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Sample records for association iuga guidelines

  1. An International Urogynecological Association (IUGA)/International Continence Society (ICS) joint report on the terminology for female anorectal dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultan, Abdul H; Monga, Ash; Lee, Joseph; Emmanuel, Anton; Norton, Christine; Santoro, Giulio; Hull, Tracy; Berghmans, Bary; Brody, Stuart; Haylen, Bernard T

    2017-01-01

    The terminology for anorectal dysfunction in women has long been in need of a specific clinically-based Consensus Report. This Report combines the input of members of the Standardization and Terminology Committees of two International Organizations, the International Urogynecological Association (IUGA) and the International Continence Society (ICS), assisted on Committee by experts in their fields to form a Joint IUGA/ICS Working Group on Female Anorectal Terminology. Appropriate core clinical categories and sub classifications were developed to give an alphanumeric coding to each definition. An extensive process of twenty rounds of internal and external review was developed to exhaustively examine each definition, with decision-making by collective opinion (consensus). A Terminology Report for anorectal dysfunction, encompassing over 130 separate definitions, has been developed. It is clinically based with the most common diagnoses defined. Clarity and user-friendliness have been key aims to make it interpretable by practitioners and trainees in all the different specialty groups involved in female pelvic floor dysfunction. Female-specific anorectal investigations and imaging (ultrasound, radiology and MRI) has been included whilst appropriate figures have been included to supplement and help clarify the text. Interval review (5-10 years) is anticipated to keep the document updated and as widely acceptable as possible. A consensus-based Terminology Report for female anorectal dysfunction terminology has been produced aimed at being a significant aid to clinical practice and a stimulus for research.

  2. Vaginal laxity: a poorly understood quality of life problem; a survey of physician members of the International Urogynecological Association (IUGA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauls, Rachel N; Fellner, Angela N; Davila, G Willy

    2012-10-01

    Our goal was to assess how physician members of the International Urogynecological Association (IUGA) perceive and manage vaginal laxity. An Internet-based survey was circulated targeting physician members of IUGA that consisted of 27 questions and was designed to query attitudes and practices with respect to vaginal laxity. Five hundred and sixty-three of the 2,235 surveys were completed (25% response rate). Most respondents (65% male and 35 % female) listed urogynecology as their specialty. The geographical distribution was Europe (39%), North America (23%), Asia (15%), South America (14%), Australia (6%), and Africa (3%). Eighty-three percent described laxity as underreported by their patients. The majority considered laxity a bothersome condition to patients that impacts relationship happiness and sexual function. The introitus was listed most often as being responsible for these symptoms. Whereas only 54% offered surgical treatment, surgery was cited as more effective than Kegel exercises or physical therapy. North Americans were more likely to prefer and perform surgical treatment for this problem. Vaginal laxity is common and may impact sexual function and quality of life. Expanding our knowledge regarding pathophysiology and treatment would be of benefit to these patients.

  3. An International Urogynecological Association (IUGA)/International Continence Society (ICS) joint report on the terminology for the conservative and nonpharmacological management of female pelvic floor dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo, Kari; Frawley, Helena C; Haylen, Bernard T; Abramov, Yoram; Almeida, Fernando G; Berghmans, Bary; Bortolini, Maria; Dumoulin, Chantale; Gomes, Mario; McClurg, Doreen; Meijlink, Jane; Shelly, Elizabeth; Trabuco, Emanuel; Walker, Carolina; Wells, Amanda

    2017-02-01

    There has been an increasing need for the terminology on the conservative management of female pelvic floor dysfunction to be collated in a clinically based consensus report. This Report combines the input of members and elected nominees of the Standardization and Terminology Committees of two International Organizations, the International Urogynecological Association (IUGA) and the International Continence Society (ICS), assisted at intervals by many external referees. An extensive process of nine rounds of internal and external review was developed to exhaustively examine each definition, with decision-making by collective opinion (consensus). Before opening up for comments on the webpages of ICS and IUGA, five experts from physiotherapy, neurology, urology, urogynecology, and nursing were invited to comment on the paper. A Terminology Report on the conservative management of female pelvic floor dysfunction, encompassing over 200 separate definitions, has been developed. It is clinically based, with the most common symptoms, signs, assessments, diagnoses, and treatments defined. Clarity and ease of use have been key aims to make it interpretable by practitioners and trainees in all the different specialty groups involved in female pelvic floor dysfunction. Ongoing review is not only anticipated, but will be required to keep the document updated and as widely acceptable as possible. A consensus-based terminology report for the conservative management of female pelvic floor dysfunction has been produced, aimed at being a significant aid to clinical practice and a stimulus for research.

  4. Variability in practice patterns in stress urinary incontinence and pelvic organ prolapse: results of an IUGA survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammerer-Doak, Dorothy; Svabik, Kamil; Bazi, Tony

    2017-05-01

    Members of the International Urogynecological Association (IUGA) come from different geographic locations and practice settings. A member survey regarding practice patterns provides valuable information for practitioners and researchers alike, and allows the IUGA to discover areas to focus on education and information dissemination. A questionnaire was developed by the IUGA Research and Development committee and distributed electronically to IUGA surgeons. Answers were analyzed in reference to demographics, geographic distribution, and academic affiliation. Five hundred sixty-four members answered the questionnaire, representing a 28 % response rate, and closely reflecting the geographic distribution of IUGA membership. Preferred surgical treatment for uncomplicated SUI was the mid-urethral trans-obturator sling (49.7 %). Vaginal mesh was mainly used for repair of recurrent POP (20.4 %). Pessary use was offered "always" or "frequently" by 61.5 %, with no difference in academic affiliation, but significant differences based on region of practice. Compared to practitioners in non-academic centers, those with academic affiliation utilized Urodynamic studies (UDS) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) more frequently in the evaluation of POP. Regions of practice significantly influenced the majority of practice patterns, with the highest impact found in the use of robotic assistance. Many practice patterns in the evaluation and treatment of POP and SUI depend on academic affiliation and geographic location. Practice patterns are not always based on most recent evidence-based data.

  5. How to write an ICS/IUGA conference abstract.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cartwright, R.; Tikkinen, K.A.; Vierhout, M.E.; Koelbl, H.

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: This article aims to condense the lectures and discussions from workshops on good reporting at IUGA Como 2009 and ICS San Francisco 2009, providing practical advice for the novice researcher summarising their data for the first time. CONCLUSIONS: Drafting an abstract can be a time

  6. III Brazilian Thoracic Association Guidelines on tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conde, Marcus Barreto; Melo, Fernando Augusto Fiuza de; Marques, Ana Maria Campos; Cardoso, Ninarosa Calzavara; Pinheiro, Valeria Goes Ferreira; Dalcin, Paulo de Tarso Roth; Machado Junior, Almério; Lemos, Antonio Carlos Moreira; Netto, Antônio Ruffino; Durovni, Betina; Sant'Anna, Clemax Couto; Lima, Dinalva; Capone, Domenico; Barreira, Draurio; Matos, Eliana Dias; Mello, Fernanda Carvalho de Queiroz; David, Fernando Cezar; Marsico, Giovanni; Afiune, Jorge Barros; Silva, José Roberto Lapa e; Jamal, Leda Fátima; Telles, Maria Alice da Silva; Hirata, Mário Hiroyuki; Dalcolmo, Margareth Pretti; Rabahi, Marcelo Fouad; Cailleaux-Cesar, Michelle; Palaci, Moises; Morrone, Nelson; Guerra, Renata Leborato; Dietze, Reynaldo; Miranda, Silvana Spíndola de; Cavalcante, Solange Cesar; Nogueira, Susie Andries; Nonato, Tatiana Senna Galvão; Martire, Terezinha; Galesi, Vera Maria Nader; Dettoni, Valdério do Valle

    2009-10-01

    New scientific articles about tuberculosis (TB) are published daily worldwide. However, it is difficult for health care workers, overloaded with work, to stay abreast of the latest research findings and to discern which information can and should be used in their daily practice on assisting TB patients. The purpose of the III Brazilian Thoracic Association (BTA) Guidelines on TB is to critically review the most recent national and international scientific information on TB, presenting an updated text with the most current and useful tools against TB to health care workers in our country. The III BTA Guidelines on TB have been developed by the BTA Committee on TB and the TB Work Group, based on the text of the II BTA Guidelines on TB (2004). We reviewed the following databases: LILACS (SciELO) and PubMed (Medline). The level of evidence of the cited articles was determined, and 24 recommendations on TB have been evaluated, discussed by all of the members of the BTA Committee on TB and of the TB Work Group, and highlighted. The first version of the present Guidelines was posted on the BTA website and was available for public consultation for three weeks. Comments and critiques were evaluated. The level of scientific evidence of each reference was evaluated before its acceptance for use in the final text.

  7. European Association of Urology guidelines on vasectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohle, Gert R; Diemer, Thorsten; Kopa, Zsolt; Krausz, Csilla; Giwercman, Aleksander; Jungwirth, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    The European Association of Urology presents its guidelines for vasectomy. Vasectomy is highly effective, but problems can arise that are related to insufficient preoperative patient information, the surgical procedure, and postoperative follow-up. These guidelines aim to provide information and recommendations for physicians who perform vasectomies and to promote the provision of adequate information to the patient before the operation to prevent unrealistic expectations and legal procedures. An extensive review of the literature was carried out using Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews from 1980 to 2010. The focus was on randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and meta-analyses of RCTs (level 1 evidence) and on well-designed studies without randomisation (level 2 and 3 evidence). A total of 113 unique records were identified for consideration. Non-English language publications were excluded as well as studies published as abstracts only or reports from meetings. The guidelines discuss indications and contraindications for vasectomy, preoperative patient information and counselling, surgical techniques, postoperative care and subsequent semen analysis, and complications and late consequences. Vasectomy is intended to be a permanent form of contraception. There are no absolute contraindications for vasectomy. Relative contraindications may be the absence of children, age European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. European Association of Urology guidelines on priapism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salonia, Andrea; Eardley, Ian; Giuliano, François; Hatzichristou, Dimitrios; Moncada, Ignacio; Vardi, Yoram; Wespes, Eric; Hatzimouratidis, Konstantinos

    2014-02-01

    Priapism is defined as a penile erection that persists beyond or is unrelated to sexual interest or stimulation. It can be classified into ischaemic (low flow), arterial (high flow), or stuttering (recurrent or intermittent). To provide guidelines on the diagnosis and treatment of priapism. Systematic literature search on the epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment of priapism. Articles with highest evidence available were selected to form the basis of these recommendations. Ischaemic priapism is usually idiopathic and the most common form. Arterial priapism usually occurs after blunt perineal trauma. History is the mainstay of diagnosis and helps determine the pathogenesis. Laboratory testing is used to support clinical findings. Ischaemic priapism is an emergency condition. Intervention should start within 4-6h, including decompression of the corpora cavernosa by aspiration and intracavernous injection of sympathomimetic drugs (e.g. phenylephrine). Surgical treatment is recommended for failed conservative management, although the best procedure is unclear. Immediate implantation of a prosthesis should be considered for long-lasting priapism. Arterial priapism is not an emergency. Selective embolization is the suggested treatment modality and has high success rates. Stuttering priapism is poorly understood and the main therapeutic goal is the prevention of future episodes. This may be achieved pharmacologically, but data on efficacy are limited. These guidelines summarise current information on priapism. The extended version are available on the European Association of Urology Website (www.uroweb.org/guidelines/). Priapism is a persistent, often painful, penile erection lasting more than 4h unrelated to sexual stimulation. It is more common in patients with sickle cell disease. This article represents the shortened EAU priapism guidelines, based on a systematic literature review. Cases of priapism are classified into ischaemic (low flow), arterial (high flow), or

  9. American Association of Dental Schools Curricular Guidelines for Oral Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Dental Education, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Oral radiology curricular guidelines developed by the American Association of Dental Schools are provided. The guidelines describe minimal conditions under which a satisfactory educational experience can be offered. Principles of x-radiation, radiobiological concepts, radiological health, radiographic technique, radiographic quality, and darkroom…

  10. Past and future American Psychological Association guidelines for statistical practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Finch, S; Thomason, N; Cumming, G

    2002-01-01

    We review the publication guidelines of the American Psychological Association (APA) since 1929 and document their advice for authors about statistical practice. Although the advice has been extended with each revision of the guidelines, it has largely focused on null hypothesis significance testing

  11. Utilization of the American Telemedicine Association's Clinical Practice Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniotti, Nina; Bernard, Jordana

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background: The American Telemedicine Association (ATA) Standards and Guidelines Committee develops practice standards and guidelines. Key to the Committee's mission is dissemination so the standards can be used in the practice of telemedicine. Over a 2-year period, when a standards document was accessed from the ATA Web site, a short survey was completed, but it did not assess how the documents were used once downloaded. A more formal survey was conducted to determine the impact ATA standards and guidelines are having on healthcare delivery via telemedicine. Materials and Methods: A survey was developed and distributed via SurveyMonkey to 13,177 ATA members and nonmembers in November 2011. Results were compiled and analyzed after a 90-day open period for responses to be submitted. Results: The majority of respondents (96%) believe the practice of telemedicine/telehealth should have standards and guidelines and that the ATA and other professional societies/associations should be responsible for developing them. The top uses of guidelines include guidance for clinical practice, training, gaining reimbursement, and research. Respondents indicating a need for standards and guidelines said the ATA (78.7%) and other professional societies/associations (74.5%) should be responsible for development. When asked to list specific practice guidelines or standards they are using for telehealth, the majority (21.5%) are using in-house (e.g., hospital, company)-developed guidelines, followed by those from professional associations/societies (20.4%) and those developed by the ATA (18.2%). Conclusions: Overall, the survey results indicate guidelines documents developed by the ATA and other professional societies and those developed in-house are being regularly accessed and used in both public and private sectors. Practitioners of telemedicine believe that standards and guidelines are needed for guidance for clinical practice, training, gaining reimbursement, and research

  12. Workshop on problem areas associated with developing carcinogen guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-06-01

    A workshop was conducted to discuss problem areas associated with developing carcinogen guidelines. Session topics included (1) definition of a carcinogen for regulatory purposes; (2) potency; (3) risk assessment; (4) uncertainties; (5) de minimis quantity; and (6) legal and regulatory issues. Separate abstracts have been prepared for individual papers. (ACR)

  13. American Association of Dental Schools Curricular Guidelines for Orthodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Dental Education, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Guidelines reviewed and approved by the American Association of Dental Schools and sent to the Council on Dental Education in June 1979 are outlined. Educational goals and objectives and sequence of instruction (including growth and development, preclinical orthodontics, and clinical experience) are discussed. (MLW)

  14. Associations between schools' guidelines and pupils' smoking and sweet consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kankaanpää, R; Tolvanen, M; Anttila, J; Lahti, S

    2014-12-01

    The aims were to find out if schools' sweet-selling was associated with pupils' sweet consumption, and whether the school's guideline about leaving the school area was associated with pupils' tobacco and sweet consumption. Two independently collected datasets from all Finnish upper secondary schools (N = 988) were linked together. The first dataset on schools' sweet-selling (yes/no) and guideline about leaving school area (yes/no) was collected via school principals in 2007 using an Internet questionnaire with a response rate of 49%, n = 480. The second dataset on pupils' self-reported: weekly school-time (0, never; 1, less than once; 2, 1-2 times; 3, 3-5 times), overall sweet consumption frequencies (1, never; 2, 1-2 times; 3, 3-5 times; 4, 6-7 times) and smoking and snuff-using frequencies (1, never; 2, every now and then; 3 = every day) was collected in 2006-2007 in the School Health Promotion Study from pupils. An average was calculated for the school-level with a response rate 80%, n = 790. The total response rate of the linked final data was 42%, n = 414. Mean values of self-reported sweet and tobacco consumption frequencies between sweet-selling and non-sweet-selling schools and between schools with different guidelines were compared using Mann-Whitney test. Pupils in sweet-selling schools and in schools without a guideline about leaving the school area, more frequently used sweet products and tobacco products than their peers in other schools. Schools may need help in building permanent guidelines to stop sweet-selling in school and to prevent leaving the school area to decrease pupils' sweet consumption and smoking.

  15. 2009 American Thyroid Association guidelines on thyroid nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perros, P

    2010-08-01

    The American Thyroid Association guidelines on thyroid nodules and differentiated thyroid cancer, published in 2009, provide valuable recommendations based on current evidence. Inevitably, controversies and uncertainties will continue to challenge clinicians and patients. On topics where evidence is not clear-cut, judgement may be coloured by pre-existing practises and the structure of the health service in each country, so one has to be aware of the pitfalls of transferring recommendations to one's own practise.

  16. A report from the 37th Annual Meeting of the International Urogynecological Association (September 4-8 - Brisbane, Australia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabasseda, X

    2012-10-01

    Urinary incontinence was one of the major topics discussed in Brisbane during the International Urogynecological Association (IUGA)'s 37th Annual Meeting. Brisbane Convention Center was the site of this year's meeting, wherein podium, oral poster and non-moderated poster sessions presented the latest advances in urogynecology. The following report summarizes state-of-the-art therapies for common urogynecological diseases as discussed in Brisbane during the beautiful pre-spring days in early September 2012. Copyright 2012 Prous Science, S.A.U. or its licensors. All rights reserved.

  17. Association Between Blood Pressure and Adherence to French Dietary Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelong, Helene; Blacher, Jacques; Menai, Mehdi; Galan, Pilar; Fezeu, Leopold; Hercberg, Serge; Kesse-Guyot, Emmanuelle

    2016-08-01

    Adopting a healthy diet like the Dietary Approach to Stop Hypertension (DASH) or Mediterranean diet (MD) represents a major lifestyle for blood pressure (BP) control in general population. Nutritional policies, such as the French Nutrition and Health Program (Programme National Nutrition Santé or PNNS), have been implemented in several countries with the aims of preventing chronic diseases. The objective of our study was to investigate association between BP and adherence to PNNS guidelines compared with adherence to DASH or MD. We conducted a cross-sectional study in 11,302 untreated participants from the NutriNet-Santé study, a French web-based cohort study. Three validated scores reflecting adherence to PNNS guidelines, DASH diet, and MD were calculated from repeated 24-hour records. Three BP measurements using a standardized protocol were collected. Multivariate linear models were used to assess the associations between the dietary scores and BP. In women, independent of age, socioeconomic status, body mass index, tobacco use, alcohol consumption, and physical activity, adherence to PNNS guidelines was inversely significantly associated with systolic BP (β = -0.63, P DASH-style diet (β = -0.66, P < 0.0001) or MD (β = -0.63, P = 0.0002). No significant association was found in men. Adherence to French nutritional recommendations was found negatively associated with BP at the same magnitude as adherence to well-known dietary pattern in the prevention and treatment of hypertension. © American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd 2016. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Polish translation and validation of the Pelvic Organ Prolapse/Urinary Incontinence Sexual Questionnaire, IUGA-Revised (PISQ-IR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzybowska, Magdalena Emilia; Piaskowska-Cala, Justyna; Wydra, Dariusz Grzegorz

    2017-12-29

    The aim of the study was to translate into Polish the Pelvic Organ Prolapse/Incontinence Sexual Questionnaire, IUGA-Revised (PISQ-IR), which evaluates sexual function in sexually active (SA) and not SA (NSA) women with pelvic floor disorders (PFD), and to validate the Polish version. After translation, back-translation and cognitive interviews, the final version of PISQ-IR was established. The study group included 252 women with PFD (124 NSA and 128 SA). All women underwent clinical evaluation and completed the PISQ-IR. For test-retest reliability, the questionnaire was administered to 99 patients twice at an interval of 2 weeks. The analysis of criterion validity required the subjects to complete self-reported measures. Internal consistency and criterion validity were assessed separately for NSA and SA women for the PISQ-IR subscales. The mean age of the women was 60.9 ± 10.6 years and their mean BMI was 27.9 ± 4.9 kg/m 2 . Postmenopausal women constituted 82.5% of the study group. Urinary incontinence (UI) was diagnosed in 60 women (23.8%), pelvic organ prolapse (POP) in 90 (35.7%), and UI and POP in 102 (40.5%). Fecal incontinence was reported by 45 women (17.9%). The PISQ-IR Polish version proved to have good internal consistency in NSA women (α 0.651 to 0.857) and SA women (α 0.605 to 0.887), and strong reliability in all subscales (Pearson's coefficient 0.759-0.899; p Polish version is a valid tool for evaluating sexual function in women with PFD.

  19. Reporting of financial conflicts of interest in clinical practice guidelines: a case study analysis of guidelines from the Canadian Medical Association Infobase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shnier, Adrienne; Lexchin, Joel; Romero, Mirna; Brown, Kevin

    2016-08-15

    Clinical practice guidelines are widely distributed by medical associations and relied upon by physicians for the best available clinical evidence. International findings report that financial conflicts of interest (FCOI) with drug companies may influence drug recommendations and are common among guideline authors. There is no comparable study on exclusively Canadian guidelines; therefore, we provide a case study of authors' FCOI declarations in guidelines from the Canadian Medical Association (CMA) Infobase. We also assess the financial relationships between guideline-affiliated organizations and drug companies. Using a population approach, we extracted first-line drug recommendations and authors' FCOI disclosures in guidelines from the CMA Infobase. We contacted the corresponding authors on guidelines when FCOI disclosures were missing for some or all authors. We also extracted guideline-affiliated organizations and searched each of their websites to determine if they had financial relationships with drug companies. We analyzed 350 authors from 28 guidelines. Authors were named on one, two, or three guidelines, yielding 400 FCOI statements. In 75.0 % of guidelines at least one author, and in 21.4 % of guidelines all authors, disclosed FCOI with drug companies. In 54.0 % of guidelines at least one author, and in 28.6 % of guidelines over half of the authors, disclosed FCOI with manufacturers of drugs that they recommended. Twenty of 48 authors on multiple guidelines reported different FCOI in their disclosures. Eight guidelines identified affiliated organizations with financial relationships with manufacturers of drugs recommended in those guidelines. This is the first study to systematically describe FCOI disclosures by authors of Canadian guidelines and financial relationships between guideline-affiliated organizations and pharmaceutical companies. These financial relationships are common. Because authoritative value is assigned to guidelines distributed by

  20. [European Association of Urology guidelines on laser technologies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, T R W; Liatsikos, E N; Nagele, U; Traxer, O; Merseburger, A S

    2013-02-01

    The European Association of Urology (EAU) Guidelines Office has set up a guideline working panel to analyse the scientific evidence published in the world literature on lasers in urologic practice. Review the physical background and physiologic and technical aspects of the use of lasers in urology, as well as current clinical results from these new and evolving technologies, together with recommendations for the application of lasers in urology. The primary objective of this structured presentation of the current evidence base in this area is to assist clinicians in making informed choices regarding the use of lasers in their practice. Structured literature searches using an expert consultant were designed for each section of this document. Searches were carried out in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Medline and Embase on the Dialog/DataStar platform. The controlled terminology of the respective databases was used, and both Medical Subject Headings and EMTREE were analysed for relevant entry terms. One Cochrane review was identified. Depending on the date of publication, the evidence for different laser treatments is heterogeneous. The available evidence allows treatments to be classified as safe alternatives for the treatment of bladder outlet obstruction in different clinical scenarios, such as refractory urinary retention, anticoagulation, and antiplatelet medication. Laser treatment for bladder cancer should only be used in a clinical trial setting or for patients who are not suitable for conventional treatment due to comorbidities or other complications. For the treatment of urinary stones and retrograde endoureterotomy, lasers provide a standard tool to augment the endourologic procedure. In benign prostatic obstruction (BPO), laser vaporisation, resection, or enucleation are alternative treatment options. The standard treatment for BPO remains transurethral resection of the prostate for

  1. 2018 Guidelines for the Early Management of Patients With Acute Ischemic Stroke: A Guideline for Healthcare Professionals From the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, William J; Rabinstein, Alejandro A; Ackerson, Teri; Adeoye, Opeolu M; Bambakidis, Nicholas C; Becker, Kyra; Biller, José; Brown, Michael; Demaerschalk, Bart M; Hoh, Brian; Jauch, Edward C; Kidwell, Chelsea S; Leslie-Mazwi, Thabele M; Ovbiagele, Bruce; Scott, Phillip A; Sheth, Kevin N; Southerland, Andrew M; Summers, Deborah V; Tirschwell, David L

    2018-01-24

    The purpose of these guidelines is to provide an up-to-date comprehensive set of recommendations for clinicians caring for adult patients with acute arterial ischemic stroke in a single document. The intended audiences are prehospital care providers, physicians, allied health professionals, and hospital administrators. These guidelines supersede the 2013 guidelines and subsequent updates. Members of the writing group were appointed by the American Heart Association Stroke Council's Scientific Statements Oversight Committee, representing various areas of medical expertise. Strict adherence to the American Heart Association conflict of interest policy was maintained. Members were not allowed to participate in discussions or to vote on topics relevant to their relations with industry. The members of the writing group unanimously approved all recommendations except when relations with industry precluded members voting. Prerelease review of the draft guideline was performed by 4 expert peer reviewers and by the members of the Stroke Council's Scientific Statements Oversight Committee and Stroke Council Leadership Committee. These guidelines use the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association 2015 Class of Recommendations and Levels of Evidence and the new American Heart Association guidelines format. These guidelines detail prehospital care, urgent and emergency evaluation and treatment with intravenous and intra-arterial therapies, and in-hospital management, including secondary prevention measures that are appropriately instituted within the first 2 weeks. The guidelines support the overarching concept of stroke systems of care in both the prehospital and hospital settings. These guidelines are based on the best evidence currently available. In many instances, however, only limited data exist demonstrating the urgent need for continued research on treatment of acute ischemic stroke. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Guidelines for the Management of Patients With Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms: A Guideline for Healthcare Professionals From the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, B Gregory; Brown, Robert D; Amin-Hanjani, Sepideh; Broderick, Joseph P; Cockroft, Kevin M; Connolly, E Sander; Duckwiler, Gary R; Harris, Catherine C; Howard, Virginia J; Johnston, S Claiborne Clay; Meyers, Philip M; Molyneux, Andrew; Ogilvy, Christopher S; Ringer, Andrew J; Torner, James

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this updated statement is to provide comprehensive and evidence-based recommendations for management of patients with unruptured intracranial aneurysms. Writing group members used systematic literature reviews from January 1977 up to June 2014. They also reviewed contemporary published evidence-based guidelines, personal files, and published expert opinion to summarize existing evidence, indicate gaps in current knowledge, and when appropriate, formulated recommendations using standard American Heart Association criteria. The guideline underwent extensive peer review, including review by the Stroke Council Leadership and Stroke Scientific Statement Oversight Committees, before consideration and approval by the American Heart Association Science Advisory and Coordinating Committee. Evidence-based guidelines are presented for the care of patients presenting with unruptured intracranial aneurysms. The guidelines address presentation, natural history, epidemiology, risk factors, screening, diagnosis, imaging and outcomes from surgical and endovascular treatment. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. 78 FR 17679 - Implementation of the Updated American Veterinary Medical Association Guidelines for the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-22

    ... the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) Guidelines for the Euthanasia of Animals: 2013... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Implementation of the Updated American Veterinary Medical Association Guidelines for the Euthanasia of Animals: 2013 Edition SUMMARY: The National Institutes of Health...

  4. Guidelines for the early management of patients with acute ischemic stroke: a guideline for healthcare professionals from the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauch, Edward C; Saver, Jeffrey L; Adams, Harold P; Bruno, Askiel; Connors, J J Buddy; Demaerschalk, Bart M; Khatri, Pooja; McMullan, Paul W; Qureshi, Adnan I; Rosenfield, Kenneth; Scott, Phillip A; Summers, Debbie R; Wang, David Z; Wintermark, Max; Yonas, Howard

    2013-03-01

    The authors present an overview of the current evidence and management recommendations for evaluation and treatment of adults with acute ischemic stroke. The intended audiences are prehospital care providers, physicians, allied health professionals, and hospital administrators responsible for the care of acute ischemic stroke patients within the first 48 hours from stroke onset. These guidelines supersede the prior 2007 guidelines and 2009 updates. Members of the writing committee were appointed by the American Stroke Association Stroke Council's Scientific Statement Oversight Committee, representing various areas of medical expertise. Strict adherence to the American Heart Association conflict of interest policy was maintained throughout the consensus process. Panel members were assigned topics relevant to their areas of expertise, reviewed the stroke literature with emphasis on publications since the prior guidelines, and drafted recommendations in accordance with the American Heart Association Stroke Council's Level of Evidence grading algorithm. The goal of these guidelines is to limit the morbidity and mortality associated with stroke. The guidelines support the overarching concept of stroke systems of care and detail aspects of stroke care from patient recognition; emergency medical services activation, transport, and triage; through the initial hours in the emergency department and stroke unit. The guideline discusses early stroke evaluation and general medical care, as well as ischemic stroke, specific interventions such as reperfusion strategies, and general physiological optimization for cerebral resuscitation. Because many of the recommendations are based on limited data, additional research on treatment of acute ischemic stroke remains urgently needed.

  5. The European Association of Urology (EAU) guidelines methodology: a critical evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aus, Gunnar; Chapple, Christopher; Hanûs, Tomas; Irani, Jacques; Lobel, Bernard; Loch, Tillmann; Mitropoulos, Dionysios; Parsons, Keith; Plass, Karin; Schmid, Hans-Peter

    2009-11-01

    Guidelines can be produced and written in numerous ways. The aim of the present article is to describe and evaluate the method currently used to produce the European Association of Urology (EAU) guidelines. The methodology is described in detail, compared to other urologic guidelines by members of the EAU Guidelines Office Board. The new methodology is evaluated by the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation (AGREE) instrument. The currently used methodology is adapted to the aims and objectives as established by the EAU for their guidelines; wide coverage (essentially all fields of urology) and useful to urologists all over Europe. The frequent updates are easily accessible in a printed and electronic format. The AGREE instrument supports these strong points, but also identifies potentially weak points, such as no patient involvement, no formal validation of the guidelines texts prior to publication, and lack of discussion of organisational barriers and cost implications. The currently used methodology for the production of EAU guidelines fulfils the association's main objectives related to their guidelines, but the texts will benefit from the inclusion of country-specific cost and organisational data. For the practising clinician, these guidelines will help to take science into clinical practice.

  6. European Association of Urology guidelines on Male Infertility: the 2012 update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungwirth, Andreas; Giwercman, Aleksander; Tournaye, Herman; Diemer, Thorsten; Kopa, Zsolt; Dohle, Gert; Krausz, Csilla

    2012-08-01

    New data regarding the diagnosis and treatment of male infertility have emerged and led to an update of the European Association of Urology (EAU) guidelines for Male Infertility. To review the new EAU guidelines for Male Infertility. A comprehensive work-up of the literature obtained from Medline, the Cochrane Central Register of Systematic Reviews, and reference lists in publications and review articles was developed and screened by a group of urologists and andrologists appointed by the EAU Guidelines Committee. Previous recommendations based on the older literature on this subject were taken into account. Levels of evidence and grade of guideline recommendations were added, modified from the Oxford Centre for Evidence-based Medicine Levels of Evidence. These EAU guidelines are a short comprehensive overview of the updated guidelines of male infertility as recently published by the EAU (http://www.uroweb.org/guidelines/online-guidelines/), and they are also available in the National Guideline Clearinghouse (http://www.guideline.gov/). Copyright © 2012 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Guideline on Muscle-Invasive and Metastatic Bladder Cancer (European Association of Urology Guideline): American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Endorsement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milowsky, Matthew I; Rumble, R Bryan; Booth, Christopher M; Gilligan, Timothy; Eapen, Libni J; Hauke, Ralph J; Boumansour, Pat; Lee, Cheryl T

    2016-06-01

    To endorse the European Association of Urology guideline on muscle-invasive (MIBC) and metastatic bladder cancer. The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has a policy and set of procedures for endorsing clinical practice guidelines that have been developed by other professional organizations. The guideline on MIBC and metastatic bladder cancer was reviewed for developmental rigor by methodologists. The ASCO Endorsement Panel then reviewed the content and recommendations. The ASCO Endorsement Panel determined that the recommendations from the European Association of Urology guideline on MIBC and metastatic bladder cancer, published online in March 2015, are clear, thorough, and based on the most relevant scientific evidence. ASCO endorses the guideline on MIBC and metastatic bladder cancer and has added qualifying statements, including highlighting the use of chemoradiotherapy for select patients with MIBC and recommending a preference for clinical trials in the treatment of metastatic disease in the second-line setting. Multidisciplinary care for patients with MIBC and metastatic bladder cancer is critical. The standard treatment of MIBC (cT2-T4a N0M0) is neoadjuvant cisplatin-based combination chemotherapy followed by radical cystectomy. In cisplatin-ineligible patients, radical cystectomy alone is recommended. Adjuvant cisplatin-based chemotherapy may be offered to high-risk patients who have not received neoadjuvant therapy. Chemoradiotherapy may be offered as an alternative to cystectomy in appropriately selected patients with MIBC and in some patients for whom cystectomy is not an option. Metastatic disease should be treated with cisplatin-containing combination chemotherapy or with carboplatin combination chemotherapy or single agents in patients ineligible for cisplatin.Additional information is available at http://www.asco.org/endorsements/MIBC and www.asco.org/guidelineswiki. © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  8. Citrus County Schools Copyright Guidelines Recommended by the Citrus County Association of School Media Specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citrus County School District, Inverness, FL.

    This document contains copyright guidelines determined appropriate for the Citrus County School System (Florida) by the Citrus County Association of School Media Specialists in May, 1992. These guidelines are based on interpretation and understanding of current copyright law as applied to education and implemented in school districts in the United…

  9. American Association for Dental Schools Curricular Guidelines for Microscopic Anatomy (General and Oral).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susi, Frank; Mundell, Robert

    1980-01-01

    Guidelines developed by the Section on Anatomical Sciences of the American Association for Dental Schools are presented. These guidelines were drawn up as an effort to provide a general criterion-referenced standard against which a school can measure its course content in histology. (MLW)

  10. Guidelines for the management of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: a guideline for healthcare professionals from the American Heart Association/american Stroke Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, E Sander; Rabinstein, Alejandro A; Carhuapoma, J Ricardo; Derdeyn, Colin P; Dion, Jacques; Higashida, Randall T; Hoh, Brian L; Kirkness, Catherine J; Naidech, Andrew M; Ogilvy, Christopher S; Patel, Aman B; Thompson, B Gregory; Vespa, Paul

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this guideline is to present current and comprehensive recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). A formal literature search of MEDLINE (November 1, 2006, through May 1, 2010) was performed. Data were synthesized with the use of evidence tables. Writing group members met by teleconference to discuss data-derived recommendations. The American Heart Association Stroke Council's Levels of Evidence grading algorithm was used to grade each recommendation. The guideline draft was reviewed by 7 expert peer reviewers and by the members of the Stroke Council Leadership and Manuscript Oversight Committees. It is intended that this guideline be fully updated every 3 years. Evidence-based guidelines are presented for the care of patients presenting with aSAH. The focus of the guideline was subdivided into incidence, risk factors, prevention, natural history and outcome, diagnosis, prevention of rebleeding, surgical and endovascular repair of ruptured aneurysms, systems of care, anesthetic management during repair, management of vasospasm and delayed cerebral ischemia, management of hydrocephalus, management of seizures, and management of medical complications. aSAH is a serious medical condition in which outcome can be dramatically impacted by early, aggressive, expert care. The guidelines offer a framework for goal-directed treatment of the patient with aSAH.

  11. [European Association of Urology guidelines on assessment and nonsurgical management of urinary incontinence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, M G; Bosch, R J L; Burkhard, F C; Cruz, F; Madden, T B; Nambiar, A K; Neisius, A; de Ridder, D J M K; Tubaro, A; Turner, W H; Pickard, R S

    2013-04-01

    The previous European Association of Urology (EAU) guidelines on urinary incontinence comprised a summary of sections of the 2009 International Consultation on Incontinence. A decision was made in 2010 to rewrite these guidelines based on an independent systematic review carried out by the EAU guidelines panel, using a sustainable methodology. We present a short version of the full guidelines on assessment, diagnosis, and nonsurgical treatment of urinary incontinence, with the aim of increasing their dissemination. Evidence appraisal included a pragmatic review of existing systematic reviews and independent new literature searches, based on Population, Intervention, Comparator, Outcome questions. Appraisal of papers was carried out by an international panel of experts, who also collaborated on a series of consensus discussions, to develop concise structured evidence summaries and action-based recommendations using a modified Oxford system. The full version of the guidelines is available online (http://www.uroweb.org/guidelines/online-guidelines/). The guidelines include algorithms that refer the reader back to the supporting evidence, and they are more immediately useable in daily clinical practice. These new guidelines present an up-to-date summary of the available evidence, together with clear clinical algorithms and action-based recommendations based on the best available evidence. Where such evidence does not exist, they present a consensus of expert opinion. Copyright © 2012 AEU. Published by Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  12. Saudi oncology society and Saudi urology association combined clinical management guidelines for prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Abusamra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This is an update to the previously published Saudi guidelines for the evaluation, medical, and surgical management of patients diagnosed with prostate cancer. It is categorized according to the stage of the disease using the tumor node metastasis staging system 7th edition. The guidelines are presented with supporting evidence level, they are based on comprehensive literature review, several internationally recognized guidelines, and the collective expertise of the guidelines committee members (authors who were selected by the Saudi oncology society and Saudi urological association. Considerations to the local availability of drugs, technology, and expertise have been regarded. These guidelines should serve as a roadmap for the urologists, oncologists, general physicians, support groups, and health care policy makers in the management of patients diagnosed with adenocarcinoma of the prostate to.

  13. Saudi Oncology Society and Saudi Urology Association combined clinical management guidelines for testicular germ cell tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Alotaibi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This is an update to the previously published Saudi guidelines for the evaluation, medical, and surgical management of patients diagnosed with testicular germ cell tumors. It is categorized according to the stage of the disease using the tumor-node-metastasis staging system 7th edition. The guidelines are presented with supporting evidence level, they are based on comprehensive literature review, several internationally recognized guidelines, and the collective expertise of the guidelines committee members (authors who were selected by the Saudi Oncology Society and Saudi Urological Association. Considerations to the local availability of drugs, technology and expertise have been regarded. These guidelines should serve as a roadmap for the urologists, oncologists, general physicians, support groups, and health care policy makers in the management of patients diagnosed with testicular germ cell tumors.

  14. Saudi Oncology Society and Saudi Urology Association combined clinical management guidelines for renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Alghamdi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This is an update to the previously published Saudi guidelines for the evaluation, medical, and surgical management of patients diagnosed with renal cell carcinoma (RCC. It is categorized according to the stage of the disease using the tumor node metastasis staging system 7th edition. The guidelines are presented with supporting evidence level, they are based on comprehensive literature review, several internationally recognized guidelines, and the collective expertise of the guidelines committee members (authors who were selected by the Saudi Oncology Society and Saudi Urological Association. Considerations to the local availability of drugs, technology, and expertise have been regarded. These guidelines should serve as a roadmap for the urologists, oncologists, general physicians, support groups, and healthcare policy makers in the management of patients diagnosed with RCC.

  15. Saudi Oncology Society and Saudi Urology Association combined clinical management guidelines for renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghamdi, Abdullah; Alkhateeb, Sultan; Alghamdi, Khalid; Bazarbashi, Shouki; Murshid, Esam; Alotaibi, Mohammed; Abusamra, Ashraf; Rabah, Danny; Ahmad, Imran; Al-Mansour, Mubarak; Saadeddin, Ahmad; Alsharm, Abdullah

    2016-01-01

    This is an update to the previously published Saudi guidelines for the evaluation, medical, and surgical management of patients diagnosed with renal cell carcinoma (RCC). It is categorized according to the stage of the disease using the tumor node metastasis staging system 7(th) edition. The guidelines are presented with supporting evidence level, they are based on comprehensive literature review, several internationally recognized guidelines, and the collective expertise of the guidelines committee members (authors) who were selected by the Saudi Oncology Society and Saudi Urological Association. Considerations to the local availability of drugs, technology, and expertise have been regarded. These guidelines should serve as a roadmap for the urologists, oncologists, general physicians, support groups, and healthcare policy makers in the management of patients diagnosed with RCC.

  16. Guidelines for the Management of Spontaneous Intracerebral Hemorrhage: A Guideline for Healthcare Professionals From the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemphill, J Claude; Greenberg, Steven M; Anderson, Craig S; Becker, Kyra; Bendok, Bernard R; Cushman, Mary; Fung, Gordon L; Goldstein, Joshua N; Macdonald, R Loch; Mitchell, Pamela H; Scott, Phillip A; Selim, Magdy H; Woo, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this guideline is to present current and comprehensive recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage. A formal literature search of PubMed was performed through the end of August 2013. The writing committee met by teleconference to discuss narrative text and recommendations. Recommendations follow the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association methods of classifying the level of certainty of the treatment effect and the class of evidence. Prerelease review of the draft guideline was performed by 6 expert peer reviewers and by the members of the Stroke Council Scientific Oversight Committee and Stroke Council Leadership Committee. Evidence-based guidelines are presented for the care of patients with acute intracerebral hemorrhage. Topics focused on diagnosis, management of coagulopathy and blood pressure, prevention and control of secondary brain injury and intracranial pressure, the role of surgery, outcome prediction, rehabilitation, secondary prevention, and future considerations. Results of new phase 3 trials were incorporated. Intracerebral hemorrhage remains a serious condition for which early aggressive care is warranted. These guidelines provide a framework for goal-directed treatment of the patient with intracerebral hemorrhage. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Evolution of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Clinical Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Henry; Chao, Howard; Guerra, Andres; Sosa, Alan; Christopoulos, Georgios; Christakopoulos, Georgios E; Rangan, Bavana V; Maragkoudakis, Spyros; Jneid, Hani; Banerjee, Subhash; Brilakis, Emmanouil S

    2015-06-30

    The American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Heart Association (AHA) have been developing clinical guidelines to assist practicing clinicians. The goal of this study was to evaluate changes in ACC/AHA guideline recommendations between 2008 and 2014. The previous and current ACC/AHA guideline documents that were updated between 2008 and June 2014 were compared to determine changes in Class of Recommendation (COR) and Level of Evidence (LOE). Each recommendation was classified as new, dropped, revised, or unchanged, and the changes in evidence were examined. During the study period, 11 guideline documents (9 disease based and 2 interventional procedure based) were updated. The total number of recommendations decreased from 2,067 to 1,869 (321 fewer recommendations in disease-based guidelines and 123 additional recommendations in interventional procedure-based guidelines). The recommendation class distribution of the updated guidelines was 50.1% Class I (previously 50.8%), 39.4% Class II (previously 35.4%), and 10.4% Class III (previously 13.8%) (p = 0.001). The LOE distribution among updated versions was 15.0% for LOE: A (previously 13.3%), 50.8% for LOE: B (previously 41.4%), and 34.2% for LOE C (previously 45.3%) (p guidelines, 859 recommendations were new, 1,339 were dropped, 881 were unchanged in COR and LOE, and 129 were revised. Of the revised guidelines, 75 recommendations had an increase in LOE (the majority from LOE: C to LOE: B); 34 recommendations had a decrease in LOE; and 20 recommendations had class changes. LOE increases were justified by introduction of new randomized controlled trials, new studies, and new meta-analyses. The ACC/AHA guideline recommendations are undergoing significant changes, becoming more evidence based and scientifically robust with a tendency to exclude recommendations with insufficient scientific evidence. Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. An Association Between Pain and American Association of Respiratory Care 2010 Guidelines During Tracheal Suctioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucchini, Alberto; Canesi, Marta; Robustelli, Gaia; Fumagalli, Roberto; Bambi, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Tracheal suctioning is recalled by mechanically ventilated patients as the most painful procedure during their stay in the intensive care unit. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the implementation of American Association of Respiratory Care suction guidelines positively affects the levels of patients' pain. This is a prospective observational study on adult patients admitted to 2 general intensive care units. Pain levels in sedated mechanically ventilated patients were recorded before, during, and after tracheal suctioning, using the Critical Care Pain Observation Tool (CPOT). Forty-seven patients were enrolled, with a mean age of 61.72 (±18.46) years. Median CPOT value was 0 (quartile 1 [Q1] [25%], 0; quartile 3 [Q3] [75%], 0; min, 0; max, 2) during the procedure. The Critical Care Pain Observation Tool reached a median value of 3, while 5 minutes after suctioning. Postprocedural CPOT median score was 0 (Q1 [25%], 0; Q3 [75%], 0; min, 0; max, 2). The median number of passes during suctioning was 1 (Q1, 1; Q3, 2). The sizes of suction catheters used in the recorded procedures were as follows: 12F in 27 cases (57%), 14F in 18 cases (38%), and 10F in 2 cases (5%). The median size of the endotracheal tube was 7.5 mm (Q1, 7.5; Q3, 8). The correct ratio between endotracheal tube diameter and suction catheter was used in 24 procedures (51%). Despite the low number of patients, this study showed that the implementation of the American Association of Respiratory Care 2010 endotracheal suctioning guidelines into practice helps to reduce procedural-induced pain. Therefore, training and continuing education are important for clinical staff performing tracheal suctioning.

  19. [Revised guideline 'Vasectomy' from the Dutch Urological Association

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dohle, G.R.; Meuleman, E.J.H.; Hoekstra, J.W.; Roijen, H.J. van; Zwiers, W.

    2005-01-01

    Vasectomy is a simple and reliable method of contraception. Problems associated with vasectomy include inadequate patient information, complications of the procedure e.g. infection and scrotal bleeding (4-22%), chronic scrotal pain after the procedure (2-5%) and spontaneous recanalisation with

  20. Durability of class I American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association clinical practice guideline recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuman, Mark D; Goldstein, Jennifer N; Cirullo, Michael A; Schwartz, J Sanford

    2014-05-01

    Little is known regarding the durability of clinical practice guideline recommendations over time. To characterize variations in the durability of class I ("procedure/treatment should be performed/administered") American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) guideline recommendations. Textual analysis by 4 independent reviewers of 11 guidelines published between 1998 and 2007 and revised between 2006 and 2013. We abstracted all class I recommendations from the first of the 2 most recent versions of each guideline and identified corresponding recommendations in the subsequent version. We classified recommendations replaced by less determinate or contrary recommendations as having been downgraded or reversed; we classified recommendations for which no corresponding item could be identified as having been omitted. We tested for differences in the durability of recommendations according to guideline topic and underlying level of evidence using bivariable hypothesis tests and conditional logistic regression. Of 619 index recommendations, 495 (80.0%; 95% CI, 76.6%-83.1%) were retained in the subsequent guideline version, 57 (9.2%; 95% CI, 7.0%-11.8%) were downgraded or reversed, and 67 (10.8%; 95% CI, 8.4%-13.3%) were omitted. The percentage of recommendations retained varied across guidelines from 15.4% (95% CI, 1.9%-45.4%) to 94.1% (95% CI, 80.3%-99.3%; P cardiology guideline recommendations for procedures and treatments promulgated by the ACC/AHA varied across individual guidelines and levels of evidence. Downgrades, reversals, and omissions were most common among recommendations not supported by multiple randomized studies.

  1. Updates in the American Heart Association guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation and potential applications to veterinary patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maton, Barbara L; Smarick, Sean D

    2012-04-01

    To review the updates in the American Heart Association (AHA) guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and identify potential applications to veterinary patients. Cardiopulmonary arrest is common in veterinary emergency and critical care, and consensus guidelines are lacking. Human resuscitation guidelines are continually evolving as new clinical and experimental studies support updated recommendations. Synthesis of human, experimental animal model, and veterinary literature support the potential for updates and advancement in veterinary CPR practices. This review serves to highlight updates in the AHA guidelines for CPR and evaluate their application to small animal veterinary patients. Interventions identified will be evaluated for trans-species potential, raise questions regarding best resuscitation recommendations, and offer opportunities for further research to continue to advance veterinary CPR. The prognosis for any patient undergoing cardiopulmonary arrest remains guarded. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2012.

  2. [Association between paracetamol exposure and asthma: update and practice guidelines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moral, L; Torres-Borrego, J; Korta Murua, J; Valverde-Molina, J; Pellegrini Belinchón, J; Praena-Crespo, M; Ortega Casanueva, C; Callén-Blecua, M T; Fernández-Llamazares, C M; Calvo Rey, C

    2013-09-01

    Asthma prevalence has increased over the last few decades, especially in developed countries, and possibly due to different reasons. An association between paracetamol use or exposure at different periods of life, including gestation and childhood, and asthma prevalence has been observed in the last few years. Causality can not be established from observational reports, due to the arguable presence of many confounding factors and biases. Randomised trials are needed to elucidate the nature of this association. The Spanish Paediatric societies subscribing to this paper consider that current evidence is insufficient to discourage the use of paracetamol during gestation or in children with or at risk of asthma. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. Towards diagnostic guidelines for biofilm-associated infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall-Stoodley, Luanne; Stoodley, Paul; Kathju, Sandeep

    2012-01-01

    Biofilms associated with the human body, particularly in typically sterile locations, are difficult to diagnose and treat effectively because of their recalcitrance to conventional antibiotic therapy and host immune responses. The study of biofilms in medicine today requires a translational appro...... and treatment of BAI to mitigate their human and healthcare costs. It also highlights the need for better diagnostic markers, which exploit the difference between planktonic and biofilm cells....

  4. Primary school compliance with school canteen guidelines in Fiji and its association with student obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varman, S; Bullen, C; Tayler-Smith, K; Van Den Bergh, R; Khogali, M

    2013-03-21

    Childhood obesity is of growing public health concern in Fiji. The study setting was primary schools in Fiji's Western Division. 1) To assess primary schools' compliance with national school canteen guidelines, 2) to understand reasons for non-compliance, and 3) to assess the relationship between compliance with the guidelines and students' body mass index (BMI). Cross-sectional analysis of data collected in 2010 by public health dieticians of the Ministry of Health on annual visits to primary schools. Among 230 schools, 33 (14%) had no canteen data. Of the 197 schools with data, only 31 (16%) were fully compliant with national school canteen guidelines, while the remaining 166 (84%) did not fully comply with the guidelines. This was irrespective of school location or whether the canteen was school or commercially operated. In a random sample (n = 44 schools), overweight and obesity were more common among children in non-compliant schools than in fully compliant schools (40% vs. 32%, P schools in Fiji's Western Division did not comply with school canteen guidelines, which is worrying given the increasing rates of overweight children. Given the association between non-compliance and student overweight/obesity, further action is needed to ensure that these guidelines are implemented.

  5. Association of health literacy with adherence to screening mammography guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komenaka, Ian K; Nodora, Jesse N; Hsu, Chiu-Hsieh; Martinez, Maria Elena; Gandhi, Sonal G; Bouton, Marcia E; Klemens, Anne E; Wikholm, Lauren I; Weiss, Barry D

    2015-04-01

    To investigate the relationship of health literacy and screening mammography. All patients seen at a breast clinic underwent prospective assessment of health literacy from January 2010 to April 2013. All women at least 40 years of age were included. Men and women diagnosed with breast cancer before age 40 years were excluded. Routine health literacy assessment was performed using the Newest Vital Sign. Demographic data were also collected. Medical records were reviewed to determine if patients had undergone screening mammography: women aged 40-49 years were considered to have undergone screening if they had another mammogram within 2 years. Women 50 years or older were considered to have undergone screening mammography if they had another mammogram within 1 year. A total of 1,664 consecutive patients aged 40 years or older were seen. No patient declined the health literacy assessment. Only 516 (31%) patients had undergone screening mammography. Logistic regression analysis that included ethnicity, language, education, smoking status, insurance status, employment, income, and family history found that only three factors were associated with not obtaining a mammogram: low health literacy (odds ratio [OR] 0.27, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.19-0.37; P<.001), smoking (OR 0.64, 95% CI 0.47-0.85; P=.002), and being uninsured (OR 0.66, 95% CI 0.51-0.85; P=.001). Of all the sociodemographic variables examined, health literacy had the strongest relationship with use of screening mammography.

  6. Canadian Association of Gastroenterology Practice Guidelines: Evaluation of Dysphagia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan W Cockeram

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Dysphagia may be defined as difficulty in swallowing. Dysphagia may be classified as oropharyngeal or esophageal; oropharyngeal dysphagia arises from a structural or functional abnormality in the oropharynx, and esophageal dysphagia occurs as a result of structural or functional abnormalities in the esophagus. Esophageal dysphagia may be further subclassified symptomatically as dysphagia for solids alone, which usually suggests a mechanical problem, versus dysphagia for liquids and solids, which is more suggestive of a neuromuscular problem. Dysphagia may be described by the patient as a sensation of food 'sticking' or as a sensation of food passing slowly through the esophagus. True dysphagia always indicates organic disease and always warrants investigation and consultation if no cause is found in initial studies. These symptoms should be distinguished from those of a persistent foreign body-type sensation or a sensation of a lump, which is more typical of globus sensation. Odynophagia, defined as pain with swallowing, may occur in association with esophageal dysmotility or as a result of mucosal disease in the esophagus.

  7. Revised American Thyroid Association Guidelines for the Management of Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asa, Sylvia L.; Dralle, Henning; Elisei, Rossella; Evans, Douglas B.; Gagel, Robert F.; Lee, Nancy; Machens, Andreas; Moley, Jeffrey F.; Pacini, Furio; Raue, Friedhelm; Frank-Raue, Karin; Robinson, Bruce; Rosenthal, M. Sara; Santoro, Massimo; Schlumberger, Martin; Shah, Manisha; Waguespack, Steven G.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The American Thyroid Association appointed a Task Force of experts to revise the original Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma: Management Guidelines of the American Thyroid Association. Methods: The Task Force identified relevant articles using a systematic PubMed search, supplemented with additional published materials, and then created evidence-based recommendations, which were set in categories using criteria adapted from the United States Preventive Services Task Force Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. The original guidelines provided abundant source material and an excellent organizational structure that served as the basis for the current revised document. Results: The revised guidelines are focused primarily on the diagnosis and treatment of patients with sporadic medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) and hereditary MTC. Conclusions: The Task Force developed 67 evidence-based recommendations to assist clinicians in the care of patients with MTC. The Task Force considers the recommendations to represent current, rational, and optimal medical practice. PMID:25810047

  8. Guideline for Hereditary Angioedema (HAE 2010 by the Japanese Association for Complement Research - Secondary Publication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiko Horiuchi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This guideline was provided by the Japanese Association for Complement Research targeting clinicians for making an accurate diagnosis of hereditary angioedema (HAE, and for prompt treatment of the HAE patient in Japan. This is a 2010 year version and will be updated according to any pertinent medical advancements.

  9. Guidelines for the diagnosis and management of Hirschsprung-associated enterocolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosain, Ankush; Frykman, Philip K; Cowles, Robert A; Horton, John; Levitt, Marc; Rothstein, David H; Langer, Jacob C; Goldstein, Allan M

    2017-05-01

    Patients with Hirschsprung disease are at risk for Hirschsprung-associated enterocolitis (HAEC), an inflammatory disorder of the bowel that represents the leading cause of serious morbidity and death in these patients. The diagnosis of HAEC is made based on clinical signs and symptoms which are often non-specific, making it difficult to establish a definitive diagnosis in many patients. The purpose of this guideline is to present a rational, expert-based approach to the diagnosis and management of HAEC. The American Pediatric Surgical Association Board of Governors established a Hirschsprung Disease Interest Group. Group discussions, literature review, and expert consensus were then used to summarize the current state of knowledge regarding diagnosis, management, and prevention of Hirschsprung-associated enterocolitis (HAEC). Guidelines for the diagnosis of HAEC and its clinical grade, utilizing clinical history, physical examination findings, and radiographic findings, are presented. Treatment guidelines, including patient disposition, diet, antibiotics, rectal irrigations and surgery, are presented. Clear, standardized definitions of Hirschsprung-associated enterocolitis and its treatment are lacking in the literature. This guideline serves as a first step toward standardization of diagnosis and management. V.

  10. Patient factors associated with guideline-concordant treatment of anxiety and depression in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, M.A.; Verhaak, P.; Smolders, M.; Laurant, M.G.H.; van der Meer, K; Spreeuwenberg, P.; van Marwijk, H.W.J.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.; Bensing, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To identify associations of patient characteristics (predisposing, enabling and need factors) with guideline-concordant care for anxiety and depression in primary care. Design: Analysis of data from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA). Participants: Seven hundred and

  11. Patient factors associated with guideline-concordant treatment of anxiety and depression in primary care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, M.A.; Verhaak, P.F.M.; Smolders, M.; Laurant, M.G.H.; Meer, K. van der; Spreeuwenberg, P.; Marwijk, H.W.J. van; Penninx, B.W.J.H.; Bensing, J.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify associations of patient characteristics (predisposing, enabling and need factors) with guideline-concordant care for anxiety and depression in primary care. DESIGN: Analysis of data from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA). PARTICIPANTS: Seven hundred and

  12. International Association of Dental Traumatology guidelines for the management of traumatic dental injuries. 3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diangelis, A J; Andreasen, J O; Ebeleseder, K A

    2014-01-01

    their opinion and approval. The primary goal of these guidelines is to delineate an approach for the immediate or urgent care for management of primary teeth injuries. The IADT cannot and does not guarantee favorable outcomes from strict adherence to the guidelines, but believe that their application can......Traumatic injuries to the primary dentition present special problems and the management is often different as compared with the permanent dentition. The International Association of Dental Traumatology (IADT) has developed a consensus statement after a review of the dental literature and group...

  13. International Association of Dental Traumatology guidelines for the management of traumatic dental injuries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmgren, Barbro; Andreasen, Jens O; Flores, Marie Therese

    2012-01-01

    their opinion and approval. The primary goal of these guidelines is to delineate an approach for the immediate or urgent care for management of primary teeth injuries. The IADT cannot and does not guarantee favorable outcomes from strict adherence to the guidelines, but believe that their application can......Traumatic injuries to the primary dentition present special problems and the management is often different as compared with the permanent dentition. The International Association of Dental Traumatology (IADT) has developed a consensus statement after a review of the dental literature and group...

  14. Prevention of pelvic floor disorders: international urogynecological association research and development committee opinion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazi, Tony; Takahashi, Satoru; Ismail, Sharif; Bø, Kari; Ruiz-Zapata, Alejandra M; Duckett, Jonathan; Kammerer-Doak, Dorothy

    2016-12-01

    Pelvic floor disorders (PFD), including urinary incontinence, anal incontinence, and pelvic organ prolapse, are common and have a negative effect on the quality of life of women. Treatment is associated with morbidity and may not be totally satisfactory. Prevention of PFDs, when possible, should be a primary goal. The purpose of this paper is to summarise the current literature and give an evidence-based review of the prevention of PFDs METHODS: A working subcommittee from the International Urogynecological Association (IUGA) Research and Development (R&D) Committee was formed. An initial document addressing the prevention of PFDs was drafted, based on a review of the English-language literature. After evaluation by the entire IUGA R&D Committee, revisions were made. The final document represents the IUGA R&D Committee Opinion on the prevention of PFDs. This R&D Committee Opinion reviews the literature on the prevention of PFDs and summarises the findings with evidence-based recommendations. Pelvic floor disorders have a long latency, and may go through periods of remission, thus making causality difficult to confirm. Nevertheless, prevention strategies targeting modifiable risk factors should be incorporated into clinical practice before the absence of symptomatology.

  15. Basic life support revisited – New American Heart Association, 2015, guidelines: An update for dental professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Nadeem Ahmed Bijle

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available American Heart Association (AHA - a professional organization dealing with appropriate cardiac care in an effort to reduce disability and deaths caused by cardiovascular disease and stroke, portrays the necessity of continuous evaluated evidence-based medicine. Thus, AHA formally introduces every 5 years their guidelines for the Emergency Cardiovascular Care on the basis of a thorough evidence search to make provision of the best possible treatment for patients with cardiac emergencies. Since, new 2015 AHA guidelines are established very recently, awareness of our fellow dentists with its major changes at least with respect to basic life support (BLS seems important. Hence, this communication is scripted to throw light on the significant changes in 2015 AHA guidelines has brought in BLS protocols.

  16. Introduction to European comments on ?Medullary Thyroid Cancer: management guidelines of the American Thyroid Association?

    OpenAIRE

    Jarzab, Barbara; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla

    2013-01-01

    Guest Editors of Thyroid Research supplement devoted to medullary thyroid cancer present the history on how the discussion about ?Medullary Thyroid Cancer: management guidelines of the American Thyroid Association? was initiated and subsequently widely commented before and during European Thyroid Association ? Cancer Research Network Meeting in Lisbon. It is explained why it has been decided to publish the manuscripts within the supplement ? to document voices from the discussion and populari...

  17. European Association of Urology Guidelines on Upper Urinary Tract Urothelial Carcinoma: 2017 Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouprêt, Morgan; Babjuk, Marko; Compérat, Eva; Zigeuner, Richard; Sylvester, Richard J; Burger, Maximilian; Cowan, Nigel C; Gontero, Paolo; Van Rhijn, Bas W G; Mostafid, A Hugh; Palou, Joan; Shariat, Shahrokh F

    2018-01-01

    The European Association of Urology (EAU) Guidelines Panel on Upper Urinary Tract Urothelial Carcinoma (UTUC) has prepared updated guidelines to aid clinicians in the current evidence-based management of UTUC and to incorporate recommendations into clinical practice. To provide an overview of the EAU guidelines on UTUC as an aid to clinicians. The recommendations provided in the current guidelines are based on a thorough review of available UTUC guidelines and articles identified following a systematic search of Medline. Data on urothelial malignancies and UTUC were searched using the following keywords: urinary tract cancer; urothelial carcinomas; upper urinary tract, carcinoma; renal pelvis; ureter; bladder cancer; chemotherapy; ureteroscopy; nephroureterectomy; adjuvant treatment; instillation; recurrence; risk factors; and survival. References were weighted by a panel of experts. Owing to the rarity of UTUC, there are insufficient data to provide strong recommendations (ie, grade A). However, the results of recent multicentre studies are now available, and there is a growing number of retrospective articles in UTUC. The 2017 tumour, node, metastasis (TNM) classification is recommended. Recommendations are given for diagnosis and risk stratification, as well as for radical and conservative treatment; prognostic factors are also discussed. A single postoperative dose of intravesical mitomycin after radical nephroureterectomy reduces the risk of bladder tumour recurrence. Kidney-sparing management should be offered as a primary treatment option to patients with low-risk tumours and two functional kidneys. These guidelines contain information on the management of individual patients according to a current standardised approach. Urologists should take into account the specific clinical characteristics of each patient when determining the optimal treatment regimen, based on the proposed risk stratification of these tumours. Urothelial carcinoma of the upper urinary

  18. European Association of Urology Guidelines on Upper Urinary Tract Urothelial Cell Carcinoma: 2015 Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouprêt, Morgan; Babjuk, Marko; Compérat, Eva; Zigeuner, Richard; Sylvester, Richard J; Burger, Maximilian; Cowan, Nigel C; Böhle, Andreas; Van Rhijn, Bas W G; Kaasinen, Eero; Palou, Joan; Shariat, Shahrokh F

    2015-11-01

    The European Association of Urology (EAU) guidelines panel on upper urinary tract urothelial cell carcinoma (UTUC) has prepared updated guidelines to aid clinicians in the current evidence-based management of UTUC and to incorporate recommendations into clinical practice. To provide a brief overview of the EAU guidelines on UTUC as an aid to clinicians. The recommendations provided in the current guidelines are based on a thorough review of available UTUC guidelines and articles identified following a systematic search of Medline. Data on urothelial malignancies and UTUC were searched using these keywords: urinary tract cancer; urothelial carcinomas; upper urinary tract, carcinoma; renal pelvis; ureter; bladder cancer; chemotherapy; nephroureterectomy; adjuvant treatment; instillation; neoadjuvant treatment; recurrence; risk factors; and survival. References were weighted by a panel of experts. Due to the rarity of UTUC, there are insufficient data to provide strong recommendations (ie, grade A). However, the results of recent multicentre studies are now available, and there is a growing interest in UTUC. The 2009 TNM classification is recommended. Recommendations are given for diagnosis and risk stratification as well as radical and conservative treatment, and prognostic factors are discussed. A single postoperative dose of intravesical mitomycin after nephroureterectomy reduces the risk of bladder tumour recurrence. Recommendations are also provided for patient follow-up after different therapeutic strategies. These guidelines contain information on the management of individual patients according to a current standardised approach. Urologists should take into account the specific clinical characteristics of each patient when determining the optimal treatment regimen, based on the proposed risk stratification of these tumours. Urothelial carcinoma of the upper urinary tract is rare, but because 60% of these tumours are invasive at diagnosis, an appropriate

  19. Ureteroscopy in a community hospital compared to published data of SWL between 1997 and 2003 and the guidelines of the American Urological Association/European Association of Urology and the guidelines of the German Association of Urology

    OpenAIRE

    Benken, Nicola

    2010-01-01

    Aim of this retrospective study was to compare the results of a primary ureteroscopy (URS) in patients with flank pain and ureteral calculi of a community hospital and extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (SWL). 535 patients between 1997 and 2003 have been evaluated and matched to published results of SWL of these era and the AUA/ EAU (2007) guidelines and the guidelines of the German Association of Urology (2009). The overall stone free rate after 3 month has been slightly better in the SWL...

  20. European Thyroid Association Guidelines for Ultrasound Malignancy Risk Stratification of Thyroid Nodules in Adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Russ, Gilles; Bonnema, Steen J; Erdogan, Murat Faik

    2017-01-01

    Thyroid ultrasound (US) is a key examination for the management of thyroid nodules. Thyroid US is easily accessible, noninvasive, and cost-effective, and is a mandatory step in the workup of thyroid nodules. The main disadvantage of the method is that it is operator dependent. Thyroid US assessment...... of the risk of malignancy is crucial in patients with nodules, in order to select those who should have a fine needle aspiration (FNA) biopsy performed. Due to the pivotal role of thyroid US in the management of patients with nodules, the European Thyroid Association convened a panel of international experts...... to set up European guidelines on US risk stratification of thyroid nodules. Based on a review of the literature and on the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, American Thyroid Association, and Korean guidelines, the panel created the novel European Thyroid Imaging and Reporting Data System...

  1. Brazilian Medical Association guidelines for the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of panic disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Nigri Levitan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To present the most relevant findings regarding the Brazilian Medical Association guidelines for the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of panic disorder. Methods: We used the methodology proposed by the Brazilian Medical Association for the Diretrizes Project. The MEDLINE (PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, and LILACS online databases were queried for articles published from 1980 to 2012. Searchable questions were structured using the PICO format (acronym for “patient” [or population], “intervention” [or exposure], “comparison” [or control], and “outcome”. Results: We present data on clinical manifestations and implications of panic disorder and its association with depression, drug abuse, dependence and anxiety disorders. In addition, discussions were held on the main psychiatric and clinical differential diagnoses. Conclusions: The guidelines are proposed to serve as a reference for the general practitioner and specialist to assist in and facilitate the diagnosis of panic disorder.

  2. Mixed urinary incontinence: international urogynecological association research and development committee opinion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammerer-Doak, Dorothy; Rizk, Diaa E E; Sorinola, Olanrewaju; Agur, Wael; Ismail, Sharif; Bazi, Tony

    2014-10-01

    The definition as well as the treatment of women with mixed urinary incontinence (MUI) is controversial. Since women with MUI are a heterogeneous group, the treatment of MUI requires an individual assessment of the symptom components: stress urinary incontinence, urinary urgency, urgency urinary incontinence, urinary frequency, and nocturia. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the current literature and give an evidence-based review of the assessment and treatment of MUI. A working subcommittee from the International Urogynecological Association (IUGA) Research and Development (R&D) Committee was formed. An initial document addressing the diagnosis and management of MUI was drafted based on a literature review. After evaluation by the entire IUGA R&D Committee, revisions were made, and the final document represents the IUGA R&D Committee Opinion on MUI. This R&D Committee Opinion reviews the literature on MUI and summarizes the assessment and treatment with evidence-based recommendations. The diagnosis of MUI encompasses a very heterogeneous group of women. The evaluation and treatment requires an individualized approach. The use of validated questionnaires is recommended to assess urinary incontinence symptoms and effect on quality of life. Conservative therapy is suggested as a first-line approach; if surgery is contemplated, urodynamic investigation is recommended. Women undergoing surgical treatment for MUI need to be counselled about the possibility of persistence of urinary urgency, frequency and urge incontinence even if stress urinary incontinence is cured.

  3. Factors associated with nursing students' adherence to venous blood collection practice guidelines - A cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Karin; Brulin, Christine; Grankvist, Kjell; Juthberg, Christina

    2017-03-01

    Venous blood specimen collection is a common procedure that nursing students perform during pre-registration courses, and training for such collections takes place on campus as well as at clinical placements. However, levels of adherence to practice guidelines are still suboptimal among both nursing students and healthcare staff. We aimed to explore nursing students' adherence to the Swedish national venous blood specimen collection practice guidelines regarding patient identification and test request management and how this adherence is related to clinical experience, capability beliefs, research use, and the perceived social climate in clinical contexts. A survey with a cross-sectional design was conducted among 305 nursing students at a medium-sized university in Sweden. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression were used for data analysis. The survey showed that 82% of the students adhered to patient identification guideline practices and 80% to test request management practices. Factors associated with correct patient identification procedures were semester and frequency of research use. Factors associated with correct test request management were previous healthcare work experience, semester, and capability beliefs regarding academic abilities and evidence-based practice. We conclude that there is a need to develop educational tools to train students in research use and evidence-based practice in order to enhance guideline practice adherence and improve patient safety. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The association between alcohol consumption patterns and adherence to food consumption guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia-Martín, José L; Galán, Iñaki; Rodríguez-Artalejo, Fernando

    2011-11-01

    To examine the association between alcohol consumption patterns and adherence to major food consumption guidelines in adults in Spain. Telephone survey of 12,037 persons, representative of the population age 18 to 64 years in the region of Madrid, conducted from 2000 to 2005. The threshold between average moderate and excessive drinking was 40 g alcohol/d in men and 24 g/d in women. Binge drinking was defined as intake of ≥80 g alcohol in men and ≥60 g in women during 1 drinking session in the last 30 days. Food consumption was measured with a 24-hour recall. Statistical analyses were performed using logistic regression and adjusted for the main confounders. In total, 4.3% of study participants were excessive drinkers and 10.3% binge drinkers; 6.5% preferred spirits and 24.2% drank with meals. In comparison with never drinking, average moderate drinking with binge drinking was associated with excessive meat consumption (>1 serving/d). Excessive alcohol consumption without binge drinking was associated with insufficient intake of milk products (2 servings/d). Excessive drinkers with binge drinking more often did not meet the guidelines on consumption of fruit and vegetables (milk products, and meat. Excessive drinkers, with and without binge drinking, were more likely to skip a meal, especially breakfast. Consumption mainly of spirits was associated with insufficient fruit and vegetable consumption, and with skipping a meal. Finally, drinking at mealtimes was associated with poor adherence to most of the food consumption guidelines. No dietary differences between men and women were found in relation to alcohol consumption. Average excessive alcohol consumption, binge drinking, preference for spirits, and drinking alcohol at mealtimes are associated with poor adherence to major food consumption guidelines. Copyright © 2011 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  5. [EAU guidelines on testicular cancer: 2011 update. European Association of Urology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, P; Albrecht, W; Algaba, F; Bokemeyer, C; Cohn-Cedermark, G; Fizazi, K; Horwich, A; Laguna, M P

    2012-03-01

    On behalf of the European Association of Urology (EAU), guidelines for the diagnosis, therapy, and follow-up of testicular cancer were established. This article is a short version of the EAU testicular cancer guidelines and summarises the main conclusions from the guidelines on the management of testicular cancer. Guidelines were compiled by a multidisciplinary guidelines working group. A systematic review was carried out using Medline and Embase, also taking Cochrane evidence and data from the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus Group into consideration. A panel of experts weighted the references, and a level of evidence and grade of recommendation were assigned. There is a paucity of literature especially regarding longer term follow-up, and results from a number of ongoing trials are awaited. The choice of treatment centre is of the utmost importance, and treatment in reference centres within clinical trials, especially for poor-prognosis nonseminomatous germ cell tumours, provides better outcomes. For patients with clinical stage I seminoma, based on recently published data on long-term toxicity, adjuvant radiotherapy is no longer recommended as first-line adjuvant treatment. The TNM classification 2009 is recommended. These guidelines contain information for the standardised management of patients with testicular cancer based on the latest scientific insights. Cure rates are generally excellent, but because testicular cancer mainly affects men in their third or fourth decade of life, treatment effects on fertility require careful counselling of patients, and treatment must be tailored taking individual circumstances and patient preferences into account. Although testicular cancer has excellent cure rates, the choice of treatment centre is of the utmost importance. Expert centres achieve better results for both early stage testicular cancer (lower relapse rates) and overall survival (higher stages within clinical trials). For patients with clinical stage I

  6. Summary of European Association of Urology (EAU) Guidelines on Neuro-Urology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groen, Jan; Pannek, Jürgen; Castro Diaz, David; Del Popolo, Giulio; Gross, Tobias; Hamid, Rizwan; Karsenty, Gilles; Kessler, Thomas M; Schneider, Marc; 't Hoen, Lisette; Blok, Bertil

    2016-02-01

    Most patients with neuro-urological disorders require life-long medical care. The European Association of Urology (EAU) regularly updates guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of these patients. To provide a summary of the 2015 updated EAU Guidelines on Neuro-Urology. Structured literature searches in several databases were carried out to update the 2014 guidelines. Levels of evidence and grades of recommendation were assigned where possible. Neurological disorders often cause urinary tract, sexual, and bowel dysfunction. Most neuro-urological patients need life-long care for optimal life expectancy and quality of life. Timely diagnosis and treatment are essential to prevent upper and lower urinary tract deterioration. Clinical assessment should be comprehensive and usually includes a urodynamic investigation. The neuro-urological management must be tailored to the needs of the individual patient and may require a multidisciplinary approach. Sexuality and fertility issues should not be ignored. Numerous conservative and noninvasive possibilities of management are available and should be considered before a surgical approach is chosen. Neuro-urological patients require life-long follow-up and particular attention has to be paid to this aspect of management. The current EAU Guidelines on Neuro-Urology provide an up-to-date overview of the available evidence for adequate diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of neuro-urological patients. Patients with a neurological disorder often suffer from urinary tract, sexual, and bowel dysfunction and life-long care is usually necessary. The update of the EAU Guidelines on Neuro-Urology, summarized in this paper, enables caregivers to provide optimal support to neuro-urological patients. Conservative, noninvasive, or minimally invasive approaches are often possible. Copyright © 2015 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Analysis of overall level of evidence behind the Institute of Healthcare Improvement ventilator-associated pneumonia guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iqbal M

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Clinical practice guidelines are developed to assist in patient care but the evidence basis for many guidelines has recently been called into question. Methods We conducted a literature review using PubMed and analyzed the overall quality of evidence and made strength of recommendation behind 6 Institute of Health Care (IHI guidelines for prevention of ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP. Quality of evidence was assessed by the American Thoracic Society levels of evidence (levels I through III with addition of level IV when evidence existed that the guideline increased VAP. We also examined our own intensive care units (ICUs for evidence of a correlation between guideline compliance and the development of VAP. Results None of the guidelines could be given more than a moderate recommendation. Only one of the guidelines (head of bed elevation was graded at level II and could be given a moderate recommendation. One was graded at level IV (stress ulcer disease prophylaxis. The remainder were graded level III and given weak recommendations. In our ICUs compliance with the guidelines did not correlate with a reduction in VAP (p<0.05. Conclusions Most of the IHI guidelines are based on level III evidence. Data from our ICUs did not support guideline compliance as a method of reducing VAP. Until more data from well-designed controlled clinical trials become available, physicians should remain cautious when using current IHI VAP guidelines to direct patient care decisions or as an assessment of the quality of care.

  8. Canadian Association of Gastroenterology policy on the application for, and implementation of, clinical practice guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Harminder; Leontiadis, Grigorios I; Hookey, Lawrence; Enns, Robert; Bistritz, Lana; Rioux, Louis-Charles; Hope, Louise; Sinclair, Paul

    2014-10-01

    An important mandate of the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology (CAG), as documented in the Association's governance policies, is to optimize the care of patients with digestive disorders. Clinical practice guidelines are one means of achieving this goal. The benefits of timely, high-quality and evidenced-based recommendations include: Enhancing the professional development of clinical members through education and dissemination of synthesized clinical research; Improving patient care provided by members by providing focus on quality and evidence; Creating legislative environments that favour effective clinical practice; Enhancing the clinical care provided to patients with digestive disease by nongastroenterologists; and Identifying areas that require further information or research to improve clinical care. The present document provides the foundation required to ensure that clinical practice guidelines produced by the CAG are necessary, appropriate, credible and applicable. These recommendations should be adhered to as closely as possible to obtain CAG endorsement.

  9. Comparing American Gastroenterological Association Pancreatic Cyst Management Guidelines with Fukuoka Consensus Guidelines as Predictors of Advanced Neoplasia in Patients with Suspected Pancreatic Cystic Neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Gene K; Goldberg, David S; Thiruvengadam, Nikhil; Chandrasekhara, Vinay; Kochman, Michael L; Ginsberg, Gregory G; Vollmer, Charles M; Ahmad, Nuzhat A

    2016-11-01

    In 2015, the American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) published guidelines to provide recommendations for management of suspected pancreatic cystic neoplasms (PCNs). The aim of this study was to compare efficacy of these with the Fukuoka consensus guidelines in predicting advanced neoplasia (AN) in patients with suspected PCNs. We performed a retrospective study of 239 patients who underwent surgical resection for suspected mucinous PCN at a tertiary care center from 2000 to 2014. Surgical pathology was the gold standard. The AGA and Fukuoka criteria were applied, and their performance in predicting AN, defined as invasive cancer or high-grade dysplasia (HGD), was assessed. Advanced neoplasia was found in 71 of 239 (29.7%) patients (28 invasive cancer, 43 HGD). The Fukuoka "high-risk" (FG-HR) and AGA "high-risk" (AGA-HR) criteria identified patients with AN with sensitivities of 28.2% and 35.2%, specificities of 95.8% and 94.0%, positive predictive values of 74.1% and 71.4%, and negative predictive values of 75.9% and 77.5%, respectively. Overall, there was no significant difference between the guidelines for prediction of AN. There were 7 and 6 cases with invasive cancer, and 23 and 24 cases with HGD missed by the FG-HR and AGA-HR guidelines, respectively. In a retrospective analysis, the AGA guidelines are not superior to the Fukuoka guidelines in identifying AN in suspected PCNs. Both sets of guidelines have fair PPV for detection of AN, which would lead to avoidable resections in patients without AN. Additionally, the high-risk features of both guidelines do not accurately identify all patients with AN. Copyright © 2016 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Canadian Association of Gastroenterology and the Canadian Digestive Health Foundation: Guidelines on Colon Cancer Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desmond Leddin

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer is the third most prevalent cancer affecting both men and women in Canada. Many of these cancers are preventable, and the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology (CAG and the Canadian Digestive Health Foundation (CDHF strongly support the establishment of screening programs for colorectal cancer. These guidelines discuss a number of screening options, listing the advantages and disadvantages of each. Ultimately, the test that is used for screening should be determined by patient preference, current evidence and local resources.

  11. The Treatment of Neck Pain-Associated Disorders and Whiplash-Associated Disorders: A Clinical Practice Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussières, André E; Stewart, Gregory; Al-Zoubi, Fadi; Decina, Philip; Descarreaux, Martin; Hayden, Jill; Hendrickson, Brenda; Hincapié, Cesar; Pagé, Isabelle; Passmore, Steven; Srbely, John; Stupar, Maja; Weisberg, Joel; Ornelas, Joseph

    2016-10-01

    The objective was to develop a clinical practice guideline on the management of neck pain-associated disorders (NADs) and whiplash-associated disorders (WADs). This guideline replaces 2 prior chiropractic guidelines on NADs and WADs. Pertinent systematic reviews on 6 topic areas (education, multimodal care, exercise, work disability, manual therapy, passive modalities) were assessed using A Measurement Tool to Assess Systematic Reviews (AMSTAR) and data extracted from admissible randomized controlled trials. We incorporated risk of bias scores in the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation. Evidence profiles were used to summarize judgments of the evidence quality, detail relative and absolute effects, and link recommendations to the supporting evidence. The guideline panel considered the balance of desirable and undesirable consequences. Consensus was achieved using a modified Delphi. The guideline was peer reviewed by a 10-member multidisciplinary (medical and chiropractic) external committee. For recent-onset (0-3 months) neck pain, we suggest offering multimodal care; manipulation or mobilization; range-of-motion home exercise, or multimodal manual therapy (for grades I-II NAD); supervised graded strengthening exercise (grade III NAD); and multimodal care (grade III WAD). For persistent (>3 months) neck pain, we suggest offering multimodal care or stress self-management; manipulation with soft tissue therapy; high-dose massage; supervised group exercise; supervised yoga; supervised strengthening exercises or home exercises (grades I-II NAD); multimodal care or practitioner's advice (grades I-III NAD); and supervised exercise with advice or advice alone (grades I-II WAD). For workers with persistent neck and shoulder pain, evidence supports mixed supervised and unsupervised high-intensity strength training or advice alone (grades I-III NAD). A multimodal approach including manual therapy, self-management advice, and exercise is an

  12. American Urological Association and European Association of Urology guidelines in the management of benign prostatic hypertrophy: revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juliao, Armando A; Plata, Mauricio; Kazzazi, Amir; Bostanci, Yakup; Djavan, Bob

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to provide a complete revision of two of the most widely used clinical guidelines in the management of lower urinary tract symptoms induced by benign prostatic hyperplasia and their importance and compliance among urologists. Updates of the American Association of Urology and European Association of Urology clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) were reviewed and analyzed. Literature concerning compliance and application of these two CPGs in the different working scenarios of practicing has been evaluated. Urology has moved to an era in which costs and quality of care are being scrutinized, and compliance to CPGs will be assessed. Practicing urologists do not have the time to keep up to date with the continuous incoming literature and CPGs are a great tool to give the highest quality of care to our patients.

  13. Adherence to European Association of Urology Guidelines on Prophylactic Antibiotics: An Important Step in Antimicrobial Stewardship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Tommaso; Verze, Paolo; Brugnolli, Anna; Tiscione, Daniele; Luciani, Lorenzo Giuseppe; Eccher, Cristina; Lanzafame, Paolo; Malossini, Gianni; Wagenlehner, Florian M E; Mirone, Vincenzo; Bjerklund Johansen, Truls E; Pickard, Robert; Bartoletti, Riccardo

    2016-02-01

    The evolution of resistant pathogens is a worldwide health crisis and adherence to European Association of Urology (EAU) guidelines on antibiotic prophylaxis may be an important way to improve antibiotic stewardship and reduce patient harm and costs. To evaluate the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains and health care costs during a period of adherence to EAU guidelines in a tertiary referral urologic institution. A protocol for adherence to EAU guidelines for antibiotic prophylaxis for all urologic procedures was introduced in January 2011. Data for 3529 urologic procedures performed between January 2011 and December 2013 after protocol introduction were compared with data for 2619 procedures performed between January 2008 and December 2010 before protocol implementation. The prevalence of bacterial resistance and health care costs were compared between the two periods. The outcome measures were the proportion of resistant uropathogens and costs related to antibiotic consumption and symptomatic postoperative infection. We used χ2 and Fisher's exact tests to test the significance of differences. The proportion of patients with symptomatic postoperative infection did not differ (180/3529 [5.1%] vs. 117/2619 [4.5%]; p=0.27). A total of 342 isolates from all patients with symptomatic postoperative infections were analysed. The rate of resistance of Escherichia coli to piperacillin/tazobactam (9.1% vs. 5.4%; p=0.03), gentamicin (18.3% vs. 11.2%; p=0.02), and ciprofloxacin (32.3% vs. 19.1%; p=0.03) decreased significantly after protocol introduction. The defined daily dose (DDD) use of ciprofloxacin fell from 4.2 to 0.2 DDD per 100 patient-days after implementation (pguidelines on antibiotic prophylaxis reduced antibiotic usage without increasing post-operative infection rate and lowered the prevalence of resistant uropathogens. We analysed the impact of adherence to European Association of Urology guidelines on antibiotic prophylaxis for all surgical

  14. Guideline-recommended medications: variation across Medicare Advantage plans and associated mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selim, Alfredo J; Fincke, Benjamin G; Rogers, William H; Qian, Shirley; Selim, Bernardo J; Kazis, Lewis E

    2013-03-01

    To evaluate variation in the prescription of guideline-recommended medications across Medicare Advantage (MA) plans and to determine whether such variation is associated with increased mortality. Observational study of 111,667 patients aged 65 years or older receiving care in 203 MA plans. We linked data from the Medicare Health Outcomes (HOS) Survey cohort 9 (April 2006-May 2008) with the Medicare Part D prescription benefit files (January 1, 2006-December 31, 2007) to examine variation in treatment across MA plans and its association with differences in observed (O)/expected (E) mortality ratio for 5 high-volume chronic conditions: diabetes, coronary artery disease (CAD), congestive heart failure (CHF), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)/asthma, and depression. Analysis of variance confirmed that the 203 MA plans differed significantly in their use of guideline-recommended treatment (P≤0.02). Those MA plans with higher use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin II receptor blockers (r=-0.40; Pratios. Those MA plans with higher use of multiple guideline-recommended medications were significantly associated with lower O/E mortality ratios in CHF (r=-0.45; Pratios in patients with CAD and COPD/asthma. Those MA plans with higher use of antidepressant medications had significantly higher O/E mortality ratios (r=0.28, P<0.0001). There was wide variation across MA plans in the prescription of guideline-recommended medications that had a measurable relationship to the mortality of elderly patients with CHF and diabetes. These findings can serve to both motivate and target quality improvement programs.

  15. The Association of Shelter Veterinarians' 2016 Veterinary Medical Care Guidelines for Spay-Neuter Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Brenda; Bushby, Philip A; McCobb, Emily; White, Sara C; Rigdon-Brestle, Y Karla; Appel, Leslie D; Makolinski, Kathleen V; Wilford, Christine L; Bohling, Mark W; Eddlestone, Susan M; Farrell, Kelly A; Ferguson, Nancy; Harrison, Kelly; Howe, Lisa M; Isaza, Natalie M; Levy, Julie K; Looney, Andrea; Moyer, Michael R; Robertson, Sheilah Ann; Tyson, Kathy

    2016-07-15

    As community efforts to reduce the overpopulation and euthanasia of unwanted and unowned cats and dogs have increased, many veterinarians have increasingly focused their clinical efforts on the provision of spay-neuter services. Because of the wide range of geographic and demographic needs, a wide variety of spay-neuter programs have been developed to increase delivery of services to targeted populations of animals, including stationary and mobile clinics, MASH-style operations, shelter services, community cat programs, and services provided through private practitioners. In an effort to promote consistent, high-quality care across the broad range of these programs, the Association of Shelter Veterinarians convened a task force of veterinarians to develop veterinary medical care guidelines for spay-neuter programs. These guidelines consist of recommendations for general patient care and clinical procedures, preoperative care, anesthetic management, surgical procedures, postoperative care, and operations management. They were based on current principles of anesthesiology, critical care medicine, infection control, and surgical practice, as determined from published evidence and expert opinion. They represent acceptable practices that are attainable in spay-neuter programs regardless of location, facility, or type of program. The Association of Shelter Veterinarians envisions that these guidelines will be used by the profession to maintain consistent veterinary medical care in all settings where spay-neuter services are provided and to promote these services as a means of reducing sheltering and euthanasia of cats and dogs.

  16. DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF BREAST CANCER IN SITU. RUSSIAN ASSOCIATION OF ONCOLOGICAL MAMMOLOGY CLINICAL GUIDELINES (PROJECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Semiglazov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the first and foremost tasks of the Russian Association of Oncological Mammology (RAOM is to develop clinical guidelines on diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer taking into account international experience. The guidelines must also be applicable in all regions of the Russian Federation allowing all Russian specialist to be informed about the latest strategies of diagnosis and treatment.These clinical guidelines are based on the following consensus documents:• St. Gallen Expert Panel (2011, 2013,• Expert Panel of the IX International Conference “White Nights – 2012”,• Expert Panel of the RAOM (2013,• International consensus on treatment of metastatic breast cancer ABC 1,• NCCN (2014  and ESMO (2011 practical guidelines,as well as the results of large international randomized studies conducted in partnership with Russian oncological centers.The guidelines take into account the results of the analysis of a cumulative database on breast cancer treatment methods performed at• N.N. Petrov National Medical Research Oncology Center, Ministry of Health of Russia,• Saint  Petersburg City Clinical Oncological  Dispensary.Our guidelines are based on methods that are available everywhere in the Russian Federation, treatment schemes and drugs are presented in accordance with the marketing authorization of the Ministry of Health of Russia, drug therapy takes into account biological subtypes of breast cancer, different courses of the disease as well as nonuniform situation with drug availability in various regions of the Russian Federation.Obviously, such materials cannot serve as a direct guide for action (every patient’s disease is different, but they can lend a helping hand to a doctor striving to treat patients according to the latest achievements of modern oncology.All-Russian non-governmental organization Russian Association of Oncological Mammology. President of the RAOM, corresponding member of the RAS, Prof. V

  17. Recommended dietary pattern to achieve adherence to the American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology (AHA/ACC) Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    In 2013, the American Heart Association and American College of Cardiology published the "Guideline on Lifestyle Management to Reduce Cardiovascular Risk," which was based on a systematic review originally initiated by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. The guideline supports the America...

  18. [Update of the Clinical Guidelines of the European Association of Urology on muscle-invasive and metastatic bladder carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stenzl, A.; Cowan, N.C.; Santis, M. de; Jakse, G.; Kuczyk, M.A.; Merseburger, A.S.; Ribal, M.J.; Sherif, A.; Witjes, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    CONTEXT: New data regarding diagnosis and treatment of muscle-invasive and metastatic bladder cancer (MiM-BC) has emerged and led to an update of the European Association of Urology (EAU) guidelines for MiM-BC. OBJECTIVE: To review the new EAU guidelines for MiM-BC. EVIDENCE ACQUISITION: A

  19. Guidelines for the primary prevention of stroke: a guideline for healthcare professionals from the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Larry B; Bushnell, Cheryl D; Adams, Robert J; Appel, Lawrence J; Braun, Lynne T; Chaturvedi, Seemant; Creager, Mark A; Culebras, Antonio; Eckel, Robert H; Hart, Robert G; Hinchey, Judith A; Howard, Virginia J; Jauch, Edward C; Levine, Steven R; Meschia, James F; Moore, Wesley S; Nixon, J V Ian; Pearson, Thomas A

    2011-02-01

    This guideline provides an overview of the evidence on established and emerging risk factors for stroke to provide evidence-based recommendations for the reduction of risk of a first stroke. Writing group members were nominated by the committee chair on the basis of their previous work in relevant topic areas and were approved by the American Heart Association (AHA) Stroke Council Scientific Statement Oversight Committee and the AHA Manuscript Oversight Committee. The writing group used systematic literature reviews (covering the time since the last review was published in 2006 up to April 2009), reference to previously published guidelines, personal files, and expert opinion to summarize existing evidence, indicate gaps in current knowledge, and when appropriate, formulate recommendations using standard AHA criteria (Tables 1 and 2). All members of the writing group had the opportunity to comment on the recommendations and approved the final version of this document. The guideline underwent extensive peer review by the Stroke Council leadership and the AHA scientific statements oversight committees before consideration and approval by the AHA Science Advisory and Coordinating Committee. Schemes for assessing a person's risk of a first stroke were evaluated. Risk factors or risk markers for a first stroke were classified according to potential for modification (nonmodifiable, modifiable, or potentially modifiable) and strength of evidence (well documented or less well documented). Nonmodifiable risk factors include age, sex, low birth weight, race/ethnicity, and genetic predisposition. Well-documented and modifiable risk factors include hypertension, exposure to cigarette smoke, diabetes, atrial fibrillation and certain other cardiac conditions, dyslipidemia, carotid artery stenosis, sickle cell disease, postmenopausal hormone therapy, poor diet, physical inactivity, and obesity and body fat distribution. Less well-documented or potentially modifiable risk factors

  20. Medical guidelines for space passengers. Aerospace Medical Association Task Force on Space Travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-10-01

    In the foreseeable future, private companies will manufacture space vehicles with a capacity of transporting tourists into low Earth orbit. Because of the stresses of spaceflight, the effects of microgravity, and limited medical care capability, a system of medical clearance is highly recommended for these space tourists. It is our purpose to establish guidelines for use by private businesses, medical providers, and those planning on being a space tourist. Consequently, a Task Force was organized by the Aerospace Medical Association (AsMA) for the purpose of facilitating safety of passengers, fellow passengers, crew, and flight operations. The guidelines are meant to serve only as a template with the full expectation that exceptions might be made with appropriate rationale.

  1. Treatment guidelines for patients with thyroid nodules and well-differentiated thyroid cancer. American Thyroid Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, P A; Cooper, D S; Daniels, G H; Ladenson, P W; Greenspan, F S; Levy, E G; Braverman, L E; Clark, O H; McDougall, I R; Ain, K V; Dorfman, S G

    1996-10-28

    A set of minimum clinical guidelines for use by primary care physicians in the evaluation and management of patients with thyroid nodules or thyroid cancer was developed by consensus by an 11-member Standards of Care Committee (the authors of the article) of the American Thyroid Association, New York, NY. The participants were selected by the committee chairman and by the president of the American Thyroid Association based on their clinical experience. The committee members represented different geographic areas within the United States, to reflect different practice patterns. The guidelines were developed based on the expert opinion of the committee participants, as well as on previously published information. Each committee participant was initially assigned to write a section of the document and to submit it to the committee chairman, who revised and assembled the sections into a complete draft document, which was then circulated among all committee members for further revision. Several of the committee members further revised and refined the document, which was then submitted to the entire membership of the American Thyroid Association for written comments and suggestions, many of which were incorporated into a final draft document, which was reviewed and approved by the Executive Council of the American Thyroid Association.

  2. Practice guidelines for perioperative transesophageal echocardiography: Recommendations of the Indian association of cardiovascular thoracic anesthesiologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanchi Muralidhar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Transoesophageal Echocardiography (TEE is now an integral part of practice of cardiac anaesthesiology. Advances in instrumentation and the information that can be obtained from the TEE examination has proceeded at a breath-taking pace since the introduction of this technology in the early 1980s. Recognizing the importance of TEE in the management of surgical patients, the American Societies of Anesthesiologists (ASA and the Society of Cardiac Anesthesiologists, USA (SCA published practice guidelines for the clinical application of perioperative TEE in 1996. On a similar pattern, Indian Association of Cardiac Anaesthesiologists (IACTA has taken the task of putting forth guidelines for transesophageal echocardiography (TEE to standardize practice across the country. This review assesses the risks and benefits of TEE for several indications or clinical scenarios. The indications for this review were drawn from common applications or anticipated uses as well as current clinical practice guidelines published by various society practicing Cardiac Anaesthesia and cardiology . Based on the input received, it was determined that the most important parts of the TEE examination could be displayed in a set of 20 cross sectional imaging planes. These 20 cross sections would provide also the format for digital acquisition and storage of a comprehensive TEE examination. Because variability exists in the precise anatomic orientation between the heart and the esophagus in individual patients, an attempt was made to provide specific criteria based on identifiable anatomic landmarks to improve the reproducibility and consistency of image acquisition for each of the standard cross sections.

  3. Guidelines for Adult Stroke Rehabilitation and Recovery: A Guideline for Healthcare Professionals From the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winstein, Carolee J; Stein, Joel; Arena, Ross; Bates, Barbara; Cherney, Leora R; Cramer, Steven C; Deruyter, Frank; Eng, Janice J; Fisher, Beth; Harvey, Richard L; Lang, Catherine E; MacKay-Lyons, Marilyn; Ottenbacher, Kenneth J; Pugh, Sue; Reeves, Mathew J; Richards, Lorie G; Stiers, William; Zorowitz, Richard D

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this guideline is to provide a synopsis of best clinical practices in the rehabilitative care of adults recovering from stroke. Writing group members were nominated by the committee chair on the basis of their previous work in relevant topic areas and were approved by the American Heart Association (AHA) Stroke Council's Scientific Statement Oversight Committee and the AHA's Manuscript Oversight Committee. The panel reviewed relevant articles on adults using computerized searches of the medical literature through 2014. The evidence is organized within the context of the AHA framework and is classified according to the joint AHA/American College of Cardiology and supplementary AHA methods of classifying the level of certainty and the class and level of evidence. The document underwent extensive AHA internal and external peer review, Stroke Council Leadership review, and Scientific Statements Oversight Committee review before consideration and approval by the AHA Science Advisory and Coordinating Committee. Stroke rehabilitation requires a sustained and coordinated effort from a large team, including the patient and his or her goals, family and friends, other caregivers (eg, personal care attendants), physicians, nurses, physical and occupational therapists, speech-language pathologists, recreation therapists, psychologists, nutritionists, social workers, and others. Communication and coordination among these team members are paramount in maximizing the effectiveness and efficiency of rehabilitation and underlie this entire guideline. Without communication and coordination, isolated efforts to rehabilitate the stroke survivor are unlikely to achieve their full potential. As systems of care evolve in response to healthcare reform efforts, postacute care and rehabilitation are often considered a costly area of care to be trimmed but without recognition of their clinical impact and ability to reduce the risk of downstream medical morbidity resulting from

  4. Correlation of compliance with central line associated blood stream infection guidelines and outcomes: a review of the evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerkin R

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Clinical practice guidelines are developed to assist in patient care but the evidence basis for many guidelines has been called into question. Methods We conducted a literature review using PubMed and analyzed the overall quality of evidence and made strength of recommendation behind 8 Institute of Health Care (IHI guidelines for prevention of central line associated blood stream infection (CLABSI. Quality of evidence was assessed by the American Thoracic Society (ATS levels of evidence (levels I through III. We also examined data from our intensive care units (ICUs for evidence of a correlation between guideline compliance and the development of VAP.Results None of the guidelines was graded at level I. Two of the guidelines were graded at level II and the remaining 6 at level III. Despite the lack of evidence, 2 of the guidelines (hand hygiene, sterile gloves were given a strong recommendation. Chlorhexidine and use of nonfemoral sites were given a moderate recommendation. In our ICUs compliance with the use of chlorhexidine correlated with a reduction in CLABSI (p<0.02 but the remainder did not.Conclusions The IHI CLABSI guidelines are based on level II or III evidence. Data from our ICUs supported the use of chlorhexidine in reducing CLABSI. Until more data from well-designed controlled clinical trials become available, physicians should remain cautious when using current IHI guidelines to direct patient care decisions or as an assessment of the quality of care.

  5. Clinical practice guidelines for hypothyroidism in adults: cosponsored by the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists and the American Thyroid Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garber, Jeffrey R; Cobin, Rhoda H; Gharib, Hossein; Hennessey, James V; Klein, Irwin; Mechanick, Jeffrey I; Pessah-Pollack, Rachel; Singer, Peter A; Woeber, Kenneth A

    2012-12-01

    Hypothyroidism has multiple etiologies and manifestations. Appropriate treatment requires an accurate diagnosis and is influenced by coexisting medical conditions. This paper describes evidence-based clinical guidelines for the clinical management of hypothyroidism in ambulatory patients. The development of these guidelines was commissioned by the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) in association with American Thyroid Association (ATA). AACE and the ATA assembled a task force of expert clinicians who authored this article. The authors examined relevant literature and took an evidence-based medicine approach that incorporated their knowledge and experience to develop a series of specific recommendations and the rationale for these recommendations. The strength of the recommendations and the quality of evidence supporting each was rated according to the approach outlined in the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists Protocol for Standardized Production of Clinical Guidelines-2010 update. Topics addressed include the etiology, epidemiology, clinical and laboratory evaluation, management, and consequences of hypothyroidism. Screening, treatment of subclinical hypothyroidism, pregnancy, and areas for future research are also covered. Fifty-two evidence-based recommendations and subrecommendations were developed to aid in the care of patients with hypothyroidism and to share what the authors believe is current, rational, and optimal medical practice for the diagnosis and care of hypothyroidism. A serum thyrotropin is the single best screening test for primary thyroid dysfunction for the vast majority of outpatient clinical situations. The standard treatment is replacement with L-thyroxine. The decision to treat subclinical hypothyroidism when the serum thyrotropin is less than 10 mIU/L should be tailored to the individual patient.

  6. Salvage radical prostatectomy for recurrent prostate cancer: verification of European Association of Urology guideline criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, Philipp; Steuber, Thomas; Ahyai, Sascha; Kriegmair, Maximilian; Schiffmann, Jonas; Boehm, Katharina; Heinzer, Hans; Michl, Uwe; Schlomm, Thorsten; Haese, Alexander; Huland, Hartwig; Graefen, Markus; Tilki, Derya

    2016-01-01

    To analyse oncological and functional outcomes of salvage radical prostatectomy (SRP) in patients with recurrent prostate cancer and to compare outcomes of patients within and outside the European Association of Urology (EAU) guideline criteria (organ-confined prostate cancer ≤T2b, Gleason score ≤7 and preoperative PSA level 0.2 ng/mL and rising, continence as the use of 0-1 safety pad/day, and potency as a five-item version of the International Index of Erectile Function score of ≥18. The median follow-up was 36 months. After SRP, 42.0% of the patients experienced BCR, 15.9% developed metastasis, and 5.5% died from prostate cancer. Patients fulfilling the EAU guideline criteria were less likely to have positive lymph nodes (LNs) and had significantly better BCR-free survival (5-year BCR-free survival 73.9% vs 11.6%; P = 0.001). In multivariate analysis, low-dose-rate brachytherapy as primary treatment (P = 0.03) and presence of positive LNs at SRP (P = 0.02) were significantly associated with worse BCR-free survival. The presence of positive LNs or Gleason score >7 at SRP were independently associated with metastasis. The urinary continence rate at 1 year after SRP was 74%. Seven patients (12.7%) had complications ≥III (Clavien grade). SRP is a safe procedure providing good cancer control and reasonable urinary continence. Oncological outcomes are significantly better in patients who met the EAU guideline recommendations. © 2015 The Authors BJU International © 2015 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Pediatric Pulmonary Hypertension: Guidelines From the American Heart Association and American Thoracic Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abman, Steven H; Hansmann, Georg; Archer, Stephen L; Ivy, D Dunbar; Adatia, Ian; Chung, Wendy K; Hanna, Brian D; Rosenzweig, Erika B; Raj, J Usha; Cornfield, David; Stenmark, Kurt R; Steinhorn, Robin; Thébaud, Bernard; Fineman, Jeffrey R; Kuehne, Titus; Feinstein, Jeffrey A; Friedberg, Mark K; Earing, Michael; Barst, Robyn J; Keller, Roberta L; Kinsella, John P; Mullen, Mary; Deterding, Robin; Kulik, Thomas; Mallory, George; Humpl, Tilman; Wessel, David L

    2015-11-24

    Pulmonary hypertension is associated with diverse cardiac, pulmonary, and systemic diseases in neonates, infants, and older children and contributes to significant morbidity and mortality. However, current approaches to caring for pediatric patients with pulmonary hypertension have been limited by the lack of consensus guidelines from experts in the field. In a joint effort from the American Heart Association and American Thoracic Society, a panel of experienced clinicians and clinician-scientists was assembled to review the current literature and to make recommendations on the diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of pediatric pulmonary hypertension. This publication presents the results of extensive literature reviews, discussions, and formal scoring of recommendations for the care of children with pulmonary hypertension. © 2015 by the American Heart Association, Inc., and the American Thoracic Society.

  8. The implementation of European Association of Urology guidelines in the management of acute epididymo-orchitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garthwaite, Mary A E; Johnson, G; Lloyd, S; Eardley, I

    2007-11-01

    Acute epididymo-orchitis is a common and increasing problem. This retrospective study reviewed whether the European Association of Urology guidelines for the management of acute epididymo-orchitis, which form the basis of this Trust's present inter-departmental guidelines, are being effectively implemented. Case notes of 53 patients attending the emergency department with acute epididymo-orchitis over a 6-month period were reviewed retrospectively. The hospital results' database was used to confirm the diagnostic tests requested on patients at the time of their initial presentation. Of the study cohort, 26 patients were aged 35 years. The results demonstrated that a sexual history was documented in only 43.4% of cases. A mid-stream urine sample was sent for routine culture in 54.7% of cases whilst urine for the Chlamydia polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test was obtained in 17% and a urethral swab performed in 5.6%. Antibiotics were prescribed in 81% of cases. Of these patients, 46.5% received ciprofloxacin alone (mean age, 52 years; range, 18-87 years), 25.5% received doxycycline alone (mean age, 30 years; range, 18-45 years) and 21% received both ciprofloxacin and doxycycline (mean age, 33 years; range 18-49 years). In 26.4% of cases, verbal advice to attend a genito-urinary medicine clinic was given, whilst a formal telephone referral was made in only one case. Formal urological follow-up was arranged for only three out of 11 patients aged > 50 years. Although a joint emergency department/urology clinical protocol for the investigation and treatment of acute epididymo-orchitis already exists within the Trust, our current management conforms to this in only a minority of cases. Many different strategies can be employed in the implementation of clinical practice guidelines and all are associated with variable degrees of success. The regular movement of junior staff through each department necessitates that the distribution of management protocols and guidelines

  9. Guideline-adherent initial intravenous antibiotic therapy for hospital-acquired/ventilator-associated pneumonia is clinically superior, saves lives and is cheaper than non guideline adherent therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilke MH

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP often occurring as ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP is the most frequent hospital infection in intensive care units (ICU. Early adequate antimicrobial therapy is an essential determinant of clinical outcome. Organisations like the German PEG or ATS/IDSA provide guidelines for the initial calculated treatment in the absence of pathogen identification. We conducted a retrospective chart review for patients with HAP/VAP and assessed whether the initial intravenous antibiotic therapy (IIAT was adequate according to the PEG guidelines Materials and methods We collected data from 5 tertiary care hospitals. Electronic data filtering identified 895 patients with potential HAP/VAP. After chart review we finally identified 221 patients meeting the definition of HAP/VAP. Primary study endpoints were clinical improvement, survival and length of stay. Secondary endpoints included duration of mechanical ventilation, total costs, costs incurred on the intensive care unit (ICU, costs incurred on general wards and drug costs. Results We found that 107 patients received adequate initial intravenous antibiotic therapy (IIAT vs. 114 with inadequate IIAT according to the PEG guidelines. Baseline characteristics of both groups revealed no significant differences and good comparability. Clinical improvement was 64% over all patients and 82% (85/104 in the subpopulation with adequate IIAT while only 47% (48/103 inadequately treated patients improved (p Drug costs for the hospital stay were also lower (EUR 4,069 vs. EUR 4,833 yet not significant. The most frequent types of inadequate therapy were monotherapy instead of combination therapy, wrong type of penicillin and wrong type of cephalosporin. Discussion These findings are consistent with those from other studies analyzing the impact of guideline adherence on survival rates, clinical success, LOS and costs. However, inadequately treated patients had a higher

  10. 2014 European Thyroid Association Guidelines for the Management of Subclinical Hypothyroidism in Pregnancy and in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, John; Brown, Rosalind S.; Daumerie, Chantal; Hubalewska-Dydejczyk, Alicja; Negro, Roberto; Vaidya, Bijay

    2014-01-01

    This guideline has been produced as the official statement of the European Thyroid Association guideline committee. Subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH) in pregnancy is defined as a thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) level above the pregnancy-related reference range with a normal serum thyroxine concentration. Isolated hypothyroxinaemia (defined as a thyroxine level below the 2.5th centile of the pregnancy-related reference range with a normal TSH level) is also recognized in pregnancy. In the majority of SCH the cause is autoimmune thyroiditis but may also be due to iodine deficiency. The cause of isolated hypothyroxinaemia is usually not apparent, but iodine deficiency may be a factor. SCH and isolated hypothyroxinaemia are both associated with adverse obstetric outcomes. Levothyroxine therapy may ameliorate some of these with SCH but not in isolated hypothyroxinaemia. SCH and isolated hypothyroxinaemia are both associated with neuro-intellectual impairment of the child, but there is no evidence that maternal levothyroxine therapy improves this outcome. Targeted antenatal screening for thyroid function will miss a substantial percentage of women with thyroid dysfunction. In children SCH (serum TSH concentration >5.5-10 mU/l) normalizes in >70% and persists in the majority of the remaining patients over the subsequent 5 years, but rarely worsens. There is a lack of studies examining the impact of SCH on the neuropsychological development of children under the age of 3 years. In older children, the evidence for an association between SCH and impaired neuropsychological development is inconsistent. Good quality studies examining the effect of treatment of SCH in children are lacking. PMID:25114871

  11. AMERICAN COLLEGE OF CARDIOLOGY, AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION AND EUROPEAN SOCIETY OF CARDIOLOGY GUIDELINES (2006 FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF PATIENTS WITH ATRIAL FIBRILLATION (ENDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Fuster

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A report of the American College of Cardiology, American Heart Association Task Force on practice guidelines and the European Society of Cardiology Committee for practice guidelines.

  12. AMERICAN COLLEGE OF CARDIOLOGY, AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION AND EUROPEAN SOCIETY OF CARDIOLOGY GUIDELINES (2006 FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF PATIENTS WITH ATRIAL FIBRILLATION (ENDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Fuster

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A report of the American College of Cardiology, American Heart Association Task Force on practice guidelines and the European Society of Cardiology Committee for practice guidelines.

  13. American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists Protocol for Standardized Production of Clinical Practice Guidelines--2010 update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechanick, Jeffrey I; Camacho, Pauline M; Cobin, Rhoda H; Garber, Alan J; Garber, Jeffrey R; Gharib, Hossein; Petak, Steven M; Rodbard, Helena W; Trence, Dace L

    2010-01-01

    In 2004, the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) published the "Protocol for Standardized Production of Clinical Practice Guidelines," which was to be implemented in forthcoming clinical practice guidelines (CPG). This protocol formally incorporated subjective factors and evidence-based medicine (EBM) methods that tightly mapped evidence levels to recommendation grades. A uniform publication template and multilevel review process were also outlined. Seven CPG have been subsequently published with use of this 2004 AACE protocol. Recently, growing concerns about the usefulness of CPG have been raised. The purposes of this report are to address shortcomings of the 2004 AACE protocol and to present an updated 2010 AACE protocol for CPG development. AACE CPG are developed without any industry involvement. Multiplicities of interests among writers and reviewers that might compromise the usefulness of CPG are avoided. Three major goals are to (1) balance transparently the effect of rigid quantitative EBM methods with subjective factors, (2) create a less onerous, less time-consuming, and less costly CPG production process, and (3) introduce an electronic implementation component. The updated 2010 AACE protocol emphasizes "informed judgment" and hybridizes EBM descriptors (study design type), qualifiers (study flaws), and subjective factors (such as risk, cost, and relevance). In addition, by focusing on more specific topics and clinical questions, the expert evaluation and multilevel review process is more transparent and expeditious. Lastly, the final recommendations are linked to a new electronic implementation feature.

  14. American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, Associazione Medici Endocrinologi, and European Thyroid Association medical guidelines for clinical practice for the diagnosis and management of thyroid nodules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gharib, H; Papini, E; Paschke, R

    2010-01-01

    American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, Associazione Medici Endocrinologi, and European Thyroid Association medical guidelines for clinical practice for the diagnosis and management of thyroid nodules are systematically developed statements to assist health care professionals in medical...... decision making for specific clinical conditions. Most of the content herein is based on literature reviews. In areas of uncertainty, professional judgment was applied. These guidelines are a working document that reflects the state of the field at the time of publication. Because rapid changes...

  15. Recommended Dietary Pattern to Achieve Adherence to the American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology (AHA/ACC) Guidelines: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Horn, Linda; Carson, Jo Ann S; Appel, Lawrence J; Burke, Lora E; Economos, Christina; Karmally, Wahida; Lancaster, Kristie; Lichtenstein, Alice H; Johnson, Rachel K; Thomas, Randal J; Vos, Miriam; Wylie-Rosett, Judith; Kris-Etherton, Penny

    2016-11-29

    In 2013, the American Heart Association and American College of Cardiology published the "Guideline on Lifestyle Management to Reduce Cardiovascular Risk," which was based on a systematic review originally initiated by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. The guideline supports the American Heart Association's 2020 Strategic Impact Goals for cardiovascular health promotion and disease reduction by providing more specific details for adopting evidence-based diet and lifestyle behaviors to achieve those goals. In addition, the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans issued updated evidence relevant to reducing cardiovascular risk and provided additional recommendations for adopting healthy diet and lifestyle approaches. This scientific statement, intended for healthcare providers, summarizes relevant scientific and translational evidence and offers practical tips, tools, and dietary approaches to help patients/clients adapt these guidelines according to their sociocultural, economic, and taste preferences. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. Screening for blunt cardiac injury: an Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma practice management guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, Keith; Velopulos, Catherine; Bilaniuk, Jaroslaw W; Collier, Bryan; Crowley, William; Kurek, Stanley; Lui, Felix; Nayduch, Donna; Sangosanya, Ayodele; Tucker, Brian; Haut, Elliott R

    2012-11-01

    Diagnosing blunt cardiac injury (BCI) can be difficult. Many patients with mechanism for BCI are admitted to the critical care setting based on associated injuries; however, debate surrounds those patients who are hemodynamically stable and do not otherwise require a higher level of care. To allow safe discharge home or admission to a nonmonitored setting, BCI should be definitively ruled out in those at risk. This Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma (EAST) practice management guideline (PMG) updates the original from 1998. English-language citations were queried for BCI from March 1997 through December 2011, using the PubMed Entrez interface. Of 599 articles identified, prospective or retrospective studies examining BCI were selected. Each article was reviewed by two members of the EAST BCI PMG workgroup. Data were collated, and a consensus was obtained for the recommendations. We identified 35 institutional studies evaluating the diagnosis of adult patients with suspected BCI. This PMG has 10 total recommendations, including two Level 2 updates, two upgrades from Level 3 to Level 2, and three new recommendations. Electrocardiogram (ECG) alone is not sufficient to rule out BCI. Based on four studies showing that the addition of troponin I to ECG improved the negative predictive value to 100%, we recommend obtaining an admission ECG and troponin I from all patients in whom BCI is suspected. BCI can be ruled out only if both ECG result and troponin I level are normal, a significant change from the previous guideline. Patients with new ECG changes and/or elevated troponin I should be admitted for monitoring. Echocardiogram is not beneficial as a screening tool for BCI and should be reserved for patients with hypotension and/or arrhythmias. The presence of a sternal fracture alone does not predict BCI. Cardiac computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging can be used to differentiate acute myocardial infarction from BCI in trauma patients.

  17. New cholesterol guidelines for the management of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk: a comparison of the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association cholesterol guidelines with the 2014 National Lipid Association recommendations for patient-centered management of dyslipidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhyaru, Bhavin B; Jacobson, Terry A

    2015-05-01

    This review discusses the 2013 American College of Cardiology (ACC)/American Heart Association (AHA) Guideline on the Treatment of Blood Cholesterol to Reduce Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Risk in Adults and compares it with the 2014 National Lipid Association (NLA) Recommendations for Patient-Centered Management of Dyslipidemia. The review discusses some of the distinctions between the guidelines, including how to determine a patient's atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk, the role of lipoprotein treatment targets, the importance of moderate- and high-intensity statin therapy, and the use of nonstatin therapy in light of the IMProved Reduction of Outcomes: Vytorin Efficacy International Trial (IMPROVE-IT) trial. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Influence of the SSO/ASTRO Margin Reexcision Guidelines on Costs Associated with Breast-Conserving Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baliski, C R; Pataky, R E

    2017-03-01

    The reported reexcision rates vary significantly for patients with invasive breast cancer undergoing breast-conserving surgery (BCS). This variability is a function of both the positive pathologic margin rate and the interpretation of an adequate pathologic margin. The influence of the SSO/ASTRO margin guidelines on reexcision rates and the potential cost savings is of interest from both quality and health economics perspectives. A retrospective analysis of all patients undergoing BCS during a 3-year period (January 1, 2010-December 31, 2012) was performed. The reexcision rate and the pathologic margin status were assessed to determine the number of patients with pathologic negative margins who underwent reexcision. A decision analysis using previously published case costing information was used to determine the potential savings associated with avoidance of reoperation for patients meeting guidelines criteria. The analysis included 512 patients who underwent attempted BCS for invasive breast cancer. Reoperations occurred for 25% (126/512) of the BCS cohort, but this rate could potentially be decreased to 16% (44/512) if these guidelines were applied. Based on our cost model, application of the guidelines would provide a potential cost savings of $698 (95% confidence interval $523-$893) per patient undergoing attempted BCS in our population. Adherence to the SSO-ASTRO guidelines could prevent one-third of reoperations among patients undergoing BCS. This would result in significant cost savings to the health care system while avoiding unnecessary operations. Use of guidelines has the potential to improve the quality of care provided to patients.

  19. 2017 Guidelines of the American Thyroid Association for the Diagnosis and Management of Thyroid Disease During Pregnancy and the Postpartum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Erik K; Pearce, Elizabeth N; Brent, Gregory A; Brown, Rosalind S; Chen, Herbert; Dosiou, Chrysoula; Grobman, William A; Laurberg, Peter; Lazarus, John H; Mandel, Susan J; Peeters, Robin P; Sullivan, Scott

    2017-03-01

    Thyroid disease in pregnancy is a common clinical problem. Since the guidelines for the management of these disorders by the American Thyroid Association (ATA) were first published in 2011, significant clinical and scientific advances have occurred in the field. The aim of these guidelines is to inform clinicians, patients, researchers, and health policy makers on published evidence relating to the diagnosis and management of thyroid disease in women during pregnancy, preconception, and the postpartum period. The specific clinical questions addressed in these guidelines were based on prior versions of the guidelines, stakeholder input, and input of task force members. Task force panel members were educated on knowledge synthesis methods, including electronic database searching, review and selection of relevant citations, and critical appraisal of selected studies. Published English language articles were eligible for inclusion. The American College of Physicians Guideline Grading System was used for critical appraisal of evidence and grading strength of recommendations. The guideline task force had complete editorial independence from the ATA. Competing interests of guideline task force members were regularly updated, managed, and communicated to the ATA and task force members. The revised guidelines for the management of thyroid disease in pregnancy include recommendations regarding the interpretation of thyroid function tests in pregnancy, iodine nutrition, thyroid autoantibodies and pregnancy complications, thyroid considerations in infertile women, hypothyroidism in pregnancy, thyrotoxicosis in pregnancy, thyroid nodules and cancer in pregnant women, fetal and neonatal considerations, thyroid disease and lactation, screening for thyroid dysfunction in pregnancy, and directions for future research. We have developed evidence-based recommendations to inform clinical decision-making in the management of thyroid disease in pregnant and postpartum women. While all

  20. A strong pelvic floor is associated with higher rates of sexual activity in women with pelvic floor disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanter, Gregg; Rogers, Rebecca G; Pauls, Rachel N; Kammerer-Doak, Dorothy; Thakar, Ranee

    2015-01-01

    Introduction and Hypothesis We evaluated the associations between pelvic floor muscle strength and tone with sexual activity and sexual function in women with pelvic floor disorders. Methods This was a secondary analysis of a multicenter study of women with pelvic floor disorders from the US and UK performed to validate the Pelvic Organ Prolapse/Incontinence Sexual Questionnaire, IUGA-Revised (PISQ-IR). Participants were surveyed about whether they were sexually active and completed the PISQ-IR and Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) questionnaires to assess sexual function. Physical exams included assessment of pelvic floor strength by the Oxford Grading Scale, and assessment of pelvic floor tone per ICS guidelines. Results The cohort of 585 women was middle aged (mean age 54.9 +/−12.1) with 395 (67.5%) reporting sexual activity. Women with a strong pelvic floor (n=275) were more likely to report sexual activity than women with weak strength (n=280) (75.3 vs. 61.8%, ppelvic floor tone was not associated with sexual activity (68.8 vs. 60.2%, normal vs. hypoactive, p=0.08). After multivariable analysis, a strong pelvic floor remained predictive of sexual activity (OR 1.89, CI 1.18–3.03, ppelvic floor was associated with higher scores on the PISQ-IR domain of condition impact (Parameter Estimate 0.20+/−0.09, P=0.04), and FSFI orgasm domain (PE 0.51+/−0.17, P=0.004). Conclusion A strong pelvic floor is associated with higher rates of sexual activity as well as higher sexual function scores on the condition impact domain of the PISQ-IR and orgasm domain of the FSFI. PMID:25994625

  1. Updated European Association of Urology Guidelines Regarding Adjuvant Therapy for Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bex, Axel; Albiges, Laurence; Ljungberg, Börje; Bensalah, Karim; Dabestani, Saeed; Giles, Rachel H; Hofmann, Fabian; Hora, Milan; Kuczyk, Markus A; Lam, Thomas B; Marconi, Lorenzo; Merseburger, Axel S; Staehler, Michael; Volpe, Alessandro; Powles, Thomas

    2017-05-01

    The European Association of Urology Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC) guidelines panel updated their recommendation on adjuvant therapy in unfavourable, clinically nonmetastatic RCC following the recently reported results of a second randomised controlled phase 3 trial comparing 1-yr sunitinib to placebo for high-risk RCC after nephrectomy (S-TRAC). On the basis of conflicting results from the two available studies, the panel rated the quality of the evidence, the harm-to-benefit ratio, patient preferences, and costs. Finally, the panel, including representatives from a patient advocate group (International Kidney Cancer Coalition) voted and reached a consensus to not recommend adjuvant therapy with sunitinib for patients with high-risk RCC after nephrectomy. In two studies, sunitinib was given for 1 yr and compared to no active treatment (placebo) in patients who had their kidney tumour removed and who had a high risk of cancer coming back after surgery. Although one study demonstrated that 1 yr of sunitinib therapy resulted in a 1.2-yr longer time before the disease recurred, the other study did not show a benefit and it has not been shown that patients live longer. Despite having been diagnosed with high-risk disease, many patients remain without recurrence, and the side effects of sunitinib are high. Therefore, the panel members, including patient representatives, do not recommend sunitinib after tumour removal in these patients. Copyright © 2016 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The 2015 European Thyroid Association Guidelines on Diagnosis and Treatment of Endogenous Subclinical Hyperthyroidism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biondi, Bernadette; Bartalena, Luigi; Cooper, David S.; Hegedüs, Laszlo; Laurberg, Peter; Kahaly, George J.

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous subclinical hyperthyroidism (SHyper) is caused by Graves' disease, autonomously functioning thyroid nodules and multinodular goitre. Its diagnosis is based on a persistently subnormal serum thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) level with free thyroid hormone levels within their respective reference intervals. In 2014 the European Thyroid Association Executive Committee, given the controversies regarding the treatment of Endo SHyper, formed a task force to develop clinical practice guidelines based on the principles of evidence-based medicine. The task force recognized that recent meta-analyses, including those based on large prospective cohort studies, indicate that SHyper is associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease mortality, incident atrial fibrillation, heart failure, fractures and excess mortality in patients with serum TSH levels hyperthyroidism. Treatment could be considered in patients older than 65 years with TSH levels 0.1-0.39 mIU/l (grade 1 SHyper) because of their increased risk of atrial fibrillation, and might also be reasonable in younger (hyperthyroidism and the weaker evidence for adverse health outcomes. PMID:26558232

  3. The impact of new guidelines in Europe for the control and prevention of travel-associated Legionnaires' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricketts, Katherine D; Joseph, C A

    2006-11-01

    On 1 July 2002, EWGLINET introduced European guidelines for the control and prevention of travel-associated legionnaires' disease. This paper presents the results gathered by the surveillance scheme during the first two and a half years of the operation of the guidelines (to the end of 2004). Two hundred and thirty-seven new clusters and 70 cluster updates were identified. Investigations at 146 sites returned positive samples for legionella, and the proportion of positive sites reached over 60% in 2004. Thirty-four cluster sites were reported to have been investigated satisfactorily, but have gone on to be associated with subsequent cases ('repeater sites'). Fifty-one sites were published on the European Working Group for Legionella Infections (EWGLI) website; the publication states that EWGLINET cannot be confident that the sites have adequate control measures in place. The operation of the guidelines is discussed, and the situation in Turkey highlighted as a particular success.

  4. Guidelines for Controlling Indoor Air Quality Problems Associated with Kilns, Copiers, and Welding in Schools. Technical Bulletin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Ronald W.; And Others

    Guidelines for controlling indoor air quality problems associated with kilns, copiers, and welding in schools are provided in this document. Individual sections on kilns, duplicating equipment, and welding operations contain information on the following: sources of contaminants; health effects; methods of control; ventilation strategies; and…

  5. Evidence-based guidelines for the pharmacological treatment of anxiety disorders : recommendations from the British Association for Psychopharmacology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baldwin, DS; Anderson, IM; Nutt, DJ; Bandelow, B; Bond, A; Davidson, JRT; den Boer, JA; Fineberg, NA; Knapp, M; Scott, J; Wittchen, HU

    2005-01-01

    These British Association for Psychopharmacology guidelines cover the range and aims of treatment for anxiety disorders. They are based explicitly on the available evidence and are presented as recommendations to aid clinical decision making in primary and secondary medical care. They may also serve

  6. Guidelines, law, and governance: disconnects in the global control of airline-associated infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grout, Andrea; Howard, Natasha; Coker, Richard; Speakman, Elizabeth M

    2017-04-01

    International air travel is increasingly affecting the epidemiology of infectious diseases. A particular public health, economic, and political concern is the role of air travel in bringing infectious passengers or vectors to previously non-endemic areas. Yet, little research has been done to investigate either the infection risks associated with air travel or the empirical evidence for the effectiveness of infection control measures on aircraft and at borders. We briefly review the interface between international and national legislation, policy, and guidelines in the context of existing infection risks and possible scenarios. We have found that public health guidance and legislation, which airlines are required to follow, are often contradictory and confusing. Infection control measures for air travel need to be underpinned by coherent and enforceable national and international legislation that is based on solid epidemiological evidence. We recommend further research investment into more effective on-board vector control, health screening, and risk communications strategies, and the development of enforceable and harmonised international legislation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Association between the Adherence to the International Guidelines for Cancer Prevention and Mammographic Density.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adela Castelló

    Full Text Available Mammographic density (MD is considered a strong predictor of Breast Cancer (BC. The objective of the present study is to explore the association between MD and the compliance with the World Cancer Research Fund and the American Institute for Cancer Research (WCRF/AICR recommendations for cancer prevention.Data of 3584 women attending screening from a population-based multicenter cross-sectional study (DDM-Spain collected from October 7, 2007 through July 14, 2008, was used to calculate a score that measures the level of compliance with the WCRF/AICR recommendations: R1Maintain adequate body weight; R2Be physically active; 3RLimit the intake of high density foods; R4Eat mostly plant foods; R5Limit the intake of animal foods; R6Limit alcohol intake; R7Limit salt and salt preserved food intake; R8Meet nutritional needs through diet. The association between the score and MD (assessed by a single radiologist using a semi-quantitative scale was evaluated using ordinal logistic models with random center-specific intercepts adjusted for the main determinants of MD. Stratified analyses by menopausal status and smoking status were also carried out.A higher compliance with the WCRF/AICR recommendations was associated with lower MD (OR1-unit increase = 0.93 95%CI:0.86;0.99. The association was stronger in postmenopausal women (OR = 0.91 95%CI:0.84;0.99 and nonsmokers (OR = 0.87;95%CI:0.80;0.96 for nonsmokers, OR = 1.01 95%CI:0.91;1.12 for smokers, P-interaction = 0.042. Among nonsmokers, maintaining adequate body weight (OR = 0.81 95%CI:0.65;1.01, practicing physical activity (OR = 0.68 95%CI:0.48;0.96 and moderating the intake of high-density foods (OR = 0.58 95%CI:0.40;0.86 and alcoholic beverages (OR = 0.76 95%CI:0.55;1.05 were the recommendations showing the strongest associations with MD.postmenopausal women and non-smokers with greater compliance with the WCRF/AICR guidelines have lower MD. These results may provide guidance to design specific

  8. Management of Thyroid Peroxidase Antibody Euthyroid Women in Pregnancy: Comparison of the American Thyroid Association and the Endocrine Society Guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Mehran

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of thyroid autoantibodies is relatively high in women of childbearing age. There is evidence that positive thyroperoxidase antibody even in euthyroid women may increase the risk of spontaneous and recurrent pregnancy loss and preterm delivery. However, the evidence is not enough to justify recommendation on the screening of pregnant women for thyroid autoantibodies or LT4 supplementation for reducing maternal or fetal complications. In this paper we reviewed the related evidence and compared the new guidelines of the American Thyroid Association and Endocrine Society with respect to the screening and management of positive thyroperoxidase antibody in euthyroid pregnant women. As there was no major contradiction or disagreement between the two guidelines, either one of two guidelines may be used by clinicians for the appropriate management of thyroid autoimmunity during pregnancy.

  9. American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, Associazione Medici Endocrinologi, and European Thyroid Association Medical guidelines for clinical practice for the diagnosis and management of thyroid nodules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gharib, Hossein; Papini, Enrico; Paschke, Ralf

    2010-01-01

    American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, Associazione Medici Endocrinologi, and European Thyroid Association Medical Guidelines for Clinical Practice for the Diagnosis and Management of Thyroid Nodules are systematically developed statements to assist health care professionals in medical...... decision making for specific clinical conditions. Most of the content herein is based on literature reviews. In areas of uncertainty, professional judgment was applied.These guidelines are a working document that reflects the state of the field at the time of publication. Because rapid changes in this area...

  10. American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, Associazione Medici Endocrinologi, and European Thyroid Association Medical Guidelines for Clinical Practice for the Diagnosis and Management of thyroid Nodules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gharib, Hossein; Papini, Enrico; Paschke, Ralf

    2010-01-01

    American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, Associazione Medici Endocrinologi, and European Thyroid Association Medical Guidelines for Clinical Practice for the Diagnosis and Management of Thyroid Nodules are systematically developed statements to assist health care professionals in medical...... decision making for specific clinical conditions. Most of the content herein is based on literature reviews. In areas of uncertainty, professional judgment was applied.These guidelines are a working document that reflects the state of the field at the time of publication. Because rapid changes in this area...

  11. 2015 American Thyroid Association Management Guidelines for Adult Patients with Thyroid Nodules and Differentiated Thyroid Cancer: The American Thyroid Association Guidelines Task Force on Thyroid Nodules and Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Erik K.; Bible, Keith C.; Doherty, Gerard M.; Mandel, Susan J.; Nikiforov, Yuri E.; Pacini, Furio; Randolph, Gregory W.; Sawka, Anna M.; Schlumberger, Martin; Schuff, Kathryn G.; Sherman, Steven I.; Sosa, Julie Ann; Steward, David L.; Tuttle, R. Michael; Wartofsky, Leonard

    2016-01-01

    Background: Thyroid nodules are a common clinical problem, and differentiated thyroid cancer is becoming increasingly prevalent. Since the American Thyroid Association's (ATA's) guidelines for the management of these disorders were revised in 2009, significant scientific advances have occurred in the field. The aim of these guidelines is to inform clinicians, patients, researchers, and health policy makers on published evidence relating to the diagnosis and management of thyroid nodules and differentiated thyroid cancer. Methods: The specific clinical questions addressed in these guidelines were based on prior versions of the guidelines, stakeholder input, and input of task force members. Task force panel members were educated on knowledge synthesis methods, including electronic database searching, review and selection of relevant citations, and critical appraisal of selected studies. Published English language articles on adults were eligible for inclusion. The American College of Physicians Guideline Grading System was used for critical appraisal of evidence and grading strength of recommendations for therapeutic interventions. We developed a similarly formatted system to appraise the quality of such studies and resultant recommendations. The guideline panel had complete editorial independence from the ATA. Competing interests of guideline task force members were regularly updated, managed, and communicated to the ATA and task force members. Results: The revised guidelines for the management of thyroid nodules include recommendations regarding initial evaluation, clinical and ultrasound criteria for fine-needle aspiration biopsy, interpretation of fine-needle aspiration biopsy results, use of molecular markers, and management of benign thyroid nodules. Recommendations regarding the initial management of thyroid cancer include those relating to screening for thyroid cancer, staging and risk assessment, surgical management, radioiodine remnant ablation and therapy

  12. 2015 American Thyroid Association Management Guidelines for Adult Patients with Thyroid Nodules and Differentiated Thyroid Cancer: The American Thyroid Association Guidelines Task Force on Thyroid Nodules and Differentiated Thyroid Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugen, Bryan R; Alexander, Erik K; Bible, Keith C; Doherty, Gerard M; Mandel, Susan J; Nikiforov, Yuri E; Pacini, Furio; Randolph, Gregory W; Sawka, Anna M; Schlumberger, Martin; Schuff, Kathryn G; Sherman, Steven I; Sosa, Julie Ann; Steward, David L; Tuttle, R Michael; Wartofsky, Leonard

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid nodules are a common clinical problem, and differentiated thyroid cancer is becoming increasingly prevalent. Since the American Thyroid Association's (ATA's) guidelines for the management of these disorders were revised in 2009, significant scientific advances have occurred in the field. The aim of these guidelines is to inform clinicians, patients, researchers, and health policy makers on published evidence relating to the diagnosis and management of thyroid nodules and differentiated thyroid cancer. The specific clinical questions addressed in these guidelines were based on prior versions of the guidelines, stakeholder input, and input of task force members. Task force panel members were educated on knowledge synthesis methods, including electronic database searching, review and selection of relevant citations, and critical appraisal of selected studies. Published English language articles on adults were eligible for inclusion. The American College of Physicians Guideline Grading System was used for critical appraisal of evidence and grading strength of recommendations for therapeutic interventions. We developed a similarly formatted system to appraise the quality of such studies and resultant recommendations. The guideline panel had complete editorial independence from the ATA. Competing interests of guideline task force members were regularly updated, managed, and communicated to the ATA and task force members. The revised guidelines for the management of thyroid nodules include recommendations regarding initial evaluation, clinical and ultrasound criteria for fine-needle aspiration biopsy, interpretation of fine-needle aspiration biopsy results, use of molecular markers, and management of benign thyroid nodules. Recommendations regarding the initial management of thyroid cancer include those relating to screening for thyroid cancer, staging and risk assessment, surgical management, radioiodine remnant ablation and therapy, and thyrotropin suppression

  13. The All India Difficult Airway Association 2016 guidelines for tracheal intubation in the Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Nainan Myatra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tracheal intubation (TI is a routine procedure in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU and is often life-saving. In contrast to the controlled conditions in the operating room, critically ill patients with respiratory failure and shock are physiologically unstable. These factors, along with a suboptimal evaluation of the airway and limited oxygen reserves despite adequate pre-oxygenation, are responsible for a high incidence of life-threatening complications such as severe hypoxaemia and cardiovascular collapse during TI in the ICU. The All India Difficult Airway Association (AIDAA proposes a stepwise plan for safe management of the airway in critically ill patients. These guidelines have been developed based on available evidence; wherever robust evidence was lacking, recommendations were arrived at by consensus opinion of airway experts, incorporating the responses to a questionnaire sent to members of the AIDAA and the Indian Society of Anaesthesiologists. Non-invasive positive pressure ventilation during pre-oxygenation improves oxygen stores in patients with respiratory pathology. Nasal insufflation of oxygen at 15 L/min can increase the duration of apnoea before the occurrence of hypoxaemia. High-flow nasal cannula oxygenation at 60-70 L/min may also increase safety during TI in critically ill patients. Stable haemodynamics and gas exchange must be maintained during rapid sequence induction. It is necessary to implement an intubation protocol during routine airway management in the ICU. Adherence to a plan for difficult airway management incorporating the use of intubation aids and airway rescue devices and strategies is useful.

  14. Critical assessment of the European Association of Urology guideline indications for pelvic lymph node dissection at radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdollah, Firas; Sun, Maxine; Briganti, Alberto; Thuret, Rodolphe; Schmitges, Jan; Gallina, Andrea; Suardi, Nazareno; Capitanio, Umberto; Salonia, Andrea; Shariat, Shahrokh F; Perrotte, Paul; Rigatti, Patrizio; Montorsi, Francesco; Karakiewicz, Pierre I

    2011-12-01

    What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? Lymphadenectomy is the most accurate lymph node staging procedure in patients with prostate cancer. We presented the first formal validation of the 2010 European Association of Urology guidelines for lymphadenectomy in prostate cancer patients. • To assess the 2010 European Association of Urology (EAU) guidelines for prostate cancer, which recommend a pelvic lymph node dissection (PLND) at radical prostatectomy in all individuals with a nomogram-predicted lymph node invasion (LNI) risk of >7%. • We focused on 1520 patients treated with radical prostatectomy and PLND, between 2006 and 2010, at a single European institution. We examined the ability of the EAU proposed threshold to correctly predict histologically confirmed LNI. Moreover, we tested the ability of a range of nomogram thresholds between 1 and 14% to correctly predict histologically confirmed LNI. Finally, we externally validated the EAU PLND guideline nomogram. • Overall, 10.6% of patients had LNI. The use of the 7% limit would have allowed the avoidance of 49% of PLNDs, at the cost of missing 11% of patients with LNI. The use of thresholds of 6% and 8% would have allowed the avoidance of respectively 46% and 52% of PLNDs, at the cost of missing respectively 9% and 11% of patients with LNI. Overall, the accuracy of the EAU guideline nomogram according to the receiver operating characteristics derived area under curve was 81% • Our observations indicate that the EAU guideline nomogram is highly accurate. The recommended threshold of 7%, above which a PLND should be performed, is associated with a favourable compromise between avoidable PLNDs and potentially missed LNI cases. © 2011 THE AUTHORS. BJU INTERNATIONAL © 2011 BJU INTERNATIONAL.

  15. Guidelines for direct radionuclide cystography; Empfehlungen zur Durchfuehrung der direkten Radionuklid-Zystographie bei Kindern. Richtlinie uebernommen vom Paediatric Committee der European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fettich, J. [Univ. Medical Centre Ljubljana (Slovenia); Colarinha, P. [Inst. Portugues de Oncologia, Lisboa (Portugal); Fischer, S.; Hahn, K.; Porn, U. [Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, LMU Muenchen (Germany); Froekier, J. [Aarhus Univ. Hospital - Skejby (Denmark); Gordon, I. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, London (United Kingdom); Kabasakal, L. [Cerraphasa Tip Fakultesi, Nukleer Tip Ana Bilim Dali, Aksaray (Turkey); Mann, M. [Inst. of Child Health, Rondebosh, Red Cross Hospital, Capetown (South Africa); Mitjavila, M. [Hospital Universitario de Getafe, Madrid (Spain); Olivier, P. [CHU Nancy (France); Piepsz, A. [CHU St Pierre (Belgium); Roca, I. [Hospital Vall d' Hebron, Barcelona (Spain); Sixt, R. [The Queen Silvia Children' s Hospital, Goeteborg (Sweden); Velzen, J. van [ARPES (Netherlands)

    2002-07-01

    These ''Empfehlungen'' are the german translation of the Guidelines on MIBG-Scintigraphy in Children, which were published by the Paediatric Committee of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine. (orig.) [German] Bei den vorliegenden Empfehlungen handelt es sich um die deutsche Uebersetzung der vom Paediatric Committee der European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) publizierten Guidelines. (orig.)

  16. Guidelines for MIBG-scintigraphy in children; Empfehlungen zur Durchfuehrung der MIBG-Szintigraphie bei Kindern. Leitlinie uebernommen vom Paediatric Committee der European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olivier, P. [CHU Nancy (France); Colarinha, P. [Inst. Portugues de Oncologia, Lisbon (Portugal); Fettich, J. [Univ. Medical Centre Ljubljana (Slovenia); Fischer, S.; Hahn, K.; Porn, U. [Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Univ. of Munich (Germany); Froekier, J. [Aarhus Univ. Hospital - Skejby (Denmark); Giammarile, F. [Centre Leon Berard, Lyon (France); Gordon, I. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, London (United Kingdom); Kabasakal, L. [Cerraphasa Tipp Fakultesi, Nukleer Tipp Ana Bilim Dali, Aksaray (Turkey); Mann, M. [Red Cross Hospital Cape Town (South Africa); Mitjavila, M. [Hospital Universitario de Getafe, Madrid (Spain); Piepsz, A. [AZ VUB and CHU St Pierre, Brussels (Belgium); Sixt, R. [Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital Oestra, Goeteborg (Sweden); Velzen, J. van [ARPES (Netherlands)

    2002-07-01

    These ''Empfehlungen'' are the german translation of the Guidelines on MIBG-Scintigraphy in Children, which were published by the Paediatric Committee of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine. (orig.) [German] Bei den vorliegenden Empfehlungen handelt es sich um die deutsche Uebersetzung der vom Paediatric Committee der European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) publizierten Guidelines. (orig.)

  17. Racial/Ethnic Differences in Associations Between Neighborhood Social Cohesion and Meeting Physical Activity Guidelines, United States, 2013–2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh-Shevrin, Chau; Yen, Irene H.; Kwon, Simona C.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Neighborhood factors are increasingly recognized as determinants of health. Neighborhood social cohesion may be associated with physical activity, but previous studies examined data aggregated across racial/ethnic groups. We assessed whether neighborhood social cohesion was associated with physical activity in a nationally representative data set and explored the role of race/ethnicity. Methods We combined National Health Interview Survey data from 2013 and 2014 (n = 64,754) and constructed a neighborhood social cohesion score by summing responses to 4 questions. The outcome of meeting aerobic physical activity guidelines was defined as 150 or more minutes per week of moderate activity or 75 or more minutes of vigorous activity. Multivariable models regressing physical activity on neighborhood social cohesion were adjusted for demographic factors; interaction analyses assessed effect modification by race/ethnicity. Results In adjusted analyses, a 1-unit increase in the neighborhood social cohesion score was associated with higher odds of meeting physical activity guidelines (odds ratio [OR], 1.04; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.03–1.05). Neighborhood social cohesion and physical activity were associated among non-Hispanic white adults (OR, 1.30; 95% CI, 1.20–1.42) and Hispanic adults (OR, 1.18; 95% CI, 1.03–1.34]) but not among non-Hispanic black or Asian American adults (Chinese, Filipino, and Asian Indians). Conclusion Neighborhood social cohesion was associated with meeting physical activity guidelines in a nationally representative sample; this association may be most meaningful for non-Hispanic white and Hispanic populations. Additional studies are needed to identify neighborhood factors that help non-Hispanic black and Asian Americans to meet physical activity guidelines. PMID:27930284

  18. Racial/Ethnic Differences in Associations Between Neighborhood Social Cohesion and Meeting Physical Activity Guidelines, United States, 2013-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Stella S; Trinh-Shevrin, Chau; Yen, Irene H; Kwon, Simona C

    2016-12-08

    Neighborhood factors are increasingly recognized as determinants of health. Neighborhood social cohesion may be associated with physical activity, but previous studies examined data aggregated across racial/ethnic groups. We assessed whether neighborhood social cohesion was associated with physical activity in a nationally representative data set and explored the role of race/ethnicity. We combined National Health Interview Survey data from 2013 and 2014 (n = 64,754) and constructed a neighborhood social cohesion score by summing responses to 4 questions. The outcome of meeting aerobic physical activity guidelines was defined as 150 or more minutes per week of moderate activity or 75 or more minutes of vigorous activity. Multivariable models regressing physical activity on neighborhood social cohesion were adjusted for demographic factors; interaction analyses assessed effect modification by race/ethnicity. In adjusted analyses, a 1-unit increase in the neighborhood social cohesion score was associated with higher odds of meeting physical activity guidelines (odds ratio [OR], 1.04; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.03-1.05). Neighborhood social cohesion and physical activity were associated among non-Hispanic white adults (OR, 1.30; 95% CI, 1.20-1.42) and Hispanic adults (OR, 1.18; 95% CI, 1.03-1.34]) but not among non-Hispanic black or Asian American adults (Chinese, Filipino, and Asian Indians). Neighborhood social cohesion was associated with meeting physical activity guidelines in a nationally representative sample; this association may be most meaningful for non-Hispanic white and Hispanic populations. Additional studies are needed to identify neighborhood factors that help non-Hispanic black and Asian Americans to meet physical activity guidelines.

  19. [Update of the Clinical Guidelines of the European Association of Urology on muscle-invasive and metastatic bladder carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenzl, A; Cowan, N C; De Santis, M; Jakse, G; Kuczyk, M A; Merseburger, A S; Ribal, M J; Sherif, A; Witjes, J A

    2010-01-01

    New data regarding diagnosis and treatment of muscle-invasive and metastatic bladder cancer (MiM-BC) has emerged and led to an update of the European Association of Urology (EAU) guidelines for MiM-BC. To review the new EAU guidelines for MiM-BC. A comprehensive workup of the literature obtained from Medline, the Cochrane central register of systematic reviews, and reference lists in publications and review articles was developed and screened by a group of urologists, oncologists, and radiologist appointed by the EAU Guideline Committee. Previous recommendations based on the older literature on this subject were taken into account. Levels of evidence and grade of guideline recommendations were added, modified from the Oxford Centre for Evidence-based Medicine Levels of Evidence. The diagnosis of muscle-invasive bladder cancer (BCa) is made by transurethral resection (TUR) and following histopathologic evaluation. Patients with confirmed muscle-invasive BCa should be staged by computed tomography (CT) scans of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis, if available. Adjuvant chemotherapy is currently only advised within clinical trials. Radical cystectomy (RC) is the treatment of choice for both sexes, and lymph node dissection should be an integral part of cystectomy. An orthotopic bladder substitute should be offered to both male and female patients lacking any contraindications, such as no tumour at the level of urethral dissection. Multimodality bladder-preserving treatment in localised disease is currently regarded only as an alternative in selected, well-informed, and compliant patients for whom cystectomy is not considered for clinical or personal reasons. An appropriate schedule for disease monitoring should be based on: a) natural timing of recurrence; b) probability of disease recurrence; c) functional deterioration at particular sites; and d) consideration of treatment of a recurrence. In metastatic disease, the first-line treatment for patients fit enough to

  20. Canadian Association of Gastroenterology Consensus Guidelines on Safety and Quality Indicators in Endoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Armstrong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Several organizations worldwide have developed procedure-based guidelines and/or position statements regarding various aspects of quality and safety indicators, and credentialing for endoscopy. Although important, they do not specifically address patient needs or provide a framework for their adoption in the context of endoscopy services. The consensus guidelines reported in this article, however, aimed to identify processes and indicators relevant to the provision of high-quality endoscopy services that will support ongoing quality improvement across many jurisdictions, specifically in the areas of ethics, facility standards and policies, quality assurance, training and education, reporting standards and patient perceptions.

  1. Pulmonary Rehabilitation Exercise Prescription in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: Review of Selected Guidelines: AN OFFICIAL STATEMENT FROM THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CARDIOVASCULAR AND PULMONARY REHABILITATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvey, Chris; Bayles, Madeline Paternostro; Hamm, Larry F; Hill, Kylie; Holland, Anne; Limberg, Trina M; Spruit, Martijn A

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is associated with disabling dyspnea, skeletal muscle dysfunction, and significant morbidity and mortality. Current guidelines recommend pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) to improve dyspnea, functional capacity, and quality of life. Translating exercise science into safe and effective exercise training requires interpretation and use of multiple guidelines and recommendations. The purpose of this statement is to summarize for clinicians 3 current chronic obstructive pulmonary disease guidelines for exercise that may be used to develop exercise prescriptions in the PR setting. The 3 guidelines have been published by the American College of Sports Medicine, the American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society, and the American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation. In addition to summarizing these 3 guidelines, this statement describes clinical applications, explores areas of uncertainty, and suggests strategies for providing effective exercise training, given the diversity of guidelines and patient complexity.

  2. A prospective study of 100 cases of penile cancer managed according to European Association of Urology guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegarty, Paul K; Kayes, Oliver; Freeman, Alex; Christopher, Nim; Ralph, David J; Minhas, Suks

    2006-09-01

    To prospectively assess the outcome of patients treated according to the European Association of Urology (EAU) guidelines on the management of penile cancer, a system originally based on retrospective series. Between 2002 and 2005, 100 consecutive patients (median age 62 years) with penile cancer were treated at one institution; all were categorized and treated according to EAU guidelines. Data were analysed using the z-test, with significance defined as P 12 months of follow-up (mean 29); the survival of the whole group was 92%. Of men with palpable nodes, 72% had lymph node involvement, whereas 18% of those with impalpable nodes who had lymphadenectomy according to the guidelines had lymph node disease. The grade of the primary tumour was more predictive than T stage for lymph node involvement and survival. The 3-year disease-specific survival for N0, N1 and N2 disease was 100%, 100% and 73%, respectively, and survival at 12 months for N3 disease was 67%. The median survival for those with metastases was 3 months. The overall survival of men with penile cancer is high, with a clear benefit for early lymphadenectomy in men with positive nodal disease. However, the current EAU guidelines are limited in predicting those patients with micrometastatic disease, with the result that 82% of patients undergo unnecessary prophylactic lymphadenectomy. There is a need to identify more accurate molecular markers for predicting lymph node disease, or the role of novel staging techniques must be assessed.

  3. Evidence-based guidelines for treating bipolar disorder: revised third edition Recommendations from the British Association for Psychopharmacology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, G.M.; Haddad, P. M.; Ferrier, I.N.; Aronson, J.K.; Barnes, T.R.H.; Cipriani, A.; Coghill, D.R.; Fazel, S.; Geddes, J.R.; Grunze, H.; Holmes, E.A.; Howes, O.; Hudson, S.; Hunt, N.; Jones, I.; Macmillan, I.C.; McAllister-Williams, H.; Miklowitz, D.M.; Morriss, R.; Munafò, M.; Paton, C.; Saharkian, B.J.; Saunders, K.E.A.; Sinclair, J.M.A.; Taylor, D.; Vieta, E.; Young, A.H.

    2016-01-01

    The British Association for Psychopharmacology guidelines specify the scope and targets of treatment for bipolar disorder. The third version is based explicitly on the available evidence and presented, like previous Clinical Practice Guidelines, as recommendations to aid clinical decision making for practitioners: it may also serve as a source of information for patients and carers, and assist audit. The recommendations are presented together with a more detailed review of the corresponding evidence. A consensus meeting, involving experts in bipolar disorder and its treatment, reviewed key areas and considered the strength of evidence and clinical implications. The guidelines were drawn up after extensive feedback from these participants. The best evidence from randomized controlled trials and, where available, observational studies employing quasi-experimental designs was used to evaluate treatment options. The strength of recommendations has been described using the GRADE approach. The guidelines cover the diagnosis of bipolar disorder, clinical management, and strategies for the use of medicines: in short-term treatment of episodes, relapse prevention and stopping treatment. The use of medication is integrated with a coherent approach to psychoeducation and behaviour change. PMID:26979387

  4. Adjuvant and Salvage Radiation Therapy After Prostatectomy: American Society for Radiation Oncology/American Urological Association Guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valicenti, Richard K., E-mail: Richard.valicenti@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Davis School of Medicine, Davis, California (United States); Thompson, Ian [Department of Urology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas (United States); Albertsen, Peter [Division of Urology, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, Connecticut (United States); Davis, Brian J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Medical School, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Goldenberg, S. Larry [Department of Urologic Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Wolf, J. Stuart [Department of Urology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Sartor, Oliver [Department of Medicine and Urology, Tulane Medical School, New Orleans, Louisiana (United States); Klein, Eric [Glickman Urological Kidney Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Hahn, Carol [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Michalski, Jeff [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Roach, Mack [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Faraday, Martha M. [Four Oaks, Inc (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this guideline was to provide a clinical framework for the use of radiation therapy after radical prostatectomy as adjuvant or salvage therapy. Methods and Materials: A systematic literature review using PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane database was conducted to identify peer-reviewed publications relevant to the use of radiation therapy after prostatectomy. The review yielded 294 articles; these publications were used to create the evidence-based guideline statements. Additional guidance is provided as Clinical Principles when insufficient evidence existed. Results: Guideline statements are provided for patient counseling, use of radiation therapy in the adjuvant and salvage contexts, defining biochemical recurrence, and conducting a restaging evaluation. Conclusions: Physicians should offer adjuvant radiation therapy to patients with adverse pathologic findings at prostatectomy (ie, seminal vesicle invastion, positive surgical margins, extraprostatic extension) and salvage radiation therapy to patients with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) or local recurrence after prostatectomy in whom there is no evidence of distant metastatic disease. The offer of radiation therapy should be made in the context of a thoughtful discussion of possible short- and long-term side effects of radiation therapy as well as the potential benefits of preventing recurrence. The decision to administer radiation therapy should be made by the patient and the multidisciplinary treatment team with full consideration of the patient's history, values, preferences, quality of life, and functional status. The American Society for Radiation Oncology and American Urological Association websites show this guideline in its entirety, including the full literature review.

  5. AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGISTS AND AMERICAN COLLEGE OF ENDOCRINOLOGY COMPREHENSIVE CLINICAL PRACTICE GUIDELINES FOR MEDICAL CARE OF PATIENTS WITH OBESITYEXECUTIVE SUMMARYComplete Guidelines available at https://www.aace.com/publications/guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvey, W Timothy; Mechanick, Jeffrey I; Brett, Elise M; Garber, Alan J; Hurley, Daniel L; Jastreboff, Ania M; Nadolsky, Karl; Pessah-Pollack, Rachel; Plodkowski, Raymond

    2016-07-01

    Development of these guidelines is mandated by the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) Board of Directors and the American College of Endocrinology (ACE) Board of Trustees and adheres to published AACE protocols for the standardized production of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs). Recommendations are based on diligent review of clinical evidence with transparent incorporation of subjective factors. There are 9 broad clinical questions with 123 recommendation numbers that include 160 specific statements (85 [53.1%] strong [Grade A], 48 [30.0%] intermediate [Grade B], and 11 [6.9%] weak [Grade C], with 16 [10.0%] based on expert opinion [Grade D]) that build a comprehensive medical care plan for obesity. There were 133 (83.1%) statements based on strong (best evidence level [BEL] 1 = 79 [49.4%]) or intermediate (BEL 2 = 54 [33.7%]) levels of scientific substantiation. There were 34 (23.6%) evidence-based recommendation grades (Grades A-C = 144) that were adjusted based on subjective factors. Among the 1,788 reference citations used in this CPG, 524 (29.3%) were based on strong (evidence level [EL] 1), 605 (33.8%) were based on intermediate (EL 2), and 308 (17.2%) were based on weak (EL 3) scientific studies, with 351 (19.6%) based on reviews and opinions (EL 4). The final recommendations recognize that obesity is a complex, adiposity-based chronic disease, where management targets both weight-related complications and adiposity to improve overall health and quality of life. The detailed evidence-based recommendations allow for nuanced clinical decision-making that addresses real-world medical care of patients with obesity, including screening, diagnosis, evaluation, selection of therapy, treatment goals, and individualization of care. The goal is to facilitate high-quality care of patients with obesity and provide a rational, scientific approach to management that optimizes health outcomes and safety. A1C = hemoglobin A1c AACE = American

  6. Are the 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans Associated With Reduced Risk of Type 2 Diabetes and Cardiometabolic Risk Factors?

    OpenAIRE

    Zamora, Daisy; Gordon-Larsen, Penny; He, Ka; Jacobs, David R.; Shikany, James M.; Popkin, Barry M.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine the prospective association between accordance with the 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans (DGA) and subsequent diabetes incidence and changes in cardiometabolic risk factors. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The sample consisted of 4,381 black and white young adults examined repeatedly from 1985 to 2005. We used the 2005 Diet Quality Index (DQI) to rate participants’ diets based on meeting key dietary recommendations conveyed by the 2005 DGA. RESULTS Overall, we found no a...

  7. Saudi oncology society and Saudi urology association combined clinical management guidelines for urothelial urinary bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mubarak Al-mansour

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this report, updated guidelines for the evaluation, medical, and surgical management of transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder are resented. They are categorized according the stage of the disease using the TNM staging system 7 th edition. The recommendations are presented with supporting level of evidence.

  8. DRAFT: Russian Association of Endocrinologists Clinic Guidelines for Thyroid Nodules Diagnostic and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Eduardovich Vanushko

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Russian guidelines for diagnostic of thyroid nodules gained some actual questions: necessity of ultrasound (US-screening of the thyroid cancer, indications for fine needle aspiration and exam of calcitonin, necessity of unification of US and cytopathology classification for signs of thyroid nodules. 

  9. Saudi oncology society and Saudi urology association combined clinical management guidelines for renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazarbashi, Shouki; Alkhateeb, Sultan; Abusamra, Ashraf; Rabah, Danny; Alotaibi, Mohammed; Almansour, Mubarak; Murshid, Esam; Alsharm, Abdullah; Alolayan, Ashwaq; Ahmad, Imran; Alghamdi, Khalid; Alghamdi, Abdullah

    2014-10-01

    In this report, updated guidelines for the evaluation, medical and surgical management of renal cell carcinoma are presented. They are categorized according the stage of the disease using the tumor node metastasis staging system 7(th) edition. The recommendations are presented with supporting evidence level.

  10. Saudi oncology society and Saudi urology association combined clinical management guidelines for testicular germ cell tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alotaibi, Mohammed; Bazarbashi, Shouki; Alkhateeb, Sultan; Abusamra, Ashraf; Rabah, Danny; Almansour, Mubarak; Murshid, Esam; Alsharm, Abdullah; Ahmad, Imran; Alghamdi, Khalid; Saadeddin, Ahmad; Alghamdi, Abdullah

    2014-10-01

    In this report, updated guidelines for the evaluation, medical, and surgical management of germ cell tumor of testes are resented. They are categorized according the stage of the disease using the tumor-node-metastasis staging system 7(th) edition. The recommendations are presented with supporting level of evidence.

  11. Saudi oncology society and Saudi urology association combined clinical management guidelines for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhateeb, Sultan; Abusamra, Ashraf; Rabah, Danny; Alotaibi, Mohammed; Mahmood, Rana; Almansour, Mubarak; Murshid, Esam; Alsharm, Abdullah; Alolayan, Ashwaq; Ahmad, Imran; Alkushi, Hussain; Alghamdi, Abdullah; Bazarbashi, Shouki

    2014-10-01

    In this report, updated guidelines for the evaluation, medical, and surgical management of prostate cancer are presented. They are categorized according the stage of the disease using the tumor node metastasis staging system 7(th) edition. The recommendations are presented with supporting evidence level.

  12. Saudi oncology society and Saudi urology association combined clinical management guidelines for renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shouki Bazarbashi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this report, updated guidelines for the evaluation, medical and surgical management of renal cell carcinoma are presented. They are categorized according the stage of the disease using the tumor node metastasis staging system 7 th edition. The recommendations are presented with supporting evidence level.

  13. Saudi oncology society and Saudi urology association combined clinical management guidelines for testicular germ cell tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Alotaibi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this report, updated guidelines for the evaluation, medical, and surgical management of germ cell tumor of testes are resented. They are categorized according the stage of the disease using the tumor-node-metastasis staging system 7 th edition. The recommendations are presented with supporting level of evidence.

  14. Saudi oncology society and Saudi urology association combined clinical management guidelines for prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sultan Alkhateeb

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this report, updated guidelines for the evaluation, medical, and surgical management of prostate cancer are presented. They are categorized according the stage of the disease using the tumor node metastasis staging system 7 th edition. The recommendations are presented with supporting evidence level.

  15. Results and summary of voting among the audience during presentation and discussion of Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma clinical guidelines prepared by American Thyroid Association

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Soderstrom, Folke

    2013-01-01

    The one-day ETA-CRN meeting, preceding the ETA meeting in Lisbon, was planned in advance to provide a thorough assessment of the European response to the published American Thyroid Association MTC guidelines. During the meeting, following each of the European speakers, a series of questions, rela...... welcomes the American Guidelines on the management of MTC, but simultaneously only partially agrees with some of the statements in the guidelines....

  16. Molecular testing guideline for selection of lung cancer patients for EGFR and ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitors: guideline from the College of American Pathologists, International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer, and Association for Molecular Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindeman, Neal I; Cagle, Philip T; Beasley, Mary Beth; Chitale, Dhananjay Arun; Dacic, Sanja; Giaccone, Giuseppe; Jenkins, Robert Brian; Kwiatkowski, David J; Saldivar, Juan-Sebastian; Squire, Jeremy; Thunnissen, Erik; Ladanyi, Marc

    2013-07-01

    To establish evidence-based recommendations for the molecular analysis of lung cancers that are that are required to guide EGFR- and ALK-directed therapies, addressing which patients and samples should be tested, and when and how testing should be performed. Three cochairs without conflicts of interest were selected, one from each of the 3 sponsoring professional societies: College of American Pathologists, International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer, and Association for Molecular Pathology. Writing and advisory panels were constituted from additional experts from these societies. Three unbiased literature searches of electronic databases were performed to capture articles published published from January 2004 through February 2012, yielding 1533 articles whose abstracts were screened to identify 521 pertinent articles that were then reviewed in detail for their relevance to the recommendations. Evidence was formally graded for each recommendation. Initial recommendations were formulated by the cochairs and panel members at a public meeting. Each guideline section was assigned to at least 2 panelists. Drafts were circulated to the writing panel (version 1), advisory panel (version 2), and the public (version 3) before submission (version 4). The 37 guideline items address 14 subjects, including 15 recommendations (evidence grade A/B). The major recommendations are to use testing for EGFR mutations and ALK fusions to guide patient selection for therapy with an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) or anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitor, respectively, in all patients with advanced-stage adenocarcinoma, regardless of sex, race, smoking history, or other clinical risk factors, and to prioritize EGFR and ALK testing over other molecular predictive tests. As scientific discoveries and clinical practice outpace the completion of randomized clinical trials, evidence-based guidelines developed by expert practitioners are vital for communicating emerging

  17. Evaluation and management of penetrating lower extremity arterial trauma: an Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma practice management guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Nicole; Rajani, Ravi R; Bokhari, Faran; Chiu, William C; Kerwin, Andrew; Seamon, Mark J; Skarupa, David; Frykberg, Eric

    2012-11-01

    Extremity arterial injury after penetrating trauma is common in military conflict or urban trauma centers. Most peripheral arterial injuries occur in the femoral and popliteal vessels of the lower extremity. The Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma first published practice management guidelines for the evaluation and treatment of penetrating lower extremity arterial trauma in 2002. Since that time, there have been advancements in the management of penetrating lower extremity arterial trauma. As a result, the Practice Management Guidelines Committee set out to develop updated guidelines. A MEDLINE computer search was performed using PubMed (www.pubmed.gov). The search retrieved English language articles regarding penetrating lower extremity trauma from 1998 to 2011. References of these articles were also used to locate articles not identified through the MEDLINE search. Letters to the editor, case reports, book chapters, and review articles were excluded. The topics investigated were prehospital management, diagnostic evaluation, use of imaging technology, the role of temporary intravascular shunts, use of tourniquets, and the role of endovascular intervention. Forty-three articles were identified. From this group, 20 articles were selected to construct the guidelines. There have been changes in practice since the publication of the previous guidelines in 2002. Expedited triage of patients is possible with physical examination and/or the measurement of ankle-brachial indices. Computed tomographic angiography has become the diagnostic study of choice when imaging is required. Tourniquets and intravascular shunts have emerged as adjuncts in the treatment of penetrating lower extremity arterial trauma. The role of endovascular intervention warrants further investigation.

  18. Diabetes guidelines: a summary and comparison of the recommendations of the American Diabetes Association, Veterans Health Administration, and American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, M J; Sterrett, J J; Carson, D S

    2000-08-01

    This paper summarizes and compares 3 major organizations' guidelines for the management of diabetes mellitus. Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease that affects >16 million Americans. A decrease in adverse events has been demonstrated when hyperglycemia and comorbid conditions such as hypertension and dyslipidemia are controlled in patients with diabetes. Although each patient with diabetes is unique and medical care should be tailored to his or her individual needs, clinical evidence and expert opinion have established a baseline level of care for all patients with diabetes. Guidelines have been created to guide practitioners in selecting appropriate care, but their length and complexity may serve as barriers to their use. The diabetes management guidelines of the American Diabetes Association (ADA), Veterans Health Administration (VA), and American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) are summarized and compared in both text and tabular form. Although the guidelines published by the ADA, VA, and AACE vary slightly, all of them can be used to ensure that patients with diabetes receive appropriate care.

  19. 2016 Guidelines for the management of thyroid storm from The Japan Thyroid Association and Japan Endocrine Society (First edition).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Tetsurou; Isozaki, Osamu; Suzuki, Atsushi; Wakino, Shu; Iburi, Tadao; Tsuboi, Kumiko; Kanamoto, Naotetsu; Otani, Hajime; Furukawa, Yasushi; Teramukai, Satoshi; Akamizu, Takashi

    2016-12-30

    Thyroid storm is an endocrine emergency which is characterized by multiple organ failure due to severe thyrotoxicosis, often associated with triggering illnesses. Early suspicion, prompt diagnosis and intensive treatment will improve survival in thyroid storm patients. Because of its rarity and high mortality, prospective intervention studies for the treatment of thyroid storm are difficult to carry out. We, the Japan Thyroid Association and Japan Endocrine Society taskforce committee, previously developed new diagnostic criteria and conducted nationwide surveys for thyroid storm in Japan. Detailed analyses of clinical data from 356 patients revealed that the mortality in Japan was still high (∼11%) and that multiple organ failure and acute heart failure were common causes of death. In addition, multimodal treatment with antithyroid drugs, inorganic iodide, corticosteroids and beta-adrenergic antagonists has been suggested to improve mortality of these patients. Based on the evidence obtained by nationwide surveys and additional literature searches, we herein established clinical guidelines for the management of thyroid storm. The present guideline includes 15 recommendations for the treatment of thyrotoxicosis and organ failure in the central nervous system, cardiovascular system, and hepato-gastrointestinal tract, admission criteria for the intensive care unit, and prognostic evaluation. We also proposed preventive approaches to thyroid storm, roles of definitive therapy, and future prospective trial plans for the treatment of thyroid storm. We hope that this guideline will be useful for many physicians all over the world as well as in Japan in the management of thyroid storm and the improvement of its outcome.

  20. Practical Management of HIV-Associated Anemia in Resource-Limited Settings: Prospective Observational Evaluation of a New Mozambican Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brentlinger, Paula E; Silva, Wilson P; Vermund, Sten H; Valverde, Emilio; Buene, Manuel; Moon, Troy D

    2016-01-01

    Mozambique's updated guideline for management of HIV-associated anemia prompts clinicians to consider opportunistic conditions, adverse drug reactions, and untreated immunosuppression in addition to iron deficiency, intestinal helminthes, and malaria. We prospectively evaluated this guideline in rural Zambézia Province. Likely cause(s) of anemia were determined through prespecified history, physical examination, and laboratory testing. Diagnoses were "etiologic" if laboratory confirmed (sputum microscopy, blood culture, Plasmodium falciparum malaria rapid test) or "syndromic" if not. To assess hemoglobin response, we used serial point-of-care measurements. We studied 324 ambulatory, anemic (hemoglobin management (iron supplementation, deworming, and/or antimalarials) alone. Thirty (9.3%) died and/or were hospitalized, and 125 (38.6%) were lost to follow-up. Multivariable linear and logistic regression models described better hemoglobin responses and/or outcomes in subjects with higher CD4(+) T-lymphocyte counts, pre-enrollment antiretroviral therapy and/or co-trimoxazole prophylaxis, discontinuation of zidovudine for suspected adverse reaction, and smear-positive tuberculosis. Adverse outcomes were associated with fever, low body mass index, bacteremia, esophageal candidiasis, and low or missing CD4(+) T cell counts. In this severely resource-limited setting, successful anemia management often required interventions other than conventional presumptive treatment, thus supporting Mozambique's guideline revision.

  1. Singapore Urological Association Clinical Guidelines for Male Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms/Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The first clinical guidelines for male lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS)/benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) were published in 2005. An update is urgently needed in view of BPH being recognised as one of ten chronic illnesses by the Ministry of Health, Singapore. This review summarises the definition of BPH and the epidemiology of male LUTS/BPH in Singapore. BPH can be phenotyped with noninvasive transabdominal ultrasonography, according to intravesical prostatic protrusion and prostate volume, and classified according to severity (staging) for individualised treatment. At the initial evaluation, the majority of patients (59%) can be managed with fluid adjustment, exercise and diet; 32% with medications, using alpha blockers and/or 5-alpha reductase inhibitors for prostates weighing more than 30 g; and 9% with surgical intervention for more advanced disease. The 2015 guidelines comprise updated evidence that will help family medicine practitioners and specialists manage this common ailment more cost-effectively. PMID:28848988

  2. Guidelines for the prevention of ventilator-associated pneumonia and their implementation. The Spanish "Zero-VAP" bundle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez Lerma, F; Sánchez García, M; Lorente, L; Gordo, F; Añón, J M; Álvarez, J; Palomar, M; García, R; Arias, S; Vázquez-Calatayud, M; Jam, R

    2014-05-01

    "Zero-VAP" is a proposal for the implementation of a simultaneous multimodal intervention in Spanish intensive care units (ICU) consisting of a bundle of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) prevention measures. An initiative of the Spanish Societies of Intensive Care Medicine and of Intensive Care Nurses, the project is supported by the Spanish Ministry of Health, and participation is voluntary. In addition to guidelines for VAP prevention, the "Zero-VAP" Project incorporates an integral patient safety program and continuous online validation of the application of the bundle. For the latter, VAP episodes and participation indices are entered into the web-based Spanish ICU Infection Surveillance Program "ENVIN-HELICS" database, which provides continuous information about local, regional and national VAP incidence rates. Implementation of the guidelines aims at the reduction of VAP to less than 9 episodes per 1000 days of mechanical ventilation. A total of 35 preventive measures were initially selected. A task force of experts used the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation Working Group methodology to generate a list of 7 basic "mandatory" recommendations (education and training in airway management, strict hand hygiene for airway management, cuff pressure control, oral hygiene with chlorhexidine, semi-recumbent positioning, promoting measures that safely avoid or reduce time on ventilator, and discouraging scheduled changes of ventilator circuits, humidifiers and endotracheal tubes) and 3 additional "highly recommended" measures (selective decontamination of the digestive tract, aspiration of subglottic secretions, and a short course of iv antibiotic). We present the Spanish VAP prevention guidelines and describe the methodology used for the selection and implementation of the recommendations and the organizational structure of the project. Compared to conventional guideline documents, the associated safety assurance program, the

  3. [Certification of an ambulatory gastroenterologic service fulfilling ISO Law 9001--criteria and national guidelines of the Gastroenterologic Association].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkner, B

    2000-09-01

    The objectives of certification and accreditation are the deployment and examination of quality improvement measures in health care services. The quality management system of the ISO 9001 is created to install measures and tools leading to assured and improved quality in health care. Only some experiences with certification fulfilling ISO 9001 criteria exist in the German health care system. Evidence-based clinical guidelines can serve as references for the development of standards in quality measurement. Only little data exists on the implementation strategy of guidelines and evaluation, respectively. A pilot quality management system in consistence with ISO 9001 criteria was developed for ambulatory, gastroenterological services. National guidelines of the German Society of Gastroenterology and Metabolism and the recommendations of the German Association of Physicians for quality assurance of gastrointestinal endoscopy were included in the documentation and internal auditing. This pilot quality management system is suitable for the first steps in the introduction of quality management in ambulatory health care. This system shows validity for accreditation and certification of gastrointestinal health care units as well.

  4. Canadian Association of Gastroenterology Policy on the Application for, and Implementation of, Clinical Practice Guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harminder Singh

    2014-01-01

    Enhancing the professional development of clinical members through education and dissemination of synthesized clinical research;Improving patient care provided by members by providing focus on quality and evidence;Creating legislative environments that favour effective clinical practice;Enhancing the clinical care provided to patients with digestive disease by nongastroenterologists; andIdentifying areas that require further information or research to improve clinical care.The present document provides the foundation required to ensure that clinical practice guidelines produced by the CAG are necessary, appropriate, credible and applicable. These recommendations should be adhered to as closely as possible to obtain CAG endorsement.

  5. Association between adherence to nutritional guidelines, the metabolic syndrome and adiposity markers in a French adult general population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camille Lassale

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Few studies have focused on the association between diet quality scores and the Metabolic Syndrome (MetS, a multi-component condition predictive of cardiovascular diseases (CVD and death. The present study aims at investigating, in a cross-sectional design, the association between adherence to the French dietary guidelines through an a priori score - the French Nutrition and Health Program-Guideline Score (PNNS-GS - and cardiovascular risk factors (CVRF including the MetS and adiposity markers. METHODS: 7902 French adults participating in the NutriNet-Santé study (an on-going web-based cohort study attended a clinical and biological examination between January 2011 and November 2012: a fasting blood sample was drawn, blood pressure and body composition (bio-impedance were measured. Multivariate linear and logistic regression models were used to assess the association between PNNS-GS and CVRF or the MetS. RESULTS: An increase of PNNS-GS was significantly negatively associated with waist circumference (WC, systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP and DBP and serum triglycerides concentrations. From bottom to top quartile of PNNS-GS, SBP decreased from 129.9 to 128.8 mm Hg, DBP from 76.7 to 75.9 mm Hg, serum triglycerides concentrations from 110.8 to 104.6 mg/dL and WC from 94.8 to 90.1 cm for men and 81.3 to 78.9 cm for women. All adiposity markers (waist and hip circumference, % body fat, % trunk fat, % leg fat were markedly reduced across quartiles of PNNS-GS and linearly. Individuals with a better PNNS-GS (quartile 4 vs quartile 1 were less likely to have the MetS (OR=0.71, 95% CI: 0.56-0.89. CONCLUSION: The negative association between a higher adherence to the French dietary guidelines and a number of CVRF, the MetS prevalence and regional adiposity supports the importance of promoting the PNNS dietary guidelines in the population for the prevention of cardiometabolic abnormalities and hence, cardiovascular diseases.

  6. Key Steps in Conducting Systematic Reviews for Underpinning Clinical Practice Guidelines: Methodology of the European Association of Urology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoll, Thomas; Omar, Muhammad Imran; Maclennan, Steven; Hernández, Virginia; Canfield, Steven; Yuan, Yuhong; Bruins, Max; Marconi, Lorenzo; Van Poppel, Hein; N'Dow, James; Sylvester, Richard

    2017-09-13

    The findings of systematic reviews (SRs) and meta-analyses (MAs) are used for clinical decision making. The European Association of Urology has committed increasing resources into the development of high quality clinical guidelines based on such SRs and MAs. In this paper, we have summarised the process of conducting SRs for underpinning clinical practice guidelines under the auspices of the European Association of Urology Guidelines Office. The process involves explicit methods and the findings should be reproducible. When conducting a SR, the essential first step is to formulate a clear and answerable research question. An extensive literature search lays the foundation for evidence synthesis. Data are extracted independently by two reviewers and any disagreements are resolved by discussion or arbitration by a third reviewer. In SRs, data for particular outcomes in individual randomised controlled trials may be combined statistically in a meta-analysis to increase power when the studies are similar enough. Biases in studies included in a SR/MA can lead to either an over estimation or an under estimation of true intervention effect size, resulting in heterogeneity in outcome between studies. A number of different tools are available such as Cochrane Risk of Bias assessment tool for randomised controlled trials. In circumstances where there is too much heterogeneity, or when a review has included nonrandomised comparative studies, it is more appropriate to conduct a narrative synthesis. The GRADE tool for assessing quality of evidence strives to be a structured and transparent system, which can be applied to all evidence, regardless of quality. A SR not only identifies, evaluates, and summarises the best available evidence, but also the gaps to be targeted by future studies. SRs and MAs are integral in developing sound clinical practice guidelines and recommendations. Clinical practice guidelines should be evidence based, and systematic reviews and meta

  7. Adherence to 24-Hour Movement Guidelines for the Early Years and associations with social-cognitive development among Australian preschool children

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dylan P. Cliff; Jade McNeill; Stewart A. Vella; Steven J. Howard; Rute Santos; Marijka Batterham; Edward Melhuish; Anthony D. Okely; Marc de Rosnay

    2017-01-01

    ...–13 h of good quality sleep. Using an Australian sample, this study reports the proportion of preschool children meeting these guidelines and investigates associations with social-cognitive development...

  8. 2015 American Heart Association/American Stroke Association Focused Update of the 2013 Guidelines for the Early Management of Patients With Acute Ischemic Stroke Regarding Endovascular Treatment: A Guideline for Healthcare Professionals From the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, William J; Derdeyn, Colin P; Biller, José; Coffey, Christopher S; Hoh, Brian L; Jauch, Edward C; Johnston, Karen C; Johnston, S Claiborne; Khalessi, Alexander A; Kidwell, Chelsea S; Meschia, James F; Ovbiagele, Bruce; Yavagal, Dileep R

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this guideline is to provide a focused update of the current recommendations for the endovascular treatment of acute ischemic stroke. When there is overlap, the recommendations made here supersede those of previous guidelines. This focused update analyzes results from 8 randomized, clinical trials of endovascular treatment and other relevant data published since 2013. It is not intended to be a complete literature review from the date of the previous guideline publication but rather to include pivotal new evidence that justifies changes in current recommendations. Members of the writing committee were appointed by the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association Stroke Council's Scientific Statement Oversight Committee and the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association Manuscript Oversight Committee. Strict adherence to the American Heart Association conflict of interest policy was maintained throughout the consensus process. Recommendations follow the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association methods of classifying the level of certainty of the treatment effect and the class of evidence. Prerelease review of the draft guideline was performed by 6 expert peer reviewers and by the members of the Stroke Council Scientific Statement Oversight Committee and Stroke Council Leadership Committee. Evidence-based guidelines are presented for the selection of patients with acute ischemic stroke for endovascular treatment, for the endovascular procedure, and for systems of care to facilitate endovascular treatment. Certain endovascular procedures have been demonstrated to provide clinical benefit in selected patients with acute ischemic stroke. Systems of care should be organized to facilitate the delivery of this care. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: New Evidence Since the 2011 American Cardiology of Cardiology Foundation and American Heart Association Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraiche, Ariane; Wang, Andrew

    2016-07-01

    Since publication of the 2011 American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF) and American Heart Association (AHA) Guideline for the diagnosis and treatment of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), more recent studies offer greater insights about this condition. With increased recognition of the role of sarcomere protein mutations and myocardial structural abnormalities in the pathophysiology of this disease, new evidence offers potential improvements for the management of patients with HCM. In this review of studies published since 2011, we highlight several studies that may impact diagnostic considerations, risk stratification, and treatment of symptoms in HCM.

  10. Updated European Association of Urology Guidelines Recommendations for the Treatment of First-line Metastatic Clear Cell Renal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powles, Thomas; Albiges, Laurence; Staehler, Michael; Bensalah, Karim; Dabestani, Saeed; Giles, Rachel H; Hofmann, Fabian; Hora, Milan; Kuczyk, Markus A; Lam, Thomas B; Marconi, Lorenzo; Merseburger, Axel S; Fernández-Pello, Sergio; Tahbaz, Rana; Volpe, Alessandro; Ljungberg, Börje; Bex, Axel

    2017-12-06

    The randomised phase III clinical trial Checkmate-214 showed a survival superiority for the combination of ipilimumab and nivolumab when compared with the previous standard of care in first-line metastatic/advanced clear cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC) (Escudier B, Tannir NM, McDermott DF, et al. CheckMate 214: efficacy and safety of nivolumab plus ipilimumab vs sunitinib for treatment-naïve advanced or metastatic renal cell carcinoma, including IMDC risk and PD-L1 expression subgroups. LBA5, ESMO 2017, 2017). These results change the frontline standard of care for this disease and have implications for the selection of subsequent therapies. For this reason the European Association of Urology RCC guidelines have been updated. The European Association of Urology guidelines will be updated based on the results of the phase III Checkmate-214 clinical trial. The trial showed superior survival for a combination of ipilimumab and nivolumab (IN), compared with the previous standard of care, in intermediate- and poor-risk patients with metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma. When IN is not safe or feasible, alternative agents such as sunitinib, pazopanib, and cabozantinib should be considered. Furthermore, at present, the data from the trial are immature in favourable-risk patients. Therefore, sunitinib or pazopanib remains the favoured agent for this subgroup of patients. Copyright © 2017 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. American Osteopathic Association Guidelines for Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment (OMT) for Patients With Low Back Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT) is a distinctive modality commonly used by osteopathic physicians to complement conventional management of musculoskeletal disorders, including those that cause low back pain (LBP). Osteopathic manipulative treatment is defined in the Glossary of Osteopathic Terminology as "The therapeutic application of manually guided forces by an osteopathic physician (U.S. Usage) to improve physiologic function and/or support homeostasis that has been altered by somatic dysfunction. OMT employs a variety of techniques" (eAppendix). Somatic dysfunction is defined as "Impaired or altered function of related components of the somatic (body framework) system: skeletal, arthrodial and myofascial structures, and their related vascular, lymphatic, and neural elements. Somatic dysfunction is treatable using osteopathic manipulative treatment." These guidelines update the AOA guidelines for osteopathic physicians to utilize OMT for patients with nonspecific acute or chronic LBP published in 2010 on the National Guideline Clearinghouse.1 METHODS: This update process commenced with literature searches that included electronic databases, personal contact with key researchers of OMT and low back pain, and Internet search engines. Early in the process, the Task Force on the Low Back Pain Clinical Practice Guidelines discovered the 2014 systematic literature review conducted by Franke et al2; this study serves as the basis for this updated guideline and further builds upon the literature used to support the previous guidelines. Findings from other eligible studies published after the search parameters of the Franke et al systematic review were also incorporated. The authors of the systematic review identified 307 studies. Thirty-one were evaluated and 16 were excluded. Of the 15 studies included in the review, 6 were retrieved from Germany, 5 from the United States, 2 from the United Kingdom, and 2 from Italy. Two additional studies published after the

  12. Integration of 60 000 exomes and ACMG guidelines question the role of Catecholaminergic Polymorphic Ventricular Tachycardia associated variants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paludan-Müller, Christian; Ahlberg, Gustav; Ghouse, Jonas

    2017-01-01

    Catecholaminergic Polymorphic Ventricular Tachycardia (CPVT) is a highly lethal cardiac arrhythmia disease occurring during exercise or psychological stress. CPVT has an estimated prevalence of 1:10 000 and has mainly been associated with variants in calcium regulating genes. Identification...... of potential false-positive pathogenic variants was conducted by searching The Exome Aggregation Consortium (ExAC) database (n=60 706) for variants reported to be associated with CPVT. The pathogenicity of the interrogated variants was assessed using guidelines from the American College of Medical Genetics...... and Genomics (ACMG) and in silico prediction tools. Thirty-eight out of 246 variants (15%) previously associated with CPVT were identified in the ExAC database. We predicted the CPVT prevalence to be 1:132. The ACMG standards classified 29% of ExAC variants as pathogenic or likely pathogenic. The in silico...

  13. 2015 Oman Heart Association guidelines for the management of hypertension : practical recommendations from the Oman Heart Association (OHA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Deeb, Mohammed H; Sulaiman, Kadhim J; Al-Riyami, Abdullah A; Mohsin, Nabil; Al-Mukhaini, Mohamed; Al-Lamki, Mohamed; Al-Busaidi, Noor; Al-Salmi, Issa; Al-Lawati, Jawad; Al-Rawahi, Najib; Al-Riyami, Mohamed B; Abdul-Rahman, Said; Al-Hinai, Said; Jaffer, Batool; Al-Wahaebi, Ahmed; Al-Khalili, Hanan; Al-Zadjali, Matllooba

    2015-03-01

    Hypertension (HTN) is a major independent risk factor for the development of stroke, coronary artery disease (CAD), peripheral arterial disease (PAD), heart failure (HF) and chronic kidney disease (CKD). HTN is a growing public health problem in Oman, almost certainly the most prevalent modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). The risk of CVD in patients with HTN can be greatly reduced with lifestyle modifications and effective antihypertensive therapy. Randomized trials have shown that blood pressure (BP) lowering produces rapid reductions in CV risk. Several studies have shown that the majority of the hypertensive patients remain uncontrolled. It is well established that the observed poor control of the disease is not only related to poor adherence to medications, but also to limited awareness and adherence to evidence-based management of hypertension among physicians. Several guidelines for the management of patients with hypertension have been published. However, the aim of this document is to provide the busy physicians in Oman with more concise and direct approach towards implementing these guidelines into clinical practice.

  14. Clinical guidelines for male lower urinary tract symptoms associated with non-neurogenic overactive bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Cheng Wang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this guideline is to direct urologists and patients regarding how to identify overactive bladder (OAB in male patients with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS and to make an accurate diagnosis and establish treatment goals to improve the patients' quality of life (QoL. LUTS are commonly divided into storage, voiding, and postmicturition symptoms, and are highly prevalent in elderly men. LUTS can result from a complex interplay of pathophysiologic features that can include bladder dysfunction and bladder outlet dysfunction such as benign prostatic obstruction (BPO or poor relaxation of the urethral sphincter. Diagnosis of OAB in male LUTS leads to accurate diagnosis of pure OAB and bladder outlet-related OAB, and appropriate treatment in men with residual storage symptoms after treatment for LUTS.

  15. Prevention of catheter-associated urinary tract infection: implementation strategies of international guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Lúcia Fonseca Andrade

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective to describe strategies used by health professionals on the implementation of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines for the prevention of urinary infection related to catheterism. Method systematic review on literature based on data from CINAHL(r, Nursing & Allied Health Collection, Cochrane Plus Collection, MedicLatina, MEDLINE(r, Academic Search Complete, ACS - American Chemical Society, Health Reference Center Academic, Nursing Reference Center, ScienceDirect Journals and Wiley Online Library. A sample of 13 articles was selected. Results studies have highlighted the decrease of urinary tract infection related to catheterism through reminder systems to decrease of people submitted to urinary catheterism, audits about nursing professionals practice and bundles expansion. Conclusion the present review systemizes the knowledge of used strategies by health professionals on introduction to international recommendations, describing a rate decrease of such infection in clinical practice.

  16. American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, Associazione Medici Endocrinologi, and European Thyroid Association medical guidelines for clinical practice for the diagnosis and management of thyroid nodules: Executive Summary of recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gharib, H; Papini, E; Paschke, R

    2010-01-01

    American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, Associazione Medici Endocrinologi, and European Thyroid Association medical guidelines for clinical practice for the diagnosis and management of thyroid nodules are systematically developed statements to assist health care professionals in medical...

  17. Adherence to 24-Hour Movement Guidelines for the Early Years and associations with social-cognitive development among Australian preschool children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cliff, Dylan P; McNeill, Jade; Vella, Stewart A; Howard, Steven J; Santos, Rute; Batterham, Marijka; Melhuish, Edward; Okely, Anthony D; de Rosnay, Marc

    2017-11-20

    The new Australian 24-Hour Movement Guidelines for the Early Years recommend that, for preschoolers, a healthy 24-h includes: i) ≥180 min of physical activity, including ≥60 min of energetic play, ii) ≤1 h of sedentary screen time, and iii) 10-13 h of good quality sleep. Using an Australian sample, this study reports the proportion of preschool children meeting these guidelines and investigates associations with social-cognitive development. Data from 248 preschool children (mean age = 4.2 ± 0.6 years, 57% boys) participating in the PATH-ABC study were analyzed. Children completed direct assessments of physical activity (accelerometry) and social cognition (the Test of Emotional Comprehension (TEC) and Theory of Mind (ToM)). Parents reported on children's screen time and sleep. Children were categorised as meeting/not meeting: i) individual guidelines, ii) combinations of two guidelines, or iii) all three guidelines. Associations were examined using linear regression adjusting for child age, sex, vocabulary, area level socio-economic status and childcare level clustering. High proportions of children met the physical activity (93.1%) and sleep (88.7%) guidelines, whereas fewer met the screen time guideline (17.3%). Overall, 14.9% of children met all three guidelines. Children meeting the sleep guideline performed better on TEC than those who did not (mean difference [MD] = 1.41; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.36, 2.47). Children meeting the sleep and physical activity or sleep and screen time guidelines also performed better on TEC (MD = 1.36; 95% CI = 0.31, 2.41) and ToM (MD = 0.25; 95% CI = -0.002, 0.50; p = 0.05), respectively, than those who did not. Meeting all three guidelines was associated with better ToM performance (MD = 0.28; 95% CI = -0.002, 0.48, p = 0.05), while meeting a larger number of guidelines was associated with better TEC (3 or 2 vs. 1/none, p sleep and screen time guidelines, may be beneficial for their

  18. Utility of 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Cholesterol Guidelines in HIV-Infected Adults With Carotid Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Binh An P; Weigel, Bernard; Ma, Yifei; Scherzer, Rebecca; Li, Danny; Hur, Sophia; Kalapus, S C; Deeks, Steven; Hsue, Priscilla

    2017-07-01

    Although HIV is associated with increased atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, it is unknown whether guidelines can identify HIV-infected adults who may benefit from statins. We compared the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association and 2004 Adult Treatment Panel III recommendations in HIV-infected adults and evaluated associations with carotid artery intima-media thickness and plaque. Carotid artery intima-media thickness was measured at baseline and 3 years later in 352 HIV-infected adults without clinical atherosclerotic CVD and not on statins. Plaque was defined as IMT >1.5 mm in any segment. At baseline, the median age was 43 (interquartile range, 39-49), 85% were men, 74% were on antiretroviral medication, and 50% had plaque. The American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines were more likely to recommend statins compared with the Adult Treatment Panel III guidelines, both overall (26% versus 14%; PCardiology/American Heart Association guidelines recommended statins to a greater number of HIV-infected adults compared with the Adult Treatment Panel III guidelines, both failed to recommend therapy in the majority of HIV-affected adults with carotid plaque. Baseline carotid atherosclerosis but not atherosclerotic CVD risk scores was an independent predictor of mortality. HIV-specific guidelines that include detection of subclinical atherosclerosis may help to identify HIV-infected adults who are at increased atherosclerotic CVD risk and may be considered for statins. © 2017 The Authors.

  19. Hyperthyroidism and Other Causes of Thyrotoxicosis: Management Guidelines of the American Thyroid Association and American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V V Fadeyev

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available В конце весны 2011 г. вышли новые рекомендации Американской тиреоидной ассоциации и Американской ассоциации клинических эндокринологов по диагностике и лечению тиреотоксикоза. Они озаглавлены “Гипертиреоз и другие причины тиреотоксикоза”. Bahn R.S., Burch H.B., Cooper D.S., Garber J.R., Greenlee M.C., Klein I., Laurberg P., McDougall I.R., Montori V.M., Rivkees S.A., Ross D.S., Sosa J.A., Stan M.N. Hyperthyroidism and Other Causes of Thyrotoxicosis: Management Guidelines of the American Thyroid Association and American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists. Thyroid. 2011:21. Рекомендации представляют собой достаточно большой документ, изданный на 54 журнальных страницах. Важно отметить, что в его создании участвовали не только американские, но и европейские эксперты, т.е. представленные рекомендации не узкоспецифичны для США, где, как известно, есть свои особенности организации медицинской помощи. В документе сформулировано собственно 100 пунктов рекомендаций, каждому из которых представлен уровень силы рекомендации и уровень доказательности. Большая же часть объема документа представлена обсуждением и аргументацией,на основании которой были сформулированы 100 рекомендаций. В этой статье хотелось бы

  20. 2013 AHA/ACC guideline on lifestyle management to reduce cardiovascular risk: A report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association task force on practice guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    The goals of the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Heart Association (AHA) are to prevent cardiovascular (CV) diseases, improve the management of people who have these diseases through professional education and research, and develop guidelines, standards and policies that promot...

  1. AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGISTS MEDICAL GUIDELINES FOR CLINICAL PRACTICE FOR THE EVALUATION AND TREATMENT OF HYPERTHYROIDISM AND HYPOTHYROIDISM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskin, H Jack; Cobin, Rhoda H; Duick, Daniel S; Gharib, Hossein; Guttler, Richard B; Kaplan, Michael M; Segal, Robert L; Garber, Jeffrey R; Hamilton, Carlos R; Handelsman, Yehuda; Hellman, Richard; Kukora, John S; Levy, Philip; Palumbo, Pasquale J; Petak, Steven M; Rettinger, Herbert I; Rodbard, Helena W; Service, F John; Shankar, Talla P; Stoffer, Sheldon S; Tourtelot, John B

    2002-11-01

    These clinical practice guidelines summarize the recommendations of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists for the diagnostic evaluation of hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism and for treatment strategies in patients with these disorders. The sensitive thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH or thyrotropin) assay has become the single best screening test for hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism, and in most outpatient clinical situations, the serum TSH is the most sensitive test for detecting mild thyroid hormone excess or deficiency. Therapeutic options for patients with Graves' disease include thyroidectomy (rarely used now in the United States), antithyroid drugs (frequently associated with relapses), and radioactive iodine (currently the treatment of choice). In clinical hypothyroidism, the standard treatment is levothyroxine replacement, which must be tailored to the individual patient. Awareness of subclinical thyroid disease, which often remains undiagnosed, is emphasized, as is a system of care that incorporates regular follow-up surveillance by one physician as well as education and involvement of the patient.

  2. Health care utilization and costs associated with adherence to clinical practice guidelines for early magnetic resonance imaging among workers with acute occupational low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Janessa M; Fulton-Kehoe, Deborah; Jarvik, Jeffrey G; Franklin, Gary M

    2014-04-01

    To estimate health care utilization and costs associated with adherence to clinical practice guidelines for the use of early magnetic resonance imaging (MRI; within the first 6 weeks of injury) for acute occupational low back pain (LBP). Washington State Disability Risk Identification Study Cohort (D-RISC), consisting of administrative claims and patient interview data from workers' compensation claimants (2002-2004). In this prospective, population-based cohort study, we compared health care utilization and costs among workers whose imaging was adherent to guidelines (no early MRI) to workers whose imaging was not adherent to guidelines (early MRI in the absence of red flags). We identified workers (age>18) with work-related LBP using administrative claims. We obtained demographic, injury, health, and employment information through telephone interviews to adjust for baseline differences between groups. We ascertained health care utilization and costs from administrative claims for 1 year following injury. Of 1,770 workers, 336 (19.0 percent) were classified as nonadherent to guidelines. Outpatient and physical/occupational therapy utilization was 52-54 percent higher for workers whose imaging was not adherent to guidelines compared to workers with guideline-adherent imaging; utilization of chiropractic care was significantly lower (18 percent). Nonadherence to guidelines for early MRI was associated with increased likelihood of lumbosacral injections or surgery and higher costs for out-patient, inpatient, and nonmedical services, and disability compensation. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  3. Knowledge of Energy Balance Guidelines and Associated Clinical Care Practices: The U.S. National Survey of Energy Balance Related Care among Primary Care Physicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pronk, Nicolaas P.; Krebs-Smith, Susan M.; Galuska, Deborah A.; Liu, Benmei; Kushner, Robert F.; Troiano, Richard P.; Clauser, Steven B.; Ballard-Barbash, Rachel; Smith, Ashley Wilder

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess primary care physicians’ (PCPs) knowledge of energy balance related guidelines and the association with sociodemographic characteristics and clinical care practices. Method As part of the 2008 U.S. nationally representative National Survey of Energy Balance Related Care among Primary Care Physicians (EB-PCP), 1,776 PCPs from four specialties who treated adults (n=1,060) or children and adolescents (n=716) completed surveys on sociodemographic information, knowledge of energy balance guidelines, and clinical care practices. Results EB-PCP response rate was 64.5%. For PCPs treating children, knowledge of guidelines for healthy BMI percentile, physical activity, and fruit and vegetables intake was 36.5%, 27.0%, and 62.9%, respectively. For PCPs treating adults, knowledge of guidelines for overweight, obesity, physical activity, and fruit and vegetables intake was 81.4%, 81.3%, 70.9%, and 63.5%, respectively. Generally, younger, female physicians were more likely to exhibit correct knowledge. Knowledge of weight-related guidelines was associated with assessment of body mass index (BMI) and use of BMI-for-age growth charts. Conclusion Knowledge of energy balance guidelines among PCPs treating children is low, among PCPs treating adults it appeared high for overweight and obesity-related clinical guidelines and moderate for physical activity and diet, and was mostly unrelated to clinical practices among all PCPs. PMID:22609144

  4. Sperm toxicity testing: UK best practice guideline from the Association of Biomedical Andrologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, S; Woodward, B; Tomlinson, M

    2018-02-09

    In order to ensure the quality and integrity of diagnostic semen analysis results, materials used should be tested to ensure that they do not interfere with sperm function. As a toxicity test, complex sperm function testing may be considered controversial, since the fertilizing capacity of single sperm can never be assured. In preference, sperm motility offers a unique means of assessing the toxicity of reagents and materials before they are used in routine practice. Motility is the semen parameter most likely to be influenced by the external environment. Indeed, it is the main reason that laboratories insist on supplying their own approved specimen containers and ensuring that patients, as far as possible, adhere to strict conditions for sample collection and transport prior to testing. This differs to other indirect tests of toxicity such as the mouse embryo assay, whereby the rate of mouse pre-implantation embryo development to the blastocyst stage is compared. This guideline is aimed at health care scientists who deal with andrology in both general pathology and specialised fertility laboratories, and provides a model approach to sperm toxicity testing. For assisted reproduction clinics, the same methodology can be used to test any consumables that are used for sperm processing, and as an indirect guide for any consumables that come into direct contact with oocytes and pre-implantation embryos.

  5. Less is More: Comparing the 2015 and 2009 American Thyroid Association Guidelines for Thyroid Nodules and Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Brian W; Yousman, Wina; Wong, Wei Xiang; Cheng, Cheng; McAninch, Elizabeth A

    2016-06-01

    The American Thyroid Association (ATA) has recently revised its guidance pertaining to thyroid nodules and follicular cell-derived thyroid cancer. The 2015 guidelines are massive in both scope and scale, with changes in the organizational approach to risk stratification of nodules and cancer, as well as multiple sections covering new material. This review highlights the major structural and organizational changes, focusing attention on the most dramatically changed recommendations, that is, those recommendations that clinicians will find striking because they call for significant divergence from prior clinical practice. The revised approach to thyroid nodule risk stratification is based on sonographic pattern, with an emphasis on pattern rather than growth in the long-term surveillance of nodules. Accumulating data have also been incorporated into an updated risk stratification scheme for thyroid cancer that increases the size of the low-risk pool, in part because low-volume lymph nodal metastases are now considered low risk. The most fundamentally altered recommendation is that lobectomy might be considered as the initial surgical approach for follicular cell-derived thyroid cancers from 1 to 4 cm in size. The underlying theme of the 2015 ATA guidelines is that "less is more." As these new recommendations are adopted, fewer fine-needle aspiration biopsies will need to be done, less extensive surgeries will become more common, less radioactive iodine will be used either for treatment or for diagnostics, and less stimulated thyroglobulin testing will be done. Mastery of these guidelines will help clinicians know when it is reasonable to do less, thus providing responsibly individualized therapy for their patients.

  6. Management of adult pancreatic injuries: A practice management guideline from the Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Vanessa Phillis; Patel, Nimitt J; Bokhari, Faran; Madbak, Firas G; Hambley, Jana E; Yon, James R; Robinson, Bryce R H; Nagy, Kimberly; Armen, Scott B; Kingsley, Samuel; Gupta, Sameer; Starr, Frederic L; Moore, Henry R; Oliphant, Uretz J; Haut, Elliott R; Como, John J

    2017-01-01

    Traumatic injury to the pancreas is rare but is associated with significant morbidity and mortality, including fistula, sepsis, and death. There are currently no practice management guidelines for the medical and surgical management of traumatic pancreatic injuries. The overall objective of this article is to provide evidence-based recommendations for the physician who is presented with traumatic injury to the pancreas. The MEDLINE database using PubMed was searched to identify English language articles published from January 1965 to December 2014 regarding adult patients with pancreatic injuries. A systematic review of the literature was performed, and the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation framework was used to formulate evidence-based recommendations. Three hundred nineteen articles were identified. Of these, 52 articles underwent full text review, and 37 were selected for guideline construction. Patients with grade I/II injuries tend to have fewer complications; for these, we conditionally recommend nonoperative or nonresectional management. For grade III/IV injuries identified on computed tomography or at operation, we conditionally recommend pancreatic resection. We conditionally recommend against the routine use of octreotide for postoperative pancreatic fistula prophylaxis. No recommendations could be made regarding the following two topics: optimal surgical management of grade V injuries, and the need for routine splenectomy with distal pancreatectomy. Systematic review, level III.

  7. Guidelines for the management and treatment of periodic fever syndromes: Cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (cryopyrinopathies - CAPS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terreri, Maria Teresa R A; Bernardo, Wanderley Marques; Len, Claudio Arnaldo; da Silva, Clovis Artur Almeida; de Magalhães, Cristina Medeiros Ribeiro; Sacchetti, Silvana B; Ferriani, Virgínia Paes Leme; Piotto, Daniela Gerent Petry; Cavalcanti, André de Souza; de Moraes, Ana Júlia Pantoja; Sztajnbok, Flavio Roberto; de Oliveira, Sheila Knupp Feitosa; Campos, Lucia Maria Arruda; Bandeira, Marcia; Santos, Flávia Patricia Sena Teixeira; Magalhães, Claudia Saad

    2016-01-01

    To establish guidelines based on cientific evidences for the management of cryopyrin associated periodic syndromes. The Guideline was prepared from 4 clinical questions that were structured through PICO (Patient, Intervention or indicator, Comparison and Outcome), to search in key primary scientific information databases. After defining the potential studies to support the recommendations, these were graduated considering their strength of evidence and grade of recommendation. 1215 articles were retrieved and evaluated by title and abstract; from these, 42 articles were selected to support the recommendations. 1. The diagnosis of CAPS is based on clinical history and clinical manifestations, and later confirmed by genetic study. CAPS may manifest itself in three phenotypes: FCAS (mild form), MWS (intermediate form) and CINCA (severe form). Neurological, ophthalmic, otorhinolaryngological and radiological assessments may be highly valuable in distinguishing between syndromes; 2. The genetic diagnosis with NLRP3 gene analysis must be conducted in suspected cases of CAPS, i.e., individuals presenting before 20 years of age, recurrent episodes of inflammation expressed by a mild fever and urticaria; 3. Laboratory abnormalities include leukocytosis and elevated serum levels of inflammatory proteins; and 4. Targeted therapies directed against interleukin-1 lead to rapid remission of symptoms in most patients. However, there are important limitations on the long-term safety. None of the three anti-IL-1β inhibitors prevents progression of bone lesions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  8. The American Association of Endocrine Surgeons Guidelines for Definitive Management of Primary Hyperparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Scott M; Wang, Tracy S; Ruan, Daniel T; Lee, James A; Asa, Sylvia L; Duh, Quan-Yang; Doherty, Gerard M; Herrera, Miguel F; Pasieka, Janice L; Perrier, Nancy D; Silverberg, Shonni J; Solórzano, Carmen C; Sturgeon, Cord; Tublin, Mitchell E; Udelsman, Robert; Carty, Sally E

    2016-10-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism (pHPT) is a common clinical problem for which the only definitive management is surgery. Surgical management has evolved considerably during the last several decades. To develop evidence-based guidelines to enhance the appropriate, safe, and effective practice of parathyroidectomy. A multidisciplinary panel used PubMed to review the medical literature from January 1, 1985, to July 1, 2015. Levels of evidence were determined using the American College of Physicians grading system, and recommendations were discussed until consensus. Initial evaluation should include 25-hydroxyvitamin D measurement, 24-hour urine calcium measurement, dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, and supplementation for vitamin D deficiency. Parathyroidectomy is indicated for all symptomatic patients, should be considered for most asymptomatic patients, and is more cost-effective than observation or pharmacologic therapy. Cervical ultrasonography or other high-resolution imaging is recommended for operative planning. Patients with nonlocalizing imaging remain surgical candidates. Preoperative parathyroid biopsy should be avoided. Surgeons who perform a high volume of operations have better outcomes. The possibility of multigland disease should be routinely considered. Both focused, image-guided surgery (minimally invasive parathyroidectomy) and bilateral exploration are appropriate operations that achieve high cure rates. For minimally invasive parathyroidectomy, intraoperative parathyroid hormone monitoring via a reliable protocol is recommended. Minimally invasive parathyroidectomy is not routinely recommended for known or suspected multigland disease. Ex vivo aspiration of resected parathyroid tissue may be used to confirm parathyroid tissue intraoperatively. Clinically relevant thyroid disease should be assessed preoperatively and managed during parathyroidectomy. Devascularized normal parathyroid tissue should be autotransplanted. Patients should be observed

  9. Validation of the Clavien-Dindo Grading System in Urology by the European Association of Urology Guidelines Ad Hoc Panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitropoulos, Dionysios; Artibani, Walter; Biyani, Chandra Shekhar; Bjerggaard Jensen, Jørgen; Rouprêt, Morgan; Truss, Michael

    2017-03-07

    Since 2012 uniformed reporting of complications after urological procedures has been advocated by the European Association of Urology (EAU) guidelines. The Clavien-Dindo grading system was recommended to report the outcomes of urologic procedures. To validate the Clavien-Dindo grading system in urology. Members of the EAU working group compiled a list of case scenarios including those with minor and major complications. A survey was administered online via Survey Monkey to the members of EAU committees for the appropriate grading according to the Clavien-Dindo classification of surgical complications. Scenarios with intraoperative complications were intentionally included to assess respondents' awareness of the Clavien-Dindo applicability. Survey data collected were used to calculate agreement rates and to estimate the overall inter-rater agreement on all cases using Fleiss' kappa (κ). Differences in agreement rates for each scenario among groups with different criteria about the system were estimated using the chi-square test. Evaluable responses were received from 81 out of 174 invited raters (46.5%). Of them 56.9% believed that the Clavien-Dindo system was adequate for grading postoperative complications. The agreement rate was over a score of ≥80% in nine cases, 60-79% in 10 cases, 40-59% in 14 cases, and urology and should be used systematically. However, it does not apply for intraoperative complications, and there is a need for an additional tool. A rigorous methodology is mandatory when surgeons report about complications after surgery. In this study, the European Association of Urology Guidelines Panel has validated the use of the Clavien-Dindo grading system in urology. Copyright © 2017 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Diet quality: associations with health messages included in the Danish Dietary Guidelines 2005, personal attitudes and social factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biltoft-Jensen, Anja Pia; Groth, Margit Velsing; Matthiessen, Jeppe

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To Study the association between diet quality and the new health messages in the Danish Dietary Guidelines 2005, i.e. 'Eat a varied diet', 'Engage in regular physical activity' and 'Maintain a healthy body weight'. Design/setting/subjects: The study was cross-sectional, comprising a ra...... with healthy eating. The dietary habits reported were strongly influenced by personal intentions. Thus, the biggest challenge for public health nutritionists will be to reach non-compliers who seldom have intentions to eat healthily....... a random sample of 3151 Danish adults aged 18-75 years. Dietary intake was estimated using a 7 d pre-coded food diary. information on social background, leisure-time physical activity, height, body weight and intention to eat healthily was Obtained by in-person interviews. Logistic regression models Were...

  11. Does perceived neighborhood walkability and safety mediate the association between education and meeting physical activity guidelines?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Michael; Yin, Shaoman; Soler, Robin; Njai, Rashid; Siegel, Paul Z; Liao, Youlian

    2015-04-09

    The role of neighborhood walkability and safety in mediating the association between education and physical activity has not been quantified. We used data from the 2010 and 2012 Communities Putting Prevention to Work Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System and structural equation modeling to estimate how much of the effect of education level on physical activity was mediated by perceived neighborhood walkability and safety. Neighborhood walkability accounts for 11.3% and neighborhood safety accounts for 6.8% of the effect. A modest proportion of the important association between education and physical activity is mediated by perceived neighborhood walkability and safety, suggesting that interventions focused on enhancing walkability and safety could reduce the disparity in physical activity associated with education level.

  12. [European guidelines for the diagnosis and management of upper urinary tract urothelial cell carcinomas: 2011 update. European Association of Urology Guideline Group for urothelial cell carcinoma of the upper urinary tract].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouprêt, M; Zigeuner, R; Palou, J; Boehle, A; Kaasinen, E; Sylvester, R; Babjuk, M; Oosterlinck, W

    2012-01-01

    The European Association of Urology (EAU) Guideline Group for urothelial cell carcinoma of the upper urinary tract (UUT-UCC) has prepared new guidelines to aid clinicians in assessing the current evidence-based management of UUT-UCC and to incorporate present recommendations into daily clinical practice. This paper provides a brief overview of the EAU guidelines on UUT-UCC as an aid to clinicians in their daily practice. The recommendations provided in the current guidelines are based on a thorough review of available UUT-UCC guidelines and papers identified using a systematic search of Medline. Data on urothelial malignancies and UUT-UCCs in the literature were searched using Medline with the following keywords: urinary tract cancer, urothelial carcinomas, upper urinary tract, carcinoma, transitional cell, renal pelvis, ureter, bladder cancer, chemotherapy, nephroureterectomy, adjuvant treatment, neoadjuvant treatment, recurrence, risk factors, and survival. A panel of experts weighted the references. There is a lack of data in the current literature to provide strong recommendations due to the rarity of the disease. A number of recent multicentre studies are now available, whereas earlier publications were based only on limited populations. However, most of these studies have been retrospective analyses. The TNM classification 2009 is recommended. Recommendations are given for diagnosis as well as for radical and conservative treatment; prognostic factors are also discussed. Recommendations are provided for patient follow-up after different therapeutic options. These guidelines contain information for the diagnosis and treatment of individual patients according to a current standardised approach. When determining the optimal treatment regimen, physicians must take into account each individual patient's specific clinical characteristics with regard to renal function including medical comorbidities; tumour location, grade and stage; and molecular marker status

  13. Association for Specialists in Group Work: Best Practice Guidelines 2007 Revisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, R. Valorie; Pender, Debra A.

    2008-01-01

    The Association for Specialists in Group Work (ASGW) supports the practice of ethical and effective group work through the publication of guiding principles in planning, performing and processing group work. Originally prepared, approved and published in 1998 (ASGW; Rapin and Keel), the current revision addresses changes in the American Counseling…

  14. Saudi Guidelines on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Pulmonary Hypertension: Pulmonary hypertension associated with hemolytic anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarfraz Saleemi

    2014-01-01

    Because of a unique pathophysiology, pulmonary hypertension associated with hemolytic disorders was moved from WHO group I to group V PH diseases. Treatment strategies are also unique and include blood transfusion, iron chelation, hydroxyurea, and oxygen therapy. The role of PH-specific agents has not been established.

  15. International Association of Dental Traumatology guidelines for the management of traumatic dental injuries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diangelis, Anthony J; Andreasen, Jens O; Ebeleseder, Kurt A

    2012-01-01

    should assist dentists and patients in decision making and for providing the best care effectively and efficiently. The International Association of Dental Traumatology (IADT) has developed a consensus statement after a review of the dental literature and group discussions. Experienced researchers...

  16. International Association of Dental Traumatology guidelines for the management of traumatic dental injuries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Lars; Andreasen, Jens O; Day, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Avulsion of permanent teeth is one of the most serious dental injuries, and a prompt and correct emergency management is very important for the prognosis. The International Association of Dental Traumatology (IADT) has developed a consensus statement after a review of the dental literature...

  17. International Association of Dental Traumatology guidelines for the management of traumatic dental injuries. 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diangelis, A J; Andreasen, J O; Ebeleseder, K A

    2014-01-01

    should assist dentists and patients in decision making and for providing the best care effectively and efficiently. The International Association of Dental Traumatology (IADT) has developed a consensus statement after a review of the dental literature and group discussions. Experienced researchers...

  18. International Association of Dental Traumatology guidelines for the management of traumatic dental injuries. 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diangelis, A J; Andreasen, J O; Ebeleseder, K A

    2014-01-01

    Avulsion of permanent teeth is one of the most serious dental injuries, and a prompt and correct emergency management is very important for the prognosis. The International Association of Dental Traumatology (IADT) has developed a consensus statement after a review of the dental literature...

  19. European Association of Urology Guidelines for Clear Cell Renal Cancers That Are Resistant to Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-Targeted Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powles, Thomas; Staehler, Michael; Ljungberg, Börje; Bensalah, Karim; Canfield, Steven E; Dabestani, Saeed; Giles, Rachel H; Hofmann, Fabian; Hora, Milan; Kuczyk, Markus A; Lam, Thomas; Marconi, Lorenzo; Merseburger, Axel S; Volpe, Alessandro; Bex, Axel

    2016-11-01

    The European Association of Urology renal cancer guidelines panel recommends nivolumab and cabozantinib over the previous standard of care in patients who have failed one or more lines of vascular endothelial growth factor-targeted therapy. New data have recently become available showing a survival benefit for cabozantinib. Copyright © 2016 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Adherence to 24-Hour Movement Guidelines for the Early Years and associations with social-cognitive development among Australian preschool children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dylan P. Cliff

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The new Australian 24-Hour Movement Guidelines for the Early Years recommend that, for preschoolers, a healthy 24-h includes: i ≥180 min of physical activity, including ≥60 min of energetic play, ii ≤1 h of sedentary screen time, and iii 10–13 h of good quality sleep. Using an Australian sample, this study reports the proportion of preschool children meeting these guidelines and investigates associations with social-cognitive development. Methods Data from 248 preschool children (mean age = 4.2 ± 0.6 years, 57% boys participating in the PATH-ABC study were analyzed. Children completed direct assessments of physical activity (accelerometry and social cognition (the Test of Emotional Comprehension (TEC and Theory of Mind (ToM. Parents reported on children’s screen time and sleep. Children were categorised as meeting/not meeting: i individual guidelines, ii combinations of two guidelines, or iii all three guidelines. Associations were examined using linear regression adjusting for child age, sex, vocabulary, area level socio-economic status and childcare level clustering. Results High proportions of children met the physical activity (93.1% and sleep (88.7% guidelines, whereas fewer met the screen time guideline (17.3%. Overall, 14.9% of children met all three guidelines. Children meeting the sleep guideline performed better on TEC than those who did not (mean difference [MD] = 1.41; 95% confidence interval (CI = 0.36, 2.47. Children meeting the sleep and physical activity or sleep and screen time guidelines also performed better on TEC (MD = 1.36; 95% CI = 0.31, 2.41 and ToM (MD = 0.25; 95% CI = −0.002, 0.50; p = 0.05, respectively, than those who did not. Meeting all three guidelines was associated with better ToM performance (MD = 0.28; 95% CI = −0.002, 0.48, p = 0.05, while meeting a larger number of guidelines was associated with better TEC (3 or 2 vs. 1/none, p < 0.02 and To

  1. Clinical Guidelines for Stellate Ganglion Block to Treat Anxiety Associated With Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    the following questions may assist with this issue. Is the patient: • pending a medical board? • pending a determination of medical disability from...PTSD? • pending a legal adverse action? • perceiving positive social aspects of being a disabled veteran? Providers must also establish whether the...and efficacy. Eliminating the stigma some individuals associate with PTSD remains an important part of treating the military community. Military

  2. Does Perceived Neighborhood Walkability and Safety Mediate the Association Between Education and Meeting Physical Activity Guidelines?

    OpenAIRE

    Pratt, Michael; Yin, Shaoman; Soler, Robin; Njai, Rashid; Siegel, Paul Z.; Liao, Youlian

    2015-01-01

    The role of neighborhood walkability and safety in mediating the association between education and physical activity has not been quantified. We used data from the 2010 and 2012 Communities Putting Prevention to Work Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System and structural equation modeling to estimate how much of the effect of education level on physical activity was mediated by perceived neighborhood walkability and safety. Neighborhood walkability accounts for 11.3% and neighborhood safet...

  3. Guidelines for the prevention of stroke in women: a statement for healthcare professionals from the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushnell, Cheryl; McCullough, Louise D; Awad, Issam A; Chireau, Monique V; Fedder, Wende N; Furie, Karen L; Howard, Virginia J; Lichtman, Judith H; Lisabeth, Lynda D; Piña, Ileana L; Reeves, Mathew J; Rexrode, Kathryn M; Saposnik, Gustavo; Singh, Vineeta; Towfighi, Amytis; Vaccarino, Viola; Walters, Matthew R

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this statement is to summarize data on stroke risk factors that are unique to and more common in women than men and to expand on the data provided in prior stroke guidelines and cardiovascular prevention guidelines for women. This guideline focuses on the risk factors unique to women, such as reproductive factors, and those that are more common in women, including migraine with aura, obesity, metabolic syndrome, and atrial fibrillation. Writing group members were nominated by the committee chair on the basis of their previous work in relevant topic areas and were approved by the American Heart Association (AHA) Stroke Council's Scientific Statement Oversight Committee and the AHA's Manuscript Oversight Committee. The panel reviewed relevant articles on adults using computerized searches of the medical literature through May 15, 2013. The evidence is organized within the context of the AHA framework and is classified according to the joint AHA/American College of Cardiology and supplementary AHA Stroke Council methods of classifying the level of certainty and the class and level of evidence. The document underwent extensive AHA internal peer review, Stroke Council Leadership review, and Scientific Statements Oversight Committee review before consideration and approval by the AHA Science Advisory and Coordinating Committee. We provide current evidence, research gaps, and recommendations on risk of stroke related to preeclampsia, oral contraceptives, menopause, and hormone replacement, as well as those risk factors more common in women, such as obesity/metabolic syndrome, atrial fibrillation, and migraine with aura. To more accurately reflect the risk of stroke in women across the lifespan, as well as the clear gaps in current risk scores, we believe a female-specific stroke risk score is warranted.

  4. AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGISTS AND AMERICAN COLLEGE OF ENDOCRINOLOGY GUIDELINES FOR MANAGEMENT OF DYSLIPIDEMIA AND PREVENTION OF CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jellinger, Paul S; Handelsman, Yehuda; Rosenblit, Paul D; Bloomgarden, Zachary T; Fonseca, Vivian A; Garber, Alan J; Grunberger, George; Guerin, Chris K; Bell, David S H; Mechanick, Jeffrey I; Pessah-Pollack, Rachel; Wyne, Kathleen; Smith, Donald; Brinton, Eliot A; Fazio, Sergio; Davidson, Michael

    2017-04-01

    The development of these guidelines is mandated by the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) Board of Directors and American College of Endocrinology (ACE) Board of Trustees and adheres with published AACE protocols for the standardized production of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs). Recommendations are based on diligent reviews of the clinical evidence with transparent incorporation of subjective factors, according to established AACE/ACE guidelines for guidelines protocols. The Executive Summary of this document contains 87 recommendations of which 45 are Grade A (51.7%), 18 are Grade B (20.7%), 15 are Grade C (17.2%), and 9 (10.3%) are Grade D. These detailed, evidence-based recommendations allow for nuance-based clinical decision-making that addresses multiple aspects of real-world medical care. The evidence base presented in the subsequent Appendix provides relevant supporting information for Executive Summary Recommendations. This update contains 695 citations of which 203 (29.2 %) are EL 1 (strong), 137 (19.7%) are EL 2 (intermediate), 119 (17.1%) are EL 3 (weak), and 236 (34.0%) are EL 4 (no clinical evidence). This CPG is a practical tool that endocrinologists, other health care professionals, health-related organizations, and regulatory bodies can use to reduce the risks and consequences of dyslipidemia. It provides guidance on screening, risk assessment, and treatment recommendations for a range of individuals with various lipid disorders. The recommendations emphasize the importance of treating low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) in some individuals to lower goals than previously endorsed and support the measurement of coronary artery calcium scores and inflammatory markers to help stratify risk. Special consideration is given to individuals with diabetes, familial hypercholesterolemia, women, and youth with dyslipidemia. Both clinical and cost-effectiveness data are provided to support treatment decisions. 4S

  5. Impact of Homeowner Association (HOA) landscaping guidelines on residential water use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentz, Elizabeth A.; Rode, Sandra; Li, Xiaoxiao; Tellman, Elizabeth M.; Turner, B. L., II

    2016-05-01

    The association between increasing water intensive land-cover, such as the use of turf grass and trees, and increasing water use is a growing concern for water-stressed arid cities. Appropriate regulatory measures addressing residential landscaping, such as those applied by Homeowner Associations (HOAs), may serve to reduce municipal water use, joining other water-use reducing measures under consideration by arid cities. This research assesses quantitatively the role that Covenants, Conditions, and Restrictions (CCRs) applied to landscaping by HOAs play on water consumption. Statistical comparisons and models of n=1973 parcels in Goodyear, Arizona, USA, reveal that: HOA yards have less vegetation cover and those households use less peak-season water (July) than those households in non-HOA neighborhoods. This hold true even though the HOA CCRs regulate only the minimum required front-yard vegetation and most residents maintain more than the minimum vegetation level. Furthermore, front-yard landscaping tends to be mimicked in the backyard such that total yard landscaping tracks best with total household water use. Results of the study suggest that HOA landscaping regulations have the potential to reduce peak-season water use by up to 24% if CCRs were to set maximum vegetation regulations rather than minimum and if compliance were enforced. Lowering residential water consumption in this way potentially involves tradeoffs with the cooling effects of vegetation and its consequences on the urban heat island effect, on energy use, and on home values.

  6. Compliance with American Urological Association Guidelines for Post-Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy Antibiotics Does Not Appear to Increase Rates of Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmukh, Sameer; Sternberg, Kevan; Hernandez, Natalia; Eisner, Brian H

    2015-10-01

    We compared infection rates after percutaneous nephrolithotomy in a group of patients without a history of infection or struvite calculi who received 24 hours or less of antibiotics postoperatively (ie compliance with AUA guidelines) vs a group that received 5 to 7 days of antibiotics postoperatively. We retrospectively reviewed the records of consecutive percutaneous nephrolithotomy procedures in patients without a history of urinary tract infection. Group 1 received 24 hours or less of antibiotics postoperatively and group 2 received a mean of 6 days of antibiotics postoperatively. A total of 52 patients in group 1 (24 hours or less of antibiotics) and 30 in group 2 (mean 6 days of antibiotics) met study inclusion criteria. In 5 group 1 patients (9.6%) fever developed within 72 hours of percutaneous nephrolithotomy but none demonstrated bacteriuria or bacteremia on cultures. No patient in group 1 was treated for urinary tract infection on postoperative days 3 to 14. In 4 group 2 patients (13.3%) fever developed within 72 hours of percutaneous nephrolithotomy. A single patient showed bacteriuria (less than 10,000 cfu mixed gram-positive bacteria) on culture while no patient demonstrated bacteremia. No patient in group 2 was treated for urinary tract infection on postoperative days 3 to 14. There was no difference in stone-free rates or the need for additional procedures between the 2 groups. In this pilot series compliance with AUA guidelines for antibiotic prophylaxis did not result in higher rates of infection than in a comparable group of 30 patients who received approximately 6 days of antibiotics postoperatively. Copyright © 2015 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. British Dietetic Association evidence-based guidelines for the protein requirements of adults undergoing maintenance haemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, H L; Jackson, H; Walker, G H; Macafee, S; Magee, K; Hooper, L; Stewart, L; MacLaughlin, H L

    2013-08-01

    Existing nutritional guidelines suggest that protein requirements of adults with stage five chronic kidney disease undergoing haemodialysis (HD) or peritoneal dialysis (PD) are increased as a result of protein losses during dialysis. The present review aimed to update previous guidance and develop evidence-based practice guidelines on the protein requirements of adults undergoing maintenance dialysis. Following a PICO approach (Participants or Population, Intervention or Exposure, Comparison and Outcome), four research questions were formulated to investigate the total protein requirement and protein quality required by adults undergoing HD and PD. A comprehensive, systematic review was undertaken using the databases Medline, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library from 2005 to September 2009 for HD studies and from 1997 to September 2009 for PD studies. The literature search yielded 2931 studies, which were assessed for inclusion. Following appraisal, 19 studies in HD and 18 studies in PD met the inclusion criteria and were systematically reviewed. Limited good quality evidence supports the recommendations that: (i) adults undergoing maintenance HD require a minimum protein intake of 1.1 g kg(-1) ideal body weight (IBW) per day; and (ii) adults undergoing maintenance PD require a minimum protein intake of 1.0-1.2 kg(-1) IBW per day, in conjunction with an adequate energy intake. There were no studies that addressed the quality of protein for either HD or PD. Evidence suggests that nutritional status may be maintained with lower protein intakes than previously recommended. However, the evidence base is limited and further randomised controlled trials are required to establish the optimal protein intake for dialysis patients. © 2013 The Authors Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics © 2013 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  8. When to Perform Karyotype Analysis in Infertile Men? Validation of the European Association of Urology Guidelines with the Proposal of a New Predictive Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventimiglia, Eugenio; Capogrosso, Paolo; Boeri, Luca; Pederzoli, Filippo; Cazzaniga, Walter; Scano, Roberta; Ippolito, Silvia; Fossati, Nicola; Alfano, Massimo; Montorsi, Francesco; Salonia, Andrea

    2016-12-01

    Known genetic alterations play a major role in perturbing male reproductive health. We sought to retrospectively validate the European Association of Urology (EAU) guidelines for karyotype analysis (KA) in a homogenous cohort of 1168 White European men presenting for primary couple's infertility (noninterracial infertile couples only) and to develop a novel nomogram capable of predicting karyotype alterations. Overall, 742 (63.5%) patients would have deserved KA according to the EAU guidelines. Of those, 48 (6.9% of the assessable patients according to EAU guidelines) displayed any kind of alteration at KA. Conversely, hypothetically relying on the EAU criteria, 12 (20%) out of 60 patients with karyotype abnormalities would not have been candidates for the same genetic assessment. Overall, 694 (62.6%) patients would have been candidates for genetic workup despite having a normal karyotype. As a whole, the EAU guideline sensitivity, specificity, and discrimination were 80%, 37%, and 59%, respectively. We developed a novel nomogram, with a 2% probability cut-off, which allows for a more careful detection of KA alterations. The application of the European Association of Urology guidelines for karyotype analysis does not ensure an adequate diagnostic process. In this regard, we propose a novel diagnostic tool to improve detection of alterations at karyotype analysis. Copyright © 2016 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. A hospital-site controlled intervention using audit and feedback to implement guidelines concerning inappropriate treatment of catheter-associated asymptomatic bacteriuria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hysong Sylvia

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI is one of the most common hospital-acquired infections. However, many cases treated as hospital-acquired CAUTI are actually asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU. Evidence-based guidelines recommend that providers neither screen for nor treat ABU in most catheterized patients, but there is a significant gap between these guidelines and clinical practice. Our objectives are (1 to evaluate the effectiveness of an audit and feedback intervention for increasing guideline-concordant care concerning catheter-associated ABU and (2 to measure improvements in healthcare providers' knowledge of and attitudes toward the practice guidelines associated with the intervention. Methods/Design The study uses a controlled pre/post design to test an intervention using audit and feedback of healthcare providers to improve their compliance with ABU guidelines. The intervention and the control sites are two VA hospitals. For objective 1 we will review medical records to measure the clinical outcomes of inappropriate screening for and treatment of catheter-associated ABU. For objective 2 we will survey providers' knowledge and attitudes. Three phases of our protocol are proposed: the first 12-month phase will involve observation of the baseline incidence of inappropriate screening for and treatment of ABU at both sites. This surveillance for clinical outcomes will continue at both sites throughout the study. Phase 2 consists of 12 months of individualized audit and feedback at the intervention site and guidelines distribution at both sites. The third phase, also over 12 months, will provide unit-level feedback at the intervention site to assess sustainability. Healthcare providers at the intervention site during phase 2 and at both sites during phase 3 will complete pre/post surveys of awareness and familiarity (knowledge, as well as of acceptance and outcome expectancy (attitudes regarding the relevant

  10. American Gastroenterological Association guidelines are inaccurate in detecting pancreatic cysts with advanced neoplasia: a clinicopathologic study of 225 patients with supporting molecular data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhi, Aatur D; Zeh, Herbert J; Brand, Randall E; Nikiforova, Marina N; Chennat, Jennifer S; Fasanella, Kenneth E; Khalid, Asif; Papachristou, Georgios I; Slivka, Adam; Hogg, Melissa; Lee, Kenneth K; Tsung, Allan; Zureikat, Amer H; McGrath, Kevin

    2016-06-01

    The American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) recently reported evidence-based guidelines for the management of asymptomatic neoplastic pancreatic cysts. These guidelines advocate a higher threshold for surgical resection than prior guidelines and imaging surveillance for a considerable number of patients with pancreatic cysts. The aims of this study were to assess the accuracy of the AGA guidelines in detecting advanced neoplasia and present an alternative approach to pancreatic cysts. The study population consisted of 225 patients who underwent EUS-guided FNA for pancreatic cysts between January 2014 and May 2015. For each patient, clinical findings, EUS features, cytopathology results, carcinoembryonic antigen analysis, and molecular testing of pancreatic cyst fluid were reviewed. Molecular testing included the assessment of hotspot mutations and deletions for KRAS, GNAS, VHL, TP53, PIK3CA, and PTEN. Diagnostic pathology results were available for 41 patients (18%), with 13 (6%) harboring advanced neoplasia. Among these cases, the AGA guidelines identified advanced neoplasia with 62% sensitivity, 79% specificity, 57% positive predictive value, and 82% negative predictive value. Moreover, the AGA guidelines missed 45% of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms with adenocarcinoma or high-grade dysplasia. For cases without confirmatory pathology, 27 of 184 patients (15%) with serous cystadenomas (SCAs) based on EUS findings and/or VHL alterations would continue magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) surveillance. In comparison, a novel algorithmic pathway using molecular testing of pancreatic cyst fluid detected advanced neoplasias with 100% sensitivity, 90% specificity, 79% positive predictive value, and 100% negative predictive value. The AGA guidelines were inaccurate in detecting pancreatic cysts with advanced neoplasia. Furthermore, because the AGA guidelines manage all neoplastic cysts similarly, patients with SCAs will continue to undergo unnecessary MRI

  11. Clarifications, guidelines and questions about the dental bleaching "associated" with orthodontic treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Consolaro

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available With regard to the best moment for carrying out or recommending dental bleaching to orthodontic patients, some explanations and orientations are given in order to answers the following questions: 1 Why orthodontic treatment completion is considered the best opportunity for carrying out the procedure? 2 Why dental bleaching should not be performed immediately before orthodontic treatment? 3 If that would be possible at any special case, what would that be? 4 Why dental bleaching should not be performed during orthodontic treatment? 5 If that would be possible at any special case, what would that be? This article highlights why it is essential to protect both the mucosa and the cervical region, regardless of the moment when dental bleaching is performed, whether associated with orthodontic treatment or not. The "how", "why" and "if" of whether or not it is convenient to perform dental bleaching before orthodontic treatment are still a matter of clinical suggestion, as it is a procedure that is under analysis, empirical knowledge waiting for scientific proof or disproof! Although tooth enamel has adamantine fluid flowing within it, providing a specific metabolism that is peculiar to its own and which could scientifically explain and base the option of carrying out teeth whitening before and during orthodontic treatment, we must still be very careful.

  12. Organizational and managerial factors associated with clinical practice guideline adherence: a simulation-based study in 36 French hospital wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saillour-Glénisson, Florence; Kret, Marion; Domecq, Sandrine; Sibé, Matthieu; Daucourt, Valentin; Migeot, Virginie; Veillard, David; Michel, Philippe

    2017-08-01

    To identify managerial and organizational characteristics of multi-specialty medicine wards and individual characteristics of health professionals that are most strongly associated with clinical practice guidelines (CPG) adherence. Cross-sectional stratified cluster sample design. Data were gathered from 36 randomly selected multi-specialty medicine wards. The study population included all health professionals involved in patient care working in the participating wards. The degree of CPG adherence was measured using clinical vignettes on three topics: pain management, managing heart failure and managing diabetes. Responses from each professional to each clinical case were quantified using a 10-point scale. Managerial and organizational characteristics of medical department and individual characteristics of health professionals were obtained using three questionnaires. The study sample consisted of 859 professionals (362 orderlies, 361 nurses and 136 physicians). Factors independently and positively associated with CPG adherence were (i) individual factors: low age of professionals, expertise in diabetology and activity in cardiology; (ii) organizational and managerial factors: good understanding between physicians and other personnel; and (iii) structural factors: computer-based test results and prescriptions, presence of medical specialists, inter-department mobility of orderlies, medium-length stay (between 7 and 10 days) and large bed capacity. Good CPG adherence in general medicine needs institutional dynamism, availability of clinical competence and team culture based on cooperation.

  13. The Association between Dietary Quality and Dietary Guideline Adherence with Mental Health Outcomes in Adults: A Cross-Sectional Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meegan, Amy P; Perry, Ivan J; Phillips, Catherine M

    2017-03-05

    The prevalence of adverse mental health outcomes in adults is increasing. Although beneficial effects of selected micronutrients and foods on mental health have been reported, they do not reflect the impact of the habitual diet on mental health. Therefore, our objective is to examine potential associations between dietary quality, dietary composition and compliance with food pyramid recommendations with depressive symptoms, anxiety and well-being (assessed using CES-D, HADS-A and WHO-5 screening tools) in a cross-sectional sample of 2047 middle-aged adults. Diet was assessed using a self-completed FFQ. Chi-square tests, t-tests and logistic regression analyses were used to investigate the associations between dietary components and mental health outcomes. Dietary quality, but not dietary composition or guideline adherence, was associated with well-being. Those with high dietary quality were more likely to report well-being (OR =1.67, 95% CI 1.15-2.44, p = 0.007) relative to those with low dietary quality. This remained significant among females (OR = 1.92, (95% CI 1.14-3.23, p = 0.014) and non-obese individuals (OR = 2.03, 95% CI 1.28-3.20, p = 0.003). No associations between any dietary measures with anxiety or depressive symptoms were observed. These novel results highlight the importance of dietary quality in maintaining optimal psychological well-being. Better understanding of the relationship between dietary quality and mental health may provide insight into potential therapeutic or intervention strategies to improve mental health and well-being.

  14. The Association between Dietary Quality and Dietary Guideline Adherence with Mental Health Outcomes in Adults: A Cross-Sectional Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy P. Meegan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of adverse mental health outcomes in adults is increasing. Although beneficial effects of selected micronutrients and foods on mental health have been reported, they do not reflect the impact of the habitual diet on mental health. Therefore, our objective is to examine potential associations between dietary quality, dietary composition and compliance with food pyramid recommendations with depressive symptoms, anxiety and well-being (assessed using CES-D, HADS-A and WHO-5 screening tools in a cross-sectional sample of 2047 middle-aged adults. Diet was assessed using a self-completed FFQ. Chi-square tests, t-tests and logistic regression analyses were used to investigate the associations between dietary components and mental health outcomes. Dietary quality, but not dietary composition or guideline adherence, was associated with well-being. Those with high dietary quality were more likely to report well-being (OR =1.67, 95% CI 1.15–2.44, p = 0.007 relative to those with low dietary quality. This remained significant among females (OR = 1.92, (95% CI 1.14–3.23, p = 0.014 and non-obese individuals (OR = 2.03, 95% CI 1.28–3.20, p = 0.003. No associations between any dietary measures with anxiety or depressive symptoms were observed. These novel results highlight the importance of dietary quality in maintaining optimal psychological well-being. Better understanding of the relationship between dietary quality and mental health may provide insight into potential therapeutic or intervention strategies to improve mental health and well-being.

  15. AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGISTS AND AMERICAN COLLEGE OF ENDOCRINOLOGY PROTOCOL FOR STANDARDIZED PRODUCTION OF CLINICAL PRACTICE GUIDELINES, ALGORITHMS, AND CHECKLISTS - 2017 UPDATE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechanick, Jeffrey I; Pessah-Pollack, Rachel; Camacho, Pauline; Correa, Ricardo; Figaro, M Kathleen; Garber, Jeffrey R; Jasim, Sina; Pantalone, Kevin M; Trence, Dace; Upala, Sikarin

    2017-08-01

    Clinical practice guideline (CPG), clinical practice algorithm (CPA), and clinical checklist (CC, collectively CPGAC) development is a high priority of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) and American College of Endocrinology (ACE). This 2017 update in CPG development consists of (1) a paradigm change wherein first, environmental scans identify important clinical issues and needs, second, CPA construction focuses on these clinical issues and needs, and third, CPG provide CPA node/edge-specific scientific substantiation and appended CC; (2) inclusion of new technical semantic and numerical descriptors for evidence types, subjective factors, and qualifiers; and (3) incorporation of patient-centered care components such as economics and transcultural adaptations, as well as implementation, validation, and evaluation strategies. This third point highlights the dominating factors of personal finances, governmental influences, and third-party payer dictates on CPGAC implementation, which ultimately impact CPGAC development. The AACE/ACE guidelines for the CPGAC program is a successful and ongoing iterative exercise to optimize endocrine care in a changing and challenging healthcare environment. AACE = American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists ACC = American College of Cardiology ACE = American College of Endocrinology ASeRT = ACE Scientific Referencing Team BEL = best evidence level CC = clinical checklist CPA = clinical practice algorithm CPG = clinical practice guideline CPGAC = clinical practice guideline, algorithm, and checklist EBM = evidence-based medicine EHR = electronic health record EL = evidence level G4GAC = Guidelines for Guidelines, Algorithms, and Checklists GAC = guidelines, algorithms, and checklists HCP = healthcare professional(s) POEMS = patient-oriented evidence that matters PRCT = prospective randomized controlled trial.

  16. Which Physician and Practice Characteristics are Associated With Adherence to Evidence-Based Guidelines for Depressive and Anxiety Disorders?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smolders, Mirrian; Laurant, Miranda; Verhaak, Peter; Prins, Marijn; van Marwijk, Harm; Penninx, Brenda; Wensing, Michel; Grol, Richard

    Background: Research on quality of care for depressive and anxiety disorders has reported low rates of adherence to evidence-based depression and anxiety guidelines. To improve this care, we need a better understanding of the factors determining guideline adherence. Objective: To investigate how

  17. After Guidelines, What?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis M Bowie

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In a recent survey, Canadian Thoracic Society (CTS members indicated that they feel our association should be involved in the production of guidelines (1. There is evidence in the literature that suggests guidelines can have some effect in changing behaviour, although this is variable and modest at best. Certainly, the production of guidelines is not without costs, particularly in time spent by experts in reviewing the literature and producing them. For good reasons, delays frequently occur in their production, often leading to recommendations that may be outdated. People sometimes forget that one of the most important reasons for producing guidelines is to identify questions that require future research.

  18. The association between guideline-based treatment instructions at the point of discharge and lower 1-year mortality in Medicare patients after acute myocardial infarction: the American College of Cardiology's Guidelines Applied in Practice (GAP) initiative in Michigan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Adam M; Ramanath, Vijay S; Grzybowski, Mary; Riba, Arthur L; Jani, Sandeep M; Mehta, Rajendra; De Franco, Anthony C; Parrish, Robert; Skorcz, Stephen; Baker, Patricia L; Faul, Jessica; Chen, Benrong; Roychoudhury, Canopy; Elma, Mary Anne C; Mitchell, Kristi R; Froehlich, James B; Montoye, Cecelia; Eagle, Kim A

    2007-09-01

    The American College of Cardiology's Guidelines Applied in Practice (GAP) initiative for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) has been shown to increase the use of guideline-based therapies and improve outcomes in patients with AMI. It is unknown whether hospitals that are more successful in using the standard discharge contract--a key component of GAP that emphasizes guideline-based medications, lifestyle modification, and follow-up planning--experience a proportionally greater improvement in patient outcomes. Medicare patients treated for AMI in all 33 participating GAP hospitals in Michigan were enrolled. We aggregated the hospitals into 3 tertiles based on the rates of discharge contract use: 0% to 8.4% (tertile 1), >8.4% to 38.0% (tertile 2), and >38.0% to 61.1% (tertile 3). We analyzed 1-year follow-up mortality both pre- and post-GAP and compared the mortality decline post-GAP with discharge contract use according to tertile. There were 1368 patients in the baseline (pre-GAP) cohort and 1489 patients in the post-GAP cohort. After GAP implementation, mortality at 1 year decreased by 1.2% (P = .71), 1.2% (P = .68), and 6.0% (P = .03) for tertiles 1, 2, and 3, respectively. After multivariate adjustment, discharge contract use was significantly associated with decreased 1-year mortality in tertile 2 (odds ratio 0.43, 95% CI 0.22-0.84) and tertile 3 (odds ratio 0.45, 95% CI 0.27-0.75). Increased hospital utilization of the standard discharge contract as part of the GAP program is associated with decreased 1-year mortality in Medicare patient populations with AMI. Hospital efforts to promote adherence to guideline-based care tools such as the discharge contract used in GAP may result in mortality reductions for their patient populations at 1 year.

  19. European Association of Urology Guidelines for Clear Cell Renal Cancers That Are Resistant to Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-Targeted Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Powles, Thomas; Staehler, Michael; Ljungberg, Börje; Bensalah, Karim; Canfield, Steven E; Dabestani, Saeed; Giles, Rachel H; Hofmann, Fabian; Hora, Milan; Kuczyk, Markus A; Lam, Thomas; Marconi, Lorenzo; Merseburger, Axel S; Volpe, Alessandro; Bex, Axel

    2016-01-01

    The European Association of Urology renal cancer guidelines panel recommends nivolumab and cabozantinib over the previous standard of care in patients who have failed one or more lines of vascular endothelial growth factor-targeted therapy. New data have recently become available showing a survival

  20. European Association of Urology Guidelines for Clear Cell Renal Cancers That Are Resistant to Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-Targeted Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Powles, Thomas; Staehler, Michael; Ljungberg, Börje; Bensalah, Karim; Canfield, Steven E; Dabestani, Saeed; Giles, Rachel H; Hofmann, Fabian; Hora, Milan; Kuczyk, Markus A; Lam, Thomas; Marconi, Lorenzo; Merseburger, Axel S; Volpe, Alessandro; Bex, Axel

    The European Association of Urology renal cancer guidelines panel recommends nivolumab and cabozantinib over the previous standard of care in patients who have failed one or more lines of vascular endothelial growth factor-targeted therapy. New data have recently become available showing a survival

  1. Proportion of preschool-aged children meeting the Canadian 24-Hour Movement Guidelines and associations with adiposity: results from the Canadian Health Measures Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Philippe Chaput

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background New Canadian 24-Hour Movement Guidelines for the Early Years have been released in 2017. According to the guidelines, within a 24-h period, preschoolers should accumulate at least 180 min of physical activity (of which at least 60 min is moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, engage in no more than 1 h of screen time, and obtain between 10 and 13 h of sleep. This study examined the proportions of preschool-aged (3 to 4 years Canadian children who met these new guidelines and different recommendations within the guidelines, and the associations with adiposity indicators. Methods Participants were 803 children (mean age: 3.5 years from cycles 2–4 of the Canadian Health Measures Survey (CHMS, a nationally representative cross-sectional sample of Canadians. Physical activity was accelerometer-derived, and screen time and sleep duration were parent-reported. Participants were classified as meeting the overall 24-Hour Movement Guidelines if they met all three specific time recommendations for physical activity, screen time, and sleep. The adiposity indicators in this study were body mass index (BMI z-scores and BMI status (World Health Organization Growth Standards. Results A total of 12.7% of preschool-aged children met the overall 24-Hour Movement Guidelines, and 3.3% met none of the three recommendations. A high proportion of children met the sleep duration (83.9% and physical activity (61.8% recommendations, while 24.4% met the screen time recommendation. No associations were found between meeting individual or combined recommendations and adiposity. Conclusions Very few preschool-aged children in Canada (~13% met all three recommendations contained within the 24-Hour Movement Guidelines. None of the combinations of recommendations were associated with adiposity in this sample. Future work should focus on identifying innovative ways to reduce screen time in this population, and should examine the associations of

  2. Guidelines for identification and treatment of individuals with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder and associated fetal alcohol spectrum disorders based upon expert consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Susan; Absoud, Michael; Blackburn, Carolyn; Branney, Polly; Colley, Bill; Farrag, Emad; Fleisher, Susan; Gregory, Ges; Gudjonsson, Gisli H; Kim, Keira; O'Malley, Kieran D; Plant, Moira; Rodriguez, Alina; Ozer, Susan; Takon, Inyang; Woodhouse, Emma; Mukherjee, Raja

    2016-09-22

    The association of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) results in a complex constellation of symptoms that complicates the successful diagnosis and treatment of the affected individual. Current literature lacks formal guidelines, randomized control trials, and evidence-based treatment plans for individuals with ADHD and associated FASD. Therefore, a meeting of professional experts was organized with the aim of producing a consensus on identification and treatment guidelines that will aid clinicians in caring for this unique patient population. Experts from multiple disciplines in the fields of ADHD and FASD convened in London, United Kingdom, for a meeting hosted by the United Kingdom ADHD Partnership (UKAP; www.UKADHD.com ) in June 2015. The meeting provided the opportunity to address the complexities of ADHD and FASD from different perspectives and included presentations, discussions, and group work. The attendees worked towards producing a consensus for a unified approach to ADHD and associated FASD. The authors successfully came to consensus and produced recommended guidelines with specific regards to identification and assessment, interventions and treatments, and multiagency liaisons and care management, highlighting that a lifespan approach to treatment needs to be adopted by all involved. Included in the guidelines are: 1) unique 'red flags', which when identified in the ADHD population can lead to an accurate associated FASD diagnosis, 2) a treatment decision tree, and 3) recommendations for multiagency care management. While clinically useful guidelines were achieved, more research is still needed to contribute to the knowledge base about the diagnosis, treatment, and management of those with ADHD and associated FASD.

  3. Guidelines, minimal requirements and standard of cancer care around the Mediterranean Area: report from the Collaborative AROME (Association of Radiotherapy and Oncology of the Mediterranean Area) working parties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    Guidelines are produced in oncology to facilitate clinical decision making and improve clinical practice. However, existing guidelines are mainly developed for countries with a certain availability of means and cultural aspects are rarely taken into account. Around the Mediterranean Area, countries share common cultural backgrounds but also great disparities with respect to availability of means; current guidelines by most societies are not applicable to all of those countries. Association of Radiotherapy and Oncology of the Mediterranean Area (AROME) is a scientific organization for the promotion and overcoming of inequalities in oncology clinical practice around the Mediterranean Area. In an effort to accomplish this goal, members of the AROME society have developed clinical recommendations for most common cancer sites in countries around the Mediterranean Area. The structure of these recommendations lies in the concept of minimal requirements vs. standard of care; they are being presented and discussed in the main text. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Primary care guidelines for the management of persons infected with HIV: 2013 update by the HIV Medicine Association of the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aberg, Judith A; Gallant, Joel E; Ghanem, Khalil G; Emmanuel, Patricia; Zingman, Barry S; Horberg, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    Evidence-based guidelines for the management of persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) were prepared by an expert panel of the HIV Medicine Association of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. These updated guidelines replace those published in 2009. The guidelines are intended for use by healthcare providers who care for HIV-infected patients. Since 2009, new antiretroviral drugs and classes have become available, and the prognosis of persons with HIV infection continues to improve. However, with fewer complications and increased survival, HIV-infected persons are increasingly developing common health problems that also affect the general population. Some of these conditions may be related to HIV infection itself or its treatment. HIV-infected persons should be managed and monitored for all relevant age- and sex-specific health problems. New information based on publications from the period 2009-2013 has been incorporated into this document.

  5. Implementation of the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Blood Cholesterol Guideline Including Data From the Improved Reduction of Outcomes: Vytorin Efficacy International Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziaeian, Boback; Dinkler, John; Watson, Karol

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in developed countries. The management of blood cholesterol through use of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors (statins) in at-risk patients is a pillar of medical therapy for the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. The recent 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guideline on managing blood cholesterol provides an important framework for the effective implementation of risk-reduction strategies. The guideline identifies four cohorts of patients with proven benefits from statin therapy and streamlines the dosing and monitoring recommendations based on evidence from published, randomized controlled trials. Primary care physicians and cardiologists play key roles in identifying populations at elevated ASCVD risk. In providing a practical management overview of the current blood cholesterol guideline, we facilitate more informed discussions on treatment options between healthcare providers and their patients. PMID:26198559

  6. Compliance With the AAOS Guidelines for Treatment of Osteoarthritis of the Knee: A Survey of the American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Victor Rex; Ong, Alvin Chua; Orozco, Fabio Ramiro; Hernandez, Victor Hugo; Lutz, Rex William; Post, Zachary Douglas

    2018-02-01

    The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) published a series of evidence-based guidelines for treatment of knee osteoarthritis (OA). We studied compliance with these guidelines among orthopaedic surgeons. We sent a survey to members of the American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons. It included five clinical vignettes based on the Kellgren-Lawrence radiographic system for classification of knee OA. Respondents selected treatment currently supported or not supported by the AAOS guidelines. Of 345 responses, the frequency of use of recommended interventions was 80%, 82%, 21%, 50%, and 98% for OA at stages 0 through 4, respectively. For stage 2 and stage 3 OA, intra-articular hyaluronic acid was the most commonly selected intervention not recommended by the AAOS. Apparently, AAOS guidelines on the treatment of OA have not reached the orthopaedic community, resulting in lack of treatment consensus and continued use of modalities with no proven patient benefits. Management of moderate to severe knee OA does not align with AAOS guidelines. We encourage researchers to conduct clinical trials to identify the role of intra-articular corticosteroids in treating this condition.

  7. New worldwide lipid guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraf, Smriti; Ray, Kausik K

    2015-07-01

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) remains the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in most countries. Modification of common risk factors such as dyslipidaemia can result in significant reduction of ASCVD incidence in the population and improve clinical outcomes. The purpose of this review is to discuss and compare the latest worldwide lipid guidelines, and to demonstrate the variation in practice in different parts of the world. The lipid guidelines have recently been updated in different countries. The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidelines in the United Kingdom were issued in July 2014, are risk based and are broadly similar to the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association task force guidelines that were published in November 2013. Both these guidelines are in variance with both the Canadian Guidelines and the European Society of Cardiology/European Atherosclerosis Society guidelines 2011, which are target based and have different risk scoring systems, which results in significant variation in practice and increased healthcare costs in certain countries. The difference in guidelines in different countries makes it difficult for the clinician to standardize the treatment provided to individuals. The variance in risk scoring systems makes it difficult to compare risk prediction tools across countries and hence the optimum treatment available for a given population. Standardization of guidelines based on randomized controlled trial data and validation and calibration of various risk scoring systems could help improve clinical outcomes in this high-risk group of individuals at risk of ASCVD within individual countries.

  8. ACC/AHA Special Report: Clinical Practice Guideline Implementation Strategies: A Summary of Systematic Reviews by the NHLBI Implementation Science Work Group: A Report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Clinical Practice Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Wiley V; Pearson, Thomas A; Bennett, Glen C; Cushman, William C; Gaziano, Thomas A; Gorman, Paul N; Handler, Joel; Krumholz, Harlan M; Kushner, Robert F; MacKenzie, Thomas D; Sacco, Ralph L; Smith, Sidney C; Stevens, Victor J; Wells, Barbara L; Castillo, Graciela; Heil, Susan K R; Stephens, Jennifer; Vann, Julie C Jacobson

    2017-02-28

    reviews), reminders (3 of 4 reviews), and provider incentives (1 of 1 review) were generally effective for cost reduction. Educational outreach visits (1 of 1 review) and provider incentives (1 of 1 review) were also generally effective for cost-effectiveness outcomes. Barriers to clinician adoption or adherence to guidelines included time constraints (8 reviews/overviews); limited staffing resources (2 overviews); timing (5 reviews/overviews); clinician skepticism (5 reviews/overviews); clinician knowledge of guidelines (4 reviews/overviews); and higher age of the clinician (1 overview). Facilitating factors included guideline characteristics such as format, resources, and end-user involvement (6 reviews/overviews); involving stakeholders (5 reviews/overviews); leadership support (5 reviews/overviews); scope of implementation (5 reviews/overviews); organizational culture such as multidisciplinary teams and low-baseline adherence (9 reviews/overviews); and electronic guidelines systems (3 reviews). The strategies of audit and feedback and educational outreach visits were generally effective in improving both process of care and clinical outcomes. Reminders and provider incentives showed mixed effectiveness, or were generally ineffective. No general conclusion could be reached about cost effectiveness, because of limitations in the evidence. Important gaps exist in the evidence on effectiveness of implementation interventions, especially regarding clinical outcomes, cost effectiveness and contextual issues affecting successful implementation. © 2017 by the American College of Cardiology Foundation and the American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Is adherence to the Canadian 24-Hour Movement Behaviour Guidelines for Children and Youth associated with improved indicators of physical, mental, and social health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Ian; Roberts, Karen C; Thompson, Wendy

    2017-07-01

    The Canadian 24-Hour Movement Guidelines for Children and Youth were released in 2016. These guidelines contained recommendations for moderate to vigorous physical activity, screen time, and sleep duration. The objectives of this study were to determine (i) if achieving the individual recommendations and combinations of the recommendations within the guidelines is associated with indicators of physical, mental, and social health within children and youth; (ii) if meeting the recommendation for a specific movement behaviour is associated with larger differences in physical, mental, and social health indicators compared with meeting the recommendations for the other specific movement behaviours; and (iii) if physical, mental, and social health indicators differ according to different combinations of the guideline recommendations achieved. To address these objectives, we studied a representative sample of over 17 000 Canadians aged 10-17 years. The findings indicated that participants achieving any given recommendation had preferable scores for the health outcomes compared with participants who did not meet the recommendations. There was a dose-response pattern between the number of recommendations achieved and the health outcomes, indicating that the health outcomes improved as more recommendations were achieved. When the number of recommendations achieved was the same, there were no differences in the health outcomes. For instance, health indicators scores were not different in the group who achieved the sleep and screen time recommendations, the group who achieved sleep and moderate to vigorous physical activity recommendations, and the group who achieved screen time and moderate to vigorous physical activity recommendations.

  10. Guideline for diagnosis and treatment of subacromial pain syndrome: a multidisciplinary review by the Dutch Orthopaedic Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diercks, Ron; Bron, Carel; Dorrestijn, Oscar; Meskers, Carel; Naber, René; de Ruiter, Tjerk; Willems, Jaap; Winters, Jan; van der Woude, Henk Jan

    2014-06-01

    Treatment of "subacromial impingement syndrome" of the shoulder has changed drastically in the past decade. The anatomical explanation as "impingement" of the rotator cuff is not sufficient to cover the pathology. "Subacromial pain syndrome", SAPS, describes the condition better. A working group formed from a number of Dutch specialist societies, joined by the Dutch Orthopedic Association, has produced a guideline based on the available scientific evidence. This resulted in a new outlook for the treatment of subacromial pain syndrome. The important conclusions and advice from this work are as follows: (1) The diagnosis SAPS can only be made using a combination of clinical tests. (2) SAPS should preferably be treated non-operatively. (3) Acute pain should be treated with analgetics if necessary. (4) Subacromial injection with corticosteroids is indicated for persistent or recurrent symptoms. (5) Diagnostic imaging is useful after 6 weeks of symptoms. Ultrasound examination is the recommended imaging, to exclude a rotator cuff rupture. (6) Occupational interventions are useful when complaints persist for longer than 6 weeks. (7) Exercise therapy should be specific and should be of low intensity and high frequency, combining eccentric training, attention to relaxation and posture, and treatment of myofascial trigger points (including stretching of the muscles) may be considered. (8) Strict immobilization and mobilization techniques are not recommended. (9) Tendinosis calcarea can be treated by shockwave (ESWT) or needling under ultrasound guidance (barbotage). (10) Rehabilitation in a specialized unit can be considered in chronic, treatment resistant SAPS, with pain perpetuating behavior. (11) There is no convincing evidence that surgical treatment for SAPS is more effective than conservature management. (12) There is no indication for the surgical treatment of asymptomatic rotator cuff tears.

  11. Diagnosis and treatment of dermatophytosis in dogs and cats.: Clinical Consensus Guidelines of the World Association for Veterinary Dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriello, Karen A; Coyner, Kimberly; Paterson, Susan; Mignon, Bernard

    2017-06-01

    Dermatophytosis is a superficial fungal skin disease of cats and dogs. The most common pathogens of small animals belong to the genera Microsporum and Trichophyton. It is an important skin disease because it is contagious, infectious and can be transmitted to people. The objective of this document is to review the existing literature and provide consensus recommendations for veterinary clinicians and lay people on the diagnosis and treatment of dermatophytosis in cats and dogs. The authors served as a Guideline Panel (GP) and reviewed the literature available prior to September 2016. The GP prepared a detailed literature review and made recommendations on selected topics. The World Association of Veterinary Dermatology (WAVD) provided guidance and oversight for this process. A draft of the document was presented at the 8th World Congress of Veterinary Dermatology (May 2016) and was then made available via the World Wide Web to the member organizations of the WAVD for a period of three months. Comments were solicited and posted to the GP electronically. Responses were incorporated by the GP into the final document. No one diagnostic test was identified as the gold standard. Successful treatment requires concurrent use of systemic oral antifungals and topical disinfection of the hair coat. Wood's lamp and direct examinations have good positive and negative predictability, systemic antifungal drugs have a wide margin of safety and physical cleaning is most important for decontamination of the exposed environments. Finally, serious complications of animal-human transmission are exceedingly rare. © 2017 The Authors. Veterinary Dermatology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of the ESVD and ACVD.

  12. [Endoprosthesis Infections - Guidelines for Antibiotic Therapy Common Guidelines of the Czech Society for Orthopaedics and Traumatology and the Society for Infectious Diseases of the Czech Medical Association of J. E. Purkyně].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musil, D; Balejová, M; Horníková, M; Chrdle, A; Mallátová, N; Nyč, O; Chmelík, V; Gallo, J; Jahoda, D; Stehlík, J

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE OF THE STUDY This study aims to articulate regional guidelines for curative and suppressive antibiotic therapy of total joint replacement infections. MATERIAL AND METHODS When developing the standard, used as source materials were the published foreign guidelines for antibiotic therapy of prosthetic joint infections, the analysis of resistance of bacterial strains conducted in the Hospital in České Budějovice, a.s. and the assessment of strain resistance for the Czech Republic published by the European Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance Network (EARS-Net). Considered was also the availability of individual antibiotics in the Czech Republic and restricted prescription according to the Summary of Product Characteristics as specified in the State Institute for Drug Control marketing authorisation. The expert group composed of orthopaedists, microbiologists and infectious disease specialists elaborated the basic antibiotic guideline for choosing an appropriate antibiotic/antifungal drug based on the usual susceptibility, its dose and dosage interval for initial and continuation therapy. The comments of individual specialists were gradually incorporated therein and in case of doubts majority rule was applied. The drafted document was sent for peer reviews to clinical orthopaedic, infectious disease and microbiological centres, whose comments were also incorporated and the finalised document was submitted for evaluation to specialised medical societies. RESULTS The outcome is the submitted guideline for antibiotic curative and suppressive therapy suitable for managing the prosthetic joint infections, which was approved by the committee of the Czech Society for Orthopaedics and Traumatology andthe Society for Infectious Diseases of the Czech Medical Association of J. E. Purkyně. DISCUSION Curative therapy of total joint replacement infections consists primarily in surgical treatment and has to be accompanied by adequate antibiotic therapy administered

  13. Case-based educational intervention to assess change in providers' knowledge and attitudes towards the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Cholesterol Management Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokharel, Yashashwi; Steinberg, Lynne; Chan, Winston; Akeroyd, Julia M; Jones, Peter H; Nambi, Vijay; Nasir, Khurram; Petersen, Laura; Ballantyne, Christie M; Virani, Salim S

    2016-03-01

    Prior studies have shown provider-level knowledge gaps regarding the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guideline on the treatment of cholesterol and concerns about 10-year atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) risk estimation. The effect of an educational intervention to mitigate knowledge gaps is unknown. We developed a questionnaire and administered it to providers before (pre-training) and after (post-training) a case-based educational intervention across 6 sites in Texas. The intervention highlighted the key recommendations of the 2013 guideline and the differences from the prior guideline mainly using clinical-vignettes. Several practice pertinent items were also discussed. Most participants were providers-in-training (78%) in internal medicine (68%). Compared to pre-training, the post-training metrics were: 43% vs. 82% for providers' ability to identify 4 statin benefit groups; 47% vs. 97% for their awareness of the ASCVD risk threshold of ≥ 7.5% to initiate discussion about risks/benefits of statin therapy; 9% vs. 40% for awareness of differences between the Framingham and the ASCVD risk estimator; 26% vs. 78% for awareness of the definition of statin intensity; 35% vs. 62% for using a repeat lipid panel to document treatment response and adherence; and 46% vs. 81% for confidence in using the ASCVD risk estimator, respectively. A case-based educational intervention was associated with significant increase in providers' knowledge towards the 2013 cholesterol guideline, which could be related to the engaging nature of our intervention, using practice pertinent information and clinical vignettes. Such interventions could be useful in effective dissemination of the cholesterol guideline. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  14. Case-based Educational Intervention to Assess Change in Providers’ Knowledge and Attitudes Towards the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Cholesterol Management Guideline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokharel, Yashashwi; Steinberg, Lynne; Chan, Winston; Akeroyd, Julia M.; Jones, Peter H.; Nambi, Vijay; Nasir, Khurram; Petersen, Laura; Ballantyne, Christie M.; Virani, Salim S.

    2017-01-01

    Objective Prior studies have shown provider-level knowledge gaps regarding the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guideline on the treatment of cholesterol and concerns about 10-year atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) risk estimation. The effect of an educational intervention to mitigate knowledge gaps is unknown. Methods We developed a questionnaire and administered it to providers before (pre-training) and after (post-training) a case-based educational intervention across 6 sites in Texas. The intervention highlighted the key recommendations of the 2013 guideline and the differences from the prior guideline mainly using clinical-vignettes. Several practice pertinent items were also discussed. Results Most participants were providers-in-training (78%) in internal medicine (68%). Compared to pre-training, the post-training metrics were: 43% vs. 82% for providers’ ability to identify 4 statin benefit groups; 47% vs. 97% for their awareness of the ASCVD risk threshold of ≥7.5% to initiate discussion about risks/benefits of statin therapy; 9% vs. 40% for awareness of differences between the Framingham and the ASCVD risk estimator; 26% vs. 78% for awareness of the definition of statin intensity; 35% vs. 62% for using a repeat lipid panel to document treatment response and adherence; and 46% vs. 81% for confidence in using the ASCVD risk estimator, respectively. Conclusions A case-based educational intervention was associated with significant improvements in providers’ knowledge and attitudes towards the 2013 cholesterol guideline, which could be related to the engaging nature of our intervention, using practice pertinent information and clinical vignettes. Such interventions could be useful in effective dissemination of the cholesterol guideline. PMID:26773472

  15. AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGISTS, AMERICAN COLLEGE OF ENDOCRINOLOGY, AND ASSOCIAZIONE MEDICI ENDOCRINOLOGI MEDICAL GUIDELINES FOR CLINICAL PRACTICE FOR THE DIAGNOSIS AND MANAGEMENT OF THYROID NODULES - 2016 UPDATE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gharib, Hossein; Papini, Enrico; Garber, Jeffrey R

    2016-01-01

    as diagnostic cornerstones. The key issues discussed in these guidelines are as follows: (1) US-based categorization of the malignancy risk and indications for US-guided FNA (henceforth, FNA), (2) cytologic classification of FNA samples, (3) the roles of immunocytochemistry and molecular testing applied...... for relapsing, benign cystic lesions, while US-guided thermal ablation treatments may be considered for solid or mixed symptomatic benign thyroid nodules. Surgery remains the treatment of choice for malignant or suspicious nodules. The present document updates previous guidelines released in 2006 and 2010...... by the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE), American College of Endocrinology (ACE) and Associazione Medici Endocrinologi (AME). ABBREVIATIONS: AACE = American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists ACE = American College of Endocrinology AME = Associazione Medici Endocrinologi BEL = best...

  16. Discordant American College of Physicians and international rheumatology guidelines for gout management: consensus statement of the Gout, Hyperuricemia and Crystal-Associated Disease Network (G-CAN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalbeth, Nicola; Bardin, Thomas; Doherty, Michael; Lioté, Frédéric; Richette, Pascal; Saag, Kenneth G; So, Alexander K; Stamp, Lisa K; Choi, Hyon K; Terkeltaub, Robert

    2017-09-01

    In November 2016, the American College of Physicians (ACP) published a clinical practice guideline on the management of acute and recurrent gout. This guideline differs substantially from the latest guidelines generated by the American College of Rheumatology (ACR), European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) and 3e (Evidence, Expertise, Exchange) Initiative, despite reviewing largely the same body of evidence. The Gout, Hyperuricemia and Crystal-Associated Disease Network (G-CAN) convened an expert panel to review the methodology and conclusions of these four sets of guidelines and examine possible reasons for discordance between them. The G-CAN position, presented here, is that the fundamental pathophysiological knowledge underlying gout care, and evidence from clinical experience and clinical trials, supports a treat-to-target approach for gout aimed at lowering serum urate levels to below the saturation threshold at which monosodium urate crystals form. This practice, which is truly evidence-based and promotes the steady reduction in tissue urate crystal deposits, is promoted by the ACR, EULAR and 3e Initiative recommendations. By contrast, the ACP does not provide a clear recommendation for urate-lowering therapy (ULT) for patients with frequent, recurrent flares or those with tophi, nor does it recommend monitoring serum urate levels of patients prescribed ULT. Results from emerging clinical trials that have gout symptoms as the primary end point are expected to resolve this debate for all clinicians in the near term future.

  17. Adherence to evidence-based guidelines for depression and anxiety disorders is associated with recording of the diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smolders, Mirrian; Laurant, Miranda; Verhaak, Peter; Prins, Marijn; van Marwijk, Harm; Penninx, Brenda; Wensing, Michel; Grol, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To assess professionals' adherence to evidence-based guidelines and to investigate whether or not this is influenced by recording of the diagnosis and symptom severity. Method: Analysis of baseline cross-sectional data of a cohort study of 721 primary care patients with a confirmed

  18. Adherence to evidence-based guidelines for depression and anxiety disorders is associated with recording of the diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smolders, M.; Laurant, M.G.H.; Verhaak, P.; Prins, M.; Marwijk, van H.W.J.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.; Wensing, M.; Grol, R.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess professionals' adherence to evidence-based guidelines and to investigate whether or not this is influenced by recording of the diagnosis and symptom severity. METHOD: Analysis of baseline cross-sectional data of a cohort study of 721 primary care patients with a confirmed

  19. Adherence to evidence-based guidelines for depression and anxiety disorders is associated with recording of the diagnosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smolders, M.; Laurant, M.; Verhaak, P.; Prins, M.; Marwijk, H. van; Penninx, B.; Wensing, M.; Grol, R.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To assess professionals' adherence to evidence-based guidelines and to investigate whether or not this is influenced by recording of the diagnosis and symptom severity. Method: Analysis of baseline cross-sectional data of a cohort study of 721 primary care patients with a confirmed

  20. Validation of the MEDFICTS dietary questionnaire: A clinical tool to assess adherence to American Heart Association dietary fat intake guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bindeman Jody

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dietary assessment tools are often too long, difficult to quantify, expensive to process, and largely used for research purposes. A rapid and accurate assessment of dietary fat intake is critically important in clinical decision-making regarding dietary advice for coronary risk reduction. We assessed the validity of the MEDFICTS (MF questionnaire, a brief instrument developed to assess fat intake according to the American Heart Association (AHA dietary "steps". Methods We surveyed 164 active-duty US Army personnel without known coronary artery disease at their intake interview for a primary prevention cardiac intervention trial using the Block food frequency (FFQ and MF questionnaires. Both surveys were completed on the same intake visit and independently scored. Correlations between each tools' assessment of fat intake, the agreement in AHA step categorization of dietary quality with each tool, and the test characteristics of the MF using the FFQ as the gold standard were assessed. Results Subjects consumed a mean of 36.0 ± 13.0% of their total calories as fat, which included saturated fat consumption of 13.0 ± 0.4%. The majority of subjects (125/164; 76.2% had a high fat (worse than AHA Step 1 diet. There were significant correlations between the MF and the FFQ for the intake of total fat (r = 0.52, P 70 [high fat diet] was negligible (kappa statistic = 0.036. The MF was accurate at the extremes of fat intake, but could not reliably identify the 3 AHA dietary classifications. Alternative MF cutpoints of 50 (high fat diet were highly sensitive (96%, but had low specificity (46% for a high fat diet. ROC curve analysis identified that a MF score cutoff of 38 provided optimal sensitivity 75% and specificity 72%, and had modest agreement (kappa = 0.39, P Conclusions The MEDFICTS questionnaire is most suitable as a tool to identify high fat diets, rather than discriminate AHA Step 1 and Step 2 diets. Currently recommended

  1. Summary guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halsnaes, K.; Painuly, J.P.; Turkson, J.; Meyer, H.J.; Markandya, A.

    1999-09-01

    This document is a summary version of the methodological guidelines for climate change mitigation assessment developed as part of the Global Environment Facility (GEF) project Economics of Greenhouse Gas Limitations; Methodological Guidelines. The objectives of this project have been to develop a methodology, an implementing framework and a reporting system which countries can use in the construction of national climate change mitigation policies and in meeting their future reporting obligations under the FCCC. The methodological framework developed in the Methodological Guidelines covers key economic concepts, scenario building, modelling tools and common assumptions. It was used by several country studies included in the project. (au) 13 refs.

  2. Implementation of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association 2008 Guidelines for the Management of Adults With Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goossens, Eva; Fernandes, Susan M; Landzberg, Michael J; Moons, Philip

    2015-08-01

    Although different guidelines on adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) care advocate for lifetime cardiac follow-up, a critical appraisal of the guideline implementation is lacking. We investigated the implementation of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association 2008 guidelines for ACHD follow-up by investigating the type of health care professional, care setting, and frequency of outpatient visits in young adults with CHD. Furthermore, correlates for care in line with the recommendations or untraceability were investigated. A cross-sectional observational study was conducted, including 306 patients with CHD who had a documented outpatient visit at pediatric cardiology before age 18 years. In all, 210 patients (68.6%) were in cardiac follow-up; 20 (6.5%) withdrew from follow-up and 76 (24.9%) were untraceable. Overall, 198 patients were followed up in tertiary care, 1/4 (n = 52) of which were seen at a formalized ACHD care program and 3/4 (n = 146) remained at pediatric cardiology. Of those followed in formalized ACHD and pediatric cardiology care, the recommended frequency was implemented in 94.2% and 89%, respectively (p = 0.412). No predictors for the implementation of the guidelines were identified. Risk factors for becoming untraceable were none or lower number of heart surgeries, health insurance issues, and nonwhite ethnicity. In conclusion, a significant number of adults continue to be cared for by pediatric cardiologists, indicating that transfer to adult-oriented care was not standard practice. Frequency of follow-up for most patients was in line with the ACC/AHA 2008 guidelines. A considerable proportion of young adults were untraceable in the system, which makes them vulnerable for discontinuation of care. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. 2007 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) Guidelines on perioperative cardiac evaluation are usually incorrectly applied by anesthesiology residents evaluating simulated patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigoda, Michael M; Sweitzer, Bobbiejean; Miljkovic, Nikola; Arheart, Kristopher L; Messinger, Shari; Candiotti, Keith; Lubarsky, David

    2011-04-01

    The 2007 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) Guidelines on Perioperative Cardiac Evaluation and Care for Noncardiac Surgery is the accepted standard for perioperative cardiac evaluation. Anesthesiology training programs are required to teach these algorithms. We estimated the percentage of residents nationwide who correctly applied suggested testing algorithms from the ACC/AHA guidelines when they evaluated simulated patients in common clinical scenarios. Anesthesiology resident volunteers at 24 training programs were presented with 6 scenarios characterized by surgical procedure, patient's risk factors, and patient's functional capacity. Scenarios and 5 possible recommendations per scenario were both presented in randomized orders. Senior anesthesiologists at 24 different United States training programs along with the first author of the 2007 ACC/AHA guidelines validated the appropriate recommendation to this web-based survey before distribution. The 548 resident participants, representing 12% of anesthesiology trainees in the United States, included 48 PGY-1s (preliminary year before anesthesia training), 166 Clinical Anesthesia Year 1 (CA-1) residents, 161 CA-2s, and 173 CA-3s. For patients with an active cardiac condition, the upper 95% confidence bound for the percent of residents who recommended evaluations consistent with the guidelines was 78%. However, for the remaining 5 scenarios, the upper 95% confidence bound for the percent of residents with an appropriate recommendation was 46%. The results show that fewer than half of anesthesiology residents nationwide correctly demonstrate the approach considered the standard of care for preoperative cardiac evaluation. Further study is necessary to elucidate the correct intervention(s), such as use of decision support tools, increased clarity of guidelines for routine use, adjustment in educational programs, and/or greater familiarity of responsible faculty with the material.

  4. [Long-term Application of Opioids for Non-Tumor Associated Pain--Impact of the S3 Guidelines for the Field of Orthopaedic Surgery and Trauma Surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartz, C; Häuser, W; Schiltenwolf, M

    2016-04-01

    The S3 guidelines for long-term application of opioids for non-tumour-associated pain, the so-called "LONTS", have recently been updated. German health insurance data indicated that over the last 3 to 4 years an increasing number of patients have been treated with opioids for non-tumour-associated pain. Many patients with somatoform pain disorder were treated with opioids. The S3-guidelines have therefore been modified after 5 years on the basis of a systematic literature search. Seventeen experts in the field were appointed. In addition, among 25 medical societies, one psychological society, two patient support groups, and the DGOOC and IGOST were involved in the decision making process. According to the updated S3 guidelines "LONTS", opioids are a valuable treatment option in the field of orthopaedics and trauma surgery for patients suffering from chronic arthritis or back pain. One third of the patients suffering from chronic arthritis or knee pain benefit from long-term application (pain relief, as well as improved range of motion without severe drug-induced side effects. Patients suffering from fibromyalgia syndrome benefited from treatment with tramadol, but no other opioid is recommended for fibromyalgia. Opioids are contraindicated in primary headaches, as well as in functional and psychological disorders with pain as the leading symptom. Treatment with opioids is associated with considerable risks, among them substance abuse, sexual dysfunction and an increased mortality rate. Supportive measures, such as physical therapy, physiotherapy and/or psychotherapy, are always recommended. Opioid analgetics are a treatment option for particular pain syndromes (arthritis, back pain). However, the latest S3 guidelines emphasise patient education and therapy. The indication, effects, side effects and therapeutic objectives should be regularly assessed, both before and during treatment. Once therapeutic goals have been achieved, measures such as physical therapy

  5. Electrical safety guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    The Electrical Safety Guidelines prescribes the DOE safety standards for DOE field offices or facilities involved in the use of electrical energy. It has been prepared to provide a uniform set of electrical safety standards and guidance for DOE installations in order to affect a reduction or elimination of risks associated with the use of electrical energy. The objectives of these guidelines are to enhance electrical safety awareness and mitigate electrical hazards to employees, the public, and the environment.

  6. Discrepancy Between European Association of Urology Guidelines and Daily Practice in the Management of Non-muscle-invasive Bladder Cancer: Results of a European Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricksen, Kees; Aziz, Atiqullah; Bes, Perrine; Chun, Felix K-H; Dobruch, Jakub; Kluth, Luis A; Gontero, Paolo; Necchi, Andrea; Noon, Aidan P; van Rhijn, Bas W G; Rink, Michael; Roghmann, Florian; Rouprêt, Morgan; Seiler, Roland; Shariat, Shahrokh F; Qvick, Brian; Babjuk, Marek; Xylinas, Evanguelos

    2017-10-23

    The European Association of Urology (EAU) non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) guidelines are meant to help minimise morbidity and improve the care of patients with NMIBC. However, there may be underuse of guideline-recommended care in this potentially curable cohort. To assess European physicians' current practice in the management of NMIBC and evaluate its concordance with the EAU 2013 guidelines. Initial 45-min telephone interviews were conducted with 20 urologists to develop a 26-item questionnaire for a 30-min online quantitative interview. A total of 498 physicians with predefined experience in treatment of NMIBC patients, from nine European countries, completed the online interviews. Descriptive statistics of absolute numbers and percentages of the use of diagnostic tools, risk group stratification, treatment options chosen, and follow-up regimens were used. Guidelines are used by ≥87% of physicians, with the EAU guidelines being the most used ones (71-100%). Cystoscopy (60-97%) and ultrasonography (42-95%) are the most used diagnostic techniques. Using EAU risk classification, 40-69% and 88-100% of physicians correctly identify all the prognostic factors for low- and high-risk tumours, respectively. Re-transurethral resection of the bladder tumour (re-TURB) is performed in 25-75% of low-risk and 55-98% of high-risk patients. Between 21% and 88% of patients received a single instillation of chemotherapy within 24h after TURB. Adjuvant intravesical treatment is not given to 6-62%, 2-33%, and 1-20% of the patients with low-, intermediate-, and high-risk NMIBC, respectively. Patients with low-risk NMIBC are likely to be overmonitored and those with high-risk NMIBC undermonitored. Our study is limited by the possible recall bias of the selected physicians. Although most European physicians claim to apply the EAU guidelines, adherence to them is low in daily practice. Our survey among European physicians investigated discrepancies between guidelines and

  7. 2005 American Heart Association (AHA) guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and emergency cardiovascular care (ECC) of pediatric and neonatal patients: pediatric basic life support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-05-01

    This publication presents the 2005 American Heart Association (AHA) guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and emergency cardiovascular care (ECC) of the pediatric patient and the 2005 American Academy of Pediatrics/AHA guidelines for CPR and ECC of the neonate. The guidelines are based on the evidence evaluation from the 2005 International Consensus Conference on Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care Science With Treatment Recommendations, hosted by the American Heart Association in Dallas, Texas, January 23-30, 2005. The "2005 AHA Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care" contain recommendations designed to improve survival from sudden cardiac arrest and acute life-threatening cardiopulmonary problems. The evidence evaluation process that was the basis for these guidelines was accomplished in collaboration with the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR). The ILCOR process is described in more detail in the "International Consensus on Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care Science With Treatment Recommendations." The recommendations in the "2005 AHA Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care" confirm the safety and effectiveness of many approaches, acknowledge that other approaches may not be optimal, and recommend new treatments that have undergone evidence evaluation. These new recommendations do not imply that care involving the use of earlier guidelines is unsafe. In addition, it is important to note that these guidelines will not apply to all rescuers and all victims in all situations. The leader of a resuscitation attempt may need to adapt application of the guidelines to unique circumstances. The following are the major pediatric advanced life support changes in the 2005 guidelines: There is further caution about the use of endotracheal tubes. Laryngeal mask airways are acceptable when used by experienced

  8. Clinical practice guidelines of the French Association for Supportive Care in Cancer and the French Society for Psycho-oncology: refusal of treatment by adults afflicted with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faivre, J C; Adam, V; Block, V; Metzger, M; Salleron, J; Dauchy, S

    2017-11-01

    The study's purpose was to develop practical guidelines for assessment and management of refusal of treatment by adults afflicted with cancer. The French Association for Supportive Care in Cancer and the French Society for Psycho-oncology gathered a task force that applied a consensus methodology to draft guidelines studied predisposing situations, the diagnosis, regulatory aspects, and the management of refusal of treatment by adults afflicted with cancer. We propose five guidelines: (1) be aware of the conditions/profiles of patients most often associated with refusal of treatment so as to adequately underpin the care and support measures; (2) understand the complexity of the process of refusal and knowing how to accurately identify the type and the modalities of the refused treatments; (3) apply a way to systematically analyze refusal, thereby promoting progression from a situation of disaccord toward a consensual decision; (4) devise procedures, according to the legal context, to address refusal of treatment that safeguards the stakeholders in situations of sustained disaccord; and (5) know the indications for ethical collective decision-making. The quality of the relationship between patients and health professionals, and the communication between them are essential components involved in reaching a point of consent or refusal of treatment. A process of systematic analysis of refusal is recommended as the only way to ensure that all of the physiological, psychological, and contextual elements that are potentially involved are taken into account.

  9. Use of a mental health guideline by occupational physicians and associations with return to work in workers sick-listed due to common mental disorders : A retrospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Beurden, K.M.; Joosen, M.C.W.; Terluin, B.; Van Weeghel, J.; Van Der Klink, J.J.L.; Brouwers, E.P.M.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate (1) whether adherence to the Dutch occupational mental health guideline by occupational physicians was associated with time to return to work in workers sick-listed due to common mental disorders; and (2) whether adherence to specific guideline items

  10. Eating Habits and Dietary Intake: Is Adherence to Dietary Guidelines Associated with Importance of Healthy Eating among Undergraduate University Students in Finland?

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Ansari, Walid; Suominen, Sakari; Samara, Anastasia

    2015-12-01

    Poor eating habits among young adults are a public health concern. This survey examined the eating habits of undergraduate university students in Finland. We assessed students' dietary intake of a variety of food groups, their adherence to international dietary guidelines (whole sample and by gender), and the associations between importance of eating healthy and dietary guidelines adherence (whole sample and by gender). During the 2013-2014 academic year, 1,189 undergraduate students enrolled at the University of Turku in southwestern Finland completed an online self-administered questionnaire. Students reported their eating habits of 12 food groups, the number of daily servings of fruits/vegetables they consume and how important it is for them to eat healthy. For dietary adherence recommendations, we employed WHO guidelines. Chi-square statistic tested the differences in dietary guidelines adherence between males and females and also the associations between the gradients of importance of healthy eating and the self reported eating habits for each of the food groups, for the whole sample and by gender. We observed high levels of dietary adherence (>70%) for most of the 'unhealthy food' items (cake/cookies, snacks, fast food/canned food, and lemonade/soft drinks), and moderate adherence for most of the 'healthy food' items (>50%) (dairy/dairy products, fruit/vegetables servings/day, fresh fruit, salads/raw vegetables and cereal/cereal products). Fish/seafood, meat/sausage products and cooked vegetables had levels students considered important to eat healthy (78.8%). The importance of eating healthy was significantly associated with adherence for all food groups besides sweets and cake/cookies. These associations remained significant for women but some of them not for men (cereal/cereal products, snacks and sweets). The results suggest high adherence to the guidelines mainly for 'unhealthy food' groups, and moderate adherence for healthier food groups. There was

  11. 2015 American Thyroid Association Management Guidelines for Adult Patients with Thyroid Nodules and Differentiated Thyroid Cancer: What is new and what has changed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugen, Bryan R

    2017-02-01

    Thyroid nodules are very common, and thyroid cancer is currently the fifth leading cancer diagnosis in women. The American Thyroid Association has led the development and revision of guidelines for the management of patients with thyroid nodules and differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC). The most current revision was published in the January 2016 issue of the journal Thyroid. The current guidelines have 101 recommendations, with 8 figures and 17 tables that are hopefully helpful to those treating patients with thyroid nodules and cancer. The primary goals of the American Thyroid Association Guidelines Task Force were to use the current evidence to guide recommendations and yet be as helpful and practical as possible within the scope and strength of the evidence. The current review focuses on new and significantly revised recommendations that may very well change clinical practice. The author notes 3 new basic principles that have emerged in this guidelines revision: 1) the management of thyroid nodules, including the decision to perform a fine-needle aspiration biopsy as well as follow-up decision making, will be heavily influenced by the newly developed sonographic risk pattern; 2) the long-term management of DTC along with thyroid-stimulating hormone target goals will be heavily influenced by the 4 categories of "response to therapy"; and 3) the management of patients with radioactive iodine-refractory DTC will be divided into 4 basic decision-making groups: patients who should undergo monitoring, patients who should undergo directed therapies, patients who should undergo systemic therapies, and patients who should be offered entry into clinical trials. Cancer 2017;123:372-381. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  12. An examination of school- and student-level characteristics associated with the likelihood of students' meeting the Canadian physical activity guidelines in the COMPASS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Amanda; Faulkner, Guy; Giangregorio, Lora; Leatherdale, Scott T

    2017-11-09

    To examine school- and student-level correlates of physical activity. Cross-sectional Year 2 data collected from 45 298 grade 9-12 students attending 89 secondary schools in the COMPASS study were examined using multi-level modelling to predict the likelihood of students a) achieving 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) daily; and b) achieving the Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology (CSEP) activity guideline for youth (60 minutes/MVPA daily, vigorous physical activity at least three days in a week, and resistance training at least three days in a week). The prevalence of students achieving 60 minutes of MVPA daily and meeting the CSEP guideline was 49.3% and 31.0% respectively. Modest between-school variability was identified (1.1% for 60 minutes MVPA and 0.8% for CSEP guideline). School-level characteristics significantly associated with the outcome measures included location, school size, quality of facilities, and accessibility of facilities. Significant student-level correlates included sex, grade, weekly income, binge drinking, fruit and vegetable consumption, and body mass index. Most youth in this large study reported inadequate physical activity levels. Students were more likely to achieve 60 minutes of MVPA if they attended a larger school or a school in an urban location, whereas students were less likely to meet the CSEP guideline if they attended a school in a small urban location. However, student-level factors, such as binge drinking and inadequate fruit and vegetable consumption, were more strongly associated with the outcomes examined.

  13. Association of Guideline-Based Admission Treatments and Life Expectancy After Myocardial Infarction in Elderly Medicare Beneficiaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucholz, Emily M; Butala, Neel M; Normand, Sharon-Lise T; Wang, Yun; Krumholz, Harlan M

    2016-05-24

    Guideline-based admission therapies for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) significantly improve 30-day survival, but little is known about their association with long-term outcomes. This study evaluated the association of 5 AMI admission therapies (aspirin, beta-blockers, acute reperfusion therapy, door-to-balloon [D2B] time ≤90 min, and time to fibrinolysis ≤30 min) with life expectancy and years of life saved after AMI. We analyzed data from the Cooperative Cardiovascular Project, a study of Medicare beneficiaries hospitalized for AMI, with 17 years of follow-up. Life expectancy and years of life saved after AMI were calculated using Cox proportional hazards regression with extrapolation using exponential models. Survival for recipients and non-recipients of the 5 guideline-based therapies diverged early after admission and continued to diverge during 17-year follow-up. Receipt of aspirin, beta-blockers, and acute reperfusion therapy on admission was associated with longer life expectancy of 0.78 (standard error [SE]: 0.05), 0.55 (SE: 0.06), and 1.03 (SE: 0.12) years, respectively. Patients receiving primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) within 90 min lived 1.08 (SE: 0.49) years longer than patients with D2B times >90 min, and door-to-needle (D2N) times ≤30 min were associated with 0.55 (SE: 0.12) more years of life. A dose-response relationship was observed between longer D2B and D2N times and shorter life expectancy after AMI. Guideline-based therapy for AMI admission is associated with both early and late survival benefits, and results in meaningful gains in life expectancy and large numbers of years of life saved in elderly patients. Copyright © 2016 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Diagnosis and treatment of bone metastasis: comprehensive guideline of the Japanese Society of Medical Oncology, Japanese Orthopedic Association, Japanese Urological Association, and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, H; Kato, S; Sekine, I; Abe, K; Araki, N; Iguchi, H; Izumi, T; Inaba, Y; Osaka, I; Kato, S; Kawai, A; Kinuya, S; Kodaira, M; Kobayashi, E; Kobayashi, T; Sato, J; Shinohara, N; Takahashi, S; Takamatsu, Y; Takayama, K; Takayama, K; Tateishi, U; Nagakura, H; Hosaka, M; Morioka, H; Moriya, T; Yuasa, T; Yurikusa, T; Yomiya, K; Yoshida, M

    2016-01-01

    Diagnosis and treatment of bone metastasis requires various types of measures, specialists and caregivers. To provide better diagnosis and treatment, a multidisciplinary team approach is required. The members of this multidisciplinary team include doctors of primary cancers, radiologists, pathologists, orthopaedists, radiotherapists, clinical oncologists, palliative caregivers, rehabilitation doctors, dentists, nurses, pharmacists, physical therapists, occupational therapists, medical social workers, etc. Medical evidence was extracted from published articles describing meta-analyses or randomised controlled trials concerning patients with bone metastases mainly from 2003 to 2013, and a guideline was developed according to the Medical Information Network Distribution Service Handbook for Clinical Practice Guideline Development 2014. Multidisciplinary team meetings are helpful in diagnosis and treatment. Clinical benefits such as physical or psychological palliation obtained using the multidisciplinary team approaches are apparent. We established a guideline describing each specialty field, to improve understanding of the different fields among the specialists, who can further provide appropriate treatment, and to improve patients' outcomes.

  15. Guideline of guidelines: kidney stones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemba, Justin B; Matlaga, Brian R

    2015-08-01

    Several professional organizations have developed evidence-based guidelines for the initial evaluation, diagnostic imaging selection, symptomatic management, surgical treatment, medical therapy, and prevention of recurrence for both ureteric and renal stones. The purpose of this article is to summarize these guidelines with reference to the strength of evidence. All guidelines endorse an initial evaluation to exclude concomitant infection, imaging with a non-contrast computed tomography scan, and consideration of medical expulsive therapy or surgical intervention depending on stone size and location. Recommends for metabolic evaluation vary by guideline, but all endorse increasing fluid intake to reduce the risk of recurrence. © 2015 The Authors BJU International © 2015 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. The Australasian Hepatology Association consensus guidelines for the provision of adherence support to patients with hepatitis C on direct acting antivirals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richmond JA

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Jacqueline A Richmond,1,2 Suzanne Sheppard-Law,3,4 Susan Mason,5 Sherryne L Warner6,7 1Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and Society, La Trobe University, 2Victorian Infectious Diseases Service, The Royal Melbourne Hospital, Melbourne, VIC, 3Faculty of Health, University of Technology, 4Sydney Children’s Hospital Network, 5AW Morrow Gastroenterology and Liver Centre, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, NSW, 6Department of Gastroenterology, Monash Health, 7Department of Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia Background: Hepatitis C is a blood-borne virus primarily spread through sharing of drug-injecting equipment. Approximately 150 million people worldwide and 230,000 Australians are living with chronic hepatitis C infection. In March 2016, the Australian government began subsidizing direct acting antivirals (DAAs for the treatment of hepatitis C, which are highly effective (95% cure rate and have few side effects. However, there is limited evidence to inform the provision of adherence support to people with hepatitis C on DAAs including the level of medication adherence required to achieve a cure. Methodology: In February 2016, a steering committee comprising four authors convened an expert panel consisting of six hepatology nurses, a hepatologist, a pharmacist, a consumer with hepatitis C and treatment experience, and a consumer advocate. The expert panel focused on the following criteria: barriers and enablers to DAA adherence; assessment and monitoring of DAA adherence; components of a patient-centered approach to DAA adherence; patients that may require additional adherence support; and interventions to support DAA adherence. The resultant guidelines underwent three rounds of consultation with the expert panel, Australasian Hepatology Association (AHA members (n=12, and key stakeholders (n=7 in June 2016. Feedback was considered by the steering committee and incorporated if consensus was achieved. Results

  17. Guidelines of the Indian Association of Cardiovascular and Thoracic Anaesthesiologists and Indian College of Cardiac Anaesthesia for perioperative transesophageal echocardiography fellowship examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanchi Muralidhar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available During current medical care, perioperative transesophageal echocardiography (TEE has become a vital component of patient management, especially in cardiac operating rooms and in critical care medicine. Information derived from echocardiography has an important bearing on the patient′s outcome. The Indian Association of Cardiovascular and Thoracic Anaesthesiologists (IACTA has promoted the use of TEE during routine clinical care of patients undergoing cardiac surgery. An important mission of IACTA is to oversee training and certify anesthesiologists in the perioperative and intensive care use of TEE. The provision of "Fellowship" is by way of conducting IACTA - TEE fellowship (F-TEE examination. This has been done annually for the past 7 years using well-established curriculums by accredited national and international societies. Now, with the transformation and reconstitution of IACTA education and research cell into the newly formed Indian College of Cardiac Anaesthesia, F-TEE is bound to meet international standards. To ensure that the examinations are conducted in a transparent and foolproof manner, the guideline committee (formulated in 2010 of IACTA has taken the onus of formulating the guidelines for the same. These guidelines have been formally reviewed and updated since 2010 and are detailed here to serve as a guide to both the examinee and examiner ensuring standardization, efficiency, and competency of the IACTA F-TEE certification process.

  18. 2017 American Heart Association Focused Update on Pediatric Basic Life Support and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Quality: An Update to the American Heart Association Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Dianne L; de Caen, Allan R; Berger, Stuart; Samson, Ricardo A; Schexnayder, Stephen M; Joyner, Benny L; Bigham, Blair L; Niles, Dana E; Duff, Jonathan P; Hunt, Elizabeth A; Meaney, Peter A

    2018-01-02

    This focused update to the American Heart Association guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and emergency cardiovascular care follows the Pediatric Task Force of the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation evidence review. It aligns with the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation's continuous evidence review process, and updates are published when the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation completes a literature review based on new science. This update provides the evidence review and treatment recommendation for chest compression-only CPR versus CPR using chest compressions with rescue breaths for children American Heart Association Guidelines Update for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care." Two demonstrated worse 30-day outcomes with chest compression-only CPR for children 1 through 18 years of age, whereas 2 studies documented no difference between chest compression-only CPR and CPR using chest compressions with rescue breaths. When the results were analyzed for infants American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Author Guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunisrina Qismullah Yusuf

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Guidelines for Article Submission   SiELE journal accepts articles on research and development in the field of teaching and learning of English, linguistics, educational development, policy and cultural studies in education. To be considered for publication, the article should be presented in the following system: First page: include a title page with the full title of the paper (must not exceed 16 words, the author(s’ name(s, affiliation(s, phone number(s and e-mail address of the corresponding author. A brief bio-data of the author(s (maximum of 100 words is provided in this page. Second page and subsequent page: Submissions should be between 4000-6000 (including abstract, table(s, figure(s and references in A4 size paper with margins as the following: top 3 cm, bottom 3 cm, right 2.5 cm and left 4 cm. The font is Times New Roman, size 12 and single spaced. The article should generally consist of the following sections: introduction, review of literature, method, findings, discussion and conclusion. Headings and subheadings should be presented as follows (provide a space between the headings and sub-headings. 1         INTRODUCTION 1.1      Subheading of the content  1.1.1   Subheading of the content  For Tables, the title size is 12 and the content size is 10. Please number the tables subsequently throughout your article and the title is written above the table. For Figures, the title size is 12 and the content size (if any is 10. Please number the figures subsequently throughout your article and the title is written below the figure. The reference list should be arranged alphabetically following the guidelines of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (5th ed.. See the following examples:   Book: Ellis, R. (2003. Task-based language learning and teaching. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Internet source: Andrewes, S. (2003. Group work v. whole-class activities. Retrieved October 1, 2012 from

  20. Author Guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunisrina Qismullah Yusuf

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Guidelines for Article Submission   SiELE journal accepts articles on research and development in the field of teaching and learning of English, linguistics, educational development, policy and cultural studies in education. To be considered for publication, the article should be presented in the following system: First page: include a title page with the full title of the paper (must not exceed 16 words, the author(s’ name(s, affiliation(s, phone number(s and e-mail address of the corresponding author. A brief bio-data of the author(s (maximum of 100 words is provided in this page. Second page and subsequent page: Submissions should be between 4000-6000 (including abstract, table(s, figure(s and references in A4 size paper with margins as the following: top 3 cm, bottom 3 cm, right 2.5 cm and left 4 cm. The font is Times New Roman, size 12 and single spaced. The article should generally consist of the following sections: introduction, review of literature, method, findings, discussion and conclusion. Headings and subheadings should be presented as follows (provide a space between the headings and sub-headings. 1         INTRODUCTION 1.1      Subheading of the Content  1.1.1   Subheading of the Content  For Tables, the title size is 12 and the content size is 10. Please number the tables subsequently throughout your article and the title is written above the table. For Figures, the title size is 12 and the content size (if any is 10. Please number the figures subsequently throughout your article and the title is written below the figure. The reference list should be arranged alphabetically following the guidelines of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (5th ed.. See the following examples:   Book: Ellis, R. (2003. Task-based language learning and teaching. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Internet source: Andrewes, S. (2003. Group work v. whole-class activities. Retrieved October 1, 2012 from

  1. Author Guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunisrina Qismullah Yusuf

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Guidelines for Article Submission SiELE journal accepts articles on research and development in the field of teaching and learning of English, linguistics, educational development, policy and cultural studies in education. To be considered for publication, the article should be presented in the following system: First page: include a title page with the full title of the paper (must not exceed 16 words, the author(s’ name(s, affiliation(s, phone number(s and e-mail address of the corresponding author. A brief bio-data of the author(s (maximum of 100 words is provided in this page. Second p age and subsequent page: Submissions should be between 4000-6000 (including abstract, table(s, figure(s and references in A4 size paper with margins as the following: top 3 cm, bottom 3 cm, right 2.5 cm and left 4 cm. The font is Times New Roman, size 12 and single spaced. The article should generally consist of the following sections: introduction, review of literature, method, findings, discussion and conclusion. Headings and subheadings should be presented as follows (provide a space between the headings and sub-headings. 1 INTRODUCTION 1.1 Subheading of the Content 1.1.1 Subheading of the Content For Tables, the title size is 12 and the content size is 10. Please number the tables subsequently throughout your article and the title is written above the table. For Figures, the title size is 12 and the content size (if any is 10. Please number the figures subsequently throughout your article and the title is written below the figure. The reference list should be arranged alphabetically following the guidelines of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (5th ed.. See the following examples:   Book: Ellis, R. (2003. Task-based language learning and teaching. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Internet source: Andrewes, S. (2003. Group work v. whole-class activities. Retrieved October 1, 2012 from http://www.teachingenglish.org

  2. Author Guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunisrina Qismullah Yusuf

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Guidelines for Article Submission SiELE journal accepts articles on research and development in the field of teaching and learning of English, linguistics, educational development, policy and cultural studies in education. To be considered for publication, the article should be presented in the following system: First page: include a title page with the full title of the paper (must not exceed 16 words, the author(s’ name(s, affiliation(s, phone number(s and e-mail address of the corresponding author. A brief bio-data of the author(s (maximum of 100 words is provided in this page. Second page and subsequent page: Submissions should be between 4000-6000 (including abstract, table(s, figure(s and references in A4 size paper with margins as the following: top 3 cm, bottom 3 cm, right 2.5 cm and left 4 cm. The font is Times New Roman, size 12 and single spaced. The article should generally consist of the following sections: introduction, review of literature, method, findings, discussion and conclusion. Headings and subheadings should be presented as follows (provide a space between the headings and sub-headings. 1 INTRODUCTION 1.1 Subheading of the content 1.1.1 Subheading of the content For Tables, the title size is 12 and the content size is 10. Please number the tables subsequently throughout your article and the title is written above the table. For Figures, the title size is 12 and the content size (if any is 10. Please number the figures subsequently throughout your article and the title is written below the figure. The reference list should be arranged alphabetically following the guidelines of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (5th ed.. See the following examples: Back Matter| 79 80 | STUDIES IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND EDUCATION, Volume 1, Number 1, March 2014 Book: Ellis, R. (2003. Task-based language learning and teaching. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Internet source: Andrewes, S. (2003. Group work v

  3. Author Guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunisrina Qismullah Yusuf

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Guidelines for Article Submission   SiELE journal accepts articles on research and development in the field of teaching and learning of English, linguistics, educational development, policy and cultural studies in education. To be considered for publication, the article should be presented in the following system: First page: include a title page with the full title of the paper (must not exceed 16 words, the author(s’ name(s, affiliation(s, phone number(s and e-mail address of the corresponding author. A brief bio-data of the author(s (maximum of 100 words is provided in this page. Second page and subsequent page: Submissions should be between 4000-6000 (including abstract, table(s, figure(s and references in A4 size paper with margins as the following: top 3 cm, bottom 3 cm, right 2.5 cm and left 4 cm. The font is Times New Roman, size 12 and single spaced. The article should generally consist of the following sections: introduction, review of literature, method, findings, discussion and conclusion. Headings and subheadings should be presented as follows (provide a space between the headings and sub-headings. 1         INTRODUCTION 1.1      Subheading of the content  1.1.1   Subheading of the content  For Tables, the title size is 12 and the content size is 10. Please number the tables subsequently throughout your article and the title is written above the table. For Figures, the title size is 12 and the content size (if any is 10. Please number the figures subsequently throughout your article and the title is written below the figure. The reference list should be arranged alphabetically following the guidelines of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (5th ed.. See the following examples:   Book: Ellis, R. (2003. Task-based language learning and teaching. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Internet source: Andrewes, S. (2003. Group work v. whole-class activities. Retrieved October 1, 2012 from

  4. A regional comparison of cardiac rehabilitation personnel. Adherence to the 1995 American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation Guidelines by Staff Position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, S B; Pescatello, L S

    1997-01-01

    The American Association of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation (AACVPR) established guidelines for cardiac rehabilitation (CR) personnel regarding educational degree attainment, licensure, and certification. New England hospital-based CR personnel were surveyed by staff position to determine their adherence to these guidelines. The New England Hospital-Based CR Program Questionnaire was designed to obtain information regarding program characteristics and personnel credentialing. Initially, 117 program directors agreed to participate, and 108 returned completed questionnaires for a response rate of 92.3%. Of the CR programs surveyed, 41% were within hospitals containing 101 to 250 beds, whereas most of those providing inpatient (66.6%) and outpatient (82.4%) CR enrolled less than 200 patients annually. Overall, 40.7% of personnel (n = 450) by staff position reported that they met the minimum recommendations, whereas 7.0% (n = 470) met the preferred AACVPR recommendations. Registered nurses (n = 67) and physical therapists (n = 58) were most compliant with the minimum guidelines: 89.6% and 84.5%, respectively. In contrast, 10.9% of the program directors/coordinators (PD/C; n = 128) met the minimum qualifications, and 5.5% met the preferred AACVPR qualifications. Most PD/C had Advanced Cardiac Life Support Certification (84.4%), but few (18%) attained American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) certification. Overall, compliance of New England hospital-based CR personnel with the AACVPR minimum/preferred guidelines for educational degree and certification was lacking, as was acquisition of ACSM certification. The effect of these findings on the future status of recommended and required CR personnel qualifications for hire merits attention.

  5. Application of the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Cholesterol Guideline to the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys from 1998 to 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Shin Song

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA guideline for the treatment of blood cholesterol recommends statin therapy for individuals at high risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD. The aim of this study was to investigate serial trends in the percentages of Korean adults considered eligible for statin therapy according to the new ACC/AHA cholesterol guideline.MethodsData from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES I (1998, n=7,698, II (2001, n=5,654, III (2005, n=5,269, IV (2007 to 2009, n=15,727, and V (2010 to 2012, n=16,304, which used a stratified, multistage, probability sampling design, were used as representative of the entire Korean population.ResultsThe percentage of adults eligible for statin therapy according to the ACC/AHA cholesterol guideline increased with time: 17.0%, 19.0%, 20.8%, 20.2%, and 22.0% in KNHANES I, II, III, IV, and V, respectively (P=0.022. The prevalence of ASCVD was 1.4% in KNHANES I and increased to 3.3% in KNHANES V. The percentage of diabetic patients aged 40 to 75 years with a low density lipoprotein cholesterol levels of 70 to 189 mg/dL increased from 4.8% in KNHANES I to 6.1% in KNHANES V. People with an estimated 10-year ASCVD risk ≥7.5% and aged 40 to 75 years accounted for the largest percentage among the four statin benefit groups: 9.1% in KNHANES I and 11.0% in KNHANES V.ConclusionApplication of the 2013 ACC/AHA guideline has found that the percentage of Korean adults in the statin benefit groups has increased over the past 15 years.

  6. American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists and Associazione Medici Endocrinologi medical guidelines for clinical practice for the diagnosis and management of thyroid nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharib, Hossein; Papini, Enrico; Valcavi, Roberto; Baskin, H Jack; Crescenzi, Anna; Dottorini, Massimo E; Duick, Daniel S; Guglielmi, Rinaldo; Hamilton, Carlos Robert; Zeiger, Martha A; Zini, Michele

    2006-01-01

    Thyroid nodules are common and are frequently benign. Current data suggest that the prevalence of palpable thyroid nodules is 3% to 7% in North America; the prevalence is as high as 50% based on ultrasonography (US) or autopsy data. The introduction of sensitive thyrotropin (thyroid-stimulating hormone or TSH) assays, the widespread application of fine-needle aspiration (FNA) biopsy, and the availability of high-resolution US have substantially improved the management of thyroid nodules. This document was prepared as a collaborative effort between the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) and the Associazione Medici Endocrinologi (AME). Most Task Force members are members of AACE. We have used the AACE protocol for clinical practice guidelines, with rating of available evidence, linking the guidelines to the strength of recommendations. Key observations include the following. Although most patients with thyroid nodules are asymptomatic, occasionally patients complain of dysphagia, dysphonia, pressure, pain, or symptoms of hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism. Absence of symptoms does not rule out a malignant lesion; thus, it is important to review risk factors for malignant disease. Thyroid US should not be performed as a screening test. All patients with a palpable thyroid nodule, however, should undergo US examination. US-guided FNA (US-FNA) is recommended for nodules > or = 10 mm; US-FNA is suggested for nodules guidelines will be useful to clinical endocrinologists, endocrine surgeons, pediatricians, and internists whose practices include management of patients with thyroid disorders. These guidelines are thorough and practical, and they offer reasoned and balanced recommendations based on the best available evidence.

  7. Dietary guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelsøe, Erling

    2015-01-01

    Dietary guidelines are issued regularly in most developed countries. In almost all cases they are concerned solely with the nutritional aspects of food and eating and are based on an understanding of food exclusively as a source of nutrients. In recent years, however, a growing number of proposals...... in a number of countries have addressed the issue of making dietary guidelines that integrate health and sustainability, but in all cases they have been met with different kinds of resistance. This article reviews the development towards an integrated understanding of health and sustainability in relation...... to food and eating and the emergence of proposals for integrated guidelines. It explores the conflicts and controversies that have arisen in the wake of the various proposals and identifies a number of different types of conflicts. These relate to conflicts of interests between the various actors involved...

  8. Use of a mental health guideline by occupational physicians and associations with return to work in workers sick-listed due to common mental disorders: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Beurden, Karlijn M; Joosen, Margot C W; Terluin, Berend; van Weeghel, Jaap; van der Klink, Jac J L; Brouwers, Evelien P M

    2017-07-07

    The aim of this study was to evaluate (1) whether adherence to the Dutch occupational mental health guideline by occupational physicians was associated with time to return to work in workers sick-listed due to common mental disorders; and (2) whether adherence to specific guideline items was associated with time to return to work. Twelve performance indicators were developed to assess occupational physicians' guideline adherence. Medical records of 114 sick-listed workers were audited. Performance indicators were scored as indicating no (0), minimal (1) or adequate adherence (2). Cox regression analysis was used to assess the association between guideline adherence and first or full return to work. Guideline adherence was predominantly minimal on most performance indicators. This low overall adherence was not associated with first return to work (Hazard Ratio 1.07, p = 0.747) or with full return to work (Hazard Ratio 1.25, p = 0.301). Only one performance indicator (regular contact between occupational physician and employer) was significantly associated with earlier full return to work (Hazard Ratio 1.87, p = 0.021). Overall, the guideline adherence of occupational physicians was not related to earlier return to work. However, there was considerable room for improvement in guideline use. Whether this leads to earlier return to work is still an ununanswered question. Implications for Rehabilitation Adherence of occupational physicians to an evidence-based occupational mental health guideline was low. Regular contact between occupational physician and employer was associated with earlier full return to work in workers with common mental disorders. It is important to focus on how implementation problems and barriers for guideline use can be overcome, in order to improve the quality of occupational mental health care and to potentially reduce sickness absence duration in workers with common mental disorders.

  9. Evidence-based pharmacological treatment of anxiety disorders, post-traumatic stress disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder : A revision of the 2005 guidelines from the British Association for Psychopharmacology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baldwin, David S.; Anderson, Ian M.; Nutt, David J.; Allgulander, Christer; Bandelow, Borwin; den Boer, Johan A.; Christmas, David M.; Davies, Simon; Fineberg, Naomi; Lidbetter, Nicky; Malizia, Andrea; McCrone, Paul; Nabarro, Daniel; O'Neill, Catherine; Scott, Jan; van der Wee, Nic; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich

    This revision of the 2005 British Association for Psychopharmacology guidelines for the evidence-based pharmacological treatment of anxiety disorders provides an update on key steps in diagnosis and clinical management, including recognition, acute treatment, longer-term treatment, combination

  10. Surgery for Aortic Dilatation in Patients With Bicuspid Aortic Valves: A Statement of Clarification From the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Clinical Practice Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiratzka, Loren F; Creager, Mark A; Isselbacher, Eric M; Svensson, Lars G; Nishimura, Rick A; Bonow, Robert O; Guyton, Robert A; Sundt, Thoralf M; Halperin, Jonathan L; Levine, Glenn N; Anderson, Jeffrey L; Albert, Nancy M; Al-Khatib, Sana M; Birtcher, Kim K; Bozkurt, Biykem; Brindis, Ralph G; Cigarroa, Joaquin E; Curtis, Lesley H; Fleisher, Lee A; Gentile, Federico; Gidding, Samuel; Hlatky, Mark A; Ikonomidis, John; Joglar, José; Kovacs, Richard J; Ohman, E Magnus; Pressler, Susan J; Sellke, Frank W; Shen, Win-Kuang; Wijeysundera, Duminda N

    2016-02-16

    Two guidelines from the American College of Cardiology (ACC), the American Heart Association (AHA), and collaborating societies address the risk of aortic dissection in patients with bicuspid aortic valves and severe aortic enlargement: the "2010 ACCF/AHA/AATS/ACR/ASA/SCA/SCAI/SIR/STS/SVM Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Patients With Thoracic Aortic Disease" (Circulation. 2010;121:e266-e369) and the "2014 AHA/ACC Guideline for the Management of Patients With Valvular Heart Disease" (Circulation. 2014;129:e521-e643). However, the 2 guidelines differ with regard to the recommended threshold of aortic root or ascending aortic dilatation that would justify surgical intervention in patients with bicuspid aortic valves. The ACC and AHA therefore convened a subcommittee representing members of the 2 guideline writing committees to review the evidence, reach consensus, and draft a statement of clarification for both guidelines. This statement of clarification uses the ACC/AHA revised structure for delineating the Class of Recommendation and Level of Evidence to provide recommendations that replace those contained in Section 9.2.2.1 of the thoracic aortic disease guideline and Section 5.1.3 of the valvular heart disease guideline. © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation and American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Utility of Nontraditional Risk Markers in Individuals Ineligible for Statin Therapy According to the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Cholesterol Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeboah, Joseph; Polonsky, Tamar S; Young, Rebekah; McClelland, Robyn L; Delaney, Joseph C; Dawood, Farah; Blaha, Michael J; Miedema, Michael D; Sibley, Christopher T; Carr, J Jeffrey; Burke, Gregory L; Goff, David C; Psaty, Bruce M; Greenland, Philip; Herrington, David M

    2015-09-08

    In the general population, the majority of cardiovascular events occur in people at the low to moderate end of population risk distribution. The 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guideline on the treatment of blood cholesterol recommends consideration of statin therapy for adults with an estimated 10-year atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) risk ≥7.5% based on traditional risk factors. Whether use of nontraditional risk markers can improve risk assessment in those below this threshold for statin therapy is unclear. Using data from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA), a population sample free of clinical CVD at baseline, we calibrated the Pooled Cohort Equations (cPCE). ASCVD was defined as myocardial infarction, coronary heart disease death, or fatal or nonfatal stroke. Adults with an initial cPCE Cardiology/American Heart Association cholesterol guidelines (Class IIB) identify small subgroups of asymptomatic population with a 10-year cPCE risk 7.5% who may warrant statin therapy considerations. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. Diagnosis of Upper Quadrant Lymphedema Secondary to Cancer: Clinical Practice Guideline From the Oncology Section of the American Physical Therapy Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenhagen, Kimberly; Davies, Claire; Perdomo, Marisa; Ryans, Kathryn; Gilchrist, Laura

    2017-07-01

    The Oncology Section of the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) developed a clinical practice guideline to aid the clinician in diagnosing secondary upper quadrant cancer-related lymphedema. Following a systematic review of published studies and a structured appraisal process, recommendations were written to guide the physical therapist and other health care clinicians in the diagnostic process. Overall clinical practice recommendations were formulated based on the evidence for each diagnostic method and were assigned a grade based on the strength of the evidence for different patient presentations and clinical utility. In an effort to maximize clinical applicability, recommendations were based on the characteristics as to the location and stage of a patient's upper quadrant lymphedema. © American Physical Therapy Association 2017. Published by Oxford University Press [on behalf of the American Physical Therapy Association].

  13. AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGISTS AND AMERICAN COLLEGE OF ENDOCRINOLOGY GUIDELINES FOR MANAGEMENT OF DYSLIPIDEMIA AND PREVENTION OF CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE - EXECUTIVE SUMMARYComplete Appendix to Guidelines available at http://journals.aace.com.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jellinger, Paul S; Handelsman, Yehuda; Rosenblit, Paul D; Bloomgarden, Zachary T; Fonseca, Vivian A; Garber, Alan J; Grunberger, George; Guerin, Chris K; Bell, David S H; Mechanick, Jeffrey I; Pessah-Pollack, Rachel; Wyne, Kathleen; Smith, Donald; Brinton, Eliot A; Fazio, Sergio; Davidson, Michael; Zangeneh, Farhad; Bush, Michael A

    2017-04-02

    The development of these guidelines is mandated by the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) Board of Directors and American College of Endocrinology (ACE) Board of Trustees and adheres with published AACE protocols for the standardized production of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs). Each Recommendation is based on a diligent review of the clinical evidence with transparent incorporation of subjective factors. The Executive Summary of this document contains 87 Recommendations of which 45 are Grade A (51.7%), 18 are Grade B (20.7%), 15 are Grade C (17.2%), and 9 (10.3%) are Grade D. These detailed, evidence-based recommendations allow for nuance-based clinical decision making that addresses multiple aspects of real-world medical care. The evidence base presented in the subsequent Appendix provides relevant supporting information for Executive Summary Recommendations. This update contains 695 citations of which 202 (29.1 %) are evidence level (EL) 1 (strong), 137 (19.7%) are EL 2 (intermediate), 119 (17.1%) are EL 3 (weak), and 237 (34.1%) are EL 4 (no clinical evidence). This CPG is a practical tool that endocrinologists, other healthcare professionals, regulatory bodies and health-related organizations can use to reduce the risks and consequences of dyslipidemia. It provides guidance on screening, risk assessment, and treatment recommendations for a range of patients with various lipid disorders. These recommendations emphasize the importance of treating low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) in some individuals to lower goals than previously recommended and support the measurement of coronary artery calcium scores and inflammatory markers to help stratify risk. Special consideration is given to patients with diabetes, familial hypercholesterolemia, women, and pediatric patients with dyslipidemia. Both clinical and cost-effectiveness data are provided to support treatment decisions. A1C = hemoglobin A1C ACE = American College of

  14. 2013 ACC/AHA guideline on the treatment of blood cholesterol to reduce atherosclerotic cardiovascular risk in adults: A report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association task force on practice guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    This guideline is based on the Full Panel Report which is provided as a data supplement to the guideline. The Full Panel Report contains background and additional material related to content, methodology, evidence synthesis, rationale and references and is supported by the NHLBI Systematic Evidence ...

  15. Clinical practice variation and need for pediatric-specific treatment guidelines among rheumatologists caring for children with ANCA-associated vasculitis: an international clinician survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westwell-Roper, Clara; Lubieniecka, Joanna M; Brown, Kelly L; Morishita, Kimberly A; Mammen, Cherry; Wagner-Weiner, Linda; Yen, Eric; Li, Suzanne C; O'Neil, Kathleen M; Lapidus, Sivia K; Brogan, Paul; Cimaz, Rolando; Cabral, David A

    2017-08-07

    Because pediatric antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis is rare, management generally relies on adult data. We assessed treatment practices, uptake of existing clinical assessment tools, and interest in pediatric treatment protocols among rheumatologists caring for children with granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) and microscopic polyangiitis (MPA). A needs-assessment survey developed by an international working group of pediatric rheumatologists and two nephrologists was circulated internationally. Data were summarized with descriptive statistics. Pearson's chi-square tests were used in inferential univariate analyses. The 209 respondents from 36 countries had collectively seen ~1600 children with GPA/MPA; 144 had seen more than two in the preceding 5 years. Standardized and validated clinical assessment tools to score disease severity, activity, and damage were used by 59, 63, and 36%, respectively; barriers to use included lack of knowledge and limited perceived utility. Therapy varied significantly: use of rituximab rather than cyclophosphamide was more common among respondents from the USA (OR = 2.7 [1.3-5.5], p = 0.0190, n = 139), those with >5 years of independent practice experience (OR = 3.8 [1.3-12.5], p = 0.0279, n = 137), and those who had seen >10 children with GPA/MPA in their careers (OR = 4.39 [2.1-9.1], p = 0.0011, n = 133). Respondents who had treated >10 patients were also more likely to continue maintenance therapy for at least 24 months (OR = 3.0 [1.4-6.4], p = 0.0161, n = 127). Ninety six percent of respondents believed in a need for pediatric-specific treatment guidelines; 46% supported adaptation of adult guidelines while 69% favoured guidelines providing a limited range of treatment options to allow comparison of effectiveness through a registry. These data provide a rationale for developing pediatric-specific consensus treatment guidelines for GPA/MPA. While pediatric rheumatologist uptake

  16. Prevention of cardiovascular disease: highlights for the clinician of the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenger, Nanette K

    2014-04-01

    Prevention of cardiovascular disease, undoubtedly an emphasis of clinical care in 2014, will provide both opportunities and challenges to patients and their healthcare providers. The recently-released ACC/AHA guidelines on assessment of cardiovascular risk, lifestyle management to reduce cardiovascular risk, management of overweight and obesity, and treatment of blood cholesterol to reduce atherosclerotic cardiovascular risk, have introduced new concepts and revised prior conventional strategies. New to risk assessment are the Pooled Cohort Equations, targeting the expanded concept of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) and focusing not solely on mortality but as well on major nonfatal events. The lifestyle management focuses on diet and physical activity for lipid and blood pressure control. The cholesterol guideline identifies four high-risk groups with the greatest benefits from statin therapy: preexisting ASCVD, primary LDL-C elevations ≥ 190 mm/dl, those 45-75 years with diabetes and LDL-C 70-189 mm/dl without clinical ASCVD, and those 40-75 years without clinical ASCVD with an LDL-C 70-189 mg/dl with a 7.5% or greater 10-year ASCVD risk. Eliminated are arbitrary LDL-C treatment targets, with individual patient risk status guiding who should take statins and the appropriate intensity of statin drugs. Patient-physician discussions of individual benefits and risks are paramount. Management of high blood pressure remains controversial, with two different expert panels offering varying treatment targets; there is general agreement on a <140/90 mmHg goal, but substantial disagreement on blood pressure targets for older adults. Clinicians and their patients deserve a well-researched concensus document. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association and 2004 Adult Treatment Panel III cholesterol guidelines applied to HIV-infected patients with/without subclinical high-risk coronary plaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanni, Markella V; Fitch, Kathleen V; Feldpausch, Meghan; Han, Allison; Lee, Hang; Lu, Michael T; Abbara, Suhny; Ribaudo, Heather; Douglas, Pamela S; Hoffmann, Udo; Lo, Janet; Grinspoon, Steven K

    2014-09-10

    The 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) cholesterol guidelines are being applied to HIV-infected patients but have not been validated in this at-risk population, which is known to have a high prevalence of subclinical high-risk morphology (HRM) coronary atherosclerotic plaque. To compare recommendations for statins among HIV-infected subjects with/without HRM coronary plaque according to 2013 ACC/AHA versus 2004 Adult Treatment Panel III guidelines. Data from 108 HIV-infected subjects without known cardiovascular disease (CVD) or lipid-lowering treatment who underwent contrast-enhanced computed tomography angiography were analyzed. Recommendations for statin therapy according to 2013 versus 2004 guidelines were assessed among those with/without HRM coronary plaque. Among all subjects, 10-year atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) risk score was 3.3% (1.6, 6.6), yet 36% of subjects had HRM coronary plaque. Among those with HRM coronary plaque, statins would be recommended for 26% by 2013 guidelines versus 10% by 2004 guidelines (P = 0.04). Conversely, among those without HRM coronary plaque, statins would be recommended for 19% by 2013 guidelines versus 7% by 2004 guidelines (P = 0.005). In multivariate modeling, while 10-year ASCVD risk score related to HRM coronary plaque burden (P = 0.02), so too did other factors not incorporated into 2013 guidelines. The 2013 ACC/AHA cholesterol guidelines recommend statin therapy for a higher percentage of subjects with and without HRM coronary plaque relative to 2004 guidelines. However, even by 2013 guidelines, statin therapy would not be recommended for the majority (74%) of HIV-infected subjects with subclinical HRM coronary plaque. Outcome studies are needed to determine the utility of new statin recommendations and the contribution of HRM coronary plaque to CVD events among HIV-infected subjects.

  18. AUTHOR GUIDELINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chief Editor

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available AUTHOR GUIDELINESIndian Journal of Community Health (IJCH accepts only online submission of manuscript(s by using Open Journal software (OJS at http://www.iapsmupuk.org/journal/index.php/IJCH/loginOnline SubmissionsAlready have a Username/Password for Indian Journal of Community Health (IJCH? GO TO LOGINNeed a Username/Password?GO TO REGISTRATIONNote: Registration and login are required to submit items online and to track the status of current submissions.Author GuidelinesIJCH strictly adheres on the recommendations for the Conduct, Reporting, Editing and Publication of Scholarly Work in Medical Journals as per the standard universal guidelines given by International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE - Recommendations for Uniform Requirements for Manuscripts. Authors are requested to visit http://www.icmje.org/index.html before making online submission of their manuscript(s.SectionsEditorial:On issues of current public health needAbout 1000 – 1200 wordsReferences: 5 – 10 (PubMed - Citation preferredInvited Commentary:Brief, provocative, opinionated communicationsOn issues of current public health needMain Text: 750-1000 words excluding referencesReferences: 5 – 10 (PubMed - Citation preferredOriginal Article:Articles from Original ResearchStructured abstract: 250 wordsMain Text: 2500 - 3000 words, IMRD formatKey Words: 5 - 8References: 20 – 25 (PubMed - Citation preferredTables / Figures: 3 – 4*Certificate of clearance from respective Institutional Ethical Committee (IECReview Article:On subject of public health relevanceAbstract: 250 wordsMain Text: 2500 - 3000 wordsKey Words: 3 - 4References: 20 – 25 (PubMed - Citation preferredTables / Figures: 3 – 4Short Communication / Article:Short report of a research project / outbreakMain Text : 1000 – 1200 wordsReferences: 10 – 15 (PubMed - Citation preferredTable / Figure: 01*Certificate of clearance from respective Institutional Ethical Committee (IECReport from the field

  19. [CPR--guidelines 2000. New international guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gervais, H W

    2001-03-01

    The "Guidelines 2000 for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care. An International Consensus an Science" are the first true international CPR guidelines in the history of resuscitation medicine. Experts from major international resuscitation organizations (International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation, ILCOR) achieved a consensus of recommendations which had to pass a rigorous review procedure applying the tools of evidence-based medicine: all proposed guidelines or guideline changes had to be based on critically appraised pieces of evidence which had to be integrated into a final class of recommendations. The most important changes compared to previous recommendations from either the European Resuscitation Council or the American Heart Association are presented and commented upon.

  20. Diagnosis of stable ischemic heart disease: summary of a clinical practice guideline from the American College of Physicians/American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association/American Association for Thoracic Surgery/Preventive Cardiovascular Nurses Association/Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qaseem, Amir; Fihn, Stephan D; Williams, Sankey; Dallas, Paul; Owens, Douglas K; Shekelle, Paul

    2012-11-20

    The American College of Physicians (ACP) developed this guideline in collaboration with the American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF), American Heart Association (AHA), American Association for Thoracic Surgery, Preventive Cardiovascular Nurses Association, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons to help clinicians diagnose known or suspected stable ischemic heart disease. Literature on this topic published before November 2011 was identified by using MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane CENTRAL, PsychINFO, AMED, and SCOPUS. Searches were limited to human studies published in English. This guideline grades the evidence and recommendations according to a translation of the ACCF/AHA grading system into ACP's clinical practice guidelines grading system. This guideline includes 28 recommendations that address the following issues: the initial diagnosis of the patient who might have stable ischemic heart disease, cardiac stress testing to assess the risk for death or myocardial infarction in patients diagnosed with stable ischemic heart disease, and coronary angiography for risk assessment.

  1. Record Keeping Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2007

    2007-01-01

    These guidelines are designed to educate psychologists and provide a framework for making decisions regarding professional record keeping. State and federal laws, as well as the American Psychological Association's "Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct," generally require maintenance of appropriate records of psychological…

  2. AACE hyperandrogenism guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goolsby, M J

    2001-11-01

    The problems associated with hyperandrogenism are not uncommon in primary care settings. In fact, polycystic ovary syndrome, a common cause of androgen excess, exists in 5% to 10% of women during their reproductive years, with onset typically in adolescence. The subject of this column is the AACE's Hyperandrogenism Guidelines, which review the evaluation and treatment of the disorders causing androgenic excess.

  3. Curricular Guidelines for Endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Dental Education, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Guidelines developed by the Section on Endodontics of the American Association of Dental Schools for use by educational institutions as curriculum development aids are provided. Endodontics is that branch of dentistry dealing with diagnosis and treatment of oral conditions that arise as a result of pathoses of dental pulp. (MLW)

  4. Methodological guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halsnaes, K.; Callaway, J.M.; Meyer, H.J.

    1999-04-01

    The guideline document establishes a general overview of the main components of climate change mitigation assessment. This includes an outline of key economic concepts, scenario structure, common assumptions, modelling tools and country study assumptions. The guidelines are supported by Handbook Reports that contain more detailed specifications of calculation standards, input assumptions and available tools. The major objectives of the project have been provided a methodology, an implementing framework and a reporting system which countries can follow in meeting their future reporting obligations under the FCCC and for GEF enabling activities. The project builds upon the methodology development and application in the UNEP National Abatement Coasting Studies (UNEP, 1994a). The various elements provide countries with a road map for conducting climate change mitigation studies and submitting national reports as required by the FCCC. (au) 121 refs.

  5. Associations between adherence to the Danish Food-Based Dietary Guidelines and cardiometabolic risk factors in a Danish adult population: the DIPI study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arentoft, Johanne Louise; Hoppe, Camilla; Andersen, Elisabeth Wreford

    2018-01-01

    Diet is recognised as one modifiable lifestyle factor for ischaemic heart disease (IHD). We aimed at investigating the associations between adherence to the Danish Food-Based Dietary Guidelines (FBDG) indicated by a Dietary Quality Index (DQI) and selected cardiometabolic risk factors in a cross......-sectional study with 219 Danish adult participants (59 %women; age 31-65years) with a minimum of one self-rated risk marker of IHD. Information regarding diet was obtained using web-based dietary assessment software and adherence to the Danish FBDG was expressed by a DQI calculated from 5 food and nutrient...... indicators (whole grain, fish, fruit and vegetables, energy from saturated fat and from added sugar). Background information, blood samples and anthropometrics were collected and blood pressure was measured. Linear regression analyses were used to evaluate the association between DQI and cardiometabolic risk...

  6. 2016 Laboratory guidelines for postvasectomy semen analysis: Association of Biomedical Andrologists, the British Andrology Society and the British Association of Urological Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, P; Woodward, B J; Muneer, A; Kirkman-Brown, J C

    2016-07-01

    Post-vasectomy semen analysis (PVSA) is the procedure used to establish whether sperm are present in the semen following a vasectomy. PVSA is presently carried out by a wide variety of individuals, ranging from doctors and nurses in general practitioner (GP) surgeries to specialist scientists in andrology laboratories, with highly variable results.Key recommendations are that: (1) PVSA should take place a minimum of 12 weeks after surgery and after a minimum of 20 ejaculations. (2) Laboratories should routinely examine samples within 4 h of production if assessing for the presence of sperm. If non-motile sperm are observed, further samples must be examined within 1 h of production. (3) Assessment of a single sample is acceptable to confirm vasectomy success if all recommendations and laboratory methodology are met and no sperm are observed. Clearance can then be given. (4) The level for special clearance should be <100 000/mL non-motile sperm. Special clearance cannot be provided if any motile sperm are observed and should only be given after assessment of two samples in full accordance with the methods contained within these guidelines. Surgeons are responsible both preoperatively and postoperatively for the counselling of patients and their partners regarding complications and the possibility of late recanalisation after clearance. These 2016 guidelines replace the 2002 British Andrology Society (BAS) laboratory guidelines and should be regarded as definitive for the UK in the provision of a quality PVSA service, accredited to ISO 15189:2012, as overseen by the United Kingdom Accreditation Service (UKAS). Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  7. Training Guidelines for Employee Relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotel and Catering Training Board, Wembley (England).

    This set of guidelines is intended for use by employers desiring to establish the training needs of those involved in employee relations. The 16 guidelines cover the following principal activities normally associated with employee relations: staff management policy and aims, staff recruitment and selection, terms and conditions of employment,…

  8. Guideline on anterior cruciate ligament injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meuffels, Duncan E; Poldervaart, Michelle T; Diercks, Ronald; Fievez, Alex W F M; Patt, Thomas W; Hart, Cor P van der; Hammacher, Eric R; Meer, Fred van der; Goedhart, Edwin A; Lenssen, Anton F; Muller-Ploeger, Sabrina B; Pols, Margreet A; Saris, Daniel B F

    The Dutch Orthopaedic Association has a long tradition of development of practical clinical guidelines. Here we present the recommendations from the multidisciplinary clinical guideline working group for anterior cruciate ligament injury. The following 8 clinical questions were formulated by a

  9. Author Guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chief Editor

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Author GuidelinesIJCH strictly adheres on the recommendations for the Conduct, Reporting, Editing and Publication of Scholarly Work in Medical Journals as per the standard universal guidelines given by International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE - Recommendations for Uniform Requirements for Manuscripts. Authors are requested to visit http://www.icmje.org/index.html before making online submission of their manuscript(s.  http://www.icmje.org/recommendations/browse/manuscript-preparation/preparing-for-submission.html Preparing for SubmissionPAGE CONTENTSGeneral PrinciplesReporting GuidelinesManuscript SectionsTitle PageAbstractIntroductionMethodsResultsDiscussionReferencesTablesIllustrations (FiguresUnits of MeasurementAbbreviations and Symbols1. General PrinciplesThe text of articles reporting original research is usually divided into Introduction, Methods, Results, and Discussion sections. This so-called “IMRAD” structure is not an arbitrary publication format but a reflection of the process of scientific discovery. Articles often need subheadings within these sections to further organize their content. Other types of articles, such as meta-analyses, may require different formats, while case reports, narrative reviews, and editorials may have less structured or unstructured formats.Electronic formats have created opportunities for adding details or sections, layering information, cross-linking, or extracting portions of articles in electronic versions. Supplementary electronic-only material should be submitted and sent for peer review simultaneously with the primary manuscript.2. Reporting GuidelinesReporting guidelines have been developed for different study designs; examples include CONSORT for randomized trials, STROBE for observational studies, PRISMA for systematic reviews and meta-analyses, and STARD for studies of diagnostic accuracy. Journals are encouraged to ask authors to follow these guidelines because

  10. A.S.P.E.N. clinical guidelines: support of pediatric patients with intestinal failure at risk of parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wales, Paul W; Allen, Nancy; Worthington, Patricia; George, Donald; Compher, Charlene; Teitelbaum, Daniel

    2014-07-01

    Children with severe intestinal failure and prolonged dependence on parenteral nutrition are susceptible to the development of parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD). The purpose of this clinical guideline is to develop recommendations for the care of children with PN-dependent intestinal failure that have the potential to prevent PNALD or improve its treatment. A systematic review of the best available evidence to answer a series of questions regarding clinical management of children with intestinal failure receiving parenteral or enteral nutrition was undertaken and evaluated using concepts adopted from the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) Working Group. A consensus process was used to develop the clinical guideline recommendations prior to external and internal review and approval by the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition Board of Directors. (1) Is ethanol lock effective in preventing bloodstream infection and catheter removal in children at risk of PNALD? (2) What fat emulsion strategies can be used in pediatric patients with intestinal failure to reduce the risk of or treat PNALD? (3) Can enteral ursodeoxycholic acid improve the treatment of PNALD in pediatric patients with intestinal failure? (4) Are PNALD outcomes improved when patients are managed by a multidisciplinary intestinal rehabilitation team? © 2014 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  11. Testicular Cancer on the Web-an Appropriate Source of Patient Information in Concordance with the European Association of Urology Guidelines?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paffenholz, Pia; Salem, Johannes; Borgmann, Hendrik; Nestler, Tim; Pfister, David; Ruf, Christian; Tsaur, Igor; Haferkamp, Axel; Heidenreich, Axel

    2017-08-04

    Despite the continuous growth of the internet, little is known about the quality of online information on testicular cancer, the most common solid malignancy in young men. In our study, we analysed the quality, readability and popularity of the most popular websites on testicular cancer. Therefore, we performed a web search for the term "testicular cancer" using www.google.com . Fifty-one websites were evaluated for HONcode quality certification, Alexa Popularity Rank and readability levels. Furthermore, the websites' content on eight major topics of the current European Association of Urology Guidelines on testicular cancer was assessed. Fourteen (28%) had a HONcode quality certificate and the mean Alexa Popularity Rank of all 51 websites was 54,040 (interquartile range 6648-282,797). Websites were difficult to read requiring 9 years of US school education to properly understand the information. The websites mentioned 80% of the guideline topics on average, revealing "prognosis" (59%) and "follow-up" (57%) as underrepresented subtopics. Furthermore, 12% of all topics were displayed incorrectly, particularly due to wrong information concerning "aetiology" (42%). Sixty percent of the topics were mentioned in an incomplete fashion, with less than half of the websites displaying complete information on "staging" (47%), "diagnostic evaluation" (49%) or "disease management" (45%). In general, online health information concerning testicular cancer is mentioned correctly on most websites. However, improvement regarding readability and completeness of the given information is needed. Nevertheless, highly selected websites on testicular cancer can serve as an appropriate source of patient information.

  12. In-house consultation to support professionals' responses to child abuse and neglect: Determinants of professionals' use and the association with guideline adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konijnendijk, Annemieke A J; Boere-Boonekamp, Magda M; Kaya, Anna H; Haasnoot, Maria E; Need, Ariana

    2017-07-01

    This study examined the presence and strengths of determinants associated with consultation of an in-house expert on child abuse and neglect (CAN) by preventive child health care professionals who suspect CAN. This study also assessed the relationship between in-house CAN expert consultation and professionals' performance of six recommended activities described in a national guideline on preventing CAN for preventive child health care professionals. A total of 154 professionals met the study's inclusion criteria. They filled in a questionnaire that measured in-house consultation practices and twelve determinants associated with the professional, the in-house expert, and the organizational context. Bivariate and multivariate regression analyses were performed. Almost half of the participants (46.8%) reported to consult the in-house expert in (almost) all of their suspected CAN cases. Professionals who reported better recollection of consulting the in-house expert (i.e. not forgetting to consult the expert) (p=.001), who were more familiar with consultation (p=.002), who had more positive attitudes and beliefs about consultation (p=.011) and who reported being more susceptible to the behavior (p=.001) and expectations/opinions (p=.025) of colleagues regarding in-house expert consultation were more likely to consult the in-house expert. Furthermore, in-house expert consultation was positively associated with two of six key guideline activities: consulting the regional child protection service and monitoring whether support was provided to families. The implications of these results for improving professionals' responses to CAN are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. EMQN best practice guidelines for the molecular genetic testing and reporting of fragile X syndrome and other fragile X-associated disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biancalana, Valérie; Glaeser, Dieter; McQuaid, Shirley; Steinbach, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Different mutations occurring in the unstable CGG repeat in 5' untranslated region of FMR1 gene are responsible for three fragile X-associated disorders. An expansion of over ∼200 CGG repeats when associated with abnormal methylation and inactivation of the promoter is the mutation termed 'full mutation' and is responsible for fragile X syndrome (FXS), a neurodevelopmental disorder described as the most common cause of inherited intellectual impairment. The term 'abnormal methylation' is used here to distinguish the DNA methylation induced by the expanded repeat from the 'normal methylation' occurring on the inactive X chromosomes in females with normal, premutation, and full mutation alleles. All male and roughly half of the female full mutation carriers have FXS. Another anomaly termed 'premutation' is characterized by the presence of 55 to ∼200 CGGs without abnormal methylation, and is the cause of two other diseases with incomplete penetrance. One is fragile X-associated primary ovarian insufficiency (FXPOI), which is characterized by a large spectrum of ovarian dysfunction phenotypes and possible early menopause as the end stage. The other is fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS), which is a late onset neurodegenerative disorder affecting males and females. Because of the particular pattern and transmission of the CGG repeat, appropriate molecular testing and reporting is very important for the optimal genetic counselling in the three fragile X-associated disorders. Here, we describe best practice guidelines for genetic analysis and reporting in FXS, FXPOI, and FXTAS, including carrier and prenatal testing.

  14. [The differences between the guidelines of the European Society of Cardiology and the American College of Cardiology/ American Heart Association for oral P2Y12 inhibitor therapy in the management of patients with acute coronary syndromes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serebruany, V L; Pershukov, I V

    2013-01-01

    The analysis of the evidence that formed the basis for the current guidelines of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) on oral therapy by antithrombotic drugs for acute coronary syndromes (ACS), and a comparison with the U.S. guidelines. The ESC guidelines, published during 2011-2012, declared the superiority of prasugrel and ticagrelor over clopidogrel in patients with ACS without ST elevation and myocardial infarction (MI) with ST elevation. These guidelines are based in each case on a subgroup analysis of a single study using either prasugrel (TRITON), or ticagrelor (PLATO). In contrast, the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Heart Association (AHA) guidelines, published in 2012-2013, are more balanced, conservative and present evidence-based outlook, suggesting no proven extra benefit of one P2Y12 antagonist over the other(s). The ESC guidelines regarding the findings of the superiority of prasugrel or ticagrelor over clopidogrel are overly optimistic and not always evidence-based. A small frequency of clinical use of prasugrel and ticagrelor in the world in general and Europe in particular, suggests a discrepancy between the traditionally appointed treatment and published ESC guidelines.

  15. Prediction of treatment failure using 2010 World Health Organization Guidelines is associated with high misclassification rates and drug resistance among HIV-infected Cambodian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westley, Benjamin P; DeLong, Allison K; Tray, Chhraing S; Sophearin, Dim; Dufort, Elizabeth M; Nerrienet, Eric; Schreier, Leeann; Harwell, Joseph I; Kantor, Rami

    2012-08-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) in resource-limited settings (RLSs) is monitored clinically and immunologically, according to World Health Organization (WHO) or national guidelines. Revised WHO pediatric guidelines were published in 2010, but their ability to accurately identify virological failure is unclear. We evaluated performance of WHO 2010 guidelines and compared them with WHO 2006 and Cambodia 2011 guidelines among children on ≥6 months of first-line ART at Angkor Hospital for Children between January 2005 and September 2010. We determined sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and accuracy using bootstrap resampling to account for multiple tests per child. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) resistance was compared between those correctly and incorrectly identified by each guideline. Among 457 children with 1079 viral loads (VLs), 20% had >400 copies/mL. For children with WHO stage 1/2 HIV, misclassification as failure (met CD4 failure criteria, but VL undetectable) was 64% for WHO 2006 guidelines, 33% for WHO 2010 guidelines, and 81% for Cambodia 2011 guidelines; misclassification as success (did not meet CD4 failure, but VL detectable) was 11%, 12%, and 12%, respectively. For children with WHO stage 3/4 HIV, misclassification as failure was 35% for WHO 2006 guidelines, 40% for WHO 2010 guidelines, and 43% for Cambodia 2011 guidelines; misclassification as success was 13%, 24%, and 21%, respectively. Compared with WHO 2006 guidelines, WHO 2010 guidelines significantly increased the risk of misclassification as success in stage 3/4 HIV (P < .05). The WHO 2010 guidelines failed to identify 98% of children with extensive reverse-transcriptase resistance. In our cohort, lack of virological monitoring would result in unacceptable treatment failure misclassification, leading to premature ART switch and resistance accumulation. Affordable virological monitoring suitable for use in RLSs is desperately needed.

  16. Refining the American Urological Association and American Society for Radiation Oncology guideline for adjuvant radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy using the pathologic Gleason score

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Song

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, it has been suggested that the guideline for adjuvant radiotherapy (ART following radical prostatectomy (RP sponsored by the American Urological Association and American Society for Radiation Oncology (AUA/ASTRO may result in a significant overtreatment. Thus, the objective of the present study was to refine the AUA/ASTRO guideline for ART in patients at risk for biochemical recurrence (BCR after RP. To this end, we reviewed our prospectively maintained database and selected 193 patients who met the AUA/ASTRO ART criteria. With a median follow-up of 24.0 months, BCR rate was 17.6% (34/193. When stratified by the Gleason score, BCR rate in men with Gleason score 6 was 6.8%. There was no significant association between BCR-free survival and surgical margin (P = 0.690 and pathologic stage (P = 0.353 in patients with the Gleason score 6. However, in patients with positive surgical margins (PSMs/pathologic stage ≥T3, there was a significant difference in BCR-free survival according to Gleason score (≤ 7 vs 8-10, P = 0.047. Multivariate Cox regression analysis demonstrated that pathologic stage ≥T3 (HR = 2.106; P= 0.018, PSMs (HR = 2.411; P= 0.003, and pathologic Gleason score 8-10 (HR = 4.715; P< 0.001 were independent predictors of BCR after RP. Therefore, in addition to pathologic stage ≥T3 and PSMs, Gleason score 8-10 predicts BCR after RP. In patients with Gleason score 6, observation rather than ART may be more appropriate regardless of stage and surgical margin status.

  17. Refining the American Urological Association and American Society for Radiation Oncology guideline for adjuvant radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy using the pathologic Gleason score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wan; Kwon, Young Suk; Jeon, Seong Soo; Kim, Isaac Yi

    2017-01-01

    Recently, it has been suggested that the guideline for adjuvant radiotherapy (ART) following radical prostatectomy (RP) sponsored by the American Urological Association and American Society for Radiation Oncology (AUA/ASTRO) may result in a significant overtreatment. Thus, the objective of the present study was to refine the AUA/ASTRO guideline for ART in patients at risk for biochemical recurrence (BCR) after RP. To this end, we reviewed our prospectively maintained database and selected 193 patients who met the AUA/ASTRO ART criteria. With a median follow-up of 24.0 months, BCR rate was 17.6% (34/193). When stratified by the Gleason score, BCR rate in men with Gleason score 6 was 6.8%. There was no significant association between BCR-free survival and surgical margin (P = 0.690) and pathologic stage (P = 0.353) in patients with the Gleason score 6. However, in patients with positive surgical margins (PSMs)/pathologic stage ≥T3, there was a significant difference in BCR-free survival according to Gleason score (≤ 7 vs 8-10, P = 0.047). Multivariate Cox regression analysis demonstrated that pathologic stage ≥T3 (HR = 2.106; P= 0.018), PSMs (HR = 2.411; P= 0.003), and pathologic Gleason score 8-10 (HR = 4.715; PGleason score 8-10 predicts BCR after RP. In patients with Gleason score 6, observation rather than ART may be more appropriate regardless of stage and surgical margin status.

  18. American Bar Association Supplementary Guidelines for the Mitigation Function of Defense Teams in Death Penalty Cases: Implications for Social Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Arlene Bowers

    2012-01-01

    When a client faces a penalty of death, defense attorneys may call on social workers in many capacities: mitigation specialist, expert witness, consulting specialist, direct witness, or defense-initiated victim outreach worker. The American Bar Association set forth standards for capital defense attorneys, which led an interdisciplinary team to…

  19. Knowledge of Pediatric Critical Care Nurses Regarding Evidence Based Guidelines for Prevention of Ventilator Associated Pneumonia (VAP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Gehan EL Nabawy; Abosamra, Omyma Mostafa

    2015-01-01

    Ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP) is a costly, preventable, and often fatal consequence of medical therapy that increases hospital and intensive care stays in mechanically ventilated patients. The prevention of VAP is primarily the responsibility of the bedside nurse whose knowledge, beliefs, and practices influence the health outcome of ICU…

  20. Saudi Guidelines on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Pulmonary Hypertension: Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with congenital heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Lopes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital heart disease (CHD with intracardiac/extracardiac shunts is an important etiology of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH. The majority of children with congenital cardiac shunts do not develop advanced pulmonary vasculopathy, as surgical repair of the anomalies is now performed early in life. However, if not repaired early, some defects will inevitably lead to pulmonary vascular disease (truncus arteriosus, transposition of the great arteries associated with a ventricular septal defect (VSD, atrioventricular septal defects remarkably in Down syndrome, large, nonrestrictive VSDs, patent ductus arteriosus and related anomalies. The majority of patients are now assigned to surgery based on noninvasive evaluation only. PAH becomes a concern (requiring advanced diagnostic procedures in about 2-10% of them. In adults with CHD, the prevalence of advanced pulmonary vasculopathy (Eisenmenger syndrome is around 4-12%. [1] This article will discuss the diagnostic and management approach for PAH associated with CHD (PAH-CHD.

  1. Adherence of the indication to European Association of Urology guideline recommended pelvic lymph node dissection at a high-volume center: Differences between open and robot-assisted radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffmann, J; Haese, A; Leyh-Bannurah, Sami-Ramzi; Salomon, G; Steuber, T; Schlomm, T; Boehm, K; Beyer, B; Larcher, A; Michl, U; Heinzer, H; Huland, H; Graefen, M; Karakiewicz, P I

    2015-11-01

    Contemporary adherence of the indication to European Association of Urology (EAU) guideline recommendation for pelvic lymph node dissection (PLND) at either open (ORP) or robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) at a high-volume center is unknown. To assess guideline recommended and observed PLND rates in a high-volume center cohort. We relied on the Martini-Clinic database and focused on patients treated with either ORP or RARP, between 2010 and 2013. Actual performed PLND was compared to European Association of Urology (EAU) guideline recommendation defined by nomogram predicted risk of lymph node invasion >5%. Categorical and multivariable logistic regression analyses targeted two endpoints: 1) probability of guideline recommended PLND and 2) probability of no PLND, when not recommended by EAU guideline. Within 7868 PCa patients, adherence to EAU PLND guideline recommendation was 97.1% at ORP and 96.8% at RARP (p = 0.7). When PLND was not recommended, it was more frequently performed at RARP (71.6%) than at ORP (66.2%) (p = 0.002). Gleason score, PSA and number of positive biopsy cores were independent predictors for both either PLND when recommended, or no PLND when not recommended (all p < 0.05). Clinical tumor stage, age and surgical approach were also independent predictors for no PLND when not recommended (all p < 0.05). Adherence of the indication to EAU guideline recommended PLND is high at this high-volume center. Neither ORP nor RARP represent a barrier for PLND, when recommended. However, a high number of patients underwent PLND despite absence of guideline recommendation. Possible staging advantages and PLND related complications needs to be individually considered, especially, when LNI risk is low. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. GRADE guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guyatt, Gordon H; Thorlund, Kristian; Oxman, Andrew D

    2013-01-01

    , calculating summary measures requires converting to the same units of measurement for each study. The longest standing and most widely used approach is to divide the difference in means in each study by its standard deviation and present pooled results in standard deviation units (standardized mean difference...... in means is usually desirable. When the natural units of the outcome measure are not easily interpretable, choosing a threshold to create a binary outcome and presenting relative and absolute effects become a more attractive alternative. When studies use different measures of the same construct...... and absolute effects, presenting the ratio of the means of intervention and control groups, and presenting the results in minimally important difference units. We outline the merits and limitations of each alternative and provide guidance for meta-analysts and guideline developers....

  3. Sodium bicarbonate use during in-hospital pediatric pulseless cardiac arrest - a report from the American Heart Association Get With The Guidelines(®)-Resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Tia T; Stromberg, Daniel; Stigall, William; Burton, Grant; Zaritsky, Arno

    2015-04-01

    Despite limited recommendations for using sodium bicarbonate (SB) during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), we hypothesized that SB continues to be used frequently during pediatric in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) and that its use varies by hospital-specific, patient-specific, and event-specific characteristics. We analyzed 3719 pediatric (<18 years) index pulseless CPR events from the American Heart Association Get With The Guidelines-Resuscitation database from 1/2000 to 9/2010. SB was used in 2536 (68%) of 3719 CPR events. Incidence of SB use between 2000 and 2005 vs. 2006 and 2010 was 71.1% vs. 66.2% (P=0.002). The primary outcome was survival to discharge. Secondary outcomes included 24-h survival and neurologic outcome. Multivariable logistic regression analyzed the association between SB use and outcomes. SB had increased use an ICU location, metabolic/electrolyte disturbance, prolonged CPR, pVT/VF, and concurrently with other pharmacologic interventions. Adjusting for confounding factors, SB use was associated with decreased 24-h survival (aOR 0.83, 95% CI: 0.69, 0.99) and decreased survival to discharge (aOR 0.80; 95% CI: 0.65, 0.97). Inclusion of metabolic/electrolyte abnormalities, hyperkalemia, and toxicologic abnormalities only (n=674), SB use was not associated with worse outcomes or unfavorable neurologic outcome. SB is used frequently during pediatric pulseless IHCA, yet there is a significant trend toward less routine use over the last decade. Because SB is more likely to be used in an ICU, with prolonged CPR, and concurrently with other pharmacologic interventions; its use during CPR may be associated with poor prognosis due to an association with "last ditch" efforts of resuscitation rather than causation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. EAU guidelines on testicular cancer: 2011 update

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albers, Peter; Albrecht, Walter; Algaba, Ferran; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Cohn-Cedermark, Gabriella; Fizazi, Karim; Horwich, Alan; Laguna, Maria Pilar

    2011-01-01

    On behalf of the European Association of Urology (EAU), guidelines for the diagnosis, therapy, and follow-up of testicular cancer were established. This article is a short version of the EAU testicular cancer guidelines and summarises the main conclusions from the guidelines on the management of

  5. Use of Curriculum Guidelines by Dental Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susi, Frank R.

    1986-01-01

    A survey of dental school course directors concerning their knowledge and use of curriculum guidelines provided by the American Association of Dental Schools found that many are aware of the guidelines and find them useful. Further guideline dissemination efforts and determining priorities for curriculum elements are recommended. (MSE)

  6. Practical Performance of the 2015 American Thyroid Association Guidelines for Predicting Tumor Recurrence in Patients with Papillary Thyroid Cancer in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seul Gi; Lee, Woo Kyung; Lee, Hye Sun; Moon, Jieun; Lee, Cho Rok; Kang, Sang Wook; Jeong, Jong Ju; Nam, Kee-Hyun; Chung, Woong Youn; Jo, Young Suk; Lee, Jandee

    2017-02-01

    The 2015 American Thyroid Association (ATA) management guidelines for adult patients with differentiated thyroid cancer propose the use of the modified initial risk stratification and response to therapy re-stratification systems. This study was conducted to validate the practicality of the revised guidelines for predicting tumor recurrence in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer. Patients with papillary thyroid cancer (n = 2425) who underwent total thyroidectomy with central neck node dissection with or without modified radical neck node dissection at a single institution between October 1985 and July 2009 were retrospectively enrolled. The accuracy of three different risk-stratification strategies for predicting disease-free survival, set out in the 2009 and 2015 ATA management guidelines, was assessed: the initial risk stratification (ATA 2009-RSS), the modified initial risk stratification (ATA 2015-RSS), and the response to therapy re-stratification (ATA 2015-RTR). After applying the ATA 2015-RSS, 258/1913 (13.5%) of patients originally designated as intermediate risk by the ATA 2009-RSS were designated as low risk. This was mainly due to the small number of metastatic lymph nodes. Recurrence was detected in 136 (5.6%) patients during follow-up. Of the 2425 cases examined, 375 were designated as low risk by the ATA 2009-RSS, with a recurrence rate of 1.1%. However, the ATA 2015-RSS designated 633 (26.1%) cases as low risk, with a recurrence rate of 0.9%. Implementing the ATA 2015-RTR predicted an excellent response in 1597 (65.9%) cases, with a recurrence rate of 1.1%. According to the proportion of variance explained (PVE), the Akaike information criterion, Harrell's c index, and integrated area under the curve, comparing the predictive accuracy of the ATA 2009-RSS, ATA 2015-RSS, and ATA 2015-RTR revealed that the ATA 2015-RTR was a superior predictor of recurrence. A proportion of patients designated as intermediate risk by the ATA 2009-RSS were

  7. Diagnosis and treatment for clinically localized prostate cancer. Adherence to the European Association of Urology clinical guidelines in a nationwide population-based study - GESCAP group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Veiga, F; Rodríguez-Antolín, A; Miñana, B; Hernández, C; Suárez, J F; Fernández-Gómez, J M; Unda, M; Burgos, J; Alcaraz, A; Rodríguez, P; Medina, R; Castiñeiras, J; Moreno, C; Pedrosa, E; Cózar, J M

    To assess the adherence to European Association of Urology (EAU) guidelines in the management of prostate cancer (PCa) in Spain. Epidemiological, population-based, study including a national representative sample of 3,918 incident patients with histopathological confirmation during 2010; 95% of the patient's sample was followed up for at least one year. Diagnosis along with treatment related variables (for localized PCa -low, intermediate, high and locally-advanced by D'Amico risk stratification) was recorded. Differences between groups were tested with Chi-squared and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Mean (SD) age of PCa patients was 68.48 (8.18). Regarding diagnostic by biopsy procedures, 64.56% of all patients had 8-12 cores in first biopsy and 46.5% of the patients over 75 years, with PSA<10ng/mL were biopsied. Staging by Computer Tomography (CT) or Bone Scan (BS) was used for determining tumor extension in 60.09% of high-risk cases and was applied differentially depending on patients' age; 3,293 (84.05%) patients received a treatment for localized PCa. Radical prostatectomy was done in 1,277 patients and 206 out of these patients also had a lymphadenectomy, being 4.64% low-risk, 22.81% intermediate-risk and 36.00% high-risk patients; 86.08% of 1,082 patients who had radiotherapy were treated with 3D or IMRT and 35.77% received a dose ≥75Gy; 419 patients were treated with brachytherapy (BT): 54.81% were low-risk patients, 22.84% intermediate-risk and 12.98% high-risk. Hormonotherapy (HT, n=521) was applied as single therapy in 9.46% of low-risk and 17.92% of intermediate-risk patients. Additionally, HT was combined with RT in 14.34% of lower-risk patients and 58.26% of high-risk patients, and 67.19% low-intermediate risk with RT and/or BT received neoadjuvant/concomitant/adjuvant HT. Finally, 83.75% of high-risk patients undergoing RT and/or BT also received HT. Although EAU guidelines for PCa management are easily available in Europe, the adherence to their

  8. National Athletic Trainers' Association Releases New Guidelines for Exertional Heat Illnesses: What School Nurses Need to Know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanScoy, Rachel M; DeMartini, Julie K; Casa, Douglas J

    2016-05-01

    Exertional heat illnesses (EHI) occur in various populations and settings. Within a school setting, there are student athletes who take part in physical activity where the risk of EHI is increased. The National Athletic Trainers' Association (NATA) released an updated position statement on EHI in September of 2015. This article is a summary of the position statement. The sports medicine team, including school nurses and athletic trainers, provides quality health care to these physically active individuals. Thus, it is important for school nurses to understand the prevention, recognition, and treatment of EHI. © 2016 The Author(s).

  9. Human milk banking guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharadva, Ketan; Tiwari, Satish; Mishra, Sudhir; Mukhopadhyay, Kanya; Yadav, Balraj; Agarwal, R K; Kumar, Vishesh

    2014-06-01

    WHO and UNICEF state that the use of human milk from other sources should be the first alternative when it is not possible for the mother to breastfeed. Human milk banks should be made available in appropriate situations. The IYCF Chapter is actively concerned about the compelling use of formula feeds in the infants because of the non availability of human breast milk banks. A National Consultative Meet for framing guidelines was summoned by the IYCF Chapter and the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Government of India on 30th June, 2013, with representations from various stakeholders. The guidelines were drafted after an extensive literature review and discussions. Though these guidelines are based on the experiences and guidelines from other countries, changes have been made to suit the Indian setup, culture and needs, without compromising scientific evidence. To ensure quality of donated breast milk as a safe end product. Human Milk Banking Association should be constituted, and human milk banks should be established across the country. National coordination mechanism should be developed with a secretariat and technical support to follow-up on action in States. Budgetary provisions should be made available for the activities.

  10. Management of neck pain and associated disorders: A clinical practice guideline from the Ontario Protocol for Traffic Injury Management (OPTIMa) Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Côté, Pierre; Wong, Jessica J; Sutton, Deborah; Shearer, Heather M; Mior, Silvano; Randhawa, Kristi; Ameis, Arthur; Carroll, Linda J; Nordin, Margareta; Yu, Hainan; Lindsay, Gail M; Southerst, Danielle; Varatharajan, Sharanya; Jacobs, Craig; Stupar, Maja; Taylor-Vaisey, Anne; van der Velde, Gabrielle; Gross, Douglas P; Brison, Robert J; Paulden, Mike; Ammendolia, Carlo; David Cassidy, J; Loisel, Patrick; Marshall, Shawn; Bohay, Richard N; Stapleton, John; Lacerte, Michel; Krahn, Murray; Salhany, Roger

    2016-07-01

    To develop an evidence-based guideline for the management of grades I-III neck pain and associated disorders (NAD). This guideline is based on recent systematic reviews of high-quality studies. A multidisciplinary expert panel considered the evidence of effectiveness, safety, cost-effectiveness, societal and ethical values, and patient experiences (obtained from qualitative research) when formulating recommendations. Target audience includes clinicians; target population is adults with grades I-III NAD 3 months duration, clinicians may consider structured patient education in combination with: range of motion and strengthening exercises, qigong, yoga, multimodal care (exercise with manipulation or mobilization), clinical massage, low-level laser therapy, or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. In view of evidence of no effectiveness, clinicians should not offer strengthening exercises alone, strain-counterstrain therapy, relaxation massage, relaxation therapy for pain or disability, electrotherapy, shortwave diathermy, clinic-based heat, electroacupuncture, or botulinum toxin injections. For NAD grade III ≤3 months duration, clinicians may consider supervised strengthening exercises in addition to structured patient education. In view of evidence of no effectiveness, clinicians should not offer structured patient education alone, cervical collar, low-level laser therapy, or traction. RECOMMENDATION 7: For NAD grade III >3 months duration, clinicians should not offer a cervical collar. Patients who continue to experience neurological signs and disability more than 3 months after injury should be referred to a physician for investigation and management. RECOMMENDATION 8: Clinicians should reassess the patient at every visit to determine if additional care is necessary, the condition is worsening, or the patient has recovered. Patients reporting significant recovery should be discharged.

  11. Guidelines for emergency laparoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sauerland Stefan

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Acute abdominal pain is a leading symptom in many surgical emergency patients. Laparoscopy allows for accurate diagnosis and immediate therapy of many intraabdominal pathologies. The guidelines of the EAES (European Association for Endoscopic Surgery provides scientifically founded recommendations about the role of laparoscopy in the different situations. Generally, laparoscopy is well suited for the therapy of the majority of diseases that cause acute abdominal pain.

  12. EMQN best practice guidelines for the molecular genetic testing and reporting of fragile X syndrome and other fragile X-associated disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biancalana, Valérie; Glaeser, Dieter; McQuaid, Shirley; Steinbach, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Different mutations occurring in the unstable CGG repeat in 5' untranslated region of FMR1 gene are responsible for three fragile X-associated disorders. An expansion of over ∼200 CGG repeats when associated with abnormal methylation and inactivation of the promoter is the mutation termed ‘full mutation' and is responsible for fragile X syndrome (FXS), a neurodevelopmental disorder described as the most common cause of inherited intellectual impairment. The term ‘abnormal methylation' is used here to distinguish the DNA methylation induced by the expanded repeat from the ‘normal methylation' occurring on the inactive X chromosomes in females with normal, premutation, and full mutation alleles. All male and roughly half of the female full mutation carriers have FXS. Another anomaly termed ‘premutation' is characterized by the presence of 55 to ∼200 CGGs without abnormal methylation, and is the cause of two other diseases with incomplete penetrance. One is fragile X-associated primary ovarian insufficiency (FXPOI), which is characterized by a large spectrum of ovarian dysfunction phenotypes and possible early menopause as the end stage. The other is fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS), which is a late onset neurodegenerative disorder affecting males and females. Because of the particular pattern and transmission of the CGG repeat, appropriate molecular testing and reporting is very important for the optimal genetic counselling in the three fragile X-associated disorders. Here, we describe best practice guidelines for genetic analysis and reporting in FXS, FXPOI, and FXTAS, including carrier and prenatal testing. PMID:25227148

  13. Tract Sizes in Miniaturized Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy: A Systematic Review from the European Association of Urology Urolithiasis Guidelines Panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhayel, Yasir; Tepeler, Abdulkadir; Dabestani, Saeed; MacLennan, Steven; Petřík, Aleš; Sarica, Kemal; Seitz, Christian; Skolarikos, Andreas; Straub, Michael; Türk, Christian; Yuan, Yuhong; Knoll, Thomas

    2017-08-01

    Miniaturized instruments for percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL), utilizing tracts sized ≤22 Fr, have been developed in an effort to reduce the morbidity and increase the efficiency of stone removal compared with standard PNL (>22 Fr). We systematically reviewed all available evidence on the efficacy and safety of miniaturized PNL for removing renal calculi. The review was performed according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses statement. Since it was not possible to perform a meta-analysis, the data were summarized in a narrative synthesis. After screening 2945 abstracts, 18 studies were included (two randomized controlled trials [RCTs], six nonrandomized comparative studies, and 10 case series). Thirteen studies were full-text articles and five were only available as congress abstracts. The size of tracts used in miniaturized procedures ranged from 22 Fr to 4.8 Fr. The largest mean stone size treated using small instruments was 980mm2. Stone-free rates were comparable in miniaturized and standard PNL procedures. Procedures performed with small instruments tended to be associated with significantly lower blood loss, while the procedure duration tended to be significantly longer. Other complications were not notably different between PNL types. Study designs and populations were heterogeneous. Study limitations included selection and outcome reporting bias, as well as a lack of information on relevant confounding factors. The studies suggest that miniaturized PNL is at least as efficacious and safe as standard PNL for the removal of renal calculi. However, the quality of the evidence was poor, drawn mainly from small studies, the majority of which were single-arm case series, and only two of which were RCTs. Furthermore, the tract sizes used and types of stones treated were heterogeneous. Hence, the risks of bias and confounding were high, highlighting the need for more reliable data from RCTs. Removing kidney stones via

  14. New-onset left bundle branch block-associated idiopathic nonischemic cardiomyopathy and left ventricular ejection fraction response to guideline-directed therapies: The NEOLITH study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Norman C; Singh, Madhurmeet; Adelstein, Evan C; Jain, Sandeep K; Mendenhall, G Stuart; Shalaby, Alaa A; Voigt, Andrew H; Saba, Samir

    2016-04-01

    Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) response to guideline-directed medical therapy (GDMT) and to early cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) in new-onset idiopathic nonischemic cardiomyopathy (NICM) and left bundle branch block (LBBB) is not well described. CRT is recommended if LVEF remains ≤35% after at least 3 months of GDMT. The purpose of this study was to describe LVEF response to GDMT at 3 months and to early CRT in new-onset LBBB-associated idiopathic NICM. A retrospective cohort study was performed in subjects with new-onset idiopathic NICM, LVEF ≤35%, and LBBB or narrow (35% in 39 narrow QRS complex subjects (56%) and 2 LBBB subjects (6%) (P 35% (relative risk 10.30; 95% confidence interval 2.63-40.27; P = .0008) and absolute difference between post-GDMT LVEF and initial LVEF (β = 16.296; standard error = 2.977; P < .0001) in final multivariable analyses. CRT super-response, defined as post-CRT LVEF ≥50%, was observed in 8 of LBBB subjects (35%) who received CRT. GDMT did not significantly improve LVEF in new-onset LBBB-associated idiopathic NICM at 3 months. Most remained candidates for CRT, and a high percentage were super-responders. Optimal timing for CRT implantation requires further investigation. Copyright © 2016 Heart Rhythm Society. All rights reserved.

  15. Evaluation of DOQI guidelines: early start of dialysis treatment is not associated with better health-related quality of life. National Kidney Foundation-Dialysis Outcomes Quality Initiative

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korevaar, Johanna C.; Jansen, Maarten A. M.; Dekker, Friedo W.; Boeschoten, Elisabeth W.; Bossuyt, Patrick M. M.; Krediet, Raymond T.

    2002-01-01

    The National Kidney Foundation-Dialysis Outcomes Quality Initiative (DOQI) guideline, which is largely opinion based, promotes an earlier initiation of dialysis treatment than usual. Implementation of this guideline would require an expansion of dialysis capacity, leading to a considerable increase

  16. Singapore Paediatric Resuscitation Guidelines 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Gene Yong Kwang; Chan, Irene Lai Yeen; Ng, Agnes Suah Bwee; Chew, Su Yah; Mok, Yee Hui; Chan, Yoke Hwee; Ong, Jacqueline Soo May; Ganapathy, Sashikumar; Ng, Kee Chong

    2017-01-01

    We present the revised 2016 Singapore paediatric resuscitation guidelines. The International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation’s Pediatric Taskforce Consensus Statements on Science and Treatment Recommendations, as well as the updated resuscitation guidelines from the American Heart Association and European Resuscitation Council released in October 2015, were debated and discussed by the workgroup. The final recommendations for the Singapore Paediatric Resuscitation Guidelines 2016 were derived after carefully reviewing the current available evidence in the literature and balancing it with local clinical practice. PMID:28741003

  17. An analysis of the Association of Society of Chest Pain Centers Accreditation to American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction guideline adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Abhinav; Glickman, Seth W; Ou, Fang-Shu; Peacock, W Frank; McCord, James K; Cairns, Charles B; Peterson, Eric D; Ohman, E Magnus; Gibler, W Brian; Roe, Matthew T

    2009-07-01

    Since 2003, the Society of Chest Pain Centers (SCPC) has provided hospital accreditation for acute coronary syndrome care processes. Our objective is to evaluate the association between SCPC accreditation and adherence to the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) evidence-based guidelines for non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI). The secondary objective is to describe the clinical outcomes and the association with accreditation. We conducted a secondary analysis of data from patients with NSTEMI enrolled in the Can Rapid Risk Stratification of Unstable Angina Patients Suppress Adverse Outcomes With Early Implementation of the ACC/AHA Guidelines (CRUSADE) quality improvement initiative in 2005. The analysis explored differences between SCPC-accredited and nonaccredited hospitals in evidence-based therapy given within the first 24 hours (including aspirin, beta-blocker, glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors, heparin, and ECG within 10 minutes). Of 33,238 patients treated at 21 accredited hospitals and 323 nonaccredited hospitals, those at SCPC-accredited centers (n=3,059) were more likely to receive aspirin (98.1% versus 95.8%; odds ratio [OR] 1.73; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.06 to 2.83) and beta-blockers (93.4% versus 90.6%; OR 1.68; 95% CI 1.04 to 2.70) within 24 hours than patients at non-SCPC-accredited centers (n=30,179). No difference was observed in obtaining a timely ECG (40.4% versus 35.2%; OR 1.28; 95% CI 0.98 to 1.67), administering a glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitor (OR 1.30; 95% CI 0.93 to 1.80), or administering heparin (OR 1.12; 95% CI 0.74 to 1.70). Also, there was no significant difference in risk-adjusted mortality for patients treated at SCPC hospitals versus nonaccredited hospitals (3.4% versus 3.5%; adjusted OR 1.17; 95% CI 0.88 to 1.55). SCPC-accredited hospitals had higher NSTEMI ACC/AHA evidence-based guideline adherence in the first 24 hours of care on 2 of the 5 measures. No difference in

  18. Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation and Concordance With the American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology/Heart Rhythm Society Guidelines: Findings From ORBIT-AF (Outcomes Registry for Better Informed Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Adam S; Kim, Sunghee; Fonarow, Gregg C; Thomas, Laine E; Reiffel, James A; Allen, Larry A; Freeman, James V; Naccarelli, Gerald; Mahaffey, Kenneth W; Go, Alan S; Kowey, Peter R; Ansell, Jack E; Gersh, Bernard J; Hylek, Elaine M; Peterson, Eric D; Piccini, Jonathan P

    2017-11-01

    It is unclear how frequently patients with atrial fibrillation receive guideline-concordant (GC) care and whether guideline concordance is associated with improved outcomes. Using data from ORBIT-AF (Outcomes Registry for Better Informed Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation), we determined how frequently patients received care that was concordant with 11 recommendations from the 2014 American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology/Heart Rhythm Society atrial fibrillation guidelines pertaining to antithrombotic therapy, rate control, and antiarrhythmic medications. We also analyzed the association between GC care and clinical outcomes at both the patient level and center level. A total of 9570 patients were included. The median age was 75 years (interquartile range, 67-82), and the median CHA2DS2-VASc score was 4 (interquartile range, 3-5). A total of 5977 patients (62.5%) received care that was concordant with all guideline recommendations for which they were eligible. Rates of GC care were higher in patients treated by providers with greater specialization in arrhythmias (60.0%, 62.4%, and 67.0% for primary care physicians, cardiologists, and electrophysiologists, respectively; Passociation between GC care and improved risk-adjusted outcomes. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. [Comparison between European Society of Cardiology (ESC) and American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) guidelines for initial management of ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puymirat, E; Ducrocq, G

    2013-08-01

    The European Society of Cardiology (ESC) and American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) have recently updated guidelines for management of ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). The aim of this study is to compare the both recommendations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Evaluation of anti-wrinkle effects of a novel cosmetic containing retinol using the guideline of the Japan Cosmetic Industry Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawada, Akira; Konishi, Natsuko; Momma, Tomoyuki; Oiso, Naoki; Kawara, Shigeru

    2009-11-01

    Retinol is known to be effective in the treatment of sallowness, wrinkling, red blotchiness and hyperpigmented spots in aging skin. In this study, we have evaluated the anti-wrinkle effects of a new cosmetic containing retinol. An open study was performed in 30 healthy Japanese women who had wrinkles at the corners of the eyes. The tested lotion, Retin-OX+ (RoC SA, Colombes, France), was applied on wrinkles of one side of the face for 8 weeks, and not on the other site as a control. Anti-wrinkle effects were evaluated by two methods: (i) doctors' observation and photos based on the guideline of the Japan Cosmetic Industry Association; and (ii) the Robo Skin Analyzer. This lotion showed marked and moderate improvement in 34% of the subjects with a significant difference as compared with the control sites (P < 0.05). Moreover, the length and area decreased in the applied site more than the control site with a significant difference (P < 0.01). All the patients completed the study without significant adverse reactions. The tested lotion was well tolerated and may be an optional preparation for the treatment of wrinkles at the corner of the eyes.

  1. Hepatocellular carcinoma: illustrated guide to systematic radiologic diagnosis and staging according to guidelines of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McEvoy, Sinead H

    2013-10-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is a malignancy that predominantly occurs in the setting of cirrhosis. Its incidence is rising worldwide. Hepatocellular carcinoma differs from most malignancies because it is commonly diagnosed on the basis of imaging features alone, without histologic confirmation. The guidelines from the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD) are a leading statement for the diagnosis and staging of hepatocellular carcinoma, and they have recently been updated, incorporating several important changes. AASLD advocates the use of the Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC) staging system, which combines validated imaging and clinical predictors of survival to determine stage and which links staging with treatment options. Each stage of the BCLC system is outlined clearly, with emphasis on case examples. Focal liver lesions identified at ultrasonographic surveillance in patients with cirrhosis require further investigation. Lesions larger than 1 cm should be assessed with multiphasic computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. Use of proper equipment and protocols is essential. Lesions larger than 1 cm can be diagnosed as hepatocellular carcinoma from a single study if the characteristic dynamic perfusion pattern of arterial hyperenhancement and venous or delayed phase washout is demonstrated. If the imaging characteristics of hepatocellular carcinoma are not met, the alternate modality should be performed. Biopsy should be used if neither modality is diagnostic of hepatocellular carcinoma. Once the diagnosis has been made, the cancer should be assigned a BCLC stage, which will help determine suitable treatment options. Radiologists require a systematic approach to diagnose and stage hepatocellular carcinoma with appropriate accuracy and precision.

  2. Temporal trends and factors associated with diabetes mellitus among patients hospitalized with heart failure: Findings from Get With The Guidelines-Heart Failure registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echouffo-Tcheugui, Justin B; Xu, Haolin; DeVore, Adam D; Schulte, Phillip J; Butler, Javed; Yancy, Clyde W; Bhatt, Deepak L; Hernandez, Adrian F; Heidenreich, Paul A; Fonarow, Gregg C

    2016-12-01

    The contribution of diabetes to the burden of heart failure (HF) remains largely undescribed. Assessing diabetes temporal trends among US patients hospitalized with HF and their relation with quality measures in real-world practice can help to define this burden. Using data from the Get With the Guidelines-Heart Failure registry, we assessed temporal trends in diabetes prevalence among patients with HF and in subgroups with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF; EF diabetes (44.0% overall, 41.8% in HFrEF, 46.7% in HFbEF, 45.5% in HFpEF). There was a temporal increase in diabetes frequency in HF patients (43.2%-45.8%; Ptrend Diabetic patients had a longer hospital stay (adjusted odds ratio 1.14, 95% CI 1.12-1.16), but lower in-hospital mortality (adjusted odds ratio 0.93 [0.89-0.97]) compared with those without diabetes, with limited differences in quality measures. Temporal trends in diabetes were not associated with in-hospital mortality or length of stay. There were no temporal interactions of most HF quality measures with diabetes status. Approximately 44% of hospitalized HF patients have diabetes, and this proportion has been increasing over the past 10years, particularly among those patients with new-onset HFpEF. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. An Update on the Management of Chronic Hepatitis C: 2015 Consensus Guidelines from the Canadian Association for the Study of the Liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert P Myers

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic hepatitis C remains a significant medical and economic burden in Canada, affecting nearly 1% of the population. Since the last Canadian consensus conference on the management of chronic hepatitis C, major advances have occurred that warrant a review of recommended management approaches for these patients. Specifically, direct-acting antiviral agents with dramatically improved rates of virological clearance compared with standard therapy have been developed and interferon-free, all-oral antiviral regimens have been approved. In light of this new evidence, an update to the 2012 Canadian Association for the Study of the Liver consensus guidelines on the management of hepatitis C was produced. The present document reviews the epidemiology of hepatitis C in Canada, preferred diagnostic testing approaches and recommendations for the treatment of chronically infected patients with the newly approved antiviral agents, including those who have previously failed peginterferon and ribavirin-based therapy. In addition, recommendations are made regarding approaches to reducing the burden of hepatitis C in Canada.

  4. Author Guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chief Editor

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available AUTHOR GUIDELINES Indian Journal of Community Health (IJCH accepts only online submission of manuscript(s by using Open Journal software (OJS at http://www.iapsmupuk.org/journal/index.php/IJCH/login Online SubmissionsAlready have a Username/Password for Indian Journal of Community Health (IJCH? GO TO LOGINNeed a Username/Password?GO TO REGISTRATIONNote: Registration and login are required to submit items online and to track the status of current submissions.Author GuidelinesIJCH strictly adheres on the recommendations for the Conduct, Reporting, Editing and Publication of Scholarly Work in Medical Journals as per the standard universal guidelines given by International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE - Recommendations for Uniform Requirements for Manuscripts. Authors are requested to visit http://www.icmje.org/index.html before making online submission of their manuscript(s. http://www.icmje.org/recommendations/browse/manuscript-preparation/preparing-for-submission.html Preparing for SubmissionGeneral PrinciplesReporting GuidelinesManuscript SectionsTitle PageAbstractIntroductionMethodsResultsDiscussionReferencesTablesIllustrations (FiguresUnits of MeasurementAbbreviations and Symbols 1. General PrinciplesThe text of articles reporting original research is usually divided into Introduction, Methods, Results, and Discussion sections. This so-called “IMRAD” structure is not an arbitrary publication format but a reflection of the process of scientific discovery. Articles often need subheadings within these sections to further organize their content. Other types of articles, such as meta-analyses, may require different formats, while case reports, narrative reviews, and editorials may have less structured or unstructured formats.Electronic formats have created opportunities for adding details or sections, layering information, cross-linking, or extracting portions of articles in electronic versions. Supplementary electronic

  5. AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGISTS, AMERICAN COLLEGE OF ENDOCRINOLOGY, AND ASSOCIAZIONE MEDICI ENDOCRINOLOGI MEDICAL GUIDELINES FOR CLINICAL PRACTICE FOR THE DIAGNOSIS AND MANAGEMENT OF THYROID NODULES--2016 UPDATE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharib, Hossein; Papini, Enrico; Garber, Jeffrey R; Duick, Daniel S; Harrell, R Mack; Hegedüs, Laszlo; Paschke, Ralf; Valcavi, Roberto; Vitti, Paolo

    2016-05-01

    malignant or suspicious nodules. The present document updates previous guidelines released in 2006 and 2010 by the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE), American College of Endocrinology (ACE) and Associazione Medici Endocrinologi (AME).

  6. Application of the European Society of Cardiology, Adult Treatment Panel III and American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines for cardiovascular risk management in a French cohort of rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tournadre, Anne; Tatar, Zuzana; Pereira, Bruno; Chevreau, Maxime; Gossec, Laure; Gaudin, Philippe; Soubrier, Martin; Dougados, Maxime

    2015-03-15

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have greater rates of cardiovascular mortality and RA is an independent cardiovascular risk factor. For the management of cholesterol, the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) developed new guidelines for the general population. None of the European or American guidelines are specific to RA. The European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) recommends applying a coefficient to cardiovascular risk equations based on the characteristics of RA. Our objective was to compare the three different sets of guidelines for the eligibility of statin therapy in RA-specific population with very high risk of cardiovascular disease. We calculated the proportion of patients eligible for statins according to the guidelines of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC), the Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP-III) and the ACC/AHA in a French cohort of statin-naïve RA patients at least 40 years age. Of the 547 women and 130 men analyzed, statins would be recommended for 9.1% of the women and 26.4% of the men, 15.6% of the women and 53.1% of the men, 38.8% of the women and 78.5% of the men, according to the ESC, ATP-III and ACC/AHA guidelines respectively. In RA patients, as has been observed in the general population, discordance in risk assessment and cholesterol treatment was observed between the three sets of guidelines. The use of the new ACC/AHA guidelines would expand the eligibility for statins and may be applied to RA population a condition at very high risk of cardiovascular disease. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  7. EAU Guidelines on Muscle-invasive and Metastatic Bladder Cancer: Summary of the 2013 Guidelines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witjes, J.A.; Comperat, E.; Cowan, N.C.; Santis, M. de; Gakis, G.; Lebret, T.; Ribal, M.J.; Heijden, A.G. van der; Sherif, A.

    2014-01-01

    CONTEXT: The European Association of Urology (EAU) guidelines panel on Muscle-invasive and Metastatic bladder cancer (BCa) updates its guidelines yearly. This updated summary provides a synthesis of the 2013 guidelines document, with emphasis on the latest developments. OBJECTIVE: To provide graded

  8. Guideline Implementation: Hand Hygiene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Judith L

    2017-02-01

    Performing proper hand hygiene and surgical hand antisepsis is essential to reducing the rates of health care-associated infections, including surgical site infections. The updated AORN "Guideline for hand hygiene" provides guidance on hand hygiene and surgical hand antisepsis, the wearing of fingernail polish and artificial nails, proper skin care to prevent dermatitis, the wearing of jewelry, hand hygiene product selection, and quality assurance and performance improvement considerations. This article focuses on key points of the guideline to help perioperative personnel make informed decisions about hand hygiene and surgical hand antisepsis. The key points address the necessity of keeping fingernails and skin healthy, not wearing jewelry on the hands or wrists in the perioperative area, properly performing hand hygiene and surgical hand antisepsis, and involving patients and visitors in hand hygiene initiatives. Perioperative RNs should review the complete guideline for additional information and for guidance when writing and updating policies and procedures. Copyright © 2017 AORN, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Comments to guidelines of American association of Clinical Endocrinologists and European Thyroid Association for the diagnosis and management of thyroid nodules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V V Fadeyev

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Летом этого года был издан важный документ для всех тех, кто занимается патологией щитовидной железы (ЩЖ, – новые клинические рекомендации по диагностике и лечению узлового зоба. В его разработке приняли участие ведущие эксперты Американской ассоциации клинических эндокринологов (AACE и Европейской тиреоидологической ассоциации (ЕТА. Кроме того, в качестве отдельного участника по их созданию выделена Итальянская ассоциация клинических эндокринологов. Полный текст рекомендаций на английском языке представлен в свободном доступе по адресу http://www.aace.com/pub/guidelines/ Как и все современные рекомендации, этот документ выдвигает уровни доказательности своих положений (табл..В этой статье хотелось бы кратко изложить и прокомментировать основные положения новых рекомендаций. Их текст разбит тематически на главы (клиническое исследование, диагностика и т. д.. При этом вначале идет текст с литературными ссылками, подводящий к “Ключевым рекомендациям” (Key recommendations, которые изложены по пунктам с выделенным уровнем доказательности (ДОК и рекомендательности (РЕК. Отдельный

  10. British Society of Gastroenterology/Association of Coloproctologists of Great Britain and Ireland guidelines for the management of large non-pedunculated colorectal polyps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutter, Matthew D; Chattree, Amit; Barbour, Jamie A; Thomas-Gibson, Siwan; Bhandari, Pradeep; Saunders, Brian P; Veitch, Andrew M; Anderson, John; Rembacken, Bjorn J; Loughrey, Maurice B; Pullan, Rupert; Garrett, William V; Lewis, Gethin; Dolwani, Sunil

    2015-12-01

    These guidelines provide an evidence-based framework for the management of patients with large non-pedunculated colorectal polyps (LNPCPs), in addition to identifying key performance indicators (KPIs) that permit the audit of quality outcomes. These are areas not previously covered by British Society of Gastroenterology (BSG) Guidelines.A National Institute of Health and Care Excellence (NICE) compliant BSG guideline development process was used throughout and the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation (AGREE II) tool was used to structure the guideline development process. A systematic review of literature was conducted for English language articles up to May 2014 concerning the assessment and management of LNPCPs. Quality of evaluated studies was assessed using the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN) Methodology Checklist System. Proposed recommendation statements were evaluated by each member of the Guideline Development Group (GDG) on a scale from 1 (strongly agree) to 5 (strongly disagree) with >80% agreement required for consensus to be reached. Where consensus was not reached a modified Delphi process was used to re-evaluate and modify proposed statements until consensus was reached or the statement discarded. A round table meeting was subsequently held to finalise recommendations and to evaluate the strength of evidence discussed. The GRADE tool was used to assess the strength of evidence and strength of recommendation for finalised statements.KPIs, a training framework and potential research questions for the management of LNPCPs were also developed. It is hoped that these guidelines will improve the assessment and management of LNPCPs. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  11. AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGISTS AND AMERICAN COLLEGE OF ENDOCRINOLOGY COMPREHENSIVE CLINICAL PRACTICE GUIDELINES FOR MEDICAL CARE OF PATIENTS WITH OBESITY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvey, W Timothy; Mechanick, Jeffrey I; Brett, Elise M; Garber, Alan J; Hurley, Daniel L; Jastreboff, Ania M; Nadolsky, Karl; Pessah-Pollack, Rachel; Plodkowski, Raymond

    2016-07-01

    Development of these guidelines is mandated by the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) Board of Directors and the American College of Endocrinology (ACE) Board of Trustees and adheres to published AACE protocols for the standardized production of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs). Recommendations are based on diligent review of clinical evidence with transparent incorporation of subjective factors. There are 9 broad clinical questions with 123 recommendation numbers that include 160 specific statements (85 [53.1%] strong [Grade A]; 48 [30.0%] intermediate [Grade B], and 11 [6.9%] weak [Grade C], with 16 [10.0%] based on expert opinion [Grade D]) that build a comprehensive medical care plan for obesity. There were 133 (83.1%) statements based on strong (best evidence level [BEL] 1 = 79 [49.4%]) or intermediate (BEL 2 = 54 [33.7%]) levels of scientific substantiation. There were 34 (23.6%) evidence-based recommendation grades (Grades A-C = 144) that were adjusted based on subjective factors. Among the 1,790 reference citations used in this CPG, 524 (29.3%) were based on strong (evidence level [EL] 1), 605 (33.8%) were based on intermediate (EL 2), and 308 (17.2%) were based on weak (EL 3) scientific studies, with 353 (19.7%) based on reviews and opinions (EL 4). The final recommendations recognize that obesity is a complex, adiposity-based chronic disease, where management targets both weight-related complications and adiposity to improve overall health and quality of life. The detailed evidence-based recommendations allow for nuanced clinical decision-making that addresses real-world medical care of patients with obesity, including screening, diagnosis, evaluation, selection of therapy, treatment goals, and individualization of care. The goal is to facilitate high-quality care of patients with obesity and provide a rational, scientific approach to management that optimizes health outcomes and safety. A1C = hemoglobin A1c AACE = American

  12. Management of stable ischemic heart disease: summary of a clinical practice guideline from the American College of Physicians/American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association/American Association for Thoracic Surgery/Preventive Cardiovascular Nurses Association/Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qaseem, Amir; Fihn, Stephan D; Dallas, Paul; Williams, Sankey; Owens, Douglas K; Shekelle, Paul

    2012-11-20

    The American College of Physicians (ACP) developed this guideline with the American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF), American Heart Association (AHA), American Association for Thoracic Surgery, Preventive Cardiovascular Nurses Association, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons to present the available evidence on the management of stable known or suspected ischemic heart disease. Literature on this topic published before November 2011 was identified by using MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane CENTRAL, PsychINFO, AMED, and SCOPUS. Searches were limited to human studies published in English. This guideline grades the evidence and recommendations according to a translation of the ACCF/AHA grading system into ACP's clinical practice guidelines grading system. The guideline includes 48 specific recommendations that address the following issues: patient education, management of proven risk factors (dyslipidemia, hypertension, diabetes, physical activity body weight, and smoking), risk factor reduction strategies of unproven benefit, medical therapy to prevent myocardial infarction and death and to relieve symptoms, alternative therapy, revascularization to improve survival and symptoms, and patient follow-up.

  13. Guidelines for Obesity Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Donna H

    2016-09-01

    This article addresses current best practices in obesity management, primarily through the discussion of 5 guidelines documents: those sponsored by the US National Institutes of Health and the AHA/ACC/TOS, ENDO, ASBP, AACE, and the United Kingdom's NICE. Common to all of these reports is the emphasis on addressing weight management as a pathway to prevention and optimal management of obesity-associated comorbidities (ie, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases). No one of these documents fits all needs; all have a place. Further, no one of these documents is final. As knowledge advances, all will require updating. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Medical Treatment of Nocturia in Men with Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms: Systematic Review by the European Association of Urology Guidelines Panel for Male Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakalis, Vasileios I; Karavitakis, Markos; Bedretdinova, Dina; Bach, Thorsten; Bosch, J L H Ruud; Gacci, Mauro; Gratzke, Christian; Herrmann, Thomas R; Madersbacher, Stephan; Mamoulakis, Charalampos; Tikkinen, Kari A O; Gravas, Stavros; Drake, Marcus J

    2017-11-01

    The treatment of nocturia is a key challenge due to the multi-factorial pathophysiology of the symptom and the disparate outcome measures used in research. To assess and compare available therapy options for nocturia, in terms of symptom severity and quality of life. Medical databases (Embase, Medline, Cochrane Systematic Reviews, Cochrane Central) were searched with no date restriction. Comparative studies were included which studied adult men with nocturia as the primary presentation and lower urinary tract symptoms including nocturia or nocturnal polyuria. Outcomes were symptom severity, quality of life, and harms. We identified 44 articles. Antidiuretic therapy using dose titration was more effective than placebo in relation to nocturnal voiding frequency and duration of undisturbed sleep; baseline serum sodium is a key selection criterion. Screening for hyponatremia (Guideline Panel are presented. Issues of trial design make therapy of nocturia a challenging topic. The range of contributory factors relevant in nocturia makes it desirable to identify predictors of response to guide therapy. Consistent responses were reported for titrated antidiuretic therapy. For other therapies, responses were less certain, and potentially of limited clinical benefit. This review provides an overview of the current drug treatments of nocturia, which is the need to wake at night to pass urine. The symptom can be caused by several different medical conditions, and measuring its severity and impact varies in separate research studies. No single treatment deals with the symptom in all contexts, and careful assessment is essential to make suitable treatment selection. Copyright © 2017 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The 2015 guidelines for the laboratory diagnosis of rheumatic diseases by the All-Russian Public Organization «Association of Rheumatology of Russia»

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. N. Aleksandrova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives the clinical guidelines for the laboratory diagnosis of rheumatic diseases (RDs elaborated by the Association of Rheumatologists of Russia in terms of the international requirements for methodology of a system search and assessment of the quality of evidence. The main goal of the laboratory diagnosis of RDs is to obtain objective information on the presence and pattern of immunopathological changes in a patient, which is an important tool for the early diagnosis, assessment of activity and severity of the disease, and its prediction, and efficiency of performed therapy. The clinical informative value of laboratory studies is determined by calculating their diagnostic sensitivity and specificity and the likelihood ratio for positive and negative results. Serological antibody detection tests hold a central position in the laboratory diagnosis of RDs. The main diagnostic laboratory markers of the latter are antinuclear antibodies, rheumatoid factor, anticitrullinated protein antibodies, antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies, and antiphospholipid antibodies. The positive results of autoantibody detection include diagnostic criteria for systemic autoimmune RDs, are used to assess the activity and prognosis of these diseases, play an important role in the diagnosis of earlystage RD, permit identification of individual clinical and laboratory RD subtypes, and serve as predictors for RDs in the absence of its symptoms. Standard autoantibody profiles were elaborated; a list of primary (screening, secondary (confirming, and additional serological tests were made out to diagnose systemic autoimmune RDs. The important laboratory markers of RDs are acutephase indicators (erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, etc. that can assess the inflammatory activity of the disease, its progression pattern, and prognosis during the chronic inflammatory process, as well as therapeutic efficiency. Other laboratory biomarkers (immunoglobulins

  16. ADHD rehabilitation through video gaming: A systematic review using PRISMA guidelines of the current findings and the associated risk of bias.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago eStrahler Rivero

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Empirical research studies have highlighted the need to investigate whether video game can be useful as a tool within a neuropsychological rehabilitation program for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder patients. However, little is known about the possible gains that this kind of video game based interventions can produce and even if these gains can be transferred to real life abilities. The present paper aims to uncover key information related to the use of video game in ADHD neuropsychological rehabilitation/intervention by focusing on its gains and its capability to transfer/generalize these gains to real life situation via a systematic review of the empirical literature. The PRISMA guidelines were adopted. Internet-based bibliographic searches were conducted via seven major electronic databases (i.e., PsycARTICLES, PsycINFO, Web of Science, Core Collection BIOSIS Citation Index, MEDLINE, SciELO Citation Index, and PubMed to access studies examining the association between video game interventions in ADHD patients and behavioral and cognitive outcomes. A total of 14 empirical studies meeting the inclusion criteria were identified. The studies reported the attention, working memory and the behavioral aspects as the main target of the intervention. Cognitive and behavioral gains were reported after the video game training. However, many bias related to the choice of outcome instruments, sampling and blindness of assessors, weaken the results power. Additional researches are important to clarify the effects and stability of the video games training programs, and an important effort should be made to construct better methods to assess improvements on everyday cognitive abilities and real world functioning.

  17. Clinical implications of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines for the treatment of blood cholesterol for a rural community: Data from the Heart of New Ulm Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miedema, Michael D; Sidebottom, Abbey C; Sillah, Arthur; Benson, Gretchen; Knickelbine, Thomas; VanWormer, Jeffrey J

    The 2013 American College of Cardiology (ACC)/AHA cholesterol guidelines represented a significant paradigm shift in the approach to the treatment of cholesterol in the United States. To assess prevalence of indications for statin therapy according to the ACC/AHA cholesterol guidelines in a rural community. A cross-sectional analysis was performed using data from the Heart of New Ulm Project, a population-based intervention aimed at reducing modifiable Adult Treatment Panel (ATP) III guidelines for the treatment of cholesterol for cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) risk factors in New Ulm, MN. Indications for statin therapy according to the ACC/AHA guidelines were determined using electronic health record data for area residents aged 40 to 79 years with visits in 2012 to 2013. There were 7855 adults aged 40 to 79 years in the target population, of which 4350 (55.4%) had a clinic visit with a fasting lipid panel. In our study sample (mean age 59.6 [10.4] years, 53.0% female), 2606 (59.9%) met one of the 4 major indications for statin therapy (19.2% clinical ASCVD, 15.5% diabetes, 1.1% low-density lipoprotein cholesterol ≥ 190 mg/dL, and 24.0% ≥ 7.5% 10-year ASCVD risk). Of those with an indication, 63.3% were on a statin (10.9% on a high-intensity statin). Of the 1375 patients (31.6%) who were not statin eligible (10-year ASCVD risk guidelines and two-thirds of these patients were prescribed a statin. In addition, almost 30% of those ineligible were taking a statin, suggesting the guidelines may provide an opportunity to decrease statin use in those at low ASCVD risk. Copyright © 2016 National Lipid Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Methodological quality of guidelines in gastroenterology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malheiro, Rui; de Monteiro-Soares, Matilde; Hassan, Cesare; Dinis-Ribeiro, Mário

    2014-06-01

    Clinical guidelines are a common feature in modern endoscopy practice and they are being produced faster than ever. However, their methodological quality is rarely assessed. This study evaluated the methodological quality of current clinical guidelines in the field of gastroenterology, with an emphasis on endoscopy. Practice guidelines published by the American College of Gastroenterology (ACG), American Gastroenterological Association (AGA), American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE), European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE), British Society of Gastroenterology (BSG), National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE), and the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN) were searched between September and October 2012 and evaluated using the AGREE II (Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation) instrument (23 items, scores 1 - 7 for each item; higher scores mean better quality). A total of 100 guidelines were assessed. The mean number of items scoring 6 or 7 per guideline was 9.2 (out of 23 items). Overall, 99 % of guidelines failed to include the target population in the development process, and 96 % did not report facilitators and barriers to guideline application. In addition, 86 % did not include advice or tools, and 94 % did not present monitoring or auditing criteria. The global methodological quality of clinical guidelines in the field of gastroenterology is poor, particularly regarding involvement of the target population in the development of guidelines and in the provision of clear suggestions to practitioners. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. [Urolithiasis guidelines: retrospective view and perspectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türk, C

    2016-10-01

    The first German guidelines on urolithiasis were published in four sections in "Der Urologe A" in 1997 and were listed at The Association of the Scientific Medical Societies in Germany (AWMF) in 1999. The European Association of Urology (EAU) published the first guidelines on urolithiasis in 2000. All guidelines must be updated on a regular basis. Guidelines should represent the highest level of evidence for the best diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, independent of economic pressure. Guidelines should safeguard optimal patient care and also serve as a basis for education and training of healthcare professionals. They are a tool for quality management and for national healthcare structures and strategies as well as for the judicature. Medical guidelines form the foundation for the elaboration of local clinical treatment pathways, which are the bridge to treatment of patients and also take economic and regional circumstances into consideration. In the future information technology (IT) could play an even more important role for both the complex methods of establishing guidelines and their implementation. The contents of guidelines could then be directly integrated into the clinical pathway, if necessary or into electronic patient charts in order to propose a medically and financially optimized treatment pathway. Because of the complexity of producing guidelines, they will in part be produced at a national level and adapted to the regional circumstances. Future technical, medical and genetic developments will lead to a multidisciplinary and multiprofessional cooperation in the production of guidelines.

  20. Impact of the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association cholesterol guidelines on the prescription of high-intensity statins in patients hospitalized for acute coronary syndrome or stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentino, Michael; Al Danaf, Jad; Panakos, Andrew; Ragupathi, Loheetha; Duffy, Danielle; Whellan, David

    2016-11-01

    The 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association cholesterol management guidelines represented a paradigm shift from the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III guidelines, replacing low-density lipoprotein cholesterol targets with a risk assessment model to guide statin therapy. Our objectives are to compare provider prescription of high-intensity statin therapy in patients hospitalized with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) or cerebrovascular accident (CVA) before and after the publication of the 2013 cholesterol guidelines, determine potential predictors of high-intensity statin utilization, and identify targets for improvement in cardiovascular risk reduction among these high-risk populations. A single-center retrospective cohort study of 695 patients discharged with a diagnosis of ACS or CVA in the 6months before (n=359) and after (n=336) the release of the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association cholesterol guidelines. Patient characteristics were compared using analysis of variance and χ2 tests. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to assess clinical predictors of provider utilization of high-intensity statins. After the 2013 cholesterol guidelines, the rate of prescribing high-intensity statins was greater for statin-naïve patients compared with those already on statin therapy (odds ratio [OR]0.51, P=.02). Prescription of high-intensity statins was higher for patients with ACS compared with CVA (OR 8.4, Pguidelines; OR 4.5, Pguidelines). Prescription of high-intensity statins steadily improved over the study period, significantly among patients with CVA (P<.001). Physicians were more likely to prescribe high-intensity statins in statin-naïve patients as compared with intensifying existing statin therapy, and their prescription pattern was lower after CVA vs ACS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Ultrasound Risk Categories for Thyroid Nodules and Cytology Results: A Single Institution’s Experience after the Adoption of the 2016 Update of Medical Guidelines by the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists and Associazione Medici Endocrinologi

    OpenAIRE

    Roberto Negro; Gabriele Greco; Ermenegildo Colosimo

    2017-01-01

    Objectives. In 2016, the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) and Associazione Medici Endocrinologi (AME) released updated guidelines for the diagnosis and management of thyroid nodules. The aim of this study was to evaluate the AACE/AME recommendations for FNA in clinical practice, by comparing the (US) stratification risk and indications for FNA with cytologic results. Methods. From May to December 2016, we collected the cytologic results from FNAs of nodules that were c...

  2. World association for the advancement of veterinary parasitology (WAAVP): Second edition of guidelines for evaluating the efficacy of anthelmintics in swine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hennessy, D.R.; Bauer, C.; Boray, J.C.

    2006-01-01

    Guidelines are provided for evaluating the efficacy of anthelmintics in swine which, in conjunction with other sets of guidance such as those of the International Cooperation on Harmonization of Technical Requirements for Registration of Veterinary Medicinal Products (VICH GL7 and VICH GL16...

  3. Vitamin D supplementation guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pludowski, Pawel; Holick, Michael F; Grant, William B; Konstantynowicz, Jerzy; Mascarenhas, Mario R; Haq, Afrozul; Povoroznyuk, Vladyslav; Balatska, Nataliya; Barbosa, Ana Paula; Karonova, Tatiana; Rudenka, Ema; Misiorowski, Waldemar; Zakharova, Irina; Rudenka, Alena; Łukaszkiewicz, Jacek; Marcinowska-Suchowierska, Ewa; Łaszcz, Natalia; Abramowicz, Pawel; Bhattoa, Harjit P; Wimalawansa, Sunil J

    2018-01-01

    Research carried out during the past two-decades extended the understanding of actions of vitamin D, from regulating calcium and phosphate absorption and bone metabolism to many pleiotropic actions in organs and tissues in the body. Most observational and ecological studies report association of higher serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentrations with improved outcomes for several chronic, communicable and non-communicable diseases. Consequently, numerous agencies and scientific organizations have developed recommendations for vitamin D supplementation and guidance on optimal serum 25(OH)D concentrations. The bone-centric guidelines recommend a target 25(OH)D concentration of 20ng/mL (50nmol/L), and age-dependent daily vitamin D doses of 400-800IU. The guidelines focused on pleiotropic effects of vitamin D recommend a target 25(OH)D concentration of 30ng/mL (75nmol/L), and age-, body weight-, disease-status, and ethnicity dependent vitamin D doses ranging between 400 and 2000IU/day. The wise and balanced choice of the recommendations to follow depends on one's individual health outcome concerns, age, body weight, latitude of residence, dietary and cultural habits, making the regional or nationwide guidelines more applicable in clinical practice. While natural sources of vitamin D can raise 25(OH)D concentrations, relative to dietary preferences and latitude of residence, in the context of general population, these sources are regarded ineffective to maintain the year-round 25(OH)D concentrations in the range of 30-50ng/mL (75-125nmol/L). Vitamin D self-administration related adverse effects, such as hypercalcemia and hypercalciuria are rare, and usually result from taking extremely high doses of vitamin D for a prolonged time. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Guidelines on renal cell cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mickisch, G; Carballido, J; Hellsten, S; Schuize, H; Mensink, H

    Objectives., On behalf of the European Association of Urology (EAU), Guidelines for Diagnosis, Therapy and. Follow Up of Renal. Cell Carcinoma Patients were established. Criteria for recommendations were evidence based and included aspects of cost-effectiveness and clinical feasibility. Method: A

  5. Curriculum Guidelines on Forensic Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Dental Education, 1990

    1990-01-01

    The American Association of Dental Schools' guidelines for curriculum design explain the scope of forensic dentistry and interrelationships with other fields, give an overview of the curriculum, and outline suggested primary educational goals, prerequisites, core content, specific behavioral objectives, sequencing, faculty and facility…

  6. Teacher Certification/Preparation Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotter, Rita

    1990-01-01

    Presents guidelines for general and theater specialist K-12 teacher certification developed by the American Alliance for Theatre Education and the Speech Communication Association. Advocates that all teachers have preparation in arts and communication and that theater and communication specialists continue to be trained. (SR)

  7. Curriculum Guidelines for Microscopic Anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Dental Education, 1993

    1993-01-01

    The American Association of Dental Schools' guidelines for curricula in microscopic anatomy offer an overview of the histology curriculum, note primary educational goals, outline specific content for general and oral histology, suggest prerequisites, and make recommendations for sequencing. Appropriate faculty and facilities are also suggested.…

  8. Predoctoral Curriculum Guidelines for Biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Dental Education, 1986

    1986-01-01

    The American Association of Dental Schools' predoctoral guidelines for biomaterials curricula includes notes on interrelationships between this and other fields, a curriculum overview, primary educational goals, prerequisites, a core content outline, specific behavioral objectives for each content area, and information on sequencing, faculty and…

  9. Physical Activity Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... use this site. health.gov Physical Activity Guidelines Physical Activity Physical activity is key to improving the health of the Nation. Based on the latest science, the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans is an essential resource for ...

  10. Extracorporeal Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (E-CPR) During Pediatric In-Hospital Cardiopulmonary Arrest Is Associated With Improved Survival to Discharge: A Report from the American Heart Association's Get With The Guidelines-Resuscitation (GWTG-R) Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasa, Javier J; Rogers, Rachel S; Localio, Russell; Shults, Justine; Raymond, Tia; Gaies, Michael; Thiagarajan, Ravi; Laussen, Peter C; Kilbaugh, Todd; Berg, Robert A; Nadkarni, Vinay; Topjian, Alexis

    2016-01-12

    Although extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (E-CPR) can result in survival after failed conventional CPR (C-CPR), no large, systematic comparison of pediatric E-CPR and continued C-CPR has been reported. Consecutive patients CPR events ≥10 minutes in duration reported to the Get With the Guidelines-Resuscitation registry between January 2000 and December 2011 were identified. Hospitals were grouped by teaching status and location. Primary outcome was survival to discharge. Regression modeling was performed, conditioning on hospital groups. A secondary analysis was performed with the use of propensity score matching. Of 3756 evaluable patients, 591 (16%) received E-CPR and 3165 (84%) received C-CPR only. Survival to hospital discharge and survival with favorable neurological outcome (Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category score of 1-3 or unchanged from admission) were greater for E-CPR (40% [237 of 591] and 27% [133 of 496]) versus C-CPR patients (27% [862 of 3165] and 18% [512 of 2840]). Odds ratios (ORs) for survival to hospital discharge and survival with favorable neurological outcome were greater for E-CPR versus C-CPR. After adjustment for covariates, patients receiving E-CPR had higher odds of survival to discharge (OR, 2.80; 95% confidence interval, 2.13-3.69; PCPR. This association persisted when analyzed by propensity score-matched cohorts (OR, 1.70; 95% confidence interval, 1.33-2.18; PCPR of ≥10 minutes duration, E-CPR was associated with improved survival to hospital discharge and survival with favorable neurological outcome compared with C-CPR. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Clinical practice guideline: tinnitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunkel, David E; Bauer, Carol A; Sun, Gordon H; Rosenfeld, Richard M; Chandrasekhar, Sujana S; Cunningham, Eugene R; Archer, Sanford M; Blakley, Brian W; Carter, John M; Granieri, Evelyn C; Henry, James A; Hollingsworth, Deena; Khan, Fawad A; Mitchell, Scott; Monfared, Ashkan; Newman, Craig W; Omole, Folashade S; Phillips, C Douglas; Robinson, Shannon K; Taw, Malcolm B; Tyler, Richard S; Waguespack, Richard; Whamond, Elizabeth J

    2014-10-01

    Tinnitus is the perception of sound without an external source. More than 50 million people in the United States have reported experiencing tinnitus, resulting in an estimated prevalence of 10% to 15% in adults. Despite the high prevalence of tinnitus and its potential significant effect on quality of life, there are no evidence-based, multidisciplinary clinical practice guidelines to assist clinicians with management. The focus of this guideline is on tinnitus that is both bothersome and persistent (lasting 6 months or longer), which often negatively affects the patient's quality of life. The target audience for the guideline is any clinician, including nonphysicians, involved in managing patients with tinnitus. The target patient population is limited to adults (18 years and older) with primary tinnitus that is persistent and bothersome. The purpose of this guideline is to provide evidence-based recommendations for clinicians managing patients with tinnitus. This guideline provides clinicians with a logical framework to improve patient care and mitigate the personal and social effects of persistent, bothersome tinnitus. It will discuss the evaluation of patients with tinnitus, including selection and timing of diagnostic testing and specialty referral to identify potential underlying treatable pathology. It will then focus on the evaluation and treatment of patients with persistent primary tinnitus, with recommendations to guide the evaluation and measurement of the effect of tinnitus and to determine the most appropriate interventions to improve symptoms and quality of life for tinnitus sufferers. The development group made a strong recommendation that clinicians distinguish patients with bothersome tinnitus from patients with nonbothersome tinnitus. The development group made a strong recommendation against obtaining imaging studies of the head and neck in patients with tinnitus, specifically to evaluate tinnitus that does not localize to 1 ear, is nonpulsatile

  12. 2017 American College of Rheumatology/American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons Guideline for the Perioperative Management of Antirheumatic Medication in Patients With Rheumatic Diseases Undergoing Elective Total Hip or Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Susan M; Springer, Bryan; Guyatt, Gordon; Abdel, Matthew P; Dasa, Vinod; George, Michael; Gewurz-Singer, Ora; Giles, Jon T; Johnson, Beverly; Lee, Steve; Mandl, Lisa A; Mont, Michael A; Sculco, Peter; Sporer, Scott; Stryker, Louis; Turgunbaev, Marat; Brause, Barry; Chen, Antonia F; Gililland, Jeremy; Goodman, Mark; Hurley-Rosenblatt, Arlene; Kirou, Kyriakos; Losina, Elena; MacKenzie, Ronald; Michaud, Kaleb; Mikuls, Ted; Russell, Linda; Sah, Alexander; Miller, Amy S; Singh, Jasvinder A; Yates, Adolph

    2017-08-01

    This collaboration between the American College of Rheumatology and the American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons developed an evidence-based guideline for the perioperative management of antirheumatic drug therapy for adults with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), spondyloarthritis (SpA) including ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), or systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) undergoing elective total hip (THA) or total knee arthroplasty (TKA). A panel of rheumatologists, orthopedic surgeons specializing in hip and knee arthroplasty, and methodologists was convened to construct the key clinical questions to be answered in the guideline. A multi-step systematic literature review was then conducted, from which evidence was synthesized for continuing versus withholding antirheumatic drug therapy and for optimal glucocorticoid management in the perioperative period. A Patient Panel was convened to determine patient values and preferences, and the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation methodology was used to rate the quality of evidence and the strength of recommendations, using a group consensus process through a convened Voting Panel of rheumatologists and orthopedic surgeons. The strength of the recommendation reflects the degree of certainty that benefits outweigh harms of the intervention, or vice versa, considering the quality of available evidence and the variability in patient values and preferences. The guideline addresses the perioperative use of antirheumatic drug therapy including traditional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, biologic agents, tofacitinib, and glucocorticoids in adults with RA, SpA, JIA, or SLE who are undergoing elective THA or TKA. It provides recommendations regarding when to continue, when to withhold, and when to restart these medications, and the optimal perioperative dosing of glucocorticoids. The guideline includes 7 recommendations, all of which are conditional

  13. Molecular Biomarkers for the Evaluation of Colorectal Cancer: Guideline From the American Society for Clinical Pathology, College of American Pathologists, Association for Molecular Pathology, and the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepulveda, Antonia R; Hamilton, Stanley R; Allegra, Carmen J; Grody, Wayne; Cushman-Vokoun, Allison M; Funkhouser, William K; Kopetz, Scott E; Lieu, Christopher; Lindor, Noralane M; Minsky, Bruce D; Monzon, Federico A; Sargent, Daniel J; Singh, Veena M; Willis, Joseph; Clark, Jennifer; Colasacco, Carol; Rumble, R Bryan; Temple-Smolkin, Robyn; Ventura, Christina B; Nowak, Jan A

    2017-05-01

    Purpose Molecular testing of colorectal cancers (CRCs) to improve patient care and outcomes of targeted and conventional therapies has been the center of many recent studies, including clinical trials. Evidence-based recommendations for the molecular testing of CRC tissues to guide epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) -targeted therapies and conventional chemotherapy regimens are warranted in clinical practice. The purpose of this guideline is to develop evidence-based recommendations to help establish standard molecular biomarker testing for CRC through a systematic review of the literature. Methods The American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP), College of American Pathologists (CAP), Association for Molecular Pathology (AMP), and the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) convened an Expert Panel to develop an evidence-based guideline to help establish standard molecular biomarker testing, guide targeted therapies, and advance personalized care for patients with CRC. A comprehensive literature search that included over 4,000 articles was conducted to gather data to inform this guideline. Results Twenty-one guideline statements (eight recommendations, 10 expert consensus opinions and three no recommendations) were established. Recommendations Evidence supports mutational testing for genes in the EGFR signaling pathway, since they provide clinically actionable information as negative predictors of benefit to anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody therapies for targeted therapy of CRC. Mutations in several of the biomarkers have clear prognostic value. Laboratory approaches to operationalize molecular testing for predictive and prognostic molecular biomarkers involve selection of assays, type of specimens to be tested, timing of ordering of tests and turnaround time for testing results. Additional information is available at: www.asco.org/CRC-markers-guideline and www.asco.org/guidelineswiki.

  14. An exploration of how guideline developer capacity and guideline implementability influence implementation and adoption: study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lemieux-Charles Louise

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Practice guidelines can improve health care delivery and outcomes but several issues challenge guideline adoption, including their intrinsic attributes, and whether and how they are implemented. It appears that guideline format may influence accessibility and ease of use, which may overcome attitudinal barriers of guideline adoption, and appear to be important to all stakeholders. Guideline content may facilitate various forms of decision making about guideline adoption relevant to different stakeholders. Knowledge and attitudes about, and incentives and capacity for implementation on the part of guideline sponsors may influence whether and how they develop guidelines containing these features, and undertake implementation. Examination of these issues may yield opportunities to improve guideline adoption. Methods The attributes hypothesized to facilitate adoption will be expanded by thematic analysis, and quantitative and qualitative summary of the content of international guidelines for two primary care (diabetes, hypertension and institutional care (chronic ulcer, chronic heart failure topics. Factors that influence whether and how guidelines are implemented will be explored by qualitative analysis of interviews with individuals affiliated with guideline sponsoring agencies. Discussion Previous research examined guideline implementation by measuring rates of compliance with recommendations or associated outcomes, but this produced little insight on how the products themselves, or their implementation, could be improved. This research will establish a theoretical basis upon which to conduct experimental studies to compare the cost-effectiveness of interventions that enhance guideline development and implementation capacity. Such studies could first examine short-term outcomes predictive of guideline utilization, such as recall, attitude toward, confidence in, and adoption intention. If successful, then long-term objective

  15. An exploration of how guideline developer capacity and guideline implementability influence implementation and adoption: study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliardi, Anna R; Brouwers, Melissa C; Palda, Valerie A; Lemieux-Charles, Louise; Grimshaw, Jeremy M

    2009-07-02

    Practice guidelines can improve health care delivery and outcomes but several issues challenge guideline adoption, including their intrinsic attributes, and whether and how they are implemented. It appears that guideline format may influence accessibility and ease of use, which may overcome attitudinal barriers of guideline adoption, and appear to be important to all stakeholders. Guideline content may facilitate various forms of decision making about guideline adoption relevant to different stakeholders. Knowledge and attitudes about, and incentives and capacity for implementation on the part of guideline sponsors may influence whether and how they develop guidelines containing these features, and undertake implementation. Examination of these issues may yield opportunities to improve guideline adoption. The attributes hypothesized to facilitate adoption will be expanded by thematic analysis, and quantitative and qualitative summary of the content of international guidelines for two primary care (diabetes, hypertension) and institutional care (chronic ulcer, chronic heart failure) topics. Factors that influence whether and how guidelines are implemented will be explored by qualitative analysis of interviews with individuals affiliated with guideline sponsoring agencies. Previous research examined guideline implementation by measuring rates of compliance with recommendations or associated outcomes, but this produced little insight on how the products themselves, or their implementation, could be improved. This research will establish a theoretical basis upon which to conduct experimental studies to compare the cost-effectiveness of interventions that enhance guideline development and implementation capacity. Such studies could first examine short-term outcomes predictive of guideline utilization, such as recall, attitude toward, confidence in, and adoption intention. If successful, then long-term objective outcomes reflecting the adoption of processes and

  16. Standards and Guidelines in Telemedicine and Telehealth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupinski, Elizabeth A.; Bernard, Jordana

    2014-01-01

    The development of guidelines and standards for telemedicine is an important and valuable process to help insure effective and safe delivery of quality healthcare. Some organizations, such as the American Telemedicine Association (ATA), have made the development of standards and guidelines a priority. The practice guidelines developed so far have been well received by the telemedicine community and are being adopted in numerous practices, as well as being used in research to support the practice and growth of telemedicine. Studies that utilize published guidelines not only help bring them into greater public awareness, but they also provide evidence needed to validate existing guidelines and guide the revision of future versions. Telemedicine will continue to grow and be adopted by more healthcare practitioners and patients in a wide variety of forms not just in the traditional clinical environments, and practice guidelines will be a key factor in fostering this growth. Creation of guidelines is important to payers and regulators as well as increasingly they are adopting and integrating them into regulations and policies. This paper will review some of the recent ATA efforts in developing telemedicine practice guidelines, review the role of research in guidelines development, review data regarding their use, and discuss some of areas where guidelines are still needed. PMID:27429261

  17. EAU Guidelines on Chronic Pelvic Pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fall, Magnus; Baranowski, Andrew P.; Elneil, Sohier; Engeler, Daniel; Hughes, John; Messelink, Embert J.; Oberpenning, Frank; Williams, Amanda C. de C.

    Context: These guidelines were prepared on behalf of the European Association of Urology (EAU) to help urologists assess the evidence-based management of chronic pelvic pain (CPP) and to incorporate the recommendations into their clinical practice. Objective: To revise guidelines for the diagnosis,

  18. 12 CFR 618.8015 - Policy guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Policy guidelines. 618.8015 Section 618.8015 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM GENERAL PROVISIONS Related Services § 618.8015 Policy guidelines. (a) The board of directors of each System bank or association providing...

  19. Development of clinical practice guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollon, Steven D; Areán, Patricia A; Craske, Michelle G; Crawford, Kermit A; Kivlahan, Daniel R; Magnavita, Jeffrey J; Ollendick, Thomas H; Sexton, Thomas L; Spring, Bonnie; Bufka, Lynn F; Galper, Daniel I; Kurtzman, Howard

    2014-01-01

    Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) are intended to improve mental, behavioral, and physical health by promoting clinical practices that are based on the best available evidence. The American Psychological Association (APA) is committed to generating patient-focused CPGs that are scientifically sound, clinically useful, and informative for psychologists, other health professionals, training programs, policy makers, and the public. The Institute of Medicine (IOM) 2011 standards for generating CPGs represent current best practices in the field. These standards involve multidisciplinary guideline development panels charged with generating recommendations based on comprehensive systematic reviews of the evidence. The IOM standards will guide the APA as it generates CPGs that can be used to inform the general public and the practice community regarding the benefits and harms of various treatment options. CPG recommendations are advisory rather than compulsory. When used appropriately, high-quality guidelines can facilitate shared decision making and identify gaps in knowledge.

  20. Molecular Biomarkers for the Evaluation of Colorectal Cancer: Guideline From the American Society for Clinical Pathology, College of American Pathologists, Association for Molecular Pathology, and American Society of Clinical Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepulveda, Antonia R; Hamilton, Stanley R; Allegra, Carmen J; Grody, Wayne; Cushman-Vokoun, Allison M; Funkhouser, William K; Kopetz, Scott E; Lieu, Christopher; Lindor, Noralane M; Minsky, Bruce D; Monzon, Federico A; Sargent, Daniel J; Singh, Veena M; Willis, Joseph; Clark, Jennifer; Colasacco, Carol; Rumble, R Bryan; Temple-Smolkin, Robyn; Ventura, Christina B; Nowak, Jan A

    2017-03-01

    To develop evidence-based guideline recommendations through a systematic review of the literature to establish standard molecular biomarker testing of colorectal cancer (CRC) tissues to guide epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) therapies and conventional chemotherapy regimens. The American Society for Clinical Pathology, College of American Pathologists, Association for Molecular Pathology, and American Society of Clinical Oncology convened an expert panel to develop an evidence-based guideline to establish standard molecular biomarker testing and guide therapies for patients with CRC. A comprehensive literature search that included more than 4,000 articles was conducted. Twenty-one guideline statements were established. Evidence supports mutational testing for EGFR signaling pathway genes, since they provide clinically actionable information as negative predictors of benefit to anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody therapies for targeted therapy of CRC. Mutations in several of the biomarkers have clear prognostic value. Laboratory approaches to operationalize CRC molecular testing are presented. Key Words: Molecular diagnostics; Gastrointestinal; Histology; Genetics; Oncology. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Clinical Pathology, College of American Pathologists, Association for Molecular Pathology, American Society for Clinical Oncology, and American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. FELASA guidelines for the refinement of methods for genotyping genetically-modified rodents: a report of the Federation of European Laboratory Animal Science Associations Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaparte, Dolores; Cinelli, Paolo; Douni, Eleni; Hérault, Yann; Maas, Maas; Pakarinen, Pirjo; Poutanen, Matti; Lafuente, Mirentxu Santos; Scavizzi, Ferdinando

    2013-07-01

    The use of genetically-modified (GM) animals as research models continues to grow. The completion of the mouse genome sequence, together with the high-throughput international effort to introduce mutations across the mouse genome in the embryonic stem (ES) cells (www.knockoutmouse.org) facilitates an efficient way to obtain mutated mouse strains as research models. The increasing number of available mutated mouses trains and their combinations, together with the increasing complexity in the targeting approaches used,reinforces the need for guidelines that will provide information about the mouse strains and the robust and reliable methods used for their genotyping. This information, however, should be obtained with a method causing minimal discomfort to the experimental animals. We have, therefore, compiled the present document which summarizes the currently available methods for obtaining genotype information. It provides updated guidelines concerning animal identification, DNA sampling and genotyping, and the information to be kept and distributed for any mutated rodent strain.

  2. Guidelines for the prevention and control of tuberculosis in non-human primates: recommendations of the European Primate Veterinary Association Working Group on Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushmitz, Moshe; Lecu, Alex; Verreck, Frank; Preussing, Ellen; Rensing, Susanne; Mätz-Rensing, Kerstin

    2009-02-01

    Effective tuberculosis (TB) control requires accurate diagnostic methods but the tuberculin skin test has serious limitations. Both false-negative and false-positive reactions are common, resulting in the spread of the infection and devastating TB outbreaks. Results of questionnaire surveys concerning TB testing practices in primate housing facilities showed great differences in testing practices. Although there was some uniformity regarding the sites of application, the amounts of tuberculin used and the time intervals for retesting, a great deal of variety was revealed considering the types of tuberculin preparations, the interpretation of tests and the susceptibility of animals. Here, we summarize the most common practices as regards TB control and prevention for non-human primates, and attempt to establish a uniform guideline based upon our experience with primate husbandry and care programmes as well as recent developments in the literature. The present guideline represents a consensus recommendation intending to harmonize the existing protocols.

  3. Guidelines for vaccination of dogs and cats in Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Woo-Jin; Kim, H. T.; Yoo, Han Sang; Youn, Hwa-Young

    2014-01-01

    This guideline contains the recommended vaccination schedules of dogs and cats from World Small Animal Veterinary Association (WSAVA) and American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA). In 2010, WSAVA published guidelines for the vaccination of dogs and cats. And, in 2011, AAHA also published guidelines for vaccination of dogs. In Korea, there is no published guideline for vaccination of dogs and cats yet. Therefore, the plane of vaccination also reports the present situation of vaccination sche...

  4. European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, European Society of Gastroenterology and Endoscopy Nurses and Associates, and the European Society of Anaesthesiology Guideline: Non-anaesthesiologist administration of propofol for GI endoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dumonceau, J.M.; Riphaus, A.; Aparicio, J.R.

    2010-01-01

    Propofol sedation by non-anaesthesiologists is an upcoming sedation regimen in several countries throughout Europe. Numerous studies have shown the efficacy and safety of this sedation regimen in gastrointestinal endoscopy. Nevertheless, this issue remains highly controversial. The aim of this ev......Propofol sedation by non-anaesthesiologists is an upcoming sedation regimen in several countries throughout Europe. Numerous studies have shown the efficacy and safety of this sedation regimen in gastrointestinal endoscopy. Nevertheless, this issue remains highly controversial. The aim......), the European Society of Gastroenterology and Endoscopy Nurses and Associates (ESGENA) and the European Society of Anaesthesiology (ESA). These three societies have endorsed the present guideline.The guideline is published simultaneously in the Journals Endoscopy and European Journal of Anaesthesiology....

  5. 2017 HIV Medicine Association of Infectious Diseases Society of America Clinical Practice Guideline for the Management of Chronic Pain in Patients Living With Human Immunodeficiency Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, R Douglas; Merlin, Jessica; Lum, Paula J; Ahmed, Ebtesam; Alexander, Carla; Corbett, Amanda H; Foley, Kathleen; Leonard, Kate; Treisman, Glenn Jordan; Selwyn, Peter

    2017-10-30

    Pain has always been an important part of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease and its experience for patients. In this guideline, we review the types of chronic pain commonly seen among persons living with HIV (PLWH) and review the limited evidence base for treatment of chronic noncancer pain in this population. We also review the management of chronic pain in special populations of PLWH, including persons with substance use and mental health disorders. Finally, a general review of possible pharmacokinetic interactions is included to assist the HIV clinician in the treatment of chronic pain in this population.It is important to realize that guidelines cannot always account for individual variation among patients. They are not intended to supplant physician judgment with respect to particular patients or special clinical situations. The Infectious Diseases Society of American considers adherence to these guidelines to be voluntary, with the ultimate determination regarding their application to be made by the physician in the light of each patient's individual circumstances. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. ACC/AHA Special Report: Clinical Practice Guideline Implementation Strategies: A Summary of Systematic Reviews by the NHLBI Implementation Science Work Group: A Report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Clinical Practice Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Wiley V; Pearson, Thomas A; Bennett, Glen C; Cushman, William C; Gaziano, Thomas A; Gorman, Paul N; Handler, Joel; Krumholz, Harlan M; Kushner, Robert F; MacKenzie, Thomas D; Sacco, Ralph L; Smith, Sidney C; Stevens, Victor J; Wells, Barbara L

    2017-02-28

    reviews), reminders (3 of 4 reviews), and provider incentives (1 of 1 review) were generally effective for cost reduction. Educational outreach visits (1 of 1 review) and provider incentives (1 of 1 review) were also generally effective for cost-effectiveness outcomes. Barriers to clinician adoption or adherence to guidelines included time constraints (8 reviews/overviews); limited staffing resources (2 overviews); timing (5 reviews/overviews); clinician skepticism (5 reviews/overviews); clinician knowledge of guidelines (4 reviews/overviews); and higher age of the clinician (1 overview). Facilitating factors included guideline characteristics such as format, resources, and end-user involvement (6 reviews/overviews); involving stakeholders (5 reviews/overviews); leadership support (5 reviews/overviews); scope of implementation (5 reviews/overviews); organizational culture such as multidisciplinary teams and low-baseline adherence (9 reviews/overviews); and electronic guidelines systems (3 reviews). The strategies of audit and feedback and educational outreach visits were generally effective in improving both process of care and clinical outcomes. Reminders and provider incentives showed mixed effectiveness, or were generally ineffective. No general conclusion could be reached about cost effectiveness, because of limitations in the evidence. Important gaps exist in the evidence on effectiveness of implementation interventions, especially regarding clinical outcomes, cost effectiveness and contextual issues affecting successful implementation. Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation and American Heart Association, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. EAU guidelines on chronic pelvic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fall, Magnus; Baranowski, Andrew P; Elneil, Sohier; Engeler, Daniel; Hughes, John; Messelink, Embert J; Oberpenning, Frank; de C Williams, Amanda C

    2010-01-01

    These guidelines were prepared on behalf of the European Association of Urology (EAU) to help urologists assess the evidence-based management of chronic pelvic pain (CPP) and to incorporate the recommendations into their clinical practice. To revise guidelines for the diagnosis, therapy, and follow-up of CPP patients. Guidelines were compiled by a working group and based on a systematic review of current literature using the PubMed database, with important papers reviewed for the 2003 EAU guidelines as a background. A panel of experts weighted the references. The full text of the guidelines is available through the EAU Central Office and the EAU Web site (www.uroweb.org). This article is a short version of the full guidelines text and summarises the main conclusions from the guidelines on the management of CPP. A guidelines text is presented including chapters on chronic prostate pain and bladder pain syndromes, urethral pain, scrotal pain, pelvic pain in gynaecologic practice, neurogenic dysfunctions, the role of the pelvic floor and pudendal nerve, psychological factors, general treatment of CPP, nerve blocks, and neuromodulation. These guidelines have been drawn up to provide support in the management of the large and difficult group of patients suffering from CPP.

  8. Risk group stratification to predict recurrence after transurethral resection in Japanese patients with stage Ta and T1 bladder tumours: validation study on the European Association of Urology guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakano, Shigeru; Matsuyama, Hideyasu; Takai, Kimio; Yoshihiro, Satoru; Kamiryo, Yoriaki; Shirataki, Satoshi; Kaneda, Yoshitaka; Hashimoto, Osamu; Joko, Keiji; Suga, Akinobu; Yamamoto, Mitsutaka; Hayashida, Shigeaki; Baba, Yoshikazu; Aoki, Akihiko

    2011-05-01

    • To validate the European Association of Urology (EAU) guidelines on risk group stratification to predict recurrence in Japanese patients with stage Ta and T1 bladder tumours. • A cohort of 592 Japanese patients who were treated with transurethral resection (TUR) and histopathologically diagnosed with Ta and T1 urothelial carcinoma of the bladder were enrolled in this retrospective study. • The primary endpoint of the present study was recurrence-free survival, and the median follow-up duration was 37 months in recurrence-free survivors. • Multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression analysis showed that the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (ECOG PS), prior recurrence rate, number of tumours and T category were independent predictors of time to recurrence (P guidelines for predicting recurrence, the vast majority of Japanese patients were classified into intermediate risk. • The intermediate-risk patients were further divided into intermediate-low-risk and intermediate-high-risk subgroups based on the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer risk table, and a significant difference in the recurrence-free survival rates was found between these subgroups (P guidelines for recurrence might not be applicable to Japanese patients with Ta and T1 bladder tumours, but the subgroup classification of intermediate risk could be appropriate. © 2010 THE AUTHORS. BJU INTERNATIONAL © 2010 BJU INTERNATIONAL.

  9. An update on the management of hepatitis C: guidelines for protease inhibitor-based triple therapy from the Latin American Association for the Study of the Liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez-Tapia, Norberto C; Ridruejo, Ezequiel; Alves de Mattos, Angelo; Bessone, Fernando; Daruich, Jorge; Sánchez-Ávila, Juan F; Cheinquer, Hugo; Zapata, Rodrigo; Uribe, Misael; Bosques-Padilla, Francisco; Gadano, Adrián; Sosa, Alejandro; Dávalos-Moscol, Milagros; Marroni, Claudio; Muñoz-Espinoza, Linda; Castro-Narro, Graciela; Paraná, Raymundo; Méndez-Sánchez, Nahum

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis C is a common cause of end-stage liver disease, and the main indication for liver transplantation in Latin America. Treatment of hepatitis C infected patients improves important long-term outcomes as mortality. Sustained viral response is reached in near 50% of patients with the previous management based in pegylated interferon and ribavirin. Recently new drugs were available increasing sustained viral response significantly, changing the standard of care to triple therapy. This guidelines provides a framework for practitioner in Latin America, to the management of patients with hepatitis C chronic infection. 

  10. Patterns of prescription and adherence to European Association of Urology guidelines on androgen deprivation therapy in prostate cancer: an Italian multicentre cross-sectional analysis from the Choosing Treatment for Prostate Cancer (CHOICE) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgia, Giuseppe; Russo, Giorgio Ivan; Tubaro, Andrea; Bortolus, Roberto; Randone, Donato; Gabriele, Pietro; Trippa, Fabio; Zattoni, Filiberto; Porena, Massimo; Mirone, Vincenzo; Serni, Sergio; Del Nero, Alberto; Lay, Giancarlo; Ricardi, Umberto; Rocco, Francesco; Terrone, Carlo; Pagliarulo, Arcangelo; Ludovico, Giuseppe; Vespasiani, Giuseppe; Brausi, Maurizio; Simeone, Claudio; Novella, Giovanni; Carmignani, Giorgio; Leonardi, Rosario; Pinnarò, Paola; De Paula, Ugo; Corvò, Renzo; Tenaglia, Raffaele; Siracusano, Salvatore; Mantini, Giovanna; Gontero, Paolo; Savoca, Gianfranco; Ficarra, Vincenzo

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate both the patterns of prescription of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) in patients with prostate cancer (PCa) and the adherence to European Association of Urology (EAU) guidelines for ADT prescription. The Choosing Treatment for Prostate Cancer (CHOICE) study was an Italian multicentre cross-sectional study conducted between December 2010 and January 2012. A total of 1 386 patients, treated with ADT for PCa (first prescription or renewal of ADT), were selected. With regard to the EAU guidelines on ADT, the cohort was categorized into discordant ADT (Group A) and concordant ADT (Group B). The final cohort included 1 075 patients with a geographical distribution including North Italy (n = 627, 58.3%), Central Italy (n = 233, 21.7%) and South Italy (n = 215, 20.0%). In the category of patients treated with primary ADT, a total of 125 patients (56.3%) were classified as low risk according to D'Amico classification. With regard to the EAU guidelines, 285 (26.51%) and 790 patients (73.49%) were classified as discordant (Group A) and concordant (Group B), respectively. In Group A, patients were more likely to receive primary ADT (57.5%, 164/285 patients) than radical prostatectomy (RP; 30.9%, 88/285 patients), radiation therapy (RT; 6.7%, 19/285 patients) or RP + RT (17.7%, 14/285 patients; P guideline adherence for ADT was low in Italy and was influenced by geographic area. Healthcare providers and urologists should consider these results in order to quantify the inadequate use of ADT and to set policy strategies to overcome this risk. © 2015 The Authors BJU International © 2015 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Prevention of infective endocarditis: guidelines from the American Heart Association: a guideline from the American Heart Association Rheumatic Fever, Endocarditis, and Kawasaki Disease Committee, Council on Cardiovascular Disease in the Young, and the Council on Clinical Cardiology, Council on Cardiovascular Surgery and Anesthesia, and the Quality of Care and Outcomes Research Interdisciplinary Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Walter; Taubert, Kathryn A; Gewitz, Michael; Lockhart, Peter B; Baddour, Larry M; Levison, Matthew; Bolger, Ann; Cabell, Christopher H; Takahashi, Masato; Baltimore, Robert S; Newburger, Jane W; Strom, Brian L; Tani, Lloyd Y; Gerber, Michael; Bonow, Robert O; Pallasch, Thomas; Shulman, Stanford T; Rowley, Anne H; Burns, Jane C; Ferrieri, Patricia; Gardner, Timothy; Goff, David; Durack, David T

    2007-10-09

    The purpose of this statement is to update the recommendations by the American Heart Association (AHA) for the prevention of infective endocarditis that were last published in 1997. A writing group was appointed by the AHA for their expertise in prevention and treatment of infective endocarditis, with liaison members representing the American Dental Association, the Infectious Diseases Society of America, and the American Academy of Pediatrics. The writing group reviewed input from national and international experts on infective endocarditis. The recommendations in this document reflect analyses of relevant literature regarding procedure-related bacteremia and infective endocarditis, in vitro susceptibility data of the most common microorganisms that cause infective endocarditis, results of prophylactic studies in animal models of experimental endocarditis, and retrospective and prospective studies of prevention of infective endocarditis. MEDLINE database searches from 1950 to 2006 were done for English-language papers using the following search terms: endocarditis, infective endocarditis, prophylaxis, prevention, antibiotic, antimicrobial, pathogens, organisms, dental, gastrointestinal, genitourinary, streptococcus, enterococcus, staphylococcus, respiratory, dental surgery, pathogenesis, vaccine, immunization, and bacteremia. The reference lists of the identified papers were also searched. We also searched the AHA online library. The American College of Cardiology/AHA classification of recommendations and levels of evidence for practice guidelines were used. The paper was subsequently reviewed by outside experts not affiliated with the writing group and by the AHA Science Advisory and Coordinating Committee. The major changes in the updated recommendations include the following: (1) The Committee concluded that only an extremely small number of cases of infective endocarditis might be prevented by antibiotic prophylaxis for dental procedures even if such

  12. Initiation Patterns of Statins in the 2 Years After Release of the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) Cholesterol Management Guideline in a Large US Health Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olufade, Temitope; Zhou, Siting; Anzalone, Deborah; Kern, David M; Tunceli, Ozgur; Cziraky, Mark J; Willey, Vincent J

    2017-05-04

    The purpose of this study was to characterize changes in statin utilization patterns in patients newly initiated on therapy in the 2 years following the release of the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) cholesterol management guideline in a large US health plan population. This retrospective, observational study used administrative medical and pharmacy claims data to identify patients newly initiated on statin therapy over 4 quarters prior to and 8 quarters following the release of the guideline (average N/quarter=3596). Patients were divided into the 4 statin benefit groups (SBGs) based on risk factors and laboratory lipid levels as defined in the guideline: SBG1 (with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease [ASCVD]; N=1046/quarter), SBG2 (without ASCVD, with low-density lipoprotein cholesterol ≥190 mg/dL; N=454/quarter), SBG3 (without ASCVD, aged 40-75 years, with diabetes mellitus, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol 70-189 mg/dL; N=1391/quarter), SBG4 (no ASCVD or diabetes mellitus, age 40-75 years, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol 70-189 mg/dL, estimated 10-year ASCVD risk of ≥7.5%; N=705/quarter). Demographic variables, statin utilization patterns, lipid levels, and comorbidities were analyzed for pre- and postguideline periods. Postguideline, gradually increased high-intensity statin initiation occurred in SBG1, SBG2, and in SBG3 patients with 10-year ASCVD risk ≥7.5%. Moderate- to high-intensity statin initiation gradually increased among SBG4 patients. Recommended-intensity statin choice changed to a greater degree among patients treated by specialty care physicians. Regarding sex, target-intensity statin initiation was lower in women in all groups before and after guideline release. Prescriber implementation of the guideline recommendations has gradually increased, with the most marked change in the increased initiation of high-intensity statins in patients with ASCVD and in those treated by a specialist

  13. Public informations guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1986-06-01

    The purpose of these Public Information Guidelines is to provide principles for the implementation of the NWPA mandate and the Mission Plan requirements for the provision of public information. These Guidelines set forth the public information policy to be followed by all Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) performance components. The OCRWM offices should observe these Guidelines in shaping and conducting public information activities.

  14. European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, European Society of Gastroenterology and Endoscopy Nurses and Associates, and the European Society of Anaesthesiology Guideline: Non-anesthesiologist administration of propofol for GI endoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dumonceau, J.M.; Riphaus, A.; Aparicio, J.R.

    2010-01-01

    Propofol sedation by non-anesthesiologists is an upcoming sedation regimen in several countries throughout Europe. Numerous studies have shown the efficacy and safety of this sedation regimen in gastrointestinal endoscopy. Nevertheless, this issue remains highly controversial. The aim of this evi......Propofol sedation by non-anesthesiologists is an upcoming sedation regimen in several countries throughout Europe. Numerous studies have shown the efficacy and safety of this sedation regimen in gastrointestinal endoscopy. Nevertheless, this issue remains highly controversial. The aim......), the European Society of Gastroenterology and Endoscopy Nurses and Associates (ESGENA) and the European Society of Anaesthesiology (ESA). These three societies have endorsed the present guideline....

  15. Guidelines and checklists for short-term missions in global pediatric surgery: Recommendations from the American Academy of Pediatrics Delivery of Surgical Care Global Health Subcommittee, American Pediatric Surgical Association Global Pediatric Surgery Committee, Society for Pediatric Anesthesia Committee on International Education and Service, and American Pediatric Surgical Nurses Association, Inc. Global Health Special Interest Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Marilyn; Drum, Elizabeth; Evans, Faye M; Fitzgerald, Tamara; Fraser, Jason; Holterman, Ai-Xuan; Jen, Howard; Kynes, J Matthew; Kreiss, Jenny; McClain, Craig D; Newton, Mark; Nwomeh, Benedict; O'Neill, James; Ozgediz, Doruk; Politis, George; Rice, Henry; Rothstein, David; Sanchez, Julie; Singleton, Mark; Yudkowitz, Francine S

    2017-11-15

    Pediatric surgeons, anesthesia providers, and nurses from North America and other high-income countries (HICs) are increasingly engaged in resource-limited areas, with short-term missions (STMs) as the most common form of involvement. However, consensus recommendations currently do not exist for STMs in pediatric general surgery and associated perioperative care. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) Delivery of Surgical Care Subcommittee and American Pediatric Surgical Association (APSA) Global Pediatric Surgery Committee, with the American Pediatric Surgical Nurses Association, Inc. (APSNA) Global Health Special Interest Group, and the Society for Pediatric Anesthesia (SPA) Committee on International Education and Service generated consensus recommendations for STMs based on extensive experience with STMs. Three distinct, but related areas were identified: 1) Broad goals of surgical partnerships between HICs- and low and middle-income countries (LMICs). A previous set of guidelines published by the Global Paediatric Surgery Network Collaborative (GPSN), was endorsed by all groups; 2) Guidelines for the conduct of STMs were developed, including planning, in-country perioperative patient care, post-trip follow-up, and sustainability; 3) travel and safety considerations critical to STM success were enumerated. A diverse group of stakeholders developed these guidelines for STMs in LMICs. These guidelines may be a useful tool to ensure safe, responsible, and ethical STMs given increasing engagement of HIC providers in this work. 5. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Guideline clinical nutrition in patients with stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Rainer; Smoliner, Christine; Jäger, Martin; Warnecke, Tobias; Leischker, Andreas H; Dziewas, Rainer

    2013-12-01

    Stroke is regularly accompanied by dysphagia and other factors associated with decreased nutritional intake. Dysphagia with aspiration pneumonia and insufficient nutritional intake lead to worse outcome after stroke.This guideline is the first chapter of the guideline "Clinical Nutrition in Neurology" of the German Society for Clinical Nutrition (DGEM) which itself is one part of a comprehensive guideline about all areas of Clinical Nutrition. The thirty-one recommendations of the guideline are based on a systematic literature search and review, last updated December 31, 2011. All recommendations were discussed and consented at several consensus conferences with the entire DGEM guideline group. The recommendations underline the importance of an early screening and assessment of dysphagia and give advice for an evidence based and comprehensive nutritional management to avoid aspiration, malnutrition and dehydration.

  17. Physical therapy management of congenital muscular torticollis: an evidence-based clinical practice guideline: from the Section on Pediatrics of the American Physical Therapy Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Sandra L; Coulter, Colleen; Fetters, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Congenital muscular torticollis (CMT) is an idiopathic postural deformity evident shortly after birth, typically characterized by lateral flexion of the head to one side and cervical rotation to the opposite side due to unilateral shortening of the sternocleidomastoid muscle. CMT may be accompanied by other neurological or musculoskeletal conditions. Infants with CMT are frequently referred to physical therapists (PTs) to treat their asymmetries. This evidence-based clinical practice guideline (CPG) provides guidance on which infants should be monitored, treated, and/or referred, and when and what PTs should treat. Based upon critical appraisal of literature and expert opinion, 16 action statements for screening, examination, intervention, and follow-up are linked with explicit levels of evidence. The CPG addresses referral, screening, examination and evaluation, prognosis, first-choice and supplemental interventions, consultation, discharge, follow-up, suggestions for implementation and compliance audits, flow sheets for referral paths and classification of CMT severity, and research recommendations.

  18. 2017 American College of Rheumatology/American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons Guideline for the Perioperative Management of Antirheumatic Medication in Patients With Rheumatic Diseases Undergoing Elective Total Hip or Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Susan M; Springer, Bryan; Guyatt, Gordon; Abdel, Matthew P; Dasa, Vinod; George, Michael; Gewurz-Singer, Ora; Giles, Jon T; Johnson, Beverly; Lee, Steve; Mandl, Lisa A; Mont, Michael A; Sculco, Peter; Sporer, Scott; Stryker, Louis; Turgunbaev, Marat; Brause, Barry; Chen, Antonia F; Gililland, Jeremy; Goodman, Mark; Hurley-Rosenblatt, Arlene; Kirou, Kyriakos; Losina, Elena; MacKenzie, Ronald; Michaud, Kaleb; Mikuls, Ted; Russell, Linda; Sah, Alexander; Miller, Amy S; Singh, Jasvinder A; Yates, Adolph

    2017-09-01

    This collaboration between the American College of Rheumatology and the American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons developed an evidence-based guideline for the perioperative management of antirheumatic drug therapy for adults with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), spondyloarthritis (SpA) including ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), or systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) undergoing elective total hip (THA) or total knee arthroplasty (TKA). A panel of rheumatologists, orthopedic surgeons specializing in hip and knee arthroplasty, and methodologists was convened to construct the key clinical questions to be answered in the guideline. A multi-step systematic literature review was then conducted, from which evidence was synthesized for continuing versus withholding antirheumatic drug therapy and for optimal glucocorticoid management in the perioperative period. A Patient Panel was convened to determine patient values and preferences, and the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation methodology was used to rate the quality of evidence and the strength of recommendations, using a group consensus process through a convened Voting Panel of rheumatologists and orthopedic surgeons. The strength of the recommendation reflects the degree of certainty that benefits outweigh harms of the intervention, or vice versa, considering the quality of available evidence and the variability in patient values and preferences. The guideline addresses the perioperative use of antirheumatic drug therapy including traditional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, biologic agents, tofacitinib, and glucocorticoids in adults with RA, SpA, JIA, or SLE who are undergoing elective THA or TKA. It provides recommendations regarding when to continue, when to withhold, and when to restart these medications, and the optimal perioperative dosing of glucocorticoids. The guideline includes 7 recommendations, all of which are conditional

  19. Failure to Adhere to Protocol Specified Radiation Therapy Guidelines Was Associated With Decreased Survival in RTOG 9704-A Phase III Trial of Adjuvant Chemotherapy and Chemoradiotherapy for Patients With Resected Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrams, Ross A., E-mail: Ross_a_abrams@rush.edu [Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States); Winter, Kathryn A. [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Statistical Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Regine, William F. [University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD (United States); Safran, Howard [Brown University, Providence, RI (United States); Hoffman, John P. [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Lustig, Robert [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Statistical Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Konski, Andre A. [Wayne State Medical Center, Detroit, MI (United States); Benson, Al B. [Northwestern University, Chicago, IL (United States); Macdonald, John S. [St. Vincent' s Cancer Care Center, New York, NY (United States); Rich, Tyvin A. [University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Willett, Christopher G. [Duke University, Durham, NC (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: In Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9704, as previously published, patients with resected pancreatic adenocarcinoma received continuous infusion 5-FU and concurrent radiotherapy (5FU-RT). 5FU-RT treatment was preceded and followed by randomly assigned chemotherapy, either 5-FU or gemcitabine. This analysis explored whether failure to adhere to specified RT guidelines influenced survival and/or toxicity. Methods and Materials: RT requirements were protocol specified. Adherence was scored as per protocol (PP) or less than per protocol (associated with decreased risk of failure (p = 0.016) and, for gemcitabine patients, a trend toward reduced Grade 4/5 nonhematologic toxicity (p = 0.065). Conclusions: This is the first Phase III, multicenter, adjuvant protocol for pancreatic adenocarcinoma to evaluate the impact of adherence to specified RT protocol guidelines on protocol outcomes. Failure to adhere to specified RT guidelines was associated with reduced survival and, for patients receiving gemcitabine, trend toward increased nonhematologic toxicity.

  20. [Undescended testis: current treatment guidelines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haid, B

    2016-01-01

    Cryptorchidism is the most common genital malformation in male newborns. In recent years, guidelines concerning diagnosis and therapy have undergone considerable evolution with the implementation of recent knowledge in pathophysiology, diagnosis, and therapy. The aim of this publication is to provide an overview of the current national and international guideline recommendations concerning diagnosis and treatment of cryptorchidism. Critical points are discussed in light of current scientific literature. The current guidelines of the European Association of Urology (EAU)/European Society for Pediatric Urology (ESPU), the American Association of Urology (AUA), the pediatric urologic task force of the Austrian Society of Urology (ÖGU), the international consultation on urological disease (ICUD) and the German Society of Urology (DGU)/German Association of Pediatric Surgery (DGKCh) have been analyzed concerning the most important aspects of treatment and diagnosis. There is broad consensus concerning most steps and decisions for the treatment of cryptorchidism. However, some aspects of diagnostic imaging, the use of hormonal therapy, and surgical access in nonpalpable testis warrant further discussion and are the fields of considerable changes.

  1. D 59 Design Guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, Hans F.; Lamberti, Alberto

    The present guidelines are specifically dedicated to Low Crested Structures on attempt to provide methodological tools both for the engineering design of structures and for prediction of performance and environmental impacts. It is anticipated that the guidelines will provide valuable inputs to c...

  2. Measure Guideline: Ventilation Cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Springer, D. [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), David, CA (United States); Dakin, B. [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), David, CA (United States); German, A. [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), David, CA (United States)

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this measure guideline is to provide information on a cost-effective solution for reducing cooling system energy and demand in homes located in hot-dry and cold-dry climates. This guideline provides a prescriptive approach that outlines qualification criteria, selection considerations, and design and installation procedures.

  3. Measure Guideline: Ventilation Cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Springer, D.; Dakin, B.; German, A.

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this measure guideline on ventilation cooling is to provide information on a cost-effective solution for reducing cooling system energy and demand in homes located in hot-dry and cold-dry climates. This guideline provides a prescriptive approach that outlines qualification criteria, selection considerations, and design and installation procedures.

  4. [The German Guideline Clearinghouse on Breast Cancer: the need for frequent updating of breast cancer guidelines requires effective guideline updating procedures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weingart, Olaf; Sonntag, Dietrich; Trapp, Henrike; Bartsch, Hans-Helge; Baumeister, Rüdiger G H; Goerke, Kay; Giersiepen, Klaus; Hindenburg, Hans-Joachim; Ming, Karin; Schulz-Wendtland, Rüdiger; Störkel, Stephan; Kober, Thilo; Thole, Henning; Kirchner, Hanna; Ollenschläger, Günter

    2004-08-01

    In order to promote the quality of health care and guidelines in Germany the German Guideline Clearinghouse (Sponsors: German Medical Association, National Association of the Statutory Health Insurance Physicians, German Hospital Federation, Associations of the Sickness Funds and the Statutory Pension Insurance) was established at the Agency for Quality in Medicine (AQuMed) in 1999. The results of the 10th Guideline Clearing Project, the Guideline Clearing Report "Breast Cancer", were published in December 2003. In a systematic search using English/German language guideline databases and literature databases (Medline, Healthstar, Embase), 16 national guidelines were identified which were in accordance to the inclusion criteria (breast cancer treatment; German or English language; published after 1992; new guideline or genuine update (no adaptation); recommended for country-wide implementation). The methodological quality of these 16 guidelines was evaluated using the appraisal instrument of the German Guideline Clearinghouse, the checklist "Methodological Quality of Clinical Practice Guidelines". A peer review of the guidelines was performed by a multidisciplinary focus group of experts (intended guideline users from clinical and ambulatory settings as well as patients). This group consented comments and recommendations for actions of health care policy makers in Germany for a German breast cancer guideline based on examples from the appraised guidelines. None of the identified guidelines contained information about all of the 24 key topics that the focus group considered to be relevant for a German national guideline. The selected exemplary text extracts from the evaluated guidelines can be used as benchmarks and example sources for the development of a national German breast cancer guideline. From the beginning, patients should be involved in the development process within a multidisciplinary team. Due to the rapid emergence of new evidence, oncology guidelines

  5. Evaluation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) and reduced ejection fraction heart failure (HFrEF) discharge medication prescribing: Is drug therapy concordant with national guidelines associated with a reduction in 30-day readmissions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Amy; Tolley, Elizabeth; Hartmann, Jonathan; Reedus, Jasmine; Bowlin, Brandi; Finch, Christopher; Sands, Christopher W; Self, Timothy

    2016-10-01

    Approximately 1 in 5 hospitalized COPD patients are readmitted within 30 days of discharge. CHF coexists in more than 20% of patients with COPD, and is associated with early readmission for COPD. Reducing 30-day hospital readmissions for COPD is of intense current interest. A retrospective chart review was performed to identify patients discharged with COPD exacerbation and HFrEF. The primary objective was to evaluate if discharge medication prescribing following guidelines for both COPD and HFrEF correlates with reduced 30-day readmission rates. The study included 281 admissions with 39.1% prescribed appropriate discharge medications for both COPD and HFrEF; 30-day readmission rate was 24.5% for these patients compared to 31.1% that were not prescribed appropriate medications (p = 0.24). Beta blockers, ACE inhibitors or ARBS, and aldosterone antagonists were under-prescribed, but this did not significantly associate with increased readmission (p = 0.51, p = 0.23 or 0.99, and p = 0.18, respectively). Those prescribed hydralazine or nitrates were more likely to readmit (both p = 0.01). Diabetes and hyperlipidemia were associated with increased readmission (p = 0.01 and 0.05). This study did not show a significant difference in 30-day readmission rate based on appropriate discharge medications for both COPD and HFrEF. The comorbidities diabetes and hyperlipidemia and prescription of hydralazine or nitrates were significantly associated with increased readmission rate. Larger patient populations may be needed to assess if guideline based discharge medication prescribing is associated with reduced 30-day readmissions for COPD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. EAU guidelines on penile curvature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatzimouratidis, Konstantinos; Eardley, Ian; Giuliano, François; Hatzichristou, Dimitrios; Moncada, Ignacio; Salonia, Andrea; Vardi, Yoram; Wespes, Eric

    2012-09-01

    Penile curvature can be congenital or acquired. Acquired curvature is secondary due to La Peyronie (Peyronie's) disease. To provide clinical guidelines on the diagnosis and treatment of penile curvature. A systematic literature search on the epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment of penile curvature was performed. Articles with the highest evidence available were selected and formed the basis for assigning levels of evidence and grades of recommendations. The pathogenesis of congenital penile curvature is unknown. Peyronie's disease is a poorly understood connective tissue disorder most commonly attributed to repetitive microvascular injury or trauma during intercourse. Diagnosis is based on medical and sexual histories, which are sufficient to establish the diagnosis. Physical examination includes assessment of palpable nodules and penile length. Curvature is best documented by a self-photograph or pharmacologically induced erection. The only treatment option for congenital penile curvature is surgery based on plication techniques. Conservative treatment for Peyronie's disease is associated with poor outcomes. Pharmacotherapy includes oral potassium para-aminobenzoate, intralesional treatment with verapamil, clostridial collagenase or interferon, topical verapamil gel, and iontophoresis with verapamil and dexamethasone. They can be efficacious in some patients, but none of these options carry a grade A recommendation. Steroids, vitamin E, and tamoxifen cannot be recommended. Extracorporeal shock wave treatment and penile traction devices may only be used to treat penile pain and reduce penile deformity, respectively. Surgery is indicated when Peyronie's disease is stable for at least 3 mo. Tunical shortening procedures, especially plication techniques, are the first treatment options. Tunical lengthening procedures are preferred in more severe curvatures or in complex deformities. Penile prosthesis implantation is recommended in patients with erectile dysfunction

  7. Community health workers adherence to referral guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lal, Sham; Ndyomugenyi, Richard; Paintain, Lucy

    2016-01-01

    and symptoms. CHW treatment registers were reviewed to identify children eligible for referral according to training guidelines (temperature of ≥38.5 °C), to assess whether CHWs adhered to the guidelines and referred them. Factors associated with adherence were examined with logistic regression models. Results...... to the referral guideline. Methods A secondary analysis was undertaken of data collected during two cluster-randomized trials conducted between January 2010 and July 2011, one in a moderate-to-high malaria transmission setting and the other in a low malaria transmission setting. All CHWs were trained to prescribe...

  8. International ERS/ESICM/ESCMID/ALAT guidelines for the management of hospital-acquired pneumonia and ventilator-associated pneumonia: Guidelines for the management of hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP)/ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) of the European Respiratory Society (ERS), European Society of Intensive Care Medicine (ESICM), European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ESCMID) and Asociación Latinoamericana del Tórax (ALAT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Antoni; Niederman, Michael S; Chastre, Jean; Ewig, Santiago; Fernandez-Vandellos, Patricia; Hanberger, Hakan; Kollef, Marin; Li Bassi, Gianluigi; Luna, Carlos M; Martin-Loeches, Ignacio; Paiva, J Artur; Read, Robert C; Rigau, David; Timsit, Jean François; Welte, Tobias; Wunderink, Richard

    2017-09-01

    The most recent European guidelines and task force reports on hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) and ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) were published almost 10 years ago. Since then, further randomised clinical trials of HAP and VAP have been conducted and new information has become available. Studies of epidemiology, diagnosis, empiric treatment, response to treatment, new antibiotics or new forms of antibiotic administration and disease prevention have changed old paradigms. In addition, important differences between approaches in Europe and the USA have become apparent.The European Respiratory Society launched a project to develop new international guidelines for HAP and VAP. Other European societies, including the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine and the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, were invited to participate and appointed their representatives. The Latin American Thoracic Association was also invited.A total of 15 experts and two methodologists made up the panel. Three experts from the USA were also invited (Michael S. Niederman, Marin Kollef and Richard Wunderink).Applying the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation) methodology, the panel selected seven PICO (population-intervention-comparison-outcome) questions that generated a series of recommendations for HAP/VAP diagnosis, treatment and prevention. Copyright ©ERS 2017.

  9. Comparison of composite measure methodologies for rewarding quality of care: an analysis from the American Heart Association's Get With The Guidelines program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eapen, Zubin J; Fonarow, Gregg C; Dai, David; O'Brien, Sean M; Schwamm, Lee H; Cannon, Christopher P; Heidenreich, Paul A; Bhatt, Deepak L; Peterson, Eric D; Hernandez, Adrian F

    2011-11-01

    Composite indices of health care performance are an aggregation of underlying individual performance measures and are increasingly being used to rank hospitals. We sought to conduct an observational analysis to determine the influence of the opportunity-based and all-or-none composite performance measures on hospital rankings. We examined 194 245 patients hospitalized with acute myocardial infarction between July 2006 and June 2009 from 334 hospitals participating in the Get With The Guidelines--Coronary Artery Disease (GWTG-CAD) quality improvement program. We analyzed hospital opportunity-based and all-or-none composite scores and 30-day risk-standardized all-cause mortality and readmission rates. We found that the median calculated opportunity-based score for these hospitals was 95.5 (interquartile range, 90.4, 98.0). The median all-or-none score was 88.9 (interquartile range, 79.7, 94.4). The 2 scoring methods were significantly correlated with one another (r=0.98, PRankings generated by the two methods were significantly correlated (r=0.93, Prankings diminished similarly for both composite measures. When including additional performance measures into the composite score, the two methods produced similar changes in hospital rankings. The opportunity-based and all-or-none coronary artery disease composite indices are highly correlated and yield similar ranking of the top and bottom quintiles of hospitals. The two methods provide similarly modest correlations with 30-day mortality, but not readmission.

  10. Bridging the guideline implementation gap: a systematic, document-centered approach to guideline implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiffman, Richard N; Michel, George; Essaihi, Abdelwaheb; Thornquist, Elizabeth

    2004-01-01

    A gap exists between the information contained in published clinical practice guidelines and the knowledge and information that are necessary to implement them. This work describes a process to systematize and make explicit the translation of document-based knowledge into workflow-integrated clinical decision support systems. This approach uses the Guideline Elements Model (GEM) to represent the guideline knowledge. Implementation requires a number of steps to translate the knowledge contained in guideline text into a computable format and to integrate the information into clinical workflow. The steps include: (1) selection of a guideline and specific recommendations for implementation, (2) markup of the guideline text, (3) atomization, (4) deabstraction and (5) disambiguation of recommendation concepts, (6) verification of rule set completeness, (7) addition of explanations, (8) building executable statements, (9) specification of origins of decision variables and insertions of recommended actions, (10) definition of action types and selection of associated beneficial services, (11) choice of interface components, and (12) creation of requirement specification. The authors illustrate these component processes using examples drawn from recent experience translating recommendations from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's guideline on management of chronic asthma into a workflow-integrated decision support system that operates within the Logician electronic health record system. Using the guideline document as a knowledge source promotes authentic translation of domain knowledge and reduces the overall complexity of the implementation task. From this framework, we believe that a better understanding of activities involved in guideline implementation will emerge.

  11. Guidelines for the structure and function of an interdisciplinary team for persons with brain injury. Joint Committee on Interprofessional Relations between Division 40 (Clinical Neuropsychology) of the American Psychological Association and the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-03-01

    This report provides guidelines for the structure and function of interdisciplinary teams assembled for the delivery of clinical services to individuals with brain injury. Specifically, the report addresses issues concerning team membership, skills required of the team coordinator, and the processes that facilitate the attainment of team goals. These general suggestions are designed to give rehabilitation professionals and health care administrators some guiding principles for interdisciplinary teams involved in the clinical management of individuals with brain injury.

  12. Guidelines for maintenance of adult patients with brain death and potential for multiple organ donations: the Task Force of the Brazilian Association of Intensive Medicine the Brazilian Association of Organs Transplantation, and the Transplantation Center of Santa Catarina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westphal, G A; Caldeira Filho, M; Fiorelli, A; Vieira, K D; Zaclikevis, V; Bartz, M; Wanzuita, R; Teixeira, C; Franke, C; Machado, F O; Friedman, G; Andrade, J; Matos, J D; Lamgaro, D M; Silva, E; Costa, G; Coelho, M E; Oliveira, M C; Youssef, N C M; Akamine, N; Duarte, P; Lisboa, R; Mazzali, M; Ferraz Neto, B H

    2012-10-01

    The organ shortage for transplantation, the principal factor that increases waiting lists, has become a serious public health problem. In this scenario, the intensivist occupies a prominent position as one of the professionals that first has a chance to identify brain death and to be responsible for the maintenance of the potential deceased donor. This report attempts to establish guidelines for care and maintenance of adult deceased donor organs guiding and standardizing care provided to patients with brain death. These guidelines were composed by intensivists, transplant coordinators, professionals from various transplant teams, and used transplant center. The formulated questions were forwarded to all members and recommendations were constructed after an extensive literature review selecting articles with the highest degree of evidence. Guidelines were developed in the form of questions reflecting frequent experiences in clinical intensive care practices. The main questions were: Is there an optimal interval for keeping organs of deceased donors viable? What actions are considered essential for maintaining deceased donors in this period? What are the limits of body temperature? How should the patient be warmed? Which laboratory tests should be performed? What is the collection interval? What are the limits in the laboratory and the capture scenario? What are the limits of blood pressure? When and how should one use catecholamines? This pioneer project involved a multidisciplinary team working in organ transplantation seeking to provide treatment guidance to increase the number of viable organs from deceased adult donors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Primary care guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ijäs, Jarja; Alanen, Seija; Kaila, Minna

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the adoption of the national Hypertension Guideline in primary care and to evaluate the consistency of the views of the health centre senior executives on the guideline's impact on clinical practices in the treatment of hypertension in their health centres. DESIGN: A cross......-sectional telephone survey. SETTING: All municipal health centres in Finland. SUBJECTS: Health centres where both the head physician and the senior nursing officer responded. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Agreement in views of the senior executives on the adoption of clinical practices as recommended in the Hypertension...... Guideline. RESULTS: Data were available from 143 health centres in Finland (49%). The views of head physicians and senior nursing officers on the adoption of the Hypertension Guideline were not consistent. Head physicians more often than senior nursing officers (44% vs. 29%, p

  14. Adopting preoperative fasting guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Megan; Comrie, Rhonda

    2009-07-01

    In 1999, the American Society of Anesthesiologists adopted preoperative fasting guidelines to enhance the quality and efficiency of patient care. Guidelines suggest that healthy, non-pregnant patients should fast six hours from solids and two hours from liquids. Although these guidelines are in place, studies suggest that providers are still using the blanket statement "NPO after midnight" without regard to patient characteristics, the procedure, or the time of the procedure. Using theory to help change provider's beliefs may help make change more successful. Rogers' Theory of Diffusion of Innovations can assist in changing long-time practice by laying the groundwork for an analysis of the benefits and disadvantages of proposed changes, such as changes to fasting orders, while helping initiate local protocols instead of additional national guidelines.

  15. EMI Messaging Guidelines

    CERN Document Server

    Cons, L.

    2011-01-01

    Guidelines for potential users of messaging within EMI. The goal is to provide enough practical information so that EMI product teams can start investigating whether using messaging in their products can be beneficial or not.

  16. A comparative study of teaching clinical guideline for prevention of ventilator-associated pneumonia in two ways: face-to-face and workshop training on the knowledge and practice of nurses in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdani, Majid; Sabetian, Golnar; Ra'ofi, Shahin; Roudgari, Amir; Feizi, Monireh

    2015-04-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is one of the most popular nosocomial infections in the intensive care units and the nurse's role in preventing it is very important. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of two methods of face to face training and work- shop clinical guidelines in prevention of VAP. In this experimental randomized clinical trial, the knowledge and practice of nurses in ICUs were studied in two groups: face to face training (35 nurses) and workshops (40 nurses) by using clinical guidelines in prevention of VAP in one of the hospitals of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. The level of knowledge and practice in each group was assessed by self-report questionnaire, knowledge questionnaire and also direct observation of practice, before and after training. Data were analyzed with descriptive statistics, paired t-test, independent t-test, McNemar test, Fisher's exact, sign and Chi-square test, using SPSS 14. This study demonstrated that both methods of face to face training and workshop were very effective. The incidence of inappropriate pressure of cuff in the tracheal tubes and tracheostomy tubes was significantly reduced after training (p=0.001). But, by comparison of these two methods and the relationship between the variables revealed that no significant difference was found between the two groups of face to face training and workshop. Training the nurses is highly effective in preventing VAP, particularly for appropriate cuff pressure, suctioning and disinfecting hands.

  17. American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists and American College of Endocrinology Protocol for Standardized Production of Clinical Practice Guidelines, Algorithms, and Checklists--2014 Update and the AACe G4G Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechanick, Jeffrey I; Camacho, Pauline M; Garber, Alan J; Garber, Jeffrey R; Pessah-Pollack, Rachel; Petak, Steven M; Tangpricha, Vin; Trence, Dace L

    2014-07-01

    In 2010, the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) published an update to the original 2004 guidelines. This update hybridized strict evidence-based medicine methods with subjective factors and improved the efficiency of clinical practice guidelines (CPG) production, clinical applicability, and usefulness. Current and persistent shortcomings involving suboptimal implementation and protracted development timelines are addressed in the current 2014 update. The major advances include 1) formulation of an organizational educational strategy, represented by the AACE Council on Education, to address relevant teaching and decision-making tools for clinical endocrinologists, and to generate specific clinical questions to drive CPG, clinical algorithm (CA), and clinical checklist (CC) development; 2) creation and prioritization of printed and online CAs and CCs with a supporting evidence base; 3) focus on clinically relevant and question-oriented topics; 4) utilization of "cascades," where there can be more than 1 recommendation for 1 clinical question; and 5) incorporation of performance metrics to validate, optimize, and effectively update CPG, CAs, and CCs. Efforts continue to translate these clinical tools to electronic formats that can be integrated into a paperless healthcare delivery system, as well as applying them to diverse clinical settings by incorporating transcultural factors.

  18. Transparent Guideline Methodology Needed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lidal, Ingeborg; Norén, Camilla; Mäkelä, Marjukka

    2013-01-01

    Group.2 Similar criteria for guideline quality have been suggested elsewhere.3 Our conclusion was that this much needed guideline is currently unclear about several aspects of the methodology used in developing the recommendations. This means potential users cannot be certain that the recommendations...... are based on best currently available evidence. Our concerns are in two main categories: the rigor of development, including methodology of searching, evaluating, and combining the evidence; and editorial independence, including funding and possible conflicts of interest....

  19. Vestibular Rehabilitation for Peripheral Vestibular Hypofunction: An Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guideline: FROM THE AMERICAN PHYSICAL THERAPY ASSOCIATION NEUROLOGY SECTION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Courtney D; Herdman, Susan J; Whitney, Susan L; Cass, Stephen P; Clendaniel, Richard A; Fife, Terry D; Furman, Joseph M; Getchius, Thomas S D; Goebel, Joel A; Shepard, Neil T; Woodhouse, Sheelah N

    2016-04-01

    Uncompensated vestibular hypofunction results in postural instability, visual blurring with head movement, and subjective complaints of dizziness and/or imbalance. We sought to answer the question, "Is vestibular exercise effective at enhancing recovery of function in people with peripheral (unilateral or bilateral) vestibular hypofunction?" A systematic review of the literature was performed in 5 databases published after 1985 and 5 additional sources for relevant publications were searched. Article types included meta-analyses, systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials, cohort studies, case control series, and case series for human subjects, published in English. One hundred thirty-five articles were identified as relevant to this clinical practice guideline. Based on strong evidence and a preponderance of benefit over harm, clinicians should offer vestibular rehabilitation to persons with unilateral and bilateral vestibular hypofunction with impairments and functional limitations related to the vestibular deficit. Based on strong evidence and a preponderance of harm over benefit, clinicians should not include voluntary saccadic or smooth-pursuit eye movements in isolation (ie, without head movement) as specific exercises for gaze stability. Based on moderate evidence, clinicians may offer specific exercise techniques to target identified impairments or functional limitations. Based on moderate evidence and in consideration of patient preference, clinicians may provide supervised vestibular rehabilitation. Based on expert opinion extrapolated from the evidence, clinicians may prescribe a minimum of 3 times per day for the performance of gaze stability exercises as 1 component of a home exercise program. Based on expert opinion extrapolated from the evidence (range of supervised visits: 2-38 weeks, mean = 10 weeks), clinicians may consider providing adequate supervised vestibular rehabilitation sessions for the patient to understand the goals of the program

  20. Empirical influence of the multicultural guidelines: A brief report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouad, Nadya A; Santana, Mercedes; Ghosh, Arpita

    2017-10-01

    In 2002, the American Psychological Association (APA) Council of Representatives approved the "Guidelines for Multicultural Education, Training, Research, Practice and Organizational Change for Psychologists." The Guidelines have been downloaded 64,153 times from the APA website from 2007 to 2013, and have been cited nearly 900 times. This suggests that the Guidelines have influenced education, training, research, and practice in psychology. However, it is unclear how the Guidelines have influenced these domains. We conducted a comprehensive literature review to examine how the Guidelines have influenced the field. Articles were coded for several criteria, including whether the Guidelines were cited, the type of research that was conducted, study findings, limitations, and future directions of research. The data for this study consisted of 895 empirical articles published since the 2003 publication of the Guidelines. A literature review using the keywords APA and multicultural guidelines were searched in PsycINFO and ERIC databases. Articles were then coded by the research team. Findings from the literature review suggested that although there were a total of 895 articles and books that cited the Guidelines, only 34 met our coding criteria. Our findings suggest that most of the articles that cited the Guidelines used the citation as a way to document that culture is important to consider. In some cases, other professions cited the Guidelines to argue that their discipline should also attend to culture. However, very few articles focused on framing an investigation around a specific guideline. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. January 2014 pulmonary journal club: interventional guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathew M

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. A few years ago a colleague and I were discussing the shape of healthcare in the USA. One of the comments that was made was "that despite the high costs within our system, that at least there was some standardization in the treatment of certain diseases, for example, receiving Aspirin for an acute myocardial infarction". Guidelines exist to ensure that for certain conditions a standard of care is practiced. When guidelines start to become a measuring stick for what is now considered best practice…..then it our responsibility to ensure that guidelines are rooted on high quality evidence. This paper reviewed the validity of guidelines published and practiced by several of the interventional medical societies including the American Association for Bronchology and Interventional Pulmonology (AABIP, American Society of Diagnostic and Interventional Nephrology (ASDIN, American Society For Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE and the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI. A total of ...

  2. Evidence-based clinical practice guideline for the use of pit-and-fissure sealants: A report of the American Dental Association and the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, John T; Crall, James J; Fontana, Margherita; Gillette, E Jane; Nový, Brian B; Dhar, Vineet; Donly, Kevin; Hewlett, Edmond R; Quinonez, Rocio B; Chaffin, Jeffrey; Crespin, Matt; Iafolla, Timothy; Siegal, Mark D; Tampi, Malavika P; Graham, Laurel; Estrich, Cameron; Carrasco-Labra, Alonso

    2016-08-01

    This article presents evidence-based clinical recommendations for the use of pit-and-fissure sealants on the occlusal surfaces of primary and permanent molars in children and adolescents. A guideline panel convened by the American Dental Association (ADA) Council on Scientific Affairs and the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry conducted a systematic review and formulated recommendations to address clinical questions in relation to the efficacy, retention, and potential side effects of sealants to prevent dental caries; their efficacy compared with fluoride varnishes; and a head-to-head comparison of the different types of sealant material used to prevent caries on pits and fissures of occlusal surfaces. This is an update of the ADA 2008 recommendations on the use of pit-and-fissure sealants on the occlusal surfaces of primary and permanent molars. The authors conducted a systematic search in MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and other sources to identify randomized controlled trials reporting on the effect of sealants (available on the US market) when applied to the occlusal surfaces of primary and permanent molars. The authors used the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation approach to assess the quality of the evidence and to move from the evidence to the decisions. The guideline panel formulated 3 main recommendations. They concluded that sealants are effective in preventing and arresting pit-and-fissure occlusal carious lesions of primary and permanent molars in children and adolescents compared with the nonuse of sealants or use of fluoride varnishes. They also concluded that sealants could minimize the progression of noncavitated occlusal carious lesions (also referred to as initial lesions) that receive a sealant. Finally, based on the available limited evidence, the panel was unable to provide specific recommendations on the relative merits of 1 type of sealant material over the others. These

  3. Japanese Guideline for Atopic Dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ichiro Katayama

    2011-01-01

    The basics of treatment discussed in this guideline are based on the “Guidelines for the Treatment of Atopic Dermatitis 2008” prepared by the Health and Labour Sciences Research and the “Guidelines for the Management of Atopic Dermatitis 2009 (ADGL2009” prepared by the Atopic Dermatitis Guidelines Advisory Committee, Japanese Society of Allergology in principle.

  4. Animal care guidelines and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, A B

    2007-06-01

    Two notions broadly accepted in developed western societies have made animal care guidelines inevitable. These are that domestic animals are sentient and that humans are responsible to ensure the proper care of domestic animals. Despite these common views, people have differing moral understandings of the human-animal relationship, and there are sharp divisions over how these views should be applied to domestic animal care. Animal care guidelines have been developed by different nations at several organizational levels to represent a compromise that is acceptable to most people. These organizational levels include individual poultry companies, national poultry associations, individual customers of the poultry industry, national associations of customer companies, national governments, and international organizations. Animal care guideline development has typically included input from producers and scientists and, depending on the sponsoring organization, animal advocates and government representatives as well. Animal advocacy groups have also sought to influence domestic animal care by campaigning against animal production practices or by offering their preferred guidelines for producers to adopt in the hope that the endorsement of the welfare group would add value to the product. Originally, animal care guidelines were only recommended, with little or no requirement for compliance. In recent years, the need for retail companies to assure certain welfare standards has led to animal welfare auditing of production facilities. Animal care guidelines primarily have sought to establish standards for handling and husbandry in existing production systems. Future guidelines may put increasing emphasis on adoption of alternative management practices or housing systems. International animal care guidelines are being developed on 2 levels (i.e., among national governments to create a common standard for trade in animal products and within international retail companies to

  5. In-house consultation to support professionals’ responses to child abuse and neglect : Determinants of professionals’ use and the association with guideline adherence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konijnendijk, Annemieke Ariënne Johanneke; Boere-Boonekamp, Magdalena M.; Kaya, Anna H.; Haasnoot, Maria E.; Need, Ariana

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the presence and strengths of determinants associated with consultation of an in-house expert on child abuse and neglect (CAN) by preventive child health care professionals who suspect CAN. This study also assessed the relationship between in-house CAN expert consultation and

  6. Evidence-based guidelines on the use of opioids in chronic non-cancer pain--a consensus statement by the Pain Association of Singapore Task Force

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ho, K.Y.; Chua, N.H.; George, J.M.; Yeo, S.N.; Main, N.B.; Choo, C.Y.; Tan, J.W.; Tan, K.H.; Ng, B.Y.

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: While opioids are effective in carefully selected patients with chronic non-cancer pain (CNCP), they are associated with potential risks. Therefore, treatment recommendations for the safe and effective use of opioids in this patient population are needed. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A

  7. The diagnosis of dementia due to Alzheimer's disease: Recommendations from the National Institute on Aging-Alzheimer's Association workgroups on diagnostic guidelines for Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McKhann, G.M.; Knopman, D.S.; Chertkow, H.; Hyman, B.T.; Jack, C.R.; Kawas, C.H.; Klunk, W.E.; Koroshetz, W.J.; Manly, J.J.; Mayeux, R.; Mohs, R.C.; Morris, J.C.; Rossor, M.N.; Scheltens, P.; Carrillo, M.C.; Thies, B.; Weintraub, S.; Phelps, C.H.

    2011-01-01

    The National Institute on Aging and the Alzheimer's Association charged a workgroup with the task of revising the 1984 criteria for Alzheimer's disease (AD) dementia. The workgroup sought to ensure that the revised criteria would be flexible enough to be used by both general healthcare providers

  8. The wound/burn guidelines - 1: Wounds in general.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Yuji; Hasegawa, Minoru; Maekawa, Takeo; Le Pavoux, Andres; Asano, Yoshihide; Abe, Masatoshi; Ishii, Takayuki; Ito, Takaaki; Isei, Taiki; Imafuku, Shinichi; Irisawa, Ryokichi; Ohtsuka, Masaki; Ohtsuka, Mikio; Ogawa, Fumihide; Kadono, Takafumi; Kodera, Masanari; Kawakami, Tamihiro; Kawaguchi, Masakazu; Kukino, Ryuichi; Kono, Takeshi; Sakai, Keisuke; Takahara, Masakazu; Tanioka, Miki; Nakanishi, Takeshi; Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Hashimoto, Akira; Hayashi, Masahiro; Fujimoto, Manabu; Fujiwara, Hiroshi; Matsuo, Koma; Madokoro, Naoki; Yamasaki, Osamu; Yoshino, Yuichiro; Tachibana, Takao; Ihn, Hironobu

    2016-04-01

    The Japanese Dermatological Association determined to prepare the Wound/Burn Guidelines focusing on treatments, catering to needs for the clinical practice of dermatology. Among these guidelines, "Wounds in General" was intended to explain knowledge necessary "to heal wounds" without specifying particular disorders. © 2016 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  9. Latest opportunistic infection prevention guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amico, R

    1998-01-01

    Although people with HIV are living longer than ever before, they continue to suffer from infections that are associated with low T4-cell counts. The U.S. Public Health Service (PHS) and the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) have updated the guidelines for preventing opportunistic infections, including their positions on when prophylaxis is indicated. Summaries are given for preventing the following infections: cytomegalovirus (CMV), cryptosporidiosis, fungal infections, human papillomavirus (HPV), herpes-related infections, mycobacterium avium complex (MAC), pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP), streptococcal pneumonia, toxoplasmosis, and tuberculosis.

  10. Translating Osteoporosis Prevention Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan-Olsen, Sharon L; Hosking, Sarah M; Dobbins, Amelia G; Pasco, Julie A

    2017-04-01

    In Australia, the social gradient of chronic disease has never been as prominent as in current times, and the uptake of preventive health messages appears to be lower in discrete population groups. In efforts to re-frame health promotion from addressing behavior change to empowerment, we engaged community groups in disadvantaged neighborhoods to translate published preventive guidelines into easy-to-understand messages for the general population. Our research team established partnerships with older aged community groups located in disadvantaged neighborhoods, determined by cross-referencing addresses with the Australian Bureau of Statistics, to translate guidelines regarding osteoporosis prevention. We developed an oversized jigsaw puzzle that we used to translate recommended osteoporosis prevention guidelines. Successful participatory partnerships between researchers, health promotion professionals, and community groups in disadvantaged neighborhoods build capacity in researchers to undertake future participatory processes; they also make the best use of expert knowledge held by specific communities.

  11. Guidelines for Project Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Arieh, David

    2001-01-01

    Project management is an important part of the professional activities at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Project management is the means by which many of the operations at KSC take shape. Moreover, projects at KSC are implemented in a variety of ways in different organizations. The official guidelines for project management are provided by NASA headquarters and are quite general. The project reported herein deals with developing practical and detailed project management guidelines in support of the project managers. This report summarizes the current project management effort in the Process Management Division and presents a new modeling approach of project management developed by the author. The report also presents the Project Management Guidelines developed during the summer.

  12. Exercise in Pregnancy: Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artal, Raul

    2016-09-01

    In recent years it has been recognized that in all phases of life, including pregnancy, physical activity promotes health benefits and precludes comorbidities, the scientific evidence is indisputable. Several organizations around the world have updated in recent years the guidelines and recommendations for exercise in pregnancy. The December 2015, updated guidelines of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists emphasize that physical activity in pregnancy has minimal risk. Although recommending exercise in pregnancy, the anatomic/physiological changes, absolute and relative contraindications should be considered. Women who exercised regularly before pregnancy, in the absence of contraindications, can continue and engage in moderate to strenuous activities, although information on strenuous activities in pregnancy is still limited. This review summarizes the most recent published and recommended guidelines.

  13. Association Between Loyalty to Community Pharmacy and Medication Persistence and Compliance, and the Use of Guidelines-Recommended Drugs in Type 2 Diabetes: A Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dossa, Anara Richi; Grégoire, Jean-Pierre; Lauzier, Sophie; Guénette, Line; Sirois, Caroline; Moisan, Jocelyne

    2015-07-01

    Pharmacists record data on all drugs claimed and may build a personal relationship with their clients. We hypothesized that loyalty to a single pharmacy could be associated with a better quality of drug use.To assess the association between pharmacy loyalty and quality of drug use among individuals treated with oral antidiabetes drugs (OADs).This is a cohort study using Quebec Health Insurance Board data. Associations were assessed using multivariable logistic regression.New OAD users, aged ≥18 years.Individuals who filled all their prescription drugs in the same pharmacy during the first year of treatment were considered loyal. During year 2 of treatment we assessed 4 quality indicators of drug use: persistence with antidiabetes treatment, compliance with antidiabetes treatment among those considered persistent, use of an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or of an angiotensin II receptor blocker (ACEi/ARB), and use of a lipid-lowering drug.Of 124,009 individuals, 59.75% were identified as loyal. Nonloyal individuals were less likely to persist with their antidiabetes treatment (adjusted odds ratio = 0.89; 95% CI: 0.86-0.91), to comply with their antidiabetes treatment (0.82; 0.79-0.84), to use an ACEi/ARB (0.85; 0.83-0.88) and to use a lipid-lowering drug (0.83; 0.80-0.85). Quality of drug use decreased as the number of different pharmacies increased (linear contrast tests <0.001).Results underscore the important role pharmacists could play in helping their clients with chronic diseases to better manage their drug treatments. Further research is needed to determine to what extent the positive effects associated with pharmacy loyalty are specifically due to pharmacists.

  14. Toward defining the preclinical stages of Alzheimer's disease: Recommendations from the National Institute on Aging-Alzheimer's Association workgroups on diagnostic guidelines for Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Sperling, Reisa A.; Aisen, Paul S.; Beckett, Laurel A.; Bennett, David A.; Craft, Suzanne; Anne M Fagan; Iwatsubo, Takeshi; Jack, Clifford R.; Kaye,Jeffrey; Thomas J Montine; Park, Denise C.; Reiman, Eric M.; Rowe, Christopher C.; Siemers, Eric; Stern, Yaakov

    2011-01-01

    The pathophysiological process of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is thought to begin many years before the diagnosis of AD dementia. This long “preclinical” phase of AD would provide a critical opportunity for therapeutic intervention; however, we need to further elucidate the link between the pathological cascade of AD and the emergence of clinical symptoms. The National Institute on Aging and the Alzheimer's Association convened an international workgroup to review the biomarker, epidemiological,...

  15. Achieving International Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetes and American Diabetes Association clinical guidelines offers cardiorenal protection for youth with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjornstad, Petter; Pyle, Laura; Nguyen, Nhung; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K; Bishop, Franziska K; Wadwa, R Paul; Maahs, David M

    2015-02-01

    Most youth with type 1 diabetes do not meet the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and International Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetes (ISPAD) targets for hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), blood pressure (BP), lipids, and body mass index (BMI). We hypothesized that ISPAD/ADA goal achievement at baseline would be associated with cardiorenal risk factors at baseline and 2 yr follow-up in adolescents with type 1 diabetes. We assessed the cross-sectional and longitudinal relationships between ISPAD/ADA goal achievement at baseline and cardiorenal health at baseline and 2-yr follow-up (n = 297; 15.4 ± 2.1 yr at baseline) in adolescents with type 1 diabetes. Goal achievement was defined as HbA1c low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) 35 mg/dL, triglycerides (TG) confidence interval (CI): 3.8-105.2) compared to those who met 4-6 goals after adjusting for Tanner stage, sex, age, and diabetes duration. No statistically significant differences in the cardiorenal outcomes were observed between adolescents with type 1 diabetes who met 4-6 goals and non-diabetic controls (n = 96). In adolescents with type 1 diabetes, baseline ADA/ISPAD goal achievement was associated with cardiorenal protection at baseline and 2-yr follow-up. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Intensive care treatments associated with favorable discharge outcomes in Argentine children with severe traumatic brain injury: For the South American Guideline Adherence Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavilala, Monica S.; Lujan, Silvia B.; Qiu, Qian; Bell, Michael J.; Guadagnoli, Nahuel; Faguaga, Gabriela A.; Baggio, Gloria M.; Busso, Leonardo O.; García, Mirta E.; González Carrillo, Osvaldo R.; Medici, Paula L.; Sáenz, Silvia S.; Vanella, Elida E.; Petroni, Gustavo J.

    2017-01-01

    Objective Little is known about the critical care management of children with traumatic brain injury (TBI) in low middle income countries. We aimed to identify indicators of intensive care unit (ICU) treatments associated with favorable outcomes in Argentine children with severe TBI. Methods We conducted a secondary analysis of data from patients previously enrolled in a prospective seven center study of children with severe TBI who were admitted to an ICU in one of the seven study centers. Severe TBI was defined by head AIS ≥ 3, head CT with traumatic lesion, and admission GCS < 9. Seven indicators of best practice TBI care were examined. The primary outcome was discharge Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category Scale [PCPC] and Pediatric Overall Performance category Scale [POPC]. We also examined variation in ICU care and in-patient mortality. Results Of the 117 children, 67% were male and 7.5 (4.3) years on average, 92% had isolated TBI. Hypotension (54%) was more common than hypoxia (28%) and clinical or radiographic signs of high intracranial pressure (ICP) were observed in 92%. Yet, ICP monitoring occurred in 60% and hyperosmolar therapy was used in only 36%. Adherence to indicators of best TBI practice ranged from 55.6% to 83.7% across the seven centers and adherence was associated with favorable discharge PCPC (aRR 0.98; 95% CI [0.96, 0.99]), and POPC (aRR 0.98; 95% CI [0.96, 0.99]). Compared to patients whose adherence rates were below 65%, patients whose adherence rates were higher between 75%-100% had better discharge PCPC (aRR 0.28; 95% CI [0.10, 0.83]) and POPC (aRR 0.32; 95% CI [0.15, 0.73]. Two indicators were associated with favorable discharge PCPC: Avoidance of hypoxia (aRR 0.46; 95% CI [0.23, 0.93]), and Nutrition started in 72 hours (aRR 0.45; 95% CI [0.21, 0.99]). Avoiding hypoxia was also associated with favorable discharge POPC (aRR 0.47; 95% CI [0.22, 0.99]). Conclusion There is variation in Argentine ICU practice in the care of children

  17. Evidence-based guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rovira, Àlex; Wattjes, Mike P; Tintoré, Mar

    2015-01-01

    The clinical use of MRI in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) has advanced markedly over the past few years. Technical improvements and continuously emerging data from clinical trials and observational studies have contributed to the enhanced performance of this tool for achieving a prompt...... diagnosis in patients with MS. The aim of this article is to provide guidelines for the implementation of MRI of the brain and spinal cord in the diagnosis of patients who are suspected of having MS. These guidelines are based on an extensive review of the recent literature, as well as on the personal...... of MRI in clinical practice for the diagnosis of MS....

  18. Guidelines for Urban Labs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scholl, Christian; Agger Eriksen, Mette; Baerten, Nik

    2017-01-01

    These guidelines are intended for team members and managers of urban labs and, more generally, for civil servants and facilitators in cities working with experimental processes to tackle complex challenges. They aim to support the everyday practice of collaboratively experimenting and learning how...... local conditions. Hence, the following guidelines do not provide a single definitive answer on ways to organize and run an urban lab or its experimental activities, but rather they offer, through frameworks and examples, guidance for ways to act in relation to, and reflect on, key issues. We hope...

  19. Strategy Guideline: Demonstration Home

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savage, C.; Hunt, A.

    2012-12-01

    This guideline will provide a general overview of the different kinds of demonstration home projects, a basic understanding of the different roles and responsibilities involved in the successful completion of a demonstration home, and an introduction into some of the lessons learned from actual demonstration home projects. Also, this guideline will specifically look at the communication methods employed during demonstration home projects. And lastly, we will focus on how to best create a communication plan for including an energy efficient message in a demonstration home project and carry that message to successful completion.

  20. Strategy Guideline. Demonstration Home

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, A.; Savage, C.

    2012-12-01

    This guideline will provide a general overview of the different kinds of demonstration home projects, a basic understanding of the different roles and responsibilities involved in the successful completion of a demonstration home, and an introduction into some of the lessons learned from actual demonstration home projects. Also, this guideline will specifically look at the communication methods employed during demonstration home projects. And lastly, we will focus on how to best create a communication plan for including an energy efficient message in a demonstration home project and carry that message to successful completion.

  1. Implications of Coronary Artery Calcium Testing Among Statin Candidates According to American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Cholesterol Management Guidelines: MESA (Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasir, Khurram; Bittencourt, Marcio S; Blaha, Michael J; Blankstein, Ron; Agatson, Arthur S; Rivera, Juan J; Miedema, Michael D; Miemdema, Michael D; Sibley, Christopher T; Shaw, Leslee J; Blumenthal, Roger S; Budoff, Matthew J; Krumholz, Harlan M

    2015-10-13

    The American College of Cardiology (ACC)/American Heart Association (AHA) cholesterol management guidelines have significantly broadened the scope of candidates eligible for statin therapy. This study evaluated the implications of the absence of coronary artery calcium (CAC) in reclassifying patients from a risk stratum in which statins are recommended to one in which they are not. MESA (Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis) is a longitudinal study of 6,814 men and women 45 to 84 years of age without clinical atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) risk at enrollment. We excluded 1,100 participants (16%) on lipid-lowering medication, 87 (1.3%) without low-density lipoprotein levels, 26 (0.4%) with missing risk factors for calculation of 10-year risk of ASCVD, 633 (9%) >75 years of age, and 209 (3%) with low-density lipoprotein coronary heart disease events occurred over a median (interquartile range) follow-up of 10.3 (9.7 to 10.8) years. The new ACC/AHA guidelines recommended 2,377 (50%) MESA participants for moderate- to high-intensity statins; the majority (77%) was eligible because of a 10-year estimated ASCVD risk ≥7.5%. Of those recommended statins, 41% had CAC = 0 and had 5.2 ASCVD events/1,000 person-years. Among 589 participants (12%) considered for moderate-intensity statin, 338 (57%) had a CAC = 0, with an ASCVD event rate of 1.5 per 1,000 person-years. Of participants eligible (recommended or considered) for statins, 44% (1,316 of 2,966) had CAC = 0 at baseline and an observed 10-year ASCVD event rate of 4.2 per 1,000 person-years. Significant ASCVD risk heterogeneity exists among those eligible for statins according to the new guidelines. The absence of CAC reclassifies approximately one-half of candidates as not eligible for statin therapy. Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Association Between Loyalty to Community Pharmacy and Medication Persistence and Compliance, and the Use of Guidelines-Recommended Drugs in Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dossa, Anara Richi; Grégoire, Jean-Pierre; Lauzier, Sophie; Guénette, Line; Sirois, Caroline; Moisan, Jocelyne

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Pharmacists record data on all drugs claimed and may build a personal relationship with their clients. We hypothesized that loyalty to a single pharmacy could be associated with a better quality of drug use. To assess the association between pharmacy loyalty and quality of drug use among individuals treated with oral antidiabetes drugs (OADs). This is a cohort study using Quebec Health Insurance Board data. Associations were assessed using multivariable logistic regression. New OAD users, aged ≥18 years. Individuals who filled all their prescription drugs in the same pharmacy during the first year of treatment were considered loyal. During year 2 of treatment we assessed 4 quality indicators of drug use: persistence with antidiabetes treatment, compliance with antidiabetes treatment among those considered persistent, use of an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or of an angiotensin II receptor blocker (ACEi/ARB), and use of a lipid-lowering drug. Of 124,009 individuals, 59.75% were identified as loyal. Nonloyal individuals were less likely to persist with their antidiabetes treatment (adjusted odds ratio = 0.89; 95% CI: 0.86–0.91), to comply with their antidiabetes treatment (0.82; 0.79–0.84), to use an ACEi/ARB (0.85; 0.83–0.88) and to use a lipid-lowering drug (0.83; 0.80–0.85). Quality of drug use decreased as the number of different pharmacies increased (linear contrast tests loyalty are specifically due to pharmacists. PMID:26166087

  3. Prevention of central venous catheter-associated bloodstream infections: A questionnaire evaluating the knowledge of the selected 11 evidence-based guidelines by Polish nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedunska, Karina; Dyk, Danuta

    2015-12-01

    This study evaluated the questionnaire testing nurses' knowledge about the maintenance of a central venous catheter (CVC) and assessed it with regard to age, work experience, type of ward, frequency of trainings, and postgraduate education. There were 1,180 questionnaires (N = 784; 66.4% of the total sample) distributed in several regions of Poland for a period of 7 months. The difficulty level for each question ranged from 0.22-0.88. Copyright © 2015 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Effective doses, guidelines & regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burch, Michael D

    2008-01-01

    A number of countries have developed regulations or guidelines for cyanotoxins and cyanobacteria in drinking water, and in some cases in water used for recreational activity and agriculture. The main focus internationally has been upon microcystin toxins, produced predominantly by Microcystis aeruginosa. This is because microcystins are widely regarded as the most significant potential source of human injury from cyanobacteria on a world-wide scale. Many international guidelines have taken their lead from the World Health Organization's (WHO) provisional guideline of 1 microg L(-1) for microcystin-LR in drinking-water released in 1998 (WHO 2004). The WHO guideline value is stated as being 'provisional', because it covers only microcystin-LR, for reasons that the toxicology is limited and new data for toxicity of cyanobacterial toxins are being generated. The derivation of this guideline is based upon data that there is reported human injury related to consumption of drinking water containing cyanobacteria, or from limited work with experimental animals. It was also recognised that at present the human evidence for microcystin tumor promotion is inadequate and animal evidence is limited. As a result the guideline is based upon the model of deriving a Tolerable Daily intake (TDI) from an animal study No Observed Adverse Effects Level (NOAEL), with the application of appropriate safety or uncertainty factors. The resultant WHO guideline by definition is the concentration of a toxin that does not result in any significant risk to health of the consumer over a lifetime of consumption. Following the release of this WHO provisional guideline many countries have either adopted it directly (e.g., Czech Republic, France, Japan, Korea, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Brazil and Spain), or have adopted the same animal studies, TDI and derivation convention to arrive at slight variants based upon local requirements (e.g., Australia, Canada). Brazil currently has the most

  5. Pairing smoking-cessation services with lung cancer screening: A clinical guideline from the Association for the Treatment of Tobacco Use and Dependence and the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fucito, Lisa M; Czabafy, Sharon; Hendricks, Peter S; Kotsen, Chris; Richardson, Donna; Toll, Benjamin A

    2016-04-15

    Smoking cessation is crucial for reducing cancer risk and premature mortality. The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) has recommended annual lung cancer screening with low-dose computed tomography (LDCT), and the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services recently approved lung screening as a benefit for patients ages 55 to 77 years who have a 30 pack-year history. The Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco (SRNT) and the Association for the Treatment of Tobacco Use and Dependence (ATTUD) developed the guideline described in this commentary based on an illustrative literature review to present the evidence for smoking-cessation health benefits in this high-risk group and to provide clinical recommendations for integrating evidence-based smoking-cessation treatment with lung cancer screening. Unfortunately, extant data on lung cancer screening participants were scarce at the time this guideline was written. However, in this review, the authors summarize the sufficient evidence on the benefits of smoking cessation and the efficacy of smoking-cessation interventions for smokers ages 55 to 77 years to provide smoking-cessation interventions for smokers who seek lung cancer screening. It is concluded that smokers who present for lung cancer screening should be encouraged to quit smoking at each visit. Access to evidence-based smoking-cessation interventions should be provided to all smokers regardless of scan results, and motivation to quit should not be a necessary precondition for treatment. Follow-up contacts to support smoking-cessation efforts should be arranged for smokers. Evidence-based behavioral strategies should be used at each visit to motivate smokers who are unwilling to try quitting/reducing smoking or to try evidence-based treatments that may lead to eventual cessation. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  6. A comparative study of teaching clinical guideline for prevention of ventilator-associated pneumonia in two ways: face-to-face and workshop training on the knowledge and practice of nurses in the Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAJID YAZDANI

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP is one of the most popular nosocomial infections in the intensive care units and the nurse’s role in preventing it is very important. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of two methods of face to face training and work- shop clinical guidelines in prevention of VAP. Methods: In this experimental randomized clinical trial, the knowledge and practice of nurses in ICUs were studied in two groups: face to face training (35 nurses and workshops (40 nurses by using clinical guidelines in prevention of VAP in one of the hospitals of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. The level of knowledge and practice in each group was assessed by selfreport questionnaire, knowledge questionnaire and also direct observation of practice, before and after training. Data were analyzed with descriptive statistics, paired t-test, independent t-test, McNemar test, Fisher’s exact, sign and Chi-square test, using SPSS 14. Results: This study demonstrated that both methods of face to face training and workshop were very effective. The incidence of inappropriate pressure of cuff in the tracheal tubes and tracheostomy tubes was significantly reduced after training (p=0.001. But, by comparison of these two methods and the relationship between the variables revealed that no significant difference was found between the two groups of face to face training and workshop. Conclusion: Training the nurses is highly effective in preventing VAP, particularly for appropriate cuff pressure, suctioning and disinfecting hands.

  7. Assessing Level of Agreement for Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease Risk Categorization Between Coronary Artery Calcium Score and the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Cardiovascular Prevention Guidelines and the Potential Impact on Treatment Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isma'eel, Hussain; Min, David; Al-Shaar, Laila; Hachamovitch, Rory; Halliburton, Sandra; Gentry, James; Griffin, Brian; Schoenhagen, Paul; Phelan, Dermot

    2016-11-15

    The 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association cardiovascular prevention guidelines use a new pooled cohort equation (PCE) to predict 10-year risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) events which form the basis of treatment recommendations. Coronary artery calcium score (CACS) has been proposed as a means to assess atherosclerotic risk. We sought to study the level of agreement in predicted ASCVD risk by CACS and PCE-calculated models and the potential impact on therapy of additional CACS testing. We studied 687 treatment naive, consecutive patients (mean age 53.5 years, 72% men) who had a CACS study at our institution. Clinical and imaging data were recorded. ASCVD risk was calculated using the published PCE-based algorithm. CACS-based risk was categorized by previously published recommendations. Risk stratification comparisons were made and level of agreement calculated. In the cohort, mean ASCVD PCE-calculated risk was 5.3 ± 5.2% and mean CACS was 80 ± 302 Agatston units (AU). Of the intermediate PCE-calculated risk (5% to guidelines, 40% had a CACS of 0 AU and an additional 44% had CACS >0 but <100 AU. The level of agreement between the new PCE model of ASCVD risk and demonstrable coronary artery calcium is low. CACS testing may be most beneficial in those with an intermediate risk of ASCVD (PCE-calculated risk of 5% to <7.5%) where, in approximately half of patients, CACS testing significantly refined risk assessment primarily into a very low-risk category. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Use of lipoprotein particle measures for assessing coronary heart disease risk post-American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology guidelines: the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, Brian T; Guan, Weihua; Remaley, Alan T; Paramsothy, Pathmaja; Heckbert, Susan R; McClelland, Robyn L; Greenland, Philip; Michos, Erin D; Tsai, Michael Y

    2015-02-01

    The American College of Cardiology and American Heart Association have issued guidelines indicating that the contribution of apolipoprotein B-100 (ApoB) to cardiovascular risk assessment remains uncertain. The present analysis evaluates whether lipoprotein particle measures convey risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) in 4679 Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) participants. Cox regression analysis was performed to determine associations between lipids or lipoproteins and primary CHD events. After adjustment for nonlipid variables, lipoprotein particle levels in fourth quartiles were found to convey significantly greater risk of incident CHD when compared to first quartile levels (hazard ratio [HR]; 95% confidence interval [CI]): ApoB (HR, 1.84; 95% CI, 1.25-2.69), ApoB/ApoA-I (HR, 1.91; 95% CI, 1.32-2.76), total low-density lipoprotein-particles (LDL-P; HR, 1.77; 95% CI, 1.21-2.58), and the LDL-P/HDL-P (high-density lipoprotein-P) ratio (HR, 2.28; 95% CI, 1.54-3.37). Associations between lipoprotein particle measures and CHD were attenuated after adjustment for standard lipid panel variables. Using the American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology risk calculator as a baseline model for CHD risk assessment, significant net reclassification improvement scores were found for ApoB/ApoA-I (0.18; P=0.007) and LDL-P/high-density lipoprotein-P (0.15; Passociations of lipoprotein particle measures with CHD after the adjustment for lipids indicate that their measurement does not detect risk that is unaccounted for by the standard lipid panel. However, the possibility that lipoprotein measures may identify CHD risk in a subpopulation of individuals with normal cholesterol, but elevated lipoprotein particle numbers cannot be ruled out. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Assessing guidelines for burn referrals in a resource-constrained setting: Demographic and clinical factors associated with inter-facility transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingberg, A; Wallis, L; Rode, H; Stenberg, T; Laflamme, L; Hasselberg, M

    2017-08-01

    The aim was to assess demographic and clinical factors associated with inter-facility referrals for patients with burns in a resource-constrained setting. This was a cross-sectional case review of patients presenting with a burn at the trauma unit at the Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital (RXH) in Cape Town, South Africa. Six hundred and eleven-(71%) children were referred to the burns or the intensive care unit and 253 children were treated and discharged from the trauma unit. Of those admitted as inpatients 94% fulfilled at least one of the criteria for referral and 80% of those treated and discharged fulfilled the criteria for referral. Almost three out of four children evaluated at the trauma unit were referred to the burns unit for further management. However, a large number of patients were treated and discharged from the trauma unit despite being eligible for referral. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  10. Instructional Guidelines. Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fordyce, H. L.; Doshier, Dale

    Using the standards of the American Welding Society and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, this welding instructional guidelines manual presents a course of study in accordance with the current practices in industry. Intended for use in welding programs now practiced within the Federal Prison System, the phases of the program are…

  11. GRADE Equity Guidelines 3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Welch, Vivian A; Akl, Elie A; Pottie, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this paper is to describe a conceptual framework for how to consider health equity in the GRADE (Grading Recommendations Assessment and Development Evidence) guideline development process. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: Consensus-based guidance developed by the GRADE working grou...

  12. Guidelines on testicular cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albers, Peter; Albrecht, Walter; Algaba, Ferran; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Cohn-Cedermark, Gabriella; Horwich, Alan; Klepp, Olbjoern; Laguna, M. Pilar; Pizzocaro, Giorgio

    2005-01-01

    To up-date the 2001 version of the EAU testicular cancer guidelines. A non-structured literature review until January 2005 using the MEDLINE database has been performed. Literature has been classified according to evidence-based medicine levels. Testicular cancer is a highly curable disease.

  13. Guidelines for Authors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 19; Issue 1. Guidelines for Authors. Information and Announcements Volume 19 Issue 1 January 2014 pp 99-103. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/019/01/0099-0103. Resonance – Journal of ...

  14. Tinnitus guidelines and treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Dalia Gustaityté; Ovesen, Therese

    2014-01-01

    In this study literature search was performed on tinnitus guidelines and treatment. Tinnitus can be described as the perception of sound in the absence of external acoustic stimulation, and validated questionnaires, oto-neurological examination, audiometry tests, MRI and angiography are necessary...

  15. Space Guidelines for Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisconsin Coordinating Committee for Higher Education, Madison.

    The following guidelines are recommended: stack space--for each 10 volumes, one square foot of space; reading room--25 square feet per station x 20% of the total undergraduate population; carrel space--25% of the graduate enrollment x 45 square feet; office and auxilliary space--135 square feet x full time equivalent staff. (NI)

  16. Training Guidelines: Bricks Operatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceramics, Glass, and Mineral Products Industry Training Board, Harrow (England).

    This manual offers guidelines for training of personnel involved in the manufacture of bricks, including employment practices; handling and preparation of raw materials; making, drying, firing, sorting, packing, and loading of bricks. A major emphasis is placed on industrial safety. (MF)

  17. ADULT INFLUENZA VACCINATION GUIDELINE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    meeting to consider the draft guideline. Financial sponsor. Development supported by an ... respiratory vaccinations consensus meeting was held in. Gauteng (see below). Participants were invited ..... Boorman D. Influenza vaccine and its relationship to absenteeism in the workplace. Occupational Health SA 1997; 3: 29-30.

  18. Measure Guideline: Evaporative Condensers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    German, A [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), Davis, CA (United States); Dakin, B. [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), Davis, CA (United States); Hoeschele, M. [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), Davis, CA (United States)

    2012-03-01

    This measure guideline on evaporative condensers provides information on properly designing, installing, and maintaining evaporative condenser systems as well as understanding the benefits, costs, and tradeoffs. This is a prescriptive approach that outlines selection criteria, design and installation procedures, and operation and maintenance best practices.

  19. Evidence-based guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wattjes, Mike P; Rovira, Àlex; Miller, David

    2015-01-01

    . This use of MRI can help predict treatment response and assess the efficacy and safety of new therapies. In the second part of the MAGNIMS (Magnetic Resonance Imaging in MS) network's guidelines on the use of MRI in MS, we focus on the implementation of this technique in prognostic and monitoring tasks. We...

  20. Field Campaign Guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voyles, J. W. [DOE ARM Climate Research Facility, Washington, DC (United States); Chapman, L. A. [DOE ARM Climate Research Facility, Washington, DC (United States)

    2015-12-01

    This document establishes a common set of guidelines for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility for planning, executing, and closing out field campaigns. The steps that guide individual field campaigns are described in the Field Campaign Tracking System and are specifically tailored to meet the scope of each field campaign.

  1. Curriculum Guidelines for Pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, David H.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Pharmacology embraces the physical and chemical properties of drugs; the preparation of pharmaceutical agents; the absorption, fate, and excretion of drugs; and the effects of drugs on living systems. These guidelines represent a consensus on what would constitute a minimally acceptable pharmacology course for predoctoral dental students. (MLW)

  2. Primary care physician compliance with colorectal cancer screening guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nodora, Jesse N; Martz, William D; Ashbeck, Erin L; Jacobs, Elizabeth T; Thompson, Patricia A; Martínez, María Elena

    2011-09-01

    To assess self-reported compliance to colorectal cancer (CRC) screening guidelines among primary care physicians (PCPs) and to assess physician and practice characteristics associated with reported compliance. Survey data from 984 PCPs in Arizona were used. Self-reported CRC screening practices, recommendations, and compliance with guidelines were assessed. Physician and practice characteristics associated with guideline compliance were also evaluated. While 77.5% of physicians reported using national screening guidelines, only 51.7% reported recommendations consistent with the guidelines. Younger physicians were significantly more likely to report compliance with screening guidelines (OR = 1.50, 95% CI = 1.07-2.10) as were female clinicians (OR = 1.46, 95% CI = 1.11-1.92). Physicians practicing in solo (OR = 0.33, 95% CI = 0.19-0.58), group (OR = 0.36, 95% CI = 0.21-0.62), or community health centers (OR = 0.37, 95% CI = 0.17-0.81) were significantly less likely to report following guidelines as compared to those in academic practice. Guideline compliance was higher for fecal occult blood test (FOBT) (65.0%) than colonoscopy (56.7%); overuse of screening for these modalities was reported among 34.4% of physicians. PCPs are not adequately following CRC screening guidelines. Further studies are needed to clarify the reasons for this lack of compliance, especially as guidelines become more complex.

  3. Epilepsy and vaccinations: Italian guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruna, Dario; Balestri, Paolo; Zamponi, Nelia; Grosso, Salvatore; Gobbi, Giuseppe; Romeo, Antonino; Franzoni, Emilio; Osti, Maria; Capovilla, Giuseppe; Longhi, Riccardo; Verrotti, Alberto

    2013-10-01

    Reports of childhood epilepsies in temporal association with vaccination have had a great impact on the acceptance of vaccination programs by health care providers, but little is known about this possible temporal association and about the types of seizures following vaccinations. For these reasons the Italian League Against Epilepsy (LICE), in collaboration with other Italian scientific societies, has decided to generate Guidelines on Vaccinations and Epilepsy. The aim of Guidelines on Vaccinations and Epilepsy is to present recent unequivocal evidence from published reports on the possible relationship between vaccines and epilepsy in order to provide information about contraindications and risks of vaccinations in patients with epilepsy. The following main issues have been addressed: (1) whether contraindications to vaccinations exist in patients with febrile convulsions, epilepsy, and/or epileptic encephalopathies; and (2) whether any vaccinations can cause febrile seizures, epilepsy, and/or epileptic encephalopathies. Diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP) vaccination and measles, mumps, and rubella vaccination (MMR) increase significantly the risk of febrile seizures. Recent observations and data about the relationships between vaccination and epileptic encephalopathy show that some cases of apparent vaccine-induced encephalopathy could in fact be caused by an inherent genetic defect with no causal relationship with vaccination. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2013 International League Against Epilepsy.

  4. EAU guidelines on primary urethral carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gakis, Georgios; Witjes, J Alfred; Compérat, Eva; Cowan, Nigel C; De Santis, Maria; Lebret, Thierry; Ribal, Maria J; Sherif, Amir M

    2013-11-01

    The European Association of Urology (EAU) Guidelines Group on Muscle-Invasive and Metastatic Bladder Cancer prepared these guidelines to deliver current evidence-based information on the diagnosis and treatment of patients with primary urethral carcinoma (UC). To review the current literature on the diagnosis and treatment of patients with primary UC and assess its level of scientific evidence. A systematic literature search was performed to identify studies reporting urethral malignancies. Medline was searched using the controlled vocabulary of the Medical Subject Headings database, along with a free-text protocol. Primary UC is considered a rare cancer, accounting for guidelines document on primary UC is the first publication on this topic by the EAU. It aims to increase awareness in the urologic community and provide scientific transparency to improve outcomes of this rare urogenital malignancy. Copyright © 2013 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGISTS AND AMERICAN COLLEGE OF ENDOCRINOLOGY CLINICAL PRACTICE GUIDELINES FOR THE DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF POSTMENOPAUSAL OSTEOPOROSIS - 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho, Pauline M; Petak, Steven M; Binkley, Neil; Clarke, Bart L; Harris, Steven T; Hurley, Daniel L; Kleerekoper, Michael; Lewiecki, E Michael; Miller, Paul D; Narula, Harmeet S; Pessah-Pollack, Rachel; Tangpricha, Vin; Wimalawansa, Sunil J; Watts, Nelson B

    2016-09-02

    AACE = American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists AFF = atypical femur fracture ASBMR = American Society for Bone and Mineral Research BEL = best evidence level BMD = bone mineral density BTM = bone turnover marker CBC = complete blood count CI = confidence interval DXA = dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry EL = evidence level FDA = U.S. Food and Drug Administration FLEX = Fracture Intervention Trial (FIT) Long-term Extension FRAX® = Fracture Risk Assessment Tool GFR = glomerular filtration rate GI = gastrointestinal HORIZON = Health Outcomes and Reduced Incidence with Zoledronic Acid Once Yearly IOF = International Osteoporosis Foundation ISCD = International Society for Clinical Densitometry IU = international units IV = intravenous LSC = least significant change NBHA = National Bone Health Alliance NOF = National Osteoporosis Foundation 25(OH)D = 25-hydroxy vitamin D ONJ = osteonecrosis of the jaw PINP = serum carboxy-terminal propeptide of type I collagen PTH = parathyroid hormone R = recommendation RANK = receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B RANKL = receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand RCT = randomized controlled trial RR = relative risk S-CTX = serum C-terminal telopeptide SQ = subcutaneous VFA = vertebral fracture assessment WHO = World Health Organization.

  6. AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGISTS AND AMERICAN COLLEGE OF ENDOCRINOLOGY CLINICAL PRACTICE GUIDELINES FOR THE DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF POSTMENOPAUSAL OSTEOPOROSIS - 2016--EXECUTIVE SUMMARY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho, Pauline M; Petak, Steven M; Binkley, Neil; Clarke, Bart L; Harris, Steven T; Hurley, Daniel L; Kleerekoper, Michael; Lewiecki, E Michael; Miller, Paul D; Narula, Harmeet S; Pessah-Pollack, Rachel; Tangpricha, Vin; Wimalawansa, Sunil J; Watts, Nelson B

    2016-09-01

    AACE = American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists AFF = atypical femur fracture ASBMR = American Society for Bone and Mineral Research BEL = best evidence level BMD = bone mineral density BTM = bone turnover marker CBC = complete blood count CI = confidence interval DXA = dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry EL = evidence level FDA = U.S. Food and Drug Administration FLEX = Fracture Intervention Trial (FIT) Long-term Extension FRAX(®) = Fracture Risk Assessment Tool GFR = glomerular filtration rate GI = gastrointestinal HORIZON = Health Outcomes and Reduced Incidence with Zoledronic Acid Once Yearly IOF = International Osteoporosis Foundation ISCD = International Society for Clinical Densitometry IU = international units IV = intravenous LSC = least significant change NBHA = National Bone Health Alliance NOF = National Osteoporosis Foundation 25(OH)D = 25-hydroxy vitamin D ONJ = osteonecrosis of the jaw PINP = serum carboxy-terminal propeptide of type I collagen PTH = parathyroid hormone R = recommendation RANK = receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B RANKL = receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand RCT = randomized controlled trial RR = relative risk S-CTX = serum C-terminal telopeptide SQ = subcutaneous VFA = vertebral fracture assessment WHO = World Health Organization.

  7. American Association for Emergency Psychiatry Task Force on Medical Clearance of Adults Part I: Introduction, Review and Evidence-Based Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Eric L.; Nordstrom, Kimberly; Wilson, Michael P.; Peltzer-Jones, Jennifer M.; Zun, Leslie; Ng, Anthony; Allen, Michael H.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction In the United States, the number of patients presenting to the emergency department (ED) for a mental health concern is significant and expected to grow. The breadth of the medical evaluation of these patients is controversial. Attempts have been made to establish a standard evaluation for these patients, but to date no nationally accepted standards exist. A task force of the American Association of Emergency Psychiatry, consisting of physicians from emergency medicine and psychiatry, and a psychologist was convened to form consensus recommendations on the medical evaluation of psychiatric patients presenting to EDs. Methods The task force reviewed existing literature on the topic of medical evaluation of psychiatric patients in the ED (Part I) and then combined this with expert consensus (Part II). Results In Part I, we discuss terminological issues and existing evidence on medical exams and laboratory studies of psychiatric patients in the ED. Conclusion Emergency physicians should work cooperatively with psychiatric receiving facilities to decrease unnecessary testing while increasing the quality of medical screening exams for psychiatric patients who present to EDs. PMID:28210358

  8. Guidelines for the use of long-term central venous catheter in children with hemato-oncological disorders. On behalf of supportive therapy working group of Italian Association of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology (AIEOP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carraro, F; Cicalese, M P; Cesaro, S; De Santis, R; Zanazzo, G; Tornesello, A; Giordano, P; Bergadano, A; Giacchino, M

    2013-10-01

    In the last 30 years, the use of long-term central venous catheters (CVC) is increased especially for children with hemato-oncological disorders. However, the use of CVC is associated to complications, as mechanical accidents, thrombosis, and infections that can determine a prolongation of hospital stay, an increase of costs, and sometimes life-threatening conditions that require urgent systemic treatment or CVC removal. CVC removal may be troublesome especially in neonates, infants, or any other "highly needed CVC patients"; in these selected cases, the prevention and treatment of CVC-related complications play a pivotal role and specific surveillance programs are crucial. While extensive literature is focused on CVC management in adults, no guidelines are available for children. To this aim, the first recommendations for the management of CVC infectious complication in pediatric age have been written after pediatric and adult literature review and collegial discussion among members of Supportive Therapy working group of Italian Association of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology. Compared to the adult age, the necessity of peripheral vein cultures for the diagnosis of CVC-related infection remains controversial in children because of the poorer venous asset and a conservative, pharmacologically focused management through CVC remains mandatory, with CVC removal to be performed only in selected cases.

  9. Alzheimer's disease management guideline: update 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal-Gidan, Freddi; Cherry, Debra; Jones, Randi; Williams, Bradley; Hewett, Linda; Chodosh, Joshua

    2011-05-01

    Frequent review and update of guidelines are necessary for them to remain current and useful for clinical practices. This second revision of the postdiagnostic management of Alzheimer's disease (AD) guideline by the California Workgroup was prompted by significant advances in knowledge about appropriate care management, including pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic approaches to treatment of the disease, accompanying behavioral problems, and functional decline. The focus remains explicitly on primary care, where the majority of it occurs for those with AD and other dementias. In all, 40 experts in dementia care were recruited from a variety of disciplines across California. Four workgroups were created that reviewed recent research findings from a total of 569 publications since 2002. The revised Guideline incorporates 305 new references, including 11 state and federal laws, in addition to 78 references from the previous version. The Guideline is divided into four sections that address postdiagnostic management: (1) assessment, (2) treatment, (3) patient and family education and support, and (4) legal considerations associated with AD. Significant revisions and changes in each area and the underlying research to support the recommendations are presented in this article. New topics related to early stage and end-of-life were identified and recommendations were developed for these specific populations. The Guideline recommendations provide a framework to inform and improve medical care for AD by primary health care providers. Copyright © 2011 The Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Benefits and Harms of Treatment of Asymptomatic Bacteriuria: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis by the European Association of Urology Urological Infection Guidelines Panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köves, Bela; Cai, Tommaso; Veeratterapillay, Rajan; Pickard, Robert; Seisen, Thomas; Lam, Thomas B; Yuan, Cathy Yuhong; Bruyere, Franck; Wagenlehner, Florian; Bartoletti, Riccardo; Geerlings, Suzanne E; Pilatz, Adrian; Pradere, Benjamin; Hofmann, Fabian; Bonkat, Gernot; Wullt, Björn

    2017-12-01

    People with asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU) are often unnecessarily treated with antibiotics risking adverse effects and antimicrobial resistance. We performed a systematic review to determine any benefits and harms of treating ABU in particular patient groups. Relevant databases were searched and eligible trials were assessed for risk-of-bias and Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Education quality. Where possible, a meta-analysis of extracted data was performed or a narrative synthesis of the evidence was presented. After screening 3626 articles, 50 studies involving 7088 patients were included. Overall, quality of evidence ranged from very low to low. There was no evidence of benefit for patients with no risk factors, patients with diabetes mellitus, postmenopausal women, elderly institutionalised patients, patients with renal transplants, or patients prior to joint replacement, and treatment was harmful for patients with recurrent urinary tract infection (UTI). Treatment of ABU resulted in a lower risk of postoperative UTI after transurethral resection surgery. In pregnant women, we found evidence that treatment of ABU decreased risk of symptomatic UTI, low birthweight, and preterm delivery. ABU should be treated prior to transurethral resection surgery. In addition, current evidence also suggests that ABU treatment is required in pregnant women, although the results of a recent trial have challenged this view. We reviewed available scientific studies to see if people with bacteria in their urine but without symptoms of urinary tract infection should be treated with antibiotics to eliminate bacteria. For most people, treatment was not beneficial and may be harmful. Antibiotic treatment did appear to benefit women in pregnancy and those about to undergo urological surgery. Copyright © 2017 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, European Society of Gastroenterology and Endoscopy Nurses and Associates, and the European Society of Anaesthesiology Guideline: Non-anesthesiologist administration of propofol for GI endoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dumonceau, J.M.; Riphaus, A.; Aparicio, J.R.

    2010-01-01

    of this evidence- and consensus-based set of guideline is to provide non-anesthesiologists with a comprehensive framework for propofol sedation during digestive endoscopy. This guideline results from a collaborative effort from representatives of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE...

  12. European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, European Society of Gastroenterology and Endoscopy Nurses and Associates, and the European Society of Anaesthesiology Guideline: Non-anaesthesiologist administration of propofol for GI endoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dumonceau, J.M.; Riphaus, A.; Aparicio, J.R.

    2010-01-01

    of this evidence- and consensus-based set of guideline is to provide non-anaesthesiologists with a comprehensive framework for propofol sedation during digestive endoscopy. This guideline results from a collaborative effort from representatives of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE...

  13. De standaard 'opsporing visuele stoornissen 0-19 jaar' van de jeugdgezondheidszorg [The guideline 'Detection of visual disorders at the age of 0-19' from the Dutch association of child health care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velzen-Mol, H.W.M. van; Blankespoor, M.N.; Wagenaar-Fischer, M.M.; Leerdam, F.J.M. van

    2003-01-01

    The child health-care guideline 'Detection of visual disorders at the age of 0-19' draws attention to the importance of early detection of visual disorders and provides guidelines to child health-care workers for detecting disorders during routine check-ups. Children under the age of 3 are examined

  14. Primary prevention of ischemic stroke: a guideline from the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association Stroke Council: cosponsored by the Atherosclerotic Peripheral Vascular Disease Interdisciplinary Working Group; Cardiovascular Nursing Council; Clinical Cardiology Council; Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Metabolism Council; and the Quality of Care and Outcomes Research Interdisciplinary Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Larry B; Adams, Robert; Alberts, Mark J; Appel, Lawrence J; Brass, Lawrence M; Bushnell, Cheryl D; Culebras, Antonio; DeGraba, Thomas J; Gorelick, Philip B; Guyton, John R; Hart, Robert G; Howard, George; Kelly-Hayes, Margaret; Nixon, J V Ian; Sacco, Ralph L

    2006-06-20

    This guideline provides an overview of the evidence on various established and potential stroke risk factors and provides recommendations for the reduction of stroke risk. Writing group members were nominated by the committee chair on the basis of each writer's previous work in relevant topic areas and were approved by the American Heart Association Stroke Council's Scientific Statement Oversight Committee. The writers used systematic literature reviews (covering the time period since the last review published in 2001 up to January 2005), reference to previously published guidelines, personal files, and expert opinion to summarize existing evidence, indicate gaps in current knowledge, and when appropriate, formulate recommendations based on standard American Heart Association criteria. All members of the writing group had numerous opportunities to comment in writing on the recommendations and approved the final version of this document. The guideline underwent extensive peer review before consideration and approval by the AHA Science Advisory and Coordinating Committee. Schemes for assessing a person's risk of a first stroke were evaluated. Risk factors or risk markers for a first stroke were classified according to their potential for modification (nonmodifiable, modifiable, or potentially modifiable) and strength of evidence (well documented or less well documented). Nonmodifiable risk factors include age, sex, low birth weight, race/ethnicity, and genetic factors. Well-documented and modifiable risk factors include hypertension, exposure to cigarette smoke, diabetes, atrial fibrillation and certain other cardiac conditions, dyslipidemia, carotid artery stenosis, sickle cell disease, postmenopausal hormone therapy, poor diet, physical inactivity, and obesity and body fat distribution. Less well-documented or potentially modifiable risk factors include the metabolic syndrome, alcohol abuse, drug abuse, oral contraceptive use, sleep-disordered breathing, migraine

  15. Oncological Outcomes of Laparoscopic Nephroureterectomy Versus Open Radical Nephroureterectomy for Upper Tract Urothelial Carcinoma: An European Association of Urology Guidelines Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyronnet, Benoit; Seisen, Thomas; Dominguez-Escrig, Jose-Luis; Bruins, Harman Max; Yuan, Cathy Yuhong; Lam, Thomas; Maclennan, Steven; N'dow, James; Babjuk, Marko; Comperat, Eva; Zigeuner, Richard; Sylvester, Richard J; Burger, Maximilian; Mostafid, Hugh; van Rhijn, Bas W G; Gontero, Paolo; Palou, Joan; Shariat, Sharokh F; Roupret, Morgan

    2017-11-15

    laparoscopically and in patients with locally advanced high-risk (pT3/pT4 and/or high-grade) UTUC. We reviewed the literature comparing the outcomes of two different surgical procedures for the treatment of upper tract urothelial carcinoma. Open radical nephroureterectomy is a surgical procedure in which the kidney is removed through a large incision in the abdomen, while in laparoscopic radical nephroureterectomy, the kidney is removed through a number of small incisions. Our findings suggest that the outcomes of laparoscopic radical nephroureterectomy may be poorer than those of open radical nephroureterectomy, particularly when the bladder cuff is also required to be removed. Laparoscopic radical nephroureterectomy may also be less effective in patients with locally advanced (pT3/pT4) or high-grade upper tract urothelial carcinomas. Copyright © 2017 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Curriculum Guidelines for Predoctoral Oral Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Dental Education, 1987

    1987-01-01

    The American Association of Dental Schools' guidelines for oral radiology curricula give an overview of the field and its interrelationships with other fields and outline the primary educational objectives, prerequisites, core content, specific behavioral objectives, sequencing, faculty, facilities, and occupational hazards to be considered in…

  17. Postoperative pain treatment' practice guideline revised

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houweling, P.L.; Molag, M.L.; Boekel, R.L.M. van; Verbrugge, S.J.; Haelst, I.M. van; Hollmann, M.W.

    2013-01-01

    - On the initiative of the Dutch Association of Anaesthesiologists, a multidisciplinary workgroup has revised the 2003 practice guideline on 'Postoperative pain treatment' for adults and children.- The main reason for revision was the availability of new drugs and new methods of administration. The

  18. Guidelines on Testicular Cancer: 2015 Update

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albers, Peter; Albrecht, Walter; Algaba, Ferran; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Cohn-Cedermark, Gabriella; Fizazi, Karim; Horwich, Alan; Laguna, Maria Pilar; Nicolai, Nicola; Oldenburg, Jan

    2015-01-01

    This is an update of the previous European Association of Urology testis cancer guidelines published in 2011, which included major changes in the diagnosis and treatment of germ cell tumours. To summarise latest developments in the treatment of this rare disease. Recommendations have been agreed

  19. Danish national guideline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Anne Petas Swane; Engsbro, Anne Line Østergaard; Fassov, Janne

    2017-01-01

    National Danish guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) in adult patients in secondary and tertiary care have been approved by the Danish Society for Gastroenterology and Hepatology. IBS can be a positive diagnosis in patients fulfilling the Rome III criteria...... for IBS with no alarm signals, a normal physical examination and a normal CRP and hemoglobin. In patients bowel disease with a high probability. Patients with IBS and diarrhea should be tested for celiac disease. Endoscopy...

  20. TORIS Data Preparation Guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guinn, H.; Remson, D.

    1999-03-11

    The objective of this manual is to present guidelines and procedures for the preparation of new data for the Tertiary Oil Recovery Information System (TORIS) data base. TORIS is an analytical system currently maintained by the Department of Energy's (DOE) Bartlesville Project Office. It uses an extensive field- and reservoir-level data base to evaluate the technical and economic recovery potential of specific crude oil reservoirs.

  1. Measure Guideline: Evaporative Condensers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    German, A.; Dakin, B.; Hoeschele, M.

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this measure guideline on evaporative condensers is to provide information on a cost-effective solution for energy and demand savings in homes with cooling loads. This is a prescriptive approach that outlines selection criteria, design and installation procedures, and operation and maintenance best practices. This document has been prepared to provide a process for properly designing, installing, and maintaining evaporative condenser systems as well as understanding the benefits, costs, and tradeoffs.

  2. Prognostic Performance and Reproducibility of the 1973 and 2004/2016 World Health Organization Grading Classification Systems in Non-muscle-invasive Bladder Cancer: A European Association of Urology Non-muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer Guidelines Panel Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soukup, Viktor; Čapoun, Otakar; Cohen, Daniel; Hernández, Virginia; Babjuk, Marek; Burger, Max; Compérat, Eva; Gontero, Paolo; Lam, Thomas; MacLennan, Steven; Mostafid, A Hugh; Palou, Joan; van Rhijn, Bas W G; Rouprêt, Morgan; Shariat, Shahrokh F; Sylvester, Richard; Yuan, Yuhong; Zigeuner, Richard

    2017-11-01

    Tumour grade is an important prognostic indicator in non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). Histopathological classifications are limited by interobserver variability (reproducibility), which may have prognostic implications. European Association of Urology NMIBC guidelines suggest concurrent use of both 1973 and 2004/2016 World Health Organization (WHO) classifications. To compare the prognostic performance and reproducibility of the 1973 and 2004/2016 WHO grading systems for NMIBC. A systematic literature search was undertaken incorporating Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane Library. Studies were critically appraised for risk of bias (QUIPS). For prognosis, the primary outcome was progression to muscle-invasive or metastatic disease. Secondary outcomes were disease recurrence, and overall and cancer-specific survival. For reproducibility, the primary outcome was interobserver variability between pathologists. Secondary outcome was intraobserver variability (repeatability) by the same pathologist. Of 3593 articles identified, 20 were included in the prognostic review; three were eligible for the reproducibility review. Increasing tumour grade in both classifications was associated with higher disease progression and recurrence rates. Progression rates in grade 1 patients were similar to those in low-grade patients; progression rates in grade 3 patients were higher than those in high-grade patients. Survival data were limited. Reproducibility of the 2004/2016 system was marginally better than that of the 1973 system. Two studies on repeatability showed conflicting results. Most studies had a moderate to high risk of bias. Current grading classifications in NMIBC are suboptimal. The 1973 system identifies more aggressive tumours. Intra- and interobserver variability was slightly less in the 2004/2016 classification. We could not confirm that the 2004/2016 classification outperforms the 1973 classification in prediction of recurrence and progression. This article

  3. The lung cancer management guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jazieh Abdul-Rahman

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The Lung Cancer Guidelines Committee developed 2008 Lung Cancer Management Guidelines based on available evidences in the literature. These guidelines are stage-dependent and addressing the most common clinical scenarios. They address diagnosis, work-up, treatment, and follow up of lung cancer.

  4. Cardiac computed tomography in current cardiology guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mallah, Mouaz H; Aljizeeri, Ahmed; Villines, Todd C; Srichai, Monvadi B; Alsaileek, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Practice guidelines issued by professional societies significantly impact cardiology practice throughout the world. They increasingly incorporate cardiac CT imaging. This review systematically analyzes clinical practice guidelines issued by the American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF)/American Heart Association (AHA) and the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) as well as the multi-societal appropriateness criteria in their latest versions as of September 1st, 2015, in order to identify the extent to which they include recommendations to use cardiac CT in specific clinical situations. Copyright © 2015 Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography. All rights reserved.

  5. EAU guidelines on renal cell carcinoma: the 2010 update.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ljungberg, B.; Cowan, N.C.; Hanbury, D.C.; Hora, M.; Kuczyk, M.A.; Merseburger, A.S.; Patard, J.J.; Mulders, P.F.A.; Sinescu, I.C.

    2010-01-01

    CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVES: The European Association of Urology Guideline Group for renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has prepared these guidelines to help clinicians assess the current evidence-based management of RCC and to incorporate the present recommendations into daily clinical practice. EVIDENCE

  6. Palliative Sedation: An Analysis of International Guidelines and Position Statements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurschick, Lauren; Mayer, Deborah K; Hanson, Laura C

    2015-09-01

    To describe the suggested clinical practice of palliative sedation as it is presented in the literature and discuss available guidelines for its use. CINAHL, PubMed, and Web of Science were searched for publications since 1997 for recommended guidelines and position statements on palliative sedation as well as data on its provision. Keywords included palliative sedation, terminal sedation, guidelines, United States, and end of life. Inclusion criteria were palliative sedation policies, frameworks, guidelines, or discussion of its practice, general or oncology patient population, performance of the intervention in an inpatient unit, for humans, and in English. Exclusion criteria were palliative sedation in children, acute illness, procedural, or burns, and predominantly ethical discussions. Guidelines were published by American College of Physicians-American Society of Internal Medicine (2000), Hospice and Palliative Nurses Association (2003), American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine (2006), American Medical Association (2008), Royal Dutch Medical Association (2009), European Association for Palliative Care (2009), National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization (2010), and National Comprehensive Cancer Network (2012). Variances throughout guidelines include definitions of the practice, indications for its use, continuation of life-prolonging therapies, medications used, and timing/prognosis. The development and implementation of institutional-based guidelines with clear stance on the discussed variances is necessary for consistency in practice. Data on provision of palliative sedation after implementation of guidelines needs to be collected and disseminated for a better understanding of the current practice in the United States. © The Author(s) 2014.

  7. Guidelines for the management of contact dermatitis: an update.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bourke, J

    2009-05-01

    These guidelines for management of contact dermatitis have been prepared for dermatologists on behalf of the British Association of Dermatologists. They present evidence-based guidance for investigation and treatment, with identification of the strength of evidence available at the time of preparation of the guidelines, including details of relevant epidemiological aspects, diagnosis and investigation.

  8. Guidelines for the management of contact dermatitis: an update.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bourke, J

    2012-02-01

    These guidelines for management of contact dermatitis have been prepared for dermatologists on behalf of the British Association of Dermatologists. They present evidence-based guidance for investigation and treatment, with identification of the strength of evidence available at the time of preparation of the guidelines, including details of relevant epidemiological aspects, diagnosis and investigation.

  9. Resuscitation Guideline 2000: What is the level of Awareness and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Cardiopulmonary resuscitation was officially instituted in 1960. In 1992, the American Heart Association released the first set of resuscitation guidelines. Following a general consensus by experts drawn from various resuscitation councils worldwide, a new set of evidence based guidelines was released in ...

  10. Guidelines Adherence and Hypertension Control in an Outpatient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate doctors' adherence to Malaysian Clinical Practice Guideline (CPG) 2008 in established hypertensive patients with cardiovascular diseases and factors associated with guideline adherence and hypertension control in Pulau Pinang Hospital, Malaysia. Methods: Prescriptions written by 13 doctors for ...

  11. Evaluating compliance to Kenya national cancer guidelines on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: In Kenya, breast cancer is one of the most prevalent diseases among women. Early diagnosis and stage-directed treatment are vital in reducing morbidity and mortality associated with it. The Kenya National Cancer Guidelines (KNCG) was developed in 2013. Utility of the guidelines is expected to improve early ...

  12. Medicare depreciation; useful life guidelines--HCFA. Proposed rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-09-30

    We are proposing to amend Medicare regulations to clarify which useful life guidelines providers of health care services may use to determine the useful life of a depreciable asset for Medicare reimbursement purposes. Current regulations state that providers must utilize HHS useful life guidelines or, if none have been published by HHS, the American Hospital Association (AHA) useful life guidelines of 1973 or IRS guidelines. We are proposing to eliminate the reference to IRS guidelines because those previously acceptable for Medicare purposes are outdated and have been made obsolete by the IRS or by statutory change. We would also delete the specific reference to the 1973 AHA guidelines. In addition, we intend this amendment to clarify that certain tax legislation on accelerated depreciation, recently passed by Congress, does not apply to the Medicare program.

  13. Improving the use of research evidence in guideline development: 1. Guidelines for guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oxman Andrew D

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The World Health Organization (WHO, like many other organisations around the world, has recognised the need to use more rigorous processes to ensure that health care recommendations are informed by the best available research evidence. This is the first of a series of 16 reviews that have been prepared as background for advice from the WHO Advisory Committee on Health Research to WHO on how to achieve this. Objectives We reviewed the literature on guidelines for the development of guidelines. Methods We searched PubMed and three databases of methodological studies for existing systematic reviews and relevant methodological research. We did not conduct systematic reviews ourselves. Our conclusions are based on the available evidence, consideration of what WHO and other organisations are doing and logical arguments. Key questions and answers We found no experimental research that compared different formats of guidelines for guidelines or studies that compared different components of guidelines for guidelines. However, there are many examples, surveys and other observational studies that compared the impact of different guideline development documents on guideline quality. What have other organizations done to develop guidelines for guidelines from which WHO can learn? • Establish a credible, independent committee that evaluates existing methods for developing guidelines or that updates existing ones. • Obtain feedback and approval from various stakeholders during the development process of guidelines for guidelines. • Develop a detailed source document (manual that guideline developers can use as reference material. What should be the key components of WHO guidelines for guidelines? • Guidelines for guidelines should include information and instructions about the following components: 1 Priority setting; 2 Group composition and consultations; 3 Declaration and avoidance of conflicts of interest; 4 Group processes; 5

  14. Thyroid nodule guidelines: agreement, disagreement and need for future research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paschke, Ralf; Hegedüs, Laszlo; Alexander, Erik

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews agreement, disagreement and need for future research of the thyroid nodule guidelines published by the British Thyroid Association, National Cancer Institute, American Thyroid Association and the joint, transatlantic effort of three large societies, the American Society...... of Clinical Endocrinologists, Associazione Medici Endocrinologi and the European Thyroid Association, published in 2010. Consensus exists for most topics in the various guidelines. A few areas of disagreement, such as the use of scintigraphy, are mostly due to differences in disease prevalence in different...

  15. Ultrasound Risk Categories for Thyroid Nodules and Cytology Results: A Single Institution's Experience after the Adoption of the 2016 Update of Medical Guidelines by the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists and Associazione Medici Endocrinologi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negro, Roberto; Greco, Gabriele; Colosimo, Ermenegildo

    2017-01-01

    In 2016, the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) and Associazione Medici Endocrinologi (AME) released updated guidelines for the diagnosis and management of thyroid nodules. The aim of this study was to evaluate the AACE/AME recommendations for FNA in clinical practice, by comparing the (US) stratification risk and indications for FNA with cytologic results. From May to December 2016, we collected the cytologic results from FNAs of nodules that were classified using a three-tier US category system (low, intermediate, and high risk). We obtained 859 FNAs from 598 patients: 341 (39.7%) from low, 489 (56.9%) from intermediate, and 29 (3.4%) from high risk nodules. Of these, 88.5% and 74.9% of low and intermediate risk nodules, respectively, were cytologically benign, whereas 84.6% of high risk nodules had a moderate-to-elevated risk of malignancy or were malignant. If FNAs had been limited to intermediate risk nodules >20 mm, we would have missed 13/17 (76.5%) nodules that had moderate-to-elevated risk of malignancy or were malignant (11/13 were malignant based on histology). A nonnegligible number of cytologically malignant nodules or nodules that were suspected to be malignant would be missed if intermediate US risk nodules <20 mm were not biopsied.

  16. Ultrasound Risk Categories for Thyroid Nodules and Cytology Results: A Single Institution’s Experience after the Adoption of the 2016 Update of Medical Guidelines by the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists and Associazione Medici Endocrinologi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Negro

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. In 2016, the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE and Associazione Medici Endocrinologi (AME released updated guidelines for the diagnosis and management of thyroid nodules. The aim of this study was to evaluate the AACE/AME recommendations for FNA in clinical practice, by comparing the (US stratification risk and indications for FNA with cytologic results. Methods. From May to December 2016, we collected the cytologic results from FNAs of nodules that were classified using a three-tier US category system (low, intermediate, and high risk. Results. We obtained 859 FNAs from 598 patients: 341 (39.7% from low, 489 (56.9% from intermediate, and 29 (3.4% from high risk nodules. Of these, 88.5% and 74.9% of low and intermediate risk nodules, respectively, were cytologically benign, whereas 84.6% of high risk nodules had a moderate-to-elevated risk of malignancy or were malignant. If FNAs had been limited to intermediate risk nodules >20 mm, we would have missed 13/17 (76.5% nodules that had moderate-to-elevated risk of malignancy or were malignant (11/13 were malignant based on histology. Conclusions. A nonnegligible number of cytologically malignant nodules or nodules that were suspected to be malignant would be missed if intermediate US risk nodules <20 mm were not biopsied.

  17. Factors influencing hospital implementation of acute pain management practice guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, H J; Lagasse, R S; Ciccone, K; Jakubowski, M S; Kitain, E M

    2001-06-01

    To identify factors that may influence the implementation of acute pain management guidelines in hospital settings. Two questionnaire surveys. Healthcare Association of New York State, Albany, NY. The surveys were administered to 220 hospitals in New York State regarding their acute pain management practices and resources available. One survey was addressed to each hospital's chief executive officer (CEO) and the second survey was addressed to the clinical director of the Department of Anesthesiology or Acute Pain Service. The barriers and incentives to guideline implementation identified by CEOs were analyzed using factor analysis. Logistic regression was employed to determine predictors of guideline implementation by linking the CEOs' survey data with the clinical directors' report of guideline usage. According to clinical directors, only 27% of the responding hospitals were using a published pain management practice guideline. Factors predictive of guideline implementation include resource availability and belief in the benefits of using guidelines to improve quality of care or to achieve economic/legal advantages. Guideline implementation, however, does not necessarily include applying all key elements recommended by the federal Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (formerly Agency for Health Care Policy and Research) guideline. For example, a collaborative, interdisciplinary approach to pain control was used in only 42% of the hospitals, and underutilization of nonpharmacologic therapies to control pain was widespread. Resource availability, particularly staff with expertise in pain management and existence of a formal quality assurance program to monitor pain management, was significantly predictive of compliance with key guideline elements. Resource availability significantly influences the implementation of pain management practice guidelines in hospital settings. Implementation is often incomplete because various factors affect the feasibility of

  18. Evidence-based guideline summary: diagnosis and treatment of limb-girdle and distal dystrophies: report of the guideline development subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology and the practice issues review panel of the American Association of Neuromuscular & Electrodiagnostic Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanaswami, Pushpa; Weiss, Michael; Selcen, Duygu; David, William; Raynor, Elizabeth; Carter, Gregory; Wicklund, Matthew; Barohn, Richard J; Ensrud, Erik; Griggs, Robert C; Gronseth, Gary; Amato, Anthony A

    2014-10-14

    To review the current evidence and make practice recommendations regarding the diagnosis and treatment of limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMDs). Systematic review and practice recommendation development using the American Academy of Neurology guideline development process. Most LGMDs are rare, with estimated prevalences ranging from 0.07 per 100,000 to 0.43 per 100,000. The frequency of some muscular dystrophies varies based on the ethnic background of the population studied. Some LGMD subtypes have distinguishing features, including pattern of muscle involvement, cardiac abnormalities, extramuscular involvement, and muscle biopsy findings. The few published therapeutic trials were not designed to establish clinical efficacy of any treatment. For patients with suspected muscular dystrophy, clinicians should use a clinical approach to guide genetic diagnosis based on clinical phenotype, inheritance pattern, and associated manifestations (Level B). Clinicians should refer newly diagnosed patients with an LGMD subtype and high risk of cardiac complications for cardiology evaluation even if they are asymptomatic from a cardiac standpoint (Level B). In patients with LGMD with a known high risk of respiratory failure, clinicians should obtain periodic pulmonary function testing (Level B). Clinicians should refer patients with muscular dystrophy to a clinic that has access to multiple specialties designed specifically to care for patients with neuromuscular disorders (Level B). Clinicians should not offer patients with LGMD gene therapy, myoblast transplantation, neutralizing antibody to myostatin, or growth hormone outside of a research study designed to determine efficacy and safety of the treatment (Level R). Detailed results and recommendations are available on the Neurology® Web site at Neurology.org. © 2014 American Academy of Neurology.

  19. The association of Carotid Revascularization Endarterectomy versus Stent Trial (CREST) and Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Carotid Guideline Publication on utilization and outcomes of carotid stenting among "high-risk" patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzler, Gregory G; Farber, Alik; Rybin, Denis V; Doros, Gheorghe; Siracuse, Jeffrey J; Eslami, Mohammad H

    2017-07-01

    Since the 2004 approval by the United States Food and Drug Administration of carotid artery stenting (CAS), there have been two seminal publications about CAS reimbursement (Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services guidelines; 2008) and clinical outcomes (Carotid Revascularization Endarterectomy versus Stent Trial [CREST]; 2010). We explored the association between these publications and national trends in CAS use among high-risk symptomatic patients. The most recent congruent data sets of the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) were queried for patients undergoing carotid revascularization. The sample was limited to include only patients who were defined as "high-risk" if they had a Charlson Comorbidity Score of ≥3.0. Subgroup analyses were performed of high-risk patients with symptomatic carotid stenosis. Utilization proportions of CAS were calculated quarterly from 2005 to 2011 for NIS. Three time intervals related to Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services guidelines and CREST publication were selected: 2005 to 2008, 2008 to 2010, and after 2010. Logistic regression with piecewise linear trend for time was used to estimate different trends in CAS use for the overall high-risk sample and for neurologically asymptomatic and symptomatic cases. Multivariate logistic regression was used to compare odds of postoperative mortality and stroke between these two procedures at different time intervals independent of confounding variables. During the study period, 20,079 carotid endarterectomies (CEAs) and 3447 CAS procedures were performed in high-risk patients in the NIS database. CAS utilization constituted 20.5% of carotid revascularization procedures among high-risk symptomatic patients, with a significant increase from 18.6% to 24.4% during the study period (P carotid revascularization in a high-risk cohort of patients has significantly increased from 2005 to 2011. Compared with CEA, CAS independently increased the odds of perioperative in-hospital stroke in

  20. EAU guidelines on testicular cancer: 2011 update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, Peter; Albrecht, Walter; Algaba, Ferran; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Cohn-Cedermark, Gabriella; Fizazi, Karim; Horwich, Alan; Laguna, Maria Pilar

    2011-08-01

    On behalf of the European Association of Urology (EAU), guidelines for the diagnosis, therapy, and follow-up of testicular cancer were established. This article is a short version of the EAU testicular cancer guidelines and summarises the main conclusions from the guidelines on the management of testicular cancer. Guidelines were compiled by a multidisciplinary guidelines working group. A systematic review was carried out using Medline and Embase, also taking Cochrane evidence and data from the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus Group into consideration. A panel of experts weighted the references, and a level of evidence and grade of recommendation were assigned. There is a paucity of literature especially regarding longer term follow-up, and results from a number of ongoing trials are awaited. The choice of treatment centre is of the utmost importance, and treatment in reference centres within clinical trials, especially for poor-prognosis nonseminomatous germ cell tumours, provides better outcomes. For patients with clinical stage I seminoma, based on recently published data on long-term toxicity, adjuvant radiotherapy is no longer recommended as first-line adjuvant treatment. The TNM classification 2009 is recommended. These guidelines contain information for the standardised management of patients with testicular cancer based on the latest scientific insights. Cure rates are generally excellent, but because testicular cancer mainly affects men in their third or fourth decade of life, treatment effects on fertility require careful counselling of patients, and treatment must be tailored taking individual circumstances and patient preferences into account. Copyright © 2011 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. A review of clinical guidelines.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Andrews, E J

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Clinical guidelines are increasingly used in patient management but few clinicians are familiar with their origin or appropriate application. METHODS: A Medline search using the terms \\'clinical guidelines\\' and \\'practice guidelines\\' was conducted. Additional references were sourced by manual searching from the bibliographies of articles located. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Clinical guidelines originated in the USA in the early 1980s, initially as a cost containment exercise. Significant improvements in the process and outcomes of care have been demonstrated following their introduction, although the extent of improvement varies considerably. The principles for the development of guidelines are well established but many published guidelines fall short of these basic quality criteria. Guidelines are only one aspect of improving quality and should be used within a wider framework of promoting clinical effectiveness. Understanding their limitations as well as their potential benefits should enable clinicians to have a clearer view of their place in everyday practice.

  2. 2017 American Heart Association Focused Update on Adult Basic Life Support and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Quality: An Update to the American Heart Association Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinman, Monica E; Goldberger, Zachary D; Rea, Thomas; Swor, Robert A; Bobrow, Bentley J; Brennan, Erin E; Terry, Mark; Hemphill, Robin; Gazmuri, Raúl J; Hazinski, Mary Fran; Travers, Andrew H

    2018-01-02

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation is a lifesaving technique for victims of sudden cardiac arrest. Despite advances in resuscitation science, basic life support remains a critical factor in determining outcomes. The American Heart Association recommendations for adult basic life support incorporate the most recently published evidence and serve as the basis for education and training for laypeople and healthcare providers who perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Prevention, diagnosis, therapy and follow-up care of sepsis: 1st revision of S-2k guidelines of the German Sepsis Society (Deutsche Sepsis-Gesellschaft e.V. (DSG and the German Interdisciplinary Association of Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine (Deutsche Interdisziplinäre Vereinigung für Intensiv- und Notfallmedizin (DIVI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinhart, K.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Practice guidelines are systematically developed statements and recommendations that assist the physicians and patients in making decisions about appropriate health care measures for specific clinical circumstances taking into account specific national health care structures. The 1st revision of the S-2k guideline of the German Sepsis Society in collaboration with 17 German medical scientific societies and one self-help group provides state-of-the-art information (results of controlled clinical trials and expert knowledge on the effective and appropriate medical care (prevention, diagnosis, therapy and follow-up care of critically ill patients with severe sepsis or septic shock. The guideline had been developed according to the “German Instrument for Methodological Guideline Appraisal” of the Association of the Scientific Medical Societies (AWMF. In view of the inevitable advancements in scientific knowledge and technical expertise, revisions, updates and amendments must be periodically initiated. The guideline recommendations may not be applied under all circumstances. It rests with the clinician to decide whether a certain recommendation should be adopted or not, taking into consideration the unique set of clinical facts presented in connection with each individual patient as well as the available resources.

  4. 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association and 2004 Adult Treatment Panel III cholesterol guidelines applied to HIV-infected patients with/without subclinical high-risk coronary plaque

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zanni, Markella V; Fitch, Kathleen V; Feldpausch, Meghan; Han, Allison; Lee, Hang; Lu, Michael T; Abbara, Suhny; Ribaudo, Heather; Douglas, Pamela S; Hoffmann, Udo; Lo, Janet; Grinspoon, Steven K

    2014-01-01

    ...) coronary atherosclerotic plaque. To compare recommendations for statins among HIV-infected subjects with/without HRM coronary plaque according to 2013 ACC/AHA versus 2004 Adult Treatment Panel III guidelines...

  5. Guidelines for Authors

    OpenAIRE

    K., Ed.

    2016-01-01

    Guidelines for Authors cumhuriyet theology journal  reguires writers to use the The Chicago Manual of Style “notes and bibliography” system of referencing.First citation: author(s) first name and last name, title, (if applicable) first and last name of translator or editor, place of publication, publisher, date of publication, page number.Subsequent citations: author’s last name, the short title, and the page number should be indicated in all subsequent citations. Footnote citations should co...

  6. Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Perioperative Nutritional, Metabolic, and Nonsurgical Support of the Bariatric Surgery Patient—2013 Update: Cosponsored by American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, The Obesity Society, and American Society for Metabolic & Bariatric Surgery*

    OpenAIRE

    Mechanick, Jeffrey I.; Youdim, Adrienne; Jones, Daniel B.; Garvey, W. Timothy; Hurley, Daniel L.; McMahon, Molly; Heinberg, Leslie J.; Kushner, Robert; Adams, Ted D.; Shikora, Scott; Dixon, John B.; Brethauer, Stacy

    2013-01-01

    The development of these updated guidelines was commissioned by the AACE, TOS, and ASMBS Board of Directors and adheres to the AACE 2010 protocol for standardized production of clinical practice guidelines (CPG). Each recommendation was re-evaluated and updated based on the evidence and subjective factors per protocol. Examples of expanded topics in this update include: the roles of sleeve gastrectomy, bariatric surgery in patients with type-2 diabetes, bariatric surgery for patients with mil...

  7. CLINICAL PRACTICE GUIDELINES FOR THE PERIOPERATIVE NUTRITIONAL, METABOLIC, AND NONSURGICAL SUPPORT OF THE BARIATRIC SURGERY PATIENT—2013 UPDATE: COSPONSORED BY AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGISTS, THE OBESITY SOCIETY, AND AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR METABOLIC & BARIATRIC SURGERY★

    OpenAIRE

    Mechanick, Jeffrey I.; Youdim, Adrienne; Jones, Daniel B.; Garvey, W. Timothy; Hurley, Daniel L.; McMahon, M. Molly; Heinberg, Leslie J.; Kushner, Robert; Adams, Ted D.; Shikora, Scott; Dixon, John B.; Brethauer, Stacy

    2013-01-01

    The development of these updated guidelines was commissioned by the AACE, TOS, and ASMBS Board of Directors and adheres to the AACE 2010 protocol for standardized production of clinical practice guidelines (CPG). Each recommendation was re-evaluated and updated based on the evidence and subjective factors per protocol. Examples of expanded topics in this update include: the roles of sleeve gastrectomy, bariatric surgery in patients with type-2 diabetes, bariatric surgery for patients with mil...

  8. Diretrizes da Associação Médica Brasileira para o tratamento do transtorno de ansiedade social Guidelines of the Brazilian Medical Association for the treatment of social anxiety disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle N. Levitan

    2011-09-01

    functional and psychosocial impairment. The Brazilian Medical Association (BMA, with the project named Diretrizes (Guidelines, in English, seeks to develop consensus for the diagnosis and treatment of common diseases. The aim of this article is to present the most important findings of the guidelines on the treatment of SAD, serving as a reference for the general practitioner and specialist. METHOD: The method used was proposed by the BMA. The search was conducted in the databases of MEDLINE (PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science and LILACS, between 1980 and 2010. The strategy used was based on structured questions as PICO (acronym formed by the initials of "patient or population", "intervention, display or exhibition", "control or comparison" and "outcome". RESULTS: Studies show that the first-line pharmacological treatment for adults and children are serotonin selective reuptake inhibitors and serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, whereas cognitive-behavioral therapy is considered the best psychotherapeutic treatment. Moreover, some psychiatric comorbidities were associated with a worse outcome of SAD. CONCLUSIONS: Despite its high prevalence, SAD does not receive adequate attention and treatment. The best choice for the treatment of adults is a combination of cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy with serotonin selective reuptake inhibitors and serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors. Other options as benzodiazepines or monoamine oxidase inhibitors must be used as second and third choices, respectively.

  9. Guideline on anterior cruciate ligament injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    The Dutch Orthopaedic Association has a long tradition of development of practical clinical guidelines. Here we present the recommendations from the multidisciplinary clinical guideline working group for anterior cruciate ligament injury. The following 8 clinical questions were formulated by a steering group of the Dutch Orthopaedic Association. What is the role of physical examination and additional diagnostic tools? Which patient-related outcome measures should be used? What are the relevant parameters that influence the indication for an ACL reconstruction? Which findings or complaints are predictive of a bad result of an ACL injury treatment? What is the optimal timing for surgery for an ACL injury? What is the outcome of different conservative treatment modalities? Which kind of graft gives the best result in an ACL reconstruction? What is the optimal postoperative treatment concerning rehabilitation, resumption of sports, and physiotherapy? These 8 questions were answered and recommendations were made, using the “Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation” instrument. This instrument seeks to improve the quality and effectiveness of clinical practical guidelines by establishing a shared framework to develop, report, and assess. The steering group has also developed 7 internal indicators to aid in measuring and enhancing the quality of the treatment of patients with an ACL injury, for use in a hospital or practice. PMID:22900914

  10. Postdoctoral program guidelines.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teich-McGoldrick, Stephanie; Miller, Andrew W.; Sava, Dorina Florentina; Liu, Yanli; Ferreira, Summer Rhodes; Biedermann, Laura Butler; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis; Hall, Lisa Michelle; Liu, Xiaohua H.; Ekoto, Isaac

    2012-04-01

    We, the Postdoc Professional Development Program (PD2P) leadership team, wrote these postdoc guidelines to be a starting point for communication between new postdocs, their staff mentors, and their managers. These guidelines detail expectations and responsibilities of the three parties, as well as list relevant contacts. The purpose of the Postdoc Program is to bring in talented, creative people who enrich Sandia's environment by performing innovative R&D, as well as by stimulating intellectual curiosity and learning. Postdocs are temporary employees who come to Sandia for career development and advancement reasons. In general, the postdoc term is 1 year, renewable up to five times for a total of six years. However, center practices may vary; check with your manager. At term, a postdoc may apply for a staff position at Sandia or choose to move to university, industry or another lab. It is our vision that those who leave become long-term collaborators and advocates whose relationships with Sandia have a positive effect upon our national constituency.

  11. VALIDATION GUIDELINES FOR LABORATORIES PERFORMING FORENSIC ANALYSIS OF CHEMICAL TERRORISM

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Scientific Working Group on Forensic Analysis of Chemical Terrorism (SWGFACT) has developed the following guidelines for laboratories engaged in the forensic analysis of chemical evidence associated with terrorism. This document provides a baseline framework and guidance for...

  12. Engineering policy guidelines for design of driven piles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    These guidelines were developed as part of a comprehensive research program undertaken by the Missouri Department of : Transportation (MoDOT) to reduce costs associated with design and construction of bridge foundations while maintaining appropriate ...

  13. Engineering policy guidelines for design of earth slopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    These guidelines were developed as part of a comprehensive research program undertaken by the Missouri Department of Transportation (MoDOT) to reduce costs associated with design and construction of bridge foundations while maintaining appropriate le...

  14. Engineering policy guidelines for design of drilled shafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    These guidelines were developed as part of a comprehensive research program undertaken by the Missouri Department of Transportation (MoDOT) to reduce costs associated with design and construction of bridge foundations while maintaining appropriate le...

  15. Engineering policy guidelines for design of spread footings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    These guidelines were developed as part of a comprehensive research program undertaken by the Missouri Department of Transportation (MoDOT) to reduce costs associated with design and construction of bridge foundations while maintaining appropriate le...