WorldWideScience

Sample records for association news policy

  1. Vulture News: Editorial Policies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Focus and Scope. Vulture News is the journal of the IUCN Vulture Specialist Group. It was originally the journal of the Vulture Study Group, which was formed in 1973 in southern Africa. The journal has been published since 1979 and is a venue for research, news, information and reports on vultures in all parts of the word ...

  2. Zimbabwe Science News: Editorial Policies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Focus and Scope. The Zimbabwe Scientific Association was founded in Bulawayo in 1899 to promote the study and advancement of science in Zimbabwe and to facilitate the acquisition and dissemination of scientific knowledge. The Zimbabwe Science News was first published in 1967 and is now in its thirty-third volume.

  3. News

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    No news have been published. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's Partners · Terms and Conditions of Use · Contact AJOL · News. OTHER RESOURCES... for Researchers · for Journals · for Authors · for Policy Makers · about ...

  4. The Public Policy Pedagogy of Corporate and Alternative News Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Deirdre M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper argues for seeing in-depth news coverage of political, social, and economic issues as "public policy pedagogy." To develop my argument, I draw on Nancy Fraser's democratic theory, which attends to social differences and does not assume that unity is a starting point or an end goal of public dialogue. Alongside the formation of…

  5. [Exaggerated health news: association between exaggeration in university press releases and exaggeration in news media coverage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schat, J; Bossema, F G; Numans, M E; Smeets, I; Burger, P

    2018-01-01

    To determine how often press releases and news articles contain exaggeration and to locate its origin in the trajectory from research paper to news article. Retrospective quantitative content analysis. We analysed press releases on health-related research published by Dutch universities and university medical centres in 2015 (n = 129) as well as news media articles related to those press releases (n = 185). 20% of press releases and 29% of news articles exaggerated the conclusion or causal claim. Explicit health advice was, when present, exaggerated in 7% of press releases and 10% of news articles. When press releases exaggerated the conclusion or causal claim, 92% of associated news articles contained the same exaggeration. When the conclusion was not exaggerated in the press release, 6% of the news articles was exaggerated. The relative chance for exaggerated news associated with exaggerated press releases was 16.08 (95% CI: 7.35-35.18). Exaggerated press releases were associated with news articles more frequently. The relative chance for news articles to be associated with exaggerated press releases vs. a non-exaggerated press release was 1.45 (95% CI: 1.02-2.04). Exaggeration in health-related news is strongly correlated with exaggeration in the original press release and occurs in more than 1 in 5 articles. Monitoring and, if necessary, improving the accuracy and correctness of academic press releases seem to be important measures to improve the quality of health related news.

  6. Who Gets on the News? The relation between media biases and different actors in news reporting on complex policy processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.A. Korthagen (Iris)

    2013-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Having a voice in media is important to gain power and legitimacy in policy processes. However, media are biased in transmitting information. Using a quantitative content analysis of ten years’ news reporting around water management policies in the Netherlands, we

  7. Factors associated with patient preferences for communication of bad news.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimori, Maiko; Akechi, Tatsuo; Uchitomi, Yosuke

    2017-06-01

    Communication based on patient preferences can alleviate their psychological distress and is an important part of patient-centered care for physicians who have the task of conveying bad news to cancer patients. The present study aimed to explore the demographic, medical, and psychological factors associated with patient preferences with regard to communication of bad news. Outpatients with a variety of cancers were consecutively invited to participate in our study after their follow-up medical visit. A questionnaire assessed their preferences regarding the communication of bad news, covering four factors-(1) how bad news is delivered, (2) reassurance and emotional support, (3) additional information, and (4) setting-as well as on demographic, medical, and psychosocial factors. A total of 529 outpatients with a variety of cancers completed the questionnaire. Multiple regression analyses indicated that patients who were younger, female, had greater faith in their physician, and were more highly educated placed more importance on "how bad news is delivered" than patients who were older, male, had less faith in their physician, and a lower level of education. Female patients and patients without an occupation placed more importance on "reassurance and emotional support." Younger, female, and more highly educated patients placed more importance on "additional information." Younger, female, and more highly educated patients, along with patients who weren't undergoing active treatment placed more importance on "setting." Patient preferences with regard to communication of bad news are associated with factors related to patient background. Physicians should consider these characteristics when delivering bad news and use an appropriate communication style tailored to each patient.

  8. Injury news coverage, relative concern, and support for alcohol-control policies: an impersonal impact explanation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Michael D; Hayes, Andrew F; Chung, Adrienne H

    2015-01-01

    Research on the impersonal impact hypothesis suggests that news (especially print) coverage of health and safety risks primarily influences perceptions of risk as a societal issue, and not perceptions of personal risk. The authors propose that the impersonal impact of news-impact primarily on concerns about social-level risks-will mediate effects of news stories on support for public health policies; such effects substantively matter as evidence suggests health policies, in turn, have important effects on protective behaviors and health outcomes. In an experiment using 60 randomly selected violent crime and accident news stories manipulated to contain or not contain reference to alcohol use as a causative factor, the authors find that the effect of stories that mention alcohol as a causative factor on support for alcohol-control policies is mediated by social-level concern and not by personal-level concern. In so doing, the authors provide a theoretical explanation as well as empirical evidence regarding the potential for news coverage-including breaking or episodic news-to influence health-related public policy.

  9. Injury News Coverage, Relative Concern, and Support for Alcohol-Control Policies: An Impersonal Impact Explanation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Michael D.; Hayes, Andrew F.

    2015-01-01

    Research on the impersonal impact hypothesis suggests that news (especially print) coverage of health and safety risks primarily influences perceptions of risk as a societal issue, and not perceptions of personal risk. We propose that the impersonal impact of news—impact primarily on concerns about social-level risks—will mediate effects of news stories on support for public health policies; such effects substantively matter as evidence suggests health policies in turn have important effects on protective behaviors and health outcomes. In an experiment using 60 randomly-selected violent crime and accident news stories manipulated to contain or not contain reference to alcohol use as a causative factor, we find that the effect of stories that mention alcohol as a causative factor on support for alcohol-control policies is mediated by social-level concern and not by personal-level concern. In so doing, we provide a theoretical explanation as well as empirical evidence regarding the potential for news coverage—including breaking or episodic news—to influence health-related public policy. PMID:24870830

  10. News media coverage of U.S. Ebola policies: Implications for communication during future infectious disease threats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sell, Tara Kirk; Boddie, Crystal; McGinty, Emma E; Pollack, Keshia; Smith, Katherine Clegg; Burke, Thomas A; Rutkow, Lainie

    2016-12-01

    The Ebola outbreak of 2014-2015 raised concerns about the disease's potential spread in the U.S. and received significant news media coverage. Prior research has shown that news media coverage of policy options can influence public opinion regarding those policies, as well as public attitudes toward the broader social issues and target populations addressed by such policies. To assess news media coverage of Ebola policies, the content of U.S.-focused news stories (n=1262) published between July 1 and November 30, 2014 from 12 news sources was analyzed for 13 policy-related messages. Eight-two percent of news stories mentioned one or more policy-related messages. The most frequently appearing policy-related messages overall were those about isolation (47%) and quarantine (40%). The least frequently mentioned policy-related message described dividing potentially exposed persons into distinct groups based on their level of Ebola risk in order to set different levels of restrictions (5%). Message frequency differed depending on whether news sources were located in an area that experienced an Ebola case or controversy, by news sources' political ideological perspective, and by type of news source (print and television). All policy-related messages showed significant increases in frequency after the first case of Ebola was diagnosed in the U.S. on September 30, 2014, with the exception of messages related to isolation, which showed a significant decrease. Results offer insight into how the news media covers policies to manage emerging disease threats. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Breaking the news or fueling the epidemic? Temporal association between news media report volume and opioid-related mortality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabarun Dasgupta

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Historical studies of news media have suggested an association between reporting and increased drug abuse. Period effects for substance use have been documented for different classes of legal and illicit substances, with the suspicion that media publicity may have played major roles in their emergence. Previous analyses have drawn primarily from qualitative evidence; the temporal relationship between media reporting volume and adverse health consequences has not been quantified nationally. We set out to explore whether we could find a quantitative relationship between media reports about prescription opioid abuse and overdose mortality associated with these drugs. We assessed whether increases in news media reports occurred before or after increases in overdose deaths.Our ecological study compared a monthly time series of unintentional poisoning deaths involving short-acting prescription opioid substances, from 1999 to 2005 using multiple cause-of-death data published by the National Center for Health Statistics, to monthly counts of English-language news articles mentioning generic and branded names of prescription opioids obtained from Google News Archives from 1999 to 2005. We estimated the association between media volume and mortality rates by time-lagged regression analyses. There were 24,272 articles and 30,916 deaths involving prescription opioids during the seven-year study period. Nationally, the number of articles mentioning prescription opioids increased dramatically starting in early 2001, following prominent coverage about the nonmedical use of OxyContin. We found a significant association between news reports and deaths, with media reporting preceding fatal opioid poisonings by two to six months and explaining 88% (p<0.0001, df 78 of the variation in mortality.While availability, structural, and individual predispositions are key factors influencing substance use, news reporting may enhance the popularity of psychoactive

  12. News Coverage and Access to Contextual Policy Information in the Case of Recreational Water Rights in Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, Deserai Anderson

    2011-01-01

    Local news media help shape the agendas from which new policies emerge. Furthermore, local media help determine public understanding of complex issues. Media should inform citizens and policymakers on important policy issues. This study uses a content analysis of 11 newspapers to understand the manner in which reporters covered a specific…

  13. News coverage and sales of products with trans fat: effects before and after changes in federal labeling policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederdeppe, Jeff; Frosch, Dominick L

    2009-05-01

    The Food and Drug Administration mandated that food products list the amount of trans fat per serving on nutrition facts labels by January 1, 2006. There have been no coordinated efforts to raise awareness about trans fat since the policy went into effect, but news coverage may promote informed decisions about food purchases. This paper assesses whether news coverage influenced sales of products containing trans fat, between December 13, 2004, and June 24, 2007, both before and after the labeling policy went into effect. Sales data for products containing trans fat from a major grocery store chain with stores throughout Los Angeles County were merged with news coverage data from LexisNexis and ProQuest. Cross-sectional time-series regression was conducted in 2008 to assess the effect of news coverage on weekly unit sales volume for seven trans-fat products across 11,997 store-weeks. News coverage effects were apparent for sales of two of the seven trans-fat products in the year before the trans-fat nutrition facts labeling policy went into effect (ptrans-fat products in the post-labeling period (ptrans fat, combined with labeling information, appears to influence consumer behavior in the short term. News coverage and product labeling may not be sufficient to promote sustained changes in trans-fat purchases.

  14. 76 FR 50813 - Major Capital Investment Projects; Guidance on News Starts/Small Starts Policies and Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-16

    ... Federal Transit Administration Major Capital Investment Projects; Guidance on News Starts/Small Starts... policy guidance on the New and Small Starts capital project review and evaluation process and criteria...) published by FTA in June 2010, which sought public comment on the New Starts and Small Starts project...

  15. The association between exaggeration in health related science news and academic press releases: retrospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumner, Petroc; Vivian-Griffiths, Solveiga; Boivin, Jacky; Williams, Andy; Venetis, Christos A; Davies, Aimée; Ogden, Jack; Whelan, Leanne; Hughes, Bethan; Dalton, Bethan; Boy, Fred; Chambers, Christopher D

    2014-12-09

    To identify the source (press releases or news) of distortions, exaggerations, or changes to the main conclusions drawn from research that could potentially influence a reader's health related behaviour. Retrospective quantitative content analysis. Journal articles, press releases, and related news, with accompanying simulations. Press releases (n = 462) on biomedical and health related science issued by 20 leading UK universities in 2011, alongside their associated peer reviewed research papers and news stories (n = 668). Advice to readers to change behaviour, causal statements drawn from correlational research, and inference to humans from animal research that went beyond those in the associated peer reviewed papers. 40% (95% confidence interval 33% to 46%) of the press releases contained exaggerated advice, 33% (26% to 40%) contained exaggerated causal claims, and 36% (28% to 46%) contained exaggerated inference to humans from animal research. When press releases contained such exaggeration, 58% (95% confidence interval 48% to 68%), 81% (70% to 93%), and 86% (77% to 95%) of news stories, respectively, contained similar exaggeration, compared with exaggeration rates of 17% (10% to 24%), 18% (9% to 27%), and 10% (0% to 19%) in news when the press releases were not exaggerated. Odds ratios for each category of analysis were 6.5 (95% confidence interval 3.5 to 12), 20 (7.6 to 51), and 56 (15 to 211). At the same time, there was little evidence that exaggeration in press releases increased the uptake of news. Exaggeration in news is strongly associated with exaggeration in press releases. Improving the accuracy of academic press releases could represent a key opportunity for reducing misleading health related news. © Sumner et al 2014.

  16. News media coverage of trans fat: health risks and policy responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarlenski, Marian; Barry, Colleen L

    2013-01-01

    Prior research indicates that the news media play a critical role in transmitting information to the public about the most pressing public health problems, and framing attributions about who in society is responsible for solving these problems. In this article, we use content analysis methods to study the agenda-setting and framing functions of the news media in shaping perceptions about the health risks posed by trans fat in the U.S. diet. A census of news stories focusing on trans fat was collected from the two largest circulation U.S. newspapers and three major television networks from 1998 to 2008 (N = 156). The content of news coverage was analyzed using a 23-item instrument. Findings indicated that the news media served an important agenda-setting role in educating the public about the presence of trans fat in the U.S. diet and describing the health risks these foods pose. In addition, results indicate that news media coverage framed attributions of responsibility for solving the problem of trans fat in the food supply. News stories noting the heart disease risks of trans fat were significantly more likely to mention governmental responses aimed at curbing consumption than news coverage that did not note these health risks.

  17. "Like throwing a bowling ball at a battle ship" audience responses to Australian news stories about alcohol pricing and promotion policies: a qualitative focus group study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea S Fogarty

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Policies affecting alcohol's price and promotion are effective measures to reduce harms. Yet policies targeting populations are unpopular with the public, whose views can be influenced by news framings of policy narratives. In Australia, alcohol taxation receives high news coverage, while advertising restrictions have not until recently, and narratives are highly contested for each. However, research specifically examining how audiences respond to such news stories is scant. We sought to explore audience understanding of news reports about two alcohol policy proposals. METHOD: From June to August 2012, 46 participants were recruited for 8 focus groups in age-brackets of young people aged 18-25 years, parents of young people, and adults aged 25 or older. Groups were split by education. Participants were asked their prior knowledge of alcohol policies, before watching and discussing four news stories about alcohol taxation and advertising. RESULTS: Participants were clear that alcohol poses problems, yet thought policy solutions were ineffective in a drinking culture they viewed as unamenable to change and unaffected by alcohol's price or promotion. Without knowledge of its actual effect on consumption, they cited the 2008 alcopops tax as a policy failure, blaming cheaper substitution. Participants had low knowledge of advertising restrictions, yet were concerned about underage exposure. They offered conditional support for restrictions, while doubting its effectiveness. There was marked distrust of statistics and news actors in broadcasts, yet discussions matched previous research findings. CONCLUSIONS: News coverage has resulted in strong audience understanding of alcohol related problems but framed solutions have not always provided clear messages, despite audience support for policies. Future advocacy will need to continue recent moves to address the links between alcohol's price and promotion with the drinking culture, as well

  18. “Like Throwing a Bowling Ball at a Battle Ship” Audience Responses to Australian News Stories about Alcohol Pricing and Promotion Policies: A Qualitative Focus Group Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, Andrea S.; Chapman, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Policies affecting alcohol’s price and promotion are effective measures to reduce harms. Yet policies targeting populations are unpopular with the public, whose views can be influenced by news framings of policy narratives. In Australia, alcohol taxation receives high news coverage, while advertising restrictions have not until recently, and narratives are highly contested for each. However, research specifically examining how audiences respond to such news stories is scant. We sought to explore audience understanding of news reports about two alcohol policy proposals. Method From June to August 2012, 46 participants were recruited for 8 focus groups in age-brackets of young people aged 18–25 years, parents of young people, and adults aged 25 or older. Groups were split by education. Participants were asked their prior knowledge of alcohol policies, before watching and discussing four news stories about alcohol taxation and advertising. Results Participants were clear that alcohol poses problems, yet thought policy solutions were ineffective in a drinking culture they viewed as unamenable to change and unaffected by alcohol’s price or promotion. Without knowledge of its actual effect on consumption, they cited the 2008 alcopops tax as a policy failure, blaming cheaper substitution. Participants had low knowledge of advertising restrictions, yet were concerned about underage exposure. They offered conditional support for restrictions, while doubting its effectiveness. There was marked distrust of statistics and news actors in broadcasts, yet discussions matched previous research findings. Conclusions News coverage has resulted in strong audience understanding of alcohol related problems but framed solutions have not always provided clear messages, despite audience support for policies. Future advocacy will need to continue recent moves to address the links between alcohol’s price and promotion with the drinking culture, as well as facilitate

  19. "Like throwing a bowling ball at a battle ship" audience responses to Australian news stories about alcohol pricing and promotion policies: a qualitative focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, Andrea S; Chapman, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Policies affecting alcohol's price and promotion are effective measures to reduce harms. Yet policies targeting populations are unpopular with the public, whose views can be influenced by news framings of policy narratives. In Australia, alcohol taxation receives high news coverage, while advertising restrictions have not until recently, and narratives are highly contested for each. However, research specifically examining how audiences respond to such news stories is scant. We sought to explore audience understanding of news reports about two alcohol policy proposals. From June to August 2012, 46 participants were recruited for 8 focus groups in age-brackets of young people aged 18-25 years, parents of young people, and adults aged 25 or older. Groups were split by education. Participants were asked their prior knowledge of alcohol policies, before watching and discussing four news stories about alcohol taxation and advertising. Participants were clear that alcohol poses problems, yet thought policy solutions were ineffective in a drinking culture they viewed as unamenable to change and unaffected by alcohol's price or promotion. Without knowledge of its actual effect on consumption, they cited the 2008 alcopops tax as a policy failure, blaming cheaper substitution. Participants had low knowledge of advertising restrictions, yet were concerned about underage exposure. They offered conditional support for restrictions, while doubting its effectiveness. There was marked distrust of statistics and news actors in broadcasts, yet discussions matched previous research findings. News coverage has resulted in strong audience understanding of alcohol related problems but framed solutions have not always provided clear messages, despite audience support for policies. Future advocacy will need to continue recent moves to address the links between alcohol's price and promotion with the drinking culture, as well as facilitate understandings of how this culture is amenable to

  20. Alcohol control in the news: the politics of media representations of alcohol policy in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawhon, Mary; Herrick, Clare

    2013-10-01

    Media coverage of the "problems" associated with alcohol is widespread in countries of the global North and now, increasingly, in those of the global South. However, despite this mounting ubiquity, there have been very few analyses either of newspaper coverage of alcohol or of media coverage of alcohol policy, especially outside Europe and North America. This article argues that given international concern with the long-term health, economic, social, and developmental consequences of risky drinking in the global South, an exploration of newspaper coverage of nascent alcohol policy in such a context is both timely and valuable. Indeed, such analyses bring to the fore the deeply contextual and contingent nature of alcohol's problematization in politics, policy, and public life. To examine these assertions, we explore the "attention allocation" processes of two South African alcohol control policies--the Western Cape Liquor Bill and the city of Cape Town's liquor bylaws--in two regional English-language newspapers between 2007 and 2011. In so doing, the article highlights the particularities of the political valence of alcohol in the South African context. Furthermore, it also draws out the tensions between alcohol as a source of livelihoods in a context of endemic unemployment and chronic poverty and alcohol as a causal factor in poverty, crime, violence, and social disintegration. In contrast to media coverage of alcohol policy in Europe and North America, this analysis of the South African press suggests that liquor consumption is far less likely to be framed as an express health risk, forcing us to question how preventative policy efforts should best proceed.

  1. Media advocacy and underage drinking policies: a study of Louisiana news media from 1994 through 2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harwood, Eileen M; Witson, Jean C; Fan, David P; Wagenaar, Alexander C

    2005-07-01

    The communications literature firmly establishes the significant role of media advocacy in setting public agenda and influencing the direction of public opinion on social issues. Recent public health campaigns embrace media advocacy as an integral part of efforts to change public health policies, yet further studies are needed on the best strategies to promote legislative action. This article examines press coverage in the Baton Rouge Advocate and the New Orleans Times-Picayune newspapers and Louisiana State legislation pertaining to underage drinking from January 1994 to June 2003 and focuses on evidence of media priming and framing of underage drinking and four related legislative policies. High press coverage of alcohol bills during the legislative process was associated with defeated legislation, whereas little or no press coverage was associated with bills successfully passed into law. The authors conclude that more work is needed to understand how media advocacy strategies may hinder enactment of bills.

  2. Fear and Anger Responses to Local News Coverage of Alcohol-Related Crimes, Accidents, and Injuries: Explaining News Effects on Policy Support Using a Representative Sample of Messages and People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodall, Catherine E.; Slater, Michael D.; Myers, Teresa A.

    2013-01-01

    An experiment investigated emotional reactions to news on policy support. Stimuli were selected from a nationally representative sample of local crime/accident news, and a nationally representative online panel of U.S. adults. Stories were manipulated to mention or not mention the role of alcohol. Anger elicited by stories increased blame of individuals, whereas fear increased consideration of contributing societal factors. Mention of alcohol increased likelihood of different emotional responses dominating--greater anger when alcohol was mentioned and greater fear when not mentioned. Such emotions influence policy support: enforcement of existing laws controlling individual behavior in addition to new laws when anger predominated, and, indirectly, support for new laws changing social context in which alcohol is promoted and sold when fear predominated. PMID:23729838

  3. Reaching "an audience that you would never dream of speaking to": influential public health researchers' views on the role of news media in influencing policy and public understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Simon; Haynes, Abby; Derrick, Gemma; Sturk, Heidi; Hall, Wayne D; St George, Alexis

    2014-01-01

    While governments and academic institutions urge researchers to engage with news media, traditional academic values of public disengagement have inhibited many from giving high priority to media activity. In this interview-based study, the authors report on the views about news media engagement and strategies used by 36 peer-voted leading Australian public health researchers in 6 fields. The authors consider their views about the role and importance of media in influencing policy, their reflections on effective or ineffective media communicators, and strategies used by these researchers about how to best retain their credibility and influence while engaging with the news media. A willingness and capacity to engage with the mass media was seen as an essential attribute of influential public health researchers.

  4. Frame contestation in the news: national identity, cultural resonance, and U.S. drone policy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rowling, C.M.; Sheets, P.; Jones, T.M.

    2013-01-01

    Scholarship suggests that disagreement among political officials significantly impacts how the press covers a particular policy issue and how the public perceives and comes to understand it. An unexplored area of research in the framing effects literature asks to what extent frame contestation

  5. Effects of news media messages about mass shootings on attitudes toward persons with serious mental illness and public support for gun control policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinty, Emma E; Webster, Daniel W; Barry, Colleen L

    2013-05-01

    In recent years, mass shootings by persons with serious mental illness have received extensive news media coverage. The authors test the effects of news stories about mass shootings on public attitudes toward persons with serious mental illness and support for gun control policies. They also examine whether news coverage of proposals to prevent persons with serious mental illness from having guns exacerbates the public's negative attitudes toward this group. The authors conducted a survey-embedded randomized experiment using a national sample (N=1,797) from an online panel. Respondents were randomly assigned to groups instructed to read one of three news stories or to a no-exposure control group. The news stories described, respectively, a mass shooting by a person with serious mental illness, the same mass shooting and a proposal for gun restrictions for persons with serious mental illness, and the same mass shooting and a proposal to ban large-capacity magazines. Outcome measures included attitudes toward working with or living near a person with serious mental illness, perceived dangerousness of persons with serious mental illness, and support for gun restrictions for persons with serious mental illness and for a ban on large-capacity magazines. Compared with the control group, the story about a mass shooting heightened respondents' negative attitudes toward persons with serious mental illness and raised support for gun restrictions for this group and for a ban on large-capacity magazines. Including information about the gun restriction policy in a story about a mass shooting did not heighten negative attitudes toward persons with serious mental illness or raise support for the restrictions. The aftermath of mass shootings is often viewed as a window of opportunity to garner support for gun control policies, but it also exacerbates negative attitudes toward persons with serious mental illness.

  6. Research News

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News & Progress Research News Share this page Facebook Twitter Email Research News Research News Quarterly Updates Research Call Archive ... best way to stay up to date on research and important advancements in MS is to sign up for email updates. Get Email Updates Get Email Updates Colophon ... Connection About the Society ...

  7. Soil news - the soil carbon and climate policy journey in Australia and the role of different media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggs, Ron

    2015-07-01

    ‘Enough soil carbon to mitigate climate change is a big ask’ was a litmus piece in the October 2012 edition of Agriculture Today. The paper was the New South Wales Department of Primary Industries’ flagship research, advisory and farm management vehicle, published monthly in The Land for 20 years, on the web since 2005 until December 2012. The October 2012 story dovetailed with Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) television Lateline reporting that the Federal Coalition's (from now on Government's) climate policy could not demonstrate that storing carbon in Australian soils would achieve the major proportion of a target to reduce Australia's greenhouse emissions by five per cent on 2000 levels by 2020. It also provided background for the ABC's FactCheck verdict that voters in 2013 federal election were not hearing “the full story on climate research”. The real story is how to inform urban Australia's poor understanding and lack of connection to how land managers must maintain and where possible improve soil quality for food security and food production as we adapt to climate change. And if you are in the business of information delivery or providing content, how do you choose your distribution channels to target as wide an audience as possible? One fundamental yardstick to avoid disenfranchising and discriminating against some people who want, and rely on, your information is to continually critically assess how fast high speed internet is reaching marginalised rural areas. Print is still the preferred news medium for the majority of farmers.

  8. Twitter Activity Associated With U.S. News and World Report Reputation Scores for Urology Departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciprut, Shannon; Curnyn, Caitlin; Davuluri, Meena; Sternberg, Kevan; Loeb, Stacy

    2017-10-01

    To analyze the association between US urology department Twitter presence and U.S. News and World Report (USNWR) reputation scores, to examine the content, informational value, and intended audience of these platforms, and to identify objectives for Twitter use. We identified Twitter accounts for urology departments scored in the 2016-2017 USNWR. Correlation coefficients were calculated between Twitter metrics (number of followers, following, tweets, and Klout influence scores) with USNWR reputation scores. We also performed a detailed content analysis of urology department tweets during a 6-month period to characterize the content. Finally, we distributed a survey to the urology department accounts via Twitter, inquiring who administers the content, and their objectives for Twitter use. Among 42 scored urology departments with Twitter accounts, the median number of followers, following, and tweets were 337, 193, and 115, respectively. All of these Twitter metrics had a statistically significant positive correlation with reputation scores (P twitter use among urology departments was visibility and reputation, and urologists are considered the most important target audience. There is statistically significant correlation between Twitter activity and USNWR reputation scores for urology departments. Our results suggest that Twitter provides a novel mechanism for urology departments to communicate about academic and educational topics, and social media engagement can enhance reputation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Temporal Topic Modeling to Assess Associations between News Trends and Infectious Disease Outbreaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Saurav; Chakraborty, Prithwish; Nsoesie, Elaine O.; Cohn, Emily; Mekaru, Sumiko R.; Brownstein, John S.; Ramakrishnan, Naren

    2017-01-01

    In retrospective assessments, internet news reports have been shown to capture early reports of unknown infectious disease transmission prior to official laboratory confirmation. In general, media interest and reporting peaks and wanes during the course of an outbreak. In this study, we quantify the extent to which media interest during infectious disease outbreaks is indicative of trends of reported incidence. We introduce an approach that uses supervised temporal topic models to transform large corpora of news articles into temporal topic trends. The key advantages of this approach include: applicability to a wide range of diseases and ability to capture disease dynamics, including seasonality, abrupt peaks and troughs. We evaluated the method using data from multiple infectious disease outbreaks reported in the United States of America (U.S.), China, and India. We demonstrate that temporal topic trends extracted from disease-related news reports successfully capture the dynamics of multiple outbreaks such as whooping cough in U.S. (2012), dengue outbreaks in India (2013) and China (2014). Our observations also suggest that, when news coverage is uniform, efficient modeling of temporal topic trends using time-series regression techniques can estimate disease case counts with increased precision before official reports by health organizations.

  10. Vulture News

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vulture News is the journal of the IUCN Vulture Specialist Group. It was originally the journal of the Vulture Study Group, which was formed in 1973 in southern Africa. The journal has been published since 1979 and is a venue for research, news, information and reports on vultures in all parts of the word where they occur.

  11. 28 CFR 50.10 - Policy with regard to the issuance of subpoenas to members of the news media, subpoenas for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... considering issuing a subpoena to a member of the news media, and similarly all reasonable alternative... from alternative nonmedia sources. (4) The use of subpoenas to members of the news media should, except... subpoenas to members of the news media, subpoenas for telephone toll records of members of the news media...

  12. No news is good news?

    CERN Multimedia

    Peter Schmid

    I'm retired and living back home in Austria. But I am still excited about ATLAS and I try to follow the progress of the project as closely as I can. The ATLAS e-news are an excellent source of information. Appearing now every month they provide a broad, solid view of what is going on. But I'm greedy; I'd love to be "on-line". When the first End-Cap Toroid moved from hall 180 to the pit I was frustrated. I knew that it was happening but I could only get first pictures and reports a few days later. In the meantime the ECT was lowered into the cavern; no information on this available nowhere up to the this issue of the e-news. Here is my dream: an "ATLAS news ticker", i.e. a web page with the news appearing on the day they happen; just one line of information, possibly with a reference to a picture, a person or a report. My idea isn't new. On the ATLAS web-site for the public we have a window "latest news". But I was disappointed when, until a week ago, the latest news dated from December 2006 !!! Can't we do...

  13. NEWS: Institute news

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-07-01

    Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Leeds. Physics at Work Exhibition: 12-14 September, University of Cambridge The year 2000 Exhibition will be the 16th organized by Brenda Jennison. The exhibition will be held at the Cavendish Laboratory and further details can be obtained from Brenda at the University (tel: 01223 332888, fax: 01223 332894 or e-mail: bmj10@cam.ac.uk). News on GNVQ science The Institute of Physics and the Royal Society of Chemistry are currently financing the compilation of a directory of resources to assist teachers in identifying and selecting suitable materials for teaching the new GNVQ science specifications. Work on the first part of the directory will soon be completed and it is hoped to publish the material in both print and electronic forms before the end of the summer term. This first part covers resources - all evaluated by practising GNVQ teachers - supporting the teaching of the compulsory units for Advanced GNVQ Science. A small team comprising a physics teacher, a chemistry teacher and a biology teacher, all involved with GNVQ programmes and led by Dr Ken Gadd, has carried out the work. They have established a network of teachers around the country to help with the evaluation of curriculum materials. The next part of the project will be to examine the feasibility of providing a similar listing for the optional units at this level. Future development, depending on the availability of funds, will extend the project to Intermediate level programmes in science, including the Part One, once its structure has been agreed at QCA. Further information about the Directory and the next phase of development will be available in the autumn. Activities Physics on Stage The future of science, technology and the ensuing wealth creation potential for Britain will depend on the quality of science education in schools today. Yet the numbers studying physics, which underpins science and engineering, are falling. This problem is currently

  14. Evidence-Based Policy Making: Assessment of the American Heart Association's Strategic Policy Portfolio: A Policy Statement From the American Heart Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labarthe, Darwin R; Goldstein, Larry B; Antman, Elliott M; Arnett, Donna K; Fonarow, Gregg C; Alberts, Mark J; Hayman, Laura L; Khera, Amit; Sallis, James F; Daniels, Stephen R; Sacco, Ralph L; Li, Suhui; Ku, Leighton; Lantz, Paula M; Robinson, Jennifer G; Creager, Mark A; Van Horn, Linda; Kris-Etherton, Penny; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Whitsel, Laurie P

    2016-05-03

    American Heart Association (AHA) public policy advocacy strategies are based on its Strategic Impact Goals. The writing group appraised the evidence behind AHA's policies to determine how well they address the association's 2020 cardiovascular health (CVH) metrics and cardiovascular disease (CVD) management indicators and identified research needed to fill gaps in policy and support further policy development. The AHA policy research department first identified current AHA policies specific to each CVH metric and CVD management indicator and the evidence underlying each policy. Writing group members then reviewed each policy and the related metrics and indicators. The results of each review were summarized, and topic-specific priorities and overarching themes for future policy research were proposed. There was generally close alignment between current AHA policies and the 2020 CVH metrics and CVD management indicators; however, certain specific policies still lack a robust evidence base. For CVH metrics, the distinction between policies for adults (age ≥20 years) and children (American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Engineering News

    OpenAIRE

    Nystrom, Lynn; Haugh, Lindsey; Simpkins, David

    2014-01-01

    Engineering News is the College of Engineering's annual newsletter sent to all alumni of the college. Virginia Tech leaders, along with counterparts in New Jersey, welcomed a late December approval by the Federal Aviation Administration to operate a test site to integrate unmanned aircraft into the national airspace.

  16. Fake News

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederiksen, Linda

    2017-01-01

    In a politically and digitally polarized environment, identifying and evaluating fake news is more difficult than ever before. Librarians who have been teaching information and media literacy skills for decades understand the role we can and must play in this environment.

  17. AJOL NEWS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    No announcements have been published. ISSN: 2073-073X. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's Partners · Terms and Conditions of Use · Contact AJOL · News. OTHER RESOURCES... for Researchers · for Journals ...

  18. Sadhana| News

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    sadh/028/06/1047-1055. Sadhana. Current Issue : Vol. 42, Issue 8. Current Issue Volume 42 | Issue 8. August 2017. Home · Volumes & Issues · Special Issues · Search · Editorial Board · Information for Authors · Subscription. Sadhana | News.

  19. Online news

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjarvard, Stig; Kammer, Aske Søndergaard

    2015-01-01

    decades, these features have come under pressure due to – among other things – the spread of digital media. In this article, we explore two current structural economic challenges to legacy newspaper organizations in Denmark. The first challenge regards the implementation of subscription on news websites...

  20. News & Announcements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-08-01

    News from Journal House National Chemistry Week (NCW) right" alt="National Chemistry Week"> Celebrating Chemistry and Art is the theme of NCW 2001, to be held November 4-10, 2001. As you make plans for participating in the celebrations in your area, keep in mind that JCE is developing special materials on this theme, which will appear in our October issue: Classroom Activities, a comprehensive Illustrated Resource Paper, Report from Online, specially written brief articles illustrated in color, articles related to the theme, and CLIPs (Chemical Laboratory Information Profiles). Awards Announced Passer Award Passer Award recipients from the April 1 closing date are: George Bennett, Millikin University, Decatur, IL Daniel Berger, Bluffton College, Bluffton, OH Karen Dunlap, Sierra College, Rocklin, CA Myung-Hoon Kim, Georgia Perimeter College, Dunwoody, GA Cheryl Longfellow, Philadelphia University, Philadelphia, PA Jerry Maas, Oakton Community College, Des Plaines, IL Tim Royappa, University of West Florida, Pensacola, FL Visiting Scientist Award, Western Connecticut Section Diane Bunce, The Catholic University of America, has been selected as the 2001 Visiting Scientist of the Western Connecticut Section of the ACS. The award, presented annually since 1967, brings an outstanding chemical educator to visit high schools in Fairfield County, CT. In May, Bunce visited three high schools, Christian Heritage School, Fairfield High School, and Greenwich High School, where she interacted with teachers and students and presented lectures and demonstrations to several chemistry classes. She was also keynote speaker at the ACS local section's Education Night. The awardee is selected by a committee of university and high school teachers, industrial chemists, and the previous Visiting Scientist; there is an honorarium of 1500 plus expenses. Welch Award Roger D. Kornberg, a professor of structural biology at the Stanford University School of Medicine, received the 2001 Welch

  1. Googling the news

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørmen, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Search engines provide a window into the changing association between websites and keywords across cultures and countries and over time. As such, they offer journalism and news researchers an opportunity to study how search engines, in this case Google, mediate news events and stories online...... case study, ways to work with the influence of endogenous factors (keywords, language settings, geo-location, Web history and clicking behaviour) and mitigate the effects of the exogenous factors (experimentation and randomisation) are suggested. Then, a new approach to studying search results is put...... forward, which builds on purposeful sampling of real-world participants or constructed research profiles. Finally, perspectives for news and journalism scholars in studying algorithmically generated content in a broader context are offered....

  2. American Telemedicine Association: Federal Telemedicine Policy Summit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Forstag

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available ATA Federal Telemedicine Policy Summit, Washington DC - Hyatt Regency on Capitol Hill June 27, 2013 at 1:00 pm and June 28, 2013 at 12:00 pm The ATA Federal Telemedicine Policy Summit is an opportunity to hear and interact with leaders from Congress, key federal agencies and influential policy thinkers about the latest developments affecting telemedicine. The Summit will include participation of key stakeholders including healthcare providers, business interests, medical societies, consumer groups and more. Join the conversation and hear the latest, inside information about the swift changes underway in healthcare delivery, public policy and the opportunities these provide for those involved in telemedicine. The Summit has an exciting line-up of speakers, representing the nation’s top policy leaders in healthcare. For information: http://www.americantelemed.org/ata-federal-telemedicine-policy-summit/summit-overview

  3. Yeti News

    OpenAIRE

    Hervera González, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Yeti.News és una aplicació de notícies creades i consumides pels usuaris. L'objectiu és que l'usuari normalment és el primer en topar-se amb la notícia i serà el que podrà donar més informació i imatges del succés. L'usuari pujarà imatges/vídeos del succés i en farà un petit reportatge per poder publicar la notícia. La resta d'usuaris podran llegir-la i votar-la per donar credibilitat al succés. Yeti.News es una aplicación de noticias creadas y consumidas por los usuarios. El objetivo es q...

  4. Association between Integration Policies and Immigrants' Mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ikram, Umar Z; Malmusi, Davide; Juel, Knud

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To integrate immigrants into their societies, European countries have adopted different types of policies, which may influence health through both material and psychosocial determinants. Recent studies have suggested poorer health outcomes for immigrants living in countries with poorly...... rated integration policies. OBJECTIVE: To analyse mortality differences of immigrants from the same country of origin living in countries with distinct integration policy contexts. METHODS: From the mortality dataset collected in the Migrant Ethnic Health Observatory (MEHO) project, we chose...... the Netherlands (linked data from 1996-2006), France (unlinked; 2005-2007) and Denmark (linked; 1992-2001) as representatives of the inclusive, assimilationist and exclusionist policy models, respectively, based on the Migrant Integration Policy Index. We calculated for each country sex- and age...

  5. A CENTURY OF NEWS DISCOURSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan Bell

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper traces the development of news discourse across the 20th century ihrough a case study ofthe coverage of three expeditions to the South Pole: Captain Scott in 1912, Sir Edmund Hillary in 1958, and Peter Hillary in 1999. The way the news about the three expeditions reached New Zealand media serves as a framework and an illustration to examine three related issues: how technology has changed the time and place dimensions of news delivery; the consequent and concomitant shifts in news presentation; and associated changes in how humans have understood time and place. News values remain the same at a broad level across the century, but different in detail. Nationalism is obtrusive, but its focus shifts. In news practice, the deadline and the scoop drive the news in al1 three periods, but the scooping medium shifts from press to radio to television. The lapse between an event and its reporting shrinks exponentially from months to hours to minutes. The design of newspaper front pages changes radically, and news language compresses. There are social impacts, with newsworthy figures receiving closer exposure and the audience being cast in a more voyeuristic role.

  6. News Research for Better Newspapers, Volume Five.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Chilton R., Comp.

    The findings of research studies that come from a variety of sources and concern newspapers, some aspects of television news, and news media audiences are summarized briefly. Among the topics are audience characteristics, content of stories, readership, headlines and makeup, editorial policy, and editorial administration and personnel. Most of the…

  7. FAKE NEWS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendricks, Vincent Fella; Vestergaard, Mads

    Politik og medier oversvømmes af fordrejninger, fortielser, forglemmelser og forvanskninger af sandheden. Vi invaderes af populistiske fortællinger, “alternative kendsgerninger” og “fake news”. Det er nu et faktum, at misinformation er noget man aktivt må forholde sig til som politiker, som...... for virkelige udfordringer, vi står over for. FAKE NEWS giver et første sammenhængende billede af hvordan opmærksomhedsøkonomien kan ende i det postfaktuelle demokrati: Eventyrlige fortællinger erstatter kendsgerninger som grundlag for politisk meningsdannelse, debat og lovgivning. Et monster, som de færreste...

  8. Disease Outbreak News

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diseases Biorisk reduction Disease outbreak news Disease Outbreak News (DONs) Latest DONs Rift Valley fever – Gambia ... Disease outbreaks by country RSS feeds Disease outbreak news Related links Ebola virus disease - website Avian influenza ...

  9. National Cancer Institute News

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and events from NCI-funded research and programs News & Events Featured News High-Fat Diet Linked to Prostate Cancer Metastasis ... Scientific Meetings and Lectures Conferences Social Media Events News Archive 2018 2017 2016 2015 2014 2013 National ...

  10. Vulture News: About this journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's Partners · Terms and Conditions of Use · Contact AJOL · News. OTHER RESOURCES... for Researchers · for Journals · for Authors · for Policy Makers · about Open Access · Journal Quality.

  11. News and events | Page 7 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Fostering urban resilience: IDRC at the IPCC Cities and Climate Change Science Conference · Skyline of Nairobi. Mutua Matheka. Event. Think Tank Initiative to host African Evidence Informed Policy Forum · News at IDRC logo. News. IDRC invests in research and knowledge to empower women in India. Search news and ...

  12. Exploring Digital News Publishing Business Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindskow, Kasper

    . In order to do so, a theoretical model is developed that is suited for the analysis of the strategic design of business models, including the production networks that support them, in the sectors of the economy that are affected by networked informatization in general and in digital news publishing...... of the traditional business models poses an existential threat to news publishing and has given rise to a continuing struggle among news publishers to design digital business models that will be sustainable in the future. This dissertation argues that a central and underresearched aspect of digital news publishing...... business models concerns the production networks that support the co-production of digital news offerings. To fill this knowledge gap, this dissertation explores the strategic design of the digital news publishing production networks that are associated with HTML-based news offerings on the open Web...

  13. News and the overloaded consumer: factors influencing information overload among news consumers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holton, Avery E; Chyi, Hsiang Iris

    2012-11-01

    News producers continue to increase their volume of production and delivery platforms in an effort to reach and maintain news consumers. However, consumers may not necessarily find more news desirable. Previous studies have suggested that information surplus can lead to negative outcomes for consumers, but research of outcomes related to news production and consumption has been scant. This study explores novel areas of news surplus and overload, empirically examining factors associated with the degree of perceived overload across a broad spectrum of news delivery platforms. The findings reveal that the majority of today's news consumers feel overloaded with the amount of news they are confronted with. Gender, news interest, and the use of specific news platforms and outlets predict the degree of that overload. News access through platforms and outlets such as computers, e-readers, and Facebook is positively associated with overload, whereas other platforms such as television and the iPhone are negatively associated with overload. Implications for media psychology and news consumption are discussed.

  14. Food and nutrition policies associate with indicators of healthy eating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Chen; Mikkelsen, Bent Egberg

    2009-01-01

    become one of the preferred organizational tools to frame these efforts. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the association between having a local food & nutrition policy and indicators of healthy eating at school. It is based results from a web survey among food service coordinators in 179...... between having a food & nutrition policy and indicators of healthy eating praxis....

  15. Genre-Specific Cultivation Effects: Lagged Associations between Overall TV Viewing, Local TV News Viewing, and Fatalistic Beliefs about Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederdeppe, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    Cultivation theory and research has been criticized for its failure to consider variation in effects by genre, employ appropriate third-variable controls, and determine causal direction. Recent studies, controlling for a variety of demographic characteristics and media use variables, have found that exposure to local television (TV) newscasts is associated with a variety of problematic “real-world” beliefs. However, many of these studies have not adequately assessed causal direction. Redressing this limitation, we analyzed data from a two-wave national representative survey which permitted tests of lagged association between overall TV viewing, local TV news viewing, and fatalistic beliefs about cancer prevention. We first replicated the original cultivation effect and found a positive association between overall TV viewing at time 1 and increased fatalistic beliefs about cancer prevention at time 2. Analyses also provided evidence that local TV news viewing at time 1 predicts increased fatalistic beliefs about cancer prevention at time 2. There was little evidence for reverse causation in predicting changes in overall TV viewing or local TV news viewing. The paper concludes with a discussion of theoretical and practical implications of these findings. PMID:25605981

  16. Measuring News Media Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksl, Adam; Ashley, Seth; Craft, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    News media literacy refers to the knowledge and motivations needed to identify and engage with journalism. This study measured levels of news media literacy among 500 teenagers using a new scale measure based on Potter's model of media literacy and adapted to news media specifically. The adapted model posits that news media literate individuals…

  17. Novae news

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    As announced in the previous Bulletin, Novae has opened a new snack bar on the Flagstaff car park, just a few metres from CERN's reception area (Building 33).   Just a few metres from the CERN Reception, the new Novae snack point welcomes visitors and CERNois. Opening hours Currently: Monday to Friday, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. From September: Monday to Friday, 7:45 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturdays from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. The snack bar selection includes breakfast, starting at 2.70 CHF, cold dishes from 5 CHF, and hot dishes from 6 CHF.   Novae has also installed a 24-hour-a-day food vending machine in the CERN hostel (Building 39) and in Building 13. You can buy pasta and cooked dishes for 6.50 CHF to 8 CHF. In addition, a groceries vending machine has been installed in the main building, just across from the news kiosk. Nearly 60 different items are available around the clock. Finally, Novae has introduced a new payment system in several buildings on the Meyrin site. It accepts credit ca...

  18. Physics News

    CERN Multimedia

    Gianotti, F.

    In spite of the fact that real data will only come in the year 2006, this is a very busy and interesting time for Physics-related activities. A very short overview of these activities is given in this issue of the ATLAS News Letter, while the various topics will be described in more detail in the next issues. The Physics and Combined Performance groups are working in four main areas: 1) Assess the ATLAS potential for physics, with emphasis on new channels and ideas. Recent examples are Extra-dimensions, invisible Higgs decays, heavy ion physics, the expected potential of a "Super-LHC" running at a luminosity of 10^35, etc.. 2) Improve the understanding of the detector performance and optimise the reconstruction algorithms. Examples of issues in the pipeline are: can we tag charm-jet ? What can we gain in the jet energy resolution by combining the calorimeter and tracker information to reconstruct the jet energy ? 3) Follow detector changes and detector-related issues and monitor the impact on the perform...

  19. ¿Usted Va Al Capitolio También?: Adult Immigrants' Positioning in Response to News and Digital Media about Immigration Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguerón-Liu, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    This article explores the ways in which adult immigrants engaged in discussion about immigration news at a web design course during the passing of Senate Bill 1070 in Arizona. Drawing on the method and theory of mediated discourse analysis, two focal interactions reveal the diverse positions that students took up in relation to anti-immigrant…

  20. Who Makes The News?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørndrup, Hanne; Bentsen, Martine

    -running and most extensive research on gender in the news media. It began in 1995 when volunteers in 71 countries around the world monitored women’s presence in their national radio, television and print news. The research revealed that only 17% of news subjects – the people who are interviewed or whom the news...... media. In 2010 women made up 31 % of the news subjects compared to the global average of 24 % women. This year the share of women in news has declined to 25% so Denmark is almost on level with the global average....

  1. Market News Price Dataset

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Real-time price data collected by the Boston Market News Reporter. The NOAA Fisheries' "Fishery Market News" began operations in New York City on February 14, 1938....

  2. News/Press Releases

    Data.gov (United States)

    Office of Personnel Management — A press release, news release, media release, press statement is written communication directed at members of the news media for the purpose of announcing programs...

  3. News & Announcements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    News from Journal House Guidelines for Submission The Journal's current Guide to Submissions can be found on pages 29-30 of this issue. They have been streamlined a bit and also include a handy check list. This information is also available on JCE Online at http://jchemed.chem.wisc.edu/Journal/Authors/. Wanted: Demo Checkers The Tested Demonstrations column needs people who like to try out demos. Column editor Ed Vitz is looking for additional volunteers to serve as "checkers" for manuscripts that have been submitted to the Journal for possible publication as Tested Demonstrations. A checker is expected to perform two functions: to review the manuscript for accuracy and novelty, and to attempt to perform the demonstration according to the procedure supplied by the author. Checkers may suggest important improvements in demonstration procedures, and for their efforts they are cited in the byline when the manuscript is published. For instance, the demo showing the yellow cascading precipitates (lead iodide) made from potassium iodide and lead nitrate was submitted by Wobbe de Vos and checked by Kim Kostka. The (yellow) cascading precipitates are from "Using Large Glass Cylinders To Demonstrate Chemical Reactions" that appeared in the April 1999 issue of JCE. We prefer that checkers begin the review process (which may in some cases involve procuring supplies) very soon after being contacted so that their review can be completed in the timely manner that authors deserve. Checkers are usually teachers who routinely present lecture demonstrations in their classes in either high school or colleges. We try not to call on checkers more often than once a year, which is one of the reasons for this request. Another is that we lose many highly valued, experienced checkers to retirement or other endeavors. Prospective checkers may want to look at a copy of the JCE Tested Demonstration Evaluation Form. It can be found on the Web at http://www.kutztown.edu/ vitz

  4. Figuring Out Health News

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stones Brain and Nervous System Figuring Out Health News KidsHealth > For Teens > Figuring Out Health News Print A A A What's in this article? ... on teens and suicide. She came across a news article about how some antidepressants increase the chances ...

  5. Adolescent drinking patterns across countries: associations with alcohol policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilligan, Conor; Kuntsche, Emmanuel; Gmel, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    Early consumption of full servings of alcohol and early experience of drunkenness have been linked with alcohol-related harmful effects in adolescence, as well as adult health and social problems. On the basis of secondary analysis of county-level prevalence data, the present study explored the current pattern of drinking and drunkenness among 15- and 16-year-old adolescents in 40 European and North American countries. Data from the 2006 Health Behavior in School Children survey and the European School Survey Project on Alcohol and other Drugs were used. The potential role of alcohol control and policy measures in explaining variance in drinking patterns across countries was also examined. Policy measures and data on adult consumption patterns were taken from the WHO Global Information System on Alcohol and Health, Eurostat and the indicator of alcohol control policy strength developed by Brand DA, Saisana M, Rynn LA et al. [(2007) Comparative analysis of alcohol control policies in 30 countries. PLoS Med 4:e151.]. We found that a non-significant trend existed whereby higher prices and stronger alcohol controls were associated with a lower proportion of weekly drinking but a higher proportion of drunkenness. It is important that future research explores the causal relationships between alcohol policy measures and alcohol consumption patterns to determine whether strict policies do in fact have any beneficial effect on drinking patterns, or rather, lead to rebellion and an increased prevalence of binge drinking.

  6. News & Announcements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-08-01

    News from Journal House Perspective on JCE Online Recently a reader asked us for a perspective on JCE Onlinehow the chemical education community is receiving it and how the Journal staff itself views it. We share our responses below. Subscriber Numbers How many people subscribe to JCE Online+? As of June 1, 1999, our records show that 13% of individual JCE subscriptions in the USA include JCE Online+. This percentage has increased significantly during the past year- in June 1998 it was approximately 4% and December 1998 about 7%. Almost all subscribers to JCE Online subscribe to print as well. Since JCE Online has only very recently been made available to institutional subscribers, there are no numbers to report. There has been considerable interest in online from libraries. Given that JCE Online+ is a fairly recent subscriber option and that many subscribers have a wait-and-see approach to any new option, we feel that the numbers above are quite high. The steady growth is encouraging. Online Usage How many people visit our Web site? Statistics for the period January 1, 1999, through May 31, 1999, that may be of interest include: Total Pages Served 361,115 Total Visits 138,377 Total Unique Visitors 51,744 Total Repeat Visitors 11,536 Average Visit Length 03:05 Average Requests/Visit 10.8 Average Pages/Visit 2.6 Average Daily Visits 916 Online Rationale and Expectations JCE Online is a very important part of the whole Journal, but we do not expect it to supplant print: online and print are very different media. Usage of JCE Online is growing steadily; our subscribers are realizing what we have learned: it is not possible to deliver the Journal in the print medium alone- print is no longer adequate to accomplish our mission. Examples of things not possible in print include: ·JCE Index to all 76 years of Journal issues, available all the time with responses within seconds. ·Supplementary materials that are important to only a limited number of our subscribers

  7. The news Engine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Ralf

    The News Engine How a new experiment in newsrooms can change process, product and people.   By Ralf Andersson   In fall 2012, the news department of the Danish Broadcasting Corporation,decided to implement a new workflow called ”The News Engine” - in order to workfaster, more freely, flexible...... and with fewer resources. This was done to raisethe productivity. The fundamental principle was that all stories should fit all platforms(content sharing) - and that no one did their own story anymore. DR News introduced 8-10 mobile live teams who are responsible for doinginterviews, record pictures and sound...... platforms. It discusses challengesof new practices of news production, cross-media reporting and mediaconvergence, resulting from DR’s new experiment, the news engine – with differentaspects: Product: The main news program 6:30 has fewer stories, but each one has moreelements. It’s not just one single pre...

  8. News bites

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reporting in the Journal of Neuroscience, the researchers said they found that one of the experimental drugs, known as. MW151, significantly slowed the effects ... Foundation, the Alzheimer's Association and the Kleberg Foundation. Unlike many drugs, the new medications, which are taken orally, easily cross the.

  9. News Authorship and News Sources: Impacts on Environmental Coverage in The Nigerian Press

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogadimma C. Emenyeonu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the impacts of news authorship and news sources on environmental coverage in the Nigerian press to shed light on the roles they play in news construction. The study finds that journalists in conjunction with policy makers are the catalyst for environmental information, whereas citizens who are pivotal in creating relevant public opinion on environmental issues are left behind. The study reveals that investigative reporting lacks in environmental coverage because most coverage are events driven which explains why environmental news is reported as straight news and as such journalists rely heavily on official sources rather than subsidiary sources. The study opines that for proper environmental coverage, journalists must choose sources from both main and subsidiary actors and revert to proactive, investigative and interpretive reporting so as to make environmental stories relatable to the intended audiences.

  10. News & Announcements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-02-01

    News from Journal House Journal Ambassadors, 1999 What do the people listed below have in common? A search of our records indicates that each has been a participant in our Journal Ambassador program during 1999. Guy Anderson Jim Becvar Jerry Bell Jim Birk Diane Bunce Ann Cartwright Thomas Clark Jane Crosby Maria Dean Art Ellis Donald Elswick Tommy Franklin Babu George Paul Heath Angela Hoffman Lynn Hogue J. J. Lagowski Frank Lambert Dorothy Lehmkuhl George Lelevre Scott Luaders Jane McMullen Marci Merritt Carl Minnier Richard Narske Ron Perkins Gabriel Pinto Dick Potts Herb Retcofsky Jerry Sarquis Elke Schoffers Sara Selfe Uni Susskind J. Mark Tolman John Varine Dawn Wakeley Marla White Those who are a part of this program take materials about the Journal to workshops, outreach programs, seminars, regional meetings, award nights, short courses, and other events at home and abroad, places where people who are interested in chemical education gather. Given about three weeks notice, we can outfit you with a variety of materials that will help others get tuned in to the good things that are happening in chemical education. We can send you an assortment of Journal issues, subscription forms, our Publications/Software Catalog, reprints from the Viewpoints series, copies of Classroom Activities, or JCE Gift Award Certificates, assuming that supplies are available. Of course we can arrange for the group to have temporary access to JCE Online. We can send you a brochure about the Ambassador program or answer any questions - just ask: email to jce@chem.wisc.edu; phone 1-800-991-5534 (U.S.) or 608-262-5153 (non-U.S.); fax 608-265-8094. If by chance you were a Journal Ambassador in 1999 but your name was not included, just let us know so that you can be recognized in a future column. Gift Subscription Awards As spring, the season of awards, approaches, we remind you of our handy Gift Certificates (a replica is shown on page 142). A gift of the Journal is not only affordable

  11. The use of language and its impact on energy policy discourse: A case study of the hydrogen economy and the news media during the G.W. Bush administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waegel, Alexander Francis

    The development of policy is subject to many different influences. The subjects are often complex and citizens must rely on information provided by third parties in order to participate in the discussion. The news media has traditionally been the primary provider of such information and are counted upon to publish unbiased accounts of events. However, the news media gets information from its own sources and this offers an opportunity for powerful, well-organized groups to influence the presentation of these topics. This is done through the creation and dissemination of constructed narratives, which remove the contexts from facts to present different conclusions (Barthes, 1957). Sourcing discusses how the news media may be influenced by powerful organizations providing free, easily published material (Herman, 1988). The 24 hour news cycle, the demand for ratings, and the impossibility of funding independent research journalism for every topic requires them to seek information from sources viewed as reliable and authoritative, such as the government or major corporations. The wealthier and more powerful organizations are better able to provide this large quantity of information in a readily publishable format and thus have the potential to influence the presentation to reflect positively on their positions. As a technologically and politically complex subject, energy policy would be particularly prone to the influence of sourcing. Hydrogen energy was used as a case study to search for the presence of sourcing. Hydrogen fuels cells offer potential for the reduction of greenhouse gasses and other benefits, but have significant disadvantages as well. While the academic community remained divided on the technology, the G.W. Bush administration offered it unwavering support. The Bush administration and the academic community both released a great deal of information about hydrogen but each set presented a very different outlook. Articles, press releases, and speeches from

  12. NEWS: Web's wonders!

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-07-01

    Introducing this month's collection of useful websites for physics teachers. If you have any suggestions for this column then please send them to us at ped@ioppublishing.co.uk Dave Pickersgill has drawn our attention to the following: www.sheffcol.ac.uk/links/ which has annotated, classified and searchable links to over 1700 educational sites. Included are around 500 science links. Members of the American Association of Physics Teachers were recently informed of a website for those hoping to arouse interest and knowledge of astronomy in their students. Space.com, a comprehensive space news website, had launched `spaceKids', a new channel specifically targeted at children complete with a gallery of space images, space and science news, stories, a space question and answer section hosted by a team of science teachers, interactive games, weekly polls and competitions. The website can be found at www.spacekids.com Those fascinated by all aspects of nuclear fusion should take a look at the General Atomics educational site: FusionEd.gat.com as well as the national site fusion.gat.com/PlasmaOutreach

  13. News; Actualite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ormano, P.

    2004-10-01

    Japan) to 13 milliards of dollars. The Ghislenghien pipeline (south-west of Belgium) has been put again in use at the beginning of September. The British group Shell has engaged itself in a policy of assignment of non strategic assets for centring the activity of the group and for especially investing in the exploration-production sector. The Russian President, Vladimir Poutine, has declared that the hydrocarbons productions will continue to increase. The Nigerian navy has opened an inquiry on the theft of a tanker. The Romanian government has invited tenders in November 2003 for the privatization of the two firms of natural gas distribution: Distrigaz Nord and Distrigaz Sud. The Nigerian government wants to sale its failing refineries in the framework of a privatization plan. Tripoli has announced the conditions of auction of 15 petroleum sea or underground exploration blocks. At the middle of September, New Delhi and Islamabad are agreed for reinforcing their cooperation in the energetic sector. The Moroccan crude oil imports have increased of 82.7% in volume and of 102% in value for the first seven months of 2004 reaching 710 millions of euros. The petroleum Brazilian firm, Petrobras, has announced that it is buying (for 450 M USD) Agip do Brazil, specialized in the distribution of fuels and gas. The Oman government and the Chinese State petroleum group, Sinopec, have signed the 7th of September, an agreement for the petroleum exploration in the sultanate. The 'Compagnie Generale de Geophysique' (CGG) has obtained for the six first months 2004, a clear showing a deficit result of 4.1 millions of euros. IFP Investment, the share holding of the IFP, has bought to the IFP, the whole of the shares of RSI. The clear result of Total is for the first semester 2004 of 2.60 milliards of dollars (in rise of 30% compared with the second trimester 2003. The French petroleum group Total has announced the 22th of September its purchase plan of 25% of the Russian gas firm

  14. Invisible giants in broadcast journalism: news agencies and the global news ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cleidejane Esperidião

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Key actors of the global informational web, the international television news agencies are not often covered in the communications field in Brazil. This paper aims to understand the dynamics established between these transnational companies and their subscribers (world television stations. It attempts to clarify how these western-led news agency companies operate within the flow of communication. It intends to identify production processes (assessment, collection, treatment and radial distribution for the Associated Press Television News (APTN and Reuters Television News (Reuters TV.

  15. INVISIBLE GIANTS IN BROADCAST JOURNALISM: news agencies and the global news ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cleidejane Esperidião

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Key actors of the global informational web, the international television news agencies are not often covered in the communications field in Brazil. This paper aims to understand the dynamics established between these transnational companies and their subscribers (world television stations. It attempts to clarify how these western-led news agency companies operate within the flow of communication. It intends to identify production processes (assessment, collection, treatment and radial distribution for the Associated Press Television News (APTN and Reuters Television News (Reuters TV.

  16. Magnet News

    CERN Multimedia

    Foussat, A; Ruber, R

    Central Solenoid Test The Central Solenoid (CS) and its associated Proximity Cryogenic System have been designed by KEK in collaboration with CERN. Following construction and extensive tests at the Toshiba manufacturing site in Yokohama, Japan, the equipment has been shipped to CERN. The CS is now being prepared for the integration in a common cryostat with the LAr calorimeter, after which a full on-surface test has to be completed before final installation 100m underground in the ATLAS cavern. For this purpose a provisional set-up for the re- commissioning of the final Proximity Cryogenics, the connecting Chimney and the Central Solenoid has been established. During the month of May the Proximity Cryogenics and Chimney with superconducting bus lines have been tested (figure1). The equipment was cooled down to 4.5K and a current of 9000 amperes was applied to the chimney. This is almost 20% above the nominal operational current of 7400 amperes. A number of tests and simulations have been successfully perf...

  17. Institute news

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-11-01

    Joining the team A new member of staff has recently joined the Institute of Physics Education Department (Schools and Colleges) team. (Dr) Steven Chapman will have managerial responsibility for physics education issues in the 11 - 16 age range, particularly on the policy side. He will work closely with Mary Wood, who spends much of her time out and about doing the practical things to support physics education pre-16. Catherine Wilson will be spending more of her time working to support the Post-16 Physics Initiative but retains overall responsibility for the department. Steven graduated in Physics and Astronomy and then went on to do his doctorate at Sussex University. He stayed in the research field for a while, including a period at NPL. Then, having decided to train as a teacher, he taught for the last five years, most recently at a brand new school in Sutton where he was Head of Physics. Physics update Dates for `Physics Update' courses in 2000, intended for practising science teachers, are as follows: 1 - 3 April: Malvern College 9 - 10 June: Stirling University 8 - 10 July: York University 8 - 10 December: Oxford University The deadline for applications for the course to be held on 11 - 13 December 1999 at the School of Physics, Exeter University, is 12 November, so any late enquiries should be sent to Leila Solomon at The Institute of Physics, 76 Portland Place, London W1N 3DH (tel: 020 7470 4821) right away. Name that teacher! Late nominations are still welcome for the Teachers of Physics/Teachers of Primary Science awards for the year 2000. Closing date for nominations is `the last week in November'. Further details can be obtained from Catherine Wilson or Barbara Hill in the Institute's Education Department. Forward and back! The Education Group's one-day meeting on 13 November is accepting bookings until almost the last minute, so don't delay your application! The day is entitled `Post-16 physics: Looking forward, learning from the past' and it aims to

  18. Policies, standards and managements associated with PG utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuan, L. M.; Zheng, H. G.; Zhao, J. J.; Wang, A. L.; Sun, S. F.

    2017-08-01

    With rapid growth in the production of high concentration phosphate and compound fertilizers in China, PG production is increasing every year. However, its utilization is not increasing at the same pace. Phosphogypsum is usually stored in such a way that not only it occupies lot of land, but also leads to minimal environmental pollution. This paper summarized the policies, standards and managements issues associated with PG utilization, and in order to help the PG utilization and management effectively.

  19. News and events | Page 6 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Explore our coming events in Canada and our regions, or find out about past speakers, workshops, and conferences. IDRC / MACHTELD VAN DEN BERG. News. The Policy and Evaluation Division is seeking a 2018 Research Awardee · The SGCI logo. News. The Science Granting Councils Initiative in sub-Saharan Africa ...

  20. Routinizing Breaking News

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartley, Jannie Møller

    2011-01-01

    This chapter revisits seminal theoretical categorizations of news proposed three decades earlier by US sociologist Gaye Tuchman. By exploring the definition of ”breaking news” in the contemporary online newsrooms of three Danish news organisations, the author offers us a long overdue re......-theorization of journalistic practice in the online context and helpfully explores well-evidenced limitations to online news production, such as the relationship between original reporting and the use of ”shovelware.”...

  1. News & Announcements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-09-01

    work hard and often spend more than the typical work week doing their jobs superlatively and making this a great Journal. The Board of Publication, the Division of Chemical Education, and everyone associated with the Journal are dedicated to providing our readers with the best possible publication at the lowest possible cost. All that effort counts for a lot, and you are the beneficiary. What can you do to help continue this tradition of excellence at minimal cost? Become a JCE Ambassador. Ask others to join with us as subscribers. Or give them gift subscriptions (an even better bargain) and encourage them to continue to subscribe. The more subscribers we have, the less the cost to each. Also, volunteer your time as an author, reviewer, column editor, or in some other capacity. JCE is a great journal because its readers have given of themselves to make it that way. Please continue to work with us to keep it that way. Awards Aspirin Prize The first international Aspirin Prize for Solidarity through Chemistry has been awarded to K. C. Nicolaou of Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA, and the University of California, San Diego. The prize honors Nicolaou for his creativity in the synthesis of natural products and for his development of innovative synthetic methods. Nicolaou and his colleagues E. J. Sorensen and N. Winssinger contributed an overview of this area of chemistry to the Journal in their Viewpoints article, "The Art and Science of Organic and Natural Products Synthesis", J. Chem. Educ. 1998, 75, 1225. The award commemorates the centenary of the first synthesis of a pure and stable form of acetylsalicylic acid, the active ingredient of aspirin. Awarded every two years, the Aspirin Prize is sponsored by Química Farmacéutica Bayer S.A. (Barcelona) and includes a monetary award of 20,000. Courses, Seminars, Meetings, Opportunities Travel Awards, ACS Women Chemists Committee Women Chemists Committee of the American Chemical Society is calling for applications

  2. The U.S. Online News Coverage of Mammography Based on a Google News Search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young Lin, Leng Leng; Rosenkrantz, Andrew B

    2017-12-01

    To characterize online news coverage relating to mammography, including articles' stance toward screening mammography. Google News was used to search U.S. news sites over a 9-year period (2006-2015) based on the search terms "mammography" and "mammogram." The top 100 search results were recorded. Identified articles were manually reviewed. The top 100 news articles were from the following sources: local news outlet (50%), national news outlet (24%), nonimaging medical source (13%), entertainment or culture news outlet (6%), business news outlet (4%), peer-reviewed journal (1%), and radiology news outlet (1%). Most common major themes were the screening mammography controversy (29%), description of a new breast imaging technology (23%), dense breasts (11%), and promotion of a public screening initiative (11%). For the most recent year, article stance toward screening mammography was 59%, favorable; 16%, unfavorable; and 25%, neutral. After 2010, there was an abrupt shift in articles' stances from neutral to both favorable and unfavorable. A wide range of online news sources addressed a range of issues related to mammography. National, rather than local, news sites were more likely to focus on the screening controversy and more likely to take an unfavorable view. The controversial United States Preventive Services Task Force guidelines may have influenced articles to take a stance on screening mammography. As such online news may impact public perception of the topic and thus potentially impact guideline adherence, radiologists are encouraged to maintain awareness of this online coverage and to support the online dissemination of reliable and accurate information. Copyright © 2017 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Associations of tobacco control policies with birth outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Summer Sherburne; Baum, Christopher F; Oken, Emily; Gillman, Matthew W

    2014-11-01

    It is unclear whether the benefits of tobacco control policies extend to pregnant women and infants, especially among racial/ethnic minority and low socioeconomic populations that are at highest risk for adverse birth outcomes. To examine the associations of state cigarette taxes and the enactment of smoke-free legislation with US birth outcomes according to maternal race/ethnicity and education. Using a quasi-experimental approach, we analyzed repeated cross sections of US natality files with 16,198,654 singleton births from 28 states and Washington, DC, between 2000 and 2010. We first used probit regression to model the associations of 2 tobacco control policies with the probability that a pregnant woman smoked (yes or no). We then used linear or probit regression to estimate the associations of the policies with birth outcomes. We also examined the association of taxes with birth outcomes across maternal race/ethnicity and education. State cigarette taxes and smoke-free restaurant legislation. Birth weight (in grams), low birth weight (90th percentile for gestational age and sex). White and black mothers with the least amount of education (0-11 years) had the highest prevalence of maternal smoking during pregnancy (42.4% and 20.0%, respectively) and the poorest birth outcomes, but the strongest responses to cigarette taxes. Among white mothers with a low level of education, every $1.00 increase in the cigarette tax reduced the level of smoking by 2.4 percentage points (-0.0024 [95% CI, -0.0004 to -0.0001]), and the birth weight of their infants increased by 5.41 g (95% CI, 1.92-8.89 g). Among black mothers with a low level of education, tax increases reduced smoking by 2.1 percentage points (-0.0021 [95% CI, -0.0003 to -0.0001]), and the birth weight of their infants increased by 3.98 g (95% CI, 1.91-6.04 g). Among these mothers, tax increases also reduced the risk of having low-birth-weight, preterm, and small-for-gestational-age babies, but increased the risk

  4. Associations Between Antibullying Policies and Bullying in 25 States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatzenbuehler, Mark L; Schwab-Reese, Laura; Ranapurwala, Shabbar I; Hertz, Marci F; Ramirez, Marizen R

    2015-10-01

    antibullying legislation were consistently associated with decreased odds of exposure to both bullying and cyberbullying: statement of scope, description of prohibited behaviors, and requirements for school districts to develop and implement local policies. Antibullying policies may represent effective intervention strategies for reducing students' risk of being bullied and cyberbullied in schools.

  5. Zimbabwe Science News: About this journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's Partners · Terms and Conditions of Use · Contact AJOL · News. OTHER RESOURCES... for Researchers · for Journals · for Authors · for Policy Makers · about Open Access · Journal Quality.

  6. With News Search Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, Holly

    2005-01-01

    Although there are many news search engines on the Web, finding the news items one wants can be challenging. Choosing appropriate search terms is one of the biggest challenges. Unless one has seen the article that one is seeking, it is often difficult to select words that were used in the headline or text of the article. The limited archives of…

  7. Archives: Vulture News

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 11 of 11 ... Archives: Vulture News. Journal Home > Archives: Vulture News. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives. 1 - 11 of 11 Items. 2015. Vol 68, No 1 (2015) ...

  8. Archives: Zimbabwe Science News

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 10 of 10 ... Archives: Zimbabwe Science News. Journal Home > Archives: Zimbabwe Science News. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives. 1 - 10 of 10 Items. 2002 ...

  9. BRAZILIAN NEWS PORTALS CHARACTERISTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heloiza G. Herckovitz

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available A content analysis of four Brazilian news media portals found that economic news dominated the top headlines with little attention paid to education, the environment and welfare. Other trends included a focus on local events and national news sources, reliance on few sources, mostly official ones, and a low percentage of news that fitted the concept of newsworthiness (a combination of both social significance and deviance concepts. Other findings of a study of 432 top news stories published by UOL, Estadão, iG and Terra during a 15-day period between February and March 2008 indicate that the top portions of the portals’ front pages carry news that lacks story depth, editorial branding, and multimedia applications. The results suggest that online news portals are in their infancy although Brazil has the largest online population of Latin America. This study hopes to shed light on the gatekeeping process in Brazilian news portals. Brazilian media portals have yet to become a significant editorial force able to provide knowledge about social issues and public affairs in a socially responsible fashione.

  10. Determining Citizens’ Opinions About Stories in the News Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timo Wandhöfer

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We describe a method whereby a governmental policy maker can discover citizens’ reaction to news stories. This is particularly relevant in the political world, where governments’ policy statements are reported by the news media and discussed by citizens. The work here addresses two main questions: whereabouts are citizens discussing a news story, and what are they saying? Our strategy to answer the first question is to find news articles pertaining to the policy statements, then perform internet searches for references to the news articles’ headlines and URLs. We have created a software tool that schedules repeating Google searches for the news articles and collects the results in a database, enabling the user to aggregate and analyse them to produce ranked tables of sites that reference the news articles. Using data mining techniques we can analyse data so that resultant ranking reflects an overall aggregate score, taking into account multiple datasets, and this shows the most relevant places on the internet where the story is discussed. To answer the second question, we introduce the WeGov toolbox as a tool for analysing citizens’ comments and behaviour pertaining to news stories.  We first use the tool for identifying social network discussions, using different strategies for Facebook and Twitter. We apply different analysis components to analyse the data to distil the essence of the social network users’ comments, to determine influential users and identify important comments.

  11. Good Friends, Bad News

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars Kai; Arvidsson, Adam; Nielsen, Finn Årup

    the NY Times finds a strong link between positive affect and virality, and, based on psychological theories it is concluded that this relation is universally valid. The conclusion appears to be in contrast with classic theory of diffusion in news media emphasizing negative affect as promoting propagation....... In this paper we explore the apparent paradox in a quantitative analysis of information diffusion on Twitter. Twitter is interesting in this context as it has been shown to present both the characteristics social and news media. The basic measure of virality in Twitter is the probability of retweet. Twitter...... is different from email in that retweeting does not depend on pre-existing social relations, but often occur among strangers, thus in this respect Twitter may be more similar to traditional news media. We therefore hypothesize that negative news content is more likely to be retweeted, while for non-news tweets...

  12. Tweeting News Articles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Toledo Bastos

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article we investigate the impact of social media readership to the editorial profile of newspapers. We analyze tweets containing links to news articles from eight of the largest national newspapers in the United States, United Kingdom, Spain, Brazil, and Germany. The data collection follows the first two weeks of October 2012 and includes 2,842,699 tweets with links to news articles. Twitter-shortened links were resolved using a three-pass routine and assigned to 1 of the 21 newspaper sections. We found the concentration of links to news articles posted by top users to be lower than reported in the literature and the strategy of relaying headlines on Twitter via automatic news aggregators (feeds to be inefficient. The results of this investigation show which sections of a newspaper are the most and least read by readers in different parts of the world, with German readers placing greater emphasis on Politics and Economy; Brazilians on Sports and Arts; Spaniards on Local and National news; Britons and Americans on Opinion and World news. We also found that German and Spanish readers are more likely to read multiple national newspapers, while British readers more often resort to foreign sources of news. The results confirm that feedback to news items from a large user base is pivotal for the replication of content and that newspapers and news items can be clustered according to the editorial profile and principles of newsworthiness inherited from legacy media. The results of this investigation shed light onto the networked architecture of journalism that increasingly depends on readership agency.

  13. Cascading Corruption News

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Mads

    2018-01-01

    Through a content analysis of 8,800 news items and six months of front pages in three Brazilian newspapers, all dealing with corruption and political transgression, this article documents the remarkable skew of media attention to corruption scandals. The bias is examined as an information...... phenomenon, arising from systemic and commercial factors of Brazil’s news media: An information cascade of news on corruption formed, destabilizing the governing coalition and legitimizing the impeachment process of Dilma Rousseff. As this process gained momentum, questions of accountability were disregarded...

  14. News media representations of a common EU foreign and security policy: a cross-national content analysis of CFSP coverage in national quality newspapers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kandyla, A.-A.; de Vreese, C.

    2011-01-01

    This study is a cross-national comparative content analysis of the broadsheet press coverage of EU Common Foreign and Security issues (n=1453) focusing on the presence of indicators of a European Public Sphere. Specifically, we investigated the visibility of Common Foreign and Security Policy (CFSP)

  15. Is Crime News Coverage Excessive?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graber, Doris A.

    1979-01-01

    Reports on the frequency and manner in which various crime and noncrime news topics were presented in selected newspapers and television newscasts in 1976. Examines news flow data to determine whether news output was inflexible, and whether crime news coverage distorted the amount of real-life crime. (PD)

  16. News media consumption among immigrants in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Connie Carøe

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, especially with the advent of Digital Broadcasting Technology, transnational media has become central in the consumption of news by immigrant populations. This has received some attention as a factor associated with lack of integration into their new societies. The present article...... demonstrates that diaspora as an analytic term is indeed relevant for immigrants, leaving room for questions of multiple belonging with implications for everyday life. According to recent data, people with migrant experience tend to seek news very broadly. Extensive news media consumption, desire for more...... international news than is currently the national television channels, are also part of the picture. A diaspora perspective transforms the prospect presented by observers and journalists, worried about integration processes, and prompts considerations that immigrants are also emigrants....

  17. News and Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    The latest news from the Office of Cancer Nanotechnology Research and the Alliance, as well as upcoming and past events attended by the Office of Cancer Nanotechnology Research staff, and relevant upcoming scientific meetings.

  18. Turning News into Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otten, Nick; Stelmach, Majorie

    1987-01-01

    Suggests young people can respond to news stories and political issues they feel strongly about through poetry, and presents one student's effective use of satire which lets his emotions "leak through" to the reader. (NH)

  19. CCG - News & Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI's Center for Cancer Genomics (CCG) has been widely recognized for its research efforts to facilitiate advances in cancer genomic research and improve patient outcomes. Find the latest news about and events featuring CCG.

  20. Breaking News as Radicalisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartley, Jannie Møller

    The aim of the paper is to make explicit how the different categories are applied in the online newsroom and thus how new categories can be seen as positioning strategies in the form of radicalisations of already existing categories. Thus field theory provides us with tools to analyse how online...... journalists are using the categorisations to create hierarchies within the journalistic field in order to position themselves as specialists in what Tuchman has called developing news, aiming and striving for what today is know as breaking news and the “exclusive scoop,” as the trademark of online journalism...... in a media environment where immediacy rules (Domingo 2008a). Following this research the primary focus of this paper is the category breaking news and Tuchmans developing news, but as they are all connected the analysis will also draw upon the other categories in Tuchmans typology. The theoretical framework...

  1. Multimodal news framing effects

    OpenAIRE

    Powell, T.E.

    2017-01-01

    Visuals in news media play a vital role in framing citizens’ political preferences. Yet, compared to the written word, visual images are undervalued in political communication research. Using framing theory, this thesis redresses the balance by studying the combined, or multimodal, effects of visual and verbal media. Three experimental studies using international affairs news – a ready source of compelling visuals – address the following questions: (a) what is the individual and combined cont...

  2. News, discussion and associative issue ownership: instability at the micro level versus stability at the macro level

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleinnijenhuis, J.; Walter, A.S.

    2014-01-01

    Associative issue ownership refers to one of the prerequisites for representative democracy-public awareness of the issue priorities of competing political parties. This article addresses the question of how the instability of associative issue ownership at the micro level of individual voters,

  3. Modeling news dissemination on nuclear issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reis Junior, Jose S.B.; Barroso, Antonio C.O.; Menezes, Mario O., E-mail: jsbrj@ime.usp.b, E-mail: barroso@ipen.b, E-mail: mario@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Using a modified epidemiological model, the dissemination of news by media agents after the occurrence of large scale disasters was studied. A modified compartmented model was developed in a previous paper presented at INAC 2007. There it used to study to the Chernobyl's nuclear accident (1986) and the Concorde airplane crash (2000). Now the model has been applied to a larger and more diverse group of events - nuclear, non-nuclear and naturally caused disasters. To be comprehensive, old and recent events from various regions of the world were selected. A more robust news repository was used, and improved search techniques were developed to ensure that the scripts would not count false positive news. The same model was used but with improved non-linear embedded simulation optimization algorithms to generate the parameters of interest for our model. Individual parameters and some specific combination of them allow some interesting perceptions on how the nature of the accident / disaster gives rise to different profiles of growth and decay of the news. In our studies events involving nuclear causes generate news repercussion with more explosive / robust surge profiles and longer decaying tails than those of other natures. As a consequence of these differences, public opinion and policy makers are also much more sensitive to some issues than to others. The model, through its epidemiological parameters, shows in quantitative manner how 'nervous' the media content generators are with respect to nuclear installations and how resilient this negative feelings about nuclear is. (author)

  4. News values on social media: News organizations' Facebook use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Rawi, Ahmed

    2017-08-01

    This study examines the news selection practices followed by news organizations through investigating the news posted on social networking sites and, in particular, the Facebook pages of four foreign Arabic language TV stations: The Iranian Al-Alam TV, Russia Today, Deutsche Welle, and BBC. A total of 15,589 news stories are analyzed in order to examine the prominence of references to countries and political actors. The study reveals that social significance and proximity as well as the news organizations' ideological agenda are the most important elements that dictate the news selection process.

  5. News values on social media: News organizations’ Facebook use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Rawi, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the news selection practices followed by news organizations through investigating the news posted on social networking sites and, in particular, the Facebook pages of four foreign Arabic language TV stations: The Iranian Al-Alam TV, Russia Today, Deutsche Welle, and BBC. A total of 15,589 news stories are analyzed in order to examine the prominence of references to countries and political actors. The study reveals that social significance and proximity as well as the news organizations’ ideological agenda are the most important elements that dictate the news selection process. PMID:29278253

  6. Thrilling News Revisited: The Role of Suspense for the Enjoyment of News Stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaspar, Kai; Zimmermann, Daniel; Wilbers, Anne-Kathrin

    2016-01-01

    Previous research on news perception has been dominated by a cognitively oriented perspective on reception processes, whereas emotions have been widely neglected. Consequently, it has remained open which features of a news story might elicit affective responses and hence modulate news perception, shifting the focus to the emotional potential of the narrative. According to the affective-disposition theory, the experience of suspense is the striving force of immersion in fictional dramas. Thereby, a positive affective disposition toward the protagonist of a story and a high likelihood of a bad ending should increase suspense that, in turn, should positively influence reading appreciation and lingering interest in the story. We investigated whether suspense and its determinants also play such a key role in the context of news stories. Study 1 ( n = 263) successfully replicated results of an earlier study, whereas Studies 2 ( n = 255) and 3 ( n = 599) challenged the generalizability of some effects related to manipulated characteristics of a news story. In contrast, correlational relationships between perceived news characteristics and news evaluation were relatively stable. In particular, participants' liking of the protagonist and the perceived likelihood of a good ending were positively associated with suspense, reading appreciation, and lingering interest. This result indicates a preference for happy endings and contradicts the notion that likely negative outcomes are beneficial for suspense and the enjoyment of news stories, as postulated by the affective-disposition theory in the context of fictional dramas. Moreover, experienced suspense reliably mediated the correlations between, on the one hand, participants' liking of the protagonist and the perceived likelihood of a good ending and, on the other hand, reading appreciation and lingering interest. The news story's personal relevance was less influential than expected. Further, we observed a large absence of

  7. Thrilling News Revisited: The Role of Suspense for the Enjoyment of News Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaspar, Kai; Zimmermann, Daniel; Wilbers, Anne-Kathrin

    2016-01-01

    Previous research on news perception has been dominated by a cognitively oriented perspective on reception processes, whereas emotions have been widely neglected. Consequently, it has remained open which features of a news story might elicit affective responses and hence modulate news perception, shifting the focus to the emotional potential of the narrative. According to the affective-disposition theory, the experience of suspense is the striving force of immersion in fictional dramas. Thereby, a positive affective disposition toward the protagonist of a story and a high likelihood of a bad ending should increase suspense that, in turn, should positively influence reading appreciation and lingering interest in the story. We investigated whether suspense and its determinants also play such a key role in the context of news stories. Study 1 (n = 263) successfully replicated results of an earlier study, whereas Studies 2 (n = 255) and 3 (n = 599) challenged the generalizability of some effects related to manipulated characteristics of a news story. In contrast, correlational relationships between perceived news characteristics and news evaluation were relatively stable. In particular, participants' liking of the protagonist and the perceived likelihood of a good ending were positively associated with suspense, reading appreciation, and lingering interest. This result indicates a preference for happy endings and contradicts the notion that likely negative outcomes are beneficial for suspense and the enjoyment of news stories, as postulated by the affective-disposition theory in the context of fictional dramas. Moreover, experienced suspense reliably mediated the correlations between, on the one hand, participants' liking of the protagonist and the perceived likelihood of a good ending and, on the other hand, reading appreciation and lingering interest. The news story's personal relevance was less influential than expected. Further, we observed a large absence of

  8. Ahok in Virtual News

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novian Anata Putra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Every society is flooded by Information in the Internet era. News sites as one of the sources of information are now numerous. However, do these bits of information worth to be trusted fully? Through quantitative content analysis, the researcher tried to examine one of the news sites based on religion (Islamic hardliners, VOA-Islam, in reporting Basuki Tjahaja Purnama a.k.a Ahok, which incidentally is a non-Muslim Chinese descent. Using Jurgen Westerstahl’s objectivity approach (1983, found the fact that the news presented by VOA-Islam does not contain elements of balance, even most of it shows a negative tendency, cornered Ahok as a central figure in DKI Jakarta. In fact, from the dimensions of relevance, the percentage of news from VOA-Islam, which has a significant effect to the activity of community life and proximity to the topic of the public, are quite high. In addition to the large amount of news that contains racial issues, it becomes worrisome because it could lead to the disintegration of the nation.

  9. Public attention to science and political news and support for climate change mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, P. Sol; Nisbet, Erik C.; Myers, Teresa A.

    2015-06-01

    We examine how attention to science and political news may influence public knowledge, perceived harm, and support for climate mitigation policies. Previous research examining these relationships has not fully accounted for how political ideology shapes the mental processes through which the public interprets media discourses about climate change. We incorporate political ideology and the concept of motivated cognition into our analysis to compare and contrast two prominent models of opinion formation, the scientific literacy model, which posits that disseminating scientific information will move public opinion towards the scientific consensus, and the motivated reasoning model, which posits that individuals will interpret information in a biased manner. Our analysis finds support for both models of opinion formation with key differences across ideological groups. Attention to science news was associated with greater perceptions of harm and knowledge for conservatives, but only additional knowledge for liberals. Supporting the literacy model, greater knowledge was associated with more support for climate mitigation for liberals. In contrast, consistent with motivated reasoning, more knowledgeable conservatives were less supportive of mitigation policy. In addition, attention to political news had a negative association with perceived harm for conservatives but not for liberals.

  10. Sharing good NEWS across the world: developing comparable scores across 12 countries for the neighborhood environment walkability scale (NEWS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The IPEN (International Physical Activity and Environment Network) Adult project seeks to conduct pooled analyses of associations of perceived neighborhood environment, as measured by the Neighborhood Environment Walkability Scale (NEWS) and its abbreviated version (NEWS-A), with physical activity using data from 12 countries. As IPEN countries used adapted versions of the NEWS/NEWS-A, this paper aimed to develop scoring protocols that maximize cross-country comparability in responses. This information is also highly relevant to non-IPEN studies employing the NEWS/NEWS-A, which is one of the most popular measures of perceived environment globally. Methods The following countries participated in the IPEN Adult study: Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Colombia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Hong Kong, Mexico, New Zealand, Spain, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Participants (N = 14,305) were recruited from neighborhoods varying in walkability and socio-economic status. Countries collected data on the perceived environment using a self- or interviewer-administered version of the NEWS/NEWS-A. Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) was used to derive comparable country-specific measurement models of the NEWS/NEWS-A. The level of correspondence between standard and alternative versions of the NEWS/NEWS-A factor-analyzable subscales was determined by estimating the correlations and mean standardized difference (Cohen’s d) between them using data from countries that had included items from both standard and alternative versions of the subscales. Results Final country-specific measurement models of the NEWS/NEWS-A provided acceptable levels of fit to the data and shared the same factorial structure with six latent factors and two single items. The correspondence between the standard and alternative versions of subscales of Land use mix – access, Infrastructure and safety for walking/cycling, and Aesthetics was high. The Brazilian version of the Traffic safety

  11. Insight4News: Connecting News to Relevant Social Conversations

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Bichen; Ifrim, Georgiana; Hurley, Neil J.

    2014-01-01

    We present the Insight4News system that connects news articles to social conversations, as echoed in microblogs such as Twitter. Insight4News tracks feeds from mainstream media, e.g., BBC, Irish Times, and extracts relevant topics that summarize the tweet activity around each article, recommends relevant hashtags, and presents complementary views and statistics on the tweet activity, related news articles, and timeline of the story with regard to Twitter reaction. The user can track their own...

  12. The impact of the explosion of EU news on voter choice in the 2014 EU Elections

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kleinnijenhuis, J; van Atteveldt, W.H

    2016-01-01

    .... They were held after years of daily news about the euro crisis and after months of news about the popular uprising in the Ukraine against president Yanukovych, who had refused to sign the association...

  13. Factors influencing trust in media: exploring the association between media consumption and news about the 15M Movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariadna Fernández-Planells

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Debate over consumer trust in traditional media has intensified due to theappearance of networked social movements, particularly considering media coverage ofthe protests, the emergence of alternative media and social media as informationsources. A survey was created for this study to provide insight into the associationbetween media exposure, trust and political participation in networked socialmovements, specifically among 15M Movement activists. Data is presented to show towhat extent do 15M activists view traditional and alternative media as trustworthy. Thearticle also looks at the causes of trust and mistrust in those media.Results indicate that politically-interested online users placed more trust in informationdisseminated by alternative media than by conventional media. Furthermore, exposure tosocial media is associated with trust in media, while age and gender are not. This meansthat the increased use of alternative and social media involves a decreased trust ininformation provided by traditional media. Instead, those who do not use social mediaand those who use traditional media are those who most trusted mass media the most. 

  14. Global news production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Lisbeth

    Events around the world are broadcast by giant media players such as CNN, BBC and NHK amongst others. Consumers of news media receive the final message without knowing the processes that the images, the text and the sound have gone through. The media players can be considered as professional...... generators of national news, who manipulate presentations according to professional standards as well as local needs that are culturally based. This book explores how powerful political and economic agendas in the national media environment influence the production processes. It shows how the outcome...

  15. News from Afar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harmsen, Peter

    News filtering through about the changing fortunes of the Axis had a direct impact on public opinion in occupied Europe during the war years, not only affecting morale but also at times triggering mass popular action. For example, a wave of protests against the German occupation broke out....... This paper describes the way a number of Danish news outlets reported on three key battles in the Pacific: the attack on Pearl Harbor in December 1941, the battle of Midway in June 1942, and the battle of Iwo Jima in the spring of 1945, held against examples of the importance attributed to the Pacific...

  16. Is the Internet Bad News? The Online News Era and the Market for High-Quality News

    OpenAIRE

    Frijters, Paul; Velamuri, Malathi

    2009-01-01

    We review and model the impact of the internet on the production and uptake of high- quality news. Our review of trends in the market for news suggests 3 stylized facts: i) particular quality news markets are dominated by merely a few providers, ii) demand for quality news appears stable, but provision of news has become specialized; mainstream news is decoupled from quality news, and iii) the dominant business model of internet news mirrors that of radio, television, and newsp...

  17. News exposure predicts anti-Muslim prejudice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaver, John H; Sibley, Chris G; Osborne, Danny; Bulbulia, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    News coverage of Islamic extremism is reigniting debates about the media's role in promoting prejudice toward Muslims. Psychological theories of media-induced prejudice date to the 1950's, and find support from controlled experiments. However, national-scale studies of media effects on Muslim prejudice are lacking. Orthogonal research investigating media-induced prejudice toward immigrants has failed to establish any link. Moreover, it has been found that people interpret the news in ways that confirm pre-existing attitudes, suggesting that media induced Muslim prejudice in liberal democracies is unlikely. Here, we test the association between news exposure and anti-Muslim prejudice in a diverse national sample from one of the world's most tolerant societies, where media effects are least likely to hold (N = 16,584, New Zealand). In support of media-induced Islamophobia, results show that greater news exposure is associated with both increased anger and reduced warmth toward Muslims. Additionally, the relationship between media exposure and anti-Muslim prejudice does not reliably vary with political ideology, supporting claims that it is widespread representations of Muslims in the news, rather than partisan media biases, that drives anti-Muslim prejudice.

  18. News exposure predicts anti-Muslim prejudice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John H Shaver

    Full Text Available News coverage of Islamic extremism is reigniting debates about the media's role in promoting prejudice toward Muslims. Psychological theories of media-induced prejudice date to the 1950's, and find support from controlled experiments. However, national-scale studies of media effects on Muslim prejudice are lacking. Orthogonal research investigating media-induced prejudice toward immigrants has failed to establish any link. Moreover, it has been found that people interpret the news in ways that confirm pre-existing attitudes, suggesting that media induced Muslim prejudice in liberal democracies is unlikely. Here, we test the association between news exposure and anti-Muslim prejudice in a diverse national sample from one of the world's most tolerant societies, where media effects are least likely to hold (N = 16,584, New Zealand. In support of media-induced Islamophobia, results show that greater news exposure is associated with both increased anger and reduced warmth toward Muslims. Additionally, the relationship between media exposure and anti-Muslim prejudice does not reliably vary with political ideology, supporting claims that it is widespread representations of Muslims in the news, rather than partisan media biases, that drives anti-Muslim prejudice.

  19. News exposure predicts anti-Muslim prejudice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibley, Chris G.; Osborne, Danny; Bulbulia, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    News coverage of Islamic extremism is reigniting debates about the media’s role in promoting prejudice toward Muslims. Psychological theories of media-induced prejudice date to the 1950’s, and find support from controlled experiments. However, national-scale studies of media effects on Muslim prejudice are lacking. Orthogonal research investigating media-induced prejudice toward immigrants has failed to establish any link. Moreover, it has been found that people interpret the news in ways that confirm pre-existing attitudes, suggesting that media induced Muslim prejudice in liberal democracies is unlikely. Here, we test the association between news exposure and anti-Muslim prejudice in a diverse national sample from one of the world’s most tolerant societies, where media effects are least likely to hold (N = 16,584, New Zealand). In support of media-induced Islamophobia, results show that greater news exposure is associated with both increased anger and reduced warmth toward Muslims. Additionally, the relationship between media exposure and anti-Muslim prejudice does not reliably vary with political ideology, supporting claims that it is widespread representations of Muslims in the news, rather than partisan media biases, that drives anti-Muslim prejudice. PMID:28362823

  20. Thrilling news revisited: The role of suspense for the enjoyment of news stories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Kaspar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Previous research on news perception has been dominated by a cognitively oriented perspective on reception processes, whereas emotions have been widely neglected. Consequently, it has remained open which features of a news story might elicit affective responses and hence modulate news perception, shifting the focus to the emotional potential of the narrative. According to the affective-disposition theory, the experience of suspense is the striving force of immersion in fictional dramas. Thereby, a positive affective disposition toward the protagonist of a story and a high likelihood of a bad ending should increase suspense that, in turn, should positively influence reading appreciation and lingering interest in the story. We investigated whether suspense and its determinants also play such a key role in the context of news stories. Study 1 (n = 263 successfully replicated results of an earlier study, whereas Studies 2 (n = 255 and 3 (n = 599 challenged the generalizability of some effects related to manipulated characteristics of a news story. In contrast, correlational relationships between perceived news characteristics were relatively stable. In particular, a higher liking of the protagonist and a higher perceived likelihood of a good versus bad ending were positively associated with suspense, reading appreciation, and lingering interest. This result indicates a preference for happy endings and it contradicts the notion that likely negative outcomes are beneficial for suspense and the enjoyment of news stories, as postulated by the affective-disposition theory in the context of fictional dramas. Moreover, experienced suspense reliably mediated the correlations between, on the one hand, participants’ liking of the protagonist and the perceived likelihood of a good ending and, on the other hand, reading appreciation and lingering interest. The news story’s personal relevance was less influential than expected. Further, we observed a large

  1. Automatic Detection of Fake News

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez-Rosas, Verónica; Kleinberg, Bennett; Lefevre, Alexandra; Mihalcea, Rada

    2017-01-01

    The proliferation of misleading information in everyday access media outlets such as social media feeds, news blogs, and online newspapers have made it challenging to identify trustworthy news sources, thus increasing the need for computational tools able to provide insights into the reliability of online content. In this paper, we focus on the automatic identification of fake content in online news. Our contribution is twofold. First, we introduce two novel datasets for the task of fake news...

  2. Tobacco and alcohol sales in community pharmacies: policy statements from U.S. professional pharmacy associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corelli, Robin L; Chai, Tiffany; Karic, Alda; Fairman, Melinda; Baez, Karina; Hudmon, Karen Suchanek

    2014-01-01

    To characterize the extent to which state and national professional pharmacy associations have implemented formal policies addressing the sale of tobacco and alcohol products in community pharmacies. To determine existence of tobacco and alcohol policies, national professional pharmacy associations (n = 10) and state-level pharmacy associations (n = 86) affiliated with the American Pharmacists Association (APhA) and/or the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP) were contacted via telephone and/or e-mail, and a search of the association websites was conducted. Of 95 responding associations (99%), 14% have a formal policy opposing the sale of tobacco products in pharmacies and 5% have a formal policy opposing the sale of alcohol in pharmacies. Of the associations representing major tobacco-producing states, 40% have a formal policy against tobacco sales in pharmacies, significantly more than the 8% of non-tobacco state associations with such policies. Among national professional pharmacy associations, only APhA and ASHP have formal policy statements opposing the sale of both tobacco and alcohol in pharmacies. Most state-level professional pharmacy associations affiliated with these two national organizations have no formal policy statement or position.

  3. [Semantic Network Analysis of Online News and Social Media Text Related to Comprehensive Nursing Care Service].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minji; Choi, Mona; Youm, Yoosik

    2017-12-01

    As comprehensive nursing care service has gradually expanded, it has become necessary to explore the various opinions about it. The purpose of this study is to explore the large amount of text data regarding comprehensive nursing care service extracted from online news and social media by applying a semantic network analysis. The web pages of the Korean Nurses Association (KNA) News, major daily newspapers, and Twitter were crawled by searching the keyword 'comprehensive nursing care service' using Python. A morphological analysis was performed using KoNLPy. Nodes on a 'comprehensive nursing care service' cluster were selected, and frequency, edge weight, and degree centrality were calculated and visualized with Gephi for the semantic network. A total of 536 news pages and 464 tweets were analyzed. In the KNA News and major daily newspapers, 'nursing workforce' and 'nursing service' were highly rated in frequency, edge weight, and degree centrality. On Twitter, the most frequent nodes were 'National Health Insurance Service' and 'comprehensive nursing care service hospital.' The nodes with the highest edge weight were 'national health insurance,' 'wards without caregiver presence,' and 'caregiving costs.' 'National Health Insurance Service' was highest in degree centrality. This study provides an example of how to use atypical big data for a nursing issue through semantic network analysis to explore diverse perspectives surrounding the nursing community through various media sources. Applying semantic network analysis to online big data to gather information regarding various nursing issues would help to explore opinions for formulating and implementing nursing policies.

  4. News reports of bullying-related fatal and nonfatal injuries in the Americas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srabstein, Jorge Carlos

    2013-05-01

    Bullying is a multifaceted and injurious form of maltreatment, prevalent across social settings and around the globe. Victims and perpetrators of bullying are at significant risk of suffering from an array of morbidity and dying young due to accidental injuries, suicide, and homicide. This study reviews news reports of nonfatal and fatal injuries linked to bullying throughout the Western Hemisphere during 12 months. News reports, obtained through a Google search, of episodes of fatal and nonfatal injuries related to school bullying and violence from July 2011 through June 2012 that affected children and adolescents (ages 5 to 19 years) throughout the Americas were analyzed. News reports were found of 82 cases of bullying-related fatal and nonfatal injuries, occurring in one year, across 24 countries and dependent territories in the Western Hemisphere, which have a combined total youth population of 225.5 million children and adolescents ages 5 to 19 years. Ninety-seven percent of the victims were between 10 and 19 years old; 60% of them were below age 15, with a male/female ratio of 2:1. News reports of fatal and nonfatal injurious events related to bullying and affecting children and adolescents in the Americas in one year represent the tip of the public health iceberg composing the unknown magnitude of injuries associated with this type of maltreatment. Data on the magnitude of mortality linked to bullying, which would be of the essence in developing public health policies for its prevention, have not been documented.

  5. Making news about medicines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trigt, Anna Maria van

    1995-01-01

    People are very interested in information about health and illness. Studies show that they are more interested in new medical discoveries than in sport in the news. Mass media channels (e.g. newspapers, television) do pay attention to information about health and illness. Both patients, health

  6. CERN television news

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    CERN events brought right to your desktop by the new video bulletin.   CERN now has its very own news broadcast , or rather 'webcast', with a host of special reports and even a star presenter. From today onwards, just go to the Bulletin's web page, click on the 'video news' link and sit back and enjoy the latest news about CERN, presented in images by Wendy Korda. The ten-minute newscast in both French and English, the Organization's two official languages, presents interviews, pictures of experiments and computer-generated graphics, bringing you right up to date with some of the Laboratory's latest stories. The show concludes with a selection of the best snapshots taken by the CERN Photo Lab. So every one or two months CERN's Audio-Video Service (ETT/DH) will be putting together a video news report that you can watch on your own desktop computer. Daniel Boileau, Patrick Gilbert de Vautibault and Jacques Fichet, the Service's three technicians, came up with the idea of producing this regular feat...

  7. Multimodal news framing effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Powell, T.E.

    2017-01-01

    Visuals in news media play a vital role in framing citizens’ political preferences. Yet, compared to the written word, visual images are undervalued in political communication research. Using framing theory, this thesis redresses the balance by studying the combined, or multimodal, effects of visual

  8. News of the Year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Lifer, Evan; Olson, Renee; Milliot, Jim; Bing, Jonathan

    1998-01-01

    Reviews library news for 1997. Highlights public library budgets, examined by number of patrons served; Internet filters and censorship; librarians and the media; private and government funding sources; outsourcing; expectations for growth in the publishing industry, emphasizing the Asian economic crisis; and new ideas from the next generation of…

  9. Television News Without Pictures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graber, Doris A.

    1987-01-01

    Describes "gestalt" coding procedures that concentrate on the meanings conveyed by audio-visual messages rather than on coding individual pictorial elements shown in a news story. Discusses the totality of meaning that results from the interaction of verbal and visual story elements, external settings, and the decoding proclivities of…

  10. Vulture News: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. Vulture News publishes original articles, reports, literature reviews and other material relevant to the field of vulture and condor biology, research and conservation. The journal has three sections for contributors: - The Articles section accepts manuscripts that will be sent to at least two referees for peer ...

  11. Zimbabwe Science News

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Zimbabwe Science News has ceased publication. Vol 33, No 1 (1999). DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Open Access DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Subscription or Fee Access. Table of Contents. Articles. Science-based economic development: The Eureka Factor · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT ...

  12. Crime News Coverage in Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graber, Doris A.

    According to one sociological model, news is a product of socially determined notions of who and what is important and the organizational structures that result for routinizing news collection; events that deviate from these notions are ignored. This report describes a study of crime news coverage in the media that used this model to examine the…

  13. Patterns in television news use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konig, R.P.; Renckstorf, K.; Wester, F.P.J.F.

    2001-01-01

    In this study we explore patterns of television news use, using data from a national survey on Media Use in the Netherlands conducted in 1994 (n = 969). Results indicate that people are much more likely to prefer watching television news selectively and attentively than watching the news while

  14. Journal of the Eritrean Medical Association: Editorial Policies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Focus and Scope. The journal aims to publish and disseminate scientifically rigorous health information of Eritrean and international significance that enables policy makers, researchers, and practitioners to be more effective in the improvement of the health of Eritrean people.

  15. Blended news delivery in healthcare: a framework for injecting good news into bad news conversations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legg, Angela M; Sweeny, Kate

    2015-01-01

    Clinicians often inject good news into bad news delivery, and they do so for a variety of reasons. We present a framework that draws from research in the fields of health and social psychology to shed light on situations in which clinicians add superfluous good news into bad news conversations in an effort to ease the conversation or mitigate patients' distress, a broad strategy we refer to as blended news delivery. Our framework includes predictors of clinicians' use of blended news delivery, characteristics of blended news and outcomes of this strategy for both patients and clinicians. This framework addresses a common aspect of health communication and can direct future research on ideal strategies for and likely consequences of blended news delivery and communication more broadly.

  16. BBC VERSUS EURO NEWS: DISCOURSE AND IDEOLOGY IN NEWS TRANSLATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosseini, F.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to compare discursive strategies employed by two international news agencies including Euro News and BBC. Van Dijk’s (2004 model of CDA was adopted. Thirty pieces of news about internal affairs of Iran together with their Persian translations were downloaded from the corresponding website, i.e. 30 pieces of English news and their corresponding Persian translations from the Euro News website and 30 pieces of English news with their corresponding translations from the BBC website. The frequency of lexical items was observed to not differ significantly. Two sets of translations were compared to their source texts based on four discursive strategies of hyperbole, polarization, vagueness and euphemism. An independent-samples t-test was conducted to compare the frequency of strategies applied by the two news agencies. Results revealed no significant difference between the two agencies except for the discursive strategy of vagueness.

  17. Product Differentiation in Local TV News.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwater, Tony

    1984-01-01

    Investigates whether size of broadcast market is associated with the variety of information broadcast by television stations in a community and describes what each station within a market contributes to a community's information with respect to unique news stories. Concludes that the larger the market, the more unique stories broadcast. (FL)

  18. News Values and the Vividness of Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennamer, J. David

    1988-01-01

    Claims that the long list of traditionally accepted news values can be replaced with a single concept, vividness, and that vivid information may not be the best information. Blames much of the alleged deficiencies associated with journalistic practice such as sensationalism and preoccupation with conflict on the journalistic practice of writing to…

  19. Sensing the News: User Experiences when Reading Locative News

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kjetil Vaage Øie

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on user experiences on reading location-aware news on the mobile platform and aims to explore what experiences this kind of locative journalism generates and how such experiences change the users’ social interaction with news. We produced a specially designed mobile application and tailored news stories specific to this project called LocaNews in order to explore participants’ relation to the content in this journalistic format. The result is generated through a field study and a questionnaire of 32 people to find out how they experience the news presented in this format. The user participants’ responses are analyzed based on their news experiences, contextualizing places and their social interaction with the news within this form of journalism. Results showed that the local, semi-local and non-local user approaches the locative news in a different manner, but that the average user found this kind of news more interesting and more informative than ordinary news. The participants also have a problem identifying this as journalism, rather than an information service.

  20. NetWorking News

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fritsch, Jonas; Iversen, Ole Sejer; Dindler, Christian

    with adults or children. However there is a need for new methods to support communication and collaboration between designers and children. This article proposes a new method for understandings children’s appropriation of new technology in an interactive workshop setting. The method, which we call...... the Networking News workshop, offers an opportunity to make first hand studies of children’s IT supported social activities in an informal classroom setting....

  1. Vulture News: Site Map

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal Home · Journals · Vulture News · About · Log In · Register · Advanced Search · By Author · By Title. Issues. Current Issue · Archives · Open Journal Systems · Help. ISSN: 1606-7479. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's ...

  2. NetWorking News

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fritsch, Jonas; Iversen, Ole Sejer; Dindler, Christian

    For many years cooperative design was primarily concerned with the development of IT supported systems for professional users. However, the cooperative design approach can embrace other social practices such as children’s everyday life. At a methodological level there is no difference in designin...... the Networking News workshop, offers an opportunity to make first hand studies of children’s IT supported social activities in an informal classroom setting....

  3. NEWS AGENCIES AND NEWS SOURCES IN KYRGYZSTAN IN THE CONTEXT OF INTERNATIONAL NEWS FLOW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Topcugul NARMAMATOVA

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The development of communication eliminated the time and space limit, which at the same time brought the acceleration of exchange of information between countries and societies, and made it possible for society's people to be immediately informed of the news in the world. Capitalist countries, which have wisdom and technology in the world, have become dominant over other developing countries. Whereat with the aid of communication and technological infrastructure they have been able to manage these countries economically-politically, or culturally and ideologically. The superior countries in international news distribution dominate other undeveloped or developing countries and with international media outlets they consolidate and maintain this superiority. These international media holdings, which are used as heart’s-blood of the media organizations in developing countries, in order to influence or disinterest public opinion determine news choices according to some political, economic and diplomatic criteria. Besides, when events in the developing countries adhered to "super-capitalist forces", they will be transformed into a news by international media organizations. Thus, the news of international news agencies reflect neither the interests nor the social reality of the developing countries like Kyrgyzstan.In this study were examined foreign news which published in news agencies in Kyrgyzstan in the context of international news flow and by the way there were attempted to explain how the news agencies were influenced by the one-way news flow. In this research were used literature review and content analysis.

  4. Contact: Releasing the news

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinotti, Roberto

    The problem of mass behavior after man's future contacts with other intelligences in the universe is not only a challenge for social scientists and political leaders all over the world, but also a cultural time bomb as well. In fact, since the impact of CETI (Contact with Extraterrestrial Intelligence) on human civilization, with its different cultures, might cause a serious socio-anthropological shock, a common and predetermined worldwide strategy is necessary in releasing the news after the contact, in order to keep possible manifestations of fear, panic and hysteria under control. An analysis of past studies in this field and of parallel historical situations as analogs suggests a definite "authority crisis" in the public as a direct consequence of an unexpected release of the news, involving a devastating "chain reaction" process (from both the psychological and sociological viewpoints) of anomie and maybe the collapse of today's society. The only way to prevent all this is to prepare the world's public opinion concerning contact before releasing the news, and to develop a long-term strategy through the combined efforts of scientists, political leaders, intelligence agencies and the mass media, in order to create the cultural conditions in which a confrontation with ETI won't affect mankind in a traumatic way. Definite roles and tasks in this multi-level model are suggested.

  5. News from Council - September 2016

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    I would like to inform you of the main news from the Council this week. First of all, the Council congratulated CERN and the Collaborations on the superb performance of the accelerator complex and experiments. It has been a great year so far, with important physics results across the whole spectrum of the CERN research programme.   Looking forward, one of the main accomplishments from this week’s meetings is that the Council has approved the opening of a credit facility with the European Investment Bank (EIB) to cover the cash shortage during the peak years of the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) construction. This is very good news since it will allow us to carry out the work necessary for the HL-LHC without compromising the rest of the Laboratory’s scientific programme. Turning to the scientific and geographical enlargement, the Council approved the admission of India as an Associate Member State, and I very much hope that the agreement can be signed in the near future so that Indi...

  6. Factors Associated With Occupational Sun-Protection Policies in Local Government Organizations in Colorado.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walkosz, Barbara J; Buller, David B; Andersen, Peter A; Wallis, Allan; Buller, Mary Klein; Scott, Michael D

    2015-09-01

    Skin cancer prevention remains a national priority. Reducing chronic UV radiation exposure for outdoor workers through sun-safety practices is an important step to help reduce the incidence of skin cancer. To determine the presence of occupational sun-safety policies at local government organizations in a single state. Of 571 potentially eligible local government organizations of Colorado cities, counties, and special tax districts, we enrolled 98 in a randomized pretest-posttest controlled experiment starting August 15, 2010, that evaluated an intervention to promote the adoption of sun-safety policies. We used a policy-coding protocol to evaluate personal sun-protection practices, environmental and administrative controls, and policy directives for sun safety starting February 10, 2011. We report the baseline assessment of the occupational sun-protection policies of these organizations. The presence of an occupational sun-safety policy. Overall, 85 local government organizations (87%) had policies that required personal sun-protection practices, including the use of eyewear, hats, and protective clothing. However, of the 98 responding organizations, only 8 hat policies (8%), 10 eyewear policies (10%), and 7 clothing policies (7%) mentioned sun protection as the intent of the policy. Only cosmopoliteness, operationalized as proximity to an urban area, was associated with the presence of a sun-safety policy (odds ratio, 0.99 [95% CI, 0.98-1.00]; P = .02). Outdoor workers are at increased risk for skin cancer because of long-term exposure to solar UV radiation. Although organizational policies have the potential to increase sun protection in occupational settings, occupational sun-safety policies were uncommon among local governments. Opportunities exist for dermatologists and other physicians to influence occupational sun-safety practices and policies, which are consistent with other safety procedures and could easily be integrated into existing workplace

  7. Networks in the news media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bro, Peter

    When news reporters connect people in a single news story or in a series of coherent news stories they essentially construct networks in the news media. Networks through which social actors are aligned symbolically in written, visible or audible form. These socio-symbolic networks not only copy...... more formal types of social networks, but also complement or even substitute social networking elsewhere, and as such this particular type of social network offers people both inside and outside the news room new potentials - and problems. This article describe the basic vision of networks in the news...... media and discuss the importance of this analytical framework when it comes to understanding prevailing forms and norms in contemporary journalism....

  8. News for assimilation or integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alencar, Amanda; Deuze, Mark

    2017-04-01

    This study investigates the functions of news media in shaping acculturation experiences of new economic and refugee immigrants in the Netherlands and Spain. Focus group data revealed that consumption of host country news media was mainly connected to immigrants' deliberate strategies to assimilate the culture, politics and language of the host society, while exposure to transnational news was viewed in terms of strategies of integration in both countries. We also observed that participants' educational background and language skills combined with their perceptions of the host country's news have an impact on the use they make of news for assimilating and/or integrating into the host society. Finally, important sociopolitical conditions of the context influenced the ways participants use the news media in their process of acculturation.

  9. Teacher Representation in News Reporting on Standardised Testing: A Case Study from Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shine, Kathryn; O'Donoghue, Tom

    2013-01-01

    News media coverage on education plays a "uniquely important role in shaping public opinion", can influence educational policy, and can affect and concern teachers. Yet, research examining how teachers have been represented in the news is scarce. What is particularly scarce are investigations with a historical dimension. The study…

  10. Workers' perceptions about worksite policies and environments and their association with leisure-time physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucove, Jaime C; Huston, Sara L; Evenson, Kelly R

    2007-01-01

    To estimate the employed population's exposure to perceived worksite policies and environments hypothesized to promote physical activity and to determine their relationship to leisure-time physical activity. Cross-sectional, random-digit-dial telephone survey. Community. Employed adults (n = 987) in six North Carolina counties. Outcomes included any leisure-time physical activity, recommended physical activity, and work-break physical activity. Perceived worksite policies and environments included on-site fitness facility at work, safe place to walk outside work, paid time for activity, subsidized health-club membership, and flexible work schedule. Descriptive statistics were used to describe the study population and exposure to perceived worksite policies and environments. Multivariable logistic regression was used to evaluate relationships between perceived worksite policies and environments and physical activity, controlling for age, race, sex, educational status, disability, and general health status. Various supportive worksite policies and environments were reported by 15% to 56% of employed participants. Associations between perceived worksite policies and environments and physical activity were strongest for having paid time for non-work-related physical activity, an on-site fitness facility at work, and subsidies for health clubs. Recommended activity was not associated with perceived worksite policies and environments. Worksite policies and environments are promising factors for future study in physical activity promotion. Studies should evaluate these relationships in other populations and explore measurement error in self-reported worksite policies and environments.

  11. Perceived Threat Associated with Police Officers and Black Men Predicts Support for Policing Policy Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Allison L.; Haas, Ingrid J.

    2016-01-01

    Racial disparities in policing and recent high-profile incidents resulting in the deaths of Black men have ignited a national debate on policing policies. Given evidence that both police officers and Black men may be associated with threat, we examined the impact of perceived threat on support for reformed policing policies. Across three studies we found correlational evidence that perceiving police officers as threatening predicts increased support for reformed policing practices (e.g., limiting the use of lethal force and matching police force demographics to those of the community). In contrast, perceiving Black men as threatening predicted reduced support for policing policy reform. Perceived threat also predicted willingness to sign a petition calling for police reform. Experimental evidence indicated that priming participants to associate Black men with threat could also reduce support for policing policy reform, and this effect was moderated by internal motivation to respond without prejudice. Priming participants to associate police officers with threat did not increase support for policing policy reform. Results indicate that resistance to policing policy reform is associated with perceiving Black men as threatening. Moreover, findings suggest that publicizing racially charged police encounters, which may conjure associations between Black men and threat, could reduce support for policing policy reform. PMID:27462294

  12. Internet Archaeology News

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cèsar Carreras Monfort

    1999-05-01

    Full Text Available La revista Internet Archaeology News s'adreça a un públic restringit, especialitzat en arqueologia i sobretot en aplicacions de caràcter informàtic i noves metodologies de treball. El fet que la revista neixi amb la voluntat d'ésser innovadora en el seu camp i molt especialitzada no treu que el nivell de les col·laboracions sigui de força qualitat gràcies a la política del equip editorial.

  13. CERN Video News

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    From Monday you can see on the web the new edition of CERN's Video News. Thanks to a collaboration between the audiovisual teams at CERN and Fermilab, you can see a report made by the American laboratory. The clip concerns the LHC magnets that are being constructed at Fermilab. Also in the programme: the spectacular rotation of one of the ATLAS coils, the arrival at CERN of the first American magnet made at Brookhaven, the story of the discovery 20 years ago of the W and Z bosons at CERN. http://www.cern.ch/video or Bulletin web page.

  14. The association between education and work stress: does the policy context matter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorsten Lunau

    Full Text Available Several studies report socioeconomic differences in work stress, where people in lower socioeconomic positions (SEP are more likely to experience this burden. In the current study, we analyse associations between education and work stress in a large sample of workers from 16 European countries. In addition we explore whether distinct national labour market policies are related to smaller inequalities in work stress according to educational attainment.We use data collected in 2010/11 in two comparative studies ('Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe' and the 'English Longitudinal Study of Ageing'; N = 13695, with samples of men and women aged 50 to 64 from 16 European countries. We measure highest educational degree according to the international standard classification of education (ISCED and assess work stress in terms of the demand-control and the effort-reward imbalance model. National labour market policies are measured on the basis of policy indicators which are divided into (1 'protective' policies offering financial compensation to those excluded from the labour market (e.g. replacement rate, and (2 'integrative' policies supporting disadvantaged individuals on the labour market (e.g. investments into active labour market policies or possibilities for further qualification in later life. In addition to country-specific analyses, we estimate multilevel models and test for interactions between the indicators of national policies and individual education.Main findings demonstrate consistent associations between lower education and higher levels of work stress in all countries. The strength of this association, however, varies across countries and is comparatively small in countries offering pronounced 'integrative' policies, in terms of high investments into measures of an active labor market policy and high participation rates in lifelong learning activities.Our results point to different types of policies that may help to

  15. The association between education and work stress: does the policy context matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunau, Thorsten; Siegrist, Johannes; Dragano, Nico; Wahrendorf, Morten

    2015-01-01

    Several studies report socioeconomic differences in work stress, where people in lower socioeconomic positions (SEP) are more likely to experience this burden. In the current study, we analyse associations between education and work stress in a large sample of workers from 16 European countries. In addition we explore whether distinct national labour market policies are related to smaller inequalities in work stress according to educational attainment. We use data collected in 2010/11 in two comparative studies ('Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe' and the 'English Longitudinal Study of Ageing'; N = 13695), with samples of men and women aged 50 to 64 from 16 European countries. We measure highest educational degree according to the international standard classification of education (ISCED) and assess work stress in terms of the demand-control and the effort-reward imbalance model. National labour market policies are measured on the basis of policy indicators which are divided into (1) 'protective' policies offering financial compensation to those excluded from the labour market (e.g. replacement rate), and (2) 'integrative' policies supporting disadvantaged individuals on the labour market (e.g. investments into active labour market policies or possibilities for further qualification in later life). In addition to country-specific analyses, we estimate multilevel models and test for interactions between the indicators of national policies and individual education. Main findings demonstrate consistent associations between lower education and higher levels of work stress in all countries. The strength of this association, however, varies across countries and is comparatively small in countries offering pronounced 'integrative' policies, in terms of high investments into measures of an active labor market policy and high participation rates in lifelong learning activities. Our results point to different types of policies that may help to reduce

  16. National health policy: back to the future. Ad Hoc Committee on National Health Policy American Speech-Language-Hearing Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-03-01

    After an extensive review of the literature and discussion of both national and state proposed health plans, the committee arrived at the following conclusions: 1. The issues that prompted development of the 1971 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association's (ASHA) Position Statement on National Health Care have not been resolved or altered. 2. Few significant national health plans or policies are being supported by the Bush Administration other than managed-care plans. 3. A national health policy will be driven by the development of state health policies and plans. 4. Implementation of national or state health plans will affect both professions at all service provision sites, including public schools. 5. Five general models apply to all existing or proposed national and state health policies or plans: single payer (e.g., a Canadian-style plan) minimum basic benefits ("play or pay") expanded Medicare or Medicaid benefits rationed healthcare (e.g., Oregon plan) managed care (e.g., health maintenance organizations) 6. There will be continued efforts to eliminate Medicaid mandates. 7. ASHA needs to advocate for the inclusion of rehabilitative services as basic rather than optional services in all health plans. 8. ASHA must advocate for adequate access to quality care regardless of healthcare or education provider setting.

  17. How the news media activate public expression and influence national agendas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Gary; Schneer, Benjamin; White, Ariel

    2017-11-10

    We demonstrate that exposure to the news media causes Americans to take public stands on specific issues, join national policy conversations, and express themselves publicly-all key components of democratic politics-more often than they would otherwise. After recruiting 48 mostly small media outlets, we chose groups of these outlets to write and publish articles on subjects we approved, on dates we randomly assigned. We estimated the causal effect on proximal measures, such as website pageviews and Twitter discussion of the articles' specific subjects, and distal ones, such as national Twitter conversation in broad policy areas. Our intervention increased discussion in each broad policy area by ~62.7% (relative to a day's volume), accounting for 13,166 additional posts over the treatment week, with similar effects across population subgroups. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  18. Sharing good NEWS across the world: developing comparable scores across 12 countries for the Neighborhood Environment Walkability Scale (NEWS)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cerin, Ester; Conway, Terry L; Cain, Kelli L; Kerr, Jacqueline; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; Owen, Neville; Reis, Rodrigo S; Sarmiento, Olga L; Hinckson, Erica A; Salvo, Deborah; Christiansen, Lars B; Macfarlane, Duncan J; Davey, Rachel; Mitáš, Josef; Aguinaga-Ontoso, Ines; Sallis, James F

    2013-01-01

    The IPEN (International Physical Activity and Environment Network) Adult project seeks to conduct pooled analyses of associations of perceived neighborhood environment, as measured by the Neighborhood Environment Walkability Scale (NEWS...

  19. PUSHED NEWS: When the news comes to the cellphone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Fidalgo

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Combining two findings of recent surveys on the Internet whichstate that 1 “the Internet will soon surpass all other media as a main source for national and international news” and 2 “the mobile device will be the primary connection tool to the Internet in 2020” leads us to the conclusion that smartphones will soon be the primary source for news access. But if so, how will news come to the Internetconnected cellphones? In accordance with the distinction, already drawn in 1997, between push and pull technologies as two different forms of how content is delivered to the end users, cellphones are characterized as push devices (passive reception, in opposition to computers, classified as pull devices (active reception. The news items that fit cellphones are pushed news. And they will be pushed as SMS, e-mails, tweets and through news aggregators.

  20. Pushed news: when the news comes to the cellphone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Fidalgo

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Combining two findings of recent surveys on the Internet which state that 1 “the Internet will soon surpass all other media as a main source for national and international news” and 2 “the mobile device will be the primary connection tool to the Internet in 2020” leads us to the conclusion that smartphones will soon be the primary source for news access. But if so, how will news come to the Internetconnected cellphones? In accordance with the distinction, already drawn in 1997, between push and pull technologies as two different forms of how content is delivered to the end users, cellphones are characterized as push devices (passive reception, in opposition to computers, classified as pull devices (active reception. The news items that fit cellphones are pushed news. And they will be pushed as SMS, e-mails, tweets and through news aggregators.

  1. Agenda-Setting by Electronic Text News.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heeter, Carrie; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Examines the agenda-setting impacts of electronic text news (ETN) and reactions to ETN as a news medium. Finds that electronic news viewers have nearly the same agenda as do users of traditional media. (MM)

  2. Transactions of the Zimbabwe Scientific Association: Editorial Policies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Focus and Scope. The Zimbabwe Scientific Association was founded in Bulawayo in 1899 to promote the study and advancement of science in Zimbabwe and to facilitate the acquisition and dissemination of scientific knowledge. Its journal, Transactions of the Zimbabwe Scientific Association, was first published in 1903 ...

  3. Attitude toward Homosexuality and Attention to News about AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennamer, J. David; Honnold, Julie A.

    1995-01-01

    Finds that lower attention to news about AIDS was predicted by negative attitudes toward homosexuality, conservative AIDS policy attitudes, lower perceived risk of getting AIDS, in addition to being male, older, white, and better educated. Finds that the model predicted media attention better for men than for women. (SR)

  4. Local tobacco policy and tobacco outlet density: associations with youth smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipperman-Kreda, Sharon; Grube, Joel W; Friend, Karen B

    2012-06-01

    This study investigates the associations between local tobacco policy, tobacco outlet density, and youth smoking. A primary focus is on whether local tobacco policy moderates the relation between outlet density and youth smoking. In all, 1,491 youth (51.9% male, mean age = 14.7 years, standard deviation = 1.05) in 50 midsized California cities were surveyed through a computer-assisted telephone interview. Measures of local clean air policy and youth access policy were created based on a review of tobacco policies in these cities. Outlet density was calculated as the number of retail tobacco outlets per 10,000 persons, and city characteristics were obtained from 2000 U.S. Census data. Using multilevel regression analyses and controlling for city characteristics, tobacco outlet density was positively associated with youth smoking. No significant main effects were found for the two tobacco policy types on any of the smoking outcomes after controlling for interactions and covariates. However, statistically significant interactions were found between local clean air policy and tobacco outlet density for ever smoked and past 12-month cigarette smoking. Comparisons of simple slopes indicated that the positive associations between tobacco outlet density and youth smoking behaviors were stronger at the lowest level of local clean air policy compared with the moderate and high levels. Our results suggest that tobacco outlet density is related to youth smoking. In addition, local clean air policy may act as a moderator of relationship between tobacco outlet density and youth smoking, such that density is less important at moderate and high levels of this tobacco policy. Copyright © 2012 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Is macroeconomic announcement news priced?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Goeij, Peter; Hu, Jiehui; Werker, Bas

    2016-01-01

    We test whether news contained in macroeconomic announcements (MEAs) is priced in the cross-section of stock returns. When including news on a set of widely followed individual macroeconomic fundamentals in the cross-section of stock returns, estimates of their prices of risk are consistent with the

  6. CERN Video News on line

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The latest CERN video news is on line. In this issue : an interview with the Director General and reports on the new home for the DELPHI barrel and the CERN firemen's spectacular training programme. There's also a vintage video news clip from 1954. See: www.cern.ch/video or Bulletin web page

  7. Dow Jones News/Retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulton, James C.

    1979-01-01

    Provides an overview of the Dow Jones News/Retrieval Database, describing its scope, users, history and development, foreign news categories, problems, and searching hints. Also included are an example of a typical search, a tabulated searchguide, and the database specifications. (JD)

  8. Kissinger's Press Conferences, 1972-1974: An Exploration of Form and Role Relationship on News Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Catherine Ann

    1977-01-01

    Explores Kissinger's press conferences during the Nixon administration focusing on how the management of foreign news policy is affected by the press conference as a form of specialized or elite interview and Kissinger's relationship with the press. (MH)

  9. A Generic News Crawler and Extractor

    OpenAIRE

    Hamborg, Felix; Meuschke, Norman; Breitinger, Corinna; Gipp, Bela

    2017-01-01

    The amount of news published and read online has increased tremendously in recent years, making news data an interesting resource for many research disciplines, such as the social sciences and linguistics. However, large scale collection of news data is cumbersome due to a lack of generic tools for crawling and extracting such data. We present news-please, a generic, multilanguage, open-source crawler and extractor for news that works out-of-thebox for a large variety of news websites. ...

  10. Breaking bad news to people with a learning disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, S

    This article identifies the difficulties often associated with breaking bad news, from a nursing perspective. The additional considerations involved in breaking bad news to people with learning disabilities are identified, and a six-step protocol (Buckman, 1991) is introduced and explored in relation to this client group. Effective communication is seen to be crucial when working with people with a learning disability, and a system for accurate listening is offered (Conboy-Hill, 1992). Finally, recommendations for helping professionals to learn how to break bad news sensitively to this client group are suggested. They include multi-agency working, education and training opportunities, standard statements, resources, support and research initiatives.

  11. Climate News Across Media Platforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskjær, Mikkel Fugl

    2015-01-01

    In a changing media landscape marked by technological, institutional and cultural convergence, comparative and cross-media content analysis represents a valuable analytical tool in mapping the diverse channels of climate change communication. This paper presents a comparative study of climate...... quantitative and qualitative content analysis the paper documents and explores the extent and character of climate change news across different media platforms. The study aims at contributing to the on-going assessment of how news media are addressing climate change at a time when old and new media...... change news on five different media platforms: newspapers, television, radio, web-news and mobile news. It investigates the themes and actors represented in public climate change communication as well as the diverse possibilities of participating in public debates and information sharing. By combining...

  12. News media old and new

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Kim Christian

    2014-01-01

    This article presents and discusses three different approaches to the exploration of the cross-media challenges facing news audiences, as they seek access to, navigate in and make sense of the multitude of news sources across print, broadcasting, online and mobile media platforms. From a modernized...... uses and gratifications perspective, based on the notion of “worthwhileness” as the determinant of people's everyday selections from the “supermarket of news”, the article first reports from a longitudinal survey study in Denmark in which the author's foundational mapping of cross-media news...... and mobile devices. Secondly, the article summarizes the findings of a qualitative study of citizens' news repertoires, which was fortified with a quantitative factor analysis in order to find patterns in people's news consumption. Thirdly, findings are presented from a 2013 study that explored ubiquitous...

  13. Farmers’ Awareness of Ecosystem Services and the Associated Policy Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangfang Xun

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes the primary factors influencing farmers’ awareness of ecosystem services. This study, through questionnaires, conducts research on farmers’ awareness of and demand for ecosystem service functions. The research encapsulates 156 households from 21 groups of villagers in the Guangxi Karst Ecological Immigration District in China. The results of the factors influencing farmers’ awareness of ecosystem services, analyzed using a regression model, show that: (1 Farmers are concerned with ecosystem service functions that directly benefit them; however, they do not sufficiently understand the ecosystem’s ecological security maintenance or cultural landscape functions; (2 Farmers’ awareness of ecosystem service functions is not consistent with their corresponding demand, including the ecosystem’s leisure and entertainment, social security, disaster prevention and water purification services; (3 Education level, land area cultivated by the household, proportion of the household’s income from agriculture and immigration status directly affect farmers’ awareness of ecosystem services; (4 Farmers’ personal characteristics, family characteristics and subjective attitudes have different effects on the level of ecological service cognition. Understanding farmers’ awareness of ecosystem services, and the influencing factors can help policymakers and development managers plan local development and policies, and enable harmonious development of the human-earth system in immigration regions of China.

  14. Association between district and state policies and US public elementary school competitive food and beverage environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chriqui, Jamie F; Turner, Lindsey; Taber, Daniel R; Chaloupka, Frank J

    2013-08-01

    Given the importance of developing healthy eating patterns during early childhood, policies to improve the elementary school food and beverage environments are critical. To examine the association between district and state policy and/or law requirements regarding competitive food and beverages and public elementary school availability of foods and beverages high in fats, sugars, and/or sodium. Multivariate, pooled, cross-sectional analysis of data gathered annually during elementary school years 2008-2009 through 2010-2011 in the United States. Survey respondents at 1814 elementary schools (1485 unique) in 957 districts in 45 states (food analysis) and 1830 elementary schools (1497 unique) in 962 districts and 45 states (beverage analysis). EXPOSURES Competitive food and beverage policy restrictions at the state and/or district levels. Competitive food and beverage availability. RESULTS Sweets were 11.2 percentage points less likely to be available (32.3% vs 43.5%) when both the district and state limited sugar content, respectively. Regular-fat baked goods were less available when the state law, alone and in combination with district policy, limited fat content. Regular-fat ice cream was less available when any policy (district, state law, or both) limited competitive food fat content. Sugar-sweetened beverages were 9.5 percentage points less likely to be available when prohibited by district policy (3.6% vs 13.1%). Higher-fat milks (2% or whole milk) were less available when prohibited by district policy or state law, with either jurisdiction's policy or law associated with an approximately 15 percentage point reduction in availability. Both district and state policies and/or laws have the potential to reduce in-school availability of high-sugar, high-fat foods and beverages. Given the need to reduce empty calories in children's diets, governmental policies at all levels may be an effective tool.

  15. Parasocial Interaction and Local TV News: Perceptions of News Teams and News Personalities in Denver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Craig M.

    To measure Denver viewers' parasocial tendencies (inclinations to establish vicarious relationships) with TV news personalities, a study conducted a telephone survey in the Denver metropolitan area in October and November, 1987. The study examined viewer reactions to four local stations'"news teams" and individual news…

  16. Investigating people’s news diets: how online news users use offline news

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trilling, D.; Schoenbach, K.

    2015-01-01

    The question how offline media use is related to online media use has been heavily debated in the last decades. If they are functionally equivalent, then advantages like low costs, rapid publication cycles, and easy access to online news could lead to them displacing offline news. Data from a

  17. Community characteristics associated with smokefree park policies in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Nancy E; Bernat, Debra H; Ferketich, Amy K; Danesh, David; Klein, Elizabeth G

    2014-06-01

    Outdoor smokefree (SF) policies have the potential to decrease secondhand smoke exposure and denormalize smoking. In order to inform dissemination and evaluation of this emergent tobacco control strategy, this study examined the prevalence of SF park policies in the United States and the community-level characteristics associated with enactment of such policies. Counties with existing SF park policies in one or more jurisdictions were identified using passive surveillance data from the American Nonsmokers' Rights Foundation (ANR). ANR data were validated in a random subsample of counties. County-level characteristics were obtained from public data sources and included population demographics, socioeconomic status (SES), urbanicity, and voter affiliation. State-level tobacco control variables included presence of indoor SF policies and adult smoking prevalence. General estimating equations were used to identify predictors of having a SF park policy while accounting for clustering of counties within states. Eleven percent (n = 355) of counties in the United States (n = 3,143) had at least 1 jurisdiction with a SF park policy. The odds of a county having a SF park policy decreased as the percentage of older residents, recent movers, and smokers increased, and the odds increased as the percentage of Democratic voters increased. Odds were higher for counties with higher SES versus low-SES counties and urban/suburban versus rural counties. SF park policies are currently limited to relatively few jurisdictions, and there is evidence of disparities in adoption of these policies. Public health practitioners should focus promotion of SF park policies on low-SES communities with children and youth and rural areas.

  18. Journal of the Ghana Science Association: Editorial Policies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Focus and Scope. The Journal of the Ghana Science Association publishes scholarly articles in all disciplines of science and technology and will normally be published three times in a year. Articles are accepted from Ghana and elsewhere and the topic need not be related to Ghana or West Africa. The contents of the ...

  19. Fear by Association: Perceptions of Anti-Immigrant Policy and Health Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Edward D; Sanchez, Gabriel R; Juárez, Melina

    2017-06-01

    The United States is experiencing a renewed period of immigration and immigrant policy activity as well as heightened enforcement of such policies. This intensified activity can affect various aspects of immigrant health, including mental health. We use the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation 2015 Latino National Health and Immigration Survey (n = 1,493) to examine the relationship between immigration and immigrant policy and Latino health and well-being. We estimate a series of categorical regression models and find that there are negative health consequences associated with Latinos' perceptions of living in states with unfavorable anti-immigration laws, including reporting poor health and problems with mental health. This article builds on the work of public health scholars who have found a link between this heightened policy environment and the mental health of immigrants, yet expands on this research by finding that the health consequences associated with immigration policy extend to Latinos broadly, not just immigrants. These findings are relevant to scholars of immigration and health policy as well as policy makers who should consider these negative effects on the immigrant community during their decision-making process. Copyright © 2017 by Duke University Press.

  20. Qualitative content analysis of online news media coverage of weight loss surgery and related reader comments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, N M; Champion, C C; Spence, J C

    2012-10-01

    The media has the ability to affect public opinion and policy direction. Prevalence of morbid obesity in Canada is increasing; as is the only effective long-term treatment, weight loss surgery (WLS). Limited research has explored media re/presentations of WLS. The purpose of this study was to examine national online news coverage (and reader comments) of WLS using content analysis. We sought to understand the dominant messages being conveyed within the news texts and reader comments, specifically whose voice was represented, who was the intended audience and what was the overall tone. Articles and comments were retrieved from the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation news web site and analysed using line-by-line techniques. Articles were predominantly 'positive/supportive' (63%) in tone and frequently presented the voices and opinions of 'experts' conveying a biomedical perspective. Comments were overwhelmingly 'negative' (56%) and often derogatory including such language as 'piggy' and 'fatty'. Comments were almost exclusively anonymous (99%) and were frequently directed at other commenters (33%) and 'fat' people (6%). The potentially problematic nature of media framing and reader comments, particularly as they could relate to weight-based stigmatization and discrimination is discussed. © 2012 The Authors. Clinical Obesity © 2012 International Association for the Study of Obesity.

  1. School lunch and snacking patterns among high school students: Associations with school food environment and policies

    OpenAIRE

    Story Mary; Hannan Peter J; French Simone A; Neumark-Sztainer Dianne; Fulkerson Jayne A

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Objectives This study examined associations between high school students' lunch patterns and vending machine purchases and the school food environment and policies. Methods A randomly selected sample of 1088 high school students from 20 schools completed surveys about their lunch practices and vending machine purchases. School food policies were assessed by principal and food director surveys. The number of vending machines and their hours of operation were assessed by trained resear...

  2. 75 FR 4416 - Policy on Cooperating Associations, Draft Director's Order #32

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-27

    ... National Park Service Policy on Cooperating Associations, Draft Director's Order 32 AGENCY: National Park... of the Cooperating Association Steering Committee submitted to the National Leadership Council in... instrument(s). ] DATES: Comments must be received by February 26, 2010. ADDRESSES: The Draft Director's Order...

  3. Are Alcohol Policies Associated with Alcohol Consumption in Low- and Middle-Income Countries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Won Kim; Bond, Jason; Greenfield, Thomas K.

    2014-01-01

    Aims To examine the associations between alcohol control policies in four regulatory domains with alcohol consumption in low- and middle-income countries (LAMICs), controlling for country-level living standards and drinking patterns. Design Cross-sectional analyses of individual-level alcohol consumption survey data and country-level alcohol policies using multi-level modeling Setting Data from 15 LAMICs collected in the Gender, Alcohol, and Culture: an International Study (GENACIS) Participants Persons aged 18–65 Measurements Alcohol policy data compiled by the World Health Organization; individual-level current drinking status, usual quantity and frequency of drinking, binge drinking frequency, and total drinking volume; Gross Domestic Product based on purchasing power parity (GDP-PPP) per capita; detrimental drinking pattern scale; and age and gender as individual-level covariates Findings Alcohol policies regulating the physical availability of alcohol, particularly those concerning business hours or involving a licensing system for off-premises alcohol retail sales, as well as minimum legal drinking age, were the most consistent predictors of alcohol consumption. Aggregate relative alcohol price levels were inversely associated with all drinking variables (pdrinking volume. Greater restrictions on alcohol advertising, particularly beer advertising, were inversely associated with alcohol consumption (plimits for drivers and random breath testing to enforce BAC limits were not significantly associated with alcohol consumption. Conclusions Alcohol policies that regulate the physical availability of alcohol are associated with lower alcohol consumption in low- and middle-income countries. PMID:24716508

  4. Are alcohol policies associated with alcohol consumption in low- and middle-income countries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Won Kim; Bond, Jason; Greenfield, Thomas K

    2014-07-01

    To examine the associations between alcohol control policies in four regulatory domains with alcohol consumption in low- and middle-income countries (LAMICs), controlling for country-level living standards and drinking patterns. Cross-sectional analyses of individual-level alcohol consumption survey data and country-level alcohol policies using multi-level modeling. Data from 15 LAMICs collected in the Gender, Alcohol, and Culture: an International Study (GENACIS) data set. Individuals aged 18-65 years. Alcohol policy data compiled by the World Health Organization; individual-level current drinking status, usual quantity and frequency of drinking, binge drinking frequency and total drinking volume; gross domestic product based on purchasing power parity (GDP-PPP) per capita; detrimental drinking pattern scale; and age and gender as individual-level covariates. Alcohol policies regulating the physical availability of alcohol, particularly those concerning business hours or involving a licensing system for off-premises alcohol retail sales, as well as minimum legal drinking age, were the most consistent predictors of alcohol consumption. Aggregate relative alcohol price levels were associated inversely with all drinking variables (P alcohol advertising, particularly beer advertising, were associated inversely with alcohol consumption (P alcohol concentration (BAC) limits for drivers and random breath testing to enforce BAC limits were not associated significantly with alcohol consumption. Alcohol policies that regulate the physical availability of alcohol are associated with lower alcohol consumption in low- and middle-income countries. © 2014 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  5. Association Between Academic Medical Center Pharmaceutical Detailing Policies and Physician Prescribing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, Ian; Ang, Desmond; Steinhart, Jonathan; Chao, Matthew; Patterson, Mark; Sah, Sunita; Wu, Tina; Schoenbaum, Michael; Hutchins, David; Brennan, Troyen; Loewenstein, George

    2017-05-02

    In an effort to regulate physician conflicts of interest, some US academic medical centers (AMCs) enacted policies restricting pharmaceutical representative sales visits to physicians (known as detailing) between 2006 and 2012. Little is known about the effect of these policies on physician prescribing. To analyze the association between detailing policies enacted at AMCs and physician prescribing of actively detailed and not detailed drugs. The study used a difference-in-differences multivariable regression analysis to compare changes in prescribing by physicians before and after implementation of detailing policies at AMCs in 5 states (California, Illinois, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, and New York) that made up the intervention group with changes in prescribing by a matched control group of similar physicians not subject to a detailing policy. Academic medical center implementation of policies regulating pharmaceutical salesperson visits to attending physicians. The monthly within-drug class market share of prescriptions written by an individual physician for detailed and nondetailed drugs in 8 drug classes (lipid-lowering drugs, gastroesophageal reflux disease drugs, diabetes drugs, antihypertensive drugs, hypnotic drugs approved for the treatment of insomnia [sleep aids], attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder drugs, antidepressant drugs, and antipsychotic drugs) comparing the 10- to 36-month period before implementation of the detailing policies with the 12- to 36-month period after implementation, depending on data availability. The analysis included 16 121 483 prescriptions written between January 2006 and June 2012 by 2126 attending physicians at the 19 intervention group AMCs and by 24 593 matched control group physicians. The sample mean market share at the physician-drug-month level for detailed and nondetailed drugs prior to enactment of policies was 19.3% and 14.2%, respectively. Exposure to an AMC detailing policy was associated with a

  6. Are they multiperspectival?: The news of news agencies

    OpenAIRE

    Jeon, Suhyeon

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this master thesis is to examine the coverage pattern of major international news agencies, Reuters, AP, and AFP with an emphasis on speakers and quotes, especially when they cover political issues in particular countries. This master thesis builds the premise that today’s journalism can be improved in terms of the press performance and one way to pursue this is seeking and trying out various alternatives. The research picks one alternative, multiperspectival news among others in o...

  7. Prostate Cancer Foundation News

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... when men who are being treated with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) see their PSA levels begin to... ... fight against prostate cancer today. Donate Terms of use Privacy Policy © Prostate Cancer Foundation, 2018 Understanding Prostate ...

  8. 45 CFR 17.2 - Basic policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Basic policy. 17.2 Section 17.2 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION RELEASE OF ADVERSE INFORMATION TO NEWS MEDIA § 17.2 Basic policy. All adverse information release to news media shall be factual in content and...

  9. News comments: exploring, modeling, and online prediction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsagkias, M.; Weerkamp, W.; de Rijke, M.

    2010-01-01

    Online news agents provide commenting facilities for their readers to express their opinions or sentiments with regards to news stories. The number of user supplied comments on a news article may be indicative of its importance, interestingness, or impact. We explore the news comments space, and

  10. Young Adolescents' Intentional Use of Science News

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Pei-Ying; Chang, Wen-Hua; Chen, Sufen; Chang, Huey-Por

    2014-01-01

    Profiling adolescent students' intentional use of science news reports can inform science news-infused instruction. This study reports on the development and validation of a Views of Science News Instruction Questionnaire (VSNIQ) designed to explore Grade 7 (12-13 years old) students' views of reasoning with respect to science news. Forty items…

  11. 7 CFR 28.904 - Market news.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Market news. 28.904 Section 28.904 Agriculture..., TESTING, AND STANDARDS Cotton Classification and Market News Service for Producers Classification and Market News Services § 28.904 Market news. The Director shall cause to be distributed to producers of...

  12. Diverse artikelen in Gay Amsterdam News

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hekma, G.

    2002-01-01

    Vernedering, in: Gay Amsterdam News 125 (jan 2002), pp. 20-21; Webseks, zaad, zweetseks, in: Gay Amsterdam News 126 (feb 2002), pp. 30-31; Wurgseks, in: Gay Amsterdam News 127 (mrt 2002), pp. 30-31; Wijnandus Johannes Sengers (1927-2002), in: Gay Amsterdam News 133 (sept 2002), pp. 49.

  13. School lunch and snacking patterns among high school students: associations with school food environment and policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne; French, Simone A; Hannan, Peter J; Story, Mary; Fulkerson, Jayne A

    2005-10-06

    This study examined associations between high school students' lunch patterns and vending machine purchases and the school food environment and policies. A randomly selected sample of 1088 high school students from 20 schools completed surveys about their lunch practices and vending machine purchases. School food policies were assessed by principal and food director surveys. The number of vending machines and their hours of operation were assessed by trained research staff. Students at schools with open campus policies during lunchtime were significantly more likely to eat lunch at a fast food restaurant than students at schools with closed campus policies (0.7 days/week vs. 0.2 days/week, p off during lunch time, students purchased soft drinks from vending machines 1.4 +/- 1.6 days/week as compared to 1.9 +/- 1.8 days/week in schools in which soft drink machines were turned on during lunch (p = .040). School food policies that decrease access to foods high in fats and sugars are associated with less frequent purchase of these items in school among high school students. Schools should examine their food-related policies and decrease access to foods that are low in nutrients and high in fats and sugars.

  14. School lunch and snacking patterns among high school students: Associations with school food environment and policies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Story Mary

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives This study examined associations between high school students' lunch patterns and vending machine purchases and the school food environment and policies. Methods A randomly selected sample of 1088 high school students from 20 schools completed surveys about their lunch practices and vending machine purchases. School food policies were assessed by principal and food director surveys. The number of vending machines and their hours of operation were assessed by trained research staff. Results Students at schools with open campus policies during lunchtime were significantly more likely to eat lunch at a fast food restaurant than students at schools with closed campus policies (0.7 days/week vs. 0.2 days/week, p Conclusion School food policies that decrease access to foods high in fats and sugars are associated with less frequent purchase of these items in school among high school students. Schools should examine their food-related policies and decrease access to foods that are low in nutrients and high in fats and sugars.

  15. Association between tobacco control policies and smoking behaviour among adolescents in 29 European countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hublet, Anne; Schmid, Holger; Clays, Els

    2009-01-01

    AIMS: To investigate the associations between well-known, cost-effective tobacco control policies at country level and smoking prevalence among 15-year-old adolescents. DESIGN: Multi-level modelling based on the 2005-06 Health Behaviour in School-aged Children Study, a cross-national study......, including daily smoking (dichotomous). FINDINGS: Interaction effects between gender and smoking policies were identified, therefore boys and girls were analysed separately. Large cross-national differences in smoking prevalence were documented. Intraclass correlations (ICC) of 0.038 (boys) and 0.035 (girls...... vending machines) = -0.372, P = 0.06]. CONCLUSIONS: For boys, some of the currently recommended tobacco control policies may help to reduce smoking prevalence. However, the model is less suitable for girls, indicating gender differences in the potential efficacy of smoking policies. Future research should...

  16. Creative Cycling of News Professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrid Gynnild, PhD.

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The theory of creative cycling emerged from my PhD study of news professionals in Norway. The study was carried out according to classic grounded theory principles (Glaser and Strauss 1967, Glaser 1978, 1998, 2001, 2005, and the area of interest was the performance of news journalism in the multimedia age. The theory runs counter to widespread tendencies of industrial age thinking in news media. It emphasizes news professionals’ search for meaning in their daily work, and suggests that their main concern is self-fulfillment through original contribution. The dilemma and resolution, creative cycling, is a basic social process continuously going within inner and outer framings. It consists of three interrelated dimensions: productive processing, breaks and shifts and inspirational looping.

  17. RHYTHM STRUCTURE IN NEWS READING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lluís Mas Manchón

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Rhythm is central to news reading in radio and television programs. This paper proposes a three level structure for rhythm in news discourse. It gives a comprehensive definition of rhythm and types of rhythm. Firstly, the Base Rhythm Structure consists of semantic and pragmatic rhythmic accents, coincident with very specific words. Secondly, these accents are grouped together according to type, frequency and order, thereby configuring three types of “rhythmic units” (the Internal Rhythm Structure: starting, main and end units. A last structure level presents four discursive factors that are very important in integrating the overall time structure of news announcing (the Melodic Rhythm Structure. This integral structure for news announcing rhythm should be further tested in acoustic-experimental studies under the criterion of information transmission efficacy.

  18. Rhythm structure in news reading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lluís Mas Manchón

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Rhythm is central to news reading in radio and television programs. This paper proposes a three level structure for rhythm in news discourse. It gives a comprehensive definition of rhythm and types of rhythm. Firstly, the Base Rhythm Structure consists of semantic and pragmatic rhythmic accents, coincident with very specific words. Secondly, these accents are grouped together according to type, frequency and order, thereby configuring three types of “rhythmic units” (the Internal Rhythm Structure: starting, main and end units. A last structure level presents four discursive factors that are very important in integrating the overall time structure of news announcing (the Melodic Rhythm Structure. This integral structure for news announcing rhythm should be further tested in acoustic-experimental studies under the criterion of information transmission efficacy.

  19. Subprime Loans and Fake News

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendricks, Vincent Fella

    2017-01-01

    Could the market fundamentalism that ruled the pre-crisis financial markets of the 2000s hold lessons for how we should approach the unregulated information and news market in the digital age?......Could the market fundamentalism that ruled the pre-crisis financial markets of the 2000s hold lessons for how we should approach the unregulated information and news market in the digital age?...

  20. News from Council

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    With this message I would like to share with you some highlights of this week’s Council meetings.   A major topic was the approval of CERN’s Medium Term Plan (MTP) 2017-2021, along with the budget for 2017. In approving the document, Council expressed its very strong support for the research programme the MTP outlines for the coming years.  Another important topic this week was the formal approval of the High Luminosity LHC project, HL-LHC. This comes as extremely good news not only for CERN, but also for particle physics globally. HL-LHC is the top priority of the European Strategy for Particle Physics in its 2013 update, and is part of the 2016 roadmap of the European Strategy Forum on Research Infrastructures, ESFRI. It was also identified as a priority in the US P5 strategy process, and in Japan’s strategic vision for the field. It secures CERN’s future until 2035, and ensures that we will achieve the maximum scientific return on the investment...

  1. New Bulletin: Latest News

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    The paper version of the CERN Bulletin will be published twice a month with effect from 18 April 2005. The electronic version will be updated weekly. This year will see many changes in the Bulletin, designed to make it more economical, more compact and more attractive. From 18 April the paper version of the Bulletin will be published twice monthly, so we shall have to stop calling it the "Weekly". The purpose of this change in publication frequency is to redistribute the resources of the Publications Section of the Communications Group so that it can produce new brochures for the general public. However, so as not to compromise on topicality and communication of information, the Official News and General Information sections, the Pension Fund and training announcements and the seminar schedule will continue to be updated weekly. If you have signed up to be informed of the updates, you will continue to receive a weekly e-mail reminding you that the electronic version of the Bulletin has been updated. Offici...

  2. Associations between national gambling policies and disordered gambling prevalence rates within Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planzer, Simon; Gray, Heather M; Shaffer, Howard J

    2014-01-01

    Policymakers and other interested stakeholders currently are seeking information about the comparative effectiveness of different regulatory approaches to minimising gambling-related harm. This study responds to this research gap by exploring associations between gambling policies and disordered gambling prevalence rates. We gathered information about gambling policies for thirty European jurisdictions and past-year prevalence rates for disordered gambling for twelve of these jurisdictions. We present policy trends and prevalence rates and then describe the level of association between policy and prevalence. We observe one statistically significant association between policy and prevalence: rates of sub-clinical (i.e., Level 2) disordered gambling were higher within environments that mandated less strict regulation of advertising for online gambling. Finally, we discuss the implications of our research in the context of the current process regarding the pan-European regulation of gambling. Our findings do not offer evidence for certain assumptions made in the past by the European judiciary. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Competing Discourses about Youth Sexual Exploitation in Canadian News Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saewyc, Elizabeth M; Miller, Bonnie B; Rivers, Robert; Matthews, Jennifer; Hilario, Carla; Hirakata, Pam

    2013-10-01

    Media holds the power to create, maintain, or break down stigmatizing attitudes, which affect policies, funding, and services. To understand how Canadian news media depicts the commercial sexual exploitation of children and youth, we examined 835 Canadian newspaper articles from 1989-2008 using a mixed methods critical discourse analysis approach, comparing representations to existing research about sexually exploited youth. Despite research evidence that equal rates of boys and girls experience exploitation, Canadian news media depicted exploited youth predominantly as heterosexual girls, and described them alternately as victims or workers in a trade, often both in the same story. News media mentioned exploiters far less often than victims, and portrayed them almost exclusively as male, most often called 'customers' or 'consumers,' and occasionally 'predators'; in contrast, research has documented the majority of sexually exploited boys report female exploiters. Few news stories over the past two decades portrayed the diversity of victims, perpetrators, and venues of exploitation reported in research. The focus on victims but not exploiters helps perpetuate stereotypes of sexual exploitation as business or a 'victimless crime,' maintains the status quo, and blurs responsibility for protecting youth under the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child. Health care providers and researchers can be advocates for accuracy in media coverage about sexual exploitation; news reporters and editors should focus on exploiters more than victims, draw on existing research evidence to avoid perpetuating stereotypes, and use accurate terms, such as commercial sexual exploitation, rather than terms related to business or trade.

  4. Associations between national viral hepatitis policies/programmes and country-level socioeconomic factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lazarus, Jeffrey V; Sperle, Ida; Safreed-Harmon, Kelly

    2017-01-01

    and policy responses across WHO Member States (MS). METHODS: WHO MS focal points completed a questionnaire on national viral hepatitis policies. This secondary analysis of data reported in the 2013 Global Policy Report on the Prevention and Control of Viral Hepatitis in WHO Member States used logistic......BACKGROUND: As more countries worldwide develop national viral hepatitis strategies, it is important to ask whether context-specific factors affect their decision-making. This study aimed to determine whether country-level socioeconomic factors are associated with viral hepatitis programmes...... regression to examine associations between four survey questions and four socioeconomic factors: country income level, Human Development Index (HDI), health expenditure and physician density. RESULTS: This analysis included 119 MS. MS were more likely to have routine viral hepatitis surveillance and to have...

  5. Supervisors' perceptions of organizational policies are associated with their likelihood to accommodate back-injured workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Connor; Kristman, Vicki L; Shaw, William S; Loisel, Patrick; Reguly, Paula; Williams-Whitt, Kelly; Soklaridis, Sophie

    2017-02-01

    Background Low back pain (LBP) is a major concern among North American workplaces and little is known regarding a supervisor's decision to support job accommodation for workers with LBP. The extent to which supervisors are included in a company's effort to institute disability management policies and practices and workplace safety climate are two factors that may influence a supervisor's decision to accommodate workers with LBP. Objective Determine the association between supervisors' perceptions of disability management policies, corporate safety culture and their likelihood of supporting job accommodations for workers with LBP. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study of supervisors (N=796) recruited from a non-random, convenience sample of 19 Canadian and US employers. The outcome was supervisors' likeliness to support job accommodation and the exposure was global work safety culture and disability management policies and practices. A multivariable generalized linear modelling strategy was used and final models for each exposure were obtained after assessing potential effect modifiers and confounders. Results In the study, 796 eligible supervisors from 19 employers participated. Disability management policies and practices were positively associated with supervisors' likeliness to accommodate (β=0.19; 95% CI: 0.13; 0.24) while no significant association was found between corporate safety culture (β= -0.084; 95% CI: -0.19; 0.027) and supervisors' likeliness to accommodate. Conclusions Employers should ensure that proactive disability management policies and practices are clearly communicated to supervisors in order to improve job modification and return to work efforts. Implications for Rehabilitation Low back pain (LBP) is a major workplace concern and little is known regarding what factors are associated with a supervisor's likelihood to support job accommodation for workers with LBP. The objective of this article was to determine the association

  6. The Association Between Tobacco Control Policy and Educational Inequalities in Smoking Cessation in the Netherlands from 1988 Through 2011

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosdriesz, Jizzo R.; Nagelhout, Gera E.; Stronks, Karien; Willemsen, Marc C.; Kunst, Anton E.

    2015-01-01

    Tobacco control policies seemed to have failed to reduce socioeconomic inequalities in smoking in the past. It has been argued that a comprehensive mix of policies is needed. Our aim was to assess whether tobacco control policy development in the Netherlands between 1988 and 2011 was associated with

  7. Just News 20 Final

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    corruption to enforcing rules for environmental health and safety. In the Philippines, researchers have looked at how business, media, civil society and other groups benefit from a national policy introduced in 2011 that requires local governments to disclose financial and procurement-related information on their websites.

  8. Probing the smoking-suicide association: do smoking policy interventions affect suicide risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grucza, Richard A; Plunk, Andrew D; Krauss, Melissa J; Cavazos-Rehg, Patricia A; Deak, Joseph; Gebhardt, Kacie; Chaloupka, Frank J; Bierut, Laura J

    2014-11-01

    Smokers exhibit elevated risk for suicide, but it is unknown whether smoking interventions reduce suicide risk. We examined whether state-level policy interventions-increases in cigarette excise taxes and strengthening of smoke-free air laws-corresponded to a reduction in suicide risk during the 1990s and the early 2000s. We also examined whether the magnitude of such reductions correlated with individuals' predicted probability of smoking, which would be expected if the associations stemmed from changes in smoking behavior. We paired individual-level data on suicide deaths from the U.S. Multiple Cause of Death files, years 1990-2004, with living population data from the same period. These were linked with state data on cigarette excise taxes and smoke-free air policies. Utilizing a quasiexperimental analytical approach, we estimated the association between changes in policy and suicide risk. To examine whether associations correlated with individuals' probability of smoking, we used external survey data to derive a predicted probability of smoking function from demographic variables, which was then used to stratify the population by predicted smoking prevalence. Cigarette excise taxes, smoke-free air policies, and an index combining the two policies all exhibited protective associations with suicide. The associations were strongest in segments of the population where predicted smoking prevalence was the highest and weaker in segments of the population where predicted smoking prevalence was the lowest, suggesting that the protective associations were related to changes in smoking behavior. These results provide support for the proposition that population interventions for smoking could reduce risk for suicide. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Probing the Smoking–Suicide Association: Do Smoking Policy Interventions Affect Suicide Risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plunk, Andrew D.; Krauss, Melissa J.; Cavazos-Rehg, Patricia A.; Deak, Joseph; Gebhardt, Kacie; Chaloupka, Frank J.; Bierut, Laura J.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Smokers exhibit elevated risk for suicide, but it is unknown whether smoking interventions reduce suicide risk. We examined whether state-level policy interventions—increases in cigarette excise taxes and strengthening of smoke-free air laws—corresponded to a reduction in suicide risk during the 1990s and the early 2000s. We also examined whether the magnitude of such reductions correlated with individuals’ predicted probability of smoking, which would be expected if the associations stemmed from changes in smoking behavior. Methods: We paired individual-level data on suicide deaths from the U.S. Multiple Cause of Death files, years 1990–2004, with living population data from the same period. These were linked with state data on cigarette excise taxes and smoke-free air policies. Utilizing a quasiexperimental analytical approach, we estimated the association between changes in policy and suicide risk. To examine whether associations correlated with individuals’ probability of smoking, we used external survey data to derive a predicted probability of smoking function from demographic variables, which was then used to stratify the population by predicted smoking prevalence. Results: Cigarette excise taxes, smoke-free air policies, and an index combining the two policies all exhibited protective associations with suicide. The associations were strongest in segments of the population where predicted smoking prevalence was the highest and weaker in segments of the population where predicted smoking prevalence was the lowest, suggesting that the protective associations were related to changes in smoking behavior. Conclusion: These results provide support for the proposition that population interventions for smoking could reduce risk for suicide. PMID:25031313

  10. Potential unintended pregnancies averted and cost savings associated with a revised Medicaid sterilization policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrero, Sonya; Zite, Nikki; Potter, Joseph E; Trussell, James; Smith, Kenneth

    2013-12-01

    Medicaid sterilization policy, which includes a mandatory 30-day waiting period between consent and the sterilization procedure, poses significant logistical barriers for many women who desire publicly funded sterilization. Our goal was to estimate the number of unintended pregnancies and the associated costs resulting from unfulfilled sterilization requests due to Medicaid policy barriers. We constructed a cost-effectiveness model from the health care payer perspective to determine the incremental cost over a 1-year time horizon of the current Medicaid sterilization policy compared to a hypothetical, revised policy in which women who desire a postpartum sterilization would face significantly reduced barriers. Probability estimates for potential outcomes in the model were based on published sources; costs of Medicaid-funded sterilizations and Medicaid-covered births were based on data from the Medicaid Statistical Information System and The Guttmacher Institute, respectively. With the implementation of a revised Medicaid sterilization policy, we estimated that the number of fulfilled sterilization requests would increase by 45%, from 53.3% of all women having their sterilization requests fulfilled to 77.5%. Annually, this increase could potentially lead to over 29,000 unintended pregnancies averted and $215 million saved. A revised Medicaid sterilization policy could potentially honor women's reproductive decisions, reduce the number of unintended pregnancies and save a significant amount of public funds. Compared to the current federal Medicaid sterilization policy, a hypothetical, revised policy that reduces logistical barriers for women who desire publicly funded, postpartum sterilization could potentially avert over 29,000 unintended pregnancies annually and therefore lead to cost savings of $215 million each year. © 2013.

  11. Inclusive Education Policy: What the Leadership of Canadian Teacher Associations Has to Say about It

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, S. Anthony; Lyons, Wanda; Timmons, Vianne

    2015-01-01

    In inclusive education research, rarely are teacher associations a topic of investigation despite their critical role in its implementation and efficacy. A study was conducted as part of the Canadian Disability Policy Alliance using a "learning collaborative" methodology that explored the extent to which Canadian provincial/territorial…

  12. Are School Policies Focused on Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Associated with Less Bullying? Teachers’ Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Stephen T.; Day, Jack K.; Ioverno, Salvatore; Toomey, Russell B.

    2016-01-01

    Bullying is common in U.S. schools and is linked to emotional, behavioral, and academic risk for school-aged students. School policies and practices focused on sexual orientation and gender identity (SOGI) have been designed to reduce bullying and show promising results. Most studies have drawn from students’ reports: We examined teachers’ reports of bullying problems in their schools along with their assessments of school safety, combined with principals’ reports of SOGI-focused policies and practices. Merging two independent sources of data from over 3,000 teachers (California School Climate Survey) and nearly 100 school principals (School Health Profiles) at the school level, we used multi-level models to understand bullying problems in schools. Our results show that SOGI-focused policies reported by principals do not have a strong independent association with teachers’ reports of bullying problems in their schools. However, in schools with more SOGI-focused policies, the association between teachers’ assessments of school safety and bullying problems is stronger. Recent developments in education law and policy in the United States and their relevance for student well-being are discussed. PMID:26790701

  13. Are school policies focused on sexual orientation and gender identity associated with less bullying? Teachers' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Stephen T; Day, Jack K; Ioverno, Salvatore; Toomey, Russell B

    2016-02-01

    Bullying is common in U.S. schools and is linked to emotional, behavioral, and academic risk for school-aged students. School policies and practices focused on sexual orientation and gender identity (SOGI) have been designed to reduce bullying and show promising results. Most studies have drawn from students' reports: We examined teachers' reports of bullying problems in their schools along with their assessments of school safety, combined with principals' reports of SOGI-focused policies and practices. Merging two independent sources of data from over 3000 teachers (California School Climate Survey) and nearly 100 school principals (School Health Profiles) at the school level, we used multi-level models to understand bullying problems in schools. Our results show that SOGI-focused policies reported by principals do not have a strong independent association with teachers' reports of bullying problems in their schools. However, in schools with more SOGI-focused policies, the association between teachers' assessments of school safety and bullying problems is stronger. Recent developments in education law and policy in the United States and their relevance for student well-being are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Society for the Study of School Psychology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Regional Journalism in Southeast Asia and ASEAN Identity in Making: Asia News Network as a Case for International and Intercultural Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulaş Başar Gezgin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Somehow in analogy with the European Union, 10 Southeast Asian countries are in the process of forming a political and economic union which is (ASEAN Association of Southeast Asian Nations for decades. This process of regional integration goes in tandem with the regional media associations such as Asia News Network (ANN which is an Asian-German initiative that consists of daily newspapers from various Asian countries. As a regional association covering not only all ASEAN countries, but also ASEAN neighbors; ANN may serve a significant role for regional collaboration and integration. The network is instrumental to the promotion of freedom of speech which is not always easy to propound in some of these countries. This article analyzes news coverage and publication policy of ANN and discusses challenges and opportunities of regional journalism in SEA as a case for international and intercultural communication.

  15. Evaluating a traditional medicine policy in South Africa: phase 1 development of a policy assessment tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavriilidis, Georgios; Östergren, Per-Olof

    2012-01-01

    Policies that empower individuals and communities may be appropriate for public health, and more broadly. Simple, transparent and acceptable tools are therefore required to evaluate policies from an empowerment perspective. In 2008, the South African Department of Health (DOHSA) drafted a policy to endorse the integration of African Traditional Medicine (ATM) into the public health sector, following the World Health Organization's (WHO) long-standing directives. The purpose of this study is to critically analyze this policy using a novel evaluation tool. A 12-point 'Policy Empowerment Index' (PEI) is introduced, and used to classify and score the policy according to five theoretical policy types. The evaluation was based on a stepwise review and associated publications: policy drafts, policy statements and news announcements. According to the assessment tool, the ATM policy was marginally 'supportive' of constituent empowerment, although several 'directive' features were also observed. The importance of ATM to SA's communities and the promotion of education, employment, entrepreneurship and peripheral resource mobilization were the main empowering elements. Centralised conception, planning and implementation, the absence of provisions for local adaptations and the authoritative legislation context were sub-optimal features. South Africa's ATM legislation may need to further involve communities in policy design and implementation to capitalise upon the broader benefits of community empowerment. However, the iterative nature of method and evaluation is important. Indeed, they are proposed as points to initiate participatory development, and improve policy evaluation. Such instruments can empower constituents in the political process.

  16. Palliative Care and Cardiovascular Disease and Stroke: A Policy Statement From the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Lynne T; Grady, Kathleen L; Kutner, Jean S; Adler, Eric; Berlinger, Nancy; Boss, Renee; Butler, Javed; Enguidanos, Susan; Friebert, Sarah; Gardner, Timothy J; Higgins, Phil; Holloway, Robert; Konig, Madeleine; Meier, Diane; Morrissey, Mary Beth; Quest, Tammie E; Wiegand, Debra L; Coombs-Lee, Barbara; Fitchett, George; Gupta, Charu; Roach, William H

    2016-09-13

    The mission of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association includes increasing access to high-quality, evidence-based care that improves patient outcomes such as health-related quality of life and is consistent with the patients' values, preferences, and goals. Awareness of and access to palliative care interventions align with the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association mission. The purposes of this policy statement are to provide background on the importance of palliative care as it pertains to patients with advanced cardiovascular disease and stroke and their families and to make recommendations for policy decisions. Palliative care, defined as patient- and family-centered care that optimizes health-related quality of life by anticipating, preventing, and treating suffering, should be integrated into the care of all patients with advanced cardiovascular disease and stroke early in the disease trajectory. Palliative care focuses on communication, shared decision making about treatment options, advance care planning, and attention to physical, emotional, spiritual, and psychological distress with inclusion of the patient's family and care system. Our policy recommendations address the following: reimbursement for comprehensive delivery of palliative care services for patients with advanced cardiovascular disease and stroke; strong payer-provider relationships that involve data sharing to identify patients in need of palliative care, identification of better care and payment models, and establishment of quality standards and outcome measurements; healthcare system policies for the provision of comprehensive palliative care services during hospitalization, including goals of care, treatment decisions, needs of family caregivers, and transition to other care settings; and health professional education in palliative care as part of licensure requirements. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Sociodemographic correlates of self-reported exposure to e-cigarette communications and its association with public support for smoke-free and vape-free policies: results from a national survey of US adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Andy S L; Bigman, Cabral A; Sanders-Jackson, Ashley

    2015-11-01

    Exposure to e-cigarette communications (eg, advertisements, news and entertainment media, and interpersonal discussion) may influence support for smoke-free or vape-free policies. This study examined the sociodemographic correlates of self-reported exposure to e-cigarette communications and their relationships with support for restricting vaping and smoking in public venues. Online survey data was collected from a representative sample of US adults (n=1449) between October and December 2013 (mean age=50 years, 51% female, 8% African-American, 10% Hispanic, 6% other races) and weighted to match the US adult population. We fitted multiple regression models, adjusting for demographic variables, to examine associations between support for policies to restrict vaping and smoking in public venues and self-reported frequency of exposure to e-cigarette communications in the preceding month. We fitted separate models to assess associations between policy support and frequency of exposures weighted by whether each category of e-cigarette communications was perceived as positive or negative. Higher self-reported exposure to advertising (B=-0.022, p=0.006), other media (B=-0.022, p=0.043) and interpersonal discussion (B=-0.071, p<0.0005) perceived as positive were associated with lower support for vaping restrictions, adjusting for covariates. Exposure to e-cigarette communications was associated with lower support for smoking restrictions in bivariate analyses but was not significant after adjusting for covariates. Further research is needed to assess whether messages portraying e-cigarettes as a way to circumvent smoking restrictions from advertisements and other media are influencing public support for vape-free policies. These findings provide empirical evidence to inform the policy debate over regulating specific e-cigarette advertising claims. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to

  18. The involvement of midwives' associations in policy and planning about the midwifery workforce: A global survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Sofia Castro; Titulaer, Patricia; Bokosi, Martha; Homer, Caroline S E; ten Hoope-Bender, Petra

    2015-11-01

    a fit-for-purpose midwifery workforce is needed to respond to the current and future needs in sexual, reproductive, maternal and newborn health and to achieve universal health coverage. Evidence-based policy and planning that involves all stakeholders, including professional associations can assist with the development of such a workforce. The aim of the study was to explore how and when midwives' associations are involved in the planning processes for the midwifery workforce and which tools and approaches the associations perceived were used to support human resources for health policy. all 108 member associations of the International Confederation of Midwives were invited to participate. A questionnaire collected data including: the involvement of the association in the national planning dialogue, processes and methods for participation and engagement; mechanisms to guide and inform decision-making; and, the tools, data and evidence used to influence human resources for health policy. A descriptive analysis was conducted and comparisons were made by country group based on national income strata. 73 (68%) midwives' associations participated in the study, representing 67 (71%) countries. In most (95%) countries, the planning process to determine the provision of reproductive, maternal and newborn health was centralised at the ministry of health level and included midwives' associations amongst others. Less than two thirds of associations reported involvement in planning and policy. The planning processes in which they took part were the reproductive, maternal and newborn plan (63%), the national health plan (58%), and the human resources for health plan (52%). Planning was more frequently undertaken at national than sub-national levels in middle- and low-income countries than in high-income countries. Midwives associations were often unaware of the human resources for health approaches used to calculate the number of midwives required, and reported low use of

  19. News on pediatric urology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Masnata

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric urology is a pediatric speciality dedicated to the diagnosis and treatment of congenital and acquired genitourinary tract diseases. It is a speciality that is rapidly changing, thanks to the technological development that has been emerging in recent years. There have been important diagnostic and therapeutic news.Congenital anomalies of the kidneys and urinary tract (CAKUT include various entities of structural malformations that result from defects in their morphogenesis. Clinical research and genetic studies on the origins of CAKUT are quickly evolving, with significant growth of high-quality research.Management goals of CAKUT include prevention of febrile urinary tract infections (UTIs in newborns and toddles and renal injury, while minimizing the morbidity of treatment and follow-up. Treatment options include observation with or without continuous antibiotic prophylaxis (CAP and surgical correction. Now, randomized controlled studies show that children with normal urinary tracts or low-grade vesicoureteral reflux (VUR do not benefit from prophylaxis.All children with known mechanical or functional obstructions of the urinary tract are considered to have UTI. Functional obstruction often results from lower urinary tract dysfunction (LUTD of either neurogenic or non-neurogenic origin and dilating VUR.The role of bladder and bowel dysfunction (BBD in children with UTI and the long-term risk of renal scarring have shed new light on treatment strategies. Often it is BBD, rather than reflux, that causes UTI in children older than 2 years.Pediatric urology has evolved in recent years, with a greater focus on bladder and renal function, minimally invasive treatment, evidence-based interventions, and guideline adherence. Other topics in pediatric urology include urinary incontinence in children with special needs and the use of robot-assisted laparoscopic surgery (RALS in children, with advantages over conventional laparoscopic surgery

  20. Associations between pedagogues attitudes, praxis and policy in relation to physical activity of children in kindergarten

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Bent Egberg

    2011-01-01

    between policies and pedagogue ’ s attitudes towards promoting children ’ s physical activity and the number of days that pedagogues initiated games that made the children physically active. The study suggests that the social and organizational environment in the kindergarten is an important determinant...... and 693 integrated institutions returned the survey. The results show a relation between pedagogue ’ s attitudes towards promoting children ’ s physical activity and the number of children having moderately intense physical activity for at least one hour a day. The study also shows a positive association...... for the level of physical activity among children. This means that the individual norms and attitudes of pedagogues along with the collective intentions and values expressed in written and adopted organizational policies (a Physical Activity Policy - PAP) are important aspects to be worked upon if kindergarten...

  1. Affirming our commitment to research: the Medical Library Association's research policy statement: the process and findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grefsheim, Suzanne F; Rankin, Jocelyn A; Perry, Gerald J; McKibbon, K Ann

    2008-04-01

    Building on its 1995 research policy statement, the Medical Library Association (MLA) has issued a new research policy, The Research Imperative. This paper shares the background research that informed the new policy. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with fifty-one key informants representing various library types, functions, geographic locations, ages, and ethnicities. The grounded theory approach was used to analyze the resulting textual database. Additionally, to gather input from the membership as a whole, two open forums were held at MLA annual meetings. Key informant data indicated that the policy should provide roles for MLA in leadership, advocacy, collaboration, services, education, publishing, and development of a research agenda. Evidence-based library and information practice was emphasized. Six themes emerged to center the new policy: creation of a research culture, challenges, domains of research, research skills set, roles of stakeholders, and measurement of progress. Reflecting the interests and beliefs of the membership, The Research Imperative challenges MLA members to build a supportive culture that values and contributes to a research base that is recognized as an essential tool for future practice.

  2. Local Television News Coverage of the Affordable Care Act: Emphasizing Politics Over Consumer Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gollust, Sarah E; Baum, Laura M; Niederdeppe, Jeff; Barry, Colleen L; Fowler, Erika Franklin

    2017-05-01

    To examine the public health and policy-relevant messages conveyed through local television news during the first stage of Affordable Care Act (ACA) implementation, when about 10 million Americans gained insurance. We conducted a content analysis of 1569 ACA-related local evening television news stories, obtained from sampling local news aired between October 1, 2013, and April 19, 2014. Coders systematically collected data using a coding instrument tracking major messages and information sources cited in the news. Overall, only half of all ACA-related news coverage focused on health insurance products, whereas the remainder discussed political disagreements over the law. Major policy tools of the ACA-the Medicaid expansion and subsidies available-were cited in less than 10% of news stories. Number of enrollees (27%) and Web site glitches (33%) were more common features of coverage. Sources with a political affiliation were by far the most common source of information (> 40%), whereas research was cited in less than 4% of stories. The most common source of news for Americans provided little public health-relevant substance about the ACA during its early implementation, favoring political strategy in coverage.

  3. Live Reporting in a News / Current Affairs TV Show as a Factor of (Non Credibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tena Perišin

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Only a perfunctory glance at the content of current aff airs/news programs makes it clear that in just a few years time, live reporting on Croatian TV news shows has increased dramatically. Technologicaladvancements, the equipping of TV stations with mobile satellite vans, and the pressure of competition have all resulted in increased instances of live reporting. When investigating news values, pictureand sound, as well as the possibility of immediate, timely reporting represent the key characteristics of TV journalism. In this context, live reports, as part of a news segment, should add to the authenticity and credibility of the program. Currently, however, TV broadcasting houses attempt to best one another in the number of live broadcasts as a means to purport a higher quality of their program. The direct address to the camera turns a reporter from an anonymous bearer of information into the “main star”. The figures accumulated on the extent of this form used in a news show do not determine the professional level of the editorial policy. Live reporting cannot be regarded as news value if other news values are neglected in the process. Recent research shows that live reports, in most cases, have been stripped of the initial notion of reporting on important and recent events. As such, they are becoming less of a justifi ed element in the creation of news.

  4. How to Spot Fake News?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Çev.: Fatih Canata

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Critical thinking is a key skill in media and information literacy, and the mission of libraries is to educate and advocate its importance. Discussions about fake news has led to a new focus on media literacy more broadly, and the role of libraries and other education institutions in providing this. When Oxford Dictionaries announce post-truth is Word of the Year 2016, as librarians realise action is needed to educate and advocate for critical thinking – a crucial skill when navigating the information society, an infographic with eight simple steps have been prepared by IFLA to discover the verifiability of a given news-piece in front of you.

  5. TV Entertainment, News, and Racial Perceptions of College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, G. Blake; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Shows that greater exposure to TV entertainment content is associated with beliefs that African Americans enjoy a relatively higher socioeconomic positions with respect to average income, social class, and educational achievement, whereas higher exposure to TV news was associated with perceptions that, in comparison with whites, African Americans…

  6. Socio-demographic Correlates of Self-reported Exposure to E-Cigarette Communications and its Association with Public Support for Smoke-Free and Vape-Free Policies: Results From a National Survey of U.S. Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Andy SL; Bigman, Cabral A.; Sanders-Jackson, Ashley

    2014-01-01

    Background Exposure to e-cigarette communications (e.g., advertisements, news and entertainment media, and interpersonal discussion) may influence support for smoke-free or vape-free policies. This study examined the socio-demographic correlates of self-reported exposure to e-cigarette communications and their relationships with support for restricting vaping and smoking in public venues. Method Online survey data was collected from a representative sample of U.S. adults (n=1,449) between October and December 2013 (mean age=50 years, 51% female, 8% African-American, 10% Hispanic, 6% other races) and weighted to match the U.S. adult population. We fitted multiple regression models, adjusting for demographic variables, to examine associations between support for policies to restrict vaping and smoking in public venues and self-reported frequency of exposure to e-cigarette communications in the preceding month. We fitted separate models to assess associations between policy support and frequency of exposures weighted by whether each category of e-cigarette communications was perceived as positive or negative. Results Higher self-reported exposure to advertising (B=-.022, p=.006), other media (B=-.022, p=.043), and interpersonal discussion (B=-.071, pvaping restrictions, adjusting for covariates. Exposure to e-cigarette communications was associated with lower support for smoking restrictions in bivariate analyses but was not significant after adjusting for covariates. Conclusion Further research is needed to assess whether messages portraying e-cigarettes as a way to circumvent smoking restrictions from advertisements and other media are influencing public support for vape-free policies. These findings provide empirical evidence to inform the policy debate over regulating specific e-cigarette advertising claims. PMID:25015372

  7. Conflict over natural resource management a social indicator based on analysis of online news media text

    Science.gov (United States)

    David N. Bengston; David P. Fan

    1999-01-01

    An indicator of the level of conflict over natural resource management was developed and applied to the case of U.S. national forest policy and management. Computer-coded content analysis was used to identify expressions of conflict in a national database of almost 10,000 news media stories about the U.S. Forest Service. Changes in the amount of news media discussion...

  8. Bias in Cable News: Persuasion and Polarization

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Gregory J; Ali Yurukoglu

    2014-01-01

    We measure the persuasive effects of slanted news and tastes for like-minded news, exploiting cable channel positions as exogenous shifters of cable news viewership. Channel positions do not correlate with demographics that predict viewership and voting, nor with local satellite viewership. We estimate that Fox News increases Republican vote shares by 0.3 points among viewers induced into watching 2.5 additional minutes per week by variation in position. We then estimate a model of voters who...

  9. Emotional Mining: Tagging Emoticons to Online News

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasinathan, Vinothini; Mustapha, Aida; Zhi Yong, Lee; Aida Zamnah, Z. A.

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents an emotion mining system, which assigns emoticons to newspaper articles into a pre-defined emotion category based on the underlying emotion in the news. Next, the system makes recommendation to the reader by tagging the news headline with the respective emoticons. Users are then able to decide whether to read the news based on the emoticons provided. The system also provides a filter for the users to choose the category of news to read following the emoticons.

  10. Fight or flight: Affective news framing effects

    OpenAIRE

    Feinholdt, A.

    2016-01-01

    This dissertation investigates how emotions shape and are shaped by news framing and how this interplay leads to a number of affective news framing effects. My work reveals that emotions do not only function as mechanisms but also as channels strengthening or weakening framing effects. In addition, I show that issue characteristics and the selected news frame can determine whether and how emotions are elicited. Further, I provide evidence that affective news framing effects can arise as the r...

  11. Associations between national viral hepatitis policies/programmes and country-level socioeconomic factors: a sub-analysis of data from the 2013 WHO viral hepatitis policy report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, Jeffrey V; Sperle, Ida; Safreed-Harmon, Kelly; Gore, Charles; Cebolla, Beatriz; Spina, Alexander

    2017-07-26

    As more countries worldwide develop national viral hepatitis strategies, it is important to ask whether context-specific factors affect their decision-making. This study aimed to determine whether country-level socioeconomic factors are associated with viral hepatitis programmes and policy responses across WHO Member States (MS). WHO MS focal points completed a questionnaire on national viral hepatitis policies. This secondary analysis of data reported in the 2013 Global Policy Report on the Prevention and Control of Viral Hepatitis in WHO Member States used logistic regression to examine associations between four survey questions and four socioeconomic factors: country income level, Human Development Index (HDI), health expenditure and physician density. This analysis included 119 MS. MS were more likely to have routine viral hepatitis surveillance and to have a national strategy and/or policy/guidelines for preventing infection in healthcare settings if they were in the higher binary categories for income level, HDI, health expenditure and physician density. In multivariable analyses, the only significant finding was a positive association between having routine surveillance and being in the higher binary HDI category (adjusted odds ratio 26; 95% confidence interval 2.0-340). Countries with differing socioeconomic status indicators did not appear to differ greatly regarding the existence of key national policies and programmes. A more nuanced understanding of the multifaceted interactions of socioeconomic factors, health policy, service delivery and health outcomes is needed to support country-level efforts to eliminate viral hepatitis.

  12. Associations between national viral hepatitis policies/programmes and country-level socioeconomic factors: a sub-analysis of data from the 2013 WHO viral hepatitis policy report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey V Lazarus

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As more countries worldwide develop national viral hepatitis strategies, it is important to ask whether context-specific factors affect their decision-making. This study aimed to determine whether country-level socioeconomic factors are associated with viral hepatitis programmes and policy responses across WHO Member States (MS. Methods WHO MS focal points completed a questionnaire on national viral hepatitis policies. This secondary analysis of data reported in the 2013 Global Policy Report on the Prevention and Control of Viral Hepatitis in WHO Member States used logistic regression to examine associations between four survey questions and four socioeconomic factors: country income level, Human Development Index (HDI, health expenditure and physician density. Results This analysis included 119 MS. MS were more likely to have routine viral hepatitis surveillance and to have a national strategy and/or policy/guidelines for preventing infection in healthcare settings if they were in the higher binary categories for income level, HDI, health expenditure and physician density. In multivariable analyses, the only significant finding was a positive association between having routine surveillance and being in the higher binary HDI category (adjusted odds ratio 26; 95% confidence interval 2.0–340. Conclusion Countries with differing socioeconomic status indicators did not appear to differ greatly regarding the existence of key national policies and programmes. A more nuanced understanding of the multifaceted interactions of socioeconomic factors, health policy, service delivery and health outcomes is needed to support country-level efforts to eliminate viral hepatitis.

  13. Implementation of news module for news client based on ApiCloud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Xin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available With the development of new media technology, news client has become the main battlefield of news browsing. Based on the ApiCloud hybrid development platform, this paper uses HTML, JavaScript and other technologies to develop the mobile client news module, and uses WAMP integrated development environment to build a news publishing system on the server side.

  14. Arousing news characteristics in Dutch television news 1990-2004: an exploration of competitive strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks Vettehen, P.; Beentjes, J.; Nuijten, K.; Peeters, A.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates the processes by which competition in the television news market might promote the presence of arousing characteristics in television news. A total of 3,024 news stories from six Dutch television news programs over the period 1990 to 2004 were investigated through content

  15. Exploiting Tri-Relationship for Fake News Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Shu, Kai; Wang, Suhang; Liu, Huan

    2017-01-01

    Social media for news consumption is becoming popular nowadays. The low cost, easy access and rapid information dissemination of social media bring benefits for people to seek out news timely. However, it also causes the widespread of fake news, i.e., low-quality news pieces that are intentionally fabricated. The fake news brings about several negative effects on individual consumers, news ecosystem, and even society trust. Previous fake news detection methods mainly focus on news contents fo...

  16. Working with the News Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordovensky, Pat; Marx, Gary

    This booklet provides advice on how schools can forge useful working relationships with the news media. Nineteen ground rules for working with print or broadcast media are outlined. The most important rule for all occasions is to make sure that your information is true. Strategies are described for using various tools of the trade, such as the…

  17. How to Tell Bad News

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Nicholas J.

    2012-01-01

    Therapists, physicians, police officers, and emergency staff often are the messengers of bad news. They have to tell a patient, a parent, or a loved one about a death, an accident, a school shooting, a life-threatening diagnosis, a terrorist attack, or a suicide. Usually the messenger bears a heavy responsibility but has little training and seeks…

  18. Myth, Method and International News.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lule, Jack

    Defining myth as a cultural narrative in symbolic form that articulates a world view and offers consensus with that view, this paper uses a brief "New York Times" report on the Soviet shooting down of South Korean airline flight 007 as the basis for comparison of international news and myth. Following a review of the literature on myth…

  19. School Violence and the News

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... schools safer is greater awareness of problems like bullying and discrimination. Many schools now have programs to fight these problems, and teachers and administrators know more about protecting students from violence. Tips for Parents Know where your kids get news and information, ...

  20. The Dutch and the news

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Annemarie Wennekers; Jos de Haan

    2017-01-01

    Original title: Nederlanders en nieuws For a long time, the television and newspapers were the most prominent news sources in the Netherlands, but digitalisation and the rise of new media have caused major shifts in the media landscape. Based on a time use survey focusing on media (Media:Tijd

  1. news interview talk: Organisational properties

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    practitioners in the domain of English for Specific Purposes (ESP) to generate communicative and meta-communicative .... Adopting a discourse-based approach places this research article in the realm of qualitative research (cf. ..... design language activities for South African business-news interviewer trainees. Adopting ...

  2. Linking online news and social media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsagkias, M.; de Rijke, M.; Weerkamp, W.

    2011-01-01

    Much of what is discussed in social media is inspired by events in the news and, vice versa, social media provide us with a handle on the impact of news events. We address the following linking task: given a news article, find social media utterances that implicitly reference it. We follow a

  3. Product Differentiation in Local Television News.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwater, Tony

    A study was conducted to investigate the extent to which local television stations exhibited diversity in newscast content within three midwest broadcast markets. A second objective was to describe the nature of the news content characteristic of local news stories that were broadcast by only one station within a market (or unique news stories). A…

  4. Wordplay in English Online News Headlines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsefi, Roya; Mahadi, Tengku Sepora Tengku

    2016-01-01

    Within the endless stream of information available on the news media market, news headline language is characterised by several linguistic, pragmatic, rhetorical and functional features that distinguish it from other varieties of language that are not specialised. In the present study, the rhetorical features of English news headlines, through…

  5. Semantic Analysis of FBI News Reports

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nizamani, Sarwat; Memon, Nasrullah

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present our work on semantic analysis of FBI News reports. In the paper we have considered the News which are of the immense significance for the analyst who want to analyze the News of specific area. With this definite analysis we are able to extract critical events or concepts...

  6. Daily Market News Sentiment and Stock Prices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.E. Allen (David); M.J. McAleer (Michael); A.K. Singh (Abhay)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractIn recent years there has been a tremendous growth in the influx of news related to traded assets in international financial markets. This financial news is now available via print media but also through real-time online sources such as internet news and social media sources. The

  7. The Places and Spaces of News Audiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    on-demand. Day-by-day, month-by-month, year-by-year, technology moves forward, impacting more than just the ways in which we get news. These fundamental shifts change what news ‘is’. This book expands our understanding of contemporary news audiences and explores how the different places and spaces...

  8. Association of school nutrition policy and parental control with childhood overweight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Dong-Chul; Lee, Chung Gun

    2012-06-01

    Schools and parents may play important roles in preventing childhood obesity by affecting children's behaviors related to energy balance. This study examined how school nutrition policy and parental control over children's eating and physical activity habits are associated with the children's overweight/obesity (hereafter overweight) status. Data were analyzed from a total of 246 pairs of children and parents who were recruited in the 2008-2009 academic year from 10 randomly selected public secondary schools in Indiana (school response rate = 66.7%; participant response rate = 73.5%). Logistic regression analyses were performed to examine odds ratios of different levels of school nutrition policies and parental control with and without adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics. Children who attended schools where soda pop (OR = 3.79, p obese than those at schools where such items were not sold. Children whose parents rarely or never ensured that their child was avoiding eating too many sweets (OR = 2.33, p = .08), avoiding spending too much time watching TV (OR = 2.24, p = .06), or engaging in physical activity (OR = 2.35, p = .09) were more likely to be obese than children whose parents did so always or most of the time. School nutrition policy and parental control over children's eating and physical activity habits are associated with the children's overweight status. © 2012, American School Health Association.

  9. ['Walkability' and physical activity - results of empirical studies based on the 'Neighbourhood Environment Walkability Scale (NEWS)'].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rottmann, M; Mielck, A

    2014-02-01

    'Walkability' is mainly assessed by the NEWS questionnaire (Neighbourhood Environment Walkability Scale); in Germany this questionnaire is widely unknown. We now try to fill this gap by providing a systematic overview of empirical studies based on the NEWS. A systematic review was conducted concerning original papers including empirical analyses based on the NEWS. The results are summarised and presented in tables. Altogether 31 publications could be identified. Most of them focus on associations with the variable 'physical activity', and they often report significant associations with at least some of the scales included in the NEWS. Due to methodological differences between the studies it is difficult to compare the results. The concept of 'walkability' should also be established in the German public health discussion. A number of methodological challenges remain to be solved, such as the identification of those scales and items in the NEWS that show the strongest associations with individual health behaviours. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. PSEUDO-SCIENTIFIC ECONOMIC POLICIES OF MOLDOVA ASSOCIATION TO THE EU: METHODOLOGY, PROBLEMS, SOLUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghe RUSU

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Economic policies and decisions on EU association starting with the begginig of 90’s were pseudo-scientific, contradictory, incoherent because those policies have not based themselves on modern and current economic theories elaborated and promoted by the EU. Actuality. The topic is actual from the perspective of the factors’ analysis which were conducting to delay the association process of Moldova to the EU. At the same time, those were increasing instability, disequilibrium in the national economy and raise of social vulnerability and constraint levels which ultimately increased the gap between the national and EU economic development levels. During the period of 2000-2015, the socio-economic policy of the Republic of Moldova is described more as small and fragmented steps on conceiving economic and financial instruments for the integration into the EU which were reflected in the Neighbourhood Partnership and Association Agreement with the EU. These processes conducted for the state incapacity to define its own objectives and social-economic priorities for the association as well as legitimated a continuous stage of transition to the market economy. The scope of the present article is to propose a real change of the development and social-economic association policies for achieving final objective on integration to EU. The proposals would consist in emphasizing and implementation of the EU economic principles reflected in the neoclassic synthesis and neo-conservative theories; the elaboration and implementation of a new Strategy on economic supervision, coordination and anticipation of the economic disequilibrium; achieve economic stability for diminishing the negative effects of the global and regional crisis on national economy and adaptation of the development policies to the national socio-economic conditions. The methods used for the elaboration and achieving the expected results of the study were analysis and synthesis of the

  11. Delivering Bad News: Attitudes, Feelings, and Practice Characteristics Among Speech-Language Pathologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Rinat; Gold, Azgad

    2018-02-06

    The purpose of this study was to examine the attitudes, feelings, and practice characteristics of speech-language pathologists (SLPs) in Israel regarding the subject of delivering bad news. One hundred and seventy-three Israeli SLPs answered an online survey. Respondents represented SLPs in Israel in all stages of vocational experience, with varying academic degrees, from a variety of employment settings. The survey addressed emotions involved in the process of delivering bad news, training on this subject, and background information of the respondents. Frequency distributions of the responses of the participants were determined, and Pearson correlations were computed to determine the relation between years of occupational experience and the following variables: frequency of delivering bad news, opinions regarding training, and emotions experienced during the process of bad news delivery. Our survey showed that bad news delivery is a task that most participants are confronted with from the very beginning of their careers. Participants regarded training in the subject of delivering bad news as important but, at the same time, reported receiving relatively little training on this subject. In addition, our survey showed that negative emotions are involved in the process of delivering bad news. Training SLPs on specific techniques is required for successfully delivering bad news. The emotional burden associated with breaking bad news in the field of speech-language pathology should be noticed and addressed.

  12. Individual, social, and environmental factors associated with support for smoke-free housing policies among subsidized multiunit housing tenants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Nancy E; Ferketich, Amy K; Klein, Elizabeth G; Wewers, Mary Ellen; Pirie, Phyllis

    2013-06-01

    Mandatory smoke-free policies in subsidized, multiunit housing (MUH) may decrease secondhand smoke exposure in households with the highest rates of exposure. Ideally, policies should be based on a strong understanding of factors affecting support for smoke-free policies in the target population to maximize effectiveness. A face-to-face survey was conducted from August to October 2011 using a stratified random sample of private subsidized housing units in Columbus, OH, without an existing smoke-free policy (n = 301, 64% response rate). Lease holders were asked to report individual, social, and environmental factors hypothesized to be related to support for smoke-free policies. Multiple logistic regression models were used to identify factors independently associated with policy support. Most tenants supported smoke-free policies in common areas (82.7%), half supported policies inside units (54.5%), and one third supported a ban outside the building (36.3%). Support for smoke-free policies in units and outdoors was more common among nonsmokers than smokers (71.5% vs. 35.7%, p social, but no environmental, factors were independently associated with policy support. Smokers who intended to quit within 6 months or less were more likely than other smokers to support in-unit policies (45.3% vs. 21.1%; p = .003). More than half of subsidized MUH tenants supported smoke-free policies inside their units. Strategies to address individual- and social-level barriers to behavior change should be implemented in parallel with smoke-free policies. Policies should be evaluated with objective measures to determine their effectiveness.

  13. How do local government associations influence policy? Assessing conditions for policy influence of interest groups in Brazil and the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Macedo de Jesus (Anderson)

    2010-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ In recent years a considerable number of studies have been undertaken concerning the impact of interest groups' influence in the European and North American policy-making process.

  14. News from the Library

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Library

    2010-01-01

    The LHC Library to be merged with the Central Library. Not everyone knows that CERN Scientific Information Service currently counts three physical libraries on site. The Central Library is located in Building 52 and there are two satellite libraries located respectively in building 30 (the LHC Library) and in building 864 on Prévessin site (the SPS Library). Moreover, the Legal Service Library is located in Building 60. In the past, there have been at CERN up to 6 satellite libraries; they were essential at a time when information was only in paper form and having multiple copies of documents located in several places at CERN was useful to facilitate scientific research. Today, this need is less critical as most of our resources are online. That is why, following a SIPB (Scientific Information Policy Board) decision, the collections of the LHC Library will be merged this summer with the Central collection. This reorganization and centralization of resources will improve loan services. The SP...

  15. Fake news in healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. An article in the National Review by Pascal-Emmanuel Gobry points out that there is considerable waste in healthcare spending (1. He blames much of this on two entitlements-Medicare and employer-sponsored health insurance. He also lays much of the blame on doctors. “Doctors are the biggest villains in American health care. ... As with public-school teachers, we should be able to recognize that a profession as a whole can be pathological even as many individual members are perfectly good actors, and even if many of them are heroes. And just like public-school teachers, the medical profession as a whole puts its own interests ahead of those of the citizens it claims to be dedicated to serve.” Who is Pascal-Emmanuel Gobry and how could he say something so nasty about teachers and my profession? A quick internet search revealed that Mr. Gobry is a fellow at the Ethics & Public Policy Center …

  16. Picturing obesity: analyzing the social epidemiology of obesity conveyed through US news media images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gollust, Sarah E; Eboh, Ijeoma; Barry, Colleen L

    2012-05-01

    News media coverage can affect how Americans view health policy issues. While previous research has investigated the text content of news media coverage of obesity, these studies have tended to ignore the photographs and other images that accompany obesity-related news coverage. Images can convey important messages about which groups in society are more or less affected by a health problem, and, in turn, shape public understanding about the social epidemiology of that condition. In this study, we analyzed the images of overweight and obese individuals in Time and Newsweek coverage over a 25-year period (1984-2009), and compared these depictions, which we characterize as representing the "news media epidemiology" of obesity, to data describing the true national prevalence of obesity within key populations of interest over this period. Data collected included descriptive features of news stories and accompanying images, and demographic characteristics of individuals portrayed in images. Over the 25-year period, we found that news magazines increasingly depicted non-whites as overweight and obese, and showed overweight and obese individuals less often performing stereotypical behaviors. Even with increasing representation of non-whites over time, news magazines still underrepresented African Americans and Latinos. In addition, the elderly were starkly underrepresented in images of the overweight and obese compared to actual prevalence rates. Research in other policy arenas has linked media depictions of the populations affected by social problems with public support for policies to combat them. Further research is needed to understand how news media depictions can affect public stigma toward overweight and obese individuals and public support for obesity prevention efforts. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. CLEF NewsREEL 2017 Overview : Offline and Online Evaluation of Stream-based News Recommender Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kille, Benjamin; Lommatzsch, Andreas; Hopfgartner, Frank; Larson, M.A.; Brodt, Torben; Cappellato, Linda; Ferro, Nicola; Goeuriot, Lorraine; Mandl, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    The CLEF NewsREEL challenge allows researchers to evaluate news recommendation algorithms both online (NewsREEL Live) and offline (News-REEL Replay). Compared with the previous year NewsREEL challenged participants with a higher volume of messages and new news portals. In the 2017 edition of the

  18. NEWS: And finally ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-05-01

    UK A-level curriculum broadening announced by the Government in March has been welcomed by the Save British Science Society, which back in 1996 had called for the sixth-form course to require at least five subjects, including a mixture of arts and science subjects. The Society had noted that the percentage of students studying three science A-levels fell from around 44% in 1962 to less than half that figure by the mid-1990s; during the same period the proportion studying three arts and humanities remained roughly constant. The absence of any clear policy for steering young people into studying at least some science and some of the arts and humanities was still a cause for concern. Engineering Council statistics have shown that the take-up of engineering and technology courses at universities in 1998 had dropped by 7.2% on the previous year (the overall percentage figure for all subjects had declined by 2%). Much of the engineering decline had resulted from a decrease in overseas students, however, as the UK figures were much steadier. Individual engineering courses showed marked differences in student acceptances: civil and chemical engineering showed falls of 6% and 5% respectively, while mechanical engineering grew by 4%. Aeronautical engineering also showed a strong rise of 7%. ... And before you give up with 1999, the Eclipse and Millennium fever, remember that next year will be Maths Year 2000, with its emphasis on raising numeracy standards in the UK and changes to teaching and learning! Something to look forward to, perhaps?

  19. Navigating cross-media news use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Swart, Joëlle; Peters, Chris; Broersma, Marcel

    2017-01-01

    The current news media landscape is characterized by an abundance of digital outlets and increased opportunities for users to navigate news themselves. Yet, it is still unclear how people negotiate this fluctuating environment to decide which news media to select or ignore, how they assemble...... distinctive cross-media repertoires, and what makes these compositions meaningful. This article analyzes the value of different platforms, genres and practices in everyday life by mapping patterns of cross-media news use. Combining Q methodology with think-aloud protocols and day-in-the-life-interviews, five...... distinct news media repertoires are identified: 1) regionally-oriented 2) background-oriented 3) digital 4) laid-back and 5) nationally-oriented news use. Our findings indicate that users do not always use what they prefer, nor do they prefer what they use. Moreover, the boundaries they draw between news...

  20. News and Announcements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-02-01

    News from Journal House Conceptual Questions and Challenge Problems Many readers are trying to modify the way they teach and in so doing are trying to write new types of questions and problems. The Journal has a new online resource, the JCE Internet Conceptual Questions and Challenge Problems Web site, http://jchemed.chem.wisc.edu/JCEWWW/Resources/CQandChP/index.html . The site is a source of questions and problems that can be used in teaching and assessing conceptual understanding and problem solving in chemistry. Here you can find a library of free-response and multiple-choice conceptual questions and challenge problems, tips for writing these questions and problems, and a discussion of types of concept questions. This site is intended to be a means of sharing conceptual questions and challenge problems among chemical educators. It will be as inclusive as possible, and to achieve this readers need to share their questions and alert the authors to references or Web sites. The screen captures shown below should provide a feeling for what you will find when you visit the site. The authors, William R. Robinson and Susan C. Nurrenbern, welcome additions to the library of conceptual questions or other comments or suggestions. Contact them by email, fax, or regular mail. William R. Robinson and Susan C. Nurrenbern, Department of Chemistry, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-1393. Bill: phone: 765/494-5453; fax: 765/494-0239; email: wrrobin@purdue.edu. Sue: phone: 765/494-0823; fax: 765/494-0239; email: nurrenbe@purdue.edu. fax: 765/494-0239. 1998 Ford Foundation Fellowships The National Research Council has announced the recipients of the 1998 fellowships for minority scholars. Three categories of fellowships were awarded: 50 to beginning graduate students, 33 to students writing their dissertations, and 28 to recent Ph.D. recipients. There were about 1,000 applicants. For information about the next competition contact the Fellowship Office of the National

  1. News and Announcements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-05-01

    1998 ACS Meeting in Boston he suffered a serious fall following a stroke, from which he never recovered. One of his last photographs, taken the previous day at a Journal luncheon, appears on page 1360 of the November 1998 issue. His commentary on his long career in chemistry and education appears on page 1520 of the December 1998 issue. Seaborg was a Nobel laureate, discoverer of elements, scientific advisor to presidents, former chancellor of the University of California, former chairman of the Atomic Energy Commission, chairman of the steering committee of the CHEM Study project, founder of Lawrence Hall of Science, , the list goes on and on. He was at the same time a passionate supporter of education. Seaborg published fourteen articles in the Journal between 1951 and 1998. He was interviewed in 1975 by David Ridgway as part of the Impact series (JCE 1975, 52, 70), and that interview is highly recommended reading (see supplement to this article). He received the 1994 ACS George C. Pimentel Award in Chemical Education; his award address was published in the ACS Division of Chemical Education's CHED Newsletter, Fall 1995. Memorial articles with details of his life and his scientific contributions have appeared in The New York Times (Saturday, February 27, 1999, page 1) and Chemical & Engineering News (March 8, 1999, page 29). But there is also the spirit of the man, what he believed in, what he tried to do, what he hoped he had accomplished. A sense of that can be gained from the excerpts that are reprinted below, taken first from the Impact interview and then from the award address. Ridgway: On reflection, now, out of your many contributions to chemistry, is there one that you feel has had more of an impact than others? Seaborg: The discovery of plutonium would answer that question. The impact there is probably nearly as great as any single chemical discovery. Ridgway: What was the state of the "art" in your field when you first decided to bend your energies in this

  2. Association Between Competitive Food and Beverage Policies in Elementary Schools and Childhood Overweight/Obesity Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Vaznaugh, Emma V.; Sánchez, Brisa N.; Crawford, Patricia B.; Egerter, Susan

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE To our knowledge, few published studies have examined the influence of competitive food and beverage (CF&B) policies on student weight outcomes; none have investigated disparities in the influence of CF&B policies on children’s body weight by school neighborhood socioeconomic resources. OBJECTIVE To investigate whether the association between CF&B policies and population-level trends in childhood overweight/obesity differed by school neighborhood income and education levels. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS This cross-sectional study, from July 2013 to October 2014, compared overweight/obesity prevalence trends before (2001–2005) and after (2006–2010) implementation of CF&B policies in public elementary schools in California. The study included 2 700 880 fifth-grade students in 5362 public schools from 2001 to 2010. EXPOSURES California CF&B policies (effective July 1, 2004, and July 1, 2007) and school neighborhood income and education levels. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Overweight/obesity defined as a body mass index at or greater than the 85th percentile for age and sex. RESULTS Overall rates of overweight/obesity ranged from 43.5% in 2001 to 45.8% in 2010. Compared with the period before the introduction of CF&B policies, overweight/obesity trends changed in a favorable direction after the policies took effect (2005–2010); these changes occurred for all children across all school neighborhood socioeconomic levels. In the postpolicy period, these trends differed by school neighborhood socioeconomic advantage. From 2005–2010, trends in overweight/obesity prevalence leveled off among students at schools in socioeconomically disadvantaged neighborhoods but declined in socioeconomically advantaged neighborhoods. Students in the lowest-income neighborhoods experienced zero or near zero change in the odds of overweight/obesity over time: the annual percentage change in overweight/obesity odds was 0.1% for females (95% CI, −0.7 to 0.9) and −0

  3. Sympathy, shame, and few solutions: News media portrayals of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eguiagaray, Ines; Scholz, Brett; Giorgi, Caterina

    2016-09-01

    there is a lack of public understanding about fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD), and many countries lack policies to deal with FASD concerns. Given the role of news media in disseminating a range of health information, the aim of the current study was to explore the media coverage on alcohol use during pregnancy and FASD, and to identify ways to improve associated health messages. the current study uses a framing analysis of news media reports about FASD over a 1-year period. Framing analysis seeks to better understand how media messages serve to shape the thoughts, feelings, and decisions of readers. two frames dominated the media coverage of FASD: a frame of sympathy, and a frame of shame. Some news media encouraged feelings of sympathy for children with FASD, while others encouraged sympathy towards mothers of these children. At the same time, mothers were also portrayed as deserving of shame. the interrelated frames of sympathy and shame may confuse readers, as they inconsistently hold different parties responsible for the impact of FASD. Media portrayals that encourage women to refrain from alcohol consumption during pregnancy might be more useful than stigmatising and isolating those who do. practitioners should be aware that conflicting messages about alcohol consumption during pregnancy might lead to shame and confusion, and should encourage openness with mothers to challenge stigma. Guidelines for media reporting should discourage stigmatising frames, and media articles should also consider the role that government, non-government organisations, and the alcohol industry could play for improving FASD shame. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. News - references; Actualites - reperes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2004-07-15

    The French LP Gas Association (CFBP) publishes its 2003 report. The French Chart of Environment adds a new article in the French Constitution as to maintain the right for everyone of a no harmful environment. A new web service in France on air pollution, day by day is presented. Autogas was at the first European Mobility Show in Paris, with a MAN LPG bus. The results of Rubis, a French group active in LP Gas in France, Italy and Africa are given. (authors)

  5. Associations between disaster exposures, peritraumatic distress, and posttraumatic stress responses in Fukushima nuclear plant workers following the 2011 nuclear accident: the Fukushima NEWS Project study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Shigemura

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The 2011 Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident was the worst nuclear disaster since Chernobyl. The nearby Daini plant also experienced substantial damage but remained intact. Workers for the both plants experienced multiple stressors as disaster victims and workers, as well as the criticism from the public due to their company's post-disaster management. Little is known about the psychological pathway mechanism from nuclear disaster exposures, distress during and immediately after the event (peritraumatic distress; PD, to posttraumatic stress responses (PTSR. METHODS: A self-report questionnaire was administered to 1,411 plant employees (Daiichi, n = 831; Daini, n = 580 2-3 months post-disaster (total response rate: 80.2%. The socio-demographic characteristics and disaster-related experiences were assessed as independent variables. PD and PTSR were measured by the Japanese versions of Peritraumatic Distress Inventory and the Impact of Event Scale-Revised, respectively. The analysis was conducted separately for the two groups. Bivariate regression analyses were performed to assess the relationships between independent variables, PD, and PTSR. Significant variables were subsequently entered in the multiple regression analyses to explore the pathway mechanism for development of PTSR. RESULTS: For both groups, PTSR highly associated with PD (Daiichi: adjusted β, 0.66; p<0.001; vs. Daini: adjusted β, 0.67; p<0.001. PTSR also associated with discrimination/slurs experience (Daiichi: 0.11; p<0.001; vs. Daini, 0.09; p = 0.005 and presence of preexisting illness(es (Daiichi: 0.07; p = 0.005; vs. Daini: 0.15; p<.0001. Other disaster-related variables were likely to be associated with PD than PTSR. CONCLUSION: Among the Fukushima nuclear plant workers, disaster exposures associated with PD. PTSR was highly affected by PD along with discrimination/slurs experience.

  6. Associations between disaster exposures, peritraumatic distress, and posttraumatic stress responses in Fukushima nuclear plant workers following the 2011 nuclear accident: the Fukushima NEWS Project study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigemura, Jun; Tanigawa, Takeshi; Nishi, Daisuke; Matsuoka, Yutaka; Nomura, Soichiro; Yoshino, Aihide

    2014-01-01

    The 2011 Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident was the worst nuclear disaster since Chernobyl. The nearby Daini plant also experienced substantial damage but remained intact. Workers for the both plants experienced multiple stressors as disaster victims and workers, as well as the criticism from the public due to their company's post-disaster management. Little is known about the psychological pathway mechanism from nuclear disaster exposures, distress during and immediately after the event (peritraumatic distress; PD), to posttraumatic stress responses (PTSR). A self-report questionnaire was administered to 1,411 plant employees (Daiichi, n = 831; Daini, n = 580) 2-3 months post-disaster (total response rate: 80.2%). The socio-demographic characteristics and disaster-related experiences were assessed as independent variables. PD and PTSR were measured by the Japanese versions of Peritraumatic Distress Inventory and the Impact of Event Scale-Revised, respectively. The analysis was conducted separately for the two groups. Bivariate regression analyses were performed to assess the relationships between independent variables, PD, and PTSR. Significant variables were subsequently entered in the multiple regression analyses to explore the pathway mechanism for development of PTSR. For both groups, PTSR highly associated with PD (Daiichi: adjusted β, 0.66; pvariables were likely to be associated with PD than PTSR. Among the Fukushima nuclear plant workers, disaster exposures associated with PD. PTSR was highly affected by PD along with discrimination/slurs experience.

  7. A content analysis of news coverage of the HPV vaccine by U.S. newspapers, January 2002-June 2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calloway, Crystal; Jorgensen, Cynthia M; Saraiya, Mona; Tsui, Jennifer

    2006-09-01

    Genital Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the United States. Of the 100 HPV types, HPV type 16 and HPV type 18 have been demonstrated to cause cervical cancer. Two pharmaceutical manufacturers have developed and tested HPV vaccines and are applying to the FDA for licensure. This research describes the content of HPV vaccine information contained in news articles. The Lexis-Nexis database was used to identify 25 articles on HPV that were published in 285 U.S. newspapers from January 1, 2003 to June 17, 2005. The coding schema captured information about the news event and source, as well as HPV and cervical cancer, transmission, vaccine, potential impact of the vaccine, and its relationship to PAP tests. The content analysis revealed that the news coverage of HPV vaccine provides information on the experimental status and efficacy of the vaccine, explains link between HPV and cervical cancer, and reports the manufacturers by name, as well as relies on them for a news source. Detailed information about HPV, however, was frequently missing which could lead to an incomplete picture or lack of understanding of the complexity of HPV and cervical cancer. As a major source of medical information, the media can be particularly important in educating policy makers and the general public about new scientific advances. Public health officials may wish to collaborate with journalists, health educators, healthcare providers, and women's health advocates to ensure that future educational initiatives explain the complexity of the association of HPV and cervical cancer and to stress the importance of continued cervical cancer screening.

  8. Misunderstanding International News in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques Wainberg

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates the nature of the Brazilian public comprehension of international news by revealing the quality of such reception with regard to a sample of 170 subjects randomly selected in the city of Porto Alegre, Brazil. A questionnaire was created taking as a basis the directives of Bloom et al(1972. Evaluated in it are the cognitive and aff ective dimensions of thought. In the fi rst case, questions were formulated that allowed the establishment of the level of knowledge of individuals, as well as their comprehension abilities, application, analysis, synthesis, and evaluation of a wide range of international news topics. For the aff ective dimension the following abilities were evaluated: attention, response, valorization, organization and the structuring of a value scale.

  9. News Coverage of Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Taxes: Pro- and Antitax Arguments in Public Discourse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gollust, Sarah E.; Jarlenski, Marian P.; Nathanson, Ashley M.; Barry, Colleen L.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We examined news coverage of public debates about large taxes on sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) to illuminate how the news media frames the debate and to inform future efforts to promote obesity-related public policy. Methods. We conducted a quantitative content analysis in which we assessed how frequently 30 arguments supporting or opposing SSB taxes appeared in national news media and in news outlets serving jurisdictions where SSB taxes were proposed between January 2009 and June 2011. Results. News coverage included more discrete protax than antitax arguments on average. Supportive arguments about the health consequences and financial benefits of SSB taxes appeared most often. The most frequent opposing arguments focused on how SSB taxes would hurt the economy and how they constituted inappropriate governmental intrusion. Conclusions. News outlets that covered the debate on SSB taxes in their jurisdictions framed the issue in largely favorable ways. However, because these proposals have not gained passage, it is critical for SSB tax advocates to reach audiences not yet persuaded about the merits of this obesity prevention policy. PMID:23597354

  10. News in Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    China Accomplishes International Evaluation on Science Funding and Management Performance Panel Meeting of NSFC-NIH Joint Program in Beijing NSFC and CAS's New Round Collaboration for Large Scientific Facilities Vice President Shen Wenqing Meets with President of the Helmholtz Association NSFC Supervision Delegation Visits to Japan and Korea NSFC Strengthens Ties with PIs of the Research Fund for International Young Scientists The 9th ASIAHORCs Meeting Held in Daejoen, Korea NSFC Vice President Meets with ICTP Director First U.S.-China Women Chemists Workshop in Beijing Vice President Attends 5th ASIAHORCs Meeting NSFC Vice President Attended IIASA Council Meeting NSFC Vice President Meets With JST Guests

  11. Cinema and the communication of bad news

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Isabel GÓMEZ CORDOBA

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Breaking Bad News requires medical professionals possess a range of skills to ensure that the patient has the information required for decision?making, this process occurs without further damage and even has a therapeutic effect, and another, that the doctor is not exposed to legal risk or stress associated with the inability to cope with the feelings of the patient, their families or themselves. This article discusses the aspects of communication of bad news in the field of doctor?patient relationship will be presented. The SPIKES model and discussion of movie segments related to the subject was employed as a thread, such as Doctor, 50/50, The Barbarian Invasions, Wings of Life, Stepmom, Letters to God, Wit, The butterfly blue, The power of friendship, Life without me, Make me laugh, Knockin ‘on Heaven’s Door, My Life, A crazy Loose in Brooklyn, As suicide and not die in the attempt, A lesson of life, and The sacrifice of a mother, as a pedagogical strategy in medical training.

  12. Association between Integration Policies and Immigrants’ Mortality: An Explorative Study across Three European Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikram, Umar Z.; Malmusi, Davide; Juel, Knud; Rey, Grégoire; Kunst, Anton E.

    2015-01-01

    Background To integrate immigrants into their societies, European countries have adopted different types of policies, which may influence health through both material and psychosocial determinants. Recent studies have suggested poorer health outcomes for immigrants living in countries with poorly rated integration policies. Objective To analyse mortality differences of immigrants from the same country of origin living in countries with distinct integration policy contexts. Methods From the mortality dataset collected in the Migrant Ethnic Health Observatory (MEHO) project, we chose the Netherlands (linked data from 1996-2006), France (unlinked; 2005-2007) and Denmark (linked; 1992-2001) as representatives of the inclusive, assimilationist and exclusionist policy models, respectively, based on the Migrant Integration Policy Index. We calculated for each country sex- and age-standardized mortality rates for Turkish-, Moroccan- and local-born populations aged 20-69 years. Poisson regression was used to estimate the mortality rate ratios (MRRs) for cross-country and within-country comparisons. The analyses were further stratified by age group and cause of death. Results Compared with their peers in the Netherlands, Turkish-born immigrants had higher all-cause mortality in Denmark (MRR men 1.92; 95% CI 1.74-2.13 and women 2.11; 1.80-2.47) but lower in France (men 0.64; 0.59-0.69 and women 0.58; 0.51-0.67). A similar pattern emerged for Moroccan-born immigrants. The relative differences between immigrants and the local-born population were also largest in Denmark and lowest in France (e.g., Turkish-born men MRR 1.52; 95% CI 1.38-1.67 and 0.62; 0.58-0.66, respectively). These patterns were consistent across all age groups, and more marked for cardiovascular diseases. Conclusions Although confounders and data comparability issues (e.g., French cross-sectional data) may affect the findings, this study suggests that different macro-level policy contexts may influence

  13. Cost savings associated with 10 years of road safety policies in Catalonia, Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suelves, Josep M; Barbería, Eneko

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine whether the road safety policies introduced between 2000 and 2010 in Catalonia, Spain, which aimed primarily to reduce deaths from road traffic collisions by 50% by 2010, were associated with economic benefits to society. Methods A cost analysis was performed from a societal perspective with a 10-year time horizon. It considered the costs of: hospital admissions; ambulance transport; autopsies; specialized health care; police, firefighter and roadside assistance; adapting to disability; and productivity lost due to institutionalization, death or sick leave of the injured or their caregivers; as well as material and administrative costs. Data were obtained from a Catalan hospital registry, the Catalan Traffic Service information system, insurance companies and other sources. All costs were calculated in euros (€) at 2011 values. Findings A substantial reduction in deaths from road traffic collisions was observed between 2000 and 2010. Between 2001 and 2010, with the implementation of new road safety policies, there were 26 063 fewer road traffic collisions with victims than expected, 2909 fewer deaths (57%) and 25 444 fewer hospitalizations. The estimated total cost savings were around €18 000 million. Of these, around 97% resulted from reductions in lost productivity. Of the remaining cost savings, 63% were associated with specialized health care, 15% with adapting to disability and 8.1% with hospital care. Conclusion The road safety policies implemented in Catalonia in recent years were associated with a reduction in the number of deaths and injuries from traffic collisions and with substantial economic benefits to society. PMID:23397348

  14. Work–life balance policies: Challenges and benefits associated with implementing flexitime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Downes

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Helping employees to balance their work and family lives is a business imperative. Work–life balance policies (like flexitime aim to support employees to do so. However, implementing these policies is problematic.Research purpose: The aim of this article is to report on the challenges and benefits associated with implementing flexitime as a work–life balance policy.Motivation for the study: Organisations must develop and implement work–life balance policies. This requires human resource practitioners to investigate and understand experiences and perceptions about the challenges and benefits of flexitime.Research design, approach and method: The researcher used a qualitative research design with an exploratory approach. She drew a nonprobability purposive and voluntary sample (n = 15 from the financial sector. She used semi-structured in-depth interviews to collect the data and conducted content analyses to analyse and interpret them.Main findings: The researcher extracted four main themes (individual and general challenges, the aspects organisations need to implement flexitime effectively and the benefits that would follow its implementation from the data. Its benefits vary from work–life balance to employee loyalty and commitment. Some challenges are maintaining productivity, a shortage of critical resources and understanding flexitime.Practical/managerial implications: The research identified requirements that human resource practitioners should attend to in order to ensure that organisations use flexitime more effectively.Contribution/value-add: The researcher obtained unique findings about the minimum requirements for implementing flexitime effectively. They could assist organisations to address the challenges that employees face.

  15. Exaggerations and Caveats in Press Releases and Health-Related Science News.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumner, Petroc; Vivian-Griffiths, Solveiga; Boivin, Jacky; Williams, Andrew; Bott, Lewis; Adams, Rachel; Venetis, Christos A; Whelan, Leanne; Hughes, Bethan; Chambers, Christopher D

    2016-01-01

    Exaggerated or simplistic news is often blamed for adversely influencing public health. However, recent findings suggested many exaggerations were already present in university press releases, which scientists approve. Surprisingly, these exaggerations were not associated with more news coverage. Here we test whether these two controversial results also arise in press releases from prominent science and medical journals. We then investigate the influence of mitigating caveats in press releases, to test assumptions that caveats harm news interest or are ignored. Using quantitative content analysis, we analyzed press releases (N = 534) on biomedical and health-related science issued by leading peer-reviewed journals. We similarly analysed the associated peer-reviewed papers (N = 534) and news stories (N = 582). Main outcome measures were advice to readers and causal statements drawn from correlational research. Exaggerations in press releases predicted exaggerations in news (odds ratios 2.4 and 10.9, 95% CIs 1.3 to 4.5 and 3.9 to 30.1) but were not associated with increased news coverage, consistent with previous findings. Combining datasets from universities and journals (996 press releases, 1250 news), we found that when caveats appeared in press releases there was no reduction in journalistic uptake, but there was a clear increase in caveats in news (odds ratios 9.6 and 9.5 for caveats for advice and causal claims, CIs 4.1 to 24.3 and 6.0 to 15.2). The main study limitation is its retrospective correlational nature. For health and science news directly inspired by press releases, the main source of both exaggerations and caveats appears to be the press release itself. However we find no evidence that exaggerations increase, or caveats decrease, the likelihood of news coverage. These findings should be encouraging for press officers and scientists who wish to minimise exaggeration and include caveats in their press releases.

  16. World endocrinology news

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M A Berkovskaya

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available • Actuality of the problem of metabolic syndrome: expert opinion. • Chemerin is a novel adipokine associated with obesity and metabolic syndrome. • Brothers of women with polycystic ovary syndrome are characterised by impaired glucose tolerance, reduced insulin sensitivity and related metabolic defects. • Microvascular dysfunction: a potential pathophysiological role in the metabolic syndrome. • Cardiotrophin-1 is expressed in adipose tissue and it is UP-regulated in the metabolic syndrome. • Magnesium Intake, Metabolic Abnormalities, and Inflammation. • Red meat in the diet. • Relationships of maternal and paternal birth weights to features of the metabolic syndrome in adult offspring: an inter-generation study in South India. • The truth about milk! • Therapeutic uses of aromatase inhibitors in men. • Reduction of body weight and co-morbidities by orlistat: The XXL - Primary Health Care Trial

  17. For Video Games, Bad News Is Good News: News Reporting of Violent Video Game Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copenhaver, Allen; Mitrofan, Oana; Ferguson, Christopher J

    2017-12-01

    News coverage of video game violence studies has been critiqued for focusing mainly on studies supporting negative effects and failing to report studies that did not find evidence for such effects. These concerns were tested in a sample of 68 published studies using child and adolescent samples. Contrary to our hypotheses, study effect size was not a predictor of either newspaper coverage or publication in journals with a high-impact factor. However, a relationship between poorer study quality and newspaper coverage approached significance. High-impact journals were not found to publish studies with higher quality. Poorer quality studies, which tended to highlight negative findings, also received more citations in scholarly sources. Our findings suggest that negative effects of violent video games exposure in children and adolescents, rather than large effect size or high methodological quality, increase the likelihood of a study being cited in other academic publications and subsequently receiving news media coverage.

  18. World thyroidology news

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuliya Aleksandrovna Manuylova

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The article is to overview papers:Effect of vitamin C on the absorption of levothyroxine in patients with hypothyroidism and gastritis.Management of neonates born to women with Graves’ disease: a cohort study.A prospective, randomized trial of intravenous glucocorticoids therapy with different protocols for patients with Graves’ ophthalmopathy.Glucocorticoid regimens for prevention of Graves’ ophthalmopathy progression following radioiodine treatment: systematic review and meta-analysis.Smoking induces overexpression of immediate early genes in active Graves’ ophthalmopathy.Obesity and the risk of papillary thyroid cancer: A pooled analysis of three case-control studies.Differentiation of postpartum Graves’ thyrotoxicosis from postpartum destructive thyrotoxicosis using antithyrotropin receptor antibodies and thyroid blood flow.Follow-up of newborns of mothers with Graves’ disease.Severity of birth defects after propylthiouracil exposure in early pregnancy.The attitude toward hypothyroid- ism during early gestation: time for a change of mind?Effect of iodine restriction on thyroid function in subclinical hypothyroid patients in an iodine-replete area: A long period observa- tion in a large-scale cohort.Subclinical hypothyroidism and risk for incident ischemic stroke among postmenopausal women.Hashimoto’s thyroiditis pathology and risk for thyroid cancer.Anxiety and depression are more prevalent in patients with Graves’ disease than in patients with nodular goitre.The TRHR gene is associated with hypothalamo-pituitary sensitivity to levothyroxine.

  19. News from Council

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Today concludes a very busy week for Council. As you’ll have seen from the press release this morning, Council elected a new President, who will take up his mandate on 1 January along with the new management team, which was also approved by Council yesterday.   You’ll find full details of the incoming Director-General’s management team and structures here. Completing the configuration for the immediate future, Council also approved the medium term plan, along with the budget for 2016. In other Council business, two complete applications for Associate Membership were discussed. Following an earlier letter, India’s complete application was received and considered by Council. Consequently, a fact-finding mission has been established to report back before the end of the year. A new application was also received from Azerbaijan, with a fact-finding mission to be established. India’s involvement with CERN goes back to the 1970s, and the country...

  20. Decoding the codes: A content analysis of the news coverage of genetic cloning by three online news sites and three national daily newspapers, 1996 through 1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Jon E.

    This study compared news coverage of genetic cloning research in three online news sites (CNN.com, ABC.com, and MSNBC.com) and three national daily newspapers (The New York Times, The Washington Post, and USA Today). The study involved the analysis of 230 online and print news articles concerning genetic cloning published from 1996 through 1998. Articles were examined with respect to formats, sources, focus, tone, and assessments about the impact of cloning research. Findings indicated that while print news formats remained relatively constant for the duration of this study, online news formats changed significantly with respect to the kinds of media used to represent the news, the layouts used to represent cloning news, and the emphasis placed on audio-visual content. Online stories were as much as 20 to 70% shorter than print stories. More than 50% of the articles appearing online were composed by outside sources (wire services, guest columnists, etc.). By comparison, nearly 90% of the articles published by print newspapers were written "in-house" by science reporters. Online news sites cited fewer sources and cited a smaller variety of sources than the newspapers examined here. In both news outlets, however, the sources most frequently cited were those with vested interests in furthering cloning research. Both online and print news coverage of cloning tends to focus principally on the technical procedures and on the future benefits of cloning. More than 60% of the articles focused on the techniques and technologies of cloning. Less than 25% of the articles focused on social, ethical, or legal issues associated with cloning. Similarly, articles from all six sources (75%) tended to be both positive and future-oriented. Less than 5% of the total articles examined here had a strongly negative or critical tone. Moreover, both online and print news sources increasingly conveyed a strong sense of acceptance about the possibility of human cloning. Data from this study

  1. Intimate partner violence and health provider training and screening in the news.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manganello, Jennifer A; Webster, Daniel; Campbell, Jacquelyn C

    2006-01-01

    Intimate partner violence is a significant women's health issue. Since the news media can play a role in policy development, it is important to understand how newspapers have portrayed training and screening. The purpose of this study was to describe the frequency and nature of print news coverage of health issues related to partner violence, specifically, provider training and screening by health providers. We conducted a content analysis on articles obtained from major city and state capital daily newspapers from 20 states. News articles and editorials mentioning intimate partner violence and provider training and screening were examined for the years 1994 through 2001 (N = 188). Results showed that print news coverage was limited and received low levels of attention, indicating little potential to influence either policy or individual behavior. However, when the issue was covered, little debate or controversy was present, and a broad discussion of the issue was generally provided. News coverage of training and screening could be improved by increasing dissemination of research results, illustrating the policy implications of these issues, and offering resource information to women experiencing violence.

  2. War Policy, Public Support, and the Media

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Darley, William M

    2005-01-01

    Perhaps no element of the current conflict in Iraq engenders more emotion and acrimony within the military than debate concerning the role and influence of the news media on public opinion and national policy...

  3. ASSOCIATION OF GOVERNMENT POLICY AND MOTHER’S PERCEPTION TO EXCLUSIVE BREASTFEEDING PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mufdlilah

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although the Indonesian government has campaigned exclusive breastfeeding during the past decade through maternal and child program of Ministry of Health, however, its coverage in Yogyakarta province remains low. Objective: This study aims to analyze factors related to exclusive breastfeeding program, especially indicators that can explain government’s regulation and mothers’ perception to exclusive breastfeeding practice. Methods: It was a cross-sectional study involved 185 mothers who have 6-12 months infants with parity 1-3. The correspondents live in Sleman district and had normal delivery in hospital, health center or midwifery private practitioner. The association between the exogenous (government policy and mothers’ perception and the endogenous variables (mothers’ participation to exclusive breastfeeding practice was determined using Lisrel version 8.80. Results: Although the government policy contributed to the success of implementing breastfeeding program (33%, providing breastfeeding rooms (28%, and declaring the related government regulation (17%; however, its contribution was recorded at only 2% to human resources. Knowledge significantly encouraged mothers to breastfeed whilst infrastructure was assessed as a strong determinant of mothers’ willingness to participate in the program at the contribution of 50%. Conclusion: Although there was only a weak association between government regulation to mothers’ perception and between mothers’ perception towards exclusive breastfeeding practice, the study highlights the importance of providing adequate information to improve mothers’ knowledge on exclusive breastfeeding. By knowledge improvement, mothers will have better perception, which in turn will improve their self-efficacy and practices in exclusive breastfeeding.

  4. Framework for Urdu News Headlines Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kashif AHMED

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Automatic text classification has great significance in the field of text mining and plays a pivotal role in areas such as spam filtering, news classification, noise reduction etc. It is evident from the literature that there is ample of research conducted for classifying text documents e.g. English news classification, Persian text classification etc. but there is no copious amount of work related to short Urdu text or Urdu news headlines classification. Therefore, after examining various existing news classification methodologies we propose an SVM based framework in this paper for classification of Urdu news headlines. This approach classifies Urdu news based on headlines in their respective pre-defined categories by utilizing their feature vector’s maximum indexes. This proposed system is compared with existing state-of-the art techniques.

  5. Canadian Association of Gastroenterology policy on the application for, and implementation of, clinical practice guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Harminder; Leontiadis, Grigorios I; Hookey, Lawrence; Enns, Robert; Bistritz, Lana; Rioux, Louis-Charles; Hope, Louise; Sinclair, Paul

    2014-10-01

    An important mandate of the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology (CAG), as documented in the Association's governance policies, is to optimize the care of patients with digestive disorders. Clinical practice guidelines are one means of achieving this goal. The benefits of timely, high-quality and evidenced-based recommendations include: Enhancing the professional development of clinical members through education and dissemination of synthesized clinical research; Improving patient care provided by members by providing focus on quality and evidence; Creating legislative environments that favour effective clinical practice; Enhancing the clinical care provided to patients with digestive disease by nongastroenterologists; and Identifying areas that require further information or research to improve clinical care. The present document provides the foundation required to ensure that clinical practice guidelines produced by the CAG are necessary, appropriate, credible and applicable. These recommendations should be adhered to as closely as possible to obtain CAG endorsement.

  6. NEWS: Design and creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-03-01

    Delcam, a manufacturing software developer, has supplied substantial funding towards a UK Government initiative intended to revolutionize the study of design and technology in schools. The computer-aided design software for schools (CAD-CAM) programme will give students a bridge into industry by enabling them to employ video links with engineers at companies such as British Aerospace and Rolls Royce. They will then be able to convert their virtual reality designs into a finished product. When the revised National Curriculum comes into effect this year, CAD-CAM will become compulsory from Key Stage 3, reflecting the greater focus on work-related learning, as well as the added importance being given to Information and Communications Technology (ICT) within the curriculum. Under the new scheme, schools can use a range of software designed in the UK (currently used for such items as jet aircraft and Formula One racing cars), which is being made available free of charge. The Design and Technology Association is monitoring the programme and the schools taking part have had to propose targets, focused on curriculum innovation, pupil outcomes and staff development. Still on the theme of design is the `Young Foresight' project launched in January and inviting 13 to 14 year-olds to tackle the challenges of the future through designing a new product for the world of 2020. The aim here is to encourage creativity, enterprise and innovation among young people by giving them an idea of what is involved in the design and development of a successful product. The students will be supported by mentors drawn from the local business community and there will be related BBC schools television programmes early in March with classroom resources, teacher training and an interactive website. The first phase of the initiative, based on 100 schools from across England and Wales, should be completed by autumn 2000, with phase 2 for 3000 schools over a three-year period incorporating a further

  7. News media framing of serious mental illness and gun violence in the United States, 1997-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinty, Emma E; Webster, Daniel W; Jarlenski, Marian; Barry, Colleen L

    2014-03-01

    Recent mass shootings by persons seemingly afflicted with serious mental illness (SMI) have received extensive news media coverage and prompted national dialogue about the causes of, and policy responses to, mass shootings. News media framing of SMI as a cause of gun violence may influence public attitudes about persons with SMI and support for gun violence prevention proposals. We analyzed the content of a 25% random sample of news stories on SMI and gun violence published in 14 national and regional news sources from 1997 to 2012. Across the study period, most news coverage occurred in the wake of mass shootings, and "dangerous people" with SMI were more likely than "dangerous weapons" to be mentioned as a cause of gun violence.

  8. News Media Framing of Serious Mental Illness and Gun Violence in the United States, 1997-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Daniel W.; Jarlenski, Marian; Barry, Colleen L.

    2014-01-01

    Recent mass shootings by persons seemingly afflicted with serious mental illness (SMI) have received extensive news media coverage and prompted national dialogue about the causes of, and policy responses to, mass shootings. News media framing of SMI as a cause of gun violence may influence public attitudes about persons with SMI and support for gun violence prevention proposals. We analyzed the content of a 25% random sample of news stories on SMI and gun violence published in 14 national and regional news sources from 1997 to 2012. Across the study period, most news coverage occurred in the wake of mass shootings, and “dangerous people” with SMI were more likely than “dangerous weapons” to be mentioned as a cause of gun violence. PMID:24432874

  9. Implicit Operational Definitions of Economic News Literacy in the Printed News Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanSickle, Ronald L.

    1981-01-01

    Describes study which focused on the economic vocabulary used in national and international news magazines and papers. Compares findings with definitions of economic literacy proposed by economists and suggests that economics courses include economic news literacy. (KC)

  10. News with an attitude: assessing the mechanisms underlying the effects of opinionated news

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boukes, M.; Boomgaarden, H.G.; Moorman, M.; de Vreese, C.H.

    2014-01-01

    Opinionated news targets communities of likeminded viewers, relies on dramaturgical storytelling techniques, and shares characteristics with political satire. Accordingly, opinionated news should be understood as a specific form of political entertainment. We have investigated the mechanisms

  11. NEWS: Post-16 update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Peter

    2000-07-01

    education must work together for common goals. In the coming year I hope that the Institute of Physics itself will organize discussion meetings among participants representing a full cross section of interests. The Institute of course already works closely with other associations speaking for science and for science education; inasmuch as they explore issues affecting science education broadly, the booklets may present new opportunities for cooperation. Last but not least, it is important that we influence government bodies regulating and funding education. Copies of the booklets can be downloaded as PDF files from the Web at post16.iop.org/shaping/ or purchased (at £5.50 per title, or £22 for all five titles, including p&p) from Ingrid Ebeyer at the Institute (ingrid.ebeyer@iop.org).

  12. NEWS: AAPT Summer Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellema, Steve

    2000-11-01

    The 2000 Summer Meeting of the American Association of Physics Teachers (AAPT) was held from 28~July-2~August at the University of Guelph in Ontario, Canada. Despite somewhat rainy weather throughout the week, the annual gathering was an enjoyable one, filled with interesting talks on the state of physics education in North America. Using a new scheduling format for the summer meeting, all of the paid workshops and tutorials were held on Saturday and Sunday 29-30 July. The invited and contributed papers for the main AAPT meeting were then presented on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday. As had been done in 1999 in San Antonio, a two-day tandem meeting dedicated to Physics Education Research (PER) was held on Wednesday and Thursday 2-3 August, immediately after the main AAPT meeting. Over the three days of the main meeting, 60 sessions were held under the sponsorship of various AAPT committees. These included sessions (numbers in parentheses) organized by the committees on Apparatus (1), Astronomy Education (3), Awards (2), Computers (5), Graduate Education (2), High Schools (1), History and Philosophy (1), Instructional Media (3), International Education (1), Laboratories (2), Pre-High School Education (2), Programs (4), Professional Concerns (6), Research in Physics Education (8), Science Education for the Public (2), Two-Year Colleges (5), Undergraduate Education (7) and Women in Physics (4). Figure 1. Guelph Church of Our Lady. The main meeting opened on Sunday evening with an invited lecture by Dr John J Simpson from the host institution, the University of Guelph, describing the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory. At the ceremonial session that began the activities on Monday morning, recognition was given to Clifford Swartz for his almost 30 years of service as Editor of the AAPT journal, The Physics Teacher. This was followed by an invited talk by Jim Nelson from Seminole County Public School in Florida, who received the Excellence in Pre-College Teaching Award. The

  13. Information and Records Management (IRM News Portal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Taş

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available IRM News; by continuously following, information technologies, social media, visual and print press, not only it watches the improvements of our field but also it tries to audit any kind of information/records which are newsworthy, in this point of view, it creates the aims in this perspective; “Information and Records Management (IRM News Portal; has the target that; to present and archive the news which are about Centre of Archive, Documentation and Information, published in both national press and electronic space, and also IRMNews Portal aims to ensure reaching all these news from one point. ”

  14. New format for ATLAS e-news

    CERN Multimedia

    Pauline Gagnon

    ATLAS e-news got a new look! As of November 30, 2007, we have a new format for ATLAS e-news. Please go to: http://atlas-service-enews.web.cern.ch/atlas-service-enews/index.html . ATLAS e-news will now be published on a weekly basis. If you are not an ATLAS colaboration member but still want to know how the ATLAS experiment is doing, we will soon have a version of ATLAS e-news intended for the general public. Information will be sent out in due time.

  15. The News Media as a Political Institution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørsten, Mark; Allern, Sigurd

    2011-01-01

    On the basis of Scandinavian journalism research this article discusses the changing political roles of news organizations and journalists after the fall of the party press and the dissolution of broadcasting as a state-controlled monopoly. Given these institutional changes, we ask the following......: what new roles, if any, are news organizations and journalists playing in the political system? What are the characteristics of these new roles, and how do news organizations use their newfound political power? We address these questions in the context of an institutional approach to the news coupled...... with Hallin and Mancini's analysis of media systems....

  16. The shifting cross-media news landscape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Kim Christian; Steeg Larsen, Bent

    2010-01-01

    The article offers new insights for democracy and for news producers by mapping the use and users of today’s cross-media news landscape, as the everyday consumption of news across the range of available news media and formats is shifting as a result of transformations of technology, culture...... and lifestyles. Theoretically the study is anchored in Habermas’s notion of the public sphere, and its recent reconceptualizations in theories of ‘cultural citizenship’, 'civic agency' and 'public connection'. The project operationalizes these theories through the concept of users' perceived “worthwhileness...

  17. News: Good chemical manufacturing process criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    This news column covers topics relating to manufacturing criteria, machine to machine technology, novel process windows, green chemistry indices, business resilience, immobilized enzymes, and Bt crops.

  18. News and Announcements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-07-01

    the inside of meteorites. Zare and colleague Andrew Alexander are contributors to the Journal's Viewpoints series, sponsored by the Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation: "Anatomy of Elementary Chemical Reactions", JCE, 1998, 75, 1105. The Welch Award in Chemistry has been given by the Welch Foundation since 1972 to honor lifetime achievements in the field. Zare will be honored and presented with a $300,000 prize and gold medallion during the Foundation's annual award banquet held in Houston in October. NEACT Conference: Chemistry of Materials and Material Science The 61st Summer Conference of NEACT, the New England Association of Chemistry Teachers, will be held from Monday, August 9, through Thursday, August 12, at Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, MA. The four-day conference will feature an exploration of the chemistry of materials and material science and effective methods of presenting these in the classroom and laboratory. The keynote address is "Teaching Solid State Chemistry at MIT" by Ron Latanision of MIT's Department of Material Science. Other presentations include "Driving Force", James Livingston; "The Colorful Nanoworld", Moungi Bawendi; "Molecular Wire-Based Amplification in Chemical Sensors", Timothy Swager; "Putting Solids in the Foundation", Arthur Ellis, George Lisensky, and Karen Nordell; "Miracle Materials", Valerie Wilcox; "Teaching About Polymers to Chemistry Students", Richard Stein; and "Using Software in Teaching About Polymers to Chemistry Students", William Vining. There will be a selection of workshops on the conference theme as well. The conference is open to all. The program chairperson is Peter J. Nassiff, Science Department Chairperson at Burlington High School. For further information contact Nassiff at 80 Gregory Road, Framingham, MA 01701; email: pnassiff@massed.net. Call for Symposia, Papers, & Workshops: 16th BCCE The Web site for the 16th Biennial Conference on Chemical Education, July 30-August 3, 2000, at the

  19. News and Announcements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-04-01

    of Michigan in Ann Arbor from July 30-August 3, 2000. Information about the conference is posted on the World Wide Web at www.umich.edu/ bcce or may be obtained from the following persons. General Chair: Seyhan Ege; phone: 734/764-7340; fax: 734/647-4865; email: snege@umich.edu. Program Chair: Brian Coppola; phone: 734/764-7329; email: bcoppola@umich.edu. Workshop Coordinator: Evelyn Jackson; phone: 517/355-9715 ext.204; email: ejackson@argus.cem.msu.edu. Massachusetts State Science Fair The 50th Massachusetts State Science Fair will take place April 30 and May 1, 1999. To celebrate the anniversary, we plan to hold a gathering of all Fair alumni/alumnae. Thus we are trying to contact all persons who have ever exhibited science projects at this state-wide high school Fair that has been held each year at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Anyone who has exhibited a science project at the State Fair should send their name, present address, the name of the school they were attending when participating in the Fair, and the date(s) they exhibited to the Fair office: Massachusetts State Science Fair, 45 Howlands Lane, Kingston, MA 02364-1637. If there are questions, contact Micheline M. Mathews-Roth, M.D., the chair of the alumni/alumnae committee, by phone at 617/525-2249. Call for Proposals, EDUCAUSE '99 Celebrating New Beginnings is the title of the EDUCAUSE '99 annual conference, to be held October 26-29, 1999, in Long Beach, California. The conference will be a celebration of new beginnings and a forum to shape and define our agenda for the 21st century. This is a new association focused on enabling information technology to shape the nature of teaching, learning, scholarship, research, and institutional management and invite you to participate. At this first EDUCAUSE annual conference, we will identify the opportunities, address the issues, and celebrate the potential for transforming education through information technology; we will bring together information

  20. Content Analysis of US News Stories About E-Cigarettes in 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wackowski, Olivia A; Giovenco, Daniel P; Singh, Binu; Lewis, M Jane; Steinberg, Michael B; Delnevo, Cristine D

    2017-08-03

    Coverage of e-cigarettes in the news media may shape public perceptions about them but little is known about such news content. This content analysis characterized discussion of e-cigarettes in leading print and online US news sources in 2015. We searched Access World News and Factiva databases for e-cigarette-related news articles appearing in the top 30 circulating newspapers, 4 newswires, and 4 online news sources in the United States in 2015 (n = 295). Coders identified the presence of various e-cigarette topics (e.g. regulation), and benefit and risk statements. Nearly half of articles (45.1%) focused primarily on e-cigarette policy/regulatory issues, although e-cigarette prevalence (21.0%) and health effects (21.7%) were common main topics. Concerns about youth were frequently mentioned, including the rise in youth e-cigarette use (45.4%), gateway to smoking potential (33.9%) and appeal of flavors (22.4%). Youth e-cigarette prevalence was more frequently mentioned than adult prevalence in articles discussing FDA regulation (61% vs. 13.5%, respectively). News articles more frequently discussed potential e-cigarette risks or concerns (80%) than benefits (45.4%), such as smoking harm-reduction. Quoted physicians, researchers, and government representatives were more likely to refer to e-cigarette risks than benefits. In 2015, rising rates of e-cigarette use among youth and policy strategies to address e-cigarettes dominated US e-cigarette news stories, leading up to their FDA regulation in 2016. Statements about e-cigarettes' potential risks were frequently attributed to trusted sources such as physicians, and outnumbered claims about their harm-reduction benefits. Such coverage may impact e-cigarette risk perceptions, use intentions and policy support. In the year leading up to the FDA's Deeming Rule, concerns about youth use or potential use were frequently discussed in e-cigarette news. News articles more frequently discussed potential e-cigarette risks

  1. Tailor-Made News: Meeting the demands of news users on mobile and social media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot Kormelink, T.; Costera Meijer, I.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the technological possibilities for portable, personalized, and participatory news use, the public has not turned en masse from passive receivers who consume news on the producers' terms, into active users who tailor news to fit their personal preferences and practices. Unmistakably, some

  2. The Usefulness of a News Media Literacy Measure in Evaluating a News Literacy Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksl, Adam; Craft, Stephanie; Ashley, Seth; Miller, Dean

    2017-01-01

    A survey of college students showed those who had taken a news literacy course had significantly higher levels of news media literacy, greater knowledge of current events, and higher motivation to consume news, compared with students who had not taken the course. The effect of taking the course did not diminish over time. Results validate the News…

  3. Young people’s news orientations and uses of traditional and new media for news

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Cauwenberge, A.; d'Haenens, L.; Beentjes, H.

    2013-01-01

    This article reports on Flemish college students’ news orientations and their uses of traditional and new media for news within a public service media environment. We used five homogeneous focus groups that covered variation in news media use. The analysis of the focus groups revealed major

  4. News

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-05-01

    Schools lecture: Institute of Physics roadshow is a lecture series with a difference Rugby Meeting: 17th Annual Meeting for Teachers of Physics boasts an impressive schedule Courses: Year-12 pupils go to Open University Camera Competition: Enter now to win a new camera! Conference: Teachers invited to CERN in September New Zealand: Royal Society of New Zealand tackles fear of physics Bulgaria: Fairies, witches and extraterrestrials: how to teach science using theatre Schools lecture: Institute seeks speaker for its annual lecture series Competition: Critical thinking is encouraged by global warming competition Scotland: Two good reasons to visit Scotland this summer Competition: Test your knowledge Free Event: June IOP conference Conference: Also in Liverpool…

  5. News

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-05-01

    SHAP Awards: SHAP students come out on top APECS Seminar: Able Pupils Experience Challenging Science project gets support SHAP Awards : Teachers get awards too Institute Awards: Musical squares: musical pair continue to share their adventures in sound Meeting: Rugby School hosts Schools’ Physics Group Meeting Germany: German didactics group puts on a full programme for spring meeting Radio Communication: GB4FUN: mobile radio shack hits the airwaves and is a hit with schools Saturn: Cassini Huygens mission: Saturn here we come! World Year of Physics: Conference continues with its preparations for 2005 Resources: New resources on radioactive materials available JG was supported by KBN grant no 2 P03A 020 24.

  6. Media Literacy, News Literacy, or News Appreciation? A Case Study of the News Literacy Program at Stony Brook University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    This case study provides practical and theoretical insights into the Stony Brook news literacy program, which is one of the most ambitious and well-funded curricular experiments in modern journalism education and media literacy. Analysis of document, interview, and observation data indicates that news literacy educators sought to teach students…

  7. Outsourcing the news? An empirical assessment of the role of sources and news agencies in the contemporary news landscape

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boumans, J.W.

    2016-01-01

    Journalists are increasingly accused of uncritically recycling subsidized material in the form of press releases and news agency copy. This practice has been labeled churnalism and is believed to compromise journalism’s autonomy and threaten news quality. While the context - rampant competition,

  8. The association of soda sales tax and school nutrition laws: a concordance of policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greathouse, K Leigh; Chriqui, Jamie; Moser, Richard P; Agurs-Collins, Tanya; Perna, Frank M

    2014-10-01

    The current research examined the association between state disfavoured tax on soda (i.e. the difference between soda sales tax and the tax on food products generally) and a summary score representing the strength of state laws governing competitive beverages (beverages that compete with the beverages in the federally funded school lunch programme) in US schools. The Classification of Laws Associated with School Students (CLASS) summary score reflected the strength of a state's laws restricting competitive beverages sold in school stores, vending machines, school fundraisers and à la carte cafeteria items. Bridging the Gap (BTG) is a nationally recognized research initiative that provided state-level soda tax data. The main study outcome was the states' competitive beverage summary scores for elementary, middle and high school grade levels, as predicted by the states' disfavoured soda tax. Univariate and multivariate analyses were conducted, adjusting for year and state. Data from BTG and CLASS were used. BTG and CLASS data from all fifty states and the District of Columbia from 2003 to 2010 were used. A higher disfavoured soda sales tax was generally associated with an increased likelihood of having strong school beverage laws across grade levels, and especially when disfavoured soda sales tax was >5 %. These data suggest a concordance between states' soda taxes and laws governing beverages sold in schools. States with high disfavoured sales tax on soda had stronger competitive beverage laws, indicating that the state sales tax environment may be associated with laws governing beverage policy in schools.

  9. BreakingNews: Article Annotation by Image and Text Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramisa, Arnau; Yan, Fei; Moreno-Noguer, Francesc; Mikolajczyk, Krystian

    2017-06-30

    Current approaches lying in the intersection of computer vision and NLP have achieved unprecedented breakthroughs in tasks like automatic captioning or image retrieval. Most of these methods, though, rely on training sets of images associated with annotations that specifically describe the visual content. This paper proposes going a step further and explores more complex cases where textual descriptions are loosely related to images. We focus on the particular domain of News. We introduce new deep learning methods that address source and popularity prediction, article illustration, and article geolocation. An adaptive CNN is proposed, that shares most of the structure for all tasks, and is suitable for multitask and transfer learning. Deep CCA is deployed for article illustration, and a new loss function based on Great Circle Distance is proposed for geolocation. Furthermore, we present BreakingNews, a novel dataset with approximately 100K news articles including images, text, captions, and enriched with heterogeneous meta-data. BreakingNews allows exploring all aforementioned problems, for which we provide baseline performances using various CNN architectures, and different representations of the textual and visual features. We report promising results and bring to light several limitations of current state-of-the-art, which we hope will help spur progress in the field.

  10. The NEWS Water Cycle Climatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodell, Matthew; Beaudoing, Hiroko Kato; L'Ecuyer, Tristan; William, Olson

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Energy and Water Cycle Study (NEWS) program fosters collaborative research towards improved quantification and prediction of water and energy cycle consequences of climate change. In order to measure change, it is first necessary to describe current conditions. The goal of the first phase of the NEWS Water and Energy Cycle Climatology project was to develop "state of the global water cycle" and "state of the global energy cycle" assessments based on data from modern ground and space based observing systems and data integrating models. The project was a multi-institutional collaboration with more than 20 active contributors. This presentation will describe the results of the water cycle component of the first phase of the project, which include seasonal (monthly) climatologies of water fluxes over land, ocean, and atmosphere at continental and ocean basin scales. The requirement of closure of the water budget (i.e., mass conservation) at various scales was exploited to constrain the flux estimates via an optimization approach that will also be described. Further, error assessments were included with the input datasets, and we examine these in relation to inferred uncertainty in the optimized flux estimates in order to gauge our current ability to close the water budget within an expected uncertainty range.

  11. East-West News Flow "Imbalance": Qualifying the Quantifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Duc, Don R.

    1981-01-01

    A study of Eurovision-Intervision news exchange patterns suggests that any global explanation for imbalance will be premature until the news item values in each exchange are understood as clearly as its news item volume. (PD)

  12. TERRA NEWS: Sensationalism and Fait-divers on the Internet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Golembiewski

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This article presents an analysis of the news program Jornal do Terra (Terra News shown on the Terra website. The study involved two aspects: forms of news presentations on TV, based on studies by Pedro Maciel, and criteria of news value, based on Mário Erbolatto’s view. In addition, we used Luis Arthur Ferraretto’s studies of the news formats used specifically on the radio. The objective of this work was to verify what kind of news is transmitted by the news program Terra News, and to compare it with the traditional news program we watch on TV. The study confirmed that Terra News utilizes conventional formats of news presentation and makes a selection of sensationalist news about fait-divers.

  13. Terra News: sensationalism and fait-divers on the Internet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Golembiewski

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents an analysis of the news program Jornal do Terra (Terra News shown on the Terra website. The study involved two aspects: forms of news presentations on TV, based on studies by Pedro Maciel, and criteria of news value, based on Mário Erbolatto’s view. In addition, we used Luis Arthur Ferraretto’s studies of the news formats used specifically on the radio. The objective of this work was to verify what kind of news is transmitted by the news program Terra News, and to compare it with the traditional news program we watch on TV. The study confirmed that Terra News utilizes conventional formats of news presentation and makes a selection of sensationalist news about fait-divers.

  14. News and Features Updates from USA.gov

    Data.gov (United States)

    General Services Administration — Stay on top of important government news and information with the USA.gov Updates: News and Features RSS feed. We'll update this feed when we add news and featured...

  15. News Paper | Women in Science | Initiatives | Indian Academy of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    News Paper. News and Articles from Newspapers/Magazines. Level-playing field for women scientists - The Hindu. News item on Women's Day Conference by the National Task Force (DST) for Women in Science. More ...

  16. Factors associated with female genital mutilation in Burkina Faso and its policy implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung Donna

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Female genital mutilation (FGM usually undertaken between the ages of 1-9 years and is widely practised in some part of Africa and by migrants from African countries in other parts of the world. Laws prohibit FGM in almost every country. FGM can cause immediate complications (pain, bleeding and infection and delayed complications (sexual, obstetric, psychological problems. Several factors have been associated with an increased likelihood of FGM. In Burkina Faso, the prevalence of FGM appears to have increased in recent years. Methods We investigated social, demographic and economic factors associated with FGM in Burkina Faso using the 2003 Demographic Health Survey (DHS. The DHS is a nationally representative cross-sectional survey (multistage stratified random sampling of households of women of reproductive age (15-49 years. Associations between potential risk factors and the prevalence of FGM were explored using χ2 and t-tests and Mann Whitney U-test as appropriate. Logistic regression modelling was used to investigate social, demographic and economic risk factors associated with FGM. Main outcome measures i whether a woman herself had had FGM; ii whether she had one or more daughters with FGM. Results Data were available on 12,049 women. Response rates by region were at least 90%. Women interviewed were representative of the underlying populations of the different regions of Burkina Faso. Seventy seven percent (9267 of the women interviewed had had FGM. 7336 women had a daughter of whom 2216 (30.2% had a daughter with FGM and 334 (4.5% said that they intended that their daughter should have it. Univariate analysis showed that age, religion, wealth, ethnicity, literacy, years of education, household affluence, region and who had responsibility for health care decisions in the household had (RHCD were all significantly related to the two outcomes (p Conclusions and Policy implications Factors associated with FGM are varied

  17. Gasoline taxes : an examination of news media discourse related to gas tax funding in six states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    Why is it that some state legislatures approved gasoline tax increases while others did not? : In this analysis we examine gasoline tax issue frames in the print news media to see if these : frames provide clues to the eventual policy outcomes. : We ...

  18. Lighting and marking policies are associated with reduced farm equipment-related crash rates: a policy analysis of nine Midwestern US states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Marizen; Bedford, Ronald; Wu, Hongqian; Harland, Karisa; Cavanaugh, Joseph E; Peek-Asa, Corinne

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of roadway policies for lighting and marking of farm equipment in reducing crashes in Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota and Wisconsin. In this ecological study, state policies on lighting and marking of farm equipment were scored for compliance with standards of the American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers (ASABE). Using generalized estimating equations negative binomial models, we estimated the relationships between lighting and marking scores, and farm equipment crash rates, per 100 000 farm operations. A total of 7083 crashes involving farm equipment was reported from 2005 to 2010 in the Upper Midwest and Great Plains. As the state lighting and marking score increased by 5 units, crash rates reduced by 17% (rate ratio=0.83; 95% CI 0.78 to 0.88). Lighting-only (rate ratio=0.48; 95% CI 0.45 to 0.51) and marking-only policies (rate ratio=0.89; 95% CI 0.83 to 0.96) were each associated with reduced crash rates. Aligning lighting and marking policies with ASABE standards may effectively reduce crash rates involving farm equipment. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  19. Detecting Terrorism Incidence Type from News Summary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nizamani, Sarwat; Memon, Nasrullah

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents the experiments to detect terrorism incidence type from news summary data. We have applied classification techniques on news summary data to analyze the incidence and detect the type of incidence. A number of experiments are conducted using various classification algorithms...

  20. Creating Reality: How TV News Distorts Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altheide, David L.

    A three-year research project, including more than one year in a network affiliate station, provided the material for an analysis of current practices in television news programming. Based on the thesis that the organization of news encourages the oversimplification of events, this analysis traces the foundation of the bias called the "news…

  1. Mass News: Practices, Controversies, and Alternatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroy, David J., Ed.; Sterling, Christopher H., Ed.

    This selection of readings, primarily intended for a college journalism course, discusses the strengths and weaknesses of the major sources of the public news--the wire services, newspapers, and television. The first part of the book deals with the context of mass news and serves as an introduction to some of the crucial ideas shaping thinking…

  2. Spaces and Places of News Consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Chris

    2016-01-01

    of geographic scale, mobile news use, and everyday life practices. Considering spatiotemporal transformations in everyday life provides a useful starting point for thinking about the changing places news is available, and the remainder of the chapter explores some prominent examples, namely the home, workplace...

  3. Science News and the Science Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Laura

    2006-01-01

    Using "Science News" as a teaching tool promotes writing about science, talking about science, and broadening students' views about what science is. This article describes an ongoing assignment in which students choose one article from "Science News" each week and write a brief summary and explanation of why they picked that article. (Contains 1…

  4. Predicting User Views in Online News

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hardt, Daniel; Rambow, Owen

    2017-01-01

    We analyze user viewing behavior on anonline news site. We collect data from64,000 news articles, and use text featuresto predict frequency of user views.We compare predictiveness of the headlineand “teaser” (viewed before clicking) andthe body (viewed after clicking). Both arepredictive of click...

  5. Data Exchanges in Mobile News Apps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kammer, Aske; Wallberg, Filip

    This paper maps the flows of data to and from third-party actors when users access content in mobile news apps. This way, it analyzes the strategic networks of collaboration and data exchange that news organizations engage in in the digital economy, expanding the traditional two-sided model...

  6. News Analytics for Financial Decision Support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V. Milea (Viorel)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThis PhD thesis contributes to the newly emerged, growing body of scientific work on the use of News Analytics in Finance. Regarded as the next significant development in Automated Trading, News Analytics extends trading algorithms to incorporate information extracted from textual

  7. Fight or flight: Affective news framing effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feinholdt, A.

    2016-01-01

    This dissertation investigates how emotions shape and are shaped by news framing and how this interplay leads to a number of affective news framing effects. My work reveals that emotions do not only function as mechanisms but also as channels strengthening or weakening framing effects. In addition,

  8. Developing a News Media Literacy Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley, Seth; Maksl, Adam; Craft, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    Using a framework previously applied to other areas of media literacy, this study developed and assessed a measurement scale focused specifically on critical news media literacy. Our scale appears to successfully measure news media literacy as we have conceptualized it based on previous research, demonstrated through assessments of content,…

  9. CSIR eNews: Built environment

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    CSIR

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available stream_source_info CSIR e-NewsBE4_2008.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 108 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name CSIR e-NewsBE4_2008.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 /var...

  10. Automatic Amharic text news classification: Aneural networks ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study is on classification of Amharic news automatically using neural networks approach. Learning Vector Quantization (LVQ) algorithm is employed to classify new instance of Amharic news based on classifier developed using training dataset. Two weighting schemes, Term Frequency (TF) and Term Frequency by ...

  11. Fast-food fights: news coverage of local efforts to improve food environments through land-use regulations, 2001-2013. [corrected

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nixon, Laura; Mejia, Pamela; Dorfman, Lori; Cheyne, Andrew; Young, Sandra; Friedman, Lissy C; Gottlieb, Mark A; Wooten, Heather

    2015-01-01

    .... To understand how these policies are debated, we searched existing databases and the Internet and analyzed news coverage and legal documentation of efforts to restrict fast-food restaurants in 77 US...

  12. Association between Florida's smoke-free policy and acute myocardial infarction by race: A time series analysis, 2000-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mead, Erin L; Cruz-Cano, Raul; Bernat, Debra; Whitsel, Laurie; Huang, Jidong; Sherwin, Chris; Robertson, Rose Marie

    2016-11-01

    Racial disparities in acute myocardial infarctions (AMIs) are increasing over time. Previous studies have shown that the implementation of smoke-free policies is associated with reduced AMI rates. The objective of this study was to determine the association between smoke-free policy and AMI hospitalization rates and smoking by race. Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project data from Florida from 2000-2013 were analyzed using interrupted time series analysis to determine the relationship between Florida's smoke-free restaurant and workplace laws and AMI among the total adult population (aged ≥18years), by age, race, and gender. Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System data from Florida from 2000 to 2010 were analyzed using logistic regression to determine the association between policy and the adult smoking prevalence. After implementation of the smoke-free policy, no statistically significant associations between AMI hospitalization rates or smoking prevalence were detected in the total population. In the subgroup analysis, the policy was associated with declines in AMI hospitalization rates among non-Hispanic white adults aged 18-44years (β=-0.001 per 10,000, p-value=0.0083). No other relationships with AMI hospitalization rates and smoking prevalence were found in the subgroup analysis. More comprehensive smoke-free and tobacco control policies are needed to further reduce AMI hospitalization rates, particularly among minority populations. Further research is needed to understand and address how the implementation of smoke-free policies affects secondhand smoke exposure among racial and ethnic minorities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Perceiving the future news: Evidence for retrocausation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, Dale E.; Cyrus, Patricia S.

    2017-05-01

    Thirty-three exploratory psi investigations were recently performed using Conscious State Psi and Dream State Psi protocols for photographic material that did not exist at the time of the psi sessions. Results would provide evidence for retrocausation if the future photographs had influenced the sessions' data. The psi targets were Associated Press (AP) news photographs published in a Reading, PA area newspaper on a specific page three days in the future. These photographs were taken one day after the psi sessions. Following each psi session, and prior to the photograph's existence, perceptions were recorded in project records and email transmitted for date validation. Feedback was provided when the photograph was published. There were two phases: Phase I was an informal investigation performed by the principle author to evaluate project feasibility. Phase II was a formal investigation with a colleague 1,000 miles from the principle author and the area newspaper location. All data were evaluated by direct comparison to the intended photographs using numerical assessment scales and noting unique features. Data from 21 of the 33 sessions (64%) yielded sketches and narratives with medium and high degrees of correlations with the future news photographs. A subsequent binary analysis using control photographs yielded p = 0.040. Visual informational content of these future newspaper photographs had interacted with the brain's cognitive processes in a retrocausal sense. The future photographs affected the sessions' data. A subconscious interaction between the future and the present or past may be an on-going feature of the mental and physical universe. Suggestions for follow-on investigations into retrocausation are provided.

  14. Waterpipe tobacco smoking legislation and policy enactment: a global analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawad, Mohammed; El Kadi, Lama; Mugharbil, Sanaa; Nakkash, Rima

    2015-03-01

    (1) To review how current global tobacco control policies address regulation of waterpipe tobacco smoking (WTS). (2) To identify features associated with enactment and enforcement of WTS legislation. (1) Legislations compiled by Tobacco Control Laws (www.tobaccocontrollaws.org). (2) Weekly news articles by 'Google Alerts' (www.google.com/alerts) from July 2013 to August 2014. (1) Countries containing legislative reviews, written by legal experts, were included. Countries prohibiting tobacco sales were excluded. (2) News articles discussing aspects of the WHO FCTC were included. News articles related to electronic-waterpipe, crime, smuggling, opinion pieces or brief mentions of WTS were excluded. (1) Two reviewers independently abstracted the definition of "tobacco product" and/or "smoking". Four tobacco control domains (smokefree law, misleading descriptors, health warning labels and advertising/promotion/sponsorship) were assigned one of four categories based on the degree to which WTS had specific legislation. (2) Two investigators independently assigned at least one theme and associated subtheme to each news article. (1) Reviewed legislations of 62 countries showed that most do not address WTS regulation but instead rely on generic tobacco/smoking definitions to cover all tobacco products. Where WTS was specifically addressed, no additional legislative guidance accounted for the unique way it is smoked, except for in one country specifying health warnings on waterpipe apparatuses (2) News articles mainly reported on noncompliance with public smoking bans, especially in India, Pakistan and the UK. A regulatory framework evaluated for effectiveness and tailored for the specificities of WTS needs to be developed. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  15. Earned media and public engagement with CDC's "Tips from Former Smokers" campaign: an analysis of online news and blog coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornfield, Rachel; Smith, Katherine Clegg; Szczypka, Glen; Vera, Lisa; Emery, Sherry

    2015-01-20

    In March 2012, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) launched the first-ever paid national tobacco education campaign. At a cost of US $54 million, "Tips from Former Smokers" (Tips) ran for 3 months across multiple media, depicting the suffering experienced by smokers and their families in graphic detail. The potential impact and reach of the Tips campaign was not limited to that achieved through paid media placements. It was also potentially extended through "earned media", including news and blog coverage of the campaign. Such coverage can shape public understanding of and facilitate public engagement with key health issues. To better understand the contribution of earned media to the public's engagement with health issues in the current news media environment, we examined the online "earned media" and public engagement generated by one national public health campaign. We constructed a purposive sample of online media coverage of the CDC's 2012 Tips from Former Smokers television campaign, focusing on 14 influential and politically diverse US news outlets and policy-focused blogs. We identified relevant content by combining campaign and website-specific keywords for 4 months around the campaign release. Each story was coded for content, inclusion of multimedia, and measures of audience engagement. The search yielded 36 stories mentioning Tips, of which 27 were focused on the campaign. Story content between pieces was strikingly similar, with most stories highlighting the same points about the campaign's content, cost, and potential impact. We saw notable evidence of audience engagement; stories focused on Tips generated 9547 comments, 8891 Facebook "likes", 1027 tweets, and 505 story URL shares on Facebook. Audience engagement varied by story and site, as did the valence and relevance of associated audience comments. Comments were most oppositional on CNN and most supportive on Yahoo. Comment coding revealed approximately equal levels of

  16. News Media Framing of New York City’s Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Portion-Size Cap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Joanna E.; Truant, Patricia L.; Rutkow, Lainie; Kanarek, Norma F.; Barry, Colleen L.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We assessed news media framing of New York City’s proposed regulation to prohibit the sale of sugar-sweetened beverages greater than 16 ounces. Methods. We conducted a quantitative content analysis of print and television news from within and outside New York City media markets. We examined support for and opposition to the portion-size cap in the news coverage from its May 31, 2012, proposal through the appellate court ruling on July 31, 2013. Results. News coverage corresponded to key events in the policy’s evolution. Although most stories mentioned obesity as a problem, a larger proportion used opposing frames (84%) than pro-policy frames (36%). Mention of pro-policy frames shifted toward the policy’s effect on special populations. The debate’s most prominent frame was the opposing frame that the policy was beyond the government’s role (69%). Conclusions. News coverage within and outside the New York City media market was more likely to mention arguments in opposition to than in support of the portion-size cap. Understanding how the news media framed this issue provides important insights for advocates interested in advancing similar measures in other jurisdictions. PMID:26378853

  17. Factors affecting response to national early warning score (NEWS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolic, Ivana; Crane, Smiley; McCartney, Suzanne; Perkins, Zane; Taylor, Alex

    2015-05-01

    The NEWS is a physiological score, which prescribes an appropriate response for the deteriorating patient in need of urgent medical care. However, it has been suggested that compliance with early warning scoring systems for identifying patient deterioration may vary out of hours. We aimed to (1) assess the scoring accuracy and the adequacy of the prescribed clinical responses to NEWS and (2) assess whether responses were affected by time of day, day of week and score severity. We performed a prospective observational study of 370 adult patients admitted to an acute medical ward in a London District General Hospital. Patient characteristics, NEW score, time of day, day of week and clinical response data were collected for the first 24h of admission. Patients with less than a 12h hospital stay were excluded. We analysed data with univariate and multivariate logistic regression. In 70 patients (18.9%) the NEW score was calculated incorrectly. There was a worsening of the clinical response with increasing NEW score. An appropriate clinical response to the NEWS was observed in 274 patients (74.1%). Patients admitted on the weekend were more likely to receive an inadequate response, compared to patients admitted during the week (pscore remained significantly associated with an inadequate clinical response. Furthermore, our results demonstrate a small increase in inadequate NEWS responses at night, however this was not clinically or statistically significant. The high rate of incorrectly calculated NEW scores has implications for the prescribed actions. Clinical response to NEWS score triggers is significantly worse at weekends, highlighting an important patient safety concern. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. National men's health policies in Ireland and Australia: what are the challenges associated with transitioning from development to implementation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, N; Smith, J A

    2011-07-01

    The recent publication of national men's health policies in Ireland and Australia marks the first attempts by state governments anywhere in the world to target men as a specific population group for the strategic planning of health. The impetus for policy action in both countries can be traced to an increasing concern about sex differences in health status between men and women; a growing awareness of the need for a more gender-specific approach to health policy; and an expanding men's health field at a research, advocacy and community/voluntary level. This paper will describe the background to men's health policy development in Ireland and Australia; outline the aims, methodologies and key principles used for policy development; and highlight the principal priorities for policy action. It will pay particular attention to the challenges associated with transitioning from policy development to implementation, and reflect on some of the key lessons learned to date. Copyright © 2011 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The difficulties experienced by nurses and healthcare staff involved in the process of breaking bad news.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnock, Clare; Buchanan, Jean; Tod, Angela Mary

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the difficulties experienced by nurses and healthcare professionals when engaging in the process of breaking bad news. The challenges faced by staff when breaking bad news have previously been researched in relation to particular settings or participants. This study involved staff from diverse settings and roles to develop broader insights into the range of difficulties experienced in clinical practice. The study used a descriptive survey design involving self-reported written accounts and framework analysis. Data were collected using a structured questionnaire containing a free text section that asked participants to describe a difficult experience they had encountered when involved in the process of breaking bad news. Data were collected from healthcare staff from hospital, community, hospice and care home settings attending training days on breaking bad news between April 2011 and April 2014. Multiple inter-related factors presented challenges to staff engaging in activities associated with breaking bad news. Traditional subjects such as diagnostic and treatment information were described but additional topics were identified such as the impact of illness and care at the end of life. A descriptive framework was developed that summarizes the factors that contribute to creating difficult experiences for staff when breaking bad news. The framework provides insights into the scope of the challenges faced by staff when they engage in the process of breaking bad news. This provides the foundation for developing interventions to support staff that more closely matches their experiences in clinical practice. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Medical Schools' Industry Interaction Policies Not Associated With Trainees' Self-Reported Behavior as Residents: Results of a National Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, James S.; Austad, Kirsten E.; Franklin, Jessica M.; Chimonas, Susan; Campbell, Eric G.; Avorn, Jerry; Kesselheim, Aaron S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Medical students attending schools with policies limiting industry/student interactions report fewer relationships with pharmaceutical representatives. Objective To investigate whether associations between students' medical school policies and their more limited industry interaction behaviors persist into residency. Methods We randomly sampled 1800 third-year residents who graduated from 120 allopathic US-based medical schools, using the American Medical Association Physician Masterfile. We surveyed them in 2011 to determine self-reported behavior and preferences for brand-name prescriptions, and we calculated the strength of their medical schools' industry interaction policies using the 2008 American Medical Student Association and Institute on Medicine as a Profession databases. We used logistic regression to estimate the association between strength of school policies and residents' behaviors with adjustments for class size, postresidency career plan, and concern about medical school debt. Results We achieved a 44% survey response rate (n = 739). Residents who graduated from schools with restrictive policies were no more or less likely to accept industry gifts or industry-sponsored meals, speak with marketing representative about drug products, attend industry-sponsored lectures, or prefer brand-name medications than residents who graduated from schools with less restrictive policies. Residents who correctly answered evidence-based prescription questions were about 30% less likely to have attended industry-sponsored lectures (OR = 0.72, 95% CI 0.56–0.98). Conclusions Any effect that medical school industry interaction policies had on insulating students from pharmaceutical marketing did not persist in the behavior of residents in our sample. This suggests that residency training environments are important in influencing behavior. PMID:26692972

  1. Evaluating a traditional medicine policy in South Africa: phase 1 development of a policy assessment tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios Gavriilidis

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Policies that empower individuals and communities may be appropriate for public health, and more broadly. Simple, transparent and acceptable tools are therefore required to evaluate policies from an empowerment perspective. In 2008, the South African Department of Health (DOHSA drafted a policy to endorse the integration of African Traditional Medicine (ATM into the public health sector, following the World Health Organization's (WHO long-standing directives. Objective: The purpose of this study is to critically analyze this policy using a novel evaluation tool. Design: A 12-point ‘Policy Empowerment Index’ (PEI is introduced, and used to classify and score the policy according to five theoretical policy types. The evaluation was based on a stepwise review and associated publications: policy drafts, policy statements and news announcements. Results: According to the assessment tool, the ATM policy was marginally ‘supportive’ of constituent empowerment, although several ‘directive’ features were also observed. The importance of ATM to SA's communities and the promotion of education, employment, entrepreneurship and peripheral resource mobilization were the main empowering elements. Centralised conception, planning and implementation, the absence of provisions for local adaptations and the authoritative legislation context were sub-optimal features. Conclusions: South Africa's ATM legislation may need to further involve communities in policy design and implementation to capitalise upon the broader benefits of community empowerment. However, the iterative nature of method and evaluation is important. Indeed, they are proposed as points to initiate participatory development, and improve policy evaluation . Such instruments can empower constituents in the political process.

  2. The Nation in the News

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabech, Sidsel Grøn

    In my paper media texts are analysed in order to find places in everyday discourse, where identity constructions are constructed and contested. I explore the role that old and new media play in the construction and distribution of national identity constructions. Media like television, newspaper...... aim to discuss how news media establish themselves as representatives of a certain national identity and narrative and are positioned in the national media landscape according to this. This paper raises the questions: Do national identity constructions need their “own” national media in order...... to settle and gain importance? And how do rather stable and traditional identity landscapes react to the new media? What possibilities do new media bring for especially alternative identity constructions? To answer these questions I focus on Austrian national identity. Due to the cultural and political...

  3. Specific Modifications to Contract Policy for Staff Members and Project Associates related to the Human Resources Plan and LHC Completion

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    As agreed at the Committee meetings last December, the Management hereby submits two specific proposals to adjust staff contract policy and a third concerning appointments of Project Associates, following indications given in the Human Resources Plan presented last December. These proposals are limited to changes which are urgently required for the implementation of the HR Plan and the completion of the LHC. Other aspects concerning contract policy, raised by Internal Task Force 4 last year, and in particular the policy and procedures governing the award of indefinite contracts, require more in-depth study on which the Management will report progress on the clarification of these wider policy issues later in the year to TREF. After discussion at TREF in February 2003, the Management hereby submits these proposals for approval by the Finance Committee (paragraph 2.1 below) and by the Council (paragraphs 2.2 and 3.1 below), for entry into force on 1 April 2003.

  4. Challenges in covering health disparities in local news media: an exploratory analysis assessing views of journalists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallington, Sherrie Flynt; Blake, Kelly D; Taylor-Clark, Kalahn; Viswanath, K

    2010-10-01

    News coverage of health topics influences knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors at the individual level, and agendas and actions at the institutional and policy levels. Because disparities in health often are the result of social inequalities that require community-level or policy-level solutions, news stories employing a health disparities news frame may contribute to agenda-setting among opinion leaders and policymakers and lead to policy efforts aimed at reducing health disparities. This study objective was to conduct an exploratory analysis to qualitatively describe barriers that health journalists face when covering health disparities in local media. Between June and October 2007, 18 journalists from television, print, and radio in Boston, Lawrence, and Worcester, Massachusetts, were recruited using a purposive sampling technique. In-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted by telephone, and the crystallization/immersion method was used to conduct a qualitative analysis of interview transcripts. Our results revealed that journalists said that they consider several angles when developing health stories, including public impact and personal behavior change. Challenges to employing a health disparities frame included inability to translate how research findings may impact different socioeconomic groups, and difficulty understanding how findings may translate across racial/ethnic groups. Several journalists reported that disparities-focused stories are "less palatable" for some audiences. This exploratory study offers insights into the challenges that local news media face in using health disparities news frames in their routine coverage of health news. Public health practitioners may use these findings to inform communication efforts with local media in order to advance the public dialogue about health disparities.

  5. The Vexing Problem of Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia: Observations on Pathophysiology, Public Policy, and Clinical Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallet, Richard H

    2015-10-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is an acquired infection related primarily to the consequences of prolonged endotracheal intubation. It is considered the most important infectious challenge in the critical care setting. Preventable complications of hospital care are considered an important source of wasted health-care costs believed to consume up to 47% of annual expenditures in the United States. Whether VAP is preventable has become a highly contentious debate since public reporting commenced a decade ago. This selective review focuses on specific aspects of this debate, including the inherent vagaries in the diagnosis of VAP and the marked disparities between VAP rates based on clinical diagnosis versus surveillance data. Also discussed is how this debate has impacted public policy, leading to the new paradigm of ventilator-associated events. The limited ability of artificial airways to prevent microaspiration and biofilm build-up, as well as non-modifiable conditions increasing the risk of VAP, is described in detail. In addition, the origins of the mistaken but widely embraced notion that zero VAP is a realistic achievement are examined. Copyright © 2015 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  6. Bad news and good news: what the dentist needs to know about transmissible spongiform encephalopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, T S; Rushing, E J

    1998-05-01

    Since reports of the "mad cow disease" epidemic in Great Britain erupted in the international press, sensational and intimidating articles about the risk that bovine spongiform encephalopathy and related diseases may pose to humans have appeared. The bad news is that compelling scientific evidence suggests so-called prion disease can and has infected humans, although the overall risk appears to be low. Furthermore, at present, there is no reliable antemortem diagnosis, specific treatment, or vaccine to prevent the disease. The agent thought to be responsible for this unusual class of disease is a rogue protein (called a prion) that, unlike all other agents known to cause infectious disease, contains neither DNA nor RNA. According to a popular hypothesis, normal membrane-associated prion proteins undergo conformational changes that can cause disease. The "bad" prion forms cause holes or a spongy appearance in the brain in all disease variants, hence the generic designation of spongiform encephalopathy. The good news is that risk for exposure to prion disease is exceedingly remote in the dental practice and that current universal infection control procedures are probably sufficient.

  7. Cashflow news, the value premium and an asset pricing view on European stock market integration

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas Nitschka

    2007-01-01

    The decomposition of national CAPM market betas of European countries� value and growth portfolio returns into cashflow and discount rate news driven components reveals that i) high average returns on value portfolios are associated with disproportionately high sensitivity to national cashflow news which corroborates recent evidence for the U.S. and ii) two-beta variants of national CAPMs capture the cross-sectional dispersion in European stock returns. The latter finding is suggestive of r...

  8. Difference-in-Differences Analysis of the Association Between State Same-Sex Marriage Policies and Adolescent Suicide Attempts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raifman, Julia; Moscoe, Ellen; Austin, S Bryn; McConnell, Margaret

    2017-04-01

    Suicide is the second leading cause of death among adolescents between the ages of 15 and 24 years. Adolescents who are sexual minorities experience elevated rates of suicide attempts. To evaluate the association between state same-sex marriage policies and adolescent suicide attempts. This study used state-level Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (YRBSS) data from January 1, 1999, to December 31, 2015, which are weighted to be representative of each state that has participation in the survey greater than 60%. A difference-in-differences analysis compared changes in suicide attempts among all public high school students before and after implementation of state policies in 32 states permitting same-sex marriage with year-to-year changes in suicide attempts among high school students in 15 states without policies permitting same-sex marriage. Linear regression was used to control for state, age, sex, race/ethnicity, and year, with Taylor series linearized standard errors clustered by state and classroom. In a secondary analysis among students who are sexual minorities, we included an interaction between sexual minority identity and living in a state that had implemented same-sex marriage policies. Implementation of state policies permitting same-sex marriage during the full period of YRBSS data collection. Self-report of 1 or more suicide attempts within the past 12 months. Among the 762 678 students (mean [SD] age, 16.0 [1.2] years; 366 063 males and 396 615 females) who participated in the YRBSS between 1999 and 2015, a weighted 8.6% of all high school students and 28.5% of students who identified as sexual minorities reported suicide attempts before implementation of same-sex marriage policies. Same-sex marriage policies were associated with a 0.6-percentage point (95% CI, -1.2 to -0.01 percentage points) reduction in suicide attempts, representing a 7% relative reduction in the proportion of high school students attempting suicide owing to same

  9. Breaking bad news in cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apostolos Konstantis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In a regional hospital, many patients are newly diagnosed with cancer. Breaking the bad news in these patients and their relatives is a tough task. Many doctors are not experienced in talking to patients about death or death-related diseases. In recent years, there have been great efforts to change the current situation. The aim of this study was to investigate the experience and education of medical personnel in breaking bad news in a secondary hospital. Materials and Methods: 59 doctors from General Hospital of Komotini, Greece were included in the study. All the doctors were in clinical specialties that treated cancer patients. A brief questionnaire was developed based on current guidelines such as Baile/SPIKES framework and the ABCDE mnemonic. Results: Residents are involved in delivering bad news less frequently than specialists. Only 21 doctors (35.59% had specific training on breaking bad news. 20 doctors (33.90% were aware of the available techniques and protocols on breaking bad news. 47 doctors (79.66% had a consistent plan for breaking bad news. 57 (96.61% delivered bad news in a quiet place, 53 (89.83% ensured no interruptions and enough time, 53 (89.83% used simple words and 54 (91.53% checked for understanding and did not rush through the news. 46 doctors (77.97% allowed relatives to determine patient′s knowledge about the disease. Conclusions: There were low rates of specific training in breaking bad news. However, the selected location, the physician′s speech and their plan were according to current guidelines.

  10. Infant mortality in South Africa--distribution, associations and policy implications, 2007: an ecological spatial analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartorius, Benn K D; Sartorius, Kurt; Chirwa, Tobias F; Fonn, Sharon

    2011-11-18

    Many sub-Saharan countries are confronted with persistently high levels of infant mortality because of the impact of a range of biological and social determinants. In particular, infant mortality has increased in sub-Saharan Africa in recent decades due to the HIV/AIDS epidemic. The geographic distribution of health problems and their relationship to potential risk factors can be invaluable for cost effective intervention planning. The objective of this paper is to determine and map the spatial nature of infant mortality in South Africa at a sub district level in order to inform policy intervention. In particular, the paper identifies and maps high risk clusters of infant mortality, as well as examines the impact of a range of determinants on infant mortality. A Bayesian approach is used to quantify the spatial risk of infant mortality, as well as significant associations (given spatial correlation between neighbouring areas) between infant mortality and a range of determinants. The most attributable determinants in each sub-district are calculated based on a combination of prevalence and model risk factor coefficient estimates. This integrated small area approach can be adapted and applied in other high burden settings to assist intervention planning and targeting. Infant mortality remains high in South Africa with seemingly little reduction since previous estimates in the early 2000's. Results showed marked geographical differences in infant mortality risk between provinces as well as within provinces as well as significantly higher risk in specific sub-districts and provinces. A number of determinants were found to have a significant adverse influence on infant mortality at the sub-district level. Following multivariable adjustment increasing maternal mortality, antenatal HIV prevalence, previous sibling mortality and male infant gender remained significantly associated with increased infant mortality risk. Of these antenatal HIV sero-prevalence, previous

  11. The news machine hacking, the untold story

    CERN Document Server

    Hanning, James

    2014-01-01

    There is one mystery figure at the heart of ?Hackergate' ? Glenn Mulcaire, the News of the World's top private investigator. The former AFC Wimbledon footballer has never spoken publicly or in court about his work investigating and backing up front-page news stories (such as the News of the World's award-winning David Beckham scoop). Mulcaire's arrest in 2006 for intercepting royal-household phone messages barely registered at the time. Yet his work has continued to generate headlines and embarrassment for the establishment ? with a Prime Minister on the back foot after his former aide Andy

  12. News search, blogs and feeds a toolkit

    CERN Document Server

    Vage, Lars

    2010-01-01

    This book is about news search and monitoring. Aimed at professionals with a strategic need of monitoring the surrounding world, users with a need to find the best news sources, monitoring services and news search strategies and techniques will benefit from reading this book. The main purpose is to present a practical handbook with an analysis of readily available tools, blending with passages of a theoretical nature. It is also useful for students at LIS programmes and related information programmes and for librarians and information professionals. The authors aim to aid the reader in reachin

  13. Engaging and Disengaging with Political News

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørmen, Jacob; Linaa Jensen, Jakob

    with political news if often portrayed as both a requirement for a well-functioning democracy (Walsh, 2004) and as a source of increased civic participation (Norris, 2012). Furthermore, the consumption and discussion of political news can be seen as an essential part of the ongoing opinion formation (Gamson...... level, we further investigate the differences between users that only consume political news and users that also talk about politics with others. And on the tertiary level, we identify the most widespread communicative practices (e.g. sharing content on social network sites, writing comments on blogs...

  14. Communicative competence in the delivery of bad news.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillotti, Cathy; Thompson, Teresa; McNeilis, Kelly

    2002-04-01

    Grounded in the Cegala and Waldron (Communication Studies 43 (1992) 105) model of communicative competence, the present study applied the McNeilis (Health Communication 13 (2001) 5) provider-patient coding scheme to video tapes of 3rd year medical students delivering bad news to a standardized patient. The goal of the study was to understand the specific communicative moves that are associated with perceptions of competence during bad news delivery. The coding scheme assesses Content, Acknowledgment Tokens, Interruptions, Alignment, and Function of the message. Naïve observers also evaluated the tapes on several items, assessing empathy and communicative effectiveness. Nonmedical talk was the most common type of content, followed by discussion of the current health problem. Neither acknowledgment tokens nor interruptions were frequent. The most common function of a message was a closed question, followed by explanations, assertions, and open questions. Summing across the functions indicated that information giving was the nost common behavior. The perceivers' data showed fairly neutral assessments of the medical students--they were generally not evaluated very positively, although they were not disliked. Regression analyses indicated numerous specific communicative behaviors that were associated with judgments of competence. Statements falling into the Nonspecific Content category were associated with more positive perceptions, while relational statements, moderately closed questions, solicited answers, expansions, restatements, assertions, explanations, open questions, bracketing, and small talk as well as information verifying, seeking, and giving (summed functions) led to more negative perceptions. The results indicate that the delivery of bad news requires communicative moves that differ from other kinds of medical communication. Depending on the results of future analyses of this topic health are providers may be well advised to focus little of their

  15. The association between organic school food policy and school food environment: results from an observational study in Danish schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chen; Mikkelsen, Bent E

    2014-03-01

    School food in many countries has become the object of change and innovation processes, not only in relation to policies for healthier eating but also in relation to policies for more sustainable food consumption and procurement. The purpose of this study was to examine the possible influence that organic food sourcing policies in Danish school meal systems may have on the development of healthier school food environments. The study was a cross-sectional analysis undertaken among 179 school food coordinators (SFCs) through a web-based questionnaire (WBQ) in a sample of Danish public primary schools. The 'organic' schools were compared to 'non-organic' schools. The questionnaire explored the attitudes, intentions/policies and actions in relation to organic and healthy foods served in the schools. Data indicates that 20 'organic' schools were associated with the indicators of healthier school environments, including adopting a Food and Nutrition Policy (FNP) in the school (p = .032), recommending children to eat healthily (p = .004). The study suggests that organic food policies in schools may have potential to support a healthier school food environment.

  16. School lunch and snacking patterns among high school students: associations with school food environment and policies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne; French, Simone A; Hannan, Peter J; Story, Mary; Fulkerson, Jayne A

    2005-01-01

    .... Students at schools with open campus policies during lunchtime were significantly more likely to eat lunch at a fast food restaurant than students at schools with closed campus policies (0.7 days/week vs. 0.2 days/week, p < .001...

  17. An Investigation of the National School Board Association Key Work Standards for Public Policy Leadership and School Board Chair Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quarles, Roger C.

    2011-01-01

    This multiple case qualitative study addressed the National School Board Association's (NSBA) Key Work standards for public policy leadership by local school boards, and how three elite school board chairs understood and implemented those standards. Elite board chair status was defined by experience, training, and peer recognition. The study…

  18. Predicting the volume of comments on online news stories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsagkias, M.; Weerkamp, W.; de Rijke, M.; Cheung, D.; Song, I.-Y.; Chu, W.; Hu, X.; Lin, J.; Li, J.; Peng, Z.

    2009-01-01

    On-line news agents provide commenting facilities for readers to express their views with regard to news stories. The number of user supplied comments on a news article may be indicative of its importance or impact. We report on exploratory work that predicts the comment volume of news articles

  19. The Role of Audiovisual Mass Media News in Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrani, Taher; Sim, Tam Shu

    2011-01-01

    The present paper focuses on the role of audio/visual mass media news in language learning. In this regard, the two important issues regarding the selection and preparation of TV news for language learning are the content of the news and the linguistic difficulty. Content is described as whether the news is specialized or universal. Universal…

  20. 16 CFR 1012.6 - The news media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false The news media. 1012.6 Section 1012.6... PERSONNEL AND OUTSIDE PARTIES § 1012.6 The news media. The Agency recognizes that the news media occupy a... inherently public nature of the news media allows their activities to be exempt from the requirements of this...

  1. Construction of the image of politics in Spanish TV news programmes. The endo- and exo- balances of the quality of political information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Palencia-Lefler

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In our society the image that citizens have of politics is strongly conditioned by the way politics are represented in the media and, in particular, in TV news programmes. This article, a product of an R&D project funded by the Spanish Ministry of Education, Social Policy and Sport, analyses the presence and image of political news in eight Spanish TV channels. This article also proposes a new method to measure the quality of political information in Spanish TV news programmes through the definition of the endo- and exo- balances of the political content of news programmes. The main conclusions of this study are that the news programmes of Televisión Española and Cuatro offer a more balanced image of politics, while the news programmes from Sexta and Canal 9 offer more unbalanced image. The percentage of news devoted to politics does not depend on the channels’ ownership (public or private or broadcast coverage (national or regional. On the other hand, there is a relation between the percentages of political issues and policy issues news presented on television.

  2. Oughts and ideals: Framing people with migration background in TV news

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Sommer

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Based on the framing concept the paper explores the context and structure of TV news coverage about minority groups. A sample of 285 TV news reports on people with migration background in Germany is analyzed for its implicit plot structures and particular political goal expressions. Cluster analysis reveals four news frames: Crime, Migration Policy, Cultural Proximity, and Terrorism Risk, indicating that the public image of people with migration background in Germany remains negative and implicitly biased. This becomes evident by the large amount of risk communication about potential terrorist attacks and the prevailing expression of absolute goals compared to gradual ones. Theoretically and methodically, integrating the framing concept and specific types of goals promises deeper insight into the current discourse on integration issues.

  3. Terra News: sensationalism and fait-divers on the Internet

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos Golembiewski; Diógenes Pandini

    2009-01-01

    This article presents an analysis of the news program Jornal do Terra (Terra News) shown on the Terra website. The study involved two aspects: forms of news presentations on TV, based on studies by Pedro Maciel, and criteria of news value, based on Mário Erbolatto’s view. In addition, we used Luis Arthur Ferraretto’s studies of the news formats used specifically on the radio. The objective of this work was to verify what kind of news is transmitted by the news p...

  4. Alternative Fuel News, Vol. 3 No. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-09-23

    This special issue of Alternative Fuel News highlights the Fifth National Clean Cities Conference held in Louisville, Kentucky. The momentum for the program is stronger than ever and the coalitions are working to propel the alternative fuel industry forward.

  5. Alternative Fuel News, Volume 4, Number 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ficker, C.

    2000-11-14

    This issue of Alternative Fuel News focuses on transit buses and refuse haulers. Many transit agencies and waste management companies are investigating alternatives to traditional diesel buses and refuse haulers.

  6. News Media Framing of Negative Campaigning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Rasmus Tue

    2014-01-01

    News media coverage of election campaigns is often characterized by use of the strategic game frame and a focus on politicians’ use of negative campaigning. However, the exact relationship between these two characteristics of news coverage is largely unexplored. This article theorizes that consumer...... demand and norms of journalistic independence might induce the news media outlets to cover negative campaigning with a strategic game frame. A comprehensive content analysis based on several newspaper types, several election campaigns, and several different measurements of media framing confirms...... that news coverage of negative campaigning does apply the strategic game frame to a significantly larger degree than articles covering positive campaigning. This finding has significant implications for campaigning politicians and for scholars studying campaign and media effects....

  7. Communicating Uncertain News in Cancer Consultations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alby, Francesca; Zucchermaglio, Cristina; Fatigante, Marilena

    2017-12-01

    In cancer communication, most of the literature is in the realm of delivering bad news while much less attention has been given to the communication of uncertain news around the diagnosis and the possible outcomes of the illness. Drawing on video-recorded cancer consultations collected in two Italian hospitals, this article analyzes three communication practices used by oncologists to interactionally manage the uncertainty during the visit: alternating between uncertain bad news and certain good news, anticipating scenarios, and guessing test results. Both diagnostic and personal uncertainties are not hidden to the patient, yet they are reduced through these practices. Such communication practices are present in 32 % of the visits in the data set, indicating that the interactional management of uncertainty is a relevant phenomenon in oncological encounters. Further studies are needed to improve both its understanding and its teaching.

  8. Anatomy of news consumption on Facebook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Ana Lucía; Zollo, Fabiana; Del Vicario, Michela; Bessi, Alessandro; Scala, Antonio; Caldarelli, Guido; Stanley, H Eugene; Quattrociocchi, Walter

    2017-03-21

    The advent of social media and microblogging platforms has radically changed the way we consume information and form opinions. In this paper, we explore the anatomy of the information space on Facebook by characterizing on a global scale the news consumption patterns of 376 million users over a time span of 6 y (January 2010 to December 2015). We find that users tend to focus on a limited set of pages, producing a sharp community structure among news outlets. We also find that the preferences of users and news providers differ. By tracking how Facebook pages "like" each other and examining their geolocation, we find that news providers are more geographically confined than users. We devise a simple model of selective exposure that reproduces the observed connectivity patterns.

  9. The Electronic Archiving of Arab News Agencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haifa Ayub Gigawy

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available This Research aims to present the electronic archives of Arab news agency websites and their methods of searching for and retrieving information. Also, its aim is to examine all their methods in order to find out which are the best and most practically useful ones. The research refers to the news agencies and the Internet, through the methods that users encounter in these inquires and links which present information. It concentrates on practical ways of searching for news items in both texts and pictures. The research contains tables showing the results. It presents a brief summery for each of Arab news agencies.The research comes to the conclusion that there are many things which need to be considered, and also some suggestions as to how the search for and retrieval of information might be improved

  10. Broadcast News: The Absence of Native Storytellers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mark Trahant

    2005-01-01

      Trahant explores the consequences of Native Indians not being among those journalists who report for TV or radio stations and says improvement won't happen "until TV news recognizes the depth of the problem...

  11. Uncovering the skewness news impact curve

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Anatolyev, Stanislav; Petukhov, A.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 4 (2016), s. 746-771 ISSN 1479-8409 Institutional support: PRVOUK-P23 Keywords : conditional skewness * news impact curve * stock returns Subject RIV: AH - Economics Impact factor: 1.800, year: 2016

  12. Uncovering the skewness news impact curve

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Anatolyev, Stanislav; Petukhov, A.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 4 (2016), s. 746-771 ISSN 1479-8409 Institutional support: RVO:67985998 Keywords : conditional skewness * news impact curve * stock returns Subject RIV: AH - Economics Impact factor: 1.800, year: 2016

  13. Incorporating popularity in a personalized news recommender system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirmal Jonnalagedda

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Online news reading has become a widely popular way to read news articles from news sources around the globe. With the enormous amount of news articles available, users are easily overwhelmed by information of little interest to them. News recommender systems help users manage this flood by recommending articles based on user interests rather than presenting articles in order of their occurrence. We present our research on developing personalized news recommendation system with the help of a popular micro-blogging service, “Twitter.” News articles are ranked based on the popularity of the article identified from Twitter’s public timeline. In addition, users construct profiles based on their interests and news articles are also ranked based on their match to the user profile. By integrating these two approaches, we present a hybrid news recommendation model that recommends interesting news articles to the user based on their popularity as well as their relevance to the user profile.

  14. The Association Between Tobacco Control Policy and Educational Inequalities in Smoking Cessation in the Netherlands from 1988 Through 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosdriesz, Jizzo R; Nagelhout, Gera E; Stronks, Karien; Willemsen, Marc C; Kunst, Anton E

    2015-11-01

    Tobacco control policies seemed to have failed to reduce socioeconomic inequalities in smoking in the past. It has been argued that a comprehensive mix of policies is needed. Our aim was to assess whether tobacco control policy development in the Netherlands between 1988 and 2011 was associated with educational inequalities in smoking cessation and cigarette consumption. Data were derived from the cross-sectional Dutch Continuous Survey of Smoking Habits, with a study sample of 259,140 respondents from 1988 through 2011. Outcomes were the quit ratio and mean number of cigarettes smoked per day. The determinant was the Tobacco Control Scale (TCS). We used multilevel logistic regression modeling, with years, quarters, and individuals as levels, and controlled for sex, age, and time. A significant association between the TCS and smoking cessation was found in 2001-2011, but not in 1988-2000. Associations for low- and high-education groups were similar (OR = 1.23; 95% CI = 1.12-1.34 and OR = 1.17; 95% CI = 1.03-1.32 respectively). The TCS was not significantly associated with the number of cigarettes smoked per day for either the low- or high-education groups (B = -0.09; 95% CI = -0.46-0.27 and B = -0.59; 95% CI = -1.24-0.06 respectively). Strong tobacco control policies introduced in the Netherlands after 2000 were positively associated with national trends in smoking cessation, whereas weaker policies introduced gradually before 2000 were not. However, these measures do not seem to have either widened or narrowed educational inequalities in smoking cessation rates-both groups benefitted about equally. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. The Interaction of Production and Consumption in the News Media Social Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Gary; Kerrigan, Finola; Mehmood, Rashid; Rahman, Mustafizur

    Newspapers are operating in increasingly competitive and fragmented markets for audiences and advertising revenues, government media policy and changing audience requirements for news and the ways in which it is presented and delivered. A growing army of bloggers and amateur citizen journalists now delivers - but rarely edits - content for all media platforms, while new media technologies, combined with the changing structure of global news industries, are radically changing the ways in which newspapers and media business functions and struggles for profitability. Our research sought to answer the question of how the internet is impacting on producer/consumer value activities in the news media supply chain. To answer this question initial descriptive statistical analysis was performed on 51 newspapers. This was followed by a focus group undertaken with London-based news media organizations and bloggers. The findings showed that in spite of initial fear and rejection, the internet is now firmly embedded in news media supply chain operations. Firms are now using the internet as an operant resource and working proactively with consumers to develop various forms of relationship value. We highlight the role of consumers in the creation of news (editorial) content and consumer-driven moves toward a merged media platform of distribution (including television, online, mobile and printed forms). Regional news media organizations will probably continue to survive if they are able to supply a highly specialized and 'hyper local' community service. This will be in the form of 'hybrid' content: analysis, interpretation and investigative reporting in a print product that appears less than daily combined with constant updating and reader interaction on the web.

  16. CERN Video News, 2nd edition

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    This week you will be able to watch on the web the second edition of CERN's video news (see Bulletin n°45/2002, p.3). On this news reel: the ATRAP experiment's latest achievements, superconducting cable production for CMS, the CAST experiment and the European digital conferencing project InDiCo. Go to : www.cern.ch/video, or Bulletin web page.

  17. Top medical news stories 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. Here is our list of the top seven medical news stories for 2015 with special emphasis on the Southwest. 7. Wearable health devices: A wave of wearable computing devices such as Fitbit and UP wristbands have people keeping track of how much they sit, stand, walk, climb stairs and calories they consume (1. These fitness-tracking devices herald a series of devices that will detect and monitor serious diseases. However, these so-called medical-grade wearables require approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, a regulatory hurdle avoided by the fitness-tracking devices which will likely slow their introduction. 6. Caitlyn Jenner: Caitlyn Jenner became the most famous transgender woman in the world following an interview published in Vanity Fair (2. The Vanity Fair website saw 11.6 million visits curious about the former Olympic athlete. Though Jenner publicly shared her gender identity, many transgender Americans do not-12% of gender non-conforming adults said they ...

  18. A test of rivaling approaches to explain news effects: A multi-wave panel study of agenda setting, social and economic conditions, the tone of the news, and horse race news

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleinnijenhuis, J.; van Hoof, A.M.J.; Oegema, D.; de Ridder, J.A.

    2007-01-01

    Different "paradigmatic" approaches to explain news effects on voting may supplement each other, because their starting points are based on different news types in political campaign news: news on issue positions of parties, news on real-world developments, news on support or criticism for parties,

  19. Focal Points on Constructing News Stories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Yuryevna Ilyinova

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The issues stated in the article line with the current interest to pragmatic value of news releases in modern media. The news is thought to be a verbalized focal reflection of some event that was chosen by media professionals for setting the current information agenda. Having generated the opinions on the newsworthiness the authors present a set of values that may be used for measurement of relevance and clarity of an event reflection in the news content with frequency, clarity, predictability, unexpectedness, amplitude, cultural proximity, elite nations, elite people, personification, negativity among them. The novelty of the research is that the newsworthiness is checked with the focus to lexical (thematic representation of the news in a diachronic approach: the empirical base of the research was taken from the archives of UK national and local media sources (18–20th cent. and implied comparison of lexical means that reflected an event itself and some values of human interest potential in the news stories written in defined periods. The article states the trend for dynamics in the way the event is reflected in the news stories – the information core of the story is merged with detailed reporting parts, and their content is conditioned by social and moral values.

  20. New York Times Current News Physics Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cise, John

    2010-03-01

    Since 2007 I have been using NYTimes current News articles rich in graphics and physics variables for developing edited one page web (http://CisePhysics.homestead.com/files/NYT.htm) physics questions based on current events in the news. The NYTimes home page listed above contains currently ten pages with about 40 one page current edited News related physics articles per page containing: rich graphics, graphic editions by the author, edited articles, introduction to a question, questions, and answers. I use these web pages to introduce new physics concepts to students with current applications of concepts in the news. I also use these one page physics applications as pop quizzes and extra credit for students. As news happens(e.g. the 2010 Vancouver Olympics) I find the physics applications in the NYTimes articles and generate applications and questions. These new one page applications with questions are added to the home page: http://CisePhysics.homestead.com/files/NYT.htm The newest pages start with page 10 and work back in time to 9, 8, etc. The ten web pages with about 40 news articles per page are arranged in the traditional manner: vectors, kinematics, projectiles, Newton, Work & Energy, properties of matter, fluids, temperature, heat, waves, and sound. This site is listed as a resource in AAPT's Compadre site.

  1. Children's direct fright and worry reactions to violence in fiction and news television programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Molen, Juliette H Walma; Bushman, Brad J

    2008-09-01

    To examine whether violence in fictional and news television content frightens and worries children. Mixed factorial. Type of reaction (fright, worry) and television programming (violent news, violent fiction) were within-subjects factors, whereas age, sex, and television viewing frequency were between-subjects factors. Participants included 572 children (47% boys), aged 8 to 12 years, from 9 urban and rural primary schools in the Netherlands. The main exposure was to descriptions of 8 threats frequently depicted in fictional and news programs (eg, murder, war, house fires). Children reported whether they were frightened or worried by these threats. Violent threats increased both fright and worry. These 2 reactions could be distinguished from one another in a factor analysis. When violent content was described as news, it produced more fear reactions than when it was described as fiction. Fright and worry were greater in girls than in boys, in younger children than in older children, and in light television viewers than in heavy television viewers. Pediatricians should inform parents, educators, policy makers, and broadcasters about the potentially harmful effect of violent programming on children's emotions, especially in the case of news programming.

  2. Papua in Media: A Discourse Critical Analysis of Economic News in Three National Indonesian Newspapers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mungky Diana Sari

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available For so many years, peace in Papua has become a high critical thing in Indonesian politics. In order to find the solution, the paradigm has been shifted from security to welfare or economic approach. Article explored the impact of religion affiliation toward news making and news frame, especially in economic news published by mass media. This research was developed to explore the framing formed by three media outlets which each of them affiliated with certain religion. This research focused on the analysis of economic articles published by three media outlets; Sinar Harapan, Republika, and Kompas daily. The method of framing analysis was based on Robert N. Entman theory, while the critical discourse analysis method was based on Norman Fairclough theory. Political economics theories such as Vincent Mosco, Robert E. Babe, and D.W. Smythe to analyze the influence of religion affiliation in news production were also used. Meanwhile, some political communication theories such as Brian McNair, Dann Nimmo, Noam Chomsky and Denis McQuail were also used to know how media stands in Papua conflict. From the research, it is discovered that the religion affiliation has a big impact on news media and its content, and also the frame that is built. Not only political-economic matters, but "the-sense-of-belonging" of the owner through particular religion gives impact to media policy. The content and frame are finally influencing political communication in Indonesia in Papua conflict particularly. 

  3. Genomics for public health improvement: relevant international ethical and policy issues around genome-wide association studies and biobanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, T

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies and biobanks are at the forefront of genomics research and possess unprecedented potential to improve public health. However, for public health genomics to ultimately fulfill its potential, technological and scientific advances alone are insufficient. Scientists, ethicists, policy makers, and regulators must work closely together with research participants and communities in order to craft an equitable and just ethical framework, and a sustainable environment for effective policies. Such a framework should be a 'hybrid' form which balances equity and solidarity with entrepreneurship and scientific advances. A good balance between research and policy on one hand, and privacy, protection and trust on the other is the key for public health improvement based on advances in genomics science. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. The New News Media: Democratic implications of undergraduate education and news consumption over social and traditional media

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Communication students at Simon Fraser University were surveyed and interviewed to deduce perceptions and behaviour of news consumption over social and traditional media. Both social media and traditional media are used to consume news with traditional media acting as the primary news source and as more accessible and reliable than social media. News stories considered important or having various perspectives were verified the most, especially world news. Extent of accessibility of sources an...

  5. Convergence vs. diversity: rethinking the quality of TV news

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Becker

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Wider audience participation, the hybridization of genres and formats, and transmediality, are the main features of today´s communication processes. Convergence influences journalistic practice and imposes new ways of doing and thinking about television broadcasting. TV newscasts are still the highest-impact information products in the world. However, watching TV and accessing the internet are activities that are increasingly intertwined. The purpose of this study is to identify effects of the use of digital tools on the construction of the news and to verify whether they contribute to a higher quality audiovisual journalism and to a new way of writing the daily social experience. This study will present the results of a quantitative and qualitative analysis of the news of two vehicles of: the main private Brazilian communication group: Globo; the local television newscast RJTV; and the news portal G1. This paper featured in the Journalism Research and Education section, at the International Association of Media and Communication Research- IAMCR, Durban, South Africa, 2012.

  6. CONVERGENCE VS DIVERSITY: RETHINKING THE QUALITY OF TV NEWS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Becker

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Wider audience participation, the hybridization of genres and formats, and transmediality, are the main features of today´s communication processes. Convergence influences journalistic practice and imposes new ways of doing and thinking about television broadcasting. TV newscasts are still the highest-impact information products in the world. However, watching TV and accessing the internet are activities that are increasingly intertwined. The purpose of this study is to identify effects of the use of digital tools on the construction of the news and to verify whether they contribute to a higher quality audiovisual journalism and to a new way of writing the daily social experience. This study will present the results of a quantitative and qualitative analysis of the news of two vehicles of: the main private Brazilian communication group: Globo; the local television newscast RJTV; and the news portal G1. This paper featured in the Journalism Research and Education section, at the International Association of Media and Communication Research- IAMCR, Durban, South Africa, 2012.

  7. Survivors on Cancer: the portrayal of survivors in print news.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kromm, Elizabeth Edsall; Smith, Katherine Clegg; Singer, Rachel Friedman

    2007-12-01

    This study examines the types of news stories that include comments by everyday cancer survivors and the messages or information these individuals provide. Even though these non-celebrity survivors increasingly serve on the front lines of cancer prevention and advocacy efforts and often engage with media, the role they play in the media discourse on cancer has not been a focus of research. We conducted a thematic content analysis of print news articles of non-celebrity cancer survivors in 15 leading national daily newspapers for four consecutive months starting in June 2005 to identify the issues or events that included a survivor perspective and the messages or information conveyed by the everyday survivors. Journalists included survivor commentary primarily when covering cancer fundraising events and when focusing on individual survivorship stories. In overall news coverage involving survivors, breast and prostate cancers received the greatest attention, followed by blood and lung cancers. Survivors spoke mainly about the diagnosis experience and life post-cancer. Our analysis of survivors' comments revealed that discussions of the diagnosis experience often convey fear and a lack of confidence in cancer screening practices, while cancer is portrayed as a positive life event. While evidence of a positive and hopeful portrayal of survivorship is an encouraging finding for continued efforts to decrease stigma associated with a cancer diagnosis and for the public understanding of the disease, it is important to consider potential negative implications of an idealized and restricted media discourse on survivorship. The increasing size and capacity of the survivor community offers opportunities for the cancer advocacy community to consider how news media portrayal of cancer and survivorship may contribute in both positive and potentially detrimental ways to public understanding of this disease, its survivors and life after cancer.

  8. An analytical characterization of noisy fiscal policy

    OpenAIRE

    Fève, Patrick; Kass-Hanna, Tannous; Pietrunti, Mario

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides an analytical characterization of the effects of noisy news shocks on fiscal policy. We consider a small-scale Dynamic Stochastic General Equilibrium (DSGE) model with capital accumulation and endogenous labor supply and show that noise dampens the propagation of anticipated fiscal policy over the business cycle, thus reducing the fiscal multiplier.

  9. From the Director's Desk News

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Gloria Lihemo

    2015-12-01

    Dec 1, 2015 ... Call for: Abstracts/paper proposals on ICT policy and regulation research carried out in the Asia Pacific and Africa, or relevant to the Asia-Pacific and Africa. Deadline: January 15, 2016. Content: A two-and-a-half-day conference will accommodate approximately 30 paper presenters from Africa and the ...

  10. High quality topic extraction from business news explains abnormal financial market volatility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisano, Ryohei; Sornette, Didier; Mizuno, Takayuki; Ohnishi, Takaaki; Watanabe, Tsutomu

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the mutual relationships between information flows and social activity in society today is one of the cornerstones of the social sciences. In financial economics, the key issue in this regard is understanding and quantifying how news of all possible types (geopolitical, environmental, social, financial, economic, etc.) affects trading and the pricing of firms in organized stock markets. In this article, we seek to address this issue by performing an analysis of more than 24 million news records provided by Thompson Reuters and of their relationship with trading activity for 206 major stocks in the S&P US stock index. We show that the whole landscape of news that affects stock price movements can be automatically summarized via simple regularized regressions between trading activity and news information pieces decomposed, with the help of simple topic modeling techniques, into their "thematic" features. Using these methods, we are able to estimate and quantify the impacts of news on trading. We introduce network-based visualization techniques to represent the whole landscape of news information associated with a basket of stocks. The examination of the words that are representative of the topic distributions confirms that our method is able to extract the significant pieces of information influencing the stock market. Our results show that one of the most puzzling stylized facts in financial economies, namely that at certain times trading volumes appear to be "abnormally large," can be partially explained by the flow of news. In this sense, our results prove that there is no "excess trading," when restricting to times when news is genuinely novel and provides relevant financial information.

  11. [Influence of the news media].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camarena Luna, R

    1991-01-01

    Newspapers, in addition to news, also cover topics of permanent interest to their readers. One such topic is sexuality. The appearance of the incurable sexually transmitted disease AIDS obliges a reconsideration of the complex and contradictory concept of sexuality. Sexuality is not often spoken of openly; rather, it is secret, hidden, and referred to obliquely. Sexuality is the manifestation and satisfaction of the sexual impulses common to all individuals. Sexuality is determined by anatomic and physiologic aspects and also by the knowledge, experiences, values, and norms internalized by the individual living in a social group. Messages about sexual conduct are constantly being received. This social part of sexuality supported by customs and morals is the part that is directly influenced by communications media. An important objective of the media is to create awareness and mold opinions. Mexico's large national circulation newspapers present different points of view about sexuality. Newspapers that continually critique homosexual practices and those that demonstrate implicit approval of pornographic videos by advertising them both present attitudes without providing opportunities to reason, compare, or support opinions. Sexuality is usually referred to indirectly and superficially in the press. Sex education may be mentioned but not the erotic implications of sexuality, and acceptance or opposition to use of condoms may be discussed without mention of psychological barriers to their use. The national press is not prepared to propose new attitudes toward sexuality in the age of AIDS. Only 1 national newspaper in Mexico regularly provides information on AIDS including aspects related to sexual pleasure and responsibility and safer sex. The majority continue with their pre-AIDS coverage of sexuality, using it to arouse interest but providing little depth. Newspapers should provide more extensive coverage on sexuality and its modifications due to AIDS, a reality

  12. Association Between Flexible Duty Hour Policies and General Surgery Resident Examination Performance: A Flexibility in Duty Hour Requirements for Surgical Trainees (FIRST) Trial Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blay, Eddie; Hewitt, D Brock; Chung, Jeanette W; Biester, Thomas; Fiore, James F; Dahlke, Allison R; Quinn, Christopher M; Lewis, Frank R; Bilimoria, Karl Y

    2017-02-01

    Concerns persist about the effect of current duty hour reforms on resident educational outcomes. We investigated whether a flexible, less-restrictive duty hour policy (Flexible Policy) was associated with differential general surgery examination performance compared with current ACGME duty hour policy (Standard Policy). We obtained examination scores on the American Board of Surgery In-Training Examination, Qualifying Examination (written boards), and Certifying Examination (oral boards) for residents in 117 general surgery residency programs that participated in the Flexibility in Duty Hour Requirements for Surgical Trainees (FIRST) Trial. Using bivariate analyses and regression models, we compared resident examination performance across study arms (Flexible Policy vs Standard Policy) for 2015 and 2016, and 1 year of the Qualifying Examination and Certifying Examination. Adjusted analyses accounted for program-level factors, including the stratification variable for randomization. In 2016, FIRST trial participants were 4,363 general surgery residents. Mean American Board of Surgery In-Training Examination scores for residents were not significantly different between study groups (Flexible Policy vs Standard Policy) overall (Flexible Policy: mean [SD] 502.6 [100.9] vs Standard Policy: 502.7 [98.6]; p = 0.98) or for any individual postgraduate year level. There was no difference in pass rates between study arms for either the Qualifying Examination (Flexible Policy: 90.4% vs Standard Policy: 90.5%; p = 0.99) or Certifying Examination (Flexible Policy: 86.3% vs Standard Policy: 88.6%; p = 0.24). Results from adjusted analyses were consistent with these findings. Flexible, less-restrictive duty hour policies were not associated with differences in general surgery resident performance on examinations during the FIRST Trial. However, more years under flexible duty hour policies might be needed to observe an effect. Copyright © 2016 American College of Surgeons

  13. Association of US State Implementation of Newborn Screening Policies for Critical Congenital Heart Disease With Early Infant Cardiac Deaths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abouk, Rahi; Grosse, Scott D; Ailes, Elizabeth C; Oster, Matthew E

    2017-12-05

    In 2011, critical congenital heart disease was added to the US Recommended Uniform Screening Panel for newborns, but whether state implementation of screening policies has been associated with infant death rates is unknown. To assess whether there was an association between implementation of state newborn screening policies for critical congenital heart disease and infant death rates. Observational study with group-level analyses. A difference-in-differences analysis was conducted using the National Center for Health Statistics' period linked birth/infant death data set files for 2007-2013 for 26 546 503 US births through June 30, 2013, aggregated by month and state of birth. State policies were classified as mandatory or nonmandatory (including voluntary policies and mandates that were not yet implemented). As of June 1, 2013, 8 states had implemented mandatory screening policies, 5 states had voluntary screening policies, and 9 states had adopted but not yet implemented mandates. Numbers of early infant deaths (between 24 hours and 6 months of age) coded for critical congenital heart disease or other/unspecified congenital cardiac causes for each state-month birth cohort. Between 2007 and 2013, there were 2734 deaths due to critical congenital heart disease and 3967 deaths due to other/unspecified causes. Critical congenital heart disease death rates in states with mandatory screening policies were 8.0 (95% CI, 5.4-10.6) per 100 000 births (n = 37) in 2007 and 6.4 (95% CI, 2.9-9.9) per 100 000 births (n = 13) in 2013 (for births by the end of July); for other/unspecified cardiac causes, death rates were 11.7 (95% CI, 8.6-14.8) per 100 000 births in 2007 (n = 54) and 10.3 (95% CI, 5.9-14.8) per 100 000 births (n = 21) in 2013. Early infant deaths from critical congenital heart disease through December 31, 2013, decreased by 33.4% (95% CI, 10.6%-50.3%), with an absolute decline of 3.9 (95% CI, 3.6-4.1) deaths per 100 000 births after

  14. When good news is bad news: explicating the moderated mediation dynamic behind the reversed mobilization effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuck, A.R.T.; de Vreese, C.H.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the mobilizing potential of positive news framing on opponents of a referendum proposal. On the basis of an experiment (N = 470), using bootstrapping as a method to assess conditional indirect effects, mediation analysis showed that positive news framing—endorsing a

  15. The Role of News Teasers in Processing TV News and Commercials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Glen T.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Explores the role of news teasers on memory and attention for commercials in evening newscasts. Finds that they enhance moderately the primacy-recency pattern found in visual and verbal memory scores. Finds that news teasers appear to have an effect on processing strategies employed by viewers. (SR)

  16. Interest in news and politics - or situational determinants? Why people watch the news

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wonneberger, A.; Schoenbach, K.; van Meurs, L.

    2011-01-01

    This study compared and integrated the influence of motivational and situational determinants on news viewing behavior. Individual people-meter data allowed the unobtrusive study of news viewing situations. The finding is that the viewing context is much more important than motivations. However,

  17. “It’s Only a Pastime, Really”: Young People’s Experiences of Social Media as a Source of News about Public Affairs

    OpenAIRE

    Malin Sveningsson

    2015-01-01

    Western democracies have seen a decreased participation in activities traditionally associated with political participation. One aspect of participating politically is to keep up-to-date with what happens in society, for example, by following the news. Here, youth have been found to be less active than older generations. The decline in young people’s consumption of news media does not necessarily mean that they are disinterested in news or politics; they may get their information from other s...

  18. Teachable Moments in the News - an Online Resource Solar System Science News

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhala, H. A. T.; Miller, E. A.; Goldstein, J. J.

    2004-12-01

    Teachable Moments in the News (www.challenger.org/tmn/) is an online resource developed at Challenger Center for Space Science Education that takes recent news stories related to Solar System science and places them in a context relevant to the grades K-12 science curriculum. Using stories such as the launch of the MESSENGER spacecraft to Mercury, Teachable Moments in the News is meant to provide a seamless pathway from the news desk to the classroom. For each news item, an overview of the story is provided, along with high-quality inquiry-based, standards-driven lessons and links to more in-depth articles. Teachable Moments in the News is also a great tool for scientists who wish to stay informed of the recent events in Solar System exploration. The archived back issues of the quarterly published Web digest allow for a quick refresher on the most important news stories over the past several months. The very accessible nature of the stories makes the resource valuable for college students, and even the general public, as a means to keep up-to-date about current developments in planetary astronomy. Furthermore, college and university teachers can easily adapt many of the lessons to fit into the curriculum of an undergraduate astronomy course. During the poster session, we welcome suggestions from the scientific community on ways to enhance the usefulness of Teachable Moments in the News. For example, researchers could form partnerships with Teachable Moments in the News to provide news stories on their current research to be featured on the Web site. We invite researchers interested in this education and public outreach tool to visit the poster and provide suggestions on how to make the resource work as effectively as possible.

  19. Examining Overreaction in Indian Stock Market for Quarterly News

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sitangshu Khatua

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Market Overreaction is a very familiar and age-old craze amongst traders. Pigou (1929 defined it as a ‘conducting rod along which an error of optimism or pessimism, once generated, propagates itself about the business world.’ The question of whether or not Indian stock prices market is overreacted during any stock-specific news is best answered by a comprehensive and concurrent analysis of the various tests and data available while using the event study. This study wants to address the impact of size, volatility and asymmetry in the terms of investors’ overreaction to the firm-specific news not only individually but also jointly. The outcome of this study helps to solve the problem concerning the extent to which quarterly announcements have informational content, and whether the investors are affected by the signals. The present study substantiates the policy recommendation for the market players as well as for the analysts in estimating earning announcement events under different market condition and different market capitalization value of the firm.

  20. Measuring the Interestingness of News Articles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pon, R K; Cardenas, A F; Buttler, D J

    2007-09-24

    An explosive growth of online news has taken place. Users are inundated with thousands of news articles, only some of which are interesting. A system to filter out uninteresting articles would aid users that need to read and analyze many articles daily, such as financial analysts and government officials. The most obvious approach for reducing the amount of information overload is to learn keywords of interest for a user (Carreira et al., 2004). Although filtering articles based on keywords removes many irrelevant articles, there are still many uninteresting articles that are highly relevant to keyword searches. A relevant article may not be interesting for various reasons, such as the article's age or if it discusses an event that the user has already read about in other articles. Although it has been shown that collaborative filtering can aid in personalized recommendation systems (Wang et al., 2006), a large number of users is needed. In a limited user environment, such as a small group of analysts monitoring news events, collaborative filtering would be ineffective. The definition of what makes an article interesting--or its 'interestingness'--varies from user to user and is continually evolving, calling for adaptable user personalization. Furthermore, due to the nature of news, most articles are uninteresting since many are similar or report events outside the scope of an individual's concerns. There has been much work in news recommendation systems, but none have yet addressed the question of what makes an article interesting.

  1. Reduction of central venous catheter associated blood stream infections following implementation of a resident oversight and credentialing policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    West Cheri E

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study assesses the impact that a resident oversight and credentialing policy for central venous catheter (CVC placement had on institution-wide central line associated bloodstream infections (CLABSI. We therefore investigated the rate of CLABSI per 1,000 line days during the 12 months before and after implementation of the policy. Methods This is a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data at an academic medical center with four adult ICUs and a pediatric ICU. All patients undergoing non-tunneled CVC placement were included in the study. Data was collected on CLABSI, line days, and serious adverse events in the year prior to and following policy implementation on 9/01/08. Results A total of 813 supervised central lines were self-reported by residents in four departments. Statistical analysis was performed using paired Wilcoxon signed rank tests. There were reductions in median CLABSI rate (3.52 vs. 2.26; p = 0.015, number of CLBSI per month (16.0 to 10.0; p = 0.012, and line days (4495 vs. 4193; p = 0.019. No serious adverse events reported to the Pennsylvania Patient Safety Authority. Conclusions Implementation of a new CVC resident oversight and credentialing policy has been significantly associated with an institution-wide reduction in the rate of CLABSI per 1,000 central line days and total central line days. No serious adverse events were reported. Similar resident oversight policies may benefit other teaching institutions, and support concurrent organizational efforts to reduce hospital acquired infections.

  2. Fake News Detection on Social Media: A Data Mining Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Shu, Kai; Sliva, Amy; Wang, Suhang; Tang, Jiliang; Liu, Huan

    2017-01-01

    Social media for news consumption is a double-edged sword. On the one hand, its low cost, easy access, and rapid dissemination of information lead people to seek out and consume news from social media. On the other hand, it enables the wide spread of "fake news", i.e., low quality news with intentionally false information. The extensive spread of fake news has the potential for extremely negative impacts on individuals and society. Therefore, fake news detection on social media has recently b...

  3. Agenda Setting Theory and International News: A Comparative Analysis of News Articles Coverage on Iraq War in Malaysian English Newspapers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kassed Hanaa Kadum

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of the paper is to discuss the application of Agenda Setting Theory in the publication of news about Iraq war in - the New Straits Times press (NSTP and the Star. This study examines a longitudinal content analysis of 535 news through three periods (before, during and after the occupation of Iraq. The result of this study shows that NSTP gave more emphasis to the issue of the policy of unipolar for the United States while the Star gave more emphasis to the issue of Iraqi suffering. Thus, this study can shed some light on how Eastern country views Iraq and this perhaps could help Iraq reform its image by expanding the scope of diplomatic, business and cultural actions. This study provides support to the theoretical proposition that the media are not successful in telling the audience what to think, but it is stunningly successful in telling the audience what to think about (first level of Agenda Setting. This study also provides support to the theoretical proposition that differences in media organizations have profound impact on how the important issues are framed.

  4. Is Participation in Preschool Education Associated with Higher Student Achievement? Policy Brief No. 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval-Hernandez, Andres; Taniguchi, Kyoko; Aghakasiri, Parisa

    2013-01-01

    Preschool education is a major topic on many national educational agendas. Countries and supranational organizations have promoted reforms aimed at readying children for entry into formal schooling, and preschool coverage rates have steadily increased in recent decades. In this policy brief the authors analyze data from 37 education systems that…

  5. WTO judicial Politics and EU Trade Policy: Business Associations as Vessels of Special Interest?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poletti, A.; De Bièvre, D.; Hanegraaff, M.

    2016-01-01

    This article focuses on the effects of the WTO’s quasi-judicial system of dispute resolution on the politics of trade policy making in the European Union (EU). We argue that this institutional innovation had a systematic transformative effect on EU trade politics, creating pressures for

  6. Exploring the New Narrative of Internet News

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Hui Chen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper demonstrates that digital tools provide opportunities for new storytelling techniques. To take full advantage of the new media resources and to establish an innovative news narrative structure, the existing research limit and the relationship between narrative and the media were examined. This paper progresses from a discussion on the narrative structure to how the plot of a story is influenced by its discourse, and then to how different media characteristics can change the structure and voice of the involved narrative. A new narrative structure that can be used to explore the hypertext and interactivity of Internet news is described. Finally, this paper discusses the cultivation of news storytelling in the digital age.

  7. Astronomy, New Instrumentation, and the News Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maran, Stephen P.

    2000-01-01

    Reporting of astronomical discoveries and events in the news media continues to expand to satisfy a seemingly voracious public interest. New telescopes, instruments, and facilities both up in space and on the ground, provide unique opportunities for media outreach on what scientists are accomplishing. And, new media such as website news providers, high-definition television, and video news walls help to fuel the growing activity. Ever since Tycho Brahe operated his own printing press, astronomers have striven to document their accomplishments for the wider world. In recent years, astronomers' media outreach has been successful in reaching the mass television audience through successful efforts at animation and scientific visualization, and through dramatic images acquired by some facilities, such as the solar physics satellites and ground observatories.

  8. Breaking Bad News in Veterinary Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickels, Bonnie McCracken; Feeley, Thomas Hugh

    2017-06-16

    The patient-provider relationship in the context of veterinary medicine represents a unique opportunity for studying how bad news is communicated to pet owners by conducting structured interviews with veterinarians. A sample of 44 veterinarians' responses was recorded and content-analyzed in an effort to identify themes among providers in their clinical experience of breaking bad news (BBN). Two coders revealed several themes in the data that were organized by three overarching areas: (1) breaking bad news in general, (2) euthanasia, and (3) social support. The findings from interviews indicated the COMFORT model (Villagran, Goldsmith, Wittenberg-Lyles, & Baldwin, 2010) in medical education provided a useful framework to organize the communication of BBN in veterinary medicine. Results were discussed in relation to future research in patient-provider communication and COMFORT's potential value for training students in veterinarian education.

  9. Swisster – a news website for Anglophones

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Employees of CERN can now sign up for a free account at Swisster.ch, an English language website devoted to Swiss news and current affairs. « prev next » The website, which is aimed at English speakers in Switzerland, normally requires an annual subscription of 300 CHF, but has teamed up with sponsors to offer a free subscription for CERN employees. The service provides a daily newsletter containing the main news and other information sent to subscribers every working day. The Swisster website also offers a variety of services such as health, education and food forums called "corners", as well as weather & snow forecasts, blogs and even a TV guide for Anglophones. The editorial team of English-speaking journalists is based in Lausanne, Geneva, Zurich and Neuchatel and covers news for expatriates and English speakers living and working in Switzerland. Swisster.ch also has a Saturday morning radio show from 08:30 to 09:30, on Radio Cit�...

  10. [Recent history of the news coverage of violence against women in Spain, 1997-2001].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vives-Cases, Carmen; Ruiz, María Teresa; Alvarez-Dardet, Carlos; Martín, Marta

    2005-01-01

    To explore press coverage of violence against women between 1997 and 2001, and to analyze the temporal development of murders due to this cause in Spain and the social context in which these media events take place. Quantitative content analyses were performed of 865 news items on violence against women in the Spanish newspapers El País, ABC and El Mundo (1997-2001). Absolute and relative frequencies, and relative risk (RR), 95% confidence intervals (95% CI), were calculated. Crude mortality rates were calculated for violence against women (1998-2003) based on the Register of the Federation of Separated and Divorced Women. Press coverage of violence against women increased, coinciding with dramatic events and political responses to the problem. In this context, mortality from this cause remained constant. News about incidents (65%) were more frequent than news about interventions (35%). In news items in which sex was identified (35% of the total), women (n = 151) and men (n = 150) shared the role of principle information source. Men from law institutions (RR = 1.77; 95% CI, 1.44-2.17) and women from health institutions (RR = 0.39; 95% CI, 0.14-1.08) and associations (RR = 0.33; 95% CI, 0.13-0.81) were more likely to be the main source of information than their counterparts. Men had a higher probability than women of being the main source of information in news about punishment (RR = 1.42; 95% CI, 1.12-1.81). In a context in which mortality from violence against women remains constant, news about this subject has increased, coinciding with dramatic events and political responses. The main sources of information are politicians of both sexes, men from law institutions, and women from health institutions and associations. Men are the main source of information in news about punishment.

  11. Tipping news in information accumulation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, J. K.

    2010-05-01

    As a continuous opinion dynamics model, the information accumulation system (IAS) includes three basic mechanisms of the news, the inheritance and the diffusion as contributing to the information accumulation process of a system. A system is composed of agents who diffuse information through internal interaction, while each of them has incomplete memory or inheritance rate. The news comes from external sources of information, such as mass media. Previously the model IAS was studied only for the small news problems. In this study, a tipping news problem is considered. A key question of the problem is: what is the minimum strength of advertisement that can tip the minority opinion to a majority one? Dynamics of the IAS is briefly revisited with a special interest on nonlinear behavior of the model. In particular, it is shown that a discrete map of the IAS for a single color problem can be transformed into a logistic map, from which the dynamics of the IAS can be better understood. To show the applicability of the IAS model, the result is applied to explain the concept of the critical population size, which claims that there is a minimum population size for a social knowledge system to be continuously inherited without being lost. And critical size of the tipping news is found analytically in terms of IAS parameters. Some of the key results from the present study are compared in detail with the results from the Brownian particle model, which is believed to be the most similar model to the IAS. The concept of tipping news is used to show that a traditional society can tip at an exceptionally low inter-community exposure. Finally, the result was applied to the language competition problem.

  12. When Sound Bites Become the News: a Case Study on Manufacturing News in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tena Perišin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Media environment is rapidly changing and facing a widespread crisis in journalism. It is followed by the decline of audience trust and increasing market pressures. The main goal is to win the audience’s attention, very often by creating drama and producing ‘conflict’. The news is not based on something that really happened and that is relevant, but it is more often manufactured or artificially produced. In this case study we explore the curious life cycle of a sound bite from a passing remark by the then Croatian Prime Minister Zoran Milanović’s to the headlines, discussions and extensive reports which developed over the course of several days. This example shows how news could be manufactured and content blurred when it is built around a fragment without providing the context, in this case a political quote. For several days, politicians, experts, war veterans, but also ordinary citizens were involved in the manufactured news story without making a reference to the context. Consequently, the democratic debate was avoided. Drawing on a discussion of news fragmentation as isolation from context, we show that in this case, news values (what news is are increasingly blurred, preventing the news from becoming the source of information and discussion of the country’s key issues.

  13. Bad news: The influence of news coverage and Google searches on Gardasil adverse event reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faasse, Kate; Porsius, Jarry T; Faasse, Jonathan; Martin, Leslie R

    2017-12-14

    Human papilloma virus vaccines are a safe and effective tool for reducing HPV infections that can cause cervical cancer. However, uptake of these vaccines has been suboptimal, with many people holding negative beliefs and misconceptions. Such beliefs have been linked with the experience of unpleasant side effects following medical treatment, and media coverage may heighten such concerns. The present study sought to assess the influence of news coverage (number of news articles per month) on adverse event reporting in response to Gardasil vaccination in New Zealand over a 7.5-year period, and whether the influence of news coverage was mediated by internet search activity (Google search volumes). Multiple linear regression analyses and simple mediation analyses were used, controlling for year and number of vaccinations delivered. News coverage in the previous month, and Google search volumes in the same month, were significant predictors of adverse event reporting, after accounting for vaccination rates and year. Concurrent Google search volumes partially mediated the effect of prior news coverage. The results suggest that some of the adverse events reported were not related to the vaccination itself, but to news coverage and internet search volumes, which may have contributed to public concerns about potentially unpleasant or harmful outcomes. These findings have implications for the importance of psychological and social factors in adverse event reporting, and the role of the news media in disseminating health information. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The interaction of financial news between mass media and new media: Evidence from news on Chinese stock market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongjie; Zhang, Zuochao; Liu, Lanbiao; Shen, Dehua

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, we investigate both the contemporaneous and the lead-lag relationships between the mass media news and the new media news of the financial news on the constitute stocks of the CSI 300. The empirical results show that: (1) there exists a strong correlation between these two types of news; (2) the granger causality direction from new media news to mass media news is increasingly obvious, while the reverse direction has a downward trend; (3) new media is playing a increasingly important role in the stock market and exhibits a trend to substitutes the mass media.

  15. The shifting temporalities of online news

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Henrik; Brügger, Niels

    2018-01-01

    how the temporalities of online news have developed since the first news sites in the mid-1990s. The analytical starting point for this is that such temporalities must be understood as a complex interplay between textual elements on different and overlapping levels of the webpage. This article...... to the present retrieved from the Internet Archive (www.archive. org). The shifting constitutions of time that emerge through these analyses point towards how journalistic practices have interacted with and adopted the possibilities of the digital. Due to an inbuilt instability between textual elements on stored...

  16. Welcome to the Era of Fake News

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Albright

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available For the news industry, information is used to tell stories, which have traditionally been organized around “facts”. A growing problem, however, is that fact-based evidence is not relevant to a growing segment of the populace. Journalists need facts to tell stories, but they need data to understand how to engage audiences with this accurate information. The implementation of data is part of the solution to countering the erosion of trust and the decay of social discourse across networked spaces. Rather than following “trends”, news organizations should establish the groundwork to make facts “matter” by shaping the narrative instead of following deceptive statements.

  17. Framing Peace as Violence: Television News Depictions of the 2007 Police Attack on Immigrant Rights Marchers in Los Angeles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santa Ana, Otto; Lopez, Layza; Munguia, Edgar

    2010-01-01

    This study examines two successive days of U.S. television news coverage of the May 1, 2007, immigration rights rally in Los Angeles. As thousands of demonstrators appealed peacefully for comprehensive immigration policy reform, they were assailed by 450 police officers firing munitions and using truncheons. We evaluated fifty-one television news…

  18. The emerging public discourse on state legalization of marijuana for recreational use in the US: Analysis of news media coverage, 2010-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinty, Emma E; Samples, Hillary; Bandara, Sachini N; Saloner, Brendan; Bachhuber, Marcus A; Barry, Colleen L

    2016-09-01

    US states have begun to legalize marijuana for recreational use. In the absence of clear scientific evidence regarding the likely public health consequences of legalization, it is important to understand how the risks and benefits of this policy are being discussed in the national dialogue. To assess the public discourse on recreational marijuana policy, we assessed the volume and content of US news media coverage of the topic. We analyzed the content of a 20% random sample of news stories published/aired in high circulation/viewership print, television, and Internet news sources from 2010 to 2014 (N=610). News media coverage of recreational marijuana policy was heavily concentrated in news outlets from the four states (AK, CO, OR, WA) and DC that legalized marijuana for recreational use during the study period. Overall, 53% of news stories mentioned pro-legalization arguments and 47% mentioned anti-legalization arguments. The most frequent pro-legalization arguments posited that legalization would reduce criminal justice involvement/costs (20% of news stories) and increase tax revenue (19%). Anti-legalization arguments centered on adverse public health consequences, such as detriments to youth health and well-being (22%) and marijuana-impaired driving (6%). Some evidence-informed public health regulatory options, like marketing and packaging restrictions, were mentioned in 5% of news stories or fewer. As additional states continue to debate legalization of marijuana for recreational use, it is critical for the public health community to develop communication strategies that accurately convey the rapidly evolving research evidence regarding recreational marijuana policy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Advocates, interest groups and Australian news coverage of alcohol advertising restrictions: content and framing analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fogarty Andrea S

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Legislating restrictions on alcohol advertising is a cost-effective measure to reduce consumption of alcohol. Yet Australia relies upon industry self-regulation through voluntary codes of practice regarding the content, timing and placement of alcohol advertising. Ending industry self-regulation was recommended by the National Preventative Health Taskforce; a suggestion contested by the drinks industry. Debates about emerging alcohol-control policies regularly play out in the news media, with various groups seeking to influence the discussion. This paper examines news coverage of recommendations to restrict alcohol advertising to see how supporters and opponents frame the debate, with a view to providing some suggestions for policy advocates to advance the discussion. Methods We used content and framing analyses to examine 329 Australian newspaper items mentioning alcohol advertising restrictions over 24 months. All items were coded for mentions of specific types of advertising and types of advertising restrictions, the presence of news frames that opposed or endorsed advertising restrictions, statements made within each frame and the news-actors who appeared. Results Restrictions were the main focus in only 36% of 329 items. Alcohol advertising was conceived of as television (47% and sport-related (56%. Restrictions were mentioned in non-specific terms (45%, or specified as restrictions on timing and placement (49%, or content (22%. Public health professionals (47% appeared more frequently than drinks industry representatives (18%. Five supportive news frames suggested the policy is a sensible public health response, essential to protect children, needed to combat the drinks industry, required to stop pervasive branding, or as only an issue in sport. Four unsupportive frames positioned restrictions as unnecessary for a responsible industry, an attack on legitimate commercial activities, ineffective and ‘nannyist’, or

  20. Advocates, interest groups and Australian news coverage of alcohol advertising restrictions: content and framing analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, Andrea S; Chapman, Simon

    2012-08-31

    Legislating restrictions on alcohol advertising is a cost-effective measure to reduce consumption of alcohol. Yet Australia relies upon industry self-regulation through voluntary codes of practice regarding the content, timing and placement of alcohol advertising. Ending industry self-regulation was recommended by the National Preventative Health Taskforce; a suggestion contested by the drinks industry. Debates about emerging alcohol-control policies regularly play out in the news media, with various groups seeking to influence the discussion. This paper examines news coverage of recommendations to restrict alcohol advertising to see how supporters and opponents frame the debate, with a view to providing some suggestions for policy advocates to advance the discussion. We used content and framing analyses to examine 329 Australian newspaper items mentioning alcohol advertising restrictions over 24 months. All items were coded for mentions of specific types of advertising and types of advertising restrictions, the presence of news frames that opposed or endorsed advertising restrictions, statements made within each frame and the news-actors who appeared. Restrictions were the main focus in only 36% of 329 items. Alcohol advertising was conceived of as television (47%) and sport-related (56%). Restrictions were mentioned in non-specific terms (45%), or specified as restrictions on timing and placement (49%), or content (22%). Public health professionals (47%) appeared more frequently than drinks industry representatives (18%). Five supportive news frames suggested the policy is a sensible public health response, essential to protect children, needed to combat the drinks industry, required to stop pervasive branding, or as only an issue in sport. Four unsupportive frames positioned restrictions as unnecessary for a responsible industry, an attack on legitimate commercial activities, ineffective and 'nannyist', or inessential to government policy. Support varied among

  1. Race, Nation, and News in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Hemant

    1995-01-01

    Argues that racial ideology structures news coverage of race. Illustrates how two manifestations of racial ideology, namely racial hierarchy and temporal distancing, operate in news articles to help create racialized criteria for being an "American." (SR)

  2. Television News Uses: A Cross-National Comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Mark R.

    1978-01-01

    Reports that a classification of television news uses and gratifications based on research in Leeds, England, did not adequately encompass the functions of television news for a United States audience. (GW)

  3. From the American Psychological Association to the American Psychology Association--An Organization for Psychologists or for the Discipline? 2007 Annual Report of the APA Policy and Planning Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Each year, the American Psychological Association's Policy and Planning Board takes the pulse of the Association and the discipline as a whole and writes a report that represents the Board's best appraisal of a fundamental policy. Our main objective, however, is not simply to assess the current situation but to look forward on behalf of the…

  4. Gordie Howe's Stem Cell 'Miracle': A Qualitative Analysis of News Coverage and Readers' Comments in Newspapers and Sports Websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachul, Christen; Caulfield, Timothy

    2015-10-01

    Stem cells continue to garner attention by the news media and play a role in public and policy discussions of emerging technologies. As new media platforms develop, it is important to understand how different news media represents emerging stem cell technologies and the role these play in public discussions. We conducted a comparative analysis of newspaper and sports websites coverage of one recent high profile case: Gordie Howe's stem cell treatment in Mexico. Using qualitative coding methods, we analyzed news articles and readers' comments from Canadian and US newspapers and sports websites. Results indicate that the efficacy of stem cell treatments is often assumed in news coverage and readers' comments indicate a public with a wide array of beliefs and perspectives on stem cells and their clinical efficacy. Media coverage that presents uncritical perspectives on unproven stem cell therapies may create patient expectations, may have an affect on policy discussions, and help to feed the marketing of unproven therapies. However, news coverage that provides more balanced or critical coverage of unproven stem cell treatments may also inspire more critical discussion, as reflected in readers' comments.

  5. Children and Terrorism-Related News: Training Parents in Coping and Media Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comer, Jonathan S.; Furr, Jami M.; Beidas, Rinad S.; Weiner, Courtney L.; Kendall, Philip C.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined associations between televised news regarding risk for future terrorism and youth outcomes and investigated the effects of training mothers in an empirically based approach to addressing such news with children. This approach—Coping and Media Literacy (CML)—emphasized modeling, media literacy, and contingent reinforcement and was compared via randomized design to Discussion as Usual (DAU). Ninety community youth (aged 7−13 years) and their mothers viewed a televised news clip about the risk of future terrorism, and threat perceptions and state anxiety were assessed preclip, postclip, and postdiscussion. Children responded to the clip with elevated threat perceptions and anxiety. Children of CML-trained mothers exhibited lower threat perceptions than DAU youth at postclip and at postdiscussion. Additionally, CML-trained mothers exhibited lower threat perceptions and state anxiety at postclip and postdiscussion than did DAU mothers. Moreover, older youth responded to the clip with greater societal threat perception than did younger youth. Findings document associations between terrorism-related news, threat perceptions, and anxiety and support the utility of providing parents with strategies for addressing news with children. Implications and research suggestions are discussed. PMID:18665686

  6. The Impact of the Explosion of EU News on Voter Choice in the 2014 EU Elections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Kleinnijenhuis

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The European elections in 2014 were the first to be held after a long period in which EU-related news was prominent in the media. They were held after years of daily news about the euro crisis and after months of news about the popular uprising in the Ukraine against president Yanukovych, who had refused to sign the association agreement with the EU. This could have invited political parties to overcome the usual problem of low salience of EU issues by strongly profiling themselves on EU issues. Turnout at the 2014 EU elections, however, remained low, hinting that parties were unable to convert the attention for European issues into enthusiasm for their party at the European elections. This paper asks how vote choice was influenced by party campaigning on EU related issues. A news effects analysis based on a content analysis of Dutch newspapers and television, and on a panel survey among Dutch voters revealed that EU issues functioned as wedge issues: the more strongly parties were associated in the news with the euro crisis and the Ukraine, the less they succeeded in mobilizing voters.

  7. A single-centre observational cohort study of admission National Early Warning Score (NEWS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Tom E F; Vaid, Nidhi; Ip, Dorothy; Cron, Nicholas; Wells, Matt; Torrance, Hew D T; Emmanuel, Julian

    2015-07-01

    Early warning scores are commonly used in hospitals to identify patients at risk of deterioration. The National Early Warning Score (NEWS) has recently been introduced to UK practice. However, it is not yet widely implemented. We aimed to compare NEWS to the early warning score currently used in our hospital--the Patient at Risk Score (PARS). We conducted a prospective observational cohort study of all adult general medical patients admitted to a single hospital over a 20-day period. Physiological data and early warning scores recorded in bedside charts were collected on admission and a NEWS score was retrospectively calculated. The patient notes were reviewed at 48 h after admission. The primary outcome was a composite of critical care admission or death within 2 days of admission. The secondary outcome was hospital length of stay. NEWS was more strongly associated with the primary outcome than PARS (odds ratio 1.54, p score was correlated with hospital length of stay. NEWS on admission is superior to PARS for identifying patients at risk of death or critical care admission within the first 2 days of hospital stay. Current guidelines advocate a threshold of 5 for triggering a clinical review. However, since a score of 3 or more was associated with a poor outcome, this recommendation should be reviewed. Both scores were poor predictors of hospital length of stay. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Food as a reward in the classroom: school district policies are associated with practices in US public elementary schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Lindsey; Chriqui, Jamie F; Chaloupka, Frank J

    2012-09-01

    The use of food as a reward for good student behavior or academic performance is discouraged by many national organizations, yet this practice continues to occur in schools. Our multiyear cross-sectional study examined the use of food as a reward in elementary schools and evaluated the association between district policies and school practices. School data were gathered during the 2007-2008, 2008-2009, and 2009-2010 school years via mail-back surveys (N=2,069) from respondents at nationally representative samples of US public elementary schools (1,525 unique schools, 544 of which also participated for a second year). During every year, the corresponding district policy for each school was gathered and coded for provisions pertaining to the use of food as a reward. School practices did not change over time and as of the 2009-2010 school year, respondents in 42.1% and 40.7% of schools, respectively, indicated that food was not used as a reward for academic performance or for good student behavior. In multivariate logistic regression analyses controlling for school characteristics and year, having a district policy that prohibited the use of food as a reward was significantly associated with school respondents reporting that food was not used as a reward for academic performance (Preward than were respondents in the South and Northeast. As of 2009-2010, only 11.9% of the districts in our study prohibited the use of food as a reward. Strengthening district policies may reduce the use of food rewards in elementary schools. Copyright © 2012 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Science News for the U.S. Hispanic Audience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    2008-02-01

    A science and health news service targeted toward the U.S. Hispanic community was launched on 23 January. ConCiencia, billed as the first Spanish-language science newswire service in the United States, provides free weekly news feeds to media targeting the U.S. Hispanic population. The news feeds, available to Spanish-language newspapers and radio stations, include newspaper features, radio segments, and online news content.

  10. Physical, policy, and sociocultural characteristics of the primary school environment are positively associated with children's physical activity during class time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Karen; Bremner, Alexandra; Salmon, Jo; Rosenberg, Michael; Giles-Corti, Billie

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a multidomain model to identify key characteristics of the primary school environment associated with children's physical activity (PA) during class-time. Accelerometers were used to calculate time spent in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity during class-time (CMVPA) of 408 sixth-grade children (mean ± SD age 11.1 ± 0.43 years) attending 27 metropolitan primary schools in Perth Western Australia. Child and staff self-report instruments and a school physical environment scan administered by the research team were used to collect data about children and the class and school environments. Hierarchical modeling identified key variables associated with CMVPA. The final multilevel model explained 49% of CMVPA. A physically active physical education (PE) coordinator, fitness sessions incorporated into PE sessions and either a trained PE specialist, classroom teacher or nobody coordinating PE in the school, rather than the deputy principal, were associated with higher CMVPA. The amount of grassed area per student and sporting apparatus on grass were also associated with higher CMVPA. These results highlight the relevance of the school's sociocultural, policy and physical environments in supporting class-based PA. Interventions testing optimization of the school physical, sociocultural and policy environments to support physical activity are warranted.

  11. Association between State Assistance on the Topic of Indoor Air Quality and School District-Level Policies That Promote Indoor Air Quality in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett Jones, Sherry; Doroski, Brenda; Glick, Sherry

    2015-01-01

    Nationally representative data from the 2012 School Health Policies and Practices Study examined whether state assistance on indoor air quality (IAQ) was associated with district-level policies and practices related to IAQ and integrated pest management (IPM). Districts in states that provided assistance on IAQ were more likely than districts not…

  12. Tobacco Use Documenting Policy and Its Association with Pupils' Smoking and Their Perception of the Enforcement of School Smoking Bans in Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saaristo, Vesa; Kulmala, Jenni; Raisamo, Susanna; Rimpelä, Arja; Ståhl, Timo

    2014-01-01

    Finnish national data sets on schools (N = 496) and pupils (N = 74,143; 14-16 years) were used to study whether a systematic documenting policy for the violations of school smoking bans was associated with pupils' smoking and their perceptions on the enforcement of smoking bans. Attending a school with a systematic documenting policy was…

  13. Volume, Volatility and Public News Announcements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bollerslev, Tim; Li, Jia; Xue, Yuan

    We provide new empirical evidence for the way in which financial markets process information. Our results are based on high-frequency intraday data along with new econometric techniques for making inference on the relationship between trading intensity and spot volatility around public news...

  14. Urban Stories : Producing news for urban youth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dr. Joke Hermes; Christa de Graaf

    2015-01-01

    This paper will query whether a dedicated news platform can attune to young people’s civic needs? That is to ask: can this be a space that follows a social media logic of conversation and ‘give and take’ – with producers and consumers changing roles or even losing the distinction? How could and

  15. Publicity, news content, and cultural debate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard Kristensen, Nete; From, Unni

    2015-01-01

    Forever (1995) and Sex and the City (2008). The article argues that blockbusters are not only predestined media coverage due to increasingly professional com-munication strategies. Blockbusters also carry both ‘publicist’ and media commercial news value – for many of the same reasons: These movies may...

  16. Effects of popular exemplars in television news

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lefevere, J.; De Swert, K.; Walgrave, S.

    2012-01-01

    Common people that are apparently randomly selected by journalists to illustrate a news story (popular exemplars) have a substantial effect on what the audience think about the issue. This effect may be partly due to the mere fact that popular exemplars attract attention and act as attention

  17. Social News Sites as Democratic Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szabo, András

    This thesis presents an empirical analysis and normative theoretical evaluation of Reddit, a social news website, focusing on its coverage of the 2012 US presidential election campaign. It explores the site's structural features and organization, and evaluates its coverage by standards derived from...

  18. Nitrix Oxide, the Gas in the News

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 4; Issue 4. Nitrix Oxide, the Gas in the News. T Ramasarma. General Article Volume 4 Issue 4 April 1999 pp 31-41. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/004/04/0031-0041. Author Affiliations.

  19. Assessing User Behaviour in News Video Retrieval

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollink, L.; Nguyen, G.; Koelma, D.; Schreiber, A.T.; Worring, M.

    2005-01-01

    The results of a study are presented, in which people queried a news archive using an interactive video retrieval system. 242 search sessions by 39 participants on 24 topics were assessed. Before, during and after the study, participants filled in questionnaires about their expectations of a search.

  20. Predicting Controversial News Using Facebook Reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basile, Angelo; Caselli, Tommaso; Nissim, Malvina

    2017-01-01

    Different events and their re- ception in different reader communities may give rise to controversy. We pro- pose a distant supervised entropy-based model that uses Facebook reactions as proxies for predicting news controversy. We prove the validity of this approach by running within- and

  1. The Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Digital News Audiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Chris

    2016-01-01

    these interrelated changes in the media ecology if we want to grasp the newfound complexity of media consumption. Specifically, it outlines how audience engagement with news and different spatiotemporal configurations made possible by digital technology are trends that complement and reinforce one another in terms...

  2. Alternative Fuel News, Vol. 2, No. 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Connor, K.; Riley, C.; Raye, M.

    1998-11-30

    This issue of Alternative Fuel News highlights the accomplishments of the Clean Cities coalitions during the past 5 years. Now Clean Cities advocates in city after city across the US are building stations and driving alternative fuel vehicles, in addition to enhancing public awareness.

  3. News Agencies and Global Communication: Development ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper is fundamentally, an overview of western news agencies and the roles they play in international communication. It argues that most of these roles have some consequences undesirable to the Third World Nations. Instead of facilitating the development of the poor nations of the world, the study reveals that the ...

  4. A short guide to giving bad news.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Jeffrey T

    2008-01-01

    Approaching an individual or a family with bad news, but without an appropriate plan to present the information in a structured manner, is almost a guarantee of greater emotional pain and disruption for the recipients of the news. Crisis interveners must develop a strategic plan for the announcement of bad news. That plan should entail a lead-up phase, a transmission phase, and a followup phase. The lead-up phase encompasses the gathering of accurate, verifiable information and the clear identification of the targets of the information. The transmission phase includes immediate preparation for the presentation of the information, the actual announcement, and the presentation of additional details as questions arise. The follow-up phase includes a range of supportive interventions to assist people in the immediate crisis reaction. It also includes a system of referrals for people who might benefit from additional professional care. This article provides practical guidelines for providing bad news to the loved ones of injured, ill, or deceased people.

  5. Fake news threatens a climate literate world

    OpenAIRE

    2017-01-01

    As the challenges and environmental consequences of climate change manifest, the need for a society of science-literate citizens is becoming increasingly apparent. Achieving this, however, is no easy task, particularly given the proliferation of fake news and the seeds of confusion it can sow

  6. News Agencies and Global Communication: Development ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    they play in international communication. It argues that most of these roles have some consequences undesirable to the Third World Nations. Instead of facilitating the development of the poor nations of the world, the study reveals that the major news agencies by their worldwide operations are impeding the development of ...

  7. News Writing, Poetry, Speech Share Universal Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braddock, Clayton

    1990-01-01

    Maintains that journalism skills courses must also impart to students a sense of the splendid power of language and the artisanship of molding clear ideas with words. Points out that it is up to the teacher of news writing to remind future journalists of their rich language heritage. (SR)

  8. The Best of Chem 13 News

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorsen, Kathy

    1999-07-01

    This column is designed to give JCE readers a few highlights from Chem 13 News, a monthly publication for chemistry educators from the University of Waterloo in Ontario, Canada, and provides annotations describing a particular activity or a variety of sources from which new and creative ideas can be extracted.

  9. Olfaction in Accipitrid vultures | Gilbert | Vulture News

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    No Abstract. Vulture News Vol. 55, 2006: 6-7. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's Partners · Terms and ...

  10. Breaking Bad News for Patients with Gastro-Intestinal Malignancy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    No patient was told about the prognosis and the chances of cure. Conclusion: Sympathy over-ride empathy in communicating bad news to Sudanese patients suffering of cancer. Patient education and training in breaking the bad news is needed. Key words: Communication skills, breaking bad news, truth telling, Sudan.

  11. Network Television Evening News Coverage of Infectious Disease Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Michael; Wartenberg, Daniel

    1990-01-01

    Examines coverage of several infectious diseases and teenage suicide to see whether television news favors covering illness where it clusters or when it occurs near major news centers where it is easier to cover. Finds that television news did go to where the illness broke out but tended to favor reporting urban over rural suicides. (RS)

  12. 7 CFR 500.9 - Photographs for news or advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Photographs for news or advertising. 500.9 Section 500..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE NATIONAL ARBORETUM Conduct on U.S. National Arboreturm Property § 500.9 Photographs for news or advertising. Photographs for news purposes may be taken at the USNA without prior...

  13. News and corporate reputation: Empirical findings from the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, M.M.; Kleinnijenhuis, J.

    2006-01-01

    This article examines the influence of business news on corporate reputation. A panel survey was used to measure the reputations of six companies and two professional sectors. Media coverage was analyzed by focusing on the tone of two different types of news. News about the successes of the

  14. Affective priming during the processing of news articles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baumgartner, S.E.; Wirth, W.

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigates the role of affective priming during the processing of news articles. It is assumed that the valence of the affective response to a news article will influence the processing of subsequent news articles. More specifically, it is hypothesized that participants who read

  15. A Predictive Framework for Determining How Journalists Determine News.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudino, James L.

    To determine how to articulate a concrete definition of the substance of the journalist's occupation, this paper offers a propositional framework of news value based on Kurt Lewin's gatekeeper model. First, the paper follows the established suggestion that news decisions are best studied from a gatekeeping perspective or that "news is…

  16. Dow Jones News/Retrieval--An IndepthBxook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, Tim

    1984-01-01

    This introduction to the nonbibliographic databases offered by the Dow Jones News/Retrieval Service describes file content and search strategies in four groups: Dow Jones Business and Economic News; Dow Jones Quotes (market prices for stocks and other securities); Financial and Investment Services; General News and Information Services. Examples…

  17. College Students' News Gratifications, Media Use, and Current Events Knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Richard C.; Basil, Michael D.

    1997-01-01

    Results of testing uses and gratifications theory with college students show students' media use and surveillance needs increase college year. Demographic differences and gratifications sought drive news media use. Surveillance needs result in increased use of all news media, whereas entertainment needs result in television news and CNN viewing.…

  18. Are news media substitutes? Gratifications, contents, and uses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wurff, R.

    2011-01-01

    Internet is generally expected to have one of two effects on traditional news media: It displaces them, or it forces them into distinct market niches. A shared assumption underlying both expectations is that news media displacement, or substitution, is a function of the degree to which news media

  19. Comprehending News Videotexts: The Influence of the Visual Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Jeremy

    2011-01-01

    Informed by dual coding theory, this study explores the role of the visual content in L2 listeners' comprehension of news videotexts. L1 research into the visual characteristics and comprehension of news videotexts is outlined, subsequently informing the quantitative analysis of audiovisual correspondence in the news videotexts used. In each of…

  20. 32 CFR 516.53 - News media and other inquiries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true News media and other inquiries. 516.53 Section... Litigation in Which the United States Has An Interest § 516.53 News media and other inquiries. News media... clearance. Local public affairs officers will refer press inquiries to HQDA (SAPA), WASH DC 20310-1500, with...

  1. CSIR general news: February-December 2007 issues

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    CSIR

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available stream_source_info CSIR e-News1_2007.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 1704 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name CSIR e-News1_2007.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 CSIR General News Term...

  2. News for the '90s: A Question of Values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Rosalind, Ed.; Thoman, Elizabeth, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    This special issue of "Media & Values" gives a perspective on how news is changing, what is missing in the news, and how to spot bias and misinformation in news coverage, both print and electronic. Articles examine the impact of computer imaging on the credibility of photographs and the issue of privacy--just how far should journalists go to get a…

  3. The impact of firm specific news on implied volatilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.W.M. Donders (Monique); A.C.F. Vorst (Ton)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractWe study the implied volatility behavior of call options around scheduled news announcement days. Implied volatilities increase significantly during the pre-event period and reach a maximum on the eve of the news announcement. After the news release, implied volatility drops sharply and

  4. Comparing local TV news with national TV news in cancer coverage: an exploratory content analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chul-Joo; Long, Marilee; Slater, Michael D; Song, Wen

    2014-12-01

    The authors compared local TV news with national TV news in terms of cancer coverage using a nationally representative sample of local nightly TV and national network TV (i.e., ABC, CBS, NBC, and CNN) cancer news stories that aired during 2002 and 2003. Compared with national TV news, local TV cancer stories were (a) much shorter in length, (b) less likely to report on cancer prevention (i.e., preventive behaviors and screening tests), and (c) less likely to reference national organizations (i.e., National Cancer Institute, American Cancer Society, National Institutes of Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Food and Drug Administration) that have made clear recommendations about ways to prevent cancer. The implications of these findings for health communication research and cancer education were discussed.

  5. News Media Framing of Preventable Crisis Clusters. Case Study: Newborn Babies Killed in the Fire at a Romanian Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camelia CMECIU

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In crisis situations, public or private organi-zations become vulnerable. When organizations adopt the silence strategy, the public seeks in-formation in the news media which may induce the attribution of crisis responsibility. The crisis managers should check the news media framing of the (organizational and/or individual respon-sibility level, the news practices of daily and tabloid press and the journalists’ use of the cri-sis issues and news frames of the situation. Our study will focus on one of the greatest tragedies in Romania, the newborn babies’ death during the 2010 fre at the Giuleşti Maternity Hospital in Bucharest. The comparative analysis focuses on the news media coverage of this crisis in the online versions of four national newspapers with the largest circulation. The content analysis high-lights the crisis news frames and issues in Roma-nian daily and tabloid newspapers. The fndings suggest that, despite the same salience of crisis frames (attribution of responsibility, human inter-est, economic consequences, confict, morality, the sensationalist and sober news stories differ in three ways: the assigning of the level of re-sponsibility, the crisis issues associated with the fve frames, and the coverage of the micro and macro-relations established between the organi-zations during the crisis situation.

  6. The changing image of the enemy in the news discourse of Israeli newspapers, 1993-1994

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lea Mandelzis

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Given that media representations are closely linked to public opinion and political policy, they are especially important during transitional periods, when people are most open to change (Dennis, 1991. The 1993 Oslo accords marked a radical change in Israeli politics. The mutual recognition between Israel and the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO and the handshake on the White House lawn between Prime Minister Rabin and Chairman Arafat on September 1993 were dramatic and revolutionary steps. They reflected shifts in the attitudes of the Israeli government and media towards the Arab world in general and the Palestinians in particular. This study examines changes that occurred within the news discourse of two leading newspapers as Israeli society evolved from a war culture towards a vision of peace. It focuses on stereotypes and myths relating to the perceived enemy of the State of Israel, namely Yasser Arafat and the PLO. A sample was selected on a weekly random basis over two consecutive periods, separated by the signing of the Oslo accords, which marked a "transitory" breakpoint. (Azar and Cohen, 1979:159, i.e., a turning point and apex in a transformation from war to peace. Discourse content analysis was applied to 1186 news articles published on the first two pages of Ha'aretz, a quality newspaper, and Yedioth Ahronoth, a more popular publication. The chosen news articles related to security, peace and politics. The pre-Oslo period was defined as lasting from 20 January 1993 to 26 August 1993; the post-Oslo period, from 3 September 1993 to 31 October 1994, when the peace treaty between Israel and Jordan was signed. The most prominent topic or actor in the news article was defined as 'primary'. The second most prominent topic or actor in the text was defined as 'secondary'. Quantitative research methods were complemented by qualitative data, i.e., selected quotations from news articles and interviews with key Israeli policymakers. The

  7. News in an age of competition: The case of sensationalism in Dutch television news, 1995-2001

    OpenAIRE

    Hendriks Vettehen, P.G.J.; Nuijten, C.M.; Beentjes, J.W.J.

    2005-01-01

    Trends in sensationalism in Dutch television news were investigated through a content analysis of 3 Dutch TV news programs in 1995 and 2001, a period when the competition between Dutch TV news programs increased. Indicators of sensationalism were derived from 4 categories: tabloid packaging, basic needs content, concreteness, and proximity. Results showed a trend toward the use of more sensational production techniques in Dutch TV news. However, these increases were not found on all indicator...

  8. The free vaccination policy of influenza in Beijing, China: The vaccine coverage and its associated factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Min; Fang, Renfei; Wu, Jiang; Pang, Xinghuo; Deng, Ying; Lei, Trudy; Xie, Zheng

    2016-04-19

    In order to improve influenza vaccination coverage, the coverage rate and reasons for non-vaccination need to be determined. In 2007, the Beijing Government published a policy providing free influenza vaccinations to elderly people living in Beijing who are older than 60. This study examines the vaccination coverage after the policy was carried out and factors influencing vaccination among the elderly in Beijing. A cross-sectional survey was conducted through the use of questionnaires in 2013. A total of 1673 eligible participants were selected by multistage stratified random sampling in Beijing using anonymous questionnaires in-person. They were surveyed to determine vaccination status and social demographic information. The influenza vaccination coverage was 38.7% among elderly people in Beijing in 2012. The most common reason for not being vaccinated was people thinking they did not need to have a flu shot. After controlling for age, gender, income, self-reported health status, and the acceptance of health promotion, the rate in rural areas was 2.566 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.801-3.655, Pvaccination uptake. Those whom received information through television, community boards, or doctors were more likely to get vaccinated compared to those who did not (Odds Ratio [OR]=1.403, Pvaccine coverage in Beijing is much lower than that of developed countries with similar policies. The rural-urban disparity in coverage rate (64.1% versus 33.5%), may be explained by differing health provision systems and personal attitudes toward free services due to socioeconomic factors. Methods for increasing vaccination levels include increasing the focus on primary care and health education programs, particularly recommendations from doctors, to the distinct target populations, especially with a focus on expanding these efforts in urban areas. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Public responses to proposals for a tax on sugar-sweetened beverages: A thematic analysis of online reader comments posted on major UK news websites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molly Thomas-Meyer

    Full Text Available Regular consumption of sugar sweetened beverages (SSBs is associated with weight gain, type 2 diabetes, and dental caries. The UK will introduce a levy on the manufacturers of SSBs in 2018. Details will be negotiated over the next two years. How the UK public views SSB taxes is likely to be an important determinant of the content and success of the final policy. We aimed to capture the views, ideas and concerns of commenters on major UK news websites on SSB taxes.We conducted a qualitative analysis of reader comments to online news coverage of one proposal for an SSB tax in the UK. 1645 comments on four articles were included. Three underpinning themes influenced support or opposition to the tax: the balance between individual responsibility and autonomy, and population need; mistrust of the intention of the proposed tax and those promoting it; and variations in the perceived complexity of unhealthy diets and obesity associated with variations in what are considered appropriate interventions. Arguments under each theme were used to justify both support and opposition in different cases.As the final form of the UK SSB tax is negotiated, effort should be made to address the concerns we identified. Our results suggest these efforts could usefully focus on emphasising the social and environmental determinants of diet and obesity, reinforcing the benefits of the tax to the NHS, and pitching the tax as playing into a variety of different conceptualisations of obesity.

  10. Trends In News Media Coverage Of Mental Illness In The United States: 1995-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinty, Emma E; Kennedy-Hendricks, Alene; Choksy, Seema; Barry, Colleen L

    2016-06-01

    The United States is engaged in ongoing dialogue around mental illness. To assess trends in this national discourse, we studied the volume and content of a random sample of 400 news stories about mental illness from the period 1995-2014. Compared to news stories in the first decade of the study period, those in the second decade were more likely to mention mass shootings by people with mental illnesses. The most frequently mentioned topic across the study period was violence (55 percent overall) divided into categories of interpersonal violence or self-directed (suicide) violence, followed by stories about any type of treatment for mental illness (47 percent). Fewer news stories, only 14 percent, described successful treatment for or recovery from mental illness. The news media's continued emphasis on interpersonal violence is highly disproportionate to actual rates of violence among those with mental illnesses. Research suggests that this focus may exacerbate social stigma and decrease support for public policies that benefit people with mental illnesses. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  11. Trends In News Media Coverage Of Mental Illness In The United States: 1995–2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinty, Emma E.; Kennedy-Hendricks, Alene; Choksy, Seema; Barry, Colleen L.

    2016-01-01

    The United States is engaged in ongoing dialogue around mental illness. To assess trends in this national discourse, we studied the volume and content of a random sample of 400 news stories about mental illness from the period 1995–2014. Compared to news stories in the first decade of the study period, those in the second decade were more likely to mention mass shootings by people with mental illnesses. The most frequently mentioned topic across the study period was violence (55 percent overall) divided into categories of interpersonal violence or self-directed (suicide) violence, followed by stories about any type of treatment for mental illness (47 percent). Fewer news stories, only 14 percent, described successful treatment for or recovery from mental illness. The news media’s continued emphasis on interpersonal violence is highly disproportionate to actual rates of violence among those with mental illnesses. Research suggests that this focus may exacerbate social stigma and decrease support for public policies that benefit people with mental illnesses. PMID:27269031

  12. A website for astronomical news in Spanish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Gil, A.

    2008-06-01

    Noticias del Cosmos is a collection of web pages within the Astronomical Observatory of the University of Valencia's website where we publish short daily summaries of astronomical press releases. Most, if not all of, the releases are originally written in English, and often Spanish readers may find them difficult to understand because not many people are familiar with the scientific language employed in these releases. Noticias del Cosmos has two principal aims. First, we want to communicate the latest astronomical news on a daily basis to a wide Spanish-speaking public who would otherwise not be able to read them because of the language barrier. Second, daily news can be used as a tool to introduce the astronomical topics of the school curriculum in a more immediate and relevant way. Most of the students at school have not yet reached a good enough level in their knowledge of English to fully understand a press release, and Noticias del Cosmos offers them and their teachers this news in their mother tongue. During the regular programme of school visits at the Observatory we use the news as a means of showing that there is still a lot to be discovered. So far the visits to the website have been growing steadily. Between June 2003 and June 2007 we had more than 30,000 visits (excluding 2006). More than 50% of the visits come from Spain, followed by visitors from South and Central America. The feedback we have received from teachers so far has been very positive, showing the usefulness of news items in the classroom when teaching astronomy.

  13. “It was only a mild concussion”: Exploring the description of sports concussion in online news articles

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, Osman Hassan; Eric E. Hall

    2017-01-01

    Background/aims Concussion is widely discussed in online sports news articles, but the terms used to report this injury vary. This study aimed to use a systematic search strategy and explore the description of sports concussion in online sports news articles. Methods A systematic approach was employed to obtain online articles related to sports concussion from four sports associated with concussion (hockey, football, soccer, and rugby). Included articles were evaluated for the descriptors use...

  14. Bringing Central Line–Associated Bloodstream Infection Prevention Home: CLABSI Definitions and Prevention Policies in Home Health Care Agencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinke, Michael L.; Bundy, David G.; Milstone, Aaron M.; Deuber, Kristin; Chen, Allen R.; Colantuoni, Elizabeth; Miller, Marlene R.

    2015-01-01

    Background A study was conducted to investigate home health care agency central line–associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) definitions and prevention policies and compare them to the Joint Commission National Patient Safety Goal (NPSG.07.04.01), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) CLABSI prevention recommendations, and a best-practice central line care bundle for inpatients. Methods A telephone-based survey was conducted in 2011 of a convenience sample of home health care agencies associated with children’s hematology/oncology centers. Results Of the 97 eligible home health care agencies, 57 (59%) completed the survey. No agency reported using all five aspects of the National Healthcare and Safety Network/Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology CLABSI definition and adjudication process, and of the 50 agencies that reported tracking CLABSI rates, 20 (40%) reported using none. Only 10 agencies (18%) had policies consistent with all elements of the inpatient-focused NPSG.07.04.01, 10 agencies (18%) were consistent with all elements of the home care targeted CDC CLABSI prevention recommendations, and no agencies were consistent with all elements of the central line care bundle. Only 14 agencies (25%) knew their overall CLABSI rate: mean 0.40 CLABSIs per 1,000 central line days (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.18 to 0.61). Six agencies (11%) knew their agency’s pediatric CLABSI rate: mean 0.54 CLABSIs per 1,000 central line days (95% CI, 0.06 to 1.01). Conclusions The policies of a national sample of home health care agencies varied significantly from national inpatient and home health care agency targeted standards for CLABSI definitions and prevention. Future research should assess strategies for standardizing home health care practices consistent with evidence-based recommendations. PMID:23991509

  15. Nuclear voices in the news : A comparison of source, news agency and newspaper content about nuclear energy over time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boumans, J.W.; Vliegenthart, R.; Boomgaarden, H.G.

    While news media are frequently criticized for their alleged increasing reliance on ‘subsidized content’ provided by sources and news agencies, this claim is seldom empirically verified. Based on insights from computer science, this study proposes an approach to quantitatively compare source, news

  16. News in an age of competition: The case of sensationalism in Dutch television news, 1995-2001

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks Vettehen, P.G.J.; Nuijten, C.M.; Beentjes, J.W.J.

    2005-01-01

    Trends in sensationalism in Dutch television news were investigated through a content analysis of 3 Dutch TV news programs in 1995 and 2001, a period when the competition between Dutch TV news programs increased. Indicators of sensationalism were derived from 4 categories: tabloid packaging, basic

  17. Is the internet about to take over? How using online news is related to offline news consumption patterns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trilling, D.; Schönbach, K.

    2011-01-01

    In the ongoing debate on the role of the Internet in public discourse, it is often assumed that online news fundamentally changes mass communication. But is there a relationship between online news use and a differentiation in overall news consumption patterns? The results of a large-scale survey

  18. Audiovisual infotainment in European news: a comparative content analysis of Dutch, Spanish and Irish television news programs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alencar, A.; Kruikemeier, S.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates to what extent audiovisual infotainment features can be found in the narrative structure of television news in three European countries news. Content analysis included a sample of 639 news reports (or reporter packages) aired in the first three weeks of September 2013, in six

  19. KONSEP PENULISAN JURNALISTIK MASA DEPAN DAN DESAIN STORYBOARD UNTUK ONLINE NEWS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ido Priyana Hadi

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Entering this 21st century%2C press (on newspapers and magazines no longer count on physical printed edition to meet the readers demand on actual news. Press are required to provide online information in term of minutes or even seconds as soon as an event is occuring. Thus%2C speed has become an essential factor in journalism. News is associated to new-ness. Newspapers and magazines are competing one another to serve news fresh from the oven. Journalism has proceeds to an outstanding speed and dynamics which transforms its operation pattern%2C affiliated with the boost of information technology and communication especially the internet. Abstract in Bahasa Indonesia : Memasuki trend abad ke 21 pers cetak (koran dan majalah sekarang tidak saja mengandalkan edisi fisik cetak untuk menjumpai para pembaca setianya dengan sajian berita-berita aktualnya. Tetapi dituntut mampu memberikan sajian informasi online yang seketika%2C dalam hitungan menit atau bahkan detik atas peristiwa atau kejadian disuatu tempat. Karenanya unsur kecepatan (speed menjadi sesuatu yang esensial dalam jurnalistik. News yang berarti berita terkandung didalamnya makna kebaruan. Surat kabar dan majalah dengan sendirinya berkompetisi dalam menyampaikan kebaruan tersebut. Karenanya kehidupan jurnalistik mengalami percepatan serta dinamika yang luar biasa%2C yang pada akhirnya mengubah pola pengerjaan jurnalistik seiring dengan kemajuan di bidang teknologi informasi dan komunikasi khususnya internet. Writing%2C Journalism%2C Online News%2C Storyboard Design.

  20. Workshop: Improving the Assessment and Valuation of Climate Change Impacts for Policy and Regulatory Analysis: Research on Climate Change Impacts and Associated Economic Damages (part 2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is a workshop titled Improving the Assessment and Valuation of Climate Change Impacts for Policy and Regulatory Analysis: Research on Climate Change Impacts and Associated Economic Damages (part 2)

  1. Political science. Exposure to ideologically diverse news and opinion on Facebook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakshy, Eytan; Messing, Solomon; Adamic, Lada A

    2015-06-05

    Exposure to news, opinion, and civic information increasingly occurs through social media. How do these online networks influence exposure to perspectives that cut across ideological lines? Using deidentified data, we examined how 10.1 million U.S. Facebook users interact with socially shared news. We directly measured ideological homophily in friend networks and examined the extent to which heterogeneous friends could potentially expose individuals to cross-cutting content. We then quantified the extent to which individuals encounter comparatively more or less diverse content while interacting via Facebook's algorithmically ranked News Feed and further studied users' choices to click through to ideologically discordant content. Compared with algorithmic ranking, individuals' choices played a stronger role in limiting exposure to cross-cutting content. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  2. Public Budgetary Policy Associated with the Requirements of the European Union Integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgeta DRAGOMIR

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available In the complex process of accession to the European Union and the entry into the Euro Zone, Romania is bound to focus its efforts withinfinalizing the necessary reforms for fulfilling its commitments. Economic boost, low inflation, budget deficit remained within sustainable and stableexchange rates, all represent priorities and benchmarks of the European construction. In each state, budgetary policy is a result of the elaborationproject of several categories of related budgets that make up a system. The budget system is variable depending on the organizational structure ofeach state: unitary type (France, England, Sweden etc. and federal type (U.S., Canada, Switzerland, etc.. In Romania the need of resources at thelevel of society and their possibilities are reflected in the general consolidated budget. The law on Public Finances indicates that the management ofpublic financial resources is carried out by a unified budget system.

  3. Drinking policies and exercise-associated hyponatraemia: is anyone still promoting overdrinking?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrami, F G; Hew-Butler, T; Noakes, T D

    2008-10-01

    The purpose of this review is to describe the evolution of hydration research and advice on drinking during exercise from published scientific papers, books and non-scientific material (advertisements and magazine contents) and detail how erroneous advice is likely propagated throughout the global sports medicine community. Hydration advice from sports-linked entities, the scientific community, exercise physiology textbooks and non-scientific sources was analysed historically and compared with the most recent scientific evidence. Drinking policies during exercise have changed substantially throughout history. Since the mid-1990s, however, there has been an increase in the promotion of overdrinking by athletes. While the scientific community is slowly moving away from "blanket" hydration advice in which one form of advice fits all and towards more modest, individualised, hydration guidelines in which thirst is recognised as the best physiological indicator of each subject's fluid needs during exercise, marketing departments of the global sports drink industry continue to promote overdrinking.

  4. Cohesiveness in financial news and its relation to market volatility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piškorec, Matija; Antulov-Fantulin, Nino; Novak, Petra Kralj; Mozetič, Igor; Grčar, Miha; Vodenska, Irena; Smuc, Tomislav

    2014-05-22

    Motivated by recent financial crises, significant research efforts have been put into studying contagion effects and herding behaviour in financial markets. Much less has been said regarding the influence of financial news on financial markets. We propose a novel measure of collective behaviour based on financial news on the Web, the News Cohesiveness Index (NCI), and we demonstrate that the index can be used as a financial market volatility indicator. We evaluate the NCI using financial documents from large Web news sources on a daily basis from October 2011 to July 2013 and analyse the interplay between financial markets and finance-related news. We hypothesise that strong cohesion in financial news reflects movements in the financial markets. Our results indicate that cohesiveness in financial news is highly correlated with and driven by volatility in financial markets.

  5. Cohesiveness in Financial News and its Relation to Market Volatility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piškorec, Matija; Antulov-Fantulin, Nino; Novak, Petra Kralj; Mozetič, Igor; Grčar, Miha; Vodenska, Irena; Šmuc, Tomislav

    2014-05-01

    Motivated by recent financial crises, significant research efforts have been put into studying contagion effects and herding behaviour in financial markets. Much less has been said regarding the influence of financial news on financial markets. We propose a novel measure of collective behaviour based on financial news on the Web, the News Cohesiveness Index (NCI), and we demonstrate that the index can be used as a financial market volatility indicator. We evaluate the NCI using financial documents from large Web news sources on a daily basis from October 2011 to July 2013 and analyse the interplay between financial markets and finance-related news. We hypothesise that strong cohesion in financial news reflects movements in the financial markets. Our results indicate that cohesiveness in financial news is highly correlated with and driven by volatility in financial markets.

  6. Science versus News: On the Cutting Edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinney, A. L.; French, V.; Villard, R.; Maran, S. P.

    1998-12-01

    This session is to aid communication between scientists and journalists, to motivate astronomers to be active in communicating their science to the public via the press, and to help both astronomers and journalists to understand the constraints under which the other group is operating. The session consists of two talks of about 20 minutes, followed by a panel discussion. The first talk is "What Makes a Topic News?" This segment, by Miles O'Brien of CNN News, takes the AAS audiences behind the scenes in the world of producing science news stories. --- What drives selection of assignments? How does the science reporter convince their editor to cover a story? What factors about television producing help and also hurt getting science subjects across to the public? The second talk is "Public Knowledge on Science: The Growing Gap Between Scientists and the Taxpayer." This presentation by Jon Miller, a public opinion expert will emphasize the problems scientists and society, face in communicating to the public. --- What does the public know about science and scientific method? How much translation is required to communicate with the public to engage their interest without unacceptable compromise of scientific accuracy? The final segment is a panel of both science journalists and astronomers moderated by Steve Maran. Together they will tackle a question that gets to the heart of the Science-Vs-News controversies, "When Should Results Go Public?" Published too soon, science is called "hype"; Published too late, it is no longer "news." Should all results be peer reviewed first, and is that a satisfactory prerequisite? Do scientists take self-serving advantage of the public interest by making announcements before results appear in journals? How do we address the public desire to experience science unfolding and to see real-time data such as planetary science missions? The panelists are Dr. David Helfand, from Columbia University, Dr. Bruce Margon, from the University of

  7. Natural gas news; Gaz actualites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1998-12-01

    This brochure is a compilation of practical information concerning the Gaz de France group: organization chart, daughter companies, services, economical activity, natural gas market, trade, regulations etc. A list of partners, directions, centres, groups, associations and other various organisms in relation with Gaz de France company is given. (J.S.)

  8. USDA-ARS Quartlerly News

    Science.gov (United States)

    This quarterly article is an update of research going on at The USDA-ARS Thad Cochran Southern Horticultural Laboratory in Poplarville, MS to be published in the Louisiana Nursery and Landscape Associations (LANLA) quarterly newsletter. This is one of three publications that I am sending out to the ...

  9. Methadone Prescribing and Overdose and the Association with Medicaid Preferred Drug List Policies - United States, 2007-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faul, Mark; Bohm, Michele; Alexander, Caleb

    2017-03-31

    Drug overdose is a leading cause of injury death in the United States; 47,055 fatal drug overdoses were reported in 2014, a 6.5% increase from the previous year (1), driven by opioid use disorder (2,3). Methadone is an opioid prescribed for pain management and is also provided through opioid treatment programs to treat opioid use disorders. Because methadone might remain in a person's system long after the pain-relieving benefits have been exhausted, it can cause slow or shallow breathing and dangerous changes in heartbeat that might not be perceived by the patient (4,5). In December 2006, the Food and Drug Administration issued a Public Health Advisory that alerted health care professionals to reports of death and life-threatening adverse events, such as respiratory depression and cardiac arrhythmias, in patients receiving methadone (4); in January 2008, a voluntary manufacturer restriction limited distribution of the 40 mg formulation of methadone.* CDC analyzed state mortality and health care data and preferred drug list (PDL) policies to 1) compare the percentage of deaths involving methadone with the rate of prescribing methadone for pain, 2) characterize variation in methadone prescribing among payers and states, and 3) assess whether an association existed between state Medicaid reimbursement PDL policies and methadone overdose rates. The analyses found that, from 2007 to 2014, large declines in methadone-related overdose deaths occurred. Prescriptions for methadone accounted for 0.85% of all opioid prescriptions for pain in the commercially insured population and 1.1% in the Medicaid population. In addition, an association was observed between Medicaid PDLs requiring prior authorization for methadone and lower rates of methadone overdose among Medicaid enrollees. PDL policies requiring prior authorization might help to reduce the number of methadone overdoses.

  10. Negative statin-related news stories decrease statin persistence and increase myocardial infarction and cardiovascular mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sune Fallgaard; Nordestgaard, Børge Grønne

    2016-01-01

    in cities, and with other ethnicity than Danish, while the opposite was true for positive statin-related news stories and for baseline cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Early statin discontinuation was also associated with increased risk of myocardial infarction and death from cardiovascular disease....

  11. Professors' Pay Raises Beat Inflation; So Much for the Good News

    Science.gov (United States)

    June, Audrey Williams

    2009-01-01

    Faculty pay has been battered by the deepening national recession, but one cannot tell that from the American Association of University Professors' new annual report on the economic status of the profession. The average salary of a full-time faculty member rose 3.4% in 2008-2009, it says, a rate well above inflation. That would be good news, but…

  12. NEWS for Africa: adaptation and reliability of a built environment questionnaire for physical activity in seven African countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyeyemi, Adewale L; Kasoma, Sandra S; Onywera, Vincent O; Assah, Felix; Adedoyin, Rufus A; Conway, Terry L; Moss, Sarah J; Ocansey, Reginald; Kolbe-Alexander, Tracy L; Akinroye, Kingsley K; Prista, Antonio; Larouche, Richard; Gavand, Kavita A; Cain, Kelli L; Lambert, Estelle V; Aryeetey, Richmond; Bartels, Clare; Tremblay, Mark S; Sallis, James F

    2016-03-08

    Built environment and policy interventions are effective strategies for controlling the growing worldwide deaths from physical inactivity-related non-communicable diseases. To improve built environment research and develop African specific evidence, it is important to first tailor built environment measures to African contexts and assess their psychometric properties across African countries. This study reports on the adaptation and test-retest reliability of the Neighborhood Environment Walkability Scale in seven sub-Saharan African countries (NEWS-Africa). The original NEWS comprising 8 subscales measuring reported physical and social attributes of neighborhood environments was systematically adapted for Africa through extensive input from physical activity and public health researchers, built environment professionals, and residents in seven African countries: Cameroon, Ghana, Kenya, Mozambique, Nigeria, South Africa and Uganda. Cognitive testing of NEWS-Africa was conducted among diverse residents (N = 109, 50 youth [12 - 17 years] and 59 adults [22 - 67 years], 69 % from low socioeconomic status [SES] neighborhoods). NEWS-Africa was translated into local languages and evaluated for 2-week test-retest reliability in adult participants (N = 301; female = 50.2 %; age = 32.3 ± 12.9 years) purposively recruited from neighborhoods varying in walkability (high and low walkable) and SES (high and low income) and from villages in six of seven participating countries. The original 67 NEWS items was expanded to 89 scores (76 individual NEWS items and 13 computed scales). Several modifications were made to individual items, and some new items were added to capture important attributes in the African environment. A new scale on personal safety was created, and the aesthetics scale was enlarged to reflect African specific characteristics. Over 95 % of all NEWS-Africa scores (items plus computed scales) demonstrated evidence of "excellent" (ICCs

  13. Do People Prefer to Pass Along Good or Bad News? Valence and Relevance of News as Predictors of Transmission Propensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath

    1996-11-01

    Anecdotal evidence seems to indicate that exaggeratedly bad news may propagate in the marketplace of ideas. Three studies investigate whether people prefer to pass along pieces of bad news or good news that are equated for "surprisingness." People typically prefer to pass along central rather than extreme information (i.e., news that is less surprising rather than more surprising). However, when confronted with extreme information, the results support a preference for congruence, that is, people prefer to pass along news that is congruent with the emotional valence of the domain in question. This means that in emotionally negative domains, contrary to some theoretical predictions, people are willing to pass along bad news even when it is exaggeratedly bad. At the same time, however, people transmit exaggeratedly good news in emotionally positive domains. The general discussion indicates how these results may inform research on word of mouth for consumer products and social relations in organizations.

  14. Recommendations for how to communicate bad news

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Villa López

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The communication, along with the control of the symptoms and the emotional support are the basic instruments that are used in the daily development of our profession. To be little capable at the time of notifying bad news can generate an added suffering unnecessary in the person who receives the new and a deterioration in the relation professional-patient.In many occasions, at the time of approaching these situations, the professional of the health usually feels anguish, fear and restlessness, this is because during is scared and restlessness this happens because during his stage of studies in the faculty the student has received a formation based on the binomial health-disease from a totally biological perspective forgetting the abilities communication.Supported in different bibliographical sources, this article tries to analyze the factors that influence when communicating the bad news and, to suggest some preventatives ideas on how giving them trying to prevent the burnout syndrome.

  15. Alternative Fuel News, Vol. 2, No. 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NREL

    1999-03-17

    The cover story in this issue of the Alternative Fuel News highlights the niche market principle; the places in which AFVs would best fit. This year's SEP funding is expected to be the springboard needed for the development of niche projects. The Clean Cities Program, by matching those needs and attributes in niches, can dramatically increase the attractiveness of AFVs and make an impact on those high-mileage, high-use fleets.

  16. News at Six: Hepatitis C Special

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Thursz

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This Bristol Myers Squibb-sponsored symposium was chaired by Mark Thursz, who oversaw a novel news bulletin-themed symposium with sessions provided by a distinguished, international team of roving reporters; Charles Gore from the World Hepatitis Alliance, Jean-Michel Pawlotsky from France, Alessandra Mangia from Italy, Ashley Brown and Graham Foster from London, Heiner Wedemeyer from Germany, and Rafael Esteban from Spain.

  17. Welcome to the Era of Fake News

    OpenAIRE

    Jonathan Albright

    2017-01-01

    For the news industry, information is used to tell stories, which have traditionally been organized around “facts”. A growing problem, however, is that fact-based evidence is not relevant to a growing segment of the populace. Journalists need facts to tell stories, but they need data to understand how to engage audiences with this accurate information. The implementation of data is part of the solution to countering the erosion of trust and the decay of social discourse across networked space...

  18. Alternative Fuel News, Vol. 2, No. 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NREL

    1999-01-06

    In this issue of the Alternative Fuel News, the authors remember what happened just 25 years ago (the energy crisis of 1973) and reiterate that foreign oil dependence is still a national issue. Highlighted are some the successes in the Clean Cities Program and the alternative fuels industry. Also featured is the Natural Gas Vehicle Coalition (NGVC) and the United States Postal Service (USPS) delivers with AFVs.

  19. What's unusual in online disease outbreak news?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collier Nigel

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accurate and timely detection of public health events of international concern is necessary to help support risk assessment and response and save lives. Novel event-based methods that use the World Wide Web as a signal source offer potential to extend health surveillance into areas where traditional indicator networks are lacking. In this paper we address the issue of systematically evaluating online health news to support automatic alerting using daily disease-country counts text mined from real world data using BioCaster. For 18 data sets produced by BioCaster, we compare 5 aberration detection algorithms (EARS C2, C3, W2, F-statistic and EWMA for performance against expert moderated ProMED-mail postings. Results We report sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV, negative predictive value (NPV, mean alerts/100 days and F1, at 95% confidence interval (CI for 287 ProMED-mail postings on 18 outbreaks across 14 countries over a 366 day period. Results indicate that W2 had the best F1 with a slight benefit for day of week effect over C2. In drill down analysis we indicate issues arising from the granular choice of country-level modeling, sudden drops in reporting due to day of week effects and reporting bias. Automatic alerting has been implemented in BioCaster available from http://born.nii.ac.jp. Conclusions Online health news alerts have the potential to enhance manual analytical methods by increasing throughput, timeliness and detection rates. Systematic evaluation of health news aberrations is necessary to push forward our understanding of the complex relationship between news report volumes and case numbers and to select the best performing features and algorithms.

  20. News from the Biological Stain Commission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyon, H O; Kiernan, J A

    2008-01-01

    of the International Standards Organization (ISO/TC 212) and its working groups, WG 1, WG 2 and WG 3. In this issue of News from the BSC, H.O. Lyon provides information from the annual meeting of ISO/TC 212 that took place June 2-4, 2008 in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. In addition, under the heading...... of "Certification," J.A. Kiernan examines the certification procedure for thionine used by the BSC laboratory in Rochester, NY....