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Sample records for association implicates mmp20

  1. The odontogenic ameloblast-associated protein (ODAM) cooperates with RUNX2 and modulates enamel mineralization via regulation of MMP-20.

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    Lee, Hye-Kyung; Lee, Dong-Seol; Ryoo, Hyun-Mo; Park, Jong-Tae; Park, Su-Jin; Bae, Hyun-Sook; Cho, Moon-Il; Park, Joo-Cheol

    2010-10-15

    We have previously reported that the odontogenic ameloblast-associated protein (ODAM) plays important roles in enamel mineralization through the regulation of matrix metalloproteinase-20 (MMP-20). However, the precise function of ODAM in MMP-20 regulation remains largely unknown. The aim of the present study was to uncover the molecular mechanisms responsible for MMP-20 regulation. The subcellular localization of ODAM varies in a stage-specific fashion during ameloblast differentiation. During the secretory stage of amelogenesis ODAM was localized to both the nucleus and cytoplasm of ameloblasts. However, during the maturation stage of amelogenesis, ODAM was observed in the cytoplasm and at the interface between ameloblasts and the enamel layer, but not in the nucleus. Secreted ODAM was detected in the conditioned medium of ameloblast-lineage cell line (ALC) from days 14 to 21, which coincided with the maturation stage of amelogenesis. Interestingly, the expression of Runx2 and nuclear ODAM correlated with MMP-20 expression in ALC. We therefore examined whether ODAM cooperates with Runx2 to regulate MMP-20 and modulate enamel mineralization. Increased expression of ODAM and Runx2 augmented MMP-20 expression, and Runx2 expression enhanced expression of ODAM, although overexpression of ODAM did not influence Runx2 expression. Conversely, loss of Runx2 in ALC decreased ODAM expression, resulting in down-regulation of MMP-20 expression. Increased MMP-20 expression accelerated amelogenin processing during enamel mineralization. Our data suggest that Runx2 regulates the expression of ODAM and that nuclear ODAM serves an important regulatory function in the mineralization of enamel through the regulation of MMP-20 apart from a different, currently unidentified, function of extracellular ODAM. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. MMP20 cleaves E-cadherin and influences ameloblast development.

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    Bartlett, John D; Yamakoshi, Yasuo; Simmer, James P; Nanci, Antonio; Smith, Charles E

    2011-01-01

    Dental enamel development occurs in stages as observed by the changing morphology of the ameloblasts that are responsible for enamel formation. During the secretory stage of development, proteins including MMP20 are secreted into the enamel matrix. MMP20 is required for proper enamel formation as mutation of the Mmp20 gene causes autosomal recessive amelogenesis imperfecta. Here, we examined in detail the morphology of the Mmp20-null ameloblast cell layer. Intriguingly, we found that the Mmp20-null mouse secretory stage ameloblasts retract their Tomes' processes as if preparing to enter the maturation stage but later reextend their Tomes' processes as if resuming the secretory stage. We also demonstrated that MMP20 cleaves epithelial cadherin, i.e. E-cadherin. Cadherins are transmembrane proteins with extracellular domains that provide adhesive contacts between neighboring cells. Their intracellular domains bind to the cell cytoskeleton through catenins, including β-catenin. When specific MMPs cleave the cadherin extracellular domain, β-catenin is released and may locate to the cell nucleus as a transcription factor. Therefore, MMP20 may influence ameloblast developmental progression through hydrolysis of cadherin extracellular domains with associated release of transcription factor(s). Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Evolutionary Analysis Predicts Sensitive Positions of MMP20 and Validates Newly- and Previously-Identified MMP20 Mutations Causing Amelogenesis Imperfecta

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    Barbara Gasse

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI designates a group of genetic diseases characterized by a large range of enamel disorders causing important social and health problems. These defects can result from mutations in enamel matrix proteins or protease encoding genes. A range of mutations in the enamel cleavage enzyme matrix metalloproteinase-20 gene (MMP20 produce enamel defects of varying severity. To address how various alterations produce a range of AI phenotypes, we performed a targeted analysis to find MMP20 mutations in French patients diagnosed with non-syndromic AI. Genomic DNA was isolated from saliva and MMP20 exons and exon-intron boundaries sequenced. We identified several homozygous or heterozygous mutations, putatively involved in the AI phenotypes. To validate missense mutations and predict sensitive positions in the MMP20 sequence, we evolutionarily compared 75 sequences extracted from the public databases using the Datamonkey webserver. These sequences were representative of mammalian lineages, covering more than 150 million years of evolution. This analysis allowed us to find 324 sensitive positions (out of the 483 MMP20 residues, pinpoint functionally important domains, and build an evolutionary chart of important conserved MMP20 regions. This is an efficient tool to identify new- and previously-identified mutations. We thus identified six functional MMP20 mutations in unrelated families, finding two novel mutated sites. The genotypes and phenotypes of these six mutations are described and compared. To date, 13 MMP20 mutations causing AI have been reported, making these genotypes and associated hypomature enamel phenotypes the most frequent in AI.

  4. Assessment of dental fluorosis in Mmp20 +/- mice.

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    Sharma, R; Tye, C E; Arun, A; MacDonald, D; Chatterjee, A; Abrazinski, T; Everett, E T; Whitford, G M; Bartlett, J D

    2011-06-01

    The molecular mechanisms that underlie dental fluorosis are poorly understood. The retention of enamel proteins hallmarking fluorotic enamel may result from impaired hydrolysis and/or removal of enamel proteins. Previous studies have suggested that partial inhibition of Mmp20 expression is involved in the etiology of dental fluorosis. Here we ask if mice expressing only one functional Mmp20 allele are more susceptible to fluorosis. We demonstrate that Mmp20 (+/-) mice express approximately half the amount of MMP20 as do wild-type mice. The Mmp20 heterozygous mice have normal-appearing enamel, with Vickers microhardness values similar to those of wild-type control enamel. Therefore, reduced MMP20 expression is not solely responsible for dental fluorosis. With 50-ppm-fluoride (F(-)) treatment ad libitum, the Mmp20 (+/-) mice had F(-) tissue levels similar to those of Mmp20 (+/+) mice. No significant difference in enamel hardness was observed between the F(-)-treated heterozygous and wild-type mice. Interestingly, we did find a small but significant difference in quantitative fluorescence between these two groups, which may be attributable to slightly higher protein content in the Mmp20 (+/-) mouse enamel. We conclude that MMP20 plays a nominal role in dental enamel fluorosis.

  5. Assessment of Dental Fluorosis in Mmp20+/− Mice

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    Sharma, R.; Tye, C.E.; Arun, A.; MacDonald, D.; Chatterjee, A.; Abrazinski, T.; Everett, E.T.; Whitford, G.M.; Bartlett, J.D.

    2011-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms that underlie dental fluorosis are poorly understood. The retention of enamel proteins hallmarking fluorotic enamel may result from impaired hydrolysis and/or removal of enamel proteins. Previous studies have suggested that partial inhibition of Mmp20 expression is involved in the etiology of dental fluorosis. Here we ask if mice expressing only one functional Mmp20 allele are more susceptible to fluorosis. We demonstrate that Mmp20+/− mice express approximately half the amount of MMP20 as do wild-type mice. The Mmp20 heterozygous mice have normal-appearing enamel, with Vickers microhardness values similar to those of wild-type control enamel. Therefore, reduced MMP20 expression is not solely responsible for dental fluorosis. With 50-ppm-fluoride (F−) treatment ad libitum, the Mmp20+/− mice had F− tissue levels similar to those of Mmp20+/+ mice. No significant difference in enamel hardness was observed between the F−-treated heterozygous and wild-type mice. Interestingly, we did find a small but significant difference in quantitative fluorescence between these two groups, which may be attributable to slightly higher protein content in the Mmp20+/− mouse enamel. We conclude that MMP20 plays a nominal role in dental enamel fluorosis. PMID:21386097

  6. MMP20 modulates cadherin expression in ameloblasts as enamel develops.

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    Guan, X; Bartlett, J D

    2013-12-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-20 (enamelysin, MMP20) is essential for dental enamel development. Seven different MMP20 mutations in humans cause non-syndromic enamel malformations, termed amelogenesis imperfecta, and ablation of Mmp20 in mice results in thin brittle enamel with a dysplastic rod pattern. Healthy enamel formation requires the sliding movement of ameloblasts in rows during the secretory stage of development. This is essential for formation of the characteristic decussating enamel rod pattern observed in rodents, and this is also when MMP20 is secreted into the enamel matrix. Therefore, we propose that MMP20 facilitates ameloblast movement by cleaving ameloblast cell-cell contacts. Here we show that MMP20 cleaves the extracellular domains of the E- and N-cadherin adherens junction proteins, that both E- and N-cadherin transcripts are expressed at significantly higher levels in Mmp20 null vs. wild-type (WT) mice, and that in Mmp20 ablated mice, high-level ameloblast N-cadherin expression persists during the maturation stage of development. Furthermore, we show that E-cadherin gene expression is down-regulated from the pre-secretory to the secretory stage, while N-cadherin levels are up-regulated. This E- to N-cadherin switch supports epithelial migration in other tissues and may be an important event necessary for the ameloblasts to start moving in rows that slide by one another.

  7. The Presence of MMP-20 Reinforces Biomimetic Enamel Regrowth.

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    Prajapati, S; Ruan, Q; Mukherjee, K; Nutt, S; Moradian-Oldak, J

    2018-01-01

    Biomimetic synthesis of artificial enamel is a promising strategy for the prevention and restoration of defective enamel. We have recently reported that a hydrogel system composed of chitosan-amelogenin (CS-AMEL) and calcium phosphate is effective in forming an enamel-like layer that has a seamless interface with natural tooth surfaces. Here, to improve the mechanical system function and to facilitate the biomimetic enamel regrowth, matrix metalloproteinase-20 (MMP-20) was introduced into the CS-AMEL hydrogel. Inspired by our recent finding that MMP-20 prevents protein occlusion inside enamel crystals, we hypothesized that addition of MMP-20 to CS-AMEL hydrogel could reinforce the newly grown layer. Recombinant human MMP-20 was added to the CS-AMEL hydrogel to cleave full-length amelogenin during the growth of enamel-like crystals on an etched enamel surface. The MMP-20 proteolysis of amelogenin was studied, and the morphology, composition, and mechanical properties of the newly grown layer were characterized. We found that amelogenin was gradually degraded by MMP-20 in the presence of chitosan. The newly grown crystals in the sample treated with MMP-20-CS-AMEL hydrogel showed more uniform orientation and greater crystallinity than the samples treated with CS-AMEL hydrogel without MMP-20. Stepwise processing of amelogenin by MMP-20 in the CS-AMEL hydrogel prevented undesirable protein occlusion within the newly formed crystals. As a result, both the modulus and hardness of the repaired enamel were significantly increased (1.8- and 2.4-fold, respectively) by the MMP-20-CS-AMEL hydrogel. Although future work is needed to further incorporate other enamel matrix proteins into the system, this study brings us one step closer to biomimetic enamel regrowth.

  8. MMP20 Proteolysis of Native Amelogenin Regulates Mineralization In Vitro

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    Kwak, S.Y.; Yamakoshi, Y.; Simmer, J.P.; Margolis, H.C.

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that native phosphorylated full-length porcine amelogenin (P173) and its predominant cleavage product (P148) can inhibit spontaneous calcium phosphate formation in vitro by stabilizing an amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) precursor phase. Since full-length amelogenin undergoes proteolysis by matrix metalloproteinase 20 (MMP20, enamelysin) soon after secretion, the present study was conducted to assess the effect of amelogenin proteolysis on calcium phosphate formation. Calcium and phosphate were sequentially added to protein solutions without and with added MMP20 (ratio = 200:1) under physiological-like conditions of ionic strength (163 mM) in 50 mM Tris-HCl (pH 7.4) at 37 °C. Protein degradation with time was assessed by gel-electrophoresis, and mineral products formed were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). MMP20 was found to cleave P173 to primarily generate P148, along with P162, P46-148, and P63/64-148. In sharp contrast, MMP20 did not cleave P148. In addition, the formation of well-aligned bundles of enamel-like hydroxyapatite (HA) crystals was promoted in the presence of P173 with added MMP20, while only ACP particles were seen in the absence of MMP20. Although P148 was found to have a somewhat lower capacity to stabilize ACP and prevent HA formation compared with P173 in the absence of MMP20, essentially no HA formation was observed in the presence of somewhat higher concentrations of P148 regardless of MMP20 addition, due to the lack of observed protein proteolysis. Present findings suggest that ACP transformation to ordered arrays of enamel crystals may be regulated in part by the proteolysis of full-length native amelogenin, while the predominant amelogenin degradation product in developing enamel (e.g., P148) primarily serves to prevent uncontrolled mineral formation during the secretory stage of amelogenesis. PMID:27558264

  9. Pseudogenization of the tooth gene enamelysin (MMP20) in the common ancestor of extant baleen whales

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    Meredith, Robert W.; Gatesy, John; Cheng, Joyce; Springer, Mark S.

    2011-01-01

    Whales in the suborder Mysticeti are filter feeders that use baleen to sift zooplankton and small fish from ocean waters. Adult mysticetes lack teeth, although tooth buds are present in foetal stages. Cladistic analyses suggest that functional teeth were lost in the common ancestor of crown-group Mysticeti. DNA sequences for the tooth-specific genes, ameloblastin (AMBN), enamelin (ENAM) and amelogenin (AMEL), have frameshift mutations and/or stop codons in this taxon, but none of these molecular cavities are shared by all extant mysticetes. Here, we provide the first evidence for pseudogenization of a tooth gene, enamelysin (MMP20), in the common ancestor of living baleen whales. Specifically, pseudogenization resulted from the insertion of a CHR-2 SINE retroposon in exon 2 of MMP20. Genomic and palaeontological data now provide congruent support for the loss of enamel-capped teeth on the common ancestral branch of crown-group mysticetes. The new data for MMP20 also document a polymorphic stop codon in exon 2 of the pygmy sperm whale (Kogia breviceps), which has enamel-less teeth. These results, in conjunction with the evidence for pseudogenization of MMP20 in Hoffmann's two-toed sloth (Choloepus hoffmanni), another enamel-less species, support the hypothesis that the only unique, non-overlapping function of the MMP20 gene is in enamel formation. PMID:20861053

  10. Formation of the dentino-enamel interface in enamelysin (MMP-20)-deficient mouse incisors.

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    Beniash, Elia; Skobe, Ziedonis; Bartlett, John D

    2006-05-01

    An anomalous dentino-enamel junction (DEJ), manifested by delamination of the enamel layer, was reported in enamelysin [matrix metalloproteinase-20 (MMP-20)] knockout (KO) mice. To better understand the possible role of MMP-20 in the formation of the DEJ, we performed transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies of the DEJ at early stages of tooth morphogenesis in KO mice. Our TEM analysis revealed that in the incisors from KO mice the mantle dentin is hypomineralized at the onset of enamel mineralization. At this early stage, TEM revealed no apparent differences in nascent aprismatic enamel between the KO mice and the controls. Hypomineralized mantle dentin was also observed in the incisors from KO mice, as assessed by back-scattered SEM at the secretory and early maturation stages, but not in the late-maturation stage, suggesting that the mineralization of mantle dentin is not completely arrested, but rather postponed. Histological studies indicate that the organic content in the initial enamel layer remains very high throughout amelogenesis. These results imply that MMP-20 is involved in the regulation of mineralization in mantle dentin and demonstrate the complex nature of DEJ formation. They also suggest that the structural and functional properties of the DEJ are determined during the initial mineralization stages.

  11. Mutations in MSX1, PAX9 and MMP20 genes in Saudi Arabian patients with tooth agenesis.

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    Shahid, Mohammad; Balto, Hanan A; Al-Hammad, Nouf; Joshi, S; Khalil, Hesham Saleh; Somily, Ali Mohammed; Sinjilawi, Nasr Abdul-Aziz; Al-Ghamdi, Sameer; Faiyaz-Ul-Haque, Muhammad; Dhillon, Varinderpal S

    2016-08-01

    Tooth agenesis in human being is the most common congenital anomaly associated with dental development. Mutations in many genes such as MSH homeobox 1 (MSX1), paired box gene 9 (PAX9), ectodysplasin A (EDA) and EDA receptor (EDAR) have been associated with familial form of this condition. However, in large majority of patients, genetic cause could not be identified. The primary aim of present study was to identify the causative mutation(s) in these genes in Saudi Arabian families diagnosed with non-syndromic form of disease. Direct sequencing of coding regions, including exon-intron boundaries of these genes was carried out. All identified nucleotide variations were also tested to exclude possibility of being rare polymorphisms. The sequence analysis of exons and exon-intronic regions of these genes revealed five new mutations that include four in MSX1, one in PAX9 and one single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in majority of the patients in MMP20. One novel mutation in exon 1 of MSX1 gene (5354C > G; A40G) was found in three patients. In addition, another novel mutation was detected in two patients in exon 3 (PAX9) as g.10672A > T which changes asparagine to isoleucine at position 40. These mutations were not found in any of the control subjects. A single SNP in MMP20 genes (g.5066A > C) that changes lysine to threonine at position 18 was found in 10% controls as well. Our results for the first time demonstrates that mutations in MSX1 gene might play an important role in hypodontia cases involving pre-molars and is a risk factor for this ethnic population mainly of Arabs and is first report linking these mutations with tooth agenesis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Expression of Matrix Metalloproteinase (MMP)-20 and Potential Interaction with Dentin Sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) in Human Major Salivary Glands.

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    Koli, Komal; Saxena, Geetu; Ogbureke, Kalu U E

    2015-07-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-20 (MMP-20) expression is widely regarded as tooth-specific, with expression limited to dental hard tissues. Necessary for sound enamel formation, MMP-20 and MMP-2 proteolytically process dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) into dentin sialoprotein, dentin phosphoprotein, and dentin glycoprotein during tooth formation. In the mid-2000s, three members of the small integrin-binding ligand N-linked glycoproteins (SIBLINGs) were reported to bind specifically with high affinity (nM) to, and activate, three MMPs in vitro: bone sialoprotein with MMP-2; osteopontin with MMP-3; and dentin matrix protein1 with MMP-9. The SIBLING-MMP interaction was confirmed in biological systems such as the ducts of salivary glands, where all five members of the SIBLINGs are expressed. Recently, we documented MMP-20 expression and interaction with DSPP (another member of the SIBLING family) in human oral squamous cell carcinoma. Here we report the expression of MMP-20, and confirm its co-expression and potential interaction with DSPP in human major salivary gland tissues and cell line using immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, western blot, quantitative RT-PCR, and proximity ligation assay. This report reinforces our earlier suggestion that the SIBLING-MMP complexes may be involved in the turnover of extracellular proteins damaged by oxidation byproducts in metabolically active duct epithelial systems. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. [Effect of fluoride on the expression of MMP-20/TIMP-2 in ameloblast of rat incisor and the antagonistic effect of melatonin against fluorosis].

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    Zhang, Xue-li; Xi, Shu-hua; Guo, Xiao-ying; Cheng, Guang-yan; Zhang, Ying

    2011-02-01

    To study the effect of concentration of fluoride on the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-20(MMP-20) and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2) in the ameloblast of rat incisor,and explore the formation mechanism of dental fluorosis. By comparing the different expression of MMP-20,TIMP-2 between fluoride group and the melatonin group,to decide whether melatonin has antagonitic effect on dental fluorosis. Forty Wistar rats were randomly divided into 6 groups. The groups were as follows: control group,low-dose group, high-dose group,normal saline group and melatonin group. The animals were sacrificed 10 weeks after treatment. HE and immunohistochemical staining were used to observe the changes of ameloblasts and the expression of MMP-20 and TIMP-2 in rat incisors. MetaMorph microscope images analysis system was used to analyze the images, and SPSS12.0 software package was used for data analysis. The surface of rat incisors fed with fluoride had chalky color change and cross stritations could be seen on the enamel surface.In the fluoride group,the ameloblasts were disarranged, cells arranged in multi-layer,even showing vacuolar change.The changes in the high-dose group was severer than the low-dose group. MMP-20, TIMP-2 were expressed both in the secretory ameloblasts, and in the odontoblasts.The expression of MMP-20 in rat's ameloblasts in the experimental group was significantly lower than that in the control group (P 0.05). The difference of expression of TIMP-2 was not significant among all the groups. The difference of expression of MMP-20 and TIMP-2 was not significant between the melatonin and the fluoride groups. The excessive fluoride can inhibit the secretion of MMP-20 and disturb the balance between MMP-20 and TIMP-2,which lead to the delay of amelogenin removal and enamel demineralization. Melatonin has no antagonistic effect on the dental fluorosis. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (30600509) and Natural Science

  14. Transforming growth factor-β1 regulates expression of the matrix metalloproteinase 20 (Mmp20) gene through a mechanism involving the transcription factor, myocyte enhancer factor-2C, in ameloblast lineage cells.

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    Gao, Yuguang; Zhang, Li; Xiang, Lili; Li, Bohan; Liu, Xiaoying; Wang, Yumin; Sun, Yan

    2014-04-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-20 (Mmp20) plays an essential role in amelogenesis during tooth development and is regulated by transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) in mouse ameloblast lineage cells (ALCs). The objective of this study was to explore the role of myocyte enhancer factor-2C (MEF2C), a key transcription factor in craniofacial development, in TGF-β1-induced Mmp20 gene expression. We investigated Mmp20 expression in ALCs over-expressing MEF2C and in ALCs with MEF2C knocked down. We also analyzed activity of the Mmp20 promoter using a transient reporter gene-expression assay in cultured ALCs. Putative transcription factor-binding sites for MEF2C and TGF-β1 on the Mmp20 promoter were analyzed with bioinformatics tools and examined using an electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP). The expression of Mmp20 was induced, in a dose-dependent manner, by MEF2C over-expression, and TGF-β1-induced Mmp20 expression was blocked by MEF2C knockdown in ALCs. There was a TGF-β1/MEF2C-responsive region, including a putative MEF2-binding site, between base pairs -356 and -73 of the Mmp20 promoter. Mutation of the putative MEF2-binding site significantly reduced Mmp20 promoter activity upon activation with MEF2C or TGF-β1. In conclusion, TGF-β1-induced Mmp20 expression in ALCs was regulated through the MEF2-binding site on the Mmp20 promoter and thus mediated by the MEF2C signaling pathway. © 2014 Eur J Oral Sci.

  15. Expression pattern, subcellular localization, and functional implications of ODAM in ameloblasts, odontoblasts, osteoblasts, and various cancer cells.

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    Lee, Hye-Kyung; Park, Su-Jin; Oh, Hyun-Jung; Kim, Jung-Wook; Bae, Hyun-Sook; Park, Joo-Cheol

    2012-01-01

    During tooth development and tumorigenesis, the odontogenic ameloblast-associated protein (ODAM) is involved in cellular differentiation and matrix protein production. However, the precise function of ODAM remains largely unknown. To suggest new functional roles of ODAM, we investigated the cellular expression and subcellular localization of ODAM in tooth and cancer cells. ODAM was expressed in ameloblasts, odontoblasts, and osteoblasts in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, ODAM was localized in both the nucleus and cytoplasm of MMP-20 expressing ameloblasts and odontoblasts, but only in the cytoplasm of non-MMP-20 expressing osteoblasts. The extracellular secretion of ODAM was not observed in odontoblasts and osteoblasts, but was seen in ameloblasts. In addition, ODAM was discovered in the nucleus, cytoplasm, and extracellular matrix of various cancer cells. These results suggest that the expression pattern and subcellular localization of ODAM is highly variable and dependent on cell types and their differentiation states, and that functional correlations exist between ODAM and MMP-20. This study provides the first evidence for ODAM in multiple cellular compartments of differentiating odontogenic and cancer cell lines with important functional implications. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Exploring health implications associated with irregular migration ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although there have been several negative media reports on the plight of irregular migrants from Ghana, research on issues related to their health has been rather scanty. The study assesses health implications associated with irregular migration from Ghana using both the Techiman and Nkoranza Municipalities as a case ...

  17. Architectural Implications for Spatial Object Association Algorithms*

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    Kumar, Vijay S.; Kurc, Tahsin; Saltz, Joel; Abdulla, Ghaleb; Kohn, Scott R.; Matarazzo, Celeste

    2013-01-01

    Spatial object association, also referred to as crossmatch of spatial datasets, is the problem of identifying and comparing objects in two or more datasets based on their positions in a common spatial coordinate system. In this work, we evaluate two crossmatch algorithms that are used for astronomical sky surveys, on the following database system architecture configurations: (1) Netezza Performance Server®, a parallel database system with active disk style processing capabilities, (2) MySQL Cluster, a high-throughput network database system, and (3) a hybrid configuration consisting of a collection of independent database system instances with data replication support. Our evaluation provides insights about how architectural characteristics of these systems affect the performance of the spatial crossmatch algorithms. We conducted our study using real use-case scenarios borrowed from a large-scale astronomy application known as the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST). PMID:25692244

  18. Association between matrix metalloproteinases polymorphisms and ovarian cancer risk: A meta-analysis and systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu-Ming Zhu

    Full Text Available Published data on the relationship between matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs polymorphisms and ovarian cancer risk have implicated inconclusive results. To evaluate the role of MMPs polymorphisms in ovarian cancer risk, a meta-analysis and systematic review were performed.MMPs polymorphisms which could be quantitatively synthesized were involved in meta-analysis. Five comparison models (homozygote model, heterozygote model, dominant model, recessive model, additive model were carried out, a subgroup analysis was performed to clarify heterogeneity source. The remaining polymorphisms which could not be quantitatively synthesized were involved in systematic review.10 articles with 20 studies were included in this paper. Among those studies, 8 studies involving MMP1 rs1799750 and MMP3 rs34093618 could be meta-analyzed and 12 studies involving 12 polymorphisms could not. Meta-analysis showed that no associations were found between MMP1 rs1799750 (homozygote model: OR = 0.93, 95%CI = 0.70-1.23, POR = 0.60; heterozygote model: OR = 1.09, 95%CI = 0.78-1.54, POR = 0.61; dominant model: OR = 1.02, 95%CI = 0.83-1.25, POR = 0.84; recessive model: OR = 0.95, 95%CI = 0.75-1.21, POR = 0.67; additive model: OR = 1.00, 95%CI = 0.85-1.17, POR = 0.99, MMP3 rs34093618 (homozygote model: OR = 1.25, 95%CI = 0.70-2.24, POR = 0.46; heterozygote model: OR = 1.08, 95%CI = 0.51-2.31, POR = 0.84; dominant model: OR = 0.97, 95%CI = 0.68-1.38, POR = 0.85; recessive model: OR = 1.12, 95%CI = 0.69-1.80, POR = 0.65; additive model: OR = 1.01, 95%CI = 0.79-1.31, POR = 0.91 and ovarian cancer. Furthermore, similar results were detected in subgroup analysis. The systematic review on 12 polymorphisms suggested that MMP2 C-735T, MMP7 A-181G, MMP8 rs11225395, MMP9 rs6094237, MMP12 rs2276109, MMP20 rs2292730, MMP20 rs12278250, MMP20 rs9787933 might have a potential effect on ovarian cancer risk.In summary, polymorphisms of MMPs might not be associated with ovarian cancer risk. However

  19. Mechanisms and implications of air pollution particle associations with chemokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seagrave, Jeanclare

    2008-11-01

    Inflammation induced by inhalation of air pollutant particles has been implicated as a mechanism for the adverse health effects associated with exposure to air pollution. The inflammatory response is associated with upregulation of various pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. We have previously shown that diesel exhaust particles (DEP), a significant constituent of air pollution particulate matter in many urban areas, bind and concentrate IL-8, an important human neutrophil-attracting chemokine, and that the chemokine remains biologically active. In this report, we examine possible mechanisms of this association and the effects on clearance of the chemokine. The binding appears to be the result of ionic interactions between negatively charged particles and positively charged chemokine molecules, possibly combined with intercalation into small pores in the particles. The association is not limited to diesel exhaust particles and IL-8: several other particle types also adsorb the chemokine and several other cytokines are adsorbed onto the diesel particles. However, there are wide ranges in the effectiveness of various particle types and various cytokines. Finally, male Fisher 344 rats were intratracheally instilled with chemokine alone or combined with diesel exhaust or silica particles under isofluorane anesthesia. In contrast to silica particles, which do not bind the chemokine, the presence of diesel exhaust particles, which bind the chemokine, prolonged the retention of the chemokine.

  20. Dermatomyositis and myastenia gravis: An uncommon association with therapeutic implications.

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    Sangüesa Gómez, Clara; Flores Robles, Bryan Josué; Méndez Perles, Clara; Barbadillo, Carmen; Godoy, Hildegarda; Andréu, José Luis

    2015-01-01

    The association of dermatomyositis with myasthenia gravis (MG) is uncommon, having been reported so far in only 26 cases. We report the case of a 69 year-old man diagnosed with MG two years ago and currently treated with piridostigmyne. The patient developed acute proximal weakness, shoulder pain and elevated creatine-kinase (CK). He also developed generalized facial erythema and Gottron's papules. Laboratory tests showed positive antinuclear and anti-Mi2 antibodies. Further analysis confirmed CK levels above 1000 U/l. The clinical management of the patient and the therapeutic implications derived from the coexistence of both entities are discusssed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Multidrug resistance-associated proteins and implications in drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ya-He; Di, Yuan-Ming; Zhou, Zhi-Wei; Mo, Sui-Lin; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2010-01-01

    1. The multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs) belong to the ATP-binding cassette superfamily (ABCC family) of transporters that are expressed differentially in the liver, kidney, intestine and blood-brain barrier. There are nine human MRPs that transport a structurally diverse array of endo- and xenobiotics as well as their conjugates. 2. Multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 can be distinguished from MRP2 and MRP3 by its higher affinity for leukotriene C(4). Unlike MRP1, MRP2 functions in the extrusion of endogenous organic anions, such as bilirubin glucuronide and certain anticancer agents. In addition to the transport of glutathione and glucuronate conjugates, MRP3 has the additional capability of mediating the transport of monoanionic bile acids. 3. Both MRP4 and MRP5 are able to mediate the transport of cyclic nucleotides and confer resistance to certain antiviral and anticancer nucleotide analogues. Hereditary deficiency of MRP6 results in pseudoxanthoma elasticum. In the body, MRP6 is involved in the transport of glutathione conjugates and the cyclic pentapeptide BQ123. 4. Various MRPs show considerable differences in tissue distribution, substrate specificity and proposed physiological function. These proteins play a role in drug disposition and excretion and thus are implicated in drug toxicity and drug interactions. Increased efflux of natural product anticancer drugs and other anticancer agents mediated by MRPs from cancer cells is associated with tumour resistance. 5. A better understanding of the function and regulating mechanisms of MRPs could help minimize and avoid drug toxicity and unfavourable drug-drug interactions, as well as help overcome drug resistance.

  2. Persistent primitive hypoglossal artery associated with Chiari II malformation: Diagnosis and clinical implications

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    Gupta Mudit

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of persistent primitive hypoglossal artery (PPHA associated with Chiari II malformation and discuss the clinical implications. There has been one reported case of PPHA associated with Chiari 1 malformation, but none in association with Chiari II. Our patient also had a widened hypoglossal canal, with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF sac herniation through it.

  3. Sex Differences: Implications for the Obesity-Asthma Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sood, Akshay

    2011-01-01

    We have demonstrated in several studies that obesity and adipokines are more strongly associated with asthma in women than in men. The reason for this controversial sex difference is not known. Based on our prior studies, we hypothesize that sex-related difference in ectopic fat may explain the obesity-asthma association in women. PMID:21088605

  4. Associations between perceived social environment and neighborhood safety: Health implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jesus, Maria; Puleo, Elaine; Shelton, Rachel C; Emmons, Karen M

    2010-09-01

    This study examined the associations between social networks, social support, social cohesion, and perceived neighborhood safety among an ethnically diverse sample of 1352 residents living in 12 low-income public housing sites in Boston, Massachusetts. For males and females, social cohesion was associated with perceived safety. For males, a smaller social network was associated with greater feelings of safety. Social support was not a significant predictor of perceived safety. The findings reported here are useful in exploring a potential pathway through which social environmental factors influence health and in untangling the complex set of variables that may influence perceived safety. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Noncognitive Behavioral Changes Associated With Alzheimer's Disease: Implications of Neuroimaging Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victoroff, Jeff; Lin, Feng V; Coburn, Kerry L; Shillcutt, Samuel D; Voon, Valerie; Ducharme, Simon

    2017-09-06

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is commonly associated with noncognitive behavioral changes (NCBCs). The authors systematically reviewed whether neuroimaging has helped with understanding the pathophysiology, diagnosis, or management of NCBCs associated with AD, including depression, aggression or agitation, anxiety, apathy, psychosis, and sleep disorder. The authors identified dissociable neural substrates with multimodal imaging: depression implicates the lateral and superior prefrontal cortex; apathy and agitation implicate the dorsal anterior cingulate; psychosis implicates right lateralized frontal and medial temporal areas; and anxiety implicates mesial temporal regions. Frontal white matter changes appear to underlie many NCBCs, emphasizing the preventative management of vascular risk factors. Further delineation of underlying neurocircuitry and pathophysiology in larger data sets might lead to biomarker identification for diagnosis and optimizing treatment targets.

  6. Associations of sleep disturbance with ADHD: implications for treatment

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    Hvolby, Allan

    2014-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is commonly associated with disordered or disturbed sleep. The relationships of ADHD with sleep problems, psychiatric comorbidities and medications are complex and multidirectional. Evidence from published studies comparing sleep in individuals with ADHD with typically developing controls is most concordant for associations of ADHD with: hypopnea/apnea and peripheral limb movements in sleep or nocturnal motricity in polysomnographic studies; inc...

  7. Behavioral Implications of Risk-Return Associations: An Application of

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    Ranjan Dasgupta

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This study primarily investigates the risk attitudes of the fifty CNX NIFTY companies from a behavioral perspective as proposed by Kahneman and Tversky (1979 and Tversky and Kahneman (1992. It hypothesizes that for below target returns, a large majority of Indian companies would be risk-seeking, and for above target returns, most of them would be risk-averse. To fulfil its objectives, this study uses rates of return on assets and equity and the capital ratios of fifty CNX NIFTY companies over the period 2009-2013. It also uses Kendall’s (1938 test to measure the correlations between above variables within the relevant groups (all companies and each sub group [under Size and Industry]. Results show that bigger and smaller Indian companies and their managers are mostly risk-seeking and risk-averse respectively and shareholders-centric in regard to their attitude. These results will have important implications for the Indian companies and managers in evaluating their risk attitudes from the behavioral perspective.

  8. Nitrogen fixation associated with sago (Metroxylon sagu) and some implications.

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    Shipton, W A; Baker, A; Blaney, B J; Horwood, P F; Warner, J M; Pelowa, D; Greenhill, A R

    2011-01-01

    To determine the presence and contribution of diazotrophic bacteria to nitrogen concentrations in edible starch derived from the sago palm (Metroxylon sagu). Isolation of diazotrophic bacteria and analysis of nitrogen fixation were conducted on pith, root and sago starch samples. Acetylene reduction showed that five of ten starch samples were fixing nitrogen. Two presumptive nitrogen-fixing bacteria from starch fixed nitrogen in pure culture and five isolates were positive for the nif H gene. Nitrogen concentrations in 51 starch samples were low (37 samples sago starch, which undoubtedly plays a role in fermentation ecology. Nitrogen levels are considered too low to be of nutritional benefit and to protect against nutritional-associated illnesses. Sago starch does not add significantly to the protein calorie intake and may be associated with susceptibility to nutritional-associated illness. © 2010 The Authors. Letters in Applied Microbiology © 2010 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  9. Clinical implications and pathological associations of circulating mitochondrial DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuboly, Eszter; Mcllroy, Daniel; Briggs, Gabrielle; Lott, Natalie; Balogh, Zsolt J

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondria are membrane-enclosed organelles, the energy-producing centers in almost all eukaryotic cells. The evolutionary emergence of mitochondria is a result of the endocytosis of a-proteobacteria. There are several characteristic features which refer to its prokaryotic ancestors including its independent sets of double-stranded mitochondrial DNA, which is uniquely circular in form and contains a significant amount of unmethylated DNA as CpG islands. Resent research has proven that free mitochondrial DNA found in blood was associated with innate immunomodulation in a broad-range of clinical conditions. Upon release, mitochondrial DNA acts as a danger-associated molecular pattern in the circulation, it is recognized by pattern recognition receptors and it facilitates inflammatory responses. Besides its high receptor activation potential, mitochondrial DNA is likely to perform direct crosstalk with activated leukocytes and to be contributed to other anti-microbial activities. Here we highlight the pathological conditions where cell free mtDNA is involved, describe the potential sources and mechanisms of extracellular mtDNA release and explore evidence for its mechanism of action after being excreted and potential therapeutic strategies.

  10. Clinical implication for endometriosis associated with ovarian cancer

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    Pao-Ling Torng

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We reviewed current literature regarding the association of endometriosis and epithelial ovarian cancer based on epidemiology studies, molecular researches and clinical observations. Our methods include a review of literature research of MEDLINE, PubMed, Cochrane Library of Systematic Reviews and reference search in selected papers. The life time risk of epithelial ovarian cancer in women with endometriosis is low, yet there might be a cluster of individuals who have higher risk of developing epithelial ovarian cancer from endometriosis. Endometriosis associated ovarian cancer (EAOC is predominant in particular histological subtypes of epithelial ovarian carcinoma and are related to some specific molecular aberrations. Clinical observations showed age as an important variable to the development of EAOC. Rapid growth of tumor and solid components in sonography are key features to detect malignant transformation of endometriosis. Evidence is not clear about prophylactic oophorectomy in preventing EAOC in patients with endometriosis. This review provided rationale data for identifying, monitoring, counseling and management of women with endometriosis who are potentially high risk for malignant transformation. Keywords: Endometriosis, Epithelial ovarian cancer, Malignant transformation

  11. Cluster formation in liverwort-associated methylobacteria and its implications

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    Kutschera, U.; Thomas, J.; Hornschuh, M.

    2007-08-01

    Pink-pigmented methylotropic bacteria of the genus Methylobacterium inhabit the surfaces of plant organs. In bryophytes, these methylobacteria enhance cell growth, but the nature of this plant-microbe interaction is largely unknown. In this study, methylobacteria were isolated from the upper surface of the free-living thalli of the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha L. Identification of one strain by 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene-targeted polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and other data show that these microbes represent an undescribed species of the genus Methylobacterium ( Methylobacterium sp.). The growth-promoting activity of these wild-type methylobacteria was tested and compared with that of the type strain Methylobacterium mesophilicum. Both types of methylobacteria stimulated surface expansion of isolated gemmae from Marchantia polymorpha by about 350%. When suspended in water, the liverwort-associated bacteria ( Methylobacterium sp.) formed dense clusters of up to 600 cells. In liquid cultures of Methylobacterium mesophilicum, single cells were observed, but no clustering occurred. We suggest that the liverwort-associated methylobacteria are co-evolved symbionts of the plants: Cluster formation may be a behavior that enhances the survival of the epiphytic microbes during periods of drought of these desiccation-tolerant lower plants.

  12. Factors associated with self-reported health: implications for ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    BACKGROUND: Advocates for environmental justice, local, state, and national public health officials, exposure scientists, need broad-based heath indices to identify vulnerable communities. Longitudinal studies show that perception of current health status predicts subsequent mortality, suggesting that self-reported health (SRH) may be useful in screening-level community assessments. This paper evaluates whether SRH is an appropriate surrogate indicator of health status by evaluating relationships between SRH and sociodemographic, lifestyle, and health care factors as well as serological indicators of nutrition, health risk, and environmental exposures.METHODS: Data were combined from the 2003-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys for 1372 nonsmoking 20-50 year olds. Ordinal and binary logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios and 95 % confidence intervals of reporting poorer health based on measures of nutrition, health condition, environmental contaminants, and sociodemographic, health care, and lifestyle factors.RESULTS: Poorer SRH was associated with several serological measures of nutrition, health condition, and biomarkers of toluene, cadmium, lead, and mercury exposure. Race/ethnicity, income, education, access to health care, food security, exercise, poor mental and physical health, prescription drug use, and multiple health outcome measures (e.g., diabetes, thyroid problems, asthma) were also associated with poorer SRH.CONCLUS

  13. Tumor-associated macrophages: implications in cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petty, Amy J; Yang, Yiping

    2017-03-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), representing most of the leukocyte population in solid tumors, demonstrate great phenotypic heterogeneity and diverse functional capabilities under the influence of the local tumor microenvironment. These anti-inflammatory and protumorigenic macrophages modulate the local microenvironment to facilitate tumor growth and metastasis. In this review, we examine the origin of TAMs and the complex regulatory networks within the tumor microenvironment that facilitate the polarization of TAMs toward a protumoral phenotype. More extensively, we evaluate the mechanisms by which TAMs mediate angiogenesis, metastasis, chemotherapeutic resistance and immune evasion. Lastly, we will highlight novel interventional strategies targeting TAMs in preclinical studies and in early clinical trials that have significant potential in improving efficacy of current chemotherapeutic and/or immunotherapeutic approaches.

  14. Associations between Gun Violence Exposure, Gang Associations, and Youth Aggression: Implications for Prevention and Intervention Programs

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    Myriam Forster

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Using cross-sectional data collected from three middle schools in Southeast Los Angeles, we assessed the association of neighborhood violence exposure, gang associations, and social self-control with past week aggression in a sample of minority youth (n=164. Results from Poisson and logistic regression models showed that direct exposure to gun violence, having friends in gangs, and low social self control were all positively associated with past week aggression. Among girls, having gang affiliated family members was positively associated with aggression, whereas among boys having friends in gangs was associated with past week aggression. Subjective expectations of engagement in future interpersonal violence were associated with being male, having friends in gangs, and fear of neighborhood gun violence. We recommend that youth violence prevention and intervention programs address the impact of family, peers, and gun violence on student coping and identify students with low social self-control who could benefit from social and emotional skills training.

  15. Understanding Driving Forces and Implications Associated with the Land Use and Land Cover Changes in Portugal

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    Bruno M. Meneses

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the processes of land use and land cover changes (LUCC and the associated driving forces is important for achieving sustainable development. This paper presents the LUCC in Portugal at the regional level (NUTS II from 1995 to 2010 and discusses the main driving forces and implications associated with these LUCC. The main objectives of this work are: (a to quantify the land use and land cover (LUC types (level I of LUC cartography by NUT II in Portugal for the years 1995, 2007 and 2010; (b to assess the spatio-temporal LUCC; and (c to identify and discuss the main driving forces of LUCC and corresponding implications based on correlations and Principal Components Analysis. The results revealed large regional and temporal LUCC and further highlighted the different and sometimes opposite time trends between neighboring regions. By associating driving forces to LUCC, different influences at the regional level were observed, namely LUCC into agriculture land derived from the construction of dams (Alentejo region, or the conversion of coniferous forest into eucalypt forest (Centre region associated with increased gross value added (GVA and employment in industry and forestry. Temporal differentiation was also observed, particularly in the settlements that expanded between 1995 and 2007 due to the construction of large infrastructures (e.g., highways, industrial complexes, or buildings, which is reflected on employment in industry and construction and respective GVA. However, certain LUCC have implications, particularly in energy consumption, for which different behavior between regions can be highlighted in this analysis, but also on land-use sustainability.

  16. Awareness in Alzheimer's disease and associated dementias: theoretical framework and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clare, Linda; Marková, Ivana S; Roth, Ilona; Morris, Robin G

    2011-11-01

    Awareness can be defined as a reasonable or realistic perception or appraisal of a given aspect of one's situation, functioning or performance, or of the resulting implications, expressed explicitly or implicitly. Disturbances of awareness have significant implications for people with dementia and their caregivers. The construction of awareness has been extensively studied in dementia, but a lack of conceptual and methodological clarity in this area means that few clear findings have emerged. This article presents a framework for conceptualizing awareness in people with Alzheimer's disease and associated dementias that can guide research and influence practice. This article begins by considering the general concept of awareness and the ways in which neurological damage can place constraints on awareness. Within an integrative biopsychosocial model that acknowledges the influence of neurocognitive, psychological, and social variables on awareness, challenges for empirical research on awareness in dementia are addressed, and a 'levels of awareness' framework is presented within which awareness operates at four levels of increasing complexity, providing a means of differentiating among awareness phenomena. Approaches to mapping awareness phenomena are discussed, and directions for future research and clinical practice are outlined. The levels of awareness framework should act as a stimulus to further research in this area, resulting in a more coherent understanding of the nature of awareness deficits, the implications of these for people with dementia and their caregivers, and the possibilities for targeted and effective interventions.

  17. IMPLICATIONS OF THE TENTATIVE ASSOCIATION BETWEEN GW150914 AND A FERMI -GBM TRANSIENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiang; Yuan, Qiang; Jin, Zhi-Ping; Fan, Yi-Zhong; Liu, Si-Ming; Wei, Da-Ming [Key Laboratory of dark Matter and Space Astronomy, Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Science, Nanjing 210008 (China); Zhang, Fu-Wen, E-mail: yzfan@pmo.ac.cn, E-mail: dmwei@pmo.ac.cn, E-mail: fwzhang@glut.edu.cn [College of Science, Guilin University of Technology, Guilin 541004 (China)

    2016-08-10

    The merger-driven gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and their associated gravitational-wave (GW) radiation, if both are successfully detected, have some far-reaching implications, including, for instance: (i) the statistical comparison of the physical properties of the short/long-short GRBs with and without GW detection can test the general origin model; (ii) revealing the physical processes taking place at the central engine; (iii) measuring the velocity of the gravitational wave directly/accurately. In this work, we discuss these implications in the case of a possible association of GW150914/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) transient 150914. We compared GBM transient 150914 with other SGRBs and found that such an event may be a distinct outlier in some statistical diagrams, possibly due to its specific binary black hole merger origin. However, the presence of a “new” group of SGRBs with “unusual” physical parameters is also possible. If the outflow of GBM transient 150914 was launched by the accretion onto the nascent black hole, the magnetic activity rather than the neutrino process is likely responsible for the energy extraction, and the accretion disk mass is estimated to be ∼10{sup −5} M {sub ⊙}. The GW150914/GBM transient 150914 association, if confirmed, would provide the first opportunity to directly measure the GW velocity, and its departure from the speed of the light should be within a factor of ∼10{sup −17}.

  18. The estrogen hypothesis of Schizophrenia implicates glucose metabolism: Association study in three independent samples

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    Timm Sally

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Schizophrenia is a highly heritable complex psychiatric disorder with an underlying pathophysiology that is still not well understood. Metaanalyses of schizophrenia linkage studies indicate numerous but rather large disease-associated genomic regions, whereas accumulating gene- and protein expression studies have indicated an equally large set of candidate genes that only partially overlap linkage genes. A thorough assessment, beyond the resolution of current GWA studies, of the disease risk conferred by the numerous schizophrenia candidate genes is a daunting and presently not feasible task. We undertook these challenges by using an established clinical paradigm, the estrogen hypothesis of schizophrenia, as the criterion to select candidates among the numerous genes experimentally implicated in schizophrenia. Bioinformatic tools were used to build and priorities the signaling networks implicated by the candidate genes resulting from the estrogen selection. We identified ten candidate genes using this approach that are all active in glucose metabolism and particularly in the glycolysis. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that variants of the glycolytic genes are associated with schizophrenia or at least with gender-associated aspects of the illness. Results We genotyped 185 SNPs in three independent case-control samples of Scandinavian origin (a total of 765 patients and 1274 control subjects. Variants of the mitogen-activated protein kinase 14 gene (MAPK14 and the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase 1 (PCK1 and fructose-1,6-biphosphatase (FBP1 were nominal significantly associated with schizophrenia, and several haplotypes within enolase 2 gene (ENO2 consist of the same SNP allele having elevated risk of schizophrenia. Importantly, we find no evidence of stratification due to nationality or gender. Conclusion Several gene variants in the Glycolysis were associated with schizophrenia in three independent samples. However, the

  19. The association between aerobic fitness and language processing in children: implications for academic achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scudder, Mark R; Federmeier, Kara D; Raine, Lauren B; Direito, Artur; Boyd, Jeremy K; Hillman, Charles H

    2014-06-01

    Event-related brain potentials (ERPs) have been instrumental for discerning the relationship between children's aerobic fitness and aspects of cognition, yet language processing remains unexplored. ERPs linked to the processing of semantic information (the N400) and the analysis of language structure (the P600) were recorded from higher and lower aerobically fit children as they read normal sentences and those containing semantic or syntactic violations. Results revealed that higher fit children exhibited greater N400 amplitude and shorter latency across all sentence types, and a larger P600 effect for syntactic violations. Such findings suggest that higher fitness may be associated with a richer network of words and their meanings, and a greater ability to detect and/or repair syntactic errors. The current findings extend previous ERP research explicating the cognitive benefits associated with greater aerobic fitness in children and may have important implications for learning and academic performance. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Statin-associated immune-mediated myopathy: biology and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher-Stine, Lisa; Basharat, Pari

    2017-04-01

    In the last 6 years, our understanding of statin-associated myopathy expanded to include not only a toxic myopathy with limited and reversible side-effects but also an autoimmune variety in which statins likely induce an autoimmune myopathy that is both associated with a specific autoantibody and responsive to immunosuppression and immune modulation. This review widens the reader's understanding of statin myopathy to include an autoimmune process. Statin-associated immune-mediated myopathy provides an example of an environmental trigger (statins) directly implicated in an autoimmune disease associated with a genetic predisposition as well as potential risk factors including concomitant diseases and specific statins. Given a median exposure to statins of 38 months, providers should be aware that anti-3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR) myopathy may occur even after several years of statin exposure. It is important for the reader to understand the clinical presentation of statin-associated immune-mediated myopathy and the difference in its clinical presentation to that of statins as direct myotoxins. Prompt recognition of such an entity allows the clinician to immediately stop the offending agent if it has not already been discontinued as well as to recognize that statin rechallenge is not a likely option, and that prompt treatment with immunosuppression and/or immunomodulation is usually of enormous benefit to the patient in restoring muscle strength and physical function. VIDEO ABSTRACT.

  1. A Preliminary Genome-Wide Association Study of Pain-Related Fear: Implications for Orofacial Pain

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    Cameron L. Randall

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Acute and chronic orofacial pain can significantly impact overall health and functioning. Associations between fear of pain and the experience of orofacial pain are well-documented, and environmental, behavioral, and cognitive components of fear of pain have been elucidated. Little is known, however, regarding the specific genes contributing to fear of pain. Methods. A genome-wide association study (GWAS; N=990 was performed to identify plausible genes that may predispose individuals to various levels of fear of pain. The total score and three subscales (fear of minor, severe, and medical/dental pain of the Fear of Pain Questionnaire-9 (FPQ-9 were modeled in a variance components modeling framework to test for genetic association with 8.5 M genetic variants across the genome, while adjusting for sex, age, education, and income. Results. Three genetic loci were significantly associated with fear of minor pain (8q24.13, 8p21.2, and 6q26; p<5×10-8 for all near the genes TMEM65, NEFM, NEFL, AGPAT4, and PARK2. Other suggestive loci were found for the fear of pain total score and each of the FPQ-9 subscales. Conclusions. Multiple genes were identified as possible candidates contributing to fear of pain. The findings may have implications for understanding and treating chronic orofacial pain.

  2. A Preliminary Genome-Wide Association Study of Pain-Related Fear: Implications for Orofacial Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, Cameron L; Wright, Casey D; Chernus, Jonathan M; McNeil, Daniel W; Feingold, Eleanor; Crout, Richard J; Neiswanger, Katherine; Weyant, Robert J; Shaffer, John R; Marazita, Mary L

    2017-01-01

    Acute and chronic orofacial pain can significantly impact overall health and functioning. Associations between fear of pain and the experience of orofacial pain are well-documented, and environmental, behavioral, and cognitive components of fear of pain have been elucidated. Little is known, however, regarding the specific genes contributing to fear of pain. A genome-wide association study (GWAS; N = 990) was performed to identify plausible genes that may predispose individuals to various levels of fear of pain. The total score and three subscales (fear of minor, severe, and medical/dental pain) of the Fear of Pain Questionnaire-9 (FPQ-9) were modeled in a variance components modeling framework to test for genetic association with 8.5 M genetic variants across the genome, while adjusting for sex, age, education, and income. Three genetic loci were significantly associated with fear of minor pain (8q24.13, 8p21.2, and 6q26; p pain total score and each of the FPQ-9 subscales. Multiple genes were identified as possible candidates contributing to fear of pain. The findings may have implications for understanding and treating chronic orofacial pain.

  3. BCAT1 expression associates with ovarian cancer progression: possible implications in altered disease metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi-Qiang; Faddaoui, Adnen; Bachvarova, Magdalena; Plante, Marie; Gregoire, Jean; Renaud, Marie-Claude; Sebastianelli, Alexandra; Guillemette, Chantal; Gobeil, Stéphane; Macdonald, Elizabeth; Vanderhyden, Barbara; Bachvarov, Dimcho

    2015-10-13

    Previously, we have identified the branched chain amino-acid transaminase 1 (BCAT1) gene as notably hypomethylated in low-malignant potential (LMP) and high-grade (HG) serous epithelial ovarian tumors, compared to normal ovarian tissues. Here we show that BCAT1 is strongly overexpressed in both LMP and HG serous epithelial ovarian tumors, which probably correlates with its hypomethylated status. Knockdown of the BCAT1 expression in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) cells led to sharp decrease of cell proliferation, migration and invasion and inhibited cell cycle progression. BCAT1 silencing was associated with the suppression of numerous genes and pathways known previously to be implicated in ovarian tumorigenesis, and the induction of some tumor suppressor genes (TSGs). Moreover, BCAT1 suppression resulted in downregulation of numerous genes implicated in lipid production and protein synthesis, suggesting its important role in controlling EOC metabolism. Further metabolomic analyses were indicative for significant depletion of most amino acids and different phospho- and sphingolipids following BCAT1 knockdown. Finally, BCAT1 suppression led to significantly prolonged survival time in xenograft model of advanced peritoneal EOC. Taken together, our findings provide new insights about the functional role of BCAT1 in ovarian carcinogenesis and identify this transaminase as a novel EOC biomarker and putative EOC therapeutic target.

  4. Discovery of rare variants via sequencing: implications for the design of complex trait association studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingshan Li

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available There is strong evidence that rare variants are involved in complex disease etiology. The first step in implicating rare variants in disease etiology is their identification through sequencing in both randomly ascertained samples (e.g., the 1,000 Genomes Project and samples ascertained according to disease status. We investigated to what extent rare variants will be observed across the genome and in candidate genes in randomly ascertained samples, the magnitude of variant enrichment in diseased individuals, and biases that can occur due to how variants are discovered. Although sequencing cases can enrich for casual variants, when a gene or genes are not involved in disease etiology, limiting variant discovery to cases can lead to association studies with dramatically inflated false positive rates.

  5. Population structure and linkage disequilibrium in Lupinus albus L. germplasm and its implication for association mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Muhammad Javed; Mamidi, Sujan; Ahsan, Rubina; Kianian, Shahryar F; Coyne, Clarice J; Hamama, Anwar A; Narina, Satya S; Bhardwaj, Harbans L

    2012-08-01

    White lupin (Lupinus albus L.) has been around since 300 B.C. and is recognized for its ability to grow on poor soils and application as green manure in addition to seed harvest. The seed has very high levels of protein (33-47 %) and oil (6-13 %). It also has many secondary metabolites that are potentially of nutraceutical value to animals and humans. Despite such a great potential, lupins role in modern agriculture began only in the twentieth century. Although a large collection of Lupinus germplasm accessions is available worldwide, rarely have they been genetically characterized. Additionally, scarce genomic resources in terms of recombinant populations and genome information have been generated for L. albus. With the advancement in association mapping methods, the natural populations have the potential to replace the recombinant populations in gene mapping and marker-trait associations. Therefore, we studied the genetic similarity, population structure and marker-trait association in a USDA germplasm collection for their current and future application in this crop improvement. A total of 122 PI (Plant Inventory) lines were screened with 18 AFLP primer pairs that generated 2,277 fragments. A subset of 892 polymorphic markers with MAF >0.05 (minor allele frequency) were used for association mapping. The cluster analysis failed to group accessions on the basis of their passport information, and a weak structure and low linkage disequilibrium (LD) were observed indicating the usefulness of the collection for association mapping. Moreover, we were also able to identify two markers (a p value of 1.53 × 10(-4) and 2.3 × 10(-4)) that explained 22.69 and 20.5 % of seed weight variation determined using R (LR) (2) . The implications of lack of geographic clustering, population structure, low LD and the ability of AFLP to map seed weight trait using association mapping and the usefulness of the PI collections in breeding programs are discussed.

  6. Survival Implications Associated with Variation in Mastectomy Rates for Early-Staged Breast Cancer

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    John M. Brooks

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite a 20-year-old guideline from the National Institutes of Health (NIH Consensus Development Conference recommending breast conserving surgery with radiation (BCSR over mastectomy for woman with early-stage breast cancer (ESBC because it preserves the breast, recent evidence shows mastectomy rates increasing and higher-staged ESBC patients are more likely to receive mastectomy. These observations suggest that some patients and their providers believe that mastectomy has advantages over BCSR and these advantages increase with stage. These beliefs may persist because the randomized controlled trials (RCTs that served as the basis for the NIH guideline were populated mainly with lower-staged patients. Our objective is to assess the survival implications associated with mastectomy choice by patient alignment with the RCT populations. We used instrumental variable methods to estimate the relationship between surgery choice and survival for ESBC patients based on variation in local area surgery styles. We find results consistent with the RCTs for patients closely aligned to the RCT populations. However, for patients unlike those in the RCTs, our results suggest that higher mastectomy rates are associated with reduced survival. We are careful to interpret our estimates in terms of limitations of our estimation approach.

  7. Biomechanical and organisational stressors and associations with employment withdrawal among pregnant workers: evidence and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guendelman, Sylvia; Gemmill, Alison; MacDonald, Leslie A

    2016-12-01

    The distribution of exposure to biomechanical and organisational job stressors (BOJS) and associations with employment withdrawal (antenatal leave, unemployment) was examined in a case-control study of 1114 pregnant workers in California. We performed descriptive and multivariate logistic and multinomial regression analyses. At pregnancy onset, 57% were exposed to one or more biomechanical stressors, including frequent bending, heavy lifting and prolonged standing. One-third were simultaneously exposed to BOJS. Exposure to biomechanical stressors declined as pregnancy progressed and cessation often (41%) coincided with employment withdrawal (antenatal leave and unemployment). In multivariate modelling, whether we adjusted for or considered organisational stressors as coincident exposures, results showed that pregnant workers exposed to biomechanical stressors had increased employment withdrawal compared to the unexposed. Work schedule accommodations moderate this association. Paid antenatal leave, available to few US women, was an important strategy for mitigating exposure to BOJS. Implications for science and policy are discussed. Practitioner Summary: This case-control study showed that exposure to biomechanical stressors decline throughout pregnancy. Antenatal leave was an important strategy used for mitigating exposure among sampled California women with access to paid benefits. Employment withdrawal among workers exposed to BJOS may be reduced by proactive administrative and engineering efforts applied early in pregnancy.

  8. Geochemical Implications of CO2 Leakage Associated with Geologic Storage: A Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harvey, Omar R.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Brown, Christopher F.

    2012-07-09

    Leakage from deep storage reservoirs is a major risk factor associated with geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2). Different scientific theories exist concerning the potential implications of such leakage for near-surface environments. The authors of this report reviewed the current literature on how CO2 leakage (from storage reservoirs) would likely impact the geochemistry of near surface environments such as potable water aquifers and the vadose zone. Experimental and modeling studies highlighted the potential for both beneficial (e.g., CO2 re sequestration or contaminant immobilization) and deleterious (e.g., contaminant mobilization) consequences of CO2 intrusion in these systems. Current knowledge gaps, including the role of CO2-induced changes in redox conditions, the influence of CO2 influx rate, gas composition, organic matter content and microorganisms are discussed in terms of their potential influence on pertinent geochemical processes and the potential for beneficial or deleterious outcomes. Geochemical modeling was used to systematically highlight why closing these knowledge gaps are pivotal. A framework for studying and assessing consequences associated with each factor is also presented in Section 5.6.

  9. Narcolepsy-Associated HLA Class I Alleles Implicate Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafti, Mehdi; Lammers, Gert J.; Dauvilliers, Yves; Overeem, Sebastiaan; Mayer, Geert; Nowak, Jacek; Pfister, Corinne; Dubois, Valérie; Eliaou, Jean-François; Eberhard, Hans-Peter; Liblau, Roland; Wierzbicka, Aleksandra; Geisler, Peter; Bassetti, Claudio L.; Mathis, Johannes; Lecendreux, Michel; Khatami, Ramin; Heinzer, Raphaël; Haba-Rubio, José; Feketeova, Eva; Baumann, Christian R.; Kutalik, Zoltán; Tiercy, Jean-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Narcolepsy with cataplexy is tightly associated with the HLA class II allele DQB1*06:02. Evidence indicates a complex contribution of HLA class II genes to narcolepsy susceptibility with a recent independent association with HLA-DPB1. The cause of narcolepsy is supposed be an autoimmune attack against hypocretin-producing neurons. Despite the strong association with HLA class II, there is no evidence for CD4+ T-cell-mediated mechanism in narcolepsy. Since neurons express class I and not class II molecules, the final effector immune cells involved might include class I-restricted CD8+ T-cells. Methods: HLA class I (A, B, and C) and II (DQB1) genotypes were analyzed in 944 European narcolepsy with cataplexy patients and in 4,043 control subjects matched by country of origin. All patients and controls were DQB1*06:02 positive and class I associations were conditioned on DQB1 alleles. Results: HLA-A*11:01 (OR = 1.49 [1.18–1.87] P = 7.0*10−4), C*04:01 (OR = 1.34 [1.10–1.63] P = 3.23*10−3), and B*35:01 (OR = 1.46 [1.13–1.89] P = 3.64*10−3) were associated with susceptibility to narcolepsy. Analysis of polymorphic class I amino-acids revealed even stronger associations with key antigen-binding residues HLA-A-Tyr9 (OR = 1.32 [1.15–1.52] P = 6.95*10−5) and HLA-C-Ser11 (OR = 1.34 [1.15–1.57] P = 2.43*10−4). Conclusions: Our findings provide a genetic basis for increased susceptibility to infectious factors or an immune cytotoxic mechanism in narcolepsy, potentially targeting hypocretin neurons. Citation: Tafti M, Lammers GJ, Dauvilliers Y, Overeem S, Mayer G, Nowak J, Pfister C, Dubois V, Eliaou JF, Eberhard HP, Liblau R, Wierzbicka A, Geisler P, Bassetti CL, Mathis J, Lecendreux M, Khatami R, Heinzer R, Haba-Rubio J, Feketeova E, Baumann CR, Kutalik Z, Tiercy JM. Narcolepsy-associated HLA class I alleles implicate cell-mediated cytotoxicity. SLEEP 2016;39(3):581–587. PMID:26518595

  10. Protein-altering variants associated with body mass index implicate pathways that control energy intake and expenditure in obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turcot, Valérie; Lu, Yingchang; Highland, Heather M

    2018-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified >250 loci for body mass index (BMI), implicating pathways related to neuronal biology. Most GWAS loci represent clusters of common, noncoding variants from which pinpointing causal genes remains challenging. Here we combined data from 718,734...

  11. Food Avoidance and Food Modification Practices of Older Rural Adults: Association with Oral Health Status and Implications for Service Provision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quandt, Sara A.; Chen, Haiying; Bell, Ronny A.; Savoca, Margaret R.; Anderson, Andrea M.; Leng, Xiaoyan; Kohrman, Teresa; Gilbert, Gregg H.; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Dietary variation is important for health maintenance and disease prevention among older adults. However, oral health deficits impair ability to bite and chew foods. This study examines the association between oral health and foods avoided or modified in a multiethnic rural population of older adults. It considers implications for…

  12. Protein-altering variants associated with body mass index implicate pathways that control energy intake and expenditure in obesity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turcot, Valérie; Lu, Yingchang; Highland, Heather M.; Schurmann, Claudia; Justice, Anne E.; Fine, Rebecca S.; Bradfield, Jonathan P.; Esko, Tõnu; Giri, Ayush; Graff, Mariaelisa; Guo, Xiuqing; Hendricks, Audrey E.; Karaderi, Tugce; Lempradl, Adelheid; Locke, Adam E.; Mahajan, Anubha; Marouli, Eirini; Sivapalaratnam, Suthesh; Young, Kristin L.; Alfred, Tamuno; Feitosa, Mary F.; Masca, Nicholas G. D.; Manning, Alisa K.; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Mudgal, Poorva; Ng, Maggie C. Y.; Reiner, Alex P.; Vedantam, Sailaja; Willems, Sara M.; Winkler, Thomas W.; Abecasis, Gonçalo; Aben, Katja K.; Alam, Dewan S.; Alharthi, Sameer E.; Allison, Matthew; Amouyel, Philippe; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Auer, Paul L.; Balkau, Beverley; Bang, Lia E.; Barroso, Inês; Bastarache, Lisa; Benn, Marianne; Bergmann, Sven; Bielak, Lawrence F.; Blüher, Matthias; Boehnke, Michael; Boeing, Heiner; Boerwinkle, Eric; Böger, Carsten A.; Bork-Jensen, Jette; Bots, Michiel L.; Bottinger, Erwin P.; Bowden, Donald W.; Brandslund, Ivan; Breen, Gerome; Brilliant, Murray H.; Broer, Linda; Brumat, Marco; Burt, Amber A.; Butterworth, Adam S.; Campbell, Peter T.; Cappellani, Stefania; Carey, David J.; Catamo, Eulalia; Caulfield, Mark J.; Chambers, John C.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Chen, Yii-der I.; Chowdhury, Rajiv; Christensen, Cramer; Chu, Audrey Y.; Cocca, Massimiliano; Collins, Francis S.; Cook, James P.; Corley, Janie; Corominas Galbany, Jordi; Cox, Amanda J.; Crosslin, David S.; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; D'Eustacchio, Angela; Danesh, John; Davies, Gail; Bakker, Paul I. W.; Groot, Mark C. H.; Mutsert, Renée; Deary, Ian J.; Dedoussis, George; Demerath, Ellen W.; Heijer, Martin; Hollander, Anneke I.; Ruijter, Hester M.; Dennis, Joe G.; Denny, Josh C.; Angelantonio, Emanuele; Drenos, Fotios; Du, Mengmeng; Dubé, Marie-Pierre; Dunning, Alison M.; Easton, Douglas F.; Edwards, Todd L.; Ellinghaus, David; Ellinor, Patrick T.; Elliott, Paul; Evangelou, Evangelos; Farmaki, Aliki-Eleni; Farooqi, I. Sadaf; Faul, Jessica D.; Fauser, Sascha; Feng, Shuang; Ferrannini, Ele; Ferrieres, Jean; Florez, Jose C.; Ford, Ian; Fornage, Myriam; Franco, Oscar H.; Franke, Andre; Franks, Paul W.; Friedrich, Nele; Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth; Galesloot, Tessel E.; Gan, Wei; Gandin, Ilaria; Gasparini, Paolo; Gibson, Jane; Giedraitis, Vilmantas; Gjesing, Anette P.; Gordon-Larsen, Penny; Gorski, Mathias; Grabe, Hans-Jörgen; Grant, Struan F. A.; Grarup, Niels; Griffiths, Helen L.; Grove, Megan L.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Gustafsson, Stefan; Haessler, Jeff; Hakonarson, Hakon; Hammerschlag, Anke R.; Hansen, Torben; Harris, Kathleen Mullan; Harris, Tamara B.; Hattersley, Andrew T.; Have, Christian T.; Hayward, Caroline; He, Liang; Heard-Costa, Nancy L.; Heath, Andrew C.; Heid, Iris M.; Helgeland, Øyvind; Hernesniemi, Jussi; Hewitt, Alex W.; Holmen, Oddgeir L.; Hovingh, G. Kees; Howson, Joanna M. M.; Hu, Yao; Huang, Paul L.; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Ikram, M. Arfan; Ingelsson, Erik; Jackson, Anne U.; Jansson, Jan-Håkan; Jarvik, Gail P.; Jensen, Gorm B.; Jia, Yucheng; Johansson, Stefan; Jørgensen, Marit E.; Jørgensen, Torben; Jukema, J. Wouter; Kahali, Bratati; Kahn, René S.; Kähönen, Mika; Kamstrup, Pia R.; Kanoni, Stavroula; Kaprio, Jaakko; Karaleftheri, Maria; Kardia, Sharon L. R.; Karpe, Fredrik; Kathiresan, Sekar; Kee, Frank; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Kim, Eric; Kitajima, Hidetoshi; Komulainen, Pirjo; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Kooperberg, Charles; Korhonen, Tellervo; Kovacs, Peter; Kuivaniemi, Helena; Kutalik, Zoltán; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Lakka, Timo A.; Lamparter, David; Lange, Ethan M.; Lange, Leslie A.; Langenberg, Claudia; Larson, Eric B.; Lee, Nanette R.; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lewis, Cora E.; Li, Huaixing; Li, Jin; Li-Gao, Ruifang; Lin, Honghuang; Lin, Keng-Hung; Lin, Li-An; Lin, Xu; Lind, Lars; Lindström, Jaana; Linneberg, Allan; Liu, Ching-Ti; Liu, Dajiang J.; Liu, Yongmei; Lo, Ken S.; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Lotery, Andrew J.; Loukola, Anu; Luan, Jian'an; Lubitz, Steven A.; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Männistö, Satu; Marenne, Gaëlle; Mazul, Angela L.; McCarthy, Mark I.; McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; Medland, Sarah E.; Meidtner, Karina; Milani, Lili; Mistry, Vanisha; Mitchell, Paul; Mohlke, Karen L.; Moilanen, Leena; Moitry, Marie; Montgomery, Grant W.; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis O.; Moore, Carmel; Mori, Trevor A.; Morris, Andrew D.; Morris, Andrew P.; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Munroe, Patricia B.; Nalls, Mike A.; Narisu, Narisu; Nelson, Christopher P.; Neville, Matt; Nielsen, Sune F.; Nikus, Kjell; Njølstad, Pål R.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Nyholt, Dale R.; O'Connel, Jeffrey R.; O'Donoghue, Michelle L.; Olde Loohuis, Loes M.; Ophoff, Roel A.; Owen, Katharine R.; Packard, Chris J.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Palmer, Colin N. A.; Palmer, Nicholette D.; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Patel, Aniruddh P.; Pattie, Alison; Pedersen, Oluf; Peissig, Peggy L.; Peloso, Gina M.; Pennell, Craig E.; Perola, Markus; Perry, James A.; Perry, John R. B.; Pers, Tune H.; Person, Thomas N.; Peters, Annette; Petersen, Eva R. B.; Peyser, Patricia A.; Pirie, Ailith; Polasek, Ozren; Polderman, Tinca J.; Puolijoki, Hannu; Raitakari, Olli T.; Rasheed, Asif; Rauramaa, Rainer; Reilly, Dermot F.; Renström, Frida; Rheinberger, Myriam; Ridker, Paul M.; Rioux, John D.; Rivas, Manuel A.; Roberts, David J.; Robertson, Neil R.; Robino, Antonietta; Rolandsson, Olov; Rudan, Igor; Ruth, Katherine S.; Saleheen, Danish; Salomaa, Veikko; Samani, Nilesh J.; Sapkota, Yadav; Sattar, Naveed; Schoen, Robert E.; Schreiner, Pamela J.; Schulze, Matthias B.; Scott, Robert A.; Segura-Lepe, Marcelo P.; Shah, Svati H.; Sheu, Wayne H.-H.; Sim, Xueling; Slater, Andrew J.; Small, Kerrin S.; Smith, Albert V.; Southam, Lorraine; Spector, Timothy D.; Speliotes, Elizabeth K.; Starr, John M.; Stefansson, Kari; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Stirrups, Kathleen E.; Strauch, Konstantin; Stringham, Heather M.; Stumvoll, Michael; Sun, Liang; Surendran, Praveen; Swift, Amy J.; Tada, Hayato; Tansey, Katherine E.; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Taylor, Kent D.; Teumer, Alexander; Thompson, Deborah J.; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Thuesen, Betina H.; Tönjes, Anke; Tromp, Gerard; Trompet, Stella; Tsafantakis, Emmanouil; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Uher, Rudolf; Uitterlinden, André G.; Uusitupa, Matti; Laan, Sander W.; Duijn, Cornelia M.; Leeuwen, Nienke; van Setten, Jessica; Vanhala, Mauno; Varbo, Anette; Varga, Tibor V.; Varma, Rohit; Velez Edwards, Digna R.; Vermeulen, Sita H.; Veronesi, Giovanni; Vestergaard, Henrik; Vitart, Veronique; Vogt, Thomas F.; Völker, Uwe; Vuckovic, Dragana; Wagenknecht, Lynne E.; Walker, Mark; Wallentin, Lars; Wang, Feijie; Wang, Carol A.; Wang, Shuai; Wang, Yiqin; Ware, Erin B.; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Warren, Helen R.; Waterworth, Dawn M.; Wessel, Jennifer; White, Harvey D.; Willer, Cristen J.; Wilson, James G.; Witte, Daniel R.; Wood, Andrew R.; Wu, Ying; Yaghootkar, Hanieh; Yao, Jie; Yao, Pang; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M.; Young, Robin; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Zhan, Xiaowei; Zhang, Weihua; Zhao, Jing Hua; Zhao, Wei; Zhou, Wei; Zondervan, Krina T.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Pospisilik, John A.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Deloukas, Panos; Frayling, Timothy M.; Lettre, Guillaume; North, Kari E.; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Loos, Ruth J. F.

    2018-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified >250 loci for body mass index (BMI), implicating pathways related to neuronal biology. Most GWAS loci represent clusters of common, noncoding variants from which pinpointing causal genes remains challenging. Here we combined data from 718,734

  13. Novel genes associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: diagnostic and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, Ruth; Chiò, Adriano; Traynor, Bryan J

    2018-01-01

    The disease course of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is rapid and, because its pathophysiology is unclear, few effective treatments are available. Genetic research aims to understand the underlying mechanisms of ALS and identify potential therapeutic targets. The first gene associated with ALS was SOD1, identified in 1993 and, by early 2014, more than 20 genes had been identified as causative of, or highly associated with, ALS. These genetic discoveries have identified key disease pathways that are therapeutically testable and could potentially lead to the development of better treatments for people with ALS. Since 2014, seven additional genes have been associated with ALS (MATR3, CHCHD10, TBK1, TUBA4A, NEK1, C21orf2, and CCNF), all of which were identified by genome-wide association studies, whole genome studies, or exome sequencing technologies. Each of the seven novel genes code for proteins associated with one or more molecular pathways known to be involved in ALS. These pathways include dysfunction in global protein homoeostasis resulting from abnormal protein aggregation or a defect in the protein clearance pathway, mitochondrial dysfunction, altered RNA metabolism, impaired cytoskeletal integrity, altered axonal transport dynamics, and DNA damage accumulation due to defective DNA repair. Because these novel genes share common disease pathways with other genes implicated in ALS, therapeutics targeting these pathways could be useful for a broad group of patients stratified by genotype. However, the effects of these novel genes have not yet been investigated in animal models, which will be a key step to translating these findings into clinical practice. WHERE NEXT?: The identification of these seven novel genes has been important in unravelling the molecular mechanisms underlying ALS. However, our understanding of what causes ALS is not complete, and further genetic research will provide additional detail about its causes. Increased genetic knowledge will

  14. Factors associated with female genital mutilation in Burkina Faso and its policy implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung Donna

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Female genital mutilation (FGM usually undertaken between the ages of 1-9 years and is widely practised in some part of Africa and by migrants from African countries in other parts of the world. Laws prohibit FGM in almost every country. FGM can cause immediate complications (pain, bleeding and infection and delayed complications (sexual, obstetric, psychological problems. Several factors have been associated with an increased likelihood of FGM. In Burkina Faso, the prevalence of FGM appears to have increased in recent years. Methods We investigated social, demographic and economic factors associated with FGM in Burkina Faso using the 2003 Demographic Health Survey (DHS. The DHS is a nationally representative cross-sectional survey (multistage stratified random sampling of households of women of reproductive age (15-49 years. Associations between potential risk factors and the prevalence of FGM were explored using χ2 and t-tests and Mann Whitney U-test as appropriate. Logistic regression modelling was used to investigate social, demographic and economic risk factors associated with FGM. Main outcome measures i whether a woman herself had had FGM; ii whether she had one or more daughters with FGM. Results Data were available on 12,049 women. Response rates by region were at least 90%. Women interviewed were representative of the underlying populations of the different regions of Burkina Faso. Seventy seven percent (9267 of the women interviewed had had FGM. 7336 women had a daughter of whom 2216 (30.2% had a daughter with FGM and 334 (4.5% said that they intended that their daughter should have it. Univariate analysis showed that age, religion, wealth, ethnicity, literacy, years of education, household affluence, region and who had responsibility for health care decisions in the household had (RHCD were all significantly related to the two outcomes (p Conclusions and Policy implications Factors associated with FGM are varied

  15. Implications of patient-borne costs associated with pediatric neurosurgical care in eastern Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awori, Jonathan; Strahle, Jennifer; Okechi, Humphrey; Davis, Matthew C

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE Pediatric neurosurgery can be highly cost-effective even in the developing world, but delivery of these services is hampered by resource limitations at the levels of both health care infrastructure and individual patients. Few studies have evaluated costs borne by neurosurgical patients in the developing world and their potential implications for efficient and effective delivery of care in this population. METHODS The families of 40 pediatric neurosurgery patients were surveyed in February 2015 at the AIC Kijabe Hospital in Kijabe, Kenya. Costs associated with obtaining inpatient care were assessed. RESULTS Patient families were charged an average of US $539.44 for neurosurgical services, representing 132% of their annual income. Indirect expenses (transport, food and lodging, lost wages) constituted US $79.37, representing 14.7% of the overall cost and 19.5% of their annual income. CONCLUSIONS Expansion of pediatric neurosurgical services throughout the developing world necessitates increased attention to seemingly insignificant expenses that are absorbed by patients and their families. Even when all direct costs are covered at the institutional or national level, without additional assistance, some patients may be too poor to obtain even "free" neurosurgical care.

  16. Factors associated with uterine endometrial hyperplasia and pyometra in wild canids: implications for fertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asa, Cheryl S; Bauman, Karen L; Devery, Sarah; Zordan, Martín; Camilo, Gerardo R; Boutelle, Sally; Moresco, Anneke

    2014-01-01

    The ability to safely and effectively manage reproduction is central to the success of AZA captive-breeding programs. Although the AZA Wildlife Contraception Center routinely monitors contraceptive safety, there have been no studies that compare the effects of contraceptive use to separation of males from females, the other option for preventing reproduction. We used retrospective medical records and pathology reports submitted by AZA and related facilities for the seven AZA-managed canid species to assess rates of uterine pathology relative to female reproductive life histories. Our results showed that the prevalence of both pyometra and endometrial hyperplasia (EH) was associated not only with treatment with the two most common contraceptives (Suprelorin® and MGA implants) but also with the number of years barren (i.e., not producing a litter and not contracepted). Rates of pyometra and EH were especially high in African painted dogs and red wolves, but lowest in swift and fennec foxes. The number of years producing a litter had a low association, suggesting it could be protective against uterine pathology. A more recently developed Suprelorin® protocol using Ovaban® to prevent the initial stimulation phase, followed by implant removal when reversal is desired, may be a safer contraceptive option. These results concerning the relationship between reproductive management and uterine health have important implications for AZA-managed programs, since the unsustainability of many captive populations may be due at least in part to infertility. Managing a female's reproductive lifespan to optimize or maintain fertility will require a reconsideration of how breeding recommendations are formulated. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Cellular, molecular, and epigenetic mechanisms in non-associative conditioning: implications for pain and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahn, Elizabeth J; Guzman-Karlsson, Mikael C; David Sweatt, J

    2013-10-01

    Sensitization is a form of non-associative conditioning in which amplification of behavioral responses can occur following presentation of an aversive or noxious stimulus. Understanding the cellular and molecular underpinnings of sensitization has been an overarching theme spanning the field of learning and memory as well as that of pain research. In this review we examine how sensitization, both in the context of learning as well as pain processing, shares evolutionarily conserved behavioral, cellular/synaptic, and epigenetic mechanisms across phyla. First, we characterize the behavioral phenomenon of sensitization both in invertebrates and vertebrates. Particular emphasis is placed on long-term sensitization (LTS) of withdrawal reflexes in Aplysia following aversive stimulation or injury, although additional invertebrate models are also covered. In the context of vertebrates, sensitization of mammalian hyperarousal in a model of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), as well as mammalian models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain is characterized. Second, we investigate the cellular and synaptic mechanisms underlying these behaviors. We focus our discussion on serotonin-mediated long-term facilitation (LTF) and axotomy-mediated long-term hyperexcitability (LTH) in reduced Aplysia systems, as well as mammalian spinal plasticity mechanisms of central sensitization. Third, we explore recent evidence implicating epigenetic mechanisms in learning- and pain-related sensitization. This review illustrates the fundamental and functional overlay of the learning and memory field with the pain field which argues for homologous persistent plasticity mechanisms in response to sensitizing stimuli or injury across phyla. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Periodontal Systemic Connections-Novel Associations-A Review of the Evidence with Implications for Medical Practitioners

    OpenAIRE

    Kalakonda, Butchibabu; Koppolu, Pradeep; Baroudi, Kusai; Mishra, Ashank

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal diseases, considered as inflammatory diseases have proved to have a spectrum of systemic implications. Earliest research has associated periodontal disease with common systemic aliments such as hypertension, diabetes, osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis to name a few. The evolution of advanced diagnostic aids let researchers make vast inroads in linking periodontal diseases to systemic diseases like Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and even Schizophrenia. Our aim was to review and critical...

  19. [Food addiction: Definition, measurement and limits of the concept, associated factors, therapeutic and clinical implications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cathelain, Sarah; Brunault, Paul; Ballon, Nicolas; Réveillère, Christian; Courtois, Robert

    2016-12-01

    Addictions, which are characterized by the inability to control a behavior despite existence of physical or psychological consequences, have biological, psychological and social determinants. Although the possibility of developing an addiction to some psychoactive substances (e.g. alcohol, tobacco, cannabis) and to gambling (i.e., gambling disorder) is now well demonstrated, the possibility to develop a non-drug addiction (i.e., behavioral addiction) to certain behaviors which provide pleasure (e.g. eating, having sex, buying things) is still in debate. The concept of food addiction, which refers to people who exhibit substance dependence criteria in relation to some high-fat and high-sugar foods, was recently proposed by applying substance dependence DSM criteria to eating behavior. To assess food addiction, the Yale Food Addiction Scale is now the only self-administered questionnaire (diagnosis and estimate of the number of symptoms of food addiction). Prevalence for food addiction is higher in overweight and obese patients, and in patients with certain psychopathological characteristics (i.e., depression, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, high impulsivity), in patients who are single and in patients with neurobiological alterations in the reward system. However, it is still unclear whether food addiction is necessary associated with subsequent increase in body weight and/or obesity. An increasing number of studies demonstrated that drug addiction and food addiction shares some similar clinical, neurobiological and psychopathological and sociocultural risk factors. To test the pertinence to include food addiction as an addiction, it would be interesting to conduct future studies in patients who may experience harms related to their food addiction, including not only patients with obesity, but also patients with metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, atherosclerosis, stroke, or coronary heart disease. Food addiction is a clinical

  20. Association of bacteria with marine invertebrates: Implications for ballast water management

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Khandeparker, L.; Anil, A.C.

    phytoplankton, and their implications for ballast water risk management. Marine Pollution Bulletin (In press) Colwell RR (1996) Global climate and infectious disease: the cholera paradigm. Science 274: 2025- 2031 Conway DVP, White RG, Hugues-Dit-Ciles J... that threaten naturally evolved biodiversity, the consequences of which are increasingly being realized (Anil et al. 2002). The unintentional introduction of disease causing pathogenic bacteria, which are transported from the place of origin or formed during...

  1. Protein-altering variants associated with body mass index implicate pathways that control energy intake and expenditure in obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turcot, Valérie; Lu, Yingchang; Highland, Heather M; Schurmann, Claudia; Justice, Anne E; Fine, Rebecca S; Bradfield, Jonathan P; Esko, Tõnu; Giri, Ayush; Graff, Mariaelisa; Guo, Xiuqing; Hendricks, Audrey E; Karaderi, Tugce; Lempradl, Adelheid; Locke, Adam E; Mahajan, Anubha; Marouli, Eirini; Sivapalaratnam, Suthesh; Young, Kristin L; Alfred, Tamuno; Feitosa, Mary F; Masca, Nicholas G D; Manning, Alisa K; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Mudgal, Poorva; Ng, Maggie C Y; Reiner, Alex P; Vedantam, Sailaja; Willems, Sara M; Winkler, Thomas W; Abecasis, Gonçalo; Aben, Katja K; Alam, Dewan S; Alharthi, Sameer E; Allison, Matthew; Amouyel, Philippe; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Auer, Paul L; Balkau, Beverley; Bang, Lia E; Barroso, Inês; Bastarache, Lisa; Benn, Marianne; Bergmann, Sven; Bielak, Lawrence F; Blüher, Matthias; Boehnke, Michael; Boeing, Heiner; Boerwinkle, Eric; Böger, Carsten A; Bork-Jensen, Jette; Bots, Michiel L; Bottinger, Erwin P; Bowden, Donald W; Brandslund, Ivan; Breen, Gerome; Brilliant, Murray H; Broer, Linda; Brumat, Marco; Burt, Amber A; Butterworth, Adam S; Campbell, Peter T; Cappellani, Stefania; Carey, David J; Catamo, Eulalia; Caulfield, Mark J; Chambers, John C; Chasman, Daniel I; Chen, Yii-Der I; Chowdhury, Rajiv; Christensen, Cramer; Chu, Audrey Y; Cocca, Massimiliano; Collins, Francis S; Cook, James P; Corley, Janie; Corominas Galbany, Jordi; Cox, Amanda J; Crosslin, David S; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; D'Eustacchio, Angela; Danesh, John; Davies, Gail; Bakker, Paul I W; Groot, Mark C H; Mutsert, Renée; Deary, Ian J; Dedoussis, George; Demerath, Ellen W; Heijer, Martin; Hollander, Anneke I; Ruijter, Hester M; Dennis, Joe G; Denny, Josh C; Angelantonio, Emanuele; Drenos, Fotios; Du, Mengmeng; Dubé, Marie-Pierre; Dunning, Alison M; Easton, Douglas F; Edwards, Todd L; Ellinghaus, David; Ellinor, Patrick T; Elliott, Paul; Evangelou, Evangelos; Farmaki, Aliki-Eleni; Farooqi, I Sadaf; Faul, Jessica D; Fauser, Sascha; Feng, Shuang; Ferrannini, Ele; Ferrieres, Jean; Florez, Jose C; Ford, Ian; Fornage, Myriam; Franco, Oscar H; Franke, Andre; Franks, Paul W; Friedrich, Nele; Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth; Galesloot, Tessel E; Gan, Wei; Gandin, Ilaria; Gasparini, Paolo; Gibson, Jane; Giedraitis, Vilmantas; Gjesing, Anette P; Gordon-Larsen, Penny; Gorski, Mathias; Grabe, Hans-Jörgen; Grant, Struan F A; Grarup, Niels; Griffiths, Helen L; Grove, Megan L; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Gustafsson, Stefan; Haessler, Jeff; Hakonarson, Hakon; Hammerschlag, Anke R; Hansen, Torben; Harris, Kathleen Mullan; Harris, Tamara B; Hattersley, Andrew T; Have, Christian T; Hayward, Caroline; He, Liang; Heard-Costa, Nancy L; Heath, Andrew C; Heid, Iris M; Helgeland, Øyvind; Hernesniemi, Jussi; Hewitt, Alex W; Holmen, Oddgeir L; Hovingh, G Kees; Howson, Joanna M M; Hu, Yao; Huang, Paul L; Huffman, Jennifer E; Ikram, M Arfan; Ingelsson, Erik; Jackson, Anne U; Jansson, Jan-Håkan; Jarvik, Gail P; Jensen, Gorm B; Jia, Yucheng; Johansson, Stefan; Jørgensen, Marit E; Jørgensen, Torben; Jukema, J Wouter; Kahali, Bratati; Kahn, René S; Kähönen, Mika; Kamstrup, Pia R; Kanoni, Stavroula; Kaprio, Jaakko; Karaleftheri, Maria; Kardia, Sharon L R; Karpe, Fredrik; Kathiresan, Sekar; Kee, Frank; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Kim, Eric; Kitajima, Hidetoshi; Komulainen, Pirjo; Kooner, Jaspal S; Kooperberg, Charles; Korhonen, Tellervo; Kovacs, Peter; Kuivaniemi, Helena; Kutalik, Zoltán; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Lakka, Timo A; Lamparter, David; Lange, Ethan M; Lange, Leslie A; Langenberg, Claudia; Larson, Eric B; Lee, Nanette R; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lewis, Cora E; Li, Huaixing; Li, Jin; Li-Gao, Ruifang; Lin, Honghuang; Lin, Keng-Hung; Lin, Li-An; Lin, Xu; Lind, Lars; Lindström, Jaana; Linneberg, Allan; Liu, Ching-Ti; Liu, Dajiang J; Liu, Yongmei; Lo, Ken S; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Lotery, Andrew J; Loukola, Anu; Luan, Jian'an; Lubitz, Steven A; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Männistö, Satu; Marenne, Gaëlle; Mazul, Angela L; McCarthy, Mark I; McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; Medland, Sarah E; Meidtner, Karina; Milani, Lili; Mistry, Vanisha; Mitchell, Paul; Mohlke, Karen L; Moilanen, Leena; Moitry, Marie; Montgomery, Grant W; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis O; Moore, Carmel; Mori, Trevor A; Morris, Andrew D; Morris, Andrew P; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Munroe, Patricia B; Nalls, Mike A; Narisu, Narisu; Nelson, Christopher P; Neville, Matt; Nielsen, Sune F; Nikus, Kjell; Njølstad, Pål R; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nyholt, Dale R; O'Connel, Jeffrey R; O'Donoghue, Michelle L; Olde Loohuis, Loes M; Ophoff, Roel A; Owen, Katharine R; Packard, Chris J; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Palmer, Colin N A; Palmer, Nicholette D; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Patel, Aniruddh P; Pattie, Alison; Pedersen, Oluf; Peissig, Peggy L; Peloso, Gina M; Pennell, Craig E; Perola, Markus; Perry, James A; Perry, John R B; Pers, Tune H; Person, Thomas N; Peters, Annette; Petersen, Eva R B; Peyser, Patricia A; Pirie, Ailith; Polasek, Ozren; Polderman, Tinca J; Puolijoki, Hannu; Raitakari, Olli T; Rasheed, Asif; Rauramaa, Rainer; Reilly, Dermot F; Renström, Frida; Rheinberger, Myriam; Ridker, Paul M; Rioux, John D; Rivas, Manuel A; Roberts, David J; Robertson, Neil R; Robino, Antonietta; Rolandsson, Olov; Rudan, Igor; Ruth, Katherine S; Saleheen, Danish; Salomaa, Veikko; Samani, Nilesh J; Sapkota, Yadav; Sattar, Naveed; Schoen, Robert E; Schreiner, Pamela J; Schulze, Matthias B; Scott, Robert A; Segura-Lepe, Marcelo P; Shah, Svati H; Sheu, Wayne H-H; Sim, Xueling; Slater, Andrew J; Small, Kerrin S; Smith, Albert V; Southam, Lorraine; Spector, Timothy D; Speliotes, Elizabeth K; Starr, John M; Stefansson, Kari; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Stirrups, Kathleen E; Strauch, Konstantin; Stringham, Heather M; Stumvoll, Michael; Sun, Liang; Surendran, Praveen; Swift, Amy J; Tada, Hayato; Tansey, Katherine E; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Taylor, Kent D; Teumer, Alexander; Thompson, Deborah J; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Thuesen, Betina H; Tönjes, Anke; Tromp, Gerard; Trompet, Stella; Tsafantakis, Emmanouil; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Uher, Rudolf; Uitterlinden, André G; Uusitupa, Matti; Laan, Sander W; Duijn, Cornelia M; Leeuwen, Nienke; van Setten, Jessica; Vanhala, Mauno; Varbo, Anette; Varga, Tibor V; Varma, Rohit; Velez Edwards, Digna R; Vermeulen, Sita H; Veronesi, Giovanni; Vestergaard, Henrik; Vitart, Veronique; Vogt, Thomas F; Völker, Uwe; Vuckovic, Dragana; Wagenknecht, Lynne E; Walker, Mark; Wallentin, Lars; Wang, Feijie; Wang, Carol A; Wang, Shuai; Wang, Yiqin; Ware, Erin B; Wareham, Nicholas J; Warren, Helen R; Waterworth, Dawn M; Wessel, Jennifer; White, Harvey D; Willer, Cristen J; Wilson, James G; Witte, Daniel R; Wood, Andrew R; Wu, Ying; Yaghootkar, Hanieh; Yao, Jie; Yao, Pang; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M; Young, Robin; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Zhan, Xiaowei; Zhang, Weihua; Zhao, Jing Hua; Zhao, Wei; Zhou, Wei; Zondervan, Krina T; Rotter, Jerome I; Pospisilik, John A; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Borecki, Ingrid B; Deloukas, Panos; Frayling, Timothy M; Lettre, Guillaume; North, Kari E; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Loos, Ruth J F

    2018-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified >250 loci for body mass index (BMI), implicating pathways related to neuronal biology. Most GWAS loci represent clusters of common, noncoding variants from which pinpointing causal genes remains challenging. Here we combined data from 718,734 individuals to discover rare and low-frequency (minor allele frequency (MAF) < 5%) coding variants associated with BMI. We identified 14 coding variants in 13 genes, of which 8 variants were in genes (ZBTB7B, ACHE, RAPGEF3, RAB21, ZFHX3, ENTPD6, ZFR2 and ZNF169) newly implicated in human obesity, 2 variants were in genes (MC4R and KSR2) previously observed to be mutated in extreme obesity and 2 variants were in GIPR. The effect sizes of rare variants are ~10 times larger than those of common variants, with the largest effect observed in carriers of an MC4R mutation introducing a stop codon (p.Tyr35Ter, MAF = 0.01%), who weighed ~7 kg more than non-carriers. Pathway analyses based on the variants associated with BMI confirm enrichment of neuronal genes and provide new evidence for adipocyte and energy expenditure biology, widening the potential of genetically supported therapeutic targets in obesity.

  2. VHB-JOURQUAL2: Method, Results, and Implications of the German Academic Association for Business Research's Journal Ranking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulf Schrader

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available VHB-JOURQUAL represents the official journal ranking of the German Academic Association for Business Research. Since its introduction in 2003, the ranking has become the most influential journal evaluation approach in German-speaking countries, impacting several key managerial decisions of German, Austrian, and Swiss business schools. This article reports the methodological approach of the ranking’s second edition. It also presents the main results and additional analyses on the validity of the rating and the underlying decision processes of the respondents. Selected implications for researchers and higher-education institutions are discussed.

  3. Migraine Associated with Gastrointestinal Disorders: Review of the Literature and Clinical Implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemert, van S.; Breedveld, A.C.; Rovers, J.M.P.; Vermeiden, J.P.W.; Witteman, B.J.M.; Smits, M.; Roos, de N.M.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that migraine may be associated with gastrointestinal (GI) disorders, including irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), inflammatory bowel syndrome, and celiac disease. Here, an overview of the associations between migraine and GI disorders is presented, as well as possible

  4. Incidence and clinical implication of nosocomial infections associated with implantable biomaterials – catheters, ventilator-associated pneumonia, urinary tract infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guggenbichler, Josef Peter; Assadian, Ojan; Boeswald, Michael; Kramer, Axel

    2012-01-01

    Health care associated infections, the fourth leading cause of disease in industrialised countries, are a major health issue. One part of this condition is based on the increasing insertion and implantation of prosthetic medical devices, since presence of a foreign body significantly reduces the number of bacteria required to produce infection. The most significant hospital-acquired infections, based on frequency and potential severity, are those related to procedures e.g. surgical site infections and medical devices, including urinary tract infection in catheterized patients, pneumonia in patients intubated on a ventilator and bacteraemia related to intravascular catheter use. At least half of all cases of nosocomial infections are associated with medical devices. Modern medical and surgical practices have increasingly utilized implantable medical devices of various kinds. Such devices may be utilized only short-time or intermittently, for months, years or permanently. They improve the therapeutic outcome, save human lives and greatly enhance the quality of life of these patients. However, plastic devices are easily colonized with bacteria and fungi, able to be colonized by microorganisms at a rate of up to 0.5 cm per hour. A thick biofilm is formed within 24 hours on the entire surface of these plastic devices once inoculated even with a small initial number of bacteria. The aim of the present work is to review the current literature on causes, frequency and preventive measures against infections associated with intravascular devices, catheter-related urinary tract infection, ventilator-associated infection, and infections of other implantable medical devices. Raising awareness for infection associated with implanted medical devices, teaching and training skills of staff, and establishment of surveillance systems monitoring device-related infection seem to be the principal strategies used to achieve reduction and prevention of such infections. The intelligent use

  5. Narcolepsy-Associated HLA Class I Alleles Implicate Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tafti, M.; Lammers, G.J.; Dauvilliers, Y.; Overeem, S.; Mayer, G.; Nowak, J.; Pfister, C.; Dubois, V.; Eliaou, J.F.; Eberhard, H.P.; Liblau, R.; Wierzbicka, A.; Geisler, P.; Bassetti, C.L.; Mathis, J.; Lecendreux, M.; Khatami, R.; Heinzer, R.; Haba-Rubio, J.; Feketeova, E.; Baumann, C.R.; Kutalik, Z.; Tiercy, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVES: Narcolepsy with cataplexy is tightly associated with the HLA class II allele DQB1*06:02. Evidence indicates a complex contribution of HLA class II genes to narcolepsy susceptibility with a recent independent association with HLA-DPB1. The cause of narcolepsy is supposed be an

  6. Genome-wide association study implicates PARD3B-based AIDS restriction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Troyer, Jennifer L.; Nelson, George W.; Lautenberger, James A.; Chinn, Leslie; McIntosh, Carl; Johnson, Randall C.; Sezgin, Efe; Kessing, Bailey; Malasky, Michael; Hendrickson, Sher L.; Li, Guan; Pontius, Joan; Tang, Minzhong; An, Ping; Winkler, Cheryl A.; Limou, Sophie; Le Clerc, Sigrid; Delaneau, Olivier; Zagury, Jean-François; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; van Manen, Daniëlle; Bream, Jay H.; Gomperts, Edward D.; Buchbinder, Susan; Goedert, James J.; Kirk, Gregory D.; O'Brien, Stephen J.

    2011-01-01

    Host genetic variation influences human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and progression to AIDS. Here we used clinically well-characterized subjects from 5 pretreatment HIV/AIDS cohorts for a genome-wide association study to identify gene associations with rate of AIDS progression. European

  7. Restoring Wisconsin Art Therapy Association in Art Therapy History: Implications for Professional Definition and Inclusivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potash, Jordan; Burnie, Michele; Pearson, Rosemary; Ramirez, Wayne

    2016-01-01

    The Wisconsin Art Therapy Association (WATA), formally established in 1969, was the first incorporated organization of art therapists in the United States. Under the leadership of Wayne Ramirez, WATA lobbied the national association for an inclusive definition of art therapy that aimed to foster respect for psychiatric, educational, and community…

  8. Venous thromboembolism in overt hyperthyroidism - a direct association with clinical implications?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elbers, L. P. B.; van Zaane, B.; Gerdes, V. E. A.; Coutinho, J. M.; Bisschop, P. H.; Fliers, E.

    2014-01-01

    Hyperthyroidism is associated with procoagulant changes in the haemostatic system. At present, it is uncertain whether this leads to an increased risk of venous and/or arterial thrombosis. Only a few small studies have investigated this association but due to methodological limitations it is not

  9. Psychiatric genome-wide association study analyses implicate neuronal, immune and histone pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Dushlaine, Colm; Rossin, Lizzy; Lee, Phil H.

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of psychiatric disorders have identified multiple genetic associations with such disorders, but better methods are needed to derive the underlying biological mechanisms that these signals indicate. We sought to identify biological pathways in GWAS data from ...

  10. Psychiatric genome-wide association study analyses implicate neuronal, immune and histone pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O'Dushlaine, Colm; Rossin, Lizzy; Lee, Phil H.; Duncan, Laramie; Parikshak, Neelroop N.; Newhouse, Stephen; Ripke, Stephan; Neale, Benjamin M.; Purcell, Shaun M.; Posthuma, Danielle; Nurnberger, John I.; Lee, S. Hong; Faraone, Stephen V.; Perlis, Roy H.; Mowry, Bryan J.; Thapar, Anita; Goddard, Michael E.; Witte, John S.; Absher, Devin; Agartz, Ingrid; Akil, Huda; Amin, Farooq; Andreassen, Ole A.; Anjorin, Adebayo; Anney, Richard; Anttila, Verneri; Arking, Dan E.; Asherson, Philip; Azevedo, Maria H.; Backlund, Lena; Badner, Judith A.; Bailey, Anthony J.; Banaschewski, Tobias; Barchas, Jack D.; Barnes, Michael R.; Barrett, Thomas B.; Bass, Nicholas; Battaglia, Agatino; Bauer, Michael; Bayés, Mònica; Bellivier, Frank; Bergen, Sarah E.; Berrettini, Wade; Betancur, Catalina; Bettecken, Thomas; Biederman, Joseph; Binder, Elisabeth B.; Black, Donald W.; Blackwood, Douglas H. R.; Bloss, Cinnamon S.; Boehnke, Michael; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Breuer, René; Bruggeman, Richard; Cormican, Paul; Buccola, Nancy G.; Buitelaar, Jan K.; Bunney, William E.; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Byerley, William F.; Byrne, Enda M.; Caesar, Sian; Cahn, Wiepke; Cantor, Rita M.; Casas, Miguel; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Chambert, Kimberly; Choudhury, Khalid; Cichon, Sven; Mattheisen, Manuel; Cloninger, C. Robert; Collier, David A.; Cook, Edwin H.; Coon, Hilary; Cormand, Bru; Corvin, Aiden; Coryell, William H.; Craig, David W.; Craig, Ian W.; Crosbie, Jennifer; Cuccaro, Michael L.; Curtis, David; Czamara, Darina; Datta, Susmita; Dawson, Geraldine; Day, Richard; de Geus, Eco J.; Degenhardt, Franziska; Djurovic, Srdjan; Donohoe, Gary J.; Doyle, Alysa E.; Duan, Jubao; Dudbridge, Frank; Duketis, Eftichia; Ebstein, Richard P.; Edenberg, Howard J.; Elia, Josephine; Ennis, Sean; Etain, Bruno; Fanous, Ayman; Farmer, Anne E.; Ferrier, I. Nicol; Flickinger, Matthew; Fombonne, Eric; Foroud, Tatiana; Frank, Josef; Franke, Barbara; Fraser, Christine; Freedman, Robert; Freimer, Nelson B.; Freitag, Christine M.; Friedl, Marion; Frisén, Louise; Gallagher, Louise; Gejman, Pablo V.; Georgieva, Lyudmila; Gershon, Elliot S.; Giegling, Ina; Gill, Michael; Gordon, Scott D.; Gordon-Smith, Katherine; Green, Elaine K.; Greenwood, Tiffany A.; Grice, Dorothy E.; Gross, Magdalena; Grozeva, Detelina; Guan, Weihua; Gurling, Hugh; de Haan, Lieuwe; Haines, Jonathan L.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Hallmayer, Joachim; Hamilton, Steven P.; Hamshere, Marian L.; Hansen, Thomas F.; Hartmann, Annette M.; Hautzinger, Martin; Heath, Andrew C.; Henders, Anjali K.; Herms, Stefan; Hickie, Ian B.; Hipolito, Maria; Hoefels, Susanne; Holsboer, Florian; Hoogendijk, Witte J.; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Hultman, Christina M.; Hus, Vanessa; Ingason, Andrés; Ising, Marcus; Jamain, Stéphane; Jones, Edward G.; Jones, Ian; Jones, Lisa; Tzeng, Jung-Ying; Kähler, Anna K.; Kahn, René S.; Kandaswamy, Radhika; Keller, Matthew C.; Kennedy, James L.; Kenny, Elaine; Kent, Lindsey; Kim, Yunjung; Kirov, George K.; Klauck, Sabine M.; Klei, Lambertus; Knowles, James A.; Kohli, Martin A.; Koller, Daniel L.; Konte, Bettina; Korszun, Ania; Krabbendam, Lydia; Krasucki, Robert; Kuntsi, Jonna; Kwan, Phoenix; Landén, Mikael; Längström, Niklas; Lathrop, Mark; Lawrence, Jacob; Lawson, William B.; Leboyer, Marion; Ledbetter, David H.; Lencz, Todd; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Levinson, Douglas F.; Lewis, Cathryn M.; Li, Jun; Lichtenstein, Paul; Lieberman, Jeffrey A.; Lin, Dan-Yu; Linszen, Don H.; Liu, Chunyu; Lohoff, Falk W.; Loo, Sandra K.; Lord, Catherine; Lowe, Jennifer K.; Lucae, Susanne; MacIntyre, Donald J.; Madden, Pamela A. F.; Maestrini, Elena; Magnusson, Patrik K. E.; Mahon, Pamela B.; Maier, Wolfgang; Malhotra, Anil K.; Mane, Shrikant M.; Martin, Christa L.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Matthews, Keith; Mattingsdal, Morten; McCarroll, Steven A.; McGhee, Kevin A.; McGough, James J.; McGrath, Patrick J.; McGuffin, Peter; McInnis, Melvin G.; McIntosh, Andrew; McKinney, Rebecca; McLean, Alan W.; McMahon, Francis J.; McMahon, William M.; McQuillin, Andrew; Medeiros, Helena; Medland, Sarah E.; Meier, Sandra; Melle, Ingrid; Meyer, Jobst; Middeldorp, Christel M.; Middleton, Lefkos; Milanova, Vihra; Miranda, Ana; Monaco, Anthony P.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Moran, Jennifer L.; Moreno-de-Luca, Daniel; Morken, Gunnar; Morris, Derek W.; Morrow, Eric M.; Moskvina, Valentina; Muglia, Pierandrea; Mühleisen, Thomas W.; Muir, Walter J.; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Murtha, Michael; Myers, Richard M.; Myin-Germeys, Inez; Neale, Michael C.; Nelson, Stan F.; Nievergelt, Caroline M.; Nikolov, Ivan; Nimgaonkar, Vishwajit; Nolen, Willem A.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Nwulia, Evaristus A.; Nyholt, Dale R.; Oades, Robert D.; Olincy, Ann; Oliveira, Guiomar; Olsen, Line; Ophoff, Roel A.; Osby, Urban; Owen, Michael J.; Palotie, Aarno; Parr, Jeremy R.; Paterson, Andrew D.; Pato, Carlos N.; Pato, Michele T.; Penninx, Brenda W.; Pergadia, Michele L.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Pickard, Benjamin S.; Pimm, Jonathan; Piven, Joseph; Potash, James B.; Poustka, Fritz; Propping, Peter; Puri, Vinay; Quested, Digby J.; Quinn, Emma M.; Ramos-Quiroga, Josep Antoni; Rasmussen, Henrik B.; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Rehnström, Karola; Reif, Andreas; Ribasés, Marta; Rice, John P.; Rietschel, Marcella; Roeder, Kathryn; Roeyers, Herbert; Rothenberger, Aribert; Rouleau, Guy; Ruderfer, Douglas; Rujescu, Dan; Sanders, Alan R.; Sanders, Stephan J.; Santangelo, Susan L.; Sergeant, Joseph A.; Schachar, Russell; Schalling, Martin; Schatzberg, Alan F.; Scheftner, William A.; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Scherer, Stephen W.; Schork, Nicholas J.; Schulze, Thomas G.; Schumacher, Johannes; Schwarz, Markus; Scolnick, Edward; Scott, Laura J.; Shi, Jianxin; Shilling, Paul D.; Shyn, Stanley I.; Silverman, Jeremy M.; Slager, Susan L.; Smalley, Susan L.; Smit, Johannes H.; Smith, Erin N.; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund J. S.; St Clair, David; State, Matthew; Steffens, Michael; Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph; Strauss, John S.; Strohmaier, Jana; Stroup, T. Scott; Sutcliffe, James S.; Szatmari, Peter; Szelinger, Szabocls; Thirumalai, Srinivasa; Thompson, Robert C.; Todorov, Alexandre A.; Tozzi, Federica; Treutlein, Jens; Uhr, Manfred; van den Oord, J. C. G.; van Grootheest, Gerard; van Os, Jim; Vicente, Astrid M.; Vieland, Veronica J.; Vincent, John B.; Visscher, Peter M.; Walsh, Christopher A.; Wassink, Thomas H.; Watson, Stanley J.; Weissman, Myrna M.; Werge, Thomas; Wienker, Thomas F.; Wijsman, Ellen M.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Williams, Nigel; Willsey, A. Jeremy; Witt, Stephanie H.; Xu, Wei; Young, Allan H.; Yu, Timothy W.; Zammit, Stanley; Zandi, Peter P.; Zhang, Peng; Zitman, Frans G.; Zöllner, Sebastian; Devlin, Bernie; Kelsoe, John R.; Sklar, Pamela; Daly, Mark J.; O'Donovan, Michael C.; Craddock, Nicholas; Kendler, Kenneth S.; Weiss, Lauren A.; Wray, Naomi R.; Zhao, Zhaoming; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Sullivan, Patrick F.; Smoller, Jordan W.; Holmans, Peter A.; Breen, Gerome

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of psychiatric disorders have identified multiple genetic associations with such disorders, but better methods are needed to derive the underlying biological mechanisms that these signals indicate. We sought to identify biological pathways in GWAS data from

  11. Psychiatric genome-wide association study analyses implicate neuronal, immune and histone pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O'Dushlaine, Colm; Rossin, Lizzy; Lee, Phil H.; Duncan, Laramie; Parikshak, Neelroop N.; Newhouse, Stephen; Ripke, Stephan; Neale, Benjamin M.; Purcell, Shaun M.; Posthuma, Danielle; Nurnberger, John I.; Lee, S. Hong; Faraone, Stephen V.; Perlis, Roy H.; Mowry, Bryan J.; Thapar, Anita; Goddard, Michael E.; Witte, John S.; Absher, Devin; Agartz, Ingrid; Akil, Huda; Amin, Farooq; Andreassen, Ole A.; Anjorin, Adebayo; Anney, Richard; Anttila, Verneri; Arking, Dan E.; Asherson, Philip; Azevedo, Maria H.; Backlund, Lena; Badner, Judith A.; Bailey, Anthony J.; Banaschewski, Tobias; Barchas, Jack D.; Barnes, Michael R.; Barrett, Thomas B.; Bass, Nicholas; Battaglia, Agatino; Bauer, Michael; Bayes, Monica; Bellivier, Frank; Bergen, Sarah E.; Berrettini, Wade; Betancur, Catalina; Bettecken, Thomas; Biederman, Joseph; Binder, Elisabeth B.; Black, Donald W.; Blackwood, Douglas H. R.; Bloss, Cinnamon S.; Boehnke, Michael; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Breuer, Rene; Bruggeman, Richard; Cormican, Paul; Buccola, Nancy G.; Buitelaar, Jan K.; Bunney, William E.; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Byerley, William F.; Byrne, Enda M.; Caesar, Sian; Cahn, Wiepke; Cantor, Rita M.; Casas, Miguel; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Chambert, Kimberly; Choudhury, Khalid; Cichon, Sven; Mattheisen, Manuel; Cloninger, C. Robert; Collier, David A.; Cook, Edwin H.; Coon, Hilary; Cormand, Bru; Corvin, Aiden; Coryell, William H.; Craig, David W.; Craig, Ian W.; Crosbie, Jennifer; Cuccaro, Michael L.; Curtis, David; Czamara, Darina; Datta, Susmita; Dawson, Geraldine; Day, Richard; De Geus, Eco J.; Degenhardt, Franziska; Djurovic, Srdjan; Donohoe, Gary J.; Doyle, Alysa E.; Duan, Jubao; Dudbridge, Frank; Duketis, Eftichia; Ebstein, Richard P.; Edenberg, Howard J.; Elia, Josephine; Ennis, Sean; Etain, Bruno; Fanous, Ayman; Farmer, Anne E.; Ferrier, I. Nicol; Flicldnger, Matthew; Fombonne, Eric; Foroud, Tatiana; Frank, Josef; Franke, Barbara; Fraser, Christine; Freedman, Robert; Freimer, Nelson B.; Freitag, Christine M.; Friedl, Marion; Frisen, Louise; Gailagher, Louise; Gejman, Pablo V.; Georgieva, Lyudmila; Gershon, Elliot S.; Giegling, Ina; Gill, Michael; Gordon, Scott D.; Gordon-Smith, Katherine; Green, Elaine K.; Greenwood, Tiffany A.; Grice, Dorothy E.; Gross, Magdalena; Grozeva, Detelina; Guan, Weihua; Gurling, Hugh; De Haan, Lieuwe; Haines, Jonathan L.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Hallmayer, Joachim; Hamilton, Steven P.; Hamshere, Marian L.; Hansen, Thomas F.; Hartmann, Annette M.; Hautzinger, Martin; Heath, Andrew C.; Henders, Anjali K.; Herms, Stefan; Hickie, Ian B.; Hipolito, Maria; Hoefels, Susanne; Holsboer, Florian; Hoogendijk, Witte J.; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Hultman, Christina M.; Hus, Vanessa; Ingason, Andres; Ising, Marcus; Jamain, Stephane; Jones, Edward G.; Jones, Ian; Jones, Lisa; Tzeng, Jung-Ying; Kaehler, Anna K.; Kahn, Rene S.; Kandaswamy, Radhika; Keller, Matthew C.; Kennedy, James L.; Kenny, Elaine; Kent, Lindsey; Kim, Yunjung; Kirov, George K.; Klauck, Sabine M.; Klei, Lambertus; Knowles, James A.; Kohli, Martin A.; Koller, Daniel L.; Konte, Bettina; Korszun, Ania; Krabbendam, Lydia; Krasucki, Robert; Kuntsi, Jonna; Kwan, Phoenix; Landen, Mikael; Laengstroem, Niklas; Lathrop, Mark; Lawrence, Jacob; Lawson, William B.; Leboyer, Marion; Ledbetter, David H.; Lencz, Todd; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Levinson, Douglas F.; Lewis, Cathryn M.; Li, Jun; Lichtenstein, Paul; Lieberman, Jeffrey A.; Lin, Dan-Yu; Linszen, Don H.; Liu, Chunyu; Lohoff, Falk W.; Loo, Sandra K.; Lord, Catherine; Lowe, Jennifer K.; Lucae, Susanne; MacIntyre, Donald J.; Madden, Pamela A. F.; Maestrini, Elena; Magnusson, Patrik K. E.; Mahon, Pamela B.; Maier, Wolfgang; Malhotra, Anil K.; Mane, Shrikant M.; Martin, Christa L.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Matthews, Keith; Mattingsdal, Morten; McCarroll, Steven A.; McGhee, Kevin A.; McGough, James J.; McGrath, Patrick J.; McGuffin, Peter; McInnis, Melvin G.; McIntosh, Andrew; McKinney, Rebecca; McLean, Alan W.; McMahon, Francis J.; McMahon, William M.; McQuillin, Andrew; Medeiros, Helena; Medland, Sarah E.; Meier, Sandra; Melle, Ingrid; Meng, Fan; Meyer, Jobst; Middeldorp, Christel M.; Middleton, Lefkos; Milanova, Vihra; Miranda, Ana; Monaco, Anthony P.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Moran, Jennifer L.; Moreno-De-Luca, Daniel; Morken, Gunnar; Morris, Derek W.; Morrow, Eric M.; Moskvina, Valentina; Muglia, Pierandrea; Muehleisen, Thomas W.; Muir, Walter J.; Mueller-Myhsok, Bertram; Murtha, Michael; Myers, Richard M.; Myin-Germeys, Inez; Neale, Michael C.; Nelson, Stan F.; Nievergelt, Caroline M.; Nikolov, Ivan; Nimgaonkar, Vishwajit; Nolen, Willem A.; Noethen, Markus M.; Nwulia, Evaristus A.; Nyholt, Dale R.; Oades, Robert D.; Olincy, Ann; Oliveira, Guiomar; Olsen, Line; Ophoff, Roel A.; Osby, Urban; Owen, Michael J.; Palotie, Aarno; Parr, Jeremy R.; Paterson, Andrew D.; Pato, Carlos N.; Pato, Michele T.; Penninx, Brenda W.; Pergadia, Michele L.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Pickard, Benjamin S.; Pimm, Jonathan; Piven, Joseph; Potash, James B.; Poustka, Fritz; Propping, Peter; Puri, Vinay; Quested, Digby J.; Quinn, Emma M.; Ramos-Quiroga, Josep Antoni; Rasmussen, Henrik B.; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Rehnstroem, Karola; Reif, Andreas; Ribases, Marta; Rice, John P.; Rietschel, Marcella; Roeder, Kathryn; Roeyers, Herbert; Rothenberger, Aribert; Rouleau, Guy; Ruderfer, Douglas; Rujescu, Dan; Sanders, Alan R.; Sanders, Stephan J.; Santangelo, Susan L.; Sergeant, Joseph A.; Schachar, Russell; Schalling, Martin; Schatzberg, Alan F.; Scheftner, William A.; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Scherer, Stephen W.; Schork, Nicholas J.; Schulze, Thomas G.; Schumacher, Johannes; Schwarz, Markus; Scolnick, Edward; Scott, Laura J.; Shi, Jianxin; Shilling, Paul D.; Shyn, Stanley I.; Silverman, Jeremy M.; Slager, Susan L.; Smalley, Susan L.; Smit, Johannes H.; Smith, Erin N.; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund J. S.; Cair, David St.; State, Matthew; Steffens, Michael; Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph; Strauss, John S.; Strohmaier, Jana; Stroup, T. Scott; Sutdiffe, James S.; Szatmari, Peter; Szelinger, Szabocls; Thirumalai, Srinivasa; Thompson, Robert C.; Todorov, Alexandre A.; Tozzi, Federica; Treutlein, Jens; Uhr, Manfred; Van den Oord, Edwin J. C. G.; Van Grootheest, Gerard; Van Os, Jim; Vicente, Astrid M.; Vieland, Veronica J.; Vincent, John B.; Visscher, Peter M.; Walsh, Christopher A.; Wassink, Thomas H.; Watson, Stanley J.; Weissman, Myrna M.; Werge, Thomas; Wienker, Thomas F.; Wijsman, Ellen M.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Williams, Nigel; Willsey, A. Jeremy; Witt, Stephanie H.; Xu, Wei; Young, Allan H.; Yu, Timothy W.; Zammit, Stanley; Zandi, Peter P.; Zhang, Peng; Zitman, Frans G.; Zoellner, Sebastian; Devlin, Bernie; Kelsoe, John R.; Sklar, Pamela; Daly, Mark J.; O'Donovan, Michael C.; Craddock, Nicholas; Kendler, Kenneth S.; Weiss, Lauren A.; Wray, Naomi R.; Zhao, Zhaoming; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Sullivan, Patrick F.; Smoller, Jordan W.; Holmans, Peter A.; Breen, Gerome

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of psychiatric disorders have identified multiple genetic associations with such disorders, but better methods are needed to derive the underlying biological mechanisms that these signals indicate. We sought to identify biological pathways in GWAS data from

  12. Depression and Apathy Among People Living with HIV: Implications for Treatment of HIV Associated Neurocognitive Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Vaughn E; Whitehead, Nicole E; Burrell, Larry E; Dotson, Vonetta M; Cook, Robert L; Malloy, Paul; Devlin, Kathryn; Cohen, Ronald A

    2015-08-01

    Depression and apathy are common among people living with HIV (PLWH). However, in PLWH, it is unclear whether depression and apathy are distinct conditions, which contribute to different patterns of disruption to cognitive processing and brain systems. Understanding these conditions may enable the development of prognostic indicators for HIV associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). The present study examined substance use behavior and cognitive deficits, associated with depression and apathy, in 120 PLWH, using hierarchical regression analyses. Higher levels of depression were associated with a history of alcohol dependence and greater deficits in processing speed, motor and global cognitive functioning. Higher levels of apathy were associated with a history of cocaine dependence. It is recommended that PLWH get screened appropriately for apathy and depression, in order to receive the appropriate treatment, considering the comorbidities associated with each condition. Future research should examine the neurological correlates of apathy and depression in PLWH.

  13. Certified Health Education Specialists' Participation in Professional Associations: Implications for Marketing and Membership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thackeray, Rosemary; Neiger, Brad L.; Roe, Kathleen M.

    2005-01-01

    A number of health education professional associations exist to advance the profession through research, practice, and professional development. Benefits of individual membership may include continuing education, networking, leadership, professional recognition, advocacy, professional mobility, access to research findings, advances in the…

  14. Intimate Partner Violence Victimization and Associated Implications for Health and Functioning Among Male and Female Post-9/11 Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iverson, Katherine M; Vogt, Dawne; Maskin, Rachel M; Smith, Brian N

    2017-09-01

    There is increased emphasis on identifying patients who experience intimate partner violence (IPV) in Department of Veterans Affairs and other health care settings. A better understanding of IPV's implications for health and functioning is needed among post-911 Veterans, and especially male Veterans, to inform IPV screening and response. To identify past 6-month IPV experienced among partnered post-9/11 Veterans and examine sex-based associations between IPV and health. A national sample of Veterans completed a survey that included measures of IPV victimization and health. Types of IPV and relationships with health and functioning were examined separately for male and female Veterans. In total, 407 post-9/11 Veterans (52% women) in intimate relationships. IPV victimization was assessed with the Conflict Tactics Scales-Revised. Health and functioning indicators included posttraumatic stress disorder (PCL-5) and depression (Beck Depression Inventory-Primary Care) symptoms, physical health-related quality of life (Short-Form 12-item Health Survey), and occupational functioning (Inventory of Psychosocial Functioning). Nearly two thirds of both men and women reported past 6-month IPV, with greatest endorsement of psychological aggression (65% of men, 59% of women). A total of 8% of men and 7% of women reported physical IPV and 4% of men and 7% of women reported sexual IPV. Psychological aggression was strongly linked with mental health for both sexes and greater occupational impairment for men. Physical and sexual IPV were associated with more severe mental health symptoms for women while physical IPV was negatively associated with physical health-related quality of life for men. Recent IPV victimization, especially psychological aggression, is a key health issue for partnered male and female post-9/11 Veterans. Practice and research implications are discussed.

  15. Associates of an Elevated Natriuretic Peptide Level in Stable Heart Failure Patients: Implications for Targeted Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aftab Jan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Persistently elevated natriuretic peptide (NP levels in heart failure (HF patients are associated with impaired prognosis. Recent work suggests that NP-guided therapy can improve outcome, but the mechanisms behind an elevated BNP remain unclear. Among the potential stimuli for NP in clinically stable patients are persistent occult fluid overload, wall stress, inflammation, fibrosis, and ischemia. The purpose of this study was to identify associates of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP in a stable HF population. Methods. In a prospective observational study of 179 stable HF patients, the association between BNP and markers of collagen metabolism, inflammation, and Doppler-echocardiographic parameters including left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF, left atrial volume index (LAVI, and E/e prime (E/e′ was measured. Results. Univariable associates of elevated BNP were age, LVEF, LAVI, E/e′, creatinine, and markers of collagen turnover. In a multiple linear regression model, age, creatinine, and LVEF remained significant associates of BNP. E/e′ and markers of collagen turnover had a persistent impact on BNP independent of these covariates. Conclusion. Multiple variables are associated with persistently elevated BNP levels in stable HF patients. Clarification of the relative importance of NP stimuli may help refine NP-guided therapy, potentially improving outcome for this at-risk population.

  16. Current and future greenhouse gas emissions associated with electricity generation in China: implications for electric vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Wei; Han, Weijian; Wallington, Timothy J

    2014-06-17

    China's oil imports and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions have grown rapidly over the past decade. Addressing energy security and GHG emissions is a national priority. Replacing conventional vehicles with electric vehicles (EVs) offers a potential solution to both issues. While the reduction in petroleum use and hence the energy security benefits of switching to EVs are obvious, the GHG benefits are less obvious. We examine the current Chinese electric grid and its evolution and discuss the implications for EVs. China's electric grid will be dominated by coal for the next few decades. In 2015 in Beijing, Shanghai, and Guangzhou, EVs will need to use less than 14, 19, and 23 kWh/100 km, respectively, to match the 183 gCO2/km WTW emissions for energy saving vehicles. In 2020, in Beijing, Shanghai, and Guangzhou EVs will need to use less than 13, 18, and 20 kWh/100 km, respectively, to match the 137 gCO2/km WTW emissions for energy saving vehicles. EVs currently demonstrated in China use 24-32 kWh/100 km. Electrification will reduce petroleum imports; however, it will be very challenging for EVs to contribute to government targets for GHGs emissions reduction.

  17. Physiological Effects Associated with Quinoa Consumption and Implications for Research Involving Humans: a Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simnadis, Thomas George; Tapsell, Linda C; Beck, Eleanor J

    2015-09-01

    Quinoa is a pseudo-grain consumed as a dietary staple in South America. In recent years, consumer demand for quinoa in the developed world has grown steadily. Its perceived health benefits have been cited as a driving force behind this trend, but there are very few human studies investigating the impact of quinoa consumption. The aim of this review was to identify physiological effects of quinoa consumption with potential for human health. A critical evaluation of animal model studies was conducted. The quality of identified studies was assessed using a methodological quality assessment tool and summative conclusions were drawn to guide the direction of future human research. The majority of studies were of fair quality. Purported physiological effects of quinoa consumption included decreased weight gain, improved lipid profile and improved capacity to respond to oxidative stress. These physiological effects were attributed to the presence of saponins, protein and 20-hydroxyecdysone in the quinoa seed. The implications of these findings are that human studies should investigate the impact of quinoa consumption on weight gain and lipid levels. The role of quinoa as an antioxidant is still unclear and requires further elucidation in animal models.

  18. Coaches' implicit associations between size and giftedness: implications for the relative age effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furley, Philip; Memmert, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The relative age effect (RAE) is a well-established phenomenon in education and sports. Coaches have been assumed to be important social agents of RAE via biased selection decisions in favour of children with maturation advantages. In the present research, we used the Implicit Association Test to investigate automatic associations between body size and a player's domain-specific giftedness amongst youth baseball (N = 18) and youth soccer coaches (N = 34). We found medium to strong automatic associations between body size and player giftedness (baseball: MD = 0.62; soccer: MD = 0.51). Specifically, taller players were associated with positive performance-related attributes, whereas smaller players were associated with negative attributes. The results are in line with theories of grounded cognition by showing that the abstract concept of "sport giftedness" is partly grounded in the perception of physical height amongst youth sports coaches. We argue that this grounded cognition has the potential to influence coaches' selection decisions and in turn account for RAE as coaches are biased towards physically more matured players, even when no apparent performance advantage is evident.

  19. Experimental evidence for friction-enhancing integumentary modifications of chameleons and associated functional and evolutionary implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khannoon, Eraqi R.; Endlein, Thomas; Russell, Anthony P.; Autumn, Kellar

    2014-01-01

    The striking morphological convergence of hair-like integumentary derivatives of lizards and arthropods (spiders and insects) demonstrates the importance of such features for enhancing purchase on the locomotor substrate. These pilose structures are responsible for the unique tractive abilities of these groups of animals, enabling them to move with seeming ease on overhanging and inverted surfaces, and to traverse inclined smooth substrates. Three groups of lizards are well known for bearing adhesion-promoting setae on their digits: geckos, anoles and skinks. Similar features are also found on the ventral subdigital and distal caudal skin of chameleons. These have only recently been described in any detail, and structurally and functionally are much less well understood than are the setae of geckos and anoles. The seta-like structures of chameleons are not branched (a characteristic of many geckos), nor do they terminate in spatulate tips (which is characteristic of geckos, anoles and skinks). They are densely packed and have attenuated blunt, globose tips or broad, blade-like shafts that are flattened for much of their length. Using a force transducer, we tested the hypothesis that these structures enhance friction and demonstrate that the pilose skin has a greater frictional coefficient than does the smooth skin of these animals. Our results are consistent with friction being generated as a result of side contact of the integumentary filaments. We discuss the evolutionary and functional implications of these seta-like structures in comparison with those typical of other lizard groups and with the properties of seta-mimicking synthetic structures. PMID:24285195

  20. Association between depression and development of coronary artery disease: pathophysiologic and diagnostic implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakamoto

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Carlos V Serrano Jr1, Karina Tiemi Setani2, Erica Sakamoto2, Anna Maria Andrei3, Renério Fraguas41Heart Institute (InCor, 2Medical School, University of São Paulo, Brazil; 3Albert Einstein Hospital, São Paulo, Brazil; 4Department and Institute of Psychiatry, Medical School, University of São Paulo, BrazilAbstract: Depression and coronary artery disease (CAD are both extremely prevalent diseases. In addition, compromised quality of life and life expectancy are characteristics of both situations. There are several conditions that aggravate depression and facilitate the development of CAD, as well as provoke a worse prognosis in patients with already established CAD: inferior adherence to medical orientations (medications and life style modifications, greater platelet activation and aggregation, endothelial dysfunction, and impaired autonomic dysfunction (lowered heart rate variability. Recent literature has shown that depression alone is becoming an independent risk factor for cardiac events both in primary and secondary prevention. As the diagnosis of depression in patients with heart disease is difficult, due to similarities of symptoms, the health professional should perform a careful evaluation to differentiate the clinical signs of depression from those related with general heart diseases. After a myocardial infarction, depression is an independent risk factor for mortality. Successful therapy of depression has been shown to improve patients’ quality of life and cardiovascular outcome. However, multicentric clinical trials are needed to support this inference. A practical liaison between qualified professionals is necessary for the better management of depressed patients with excess risk in developing CAD. Accordingly, pathophysiological and clinical implications between depression and CAD are discussed in this article.Keywords: depression, coronary artery disease, behavioral disorders, prognosis

  1. The estrogen hypothesis of schizophrenia implicates glucose metabolism: association study in three independent samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Line; Hansen, Thomas; Jakobsen, Klaus D.

    2008-01-01

    ) and the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase 1 (PCK1) and fructose-1,6-biphosphatase (FBP1) were nominal significantly associated with schizophrenia, and several haplotypes within enolase 2 gene (ENO2) consist of the same SNP allele having elevated risk of schizophrenia. Importantly, we find no evidence of stratification due...

  2. Efficacy and time course of paired associative stimulation in cortical plasticity: Implications for neuropsychiatry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wischnewski, M.; Schutter, D.J.L.G.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Paired associative stimulation (PAS) has been used to study normal and abnormal cortical plasticity. However, a normative review of PAS effects has not been provided so far. To this end, the magnitude and time course of PAS protocols was systematically evaluated here. Methods: A

  3. Neutralizing antibodies against adeno-associated viruses in inflammatory bowel disease patients: implications for gene therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Marel, Sander; Comijn, Elisabeth M.; Verspaget, Hein W.; van Deventer, Sander; van den Brink, Gijs R.; Petry, Harald; Hommes, Daniel W.; Ferreira, Valerie

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) are comprised of two major disorders: Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). No curative treatment options are available, but gene therapy may offer an alternative therapeutic approach. For this a safe and reliable vector is needed. The adeno-associated

  4. A Genome-wide Association Study of Dupuytren Disease Reveals 17 Additional Variants Implicated in Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Michael; Thakkar, Dipti; Southam, Lorraine; Werker, Paul; Ophoff, Roel; Becker, Kerstin; Nothnagel, Michael; Franke, Andre; Nürnberg, Peter; Espirito-Santo, Ana Isabel; Izadi, David; Hennies, Hans Christian; Nanchahal, Jagdeep; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Furniss, Dominic

    2017-09-07

    Individuals with Dupuytren disease (DD) are commonly seen by physicians and surgeons across multiple specialties. It is an increasingly common and disabling fibroproliferative disorder of the palmar fascia, which leads to flexion contractures of the digits, and is associated with other tissue-specific fibroses. DD affects between 5% and 25% of people of European descent and is the most common inherited disease of connective tissue. We undertook the largest GWAS to date in individuals with a surgically validated diagnosis of DD from the UK, with replication in British, Dutch, and German individuals. We validated association at all nine previously described signals and discovered 17 additional variants with p ≤ 5 × 10(-8). As a proof of principle, we demonstrated correlation of the high-risk genotype at the statistically most strongly associated variant with decreased secretion of the soluble WNT-antagonist SFRP4, in surgical specimen-derived DD myofibroblasts. These results highlight important pathways involved in the pathogenesis of fibrosis, including WNT signaling, extracellular matrix modulation, and inflammation. In addition, many associated loci contain genes that were hitherto unrecognized as playing a role in fibrosis, opening up new avenues of research that may lead to novel treatments for DD and fibrosis more generally. DD represents an ideal human model disease for fibrosis research. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Implications of differential age distribution of disease-associated meningococcal lineages for vaccine development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brehony, Carina; Trotter, Caroline L.; Ramsay, Mary E.; Chandra, Manosree; Jolley, Keith A.; van der Ende, Arie; Carion, Françoise; Berthelsen, Lene; Hoffmann, Steen; Harðardóttir, Hjördís; Vazquez, Julio A.; Murphy, Karen; Toropainen, Maija; Caniça, Manuela; Ferreira, Eugenia; Diggle, Mathew; Edwards, Giles F.; Taha, Muhamed-Kheir; Stefanelli, Paola; Kriz, Paula; Gray, Steve J.; Fox, Andrew J.; Jacobsson, Susanne; Claus, Heike; Vogel, Ulrich; Tzanakaki, Georgina; Heuberger, Sigrid; Caugant, Dominique A.; Frosch, Matthias; Maiden, Martin C. J.

    2014-01-01

    New vaccines targeting meningococci expressing serogroup B polysaccharide have been developed, with some being licensed in Europe. Coverage depends on the distribution of disease-associated genotypes, which may vary by age. It is well established that a small number of hyperinvasive lineages account

  6. Association study in Alzheimer’s disease of single nucleotide polymorphisms implicated with coffee consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Junji Yamamoto

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background There is evidence from animal and in vitro models of the protective effects of caffeine in Alzheimer’s disease. The suggested mechanisms through which caffeine may protect neurons against Alzheimer’s disease pathology include the facilitation of beta-amyloid clearance, upregulation of cholinergic transmission, and increased neuronal plasticity and survival. Epidemiological studies support that Alzheimer’s disease patients consume smaller amounts of coffee beverages throughout their lives as compared to age-matched cognitively healthy individuals. Objective The aim of the present study was to determine whether the negative association between Alzheimer’s disease and coffee consumption may be influenced by a common genetic predisposition, given the fact that the pattern of coffee consumption is determined by both environmental and genetic factors. Method We conducted an in silico search addressing the association between genetic polymorphisms related to coffee consumption and the diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease. We further investigated the interactions between genes located in regions bearing these polymorphisms. Results Our analysis revealed no evidence for a genetic association (nor interaction between related proteins involving coffee consumption and Alzheimer’s disease. Discussion The negative association between Alzheimer’s disease and coffee consumption suggested by epidemiological studies is most likely due to environmental factors that are not necessarily regulated by genetic background.

  7. Gendered Risk Perceptions Associated with Human-Wildlife Conflict: Implications for Participatory Conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gore, Meredith L.; Kahler, Jessica S.

    2012-01-01

    This research aims to foster discourse about the extent to which gender is important to consider within the context of participatory approaches for biological conservation. Our objectives are to: (1) gender-disaggregate data about stakeholders' risk perceptions associated with human-wildlife conflict (HWC) in a participatory conservation context, and (2) highlight insights from characterizing gendered similarities and differences in the way people think about HWC-related risks. Two communal conservancies in Caprivi, Namibia served as case study sites. We analyzed data from focus groups (n = 2) to create gendered concept maps about risks to wildlife and livelihoods and any associations of those risks with HWC, and semi-structured interviews (n = 76; men = 38, women = 38) to measure explicit risk attitudes associated with HWC. Concept maps indicated some divergent perceptions in how groups characterized risks to wildlife and livelihoods; however, not only were identified risks to wildlife (e.g., pollution, hunting) dissimilar in some instances, descriptions of risks varied as well. Study groups reported similar risk perceptions associated with HWC with the exception of worry associated with HWC effects on local livelihoods. Gendered differences in risk perceptions may signal different priorities or incentives to participate in efforts to resolve HWC-related risks. Thus, although shared goals and interests may seem to be an obvious reason for cooperative wildlife management, it is not always obvious that management goals are shared. Opportunity exists to move beyond thinking about gender as an explanatory variable for understanding how different groups think about participating in conservation activities. PMID:22403722

  8. Gendered risk perceptions associated with human-wildlife conflict: implications for participatory conservation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meredith L Gore

    Full Text Available This research aims to foster discourse about the extent to which gender is important to consider within the context of participatory approaches for biological conservation. Our objectives are to: (1 gender-disaggregate data about stakeholders' risk perceptions associated with human-wildlife conflict (HWC in a participatory conservation context, and (2 highlight insights from characterizing gendered similarities and differences in the way people think about HWC-related risks. Two communal conservancies in Caprivi, Namibia served as case study sites. We analyzed data from focus groups (n = 2 to create gendered concept maps about risks to wildlife and livelihoods and any associations of those risks with HWC, and semi-structured interviews (n = 76; men = 38, women = 38 to measure explicit risk attitudes associated with HWC. Concept maps indicated some divergent perceptions in how groups characterized risks to wildlife and livelihoods; however, not only were identified risks to wildlife (e.g., pollution, hunting dissimilar in some instances, descriptions of risks varied as well. Study groups reported similar risk perceptions associated with HWC with the exception of worry associated with HWC effects on local livelihoods. Gendered differences in risk perceptions may signal different priorities or incentives to participate in efforts to resolve HWC-related risks. Thus, although shared goals and interests may seem to be an obvious reason for cooperative wildlife management, it is not always obvious that management goals are shared. Opportunity exists to move beyond thinking about gender as an explanatory variable for understanding how different groups think about participating in conservation activities.

  9. Diagnostic implications of associated defects in patients with typical orofacial clefts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabella L. Monlleó

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVES: To describe prevalence of associated defects and clinical-genetic characteristics of patients with typical orofacial clefts seen at a reference genetic service. METHODS: Descriptive study conducted between September of 2009 and July of 2014. Two experienced dysmorphologists personally collected and coded clinical data using a validated, standard multicenter protocol. Syndromic cases were defined by the presence of four or more minor defects, one or more major defects, or recognition of a specific syndrome. Fisher's exact and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used for statistics. RESULTS: Among 141 subjects, associated defects were found in 133 (93%, and 84 (59.5% were assigned as syndromic. Cleft palate was statistically associated with a greater number of minor defects (p < 0.0012 and syndromic assignment (p < 0.001. Syndromic group was associated with low birth weight (p < 0.04 and less access to surgical treatment (p < 0.002. There was no statistical difference between syndromic and non-syndromic groups regarding gender (p < 0.55, maternal age of 35 years and above (p < 0.50, alcohol (p < 0.50 and tobacco consumption (p < 0.11, consanguinity (p < 0.59, recurrence (p < 0.08, average number of pregnancies (p < 0.32, and offspring (p < 0.35. CONCLUSIONS: There is a lack of information on syndromic clefts. The classification system for phenotype assignment adopted in this study has facilitated recognition of high prevalence of associated defects and syndromic cases. This system may be a useful strategy to gather homogeneous samples, to elect appropriate technologies for etiologic and genotype-phenotype approaches, and to assist with multiprofessional care and genetic counseling.

  10. 2-D structure of the A region of Xist RNA and its implication for PRC2 association.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvain Maenner

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In placental mammals, inactivation of one of the X chromosomes in female cells ensures sex chromosome dosage compensation. The 17 kb non-coding Xist RNA is crucial to this process and accumulates on the future inactive X chromosome. The most conserved Xist RNA region, the A region, contains eight or nine repeats separated by U-rich spacers. It is implicated in the recruitment of late inactivated X genes to the silencing compartment and likely in the recruitment of complex PRC2. Little is known about the structure of the A region and more generally about Xist RNA structure. Knowledge of its structure is restricted to an NMR study of a single A repeat element. Our study is the first experimental analysis of the structure of the entire A region in solution. By the use of chemical and enzymatic probes and FRET experiments, using oligonucleotides carrying fluorescent dyes, we resolved problems linked to sequence redundancies and established a 2-D structure for the A region that contains two long stem-loop structures each including four repeats. Interactions formed between repeats and between repeats and spacers stabilize these structures. Conservation of the spacer terminal sequences allows formation of such structures in all sequenced Xist RNAs. By combination of RNP affinity chromatography, immunoprecipitation assays, mass spectrometry, and Western blot analysis, we demonstrate that the A region can associate with components of the PRC2 complex in mouse ES cell nuclear extracts. Whilst a single four-repeat motif is able to associate with components of this complex, recruitment of Suz12 is clearly more efficient when the entire A region is present. Our data with their emphasis on the importance of inter-repeat pairing change fundamentally our conception of the 2-D structure of the A region of Xist RNA and support its possible implication in recruitment of the PRC2 complex.

  11. Melorheostosis: Exome sequencing of an associated dermatosis implicates postzygotic mosaicism of mutated KRAS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whyte, Michael P; Griffith, Malachi; Trani, Lee; Mumm, Steven; Gottesman, Gary S; McAlister, William H; Krysiak, Kilannin; Lesurf, Robert; Skidmore, Zachary L; Campbell, Katie M; Rosman, Ilana S; Bayliss, Susan; Bijanki, Vinieth N; Nenninger, Angela; Van Tine, Brian A; Griffith, Obi L; Mardis, Elaine R

    2017-08-01

    Melorheostosis (MEL) is the rare sporadic dysostosis characterized by monostotic or polyostotic osteosclerosis and hyperostosis often distributed in a sclerotomal pattern. The prevailing hypothesis for MEL invokes postzygotic mosaicism. Sometimes scleroderma-like skin changes, considered a representation of the pathogenetic process of MEL, overlie the bony changes, and sometimes MEL becomes malignant. Osteopoikilosis (OPK) is the autosomal dominant skeletal dysplasia that features symmetrically distributed punctate osteosclerosis due to heterozygous loss-of-function mutation within LEMD3. Rarely, radiographic findings of MEL occur in OPK. However, germline mutation of LEMD3 does not explain sporadic MEL. To explore if mosaicism underlies MEL, we studied a boy with polyostotic MEL and characteristic overlying scleroderma-like skin, a few bony lesions consistent with OPK, and a large epidermal nevus known to usually harbor a HRAS, FGFR3, or PIK3CA gene mutation. Exome sequencing was performed to ~100× average read depth for his two dermatoses, two areas of normal skin, and peripheral blood leukocytes. As expected for non-malignant tissues, the patient's mutation burden in his normal skin and leukocytes was low. He, his mother, and his maternal grandfather carried a heterozygous, germline, in-frame, 24-base-pair deletion in LEMD3. Radiographs of the patient and his mother revealed bony foci consistent with OPK, but she showed no MEL. For the patient, somatic variant analysis, using four algorithms to compare all 20 possible pairwise combinations of his five DNA samples, identified only one high-confidence mutation, heterozygous KRAS Q61H (NM_033360.3:c.183A>C, NP_203524.1:p.Gln61His), in both his dermatoses but absent in his normal skin and blood. Thus, sparing our patient biopsy of his MEL bone, we identified a heterozygous somatic KRAS mutation in his scleroderma-like dermatosis considered a surrogate for MEL. This implicates postzygotic mosaicism of mutated KRAS

  12. Association of heterotrophic bacteria with aggregated Arthrospira platensis exopolysaccharides: implications in the induction of axenic cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    Inducing an axenic culture of the edible cyanobacterium Arthrospira (Spirulina) platensis using differential filtration alone is never successful; thus, it has been thought that, in non-axenic cultures, a portion of contaminating bacteria is strongly associated with Arthrospira cells. However, examination of the behavior of these bacteria during filtration revealed that they were not associated with Arthrospira cells but with aggregates of exopolysaccharides present in the medium away from the Arthrospira cells. Based on this finding, a rapid and reliable method for preparing axenic trichomes of A. platensis was established. After verifying the axenicity of the resulting trichomes on enriched agar plates, they were individually transferred to fresh sterile medium using a handmade tool, a microtrowel, to produce axenic cultures. With this technique, axenic cultures of various A. platensis strains were successfully produced. The technique described in this study is potentially applicable to a wider range of filamentous cyanobacteria.

  13. HCV and Oxidative Stress: Implications for HCV Life Cycle and HCV-Associated Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Medvedev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available HCV (hepatitis C virus is a member of the Flaviviridae family that contains a single-stranded positive-sense RNA genome of approximately 9600 bases. HCV is a major causative agent for chronic liver diseases such as steatosis, fibrosis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma which are caused by multifactorial processes. Elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS are considered as a major factor contributing to HCV-associated pathogenesis. This review summarizes the mechanisms involved in formation of ROS in HCV replicating cells and describes the interference of HCV with ROS detoxifying systems. The relevance of ROS for HCV-associated pathogenesis is reviewed with a focus on the interference of elevated ROS levels with processes controlling liver regeneration. The overview about the impact of ROS for the viral life cycle is focused on the relevance of autophagy for the HCV life cycle and the crosstalk between HCV, elevated ROS levels, and the induction of autophagy.

  14. Courtesy stigma: the social implications of associating with a gay person.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigelman, C K; Howell, J L; Cornell, D P; Cutright, J D; Dewey, J C

    1991-02-01

    We investigated the operation of courtesy stigma with American male college students who reacted to a fictitious male student described as gay, rooming by choice with a gay male student, involuntarily assigned to room with a gay, or rooming with a male heterosexual. Among respondents who expressed strong intolerance of gays, the voluntary associate of a gay was perceived as having homosexual tendencies and as possessing the same stereotyped personality traits attributed to a gay. No such courtesy stigma was attached to the involuntary associate of a gay by these respondents. Relatively tolerant respondents engaged in no courtesy stigmatization at all. Thus, courtesy stigmatization occurred only under circumscribed conditions and appeared to depend more on the tendency of highly intolerant individuals to infer that a male student who apparently liked a gay individual was himself gay than on a motivation to maintain cognitive consistency.

  15. Periodontal Systemic Connections-Novel Associations-A Review of the Evidence with Implications for Medical Practitioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalakonda, Butchibabu; Koppolu, Pradeep; Baroudi, Kusai; Mishra, Ashank

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal diseases, considered as inflammatory diseases have proved to have a spectrum of systemic implications. Earliest research has associated periodontal disease with common systemic aliments such as hypertension, diabetes, osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis to name a few. The evolution of advanced diagnostic aids let researchers make vast inroads in linking periodontal diseases to systemic diseases like Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and even Schizophrenia. Our aim was to review and critically evaluate comprehensive literature and provide knowledge to medical practitioners on these associations so as to pave way for closer interactions between medical and dental practitioners in implementing better health care. Electronic databases such as PubMed, Google Scholar and Cochrane databases were used as source of the data for relevant studies published from 2005 up to 2015 with the following keywords, “‘Periodontal disease”, “systemic conditions”, “periodontal disease and Alzheimer’s”, “Periodontal disease and Schizophrenia”, “Periodontal disease and Psoriasis” and “Periodontal disease and erectile dysfunction”. The evidence presented ascertains that a reasonable and modest association does exist between Periodontal disease and Alzheimer’s, Schizophrenia, Erectile dysfunction, as well as Psoriasis and thus establishes periodontal disease as a potential risk factor. PMID:27103910

  16. Cartilage lesions in feline stifle joints - Associations with articular mineralizations and implications for osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leijon, Alexandra; Ley, Charles J; Corin, Antonia; Ley, Cecilia

    2017-10-01

    Feline stifle osteoarthritis (OA) is common, however little is known about the early stages of the disease. Furthermore, the importance of small articular mineralizations (AMs) in feline stifle OA is controversial. This study aimed to describe microscopic articular cartilage lesions and to investigate associations between cartilage lesions and AMs, synovitis, osteochondral junction findings and subchondral bone sclerosis. Stifles of 29 cats, aged 1-23years and euthanized for reasons other than stifle disease, were examined. Osteochondral tissue and synovial membrane changes were histologically evaluated. Computed tomography and radiography were used for evaluation of AMs. Global cartilage scores (GCS, n=28) were summarized and joints assigned a histologic OA grade. Minimal to mild histologic OA was seen in 24/28 joints. In 27/29 joints tibial cartilage lesions were seen, whereas femoral lesions were only seen in two joints. Articular mineralizations were detected in 13/29 joints, 11 were small and 12 were located entirely within the medial meniscus. There was no association between GCS and presence or volumes of AMs. However, higher GCS was associated with synovitis (P=0.001) and age (P<0.0005). Presence of subchondral bone sclerosis (P<0.0005) and disruption of the calcified cartilage or tidemark (P<0.0005) were associated with cartilage lesions. We conclude that the tibial articular cartilage is a common location for histologic OA lesions in cats. Synovitis and changes in the subchondral bone and calcified cartilage may be important in the pathogenesis of feline stifle OA, whereas small AMs likely represent incidental findings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Factors associated with early growth in Egyptian infants: implications for addressing the dual burden of malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavle, Justine A; Flax, Valerie L; Abdelmegeid, Ali; Salah, Farouk; Hafez, Seham; Ramzy, Magda; Hamed, Doaa; Saleh, Gulsen; Galloway, Rae

    2016-01-01

    Optimal nutrition is critical to the attainment of healthy growth, human capital and sustainable development. In Egypt, infants and young children face overlapping forms of malnutrition, including micronutrient deficiencies, stunting and overweight. Yet, in this setting, little is known about the factors associated with growth during the first year of life. A rise in stunting in Lower Egypt from 2005 to 2008 prompted this implementation research study, which followed a longitudinal cohort of infants from birth to 1 year of age within the context of a USAID-funded maternal and child health integrated programme. We sought to determine if growth patterns and factors related to early growth differed in Lower and Upper Egypt, and examined the relationship between weight loss and subsequent stunting at 12 months of age. Growth patterns revealed that length-for-age z-score (LAZ) decreased and weight-for-length z-score (WLZ) increased from 6 to 12 months of age in both regions. One-quarter of infants were stunted and nearly one-third were overweight by 12 months of age in lower Egypt. Minimum dietary diversity was significantly associated with WLZ in Lower Egypt (β = 0.22, P < 0.05), but not in Upper Egypt. Diarrhoea, fever and programme exposure were not associated with any growth outcome. Weight loss during any period was associated with a twofold likelihood of stunting at 12 months in Lower Egypt, but not Upper Egypt. In countries, like Egypt, facing the nutrition transition, infant and young child nutrition programmes need to address both stunting and overweight through improving dietary quality and reducing reliance on energy-dense foods. © 2015 The Authors. Maternal & Child Nutrition published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Association between the serotonin transporter and cytokines: Implications for the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Yuan-Hwa; Hsieh, Wen-Chi; Chen, Li-Chi; Lirng, Jiing-Feng; Wang, Shyh-Jen

    2016-02-01

    Reduced brain serotonin transporter (SERT) has been demonstrated in bipolar disorder (BD). The aim of this study was to explore the potential role of cytokines on reduced SERT in BD. Twenty-eight BD type I patients and 28 age- and gender-matched healthy controls (HCs) were recruited. Single photon emission computed tomography with the radiotracer 123I ADAM was used for SERT imaging. Regions of interest included the midbrain, thalamus, putamen and caudate. Seven cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interferon-γ (IFN-γ), interleukin-1α (IL-1α), IL-1β, IL-4, IL-6 and IL-10, were measured using an enzyme linked immune-sorbent assay. SERT availability in the midbrain and caudate was significantly lower in BD compared to HCs. IL-1β was significantly lower, whereas IL-10 was significantly higher in BD compared to HCs. Multiple linear regression analyses revealed that there were associations between cytokines, IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6 and SERT availability in the midbrain but not in the thalamus, putamen and caudate. Furthermore, linear mixed effect analyses demonstrated that these associations were not different between HCs and BD. While many cytokines have been proposed to be important in the pathophysiology of BD, our results demonstrated that significant associations between cytokines and SERT availability may explain the role of cytokines in mood regulation. However, these associations were not different between HCs and BD, which imply the role of these cytokines is not specific for BD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Quantifying shark distribution patterns and species-habitat associations: implications of marine park zoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza, Mario; Cappo, Mike; Heupel, Michelle R; Tobin, Andrew J; Simpfendorfer, Colin A

    2014-01-01

    Quantifying shark distribution patterns and species-specific habitat associations in response to geographic and environmental drivers is critical to assessing risk of exposure to fishing, habitat degradation, and the effects of climate change. The present study examined shark distribution patterns, species-habitat associations, and marine reserve use with baited remote underwater video stations (BRUVS) along the entire Great Barrier Reef Marine Park (GBRMP) over a ten year period. Overall, 21 species of sharks from five families and two orders were recorded. Grey reef Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos, silvertip C. albimarginatus, tiger Galeocerdo cuvier, and sliteye Loxodon macrorhinus sharks were the most abundant species (>64% of shark abundances). Multivariate regression trees showed that hard coral cover produced the primary split separating shark assemblages. Four indicator species had consistently higher abundances and contributed to explaining most of the differences in shark assemblages: C. amblyrhynchos, C. albimarginatus, G. cuvier, and whitetip reef Triaenodon obesus sharks. Relative distance along the GBRMP had the greatest influence on shark occurrence and species richness, which increased at both ends of the sampling range (southern and northern sites) relative to intermediate latitudes. Hard coral cover and distance across the shelf were also important predictors of shark distribution. The relative abundance of sharks was significantly higher in non-fished sites, highlighting the conservation value and benefits of the GBRMP zoning. However, our results also showed that hard coral cover had a large effect on the abundance of reef-associated shark species, indicating that coral reef health may be important for the success of marine protected areas. Therefore, understanding shark distribution patterns, species-habitat associations, and the drivers responsible for those patterns is essential for developing sound management and conservation approaches.

  20. A GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION STUDY OF BRONCHODILATOR RESPONSE IN LATINOS IMPLICATES RARE VARIANTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Katherine A.; Torgerson, Dara G.; Gignoux, Christopher R.; Galanter, Joshua M.; Roth, Lindsey A.; Huntsman, Scott; Eng, Celeste; Oh, Sam S.; Yee, Sook Wah; Lin, Lawrence; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Moreno-Estrada, Andrés; Sandoval, Karla; Davis, Adam; Borrell, Luisa N.; Farber, Harold J.; Kumar, Rajesh; Avila, Pedro C.; Brigino-Buenaventura, Emerita; Chapela, Rocio; Ford, Jean G.; LeNoir, Michael A.; Lurmann, Fred; Meade, Kelley; Serebrisky, Denise; Thyne, Shannon; Rodríguez-Cintrón, William; Sen, Saunak; Rodríguez-Santana, José R.; Hernandez, Ryan D.; Giacomini, Kathleen M.; Burchard, Esteban G.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale The primary rescue medication to treat acute asthma exacerbation is short-acting β2- adrenergic receptor (β2AR) agonists (SABAs), however there is variation in how well an individual responds to treatment. Although these differences may be due to environmental factors, there is mounting evidence for a genetic contribution to variability in bronchodilator drug response (BDR). Methods We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) for BDR in 1,782 Latino children with asthma using standard linear regression, adjusting for genetic ancestry and ethnicity, and performed replication studies in an additional 531 Latinos. We also performed admixture mapping across the genome by testing for an association between local European, African, and Native American ancestry and BDR, adjusting for genomic ancestry and ethnicity. Results We identified seven genetic variants associated with BDR at a genome-wide significant threshold (p<5×10−8), all of which had frequencies below 5%. Furthermore, we observed an excess of small p-values driven by rare variants (frequency < 5%), and by variants in the proximity of solute carrier (SLC) genes. Admixture mapping identified five significant peaks; fine mapping within these peaks identified two rare variants in SLC22A15 as being associated with increased BDR in Mexicans. Quantitative PCR and immunohistochemistry identified SLC22A15 as being expressed in the lung and bronchial epithelial cells. Conclusion Our results suggest that rare variation contributes to individual differences in response to albuterol in Latinos, notably in solute carrier genes that include membrane transport proteins involved in the transport of endogenous metabolites and xenobiotics. Resequencing in larger, multi-ethnic population samples and additional functional studies are required to further understand the role of rare variation in BDR. PMID:23992748

  1. Quantifying shark distribution patterns and species-habitat associations: implications of marine park zoning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Espinoza

    Full Text Available Quantifying shark distribution patterns and species-specific habitat associations in response to geographic and environmental drivers is critical to assessing risk of exposure to fishing, habitat degradation, and the effects of climate change. The present study examined shark distribution patterns, species-habitat associations, and marine reserve use with baited remote underwater video stations (BRUVS along the entire Great Barrier Reef Marine Park (GBRMP over a ten year period. Overall, 21 species of sharks from five families and two orders were recorded. Grey reef Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos, silvertip C. albimarginatus, tiger Galeocerdo cuvier, and sliteye Loxodon macrorhinus sharks were the most abundant species (>64% of shark abundances. Multivariate regression trees showed that hard coral cover produced the primary split separating shark assemblages. Four indicator species had consistently higher abundances and contributed to explaining most of the differences in shark assemblages: C. amblyrhynchos, C. albimarginatus, G. cuvier, and whitetip reef Triaenodon obesus sharks. Relative distance along the GBRMP had the greatest influence on shark occurrence and species richness, which increased at both ends of the sampling range (southern and northern sites relative to intermediate latitudes. Hard coral cover and distance across the shelf were also important predictors of shark distribution. The relative abundance of sharks was significantly higher in non-fished sites, highlighting the conservation value and benefits of the GBRMP zoning. However, our results also showed that hard coral cover had a large effect on the abundance of reef-associated shark species, indicating that coral reef health may be important for the success of marine protected areas. Therefore, understanding shark distribution patterns, species-habitat associations, and the drivers responsible for those patterns is essential for developing sound management and conservation

  2. A norovirus outbreak associated with consumption of NSW oysters: implications for quality assurance systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huppatz, Clare; Munnoch, Sally A; Worgan, Tory; Merritt, Tony D; Dalton, Craig; Kelly, Paul M; Durrheim, David N

    2008-03-01

    Norovirus is a common cause of gastroenteritis outbreaks associated with raw shellfish consumption. In Australia there have been several reports of norovirus outbreaks associated with oysters despite the application of regulatory measures recommended by Food Standards Australia New Zealand. This study describes an outbreak of norovirus gastroenteritis following the consumption of New South Wales oysters. In September 2007, OzFoodNet conducted a cohort study of a gastroenteritis outbreak amongst people that had dined at a Port Macquarie restaurant. Illness was strongly associated with oyster consumption, with all cases having eaten oysters from the same lease (RR undefined, p Norovirus was detected in a faecal specimen. Although no pathogen was identified during the environmental investigation, the source oyster lease had been closed just prior to harvesting due to sewage contamination. Australian quality assurance programs do not routinely test oysters for viral contamination that pose a risk to human health. It is recommended that the feasibility of testing oysters for norovirus, particularly after known faecal contamination of oyster leases, be assessed.

  3. Conditional associative memory for musical stimuli in nonmusicians: implications for absolute pitch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermudez, Patrick; Zatorre, Robert J

    2005-08-24

    A previous positron emission tomography (PET) study of musicians with and without absolute pitch put forth the hypothesis that the posterior dorsolateral prefrontal cortex is involved in the conditional associative aspect of the identification of a pitch. In the work presented here, we tested this hypothesis by training eight nonmusicians to associate each of four different complex musical sounds (triad chords) with an arbitrary number in a task designed to have limited analogy to absolute-pitch identification. Each subject under-went a functional magnetic resonance imaging scanning procedure both before and after training. Active condition (identification of chords)-control condition (amplitude-matched noise bursts) comparisons for the pretraining scan showed no significant activation maxima. The same comparison for the posttraining scan revealed significant peaks of activation in posterior dorsolateral prefrontal, ventrolateral prefrontal, and parietal areas. A conjunction analysis was performed to show that the posterior dorsolateral prefrontal activity in this study is similar to that observed in the aforementioned PET study. We conclude that the posterior dorsolateral prefrontal cortex is selectively involved in the conditional association aspect of our task, as it is in the attribution of a verbal label to a note by absolute-pitch musicians.

  4. Identification of cancer risk and associated behaviour: implications for social marketing campaigns for cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kippen, Rebecca; James, Erica; Ward, Bernadette; Buykx, Penny; Shamsullah, Ardel; Watson, Wendy; Chapman, Kathy

    2017-08-17

    Community misconception of what causes cancer is an important consideration when devising communication strategies around cancer prevention, while those initiating social marketing campaigns must decide whether to target the general population or to tailor messages for different audiences. This paper investigates the relationships between demographic characteristics, identification of selected cancer risk factors, and associated protective behaviours, to inform audience segmentation for cancer prevention social marketing. Data for this cross-sectional study (n = 3301) are derived from Cancer Council New South Wales' 2013 Cancer Prevention Survey. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression models were used to investigate the relationship between respondent demographic characteristics and identification of each of seven cancer risk factors; demographic characteristics and practice of the seven 'protective' behaviours associated with the seven cancer risk factors; and identification of cancer risk factors and practising the associated protective behaviours, controlling for demographic characteristics. More than 90% of respondents across demographic groups identified sun exposure and smoking cigarettes as moderate or large cancer risk factors. Around 80% identified passive smoking as a moderate/large risk factor, and 40-60% identified being overweight or obese, drinking alcohol, not eating enough vegetables and not eating enough fruit. Women and older respondents were more likely to identify most cancer risk factors as moderate/large, and to practise associated protective behaviours. Education was correlated with identification of smoking as a moderate/large cancer risk factor, and with four of the seven protective behaviours. Location (metropolitan/regional) and country of birth (Australia/other) were weak predictors of identification and of protective behaviours. Identification of a cancer risk factor as moderate/large was a significant predictor for five out

  5. Generic information can retrieve known biological associations: implications for biomedical knowledge discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herman H H B M van Haagen

    Full Text Available MOTIVATION: Weighted semantic networks built from text-mined literature can be used to retrieve known protein-protein or gene-disease associations, and have been shown to anticipate associations years before they are explicitly stated in the literature. Our text-mining system recognizes over 640,000 biomedical concepts: some are specific (i.e., names of genes or proteins others generic (e.g., 'Homo sapiens'. Generic concepts may play important roles in automated information retrieval, extraction, and inference but may also result in concept overload and confound retrieval and reasoning with low-relevance or even spurious links. Here, we attempted to optimize the retrieval performance for protein-protein interactions (PPI by filtering generic concepts (node filtering or links to generic concepts (edge filtering from a weighted semantic network. First, we defined metrics based on network properties that quantify the specificity of concepts. Then using these metrics, we systematically filtered generic information from the network while monitoring retrieval performance of known protein-protein interactions. We also systematically filtered specific information from the network (inverse filtering, and assessed the retrieval performance of networks composed of generic information alone. RESULTS: Filtering generic or specific information induced a two-phase response in retrieval performance: initially the effects of filtering were minimal but beyond a critical threshold network performance suddenly drops. Contrary to expectations, networks composed exclusively of generic information demonstrated retrieval performance comparable to unfiltered networks that also contain specific concepts. Furthermore, an analysis using individual generic concepts demonstrated that they can effectively support the retrieval of known protein-protein interactions. For instance the concept "binding" is indicative for PPI retrieval and the concept "mutation abnormality" is

  6. Joint linkage and association analysis with exome sequence data implicates SLC25A40 in hypertriglyceridemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Elisabeth A; Ranchalis, Jane; Crosslin, David R; Burt, Amber; Brunzell, John D; Motulsky, Arno G; Nickerson, Deborah A; Wijsman, Ellen M; Jarvik, Gail P

    2013-12-05

    Hypertriglyceridemia (HTG) is a heritable risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Investigating the genetics of HTG may identify new drug targets. There are ~35 known single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) that explain only ~10% of variation in triglyceride (TG) level. Because of the genetic heterogeneity of HTG, a family study design is optimal for identification of rare genetic variants with large effect size because the same mutation can be observed in many relatives and cosegregation with TG can be tested. We considered HTG in a five-generation family of European American descent (n = 121), ascertained for familial combined hyperlipidemia. By using Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo joint oligogenic linkage and association analysis, we detected linkage to chromosomes 7 and 17. Whole-exome sequence data revealed shared, highly conserved, private missense SNVs in both SLC25A40 on chr7 and PLD2 on chr17. Jointly, these SNVs explained 49% of the genetic variance in TG; however, only the SLC25A40 SNV was significantly associated with TG (p = 0.0001). This SNV, c.374A>G, causes a highly disruptive p.Tyr125Cys substitution just outside the second helical transmembrane region of the SLC25A40 inner mitochondrial membrane transport protein. Whole-gene testing in subjects from the Exome Sequencing Project confirmed the association between TG and SLC25A40 rare, highly conserved, coding variants (p = 0.03). These results suggest a previously undescribed pathway for HTG and illustrate the power of large pedigrees in the search for rare, causal variants. Copyright © 2013 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Rift Valley fever virus-infected mosquito ova and associated pathology: possible implications for endemic maintenance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romoser WS

    2011-09-01

    hemocoel, RVFV-infected reproductive tissues were found, particularly follicular epithelia and oocyte/nurse cells. Ovarian infection from the hemocoel is a crucial step in establishing a vertically transmitting mosquito line. Ovarian follicles originate from germarial cells, primordia located distally in each ovariole, and infection of these cells is expected to be requisite for long-term vertical transmission. However, no germarial cell infection was found, so establishing a new line of vertically transmitting mosquitoes may require two generations. The findings support the hypothesis that Ae. mcintoshi is involved in the endemic maintenance of RVFV by vertical transmission. Detection of distinct pathology in infected eggs raises the possibility of virus-laden eggs being deposited among healthy eggs, thereby providing an exogenous source of infection via ingestion by mosquito larvae and other organisms. This has potentially significant epidemiological implications. Possible modes of entry of virus from the hemocoel into the ovaries and routes by which larvae might become infected by ingesting virus are discussed.Keywords: hemocoel, ovary, vertical transmission, Aedes mcintoshi, arbovirus, antigen positive

  8. Contrasting movements and connectivity of reef-associated sharks using acoustic telemetry: implications for management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza, Mario; Lédée, Elodie J I; Simpfendorfer, Colin A; Tobin, Andrew J; Heupel, Michelle R

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the efficacy of marine protected areas (MPAs) for wide-ranging predators is essential to designing effective management and conservation approaches. The use of acoustic monitoring and network analysis can improve our understanding of the spatial ecology and functional connectivity of reef-associated species, providing a useful approach for reef-based conservation planning. This study compared and contrasted the movement and connectivity of sharks with different degrees of reef association. We examined the residency, dispersal, degree of reef connectivity, and MPA use of grey reef (Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos), silvertip (C. albimarginatus), and bull (C. leucas) sharks monitored in the central Great Barrier Reef (GBR). An array of 56 acoustic receivers was used to monitor shark movements on 17 semi-isolated reefs. Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos and C. albimarginatus were detected most days at or near their tagging reef. However, while C. amblyrhynchos spent 80% of monitoring days in the array, C. albimarginatus was only detected 50% of the time. Despite both species moving similar distances (sharks like C. leucas, a combination of spatial planning and other alternative measures is critical. Our findings demonstrate that acoustic monitoring can serve as a useful platform for designing more effective MPA networks for reef predators displaying a range of movement patterns.

  9. Genetic diversity of Escherichia coli isolates in irrigation water and associated sediments: implications for source tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lingeng; Hume, Michael E; Sternes, Keith L; Pillai, Suresh D

    2004-11-01

    Identifying the sources of fecal contaminants in surface water bodies such as rivers and lakes is of significant importance for environmental quality, food safety and regulatory purposes. Current DNA library-based source tracking approaches rely on the comparison of the genetic relatedness among the fecal contaminants. The objective of this study was to determine the genetic relatedness of Escherichia coli isolated from irrigation water and associated sediments using pulse field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and to evaluate the genetic stability of the E. coli PFGE patterns. The isolates were obtained over a 4-month period from specific locations within irrigation canals and sediments associated with the Rio Grande River along the Texas-Mexico border. Fifty E. coli isolates were genotyped using PFGE. Different E. coli genotypes were identified among samples collected in 11 different locations. Some isolates obtained over successive months showed similar genotypic patterns. In the laboratory experiment, the PFGE pattern of one E. coli strain changed during survival in irrigation water. The genetic relatedness of this strain changed from >95% to <83% over 8-week survival. These results imply that PFGE is of such extreme resolution that it may be a challenging task to rely solely on a PFGE-based source tracking DNA fingerprint library for large watersheds.

  10. Family-based association analysis implicates IL-4 in susceptibility to Kawasaki disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, J C; Shimizu, C; Shike, H; Newburger, J W; Sundel, R P; Baker, A L; Matsubara, T; Ishikawa, Y; Brophy, V A; Cheng, S; Grow, M A; Steiner, L L; Kono, N; Cantor, R M

    2005-08-01

    Several compelling lines of evidence suggest an important influence of genetic variation in susceptibility to Kawasaki disease (KD), an acute vasculitis that causes coronary artery aneurysms in children. We performed a family-based genotyping study to test for association between KD and 58 genes involved in cardiovascular disease and inflammation. By analysis of a cohort of 209 KD trios using the transmission disequilibrium test, we documented the asymmetric transmission of five alleles including the interleukin-4 (IL-4) C(-589)T allele (P=0.03). Asymmetric transmission of the IL-4 C(-589)T was replicated in a second, independent cohort of 60 trios (P=0.05, combined P=0.002). Haplotypes of alleles in IL-4, colony-stimulating factor 2 (CSF2), IL-13, and transcription factor 7 (TCF7), all located in the interleukin gene cluster on 5q31, were also asymmetrically transmitted. The reported associations of KD with atopic dermatitis and allergy, elevated serum IgE levels, eosinophilia, and increased circulating numbers of monocyte/macrophages expressing the low-affinity IgE receptor (FCepsilonR2) may be related to effects of IL-4. Thus, the largest family-based genotyping study of KD patients to date suggests that genetic variation in the IL-4 gene, or regions linked to IL-4, plays an important role in KD pathogenesis and disease susceptibility.

  11. Accessibility of humic-associated Fe to a microbial siderophore: implications for bioavailability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Keshia M; Maurice, Patricia A; Neubauer, Elisabeth; Hofmann, Thilo; von der Kammer, Frank

    2014-01-21

    Microorganisms in aerobic, circum-neutral environments are challenged to acquire sufficient nutrient Fe due to low solubilities of Fe oxides. To overcome this challenge, many aerobic microbes produce low molecular weight (MW) organic ligands, or siderophores, with extremely high Fe-binding affinities. This research expands the existing understanding of siderophore-mediated Fe acquisition from minerals by examining the effects of the siderophore desferrioxamine B (DFOB) on Fe removal from aquatic humic substances (XAD-8-isolated) and other organic matter (OM) isolates (reverse osmosis, RO; and "transphilic", XAD-4) from several rivers including the Suwannee River (GA, USA). Analysis of samples by asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AsFlFFF) with in-line ICP-MS and UV-vis detectors showed that Fe was naturally abundant and primarily associated with intermediate to high MW OM. An excess of DFOB (relative to naturally present Fe) removed ∼ 75% of Fe and shifted the OM MW distribution to lower MWs, perhaps due to removal of "bridging" Fe, although additional mechanistic study of MW shifts is needed. Removal of other OM-associated metals (e.g., Al, Cu, Zn) by DFOB was minimal for all but a few samples. Fe bound to humic substances and other more "transphilic" organic components therefore should be considered readily bioavailable to aerobic, siderophore-producing microorganisms.

  12. The Role of Dopamine in Inflammation-Associated Depression: Mechanisms and Therapeutic Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felger, Jennifer C

    Studies investigating the impact of a variety of inflammatory stimuli on the brain and behavior have consistently reported evidence that inflammatory cytokines affect the basal ganglia and dopamine to mediate depressive symptoms related to motivation and motor activity. Findings have included inflammation-associated reductions in ventral striatal responses to hedonic reward, decreased dopamine and dopamine metabolites in cerebrospinal fluid, and decreased availability of striatal dopamine, all of which correlate with symptoms of anhedonia, fatigue, and psychomotor retardation. Similar relationships between alterations in dopamine-relevant corticostriatal reward circuitry and symptoms of anhedonia and psychomotor slowing have also been observed in patients with major depression who exhibit increased peripheral cytokines and other inflammatory markers, such as C-reactive protein. Of note, these inflammation-associated depressive symptoms are often difficult to treat in patients with medical illnesses or major depression. Furthermore, a wealth of literature suggests that inflammation can decrease dopamine synthesis, packaging, and release, thus sabotaging or circumventing the efficacy of standard antidepressant treatments. Herein, the mechanisms by which inflammation and cytokines affect dopamine neurotransmission are discussed, which may provide novel insights into treatment of inflammation-related behavioral symptoms that contribute to an inflammatory malaise.

  13. Foraging Strategies of Laysan Albatross Inferred from Stable Isotopes: Implications for Association with Fisheries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Ann E; Fitzgerald, Shannon M; Parrish, Julia K; Klavitter, John L; Romano, Marc D

    2015-01-01

    Fatal entanglement in fishing gear is the leading cause of population decline for albatross globally, a consequence of attraction to bait and fishery discards of commercial fishing operations. We investigated foraging strategies of Laysan albatross (Phoebastria immutabilis), as inferred from nitrogen and carbon isotope values of primary feathers, to determine breeding-related, seasonal, and historic factors that may affect the likelihood of association with Alaskan or Hawaiian longline fisheries. Feather samples were collected from live birds monitored for breeding status and breeding success on Midway Atoll in the northwestern Hawaiian Islands, birds salvaged as fisheries-bycatch, and birds added to museum collections before 1924. During the chick-rearing season (sampled April-May), means and variances of stable isotope values of birds with the highest, most consistent reproductive success were distinct from less productive conspecifics and completely different from birds caught in Hawaiian or Alaskan longline fisheries, suggesting birds with higher multi-annual reproductive success were less likely to associate with these fisheries. Contemporary birds with the highest reproductive success had mean values most similar to historic birds. Values of colony-bound, courting prebreeders were similar to active breeders but distinct from prebreeders caught in Alaskan longline fisheries. During the breeding season, δ15N values were highly variable for both contemporary and historic birds. Although some historic birds exhibited extremely low δ15N values unmatched by contemporary birds (fisheries.

  14. Habitat fragmentation is associated to gut microbiota diversity of an endangered primate: implications for conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barelli, Claudia; Albanese, Davide; Donati, Claudio; Pindo, Massimo; Dallago, Chiara; Rovero, Francesco; Cavalieri, Duccio; Tuohy, Kieran Michael; Hauffe, Heidi Christine; De Filippo, Carlotta

    2015-10-07

    The expansion of agriculture is shrinking pristine forest areas worldwide, jeopardizing the persistence of their wild inhabitants. The Udzungwa red colobus monkey (Procolobus gordonorum) is among the most threatened primate species in Africa. Primarily arboreal and highly sensitive to hunting and habitat destruction, they provide a critical model to understanding whether anthropogenic disturbance impacts gut microbiota diversity. We sampled seven social groups inhabiting two forests (disturbed vs. undisturbed) in the Udzungwa Mountains of Tanzania. While Ruminococcaceae and Lachnospiraceae dominated in all individuals, reflecting their role in extracting energy from folivorous diets, analysis of genus composition showed a marked diversification across habitats, with gut microbiota α-diversity significantly higher in the undisturbed forest. Functional analysis suggests that such variation may be associated with food plant diversity in natural versus human-modified habitats, requiring metabolic pathways to digest xenobiotics. Thus, the effects of changes in gut microbiota should not be ignored to conserve endangered populations.

  15. Clinical, Diagnostic, and Therapeutic Implications in Psoriasis Associated With Cardiovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonanad, C; González-Parra, E; Rivera, R; Carrascosa, J M; Daudén, E; Olveira, A; Botella-Estrada, R

    2017-11-01

    In recent years the concept of psoriasis as a systemic disease has gained acceptance due to its association with numerous comorbid conditions, particularly atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. Several studies have shown that patients with psoriasis, especially younger patients and those with more severe forms of psoriasis or with psoriatic arthritis, have a higher prevalence of risk factors and metabolic syndrome, as well as an increased risk of major cardiovascular events such as myocardial infarction, cerebrovascular disease, and peripheral arterial disease. Furthermore, it remains unclear which of the current treatments might be more effective in reducing cardiovascular risk in these patients. It is therefore important for dermatologists to be aware of this increased risk, to be able to detect modifiable risk factors early and, when appropriate, refer patients to other specialists for the prevention of major cardiovascular events. Copyright © 2017 AEDV. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. The American Heart Association's recent scientific statement on cardiac critical care: implications for pediatric practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penny, Daniel J; Shekerdemian, Lara S

    2013-01-01

    A writing group sponsored by the Council on Cardiopulmonary, Critical Care, Perioperative and Resuscitation, the Council on Clinical Cardiology, the Council on Cardiovascular Nursing, and the Council on Quality of Care and Outcomes Research of The American Heart Association has recently formulated a roadmap to meet the changing needs of the patient with cardiovascular disease requiring critical care. Although this roadmap has been formulated primarily to address the care needs of the adult with critical cardiovascular disease, it contains useful lessons pertinent to the care of the patient with pediatric and congenital cardiovascular disease. In this document, we have examined The Statement and applied its framework to the evolving field of pediatric cardiac critical care. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. The association of heavy and light chain variable domains in antibodies: implications for antigen specificity.

    KAUST Repository

    Chailyan, Anna

    2011-06-28

    The antigen-binding site of immunoglobulins is formed by six regions, three from the light and three from the heavy chain variable domains, which, on association of the two chains, form the conventional antigen-binding site of the antibody. The mode of interaction between the heavy and light chain variable domains affects the relative position of the antigen-binding loops and therefore has an effect on the overall conformation of the binding site. In this article, we analyze the structure of the interface between the heavy and light chain variable domains and show that there are essentially two different modes for their interaction that can be identified by the presence of key amino acids in specific positions of the antibody sequences. We also show that the different packing modes are related to the type of recognized antigen.

  18. Close packing effects on clean and dirty snow albedo and associated climatic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Cenlin; Takano, Yoshi; Liou, Kuo-Nan

    2017-04-01

    Previous modeling of snow albedo, a key climate feedback parameter, follows the independent scattering approximation (ISA) such that snow grains are considered as a number of separate units with distances longer than wavelengths. Here we develop a new snow albedo model for widely observed close-packed snow grains internally mixed with black carbon (BC) and demonstrate that albedo simulations match closer to observations. Close packing results in a stronger light absorption for clean and BC-contaminated snow. Compared with ISA, close packing reduces pure snow albedos by up to 0.05, whereas it enhances BC-induced snow albedo reduction and associated surface radiative forcing by up to 15% (20%) for fresh (old) snow, with larger enhancements for stronger structure packing. Finally, our results suggest that BC-snow albedo forcing and snow albedo feedback (climate sensitivity) are underestimated in previous modeling studies, making snow close packing consideration a necessity in climate modeling and analysis.

  19. Dystrophins, Utrophins, and Associated Scaffolding Complexes: Role in Mammalian Brain and Implications for Therapeutic Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Perronnet

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Two decades of molecular, cellular, and functional studies considerably increased our understanding of dystrophins function and unveiled the complex etiology of the cognitive deficits in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD, which involves altered expression of several dystrophin-gene products in brain. Dystrophins are normally part of critical cytoskeleton-associated membrane-bound molecular scaffolds involved in the clustering of receptors, ion channels, and signaling proteins that contribute to synapse physiology and blood-brain barrier function. The utrophin gene also drives brain expression of several paralogs proteins, which cellular expression and biological roles remain to be elucidated. Here we review the structural and functional properties of dystrophins and utrophins in brain, the consequences of dystrophins loss-of-function as revealed by numerous studies in mouse models of DMD, and we discuss future challenges and putative therapeutic strategies that may compensate for the cognitive impairment in DMD based on experimental manipulation of dystrophins and/or utrophins brain expression.

  20. Reassessing the importance of 'lost pleasure' associated with smoking cessation: implications for social welfare and policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechacek, Terry Frank; Nayak, Pratibha; Slovic, Paul; Weaver, Scott R; Huang, Jidong; Eriksen, Michael P

    2017-11-28

    Benefit-cost analyses of tobacco regulations include estimates of the informed choice of smokers to continue smoking. Few studies have focused on subjective feelings associated with continued smoking. This study estimates how smoker discontent and regret relate to risk perceptions and health concerns. We analysed data from a 2015 nationally representative, online survey of 1284 US adult current smokers. Information was collected on regret, intention to quit, perceived addiction, risk perceptions and health concerns. Multivariate logistic regression adjusting for sociodemographics and health status was used to examine factors associated with smoker discontent. More than 80% of current smokers report high (22.5%) or very high (59.8%) discontent due to inability to quit, perceived addiction and regret about having started to smoke. Higher levels of discontent did not vary significantly by sex, age, race/ethnicity, education or income (adjusted odds ratios (AORs) 0.5-1.2). Compared with the smokers expressing low (5.9%) or very low (3.6%) discontent, those expressing higher levels of discontent perceived their health status as fair/poor (AOR=2.3), worried most of the time about lung cancer (AOR=4.6) and felt they were more likely to develop lung cancer in the future (AOR=5.1). The proportion of smokers who might be characterised as having a preference to continue smoking are greatly outnumbered by addicted, discontent and concerned smokers who want to quit and regret ever having started to smoke. These discontent smokers could have a substantial net welfare gain if new regulations helped them escape their concerns about the health effects from continuing smoking. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  1. Soil metal concentrations and toxicity: Associations with distances to industrial facilities and implications for human health

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aelion, C. Marjorie [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, University of South Carolina, 921 Assembly Street, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Department of Public Health, University of Massachusetts, 715 North Pleasant Street, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States)], E-mail: maelion@schoolph.umass.edu; Davis, Harley T. [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, University of South Carolina, 921 Assembly Street, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); McDermott, Suzanne [Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, University of South Carolina, 3209 Colonial Drive, Columbia, SC 29203 (United States); Lawson, Andrew B. [Department of Biostatistics, Bioinformatics, and Epidemiology, Medical University of South Carolina, 135 Cannon Street, Charleston, SC 29425 (United States)

    2009-03-15

    Urban and rural areas may have different levels of environmental contamination and different potential sources of exposure. Many metals, i.e., arsenic (As), lead (Pb), and mercury (Hg), have well-documented negative neurological effects, and the developing fetus and young children are particularly at risk. Using a database of mother and child pairs, three areas were identified: a rural area with no increased prevalence of mental retardation and developmental delay (MR/DD) (Area A), and a rural area (Area B) and an urban area (Area C) with significantly higher prevalence of MR/DD in children as compared to the state-wide average. Areas were mapped and surface soil samples were collected from nodes of a uniform grid. Samples were analyzed for As, barium (Ba), beryllium (Be), chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), Pb, manganese (Mn), nickel (Ni), and Hg concentrations and for soil toxicity, and correlated to identify potential common sources. ArcGIS was used to determine distances between sample locations and industrial facilities, which were correlated with both metal concentrations and soil toxicity. Results indicated that all metal concentrations (except Be and Hg) in Area C were significantly greater than those in Areas A and B (p {<=} 0.0001) and that Area C had fewer correlations between metals suggesting more varied sources of metals than in rural areas. Area C also had a large number of facilities whose distances were significantly correlated with metals, particularly Cr (maximum r = 0.33; p = 0.0002), and with soil toxicity (maximum r = 0.25; p = 0.007) over a large spatial scale. Arsenic was not associated with distance to any facility and may have a different anthropogenic, or natural source. In contrast to Area C, both rural areas had lower concentrations of metals, lower soil toxicity, and a small number of facilities with significant associations between distance and soil metals.

  2. Prevalence and associated factors of Schistosomiasis among children in Yemen: implications for an effective control programme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hany Sady

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis, one of the most prevalent neglected tropical diseases, is a life-threatening public health problem in Yemen especially in rural communities. This cross-sectional study aims to determine the prevalence and associated risk factors of schistosomiasis among children in rural Yemen.Urine and faecal samples were collected from 400 children. Urine samples were examined using filtration technique for the presence of Schistosoma haematobium eggs while faecal samples were examined using formalin-ether concentration and Kato Katz techniques for the presence of S. mansoni. Demographic, socioeconomic and environmental information were collected via a validated questionnaire. Overall, 31.8% of the participants were found to be positive for schistosomiasis; 23.8% were infected with S. haematobium and 9.3% were infected with S. mansoni. Moreover, 39.5% of the participants were anaemic whereas 9.5% had hepatosplenomegaly. The prevalence of schistosomiasis was significantly higher among children aged >10 years compared to those aged ≤ 10 years (P<0.05. Multivariate analysis confirmed that presence of other infected family member (P<0.001, low household monthly income (P = 0.003, using unsafe sources for drinking water (P = 0.003, living nearby stream/spring (P = 0.006 and living nearby pool/pond (P = 0.002 were the key factors significantly associated with schistosomiasis among these children.This study reveals that schistosomiasis is still highly prevalent in Yemen. These findings support an urgent need to start an integrated, targeted and effective schistosomiasis control programme with a mission to move towards the elimination phase. Besides periodic drug distribution, health education and community mobilisation, provision of clean and safe drinking water, introduction of proper sanitation are imperative among these communities in order to curtail the transmission and morbidity caused by schistosomiasis. Screening and treating other infected

  3. Macrofauna associated with an introduced oyster, Pinctada radiata: Spatial scale implications of community differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tlig-Zouari, Sabiha; Rabaoui, Lotfi; Cosentino, Andrea; Irathni, Ikram; Ghrairi, Hafedh; Hassine, Oum Kalthoum Ben

    2011-01-01

    The macrozoobenthos associated with the introduced pearl oyster Pinctada radiata has been sampled at two different spatial scales of three sectors (order of hundreds of kilometres) and of eight localities (order of tens of kilometres). Moreover, the NW sector was selected to compare three localities with the presence of P. radiata (low density) and one locality where it was totally absent. The first design was hierarchical, with random localities nested within sectors; the second one was an asymmetrical factorial design, in which the presence/absence of Pinctada and hydrodynamism were considered. Similarity relationships were investigated by means of multivariate clustering, similarity percentage analysis and nm-MDS ordination; the two experimental designs have been tested by permutational MANOVA and analysis of dispersion (PERMDISP). Most of the variability of the associated zoobenthic community appeared to be mainly captured by local environmental factors; the meso-scale variability was more discriminating than differences at larger spatial scale. Large scale NW-SE biogeographic gradient may also have some effects in the assemblage composition. Although the whole arrangement of samples in the MDS plane showed a clear Bray-Curtis distance between the locality without Pinctada and all the remaining sites, pair-wise contrasts were not all significant. The factor "presence/absence" was not significant in this design, whereas the exposure was more indicative of differences in the local assemblage composition. These results may not confirm that the community structure variability is due to the impact of Pincata invasion because the potential and subtle community shift may be masked by the overwhelming influence of just the local environmental gradients. In spite of this, the introduced oyster may play the role of an engineer species at high densities, contributing to the complexity of the benthic habitat and influencing the trophic pattern of its fauna.

  4. The role of associative and non-associative learning in the training of horses and implications for the welfare (a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Baragli

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Horses were domesticated 6000 years ago and since then different types of approaches have been developed to enhance the horse's wellbeing and the human-horse relationship. Even though horse training is an increasingly important research area and many articles have been published on the subject, equitation is still the sport with the highest rate of human injuries, and a significant percentage of horses are sold or slaughtered due to behavioral problems. One explanation for this data is that the human-horse relationship is complex and the communication between humans and horses has not yet been accurately developed. Thus, this review addresses correct horse training based on scientific knowledge in animal learning and psychology. Specifically, it starts from the basic communication between humans and horses and then focuses on associative and non-associative learning, with many practical outcomes in horse management from the ground and under saddle. Finally, it highlights the common mistakes in the use of negative reinforcement, as well as all the implications that improper training could have on horse welfare. Increased levels of competence in horse training could be useful for equine technicians, owners, breeders, veterinarians, and scientists, in order to safeguard horse welfare, and also to reduce the number of human injuries and economic loss for civil society and the public health system.

  5. [Association of Schizophrenia and its Clinical Implications with the NOS1AP Gene in the Colombian Population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia, Jenny García; Duarte, Ana Victoria Valencia; Vila, Ana Lucía Páez; Kremeyer, Bárbara; Montoya, María Patricia Arbeláez; Linares, Andrés Ruiz; Acosta, Carlos Alberto Palacio; Duque, Jorge Ospina; Berrío, Gabriel Bedoya

    2012-06-01

    The nitric oxide synthase 1 adaptor protein (NOS1AP) gene is possibly implicated in schizophrenia etiopathogenesis. To determine the association of NOS1AP gene variants with schizophrenia and the relationship of variants with the clinical dimensions of the disorder in the Colombian population. It is a case-control study with 255 subjects per group. Markers within the NOS1AP gene were typified as well as other informative material of genetic origin so as to adjust by population stratification. A factorial analysis of the main components for each item in the Scales for Evaluating Negative Symptoms (SENS) together with the Scales for Evaluating Positive Symptoms (SEPS) to determine clinical dimensions. Association between the C/C genotype of the rs945713 marker with schizophrenia (OR = 1.79, 95% CI: 1.13 - 2.84) was found. The C/C genotype of the rs945713 was related to higher scores in the "affective flattening and alogia" dimension; and the A/A genotype of the rs4657181 marker was associated to lower scores in the same dimension. Significant associations of markers inside the NOS1AP gene with schizophrenia and the "affective flattening and alogia" clinical dimension were found. These results are consistent with previous studies and support the possibility that NOS1AP influences schizophrenia susceptibility. Furthermore, NOS1AP might be a modifier of schizophrenia clinical characteristics. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  6. DUF1220 copy number is associated with schizophrenia risk and severity: implications for understanding autism and schizophrenia as related diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Searles Quick, V B; Davis, J M; Olincy, A; Sikela, J M

    2015-12-15

    The copy number of DUF1220, a protein domain implicated in human brain evolution, has been linearly associated with autism severity. Given the possibility that autism and schizophrenia are related disorders, the present study examined DUF1220 copy number variation in schizophrenia severity. There are notable similarities between autism symptoms and schizophrenia negative symptoms, and divergence between autism symptoms and schizophrenia positive symptoms. We therefore also examined DUF1220 copy number in schizophrenia subgroups defined by negative and positive symptom features, versus autistic individuals and controls. In the schizophrenic population (N=609), decreased DUF1220 copy number was linearly associated with increasing positive symptom severity (CON1 P=0.013, HLS1 P=0.0227), an association greatest in adult-onset schizophrenia (CON1 P=0.00155, HLS1 P=0.00361). In schizophrenic males, DUF1220 CON1 subtype copy number increase was associated with increased negative symptom severity (P=0.0327), a finding similar to that seen in autistic populations. Subgroup analyses demonstrated that schizophrenic individuals with predominantly positive symptoms exhibited reduced CON1 copy number compared with both controls (P=0.0237) and schizophrenic individuals with predominantly negative symptoms (P=0.0068). These findings support the view that (1) autism and schizophrenia exhibit both opposing and partially overlapping phenotypes and may represent a disease continuum, (2) variation in DUF1220 copy number contributes to schizophrenia disease risk and to the severity of both disorders, and (3) schizophrenia and autism may be, in part, a harmful by-product of the rapid and extreme evolutionary increase in DUF1220 copy number in the human species.

  7. Several Critical Cell Types, Tissues, and Pathways Are Implicated in Genome-Wide Association Studies for Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Liu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to elucidate the cell types, tissues, and pathways influenced by common variants in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. We applied a nonparameter enrichment statistical approach, termed SNPsea, in 181 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs that have been identified to be associated with the risk of SLE through genome-wide association studies (GWAS in Eastern Asian and Caucasian populations, to manipulate the critical cell types, tissues, and pathways. In the two most significant cells’ findings (B lymphocytes and CD14+ monocytes, we subjected the GWAS association evidence in the Han Chinese population to an enrichment test of expression quantitative trait locus (QTL sites and DNase I hypersensitivity, respectively. In both Eastern Asian and Caucasian populations, we observed that the expression level of SLE GWAS implicated genes was significantly elevated in xeroderma pigentosum B cells (P ≤ 1.00 × 10−6, CD14+ monocytes (P ≤ 2.74 × 10−4 and CD19+ B cells (P ≤ 2.00 × 10−6, and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs (P ≤ 9.00 × 10−6. We revealed that the SLE GWAS-associated variants were more likely to reside in expression QTL in B lymphocytes (q1/q0 = 2.15, P = 1.23 × 10−44 and DNase I hypersensitivity sites (DHSs in CD14+ monocytes (q1/q0 = 1.41, P = 0.08. We observed the common variants affected the risk of SLE mostly through by regulating multiple immune system processes and immune response signaling. This study sheds light on several immune cells and responses, as well as the regulatory effect of common variants in the pathogenesis of SLE.

  8. Fluid retention associated with imatinib treatment in patients with gastroenterol stromal: Quantitative radiologic assessment and implications for management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyung Won; Shinagare, Atul B.; Krajewski, Katherine M.; Tirumani, Sree Harsha; Jagannathan, Jyothi P.; Ramaiya, Nikihil H. [Dept. of Imaging, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston (United States); Pyo, Jun Hee [The Institute for Clinical Research and Health Policy Studies, Tufts Medical Center, Boston (United States)

    2015-04-15

    We aimed to describe radiologic signs and time-course of imatinib-associated fluid retention (FR) in patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST), and its implications for management. In this Institutional Review Board-approved, retrospective study of 403 patients with GIST treated with imatinib, 15 patients with imaging findings of FR were identified by screening radiology reports, followed by manual confirmation. Subcutaneous edema, ascites, pleural effusion, and pericardial effusion were graded on a four-point scale on CT scans; total score was the sum of these four scores. The most common radiologic sign of FR was subcutaneous edema (15/15, 100%), followed by ascites (12/15, 80%), pleural effusion (11/15, 73%), and pericardial effusion (6/15, 40%) at the time of maximum FR. Two distinct types of FR were observed: 1) acute/progressive FR, characterized by acute aggravation of FR and rapid improvement after management, 2) intermittent/steady FR, characterized by occasional or persistent mild FR. Acute/progressive FR always occurred early after drug initiation/dose escalation (median 1.9 month, range 0.3-4.0 months), while intermittent/steady FR occurred at any time. Compared to intermittent/steady FR, acute/progressive FR was severe (median score, 5 vs. 2.5, p = 0.002), and often required drug-cessation/dose-reduction. Two distinct types (acute/progressive and intermittent/steady FR) of imatinib-associated FR are observed and each type requires different management.

  9. [Possible public health implications regarding associations between the degree of urbanisation and electronic media exposure amongst Colombian children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Luis F; Lucumí, Diego I; Parra, Diana C; Lobelo, Felipe

    2008-01-01

    Determining the association between the degree of urbanisation and excessive television-viewing and video-game use amongst children aged 5 to 12 years old. Data from the Colombian National Nutritional Survey 2005 was used in the analysis. Television viewing and video-game use was determined through parental reports for 13,090 children and classified as being excessive (e' 2 hours/day) or suitable (probability of TV or videogames being used for 2 hours or more as the degree of urbanisation increased. This association was statistically significant for urbanisation level 3 and higher (urbanisation level 2, OR=1,33: 0,89-1,99 95 %CI; urbanisation level 3, 1,35=OR: 1,00-1,80 95 %CI; urbanisation level 4, 1,61=OR: 1,16-2,23 95 %CI and urbanisation level 5, 1,7=OR: 1,17-2,46 95 %CI). Colombian children living in areas of high-to-moderate urbanisation and population density are at a higher risk of excessive exposure to electronic media entertainment. Due to its multiple health implications (in particular obesity and cardio-metabolic health), such sedentary behaviour should be monitored and its determinants in the Colombian paediatric population must be understand for making effective public health interventions.

  10. Infant mortality in South Africa--distribution, associations and policy implications, 2007: an ecological spatial analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartorius, Benn K D; Sartorius, Kurt; Chirwa, Tobias F; Fonn, Sharon

    2011-11-18

    Many sub-Saharan countries are confronted with persistently high levels of infant mortality because of the impact of a range of biological and social determinants. In particular, infant mortality has increased in sub-Saharan Africa in recent decades due to the HIV/AIDS epidemic. The geographic distribution of health problems and their relationship to potential risk factors can be invaluable for cost effective intervention planning. The objective of this paper is to determine and map the spatial nature of infant mortality in South Africa at a sub district level in order to inform policy intervention. In particular, the paper identifies and maps high risk clusters of infant mortality, as well as examines the impact of a range of determinants on infant mortality. A Bayesian approach is used to quantify the spatial risk of infant mortality, as well as significant associations (given spatial correlation between neighbouring areas) between infant mortality and a range of determinants. The most attributable determinants in each sub-district are calculated based on a combination of prevalence and model risk factor coefficient estimates. This integrated small area approach can be adapted and applied in other high burden settings to assist intervention planning and targeting. Infant mortality remains high in South Africa with seemingly little reduction since previous estimates in the early 2000's. Results showed marked geographical differences in infant mortality risk between provinces as well as within provinces as well as significantly higher risk in specific sub-districts and provinces. A number of determinants were found to have a significant adverse influence on infant mortality at the sub-district level. Following multivariable adjustment increasing maternal mortality, antenatal HIV prevalence, previous sibling mortality and male infant gender remained significantly associated with increased infant mortality risk. Of these antenatal HIV sero-prevalence, previous

  11. KLHL7 promotes TUT1 ubiquitination associated with nucleolar integrity: Implications for retinitis pigmentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jaehyun; Tsuruta, Fuminori; Okajima, Tomomi; Yano, Sarasa; Sato, Ban; Chiba, Tomoki

    2017-12-09

    Kelch-like protein 7 (KLHL7) is a component of Cul3-based Cullin-RING ubiquitin ligase. Recent studies have revealed that mutations in klhl7 gene cause several disorders, such as retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Although KLHL7 is considered to be crucial for regulating the protein homeostasis, little is known about its biological functions. In this study, we report that KLHL7 increases terminal uridylyl transferase 1 (TUT1) ubiquitination involved in nucleolar integrity. TUT1 is normally localized in nucleolus; however, expression of KLHL7 facilitates a vulnerability of nucleolar integrity, followed by a decrease of TUT1 localization in nucleolus. On the other hand, pathogenic KLHL7 mutants, which causes an onset of RP, have little effect on both nucleolar integrity and TUT1 localization. Finally, KLHL7 increases TUT1 ubiquitination levels. Taken together, these results imply that KLHL7 is a novel regulator of nucleolus associated with TUT1 ubiquitination. Our study may provide a valuable information to elucidate a pathogenic mechanism of RP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Increased drinking following social isolation rearing: implications for polydipsia associated with schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily R Hawken

    Full Text Available Primary polydipsia, excessive drinking without known medical cause, is especially associated with a diagnosis of schizophrenia. We used animal models of schizophrenia-like symptoms to examine the effects on schedule-induced polydipsia: post-weaning social isolation rearing, subchronic MK-801 treatment (an NMDA-receptor antagonist or the two combined. Male, Sprague-Dawley rats reared in groups or in isolation beginning at postnatal day 21 were further divided to receive subchronic MK-801 (0.5 mg/kg twice daily or saline for 7 days beginning on postnatal day 62. Following a 4-day withdrawal period, all groups were trained on a schedule-induced polydipsia paradigm. Under food-restriction, animals reared in isolation and receiving food pellets at 1-min intervals developed significantly more drinking behavior than those reared with others. The addition of subchronic MK-801 treatment did not significantly augment the amount of water consumed. These findings suggest a predisposition to polydipsia is a schizophrenia-like behavioral effect of post-weaning social isolation.

  13. Consumption of human milk glycoconjugates by infant-associated bifidobacteria: mechanisms and implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido, Daniel; Dallas, David C.

    2013-01-01

    Human milk is a rich source of nutrients and energy, shaped by mammalian evolution to provide all the nutritive requirements of the newborn. In addition, several molecules in breast milk act as bioactive agents, playing an important role in infant protection and guiding a proper development. While major breast milk nutrients such as lactose, lipids and proteins are readily digested and consumed by the infant, other molecules, such as human milk oligosaccharides and glycosylated proteins and lipids, can escape intestinal digestion and transit through the gastrointestinal tract. In this environment, these molecules guide the composition of the developing infant intestinal microbiota by preventing the colonization of enteric pathogens and providing carbon and nitrogen sources for other colonic commensals. Only a few bacteria, in particular Bifidobacterium species, can gain access to the energetic content of milk as it is displayed in the colon, probably contributing to their predominance in the intestinal microbiota in the first year of life. Bifidobacteria deploy exquisite molecular mechanisms to utilize human milk oligosaccharides, and recent evidence indicates that their activities also target other human milk glycoconjugates. Here, we review advances in our understanding of how these microbes have been shaped by breast milk components and the strategies associated with their consumption of milk glycoconjugates. PMID:23460033

  14. Satisfaction with Life in Orofacial Pain Disorders: Associations and Theoretical Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggero, Ian A; Rojas-Ramirez, Marcia V; de Leeuw, Reny; Carlson, Charles R

    2016-01-01

    To test if patients with masticatory myofascial pain, local myalgia, centrally mediated myalgia, disc displacement, capsulitis/synovitis, or continuous neuropathic pain differed in self-reported satisfaction with life. The study also tested if satisfaction with life was similarly predicted by measures of physical, emotional, and social functioning across disorders. Satisfaction with life, fatigue, affective distress, social support, and pain data were extracted from the medical records of 343 patients seeking treatment for chronic orofacial pain. Patients were grouped by primary diagnosis assigned following their initial appointment. Satisfaction with life was compared between disorders, with and without pain intensity entered as a covariate. Disorder-specific linear regression models using physical, emotional, and social predictors of satisfaction with life were computed. Patients with centrally mediated myalgia reported significantly lower satisfaction with life than did patients with any of the other five disorders. Inclusion of pain intensity as a covariate weakened but did not eliminate the effect. Satisfaction with life was predicted by measures of physical, emotional, and social functioning, but these associations were not consistent across disorders. Results suggest that reduced satisfaction with life in patients with centrally mediated myalgia is not due only to pain intensity. There may be other factors that predispose people to both reduced satisfaction with life and centrally mediated myalgia. Furthermore, the results suggest that satisfaction with life is differentially influenced by physical, emotional, and social functioning in different orofacial pain disorders.

  15. A Collapsar Model with Disk Wind: Implications for Supernovae Associated with Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, Tomoyasu; Maeda, Keiichi

    2018-02-01

    We construct a simple but self-consistent collapsar model for gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and SNe associated with GRBs (GRB-SNe). Our model includes a black hole, an accretion disk, and the envelope surrounding the central system. The evolutions of the different components are connected by the transfer of the mass and angular momentum. To address properties of the jet and the wind-driven SNe, we consider competition of the ram pressure from the infalling envelope and those from the jet and wind. The expected properties of the GRB jet and the wind-driven SN are investigated as a function of the progenitor mass and angular momentum. We find two conditions that should be satisfied if the wind-driven explosion is to explain the properties of the observed GRB-SNe: (1) the wind should be collimated at its base, and (2) it should not prevent further accretion even after the launch of the SN explosion. Under these conditions, some relations seen in the properties of the GRB-SNe could be reproduced by a sequence of different angular momentum in the progenitors. Only the model with the largest angular momentum could explain the observed (energetic) GRB-SNe, and we expect that the collapsar model can result in a wide variety of observational counterparts, mainly depending on the angular momentum of the progenitor star.

  16. Evolution of AF6-RAS association and its implications in mixed-lineage leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Matthew J.; Ottoni, Elizabeth; Ishiyama, Noboru; Goudreault, Marilyn; Haman, André; Meyer, Claus; Tucholska, Monika; Gasmi-Seabrook, Genevieve; Menezes, Serena; Laister, Rob C.; Minden, Mark D.; Marschalek, Rolf; Gingras, Anne-Claude; Hoang, Trang; Ikura, Mitsuhiko

    2017-10-23

    Elucidation of activation mechanisms governing protein fusions is essential for therapeutic development. MLL undergoes rearrangement with numerous partners, including a recurrent translocation fusing the epigenetic regulator to a cytoplasmic RAS effector, AF6/afadin. We show here that AF6 employs a non-canonical, evolutionarily conserved α-helix to bind RAS, unique to AF6 and the classical RASSF effectors. Further, all patients with MLL-AF6 translocations express fusion proteins missing only this helix from AF6, resulting in exposure of hydrophobic residues that induce dimerization. We provide evidence that oligomerization is the dominant mechanism driving oncogenesis from rare MLL translocation partners and employ our mechanistic understanding of MLL-AF6 to examine how dimers induce leukemia. Proteomic data resolve association of dimerized MLL with gene expression modulators, and inhibiting dimerization disrupts formation of these complexes while completely abrogating leukemogenesis in mice. Oncogenic gene translocations are thus selected under pressure from protein structure/function, underscoring the complex nature of chromosomal rearrangements.

  17. Public health implications of environmental noise associated with unconventional oil and gas development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hays, Jake; McCawley, Michael; Shonkoff, Seth B C

    2017-02-15

    Modern oil and gas development frequently occurs in close proximity to human populations and increased levels of ambient noise have been documented throughout some phases of development. Numerous studies have evaluated air and water quality degradation and human exposure pathways, but few have evaluated potential health risks and impacts from environmental noise exposure. We reviewed the scientific literature on environmental noise exposure to determine the potential concerns, if any, that noise from oil and gas development activities present to public health. Data on noise levels associated with oil and gas development are limited, but measurements can be evaluated amidst the large body of epidemiology assessing the non-auditory effects of environmental noise exposure and established public health guidelines for community noise. There are a large number of noise dependent and subjective factors that make the determination of a dose response relationship between noise and health outcomes difficult. However, the literature indicates that oil and gas activities produce noise at levels that may increase the risk of adverse health outcomes, including annoyance, sleep disturbance, and cardiovascular disease. More studies that investigate the relationships between noise exposure and human health risks from unconventional oil and gas development are warranted. Finally, policies and mitigation techniques that limit human exposure to noise from oil and gas operations should be considered to reduce health risks. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Implications of ghrelin and hexarelin in diabetes and diabetes-associated heart diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosa, Rasha Mofeed Habeeb; Zhang, Zhen; Shao, Renfu; Deng, Chao; Chen, Jiezhong; Chen, Chen

    2015-06-01

    Ghrelin and its synthetic analog hexarelin are specific ligands of growth hormone secretagogue (GHS) receptor. GHS have strong growth hormone-releasing effect and other neuroendocrine activities such as stimulatory effects on prolactin and adrenocorticotropic hormone secretion. Recently, several studies have reported other beneficial functions of GHS that are independent of GH. Ghrelin and hexarelin, for examples, have been shown to exert GH-independent cardiovascular activity. Hexarelin has been reported to regulate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ) in macrophages and adipocytes. PPAR-γ is an important regulator of adipogenesis, lipid metabolism, and insulin sensitization. Ghrelin also shows protective effects on beta cells against lipotoxicity through activation of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase/protein kinase B, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibition, and nuclear exclusion of forkhead box protein O1. Acylated ghrelin (AG) and unacylated ghrelin (UAG) administration reduces glucose levels and increases insulin-producing beta cell number, and insulin secretion in pancreatectomized rats and in newborn rats treated with streptozotocin, suggesting a possible role of GHS in pancreatic regeneration. Therefore, the discovery of GHS has opened many new perspectives in endocrine, metabolic, and cardiovascular research areas, suggesting the possible therapeutic application in diabetes and diabetic complications especially diabetic cardiomyopathy. Here, we review the physiological roles of ghrelin and hexarelin in the protection and regeneration of beta cells and their roles in the regulation of insulin release, glucose, and fat metabolism and present their potential therapeutic effects in the treatment of diabetes and diabetic-associated heart diseases.

  19. Distribution of LGR5+ cells and associated implications during the early stage of gastric tumorigenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Gun Jang

    Full Text Available Lgr5 was identified as a promising gastrointestinal tract stem cell marker in mice. Lineage tracing indicates that Lgr5(+ cells may not only be the cells responsible for the origin of tumors; they may also be the so-called cancer stem cells. In the present study, we investigated the presence of Lgr5(+ cells and their biological significance in normal human gastric mucosa and gastric tumors. RNAscope, a newly developed RNA in situ hybridization technique, specifically labeled Lgr5(+ cells at the basal glands of the gastric antrum. Notably, the number of Lgr5(+ cells was remarkably increased in intestinal metaplasia. In total, 76% of gastric adenomas and 43% of early gastric carcinomas were positive for LGR5. Lgr5(+ cells were found more frequently in low-grade tumors with active Wnt signaling and an intestinal gland type, suggesting that LGR5 is likely involved in the very early stages of Wnt-driven tumorigenesis in the stomach. Interestingly, similar to stem cells in normal tissues, Lgr5(+ cells were often restricted to the base of the tumor glands, and such Lgr5(+ restriction was associated with high levels of intestinal stem cell markers such as EPHB2, OLFM4, and ASCL2. Thus, our findings show that Lgr5(+ cells are present at the base of the antral glands in the human stomach and that this cell population significantly expands in intestinal metaplasias. Furthermore, Lgr5(+ cells are seen in a large number of gastric tumors ; their frequent basal arrangements and coexpression of ISC markers support the idea that Lgr5(+ cells act as stem cells during the early stage of intestinal-type gastric tumorigenesis.

  20. Pathophysiology of Escherichia coli ventilator-associated pneumonia: implication of highly virulent extraintestinal pathogenic strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messika, Jonathan; Magdoud, Fatma; Clermont, Olivier; Margetis, Dimitri; Gaudry, Stéphane; Roux, Damien; Branger, Catherine; Dreyfuss, Didier; Denamur, Erick; Ricard, Jean-Damien

    2012-12-01

    To characterize Escherichia coli ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) in intensive care unit (ICU) patients by determining antibioresistance and genotypic characteristics of E. coli isolates responsible for VAP or lung colonization, by comparing them with their oropharyngeal and rectal counterparts and by assessing representative isolates' virulence in a pneumonia mouse model. Patients under mechanical ventilation for more than 72 h were screened for simultaneous presence of E. coli in rectal, oropharyngeal, and respiratory samples (colonization or VAP). If present, E. coli isolates were characterized by antimicrobial susceptibility, phylogenetic grouping, and virulence factor (VF) gene content determination. BALB/c mice were challenged intranasally with 3.6 × 10(8) colony-forming units (CFU) of patients' E. coli isolates. Multisite E. coli colonization was observed in 19 % of patients (25 patients, 12 with E. coli VAP). One hundred fifteen distinct E. coli isolates were analyzed. B2 phylogenetic group was predominant, with high VF gene content and low antimicrobial resistance. Antimicrobial resistance diversity was observed in four patients with VAP. E. coli isolates from VAP patients were more frequently B2 isolates, with significantly greater VF gene content than lung colonization isolates. Among screened VF genes, iroN and sfa appeared important for lung infection. A very strong correlation (R (2) = 0.99) was found between VF gene content and mortality in the mouse model. This is the first study establishing antibioresistance and genotypic characteristics of E. coli isolates responsible for VAP in adult ICU patients. These isolates are highly virulent specific extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli strains expressing virulence factors, representing potential targets for new therapies.

  1. Position of the American Dietetic Association: health implications of dietary fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavin, Joanne L

    2008-10-01

    It is the position of the American Dietetic Association that the public should consume adequate amounts of dietary fiber from a variety of plant foods. Populations that consume more dietary fiber have less chronic disease. In addition, intake of dietary fiber has beneficial effects on risk factors for developing several chronic diseases. Dietary Reference Intakes recommend consumption of 14 g dietary fiber per 1,000 kcal, or 25 g for adult women and 38 g for adult men, based on epidemiologic studies showing protection against cardiovascular disease. Appropriate kinds and amounts of dietary fiber for children, the critically ill, and the very old are unknown. The Dietary Reference Intakes for fiber are based on recommended energy intake, not clinical fiber studies. Usual intake of dietary fiber in the United States is only 15 g/day. Although solubility of fiber was thought to determine physiological effect, more recent studies suggest other properties of fiber, perhaps fermentability or viscosity are important parameters. High-fiber diets provide bulk, are more satiating, and have been linked to lower body weights. Evidence that fiber decreases cancer is mixed and further research is needed. Healthy children and adults can achieve adequate dietary fiber intakes by increasing variety in daily food patterns. Dietary messages to increase consumption of high-fiber foods such as whole grains, legumes, fruits, and vegetables should be broadly supported by food and nutrition professionals. Consumers are also turning to fiber supplements and bulk laxatives as additional fiber sources. Few fiber supplements have been studied for physiological effectiveness, so the best advice is to consume fiber in foods. Look for physiological studies of effectiveness before selecting functional fibers in dietetics practice.

  2. Indicators to measure risk of disaster associated with drought: Implications for the health sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sena, Aderita; Ebi, Kristie L; Freitas, Carlos; Corvalan, Carlos; Barcellos, Christovam

    2017-01-01

    Brazil has a large semiarid region, which covers part of 9 states, over 20% of the 5565 municipalities in the country and at 22.5 million persons, 12% of the country's population. This region experiences recurrent and extended droughts and is characterized by low economic development, scarcity of natural resources including water, and difficult agricultural and livestock production. Local governments and communities need easily obtainable tools to aid their decision making process in managing risks associated with drought. To inform decision-making at the level of municipalities, we investigated factors contributing to the health risks of drought. We used education and poverty indicators to measure vulnerability, number of drought damage evaluations and historical drought occurrences as indicators of hazard, and access to water as an indicator of exposure, to derive a drought disaster risk index. Indicators such as access to piped water, illiteracy and poverty show marked differences in most states and, in nearly all states, the living conditions of communities in the semiarid region are worse than in the rest of each state. There are municipalities at high drought disaster risk in every state and there are a larger number of municipalities at higher risks from the center to the north of the semiarid region. Understanding local hazards, exposures and vulnerabilities provides the means to understand local communities' risks and develop interventions to reduce them. In addition, communities in these regions need to be empowered to add their traditional knowledge to scientific tools, and to identify the actions most relevant to their needs and realities.

  3. Indicators to measure risk of disaster associated with drought: Implications for the health sector.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aderita Sena

    Full Text Available Brazil has a large semiarid region, which covers part of 9 states, over 20% of the 5565 municipalities in the country and at 22.5 million persons, 12% of the country's population. This region experiences recurrent and extended droughts and is characterized by low economic development, scarcity of natural resources including water, and difficult agricultural and livestock production. Local governments and communities need easily obtainable tools to aid their decision making process in managing risks associated with drought.To inform decision-making at the level of municipalities, we investigated factors contributing to the health risks of drought. We used education and poverty indicators to measure vulnerability, number of drought damage evaluations and historical drought occurrences as indicators of hazard, and access to water as an indicator of exposure, to derive a drought disaster risk index.Indicators such as access to piped water, illiteracy and poverty show marked differences in most states and, in nearly all states, the living conditions of communities in the semiarid region are worse than in the rest of each state. There are municipalities at high drought disaster risk in every state and there are a larger number of municipalities at higher risks from the center to the north of the semiarid region.Understanding local hazards, exposures and vulnerabilities provides the means to understand local communities' risks and develop interventions to reduce them. In addition, communities in these regions need to be empowered to add their traditional knowledge to scientific tools, and to identify the actions most relevant to their needs and realities.

  4. Radiotracer dose reduction in integrated PET/MR: implications from national electrical manufacturers association phantom studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehmigen, Mark; Ziegler, Susanne; Jakoby, Bjoern W; Georgi, Jens-Christoph; Paulus, Daniel H; Quick, Harald H

    2014-08-01

    With the replacement of ionizing CT by MR imaging, integrated PET/MR in selected clinical applications may reduce the overall patient radiation dose when compared with PET/CT. Further potential for radiotracer dose reduction, while maintaining PET image quality (IQ) in integrated PET/MR, may be achieved by increasing the PET acquisition duration to match the longer time needed for MR data acquisition. To systematically verify this hypothesis under controlled conditions, this dose-reduction study was performed using a standardized phantom following the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) IQ protocol. All measurements were performed on an integrated PET/MR whole-body hybrid system. The NEMA IQ phantom was filled with water and a total activity of 50.35 MBq of (18)F-FDG. The sphere-to-background activity ratio was 8:1. Multiple PET data blocks of 20-min acquisition time were acquired in list-mode format and were started periodically at multiples of the (18)F-FDG half-lives. Different sinograms (2, 4, 8, and 16 min in duration) were reconstructed. Attenuation correction of the filled NEMA phantom was performed using a CT-based attenuation map template. The attenuation-corrected PET images were then quantitatively evaluated following the NEMA IQ protocol, investigating contrast recovery, background variability, and signal-to-noise ratio. Image groups with half the activity and twice the acquisition time were evaluated. For better statistics, the experiment was repeated 3 times. Contrast recovery, background variability, and signal-to-noise ratio remained almost constant over 3 half-life periods when the decreasing radiotracer activity (100%, 50%, 25%, and 12.5%) was compensated by increasing acquisition time (2, 4, 8, and 16 min). The variation of contrast recovery over 3 half-life periods was small (-6% to +7%), with a mean variation of 2%, compared with the reference setting (100%, 2 min). The signal-to-noise ratio of the hot spheres showed only minor

  5. Meth/amphetamine use and associated HIV: Implications for global policy and public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degenhardt, Louisa; Mathers, Bradley; Guarinieri, Mauro; Panda, Samiran; Phillips, Benjamin; Strathdee, Steffanie A; Tyndall, Mark; Wiessing, Lucas; Wodak, Alex; Howard, John

    2010-09-01

    Amphetamine type stimulants (ATS) have become the focus of increasing attention worldwide. There are understandable concerns over potential harms including the transmission of HIV. However, there have been no previous global reviews of the extent to which these drugs are injected or levels of HIV among users. A comprehensive search of the international peer-reviewed and grey literature was undertaken. Multiple electronic databases were searched and documents and datasets were provided by UN agencies and key experts from around the world in response to requests for information on the epidemiology of use. Amphetamine or methamphetamine (meth/amphetamine, M/A) use was documented in 110 countries, and injection in 60 of those. Use may be more prevalent in East and South East Asia, North America, South Africa, New Zealand, Australia and a number of European countries. In countries where the crystalline form is available, evidence suggests users are more likely to smoke or inject the drug; in such countries, higher levels of dependence may be occurring. Equivocal evidence exists as to whether people who inject M/A are at differing risk of HIV infection than other drug injectors; few countries document HIV prevalence/incidence among M/A injectors. High risk sexual behaviour among M/A users may contribute to increased risk of HIV infection, but available evidence is not sufficient to determine if the association is causal. A range of possible responses to M/A use and harm are discussed, ranging from supply and precursor control, to demand and harm reduction. Evidence suggests that complex issues surround M/A, requiring novel and sophisticated approaches, which have not yet been met with sufficient investment of time or resources to address them. Significant levels of M/A in many countries require a response to reduce harms that in many cases remain poorly understood. More active models of engagement with M/A users and provision of services that meet their specific needs

  6. CLINICAL IMPLICATION OF FATTY ACID CHANGES IN PATIENTS WITH PRIMARY GOUT ASSOCIATED WITH ARTERIAL HYPERTENSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. N. Kushnarenko

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study blood levels of non-esterified fatty acids (NEFAs and adenyl nucleotides, and fatty acids levels in lipids of erythrocyte membranes in patients with primary gout associated with arterial hypertension (HT. Material and methods. 175 male patients with primary gout were included in the study. According to 24-hour blood pressure (BP monitoring results patients were split into two groups: 74 patients with normal BP (group 1 and 101 patients with HT (group 2. 29 healthy age-comparable subjects were included into control group. Uric acid, total NEFAs and glycerol blood levels were studied in all patients. Adenyl nucleotides (ATP , ADP and AMP levels were determined in erythrocytes. Higher fatty acid levels were specified in lipids of erythrocyte membranes, including the following acids: myristinic (С14:0, palmitinic (С16:0, stearic (С18:0, pentadecanic (С15:0, heptadecanic (С17:0, pentadecenic (С15:1, heptadecenic (С17:1, palmitooleic (С16:1, oleic (С18:1, linoleic (С18:2ω6, α-linolenic (С18:3ω3, γ-linolenic (С18:3ω6, dihomo-γ-linolenic (С20:3ω6, arachidonic (С20:4ω6, eicosapentaenoic (С20:5ω3, and docosapentaenoic (С22:5ω3. Results and discussion. Hypertensive patients with gout demonstrated higher NEFAs blood level and greater changes in ATP-ADP-AMP system than normotensive gout patients and healthy subjects as well as 2.2 and 3.7 times higher NEFAs/ATP ratio, respectively. In hypertensive patients with primary gout the composition of fatty acids in erythrocyte membranes lipids changed due to increase in saturated fatty acids amount and decrease in unsaturated fatty acids amount, at that monoenic acid levels increased while polyenic acid levels decreased in unsaturated acids composition. Hypertensive patients with gout shown 1.3 and 2.5 times less levels of ω-3 poly-unsaturated fatty acids (PUFA than normotensive gout patients and healthy subjects, respectively. At the same time ω-6 PUFA levels changed in

  7. No evidence that protein truncating variants in BRIP1 are associated with breast cancer risk: implications for gene panel testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easton, Douglas F; Lesueur, Fabienne; Decker, Brennan; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Li, Jun; Allen, Jamie; Luccarini, Craig; Pooley, Karen A; Shah, Mitul; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Ahmad, Jamil; Thompson, Ella R; Damiola, Francesca; Pertesi, Maroulio; Voegele, Catherine; Mebirouk, Noura; Robinot, Nivonirina; Durand, Geoffroy; Forey, Nathalie; Luben, Robert N; Ahmed, Shahana; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Baynes, Caroline; Beckman, Matthias W; Benitez, Javier; Van Den Berg, David; Blot, William J; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Bojesen, Stig E; Brenner, Hermann; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chia, Kee Seng; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Conroy, Don M; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Devilee, Peter; Eriksson, Mikael; Fasching, Peter A; Figueroa, Jonine; Flyger, Henrik; Fostira, Florentia; García-Closas, Montserrat; Giles, Graham G; Glendon, Gord; González-Neira, Anna; Guénel, Pascal; Haiman, Christopher A; Hall, Per; Hart, Steven N; Hartman, Mikael; Hooning, Maartje J; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Ito, Hidemi; Jakubowska, Anna; James, Paul A; John, Esther M; Johnson, Nichola; Jones, Michael; Kabisch, Maria; Kang, Daehee; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kristensen, Vessela; Lambrechts, Diether; Li, Na; Lindblom, Annika; Long, Jirong; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Lubinski, Jan; Mannermaa, Arto; Manoukian, Siranoush; Margolin, Sara; Matsuo, Keitaro; Meindl, Alfons; Mitchell, Gillian; Muir, Kenneth; Nevelsteen, Ines; van den Ouweland, Ans; Peterlongo, Paolo; Phuah, Sze Yee; Pylkäs, Katri; Rowley, Simone M; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Schmutzler, Rita K; Shen, Chen-Yang; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Southey, Melissa C; Surowy, Harald; Swerdlow, Anthony; Teo, Soo H; Tollenaar, Rob A E M; Tomlinson, Ian; Torres, Diana; Truong, Thérèse; Vachon, Celine; Verhoef, Senno; Wong-Brown, Michelle; Zheng, Wei; Zheng, Ying; Nevanlinna, Heli; Scott, Rodney J; Andrulis, Irene L; Wu, Anna H; Hopper, John L; Couch, Fergus J; Winqvist, Robert; Burwinkel, Barbara; Sawyer, Elinor J; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Rudolph, Anja; Dörk, Thilo; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Neuhausen, Susan L; Milne, Roger L; Fletcher, Olivia; Pharoah, Paul D P; Campbell, Ian G; Dunning, Alison M; Le Calvez-Kelm, Florence; Goldgar, David E; Tavtigian, Sean V; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia

    2016-01-01

    Background BRCA1 interacting protein C-terminal helicase 1 (BRIP1) is one of the Fanconi Anaemia Complementation (FANC) group family of DNA repair proteins. Biallelic mutations in BRIP1 are responsible for FANC group J, and previous studies have also suggested that rare protein truncating variants in BRIP1 are associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. These studies have led to inclusion of BRIP1 on targeted sequencing panels for breast cancer risk prediction. Methods We evaluated a truncating variant, p.Arg798Ter (rs137852986), and 10 missense variants of BRIP1, in 48 144 cases and 43 607 controls of European origin, drawn from 41 studies participating in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC). Additionally, we sequenced the coding regions of BRIP1 in 13 213 cases and 5242 controls from the UK, 1313 cases and 1123 controls from three population-based studies as part of the Breast Cancer Family Registry, and 1853 familial cases and 2001 controls from Australia. Results The rare truncating allele of rs137852986 was observed in 23 cases and 18 controls in Europeans in BCAC (OR 1.09, 95% CI 0.58 to 2.03, p=0.79). Truncating variants were found in the sequencing studies in 34 cases (0.21%) and 19 controls (0.23%) (combined OR 0.90, 95% CI 0.48 to 1.70, p=0.75). Conclusions These results suggest that truncating variants in BRIP1, and in particular p.Arg798Ter, are not associated with a substantial increase in breast cancer risk. Such observations have important implications for the reporting of results from breast cancer screening panels. PMID:26921362

  8. Changes in heart rate variability associated with acute alcohol consumption: current knowledge and implications for practice and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanowicz, Magdalena; Schmidt, John E; Bostwick, John M; Mrazek, David A; Karpyak, Victor M

    2011-06-01

    Alcohol consumption is associated with a broad array of physiologic and behavioral effects including changes in heart rate. However, the physiologic mechanisms of alcohol effects and the reasons for individual differences in the cardiac response remain unknown. Measuring changes in resting heart rate (measured as beats/min) has not been found to be as sensitive to alcohol's effects as changes in heart rate variability (HRV). HRV is defined as fluctuations in interbeat interval length which reflect the heart's response to extracardiac factors that affect heart rate. HRV allows simultaneous assessment of both sympathetic and parasympathetic activity and the interplay between them. Increased HRV has been associated with exercise and aerobic fitness, while decreased HRV has been associated with aging, chronic stress, and a wide variety of medical and psychiatric disorders. Decreased HRV has predictive value for mortality in general population samples and patients with myocardial infarction and used as an indicator of altered autonomic function. A significant inverse correlation was found between HRV and both the severity of depression and the duration of the depressive episode. HRV analysis provides insights into mechanisms of autonomic regulation and is extensively used to clarify relationships between depression and cardiovascular disease. This article will review the methodology of HRV measurements and contemporary knowledge about effects of acute alcohol consumption on HRV. Potential implications of this research include HRV response to alcohol that could serve as a marker for susceptibility to alcoholism. At present however there is almost no research data supporting this hypothesis. Copyright © 2011 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  9. Clinical Implications of Associations between Headache and Gastrointestinal Disorders: A Study Using the Hallym Smart Clinical Data Warehouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Hwa Lee

    2017-10-01

    gastritis was significantly higher in patients with TTH compared with controls (p < 0.001. However, no differences were observed in the prevalence of HP infection between the groups.ConclusionThe observed association in this study may suggest that primary headache sufferers who experience migraines or TTH are more prone to GI disorders, which may have various clinical implications. Further research concerning the etiology of the association between headaches and GI disorders is warranted.

  10. Clinical Implications of Associations between Headache and Gastrointestinal Disorders: A Study Using the Hallym Smart Clinical Data Warehouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Hwa; Lee, Jae-June; Kwon, Youngsuk; Kim, Jong-Ho; Sohn, Jong-Hee

    2017-01-01

    higher in patients with TTH compared with controls ( p  < 0.001). However, no differences were observed in the prevalence of HP infection between the groups. The observed association in this study may suggest that primary headache sufferers who experience migraines or TTH are more prone to GI disorders, which may have various clinical implications. Further research concerning the etiology of the association between headaches and GI disorders is warranted.

  11. Ethanol exposure induces the cancer-associated fibroblast phenotype and lethal tumor metabolism: implications for breast cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Alvarez, Rosa; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Lin, Zhao; Lamb, Rebecca; Hulit, James; Howell, Anthony; Sotgia, Federica; Rubin, Emanuel; Lisanti, Michael P

    2013-01-15

    Little is known about how alcohol consumption promotes the onset of human breast cancer(s). One hypothesis is that ethanol induces metabolic changes in the tumor microenvironment, which then enhances epithelial tumor growth. To experimentally test this hypothesis, we used a co-culture system consisting of human breast cancer cells (MCF7) and hTERT-immortalized fibroblasts. Here, we show that ethanol treatment (100 mM) promotes ROS production and oxidative stress in cancer-associated fibroblasts, which is sufficient to induce myofibroblastic differentiation. Oxidative stress in stromal fibroblasts also results in the onset of autophagy/mitophagy, driving the induction of ketone body production in the tumor microenvironment. Interestingly, ethanol has just the opposite effect in epithelial cancer cells, where it confers autophagy resistance, elevates mitochondrial biogenesis and induces key enzymes associated with ketone re-utilization (ACAT1/OXCT1). During co-culture, ethanol treatment also converts MCF7 cells from an ER(+) to an ER(-) status, which is thought to be associated with "stemness," more aggressive behavior and a worse prognosis. Thus, ethanol treatment induces ketone production in cancer-associated fibroblasts and ketone re-utilization in epithelial cancer cells, fueling tumor cell growth via oxidative mitochondrial metabolism (OXPHOS). This "two-compartment" metabolic model is consistent with previous historical observations that ethanol is first converted to acetaldehyde (which induces oxidative stress) and then ultimately to acetyl-CoA (a high-energy mitochondrial fuel), or can be used to synthesize ketone bodies. As such, our results provide a novel mechanism by which alcohol consumption could metabolically convert "low-risk" breast cancer patients to "high-risk" status, explaining tumor recurrence or disease progression. Hence, our findings have clear implications for both breast cancer prevention and therapy. Remarkably, our results also show that

  12. Highly drug-resistant pathogens implicated in burn-associated bacteremia in an Iraqi burn care unit.

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    Jean-Baptiste Ronat

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: In low- and middle-income countries, bloodstream infections are an important cause of mortality in patients with burns. Increasingly implicated in burn-associated infections are highly drug-resistant pathogens with limited treatment options. We describe the epidemiology of bloodstream infections in patients with burns in a humanitarian surgery project in Iraq. METHODS: We performed a retrospective, descriptive study of blood culture isolates identified between July 2008 and September 2009 among patients with burns in a single hospital in Iraq who developed sepsis. RESULTS: In 1169 inpatients admitted to the burn unit during the study period, 212 (18% had suspected sepsis, and 65 (6% had confirmed bacteremia. Sepsis was considered the primary cause of death in 198 patients (65%; 95% CI 65-70 of the 304 patients that died. The most commonly isolated organisms were Pseudomonas aeruginosa (22 isolates [34%], Staphylococcus aureus (17 [26%], Klebsiella pneumoniae (8 [12%], Staphylococcus epidermidis (7 [11%], Acinetobacter baumannii (6 [9%], and Enterobacter cloacae (5 [8%]. A high proportion of Enterobacteriaceae strains produced extended-spectrum beta-lactamase and S. aureus isolates were uniformly methicillin-resistant. For gram-negative bacteria, the most reliably active antibiotics were imipenen and amikacin. CONCLUSIONS: Burn patients with sepsis in Iraq were commonly found to have bloodstream pathogens resistant to most antibiotics available locally. Effective empirical therapy of burn sepsis in this region of Iraq would consist of vancomycin or teicoplanin and a carbapenem-class antibiotic with antipseudomonal activity.

  13. Mutations in presenilin 2 and its implications in Alzheimer’s disease and other dementia-associated disorders

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    Cai Y

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Yan Cai,1 Seong Soo A An,1 SangYun Kim2 1Department of Bionano Technology, Gachon Medical Research Institute, Gachon University, 2Department of Neurology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do, South Korea Abstract: Alzheimer’s disease (AD is the most common form of dementia. Mutations in the genes encoding presenilin 1 (PSEN1, presenilin 2 (PSEN2, and amyloid precursor protein have been identified as the main genetic causes of familial AD. To date, more than 200 mutations have been described worldwide in PSEN1, which is highly homologous with PSEN2, while mutations in PSEN2 have been rarely reported. We performed a systematic review of studies describing the mutations identified in PSEN2. Most PSEN2 mutations were detected in European and in African populations. Only two were found in Korean populations. Interestingly, PSEN2 mutations appeared not only in AD patients but also in patients with other disorders, including frontotemporal dementia, dementia with Lewy bodies, breast cancer, dilated cardiomyopathy, and Parkinson’s disease with dementia. Here, we have summarized the PSEN2 mutations and the potential implications of these mutations in dementia-associated disorders. Keywords: mutations in presenilin 2, Alzheimer’s disease

  14. Herpesviruses dUTPases: A New Family of Pathogen-Associated Molecular Pattern (PAMP Proteins with Implications for Human Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marshall V. Williams

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The human herpesviruses are ubiquitous viruses and have a prevalence of over 90% in the adult population. Following a primary infection they establish latency and can be reactivated over a person’s lifetime. While it is well accepted that human herpesviruses are implicated in numerous diseases ranging from dermatological and autoimmune disease to cancer, the role of lytic proteins in the pathophysiology of herpesvirus-associated diseases remains largely understudies. Only recently have we begun to appreciate the importance of lytic proteins produced during reactivation of the virus, in particular the deoxyuridine triphosphate nucleotidohydrolases (dUTPase, as key modulators of the host innate and adaptive immune responses. In this review, we provide evidence from animal and human studies of the Epstein–Barr virus as a prototype, supporting the notion that herpesviruses dUTPases are a family of proteins with unique immunoregulatory functions that can alter the inflammatory microenvironment and thus exacerbate the immune pathology of herpesvirus-related diseases including myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome, autoimmune diseases, and cancer.

  15. Multiple Intelligences (MI of Associate in Hotel and Restaurant Management Students & Its Implication to the Teaching of Oral Communication

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    Juvy G. Mojares

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A number of educators argue that MI helps students build positive attitudes toward learning in English class. A study says that “Students who are using their areas of strength to learn feel more competent and confident and enjoy the challenge of acquiring new information”. This study sought to find out the MI of selected Associate in Hotel and Restaurant Management (AHRMstudents. It also delved on the implication of MI to the teaching of the subject. The research design used was basically a descriptive method employing an adopted MI survey form administered to Oral Communication students. There were five sections of second year AHRM students. Out of 196 students, 111 were selected to answer the survey questions by the use of the combination of stratified random sampling and the Slovin’s formula. Results showed that the top three intelligences the respondents have based on their scores are intrapersonal, followed by bodily/kinesthetic and logical/mathematical intelligences; least of the intelligences are verbal/linguistic and visual/spatial.This implied that teaching of Oral Communication should nurture the intrapersonal intelligence and more importantly should enhance and develop the verbal strength of the AHRM students. Teaching should focus more on improving communication skills with others, and not just within themselves.

  16. Multiple factors are involved in the dysarthria associated with Parkinson's disease: a review with implications for clinical practice and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapir, Shimon

    2014-08-01

    Motor speech abnormalities are highly common and debilitating in individuals with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD). These abnormalities, collectively termed hypokinetic dysarthria (HKD), have been traditionally attributed to hypokinesia and bradykinesia secondary to muscle rigidity and dopamine deficits. However, the role of rigidity and dopamine in the development of HKD is far from clear. The purpose of the present study was to offer an alternative view of the factors underlying HKD. The authors conducted an extensive, but not exhaustive, review of the literature to examine the evidence for the traditional view versus the alternative view. The review suggests that HKD is a highly complex and variable phenomenon including multiple factors, such as scaling and maintaining movement amplitude and effort; preplanning and initiation of movements; internal cueing; sensory and temporal processing; automaticity; emotive vocalization; and attention to action (vocal vigilance). Although not part of the dysarthria, nonmotor factors, such as depression, aging, and cognitive-linguistic abnormalities, are likely to contribute to the overall speech symptomatology associated with IPD. These findings have important implications for clinical practice and research.

  17. Type B lamins remain associated with the integral nuclear envelope protein p58 during mitosis: implications for nuclear reassembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, J; Georgatos, S D

    1994-04-15

    p58 (also referred to as the lamin B receptor) is an integral membrane protein of the nuclear envelope known to form a multimeric complex with the lamins and other nuclear proteins during interphase. To examine the fate of this complex during mitosis, we have investigated the partitioning and the molecular interactions of p58 in dividing chicken hepatoma (DU249) cells. Using confocal microscopy and double immunolabelling, we show here that lamins B1 and B2 co-localize with p58 during all phases of mitosis and co-assemble around reforming nuclei. A close juxtaposition of p58/lamin B-containing vesicles and chromosomes is already detectable in metaphase; however, p58 and lamin reassembly proceeds slowly and is completed in late telophase--G1. Flotation of mitotic membranes in sucrose density gradients and analysis of mitotic vesicles by immunoelectron microscopy confirms that p58 and most of the type B lamins reside in the same compartment. Co-immunoprecipitation of both proteins by affinity-purified anti-p58 antibodies shows that they are physically associated in the context of a mitotic p58 'sub-complex'. This sub-assembly does not include the type A lamins which are fully solubilized during mitosis. Our data provide direct, in vivo and in vitro evidence that the majority of type B lamins remain connected to nuclear membrane 'receptors' during mitosis. The implications of these findings in nuclear envelope reassembly are discussed below.

  18. The GW170817/GRB 170817A/AT 2017gfo Association: Some Implications for Physics and Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Zhang, Fu-Wen; Wang, Yuan-Zhu; Shen, Zhao-Qiang; Liang, Yun-Feng; Li, Xiang; Liao, Neng-Hui; Jin, Zhi-Ping; Yuan, Qiang; Zou, Yuan-Chuan; Fan, Yi-Zhong; Wei, Da-Ming

    2017-12-01

    On 2017 August 17, a gravitational-wave event (GW170817) and an associated short gamma-ray burst (GRB 170817A) from a binary neutron star merger had been detected. The follow-up optical/infrared observations also identified the macronova/kilonova emission (AT 2017gfo). In this work, we discuss some implications of the remarkable GW170817/GRB 170817A/AT 2017gfo association. We show that the ∼1.7 s time delay between the gravitational-wave (GW) and GRB signals imposes very tight constraints on the superluminal movement of gravitational waves (i.e., the relative departure of GW velocity from the speed of light is ≤slant 4.3× {10}-16) or the possible violation of the weak equivalence principle (i.e., the difference of the gamma-ray and GW trajectories in the gravitational field of the galaxy and the local universe should be within a factor of ∼ 3.4× {10}-9). The so-called Dark Matter Emulators and a class of contender models for cosmic acceleration (“Covariant Galileon”) are ruled out as well. The successful identification of lanthanide elements in the macronova/kilonova spectrum also excludes the possibility that the progenitors of GRB 170817A are a binary strange star system. The high neutron star merger rate (inferred from both the local sGRB data and the gravitational-wave data) together with the significant ejected mass strongly suggest that such mergers are the prime sites of heavy r-process nucleosynthesis.

  19. Genome-wide association analysis in dogs implicates 99 loci as risk variants for anterior cruciate ligament rupture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Lauren A.; Kirkpatrick, Brian; Rosa, Guilherme J. M.; Gianola, Daniel; Valente, Bruno; Sumner, Julia P.; Baltzer, Wendy; Hao, Zhengling; Binversie, Emily E.; Volstad, Nicola; Piazza, Alexander; Sample, Susannah J.

    2017-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture is a common condition that can be devastating and life changing, particularly in young adults. A non-contact mechanism is typical. Second ACL ruptures through rupture of the contralateral ACL or rupture of a graft repair is also common. Risk of rupture is increased in females. ACL rupture is also common in dogs. Disease prevalence exceeds 5% in several dog breeds, ~100 fold higher than human beings. We provide insight into the genetic etiology of ACL rupture by genome-wide association study (GWAS) in a high-risk breed using 98 case and 139 control Labrador Retrievers. We identified 129 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within 99 risk loci. Associated loci (P<5E-04) explained approximately half of phenotypic variance in the ACL rupture trait. Two of these loci were located in uncharacterized or non-coding regions of the genome. A chromosome 24 locus containing nine genes with diverse functions met genome-wide significance (P = 3.63E-0.6). GWAS pathways were enriched for c-type lectins, a gene set that includes aggrecan, a gene set encoding antimicrobial proteins, and a gene set encoding membrane transport proteins with a variety of physiological functions. Genotypic risk estimated for each dog based on the risk contributed by each GWAS locus showed clear separation of ACL rupture cases and controls. Power analysis of the GWAS data set estimated that ~172 loci explain the genetic contribution to ACL rupture in the Labrador Retriever. Heritability was estimated at 0.48. We conclude ACL rupture is a moderately heritable highly polygenic complex trait. Our results implicate c-type lectin pathways in ACL homeostasis. PMID:28379989

  20. Genome-wide association analysis in dogs implicates 99 loci as risk variants for anterior cruciate ligament rupture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren A Baker

    Full Text Available Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL rupture is a common condition that can be devastating and life changing, particularly in young adults. A non-contact mechanism is typical. Second ACL ruptures through rupture of the contralateral ACL or rupture of a graft repair is also common. Risk of rupture is increased in females. ACL rupture is also common in dogs. Disease prevalence exceeds 5% in several dog breeds, ~100 fold higher than human beings. We provide insight into the genetic etiology of ACL rupture by genome-wide association study (GWAS in a high-risk breed using 98 case and 139 control Labrador Retrievers. We identified 129 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs within 99 risk loci. Associated loci (P<5E-04 explained approximately half of phenotypic variance in the ACL rupture trait. Two of these loci were located in uncharacterized or non-coding regions of the genome. A chromosome 24 locus containing nine genes with diverse functions met genome-wide significance (P = 3.63E-0.6. GWAS pathways were enriched for c-type lectins, a gene set that includes aggrecan, a gene set encoding antimicrobial proteins, and a gene set encoding membrane transport proteins with a variety of physiological functions. Genotypic risk estimated for each dog based on the risk contributed by each GWAS locus showed clear separation of ACL rupture cases and controls. Power analysis of the GWAS data set estimated that ~172 loci explain the genetic contribution to ACL rupture in the Labrador Retriever. Heritability was estimated at 0.48. We conclude ACL rupture is a moderately heritable highly polygenic complex trait. Our results implicate c-type lectin pathways in ACL homeostasis.

  1. Population structure and linkage disequilibrium in oat (Avena sativa L.): implications for genome-wide association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, M A; Cook, D; Tinker, N A; Jannink, J-L

    2011-02-01

    The level of population structure and the extent of linkage disequilibrium (LD) can have large impacts on the power, resolution, and design of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in plants. Until recently, the topics of LD and population structure have not been explored in oat due to the lack of a high-throughput, high-density marker system. The objectives of this research were to survey the level of population structure and the extent of LD in oat germplasm and determine their implications for GWAS. In total, 1,205 lines and 402 diversity array technology (DArT) markers were used to explore population structure. Principal component analysis and model-based cluster analysis of these data indicated that, for the lines used in this study, relatively weak population structure exists. To explore LD decay, map distances of 2,225 linked DArT marker pairs were compared with LD (estimated as r²). Results showed that LD between linked markers decayed rapidly to r² = 0.2 for marker pairs with a map distance of 1.0 centi-Morgan (cM). For GWAS, we suggest a minimum of one marker every cM, but higher densities of markers should increase marker-QTL association and therefore detection power. Additionally, it was found that LD was relatively consistent across the majority of germplasm clusters. These findings suggest that GWAS in oat can include germplasm with diverse origins and backgrounds. The results from this research demonstrate the feasibility of GWAS and related analyses in oat.

  2. Emotion regulatory function of parent attention to child pain and associated implications for parental pain control behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vervoort, Tine; Trost, Zina; Sütterlin, Stefan; Caes, Line; Moors, Agnes

    2014-08-01

    We investigated the function of parental attention to child pain in regulating parental distress and pain control behaviour when observing their child performing a painful (cold pressor) task (CPT); we also studied the moderating role of parental state anxiety. Participants were 62 schoolchildren and one of their parents. Parental attention towards or away from child pain (ie, attend to pain vs avoid pain) was experimentally manipulated during a viewing task pairing unfamiliar children's neutral and pain faces. Before and after the viewing task, parental distress regulation was assessed by heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV). In a subsequent phase, parents observed their own child perform a CPT task, allowing assessment of parental pain control behaviour (indexed by latency to stop their child's CPT performance) and parental distress, which was assessed via self-report before and after observation of child CPT performance. Eye tracking during the viewing task and self-reported attention to own child's pain confirmed successful attention manipulation. Further, findings indicated that the effect of attentional strategy on parental emotion regulation (indexed by HR, self-report) and pain control behaviour depended on parents' state anxiety. Specifically, whereas low anxious parents reported more distress and demonstrated more pain control behaviour in the Attend to Pain condition, high anxious parents reported more distress and showed more pain control behaviour in the Avoid Pain condition. This inverse pattern was likewise apparent in physiological distress indices (HR) in response to the initial viewing task. Theoretical/clinical implications and further research directions are discussed. Copyright © 2014 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. SYSTEMIC INFLAMMATION IMPAIRS ATTENTION AND COGNITIVE FLEXIBILITY BUT NOT ASSOCIATIVE LEARNING IN AGED RATS: Possible Implications for Delirium

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    Deborah J Culley

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Delirium is a common and morbid condition in elderly hospitalized patients. Its pathophysiology is poorly understood but inflammation has been implicated based on a clinical association with systemic infection and surgery and preclinical data showing that systemic inflammation adversely affects hippocampus-dependent memory. However, clinical manifestations and imaging studies point to abnormalities not in the hippocampus but in cortical circuits. We therefore tested the hypothesis that systemic inflammation impairs prefrontal cortex function by assessing attention and executive function in aged animals. Aged (24-month-old Fischer-344 rats received a single intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 50 ug/kg or saline and were tested on the attentional shifting task (AST, an index of integrity of the prefrontal cortex, on days 1-3 post-injection. Plasma and frontal cortex concentrations of the cytokine TNFα and the chemokine CCL2 were measured by ELISA in separate groups of identically treated, age-matched rats. LPS selectively impaired reversal learning and attentional shifts without affecting discrimination learning in the AST, indicating a deficit in attention and cognitive flexibility but not learning globally. LPS increased plasma TNFα and CCL2 acutely but this resolved within 24-48 h. TNFα in the frontal cortex did not change whereas CCL2 increased nearly 3-fold 2 h after LPS but normalized by the time behavioral testing started 24 h later. Together, our data indicate that systemic inflammation selectively impairs attention and executive function in aged rodents and that the cognitive deficit is independent of concurrent changes in frontal cortical TNFα and CCL2. Because inattention is a prominent feature of clinical delirium, our data support a role for inflammation in the pathogenesis of this clinical syndrome and suggest this animal model could be useful for studying that relationship further.

  4. Gene-based association study for lipid traits in diverse cohorts implicates BACE1 and SIDT2 regulation in triglyceride levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Andaleon

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasma lipid levels are risk factors for cardiovascular disease, a leading cause of death worldwide. While many studies have been conducted on lipid genetics, they mainly focus on Europeans and thus their transferability to diverse populations is unclear. We performed SNP- and gene-level genome-wide association studies (GWAS of four lipid traits in cohorts from Nigeria and the Philippines and compared them to the results of larger, predominantly European meta-analyses. Two previously implicated loci met genome-wide significance in our SNP-level GWAS in the Nigerian cohort, rs34065661 in CETP associated with HDL cholesterol (P = 9.0 × 10−10 and rs1065853 upstream of APOE associated with LDL cholesterol (P = 6.6 × 10−9. The top SNP in the Filipino cohort associated with triglyceride levels (rs662799; P = 2.7 × 10−16 and has been previously implicated in other East Asian studies. While this SNP is located directly upstream of well known APOA5, we show it may also be involved in the regulation of BACE1 and SIDT2. Our gene-based association analysis, PrediXcan, revealed decreased expression of BACE1 and decreased expression of SIDT2 in several tissues, all driven by rs662799, significantly associate with increased triglyceride levels in Filipinos (FDR <0.1. In addition, our PrediXcan analysis implicated gene regulation as the mechanism underlying the associations of many other previously discovered lipid loci. Our novel BACE1 and SIDT2 findings were confirmed using summary statistics from the Global Lipids Genetic Consortium (GLGC meta-GWAS.

  5. Clinical-Genetic Associations in the Prospective Huntington at Risk Observational Study (PHAROS): Implications for Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biglan, Kevin Michael; Shoulson, Ira; Kieburtz, Karl; Oakes, David; Kayson, Elise; Shinaman, M Aileen; Zhao, Hongwei; Romer, Megan; Young, Anne; Hersch, Steven; Penney, Jack; Marder, Karen; Paulsen, Jane; Quaid, Kimberly; Siemers, Eric; Tanner, Caroline; Mallonee, William; Suter, Greg; Dubinsky, Richard; Gray, Carolyn; Nance, Martha; Bundlie, Scott; Radtke, Dawn; Kostyk, Sandra; Baic, Corrine; Caress, James; Walker, Francis; Hunt, Victoria; O'Neill, Christine; Chouinard, Sylvain; Factor, Stewart; Greenamyre, Timothy; Wood-Siverio, Cathy; Corey-Bloom, Jody; Song, David; Peavy, Guerry; Moskowitz, Carol; Wesson, Melissa; Samii, Ali; Bird, Thomas; Lipe, Hillary; Blindauer, Karen; Marshall, Frederick; Zimmerman, Carol; Goldstein, Jody; Rosas, Diana; Novak, Peter; Caviness, John; Adler, Charles; Duffy, Amy; Wheelock, Vicki; Tempkin, Teresa; Richman, David; Seeberger, Lauren; Albin, Roger; Chou, Kelvin L; Racette, Brad; Perlmutter, Joel S; Perlman, Susan; Bordelon, Yvette; Martin, Wayne; Wieler, Marguerite; Leavitt, Blair; Raymond, Lynn; Decolongon, Joji; Clarke, Lorne; Jankovic, Joseph; Hunter, Christine; Hauser, Robert A; Sanchez-Ramos, Juan; Furtado, Sarah; Suchowersky, Oksana; Klimek, Mary Lou; Guttman, Mark; Sethna, Rustom; Feigin, Andrew; Cox, Marie; Shannon, Barbara; Percy, Alan; Dure, Leon; Harrison, Madaline; Johnson, William; Higgins, Donald; Molho, Eric; Nickerson, Constance; Evans, Sharon; Hobson, Douglas; Singer, Carlos; Galvez-Jimenez, Nestor; Shannon, Kathleen; Comella, Cynthia; Ross, Christopher; Saint-Hilaire, Marie H; Testa, Claudia; Rosenblatt, Adam; Hogarth, Penelope; Weiner, William; Como, Peter; Kumar, Rajeev; Cotto, Candace; Stout, Julie; Brocht, Alicia; Watts, Arthur; Eberly, Shirley; Weaver, Christine; Foroud, Tatiana; Gusella, James; MacDonald, Marcy; Myers, Richard; Fahn, Stanley; Shults, Clifford

    2016-01-01

    Identifying measures that are associated with the cytosine-adenine-guanine (CAG) expansion in individuals before diagnosis of Huntington disease (HD) has implications for designing clinical trials. To identify the earliest features associated with the motor diagnosis of HD in the Prospective Huntington at Risk Observational Study (PHAROS). A prospective, multicenter, longitudinal cohort study was conducted at 43 US and Canadian Huntington Study Group research sites from July 9, 1999, through December 17, 2009. Participants included 983 unaffected adults at risk for HD who had chosen to remain unaware of their mutation status. Baseline comparability between CAG expansion (≥37 repeats) and nonexpansion (Huntington disease mutation status in individuals with CAG expansion vs without CAG expansion. Unified Huntington's Disease Rating Scale motor (score range, 0-124; higher scores indicate greater impairment), cognitive (symbol digits modality is the total number of correct responses in 90 seconds; lower scores indicate greater impairment), behavioral (score range, 0-176; higher scores indicate greater behavioral symptoms), and functional (Total Functional Capacity score range, 0-13; lower scores indicate reduced functional ability) domains were assessed at baseline and every 9 months up to a maximum of 10 years. Among the 983 research participants at risk for HD in the longitudinal cohort, 345 (35.1%) carried the CAG expansion and 638 (64.9%) did not. The mean (SD) duration of follow-up was 5.8 (3.0) years. At baseline, participants with expansions had more impaired motor (3.0 [4.2] vs 1.9 [2.8]; P < .001), cognitive (P < .05 for all measures except Verbal Fluency, P = .52), and behavioral domain scores (9.4 [11.4] vs 6.5 [8.5]; P < .001) but not significantly different measures of functional capacity (12.9 [0.3] vs 13.0 [0.2]; P = .23). With findings reported as mean slope (95% CI), in the longitudinal analyses, participants with CAG expansions

  6. Cortical mechanics and myosin-II abnormalities associated with post-ovulatory aging: implications for functional defects in aged eggs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Amelia C.L.; Kyle, Diane D.; McGinnis, Lauren A.; Lee, Hyo J.; Aldana, Nathalia; Robinson, Douglas N.; Evans, Janice P.

    2016-01-01

    STUDY HYPOTHESIS Cellular aging of the egg following ovulation, also known as post-ovulatory aging, is associated with aberrant cortical mechanics and actomyosin cytoskeleton functions. STUDY FINDING Post-ovulatory aging is associated with dysfunction of non-muscle myosin-II, and pharmacologically induced myosin-II dysfunction produces some of the same deficiencies observed in aged eggs. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY Reproductive success is reduced with delayed fertilization and when copulation or insemination occurs at increased times after ovulation. Post-ovulatory aged eggs have several abnormalities in the plasma membrane and cortex, including reduced egg membrane receptivity to sperm, aberrant sperm-induced cortical remodeling and formation of fertilization cones at the site of sperm entry, and reduced ability to establish a membrane block to prevent polyspermic fertilization. STUDY DESIGN, SAMPLES/MATERIALS, METHODS Ovulated mouse eggs were collected at 21–22 h post-human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) (aged eggs) or at 13–14 h post-hCG (young eggs), or young eggs were treated with the myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) inhibitor ML-7, to test the hypothesis that disruption of myosin-II function could mimic some of the effects of post-ovulatory aging. Eggs were subjected to various analyses. Cytoskeletal proteins in eggs and parthenogenesis were assessed using fluorescence microscopy, with further analysis of cytoskeletal proteins in immunoblotting experiments. Cortical tension was measured through micropipette aspiration assays. Egg membrane receptivity to sperm was assessed in in vitro fertilization (IVF) assays. Membrane topography was examined by low-vacuum scanning electron microscopy (SEM). MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE Aged eggs have decreased levels and abnormal localizations of phosphorylated myosin-II regulatory light chain (pMRLC; P = 0.0062). Cortical tension, which is mediated in part by myosin-II, is reduced in aged mouse eggs when compared with

  7. Inhibitions and implications associated with celebrity participation in social marketing programs focusing on HIV prevention: an exploratory research

    OpenAIRE

    Beatriz Casais; João F. Proença

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses celebrity participation in social marketing programs focusing on public health, especially on HIV programs. The research identifies the inhibitions of celebrity people and implications that this involvement may have upon their lives. The paper analysis data from in-depth interviews made to twenty-seven Portuguese celebrities from arts, show business and sports. The results show absence of prejudice against HIV. Famous people feel motivated to join public health and HIV ca...

  8. Learner, Patient, and Supervisor Features Are Associated With Different Types of Cognitive Load During Procedural Skills Training: Implications for Teaching and Instructional Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sewell, Justin L; Boscardin, Christy K; Young, John Q; Ten Cate, Olle; O'Sullivan, Patricia S

    2017-11-01

    Cognitive load theory, focusing on limits of the working memory, is relevant to medical education; however, factors associated with cognitive load during procedural skills training are not well characterized. The authors sought to determine how features of learners, patients/tasks, settings, and supervisors were associated with three types of cognitive load among learners performing a specific procedure, colonoscopy, to identify implications for procedural teaching. Data were collected through an electronically administered survey sent to 1,061 U.S. gastroenterology fellows during the 2014-2015 academic year; 477 (45.0%) participated. Participants completed the survey immediately following a colonoscopy. Using multivariable linear regression analyses, the authors identified sets of features associated with intrinsic, extraneous, and germane loads. Features associated with intrinsic load included learners (prior experience and year in training negatively associated, fatigue positively associated) and patient/tasks (procedural complexity positively associated, better patient tolerance negatively associated). Features associated with extraneous load included learners (fatigue positively associated), setting (queue order positively associated), and supervisors (supervisor engagement and confidence negatively associated). Only one feature, supervisor engagement, was (positively) associated with germane load. These data support practical recommendations for teaching procedural skills through the lens of cognitive load theory. To optimize intrinsic load, level of experience and competence of learners should be balanced with procedural complexity; part-task approaches and scaffolding may be beneficial. To reduce extraneous load, teachers should remain engaged, and factors within the procedural setting that may interfere with learning should be minimized. To optimize germane load, teachers should remain engaged.

  9. A genome-wide association study of kynurenic acid in cerebrospinal fluid: implications for psychosis and cognitive impairment in bipolar disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellgren, CM; Kegel, ME; Bergen, SE; Ekman, CJ; Olsson, S; Larsson, M; Vawter, MP; Backlund, L; Sullivan, PF; Sklar, P; Smoller, JW; Magnusson, PKE; Hultman, CM; Walther-Jallow, L; Svensson, CI; Lichtenstein, P; Schalling, M; Engberg, G; Erhardt, S; Landén, M

    2016-01-01

    Elevated cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of the glia-derived N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor antagonist kynurenic acid (KYNA) have consistently been implicated in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Here, we conducted a genome-wide association study based on CSF KYNA in bipolar disorder and found support for an association with a common variant within 1p21.3. After replication in an independent cohort, we linked this genetic variant—associated with reduced SNX7 expression—to positive psychotic symptoms and executive function deficits in bipolar disorder. A series of post-mortem brain tissue and in vitro experiments suggested SNX7 downregulation to result in a caspase-8-driven activation of interleukin-1β and a subsequent induction of the brain kynurenine pathway. The current study demonstrates the potential of using biomarkers in genetic studies of psychiatric disorders, and may help to identify novel drug targets in bipolar disorder. PMID:23459468

  10. Genome-wide association study of migraine implicates a common susceptibility variant on 8q22.1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anttila, Verneri; Stefansson, Hreinn; Kallela, Mikko

    2010-01-01

    1835740 on chromosome 8q22.1 to be associated with migraine (P = 5.38 × 10¿¿, odds ratio = 1.23, 95% CI 1.150-1.324) in a genome-wide association study of 2,731 migraine cases ascertained from three European headache clinics and 10,747 population-matched controls. The association was replicated in 3...

  11. A review of adaptive change in musculoskeletal impedance during space flight and associated implications for postflight head movement control

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, P. V.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Layne, C. S.

    1997-01-01

    We present a review of converging sources of evidence which suggest that the differences between loading histories experienced in 1-g and weightlessness are sufficient to stimulate adaptation in mechanical impedance of the musculoskeletal system. As a consequence of this adaptive change we argue that we should observe changes in the ability to attenuate force transmission through the musculoskeletal system both during and after space flight. By focusing attention on the relation between human sensorimotor activity and support surfaces, the importance of controlling mechanical energy flow through the musculoskeletal system is demonstrated. The implications of such control are discussed in light of visual-vestibular function in the specific context of head and gaze control during postflight locomotion. Evidence from locomotory biomechanics, visual-vestibular function, ergonomic evaluations of human vibration, and specific investigations of locomotion and head and gaze control after space flight, is considered.

  12. Identification of aerosol types over Indo-Gangetic Basin: implications to optical properties and associated radiative forcing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, S; Srivastava, A K; Singh, A K; Singh, Sachchidanand

    2015-08-01

    The aerosols in the Indo-Gangetic Basin (IGB) are a mixture of sulfate, dust, black carbon, and other soluble and insoluble components. It is a challenge not only to identify these various aerosol types, but also to assess the optical and radiative implications of these components. In the present study, appropriate thresholds for fine-mode fraction and single-scattering albedo have been used to first identify the aerosol types over IGB. Four major aerosol types may be identified as polluted dust (PD), polluted continental (PC), black carbon-enriched (BCE), and organic carbon-enriched (OCE). Further, the implications of these different types of aerosols on optical properties and radiative forcing have been studied. The aerosol products derived from CIMEL sun/sky radiometer measurements, deployed under Aerosol Robotic Network program of NASA, USA were used from four different sites Karachi, Lahore, Jaipur, and Kanpur, spread over Pakistan and Northern India. PD is the most dominant aerosol type at Karachi and Jaipur, contributing more than 50% of all the aerosol types. OCE, on the other hand, contributes only about 12-15% at all the stations except at Kanpur where its contribution is ∼38%. The spectral dependence of AOD was relatively low for PD aerosol type, with the lowest AE values (aerosol types, with the highest AE values (>1.0). SSA was found to be the highest for OCE (>0.9) and the lowest for BCE (aerosols, with drastically different spectral variability. The direct aerosol radiative forcing at the surface and in the atmosphere was found to be the maximum at Lahore among all the four stations in the IGB.

  13. Graph-Theoretic Properties of Networks Based on Word Association Norms: Implications for Models of Lexical Semantic Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruenenfelder, Thomas M.; Recchia, Gabriel; Rubin, Tim; Jones, Michael N.

    2016-01-01

    We compared the ability of three different contextual models of lexical semantic memory (BEAGLE, Latent Semantic Analysis, and the Topic model) and of a simple associative model (POC) to predict the properties of semantic networks derived from word association norms. None of the semantic models were able to accurately predict all of the network…

  14. On Neutrosophic Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Said Broumi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we firstly review the neutrosophic set, and then construct two new concepts called neutrosophic implication of type 1 and of type 2 for neutrosophic sets. Furthermore, some of their basic properties and some results associated with the two neutrosophic implications are proven.

  15. Comorbid Problems in ADHD : Degree of Association, Shared Endophenotypes, and Formation of Distinct Subtypes. Implications for a Future DSM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rommelse, Nanda N. J.; Altink, Marieke E.; Fliers, Ellen A.; Martin, Neilson C.; Buschgens, Cathelijne J. M.; Hartman, Catharina A.; Buitelaar, Jan K.; Faraone, Stephen V.; Sergeant, Joseph A.; Oosterlaan, Jaap

    We aimed to assess which comorbid problems (oppositional defiant behaviors, anxiety, autistic traits, motor coordination problems, and reading problems) were most associated with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD); to determine whether these comorbid problems shared executive and motor

  16. Ethanol exposure induces the cancer-associated fibroblast phenotype and lethal tumor metabolism: Implications for breast cancer prevention

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sanchez-Alvarez, Rosa; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Lin, Zhao; Lamb, Rebecca; Hulit, James; Howell, Anthony; Sotgia, Federica; Rubin, Emanuel; Lisanti, Michael P

    2013-01-01

    ...) and hTERT-immortalized fibroblasts. Here, we show that ethanol treatment (100 mM) promotes ROS production and oxidative stress in cancer-associated fibroblasts, which is sufficient to induce myofibroblastic differentiation...

  17. Free Associations Mirroring Self- and World-Related Concepts: Implications for Personal Construct Theory, Psycholinguistics and Philosophical Psychology

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kuška, M.; Trnka, R.; Kuběna, Aleš Antonín; Růžička, J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 1 (2016), č. článku 981. ISSN 1664-1078 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP402/12/G097 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : psycholinguistics * world * personal construct theory * free association * association network Subject RIV: AN - Psychology Impact factor: 2.323, year: 2016 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2016/E/kubena-0464017.pdf

  18. Physical landscape associations with mapped ecosystem values with implications for spatial value transfer: An empirical study from Norway

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Greg; Hausner, Vera Helene; Lægreid, Eiliv Jenssen

    2015-01-01

    Accepted manuscript version. Published version available at http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecoser.2015.07.005 The identification of spatial associations between perceived ecosystem values and physical landscapes is confronted by a diversity of mapping methods, heterogeneous human populations, and variability in physical landscape classification systems. This study reviews previous research on spatial associations and reports new empirical findings from Norway to describe the potentia...

  19. U.S. Latina Age of Sexual Debut: Long-term Associations and Implications for HIV and Drug Abuse Prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Dillon, Frank R; DE LA ROSA, MARIO; Schwartz, Seth J; Rojas, Patria; Duan, Rui; Robert M. Malow

    2010-01-01

    This cross-sectional study explored associations among (a) age of sexual debut, (b) drug abuse, and (c) sexual risk behaviors among an urban community based sample of 158 predominantly immigrant, Latina adults. Time in the United States and having a mother who used drugs during the participants' childhood or adolescence were significantly related to age of sexual debut. In turn, younger ages of sexual debut were associated with drug abuse and more sexual risk behaviors (greater number of sexu...

  20. Sleep Restriction Therapy for Insomnia is Associated with Reduced Objective Total Sleep Time, Increased Daytime Somnolence, and Objectively Impaired Vigilance: Implications for the Clinical Management of Insomnia Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyle, Simon D.; Miller, Christopher B.; Rogers, Zoe; Siriwardena, A. Niroshan; MacMahon, Kenneth M.; Espie, Colin A.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: To investigate whether sleep restriction therapy (SRT) is associated with reduced objective total sleep time (TST), increased daytime somnolence, and impaired vigilance. Design: Within-subject, noncontrolled treatment investigation. Setting: Sleep research laboratory. Participants: Sixteen patients [10 female, mean age = 47.1 (10.8) y] with well-defined psychophysiological insomnia (PI), reporting TST ≤ 6 h. Interventions: Patients were treated with single-component SRT over a 4-w protocol, sleeping in the laboratory for 2 nights prior to treatment initiation and for 3 nights (SRT night 1, 8, 22) during the acute interventional phase. The psychomotor vigilance task (PVT) was completed at seven defined time points [day 0 (baseline), day 1,7,8,21,22 (acute treatment) and day 84 (3 mo)]. The Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) was completed at baseline, w 1-4, and 3 mo. Measurement and results: Subjective sleep outcomes and global insomnia severity significantly improved before and after SRT. There was, however, a robust decrease in PSG-defined TST during acute implementation of SRT, by an average of 91 min on night 1, 78 min on night 8, and 69 min on night 22, relative to baseline (P treatment (at four of five assessment points, all P sleep restriction therapy is associated with reduced objective total sleep time, increased daytime sleepiness, and objective performance impairment. Our data have important implications for implementation guidelines around the safe and effective delivery of cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia. Citation: Kyle SD; Miller CB; Rogers Z; Siriwardena AN; MacMahon KM; Espie CA. Sleep restriction therapy for insomnia is associated with reduced objective total sleep time, increased daytime somnolence, and objectively impaired vigilance: implications for the clinical management of insomnia disorder. SLEEP 2014;37(2):229-237. PMID:24497651

  1. Association of religion with delusions and hallucinations in the context of schizophrenia: implications for engagement and adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gearing, Robin Edward; Alonzo, Dana; Smolak, Alex; McHugh, Katie; Harmon, Sherelle; Baldwin, Susanna

    2011-03-01

    The relationship of religion and schizophrenia is widely acknowledged, but often minimized by practitioners and under investigated by researchers. In striving to help fill this gap, this paper focuses on examining four aims: 1) how research has investigated the association between religiosity and schizophrenia; 2) how is religiosity associated with delusions and hallucinations; 3) what are the risk and protective factors associated with religiosity and schizophrenia; and 4) does religion influence treatment adherence with individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia. A systematic literature search of PsycINFO and MEDLINE databases from January 1, 1980 through January 1, 2010 was conducted using the terms schizophrenia, schizoaffective, schizophreniform, psychotic disorder not otherwise specified (NOS) and religion, religiosity, spirituality, or faith. Seventy (n=70) original research studies were identified. Religion can act as both a risk and protective factor as it interacts with the schizophrenia symptoms of hallucination and delusions. Cultural influences tend to confound the association of religion and schizophrenia. Adherence to treatment has a mixed association with religiosity. The relationship between religion and schizophrenia may be of benefit to both clinicians and researchers through enhancing adherence to treatment, and enhancement of the protective aspects while minimizing associated risk. The relationship of religion and schizophrenia needs further research that is more nuanced and methodologically rigorous, specifically concerning its influence on engagement and adherence to treatment. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Investigating the separate and interactive associations of trauma and depression on brain structure: implications for cognition and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karstens, Aimee J; Ajilore, Olusola; Rubin, Leah H; Yang, Shaolin; Zhang, Aifeng; Leow, Alex; Kumar, Anand; Lamar, Melissa

    2017-11-01

    Trauma and depression are associated with brain structural alterations; their combined effects on these outcomes are unclear. We previously reported a negative effect of trauma, independent of depression, on verbal learning and memory; less is known about underlying structural associates. We investigated separate and interactive associations of trauma and depression on brain structure. Adults aged 30-89 (N = 203) evaluated for depression (D+) and trauma history (T+) using structured clinical interviews were divided into 53 D+T+, 42 D+T-, 50 D-T+, and 58 D-T-. Multivariable linear regressions examined the separate and interactive associations of depression and trauma with prefrontal and temporal lobe cortical thickness composites and hippocampal volumes adjusting for age, sex, predicted verbal IQ, comorbid anxiety, and vascular risk. Significant results informed analyses of tract-based structural connectomic measures of efficiency and centrality. Trauma, independent of depression, was associated with greater left prefrontal cortex (PFC) thickness, in particular the medial orbitofrontal cortex and pars orbitalis. A trauma × depression interaction was observed for the right PFC in age-stratified analyses: Older D + T+ had reduced PFC thickness compared with older D - T+ individuals. Regardless of age, trauma was associated with more left medial orbitofrontal cortex efficiency and less pars orbitalis centrality. In the T+ group, left pars orbitalis cortical thickness and centrality negatively correlated with verbal learning. Trauma, independent of depression, associated with altered PFC characteristics, morphologically and in terms of structural network communication and influence. Additionally, findings suggest that there may be a combined effect of trauma and depression in older adults. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Do emotional eating urges regulate affect? Concurrent and prospective associations and implications for risk models of binge eating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haedt-Matt, Alissa A; Keel, Pamela K; Racine, Sarah E; Burt, S Alexandra; Hu, Jean Yueqin; Boker, Steven; Neale, Michael; Klump, Kelly L

    2014-12-01

    Emotional eating (EE) reflects an urge to eat in response to emotional rather than physical cues and is a risk factor for the development of binge eating. EE has been conceptualized as an attempt to regulate negative affect (NA), a posited maintenance factor for binge eating. However, no study has examined whether EE urges regulate affect. Further, no studies have examined longitudinal associations between EE urges and positive affect (PA). We examined within-subject longitudinal associations between affect and EE urges in a community-based sample of female twins (mean age = 17.8 years). Participants (N = 239) completed ratings of affect and EE urges for 45 consecutive days. Greater NA was concurrently associated with greater EE urges. Additionally, greater EE urges predicted worse NA for both concurrent and prospective (next-day) analyses. Finally, lower PA was associated with greater EE urges in concurrent analyses, but there were no prospective associations between changes in PA and EE urges. EE urges do not appear to effectively regulate affect. EE urges in a community-based sample appear to have the same functional relationship with affect as binge eating in clinical samples, further supporting EE as a useful dimensional construct for examining processes related to binge eating. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Free Associations Mirroring Self- and World-Related Concepts: Implications for Personal Construct Theory, Psycholinguistics and Philosophical Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuška, Martin; Trnka, Radek; Kuběna, Aleš A; Růžička, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    People construe reality by using words as basic units of meaningful categorization. The present theory-driven study applied the method of a free association task to explore how people express the concepts of the world and the self in words. The respondents were asked to recall any five words relating with the word world. Afterward they were asked to recall any five words relating with the word self. The method of free association provided the respondents with absolute freedom to choose any words they wanted. Such free recall task is suggested as being a relatively direct approach to the respondents' self- and world-related conceptual categories, without enormous rational processing. The results provide us, first, with associative ranges for constructs of the world and the self, where some associative dimensions are defined by semantic polarities in the meanings of peripheral categories (e.g., Nature vs. Culture). Second, our analysis showed that some groups of verbal categories that were associated with the words world and self are central, while others are peripheral with respect to the central position. Third, the analysis of category networks revealed that some categories play the role of a transmitter, mediating the pathway between other categories in the network.

  5. Mendelian Randomization Implicates High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol-Associated Mechanisms in Etiology of Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Stephen; Davey Smith, George

    2017-08-01

    Undertake a systematic investigation into associations between genetic predictors of lipid fractions and age-related macular degeneration (AMD) risk. Two-sample Mendelian randomization investigation using published data. A total of 33 526 individuals (16 144 cases, 17 832 controls) predominantly of European ancestry from the International Age-related Macular Degeneration Genomics Consortium. We consider 185 variants previously demonstrated to be associated with at least 1 of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, or triglycerides at a genome-wide level of significance, and test their associations with AMD. We particularly focus on variants in gene regions that are proxies for specific pharmacologic agents for lipid therapy. We then conduct a 2-sample Mendelian randomization investigation to assess the causal roles of LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, and triglycerides on AMD risk. We also conduct parallel investigations for coronary artery disease (CAD) (viewed as a positive control) and Alzheimer's disease (a negative control) for comparison. Diagnosis of AMD. We find evidence that HDL-cholesterol is a causal risk factor for AMD, with an odds ratio (OR) estimate of 1.22 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.03-1.44) per 1 standard deviation increase in HDL-cholesterol. No causal effect of LDL-cholesterol or triglycerides was found. Variants in the CETP gene region associated with increased circulating HDL-cholesterol also associate with increased AMD risk, although variants in the LIPC gene region that increase circulating HDL-cholesterol have the opposite direction of association with AMD risk. Parallel analyses suggest that lipids have a greater role for AMD compared with Alzheimer's disease, but a lesser role than for CAD. Some genetic evidence suggests that HDL-cholesterol is a causal risk factor for AMD risk and that increasing HDL-cholesterol (particularly via CETP inhibition) will increase AMD risk

  6. Statistical trends in the Journal of the American Medical Association and implications for training across the continuum of medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Lauren D; Braganza, Melissa; Salih, Rondek; Colditz, Graham A

    2013-01-01

    Statistical training across the continuum of medical education may not have advanced at the pace of statistical reporting in the medical literature, yet a comprehensive understanding of statistical concepts most commonly presented in current research is critical to the effective practice of Evidence Based Medicine. The objective of this content analysis was to describe statistical techniques used in a leading medical journal, JAMA, across a 20-year period, with a focus on implications for medical education. Two issues of JAMA published each month in 1990, 2000, and 2010 were randomly selected; from these, 361 articles were reviewed. Primary focus, study design, and statistical components were abstracted and examined by year of publication. The number of published RCTs and cohort studies differed significantly across years of interest, with an increasing trend of publication. The most commonly reported statistics over the 20-year period of interest included measures of morbidity and mortality, descriptive statistics, and epidemiologic outcomes. However, between 1990 and 2010, there was an increase in reporting of more advanced methods, such as multivariable regression, multilevel modeling, survival analysis, and sensitivity analysis. While this study is limited by a focus on one specific journal, a strength is that the journal examined is widely read by a range of clinical specialties and is considered a leading journal in the medical field, setting standards for published research. The increases in frequency and complexity of statistical reporting in the literature over the past two decades may suggest that moving beyond basic statistical concepts to a more comprehensive understanding of statistical methods is an important component of clinicians' ability to effectively read and use the medical research. These findings provide information to consider as medical schools and graduate medical education training programs review and revise their statistical training

  7. Statistical trends in the Journal of the American Medical Association and implications for training across the continuum of medical education.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren D Arnold

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Statistical training across the continuum of medical education may not have advanced at the pace of statistical reporting in the medical literature, yet a comprehensive understanding of statistical concepts most commonly presented in current research is critical to the effective practice of Evidence Based Medicine. The objective of this content analysis was to describe statistical techniques used in a leading medical journal, JAMA, across a 20-year period, with a focus on implications for medical education. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Two issues of JAMA published each month in 1990, 2000, and 2010 were randomly selected; from these, 361 articles were reviewed. Primary focus, study design, and statistical components were abstracted and examined by year of publication. The number of published RCTs and cohort studies differed significantly across years of interest, with an increasing trend of publication. The most commonly reported statistics over the 20-year period of interest included measures of morbidity and mortality, descriptive statistics, and epidemiologic outcomes. However, between 1990 and 2010, there was an increase in reporting of more advanced methods, such as multivariable regression, multilevel modeling, survival analysis, and sensitivity analysis. While this study is limited by a focus on one specific journal, a strength is that the journal examined is widely read by a range of clinical specialties and is considered a leading journal in the medical field, setting standards for published research. CONCLUSIONS: The increases in frequency and complexity of statistical reporting in the literature over the past two decades may suggest that moving beyond basic statistical concepts to a more comprehensive understanding of statistical methods is an important component of clinicians' ability to effectively read and use the medical research. These findings provide information to consider as medical schools and graduate medical education

  8. Plakophilin-associated RNA-binding proteins in prostate cancer and their implications in tumor progression and metastasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Cheng; Stroebel, Philipp; Marx, Alexander; Hofmann, Ilse

    Both plakophilins (PKP) 1 and 3 play a role in the progression of prostate cancer. The RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) GAP-SH3-binding protein (G3BP), fragile-X-related protein 1 (FXR1), poly(A)-binding protein, cytoplasmic 1 (PABPC1), and up-frameshift factor 1 (UPF1) are associated with PKP3. All

  9. A genome-wide association study of anorexia nervosa suggests a risk locus implicated in dysregulated leptin signaling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Xiang-Dong; Chang, Xiao; Connolly, John J.; Tian, Lifeng; Liu, Yichuan; Bhoj, Elizabeth J; Robinson, Nora; Abrams, Debra; Li, Yun R.; Bradfield, Jonathan P.; Kim, Cecilia E.; Li, Jin; Wang, Fengxiang; Snyder, James; Lemma, Maria; Hou, Cuiping; Wei, Zhi; Guo, Yiran; Qiu, Haijun; Mentch, Frank D.; Thomas, Kelly A.; Chiavacci, Rosetta M.; Cone, Roger; Li, Bingshan; Sleiman, Patrick M. A.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Kas, Martien J.H.

    2017-01-01

    We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of anorexia nervosa (AN) using a stringently defined phenotype. Analysis of phenotypic variability led to the identification of a specific genetic risk factor that approached genome-wide significance (rs929626 in EBF1 (Early B-Cell Factor 1);

  10. Population dynamics of an invasive forest insect and associated natural enemies in the aftermath of invasion: implications for biological control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding the population dynamics of exotic pests and associated natural enemies is important in developing sound management strategies in invaded forest ecosystems. The emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), is an invasive phloem-feeding beetle that h...

  11. American Bar Association Supplementary Guidelines for the Mitigation Function of Defense Teams in Death Penalty Cases: Implications for Social Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Arlene Bowers

    2012-01-01

    When a client faces a penalty of death, defense attorneys may call on social workers in many capacities: mitigation specialist, expert witness, consulting specialist, direct witness, or defense-initiated victim outreach worker. The American Bar Association set forth standards for capital defense attorneys, which led an interdisciplinary team to…

  12. A genome-wide association study of anorexia nervosa suggests a risk locus implicated in dysregulated leptin signaling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Dong; Chang, Xiao; Connolly, John J.; Tian, Lifeng; Liu, Yichuan; Bhoj, Elizabeth J.; Robinson, Nora; Abrams, Debra; Li, Yun R.; Bradfield, Jonathan P.; Kim, Cecilia E.; Li, Jin; Wang, Fengxiang; Snyder, James; Lemma, Maria; Hou, Cuiping; Wei, Zhi; Guo, Yiran; Qiu, Haijun; Mentch, Frank D.; Thomas, Kelly A.; Chiavacci, Rosetta M.; Cone, Roger; Li, Bingshan; Sleiman, Patrick A.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Perica, Vesna Boraska; Franklin, Christopher S.; Floyd, James A.B.; Thornton, Laura M.; Huckins, Laura M.; Southam, Lorraine; Rayner, William N; Tachmazidou, Ioanna; Schmidt, Ulrike; Tozzi, Federica; Kiezebrink, Kirsty; Hebebrand, Johannes; Gorwood, Philip; Adan, Roger A.H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/096757191; Kas, Martien J.H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/185967019; Favaro, Angela; Santonastaso, Paolo; Fernánde-Aranda, Fernando; Gratacos, Monica; Rybakowski, Filip; Dmitrzak-Weglarz, Monika; Kaprio, Jaakko; Keski-Rahkonen, Anna; Raevuori-Helkamaa, Anu; Furth, Eric F.Van; Slof-Opt Landt, Margarita C.T.; Hudson, James I.; Reichborn-Kjennerud, Ted; Knudsen, Gun Peggy S.; Monteleone, Palmiero; Karwautz, Andreas; Berrettini, Wade H.; Schork, Nicholas J.; Ando, Tetsuya; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Esko, Toñu; Fischer, Krista; Männik, Katrin; Metspalu, Andres; Baker, Jessica H.; DeSocio, Janiece E.; Hilliard, Christopher E.; O'Toole, Julie K.; Pantel, Jacques; Szatkiewicz, Jin P.; Zerwas, Stephanie; Davis, Oliver S P; Helder, Sietske; Bühren, Katharina; Burghardt, Roland; De Zwaan, Martina; Egberts, Karin; Ehrlich, Stefan; Herpertz-Dahlmann, Beate; Herzog, Wolfgang; Imgart, Hartmut; Scherag, André; Zipfel, Stephan; Boni, Claudette; Ramoz, Nicolas; Versini, Audrey; Danner, Unna N.; Hendriks, Judith; Koeleman, Bobby P.C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/157197468; Ophoff, Roel A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/16237299X; Strengman, Eric|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304815195; van Elburg, Annemarie A.; Bruson, Alice; Clementi, Maurizio; Degortes, Daniela; Forzan, Monica; Tenconi, Elena; Docampo, Elisa; Escaramís, Geòrgia; Jiménez-Murcia, Susana; Lissowska, Jolanta; Rajewski, Andrzej; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Slopien, Agnieszka; Hauser, Joanna; Karhunen, Leila; Meulenbelt, Ingrid; Slagboom, P. Eline; Tortorella, Alfonso; Maj, Mario; Dedoussis, George; DIkeos, DImitris; Gonidakis, Fragiskos; Tziouvas, Konstantinos; Tsitsika, Artemis; Papezova, Hana; Slachtova, Lenka; Martaskova, Debora; Kennedy, James L.; Levitan, Robert D.; Yilmaz, Zeynep; Huemer, Julia; Koubek, Doris; Merl, Elisabeth; Wagner, Gudrun; Lichtenstein, Paul; Breen, Gerome; Cohen-Woods, Sarah; Farmer, Anne; McGuffin, Peter; Cichon, Sven; Giegling, Ina; Herms, Stefan; Rujescu, Dan; Schreiber, Stefan; Wichmann, H-Erich; Dina, Christian; Sladek, Rob; Gambaro, Giovanni; Soranzo, Nicole; Julia, Antonio; Marsal, Sara; Rabionet, Raquel; Gaborieau, Valerie; DIck, Danielle M.; Palotie, Aarno; Ripatti, Samuli; Widén, Elisabeth; Andreassen, Ole A.; Espeseth, Thomas; Lundervold, Astri J; Reinvang, Ivar; Steen, Vidar M.; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Mattingsdal, Morten; Ntalla, Ioanna; Bencko, Vladimir; Foretova, Lenka; Janout, Vladimir; Navratilova, Marie; Gallinger, Steven; Pinto, Dalila; Scherer, Stephen W.; Aschauer, Harald; Carlberg, Laura; Schosser, Alexandra; Alfredsson, Lars; Ding, Bo; Klareskog, Lars; Padyukov, Leonid; Finan, Chris; Kalsi, Gursharan; Roberts, Marion; Barrett, Jeff C.; Estivill, Xavier; Hinney, Anke; Sullivan, Patrick F; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Bulik, Cynthia M.; Brandt, Harry; Crawford, Steve; Crow, Scott; Fichter, Manfred M.; Halmi, Katherine A.; Johnson, Craig; Kaplan, Allan S.; La Via, Maria C.; Mitchell, James R.; Strober, Michael; Rotondo, Alessandro; Treasure, Janet; Woodside, D. Blake; Keel, Pamela K.; Klump, Kelly L.; Lilenfeld, Lisa; Bergen, Andrew W.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/345481240; Kaye, Walter; Magistretti, Pierre

    2017-01-01

    We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of anorexia nervosa (AN) using a stringently defined phenotype. Analysis of phenotypic variability led to the identification of a specific genetic risk factor that approached genome-wide significance (rs929626 in EBF1 (Early B-Cell Factor 1); P =

  13. Genetic association analyses implicate aberrant regulation of innate and adaptive immunity genes in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Deborah S Cunninghame; Pinder, Christopher L; Tombleson, Philip; Behrens, Timothy W; Martín, Javier; Fairfax, Benjamin P; Knight, Julian C; Chen, Lingyan; Replogle, Joseph; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Rönnblom, Lars; Graham, Robert R; Wither, Joan E; Rioux, John D; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E; Vyse, Timothy J

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE; OMIM 152700) is a genetically complex autoimmune disease characterized by loss of immune tolerance to nuclear and cell surface antigens. Previous genome-wide association studies (GWAS) had modest sample sizes, reducing their scope and reliability. Our study comprised 7,219 cases and 15,991 controls of European ancestry: a new GWAS, meta-analysis with a published GWAS and a replication study. We have mapped 43 susceptibility loci, including 10 novel associations. Assisted by dense genome coverage, imputation provided evidence for missense variants underpinning associations in eight genes. Other likely causal genes were established by examining associated alleles for cis-acting eQTL effects in a range of ex vivo immune cells. We found an over-representation (n=16) of transcription factors among SLE susceptibility genes. This supports the view that aberrantly regulated gene expression networks in multiple cell types in both the innate and adaptive immune response contribute to the risk of developing SLE. PMID:26502338

  14. Moving beyond Alcohol: A Review of Other Issues Associated with Fraternity Membership with Implications for Practice and Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biddix, J. Patrick

    2016-01-01

    This review of research synthesizes more than a decade of published studies on problems associated with fraternity membership beyond alcohol misuse. Topics include sex-related issues, drug use, hazing, and other issues such as gambling, academic dishonesty, campus civility, and fake identification use. Recommendations suggest the need for a role…

  15. Perceptions of Rural Consumers on the Aspects of Meat Quality and Health Implications Associated With Meat Consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nomasonto M. Xazela

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to determine the perceptions of rural low-income consumers on meat quality and health issues associated with meat consumption. A total of 466 consumers in the Eastern Cape (EC Province (South Africa (SA were randomly sampled, and principal component analyses (PCA were used to analyse the data. With regard to purchasing decisions, correlation analysis was performed to establish the relationships between actual scores and mean scores so as to determine purchase motives and decisions. The major purchase point mentioned by all consumers was the supermarket (65%, and the reasons were that this purchase point was the most hygienic and the meat was fresh (35%. The estimated relationship showed a significant association between products consumed at home and the source of income of consumers. With regard to consumption patterns and health issues, most consumers were aware of nutritional balance issues (64%, and most were aware of the health risks associated with meat consumption (59%. It was concluded that consumer perceptions on the meat quality aspects associated with health and consumption patterns are affected by disposable income and cultural background.

  16. Self-injury and aggression in adults with tuberous sclerosis complex: Frequency, associated person characteristics, and implications for assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilde, Lucy; Eden, Kate; de Vries, Petrus; Moss, Jo; Welham, Alice; Oliver, Chris

    2017-05-01

    Even though self-injury and aggression are common in tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), understanding of these behaviours in adults with TSC and intellectual disability (ID) is limited. Little is known about their frequency in comparison to other ID-related genetic disorders or their association with other TSC-Associated Neuropsychiatric Disorders (TAND). This study determined the caregiver-reported frequency of self-injury and aggression in adults with TSC plus ID in comparison to Down syndrome (DS) and Angelman syndrome (AS), and assessed demographic and behavioural characteristics associated with the occurrence of each behaviour in TSC. Rates of self-injury and aggression in adults with TSC plus ID were 31% and 37.9% respectively. The odds of self-injury for adults with TSC were nearly twice as high as the odds for adults with DS, and the odds of aggression were over 2.5 times higher for adults with TSC than for adults with DS. When compared to adults with AS, odds of self-injury in TSC were around half those of the AS group, and odds of aggression were less than a third of those for adults with AS. These differences were not statistically significant. In adults with TSC, poorer communication and socialisation skills, gastric health problems and impulsivity were associated with self-injury; compulsive behaviour and impulsivity were associated with aggression. Caregivers and professionals should be alert to the likelihood of these behaviours in adults with TSC plus ID, and to characteristics associated with increased risk for their occurrence. We suggest assessment strategies to identify those at elevated risk. This paper adds specific examination of behavioural difficulties in adults with tuberous sclerosis complex who also have intellectual disability, a population at heightened risk of adverse behavioural outcomes which has received limited focussed examination to date. Findings support existing suggestions that there is relatively high risk for both self

  17. Trends and Group Differences in the Association between Educational Attainment and U.S. Adult Mortality: Implications for Understanding Education’s Causal Influence*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, Mark D.; Hummer, Robert A.; Sasson, Isaac

    2014-01-01

    Has the shape of the association between educational attainment and U.S. adult mortality changed in recent decades? If so, is it changing consistently across demographic groups? What can changes in the shape of the association tell us about the possible mechanisms in play for improving health and lowering mortality risk over the adult life course? This paper develops the argument that societal technological change may have had profound effects on the importance of educational attainment – particularly advanced education – in the U.S. adult population for garnering health advantages and that these changes should be reflected in changes in the functional form of the association between educational attainment and mortality. We review the historical evidence on the changing functional form of the association, drawing on studies based in the United States, to assess whether these changes are consistent with our argument about the role of technological change. We also provide an updated analysis of these functional form patterns and trends, contrasting data from the early 21st Century with data from the late 20th Century. This updated evidence suggests that the shape of the association between educational attainment and U.S. adult mortality appears to be reflecting lower and lower adult mortality for very highly educated Americans compared to their low-educated counterparts in the 21st Century. We draw on this review and updated evidence to reflect on the question whether education’s association with adult mortality has become increasingly causal in recent decades, why, and the potential research, policy, and global implications of these changes. PMID:25440841

  18. Family history of diabetes is associated with enhanced adipose lipolysis: Evidence for the implication of epigenetic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlman, I; Ryden, M; Arner, P

    2017-11-11

    Type 2 diabetes is associated with insulin resistance, adipose hypertrophy and increased lipolysis. The heritability of these traits has been determined by associating them with a family history of diabetes. Abdominal subcutaneous fat biopsies were obtained from 581 subjects in a cross-sectional study. Fat cells were isolated, and the difference between measured and expected fat-cell volume was used to determine adipose morphology (degree of hypertrophy or hyperplasia). Spontaneous lipolytic activity was determined in explants of adipose tissue by measuring glycerol release. Insulin-stimulated lipogenesis was assessed by measuring the incorporation of radiolabelled glucose into fat-cell lipids. Information on parental history of diabetes was gathered by a questionnaire. Adipose morphology correlated positively with lipolysis (P<0.0001) and inversely with insulin-stimulated lipogenesis (P<0.008). Also, 24% of probands had a family history of diabetes, which was associated with higher body mass index (BMI) scores, and more insulin resistance (HOMAIR) and adipose hypertrophy. Lipolytic activity was increased, and insulin-stimulated lipogenesis decreased, in probands with a parental history of diabetes. The results for HOMAIR, lipolysis and adipose morphology remained significant after adjusting for proband BMI. A maternal history of diabetes was associated with increased adipose lipolytic activity in probands. A family history of diabetes is independent of proband BMI, but associated with adipocyte hypertrophy and enhanced lipolysis, which suggests that these factors are genetically linked to diabetes. Moreover, the influence on lipolysis was only observed in probands with a maternal history of diabetes, thereby supporting an epigenetic impact. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Association Studies and Direct DNA Sequencing Implicate Genetic Susceptibility Loci in the Etiology of Nonsyndromic Orofacial Clefts in Sub-Saharan African Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowans, L.J.J.; Adeyemo, W.L.; Eshete, M.; Mossey, P.A.; Busch, T.; Aregbesola, B.; Donkor, P.; Arthur, F.K.N.; Bello, S.A.; Martinez, A.; Li, M.; Augustine-Akpan, E.A.; Deressa, W.; Twumasi, P.; Olutayo, J.; Deribew, M.; Agbenorku, P.; Oti, A.A.; Braimah, R.; Plange-Rhule, G.; Gesses, M.; Obiri-Yeboah, S.; Oseni, G.O.; Olaitan, P.B.; Abdur-Rahman, L.; Abate, F.; Hailu, T.; Gravem, P.; Ogunlewe, M.O.; Buxó, C.J.; Marazita, M.L.; Adeyemo, A.A.; Murray, J.C.; Butali, A.

    2016-01-01

    Orofacial clefts (OFCs) are congenital dysmorphologies of the human face and oral cavity, with a global incidence of 1 per 700 live births. These anomalies exhibit a multifactorial pattern of inheritance, with genetic and environmental factors both playing crucial roles. Many loci have been implicated in the etiology of nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (NSCL/P) in populations of Asian and European ancestries, through genome-wide association studies and candidate gene studies. However, few populations of African descent have been studied to date. Here, the authors show evidence of an association of some loci with NSCL/P and nonsyndromic cleft palate only (NSCPO) in cohorts from Africa (Ghana, Ethiopia, and Nigeria). The authors genotyped 48 single-nucleotide polymorphisms that were selected from previous genome-wide association studies and candidate gene studies. These markers were successfully genotyped on 701 NSCL/P and 163 NSCPO cases, 1,070 unaffected relatives, and 1,078 unrelated controls. The authors also directly sequenced 7 genes in 184 nonsyndromic OFC (NSOFC) cases and 96 controls from Ghana. Population-specific associations were observed in the case-control analyses of the subpopulations, with West African subpopulations (Ghana and Nigeria) showing a similar pattern of associations. In meta-analyses of the case-control cohort, PAX7 (rs742071, P = 5.10 × 10−3), 8q24 (rs987525, P = 1.22 × 10−3), and VAX1 (rs7078160, P = 0.04) were nominally associated with NSCL/P, and MSX1 (rs115200552, P = 0.01), TULP4 (rs651333, P = 0.04), CRISPLD2 (rs4783099, P = 0.02), and NOG1 (rs17760296, P = 0.04) were nominally associated with NSCPO. Moreover, 7 loci exhibited evidence of threshold overtransmission in NSOFC cases through the transmission disequilibrium test and through analyses of the family-based association for disease traits. Through DNA sequencing, the authors also identified 2 novel, rare, potentially pathogenic variants (p.Asn323Asp

  20. A Pilot Genome-Wide Association Study in Postmenopausal Mexican-Mestizo Women Implicates the RMND1/CCDC170 Locus Is Associated with Bone Mineral Density

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    Marisela Villalobos-Comparán

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To identify genetic variants influencing bone mineral density (BMD in the Mexican-Mestizo population, we performed a GWAS for femoral neck (FN and lumbar spine (LS in Mexican-Mestizo postmenopausal women. In the discovery sample, 300,000 SNPs were genotyped in a cohort of 411 postmenopausal women and seven SNPs were analyzed in the replication cohort (n=420. The combined results of a meta-analysis from the discovery and replication samples identified two loci, RMND1 (rs6904364, P=2.77×10−4 and CCDC170 (rs17081341, P=1.62×10−5, associated with FN BMD. We also compared our results with those of the Genetic Factors for Osteoporosis (GEFOS Consortium meta-analysis. The comparison revealed two loci previously reported in the GEFOS meta-analysis: SOX6 (rs7128738 and PKDCC (rs11887431 associated with FN and LS BMD, respectively, in our study population. Interestingly, rs17081341 rare in Caucasians (minor allele frequency < 0.03 was found in high frequency in our population, which suggests that this association could be specific to non-Caucasian populations. In conclusion, the first pilot Mexican GWA study of BMD confirmed previously identified loci and also demonstrated the importance of studying variability in diverse populations and/or specific populations.

  1. Splay Faults and Associated Mass Transport Deposits in the Manila Accretionary Wedge near Taiwan: Implications for Geohazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, A. T.; Liu, C. S.; Dirgantara, F.

    2015-12-01

    Plate interface megathrusts are major seismogenic faults in subduction zone, capable of generating great earthquakes with widespread submarine landslides and damaging tsunami. Upward branching of megathrusts results in splay faults in the accretionary wedge. Reflection seismic data across the accretionary wedge off southern Taiwan, reveal at least two strands of splay faults as well as multiple stacked mass transport deposits (MTDs) nearby the faults. With the help of sediment coring and age datings in the vicinity of the splay fault, implications for temporal evolution of the mass wasting processes and episodic activities of splay faults are discussed in this paper. Seismic data show two branches of arcward and gently-dipping splay faults with two slope basins lying in the footwall and hangingwall of the faults, respectively. The older and buried splay fault is inactive as the fault tip is covered by up to 1000 m thick sediments in the footwall slope basin, indicating that it ceased to be active around 0.5 Ma ago. Repeated slip of this fault prior to ~0.5 Ma ago may also result in 4 stacked and multiple mass transport deposits (MTDs) of up to 700-m thick found in vicinity of this fault. This fossil splay fault is characterized by reflection polarity similar to that of seafloor, indicative of low water saturation along the fault zone and hence not an active fluid conduit. The younger and overlying splay fault cuts through the seafloor and the emergent fault tip lying at the toe of steep slope (~ 15 degree) with significant slope break. There is also a 500-m horizontal offset, between the buried paleo-seafloor in the footwall and the present-day seafloor on the hangingwall. The reflection polarity of this fault zone is reversed to that of seafloor, indicating fluid rich for this fault patch. These lines of evidence suggest that this young splay fault is an active fault with active fluid circulation along the fault. Our results indicate that the old splay fault

  2. The use of common mitochondrial variants to detect and characterise population structure in the Australian population: implications for genome-wide association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Enda M; McRae, Allan F; Zhao, Zhen-Zhen; Martin, Nicholas G; Montgomery, Grant W; Visscher, Peter M

    2008-11-01

    There is an increasing recognition of the potential role of variants in mitochondrial DNA and nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins in modifying disease risk. This has led to a rise in the number of mitochondrial association studies being undertaken. The unique inheritance pattern of mitochondria makes mitochondrial DNA variation susceptible to having geographical structure. Such a structure may have a dramatic impact on mitochondrial association studies, particularly in heterogeneous populations. By combining self-reported ancestry data and mitochondrial genotype data for a sample of 3839 individuals from 1037 Australian families, population substructure is tested by looking for evidence of differences in mitochondrial haplogroup and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) frequencies between different ancestral groups in Australia. In addition, the substructure within ancestral groups is tested by comparing the similarity of mates to randomly drawn pairs of individuals from the same ancestral group. It is shown that there are significant differences in the frequency of variants both between European and non-European groups, and within Europe. This agrees with previous studies of European mitochondrial variation. No evidence was found for structure within ancestral groups. These results have implications for future association studies in the Australian population, and other populations of heterogeneous ancestry.

  3. Genome-wide association implicates numerous genes and pleiotropy underlying ecological trait variation in natural populations of Populus trichocarpa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKown, Athena [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Klapste, Jaroslav [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Guy, Robert [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Geraldes, Armando [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Porth, Ilga [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Hannemann, Jan [University of Victoria, Canada; Friedmann, Michael [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Muchero, Wellington [ORNL; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; Ehlting, Juergen [University of Victoria, Canada; Cronk, Quentin [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; El-Kassaby, Yousry [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Mansfield, Shawn [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Douglas, Carl [University of British Columbia, Vancouver

    2014-01-01

    To uncover the genetic basis of phenotypic trait variation, we used 448 unrelated wild accessions of black cottonwood (Populus trichocarpa Torr. & Gray) from natural populations throughout western North America. Extensive information from large-scale trait phenotyping (with spatial and temporal replications within a common garden) and genotyping (with a 34K Populus SNP array) of all accessions were used for gene discovery in a genome-wide association study (GWAS).

  4. Genotypic and phenotypic properties of cattle-associated Campylobacter and their implications to public health in the USA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasser M Sanad

    Full Text Available Since cattle are a major source of food and the cattle industry engages people from farms to processing plants and meat markets, it is conceivable that beef-products contaminated with Campylobacter spp. would pose a significant public health concern. To better understand the epidemiology of cattle-associated Campylobacter spp. in the USA, we characterized the prevalence, genotypic and phenotypic properties of these pathogens. Campylobacter were detected in 181 (19.2% out of 944 fecal samples. Specifically, 71 C. jejuni, 132 C. coli, and 10 other Campylobacter spp. were identified. The prevalence of Campylobacter varied regionally and was significantly (P<0.05 higher in fecal samples collected from the South (32.8% as compared to those from the North (14.8%, Midwest (15.83%, and East (12%. Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE analysis showed that C. jejuni and C. coli isolates were genotypically diverse and certain genotypes were shared across two or more of the geographic locations. In addition, 13 new C. jejuni and two C. coli sequence types (STs were detected by Multi Locus Sequence Typing (MLST. C. jejuni associated with clinically human health important sequence type, ST-61 which was not previously reported in the USA, was identified in the present study. Most frequently observed clonal complexes (CC were CC ST-21, CC ST-42, and CC ST-61, which are also common in humans. Further, the cattle associated C. jejuni strains showed varying invasion and intracellular survival capacity; however, C. coli strains showed a lower invasion and intracellular survival potential compared to C. jejuni strains. Furthermore, many cattle associated Campylobacter isolates showed resistance to several antimicrobials including ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, and gentamicin. Taken together, our results highlight the importance of cattle as a potential reservoir for clinically important Campylobacter.

  5. Strong association of socioeconomic status with genetic ancestry in Latinos: implications for admixture studies of type 2 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florez, J. C.; Price, A. L.; Campbell, D.; Riba, L.; Parra, M. V.; Yu, F.; Duque, C.; Saxena, R.; Gallego, N.; Tello-Ruiz, M.; Franco, L.; Rodríguez-Torres, M.; Villegas, A.; Bedoya, G.; Aguilar-Salinas, C. A.; Tusié-Luna, M. T.; Ruiz-Linares, A.; Reich, D.

    2011-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Type 2 diabetes is more prevalent in US American minority populations of African or Native American descent than it is in European Americans. However, the proportion of this epidemiological difference that can be ascribed to genetic or environmental factors is unknown. To determine whether genetic ancestry is correlated with diabetes risk in Latinos, we estimated the proportion of European ancestry in case-control samples from Mexico and Colombia in whom socioeconomic status had been carefully ascertained. Methods We genotyped 67 ancestry-informative markers in 499 participants with type 2 diabetes and 197 controls from Medellín (Colombia), as well as in 163 participants with type 2 diabetes and 72 controls from central Mexico. Each participant was assigned a socioeconomic status scale via various measures. Results Although European ancestry was associated with lower diabetes risk in Mexicans (OR [95% CI] 0.06 [0.02–0.21], p=2.0 × 10−5) and Colombians (OR 0.26 [0.08–0.78], p=0.02), adjustment for socioeconomic status eliminated the association in the Colombian sample (OR 0.64 [0.19–2.12], p=0.46) and significantly attenuated it in the Mexican sample (OR 0.17 [0.04–0.71], p=0.02). Adjustment for BMI did not change the results. Conclusions/interpretation The proportion of non-European ancestry is associated with both type 2 diabetes and lower socioeconomic status in admixed Latino populations from North and South America. We conclude that ancestry-directed search for genetic markers associated with type 2 diabetes in Latinos may benefit from information involving social factors, as these factors have a quantitatively important effect on type 2 diabetes risk relative to ancestry effects. PMID:19526211

  6. Association Between Heart Rate Variability Measures and Blood Glucose Levels: Implications for Noninvasive Glucose Monitoring for Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothberg, Leon J; Lees, Ty; Clifton-Bligh, Roderick; Lal, Sara

    2016-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a global metabolic epidemic associated with numerous adverse complications. Invasive finger prick tests or invasive monitors are currently the most common means of monitoring and controlling blood glucose levels (BGLs). Heart rate variability (HRV) is a noninvasive measure of the autonomic nervous system, and its dynamic physiological nature may provide an alternative means of blood glucose monitoring. However, the relationship between BGL and HRV parameters remains relatively unknown. Thirty-two participants with diabetes (39.97 ± 17.21 years of age) and 31 without diabetes (27.87 ± 10.55 years of age) participated in the current study. Fasting preceded a 10-min three-lead electrocardiogram (ECG), which was followed by a finger prick blood glucose assessment. Following this, a regular meal was consumed, and 30 min after ingestion, a second postprandial 10-min ECG was obtained, and blood glucose assessment was conducted. Low-frequency (LF) power, high-frequency (HF) power, and total power (TP) of HRV were negatively associated with BGL in participants with DM. Additionally, the ratio of LF to HF was positively correlated with BGL. Duration of DM was also associated with multiple HRV parameters, with negative associations to both LF and HF parameters as well as TP. This study demonstrates links between specific HRV variables and BGL. In the future the dynamic nature of HRV could provide a unique and real-time method for monitoring BGL, for continuous noninvasive prediction and/or management of DM.

  7. An Emerging Entity: Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Associated with a Known BRCA Mutation: Clinical Descriptors, Treatment Implications, and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowery, Maeve A.; Kelsen, David P.; Stadler, Zsofia K.; Yu, Kenneth H.; Janjigian, Yelena Y.; Ludwig, Emmy; D'Adamo, David R.; Salo-Mullen, Erin; Robson, Mark E.; Allen, Peter J.; Kurtz, Robert C.

    2011-01-01

    Background. BRCA1 and BRCA2 germline mutations are associated with an elevated risk for pancreas adenocarcinoma (PAC). Other BRCA-associated cancers have been shown to have greater sensitivity to platinum and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors with better clinical outcomes than in sporadic cases; however, outcomes in BRCA-associated PAC have not been reported. Methods. Patients with a known BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation and a diagnosis of PAC were identified from the Gastrointestinal Oncology Service, Familial Pancreas Cancer Registry, and Clinical Genetics Service at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. Results. Fifteen patients, five male, with a BRCA1 (n = 4) or BRCA2 (n = 11) mutation and PAC and one patient with a BRCA1 mutation and acinar cell carcinoma of the pancreas were identified. Seven female patients (70%) had a prior history of breast cancer. Four patients received a PARP inhibitor alone or in combination with chemotherapy; three demonstrated an initial radiographic partial response by Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors whereas one patient had stable disease for 6 months. Six patients received platinum-based chemotherapy first line for metastatic disease; five of those patients had a radiographic partial response. Conclusion. BRCA mutation–associated PAC represents an underidentified, but clinically important, subgroup of patients. This is of particular relevance given the ongoing development of therapeutic agents targeting DNA repair, which may potentially offer a significant benefit to a genetically selected population. We anticipate that further study and understanding of the clinical and biologic features of BRCA-mutant PAC will aid in the identification of tissue biomarkers indicating defective tumor DNA repair pathways in sporadic PAC. PMID:21934105

  8. The clinical implication of cancer-associated microvasculature and fibroblast in advanced colorectal cancer patients with synchronous or metachronous metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Yoonjin; Lee, Hee Eun; Kim, Woo Ho; Kim, Duck-Woo; Kang, Sung-Bum; Lee, Hye Seung

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the clinical significance of microvessel density (MVD), lymphatic vessel density (LVD), and cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) in relation to tumor location in advanced colorectal cancer (CRC). Using immunohistochemistry, we examined 181 advanced CRC patients for CD31 and D2-40 to measure MVD and LVD, respectively, α-smooth muscle actin (SMA) and desmin to identify CAFs, and PTEN to examine genetic changes of CAFs. To evaluate the regional heterogeneity of these properties, we examined tissue from four sites (the center and periphery of the primary cancer, a distant metastasis, and a lymph node metastasis) in each patient. MVD, LVD, and CAFs showed significant heterogeneity with respect to the tumor location. LVD was the greatest in the center of the primary cancers and the amount of CAFs was the lowest in distant metastases. In distant metastases, those from the lung had higher LVD and MVD, but fewer CAFs than those from the liver, peritoneum, or ovary. Patients with low MVD and LVD in the center of the primary cancer had worse outcomes and patients with few CAFs in distant metastases and in the primary tumor had a lower survival rate. PTEN expression in CAFs in distant metastases was lost in 11 of 181 CRC patients (6.1%), which was associated with a worse prognosis. The microenvironment, including cancer-associated microvasculature and fibroblasts, is heterogeneous with respect to the tumor location in CRC patients. Therefore, heterogeneity of microenvironments should be taken into account when managing CRC patients.

  9. Geochemistry of phosphatic-shales and associated authigenic minerals of the Miocene Monterey Formation: Implications for paragenetic evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval, A.; Loyd, S. J.

    2016-12-01

    The Monterey Formation is a petroleum source and reservoir rock in California that was deposited in several basins during the tectonically-active Middle Miocene. The middle carbonaceous marl member of the Monterey Formation contains intervals of phosphatic-shales that are rhythmically cemented by dolomite as layers and concretions. Diagenetic minerals can form as the result of organic matter remineralization facilitated by microbes utilizing oxygen, nitrate, iron (III), sulfate and fermentation products as electron acceptors. Precipitation of phosphate and carbonate minerals tends to occur in suboxic-anoxic sediments, generally experiencing sulfate reduction, where degradation of organic matter yields alkalinity, sulfide and phosphate ions. Here, we present sulfur and carbon geochemical data in order to better characterize the conditions that led to the precipitation of phosphorous-rich minerals (e.g., carbonate-fluorapatite (CFA)) and dolomite that occur in close stratigraphic proximity. These data include concentration of CFA-associated sulfate, carbonate associated sulfate (CAS) and the respective δ°S values. The concentration of inorganic/organic carbon and associated δC values have been determined for CFA, dolomite and the host-shale, in order to further characterize the diagenetic environment of precipitation. These data indicate that authigenesis occurred in pore waters influenced by multiple microbial reactions, including respiration and methanogenesis reactions, and ultimately highlight the complexity of the Monterey diagenetic environment.

  10. Kinesiophobia is Strongly Associated with Altered Loading after an ACL Reconstruction: Implications for Re-injury Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noehren, Brian; Kline, Paul; Ireland, Mary Lloyd; Johnson, Darren L.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: The effect of kinesiophobia (fear of movement) following an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction has recently received greater attention. Elevated kinesiophobia as measured on the Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia (TSK) has been previously found to be associated with poorer outcomes. However, the effect of kinesiophobia in ACL reconstructed patients on high impact and challenging tasks associated with re injury risk such as jumping has not been investigated. Establishing the relationship between kinesiophobia and jump landing mechanics could result in the development of specific treatments to reduce fear of movement and improve jump landing mechanics after ACL reconstruction, resulting in a diminished re-injury risk. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to define the relationship between landing mechanics (axial loading rates and impact forces) with the TSK score in patients 6 months after ACL reconstruction. Methods: Twenty subjects, 6 months post ACL reconstruction, who had completed post-operative physical therapy, and were cleared by their physician to begin return to sport drills participated in the study. Subjects completed an instrumented drop vertical landing assessment with the ground reaction forces recorded while the subjects performed a drop vertical jump task off a 30.48 cm high box. Three trials were taken and the data were analyzed using custom Labview code and Visual 3D software during the period of time from foot contact until initial impact peak. The average loading rate was defined as the linear portion of the vertical ground reaction curve between 20-80% of foot contact to initial impact peak. Subjects also completed the TSK questionnaire. Associations between loading rate and vertical impact peak to the TSK scale were made with Pearson correlation coefficients with significant relationships defined as pkinesiophobia to be associated with a lower weight-bearing in the ACL reconstructed limb. Potentially, subjects who are

  11. The MS Risk Allele of CD40 Is Associated with Reduced Cell-Membrane Bound Expression in Antigen Presenting Cells: Implications for Gene Function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Field

    Full Text Available Human genetic and animal studies have implicated the costimulatory molecule CD40 in the development of multiple sclerosis (MS. We investigated the cell specific gene and protein expression variation controlled by the CD40 genetic variant(s associated with MS, i.e. the T-allele at rs1883832. Previously we had shown that the risk allele is expressed at a lower level in whole blood, especially in people with MS. Here, we have defined the immune cell subsets responsible for genotype and disease effects on CD40 expression at the mRNA and protein level. In cell subsets in which CD40 is most highly expressed, B lymphocytes and dendritic cells, the MS-associated risk variant is associated with reduced CD40 cell-surface protein expression. In monocytes and dendritic cells, the risk allele additionally reduces the ratio of expression of full-length versus truncated CD40 mRNA, the latter encoding secreted CD40. We additionally show that MS patients, regardless of genotype, express significantly lower levels of CD40 cell-surface protein compared to unaffected controls in B lymphocytes. Thus, both genotype-dependent and independent down-regulation of cell-surface CD40 is a feature of MS. Lower expression of a co-stimulator of T cell activation, CD40, is therefore associated with increased MS risk despite the same CD40 variant being associated with reduced risk of other inflammatory autoimmune diseases. Our results highlight the complexity and likely individuality of autoimmune pathogenesis, and could be consistent with antiviral and/or immunoregulatory functions of CD40 playing an important role in protection from MS.

  12. Heterogeneity of environments associated with transmission of visceral leishmaniasis in South-Eastern France and implication for control strategies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoit Faucher

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Visceral leishmaniasis due to Leishmania infantum is currently spreading into new foci across Europe. Leishmania infantum transmission in the Old World was reported to be strongly associated with a few specific environments. Environmental changes due to global warming or human activity were therefore incriminated in the spread of the disease. However, comprehensive studies were lacking to reliably identify all the environments at risk and thereby optimize monitoring and control strategy. METHODOLOGY/FINDINGS: We exhaustively collected 328 cases of autochthonous visceral leishmaniasis from 1993 to 2009 in South-Eastern France. Leishmaniasis incidence decreased from 31 yearly cases between 1993 and 1997 to 12 yearly cases between 2005 and 2009 mostly because Leishmania/HIV coinfection were less frequent. No spread of human visceral leishmaniasis was observed in the studied region. Two major foci were identified, associated with opposite environments: whereas one involved semi-rural hillside environments partly made of mixed forests, the other involved urban and peri-urban areas in and around the region main town, Marseille. The two neighboring foci were related to differing environments despite similar vectors (P. perniciosus, canine reservoir, parasite (L. infantum zymodeme MON-1, and human host. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This unprecedented collection of cases highlighted the occurrence of protracted urban transmission of L. infantum in France, a worrisome finding as the disease is currently spreading in other areas around the Mediterranean. These results complete previous studies about more widespread canine leishmaniasis or human asymptomatic carriage. This first application of systematic geostatistical methods to European human visceral leishmaniasis demonstrated an unsuspected heterogeneity of environments associated with the transmission of the disease. These findings modify the current view of leishmaniasis epidemiology. They

  13. Amylase activity is associated with AMY2B copy numbers in dog: implications for dog domestication, diet and diabetes.

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    Arendt, Maja; Fall, Tove; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Axelsson, Erik

    2014-10-01

    High amylase activity in dogs is associated with a drastic increase in copy numbers of the gene coding for pancreatic amylase, AMY2B, that likely allowed dogs to thrive on a relatively starch-rich diet during early dog domestication. Although most dogs thus probably digest starch more efficiently than do wolves, AMY2B copy numbers vary widely within the dog population, and it is not clear how this variation affects the individual ability to handle starch nor how it affects dog health. In humans, copy numbers of the gene coding for salivary amylase, AMY1, correlate with both salivary amylase levels and enzyme activity, and high amylase activity is related to improved glycemic homeostasis and lower frequencies of metabolic syndrome. Here, we investigate the relationship between AMY2B copy numbers and serum amylase activity in dogs and show that amylase activity correlates with AMY2B copy numbers. We then describe how AMY2B copy numbers vary in individuals from 20 dog breeds and find strong breed-dependent patterns, indicating that the ability to digest starch varies both at the breed and individual level. Finally, to test whether AMY2B copy number is strongly associated with the risk of developing diabetes mellitus, we compare copy numbers in cases and controls as well as in breeds with varying diabetes susceptibility. Although we see no such association here, future studies using larger cohorts are needed before excluding a possible link between AMY2B and diabetes mellitus. © 2014 The Authors. Animal Genetics published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  14. Factors associated with self-reported health: implications for screening level community-based health and environmental studies

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    Jane E. Gallagher

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Advocates for environmental justice, local, state, and national public health officials, exposure scientists, need broad-based health indices to identify vulnerable communities. Longitudinal studies show that perception of current health status predicts subsequent mortality, suggesting that self-reported health (SRH may be useful in screening-level community assessments. This paper evaluates whether SRH is an appropriate surrogate indicator of health status by evaluating relationships between SRH and sociodemographic, lifestyle, and health care factors as well as serological indicators of nutrition, health risk, and environmental exposures. Methods Data were combined from the 2003–2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys for 1372 nonsmoking 20–50 year olds. Ordinal and binary logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios and 95 % confidence intervals of reporting poorer health based on measures of nutrition, health condition, environmental contaminants, and sociodemographic, health care, and lifestyle factors. Results Poorer SRH was associated with several serological measures of nutrition, health condition, and biomarkers of toluene, cadmium, lead, and mercury exposure. Race/ethnicity, income, education, access to health care, food security, exercise, poor mental and physical health, prescription drug use, and multiple health outcome measures (e.g., diabetes, thyroid problems, asthma were also associated with poorer SRH. Conclusion Based on the many significant associations between SRH and serological assays of health risk, sociodemographic measures, health care access and utilization, and lifestyle factors, SRH appears to be a useful health indicator with potential relevance for screening level community-based health and environmental studies.

  15. Variations in Helicobacter pylori cytotoxin-associated genes and their influence in progression to gastric cancer: implications for prevention.

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    Cosmeri Rizzato

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (HP is a bacterium that colonizes the human stomach and can establish a long-term infection of the gastric mucosa. Persistent Hp infection often induces gastritis and is associated with the development of peptic ulcer disease, atrophic gastritis, and gastric adenocarcinoma. Virulent HP isolates harbor the cag (cytotoxin-associated genes pathogenicity island (cagPAI, a 40 kb stretch of DNA that encodes components of a type IV secretion system (T4SS. This T4SS forms a pilus for the injection of virulence factors into host target cells, such as the CagA oncoprotein. We analyzed the genetic variability in cagA and other selected genes of the HP cagPAI (cagC, cagE, cagL, cagT, cagV and cag Gamma using DNA extracted from frozen gastric biopsies or from clinical isolates. Study subjects were 95 cagA+ patients that were histologically diagnosed with chronic gastritis or gastric cancer in Venezuela and Mexico, areas with high prevalence of Hp infection. Sequencing reactions were carried out by both Sanger and next-generation pyrosequencing (454 Roche methods. We found a total of 381 variants with unambiguous calls observed in at least 10% of the originally tested samples and reference strains. We compared the frequencies of these genetic variants between gastric cancer and chronic gastritis cases. Twenty-six SNPs (11 non-synonymous and 14 synonymous showed statistically significant differences (P<0.05, and two SNPs, in position 1039 and 1041 of cagE, showed a highly significant association with cancer (p-value = 2.07×10⁻⁶, and the variant codon was located in the VirB3 homology domain of Agrobacterium. The results of this study may provide preliminary information to target antibiotic treatment to high-risk individuals, if effects of these variants are confirmed in further investigations.

  16. Eating breakfast and dinner together as a family: Associations with sociodemographic characteristics and implications for diet quality and weight status

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    Larson, Nicole; MacLehose, Rich; Fulkerson, Jayne A.; Berge, Jerica M.; Story, Mary; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

    2013-01-01

    Background Research has shown that adolescents who frequently share evening meals with their families experience more positive health outcomes, including diets of higher nutritional quality. However, little is known about families eating together at breakfast. Objectives This study examined sociodemographic differences in family meal frequencies in a population-based adolescent sample. Additionally, this study examined associations of family breakfast meal frequency with dietary quality and weight status. Design Cross-sectional data from EAT 2010 (Eating and Activity in Teens) included anthropometric assessments and classroom-administered surveys completed in 2009-2010. Participants/setting Participants included 2,793 middle and high school students (53.2% girls, mean age=14.4 years) from Minneapolis/St. Paul, MN, public schools. Main outcome measures Usual dietary intake was self-reported on a food frequency questionnaire. Height and weight were measured. Statistical analyses performed Regression models adjusted for sociodemographic characteristics, family dinner frequency, family functioning, and family cohesion were used to examine associations of family breakfast frequency with dietary quality and weight status. Results On average, adolescents reported having family breakfast meals 1.5 times (SD=2.1) and family dinner meals 4.1 times (SD=2.6) in the past week. There were racial/ethnic differences in family breakfast frequency, with the highest frequencies reported by adolescents of Black, Hispanic, Native American, and mixed race/ethnicity. Family breakfast frequency was also positively associated with male sex; younger age; and living in a two-parent household. Family breakfast frequency was associated with several markers of better diet quality (such as higher intake of fruit, whole grains, and fiber) and lower risk for overweight/obesity. For example, adolescents who reported seven family breakfasts in the past week consumed an average of 0.37 additional

  17. Amylase activity is associated with AMY2B copy numbers in dog: implications for dog domestication, diet and diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Arendt, Maja; Fall, Tove; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Axelsson, Erik

    2014-01-01

    High amylase activity in dogs is associated with a drastic increase in copy numbers of the gene coding for pancreatic amylase, AMY2B, that likely allowed dogs to thrive on a relatively starch-rich diet during early dog domestication. Although most dogs thus probably digest starch more efficiently than do wolves, AMY2B copy numbers vary widely within the dog population, and it is not clear how this variation affects the individual ability to handle starch nor how it affects dog health. In huma...

  18. Short-term Exposure to Microgravity and the Associated Risk of Sudden Cardiac Arrest: Implications for Commercial Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laing, Kevin J. C.; Russamono, Thais

    2013-02-01

    The likelihood of trained astronauts developing a life threatening cardiac event during spaceflight is relatively rare, whilst the incidence in untrained individuals is unknown. Space tourists who live a sedentary lifestyle have reduced cardiovascular function, but the associated danger of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) during a suborbital spaceflight (SOSF) is unclear. Risk during SOSF was examined by reviewing several microgravity studies and methods of determining poor cardiovascular condition. Accurately assessing cardiovascular function and improving baroreceptor sensitivity through exercise is suggested to reduce the incidence of SCA during future SOSFs. Future studies will benefit from past participants sharing medical history; allowing creation of risk profiles and suitable guidelines.

  19. Higher body mass index in older adults is associated with lower gray matter volume: implications for memory performance.

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    Masouleh, Shahrzad Kharabian; Arélin, Katrin; Horstmann, Annette; Lampe, Leonie; Kipping, Judy A; Luck, Tobias; Riedel-Heller, Steffi G; Schroeter, Matthias L; Stumvoll, Michael; Villringer, Arno; Witte, Anja Veronica

    2016-04-01

    Midlife obesity has been associated with increased dementia risk, yet reports on brain structure and function are mixed. We therefore assessed the effects of body mass index (BMI) on gray matter volume (GMV) and cognition in a well-characterized sample of community-dwelled older adults. GMV was measured using 3T-neuroimaging in 617 participants (258 women, 60-80 years, BMI 17-41 kg/m(2)). In addition, cognitive performance and various confounders including hypertension, diabetes, and apolipoprotein E genotype were assessed. A higher BMI correlated significantly with lower GMV in multiple brain regions, including (pre)frontal, temporal, insular and occipital cortex, thalamus, putamen, amygdala, and cerebellum, even after adjusting for confounders. In addition, lower GMV in prefrontal and thalamic areas partially mediated negative effects of (1) higher BMI and (2) higher age on memory performance. We here showed that a higher BMI in older adults is associated with widespread gray matter alterations, irrespective of obesity-related comorbidities and other confounders. Our results further indicate that a higher BMI induces structural alterations that translate into subtle impairments in memory performance in aging. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Clinical implications of the novel cytokine IL-38 expressed in lung adenocarcinoma: Possible association with PD-L1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Kazuki; Okamoto, Tatsuro; Tominaga, Masaki; Teraishi, Koji; Akamine, Takaki; Takamori, Shinkichi; Katsura, Masakazu; Toyokawa, Gouji; Shoji, Fumihiro; Okamoto, Masaki; Oda, Yoshinao; Hoshino, Tomoaki; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2017-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-38, a novel member of the IL-1 cytokine family, is homologous to IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) and IL-36Ra, and has been reported to act as an antagonist. IL-38 expression is found in tonsil, placenta, and spleen, and recent studies suggest an association between IL-38 and autoimmune diseases. However, whether IL-38 plays a role in carcinogenesis or cancer growth is unclear. In the present study, we identified increases in IL-38 expression by immunohistochemistry in multiple types of cancer cells. In the examination of 417 surgically resected primary lung adenocarcinomas, Fisher's exact tests showed significant associations between high IL-38 expression and high tumor grades, an advanced T status, advanced N status, advanced stage, and the presence of pleural and vessel invasions. Survival analyses by the Kaplan-Meier method showed that patients with high expression of IL-38 had significantly shorter disease-free survival and shorter overall survival after surgery than patients with low expression of IL-38 (log-rank test: P = 0.0021 and P = 0.0035, respectively). Moreover, programmed cell death-ligand 1 (PD-L1)-positive cases showed higher expression of IL-38 than PD-L1-negative cases (Wilcoxon rank-sum test: P lung adenocarcinoma patients. IL-38 may affect host immunity or the tumor microenvironment, and contribute to the progression of lung adenocarcinoma.

  1. Study of association and molecular analysis of human papillomavirus in breast cancer of Indian patients: Clinical and prognostic implication.

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    Saimul Islam

    Full Text Available Human papillomavirus (HPV causes tumors primarily Cervical cancer. Recently, inconsistent reports came up in Breast cancer (BC too. In India, despite treatment 70,218 BC patients die each year. So, we explored the association of HPV, if any, with BC prognosis in Indian pre-therapeutic (PT and Neo-adjuvant chemotherapy (NACT patients with subsequent analysis of HPV profile.HPV prevalence was checked and analysis of physical status, copy number, genome variation, promoter methylation and expression (mRNA and protein of the prevalent subtype was done.High prevalence of HPV was observed in both PT (64.0% and NACT (71.0% cases with significant association with younger (20-45 yrs PT patients. Interestingly, HPV infection was significantly increased from adjacent normal breast (9.5%, 2/21, fibro adenomas (30%, 3/10 to tumors (64.8%, 203/313 samples. In both PT and NACT cases, HPV16 was the most prevalent subtype (69.0% followed by HPV18 and HPV33. Survival analysis illustrated hrHPV infected PT patients had worst prognosis. So, detailed analysis of HPV16 profile was done which showed Europian-G350 as the most frequent HPV16 variant along with high rate of integration. Moreover, low copy number and hyper-methylation of P97 early promoter were concordant with low HPV16 E6 and E7 mRNA and protein expression. Notably, four novel variations (KT020838, KT020840, KT020841 and KT020839 in the LCR region and two (KT020836 and KT020837 in the E6 region were identified for the first time along with two novel E6^E7*I (KU199314 and E6^E7*II (KU199315 fusion transcript variants.Thus, significant association of hrHPV with prognosis of Indian BC patients led to additional investigation of HPV16 profile. Outcomes indicated a plausible role of HPV in Indian BC patients.

  2. Multiple Evidences for Association between Cognitive Impairment and Dysglycemia in Parkinson’s Disease: Implications for Clinical Practice

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    Liu Yang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: It remains unclear about the etiopathogenesis of cognitive impairment (CI in Parkinson’s disease (PD. Since diabetes mellitus (DM has been shown to be associated with CI in several diseases, we examined the association between CI and dysglycemia in PD.Methods: Enrolled PD patients completed a series of clinical and neuropsychological assessments. Motor symptoms were determined by Hohen-Yahr staging (H-Y staging and Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale – motor score (UPDRS-III. Neuropsychological functions were evaluated by the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE, the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA, and the Hamilton Anxiety and Depression Scales. Moreover, fasting glucose, fasting insulin, glycosylated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c and oral glucose tolerance test were performed to assess glucose metabolism.Results: MoCA and MMSE scores in PD patients with DM group (PD-DM were significantly lower than those in PD patients without DM group (PD-nDM. Consistently, PD-DM group showed significantly higher constituent ratio of CI than PD-nDM group. In addition, MoCA scores in HbA1c ≥ 6.5% group and HbA1c ≥ 7% group were significantly lower than those in the corresponding control groups. MoCA score in IR ≥ 3 group was significantly lower than that in IR < 3 group. Furthermore, MoCA score was negatively correlated with H-Y staging, HbA1c and insulin resistance, respectively. Finally, regression analysis indicated that H-Y staging and HbA1c ≥ 7% were independent risk factors of CI in PD.Conclusion: CI may be tightly associated with dysglycemia in, at least partially, PD patients. Importantly, H-Y staging and HbA1c ≥ 7%, two independent risk factors of CI in PD, may serve as key biomarkers in future PD clinical practice.

  3. Spatial and temporal associations of road traffic noise and air pollution in London: Implications for epidemiological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fecht, Daniela; Hansell, Anna L; Morley, David; Dajnak, David; Vienneau, Danielle; Beevers, Sean; Toledano, Mireille B; Kelly, Frank J; Anderson, H Ross; Gulliver, John

    2016-03-01

    Road traffic gives rise to noise and air pollution exposures, both of which are associated with adverse health effects especially for cardiovascular disease, but mechanisms may differ. Understanding the variability in correlations between these pollutants is essential to understand better their separate and joint effects on human health. We explored associations between modelled noise and air pollutants using different spatial units and area characteristics in London in 2003-2010. We modelled annual average exposures to road traffic noise (LAeq,24h, Lden, LAeq,16h, Lnight) for ~190,000 postcode centroids in London using the UK Calculation of Road Traffic Noise (CRTN) method. We used a dispersion model (KCLurban) to model nitrogen dioxide, nitrogen oxide, ozone, total and the traffic-only component of particulate matter ≤2.5μm and ≤10μm. We analysed noise and air pollution correlations at the postcode level (~50 people), postcodes stratified by London Boroughs (~240,000 people), neighbourhoods (Lower layer Super Output Areas) (~1600 people), 1km grid squares, air pollution tertiles, 50m, 100m and 200m in distance from major roads and by deprivation tertiles. Across all London postcodes, we observed overall moderate correlations between modelled noise and air pollution that were stable over time (Spearman's rho range: |0.34-0.55|). Correlations, however, varied considerably depending on the spatial unit: largest ranges were seen in neighbourhoods and 1km grid squares (both Spearman's rho range: |0.01-0.87|) and was less for Boroughs (Spearman's rho range: |0.21-0.78|). There was little difference in correlations between exposure tertiles, distance from road or deprivation tertiles. Associations between noise and air pollution at the relevant geographical unit of analysis need to be carefully considered in any epidemiological analysis, in particular in complex urban areas. Low correlations near roads, however, suggest that independent effects of road noise and

  4. Necrophagous beetles associated with carcasses in a semi-arid environment in northeastern Brazil: implications for forensic entomology.

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    Mayer, Ana C G; Vasconcelos, Simão D

    2013-03-10

    Data on the ecology and bionomics of necrophagous beetles are scarce in tropical countries despite their relevance in forensic investigations. We performed a survey on the diversity and temporal pattern of colonization of beetles on pig carcasses in a fragment of dry forest in northeastern Brazil. We collected 1550 adults of diverse feeding habits from 12 families, of which 96% had necrophagous and/or copro-necrophagous habits and belonged to four families: Dermestidae, Scarabaeidae, Cleridae and Trogidae. Three species, Dermestes maculatus, Necrobia rufipes and Omorgus suberosus are reported for the first time with an expanded geographical distribution that includes the semi-arid region in Brazil. Adult beetles were collected as early as 24h after death. One endemic species, Deltochilum verruciferum, stood out in terms of numerical dominance and temporal occurrence during different stages of decomposition. Its intimate association with carrion emphasizes their potential role in forensic entomology in the region. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Postsurgical Pathologies Associated with Intradural Electrical Stimulation in the Central Nervous System: Design Implications for a New Clinical Device

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    Katherine N. Gibson-Corley

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord stimulation has been utilized for decades in the treatment of numerous conditions such as failed back surgery and phantom limb syndromes, arachnoiditis, cancer pain, and others. The placement of the stimulating electrode array was originally subdural but, to minimize surgical complexity and reduce the risk of certain postsurgical complications, it became exclusively epidural eventually. Here we review the relevant clinical and experimental pathologic findings, including spinal cord compression, infection, hematoma formation, cerebrospinal fluid leakage, chronic fibrosis, and stimulation-induced neurotoxicity, associated with the early approaches to subdural electrical stimulation of the central nervous system, and the spinal cord in particular. These findings may help optimize the safety and efficacy of a new approach to subdural spinal cord stimulation now under development.

  6. [Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis associated with ovarian teratoma: Description of a case and anesthetic implications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arteche Andrés, M A; Zugasti Echarte, O; de Carlos Errea, J; Pérez Rodríguez, M; Leyún Pérez de Zabalza, R; Azcona Calahorra, M A

    2015-10-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis is an autoimmune encephalitis relationated or not with a neoplasm. Although its incidence is unknown, probably remains underdiagnosed. Epidemiological studies place it as the second cause of immune-mediated encephalitis and the first in patients aged less of 30 years. It shows neuropsychiatric symptoms and autonomic instability. After diagnosis, based on the detection of antibodies in serum or cerebrospinal fluid, an occult malignancy must be investigated. While increasing number of cases have been diagnosed and the important role of this receptor in general anesthesia mechanisms, the interaction of the disease with anesthetic agents and perioperative stress is unknown. We describe the case of a patient with encephalitis associated to ovarian teratoma that underwent gynaecological laparoscopy. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Novel Role of Merlin Tumor Suppressor in Autophagy and Its Implication in Treating NF2-Associated Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Although tumors in NF2 patients are mostly benign, they ultimately compress neighboring nerves or  increase  intracranial   pressure , and cause a range of...knock‐down was associated with enhanced cellular stress that would promote tumorigenesis.    These  analyses  provide new insight into the role of Merlin...results of LC3 coupling efficiency, as well as autophagy induction  analyses  (Figures 7‐9), suggest that  the role of Merlin in autophagy has general

  8. Cancer-associated stroma affects FDG uptake in experimental carcinomas. Implications for FDG-PET delineation of radiotherapy target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farace, Paolo; Merigo, Flavia; Galie, Mirco; Sbarbati, Andrea; Marzola, Pasquina [University of Verona, Department of Morphological-Biomedical Sciences, Section of Anatomy and Histology, Verona (Italy); D' Ambrosio, Daniela; Nanni, Cristina; Spinelli, Antonello; Fanti, Stefano [Policlinico ' S. Orsola-Malpighi' , Department of Nuclear Medicine, Bologna (Italy); Degrassi, Anna [Nerviano Medical Sciences, Milan (Italy); Rubello, Domenico [' S. Maria della Misericordia' Hospital, PET Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rovigo (Italy)

    2009-04-15

    To analyse the influence of cancer-associated stroma on FDG-uptake in two carcinoma models characterized by different stromal degrees. Eight nude mice were subcutaneously injected with DU-145 prostate cancer cells or BXPC-3 pancreatic cancer cells, and underwent FDG-PET imaging about 2 weeks after implantation. After the mice were killed, histology, and CD31 and GLUT1 immunohistochemistry were performed. To further evaluate the highly stromalized carcinoma using perfusion-sensitive imaging, four BXPC-3 tumours underwent two successive albumin-binding (MS-325) MRI scans during tumour growth. FDG uptake was significantly higher in the DU-145 than in the BXPC-3 tumours, which were hardly distinguishable from adjacent normal tissue. In the BXPC-3 tumours, histology confirmed the widespread presence of aberrant infiltrated stroma, embedded with numerous vessels marked by CD31. In both tumour types, the stromal matrix was negative for GLUT1. In DU-145 tumour cells, GLUT1 immunostaining was greater than in BXPC-3 tumour cells, but not homogeneously, since it was less evident in the tumour cells which were nearer to vessels and stroma. Finally, MS-325 MRI always clearly showed areas of enhancement in the BXPC-3 tumours. Cancer-associated stroma has been reported to be capable of aerobic metabolism with low glucose consumption. Furthermore, it has been proposed that regions with high vascular perfusion exhibit a significantly lower FDG uptake, suggesting some vascular/metabolic reciprocity. Since our results are consistent with these recent findings, they signal a risk of tumour volume underestimation in radiotherapy if FDG uptake alone is used for target delineation of carcinomas, which suggests that additional evaluation should be performed using vasculature/perfusion-sensitive imaging. (orig.)

  9. Differing roles of autophagy in HIV-associated neurocognitive impairment and encephalitis with implications for morphine co-exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seth M Dever

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the role of autophagy in HIV-infected subjects with neurocognitive impairment (NCI ± HIV encephalitis (HIVE, many of which had a history of polysubstance abuse/dependence, using post-mortem brain tissues to determine whether differences in autophagy related factors may be more associated with NCI or NCI-encephalitis. Using qRT-PCR, we detected significant differences in gene expression levels with SQSTM1, LAMP1 higher in HIV-infected subjects without NCI while ATG5, SQSTM1 were then lower in HIV infection/NCI and ATG7, SQSTM1 being higher in NCI-HIVE. Immunohistochemical labeling of these autophagy associated proteins (also including Beclin 1 and LC3B in Iba1-postive microglial cells showed generally higher immunoreactivity in the NCI and NCI-HIVE groups with more focal vs. diffuse patterns of expression in the NCI-HIVE group. Furthermore, analysis of microarray data from these same subjects found significantly higher levels of LAMP1 in NCI-HIVE compared to uninfected subjects in the basal ganglia. Finally, we tested the effect of supernatant from HIV-1-infected microglia and HIV-1 Tat protein in combination with morphine on neurons in vitro and found opposing events with both significant inhibition of autophagic flux and reduced dendrite length for morphine and supernatant treatment while Tat and morphine exposure resulted in lower autophagic activity at an earlier time point and higher levels in the later. These results suggest autophagy genes and their corresponding proteins may be differentially regulated at the transcriptional, translational, and post-translational levels in the brain during various stages of the HIV disease and that infected individuals exposed to morphine can experience mixed signaling of autophagic activity which could lead to more severe NCI than those without opioid use.

  10. Differing roles of autophagy in HIV-associated neurocognitive impairment and encephalitis with implications for morphine co-exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dever, Seth M.; Rodriguez, Myosotys; Lapierre, Jessica; Costin, Blair N.; El-Hage, Nazira

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the role of autophagy in HIV-infected subjects with neurocognitive impairment (NCI) ± HIV encephalitis (HIVE), many of which had a history of polysubstance abuse/dependence, using post-mortem brain tissues to determine whether differences in autophagy related factors may be more associated with NCI or NCI-encephalitis. Using qRT-PCR, we detected significant differences in gene expression levels with SQSTM1, LAMP1 higher in HIV-infected subjects without NCI while ATG5, SQSTM1 were then lower in HIV infection/NCI and ATG7, SQSTM1 being higher in NCI-HIVE. Immunohistochemical labeling of these autophagy associated proteins (also including Beclin 1 and LC3B) in Iba1-positive microglial cells showed generally higher immunoreactivity in the NCI and NCI-HIVE groups with more focal vs. diffuse patterns of expression in the NCI-HIVE group. Furthermore, analysis of microarray data from these same subjects found significantly higher levels of LAMP1 in NCI-HIVE compared to uninfected subjects in the basal ganglia. Finally, we tested the effect of supernatant from HIV-1-infected microglia and HIV-1 Tat protein in combination with morphine on neurons in vitro and found opposing events with both significant inhibition of autophagic flux and reduced dendrite length for morphine and supernatant treatment while Tat and morphine exposure resulted in lower autophagic activity at an earlier time point and higher levels in the later. These results suggest autophagy genes and their corresponding proteins may be differentially regulated at the transcriptional, translational, and post-translational levels in the brain during various stages of the HIV disease and that infected individuals exposed to morphine can experience mixed signaling of autophagic activity which could lead to more severe NCI than those without opioid use. PMID:26217309

  11. Bacteria isolated from conspecific bite wounds in Norway and black rats: implications for rat bite-associated infections in people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himsworth, Chelsea G; Zabek, Erin; Tang, Patrick; Parsons, Kirbee L; Koehn, Martha; Jardine, Claire M; Patrick, David M

    2014-02-01

    Bites associated with wild and domestic Norway and black rats (Rattus norvegicus and Rattus rattus) may have a variety of health consequences in people. Bite-related infections are among the most significant of these consequences; however, there is little data on the infectious agents that can be transmitted from rats to people through biting. This is problematic because without an accurate understanding of bite-related infection risks, it is difficult for health professionals to evaluate the adequacy of existing guidelines for empirical therapy. The objectives of this study were to increase our knowledge of the bacterial species associated with rat bites by studying bite wounds that wild rats inflict upon one another and to review the literature regarding rat bites and bite wound management. Wild Norway and black rats (n=725) were trapped in Vancouver, Canada, and examined for bite wounds in the skin. All apparently infected wounds underwent aerobic and anaerobic culture, and isolated bacteria were identified. Thirty-six rats had bite wound-related infections, and approximately 22 different species of bacteria belonging to 18 genera were identified. Staphylococcus aureus was the most common isolate; however, the majority of infections (72.5%) were polymicrobial. Rat bites can result in infection with a number of aerobic and anaerobic Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. In humans, these wounds are best managed through early recognition and cleansing. The benefit of prophylactic antimicrobial treatment is debatable, but given the deep puncturing nature of rodent bites, we suggest that they should be considered a high risk for infection. Antibiotics selected should include coverage for a broad range of bacterial species.

  12. Dietary Fatty Acids Differentially Associate with Fasting Versus 2-Hour Glucose Homeostasis: Implications for The Management of Subtypes of Prediabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Guess

    Full Text Available Over-nutrition has fuelled the global epidemic of type 2 diabetes, but the role of individual macronutrients to the diabetogenic process is not well delineated. We aimed to examine the impact of dietary fatty acid intake on fasting and 2-hour plasma glucose concentrations, as well as tissue-specific insulin action governing each. Normoglycemic controls (n = 15, athletes (n = 14, and obese (n = 23, as well as people with prediabetes (n = 10 and type 2 diabetes (n = 11, were queried about their habitual diet using a Food Frequency Questionnaire. All subjects were screened by an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT and studied using the hyperinsulinemic/euglycemic clamp with infusion of 6,62H2-glucose. Multiple regression was performed to examine relationships between dietary fat intake and 1 fasting plasma glucose, 2 % suppression of endogenous glucose production, 3 2-hour post-OGTT plasma glucose, and 4 skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity (glucose rate of disappearance (Rd and non-oxidative glucose disposal (NOGD. The %kcal from saturated fat (SFA was positively associated with fasting (β = 0.303, P = 0.018 and 2-hour plasma glucose (β = 0.415, P<0.001, and negatively related to % suppression of hepatic glucose production (β = -0.245, P = 0.049, clamp Rd (β = -0.256, P = 0.001 and NOGD (β = -0.257, P = 0.001. The %kcal from trans fat was also negatively related to clamp Rd (β = -0.209, P = 0.008 and NOGD (β = -0.210, P = 0.008. In contrast, the %kcal from polyunsaturated fat (PUFA was negatively associated with 2-hour glucose levels (β = -0.383, P = 0.001, and positively related to Rd (β = 0.253, P = 0.007 and NOGD (β = 0.246, P = 0.008. Dietary advice to prevent diabetes should consider the underlying pathophysiology of the prediabetic state.

  13. The cys-loop ligand-gated ion channel gene family of Tetranychus urticae: implications for acaricide toxicology and a novel mutation associated with abamectin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dermauw, W; Ilias, A; Riga, M; Tsagkarakou, A; Grbić, M; Tirry, L; Van Leeuwen, T; Vontas, J

    2012-07-01

    The cys-loop ligand-gated ion channel (cysLGIC) super family of Tetranychus urticae, the two-spotted spider mite, represents the largest arthropod cysLGIC super family described to date and the first characterised one within the group of chelicerates. Genome annotation, phylogenetic analysis and comparison of the cysLGIC subunits with their counterparts in insects reveals that the T. urticae genome encodes for a high number of glutamate- and histamine-gated chloride channel genes (GluCl and HisCl) compared to insects. Three orthologues of the insect γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-gated chloride channel gene Rdl were detected. Other cysLGIC groups, such as the nAChR subunits, are more conserved and have clear insect orthologues. Members of cysLGIC family mediate endogenous chemical neurotransmission and they are prime targets of insecticides. Implications for toxicology associated with the identity and specific features of T. urticae family members are discussed. We further reveal the accumulation of known and novel mutations in different GluCl channel subunits (Tu_GluCl1 and Tu_GluCl3) associated with abamectin resistance in T. urticae, and provide genetic evidence for their causality. Our study provides useful toxicological insights for the exploration of the T. urticae cysLGIC subunits as putative molecular targets for current and future chemical control strategies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Sleep restriction therapy for insomnia is associated with reduced objective total sleep time, increased daytime somnolence, and objectively impaired vigilance: implications for the clinical management of insomnia disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyle, Simon D; Miller, Christopher B; Rogers, Zoe; Siriwardena, A Niroshan; Macmahon, Kenneth M; Espie, Colin A

    2014-02-01

    To investigate whether sleep restriction therapy (SRT) is associated with reduced objective total sleep time (TST), increased daytime somnolence, and impaired vigilance. Within-subject, noncontrolled treatment investigation. Sleep research laboratory. Sixteen patients [10 female, mean age = 47.1 (10.8) y] with well-defined psychophysiological insomnia (PI), reporting TST ≤ 6 h. Patients were treated with single-component SRT over a 4-w protocol, sleeping in the laboratory for 2 nights prior to treatment initiation and for 3 nights (SRT night 1, 8, 22) during the acute interventional phase. The psychomotor vigilance task (PVT) was completed at seven defined time points [day 0 (baseline), day 1,7,8,21,22 (acute treatment) and day 84 (3 mo)]. The Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) was completed at baseline, w 1-4, and 3 mo. Subjective sleep outcomes and global insomnia severity significantly improved before and after SRT. There was, however, a robust decrease in PSG-defined TST during acute implementation of SRT, by an average of 91 min on night 1, 78 min on night 8, and 69 min on night 22, relative to baseline (P sleep restriction therapy is associated with reduced objective total sleep time, increased daytime sleepiness, and objective performance impairment. Our data have important implications for implementation guidelines around the safe and effective delivery of cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia.

  15. Chronic biofilm infection in breast implants is associated with an increased T-cell lymphocytic infiltrate: implications for breast implant-associated lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Honghua; Jacombs, Anita; Vickery, Karen; Merten, Steven L; Pennington, David G; Deva, Anand K

    2015-02-01

    Biofilm infection of breast implants significantly potentiates capsular contracture. This study investigated whether chronic biofilm infection could promote T-cell hyperplasia. In the pig study, 12 textured and 12 smooth implants were inserted into three adult pigs. Implants were left in situ for a mean period of 8.75 months. In the human study, 57 capsules from patients with Baker grade IV contracture were collected prospectively over a 4-year period. Biofilm and surrounding lymphocytes were analyzed using culture, nucleic acid, and visualization techniques. In the pig study, all samples were positive for bacterial biofilm. There was a significant correlation between the bacterial numbers and grade of capsular contracture (p = 0.04). Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction showed that all lymphocytes were significantly more numerous on textured compared with smooth implants (p biofilm. Analysis of lymphocyte numbers showed a T-cell predominance (p biofilm infection around breast prostheses produces an increased T-cell response both in the pig and in humans. A possible link between bacterial biofilm and T-cell hyperplasia is significant in light of breast implant-associated anaplastic large-cell lymphoma. Risk, V.

  16. Grass-Shrub Associations over a Precipitation Gradient and Their Implications for Restoration in the Great Basin, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holthuijzen, Maike F.; Veblen, Kari E.

    2015-01-01

    As environmental stress increases positive (facilitative) plant interactions often predominate. Plant-plant associations (or lack thereof) can indicate whether certain plant species favor particular types of microsites (e.g., shrub canopies or plant-free interspaces) and can provide valuable insights into whether “nurse plants” will contribute to seeding or planting success during ecological restoration. It can be difficult, however, to anticipate how relationships between nurse plants and plants used for restoration may change over large-ranging, regional stress gradients. We investigated associations between the shrub, Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis), and three common native grasses (Poa secunda, Elymus elymoides, and Pseudoroegneria spicata), representing short-, medium-, and deep-rooted growth forms, respectively, across an annual rainfall gradient (220–350 mm) in the Great Basin, USA. We hypothesized that positive shrub-grass relationships would become more frequent at lower rainfall levels, as indicated by greater cover of grasses in shrub canopies than vegetation-free interspaces. We sampled aerial cover, density, height, basal width, grazing status, and reproductive status of perennial grasses in canopies and interspaces of 25–33 sagebrush individuals at 32 sites along a rainfall gradient. We found that aerial cover of the shallow rooted grass, P. secunda, was higher in sagebrush canopy than interspace microsites at lower levels of rainfall. Cover and density of the medium-rooted grass, E. elymoides were higher in sagebrush canopies than interspaces at all but the highest rainfall levels. Neither annual rainfall nor sagebrush canopy microsite significantly affected P. spicata cover. E. elymoides and P. spicata plants were taller, narrower, and less likely to be grazed in shrub canopy microsites than interspaces. Our results suggest that exploring sagebrush canopy microsites for restoration of native perennial grasses

  17. Grass-Shrub Associations over a Precipitation Gradient and Their Implications for Restoration in the Great Basin, USA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maike F Holthuijzen

    Full Text Available As environmental stress increases positive (facilitative plant interactions often predominate. Plant-plant associations (or lack thereof can indicate whether certain plant species favor particular types of microsites (e.g., shrub canopies or plant-free interspaces and can provide valuable insights into whether "nurse plants" will contribute to seeding or planting success during ecological restoration. It can be difficult, however, to anticipate how relationships between nurse plants and plants used for restoration may change over large-ranging, regional stress gradients. We investigated associations between the shrub, Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis, and three common native grasses (Poa secunda, Elymus elymoides, and Pseudoroegneria spicata, representing short-, medium-, and deep-rooted growth forms, respectively, across an annual rainfall gradient (220-350 mm in the Great Basin, USA. We hypothesized that positive shrub-grass relationships would become more frequent at lower rainfall levels, as indicated by greater cover of grasses in shrub canopies than vegetation-free interspaces. We sampled aerial cover, density, height, basal width, grazing status, and reproductive status of perennial grasses in canopies and interspaces of 25-33 sagebrush individuals at 32 sites along a rainfall gradient. We found that aerial cover of the shallow rooted grass, P. secunda, was higher in sagebrush canopy than interspace microsites at lower levels of rainfall. Cover and density of the medium-rooted grass, E. elymoides were higher in sagebrush canopies than interspaces at all but the highest rainfall levels. Neither annual rainfall nor sagebrush canopy microsite significantly affected P. spicata cover. E. elymoides and P. spicata plants were taller, narrower, and less likely to be grazed in shrub canopy microsites than interspaces. Our results suggest that exploring sagebrush canopy microsites for restoration of native perennial

  18. Mechanism of ROS scavenging and antioxidant signalling by redox metallic and fullerene nanomaterials: Potential implications in ROS associated degenerative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Mohd Javed; Ahamed, Maqusood; Alhadlaq, Hisham A; Alshamsan, Aws

    2017-04-01

    The balance between oxidation and anti-oxidation is believed to be critical in maintaining healthy biological systems. However, our endogenous antioxidant defense systems are incomplete without exogenous antioxidants and, therefore, there is a continuous demand for exogenous antioxidants to prevent stress and ageing associated disorders. Nanotechnology has yielded enormous variety of nanomaterials (NMs) of which metallic and carbonic (mainly fullerenes) NMs, with redox property, have been found to be strong scavengers of ROS and antioxidants in preclinical in vitro and in vivo models. Redox activity of metal based NMs and membrane translocation time of fullerene NMs seem to be the major determinants in ROS scavenging potential exhibited by these NMs. A comprehensive knowledge about the effects of ROS scavenging NMs in cellular antioxidant signalling is largely lacking. This review compiles the mechanisms of ROS scavenging as well as antioxidant signalling of the aforementioned metallic and fullerene NMs. Direct interaction between NMs and proteins does greatly affect the corona/adsorption formation dynamics but such interaction does not provide the explanation behind diverse biological outcomes induced by NMs. Indirect interaction, however, that could occur via NMs uptake and dissolution, NMs ROS induction and ROS scavenging property, and NMs membrane translocation time seem to work as a central mode of interaction. The usage of potential antioxidant NMs in biological systems would greatly impact the field of nanomedicine. ROS scavenging NMs hold great promise in the future treatment of ROS related degenerative disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Malachi’s concept of a Torah-compliant community (Ml 3:22 [MT] and its associated implications

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    Blessing O. Boloje

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on Malachi’s distinctive claims that guarantee a well-ordered community, namely the validity and feasibility of a Torah-compliant community. Since Torah compliance is a fundamental core of Israel’s life, in the book of Malachi, Yahweh’s Torah functions as the reliable and invariable authority for the community well-being as a whole. Community well-being as pictured by Malachi is created not only by Yahweh but also as the consequent contemplation and action of community. Malachi notes clearly that it is the sins of the community as a whole that renders it inconceivable that Yahweh’s blessings should attend to them as they are now, and Malachi demands certain definite and substantial actions as preconditions to the manifestation of the desired expectations. To him the secret of creating and maintaining a healthy, viable community and living as people in covenant relationship with Yahweh, is by ‘remembering’ (upholding and practicing Yahweh’s Torah. Accordingly, Malachi enjoined his audience to remember the Torah of Moses, which constitutes the fundamental dimensions of their relationship with Yahweh. This article is thus an attempt to understand Malachi’s concept of a Torah-compliant community and its associated blessings of happiness and shalom.

  20. Association of clinical signs and symptoms with pneumococcal acute otitis media by serotype--implications for vaccine effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmu, Arto A I; Jokinen, Jukka T; Kaijalainen, Tarja; Leinonen, Maija; Karma, Pekka; Kilpi, Terhi M

    2005-01-01

    Clinical symptoms and signs in acute otitis media (AOM) may differ depending on the various pneumococcal serotypes causing the disease. Alteration in clinical presentation of AOM could be expected after wide-scale pneumococcal vaccinations if there were considerable differences between vaccine serotypes and nonvaccine serotypes. In this study, data from 831 children in the control arm of the Finnish Otitis Media Vaccine Trial were used. The children were followed up prospectively in 8 study clinics from 2 to 24 months of age. If AOM was diagnosed, myringotomy was done, and middle ear fluid was aspirated for bacterial culture. Clinical symptoms and signs of AOM were routinely recorded on structured case report forms. Consistent with previous studies, 60% of pneumococcal episodes were caused by vaccine serotypes. There were no major differences between the clinical presentations of AOM due to different serotypes or serotype categories. However, earache was more often associated with AOM caused by vaccine and cross-reactive serotypes, compared with AOM caused by non-vaccine-related serotypes (42% vs. 29%; odds ratio, 1.66; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-2.70). Introduction of the currently available pneumococcal conjugate vaccine is unlikely to result in a remarkable alteration in the clinical presentation of pneumococcal AOM in infants.

  1. δ-opioid receptor and somatostatin receptor-4 heterodimerization: possible implications in modulation of pain associated signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rishi K Somvanshi

    Full Text Available Pain relief is the principal action of opioids. Somatostatin (SST, a growth hormone inhibitory peptide is also known to alleviate pain even in cases when opioids fail. Recent studies have shown that mice are prone to sustained pain and devoid of analgesic effect in the absence of somatostatin receptor 4 (SSTR4. In the present study, using brain slices, cultured neurons and HEK-293 cells, we showed that SSTR4 and δ-Opioid receptor (δOR exist in a heteromeric complex and function in synergistic manner. SSTR4 and δOR co-expressed in cortical/striatal brain regions and spinal cord. Using cultured neuronal cells, we describe the heterogeneous complex formation of SSTR4 and δOR at neuronal cell body and processes. Cotransfected cells display inhibition of cAMP/PKA and co-activation of SSTR4 and δOR oppose receptor trafficking induced by individual receptor activation. Furthermore, downstream signaling pathways either associated with withdrawal or pain relief are modulated synergistically with a predominant role of SSTR4. Inhibition of cAMP/PKA and activation of ERK1/2 are the possible cellular adaptations to prevent withdrawal induced by chronic morphine use. Our results reveal direct intra-membrane interaction between SSTR4 and δOR and provide insights for the molecular mechanism for the anti-nociceptive property of SST in combination with opioids as a potential therapeutic approach to avoid undesirable withdrawal symptoms.

  2. Couples with Intimate Partner Violence Seeking Relationship Help: Associations and Implications for Self-Help and Online Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roddy, McKenzie K; Georgia, Emily J; Doss, Brian D

    2017-04-20

    In-person conjoint treatments for relationship distress are effective at increasing relationship satisfaction, and newly developed online programs are showing promising results. However, couples reporting even low levels intimate partner violence (IPV) are traditionally excluded from these interventions. To improve the availability of couple-based treatment for couples with IPV, the present study sought to determine whether associations with IPV found in community samples generalized to couples seeking help for their relationship and whether web-based interventions for relationship distressed worked equally well for couples with IPV. In the first aim, in a sample of 2,797 individuals who were seeking online help for their relationship, the levels and correlates of both low-intensity and clinically significant IPV largely matched what is found in community samples. In the second aim, in a sample of 300 couples who were randomly assigned to a web-based intervention or a waitlist control group, low-impact IPV did not moderate the effects of the intervention for relationship distress. Therefore, web-based interventions may be an effective (and easily accessible) intervention for relationship distress for couples with low-intensity IPV. © 2017 Family Process Institute.

  3. Drying-induced decomposition and associated changes in aggregation and carbon distribution in subalpine meadow soils: implication of drought

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berhe, A. A.; Arnold, C. L.; Ghezzehei, T. A.

    2016-12-01

    While peatlands are garnering much attention for their greenhouse gas feedback potential in a warming climate, the coupled biogeochemical and hydrological impact of structural and physical changes in these types of systems as a result of drought-induced drying and desiccation has not been studied in detail. The cyclic drawdown/recharge of the water table that exists in most peatland systems impose important controls on organic matter storage and decomposition as well as soil physical properties. In order to better understand how high elevation peatlands will respond to increasingly dry years, we incubated meadow soils collected along a hydrologic gradient at 5 different water potentials and measured the CO2 flux at intervals for over one year to determine how desiccation of meadow soils (from the Harvey Monroe Hall Research Natural Area at the crest of the Sierra Nevada) influences gaseous fluxes of C, as well as aggregation of the organic-rich soils and distribution of the soil C in different physical pools (macro- vs. micro-aggregate, and silt+ clay fractions). We found that the cumulative carbon mineralization was greatest at the highest (0.1 bar) and lowest (4 bar) water potential, across all regions of the meadow, indicating the presence of two separate pools of labile carbon that can be accessed only after a threshold of drying is reached in the soil. We also observe important changes associated with aggregate size distributions and fraction of total carbon distributed in three distinct pools.

  4. Body-Weight Fluctuation in Collegiate Wrestlers: Implications of the National Collegiate Athletic Association Weight-Certification Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransone, Jack; Hughes, Brian

    2004-06-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine fluctuations in total body weight of the elite collegiate wrestler during the competitive season. DESIGN AND SETTING: The study period lasted 2 competitive seasons, beginning 1 month before the 1999-2000 and 2000- 2001 competitive seasons and ending 1 month after the National Championships. SUBJECTS: Seventy-eight male subjects (age = 21.3 +/- 1.5 years, height = 154.1 +/- 0.5 cm) from 4 major universities whose teams finished in the top 5 at both the 2000 and 2001 National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I National Wrestling Championships. MEASUREMENTS: Each subject was asked to report to the testing area 24 hours before, 1 hour before, and 24 hours after a competitive wrestling match, and weight was recorded to the nearest 0.1 lb (0.45 kg). Comparisons among the prematch weights, official weigh-ins, and postmatch weights were made using a randomized, 1-group, repeated-measures factorial analysis of covariance with an alpha level of.05. RESULTS: A significant difference (F(2,154) = 229.99, P body-weight changes 24 hours and 1 hour before the match (t(77) = 56.21, P <.0001). CONCLUSIONS: Elite collegiate wrestlers, like novice wrestlers, significantly reduce weight immediately before and gain weight after the competition.

  5. Prognostic Implication of the QRS Axis and its Association with Myocardial Scarring in Patients with Left Bundle Branch Block.

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    Park, Chan Soon; Cha, Myung-Jin; Choi, Eue-Keun; Oh, Seil

    2017-03-01

    Left bundle branch block (LBBB) with left axis deviation (LAD) has a worse prognosis than LBBB with a normal axis, and myocardial dysfunction has been suggested as a cause of left axis deviation. This study investigated the prognostic significance of the QRS axis in patients with LBBB and analyzed its relationship with the amount of myocardial scarring. A total of 829 patients were diagnosed with LBBB at Seoul National University Hospital from October 2004 to June 2014. Of these, 314 who were asymptomatic and had no previous history of cardiac disease were included in the present study. Myocardial scarring was calculated using the Selvester QRS scoring system, and LAD was defined as a QRS axis between -180° and -30°. Of the total patients, 91 (29%) had LAD, and patients were followed for a median of 30 months. During follow-up, two patients were hospitalized for de novo heart failure, four had pacemaker implants, and 10 died. There was a significant inverse correlation between myocardial scar score and the QRS axis (r=-0.356, paxis (5.5% vs. 1.3%, log-rank p=0.010); the prognostic value was attenuated in multivariable analysis (hazard ratio 4.117; 95% confidence interval 0.955-17.743; p=0.058). Concomitant LAD is an indicator of poor prognosis for patients with LBBB and may be associated with greater myocardial scarring.

  6. Aspergillus parasiticus communities associated with sugarcane in the Rio Grande Valley of Texas: implications of global transport and host association within Aspergillus section Flavi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garber, N P; Cotty, P J

    2014-05-01

    In the Rio Grande Valley of Texas (RGV), values of maize and cottonseed crops are significantly reduced by aflatoxin contamination. Aflatoxin contamination of susceptible crops is the product of communities of aflatoxin producers and the average aflatoxin-producing potentials of these communities influence aflatoxin contamination risk. Cropping pattern influences community composition and, thereby, the epidemiology of aflatoxin contamination. In 2004, Aspergillus parasiticus was isolated from two fields previously cropped to sugarcane but not from 23 fields without recent history of sugarcane cultivation. In 2004 and 2005, A. parasiticus composed 18 to 36% of Aspergillus section Flavi resident in agricultural soils within sugarcane-producing counties. A. parasiticus was not detected in counties that do not produce sugarcane. Aspergillus section Flavi soil communities within sugarcane-producing counties differed significantly dependent on sugarcane cropping history. Fields cropped to sugarcane within the previous 5 years had greater quantities of A. parasiticus (mean = 16 CFU/g) than fields not cropped to sugarcane (mean = 0.1 CFU/g). The percentage of Aspergillus section Flavi composed of A. parasiticus increased to 65% under continuous sugarcane cultivation and remained high the first season of rotation out of sugarcane. Section Flavi communities in fields rotated to non-sugarcane crops for 3 to 5 years were composed of history averaged only 0.2% A. parasiticus. The section Flavi community infecting RGV sugarcane stems ranged from 95% A. parasiticus in billets prepared for commercial planting to 52% A. parasiticus in hand-collected sugarcane stems. Vegetative compatibility assays and multilocus phylogenies verified that aflatoxin contamination of raw sugar was previously attributed to similar A. parasiticus in Japan. Association of closely related A. parasiticus genotypes with sugarcane produced in Japan and RGV, frequent infection of billets by these genotypes

  7. Association among gestation length and health, production, and reproduction in Holstein cows and implications for their offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira-Neto, A; Galvão, K N; Thatcher, W W; Santos, J E P

    2017-04-01

    Objectives were to evaluate associations among gestation length (GL) and performance in Holstein cows and their offspring. A total of 8,095 Holstein cows and 3,635 female offspring born alive on 2 farms using only artificial insemination (AI) were evaluated. Gestation length averaged 276 ± 6 d in the 8,095 dams, and it was categorized as short (SGL; at least 1 SD below the population mean; mean = 266 d, range 256 to 269 d), average (AGL; population mean ± 1 SD; mean = 276 d, range 270 to 282 d), or long (LGL; at least 1 SD above the population mean; mean = 285 d, range 283 to 296 d). Responses evaluated in dams included incidence of diseases within 90 d in milk (DIM), pregnancy at first AI and by 300 DIM, and time to pregnancy. Milk yield and removal from the herd by culling or death were recorded for the first 300 DIM. Responses evaluated in female offspring born alive included removal from the herd and reproductive performance. Within primiparous cows, those with SGL had greater incidence of stillbirth, retained placenta, and metritis than primiparous with AGL or LGL; however, within multiparous cows, those with SGL or LGL had greater incidence of dystocia, stillbirth, retained placenta, and metritis than cows with AGL. Morbidity and rate of morbidity were greater for SGL and LGL than AGL. Rate of removal of dams from the herd was 38% faster for SGL than AGL. Milk production was greatest in AGL cows, but responses depended on parity. For primiparous cows, milk production was less in SGL and LGL than in AGL (AGL = 35.4, SGL = 34.6, LGL = 33.0 ± 0.4 kg/d), whereas for multiparous cows, production was less in SGL but greater in LGL than in AGL (AGL = 41.6, SGL = 38.6, LGL = 42.4 ± 0.3 kg/d). A smaller proportion of cows with SGL received at least one AI, but pregnancy at first AI did not differ among groups. Rate of pregnancy was 11% slower for LGL multiparous than for AGL multiparous. By 300 DIM, pregnancy was greater in AGL than SGL. Pregnancy by 300 DIM in

  8. Stimulated release of tissue plasminogen activator from artery wall sympathetic nerves: implications for stress-associated wall damage.

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    Hao, Zhifang; Jiang, Xi; Sharafeih, Roshanak; Shen, Shujing; Hand, Arthur R; Cone, Robert E; O'Rourke, James

    2005-06-01

    Recurrent stress is clinically associated with early onset hypertension and coronary artery disease. A mechanism linking emotion to pathogenic remodeling of the artery wall has not been identified. Stress stimulates acute regulated release of tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) into the circulation, which is presently attributed to the vascular endothelium. Sympathetic neurons also synthesize t-PA and axonally transport it to the arterial smooth muscle. Unlike release by the endothelium, a stress-stimulated sympathetic discharge would potentially accelerate degradation of the wall matrix by plasmin. To assess whether sympathetic axons are the principal source of acute stress-induced arterial release of t-PA, we compared the output from small densely innervated and large sparsely innervated isolated artery segments before and after sympathetic stimulation, and after ablations. Following phenylephrine infusion densely-innervated microvessels in uveal eyecups were released over 60-fold greater amounts of active t-PA per milligram than the sparsely innervated aorta; and ten-fold more than carotid artery segments. Mesenteric artery release was 4.8-fold greater than release by the carotid artery. In vivo, uveal release of t-PA increased more than three-fold within one minute following superior cervical sympathetic ganglion electrical stimulation, and after phenylephrine, or nicotine infusions of the anterior chamber. Circulating levels of t-PA fell 70% following chemical sympathectomy. We propose that sympathetic nerves are the primary source of stress-induced release of t-PA into and from the densely innervated resistance arteries and arterioles, where dysregulated plasmin-induced proteolysis could damage the wall matrix.

  9. Leber congenital amaurosis associated with AIPL1: challenges in ascribing disease causation, clinical findings, and implications for gene therapy.

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    Mei Hong Tan

    Full Text Available Leber Congenital Amaurosis (LCA and Early Childhood Onset Severe Retinal Dystrophy are clinically and genetically heterogeneous retinal disorders characterised by visual impairment and nystagmus from birth or early infancy. We investigated the prevalence of sequence variants in AIPL1 in a large cohort of such patients (n = 392 and probed the likelihood of disease-causation of the identified variants, subsequently undertaking a detailed assessment of the phenotype of patients with disease-causing mutations. Genomic DNA samples were screened for known variants in the AIPL1 gene using a microarray LCA chip, with 153 of these cases then being directly sequenced. The assessment of disease-causation of identified AIPL1 variants included segregation testing, assessing evolutionary conservation and in silico predictions of pathogenicity. The chip identified AIPL1 variants in 12 patients. Sequencing of AIPL1 in 153 patients and 96 controls found a total of 46 variants, with 29 being novel. In silico analysis suggested that only 6 of these variants are likely to be disease-causing, indicating a previously unrecognized high degree of polymorphism. Seven patients were identified with biallelic changes in AIPL1 likely to be disease-causing. In the youngest subject, electroretinography revealed reduced cone photoreceptor function, but rod responses were within normal limits, with no measurable ERG in other patients. An increasing degree and extent of peripheral retinal pigmentation and degree of maculopathy was noted with increasing age in our series. AIPL1 is significantly polymorphic in both controls and patients, thereby complicating the establishment of disease-causation of identified variants. Despite the associated phenotype being characterised by early-onset severe visual loss in our patient series, there was some evidence of a degree of retinal structural and functional preservation, which was most marked in the youngest patient in our cohort

  10. The cannabinoid receptor 1 associates with NMDA receptors to produce glutamatergic hypofunction: implications in psychosis and schizophrenia.

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    Pilar eSánchez-Blázquez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The endocannabinoid system is widespread throughout the central nervous system and its type 1 receptor (CB1 plays a crucial role in preventing the neurotoxicity caused by activation of glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs. Indeed, it is the activity of NMDARs themselves that provides the demands on the endogenous cannabinoids in order to control their calcium currents. Therefore, a physiological role of this system is to maintain NMDAR activity within safe limits, thereby protecting neural cells from excitotoxicity. Thus, cannabinoids may be able to control NMDAR overactivation-related neural dysfunctions; however the major obstacles to the therapeutic utilization of these compounds are their psychotropic effects and negative influence on cognitive performance. Studies in humans have indicated that abuse of smoked cannabis can promote psychosis and even circumstantially precipitate symptoms of schizophrenia, although the latter appears to require a prior vulnerability in the individual. It is possible that cannabinoids provoke psychosis/schizophrenia reflecting a mechanism common to neuroprotection the reduction of NMDAR activity. Cannabinoids are proposed to produce such effect by reducing the pre-synaptic release of glutamate or interfering with postsynaptic NMDAR-regulated signaling pathways. The efficacy of such control requires the endocannabinoid system to apply its negative influence in a manner that is proportional to the strength of NMDAR signaling. Thus, cannabinoids acting at the wrong time or exerting an inappropriate influence on their receptors may cause NMDAR hypofunction. The purpose of the present review is to draw the attention of the reader to the newly described functional and physical CB1-NMDAR association, which may elucidate the scenario required for the rapid and efficacious control of NMDAR activity. Whether alterations in these mechanisms may increase NMDAR hypofunction leading to vulnerability to

  11. Excess soluble CD40L contributes to blood brain barrier permeability in vivo: implications for HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna C Davidson

    Full Text Available Despite the use of anti-retroviral therapies, a majority of HIV-infected individuals still develop HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders (HAND, indicating that host inflammatory mediators, in addition to viral proteins, may be contributing to these disorders. Consistently, we have previously shown that levels of the inflammatory mediator soluble CD40L (sCD40L are elevated in the circulation of HIV-infected, cognitively impaired individuals as compared to their infected, non-impaired counterparts. Recent studies from our group suggest a role for the CD40/CD40L dyad in blood brain barrier (BBB permeability and interestingly, sCD40L is thought to regulate BBB permeability in other inflammatory disorders of the CNS. Using complementary multiphoton microscopy and quantitative analyses in wild-type and CD40L deficient mice, we now reveal that the HIV transactivator of transcription (Tat can induce BBB permeability in a CD40L-dependent manner. This permeability of the BBB was found to be the result of aberrant platelet activation induced by Tat, since depletion of platelets prior to treatment reversed Tat-induced BBB permeability. Furthermore, Tat treatment led to an increase in granulocyte antigen 1 (Gr1 positive monocytes, indicating an expansion of the inflammatory subset of cells in these mice, which were found to adhere more readily to the brain microvasculature in Tat treated animals. Exploring the mechanisms by which the BBB becomes compromised during HIV infection has the potential to reveal novel therapeutic targets, thereby aiding in the development of adjunct therapies for the management of HAND, which are currently lacking.

  12. Prognostic Implication of the QRS Axis and its Association with Myocardial Scarring in Patients with Left Bundle Branch Block

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chan Soon; Cha, Myung-jin; Choi, Eue-Keun

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objectives Left bundle branch block (LBBB) with left axis deviation (LAD) has a worse prognosis than LBBB with a normal axis, and myocardial dysfunction has been suggested as a cause of left axis deviation. This study investigated the prognostic significance of the QRS axis in patients with LBBB and analyzed its relationship with the amount of myocardial scarring. Subjects and Methods A total of 829 patients were diagnosed with LBBB at Seoul National University Hospital from October 2004 to June 2014. Of these, 314 who were asymptomatic and had no previous history of cardiac disease were included in the present study. Myocardial scarring was calculated using the Selvester QRS scoring system, and LAD was defined as a QRS axis between -180° and -30°. Results Of the total patients, 91 (29%) had LAD, and patients were followed for a median of 30 months. During follow-up, two patients were hospitalized for de novo heart failure, four had pacemaker implants, and 10 died. There was a significant inverse correlation between myocardial scar score and the QRS axis (r=-0.356, p<0.001). Patients with concomitant LAD had a higher rate of major cardiac adverse events compared with patients with a normal axis (5.5% vs. 1.3%, log-rank p=0.010); the prognostic value was attenuated in multivariable analysis (hazard ratio 4.117; 95% confidence interval 0.955-17.743; p=0.058). Conclusion Concomitant LAD is an indicator of poor prognosis for patients with LBBB and may be associated with greater myocardial scarring. PMID:28382083

  13. Proposed changes to the American Psychiatric Association diagnostic criteria for autism spectrum disorder: implications for young children and their families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Roy; Nozyce, Molly

    2013-05-01

    The American Psychiatric Association has revised the diagnostic criteria for their DSM-5 manual. Important changes have been made to the diagnosis of the current (DSM-IV) category of Pervasive Developmental Disorders. This category includes Autistic Disorder (autism), Asperger's Disorder, and Pervasive Developmental Disorder Not Otherwise Specified (PDD-NOS). The DSM-5 deletes Asperger's Disorder and PDD-NOS as diagnostic entities. This change may have unintended consequences, including the possibility that the new diagnostic framework will adversely affect access to developmental interventions under Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) programs, Early Intervention (for birth to 2 years olds) and preschool special education (for 3 and 4 years olds). Changing the current diagnosis of PDD-NOS to a "Social Communication Disorder" focused on language pragmatics in the DSM-5 may restrict eligibility for IDEA programs and limit the scope of services for affected children. Young children who meet current criteria for PDD-NOS require more intensive and multi-disciplinary services than would be available with a communication domain diagnosis and possible service authorization limited to speech-language therapy. Intensive behavioral interventions, inclusive group setting placements, and family support services are typically more available for children with an autism spectrum disorder than with diagnoses reflecting speech-language delay. The diagnostic distinction reflective of the higher language and social functioning between Asperger's Disorder and autism is also undermined by eliminating the former as a categorical diagnosis and subsuming it under autism. This change may adversely affect treatment planning and misinform parents about prognosis for children who meet current criteria for Asperger's Disorder.

  14. Is There an Association between Body Mass Index and Cervical Length? Implications for Obesity and Cervical Length Management in Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesh, Kartik K; Cantonwine, David E; Zera, Chloe; Arjona, Melanie; Smith, Nicole A; Robinson, Julian N; McElrath, Thomas F

    2017-05-01

    Objective Obesity and cervical insufficiency are leading causes of morbidity in pregnancy. We assess the relationship between maternal body mass index (BMI) and second-trimester cervical length. Methods A secondary analysis of a nested case-control study of women with singleton gestations enrolled from 2006 to 2008. The primary exposure was first-trimester BMI, categorized per World Health Organization criteria: normal (18.5 to ≤ 25 kg/m(2)), overweight (25 to ≤ 30 kg/m(2)), and obese (> 30 kg/m(2)). The primary outcome was cervical length > 75th percentile. Results Among 391 pregnant women observed, the median cervical length was 3.6 cm, and the median BMI was 24.8 kg/m(2). In multivariable analyses, after adjusting for BMI, age, race, parity, smoking, and gestational age at delivery, women who were overweight (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]: 2.18; 95% CI: 1.20-3.96) and obese (AOR: 2.83; 95% CI: 1.47-5.43) were more than two times more likely to have a cervical length > 75th percentile. When cervical length and BMI were assessed linearly, for each 1.0 kg/m(2) increase in BMI, cervical length increased by 0.25 mm. These results were robust to utilizing different cutoffs of cervical length and pre-pregnancy BMI. Conclusion This study demonstrates a relationship between BMI and cervical length suggesting that obesity may be associated with longer cervical length. These results will need to be replicated in larger cohorts undergoing universal cervical length assessment. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  15. Structure determination of disease associated peak AAA from l-Tryptophan implicated in the eosinophilia-myalgia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klarskov, Klaus; Gagnon, Hugo; Boudreault, Pierre-Luc; Normandin, Chad; Plancq, Baptiste; Marsault, Eric; Gleich, Gerald J; Naylor, Stephen

    2018-01-05

    The eosinophilia-myalgia syndrome (EMS) outbreak of 1989 that occurred in the USA and elsewhere was caused by the ingestion of l-Tryptophan (L-Trp) solely manufactured by the Japanese company Showa Denko K.K. (SD). Six compounds present in the SD L-Trp were reported to be case-associated contaminants. However, "one" of these compounds, Peak AAA has remained structurally uncharacterized, despite the fact that it was described as "the only statistically significant (p=0.0014) contaminant". Here, we employ on-line microcapillary-high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LC-MS), and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) to determine that Peak AAA is in fact two structurally related isomers. Peak AAA1 and Peak AAA2 differed in LC retention times, and were determined by accurate mass-LC-MS to both have a protonated molecular ion (MH+) of mass 343.239Da (Da), corresponding to a molecular formula of C21H30N2O2, and possessing eight degrees of unsaturation (DoU) for the non-protonated molecule. By comparing the LC-MS and LC-MS-MS retention times and spectra with authentic synthetic standards, Peak AAA1 was identified as the intermolecular condensation product of L-Trp with anteiso 7-methylnonanoic acid, to afford (S)-2-amino-3-(2-((S,E)-7-methylnon-1-en-1-yl)-1H-indol-3-yl)propanoic acid. Peak AAA2 was determined to be a condensation product of L-Trp with decanoic acid, which produced (S)-2-amino-3-(2-((E)-dec-1-en-1-yl)-1H-indol-3-yl)propanoic acid. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Lymphotropic Virions Affect Chemokine Receptor-Mediated Neural Signaling and Apoptosis: Implications for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1-Associated Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jialin; Ghorpade, Anuja; Niemann, Douglas; Cotter, Robin L.; Thylin, Michael R.; Epstein, Leon; Swartz, Jennifer M.; Shepard, Robin B.; Liu, Xiaojuan; Nukuna, Adeline; Gendelman, Howard E.

    1999-01-01

    Chemokine receptors pivotal for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection in lymphocytes and macrophages (CCR3, CCR5, and CXCR4) are expressed on neural cells (microglia, astrocytes, and/or neurons). It is these cells which are damaged during progressive HIV-1 infection of the central nervous system. We theorize that viral coreceptors could effect neural cell damage during HIV-1-associated dementia (HAD) without simultaneously affecting viral replication. To these ends, we studied the ability of diverse viral strains to affect intracellular signaling and apoptosis of neurons, astrocytes, and monocyte-derived macrophages. Inhibition of cyclic AMP, activation of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate, and apoptosis were induced by diverse HIV-1 strains, principally in neurons. Virions from T-cell-tropic (T-tropic) strains (MN, IIIB, and Lai) produced the most significant alterations in signaling of neurons and astrocytes. The HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein, gp120, induced markedly less neural damage than purified virions. Macrophage-tropic (M-tropic) strains (ADA, JR-FL, Bal, MS-CSF, and DJV) produced the least neural damage, while 89.6, a dual-tropic HIV-1 strain, elicited intermediate neural cell damage. All T-tropic strain-mediated neuronal impairments were blocked by the CXCR4 antibody, 12G5. In contrast, the M-tropic strains were only partially blocked by 12G5. CXCR4-mediated neuronal apoptosis was confirmed in pure populations of rat cerebellar granule neurons and was blocked by HA1004, an inhibitor of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, protein kinase A, and protein kinase C. Taken together, these results suggest that progeny HIV-1 virions can influence neuronal signal transduction and apoptosis. This process occurs, in part, through CXCR4 and is independent of CD4 binding. T-tropic viruses that traffic in and out of the brain during progressive HIV-1 disease may play an important role in HAD neuropathogenesis. PMID:10482576

  17. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons associated with road deposited solid and their ecological risk: Implications for road stormwater reuse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Liang [Graduate school at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Liu, An [College of Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Li, Yang; Zhang, Lixun; Zhang, Guijuan [Graduate school at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, Shenzhen 518055 (China); State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Microorganism Application and Risk Control (MARC), Tsinghua University, Shenzhen 518055, Guangdong (China); Guan, Yuntao, E-mail: guanyt@tsinghua.edu.cn [Graduate school at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, Shenzhen 518055 (China); State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Microorganism Application and Risk Control (MARC), Tsinghua University, Shenzhen 518055, Guangdong (China)

    2016-09-01

    Reusing stormwater is becoming popular worldwide. However, urban road stormwater commonly contains toxic pollutants, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), which could undermine reuse safety. This study investigated pollution level of PAHs and their composition build-up on urban roads in a typical megacity in South China. The potential ecological risk posed by PAHs associated with road deposited solid (RDS) was also assessed. Results showed that ecological risk levels varied based on different land use types, which could be significantly influenced by the composition of PAHs and characteristics of RDS. A higher percentage of high-ring PAHs, such as more than four rings, could pose higher ecological risk and are more likely to undermine stormwater reuse safety. Additionally, the degree of traffic congestion rather than traffic volume was found to exert a more significant influence on the generation of high-ring PAH generation. Therefore, stormwater from more congested roads might need proper treatment (particularly for removing high-ring PAHs) before reuse or could be suitable for purposes requiring low-water-quality. The findings of this study are expected to contribute to adequate stormwater reuse strategy development and to enhance the safety of urban road stormwater reuse. - Highlights: • PAHs build-up on road surfaces varies with traffic and land use conditions. • RDS characteristics and PAH composition were considered in ecological risk assessment. • ΣPAH concentration attached to RDS cannot represent their overall ecological risk. • Higher percentage of 5–6 rings PAHs can pose higher ecological risk. • TC exerts more important influences on 5–6 rings PAHs build-up compared with TV.

  18. Radiation therapy for gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma: Dose-volumetric analysis and its clinical implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Hyeon Won; Kim, Tae Hyun; Choi, Il Ju; Kim, Chan Gyoo; Lee, Jong Yeul; Cho, Soo Jeong; Eom, Hyeon Seok; Moon, Sung Ho; Kim, Dae Yong [Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    To assess the clinical outcomes of radiotherapy (RT) using two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional conformal RT (3D-CRT) for patients with gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma to evaluate the effectiveness of involved field RT with moderate-dose and to evaluate the benefit of 3D-CRT comparing with 2D-RT. Between July 2003 and March 2015, 33 patients with stage IE and IIE gastric MALT lymphoma received RT were analyzed. Of 33 patients, 17 patients (51.5%) were Helicobacter pylori (HP) negative and 16 patients (48.5%) were HP positive but refractory to HP eradication (HPE). The 2D-RT (n = 14) and 3D-CRT (n = 19) were performed and total dose was 30.6 Gy/17 fractions. Of 11 patients who RT planning data were available, dose-volumetric parameters between 2D-RT and 3D-CRT plans was compared. All patients reached complete remission (CR) eventually and median time to CR was 3 months (range, 1 to 15 months). No local relapse occurred and one patient died with second primary malignancy. Tumor response, survival, and toxicity were not significantly different between 2D-RT and 3D-CRT (p > 0.05, each). In analysis for dose-volumetric parameters, Dmax and CI for PTV were significantly lower in 3D-CRT plans than 2D-RT plans (p < 0.05, each) and Dmean and V15 for right kidney and Dmean for left kidney were significantly lower in 3D-CRT than 2D-RT (p < 0.05, each). Our data suggested that involved field RT with moderate-dose for gastric MALT lymphoma could be promising and 3D-CRT could be considered to improve the target coverage and reduce radiation dose to the both kidneys.

  19. Higher FKBP5, COMT, CHRNA5, and CRHR1 allele burdens are associated with PTSD and interact with trauma exposure: implications for neuropsychiatric research and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boscarino JA

    2012-03-01

    interacts with risk allele count, such that PTSD is increased in those with higher risk allele counts and higher trauma exposures. Since the single nucleotide polymorphisms studied encompass stress circuitry and addiction biology, these findings may have implications for neuropsychiatric research and treatment.Keywords: posttraumatic stress disorder, genetic association study, single nucleotide polymorphism, risk alleles, trauma exposure, neuroticism, childhood adversity

  20. Heterogeneous associations between smoking and a wide range of initial presentations of cardiovascular disease in 1937360 people in England: lifetime risks and implications for risk prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujades-Rodriguez, Mar; George, Julie; Shah, Anoop Dinesh; Rapsomaniki, Eleni; Denaxas, Spiros; West, Robert; Smeeth, Liam; Timmis, Adam; Hemingway, Harry

    2015-02-01

    implications for research, clinical screening and risk prediction. © The Author 2014; all rights reserved. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association.

  1. Social skills and associated psychopathology in children with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome: implications for interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shashi, V; Veerapandiyan, A; Schoch, K; Kwapil, T; Keshavan, M; Ip, E; Hooper, S

    2012-09-01

    Although distinctive neuropsychological impairments have been delineated in children with chromosome 22q11 deletion syndrome (22q11DS), social skills and social cognition remain less well-characterised. To examine social skills and social cognition and their relationship with neuropsychological function/behaviour and psychiatric diagnoses in children with 22q11DS. Sixty-six children with 22q11DS and 54 control participants underwent neuropsychological testing and were administered the Diagnostic Analysis of Non-Verbal Accuracy (DANVA) for face and auditory emotion recognition, a measure of social cognition: their parents/guardians were administered the Social Skills Rating System (SSRS) - parent version, Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) - parent version and the Computerised Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children (C-DISC). The 22q11DS group exhibited significantly lower social skills total score and more problem social behaviours, lower neurocognitive functioning, higher rates of anxiety disorders and more internalising symptoms than the control group. Participants with 22q11DS also exhibited significant deficits in their ability to read facial expressions compared with the control group, but performed no differently than the control participants in the processing of emotions by tone of voice. Within the 22q11DS group, higher social competency was correlated with higher global assessment of functioning and parental socio-economic status. Social competency was worse in those with anxiety disorders, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, more than two psychiatric diagnoses on the C-DISC and higher internalising symptoms. No significant correlations of SSRS scores were seen with IQ, executive functions, attention, or verbal learning and memory. No correlations were found between social cognition and social skill scores. Our results indicate that social skills in children with 22q11DS are associated with behaviour/emotional functioning and not with neurocognition

  2. Delta-associated molluscan life and death assemblages in the northern Adriatic Sea: Implications for paleoecology, regional diversity and conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Kristina; Zuschin, Martin

    2013-01-15

    Life-death (LD) studies of shelly macrofauna are important to evaluate how well a fossil assemblage can reflect the original living community, but can also serve as a proxy for recent ecological shifts in marine habitats and in practice this has to be distinguished using taphonomic preservation pattern and estimates of time-averaging. It remains to be rigorously evaluated, however, how to distinguish between sources of LD disagreement. In addition, death assemblages (DAs) also preserve important information on regional diversity which is not available from single censuses of the life assemblages (LAs). The northern Adriatic Sea is an ecosystem under anthropogenic pressure, and we studied the distribution and abundance of living and dead bivalve and gastropod species in the physically stressful environments (tidal flat and shallow sublittoral soft bottoms) associated with the delta of the Isonzo River (Gulf of Trieste). Specifically we evaluated the fidelity of richness, evenness, abundance, habitat discrimination and beta diversity. A total of 10,740 molluscs from fifteen tidal flat and fourteen sublittoral sites were analyzed for species composition and distribution of living and dead molluscs. Of 78 recorded species, only eleven were numerically abundant. There were many more dead than living individuals and rarefied species richness in the DA was higher at all spatial scales, but the differences are lower in habitats and in the region than at individual stations. Evenness was always higher in death assemblages, and probably due to temporally more variable LAs the differences are stronger in the sublittoral habitats. Distinct assemblages characterized intertidal and sublittoral habitats, and the distribution and abundance of empty shells generally corresponded to that of the living species. Death assemblages have lower beta diversity than life assemblages, but empty shells capture compositional differences between habitats to a higher degree than living shells

  3. Association between tobacco use and body mass index in urban Indian population: implications for public health in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shukla Heema C

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Body mass index [BMI, weight (kg/height (m2], a measure of relative weight, is a good overall indicator of nutritional status and predictor of overall health. As in many developing countries, the high prevalence of very low BMIs in India represents an important public health risk. Tobacco, smoked in the form of cigarettes or bidis (handmade by rolling a dried rectangular piece of temburni leaf with 0.15–0.25 g of tobacco or chewed, is another important determinant of health. Tobacco use also may exert a strong influence on BMI. Methods The relationship between very low BMI (2 and tobacco use was examined using data from a representative cross-sectional survey of 99,598 adults (40,071 men and 59,527 women carried out in the city of Mumbai (formerly known as Bombay in western India. Participants were men and women aged ≥ 35 years who were residents of the main city of Mumbai. Results All forms of tobacco use were associated with low BMI. The prevalence of low BMI was highest in bidi-smokers (32% compared to 13% in non-users. For smokers, the adjusted odds ratio (OR and 95% confidence interval (CI were OR = 1.80(1.65 to 1.96 for men and OR = 1.59(1.09 to 2.32 for women, respectively, relative to non-users. For smokeless tobacco and mixed habits (smoking and smokeless tobacco, OR = 1.28(1.19 to 1.38 and OR = 1.83(1.67 to 2.00 for men and OR = 1.50(1.43 to 1.59 and OR = 2.19(1.90 to 3.41 for women, respectively. Conclusion Tobacco use appears to be an independent risk factor for low BMI in this population. We conclude that in such populations tobacco control research and interventions will need to be conducted in concert with nutrition research and interventions in order to improve the overall health status of the population.

  4. Conserved DNA methylation combined with differential frontal cortex and cerebellar expression distinguishes C9orf72-associated and sporadic ALS, and implicates SERPINA1 in disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebbert, Mark T W; Ross, Christian A; Pregent, Luc J; Lank, Rebecca J; Zhang, Cheng; Katzman, Rebecca B; Jansen-West, Karen; Song, Yuping; da Rocha, Edroaldo Lummertz; Palmucci, Carla; Desaro, Pamela; Robertson, Amelia E; Caputo, Ana M; Dickson, Dennis W; Boylan, Kevin B; Rademakers, Rosa; Ordog, Tamas; Li, Hu; Belzil, Veronique V

    2017-11-01

    We previously found C9orf72-associated (c9ALS) and sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (sALS) brain transcriptomes comprise thousands of defects, among which, some are likely key contributors to ALS pathogenesis. We have now generated complementary methylome data and combine these two data sets to perform a comprehensive "multi-omic" analysis to clarify the molecular mechanisms initiating RNA misregulation in ALS. We found that c9ALS and sALS patients have generally distinct but overlapping methylome profiles, and that the c9ALS- and sALS-affected genes and pathways have similar biological functions, indicating conserved pathobiology in disease. Our results strongly implicate SERPINA1 in both C9orf72 repeat expansion carriers and non-carriers, where expression levels are greatly increased in both patient groups across the frontal cortex and cerebellum. SERPINA1 expression is particularly pronounced in C9orf72 repeat expansion carriers for both brain regions, where SERPINA1 levels are strictly down regulated across most human tissues, including the brain, except liver and blood, and are not measurable in E18 mouse brain. The altered biological networks we identified contain critical molecular players known to contribute to ALS pathology, which also interact with SERPINA1. Our comprehensive combined methylation and transcription study identifies new genes and highlights that direct genetic and epigenetic changes contribute to c9ALS and sALS pathogenesis.

  5. Contribution of phytoliths to total biogenic silica volumes in the tropical rivers of Malaysia and associated implications for the marine biogeochemical cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Jiaye; Liu, Sen; Liu, Yanguang; Ma, Yongxing; Ran, Xiangbin

    2016-09-01

    The contribution of phytoliths to total biogenic silica (BSi) volumes in rivers worldwide, and the associated implications for the biogeochemical cycle, require in-depth study. Based on samples from rivers in Peninsular Malaysia, this project investigated the source and characteristics of BSi found in Asian tropical rivers, as well as the process of reverse weathering taking place in these fluvial systems. Results indicated that BSi samples collected in sediments consisted of phytolith, diatom and sponge spicules. Phytoliths, predominantly of the elongate form, comprised 92.8%-98.3% of BSi in the Pahang River. Diatom BSi in this river consisted mainly of pennatae diatoms, but represented a relatively small proportion of the total BSi volume. However, diatom BSi (predominantly of the Centricae form) was more prevalent in the Pontian and Endau Rivers with shares of 68.8% and 79.3% of the total BSi volumes, respectively, than Pahang River. Carbon contents of the BSi particulates ranged from 1.85% to 10.8% with an average of 4.79%. These values are higher than those recorded in other studies to date, and indicate that BSi plays a major role in controlling permanent carbon burial. This study suggests that phytoliths from terrestrial plants are the primary constituents of BSi in the rivers of Peninsular Malaysia, and therefore represent a significant proportion of the coastal silica budget.

  6. Implicative Algebras

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tadesse

    Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Computer and Mathematical Sciences, Addis Ababa. University, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia(*drkvenkateswarlu@gmail.com, **berhanufk@yahoo.co.uk). ABSTRACT. In this paper we introduce the concept of implicative algebras which is an equivalent definition of lattice implication algebra ...

  7. Association between Helicobacter pylori seropositivity and mild to moderate COPD: clinical implications in an Asian country with a high prevalence of H. pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ha Youn; Kim, Ji Won; Lee, Jung Kyu; Heo, Eun Young; Chung, Hee Soon; Kim, Deog Keom

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is a major cause of gastric diseases. The clinical implications of H. pylori infection in various diseases outside the gastrointestinal system have also been reported, including in some respiratory disorders. In this study, we investigated the seroprevalence of H. pylori in patients with mild to moderate COPD in an Asian country with a high prevalence of H. pylori infection. Also, we aimed to elucidate the association between the seroprevalence of H. pylori and the decline of lung function in patients with COPD. Participants who underwent a medical checkup for H. pylori at a referral hospital in Korea were recruited for this study. All participants were tested for H. pylori infection using an immunoassay of the H. pylori-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) concentration and a rapid urease test at the time of endoscopy with a gastric mucosal specimen. We assessed the decline in lung function using the spirometric data of those who underwent spirometry more than three times. In total, 603 participants (201 patients with COPD and 402 controls) were analyzed. The seroprevalence of H. pylori IgG in the patients and controls was 45.8% and 52.2%, respectively (P=0.134). The H. pylori IgG level in patients with COPD was not significantly different from that of the controls (114.8 and 109.6 units/mL, respectively; P=0.549). In addition, there were no significant differences in the annual forced expiratory volume in 1 second or forced vital capacity between the participants with H. pylori seropositivity and seronegativity. This study showed no relationship between H. pylori infection and COPD in a country with a high burden of H. pylori infection. Furthermore, H. pylori infection did not affect the rate of lung function decline in this study population.

  8. Impairment of the natriuretic peptide system in follitropin receptor knockout mice and reversal by estradiol: implications for obesity-associated hypertension in menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belo, Najara O; Sairam, M Ram; Dos Reis, Adelina M

    2008-03-01

    Estrogen is considered a major regulator of adipose tissue in females. Estrogen increases circulating levels of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), a hormone with renal and cardiovascular effects. The aim of this study was to determine the status of the natriuretic peptide system in female follitropin-receptor knockout (FORKO) mice that could be associated with obesity and hypertension observed in these mutants. Furthermore, estradiol treatment was used to reverse alterations observed. FORKO and wild-type (WT) mice received daily injections of estradiol for 4 d. On the fifth day, blood was collected for determination of plasma ANP levels, and selected tissues were collected for determination of ANP, natriuretic peptide receptor type-A (NPR-A) and type-C (NPR-C) gene expression by RT-PCR and binding of [(125)I]ANP by autoradiography. At 5 months of age, FORKO mice were heavier and had more adipose tissue than WT mice. FORKO mice had lower plasma ANP levels and atrial ANP gene expression and higher renal and adipocyte NPR-C gene expression than WT mice. Estradiol treatment reduced weight gain and increased atrial ANP synthesis as well as decreased ANP clearance NPR-C receptors, resulting in elevation of circulating ANP level. In conclusion, this study shows that FORKO females have an impaired natriuretic peptide system, which may contribute to the susceptibility of FORKO mice to developing age-related hypertension previously shown in these animals. This study establishes a relation between estrogen, adipose tissue, and ANP, which may have important implications in menopausal women.

  9. Disease-associated pathophysiologic structures in pediatric rheumatic diseases show characteristics of scale-free networks seen in physiologic systems: implications for pathogenesis and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGhee Timothy

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While standard reductionist approaches have provided some insights into specific gene polymorphisms and molecular pathways involved in disease pathogenesis, our understanding of complex traits such as atherosclerosis or type 2 diabetes remains incomplete. Gene expression profiling provides an unprecedented opportunity to understand complex human diseases by providing a global view of the multiple interactions across the genome that are likely to contribute to disease pathogenesis. Thus, the goal of gene expression profiling is not to generate lists of differentially expressed genes, but to identify the physiologic or pathogenic processes and structures represented in the expression profile. Methods RNA was separately extracted from peripheral blood neutrophils and mononuclear leukocytes, labeled, and hybridized to genome level microarrays to generate expression profiles of children with polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis, juvenile dermatomyositis relative to childhood controls. Statistically significantly differentially expressed genes were identified from samples of each disease relative to controls. Functional network analysis identified interactions between products of these differentially expressed genes. Results In silico models of both diseases demonstrated similar features with properties of scale-free networks previously described in physiologic systems. These networks were observable in both cells of the innate immune system (neutrophils and cells of the adaptive immune system (peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Conclusion Genome-level transcriptional profiling from childhood onset rheumatic diseases suggested complex interactions in two arms of the immune system in both diseases. The disease associated networks showed scale-free network patterns similar to those reported in normal physiology. We postulate that these features have important implications for therapy as such networks are relatively resistant

  10. Experimental acute lung injury induces multi-organ epigenetic modifications in key angiogenic genes implicated in sepsis-associated endothelial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomsztyk, Karol; Mar, Daniel; An, Dowon; Sharifian, Roya; Mikula, Michal; Gharib, Sina A; Altemeier, William A; Liles, W Conrad; Denisenko, Oleg

    2015-05-11

    The Tie2/angiopoietin (Tie2/Ang) and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-ligand systems (VEGFR/VEGF) are recognized to play important roles in the regulation of microvascular endothelial function. Downregulation of these genes during sepsis has been implicated in the pathogenesis of sepsis-related microvascular leak and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. Mechanisms responsible for dysregulation of angiogenic genes in sepsis are poorly defined. Western blot, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and multiplex chromatin immunoprecipitation platform (Matrix ChIP) were used to investigate serum albumin leak, changes in gene expression, and associated epigenetic alterations in a murine model of acute lung injury-induced sepsis (ALI-sepsis). Experimental ALI-sepsis induced microvascular leak and downregulation of expression of Angpt1 (Ang1), Tek (Tie2), and Kdr (Vegfr2 or Flk-1) genes in the lung, kidney, and liver. These changes correlate with a decrease in RNA polymerase II density at these genes, and the greatest response was observed in the lung. ALI-sepsis reduced levels of transcription-permissive histone H3 lysine acetylation (H3KAc) at these loci in all examined tissues. Decreases in permissive H3K4m3 and H3Km2 marks were detected only in the lung. In contrast, only minimal alterations in transcription-repressive histone modifications (H3K27m3, H3K9m2, H3K9m3, and H4K20m3) were observed in all tissues. Our results demonstrate that decreases in transcription-permissive, but not increases in transcription-repressive, histone modifications at Angpt1, Tek, and Kdr are a systemic, rather than a lung-restricted, response, involving key end-organs in experimental ALI-sepsis. Given that ventilator-associated pneumonia is a major cause of sepsis in critically ill patients, elucidation of mechanisms mediating epigenetic alterations during sepsis provides fundamental new insights into the pathogenesis of sepsis-induced microvascular leak and subsequent

  11. Factors associated with physical and sexual violence by police among people who inject drugs in Ukraine: implications for retention on opioid agonist therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutsa, Oksana; Marcus, Ruthanne; Bojko, Martha J; Zelenev, Alexei; Mazhnaya, Alyona; Dvoriak, Sergii; Filippovych, Sergii; Altice, Frederick L

    2016-01-01

    Ukraine's volatile HIV epidemic, one of the largest in Eastern Europe and Central Asia, remains concentrated in people who inject drugs (PWID). HIV prevalence is high (21.3% to 41.8%) among the estimated 310,000 PWID. Opioid agonist therapy (OAT) is the most cost-effective HIV prevention strategy there, yet OAT services are hampered by negative attitudes and frequent harassment of OAT clients and site personnel by law enforcement. This paper examines the various types of police violence that Ukrainian PWID experience and factors associated with the different types of violence, as well as the possible implications of police harassment on OAT retention. In 2014 to 2015, we conducted a cross-sectional survey in five Ukrainian cities with 1613 PWID currently, previously and never on OAT, using a combination of respondent-driven sampling, as well as random sampling. We analysed correlates of police violence by multiple factors, including by gender, and their effects on duration of OAT retention. Self-reported physical and sexual violence by police were the two primary outcomes, while retention on OAT was used as a secondary outcome. Overall, 1033 (64.0%) PWID reported being physically assaulted by police, which was positively correlated with currently or previously being on OAT (69.1% vs. 60.2%; p<0.01). HIV prevalence rates were higher in those receiving OAT than those not on OAT (47.6% vs. 36.1%; p<0.01). Police violence experiences differed by sex, with men experiencing significantly more physical violence, while women experienced more sexual violence (65.9% vs. 42.6%; p<0.01). For PWID who had successfully accessed OAT, longer OAT retention was significantly correlated both with sexual assault by police and fewer non-fatal overdoses. Police violence is a frequent experience among PWID in Ukraine, particularly for those accessing OAT, an evidence-based primary and secondary HIV prevention strategy. Police violence experiences, however, were different for men and

  12. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF-BB-mediated induction of monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 in human astrocytes: implications for HIV-associated neuroinflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bethel-Brown Crystal

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Chemokine (C-C motif ligand 2, also known as monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1 is an important factor for the pathogenesis of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND. The mechanisms of MCP-1-mediated neuropathogenesis, in part, revolve around its neuroinflammatory role and the recruitment of monocytes into the central nervous system (CNS via the disrupted blood-brain barrier (BBB. We have previously demonstrated that HIV-1/HIV-1 Tat upregulate platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF-BB, a known cerebrovascular permeant; subsequently, the present study was aimed at exploring the regulation of MCP-1 by PDGF-BB in astrocytes with implications in HAND. Specifically, the data herein demonstrate that exposure of human astrocytes to HIV-1 LAI elevated PDGF-B and MCP-1 levels. Furthermore, treating astrocytes with the human recombinant PDGF-BB protein significantly increased the production and release of MCP-1 at both the RNA and protein levels. MCP-1 induction was regulated by activation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK and p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinases and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K/Akt pathways and the downstream transcription factor, nuclear factor κB (NFκB. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assays demonstrated increased binding of NFκB to the human MCP-1 promoter following PDGF-BB exposure. Conditioned media from PDGF-BB-treated astrocytes increased monocyte transmigration through human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs, an effect that was blocked by STI-571, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor (PDGF receptor (PDGF-R blocker. PDGF-BB-mediated release of MCP-1 was critical for increased permeability in an in vitro BBB model as evidenced by blocking antibody assays. Since MCP-1 is linked to disease severity, understanding its modulation by PDGF-BB could aid in understanding the proinflammatory responses in HAND. These results suggest that astrocyte

  13. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB-mediated induction of monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 in human astrocytes: implications for HIV-associated neuroinflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2, also known as monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) is an important factor for the pathogenesis of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). The mechanisms of MCP-1-mediated neuropathogenesis, in part, revolve around its neuroinflammatory role and the recruitment of monocytes into the central nervous system (CNS) via the disrupted blood-brain barrier (BBB). We have previously demonstrated that HIV-1/HIV-1 Tat upregulate platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB, a known cerebrovascular permeant; subsequently, the present study was aimed at exploring the regulation of MCP-1 by PDGF-BB in astrocytes with implications in HAND. Specifically, the data herein demonstrate that exposure of human astrocytes to HIV-1 LAI elevated PDGF-B and MCP-1 levels. Furthermore, treating astrocytes with the human recombinant PDGF-BB protein significantly increased the production and release of MCP-1 at both the RNA and protein levels. MCP-1 induction was regulated by activation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathways and the downstream transcription factor, nuclear factor κB (NFκB). Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays demonstrated increased binding of NFκB to the human MCP-1 promoter following PDGF-BB exposure. Conditioned media from PDGF-BB-treated astrocytes increased monocyte transmigration through human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs), an effect that was blocked by STI-571, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor (PDGF receptor (PDGF-R) blocker). PDGF-BB-mediated release of MCP-1 was critical for increased permeability in an in vitro BBB model as evidenced by blocking antibody assays. Since MCP-1 is linked to disease severity, understanding its modulation by PDGF-BB could aid in understanding the proinflammatory responses in HAND. These results suggest that astrocyte activation by PDGF

  14. Implication of P-glycoprotein in formation of depression-prone personality: association study between the C3435T MDR1 gene polymorphism and interpersonal sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enokido, Masanori; Suzuki, Akihito; Sadahiro, Ryoichi; Matsumoto, Yoshihiko; Shibuya, Naoshi; Goto, Kaoru; Otani, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    Interpersonal sensitivity is defined as undue and excessive awareness of, and sensitivity to, the behavior and feelings of others. Previous studies suggested that interpersonal sensitivity is one of the vulnerable factors to depression, and that genetic factors and cortisol are involved in the formation of interpersonal sensitivity. On the other hand, P-glycoprotein, which is encoded by the multidrug resistance 1 (MDR1) gene, serves as a barrier to entry and as an active eliminator for xenobiotics and cellular metabolites including cortisol, which is implicated in multiple brain functions. In the present study, we examined the effects of the MDR1 C3435T polymorphism (rs1045642) on interpersonal sensitivity in healthy subjects. The subjects were 842 healthy Japanese volunteers (mean age = 26.7 years, male/female ratio = 490/352). The C3435T polymorphism of MDR1 gene was detected by a PCR method, and interpersonal sensitivity was assessed by the Interpersonal Sensitivity Measure (IPSM). The 2-factor analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) showed a significant main effect of the MDR1 genotype on the IPSM scores with a significant interaction between the genotype and gender. The subsequent 1-factor ANCOVA showed that in females the C/C genotype group had higher IPSM scores than the C/T genotype group (p < 0.001) and the T/T genotype group (p < 0.001), and the C/T genotype group had higher IPSM scores than the T/T genotype group (p = 0.014). In males no significant association was found between the MDR1 genotype and the IPSM scores. In allelic analyses using the χ(2) tests, the C allele frequency in females was significantly higher (p < 0.001) in the high IPSM group than in the low IPSM group, while there was no significant difference in the C allele frequency between the high and low IPSM groups in total subjects and males. The present study suggests that the C3435T polymorphism of the MDR1 gene affects the formation of a depression-prone personality trait in Japanese females.

  15. Factors associated with physical and sexual violence by police among people who inject drugs in Ukraine: implications for retention on opioid agonist therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oksana Kutsa

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Ukraine's volatile HIV epidemic, one of the largest in Eastern Europe and Central Asia, remains concentrated in people who inject drugs (PWID. HIV prevalence is high (21.3% to 41.8% among the estimated 310,000 PWID. Opioid agonist therapy (OAT is the most cost-effective HIV prevention strategy there, yet OAT services are hampered by negative attitudes and frequent harassment of OAT clients and site personnel by law enforcement. This paper examines the various types of police violence that Ukrainian PWID experience and factors associated with the different types of violence, as well as the possible implications of police harassment on OAT retention. Methods: In 2014 to 2015, we conducted a cross-sectional survey in five Ukrainian cities with 1613 PWID currently, previously and never on OAT, using a combination of respondent-driven sampling, as well as random sampling. We analysed correlates of police violence by multiple factors, including by gender, and their effects on duration of OAT retention. Self-reported physical and sexual violence by police were the two primary outcomes, while retention on OAT was used as a secondary outcome. Results: Overall, 1033 (64.0% PWID reported being physically assaulted by police, which was positively correlated with currently or previously being on OAT (69.1% vs. 60.2%; p<0.01. HIV prevalence rates were higher in those receiving OAT than those not on OAT (47.6% vs. 36.1%; p<0.01. Police violence experiences differed by sex, with men experiencing significantly more physical violence, while women experienced more sexual violence (65.9% vs. 42.6%; p<0.01. For PWID who had successfully accessed OAT, longer OAT retention was significantly correlated both with sexual assault by police and fewer non-fatal overdoses. Conclusions: Police violence is a frequent experience among PWID in Ukraine, particularly for those accessing OAT, an evidence-based primary and secondary HIV prevention strategy. Police

  16. Association between Helicobacter pylori seropositivity and mild to moderate COPD: clinical implications in an Asian country with a high prevalence of H. pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee HY

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Ha Youn Lee,1,2 Ji Won Kim,2,3 Jung Kyu Lee,2,4 Eun Young Heo,2,4 Hee Soon Chung,2,4 Deog Keom Kim2,4 1Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, 2Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 3Division of Gastroenterology, 4Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul Metropolitan Government-Seoul National University Boramae Medical Center, Seoul, Republic of Korea Background: Helicobacter pylori infection is a major cause of gastric diseases. The clinical implications of H. pylori infection in various diseases outside the gastrointestinal system have also been reported, including in some respiratory disorders. In this study, we investigated the seroprevalence of H. pylori in patients with mild to moderate COPD in an Asian country with a high prevalence of H. pylori infection. Also, we aimed to elucidate the association between the seroprevalence of H. pylori and the decline of lung function in patients with COPD.Methods: Participants who underwent a medical checkup for H. pylori at a referral hospital in Korea were recruited for this study. All participants were tested for H. pylori infection using an immunoassay of the H. pylori-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG concentration and a rapid urease test at the time of endoscopy with a gastric mucosal specimen. We assessed the decline in lung function using the spirometric data of those who underwent spirometry more than three times.Results: In total, 603 participants (201 patients with COPD and 402 controls were analyzed. The seroprevalence of H. pylori IgG in the patients and controls was 45.8% and 52.2%, respectively (P=0.134. The H. pylori IgG level in patients with COPD was not significantly different from that of the controls (114.8 and 109.6 units/mL, respectively; P=0.549. In addition, there

  17. A musculoskeletal model of low grade connective tissue inflammation in patients with thyroid associated ophthalmopathy (TAO): the WOMED concept of lateral tension and its general implications in disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncayo, Roy; Moncayo, Helga

    2007-01-01

    Background Low level connective tissue inflammation has been proposed to play a role in thyroid associated ophthalmopathy (TAO). The aim of this study was to investigate this postulate by a musculoskeletal approach together with biochemical parameters. Methods 13 patients with TAO and 16 controls were examined. Erythrocyte levels of Zn, Cu, Ca2+, Mg, and Fe were determined. The musculoskeletal evaluation included observational data on body posture with emphasis on the orbit-head region. The angular foot position in the frontal plane was quantified following gait observation. The axial orientation of the legs and feet was evaluated in an unloaded supine position. Functional propioceptive tests based on stretch stimuli were done by using foot inversion and foot rotation. Results Alterations in the control group included neck tilt in 3 cases, asymmetrical foot angle during gait in 2, and a reaction to foot inversion in 5 cases. TAO patients presented facial asymmetry with displaced eye fissure inclination (mean 9.1°) as well as tilted head-on-neck position (mean 5.7°). A further asymmetry feature was external rotation of the legs and feet (mean 27°). Both foot inversion as well as foot rotation induced a condition of neuromuscular deficit. This condition could be regulated by gentle acupressure either on the lateral abdomen or the lateral ankle at the acupuncture points gall bladder 26 or bladder 62, respectively. In 5 patients, foot rotation produced a phenomenon of moving toes in the contra lateral foot. In addition foot rotation was accompanied by an audible tendon snapping. Lower erythrocyte Zn levels and altered correlations between Ca2+, Mg, and Fe were found in TAO. Conclusion This whole body observational study has revealed axial deviations and body asymmetry as well as the phenomenon of moving toes in TAO. The most common finding was an arch-like displacement of the body, i.e. eccentric position, with foot inversion and head tilt to the contra lateral side

  18. Trends in participation rates for wildlife-associated outdoor recreation activities by age and race/ethnicity: implications for cohort-component projection models

    Science.gov (United States)

    John F. Dwyer; Allan Marsinko

    1998-01-01

    Cohort-component projection models have been used to explore the implications of increased aging and growth of racial/ethnic minority groups on number of participants in outdoor recreation activities in the years ahead. Projections usually assume that participation rates by age and race/ethnicity remain constant over time. This study looks at trends in activity...

  19. Genome-Wide Association Study Reveals Genetic Architecture of Eating Behaviors in Pigs and its Implications for Humans Obesity by Comparative Genome Mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Do, Duy Ngoc; Strathe, Anders Bjerring; Ostersen, Tage

    2013-01-01

    This study was aimed at identifying genomic regions controlling feeding behaviors inDanish Duroc boars and its potential implications for eating behaviors in humans.Individual daily feed intake (DFI), total daily time spent in feeder (TPD), number of dailyvisits to feeder (NVD), time spent to eat...

  20. Nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor resistance mutations associated with first-line stavudine-containing antiretroviral therapy: programmatic implications for countries phasing out stavudine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tang, Michele W.; Rhee, Soo-Yon; Bertagnolio, Silvia; Ford, Nathan; Holmes, Susan; Sigaloff, Kim C.; Hamers, Raph L.; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F.; Fleury, Herve J.; Kanki, Phyllis J.; Ruxrungtham, Kiat; Hawkins, Claudia A.; Wallis, Carole L.; Stevens, Wendy; van Zyl, Gert U.; Manosuthi, Weerawat; Hosseinipour, Mina C.; Ngo-Giang-Huong, Nicole; Belec, Laurent; Peeters, Martine; Aghokeng, Avelin; Bunupuradah, Torsak; Burda, Sherri; Cane, Patricia; Cappelli, Giulia; Charpentier, Charlotte; Dagnra, Anoumou Y.; Deshpande, Alaka K.; El-Katib, Ziad; Eshleman, Susan H.; Fokam, Joseph; Gody, Jean-Chrysostome; Katzenstein, David; Koyalta, Donato D.; Kumwenda, Johnstone J.; Lallemant, Marc; Lynen, Lutgarde; Marconi, Vincent C.; Margot, Nicolas A.; Moussa, Sandrine; Ndung'u, Thumbi; Nyambi, Phillipe N.; Orrell, Catherine; Schapiro, Jonathan M.; Schuurman, Rob; Sirivichayakul, Sunee; Smith, Davey; Zolfo, Maria; Jordan, Michael R.; Shafer, Robert W.

    2013-01-01

    The World Health Organization Antiretroviral Treatment Guidelines recommend phasing-out stavudine because of its risk of long-term toxicity. There are two mutational pathways of stavudine resistance with different implications for zidovudine and tenofovir cross-resistance, the primary candidates for

  1. Inhibitions and implications associated with celebrity participation in health-related social marketing: an exploratory research focused on HIV prevention in Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casais, Beatriz; Proença, João F

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses motivations and inhibitions among celebrities to participate in health-related social marketing. The research identifies the implications that this involvement may have upon their lives. Results from in-depth interviews with 27 Portuguese celebrities show that they expect a fee for endorsements of commercial and government social marketing, despite the positive image they may gain from endorsing public health. The results demonstrate an absence of celebrity prejudice against HIV because of its serious nature and the social stigma attached to AIDS. This research suggests there is a positive bias and presents helpful information for negotiations between institutions and celebrities.

  2. Changes in the pastoral sheep systems of semi-arid Mediterranean areas: association with common agricultural policy reform and implications for sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula M. Toro-Mujica

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of sheep systems the Mediterranean region have been influenced by reforms coming from the Common Agricultural Policy, and the general economic evolution of markets. The aim of this study was the analysis of the structural changes that occurred between 1999 and 2009, and the identification of future implications for the sheep systems in Andalusia region, Spain. Analysis of the structural changes allowed the generation of strategic information, identified trends that should suggest new rural policies and changes that are likely to have social and environmental impacts, and lastly, prioritize future research. The application of multivariate methodology allowed clustering the farm population into four groups. The typology of these systems was determined by variables related to the sheep subsystem, by the set of agricultural activities, and by changes in swine husbandry, within a context of changes in land tenure and the drive for agricultural intensification. Major modifications of extant systems included a 42% reduction in the number of farms, a decrease in sheep numbers, replacement of native rangelands with improved pastures, olive trees and orchards, a reduction of traditional extensive pastoral activities, and increases in hog production in Dehesa grasslands. Given the historical economic and social importance of the sheep-cereal system, the observed substantial modifications of land use suggest a need to assess their consequences in terms of social and environmental impacts, as well as their implications for climate change.

  3. Implicative Algebras | Kolluru | Momona Ethiopian Journal of Science

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper we introduce the concept of implicative algebras which is an equivalent definition of lattice implication algebra of Xu (1993) and further we prove that it is a regular Autometrized Algebra. Further we remark that the binary operation → on lattice implicative algebra can never be associative. Keywords: Implicative ...

  4. IL-4R(alpha), a new member that associates with Syk kinase: implication in IL-4-induced human neutrophil functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennaciri, Jamila; Girard, Denis

    2009-10-15

    Although Syk has been reported to be associated with IL-2R beta [corrected] and IL-15R alpha in some hematopoietic cells, its association has never been investigated in the IL-4/IL-4R system. In this study, we demonstrate for the first time that Syk is constitutively associated with IL-4R(alpha)in human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) and that IL-4 stimulation increases the amount of Syk associated with IL-4R(alpha). Moreover, upon IL-4 treatment, a pool of Syk associated with IL-4R(alpha) is phosphorylated. We also report that such association is not unique to PMNs because Syk associates with IL-4R(alpha) in Raji and in PBMC cells. Stimulation of PMNs by IL-4 increased the amount of Syk associated with PLC-gamma2, pAkt, and alpha-tubulin. Pretreatment of cells with the Syk-selective inhibitor piceatannol or Syk inhibitor II, significantly inhibited the ability of IL-4 to enhance phagocytosis and cell adhesion and to delay apoptosis, and these results correlate with the ability of piceatannol to reduce Syk activation and its association with IL-4R(alpha). Down-regulation of Syk by antisense techniques demonstrates the importance of Syk in the antiapoptotic effect of IL-4. We conclude that association of Syk to IL-4R(alpha) is of biological significance and that IL-4R(alpha) is a new candidate to be added to the few cytokine receptor components which associate with Syk.

  5. Interactive adsorption of phenolic acids and amino acids on soil minerals : Implications for the formation and properties of soil mineral–organic associations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gao, J.

    2017-01-01

    The bioavailability and dynamics of soil organic matter (SOM) depend largely on the association with mineral particles. However, no consensus exists on the formation, composition and structure of the mineral–organic associations (MOAs). The experimental evidence for the multilayer model of MOAs was

  6. Trans-ancestry genome-wide association study identifies 12 genetic loci influencing blood pressure and implicates a role for DNA methylation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kato, Norihiro; Loh, Marie; Takeuchi, Fumihiko; Verweij, Niek; Wang, Xu; Zhang, Weihua; Kelly, Tanika N.; Saleheen, Danish; Lehne, Benjamin; Leach, Irene Mateo; Drong, Alexander W.; Abbott, James; Wahl, Simone; Tan, Sian-Tsung; Scott, William R.; Campanella, Gianluca; Chadeau-Hyam, Marc; Afzal, Uzma; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S.; Bonder, Marc Jan; Chen, Peng; Dehghan, Abbas; Edwards, Todd L.; Esko, Tonu; Go, Min Jin; Harris, Sarah E.; Hartiala, Jaana; Kasela, Silva; Kasturiratne, Anuradhani; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Kleber, Marcus E.; Li, Huaixing; Mok, Zuan Yu; Nakatochi, Masahiro; Sapari, Nur Sabrina; Saxena, Richa; Stewart, Alexandre F. R.; Stolk, Lisette; Tabara, Yasuharu; Teh, Ai Ling; Wu, Ying; Wu, Jer-Yuarn; Zhang, Yi; Aits, Imke; Alves, Alexessander Da Silva Couto; Das, Shikta; Dorajoo, Rajkumar; Hopewell, Jemma C.; Kim, Yun Kyoung; Koivula, Robert W.; Luan, Jian'an; Lyytikainen, Leo-Pekka; Nguyen, Quang N.; Pereira, Mark A.; Postmus, Iris; Raitakari, Olli T.; Bryan, Molly Scannell; Scott, Robert A.; Sorice, Rossella; Tragante, Vinicius; Traglia, Michela; White, Jon; Yamamoto, Ken; Zhang, Yonghong; Adair, Linda S.; Ahmed, Alauddin; Akiyama, Koichi; Asif, Rasheed; Aung, Tin; Barroso, Ines; Bjonnes, Andrew; Braun, Timothy R.; Cai, Hui; Chang, Li-Ching; Chen, Chien-Hsiun; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Chong, Yap-Seng; Collins, Rory; Courtney, Regina; Davies, Gail; Delgado, Graciela; Do, Loi D.; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Gao, Yu-Tang; Grammer, Tanja B.; Grarup, Niels; Grewal, Jagvir; Gu, Dongfeng; Wander, Gurpreet S.; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hazen, Stanley L.; He, Jing; Heng, Chew-Kiat; Hixson, James E.; Hofman, Albert; Hsu, Chris; Huang, Wei; Husemoen, Lise L. N.; Hwang, Joo-Yeon; Ichihara, Sahoko; Igase, Michiya; Isono, Masato; Justesen, Johanne M.; Katsuy, Tomohiro; Kibriya, Muhammad G.; Kim, Young Jin; Kishimoto, Miyako; Koh, Woon-Puay; Kohara, Katsuhiko; Kumari, Meena; Kwek, Kenneth; Lee, Nanette R.; Lee, Jeannette; Liao, Jiemin; Lieb, Wolfgang; Liewald, David C. M.; Matsubara, Tatsuaki; Matsushita, Yumi; Meitinger, Thomas; Mihailov, Evelin; Milani, Lili; Mills, Rebecca; Mononen, Nina; Mueller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nabika, Toru; Nakashima, Eitaro; Ng, Hong Kiat; Nikus, Kjell; Nutile, Teresa; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Ohnaka, Keizo; Parish, Sarah; Paternoster, Lavinia; Peng, Hao; Peters, Annette; Pham, Son T.; Pinidiyapathirage, Mohitha J.; Rahman, Mahfuzar; Rakugi, Hiromi; Rolandsson, Olov; Rozario, Michelle Ann; Ruggiero, Daniela; Sala, Cinzia F.; Sarju, Ralhan; Shimokawa, Kazuro; Snieder, Harold; Sparso, Thomas; Spiering, Wilko; Starr, John M.; Stott, David J.; Stram, Daniel O.; Sugiyama, Takao; Szymczak, Silke; Tang, W. H. Wilson; Tong, Lin; Trompet, Stella; Turjanmaa, Vaino; Ueshima, Hirotsugu; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Umemura, Satoshi; Vaarasmaki, Marja; van Dam, Rob M.; van Gilst, Wiek H.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Viikari, Jorma S.; Waldenberger, Melanie; Wang, Yiqin; Wang, Aili; Wilson, Rory; Wong, Tien-Yin; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Yamaguchi, Shuhei; Ye, Xingwang; Young, Robin D.; Young, Terri L.; Yuan, Jian-Min; Zhou, Xueya; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Ciullo, Marina; Clarke, Robert; Deloukas, Panos; Franke, Andre; Franks, Paul W.; Franks, Steve; Friedlander, Yechiel; Gross, Myron D.; Guo, Zhirong; Hansen, Torben; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jorgensen, Torben; Jukema, J. Wouter; Kahonen, Mika; Kajio, Hiroshi; Kivimaki, Mika; Lee, Jong-Young; Lehtimaki, Terho; Linneberg, Allan; Miki, Tetsuro; Pedersen, Oluf; Samani, Nilesh J.; Sorensen, Thorkild I. A.; Takayanagi, Ryoichi; Toniolo, Daniela; Ahsan, Habibul; Allayee, Hooman; Chen, Yuan-Tsong; Danesh, John; Deary, Ian J.; Franco, Oscar H.; Franke, Lude; Heijman, Bastiaan T.; Holbrook, Joanna D.; Isaacs, Aaron; Kim, Bong-Jo; Lin, Xu; Liu, Jianjun; Maerz, Winfried; Metspalu, Andres; Mohlke, Karen L.; Sanghera, Dharambir K.; Shu, Xiao-Ou; van Meurs, Joyce B. J.; Vithana, Eranga; Wickremasinghe, Ananda R.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H. W.; Yokota, Mitsuhiro; Zheng, Wei; Zhu, Dingliang; Vineis, Paolo; Kyrtopoulos, Soterios A.; Kleinjans, Jos C. S.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Soong, Richie; Gieger, Christian; Scott, James; Teo, Yik-Ying; He, Jiang; Elliott, Paul; Tai, E. Shyong; van der Harst, Pim; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Chambers, John C.

    2015-01-01

    We carried out a trans-ancestry genome-wide association and replication study of blood pressure phenotypes among up to 320,251 individuals of East Asian, European and South Asian ancestry. We find genetic variants at 12 new loci to be associated with blood pressure (P = 3.9 x 10(-11) to 5.0 x

  7. Predictors of Adults' Knowledge and Awareness of HPV, HPV-Associated Cancers, and the HPV Vaccine: Implications for Health Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Kimberly R.; Singh, Shipra

    2018-01-01

    High human papillomavirus (HPV) prevalence and low HPV vaccine uptake are significant public health concerns. Disparities in HPV-associated cancers and HPV vaccine uptake rates suggest the need for additional research examining factors associated with vaccine acceptance. This study assessed HPV awareness and knowledge and identified…

  8. Shame amplifies the association between stressful life events and paranoia amongst young adults using mental health services: Implications for understanding risk and psychological resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Judith; Jones, Christopher; Lin, Ashleigh; Wood, Stephen; Heinze, Kareen; Jackson, Christopher

    2014-12-15

    Shame is associated with a range of psychological disorders, and is a trans-diagnostic moderator of the association between stressors and symptoms of disorder. However, research has yet to investigate shame in relation to specific psychotic symptoms in clinical groups. In order to address this, the present study investigated shame in young adults with mental health problems, to test whether shame was i) directly associated with paranoia, a prevalent psychotic symptom, and ii) a moderator of the association between stress and paranoia. Sixty participants completed measures of stressful events, paranoia, shame, depression and anxiety. Results from a cross-sectional regression analysis suggested that shame was associated with paranoia after the stressful life event measure was entered into the model, and shame moderated the association between stress and paranoia. For individuals scoring high on shame, shame amplified the association between stress and paranoia, but for low-shame individuals, the association between stress and paranoia was non-significant. These findings suggest that high levels of shame could confer vulnerability for paranoia amongst clinical groups, and that resistance to experiencing shame could be a marker of resilience. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Trans-ancestry genome-wide association study identifies 12 genetic loci influencing blood pressure and implicates a role for DNA methylation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Kato (Norihiro); M. Loh (Marie); F. Takeuchi (Fumihiko); N. Verweij (Niek); X. Wang (Xu); W. Zhang (Weihua); T. NKelly (Tanika); D. Saleheen; B. Lehne (Benjamin); I.M. Leach (Irene Mateo); A. Drong (Alexander); J. Abbott (James); S. Wahl (Simone); S.-T. Tan (Sian-Tsung); W.R. Scott (William R.); G. Campanella (Gianluca); M. Chadeau-Hyam (Marc); U. Afzal (Uzma); T.S. Ahluwalia (Tarunveer Singh); M.J. Bonder (Marc); P. Chen (Ping); A. Dehghan (Abbas); T.L. Edwards (Todd L.); T. Esko (Tõnu); M.J. Go (Min Jin); S.E. Harris (Sarah); J. Hartiala (Jaana); S. Kasela (Silva); A. Kasturiratne (Anuradhani); C.C. Khor; M.E. Kleber (Marcus); H. Li (Huaixing); Z.Y. Mok (Zuan Yu); M. Nakatochi (Masahiro); N.S. Sapari (Nur Sabrina); R. Saxena (Richa); A.F. Stewart (Alexandre F.); L. Stolk (Lisette); Y. Tabara (Yasuharu); A.L. Teh (Ai Ling); Y. Wu (Ying); J.-Y. Wu (Jer-Yuarn); Y. Zhang (Yi); I. Aits (Imke); A. Da Silva Couto Alves (Alexessander); S. Das (Shikta); R. Dorajoo (Rajkumar); J. CHopewell (Jemma); Y.K. Kim (Yun Kyoung); R. WKoivula (Robert); J. Luan (Jian'An); L.-P. Lyytikäinen (Leo-Pekka); Q. NNguyen (Quang); M.A. Pereira (Mark A); D. Postmus (Douwe); O. TRaitakari (Olli); M. Scannell Bryan (Molly); R.A. Scott (Robert); R. Sorice; V. Tragante (Vinicius); M. Traglia (Michela); J. White (Jon); K. Yamamoto (Ken); Y. Zhang (Yonghong); L.S. Adair (Linda); A. Ahmed (Alauddin); K. Akiyama (Koichi); R. Asif (Rasheed); T. Aung (Tin); I. Barroso (Inês); A. Bjonnes (Andrew); T.R. Braun (Timothy R.); H. Cai (Hui); L.-C. Chang (Li-Ching); C.-H. Chen; C-Y. Cheng (Ching-Yu); Y.-S. Chong (Yap-Seng); F.S. Collins (Francis); R. Courtney (Regina); G. Davies (Gail); G. Delgado; L.D. Do (Loi D.); P.A. Doevendans (Pieter); R.T. Gansevoort (Ron); Y. Gao; T.B. Grammer (Tanja B); N. Grarup (Niels); J. Grewal (Jagvir); D. Gu (D.); G. SWander (Gurpreet); A.L. Hartikainen; S.L. Hazen (Stanley); J. He (Jing); C.K. Heng (Chew-Kiat); E.J.A. Hixso (E. James Ames); A. Hofman (Albert); C. Hsu (Chris); W. Huang (Wei); L.L.N. Husemoen (Lise Lotte); J.-Y. Hwang (Joo-Yeon); S. Ichihara (Sahoko); M. Igase (Michiya); M. Isono (Masato); J.M. Justesen (Johanne M.); T. Katsuya (Tomohiro); M. GKibriya (Muhammad); Y.J. Kim; M. Kishimoto (Miyako); W.-P. Koh (Woon-Puay); K. Kohara (Katsuhiko); M. Kumari (Meena); K. Kwek (Kenneth); N.R. Lee (Nanette); J. Lee (Jeannette); J. Liao (Jie); W. Lieb (Wolfgang); D.C. Liewald (David C.); T. Matsubara (Tatsuaki); Y. Matsushita (Yumi); T. Meitinger (Thomas); E. Mihailov (Evelin); L. Milani (Lili); R. Mills (Rebecca); K. Mononen (Kari); M. Müller-Nurasyid (Martina); T. Nabika (Toru); E. Nakashima (Eitaro); H.K. Ng (Hong Kiat); K. Nikus (Kjell); T. Nutile; T. Ohkubo (Takayoshi); K. Ohnaka (Keizo); S. Parish (Sarah); L. Paternoster (Lavinia); H. Peng (Hao); A. Peters (Annette); S. TPham (Son); M.J. Pinidiyapathirage (Mohitha J.); M. Rahman (Mahfuzar); H. Rakugi (Hiromi); O. Rolandsson (Olov); M.A. Rozario (Michelle Ann); D. Ruggiero; C. Sala (Cinzia); R. Sarju (Ralhan); K. Shimokawa (Kazuro); H. Snieder (Harold); T. Sparsø (Thomas); W. Spiering (Wilko); J.M. Starr (John); D.J. Stott (David J.); D. OStram (Daniel); T. Sugiyama (Takao); S. Szymczak (Silke); W.H.W. Tang (W.H. Wilson); L. Tong (Lin); S. Trompet (Stella); V. Turjanmaa (Väinö); H. Ueshima (Hirotsugu); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); S. Umemura (Satoshi); M. Vaarasmaki (Marja); R.M. Dam (Rob Mvan); W.H. van Gilst (Wiek); D.J. van Veldhuisen (Dirk); J. Viikari (Jorma); M. Waldenberger (Melanie); Y. Wang (Yiqin); A. Wang (Aili); R. Wilson (Rory); T.Y. Wong (Tien Yin); Y.-B. Xiang (Yong-Bing); S. Yamaguchi (Shuhei); X. Ye (Xingwang); R. Young (Robin); T.L. Young (Terri); J.-M. Yuan (Jian-Min); X. Zhou (Xueya); F.W. Asselbergs (Folkert); M. Ciullo; R. Clarke (Robert); P. Deloukas (Panagiotis); A. Franke (Andre); W.F. Paul (W. Frank); S. Franks (Steve); Y. Friedlander (Yechiel); M.D. Gross (Myron D.); Z. Guo (Zhirong); T. Hansen (T.); M.-R. Jarvelin (Marjo-Riitta); T. Jørgensen (Torben); J.W. Jukema (Jan Wouter); M. Kähönen (Mika); H. Kajio (Hiroshi); M. Kivimaki (Mika); J.-Y. Lee (Jong-Young); T. Lehtimäki (Terho); A. Linneberg (Allan); T. Miki (Tetsuro); O. Pedersen (Oluf); N.J. Samani (Nilesh); T.I.A. Sørensen (Thorkild); R. Takayanagi (Ryoichi); D. Toniolo (Daniela); H. Ahsan (Habibul); H. Allayee (Hooman); Y.-T. Chen (Yuan-Tsong); J. Danesh (John); I.J. Deary (Ian J.); O.H. Franco (Oscar); L. Franke (Lude); B. THeijman (Bastiaan); J.D. Holbrook (Joanna D.); A.J. Isaacs (Aaron); B.-J. Kim (Bong-Jo); X. Lin (Xu); J. Liu (Jianjun); W. März (Winfried); A. Metspalu (Andres); K.L. Mohlke (Karen); K. Sangher; D. Harambir (Dharambir); X.-O. Shu (Xiao-Ou); J.B.J. van Meurs (Joyce); E.N. Vithana (Eranga); A.R. Wickremasinghe (Ananda); C. Wijmenga (Cisca); B.H.W. Wolffenbuttel (Bruce H.W.); M. Yokota (Mitsuhiro); W. Zheng (Wei); D. Zhu (Dingliang); P. Vineis (Paolo); S.A. Kyrtopoulos (Soterios A.); J.C.S. Kleinjans (Jos C.S.); M.I. McCarthy (Mark); R. Soong (Richie); C. Gieger (Christian); J. Scott (James); Y.Y. Teo (Yik Ying); J. He (Jiang); P. Elliott (Paul); E.S. Tai (Shyong); P. van der Harst (Pim); J.S. Kooner (Jaspal S.); J.C. Chambers (John)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractWe carried out a trans-ancestry genome-wide association and replication study of blood pressure phenotypes among up to 320,251 individuals of East Asian, European and South Asian ancestry. We find genetic variants at 12 new loci to be associated with blood pressure (P = 3.9 × 10 -11 to

  10. An Analysis of Activities in Farmstead Mechanization Experienced by Selected Farmers and Associated Businesses, with Implications for Vocational-Technical Education in Agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Clinton O.

    The investigation was conducted to analyze selected activities in farmstead mechanization as experienced by farmers and associated businesses and to interpret the findings. Data were obtained from Kansas Farm Management Association records and by interviews with 30 selected farmers with functional mechanized farmsteads, 18 dealers, and 16…

  11. Trans-ancestry genome-wide association study identifies 12 genetic loci influencing blood pressure and implicates a role for DNA methylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kato, Norihiro; Loh, Marie; Takeuchi, Fumihiko

    2015-01-01

    We carried out a trans-ancestry genome-wide association and replication study of blood pressure phenotypes among up to 320,251 individuals of East Asian, European and South Asian ancestry. We find genetic variants at 12 new loci to be associated with blood pressure (P = 3.9 × 10(-11) to 5.0 × 10(...

  12. Association between Obesity, hsCRP ≥2 mg/L, and Subclinical Atherosclerosis: Implications of JUPITER from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaha, Michael J.; Rivera, Juan J.; Budoff, Matthew J.; Blankstein, Ron; Agatston, Arthur; O’Leary, Daniel H.; Cushman, Mary; Lakoski, Susan; Criqui, Michael H.; Szklo, Moyses; Blumenthal, Roger S.; Nasir, Khurram

    2011-01-01

    Objective High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) levels are closely associated with abdominal obesity, metabolic syndrome, and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. The JUPITER trial has encouraged using hsCRP ≥2 mg/L to guide statin therapy; however the association of hsCRP to atherosclerosis, independent of obesity, remains unknown. Methods and Results We studied 6,760 participants from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA). Participants were stratified into 4 groups: non-obese/low hsCRP, non-obese/high hsCRP, obese/low hsCRP, and obese/high hsCRP. Using multivariable logistic and robust linear regression, we described the association with subclinical atherosclerosis, using coronary artery calcium (CAC) and carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT). Mean BMI was 28.3 ± 5.5 kg/m2, and median hsCRP was 1.9 mg/L (0.84 – 4.26). High hsCRP, in the absence of obesity, was not associated with CAC and was mildly associated with cIMT. Obesity was strongly associated with CAC and cIMT independent of hsCRP. When obesity and high hsCRP were both present, there was no evidence of multiplicative interaction. Similar associations were seen among 2,083 JUPITER-eligible individuals. Conclusions High hsCRP, as defined by JUPITER, was not associated with CAC and was mildly associated with cIMT in the absence of obesity. In contrast, obesity was associated with both measures of subclinical atherosclerosis independent of hsCRP status. PMID:21474823

  13. Th17 response and autophagy - main pathways implicated in the development of inflammatory bowel disease by genome-wide association studies: new factors involved in inflammatory bowel disease susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Díaz-Peña

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is an entity that mainly includes ulcerative colitis (UC and Crohn's disease (CD. Improved health care, diet changes, and higher industrialization are associated with an increase in IBD prevalence. This supports the central role of environmental factors in the pathology of this disease. However, IBD also shows a relevant genetic component as shown by high heritability. Classic genetic studies showed relevant associations between IBD susceptibility and genes involved in the immune response. This is consistent with prior theories about IBD development. According to these, contact of the immune system with a high number of harmless antigens from the diet and the bacterial flora should originate tolerance while preserving response against pathogens. Failure to achieve this balance may originate the typical inflammatory response associated with IBD. Recently, genome-wide association studies (GWASs have confirmed the implication of the immune system, particularly the Th17 immune response, previously associated to other autoimmune diseases, and of autophagy. In this paper, the mechanisms involved in these two relevant pathways and their potential role in the pathogenesis of IBD are reviewed.

  14. Implications of social structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brask, Josefine Bohr

    Social systems in nature are characterised by heterogeneous social structures. The pattern of social interactions or associations between individuals within populations (i.e. their social network) is typically non-random. Such structuring may have important implications for the expression...... social environment of the individual. In the last two studies, we investigate the role of social structure for cooperation in a classic natural system for behavioural research, the Trinidadian guppy (Poecilia reticulata), by means of computer simulations. Cooperation contradicts evolutionary theory...... and evolution of behaviour, and for individual fitness. In this thesis I investigated implications of social structure for fitness and behaviour, with focus on three main areas: social structure & fitness, social structure & communication, and social structure & cooperation. These areas were investigated...

  15. Exploration of the Association between Nurses’ Moral Distress and Secondary Traumatic Stress Syndrome: Implications for Patient Safety in Mental Health Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Christodoulou-Fella

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Work-related moral distress (MD and secondary traumatic stress syndrome (STSS may be associated with compromised health status among health professionals, reduced productivity, and inadequate safety of care. We explored the association of MD with the severity of STSS symptoms, along with the mediating role of mental distress symptoms. Associations with emotional exhaustion and professional satisfaction were also assessed. This cross-sectional survey conducted in 206 mental health nurses (MHNs was employed across public sector community and hospital settings in Cyprus. The analysis revealed that MD (measured by the modified Moral Distress Scale was positively associated with both STSS (measured by the Secondary Traumatic Stress Scale and mental distress symptoms (assessed by the General Health Questionnaire-28. The association of MD with STSS symptoms was partially mediated by mental distress symptoms. This association remained largely unchanged after adjusting for gender, age, education, rank, and intention to quit the job. Our findings provide preliminary evidence on the association between MD and STSS symptomatology in MHNs. Situations that may lead health professionals to be in moral distress seem to be mainly related to the work environment; thus interventions related to organizational empowerment of MHNs need to be developed.

  16. Genome wide analysis of narcolepsy in China implicates novel immune loci and reveals changes in association prior to versus after the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Han

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies in narcolepsy, an autoimmune disorder affecting hypocretin (orexin neurons and recently associated with H1N1 influenza, have demonstrated significant associations with five loci. Using a well-characterized Chinese cohort, we refined known associations in TRA@ and P2RY11-DNMT1 and identified new associations in the TCR beta (TRB@; rs9648789 max P = 3.7 × 10(-9 OR 0.77, ZNF365 (rs10995245 max P = 1.2 × 10(-11 OR 1.23, and IL10RB-IFNAR1 loci (rs2252931 max P = 2.2 × 10(-9 OR 0.75. Variants in the Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA- DQ region were associated with age of onset (rs7744020 P = 7.9×10(-9 beta -1.9 years and varied significantly among cases with onset after the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic compared to previous years (rs9271117 P = 7.8 × 10(-10 OR 0.57. These reflected an association of DQB1*03:01 with earlier onset and decreased DQB1*06:02 homozygosity following 2009. Our results illustrate how genetic association can change in the presence of new environmental challenges and suggest that the monitoring of genetic architecture over time may help reveal the appearance of novel triggers for autoimmune diseases.

  17. Gene expression atlas of pigeonpea and its application to gain insights into genes associated with pollen fertility implicated in seed formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazhamala, Lekha T; Purohit, Shilp; Saxena, Rachit K; Garg, Vanika; Krishnamurthy, L; Verdier, Jerome; Varshney, Rajeev K

    2017-04-01

    Pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan) is an important grain legume of the semi-arid tropics, mainly used for its protein rich seeds. To link the genome sequence information with agronomic traits resulting from specific developmental processes, a Cajanus cajan gene expression atlas (CcGEA) was developed using the Asha genotype. Thirty tissues/organs representing developmental stages from germination to senescence were used to generate 590.84 million paired-end RNA-Seq data. The CcGEA revealed a compendium of 28 793 genes with differential, specific, spatio-temporal and constitutive expression during various stages of development in different tissues. As an example to demonstrate the application of the CcGEA, a network of 28 flower-related genes analysed for cis-regulatory elements and splicing variants has been identified. In addition, expression analysis of these candidate genes in male sterile and male fertile genotypes suggested their critical role in normal pollen development leading to seed formation. Gene network analysis also identified two regulatory genes, a pollen-specific SF3 and a sucrose-proton symporter, that could have implications for improvement of agronomic traits such as seed production and yield. In conclusion, the CcGEA provides a valuable resource for pigeonpea to identify candidate genes involved in specific developmental processes and to understand the well-orchestrated growth and developmental process in this resilient crop. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  18. Changes in the pastoral sheep systems of semi-arid Mediterranean areas: association with common agricultural policy reform and implications for sustainability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toro-Mujica, P.M.; Aguilar, C.; Vera, R.; Barba, C.; Rivas, J.; García-Martínez, A.

    2015-07-01

    The dynamics of sheep systems the Mediterranean region have been influenced by reforms coming from the Common Agricultural Policy, and the general economic evolution of markets. The aim of this study was the analysis of the structural changes that occurred between 1999 and 2009, and the identification of future implications for the sheep systems in Andalusia region, Spain. Analysis of the structural changes allowed the generation of strategic information, identified trends that should suggest new rural policies and changes that are likely to have social and environmental impacts, and lastly, prioritize future research. The application of multivariate methodology allowed clustering the farm population into four groups. The typology of these systems was determined by variables related to the sheep subsystem, by the set of agricultural activities, and by changes in swine husbandry, within a context of changes in land tenure and the drive for agricultural intensification. Major modifications of extant systems included a 42% reduction in the number of farms, a decrease in sheep numbers, replacement of native rangelands with improved pastures, olive trees and orchards, a reduction of traditional extensive pastoral activities, and increases in hog production in Dehesa grasslands. Given the historical economic and social importance of the sheep-cereal system, the observed substantial modifications of land use suggest a need to assess their consequences in terms. (Author)

  19. Comprehensive gene-based association study of a chromosome 20 linked region implicates novel risk loci for depressive symptoms in psychotic illness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Bernard Bigdeli

    Full Text Available Prior genomewide scans of schizophrenia support evidence of linkage to regions of chromosome 20. However, association analyses have yet to provide support for any etiologically relevant variants.We analyzed 2988 LD-tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in 327 genes on chromosome 20, to test for association with schizophrenia in 270 Irish high-density families (ISHDSF, N = 270 families, 1408 subjects. These SNPs were genotyped using an Illumina iSelect genotyping array which employs the Infinium assay. Given a previous report of novel linkage with chromosome 20p using latent classes of psychotic illness in this sample, association analysis was also conducted for each of five factor-derived scores based on the Operational Criteria Checklist for Psychotic Illness (delusions, hallucinations, mania, depression, and negative symptoms. Tests of association were conducted using the PDTPHASE and QPDTPHASE packages of UNPHASED. Empirical estimates of gene-wise significance were obtained by adaptive permutation of a the smallest observed P-value and b the threshold-truncated product of P-values for each locus.While no single variant was significant after LD-corrected Bonferroni-correction, our gene-dropping analyses identified loci which exceeded empirical significance criteria for both gene-based tests. Namely, R3HDML and C20orf39 are significantly associated with depressive symptoms of schizophrenia (P(emp<2×10⁻⁵ based on the minimum P-value and truncated-product methods, respectively.Using a gene-based approach to family-based association, R3HDML and C20orf39 were found to be significantly associated with clinical dimensions of schizophrenia. These findings demonstrate the efficacy of gene-based analysis and support previous evidence that chromosome 20 may harbor schizophrenia susceptibility or modifier loci.

  20. Genome-Wide Association Study of MKI67 Expression and its Clinical Implications in HBV-Related Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Southern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-kun Yang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is a common malignant tumor with a high rate of recurrence. Immunohistochemical analysis of the marker of proliferation Ki-67 (MKI67 is used to assess proliferation activity of HCC The regulation of MKI67 expression remains unclear in HCC This study aims to explore the association between MKI67 expression and gene variants. Methods: A total of 195 hepatitis B virus (HBV-related HCC patients were genotyped using Illumina HumanExome BeadChip-12-1_A (242,901 markers. An independent cohort (97 subjects validated the association of polymorphism determinants and candidate genes with MKI67 expression. The relationships between MKI67 with p53 and variants of candidate genes in the clinical outcomes of HCC patients were analyzed. Results: We found that MKI67 combined with p53 was associated with a 3-year recurrence-free survival and five variants near TTN and CCDC8 were associated with MKI67 expression. TTN harboring rs2288563-TT and rs2562832-AA+CA indicated a favorable outcome for HCC patients. Conclusion: Variants near TTN and CCDC8 were associated with MKI67 expression, and rs2288563 and rs2562832 in TTN are potential biomarkers for the prediction of clinical outcomes in HBV-related HCC patients.

  1. Neuropsychiatry of fragile X-premutation carriers with and without fragile X-associated tremor-ataxia syndrome: implications for neuropsychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeois, James A

    2016-08-01

    Clinical neuropsychologists benefit from clinical currency in recently ascertained neuropsychiatric illness, such as fragile X premutation (FXPM) disorders. The author reviewed the clinical literature through 2016 for neuropsychiatric phenotypes in FXPM disorders, including patients with fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS). A PubMed search using the search terms 'Fragile X,' 'Premutation,' 'Carriers,' 'Psychiatric,' 'Dementia,' 'Mood,' and 'Anxiety' for citations in the clinical literature through 2016 was reviewed for studies specifically examining the neuropsychiatric phenotype in FXPM patients. The relevant articles were classified according to specific neuropsychiatric syndromes, including child onset, adult onset with and without FXTAS, as well as common systemic comorbidities in FXPM patients. Eighty-six articles were reviewed for the neuropsychiatric and other phenotypes in FXPM patients. The neuropsychiatric phenotype in FXPM patients is distinct from that of full mutation (Fragile X Syndrome) patients. FXTAS is associated with a specific cortical-subcortical major or mild neurocognitive disorder (NCD). FXPM patients are at risk for neuropsychiatric illness. In addition, FXPM patients are at risk for other systemic conditions that should raise suspicion for FXPM-associated illnesses. Clinicians should consider a diagnosis of FXPM-associated neuropsychiatric illness when patients with specific clinical scenarios are encountered; especially in patient pedigrees consistent with a typical (often multigenerational) presentation of fragile X-associated conditions, confirmatory genetic testing should be considered. Clinical management should take into account the psychological challenges of a multigenerational genetic neuropsychiatric illness with a variable CNS and systemic clinical phenotype.

  2. Glutathione S-transferase omega genes in Alzheimer and Parkinson disease risk, age-at-diagnosis and brain gene expression: an association study with mechanistic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Mariet; Zou, Fanggeng; Chai, High Seng; Younkin, Curtis S; Miles, Richard; Nair, Asha A; Crook, Julia E; Pankratz, V Shane; Carrasquillo, Minerva M; Rowley, Christopher N; Nguyen, Thuy; Ma, Li; Malphrus, Kimberly G; Bisceglio, Gina; Ortolaza, Alexandra I; Palusak, Ryan; Middha, Sumit; Maharjan, Sooraj; Georgescu, Constantin; Schultz, Debra; Rakhshan, Fariborz; Kolbert, Christopher P; Jen, Jin; Sando, Sigrid B; Aasly, Jan O; Barcikowska, Maria; Uitti, Ryan J; Wszolek, Zbigniew K; Ross, Owen A; Petersen, Ronald C; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Dickson, Dennis W; Younkin, Steven G; Ertekin-Taner, Nilüfer

    2012-04-11

    Glutathione S-transferase omega-1 and 2 genes (GSTO1, GSTO2), residing within an Alzheimer and Parkinson disease (AD and PD) linkage region, have diverse functions including mitigation of oxidative stress and may underlie the pathophysiology of both diseases. GSTO polymorphisms were previously reported to associate with risk and age-at-onset of these diseases, although inconsistent follow-up study designs make interpretation of results difficult. We assessed two previously reported SNPs, GSTO1 rs4925 and GSTO2 rs156697, in AD (3,493 ADs vs. 4,617 controls) and PD (678 PDs vs. 712 controls) for association with disease risk (case-controls), age-at-diagnosis (cases) and brain gene expression levels (autopsied subjects). We found that rs156697 minor allele associates with significantly increased risk (odds ratio = 1.14, p = 0.038) in the older ADs with age-at-diagnosis > 80 years. The minor allele of GSTO1 rs4925 associates with decreased risk in familial PD (odds ratio = 0.78, p = 0.034). There was no other association with disease risk or age-at-diagnosis. The minor alleles of both GSTO SNPs associate with lower brain levels of GSTO2 (p = 4.7 × 10-11-1.9 × 10-27), but not GSTO1. Pathway analysis of significant genes in our brain expression GWAS, identified significant enrichment for glutathione metabolism genes (p = 0.003). These results suggest that GSTO locus variants may lower brain GSTO2 levels and consequently confer AD risk in older age. Other glutathione metabolism genes should be assessed for their effects on AD and other chronic, neurologic diseases.

  3. Glutathione S-transferase omega genes in Alzheimer and Parkinson disease risk, age-at-diagnosis and brain gene expression: an association study with mechanistic implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen Mariet

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glutathione S-transferase omega-1 and 2 genes (GSTO1, GSTO2, residing within an Alzheimer and Parkinson disease (AD and PD linkage region, have diverse functions including mitigation of oxidative stress and may underlie the pathophysiology of both diseases. GSTO polymorphisms were previously reported to associate with risk and age-at-onset of these diseases, although inconsistent follow-up study designs make interpretation of results difficult. We assessed two previously reported SNPs, GSTO1 rs4925 and GSTO2 rs156697, in AD (3,493 ADs vs. 4,617 controls and PD (678 PDs vs. 712 controls for association with disease risk (case-controls, age-at-diagnosis (cases and brain gene expression levels (autopsied subjects. Results We found that rs156697 minor allele associates with significantly increased risk (odds ratio = 1.14, p = 0.038 in the older ADs with age-at-diagnosis > 80 years. The minor allele of GSTO1 rs4925 associates with decreased risk in familial PD (odds ratio = 0.78, p = 0.034. There was no other association with disease risk or age-at-diagnosis. The minor alleles of both GSTO SNPs associate with lower brain levels of GSTO2 (p = 4.7 × 10-11-1.9 × 10-27, but not GSTO1. Pathway analysis of significant genes in our brain expression GWAS, identified significant enrichment for glutathione metabolism genes (p = 0.003. Conclusion These results suggest that GSTO locus variants may lower brain GSTO2 levels and consequently confer AD risk in older age. Other glutathione metabolism genes should be assessed for their effects on AD and other chronic, neurologic diseases.

  4. Purification, biochemical characterization, and implications of an alkali-tolerant catalase from the spacecraft-associated and oxidation-resistant Acinetobacter gyllenbergii 2P01AA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muster, N; Derecho, I; Dallal, F; Alvarez, R; McCoy, K B; Mogul, R

    2015-04-01

    Herein, we report on the purification, characterization, and sequencing of catalase from Acinetobacter gyllenbergii 2P01AA, an extremely oxidation-resistant bacterium that was isolated from the Mars Phoenix spacecraft assembly facility. The Acinetobacter are dominant members of the microbial communities that inhabit spacecraft assembly facilities and consequently may serve as forward contaminants that could impact the integrity of future life-detection missions. Catalase was purified by using a 3-step chromatographic procedure, where mass spectrometry provided respective subunit and intact masses of 57.8 and 234.6 kDa, which were consistent with a small-subunit tetrameric catalase. Kinetics revealed an extreme pH stability with no loss in activity between pH 5 and 11.5 and provided respective kcat/Km and kcat values of ∼10(7) s(-1) M(-1) and 10(6) s(-1), which are among the highest reported for bacterial catalases. The amino acid sequence was deduced by in-depth peptide mapping, and structural homology suggested that the catalases from differing strains of A. gyllenbergii differ only at residues near the subunit interfaces, which may impact catalytic stability. Together, the kinetic, alkali-tolerant, and halotolerant properties of the catalase from A. gyllenbergii 2P01AA are significant, as they are consistent with molecular adaptations toward the alkaline, low-humidity, and potentially oxidizing conditions of spacecraft assembly facilities. Therefore, these results support the hypothesis that the selective pressures of the assembly facilities impact the microbial communities at the molecular level, which may have broad implications for future life-detection missions.

  5. Restructuring of basal ganglia circuitry and associated behaviors triggered by low striatal D2 receptor expression: implications for substance use disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbs, L K; Lemos, J C; Alvarez, V A

    2017-01-01

    Dopamine D2 receptors (D2Rs) consistently emerge as a critical substrate for the etiology of some major psychiatric disorders. Indeed, a central theory of substance use disorders (SUDs) postulates that a reduction in D2R levels in the striatum is a determining factor that confers vulnerability to abuse substances. A large number of clinical and preclinical studies strongly support this link between SUDs and D2Rs; however, identifying the mechanism by which low D2Rs facilitate SUDs has been hindered by the complexity of circuit connectivity, the heterogeneity of D2R expression and the multifaceted constellation of phenotypes observed in SUD patient. Animal models are well-suited for understanding the mechanisms because they allow access to the circuitry and the genetic tools that enable a dissection of the D2R heterogeneity. This review discusses recent findings on the functional role of D2Rs and highlights the distinctive contributions of D2Rs expressed on specific neuronal subpopulations to the behavioral responses to stimulant drugs. A circuit-wide restructuring of local and long-range inhibitory connectivity within the basal ganglia is observed in response to manipulation of striatal D2R levels and is accompanied by multiple alterations in dopamine-dependent behaviors. Collectively, these new findings provide compelling evidence for a critical role of striatal D2Rs in shaping basal ganglia connectivity; even among neurons that do not express D2Rs. These findings from animal models have deep clinical implications for SUD patients with low levels D2R availability where a similar restructuring of basal ganglia circuitry is expected to take place. © 2016 The Authors. Genes, Brain and Behavior published by International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Close association between paralogous multiple isomiRs and paralogous/orthologues miRNA sequences implicates dominant sequence selection across various animal species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Li; Zhao, Yang; Zhang, Hui; Yang, Sheng; Chen, Feng

    2013-09-25

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are crucial negative regulators of gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Next-generation sequencing technologies have identified a series of miRNA variants (named isomiRs). In this study, paralogous isomiR assemblies (from the miRNA locus) were systematically analyzed based on data acquired from deep sequencing data sets. Evolutionary analysis of paralogous (members in miRNA gene family in a specific species) and orthologues (across different animal species) miRNAs was also performed. The sequence diversity of paralogous isomiRs was found to be similar to the diversity of paralogous and orthologues miRNAs. Additionally, both isomiRs and paralogous/orthologues miRNAs were implicated in 5' and 3' ends (especially 3' ends), nucleotide substitutions, and insertions and deletions. Generally, multiple isomiRs can be produced from a single miRNA locus, but most of them had lower enrichment levels, and only several dominant isomiR sequences were detected. These dominant isomiR groups were always stable, and one of them would be selected as the most abundant miRNA sequence in specific animal species. Some isomiRs might be consistent to miRNA sequences in some species but not the other. Homologous miRNAs were often detected in similar isomiR repertoires, and showed similar expression patterns, while dominant isomiRs showed complex evolutionary patterns from miRNA sequences across the animal kingdom. These results indicate that the phenomenon of multiple isomiRs is not a random event, but rather the result of evolutionary pressures. The existence of multiple isomiRs enables different species to express advantageous sequences in different environments. Thus, dominant sequences emerge in response to functional and evolutionary pressures, allowing an organism to adapt to complex intra- and extra-cellular events. © 2013.

  7. An updated list of the plants associated with plant-parasitic Aphelenchoides (Nematoda: Aphelenchoididae) and its implications for plant-parasitism within this genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Monge, Alcides; Flores, Lorena; Salazar, Luis; Hockland, Sue; Bert, Wim

    2015-09-08

    Few Aphelenchoides spp. are facultative plant-parasites (foliar and bulb nematodes); three of them are well known in agricultural systems, namely Aphelenchoides besseyi, A. fragariae and A. ritzemabosi. Ten other plant-parasitic species, A. arachidis, A. bicaudatus, A. blastophthorus, A. dalianensis, A. ensete, A. nechaleos, A. paranechaleos, A. saprophilus, A. sphaerocephalus and A. subtenuis, have been reported from a limited number of plant species. We compiled a new database of the associated plants for these thirteen species, a comprehensive list that includes 1104 reports from 126 botanical families. A. besseyi, A. fragariae and A. ritzemabosi represent 94% of the reports, circa 83% and 16% of the total reports correspond to flowering plants and ferns, respectively, with three records on conifers and two from other botanical groups also listed. Most plant-parasitic Aphelenchoides show a remarkably broad diversity of associated plants. Most species appear to have no specific plant hosts (i.e. are generalists). The broad host ranges of these species and absence of more intimate interactions with the associated plants highlights the primitive mode of parasitism in Aphelenchoides species, making them potentially interesting in the study of the evolution of plant parasitism. Even though the compiled list of associated plants is long, it probably only represents a fraction of the potential range. The complete compilation has been uploaded to http://nematodes.myspecies.info/.

  8. "If Only I Were Thin Like Her, Maybe I Could Be Happy Like Her": The Self-Implications of Associating a Thin Female Ideal with Life Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Peggy Chin

    2003-01-01

    Women often feel dissatisfied with their appearance after comparing themselves to other females who epitomize the thin-ideal standard of beauty. The current study posits that women associate a thin-ideal female body type with positive life-success, and that it may be this psychological link that drives feelings of negativity toward the self after…

  9. Search for Gravitational Waves Associated with Gamma-Ray Bursts during the First Advanced LIGO Observing Run and Implications for the Origin of GRB 150906B

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Phythian-Adams, A.T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.T.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Ananyeva, A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Appert, S.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Avila-Alvarez, A.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, R.D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Becsy, B.; Beer, C.; Bejger, M.; Belahcene, I.; Belgin, M.; Bell, A. S.; Berger, B. K.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Billman, C. R.; Birch, M.J.; Birney, R.; Birnholtz, O.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackman, J.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, J.G.; Bohe, A.; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Broida, J. E.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, A.D.; Brown, D.; Brown, N. M.; Brunett, S.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cabero, M.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Bustillo, J. Calderon; Callister, T. A.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Canepa, M.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, H.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Diaz, J. Casanueva; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglia, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Baiardi, L. Cerboni; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, D. S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Cheeseboro, B. D.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y; Cheng, H. -P.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Chmiel, T.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, A. J. K.; Chua, S. S. Y.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Cocchieri, C.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P. -F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Conti, L.; Cooper, S. J.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J. -P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Covas, P. B.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cullen, T. J.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, Laura; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Dalya, G.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dasgupta, A.; Costa, C. F. Da Silva; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Davis, D.; Daw, E. J.; Day, B.; Day, R.; De, S.; Debra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De laurentis, M.; Deleglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.A.; Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Devenson, J.; Devine, R. C.; Dhurandhar, S.; Diaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Giovanni, M. Di; Di Girolamo, T.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Doctor, Z.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Dorrington, I.; Douglas, R.; Alvarez, M. Dovale; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H. -B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Eisenstein, R. A.; Essick, R. C.; Etienne, Z.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Fauchon-Jones, E. J.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Galiana, A. Fernandez; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M; Fong, H.; Forsyth, S. S.; Fournier, J. -D.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fries, E. M.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H.; Gadre, B. U.; Gaebel, S. M.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gaur, G.; Gayathri, V.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghonge, S.; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, A.; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.P.; Glaefke, A.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; Gonzalez, Idelmis G.; Castro, J. M. Gonzalez; Gopakumar, A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Lee-Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Grado, A.; Graef, C.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.M.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Hall, B. R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C. -J.; Haughian, K.; Healy, J.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Henry, J.A.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hofman, D.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J. -M.; Isi, M.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jimenez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W.; Jones, I.D.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Junker, J.; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Karki, S.; Karvinen, K. S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kefelian, F.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kennedy, R.E.; Key, J. S.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, I.; Khan., S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, Chunglee; Kim, J. C.; Kim, Whansun; Kim, W.; Kim, Y.M.; Kimbrell, S. J.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kirchhoff, R.; Kissel, J. S.; Klein, B.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Koch, P.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kaermer, C.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Krolak, A.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kumar, R.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Lackey, B. D.; Landry, M.; Lang, R. N.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lanza, R. K.; Lartaux-Vollard, A.; Lasky, P. D.; Laxen, M.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C.H.; Lee, K.H.; Lee, M.H.; Lee, K.; Lehmann, J.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Li, T. G. F.; Libson, A.; Littenberg, T. B.; Liu, J.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lombardi, A. L.; London, L. T.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lovelace, G.; Lueck, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; Macfoy, S.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magana-Sandoval, F.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Marka, S.; Marka, Z.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martynov, D. V.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Mastrogiovanni, S.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGrath Hoareau, C.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McRae, T.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Meidam, J.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mendoza-Gandara, D.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E. L.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Metzdorff, R.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, A. L.; Miller, A.; Miller, B. B.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, B.C.; Moore, C. J.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, S.D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Muniz, E. A. M.; Murray, P.G.; Mytidis, A.; Napier, K.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nelemans, G.; Nelson, T. J. N.; Gutierrez-Neri, M.; Nery, M.; Neunzert, A.; Newport, J. M.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Noack, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; Ochsner, E.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oliver, M.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ottaway, D. J.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pace, A. E.; Page, J.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H. R.; Parker, W.S; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patricelli, B.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Castro-Perez, J.; Perreca, A.; Perri, L. M.; Pfeiffer, H. P.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O. J.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poe, M.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Pratt, J. W. W.; Predoi, V.; Prestegard, T.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L. G.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Puerrer, M.; Qi, H.; Qin, J.; Qiu, S.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajan, C.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Read, J.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Rew, H.; Reyes, S. D.; Rhoades, E.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Rizzo, M.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, R.; Romie, J. H.; Rosinska, D.; Rowan, S.; Ruediger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, Perminder S; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Sakellariadou, M.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sampson, L. M.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sandberg, V.; Sanders, J. R.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Scheuer, J.; Schmidt, E.; Schmidt, J; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.B.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schoenbeck, A.; Schreiber, K.E.C.; Schuette, D.; Schwalbe, S. G.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Setyawati, Y.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaffer, T. J.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sieniawska, M.; Sigg, D.; Silva, António Dias da; Singer, A; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, B.; Smith, R. J. E.; Smith, R. J. E.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Spencer, A. P.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Stevenson-Moore, P.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Stratta, G.; Strigin, S. E.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sunil, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepanczyk, M. J.; Szolgyen, A.; Tacca, M.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tapai, M.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, W.R.; Theeg, T.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thrane, E.; Tippens, T.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Toland, K.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Tornasi, Z.; Torrie, C. I.; Toyra, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifiro, D.; Trinastic, J.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tse, M.; Tso, R.; Turconi, M.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; van Bakel, N.; Van Beuzekom, Martin; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.F.F.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heijningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Varma, V.; Vass, S.; Vasuth, M.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P.J.; Venkateswara, K.; Venugopalan, G.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Vicere, A.; Viets, A. D.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J. -Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Voss, D. V.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, MT; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, Y.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Watchi, J.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L. -W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Wen, L.; Wessels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whiting, B. F.; Whittle, C.; Williams, D.; Williams, D.R.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Woehler, J.; Worden, J.; Wright, J.L.; Wu, D.S.; Wu, G.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yap, M. J.; Yu, Hang; Yu, Haocun; Yvert, M.; Zadrozny, A.; Yvert, M.; Zadrozny, A.; Zangrando, L.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J. -P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, T.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zweizig, J.; Aptekar, R. L.; Frederiks, D. D.; Golenetskii, S. V.; Golovin, D. V.; Hurley, K.; Litvak, M. L.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Rau, A.; Sanin, A. B.; Svinkin, D. S.; von Kienlin, A.; Zhang, X.

    2017-01-01

    We present the results of the search for gravitational waves (GWs) associated with gamma-ray bursts detected during the first observing run of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO). We find no evidence of a GW signal for any of the 41 gamma-ray bursts for which LIGO

  10. Quantifying sources of variation in the frequency of fungi associated with spruce beetles: implications for hypothesis testing and sampling methodology in bark beetle-symbiont relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian H. Aukema; Richard A. Werner; Kirsten E. Haberkern; Barbara L. Illman; Murray K. Clayton; Kenneth F. Raffa

    2005-01-01

    The spruce beetle, Dendroctonus rufipennis (Kirby), causes landscape level mortality to mature spruce (Picea spp.) throughout western and northern North America. As with other bark beetles, this beetle is associated with a variety of fungi, whose ecological functions are largely unknown. It has been proposed that the relative...

  11. Genome-Wide Association Study for Circulating Tissue Plasminogen Activator Levels and Functional Follow-Up Implicates Endothelial STXBP5 and STX2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, Jie; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Yamkauchi, Munekazu; Trompet, Stella; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Sabater-Lleal, Maria; Tregouet, David-Alexandre; Chen, Wei-Min; Smith, Nicholas L.; Kleber, Marcus E.; Shin, So-Youn; Becker, Diane M.; Tang, Weihong; Dehghan, Abbas; Johnson, Andrew D.; Vinh Truong, [No Value; Folkersen, Lasse; Yang, Qiong; Oudot-Mellkah, Tiphaine; Buckley, Brendan M.; Moore, Jason H.; Williams, Frances M. K.; Campbell, Harry; Silbernagel, Guenther; Vitart, Veronique; Rudan, Igor; Tofler, Geoffrey H.; Navis, Gerjan J.; DeStefano, Anita; Wright, Alan F.; Chen, Ming-Huei; de Craen, Anton J. M.; Worrall, Bradford B.; Rudnicka, Alicja R.; Rumley, Ann; Bookman, Ebony B.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Chen, Fang; Keene, Keith L.; Franco, Oscar H.; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Carter, Angela M.; Jukema, J. Wouter; Sattar, Naveed; Bis, Joshua C.; Ikram, Mohammad A.; Sale, Michele M.; McKnight, Barbara; Fornage, Myriam; Ford, Ian; Taylor, Kent; Slagboom, P. Eline; McArdle, Wendy L.; Hsu, Fang-Chi; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Goodall, Alison H.; Yanek, Lisa R.; Furie, Karen L.; Cushman, Mary; Hofman, Albert; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Folsom, Aaron R.; Basu, Saonli; Matijevic, Nena; van Gilst, Wiek H.; Wilson, James F.; Westendorp, Rudi G. J.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Reilly, Muredach P.; Tracy, Russell P.; Polasek, Ozren; Winkelmann, Bernhard R.; Grant, Peter J.; Hillege, Hans L.; Cambien, Francois; Stott, David J.; Lowe, Gordon D.; Spector, Timothy D.; Meigs, James B.; Marz, Winfried; Eriksson, Per; Becker, Lewis C.; Morange, Pierre-Emmanuel; Soranzo, Nicole; Williams, Scott M.; Hayward, Caroline; van der Harst, Pim; Hamsten, Anders; Lowenstein, Charles J.; Strachan, David P.; O'Donnell, Christopher J.

    Objective Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a serine protease, catalyzes the conversion of plasminogen to plasmin, the major enzyme responsible for endogenous fibrinolysis. In some populations, elevated plasma levels of tPA have been associated with myocardial infarction and other cardiovascular

  12. Genome-wide association study implicates chromosome 9q21.31 as a susceptibility locus for asthma in mexican children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana B Hancock

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Many candidate genes have been studied for asthma, but replication has varied. Novel candidate genes have been identified for various complex diseases using genome-wide association studies (GWASs. We conducted a GWAS in 492 Mexican children with asthma, predominantly atopic by skin prick test, and their parents using the Illumina HumanHap 550 K BeadChip to identify novel genetic variation for childhood asthma. The 520,767 autosomal single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs passing quality control were tested for association with childhood asthma using log-linear regression with a log-additive risk model. Eleven of the most significantly associated GWAS SNPs were tested for replication in an independent study of 177 Mexican case-parent trios with childhood-onset asthma and atopy using log-linear analysis. The chromosome 9q21.31 SNP rs2378383 (p = 7.10x10(-6 in the GWAS, located upstream of transducin-like enhancer of split 4 (TLE4, gave a p-value of 0.03 and the same direction and magnitude of association in the replication study (combined p = 6.79x10(-7. Ancestry analysis on chromosome 9q supported an inverse association between the rs2378383 minor allele (G and childhood asthma. This work identifies chromosome 9q21.31 as a novel susceptibility locus for childhood asthma in Mexicans. Further, analysis of genome-wide expression data in 51 human tissues from the Novartis Research Foundation showed that median GWAS significance levels for SNPs in genes expressed in the lung differed most significantly from genes not expressed in the lung when compared to 50 other tissues, supporting the biological plausibility of our overall GWAS findings and the multigenic etiology of childhood asthma.

  13. Genome-wide association study implicates chromosome 9q21.31 as a susceptibility locus for asthma in mexican children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Dana B; Romieu, Isabelle; Shi, Min; Sienra-Monge, Juan-Jose; Wu, Hao; Chiu, Grace Y; Li, Huiling; del Rio-Navarro, Blanca Estela; Willis-Owen, Saffron A G; Willis-Owens, Saffron A G; Weiss, Scott T; Raby, Benjamin A; Gao, Hong; Eng, Celeste; Chapela, Rocio; Burchard, Esteban G; Tang, Hua; Sullivan, Patrick F; London, Stephanie J

    2009-08-01

    Many candidate genes have been studied for asthma, but replication has varied. Novel candidate genes have been identified for various complex diseases using genome-wide association studies (GWASs). We conducted a GWAS in 492 Mexican children with asthma, predominantly atopic by skin prick test, and their parents using the Illumina HumanHap 550 K BeadChip to identify novel genetic variation for childhood asthma. The 520,767 autosomal single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) passing quality control were tested for association with childhood asthma using log-linear regression with a log-additive risk model. Eleven of the most significantly associated GWAS SNPs were tested for replication in an independent study of 177 Mexican case-parent trios with childhood-onset asthma and atopy using log-linear analysis. The chromosome 9q21.31 SNP rs2378383 (p = 7.10x10(-6) in the GWAS), located upstream of transducin-like enhancer of split 4 (TLE4), gave a p-value of 0.03 and the same direction and magnitude of association in the replication study (combined p = 6.79x10(-7)). Ancestry analysis on chromosome 9q supported an inverse association between the rs2378383 minor allele (G) and childhood asthma. This work identifies chromosome 9q21.31 as a novel susceptibility locus for childhood asthma in Mexicans. Further, analysis of genome-wide expression data in 51 human tissues from the Novartis Research Foundation showed that median GWAS significance levels for SNPs in genes expressed in the lung differed most significantly from genes not expressed in the lung when compared to 50 other tissues, supporting the biological plausibility of our overall GWAS findings and the multigenic etiology of childhood asthma.

  14. Genetic Association and Gene-gene interaction of HAS2, HABP1 and HYAL3 Implicate Hyaluronan Metabolic Genes in Glaucomatous Neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaustuv Basu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyaluronan (HA plays a significant role in maintaining aqueous humor outflow in trabecular meshwork, the primary ocular tissue involved in glaucoma. We examined potential association of the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs of the HA synthesizing gene – hyaluronan synthase 2 (HAS2, hyaluronan binding protein 1 (HABP1 and HA catabolic gene hyaluronidase 3 (HYAL3 in the primary open angle glaucoma (POAG patients in the Indian population. Thirteen tagged SNPs (6 for HAS2, 3 for HABP1 and 4 for HYAL3 were genotyped in 116 high tension (HTG, 321 non-high tension glaucoma (NHTG samples and 96 unrelated, age-matched, glaucoma-negative, control samples. Allelic and genotypic association were analyzed by PLINK v1.04; haplotypes were identified using PHASE v2.1 and gene-gene interaction was analyzed using multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR v2.0. An allelic association (rs6651224; p = 0.03; OR: 0.49; 95% CI: 0.25–0.94 was observed at the second intron (C>G of HAS2 both for NHTG and HTG. rs1057308 revealed a genotypic association (p = 0.03 at the 5’ UTR of HAS2 with only HTG. TCT haplotype (rs1805429 – rs2472614 – rs8072363 in HABP1 and TTAG and TTGA (rs2285044 – rs3774753 – rs1310073 – rs1076872 in HYAL3 were found to be significantly high (p < 0.05 both for HTG and NHTG compared to controls. Gene-gene interaction revealed HABP1 predominantly interacts with HAS2 in HTG while it associates with both HYAL3 and HAS2 in NHTG. This is the first genetic evidence, albeit from a smaller study, that the natural polymorphisms in the genes involved in hyaluronan metabolism are potentially involved in glaucomatous neurodegeneration.

  15. Genome-wide association study for colorectal cancer identifies risk polymorphisms in German familial cases and implicates MAPK signalling pathways in disease susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lascorz, Jesús; Försti, Asta; Chen, Bowang; Buch, Stephan; Steinke, Verena; Rahner, Nils; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Morak, Monika; Schackert, Hans K; Görgens, Heike; Schulmann, Karsten; Goecke, Timm; Kloor, Matthias; Engel, Cristoph; Büttner, Reinhard; Kunkel, Nelli; Weires, Marianne; Hoffmeister, Michael; Pardini, Barbara; Naccarati, Alessio; Vodickova, Ludmila; Novotny, Jan; Schreiber, Stefan; Krawczak, Michael; Bröring, Clemens D; Völzke, Henry; Schafmayer, Clemens; Vodicka, Pavel; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Brenner, Hermann; Burwinkel, Barbara; Propping, Peter; Hampe, Jochen; Hemminki, Kari

    2010-09-01

    Genetic susceptibility accounts for approximately 35% of all colorectal cancer (CRC). Ten common low-risk variants contributing to CRC risk have been identified through genome-wide association studies (GWASs). In our GWAS, 610 664 genotyped single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) passed the quality control filtering in 371 German familial CRC patients and 1263 controls, and replication studies were conducted in four additional case-control sets (4915 cases and 5607 controls). Known risk loci at 8q24.21 and 11q23 were confirmed, and a previously unreported association, rs12701937, located between the genes GLI3 (GLI family zinc finger 3) and INHBA (inhibin, beta A) [P = 1.1 x 10(-3), odds ratio (OR) 1.14, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.05-1.23, dominant model in the combined cohort], was identified. The association was stronger in familial cases compared with unselected cases (P = 2.0 x 10(-4), OR 1.36, 95% CI 1.16-1.60, dominant model). Two other unreported SNPs, rs6038071, 40 kb upstream of CSNK2A1 (casein kinase 2, alpha 1 polypeptide) and an intronic marker in MYO3A (myosin IIIA), rs11014993, associated with CRC only in the familial CRC cases (P = 2.5 x 10(-3), recessive model, and P = 2.7 x 10(-4), dominant model). Three software tools successfully pointed to the overrepresentation of genes related to the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling pathways among the 1340 most strongly associated markers from the GWAS (allelic P value < 10(-3)). The risk of CRC increased significantly with an increasing number of risk alleles in seven genes involved in MAPK signalling events (P(trend) = 2.2 x 10(-16), OR(per allele) = 1.34, 95% CI 1.11-1.61).

  16. Genome-wide pathway-based association study implicates complement system in the development of Kashin-Beck disease in Han Chinese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feng; Wen, Yan; Guo, Xiong; Zhang, Yingang; Wang, Sen; Yang, Tielin; Shen, Hui; Chen, Xiangding; Tan, Lijun; Tian, Qing; Deng, Hong-Wen

    2015-02-01

    Kashin-Beck disease (KBD) is a chronic osteochondropathy. The pathogenesis of KBD remains unknown. To identify relevant biological pathways for KBD, we conducted a genome-wide pathway-based association study (GWPAS) following by replication analysis, totally using 2743 Chinese Han adults. A modified gene set enrichment algorithm was used to detect association between KBD and 963 biological pathways. Cartilage gene expression analysis and serum complement measurement were performed to evaluate the functional relevance of identified pathway with KBD. We found that the Complement and Coagulation Cascades (CACC) pathway was significantly associated with KBD (P value=3.09×10(-5), false-discovery rate=0.042). Within the CACC pathway, the most significant association was observed at rs1656966 (P value=1.97×10(-4)) of KNG1 gene. Further replication study observed that rs1656966 (P value=0.037) was significantly associated with KBD in an independent validation sample of 1026 subjects. Gene expression analysis observed that CFD (ratio=3.39±2.68), A2M (ratio=3.67±5.63), C5 (ratio=2.65±2.52) and CD46 (ratio=2.29±137) genes of the CACC pathway were up-regulated in KBD articular cartilage compared to healthy articular cartilage. The serum level of complement C5 in KBD patients were significantly higher than that in healthy controls (P value=0.038). Our study is the first to suggest that complement system-related CACC pathway contributed to the development of KBD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Succinate Dehydrogenase Subunit B (SDHB Is Expressed in Neurofibromatosis 1-Associated Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors (Gists: Implications for the SDHB Expression Based Classification of Gists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanny H. Wang, Jerzy Lasota, Markku Miettinen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor (GIST is the most common mesenchymal tumor of the digestive tract. GISTs develop with relatively high incidence in patients with Neurofibromatosis-1 syndrome (NF1. Mutational activation of KIT or PDGFRA is believed to be a driving force in the pathogenesis of familial and sporadic GISTs. Unlike those tumors, NF1-associated GISTs do not have KIT or PGDFRA mutations. Similarly, no mutational activation of KIT or PDGFRA has been identified in pediatric GISTs and in GISTs associated with Carney Triad and Carney-Stratakis Syndrome. KIT and PDGFRA-wild type tumors are expected to have lesser response to imatinib treatment. Recently, Carney Triad and Carney-Stratakis Syndrome -associated GISTs and pediatric GISTs have been shown to have a loss of expression of succinate dehydrogenase subunit B (SDHB, a Krebs cycle/electron transport chain interface protein. It was proposed that GISTs can be divided into SDHB- positive (type 1, and SDHB-negative (type 2 tumors because of similarities in clinical features and response to imatinib treatment. In this study, SDHB expression was examined immunohistochemically in 22 well-characterized NF1-associated GISTs. All analyzed tumors expressed SDHB. Based on SDHB-expression status, NF1-associated GISTs belong to type 1 category; however, similarly to SDHB type 2 tumors, they do not respond well to imatinib treatment. Therefore, a simple categorization of GISTs into SDHB-positive and-negative seems to be incomplete. A classification based on both SDHB expression status and KIT and PDGFRA mutation status characterize GISTs more accurately and allow subdivision of SDHB-positive tumors into different clinico-genetic categories.

  18. Associations between aboveground forest biomass and waveform LiDAR metrics: implications for modeling footprint-level biomass using Global Ecosystem Dynamics Investigation data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellner, J. R.; Blair, J. B.; Duncanson, L.; Hancock, S.; Hofton, M. A.; Hughes, M.; Marselis, S.; Armston, J.; Sudderth, E. B.; Tang, H.; Weiner, L.; Dubayah, R.

    2016-12-01

    The Global Ecosystem Dynamics Investigation (GEDI) is a NASA mission to place a multi-beam waveform LiDAR on the International Space Station. GEDI will produce billions of measurements of forest canopy height to quantify aboveground carbon stocks. A critical element is the development of models that predict aboveground forest biomass at the scale of individual GEDI footprints (25 m), or clusters of individual footprints. Model development and training is ongoing using field measurements from ground-based forest inventories and discrete-return airborne LiDAR processed by the GEDI waveform simulator. These inventories contain trees whose stem locations have been mapped relative to a local coordinate system. Traditionally, biomass is associated with waveforms by identifying the subset of trees within the 25 m footprint, and then assigning all of the mass associated with those trees to the waveform (the point-mass assumption). Here we quantified associations between simulated waveform metrics and aboveground forest biomass, and the dependence of these relationships on the point-mass assumption. We then tested the ability of models to produce precise and accurate estimates of aboveground biomass. We show clearly-defined relationships between aboveground biomass and waveform LiDAR metrics at landscape scales. However, spatially clustered samples within single inventory plots represent non-random subsets of this space. This results in effective high-dimensionality of the relationship between aboveground biomass and waveform metrics. Identical waveforms are associated with distributions, rather than single values, of aboveground biomass. We show that these associations are not a consequence of location errors in field data, and that they persist after relaxing the point-mass assumption. We demonstrate models developed from the perspective of Bayesian nonparametrics to exploit the high-dimensional structure in waveform-biomass relationships using machine learning.

  19. The association between mid-facial morphology and climate in northeast Europe differs from that in north Asia: Implications for understanding the morphology of Late Pleistocene Homo sapiens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evteev, Andrej A; Movsesian, Alla A; Grosheva, Alexandra N

    2017-06-01

    The climate of northeastern Europe is likely to resemble in many ways Late Pleistocene periglacial conditions in Europe, but there have been relatively few studies exploring the association between climate and morphology in the mid-face of modern northeastern European populations. To fill this gap, we sampled 540 male skulls from 22 European and Near Eastern groups, including 314 skulls from 11 populations from northeastern Europe, to test for possible climate-morphology association at the continental scale. Our results found a moderate and highly significant association (R = 0.48, p = 0.0013, Mantel test) between sets of 23 mid-facial measurements and eight climatic variables. A partial least squares analysis revealed this association to be mostly driven by differences between groups from northeastern Europe and populations from the Mediterranean and the Caucasus. Matrices of between-group genetic distances based on Y-chromosome and mtDNA markers, as well as cranial non-metric and geographic distance matrices, were used to control for the possible influence of shared population history. Irrespective of which measure of neutral between-population distances is taken into account, the association between cranial variables and climate remains significant. The pattern of association between climate and morphology of the mid-face in western Eurasia was then compared to that in east and north Asia. Although differences between the two were found, there were also similarities that support existing functional interpretations of morphology for the bony parts of the upper airways. Last, in a preliminary analysis using a reduced set of measurements, mid-facial morphology of several Upper Paleolithic European Homo sapiens specimens was found to be more similar to groups from northern and northeastern Europe than to southern European populations. Thus, the population of northeastern Europe rather than east and north Asian groups should be used as a model when studying

  20. Targeted next-generation sequencing reveals novel USH2A mutations associated with diverse disease phenotypes: implications for clinical and molecular diagnosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Chen

    Full Text Available USH2A mutations have been implicated in the disease etiology of several inherited diseases, including Usher syndrome type 2 (USH2, nonsyndromic retinitis pigmentosa (RP, and nonsyndromic deafness. The complex genetic and phenotypic spectrums relevant to USH2A defects make it difficult to manage patients with such mutations. In the present study, we aim to determine the genetic etiology and to characterize the correlated clinical phenotypes for three Chinese pedigrees with nonsyndromic RP, one with RP sine pigmento (RPSP, and one with USH2. Family histories and clinical details for all included patients were reviewed. Ophthalmic examinations included best corrected visual acuities, visual field measurements, funduscopy, and electroretinography. Targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS was applied using two sequence capture arrays to reveal the disease causative mutations for each family. Genotype-phenotype correlations were also annotated. Seven USH2A mutations, including four missense substitutions (p.P2762A, p.G3320C, p.R3719H, and p.G4763R, two splice site variants (c.8223+1G>A and c.8559-2T>C, and a nonsense mutation (p.Y3745*, were identified as disease causative in the five investigated families, of which three reported to have consanguineous marriage. Among all seven mutations, six were novel, and one was recurrent. Two homozygous missense mutations (p.P2762A and p.G3320C were found in one individual family suggesting a potential double hit effect. Significant phenotypic divergences were revealed among the five families. Three families of the five families were affected with early, moderated, or late onset RP, one with RPSP, and the other one with USH2. Our study expands the genotypic and phenotypic variability relevant to USH2A mutations, which would help with a clear insight into the complex genetic and phenotypic spectrums relevant to USH2A defects, and is complementary for a better management of patients with such mutations. We have

  1. Frequent associations between CTL and T-Helper epitopes in HIV-1 genomes and implications for multi-epitope vaccine designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Sinu; Piontkivska, Helen

    2010-08-09

    Epitope vaccines have been suggested as a strategy to counteract viral escape and development of drug resistance. Multiple studies have shown that Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte (CTL) and T-Helper (Th) epitopes can generate strong immune responses in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-1). However, not much is known about the relationship among different types of HIV epitopes, particularly those epitopes that can be considered potential candidates for inclusion in the multi-epitope vaccines. In this study we used association rule mining to examine relationship between different types of epitopes (CTL, Th and antibody epitopes) from nine protein-coding HIV-1 genes to identify strong associations as potent multi-epitope vaccine candidates. Our results revealed 137 association rules that were consistently present in the majority of reference and non-reference HIV-1 genomes and included epitopes of two different types (CTL and Th) from three different genes (Gag, Pol and Nef). These rules involved 14 non-overlapping epitope regions that frequently co-occurred despite high mutation and recombination rates, including in genomes of circulating recombinant forms. These epitope regions were also highly conserved at both the amino acid and nucleotide levels indicating strong purifying selection driven by functional and/or structural constraints and hence, the diminished likelihood of successful escape mutations. Our results provide a comprehensive systematic survey of CTL, Th and Ab epitopes that are both highly conserved and co-occur together among all subtypes of HIV-1, including circulating recombinant forms. Several co-occurring epitope combinations were identified as potent candidates for inclusion in multi-epitope vaccines, including epitopes that are immuno-responsive to different arms of the host immune machinery and can enable stronger and more efficient immune responses, similar to responses achieved with adjuvant therapies. Signature of strong purifying selection acting at

  2. Phytoplankton size structure in the southern Bay of Bengal modified by the Summer Monsoon Current and associated eddies: Implications on the vertical biogenic flux..

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jyothibabu, R.; Vinayachandran, P. N.; Madhu, N.V.; Robin, R.S.; Karman, C.; Jagadeesan, L.; Anjusha, A.

    in the region significantly influenced by the SMC- associated anti-cyclonic eddy (location12 and 13). In general, the contribution of smaller phytoplankton size fractions (pico and nano plankton; <20 µm) to the total chlorophyll biomass was predominant... concentration, the locations with higher percentage contribution from the larger phytoplankton was placed in the right hand side of the Triplot whereas locations with smaller phytoplankton fractions (pico- and nano) making the maximum chlorophyll contribution...

  3. Trans-ancestry genome-wide association study identifies 12 genetic loci influencing blood pressure and implicates a role for DNA methylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drong, Alexander W; Abbott, James; Wahl, Simone; Tan, Sian-Tsung; Scott, William R; Campanella, Gianluca; Chadeau-Hyam, Marc; Afzal, Uzma; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S; Bonder, Marc Jan; Chen, Peng; Dehghan, Abbas; Edwards, Todd L; Esko, Tõnu; Go, Min Jin; Harris, Sarah E; Hartiala, Jaana; Kasela, Silva; Kasturiratne, Anuradhani; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Kleber, Marcus E; Li, Huaixing; Yu Mok, Zuan; Nakatochi, Masahiro; Sapari, Nur Sabrina; Saxena, Richa; Stewart, Alexandre F R; Stolk, Lisette; Tabara, Yasuharu; Teh, Ai Ling; Wu, Ying; Wu, Jer-Yuarn; Zhang, Yi; Aits, Imke; Da Silva Couto Alves, Alexessander; Das, Shikta; Dorajoo, Rajkumar; Hopewell, Jemma C; Kim, Yun Kyoung; Koivula, Robert W; Luan, Jian’an; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Nguyen, Quang N; Pereira, Mark A; Postmus, Iris; Raitakari, Olli T; Bryan, Molly Scannell; Scott, Robert A; Sorice, Rossella; Tragante, Vinicius; Traglia, Michela; White, Jon; Yamamoto, Ken; Zhang, Yonghong; Adair, Linda S; Ahmed, Alauddin; Akiyama, Koichi; Asif, Rasheed; Aung, Tin; Barroso, Inês; Bjonnes, Andrew; Braun, Timothy R; Cai, Hui; Chang, Li-Ching; Chen, Chien-Hsiun; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Chong, Yap-Seng; Collins, Rory; Courtney, Regina; Davies, Gail; Delgado, Graciela; Do, Loi D; Doevendans, Pieter A; Gansevoort, Ron T; Gao, Yu-Tang; Grammer, Tanja B; Grarup, Niels; Grewal, Jagvir; Gu, Dongfeng; Wander, Gurpreet S; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hazen, Stanley L; He, Jing; Heng, Chew-Kiat; Hixson, James E; Hofman, Albert; Hsu, Chris; Huang, Wei; Husemoen, Lise L N; Hwang, Joo-Yeon; Ichihara, Sahoko; Igase, Michiya; Isono, Masato; Justesen, Johanne M; Katsuya, Tomohiro; Kibriya, Muhammad G; Kim, Young Jin; Kishimoto, Miyako; Koh, Woon-Puay; Kohara, Katsuhiko; Kumari, Meena; Kwek, Kenneth; Lee, Nanette R; Lee, Jeannette; Liao, Jiemin; Lieb, Wolfgang; Liewald, David C M; Matsubara, Tatsuaki; Matsushita, Yumi; Meitinger, Thomas; Mihailov, Evelin; Milani, Lili; Mills, Rebecca; Mononen, Nina; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nabika, Toru; Nakashima, Eitaro; Ng, Hong Kiat; Nikus, Kjell; Nutile, Teresa; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Ohnaka, Keizo; Parish, Sarah; Paternoster, Lavinia; Peng, Hao; Peters, Annette; Pham, Son T; Pinidiyapathirage, Mohitha J; Rahman, Mahfuzar; Rakugi, Hiromi; Rolandsson, Olov; Ann Rozario, Michelle; Ruggiero, Daniela; Sala, Cinzia F; Sarju, Ralhan; Shimokawa, Kazuro; Snieder, Harold; Sparsø, Thomas; Spiering, Wilko; Starr, John M; Stott, David J; Stram, Daniel O; Sugiyama, Takao; Szymczak, Silke; Tang, W H Wilson; Tong, Lin; Trompet, Stella; Turjanmaa, Väinö; Ueshima, Hirotsugu; Uitterlinden, André G; Umemura, Satoshi; Vaarasmaki, Marja; van Dam, Rob M; van Gilst, Wiek H; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Viikari, Jorma S; Waldenberger, Melanie; Wang, Yiqin; Wang, Aili; Wilson, Rory; Wong, Tien-Yin; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Yamaguchi, Shuhei; Ye, Xingwang; Young, Robin D; Young, Terri L; Yuan, Jian-Min; Zhou, Xueya; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Ciullo, Marina; Clarke, Robert; Deloukas, Panos; Franke, Andre; Franks, Paul W; Franks, Steve; Friedlander, Yechiel; Gross, Myron D; Guo, Zhirong; Hansen, Torben; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jørgensen, Torben; Jukema, J Wouter; kähönen, Mika; Kajio, Hiroshi; Kivimaki, Mika; Lee, Jong-Young; Lehtimäki, Terho; Linneberg, Allan; Miki, Tetsuro; Pedersen, Oluf; Samani, Nilesh J; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Takayanagi, Ryoichi; Toniolo, Daniela; Ahsan, Habibul; Allayee, Hooman; Chen, Yuan-Tsong; Danesh, John; Deary, Ian J; Franco, Oscar H; Franke, Lude; Heijman, Bastiaan T; Holbrook, Joanna D; Isaacs, Aaron; Kim, Bong-Jo; Lin, Xu; Liu, Jianjun; März, Winfried; Metspalu, Andres; Mohlke, Karen L; Sanghera, Dharambir K; Shu, Xiao-Ou; van Meurs, Joyce B J; Vithana, Eranga; Wickremasinghe, Ananda R; Wijmenga, Cisca; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H W; Yokota, Mitsuhiro; Zheng, Wei; Zhu, Dingliang; Vineis, Paolo; Kyrtopoulos, Soterios A; Kleinjans, Jos C S; McCarthy, Mark I; Soong, Richie; Gieger, Christian; Scott, James

    2016-01-01

    We carried out a trans-ancestry genome-wide association and replication study of blood pressure phenotypes among up to 320,251 individuals of East Asian, European and South Asian ancestry. We find genetic variants at 12 new loci to be associated with blood pressure (P = 3.9 × 10−11 to 5.0 × 10−21). The sentinel blood pressure SNPs are enriched for association with DNA methylation at multiple nearby CpG sites, suggesting that, at some of the loci identified, DNA methylation may lie on the regulatory pathway linking sequence variation to blood pressure. The sentinel SNPs at the 12 new loci point to genes involved in vascular smooth muscle (IGFBP3, KCNK3, PDE3A and PRDM6) and renal (ARHGAP24, OSR1, SLC22A7 and TBX2) function. The new and known genetic variants predict increased left ventricular mass, circulating levels of NT-proBNP, and cardiovascular and all-cause mortality (P = 0.04 to 8.6 × 10−6). Our results provide new evidence for the role of DNA methylation in blood pressure regulation. PMID:26390057

  4. Implications of small effect sizes of individual genetic variants on the design and interpretation of genetic association studies of complex diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannidis, John P A; Trikalinos, Thomas A; Khoury, Muin J

    2006-10-01

    Accumulated evidence from searching for candidate gene-disease associations of complex diseases can offer some insights as the field moves toward discovery-oriented approaches with massive genome-wide testing. Meta-analyses of 50 non-human lymphocyte antigen gene-disease associations with documented overall statistical significance (752 studies) show summary odds ratios with a median of 1.43 (interquartile range, 1.28-1.65). Many different biases may operate in this field, for both single studies and meta-analyses, and these biases could invalidate some of these seemingly "validated" associations. Studies with a sample size of >500 show a median odds ratio of only 1.15. The median sample size required to detect the observed summary effects in each population addressed in the 752 studies is estimated to be 3,535 (interquartile range, 1,936-9,119 for cases and controls combined). These estimates are steeply inflated in the presence of modest bias. Population heterogeneity, as well as gene-gene and gene-environment interactions, could steeply increase these estimates and may be difficult to address even by very large biobanks and observational cohorts. The one visible solution is for a large number of teams to join forces on the same research platforms. These collaborative studies ideally should be designed up front to also assess more complex gene-gene and gene-environment interactions.

  5. Factors Associated with Use of Latex Condom-Compatible Lubricants by Men Who Have Sex with Men in India: Implications for HIV Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shreena Ramanathan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined the prevalence and type of rectal lubricants use and factors associated with exclusive use of latex-condom compatible lubricants (water-based lubricants among men who have sex with men (MSM using data from a large-scale cross-sectional survey conducted in 2009/10 in three Indian states. Using time-location cluster sampling, 3880 MSM were recruited from cruising sites. We used multiple logistic regression to assess the association between type of lubricants used and sociodemographic and programmatic indicators. Among those who reported using lubricants (64% more than half (53% exclusively used water-based lubricants, less than one-tenth used exclusively oil-based lubricants, and nearly 40% used both water-based and oil-based lubricants. Factors associated with exclusive use of water-based lubricants were exposure to HIV prevention interventions (AOR: 6.18, 95% CI 4.82 to 7.92 and kothi-identified MSM—feminine/anal-receptive (AOR: 2.56, 95% CI 2.12 to 3.10. Targeted HIV interventions among MSM need to promote and distribute latex condom-compatible lubricants for use during anal sex—irrespective of their presumed or stated sexual role in anal sex, and educate them not to use oil-based lubricants with condoms.

  6. A narrow group of monophyletic Tulasnella (Tulasnellaceae) symbiont lineages are associated with multiple species of Chiloglottis (Orchidaceae): Implications for orchid diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Sean A; Carter, Richard J; Peakall, Rod; Smith, Leon M; Whitehead, Michael R; Linde, Celeste C

    2010-08-01

    The Orchidaceae is characterized by exceptional species diversity. Obligate orchid mycorrhizae are predicted to determine orchid distributions, and highly specific relationships between orchids and fungi may drive orchid diversification. In this study, mycorrhizal diversity was examined in the terrestrial, photosynthetic orchid genus Chiloglottis to test the hypothesis of mycorrhizal-mediated diversification in the genus Chiloglottis. This orchid genus secures pollination by sexual deception, an obligate and highly specific pollination strategy. Here we asked whether the obligate orchid-fungal interactions are also specific. • Two sequenced loci, the internal transcribed spacer region (ITS) and mitochondrial large subunit (mtLSU), were used to identify fungal isolates and assess fungal species diversity. Symbiotic germination of two species Chiloglottis aff. jeanesii and C. valida were used to assess germination potential of isolates and confirm mycorrhizal association. • Phylogenetic analyses revealed that six representative Chiloglottis species spanning a broad survey of the genus were all associated with a narrow group of monophyletic Tulasnella fungal lineages. • The Chiloglottis-Tulasnella interaction appears to be the first known case of such a narrow symbiont association across a broadly surveyed orchid genus. It appears that the specific pollination system of Chiloglottis, rather than specific orchid-fungal interactions has been the key driving force in the diversification of the genus. These findings also indicate that plant groups with highly specific mycorrhizal partners can have a widespread distribution.

  7. An Islet-Targeted Genome-Wide Association Scan Identifies Novel Genes Implicated in Cytokine-Mediated Islet Stress in Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Poonam R; Mackey, Aaron J; Dejene, Eden A; Ramadan, James W; Langefeld, Carl D; Palmer, Nicholette D; Taylor, Kent D; Wagenknecht, Lynne E; Watanabe, Richard M; Rich, Stephen S; Nunemaker, Craig S

    2015-09-01

    Genome-wide association studies in human type 2 diabetes (T2D) have renewed interest in the pancreatic islet as a contributor to T2D risk. Chronic low-grade inflammation resulting from obesity is a risk factor for T2D and a possible trigger of β-cell failure. In this study, microarray data were collected from mouse islets after overnight treatment with cytokines at concentrations consistent with the chronic low-grade inflammation in T2D. Genes with a cytokine-induced change of >2-fold were then examined for associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms and the acute insulin response to glucose (AIRg) using data from the Genetics Underlying Diabetes in Hispanics (GUARDIAN) Consortium. Significant evidence of association was found between AIRg and single nucleotide polymorphisms in Arap3 (5q31.3), F13a1 (6p25.3), Klhl6 (3q27.1), Nid1 (1q42.3), Pamr1 (11p13), Ripk2 (8q21.3), and Steap4 (7q21.12). To assess the potential relevance to islet function, mouse islets were exposed to conditions modeling low-grade inflammation, mitochondrial stress, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, glucotoxicity, and lipotoxicity. RT-PCR revealed that one or more forms of stress significantly altered expression levels of all genes except Arap3. Thapsigargin-induced ER stress up-regulated both Pamr1 and Klhl6. Three genes confirmed microarray predictions of significant cytokine sensitivity: F13a1 was down-regulated 3.3-fold by cytokines, Ripk2 was up-regulated 1.5- to 3-fold by all stressors, and Steap4 was profoundly cytokine sensitive (167-fold up-regulation). Three genes were thus closely associated with low-grade inflammation in murine islets and also with a marker for islet function (AIRg) in a diabetes-prone human population. This islet-targeted genome-wide association scan identified several previously unrecognized candidate genes related to islet dysfunction during the development of T2D.

  8. Factors associated with grade 1 hypertension: implications for hypertension care based on the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) in primary care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Harry H X; Wong, Martin C S; Mok, Rosina Y; Kwan, Mandy W M; Chan, Wai Man; Fan, Carmen K M; Lee, Catherine L S; Griffiths, Sian M

    2015-02-27

    A Reference Framework for Hypertension Care was recently developed by Hong Kong government to emphasise the importance of primary care for subjects with high blood pressure (BP). The Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) interventional regime was recommended for patients aged 40-70 years with grade 1 hypertension (having systolic BP of 140-159 mmHg and/or diastolic BP of 90-99 mmHg). This study explored factors associated with grade 1 hypertension among subjects screened in primary care settings. The study sample consisted of community dwellers (N = 10,693) enrolled in a primary care programme in which participants overall had similar characteristics when compared to the Hong Kong population census. Invitation phone calls were given by trained researchers to a randomly selected subjects (N = 2,673, [50% of total subjects aged 40-70 years]) between January and June 2013. BP and body mass index (BMI) were measured by trained clinical professionals according to a standard protocol. Interviewer-administered survey questionnaires were used to collect self-report information on socio-demographics, family history, and lifestyle characteristics. Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to explore factors associated with grade 1 hypertension. Adjusted odds ratios (aORs) were estimated with 95% confidence intervals (CI). A total of 679 out of 2,673 subjects agreed to participate in the screening and completed the baseline assessment (100% completion rate), among which, 320 subjects (47.1%, [320/679]) were grade 1 hypertensive. Unhealthy diet (aOR = 2.19, 95%CI 1.04-4.62), irregular meals (aOR = 1.47, 95%CI 1.11-1.95), BMI >27.5 kg/m(2) (aOR = 1.87, 95%CI 1.53-2.27), duration of cigarette smoking (aOR = 1.83 per year), increased daily cigarette consumption (aOR  =1.59 per pack [20 cigarettes per pack]), duration of alcohol drinking (aOR = 1.65 per year), and higher frequency of weekly binge drinking (aOR = 1.87 per occasion) were independently associated

  9. Genome-wide SNPs and re-sequencing of growth habit and inflorescence genes in barley: implications for association mapping in germplasm arrays varying in size and structure

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    Muehlbauer Gary J

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Considerations in applying association mapping (AM to plant breeding are population structure and size: not accounting for structure and/or using small populations can lead to elevated false-positive rates. The principal determinants of population structure in cultivated barley are growth habit and inflorescence type. Both are under complex genetic control: growth habit is controlled by the epistatic interactions of several genes. For inflorescence type, multiple loss-of-function alleles in one gene lead to the same phenotype. We used these two traits as models for assessing the effectiveness of AM. This research was initiated using the CAP Core germplasm array (n = 102 assembled at the start of the Barley Coordinated Agricultural Project (CAP. This array was genotyped with 4,608 SNPs and we re-sequenced genes involved in morphology, growth and development. Larger arrays of breeding germplasm were subsequently genotyped and phenotyped under the auspices of the CAP project. This provided sets of 247 accessions phenotyped for growth habit and 2,473 accessions phenotyped for inflorescence type. Each of the larger populations was genotyped with 3,072 SNPs derived from the original set of 4,608. Results Significant associations with SNPs located in the vicinity of the loci involved in growth habit and inflorescence type were found in the CAP Core. Differentiation of true and spurious associations was not possible without a priori knowledge of the candidate genes, based on re-sequencing. The re-sequencing data were used to define allele types of the determinant genes based on functional polymorphisms. In a second round of association mapping, these synthetic markers based on allele types gave the most significant associations. When the synthetic markers were used as anchor points for analysis of interactions, we detected other known-function genes and candidate loci involved in the control of growth habit and inflorescence type. We

  10. Cross-country Association of Press Freedom and LGBT freedom with prevalence of persons living with HIV: implication for global strategy against HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xinguang; Elliott, Amy L; Wang, Shuang

    2018-01-01

    Human behaviors are affected by attitudes and beliefs, which in turn are shaped by higher-level values to which we have ascribed. In this study, we explore the relationship between two higher-level values, press freedom and LGBT freedom, and HIV infection with national data at the population level. Data were the number of persons living with HIV (PLWH, n  = 35,468,911) for 148 countries during 2011-15, press freedom index (PFI) determined by the Reporters Without Borders, and LGBT freedom index (LGBT-FI) based on laws regulating same-sex relationships and expression. PLWH prevalence (1/1000), PFI and LGBT-FI were mapped first. Multiple regression was thus used to associate the logarithm of PLWH prevalence with PFI, LGBT-FI and PFI × LGBT-FI interaction, controlling for per capita GDP and weighted by population size. Global prevalence of PLWH during 2011-15 was 0.51 per 1000 population. The prevalence showed a geographic pattern moving from high at the south and west ends of the world map to low at the north and east. Both PFI and LGBT-FI were positively associated with PLWH prevalence with a negative interaction between the two. More people are infected with HIV in countries with higher press freedom and higher LGBT freedom. Furthermore, press freedom can attenuate the positive association between levels of LGBT freedom and risk of HIV infection. This study demonstrated the urgency for and provided data supporting further research to investigate potential cultural and socioecological mechanisms underpinning the complex relationship among press freedom, LGBT freedom and HIV infection, with data collected at the individual level.

  11. Factors associated with whole carcass condemnation rates in provincially-inspected abattoirs in Ontario 2001-2007: implications for food animal syndromic surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alton, Gillian D; Pearl, David L; Bateman, Ken G; McNab, W Bruce; Berke, Olaf

    2010-08-12

    Ontario provincial abattoirs have the potential to be important sources of syndromic surveillance data for emerging diseases of concern to animal health, public health and food safety. The objectives of this study were to: (1) describe provincially inspected abattoirs processing cattle in Ontario in terms of the number of abattoirs, the number of weeks abattoirs process cattle, geographical distribution, types of whole carcass condemnations reported, and the distance animals are shipped for slaughter; and (2) identify various seasonal, secular, disease and non-disease factors that might bias the results of quantitative methods, such as cluster detection methods, used for food animal syndromic surveillance. Data were collected from the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs and the Ontario Cattlemen's Association regarding whole carcass condemnation rates for cattle animal classes, abattoir compliance ratings, and the monthly sales-yard price for various cattle classes from 2001-2007. To analyze the association between condemnation rates and potential explanatory variables including abattoir characteristics, season, year and commodity price, as well as animal class, negative binomial regression models were fit using generalized estimating equations (GEE) to account for autocorrelation among observations from the same abattoir. Results of the fitted model found animal class, year, season, price, and audit rating are associated with condemnation rates in Ontario abattoirs. In addition, a subset of data was used to estimate the average distance cattle are shipped to Ontario provincial abattoirs. The median distance from the farm to the abattoir was approximately 82 km, and 75% of cattle were shipped less than 100 km. The results suggest that secular and seasonal trends, as well as some non-disease factors will need to be corrected for when applying quantitative methods for syndromic surveillance involving these data. This study also demonstrated that

  12. Factors associated with whole carcass condemnation rates in provincially-inspected abattoirs in Ontario 2001-2007: implications for food animal syndromic surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alton Gillian D

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ontario provincial abattoirs have the potential to be important sources of syndromic surveillance data for emerging diseases of concern to animal health, public health and food safety. The objectives of this study were to: (1 describe provincially inspected abattoirs processing cattle in Ontario in terms of the number of abattoirs, the number of weeks abattoirs process cattle, geographical distribution, types of whole carcass condemnations reported, and the distance animals are shipped for slaughter; and (2 identify various seasonal, secular, disease and non-disease factors that might bias the results of quantitative methods, such as cluster detection methods, used for food animal syndromic surveillance. Results Data were collected from the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs and the Ontario Cattlemen's Association regarding whole carcass condemnation rates for cattle animal classes, abattoir compliance ratings, and the monthly sales-yard price for various cattle classes from 2001-2007. To analyze the association between condemnation rates and potential explanatory variables including abattoir characteristics, season, year and commodity price, as well as animal class, negative binomial regression models were fit using generalized estimating equations (GEE to account for autocorrelation among observations from the same abattoir. Results of the fitted model found animal class, year, season, price, and audit rating are associated with condemnation rates in Ontario abattoirs. In addition, a subset of data was used to estimate the average distance cattle are shipped to Ontario provincial abattoirs. The median distance from the farm to the abattoir was approximately 82 km, and 75% of cattle were shipped less than 100 km. Conclusions The results suggest that secular and seasonal trends, as well as some non-disease factors will need to be corrected for when applying quantitative methods for syndromic surveillance

  13. Patient cost-sharing and insurance arrangements are associated with hospital readmissions after abdominal surgery: Implications for access and quality health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youn, Bora; Soley-Bori, Marina; Soria-Saucedo, Rene; Ryan, Colleen M; Schneider, Jeffrey C; Haynes, Alex B; Cabral, Howard J; Kazis, Lewis E

    2016-03-01

    Readmission rates after operative procedures are used increasingly as a measure of hospital care quality. Patient access to care may influence readmission rates. The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between patient cost-sharing, insurance arrangements, and the risk of postoperative readmissions. Using the MarketScan Research Database (n = 121,002), we examined privately insured, nonelderly patients who underwent abdominal surgery in 2010. The main outcome measures were risk-adjusted unplanned readmissions within 7 days and 30 days of discharge. Odds of readmissions were compared with multivariable logistic regression models. In adjusted models, $1,284 increase in patient out-of-pocket payments during index admission (a difference of one standard deviation) was associated with 19% decrease in the odds of 7-day readmission (odds ratio [OR] 0.81, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.78-0.85) and 17% decrease in the odds of 30-day readmission (OR 0.83, 95% CI 0.81-0.86). Patients in the noncapitated point-of-service plans (OR 1.19, 95% CI 1.07-1.33), preferred provider organization plans (OR 1.11, 95% CI 1.03-1.19), and high-deductible plans (OR 1.12, 95% CI 1.00-1.26) were more likely to be readmitted within 30 days compared with patients in the capitated health maintenance organization and point-of-service plans. Among privately insured, nonelderly patients, increased patient cost-sharing was associated with lower odds of 7-day and 30-day readmission after abdominal surgery. Insurance arrangements also were significantly associated with postoperative readmissions. Patient cost sharing and insurance arrangements need consideration in the provision of equitable access for quality care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Prognostic implication of physical signs of congestion in acute heart failure patients and its association with steady-state biomarker levels.

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    Sayoko Negi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Congestive physical findings such as pulmonary rales and third heart sound (S3 are hallmarks of acute heart failure (AHF. However, their role in outcome prediction remains unclear. We sought to investigate the association between congestive physical findings upon admission, steady-state biomarkers at the time of discharge, and long-term outcomes in AHF patients. METHODS: We analyzed the data of 133 consecutive AHF patients with an established diagnosis of ischemic or non-ischemic (dilated or hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, admitted to a single-center university hospital between 2006 and 2010. The treating physician prospectively recorded major symptoms and congestive physical findings of AHF: paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea, orthopnea, pulmonary rales, jugular venous distension (JVD, S3, and edema. The primary endpoint was defined as rehospitalization for HF. RESULTS: Majority (63.9% of the patients had non-ischemic etiology and, at the time of admission, S3 was seen in 69.9% of the patients, JVD in 54.1%, and pulmonary rales in 43.6%. The mean follow-up period was 726 ± 31 days. Patients with pulmonary rales (p < 0.001 and S3 (p  =  0.011 had worse readmission rates than those without these findings; the presence of these findings was also associated with elevated troponin T (TnT levels at the time of discharge (odds ratio [OR] 2.8; p  =  0.02 and OR 2.6; p  =  0.05, respectively. CONCLUSION: Pulmonary rales and S3 were associated with inferior readmission rates and elevated TnT levels on discharge. The worsening of the readmission rate owing to congestive physical findings may be a consequence of on-going myocardial injury.

  15. Genome-wide association study reveals genetic architecture of eating behavior in pigs and its implications for humans obesity by comparative mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Do, Duy Ngoc; Strathe, Anders Bjerring; Ostersen, Tage

    2013-01-01

    1, PTPN4, MTMR4 and RNGTT) and positive regulation of peptide secretion genes (GHRH, NNAT and TCF7L2) were highly significantly associated with feeding behavior traits. This is the first GWAS to identify genetic variants and biological mechanisms for eating behavior in pigs and these results...... are important for genetic improvement of pig feed efficiency. We have also conducted pig-human comparative gene mapping to reveal key genomic regions and/or genes on the human genome that may influence eating behavior in human beings and consequently affect the development of obesity and metabolic syndrome...

  16. Mineralization associated with scale and altered rock and pipe fragments from the Berlín geothermal field, El Salvador; implications for metal transport in natural systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Jasmin; Williams-Jones, Anthony E.; Clark, James R.

    2005-07-01

    Composite fragments sampled at solid collectors and drains of two-phase, re-injection, and vapour pipelines of the Berlín geothermal field, El Salvador, consist mainly of sulphide- and electrum-bearing aluminium-rich amorphous silica scale, sulphide- and electrum-bearing saponitic/vermiculitic clay from the reservoir, and altered metallic pipe linings containing As-S-bearing iron oxide-oxyhydroxide grains. Siliceous and clay-rich precipitates contain concentrations of gold and silver in excess of 180 and 8000 ppm, respectively, and appreciable concentrations of copper, lead, zinc, and antimony. Altered iron fragments contain substantial arsenic. Copper, lead, and zinc occur mainly as chalcopyrite, galena, and sphalerite, respectively, in amorphous silica and clay; near the surface, chalcopyrite transported from depth alters to bornite. Gold and silver occur mainly as electrum, which deposited with base metal sulphides in the clay precipitates, and amorphous silica at higher levels in the well. Electrum precipitates in the wells due to the rapid drop in temperature and loss of H 2S associated with boiling. The concentration of gold in vapour is ˜4 times greater than that in water from associated wellheads. This suggests that gold can be transported efficiently by vapour, and implies that such transport may be important in the formation of some hydrothermal ore deposits.

  17. High-density genome-wide association mapping implicates an F-box encoding gene in Medicago truncatula resistance to Aphanomyces euteiches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonhomme, Maxime; André, Olivier; Badis, Yacine; Ronfort, Joëlle; Burgarella, Concetta; Chantret, Nathalie; Prosperi, Jean-Marie; Briskine, Roman; Mudge, Joann; Debéllé, Frédéric; Navier, Hélène; Miteul, Henri; Hajri, Ahmed; Baranger, Alain; Tiffin, Peter; Dumas, Bernard; Pilet-Nayel, Marie-Laure; Young, Nevin D; Jacquet, Christophe

    2014-03-01

    • The use of quantitative disease resistance (QDR) is a promising strategy for promoting durable resistance to plant pathogens, but genes involved in QDR are largely unknown. To identify genetic components and accelerate improvement of QDR in legumes to the root pathogen Aphanomyces euteiches, we took advantage of both the recently generated massive genomic data for Medicago truncatula and natural variation of this model legume. • A high-density (≈5.1 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)) genome-wide association study (GWAS) was performed with both in vitro and glasshouse phenotyping data collected for 179 lines. • GWAS identified several candidate genes and pinpointed two independent major loci on the top of chromosome 3 that were detected in both phenotyping methods. Candidate SNPs in the most significant locus (σ(A)²= 23%) were in the promoter and coding regions of an F-box protein coding gene. Subsequent qRT-PCR and bioinformatic analyses performed on 20 lines demonstrated that resistance is associated with mutations directly affecting the interaction domain of the F-box protein rather than gene expression. • These results refine the position of previously identified QTL to specific candidate genes, suggest potential molecular mechanisms, and identify new loci explaining QDR against A. euteiches. © 2013 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  18. Immune activation in HIV-infected aging women on antiretrovirals--implications for age-associated comorbidities: a cross-sectional pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria L Alcaide

    Full Text Available Persistent immune activation and microbial translocation associated with HIV infection likely place HIV-infected aging women at high risk of developing chronic age-related diseases. We investigated immune activation and microbial translocation in HIV-infected aging women in the post-menopausal ages.Twenty-seven post-menopausal women with HIV infection receiving antiretroviral treatment with documented viral suppression and 15 HIV-negative age-matched controls were enrolled. Levels of immune activation markers (T cell immune phenotype, sCD25, sCD14, sCD163, microbial translocation (LPS and biomarkers of cardiovascular disease and impaired cognitive function (sVCAM-1, sICAM-1 and CXCL10 were evaluated.T cell activation and exhaustion, monocyte/macrophage activation, and microbial translocation were significantly higher in HIV-infected women when compared to uninfected controls. Microbial translocation correlated with T cell and monocyte/macrophage activation. Biomarkers of cardiovascular disease and impaired cognition were elevated in women with HIV infection and correlated with immune activation.HIV-infected antiretroviral-treated aging women who achieved viral suppression are in a generalized status of immune activation and therefore are at an increased risk of age-associated end-organ diseases compared to uninfected age-matched controls.

  19. Two novel mutations in the glycine-rich region of human PAX6 gene: Implications for an association of cataracts and anosmia with aniridia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martha, A.; Ferrel, R.E.; Hittner, H.M.; Saunders, G.F. [Univ. of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Aniridia (iris hyplasia) is a autosomal dominant congenital disorder of the eye. Mutations in the human aniridia (PAX6) gene have now been identified in many patients from various ethnic groups. In the present study we describe new mutations in this gene. Out of four mutations found, three were novel mutations; the fourth one is identical to the previously reported mutations (C{yields}T transition at nt 240). The three novel mutations analyzed were in the glycine-rich region (two) and in the proline/serine/threonine-rich (PST) region (one). Previously no mutations were reported for the glycine-rich region in humans. One of the mutations found in this region is associated with cataracts in an aniridia family. The other splice mutation found in the PST domain is associated with anosmia (lack of sensation to smell) in a sporadic aniridia case. Two of the mutations presented here, one in the glycine-rich region and the other in the PST domain, were not detected by SSCR. These mutations could be detected by using MDE gel and heteroduplex information. All mutations found in the present study are similar in that 32 of 33 PAX6 mutations result in protein truncation and haploinsufficiency.

  20. Antiretroviral medications disrupt microglial phagocytosis of β-amyloid and increase its production by neurons: Implications for HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giunta Brian

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Up to 50% of long-term HIV infected patients, including those with systemically well-controlled infection, commonly experience memory problems and slowness, difficulties in concentration, planning, and multitasking. Deposition of Aβ plaques is also a common pathological feature of HIV infection. However, it is not clear whether this accumulation is due to AD-like processes, HIV-associated immunosuppression, Tat protein-induced Aβ elevations, and/or the effects of single highly active antiretroviral therapy (ART. Here we evaluated the effects of several ART medications (Zidovudine, Lamivudine, Indinavir, and Abacavir alone and in combination on: 1 Aβ1-40, 42 generation in murine N2a cells transfected with the human "Swedish" mutant form of APP; 2 microglial phagocytosis of FITC-Aβ1-42 peptides in cultured murine N9 microglia. We report for the first time that these antiretroviral compounds (10 μM generally increase Aβ generation (~50-200% in SweAPP N2a cells and markedly inhibit microglial phagocytosis of FITC-Aβ1-42 peptides in murine microglia. The most significant amyloidogenic effects were observed with combined ART (p in vitro studies, these findings raise the possibility that ART may play a casual role in the elevated Aβ found in the brains of those infected with HIV. Therefore these compounds may consequently contribute to cognitive decline observed in HIV associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND.

  1. The Association of IFI27 Expression and Fatigue Intensification during Localized Radiation Therapy: Implication of a Para-Inflammatory Bystander Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leorey N. Saligan

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms behind fatigue intensification during cancer therapy remain elusive. The interferon alpha-inducible protein 27 (IFI27 was the most up-regulated gene based on our previous microarray data in fatigued men with non-metastatic prostate cancer receiving localized external beam radiation therapy (EBRT. The purpose of this study was to confirm the IFI27 up-regulation and determine its association with fatigue intensification during EBRT. Peripheral blood samples and fatigue scores were collected at three time points—prior to EBRT, at midpoint, and at completion of EBRT. Confirmatory quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA were utilized to verify the microarray results. Subjects were a total of 40 Caucasian men with prostate cancer; 20 scheduled for EBRT (65.6 ± 7.5 years old, and 20 on active surveillance as controls (62.8 ± 6.1 years old. Significant IFI27 expression overtime during EBRT was confirmed by qPCR (p < 0.5, which correlated with fatigue scores during EBRT (R = −0.90, p = 0.006. Alterations in mechanisms associated with immune response and mitochondrial function that explain the up-regulation of IFI27 may provide an understanding of the pathways related to the intensification of fatigue during localized radiation therapy.

  2. Emphysema is associated with increased inflammation in lungs of atherosclerosis-prone mice by cigarette smoke: implications in comorbidities of COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Hongwei

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is associated with numerous vascular effects including endothelial dysfunction, arterial stiffness and atherogenesis. It is also known that a decline in lung function is associated with increased cardiovascular comorbidity in smokers. The mechanism of this cardiopulmonary dual risk by cigarette smoke (CS is not known. We studied the molecular mechanisms involved in development of emphysema in atherosclerosis-prone apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE-/- mice in response to CS exposure. Methods Adult male and female wild-type (WT mice of genetic background C57BL/6J and ApoE-/- mice were exposed to CS, and lung inflammatory responses, oxidative stress (lipid peroxidation products, mechanical properties as well as airspace enlargement were assessed. Results and Discussion The lungs of ApoE-/- mice showed augmented inflammatory response and increased oxidative stress with development of distal airspace enlargement which was accompanied with decline in lung function. Interestingly, the levels and activities of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-9 and MMP-12 were increased, whereas the level of eNOS was decreased in lungs of CS-exposed ApoE-/- mice as compared to air-exposed ApoE-/- mice or CS-exposed WT mice. Conclusion These findings suggest that CS causes premature emphysema and a decline of lung function in mice susceptible to cardiovascular abnormalities via abnormal lung inflammation, increased oxidative stress and alterations in levels of MMPs and eNOS.

  3. Regional metamorphic controls on alteration associated with gold mineralization in the Eastern Goldfields province, Western Australia: Implications for the timing and origin of Archean lode-gold deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, W. K.

    1991-10-01

    Alteration assemblages associated with Archean epigenetic gold mineralization in the Menzies-Kambalda area of the Yilgarn craton, Western Australia, vary systematically with regional metamorphic grade, up to and including upper amphibolite facies rocks. K-metasomatism is recorded by the presence of muscovite, biotite, and K-feldspar at progressively higher metamorphic grades. High metamorphic grades are commonly developed in broad thermal aureoles around fate syntectonic granitic intrusions. Metamorphic recrystallization of alteration assemblages is common in the thermal aureoles. These relations suggest broad contemporaneity among granitoid intrusion, regional metamorphism, and mineralization during the final stages of the tectonic evolution of the granite-greenstone terrain. Late syntectonic granitoids acted as centers of heat and fluid flux in large-scale, synmetamorphic hydrothermal systems that deposited gold, possibly from modified mantle-derived fluids.

  4. Cutting Edge: Molecular Structure of the IL-1R-Associated Kinase-4 Death Domain and Its Implications for TLR Signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lasker, Michael V.; Gajjar, Mark M.; Nair, Satish K. (UIUC)

    2010-07-19

    IL-1R-associated kinase (IRAK) 4 is an essential component of innate immunity. IRAK-4 deficiency in mice and humans results in severe impairment of IL-1 and TLR signaling. We have solved the crystal structure for the death domain of Mus musculus IRAK-4 to 1.7 {angstrom} resolution. This is the first glimpse of the structural details of a mammalian IRAK family member. The crystal structure reveals a six-helical bundle with a prominent loop, which among IRAKs and Pelle, a Drosophila homologue, is unique to IRAK-4. This highly structured loop contained between helices two and three, comprises an 11-aa stretch. Although innate immune domain recognition is thought to be very similar between Drosophila and mammals, this structural component points to a drastic difference. This structure can be used as a framework for future mutation and deletion studies and potential drug design.

  5. Cytokine-Mediated Loss of Blood Dendritic Cells During Epstein-Barr Virus-Associated Acute Infectious Mononucleosis: Implication for Immune Dysregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panikkar, Archana; Smith, Corey; Hislop, Andrew; Tellam, Nick; Dasari, Vijayendra; Hogquist, Kristin A; Wykes, Michelle; Moss, Denis J; Rickinson, Alan; Balfour, Henry H; Khanna, Rajiv

    2015-12-15

    Acute infectious mononucleosis (IM) is associated with altered expression of inflammatory cytokines and disturbed T-cell homeostasis, however, the precise mechanism of this immune dysregulation remains unresolved. In the current study we demonstrated a significant loss of circulating myeloid and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (DCs) during acute IM, a loss correlated with the severity of clinical symptoms. In vitro exposure of blood DCs to acute IM plasma resulted in loss of plasmacytoid DCs, and further studies with individual cytokines showed that exposure to interleukin 10 could replicate this effect. Our data provide important mechanistic insight into dysregulated immune homeostasis during acute IM. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Extremely low penetrance of deafness associated with the mitochondrial 12S rRNA mutation in 16 Chinese families: implication for early detection and prevention of deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Pu; Liu, Xin; Han, Dongyi; Qian, Yaping; Huang, Deliang; Yuan, Huijun; Li, Weiming; Yu, Fei; Zhang, Ruining; Lin, Hongyan; He, Yong; Yu, Youjun; Sun, Quanzhu; Qin, Huaiyi; Li, Ronghua; Zhang, Xin; Kang, Dongyang; Cao, Juyang; Young, Wie-Yen; Guan, Min-Xin

    2006-02-03

    Mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) have been found to be associated with sensorineural hearing loss. We report here the clinical, genetic, and molecular characterization of 16 Chinese pedigrees (a total of 246 matrilineal relatives) with aminoglycoside-induced impairment. Clinical evaluation revealed the variable phenotype of hearing impairment including audiometric configuration in these subjects, although these subjects share some common features: being bilateral and sensorineural hearing impairment. Strikingly, these Chinese pedigrees exhibited extremely low penetrance of hearing loss, ranging from 4% to 18%, with an average of 8%. In particular, nineteen of 246 matrilineal relatives in these pedigrees had aminoglycoside-induced hearing loss. Mutational analysis of the mtDNA in these pedigrees showed the presence of homoplasmic 12S rRNA A1555G mutation, which has been associated with hearing impairment in many families worldwide. The extremely low penetrance of hearing loss in these Chinese families carrying the A1555G mutation strongly supports the notion that the A1555G mutation itself is not sufficient to produce the clinical phenotype. Children carrying the A1555G mutation are susceptible to the exposure of aminoglycosides, thereby inducing or worsening hearing impairment, as in the case of these Chinese families. Using those genetic and molecular approaches, we are able to diagnose whether children carry the ototoxic mtDNA mutation. Therefore, these data have been providing valuable information and technology to predict which individuals are at risk for ototoxicity, to improve the safety of aminoglycoside therapy, and eventually to decrease the incidence of deafness.

  7. Antigenic Differences between AS03 Adjuvanted Influenza A (H1N1) Pandemic Vaccines: Implications for Pandemrix-Associated Narcolepsy Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaarala, Outi; Vuorela, Arja; Partinen, Markku; Baumann, Marc; Freitag, Tobias L.; Meri, Seppo; Saavalainen, Päivi; Jauhiainen, Matti; Soliymani, Rabah; Kirjavainen, Turkka; Olsen, Päivi; Saarenpää-Heikkilä, Outi; Rouvinen, Juha; Roivainen, Merja; Nohynek, Hanna; Jokinen, Jukka; Julkunen, Ilkka; Kilpi, Terhi

    2014-01-01

    Background Narcolepsy results from immune-mediated destruction of hypocretin secreting neurons in hypothalamus, however the triggers and disease mechanisms are poorly understood. Vaccine-attributable risk of narcolepsy reported so far with the AS03 adjuvanted H1N1 vaccination Pandemrix has been manifold compared to the AS03 adjuvanted Arepanrix, which contained differently produced H1N1 viral antigen preparation. Hence, antigenic differences and antibody response to these vaccines were investigated. Methods and Findings Increased circulating IgG-antibody levels to Pandemrix H1N1 antigen were found in 47 children with Pandemrix-associated narcolepsy when compared to 57 healthy children vaccinated with Pandemrix. H1N1 antigen of Arepanrix inhibited poorly these antibodies indicating antigenic difference between Arepanrix and Pandemrix. High-resolution gel electrophoresis quantitation and mass spectrometry identification analyses revealed higher amounts of structurally altered viral nucleoprotein (NP) in Pandemrix. Increased antibody levels to hemagglutinin (HA) and NP, particularly to detergent treated NP, was seen in narcolepsy. Higher levels of antibodies to NP were found in children with DQB1*06∶02 risk allele and in DQB1*06∶02 transgenic mice immunized with Pandemrix when compared to controls. Conclusions This work identified 1) higher amounts of structurally altered viral NP in Pandemrix than in Arepanrix, 2) detergent-induced antigenic changes of viral NP, that are recognized by antibodies from children with narcolepsy, and 3) increased antibody response to NP in association of DQB1*06∶02 risk allele of narcolepsy. These findings provide a link between Pandemrix and narcolepsy. Although detailed mechanisms of Pandemrix in narcolepsy remain elusive, our results move the focus from adjuvant(s) onto the H1N1 viral proteins. PMID:25501681

  8. Mayer Kangri metamorphic complexes in Central Qiangtang (Tibet, western China): implications for the Triassic-early Jurassic tectonics associated with the Paleo-Tethys Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yixuan; Liang, Xiao; Wang, Genhou; Yuan, Guoli; Bons, Paul D.

    2017-09-01

    The Mesozoic orogeny in Central Qiangtang Metamorphic Belt, northern Tibet, provides important insights into the geological evolution of the Paleo-Tethys Ocean. However, the Triassic-early Jurassic tectonics, particularly those associated with the continental collisionstage, remains poorly constrained. Here we present results from geological mapping, structural analysis, P-T data, and Ar-Ar geochronology of the Mayer Kangri metamorphic complex. Our data reveal an E-W-trending, 2 km wide dome-like structure associated with four successive tectonic events during the Middle Triassic and Early Jurassic. Field observations indicate that amphibolite and phengite schist complexes in this complex are separated from the overlying lower greenschist mélange by normal faulting with an evident dextral shearing component. Open antiform-like S2 foliation of the footwall phengite schist truncates the approximately north-dipping structures of the overlying mélange. Microtextures and mineral chemistry of amphibole reveal three stages of growth: Geothermobarometric estimates yield temperatures and pressures of 524 °C and 0.88 GPa for pargasite cores, 386 °C and 0.34 GPa for actinolite mantles, and 404 °C and 0.76 GPa for winchite rims. Peak blueschist metamorphism in the phengite schist occurred at 0.7-1.1 GPa and 400 °C. Our Ar-Ar dating of amphibole reveals rim-ward decreasing in age bands, including 242.4-241.2 Ma, ≥202.6-196.8, and 192.9-189.8 Ma. The results provide evidence for four distinct phases of Mesozoic tectonic evolution in Central Qiangtang: (1) northward oceanic subduction beneath North Qiangtang ( 244-220 Ma); (2) syn-collisional slab-break off (223-202 Ma); (3) early collisional extension driven by buoyant extrusion flow from depth ( 202.6-197 Ma); and (4) post-collision contraction and reburial (195.6-188.7 Ma).

  9. Association of A1C and fasting plasma glucose levels with diabetic retinopathy prevalence in the U.S. population: Implications for diabetes diagnostic thresholds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yiling J; Gregg, Edward W; Geiss, Linda S; Imperatore, Giuseppina; Williams, Desmond E; Zhang, Xinzhi; Albright, Ann L; Cowie, Catherine C; Klein, Ronald; Saaddine, Jinan B

    2009-11-01

    To examine the association of A1C levels and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) with diabetic retinopathy in the U.S. population and to compare the ability of the two glycemic measures to discriminate between people with and without retinopathy. This study included 1,066 individuals aged >or=40 years from the 2005-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. A1C, FPG, and 45 degrees color digital retinal images were assessed. Retinopathy was defined as a level >or=14 on the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study severity scale. We used joinpoint regression to identify linear inflections of prevalence of retinopathy in the association between A1C and FPG. The overall prevalence of retinopathy was 11%, which is appreciably lower than the prevalence in people with diagnosed diabetes (36%). There was a sharp increase in retinopathy prevalence in those with A1C >or=5.5% or FPG >or=5.8 mmol/l. After excluding 144 people using hypoglycemic medication, the change points for the greatest increase in retinopathy prevalence were A1C 5.5% and FPG 7.0 mmol/l. The coefficients of variation were 15.6 for A1C and 28.8 for FPG. Based on the areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves, A1C was a stronger discriminator of retinopathy (0.71 [95% CI 0.66-0.76]) than FPG (0.65 [0.60 - 0.70], P for difference = 0.009). The steepest increase in retinopathy prevalence occurs among individuals with A1C >or=5.5% and FPG >or=5.8 mmol/l. A1C discriminates prevalence of retinopathy better than FPG.

  10. Geochemistry and geochronology of carbonate-hosted base metal deposits in the southern Brooks Range, Alaska: temporal association with VMS deposits and metallogenic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Karen; Slack, John; Selby, David

    2009-01-01

    The Brooks Range contains enormous accumulations of zinc and copper, either as VMS or sediment-hosted deposits. The Ruby Creek and Omar deposits are Cu-Co stratabound deposits associated with dolomitic breccias. Numerous volcanogenic Cu-Zn (+/-Ag, Au) deposits are situated ~20 km north of the Ruby Creek deposit. The carbonate-hosted deposits consist of chalcopyrite and bornite that fill open spaces, replace the matrix of the breccias, and occur in later cross-cutting veins. Cobaltiferous pyrite, chalcocite, minor tennantite-tetrahedrite, galena, and sphalerite are also present. At Ruby Creek, phases such as carrollite, renierite, and germanite occur rarely. The deposits have undergone post-depositional metamorphism (Ruby Creek, low greenschist facies; Omar, blueschist facies). The unusual geochemical signature includes Cu-Co +/- Ag, As, Au, Bi, Ge, Hg, Sb, and U with sporadic high Re concentrations (up to 2.7 ppm). New Re-Os data were obtained for chalcopyrite, bornite, and pyrite from the Ruby Creek deposit (analyses of sulfides from Omar are in progress). The data show extremely high Re abundances (hundreds of ppb, low ppm) and contain essentially no common Os. The Re-Os data provide the first absolute ages of ore formation for the Ruby Creek deposit and demonstrate that the Re-Os systematics of pyrite, chalcopyrite, and bornite are unaffected by greenschist metamorphism. The Re-Os data show that the main phase of Cu mineralization occurred at 384 +/-4.2 Ma, which coincides with zircon U-Pb ages from igneous rocks that are spatially and genetically associated with VMS deposits. This suggests a temporal link between regional magmatism and hydrothermal mineralization.

  11. Antigenic differences between AS03 adjuvanted influenza A (H1N1) pandemic vaccines: implications for pandemrix-associated narcolepsy risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaarala, Outi; Vuorela, Arja; Partinen, Markku; Baumann, Marc; Freitag, Tobias L; Meri, Seppo; Saavalainen, Päivi; Jauhiainen, Matti; Soliymani, Rabah; Kirjavainen, Turkka; Olsen, Päivi; Saarenpää-Heikkilä, Outi; Rouvinen, Juha; Roivainen, Merja; Nohynek, Hanna; Jokinen, Jukka; Julkunen, Ilkka; Kilpi, Terhi

    2014-01-01

    Narcolepsy results from immune-mediated destruction of hypocretin secreting neurons in hypothalamus, however the triggers and disease mechanisms are poorly understood. Vaccine-attributable risk of narcolepsy reported so far with the AS03 adjuvanted H1N1 vaccination Pandemrix has been manifold compared to the AS03 adjuvanted Arepanrix, which contained differently produced H1N1 viral antigen preparation. Hence, antigenic differences and antibody response to these vaccines were investigated. Increased circulating IgG-antibody levels to Pandemrix H1N1 antigen were found in 47 children with Pandemrix-associated narcolepsy when compared to 57 healthy children vaccinated with Pandemrix. H1N1 antigen of Arepanrix inhibited poorly these antibodies indicating antigenic difference between Arepanrix and Pandemrix. High-resolution gel electrophoresis quantitation and mass spectrometry identification analyses revealed higher amounts of structurally altered viral nucleoprotein (NP) in Pandemrix. Increased antibody levels to hemagglutinin (HA) and NP, particularly to detergent treated NP, was seen in narcolepsy. Higher levels of antibodies to NP were found in children with DQB1*06:02 risk allele and in DQB1*06:02 transgenic mice immunized with Pandemrix when compared to controls. This work identified 1) higher amounts of structurally altered viral NP in Pandemrix than in Arepanrix, 2) detergent-induced antigenic changes of viral NP, that are recognized by antibodies from children with narcolepsy, and 3) increased antibody response to NP in association of DQB1*06:02 risk allele of narcolepsy. These findings provide a link between Pandemrix and narcolepsy. Although detailed mechanisms of Pandemrix in narcolepsy remain elusive, our results move the focus from adjuvant(s) onto the H1N1 viral proteins.

  12. Youth Preferences for Roll-Your-Own Versus Factory-Made Cigarettes: Trends and Associations in Repeated National Surveys (2006-2013) and Implications for Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healey, Benjamin; Edwards, Richard; Hoek, Janet

    2016-05-01

    We investigated trends in roll-your-own (RYO) and factory-made (FM) cigarette use over time among youth in New Zealand (NZ), a high RYO use country. We also explored factors associated with RYO use. We analyzed data from an annual survey of NZ students (14-15 years old) from 2006-2013. Smokers were asked whether they usually smoked RYO or FM cigarettes, and provided details of their source of supply. We estimated prevalences and developed a binary logistic regression model to explore determinants of RYO use. Between 6663 (2006) and 3143 (2013) current smokers responded. Each year, around 80% reported usually smoking RYO or FM cigarettes. The proportion reporting usual RYO use was 45% (95% confidence interval [CI] ±3%) in 2006, reducing to 40% (95% CI ±3%) in 2013 (trend test: P smokers, those who initiated smoking younger, who belonged to low or medium socioeconomic status groups, and whose friends and family both smoked. RYO use is very high among NZ youth who smoke. Preference for RYO cigarettes amongst longer-term, regular smokers suggests RYO tobacco supports and maintains youth smoking. There was some initial evidence that a 2010 differential tax increase on RYO tobacco was associated with a shift away from usual RYO use amongst those who sourced tobacco from caregivers or friends. Additional measures such as further differential excise tax increases appear warranted. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Food variety score is associated with dual burden of malnutrition in Orang Asli (Malaysian indigenous peoples) households: implications for health promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saibul, Nurfaizah; Shariff, Zalilah Mohd; Lin, Khor Geok; Kandiah, Mirnalini; Ghani, Nawalyah Abdul; Rahman, Hejar Abdul

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on the presence of dual burden households in Orang Asli (OA, indigenous people) communities and its associated factors. A total of 182 OA households in two districts in Selangor with the required criteria (182 non-pregnant women of child bearing age and 284 children aged 2-9 years old) participated in the study. Height and weight of both women and children were measured. Energy intake and food variety score (FVS) were determined using three 24-hour diet recalls. While 58% were underweight and 64% of the children were stunted, the prevalence of overweight and obesity in women were 31% and 20% respectively. The percentage of dual burden households (overweight mother/underweight child) was 25.8% while 14.8% households had normal weight mother/normal weight child. The mean food variety score (FVS) was similar for women (7.0+/-2.1) and children (6.9+/-1.9). Dual burden households were associated with women's employment status (OR: 3.18, 95% CI: 2.65-5.66), FVS of children (OR: 0.71, 95% CI: 0.51-0.95) and FVS of women (OR: 1.39, 95% CI: 1.02- 1.89). The FVS of children (OR: 0.49, 95% CI: 0.25-0.89) and women (OR: 1.92, 95% CI: 1.64-2.77) remained significant even when dual burden households were compared to only households with normal weight mother/normal weight child. In these OA communities, food variety may predict a healthier diet in children, but may increase the risk of overweight and obesity in adults. Efforts to address households with dual burden malnutrition should consider promotion of healthy diets and lifestyle for all members.

  14. An assessment of knowledge of HIV/AIDS and associated risky behavior among inmates of Kaduna convict prison: the implications for Prevention Programmes in Nigerian Prisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabitu, K; Iliyasu, Z; Joshua, I A

    2009-01-01

    Prisoners worldwide have a significantly higher prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Despite this, little is known of inmates' knowledge, behaviour and access to services, especially in developing countries. This study assessed the characteristics, HIV/AIDS knowledge, attitude and associated risky behavior among inmates of a prison in northern Nigeria. A structured interviewer-administered questionnaire was administered on a cross-section of 374 inmates of Kaduna convict prison in northern Nigeria. Information was elicited on their sociodemographic characteristics, knowledge of HIV/AIDS, attitude and indulgence in risky behaviour. About 96.1% of the inmates had heard about AIDS. Majority of them (70%) were ignorant of the causative agent; however, knowledge of route of disease transmission was high, with 91%, 67% and 46.7% of inmates mentioning sexual activity, unscreened blood transfusion and sharing unsterilized blades, respectively. They listed abstinence, faithfulness, use of condoms, new needles, syringes and blades as protective measures. Overall, 39.5%, 48.7% and 11.8% of the respondents had good, fair and poor knowledge of HIV/AIDS, respectively. Only 64 (14.9%) inmates reported having sexual intercourse in prison. These sexual encounters were homosexual in 56.2% of cases and heterosexual in 43.8% of cases. Only 28 (43.8%) of the sexually active inmates claimed to have used condoms regularly. Respectively, 72.3% and 70.8% of inmates shared barbing clippers and razor blades. There was a strong association between educational attainment and knowledge of HIV/AIDS (2 = 28.3 df = 6 P HIV/AIDS, there were gaps, misconceptions and high-risk behaviour. Well-designed information, education an communication (IEC) programmes on AIDS should be developed for inmates of prisons nationwide.

  15. Treatment Implications

    OpenAIRE

    Krishnan-Sarin, Suchitra; O’Malley, Stephanie; Krystal, John H.

    2008-01-01

    Developing pharmacotherapies to treat alcohol dependence and associated health problems traditionally has been based on gaining a better understanding of the neuroscience underlying alcohol-drinking behavior. To date, three medications have been approved for the treatment of alcohol dependence: disulfiram (Antabuse®), naltrexone (Revia®, Vivitrol®, and Naltrel®), and acamprosate (Campral®). However, these medications have modest efficacy, and there is a great need for newer medications that t...

  16. A genome-wide association meta-analysis of circulating sex hormone-binding globulin reveals multiple Loci implicated in sex steroid hormone regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea D Coviello

    Full Text Available Sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG is a glycoprotein responsible for the transport and biologic availability of sex steroid hormones, primarily testosterone and estradiol. SHBG has been associated with chronic diseases including type 2 diabetes (T2D and with hormone-sensitive cancers such as breast and prostate cancer. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS meta-analysis of 21,791 individuals from 10 epidemiologic studies and validated these findings in 7,046 individuals in an additional six studies. We identified twelve genomic regions (SNPs associated with circulating SHBG concentrations. Loci near the identified SNPs included SHBG (rs12150660, 17p13.1, p = 1.8 × 10(-106, PRMT6 (rs17496332, 1p13.3, p = 1.4 × 10(-11, GCKR (rs780093, 2p23.3, p = 2.2 × 10(-16, ZBTB10 (rs440837, 8q21.13, p = 3.4 × 10(-09, JMJD1C (rs7910927, 10q21.3, p = 6.1 × 10(-35, SLCO1B1 (rs4149056, 12p12.1, p = 1.9 × 10(-08, NR2F2 (rs8023580, 15q26.2, p = 8.3 × 10(-12, ZNF652 (rs2411984, 17q21.32, p = 3.5 × 10(-14, TDGF3 (rs1573036, Xq22.3, p = 4.1 × 10(-14, LHCGR (rs10454142, 2p16.3, p = 1.3 × 10(-07, BAIAP2L1 (rs3779195, 7q21.3, p = 2.7 × 10(-08, and UGT2B15 (rs293428, 4q13.2, p = 5.5 × 10(-06. These genes encompass multiple biologic pathways, including hepatic function, lipid metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism and T2D, androgen and estrogen receptor function, epigenetic effects, and the biology of sex steroid hormone-responsive cancers including breast and prostate cancer. We found evidence of sex-differentiated genetic influences on SHBG. In a sex-specific GWAS, the loci 4q13.2-UGT2B15 was significant in men only (men p = 2.5 × 10(-08, women p = 0.66, heterogeneity p = 0.003. Additionally, three loci showed strong sex-differentiated effects: 17p13.1-SHBG and Xq22.3-TDGF3 were stronger in men, whereas 8q21.12-ZBTB10 was stronger in women. Conditional analyses identified additional signals at the SHBG gene that together almost double the proportion

  17. A genome-wide association meta-analysis of circulating sex hormone-binding globulin reveals multiple Loci implicated in sex steroid hormone regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coviello, Andrea D; Haring, Robin; Wellons, Melissa; Vaidya, Dhananjay; Lehtimäki, Terho; Keildson, Sarah; Lunetta, Kathryn L; He, Chunyan; Fornage, Myriam; Lagou, Vasiliki; Mangino, Massimo; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; Chen, Brian; Eriksson, Joel; Garcia, Melissa; Liu, Yong Mei; Koster, Annemarie; Lohman, Kurt; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Petersen, Ann-Kristin; Prescott, Jennifer; Stolk, Lisette; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Wood, Andrew R; Zhuang, Wei Vivian; Ruokonen, Aimo; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Pouta, Anneli; Bandinelli, Stefania; Biffar, Reiner; Brabant, Georg; Cox, David G; Chen, Yuhui; Cummings, Steven; Ferrucci, Luigi; Gunter, Marc J; Hankinson, Susan E; Martikainen, Hannu; Hofman, Albert; Homuth, Georg; Illig, Thomas; Jansson, John-Olov; Johnson, Andrew D; Karasik, David; Karlsson, Magnus; Kettunen, Johannes; Kiel, Douglas P; Kraft, Peter; Liu, Jingmin; Ljunggren, Östen; Lorentzon, Mattias; Maggio, Marcello; Markus, Marcello R P; Mellström, Dan; Miljkovic, Iva; Mirel, Daniel; Nelson, Sarah; Morin Papunen, Laure; Peeters, Petra H M; Prokopenko, Inga; Raffel, Leslie; Reincke, Martin; Reiner, Alex P; Rexrode, Kathryn; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Schwartz, Stephen M; Siscovick, David; Soranzo, Nicole; Stöckl, Doris; Tworoger, Shelley; Uitterlinden, André G; van Gils, Carla H; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Wichmann, H-Erich; Zhai, Guangju; Bhasin, Shalender; Bidlingmaier, Martin; Chanock, Stephen J; De Vivo, Immaculata; Harris, Tamara B; Hunter, David J; Kähönen, Mika; Liu, Simin; Ouyang, Pamela; Spector, Tim D; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Viikari, Jorma; Wallaschofski, Henri; McCarthy, Mark I; Frayling, Timothy M; Murray, Anna; Franks, Steve; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; de Jong, Frank H; Raitakari, Olli; Teumer, Alexander; Ohlsson, Claes; Murabito, Joanne M; Perry, John R B

    2012-01-01

    Sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) is a glycoprotein responsible for the transport and biologic availability of sex steroid hormones, primarily testosterone and estradiol. SHBG has been associated with chronic diseases including type 2 diabetes (T2D) and with hormone-sensitive cancers such as breast and prostate cancer. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) meta-analysis of 21,791 individuals from 10 epidemiologic studies and validated these findings in 7,046 individuals in an additional six studies. We identified twelve genomic regions (SNPs) associated with circulating SHBG concentrations. Loci near the identified SNPs included SHBG (rs12150660, 17p13.1, p = 1.8 × 10(-106)), PRMT6 (rs17496332, 1p13.3, p = 1.4 × 10(-11)), GCKR (rs780093, 2p23.3, p = 2.2 × 10(-16)), ZBTB10 (rs440837, 8q21.13, p = 3.4 × 10(-09)), JMJD1C (rs7910927, 10q21.3, p = 6.1 × 10(-35)), SLCO1B1 (rs4149056, 12p12.1, p = 1.9 × 10(-08)), NR2F2 (rs8023580, 15q26.2, p = 8.3 × 10(-12)), ZNF652 (rs2411984, 17q21.32, p = 3.5 × 10(-14)), TDGF3 (rs1573036, Xq22.3, p = 4.1 × 10(-14)), LHCGR (rs10454142, 2p16.3, p = 1.3 × 10(-07)), BAIAP2L1 (rs3779195, 7q21.3, p = 2.7 × 10(-08)), and UGT2B15 (rs293428, 4q13.2, p = 5.5 × 10(-06)). These genes encompass multiple biologic pathways, including hepatic function, lipid metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism and T2D, androgen and estrogen receptor function, epigenetic effects, and the biology of sex steroid hormone-responsive cancers including breast and prostate cancer. We found evidence of sex-differentiated genetic influences on SHBG. In a sex-specific GWAS, the loci 4q13.2-UGT2B15 was significant in men only (men p = 2.5 × 10(-08), women p = 0.66, heterogeneity p = 0.003). Additionally, three loci showed strong sex-differentiated effects: 17p13.1-SHBG and Xq22.3-TDGF3 were stronger in men, whereas 8q21.12-ZBTB10 was stronger in women. Conditional analyses identified additional signals at the SHBG gene that together almost double the

  18. A Genome-Wide Association Meta-Analysis of Circulating Sex Hormone–Binding Globulin Reveals Multiple Loci Implicated in Sex Steroid Hormone Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunetta, Kathryn L.; He, Chunyan; Fornage, Myriam; Lagou, Vasiliki; Mangino, Massimo; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; Chen, Brian; Eriksson, Joel; Garcia, Melissa; Liu, Yong Mei; Koster, Annemarie; Lohman, Kurt; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Petersen, Ann-Kristin; Prescott, Jennifer; Stolk, Lisette; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Wood, Andrew R.; Zhuang, Wei Vivian; Ruokonen, Aimo; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Pouta, Anneli; Bandinelli, Stefania; Biffar, Reiner; Brabant, Georg; Cox, David G.; Chen, Yuhui; Cummings, Steven; Ferrucci, Luigi; Gunter, Marc J.; Hankinson, Susan E.; Martikainen, Hannu; Hofman, Albert; Homuth, Georg; Illig, Thomas; Jansson, John-Olov; Johnson, Andrew D.; Karasik, David; Karlsson, Magnus; Kettunen, Johannes; Kiel, Douglas P.; Kraft, Peter; Liu, Jingmin; Ljunggren, Östen; Lorentzon, Mattias; Maggio, Marcello; Markus, Marcello R. P.; Mellström, Dan; Miljkovic, Iva; Mirel, Daniel; Nelson, Sarah; Morin Papunen, Laure; Peeters, Petra H. M.; Prokopenko, Inga; Raffel, Leslie; Reincke, Martin; Reiner, Alex P.; Rexrode, Kathryn; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Schwartz, Stephen M.; Siscovick, David; Soranzo, Nicole; Stöckl, Doris; Tworoger, Shelley; Uitterlinden, André G.; van Gils, Carla H.; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Zhai, Guangju; Bhasin, Shalender; Bidlingmaier, Martin; Chanock, Stephen J.; De Vivo, Immaculata; Harris, Tamara B.; Hunter, David J.; Kähönen, Mika; Liu, Simin; Ouyang, Pamela; Spector, Tim D.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Viikari, Jorma; Wallaschofski, Henri; McCarthy, Mark I.; Frayling, Timothy M.; Murray, Anna; Franks, Steve; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; de Jong, Frank H.; Raitakari, Olli; Teumer, Alexander; Ohlsson, Claes; Murabito, Joanne M.; Perry, John R. B.

    2012-01-01

    Sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) is a glycoprotein responsible for the transport and biologic availability of sex steroid hormones, primarily testosterone and estradiol. SHBG has been associated with chronic diseases including type 2 diabetes (T2D) and with hormone-sensitive cancers such as breast and prostate cancer. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) meta-analysis of 21,791 individuals from 10 epidemiologic studies and validated these findings in 7,046 individuals in an additional six studies. We identified twelve genomic regions (SNPs) associated with circulating SHBG concentrations. Loci near the identified SNPs included SHBG (rs12150660, 17p13.1, p = 1.8×10−106), PRMT6 (rs17496332, 1p13.3, p = 1.4×10−11), GCKR (rs780093, 2p23.3, p = 2.2×10−16), ZBTB10 (rs440837, 8q21.13, p = 3.4×10−09), JMJD1C (rs7910927, 10q21.3, p = 6.1×10−35), SLCO1B1 (rs4149056, 12p12.1, p = 1.9×10−08), NR2F2 (rs8023580, 15q26.2, p = 8.3×10−12), ZNF652 (rs2411984, 17q21.32, p = 3.5×10−14), TDGF3 (rs1573036, Xq22.3, p = 4.1×10−14), LHCGR (rs10454142, 2p16.3, p = 1.3×10−07), BAIAP2L1 (rs3779195, 7q21.3, p = 2.7×10−08), and UGT2B15 (rs293428, 4q13.2, p = 5.5×10−06). These genes encompass multiple biologic pathways, including hepatic function, lipid metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism and T2D, androgen and estrogen receptor function, epigenetic effects, and the biology of sex steroid hormone-responsive cancers including breast and prostate cancer. We found evidence of sex-differentiated genetic influences on SHBG. In a sex-specific GWAS, the loci 4q13.2-UGT2B15 was significant in men only (men p = 2.5×10−08, women p = 0.66, heterogeneity p = 0.003). Additionally, three loci showed strong sex-differentiated effects: 17p13.1-SHBG and Xq22.3-TDGF3 were stronger in men, whereas 8q21.12-ZBTB10 was stronger in women. Conditional analyses identified additional signals at the SHBG

  19. Demographic, knowledge, attitudinal, and accessibility factors associated with uptake of cervical cancer screening among women in a rural district of Tanzania: Three public policy implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyimo Frida S

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cervical cancer is an important public health problem worldwide, which comprises approximately 12% of all cancers in women. In Tanzania, the estimated incidence rate is 30 to 40 per 100,000 women, indicating a high disease burden. Cervical cancer screening is acknowledged as currently the most effective approach for cervical cancer control, and it is associated with reduced incidence and mortality from the disease. The aim of the study was to identify the most important factors related to the uptake of cervical cancer screening among women in a rural district of Tanzania. Methods A cross sectional study was conducted with a sample of 354 women aged 18 to 69 years residing in Moshi Rural District. A multistage sampling technique was used to randomly select eligible women. A one-hour interview was conducted with each woman in her home. The 17 questions were modified from similar questions used in previous research. Results Less than one quarter (22.6% of the participants had obtained cervical cancer screening. The following characteristics, when examined separately in relation to the uptake of cervical cancer screening service, were significant: husband approval of cervical cancer screening, women's level of education, women's knowledge of cervical cancer and its prevention, women's concerns about embarrassment and pain of screening, women's preference for the sex of health provider, and women's awareness of and distance to cervical cancer screening services. When examined simultaneously in a logistic regression, we found that only knowledge of cervical cancer and its prevention (OR = 8.90, 95%CI = 2.14-16.03 and distance to the facility which provides cervical cancer screening (OR = 3.98, 95%CI = 0.18-5.10 were significantly associated with screening uptake. Conclusions Based on the study findings, three recommendations are made. First, information about cervical cancer must be presented to women. Second, public education of

  20. Unclear association between levels of Plasmodium falciparum lactate dehydrogenase (PfLDH) in saliva of malaria patients and blood parasitaemia: diagnostic implications?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambati, Eva A; Kiarie, William C; Kimani, Francis; Kimotho, James H; Otinga, Maureen S; Too, Edwin; Kaniaru, Stephen; Limson, Janice; Bulimo, Wallace

    2018-01-05

    The use of saliva in diagnosis of infectious diseases is an attractive alternative to procedures that involve blood drawing. It promises to reduce risks associated with accidental needle pricks and improve patient compliance particularly in malaria survey and drug efficacy studies. Quantification of parasitaemia is useful in establishing severity of disease and in assessing individual patient response to treatment. In current practice, microscopy is the recommended technique, despite its limitations. This study measured the levels of Plasmodium falciparum lactate dehydrogenase (PfLDH) in saliva of malaria patients and investigated the relationship with blood parasitaemia. Matched pre-treatment blood and saliva samples were collected from patients at Msambweni District Hospital, Kenya. Parasitaemia was determined and only those confirmed to be Plasmodium falciparum mono-infected were recruited. PfLDH was quantified in saliva using a commercial ELISA kit. A total of 175 samples were collected. Relationship between blood parasitaemia and concentration of PfLDH in saliva was determined using Pearson correlation statistics. F test was used to determine whether there is a significant difference between levels of PfLDH in saliva of patients with moderate to high parasitaemia and those with low parasitaemia. One-hundred and seventy-five patient samples were positive for malaria by microscopy. Of these, 62 (35%) tested positive for PfLDH in saliva, 113 (65%) were false negatives. For those that tested positive, (53) 85% were from patients with moderate to high parasitaemia while 9 (15%) were from patients with low parasitaemia. A correlation co-efficient of 0.18 indicated a weak positive relationship between the concentration of PfLDH in saliva and blood parasitaemia. There was a marginal difference between levels of PfLDH in saliva of patients with moderate to high parasitaemia and those with low parasitaemia [F (1, 59) = 1.83, p = 0.1807]. The results indicate that

  1. Retrospective analysis of associations between water quality and toxic blooms of golden alga (Prymnesium parvum) in Texas reservoirs: Implications for understanding dispersal mechanisms and impacts of climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patino, Reynaldo; Dawson, D.; VanLandeghem, Matthew M.

    2014-01-01

    Toxic blooms of golden alga (GA, Prymnesium parvum) in Texas typically occur in winter or early spring. In North America, they were first reported in Texas in the 1980s, and a marked range expansion occurred in 2001. Although there is concern about the influence of climate change on the future distribution of GA, factors responsible for past dispersals remain uncertain. To better understand the factors that influence toxic bloom dispersal in reservoirs, this study characterized reservoir water quality associated with toxic GA blooms since 2001, and examined trends in water quality during a 20-year period bracketing the 2001 expansion. Archived data were analyzed for six impacted and six nonimpacted reservoirs from two major Texas basins: Brazos River and Colorado River. Data were simplified for analysis by pooling spatially (across sampling stations) and temporally (winter, December-February) within reservoirs and generating depth-corrected (1 m) monthly values. Classification tree analysis [period of record (POR), 2001-2010] using salinity-associated variables (specific conductance, chloride, sulfate), dissolved oxygen (DO), pH, temperature, total hardness, potassium, nitrate+nitrite, and total phosphorus indicated that salinity best predicts the toxic bloom occurrence. Minimum estimated salinities for toxic bloom formation were 0.59 and 1.02 psu in Brazos and Colorado River reservoirs, respectively. Principal component analysis (POR, 2001-2010) indicated that GA habitat is best defined by higher salinity relative to nonimpacted reservoirs, with winter DO and pH also being slightly higher and winter temperature slightly lower in impacted reservoirs. Trend analysis, however, did not reveal monotonic changes in winter water quality of GA-impacted reservoirs during the 20-year period (1991-2010) bracketing the 2001 dispersal. Therefore, whereas minimum levels of salinity are required for GA establishment and toxic blooms in Texas reservoirs, the lack of trends in

  2. Associations between C-reactive protein, coronary artery calcium, and cardiovascular events: implications for the JUPITER population from MESA, a population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaha, Michael J; Budoff, Matthew J; DeFilippis, Andrew P; Blankstein, Ron; Rivera, Juan J; Agatston, Arthur; O'Leary, Daniel H; Lima, Joao; Blumenthal, Roger S; Nasir, Khurram

    2011-08-20

    The JUPITER trial showed that some patients with LDL-cholesterol concentrations less than 3·37 mmol/L (JUPITER, we established whether coronary artery calcium (CAC) might further stratify risk; additionally we compared hsCRP with CAC for risk prediction across the range of low and high hsCRP values. 950 participants from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atheroslcerosis (MESA) met all criteria for JUPITER entry. We compared coronary heart disease and cardiovascular disease event rates and multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios after stratifying by burden of CAC (scores of 0, 1-100, or >100). We calculated 5-year number needed to treat (NNT) by applying the benefit recorded in JUPITER to the event rates within each CAC strata. Median follow-up was 5·8 years (IQR 5·7-5·9). 444 (47%) patients in the MESA JUPITER population had CAC scores of 0 and, in this group, rates of coronary heart disease events were 0·8 per 1000 person-years. 74% of all coronary events were in the 239 (25%) of participants with CAC scores of more than 100 (20·2 per 1000 person-years). For coronary heart disease, the predicted 5-year NNT was 549 for CAC score 0, 94 for scores 1-100, and 24 for scores greater than 100. For cardiovascular disease, the NNT was 124, 54, and 19. In the total study population, presence of CAC was associated with a hazard ratio of 4·29 (95% CI 1·99-9·25) for coronary heart disease, and of 2·57 (1·48-4·48) for cardiovascular disease. hsCRP was not associated with either disease after multivariable adjustment. CAC seems to further stratify risk in patients eligible for JUPITER, and could be used to target subgroups of patients who are expected to derive the most, and the least, absolute benefit from statin treatment. Focusing of treatment on the subset of individuals with measurable atherosclerosis could allow for more appropriate allocation of resources. National Institutes of Health-National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  3. Urinary tract infection-like symptom is associated with worse bladder cancer outcomes in the Medicare population: Implications for sex disparities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Kyle A; Ham, Sandra; Cohn, Joshua A; Steinberg, Gary D

    2016-01-01

    To determine the time to bladder cancer diagnosis from initial infection-like symptoms and its impact on cancer outcomes. Using Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results-Medicare, we designed a retrospective cohort study identifying beneficiaries aged ≥ 66 years diagnosed with bladder cancer from 2007 to 2009. Patients were required to have a hematuria or urinary tract infection claim within 1 year of bladder cancer diagnosis (n = 21 216), and have 2 years of prior Medicare data (n = 18 956) without any precedent hematuria, bladder cancer or urinary tract infection claims (n = 12 195). The number of days to bladder cancer diagnosis was measured, as well as the impact of sex and presenting symptom on time to diagnosis, pathology, and oncological outcomes. The mean time to bladder cancer diagnosis was 72.2 days in women versus 58.9 days in men (P urinary tract infection. Cox proportional hazards analysis identified an increased risk of mortality from bladder cancer and all causes in women presenting with urinary tract infection (hazard ratio 1.37, 95% confidence interval 1.10-1.71, and hazard ratio 1.47, 95% confidence interval 1.28-1.69) compared with women with hematuria. Women have a longer interval from urinary tract infection to diagnosis of bladder cancer. Urinary tract infection presentation can adversely affect time to diagnosis, pathology and survival. Time to diagnosis seems not to be an independent predictor of bladder cancer outcomes. © 2015 The Japanese Urological Association.

  4. Association of 16 priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons with humic acid and humin fractions in a peat soil and implications for their long-term retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weixiao; Wang, Hui; Gao, Qian; Chen, Yin; Li, Senlin; Yang, Yu; Werner, David; Tao, Shu; Wang, Xilong

    2017-11-01

    To elucidate the environmental fate of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) once released into soil, sixteen humic acids (HAs) and one humin (HM) fractions were sequentially extracted from a peat soil, and sixteen priority PAHs in these humic substances (HSs) were analyzed. It was found that the total concentration of 16 PAHs (∑16PAHs) increased evidently from HA1 to HA16, and then dramatically reached the highest value in HM. The trend of ∑16PAHs in HAs relates to surface carbon and C-H/C-C contents, the bulk aliphatic carbon content and aliphaticity, as well as the condensation enhancement of carbon domains, which were derived from elemental composition, XPS, 13C NMR, as well as thermal analyses. HM was identified to be the dominant sink of 16 PAHs retention in soil, due to its aliphatic carbon-rich chemical composition and the highly condensed physical makeup of its carbon domains. This study highlights the joint roles of the physical and chemical properties of HSs in retention of PAHs in soil and the associated mechanisms; the results are of significance for PAH-polluted soil risk assessment and remediation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Odontogenic ameloblasts-associated protein (ODAM), via phosphorylation by bone morphogenetic protein receptor type IB (BMPR-IB), is implicated in ameloblast differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hye-Kyung; Park, Jong-Tae; Cho, Young-Sik; Bae, Hyun-Sook; Cho, Moon-Il; Park, Joo-Cheol

    2012-05-01

    To elucidate the function of the odontogenic ameloblast-associated protein (ODAM) in ameloblasts, we identified more than 74 proteins that interact with ODAM using protoarray. Of the identified proteins, bone morphogenetic protein receptor type-IB (BMPR-IB) was physiologically relevant in differentiating ameloblasts. ODAM and BMPR-IB exhibited similar patterns of expression in vitro, during ameloblast differentiation. ODAM and BMPR-IB interacted through the C-terminus of ODAM, which resulted in increased ODAM phosphorylation in the presence of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2). Immunoprecipitation assays using Ser-Xaa-Glu (SXE) mutants of ODAM demonstrated that the phosphorylation of ODAM by BMPR-IB occurs at this motif, and this phosphorylation is required for the activation of MAPKs. ODAM phosphorylation was detected in ameloblasts during ameloblast differentiation and enamel mineralization in vitro and involved in the activation of downstream factors of MAPKs. Therefore, the BMP-2-BMPR-IB-ODAM-MAPK signaling cascade has important roles in ameloblast differentiation and enamel mineralization. Our data suggest that ODAM facilitates the progression of tooth development in cooperation with BMPR-IB through distinct domains of ODAM. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Factors associated with quality of life and caregiver strain amongst frail older adults referred to a community rehabilitation service: implications for service delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comans, Tracy A; Currin, Michelle L; Brauer, Sandra G; Haines, Terry P

    2011-01-01

    To identify factors contributing to reduced quality of life and increased caregiver strain in an older population referred to a community rehabilitation team and to recommend service delivery models. Analytical cross-sectional study arising from baseline assessments from 107 subjects drawn from a randomised controlled trial of community rehabilitation service delivery models. A community rehabilitation team based in Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. Primary outcome variables include quality of life (EQ-5D & VAS) and Carer Strain Index. Predictor variables include participation in functional activities, history of falls, number of medications, number of co-morbidities, depression, environmental hazards, physical function and nutrition. Association between variables assessed using linear regression. Major factors contributing to reduced quality of life were having reduced participation in daily activities, depression, and having poor vision. Having poor nutrition and no longer driving also contributed to poor quality of life. The major factor contributing to increased caregiver strain was reduced participation in daily activities by the older person. Community rehabilitation services working with older populations must adopt models of care that screen for and address a wide range of factors that contribute to poor quality of life and caregiver strain.

  7. Post electrical or lightning injury syndrome: a proposal for an American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual formulation with implications for treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J Andrews

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the past, victims of electrical and lightning injuries have been assessed in a manner lacking a systematic formulation, and against ad hoc criteria, particularly in the area of neuropsychological disability. In this manner patients have, for example, only been partially treated, been poorly or incorrectly diagnosed, and have been denied the full benefit of compensation for their injuries. This paper contains a proposal for diagnostic criteria particularly for the neuropsychological aspects of the post injury syndrome. It pays attention to widely published consistent descriptions of the syndrome, and a new cluster analysis of post electrical injury patients. It formulates a proposal which could be incorporated into future editions of the American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM. The major neuropsychological consequences include neurocognitive dysfunction, and memory subgroup dysfunction, with ongoing consequences, and sometimes including progressive or delayed psychiatric, cognitive, and/or neurological symptoms. The proposed diagnostic criteria insist on a demonstrated context for the injury, both specifying the shock circumstance, and also physical consequences. It allows for a certain delay in onset of symptoms. It recognizes exclusory conditions. The outcome is a proposal for a DSM classification for the post electrical or lightning injury syndrome. This proposal is considered important for grounding patient treatment, and for further treatment trials. Options for treatment in electrical or lightning injury are summarised, and future trials are foreshadowed.

  8. Post electrical or lightning injury syndrome: a proposal for an American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual formulation with implications for treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Christopher J; Reisner, Andrew D; Cooper, Mary Ann

    2017-09-01

    In the past, victims of electrical and lightning injuries have been assessed in a manner lacking a systematic formulation, and against ad hoc criteria, particularly in the area of neuropsychological disability. In this manner patients have, for example, only been partially treated, been poorly or incorrectly diagnosed, and have been denied the full benefit of compensation for their injuries. This paper contains a proposal for diagnostic criteria particularly for the neuropsychological aspects of the post injury syndrome. It pays attention to widely published consistent descriptions of the syndrome, and a new cluster analysis of post electrical injury patients. It formulates a proposal which could be incorporated into future editions of the American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM). The major neuropsychological consequences include neurocognitive dysfunction, and memory subgroup dysfunction, with ongoing consequences, and sometimes including progressive or delayed psychiatric, cognitive, and/or neurological symptoms. The proposed diagnostic criteria insist on a demonstrated context for the injury, both specifying the shock circumstance, and also physical consequences. It allows for a certain delay in onset of symptoms. It recognizes exclusory conditions. The outcome is a proposal for a DSM classification for the post electrical or lightning injury syndrome. This proposal is considered important for grounding patient treatment, and for further treatment trials. Options for treatment in electrical or lightning injury are summarised, and future trials are foreshadowed.

  9. Interchange Reconnection Associated with a Confined Filament Eruption: Implications for the Source of Transient Cold-dense Plasma in Solar Winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ruisheng; Chen, Yao; Wang, Bing; Li, Gang; Xiang, Yongyuan

    2017-05-01

    The cold-dense plasma is occasionally detected in the solar wind with in situ data, but the source of the cold-dense plasma remains illusive. Interchange reconnections (IRs) between closed fields and nearby open fields are known to contribute to the formation of solar winds. We present a confined filament eruption associated with a puff-like coronal mass ejection (CME) on 2014 December 24. The filament underwent successive activations and finally erupted, due to continuous magnetic flux cancelations and emergences. The confined erupting filament showed a clear untwist motion, and most of the filament material fell back. During the eruption, some tiny blobs escaped from the confined filament body, along newly formed open field lines rooted around the south end of the filament, and some bright plasma flowed from the north end of the filament to remote sites at nearby open fields. The newly formed open field lines shifted southward with multiple branches. The puff-like CME also showed multiple bright fronts and a clear southward shift. All the results indicate an intermittent IR existed between closed fields of the confined erupting filament and nearby open fields, which released a portion of filament material (blobs) to form the puff-like CME. We suggest that the IR provides a possible source of cold-dense plasma in the solar wind.

  10. Gender-Associated Mitochondrial DNA Heteroplasmy in Somatic Tissues of the Endangered Freshwater Mussel Unio crassus (Bivalvia: Unionidae): Implications for Sex Identification and Phylogeographical Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mioduchowska, Monika; Kaczmarczyk, Agnieszka; Zając, Katarzyna; Zając, Tadeusz; Sell, Jerzy

    2016-11-01

    Some bivalve species possess two independent mitochondrial DNA lineages: maternally (F-type) and paternally (M-type) inherited. This phenomenon is called doubly uniparental inheritance. It is generally agreed that F-type mtDNA is typically present in female somatic and gonadal tissues as well as in male somatic tissues, whereas the M-type mtDNA occurs only in male germ line and gonadal tissue. In the present study, the mtDNA heteroplasmy (for both F and M genomes) in male somatic tissues of Unio crassus (Philipsson, 1788), species threatened with extinction, has been confirmed. Taking advantage from the presence of Mcox1 marker only in male somatic tissues, we developed a new method of sex identification in this endangered species, using nondestructive tissue sampling. Probability of correct sex identification was estimated at 97.5%. The present study is the first report on gender-associated mitochondrial DNA heteroplasmy in male somatic tissues of thick-shelled river mussel and first approach to U. crassus sex identification at molecular level. Our study also confirmed the utility of paternally inherited Mcox1 gene fragment as a complementary molecular tool for resolving phylogeographical relationships among populations of thick-shelled river mussel. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Size-resolved dust and aerosol contaminants associated with copper and lead smelting emissions: Implications for emission management and human health

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Csavina, Janae [Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Taylor, Mark P. [Environmental Science, Faculty of Science, Macquarie University, North Ryde, Sydney, NSW 2109 (Australia); Félix, Omar [Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Rine, Kyle P. [Department of Atmospheric Sciences, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Eduardo Sáez, A., E-mail: esaez@email.arizona.edu [Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Betterton, Eric A., E-mail: betterton@atmo.arizona.edu [Department of Atmospheric Sciences, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Mining operations, including crushing, grinding, smelting, refining, and tailings management, are a significant source of airborne metal and metalloid contaminants such as As, Pb and other potentially toxic elements. In this work, we show that size-resolved concentrations of As and Pb generally follow a bimodal distribution with the majority of contaminants in the fine size fraction (< 1 μm) around mining activities that include smelting operations at various sites in Australia and Arizona. This evidence suggests that contaminated fine particles (< 1 μm) are the result of vapor condensation and coagulation from smelting operations while coarse particles are most likely the result of windblown dust from contaminated mine tailings and fugitive emissions from crushing and grinding activities. These results on the size distribution of contaminants around mining operations are reported to demonstrate the ubiquitous nature of this phenomenon so that more effective emission management and practices that minimize health risks associated with metal extraction and processing can be developed. - Highlights: • Lead and copper smelting produce significant atmospheric concentrations of lead and arsenic. • Atmospheric lead and arsenic concentrations depend on particle size. • Lead isotopic analysis can be used to assess source of atmospheric contamination from smelters.

  12. The Parkinson’s disease-associated protein α-synuclein disrupts stress signaling – a possible implication for methamphetamine use?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaoxiao Wang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The human neuronal protein α-synuclein (α-syn has been linked by a plethora of studies as a causative factor in sporadic Parkinson’s disease (PD. To speed the pace of discovery about the biology and pathobiology of α-syn, organisms such as yeast, worms, and flies have been used to investigate the mechanisms by which elevated levels of α-syn are toxic to cells and to screen for drugs and genes that suppress this toxicity. We recently reported [Wang et al. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci.(2012 109: 16119–16124] that human α-syn, at high expression levels, disrupts stress-activated signal transduction pathways in both yeast and human neuroblastoma cells. Disruption of these signaling pathways ultimately leads to vulnerability to stress and to cell death. Here we discuss how the disruption of cell signaling by α-syn may have relevance to the parkinsonism that is associated with the abuse of the drug methamphetamine (meth.

  13. Mesothelin is a specific biomarker of invasive cancer in the Barrett-associated adenocarcinoma progression model Translational implications for diagnosis and therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Hector; Rojas, Pamela Leal; Yong, Ken-Tye; Ding, Hong; Xu, Gaixia; Prasad, Paras N.; Wang, Jean; Canto, Marcia; Eshleman, James R.; Montgomery, Elizabeth A.; Maitra, Anirban

    2008-01-01

    Esophageal adenocarcinoma arises in the backdrop of Barrett metaplasia-dysplasia sequence, with the vast majority of patients presenting with late stage malignancy. Mesothelin, a GPI-anchored protein, is aberrantly overexpressed on the surface of many solid cancers. Mesothelin expression was assessed in esophageal tissue microarrays (TMAs) encompassing the entire histologic spectrum of Barrett-associated dysplasia and adenocarcinoma. Mesothelin expression was observed in 24/84 (29%) of invasive adenocarcinomas, and in 5/34 (15%) lymph node metastases. In contrast, normal squamous and cardia mucosa, as well as non-invasive Barrett lesions, failed to label with mesothelin. Mesothelin was expressed in the esophageal adenocarcinoma cell line JHU-EsoAd1, but not in primary human esophageal epithelial cells. Anti-mesothelin antibody conjugated CdSe/CDS/ZnS quantum rods (QRs) were synthesized as described (Young et al, NanoLetters, 2007), and confocal bio-imaging confirmed robust binding to JHU-EsoAd1 cells. Anti-mesothelin antibody conjugated nanoparticles can be useful for the diagnosis and therapy of mesothelin-overexpressing esophageal adenocarcinomas. PMID:18691948

  14. Genome-wide association study implicates testis-sperm specific FKBP6 as a susceptibility locus for impaired acrosome reaction in stallions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terje Raudsepp

    Full Text Available Impaired acrosomal reaction (IAR of sperm causes male subfertility in humans and animals. Despite compelling evidence about the genetic control over acrosome biogenesis and function, the genomics of IAR is as yet poorly understood, providing no molecular tools for diagnostics. Here we conducted Equine SNP50 Beadchip genotyping and GWAS using 7 IAR-affected and 37 control Thoroughbred stallions. A significant (PA and g.11040379C>A (p.166H>N in exon 4 that were significantly associated with the IAR phenotype both in the GWAS cohort (n = 44 and in a large multi-breed cohort of 265 horses. All IAR stallions were homozygous for the A-alleles, while this genotype was found only in 2% of controls. The equine FKBP6 was exclusively expressed in testis and sperm and had 5 different transcripts, of which 4 were novel. The expression of this gene in AC/AG heterozygous controls was monoallelic, and we observed a tendency for FKBP6 up-regulation in IAR stallions compared to controls. Because exon 4 SNPs had no effect on the protein structure, it is likely that FKBP6 relates to the IAR phenotype via regulatory or modifying functions. In conclusion, FKBP6 was considered a susceptibility gene of incomplete penetrance for IAR in stallions and a candidate gene for male subfertility in mammals. FKBP6 genotyping is recommended for the detection of IAR-susceptible individuals among potential breeding stallions. Successful use of sperm as a source of DNA and RNA propagates non-invasive sample procurement for fertility genomics in animals and humans.

  15. Efavirenz promotes β-secretase expression and increased Aβ1-40,42 via oxidative stress and reduced microglial phagocytosis: implications for HIV associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lecia A M Brown

    Full Text Available Efavirenz (EFV is among the most commonly used antiretroviral drugs globally, causes neurological symptoms that interfere with adherence and reduce tolerability, and may have central nervous system (CNS effects that contribute in part to HIV associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND in patients on combination antiretroviral therapy (cART. Thus we evaluated a commonly used EFV containing regimen: EFV/zidovudine (AZT/lamivudine (3TC in murine N2a cells transfected with the human "Swedish" mutant form of amyloid precursor protein (SweAPP N2a cells to assess for promotion of amyloid-beta (Aβ production. Treatment with EFV or the EFV containing regimen generated significantly increased soluble amyloid beta (Aβ, and promoted increased β-secretase-1 (BACE-1 expression while 3TC, AZT, or, vehicle control did not significantly alter these endpoints. Further, EFV or the EFV containing regimen promoted significantly more mitochondrial stress in SweAPP N2a cells as compared to 3TC, AZT, or vehicle control. We next tested the EFV containing regimen in Aβ - producing Tg2576 mice combined or singly using clinically relevant doses. EFV or the EFV containing regimen promoted significantly more BACE-1 expression and soluble Aβ generation while 3TC, AZT, or vehicle control did not. Finally, microglial Aβ phagocytosis was significantly reduced by EFV or the EFV containing regimen but not by AZT, 3TC, or vehicle control alone. These data suggest the majority of Aβ promoting effects of this cART regimen are dependent upon EFV as it promotes both increased production, and decreased clearance of Aβ peptide.

  16. Efavirenz promotes β-secretase expression and increased Aβ1-40,42 via oxidative stress and reduced microglial phagocytosis: implications for HIV associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Lecia A M; Jin, Jingji; Ferrell, Darren; Sadic, Edin; Obregon, Demian; Smith, Adam J; Tan, Jun; Giunta, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Efavirenz (EFV) is among the most commonly used antiretroviral drugs globally, causes neurological symptoms that interfere with adherence and reduce tolerability, and may have central nervous system (CNS) effects that contribute in part to HIV associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) in patients on combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). Thus we evaluated a commonly used EFV containing regimen: EFV/zidovudine (AZT)/lamivudine (3TC) in murine N2a cells transfected with the human "Swedish" mutant form of amyloid precursor protein (SweAPP N2a cells) to assess for promotion of amyloid-beta (Aβ) production. Treatment with EFV or the EFV containing regimen generated significantly increased soluble amyloid beta (Aβ), and promoted increased β-secretase-1 (BACE-1) expression while 3TC, AZT, or, vehicle control did not significantly alter these endpoints. Further, EFV or the EFV containing regimen promoted significantly more mitochondrial stress in SweAPP N2a cells as compared to 3TC, AZT, or vehicle control. We next tested the EFV containing regimen in Aβ - producing Tg2576 mice combined or singly using clinically relevant doses. EFV or the EFV containing regimen promoted significantly more BACE-1 expression and soluble Aβ generation while 3TC, AZT, or vehicle control did not. Finally, microglial Aβ phagocytosis was significantly reduced by EFV or the EFV containing regimen but not by AZT, 3TC, or vehicle control alone. These data suggest the majority of Aβ promoting effects of this cART regimen are dependent upon EFV as it promotes both increased production, and decreased clearance of Aβ peptide.

  17. Role of the integrin-associated protein CD9 in binding between sperm ADAM 2 and the egg integrin alpha6beta1: implications for murine fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, M S; Tung, K S; Coonrod, S A; Takahashi, Y; Bigler, D; Chang, A; Yamashita, Y; Kincade, P W; Herr, J C; White, J M

    1999-10-12

    CD9 is a tetraspan protein that associates with several beta1 integrins, including alpha6beta1. Because alpha6beta1 is present on murine eggs and interacts with the sperm-surface glycoprotein ADAM 2 (fertilin beta), we first asked whether CD9 is present on murine eggs and whether it functions in sperm-egg binding and fusion. CD9 is present on the plasma membrane of oocytes in the ovary as well as on eggs isolated from the oviduct. The anti-CD9 mAb, JF9, potently inhibits sperm-egg binding and fusion in vitro in a dose-dependent manner. JF9 also disrupts binding of fluorescent beads coated with native fertilin or a recombinant fertilin beta disintegrin domain. (Both ligands bind to the egg via alpha6beta1.) Immunohistochemistry showed that CD9 is undetectable in the uterine epithelium, appears basolaterally and as prominent apical patches on the epithelium in the region between the uterus and the oviduct, and then persists apically in the oviduct. The integrin alpha6A subunit is found in similar apical patches in the region between the uterus and oviduct, but is confined to the basal aspect of the epithelium in the uterus and oviduct. Hence, alpha6A and CD9 both are expressed on the apical epithelial surface at the uterine-oviduct junction. These findings correlate with the observation that fertilin beta "knockout" sperm traverse the uterus but do not progress into the oviduct, contributing to the infertility of fertilin beta(-/-) male mice. Our results suggest that high-avidity binding between fertilin beta (ADAM 2) and alpha6beta1 requires cooperation between alpha6beta1 and CD9. Such cooperation may assist sperm passage into the oviduct as well as sperm-egg interactions.

  18. Unfavorable Donor Pretransplant APACHE II, SAPS II, and SOFA Scores Are Not Associated With Outcome: Implications for Heart Transplant Donor Selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzi, G; Startseva, X; Wolfrum, M; Lüscher, T F; Ruschitzka, F; Fröhlich, G M; Enseleit, F

    2016-10-01

    The quality of the donor heart and the individual risk of the recipient awaiting heart transplantation are difficult to assess. We investigated whether routinely used intensive care scoring systems can provide additional prognostic information on outcomes after heart transplantation. A total of 114 consecutive patients who underwent heart transplantation were included. The Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II), the Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS II), and the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) scores were calculated for donors and recipients. Risk factors such as the donor's cause of death, donor's catecholamine use, dialysis status of the recipient, and smoking pattern of the donor and the recipient were assessed. The association of these parameters with mortality, length of stay on the intensive care unit, and need for invasive ventilation was investigated. The median APACHE II score of the donors was 20 (confidence interval [CI], 19-20), the median SAPS II score was 46 (CI, 45-48), and the median SOFA score was 10 (CI, 9-10). In contrast, the median scores of the recipients were as follows: APACHE II, 7 (CI, 6-8); SAPS II, 13 (CI, 12-14); and SOFA, 1 (CI, 1-2). None of the scores as calculated significantly predicted clinical outcome after transplantation. This study detected no prognostic impact of donor-related risk factors on outcome after heart transplantation. Our findings support the growing practice of also considering organs from donors with high-risk scores for heart transplantation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Solar-simulated radiation and heat treatment induced metalloproteinase-1 expression in cultured dermal fibroblasts via distinct pathways: implications on reduction of sun-associated aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Cheng-Che E; Wu, Ching-Shang; Yu, Hsin-Su

    2013-12-01

    Sun exposure is an important environmental factor affecting human beings. Most knowledge regarding solar aging focused on light radiation (photoaging), and little emphasis has been placed on heat, a factor that is also closely associated with sun exposure. This study was launched to evaluate the effects of simulated solar radiation (SSR) and environmental heat on skin fibroblasts in terms of dermal aging. Cultured human dermal fibroblasts were treated with moderate amount of SSR (200J/cm(2)) and heat (+2°C). The metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) expression was used as a surrogate marker for dermal aging and the involved regulatory mechanisms were explored. Both treatment conditions did not affect viability but significantly increased the expressions of MMP-1. In parallel, both treatments increased the intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), but the increase induced by SSR is much greater than heat. In contrast, transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV-1), the sensor of environmental heat, was upregulated by heat but not SSR treatment. Pretreating fibroblasts with antioxidant abrogated the SSR-induced MMP-1 but has limited effect on heat-induced MMP-1. On the other hand, TRPV-1 antagonist pretreatment reduced heat-induced MMP-1 in fibroblasts but not their SSR-treated counterparts. Both SSR and heat induced MMP-1 expression in dermal fibroblasts but through different pathways. As current strategies for reducing sun-related aging focused on filtering of light and use of antioxidants, future strategies design to reduce solar aging should also incorporate heat-induced aging into consideration. Copyright © 2013 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Circulating pathogen-associated molecular pattern - binding proteins and High Mobility Group Box protein 1 in nascent metabolic syndrome: implications for cellular Toll-like receptor activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jialal, I; Rajamani, U; Adams-Huet, B; Kaur, H

    2014-09-01

    The Metabolic Syndrome, (MetS) a global epidemic, is a state of low grade chronic inflammation and confers an increased risk for diabetes and CVD. We have previously reported increased activity of the pathogen recognition receptors, Toll-like receptors (TLRs), TLR2 and TLR4 in MetS. We hypothesized that increased TLR activity in MetS is due in part to increased levels of circulating PAMP-binding proteins, soluble CD14 (sCD14), lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP) and the damage associated molecular pattern (DAMP), High Mobility Group Box protein 1 (HMGB-1). We measured sCD14, LBP and HMGB-1 in fasting plasma from nascent MetS (n = 37) and healthy control subjects (n = 32) by ELISA. We also investigated the effects of sCD14 and LBP on TLR4 activity in human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs). Following adjustment for body mass index and waist circumference, sCD14, LBP and HMGB-1 levels remained significantly increased in MetS. Also their levels increased with increasing numbers of MetS risk factors. Only sCD14 correlated significantly with monocyte TLR4 protein and activity. None of these soluble biomarkers correlated with TLR2 protein. Both sCD14 and HMGB-1 correlated significantly with HOMA-IR. In LPS primed HAECs, sCD14 compared to LBP, resulted in a greater increase in both TLR4 abundance and inflammatory biomediators (NF-κB, IL-1β, IL-8 and TNF-α). Thus, we make the novel observation that sCD14 reflects increased monocyte TLR4 protein and activity in nascent MetS and by contributing to increased cellular inflammation could explain, in part, the increased risk for diabetes and CVD. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  1. Predictive validity of a MK-801-induced cognitive impairment model in mice: implications on the potential limitations and challenges of modeling cognitive impairment associated with schizophrenia preclinically.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jordan W; Rueter, Lynne E; Zhang, Min

    2014-03-03

    Cognitive impairment associated with schizophrenia (CIAS) is a major and disabling symptom domain of the disease that is generally unresponsive to current pharmacotherapies. Critically important to the discovery of novel therapeutics for CIAS is the utilization of preclinical models with robust predictive validity. We investigated the predictive validity of MK-801-induced memory impairments in mouse inhibitory avoidance (MK-IA) as a preclinical model for CIAS by investigating compounds that have been tested in humans, including antipsychotics, sodium channel blocker mood stabilizers, and putative cognitive enhancers. The atypical antipsychotic clozapine, as well as risperidone and olanzapine (see Brown et al., 2013), had no effect on MK-801-induced memory impairments. For sodium channel blockers, carbamazepine significantly attenuated memory impairments induced by MK-801, whereas lamotrigine had no effect. Nicotine, donepezil, modafinil, and xanomeline all significantly attenuated MK-801-induced memory impairments, but the magnitude of effects and the dose-responses observed varied across compounds. Clinically, only acute administration of nicotine has demonstrated consistent positive effects on CIAS, while inconsistent results have been reported for lamotrigine, donepezil, and modafinil; atypical antipsychotics produce only moderate improvements at best. A positive clinical signal has been observed with xanomeline, but only in a small pilot trial. The results presented here suggest that the MK-IA model lacks robust predictive validity for CIAS as the model is likely permissive and may indicate false positive signals for compounds and mechanisms that lack clear clinical efficacy for CIAS. Our findings also highlight the potential limitations and challenges of using NMDA receptor antagonists in rodents to model CIAS. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Genome-wide association study implicates testis-sperm specific FKBP6 as a susceptibility locus for impaired acrosome reaction in stallions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raudsepp, Terje; McCue, Molly E; Das, Pranab J; Dobson, Lauren; Vishnoi, Monika; Fritz, Krista L; Schaefer, Robert; Rendahl, Aaron K; Derr, James N; Love, Charles C; Varner, Dickson D; Chowdhary, Bhanu P

    2012-01-01

    Impaired acrosomal reaction (IAR) of sperm causes male subfertility in humans and animals. Despite compelling evidence about the genetic control over acrosome biogenesis and function, the genomics of IAR is as yet poorly understood, providing no molecular tools for diagnostics. Here we conducted Equine SNP50 Beadchip genotyping and GWAS using 7 IAR-affected and 37 control Thoroughbred stallions. A significant (Phorse chromosome 13 in FK506 binding protein 6 (FKBP6). The gene belongs to the immunophilins FKBP family known to be involved in meiosis, calcium homeostasis, clathrin-coated vesicles, and membrane fusions. Direct sequencing of FKBP6 exons in cases and controls identified SNPs g.11040315G>A and g.11040379C>A (p.166H>N) in exon 4 that were significantly associated with the IAR phenotype both in the GWAS cohort (n = 44) and in a large multi-breed cohort of 265 horses. All IAR stallions were homozygous for the A-alleles, while this genotype was found only in 2% of controls. The equine FKBP6 was exclusively expressed in testis and sperm and had 5 different transcripts, of which 4 were novel. The expression of this gene in AC/AG heterozygous controls was monoallelic, and we observed a tendency for FKBP6 up-regulation in IAR stallions compared to controls. Because exon 4 SNPs had no effect on the protein structure, it is likely that FKBP6 relates to the IAR phenotype via regulatory or modifying functions. In conclusion, FKBP6 was considered a susceptibility gene of incomplete penetrance for IAR in stallions and a candidate gene for male subfertility in mammals. FKBP6 genotyping is recommended for the detection of IAR-susceptible individuals among potential breeding stallions. Successful use of sperm as a source of DNA and RNA propagates non-invasive sample procurement for fertility genomics in animals and humans.

  3. SHRIMP U-Pb ages of xenotime and monazite from the Spar Lake red bed-associated Cu-Ag deposit, western Montana: Implications for ore genesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleinikoff, John N.; Hayes, Timothy S.; Evans, Karl V.; Mazdab, Frank K.; Pillers, Renee M.; Fanning, C. Mark

    2012-01-01

    Xenotime occurs as epitaxial overgrowths on detrital zircons in the Mesoproterozoic Revett Formation (Belt Supergroup) at the Spar Lake red bed-associated Cu-Ag deposit, western Montana. The deposit formed during diagenesis of Revett strata, where oxidizing metal-bearing hydrothermal fluids encountered a reducing zone. Samples for geochronology were collected from several mineral zones. Xenotime overgrowths (1–30 μm wide) were found in polished thin sections from five ore and near-ore zones (chalcocite-chlorite, bornite-calcite, galena-calcite, chalcopyrite-ankerite, and pyrite-calcite), but not in more distant zones across the region. Thirty-two in situ SHRIMP U-Pb analyses on xenotime overgrowths yield a weighted average of 207Pb/206Pb ages of 1409 ± 8 Ma, interpreted as the time of mineralization. This age is about 40 to 60 m.y. after deposition of the Revett Formation. Six other xenotime overgrowths formed during a younger event at 1304 ± 19 Ma. Several isolated grains of xenotime have 207Pb/206Pb ages in the range of 1.67 to 1.51 Ga, and thus are considered detrital in origin. Trace element data can distinguish Spar Lake xenotimes of different origins. Based on in situ SHRIMP analysis, detrital xenotime has heavy rare earth elements-enriched patterns similar to those of igneous xenotime, whereas xenotime overgrowths of inferred hydrothermal origin have hump-shaped (i.e., middle rare earth elements-enriched) patterns. The two ages of hydrothermal xenotime can be distinguished by slightly different rare earth elements patterns. In addition, 1409 Ma xenotime overgrowths have higher Eu and Gd contents than the 1304 Ma overgrowths. Most xenotime overgrowths from the Spar Lake deposit have elevated As concentrations, further suggesting a genetic relationship between the xenotime formation and Cu-Ag mineralization.

  4. Borderline personality disorder, but not euthymic bipolar disorder, is associated with a failure to sustain reciprocal cooperative behaviour: implications for spectrum models of mood disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, K E A; Goodwin, G M; Rogers, R D

    2015-06-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) and bipolar disorder (BD) have overlapping clinical presentations and symptoms - sources of persistent clinical confusion. Game-theory can characterize how social function might be sub-optimal in the two disorders and move the field beyond the anecdotal description of clinical history. Here, we tested the hypothesis that BPD and BD can be distinguished on the basis of diminished reciprocal altruism in iterated Prisoner's Dilemma (PD) games. Twenty females with BPD, 20 females with euthymic BD and 20 healthy (non-clinical) females, matched for age and cognitive ability, were assessed for Axis-I and personality disorders, and completed psychometric measures of state affect, impulsivity and hostility. Participants completed two iterated PD games and a test of gaze-cueing. In the PD games, BPD participants failed to show statistically stable preferences to cooperate with social partners (playing tit-for-tat) and made significantly fewer cooperative responses compared to BD or controls (ANOVA main effect p = 0.03, post-hoc Tukey p < 0.05 for both comparisons). BPD participants were also less likely to sustain cooperation following experiences involving mutual cooperation than the other groups. Neither BPD nor BD participants demonstrated impairments in shifting visual attention on the basis of other peoples' gaze. These data indicate that BPD is (selectively) associated with difficulties in establishing, and then maintaining, reciprocal cooperation, involving altruism. These difficulties are not seen in euthymic BD. Our data support the differentiation of BPD from BD and offer fresh insights into the social difficulties experienced by individuals with diagnoses of BPD.

  5. Association of neighbourhood residence and preferences with the built environment, work-related travel behaviours, and health implications for employed adults: findings from the URBAN study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badland, Hannah M; Oliver, Melody; Kearns, Robin A; Mavoa, Suzanne; Witten, Karen; Duncan, Mitch J; Batty, G David

    2012-10-01

    Although the neighbourhoods and health field is well established, the relationships between neighbourhood selection, neighbourhood preference, work-related travel behaviours, and transport infrastructure have not been fully explored. It is likely that understanding these complex relationships more fully will inform urban policy development, and planning for neighbourhoods that support health behaviours. Accordingly, the objective of this study was to identify associations between these variables in a sample of employed adults. Self-reported demographic, work-related transport behaviours, and neighbourhood preference data were collected from 1616 employed adults recruited from 48 neighbourhoods located across four New Zealand cities. Data were collected between April 2008 and September 2010. Neighbourhood built environment measures were generated using geographical information systems. Findings demonstrated that more people preferred to live in urban (more walkable), rather than suburban (less walkable) settings. Those living in more suburban neighbourhoods had significantly longer work commute distances and lower density of public transport stops available within the neighbourhood when compared with those who lived in more urban neighbourhoods. Those preferring a suburban style neighbourhood commuted approximately 1.5 km further to work when compared with participants preferring urban settings. Respondents who preferred a suburban style neighbourhood were less likely to take public or active transport to/from work when compared with those who preferred an urban style setting, regardless of the neighbourhood type in which they resided. Although it is unlikely that constructing more walkable environments will result in work-related travel behaviour change for all, providing additional highly walkable environments will help satisfy the demand for these settings, reinforce positive health behaviours, and support those amenable to change to engage in higher levels of

  6. Direct observation of heavy metal-mineral association from the Clark Fork River Superfund Complex: Implications for metal transport and bioavailability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochella, M.F.; Moore, J.N.; Putnis, C.V.; Putnis, A.; Kasama, T.; Eberl, D.D.

    2005-01-01

    Two sets of samples from riverbeds and adjacent floodplains, separated by 80 river kilometers, were collected from the Clark Fork River Superfund Complex, Montana, (the largest Superfund site in the United States), and studied primarily with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with several supporting techniques to determine heavy metal-mineral association. Seven of the eight samples studied were strongly influenced by material that once resided in mining and smelting dumps and impoundments; this material was transported downstream sometime during the last century and a half from the Butte/Anaconda areas. The eighth sample was from a deeper floodplain level and dates to premining days. The TEM observations afford a direct look, down to the nanometer level, at secondary mineral formation as a result of the breakdown of sulfides and silicates in the acid environment of this massive mine-drainage system. In the shallow, oxic floodplain sediments, heavy metals of concern in this system (As, Cu, Pb, and Zn) are taken up by the formation of sulfates (particularly Pb in jarosite), as well as hydrous metal oxides (As, Cu, Pb, and Zn in and on ferrihydrite, and a possibly new vernadite-like mineral). The oxides are long-lived in these systems, as they were also found in the anoxic riverbeds. Metals are also taken up by the formation of sulfides in sulfate-reducing environments as observed in the formation of nanoclusters of chalcopyrite and sphalerite. In all samples, clays make up between 5 and 20% of the sediment and carry significant amounts of Cu and Zn. The hydrous oxides, secondary sulfides, and clays provide several routes for metal transport downstream over long distances. Besides the potential bioavailability of heavy metals exchanged on and off the hydrous metal oxides and clays, nanometer-sized sulfides may also be highly reactive in the presence of biologic systems. Copyright ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Prevalence of static and dynamic dental malocclusion features in subgroups of temporomandibular disorder patients: Implications for the epidemiology of the TMD-occlusion association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfredini, Daniele; Perinetti, Giuseppe; Stellini, Edoardo; Di Leonardo, Bruno; Guarda-Nardini, Luca

    2015-04-01

    The hypothesis that dental malocclusions may be a risk factor for temporomandibular disorders (TMD) has been greatly debated in the literature. Whilst the association between features of dental occlusion and TMD has been proven weak, if existing, it seems that the transfer of such knowledge into clinical practice is yet to be completed. This study evaluated the prevalence of static and dynamic malocclusion features in a population of TMD patients and compared it with literature data on the general population. A total of 625 consecutive TMD patients (75% female; aged 34.2 ± 6.7 years, range 25-44 years) were examined and were clustered into four groups on the basis of pain absence (ie, disk displacement and/or arthrosis without pain), or pain presence within the muscles and/or the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). As for the occlusal features, posterior crossbite, excessive overbite, anterior open bite, excessive overjet, and molar and canine asymmetry were recorded as static malocclusion findings. Medio-/laterotrusive interferences and slide length from retruded contact position (RCP) to maximum intercuspation (MI) ≥ 2 mm were also recorded as dynamic malocclusion findings. The ɸ correlation coefficient assessed the strength of the correlation between each occlusal feature and the presence of pain-related TMD condition. No significant correlation was seen between the various malocclusion findings and the presence of any pain-related TMD condition, with ɸ values ranging from -0.081 to +0.043 for molar asymmetry and laterotrusive interferences, respectively. The prevalence findings in this TMD population were within the range reported from general population studies. In adult subjects, static or dynamic malocclusion findings show similar prevalence irrespective of the presence of any specific pain-related TMD condition. Also, the prevalence values are similar to the available data at general population level. Based on the above, general practitioners should note

  8. General and Specific Approaches to Media Parenting: A Systematic Review of Current Measures, Associations with Screen-Viewing, and Measurement Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Mark J.; Urbanski, Carly R.; Sebire, Simon J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Parent-focused interventions may help to reduce youth screen-viewing (SV). This review synthesized current information on the links between parenting styles, parenting practices, and youth SV with a focus on measurement. Methods A systematic review of electronic databases was conducted. Results In all, 29 of 1189 studies met the inclusion criteria. Parenting practices were divided into rule and nonrule-based practices. Seven rules: (1) Limits on total time (n studies=23); (2) limits on time of day (n=7); (3) content restriction (n=11); (4) mealtime rules (n=2); (5) parental supervision (n=3); (6) contingent screentime (n=3); and (7) no-TV policy (n=1) were reported. Two nonrule-based practices were reported: Co-viewing (n=6) and encouragement to view (n=2). Three studies (10.3%) provided information on parenting styles. Only 12 studies (41.4%) provided information on the reliability/validity of the outcome measure, 15 (51.7%) studies provided information on the reliability/validity of the parenting measure, and 6 (20.7%) provided information on the reliability/validity of both outcome and exposure measures. Conclusions There is mixed evidence that parenting styles and media-related parenting practices are associated with youth SV. The assessment of parental influence of youth media use is hampered by the diversity of measures that have been used. There is a need for new measures that assess a range of media parenting practices that are relevant to multiple forms of SV. PMID:23944925

  9. Altered vasoreactivity in neonatal rats with pulmonary hypertension associated with bronchopulmonary dysplasia: Implication of both eNOS phosphorylation and calcium signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Dumas de la Roque

    Full Text Available Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD consists of an arrest of pulmonary vascular and alveolar growth, with persistent hypoplasia of the pulmonary microvasculature and alveolar simplification. In 25 to 40% of the cases, BPD is complicated by pulmonary hypertension (BPD-PH that significantly increases the risk of morbidity. In vivo studies suggest that increased pulmonary vascular tone could contribute to late PH in BPD. Nevertheless, an alteration in vasoreactivity as well as the mechanisms involved remain to be confirmed. The purpose of this study was thus to assess changes in pulmonary vascular reactivity in a murine model of BPD-PH. Newborn Wistar rats were exposed to either room air (normoxia or 90% O2 (hyperoxia for 14 days. Exposure to hyperoxia induced the well-known features of BPD-PH such as elevated right ventricular systolic pressure, right ventricular hypertrophy, pulmonary vascular remodeling and decreased pulmonary vascular density. Intrapulmonary arteries from hyperoxic pups showed decreased endothelium-dependent relaxation to acetylcholine without any alteration of relaxation to the NO-donor sodium nitroprusside. This functional alteration was associated with a decrease of lung eNOS phosphorylation at the Ser1177 activating site. In pups exposed to hyperoxia, serotonin and phenylephrine induced exacerbated contractile responses of intrapulmonary arteries as well as intracellular calcium response in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMC. Moreover, the amplitude of the store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE, induced by store depletion using a SERCA inhibitor, was significantly greater in PASMC from hyperoxic pups. Altogether, hyperoxia-induced BPD-PH alters the pulmonary arterial reactivity, with effects on both endothelial and smooth muscle functions. Reduced activating eNOS phosphorylation and enhanced Ca2+ signaling likely account for alterations of pulmonary arterial reactivity.

  10. Altered vasoreactivity in neonatal rats with pulmonary hypertension associated with bronchopulmonary dysplasia: Implication of both eNOS phosphorylation and calcium signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas de la Roque, Eric; Smeralda, Gwladys; Quignard, Jean-François; Freund-Michel, Véronique; Courtois, Arnaud; Marthan, Roger; Muller, Bernard; Guibert, Christelle; Dubois, Mathilde

    2017-01-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) consists of an arrest of pulmonary vascular and alveolar growth, with persistent hypoplasia of the pulmonary microvasculature and alveolar simplification. In 25 to 40% of the cases, BPD is complicated by pulmonary hypertension (BPD-PH) that significantly increases the risk of morbidity. In vivo studies suggest that increased pulmonary vascular tone could contribute to late PH in BPD. Nevertheless, an alteration in vasoreactivity as well as the mechanisms involved remain to be confirmed. The purpose of this study was thus to assess changes in pulmonary vascular reactivity in a murine model of BPD-PH. Newborn Wistar rats were exposed to either room air (normoxia) or 90% O2 (hyperoxia) for 14 days. Exposure to hyperoxia induced the well-known features of BPD-PH such as elevated right ventricular systolic pressure, right ventricular hypertrophy, pulmonary vascular remodeling and decreased pulmonary vascular density. Intrapulmonary arteries from hyperoxic pups showed decreased endothelium-dependent relaxation to acetylcholine without any alteration of relaxation to the NO-donor sodium nitroprusside. This functional alteration was associated with a decrease of lung eNOS phosphorylation at the Ser1177 activating site. In pups exposed to hyperoxia, serotonin and phenylephrine induced exacerbated contractile responses of intrapulmonary arteries as well as intracellular calcium response in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMC). Moreover, the amplitude of the store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE), induced by store depletion using a SERCA inhibitor, was significantly greater in PASMC from hyperoxic pups. Altogether, hyperoxia-induced BPD-PH alters the pulmonary arterial reactivity, with effects on both endothelial and smooth muscle functions. Reduced activating eNOS phosphorylation and enhanced Ca2+ signaling likely account for alterations of pulmonary arterial reactivity.

  11. Serotonin and corticosterone rhythms in mice exposed to cigarette smoke and in patients with COPD: implication for COPD-associated neuropathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac K Sundar

    Full Text Available The circadian timing system controls daily rhythms of physiology and behavior, and disruption of clock function can trigger stressful life events. Daily exposure to cigarette smoke (CS can lead to alteration in diverse biological and physiological processes. Smoking is associated with mood disorders, including depression and anxiety. Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD have abnormal circadian rhythms, reflected by daily changes in respiratory symptoms and lung function. Corticosterone (CORT is an adrenal steroid that plays a considerable role in stress and anti-inflammatory responses. Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5HT is a neurohormone, which plays a role in sleep/wake regulation and affective disorders. Secretion of stress hormones (CORT and 5HT is under the control of the circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Since smoking is a contributing factor in the development of COPD, we hypothesize that CS can affect circadian rhythms of CORT and 5HT secretion leading to sleep and mood disorders in smokers and patients with COPD. We measured the daily rhythms of plasma CORT and 5HT in mice following acute (3 d, sub-chronic (10 d or chronic (6 mo CS exposure and in plasma from non-smokers, smokers and patients with COPD. Acute and chronic CS exposure affected both the timing (peak phase and amplitude of the daily rhythm of plasma CORT and 5HT in mice. Acute CS appeared to have subtle time-dependent effects on CORT levels but more pronounced effects on 5HT. As compared with CORT, plasma 5HT was slightly elevated in smokers but was reduced in patients with COPD. Thus, the effects of CS on plasma 5HT were consistent between mice and patients with COPD. Together, these data reveal a significant impact of CS exposure on rhythms of stress hormone secretion and subsequent detrimental effects on cognitive function, depression-like behavior, mood/anxiety and sleep quality in smokers and patients with COPD.

  12. Association between sexual behaviors, bullying victimization and suicidal ideation in a national sample of high school students: implications of a sexual double standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Hailee K; Gjelsvik, Annie; Pearlman, Deborah N; Clark, Melissa A

    2014-01-01

    The sexual double standard is the notion that women are more harshly judged for their sexual behaviors than men. The purpose of this study was to investigate if the sexual double standard could explain gender differences in bullying victimization among adolescents and the extent to which that relationship correlated with depression and suicidal ideation. Analyses were conducted using a sample of high school students (n = 13,065) from the 2011 Youth Risk Behavior Survey, a cross-sectional and national school-based survey conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Data were assessed using multiple logistic regression, gender-stratified analyses, and interaction terms. Students who engaged in sexual intercourse (sexually active) had higher odds of being bullied. When this association was stratified by gender, odds of being bullying increased for girls (odds ratio [OR], 1.83; 95% CI, 1.58-2.13) and decreased for boys (OR, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.77-1.16). Sexually active students who were bullied also displayed more than five times (OR, 5.65; 95% CI, 4.71-6.78) the adjusted odds of depression and three times (adjusted OR, 3.38; 95% CI, 2.65-4.32) the adjusted odds of suicidal ideation compared with students who reported neither of those behavioral characteristics. When stratified by gender, girls had slightly higher odds of depression and suicidal ideation but overall, the odds remained strong for both genders. Results provide some evidence that a sexual double standard exists and may play a prominent role in bullying victimization among girls. Therefore, addressing the sexual double may be important to consider when tailoring school bullying intervention programs. Copyright © 2014 Jacobs Institute of Women's Health. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The Coronary Artery Disease-Reporting and Data System (CAD-RADS): Prognostic and Clinical Implications Associated With Standardized Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography Reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Joe X; Cury, Ricardo C; Leipsic, Jonathon; Crim, Matthew T; Berman, Daniel S; Gransar, Heidi; Budoff, Matthew J; Achenbach, Stephan; Ó Hartaigh, Bríain; Callister, Tracy Q; Marques, Hugo; Rubinshtein, Ronen; Al-Mallah, Mouaz H; Andreini, Daniele; Pontone, Gianluca; Cademartiri, Filippo; Maffei, Erica; Chinnaiyan, Kavitha; Raff, Gilbert; Hadamitzky, Martin; Hausleiter, Joerg; Feuchtner, Gudrun; Dunning, Allison; DeLago, Augustin; Kim, Yong-Jin; Kaufmann, Philipp A; Villines, Todd C; Chow, Benjamin J W; Hindoyan, Niree; Gomez, Millie; Lin, Fay Y; Jones, Erica; Min, James K; Shaw, Leslee J

    2018-01-01

    This study sought to assess clinical outcomes associated with the novel Coronary Artery Disease-Reporting and Data System (CAD-RADS) scores used to standardize coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) reporting and their potential utility in guiding post-coronary CTA care. Clinical decision support is a major focus of health care policies aimed at improving guideline-directed care. Recently, CAD-RADS was developed to standardize coronary CTA reporting and includes clinical recommendations to facilitate patient management after coronary CTA. In the multinational CONFIRM (COronary CT Angiography EvaluatioN For Clinical Outcomes: An InteRnational Multicenter) registry, 5,039 patients without known coronary artery disease (CAD) underwent coronary CTA and were stratified by CAD-RADS scores, which rank CAD stenosis severity as 0 (0%), 1 (1% to 24%), 2 (25% to 49%), 3 (50% to 69%), 4A (70% to 99% in 1 to 2 vessels), 4B (70% to 99% in 3 vessels or ≥50% left main), or 5 (100%). Kaplan-Meier and multivariable Cox models were used to estimate all-cause mortality or myocardial infarction (MI). Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to compare CAD-RADS to the Duke CAD Index and traditional CAD classification. Referrals to invasive coronary angiography (ICA) after coronary CTA were also assessed. Cumulative 5-year event-free survival ranged from 95.2% to 69.3% for CAD-RADS 0 to 5 (p CAD-RADS, which was noninferior to the Duke Index (0.7073; p = 0.893) and traditional CAD classification (0.7095; p = 0.783). ICA rates were 13% for CAD-RADS 0 to 2, 66% for CAD-RADS 3, and 84% for CAD-RADS ≥4A. For CAD-RADS 3, 58% of all catheterizations occurred within the first 30 days of follow-up. In a patient subset with available medication data, 57% of CAD-RADS 3 patients who received 30-day ICA were either asymptomatic or not receiving antianginal therapy at baseline, whereas only 32% had angina and were receiving medical therapy. CAD-RADS effectively

  14. Inhibition of ADAMTS-13 by Doxycycline Reduces von Willebrand Factor Degradation During Supraphysiological Shear Stress: Therapeutic Implications for Left Ventricular Assist Device-Associated Bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartoli, Carlo R; Kang, Jooeun; Restle, David J; Zhang, David M; Shabahang, Cameron; Acker, Michael A; Atluri, Pavan

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate a potential therapy for left ventricular assist device (LVAD)-associated bleeding. Nonsurgical bleeding is the most frequent complication of LVAD support. Recent evidence has demonstrated that supraphysiological shear stress from continuous-flow LVADs accelerates von Willebrand factor (vWF) metabolism by the action of a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with a thrombospondin type 1 motif, member 13 (ADAMTS-13) (the vWF protease). An acquired vWF deficiency causes bleeding. This suggests that ADAMTS-13 is a clinical target to reduce vWF degradation. We tested the hypothesis that inhibition of ADAMTS-13 with doxycycline, an inexpensive, clinically approved drug, reduces vWF degradation during shear stress. Whole blood was collected from human donors (n = 15), and purified, recombinant ADAMTS-13 protein was obtained. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to quantify the dose relationship between doxycycline and ADAMTS-13 activity prior to shear stress (n = 10). To determine the effect of shear stress, plasma and recombinant ADAMTS-13 were exposed to LVAD-like supraphysiological shear stress (approximately 175 dyne/cm(2)). vWF multimers and degradation fragments were characterized with electrophoresis and immunoblotting (n = 10). Förster resonance energy transfer was used to quantify plasma ADAMTS-13 activity (n = 10). An ELISA was used to quantify vWF:collagen binding activity. Platelet aggregometry was performed with adenosine 5'-diphosphate, collagen, and ristocetin (vWF-platelet pathway) agonism (n = 10). Doxycycline significantly decreased plasma ADAMTS-13 activity (p = 0.01) and the activity of recombinant human ADAMTS-13 protein by 21%. After plasma was exposed to shear stress, the same pattern of vWF degradation was observed as previously reported for LVAD patients, and vWF:collagen binding activity decreased significantly (p = 0.002). Doxycycline significantly decreased ADAMTS-13 activity (p = 0.04) and

  15. Progestins Upregulate FKBP51 Expression in Human Endometrial Stromal Cells to Induce Functional Progesterone and Glucocorticoid Withdrawal: Implications for Contraceptive- Associated Abnormal Uterine Bleeding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozlem Guzeloglu Kayisli

    -mediated transcription. The resultant PR and/or GR-mediated functional withdrawal may contribute to associated endometrial inflammation, aberrant angiogenesis, and bleeding.

  16. Factors associated with faith-based health counselling in the United States: implications for dissemination of evidence-based behavioural medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallon, Elizabeth A; Bopp, Melissa; Webb, Benjamin

    2013-03-01

    Health counselling is an evidence-based behavioural medicine approach and the most commonly reported form of faith-based health interventions. Yet, no research has explored the factors influencing the implementation of faith-based health counselling. Therefore, this study examined individual, organisational and environmental factors associated with offering/not offering faith-based health counselling programmes within faith-based organisations. A national, internet-based, opt-in, cross-sectional survey of faith leaders (N = 676) was conducted (March-December 2009) to assess faith leaders' demographic information, health status, fatalism, health-related attitudes and normative beliefs, attitudes towards health counselling, institutional and occupational information, and perceptions of parent organisation support for health and wellness interventions. Most faith leaders reported offering some type of health counselling in the past year [n = 424, 62.7%, 95% CI (59.0, 66.3)]. Results of a multivariate logistic regression showed that faith leaders reporting greater proxy efficacy (OR = 1.40, P = 0.002), greater comfort in speaking with church members about health (OR = 1.25, P = 0.005), greater perceived health (OR = 1.27, P = 0.034), and who worked at larger churches (OR ≥ 3.2, P ≤ 0.001) with greater parent organisation support (OR = 1.33, P = 0.002) had significantly higher odds of offering faith-based health counselling. Church size and parent organisation support for faith-based health interventions appear to be important factors in the presence of faith leader health counselling. The content of faith leader health counselling training should aim to increase faith leaders' confidence that church members will successfully change their health behaviours as a result of the health counselling and increase faith leaders' comfort in speaking with church members about health. Future research is needed to examine efficacious and effective dissemination methods such as

  17. Provenance and tectonic setting of siliciclastic rocks associated with the Neoproterozoic Dahongliutan BIF: Implications for the Precambrian crustal evolution of the Western Kunlun orogenic belt, NW China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jun; Wang, He; Wang, Min

    2017-10-01

    The Late Neoproterozoic Dahongliutan BIF is associated with siliciclastic rocks in the Tianshuihai terrane of the Western Kunlun orogenic belt (WKO), NW China. The sedimentary rocks have various weathering indices (e.g., CIA = 57-87, PIA = 61-96 and Th/U = 4.85-12.45), indicative of varying degrees of weathering in the source area. The rocks have trace element ratios, such as Th/Sc = 0.60-1.21 and Co/Th = 0.29-1.67, and light rare earth element (LREE) enriched chondrite-normalized REE patterns, suggesting that they were mainly sourced from intermediate and felsic rocks. Available U-Pb ages of detrital zircon from these rocks reveal that the detrital sources may have been igneous and metamorphic rocks from the WKO and the Tarim Block. Our study suggests that the Dahongliutan BIF and hosting siliciclastic rocks may have deposited in a setting transitional from a passive to active continental margin, probably related to the Late Neoproterozoic-Early Cambrian seafloor spreading and subduction of the Proto-Tethys Ocean. U-Pb dating of 163 detrital zircons defines five major age populations at 2561-2329 Ma, 2076-1644 Ma, 1164-899 Ma, 869-722 Ma and 696-593 Ma. These age groups broadly correspond to the major stages of supercontinent assembly and breakup events widely accepted for Columbia, Rodinia and Gondwana. Some zircons have TDM2 model ages of 3.9-1.8 Ga and negative εHf(t) values, suggesting that the Archean to Paleoproterozoic (as old as Eoarchean) crustal materials were episodically reworked and incorporated into the late magmatic process in the WKO. Some Neoproterozoic zircons have TDM2 model ages of 1.47-1.07 Ga and 1.81-1.53 Ga and positive εHf(t) values, indicating juvenile crustal growth during the Mesoproterozoic. Our new results, combined with published data, imply that both the Tianshuihai terrane in the WKO and the Tarim Block share the same Precambrian tectonic evolution history.

  18. Factors associated with long-stay nursing home admissions among the U.S. elderly population: comparison of logistic regression and the Cox proportional hazards model with policy implications for social work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Qian; Salmon, J Warren; Rodgers, Mark E

    2009-01-01

    Two statistical methods were compared to identify key factors associated with long-stay nursing home (LSNH) admission among the U.S. elderly population. Social Work's interest in services to the elderly makes this research critical to the profession. Effectively transitioning the "baby boomer" population into appropriate long-term care will be a great societal challenge. It remains a challenge paramount to the practice of social work. Secondary data analyses using four waves (1995, 1998, 2000, and 2002) of the Health Retirement Study (HRS) coupled with the Assets and Health Dynamics among the Oldest Old (AHEAD) surveys were conducted. Multivariable logistic regression and Cox proportional hazards model were performed and compared. Older age, lower self-perceived health, worse instrumental activities of daily living (IADL), psychiatric problems, and living alone were found significantly associated with increased risk of LSNH admission. In contrast, being female, African American, or Hispanic; owning a home; and having lower level of cognitive impairment reduced the admission risk. Home ownership showed a significant effect in logistic regression, but a marginal effect in the Cox model. The Cox model generally provided more precise parameter estimates than logistic regression. Logistic regression, used frequently in analyses, can provide a good approximation to the Cox model in identifying factors of LSNH admission. However, the Cox model gives more information on how soon the LSNH admission may happen. Our analyses, based on two models, dually identified the factors associated with LSNH admission; therefore, results discussed confidently provide implications for both public and private long-term care policies, as well as improving the assessment capabilities of social work practitioners for development of screening programs among at-risk elderly. Given the predicted surge in this population, significant factors found from this study can be utilized in a strengths

  19. Treatment Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan-Sarin, Suchitra; O’Malley, Stephanie; Krystal, John H.

    2008-01-01

    Developing pharmacotherapies to treat alcohol dependence and associated health problems traditionally has been based on gaining a better understanding of the neuroscience underlying alcohol-drinking behavior. To date, three medications have been approved for the treatment of alcohol dependence: disulfiram (Antabuse®), naltrexone (Revia®, Vivitrol®, and Naltrel®), and acamprosate (Campral®). However, these medications have modest efficacy, and there is a great need for newer medications that target different neurochemical systems and which could be used either as adjunctive treatments or to treat subpopulations of drinkers. Furthermore, it also is important to improve current treatment options by understanding and incorporating differences in how people with certain genes respond to medication (i.e., pharmacogenetic differences). PMID:23584013

  20. The Late Cretaceous I- and A-type granite association of southeast China: Implications for the origin and evolution of post-collisional extensional magmatism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jiao-Long; Qiu, Jian-Sheng; Liu, Liang; Wang, Rui-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    , leaving a granulite residue in the lower crust. Both the I- and A-type granites were emplaced during post-collisional extensional tectonism associated with rollback of the steeply subducting paleo-Pacific Plate. An increase of the dip angle of the subducted palaeo-Pacific plate between the Early and Late Cretaceous resulted in enhanced extension, further thinning the lithosphere and causing more intensive underplating of mantle-derived magmas. This generated high temperatures and caused the partial melting of the residual granulite material, producing relatively anhydrous F-bearing felsic melts. The mixing of these unusual crustal melts with more voluminous mantle-derived mafic magmas generated the parental magmas that eventually formed the peralkaline A-type granites.

  1. Association Between Cardiovascular and Intraocular Pressure Changes in a 14-Day 6 deg Head Down Tilt (HDT) Bed Rest Study: Possible Implications in Retinal Anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cromwell, Ronita; Zanello, Susana; Yarbough, Patrice; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Taibbi, Giovanni; Vizzeri, Gianmarco

    2013-01-01

    time points. There was no correlation between the largest change in IOP (BR-3 versus BR3) and cardiovascular measure changes between baseline (BR-5) and post bed rest (BR+2). While no clinically relevant visual changes were observed during the study, measurement of various retinal parameters was performed with optical coherence tomography (OCT). A decrease in central subfield retinal thickness was observed between BR+2 and baseline at BR-10, but no association was observed with IOP changes. This work investigates the time course of changes in IOP during 14-day HDT bed rest in an attempt to characterize HDT bed rest as a model of the VIIP syndrome and delve into its etiology.

  2. Astrosociological Implications of Astrobiology (Revisited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pass, Jim

    2010-01-01

    Supporters of astrobiology continue to organize the field around formalized associations and organizations under the guise of the so-called ``hard'' sciences (e.g., biology and the related physical/natural sciences). The so-called ``soft'' sciences-including sociology and the other social sciences, the behavioral sciences, and the humanities-remain largely separated from this dynamically growing field. However, as argued in this paper, space exploration involving the search for extraterrestrial life should be viewed as consisting of two interrelated parts (i.e., two sides of the same coin): astrobiology and astrosociology. Together, these two fields broadly combine the two major branches of science as they relate to the relationship between human life and alien life, as appropriate. Moreover, with a formalized system of collaboration, these two complimentary fields would also focus on the implications of their research to human beings as well as their cultures and social structures. By placing the astrosociological implications of astrobiology at a high enough priority, scientists interested in the search for alien life can augment their focus to include the social, cultural, and behavioral implications that were always associated with their work (yet previously overlooked or understated, and too often misunderstood). Recognition of the astrosociological implications expands our perception about alien life by creating a new emphasis on their ramifications to human life on Earth.

  3. Hypomethylation and Over-Expression of the Beta Isoform of BLIMP1 is Induced by Epstein-Barr Virus Infection of B Cells; Potential Implications for the Pathogenesis of EBV-Associated Lymphomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katerina Vrzalikova

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available B-lymphocyte-induced maturation protein 1 (BLIMP1 exists as two major isoforms, α and β, which arise from alternate promoters. Inactivation of the full length BLIMP1α isoform is thought to contribute to B cell lymphomagenesis by blocking post-germinal centre (GC B cell differentiation. In contrast, the shorter β isoform is functionally impaired and over-expressed in several haematological malignancies, including diffuse large B cell lymphomas (DLBCL. We have studied the influence on BLIMP1β expression of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV, a human herpesvirus that is implicated in the pathogenesis of several GC-derived lymphomas, including a subset of DLBCL and Hodgkin’s lymphoma (HL. We show that BLIMP1β expression is increased following the EBV infection of normal human tonsillar GC B cells. We also show that this change in expression is accompanied by hypomethylation of the BLIMP1β-specific promoter. Furthermore, we confirmed previous reports that the BLIMP1β promoter is hypomethylated in DLBCL cell lines and show for the first time that BLIMP1β is hypomethylated in the Hodgkin/Reed-Sternberg (HRS cells of HL. Our results provide evidence in support of a role for BLIMP1β in the pathogenesis of EBV-associated B cell lymphomas.

  4. Mining TCGA data using Boolean implications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subarna Sinha

    Full Text Available Boolean implications (if-then rules provide a conceptually simple, uniform and highly scalable way to find associations between pairs of random variables. In this paper, we propose to use Boolean implications to find relationships between variables of different data types (mutation, copy number alteration, DNA methylation and gene expression from the glioblastoma (GBM and ovarian serous cystadenoma (OV data sets from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA. We find hundreds of thousands of Boolean implications from these data sets. A direct comparison of the relationships found by Boolean implications and those found by commonly used methods for mining associations show that existing methods would miss relationships found by Boolean implications. Furthermore, many relationships exposed by Boolean implications reflect important aspects of cancer biology. Examples of our findings include cis relationships between copy number alteration, DNA methylation and expression of genes, a new hierarchy of mutations and recurrent copy number alterations, loss-of-heterozygosity of well-known tumor suppressors, and the hypermethylation phenotype associated with IDH1 mutations in GBM. The Boolean implication results used in the paper can be accessed at http://crookneck.stanford.edu/microarray/TCGANetworks/.

  5. Exploring health implications associated with irregular migration ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    When I arrived in Libya, I worked at a "connection house" (a place where social vices such as the sale of illicit drugs, gambling and commercial sex activities are common). This influenced me to engage in many bad habits like smoking all kinds of drugs, drinking, gambling and so on. One day there was a security swoop at ...

  6. Corona Associations and Their Implications for Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, M.G.; Zimbelman, J.R.

    1998-01-01

    Geologic mapping principles were applied to determine genetic relations between coronae and surrounding geomorphologic features within two study areas in order to better understand venusian coronae. The study areas contain coronae in a cluster versus a contrasting chain and are (1) directly west of Phoebe Regio (quadrangle V-40; centered at latitude 15??S, longitude 250??) and (2) west of Asteria and Beta Regiones (between latitude 23??N, longitude 239?? and latitude 43??N, longitude 275??). Results of this research indicate two groups of coronae on Venus: (1) those that are older and nearly coeval with regional plains, and occur globally; and (2) those that are younger and occur between Beta, Atla, and Themis Regiones or along extensional rifts elsewhere, sometimes showing systematic age progressions. Mapping relations and Earth analogs suggest that older plains coronae may be related to a near-global resurfacing event perhaps initiated by a mantle superplume or plumes. Younger coronae of this study that show age progression may be related to (1) a tectonic junction of connecting rifts resulting from local mantle upwelling and spread of a quasi-stationary hotspot plume, and (2) localized spread of post-plains volcanism. We postulate that on Venus most of the young, post-resurfacing coronal plumes may be concentrated within an area defined by the bounds of Beta, Atla, and Themis Regiones. ?? 1998 Academic Press.

  7. Genomic predictors of combat stress vulnerability and resilience in U.S. Marines: A genome-wide association study across multiple ancestries implicates PRTFDC1 as a potential PTSD gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nievergelt, Caroline M; Maihofer, Adam X; Mustapic, Maja; Yurgil, Kate A; Schork, Nicholas J; Miller, Mark W; Logue, Mark W; Geyer, Mark A; Risbrough, Victoria B; O'Connor, Daniel T; Baker, Dewleen G

    2015-01-01

    Research on the etiology of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has rapidly matured, moving from candidate gene studies to interrogation of the entire human genome in genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Here we present the results of a GWAS performed on samples from combat-exposed U.S. Marines and Sailors from the Marine Resiliency Study (MRS) scheduled for deployment to Iraq and/or Afghanistan. The MRS is a large, prospective study with longitudinal follow-up designed to identify risk and resiliency factors for combat-induced stress-related symptoms. Previously implicated PTSD risk loci from the literature and polygenic risk scores across psychiatric disorders were also evaluated in the MRS cohort. Participants (N=3494) were assessed using the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale and diagnosed using the DSM-IV diagnostic criterion. Subjects with partial and/or full PTSD diagnosis were called cases, all other subjects were designated controls, and study-wide maximum CAPS scores were used for longitudinal assessments. Genomic DNA was genotyped on the Illumina HumanOmniExpressExome array. Individual genetic ancestry was determined by supervised cluster analysis for subjects of European, African, Hispanic/Native American, and other descent. To test for association of SNPs with PTSD, logistic regressions were performed within each ancestry group and results were combined in meta-analyses. Measures of childhood and adult trauma were included to test for gene-by-environment (GxE) interactions. Polygenic risk scores from the Psychiatric Genomic Consortium were used for major depressive disorder (MDD), bipolar disorder (BPD), and schizophrenia (SCZ). The array produced >800K directly genotyped and >21M imputed markers in 3494 unrelated, trauma-exposed males, of which 940 were diagnosed with partial or full PTSD. The GWAS meta-analysis identified the phosphoribosyl transferase domain containing 1 gene (PRTFDC1) as a genome-wide significant PTSD locus (rs6482463; OR=1

  8. Diagnosis of lung cancer in small biopsies and cytology: implications of the 2011 International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer/American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travis, William D; Brambilla, Elisabeth; Noguchi, Masayuki; Nicholson, Andrew G; Geisinger, Kim; Yatabe, Yasushi; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Wistuba, Ignacio; Flieder, Douglas B; Franklin, Wilbur; Gazdar, Adi; Hasleton, Philip S; Henderson, Douglas W; Kerr, Keith M; Petersen, Iver; Roggli, Victor; Thunnissen, Erik; Tsao, Ming

    2013-05-01

    The new International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer/American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society lung adenocarcinoma classification provides, for the first time, standardized terminology for lung cancer diagnosis in small biopsies and cytology; this was not primarily addressed by previous World Health Organization classifications. Until recently there have been no therapeutic implications to further classification of NSCLC, so little attention has been given to the distinction of adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma in small tissue samples. This situation has changed dramatically in recent years with the discovery of several therapeutic options that are available only to patients with adenocarcinoma or NSCLC, not otherwise specified, rather than squamous cell carcinoma. This includes recommendation for use of special stains as an aid to diagnosis, particularly in the setting of poorly differentiated tumors that do not show clear differentiation by routine light microscopy. A limited diagnostic workup is recommended to preserve as much tissue for molecular testing as possible. Most tumors can be classified using a single adenocarcinoma marker (eg, thyroid transcription factor 1 or mucin) and a single squamous marker (eg, p40 or p63). Carcinomas lacking clear differentiation by morphology and special stains are classified as NSCLC, not otherwise specified. Not otherwise specified carcinomas that stain with adenocarcinoma markers are classified as NSCLC, favor adenocarcinoma, and tumors that stain only with squamous markers are classified as NSCLC, favor squamous cell carcinoma. The need for every institution to develop a multidisciplinary tissue management strategy to obtain these small specimens and process them, not only for diagnosis but also for molecular testing and evaluation of markers of resistance to therapy, is emphasized.

  9. RNAi screening in primary human hepatocytes of genes implicated in genome-wide association studies for roles in type 2 diabetes identifies roles for CAMK1D and CDKAL1, among others, in hepatic glucose regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Haney

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association (GWA studies have described a large number of new candidate genes that contribute to of Type 2 Diabetes (T2D. In some cases, small clusters of genes are implicated, rather than a single gene, and in all cases, the genetic contribution is not defined through the effects on a specific organ, such as the pancreas or liver. There is a significant need to develop and use human cell-based models to examine the effects these genes may have on glucose regulation. We describe the development of a primary human hepatocyte model that adjusts glucose disposition according to hormonal signals. This model was used to determine whether candidate genes identified in GWA studies regulate hepatic glucose disposition through siRNAs corresponding to the list of identified genes. We find that several genes affect the storage of glucose as glycogen (glycolytic response and/or affect the utilization of pyruvate, the critical step in gluconeogenesis. Of the genes that affect both of these processes, CAMK1D, TSPAN8 and KIF11 affect the localization of a mediator of both gluconeogenesis and glycolysis regulation, CRTC2, to the nucleus in response to glucagon. In addition, the gene CDKAL1 was observed to affect glycogen storage, and molecular experiments using mutant forms of CDK5, a putative target of CDKAL1, in HepG2 cells show that this is mediated by coordinate regulation of CDK5 and PKA on MEK, which ultimately regulates the phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6, a critical step in the insulin signaling pathway.

  10. Problems associated with substandard and counterfeit drugs in developing countries: a review article on global implications of counterfeit drugs in the era of antiretroviral (ARVs) drugs in a free market economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nsimba, Stephen E D

    2008-12-01

    To review the global implications associated with the use of substandard and or counterfeit drugs in developing and may be developed countries. The focus of this review is particularly on antiretroviral (ARVs), antimalarials and other drugs. Review of various literatures through Pub-Med, Medline, Google and Internet search to retrieve and download published materials was done by the author of this review paper. When patients receive a counterfeit medicines, they are subjected to multiple risks. They often suffer more than just an inconvenience; as they become victims of fraud medicines and are all put at risk of adverse effects from unprescribed medicines or substandard ingredients. Additionally, patients may lose confidence in health care professionals including their physician and pharmacist, and potentially modern medicine or the pharmaceutical industry in general. Counterfeit or substandard (poor quality) drugs pose threats to society; not only to the individual in terms of the health side effects experienced, but also to the public in terms of trade relations, economic implications, and the effects on global pandemics. It is vital for suppliers, providers, and patients to be aware of current trends in counterfeiting in order to best prepare for encounters with suspicious products. Furthermore, this is an issue that needs to be continually dealt with on national and international policy levels. Developing countries should try their level best to establish good laboratories for monitoring and checking quality of all pharmaceuticals manufactured locally and those imported or donated to these countries. The Ministries of Health and all stakeholders involved in this issue must ensure that all drugs meet the set or established international standards and national standards. Failure to do so will be to misuse the hard earned forex that is normally borrowed from banks for the procurement and distribution of drugs to its people. Indeed sub-standard medications do more

  11. Implications of Coronary Artery Calcium Testing Among Statin Candidates According to American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Cholesterol Management Guidelines: MESA (Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasir, Khurram; Bittencourt, Marcio S; Blaha, Michael J; Blankstein, Ron; Agatson, Arthur S; Rivera, Juan J; Miedema, Michael D; Miemdema, Michael D; Sibley, Christopher T; Shaw, Leslee J; Blumenthal, Roger S; Budoff, Matthew J; Krumholz, Harlan M

    2015-10-13

    The American College of Cardiology (ACC)/American Heart Association (AHA) cholesterol management guidelines have significantly broadened the scope of candidates eligible for statin therapy. This study evaluated the implications of the absence of coronary artery calcium (CAC) in reclassifying patients from a risk stratum in which statins are recommended to one in which they are not. MESA (Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis) is a longitudinal study of 6,814 men and women 45 to 84 years of age without clinical atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) risk at enrollment. We excluded 1,100 participants (16%) on lipid-lowering medication, 87 (1.3%) without low-density lipoprotein levels, 26 (0.4%) with missing risk factors for calculation of 10-year risk of ASCVD, 633 (9%) >75 years of age, and 209 (3%) with low-density lipoprotein coronary heart disease events occurred over a median (interquartile range) follow-up of 10.3 (9.7 to 10.8) years. The new ACC/AHA guidelines recommended 2,377 (50%) MESA participants for moderate- to high-intensity statins; the majority (77%) was eligible because of a 10-year estimated ASCVD risk ≥7.5%. Of those recommended statins, 41% had CAC = 0 and had 5.2 ASCVD events/1,000 person-years. Among 589 participants (12%) considered for moderate-intensity statin, 338 (57%) had a CAC = 0, with an ASCVD event rate of 1.5 per 1,000 person-years. Of participants eligible (recommended or considered) for statins, 44% (1,316 of 2,966) had CAC = 0 at baseline and an observed 10-year ASCVD event rate of 4.2 per 1,000 person-years. Significant ASCVD risk heterogeneity exists among those eligible for statins according to the new guidelines. The absence of CAC reclassifies approximately one-half of candidates as not eligible for statin therapy. Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Economic and policy implications of pandemic influenza.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Braeton J.; Starks, Shirley J.; Loose, Verne W.; Brown, Theresa Jean; Warren, Drake E.; Vargas, Vanessa N.

    2010-03-01

    Pandemic influenza has become a serious global health concern; in response, governments around the world have allocated increasing funds to containment of public health threats from this disease. Pandemic influenza is also recognized to have serious economic implications, causing illness and absence that reduces worker productivity and economic output and, through mortality, robs nations of their most valuable assets - human resources. This paper reports two studies that investigate both the short- and long-term economic implications of a pandemic flu outbreak. Policy makers can use the growing number of economic impact estimates to decide how much to spend to combat the pandemic influenza outbreaks. Experts recognize that pandemic influenza has serious global economic implications. The illness causes absenteeism, reduced worker productivity, and therefore reduced economic output. This, combined with the associated mortality rate, robs nations of valuable human resources. Policy makers can use economic impact estimates to decide how much to spend to combat the pandemic influenza outbreaks. In this paper economists examine two studies which investigate both the short- and long-term economic implications of a pandemic influenza outbreak. Resulting policy implications are also discussed. The research uses the Regional Economic Modeling, Inc. (REMI) Policy Insight + Model. This model provides a dynamic, regional, North America Industrial Classification System (NAICS) industry-structured framework for forecasting. It is supported by a population dynamics model that is well-adapted to investigating macro-economic implications of pandemic influenza, including possible demand side effects. The studies reported in this paper exercise all of these capabilities.

  13. The Gender Implication.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper further contend that many women have suffered varied traumatic experiences arising from this categorization which have manifested itself in gender inequality and discrimination that has far reaching implications for the empowerment of rural women in Nigeria. The paper concludes by examining the changes that ...

  14. and toxicological implications

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To analyze the metal/metalloid contents" of some leafy vegetables in Addis Ababa with emphasis on their toxicological implications. ' ' Method: Recently matured leaf samples of cabbage, Swiss chard, and lettuce at early maturity, from. Peacock Park'and Kera vegetable farms underwent pressurized digestion ...