis of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine and ENCODE data indicate that at least five of these nine genes have an increase in 5-hydroxymethylcytosine and a more open chromatin structure in hypoxia versus normoxia and are putative targets of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) as they contain HIF binding sites in their regulatory regions. Four of these genes are key components of the glycolytic pathway and another three are directly involved in cellular metabolism. We experimentally validated our computational findings demonstrating that seven of the nine genes are significantly up-regulated in response to hypoxia in the four neuroblastoma cell lines tested. This compact and robustly validated group of genes, is associated with the hypoxia response in aggressive neuroblastoma and may represent a novel target for biomarker and therapeutic development. PMID:27765905

  18. Profiling of human myotubes reveals an intrinsic proteomic signature associated with type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lubna Al-Khalili

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes (T2D involves a complex array of metabolic defects in skeletal muscle. An in vitro cell culture system excludes the acute effects of external systemic factors existing in vivo. Thus, we aimed to determine whether intrinsic differences in the protein profile exist in cultured myotubes derived from T2D versus normal glucose tolerant (NGT healthy people. Applying two dimensional difference gel electrophoresis technology (2-D DIGE, the abundance of 47 proteins differed in myotubes derived from T2D patients versus NGT donors. Proteins involved in fatty acid and amino acid metabolism, TCA cycle, mitochondrial function, mRNA processing, DNA repair and cell survival showed higher abundance, while proteins associated with redox signaling (PARK7; Parkinson disease 7, glutathione metabolism (glutathione S-transferase, GST, isoforms T1, P1 and M2, and protein dynamics (heat shock protein, HSP, isoform B1 and 90A showed reduced abundance in myotubes derived from T2D versus NGT donors. Consistent with our proteome analysis results, the level of total glutathione was reduced in myotubes obtained from T2D versus NGT donors. Taken together, our data provide evidence for intrinsic differences in the profile of proteins involved in energy metabolism, cellular oxidative stress, protein dynamics and gene regulation in myotubes derived from T2D patients. These differences thereby suggest a genetic or epigenetic influence on protein content level, which can be further investigated to understand the molecular underpinnings of T2D progression and lead to new therapeutic approaches.

  19. The bulk association mechanism between lysozyme and α-lactalbumine is revealed by interfacial measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Pezennec, Stephane; Bouhallab, Said; Hamon, Pascaline; Renault, A; Beaufils, S.

    2012-01-01

    Controlled interactions and assembly of proteins with one another promise to be a powerful approach for generating novel supramolecular architectures. In this study, we report on two oppositely charged proteins, Lysozyme (LYS) and alpha-Lactalbumine (ALA) which self-assemble into well-defined micrometer-sized spherical particles under specific physicochemical conditions. These particles are spontaneously built following two main steps: first the formation of oligomers constituting the element...

  20. Proteomics analyses of prostate cancer cells reveal cellular pathways associated with androgen resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höti, Naseruddin; Shah, Punit; Hu, Yingwei; Yang, Shuang; Zhang, Hui

    2017-03-01

    While significant advances have been made in the diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer, each year tens of thousands of men still die from prostate cancer in the United States. Thus, greater understanding of cellular pathways and molecular basis of prostate cancer progression in the development of androgen resistance is needed to treat these lethal phenotypes. To dissect the mechanism of androgen resistance, we utilize a proteomics approach to study the development of androgen resistance in LNCaP prostate cancer cells. Our results showed the predominant involvement of metabolic pathways that were elevated in androgen resistance phenotype. We further found the amplification of PI3K/AKT pathway and the overexpression of proteasome proteins while the mitochondrial oxidation phosphorylation was severely hampered in castration-resistant LNCaP-95 cells compared to LNCaP cells. Interestingly, we also found the induction of Dicer, a cytoplasmic endoribonuclease microRNA regulator in the androgen-ablated LNCaP-95 prostate cancer cells. We verified some of these data by orthogonal methods including Western blot analysis and in castrated animal xenograft studies. To our knowledge, this is the first report showing induced expression of proteasome proteins in androgen ablation prostate cancer cells. If validated in clinical studies, the findings will have significant implications in understanding the complexity of biochemical recurrence in prostate cancer. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Expression quantitative trait loci reveals genes and pathways associated with boar taint in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drag, Markus; Hansen, Mathias Brygger; Kadarmideen, Haja

    Boar taint (BT) is an offensive odour or taste of meat from a proportion of non-castrated male pigs due to skatole and androstenone accumulation in adipose tissue. Castration is an effective strategy to avoid BT but is currently under debate due to animal welfare concerns. This study aimed...... to functionally characterise and evaluate important expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) to identify potential causal mechanisms of BT for use in optimised breeding for reduced BT without castration. Danish Landrace male pigs (n=48) with low, medium and high genetic merit of BT were slaughtered at 100 kg...

  2. Cortical processes associated with continuous balance control as revealed by EEG spectral power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hülsdünker, T; Mierau, A; Neeb, C; Kleinöder, H; Strüder, H K

    2015-04-10

    Balance is a crucial component in numerous every day activities such as locomotion. Previous research has reported distinct changes in cortical theta activity during transient balance instability. However, there remains little understanding of the neural mechanisms underlying continuous balance control. This study aimed to investigate cortical theta activity during varying difficulties of continuous balance tasks, as well as examining the relationship between theta activity and balance performance. 37 subjects completed nine balance tasks with different levels of surface stability and base of support. Throughout the balancing task, electroencephalogram (EEG) was recorded from 32 scalp locations. ICA-based artifact rejection was applied and spectral power was analyzed in the theta frequency band. Theta power increased in the frontal, central, and parietal regions of the cortex when balance tasks became more challenging. In addition, fronto-central and centro-parietal theta power correlated with balance performance. This study demonstrates the involvement of the cerebral cortex in maintaining upright posture during continuous balance tasks. Specifically, the results emphasize the important role of frontal and parietal theta oscillations in balance control. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Transcriptome Profiling of Tomato Fruit Development Reveals Transcription Factors Associated with Ascorbic Acid, Carotenoid and Flavonoid Biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jie; Hu, Tixu; Yang, Congmei; Li, Hanxia; Yang, Mingze; Ijaz, Raina; Ye, Zhibiao; Zhang, Yuyang

    2015-01-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) serves as a research model for fruit development; however, while it is an important dietary source of antioxidant nutrients, the transcriptional regulation of genes that determine nutrient levels remains poorly understood. Here, the transcriptomes of fruit at seven developmental stages (7, 14, 21, 28, 35, 42 and 49 days after flowering) from two tomato cultivars (Ailsa Craig and HG6-61) were evaluated using the Illumina sequencing platform. A total of 26,397 genes, which were expressed in at least one developmental stage, were detected in the two cultivars, and the expression patterns of those genes could be divided into 20 groups using a K-mean cluster analysis. Gene Ontology term enrichment analysis indicated that genes involved in RNA regulation, secondary metabolism, hormone metabolism and cell wall metabolism were the most highly differentially expressed genes during fruit development and ripening. A co-expression analysis revealed several transcription factors whose expression patterns correlated with those of genes associated with ascorbic acid, carotenoid and flavonoid biosynthesis. This transcriptional correlation was confirmed by agroinfiltration mediated transient expression, which showed that most of the enzymatic genes in the ascorbic acid biosynthesis were regulated by the overexpression of each of the three transcription factors that were tested. The metabolic dynamics of ascorbic acid, carotenoid and flavonoid were investigated during fruit development and ripening, and some selected transcription factors showed transcriptional correlation with the accumulation of ascorbic acid, carotenoid and flavonoid. This transcriptome study provides insight into the regulatory mechanism of fruit development and presents candidate transcription factors involved in secondary metabolism. PMID:26133783

  4. The early asthmatic response is associated with glycolysis, calcium binding and mitochondria activity as revealed by proteomic analysis in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Yu-Dong

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The inhalation of allergens by allergic asthmatics results in the early asthmatic response (EAR, which is characterized by acute airway obstruction beginning within a few minutes. The EAR is the earliest indicator of the pathological progression of allergic asthma. Because the molecular mechanism underlying the EAR is not fully defined, this study will contribute to a better understanding of asthma. Methods In order to gain insight into the molecular basis of the EAR, we examined changes in protein expression patterns in the lung tissue of asthmatic rats during the EAR using 2-DE/MS-based proteomic techniques. Bioinformatic analysis of the proteomic data was then performed using PPI Spider and KEGG Spider to investigate the underlying molecular mechanism. Results In total, 44 differentially expressed protein spots were detected in the 2-DE gels. Of these 44 protein spots, 42 corresponded to 36 unique proteins successfully identified using mass spectrometry. During subsequent bioinformatic analysis, the gene ontology classification, the protein-protein interaction networking and the biological pathway exploration demonstrated that the identified proteins were mainly involved in glycolysis, calcium binding and mitochondrial activity. Using western blot and semi-quantitative RT-PCR, we confirmed the changes in expression of five selected proteins, which further supports our proteomic and bioinformatic analyses. Conclusions Our results reveal that the allergen-induced EAR in asthmatic rats is associated with glycolysis, calcium binding and mitochondrial activity, which could establish a functional network in which calcium binding may play a central role in promoting the progression of asthma.

  5. Genome-wide identification of polycomb target genes reveals a functional association of Pho with Scm in Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhiqing; Cheng, Daojun; Mon, Hiroaki; Tatsuke, Tsuneyuki; Zhu, Li; Xu, Jian; Lee, Jae Man; Xia, Qingyou; Kusakabe, Takahiro

    2012-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins are evolutionarily conserved chromatin modifiers and act together in three multimeric complexes, Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1), Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2), and Pleiohomeotic repressive complex (PhoRC), to repress transcription of the target genes. Here, we identified Polycomb target genes in Bombyx mori with holocentric centromere using genome-wide expression screening based on the knockdown of BmSCE, BmESC, BmPHO, or BmSCM gene, which represent the distinct complexes. As a result, the expressions of 29 genes were up-regulated after knocking down 4 PcG genes. Particularly, there is a significant overlap between targets of BmPho (331 out of 524) and BmScm (331 out of 532), and among these, 190 genes function as regulator factors playing important roles in development. We also found that BmPho, as well as BmScm, can interact with other Polycomb components examined in this study. Further detailed analysis revealed that the C-terminus of BmPho containing zinc finger domain is involved in the interaction between BmPho and BmScm. Moreover, the zinc finger domain in BmPho contributes to its inhibitory function and ectopic overexpression of BmScm is able to promote transcriptional repression by Gal4-Pho fusions including BmScm-interacting domain. Loss of BmPho expression causes relocalization of BmScm into the cytoplasm. Collectively, we provide evidence of a functional link between BmPho and BmScm, and propose two Polycomb-related repression mechanisms requiring only BmPho associated with BmScm or a whole set of PcG complexes.

  6. Transcriptome Profiling of Tomato Fruit Development Reveals Transcription Factors Associated with Ascorbic Acid, Carotenoid and Flavonoid Biosynthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Ye

    Full Text Available Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum serves as a research model for fruit development; however, while it is an important dietary source of antioxidant nutrients, the transcriptional regulation of genes that determine nutrient levels remains poorly understood. Here, the transcriptomes of fruit at seven developmental stages (7, 14, 21, 28, 35, 42 and 49 days after flowering from two tomato cultivars (Ailsa Craig and HG6-61 were evaluated using the Illumina sequencing platform. A total of 26,397 genes, which were expressed in at least one developmental stage, were detected in the two cultivars, and the expression patterns of those genes could be divided into 20 groups using a K-mean cluster analysis. Gene Ontology term enrichment analysis indicated that genes involved in RNA regulation, secondary metabolism, hormone metabolism and cell wall metabolism were the most highly differentially expressed genes during fruit development and ripening. A co-expression analysis revealed several transcription factors whose expression patterns correlated with those of genes associated with ascorbic acid, carotenoid and flavonoid biosynthesis. This transcriptional correlation was confirmed by agroinfiltration mediated transient expression, which showed that most of the enzymatic genes in the ascorbic acid biosynthesis were regulated by the overexpression of each of the three transcription factors that were tested. The metabolic dynamics of ascorbic acid, carotenoid and flavonoid were investigated during fruit development and ripening, and some selected transcription factors showed transcriptional correlation with the accumulation of ascorbic acid, carotenoid and flavonoid. This transcriptome study provides insight into the regulatory mechanism of fruit development and presents candidate transcription factors involved in secondary metabolism.

  7. Genome-Wide Association Mapping Reveals the Genetic Control Underlying Branch Angle in Rapeseed (Brassica napus L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongge Li

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Plant architecture is vital not only for crop yield, but also for field management, such as mechanical harvesting. The branch angle is one of the key factors determining plant architecture. With the aim of revealing the genetic control underlying branch angle in rapeseed (Brassica napus L., the positional variation of branch angles on individual plants was evaluated, and the branch angle increased with the elevation of branch position. Furthermore, three middle branches of individual plants were selected to measure the branch angle because they exhibited the most representative phenotypic values. An association panel with 472 diverse accessions was estimated for branch angle trait in six environments and genotyped with a 60K Brassica Infinium® SNP array. As a result of association mapping, 46 and 38 significantly-associated loci were detected using a mixed linear model (MLM and a multi-locus random-SNP-effect mixed linear model (MRMLM, which explained up to 62.2 and 66.2% of the cumulative phenotypic variation, respectively. Numerous highly-promising candidate genes were identified by annotating against Arabidopsis thaliana homologous, including some first found in rapeseed, such as TAC1, SGR1, SGR3, and SGR5. These findings reveal the genetic control underlying branch angle and provide insight into genetic improvements that are possible in the plant architecture of rapeseed.

  8. Genome-Wide Association Mapping Reveals the Genetic Control Underlying Branch Angle in Rapeseed (Brassica napus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongge; Zhang, Liping; Hu, Jihong; Zhang, Fugui; Chen, Biyun; Xu, Kun; Gao, Guizhen; Li, Hao; Zhang, Tianyao; Li, Zaiyun; Wu, Xiaoming

    2017-01-01

    Plant architecture is vital not only for crop yield, but also for field management, such as mechanical harvesting. The branch angle is one of the key factors determining plant architecture. With the aim of revealing the genetic control underlying branch angle in rapeseed (Brassica napus L.), the positional variation of branch angles on individual plants was evaluated, and the branch angle increased with the elevation of branch position. Furthermore, three middle branches of individual plants were selected to measure the branch angle because they exhibited the most representative phenotypic values. An association panel with 472 diverse accessions was estimated for branch angle trait in six environments and genotyped with a 60K Brassica Infinium® SNP array. As a result of association mapping, 46 and 38 significantly-associated loci were detected using a mixed linear model (MLM) and a multi-locus random-SNP-effect mixed linear model (MRMLM), which explained up to 62.2 and 66.2% of the cumulative phenotypic variation, respectively. Numerous highly-promising candidate genes were identified by annotating against Arabidopsis thaliana homologous, including some first found in rapeseed, such as TAC1, SGR1, SGR3, and SGR5. These findings reveal the genetic control underlying branch angle and provide insight into genetic improvements that are possible in the plant architecture of rapeseed.

  9. Deep Sequencing of Myxilla (Ectyomyxilla) methanophila, an Epibiotic Sponge on Cold-Seep Tubeworms, Reveals Methylotrophic, Thiotrophic, and Putative Hydrocarbon-Degrading Microbial Associations

    KAUST Repository

    Arellano, Shawn M.

    2012-10-11

    The encrusting sponge Myxilla (Ectyomyxilla) methanophila (Poecilosclerida: Myxillidae) is an epibiont on vestimentiferan tubeworms at hydrocarbon seeps on the upper Louisiana slope of the Gulf of Mexico. It has long been suggested that this sponge harbors methylotrophic bacteria due to its low δ13C value and high methanol dehydrogenase activity, yet the full community of microbial associations in M. methanophila remained uncharacterized. In this study, we sequenced 16S rRNA genes representing the microbial community in M. methanophila collected from two hydrocarbon-seep sites (GC234 and Bush Hill) using both Sanger sequencing and next-generation 454 pyrosequencing technologies. Additionally, we compared the microbial community in M. methanophila to that of the biofilm collected from the associated tubeworm. Our results revealed that the microbial diversity in the sponges from both sites was low but the community structure was largely similar, showing a high proportion of methylotrophic bacteria of the genus Methylohalomonas and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-degrading bacteria of the genera Cycloclasticus and Neptunomonas. Furthermore, the sponge microbial clone library revealed the dominance of thioautotrophic gammaproteobacterial symbionts in M. methanophila. In contrast, the biofilm communities on the tubeworms were more diverse and dominated by the chemoorganotrophic Moritella at GC234 and methylotrophic Methylomonas and Methylohalomonas at Bush Hill. Overall, our study provides evidence to support previous suggestion that M. methanophila harbors methylotrophic symbionts and also reveals the association of PAH-degrading and thioautotrophic microbes in the sponge. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media New York.

  10. Cross-Cancer Genome-Wide Analysis of Lung, Ovary, Breast, Prostate, and Colorectal Cancer Reveals Novel Pleiotropic Associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehringer, Gordon; Kraft, Peter; Pharoah, Paul D; Eeles, Rosalind A; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Schumacher, Fredrick R; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Lindström, Sara; Brennan, Paul; Bickeböller, Heike; Houlston, Richard S; Landi, Maria Teresa; Caporaso, Neil; Risch, Angela; Amin Al Olama, Ali; Berndt, Sonja I; Giovannucci, Edward L; Grönberg, Henrik; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Ma, Jing; Muir, Kenneth; Stampfer, Meir J; Stevens, Victoria L; Wiklund, Fredrik; Willett, Walter C; Goode, Ellen L; Permuth, Jennifer B; Risch, Harvey A; Reid, Brett M; Bezieau, Stephane; Brenner, Hermann; Chan, Andrew T; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Hudson, Thomas J; Kocarnik, Jonathan K; Newcomb, Polly A; Schoen, Robert E; Slattery, Martha L; White, Emily; Adank, Muriel A; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Baglietto, Laura; Blomquist, Carl; Canzian, Federico; Czene, Kamila; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Eliassen, A Heather; Figueroa, Jonine D; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Fletcher, Olivia; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Gaudet, Mia M; Johnson, Nichola; Hall, Per; Hazra, Aditi; Hein, Rebecca; Hofman, Albert; Hopper, John L; Irwanto, Astrid; Johansson, Mattias; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kibriya, Muhammad G; Lichtner, Peter; Liu, Jianjun; Lund, Eiliv; Makalic, Enes; Meindl, Alfons; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Muranen, Taru A; Nevanlinna, Heli; Peeters, Petra H; Peto, Julian; Prentice, Ross L; Rahman, Nazneen; Sanchez, Maria Jose; Schmidt, Daniel F; Schmutzler, Rita K; Southey, Melissa C; Tamimi, Rulla; Travis, Ruth C; Turnbull, Clare; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Wang, Zhaoming; Whittemore, Alice S; Yang, Xiaohong R; Zheng, Wei; Buchanan, Daniel D; Casey, Graham; Conti, David V; Edlund, Christopher K; Gallinger, Steven; Haile, Robert W; Jenkins, Mark; Le Marchand, Loïc; Li, Li; Lindor, Noralene M; Schmit, Stephanie L; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Woods, Michael O; Rafnar, Thorunn; Gudmundsson, Julius; Stacey, Simon N; Stefansson, Kari; Sulem, Patrick; Chen, Y Ann; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Christiani, David C; Wei, Yongyue; Shen, Hongbing; Hu, Zhibin; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Shiraishi, Kouya; Takahashi, Atsushi; Bossé, Yohan; Obeidat, Ma'en; Nickle, David; Timens, Wim; Freedman, Matthew L; Li, Qiyuan; Seminara, Daniela; Chanock, Stephen J; Gong, Jian; Peters, Ulrike; Gruber, Stephen B; Amos, Christopher I; Sellers, Thomas A; Easton, Douglas F; Hunter, David J; Haiman, Christopher A; Henderson, Brian E; Hung, Rayjean J

    2016-09-01

    Identifying genetic variants with pleiotropic associations can uncover common pathways influencing multiple cancers. We took a two-stage approach to conduct genome-wide association studies for lung, ovary, breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer from the GAME-ON/GECCO Network (61,851 cases, 61,820 controls) to identify pleiotropic loci. Findings were replicated in independent association studies (55,789 cases, 330,490 controls). We identified a novel pleiotropic association at 1q22 involving breast and lung squamous cell carcinoma, with eQTL analysis showing an association with ADAM15/THBS3 gene expression in lung. We also identified a known breast cancer locus CASP8/ALS2CR12 associated with prostate cancer, a known cancer locus at CDKN2B-AS1 with different variants associated with lung adenocarcinoma and prostate cancer, and confirmed the associations of a breast BRCA2 locus with lung and serous ovarian cancer. This is the largest study to date examining pleiotropy across multiple cancer-associated loci, identifying common mechanisms of cancer development and progression. Cancer Res; 76(17); 5103-14. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  11. Epidemiology of exertional rhabdomyolysis susceptibility in standardbred horses reveals associated risk factors and underlying enhanced performance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cajsa M Isgren

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Exertional rhabdomyolysis syndrome is recognised in many athletic horse breeds and in recent years specific forms of the syndrome have been identified. However, although Standardbred horses are used worldwide for racing, there is a paucity of information about the epidemiological and performance-related aspects of the syndrome in this breed. The objectives of this study therefore were to determine the incidence, risk factors and performance effects of exertional rhabdomyolysis syndrome in Standardbred trotters and to compare the epidemiology and genetics of the syndrome with that in other breeds. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A questionnaire-based case-control study (with analysis of online race records was conducted following identification of horses that were determined susceptible to exertional rhabdomyolysis (based on serum biochemistry from a total of 683 horses in 22 yards. Thirty six exertional rhabdomyolysis-susceptible horses were subsequently genotyped for the skeletal muscle glycogen synthase (GYS1 mutation responsible for type 1 polysaccharide storage myopathy. A total of 44 susceptible horses was reported, resulting in an annual incidence of 6.4 (95% CI 4.6-8.2% per 100 horses. Female horses were at significantly greater risk than males (odds ratio 7.1; 95% CI 2.1-23.4; p = 0.001 and nervous horses were at a greater risk than horses with calm or average temperaments (odds ratio 7.9; 95% CI 2.3-27.0; p = 0.001. Rhabdomyolysis-susceptible cases performed better from standstill starts (p = 0.04 than controls and had a higher percentage of wins (p = 0.006. All exertional rhabdomyolysis-susceptible horses tested were negative for the R309H GYS1 mutation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Exertional rhabdomyolysis syndrome in Standardbred horses has a similar incidence and risk factors to the syndrome in Thoroughbred horses. If the disorder has a genetic basis in Standardbreds, improved performance in susceptible animals may be

  12. New insights into molecular pathways associated with flatfish ovarian development and atresia revealed by transcriptional analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agulleiro María J

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis is a marine flatfish of increasing commercial interest. However, the reproduction of this species in captivity is not yet controlled mainly because of the poor knowledge on its reproductive physiology, as it occurs for other non-salmonid marine teleosts that exhibit group-synchronous ovarian follicle development. In order to investigate intra-ovarian molecular mechanisms in Senegalese sole, the aim of the present study was to identify differentially expressed genes in the ovary during oocyte growth (vitellogenesis, maturation and ovarian follicle atresia using a recently developed oligonucleotide microarray. Results Microarray analysis led to the identification of 118 differentially expressed transcripts, of which 20 and 8 were monitored by real-time PCR and in situ hybridization, respectively. During vitellogenesis, many up-regulated ovarian transcripts had putative mitochondrial function/location suggesting high energy production (NADH dehydrogenase subunits, cytochromes and increased antioxidant protection (selenoprotein W2a, whereas other regulated transcripts were related to cytoskeleton and zona radiata organization (zona glycoprotein 3, alpha and beta actin, keratin 8, intracellular signalling pathways (heat shock protein 90, Ras homolog member G, cell-to-cell and cell-to-matrix interactions (beta 1 integrin, thrombospondin 4b, and the maternal RNA pool (transducer of ERBB2 1a, neurexin 1a. Transcripts up-regulated in the ovary during oocyte maturation included ion transporters (Na+-K+-ATPase subunits, probably required for oocyte hydration, as well as a proteinase inhibitor (alpha-2-macroglobulin and a vesicle calcium sensor protein (extended synaptotagmin-2-A. During follicular atresia, few transcripts were found to be up-regulated, but remarkably most of them were localized in follicular cells of atretic follicles, and they had inferred roles in lipid transport (apolipoprotein

  13. Multiple sex-associated regions and a putative sex chromosome in zebrafish revealed by RAD mapping and population genomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L Anderson

    Full Text Available Within vertebrates, major sex determining genes can differ among taxa and even within species. In zebrafish (Danio rerio, neither heteromorphic sex chromosomes nor single sex determination genes of large effect, like Sry in mammals, have yet been identified. Furthermore, environmental factors can influence zebrafish sex determination. Although progress has been made in understanding zebrafish gonad differentiation (e.g. the influence of germ cells on gonad fate, the primary genetic basis of zebrafish sex determination remains poorly understood. To identify genetic loci associated with sex, we analyzed F(2 offspring of reciprocal crosses between Oregon *AB and Nadia (NA wild-type zebrafish stocks. Genome-wide linkage analysis, using more than 5,000 sequence-based polymorphic restriction site associated (RAD-tag markers and population genomic analysis of more than 30,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms in our *ABxNA crosses revealed a sex-associated locus on the end of the long arm of chr-4 for both cross families, and an additional locus in the middle of chr-3 in one cross family. Additional sequencing showed that two SNPs in dmrt1 previously suggested to be functional candidates for sex determination in a cross of ABxIndia wild-type zebrafish, are not associated with sex in our AB fish. Our data show that sex determination in zebrafish is polygenic and that different genes may influence sex determination in different strains or that different genes become more important under different environmental conditions. The association of the end of chr-4 with sex is remarkable because, unique in the karyotype, this chromosome arm shares features with known sex chromosomes: it is highly heterochromatic, repetitive, late replicating, and has reduced recombination. Our results reveal that chr-4 has functional and structural properties expected of a sex chromosome.

  14. Analysis of the Pseudoalteromonas tunicata genome reveals properties of a surface-associated life style in the marine environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torsten Thomas

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Colonisation of sessile eukaryotic host surfaces (e.g. invertebrates and seaweeds by bacteria is common in the marine environment and is expected to create significant inter-species competition and other interactions. The bacterium Pseudoalteromonas tunicata is a successful competitor on marine surfaces owing primarily to its ability to produce a number of inhibitory molecules. As such P. tunicata has become a model organism for the studies into processes of surface colonisation and eukaryotic host-bacteria interactions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To gain a broader understanding into the adaptation to a surface-associated life-style, we have sequenced and analysed the genome of P. tunicata and compared it to the genomes of closely related strains. We found that the P. tunicata genome contains several genes and gene clusters that are involved in the production of inhibitory compounds against surface competitors and secondary colonisers. Features of P. tunicata's oxidative stress response, iron scavenging and nutrient acquisition show that the organism is well adapted to high-density communities on surfaces. Variation of the P. tunicata genome is suggested by several landmarks of genetic rearrangements and mobile genetic elements (e.g. transposons, CRISPRs, phage. Surface attachment is likely to be mediated by curli, novel pili, a number of extracellular polymers and potentially other unexpected cell surface proteins. The P. tunicata genome also shows a utilisation pattern of extracellular polymers that would avoid a degradation of its recognised hosts, while potentially causing detrimental effects on other host types. In addition, the prevalence of recognised virulence genes suggests that P. tunicata has the potential for pathogenic interactions. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The genome analysis has revealed several physiological features that would provide P. tunciata with competitive advantage against other members of the surface-associated

  15. Study of obesity associated proopiomelanocortin gene polymorphism

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Study of obesity associated proopiomelanocortin gene polymorphism: Relation to metabolic profile and eating habits in a sample of obese Egyptian children and ... Polymorphisms in the POMC gene locus are associated with obesity phenotypes. Aim: To ... Keywords: Childhood obesity; POMC gene; Metabolic syndrome ...

  16. Novel autism subtype-dependent genetic variants are revealed by quantitative trait and subphenotype association analyses of published GWAS data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Valerie W; Addington, Anjene; Hyman, Alexander

    2011-04-27

    The heterogeneity of symptoms associated with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) has presented a significant challenge to genetic analyses. Even when associations with genetic variants have been identified, it has been difficult to associate them with a specific trait or characteristic of autism. Here, we report that quantitative trait analyses of ASD symptoms combined with case-control association analyses using distinct ASD subphenotypes identified on the basis of symptomatic profiles result in the identification of highly significant associations with 18 novel single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). The symptom categories included deficits in language usage, non-verbal communication, social development, and play skills, as well as insistence on sameness or ritualistic behaviors. Ten of the trait-associated SNPs, or quantitative trait loci (QTL), were associated with more than one subtype, providing partial replication of the identified QTL. Notably, none of the novel SNPs is located within an exonic region, suggesting that these hereditary components of ASDs are more likely related to gene regulatory processes (or gene expression) than to structural or functional changes in gene products. Seven of the QTL reside within intergenic chromosomal regions associated with rare copy number variants that have been previously reported in autistic samples. Pathway analyses of the genes associated with the QTL identified in this study implicate neurological functions and disorders associated with autism pathophysiology. This study underscores the advantage of incorporating both quantitative traits as well as subphenotypes into large-scale genome-wide analyses of complex disorders.

  17. Novel autism subtype-dependent genetic variants are revealed by quantitative trait and subphenotype association analyses of published GWAS data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie W Hu

    Full Text Available The heterogeneity of symptoms associated with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs has presented a significant challenge to genetic analyses. Even when associations with genetic variants have been identified, it has been difficult to associate them with a specific trait or characteristic of autism. Here, we report that quantitative trait analyses of ASD symptoms combined with case-control association analyses using distinct ASD subphenotypes identified on the basis of symptomatic profiles result in the identification of highly significant associations with 18 novel single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. The symptom categories included deficits in language usage, non-verbal communication, social development, and play skills, as well as insistence on sameness or ritualistic behaviors. Ten of the trait-associated SNPs, or quantitative trait loci (QTL, were associated with more than one subtype, providing partial replication of the identified QTL. Notably, none of the novel SNPs is located within an exonic region, suggesting that these hereditary components of ASDs are more likely related to gene regulatory processes (or gene expression than to structural or functional changes in gene products. Seven of the QTL reside within intergenic chromosomal regions associated with rare copy number variants that have been previously reported in autistic samples. Pathway analyses of the genes associated with the QTL identified in this study implicate neurological functions and disorders associated with autism pathophysiology. This study underscores the advantage of incorporating both quantitative traits as well as subphenotypes into large-scale genome-wide analyses of complex disorders.

  18. Cross-cancer genome-wide analysis of lung, ovary, breast, prostate and colorectal cancer reveals novel pleiotropic associations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehringer, Gordon; Kraft, Peter; Pharoah, Paul D.; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Schumacher, Fred; Schildkraut, Joellen; Lindström, Sara; Brennan, Paul; Bickeböller, Heike; Houlston, Richard S.; Landi, Maria Teresa; Caporaso, Neil; Risch, Angela; Olama, Ali Amin Al; Berndt, Sonja I; Giovannucci, Edward; Grönberg, Henrik; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Ma, Jing; Muir, Kenneth; Stampfer, Meir; Stevens, Victoria L.; Wiklund, Fredrik; Willett, Walter; Goode, Ellen L.; Permuth, Jennifer; Risch, Harvey A.; Reid, Brett M.; Bezieau, Stephane; Brenner, Hermann; Chan, Andrew T.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Hudson, Thomas J.; Kocarnik, Jonathan K.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Schoen, Robert E.; Slattery, Martha L.; White, Emily; Adank, Muriel A.; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Baglietto, Laura; Blomquist, Carl; Canzian, Federico; Czene, Kamila; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Eliassen, A. Heather; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Fletcher, Olivia; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Gaudet, Mia M.; Johnson, Nichola; Hall, Per; Hazra, Aditi; Hein, Rebecca; Hofman, Albert; Hopper, John L.; Irwanto, Astrid; Johansson, Mattias; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kibriya, Muhammad G.; Lichtner, Peter; Liu, Jianjun; Lund, Eiliv; Makalic, Enes; Meindl, Alfons; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Muranen, Taru A.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Peeters, Petra H.; Peto, Julian; Prentice, Ross L.; Rahman, Nazneen; Sanchez, Maria Jose; Schmidt, Daniel F.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Southey, Melissa C.; Tamimi, Rulla; Travis, Ruth C.; Turnbull, Clare; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Wang, Zhaoming; Whittemore, Alice S.; Yang, Xiaohong R.; Zheng, Wei; Rafnar, Thorunn; Gudmundsson, Julius; Stacey, Simon N.; Stefansson, Kari; Sulem, Patrick; Chen, Y. Ann; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Christiani, David C.; Wei, Yongyue; Shen, Hongbing; Hu, Zhibin; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Shiraishi, Kouya; Takahashi, Atsushi; Bossé, Yohan; Obeidat, Ma’en; Nickle, David; Timens, Wim; Freedman, Matthew L.; Li, Qiyuan; Seminara, Daniela; Chanock, Stephen J.; Gong, Jian; Peters, Ulrike; Gruber, Stephen B.; Amos, Christopher I.; Sellers, Thomas A.; Easton, Douglas F.; Hunter, David J.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Hung, Rayjean J.

    2016-01-01

    Identifying genetic variants with pleiotropic associations can uncover common pathways influencing multiple cancers. We took a two-staged approach to conduct genome-wide association studies for lung, ovary, breast, prostate and colorectal cancer from the GAME-ON/GECCO Network (61,851 cases, 61,820 controls) to identify pleiotropic loci. Findings were replicated in independent association studies (55,789 cases, 330,490 controls). We identified a novel pleiotropic association at 1q22 involving breast and lung squamous cell carcinoma, with eQTL analysis showing an association with ADAM15/THBS3 gene expression in lung. We also identified a known breast cancer locus CASP8/ALS2CR12 associated with prostate cancer, a known cancer locus at CDKN2B-AS1 with different variants associated with lung adenocarcinoma and prostate cancer and confirmed the associations of a breast BRCA2 locus with lung and serous ovarian cancer. This is the largest study to date examining pleiotropy across multiple cancer-associated loci, identifying common mechanisms of cancer development and progression. PMID:27197191

  19. [Central nervous system lymphoma revealed by lymphocytic meningitis in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus: An unusual association].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roriz, M; Lopes, A; Jarrin, I; Lechtman, S; Polivka, M; Bergmann, J-F; Sène, D; Mouly, S

    2017-04-01

    We report an unusual observation of central nervous system (CNS) lymphoma in a 60-year-old woman with systemic lupus erythematosus and fatal outcome. The patient had systemic erythematosus lupus for 7 years, treated with mycophenolate mofetil and developed lymphocytic meningitis in 2015 associated to the presence of EBV in the cerebrospinal fluid and a necrotic vermis' lesion. Diagnosis of large B-cell lymphoma was histologically confirmed from stereotaxic biopsy, shortly before she died from neurological complications. Even though the current association is unusual, lymphocytic meningitis with hypoglycorrachia in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus may reveal CNS lymphoma and diagnosis confirmation requires stereotaxic biopsy in order not to delay specific therapeutic management. Copyright © 2016 Société Nationale Française de Médecine Interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Cross-cancer genome-wide analysis of lung, ovary, breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer reveals novel pleiotropic associations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fehringer, G. (Gordon); P. Kraft (Peter); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); R. Eeles (Rosalind); Chatterjee, N. (Nilanjan); F.R. Schumacher (Fredrick R); J.M. Schildkraut (Joellen); S. Lindstrom (Stephen); P. Brennan (Paul); H. Bickeböller (Heike); R. Houlston (Richard); M.T. Landi (Maria Teresa); N.E. Caporaso (Neil); Risch, A. (Angela); A.A. Al Olama (Ali Amin); S.I. Berndt (Sonja); Giovannucci, E.L. (Edward L.); H. Grönberg (Henrik); Z. Kote-Jarai; Ma, J. (Jing); K.R. Muir (K.); M.J. Stampfer (Meir J.); Stevens, V.L. (Victoria L.); F. Wiklund (Fredrik); W.C. Willett (Walter C.); E.L. Goode (Ellen); Permuth, J.B. (Jennifer B.); H. Risch (Harvey); Reid, B.M. (Brett M.); Bezieau, S. (Stephane); H. Brenner (Hermann); Chan, A.T. (Andrew T.); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); T.J. Hudson (Thomas); Kocarnik, J.K. (Jonathan K.); P. Newcomb (Polly); Schoen, R.E. (Robert E.); Slattery, M.L. (Martha L.); White, E. (Emily); M.A. Adank (Muriel); H. Ahsan (Habibul); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); Baglietto, L. (Laura); Blomquist, C. (Carl); F. Canzian (Federico); K. Czene (Kamila); I. dos Santos Silva (Isabel); Eliassen, A.H. (A. Heather); J.D. Figueroa (Jonine); D. Flesch-Janys (Dieter); O. Fletcher (Olivia); M. García-Closas (Montserrat); M.M. Gaudet (Mia); Johnson, N. (Nichola); P. Hall (Per); A. Hazra (Aditi); R. Hein (Rebecca); Hofman, A. (Albert); J.L. Hopper (John); A. Irwanto (Astrid); M. Johansson (Mattias); R. Kaaks (Rudolf); M.G. Kibriya (Muhammad); P. Lichtner (Peter); J. Liu (Jianjun); E. Lund (Eiliv); Makalic, E. (Enes); A. Meindl (Alfons); B. Müller-Myhsok (B.); Muranen, T.A. (Taru A.); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); P.H.M. Peeters; J. Peto (Julian); R. Prentice (Ross); N. Rahman (Nazneen); M.-J. Sanchez (Maria-Jose); D.F. Schmidt (Daniel); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); M.C. Southey (Melissa); Tamimi, R. (Rulla); S.P.L. Travis (Simon); C. Turnbull (Clare); Uitterlinden, A.G. (Andre G.); Z. Wang (Zhaoming); A.S. Whittemore (Alice); X.R. Yang (Xiaohong); W. Zheng (Wei); D. Buchanan (Daniel); G. Casey (Graham); G. Conti (Giario); C.K. Edlund (Christopher); S. Gallinger (Steve); R. Haile (Robert); M. Jenkins (Mark); Marchand, L. (Loïcle); Li, L. (Li); N.M. Lindor (Noralane); Schmit, S.L. (Stephanie L.); S.N. Thibodeau (Stephen); M.O. Woods (Michael); T. Rafnar (Thorunn); J. Gudmundsson (Julius); S.N. Stacey (Simon); Stefansson, K. (Kari); P. Sulem (Patrick); Chen, Y.A. (Y. Ann); J.P. Tyrer (Jonathan); Christiani, D.C. (David C.); Wei, Y. (Yongyue); H. Shen (Hongbing); Z. Hu (Zhibin); X.-O. Shu (Xiao-Ou); Shiraishi, K. (Kouya); A. Takahashi (Atsushi); Y. Bossé (Yohan); M. Obeidat; D.C. Nickle (David C.); W. Timens (Wim); M. Freedman (Matthew); Li, Q. (Qiyuan); D. Seminara (Daniela); S.J. Chanock (Stephen); Gong, J. (Jian); U. Peters (Ulrike); S.B. Gruber (Stephen); Amos, C.I. (Christopher I.); T.A. Sellers (Thomas A.); D.F. Easton (Douglas F.); D. Hunter (David); C.A. Haiman (Christopher A.); B.E. Henderson (Brian); R.J. Hung (Rayjean)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractIdentifying genetic variants with pleiotropic associations can uncover common pathways influencing multiple cancers. We took a two-stage approach to conduct genome-wide association studies for lung, ovary, breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer from the GAME-ON/GECCO Network (61,851

  1. Cross-Cancer Genome-Wide Analysis of Lung, Ovary, Breast, Prostate, and Colorectal Cancer Reveals Novel Pleiotropic Associations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fehringer, Gordon; Kraft, Peter; Pharoah, Paul D.; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Lindstrom, Sara; Brennan, Paul; Bickeboller, Heike; Houlston, Richard S.; Landi, Maria Teresa; Caporaso, Neil; Risch, Angela; Al Olama, Ali Amin; Berndt, Sonja I.; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Gronberg, Henrik; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Ma, Jing; Muir, Kenneth; Stampfer, Meir J.; Stevens, Victoria L.; Wiklund, Fredrik; Willett, Walter C.; Goode, Ellen L.; Permuth, Jennifer B.; Risch, Harvey A.; Reid, Brett M.; Bezieau, Stephane; Brenner, Hermann; Chan, Andrew T.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Hudson, Thomas J.; Kocarnik, Jonathan K.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Schoen, Robert E.; Slattery, Martha L.; White, Emily; Adank, Muriel A.; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomaki, Kristiina; Baglietto, Laura; Blomquist, Carl; Canzian, Federico; Czene, Kamila; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Eliassen, A. Heather; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Fletcher, Olivia; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Gaudet, Mia M.; Johnson, Nichola; Hall, Per; Hazra, Aditi; Hein, Rebecca; Hofman, Albert; Hopper, John L.; Irwanto, Astrid; Johansson, Mattias; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kibriya, Muhammad G.; Lichtner, Peter; Liu, Jianjun; Lund, Eiliv; Makalic, Enes; Meindl, Alfons; Muller-Myhsok, Bertram; Muranen, Taru A.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Peeters, Petra H.; Peto, Julian; Prentice, Ross L.; Rahman, Nazneen; Sanchez, Maria Jose; Schmidt, Daniel F.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Southey, Melissa C.; Tamimi, Rulla; Travis, Ruth C.; Turnbull, Clare; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Wang, Zhaoming; Whittemore, Alice S.; Yang, Xiaohong R.; Zheng, Wei; Buchanan, Daniel D.; Casey, Graham; Conti, David V.; Edlund, Christopher K.; Gallinger, Steven; Haile, Robert W.; Jenkins, Mark; Le Marchand, Loic; Li, Li; Lindor, Noralene M.; Schmit, Stephanie L.; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Woods, Michael O.; Rafnar, Thorunn; Gudmundsson, Julius; Stacey, Simon N.; Stefansson, Kari; Sulem, Patrick; Chen, Y. Ann; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Christiani, David C.; Wei, Yongyue; Shen, Hongbing; Hu, Zhibin; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Shiraishi, Kouya; Takahashi, Atsushi; Bosse, Yohan; Obeidat, Ma'en; Nickle, David; Timens, Wim; Freedman, Matthew L.; Li, Qiyuan; Seminara, Daniela; Chanock, Stephen J.; Gong, Jian; Peters, Ulrike; Gruber, Stephen B.; Amos, Christopher I.; Sellers, Thomas A.; Easton, Douglas F.; Hunter, David J.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Hung, Rayjean J.

    2016-01-01

    Identifying genetic variants with pleiotropic associations can uncover common pathways influencing multiple cancers. We took a two-stage approach to conduct genome-wide association studies for lung, ovary, breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer from the GAME-ON/GECCO Network (61,851 cases, 61,820

  2. Cross-cancer genome-wide analysis of lung, ovary, breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer reveals novel pleiotropic associations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fehringer, Gordon; Kraft, Peter; Pharoah, Paul D.; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Lindström, Sara; Brennan, Paul; Bickeböller, Heike; Houlston, Richard S.; Landi, Maria Teresa; Caporaso, Neil; Risch, Angela; Al Olama, Ali Amin; Berndt, Sonja I.; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Grönberg, Henrik; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Ma, Jing; Muir, Kenneth; Stampfer, Meir J.; Stevens, Victoria L.; Wiklund, Fredrik; Willett, Walter C.; Goode, Ellen L.; Permuth, Jennifer B.; Risch, Harvey A.; Reid, Brett M.; Bezieau, Stephane; Brenner, Hermann; Chan, Andrew T.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Hudson, Thomas J.; Kocarnik, Jonathan K.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Schoen, Robert E.; Slattery, Martha L.; White, Emily; Adank, Muriel A.; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Baglietto, Laura; Blomquist, Carl; Canzian, Federico; Czene, Kamila; Dos-Santos-silva, Isabel; Eliassen, A. Heather; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Fletcher, Olivia; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Gaudet, Mia M.; Johnson, Nichola; Hall, Per; Hazra, Aditi; Hein, Rebecca; Hofman, Albert; Hopper, John L.; Irwanto, Astrid; Johansson, Mattias; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kibriya, Muhammad G.; Lichtner, Peter; Liu, Jianjun; Lund, Eiliv; Makalic, Enes; Meindl, Alfons; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Muranen, Taru A.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Peeters, Petra H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074099655; Peto, Julian; Prentice, Ross L.; Rahman, Nazneen; Sanchez, Maria Jose; Schmidt, Daniel F.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Southey, Melissa C.; Tamimi, Rulla; Travis, Ruth C.; Turnbull, Clare; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Wang, Zhaoming; Whittemore, Alice S.; Yang, Xiaohong R.; Zheng, Wei; Buchanan, Daniel D.; Casey, Graham; Conti, David V.; Edlund, Christopher K.; Gallinger, Steven; Haile, Robert W.; Jenkins, Mark; Marchand, Loïcle; Li, Li; Lindor, Noralene M.; Schmit, Stephanie L.; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Woods, Michael O.; Rafnar, Thorunn; Gudmundsson, Julius; Stacey, Simon N.; Stefansson, Kari; Sulem, Patrick; Chen, Y. Ann; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Christiani, David C.; Wei, Yongyue; Shen, Hongbing; Hu, Zhibin; Shu, Xiao Ou; Shiraishi, Kouya; Takahashi, Atsushi; Bossé, Yohan; Obeidat, Ma'en; Nickle, David; Timens, Wim; Freedman, Matthew L.; Li, Qiyuan; Seminara, Daniela; Chanock, Stephen J.; Gong, Jian; Peters, Ulrike; Gruber, Stephen B.; Amos, Christopher I.; Sellers, Thomas A.; Easton, Douglas F.; Hunter, David J.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Hung, Rayjean J.

    2016-01-01

    Identifying genetic variants with pleiotropic associations can uncover common pathways influencing multiple cancers. We took a two-stage approach to conduct genome-wide association studies for lung, ovary, breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer from the GAME-ON/GECCO Network (61,851 cases, 61,820

  3. Re-analysis of public genetic data reveals a rare X-chromosomal variant associated with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonàs-Guarch, Sílvia; Guindo-Martínez, Marta; Miguel-Escalada, Irene

    2018-01-01

    The reanalysis of existing GWAS data represents a powerful and cost-effective opportunity to gain insights into the genetics of complex diseases. By reanalyzing publicly available type 2 diabetes (T2D) genome-wide association studies (GWAS) data for 70,127 subjects, we identify seven novel associ...

  4. Comparative Genomics of Campylobacter fetus from Reptiles and Mammals Reveals Divergent Evolution in Host-Associated Lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Maarten J; Miller, William G; Yee, Emma; Zomer, Aldert L; van der Graaf-van Bloois, Linda; Fitzgerald, Collette; Forbes, Ken J; Méric, Guillaume; Sheppard, Samuel K; Wagenaar, Jaap A; Duim, Birgitta

    2016-07-02

    Campylobacter fetus currently comprises three recognized subspecies, which display distinct host association. Campylobacter fetus subsp. fetus and C fetus subsp. venerealis are both associated with endothermic mammals, primarily ruminants, whereas C fetus subsp. testudinum is primarily associated with ectothermic reptiles. Both C. fetus subsp. testudinum and C. fetus subsp. fetus have been associated with severe infections, often with a systemic component, in immunocompromised humans. To study the genetic factors associated with the distinct host dichotomy in C. fetus, whole-genome sequencing and comparison of mammal- and reptile-associated C fetus was performed. The genomes of C fetus subsp. testudinum isolated from either reptiles or humans were compared with elucidate the genetic factors associated with pathogenicity in humans. Genomic comparisons showed conservation of gene content and organization among C fetus subspecies, but a clear distinction between mammal- and reptile-associated C fetus was observed. Several genomic regions appeared to be subspecies specific, including a putative tricarballylate catabolism pathway, exclusively present in C fetus subsp. testudinum strains. Within C fetus subsp. testudinum, sapA, sapB, and sapAB type strains were observed. The recombinant locus iamABC (mlaFED) was exclusively associated with invasive C fetus subsp. testudinum strains isolated from humans. A phylogenetic reconstruction was consistent with divergent evolution in host-associated strains and the existence of a barrier to lateral gene transfer between mammal- and reptile-associated C fetus Overall, this study shows that reptile-associated C fetus subsp. testudinum is genetically divergent from mammal-associated C fetus subspecies. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  5. Comparative Genomics of Campylobacter fetus from Reptiles and Mammals Reveals Divergent Evolution in Host-Associated Lineages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Maarten J.; Miller, William G.; Yee, Emma; Zomer, Aldert L.; van der Graaf-van Bloois, Linda; Fitzgerald, Collette; Forbes, Ken J.; Méric, Guillaume; Sheppard, Samuel K.; Wagenaar, Jaap A.; Duim, Birgitta

    2016-01-01

    Campylobacter fetus currently comprises three recognized subspecies, which display distinct host association. Campylobacter fetus subsp. fetus and C. fetus subsp. venerealis are both associated with endothermic mammals, primarily ruminants, whereas C. fetus subsp. testudinum is primarily associated with ectothermic reptiles. Both C. fetus subsp. testudinum and C. fetus subsp. fetus have been associated with severe infections, often with a systemic component, in immunocompromised humans. To study the genetic factors associated with the distinct host dichotomy in C. fetus, whole-genome sequencing and comparison of mammal- and reptile-associated C. fetus was performed. The genomes of C. fetus subsp. testudinum isolated from either reptiles or humans were compared with elucidate the genetic factors associated with pathogenicity in humans. Genomic comparisons showed conservation of gene content and organization among C. fetus subspecies, but a clear distinction between mammal- and reptile-associated C. fetus was observed. Several genomic regions appeared to be subspecies specific, including a putative tricarballylate catabolism pathway, exclusively present in C. fetus subsp. testudinum strains. Within C. fetus subsp. testudinum, sapA, sapB, and sapAB type strains were observed. The recombinant locus iamABC (mlaFED) was exclusively associated with invasive C. fetus subsp. testudinum strains isolated from humans. A phylogenetic reconstruction was consistent with divergent evolution in host-associated strains and the existence of a barrier to lateral gene transfer between mammal- and reptile-associated C. fetus. Overall, this study shows that reptile-associated C. fetus subsp. testudinum is genetically divergent from mammal-associated C. fetus subspecies. PMID:27333878

  6. Improvising in music: A learning biography study to reveal skill acquisition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wopereis, Iwan; Van Merriënboer, Jeroen; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    Wopereis, I. G. J. H., Van Merriënboer, J. J. G., & Kirschner, P. A. (2010). Improvising in music: A learning biography study to reveal skill acquisition. In K. Gomez, L. Lyons, & J. Radinsky (Eds.), Proceedings of the 9th International Conference of the Learning Sciences: Vol. 2 (pp. 419-420).

  7. Genomic profiling of ER+ breast cancers after short-term estrogen suppression reveals alterations associated with endocrine resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giltnane, Jennifer M; Hutchinson, Katherine E; Stricker, Thomas P; Formisano, Luigi; Young, Christian D; Estrada, Monica V; Nixon, Mellissa J; Du, Liping; Sanchez, Violeta; Ericsson, Paula Gonzalez; Kuba, Maria G; Sanders, Melinda E; Mu, Xinmeng J; Van Allen, Eliezer M; Wagle, Nikhil; Mayer, Ingrid A; Abramson, Vandana; Gόmez, Henry; Rizzo, Monica; Toy, Weiyi; Chandarlapaty, Sarat; Mayer, Erica L; Christiansen, Jason; Murphy, Danielle; Fitzgerald, Kerry; Wang, Kai; Ross, Jeffrey S; Miller, Vincent A; Stephens, Phillip J; Yelensky, Roman; Garraway, Levi; Shyr, Yu; Meszoely, Ingrid; Balko, Justin M; Arteaga, Carlos L

    2017-08-09

    Inhibition of proliferation in estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancers after short-term antiestrogen therapy correlates with long-term patient outcome. We profiled 155 ER+/human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative (HER2-) early breast cancers from 143 patients treated with the aromatase inhibitor letrozole for 10 to 21 days before surgery. Twenty-one percent of tumors remained highly proliferative, suggesting that these tumors harbor alterations associated with intrinsic endocrine therapy resistance. Whole-exome sequencing revealed a correlation between 8p11-12 and 11q13 gene amplifications, including FGFR1 and CCND1, respectively, and high Ki67. We corroborated these findings in a separate cohort of serial pretreatment, postneoadjuvant chemotherapy, and recurrent ER+ tumors. Combined inhibition of FGFR1 and CDK4/6 reversed antiestrogen resistance in ER+FGFR1/CCND1 coamplified CAMA1 breast cancer cells. RNA sequencing of letrozole-treated tumors revealed the existence of intrachromosomal ESR1 fusion transcripts and increased expression of gene signatures indicative of enhanced E2F-mediated transcription and cell cycle processes in cancers with high Ki67. These data suggest that short-term preoperative estrogen deprivation followed by genomic profiling can be used to identify druggable alterations that may cause intrinsic endocrine therapy resistance. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  8. Potential relationship between phenotypic and molecular characteristics in revealing livestock-associated Staphylococcus aureus in Chinese humans without occupational livestock contact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanping Fan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available While some studies have defined Staphylococcus aureus based on its clonal complex and resistance pattern, few have explored the relations between the genetic lineages and antibiotic resistance patterns and immune evasion cluster (IEC genes. Our aim was to investigate the potential relationship between phenotypic and molecular characteristics so as to reveal livestock-associated S. aureus in humans. The study participants were interviewed, and they provided two nasal swabs for S. aureus analysis. All S. aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA were tested for antibiotic susceptibility, multilocus sequence type and IEC genes. Of the 1162 participants, 9.3% carried S. aureus, including MRSA (1.4% and multidrug-resistant S. aureus (MDRSA, 2.8%. The predominant multidrug-resistant pattern among MDRSA isolates was nonsusceptibility to erythromycin, clindamycin and tetracycline. The most common S. aureus genotypes were ST7, ST6, ST188 and ST59, and the predominant MRSA genotype was ST7. Notably, the livestock-associated S. aureus isolates (IEC-negative CC9, IEC-negative tetracycline-resistant CC398, and IEC-negative tetracycline-resistant CC5 were found in people with no occupational livestock contact. These findings reveal a potential relationship between S. aureus CCs and IEC genes and antibiotic resistance patterns in defining livestock-associated S. aureus in humans and support growing concern about the potential livestock-to-human transmission of livestock-associated S. aureus by non-occupational livestock contact.

  9. Impact of community-acquired paediatric rotavirus gastroenteritis on family life: data from the REVEAL study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Wielen, Marie; Giaquinto, Carlo; Gothefors, Leif; Huelsse, Christel; Huet, Frédéric; Littmann, Martina; Maxwell, Melanie; Talayero, José M P; Todd, Peter; Vila, Miguel T; Cantarutti, Luigi; Van Damme, Pierre

    2010-03-15

    Rotavirus is the leading cause of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) and the most frequent cause of severe diarrhoea in children aged less than 5 years. Although the epidemiology of rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE) is well documented, there are few data on the impact of RVGE on the families of affected children. Data associated with the burden of RVGE, including number of working days lost, levels of parental stress, the need for alternative childcare arrangements and additional nappies used, were extracted from questionnaires completed by parents of children participating in a prospective, multicentre, observational study (Rotavirus gastroenteritis Epidemiology and Viral types in Europe Accounting for Losses in public health and society, REVEAL), conducted during 2004-2005 in selected areas of Belgium, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Sweden, and the United Kingdom to estimate the incidence of RVGE in children aged less than 5 years seeking medical care as a result of AGE. 1102 children with RVGE were included in the present analysis. The proportion of RVGE cases that required at least one parent or other person to be absent from work was 39%-91% in the hospital setting, 44%-64% in the emergency department, and 20%-64% in primary care. Self-reported levels of parental stress were generally high (mean stress levels, > or = 5 on a 10-point visual analogue scale). Additional childcare arrangements were required in up to 21% of RVGE episodes. The mean number of nappies used per day during RVGE episodes was approximately double that used when the child was not ill. Paediatric RVGE cases cause disruption to families and parental stress. The burden of RVGE on children and their families could be substantially reduced by routine rotavirus vaccination of infants.

  10. Impact of community-acquired paediatric rotavirus gastroenteritis on family life: data from the REVEAL study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talayero José MP

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rotavirus is the leading cause of acute gastroenteritis (AGE and the most frequent cause of severe diarrhoea in children aged less than 5 years. Although the epidemiology of rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE is well documented, there are few data on the impact of RVGE on the families of affected children. Methods Data associated with the burden of RVGE, including number of working days lost, levels of parental stress, the need for alternative childcare arrangements and additional nappies used, were extracted from questionnaires completed by parents of children participating in a prospective, multicentre, observational study (Rotavirus gastroenteritis Epidemiology and Viral types in Europe Accounting for Losses in public health and society, REVEAL, conducted during 2004-2005 in selected areas of Belgium, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Sweden, and the United Kingdom to estimate the incidence of RVGE in children aged less than 5 years seeking medical care as a result of AGE. Results 1102 children with RVGE were included in the present analysis. The proportion of RVGE cases that required at least one parent or other person to be absent from work was 39%-91% in the hospital setting, 44%-64% in the emergency department, and 20%-64% in primary care. Self-reported levels of parental stress were generally high (mean stress levels, ≥ 5 on a 10-point visual analogue scale. Additional childcare arrangements were required in up to 21% of RVGE episodes. The mean number of nappies used per day during RVGE episodes was approximately double that used when the child was not ill. Conclusions Paediatric RVGE cases cause disruption to families and parental stress. The burden of RVGE on children and their families could be substantially reduced by routine rotavirus vaccination of infants.

  11. Field studies reveal strong postmating isolation between ecologically divergent butterfly populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn S McBride

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Gene flow between populations that are adapting to distinct environments may be restricted if hybrids inherit maladaptive, intermediate phenotypes. This phenomenon, called extrinsic postzygotic isolation (EPI, is thought to play a critical role in the early stages of speciation. However, despite its intuitive appeal, we know surprisingly little about the strength and prevalence of EPI in nature, and even less about the specific phenotypes that tend to cause problems for hybrids. In this study, we searched for EPI among allopatric populations of the butterfly Euphydryas editha that have specialized on alternative host plants. These populations recall a situation thought typical of the very early stages of speciation. They lack consistent host-associated genetic differentiation at random nuclear loci and show no signs of reproductive incompatibility in the laboratory. However, they do differ consistently in diverse host-related traits. For each of these traits, we first asked whether hybrids between populations that use different hosts (different-host hybrids were intermediate to parental populations and to hybrids between populations that use the same host (same-host hybrids. We then conducted field experiments to estimate the effects of intermediacy on fitness in nature. Our results revealed strong EPI under field conditions. Different-host hybrids exhibited an array of intermediate traits that were significantly maladaptive, including four behaviors. Intermediate foraging height slowed the growth of larvae, while intermediate oviposition preference, oviposition site height, and clutch size severely reduced the growth and survival of the offspring of adult females. We used our empirical data to construct a fitness surface on which different-host hybrids can be seen to fall in an adaptive valley between two peaks occupied by same-host hybrids. These findings demonstrate how ecological selection against hybrids can create a strong barrier to gene

  12. Genome-Wide Association Study of Coronary Artery Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomi Ogawa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Coronary artery disease (CAD is a multifactorial disease with environmental and genetic determinants. The genetic determinants of CAD have previously been explored by the candidate gene approach. Recently, the data from the International HapMap Project and the development of dense genotyping chips have enabled us to perform genome-wide association studies (GWAS on a large number of subjects without bias towards any particular candidate genes. In 2007, three chip-based GWAS simultaneously revealed the significant association between common variants on chromosome 9p21 and CAD. This association was replicated among other ethnic groups and also in a meta-analysis. Further investigations have detected several other candidate loci associated with CAD. The chip-based GWAS approach has identified novel and unbiased genetic determinants of CAD and these insights provide the important direction to better understand the pathogenesis of CAD and to develop new and improved preventive measures and treatments for CAD.

  13. Genome wide analysis of narcolepsy in China implicates novel immune loci and reveals changes in association prior to versus after the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Han

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies in narcolepsy, an autoimmune disorder affecting hypocretin (orexin neurons and recently associated with H1N1 influenza, have demonstrated significant associations with five loci. Using a well-characterized Chinese cohort, we refined known associations in TRA@ and P2RY11-DNMT1 and identified new associations in the TCR beta (TRB@; rs9648789 max P = 3.7 × 10(-9 OR 0.77, ZNF365 (rs10995245 max P = 1.2 × 10(-11 OR 1.23, and IL10RB-IFNAR1 loci (rs2252931 max P = 2.2 × 10(-9 OR 0.75. Variants in the Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA- DQ region were associated with age of onset (rs7744020 P = 7.9×10(-9 beta -1.9 years and varied significantly among cases with onset after the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic compared to previous years (rs9271117 P = 7.8 × 10(-10 OR 0.57. These reflected an association of DQB1*03:01 with earlier onset and decreased DQB1*06:02 homozygosity following 2009. Our results illustrate how genetic association can change in the presence of new environmental challenges and suggest that the monitoring of genetic architecture over time may help reveal the appearance of novel triggers for autoimmune diseases.

  14. Stratification by Smoking Status Reveals an Association of CHRNA5-A3-B4 Genotype with Body Mass Index in Never Smokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fluharty, Meg E.; Bjorngaard, Johan H.; Åsvold, Bjørn Olav; Gabrielsen, Maiken E.; Campbell, Archie; Marioni, Riccardo; Kumari, Meena; Hällfors, Jenni; Männistö, Satu; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Kaakinen, Marika; Cavadino, Alana; Postmus, Iris; Husemoen, Lise Lotte N.; Skaaby, Tea; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S.; Treur, Jorien L.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Dale, Caroline; Wannamethee, S. Goya; Lahti, Jari; Palotie, Aarno; Räikkönen, Katri; Kisialiou, Aliaksei; McConnachie, Alex; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Wong, Andrew; Dalgård, Christine; Paternoster, Lavinia; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Tyrrell, Jessica; Horwood, John; Fergusson, David M.; Kennedy, Martin A.; Frayling, Tim; Nohr, Ellen A.; Christiansen, Lene; Ohm Kyvik, Kirsten; Kuh, Diana; Watt, Graham; Eriksson, Johan; Whincup, Peter H.; Vink, Jacqueline M.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Davey Smith, George; Lawlor, Debbie; Linneberg, Allan; Ford, Ian; Jukema, J. Wouter; Power, Christine; Hyppönen, Elina; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Preisig, Martin; Borodulin, Katja; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kivimaki, Mika; Smith, Blair H.; Hayward, Caroline; Romundstad, Pål R.; Sørensen, Thorkild I. A.; Munafò, Marcus R.; Sattar, Naveed

    2014-01-01

    We previously used a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the CHRNA5-A3-B4 gene cluster associated with heaviness of smoking within smokers to confirm the causal effect of smoking in reducing body mass index (BMI) in a Mendelian randomisation analysis. While seeking to extend these findings in a larger sample we found that this SNP is associated with 0.74% lower body mass index (BMI) per minor allele in current smokers (95% CI -0.97 to -0.51, P = 2.00×10−10), but also unexpectedly found that it was associated with 0.35% higher BMI in never smokers (95% CI +0.18 to +0.52, P = 6.38×10−5). An interaction test confirmed that these estimates differed from each other (P = 4.95×10−13). This difference in effects suggests the variant influences BMI both via pathways unrelated to smoking, and via the weight-reducing effects of smoking. It would therefore be essentially undetectable in an unstratified genome-wide association study of BMI, given the opposite association with BMI in never and current smokers. This demonstrates that novel associations may be obscured by hidden population sub-structure. Stratification on well-characterized environmental factors known to impact on health outcomes may therefore reveal novel genetic associations. PMID:25474695

  15. Stratification by smoking status reveals an association of CHRNA5-A3-B4 genotype with body mass index in never smokers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy E Taylor

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We previously used a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP in the CHRNA5-A3-B4 gene cluster associated with heaviness of smoking within smokers to confirm the causal effect of smoking in reducing body mass index (BMI in a Mendelian randomisation analysis. While seeking to extend these findings in a larger sample we found that this SNP is associated with 0.74% lower body mass index (BMI per minor allele in current smokers (95% CI -0.97 to -0.51, P = 2.00 × 10(-10, but also unexpectedly found that it was associated with 0.35% higher BMI in never smokers (95% CI +0.18 to +0.52, P = 6.38 × 10(-5. An interaction test confirmed that these estimates differed from each other (P = 4.95 × 10(-13. This difference in effects suggests the variant influences BMI both via pathways unrelated to smoking, and via the weight-reducing effects of smoking. It would therefore be essentially undetectable in an unstratified genome-wide association study of BMI, given the opposite association with BMI in never and current smokers. This demonstrates that novel associations may be obscured by hidden population sub-structure. Stratification on well-characterized environmental factors known to impact on health outcomes may therefore reveal novel genetic associations.

  16. Proteomic profiling of Pseudomonas aeruginosa AES-1R, PAO1 and PA14 reveals potential virulence determinants associated with a transmissible cystic fibrosis-associated strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hare, Nathan J; Solis, Nestor; Harmer, Christopher; Marzook, N Bishara; Rose, Barbara; Harbour, Colin; Crossett, Ben; Manos, Jim; Cordwell, Stuart J

    2012-01-22

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that is the major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). While most CF patients are thought to acquire P. aeruginosa from the environment, person-person transmissible strains have been identified in CF clinics worldwide. The molecular basis for transmissibility and colonization of the CF lung remains poorly understood. A dual proteomics approach consisting of gel-based and gel-free comparisons were undertaken to analyse protein profiles in a transmissible, early (acute) isolate of the Australian epidemic strain 1 (AES-1R), the virulent burns/wound isolate PA14, and the poorly virulent, laboratory-associated strain PAO1. Over 1700 P. aeruginosa proteins were confidently identified. AES-1R protein profiles revealed elevated abundance of proteins associated with virulence and siderophore biosynthesis and acquisition, antibiotic resistance and lipopolysaccharide and fatty acid biosynthesis. The most abundant protein in AES-1R was confirmed as a previously hypothetical protein with sequence similarity to carbohydrate-binding proteins and database search revealed this gene is only found in the CF-associated strain PA2192. The link with CF infection may suggest that transmissible strains have acquired an ability to rapidly interact with host mucosal glycoproteins. Our data suggest that AES-1R expresses higher levels of proteins, such as those involved in antibiotic resistance, iron acquisition and virulence that may provide a competitive advantage during early infection in the CF lung. Identification of novel proteins associated with transmissibility and acute infection may aid in deciphering new strategies for intervention to limit P. aeruginosa infections in CF patients.

  17. Distinct and shared functions of ALS-associated proteins TDP-43, FUS and TAF15 revealed by multisystem analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapeli, Katannya; Pratt, Gabriel A; Vu, Anthony Q; Hutt, Kasey R; Martinez, Fernando J; Sundararaman, Balaji; Batra, Ranjan; Freese, Peter; Lambert, Nicole J; Huelga, Stephanie C; Chun, Seung J; Liang, Tiffany Y; Chang, Jeremy; Donohue, John P; Shiue, Lily; Zhang, Jiayu; Zhu, Haining; Cambi, Franca; Kasarskis, Edward; Hoon, Shawn; Ares, Manuel; Burge, Christopher B; Ravits, John; Rigo, Frank; Yeo, Gene W

    2016-07-05

    The RNA-binding protein (RBP) TAF15 is implicated in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). To compare TAF15 function to that of two ALS-associated RBPs, FUS and TDP-43, we integrate CLIP-seq and RNA Bind-N-Seq technologies, and show that TAF15 binds to ∼4,900 RNAs enriched for GGUA motifs in adult mouse brains. TAF15 and FUS exhibit similar binding patterns in introns, are enriched in 3' untranslated regions and alter genes distinct from TDP-43. However, unlike FUS and TDP-43, TAF15 has a minimal role in alternative splicing. In human neural progenitors, TAF15 and FUS affect turnover of their RNA targets. In human stem cell-derived motor neurons, the RNA profile associated with concomitant loss of both TAF15 and FUS resembles that observed in the presence of the ALS-associated mutation FUS R521G, but contrasts with late-stage sporadic ALS patients. Taken together, our findings reveal convergent and divergent roles for FUS, TAF15 and TDP-43 in RNA metabolism.

  18. Validation of the Reveal(®) 2.0 Group D1 Salmonella Test for Detection of Salmonella Enteritidis in Raw Shell Eggs and Poultry-Associated Matrixes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozola, Mark; Biswas, Preetha; Viator, Ryan; Feldpausch, Emily; Foti, Debra; Li, Lin; Le, Quynh-Nhi; Alles, Susan; Rice, Jennifer

    2016-07-01

    A study was conducted to assess the performance of the Reveal(®) 2.0 Group D1 Salmonella lateral flow immunoassay for use in detection of Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) in raw shell eggs and poultry-associated matrixes, including chicken carcass rinse and poultry feed. In inclusivity testing, the Reveal 2.0 test detected all 37 strains of SE tested. The test also detected all but one of 18 non-Enteritidis somatic group D1 Salmonella serovars examined. In exclusivity testing, none of 42 strains tested was detected. The exclusivity panel included Salmonella strains of somatic groups other than D1, as well as strains of other genera of Gram-negative bacteria. In matrix testing, performance of the Reveal 2.0 test was compared to that of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Food Safety and Inspection Service Microbiology Laboratory Guidebook reference culture procedure for chicken carcass rinse and to that of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Bacteriological Analytical Manual for raw shell eggs and poultry feed. For all matrixes evaluated, there were no significant differences in the ability to detect SE when comparing the Reveal 2.0 method and the appropriate reference culture procedure as determined by probability of detection statistical analysis. The ability of the Reveal 2.0 test to withstand modest perturbations to normal operating parameters was examined in robustness experiments. Results showed that the test can withstand deviations in up to three operating parameters simultaneously without significantly affecting performance. Real-time stability testing of multiple lots of Reveal 2.0 devices established the shelf life of the test device at 16 months postmanufacture.

  19. Mass Cytometry and Topological Data Analysis Reveal Immune Parameters Associated with Complications after Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadepally Lakshmikanth

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Human immune systems are variable, and immune responses are often unpredictable. Systems-level analyses offer increased power to sort patients on the basis of coordinated changes across immune cells and proteins. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation is a well-established form of immunotherapy whereby a donor immune system induces a graft-versus-leukemia response. This fails when the donor immune system regenerates improperly, leaving the patient susceptible to infections and leukemia relapse. We present a systems-level analysis by mass cytometry and serum profiling in 26 patients sampled 1, 2, 3, 6, and 12 months after transplantation. Using a combination of machine learning and topological data analyses, we show that global immune signatures associated with clinical outcome can be revealed, even when patients are few and heterogeneous. This high-resolution systems immune monitoring approach holds the potential for improving the development and evaluation of immunotherapies in the future.

  20. Integrated analysis of DNA methylation and gene expression reveals specific signaling pathways associated with platinum resistance in ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung Jae

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cisplatin and carboplatin are the primary first-line therapies for the treatment of ovarian cancer. However, resistance to these platinum-based drugs occurs in the large majority of initially responsive tumors, resulting in fully chemoresistant, fatal disease. Although the precise mechanism(s underlying the development of platinum resistance in late-stage ovarian cancer patients currently remains unknown, CpG-island (CGI methylation, a phenomenon strongly associated with aberrant gene silencing and ovarian tumorigenesis, may contribute to this devastating condition. Methods To model the onset of drug resistance, and investigate DNA methylation and gene expression alterations associated with platinum resistance, we treated clonally derived, drug-sensitive A2780 epithelial ovarian cancer cells with increasing concentrations of cisplatin. After several cycles of drug selection, the isogenic drug-sensitive and -resistant pairs were subjected to global CGI methylation and mRNA expression microarray analyses. To identify chemoresistance-associated, biological pathways likely impacted by DNA methylation, promoter CGI methylation and mRNA expression profiles were integrated and subjected to pathway enrichment analysis. Results Promoter CGI methylation revealed a positive association (Spearman correlation of 0.99 between the total number of hypermethylated CGIs and GI50 values (i.e., increased drug resistance following successive cisplatin treatment cycles. In accord with that result, chemoresistance was reversible by DNA methylation inhibitors. Pathway enrichment analysis revealed hypermethylation-mediated repression of cell adhesion and tight junction pathways and hypomethylation-mediated activation of the cell growth-promoting pathways PI3K/Akt, TGF-beta, and cell cycle progression, which may contribute to the onset of chemoresistance in ovarian cancer cells. Conclusion Selective epigenetic disruption of distinct biological

  1. Metabolic profiling reveals potential metabolic markers associated with Hypoxia Inducible Factor-mediated signalling in hypoxic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armitage, Emily G; Kotze, Helen L; Allwood, J William; Dunn, Warwick B; Goodacre, Royston; Williams, Kaye J

    2015-10-28

    Hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs) plays an important role in oxygen compromised environments and therefore in tumour survival. In this research, metabolomics has been applied to study HIFs metabolic function in two cell models: mouse hepatocellular carcinoma and human colon carcinoma, whereby the metabolism has been profiled for a range of oxygen potentials. Wild type cells have been compared to cells deficient in HIF signalling to reveal its effect on cellular metabolism under normal oxygen conditions as well as low oxygen, hypoxic and anoxic environments. Characteristic responses to hypoxia that were conserved across both cell models involved the anti-correlation between 2-hydroxyglutarate, 2-oxoglutarate, fructose, hexadecanoic acid, hypotaurine, pyruvate and octadecenoic acid with 4-hydroxyproline, aspartate, cysteine, glutamine, lysine, malate and pyroglutamate. Further to this, network-based correlation analysis revealed HIF specific pathway responses to each oxygen condition that were also conserved between cell models. From this, 4-hydroxyproline was revealed as a regulating hub in low oxygen survival of WT cells while fructose appeared to be in HIF deficient cells. Pathways surrounding these hubs were built from the direct connections of correlated metabolites that look beyond traditional pathways in order to understand the mechanism of HIF response to low oxygen environments.

  2. Generalist genes analysis of DNA markers associated with mathematical ability and disability reveals shared influence across ages and abilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docherty, Sophia J; Kovas, Yulia; Petrill, Stephen A; Plomin, Robert

    2010-07-05

    The Generalist Genes Hypothesis is based upon quantitative genetic findings which indicate that many of the same genes influence diverse cognitive abilities and disabilities across age. In a recent genome-wide association study of mathematical ability in 10-year-old children, 43 SNP associations were nominated from scans of pooled DNA, 10 of which were validated in an individually genotyped sample. The 4927 children in this genotyped sample have also been studied at 7, 9 and 12 years of age on measures of mathematical ability, as well as on other cognitive and learning abilities. Using these data we have explored the Generalist Genes Hypothesis by assessing the association of the available measures of ability at age 10 and other ages with two composite 'SNP-set' scores, formed from the full set of 43 nominated SNPs and the sub-set of 10 SNPs that were previously found to be associated with mathematical ability at age 10. Both SNP sets yielded significant associations with mathematical ability at ages 7, 9 and 12, as well as with reading and general cognitive ability at age 10. Although effect sizes are small, our results correspond with those of quantitative genetic research in supporting the Generalist Genes Hypothesis. SNP sets identified on the basis of their associations with mathematical ability at age 10 show associations with mathematical ability at earlier and later ages and show associations of similar magnitude with reading and general cognitive ability. With small effect sizes expected in such complex traits, future studies may be able to capitalise on power by searching for 'generalist genes' using longitudinal and multivariate approaches.

  3. Revealing Praxis: A Study of Professional Learning and Development as a Beginning Social Studies Teacher Educator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Jason K.

    2010-01-01

    This self-study reports on the professional learning and development of a beginning social studies teacher educator via an examination of the evolving relationship between the author's beliefs and practices during his first three years preparing social studies teachers. Throughout this time data were systematically collected in the form of written…

  4. Religious Studies and Transcultural Studies: : Revealing a Cosmos Not Known Before?

    OpenAIRE

    Berg, Esther; Rakow, K.

    2016-01-01

    Drawing on our research on Pentecostal Christianity in Singapore, the article introduces the transcultural approach and discusses its possible contributions to the academic study of religions. After a short overview of the history of the discipline, the article introduces our understanding of the transcultural approach and a discussion of similar or related approaches in Religious Studies, which emphasize relationality and polyvocality in the study of religious practices and discourses. The f...

  5. Genome-metabolite associations revealed low heritability, high genetic complexity, and causal relations for leaf metabolites in winter wheat (Triticum aestivum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matros, Andrea; Liu, Guozheng; Hartmann, Anja; Jiang, Yong; Zhao, Yusheng; Wang, Huange; Ebmeyer, Erhard; Korzun, Viktor; Schachschneider, Ralf; Kazman, Ebrahim; Schacht, Johannes; Longin, Friedrich; Reif, Jochen Christoph; Mock, Hans-Peter

    2017-01-01

    We investigated associations between the metabolic phenotype, consisting of quantitative data of 76 metabolites from 135 contrasting winter wheat (Triticum aestivum) lines, and 17 372 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers. Metabolite profiles were generated from flag leaves of plants from three different environments, with average repeatabilities of 0.5-0.6. The average heritability of 0.25 was unaffected by the heading date. Correlations among metabolites reflected their functional grouping, highlighting the strict coordination of various routes of the citric acid cycle. Genome-wide association studies identified significant associations for six metabolic traits, namely oxalic acid, ornithine, L-arginine, pentose alcohol III, L-tyrosine, and a sugar oligomer (oligo II), with between one and 17 associated SNPs. Notable associations with genes regulating transcription or translation explained between 2.8% and 32.5% of the genotypic variance (pG). Further candidate genes comprised metabolite carriers (pG 32.5-38.1%), regulatory proteins (pG 0.3-11.1%), and metabolic enzymes (pG 2.5-32.5%). The combinatorial use of genomic and metabolic data to construct partially directed networks revealed causal inferences in the correlated metabolite traits and associated SNPs. The evaluated causal relationships will provide a basis for predicting the effects of genetic interferences on groups of correlated metabolic traits, and thus on specific metabolic phenotypes. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  6. Associative Visual Agnosia: A Case Study

    OpenAIRE

    A. Charnallet; Carbonnel, S.; David, D.; Moreaud, O.

    2008-01-01

    We report a case of massive associative visual agnosia. In the light of current theories of identification and semantic knowledge organization, a deficit involving both levels of structural description system and visual semantics must be assumed to explain the case. We suggest, in line with a previous case study [1], an alternative account in the framework of (non abstractive) episodic models of memory [4].

  7. Associative visual agnosia: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charnallet, A; Carbonnel, S; David, D; Moreaud, O

    2008-01-01

    We report a case of massive associative visual agnosia. In the light of current theories of identification and semantic knowledge organization, a deficit involving both levels of structural description system and visual semantics must be assumed to explain the case. We suggest, in line with a previous case study, an alternative account in the framework of (non abstractive) episodic models of memory.

  8. Study of obesity associated proopiomelanocortin gene polymorphism

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Farida El-Baz Mohamed

    2016-03-10

    Mar 10, 2016 ... Study of obesity associated proopiomelanocortin ... Binge Eating Disorder (BED) by The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth ... Cases were compared to fifty age-, sex- and pubertal stage-matched healthy non obese children and adolescents as a control group. The work was carried ...

  9. Understanding Salesforce Behavior using Genetic Association Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.E. van den Berg (Wouter)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Using genetic association studies, this thesis aims to investigate the drivers of successful customer-salesperson interactions in a context where knowledge development has become crucial to the value creation process. Central to this thesis is the developing role of

  10. An association study between polymorphism of alcohol ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-09-28

    Sep 28, 2011 ... We wanted to determine the association between alcohol addiction and ethanol metabolizing genes and neurotransmitter related genes. MATERIALS AND METHODS. Study population. A total of 332 DNA samples from unrelated Chinese Han population in Yunnan region were obtained (214 controls and ...

  11. Monitoring studies should consider temporal variability to reveal relations between cyanobacterial abundance and environmental variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JULIANA WOJCIECHOWSKI

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available One of the main goals of monitoring cyanobacteria blooms in aquatic environments is to reveal the relationship between cyanobacterial abundance and environmental variables. Studies typically correlate data that were simultaneously sampled. However, samplings occur sparsely over time and may not reveal the short-term responses of cyanobacterial abundance to environmental changes. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that stronger cyanobacteria x environment relationships in monitoring are found when the temporal variability of sampling points is incorporated in the statistical analyses. To this end, we investigated relationships between cyanobacteria and seven environmental variables that were sampled twice yearly for three years across 11 reservoirs, and data from an intensive monitoring in one of these reservoirs. Poor correlations were obtained when correlating data simultaneously sampled. In fact, the 'highly recurrent' role of phosphorus in cyanobacteria blooms is not properly observed in all sampling periods. On the other hand, the strongest correlation values for the total phosphorus x cyanobacteria relationship were observed when we used the variation of sampling points. We have also shown that environment variables better explain cyanobacteria when a time lag is considered. We conclude that, in cyanobacteria monitoring, the best approach to reveal determinants of cyanobacteria blooms is to consider environmental variability.

  12. Chapter 11: Genome-wide association studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William S Bush

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have evolved over the last ten years into a powerful tool for investigating the genetic architecture of human disease. In this work, we review the key concepts underlying GWAS, including the architecture of common diseases, the structure of common human genetic variation, technologies for capturing genetic information, study designs, and the statistical methods used for data analysis. We also look forward to the future beyond GWAS.

  13. Genome-wide association study of antisocial personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rautiainen, M-R; Paunio, T; Repo-Tiihonen, E; Virkkunen, M; Ollila, H M; Sulkava, S; Jolanki, O; Palotie, A; Tiihonen, J

    2016-09-06

    The pathophysiology of antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) remains unclear. Although the most consistent biological finding is reduced grey matter volume in the frontal cortex, about 50% of the total liability to developing ASPD has been attributed to genetic factors. The contributing genes remain largely unknown. Therefore, we sought to study the genetic background of ASPD. We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) and a replication analysis of Finnish criminal offenders fulfilling DSM-IV criteria for ASPD (N=370, N=5850 for controls, GWAS; N=173, N=3766 for controls and replication sample). The GWAS resulted in suggestive associations of two clusters of single-nucleotide polymorphisms at 6p21.2 and at 6p21.32 at the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region. Imputation of HLA alleles revealed an independent association with DRB1*01:01 (odds ratio (OR)=2.19 (1.53-3.14), P=1.9 × 10(-5)). Two polymorphisms at 6p21.2 LINC00951-LRFN2 gene region were replicated in a separate data set, and rs4714329 reached genome-wide significance (OR=1.59 (1.37-1.85), P=1.6 × 10(-9)) in the meta-analysis. The risk allele also associated with antisocial features in the general population conditioned for severe problems in childhood family (β=0.68, P=0.012). Functional analysis in brain tissue in open access GTEx and Braineac databases revealed eQTL associations of rs4714329 with LINC00951 and LRFN2 in cerebellum. In humans, LINC00951 and LRFN2 are both expressed in the brain, especially in the frontal cortex, which is intriguing considering the role of the frontal cortex in behavior and the neuroanatomical findings of reduced gray matter volume in ASPD. To our knowledge, this is the first study showing genome-wide significant and replicable findings on genetic variants associated with any personality disorder.

  14. Experiments Are Revealing a Foundation Species: A Case Study of Eastern Hemlock (Tsuga canadensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron M. Ellison

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Foundation species are species that create and define particular ecosystems; control in large measure the distribution and abundance of associated flora and fauna; and modulate core ecosystem processes, such as energy flux and biogeochemical cycles. However, whether a particular species plays a foundational role in a system is not simply asserted. Rather, it is a hypothesis to be tested, and such tests are best done with large-scale, long-term manipulative experiments. The utility of such experiments is illustrated through a review of the Harvard Forest Hemlock Removal Experiment (HF-HeRE, a multidecadal, multihectare experiment designed to test the foundational role of eastern hemlock, Tsuga canadensis, in eastern North American forests. Experimental removal of T. canadensis has revealed that after 10 years, this species has pronounced, long-term effects on associated flora and fauna, but shorter-term effects on energy flux and nutrient cycles. We hypothesize that on century-long scales, slower changes in soil microbial associates will further alter ecosystem processes in T. canadensis stands. HF-HeRE may indeed continue for >100 years, but at such time scales, episodic disturbances and changes in regional climate and land cover can be expected to interact in novel ways with these forests and their foundation species.

  15. Genetic Diversity, Population Structure, and Linkage Disequilibrium of an Association-Mapping Panel Revealed by Genome-Wide SNP Markers in Sesame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Chengqi; Mei, Hongxian; Liu, Yanyang; Zhang, Haiyang; Zheng, Yongzhan

    2017-01-01

    The characterization of genetic diversity and population structure can be used in tandem to detect reliable phenotype–genotype associations. In the present study, we genotyped a set of 366 sesame germplasm accessions by using 89,924 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). The number of SNPs on each chromosome was consistent with the physical length of the respective chromosome, and the average marker density was approximately 2.67 kb/SNP. The genetic diversity analysis showed that the average nucleotide diversity of the panel was 1.1 × 10-3, with averages of 1.0 × 10-4, 2.7 × 10-4, and 3.6 × 10-4 obtained, respectively for three identified subgroups of the panel: Pop 1, Pop 2, and the Mixed. The genetic structure analysis revealed that these sesame germplasm accessions were structured primarily along the basis of their geographic collection, and that an extensive admixture occurred in the panel. The genome-wide linkage disequilibrium (LD) analysis showed that an average LD extended up to ∼99 kb. The genetic diversity and population structure revealed in this study should provide guidance to the future design of association studies and the systematic utilization of the genetic variation characterizing the sesame panel. PMID:28729877

  16. Meta-GWAS and Meta-Analysis of Exome Array Studies Do Not Reveal Genetic Determinants of Serum Hepcidin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galesloot, Tessel E.; van Dijk, Freerk; Geurts-Moespot, Anneke J.; Girelli, Domenico; Kiemeney, Lambertus A. L. M.; Sweep, Fred C. G. J.; Swertz, Morris A.; van der Meer, Peter; Camaschella, Clara; Toniolo, Daniela; Vermeulen, Sita H.; van der Harst, Pim; Swinkels, Dorine W.

    2016-01-01

    Serum hepcidin concentration is regulated by iron status, inflammation, erythropoiesis and numerous other factors, but underlying processes are incompletely understood. We studied the association of common and rare single nucleotide variants (SNVs) with serum hepcidin in one Italian study and two large Dutch population-based studies. We genotyped common SNVs with genome-wide association study (GWAS) arrays and subsequently performed imputation using the 1000 Genomes reference panel. Cohort-specific GWAS were performed for log-transformed serum hepcidin, adjusted for age and gender, and results were combined in a fixed-effects meta-analysis (total N 6,096). Six top SNVs (pp<1.4x10-6) was identified. Gene-based meta-analyses revealed 19 genes that showed significant association with hepcidin. Our results suggest the absence of common SNVs and rare exonic SNVs explaining a large proportion of phenotypic variation in serum hepcidin. We recommend extension of our study once additional substantial cohorts with hepcidin measurements, GWAS and/or exome array data become available in order to increase power to identify variants that explain a smaller proportion of hepcidin variation. In addition, we encourage follow-up of the potentially interesting genes that resulted from the gene-based analysis of low-frequency and rare variants. PMID:27846281

  17. Association analyses of porcine SERPINE1 reveal sex-specific effects on muscling, growth, fat accretion and meat quality

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Weisz, Filip; Bartenschlager, H.; Knoll, Aleš; Mileham, A.; Deeb, N.; Geldermann, H.; Čepica, Stanislav

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 5 (2012), s. 614-619 ISSN 0268-9146 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP502/10/1216 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : association study * fat deposition * meat quality Subject RIV: GI - Animal Husbandry ; Breeding Impact factor: 2.584, year: 2012

  18. Genome-wide meta-analysis in alopecia areata resolves HLA associations and reveals two new susceptibility loci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Betz, Regina C; Petukhova, Lynn; Ripke, Stephan; Huang, Hailiang; Menelaou, Androniki; Redler, Silke; Becker, Tim; Heilmann, Stefanie; Yamany, Tarek; Duvic, Madeliene; Hordinsky, Maria; Norris, David; Price, Vera H; Mackay-Wiggan, Julian; de Jong, Annemieke; DeStefano, Gina M; Moebus, Susanne; Böhm, Markus; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Wolff, Hans; Lutz, Gerhard; Kruse, Roland; Bian, Li; Amos, Christopher I; Lee, Annette; Gregersen, Peter K; Blaumeiser, Bettina; Altshuler, David; Clynes, Raphael; de Bakker, Paul I W; Nöthen, Markus M; Daly, Mark J; Christiano, Angela M

    2015-01-01

    Alopecia areata (AA) is a prevalent autoimmune disease with 10 known susceptibility loci. Here we perform the first meta-analysis of research on AA by combining data from two genome-wide association studies (GWAS), and replication with supplemented ImmunoChip data for a total of 3,253 cases and

  19. Gene expression profiling of puberty-associated genes reveals abundant tissue and sex-specific changes across postnatal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Huayun; Uusküla-Reimand, Liis; Makarem, Maisam; Corre, Christina; Saleh, Shems; Metcalf, Ariane; Goldenberg, Anna; Palmert, Mark R; Wilson, Michael D

    2017-09-15

    The timing of human puberty is highly variable, sexually dimorphic, and associated with adverse health outcomes. Over 20 genes carrying rare mutations have been identified in known pubertal disorders, many of which encode critical components of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified more than 100 candidate genes at loci associated with age at menarche or voice breaking in males. We know little about the spatial, temporal or postnatal expression patterns of the majority of these puberty-associated genes. Using a high-throughput and sensitive microfluidic quantitative PCR strategy, we profiled the gene expression patterns of the mouse orthologs of 178 puberty-associated genes in male and female mouse HPG axis tissues, the pineal gland, and the liver at five postnatal ages spanning the pubertal transition. The most dynamic gene expression changes were observed prior to puberty in all tissues. We detected known and novel tissue-enhanced gene expression patterns, with the hypothalamus expressing the largest number of the puberty-associated genes. Notably, over 40 puberty-associated genes in the pituitary gland showed sex-biased gene expression, most of which occurred peri-puberty. These sex-biased genes included the orthologs of candidate genes at GWAS loci that show sex-discordant effects on pubertal timing. Our findings provide new insight into the expression of puberty-associated genes and support the possibility that the pituitary plays a role in determining sex differences in the timing of puberty. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Wolbachia association with the tsetse fly, Glossina fuscipes fuscipes, reveals high levels of genetic diversity and complex evolutionary dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Symula Rebecca E

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Wolbachia pipientis, a diverse group of α-proteobacteria, can alter arthropod host reproduction and confer a reproductive advantage to Wolbachia-infected females (cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI. This advantage can alter host population genetics because Wolbachia-infected females produce more offspring with their own mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA haplotypes than uninfected females. Thus, these host haplotypes become common or fixed (selective sweep. Although simulations suggest that for a CI-mediated sweep to occur, there must be a transient phase with repeated initial infections of multiple individual hosts by different Wolbachia strains, this has not been observed empirically. Wolbachia has been found in the tsetse fly, Glossina fuscipes fuscipes, but it is not limited to a single host haplotype, suggesting that CI did not impact its population structure. However, host population genetic differentiation could have been generated if multiple Wolbachia strains interacted in some populations. Here, we investigated Wolbachia genetic variation in G. f. fuscipes populations of known host genetic composition in Uganda. We tested for the presence of multiple Wolbachia strains using Multi-Locus Sequence Typing (MLST and for an association between geographic region and host mtDNA haplotype using Wolbachia DNA sequence from a variable locus, groEL (heat shock protein 60. Results MLST demonstrated that some G. f. fuscipes carry Wolbachia strains from two lineages. GroEL revealed high levels of sequence diversity within and between individuals (Haplotype diversity = 0.945. We found Wolbachia associated with 26 host mtDNA haplotypes, an unprecedented result. We observed a geographical association of one Wolbachia lineage with southern host mtDNA haplotypes, but it was non-significant (p = 0.16. Though most Wolbachia-infected host haplotypes were those found in the contact region between host mtDNA groups, this association was non

  1. Questionnaire-based self-reported nutrition habits associate with serum metabolism as revealed by quantitative targeted metabolomics

    OpenAIRE

    Altmaier, Elisabeth; Kastenmüller, Gabi; Römisch-Margl, Werner; Thorand, Barbara; Weinberger, Klaus M; Illig, Thomas; Adamski, Jerzy; Döring, Angela; Suhre, Karsten

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Nutrition plays an important role in human metabolism and health. However, it is unclear in how far self-reported nutrition intake reflects de facto differences in body metabolite composition. To investigate this question on an epidemiological scale we conducted a metabolomics study analyzing the association of self-reported nutrition habits with 363 metabolites quantified in blood serum of 284 male participants of the KORA population study, aged between 55 and 79 years. U...

  2. Religious Studies and Transcultural Studies: : Revealing a Cosmos Not Known Before?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, Esther; Rakow, K.

    2016-01-01

    Drawing on our research on Pentecostal Christianity in Singapore, the article introduces the transcultural approach and discusses its possible contributions to the academic study of religions. After a short overview of the history of the discipline, the article introduces our understanding of the

  3. Metabolomic Profiles of Body Mass Index in the Framingham Heart Study Reveal Distinct Cardiometabolic Phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer E Ho

    Full Text Available Although obesity and cardiometabolic traits commonly overlap, underlying pathways remain incompletely defined. The association of metabolite profiles across multiple cardiometabolic traits may lend insights into the interaction of obesity and metabolic health. We sought to investigate metabolic signatures of obesity and related cardiometabolic traits in the community using broad-based metabolomic profiling.We evaluated the association of 217 assayed metabolites and cross-sectional as well as longitudinal changes in cardiometabolic traits among 2,383 Framingham Offspring cohort participants. Body mass index (BMI was associated with 69 of 217 metabolites (P<0.00023 for all, including aromatic (tyrosine, phenylalanine and branched chain amino acids (valine, isoleucine, leucine. Additional metabolic pathways associated with BMI included the citric acid cycle (isocitrate, alpha-ketoglutarate, aconitate, the tryptophan pathway (kynurenine, kynurenic acid, and the urea cycle. There was considerable overlap in metabolite profiles between BMI, abdominal adiposity, insulin resistance [IR] and dyslipidemia, modest overlap of metabolite profiles between BMI and hyperglycemia, and little overlap with fasting glucose or elevated blood pressure. Metabolite profiles were associated with longitudinal changes in fasting glucose, but the involved metabolites (ornithine, 5-HIAA, aminoadipic acid, isoleucine, cotinine were distinct from those associated with baseline glucose or other traits. Obesity status appeared to "modify" the association of 9 metabolites with IR. For example, bile acid metabolites were strongly associated with IR among obese but not lean individuals, whereas isoleucine had a stronger association with IR in lean individuals.In this large-scale metabolite profiling study, body mass index was associated with a broad range of metabolic alterations. Metabolite profiling highlighted considerable overlap with abdominal adiposity, insulin resistance

  4. Meta-GWAS and Meta-Analysis of Exome Array Studies Do Not Reveal Genetic Determinants of Serum Hepcidin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galesloot, Tessel E; Verweij, Niek; Traglia, Michela; Barbieri, Caterina; van Dijk, Freerk; Geurts-Moespot, Anneke J; Girelli, Domenico; Kiemeney, Lambertus A L M; Sweep, Fred C G J; Swertz, Morris A; van der Meer, Peter; Camaschella, Clara; Toniolo, Daniela; Vermeulen, Sita H; van der Harst, Pim; Swinkels, Dorine W

    2016-01-01

    Serum hepcidin concentration is regulated by iron status, inflammation, erythropoiesis and numerous other factors, but underlying processes are incompletely understood. We studied the association of common and rare single nucleotide variants (SNVs) with serum hepcidin in one Italian study and two large Dutch population-based studies. We genotyped common SNVs with genome-wide association study (GWAS) arrays and subsequently performed imputation using the 1000 Genomes reference panel. Cohort-specific GWAS were performed for log-transformed serum hepcidin, adjusted for age and gender, and results were combined in a fixed-effects meta-analysis (total N 6,096). Six top SNVs (p<5x10-6) were genotyped in 3,821 additional samples, but associations were not replicated. Furthermore, we meta-analyzed cohort-specific exome array association results of rare SNVs with serum hepcidin that were available for two of the three cohorts (total N 3,226), but no exome-wide significant signal (p<1.4x10-6) was identified. Gene-based meta-analyses revealed 19 genes that showed significant association with hepcidin. Our results suggest the absence of common SNVs and rare exonic SNVs explaining a large proportion of phenotypic variation in serum hepcidin. We recommend extension of our study once additional substantial cohorts with hepcidin measurements, GWAS and/or exome array data become available in order to increase power to identify variants that explain a smaller proportion of hepcidin variation. In addition, we encourage follow-up of the potentially interesting genes that resulted from the gene-based analysis of low-frequency and rare variants.

  5. Meta-GWAS and Meta-Analysis of Exome Array Studies Do Not Reveal Genetic Determinants of Serum Hepcidin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tessel E Galesloot

    Full Text Available Serum hepcidin concentration is regulated by iron status, inflammation, erythropoiesis and numerous other factors, but underlying processes are incompletely understood. We studied the association of common and rare single nucleotide variants (SNVs with serum hepcidin in one Italian study and two large Dutch population-based studies. We genotyped common SNVs with genome-wide association study (GWAS arrays and subsequently performed imputation using the 1000 Genomes reference panel. Cohort-specific GWAS were performed for log-transformed serum hepcidin, adjusted for age and gender, and results were combined in a fixed-effects meta-analysis (total N 6,096. Six top SNVs (p<5x10-6 were genotyped in 3,821 additional samples, but associations were not replicated. Furthermore, we meta-analyzed cohort-specific exome array association results of rare SNVs with serum hepcidin that were available for two of the three cohorts (total N 3,226, but no exome-wide significant signal (p<1.4x10-6 was identified. Gene-based meta-analyses revealed 19 genes that showed significant association with hepcidin. Our results suggest the absence of common SNVs and rare exonic SNVs explaining a large proportion of phenotypic variation in serum hepcidin. We recommend extension of our study once additional substantial cohorts with hepcidin measurements, GWAS and/or exome array data become available in order to increase power to identify variants that explain a smaller proportion of hepcidin variation. In addition, we encourage follow-up of the potentially interesting genes that resulted from the gene-based analysis of low-frequency and rare variants.

  6. Meta-analysis of gene expression in the mouse liver reveals biomarkers associated with inflammation increased early during aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Janice S; Ward, William O; Ren, Hongzu; Vallanat, Beena; Darlington, Gretchen J; Han, Eun-Soo; Laguna, Juan C; DeFord, James H; Papaconstantinou, John; Selman, Colin; Corton, J Christopher

    2012-07-01

    Aging is associated with a loss of cellular homeostasis, a decline in physiological function and an increase in various pathologies. Employing a meta-analysis, hepatic gene expression profiles from four independent mouse aging studies were interrogated. There was little overlap in the number of genes or canonical pathways perturbed, suggesting that independent study-specific factors may play a significant role in determining age-dependent gene expression. However, 43 genes were consistently altered during aging in three or four of these studies, including those that (1) exhibited progressively increased expression starting from 12 months of age, (2) exhibited similar expression changes in models of progeria at young ages and dampened or no changes in old longevity mouse models, (3) were associated with inflammatory tertiary lymphoid neogenesis (TLN) associated with formation of ectopic lymphoid structures observed in chronically inflamed tissues, and (4) overlapped with genes perturbed by aging in brain, muscle, and lung. Surprisingly, around half of the genes altered by aging in wild-type mice exhibited similar expression changes in adult long-lived mice compared to wild-type controls, including those associated with intermediary metabolism and feminization of the male-dependent gene expression pattern. Genes unique to aging in wild-type mice included those linked to TLN. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  7. An in silico approach reveals associations between genetic and epigenetic factors within regulatory elements in B cells from primary Sjögren’s syndrome patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orsia D. Konsta

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in genetics have highlighted several regions and candidate genes associated with primary Sjögren's syndrome (SS, a systemic autoimmune epithelitis that combines exocrine gland dysfunctions, and focal lymphocytic infiltrations. In addition to genetic factors, it is now clear that epigenetic deregulations are present during SS and restricted to specific cell type subsets such as lymphocytes and salivary gland epithelial cells. In this study, 72 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs associated with 43 SS gene risk factors were selected from publicly available and peer reviewed literature for further in silico analysis. SS risk variant location was tested revealing a broad distribution in coding sequences (5.6%, intronic sequences (55.6%, upstream/downstream genic regions (30.5%, and intergenic regions (8.3%. Moreover, a significant enrichment of regulatory motifs (promoter, enhancer, insulator, DNAse peak and eQTL characterizes SS risk variants (94.4%. Next, screening SNPs in high linkage disequilibrium (r2 ≥ 0.8 in Caucasians revealed 645 new variants including 5 SNPs with missense mutations, and indicated an enrichment of transcriptionally active motifs according to the cell type (B cells > monocytes > T cells >> A549. Finally, we looked at SS risk variants for histone markers in B cells (GM12878, monocytes (CD14+ and epithelial cells (A548. Active histone markers were associated with SS risk variants at both promoters and enhancers in B cells, and within enhancers in monocytes. In conclusion and based on the obtained in silico results, that need further confirmation, associations were observed between SS genetic risk factors and epigenetic factors and these associations predominate in B cells such as those observed at the FAM167A-BLK locus.

  8. Selective abrogation of the uPA-uPAR interaction in vivo reveals a novel role in suppression of fibrin-associated inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Connolly, Brian M; Choi, Eun Young; Gårdsvoll, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    the interaction between endogenous uPA and uPAR is selectively abrogated, whereas other functions of both the protease and its receptor are retained. Specifically, we introduced 4 amino acid substitutions into the growth factor domain (GFD) of uPA that abrogate uPAR binding while preserving the overall structure...... of the domain. Analysis of Plau(GFDhu/GFDhu) mice revealed an unanticipated role of the uPA-uPAR interaction in suppressing inflammation secondary to fibrin deposition. In contrast, leukocyte recruitment and tissue regeneration were unaffected by the loss of uPA binding to uPAR. This study identifies...... a principal in vivo role of the uPA-uPAR interaction in cell-associated fibrinolysis critical for suppression of fibrin accumulation and fibrin-associated inflammation and provides a valuable model for further exploration of this multifunctional receptor....

  9. Epigenome-Wide Association Study of Wellbeing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baselmans, Bart M L; van Dongen, Jenny; Nivard, Michel G; Lin, Bochao D; Zilhão, Nuno R; Boomsma, Dorret I; Bartels, Meike

    2015-12-01

    Wellbeing (WB) is a major topic of research across several scientific disciplines, partly driven by its strong association with psychological and mental health. Twin-family studies have found that both genotype and environment play an important role in explaining the variance in WB. Epigenetic mechanisms, such as DNA methylation, regulate gene expression, and may mediate genetic and environmental effects on WB. Here, for the first time, we apply an epigenome-wide association study (EWAS) approach to identify differentially methylated sites associated with individual differences in WB. Subjects were part of the longitudinal survey studies of the Netherlands Twin Register (NTR) and participated in the NTR biobank project between 2002 and 2011. WB was assessed by a short inventory that measures satisfaction with life (SAT). DNA methylation was measured in whole blood by the Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip (HM450k array) and the association between WB and DNA methylation level was tested at 411,169 autosomal sites. Two sites (cg10845147, p = 1.51 * 10(-8) and cg01940273, p = 2.34 * 10(-8)) reached genome-wide significance following Bonferonni correction. Four more sites (cg03329539, p = 2.76* 10(-7); cg09716613, p = 3.23 * 10(-7); cg04387347, p = 3.95 * 10(-7); and cg02290168, p = 5.23 * 10(-7)) were considered to be genome-wide significant when applying the widely used criterion of a FDR q value system categories among higher-ranking methylation sites. Overall, these results provide a first insight into the epigenetic mechanisms associated with WB and lay the foundations for future work aiming to unravel the biological mechanisms underlying a complex trait like WB.

  10. MicroRNA profiling in Muc2 knockout mice of colitis-associated cancer model reveals epigenetic alterations during chronic colitis malignant transformation.

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    Yonghua Bao

    Full Text Available Our previous studies have demonstrated that genetic deletion of the Muc2 gene causes colorectal cancers in mice. The current study further showed that at the early stage (3 months the mice exhibited colorectal cancer, including a unique phenotype of rectal prolapsed (rectal severe inflammation and adenocarcinoma. Thus, the age of 3 months might be the key point of the transition from chronic inflammation to cancer. To determine the mechanisms of the malignant transformation, we conducted miRNA array on the colonic epithelial cells from the 3-month Muc2-/- and +/+ mice. MicroRNA profiling showed differential expression of miRNAs (i.e. lower or higher expression enrichments in Muc2-/- mice. 15 of them were validated by quantitative PCR. Based on relevance to cytokine and cancer, 4 miRNAs (miR-138, miR-145, miR-146a, and miR-150 were validate and were found significantly downregulated in human colitis and colorectal cancer tissues. The network of the targets of these miRNAs was characterized, and interestedly, miRNA-associated cytokines were significantly increased in Muc2-/-mice. This is the first to reveal the importance of aberrant expression of miRNAs in dynamically transformation from chronic colitis to colitis-associated cancer. These findings shed light on revealing the mechanisms of chronic colitis malignant transformation.

  11. Population genetic studies revealed local adaptation in a high gene-flow marine fish, the small yellow croaker (Larimichthys polyactis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Wang

    Full Text Available The genetic differentiation of many marine fish species is low. Yet local adaptation may be common in marine fish species as the vast and changing marine environment provides more chances for natural selection. Here, we used anonymous as well as known protein gene linked microsatellites and mitochondrial DNA to detect the population structure of the small yellow croaker (Larimichthys polyactis in the Northwest Pacific marginal seas. Among these loci, we detected at least two microsatellites, anonymous H16 and HSP27 to be clearly under diversifying selection in outlier tests. Sequence cloning and analysis revealed that H16 was located in the intron of BAHCC1 gene. Landscape genetic analysis showed that H16 mutations were significantly associated with temperature, which further supported the diversifying selection at this locus. These marker types presented different patterns of population structure: (i mitochondrial DNA phylogeny showed no evidence of genetic divergence and demonstrated only one glacial linage; (ii population differentiation using putatively neutral microsatellites presented a pattern of high gene flow in the L. polyactis. In addition, several genetic barriers were identified; (iii the population differentiation pattern revealed by loci under diversifying selection was rather different from that revealed by putatively neutral loci. The results above suggest local adaptation in the small yellow croaker. In summary, population genetic studies based on different marker types disentangle the effects of demographic history, migration, genetic drift and local adaptation on population structure and also provide valuable new insights for the design of management strategies in L. polyactis.

  12. Novel Loci for metabolic networks and multi-tissue expression studies reveal genes for atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inouye, Michael; Ripatti, Samuli; Kettunen, Johannes; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Oksala, Niku; Laurila, Pirkka-Pekka; Kangas, Antti J; Soininen, Pasi; Savolainen, Markku J; Viikari, Jorma; Kähönen, Mika; Perola, Markus; Salomaa, Veikko; Raitakari, Olli; Lehtimäki, Terho; Taskinen, Marja-Riitta; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Palotie, Aarno; de Bakker, Paul I W

    2012-01-01

    Association testing of multiple correlated phenotypes offers better power than univariate analysis of single traits. We analyzed 6,600 individuals from two population-based cohorts with both genome-wide SNP data and serum metabolomic profiles. From the observed correlation structure of 130 metabolites measured by nuclear magnetic resonance, we identified 11 metabolic networks and performed a multivariate genome-wide association analysis. We identified 34 genomic loci at genome-wide significance, of which 7 are novel. In comparison to univariate tests, multivariate association analysis identified nearly twice as many significant associations in total. Multi-tissue gene expression studies identified variants in our top loci, SERPINA1 and AQP9, as eQTLs and showed that SERPINA1 and AQP9 expression in human blood was associated with metabolites from their corresponding metabolic networks. Finally, liver expression of AQP9 was associated with atherosclerotic lesion area in mice, and in human arterial tissue both SERPINA1 and AQP9 were shown to be upregulated (6.3-fold and 4.6-fold, respectively) in atherosclerotic plaques. Our study illustrates the power of multi-phenotype GWAS and highlights candidate genes for atherosclerosis.

  13. Novel Loci for metabolic networks and multi-tissue expression studies reveal genes for atherosclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Inouye

    Full Text Available Association testing of multiple correlated phenotypes offers better power than univariate analysis of single traits. We analyzed 6,600 individuals from two population-based cohorts with both genome-wide SNP data and serum metabolomic profiles. From the observed correlation structure of 130 metabolites measured by nuclear magnetic resonance, we identified 11 metabolic networks and performed a multivariate genome-wide association analysis. We identified 34 genomic loci at genome-wide significance, of which 7 are novel. In comparison to univariate tests, multivariate association analysis identified nearly twice as many significant associations in total. Multi-tissue gene expression studies identified variants in our top loci, SERPINA1 and AQP9, as eQTLs and showed that SERPINA1 and AQP9 expression in human blood was associated with metabolites from their corresponding metabolic networks. Finally, liver expression of AQP9 was associated with atherosclerotic lesion area in mice, and in human arterial tissue both SERPINA1 and AQP9 were shown to be upregulated (6.3-fold and 4.6-fold, respectively in atherosclerotic plaques. Our study illustrates the power of multi-phenotype GWAS and highlights candidate genes for atherosclerosis.

  14. Insights into antiviral innate immunity revealed by studying hepatitis C virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, Stacy M

    2015-08-01

    Experimental studies on the interactions of the positive strand RNA virus hepatitis C virus (HCV) with the host have contributed to several discoveries in the field of antiviral innate immunity. These include revealing the antiviral sensing pathways that lead to the induction of type I interferon (IFN) during HCV infection and also the importance of type III IFNs in the antiviral immune response to HCV. These studies on HCV/host interactions have contributed to our overall understanding of viral sensing and viral evasion of the antiviral intracellular innate immune response. In this review, I will highlight how these studies of HCV/host interactions have led to new insights into antiviral innate immunity. Overall, I hope to emphasize that studying antiviral immunity in the context of virus infection is necessary to fully understand antiviral immunity and how it controls the outcome of viral infection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Comprehensive SNP scan of DNA repair and DNA damage response genes reveal multiple susceptibility loci conferring risk to tobacco associated leukoplakia and oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Pinaki; Datta, Sayantan; Maiti, Guru Prasad; Baral, Aradhita; Jha, Ganga Nath; Panda, Chinmay Kumar; Chowdhury, Shantanu; Ghosh, Saurabh; Roy, Bidyut; Roychoudhury, Susanta

    2013-01-01

    Polymorphic variants of DNA repair and damage response genes play major role in carcinogenesis. These variants are suspected as predisposition factors to Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC). For identification of susceptible variants affecting OSCC development in Indian population, the "maximally informative" method of SNP selection from HapMap data to non-HapMap populations was applied. Three hundred twenty-five SNPs from 11 key genes involved in double strand break repair, mismatch repair and DNA damage response pathways were genotyped on a total of 373 OSCC, 253 leukoplakia and 535 unrelated control individuals. The significantly associated SNPs were validated in an additional cohort of 144 OSCC patients and 160 controls. The rs12515548 of MSH3 showed significant association with OSCC both in the discovery and validation phases (discovery P-value: 1.43E-05, replication P-value: 4.84E-03). Two SNPs (rs12360870 of MRE11A, P-value: 2.37E-07 and rs7003908 of PRKDC, P-value: 7.99E-05) were found to be significantly associated only with leukoplakia. Stratification of subjects based on amount of tobacco consumption identified SNPs that were associated with either high or low tobacco exposed group. The study reveals a synergism between associated SNPs and lifestyle factors in predisposition to OSCC and leukoplakia.

  16. Genome-Wide Association Analysis for Blood Lipid Traits Measured in Three Pig Populations Reveals a Substantial Level of Genetic Heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hui; Huang, Xiaochang; Zeng, Zhijun; Zhang, Wanchang; Liu, Chenlong; Fang, Shaoming; Huang, Lusheng; Chen, Congying

    2015-01-01

    Serum lipids are associated with myocardial infarction and cardiovascular disease in humans. Here we dissected the genetic architecture of blood lipid traits by applying genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in 1,256 pigs from Laiwu, Erhualian and Duroc × (Landrace × Yorkshire) populations, and a meta-analysis of GWAS in more than 2,400 pigs from five diverse populations. A total of 22 genomic loci surpassing the suggestive significance level were detected on 11 pig chromosomes (SSC) for six blood lipid traits. Meta-analysis of GWAS identified 5 novel loci associated with blood lipid traits. Comparison of GWAS loci across the tested populations revealed a substantial level of genetic heterogeneity for porcine blood lipid levels. We further evaluated the causality of nine polymorphisms nearby or within the APOB gene on SSC3 for serum LDL-C and TC levels. Of the 9 polymorphisms, an indel showed the most significant association with LDL-C and TC in Laiwu pigs. But the significant association was not identified in the White Duroc × Erhualian F2 resource population, in which the QTL for LDL-C and TC was also detected on SSC3. This indicates that population-specific signals may exist for the SSC3 QTL. Further investigations are warranted to validate this assumption.

  17. Genome-Wide Association Analysis for Blood Lipid Traits Measured in Three Pig Populations Reveals a Substantial Level of Genetic Heterogeneity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Yang

    Full Text Available Serum lipids are associated with myocardial infarction and cardiovascular disease in humans. Here we dissected the genetic architecture of blood lipid traits by applying genome-wide association studies (GWAS in 1,256 pigs from Laiwu, Erhualian and Duroc × (Landrace × Yorkshire populations, and a meta-analysis of GWAS in more than 2,400 pigs from five diverse populations. A total of 22 genomic loci surpassing the suggestive significance level were detected on 11 pig chromosomes (SSC for six blood lipid traits. Meta-analysis of GWAS identified 5 novel loci associated with blood lipid traits. Comparison of GWAS loci across the tested populations revealed a substantial level of genetic heterogeneity for porcine blood lipid levels. We further evaluated the causality of nine polymorphisms nearby or within the APOB gene on SSC3 for serum LDL-C and TC levels. Of the 9 polymorphisms, an indel showed the most significant association with LDL-C and TC in Laiwu pigs. But the significant association was not identified in the White Duroc × Erhualian F2 resource population, in which the QTL for LDL-C and TC was also detected on SSC3. This indicates that population-specific signals may exist for the SSC3 QTL. Further investigations are warranted to validate this assumption.

  18. Metagenome survey of a multispecies and alga-associated biofilm revealed key elements of bacterial-algal interactions in photobioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krohn-Molt, Ines; Wemheuer, Bernd; Alawi, Malik; Poehlein, Anja; Güllert, Simon; Schmeisser, Christel; Pommerening-Röser, Andreas; Grundhoff, Adam; Daniel, Rolf; Hanelt, Dieter; Streit, Wolfgang R

    2013-10-01

    Photobioreactors (PBRs) are very attractive for sunlight-driven production of biofuels and capturing of anthropogenic CO2. One major problem associated with PBRs however, is that the bacteria usually associated with microalgae in nonaxenic cultures can lead to biofouling and thereby affect algal productivity. Here, we report on a phylogenetic, metagenome, and functional analysis of a mixed-species bacterial biofilm associated with the microalgae Chlorella vulgaris and Scenedesmus obliquus in a PBR. The biofilm diversity and population dynamics were examined through 16S rRNA phylogeny. Overall, the diversity was rather limited, with approximately 30 bacterial species associated with the algae. The majority of the observed microorganisms were affiliated with Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, and Bacteroidetes. A combined approach of sequencing via GS FLX Titanium from Roche and HiSeq 2000 from Illumina resulted in the overall production of 350 Mbp of sequenced DNA, 165 Mbp of which was assembled in larger contigs with a maximum size of 0.2 Mbp. A KEGG pathway analysis suggested high metabolic diversity with respect to the use of polymers and aromatic and nonaromatic compounds. Genes associated with the biosynthesis of essential B vitamins were highly redundant and functional. Moreover, a relatively high number of predicted and functional lipase and esterase genes indicated that the alga-associated bacteria are possibly a major sink for lipids and fatty acids produced by the microalgae. This is the first metagenome study of microalga- and PBR-associated biofilm bacteria, and it gives new clues for improved biofuel production in PBRs.

  19. Genome-wide association and pathway analysis of feed efficiency in pigs reveal candidate genes and pathways for residual feed intake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duy Ngoc Do

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Residual feed intake (RFI is a complex trait that is economically important for livestock production; however, the genetic and biological mechanisms regulating RFI are largely unknown in pigs. Therefore, the study aimed to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, candidate genes and biological pathways involved in regulating RFI using Genome-wide association (GWA and pathway analyses. A total of 596 Yorkshire boars with phenotypes for two different measures of RFI (RFI1 and 2 and 60k genotypic data was used. Genome-wide association analysis was performed using a univariate mixed model and 12 and 7 SNPs were found to be significantly associated with RFI1 and RFI2, respectively. Several genes such as XIRP2, TTC29, SOGA1, MAS1, GRK5, PROX1, GPR155 and ZFYVE26 were identified as putative candidates for RFI based on their genomic location in the vicinity of these SNPs. Genes located within 50 kilo base pairs of SNPs significantly associated with RFI and RFI2 (q-value ≤ 0.2 were subsequently used for pathway analyses. These analyses were performed by assigning genes to biological pathways and then testing the association of individual pathways with RFI using a Fisher’s exact test. Metabolic pathway was significantly associated with both RFIs. Other biological pathways regulating phagosome, tight junctions, olfactory transduction, and insulin secretion were significantly associated with both RFI traits when relaxed threshold for cut-off p-value was used (p ≤ 0.05. These results implied porcine RFI is regulated by multiple biological mechanisms, although the metabolic processes might be the most important. Olfactory transduction pathway controlling the perception of feed via smell, insulin pathway controlling food intake might be important pathways for RFI. Furthermore, our study revealed key genes and genetic variants that control feed efficiency that could potentially be useful for genetic selection of more feed efficient pigs.

  20. The advent of genome-wide association studies for bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peter E; Shapiro, B Jesse

    2015-06-01

    Significant advances in sequencing technologies and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have revealed substantial insight into the genetic architecture of human phenotypes. In recent years, the application of this approach in bacteria has begun to reveal the genetic basis of bacterial host preference, antibiotic resistance, and virulence. Here, we consider relevant differences between bacterial and human genome dynamics, apply GWAS to a global sample of Mycobacterium tuberculosis genomes to highlight the impacts of linkage disequilibrium, population stratification, and natural selection, and finally compare the traditional GWAS against phyC, a contrasting method of mapping genotype to phenotype based upon evolutionary convergence. We discuss strengths and weaknesses of both methods, and make suggestions for factors to be considered in future bacterial GWAS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Genome-Wide Association Studies of Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadler, Zsofia K.; Thom, Peter; Robson, Mark E.; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Kauff, Noah D.; Hurley, Karen E.; Devlin, Vincent; Gold, Bert; Klein, Robert J.; Offit, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge of the inherited risk for cancer is an important component of preventive oncology. In addition to well-established syndromes of cancer predisposition, much remains to be discovered about the genetic variation underlying susceptibility to common malignancies. Increased knowledge about the human genome and advances in genotyping technology have made possible genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of human diseases. These studies have identified many important regions of genetic variation associated with an increased risk for human traits and diseases including cancer. Understanding the principles, major findings, and limitations of GWAS is becoming increasingly important for oncologists as dissemination of genomic risk tests directly to consumers is already occurring through commercial companies. GWAS have contributed to our understanding of the genetic basis of cancer and will shed light on biologic pathways and possible new strategies for targeted prevention. To date, however, the clinical utility of GWAS-derived risk markers remains limited. PMID:20585100

  2. Complete genome sequence of Enterobacter cloacae R11 reveals multiple genes potentially associated with high-level polymyxin E resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Chuanqing; Zhang, Chao; Fu, Jiafang; Chen, Wenbing; Jiang, Tianyi; Cao, Guangxiang

    2018-01-01

    Enterobacter cloacae strain R11 is a multidrug-resistant bacterium isolated from sewage water near a swine feedlot in China. Strain R11 can survive in medium containing up to 192 μg/mL polymyxin E, indicating a tolerance for this antibiotic that is significantly higher than that reported for other gram-negative bacteria. In this study, conjugation experiments showed that partial polymyxin E resistance could be transferred from strain R11 to Escherichia coli strain 25922, revealing that some genes related to polymyxin E resistance are plasmid-based. The complete genome sequence of this strain was determined, yielding a total of 4 993 008 bp (G+C content, 53.15%) and 4908 genes for the circular chromosome and 4 circular plasmids. Genome analysis revealed a total of 73 putative antibiotic resistance genes, including several polymyxin E resistance genes and genes potentially involved in multidrug resistance. These data provide insights into the genetic basis of the polymyxin E resistance and multidrug resistance of E. cloacae.

  3. Transcriptome Analysis of an Anthracnose-Resistant Tea Plant Cultivar Reveals Genes Associated with Resistance to Colletotrichum camelliae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu; Wang, Yuchun; Cao, Hongli; Hao, Xinyuan; Zeng, Jianming; Yang, Yajun; Wang, Xinchao

    2016-01-01

    Tea plant breeding is a topic of great economic importance. However, disease remains a major cause of yield and quality losses. In this study, an anthracnose-resistant cultivar, ZC108, was developed. An infection assay revealed different responses to Colletotrichum sp. infection between ZC108 and its parent cultivar LJ43. ZC108 had greater resistance than LJ43 to Colletotrichum camelliae. Additionally, ZC108 exhibited earlier sprouting in the spring, as well as different leaf shape and plant architecture. Microarray data revealed that the genes that are differentially expressed between LJ43 and ZC108 mapped to secondary metabolism-related pathways, including phenylpropanoid biosynthesis, phenylalanine metabolism, and flavonoid biosynthesis pathways. In addition, genes involved in plant hormone biosynthesis and signaling as well as plant-pathogen interaction pathways were also changed. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to examine the expression of 27 selected genes in infected and uninfected tea plant leaves. Genes encoding a MADS-box transcription factor, NBS-LRR disease-resistance protein, and phenylpropanoid metabolism pathway components (CAD, CCR, POD, beta-glucosidase, ALDH and PAL) were among those differentially expressed in ZC108. PMID:26849553

  4. Genome-Wide Association Analysis Reveals Genetic Heterogeneity of Sjögren's Syndrome According to Ancestry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Kimberly E; Wong, Quenna; Levine, David M; McHugh, Caitlin; Laurie, Cathy; Doheny, Kimberly; Lam, Mi Y; Baer, Alan N; Challacombe, Stephen; Lanfranchi, Hector; Schiødt, Morten; Srinivasan, M; Umehara, Hisanori; Vivino, Frederick B; Zhao, Yan; Shiboski, Stephen C; Daniels, Troy E; Greenspan, John S; Shiboski, Caroline H; Criswell, Lindsey A

    2017-06-01

    The Sjögren's International Collaborative Clinical Alliance (SICCA) is an international data registry and biorepository derived from a multisite observational study of participants in whom genotyping was performed on the Omni2.5M platform and who had undergone deep phenotyping using common protocol-directed methods. The aim of this study was to examine the genetic etiology of Sjögren's syndrome (SS) across ancestry and disease subsets. We performed genome-wide association study analyses using SICCA subjects and external controls obtained from dbGaP data sets, one using all participants (1,405 cases, 1,622 SICCA controls, and 3,125 external controls), one using European participants (585, 966, and 580, respectively), and one using Asian participants (460, 224, and 901, respectively) with ancestry adjustments via principal components analyses. We also investigated whether subphenotype distributions differ by ethnicity, and whether this contributes to the heterogeneity of genetic associations. We observed significant associations in established regions of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), IRF5, and STAT4 (P = 3 × 10-42 , P = 3 × 10-14 , and P = 9 × 10-10 , respectively), and several novel suggestive regions (those with 2 or more associations at P heterogeneity especially in the MHC; representative single-nucleotide polymorphisms from established and suggestive regions had highly significant differences in the allele frequencies in the study populations. We showed that SSA/SSB autoantibody production and the labial salivary gland focus score criteria were associated with the first worldwide principal component, indicative of higher non-European ancestry (P = 4 × 10-15 and P = 4 × 10-5 , respectively), but that subphenotype differences did not explain most of the ancestry differences in genetic associations. Genetic associations with SS differ markedly according to ancestry; however, this is not explained by differences in

  5. Associative Visual Agnosia: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Charnallet

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of massive associative visual agnosia. In the light of current theories of identification and semantic knowledge organization, a deficit involving both levels of structural description system and visual semantics must be assumed to explain the case. We suggest, in line with a previous case study [1], an alternative account in the framework of (non abstractive episodic models of memory [4].

  6. Epigenome-wide and transcriptome-wide analyses reveal gestational diabetes is associated with alterations in the human leukocyte antigen complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Alexandra M; LaRocca, Jessica; Lesseur, Corina; Marsit, Carmen J; Michels, Karin B

    2015-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) affects approximately 10 % of pregnancies in the United States and increases the risk of adverse health outcomes in the offspring. These adult disease propensities may be set by anatomical and molecular alterations in the placenta associated with GDM. To assess the mechanistic aspects of fetal programming, we measured genome-wide methylation (Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChips) and expression (Affymetrix transcriptome microarrays) in placental tissue of 41 GDM cases and 41 matched pregnancies without maternal complications from the Harvard Epigenetic Birth Cohort. Specific transcriptional and epigenetic perturbations associated with GDM status included alterations in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region, which were validated in an independent cohort, the Rhode Island Child Health Study. Gene ontology enrichment among gene regulation influenced by GDM revealed an over-representation of immune response pathways among differential expression, reflecting these coordinated changes in the MHC region. This differential methylation and expression may be capturing shifts in cellular composition, reflecting physiological changes in the placenta associated with GDM. Our study represents the largest investigation of transcriptomic and methylomic differences associated with GDM, providing comprehensive insight into how GDM shapes the intrauterine environment, which may have implications for fetal (re)programming.

  7. Characterization of the chromosomal inversion associated with the Koa mutation in the mouse revealed the cause of skeletal abnormalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzuki Hiroetsu

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Koala (Koa is a dominant mutation in mice causing bushy muzzle and pinna, and is associated with a chromosomal inversion on the distal half of chromosome 15. To identify the gene responsible for the Koa phenotypes, we investigated phenotypes of Koa homozygous mice and determined the breakpoints of the inversion with a genetic method using recombination between two different chromosomal inversions. Results Skeletal preparation of Koa homozygotes showed marked deformity of the ribs and a wider skull with extended zygomatic arches, in addition to a general reduction in the lengths of long bones. They also had open eyelids at birth caused by a defect in the extension of eyelid anlagen during the embryonic stages. The proximal and distal breakpoints of the Koa inversion were determined to be 0.8-Mb distal to the Trsps1 gene and to 0.1-Mb distal to the Hoxc4 gene, respectively, as previously reported. The phenotypes of mice with the recombinant inverted chromosomes revealed the localization of the gene responsible the Koa phenotype in the vicinity of the proximal recombinant breakpoint. Expression of the Trsps1 gene in this region was significantly reduced in the Koa homozygous and heterozygous embryos. Conclusion While no gene was disrupted by the chromosomal inversion, an association between the Koa phenotype and the proximal recombinant breakpoint, phenotypic similarities with Trps1-deficient mice or human patients with TRSP1 mutations, and the reduced expression of the Trsps1 gene in Koa mice, indicated that the phenotypes of the Koa mice are caused by the altered expression of the Trps1 gene.

  8. Evolutionary triangulation: informing genetic association studies with evolutionary evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Minjun; Graham, Britney E; Zhang, Ge; Harder, Reed; Kodaman, Nuri; Moore, Jason H; Muglia, Louis; Williams, Scott M

    2016-01-01

    Genetic studies of human diseases have identified many variants associated with pathogenesis and severity. However, most studies have used only statistical association to assess putative relationships to disease, and ignored other factors for evaluation. For example, evolution is a factor that has shaped disease risk, changing allele frequencies as human populations migrated into and inhabited new environments. Since many common variants differ among populations in frequency, as does disease prevalence, we hypothesized that patterns of disease and population structure, taken together, will inform association studies. Thus, the population distributions of allelic risk variants should reflect the distributions of their associated diseases. Evolutionary Triangulation (ET) exploits this evolutionary differentiation by comparing population structure among three populations with variable patterns of disease prevalence. By selecting populations based on patterns where two have similar rates of disease that differ substantially from a third, we performed a proof of principle analysis for this method. We examined three disease phenotypes, lactase persistence, melanoma, and Type 2 diabetes mellitus. We show that for lactase persistence, a phenotype with a simple genetic architecture, ET identifies the key gene, lactase. For melanoma, ET identifies several genes associated with this disease and/or phenotypes related to it, such as skin color genes. ET was less obviously successful for Type 2 diabetes mellitus, perhaps because of the small effect sizes in known risk loci and recent environmental changes that have altered disease risk. Alternatively, ET may have revealed new genes involved in conferring disease risk for diabetes that did not meet nominal GWAS significance thresholds. We also compared ET to another method used to filter for phenotype associated genes, population branch statistic (PBS), and show that ET performs better in identifying genes known to associate with

  9. Disease-Concordant Twins Empower Genetic Association Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Qihua; Li, Weilong; Vandin, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    concordant for a disease, should confer increased power in genetic association analysis because of their genetic relatedness. We conducted a computer simulation study to explore the power advantage of the disease-concordant twin design, which uses singletons from disease-concordant twin pairs as cases...... of an ordinary case-control design, with variations depending on genetic mode. Importantly, the enriched power for dizygotic twins also applies to disease-concordant sibling pairs, which largely extends the application of the concordant twin design. Overall, our simulation revealed a high value of disease......-concordant twins in genetic association studies and encourages the use of genetically related individuals for highly efficiently identifying both common and rare genetic variants underlying human complex diseases without increasing laboratory cost....

  10. Bayesian neural networks for detecting epistasis in genetic association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beam, Andrew L; Motsinger-Reif, Alison; Doyle, Jon

    2014-11-21

    Discovering causal genetic variants from large genetic association studies poses many difficult challenges. Assessing which genetic markers are involved in determining trait status is a computationally demanding task, especially in the presence of gene-gene interactions. A non-parametric Bayesian approach in the form of a Bayesian neural network is proposed for use in analyzing genetic association studies. Demonstrations on synthetic and real data reveal they are able to efficiently and accurately determine which variants are involved in determining case-control status. By using graphics processing units (GPUs) the time needed to build these models is decreased by several orders of magnitude. In comparison with commonly used approaches for detecting interactions, Bayesian neural networks perform very well across a broad spectrum of possible genetic relationships. The proposed framework is shown to be a powerful method for detecting causal SNPs while being computationally efficient enough to handle large datasets.

  11. Mass Cytometry and Topological Data Analysis Reveal Immune Parameters Associated with Complications after Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmikanth, Tadepally; Olin, Axel; Chen, Yang; Mikes, Jaromir; Fredlund, Erik; Remberger, Mats; Omazic, Brigitta; Brodin, Petter

    2017-08-29

    Human immune systems are variable, and immune responses are often unpredictable. Systems-level analyses offer increased power to sort patients on the basis of coordinated changes across immune cells and proteins. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation is a well-established form of immunotherapy whereby a donor immune system induces a graft-versus-leukemia response. This fails when the donor immune system regenerates improperly, leaving the patient susceptible to infections and leukemia relapse. We present a systems-level analysis by mass cytometry and serum profiling in 26 patients sampled 1, 2, 3, 6, and 12 months after transplantation. Using a combination of machine learning and topological data analyses, we show that global immune signatures associated with clinical outcome can be revealed, even when patients are few and heterogeneous. This high-resolution systems immune monitoring approach holds the potential for improving the development and evaluation of immunotherapies in the future. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Multigene phylogenies of Ophiostomataceae associated with Monterey pine bark beetles in Spain reveal three new fungal species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romón, Pedro; de Beer, Z Wilhelm; Zhou, XuDong; Duong, Tuan A; Wingfield, Brenda D; Wingfield, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Ophiostoma species, some of which cause sapstain in timber and/or are mild pathogens, are common fungal associates of bark beetles (Coleoptera: Scolytinae). Three new Ophiostomataceae from Spain are recognized in the present study based on comparisons of sequence data for three gene regions as well as morphological characteristics. The new taxa are described as Ophiostoma nebulare sp. nov., Ophiostoma euskadiense sp. nov. and Graphilbum crescericum sp. nov.

  13. Pattern changes of EEG oscillations and BOLD signals associated with temporal lobe epilepsy as revealed by a working memory task

    OpenAIRE

    Ozelo, HFB; Alessio, A; Sercheli, MS; E. Bilevicius; Pedro, T; Pereira, FRS; Rondina, JM; Damasceno, BP; F. Cendes; Covolan, RJM

    2014-01-01

    Background: It is known that the abnormal neural activity in epilepsy may be associated to the reorganization of neural circuits and brain plasticity in various ways. On that basis, we hypothesized that changes in neuronal circuitry due to epilepsy could lead to measurable variations in patterns of both EEG and BOLD signals in patients performing some cognitive task as compared to what would be obtained in normal condition. Thus, the aim of this study was to compare the cerebral areas involve...

  14. Phylogenetic and Molecular Variability Studies Reveal a New Genetic Clade of Citrus leprosis virus C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-González, Pedro Luis; Chabi-Jesus, Camila; Guerra-Peraza, Orlene; Breton, Michèle Claire; Arena, Gabriella Dias; Nunes, Maria Andreia; Kitajima, Elliot Watanabe; Machado, Marcos Antonio; Freitas-Astúa, Juliana

    2016-06-06

    Citrus leprosis virus C (CiLV-C) causes a severe disease affecting citrus orchards in the Western hemisphere. This study reveals the molecular variability of the virus by analyzing four genomic regions (p29, p15, MP and RNA2-intergenic region) distributed over its two RNAs. Nucleotide diversity (π) values were relatively low but statistically different over the analyzed genes and subpopulations, indicating their distinct evolutionary history. Values of πp29 and πMP were higher than those of πp15 and πRNA2-IR, whereas πMP was increased due to novel discovered isolates phylogenetically clustered in a divergent clade that we called SJP. Isolate BR_SP_SJP_01 RNA1 and RNA2 sequences, clade SJP, showed an identity of 85.6% and 88.4%, respectively, with those corresponding to CiLV-C, the type member of the genus Cilevirus, and its RNA2 5'-proximal region was revealed as a minor donor in a putative inter-clade recombination event. In addition to citrus, BR_SP_SJP_01 naturally infects the weed Commelina benghalensis and is efficiently transmitted by Brevipalpus yothersi mites. Our data demonstrated that negative selection was the major force operating in the evaluated viral coding regions and defined amino acids putatively relevant for the biological function of cilevirus proteins. This work provides molecular tools and sets up a framework for further epidemiological studies.

  15. Phylogenetic and Molecular Variability Studies Reveal a New Genetic Clade of Citrus leprosis virus C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Luis Ramos-González

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Citrus leprosis virus C (CiLV-C causes a severe disease affecting citrus orchards in the Western hemisphere. This study reveals the molecular variability of the virus by analyzing four genomic regions (p29, p15, MP and RNA2-intergenic region distributed over its two RNAs. Nucleotide diversity (π values were relatively low but statistically different over the analyzed genes and subpopulations, indicating their distinct evolutionary history. Values of πp29 and πMP were higher than those of πp15 and πRNA2–IR, whereas πMP was increased due to novel discovered isolates phylogenetically clustered in a divergent clade that we called SJP. Isolate BR_SP_SJP_01 RNA1 and RNA2 sequences, clade SJP, showed an identity of 85.6% and 88.4%, respectively, with those corresponding to CiLV-C, the type member of the genus Cilevirus, and its RNA2 5′-proximal region was revealed as a minor donor in a putative inter-clade recombination event. In addition to citrus, BR_SP_SJP_01 naturally infects the weed Commelina benghalensis and is efficiently transmitted by Brevipalpus yothersi mites. Our data demonstrated that negative selection was the major force operating in the evaluated viral coding regions and defined amino acids putatively relevant for the biological function of cilevirus proteins. This work provides molecular tools and sets up a framework for further epidemiological studies.

  16. Revealing pathologies in the liquid crystalline structures of the brain by polarimetric studies (Presentation Recording)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhshetyan, Karen; Melkonyan, Gurgen G.; Galstian, Tigran V.; Saghatelyan, Armen

    2015-10-01

    Natural or "self" alignment of molecular complexes in living tissue represents many similarities with liquid crystals (LC), which are anisotropic liquids. The orientational characteristics of those complexes may be related to many important functional parameters and their study may reveal important pathologies. The know-how, accumulated thanks to the study of LC materials, may thus be used to this end. One of the traditionally used methods, to characterize those materials, is the polarized light imaging (PLI) that allows for label-free analysis of anisotropic structures in the brain tissue and can be used, for example, for the analysis of myelinated fiber bundles. In the current work, we first attempted to apply the PLI on the mouse histological brain sections to create a map of anisotropic structures using cross-polarizer transmission light. Then we implemented the PLI for comparative study of histological sections of human postmortem brain samples under normal and pathological conditions, such as Parkinson's disease (PD). Imaging the coronal, sagittal and horizontal sections of mouse brain allowed us to create a false color-coded fiber orientation map under polarized light. In human brain datasets for both control and PD groups we measured the pixel intensities in myelin-rich subregions of internal capsule and normalized these to non-myelinated background signal from putamen and caudate nucleus. Quantification of intensities revealed a statistically significant reduction of fiber intensity of PD compared to control subjects (2.801 +/- 0.303 and 3.724 +/- 0.07 respectively; *p < 0.05). Our study confirms the validity of PLI method for visualizing myelinated axonal fibers. This relatively simple technique can become a promising tool for study of neurodegenerative diseases where labeling-free imaging is an important benefit.

  17. Simultaneous profiling of seed-associated bacteria and fungi reveals antagonistic interactions between microorganisms within a shared epiphytic microbiome on Triticum and Brassica seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Links, Matthew G; Demeke, Tigst; Gräfenhan, Tom; Hill, Janet E; Hemmingsen, Sean M; Dumonceaux, Tim J

    2014-04-01

    In order to address the hypothesis that seeds from ecologically and geographically diverse plants harbor characteristic epiphytic microbiota, we characterized the bacterial and fungal microbiota associated with Triticum and Brassica seed surfaces. The total microbial complement was determined by amplification and sequencing of a fragment of chaperonin 60 (cpn60). Specific microorganisms were quantified by qPCR. Bacteria and fungi corresponding to operational taxonomic units (OTU) that were identified in the sequencing study were isolated and their interactions examined. A total of 5477 OTU were observed from seed washes. Neither total epiphytic bacterial load nor community richness/evenness was significantly different between the seed types; 578 OTU were shared among all samples at a variety of abundances. Hierarchical clustering revealed that 203 were significantly different in abundance on Triticum seeds compared with Brassica. Microorganisms isolated from seeds showed 99-100% identity between the cpn60 sequences of the isolates and the OTU sequences from this shared microbiome. Bacterial strains identified as Pantoea agglomerans had antagonistic properties toward one of the fungal isolates (Alternaria sp.), providing a possible explanation for their reciprocal abundances on both Triticum and Brassica seeds. cpn60 enabled the simultaneous profiling of bacterial and fungal microbiota and revealed a core seed-associated microbiota shared between diverse plant genera. © 2014 AAFC. New Phytologist © 2014 New Phytologist Trust.

  18. Simultaneous profiling of seed-associated bacteria and fungi reveals antagonistic interactions between microorganisms within a shared epiphytic microbiome on Triticum and Brassica seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Links, Matthew G; Demeke, Tigst; Gräfenhan, Tom; Hill, Janet E; Hemmingsen, Sean M; Dumonceaux, Tim J

    2014-01-01

    In order to address the hypothesis that seeds from ecologically and geographically diverse plants harbor characteristic epiphytic microbiota, we characterized the bacterial and fungal microbiota associated with Triticum and Brassica seed surfaces. The total microbial complement was determined by amplification and sequencing of a fragment of chaperonin 60 (cpn60). Specific microorganisms were quantified by qPCR. Bacteria and fungi corresponding to operational taxonomic units (OTU) that were identified in the sequencing study were isolated and their interactions examined. A total of 5477 OTU were observed from seed washes. Neither total epiphytic bacterial load nor community richness/evenness was significantly different between the seed types; 578 OTU were shared among all samples at a variety of abundances. Hierarchical clustering revealed that 203 were significantly different in abundance on Triticum seeds compared with Brassica. Microorganisms isolated from seeds showed 99–100% identity between the cpn60 sequences of the isolates and the OTU sequences from this shared microbiome. Bacterial strains identified as Pantoea agglomerans had antagonistic properties toward one of the fungal isolates (Alternaria sp.), providing a possible explanation for their reciprocal abundances on both Triticum and Brassica seeds. cpn60 enabled the simultaneous profiling of bacterial and fungal microbiota and revealed a core seed-associated microbiota shared between diverse plant genera. PMID:24444052

  19. Re-analysis of public genetic data reveals a rare X-chromosomal variant associated with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonàs-Guarch, Sílvia; Guindo-Martínez, Marta; Miguel-Escalada, Irene; Grarup, Niels; Sebastian, David; Rodriguez-Fos, Elias; Sánchez, Friman; Planas-Fèlix, Mercè; Cortes-Sánchez, Paula; González, Santi; Timshel, Pascal; Pers, Tune H; Morgan, Claire C; Moran, Ignasi; Atla, Goutham; González, Juan R; Puiggros, Montserrat; Martí, Jonathan; Andersson, Ehm A; Díaz, Carlos; Badia, Rosa M; Udler, Miriam; Leong, Aaron; Kaur, Varindepal; Flannick, Jason; Jørgensen, Torben; Linneberg, Allan; Jørgensen, Marit E; Witte, Daniel R; Christensen, Cramer; Brandslund, Ivan; Appel, Emil V; Scott, Robert A; Luan, Jian'an; Langenberg, Claudia; Wareham, Nicholas J; Pedersen, Oluf; Zorzano, Antonio; Florez, Jose C; Hansen, Torben; Ferrer, Jorge; Mercader, Josep Maria; Torrents, David

    2018-01-22

    The reanalysis of existing GWAS data represents a powerful and cost-effective opportunity to gain insights into the genetics of complex diseases. By reanalyzing publicly available type 2 diabetes (T2D) genome-wide association studies (GWAS) data for 70,127 subjects, we identify seven novel associated regions, five driven by common variants (LYPLAL1, NEUROG3, CAMKK2, ABO, and GIP genes), one by a low-frequency (EHMT2), and one driven by a rare variant in chromosome Xq23, rs146662057, associated with a twofold increased risk for T2D in males. rs146662057 is located within an active enhancer associated with the expression of Angiotensin II Receptor type 2 gene (AGTR2), a modulator of insulin sensitivity, and exhibits allelic specific activity in muscle cells. Beyond providing insights into the genetics and pathophysiology of T2D, these results also underscore the value of reanalyzing publicly available data using novel genetic resources and analytical approaches.

  20. Microorganisms associated particulate matter: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghamdi, Mansour A; Shamy, Magdy; Redal, Maria Ana; Khoder, Mamdouh; Awad, Abdel Hameed; Elserougy, Safaa

    2014-05-01

    This study aims to determine the microbiological quality of particulate matter (PM) in an urban area in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, during December 2012 to April 2013. This was achieved by the determination of airborne bacteria, fungi, and actinobacteria associated PM10 and PM2.5, as well as their relationships with gaseous pollutants, O3, SO2 and NO2, and meteorological factors (T°C, RH% and Ws). High volume samplers with PM10 and PM2.5 selective sizes, and glass fiber filters were used to collect PM10 and PM2.5, respectively. The filters were suspended in buffer phosphate and aliquots were spread plated onto the surfaces of trypticase soy agar, malt extract agar, and starch casein agar media for counting of bacteria, fungi and actinobacteria-associated PM, respectively. PM10 and PM2.5 concentrations averaged 159.9 μg/m(3) and 60 μg/m(3), respectively, with the ratio of PM2.5/PM10 averaged ~0.4. The concentrations of O3, SO2 and NO2 averaged 35.73 μg/m(3), 38.1μg/m(3) and 52.5 μg/m(3), respectively. Fungi and actinobacteria associated PM were found in lower concentrations than bacteria. The sum of microbial loads was higher in PM10 than PM2.5, however a significant correlation (r=0.57, P ≤ 0.05) was found between the sum of microbial loads associated PM10 and PM2.5. Aspergillus fumigatus and Aspergillus niger were the common fungal types associated PM. Temperature significantly correlated with both PM10 (r=0.44), and PM2.5 (r=0.5). Significant negative correlations were found between O3 and PM2.5 (r=-0.47), and between SO2 with PM10 (r=-0.48). Wind speed positively correlated with airborne microorganisms associated PM. The regression model showed that the inverse PM2.5 concentration (1/PM2.5) was a significant determinant of fungal count associated PM. Chemical processes and environmental factors could affect properties of PM and in turn its biological quality. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Proteomic studies associated with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasap, Murat; Akpinar, Gurler; Kanli, Aylin

    2017-03-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is an insidious disorder affecting more than 1-2% of the population over the age of 65. Understanding the etiology of PD may create opportunities for developing new treatments. Genomic and transcriptomic studies are useful, but do not provide evidence for the actual status of the disease. Conversely, proteomic studies deal with proteins, which are real time players, and can hence provide information on the dynamic nature of the affected cells. The number of publications relating to the proteomics of PD is vast. Therefore, there is a need to evaluate the current proteomics literature and establish the connections between the past and the present to foresee the future. Areas covered: PubMed and Web of Science were used to retrieve the literature associated with PD proteomics. Studies using human samples, model organisms and cell lines were selected and reviewed to highlight their contributions to PD. Expert commentary: The proteomic studies associated with PD achieved only limited success in facilitating disease diagnosis, monitoring and progression. A global system biology approach using new models is needed. Future research should integrate the findings of proteomics with other omics data to facilitate both early diagnosis and the treatment of PD.

  2. Gastroschisis and associated defects: an international study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mastroiacovo, Pierpaolo

    2007-04-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the frequency and type of malformations associated with gastroschisis in a large pool of international data, to identify malformation patterns, and to evaluate the role of maternal age in non-isolated cases. Case-by-case information from 24 registries, all members of the International Clearinghouse for Birth Defects Surveillance and Research (ICBDSR), were evaluated. After the exclusion of other abdominal wall defects cases were classified as: (a) isolated; (b) recognizable syndrome, chromosomal or not; (c) multiple congenital anomalies (MCA). Our results showed that out of 3,322 total cases 469 non-isolated cases were registered (14.1%): 41 chromosomal syndromes, 24 other syndromes, and 404 MCA. Among MCA four groups of anomalies were most frequent: CNS (4.5%), cardio-vascular (2.5%), limb (2.2%), and kidney anomalies (1.9%). No similar patterns emerged except two patterns resembling limb-body wall complex and OEIS. In both of them the gastroschisis could be however misclassified. Chromosomal trisomies and possibly non-syndromic MCA are associated with an older maternal age more than isolated cases. On consideration of our data and the most valid studies published in the literature, the best estimate of the proportion of gastroschisis associated with major unrelated defects is about 10%, with a few cases associated to recognizable syndromes. Recognized syndromes with gastroschisis seem to be so exceptional that the well documented and validated cases are worth being published as interesting case report. An appropriate case definition in etiological studies should include only isolated gastroschisis after an appropriate definition of isolated and non-isolated cases and a thorough case-by-case review.

  3. Transcript profiling of crown rootless1 mutant stem base reveals new elements associated with crown root development in rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Anh Le Thi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In rice, the major part of the post-embryonic root system is made of stem-derived roots named crown roots (CR. Among the few characterized rice mutants affected in root development, crown rootless1 mutant is unable to initiate crown root primordia. CROWN ROOTLESS1 (CRL1 is induced by auxin and encodes an AS2/LOB-domain transcription factor that acts upstream of the gene regulatory network controlling CR development. Results To identify genes involved in CR development, we compared global gene expression profile in stem bases of crl1 mutant and wild-type (WT plants. Our analysis revealed that 250 and 236 genes are down- and up-regulated respectively in the crl1 mutant. Auxin induces CRL1 expression and consequently it is expected that auxin also alters the expression of genes that are early regulated by CRL1. To identify genes under the early control of CRL1, we monitored the expression kinetics of a selected subset of genes, mainly chosen among those exhibiting differential expression, in crl1 and WT following exogenous auxin treatment. This analysis revealed that most of these genes, mainly related to hormone, water and nutrient, development and homeostasis, were likely not regulated directly by CRL1. We hypothesized that the differential expression for these genes observed in the crl1 mutant is likely a consequence of the absence of CR formation. Otherwise, three CRL1-dependent auxin-responsive genes: FSM (FLATENNED SHOOT MERISTEM/FAS1 (FASCIATA1, GTE4 (GENERAL TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR GROUP E4 and MAP (MICROTUBULE-ASSOCIATED PROTEIN were identified. FSM/FAS1 and GTE4 are known in rice and Arabidopsis to be involved in the maintenance of root meristem through chromatin remodelling and cell cycle regulation respectively. Conclusion Our data showed that the differential regulation of most genes in crl1 versus WT may be an indirect consequence of CRL1 inactivation resulting from the absence of CR in the crl1 mutant. Nevertheless

  4. Children with dyslexia reveal abnormal native language representations: evidence from a study of mismatch negativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruder, Jennifer; Leppänen, Paavo H T; Bartling, Jürgen; Csépe, Valéria; Démonet, Jean-Francois; Schulte-Körne, Gerd

    2011-08-01

    Although a deficit perceiving phonemes, as indexed by the mismatch negativity (MMN), is apparent in developmental dyslexia (DD), studies have not yet addressed whether this deficit might be a result of deficient native language speech representations. The present study examines how a native-vowel prototype and an atypical vowel are discriminated by 9-year-old children with (n = 14) and without (n = 12) DD. MMN was elicited in all conditions in both groups. The control group revealed enhanced MMN to the native-vowel prototype in comparison to the atypical vowel. Children with DD did not show enhanced MMN amplitude to the native-vowel prototype, suggesting impaired tuning to native language speech representations. Furthermore, higher MMN amplitudes to the native-vowel prototype correlated with more advanced reading (r = - .47) and spelling skills (r = - .52). Copyright © 2011 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  5. A trial-by-trial analysis reveals more intense physical activity is associated with better cognitive control performance in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartanto, T A; Krafft, C E; Iosif, A M; Schweitzer, J B

    2016-01-01

    Hyperactivity is a key symptom and the most observable manifestation of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The over-activity associated with ADHD can cause specific challenges in academic settings, extracurricular activities and social relationships. Cognitive control challenges are also well established in ADHD. The current study included 44 children between the ages of 10 and 17 diagnosed with ADHD or who were typically developing (TD), all of whom had no psychiatric co-morbidity or significant learning disorders. Participants wore an actometer on their ankle while performing a flanker paradigm in order to objectively measure their rates of activity in association with cognitive control. Analyses assessed the relationship between frequency and intensity of activity to task accuracy on a trial-by-trial basis. A significant interaction effect between group and performance revealed that more intense movement was associated with better performance in the ADHD group but not in the TD group. The ADHD group demonstrated more intense activity than the TD group during correct (but not error) trials. Within-group, children with ADHD generated higher intensity movements in their correct trials compared to their error trials, whereas the TD group did not demonstrate any within-group differences. These findings suggest that excessive motoric activity associated with clinically significant ADHD symptoms may reflect compensatory efforts to modulate attention and alertness. Future research should systematically explore the relationship between motion in ADHD and how it might be used to improve cognitive performance.

  6. Copy Number Profiling of MammaPrint™ Genes Reveals Association with the Prognosis of Breast Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatima, Areej; Tariq, Fomaz; Malik, Muhammad Faraz Arshad; Qasim, Muhammad

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The MammaPrint™ gene signature, currently used in clinical practice, provides prognostic information regarding the recurrence and potential metastasis in breast cancer patients. However, the prognostic information of the 70 genes included can only be estimated at the RNA expression level. In this study, we investigated whether copy number information of MammaPrint™ genes at the DNA level can be used as a prognostic tool for breast cancer, as copy number variations (CNVs) are major contributors to cancer progression. Methods We performed CNV profiling of MammaPrint™ genes in 59 breast cancer cell lines and 650 breast cancer patients, using publicly available data in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) database. Statistical analyses including Fisher exact test, chi-square test, and Kaplan-Meier survival analyses were performed. Results All MammaPrint™ genes showed recurrent CNVs, particularly in TCGA cohort. CNVs of 32 and 36 genes showed significant associations with progesterone receptor and estrogen rector, respectively. No genes showed a significant association with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 status and lymph node status. In addition, only six genes were associated with tumor stages. RFC4, HRASLS, NMU, GPR126, SCUBE2, C20orf46, and EBF4 were associated with reduced survival and RASSF7 and ESM1 were associated with reduced disease-free survival. Conclusion Based on these findings, a concordance of CNV-based genomic rearrangement with expression profiling of these genes and their putative roles in disease tumorigenesis was established. The results suggested that the CNV profiles of the MammaPrint™ genes can be used to predict the prognosis of breast cancer patients. In addition, this approach may lead to the development of new cancer biomarkers at the DNA level. PMID:28970850

  7. Copy Number Profiling of MammaPrint™ Genes Reveals Association with the Prognosis of Breast Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatima, Areej; Tariq, Fomaz; Malik, Muhammad Faraz Arshad; Qasim, Muhammad; Haq, Farhan

    2017-09-01

    The MammaPrint™ gene signature, currently used in clinical practice, provides prognostic information regarding the recurrence and potential metastasis in breast cancer patients. However, the prognostic information of the 70 genes included can only be estimated at the RNA expression level. In this study, we investigated whether copy number information of MammaPrint™ genes at the DNA level can be used as a prognostic tool for breast cancer, as copy number variations (CNVs) are major contributors to cancer progression. We performed CNV profiling of MammaPrint™ genes in 59 breast cancer cell lines and 650 breast cancer patients, using publicly available data in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) database. Statistical analyses including Fisher exact test, chi-square test, and Kaplan-Meier survival analyses were performed. All MammaPrint™ genes showed recurrent CNVs, particularly in TCGA cohort. CNVs of 32 and 36 genes showed significant associations with progesterone receptor and estrogen rector, respectively. No genes showed a significant association with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 status and lymph node status. In addition, only six genes were associated with tumor stages. RFC4 , HRASLS , NMU , GPR126 , SCUBE2 , C20orf46 , and EBF4 were associated with reduced survival and RASSF7 and ESM1 were associated with reduced disease-free survival. Based on these findings, a concordance of CNV-based genomic rearrangement with expression profiling of these genes and their putative roles in disease tumorigenesis was established. The results suggested that the CNV profiles of the MammaPrint™ genes can be used to predict the prognosis of breast cancer patients. In addition, this approach may lead to the development of new cancer biomarkers at the DNA level.

  8. In situ hybridization and sequence analysis reveal an association of Plasmodium spp. with mortalities in wild passerine birds in Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinhopl, Nora; Nedorost, Nora; Mostegl, Meike M; Weissenbacher-Lang, Christiane; Weissenböck, Herbert

    2015-04-01

    Native European passerine birds are frequently clinically inapparent carriers of haemosporidian parasites of the genus Plasmodium. Clinical disease and death are only exceptionally reported. In the present study, tissue samples of 233 wild passerine birds found dead in Eastern Austria were examined by in situ hybridization (ISH) and partial cytochrome B gene sequence analysis for the presence, abundance and taxonomic assignment of Plasmodium spp. In 34 cases (14.6%), ISH yielded a positive result with large numbers of developmental stages in different cell types of the spleen, liver, brain and lung. The abundance of the tissue stages, which was comparable to fatal cases of avian malaria in penguins, suggested a major contribution to the cause of death. Genetic analysis revealed infections with representatives of three different valid species of Plasmodium, Plasmodium elongatum, Plasmodium lutzi and Plasmodium vaughani. Genetically identical parasite lineages had been found in a previous study in penguins kept in the Vienna zoo, providing evidence for the role of wild birds as reservoir hosts. Further, this study provides evidence that several species of Plasmodium are able to abundantly proliferate in endemic wild birds ultimately resulting in mortalities.

  9. Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus-associated chronic fatigue syndrome reveals a distinct inflammatory signature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Vincent C; Hagen, Kathryn S; Hunter, Kenneth W; Diamond, John W; Smith-Gagen, Julie; Yang, Wei; Mikovits, Judy A

    2011-01-01

    The recent identification of xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) in the blood of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) establishes that a retrovirus may play a role in the pathology in this disease. Knowledge of the immune response might lead to a better understanding of the role XMRV plays in this syndrome. Our objective was to investigate the cytokine and chemokine response in XMRV-associated CFS. Using Luminex multi-analyte profiling technology, we measured cytokine and chemokine values in the plasma of XMRV-infected CFS patients and compared these data to those of healthy controls. Analysis was performed using the Gene Expression Pattern Analysis Suite and the Random Forest tree classification algorithm. This study identifies a signature of 10 cytokines and chemokines which correctly identifies XMRV/CFS patients with 93% specificity and 96% sensitivity. These data show, for the first time, an immunological pattern associated with XMRV/CFS.

  10. Talaromyces marneffei Genomic, Transcriptomic, Proteomic and Metabolomic Studies Reveal Mechanisms for Environmental Adaptations and Virulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna K. P. Lau

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Talaromyces marneffei is a thermally dimorphic fungus causing systemic infections in patients positive for HIV or other immunocompromised statuses. Analysis of its ~28.9 Mb draft genome and additional transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolomic studies revealed mechanisms for environmental adaptations and virulence. Meiotic genes and genes for pheromone receptors, enzymes which process pheromones, and proteins involved in pheromone response pathway are present, indicating its possibility as a heterothallic fungus. Among the 14 Mp1p homologs, only Mp1p is a virulence factor binding a variety of host proteins, fatty acids and lipids. There are 23 polyketide synthase genes, one for melanin and two for mitorubrinic acid/mitorubrinol biosynthesis, which are virulence factors. Another polyketide synthase is for biogenesis of the diffusible red pigment, which consists of amino acid conjugates of monascorubin and rubropunctatin. Novel microRNA-like RNAs (milRNAs and processing proteins are present. The dicer protein, dcl-2, is required for biogenesis of two milRNAs, PM-milR-M1 and PM-milR-M2, which are more highly expressed in hyphal cells. Comparative transcriptomics showed that tandem repeat-containing genes were overexpressed in yeast phase, generating protein polymorphism among cells, evading host’s immunity. Comparative proteomics between yeast and hyphal cells revealed that glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, up-regulated in hyphal cells, is an adhesion factor for conidial attachment.

  11. Association analyses of porcine SERPINE1 reveal sex-specific effects on muscling, growth, fat accretion and meat quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisz, F; Bartenschlager, H; Knoll, A; Mileham, A; Deeb, N; Geldermann, H; Cepica, S

    2012-10-01

    The serpin peptidase inhibitor, clade E (nexin, plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1), member 1 (SERPINE1) gene encodes plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI), which is the major physiological inhibitor of tissue-type and urokinase-type plasminogen activators and plays a role in obesity and insulin resistance in women but not in men. We detected SNP FN396538:g.566G>A in intron 3 and a non-synonymous substitution NM_213910:c.612A>G in exon 3 (p.Ile159Val) and mapped the gene to position 8.4 cM on the linkage map of chromosome 3. Association analyses were conducted on the 12th-15th generation of the Meishan × Large White (MLW) cross (n = 565), with records for weight at the end of test, lifetime daily gain, test time daily gain, loin depth and backfat depth, as well as on a European wild boar × Meishan (W × M) F(2) population (n = 333) with 47 traits recorded for carcass composition and meat quality. Analyses performed across the entire MLW population or in the male animals did not show any trait significantly associated with the loci studied. In female animals, both SNPs were associated with loin depth at nominal P < 0.05 with adjusted P values equal to 0.051 (g.566) and 0.057 (c.612). Differences between homozygotes were up to 0.65 SD. In the entire W × M population and female animals, SERPINE1 was significantly associated at adjusted P < 0.05 in descending order with muscling, growth and fat accretion and in male animals with meat quality (R-value). In the studied populations, allele effects were in opposite directions, which implies that the SNPs are markers that are in linkage disequilibrium with a causative mutation. © 2011 The Authors, Animal Genetics © 2011 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  12. Digital genotyping of macrosatellites and multicopy genes reveals novel biological functions associated with copy number variation of large tandem repeats.

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    Manisha Brahmachary

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Tandem repeats are common in eukaryotic genomes, but due to difficulties in assaying them remain poorly studied. Here, we demonstrate the utility of Nanostring technology as a targeted approach to perform accurate measurement of tandem repeats even at extremely high copy number, and apply this technology to genotype 165 HapMap samples from three different populations and five species of non-human primates. We observed extreme variability in copy number of tandemly repeated genes, with many loci showing 5-10 fold variation in copy number among humans. Many of these loci show hallmarks of genome assembly errors, and the true copy number of many large tandem repeats is significantly under-represented even in the high quality 'finished' human reference assembly. Importantly, we demonstrate that most large tandem repeat variations are not tagged by nearby SNPs, and are therefore essentially invisible to SNP-based GWAS approaches. Using association analysis we identify many cis correlations of large tandem repeat variants with nearby gene expression and DNA methylation levels, indicating that variations of tandem repeat length are associated with functional effects on the local genomic environment. This includes an example where expansion of a macrosatellite repeat is associated with increased DNA methylation and suppression of nearby gene expression, suggesting a mechanism termed "repeat induced gene silencing", which has previously been observed only in transgenic organisms. We also observed multiple signatures consistent with altered selective pressures at tandemly repeated loci, suggesting important biological functions. Our studies show that tandemly repeated loci represent a highly variable fraction of the genome that have been systematically ignored by most previous studies, copy number variation of which can exert functionally significant effects. We suggest that future studies of tandem repeat loci will lead to many novel insights into their

  13. Digital Genotyping of Macrosatellites and Multicopy Genes Reveals Novel Biological Functions Associated with Copy Number Variation of Large Tandem Repeats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quilez, Javier; Hasson, Dan; Borel, Christelle; Warburton, Peter; Sharp, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Tandem repeats are common in eukaryotic genomes, but due to difficulties in assaying them remain poorly studied. Here, we demonstrate the utility of Nanostring technology as a targeted approach to perform accurate measurement of tandem repeats even at extremely high copy number, and apply this technology to genotype 165 HapMap samples from three different populations and five species of non-human primates. We observed extreme variability in copy number of tandemly repeated genes, with many loci showing 5–10 fold variation in copy number among humans. Many of these loci show hallmarks of genome assembly errors, and the true copy number of many large tandem repeats is significantly under-represented even in the high quality ‘finished’ human reference assembly. Importantly, we demonstrate that most large tandem repeat variations are not tagged by nearby SNPs, and are therefore essentially invisible to SNP-based GWAS approaches. Using association analysis we identify many cis correlations of large tandem repeat variants with nearby gene expression and DNA methylation levels, indicating that variations of tandem repeat length are associated with functional effects on the local genomic environment. This includes an example where expansion of a macrosatellite repeat is associated with increased DNA methylation and suppression of nearby gene expression, suggesting a mechanism termed “repeat induced gene silencing”, which has previously been observed only in transgenic organisms. We also observed multiple signatures consistent with altered selective pressures at tandemly repeated loci, suggesting important biological functions. Our studies show that tandemly repeated loci represent a highly variable fraction of the genome that have been systematically ignored by most previous studies, copy number variation of which can exert functionally significant effects. We suggest that future studies of tandem repeat loci will lead to many novel insights into their role in

  14. Integrated analysis of microRNA and gene expression profiles reveals a functional regulatory module associated with liver fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Zhao, Wenshan; Yang, Aiting; Xu, Anjian; Wang, Huan; Cong, Min; Liu, Tianhui; Wang, Ping; You, Hong

    2017-12-15

    -receptor interaction" were remarked significant (adjusted pGenes enriched in these pathways coupled with their regulatory miRNAs formed a functional miRNA-gene regulatory module that contains 7 miRNAs, 22 genes and 42 miRNA-gene connections. Gene interaction analysis based on String database revealed that 8 out of 22 genes were highly clustered. Finally, we experimentally confirmed a functional regulatory module containing 5 miRNAs (miR-130b-3p, miR-148a-3p, miR-345-5p, miR-378a-3p, and miR-422a) and 6 genes (COL6A1, COL6A2, COL6A3, PIK3R3, COL1A1, CCND2) associated with liver fibrosis. Our integrated analysis of miRNA and gene expression profiles highlighted a functional miRNA-gene regulatory module associated with liver fibrosis, which, to some extent, may provide important clues to better understand the underlying pathogenesis of liver fibrosis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Event-related potentials associated with masked priming of test cues reveal multiple potential contributions to recognition memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woollams, Anna M; Taylor, Jason R; Karayanidis, Frini; Henson, Richard N

    2008-06-01

    The relationship between recognition memory and repetition priming remains unclear. Priming is believed to reflect increased processing fluency for previously studied items relative to new items. Manipulations that affect fluency can also affect the likelihood that participants will judge items as studied in recognition tasks. This attribution of fluency to memory has been related to the familiarity process, as distinct from the recollection process, that is assumed by dual-process models of recognition memory. To investigate the time courses and neural sources of fluency, familiarity, and recollection, we conducted an event-related potential (ERP) study of recognition memory using masked priming of test cues and a remember/know paradigm. During the recognition test, studied and unstudied words were preceded by a brief, masked word that was either the same or different. Participants decided quickly whether each item had been studied ("old" or "new"), and for items called old, indicated whether they "remembered" (R) the encoding event, or simply "knew" (K) the item had been studied. Masked priming increased the proportion of K, but not R, judgments. Priming also decreased response times for hits but not correct rejections (CRs). Four distinct ERP effects were found. A medial-frontal FN400 (300-500 msec) was associated with familiarity (R, K Hits > CRs) and a centro-parietal late positivity (500-800 msec) with recollection (R Hits > K Hits, CRs). A long-term repetition effect was found for studied items judged "new" (Misses > CRs) in the same time window as the FN400, but with a posterior distribution. Finally, a centrally distributed masked priming effect was visible between 150 and 250 msec and continued into the 300-500 msec time window, where it was topographically dissociable from the FN400. These results suggest that multiple neural signals are associated with repetition and potentially contribute to recognition memory.

  16. Staphylococcus epidermidis pan-genome sequence analysis reveals diversity of skin commensal and hospital infection-associated isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conlan, Sean; Mijares, Lilia A; Becker, Jesse; Blakesley, Robert W; Bouffard, Gerard G; Brooks, Shelise; Coleman, Holly; Gupta, Jyoti; Gurson, Natalie; Park, Morgan; Schmidt, Brian; Thomas, Pamela J; Otto, Michael; Kong, Heidi H; Murray, Patrick R; Segre, Julia A

    2012-07-25

    While Staphylococcus epidermidis is commonly isolated from healthy human skin, it is also the most frequent cause of nosocomial infections on indwelling medical devices. Despite its importance, few genome sequences existed and the most frequent hospital-associated lineage, ST2, had not been fully sequenced. We cultivated 71 commensal S. epidermidis isolates from 15 skin sites and compared them with 28 nosocomial isolates from venous catheters and blood cultures. We produced 21 commensal and 9 nosocomial draft genomes, and annotated and compared their gene content, phylogenetic relatedness and biochemical functions. The commensal strains had an open pan-genome with 80% core genes and 20% variable genes. The variable genome was characterized by an overabundance of transposable elements, transcription factors and transporters. Biochemical diversity, as assayed by antibiotic resistance and in vitro biofilm formation, demonstrated the varied phenotypic consequences of this genomic diversity. The nosocomial isolates exhibited both large-scale rearrangements and single-nucleotide variation. We showed that S. epidermidis genomes separate into two phylogenetic groups, one consisting only of commensals. The formate dehydrogenase gene, present only in commensals, is a discriminatory marker between the two groups. Commensal skin S. epidermidis have an open pan-genome and show considerable diversity between isolates, even when derived from a single individual or body site. For ST2, the most common nosocomial lineage, we detect variation between three independent isolates sequenced. Finally, phylogenetic analyses revealed a previously unrecognized group of S. epidermidis strains characterized by reduced virulence and formate dehydrogenase, which we propose as a clinical molecular marker.

  17. Genome-wide association studies in asthma: progress and pitfalls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    March ME

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Michael E March,1 Patrick MA Sleiman,1,2 Hakon Hakonarson1,2 1Center for Applied Genomics, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia Research Institute, 2Department of Pediatrics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA Abstract: Genetic studies of asthma have revealed that there is considerable heritability to the phenotype. An extensive history of candidate-gene studies has identified a long list of genes associated with immune function that are potentially involved in asthma pathogenesis. However, many of the results of candidate-gene studies have failed to be replicated, leaving in question the true impact of the implicated biological pathways on asthma. With the advent of genome-wide association studies, geneticists are able to examine the association of hundreds of thousands of genetic markers with a phenotype, allowing the hypothesis-free identification of variants associated with disease. Many such studies examining asthma or related phenotypes have been published, and several themes have begun to emerge regarding the biological pathways underpinning asthma. The results of many genome-wide association studies have currently not been replicated, and the large sample sizes required for this experimental strategy invoke difficulties with sample stratification and phenotypic heterogeneity. Recently, large collaborative groups of researchers have formed consortia focused on asthma, with the goals of sharing material and data and standardizing diagnosis and experimental methods. Additionally, research has begun to focus on genetic variants that affect the response to asthma medications and on the biology that generates the heterogeneity in the asthma phenotype. As this work progresses, it will move asthma patients closer to more specific, personalized medicine. Keywords: asthma, genetics, GWAS, pharmacogenetics, biomarkers

  18. Genome-wide association analysis reveals genetic loci and candidate genes for feeding behavior and eating efficiency in Duroc boars.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongrong Ding

    Full Text Available Efficient use of feed resources is a challenge in the pork industry because the largest variability in expenditure is attributed to the cost of fodder. Efficiency of feeding is directly related to feeding behavior. In order to identify genomic regions controlling feeding behavior and eating efficiency traits, 338 Duroc boars were used in this study. The Illumina Porcine SNP60K BeadChip was used for genotyping. Data pertaining to individual daily feed intake (DFI, total daily time spent in feeder (TPD, number of daily visits to feeder (NVD, average duration of each visit (TPV, mean feed intake per visit (FPV, mean feed intake rate (FR, and feed conversion ratio (FCR were collected for these pigs. Despite the limited sample size, the genome-wide association study was acceptable to detect candidate regions association with feeding behavior and eating efficiency traits in pigs. We detected three genome-wide (P < 1.40E-06 and 11 suggestive (P < 2.79E-05 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP-trait associations. Six SNPs were located in genomic regions where quantitative trait loci (QTLs have previously been reported for feeding behavior and eating efficiency traits in pigs. Five candidate genes (SERPINA3, MYC, LEF1, PITX2, and MAP3K14 with biochemical and physiological roles that were relevant to feeding behavior and eating efficiency were discovered proximal to significant or suggestive markers. Gene ontology analysis indicated that most of the candidate genes were involved in the development of the hypothalamus (GO:0021854, P < 0.0398. Our results provide new insights into the genetic basis of feeding behavior and eating efficiency in pigs. Furthermore, some significant SNPs identified in this study could be incorporated into artificial selection programs for Duroc-related pigs to select for increased feeding efficiency.

  19. Genome-wide association analysis reveals genetic loci and candidate genes for feeding behavior and eating efficiency in Duroc boars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Rongrong; Quan, Jianping; Yang, Ming; Wang, Xingwang; Zheng, Enqin; Yang, Huaqiang; Fu, Disheng; Yang, Yang; Yang, Linxue; Li, Zicong; Liu, Dewu; Cai, Gengyuan; Wu, Zhenfang; Yang, Jie

    2017-01-01

    Efficient use of feed resources is a challenge in the pork industry because the largest variability in expenditure is attributed to the cost of fodder. Efficiency of feeding is directly related to feeding behavior. In order to identify genomic regions controlling feeding behavior and eating efficiency traits, 338 Duroc boars were used in this study. The Illumina Porcine SNP60K BeadChip was used for genotyping. Data pertaining to individual daily feed intake (DFI), total daily time spent in feeder (TPD), number of daily visits to feeder (NVD), average duration of each visit (TPV), mean feed intake per visit (FPV), mean feed intake rate (FR), and feed conversion ratio (FCR) were collected for these pigs. Despite the limited sample size, the genome-wide association study was acceptable to detect candidate regions association with feeding behavior and eating efficiency traits in pigs. We detected three genome-wide (P efficiency traits in pigs. Five candidate genes (SERPINA3, MYC, LEF1, PITX2, and MAP3K14) with biochemical and physiological roles that were relevant to feeding behavior and eating efficiency were discovered proximal to significant or suggestive markers. Gene ontology analysis indicated that most of the candidate genes were involved in the development of the hypothalamus (GO:0021854, P efficiency in pigs. Furthermore, some significant SNPs identified in this study could be incorporated into artificial selection programs for Duroc-related pigs to select for increased feeding efficiency.

  20. Multi-locus sequence typing of Bartonella henselae isolates from three continents reveals hypervirulent and feline-associated clones.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mardjan Arvand

    Full Text Available Bartonella henselae is a zoonotic pathogen and the causative agent of cat scratch disease and a variety of other disease manifestations in humans. Previous investigations have suggested that a limited subset of B. henselae isolates may be associated with human disease. In the present study, 182 human and feline B. henselae isolates from Europe, North America and Australia were analysed by multi-locus sequence typing (MLST to detect any associations between sequence type (ST, host species and geographical distribution of the isolates. A total of 14 sequence types were detected, but over 66% (16/24 of the isolates recovered from human disease corresponded to a single genotype, ST1, and this type was detected in all three continents. In contrast, 27.2% (43/158 of the feline isolates corresponded to ST7, but this ST was not recovered from humans and was restricted to Europe. The difference in host association of STs 1 (human and 7 (feline was statistically significant (P< or =0.001. eBURST analysis assigned the 14 STs to three clonal lineages, which contained two or more STs, and a singleton comprising ST7. These groups were broadly consistent with a neighbour-joining tree, although splits decomposition analysis was indicative of a history of recombination. These data indicate that B. henselae lineages differ in their virulence properties for humans and contribute to a better understanding of the population structure of B. henselae.

  1. Cis-eQTL-based trans-ethnic meta-analysis reveals novel genes associated with breast cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Joshua D; Graff, Rebecca E; Emami, Nima C; Tai, Caroline G; Passarelli, Michael N; Hu, Donglei; Huntsman, Scott; Hadley, Dexter; Leong, Lancelote; Majumdar, Arunabha; Zaitlen, Noah; Ziv, Elad; Witte, John S

    2017-03-01

    Breast cancer is the most common solid organ malignancy and the most frequent cause of cancer death among women worldwide. Previous research has yielded insights into its genetic etiology, but there remains a gap in the understanding of genetic factors that contribute to risk, and particularly in the biological mechanisms by which genetic variation modulates risk. The National Cancer Institute's "Up for a Challenge" (U4C) competition provided an opportunity to further elucidate the genetic basis of the disease. Our group leveraged the seven datasets made available by the U4C organizers and data from the publicly available UK Biobank cohort to examine associations between imputed gene expression and breast cancer risk. In particular, we used reference datasets describing the breast tissue and whole blood transcriptomes to impute expression levels in breast cancer cases and controls. In trans-ethnic meta-analyses of U4C and UK Biobank data, we found significant associations between breast cancer risk and the expression of RCCD1 (joint p-value: 3.6x10-06) and DHODH (p-value: 7.1x10-06) in breast tissue, as well as a suggestive association for ANKLE1 (p-value: 9.3x10-05). Expression of RCCD1 in whole blood was also suggestively associated with disease risk (p-value: 1.2x10-05), as were expression of ACAP1 (p-value: 1.9x10-05) and LRRC25 (p-value: 5.2x10-05). While genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have implicated RCCD1 and ANKLE1 in breast cancer risk, they have not identified the remaining three genes. Among the genetic variants that contributed to the predicted expression of the five genes, we found 23 nominally (p-value associated with breast cancer risk, among which 15 are not in high linkage disequilibrium with risk variants previously identified by GWAS. In summary, we used a transcriptome-based approach to investigate the genetic underpinnings of breast carcinogenesis. This approach provided an avenue for deciphering the functional relevance of genes and

  2. Comparative Genomics of Campylobacter fetus from Reptiles and Mammals Reveals Divergent Evolution in Host-Associated Lineages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gilbert, Maarten J; Miller, William G; Yee, Emma; Zomer, Aldert L; van der Graaf-van Bloois, Linda; Fitzgerald, Collette; Forbes, Ken J; Méric, Guillaume; Sheppard, Samuel K; Wagenaar, Jaap A; Duim, Birgitta

    Campylobacter fetus currently comprises three recognized subspecies, which display distinct host association. Campylobacter fetus subsp. fetus and C fetus subsp. venerealis are both associated with endothermic mammals, primarily ruminants, whereas C fetus subsp. testudinum is primarily associated

  3. Genetic diversity study of the yeast Saccharomyces bayanus var. uvarum reveals introgressed subtelomeric Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumova, Elena S; Naumov, Gennadi I; Michailova, Yulia V; Martynenko, Nikolay N; Masneuf-Pomarède, Isabelle

    2011-01-01

    Intraspecies polymorphism of the yeast Saccharomyces bayanus var. uvarum was studied using the polymerase chain reaction with a microsatellite primer (GTG)(5). Sixty-nine strains of different origins were analyzed. There existed a correlation between PCR patterns of the strains and the source of their isolation: the type of wine and the particular winemaking region. Southern hybridization analysis revealed for the first time introgression between Saccharomyces cerevisiae and S. bayanus var. uvarum. Two strains isolated from alcoholic beverages in Hungary and identified by genetic analysis as S. bayanus var. uvarum were found to harbor a number of S. cerevisiae subtelomeric sequences: Y', SUC, RTM and MAL. Copyright © 2010 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Analysis of IL2/IL21 gene variants in cholestatic liver diseases reveals an association with primary sclerosing cholangitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stallhofer, Johannes; Denk, Gerald Ulrich; Glas, Jürgen; Laubender, Rüdiger Paul; Göke, Burkhard; Rust, Christian; Brand, Stephan; Pusl, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The chromosome 4q27 region harboring IL2 and IL21 is an established risk locus for ulcerative colitis (UC) and various other autoimmune diseases. Considering the strong coincidence of primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) with UC and the increased frequency of other autoimmune disorders in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), we investigated whether genetic variation in the IL2/IL21 region may also modulate the susceptibility to these two rare cholestatic liver diseases. Four strongly UC-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the KIAA1109/TENR/IL2/IL21 linkage disequilibrium block were genotyped in 124 PBC and 41 PSC patients. Control allele frequencies from 1,487 healthy, unrelated Caucasians were available from a previous UC association study. The minor alleles of all four markers were associated with a decreased susceptibility to PSC (rs13151961: p = 0.013, odds ratio (OR) 0.34; rs13119723: p = 0.023, OR 0.40; rs6822844: p = 0.031, OR 0.41; rs6840978: p = 0.043, OR 0.46). Moreover, a haplotype consisting of the four minor alleles also had a protective effect on PSC susceptibility (p = 0.0084, OR 0.28). A haplotype of the four major alleles was independently associated with PSC when excluding the patients with concomitant inflammatory bowel disease (p = 0.033, OR 4.18). The IL2/IL21 region may be one of the highly suggestive but so far rarely identified shared susceptibility loci for PSC and UC. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Electron cryotomography studies of maturing HIV-1 particles reveal the assembly pathway of the viral core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Cora L; Cheng, Sarah N; Jensen, Grant J

    2015-01-15

    To better characterize the assembly of the HIV-1 core, we have used electron cryotomography (ECT) to image infected cells and the viral particles cryopreserved next to them. We observed progressive stages of virus assembly and egress, including flower-like flat Gag lattice assemblies, hemispherical budding profiles, and virus buds linked to the plasma membrane via a thin membrane neck. The population of budded viral particles contains immature, maturation-intermediate, and mature core morphologies. Structural characteristics of the maturation intermediates suggest that the core assembly pathway involves the formation of a CA sheet that associates with the condensed ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex. Our analysis also reveals a correlation between RNP localization within the viral particle and the formation of conical cores, suggesting that the RNP helps drive conical core assembly. Our findings support an assembly pathway for the HIV-1 core that begins with a small CA sheet that associates with the RNP to form the core base, followed by polymerization of the CA sheet along one side of the conical core toward the tip, and then closure around the body of the cone. During HIV-1 assembly and release, the Gag polyprotein is organized into a signature hexagonal lattice, termed the immature lattice. To become infectious, the newly budded virus must disassemble the immature lattice by proteolyzing Gag and then reassemble the key proteolytic product, the structural protein p24 (CA), into a distinct, mature hexagonal lattice during a process termed maturation. The mature HIV-1 virus contains a conical capsid that encloses the condensed viral genome at its wide base. Mutations or small molecules that interfere with viral maturation also disrupt viral infectivity. Little is known about the assembly pathway that results in the conical core and genome encapsidation. Here, we have used electron cryotomography to structurally characterize HIV-1 particles that are actively maturing

  6. A pharmacogenetic pilot study reveals MTHFR, DRD3, and MDR1 polymorphisms as biomarker candidates for slow atorvastatin metabolizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León-Cachón, Rafael B R; Ascacio-Martínez, Jorge A; Gamino-Peña, María E; Cerda-Flores, Ricardo M; Meester, Irene; Gallardo-Blanco, Hugo L; Gómez-Silva, Magdalena; Piñeyro-Garza, Everardo; Barrera-Saldaña, Hugo A

    2016-02-08

    The genetic variation underlying atorvastatin (ATV) pharmacokinetics was evaluated in a Mexican population. Aims of this study were: 1) to reveal the frequency of 87 polymorphisms in 36 genes related to drug metabolism in healthy Mexican volunteers, 2) to evaluate the impact of these polymorphisms on ATV pharmacokinetics, 3) to classify the ATV metabolic phenotypes of healthy volunteers, and 4) to investigate a possible association between genotypes and metabolizer phenotypes. A pharmacokinetic study of ATV (single 80-mg dose) was conducted in 60 healthy male volunteers. ATV plasma concentrations were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. Pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated by the non-compartmental method. The polymorphisms were determined with the PHARMAchip® microarray and the TaqMan® probes genotyping assay. Three metabolic phenotypes were found in our population: slow, normal, and rapid. Six gene polymorphisms were found to have a significant effect on ATV pharmacokinetics: MTHFR (rs1801133), DRD3 (rs6280), GSTM3 (rs1799735), TNFα (rs1800629), MDR1 (rs1045642), and SLCO1B1 (rs4149056). The combination of MTHFR, DRD3 and MDR1 polymorphisms associated with a slow ATV metabolizer phenotype. Further studies using a genetic preselection method and a larger population are needed to confirm these polymorphisms as predictive biomarkers for ATV slow metabolizers. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: ACTRN12614000851662, date registered: August 8, 2014.

  7. Surface phenomena revealed by in situ imaging: studies from adhesion, wear and cutting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Koushik; Mahato, Anirban; Yeung, Ho; Chandrasekar, Srinivasan

    2017-03-01

    Surface deformation and flow phenomena are ubiquitous in mechanical processes. In this work we present an in situ imaging framework for studying a range of surface mechanical phenomena at high spatial resolution and across a range of time scales. The in situ framework is capable of resolving deformation and flow fields quantitatively in terms of surface displacements, velocities, strains and strain rates. Three case studies are presented demonstrating the power of this framework for studying surface deformation. In the first, the origin of stick-slip motion in adhesive polymer interfaces is investigated, revealing a intimate link between stick-slip and surface wave propagation. Second, the role of flow in mediating formation of surface defects and wear particles in metals is analyzed using a prototypical sliding process. It is shown that conventional post-mortem observation and inference can lead to erroneous conclusions with regard to formation of surface cracks and wear particles. The in situ framework is shown to unambiguously capture delamination wear in sliding. Third, material flow and surface deformation in a typical cutting process is analyzed. It is shown that a long-standing problem in the cutting of annealed metals is resolved by the imaging, with other benefits such as estimation of energy dissipation and power from the flow fields. In closure, guidelines are provided for profitably exploiting in situ observations to study large-strain deformation, flow and friction phenomena at surfaces that display a variety of time-scales.

  8. Genome-Wide Association Mapping Reveals Novel QTL for Seedling Leaf Rust Resistance in a Worldwide Collection of Winter Wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genqiao Li

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Leaf rust of wheat ( L. is a major disease that causes significant yield losses worldwide. The short-lived nature of leaf rust resistance ( genes necessitates a continuous search for novel sources of resistance. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS on a panel of 1596 wheat accessions. The panel was evaluated for leaf rust reaction by testing with a bulk of Eriks. ( isolates collected from multiple fields of Oklahoma in 2013 and two predominant races in the fields of Oklahoma in 2015. The panel was genotyped with a set of 5011 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP markers. A total of 14 quantitative trait loci (QTL for leaf rust resistance were identified at a false discovery rate (FDR of 0.01 using the mixed linear model (MLM. Of these, eight QTL reside in the vicinity of known genes or QTL, and more studies are needed to determine their relationship with known loci. is a new QTL to bread wheat but is close to a locus previously identified in durum wheat [ L. subsp. (Desf. Husn.]. The other five QTL, including , , , , and , are likely novel loci for leaf rust resistance. The uneven distribution of the 14 QTL in the six subpopulations of the panel suggests that wheat breeders can enhance leaf rust resistance by selectively introgressing some of these QTL into their breeding materials. In addition, another 31 QTL were significantly associated with leaf rust resistance at a FDR of 0.05.

  9. Sequence analysis of three canine adipokine genes revealed an association between TNF polymorphisms and obesity in Labrador dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankowska, M; Stachowiak, M; Graczyk, A; Ciazynska, P; Gogulski, M; Nizanski, W; Switonski, M

    2016-04-01

    Obesity is an emerging health problem in purebred dogs. Due to their crucial role in energy homeostasis control, genes encoding adipokines are considered candidate genes, and their variants may be associated with predisposition to obesity. Searching for polymorphism was carried out in three adipokine genes (TNF, RETN and IL6). The study was performed on 260 dogs, including lean (n = 109), overweight (n = 88) and obese (n = 63) dogs. The largest cohort was represented by Labrador Retrievers (n = 136). Altogether, 24 novel polymorphisms were identified: 12 in TNF (including one missense SNP), eight in RETN (including one missense SNP) and four in IL6. Distributions of five common SNPs (two in TNF, two in RETN and one in IL6) were further analyzed with regard to body condition score. Two SNPs in the non-coding parts of TNF (c.-40A>C and c.233+14G>A) were associated with obesity in Labrador dogs. The obtained results showed that the studied adipokine genes are highly polymorphic and two polymorphisms in the TNF gene may be considered as markers predisposing Labrador dogs to obesity. © 2015 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  10. 2D-DIGE analysis of mango (Mangifera indica L.) fruit reveals major proteomic changes associated with ripening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Jonathan de Magalhães; Toledo, Tatiana Torres; Nogueira, Silvia Beserra; Cordenunsi, Beatriz Rosana; Lajolo, Franco Maria; do Nascimento, João Roberto Oliveira

    2012-06-18

    A comparative proteomic investigation between the pre-climacteric and climacteric mango fruits (cv. Keitt) was performed to identify protein species with variable abundance during ripening. Proteins were phenol-extracted from fruits, cyanine-dye-labeled, and separated on 2D gels at pH 4-7. Total spot count of about 373 proteins spots was detected in each gel and forty-seven were consistently different between pre-climacteric and climacteric fruits and were subjected to LC-MS/MS analysis. Functional classification revealed that protein species involved in carbon fixation and hormone biosynthesis decreased during ripening, whereas those related to catabolism and the stress-response, including oxidative stress and abiotic and pathogen defense factors, accumulated. In relation to fruit quality, protein species putatively involved in color development and pulp softening were also identified. This study on mango proteomics provides an overview of the biological processes that occur during ripening. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Synergy analysis reveals association between insulin signaling and desmoplakin expression in palmitate treated HepG2 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuewei Wang

    Full Text Available The regulation of complex cellular activities in palmitate treated HepG2 cells, and the ensuing cytotoxic phenotype, involves cooperative interactions between genes. While previous approaches have largely focused on identifying individual target genes, elucidating interacting genes has thus far remained elusive. We applied the concept of information synergy to reconstruct a "gene-cooperativity" network for palmititate-induced cytotoxicity in liver cells. Our approach integrated gene expression data with metabolic profiles to select a subset of genes for network reconstruction. Subsequent analysis of the network revealed insulin signaling as the most significantly enriched pathway, and desmoplakin (DSP as its top neighbor. We determined that palmitate significantly reduces DSP expression, and treatment with insulin restores the lost expression of DSP. Insulin resistance is a common pathological feature of fatty liver and related ailments, whereas loss of DSP has been noted in liver carcinoma. Reduced DSP expression can lead to loss of cell-cell adhesion via desmosomes, and disrupt the keratin intermediate filament network. Our findings suggest that DSP expression may be perturbed by palmitate and, along with insulin resistance, may play a role in palmitate induced cytotoxicity, and serve as potential targets for further studies on non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD.

  12. Effects of age-associated regional changes in aortic stiffness on human hemodynamics revealed by computational modeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Cuomo

    Full Text Available Although considered by many as the gold standard clinical measure of arterial stiffness, carotid-to-femoral pulse wave velocity (cf-PWV averages material and geometric properties over a large portion of the central arterial tree. Given that such properties may evolve differentially as a function of region in cases of hypertension and aging, among other conditions, there is a need to evaluate the potential utility of cf-PWV as an early diagnostic of progressive vascular stiffening. In this paper, we introduce a data-driven fluid-solid-interaction computational model of the human aorta to simulate effects of aging-related changes in regional wall properties (e.g., biaxial material stiffness and wall thickness and conduit geometry (e.g., vessel caliber, length, and tortuosity on several metrics of arterial stiffness, including distensibility, augmented pulse pressure, and cyclic changes in stored elastic energy. Using the best available biomechanical data, our results for PWV compare well to findings reported for large population studies while rendering a higher resolution description of evolving local and global metrics of aortic stiffening. Our results reveal similar spatio-temporal trends between stiffness and its surrogate metrics, except PWV, thus indicating a complex dependency of the latter on geometry. Lastly, our analysis highlights the importance of the tethering exerted by external tissues, which was iteratively estimated until hemodynamic simulations recovered typical values of tissue properties, pulse pressure, and PWV for each age group.

  13. Association with AflR in Endosomes Reveals New Functions for AflJ in Aflatoxin Biosynthesis

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    John E. Linz

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Aflatoxins are the most potent naturally occurring carcinogens of fungal origin. Biosynthesis of aflatoxin involves the coordinated expression of more than 25 genes. The function of one gene in the aflatoxin gene cluster, aflJ, is not entirely understood but, because previous studies demonstrated a physical interaction between the Zn2Cys6 transcription factor AflR and AflJ, AflJ was proposed to act as a transcriptional co-activator. Image analysis revealed that, in the absence of aflJ in A. parasiticus, endosomes cluster within cells and near septa. AflJ fused to yellow fluorescent protein complemented the mutation in A. parasiticus ΔaflJ and localized mainly in endosomes. We found that AflJ co-localizes with AflR both in endosomes and in nuclei. Chromatin immunoprecipitation did not detect AflJ binding at known AflR DNA recognition sites suggesting that AflJ either does not bind to these sites or binds to them transiently. Based on these data, we hypothesize that AflJ assists in AflR transport to or from the nucleus, thus controlling the availability of AflR for transcriptional activation of aflatoxin biosynthesis cluster genes. AflJ may also assist in directing endosomes to the cytoplasmic membrane for aflatoxin export.

  14. Crowdsourcing-based nationwide tick collection reveals the distribution of Ixodes ricinus and I. persulcatus and associated pathogens in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laaksonen, Maija; Sajanti, Eeva; Sormunen, Jani J; Penttinen, Ritva; Hänninen, Jari; Ruohomäki, Kai; Sääksjärvi, Ilari; Vesterinen, Eero J; Vuorinen, Ilppo; Hytönen, Jukka; Klemola, Tero

    2017-05-10

    A national crowdsourcing-based tick collection campaign was organized in 2015 with the objective of producing novel data on tick distribution and tick-borne pathogens in Finland. Nearly 20 000 Ixodes ticks were collected. The collected material revealed the nationwide distribution of I. persulcatus for the first time and a shift northwards in the distribution of I. ricinus in Finland. A subset of 2038 tick samples containing both species was screened for Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (the prevalence was 14.2% for I. ricinus and 19.8% for I. persulcatus), B. miyamotoi (0.2% and 0.4%, respectively) and tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV; 0.2% and 3.0%, respectively). We also report new risk areas for TBEV in Finland and, for the first time, the presence of B. miyamotoi in ticks from mainland Finland. Most importantly, our study demonstrates the overwhelming power of citizen science in accomplishing a collection effort that would have been impossible with the scientific community alone.

  15. In vitro receptor autoradiography reveals angiotensin IL (ANG II) binding associated with sensory and motor components of the vagus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diz, D.I.; Barnes, K.L.; Ferrario, C.M.

    1986-03-05

    Specific, high affinity Ang II binding in the dog's dorsal medulla is concentrated in the area postrema, nucleus tractus solitarii (nTS) and dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (dmnX). More recently Ang II binding sites were observed where bundles of vagal afferent fibers enter the dorsal medulla 6 mm rostral to obex and in the nodose ganglia and peripheral vagal nerves. Since Ang II binding in the nTS and dmnX overlies the distribution of vagal afferent fibers and efferent neurons, the effects of nodose ganglionectomy and cervical vagotomy on Ang II binding in the dorsal medulla were studied in rats and dogs using autoradiography after incubation of 14 ..mu..m coronal sections with 0.4 nM /sup 125/I-Ang II. Nonspecific binding was determined in the presence of 1 ..mu..m unlabeled Ang II. Two weeks after unilateral nodose ganglionectomy Ang II binding sites were absent ipsilaterally in the region where vagal afferent fibers enter the dorsal medulla. In the nTS and dmnX, binding near obex was reduced, while more rostrally these nuclei were almost completely devoid of Ang II binding on the denervated side. After cervical vagotomy, the loss of binding was restricted to the ipsilateral dmnX. These data are the first to reveal that Ang II binding in the dorsal medulla requires an intact vagal system.

  16. In vitro receptor autoradiography reveals angiotensin II (Ang II) binding associated with sensory and motor components of the vagus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diz, D.I.; Barnes, K.L.; Ferrario, C.M.

    1986-03-05

    Specific, high affinity Ang II binding in the dog's dorsal medulla is concentrated in the area postrema, nucleus tractus solitarii (nTS) and dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (dmnX). More recently Ang II binding sites were observed where bundles of vagal afferent fibers enter the dorsal medulla 6 mm rostral to obex and in the nodose ganglia and peripheral vagal nerves. Since Ang II binding in the nTS and dmnX overlies the distribution of vagal afferent fibers and efferent neurons, the effects of nodose ganglionectomy and cervical vagotomy on Ang II binding in the dorsal medulla were studied in rats and dogs using autoradiography after incubation of 14 ..mu..m coronal sections with 0.4 nM /sup 125/I-Ang II. Nonspecific binding was determined in the presence of 1 ..mu..M unlabeled Ang II. Two weeks after unilateral nodose ganglionectomy Ang II binding sites were absent ipsilaterally in the region where vagal afferent fibers enter the dorsal medulla. In the nTS and dmnX, binding near obex was reduced, while more rostrally these nuclei were almost completely devoid of Ang II binding on the denervated side. After cervical vagotomy, the loss of binding was restricted to the ipsilateral dmnX. These data are the first to reveal that Ang II binding in the dorsal medulla requires an intact vagal system.

  17. Integrative Analysis of Subcellular Quantitative Proteomics Studies Reveals Functional Cytoskeleton Membrane-Lipid Raft Interactions in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Anup D; Inder, Kerry L; Shah, Alok K; Cristino, Alexandre S; McKie, Arthur B; Gabra, Hani; Davis, Melissa J; Hill, Michelle M

    2016-10-07

    Lipid rafts are dynamic membrane microdomains that orchestrate molecular interactions and are implicated in cancer development. To understand the functions of lipid rafts in cancer, we performed an integrated analysis of quantitative lipid raft proteomics data sets modeling progression in breast cancer, melanoma, and renal cell carcinoma. This analysis revealed that cancer development is associated with increased membrane raft-cytoskeleton interactions, with ∼40% of elevated lipid raft proteins being cytoskeletal components. Previous studies suggest a potential functional role for the raft-cytoskeleton in the action of the putative tumor suppressors PTRF/Cavin-1 and Merlin. To extend the observation, we examined lipid raft proteome modulation by an unrelated tumor suppressor opioid binding protein cell-adhesion molecule (OPCML) in ovarian cancer SKOV3 cells. In agreement with the other model systems, quantitative proteomics revealed that 39% of OPCML-depleted lipid raft proteins are cytoskeletal components, with microfilaments and intermediate filaments specifically down-regulated. Furthermore, protein-protein interaction network and simulation analysis showed significantly higher interactions among cancer raft proteins compared with general human raft proteins. Collectively, these results suggest increased cytoskeleton-mediated stabilization of lipid raft domains with greater molecular interactions as a common, functional, and reversible feature of cancer cells.

  18. Association analysis of the FTO gene with obesity in children of Caucasian and African ancestry reveals a common tagging SNP.

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    Struan F A Grant

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently an association was demonstrated between the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP, rs9939609, within the FTO locus and obesity as a consequence of a genome wide association (GWA study of type 2 diabetes in adults. We examined the effects of two perfect surrogates for this SNP plus 11 other SNPs at this locus with respect to our childhood obesity cohort, consisting of both Caucasians and African Americans (AA. Utilizing data from our ongoing GWA study in our cohort of 418 Caucasian obese children (BMI>or=95th percentile, 2,270 Caucasian controls (BMI<95th percentile, 578 AA obese children and 1,424 AA controls, we investigated the association of the previously reported variation at the FTO locus with the childhood form of this disease in both ethnicities. The minor allele frequencies (MAF of rs8050136 and rs3751812 (perfect surrogates for rs9939609 i.e. both r(2 = 1 in the Caucasian cases were 0.448 and 0.443 respectively while they were 0.391 and 0.386 in Caucasian controls respectively, yielding for both an odds ratio (OR of 1.27 (95% CI 1.08-1.47; P = 0.0022. Furthermore, the MAFs of rs8050136 and rs3751812 in the AA cases were 0.449 and 0.115 respectively while they were 0.436 and 0.090 in AA controls res