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Sample records for associating transmembrane domains

  1. Requirement of transmembrane domain for CD154 association to lipid rafts and subsequent biological events.

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    Nadir Benslimane

    Full Text Available Interaction of CD40 with CD154 leads to recruitment of both molecules into lipid rafts, resulting in bi-directional cell activation. The precise mechanism by which CD154 is translocated into lipid rafts and its impact on CD154 signaling remain largely unknown. Our aim is to identify the domain of CD154 facilitating its association to lipid rafts and the impact of such association on signaling events and cytokine production. Thus, we generated Jurkat cell lines expressing truncated CD154 lacking the cytoplasmic domain or chimeric CD154 in which the transmembrane domain was replaced by that of transferrin receptor I, known to be excluded from lipid rafts. Our results show that cell stimulation with soluble CD40 leads to the association of CD154 wild-type and CD154-truncated, but not CD154-chimera, with lipid rafts. This is correlated with failure of CD154-chimera to activate Akt and p38 MAP kinases, known effectors of CD154 signaling. We also found that CD154-chimera lost the ability to promote IL-2 production upon T cell stimulation with anti-CD3/CD28 and soluble CD40. These results demonstrate the implication of the transmembrane domain of CD154 in lipid raft association, and that this association is necessary for CD154-mediated Akt and p38 activation with consequent enhancement of IL-2 production.

  2. STAC--A New Domain Associated with Transmembrane Solute Transport and Two-Component Signal Transduction Systems.

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    Korycinski, Mateusz; Albrecht, Reinhard; Ursinus, Astrid; Hartmann, Marcus D; Coles, Murray; Martin, Jörg; Dunin-Horkawicz, Stanislaw; Lupas, Andrei N

    2015-10-01

    Transmembrane receptors are integral components of sensory pathways in prokaryotes. These receptors share a common dimeric architecture, consisting in its basic form of an N-terminal extracellular sensor, transmembrane helices, and an intracellular effector. As an exception, we have identified an archaeal receptor family--exemplified by Af1503 from Archaeoglobus fulgidus--that is C-terminally shortened, lacking a recognizable effector module. Instead, a HAMP domain forms the sole extension for signal transduction in the cytosol. Here, we examine the gene environment of Af1503-like receptors and find a frequent association with transmembrane transport proteins. Furthermore, we identify and define a closely associated new protein domain family, which we characterize structurally using Af1502 from A. fulgidus. Members of this family are found both as stand-alone proteins and as domains within extant receptors. In general, the latter appear as connectors between the solute carrier 5 (SLC5)-like transmembrane domains and two-component signal transduction (TCST) domains. This is seen, for example, in the histidine kinase CbrA, which is a global regulator of metabolism, virulence, and antibiotic resistance in Pseudomonads. We propose that this newly identified domain family mediates signal transduction in systems regulating transport processes and name it STAC, for SLC and TCST-Associated Component. PMID:26321252

  3. Self-association of Transmembrane Domain 2 (TM2), but Not TM1, in Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase 1A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenei, Zsuzsanna A.; Borthwick, Karen; Zammit, Victor A.; Dixon, Ann M.

    2009-01-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1) controls the rate of entry of long-chain fatty acids into the mitochondrial matrix for β-oxidation and has been reported to exist as an oligomer. We have investigated the in vivo oligomerization of full-length rat CPT1A (rCPT1A) along with those of the N-terminal truncation/deletion mutants Δ(1–82), Δ(1–18), and Δ(19–30) expressed in yeast mitochondria. The data indicate that in liver mitochondria in vivo CPT1A exists as a hexamer but that during preparation and storage of mitochondria the order of oligomerization is rapidly reduced to the trimer, such that a mixture of hexamer and trimer is observed in isolated mitochondria in vitro. Mutants bearing deletions of different segments of the N terminus (including the more N-terminal of the two transmembrane domains) have the same pattern of oligomerization when expressed in yeast mitochondria. The self-association of the individual rCPT1A transmembrane (TM) domains (TM1, TM2) was also studied using the TOXCAT assay (which measures TM self-association in the Escherichia coli inner membrane). There was minimal self-association of the sequence corresponding to TM1 but significant self-association of TM2 in TOXCAT. Chemical cross-linking and analytical ultracentrifugation of a TM2-derived synthetic peptide showed oligomerization with a similar trimer/hexamer equilibrium to that observed for native rCPT1A in isolated mitochondria. Therefore, there was a correlation between the oligomerization behavior of TM2 peptide and that of the full-length protein. In silico molecular modeling of rCPT1A TM2 highlighted the favorable orientation of GXXXG and GXXXA motifs in the formation of the TM2 hexamer. PMID:19136561

  4. The Immunogenicity of the Tumor-Associated Antigen α-Fetoprotein Is Enhanced by a Fusion with a Transmembrane Domain

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    Lucile Tran

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To investigate the ability of recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara (rMVA vector to induce an immune response against a well-tolerated self-antigen. Methods. rMVA vectors expressing different form of α-fetoprotein (AFP were produced and characterized. Naïve mice were vaccinated with MVA vectors expressing the AFP antigen in either a secreted, or a membrane-bound, or an intracellular form. The immune response was monitored by an IFNΓ ELISpot assay and antibody detection. Results. Vaccination with the membrane-associated form of AFP induced a stronger CD8+ T-cell response compared to the ones obtained with the MVA encoding the secreted or the intracellular forms of AFP. Moreover, the vaccination with the membrane-bound AFP elicited the production of AFP-specific antibodies. Conclusions. The AFP transmembrane form is more immunogenic. Expressing a membrane-bound form in the context of an MVA vaccination could enhance the immunogenicity of a self-antigen.

  5. Structural and dynamic study of the transmembrane domain of the amyloid precursor protein.

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    Nadezhdin, K D; Bocharova, O V; Bocharov, E V; Arseniev, A S

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease affects people all over the world, regardless of nationality, gender or social status. An adequate study of the disease requires essential understanding of the molecular fundamentals of the pathogenesis. The amyloid β-peptide, which forms amyloid plaques in the brain of people with Alzheimer's disease, is the product of sequential cleavage of a single-span membrane amyloid precursor protein (APP). More than half of the APP mutations found to be associated with familial forms of Alzheimer's disease are located in its transmembrane domain. The pathogenic mutations presumably affect the structural-dynamic properties of the APP transmembrane domain by changing its conformational stability and/or lateral dimerization. In the present study, the structure and dynamics of the recombinant peptide corresponding to the APP fragment, Gln686-Lys726, which comprises the APP transmembrane domain with an adjacent N-terminal juxtamembrane sequence, were determined in the membrane mimetic environment composed of detergent micelles using NMR spectroscopy. The structure obtained in dodecylphosphocholine micelles consists of two α-helices: a short surface-associated juxtamembrane helix (Lys687-Asp694) and a long transmembrane helix (Gly700-Leu723), both connected via a mobile loop region. A minor bend of the transmembrane α-helix is observed near the paired residues Gly708-Gly709. A cholesterol-binding hydrophobic cavity is apparently formed under the loop region, where the juxtamembrane α-helix comes into contact with the membrane surface near the N-terminus of the transmembrane α-helix. PMID:22649674

  6. The role of palmitoylation and transmembrane domain in sorting of transmembrane adaptor proteins.

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    Chum, Tomáš; Glatzová, Daniela; Kvíčalová, Zuzana; Malínský, Jan; Brdička, Tomáš; Cebecauer, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Plasma membrane proteins synthesised at the endoplasmic reticulum are delivered to the cell surface via sorting pathways. Hydrophobic mismatch theory based on the length of the transmembrane domain (TMD) dominates discussion about determinants required for protein sorting to the plasma membrane. Transmembrane adaptor proteins (TRAP) are involved in signalling events which take place at the plasma membrane. Members of this protein family have TMDs of varying length. We were interested in whether palmitoylation or other motifs contribute to the effective sorting of TRAP proteins. We found that palmitoylation is essential for some, but not all, TRAP proteins independent of their TMD length. We also provide evidence that palmitoylation and proximal sequences can modulate sorting of artificial proteins with TMDs of suboptimal length. Our observations point to a unique character of each TMD defined by its primary amino acid sequence and its impact on membrane protein localisation. We conclude that, in addition to the TMD length, secondary sorting determinants such as palmitoylation or flanking sequences have evolved for the localisation of membrane proteins. PMID:26585312

  7. Transmembrane Domain Lengths Serve as Signatures of Organismal Complexity and Viral Transport Mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Snigdha Singh; Aditya Mittal

    2016-01-01

    It is known that membrane proteins are important in various secretory pathways, with a possible role of their transmembrane domains (TMDs) as sorting determinant factors. One key aspect of TMDs associated with various “checkposts” (i.e. organelles) of intracellular trafficking is their length. To explore possible linkages in organisms with varying “complexity” and differences in TMD lengths of membrane proteins associated with different organelles (such as Endoplasmic Reticulum, Golgi, Endoso...

  8. Role of GxxxG Motifs in Transmembrane Domain Interactions.

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    Teese, Mark G; Langosch, Dieter

    2015-08-25

    Transmembrane (TM) helices of integral membrane proteins can facilitate strong and specific noncovalent protein-protein interactions. Mutagenesis and structural analyses have revealed numerous examples in which the interaction between TM helices of single-pass membrane proteins is dependent on a GxxxG or (small)xxx(small) motif. It is therefore tempting to use the presence of these simple motifs as an indicator of TM helix interactions. In this Current Topic review, we point out that these motifs are quite common, with more than 50% of single-pass TM domains containing a (small)xxx(small) motif. However, the actual interaction strength of motif-containing helices depends strongly on sequence context and membrane properties. In addition, recent studies have revealed several GxxxG-containing TM domains that interact via alternative interfaces involving hydrophobic, polar, aromatic, or even ionizable residues that do not form recognizable motifs. In multipass membrane proteins, GxxxG motifs can be important for protein folding, and not just oligomerization. Our current knowledge thus suggests that the presence of a GxxxG motif alone is a weak predictor of protein dimerization in the membrane. PMID:26244771

  9. Evidence That the Thyroid-stimulating Hormone (TSH) Receptor Transmembrane Domain Influences Kinetics of TSH Binding to the Receptor Ectodomain*

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    Chen, Chun-Rong; McLachlan, Sandra M.; Rapoport, Basil

    2010-01-01

    Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH)-induced reduction in ligand binding affinity (negative cooperativity) requires TSH receptor (TSHR) homodimerization, the latter involving primarily the transmembrane domain (TMD) but with the extracellular domain (ECD) also contributing to this association. To test the role of the TMD in negative cooperativity, we studied the TSHR ECD tethered to the cell surface by a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor that multimerizes despite the absence of the TMD. ...

  10. Alternative packing of EGFR transmembrane domain suggests that protein-lipid interactions underlie signal conduction across membrane.

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    Bocharov, Eduard V; Lesovoy, Dmitry M; Pavlov, Konstantin V; Pustovalova, Yulia E; Bocharova, Olga V; Arseniev, Alexander S

    2016-06-01

    The human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) of HER/ErbB receptor tyrosine kinase family mediates a broad spectrum of cellular responses transducing biochemical signals via lateral dimerization in plasma membrane, while inactive receptors can exist in both monomeric and dimeric forms. Recently, the dimeric conformation of the helical single-span transmembrane domains of HER/ErbB employing the relatively polar N-terminal motifs in a fashion permitting proper kinase activation was experimentally determined. Here we describe the EGFR transmembrane domain dimerization via an alternative weakly polar C-terminal motif A(661)xxxG(665) presumably corresponding to the inactive receptor state. During association, the EGFR transmembrane helices undergo a structural adjustment with adaptation of inter-molecular polar and hydrophobic interactions depending upon the surrounding membrane properties that directly affect the transmembrane helix packing. This might imply that signal transduction through membrane and allosteric regulation are inclusively mediated by coupled protein-protein and protein-lipid interactions, elucidating paradoxically loose linkage between ligand binding and kinase activation. PMID:26903218

  11. Species-specific activity of HIV-1 Vpu and positive selection of tetherin transmembrane domain variants.

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    Matthew W McNatt

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Tetherin/BST-2/CD317 is a recently identified antiviral protein that blocks the release of nascent retrovirus, and other virus, particles from infected cells. An HIV-1 accessory protein, Vpu, acts as an antagonist of tetherin. Here, we show that positive selection is evident in primate tetherin sequences and that HIV-1 Vpu appears to have specifically adapted to antagonize variants of tetherin found in humans and chimpanzees. Tetherin variants found in rhesus macaques (rh, African green monkeys (agm and mice were able to inhibit HIV-1 particle release, but were resistant to antagonism by HIV-1 Vpu. Notably, reciprocal exchange of transmembrane domains between human and monkey tetherins conferred sensitivity and resistance to Vpu, identifying this protein domain as a critical determinant of Vpu function. Indeed, differences between hu-tetherin and rh-tetherin at several positions in the transmembrane domain affected sensitivity to antagonism by Vpu. Two alterations in the hu-tetherin transmembrane domain, that correspond to differences found in rh- and agm-tetherin proteins, were sufficient to render hu-tetherin completely resistant to HIV-1 Vpu. Interestingly, transmembrane and cytoplasmic domain sequences in primate tetherins exhibit variation at numerous codons that is likely the result of positive selection, and some of these changes coincide with determinants of HIV-1 Vpu sensitivity. Overall, these data indicate that tetherin could impose a barrier to viral zoonosis as a consequence of positive selection that has been driven by ancient viral antagonists, and that the HIV-1 Vpu protein has specialized to target the transmembrane domains found in human/chimpanzee tetherin proteins.

  12. Membrane-spanning domain of bovine foamy virus transmembrane protein having cytotoxicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Yonggang; YU Hong; WANG Jinzhong; CHEN Qimin; GENG Yunqi

    2006-01-01

    Foamy viruses (FVs) have broad cellular tropism infecting vertebrates from fish to human being,which indicates that Env protein has a high capability for membrane fusion.Conservative features in all FV transmembrane (TM) proteins include a region of hydrophobic domain called membrane-spanning domain (MSD),which contains several stretches of hydrophobic amino acids.To investigate whether these features were associated with the cytotoxicity effect of TM on Escherichia coli,a series of mutants were constructed and expressed in the E.coli BL21 (DE3) using pET-32a (+) as expressing vector.The results showed that only TM3 without MSD was expressed in E.coli,whereas the other two containing full or part of the MSD (TM1 and TM2) could not be expressed.Furthermore,the bacterial amount and living bacteria analysis revealed that the cytotoxicity of TM was dependent on its MSD,especially on the stretches of hydrophobic amino acids.Western blotting analysis showed that TM3 protein was purified with affinity purification.

  13. Transmembrane Domain Lengths Serve as Signatures of Organismal Complexity and Viral Transport Mechanisms.

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    Singh, Snigdha; Mittal, Aditya

    2016-01-01

    It is known that membrane proteins are important in various secretory pathways, with a possible role of their transmembrane domains (TMDs) as sorting determinant factors. One key aspect of TMDs associated with various "checkposts" (i.e. organelles) of intracellular trafficking is their length. To explore possible linkages in organisms with varying "complexity" and differences in TMD lengths of membrane proteins associated with different organelles (such as Endoplasmic Reticulum, Golgi, Endosomes, Nucleus, Plasma Membrane), we analyzed ~70000 membrane protein sequences in over 300 genomes of fungi, plants, non-mammalian vertebrates and mammals. We report that as we move from simpler to complex organisms, variation in organellar TMD lengths decreases, especially compared to their respective plasma membranes, with increasing organismal complexity. This suggests an evolutionary pressure in modulating length of TMDs of membrane proteins with increasing complexity of communication between sub-cellular compartments. We also report functional applications of our findings by discovering remarkable distinctions in TMD lengths of membrane proteins associated with different intracellular transport pathways. Finally, we show that TMD lengths extracted from viral proteins can serve as somewhat weak indicators of viral replication sites in plant cells but very strong indicators of different entry pathways employed by animal viruses. PMID:26925972

  14. Achondroplastic dog breeds have no mutations in the transmembrane domain of the FGFR-3 gene.

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    Martínez, S; Valdés, J; Alonso, R A

    2000-10-01

    One of the most common skeletal affections in humans is achondroplasia, a short-limbed dwarfism that is, in most cases, caused by mutations in the transmembrane domain of the fibroblast growth factor receptor-3 (FGFR-3) gene. Due to the lack of sufficient radiological, genetic, and molecular studies, most types of skeletal anomalies in dogs are classified as achondroplasia. To initiate the molecular characterization of some osteochondrodysplastic dog breeds, we obtained the DNA sequence of the transmembrane domain of the FGFR-3 gene from the dachshund, basset hound, bulldog, and German shepherd dogs. All 4 breeds showed no mutation in the evaluated region. This indicates that the mutation responsible for the osteochondrodysplastic phenotype in the tested dog breeds lies either elsewhere in the FGFR-3 gene or in other ones involved in the formation and development of endochondral bone. PMID:11041504

  15. Achondroplastic dog breeds have no mutations in the transmembrane domain of the FGFR-3 gene.

    OpenAIRE

    S. Martínez; Valdés, J; R. A. Alonso

    2000-01-01

    One of the most common skeletal affections in humans is achondroplasia, a short-limbed dwarfism that is, in most cases, caused by mutations in the transmembrane domain of the fibroblast growth factor receptor-3 (FGFR-3) gene. Due to the lack of sufficient radiological, genetic, and molecular studies, most types of skeletal anomalies in dogs are classified as achondroplasia. To initiate the molecular characterization of some osteochondrodysplastic dog breeds, we obtained the DNA sequence of th...

  16. Down-Regulation of Cell Surface Receptors Is Modulated by Polar Residues within the Transmembrane Domain

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    Zaliauskiene, Lolita; Kang, Sunghyun; Brouillette, Christie G; Lebowitz, Jacob; Arani, Ramin B; Collawn, James F.

    2000-01-01

    How recycling receptors are segregated from down-regulated receptors in the endosome is unknown. In previous studies, we demonstrated that substitutions in the transferrin receptor (TR) transmembrane domain (TM) convert the protein from an efficiently recycling receptor to one that is rapidly down regulated. In this study, we demonstrate that the “signal” within the TM necessary and sufficient for down-regulation is Thr11Gln17Thr19 (numbering in TM). Transplant...

  17. Down-Regulation of Cell Surface Receptors Is Modulated by Polar Residues within the Transmembrane Domain

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    Zaliauskiene, Lolita; Kang, Sunghyun; Brouillette, Christie G.; Lebowitz, Jacob; Arani, Ramin B.; Collawn, James F.

    2000-01-01

    How recycling receptors are segregated from down-regulated receptors in the endosome is unknown. In previous studies, we demonstrated that substitutions in the transferrin receptor (TR) transmembrane domain (TM) convert the protein from an efficiently recycling receptor to one that is rapidly down regulated. In this study, we demonstrate that the “signal” within the TM necessary and sufficient for down-regulation is Thr11Gln17Thr19 (numbering in TM). Transplantation of these polar residues into the wild-type TR promotes receptor down-regulation that can be demonstrated by changes in protein half-life and in receptor recycling. Surprisingly, this modification dramatically increases the TR internalization rate as well (∼79% increase). Sucrose gradient centrifugation and cross-linking studies reveal that propensity of the receptors to self-associate correlates with down-regulation. Interestingly, a number of cell surface proteins that contain TM polar residues are known to be efficiently down-regulated, whereas recycling receptors for low-density lipoprotein and transferrin conspicuously lack these residues. Our data, therefore, suggest a simple model in which specific residues within the TM sequences dramatically influence the fate of membrane proteins after endocytosis, providing an alternative signal for down-regulation of receptor complexes to the well-characterized cytoplasmic tail targeting signals. PMID:10930460

  18. Membrane interaction and structure of the transmembrane domain of influenza hemagglutinin and its fusion peptide complex

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    Lin Chi-Hui

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To study the organization and interaction with the fusion domain (or fusion peptide, FP of the transmembrane domain (TMD of influenza virus envelope glycoprotein for its role in membrane fusion which is also essential in the cellular trafficking of biomolecules and sperm-egg fusion. Results The fluorescence and gel electrophoresis experiments revealed a tight self-assembly of TMD in the model membrane. A weak but non-random interaction between TMD and FP in the membrane was found. In the complex, the central TMD oligomer was packed by FP in an antiparallel fashion. FP insertion into the membrane was altered by binding to TMD. An infrared study exhibited an enhanced membrane perturbation by the complex formation. A model was built to illustrate the role of TMD in the late stages of influenza virus-mediated membrane fusion reaction. Conclusion The TMD oligomer anchors the fusion protein in the membrane with minimal destabilization to the membrane. Upon associating with FP, the complex exerts a synergistic effect on the membrane perturbation. This effect is likely to contribute to the complete membrane fusion during the late phase of fusion protein-induced fusion cascade. The results presented in the work characterize the nature of the interaction of TMD with the membrane and TMD in a complex with FP in the steps leading to pore initiation and dilation during virus-induced fusion. Our data and proposed fusion model highlight the key role of TMD-FP interaction and have implications on the fusion reaction mediated by other type I viral fusion proteins. Understanding the molecular mechanism of membrane fusion may assist in the design of anti-viral drugs.

  19. Constitutive activation of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 by the transmembrane domain point mutation found in achondroplasia.

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    Webster, M K; Donoghue, D J

    1996-01-01

    Achondroplasia, the most common genetic form of dwarfism, is an autosomal dominant disorder whose underlying mechanism is a defect in the maturation of the cartilage growth plate of long bones. Achondroplasia has recently been shown to result from a Gly to Arg substitution in the transmembrane domain of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3), although the molecular consequences of this mutation have not been investigated. By substituting the transmembrane domain of the Neu receptor t...

  20. Solution NMR study of the transmembrane domain of single-span membrane proteins: opportunities and strategies.

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    Gayen, Shovanlal; Li, Qingxin; Kang, Congbao

    2012-09-01

    Membrane proteins play important roles in signal transduction across the cell membrane. Structural information for the membrane proteins is still limited due to many technical challenges. Membrane proteins containing a single α- helical transmembrane (TM) domain are very important in several pathways. Solution NMR spectroscopy is an important tool for the study of the structure of the TM domain of these types of proteins due to their small size. In this review, we summarize the importance of some single-span membrane proteins in signal transduction and the importance of understanding the structure of the TM domain. We discussed the current progress in the structural study of these types of proteins using solution NMR spectroscopy. We summarize the structures solved during last several years. The structures of the regulatory domain of the ion channels such as KCNE1, integrin and viral proteins such as the M2 channel are described. The binding interface of single TM-TM domains is discussed based on NMR structural studies. Strategies including sample preparation, detergent screening, and structural determination of single-span membrane protein are summarized. We also discuss the potential application of NMR spectroscopy to drug discovery of proteins with a single-span TM domain. PMID:23004360

  1. Striated domains: self-organizing ordered assemblies of transmembrane alpha-helical peptides and lipids in bilayers.

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    de Kruijff, Ben; Killian, J Antoinette; Ganchev, Dragomir N; Rinia, Hilde A; Sparr, Emma

    2006-03-01

    This review summarizes the knowledge on striated domains, which are ordered assemblies of transmembrane peptides and lipids under gel-state conditions. The structure, mechanism of function and utility of this system as a model for domain formation is described, resulting in a molecular description of the domains and a discussion on the relevance of these insights for the function/formation and structure of similar domains in biological membranes. PMID:16542143

  2. Role of the vaccinia virus O3 protein in cell entry can be fulfilled by its Sequence flexible transmembrane domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The vaccinia virus O3 protein, a component of the entry–fusion complex, is encoded by all chordopoxviruses. We constructed truncation mutants and demonstrated that the transmembrane domain, which comprises two-thirds of this 35 amino acid protein, is necessary and sufficient for interaction with the entry–fusion complex and function in cell entry. Nevertheless, neither single amino acid substitutions nor alanine scanning mutagenesis revealed essential amino acids within the transmembrane domain. Moreover, replication-competent mutant viruses were generated by randomization of 10 amino acids of the transmembrane domain. Of eight unique viruses, two contained only two amino acids in common with wild type and the remainder contained one or none within the randomized sequence. Although these mutant viruses formed normal size plaques, the entry–fusion complex did not co-purify with the mutant O3 proteins suggesting a less stable interaction. Thus, despite low specific sequence requirements, the transmembrane domain is sufficient for function in entry. - Highlights: • The 35 amino acid O3 protein is required for efficient vaccinia virus entry. • The transmembrane domain of O3 is necessary and sufficient for entry. • Mutagenesis demonstrated extreme sequence flexibility compatible with function

  3. Role of the vaccinia virus O3 protein in cell entry can be fulfilled by its Sequence flexible transmembrane domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satheshkumar, P.S.; Chavre, James; Moss, Bernard, E-mail: bmoss@nih.gov

    2013-09-15

    The vaccinia virus O3 protein, a component of the entry–fusion complex, is encoded by all chordopoxviruses. We constructed truncation mutants and demonstrated that the transmembrane domain, which comprises two-thirds of this 35 amino acid protein, is necessary and sufficient for interaction with the entry–fusion complex and function in cell entry. Nevertheless, neither single amino acid substitutions nor alanine scanning mutagenesis revealed essential amino acids within the transmembrane domain. Moreover, replication-competent mutant viruses were generated by randomization of 10 amino acids of the transmembrane domain. Of eight unique viruses, two contained only two amino acids in common with wild type and the remainder contained one or none within the randomized sequence. Although these mutant viruses formed normal size plaques, the entry–fusion complex did not co-purify with the mutant O3 proteins suggesting a less stable interaction. Thus, despite low specific sequence requirements, the transmembrane domain is sufficient for function in entry. - Highlights: • The 35 amino acid O3 protein is required for efficient vaccinia virus entry. • The transmembrane domain of O3 is necessary and sufficient for entry. • Mutagenesis demonstrated extreme sequence flexibility compatible with function.

  4. Coordinated movement of cytoplasmic and transmembrane domains of RyR1 upon gating.

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    Montserrat Samsó

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Ryanodine receptor type 1 (RyR1 produces spatially and temporally defined Ca2+ signals in several cell types. How signals received in the cytoplasmic domain are transmitted to the ion gate and how the channel gates are unknown. We used EGTA or neuroactive PCB 95 to stabilize the full closed or open states of RyR1. Single-channel measurements in the presence of FKBP12 indicate that PCB 95 inverts the thermodynamic stability of RyR1 and locks it in a long-lived open state whose unitary current is indistinguishable from the native open state. We analyzed two datasets of 15,625 and 18,527 frozen-hydrated RyR1-FKBP12 particles in the closed and open conformations, respectively, by cryo-electron microscopy. Their corresponding three-dimensional structures at 10.2 A resolution refine the structure surrounding the ion pathway previously identified in the closed conformation: two right-handed bundles emerging from the putative ion gate (the cytoplasmic "inner branches" and the transmembrane "inner helices". Furthermore, six of the identifiable transmembrane segments of RyR1 have similar organization to those of the mammalian Kv1.2 potassium channel. Upon gating, the distal cytoplasmic domains move towards the transmembrane domain while the central cytoplasmic domains move away from it, and also away from the 4-fold axis. Along the ion pathway, precise relocation of the inner helices and inner branches results in an approximately 4 A diameter increase of the ion gate. Whereas the inner helices of the K+ channels and of the RyR1 channel cross-correlate best with their corresponding open/closed states, the cytoplasmic inner branches, which are not observed in the K+ channels, appear to have at least as important a role as the inner helices for RyR1 gating. We propose a theoretical model whereby the inner helices, the inner branches, and the h1 densities together create an efficient novel gating mechanism for channel opening by relaxing two right

  5. All-Atom Structural Models of the Transmembrane Domains of Insulin and Type 1 Insulin-Like Growth Factor Receptors

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    Mohammadiarani, Hossein; Vashisth, Harish

    2016-01-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinase superfamily comprises many cell-surface receptors including the insulin receptor (IR) and type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF1R) that are constitutively homodimeric transmembrane glycoproteins. Therefore, these receptors require ligand-triggered domain rearrangements rather than receptor dimerization for activation. Specifically, binding of peptide ligands to receptor ectodomains transduces signals across the transmembrane domains for trans-autophosphorylation in cytoplasmic kinase domains. The molecular details of these processes are poorly understood in part due to the absence of structures of full-length receptors. Using MD simulations and enhanced conformational sampling algorithms, we present all-atom structural models of peptides containing 51 residues from the transmembrane and juxtamembrane regions of IR and IGF1R. In our models, the transmembrane regions of both receptors adopt helical conformations with kinks at Pro961 (IR) and Pro941 (IGF1R), but the C-terminal residues corresponding to the juxtamembrane region of each receptor adopt unfolded and flexible conformations in IR as opposed to a helix in IGF1R. We also observe that the N-terminal residues in IR form a kinked-helix sitting at the membrane–solvent interface, while homologous residues in IGF1R are unfolded and flexible. These conformational differences result in a larger tilt-angle of the membrane-embedded helix in IGF1R in comparison to IR to compensate for interactions with water molecules at the membrane–solvent interfaces. Our metastable/stable states for the transmembrane domain of IR, observed in a lipid bilayer, are consistent with a known NMR structure of this domain determined in detergent micelles, and similar states in IGF1R are consistent with a previously reported model of the dimerized transmembrane domains of IGF1R. Our all-atom structural models suggest potentially unique structural organization of kinase domains in each receptor. PMID

  6. Packing Density of the Erythropoietin Receptor Transmembrane Domain Correlates with Amplification of Biological Responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Verena [German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg; Sengupta, D [University of Heidelberg; Ketteler, Robin [German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg; Ullmann, G. Matthias [University of Bayreuth; Smith, Jeremy C [ORNL; Klingmuller, Ursula [German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg

    2008-10-01

    The formation of signal-promoting dimeric or oligomeric receptor complexes at the cell surface is modulated by self-interaction of their transmembrane (TM) domains. To address the importance of TM domain packing density for receptor functionality, we examined a set of asparagine mutants in the TM domain of the erythropoietin receptor (EpoR). We identified EpoR-T242N as a receptor variant that is present at the cell surface similar to wild-type EpoR but lacks visible localization in vesicle-like structures and is impaired in efficient activation of specific signaling cascades. Analysis by a molecular modeling approach indicated an increased interhelical distance for the EpoR-T242N TM dimer. By employing the model, we designed additional mutants with increased or decreased packing volume and confirmed a correlation between packing volume and biological responsiveness. These results propose that the packing density of the TM domain provides a novel layer for fine-tuned regulation of signal transduction and cellular decisions.

  7. Molecular organization in striated domains induced by transmembrane alpha-helical peptides in dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparr, Emma; Ganchev, Dragomir N; Snel, Margot M E; Ridder, Anja N J A; Kroon-Batenburg, Loes M J; Chupin, Vladimir; Rijkers, Dirk T S; Killian, J Antoinette; de Kruijff, Ben

    2005-01-11

    Transmembrane (TM) alpha-helical peptides with neutral flanking residues such as tryptophan form highly ordered striated domains when incorporated in gel-state 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) bilayers and inspected by atomic force microscopy (AFM) (1). In this study, we analyze the molecular organization of these striated domains using AFM, photo-cross-linking, fluorescence spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and X-ray diffraction techniques on different functionalized TM peptides. The results demonstrate that the striated domains consist of linear arrays of single TM peptides with a dominantly antiparallel organization in which the peptides interact with each other and with lipids. The peptide arrays are regularly spaced by +/-8.5 nm and are separated by somewhat perturbed gel-state lipids with hexagonally organized acyl chains, which have lost their tilt. This system provides an example of how domains of peptides and lipids can be formed in membranes as a result of a combination of specific peptide-peptide and peptide-lipid interactions. PMID:15628840

  8. Induction of necrosis via mitochondrial targeting of Melon necrotic spot virus replication protein p29 by its second transmembrane domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The virulence factor of Melon necrotic spot virus (MNSV), a virus that induces systemic necrotic spot disease on melon plants, was investigated. When the replication protein p29 was expressed in N. benthamiana using a Cucumber mosaic virus vector, necrotic spots appeared on the leaf tissue. Transmission electron microscopy revealed abnormal mitochondrial aggregation in these tissues. Fractionation of tissues expressing p29 and confocal imaging using GFP-tagged p29 revealed that p29 associated with the mitochondrial membrane as an integral membrane protein. Expression analysis of p29 deletion fragments and prediction of hydrophobic transmembrane domains (TMDs) in p29 showed that deletion of the second putative TMD from p29 led to deficiencies in both the mitochondrial localization and virulence of p29. Taken together, these results indicated that MNSV p29 interacts with the mitochondrial membrane and that p29 may be a virulence factor causing the observed necrosis.

  9. v-SNARE transmembrane domains function as catalysts for vesicle fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhara, Madhurima; Yarzagaray, Antonio; Makke, Mazen; Schindeldecker, Barbara; Schwarz, Yvonne; Shaaban, Ahmed; Sharma, Satyan; Böckmann, Rainer A; Lindau, Manfred; Mohrmann, Ralf; Bruns, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    Vesicle fusion is mediated by an assembly of SNARE proteins between opposing membranes, but it is unknown whether transmembrane domains (TMDs) of SNARE proteins serve mechanistic functions that go beyond passive anchoring of the force-generating SNAREpin to the fusing membranes. Here, we show that conformational flexibility of synaptobrevin-2 TMD is essential for efficient Ca(2+)-triggered exocytosis and actively promotes membrane fusion as well as fusion pore expansion. Specifically, the introduction of helix-stabilizing leucine residues within the TMD region spanning the vesicle's outer leaflet strongly impairs exocytosis and decelerates fusion pore dilation. In contrast, increasing the number of helix-destabilizing, ß-branched valine or isoleucine residues within the TMD restores normal secretion but accelerates fusion pore expansion beyond the rate found for the wildtype protein. These observations provide evidence that the synaptobrevin-2 TMD catalyzes the fusion process by its structural flexibility, actively setting the pace of fusion pore expansion. PMID:27343350

  10. A CLAG3 mutation in an amphipathic transmembrane domain alters malaria parasite nutrient channels and confers leupeptin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Paresh; Rayavara, Kempaiah; Ito, Daisuke; Basore, Katherine; Desai, Sanjay A

    2015-06-01

    Erythrocytes infected with malaria parasites have increased permeability to ions and nutrients, as mediated by the plasmodial surface anion channel (PSAC) and recently linked to parasite clag3 genes. Although the encoded protein is integral to the host membrane, its precise contribution to solute transport remains unclear because it lacks conventional transmembrane domains and does not have homology to ion channel proteins in other organisms. Here, we identified a probable CLAG3 transmembrane domain adjacent to a variant extracellular motif. Helical-wheel analysis revealed strict segregation of polar and hydrophobic residues to opposite faces of a predicted α-helical transmembrane domain, suggesting that the domain lines a water-filled pore. A single CLAG3 mutation (A1210T) in a leupeptin-resistant PSAC mutant falls within this transmembrane domain and may affect pore structure. Allelic-exchange transfection and site-directed mutagenesis revealed that this mutation alters solute selectivity in the channel. The A1210T mutation also reduces the blocking affinity of PSAC inhibitors that bind on opposite channel faces, consistent with global changes in channel structure. Transfected parasites carrying this mutation survived a leupeptin challenge significantly better than a transfection control did. Thus, the A1210T mutation contributes directly to both altered PSAC activity and leupeptin resistance. These findings reveal the molecular basis of a novel antimalarial drug resistance mechanism, provide a framework for determining the channel's composition and structure, and should guide the development of therapies targeting the PSAC. PMID:25870226

  11. Domain Bridging Associations Support Creativity

    OpenAIRE

    Kötter, Tobias; Thiel, Kilian; Berthold, Michael R

    2010-01-01

    This paper proposes a new approach to support creativity through assisting the discovery of unexpected associations across different domains. This is achieved by integrating information from heterogeneous domains into a single network, enabling the interactive discovery of links across the corresponding information resources. We discuss three different pattern of domain crossing associations in this context.

  12. Influenza M2 Transmembrane Domain Senses Membrane Heterogeneity and Enhances Membrane Curvature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Chian Sing; Khadka, Nawal K; She, Fengyu; Cai, Jianfeng; Pan, Jianjun

    2016-07-01

    Targeting host cell membranes by M2 of influenza A virus is important for virus invasion and replication. We study the transmembrane domain of M2 (M2TM) interacting with mica-supported planar bilayers and free-standing giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs). Using solution atomic force microscopy (AFM), we show that the size of M2TM oligomers is dependent on lipid composition. The addition of M2TM to lipid bilayers containing liquid-ordered (Lo) and liquid-disordered (Ld) phases reveals that M2TM preferentially partitions into the Ld phase; phase-dependent partitioning results in a larger rigidity of the Ld phase. We next use fluorescence microscopy to study the effects of M2TM on phase-coexisting GUVs. In particular, M2TM is found to increase GUVs' miscibility transition temperature Tmix. The augmented thermodynamic stability can be accounted for by considering an enhanced energy barrier of lipid mixing between coexisting phases. Our GUV study also shows that M2TM can elicit an array of vesicle shapes mimicking virus budding. M2TM enhanced membrane curvature is consistent with our AFM data, which show altered membrane rigidity and consequently line tension at domain edges. Together, our results highlight that in addition to conducting protons, M2TM can actively regulate membrane heterogeneity and augment membrane curvature. PMID:27285399

  13. v-SNARE transmembrane domains function as catalysts for vesicle fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhara, Madhurima; Yarzagaray, Antonio; Makke, Mazen; Schindeldecker, Barbara; Schwarz, Yvonne; Shaaban, Ahmed; Sharma, Satyan; Böckmann, Rainer A; Lindau, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Vesicle fusion is mediated by an assembly of SNARE proteins between opposing membranes, but it is unknown whether transmembrane domains (TMDs) of SNARE proteins serve mechanistic functions that go beyond passive anchoring of the force-generating SNAREpin to the fusing membranes. Here, we show that conformational flexibility of synaptobrevin-2 TMD is essential for efficient Ca2+-triggered exocytosis and actively promotes membrane fusion as well as fusion pore expansion. Specifically, the introduction of helix-stabilizing leucine residues within the TMD region spanning the vesicle’s outer leaflet strongly impairs exocytosis and decelerates fusion pore dilation. In contrast, increasing the number of helix-destabilizing, ß-branched valine or isoleucine residues within the TMD restores normal secretion but accelerates fusion pore expansion beyond the rate found for the wildtype protein. These observations provide evidence that the synaptobrevin-2 TMD catalyzes the fusion process by its structural flexibility, actively setting the pace of fusion pore expansion. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17571.001 PMID:27343350

  14. Nanodisc-cell fusion: control of fusion pore nucleation and lifetimes by SNARE protein transmembrane domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhenyong; Auclair, Sarah M; Bello, Oscar; Vennekate, Wensi; Dudzinski, Natasha R; Krishnakumar, Shyam S; Karatekin, Erdem

    2016-01-01

    The initial, nanometer-sized connection between the plasma membrane and a hormone- or neurotransmitter-filled vesicle -the fusion pore- can flicker open and closed repeatedly before dilating or resealing irreversibly. Pore dynamics determine release and vesicle recycling kinetics, but pore properties are poorly known because biochemically defined single-pore assays are lacking. We isolated single flickering pores connecting v-SNARE-reconstituted nanodiscs to cells ectopically expressing cognate, "flipped" t-SNAREs. Conductance through single, voltage-clamped fusion pores directly reported sub-millisecond pore dynamics. Pore currents fluctuated, transiently returned to baseline multiple times, and disappeared ~6 s after initial opening, as if the fusion pore fluctuated in size, flickered, and resealed. We found that interactions between v- and t-SNARE transmembrane domains (TMDs) promote, but are not essential for pore nucleation. Surprisingly, TMD modifications designed to disrupt v- and t-SNARE TMD zippering prolonged pore lifetimes dramatically. We propose that the post-fusion geometry of the proteins contribute to pore stability. PMID:27264104

  15. Amino Acid Sequence Requirements of the Transmembrane and Cytoplasmic Domains of Influenza Virus Hemagglutinin for Viable Membrane Fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Melikyan, Grigory B.; Lin, Sasa; Roth, Michael G.; Cohen, Fredric S.

    1999-01-01

    The amino acid sequence requirements of the transmembrane (TM) domain and cytoplasmic tail (CT) of the hemagglutinin (HA) of influenza virus in membrane fusion have been investigated. Fusion properties of wild-type HA were compared with those of chimeras consisting of the ectodomain of HA and the TM domain and/or CT of polyimmunoglobulin receptor, a nonviral integral membrane protein. The presence of a CT was not required for fusion. But when a TM domain and CT were present, fusion activity w...

  16. Structural mutants of dengue virus 2 transmembrane domains exhibit host-range phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Gwynneth S

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are over 700 known arboviruses and at least 80 immunologically distinct types that cause disease in humans. Arboviruses are transmitted among vertebrates by biting insects, chiefly mosquitoes and ticks. These viruses are widely distributed throughout the world, depending on the presence of appropriate hosts (birds, horses, domestic animals, humans and vectors. Mosquito-borne arboviruses present some of the most important examples of emerging and resurgent diseases of global significance. Methods A strategy has been developed by which host-range mutants of Dengue virus can be constructed by generating deletions in the transmembrane domain (TMD of the E glycoprotein. The host-range mutants produced and selected favored growth in the insect hosts. Mouse trials were conducted to determine if these mutants could initiate an immune response in an in vivo system. Results The DV2 E protein TMD defined as amino acids 452SWTMKILIGVIITWIG467 was found to contain specific residues which were required for the production of this host-range phenotype. Deletion mutants were found to be stable in vitro for 4 sequential passages in both host cell lines. The host-range mutants elicited neutralizing antibody above that seen for wild-type virus in mice and warrant further testing in primates as potential vaccine candidates. Conclusions Novel host-range mutants of DV2 were created that have preferential growth in insect cells and impaired infectivity in mammalian cells. This method for creating live, attenuated viral mutants that generate safe and effective immunity may be applied to many other insect-borne viral diseases for which no current effective therapies exist.

  17. Transmembrane START domain proteins: in silico identification, characterization and expression analysis under stress conditions in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satheesh, Viswanathan; Chidambaranathan, Parameswaran; Jagannadham, Prasanth Tejkumar; Kumar, Vajinder; Jain, Pradeep K.; Chinnusamy, Viswanathan; Bhat, Shripad R.; Srinivasan, R.

    2016-01-01

    Steroidogenic acute regulatory related transfer (StART) proteins that are involved in transport of lipid molecules, play a myriad of functions in insects, mammals and plants. These proteins consist of a modular START domain of approximately 200 amino acids which binds and transfers the lipids. In the present study we have performed a genome-wide search for all START domain proteins in chickpea. The search identified 36 chickpea genes belonging to the START domain family. Through a phylogenetic tree reconstructed with Arabidopsis, rice, chickpea, and soybean START proteins, we were able to identify four transmembrane START (TM-START) proteins in chickpea. These four proteins are homologous to the highly conserved mammalian phosphatidylcholine transfer proteins. Multiple sequence alignment of all the transmembrane containing START proteins from Arabidopsis, rice, chickpea, and soybean revealed that the amino acid residues to which phosphatidylcholine binds in mammals, is also conserved in all these plant species, implying an important functional role and a very similar mode of action of all these proteins across dicots and monocots. This study characterizes a few of the not so well studied transmembrane START superfamily genes that may be involved in stress signaling. Expression analysis in various tissues showed that these genes are predominantly expressed in flowers and roots of chickpea. Three of the chickpea TM-START genes showed induced expression in response to drought, salt, wound and heat stress, suggesting their role in stress response. PMID:26445326

  18. Conformational coupling of the nucleotide-binding and the transmembrane domains in ABC transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Po-Chao; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2011-08-01

    Basic architecture of ABC transporters includes two transmembrane domains (TMDs) and two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs). Although the transport process takes place in the TMDs, which provide the substrate translocation pathway across the cell membrane and control its accessibility between the two sides of the membrane, the energy required for the process is provided by conformational changes induced in the NBDs by binding and hydrolysis of ATP. Nucleotide-dependent conformational changes in the NBDs, therefore, need to be coupled to structural changes in the TMDs. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we have investigated the structural elements involved in the conformational coupling between the NBDs and the TMDs in the Escherichia coli maltose transporter, an ABC importer for which an intact structure is available both in inward-facing and outward-facing conformations. The prevailing model of coupling is primarily based on a single structural motif, known as the coupling helices, as the main structural element for the NBD-TMD coupling. Surprisingly, we find that in the absence of the NBDs the coupling helices can be conformationally decoupled from the rest of the TMDs, despite their covalent connection. That is, the structural integrity of the coupling helices and their tight coupling to the core of the TMDs rely on the contacts provided by the NBDs. Based on the conformational and dynamical analysis of the simulation trajectories, we propose that the core coupling elements in the maltose transporter involve contributions from several structural motifs located at the NBD-TMD interface, namely, the EAA loops from the TMDs, and the Q-loop and the ENI motifs from the NBDs. These three structural motifs in small ABC importers show a high degree of correlation in motion and mediate the necessary conformational coupling between the core of TMDs and the helical subdomains of NBDs. A comprehensive analysis of the structurally known ABC transporters shows a high degree

  19. A conserved gene family encodes transmembrane proteins with fibronectin, immunoglobulin and leucine-rich repeat domains (FIGLER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haga Christopher L

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In mouse the cytokine interleukin-7 (IL-7 is required for generation of B lymphocytes, but human IL-7 does not appear to have this function. A bioinformatics approach was therefore used to identify IL-7 receptor related genes in the hope of identifying the elusive human cytokine. Results Our database search identified a family of nine gene candidates, which we have provisionally named fibronectin immunoglobulin leucine-rich repeat (FIGLER. The FIGLER 1–9 genes are predicted to encode type I transmembrane glycoproteins with 6–12 leucine-rich repeats (LRR, a C2 type Ig domain, a fibronectin type III domain, a hydrophobic transmembrane domain, and a cytoplasmic domain containing one to four tyrosine residues. Members of this multichromosomal gene family possess 20–47% overall amino acid identity and are differentially expressed in cell lines and primary hematopoietic lineage cells. Genes for FIGLER homologs were identified in macaque, orangutan, chimpanzee, mouse, rat, dog, chicken, toad, and puffer fish databases. The non-human FIGLER homologs share 38–99% overall amino acid identity with their human counterpart. Conclusion The extracellular domain structure and absence of recognizable cytoplasmic signaling motifs in members of the highly conserved FIGLER gene family suggest a trophic or cell adhesion function for these molecules.

  20. On the interactions between nucleotide binding domains and membrane spanning domains in cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator: A molecular dynamic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belmonte, Luca; Moran, Oscar

    2015-04-01

    The Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Regulator (CFTR) is a membrane protein whose mutations cause cystic fibrosis, a lethal genetic disease. We performed a molecular dynamic (MD) study of the properties of the nucleotide binding domains (NBD) whose conformational changes, upon ATP binding, are the direct responsible of the gating mechanisms of CFTR. This study was done for the wild type (WT) CFTR and for the two most common mutations, ΔF508, that produces a traffic defect of the protein, and the mutation G551D, that causes a gating defect on CFTR. Using an homology model of the open channel conformation of the CFTR we thus introduced the mutations to the structure. Although the overall structures of the G551D and ΔF508 are quite well conserved, the NBD1-NBD2 interactions are severely modified in both mutants. NBD1 and NBD2 are indeed destabilized with a higher internal energy (Ei) in the ΔF508-CFTR. Differently, Ei does not change in the NBDs of G551D but, while the number of close contacts between NBD1 and NBD2 in ΔF508 is increased, a significant reduction of close contacts is found in the G551D mutated form. Hydrogen bonds formation between NBDs of the two mutated forms is also altered and it is slightly increased for the ΔF508, while are severely reduced in G551D. A consequent modification of the NBDs-ICLs interactions between residues involved in the transduction of the ATP binding and the channel gating is also registered. Indeed, while a major interaction is noticed between NBDs interface and ICL2 and ICL4 in the WT, this interaction is somehow altered in both mutated forms plausibly with effect on channel gating. Thus, single point mutations of the CFTR protein can reasonably results in channel gating defects due to alteration of the interaction mechanisms between the NBDs and NBDs-ICLs interfaces upon ATP-binding process. PMID:25640670

  1. Substrate specificity of rhomboid intramembrane proteases is governed by helix-breaking residues in the substrate transmembrane domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Sinisa; Freeman, Matthew

    2003-06-01

    Rhomboid intramembrane proteases initiate cell signaling during Drosophila development and Providencia bacterial growth by cleaving transmembrane ligand precursors. We have determined how specificity is achieved: Drosophila Rhomboid-1 is a site-specific protease that recognizes its substrate Spitz by a small region of the Spitz transmembrane domain (TMD). This substrate motif is necessary and sufficient for cleavage and is composed of residues known to disrupt helices. Rhomboids from diverse organisms including bacteria and vertebrates recognize the same substrate motif, suggesting that they use a universal targeting strategy. We used this information to search for other rhomboid substrates and identified a family of adhesion proteins from the human parasite Toxoplasma gondii, the TMDs of which were efficient substrates for rhomboid proteases. Intramembrane cleavage of these proteins is required for host cell invasion. These results provide an explanation of how rhomboid proteases achieve specificity, and allow some rhomboid substrates to be predicted from sequence information. PMID:12820957

  2. The Cucumber leaf spot virus p25 auxiliary replicase protein binds and modifies the endoplasmic reticulum via N-terminal transmembrane domains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cucumber leaf spot virus (CLSV) is a member of the Aureusvirus genus, family Tombusviridae. The auxiliary replicase of Tombusvirids has been found to localize to endoplasmic reticulum (ER), peroxisomes or mitochondria; however, localization of the auxiliary replicase of aureusviruses has not been determined. We have found that the auxiliary replicase of CLSV (p25) fused to GFP colocalizes with ER and that three predicted transmembrane domains (TMDs) at the N-terminus of p25 are sufficient for targeting, although the second and third TMDs play the most prominent roles. Confocal analysis of CLSV infected 16C plants shows that the ER becomes modified including the formation of punctae at connections between ER tubules and in association with the nucleus. Ultrastructural analysis shows that the cytoplasm contains numerous vesicles which are also found between the perinuclear ER and nuclear membrane. It is proposed that these vesicles correspond to modified ER used as sites for CLSV replication. - Highlights: • The CLSV p25 auxiliary replicase targets the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). • Targeting of CLSV p25 is associated with ER restructuring. • Restructuring of the ER occurs during CLSV infection. • CLSV p25 contains 3 predicted transmembrane domains 2 of which are required for ER targeting. • Vesicles derived from the ER may be sites of CLSV replication

  3. The Cucumber leaf spot virus p25 auxiliary replicase protein binds and modifies the endoplasmic reticulum via N-terminal transmembrane domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghoshal, Kankana [University of British Columbia, Faculty of Land and Food Systems, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada V6T 1Z4 (Canada); Theilmann, Jane; Reade, Ron; Sanfacon, Helene [Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada Pacific Agri-Food Research Centre, 4200 Hwy 97, Summerland, British Columbia, Canada V0H 1Z0 (Canada); Rochon, D’Ann, E-mail: dann.rochon@agr.gc.ca [University of British Columbia, Faculty of Land and Food Systems, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada V6T 1Z4 (Canada); Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada Pacific Agri-Food Research Centre, 4200 Hwy 97, Summerland, British Columbia, Canada V0H 1Z0 (Canada)

    2014-11-15

    Cucumber leaf spot virus (CLSV) is a member of the Aureusvirus genus, family Tombusviridae. The auxiliary replicase of Tombusvirids has been found to localize to endoplasmic reticulum (ER), peroxisomes or mitochondria; however, localization of the auxiliary replicase of aureusviruses has not been determined. We have found that the auxiliary replicase of CLSV (p25) fused to GFP colocalizes with ER and that three predicted transmembrane domains (TMDs) at the N-terminus of p25 are sufficient for targeting, although the second and third TMDs play the most prominent roles. Confocal analysis of CLSV infected 16C plants shows that the ER becomes modified including the formation of punctae at connections between ER tubules and in association with the nucleus. Ultrastructural analysis shows that the cytoplasm contains numerous vesicles which are also found between the perinuclear ER and nuclear membrane. It is proposed that these vesicles correspond to modified ER used as sites for CLSV replication. - Highlights: • The CLSV p25 auxiliary replicase targets the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). • Targeting of CLSV p25 is associated with ER restructuring. • Restructuring of the ER occurs during CLSV infection. • CLSV p25 contains 3 predicted transmembrane domains 2 of which are required for ER targeting. • Vesicles derived from the ER may be sites of CLSV replication.

  4. The intramembrane cleavage site of the amyloid precursor protein depends on the length of its transmembrane domain

    OpenAIRE

    Lichtenthaler, Stefan F.; Beher, Dirk; Heike S Grimm; Wang, Rong; Shearman, Mark S.; Masters, Colin L.; Beyreuther, Konrad

    2002-01-01

    Proteolytic processing of the amyloid precursor protein by β-secretase generates C99, which subsequently is cleaved by γ-secretase, yielding the amyloid β peptide (Aβ). This γ-cleavage occurs within the transmembrane domain (TMD) of C99 and is similar to the intramembrane cleavage of Notch. However, Notch and C99 differ in their site of intramembrane cleavage. The main γ-cleavage of C99 occurs in the middle of the TMD, whereas the cleavage of Notch occurs close to the C-terminal end of the TM...

  5. Combined effect of cortical cytoskeleton and transmembrane proteins on domain formation in biomembranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikder, Md. Kabir Uddin; Stone, Kyle A.; Kumar, P. B. Sunil; Laradji, Mohamed

    2014-08-01

    We investigate the combined effects of transmembrane proteins and the subjacent cytoskeleton on the dynamics of phase separation in multicomponent lipid bilayers using computer simulations of a particle-based implicit solvent model for lipid membranes with soft-core interactions. We find that microphase separation can be achieved by the protein confinement by the cytoskeleton. Our results have relevance to the finite size of lipid rafts in the plasma membrane of mammalian cells.

  6. Combined effect of cortical cytoskeleton and transmembrane proteins on domain formation in biomembranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sikder, K. U.; Stone, K. A.; Kumar, P. B. S.;

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the combined effects of transmembrane proteins and the subjacent cytoskeleton on the dynamics of phase separation in multicomponent lipid bilayers using computer simulations of a particle-based implicit solvent model for lipid membranes with soft-core interactions. We find that...... microphase separation can be achieved by the protein confinement by the cytoskeleton. Our results have relevance to the finite size of lipid rafts in the plasma membrane of mammalian cells. (C) 2014 AIP Publishing LLC....

  7. The immunosuppressive domain of the transmembrane envelope protein gp41 of HIV-1 binds to human monocytes and B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mühle, Michael; Kroniger, Tobias; Hoffmann, Kerstin; Denner, Joachim

    2016-06-01

    The induction of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome by the human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) is a complex process which is not yet understood in full detail. Still open is the question whether the highly conserved so-called immunosuppressive (Isu) domain in the transmembrane envelope (TM) protein gp41 of HIV-1 is actively participating in immunopathogenesis. Inactivated virus particles, recombinant gp41 and peptides corresponding to the Isu domain have been reported to inhibit lymphocyte proliferation, as well as to alter cytokine release and gene expression. Here we demonstrate, using fluorescence-activated cell sorting and competition experiments, that homopolymers of the Isu peptide of HIV-1 are binding specifically to human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, mainly to monocytes and B cells. These data suggest that a putative receptor might be involved in the immunomodulatory effects observed previously. PMID:26754765

  8. Assembly of the transmembrane domain of E. coli PhoQ histidine kinase: implications for signal transduction from molecular simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Lemmin

    Full Text Available The PhoQP two-component system is a signaling complex essential for bacterial virulence and cationic antimicrobial peptide resistance. PhoQ is the histidine kinase chemoreceptor of this tandem machine and assembles in a homodimer conformation spanning the bacterial inner membrane. Currently, a full understanding of the PhoQ signal transduction is hindered by the lack of a complete atomistic structure. In this study, an atomistic model of the key transmembrane (TM domain is assembled by using molecular simulations, guided by experimental cross-linking data. The formation of a polar pocket involving Asn202 in the lumen of the tetrameric TM bundle is crucial for the assembly and solvation of the domain. Moreover, a concerted displacement of the TM helices at the periplasmic side is found to modulate a rotation at the cytoplasmic end, supporting the transduction of the chemical signal through a combination of scissoring and rotational movement of the TM helices.

  9. Graph-Theoretic Models of Mutations in the Nucleotide Binding Domain 1 of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debra J. Knisley

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis is one of the most common inherited diseases and is caused by a mutation in a membrane protein, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR. This protein serves as a chloride channel and regulates the viscosity of mucus lining the ducts of a number of organs. Although much has been learned about the consequences of mutations on the energy landscape and the resulting disrupted folding pathway of CFTR, a level of understanding needed to correct the misfolding has not been achieved. The most common mutations of CFTR are located in one of two nucleotide binding domains, namely, the nucleotide binding domain 1 (NBD1. We model NBD1 using a nested graph model. The vertices in the lowest layer each represent an atom in the structure of an amino acid residue, while the vertices in the mid layer each represent the residue. The vertices in the top layer each represent a subdomain of the nucleotide binding domain. We use this model to quantify the effects of a single point mutation on the protein domain. We compare the wildtype structure with eight of the most common mutations. The graph-theoretic model provides insight into how a single point mutation can have such profound structural consequences.

  10. Structural Model of the Bilitranslocase Transmembrane Domain Supported by NMR and FRET Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Amrita Roy; Sikorska, Emilia; van den Boom, Johannes; Bayer, Peter; Popenda, Łukasz; Szutkowski, Kosma; Jurga, Stefan; Bonomi, Massimiliano; Sali, Andrej; Zhukov, Igor; Passamonti, Sabina; Novič, Marjana

    2015-01-01

    We present a 3D model of the four transmembrane (TM) helical regions of bilitranslocase (BTL), a structurally uncharacterized protein that transports organic anions across the cell membrane. The model was computed by considering helix-helix interactions as primary constraints, using Monte Carlo simulations. The interactions between the TM2 and TM3 segments have been confirmed by Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, increasing our confidence in the model. Several insights into the BTL transport mechanism were obtained by analyzing the model. For example, the observed cis-trans Leu-Pro peptide bond isomerization in the TM3 fragment may indicate a key conformational change during anion transport by BTL. Our structural model of BTL may facilitate further studies, including drug discovery. PMID:26291722

  11. R76 in transmembrane domain 3 of the aspartate:alanine transporter AspT is involved in substrate transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Satomi; Nanatani, Kei; Abe, Keietsu

    2016-01-01

    The L-aspartate:L-alanine antiporter of Tetragenococcus halophilus (AspT) possesses an arginine residue (R76) within the GxxxG motif in the central part of transmembrane domain 3 (TM3)-a residue that has been estimated to transport function. In this study, we carried out amino acid substitutions of R76 and used proteoliposome reconstitution for analyzing the transport function of each substitution. Both l-aspartate and l-alanine transport assays showed that R76K has higher activity than the AspT-WT (R76), whereas R76D and R76E have lower activity than the AspT-WT. These results suggest that R76 is involved in AspT substrate transport. PMID:26849958

  12. Salmeterol's extreme β2 selectivity is due to residues in both extracellular loops and transmembrane domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Jillian G; Proudman, Richard G W; Hill, Stephen J

    2015-01-01

    Salmeterol is a long-acting β2-agonist, widely used as an inhaled treatment of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. It has very high β2-affinity (log KD -8.95) and is very selective for the β2-adrenoceptor (1000-fold selectivity over the β1-adrenoceptor). This study used a mutagenesis approach to determine the exact amino acids in the human β2-adrenoceptor responsible for this very high selectivity. Wild-type β2- and β1-adrenoceptors, chimeric β2/β1-adrenoceptors, and receptors with single-point mutations were transfected into Chinese hamster ovary-K1 cells, and affinity and function were studied using [(3)H]CGP 12177 [(-)-4-(3-tert-butylamino-2-hydroxypropoxy)-benzimidazol-2-one] whole-cell binding and [(3)H]cAMP accumulation. Extracellular loop 3 (and specifically amino acid K305) had the largest single effect by reducing salmeterol's affinity for the β2-adrenoceptor by 31-fold. H296 in transmembrane 6 also had a major effect (18-fold reduction in salmeterol affinity). Combining these, in the double mutant β2-H296K-K305D, reduced salmeterol's affinity by 275-fold, to within 4-fold of that of the β1-adrenoceptor, without affecting the affinity or selectivity of other β2-agonists (salbutamol, formoterol, fenoterol, clenbuterol, or adrenaline). Another important amino acid was Y308 in transmembrane 7, although this also affected the affinity and selectivity of other agonists. F194 in extracellular loop 2 and R304 in extracellular loop 3 also had minor effects. None of these mutations (including the double mutant β2-H296K-K305D) affected the efficacy or duration of action of salmeterol. This suggests that the high affinity and selectivity of salmeterol are due to specific amino acids within the receptor itself, but that the duration of action is at least in part due to other factors, for example lipophilicity. PMID:25324048

  13. Structural Determinants of Binding the Seven-transmembrane Domain of the Glucagon-like Peptide-1 Receptor (GLP-1R).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dehua; de Graaf, Chris; Yang, Linlin; Song, Gaojie; Dai, Antao; Cai, Xiaoqing; Feng, Yang; Reedtz-Runge, Steffen; Hanson, Michael A; Yang, Huaiyu; Jiang, Hualiang; Stevens, Raymond C; Wang, Ming-Wei

    2016-06-17

    The glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) belongs to the secretin-like (class B) family of G protein-coupled receptors. Members of the class B family are distinguished by their large extracellular domain, which works cooperatively with the canonical seven-transmembrane (7TM) helical domain to signal in response to binding of various peptide hormones. We have combined structure-based site-specific mutational studies with molecular dynamics simulations of a full-length model of GLP-1R bound to multiple peptide ligand variants. Despite the high sequence similarity between GLP-1R and its closest structural homologue, the glucagon receptor (GCGR), nearly half of the 62 stably expressed mutants affected GLP-1R in a different manner than the corresponding mutants in GCGR. The molecular dynamics simulations of wild-type and mutant GLP-1R·ligand complexes provided molecular insights into GLP-1R-specific recognition mechanisms for the N terminus of GLP-1 by residues in the 7TM pocket and explained how glucagon-mimicking GLP-1 mutants restored binding affinity for (GCGR-mimicking) GLP-1R mutants. Structural analysis of the simulations suggested that peptide ligand binding mode variations in the 7TM binding pocket are facilitated by movement of the extracellular domain relative to the 7TM bundle. These differences in binding modes may account for the pharmacological differences between GLP-1 peptide variants. PMID:27059958

  14. Autonomous Transmembrane Segment S4 of the Voltage Sensor Domain Partitions into the Lipid Membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiriveedhi, Venkataswarup; Miller, Melissa; Butko, Peter; Li, Min

    2012-01-01

    The S4 transmembrane segment in voltage-gated ion channels, a highly basic α helix, responds to changes in membrane potential and induces channel opening. Earlier work by others indicates that the S4 segment interacts with lipids in plasma membrane, but its mechanism is unclear. Working with synthetic tryptophan-labeled S4 peptides, we characterized binding of autonomous S4 to lipid membranes. The binding free energy (5.2 ± 0.2 kcal/mol) of the peptide-lipid interaction was estimated from the apparent dissociation constants, determined from the changes in anisotropy of tryptophan fluorescence induced by addition of lipid vesicles with 30 mol% phosphatidylglycerol. The results are in good agreement with the prediction based on the Wimley-White hydrophobicity scale for interfacial (IF) binding of an alpha-helical peptide to the lipid bilayer (6.98 kcal/mol). High salt inhibited the interaction, thus indicating that the peptide/membrane interaction has both electrostatic and non-electrostatic components. Furthermore, the synthetic S4 corresponding to the Shaker potassium channel was found to spontaneously penetrate into the negatively charged lipid membrane to a depth of about 9 Å. Our results revealed important biophysical parameters that influence the interaction of S4 with the membrane: they include fluidity, surface charge, and surface pressure of the membrane, and the α helicity and regular spacing of basic amino-acid residues in the S4 sequence. PMID:22465069

  15. Lysosomal-Associated Transmembrane Protein 5 (LAPTM5) Is a Molecular Partner of CD1e

    OpenAIRE

    Angénieux, Catherine; Waharte, François; Gidon, Alexandre; Signorino-Gelo, François; Wurtz, Virginie; Hojeij, Rim; Proamer, Fabienne; Gachet, Christian; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Hanau, Daniel; Salamero, Jean; de la Salle, Henri

    2012-01-01

    The CD1e protein participates in the presentation of lipid antigens in dendritic cells. Its transmembrane precursor is transported to lysosomes where it is cleaved into an active soluble form. In the presence of bafilomycin, which inhibits vacuolar ATPase and consequently the acidification of endosomal compartments, CD1e associates with a 27 kD protein. In this work, we identified this molecular partner as LAPTM5. The latter protein and CD1e colocalize in trans-Golgi and late endosomal compar...

  16. Lipid interaction of the C terminus and association of the transmembrane segments facilitate atlastin-mediated homotypic endoplasmic reticulum fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Tina Y.; Bian, Xin; Sun, Sha; Hu, Xiaoyu; Klemm, Robin W.; Prinz, William A; Rapoport, Tom A.; Hu, Junjie

    2012-01-01

    The homotypic fusion of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes is mediated by atlastin (ATL), which consists of an N-terminal cytosolic domain containing a GTPase module and a three-helix bundle followed by two transmembrane (TM) segments and a C-terminal tail (CT). Fusion depends on a GTP hydrolysis-induced conformational change in the cytosolic domain. Here, we show that the CT and TM segments also are required for efficient fusion and provide insight into their mechanistic roles. The essenti...

  17. Impact of the [delta]F508 Mutation in First Nucleotide-binding Domain of Human Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator on Domain Folding and Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Hal A.; Zhao, Xun; Wang, Chi; Sauder, J. Michael; Rooney, Isabelle; Noland, Brian W.; Lorimer, Don; Kearins, Margaret C.; Conners, Kris; Condon, Brad; Maloney, Peter C.; Guggino, William B.; Hunt, John F.; Emtage, Spencer (SG); (Columbia); (JHU)

    2010-07-19

    Cystic fibrosis is caused by defects in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), commonly the deletion of residue Phe-508 (DeltaF508) in the first nucleotide-binding domain (NBD1), which results in a severe reduction in the population of functional channels at the epithelial cell surface. Previous studies employing incomplete NBD1 domains have attributed this to aberrant folding of DeltaF508 NBD1. We report structural and biophysical studies on complete human NBD1 domains, which fail to demonstrate significant changes of in vitro stability or folding kinetics in the presence or absence of the DeltaF508 mutation. Crystal structures show minimal changes in protein conformation but substantial changes in local surface topography at the site of the mutation, which is located in the region of NBD1 believed to interact with the first membrane spanning domain of CFTR. These results raise the possibility that the primary effect of DeltaF508 is a disruption of proper interdomain interactions at this site in CFTR rather than interference with the folding of NBD1. Interestingly, increases in the stability of NBD1 constructs are observed upon introduction of second-site mutations that suppress the trafficking defect caused by the DeltaF508 mutation, suggesting that these suppressors might function indirectly by improving the folding efficiency of NBD1 in the context of the full-length protein. The human NBD1 structures also solidify the understanding of CFTR regulation by showing that its two protein segments that can be phosphorylated both adopt multiple conformations that modulate access to the ATPase active site and functional interdomain interfaces.

  18. Epidermal growth factor, latrophilin, and seven transmembrane domain-containing protein 1 marker, a novel angiogenesis marker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serban, Florentina; Artene, Stefan-Alexandru; Georgescu, Ada Maria; Purcaru, Stefana Oana; Tache, Daniela Elise; Alexandru, Oana; Dricu, Anica

    2015-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor, latrophilin, and seven transmembrane domain-containing protein 1 on chromosome 1 (ELTD1), an orphan adhesion G-protein coupled receptor, was reported as a regulator of angiogenesis, also involved in cancer progression and development. More recently, ELTD1 was identified as a potential new tumor marker for high-grade glioma. ELTD1, belongs to the G-protein coupled receptor superfamily that comprises the biggest receptor family in the human genome. Following the discovery of ELTD1 almost a decade ago, only a few research groups have attempted to find its role in normal and tumor cells, important information about this receptor remaining still unknown. The ELTD1 ligand has not currently been identified and intracellular signaling studies have not yet been performed in normal or tumor cells. Although the current published data on ELTD1 function and structure are rather limited, this receptor seems to be very important, not only as biomarker, but also as molecular target in glioblastoma. This review summarizes and discusses the current knowledge on ELTD1 structure, function, and its role in both physiological and tumoral angiogenesis. PMID:26719704

  19. The matrix metalloproteinase stromelysin-3 cleaves laminin receptor at two distinct sites between the transmembrane domain and laminin binding sequence within the extracellular domain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tosikazu AMANO; Olivia KWAK; Liezhen FU; Anastasia MARSHAK; Yun-Bo SHI

    2005-01-01

    The matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) stromelysin-3 (ST3) has long been implicated to play an important role in extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling and cell fate determination during normal and pathological processes. However,like other MMPs, the molecular basis of ST3 function in vivo remains unclear due to the lack of information on its physiological substrates. Furthermore, ST3 has only weak activities toward all tested ECM proteins. Using thyroid hormone-dependent Xenopus laevis metamorphosis as a model, we demonstrated previously that ST3 is important for apoptosis and tissue morphogenesis during intestinal remodeling. Here, we used yeast two-hybrid screen with mRNAs from metamorphosing tadpoles to identify potential substrate of ST3 during development. We thus isolated the 37 kd laminin receptor precursor (LR). We showed that LR binds to ST3 in vitro and can be cleaved by ST3 at two sites,distinct from where other MMPs cleave. Through peptide sequencing, we determined that the two cleavage sites are in the extracellular domain between the transmembrane domain and laminin binding sequence. Furthermore, we demonstrated that these cleavage sites are conserved in human LR. These results together with high levels of human LR and ST3 expression in carcinomas suggest that LR is a likely in vivo substrate of ST3 and that its cleavage by ST3 may alter cell-extracellular matrix interaction, thus, playing a role in mediating the effects of ST3 on cell fate and behavior observed during development and pathogenesis.

  20. Mapping the Binding Site of the Inhibitor Tariquidar That Stabilizes the First Transmembrane Domain of P-glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loo, Tip W; Clarke, David M

    2015-12-01

    ABC (ATP-binding cassette) transporters are clinically important because drug pumps like P-glycoprotein (P-gp, ABCB1) confer multidrug resistance and mutant ABC proteins are responsible for many protein-folding diseases such as cystic fibrosis. Identification of the tariquidar-binding site has been the subject of intensive molecular modeling studies because it is the most potent inhibitor and corrector of P-gp. Tariquidar is a unique P-gp inhibitor because it locks the pump in a conformation that blocks drug efflux but activates ATPase activity. In silico docking studies have identified several potential tariquidar-binding sites. Here, we show through cross-linking studies that tariquidar most likely binds to sites within the transmembrane (TM) segments located in one wing or at the interface between the two wings (12 TM segments form 2 divergent wings). We then introduced arginine residues at all positions in the 12 TM segments (223 mutants) of P-gp. The rationale was that a charged residue in the drug-binding pocket would disrupt hydrophobic interaction with tariquidar and inhibit its ability to rescue processing mutants or stimulate ATPase activity. Arginines introduced at 30 positions significantly inhibited tariquidar rescue of a processing mutant and activation of ATPase activity. The results suggest that tariquidar binds to a site within the drug-binding pocket at the interface between the TM segments of both structural wings. Tariquidar differed from other drug substrates, however, as it stabilized the first TM domain. Stabilization of the first TM domain appears to be a key mechanism for high efficiency rescue of ABC processing mutants that cause disease. PMID:26507655

  1. The stability of the three transmembrane and the four transmembrane human vitamin K epoxide reductase models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Sangwook

    2016-04-01

    The three transmembrane and the four transmembrane helix models are suggested for human vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR). In this study, we investigate the stability of the human three transmembrane/four transmembrane VKOR models by employing a coarse-grained normal mode analysis and molecular dynamics simulation. Based on the analysis of the mobility of each transmembrane domain, we suggest that the three transmembrane human VKOR model is more stable than the four transmembrane human VKOR model.

  2. Several novel nuclear envelope transmembrane proteins identified in skeletal muscle have cytoskeletal associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkie, Gavin S; Korfali, Nadia; Swanson, Selene K; Malik, Poonam; Srsen, Vlastimil; Batrakou, Dzmitry G; de las Heras, Jose; Zuleger, Nikolaj; Kerr, Alastair R W; Florens, Laurence; Schirmer, Eric C

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear envelopes from liver and a neuroblastoma cell line have previously been analyzed by proteomics; however, most diseases associated with the nuclear envelope affect muscle. To determine whether muscle has unique nuclear envelope proteins, rat skeletal muscle nuclear envelopes were prepared and analyzed by multidimensional protein identification technology. Many novel muscle-specific proteins were identified that did not appear in previous nuclear envelope data sets. Nuclear envelope residence was confirmed for 11 of these by expression of fusion proteins and by antibody staining of muscle tissue cryosections. Moreover, transcript levels for several of the newly identified nuclear envelope transmembrane proteins increased during muscle differentiation using mouse and human in vitro model systems. Some of these proteins tracked with microtubules at the nuclear surface in interphase cells and accumulated at the base of the microtubule spindle in mitotic cells, suggesting they may associate with complexes that connect the nucleus to the cytoskeleton. The finding of tissue-specific proteins in the skeletal muscle nuclear envelope proteome argues the importance of analyzing nuclear envelopes from all tissues linked to disease and suggests that general investigation of tissue differences in organellar proteomes might yield critical insights. PMID:20876400

  3. Lysosomal-associated transmembrane protein 5 (LAPTM5 is a molecular partner of CD1e.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Angénieux

    Full Text Available The CD1e protein participates in the presentation of lipid antigens in dendritic cells. Its transmembrane precursor is transported to lysosomes where it is cleaved into an active soluble form. In the presence of bafilomycin, which inhibits vacuolar ATPase and consequently the acidification of endosomal compartments, CD1e associates with a 27 kD protein. In this work, we identified this molecular partner as LAPTM5. The latter protein and CD1e colocalize in trans-Golgi and late endosomal compartments. The quantity of LAPTM5/CD1e complexes increases when the cells are treated with bafilomycin, probably due to the protection of LAPTM5 from lysosomal proteases. Moreover, we could demonstrate that LAPTM5/CD1e association occurs under physiological conditions. Although LAPTM5 was previously shown to act as a platform recruiting ubiquitin ligases and facilitating the transport of receptors to lysosomes, we found no evidence that LATPM5 controls either CD1e ubiquitination or the generation of soluble lysosomal CD1e proteins. Notwithstanding these last observations, the interaction of LAPTM5 with CD1e and their colocalization in antigen processing compartments both suggest that LAPTM5 might influence the role of CD1e in the presentation of lipid antigens.

  4. Role of the sixth transmembrane segment of domain IV of the cockroach sodium channel in the action of sodium channel-blocker insecticides

    OpenAIRE

    Silver, Kristopher S.; Nomura, Yoshiko; Salgado, Vincent L.; Dong, Ke

    2009-01-01

    Sodium channel-blocker insecticides (SCBIs), such as indoxacarb and metaflumizone, are a new class of insecticides with a mechanism of action different from those of other insecticides that target sodium channels. SCBIs block sodium channels in a manner similar to local anesthetics (LA) such as lidocaine. Several residues, particularly F1579 and Y1586, in the sixth transmembrane segment (S6) of domain IV (IV) of rat Nav1.4 sodium channels are required for the action of LAs and SCBIs and may f...

  5. The H-loop in the Second Nucleotide-binding Domain of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator is Required for Efficient Chloride Channel Closing

    OpenAIRE

    Kloch, Monika; Milewski, Michał; Nurowska, Ewa; Dworakowska, Beata; Cutting, Garry R; Dołowy, Krzysztof

    2010-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter that functions as a cAMP-activated chloride channel. The recent model of CFTR gating predicts that the ATP binding to both nucleotide-binding domains (NBD1 and NBD2) of CFTR is required for the opening of the channel, while the ATP hydrolysis at NBD2 induces subsequent channel closing. In most ABC proteins, efficient hydrolysis of ATP requires the presence of the invariant histidine res...

  6. Graph-Theoretic Models of Mutations in the Nucleotide Binding Domain 1 of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator

    OpenAIRE

    Knisley, Debra J.; Knisley, Jeff R; Andrew Cade Herron

    2013-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is one of the most common inherited diseases and is caused by a mutation in a membrane protein, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). This protein serves as a chloride channel and regulates the viscosity of mucus lining the ducts of a number of organs. Although much has been learned about the consequences of mutations on the energy landscape and the resulting disrupted folding pathway of CFTR, a level of understanding needed to correct the misfolding ...

  7. Three ways in, one way out: water dynamics in the trans-membrane domains of the inner membrane translocase AcrB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Nadine; Kandt, Christian

    2011-10-01

    Powered by proton-motive force, the inner membrane translocase AcrB is the engine of the AcrAB-TolC efflux pump in Escherichia coli. As proton conduction in proteins occurs along hydrogen-bonded networks of polar residues and water molecules, knowledge of the protein-internal water distribution and water-interacting residues allows drawing conclusions to possible pathways of proton conduction. Here, we report a series of 6× 50 ns independent molecular dynamics simulations of asymmetric AcrB embedded in a phospholipid/water environment. Simulating each monomer in its proposed protonation state, we calculated for each trans-membrane domain the average water distribution, identified residues interacting with these waters and quantified each residue's frequency of water hydrogen bond contact. Combining this information we find three possible routes of proton transfer connecting a continuously hydrated region of known key residues in the TMD interior to bulk water by one cytoplasmic and up to three periplasm water channels in monomer B and A. We find that water access of the trans-membrane domains is regulated by four groups of residues in a combination of side chain re-orientations and shifts of trans-membrane helices. Our findings support a proton release event via Arg971 during the C intermediate or in the transition to A, and proton uptake occurring in the A or B state or during a so far unknown intermediate in between B and C where cytoplasmic water access is still possible. Our simulations suggest experimentally testable hypotheses, which have not been investigated so far. PMID:21905112

  8. Valine 738 and lysine 735 in the fifth transmembrane domain of rTas1r3 mediate insensitivity towards lactisole of the rat sweet taste receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyerhof Wolfgang

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The sweet taste inhibitor lactisole acts on the human sweet taste receptor heteromer TAS1R2-TAS1R3 but not on its rodent counterpart. Recently, it was shown that the lactisole sensitivity of the human sweet taste receptor involves the part of TAS1R3 encompassing the seven transmembrane regions but not the huge N-terminal domain. Using mutational analysis we investigated which amino acid residues distinguish lactisole insensitive rat from sensitive human T1R3 receptors. Results The functional analysis of specific receptor mutants in HEK293T cells revealed that the exchange of valine 738 in the fifth transmembrane domain of rTas1r3 by an alanine is sufficient to confer lactisole sensitivity to the rat sweet taste receptor. The sensitivity of this receptor mutant is ~2 fold lower than the sensitivity of the human sweet taste receptor. Additional substitution of lysine 735 by phenylalanine in rTas1r3 results in a rat sweet taste receptor that is as sensitive to lactisole as its human counterpart. The exchange of valine 738 to alanine was accompanied by a ~50% reduction in receptor efficacy. This effect was seen with all six different sweet compounds examined. Conclusion The lactisole insensitivity of rat sweet taste receptor is caused by only two amino acids in transmembrane region five, which is critical for the interaction of lactisole with the sweet taste receptor. The observation that the mutant receptor simultaneously displays a generally reduced sensitivity towards all agonists suggests that the lactisole insensitivity of the rodent receptor might be more likely caused by the inaccessibility of the lactisole binding site rather then by its direct disruption.

  9. Mutation G805R in the transmembrane domain of the LDL receptor gene causes familial hypercholesterolemia by inducing ectodomain cleavage of the LDL receptor in the endoplasmic reticulum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thea Bismo Strøm

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available More than 1700 mutations in the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR gene have been found to cause familial hypercholesterolemia (FH. These are commonly divided into five classes based upon their effects on the structure and function of the LDLR. However, little is known about the mechanism by which mutations in the transmembrane domain of the LDLR gene cause FH. We have studied how the transmembrane mutation G805R affects the function of the LDLR. Based upon Western blot analyses of transfected HepG2 cells, mutation G805R reduced the amounts of the 120 kDa precursor LDLR in the endoplasmic reticulum. This led to reduced amounts of the mature 160 kDa LDLR at the cell surface. However, significant amounts of a secreted 140 kDa G805R-LDLR ectodomain fragment was observed in the culture media. Treatment of the cells with the metalloproteinase inhibitor batimastat largely restored the amounts of the 120 and 160 kDa forms in cell lysates, and prevented secretion of the 140 kDa ectodomain fragment. Together, these data indicate that a metalloproteinase cleaved the ectodomain of the 120 kDa precursor G805R-LDLR in the endoplasmic reticulum. It was the presence of the polar Arg805 and not the lack of Gly805 which led to ectodomain cleavage. Arg805 also prevented γ-secretase cleavage within the transmembrane domain. It is conceivable that introducing a charged residue within the hydrophobic membrane lipid bilayer, results in less efficient incorporation of the 120 kDa G805R-LDLR in the endoplasmic reticulum membrane and makes it a substrate for metalloproteinase cleavage.

  10. Long-range coupling between the extracellular gates and the intracellular ATP binding domains of multidrug resistance protein pumps and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Shipeng; Roessler, Bryan C; Icyuz, Mert; Chauvet, Sylvain; Tao, Binli; Hartman, John L; Kirk, Kevin L

    2016-03-01

    The ABCC transporter subfamily includes pumps, the long and short multidrug resistance proteins (MRPs), and an ATP-gated anion channel, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). We show that despite their thermodynamic differences, these ABCC transporter subtypes use broadly similar mechanisms to couple their extracellular gates to the ATP occupancies of their cytosolic nucleotide binding domains. A conserved extracellular phenylalanine at this gate was a prime location for producing gain of function (GOF) mutants of a long MRP in yeast (Ycf1p cadmium transporter), a short yeast MRP (Yor1p oligomycin exporter), and human CFTR channels. Extracellular gate mutations rescued ATP binding mutants of the yeast MRPs and CFTR by increasing ATP sensitivity. Control ATPase-defective MRP mutants could not be rescued by this mechanism. A CFTR double mutant with an extracellular gate mutation plus a cytosolic GOF mutation was highly active (single-channel open probability >0.3) in the absence of ATP and protein kinase A, each normally required for CFTR activity. We conclude that all 3 ABCC transporter subtypes use similar mechanisms to couple their extracellular gates to ATP occupancy, and highly active CFTR channels that bypass defects in ATP binding or phosphorylation can be produced.-Wei, S., Roessler, B. C., Icyuz, M., Chauvet, S., Tao, B., Hartman IV, J. L., Kirk, K. L. Long-range coupling between the extracellular gates and the intracellular ATP binding domains of multidrug resistance protein pumps and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator channels. PMID:26606940

  11. Expression of lysosome-associated protein transmembrane 4B-35 in cancer and its correlation with the differentiation status of hepatocellular carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, Cong; Zhou, Rou-Li; Shao, Gen-Ze; Rui, Jing-An; Wang, Shao-Bin; Lin, Ming; Zhang, Sha; Gao, Zi-Feng

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To produce high-quality polyclonal antibody to lysosome-associated protein transmembrane 4B-35 and to identify LAPTM4B-35 expression in cancer tissues and its correlation with differentiation status of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).

  12. The conserved glycine residues in the transmembrane domain of the Semliki Forest virus fusion protein are not required for assembly and fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The alphavirus Semliki Forest virus (SFV) infects cells via a low pH-triggered fusion reaction mediated by the viral E1 protein. Both the E1 fusion peptide and transmembrane (TM) domain are essential for membrane fusion, but the functional requirements for the TM domain are poorly understood. Here we explored the role of the five TM domain glycine residues, including the highly conserved glycine pair at E1 residues 415/416. SFV mutants with alanine substitutions for individual or all five glycine residues (5G/A) showed growth kinetics and fusion pH dependence similar to those of wild-type SFV. Mutants with increasing substitution of glycine residues showed an increasingly more stringent requirement for cholesterol during fusion. The 5G/A mutant showed decreased fusion kinetics and extent in fluorescent lipid mixing assays. TM domain glycine residues thus are not required for efficient SFV fusion or assembly but can cause subtle effects on the properties of membrane fusion

  13. Associativity Between Feature Models Across Domains

    OpenAIRE

    Subramani, S; Gurumoorthy, B

    2003-01-01

    Associativity between feature models implies the automatic updating of different feature models of a part after changes are made in one of its feature models. This is an important requirement in a distributed and concurrent design environment, where integrity of part geometry has to be maintained through changes made in different task domains. The proposed algorithm takes multiple feature models of apart as input and modifies other feature models to reflect the changes made to a feature ...

  14. Bacterial expression, purification, and model membrane reconstitution of the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of the human APP binding protein LR11/SorLA for NMR studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xingsheng; Gill, Richard L; Zhu, Qin; Tian, Fang

    2011-06-01

    LR11 (SorLA) is a recently identified neuronal protein that interacts with amyloid precursor protein (APP), a central player in the pathology of the Alzheimer's disease (AD). AD is a neurodegenerative disease and the most common cause of dementia in the elderly. Current estimates suggest that as many as 5.3 million Americans are living with AD. Recent investigations have uncovered the pathophysiological relevance of APP intracellular trafficking in AD. LR11 is of particular importance due to its role in regulating APP transport and processing. LR11 is a type I transmembrane protein and belongs to a novel family of Vps10p receptors. Using a new expression vector, pMTTH (MBP-MCS1 (multiple cloning site)-Thrombin protease cleavage site-MCS2-TEV protease cleavage site-MCS3-His(6)), we successfully expressed, purified and reconstituted the LR11 transmembrane (TM) and cytoplasmic (CT) domains into bicelles and detergent micelles for NMR structural studies. This new construct allowed us to overcome several obstacles during sample preparation. MBP fused LR11TM and LR11TMCT proteins are preferably expressed at high levels in Escherichia coli membrane, making a refolding of the protein unnecessary. The C-terminal His-tag allows for easy separation of the target protein from the truncated products from the C-terminus, and provides a convenient route for screening detergents to produce high quality 2D (1)H-(15)N TROSY spectra. Thrombin protease cleavage is compatible with most of the commonly used detergents, including a direct cleavage at the E. coli membrane surface. This new MBP construct may provide an effective route for the preparation of small proteins with TM domains. PMID:21320603

  15. Evidence against extracellular exposure of a highly immunogenic region in the C-terminal domain of the simian immunodeficiency virus gp41 transmembrane protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postler, Thomas S; Martinez-Navio, José M; Yuste, Eloísa; Desrosiers, Ronald C

    2012-01-01

    The generally accepted model for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein topology includes a single membrane-spanning domain. An alternate model has been proposed which features multiple membrane-spanning domains. Consistent with the alternate model, a high percentage of HIV-1-infected individuals produce unusually robust antibody responses to a region of envelope, the so-called "Kennedy epitope," that in the conventional model should be in the cytoplasm. Here we show analogous, robust antibody responses in simian immunodeficiency virus SIVmac239-infected rhesus macaques to a region of SIVmac239 envelope located in the C-terminal domain, which in the conventional model should be inside the cell. Sera from SIV-infected rhesus macaques consistently reacted with overlapping oligopeptides corresponding to a region located within the cytoplasmic domain of gp41 by the generally accepted model, at intensities comparable to those observed for immunodominant areas of the surface component gp120. Rabbit serum raised against this highly immunogenic region (HIR) reacted with SIV envelope in cell surface-staining experiments, as did monoclonal anti-HIR antibodies isolated from an SIVmac239-infected rhesus macaque. However, control experiments demonstrated that this surface staining could be explained in whole or in part by the release of envelope protein from expressing cells into the supernatant and the subsequent attachment to the surfaces of cells in the culture. Serum and monoclonal antibodies directed against the HIR failed to neutralize even the highly neutralization-sensitive strain SIVmac316. Furthermore, a potential N-linked glycosylation site located close to the HIR and postulated to be outside the cell in the alternate model was not glycosylated. An artificially introduced glycosylation site within the HIR was also not utilized for glycosylation. Together, these data support the conventional model of SIV envelope as a type Ia transmembrane

  16. Prokaryotic expression and purification of fibronectin leucine rich transmembrane protein 3 C-terminal domain proteins in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Cai; Jing Yang; He Huang; Fang Li; Ganqiu Wu; Jing Yang; Xuegang Luo

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies have suggested that fibronectin leucine-rich transmembrane protein 3 (FLRT3) is related to injury and regeneration of the nervous system. However, the expression and biological characteristics of these proteins remain poorly understood.OBJECTIVE: To obtain FLRT3 C-terminal gene fragments, to effectively express and purify the target proteins.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: An observational study of cellular and molecular biology was performed at the laboratory of Histology and Embryology in Xiangya School of Medicine, Central South University between October 2007 and June 2008.MATERIALS: Three Sprague Dawley adult rats were used to extract total RNA from rat brains. The pGEX4T3 and Escherichia coli (E. Coli) JM109 were purchased from Promega. E. Coil BL21 was provided by Novagen.METHODS: FLRT3 protein coding C-terminal DNA fragments, at a length of 786 bp, were amplified using RT-PCR technique from rat total RNA. The amplified products were cloned into the expression vector pGEX4T3. A recombinant expression vector was then constructed and introduced into E. Coli BL21. IsopropyI-D-thiogalactopyranoside was applied to induce expression of recombinant GST fusion proteins, followed by isolation, purification, and renaturation of inclusion bodies that comprised recombinant proteins. Finally, the purified recombinant protein was obtained.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Determination of FLRT3 C-terminal DNA sequence; expression of target proteins was assayed by SDS-PAGE electrophoresis; purified recombinant protein was identified with Western blot methods.RESULTS: FLRT3 protein coding C-terminal DNA fragments, at a length of 786 bp, were successfully harvested through RT-PCR amplification, and were then cloned into the prokaryotic expression vector pGEX4T3. The results of the sequence were consistent with the known gene sequence. SDS-PAGE analysis demonstrated that there was a specific protein band in the recombinant GST fusion proteins at a relative molecular mass

  17. Modulation of ligand selectivity associated with activation of the transmembrane region of the human follitropin receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montanelli, Lucia; Van Durme, Joost J J; Smits, Guillaume; Bonomi, Marco; Rodien, Patrice; Devor, Eric J; Moffat-Wilson, Kristin; Pardo, Leonardo; Vassart, Gilbert; Costagliola, Sabine

    2004-08-01

    Recently, three naturally occurring mutations in the serpentine region of the FSH receptor (FSHr) (D567N and T449I/A) have been identified in three families with spontaneous ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS). All mutant receptors displayed abnormally high sensitivity to human chorionic gonadotropin and, in addition, D567N and T449A displayed concomitant increase in sensitivity to TSH and detectable constitutive activity. In the present study, we have used a combination of site-directed mutagenesis experiments and molecular modeling to explore the mechanisms responsible for the phenotype of the three OHSS FSHr mutants. Our results suggest that all mutations lead to weakening of interhelical locks between transmembrane helix (TM)-VI and TM-III, or TM-VI and TM-VII, which contributes to maintaining the receptor in the inactive state. They also indicate that broadening of the functional specificity of the mutant FSHr constructs is correlated to their increase in constitutive activity. This relation between basal activity and functional specificity is a characteristic of the FSHr, which is not shared by the other glycoprotein hormone receptors. It leads to the interesting suggestion that different pathways have been followed during primate evolution to avoid promiscuous stimulation of the TSHr and FSHr by human chorionic gonadotropin. In the hFSHr, specificity would be exerted both by the ectodomain and the serpentine portion. PMID:15166252

  18. The interaction between the first transmembrane domain and the thumb of ASIC1a is critical for its N-glycosylation and trafficking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Jing

    Full Text Available Acid-sensing ion channel-1a (ASIC1a, the primary proton receptor in the brain, contributes to multiple diseases including stroke, epilepsy and multiple sclerosis. Thus, a better understanding of its biogenesis will provide important insights into the regulation of ASIC1a in diseases. Interestingly, ASIC1a contains a large, yet well organized ectodomain, which suggests the hypothesis that correct formation of domain-domain interactions at the extracellular side is a key regulatory step for ASIC1a maturation and trafficking. We tested this hypothesis here by focusing on the interaction between the first transmembrane domain (TM1 and the thumb of ASIC1a, an interaction known to be critical in channel gating. We mutated Tyr71 and Trp287, two key residues involved in the TM1-thumb interaction in mouse ASIC1a, and found that both Y71G and W287G decreased synaptic targeting and surface expression of ASIC1a. These defects were likely due to altered folding; both mutants showed increased resistance to tryptic cleavage, suggesting a change in conformation. Moreover, both mutants lacked the maturation of N-linked glycans through mid to late Golgi. These data suggest that disrupting the interaction between TM1 and thumb alters ASIC1a folding, impedes its glycosylation and reduces its trafficking. Moreover, reducing the culture temperature, an approach commonly used to facilitate protein folding, increased ASIC1a glycosylation, surface expression, current density and slowed the rate of desensitization. These results suggest that correct folding of extracellular ectodomain plays a critical role in ASIC1a biogenesis and function.

  19. Transmembrane and ubiquitin-like domain-containing protein 1 (Tmub1/HOPS facilitates surface expression of GluR2-containing AMPA receptors.

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    Hyunjeong Yang

    Full Text Available Some ubiquitin-like (UBL domain-containing proteins are known to play roles in receptor trafficking. Alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid receptors (AMPARs undergo constitutive cycling between the intracellular compartment and the cell surface in the central nervous system. However, the function of UBL domain-containing proteins in the recycling of the AMPARs to the synaptic surface has not yet been reported.Here, we report that the Transmembrane and ubiquitin-like domain-containing 1 (Tmub1 protein, formerly known as the Hepatocyte Odd Protein Shuttling (HOPS protein, which is abundantly expressed in the brain and which exists in a synaptosomal membrane fraction, facilitates the recycling of the AMPAR subunit GluR2 to the cell surface. Neurons transfected with Tmub1/HOPS-RNAi plasmids showed a significant reduction in the AMPAR current as compared to their control neurons. Consistently, the synaptic surface expression of GluR2, but not of GluR1, was significantly decreased in the neurons transfected with the Tmub1/HOPS-RNAi and increased in the neurons overexpressing EGFP-Tmub1/HOPS. The altered surface expression of GluR2 was speculated to be due to the altered surface-recycling of the internalized GluR2 in our recycling assay. Eventually, we found that GluR2 and glutamate receptor interacting protein (GRIP were coimmunoprecipitated by the anti-Tmub1/HOPS antibody from the mouse brain. Taken together, these observations show that the Tmub1/HOPS plays a role in regulating basal synaptic transmission; it contributes to maintain the synaptic surface number of the GluR2-containing AMPARs by facilitating the recycling of GluR2 to the plasma membrane.

  20. Conformational changes relevant to channel activity and folding within the first nucleotide binding domain of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Rhea P; Chong, P Andrew; Protasevich, Irina I; Vernon, Robert; Noy, Efrat; Bihler, Hermann; An, Jian Li; Kalid, Ori; Sela-Culang, Inbal; Mense, Martin; Senderowitz, Hanoch; Brouillette, Christie G; Forman-Kay, Julie D

    2012-08-17

    Deletion of Phe-508 (F508del) in the first nucleotide binding domain (NBD1) of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) leads to defects in folding and channel gating. NMR data on human F508del NBD1 indicate that an H620Q mutant, shown to increase channel open probability, and the dual corrector/potentiator CFFT-001 similarly disrupt interactions between β-strands S3, S9, and S10 and the C-terminal helices H8 and H9, shifting a preexisting conformational equilibrium from helix to coil. CFFT-001 appears to interact with β-strands S3/S9/S10, consistent with docking simulations. Decreases in T(m) from differential scanning calorimetry with H620Q or CFFT-001 suggest direct compound binding to a less thermostable state of NBD1. We hypothesize that, in full-length CFTR, shifting the conformational equilibrium to reduce H8/H9 interactions with the uniquely conserved strands S9/S10 facilitates release of the regulatory region from the NBD dimerization interface to promote dimerization and thereby increase channel open probability. These studies enabled by our NMR assignments for F508del NBD1 provide a window into the conformational fluctuations within CFTR that may regulate function and contribute to folding energetics. PMID:22722932

  1. Conformational Changes Relevant to Channel Activity and Folding within the first Nucleotide Binding Domain of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Rhea P.; Chong, P. Andrew; Protasevich, Irina I.; Vernon, Robert; Noy, Efrat; Bihler, Hermann; An, Jian Li; Kalid, Ori; Sela-Culang, Inbal; Mense, Martin; Senderowitz, Hanoch; Brouillette, Christie G.; Forman-Kay, Julie D.

    2012-01-01

    Deletion of Phe-508 (F508del) in the first nucleotide binding domain (NBD1) of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) leads to defects in folding and channel gating. NMR data on human F508del NBD1 indicate that an H620Q mutant, shown to increase channel open probability, and the dual corrector/potentiator CFFT-001 similarly disrupt interactions between β-strands S3, S9, and S10 and the C-terminal helices H8 and H9, shifting a preexisting conformational equilibrium from helix to coil. CFFT-001 appears to interact with β-strands S3/S9/S10, consistent with docking simulations. Decreases in Tm from differential scanning calorimetry with H620Q or CFFT-001 suggest direct compound binding to a less thermostable state of NBD1. We hypothesize that, in full-length CFTR, shifting the conformational equilibrium to reduce H8/H9 interactions with the uniquely conserved strands S9/S10 facilitates release of the regulatory region from the NBD dimerization interface to promote dimerization and thereby increase channel open probability. These studies enabled by our NMR assignments for F508del NBD1 provide a window into the conformational fluctuations within CFTR that may regulate function and contribute to folding energetics. PMID:22722932

  2. The SAX-3 receptor stimulates axon outgrowth and the signal sequence and transmembrane domain are critical for SAX-3 membrane localization in the PDE neuron of C. elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Li

    Full Text Available SAX-3, a receptor for Slit in C. elegans, is well characterized for its function in axonal development. However, the mechanism that regulates the membrane localization of SAX-3 and the role of SAX-3 in axon outgrowth are still elusive. Here we show that SAX-3::GFP caused ectopic axon outgrowth, which could be suppressed by the loss-of-function mutation in unc-73 (a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for small GTPases and unc-115 (an actin binding protein, suggesting that they might act downstream of SAX-3 in axon outgrowth. We also examined genes related to axon development for their possible involvement in the subcellular localization of SAX-3. We found the unc-51 mutants appeared to accumulate SAX-3::GFP in the neuronal cell body of the posterior deirid (PDE neuron, indicating that UNC-51 might play a role in SAX-3 membrane localization. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the N-terminal signal sequence and the transmembrane domain are essential for the subcellular localization of SAX-3 in the PDE neurons.

  3. A negative charge in transmembrane segment 1 of domain II of the cockroach sodium channel is critical for channel gating and action of pyrethroid insecticides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are the primary target of pyrethroids, an important class of synthetic insecticides. Pyrethroids bind to a distinct receptor site on sodium channels and prolong the open state by inhibiting channel deactivation and inactivation. Recent studies have begun to reveal sodium channel residues important for pyrethroid binding. However, how pyrethroid binding leads to inhibition of sodium channel deactivation and inactivation remains elusive. In this study, we show that a negatively charged aspartic acid residue at position 802 (D802) located in the extracellular end of transmembrane segment 1 of domain II (IIS1) is critical for both the action of pyrethroids and the voltage dependence of channel activation. Charge-reversing or -neutralizing substitutions (K, G, or A) of D802 shifted the voltage dependence of activation in the depolarizing direction and reduced channel sensitivity to deltamethrin, a pyrethroid insecticide. The charge-reversing mutation D802K also accelerated open-state deactivation, which may have counteracted the inhibition of sodium channel deactivation by deltamethrin. In contrast, the D802G substitution slowed open-state deactivation, suggesting an additional mechanism for neutralizing the action of deltamethrin. Importantly, Schild analysis showed that D802 is not involved in pyrethroid binding. Thus, we have identified a sodium channel residue that is critical for regulating the action of pyrethroids on the sodium channel without affecting the receptor site of pyrethroids.

  4. Biophysical Characterization of a Vaccine Candidate against HIV-1: The Transmembrane and Membrane Proximal Domains of HIV-1 gp41 as a Maltose Binding Protein Fusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Gong

    Full Text Available The membrane proximal region (MPR, residues 649-683 and transmembrane domain (TMD, residues 684-705 of the gp41 subunit of HIV-1's envelope protein are highly conserved and are important in viral mucosal transmission, virus attachment and membrane fusion with target cells. Several structures of the trimeric membrane proximal external region (residues 662-683 of MPR have been reported at the atomic level; however, the atomic structure of the TMD still remains unknown. To elucidate the structure of both MPR and TMD, we expressed the region spanning both domains, MPR-TM (residues 649-705, in Escherichia coli as a fusion protein with maltose binding protein (MBP. MPR-TM was initially fused to the C-terminus of MBP via a 42 aa-long linker containing a TEV protease recognition site (MBP-linker-MPR-TM. Biophysical characterization indicated that the purified MBP-linker-MPR-TM protein was a monodisperse and stable candidate for crystallization. However, crystals of the MBP-linker-MPR-TM protein could not be obtained in extensive crystallization screens. It is possible that the 42 residue-long linker between MBP and MPR-TM was interfering with crystal formation. To test this hypothesis, the 42 residue-long linker was replaced with three alanine residues. The fusion protein, MBP-AAA-MPR-TM, was similarly purified and characterized. Significantly, both the MBP-linker-MPR-TM and MBP-AAA-MPR-TM proteins strongly interacted with broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies 2F5 and 4E10. With epitopes accessible to the broadly neutralizing antibodies, these MBP/MPR-TM recombinant proteins may be in immunologically relevant conformations that mimic a pre-hairpin intermediate of gp41.

  5. Packing of transmembrane domain 2 of carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1A affects oligomerization and malonyl-CoA sensitivity of the mitochondrial outer membrane protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenei, Zsuzsanna A; Warren, Gemma Z L; Hasan, Muhammad; Zammit, Victor A; Dixon, Ann M

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the sequence-dependence of oligomerization of transmembrane domain 2 (TM2) of rat carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A (rCPT1A), to elucidate the role of this domain in the function of the full-length enzyme. Oligomerization of TM2 was studied qualitatively using complementary genetic assays that facilitate measurement of helix-helix interactions in the Escherichia coli inner membrane, and multiple quantitative biophysical methods. The effects of TM2-mutations on oligomerization and malonyl-CoA inhibition of the full-length enzyme (expressed in the yeast Pichia pastoris) were quantified. Changes designed to disrupt close-packing of the GXXXG(A) motifs reduced the oligomeric state of the corresponding TM2 peptides from hexamer to trimer (or lower), a reduction also observed on mutation of the TM2 sequence in the full-length enzyme. Disruption of these GXXXG(A) motifs had a parallel effect on the malonyl-CoA sensitivity of rCPT1A, reducing the IC(50) from 30.3 ± 5.0 to 3.0 ± 0.6 μM. For all measurements, wild-type rCPT1A was used as a control alongside various appropriate (e.g., molecular mass) standards. Our results suggest that sequence-determined, TM2-mediated oligomerization is likely to be involved in the modulation of malonyl-CoA inhibition of CPT1A in response to short- and long-term changes in protein-protein and protein-lipid interactions that occur in vivo. PMID:21917985

  6. Conformational Response of Influenza A M2 Transmembrane Domain to Amantadine Drug Binding at Low pH (pH 5.5).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgieva, Elka R; Borbat, Peter P; Grushin, Kirill; Stoilova-McPhie, Svetla; Kulkarni, Nichita J; Liang, Zhichun; Freed, Jack H

    2016-01-01

    The M2 protein from influenza A plays important roles in its viral cycle. It contains a single transmembrane helix, which oligomerizes into a homotetrameric proton channel that conducts in the low-pH environment of the host-cell endosome and Golgi apparatus, leading to virion uncoating at an early stage of infection. We studied conformational rearrangements that occur in the M2 core transmembrane domain residing on the lipid bilayer, flanked by juxtamembrane residues (M2TMD21-49 fragment), upon its interaction with amantadine drug at pH 5.5 when M2 is conductive. We also tested the role of specific mutation and lipid chain length. Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy and electron microscopy were applied to M2TMD21-49, labeled at the residue L46C with either nitroxide spin-label or Nanogold® reagent, respectively. Electron microscopy confirmed that M2TMD21-49 reconstituted into DOPC/POPS at 1:10,000 peptide-to-lipid molar ratio (P/L) either with or without amantadine, is an admixture of monomers, dimers, and tetramers, confirming our model based on a dimer intermediate in the assembly of M2TMD21-49. As reported by double electron-electron resonance (DEER), in DOPC/POPS membranes amantadine shifts oligomer equilibrium to favor tetramers, as evidenced by an increase in DEER modulation depth for P/L's ranging from 1:18,000 to 1:160. Furthermore, amantadine binding shortens the inter-spin distances (for nitroxide labels) by 5-8 Å, indicating drug induced channel closure on the C-terminal side. No such effect was observed for the thinner membrane of DLPC/DLPS, emphasizing the role of bilayer thickness. The analysis of continuous wave (cw) ESR spectra of spin-labeled L46C residue provides additional support to a more compact helix bundle in amantadine-bound M2TMD 21-49 through increased motional ordering. In contrast to wild-type M2TMD21-49, the amantadine-bound form does not exhibit noticeable conformational changes in the case of G34A mutation found in certain

  7. Conformational Response of Influenza A M2 Transmembrane Domain to Amantadine Drug Binding at Low pH (pH 5.5)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgieva, Elka R.; Borbat, Peter P.; Grushin, Kirill; Stoilova-McPhie, Svetla; Kulkarni, Nichita J.; Liang, Zhichun; Freed, Jack H.

    2016-01-01

    The M2 protein from influenza A plays important roles in its viral cycle. It contains a single transmembrane helix, which oligomerizes into a homotetrameric proton channel that conducts in the low-pH environment of the host-cell endosome and Golgi apparatus, leading to virion uncoating at an early stage of infection. We studied conformational rearrangements that occur in the M2 core transmembrane domain residing on the lipid bilayer, flanked by juxtamembrane residues (M2TMD21−49 fragment), upon its interaction with amantadine drug at pH 5.5 when M2 is conductive. We also tested the role of specific mutation and lipid chain length. Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy and electron microscopy were applied to M2TMD21−49, labeled at the residue L46C with either nitroxide spin-label or Nanogold® reagent, respectively. Electron microscopy confirmed that M2TMD21−49 reconstituted into DOPC/POPS at 1:10,000 peptide-to-lipid molar ratio (P/L) either with or without amantadine, is an admixture of monomers, dimers, and tetramers, confirming our model based on a dimer intermediate in the assembly of M2TMD21−49. As reported by double electron-electron resonance (DEER), in DOPC/POPS membranes amantadine shifts oligomer equilibrium to favor tetramers, as evidenced by an increase in DEER modulation depth for P/L's ranging from 1:18,000 to 1:160. Furthermore, amantadine binding shortens the inter-spin distances (for nitroxide labels) by 5–8 Å, indicating drug induced channel closure on the C-terminal side. No such effect was observed for the thinner membrane of DLPC/DLPS, emphasizing the role of bilayer thickness. The analysis of continuous wave (cw) ESR spectra of spin-labeled L46C residue provides additional support to a more compact helix bundle in amantadine-bound M2TMD 21−49 through increased motional ordering. In contrast to wild-type M2TMD21−49, the amantadine-bound form does not exhibit noticeable conformational changes in the case of G34A mutation

  8. Inhibition of discoidin domain receptor 2-mediated lung cancer cells progression by gold nanoparticle-aptamer-assisted delivery of peptides containing transmembrane-juxtamembrane 1/2 domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Daehwan; Yeom, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Boeun; Lee, Kangseok [Department of Life Science, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Jeehyeon, E-mail: jeehyeon@cau.ac.kr [Department of Pharmacy, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Rhee, Sangmyung, E-mail: sangmyung.rhee@cau.ac.kr [Department of Life Science, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-21

    The delivery of biologically functional peptides into mammalian cells can be a direct and effective method for cancer therapy and treatment of other diseases. Discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) is a collagen-induced receptor tyrosine kinase recently identified as a novel therapeutic target in lung cancer. In this study, we report that peptides containing the functional domain of DDR2 can be efficiently delivered into lung malignant cancer cells via a gold nanoparticle-DNA aptamer conjugate (AuNP-Apt)-based system. Peptide delivery resulted in the abrogation of DDR2 activation triggered by collagen. Moreover, the peptide delivered by the AuNP-Apt system inhibited cancer cell proliferation and invasion mediated by DDR2 activation. Thus, these results suggest that peptide loaded onto AuNP-Apt conjugates can be used for the development of peptide-based biomedical applications for the treatment of DDR2-positive cancer. - Highlights: • TM-JM1/2 peptides are efficiently delivered into cells by AuNP-Apt-conjugates. • TM-JM1/2 peptides loaded onto AuNP-Apt conjugates inhibit DDR2 activation. • Inhibition of DDR2 activation by TM-JM1/2 peptides decreases tumor progression.

  9. Inhibition of discoidin domain receptor 2-mediated lung cancer cells progression by gold nanoparticle-aptamer-assisted delivery of peptides containing transmembrane-juxtamembrane 1/2 domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The delivery of biologically functional peptides into mammalian cells can be a direct and effective method for cancer therapy and treatment of other diseases. Discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) is a collagen-induced receptor tyrosine kinase recently identified as a novel therapeutic target in lung cancer. In this study, we report that peptides containing the functional domain of DDR2 can be efficiently delivered into lung malignant cancer cells via a gold nanoparticle-DNA aptamer conjugate (AuNP-Apt)-based system. Peptide delivery resulted in the abrogation of DDR2 activation triggered by collagen. Moreover, the peptide delivered by the AuNP-Apt system inhibited cancer cell proliferation and invasion mediated by DDR2 activation. Thus, these results suggest that peptide loaded onto AuNP-Apt conjugates can be used for the development of peptide-based biomedical applications for the treatment of DDR2-positive cancer. - Highlights: • TM-JM1/2 peptides are efficiently delivered into cells by AuNP-Apt-conjugates. • TM-JM1/2 peptides loaded onto AuNP-Apt conjugates inhibit DDR2 activation. • Inhibition of DDR2 activation by TM-JM1/2 peptides decreases tumor progression

  10. Relationship between G-proteins associated transmembrane cascades and MAPK phosphorylation induced by recombinant interleukin-α in fibroblast-like synoviocytes from rats with adjuvant arthritis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-qiuZHENG; WeiWEI; LeiZHU; Xiao-yiJIA

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To elucidate the relationship between G protein-associ-ated transmembrane cascade and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) phosphorylation in recombinant rat IL-1α(rIL-1α)-induced fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) from rats with adjuvant arthritis (AA). METHODS: The expressions of MAPKs phosphorylation, the stimulatory subunit of G alpha

  11. Genistein-induced fluid accumulation in ovariectomised rats' uteri is associated with increased cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asma Chinigarzadeh

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: High genistein doses have been reported to induce fluid accumulation in the uteri of ovariectomised rats, although the mechanism underlying this effect remains unknown. Because genistein binds to the oestrogen receptor and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator mediates uterine fluid secretion, we hypothesised that this genistein effect involves both the oestrogen receptor and cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator. METHODS: Ovariectomised adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with 25, 50, or 100 mg/kg/day genistein for three consecutive days with and without the ER antagonist ICI 182780. One day after the final drug injection, the animals were humanely sacrificed, and the uteri were removed for histology and cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator mRNA and protein expression analysis using real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting, respectively. The cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator protein distribution was analysed visually by immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: The histological analysis revealed an increase in the circumference of the uterine lumen with increasing doses of genistein, which was suggestive of fluid accumulation. Moreover, genistein stimulated a dose-dependent increase in the expression of cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator protein and mRNA, and high-intensity cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator immunostaining was observed at the apical membrane of the luminal epithelium following 50 and 100 mg/kg/day genistein treatment. The genistein-induced increase in uterine luminal circumference and cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator expression was antagonised by treatment with ICI 182780. CONCLUSION: Genistein-induced luminal fluid accumulation in ovariectomised rats' uteri involves the oestrogen receptor and up-regulation of cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator expression, and these findings reveal the mechanism underlying the effect of this compound on changes in fluid volume in

  12. Human cytomegalovirus gH stability and trafficking are regulated by ER-associated degradation and transmembrane architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Thomas J.; Hernandez, Rosmel E.; Noriega, Vanessa M.; Tortorella, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    The prototypic betaherpesvirus human cytomegalovirus (CMV) establishes life-long persistence within its human host. While benign in healthy individuals, CMV poses a significant threat to the immune compromised, including transplant recipients and neonates. The CMV glycoprotein complex gH/gL/gO mediates infection of fibroblasts, and together with the gH/gL/UL128/130/131 a pentameric complex permits infection of epithelial, endothethial, and myeloid cells. Given the central role of the gH/gL complex during infection, we were interested in studying cellular trafficking of the gH/gL complex through generation of human cells that stably express gH and gL. When expressed alone, CMV gH and gL were degraded through the ER-associated degradation (ERAD) pathway. However, co-expression of these proteins stabilized the polypeptides and enhanced their cell-surface expression. To further define regulatory factors involved in gH/gL trafficking, a CMV gH chimera in which the gH transmembrane and cytoplasmic tail were replaced with that of human CD4 protein permitted cell surface gH expression in absence of gL. We thus demonstrate the ability of distinct cellular processes to regulate the trafficking of viral glycoproteins. Collectively, the data provide insight into the processing and trafficking requirements of CMV envelope protein complexes and provide an example of the co-opting of cellular processes by CMV. PMID:27026399

  13. Molecular dynamics simulation of human serum paraoxonase 1 in DPPC bilayer reveals a critical role of transmembrane helix H1 for HDL association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Mahesh Chandra; Rath, Surya Narayan; Pradhan, Sukanta Kumar; Maharana, Jitendra; De, Sachinandan

    2014-01-01

    Serum paraoxonase 1 (PON1) is a high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-bound mammalian enzyme exhibiting antiatherosclerotic activity. Despite years of research, an accurate model for the binding interaction between PON1 and HDL has not been established. However, it is reported that anchoring of PON1 to HDL is mainly governed by an N-terminal alpha helix H1 and another short helix H2. Here, we studied the molecular association of full-length human PON1 (huPON1) with a HDL-mimetic dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayer using homology modeling and molecular dynamics simulations. Our results indicate that H1 is the highly dynamic part of huPON1, showing clockwise rotation of up to 30° within the DPPC bilayer. However, without phospholipid molecules, H1 experiences helical distortions, illustrating an incompatible HDL-anchoring conformation. Snorkeling interactions of K3, R18, and R27 together with aromatic locks formed by Y187, Y190, W194, and W202 are highly essential for anchoring of huPON1 to HDL's surface. Molecular mechanics/Poisson-Boltzmann solvent-accessible surface area (MM/PBSA) binding free energy calculation revealed that H1 displays greater binding affinity towards lipid molecules compared with H2 and H3, suggesting that H1 is the most probable HDL-binding domain of PON1. Binding free energy decomposition showed that K3, R18, and R27 interact with polar headgroups of DPPC membrane through electrostatic interaction. Moreover, Y187, Y190, W194, and W202 interact with DPPC lipids mainly through van der Waals interaction. Taken together, these results show that the transmembrane helix H1 along with the interfacial positively charged and aromatic resides were crucial for PON1's association with HDL particle. The current study will be useful towards understanding the antiatherosclerotic and bioscavenging properties of this promiscuous enzyme. PMID:24297451

  14. Specificity of intersubunit general anesthetic-binding sites in the transmembrane domain of the human α1β3γ2 γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiara, David C; Jayakar, Selwyn S; Zhou, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Xi; Savechenkov, Pavel Y; Bruzik, Karol S; Miller, Keith W; Cohen, Jonathan B

    2013-07-01

    GABA type A receptors (GABAAR), the brain's major inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors, are the targets for many general anesthetics, including volatile anesthetics, etomidate, propofol, and barbiturates. How such structurally diverse agents can act similarly as positive allosteric modulators of GABAARs remains unclear. Previously, photoreactive etomidate analogs identified two equivalent anesthetic-binding sites in the transmembrane domain at the β(+)-α(-) subunit interfaces, which also contain the GABA-binding sites in the extracellular domain. Here, we used R-[(3)H]5-allyl-1-methyl-5-(m-trifluoromethyl-diazirynylphenyl) barbituric acid (R-mTFD-MPAB), a potent stereospecific barbiturate anesthetic, to photolabel expressed human α1β3γ2 GABAARs. Protein microsequencing revealed that R-[(3)H]mTFD-MPAB did not photolabel the etomidate sites at the β(+)-α(-) subunit interfaces. Instead, it photolabeled sites at the α(+)-β(-) and γ(+)-β(-) subunit interfaces in the transmembrane domain. On the (+)-side, α1M3 was labeled at Ala-291 and Tyr-294 and γ2M3 at Ser-301, and on the (-)-side, β3M1 was labeled at Met-227. These residues, like those in the etomidate site, are located at subunit interfaces near the synaptic side of the transmembrane domain. The selectivity of R-etomidate for the β(+)-α(-) interface relative to the α(+)-β(-)/γ(+)-β(-) interfaces was >100-fold, whereas that of R-mTFD-MPAB for its sites was >50-fold. Each ligand could enhance photoincorporation of the other, demonstrating allosteric interactions between the sites. The structural heterogeneity of barbiturate, etomidate, and propofol derivatives is accommodated by varying selectivities for these two classes of sites. We hypothesize that binding at any of these homologous intersubunit sites is sufficient for anesthetic action and that this explains to some degree the puzzling structural heterogeneity of anesthetics. PMID:23677991

  15. Substitution of the transmembrane domain of Vpu in simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIVKU1bMC33) with that of M2 of influenza A results in a virus that is sensitive to inhibitors of the M2 ion channel and is pathogenic for pig-tailed macaques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Vpu protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 has been shown to shunt the CD4 receptor molecule to the proteasome for degradation and to enhance virus release from infected cells. The exact mechanism by which the Vpu protein enhances virus release is currently unknown but some investigators have shown that this function is associated with the transmembrane domain and potential ion channel properties. In this study, we determined if the transmembrane domain of Vpu could be functionally substituted with that of the prototypical viroporin, the M2 protein of influenza A virus. We constructed chimeric vpu gene in which the transmembrane domain of Vpu was replaced with that of the M2 protein of influenza. This chimeric vpu gene was substituted for the vpu gene in the genome of a pathogenic simian human immunodeficiency virus, SHIVKU-1bMC33. The resulting virus, SHIVM2, synthesized a Vpu protein that had a slightly different Mr compared to the parental SHIVKU-1bMC33, reflecting the different sizes of the two Vpu proteins. The SHIVM2 was shown to replicate with slightly reduced kinetics when compared to the parental SHIVKU-1bMC33 but electron microscopy revealed that the site of maturation was similar to the parental virus SHIVKU1bMC33. We show that the replication and spread of SHIVM2 could be blocked with the antiviral drug rimantadine, which is known to target the M2 ion channel. Our results indicate a dose dependent inhibition of SHIVM2 with 100 μM rimantadine resulting in a >95% decrease in p27 released into the culture medium. Rimantadine did not affect the replication of the parental SHIVKU-1bMC33. Examination of SHIVM2-infected cells treated with 50 μM rimantadine revealed numerous viral particles associated with the cell plasma membrane and within intracytoplasmic vesicles, which is similar to HIV-1 mutants lacking a functional vpu. To determine if SHIVM2 was as pathogenic as the parental SHIVKU-1bMC33 virus, two pig-tailed macaques were inoculated and

  16. Scrambling of the amino acids within the transmembrane domain of Vpu results in a simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIVTM) that is less pathogenic for pig-tailed macaques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous studies have shown that the transmembrane (TM) domain of the subtype B Vpu enhances virion release from cells and some studies have shown that this domain may form an oligomeric structure with properties of an ion channel. To date, no studies have been performed to assess the role of this domain in virus pathogenesis in a macaque model of disease. Using a pathogenic molecular clone of simian human immunodeficiency virus (SHIVKU-1bMC33), we have generated a novel virus in which the transmembrane domain of the Vpu protein was scrambled but maintained hydrophobic in nature (SHIVTM), which presumably would disrupt any ion channel TM properties of this protein. Vectors expressing the Vpu as a fusion protein with the enhanced green fluorescent protein (VpuTMEGFP) indicate that it was transported to the same intracellular compartment as the unmodified Vpu protein but did not down-regulate cell surface expression of CD4. To assess the pathogenicity of SHIVTM, three pig-tailed macaques were inoculated with the SHIVTM and monitored for 6-8 months for CD4+ T cell levels, viral loads and the stability of the sequence of the vpu gene. Our results indicated that unlike the parental SHIVKU-1bMC33, inoculation of macaques with SHIVTM did not cause a severe CD4+ T cell loss over the course of their infections. Sequence analysis of the vpu gene analyzed from sequential PBMC samples derived from macaques revealed that the scrambled TM was stable during the course of infection. At necropsy, examination of tissues revealed low viral loads and none of the pathology commonly observed in lymphoid and non-lymphoid tissues following inoculation with the pathogenic parental SHIVKU-1bMC33 virus. Thus, these results show for the first time that the TM domain of Vpu contributes to the pathogenicity of SHIVKU-1bMC33 in pig-tailed macaques

  17. Positive and Negative Allosteric Modulation of an α1β3γ2 γ-Aminobutyric Acid Type A (GABAA) Receptor by Binding to a Site in the Transmembrane Domain at the γ+-β- Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakar, Selwyn S; Zhou, Xiaojuan; Savechenkov, Pavel Y; Chiara, David C; Desai, Rooma; Bruzik, Karol S; Miller, Keith W; Cohen, Jonathan B

    2015-09-18

    In the process of developing safer general anesthetics, isomers of anesthetic ethers and barbiturates have been discovered that act as convulsants and inhibitors of γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptors (GABAARs) rather than potentiators. It is unknown whether these convulsants act as negative allosteric modulators by binding to the intersubunit anesthetic-binding sites in the GABAAR transmembrane domain (Chiara, D. C., Jayakar, S. S., Zhou, X., Zhang, X., Savechenkov, P. Y., Bruzik, K. S., Miller, K. W., and Cohen, J. B. (2013) J. Biol. Chem. 288, 19343-19357) or to known convulsant sites in the ion channel or extracellular domains. Here, we show that S-1-methyl-5-propyl-5-(m-trifluoromethyl-diazirynylphenyl) barbituric acid (S-mTFD-MPPB), a photoreactive analog of the convulsant barbiturate S-MPPB, inhibits α1β3γ2 but potentiates α1β3 GABAAR responses. In the α1β3γ2 GABAAR, S-mTFD-MPPB binds in the transmembrane domain with high affinity to the γ(+)-β(-) subunit interface site with negative energetic coupling to GABA binding in the extracellular domain at the β(+)-α(-) subunit interfaces. GABA inhibits S-[(3)H]mTFD-MPPB photolabeling of γ2Ser-280 (γM2-15') in this site. In contrast, within the same site GABA enhances photolabeling of β3Met-227 in βM1 by an anesthetic barbiturate, R-[(3)H]methyl-5-allyl-5-(m-trifluoromethyl-diazirynylphenyl)barbituric acid (mTFD-MPAB), which differs from S-mTFD-MPPB in structure only by chirality and two hydrogens (propyl versus allyl). S-mTFD-MPPB and R-mTFD-MPAB are predicted to bind in different orientations at the γ(+)-β(-) site, based upon the distance in GABAAR homology models between γ2Ser-280 and β3Met-227. These results provide an explanation for S-mTFD-MPPB inhibition of α1β3γ2 GABAAR function and provide a first demonstration that an intersubunit-binding site in the GABAAR transmembrane domain binds negative and positive allosteric modulators. PMID:26229099

  18. Functional Role of the Intracellular Loop Linking Transmembrane Domains 6 and 7 of the Human Dipeptide Transporter hPEPT1

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Liya; Li, Yiyu; Haworth, Ian S.; Davies, Daryl L.

    2010-01-01

    The human intestinal di-/tripeptide transporter (hPEPT1) is a 12-transmembrane protein that facilitates transport of peptides from the intestine into the circulation. hPEPT1 is also an important target in oral delivery of drugs, but mechanistic and structural data for the protein are limited. In particular, there is little information on the function of the loops of the transporter. In this study, we show that mutation of several charged residues in the largest intracellular loop of hPEPT1 (l...

  19. ACTN1 rod domain mutation associated with congenital macrothrombocytopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasutomi, Motoko; Kunishima, Shinji; Okazaki, Shintaro; Tanizawa, Akihiko; Tsuchida, Shinya; Ohshima, Yusei

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in ACTN1, the gene encoding the actin-crosslinking protein α-actinin-1, cause autosomal dominant macrothrombocytopenia. α-Actinin-1 exists as antiparallel dimers, composed of an N-terminal actin-binding domain (ABD), four spectrin-like repeats (SLRs), which form the spacer rod, and a C-terminal calmodulin-like (CaM) domain. All of the previously reported ACTN1 mutations associated with macrothrombocytopenia reside within the ABD and the CaM domain and not within the SLR domain. In this report, we describe a mutation in SLR2 of α-actinin-1 (p.Leu395Gln) associated with familial macrothrombocytopenia. A 3-year-old boy and his mother both had this mutation. They showed a mild form of thrombocytopenia without severe bleeding, accompanied by an elevated mean platelet volume. Consistent with the previous reports of mutations that reside in the ABD or the CaM domain, immunofluorescence examination revealed disorganization of the actin cytoskeleton in Gln395 mutant-transduced Chinese hamster ovary cells. Our findings suggest a novel mechanism for the pathogenesis of ACTN1-related macrothrombocytopenia that does not involve functional domain mutations. PMID:26453073

  20. Identification of plakoglobin domains required for association with N-cadherin and alpha-catenin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacco, P A; McGranahan, T M; Wheelock, M J; Johnson, K R

    1995-08-25

    Cadherins are calcium-dependent, cell surface glycoproteins involved in cell-cell adhesion. To function in cell-cell adhesion, the transmembrane cadherin molecule must be associated with the cytoskeleton via cytoplasmic proteins known as catenins. Three catenins, alpha-catenin, beta-catenin, and gamma-catenin (also known as plakoglobin), have been identified. The domain of the cadherin molecule important for its interaction with the catenins has been mapped to the COOH-terminal 70 amino acids, but less is known about regions of the catenins that allow them to associate with one another or with the cadherin molecule. In this study we have transfected carboxyl-terminal deletions of plakoglobin into the human fibrosarcoma HT-1080 and used immunofluorescence localization and co-immunoprecipitation to map the regions of plakoglobin that allow it to associate with N-cadherin and with alpha-catenin. Plakoglobin is an armadillo family member containing 13 weakly similar internal repeats. These data show that the alpha-catenin-binding region maps within the first repeat and the N-cadherin-binding region maps within repeats 7 and 8. PMID:7650039

  1. A single base insertion in the putative transmembrane domain of the tyrosinase gene as a cause for tyrosinase-negative oculocutaneous albinism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chintamaneni, C.D.; Kobayashi, Y.; Kwon, B.S. (Indiana Univ. School of Medicine, Indianapolis (United States)); Halaban, R. (Yale Univ. School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States)); Witkop, C.J. Jr. (Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis (United States))

    1991-06-15

    The authors have determined a molecular defect to be the likely basis for inactivity of the tyrosinase from a patient with tyrosinase-negative oculocutaneous albinism. A single base (thymine) was inserted in exon 5 of the tyrosinase gene following codon 471 in the putative transmembrane coding region. This insertion caused a shift in the reading frame of 19 amino acids at the 3{prime} end and introduced a premature termination signal that would be expected to truncate the protein by 21 amino acids at the carboxyl terminus. The albino tyrosinase was not recognized by antibodies directed to the carboxyl terminus of tyrosinase. Furthermore, as shown by gel electrophoresis of the immunoprecipitated protein, the tyrosinase was {approx} 3kDa smaller than normal. Similar immunoprecipitation data were obtained when cloned normal and mutant tyrosinases were expressed in COS-1 cells.

  2. Expression cloning and chromosomal mapping of the leukocyte activation antigen CD97, a new seven-span transmembrane molecule of the secretin receptor superfamily with an unusual extracellular domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamann, J. [Univ. of Amsterdam (Netherlands)]|[Max Planck Society, Berlin-Buch (Germany); Hamann, D.; Lier, R.A.W. [Univ. of Amsterdam (Netherlands)] [and others

    1995-08-15

    CD97 is a monomeric glycoprotein of 75 to 85 kDa that is induced rapidly on the surface of most leukocytes upon activation. We herein report the isolation of a cDNA encoding human CD97 by expression cloning in COS cells. The 3-kb cDNA clone encodes a mature polypeptide chain of 722 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 79 kDa. Within the C-terminal part of the protein, a region with seven hydrophobic segments was identified, suggesting that CD97 is a seven-span transmembrane molecule. Sequence comparison indicates that CD97 is the first leukocyte Ag in a recently described superfamily that includes the receptors for secretin, calcitonin, and other mammalian and insect peptide hormones. Different from these receptors, CD97 has an extended extracellular region of 433 amino acids that possesses three N-terminal epidermal growth factor-like domains, two of them with a calcium-binding site, and single Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) motif. The existence of structural elements characteristic for extracellular matrix proteins in a seven-span transmembrane molecule makes CD97 a receptor potentially involved in both adhesion and signaling processes early after leukocyte activation. The gene encoding CD97 is localized on chromosome 19 (19p13.12-13.2).

  3. A single amino acid substitution within the transmembrane domain of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Vpu protein renders simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIVKU-1bMC33) susceptible to rimantadine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous studies from our laboratory have shown that the transmembrane domain (TM) of the Vpu protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) contributes to the pathogenesis of SHIVKU-1bMC33 in macaques and that the TM domain of Vpu could be replaced with the M2 protein viroporin from influenza A virus. Recently, we showed that the replacement of the TM domain of Vpu with that of the M2 protein of influenza A virus resulted in a virus (SHIVM2) that was sensitive to rimantadine [Hout, D.R., Gomez, M.L., Pacyniak, E., Gomez, L.M., Inbody, S.H., Mulcahy, E.R., Culley, N., Pinson, D.M., Powers, M.F., Wong, S.W., Stephens, E.B., 2006. Substitution of the transmembrane domain of Vpu in simian human immunodeficiency virus (SHIVKU-1bMC33) with that of M2 of influenza A results in a virus that is sensitive to inhibitors of the M2 ion channel and is pathogenic for pig-tailed macaques. Virology 344, 541-558]. Based on previous studies of the M2 protein which have shown that the His-X-X-X-Trp motif within the M2 is essential to the function of the M2 proton channel, we have constructed a novel SHIV in which the alanine at position 19 of the TM domain was replaced with a histidine residue resulting in the motif His-Ile-Leu-Val-Trp. The SHIVVpuA19H replicated with similar kinetics as the parental SHIVKU-1bMC33 and pulse-chase analysis revealed that the processing of viral proteins was similar to SHIVKU-1bMC33. This SHIVVpuA19H virus was found to be more sensitive to the M2 ion channel blocker rimantadine than SHIVM2. Electron microscopic examination of SHIVVpuA19H-infected cells treated with rimantadine revealed an accumulation of viral particles at the cell surface and within intracellular vesicles, which was similar to that previously observed to SHIVM2-infected cells treated with rimantadine. These data indicate that the Vpu protein of HIV-1 can be converted into a rimantadine-sensitive ion channel with the alteration of one amino acid and provide additional evidence

  4. Evidence against Extracellular Exposure of a Highly Immunogenic Region in the C-Terminal Domain of the Simian Immunodeficiency Virus gp41 Transmembrane Protein

    OpenAIRE

    Postler, Thomas S.; Martinez-Navio, José M.; Yuste, Eloísa; Desrosiers, Ronald C

    2012-01-01

    The generally accepted model for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein topology includes a single membrane-spanning domain. An alternate model has been proposed which features multiple membrane-spanning domains. Consistent with the alternate model, a high percentage of HIV-1-infected individuals produce unusually robust antibody responses to a region of envelope, the so-called “Kennedy epitope,” that in the conventional model should be in the cytoplasm. Here we sho...

  5. Mutations in the Middle of the Transmembrane Domain Reverse the Polarity of Transport of the Influenza Virus Hemagglutinin in MDCK Epithelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Sasa; Naim, Hussein Y.; Chapin Rodriguez, A.; Roth, Michael G.

    1998-01-01

    The composition of the plasma membrane domains of epithelial cells is maintained by biosynthetic pathways that can sort both proteins and lipids into transport vesicles destined for either the apical or basolateral surface. In MDCK cells, the influenza virus hemagglutinin is sorted in the trans-Golgi network into detergent-insoluble, glycosphingolipid-enriched membrane domains that are proposed to be necessary for sorting hemagglutinin to the apical cell surface. Site- directed mutagenesis of...

  6. HSV-1 nucleocapsid egress mediated by UL31 in association with UL34 is impeded by cellular transmembrane protein 140

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During HSV-1 infection, the viral UL31 protein forms a complex with the UL34 protein at the cellular nuclear membrane, where both proteins play important roles in the envelopment of viral nucleocapsids and their egress into the cytoplasm. To characterize the mechanism of HSV-1 nucleocapsid egress, we screened host proteins to identify proteins that interacted with UL31 via yeast two-hybrid analysis. Transmembrane protein 140 (TMEM140), was identified and confirmed to bind to and co-localize with UL31 during viral infection. Further studies indicated that TMEM140 inhibits HSV-1 proliferation through selectively blocking viral nucleocapsid egress during the viral assembly process. The blockage function of TMEM140 is mediated by impeding the formation of the UL31–UL34 complex due to competitive binding to UL31. Collectively, these data suggest the essentiality of the UL31–UL34 interaction in the viral nucleocapsid egress process and provide a new anti-HSV-1 strategy in viral assembly process of nucleocapsid egress. - Highlights: • Cellular TMEM140 protein interacts with HSV-1 UL31 protein during viral infection. • Increasing expression of TMEM140 leads to inhibition of HSV-1 proliferation. • Increasing expression of TMEM140 blocks HSV-1 nucleocapsid egress process. • Binding to UL31 of TMEM140 impedes formation of HSV-1 UL31–UL34 complex

  7. HSV-1 nucleocapsid egress mediated by UL31 in association with UL34 is impeded by cellular transmembrane protein 140

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guan, Ying [Department of Viral Immunology, Institute of Medical Biology, Chinese Academy of Medicine Science, Peking Union Medical College, Kunming 650118 (China); Yunnan Academy of Tobacco Science, Kunming, Yunnan 650106 (China); Guo, Lei; Yang, Erxia; Liao, Yun; Liu, Longding; Che, Yanchun; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Lichun; Wang, Jingjing [Department of Viral Immunology, Institute of Medical Biology, Chinese Academy of Medicine Science, Peking Union Medical College, Kunming 650118 (China); Li, Qihan, E-mail: imbcams.lq@gmail.com [Department of Viral Immunology, Institute of Medical Biology, Chinese Academy of Medicine Science, Peking Union Medical College, Kunming 650118 (China)

    2014-09-15

    During HSV-1 infection, the viral UL31 protein forms a complex with the UL34 protein at the cellular nuclear membrane, where both proteins play important roles in the envelopment of viral nucleocapsids and their egress into the cytoplasm. To characterize the mechanism of HSV-1 nucleocapsid egress, we screened host proteins to identify proteins that interacted with UL31 via yeast two-hybrid analysis. Transmembrane protein 140 (TMEM140), was identified and confirmed to bind to and co-localize with UL31 during viral infection. Further studies indicated that TMEM140 inhibits HSV-1 proliferation through selectively blocking viral nucleocapsid egress during the viral assembly process. The blockage function of TMEM140 is mediated by impeding the formation of the UL31–UL34 complex due to competitive binding to UL31. Collectively, these data suggest the essentiality of the UL31–UL34 interaction in the viral nucleocapsid egress process and provide a new anti-HSV-1 strategy in viral assembly process of nucleocapsid egress. - Highlights: • Cellular TMEM140 protein interacts with HSV-1 UL31 protein during viral infection. • Increasing expression of TMEM140 leads to inhibition of HSV-1 proliferation. • Increasing expression of TMEM140 blocks HSV-1 nucleocapsid egress process. • Binding to UL31 of TMEM140 impedes formation of HSV-1 UL31–UL34 complex.

  8. B cell receptor cross-linking triggers a caspase-8-dependent apoptotic pathway that is independent of the death effector domain of Fas-associated death domain protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besnault, L; Schrantz, N; Auffredou, M T; Leca, G; Bourgeade, M F; Vazquez, A

    2001-07-15

    We have previously reported that B cell receptors, depending on the degree to which they are cross-linked, can promote apoptosis in various human B cell types. In this study, we show that B cell receptors can trigger two apoptotic pathways according to cross-linking and that these pathways control mitochondrial activation in human Burkitt's lymphoma cells. Whereas soluble anti-mu Ab triggers caspase-independent mitochondrial activation, cross-linked anti-mu Ab induces an apoptotic response associated with a caspase-dependent loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential. This B cell receptor-mediated caspase-dependent mitochondrial activation is associated with caspase-8 activation. We show here that caspase-8 inhibitors strongly decrease cross-linking-dependent B cell receptor-mediated apoptosis in Burkitt's lymphoma BL41 cells. These inhibitors act upstream from the mitochondria as they prevented the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential observed in B cell receptor-treated BL41 cells. Caspase-8 activation in these cells was also evident from the detection of cleaved fragments of caspase-8 and the cleavage of specific substrates, including Bid. Our data show that cross-linked B cell receptors induced an apoptotic pathway involving sequential caspase-8 activation, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, and the activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3. Cells expressing a dominant negative mutant of Fas-associated death domain protein were sensitive to cross-linked B cell receptor-induced caspase-8 activation and apoptosis; therefore, this caspase-8 activation was independent of the death effector domain of Fas-associated death domain protein. PMID:11441077

  9. Structure and function of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M. Morales

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis (CF is a lethal autosomal recessive genetic disease caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR. Mutations in the CFTR gene may result in a defective processing of its protein and alter the function and regulation of this channel. Mutations are associated with different symptoms, including pancreatic insufficiency, bile duct obstruction, infertility in males, high sweat Cl-, intestinal obstruction, nasal polyp formation, chronic sinusitis, mucus dehydration, and chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus lung infection, responsible for 90% of the mortality of CF patients. The gene responsible for the cellular defect in CF was cloned in 1989 and its protein product CFTR is activated by an increase of intracellular cAMP. The CFTR contains two membrane domains, each with six transmembrane domain segments, two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs, and a cytoplasmic domain. In this review we discuss the studies that have correlated the role of each CFTR domain in the protein function as a chloride channel and as a regulator of the outwardly rectifying Cl- channels (ORCCs.

  10. Molecular determinants of interactions between the N-terminal domain and the transmembrane core that modulate hERG K+ channel gating.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Fernández-Trillo

    Full Text Available A conserved eag domain in the cytoplasmic amino terminus of the human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG potassium channel is critical for its slow deactivation gating. Introduction of gene fragments encoding the eag domain are able to restore normal deactivation properties of channels from which most of the amino terminus has been deleted, and also those lacking exclusively the eag domain or carrying a single point mutation in the initial residues of the N-terminus. Deactivation slowing in the presence of the recombinant domain is not observed with channels carrying a specific Y542C point mutation in the S4-S5 linker. On the other hand, mutations in some initial positions of the recombinant fragment also impair its ability to restore normal deactivation. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET analysis of fluorophore-tagged proteins under total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF conditions revealed a substantial level of FRET between the introduced N-terminal eag fragments and the eag domain-deleted channels expressed at the membrane, but not between the recombinant eag domain and full-length channels with an intact amino terminus. The FRET signals were also minimized when the recombinant eag fragments carried single point mutations in the initial portion of their amino end, and when Y542C mutated channels were used. These data suggest that the restoration of normal deactivation gating by the N-terminal recombinant eag fragment is an intrinsic effect of this domain directed by the interaction of its N-terminal segment with the gating machinery, likely at the level of the S4-S5 linker.

  11. Integrating User's Domain Knowledge with Association Rule Mining

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Vikram

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a variation of Apriori algorithm that includes the role of domain expert to guide and speed up the overall knowledge discovery task. Usually, the user is interested in finding relationships between certain attributes instead of the whole dataset. Moreover, he can help the mining algorithm to select the target database which in turn takes less time to find the desired association rules. Variants of the standard Apriori and Interactive Apriori algorithms have been run on artificial datasets. The results show that incorporating user's preference in selection of target attribute helps to search the association rules efficiently both in terms of space and time.

  12. Role of C-terminal domain and transmembrane helices 5 and 6 in function and quaternary structure of major intrinsic proteins: analysis of aquaporin/glycerol facilitator chimeric proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchesne, Laurence; Pellerin, Isabelle; Delamarche, Christian; Deschamps, Stephane; Lagree, Valerie; Froger, Alexandrine; Bonnec, Georgette; Thomas, Daniel; Hubert, Jean-Francois

    2002-06-01

    We previously observed that aquaporins and glycerol facilitators exhibit different oligomeric states when studied by sedimentation on density gradients following nondenaturing detergent solubilization. To determine the domains of major intrinsic protein (MIP) family proteins involved in oligomerization, we constructed protein chimeras corresponding to the aquaporin AQPcic substituted in the loop E (including the proximal part of transmembrane domain (TM) 5) and/or the C-terminal part (including the distal part of TM 6) by the equivalent domain of the glycerol channel aquaglyceroporin (GlpF) (chimeras called AGA, AAG, and AGG). The analogous chimeras of GlpF were also constructed (chimeras GAG, GGA, and GAA). cRNA corresponding to all constructs were injected into Xenopus oocytes. AQPcic, GlpF, AAG, AGG, and GAG were targeted to plasma membranes. Water or glycerol membrane permeability measurements demonstrated that only the AAG chimera exhibited a channel function corresponding to water transport. Analysis of all proteins expressed either in oocytes or in yeast by velocity sedimentation on sucrose gradients following solubilization by 2% n-octyl glucoside indicated that only AQPcic and AAG exist in tetrameric forms. GlpF, GAG, and GAA sediment in a monomeric form, whereas GGA and AGG were found mono/dimeric. These data bring new evidence that, within the MIP family, aquaporins and GlpFs behave differently toward nondenaturing detergents. We demonstrate that the C-terminal part of AQPcic, including the distal half of TM 6, can be substituted by the equivalent domain of GlpF (AAG chimera) without modifying the transport specificity. Our results also suggest that interactions of TM 5 of one monomer with TM 1 of the adjacent monomer are crucial for aquaporin tetramer stability. PMID:11927589

  13. Single-channel SCAM Identifies Pore-lining Residues in the First Extracellular Loop and First Transmembrane Domains of Cx46 Hemichannels

    OpenAIRE

    KRONENGOLD, J.; Trexler, E B; Bukauskas, F.F.; Bargiello, T A; Verselis, V K

    2003-01-01

    Gap junction (GJ) channels provide an important pathway for direct intercellular transmission of signaling molecules. Previously we showed that fixed negative charges in the first extracellular loop domain (E1) strongly influence charge selectivity, conductance, and rectification of channels and hemichannels formed of Cx46. Here, using excised patches containing Cx46 hemichannels, we applied the substituted cysteine accessibility method (SCAM) at the single channel level to residues in E1 to ...

  14. ACRATA: a novel electron transfer domain associated to apoptosis and cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinez-A Carlos

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, several members of a vertebrate protein family containing a six trans-membrane (6TM domain and involved in apoptosis and cancer (e.g. STEAP, STAMP1, TSAP6, have been identified in Golgi and cytoplasmic membranes. The exact function of these proteins remains unknown. Methods We related this 6TM domain to distant protein families using intermediate sequences and methods of iterative profile sequence similarity search. Results Here we show for the first time that this 6TM domain is homolog to the 6TM heme binding domain of both the NADPH oxidase (Nox family and the YedZ family of bacterial oxidoreductases. Conclusions This finding gives novel insights about the existence of a previously undetected electron transfer system involved in apoptosis and cancer, and suggests further steps in the experimental characterization of these evolutionarily related families.

  15. ACRATA: a novel electron transfer domain associated to apoptosis and cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, several members of a vertebrate protein family containing a six trans-membrane (6TM) domain and involved in apoptosis and cancer (e.g. STEAP, STAMP1, TSAP6), have been identified in Golgi and cytoplasmic membranes. The exact function of these proteins remains unknown. We related this 6TM domain to distant protein families using intermediate sequences and methods of iterative profile sequence similarity search. Here we show for the first time that this 6TM domain is homolog to the 6TM heme binding domain of both the NADPH oxidase (Nox) family and the YedZ family of bacterial oxidoreductases. This finding gives novel insights about the existence of a previously undetected electron transfer system involved in apoptosis and cancer, and suggests further steps in the experimental characterization of these evolutionarily related families

  16. Robust red FRET sensors using self-associating fluorescent domains

    OpenAIRE

    Lindenburg, Laurens H.; Hessels, Anne M.; Ebberink, Eduard H. T. M.; Arts, Remco; Merkx, Maarten

    2013-01-01

    Elucidation of sub-cellular signaling networks by multiparameter imaging is hindered by a lack of sensitive FRET pairs spectrally compatible with the classic CFP/YFP pair. Here we present a generic strategy to enhance the traditionally poor sensitivity of red FRET sensors by developing self-associating variants of mOrange and mCherry that allow sensors to switch between well-defined on- and off states. Requiring just a single mutation of the mFruit domain, this new FRET pair improved the dyna...

  17. Hemolytic Lectin CEL-III Heptamerizes via a Large Structural Transition from α-Helices to a β-Barrel during the Transmembrane Pore Formation Process

    OpenAIRE

    Unno, Hideaki; Goda, Shuichiro; Hatakeyama, Tomomitsu

    2014-01-01

    CEL-III is a hemolytic lectin isolated from the sea cucumber Cucumaria echinata. This lectin is composed of two carbohydrate-binding domains (domains 1 and 2) and one oligomerization domain (domain 3). After binding to the cell surface carbohydrate chains through domains 1 and 2, domain 3 self-associates to form transmembrane pores, leading to cell lysis or death, which resembles other pore-forming toxins of diverse organisms. To elucidate the pore formation mechanism of CEL-III, the crystal ...

  18. The MUC1 extracellular domain subunit is found in nuclear speckles and associates with spliceosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyadarsini Kumar

    Full Text Available MUC1 is a large transmembrane glycoprotein and oncogene expressed by epithelial cells and overexpressed and underglycosylated in cancer cells. The MUC1 cytoplasmic subunit (MUC1-C can translocate to the nucleus and regulate gene expression. It is frequently assumed that the MUC1 extracellular subunit (MUC1-N does not enter the nucleus. Based on an unexpected observation that MUC1 extracellular domain antibody produced an apparently nucleus-associated staining pattern in trophoblasts, we have tested the hypothesis that MUC1-N is expressed inside the nucleus. Three different antibodies were used to identify MUC1-N in normal epithelial cells and tissues as well as in several cancer cell lines. The results of immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy analyses as well as subcellular fractionation, Western blotting, and siRNA/shRNA studies, confirm that MUC1-N is found within nuclei of all cell types examined. More detailed examination of its intranuclear distribution using a proximity ligation assay, subcellular fractionation, and immunoprecipitation suggests that MUC1-N is located in nuclear speckles (interchromatin granule clusters and closely associates with the spliceosome protein U2AF65. Nuclear localization of MUC1-N was abolished when cells were treated with RNase A and nuclear localization was altered when cells were incubated with the transcription inhibitor 5,6-dichloro-1-b-d-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole (DRB. While MUC1-N predominantly associated with speckles, MUC1-C was present in the nuclear matrix, nucleoli, and the nuclear periphery. In some nuclei, confocal microscopic analysis suggest that MUC1-C staining is located close to, but only partially overlaps, MUC1-N in speckles. However, only MUC1-N was found in isolated speckles by Western blotting. Also, MUC1-C and MUC1-N distributed differently during mitosis. These results suggest that MUC1-N translocates to the nucleus where it is expressed in nuclear speckles and that MUC1-N and MUC

  19. Identification of Transmembrane Protein 134 as a Novel LMP1-Binding Protein by Using Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation and an Enhanced Retroviral Mutagen

    OpenAIRE

    Talaty, Pooja; Emery, Amanda; Holthusen, Kirsten; Everly, David N.

    2012-01-01

    Latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) of Epstein-Barr virus induces constitutive signaling in infected cells. LMP1 signaling requires oligomerization of LMP1 via its transmembrane domain, localization to lipid rafts in the membrane, and association of the LMP1 cytoplasmic domain to adaptor proteins, such as the tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factors (TRAFs). Protein complementation is a novel technique to examine protein-protein interaction through the assembly of functional fluorescent...

  20. Structural Fluctuations of the Chromatin Fiber within Topologically Associating Domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiana, Guido; Amitai, Assaf; Pollex, Tim; Piolot, Tristan; Holcman, David; Heard, Edith; Giorgetti, Luca

    2016-03-29

    Experiments based on chromosome conformation capture have shown that mammalian genomes are partitioned into topologically associating domains (TADs), within which the chromatin fiber preferentially interacts. TADs may provide three-dimensional scaffolds allowing genes to contact their appropriate distal regulatory DNA sequences (e.g., enhancers) and thus to be properly regulated. Understanding the cell-to-cell and temporal variability of the chromatin fiber within TADs, and what determines them, is thus of great importance to better understand transcriptional regulation. We recently described an equilibrium polymer model that can accurately predict cell-to-cell variation of chromosome conformation within single TADs, from chromosome conformation capture-based data. Here we further analyze the conformational and energetic properties of our model. We show that the chromatin fiber within TADs can easily fluctuate between several conformational states, which are hierarchically organized and are not separated by important free energy barriers, and that this is facilitated by the fact that the chromatin fiber within TADs is close to the onset of the coil-globule transition. We further show that in this dynamic state the properties of the chromatin fiber, and its contact probabilities in particular, are determined in a nontrivial manner not only by site-specific interactions between strongly interacting loci along the fiber, but also by nonlocal correlations between pairs of contacts. Finally, we use live-cell experiments to measure the dynamics of the chromatin fiber in mouse embryonic stem cells, in combination with dynamical simulations, and predict that conformational changes within one TAD are likely to occur on timescales that are much shorter than the duration of one cell cycle. This suggests that genes and their regulatory elements may come together and disassociate several times during a cell cycle. These results have important implications for transcriptional

  1. Expression of genes encoding multi-transmembrane proteins in specific primate taste cell populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan D Moyer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Using fungiform (FG and circumvallate (CV taste buds isolated by laser capture microdissection and analyzed using gene arrays, we previously constructed a comprehensive database of gene expression in primates, which revealed over 2,300 taste bud-associated genes. Bioinformatics analyses identified hundreds of genes predicted to encode multi-transmembrane domain proteins with no previous association with taste function. A first step in elucidating the roles these gene products play in gustation is to identify the specific taste cell types in which they are expressed. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using double label in situ hybridization analyses, we identified seven new genes expressed in specific taste cell types, including sweet, bitter, and umami cells (TRPM5-positive, sour cells (PKD2L1-positive, as well as other taste cell populations. Transmembrane protein 44 (TMEM44, a protein with seven predicted transmembrane domains with no homology to GPCRs, is expressed in a TRPM5-negative and PKD2L1-negative population that is enriched in the bottom portion of taste buds and may represent developmentally immature taste cells. Calcium homeostasis modulator 1 (CALHM1, a component of a novel calcium channel, along with family members CALHM2 and CALHM3; multiple C2 domains; transmembrane 1 (MCTP1, a calcium-binding transmembrane protein; and anoctamin 7 (ANO7, a member of the recently identified calcium-gated chloride channel family, are all expressed in TRPM5 cells. These proteins may modulate and effect calcium signalling stemming from sweet, bitter, and umami receptor activation. Synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2B (SV2B, a regulator of synaptic vesicle exocytosis, is expressed in PKD2L1 cells, suggesting that this taste cell population transmits tastant information to gustatory afferent nerve fibers via exocytic neurotransmitter release. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Identification of genes encoding multi-transmembrane domain proteins

  2. Hemolytic Lectin CEL-III Heptamerizes via a Large Structural Transition from α-Helices to a β-Barrel during the Transmembrane Pore Formation Process*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unno, Hideaki; Goda, Shuichiro; Hatakeyama, Tomomitsu

    2014-01-01

    CEL-III is a hemolytic lectin isolated from the sea cucumber Cucumaria echinata. This lectin is composed of two carbohydrate-binding domains (domains 1 and 2) and one oligomerization domain (domain 3). After binding to the cell surface carbohydrate chains through domains 1 and 2, domain 3 self-associates to form transmembrane pores, leading to cell lysis or death, which resembles other pore-forming toxins of diverse organisms. To elucidate the pore formation mechanism of CEL-III, the crystal structure of the CEL-III oligomer was determined. The CEL-III oligomer has a heptameric structure with a long β-barrel as a transmembrane pore. This β-barrel is composed of 14 β-strands resulting from a large structural transition of α-helices accommodated in the interface between domains 1 and 2 and domain 3 in the monomeric structure, suggesting that the dissociation of these α-helices triggered their structural transition into a β-barrel. After heptamerization, domains 1 and 2 form a flat ring, in which all carbohydrate-binding sites remain bound to cell surface carbohydrate chains, stabilizing the transmembrane β-barrel in a position perpendicular to the plane of the lipid bilayer. PMID:24652284

  3. Hemolytic lectin CEL-III heptamerizes via a large structural transition from α-helices to a β-barrel during the transmembrane pore formation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unno, Hideaki; Goda, Shuichiro; Hatakeyama, Tomomitsu

    2014-05-01

    CEL-III is a hemolytic lectin isolated from the sea cucumber Cucumaria echinata. This lectin is composed of two carbohydrate-binding domains (domains 1 and 2) and one oligomerization domain (domain 3). After binding to the cell surface carbohydrate chains through domains 1 and 2, domain 3 self-associates to form transmembrane pores, leading to cell lysis or death, which resembles other pore-forming toxins of diverse organisms. To elucidate the pore formation mechanism of CEL-III, the crystal structure of the CEL-III oligomer was determined. The CEL-III oligomer has a heptameric structure with a long β-barrel as a transmembrane pore. This β-barrel is composed of 14 β-strands resulting from a large structural transition of α-helices accommodated in the interface between domains 1 and 2 and domain 3 in the monomeric structure, suggesting that the dissociation of these α-helices triggered their structural transition into a β-barrel. After heptamerization, domains 1 and 2 form a flat ring, in which all carbohydrate-binding sites remain bound to cell surface carbohydrate chains, stabilizing the transmembrane β-barrel in a position perpendicular to the plane of the lipid bilayer. PMID:24652284

  4. Control of phospholipid flip-flop by transmembrane peptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaihara, Masanori; Nakao, Hiroyuki; Yokoyama, Hirokazu [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Endo, Hitoshi [Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Ishihama, Yasushi [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Handa, Tetsurou [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Suzuka University of Medical Science, 3500-3 Minami-Tamagaki-cho, Suzuka, Mie 513-8670 (Japan); Nakano, Minoru, E-mail: mnakano@pha.u-toyama.ac.jp [Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan)

    2013-06-20

    Highlights: ► Phospholipid flip-flop in transmembrane peptide-containing vesicles was investigated. ► Peptides that contained polar residues in the center of the transmembrane region promoted phospholipid flip-flop. ► A bioinformatics approach revealed the presence of polar residues in the transmembrane region of ER membrane proteins. ► Polar residues in ER membrane proteins possibly provide flippase-like activity. - Abstract: We designed three types of transmembrane model peptides whose sequence originates from a frequently used model peptide KALP23, and we investigated their effects on phospholipid flip-flop. Time-resolved small-angle neutron scattering and a dithionite fluorescent quenching assay demonstrated that TMP-L, which has a fully hydrophobic transmembrane region, did not enhance phospholipid flip-flop, whereas TMP-K and TMP-E, which have Lys and Glu, respectively, in the center of their transmembrane regions, enhanced phospholipid flip-flop. Introduction of polar residues in the membrane-spanning helices is considered to produce a locally polar region and enable the lipid head group to interact with the polar side-chain inside the bilayers, thereby reducing the activation energy for the flip-flop. A bioinformatics approach revealed that acidic and basic residues account for 4.5% of the central region of the transmembrane domain in human ER membrane proteins. Therefore, polar residues in ER membrane proteins are considered to provide flippase-like activity.

  5. Control of phospholipid flip-flop by transmembrane peptides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Phospholipid flip-flop in transmembrane peptide-containing vesicles was investigated. ► Peptides that contained polar residues in the center of the transmembrane region promoted phospholipid flip-flop. ► A bioinformatics approach revealed the presence of polar residues in the transmembrane region of ER membrane proteins. ► Polar residues in ER membrane proteins possibly provide flippase-like activity. - Abstract: We designed three types of transmembrane model peptides whose sequence originates from a frequently used model peptide KALP23, and we investigated their effects on phospholipid flip-flop. Time-resolved small-angle neutron scattering and a dithionite fluorescent quenching assay demonstrated that TMP-L, which has a fully hydrophobic transmembrane region, did not enhance phospholipid flip-flop, whereas TMP-K and TMP-E, which have Lys and Glu, respectively, in the center of their transmembrane regions, enhanced phospholipid flip-flop. Introduction of polar residues in the membrane-spanning helices is considered to produce a locally polar region and enable the lipid head group to interact with the polar side-chain inside the bilayers, thereby reducing the activation energy for the flip-flop. A bioinformatics approach revealed that acidic and basic residues account for 4.5% of the central region of the transmembrane domain in human ER membrane proteins. Therefore, polar residues in ER membrane proteins are considered to provide flippase-like activity

  6. C2 domain of synaptotagminⅠassociates with lipid rafts of plasma membrane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L(U) JiHua; HE Li; SUI SenFang

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we report that the C2 domain of synaptotagmin I (syt I) could associate with lipid rafts of plasma membrane. We demonstrate that phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) in the target membrane and Ca2+ are the key factors to enhance the raft association of the C2 domain. We also found that the raft association of the C2 domain could be fulfilled by either C2A or C2B alone, suggesting that their raft association might be complementary. Finally, we indicate that destroying lipid rafts or blocking syt I-raft association could significantly reduce the Ca2+-driven release of glutamates. Our data indicate that the raft association of the C2 domain might play an important role in the regulated exocytosis.

  7. Familial CJD associated PrP mutants within transmembrane region induced Ctm-PrP retention in ER and triggered apoptosis by ER stress in SH-SY5Y cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Genetic prion diseases are linked to point and inserted mutations in the prion protein (PrP gene that are presumed to favor conversion of the cellular isoform of PrP (PrP(C to the pathogenic one (PrP(Sc. The pathogenic mechanisms and the subcellular sites of the conversion are not completely understood. Here we introduce several PRNP gene mutations (such as, PrP-KDEL, PrP-3AV, PrP-A117V, PrP-G114V, PrP-P102L and PrP-E200K into the cultured cells in order to explore the pathogenic mechanism of familial prion disease. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To address the roles of aberrant retention of PrP in endoplasmic reticulum (ER, the recombinant plasmids expressing full-length human PrP tailed with an ER signal peptide at the COOH-terminal (PrP-KDEL and PrP with three amino acids exchange in transmembrane region (PrP-3AV were constructed. In the preparations of transient transfections, 18-kD COOH-terminal proteolytic resistant fragments (Ctm-PrP were detected in the cells expressing PrP-KDEL and PrP-3AV. Analyses of the cell viabilities in the presences of tunicamycin and brefeldin A revealed that expressions of PrP-KDEL and PrP-3AV sensitized the transfected cells to ER stress stimuli. Western blots and RT-PCR identified the clear alternations of ER stress associated events in the cells expressing PrP-KDEL and PrP-3AV that induced ER mediated apoptosis by CHOP and caspase-12 apoptosis pathway. Moreover, several familial CJD related PrP mutants were transiently introduced into the cultured cells. Only the mutants within the transmembrane region (G114V and A117V induced the formation of Ctm-PrP and caused the ER stress, while the mutants outside the transmembrane region (P102L and E200K failed. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The data indicate that the retention of PrP in ER through formation of Ctm-PrP results in ER stress and cell apoptosis. The cytopathic activities caused by different familial CJD associated PrP mutants may vary, among them

  8. Human Immunodeficiency Virus - associated lymphomas: A neglected domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagesh Taterao Sirsath

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV associated lymphoma is an important public health concern; however, the epidemiological data available from India is sparse. Aims: The present study was carried out at a tertiary cancer care center in South India to analyze the scenario of HIV-associated lymphoma. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective observational study conducted at our center, on consecutive patients diagnosed with HIV-associated lymphoma, from January 2008 to December 2012. Results: A total of 44 patients were diagnosed with HIV-associated lymphoma, of which 18 opted for treatment. There were 11 males and 7 females in the study population. Median interval from the diagnosis of HIV infection to diagnosis of lymphoma was 18 months. Median CD4 count at the time of lymphoma diagnosis was 218/mm 3 . Five patients had Hodgkin′s lymphoma, and the rest had non-Hodgkin′s lymphoma. Five out of 18 (28% patients in the present study expired during treatment. Ten (55.5% patients are alive and lymphoma free, with a median follow up of 18 months. Conclusions: More than half of our treated patients are lymphoma free with a median follow up of 18 months; hence treatment of patients with HIV-associated lymphoma should be encouraged.

  9. Hydrophobic pulses predict transmembrane helix irregularities and channel transmembrane units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claustres Mireille

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few high-resolution structures of integral membranes proteins are available, as crystallization of such proteins needs yet to overcome too many technical limitations. Nevertheless, prediction of their transmembrane (TM structure by bioinformatics tools provides interesting insights on the topology of these proteins. Methods We describe here how to extract new information from the analysis of hydrophobicity variations or hydrophobic pulses (HPulses in the sequence of integral membrane proteins using the Hydrophobic Pulse Predictor, a new tool we developed for this purpose. To analyze the primary sequence of 70 integral membrane proteins we defined two levels of analysis: G1-HPulses for sliding windows of n = 2 to 6 and G2-HPulses for sliding windows of n = 12 to 16. Results The G2-HPulse analysis of 541 transmembrane helices allowed the definition of the new concept of transmembrane unit (TMU that groups together transmembrane helices and segments with potential adjacent structures. In addition, the G1-HPulse analysis identified helix irregularities that corresponded to kinks, partial helices or unannotated structural events. These irregularities could represent key dynamic elements that are alternatively activated depending on the channel status as illustrated by the crystal structures of the lactose permease in different conformations. Conclusions Our results open a new way in the understanding of transmembrane secondary structures: hydrophobicity through hydrophobic pulses strongly impacts on such embedded structures and is not confined to define the transmembrane status of amino acids.

  10. Structural and Functional Importance of Transmembrane Domain 3 (TM3) in the Aspartate:Alanine Antiporter AspT: Topology and Function of the Residues of TM3 and Oligomerization of AspT▿

    OpenAIRE

    Nanatani, Kei; Maloney, Peter C.; Abe, Keietsu

    2009-01-01

    AspT, the aspartate:alanine antiporter of Tetragenococcus halophilus, a membrane protein of 543 amino acids with 10 putative transmembrane (TM) helices, is the prototype of the aspartate:alanine exchanger (AAE) family of transporters. Because TM3 (isoleucine 64 to methionine 85) has many amino acid residues that are conserved among members of the AAE family and because TM3 contains two charged residues and four polar residues, it is thought to be located near (or to form part of) the substrat...

  11. SH4-domain-induced plasma membrane dynamization promotes bleb-associated cell motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tournaviti, Stella; Hannemann, Sebastian; Terjung, Stefan; Kitzing, Thomas M; Stegmayer, Carolin; Ritzerfeld, Julia; Walther, Paul; Grosse, Robert; Nickel, Walter; Fackler, Oliver T

    2007-11-01

    SH4 domains provide bipartite membrane-targeting signals for oncogenic Src family kinases. Here we report the induction of non-apoptotic plasma membrane (PM) blebbing as a novel and conserved activity of SH4 domains derived from the prototypic Src kinases Src, Fyn, Yes and Lck as well as the HASPB protein of Leishmania parasites. SH4-domain-induced blebbing is highly dynamic, with bleb formation and collapse displaying distinct kinetics. These reorganizations of the PM are controlled by Rho but not Rac or Cdc42 GTPase signalling pathways. SH4-induced membrane blebbing requires the membrane association of the SH4 domain, is regulated by the activities of Rock kinase and myosin II ATPase, and depends on the integrity of F-actin as well as microtubules. Endogenous Src kinase activity is crucial for PM blebbing in SH4-domain-expressing cells, active Src and Rock kinases are enriched in SH4-domain-induced PM blebs, and PM blebbing correlates with enhanced cell invasion in 3D matrices. These results establish a novel link between SH4 domains, Src activity and Rho signalling, and implicate SH4-domain-mediated PM dynamization as a mechanism that influences invasiveness of cells transformed by SH4-domain-containing oncoproteins. PMID:17959630

  12. Structure of the GH1 domain of guanylate kinase-associated protein from Rattus norvegicus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The crystal structure of GKAP homology domain 1 (GH1) was determined. • GKAP GH1 is a three-helix bundle connected by short flexible loops. • The predicted helix α4 associates weakly with the helix α3, suggesting dynamic nature of the GH1 domain. - Abstract: Guanylate-kinase-associated protein (GKAP) is a scaffolding protein that links NMDA receptor-PSD-95 to Shank–Homer complexes by protein–protein interactions at the synaptic junction. GKAP family proteins are characterized by the presence of a C-terminal conserved GKAP homology domain 1 (GH1) of unknown structure and function. In this study, crystal structure of the GH1 domain of GKAP from Rattus norvegicus was determined in fusion with an N-terminal maltose-binding protein at 2.0 Å resolution. The structure of GKAP GH1 displays a three-helix bundle connected by short flexible loops. The predicted helix α4 which was not visible in the crystal structure associates weakly with the helix α3 suggesting dynamic nature of the GH1 domain. The strict conservation of GH1 domain across GKAP family members and the lack of a catalytic active site required for enzyme activity imply that the GH1 domain might serve as a protein–protein interaction module for the synaptic protein clustering

  13. Depolarization-Evoked Secretion Requires Two Vicinal Transmembrane Cysteines of Syntaxin 1A

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, Roy; Marom, Merav; Atlas, Daphne

    2007-01-01

    Background The interactions of the voltage-gated Ca2+ channel (VGCC) with syntaxin 1A (Sx 1A), Synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kD (SNAP-25), and synaptotagmin, couple electrical excitation to evoked secretion. Two vicinal Cys residues, Cys 271 and Cys 272 in the Sx 1A transmembrane domain, are highly conserved and participate in modulating channel kinetics. Each of the Sx1A Cys mutants, differently modify the kinetics of Cav1.2, and neuronal Cav2.2 calcium channel. Methodology/Principle ...

  14. Disordered regions in transmembrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tusnády, Gábor E; Dobson, László; Tompa, Peter

    2015-11-01

    The functions of transmembrane proteins in living cells are widespread; they range from various transport processes to energy production, from cell-cell adhesion to communication. Structurally, they are highly ordered in their membrane-spanning regions, but may contain disordered regions in the cytosolic and extra-cytosolic parts. In this study, we have investigated the disordered regions in transmembrane proteins by a stringent definition of disordered residues on the currently available largest experimental dataset, and show a significant correlation between the spatial distributions of positively charged residues and disordered regions. This finding suggests a new role of disordered regions in transmembrane proteins by providing structural flexibility for stabilizing interactions with negatively charged head groups of the lipid molecules. We also find a preference of structural disorder in the terminal--as opposed to loop--regions in transmembrane proteins, and survey the respective functions involved in recruiting other proteins or mediating allosteric signaling effects. Finally, we critically compare disorder prediction methods on our transmembrane protein set. While there are no major differences between these methods using the usual statistics, such as per residue accuracies, Matthew's correlation coefficients, etc.; substantial differences can be found regarding the spatial distribution of the predicted disordered regions. We conclude that a predictor optimized for transmembrane proteins would be of high value to the field of structural disorder. PMID:26275590

  15. Tetraspanins and Transmembrane Adaptor Proteins As Plasma Membrane Organizers—Mast Cell Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halova, Ivana; Draber, Petr

    2016-01-01

    The plasma membrane contains diverse and specialized membrane domains, which include tetraspanin-enriched domains (TEMs) and transmembrane adaptor protein (TRAP)-enriched domains. Recent biophysical, microscopic, and functional studies indicated that TEMs and TRAP-enriched domains are involved in compartmentalization of physicochemical events of such important processes as immunoreceptor signal transduction and chemotaxis. Moreover, there is evidence of a cross-talk between TEMs and TRAP-enriched domains. In this review we discuss the presence and function of such domains and their crosstalk using mast cells as a model. The combined data based on analysis of selected mast cell-expressed tetraspanins [cluster of differentiation (CD)9, CD53, CD63, CD81, CD151)] or TRAPs [linker for activation of T cells (LAT), non-T cell activation linker (NTAL), and phosphoprotein associated with glycosphingolipid-enriched membrane microdomains (PAG)] using knockout mice or specific antibodies point to a diversity within these two families and bring evidence of the important roles of these molecules in signaling events. An example of this diversity is physical separation of two TRAPs, LAT and NTAL, which are in many aspects similar but show plasma membrane location in different microdomains in both non-activated and activated cells. Although our understanding of TEMs and TRAP-enriched domains is far from complete, pharmaceutical applications of the knowledge about these domains are under way.

  16. Ion fluxes through nanopores and transmembrane channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordin, J. R.; Diehl, A.; Barbosa, M. C.; Levin, Y.

    2012-03-01

    We introduce an implicit solvent Molecular Dynamics approach for calculating ionic fluxes through narrow nanopores and transmembrane channels. The method relies on a dual-control-volume grand-canonical molecular dynamics (DCV-GCMD) simulation and the analytical solution for the electrostatic potential inside a cylindrical nanopore recently obtained by Levin [Europhys. Lett.EULEEJ0295-507510.1209/epl/i2006-10240-4 76, 163 (2006)]. The theory is used to calculate the ionic fluxes through an artificial transmembrane channel which mimics the antibacterial gramicidin A channel. Both current-voltage and current-concentration relations are calculated under various experimental conditions. We show that our results are comparable to the characteristics associated to the gramicidin A pore, especially the existence of two binding sites inside the pore and the observed saturation in the current-concentration profiles.

  17. ESTIMATION OF ATTRACTION DOMAIN AND EXPONENTIAL CONVERGENCE RATE OF CONTINUOUS FEEDBACK ASSOCIATIVE MEMORY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周冬明; 曹进德; 李继彬

    2001-01-01

    The attraction domain of memory patterns and exponential convergence rate of the network trajectories to memory patterns for continuous feedback associative memory are estimated again by using of some analysis techniques and Liapunov method, some new re sults are obtained, that can be used for evaluation of fault-tolerance capability and the syn thesis procedures for continuous feedback associative memory neural networks.

  18. The Hippocampus Supports Encoding of Between-Domain Associations within Working Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piekema, Carinne; Kessel, Roy P. C.; Rijpkema, Mark; Fernandez, Guillen

    2009-01-01

    It has been established that the medial temporal lobe, including the hippocampus, is crucial for associative memory. The aim of the current functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study was to investigate whether the hippocampus is differentially activated for associations between items processed in the same neocortical region (within-domain)…

  19. Potential of mean force analysis of the self-association of leucine-rich transmembrane α-helices: Difference between atomistic and coarse-grained simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interaction of transmembrane (TM) proteins is important in many biological processes. Large-scale computational studies using coarse-grained (CG) simulations are becoming popular. However, most CG model parameters have not fully been calibrated with respect to lateral interactions of TM peptide segments. Here, we compare the potential of mean forces (PMFs) of dimerization of TM helices obtained using a MARTINI CG model and an atomistic (AT) Berger lipids-OPLS/AA model (ATOPLS). For helical, tryptophan-flanked, leucine-rich peptides (WL15 and WALP15) embedded in a parallel configuration in an octane slab, the ATOPLS PMF profiles showed a shallow minimum (with a depth of approximately 3 kJ/mol; i.e., a weak tendency to dimerize). A similar analysis using the CHARMM36 all-atom model (ATCHARMM) showed comparable results. In contrast, the CG analysis generally showed steep PMF curves with depths of approximately 16–22 kJ/mol, suggesting a stronger tendency to dimerize compared to the AT model. This CG > AT discrepancy in the propensity for dimerization was also seen for dilauroylphosphatidylcholine (DLPC)-embedded peptides. For a WL15 (and WALP15)/DLPC bilayer system, ATOPLS PMF showed a repulsive mean force for a wide range of interhelical distances, in contrast to the attractive forces observed in the octane system. The change from the octane slab to the DLPC bilayer also mitigated the dimerization propensity in the CG system. The dimerization energies of CG (AALALAA)3 peptides in DLPC and dioleoylphosphatidylcholine bilayers were in good agreement with previous experimental data. The lipid headgroup, but not the length of the lipid tails, was a key causative factor contributing to the differences between octane and DLPC. Furthermore, the CG model, but not the AT model, showed high sensitivity to changes in amino acid residues located near the lipid-water interface and hydrophobic mismatch between the peptides and membrane. These findings may help interpret CG and

  20. NMR Derived Model of GTPase Effector Domain (GED) Self Association: Relevance to Dynamin Assembly

    OpenAIRE

    Chakraborty, Swagata; Pratihar, Supriya; Hosur, Ramakrishna V.

    2012-01-01

    Self-association of dynamin to form spiral structures around lipidic vesicles during endocytosis is largely mediated by its ‘coiled coil’ GTPase Effector Domain (GED), which, in vitro, self-associates into huge helical assemblies. Residue-level structural characterizations of these assemblies and understanding the process of association have remained a challenge. It is also impossible to get folded monomers in the solution phase. In this context, we have developed here a strategy to probe the...

  1. Neutron Diffraction Studies of Fluid Bilayers with Transmembrane Proteins: Structural Consequences of the Achondroplasia Mutation

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Xue; Mihailescu, Mihaela; Hristova, Kalina

    2006-01-01

    Achondroplasia, the most common form of human dwarfism, is due to a G380R mutation in the transmembrane domain of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) in >97% of the studied cases. While the molecular mechanism of pathology induction is under debate, the structural consequences of the mutation have not been studied. Here we use neutron diffraction to determine the disposition of FGFR3 transmembrane domain in fluid lipid bilayers, and investigate whether the G380R mutation affects the t...

  2. Potential of mean force analysis of the self-association of leucine-rich transmembrane α-helices: Difference between atomistic and coarse-grained simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishizawa, Manami; Nishizawa, Kazuhisa, E-mail: kazunet@med.teikyo-u.ac.jp [Teikyo University School of Medical Technology, Itabashi, Tokyo (Japan)

    2014-08-21

    Interaction of transmembrane (TM) proteins is important in many biological processes. Large-scale computational studies using coarse-grained (CG) simulations are becoming popular. However, most CG model parameters have not fully been calibrated with respect to lateral interactions of TM peptide segments. Here, we compare the potential of mean forces (PMFs) of dimerization of TM helices obtained using a MARTINI CG model and an atomistic (AT) Berger lipids-OPLS/AA model (AT{sup OPLS}). For helical, tryptophan-flanked, leucine-rich peptides (WL15 and WALP15) embedded in a parallel configuration in an octane slab, the AT{sup OPLS} PMF profiles showed a shallow minimum (with a depth of approximately 3 kJ/mol; i.e., a weak tendency to dimerize). A similar analysis using the CHARMM36 all-atom model (AT{sup CHARMM}) showed comparable results. In contrast, the CG analysis generally showed steep PMF curves with depths of approximately 16–22 kJ/mol, suggesting a stronger tendency to dimerize compared to the AT model. This CG > AT discrepancy in the propensity for dimerization was also seen for dilauroylphosphatidylcholine (DLPC)-embedded peptides. For a WL15 (and WALP15)/DLPC bilayer system, AT{sup OPLS} PMF showed a repulsive mean force for a wide range of interhelical distances, in contrast to the attractive forces observed in the octane system. The change from the octane slab to the DLPC bilayer also mitigated the dimerization propensity in the CG system. The dimerization energies of CG (AALALAA){sub 3} peptides in DLPC and dioleoylphosphatidylcholine bilayers were in good agreement with previous experimental data. The lipid headgroup, but not the length of the lipid tails, was a key causative factor contributing to the differences between octane and DLPC. Furthermore, the CG model, but not the AT model, showed high sensitivity to changes in amino acid residues located near the lipid-water interface and hydrophobic mismatch between the peptides and membrane. These

  3. A Novel Topology of Proline-rich Transmembrane Protein 2 (PRRT2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Pia; Sterlini, Bruno; Castroflorio, Enrico; Marte, Antonella; Onofri, Franco; Valtorta, Flavia; Maragliano, Luca; Corradi, Anna; Benfenati, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Proline-rich transmembrane protein 2 (PRRT2) has been identified as the single causative gene for a group of paroxysmal syndromes of infancy, including epilepsy, paroxysmal movement disorders, and migraine. On the basis of topology predictions, PRRT2 has been assigned to the recently characterized family of Dispanins, whose members share the two-transmembrane domain topology with a large N terminus and short C terminus oriented toward the outside of the cell. Because PRRT2 plays a role at the synapse, it is important to confirm the exact orientation of its N and C termini with respect to the plasma membrane to get clues regarding its possible function. Using a combination of different experimental approaches, including live immunolabeling, immunogold electron microscopy, surface biotinylation and computational modeling, we demonstrate a novel topology for this protein. PRRT2 is a type II transmembrane protein in which only the second hydrophobic segment spans the plasma membrane, whereas the first one is associated with the internal surface of the membrane and forms a helix-loop-helix structure without crossing it. Most importantly, the large proline-rich N-terminal domain is not exposed to the extracellular space but is localized intracellularly, and only the short C terminus is extracellular (Ncyt/Cexo topology). Accordingly, we show that PRRT2 interacts with the Src homology 3 domain-bearing protein Intersectin 1, an intracellular protein involved in synaptic vesicle cycling. These findings will contribute to the clarification of the role of PRRT2 at the synapse and the understanding of pathogenic mechanisms on the basis of PRRT2-related neurological disorders. PMID:26797119

  4. Mechanistic insights into phosphopeptide--BRCT domain association: preorganization, flexibility, and phosphate recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-ming M; Kang, Myungshim; Chang, Chia-en A

    2012-08-30

    Promiscuous proteins are commonly observed in biological systems, for example, in modular domains that recognize phosphopeptides during signal transduction. This promiscuous recognition is of fundamental interest in chemistry and biology but is challenging when designing phosphopeptides in silico for cell biology studies. To investigate promiscuous recognition and binding processes of phosphopeptides and the modular domain, we selected a domain essential in breast cancer-the breast-cancer-associated protein 1 (BRCA1) C-terminal (BRCT) repeats as our model system. We performed molecular dynamics simulations and detailed analyses of the dihedral space to study protein fluctuation and conformational changes with phosphopeptide binding. We also studied the association processes of phosphorylated and unphosphorylated peptides using Brownian dynamics with a coarse-grained model. We found that the BRCT domain is preorganized for phosphopeptide binding but has a moderate arrangement of side chains to form complexes with various types of phosphopeptides. Phosphopeptide binding restricts the system motion in general, while the nonpolar phosphopeptide becomes more flexible in the bound state. Our analysis found that the BRCT domain utilizes different mechanisms, usually termed lock and key, induced-fit, and population-shift/conformational-selection models, to recognize peptides with different features. Brownian dynamics simulations revealed that the charged phosphate group may not always accelerate peptide association processes, but it helps the phosphopeptide orient into binding pockets accurately and stabilizes the complex. This work provides insights into molecular recognition in the promiscuous protein system. PMID:22857521

  5. Evolution of vertebrate interferon inducible transmembrane proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hickford Danielle

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interferon inducible transmembrane proteins (IFITMs have diverse roles, including the control of cell proliferation, promotion of homotypic cell adhesion, protection against viral infection, promotion of bone matrix maturation and mineralisation, and mediating germ cell development. Most IFITMs have been well characterised in human and mouse but little published data exists for other animals. This study characterised IFITMs in two distantly related marsupial species, the Australian tammar wallaby and the South American grey short-tailed opossum, and analysed the phylogeny of the IFITM family in vertebrates. Results Five IFITM paralogues were identified in both the tammar and opossum. As in eutherians, most marsupial IFITM genes exist within a cluster, contain two exons and encode proteins with two transmembrane domains. Only two IFITM genes, IFITM5 and IFITM10, have orthologues in both marsupials and eutherians. IFITM5 arose in bony fish and IFITM10 in tetrapods. The bone-specific expression of IFITM5 appears to be restricted to therian mammals, suggesting that its specialised role in bone production is a recent adaptation specific to mammals. IFITM10 is the most highly conserved IFITM, sharing at least 85% amino acid identity between birds, reptiles and mammals and suggesting an important role for this presently uncharacterised protein. Conclusions Like eutherians, marsupials also have multiple IFITM genes that exist in a gene cluster. The differing expression patterns for many of the paralogues, together with poor sequence conservation between species, suggests that IFITM genes have acquired many different roles during vertebrate evolution.

  6. Self-association of Transmembrane Domain 2 (TM2), but Not TM1, in Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase 1A: ROLE OF GXXXG(A) MOTIFS*

    OpenAIRE

    Jenei, Zsuzsanna A.; Borthwick, Karen; Zammit, Victor A.; Dixon, Ann M.

    2009-01-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1) controls the rate of entry of long-chain fatty acids into the mitochondrial matrix for β-oxidation and has been reported to exist as an oligomer. We have investigated the in vivo oligomerization of full-length rat CPT1A (rCPT1A) along with those of the N-terminal truncation/deletion mutants Δ(1–82), Δ(1–18), and Δ(19–30) expressed in yeast mitochondria. The data indicate that in liver mitochondria in vivo CPT1A exists as a he...

  7. The E2-25K ubiquitin-associated (UBA) domain aids in polyubiquitin chain synthesis and linkage specificity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → We examine the role of a ubiquitin-associated (UBA) domain in an E2 enzyme. → The E2-25K UBA domain directs polyubiquitin chain linkage specificity. → The E2-25K UBA domain regulates length of polyubiquitin chains synthesized. -- Abstract: E2-25K is an ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme with the ability to synthesize Lys48-linked polyubiquitin chains. E2-25K and its homologs represent the only known E2 enzymes which contain a C-terminal ubiquitin-associated (UBA) domain as well as the conserved catalytic ubiquitin-conjugating (UBC) domain. As an additional non-covalent binding surface for ubiquitin, the UBA domain must provide some functional specialization. We mapped the protein-protein interface involved in the E2-25K UBA/ubiquitin complex by solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and subsequently modeled the structure of the complex. Domain-domain interactions between the E2-25K catalytic UBC domain and the UBA domain do not induce significant structural changes in the UBA domain or alter the affinity of the UBA domain for ubiquitin. We determined that one of the roles of the C-terminal UBA domain, in the context of E2-25K, is to increase processivity in Lys48-linked polyubiquitin chain synthesis, possibly through increased binding to the ubiquitinated substrate. Additionally, we see evidence that the UBA domain directs specificity in polyubiquitin chain linkage.

  8. The association of heavy and light chain variable domains in antibodies: implications for antigen specificity.

    KAUST Repository

    Chailyan, Anna

    2011-06-28

    The antigen-binding site of immunoglobulins is formed by six regions, three from the light and three from the heavy chain variable domains, which, on association of the two chains, form the conventional antigen-binding site of the antibody. The mode of interaction between the heavy and light chain variable domains affects the relative position of the antigen-binding loops and therefore has an effect on the overall conformation of the binding site. In this article, we analyze the structure of the interface between the heavy and light chain variable domains and show that there are essentially two different modes for their interaction that can be identified by the presence of key amino acids in specific positions of the antibody sequences. We also show that the different packing modes are related to the type of recognized antigen.

  9. Charting the internal landscape: Affect associated with thoughts about major life domains explains life satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talya Miron-Shatz

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Studies of happiness have examined the impact of demographics, personality and emotions accompanying daily activities on life satisfaction. We suggest that how people feel while contemplating aspects of their lives, including their weight, children and future prospects, is a promising yet uncharted territory within the internal landscape of life satisfaction. In a sample of 811 American women, we assessed women's feelings when thinking about major life domains and frequency of thoughts about each domain. Regression and dominance analyses showed that emotional valence of thoughts about major life domains was an important predictor of current and prior life satisfaction, surpassing, in descending order, demographics, participants' feelings during recent activities, and their neuroticism and extraversion scores. Domains thought about more frequently were often associated with greater emotional valence. These results suggest that life satisfaction may be improved by modifying emotional valence and frequency of thoughts about life domains. Moreover, these thoughts appear to be an important and relatively stable component of well-being worthy of further study.

  10. Rigidity of transmembrane proteins determines their cluster shape

    CERN Document Server

    Jafarinia, Hamidreza; Jalali, Mir Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Protein aggregation in cell membrane is vital for majority of biological functions. Recent experimental results suggest that transmembrane domains of proteins such as $\\alpha$-helices and $\\beta$-sheets have different structural rigidity. We use molecular dynamics simulation of a coarse-grained model of protein-embedded lipid membranes to investigate the mechanisms of protein clustering. For a variety of protein concentrations, our simulations in thermal equilibrium conditions reveal that the structural rigidity of transmembrane domains dramatically affects interactions and changes the shape of the cluster. We have observed stable large aggregates even in the absence of hydrophobic mismatch which has been previously proposed as the mechanism of protein aggregation. According to our results, semi-flexible proteins aggregate to form two-dimensional clusters while rigid proteins, by contrast, form one-dimensional string-like structures. By assuming two probable scenarios for the formation of a two-dimensional tr...

  11. Molecular cloning of cDNA for the human tumor-associated antigen CO-029 and identification of related transmembrane antigens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szala, S.; Kasai, Yasushi; Steplewski, Z.; Rodeck, U.; Koprowski, H.; Linnenbach, A.J. (Wistar Inst. of Anatomy and Biology, Philadelphia, PA (USA))

    1990-09-01

    The human tumor-associated antigen CO-029 is a monoclonal antibody-defined cell surface glycoprotein of 27-34 kDa. By using the high-efficiency COS cell expression system, a full-length cDNA clone for CO-029 was isolated. When transiently expressed in COS cells, the cDNA clone directed the synthesis of an antigen reactive to monoclonal antibody CO-029 in mixed hemadsorption and immunoblot assays. Sequence analysis revealed that CO-029 belongs to a family of cell surface antigens that includes the melanoma-associated antigen ME491, the leukocyte cell surface antigen CD37, and the Sm23 antigen of the parasitic helminth Schistosoma mansoni. CO-029 and ME491 antigen expression and the effect of their corresponding monoclonal antibodies on cell growth were compared in human tumor cell lines of various histologic origins.

  12. Molecular cloning of cDNA for the human tumor-associated antigen CO-029 and identification of related transmembrane antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The human tumor-associated antigen CO-029 is a monoclonal antibody-defined cell surface glycoprotein of 27-34 kDa. By using the high-efficiency COS cell expression system, a full-length cDNA clone for CO-029 was isolated. When transiently expressed in COS cells, the cDNA clone directed the synthesis of an antigen reactive to monoclonal antibody CO-029 in mixed hemadsorption and immunoblot assays. Sequence analysis revealed that CO-029 belongs to a family of cell surface antigens that includes the melanoma-associated antigen ME491, the leukocyte cell surface antigen CD37, and the Sm23 antigen of the parasitic helminth Schistosoma mansoni. CO-029 and ME491 antigen expression and the effect of their corresponding monoclonal antibodies on cell growth were compared in human tumor cell lines of various histologic origins

  13. NMR derived model of GTPase effector domain (GED self association: relevance to dynamin assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swagata Chakraborty

    Full Text Available Self-association of dynamin to form spiral structures around lipidic vesicles during endocytosis is largely mediated by its 'coiled coil' GTPase Effector Domain (GED, which, in vitro, self-associates into huge helical assemblies. Residue-level structural characterizations of these assemblies and understanding the process of association have remained a challenge. It is also impossible to get folded monomers in the solution phase. In this context, we have developed here a strategy to probe the self-association of GED by first dissociating the assembly using Dimethyl Sulfoxide (DMSO and then systematically monitoring the refolding into helix and concomitant re-association using NMR spectroscopy, as DMSO concentration is progressively reduced. The short segment, Arg109 - Met116, acts as the nucleation site for helix formation and self-association. Hydrophobic and complementary charge interactions on the surfaces drive self-association, as the helices elongate in both the directions resulting in an antiparallel stack. A small N-terminal segment remains floppy in the assembly. Following these and other published results on inter-domain interactions, we have proposed a plausible mode of dynamin self assembly.

  14. Promiscuous and specific phospholipid binding by domains in ZAC, a membrane-associated Arabidopsis protein with an ARF GAP zinc finger and a C2 domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, R B; Lykke-Andersen, K; Frandsen, G I;

    2000-01-01

    and plasma membrane marker proteins. ZAC membrane association was confirmed in assays by a fusion between ZAC and the green fluorescence protein and prompted an analysis of the in vitro phospholipid-binding ability of ZAC. Phospholipid dot-blot and liposome-binding assays indicated that fusion proteins......Arabidopsis proteins were predicted which share an 80 residue zinc finger domain known from ADP-ribosylation factor GTPase-activating proteins (ARF GAPs). One of these is a 37 kDa protein, designated ZAC, which has a novel domain structure in which the N-terminal ARF GAP domain and a C-terminal C2...... domain are separated by a region without homology to other known proteins. Zac promoter/beta-glucuronidase reporter assays revealed highest expression levels in flowering tissue, rosettes and roots. ZAC protein was immuno-detected mainly in association with membranes and fractionated with Golgi...

  15. Structural and functional importance of transmembrane domain 3 (TM3) in the aspartate:alanine antiporter AspT: topology and function of the residues of TM3 and oligomerization of AspT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanatani, Kei; Maloney, Peter C; Abe, Keietsu

    2009-04-01

    AspT, the aspartate:alanine antiporter of Tetragenococcus halophilus, a membrane protein of 543 amino acids with 10 putative transmembrane (TM) helices, is the prototype of the aspartate:alanine exchanger (AAE) family of transporters. Because TM3 (isoleucine 64 to methionine 85) has many amino acid residues that are conserved among members of the AAE family and because TM3 contains two charged residues and four polar residues, it is thought to be located near (or to form part of) the substrate translocation pathway that includes the binding site for the substrates. To elucidate the role of TM3 in the transport process, we carried out cysteine-scanning mutagenesis. The substitutions of tyrosine 75 and serine 84 had the strongest inhibitory effects on transport (initial rates of l-aspartate transport were below 15% of the rate for cysteine-less AspT). Considerable but less-marked effects were observed upon the replacement of methionine 70, phenylalanine 71, glycine 74, arginine 76, serine 83, and methionine 85 (initial rates between 15% and 30% of the rate for cysteine-less AspT). Introduced cysteine residues at the cytoplasmic half of TM3 could be labeled with Oregon green maleimide (OGM), whereas cysteines close to the periplasmic half (residues 64 to 75) were not labeled. These results suggest that TM3 has a hydrophobic core on the periplasmic half and that hydrophilic residues on the cytoplasmic half of TM3 participate in the formation of an aqueous cavity in membranes. Furthermore, the presence of l-aspartate protected the cysteine introduced at glycine 62 against a reaction with OGM. In contrast, l-aspartate stimulated the reactivity of the cysteine introduced at proline 79 with OGM. These results demonstrate that TM3 undergoes l-aspartate-induced conformational alterations. In addition, nonreducing sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analyses and a glutaraldehyde cross-linking assay suggest that functional AspT forms homo-oligomers as a

  16. Structural and Functional Importance of Transmembrane Domain 3 (TM3) in the Aspartate:Alanine Antiporter AspT: Topology and Function of the Residues of TM3 and Oligomerization of AspT▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanatani, Kei; Maloney, Peter C.; Abe, Keietsu

    2009-01-01

    AspT, the aspartate:alanine antiporter of Tetragenococcus halophilus, a membrane protein of 543 amino acids with 10 putative transmembrane (TM) helices, is the prototype of the aspartate:alanine exchanger (AAE) family of transporters. Because TM3 (isoleucine 64 to methionine 85) has many amino acid residues that are conserved among members of the AAE family and because TM3 contains two charged residues and four polar residues, it is thought to be located near (or to form part of) the substrate translocation pathway that includes the binding site for the substrates. To elucidate the role of TM3 in the transport process, we carried out cysteine-scanning mutagenesis. The substitutions of tyrosine 75 and serine 84 had the strongest inhibitory effects on transport (initial rates of l-aspartate transport were below 15% of the rate for cysteine-less AspT). Considerable but less-marked effects were observed upon the replacement of methionine 70, phenylalanine 71, glycine 74, arginine 76, serine 83, and methionine 85 (initial rates between 15% and 30% of the rate for cysteine-less AspT). Introduced cysteine residues at the cytoplasmic half of TM3 could be labeled with Oregon green maleimide (OGM), whereas cysteines close to the periplasmic half (residues 64 to 75) were not labeled. These results suggest that TM3 has a hydrophobic core on the periplasmic half and that hydrophilic residues on the cytoplasmic half of TM3 participate in the formation of an aqueous cavity in membranes. Furthermore, the presence of l-aspartate protected the cysteine introduced at glycine 62 against a reaction with OGM. In contrast, l-aspartate stimulated the reactivity of the cysteine introduced at proline 79 with OGM. These results demonstrate that TM3 undergoes l-aspartate-induced conformational alterations. In addition, nonreducing sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analyses and a glutaraldehyde cross-linking assay suggest that functional AspT forms homo-oligomers as a

  17. Ethnic Variation in the Cross-sectional Association between Domains of Depressive Symptoms and Clinical Depression

    OpenAIRE

    Assari, Shervin; Moazen-Zadeh, Ehsan

    2016-01-01

    Background The degree by which depressive symptoms and clinical depression reflect each other may vary across populations. The present study compared Blacks and Whites for the magnitude of the cross-sectional associations between various domains of depressive symptoms and endorsement of clinical disorders of depression. Methods Data came from the National Survey of American Life, 2001–2003. We included 3570 Black (African-Americans) and 891 Non-Hispanic Whites. Predictors were positive affect...

  18. Ethnic Variation in the Cross-sectional Association between Domains of Depressive Symptoms and Clinical Depression

    OpenAIRE

    Shervin eAssari; Ehsan eMoazen Zadeh

    2016-01-01

    BackgroundThe degree by which depressive symptoms and clinical depression reflect each other may vary across populations. The present study compared Blacks and Whites for the magnitude of the cross-sectional associations between various domains of depressive symptoms and endorsement of clinical disorders of depression. MethodsData came from the National Survey of American Life (NSAL), 2001–2003. We included 3,570 Black (African Americans), and 891 Non-Hispanic Whites. Predictors were positive...

  19. Intranuclear targeting of AML/CBFα regulatory factors to nuclear matrix-associated transcriptional domains

    OpenAIRE

    Zeng, Congmei; McNeil, Sandra; Pockwinse, Shirwin; Nickerson, Jeffrey; Shopland, Lindsay; Lawrence, Jeanne B.; Penman, Sheldon; Hiebert, Scott; Lian, Jane B.; van Wijnen, André J.; Stein, Janet L.; Stein, Gary S.

    1998-01-01

    The AML/CBFα runt transcription factors are key regulators of hematopoietic and bone tissue-specific gene expression. These factors contain a 31-amino acid nuclear matrix targeting signal that supports association with the nuclear matrix. We determined that the AML/CBFα factors must bind to the nuclear matrix to exert control of transcription. Fusing the nuclear matrix targeting signal to the GAL4 DNA binding domain transactivates a genomically integrated GAL4 responsive reporter gene. These ...

  20. The intracellular domain of teneurin-1 induces the activity of microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) by binding to transcriptional repressor HINT1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöler, Jonas; Ferralli, Jacqueline; Thiry, Stéphane; Chiquet-Ehrismann, Ruth

    2015-03-27

    Teneurins are large type II transmembrane proteins that are necessary for the normal development of the CNS. Although many studies highlight the significance of teneurins, especially during development, there is only limited information known about the molecular mechanisms of function. Previous studies have shown that the N-terminal intracellular domain (ICD) of teneurins can be cleaved at the membrane and subsequently translocates to the nucleus, where it can influence gene transcription. Because teneurin ICDs do not contain any intrinsic DNA binding sequences, interaction partners are required to affect transcription. Here, we identified histidine triad nucleotide binding protein 1 (HINT1) as a human teneurin-1 ICD interaction partner in a yeast two-hybrid screen. This interaction was confirmed in human cells, where HINT1 is known to inhibit the transcription of target genes by directly binding to transcription factors at the promoter. In a whole transcriptome analysis of BS149 glioblastoma cells overexpressing the teneurin-1 ICD, several microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) target genes were found to be up-regulated. Directly comparing the transcriptomes of MITF versus TEN1-ICD-overexpressing BS149 cells revealed 42 co-regulated genes, including glycoprotein non-metastatic b (GPNMB). Using real-time quantitative PCR to detect endogenous GPNMB expression upon overexpression of MITF and HINT1 as well as promoter reporter assays using GPNMB promoter constructs, we could demonstrate that the teneurin-1 ICD binds HINT1, thus switching on MITF-dependent transcription of GPNMB. PMID:25648896

  1. Intracellular membrane association of the N-terminal domain of classical swine fever virus NS4B determines viral genome replication and virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Tomokazu; Ruggli, Nicolas; Nagashima, Naofumi; Okamatsu, Masatoshi; Igarashi, Manabu; Mine, Junki; Hofmann, Martin A; Liniger, Matthias; Summerfield, Artur; Kida, Hiroshi; Sakoda, Yoshihiro

    2015-09-01

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) causes a highly contagious disease in pigs that can range from a severe haemorrhagic fever to a nearly unapparent disease, depending on the virulence of the virus strain. Little is known about the viral molecular determinants of CSFV virulence. The nonstructural protein NS4B is essential for viral replication. However, the roles of CSFV NS4B in viral genome replication and pathogenesis have not yet been elucidated. NS4B of the GPE-  vaccine strain and of the highly virulent Eystrup strain differ by a total of seven amino acid residues, two of which are located in the predicted trans-membrane domains of NS4B and were described previously to relate to virulence, and five residues clustering in the N-terminal part. In the present study, we examined the potential role of these five amino acids in modulating genome replication and determining pathogenicity in pigs. A chimeric low virulent GPE- -derived virus carrying the complete Eystrup NS4B showed enhanced pathogenicity in pigs. The in vitro replication efficiency of the NS4B chimeric GPE-  replicon was significantly higher than that of the replicon carrying only the two Eystrup-specific amino acids in NS4B. In silico and in vitro data suggest that the N-terminal part of NS4B forms an amphipathic α-helix structure. The N-terminal NS4B with these five amino acid residues is associated with the intracellular membranes. Taken together, this is the first gain-of-function study showing that the N-terminal domain of NS4B can determine CSFV genome replication in cell culture and viral pathogenicity in pigs. PMID:26018962

  2. NMR-based approach to measure the free energy of transmembrane helix-helix interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mineev, Konstantin S; Lesovoy, Dmitry M; Usmanova, Dinara R; Goncharuk, Sergey A; Shulepko, Mikhail A; Lyukmanova, Ekaterina N; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail P; Bocharov, Eduard V; Arseniev, Alexander S

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of the energetic parameters of transmembrane helix-helix interactions is necessary for the establishment of a structure-energy relationship for α-helical membrane domains. A number of techniques have been developed to measure the free energies of dimerization and oligomerization of transmembrane α-helices, and all of these have their advantages and drawbacks. In this study we propose a methodology to determine the magnitudes of the free energy of interactions between transmembrane helices in detergent micelles. The suggested approach employs solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to determine the population of the oligomeric states of the transmembrane domains and introduces a new formalism to describe the oligomerization equilibrium, which is based on the assumption that both the dimerization of the transmembrane domains and the dissociation of the dimer can occur only upon the collision of detergent micelles. The technique has three major advantages compared with other existing approaches: it may be used to analyze both weak and relatively strong dimerization/oligomerization processes, it works well for the analysis of complex equilibria, e.g. when monomer, dimer and high-order oligomer populations are simultaneously present in the solution, and it can simultaneously yield both structural and energetic characteristics of the helix-helix interaction under study. The proposed methodology was applied to investigate the oligomerization process of transmembrane domains of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) and vascular endothelium growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2), and allowed the measurement of the free energy of dimerization of both of these objects. In addition the proposed method was able to describe the multi-state oligomerization process of the VEGFR2 transmembrane domain. PMID:24036227

  3. The C2A domain in dysferlin is important for association with MG53 (TRIM72)

    OpenAIRE

    Matsuda, Chie; Miyake, Katsuya; Kameyama, Kimihiko; Keduka, Etsuko; Takeshima, Hiroshi; Imamura, Toru; Araki, Nobukazu; NISHINO, Ichizo; Hayashi, Yukiko

    2012-01-01

    In skeletal muscle, Mitsugumin 53 (MG53), also known as muscle-specific tripartite motif 72, reportedly interacts with dysferlin to regulate membrane repair. To better understand the interactions between dysferlin and MG53, we conducted immunoprecipitation (IP) and pull-down assays. Based on IP assays, the C2A domain in dysferlin associated with MG53. MG53 reportedly exists as a monomer, a homodimer, or an oligomer, depending on the redox state. Based on pull-down assays, wild-type dysferlin ...

  4. Kinase Associated-1 Domains Drive MARK/PAR1 Kinases to Membrane Targets by Binding Acidic Phospholipids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moravcevic, Katarina; Mendrola, Jeannine M.; Schmitz, Karl R.; Wang, Yu-Hsiu; Slochower, David; Janmey, Paul A.; Lemmon, Mark A. (UPENN-MED)

    2011-09-28

    Phospholipid-binding modules such as PH, C1, and C2 domains play crucial roles in location-dependent regulation of many protein kinases. Here, we identify the KA1 domain (kinase associated-1 domain), found at the C terminus of yeast septin-associated kinases (Kcc4p, Gin4p, and Hsl1p) and human MARK/PAR1 kinases, as a membrane association domain that binds acidic phospholipids. Membrane localization of isolated KA1 domains depends on phosphatidylserine. Using X-ray crystallography, we identified a structurally conserved binding site for anionic phospholipids in KA1 domains from Kcc4p and MARK1. Mutating this site impairs membrane association of both KA1 domains and intact proteins and reveals the importance of phosphatidylserine for bud neck localization of yeast Kcc4p. Our data suggest that KA1 domains contribute to coincidence detection, allowing kinases to bind other regulators (such as septins) only at the membrane surface. These findings have important implications for understanding MARK/PAR1 kinases, which are implicated in Alzheimer's disease, cancer, and autism.

  5. Evolution of a domain conserved in microtubule-associated proteins of eukaryotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex S Rajangam

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Alex S Rajangam1, Hongqian Yang2, Tuula T Teeri1, Lars Arvestad21KTH Biotechnology, Swedish Center for Biomimetic Fiber Engineering, AlbaNova, Stockholm, Sweden; 2Stockholm Bioinformatics Center and School of Computer Science and Communication, Royal Institute of Technology, AlbaNova, Stockholm, SwedenAbstract: The microtubule network, the major organelle of the eukaryotic cytoskeleton, is involved in cell division and differentiation but also with many other cellular functions. In plants, microtubules seem to be involved in the ordered deposition of cellulose microfibrils by a so far unknown mechanism. Microtubule-associated proteins (MAP typically contain various domains targeting or binding proteins with different functions to microtubules. Here we have investigated a proposed microtubule-targeting domain, TPX2, first identified in the Kinesin-like protein 2 in Xenopus. A TPX2 containing microtubule binding protein, PttMAP20, has been recently identified in poplar tissues undergoing xylogenesis. Furthermore, the herbicide 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile (DCB, which is a known inhibitor of cellulose synthesis, was shown to bind specifically to PttMAP20. It is thus possible that PttMAP20 may have a role in coupling cellulose biosynthesis and the microtubular networks in poplar secondary cell walls. In order to get more insight into the occurrence, evolution and potential functions of TPX2-containing proteins we have carried out bioinformatic analysis for all genes so far found to encode TPX2 domains with special reference to poplar PttMAP20 and its putative orthologs in other plants.Keywords: TPX2 domain, MAP20, evolution, microtubule, cellulose, bioinformatics

  6. Domain General and Domain Preferential Brain Regions Associated with Different Types of Task Switching: A Meta-Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Chobok; Cilles, Sara E.; Johnson, Nathan F.; Gold, Brian T.

    2011-01-01

    One of our highest evolved functions as human beings is our capacity to switch between multiple tasks effectively. A body of research has identified a distributed frontoparietal network of brain regions which contribute to task switching. However, relatively less is known about whether some brain regions may contribute to switching in a domain-general manner while others may be more preferential for different kinds of switching. To explore this issue, we conducted three meta-analyses focusing...

  7. Interfacial binding and aggregation of lamin A tail domains associated with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinowski, Agnieszka; Yaron, Peter N.; Qin, Zhao; Shenoy, Siddharth; Buehler, Markus J.; Lösche, Mathias; Dahl, Kris Noel

    2014-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome is a premature aging disorder associated with the expression of Δ50 lamin A (Δ50LA), a mutant form of the nuclear structural protein lamin A (LA). Δ50LA is missing 50 amino acids from the tail domain and retains a C-terminal farnesyl group that is cleaved from the wild-type LA. Many of the cellular pathologies of HGPS are thought to be a consequence of protein-membrane association mediated by the retained farnesyl group. To better characterize the protein-membrane interface, we quantified binding of purified recombinant Δ50LA tail domain (Δ50LA-TD) to tethered bilayer membranes composed of phosphatidylserine and phosphocholine using surface plasmon resonance. Farnesylated Δ50LATD binds to the membrane interface only in the presence of Ca2+ or Mg2+ at physiological ionic strength. At extremely low ionic strength, both the farnesylated and non-farnesylated forms of Δ50LA-TD bind to the membrane surface in amounts that exceed those expected for a densely packed protein monolayer. Interestingly, the wild-type LA-TD with no farnesylation also associates with membranes at low ionic strength but forms only a single layer. We suggest that electrostatic interactions are mediated by charge clusters with a net positive charge that we calculate on the surface of the LA-TDs. These studies suggest that the accumulation of Δ50LA at the inner nuclear membrane observed in cells is due to a combination of aggregation and membrane association rather than simple membrane binding; electrostatics plays an important role in mediating this association. PMID:25194277

  8. A Novel Topology of Proline-rich Transmembrane Protein 2 (PRRT2): HINTS FOR AN INTRACELLULAR FUNCTION AT THE SYNAPSE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Pia; Sterlini, Bruno; Castroflorio, Enrico; Marte, Antonella; Onofri, Franco; Valtorta, Flavia; Maragliano, Luca; Corradi, Anna; Benfenati, Fabio

    2016-03-18

    Proline-rich transmembrane protein 2 (PRRT2) has been identified as the single causative gene for a group of paroxysmal syndromes of infancy, including epilepsy, paroxysmal movement disorders, and migraine. On the basis of topology predictions, PRRT2 has been assigned to the recently characterized family of Dispanins, whose members share the two-transmembrane domain topology with a large N terminus and short C terminus oriented toward the outside of the cell. Because PRRT2 plays a role at the synapse, it is important to confirm the exact orientation of its N and C termini with respect to the plasma membrane to get clues regarding its possible function. Using a combination of different experimental approaches, including live immunolabeling, immunogold electron microscopy, surface biotinylation and computational modeling, we demonstrate a novel topology for this protein. PRRT2 is a type II transmembrane protein in which only the second hydrophobic segment spans the plasma membrane, whereas the first one is associated with the internal surface of the membrane and forms a helix-loop-helix structure without crossing it. Most importantly, the large proline-rich N-terminal domain is not exposed to the extracellular space but is localized intracellularly, and only the short C terminus is extracellular (Ncyt/Cexo topology). Accordingly, we show that PRRT2 interacts with the Src homology 3 domain-bearing protein Intersectin 1, an intracellular protein involved in synaptic vesicle cycling. These findings will contribute to the clarification of the role of PRRT2 at the synapse and the understanding of pathogenic mechanisms on the basis of PRRT2-related neurological disorders. PMID:26797119

  9. Obif, a Transmembrane Protein, Is Required for Bone Mineralization and Spermatogenesis in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Mizuhashi

    Full Text Available Various kinds of transmembrane and secreted proteins play pivotal roles in development through cell-cell communication. We previously reported that Obif (Osteoblast induction factor, Tmem119, encoding a single transmembrane protein, is expressed in differentiating osteoblasts, and that Obif-/- mice exhibit significantly reduced bone volume in the femur. In the current study, we characterized the Obif protein and further investigated the biological phenotypes of a variety of tissues in Obif-/- mice.First, we found that O-glycosylation of the Obif protein occurs at serine residue 36 in the Obif extracellular domain. Next, we observed that Obif-/- mice exhibit bone dysplasia in association with significantly increased osteoid volume per osteoid surface (OV/OS and osteoid maturation time (Omt, and significantly decreased mineral apposition rate (MAR and bone formation rate per bone surface (BFR/BS. In addition, we observed that Obif-/- mice show a significant decrease in testis weight as well as in sperm number. By histological analysis, we found that Obif is expressed in spermatocytes and spermatids in the developing testis and that spermatogenesis is halted at the round spermatid stage in the Obif-/- testis that lacks sperm. However, the number of litters fathered by male mice was slightly reduced in Obif-/- mice compared with wild-type mice, although this was not statistically significant.Our results, taken together with previous observations, indicate that Obif is a type Ia transmembrane protein whose N-terminal region is O-glycosylated. In addition, we found that Obif is required for normal bone mineralization and late testicular differentiation in vivo. These findings suggest that Obif plays essential roles in the development of multiple tissues.

  10. Domain dependent associations between cognitive functioning and regular voluntary exercise behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swagerman, Suzanne C; de Geus, Eco J C; Koenis, Marinka M G; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E; Boomsma, Dorret I; Kan, Kees-Jan

    2015-07-01

    Regular exercise has often been suggested to have beneficial effects on cognition, but empirical findings are mixed because of heterogeneity in sample composition (age and sex); the cognitive domain being investigated; the definition and reliability of exercise behavior measures; and study design (e.g., observational versus experimental). Our aim was to scrutinize the domain specificity of exercise effects on cognition, while controlling for the other sources of heterogeneity. In a population based sample consisting of 472 males and 668 females (aged 10-86 years old) we administered the Computerized Neurocognitive Battery (CNB), which provided accuracy and speed measures of abstraction and mental flexibility, attention, working memory, memory (verbal, face, and spatial), language and nonverbal reasoning, spatial ability, emotion identification, emotion- and age differentiation, sensorimotor speed, and motor speed. Using univariate and multivariate regression models, CNB scores were associated with participants' average energy expenditure per week (weekly METhours), which were derived from a questionnaire on voluntary regular leisure time exercise behavior. Univariate models yielded generally positive associations between weekly METhours and cognitive accuracy and speed, but multivariate modeling demonstrated that direct relations were small and centered around zero. The largest and only significant effect size (β = 0.11, p < 0.001) was on the continuous performance test, which measures attention. Our results suggest that in the base population, any chronic effects of voluntary regular leisure time exercise on cognition are limited. Only a relation between exercise and attention inspires confidence. PMID:25956142

  11. TWEAK-independent Fn14 self-association and NF-κB activation is mediated by the C-terminal region of the Fn14 cytoplasmic domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharron A N Brown

    Full Text Available The tumor necrosis factor (TNF superfamily member TNF-like weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK is a pro-inflammatory and pro-angiogenic cytokine implicated in physiological tissue regeneration and wound repair. TWEAK binds to a 102-amino acid type I transmembrane cell surface receptor named fibroblast growth factor-inducible 14 (Fn14. TWEAK:Fn14 engagement activates several intracellular signaling cascades, including the NF-κB pathway, and sustained Fn14 signaling has been implicated in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory diseases and cancer. Although several groups are developing TWEAK- or Fn14-targeted agents for therapeutic use, much more basic science research is required before we fully understand the TWEAK/Fn14 signaling axis. For example, we and others have proposed that TWEAK-independent Fn14 signaling may occur in cells when Fn14 levels are highly elevated, but this idea has never been tested directly. In this report, we first demonstrate TWEAK-independent Fn14 signaling by showing that an Fn14 deletion mutant that is unable to bind TWEAK can activate the NF-κB pathway in transfected cells. We then show that ectopically-expressed, cell surface-localized Fn14 can self-associate into Fn14 dimers, and we show that Fn14 self-association is mediated by an 18-aa region within the Fn14 cytoplasmic domain. Endogenously-expressed Fn14 as well as ectopically-overexpressed Fn14 could also be detected in dimeric form when cell lysates were subjected to SDS-PAGE under non-reducing conditions. Additional experiments revealed that Fn14 dimerization occurs during cell lysis via formation of an intermolecular disulfide bond at cysteine residue 122. These findings provide insight into the Fn14 signaling mechanism and may aid current studies to develop therapeutic agents targeting this small cell surface receptor.

  12. An Autonomously Reciprocating Transmembrane Nanoactuator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Matthew A; Cockroft, Scott L

    2016-01-22

    Biological molecular machines operate far from equilibrium by coupling chemical potential to repeated cycles of dissipative nanomechanical motion. This principle has been exploited in supramolecular systems that exhibit true machine behavior in solution and on surfaces. However, designed membrane-spanning assemblies developed to date have been limited to simple switches or stochastic shuttles, and true machine behavior has remained elusive. Herein, we present a transmembrane nanoactuator that turns over chemical fuel to drive autonomous reciprocating (back-and-forth) nanomechanical motion. Ratcheted reciprocating motion of a DNA/PEG copolymer threaded through a single α-hemolysin pore was induced by a combination of DNA strand displacement processes and enzyme-catalyzed reactions. Ion-current recordings revealed saw-tooth patterns, indicating that the assemblies operated in autonomous, asymmetric cycles of conformational change at rates of up to one cycle per minute. PMID:26661295

  13. The role of palmitoylation and transmembrane domain in sorting of transmembrane adaptor proteins

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chum, Tomáš; Glatzová, Daniela; Kvíčalová, Zuzana; Malínský, Jan; Brdička, Tomáš; Cebecauer, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 129, č. 1 (2016), s. 95-107. ISSN 0021-9533 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 ; RVO:68378050 ; RVO:68378041 Keywords : LAT * PAG * Palmitoylation Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 5.432, year: 2014

  14. Mapping the Structural Requirements in the CB1 Cannabinoid Receptor Transmembrane Helix II for Signal Transduction

    OpenAIRE

    Kapur, Ankur; Samaniego, Patrick; Thakur, Ganesh A.; Makriyannis, Alexandros; Abood, Mary E.

    2008-01-01

    Amino acid residues in the transmembrane domains of the CB1 receptor are important for ligand recognition and signal transduction. We used site-directed mutagenesis to identify the role of two novel and adjacent residues in the transmembrane helix II domain, Ile2.62 and Asp2.63. We investigated the role of the conserved, negatively charged aspartate at position 2.63 in cannabinoid receptor (CB1) function by substituting it with asparagine (D2.63N) and glutamate (D2.63E). In addition, the effe...

  15. Characterization and Evolution of the Cell Cycle-Associated Mob Domain-Containing Proteins in Eukaryotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Vitulo

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The MOB family includes a group of cell cycle-associated proteins highly conserved throughout eukaryotes, whose founding members are implicated in mitotic exit and co-ordination of cell cycle progression with cell polarity and morphogenesis. Here we report the characterization and evolution of the MOB domain-containing proteins as inferred from the 43 eukaryotic genomes so far sequenced. We show that genes for Mob-like proteins are present in at least 41 of these genomes, confi rming the universal distribution of this protein family and suggesting its prominent biological function. The phylogenetic analysis reveals fi ve distinct MOB domain classes, showing a progressive expansion of this family from unicellular to multicellular organisms, reaching the highest number in mammals. Plant Mob genes appear to have evolved from a single ancestor, most likely after the loss of one or more genes during the early stage of Viridiplantae evolutionary history. Three of the Mob classes are widespread among most of the analyzed organisms. The possible biological and molecular function of Mob proteins and their role in conserved signaling pathways related to cell proliferation, cell death and cell polarity are also presented and critically discussed.

  16. Transmembrane Helix Assembly by Max-Min Ant System Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sujaree, Kanon; Kitjaruwankul, Sunan; Boonamnaj, Panisak; Supunyabut, Chirayut; Sompornpisut, Pornthep

    2015-12-01

    Because of the rapid progress in biochemical and structural studies of membrane proteins, considerable attention has been given on developing efficient computational methods for solving low-to-medium resolution structures using sparse structural data. In this study, we demonstrate a novel algorithm, max-min ant system (MMAS), designed to find an assembly of α-helical transmembrane proteins using a rigid helix arrangement guided by distance constraints. The new algorithm generates a large variety with finite number of orientations of transmembrane helix bundle and finds the solution that is matched with the provided distance constraints based on the behavior of ants to search for the shortest possible path between their nest and the food source. To demonstrate the efficiency of the novel search algorithm, MMAS is applied to determine the transmembrane packing of KcsA and MscL ion channels from a limited distance information extracted from the crystal structures, and the packing of KvAP voltage sensor domain using a set of 10 experimentally determined constraints, and the results are compared with those of two popular used stochastic methods, simulated annealing Monte Carlo method and genetic algorithm. PMID:26058409

  17. Fas-Associated Protein with Death Domain Regulates Notch Signaling during Muscle Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rong; Wang, Lu; He, Liangqiang; Yang, Bingya; Yao, Chun; Du, Pan; Xu, Qiang; Cheng, Wei; Hua, Zi-Chun

    2014-01-01

    Notch signaling plays critical roles during myogenesis by promoting the proliferation and inhibiting the differentiation of myogenic progenitors. However, the mechanism of the temporal regulation of Notch signaling during the myogenic lineage progression remains elusive. In the present study, we show that a constitutively phosphoryl-mimicking mutation of Fas-associated death domain (FADD-D) enhances Notch-1 signaling and compromises Wnt signaling in both cultured myoblasts and regenerating muscles, which results in inhibited myogenic differentiation and muscle regeneration. Inhibition of Notch signaling recovers the regeneration ability in injured FADD-D muscles through rescuing Wnt signaling. Furthermore, we found that protein kinase Cα mediates FADD-D-induced Notch-1 signaling by stabilizing Notch-1. Collectively, these data identify a novel mechanism for the temporal regulation of Notch signaling during myogenic lineage progression and muscle regeneration. PMID:26303234

  18. A Business Intelligence Model to Predict Bankruptcy using Financial Domain Ontology with Association Rule Mining Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Martin

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Today in every organization financial analysis provides the basis for understanding and evaluating the results of business operations and delivering how well a business is doing. This means that the organizations can control the operational activities primarily related to corporate finance. One way that doing this is by analysis of bankruptcy prediction. This paper develops an ontological model from financial information of an organization by analyzing the Semantics of the financial statement of a business. One of the best bankruptcy prediction models is Altman Z-score model. Altman Z-score method uses financial rations to predict bankruptcy. From the financial ontological model the relation between financial data is discovered by using data mining algorithm. By combining financial domain ontological model with association rule mining algorithm and Z-score model a new business intelligence model is developed to predict the bankruptcy.

  19. A Business Intelligence Model to Predict Bankruptcy using Financial Domain Ontology with Association Rule Mining Algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, A; Venkatesan, Dr V Prasanna

    2011-01-01

    Today in every organization financial analysis provides the basis for understanding and evaluating the results of business operations and delivering how well a business is doing. This means that the organizations can control the operational activities primarily related to corporate finance. One way that doing this is by analysis of bankruptcy prediction. This paper develops an ontological model from financial information of an organization by analyzing the Semantics of the financial statement of a business. One of the best bankruptcy prediction models is Altman Z-score model. Altman Z-score method uses financial rations to predict bankruptcy. From the financial ontological model the relation between financial data is discovered by using data mining algorithm. By combining financial domain ontological model with association rule mining algorithm and Zscore model a new business intelligence model is developed to predict the bankruptcy.

  20. The PAM domain, a multi-protein complex-associated module with an all-alpha-helix fold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izaurralde Elisa

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multimeric protein complexes have a role in many cellular pathways and are highly interconnected with various other proteins. The characterization of their domain composition and organization provides useful information on the specific role of each region of their sequence. Results We identified a new module, the PAM domain (PCI/PINT associated module, present in single subunits of well characterized multiprotein complexes, like the regulatory lid of the 26S proteasome, the COP-9 signalosome and the Sac3-Thp1 complex. This module is an around 200 residue long domain with a predicted TPR-like all-alpha-helical fold. Conclusions The occurrence of the PAM domain in specific subunits of multimeric protein complexes, together with the role of other all-alpha-helical folds in protein-protein interactions, suggest a function for this domain in mediating transient binding to diverse target proteins.

  1. A screen for nuclear transcripts identifies two linked noncoding RNAs associated with SC35 splicing domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynch Christopher R

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Noncoding RNA species play a diverse set of roles in the eukaryotic cell. While much recent attention has focused on smaller RNA species, larger noncoding transcripts are also thought to be highly abundant in mammalian cells. To search for large noncoding RNAs that might control gene expression or mRNA metabolism, we used Affymetrix expression arrays to identify polyadenylated RNA transcripts displaying nuclear enrichment. Results This screen identified no more than three transcripts; XIST, and two unique noncoding nuclear enriched abundant transcripts (NEAT RNAs strikingly located less than 70 kb apart on human chromosome 11: NEAT1, a noncoding RNA from the locus encoding for TncRNA, and NEAT2 (also known as MALAT-1. While the two NEAT transcripts share no significant homology with each other, each is conserved within the mammalian lineage, suggesting significant function for these noncoding RNAs. NEAT2 is extraordinarily well conserved for a noncoding RNA, more so than even XIST. Bioinformatic analyses of publicly available mouse transcriptome data support our findings from human cells as they confirm that the murine homologs of these noncoding RNAs are also nuclear enriched. RNA FISH analyses suggest that these noncoding RNAs function in mRNA metabolism as they demonstrate an intimate association of these RNA species with SC35 nuclear speckles in both human and mouse cells. These studies show that one of these transcripts, NEAT1 localizes to the periphery of such domains, whereas the neighboring transcript, NEAT2, is part of the long-sought polyadenylated component of nuclear speckles. Conclusion Our genome-wide screens in two mammalian species reveal no more than three abundant large non-coding polyadenylated RNAs in the nucleus; the canonical large noncoding RNA XIST and NEAT1 and NEAT2. The function of these noncoding RNAs in mRNA metabolism is suggested by their high levels of conservation and their intimate

  2. Robust Face Recognition by Hierarchical Kernel Associative Memory Models Based on Spatial Domain Gabor Transforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bai-ling Zhang

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Face recognition can be studied as an associative memory (AM problem and kernel-based AM models have been proven efficient. In this paper, a hierarchical Kernel Associative Memory (KAM face recognition scheme with a multiscale Gabor transform, is proposed. The pyramidal multiscale Gabor decomposition proposed by Nestares, Navarro, Portilla and Tabernero not only provides a very efficient implementation of the Gabor transform in the spatial domain, but also permits a fast reconstruction of images. In our method, face images of each person are first decomposed into their multiscale representations by a quasicomplete Gabor transform, which are then modelled by Kernel Associative Memories. In the recognition stage, a query face image is also represented by a Gabor multiresolution pyramid and the reconstructions from different KAM models corresponding to even Gabor channels are then simply summed to give the recall. The recognition scheme was thoroughly tested using several benchmarking face datasets, including the AR faces, UMIST faces, JAFFE faces and Yale A faces, which include different kind of face variations from occlusions, pose, expression and illumination. The experiment results show that the proposed method demonstrated strong robustness in recognizing faces under different conditions, particularly under occlusions, pose alterations and expression changes.

  3. Biophysical Aspects of Transmembrane Signaling

    CERN Document Server

    Damjanovich, Sandor

    2005-01-01

    Transmembrane signaling is one of the most significant cell biological events in the life and death of cells in general and lymphocytes in particular. Until recently biochemists and biophysicists were not accustomed to thinking of these processes from the side of a high number of complex biochemical events and an equally high number of physical changes at molecular and cellular levels at the same time. Both types of researchers were convinced that their findings are the most decisive, having higher importance than the findings of the other scientist population. Both casts were wrong. Life, even at cellular level, has a number of interacting physical and biochemical mechanisms, which finally build up the creation of an "excited" cell that will respond to particular signals from the outer or inner world. This book handles both aspects of the signalling events, and in some cases tries to unify our concepts and help understand the signals that govern the life and death of our cells. Not only the understanding, bu...

  4. Cooperative Transmembrane Penetration of Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haizhen; Ji, Qiuju; Huang, Changjin; Zhang, Sulin; Yuan, Bing; Yang, Kai; Ma, Yu-qiang

    2015-01-01

    Physical penetration of lipid bilayer membranes presents an alternative pathway for cellular delivery of nanoparticles (NPs) besides endocytosis. NPs delivered through this pathway could reach the cytoplasm, thereby opening the possibility of organelle-specific targeting. Herein we perform dissipative particle dynamics simulations to elucidate the transmembrane penetration mechanisms of multiple NPs. Our simulations demonstrate that NPs’ translocation proceeds in a cooperative manner, where the interplay of the quantity and surface chemistry of the NPs regulates the translocation efficiency. For NPs with hydrophilic surfaces, the increase of particle quantity facilitates penetration, while for NPs with partly or totally hydrophobic surfaces, the opposite highly possibly holds. Moreover, a set of interesting cooperative ways, such as aggregation, aggregation-dispersion, and aggregation-dispersion-reaggregation of the NPs, are observed during the penetration process. We find that the penetration behaviors of multiple NPs are mostly dominated by the changes of the NP-membrane force components in the membrane plane direction, in addition to that in the penetration direction, suggesting a different interaction mechanism between the multiple NPs and the membrane compared with the one-NP case. These results provide a fundamental understanding in the underlying mechanisms of cooperative penetration of NPs, and shed light on the NP-based drug and gene delivery. PMID:26013284

  5. Transmembrane topology, subcellular distribution and turnover of the gamma-aminobutyric acid/benzodizaepine receptor in chick brain cell cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments were performed utilizing trypsinization of the GABA/BZD-R in intact cells to determine (1) the subcellular distribution of membrane-associated GABA/BZD-Rs and (2) aspects of the transmembrane topology of the BZD-R. Additionally, R07-0213, a positively charged benzodiazepine, was used to distinguish between cell surface and intracellular BZD-Rs. Following trypsin treatment of intact cells a cleaved receptor fragment of Mr = 24,000 (xRF24) is generated. It remains anchored in the plasma membrane and not only retains the ability to bind [3H]flunitrazepan reversibly and irreversibly but also retains the ability to be modulated by GABA. xRF24 is not observed following trypsinization of saponin-treated cells or cell homogenates, indicating that it has a cytoplasmic domain as well as a cell surface domain, as expected for a transmembrane fragment of the BZD-R. By utilizing [3H]flunitrazepam as an irreversible photoaffinity label, BZD-R turnover was also investigated

  6. Transmembrane topology, subcellular distribution and turnover of the gamma-aminobutyric acid/benzodizaepine receptor in chick brain cell cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czajkowski, C.M.

    1987-01-01

    Experiments were performed utilizing trypsinization of the GABA/BZD-R in intact cells to determine (1) the subcellular distribution of membrane-associated GABA/BZD-Rs and (2) aspects of the transmembrane topology of the BZD-R. Additionally, R07-0213, a positively charged benzodiazepine, was used to distinguish between cell surface and intracellular BZD-Rs. Following trypsin treatment of intact cells a cleaved receptor fragment of M{sub r} = 24,000 (xRF24) is generated. It remains anchored in the plasma membrane and not only retains the ability to bind ({sup 3}H)flunitrazepan reversibly and irreversibly but also retains the ability to be modulated by GABA. xRF24 is not observed following trypsinization of saponin-treated cells or cell homogenates, indicating that it has a cytoplasmic domain as well as a cell surface domain, as expected for a transmembrane fragment of the BZD-R. By utilizing ({sup 3}H)flunitrazepam as an irreversible photoaffinity label, BZD-R turnover was also investigated.

  7. Expression of the domain cassette 8 Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 is associated with cerebral malaria in Benin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertin, Gwladys I; Lavstsen, Thomas; Guillonneau, François;

    2013-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein-1 (PfEMP-1) is a highly polymorphic adherence receptor expressed on the surface of infected erythrocytes. Based on sequence homology PfEMP-1 variants have been grouped into three major groups A-C, the highly conserved VAR2CSA variants, and semi......-conserved types defined by tandem runs of specific domains ("domain cassettes" (DC)). The PfEMP-1 type expressed determines the adherence phenotype, and is associated with clinical outcome of infection....

  8. The structure of the CARD8 caspase-recruitment domain suggests its association with the FIIND domain and procaspases through adjacent surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Tengchuan; Huang, Mo; Smith, Patrick; Jiang, Jiansheng; Xiao, T Sam

    2013-05-01

    CARD8 plays crucial roles in regulating apoptotic and inflammatory signaling pathways through the association of its caspase-recruitment domain (CARD) with those of procaspase-9 and procaspase-1. The CARD8 CARD has also been predicted to form an intramolecular complex with its FIIND domain. Here, the first crystal structure of the CARD8 CARD is reported; it adopts a six-helix bundle fold with a unique conformation of the α6 helix that is described here for the first time. The surface of the CARD8 CARD displays a prominent acidic patch at its α2, α3 and α5 helices that may interact with the procaspase-9 CARD, whereas an adjacent charged surface at its α3 and α4 helices may associate with the CARD8 FIIND domain without interfering with the CARD-CARD interaction. This suggests that the function of CARD8 may be regulated by both intramolecular and intermolecular interactions involving electrostatic attractions. PMID:23695559

  9. Fatty acyl chain-dependent but charge-independent association of the SH4 domain of Lck with lipid membranes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anoop Rawat; Avaronnan Harishchandran; Ramakrishnan Nagaraj

    2013-03-01

    The SH4 domain of Src family of nonreceptor protein tyrosine kinases represents the extreme N-terminal 1–16 amino acid region which mediates membrane association of these proteins and facilitates their functions. The SH4 domains among Src members lack well-defined sequence consensus and vary in the net charge. However, they readily anchor to the cytoplasmic face of the plasma membrane upon fatty acid acylation. Here, we report the membrane association of differentially acylated SH4 domain of Lck kinase, which has net negative charge at physiological pH. Our results suggest that despite the net negative charge, the SH4 domain of Lck associates with membranes upon fatty acid acylation. While myristoylation at the N-terminus is sufficient for providing membrane anchorage, multiple acylation determines orientation of the peptide chain with respect to the lipid bilayer. Hence, fatty acylation serves more than just a lipid anchor. It has an important role in regulating the spatial orientation of the peptide domain with respect to the lipid bilayer, which could be important for the interaction of the other domains of these kinases with their partners.

  10. A transmembrane inner nuclear membrane protein in the mitotic spindle

    OpenAIRE

    Figueroa, Ricardo; Gudise, Santhosh; Larsson, Veronica; Hallberg, Einar

    2010-01-01

    We have recently characterized a novel transmembrane protein of the inner nuclear membrane of mammalian cells. The protein has two very interesting features. First, despite being an integral membrane protein it is able to concentrate in the membranes colocalizing with the mitotic spindle in metaphase and anaphase. Hence, the protein was named Samp1, Spindle associated membrane protein 1. Secondly, it displays a functional connection to centrosomes. This article discusses various aspects of Sa...

  11. Evolutionary comparison reveals that diverging CTCF sites are signatures of ancestral topological associating domains borders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Marín, Carlos; Tena, Juan J; Acemel, Rafael D; López-Mayorga, Macarena; Naranjo, Silvia; de la Calle-Mustienes, Elisa; Maeso, Ignacio; Beccari, Leonardo; Aneas, Ivy; Vielmas, Erika; Bovolenta, Paola; Nobrega, Marcelo A; Carvajal, Jaime; Gómez-Skarmeta, José Luis

    2015-06-16

    Increasing evidence in the last years indicates that the vast amount of regulatory information contained in mammalian genomes is organized in precise 3D chromatin structures. However, the impact of this spatial chromatin organization on gene expression and its degree of evolutionary conservation is still poorly understood. The Six homeobox genes are essential developmental regulators organized in gene clusters conserved during evolution. Here, we reveal that the Six clusters share a deeply evolutionarily conserved 3D chromatin organization that predates the Cambrian explosion. This chromatin architecture generates two largely independent regulatory landscapes (RLs) contained in two adjacent topological associating domains (TADs). By disrupting the conserved TAD border in one of the zebrafish Six clusters, we demonstrate that this border is critical for preventing competition between promoters and enhancers located in separated RLs, thereby generating different expression patterns in genes located in close genomic proximity. Moreover, evolutionary comparison of Six-associated TAD borders reveals the presence of CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) sites with diverging orientations in all studied deuterostomes. Genome-wide examination of mammalian HiC data reveals that this conserved CTCF configuration is a general signature of TAD borders, underscoring that common organizational principles underlie TAD compartmentalization in deuterostome evolution. PMID:26034287

  12. Structural and functional characterization of the recombinant death domain from death-associated protein kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangelos Dioletis

    Full Text Available Death-associated protein kinase (DAPk is a calcium/calmodulin-regulated Ser/Thr-protein kinase that functions at an important point of integration for cell death signaling pathways. DAPk has a structurally unique multi-domain architecture, including a C-terminally positioned death domain (DD that is a positive regulator of DAPk activity. In this study, recombinant DAPk-DD was observed to aggregate readily and could not be prepared in sufficient yield for structural analysis. However, DAPk-DD could be obtained as a soluble protein in the form of a translational fusion protein with the B1 domain of streptococcal protein G. In contrast to other DDs that adopt the canonical six amphipathic α-helices arranged in a compact fold, the DAPk-DD was found to possess surprisingly low regular secondary structure content and an absence of a stable globular fold, as determined by circular dichroism (CD, NMR spectroscopy and a temperature-dependent fluorescence assay. Furthermore, we measured the in vitro interaction between extracellular-regulated kinase-2 (ERK2 and various recombinant DAPk-DD constructs. Despite the low level of structural order, the recombinant DAPk-DD retained the ability to interact with ERK2 in a 1∶1 ratio with a K d in the low micromolar range. Only the full-length DAPk-DD could bind ERK2, indicating that the apparent 'D-motif' located in the putative sixth helix of DAPk-DD is not sufficient for ERK2 recognition. CD analysis revealed that binding of DAPk-DD to ERK2 is not accompanied by a significant change in secondary structure. Taken together our data argue that the DAPk-DD, when expressed in isolation, does not adopt a classical DD fold, yet in this state retains the capacity to interact with at least one of its binding partners. The lack of a stable globular structure for the DAPk-DD may reflect either that its folding would be supported by interactions absent in our experimental set-up, or a limitation in the structural

  13. The transmembrane region is responsible for targeting of adaptor protein LAX into "heavy rafts''

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrdinka, Matouš; Otáhal, Pavel; Hořejší, Václav

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 5 (2012), e36330. E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA ČR GEMEM/09/E011; GA MŠk 1M0506 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : LAX * transmembrane domain * DRM Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.730, year: 2012

  14. Exploiting hydrophobicity for efficient production of transmembrane helices for structure determination by NMR spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bugge, Katrine Østergaard; Steinocher, Helena; Brooks, Andrew J.;

    2015-01-01

    -labeled protein. In this work, we have exploited the hydrophobic nature of membrane proteins to develop a simple and efficient production scheme for isotope-labeled single-pass transmembrane domains (TMDs) with or without intrinsically disordered regions. We have evaluated the applicability and limitations...... of single-pass TMDs, which are difficult to solve by other means....

  15. Rigidity of transmembrane proteins determines their cluster shape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafarinia, Hamidreza; Khoshnood, Atefeh; Jalali, Mir Abbas

    2016-01-01

    Protein aggregation in cell membrane is vital for the majority of biological functions. Recent experimental results suggest that transmembrane domains of proteins such as α -helices and β -sheets have different structural rigidities. We use molecular dynamics simulation of a coarse-grained model of protein-embedded lipid membranes to investigate the mechanisms of protein clustering. For a variety of protein concentrations, our simulations under thermal equilibrium conditions reveal that the structural rigidity of transmembrane domains dramatically affects interactions and changes the shape of the cluster. We have observed stable large aggregates even in the absence of hydrophobic mismatch, which has been previously proposed as the mechanism of protein aggregation. According to our results, semiflexible proteins aggregate to form two-dimensional clusters, while rigid proteins, by contrast, form one-dimensional string-like structures. By assuming two probable scenarios for the formation of a two-dimensional triangular structure, we calculate the lipid density around protein clusters and find that the difference in lipid distribution around rigid and semiflexible proteins determines the one- or two-dimensional nature of aggregates. It is found that lipids move faster around semiflexible proteins than rigid ones. The aggregation mechanism suggested in this paper can be tested by current state-of-the-art experimental facilities.

  16. Transmembrane Protease Serine 4 Promotes Thyroid Cancer Proliferation via CREB Phosphorylation

    OpenAIRE

    Guan, Hongyu; Liang, Weiwei; LIU, JUAN; Wei, Guohong; Li, Hai; Xiu, Lingling; Xiao, Haipeng; Li, Yanbing

    2015-01-01

    Background: Transmembrane protease serine 4 (TMPRSS4), one of the type II transmembrane serine proteases (TTSPs), is elevated in various cancers and is associated with multiple malignant phenotypes. However, the expression pattern and biologic significance of TMPRSS4 in thyroid cancer are largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the expression of TMPRSS4 in thyroid cancer and assessed the pro-proliferative role of TMPRSS4 in thyroid cancer.

  17. Structure, function and evolution of topologically associating domains (TADs) at HOX loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonfat, Nicolas; Duboule, Denis

    2015-10-01

    Hox genes encode transcription factors necessary for patterning the major developing anterior to posterior embryonic axis. In addition, during vertebrate evolution, various subsets of this gene family were co-opted along with the emergence of novel body structures, such as the limbs or the external genitalia. The morphogenesis of these axial structures thus relies in part upon the precisely controlled transcription of specific Hox genes, a mechanism involving multiple long-range enhancers. Recently, it was reported that such regulatory mechanisms were largely shared between different developing tissues, though with some specificities, suggesting the recruitment of ancestral regulatory modalities from one tissue to another. The analysis of chromatin architectures at HoxD and HoxA loci revealed the existence of two flanking topologically associating domains (TADs), precisely encompassing the adjacent regulatory landscapes. Here, we discuss the function of these TADs in the control of Hox gene regulation and we speculate about their capacity to serve as structural frameworks for the emergence of novel enhancers. In this view, TADs may have been used as genomic niches to evolve pleiotropic regulations found at many developmental loci. PMID:25913784

  18. Fluorescence modulation and associative behavior of lumazine in hydrophobic domain of micelles and bovine serum albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyon, N Shaemningwar; Islam, Mullah Muhaiminul; Phukan, Smritakshi; Mitra, Sivaprasad

    2013-04-01

    The photophysical behavior of the deprotonated form of lumazine (Lum-anion) was studied in biologically relevant surfactant systems like sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and TritonX-100 (TX-100) and also model water soluble protein, bovine serum albumin (BSA), using steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy in buffer solution of pH 12.0. The association constant values were calculated from modulated fluorescence intensity of Lum-anion in different medium. The interaction of non-ionic surfactant TX-100 was found to be about 10 times greater than SDS and CTAB. However, while the driving force of binding in SDS and/or TX-100 is mainly hydrophobic in nature, electrostatic interaction with the oppositely charged micellar head group is the predominant factor in CTAB. The thermodynamic parameters like enthalpy (ΔH) and entropy (ΔS) change, etc., corresponding to the binding of Lum-anion with BSA were estimated by performing the fluorescence titration experiment at different temperatures. Thermodynamically favorable and strong binding of Lum-anion (K~10(4) M(-1)) into BSA is due to hydrophobic interaction in the ligand binding domain II. However, the binding mechanism is entirely different in presence of protein denaturing agent like urea and electrostatic interaction plays a major role under this condition. PMID:23501728

  19. TOM1, an Arabidopsis gene required for efficient multiplication of a tobamovirus, encodes a putative transmembrane protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, T; Ohta, T; Takahashi, M; Meshi, T; Schmidt, R; Dean, C; Naito, S; Ishikawa, M

    2000-08-29

    Host-encoded factors play an important role in virus multiplication, acting in concert with virus-encoded factors. However, information regarding the host factors involved in this process is limited. Here we report the map-based cloning of an Arabidopsis thaliana gene, TOM1, which is necessary for the efficient multiplication of tobamoviruses, positive-strand RNA viruses infecting a wide variety of plants. The TOM1 mRNA is suggested to encode a 291-aa polypeptide that is predicted to be a multipass transmembrane protein. The Sos recruitment assay supported the hypothesis that TOM1 is associated with membranes, and in addition, that TOM1 interacts with the helicase domain of tobamovirus-encoded replication proteins. Taken into account that the tobamovirus replication complex is associated with membranes, we propose that TOM1 participates in the in vivo formation of the replication complex by serving as a membrane anchor. PMID:10944200

  20. Individual and Contextual Parameters Associated with Adolescents' Domain Specific Self-Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokkinos, Constantinos M.; Hatzinikolaou, Stamatia

    2011-01-01

    The present study examined the role of adolescents' self-esteem and perceptions of family and classroom contexts on their domain specific self-perceptions. 345 Greek junior high school adolescents aged 14-16 completed measures of domain specific self-perceptions, self-esteem, parenting styles and classroom climate. Hierarchical regression analyses…

  1. Re-introduction of transmembrane serine residues reduce the minimum pore diameter of channelrhodopsin-2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Richards

    Full Text Available Channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2 is a microbial-type rhodopsin found in the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Under physiological conditions, ChR2 is an inwardly rectifying cation channel that permeates a wide range of mono- and divalent cations. Although this protein shares a high sequence homology with other microbial-type rhodopsins, which are ion pumps, ChR2 is an ion channel. A sequence alignment of ChR2 with bacteriorhodopsin, a proton pump, reveals that ChR2 lacks specific motifs and residues, such as serine and threonine, known to contribute to non-covalent interactions within transmembrane domains. We hypothesized that reintroduction of the eight transmembrane serine residues present in bacteriorhodopsin, but not in ChR2, will restrict the conformational flexibility and reduce the pore diameter of ChR2. In this work, eight single serine mutations were created at homologous positions in ChR2. Additionally, an endogenous transmembrane serine was replaced with alanine. We measured kinetics, changes in reversal potential, and permeability ratios in different alkali metal solutions using two-electrode voltage clamp. Applying excluded volume theory, we calculated the minimum pore diameter of ChR2 constructs. An analysis of the results from our experiments show that reintroducing serine residues into the transmembrane domain of ChR2 can restrict the minimum pore diameter through inter- and intrahelical hydrogen bonds while the removal of a transmembrane serine results in a larger pore diameter. Therefore, multiple positions along the intracellular side of the transmembrane domains contribute to the cation permeability of ChR2.

  2. Structural and Functional Studies of the Ras-Associating and Pleckstrin Homology Domains of Grb10 and Grb14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Depetris, R.; Wu, J; Hubbard, S

    2009-01-01

    Growth factor receptor-binding proteins Grb7, Grb10 and Grb14 are adaptor proteins containing a Ras-associating (RA) domain, a pleckstrin-homology (PH) domain, a family-specific BPS (between PH and SH2) region and a C-terminal Src-homology-2 domain. Previous structural studies showed that the Grb14 BPS region binds as a pseudosubstrate inhibitor in the tyrosine kinase domain of the insulin receptor to suppress insulin signaling. Here we report the crystal structure of the RA and PH domains of Grb10 at 2.6-A resolution. The structure reveals that these two domains, along with the intervening linker, form an integrated, dimeric structural unit. Biochemical studies demonstrated that Grb14 binds to activated Ras, which may serve as a timing mechanism for downregulation of insulin signaling. Our results illuminate the membrane-recruitment mechanisms not only of Grb7, Grb10 and Grb14 but also of MIG-10, Rap1-interacting adaptor molecule, lamellipodin and Pico, proteins involved in actin-cytoskeleton rearrangement that share a structurally related RA-PH tandem unit.

  3. Detecting pore-lining regions in transmembrane protein sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nugent Timothy

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alpha-helical transmembrane channel and transporter proteins play vital roles in a diverse range of essential biological processes and are crucial in facilitating the passage of ions and molecules across the lipid bilayer. However, the experimental difficulties associated with obtaining high quality crystals has led to their significant under-representation in structural databases. Computational methods that can identify structural features from sequence alone are therefore of high importance. Results We present a method capable of automatically identifying pore-lining regions in transmembrane proteins from sequence information alone, which can then be used to determine the pore stoichiometry. By labelling pore-lining residues in crystal structures using geometric criteria, we have trained a support vector machine classifier to predict the likelihood of a transmembrane helix being involved in pore formation. Results from testing this approach under stringent cross-validation indicate that prediction accuracy of 72% is possible, while a support vector regression model is able to predict the number of subunits participating in the pore with 62% accuracy. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first tool capable of identifying pore-lining regions in proteins and we present the results of applying it to a data set of sequences with available crystal structures. Our method provides a way to characterise pores in transmembrane proteins and may even provide a starting point for discovering novel routes of therapeutic intervention in a number of important diseases. This software is freely available as source code from: http://bioinf.cs.ucl.ac.uk/downloads/memsat-svm/.

  4. Genetic Variations of Kinase Inserts Domain Receptor (KDR) Gene Are Associated with the Risk of Astrocytomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yufei; Ma, Piyong; He, Yichun; Liu, Yan; Jiang, Yang

    2016-05-01

    Astrocytomas is one of the most common central nervous system (CNS) tumors with high mortality rate. Kinase insert domain receptor (KDR) is involved in the regulation of tumor angiogenesis, migration, and vascular permeability. The aim of the study was to explore the relationship between KDR polymorphisms and risk of astrocytomas. Blood samples were collected from 157 astrocytomas patients and 160 healthy controls. Three tag-SNPs (rs2071559C/T, rs2305948T/C, and rs1870377A/T) were identified from the International HapMap Project Databases and genotyped using the method of polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). We evaluated the astrocytomas risk caused by individual SNPs and haplotype using odds ratios (ORs) and their 95 % confidence intervals (CIs). In the overall individual SNP analysis, the C allele of rs2071559 was correlated with an increased risk of astrocytomas. However, individuals with mutant allele A and genotype TA + AA of rs1870377 showed a protective effect against astrocytomas. Subgroup analysis based on WHO tumor grade revealed that the C allele of rs2071559 had more influence with the risk of astrocytomas in the grade III-IV (OR = 1.91) subgroup than the grade I-II (OR = 1.47) group. Genotype TT of rs2305948 was found to be significantly associated with susceptibility of astrocytomas only in the grade III-IV subgroup. The protective effect of rs1870377 did not reveal significant difference between the grade III-IV and grade I-II subgroups. Meanwhile, stratified analysis demonstrated that mutation of rs2071559 and rs2305948 could elevate the risk of astrocytomas more significantly in the subgroup of smokers than the nonsmokers. Interestingly, the protective effect of rs1870377 was more obvious in the nonsmokers than the smokers. Additionally, haplotype-specific analysis showed that haplotype CCT and CTT were related with an increased risk of astrocytomas. We found that individual with variants of rs

  5. Assembly of transmembrane proteins on oil-water interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunker, Peter; Landry, Corey; Chong, Shaorong; Weitz, David

    2015-03-01

    Transmembrane proteins are difficult to handle by aqueous solution-based biochemical and biophysical approaches, due to the hydrophobicity of transmembrane helices. Detergents can solubilize transmembrane proteins; however, surfactant coated transmembrane proteins are not always functional, and purifying detergent coated proteins in a micellar solution can be difficult. Motivated by this problem, we study the self-assembly of transmembrane proteins on oil-water interfaces. We found that the large water-oil interface of oil drops prevents nascent transmembrane proteins from forming non-functional aggregates. The oil provides a hydrophobic environment for the transmembrane helix, allowing the ectodomain to fold into its natural structure and orientation. Further, modifying the strength or valency of hydrophobic interactions between transmembrane proteins results in the self-assembly of spatially clustered, active proteins on the oil-water interface. Thus, hydrophobic interactions can facilitate, rather than inhibit, the assembly of transmembrane proteins.

  6. Are Aquaporins the Missing Transmembrane Osmosensors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, A E; Shachar-Hill, Y

    2015-08-01

    Regulation of cell volume is central to homeostasis. It is assumed to begin with the detection of a change in water potential across the bounding membrane, but it is not clear how this is accomplished. While examples of general osmoreceptors (which sense osmotic pressure in one phase) and stretch-activated ion channels (which require swelling of a cell or organelle) are known, effective volume regulation requires true transmembrane osmosensors (TMOs) which directly detect a water potential difference spanning a membrane. At present, no TMO molecule has been unambiguously identified, and clear evidence for mammalian TMOs is notably lacking. In this paper, we set out a theory of TMOs which requires a water channel spanning the membrane that excludes the major osmotic solutes, responds directly without the need for any other process such as swelling, and signals to other molecules associated with the magnitude of changing osmotic differences. The most likely molecules that are fit for this purpose and which are also ubiquitous in eukaryotic cells are aquaporins (AQPs). We review experimental evidence from several systems which indicates that AQPs are essential elements in regulation and may be functioning as TMOs; i.e. the first step in an osmosensing sequence that signals osmotic imbalance in a cell or organelle. We extend this concept to several systems of current interest in which the cellular involvement of AQPs as simple water channels is puzzling or counter-intuitive. We suggest that, apart from regulatory volume changes in cells, AQPs may also be acting as TMOs in red cells, secretory granules and microorganisms. PMID:25791748

  7. Multi-functional roles for the polypeptide transport associated domains of Toc75 in chloroplast protein import.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paila, Yamuna D; Richardson, Lynn Gl; Inoue, Hitoshi; Parks, Elizabeth S; McMahon, James; Inoue, Kentaro; Schnell, Danny J

    2016-01-01

    Toc75 plays a central role in chloroplast biogenesis in plants as the membrane channel of the protein import translocon at the outer envelope of chloroplasts (TOC). Toc75 is a member of the Omp85 family of bacterial and organellar membrane insertases, characterized by N-terminal POTRA (polypeptide-transport associated) domains and C-terminal membrane-integrated β-barrels. We demonstrate that the Toc75 POTRA domains are essential for protein import and contribute to interactions with TOC receptors, thereby coupling preprotein recognition at the chloroplast surface with membrane translocation. The POTRA domains also interact with preproteins and mediate the recruitment of molecular chaperones in the intermembrane space to facilitate membrane transport. Our studies are consistent with the multi-functional roles of POTRA domains observed in other Omp85 family members and demonstrate that the domains of Toc75 have evolved unique properties specific to the acquisition of protein import during endosymbiotic evolution of the TOC system in plastids. PMID:26999824

  8. Identification of transmembrane protein 134 as a novel LMP1-binding protein by using bimolecular fluorescence complementation and an enhanced retroviral mutagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talaty, Pooja; Emery, Amanda; Holthusen, Kirsten; Everly, David N

    2012-10-01

    Latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) of Epstein-Barr virus induces constitutive signaling in infected cells. LMP1 signaling requires oligomerization of LMP1 via its transmembrane domain, localization to lipid rafts in the membrane, and association of the LMP1 cytoplasmic domain to adaptor proteins, such as the tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factors (TRAFs). Protein complementation is a novel technique to examine protein-protein interaction through the assembly of functional fluorescent proteins or enzymes from inactive fragments. A previous study in our lab demonstrated the use of bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) to study the assembly of the LMP1 signaling complexes within the plasma membrane of mammalian cells. In the present study, LMP1 was used as bait in a genome-wide BiFC screen with an enhanced retroviral mutagen to identify new LMP1-binding proteins. Our screen identified a novel LMP1-binding protein, transmembrane protein 134 (Tmem134). Tmem134 is a candidate oncogene that is amplified in breast cancer cell lines. Binding, colocalization, and cofractionation between LMP1 and Tmem134 were confirmed. Finally, Tmem134 affected LMP1-induced NF-κB induction. Together, these data suggest that BiFC is a unique and novel platform to identify proteins recruited to the LMP1-signaling complex. PMID:22855487

  9. Identification of Ser/Thr kinase and forkhead associated domains in Mycobacterium ulcerans: characterization of novel association between protein kinase Q and MupFHA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunjan Arora

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium ulcerans, the causative agent of Buruli ulcer in humans, is unique among the members of Mycobacterium genus due to the presence of the virulence determinant megaplasmid pMUM001. This plasmid encodes multiple virulence-associated genes, including mup011, which is an uncharacterized Ser/Thr protein kinase (STPK PknQ.In this study, we have characterized PknQ and explored its interaction with MupFHA (Mup018c, a FHA domain containing protein also encoded by pMUM001. MupFHA was found to interact with PknQ and suppress its autophosphorylation. Subsequent protein-protein docking and molecular dynamic simulation analyses showed that this interaction involves the FHA domain of MupFHA and PknQ activation loop residues Ser170 and Thr174. FHA domains are known to recognize phosphothreonine residues, and therefore, MupFHA may be acting as one of the few unusual FHA-domain having overlapping specificity. Additionally, we elucidated the PknQ-dependent regulation of MupDivIVA (Mup012c, which is a DivIVA domain containing protein encoded by pMUM001. MupDivIVA interacts with MupFHA and this interaction may also involve phospho-threonine/serine residues of MupDivIVA.Together, these results describe novel signaling mechanisms in M. ulcerans and show a three-way regulation of PknQ, MupFHA, and MupDivIVA. FHA domains have been considered to be only pThr specific and our results indicate a novel mechanism of pSer as well as pThr interaction exhibited by MupFHA. These results signify the need of further re-evaluating the FHA domain -pThr/pSer interaction model. MupFHA may serve as the ideal candidate for structural studies on this unique class of modular enzymes.

  10. Virus-encoded 7 transmembrane receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølleskov-Jensen, Ann-Sofie; Oliveira, MarthaTrindade; Farrell, Helen Elizabeth; Davis-Poynter, Nick

    Herpesviruses are an ancient group which have exploited gene capture of multiple cellular modulators of the immune response. Viral homologues of 7 transmembrane receptors (v7TMRs) are a consistent feature of beta- and gammaherpesviruses; the majority of the v7TMRs are homologous to cellular chemo...

  11. Virus-Encoded 7 Transmembrane Receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølleskov-Jensen, Ann-Sofie; Oliveira, MarthaTrindade; Farrell, Helen Elizabeth;

    2015-01-01

    Herpesviruses are an ancient group which have exploited gene capture of multiple cellular modulators of the immune response. Viral homologues of 7 transmembrane receptors (v7TMRs) are a consistent feature of beta- and gammaherpesviruses; the majority of the v7TMRs are homologous to cellular chemo...

  12. Domains of the growth hormone receptor required for association and activation of JAK2 tyrosine kinase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    VanderKuur, J A; Wang, X; Zhang, L;

    1994-01-01

    , and that tyrosines in the N-terminal half of the cytoplasmic domain of the GHR are phosphorylated by JAK2. The finding that a specific interaction with the C-terminal half of GHR appears to be necessary for p97 phosphorylation indicates that while JAK2 activation may be necessary for a full biological response to GH...

  13. The trypanosome Pumilio-domain protein PUF7 associates with a nuclear cyclophilin and is involved in ribosomal RNA maturation

    OpenAIRE

    Droll, Dorothea; Archer, Stuart; Fenn, Katelyn; Delhi, Praveen; Matthews, Keith; Clayton, Christine

    2010-01-01

    Proteins with Pumilio RNA binding domains (Puf proteins) are ubiquitous in eukaryotes. Some Puf proteins bind to the 3′-untranslated regions of mRNAs, acting to repress translation and promote degradation; others are involved in ribosomal RNA maturation. The genome of Trypanosoma brucei encodes eleven Puf proteins whose function cannot be predicted by sequence analysis. We show here that epitope-tagged TbPUF7 is located in the nucleolus, and associated with a nuclear cyclophilin-like protein,...

  14. Association of the SPT2 chromatin protein domain containing 1 gene rs17579600 polymorphism and serum lipid traits

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Tao; Yin, Rui-Xing; Bin, Yuan; Nie, Rong-Jun; Chen, Xia; Pan, Shang-Ling

    2015-01-01

    SPT2 chromatin protein domain containing 1 gene (SPTY2D1) is a candidate gene for dyslipidemia. The single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of rs7934205 near SPTY2D1 locus was ethnic- and sex-specific associated with serum lipid levels in our previous study. Whether SPTY2D1 rs17579600 SNP and several environmental factors are associated with serum lipid profiles is unknown. A total of 712 participants of Han and 689 unrelated individuals of Mulao were included. The genotype and allele frequencie...

  15. Designing Inhibitors against HOX domain mutations of PDX-1 and studying its association in Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Allam Appa Rao; Anupam Bhattacharya; Amit Kumar; Amita Kashyap; Gr Sridhar

    2012-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus was formally known as IDDM, type I, or juvenile onset diabetes. Type 1 DM can occur at any age. In this study,we analyzed the involvement of HOX domain of PDX-1 protein.The homeodomain transcription factor, pancreas duodenum homeobox (PDX)-1, encoded by PDX-1 gene, which is a transcriptional activator of several genes, including insulin, somatostatin, glucokinase, islet amyloid polypeptide, and glucose transporter type 2 and essential for pancreas development, insulin...

  16. Designing Inhibitors against HOX domain mutations of PDX-1 and studying its association in Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allam Appa Rao

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes mellitus was formally known as IDDM, type I, or juvenile onset diabetes. Type 1 DM can occur at any age. In this study,we analyzed the involvement of HOX domain of PDX-1 protein.The homeodomain transcription factor, pancreas duodenum homeobox (PDX-1, encoded by PDX-1 gene, which is a transcriptional activator of several genes, including insulin, somatostatin, glucokinase, islet amyloid polypeptide, and glucose transporter type 2 and essential for pancreas development, insulin production, and glucose homeostasis.[1,13]. HOX domain has a length of 63aa and control developmental patterns and cell differentiation in vertebrates by acting positive or negative regulators[4,9,16]. Different approached had been applied to identify the mutational hot spot region of HOX domain and calculate mutational frequency of the amino acids which resides in the hotspot region. Binding site of the domain had been identified and found that THR208, GLN246 ,VAL247, ASN253 involved in interaction with ligand. Potential Inhibitors had been screened on the basis of various criteria and bioactivity score had been calculated. Energy optimization was done by applying AMBER force field and steepest descent method. Docking was performed by CCDC GOLD, Molegro, HEX, and Argus lab to find the best potent inhibitor and increase the accuracy of the docking process. Sitagliptin showed satisfactory result on both docking and bioactivity analysis. It showed a GOLD fitness score of 49.8386 and had a moldock score of -122.919 with a ligand efficiency -4.33692. Compound had a bioactivity score of 0.56 for protease inhibitor. Sitagliptin showed good binding affinity to the target, which helps to work the pancreas in proper way and to secret insulin.

  17. Association of astrocytes with neurons and astrocytes derived from distinct progenitor domains in the subpallium

    OpenAIRE

    Makio Torigoe; Kenta Yamauchi; Yan Zhu; Hiroaki Kobayashi; Fujio Murakami

    2015-01-01

    Astrocytes play pivotal roles in metabolism and homeostasis as well as in neural development and function in a manner thought to depend on their region-specific diversity. In the mouse spinal cord, astrocytes and neurons, which are derived from a common progenitor domain (PD) and controlled by common PD-specific transcription factors, migrate radially and share their final positions. However, whether astrocytes can only interact with neurons from common PDs in the brain remains unknown. Here,...

  18. Individual and contextual parameters associated with adolescents' domain specific self-perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokkinos, Constantinos M; Hatzinikolaou, Stamatia

    2011-04-01

    The present study examined the role of adolescents' self-esteem and perceptions of family and classroom contexts on their domain specific self-perceptions. 345 Greek junior high school adolescents aged 14-16 completed measures of domain specific self-perceptions, self-esteem, parenting styles and classroom climate. Hierarchical regression analyses revealed that both family and classroom contexts predicted students' self-perceptions, after students' demographics, academic achievement and self-esteem were controlled for. However, different patterns emerged in the relationship between family, classroom climate and self-esteem depending on domain specific self-perceptions. Academic self-perceptions (scholastic, mathematics and language competences) were predicted by classroom climate dimensions (order and organization, student involvement, rule clarity), whereas self-perceptions regarding relations with parents, close friends and behaviour conduct, were predicted by parenting styles. Given the fact that adolescence is a period of fluctuation in self-understanding which renders self-perceptions particularly malleable, the results support the critical role of the social environments where adolescents operate. PMID:20471074

  19. Expression of the domain cassette 8 Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 is associated with cerebral malaria in Benin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwladys I Bertin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein-1 (PfEMP-1 is a highly polymorphic adherence receptor expressed on the surface of infected erythrocytes. Based on sequence homology PfEMP-1 variants have been grouped into three major groups A-C, the highly conserved VAR2CSA variants, and semi-conserved types defined by tandem runs of specific domains ("domain cassettes" (DC. The PfEMP-1 type expressed determines the adherence phenotype, and is associated with clinical outcome of infection. METHODS: Parasite isolates from Beninese children or women presenting with, respectively, CM or PAM were collected along with samples from patients with uncomplicated malaria (UM. We assessed the transcript level of var genes by RT-qPCR and the expression of PfEMP-1 proteins by LC-MS/MS. RESULTS: Var genes encoding DC8 and Group A PfEMP-1 were transcribed more often and at higher levels in cerebral malaria vs. uncomplicated malaria patients. LC-MS/MS identified peptides from group A, DC8 PfEMP-1 more frequently in cerebral malaria than in uncomplicated malaria and pregnancy-associated malaria samples. CONCLUSION: This is the first study to show association between PfEMP-1 subtype and disease outcome by direct analysis of parasites proteome. The results corroborate that group A and specifically the PfEMP-1 types DC8 are universally associated with cerebral malaria. This is a crucial observation for promoting studies on malaria pathogenesis.

  20. SAP-like domain in nucleolar spindle associated protein mediates mitotic chromosome loading as well as interphase chromatin interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → The SAP-like domain in NuSAP is a functional DNA-binding domain with preference for dsDNA. → This SAP-like domain is essential for chromosome loading during early mitosis. → NuSAP is highly dynamic on mitotic chromatin, as evident from photobleaching experiments. → The SAP-like domain also mediates NuSAP-chromatin interaction in interphase nucleoplasm. -- Abstract: Nucleolar spindle associated protein (NuSAP) is a microtubule-stabilizing protein that localizes to chromosome arms and chromosome-proximal microtubules during mitosis and to the nucleus, with enrichment in the nucleoli, during interphase. The critical function of NuSAP is underscored by the finding that its depletion in HeLa cells results in various mitotic defects. Moreover, NuSAP is found overexpressed in multiple cancers and its expression levels often correlate with the aggressiveness of cancer. Due to its localization on chromosome arms and combination of microtubule-stabilizing and DNA-binding properties, NuSAP takes a special place within the extensive group of spindle assembly factors. In this study, we identify a SAP-like domain that shows DNA binding in vitro with a preference for dsDNA. Deletion of the SAP-like domain abolishes chromosome arm binding of NuSAP during mitosis, but is not sufficient to abrogate its chromosome-proximal localization after anaphase onset. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments revealed the highly dynamic nature of this NuSAP-chromatin interaction during mitosis. In interphase cells, NuSAP also interacts with chromatin through its SAP-like domain, as evident from its enrichment on dense chromatin regions and intranuclear mobility, measured by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. The obtained results are in agreement with a model where NuSAP dynamically stabilizes newly formed microtubules on mitotic chromosomes to enhance chromosome positioning without immobilizing these microtubules. Interphase NuSAP-chromatin interaction

  1. SAP-like domain in nucleolar spindle associated protein mediates mitotic chromosome loading as well as interphase chromatin interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verbakel, Werner, E-mail: werner.verbakel@chem.kuleuven.be [Laboratory of Biomolecular Dynamics, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200G, Bus 2403, 3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Carmeliet, Geert, E-mail: geert.carmeliet@med.kuleuven.be [Laboratory of Experimental Medicine and Endocrinology, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Herestraat 49, Bus 902, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Engelborghs, Yves, E-mail: yves.engelborghs@fys.kuleuven.be [Laboratory of Biomolecular Dynamics, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200G, Bus 2403, 3001 Heverlee (Belgium)

    2011-08-12

    Highlights: {yields} The SAP-like domain in NuSAP is a functional DNA-binding domain with preference for dsDNA. {yields} This SAP-like domain is essential for chromosome loading during early mitosis. {yields} NuSAP is highly dynamic on mitotic chromatin, as evident from photobleaching experiments. {yields} The SAP-like domain also mediates NuSAP-chromatin interaction in interphase nucleoplasm. -- Abstract: Nucleolar spindle associated protein (NuSAP) is a microtubule-stabilizing protein that localizes to chromosome arms and chromosome-proximal microtubules during mitosis and to the nucleus, with enrichment in the nucleoli, during interphase. The critical function of NuSAP is underscored by the finding that its depletion in HeLa cells results in various mitotic defects. Moreover, NuSAP is found overexpressed in multiple cancers and its expression levels often correlate with the aggressiveness of cancer. Due to its localization on chromosome arms and combination of microtubule-stabilizing and DNA-binding properties, NuSAP takes a special place within the extensive group of spindle assembly factors. In this study, we identify a SAP-like domain that shows DNA binding in vitro with a preference for dsDNA. Deletion of the SAP-like domain abolishes chromosome arm binding of NuSAP during mitosis, but is not sufficient to abrogate its chromosome-proximal localization after anaphase onset. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments revealed the highly dynamic nature of this NuSAP-chromatin interaction during mitosis. In interphase cells, NuSAP also interacts with chromatin through its SAP-like domain, as evident from its enrichment on dense chromatin regions and intranuclear mobility, measured by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. The obtained results are in agreement with a model where NuSAP dynamically stabilizes newly formed microtubules on mitotic chromosomes to enhance chromosome positioning without immobilizing these microtubules. Interphase Nu

  2. Crystallizing Transmembrane Peptides in Lipidic Mesophases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Höfer, Nicole; Aragão, David; Caffrey, Martin (Trinity)

    2011-09-28

    Structure determination of membrane proteins by crystallographic means has been facilitated by crystallization in lipidic mesophases. It has been suggested, however, that this so-called in meso method, as originally implemented, would not apply to small protein targets having {le}4 transmembrane crossings. In our study, the hypothesis that the inherent flexibility of the mesophase would enable crystallogenesis of small proteins was tested using a transmembrane pentadecapeptide, linear gramicidin, which produced structure-grade crystals. This result suggests that the in meso method should be considered as a viable means for high-resolution structure determination of integral membrane peptides, many of which are predicted to be coded for in the human genome.

  3. An amphipathic motif at the transmembrane-cytoplasmic junction prevents autonomous activation of the thrombopoietin receptor.

    OpenAIRE

    Staerk, Judith; Lacout, Catherine; Sato, Takeshi; Smith, Steven O.; Vainchenker, William; Constantinescu, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    Ligand binding to the thrombopoietin receptor (TpoR) is thought to impose a dimeric receptor conformation(s) leading to hematopoietic stem cell renewal, megakaryocyte differentiation, and platelet formation. Unlike other cytokine receptors, such as the erythropoietin receptor, TpoR contains an amphipathic KWQFP motif at the junction between the transmembrane (TM) and cytoplasmic domains. We show here that a mutant TpoR (delta5TpoR), where this sequence was deleted, is constitutively active. I...

  4. Use of Molecular Dynamics Data in Biochemistry Courses: An Amphipathy Scale to Determine Protein [alpha]-Helix Transmembrane Segments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazze, Fernanda M.; Fuzo, Carlos A.; Degreve, Leo; Ciancaglini, Pietro

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this manuscript is to explain the application of an amphipathy scale obtained from molecular dynamics simulations and to demonstrate how it can be useful in the protein structure field. It is shown that this scale is easy to be used with the advantage of revealing domains of transmembrane [alpha]-helix of proteins without the need of…

  5. The trypanosome Pumilio-domain protein PUF7 associates with a nuclear cyclophilin and is involved in ribosomal RNA maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droll, Dorothea; Archer, Stuart; Fenn, Katelyn; Delhi, Praveen; Matthews, Keith; Clayton, Christine

    2010-03-19

    Proteins with Pumilio RNA binding domains (Puf proteins) are ubiquitous in eukaryotes. Some Puf proteins bind to the 3'-untranslated regions of mRNAs, acting to repress translation and promote degradation; others are involved in ribosomal RNA maturation. The genome of Trypanosoma brucei encodes eleven Puf proteins whose function cannot be predicted by sequence analysis. We show here that epitope-tagged TbPUF7 is located in the nucleolus, and associated with a nuclear cyclophilin-like protein, TbNCP1. RNAi targeting PUF7 reduced trypanosome growth and inhibited two steps in ribosomal RNA processing. PMID:20153321

  6. Association of Urinary N-Domain Angiotensin I-Converting Enzyme with Plasma Inflammatory Markers and Endothelial Function

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandes, Fernanda B.; Plavnik, Frida L.; Teixeira, Andressa MS; Christofalo, Dejaldo MJ; Ajzen, Sergio A.; Higa, Elisa MS; Ronchi, Fernanda A.; Sesso, Ricardo CC; Casarini, Dulce E.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between urinary 90 kDa N-domain Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) form with C-reactive protein (CRP) and homocysteine plasma levels (Hcy), urinary nitric oxide (NOu), and endothelial function (EF) in normotensive subjects. Forty healthy subjects were evaluated through brachial Doppler US to test the response to reactive hyperemia and a panel of blood tests to determine CRP and Hcy levels, NOu, and urinary ACE. They were divided into...

  7. U3 snoRNP associates with fibrillarin a component of the scleroderma clumpy nucleolar domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrera-Esparza, Rafael; Kruse, Lars; von Essen, Marina; Campos, Lourdes; Barbosa, Olga; Bollain, Juan-José; Badillo, Isaías; Avalos-Díaz, Esperanza

    2002-01-01

    clumpy clones were detected by immunoscreening. One containing the glycine-rich and RNP2 fibrillarin domains was expressed in lysogenic bacteria. The recombinant proteins were used to elicit antibodies in rabbits, and these exhibited clumpy nucleolar reactivity. The recombinant fibrillarin tested by...... ELISA was recognized by the clumpy scleroderma serum from the majority of patients. In situ hybridization assays showed that the fibrillarin tagged by the elicited antibodies was colocalized with U3 snoRNP in the nucleolus in a clumpy manner and coprecipitated the U3 snoRNP. In conclusion, the......Serum from patients with scleroderma recognizes the clumpy autoantigen. The present studies addressed the issue as to whether the clumpy nucleolar autoantigen recognized by scleroderma serum is fibrillarin-U3 snoRNP. Clones encoding for clumpy autoantigen were immunodetected from a lambdagt11 He...

  8. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray studies of the N-domain of the Wilson disease associated protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The modified N-domain of the Wilson disease protein has been crystallized both in its native form and as a selenomethionine derivative. X-ray diffraction data were collected from the native crystal to 1.7 Å resolution, while the selenomethionine derivative diffracted to 2.7 Å resolution. Wilson disease associated protein (ATP7B) is essential for copper transport in human cells. Mutations that affect ATP7B function result in Wilson’s disease, a chronic copper toxicosis. Disease-causing mutations within the N-domain of ATP7B (WND) are known to disrupt ATP binding, but a high-resolution X-ray structure of the ATP-binding site has not been reported. The N-domain was modified to delete the disordered loop comprising residues His1115–Asp1138 (WNDΔ1115–1138). Unlike the wild-type N-domain, WNDΔ1115–1138 formed good-quality crystals. Synchrotron diffraction data have been collected from WNDΔ1115–1138 at the Canadian Light Source. A native WNDΔ1115–1138 crystal diffracted to 1.7 Å resolution and belonged to space group P42212, with unit-cell parameters a = 39.2, b = 39.2, c = 168.9 Å. MAD data were collected to 2.7 Å resolution from a SeMet-derivative crystal with unit-cell parameters a = 38.4, b = 38.4, c = 166.7 Å. The WNDΔ1115–1138 structure is likely to be solved by phasing from multiwavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) experiments

  9. Chaperone displacement from mutant cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator restores its function in human airway epithelia

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Fei; Mi, Zhibao; Condliffe, Steven B; Bertrand, Carol A.; GONG, XIAOYAN; Lu, Xiaoli; Zhang, Ruilin; Latoche, Joseph D.; Pilewski, Joseph M.; Robbins, Paul D.; Frizzell, Raymond A.

    2008-01-01

    Mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene cause cystic fibrosis (CF). The most common mutation, ΔF508, omits the phenylalanine residue at position 508 in the first nucleotide binding domain (NBD1) of CFTR. The mutant protein is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum and degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. We demonstrate that expression of NBD1 plus the regulatory domain (RD) of ΔF508 CFTR (ΔFRD) restores the biogenesis of mature ΔF508 CFTR protei...

  10. An α/β hydrolase and associated Per-ARNT-Sim domain comprise a bipartite sensing module coupled with diverse output domains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene V Nadezhdin

    Full Text Available The RsbQ α/β hydrolase and RsbP serine phosphatase form a signaling pair required to activate the general stress factor σ(B of Bacillus subtilis in response to energy limitation. RsbP has a predicted N-terminal Per-ARNT-Sim (PAS domain, a central coiled-coil, and a C-terminal protein phosphatase M (PPM domain. Previous studies support a model in which RsbQ provides an activity needed for PAS to regulate the phosphatase domain via the coiled-coil. RsbQ and the PAS domain (RsbP-PAS therefore appear to form a sensory module. Here we test this hypothesis using bioinformatic and genetic analysis. We found 45 RsbQ and RsbP-PAS homologues encoded by adjacent genes in diverse bacteria, with PAS and a predicted coiled-coil fused to one of three output domains: PPM phosphatase (Gram positive bacteria, histidine protein kinase (Gram negative bacteria, and diguanylate cyclase (both lineages. Multiple alignment of the RsbP-PAS homologues suggested nine residues that distinguish the class. Alanine substitutions at four of these conferred a null phenotype in B. subtilis, indicating their functional importance. The F55A null substitution lay in the Fα helix of an RsbP-PAS model. F55A inhibited interaction of RsbP with RsbQ in yeast two-hybrid and pull-down assays but did not significantly affect interaction of RsbP with itself. We propose that RsbQ directly contacts the PAS domains of an RsbP oligomer to provide the activating signal, which is propagated to the phosphatase domains via the coiled-coil. A similar mechanism would allow the RsbQ-PAS module to convey a common input signal to structurally diverse output domains, controlling a variety of physiological responses.

  11. Different domains of P21Cip1/waf1 regulate DNA replication and DNA repair-associated processes after UV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Many genotoxic insults result in p21 up-regulation and p21-dependent cell cycle arrest but UV irradiation triggers p21 proteolysis. The significance of the increased p21 turnover is unclear and might be associated to DNA repair. While the role of p21 in Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER) remains controversial, two recent reports explore its effect on Translesion DNA Synthesis (TLS), a process that avoids replication blockage during S phase. The first report shows that p21 degradation is required for efficient PCNA ubiquitination, a post transcriptional modification that is relevant for TLS. The second report demonstrates that p21 (-/-) cells have increased TLS-associated mutagenic rates. Herein we analyze the effect of p21 on different PCNA-driven processes including DNA replication, NER and TLS. Whereas only the CDK binding domain of p21 is required for cell cycle arrest in unstressed cells; neither the CDK- nor the PCNA-binding domains of p21 are able to block early and late steps of NER. Intriguingly, through its PCNA binding domain, p21 inhibited recruitment of the TLS-polymerase, polη to PCNA foci after UV. Moreover, this obstruction correlates with accumulation of γH2AX and increased apoptosis. Taking together, our data emphasizes the link between p21 turnover and efficient TLS. This might also suggest a potential effect of p21 on other activities of polζ, a DNA polymerase with central roles in other biological scenarios such as genetic conversion, homologous recombination and modulation of the cellular response to genotoxic agents

  12. Mammalian splicing factor SF1 interacts with SURP domains of U2 snRNP-associated proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisci, Angela; Raleff, Flore; Bagdiul, Ivona; Raabe, Monika; Urlaub, Henning; Rain, Jean-Christophe; Krämer, Angela

    2015-12-01

    Splicing factor 1 (SF1) recognizes the branch point sequence (BPS) at the 3' splice site during the formation of early complex E, thereby pre-bulging the BPS adenosine, thought to facilitate subsequent base-pairing of the U2 snRNA with the BPS. The 65-kDa subunit of U2 snRNP auxiliary factor (U2AF65) interacts with SF1 and was shown to recruit the U2 snRNP to the spliceosome. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments of SF1-interacting proteins from HeLa cell extracts shown here are consistent with the presence of SF1 in early splicing complexes. Surprisingly almost all U2 snRNP proteins were found associated with SF1. Yeast two-hybrid screens identified two SURP domain-containing U2 snRNP proteins as partners of SF1. A short, evolutionarily conserved region of SF1 interacts with the SURP domains, stressing their role in protein-protein interactions. A reduction of A complex formation in SF1-depleted extracts could be rescued with recombinant SF1 containing the SURP-interaction domain, but only partial rescue was observed with SF1 lacking this sequence. Thus, SF1 can initially recruit the U2 snRNP to the spliceosome during E complex formation, whereas U2AF65 may stabilize the association of the U2 snRNP with the spliceosome at later times. In addition, these findings may have implications for alternative splicing decisions. PMID:26420826

  13. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography morphology in optic disc pit associated maculopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz Michalewski

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Our purpose was to study the clinical manifestation and course of optic pit maculopathy using Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SD- OCT images. Materials and Methods: We used SD-OCT to examine 20 eyes of 19 patients with a macular detachment in combination with an optic. Results: We observed five different fovea appearances in regard to fluid localization. In five eyes, we recorded changes in the fluid distribution with SD-OCT. In 17/20 eyes, we noted a communication between the perineural and subretinal and/or intraretinal space at the margin of the optic disc. Conclusion: 3-dimensional SD-OCT (3D-SDOCT scans revealed a three-fold connection, between subretinal and intraretinal space, perineural space, and the vitreous cavity. Therefore, we suppose that intraretinal or subretinal fluid in optic pit maculopathy may have both a vitreous and cerebrospinal origin. A membrane, covering the optic nerve was noted in 14 cases. Even if it seems intact in some B-scans, it is not complete in others several micrometers apart. Additionally, we observed fluid accumulation below the margin of the optic disc and hyperreflective porous tissue in the optic disc excavation. Those findings do not influence the course of maculopathy.

  14. Assessors' Search Result Satisfaction Associated with Relevance in a Scientific Domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingwersen, Peter; Lykke, Marianne; Bogers, Toine;

    2010-01-01

    In this poster we investigate the associations between perceived ease of assessment of situational relevance made by a four-point scale, perceived satisfaction with retrieval results and the actual relevance assessments and retrieval performance made by test collection assessors based on their own...

  15. Childhood trauma and dimensions of depression: a specific association with the cognitive domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar A. Vares

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate associations between a history of childhood trauma and dimensions of depression in a sample of clinically depressed patients. Methods: A sample of 217 patients from a mood-disorder outpatient unit was investigated with the Beck Depression Inventory, the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, the CORE Assessment of Psychomotor Change, and the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire. A previous latent model identifying six depressive dimensions was used for analysis. Path analysis and Multiple Indicators Multiple Causes (MIMIC models were used to investigate associations between general childhood trauma and childhood maltreatment modalities (emotional, sexual, and physical abuse; emotional and physical neglect with dimensions of depression (sexual, cognition, insomnia, appetite, non-interactiveness/retardation, and agitation. Results: The overall childhood trauma index was uniquely associated with cognitive aspects of depression, but not with any other depressive dimension. An investigation of childhood maltreatment modalities revealed that emotional abuse was consistently associated with depression severity in the cognitive dimension. Conclusion: Childhood trauma, and specifically emotional abuse, could be significant risk factors for the subsequent development of cognitive symptoms of major depression. These influences might be specific to this depressive dimension and not found in any other dimension, which might have conceptual and therapeutic implications for clinicians and researchers alike.

  16. The Evolutionary History of MAPL (Mitochondria-Associated Protein Ligase and Other Eukaryotic BAM/GIDE Domain Proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy G Wideman

    Full Text Available MAPL (mitochondria-associated protein ligase, also called MULAN/GIDE/MUL1 is a multifunctional mitochondrial outer membrane protein found in human cells that contains a unique BAM (beside a membrane domain and a C-terminal RING-finger domain. MAPL has been implicated in several processes that occur in animal cells such as NF-kB activation, innate immunity and antiviral signaling, suppression of PINK1/parkin defects, mitophagy in skeletal muscle, and caspase-dependent apoptosis. Previous studies demonstrated that the BAM domain is present in diverse organisms in which most of these processes do not occur, including plants, archaea, and bacteria. Thus the conserved function of MAPL and its BAM domain remains an open question. In order to gain insight into its conserved function, we investigated the evolutionary origins of MAPL by searching for homologues in predicted proteomes of diverse eukaryotes. We show that MAPL proteins with a conserved BAM-RING architecture are present in most animals, protists closely related to animals, a single species of fungus, and several multicellular plants and related green algae. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that eukaryotic MAPL proteins originate from a common ancestor and not from independent horizontal gene transfers from bacteria. We also determined that two independent duplications of MAPL occurred, one at the base of multicellular plants and another at the base of vertebrates. Although no other eukaryote genome examined contained a verifiable MAPL orthologue, BAM domain-containing proteins were identified in the protists Bigelowiella natans and Ectocarpus siliculosis. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that these proteins are more closely related to prokaryotic BAM proteins and therefore likely arose from independent horizontal gene transfers from bacteria. We conclude that MAPL proteins with BAM-RING architectures have been present in the holozoan and viridiplantae lineages since their very beginnings

  17. Association of Urinary N-Domain Angiotensin I-Converting Enzyme with Plasma Inflammatory Markers and Endothelial Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Fernanda B; Plavnik, Frida L; Teixeira, Andressa MS; Christofalo, Dejaldo MJ; Ajzen, Sergio A; Higa, Elisa MS; Ronchi, Fernanda A; Sesso, Ricardo CC; Casarini, Dulce E

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between urinary 90 kDa N-domain Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) form with C-reactive protein (CRP) and homocysteine plasma levels (Hcy), urinary nitric oxide (NOu), and endothelial function (EF) in normotensive subjects. Forty healthy subjects were evaluated through brachial Doppler US to test the response to reactive hyperemia and a panel of blood tests to determine CRP and Hcy levels, NOu, and urinary ACE. They were divided into groups according to the presence (ACE90+) or absence (ACE90–) of the 90 kDa ACE, the presence (FH+) or absence (FH–) of family history of hypertension, and the presence or absence of these two variables FH+/ACE90+ and FH–/ACE90–. We found an impaired endothelial dilatation in subjects who presented the 90 kDa N-domain ACE as follows: 11.4% ± 5.3% in ACE90+ compared with 17.6% ± 7.1% in ACE90– group and 12.4% ± 5.6% in FH+/ACE90+ compared with 17.7% ± 6.2% in FH–/ACE90– group, P < 0.05. Hcy and CRP levels were statistically significantly lower in FH+/ACE90+ than in FH–/ACE90– group, as follows: 10.0 ± 2.3 μM compared with 12.7 ± 1.5 μM, and 1.3 ± 1.8 mg/L compared with 3.6 ± 2.0 mg/L, respectively. A correlation between flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) and CRP, Hcy, and NOu levels was not found. Our study suggests a reduction in the basal NO production confirmed by NOu analysis in subjects with the 90 kDa N-domain ACE isoform alone or associated with a family history of hypertension. Our data suggest that the presence of the 90 kDa N-domain ACE itself may have a negative impact on flow-mediated dilatation stimulated by reactive hyperemia. PMID:18475311

  18. Cloning and characterization of SCART1, a novel scavenger receptor cysteine-rich type I transmembrane molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Dorte; Fink, Dorte Rosenbek; Grønlund, Jørn;

    2009-01-01

    We have cloned and characterized a novel murine transmembrane molecule, mSCART1 belonging to the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich superfamily. The cDNA encodes a polypeptide chain of 989 amino acids, organized as a type I transmembrane protein that contains eight extracellular SRCR domains followed...... related to the WC1 family of the SRCR superfamily. Finally, a novel human scavenger receptor cysteine-rich molecule with high homology to mSCART1 was identified by searching in the human genomic databases using the mSCART1 cDNA sequence....

  19. Novel polymerase gamma (POLG1) gene mutation in the linker domain associated with parkinsonism

    OpenAIRE

    Dolhun, Rachel; Presant, Erin M; Hedera, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Background Mutations in the POLG1 gene have variable phenotypic presentations and a high degree of clinical suspicion is necessary for their recognition. Parkinsonism and ataxia are the most common movement disorders associated with POLG1 mutations but no phenotype-genotype correlation has been established. Case presentation We identified a male patient with progressive external ophthalmoplegia who also developed a progressive bradykinesia, rigidity and camptocormia in the third decade. Parki...

  20. Association of oxytocin receptor (OXTR) gene variants with multiple phenotype domains of autism spectrum disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Campbell, Daniel B.; Datta, Dibyadeep; Jones, Shaine T.; Batey Lee, Evon; Sutcliffe, James S.; Hammock, Elizabeth A.D.; Levitt, Pat

    2011-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is characterized by core deficits in social behavior, communication, and behavioral flexibility. Several lines of evidence indicate that oxytocin, signaling through its receptor (OXTR), is important in a wide range of social behaviors. In attempts to determine whether genetic variations in the oxytocin signaling system contribute to ASD susceptibility, seven recent reports indicated association of common genetic polymorphisms in the OXTR gene with ASD. Each invo...

  1. Childhood trauma and dimensions of depression: a specific association with the cognitive domain

    OpenAIRE

    Edgar A. Vares; Salum, Giovanni A; Lucas Spanemberg; Marco A. Caldieraro; Lívia H. de Souza; Roberta de P. Borges; Marcelo P. Fleck

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate associations between a history of childhood trauma and dimensions of depression in a sample of clinically depressed patients. Methods: A sample of 217 patients from a mood-disorder outpatient unit was investigated with the Beck Depression Inventory, the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, the CORE Assessment of Psychomotor Change, and the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire. A previous latent model identifying six depressive dimensions was used for analysis. Path analysis ...

  2. Characterization of amyloid-β precursor protein intracellular domain-associated transcriptional complexes in SH-SY5Y neurocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wulin Yang; Amy Yong Chen Lau; Shuizhong Luo; Qian Zhu3; Li Lu

    2012-01-01

    [Objective] Alzheimer's disease (AD) is one of the major disorders worldwide.Recent research suggests that the amyloid-β precursor protein intracellular domain (AICD) is a potential contributor to AD development and progression.The small AICD is rapidly degraded after processing from the full-length protein.The present study aimed to apply a highly efficient biotinylation approach in vitro to study AICD-associated complexes in neurocytes.[Methods] By coexpressing Escherichia coli biotin ligase with biotinyl-tagged AICD in the SH-SY5Y neuronal cell line,the effects of AICD overexpression on cell proliferation and apoptosis were analyzed.Besides,AICD-associated nuclear transcriptional complexes were purified and then examined by mass spectrometry.[Results] Our data showed that AICD overexpression not only affected cell proliferation but also led to apoptosis in differentiated SH-SY5Y cells.Moreover,biotinylation allowed single-step purification of biotinylated AICD-associated complexes from total nuclear extract via high-affinity biotin-streptavidin binding.Following this by mass spectrometry,we identified physically associated proteins,some reported previously and other novel binding partners,CUX1 and SPT5.[Conclusion]Based on these [Results],a map of theAICD-associated nuclear interactome was depicted.Specifically,AICD can activate CUXI transcriptional activity,which may be associated with AICD-dependent neuronal cell death.This work helps to understand the AICD-associated biologicalevents in AD progression and provides novel insights into the development of AD.

  3. Cancer associated E17K mutation causes rapid conformational drift in AKT1 pleckstrin homology (PH domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambuj Kumar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: AKT1 (v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homologue 1 kinase is one of the most frequently activated proliferated and survival pathway of cancer. Recently it has been shown that E17K mutation in the Pleckstrin Homology (PH domain of AKT1 protein leads to cancer by amplifying the phosphorylation and membrane localization of protein. The mutant has shown resistance to AKT1/2 inhibitor VIII drug molecule. In this study we have demonstrated the detailed structural and molecular consequences associated with the activity regulation of mutant protein. METHODS: The docking score exhibited significant loss in the interaction affinity to AKT1/2 inhibitor VIII drug molecule. Furthermore, the molecular dynamics simulation studies presented an evidence of rapid conformational drift observed in mutant structure. RESULTS: There was no stability loss in mutant as compared to native structure and the major cation-π interactions were also shown to be retained. Moreover, the active residues involved in membrane localization of protein exhibited significant rise in NHbonds formation in mutant. The rise in NHbond formation in active residues accounts for the 4-fold increase in the membrane localization potential of protein. CONCLUSION: The overall result suggested that, although the mutation did not induce any stability loss in structure, the associated pathological consequences might have occurred due to the rapid conformational drifts observed in the mutant AKT1 PH domain. GENERAL SIGNIFICANCE: The methodology implemented and the results obtained in this work will facilitate in determining the core molecular mechanisms of cancer-associated mutations and in designing their potential drug inhibitors.

  4. Nuclear domain 10-associated proteins recognize and segregate intranuclear DNA/protein complexes to negate gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rivera-Molina Yisel A

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA viruses, such as herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1, Simian virus 40 (SV40, and Cytomegaloviruses (CMV, start their replicative processes and transcription at specific nuclear domains known as ND10 (nuclear domain 10, also called PML bodies. It has been previously determined that for HSV-1 and SV40, a short DNA sequence and its binding protein are required and sufficient for cell localization of viral DNA replication and gene transcription. Results Our recent observations provide evidence that a foreign (not endogenous DNA/protein complex in the nucleus recruits ND10 proteins. First, the complexes formed from the bacterial lac operator DNA and its binding protein (lac repressor, or from HPV11 (human papillomavirus 11 origin DNA and its binding protein (E2, co-localized with different ND10 proteins. Second, the HSV-1 amplicon without inserted lac operator DNA repeats distributed in the nucleus randomly, whereas the amplicon with lac operator DNA repeats associated with ND10, suggesting that DNA-binding proteins are required to localize at ND10. The cellular intrinsic DNA/protein complex (as detected for U2 DNA showed no association with ND10. Furthermore, our examination of PML−/−, Daxx−/−, and Sp100-negative cells led to our discovering that DNA/protein complexes recruit ND10 protein independently. Using the GFP-LacI/Operator system, we were able to direct the transfected DNA to ND10 and found that gene expression was significantly repressed when the transfected DNA was directed to ND10. Conclusion Taken together, the results suggest that cells recognize DNA/protein complexes through a mechanism that involves interaction with the ND10-associated proteins.

  5. Topologically associated domains enriched for lineage-specific genes reveal expression-dependent nuclear topologies during myogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neems, Daniel S; Garza-Gongora, Arturo G; Smith, Erica D; Kosak, Steven T

    2016-03-22

    The linear distribution of genes across chromosomes and the spatial localization of genes within the nucleus are related to their transcriptional regulation. The mechanistic consequences of linear gene order, and how it may relate to the functional output of genome organization, remain to be fully resolved, however. Here we tested the relationship between linear and 3D organization of gene regulation during myogenesis. Our analysis has identified a subset of topologically associated domains (TADs) that are significantly enriched for muscle-specific genes. These lineage-enriched TADs demonstrate an expression-dependent pattern of nuclear organization that influences the positioning of adjacent nonenriched TADs. Therefore, lineage-enriched TADs inform cell-specific genome organization during myogenesis. The reduction of allelic spatial distance of one of these domains, which containsMyogenin, correlates with reduced transcriptional variability, identifying a potential role for lineage-specific nuclear topology. Using a fusion-based strategy to decouple mitosis and myotube formation, we demonstrate that the cell-specific topology of syncytial nuclei is dependent on cell division. We propose that the effects of linear and spatial organization of gene loci on gene regulation are linked through TAD architecture, and that mitosis is critical for establishing nuclear topologies during cellular differentiation. PMID:26957603

  6. The First Type III Domain of Fibronectin is Associated with the Expression of Cytokines within the Lung Tumor Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingzhe Zheng, David M. Jones, Carol Horzempa, Aparna Prasad, Paula J. McKeown-Longo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have pointed to changes in tissue mechanics as a contributory element to the development of malignancies. Increased tissue rigidity is associated with the unfolding of the Type III domains of fibronectin within the extracellular matrix. The consequences of this unfolding on cellular functions within the lung are not well understood. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of a peptide representing a partially unfolded intermediate of the first Type III repeat of fibronectin (FnIII-1c on inflammatory gene expression in adult human lung fibroblast cells. FnIII-1c induced expression of cytokines, CXCL1-3, IL-8 and TNF-α, by lung fibroblast cells. The increase in IL-8 expression was dependent on Toll-like receptor 2 and NFκB. Immunohistochemistry of tissue arrays representing squamous cell carcinoma of the lung revealed extensive stromal staining for IL-8 and fibronectin fibrils which were co-aligned with myofibroblasts. These data suggest a model in which unfolding of FnIII domains secondary to myofibroblast-generated tension may induce the release of cytokines by stromal fibroblasts present within the lung tumor.

  7. Protein domain prediction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ingolfsson, Helgi; Yona, Golan

    2008-01-01

    Domains are considered to be the building blocks of protein structures. A protein can contain a single domain or multiple domains, each one typically associated with a specific function. The combination of domains determines the function of the protein, its subcellular localization and the interacti

  8. Lack of the lectin-like domain of thrombomodulin worsens Shiga toxin-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoja, Carlamaria; Locatelli, Monica; Pagani, Chiara; Corna, Daniela; Zanchi, Cristina; Isermann, Berend; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Conway, Edward M; Noris, Marina

    2012-10-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli is a primary cause of diarrhea-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), a disorder of thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, and acute renal failure. The pathophysiology of renal microvascular thrombosis in Stx-HUS is still ill-defined. Based on evidence that abnormalities in thrombomodulin (TM), an anticoagulant endothelial glycoprotein that modulates complement and inflammation, predispose to atypical HUS, we assessed whether impaired TM function may adversely affect evolution of Stx-HUS. Disease was induced by coinjection of Stx2/LPS in wild-type mice (TM(wt/wt)) and mice that lack the lectin-like domain of TM (TM(LeD/LeD)), which is critical for its anti-inflammatory and cytoprotective properties. After Stx2/LPS, TM(LeD/LeD) mice exhibited more severe thrombocytopenia and renal dysfunction than TM(wt/wt) mice. Lack of lectin-like domain of TM resulted in a stronger inflammatory reaction after Stx2/LPS with more neutrophils and monocytes/macrophages infiltrating the kidney, associated with PECAM-1 and chemokine upregulation. After Stx2/LPS, intraglomerular fibrin(ogen) deposits were detected earlier in TM(LeD/LeD) than in TM(wt/wt) mice. More abundant fibrin(ogen) deposits were also found in brain and lungs. Under basal conditions, TM(LeD/LeD) mice exhibited excess glomerular C3 deposits, indicating impaired complement regulation in the kidney that could lead to local accumulation of proinflammatory products. TM(LeD/LeD) mice with HUS had a higher mortality rate than TM(wt/wt) mice. If applicable to humans, these findings raise the possibility that genetic or acquired TM defects might have an impact on the severity of microangiopathic lesions after exposure to Stx-producing E. coli infections and raise the potential for using soluble TM in the treatment of Stx-HUS. PMID:22942429

  9. Intact transmembrane isoforms of the neural cell adhesion molecule are released from the plasma membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, M; Krog, L; Edvardsen, K;

    1993-01-01

    density-gradient centrifugation it was shown that shed transmembrane NCAM-B was present in fractions of high, as well as low, density, indicating that a fraction of the shed NCAM is associated with minor plasma membrane fragments. Finally, it was shown that isolated soluble NCAM inhibited cell binding to......-s1 and NCAM-s2 and the function of soluble NCAM forms were investigated. It was shown that all three soluble forms could be released from brain membranes with M(r) values identical to the three major membrane-associated forms: the large transmembrane 190,000-M(r) form (NCAM-A), the smaller...... intact soluble form from membranes of cells transfected with this isoform. Thus, NCAM-s1 and NCAM-s2 probably represent intact released transmembrane NCAM-A and NCAM-B. The soluble transmembrane forms are likely to exist in vivo, as NCAM-s1 and NCAM-s2 were readily demonstrated in cerebrospinal fluid. By...

  10. Functional Identification of Close Proximity Amino Acid Side Chains within the Transmembrane-Spanning Helixes of the P2X2 Receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Xin; Xu, Huijuan; Li, Caiyue; Yin, Shikui; Xu, Tingting; Liu, Jinsong; Li, Zhiyuan

    2013-01-01

    The transition from the closed to open state greatly alters the intra- and inter-subunit interactions of the P2X receptor (P2XR). The interactions that occur in the transmembrane domain of the P2X2R remain unclear. We used substituted cysteine mutagenesis disulfide mapping to identify pairs of residues that are in close proximity within the transmembrane domain of rP2X2R and compared our results to the predicted positions of these amino acids obtained from a rat P2X2R homology model of the av...

  11. A hydrophobic domain within the small capsid protein of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus is required for assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capuano, Christopher M; Grzesik, Peter; Kreitler, Dale; Pryce, Erin N; Desai, Keshal V; Coombs, Gavin; McCaffery, J Michael; Desai, Prashant J

    2014-08-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) capsids can be produced in insect cells using recombinant baculoviruses for protein expression. All six capsid proteins are required for this process to occur and, unlike for alphaherpesviruses, the small capsid protein (SCP) ORF65 is essential for this process. This protein decorates the capsid shell by virtue of its interaction with the capsomeres. In this study, we have explored the SCP interaction with the major capsid protein (MCP) using GFP fusions. The assembly site within the nucleus of infected cells was visualized by light microscopy using fluorescence produced by the SCP-GFP polypeptide, and the relocalization of the SCP to these sites was evident only when the MCP and the scaffold protein were also present - indicative of an interaction between these proteins that ensures delivery of the SCP to assembly sites. Biochemical assays demonstrated a physical interaction between the SCP and MCP, and also between this complex and the scaffold protein. Self-assembly of capsids with the SCP-GFP polypeptide was evident. Potentially, this result can be used to engineer fluorescent KSHV particles. A similar SCP-His6 polypeptide was used to purify capsids from infected cell lysates using immobilized affinity chromatography and to directly label this protein in capsids using chemically derivatized gold particles. Additional studies with SCP-GFP polypeptide truncation mutants identified a domain residing between aa 50 and 60 of ORF65 that was required for the relocalization of SCP-GFP to nuclear assembly sites. Substitution of residues in this region and specifically at residue 54 with a polar amino acid (lysine) disrupted or abolished this localization as well as capsid assembly, whereas substitution with non-polar residues did not affect the interaction. Thus, this study identified a small conserved hydrophobic domain that is important for the SCP-MCP interaction. PMID:24824860

  12. Acquired resistance of lung adenocarcinomas to gefitinib or erlotinib is associated with a second mutation in the EGFR kinase domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Pao

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lung adenocarcinomas from patients who respond to the tyrosine kinase inhibitors gefitinib (Iressa or erlotinib (Tarceva usually harbor somatic gain-of-function mutations in exons encoding the kinase domain of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR. Despite initial responses, patients eventually progress by unknown mechanisms of "acquired" resistance. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We show that in two of five patients with acquired resistance to gefitinib or erlotinib, progressing tumors contain, in addition to a primary drug-sensitive mutation in EGFR, a secondary mutation in exon 20, which leads to substitution of methionine for threonine at position 790 (T790M in the kinase domain. Tumor cells from a sixth patient with a drug-sensitive EGFR mutation whose tumor progressed on adjuvant gefitinib after complete resection also contained the T790M mutation. This mutation was not detected in untreated tumor samples. Moreover, no tumors with acquired resistance had KRAS mutations, which have been associated with primary resistance to these drugs. Biochemical analyses of transfected cells and growth inhibition studies with lung cancer cell lines demonstrate that the T790M mutation confers resistance to EGFR mutants usually sensitive to either gefitinib or erlotinib. Interestingly, a mutation analogous to T790M has been observed in other kinases with acquired resistance to another kinase inhibitor, imatinib (Gleevec. CONCLUSION: In patients with tumors bearing gefitinib- or erlotinib-sensitive EGFR mutations, resistant subclones containing an additional EGFR mutation emerge in the presence of drug. This observation should help guide the search for more effective therapy against a specific subset of lung cancers.

  13. Carbohydrate-binding module 74 is a novel starch-binding domain associated with large and multidomain α-amylase enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valk, Vincent; Lammerts van Bueren, Alicia; van der Kaaij, Rachel M; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert

    2016-06-01

    Microbacterium aurum B8.A is a bacterium that originates from a potato starch-processing plant and employs a GH13 α-amylase (MaAmyA) enzyme that forms pores in potato starch granules. MaAmyA is a large and multi-modular protein that contains a novel domain at its C terminus (Domain 2). Deletion of Domain 2 from MaAmyA did not affect its ability to degrade starch granules but resulted in a strong reduction in granular pore size. Here, we separately expressed and purified this Domain 2 in Escherichia coli and determined its likely function in starch pore formation. Domain 2 independently binds amylose, amylopectin, and granular starch but does not have any detectable catalytic (hydrolytic or oxidizing) activity on α-glucan substrates. Therefore, we propose that this novel starch-binding domain is a new carbohydrate-binding module (CBM), the first representative of family CBM74 that assists MaAmyA in efficient pore formation in starch granules. Protein sequence-based BLAST searches revealed that CBM74 occurs widespread, but in bacteria only, and is often associated with large and multi-domain α-amylases containing family CBM25 or CBM26 domains. CBM74 may specifically function in binding to granular starches to enhance the capability of α-amylase enzymes to degrade resistant starches (RSs). Interestingly, the majority of family CBM74 representatives are found in α-amylases originating from human gut-associated Bifidobacteria, where they may assist in resistant starch degradation. The CBM74 domain thus may have a strong impact on the efficiency of RS digestion in the mammalian gastrointestinal tract. PMID:27101946

  14. Modeling the structure of SARS 3a transmembrane protein using a minimum unfavorable contact approach

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Ramakrishna; Siladitya Padhi; U Deva Priyakumar

    2015-12-01

    3a is an accessory protein from SARS coronavirus that is known to play a significant role in the proliferation of the virus by forming tetrameric ion channels. Although the monomeric units are known to consist of three transmembrane (TM) domains, there are no solved structures available for the complete monomer. The present study proposes a structural model for the transmembrane region of the monomer by employing our previously tested approach, which predicts potential orientations of TM -helices by minimizing the unfavorable contact surfaces between the different TM domains. The best model structure comprising all three -helices has been subjected to MD simulations to examine its quality. The TM bundle was found to form a compact and stable structure with significant intermolecular interactions. The structural features of the proposed model of 3a account for observations from previous experimental investigations on the activity of the protein. Further analysis indicates that residues from the TM2 and TM3 domains are likely to line the pore of the ion channel, which is in good agreement with a recent experimental study. In the absence of an experimental structure for the protein, the proposed structure can serve as a useful model for inferring structure-function relationships about the protein.

  15. A negatively charged transmembrane aspartate residue controls activation of the relaxin-3 receptor RXFP3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Zhang, Lei; Shao, Xiao-Xia; Hu, Meng-Jun; Liu, Ya-Li; Xu, Zeng-Guang; Guo, Zhan-Yun

    2016-08-15

    Relaxin-3 is an insulin/relaxin superfamily neuropeptide involved in the regulation of food intake and stress response via activation of its cognate receptor RXFP3, an A-class G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). In recent studies, a highly conserved ExxxD motif essential for binding of relaxin-3 has been identified at extracellular end of the second transmembrane domain (TMD2) of RXFP3. For most of the A-class GPCRs, a highly conserved negatively charged Asp residue (Asp(2.50) using Ballesteros-Weinstein numbering and Asp128 in human RXFP3) is present at the middle of TMD2. To elucidate function of the conserved transmembrane Asp128, in the present work we replaced it with other residues and the resultant RXFP3 mutants all retained quite high ligand-binding potency, but their activation and agonist-induced internalization were abolished or drastically decreased. Thus, the negatively charged transmembrane Asp128 controlled transduction of agonist-binding information from the extracellular region to the intracellular region through maintaining RXFP3 in a metastable state for efficient conformational change induced by binding of an agonist. PMID:27353281

  16. Confirmatory factor analysis of the Adult Asperger Assessment: The association of symptom domains within a clinical population

    OpenAIRE

    Kuenssberg, Renate; McKenzie, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a behaviourally defined disorder characterised by impairments in three domains of social interaction, communication, and repetitive, stereotyped behaviours and activities. Proposed changes to diagnostic criteria suggest that the diagnostic triad may no longer fit as the best way to conceptualise ASD, and that social and communication impairments should be considered as a single domain. The aim of this study was to examine the structure of symptom domains with...

  17. Ahcyl2 upregulates NBCe1-B via multiple serine residues of the PEST domain-mediated association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Pil Whan; Ahn, Jeong Yeal

    2016-01-01

    Inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate [IP3] receptors binding protein released with IP3 (IRBIT) was previously reported as an activator of NBCe1-B. Recent studies have characterized IRBIT homologue S-Adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase-like 2 (AHCYL2). AHCYL2 is highly homologous to IRBIT (88%) and heteromerizes with IRBIT. The two important domains in the N-terminus of AHCYL2 are a PEST domain and a coiled-coil domain which are highly comparable to those in IRBIT. Therefore, in this study, we tried to identify the role of those domains in mouse AHCYL2 (Ahcyl2), and we succeeded in identifying PEST domain of Ahcyl2 as a regulation region for NBCe1-B activity. Site directed mutagenesis and coimmunoprecipitation assay showed that NBCe1-B binds to the N-terminal Ahcyl2-PEST domain, and its binding is determined by the phosphorylation of 4 critical serine residues (Ser151, Ser154, Ser157, and Ser160) in Ahcyl2 PEST domain. Also we revealed that 4 critical serine residues in Ahcyl2 PEST domain are indispensable for the activation of NBCe1-B using measurement of intracellular pH experiment. Thus, these results suggested that the NBCe1-B is interacted with 4 critical serine residues in Ahcyl2 PEST domain, which play an important role in intracellular pH regulation through NBCe1-B.

  18. Evaluation of feline immunodeficiency virus and feline leukemia virus transmembrane peptides for serological diagnosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Fontenot, J D; Hoover, E A; Elder, J H; Montelaro, R C

    1992-01-01

    The general model for retrovirus transmembrane (TM) proteins proposed by Gallaher et al. (W. R. Gallaher, J. M. Ball, R. F. Garry, M. C. Griffin, and R. C. Montelaro, AIDS Res. Hum. Retroviruses 5:431-440, 1989) suggests that all retrovirus TM proteins may contain an immunodominant domain (Imd-TM peptide) located at the apex of the TM polypeptide. Although this Imd-TM peptide has been shown to be immunodominant in a variety of lentivirus infections, there has not been a detailed serological a...

  19. The Ability to Associate with Activation Domains in vitro is not Required for the TATA Box-Binding Protein to Support Activated Transcription in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tansey, William P.; Herr, Winship

    1995-11-01

    The TATA box-binding protein (TBP) interacts in vitro with the activation domains of many viral and cellular transcription factors and has been proposed to be a direct target for transcriptional activators. We have examined the functional relevance of activator-TBP association in vitro to transcriptional activation in vivo. We show that alanine substitution mutations in a single loop of TBP can disrupt its association in vitro with the activation domains of the herpes simplex virus activator VP16 and of the human tumor suppressor protein p53; these mutations do not, however, disrupt the transcriptional response of TBP to either activation domain in vivo. Moreover, we show that a region of VP16 distinct from its activation domain can also tightly associate with TBP in vitro, but fails to activate transcription in vivo. These data suggest that the ability of TBP to interact with activation domains in vitro is not directly relevant to its ability to support activated transcription in vivo.

  20. PorcineLEM domain-containing 3:Molecular cloning, functional characterization, and polymorphism associated with ear size

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Jing; SHI Hui-bi; ZHANG Qin; WANGLi-xian; LI Na; ZHANG Long-chao; WANGLi-gang; LIU Xin; ZHAO Ke-bin; YAN Hua; PU Lei; ZHANG Yue-bo

    2016-01-01

    Ear size exhibits remarkable diversity in pig breeds.LEM domain-containing 3 (LEMD3) on chromosome 5 is considered as an important candidate for porcine ear size. This is the ifrst study on cloning and characterization ofLEMD3 cDNA. The complete cDNA contains 4843 bp, including a 2736-bp open reading frame (ORF), a 37-bp 5´-untranslated region (UTR) and a 2070-bp 3´-UTR. The completeLEMD3 gene is 126241-bp and contains 13 exons and 12 introns. The ORF encodes a deduced LEMD3 protein of 911 amino acids, which shares 82–94% nucleic acid and 51–96% amino acid identity with other species. A phylogenetic tree constructed based on the amino acid sequences revealed that the porcine LEMD3 protein was closely related with cattle LEMD3. Resequencing of the ORF and promoter ofLEMD3 from Minzhu pig and Large White revealed three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs): L964C>A in the complete coding region, L4625A>G in the 3´ UTR, and L-394T>C in the promoter region. Genome-wide association study (GWAS) revealed that al of SNPs were shown signiifcant association with ear size in Large White×Minzhu pig intercross population. With conditional GWAS, –log10(P-value) decreased by more than 80% when each of three SNPs was included as a ifxed effect. These results suggested direct involvement ofLEMD3 or close linkage to the causative mutation for ear size. The ifndings of this study might form the basis for understanding the genetic mechanism of ear size variation in pigs and provide potential molecular markers for screening ear size diversity in pig breeds.

  1. Hepatitis C virus NS4B carboxy terminal domain is a membrane binding domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spaan Willy JM

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV induces membrane rearrangements during replication. All HCV proteins are associated to membranes, pointing out the importance of membranes for HCV. Non structural protein 4B (NS4B has been reported to induce cellular membrane alterations like the membranous web. Four transmembrane segments in the middle of the protein anchor NS4B to membranes. An amphipatic helix at the amino-terminus attaches to membranes as well. The carboxy-terminal domain (CTD of NS4B is highly conserved in Hepaciviruses, though its function remains unknown. Results A cytosolic localization is predicted for the NS4B-CTD. However, using membrane floatation assays and immunofluorescence, we now show targeting of the NS4B-CTD to membranes. Furthermore, a profile-profile search, with an HCV NS4B-CTD multiple sequence alignment, indicates sequence similarity to the membrane binding domain of prokaryotic D-lactate dehydrogenase (d-LDH. The crystal structure of E. coli d-LDH suggests that the region similar to NS4B-CTD is located in the membrane binding domain (MBD of d-LDH, implying analogy in membrane association. Targeting of d-LDH to membranes occurs via electrostatic interactions of positive residues on the outside of the protein with negative head groups of lipids. To verify that anchorage of d-LDH MBD and NS4B-CTD is analogous, NS4B-CTD mutants were designed to disrupt these electrostatic interactions. Membrane association was confirmed by swopping the membrane contacting helix of d-LDH with the corresponding domain of the 4B-CTD. Furthermore, the functionality of these residues was tested in the HCV replicon system. Conclusion Together these data show that NS4B-CTD is associated to membranes, similar to the prokaryotic d-LDH MBD, and is important for replication.

  2. Unassisted translocation of large polypeptide domains across phospholipid bilayers

    OpenAIRE

    Brambillasca, Silvia; Yabal, Monica; Makarow, Marja; Borgese, Nica

    2006-01-01

    Although transmembrane proteins generally require membrane-embedded machinery for integration, a few can insert spontaneously into liposomes. Previously, we established that the tail-anchored (TA) protein cytochrome b(5) (b5) can posttranslationally translocate 28 residues downstream to its transmembrane domain (TMD) across protein-free bilayers (Brambillasca, S., M. Yabal, P. Soffientini, S. Stefanovic, M. Makarow, R.S. Hegde, and N. Borgese. 2005. EMBO J. 24:2533–2542). In the present study...

  3. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Activation by Roflumilast Contributes to Therapeutic Benefit in Chronic Bronchitis

    OpenAIRE

    Lambert, James A.; Raju, S. Vamsee; Tang, Li Ping; McNicholas, Carmel M.; Li, Yao; Courville, Clifford A.; Farris, Roopan F.; Coricor, George E.; Smoot, Lisa H.; Mazur, Marina M.; Dransfield, Mark T; Bolger, Graeme B.; Rowe, Steven M

    2014-01-01

    Cigarette smoking causes acquired cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) dysfunction and is associated with delayed mucociliary clearance and chronic bronchitis. Roflumilast is a clinically approved phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitor that improves lung function in patients with chronic bronchitis. We hypothesized that its therapeutic benefit was related in part to activation of CFTR. Primary human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells, Calu-3, and T84 monolayers were exposed to whol...

  4. A novel COCH mutation associated with autosomal dominant nonsyndromic hearing loss disrupts the structural stability of the vWFA2 domain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cho, H.J.; Park, H.J.; Trexler, M.; Venselaar, H.; Lee, K.Y.; Robertson, N.G.; Baek, J.I.; Kang, B.S.; Morton, C.C.; Vriend, G.; Patthy, L.; Kim, U.K.

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in COCH have been associated with autosomal dominant nonsyndromic hearing loss (DFNA9) and are frequently accompanied by vestibular hypofunction. Here, we report identification of a novel missense mutation, p.F527C, located in the vWFA2 domain in members of a Korean family with late-onset

  5. Disease-associated mutations in the actin-binding domain of filamin B cause cytoplasmic focal accumulations correlating with disease severity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daniel, Philip B; Morgan, Tim; Alanay, Yasemin;

    2012-01-01

    -containing cytoplasmic focal accumulations of the substituted protein to a degree that was correlated with the severity of the associated phenotypes. In contrast, study of mutations leading to substitutions in the FLNB rod domain that result in the same phenotypes as ABD mutations, demonstrated that with only one...

  6. topPTM: a new module of dbPTM for identifying functional post-translational modifications in transmembrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Min-Gang; Huang, Kai-Yao; Lu, Cheng-Tsung; Kao, Hui-Ju; Chang, Ya-Han; Lee, Tzong-Yi

    2014-01-01

    Transmembrane (TM) proteins have crucial roles in various cellular processes. The location of post-translational modifications (PTMs) on TM proteins is associated with their functional roles in various cellular processes. Given the importance of PTMs in the functioning of TM proteins, this study developed topPTM (available online at http://topPTM.cse.yzu.edu.tw), a new dbPTM module that provides a public resource for identifying the functional PTM sites on TM proteins with structural topology. Experimentally verified TM topology data were integrated from TMPad, TOPDB, PDBTM and OPM. In addition to the PTMs obtained from dbPTM, experimentally verified PTM sites were manually extracted from research articles by text mining. In an attempt to provide a full investigation of PTM sites on TM proteins, all UniProtKB protein entries containing annotations related to membrane localization and TM topology were considered potential TM proteins. Two effective tools were then used to annotate the structural topology of the potential TM proteins. The TM topology of TM proteins is represented by graphical visualization, as well as by the PTM sites. To delineate the structural correlation between the PTM sites and TM topologies, the tertiary structure of PTM sites on TM proteins was visualized by Jmol program. Given the support of research articles by manual curation and the investigation of domain-domain interactions in Protein Data Bank, 1347 PTM substrate sites are associated with protein-protein interactions for 773 TM proteins. The database content is regularly updated on publication of new data by continuous surveys of research articles and available resources. PMID:24302577

  7. Functional characterization of transmembrane adenylyl cyclases from the honeybee brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balfanz, Sabine; Ehling, Petra; Wachten, Sebastian; Jordan, Nadine; Erber, Joachim; Mujagic, Samir; Baumann, Arnd

    2012-06-01

    The second messenger cAMP has a pivotal role in animals' physiology and behavior. Intracellular concentrations of cAMP are balanced by cAMP-synthesizing adenylyl cyclases (ACs) and cAMP-cleaving phosphodiesterases. Knowledge about ACs in the honeybee (Apis mellifera) is rather limited and only an ortholog of the vertebrate AC3 isoform has been functionally characterized, so far. Employing bioinformatics and functional expression we characterized two additional honeybee genes encoding membrane-bound (tm)ACs. The proteins were designated AmAC2t and AmAC8. Unlike the common structure of tmACs, AmAC2t lacks the first transmembrane domain. Despite this unusual topography, AmAC2t-activity could be stimulated by norepinephrine and NKH477 with EC(50s) of 0.07 μM and 3 μM. Both ligands stimulated AmAC8 with EC(50s) of 0.24 μM and 3.1 μM. In brain cryosections, intensive staining of mushroom bodies was observed with specific antibodies against AmAC8, an expression pattern highly reminiscent of the Drosophila rutabaga AC. In a current release of the honeybee genome database we identified three additional tmAC- and one soluble AC-encoding gene. These results suggest that (1) the AC-gene family in honeybees is comparably large as in other species, and (2) based on the restricted expression of AmAC8 in mushroom bodies, this enzyme might serve important functions in honeybee behavior. PMID:22426196

  8. Organization of centromeric domains in hepatocyte nuclei: rearrangement associated with de novo activation of the vitellogenin gene family in Xenopus laevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janevski, J; Park, P C; De Boni, U

    1995-04-01

    The existence of a function-dependent, nonrandom organization of chromatin domains within interphase nuclei is supported by evidence which suggests that specific chromatin domains undergo spatial rearrangement under conditions which alter gene expression. Exposure to estrogen of male Xenopus laevis hepatocytes in vitro results in de novo activation of vitellogenin mRNA production and vitellogenin protein synthesis and provides an ideal model to study the association between chromatin organization and changes in gene expression. In a test of the hypothesis that the de novo induction of vitellogenesis in male X. laevis is associated with a spatial rearrangement of specific chromatin domains, centromeric regions were localized by immunofluorescent labeling of associated kinetochore proteins in naive and in estrogen-treated, vitellogenic cells. Analyses by confocal scanning laser microscopy of the three-dimensional spatial distribution of kinetochores in estrogen-treated male hepatocytes showed that a significantly greater proportion of signals was associated with the nuclear periphery than in non-estrogen-treated, naive male cells. In hepatocyte nuclei, quantification of kinetochore signal sizes using image analysis showed that these signals were fewer in number and showed greater variation in size than those of cells in metaphase, with larger signals exhibiting total normalized fluorescence intensities of two, three, four, and five times that associated with kinetochore signals of metaphase cells. These observations are taken to reflect the existence of clustering of kinetochores and, by extension, of centromeres in these cells. In summary, the results show that centromeric domains within interphase nuclei of Xenopus hepatocytes occur as clusters and that these domains undergo spatial rearrangement under conditions which alter the transcriptional state of the cell. PMID:7698222

  9. TSSOM:Transmembrane Segments Prediction by Self—Organizing Map

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIUQi; ZHUYisheng; WANGBaohua; LIYixue

    2003-01-01

    A novel method ealled TSSOM(Transmembrane segments prediction by self-organizing map)is presented in the paper.The main idea of the method lies in the application of self-organizing feature map together with special visualization techniques to classify the multivariate "time" series of transmembrane proteins into flve classes.Through the analysis of resulting trajectories on the map,frequent patterns of transmembrane segments are detected and even some kind of "new"knowledge about membrane insertion mechanism is acquired.The discovered patterns and the knowledge are then used to predict transmembrane segments for auery sequence.The prediction results not only show that the method is powerful,but also prove that the patterns and the knowledge about the interaction bwtween the patterns are effective and acceptable.

  10. Association of kinase insert domain-containing receptor (KDR) gene polymorphism/ haplotypes with recurrent spontaneous abortion and genetic structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahsavari, Shiva; Noormohammadi, Zahra; Zare Karizi, Shohreh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recurrent spontaneous abortion is one of the diseases that can lead to physical, psychological, and, economical problems for both individuals and society. Recently a few numbers of genetic polymorphisms in kinase insert domain-containing receptor (KDR) gene are examined that can endanger the life of the fetus in pregnant women. Objective: The risk of KDR gene polymorphisms was investigated in Iranian women with idiopathic recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA). Materials and Methods: A case controlled study was performed. One hundred idiopathic recurrent spontaneous abortion patients with at least two consecutive pregnancy losses before 20 weeks of gestational age with normal karyotypes were included in the study. Also, 100 healthy women with at least one natural pregnancy were studied as control group. Two functional SNPs located in KDR gene; rs1870377 (Q472H), and rs2305948 (V297I) as well as one tag SNP in the intron region (rs6838752) were genotyped by using PCR based restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) technique. Haplotype frequency was determined for these three SNPs’ genotypes. Analysis of genetic STRUCTURE and K means clustering were performed to study genetic variation. Results: Functional SNP (rs1870377) was highly linked to tag SNP (rs6838752) (D´ value=0. 214; χ2 = 16.44, p<0. 001). K means clustering showed that k = 8 as the best fit for the optimal number of genetic subgroups in our studied materials. This result was in agreement with Neighbor Joining cluster analysis. Conclusion: In our study, the allele and genotype frequencies were not associated with RSA between patient and control individuals. Inconsistent results in different populations with different allele frequencies among RSA patients and controls may be due to ethnic variation and used sample size. PMID:27141535

  11. Evidence for distinct sodium-, dopamine-, and cocaine-dependent conformational changes in transmembrane segments 7 and 8 of the dopamine transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norregaard, Lene; Loland, Claus Juul; Gether, Ulrik

    2003-01-01

    Previously we obtained evidence based on engineering of Zn2+ binding sites that the extracellular parts of transmembrane segment 7 (TM7) and TM8 in the human dopamine transporter are important for transporter function. To further evaluate the role of this domain, we have employed the substituted ...

  12. The Transmembrane Adaptor Protein SIT Inhibits TCR-Mediated Signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Arndt, Börge; Krieger, Tina; Kalinski, Thomas; Thielitz, Anja; Reinhold, Dirk; Roessner, Albert; Schraven, Burkhart; Simeoni, Luca

    2011-01-01

    Transmembrane adaptor proteins (TRAPs) organize signaling complexes at the plasma membrane, and thus function as critical linkers and integrators of signaling cascades downstream of antigen receptors. We have previously shown that the transmembrane adaptor protein SIT regulates the threshold for thymocyte selection. Moreover, T cells from SIT-deficient mice are hyperresponsive to CD3 stimulation and undergo enhanced lymphopenia-induced homeostatic proliferation, thus indicating that SIT inhib...

  13. Expression of occludin, tight-junction-associated protein, in human digestive tract.

    OpenAIRE

    Kimura, Y; Shiozaki, H.; Hirao, M; Maeno, Y.; Doki, Y.; Inoue, M; Monden, T.; Ando-Akatsuka, Y.; Furuse, M; Tsukita, S; Monden, M

    1997-01-01

    The tight junction seals cells together at a subapical location and functionally separates the plasma membrane into an apical and a basolateral domain. This junction is one of the most characteristic structural markers of the polarized epithelial cell. Recently, occludin has been identified as an integral transmembrane protein localizing at the tight junction and directly associated with ZO-1, an undercoat-constitutive cytoplasmic protein. We have investigated occludin expression in conjuncti...

  14. Activation of an Arabidopsis resistance protein is specified by the in planta association of its leucine-rich repeat domain with the cognate oomycete effector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasileva, Ksenia V; Dahlbeck, Douglas; Staskawicz, Brian J

    2010-07-01

    Activation of plant immunity relies on recognition of pathogen effectors by several classes of plant resistance proteins. To discover the underlying molecular mechanisms of effector recognition by the Arabidopsis thaliana RECOGNITION OF PERONOSPORA PARASITICA1 (RPP1) resistance protein, we adopted an Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transient protein expression system in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), which allowed us to perform coimmunoprecipitation experiments and mutational analyses. Herein, we demonstrate that RPP1 associates with its cognate effector ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA RECOGNIZED1 (ATR1) in a recognition-specific manner and that this association is a prerequisite step in the induction of the hypersensitive cell death response of host tissue. The leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domain of RPP1 mediates the interaction with ATR1, while the Toll/Interleukin1 Receptor (TIR) domain facilitates the induction of the hypersensitive cell death response. Additionally, we demonstrate that mutations in the TIR and nucleotide binding site domains, which exhibit loss of function for the induction of the hypersensitive response, are still able to associate with the effector in planta. Thus, our data suggest molecular epistasis between signaling activity of the TIR domain and the recognition function of the LRR and allow us to propose a model for ATR1 recognition by RPP1. PMID:20601497

  15. Crystal structures of the reverse transcriptase-associated ribonuclease H domain of xenotropic murine leukemia-virus related virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Dongwen; Chung, Suhman; Miller, Maria; Le Grice, Stuart F.J.; Wlodawer, Alexander (NCI)

    2012-06-19

    The ribonuclease H (RNase H) domain of retroviral reverse transcriptase (RT) plays a critical role in the life cycle by degrading the RNA strands of DNA/RNA hybrids. In addition, RNase H activity is required to precisely remove the RNA primers from nascent (-) and (+) strand DNA. We report here three crystal structures of the RNase H domain of xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) RT, namely (i) the previously identified construct from which helix C was deleted, (ii) the intact domain, and (iii) the intact domain complexed with an active site {alpha}-hydroxytropolone inhibitor. Enzymatic assays showed that the intact RNase H domain retained catalytic activity, whereas the variant lacking helix C was only marginally active, corroborating the importance of this helix for enzymatic activity. Modeling of the enzyme-substrate complex elucidated the essential role of helix C in binding a DNA/RNA hybrid and its likely mode of recognition. The crystal structure of the RNase H domain complexed with {beta}-thujaplicinol clearly showed that coordination by two divalent cations mediates recognition of the inhibitor.

  16. Domains and domain loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haberland, Hartmut

    2005-01-01

    politicians and in the media, especially in the discussion whether some languages undergo ‘domain loss’ vis-à-vis powerful international languages like English. An objection that has been raised here is that domains, as originally conceived, are parameters of language choice and not properties of languages...... theoretical constructs that can explain language choice which were supposed to be a more powerful explanatory tool than more obvious (and observable) parameters like topic, place (setting) and interlocutor. In the meantime, at least in Scandinavia, the term ‘domain’ has been taken up in the debate among...

  17. The structure of the cysteine protease and lectin-like domains of Cwp84, a surface layer-associated protein from Clostridium difficile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The crystal structure of Cwp84, an S-layer protein from Clostridium difficile is presented for the first time. The cathepsin L-like fold of cysteine protease domain, a newly observed ‘lectin-like’ domain and several other features are described. Clostridium difficile is a major problem as an aetiological agent for antibiotic-associated diarrhoea. The mechanism by which the bacterium colonizes the gut during infection is poorly understood, but undoubtedly involves a myriad of components present on the bacterial surface. The mechanism of C. difficile surface-layer (S-layer) biogenesis is also largely unknown but involves the post-translational cleavage of a single polypeptide (surface-layer protein A; SlpA) into low- and high-molecular-weight subunits by Cwp84, a surface-located cysteine protease. Here, the first crystal structure of the surface protein Cwp84 is described at 1.4 Å resolution and the key structural components are identified. The truncated Cwp84 active-site mutant (amino-acid residues 33–497; C116A) exhibits three regions: a cleavable propeptide and a cysteine protease domain which exhibits a cathepsin L-like fold followed by a newly identified putative carbohydrate-binding domain with a bound calcium ion, which is referred to here as a lectin-like domain. This study thus provides the first structural insights into Cwp84 and a strong base to elucidate its role in the C. difficile S-layer maturation mechanism

  18. The structure of the cysteine protease and lectin-like domains of Cwp84, a surface layer-associated protein from Clostridium difficile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradshaw, William J. [University of Bath, Claverton Down, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom); Public Health England, Porton Down, Salisbury SP4 0JG (United Kingdom); Kirby, Jonathan M. [Public Health England, Porton Down, Salisbury SP4 0JG (United Kingdom); Thiyagarajan, Nethaji [University of Bath, Claverton Down, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom); Chambers, Christopher J.; Davies, Abigail H. [University of Bath, Claverton Down, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom); Public Health England, Porton Down, Salisbury SP4 0JG (United Kingdom); Roberts, April K.; Shone, Clifford C. [Public Health England, Porton Down, Salisbury SP4 0JG (United Kingdom); Acharya, K. Ravi, E-mail: bsskra@bath.ac.uk [University of Bath, Claverton Down, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-01

    The crystal structure of Cwp84, an S-layer protein from Clostridium difficile is presented for the first time. The cathepsin L-like fold of cysteine protease domain, a newly observed ‘lectin-like’ domain and several other features are described. Clostridium difficile is a major problem as an aetiological agent for antibiotic-associated diarrhoea. The mechanism by which the bacterium colonizes the gut during infection is poorly understood, but undoubtedly involves a myriad of components present on the bacterial surface. The mechanism of C. difficile surface-layer (S-layer) biogenesis is also largely unknown but involves the post-translational cleavage of a single polypeptide (surface-layer protein A; SlpA) into low- and high-molecular-weight subunits by Cwp84, a surface-located cysteine protease. Here, the first crystal structure of the surface protein Cwp84 is described at 1.4 Å resolution and the key structural components are identified. The truncated Cwp84 active-site mutant (amino-acid residues 33–497; C116A) exhibits three regions: a cleavable propeptide and a cysteine protease domain which exhibits a cathepsin L-like fold followed by a newly identified putative carbohydrate-binding domain with a bound calcium ion, which is referred to here as a lectin-like domain. This study thus provides the first structural insights into Cwp84 and a strong base to elucidate its role in the C. difficile S-layer maturation mechanism.

  19. Mutations of C19orf12, coding for a transmembrane glycine zipper containing mitochondrial protein, cause mis-localization of the protein, inability to respond to oxidative stress and increased mitochondrial Ca2+.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola eVenco

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in C19orf12 have been identified in patients affected by Neurodegeneration with Brain Iron Accumulation (NBIA, a clinical entity characterized by iron accumulation in the basal ganglia. By using western blot analysis with specific antibody and confocal studies, we showed that wild-type C19orf12 protein was not exclusively present in mitochondria, but also in the Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER and MAM (Mitochondria Associated Membrane, while mutant C19orf12 variants presented a different localization. Moreover, after induction of oxidative stress, a GFP-tagged C19orf12 wild-type protein was able to relocate to the cytosol. On the contrary, mutant isoforms were not able to respond to oxidative stress. High mitochondrial calcium concentration and increased H2O2 induced apoptosis were found in fibroblasts derived from one patient as compared to controls.C19orf12 protein is a 17kDa mitochondrial membrane-associated protein whose function is still unknown. Our in silico investigation suggests that, the glycine zipper motifs of C19orf12 form helical regions spanning the membrane. The N- and C-terminal regions with respect to the transmembrane portion, on the contrary, are predicted to rearrange in a structural domain, which is homologues to the N-terminal regulatory domain of the magnesium transporter MgtE, suggesting that C19orf12 may act as a regulatory protein for human MgtE transporters. The mutations here described affect respectively one glycine residue of the glycine zipper motifs, which are involved in dimerization of transmembrane helices and predicted to impair the correct localization of the protein into the membranes, and one residue present in the regulatory domain, which is important for protein-protein interaction.

  20. Human ClC-6 is a late endosomal glycoprotein that associates with detergent-resistant lipid domains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofie Ignoul

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The mammalian CLC protein family comprises nine members (ClC-1 to -7 and ClC-Ka, -Kb that function either as plasma membrane chloride channels or as intracellular chloride/proton antiporters, and that sustain a broad spectrum of cellular processes, such as membrane excitability, transepithelial transport, endocytosis and lysosomal degradation. In this study we focus on human ClC-6, which is structurally most related to the late endosomal/lysomal ClC-7. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a polyclonal affinity-purified antibody directed against a unique epitope in the ClC-6 COOH-terminal tail, we show that human ClC-6, when transfected in COS-1 cells, is N-glycosylated in a region that is evolutionary poorly conserved between mammalian CLC proteins and that is located between the predicted helices K and M. Three asparagine residues (N410, N422 and N432 have been defined by mutagenesis as acceptor sites for N-glycosylation, but only two of the three sites seem to be simultaneously N-glycosylated. In a differentiated human neuroblastoma cell line (SH-SY5Y, endogenous ClC-6 colocalizes with LAMP-1, a late endosomal/lysosomal marker, but not with early/recycling endosomal markers such as EEA-1 and transferrin receptor. In contrast, when transiently expressed in COS-1 or HeLa cells, human ClC-6 mainly overlaps with markers for early/recycling endosomes (transferrin receptor, EEA-1, Rab5, Rab4 and not with late endosomal/lysosomal markers (LAMP-1, Rab7. Analogously, overexpression of human ClC-6 in SH-SY5Y cells also leads to an early/recycling endosomal localization of the exogenously expressed ClC-6 protein. Finally, in transiently transfected COS-1 cells, ClC-6 copurifies with detergent-resistant membrane fractions, suggesting its partitioning in lipid rafts. Mutating a juxtamembrane string of basic amino acids (amino acids 71-75: KKGRR disturbs the association with detergent-resistant membrane fractions and also affects the segregation of ClC-6

  1. Structural basis for membrane targeting by the MVB12-associated [beta]-prism domain of the human ESCRT-I MVB12 subunit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boura, Evzen; Hurley, James H. (NIH)

    2012-03-15

    MVB12-associated {beta}-prism (MABP) domains are predicted to occur in a diverse set of membrane-associated bacterial and eukaryotic proteins, but their existence, structure, and biochemical properties have not been characterized experimentally. Here, we find that the MABP domains of the MVB12A and B subunits of ESCRT-I are functional modules that bind in vitro to liposomes containing acidic lipids depending on negative charge density. The MABP domain is capable of autonomously localizing to subcellular puncta and to the plasma membrane. The 1.3-{angstrom} atomic resolution crystal structure of the MVB12B MABP domain reveals a {beta}-prism fold, a hydrophobic membrane-anchoring loop, and an electropositive phosphoinositide-binding patch. The basic patch is open, which explains how it senses negative charge density but lacks stereoselectivity. These observations show how ESCRT-I could act as a coincidence detector for acidic phospholipids and protein ligands, enabling it to function both in protein transport at endosomes and in cytokinesis and viral budding at the plasma membrane.

  2. Structure and Function of the Intracellular Region of the Plexin-B1 Transmembrane Receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, Yufeng; Hota, Prasanta K.; Penachioni, Junia Y.; Hamaneh, Mehdi B.; Kim, SoonJeung; Alviani, Rebecca S.; Shen, Limin; He, Hao; Tempel, Wolfram; Tamagnone, Luca; Park, Hee-Won; Buck, Matthias; (Torino); (Toronto); (Case Western U.-Med)

    2010-02-11

    Members of the plexin family are unique transmembrane receptors in that they interact directly with Rho family small GTPases; moreover, they contain a GTPase-activating protein (GAP) domain for R-Ras, which is crucial for plexin-mediated regulation of cell motility. However, the functional role and structural basis of the interactions between the different intracellular domains of plexins remained unclear. Here we present the 2.4 {angstrom} crystal structure of the complete intracellular region of human plexin-B1. The structure is monomeric and reveals that the GAP domain is folded into one structure from two segments, separated by the Rho GTPase binding domain (RBD). The RBD is not dimerized, as observed previously. Instead, binding of a conserved loop region appears to compete with dimerization and anchors the RBD to the GAP domain. Cell-based assays on mutant proteins confirm the functional importance of this coupling loop. Molecular modeling based on structural homology to p120{sup GAP} {center_dot}H-Ras suggests that Ras GTPases can bind to the plexin GAP region. Experimentally, we show that the monomeric intracellular plexin-B1 binds R-Ras but not H-Ras. These findings suggest that the monomeric form of the intracellular region is primed for GAP activity and extend a model for plexin activation.

  3. Recent improvements to the SMART domain-based sequence annotation resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letunic, Ivica; Goodstadt, Leo; Dickens, Nicholas J.; Doerks, Tobias; Schultz, Joerg; Mott, Richard; Ciccarelli, Francesca; Copley, Richard R.; Ponting, Chris P.; Bork, Peer

    2002-01-01

    SMART (Simple Modular Architecture Research Tool, http://smart.embl-heidelberg.de) is a web-based resource used for the annotation of protein domains and the analysis of domain architectures, with particular emphasis on mobile eukaryotic domains. Extensive annotation for each domain family is available, providing information relating to function, subcellular localization, phyletic distribution and tertiary structure. The January 2002 release has added more than 200 hand-curated domain models. This brings the total to over 600 domain families that are widely represented among nuclear, signalling and extracellular proteins. Annotation now includes links to the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database in cases where a human disease is associated with one or more mutations in a particular domain. We have implemented new analysis methods and updated others. New advanced queries provide direct access to the SMART relational database using SQL. This database now contains information on intrinsic sequence features such as transmembrane regions, coiled-coils, signal peptides and internal repeats. SMART output can now be easily included in users’ documents. A SMART mirror has been created at http://smart.ox.ac.uk. PMID:11752305

  4. Recent improvements to the SMART domain-based sequence annotation resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letunic, Ivica; Goodstadt, Leo; Dickens, Nicholas J; Doerks, Tobias; Schultz, Joerg; Mott, Richard; Ciccarelli, Francesca; Copley, Richard R; Ponting, Chris P; Bork, Peer

    2002-01-01

    SMART (Simple Modular Architecture Research Tool, http://smart.embl-heidelberg.de) is a web-based resource used for the annotation of protein domains and the analysis of domain architectures, with particular emphasis on mobile eukaryotic domains. Extensive annotation for each domain family is available, providing information relating to function, subcellular localization, phyletic distribution and tertiary structure. The January 2002 release has added more than 200 hand-curated domain models. This brings the total to over 600 domain families that are widely represented among nuclear, signalling and extracellular proteins. Annotation now includes links to the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database in cases where a human disease is associated with one or more mutations in a particular domain. We have implemented new analysis methods and updated others. New advanced queries provide direct access to the SMART relational database using SQL. This database now contains information on intrinsic sequence features such as transmembrane regions, coiled-coils, signal peptides and internal repeats. SMART output can now be easily included in users' documents. A SMART mirror has been created at http://smart.ox.ac.uk. PMID:11752305

  5. TmpL, a transmembrane protein required for intracellular redox homeostasis and virulence in a plant and an animal fungal pathogen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang-Hyung Kim

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The regulation of intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS is critical for developmental differentiation and virulence of many pathogenic fungi. In this report we demonstrate that a novel transmembrane protein, TmpL, is necessary for regulation of intracellular ROS levels and tolerance to external ROS, and is required for infection of plants by the necrotroph Alternaria brassicicola and for infection of mammals by the human pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus. In both fungi, tmpL encodes a predicted hybrid membrane protein containing an AMP-binding domain, six putative transmembrane domains, and an experimentally-validated FAD/NAD(P-binding domain. Localization and gene expression analyses in A. brassicicola indicated that TmpL is associated with the Woronin body, a specialized peroxisome, and strongly expressed during conidiation and initial invasive growth in planta. A. brassicicola and A. fumigatus DeltatmpL strains exhibited abnormal conidiogenesis, accelerated aging, enhanced oxidative burst during conidiation, and hypersensitivity to oxidative stress when compared to wild-type or reconstituted strains. Moreover, A. brassicicola DeltatmpL strains, although capable of initial penetration, exhibited dramatically reduced invasive growth on Brassicas and Arabidopsis. Similarly, an A. fumigatus DeltatmpL mutant was dramatically less virulent than the wild-type and reconstituted strains in a murine model of invasive aspergillosis. Constitutive expression of the A. brassicicola yap1 ortholog in an A. brassicicola DeltatmpL strain resulted in high expression levels of genes associated with oxidative stress tolerance. Overexpression of yap1 in the DeltatmpL background complemented the majority of observed developmental phenotypic changes and partially restored virulence on plants. Yap1-GFP fusion strains utilizing the native yap1 promoter exhibited constitutive nuclear localization in the A. brassicicola DeltatmpL background. Collectively, we

  6. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Adult Asperger Assessment: The Association of Symptom Domains within a Clinical Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuenssberg, Renate; McKenzie, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a behaviourally defined disorder characterised by impairments in three domains of social interaction, communication, and repetitive, stereotyped behaviours and activities. Proposed changes to diagnostic criteria suggest that the diagnostic triad may no longer fit as the best way to conceptualise ASD, and that…

  7. Activation of p115-RhoGEF Requires Direct Association of G[alpha subscript 13] and the Dbl Homology Domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Zhe; Guo, Liang; Hadas, Jana; Gutowski, Stephen; Sprang, Stephen R.; Sternweis, Paul C. (IIT); (UTSMC); (Montana)

    2012-09-05

    RGS-containing RhoGEFs (RGS-RhoGEFs) represent a direct link between the G{sub 12} class of heterotrimeric G proteins and the monomeric GTPases. In addition to the canonical Dbl homology (DH) and pleckstrin homology domains that carry out the guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) activity toward RhoA, these RhoGEFs also possess RGS homology (RH) domains that interact with activated {alpha} subunits of G{sub 12} and G{sub 13}. Although the GEF activity of p115-RhoGEF (p115), an RGS-RhoGEF, can be stimulated by G{alpha}{sub 13}, the exact mechanism of the stimulation has remained unclear. Using combined studies with small angle x-ray scattering, biochemistry, and mutagenesis, we identify an additional binding site for activated G{alpha}{sub 13} in the DH domain of p115. Small angle x-ray scattering reveals that the helical domain of G{alpha}{sub 13} docks onto the DH domain, opposite to the surface of DH that binds RhoA. Mutation of a single tryptophan residue in the {alpha}3b helix of DH reduces binding to activated G{alpha}{sub 13} and ablates the stimulation of p115 by G{alpha}{sub 13}. Complementary mutations at the predicted DH-binding site in the {alpha}B-{alpha}C loop of the helical domain of G{alpha}{sub 13} also affect stimulation of p115 by G{alpha}{sub 13}. Although the GAP activity of p115 is not required for stimulation by G{alpha}{sub 13}, two hydrophobic motifs in RH outside of the consensus RGS box are critical for this process. Therefore, the binding of G{alpha}{sub 13} to the RH domain facilitates direct association of G{alpha}{sub 13} to the DH domain to regulate its exchange activity. This study provides new insight into the mechanism of regulation of the RGS-RhoGEF and broadens our understanding of G protein signaling.

  8. Structure and function of the Juxta membrane domain of the human epidermal growth factor receptor by NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a member of the receptor tyrosine kinase family involved in the regulation of cellular proliferation and differentiation. Its juxta membrane domain (JX), the region located between the transmembrane and kinase domains, plays important roles in receptor trafficking since both basolateral sorting in polarized epithelial cells and lysosomal sorting signals are identified in this region. In order to understand the regulation of these signals, we characterized the structural properties of recombinant JX domain in dodecyl phosphocholine detergent (DPC) by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. In DPC micelles, structures derived from NMR data showed three amphipathic, helical segments. Two equivalent average structural models on the surface of micelles were obtained that differ only in the relative orientation between the first and second helices. Our data suggests that the activity of sorting signals may be regulated by their membrane association and restricted accessibility in the intact receptor

  9. High-Throughput Live-Cell Microscopy Analysis of Association Between Chromosome Domains and the Nucleolus in S. cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Renjie; Normand, Christophe; Gadal, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Spatial organization of the genome has important impacts on all aspects of chromosome biology, including transcription, replication, and DNA repair. Frequent interactions of some chromosome domains with specific nuclear compartments, such as the nucleolus, are now well documented using genome-scale methods. However, direct measurement of distance and interaction frequency between loci requires microscopic observation of specific genomic domains and the nucleolus, followed by image analysis to allow quantification. The fluorescent repressor operator system (FROS) is an invaluable method to fluorescently tag DNA sequences and investigate chromosome position and dynamics in living cells. This chapter describes a combination of methods to define motion and region of confinement of a locus relative to the nucleolus in cell's nucleus, from fluorescence acquisition to automated image analysis using two dedicated pipelines. PMID:27576709

  10. Structure and function of IQ-domain GTPase-activating protein 1 and its association with tumor progression (Review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    WU, YAN; CHEN, YONG-CHANG

    2014-01-01

    IQ-domain GTPase-activating proteins (IQGAPs) are evolutionary conserved multidomain proteins that are found in numerous organisms, from yeast to mammals. To date, three IQGAP proteins have been identified in humans, of which IQGAP1 is the best characterized. As a scaffold protein, IQGAP1 contains multiple protein-interacting domains, which modulate binding to target proteins. Recent mounting studies demonstrated a role for IQGAP1 in tumor progression, supported by the altered expression and subcellular distribution of IQGAP1 in tumors. The contribution of IQGAP1 to tumor progression appears to involve a complex interplay of cell functions by integrating diverse signal transduction pathways and coordinating activities, such as cell adhesion, migration, invasion, proliferation and angiogenesis. PMID:24649059

  11. Directed evolution of the forkhead-associated domain to generate anti-phosphospecific reagents by phage-display

    OpenAIRE

    Pershad, Kritika; Wypisniak, Karolina; Kay, Brian K.

    2012-01-01

    While affinity reagents are valuable tools for monitoring protein phosphorylation and studying signaling events in cells, generating them through immunization of animals with phosphopeptides is expensive, laborious and time consuming. An attractive alternative is to use protein evolution techniques and isolate new anti-phosphopeptide binding specificities from a library of variants of a phosphopeptide-binding domain. To explore this strategy, we attempted to display on the surface of bacterio...

  12. Hibernation-associated gene regulation of plasma proteins with a collagen-like domain in mammalian hibernators.

    OpenAIRE

    Takamatsu, N; Ohba, K; Kondo, J; Kondo, N; Shiba, T

    1993-01-01

    In mammals, hibernation is expressed by only a limited number of species, and the molecular mechanisms underlying hibernation are not well understood. Recently, we have found plasma proteins which disappear from blood specifically during hibernation in a mammalian hibernator, the chipmunk. Here, we report the cDNA cloning of these chipmunk hibernation-related proteins, HP-20, -25, and -27, and analyses of their expression. All three proteins contain a collagen-like domain near the N terminus ...

  13. Evolution of the α-Subunit of Na/K-ATPase from Paramecium to Homo sapiens: Invariance of Transmembrane Helix Topology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrill, Gene A; Kostellow, Adele B; Liu, Lijun; Gupta, Raj K; Askari, Amir

    2016-05-01

    Na/K-ATPase is a key plasma membrane enzyme involved in cell signaling, volume regulation, and maintenance of electrochemical gradients. The α-subunit, central to these functions, belongs to a large family of P-type ATPases. Differences in transmembrane (TM) helix topology, sequence homology, helix-helix contacts, cell signaling, and protein domains of Na/K-ATPase α-subunit were compared in fungi (Beauveria), unicellular organisms (Paramecia), primitive multicellular organisms (Hydra), and vertebrates (Xenopus, Homo sapiens), and correlated with evolution of physiological functions in the α-subunit. All α-subunits are of similar length, with groupings of four and six helices in the N- and C-terminal regions, respectively. Minimal homology was seen for protein domain patterns in Paramecium and Hydra, with high correlation between Hydra and vertebrates. Paramecium α-subunits display extensive disorder, with minimal helix contacts. Increases in helix contacts in Hydra approached vertebrates. Protein motifs known to be associated with membrane lipid rafts and cell signaling reveal significant positional shifts between Paramecium and Hydra vulgaris, indicating that regional membrane fluidity changes occur during evolution. Putative steroid binding sites overlapping TM-3 occurred in all species. Sites associated with G-protein-receptor stimulation occur both in vertebrates and amphibia but not in Hydra or Paramecia. The C-terminus moiety "KETYY," necessary for the Na(+) activation of pump phosphorylation, is not present in unicellular species indicating the absence of classical Na(+)/K(+)-pumps. The basic protein topology evolved earliest, followed by increases in protein domains and ordered helical arrays, correlated with appearance of α-subunit regions known to involve cell signaling, membrane recycling, and ion channel formation. PMID:26961431

  14. Recognition of a Single Transmembrane Degron by Sequential Quality Control Checkpoints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayadat, Laurence; Kopito, Ron R.

    2003-01-01

    To understand the relationship between conformational maturation and quality control–mediated proteolysis in the secretory pathway, we engineered the well-characterized degron from the α-subunit of the T-cell antigen receptor (TCRα) into the α-helical transmembrane domain of homotrimeric type I integral membrane protein, influenza hemagglutinin (HA). Although the membrane degron does not appear to interfere with acquisition of native secondary structure, as assessed by the formation of native intrachain disulfide bonds, only ∼50% of nascent mutant HA chains (HA++) become membrane-integrated and acquire complex N-linked glycans indicative of transit to a post-ER compartment. The remaining ∼50% of nascent HA++ chains fail to integrate into the lipid bilayer and are subject to proteasome-dependent degradation. Site-specific cleavage by extracellular trypsin and reactivity with conformation-specific monoclonal antibodies indicate that membrane-integrated HA++ molecules are able to mature to the plasma membrane with a conformation indistinguishable from that of HAwt. These apparently native HA++ molecules are, nevertheless, rapidly degraded by a process that is insensitive to proteasome inhibitors but blocked by lysosomotropic amines. These data suggest the existence in the secretory pathway of at least two sequential quality control checkpoints that recognize the same transmembrane degron, thereby ensuring the fidelity of protein deployment to the plasma membrane. PMID:12631739

  15. Functional characterization in Caenorhabditis elegans of transmembrane worm-human orthologs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baillie David L

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The complete genome sequences for human and the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans offer an opportunity to learn more about human gene function through functional characterization of orthologs in the worm. Based on a previous genome-wide analysis of worm-human orthologous transmembrane proteins, we selected seventeen genes to explore experimentally in C. elegans. These genes were selected on the basis that they all have high confidence candidate human orthologs and that their function is unknown. We first analyzed their phylogeny, membrane topology and domain organization. Then gene functions were studied experimentally in the worm by using RNA interference and transcriptional gfp reporter gene fusions. Results The experiments gave functional insights for twelve of the genes studied. For example, C36B1.12, the worm ortholog of three presenilin-like genes, was almost exclusively expressed in head neurons, suggesting an ancient conserved role important to neuronal function. We propose a new transmembrane topology for the presenilin-like protein family. sft-4, the worm ortholog of surfeit locus gene Surf-4, proved to be an essential gene required for development during the larval stages of the worm. R155.1, whose human ortholog is entirely uncharacterized, was implicated in body size control and other developmental processes. Conclusions By combining bioinformatics and C. elegans experiments on orthologs, we provide functional insights on twelve previously uncharacterized human genes.

  16. Cutting Edge: Molecular Structure of the IL-1R-Associated Kinase-4 Death Domain and Its Implications for TLR Signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lasker, Michael V.; Gajjar, Mark M.; Nair, Satish K. (UIUC)

    2010-07-19

    IL-1R-associated kinase (IRAK) 4 is an essential component of innate immunity. IRAK-4 deficiency in mice and humans results in severe impairment of IL-1 and TLR signaling. We have solved the crystal structure for the death domain of Mus musculus IRAK-4 to 1.7 {angstrom} resolution. This is the first glimpse of the structural details of a mammalian IRAK family member. The crystal structure reveals a six-helical bundle with a prominent loop, which among IRAKs and Pelle, a Drosophila homologue, is unique to IRAK-4. This highly structured loop contained between helices two and three, comprises an 11-aa stretch. Although innate immune domain recognition is thought to be very similar between Drosophila and mammals, this structural component points to a drastic difference. This structure can be used as a framework for future mutation and deletion studies and potential drug design.

  17. Structure of the DBL3x domain of pregnancy-associated malaria protein VAR2CSA complexed with chondroitin sulfate A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, K.; Gittis, A.G.; Nguyen, P.; Gowda, D.C.; Miller, L.H.; Garboczi, D.N. (NIH); (Penn)

    2008-09-19

    Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes bind to chondroitin sulfate A (CSA) in the placenta via the VAR2CSA protein, a member of the P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein-1 family, leading to life-threatening malaria in pregnant women with severe effects on their fetuses and newborns. Here we describe the structure of the CSA binding DBL3x domain, a Duffy binding-like (DBL) domain of VAR2CSA. By forming a complex of DBL3x with CSA oligosaccharides and determining its structure, we have identified the CSA binding site to be a cluster of conserved positively charged residues on subdomain 2 and subdomain 3. Mutation or chemical modification of lysine residues at the site markedly diminished CSA binding to DBL3x. The location of the CSA binding site is an important step forward in the molecular understanding of pregnancy-associated malaria and offers a new target for vaccine development.

  18. Biochemical properties and catalytic domain structure of the CcmH protein from Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xue-Ming; Hong, Jing; Li, Hai-Yin; Lin, Dong-Hai; Hu, Hong-Yu

    2012-12-01

    In the Gram-negative bacterium of Escherichia coli, eight genes organized as a ccm operon (ccmABCDEFGH) are involved in the maturation of c-type cytochromes. The proteins encoded by the last three genes ccmFGH are believed to form a lyase complex functioning in the reduction of apocytochrome c and haem attachment. Among them, CcmH is a membrane-associated protein; its N-terminus is a catalytic domain with the active CXXC motif and the C-terminus is predicted as a TPR-like domain with unknown function. By using SCAM (scanning cysteine accessibility mutagenesis) and Gaussia luciferase fusion assays, we provide experimental evidence for the entire topological structure of E. coli CcmH. The mature CcmH is a periplasm-resident oxidoreductase anchored to the inner membrane by two transmembrane segments. Both N- and C-terminal domains are located and function in the periplasmic compartment. Moreover, the N-terminal domain forms a monomer in solution, while the C-terminal domain is a compact fold with helical structures. The NMR solution structure of the catalytic domain in reduced form exhibits mainly a three-helix bundle, providing further information for the redox mechanism. The redox potential suggests that CcmH exhibits a strong reductase that may function in the last step of reduction of apocytochrome c for haem attachment. PMID:22789558

  19. Secondary structural analysis of the carboxyl-terminal domain from different connexin isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spagnol, Gaëlle; Al-Mugotir, Mona; Kopanic, Jennifer L; Zach, Sydney; Li, Hanjun; Trease, Andrew J; Stauch, Kelly L; Grosely, Rosslyn; Cervantes, Matthew; Sorgen, Paul L

    2016-03-01

    The connexin carboxyl-terminal (CxCT) domain plays a role in the trafficking, localization, and turnover of gap junction channels, as well as the level of gap junction intercellular communication via numerous post-translational modifications and protein-protein interactions. As a key player in the regulation of gap junctions, the CT presents itself as a target for manipulation intended to modify function. Specific to intrinsically disordered proteins, identifying residues whose secondary structure can be manipulated will be critical toward unlocking the therapeutic potential of the CxCT domain. To accomplish this goal, we used biophysical methods to characterize CxCT domains attached to their fourth transmembrane domain (TM4). Circular dichroism and nuclear magnetic resonance were complementary in demonstrating the connexin isoforms that form the greatest amount of α-helical structure in their CT domain (Cx45 > Cx43 > Cx32 > Cx50 > Cx37 ≈ Cx40 ≈ Cx26). Studies compared the influence of 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol, pH, phosphorylation, and mutations (Cx32, X-linked Charcot-Marie Tooth disease; Cx26, hearing loss) on the TM4-CxCT structure. While pH modestly influences the CT structure, a major structural change was associated with phosphomimetic substitutions. Since most connexin CT domains are phosphorylated throughout their life cycle, studies of phospho-TM4-CxCT isoforms will be critical toward understanding the role that structure plays in regulating gap junction function. PMID:26542351

  20. The N-terminal domain of the Drosophila retinoblastoma protein Rbf1 interacts with ORC and associates with chromatin in an E2F independent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Ahlander

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The retinoblastoma (Rb tumor suppressor protein can function as a DNA replication inhibitor as well as a transcription factor. Regulation of DNA replication may occur through interaction of Rb with the origin recognition complex (ORC. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We characterized the interaction of Drosophila Rb, Rbf1, with ORC. Using expression of proteins in Drosophila S2 cells, we found that an N-terminal Rbf1 fragment (amino acids 1-345 is sufficient for Rbf1 association with ORC but does not bind to dE2F1. We also found that the C-terminal half of Rbf1 (amino acids 345-845 interacts with ORC. We observed that the amino-terminal domain of Rbf1 localizes to chromatin in vivo and associates with chromosomal regions implicated in replication initiation, including colocalization with Orc2 and acetylated histone H4. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest that Rbf1 can associate with ORC and chromatin through domains independent of the E2F binding site. We infer that Rbf1 may play a role in regulating replication directly through its association with ORC and/or chromatin factors other than E2F. Our data suggest an important role for retinoblastoma family proteins in cell proliferation and tumor suppression through interaction with the replication initiation machinery.

  1. Is the LIM-domain Protein HaWLIM1 Associated with Cortical Microtubules in Sunflower Protoplasts?

    OpenAIRE

    Brière, Christian; Bordel, Anne-Claire; Barthou, Henri; Jauneau, Alain; Steinmetz, André; Alibert, Gilbert; Petitprez, Michel

    2003-01-01

    Flowering plants express several LIM-domain proteins related to the animal cystein-rich proteins. The expression of sunflower LIM genes was followed by RTPCR in cultured sunflower protoplasts. A transcript was detected only for HaWLIM1, but not for the other two genes HaPLIM1 and HaPLIM2. Polyclonal antibodies raised against either full length recombinant HaWLIM1 protein or peptides recognized a 27 kDa polypeptide on Western blots. Immunocytolocalization studies showed that HaWLIM1 is located...

  2. CULTURAL DOMAINS: TRANSLATION PROBLEMS

    OpenAIRE

    Isabel Negro Alousque

    2009-01-01

    Much of the lexis of a language has a cultural referent and is thus specific to a speech community. The meaning of culturally marked words is often difficult to grasp without some cultural knowledge and poses translation problems, particularly when the words are associated with cultural domains (Nida, 2001). In the present paper we focus on the French cultural domain of cooking. After outlining the elements of the domain, we analyse the difficulties in translating the lexical units from the d...

  3. Visualizing latent domain knowledge

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, C.; Kuljis, J; Paul, RJ

    2001-01-01

    Knowledge discovery and data mining commonly rely on finding salient patterns of association from a vast amount of data. Traditional citation analysis of scientific literature draws insights from strong citation patterns. Latent domain knowledge, in contrast to the mainstream domain knowledge, often consists of highly relevant but relatively infrequently cited scientific works. Visualizing latent domain knowledge presents a significant challenge to knowledge discovery and quantitative studies...

  4. Computational approaches to detect allosteric pathways in transmembrane molecular machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolzenberg, Sebastian; Michino, Mayako; LeVine, Michael V; Weinstein, Harel; Shi, Lei

    2016-07-01

    Many of the functions of transmembrane proteins involved in signal processing and transduction across the cell membrane are determined by allosteric couplings that propagate the functional effects well beyond the original site of activation. Data gathered from breakthroughs in biochemistry, crystallography, and single molecule fluorescence have established a rich basis of information for the study of molecular mechanisms in the allosteric couplings of such transmembrane proteins. The mechanistic details of these couplings, many of which have therapeutic implications, however, have only become accessible in synergy with molecular modeling and simulations. Here, we review some recent computational approaches that analyze allosteric coupling networks (ACNs) in transmembrane proteins, and in particular the recently developed Protein Interaction Analyzer (PIA) designed to study ACNs in the structural ensembles sampled by molecular dynamics simulations. The power of these computational approaches in interrogating the functional mechanisms of transmembrane proteins is illustrated with selected examples of recent experimental and computational studies pursued synergistically in the investigation of secondary active transporters and GPCRs. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Proteins edited by J.C. Gumbart and Sergei Noskov. PMID:26806157

  5. A hidden Markov model for prediction transmembrane helices in proteinsequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnhammer, Erik L.L.; von Heijne, Gunnar; Krogh, Anders Stærmose

    1998-01-01

    constraints involved. Models were estimated both by maximum likelihood and a discriminative method, and a method for reassignment of the membrane helix boundaries were developed. In a cross validated test on single sequences, our transmembrane HMM, TMHMM, correctly predicts the entire topology for 77% of the...

  6. Promiscuous Seven Transmembrane Receptors Sensing L-α-amino Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smajilovic, Sanela; Wellendorph, Petrine; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2014-01-01

    A number of nutrient sensing seven trans-membrane (7TM) receptors have been identified and characterized over the past few years. While the sensing mechanisms to carbohydrates and free fatty acids are well understood, the molecular basis of amino acid sensing has recently come to the limelight. T...

  7. Modelling of a transmembrane evaporation module for desalination of seawater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guijt, Caroliene M.; Rácz, Imre G.; Heuven, van Jan Willem; Reith, Tom; Haan, de André B.

    1999-01-01

    Transmembrane evaporation (often called membrane distillation) carried out in a countercurrent flow module, in which incoming cold seawater is heated by the condensing product water flow, is a promising technology for low-cost seawater desalination. This paper presents a model for preliminary design

  8. Functional interaction of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator with members of the SLC26 family of anion transporters (SLC26A8 and SLC26A9): physiological and pathophysiological relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Khouri, Elma; Touré, Aminata

    2014-07-01

    The solute carrier 26 (SLC26) proteins are transmembrane proteins located at the plasma membrane of the cells and transporting a variety of monovalent and divalent anions, including chloride, bicarbonate, sulfate and oxalate. In humans, 11 members have been identified (SLC26A1 to SLC26A11) and although part of them display a very restricted tissue expression pattern, altogether they are widely expressed in the epithelial cells of the body where they contribute to the composition and the pH regulation of the secreted fluids. Importantly, mutations in SLC26A2, A3, A4, and A5 have been associated with distinct human genetic recessive disorders (i.e. diastrophic dysplasia, congenital chloride diarrhea, Pendred syndrome and deafness, respectively), demonstrating their essential and non-redundant functions in many tissues. During the last decade, physical and functional interactions of SLC26 members with the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) have been highly documented, leading to the model of a crosstalk based on the binding of the SLC26 STAS domain to the CFTR regulatory domain. In this review, we will focus on the functional interaction of SLC26A8 and SLC26A9 with the CFTR channel. In particular we will highlight the newly published studies indicating that mutations in SLC26A8 and SLC26A9 proteins are associated with a deregulation of the CFTR anion transport activity in the pathophysiological context of the sperm and the pulmonary cells. These studies confirm the physiological relevance of SLC26 and CFTR cross-regulation, opening new gates for the treatment of cystic fibrosis. PMID:24530837

  9. Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 domain cassettes 8 and 13 are associated with severe malaria in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lavstsen, Thomas; Turner, Louise; Saguti, Fredy;

    2012-01-01

    The clinical outcome of Plasmodium falciparum infections ranges from asymptomatic parasitemia to severe malaria syndromes associated with high mortality. The virulence of P. falciparum infections is associated with the type of P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) expressed on the...... surface of infected erythrocytes to anchor these to the vascular lining. Although var2csa, the var gene encoding the PfEMP1 associated with placental malaria, was discovered in 2003, the identification of the var/PfEMP1 variants associated with severe malaria in children has remained elusive. To identify...... var/PfEMP1 variants associated with severe disease outcome, we compared var transcript levels in parasites from 88 children with severe malaria and 40 children admitted to the hospital with uncomplicated malaria. Transcript analysis was performed by RT-quantitative PCR using a set of 42 primer pairs...

  10. Discovery of an essential nucleotidylating activity associated with a newly delineated conserved domain in the RNA polymerase-containing protein of all nidoviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Kathleen C; Gulyaeva, Anastasia; Zevenhoven-Dobbe, Jessika C; Janssen, George M C; Ruben, Mark; Overkleeft, Hermen S; van Veelen, Peter A; Samborskiy, Dmitry V; Kravchenko, Alexander A; Leontovich, Andrey M; Sidorov, Igor A; Snijder, Eric J; Posthuma, Clara C; Gorbalenya, Alexander E

    2015-09-30

    RNA viruses encode an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) that catalyzes the synthesis of their RNA(s). In the case of positive-stranded RNA viruses belonging to the order Nidovirales, the RdRp resides in a replicase subunit that is unusually large. Bioinformatics analysis of this non-structural protein has now revealed a nidoviral signature domain (genetic marker) that is N-terminally adjacent to the RdRp and has no apparent homologs elsewhere. Based on its conservation profile, this domain is proposed to have nucleotidylation activity. We used recombinant non-structural protein 9 of the arterivirus equine arteritis virus (EAV) and different biochemical assays, including irreversible labeling with a GTP analog followed by a proteomics analysis, to demonstrate the manganese-dependent covalent binding of guanosine and uridine phosphates to a lysine/histidine residue. Most likely this was the invariant lysine of the newly identified domain, named nidovirus RdRp-associated nucleotidyltransferase (NiRAN), whose substitution with alanine severely diminished the described binding. Furthermore, this mutation crippled EAV and prevented the replication of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) in cell culture, indicating that NiRAN is essential for nidoviruses. Potential functions supported by NiRAN may include nucleic acid ligation, mRNA capping and protein-primed RNA synthesis, possibilities that remain to be explored in future studies. PMID:26304538

  11. Use of chimeric proteins to investigate the role of transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) structural domains in peptide binding and translocation

    OpenAIRE

    Arora, Shikha; Lapinski, Philip Edward; Raghavan, Malini

    2001-01-01

    The transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) comprises two subunits, TAP1 and TAP2, each containing a hydrophobic membrane-spanning region (MSR) and a nucleotide binding domain (NBD). The TAP1/TAP2 complex is required for peptide translocation across the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. To understand the role of each structural unit of the TAP1/TAP2 complex, we generated two chimeras containing TAP1 MSR and TAP2 NBD (T1MT2C) or TAP2 MSR and TAP1 NBD (T2MT1C). We show that TAP1/T2MT...

  12. External Zn(2+) binding to cysteine-substituted cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator constructs regulates channel gating and curcumin potentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guangyu; Linsley, Rheeann; Norimatsu, Yohei

    2016-07-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel is activated by ATP binding-induced dimerization of nucleotide-binding domains, the interaction between the phosphorylated regulatory (R) domain and the curcumin-sensitive interface between intracellular loop (ICL) 1 and ICL4, and the resultant inward-to-'outward' reorientation of transmembrane domains. Although transmembrane helices (TM) 2 and TM11 link the ICL1-ICL4 interface with the interface between extracellular loop (ECL) 1 and ECL6, it is unknown whether both interfaces are gating-coupled during the reorientation. Herein, R334C and T1122C mutations were used to engineer two Zn(2+) bridges near and at the ECL1-ECL6 interface, respectively, and the gating effects of a Zn(2+) disturbance at the ECL1-ECL6 interface on the stimulatory ICL1/ICL4-R interaction were determined. The results showed that both Zn(2+) bridges inhibited channel activity in a dose- and Cl(-) -dependent manner, and the inhibition was reversed by a washout or suppressed by thiol-specific modification. Interestingly, their Cl(-) -dependent Zn(2+) inhibition was weakened at higher Zn(2+) concentrations, their Zn(2+) affinity was stronger in the resting state than in the activated state, and their activation current noises were decreased by external Zn(2+) binding. More importantly, the external Zn(2+) inhibition was reversed by internal curcumin in the R334C construct but not in the T1122C mutant. Therefore, although both Zn(2+) bridges may promote channel closure, external Zn(2+) may disturb the ECL1-ECL6 interface and thus prevent the stimulatory ICL1/ICL4-R interaction and curcumin potentiation via a gating coupling between these two interfaces. PMID:27175795

  13. A comparison of phosphospecific affinity reagents reveals the utility of recombinant Forkhead-associated domains in recognizing phosphothreonine-containing peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venegas, Leon A; Pershad, Kritika; Bankole, Oluwadamilola; Shah, Noman; Kay, Brian K

    2016-09-25

    Phosphorylation is an important post-translational event that has a wide array of functional consequences. With advances in the ability of various technologies in revealing and mapping new phosphosites in proteins, it is equally important to develop affinity reagents that can monitor such post-translational modifications in eukaryotic cells. While monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies have been shown to be useful in assessing the phosphoproteome, we have expanded our efforts to exploit the Forkhead-associated 1 (FHA1) domain as scaffold for generating recombinant affinity reagents that recognize phosphothreonine-containing peptides. A phage display library of FHA1 variants was screened by affinity selection with 15 phosphothreonine-containing peptides corresponding to various human transcription factors and kinases, including human Myc, calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), and extracellular-signal regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2). The library yielded binding variants against 10 targets (66% success rate); success was largely determined by what residue occurred at the +3 position (C-terminal) to the pThr moiety (i.e., pT+3). The FHA domains binding Myc, CaMKII, and ERK1/2 were characterized and compared against commercially available antibodies. All FHA domains were shown to be phosphorylation-dependent and phosphothreonine-specific in their binding, unlike several commercial monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies. Both the pThr and the residue at the pT+3 position were major factors in defining the specificity of the FHA domains. PMID:26772725

  14. Domain Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjørner, Dines

    Before software can be designed we must know its requirements. Before requirements can be expressed we must understand the domain. So it follows, from our dogma, that we must first establish precise descriptions of domains; then, from such descriptions, “derive” at least domain and interface requirements; and from those and machine requirements design the software, or, more generally, the computing systems.

  15. Partial association of restriction polymorphism of the ligand binding domain of human androgen receptor in prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Hessien

    2016-04-01

    Conclusion: Our results indicate that the loss of the restriction integrity in the C-terminal part (exons: 7 and 8 of the LBD is associated with the progression of benign prostatic hyperplasia to prostate cancer.

  16. The potato virus X TGBp2 protein association with the endoplasmic reticulum plays a role in but is not sufficient for viral cell-to-cell movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Ruchira; Krishnamurthy, Konduru; Blancaflor, Elison; Payton, Mark; Nelson, Richard S.; Verchot-Lubicz, Jeanmarie

    2003-01-01

    Potato virus X (PVX) TGBp1, TGBp2, TGBp3, and coat protein are required for virus cell-to-cell movement. Plasmids expressing GFP fused to TGBp2 were bombarded to leaf epidermal cells and GFP:TGBp2 moved cell to cell in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves but not in Nicotiana tabacum leaves. GFP:TGBp2 movement was observed in TGBp1-transgenic N. tabacum, indicating that TGBp2 requires TGBp1 to promote its movement in N. tabacum. In this study, GFP:TGBp2 was detected in a polygonal pattern that resembles the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) network. Amino acid sequence analysis revealed TGBp2 has two putative transmembrane domains. Two mutations separately introduced into the coding sequences encompassing the putative transmembrane domains within the GFP:TGBp2 plasmids and PVX genome, disrupted membrane binding of GFP:TGBp2, inhibited GFP:TGBp2 movement in N. benthamiana and TGBp1-expressing N. tabacum, and inhibited PVX movement. A third mutation, lying outside the transmembrane domains, had no effect on GFP:TGBp2 ER association or movement in N. benthamiana but inhibited GFP:TGBp2 movement in TGBp1-expressing N. tabacum and PVX movement in either Nicotiana species. Thus, ER association of TGBp2 may be required but not be sufficient for virus movement. TGBp2 likely provides an activity for PVX movement beyond ER association.

  17. Organization of Subunits in the Membrane Domain of the Bovine F-ATPase Revealed by Covalent Cross-linking*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jennifer; Ding, ShuJing; Walpole, Thomas B.; Holding, Andrew N.; Montgomery, Martin G.; Fearnley, Ian M.; Walker, John E.

    2015-01-01

    The F-ATPase in bovine mitochondria is a membrane-bound complex of about 30 subunits of 18 different kinds. Currently, ∼85% of its structure is known. The enzyme has a membrane extrinsic catalytic domain, and a membrane intrinsic domain where the turning of the enzyme's rotor is generated from the transmembrane proton-motive force. The domains are linked by central and peripheral stalks. The central stalk and a hydrophobic ring of c-subunits in the membrane domain constitute the enzyme's rotor. The external surface of the catalytic domain and membrane subunit a are linked by the peripheral stalk, holding them static relative to the rotor. The membrane domain contains six additional subunits named ATP8, e, f, g, DAPIT (diabetes-associated protein in insulin-sensitive tissues), and 6.8PL (6.8-kDa proteolipid), each with a single predicted transmembrane α-helix, but their orientation and topography are unknown. Mutations in ATP8 uncouple the enzyme and interfere with its assembly, but its roles and the roles of the other five subunits are largely unknown. We have reacted accessible amino groups in the enzyme with bifunctional cross-linking agents and identified the linked residues. Cross-links involving the supernumerary subunits, where the structures are not known, show that the C terminus of ATP8 extends ∼70 Å from the membrane into the peripheral stalk and that the N termini of the other supernumerary subunits are on the same side of the membrane, probably in the mitochondrial matrix. These experiments contribute significantly toward building up a complete structural picture of the F-ATPase. PMID:25851905

  18. Multiple Transmembrane Binding Sites for p-Trifluoromethyldiazirinyl-etomidate, a Photoreactive Torpedo Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Allosteric Inhibitor*

    OpenAIRE

    Hamouda, Ayman K.; Stewart, Deirdre S.; Husain, S. Shaukat; Cohen, Jonathan B.

    2011-01-01

    Photoreactive derivatives of the general anesthetic etomidate have been developed to identify their binding sites in γ-aminobutyric acid, type A and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. One such drug, [3H]TDBzl-etomidate (4-[3-(trifluoromethyl)-3H-diazirin-3-yl]benzyl-[3H]1-(1-phenylethyl)-1H-imidazole-5-carboxylate), acts as a positive allosteric potentiator of Torpedo nACh receptor (nAChR) and binds to a novel site in the transmembrane domain at the γ-α subunit interface. To extend our unders...

  19. Interaction of Spin-Labeled Inhibitors of the Vacuolar H+-ATPase with the Transmembrane Vo-Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Neil; Páli, Tibor; Kee, Terence P.; Ball, Stephen; Harrison, Michael A.; Findlay, John B. C.; Nyman, Jonas; Väänänen, Kalervo; Finbow, Malcolm E.; Marsh, Derek

    2008-01-01

    The osteoclast variant of the vacuolar H+-ATPase (V-ATPase) is a potential therapeutic target for combating the excessive bone resorption that is involved in osteoporosis. The most potent in a series of synthetic inhibitors based on 5-(5,6-dichloro-2-indolyl)-2-methoxy-2,4-pentadienamide (INDOL0) has demonstrated specificity for the osteoclast enzyme, over other V-ATPases. Interaction of two nitroxide spin-labeled derivatives (INDOL6 and INDOL5) with the V-ATPase is studied here by using the transport-active 16-kDa proteolipid analog of subunit c from the hepatopancreas of Nephrops norvegicus, in conjunction with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Analogous experiments are also performed with vacuolar membranes from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in which subunit c of the V-ATPase is replaced functionally by the Nephrops 16-kDa proteolipid. The INDOL5 derivative is designed to optimize detection of interaction with the V-ATPase by EPR. In membranous preparations of the Nephrops 16-kDa proteolipid, the EPR spectra of INDOL5 contain a motionally restricted component that arises from direct association of the indolyl inhibitor with the transmembrane domain of the proteolipid subunit c. A similar, but considerably smaller, motionally restricted population is detected in the EPR spectra of the INDOL6 derivative in vacuolar membranes, in addition to the larger population from INDOL6 in the fluid bilayer regions of the membrane. The potent classical V-ATPase inhibitor concanamycin A at high concentrations induces motional restriction of INDOL5, which masks the spectral effects of displacement at lower concentrations of concanamycin A. The INDOL6 derivative, which is closest to the parent INDOL0 inhibitor, displays limited subtype specificity for the osteoclast V-ATPase, with an IC50 in the 10-nanomolar range. PMID:17872954

  20. Is the LIM-domain protein HaWLIM1 associated with cortical microtubules in sunflower protoplasts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brière, Christian; Bordel, Anne-Claire; Barthou, Henri; Jauneau, Alain; Steinmetz, André; Alibert, Gilbert; Petitprez, Michel

    2003-10-01

    Flowering plants express several LIM-domain proteins related to the animal cystein-rich proteins. The expression of sunflower LIM genes was followed by RT-PCR in cultured sunflower protoplasts. A transcript was detected only for HaWLIM1, but not for the other two genes HaPLIM1 and HaPLIM2. Polyclonal antibodies raised against either full length recombinant HaWLIM1 protein or peptides recognized a 27 kDa polypeptide on Western blots. Immunocytolocalization studies showed that HaWLIM1 is located in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus. In the cytoplasm, HaWLIM1 is localized in punctate structures, distributed along microtubule bundles. Depolymerizing microtubules with oryzalin resulted in a strong modification of the HaWLIM1 cortical pattern. In contrast, treatment of protoplasts with latrunculin B, which disrupts actin filaments, had no effect on HaWLIM1 localization. HaWLIM1 was also located within the nucleus of interphase protoplasts. During mitosis, nuclear labelling was observed in prophase, which decreased in metaphase, disappeared in anaphase, and recovered in telophase. These results suggest a dual role for HaWLIM1: in the cytoplasm, as a component of molecular complexes which may interact with microtubules, and in the nucleus, as a partner of transcription factors during interphase. PMID:14581630

  1. Multi-objective Numeric Association Rules Mining via Ant Colony Optimization for Continuous Domains without Specifying Minimum Support and Minimum Confidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parisa Moslehi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Currently, all search algorithms which use discretization of numeric attributes for numeric association rule mining, work in the way that the original distribution of the numeric attributes will be lost. This issue leads to loss of information, so that the association rules which are generated through this process are not precise and accurate. Based on this fact, algorithms which can natively handle numeric attributes would be interesting. Since association rule mining can be considered as a multi-objective problem, rather than a single objective one, a new multi-objective algorithm for numeric association rule mining is presented in this paper, using Ant Colony Optimization for Continuous domains (ACOR. This algorithm mines numeric association rules without any need to specify minimum support and minimum confidence, in one step. In order to do this we modified ACOR for generating rules. The results show that we have more precise and accurate rules after applying this algorithm and the number of rules is more than the ones resulted from previous works.

  2. The transmembrane domain of acid trehalase mediates ubiquitin-independent multivesicular body pathway sorting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, Ju; Reggiori, Fulvio; Klionsky, Daniel J; Reggiori, Fulvio

    2007-01-01

    Trehalose serves as a storage source of carbon and plays important roles under various stress conditions. For example, in many organisms trehalose has a critical function in preserving membrane structure and fluidity during dehydration/rehydration. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, trehalose ac

  3. Polar transmembrane domains target proteins to the interior of the yeast vacuole

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reggiori, F; Black, M W; Pelham, H R; Reggiori, Fulvio

    2000-01-01

    Membrane proteins transported to the yeast vacuole can have two fates. Some reach the outer vacuolar membrane, whereas others enter internal vesicles, which form in late endosomes, and are ultimately degraded. The vacuolar SNAREs Nyv1p and Vam3p avoid this fate by using the AP-3-dependent pathway, w

  4. Nox4 B-loop Creates an Interface between the Transmembrane and Dehydrogenase Domains*

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson, Heather M.; Kawahara, Tsukasa; Nisimoto, Yukio; Smith, Susan M. E.; Lambeth, J. David

    2010-01-01

    By targeting redox-sensitive amino acids in signaling proteins, the NADPH oxidase (Nox) family of enzymes link reactive oxygen species to physiological processes. We previously analyzed the sequences of 107 Nox enzymes and identified conserved regions that are predicted to have important functions in Nox structure or activation. One such region is the cytosolic B-loop, which in Nox1–4 contains a conserved polybasic region. Previous studies of Nox2 showed that certain basic residues in the B-l...

  5. beta-1,3-Glucan recognition by an insect pathogen recognition domain causes self-association of protein: carbohydrate complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    In response to invading microorganisms, insect beta-1,3-glucan recognition protein (beta-GRP), a soluble receptor in the hemolymph, binds to the surfaces of bacteria and fungi and activates serine protease cascades associated with the prophenoloxidase (proPO) and Toll pathways; it also agglutinates ...

  6. Transmembrane Protease Serine 4 Promotes Thyroid Cancer Proliferation via CREB Phosphorylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Hongyu; Liang, Weiwei; Liu, Juan; Wei, Guohong; Li, Hai; Xiu, Lingling; Xiao, Haipeng

    2015-01-01

    Background: Transmembrane protease serine 4 (TMPRSS4), one of the type II transmembrane serine proteases (TTSPs), is elevated in various cancers and is associated with multiple malignant phenotypes. However, the expression pattern and biologic significance of TMPRSS4 in thyroid cancer are largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the expression of TMPRSS4 in thyroid cancer and assessed the pro-proliferative role of TMPRSS4 in thyroid cancer. Methods: Immunohistochemistry and real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assays were performed to assess the expression of TMPRSS4 in thyroid cancer. We evaluated in vitro cell proliferation using MTT, colony formation, anchorage-independent growth, flow cytometry analysis, and 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) incorporation assays. Western blot, real-time RT-PCR, and luciferase assays were conducted to reveal the underlying mechanisms. Results: TMPRSS4 is overexpressed in thyroid cancer and is associated with the grade of malignancy. Depletion of TMPRSS4 in thyroid cancer cells significantly suppressed proliferation. Moreover, the proliferation of thyroid cancer cells with TMPRSS4 overexpression was significantly enhanced. We also show that cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein (CREB)-cyclin D1 signaling mediates, at least partially, the role of TMPRSS4 in thyroid cancer cell proliferation. Conclusions: TMPRSS4 is overexpressed in thyroid cancer and TMPRSS4-CREB signaling is needed to sustain thyroid cancer cell proliferation. PMID:25244400

  7. Teaching old receptors new tricks: biasing seven-transmembrane receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Rajagopal, Sudarshan; Rajagopal, Keshava; Lefkowitz, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Seven-transmembrane receptors (7TMRs; also known as G protein-coupled receptors) are the largest class of receptors in the human genome and are common targets for therapeutics. Originally identified as mediators of 7TMR desensitization, β-arrestins (arrestin 2 and arrestin 3) are now recognized as true adaptor proteins that transduce signals to multiple effector pathways. Signalling that is mediated by β-arrestins has distinct biochemical and functional consequences from those mediated by G p...

  8. Surfactantlipid biosynthesis: Regulation of transmembrane transport of palmitate

    OpenAIRE

    Guthmann, Florian

    2010-01-01

    Considering the mechanisms by which antenatal maturation of lung can be induced, the role of long chain fatty acids as precursors of surfactant lipid synthesis has not been thoroughly investigated. To specifically increase surfactant synthesis during the fetal and/or neonatal period we studied the regulation of de novo phosphatidyl synthesis in type II pneumocytes. First, we characterised the transmembrane transport of palmitate, a long chain fatty acid prevalent in surfactant lipids, with...

  9. CREST - a large and diverse superfamily of putative transmembrane hydrolases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olson Eric N

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A number of membrane-spanning proteins possess enzymatic activity and catalyze important reactions involving proteins, lipids or other substrates located within or near lipid bilayers. Alkaline ceramidases are seven-transmembrane proteins that hydrolyze the amide bond in ceramide to form sphingosine. Recently, a group of putative transmembrane receptors called progestin and adipoQ receptors (PAQRs were found to be distantly related to alkaline ceramidases, raising the possibility that they may also function as membrane enzymes. Results Using sensitive similarity search methods, we identified statistically significant sequence similarities among several transmembrane protein families including alkaline ceramidases and PAQRs. They were unified into a large and diverse superfamily of putative membrane-bound hydrolases called CREST (alkaline ceramidase, PAQR receptor, Per1, SID-1 and TMEM8. The CREST superfamily embraces a plethora of cellular functions and biochemical activities, including putative lipid-modifying enzymes such as ceramidases and the Per1 family of putative phospholipases involved in lipid remodeling of GPI-anchored proteins, putative hormone receptors, bacterial hemolysins, the TMEM8 family of putative tumor suppressors, and the SID-1 family of putative double-stranded RNA transporters involved in RNA interference. Extensive similarity searches and clustering analysis also revealed several groups of proteins with unknown function in the CREST superfamily. Members of the CREST superfamily share seven predicted core transmembrane segments with several conserved sequence motifs. Conclusions Universal conservation of a set of histidine and aspartate residues across all groups in the CREST superfamily, coupled with independent discoveries of hydrolase activities in alkaline ceramidases and the Per1 family as well as results from previous mutational studies of Per1, suggests that the majority of CREST members are

  10. Resolving the biophysics of axon transmembrane polarization in a single closed-form description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When a depolarizing event occurs across a cell membrane there is a remarkable change in its electrical properties. A complete depolarization event produces a considerably rapid increase in voltage that propagates longitudinally along the axon and is accompanied by changes in axial conductance. A dynamically changing magnetic field is associated with the passage of the action potential down the axon. Over 75 years of research has gone into the quantification of this phenomenon. To date, no unified model exist that resolves transmembrane polarization in a closed-form description. Here, a simple but formative description of propagated signaling phenomena in the membrane of an axon is presented in closed-form. The focus is on using both biophysics and mathematical methods for elucidating the fundamental mechanisms governing transmembrane polarization. The results presented demonstrate how to resolve electromagnetic and thermodynamic factors that govern transmembrane potential. Computational results are supported by well-established quantitative descriptions of propagated signaling phenomena in the membrane of an axon. The findings demonstrate how intracellular conductance, the thermodynamics of magnetization, and current modulation function together in generating an action potential in a unified closed-form description. The work presented in this paper provides compelling evidence that three basic factors contribute to the propagated signaling in the membrane of an axon. It is anticipated this work will compel those in biophysics, physical biology, and in the computational neurosciences to probe deeper into the classical and quantum features of membrane magnetization and signaling. It is hoped that subsequent investigations of this sort will be advanced by the computational features of this model without having to resort to numerical methods of analysis

  11. Resolving the biophysics of axon transmembrane polarization in a single closed-form description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melendy, Robert F., E-mail: rfmelendy@liberty.edu [School of Engineering and Computational Sciences, Liberty University, Lynchburg, Virginia 24515 (United States)

    2015-12-28

    When a depolarizing event occurs across a cell membrane there is a remarkable change in its electrical properties. A complete depolarization event produces a considerably rapid increase in voltage that propagates longitudinally along the axon and is accompanied by changes in axial conductance. A dynamically changing magnetic field is associated with the passage of the action potential down the axon. Over 75 years of research has gone into the quantification of this phenomenon. To date, no unified model exist that resolves transmembrane polarization in a closed-form description. Here, a simple but formative description of propagated signaling phenomena in the membrane of an axon is presented in closed-form. The focus is on using both biophysics and mathematical methods for elucidating the fundamental mechanisms governing transmembrane polarization. The results presented demonstrate how to resolve electromagnetic and thermodynamic factors that govern transmembrane potential. Computational results are supported by well-established quantitative descriptions of propagated signaling phenomena in the membrane of an axon. The findings demonstrate how intracellular conductance, the thermodynamics of magnetization, and current modulation function together in generating an action potential in a unified closed-form description. The work presented in this paper provides compelling evidence that three basic factors contribute to the propagated signaling in the membrane of an axon. It is anticipated this work will compel those in biophysics, physical biology, and in the computational neurosciences to probe deeper into the classical and quantum features of membrane magnetization and signaling. It is hoped that subsequent investigations of this sort will be advanced by the computational features of this model without having to resort to numerical methods of analysis.

  12. Resolving the biophysics of axon transmembrane polarization in a single closed-form description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melendy, Robert F.

    2015-12-01

    When a depolarizing event occurs across a cell membrane there is a remarkable change in its electrical properties. A complete depolarization event produces a considerably rapid increase in voltage that propagates longitudinally along the axon and is accompanied by changes in axial conductance. A dynamically changing magnetic field is associated with the passage of the action potential down the axon. Over 75 years of research has gone into the quantification of this phenomenon. To date, no unified model exist that resolves transmembrane polarization in a closed-form description. Here, a simple but formative description of propagated signaling phenomena in the membrane of an axon is presented in closed-form. The focus is on using both biophysics and mathematical methods for elucidating the fundamental mechanisms governing transmembrane polarization. The results presented demonstrate how to resolve electromagnetic and thermodynamic factors that govern transmembrane potential. Computational results are supported by well-established quantitative descriptions of propagated signaling phenomena in the membrane of an axon. The findings demonstrate how intracellular conductance, the thermodynamics of magnetization, and current modulation function together in generating an action potential in a unified closed-form description. The work presented in this paper provides compelling evidence that three basic factors contribute to the propagated signaling in the membrane of an axon. It is anticipated this work will compel those in biophysics, physical biology, and in the computational neurosciences to probe deeper into the classical and quantum features of membrane magnetization and signaling. It is hoped that subsequent investigations of this sort will be advanced by the computational features of this model without having to resort to numerical methods of analysis.

  13. Association of different cognitive domains with lifetime history of psychosis and reported antipsychotic-treatment adverse events in bipolar disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Kałwa, Agnieszka; Piróg-Balcerzak, Agnieszka Magdalena; Święcicki, Łukasz

    2013-01-01

    Aim of the study. The present work aimed to assess the association between cognitive functions, the lifetime occurrence of psychotic symptoms, and reported adverse effects of antipsychotic treatments inpatients with bipolar disorders.Methods. In the present work, 44 bipolar disorder inpatients hospitalized in the Affective Disorders Unit of the Institute of Psychiatry and Neurology in Warsaw, were investigated. All of them met the criteria of remission and were prepared for release from the h...

  14. Structural characterization of the regulatory domain of brain carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Soma; Situ, Alan J; Ulmer, Tobias S

    2014-04-01

    Neurons contain a mammalian-specific isoform of the enzyme carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1C) that couples malonyl-CoA to ceramide levels thereby contributing to systemic energy homeostasis and feeding behavior. In contrast to CPT1A, which controls the rate-limiting step of long-chain fatty acid β-oxidation in all tissues, the biochemical context and regulatory mechanism of CPT1C are unknown. CPT1 enzymes are comprised of an N-terminal regulatory domain and a C-terminal catalytic domain (CD) that are separated by two transmembrane helices. In CPT1A, the regulatory domain, termed N, adopts an inhibitory and non-inhibitory state, Nα and Nβ, respectively, which differ in their association with the CD. To provide insight into the regulatory mechanism of CPT1C, we have determined the structure of its regulatory domain (residues Met1-Phe50) by NMR spectroscopy. In relation to CPT1A, the inhibitory Nα state was found to be structurally homologues whereas the non-inhibitory Nβ state was severely destabilized, suggesting a change in overall regulation. The destabilization of Nβ may contribute to the low catalytic activity of CPT1C relative to CPT1A and makes its association with the CD unlikely. In analogy to the stabilization of Nβ by the CPT1A CD, non-inhibitory interactions of N of CPT1C with another protein may exist. PMID:24037959

  15. The intracellular domain of teneurin-1 interacts with MBD1 and CAP/ponsin resulting in subcellular codistribution and translocation to the nuclear matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teneurin-1 is a type II transmembrane protein expressed in neurons of the developing and adult central nervous system. To investigate the intracellular signaling of teneurin-1, we searched for proteins interacting with its intracellular domain. One of the proteins identified is the c-Cbl-associated protein CAP/ponsin, an adaptor protein containing SH3 domains. This interaction results on one hand in the recruitment of the soluble intracellular domain of teneurin-1 to the cell membrane enriched in CAP/ponsin. On the other hand, it leads to the translocation of CAP/ponsin to the nucleus, the major site of accumulation of the intracellular domain of teneurin-1. The second interacting protein identified is the methyl-CpG binding protein MBD1. In the nucleus, the intracellular domain of teneurin-1 colocalizes with this transcriptional repressor in foci associated with the nuclear matrix. We propose that these interactions are part of a specific signaling pathway. Evidence for cleavage and nuclear translocation of the intracellular domain has been obtained by the detection of endogenous teneurin-1 immunoreactivity in nuclear speckles in chick embryo fibroblasts. Furthermore, in the nuclear matrix fraction of these cells as well as in cells expressing a hormone-inducible full-length teneurin-1 protein, a teneurin-1 fragment of identical size could be detected as in cells transfected with the intracellular domain alone

  16. Differential splicing of the apoptosis-associated speck like protein containing a caspase recruitment domain (ASC regulates inflammasomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rojanasakul Yon

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The apoptotic speck-like protein containing a caspase recruitment domain (ASC is the essential adaptor protein for caspase 1 mediated interleukin (IL-1β and IL-18 processing in inflammasomes. It bridges activated Nod like receptors (NLRs, which are a family of cytosolic pattern recognition receptors of the innate immune system, with caspase 1, resulting in caspase 1 activation and subsequent processing of caspase 1 substrates. Hence, macrophages from ASC deficient mice are impaired in their ability to produce bioactive IL-1β. Furthermore, we recently showed that ASC translocates from the nucleus to the cytosol in response to inflammatory stimulation in order to promote an inflammasome response, which triggers IL-1β processing and secretion. However, the precise regulation of inflammasomes at the level of ASC is still not completely understood. In this study we identified and characterized three novel ASC isoforms for their ability to function as an inflammasome adaptor. Methods To establish the ability of ASC and ASC isoforms as functional inflammasome adaptors, IL-1β processing and secretion was investigated by ELISA in inflammasome reconstitution assays, stable expression in THP-1 and J774A1 cells, and by restoring the lack of endogenous ASC in mouse RAW264.7 macrophages. In addition, the localization of ASC and ASC isoforms was determined by immunofluorescence staining. Results The three novel ASC isoforms, ASC-b, ASC-c and ASC-d display unique and distinct capabilities to each other and to full length ASC in respect to their function as an inflammasome adaptor, with one of the isoforms even showing an inhibitory effect. Consistently, only the activating isoforms of ASC, ASC and ASC-b, co-localized with NLRP3 and caspase 1, while the inhibitory isoform ASC-c, co-localized only with caspase 1, but not with NLRP3. ASC-d did not co-localize with NLRP3 or with caspase 1 and consistently lacked the ability to function as an

  17. Associations between Prenatal Exposure to Black Carbon and Memory Domains in Urban Children: Modification by Sex and Prenatal Stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whitney J Cowell

    Full Text Available Whether fetal neurodevelopment is disrupted by traffic-related air pollution is uncertain. Animal studies suggest that chemical and non-chemical stressors interact to impact neurodevelopment, and that this association is further modified by sex.To examine associations between prenatal traffic-related black carbon exposure, prenatal stress, and sex with children's memory and learning.Analyses included N = 258 mother-child dyads enrolled in a Boston, Massachusetts pregnancy cohort. Black carbon exposure was estimated using a validated spatiotemporal land-use regression model. Prenatal stress was measured using the Crisis in Family Systems-Revised survey of negative life events. The Wide Range Assessment of Memory and Learning (WRAML2 was administered at age 6 years; outcomes included the General Memory Index and its component indices [Verbal, Visual, and Attention Concentration]. Relationships between black carbon and WRAML2 index scores were examined using multivariable-adjusted linear regression including effect modification by stress and sex.Mothers were primarily minorities (60% Hispanic, 26% Black; 67% had ≤12 years of education. The main effect for black carbon was not significant for any WRAML2 index; however, in stratified analyses, among boys with high exposure to prenatal stress, Attention Concentration Index scores were on average 9.5 points lower for those with high compared to low prenatal black carbon exposure (P3-way interaction = 0.04.The associations between prenatal exposure to black carbon and stress with children's memory scores were stronger in boys than in girls. Studies assessing complex interactions may more fully characterize health risks and, in particular, identify vulnerable subgroups.

  18. Analysis of Medical Domain Using CMARM: Confabulation Mapreduce Association Rule Mining Algorithm for Frequent and Rare Itemsets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Jyoti Gautam

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In Human Life span, disease is a major cause of illness and death in the modern society. There are various factors that are responsible for diseases like work environment, living and working conditions, agriculture and food production, housing, unemployment, individual life style etc. The early diagnosis of any disease that frequently and rarely occurs with the growing age can be helpful in curing the disease completely or to some extent. The long-term prognosis of patient records might be useful to find out the causes that are responsible for particular diseases. Therefore, human being can take early preventive measures to minimize the risk of diseases that may supervene with the growing age and hence increase the life expectancy chances. In this paper, a new CMARM: Confabulation-MapReduce based association rule mining algorithm is proposed for the analysis of medical data repository for both rare and frequent itemsets using an iterative MapReduce based framework inspired by cogency. Cogency is the probability of the assumed facts being true if the conclusion is true, means it is based on pairwise item conditional probability, so the proposed algorithm mine association rules by only one pass through the file. The proposed algorithm is also valuable for dealing with infrequent items due to its cogency inspired approach.

  19. Variations in in vivo phosphorylation at the proline-rich domain of the microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) during rat brain development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, C; Díaz-Nido, J; Avila, J

    1995-01-01

    Microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) is an in vitro substrate for MAP kinase. Part of the phosphorylation occurs at the C-terminal microtubule-binding domain of the molecule which contains a cluster of putative consensus sites for MAP kinase on a proline-rich region. A peptide with the sequence RTPGTPG-TPSY, located at this region of the molecule, is efficiently phosphorylated by MAP kinase in vitro. An antibody (972) raised against this non-phosphorylated peptide has been used to test for in vivo phosphorylation at the proline-rich domain of the MAP2 molecule. The reaction of purified MAP2 with antibody 972 diminishes after in vitro phosphorylation by MAP kinase and is enhanced after in vitro dephosphorylation by alkaline phosphatase. A fraction of brain MAP2 isolated by iron-chelation affinity chromatography appears to be phosphorylated in vivo at the site recognized by antibody 972. There is some variation in the phosphorylation of MAP2 at the proline-rich region throughout rat brain development. MAP2C is more highly phosphorylated in the developing rat brain, whereas high-molecular-mass MAP2 is more extensively phosphorylated in the adult rat brain. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:7887902

  20. Genetic Analysis and Species Specific Amplification of the Artemisinin Resistance-Associated Kelch Propeller Domain in P. falciparum and P. vivax.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eldin Talundzic

    Full Text Available Plasmodium falciparum resistance to artemisinin has emerged in the Greater Mekong Subregion and now poses a threat to malaria control and prevention. Recent work has identified mutations in the kelch propeller domain of the P. falciparum K13 gene to be associated artemisinin resistance as defined by delayed parasite clearance and ex vivo ring stage survival assays. Species specific primers for the two most prevalent human malaria species, P. falciparum and P. vivax, were designed and tested on multiple parasite isolates including human, rodent, and non- humans primate Plasmodium species. The new protocol described here using the species specific primers only amplified their respective species, P. falciparum and P. vivax, and did not cross react with any of the other human malaria Plasmodium species. We provide an improved species specific PCR and sequencing protocol that could be effectively used in areas where both P. falciparum and P. vivax are circulating. To design this improved protocol, the kelch gene was analyzed and compared among different species of Plasmodium. The kelch propeller domain was found to be highly conserved across the mammalian Plasmodium species.

  1. SGTA Recognizes a Noncanonical Ubiquitin-like Domain in the Bag6-Ubl4A-Trc35 Complex to Promote Endoplasmic Reticulum-Associated Degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Xu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Elimination of aberrantly folded polypeptides from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER by the ER-associated degradation (ERAD system promotes cell survival under stress conditions. This quality control mechanism requires movement of misfolded proteins across the ER membrane for targeting to the cytosolic proteasome, a process facilitated by a “holdase” complex, consisting of Bag6 and the cofactors Ubl4A and Trc35. This multiprotein complex also participates in several other protein quality control processes. Here, we report SGTA as a component of the Bag6 system, which cooperates with Bag6 to channel dislocated ERAD substrates that are prone to aggregation. Using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and biochemical assays, we demonstrate that SGTA contains a noncanonical ubiquitin-like-binding domain that interacts specifically with an unconventional ubiquitin-like protein/domain in Ubl4A at least in part via electrostatics. This interaction helps recruit SGTA to Bag6, enhances substrate loading to Bag6, and thus prevents the formation of nondegradable protein aggregates in ERAD.

  2. Cloning, overexpression, purification and crystallization of the CRN12 coiled-coil domain from Leishmania donovani

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The L. donovani coronin CRN12 coiled-coil domain (5.8 kDa) was cloned, overexpressed and purified to homogeneity. Crystals of recombinant L. donovani coronin CRN12 coiled-coil domain were grown by vapour diffusion using a hanging-drop setup. Leishmania donovani coronin CRN12 is an actin-binding protein which consists of two domains: an N-terminal WD repeat domain and a C-terminal coiled-coil domain. The coiled-coil domain is 53 residues in length. Helix–helix interactions in general and coiled coils in particular are ubiquitous in the structure of proteins and play a significant role in the association among proteins, including supramolecular assemblies and transmembrane receptors that mediate cellular signalling, transport and actin dynamics. The L. donovani coronin CRN12 coiled-coil domain (5.8 kDa) was cloned, overexpressed, purified to homogeneity and the N-terminal 6×His tag was successfully removed by thrombin cleavage. Crystals of recombinant L. donovani coronin CRN12 coiled-coil domain were grown by vapour diffusion using a hanging-drop setup. Diffraction-quality crystals were obtained and data extending to 2.46 Å resolution were collected at 100 K on BM14, ESRF, Grenoble, France. The crystal belonged to the monoclinic space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 118.0, b = 50.6, c = 46.0 Å, β = 111.0°. Matthews coefficient (VM) calculations suggested the presence of 4–6 molecules in the asymmetric unit, corresponding to a solvent content of ∼33–55%, and are consistent with self-rotation function calculations

  3. Electric fingerprint of voltage sensor domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Caio S.; Amaral, Cristiano; Treptow, Werner

    2014-01-01

    A dynamic transmembrane voltage field has been suggested as an intrinsic element in voltage sensor (VS) domains. Here, the dynamic field contribution to the VS energetics was analyzed via electrostatic calculations applied to a number of atomistic structures made available recently. We find that the field is largely static along with the molecular motions of the domain, and more importantly, it is minimally modified across VS variants. This finding implies that sensor domains transfer approximately the same amount of gating charges when moving the electrically charged S4 helix between fixed microscopic configurations. Remarkably, the result means that the observed operational diversity of the domain, including the extension, rate, and voltage dependence of the S4 motion, as dictated by the free energy landscape theory, must be rationalized in terms of dominant variations of its chemical free energy. PMID:25422443

  4. Heterologous transmembrane signaling by a human insulin receptor-v-ros hybrid in Chinese hamster ovary cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A hybrid receptor molecule composed of the extracellular ligand-binding domain of the human insulin receptor and the transmembrane and cytoplasmic (protein-tyrosine kinase) domains of the chicken sarcoma virus UR2 transforming protein p68/sup gag-ros/ has been constructed and expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. The hybrid is processed normally into α and hybrid β subunits, is expressed on the cell surface at high levels, and binds insulin with near-wild-type affinity. Furthermore, insulin stimulates the phosphorylation on tyrosine resides of the hybrid β-subunit in vivo and the phosphorylation of an exogeneous substrate [poly(Glu,Tyr)] in vitro. Thus the hybrid is capable of heterologous transmembrane signaling. However, the hybrid mediates neither the insulin-activated uptake of 2-deoxyglucose nor the incorporation of [3H]thymidine into DNA, suggesting that the physiological response(s) mediated by ligand-activated protein-tyrosine kinases may utilize distinct intracellular mechanisms for postreceptor signaling

  5. Heterologous transmembrane signaling by a human insulin receptor-v-ros hybrid in Chinese hamster ovary cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, L.; Morgan, D.O.; Jong, S.M.; Wang, L.H.; Roth, R.A.; Rutter, W.J.

    1987-08-01

    A hybrid receptor molecule composed of the extracellular ligand-binding domain of the human insulin receptor and the transmembrane and cytoplasmic (protein-tyrosine kinase) domains of the chicken sarcoma virus UR2 transforming protein p68/sup gag-ros/ has been constructed and expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. The hybrid is processed normally into ..cap alpha.. and hybrid ..beta.. subunits, is expressed on the cell surface at high levels, and binds insulin with near-wild-type affinity. Furthermore, insulin stimulates the phosphorylation on tyrosine resides of the hybrid ..beta..-subunit in vivo and the phosphorylation of an exogeneous substrate (poly(Glu,Tyr)) in vitro. Thus the hybrid is capable of heterologous transmembrane signaling. However, the hybrid mediates neither the insulin-activated uptake of 2-deoxyglucose nor the incorporation of (/sup 3/H)thymidine into DNA, suggesting that the physiological response(s) mediated by ligand-activated protein-tyrosine kinases may utilize distinct intracellular mechanisms for postreceptor signaling

  6. Regulation of KV channel voltage-dependent activation by transmembrane β subunits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohui eSun

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-activated K+ (KV channels are important for shaping action potentials and maintaining resting membrane potential in excitable cells. KV channels contain a central pore-gate domain (PGD surrounded by four voltage-sensing domains (VSD. The VSDs will change conformation in response to alterations of the membrane potential thereby inducing the opening of the PGD. Many KV channels are heteromeric protein complexes containing auxiliary β subunits. These β subunits modulate channel expression and activity to increase functional diversity and render tissue specific phenotypes. This review focuses on the KV β subunits that contain transmembrane (TM segments including the KCNE family and the β subunits of large conductance, Ca2+- and voltage-activated K+ (BK channels. These TM β subunits affect the voltage-dependent activation of KV α subunits. Experimental and computational studies have described the structural location of these β subunits in the channel complexes and the biophysical effects on VSD activation, PGD opening and VSD-PGD coupling. These results reveal some common characteristics and mechanistic insights into KV channel modulation by TM β subunits.

  7. Transmembrane myosin chitin synthase involved in mollusc shell formation produced in Dictyostelium is active

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenitzer, Veronika [INM - Leibniz Institute for New Materials, Biomineralisation Group, Campus D2.2, D-66123 Saarbruecken (Germany); Universitaet Regensburg, Biochemie I, Universitaetsstrasse 31, D-93053 Regensburg (Germany); Eichner, Norbert [Universitaet Regensburg, Biochemie I, Universitaetsstrasse 31, D-93053 Regensburg (Germany); Clausen-Schaumann, Hauke [Munich University of Applied Sciences, Lothstrasse 34, D-80335 Muenchen, Germany, and Center for NanoScience (CeNS), Geschwister-Scholl-Platz 1, D-80539 Muenchen (Germany); Weiss, Ingrid M., E-mail: ingrid.weiss@inm-gmbh.de [INM - Leibniz Institute for New Materials, Biomineralisation Group, Campus D2.2, D-66123 Saarbruecken (Germany); Universitaet Regensburg, Biochemie I, Universitaetsstrasse 31, D-93053 Regensburg (Germany)

    2011-12-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dictyostelium produces the 264 kDa myosin chitin synthase of bivalve mollusc Atrina. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chitin synthase activity releases chitin, partly associated with the cell surface. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Membrane extracts of transgenic slime molds produce radiolabeled chitin in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chitin producing Dictyostelium cells can be characterized by atomic force microscopy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This model system enables us to study initial processes of chitin biomineralization. -- Abstract: Several mollusc shells contain chitin, which is formed by a transmembrane myosin motor enzyme. This protein could be involved in sensing mechanical and structural changes of the forming, mineralizing extracellular matrix. Here we report the heterologous expression of the transmembrane myosin chitin synthase Ar-CS1 of the bivalve mollusc Atrina rigida (2286 amino acid residues, M.W. 264 kDa/monomer) in Dictyostelium discoideum, a model organism for myosin motor proteins. Confocal laser scanning immunofluorescence microscopy (CLSM), chitin binding GFP detection of chitin on cells and released to the cell culture medium, and a radiochemical activity assay of membrane extracts revealed expression and enzymatic activity of the mollusc chitin synthase in transgenic slime mold cells. First high-resolution atomic force microscopy (AFM) images of Ar-CS1 transformed cellulose synthase deficient D. discoideumdcsA{sup -} cell lines are shown.

  8. HMM_RA: An Improved Method for Alpha-Helical Transmembrane Protein Topology Prediction

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    Changhui Yan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available α-helical transmembrane (TM proteins play important and diverse functional roles in cells. The ability to predict the topology of these proteins is important for identifying functional sites and inferring function of membrane proteins. This paper presents a Hidden Markov Model (referred to as HMM_RA that can predict the topology of α-helical transmembrane proteins with improved performance. HMM_RA adopts the same structure as the HMMTOP method, which has five modules: inside loop, inside helix tail, membrane helix, outside helix tail and outside loop. Each module consists of one or multiple states. HMM_RA allows using reduced alphabets to encode protein sequences. Thus, each state of HMM_RA is associated with n emission probabilities, where n is the size of the reduced alphabet set. Direct comparisons using two standard data sets show that HMM_RA consistently outperforms HMMTOP and TMHMM in topology prediction. Specifically, on a high-quality data set of 83 proteins, HMM_RA outperforms HMMTOP by up to 7.6% in topology accuracy and 6.4% in α-helices location accuracy. On the same data set, HMM_RA outperforms TMHMM by up to 6.4% in topology accuracy and 2.9% in location accuracy. Comparison also shows that HMM_RA achieves comparable performance as Phobius, a recently published method.

  9. Transmembrane and truncated (SEC isoforms of MUC1 in the human endometrium and Fallopian tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wreschner Daniel H

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The cell surface mucin MUC1 is expressed by endometrial epithelial cells with increased abundance in the secretory phase of the menstrual cycle, when it is found both at the apical cell surface and in secretions. This suggests the presence of a maternal cell surface glycoprotein barrier to embryo implantation, arising from the anti-adhesive property of MUC1. In previous work, we demonstrated alternatively spliced MUC1 variant forms in tumour cells. The variant MUC1/SEC lacks the transmembrane and cytoplasmic sequences found in the full-length variant. We now show that MUC1/SEC mRNA is present in endometrial carcinoma cell lines, endometrial tissue and primary cultured endometrial epithelial cells. The protein can be detected using isoform-specific antibodies in uterine flushings, suggesting release from endometrium in vivo. However, on the basis of immunolocalisation studies, MUC1/SEC also remains associated with the apical epithelial surface both in tissue and in cultured cells. Transmembrane MUC1 and MUC1/SEC are both strikingly localised to the apical surface of tubal epithelium. Thus MUC1 may contribute to the anti-adhesive character of the tubal surface, inhibiting ectopic implantation. The mechanism by which this barrier is overcome in endometrium at implantation is the subject of ongoing investigation.

  10. Possible paraneoplastic syndrome case of bullous pemphigoid with immunoglobulin G anti-BP180 C-terminal domain antibodies associated with psoriasis and primary macroglobulinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maki, Nobuki; Demitsu, Toshio; Umemoto, Naoka; Nagashima, Kazutaka; Nakamura, Toshinobu; Kakurai, Maki; Nakamura, Satoshi; Yamada, Tomoko; Ishii, Norito; Hashimoto, Takashi

    2016-05-01

    A 61-year-old Japanese man developed bullous skin lesions during topical therapy for psoriasis vulgaris. Physical examination demonstrated numerous tense bullae and scaly erythemas on the trunk and extremities. Histopathology of the skin biopsy demonstrated subepidermal bullae and lymphocytic infiltration with eosinophils in the dermis. Direct immunofluorescence revealed linear deposits of immunoglobulin (Ig)G, IgA and C3 along the basement membrane zone. Indirect immunofluorescence of 1 mol/L NaCl-split skin showed IgG reactivity with both epidermal and the dermal sides. IgM reactivity with both the epidermal and dermal sides was also detected. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays showed negative results for both BP180 and BP230. Immunoelectrophoresis of serum and bone marrow aspiration revealed underlying primary macroglobulinemia with M-proteinemia of IgM-κ type. Immunoblot analysis revealed IgG, but not IgM, antibodies to recombinant protein of BP180 C-terminal domain. We diagnosed the present case as bullous pemphigoid with IgG anti-BP180 C-terminal domain autoantibodies associated with primary macroglobulinemia and psoriasis vulgaris. Systemic administration of prednisolone 30 mg/day resulted in dramatic improvement of both bullous and psoriatic skin lesions. When the bullous and psoriatic lesions relapsed, DRC chemotherapy (dexamethasone, rituximab and cyclophosphamide) for macroglobulinemia was performed. Then, the psoriatic lesions improved and the bullous lesions disappeared. We suggested that the present case may be paraneoplastic syndrome of bullous pemphigoid associated with primary macroglobulinemia and psoriasis vulgaris. PMID:26507447

  11. Positional cloning of zinc finger domain transcription factor Zfp69, a candidate gene for obesity-associated diabetes contributed by mouse locus Nidd/SJL.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Scherneck

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Polygenic type 2 diabetes in mouse models is associated with obesity and results from a combination of adipogenic and diabetogenic alleles. Here we report the identification of a candidate gene for the diabetogenic effect of a QTL (Nidd/SJL, Nidd1 contributed by the SJL, NON, and NZB strains in outcross populations with New Zealand Obese (NZO mice. A critical interval of distal chromosome 4 (2.1 Mbp conferring the diabetic phenotype was identified by interval-specific congenic introgression of SJL into diabetes-resistant C57BL/6J, and subsequent reporter cross with NZO. Analysis of the 10 genes in the critical interval by sequencing, qRT-PCR, and RACE-PCR revealed a striking allelic variance of Zfp69 encoding zinc finger domain transcription factor 69. In NZO and C57BL/6J, a retrotransposon (IAPLTR1a in intron 3 disrupted the gene by formation of a truncated mRNA that lacked the coding sequence for the KRAB (Krüppel-associated box and Znf-C2H2 domains of Zfp69, whereas the diabetogenic SJL, NON, and NZB alleles generated a normal mRNA. When combined with the B6.V-Lep(ob background, the diabetogenic Zfp69(SJL allele produced hyperglycaemia, reduced gonadal fat, and increased plasma and liver triglycerides. mRNA levels of the human orthologue of Zfp69, ZNF642, were significantly increased in adipose tissue from patients with type 2 diabetes. We conclude that Zfp69 is the most likely candidate for the diabetogenic effect of Nidd/SJL, and that retrotransposon IAPLTR1a contributes substantially to the genetic heterogeneity of mouse strains. Expression of the transcription factor in adipose tissue may play a role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes.

  12. High constitutive activity of a virus-encoded seven transmembrane receptor in the absence of the conserved DRY motif (Asp-Arg-Tyr) in transmembrane helix 3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, Mette M; Kledal, Thomas N; Schwartz, Thue W

    2005-01-01

    The highly conserved Arg in the so-called DRY motif (Asp-Arg-Tyr) at the intracellular end of transmembrane helix 3 is in general considered as an essential residue for G protein coupling in rhodopsin-like seven transmembrane (7TM) receptors. In the open reading frame 74 (ORF74) receptor encoded by...

  13. Association of different cognitive domains with lifetime history of psychosis and reported antipsychotic-treatment adverse events in bipolar disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kałwa, Agnieszka

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the study. The present work aimed to assess the association between cognitive functions, the lifetime occurrence of psychotic symptoms, and reported adverse effects of antipsychotic treatments inpatients with bipolar disorders.Methods. In the present work, 44 bipolar disorder inpatients hospitalized in the Affective Disorders Unit of the Institute of Psychiatry and Neurology in Warsaw, were investigated. All of them met the criteria of remission and were prepared for release from the hospital unit. Twenty-two patients were hospitalized in the manic stage of the illness, and 22 were in the depressive stage of illness. Both groups were assessed using adequate psychiatric rating scales (HDRS or YMRS and CAMRS and neuropsychological tests (WCST, TMT, Stroop Test and Verbal Fluency Test.Results. Patients who had a prior history of psychotic symptoms had poorer verbal functioning in comparison to subjects without such a history. However, individuals hospitalized in the manic state of disease, and who reported more adverse events after antipsychotic medication during the whole course of illness, had worse results in some parameters of executive function measurements in the WCST test, namely occurring in a greater percentage of nonperseverative errors and a lower number of completed categories.Discussion. Generally the results confirm findings according to which, patients with the history of psychosis performe worse on neurocognitive tasks. However, the nature of dysfunctions found, generates questions about its relations with the experience of psychosis and antipsychotic treatment. Conclusion: Different aspects of cognitive dysfunctions may be related to the experience of psychosis and antipsychotic treatment in patients with bipolar disorders.

  14. Phospholipase D family member 4, a transmembrane glycoprotein with no phospholipase D activity, expression in spleen and early postnatal microglia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumio Yoshikawa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Phospholipase D (PLD catalyzes conversion of phosphatidylcholine into choline and phosphatidic acid, leading to a variety of intracellular signal transduction events. Two classical PLDs, PLD1 and PLD2, contain phosphatidylinositide-binding PX and PH domains and two conserved His-x-Lys-(x(4-Asp (HKD motifs, which are critical for PLD activity. PLD4 officially belongs to the PLD family, because it possesses two HKD motifs. However, it lacks PX and PH domains and has a putative transmembrane domain instead. Nevertheless, little is known regarding expression, structure, and function of PLD4. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: PLD4 was analyzed in terms of expression, structure, and function. Expression was analyzed in developing mouse brains and non-neuronal tissues using microarray, in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry, and immunocytochemistry. Structure was evaluated using bioinformatics analysis of protein domains, biochemical analyses of transmembrane property, and enzymatic deglycosylation. PLD activity was examined by choline release and transphosphatidylation assays. Results demonstrated low to modest, but characteristic, PLD4 mRNA expression in a subset of cells preferentially localized around white matter regions, including the corpus callosum and cerebellar white matter, during the first postnatal week. These PLD4 mRNA-expressing cells were identified as Iba1-positive microglia. In non-neuronal tissues, PLD4 mRNA expression was widespread, but predominantly distributed in the spleen. Intense PLD4 expression was detected around the marginal zone of the splenic red pulp, and splenic PLD4 protein recovered from subcellular membrane fractions was highly N-glycosylated. PLD4 was heterologously expressed in cell lines and localized in the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus. Moreover, heterologously expressed PLD4 proteins did not exhibit PLD enzymatic activity. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Results showed that PLD4 is a non

  15. Multiple Mechanisms Contribute to the Cell Growth Defects Imparted by Human Telomerase Insertion in Fingers Domain Mutations Associated with Premature Aging Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Tsz Wai; MacNeil, Deanna Elise; Autexier, Chantal

    2016-04-15

    Normal human stem cells rely on low levels of active telomerase to sustain their high replicative requirements. Deficiency in telomere maintenance mechanisms leads to the development of premature aging diseases, such as dyskeratosis congenita and aplastic anemia. Mutations in the unique "insertion in fingers domain" (IFD) in the human telomerase reverse transcriptase catalytic subunit (hTERT) have previously been identified and shown to be associated with dyskeratosis congenita and aplastic anemia. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms impacted by these IFD mutations. We performed comparative functional analyses of disease-associated IFD variants at the molecular and cellular levels. We report that hTERT-P721R- and hTERT-R811C-expressing cells exhibited growth defects likely due to impaired TPP1-mediated recruitment of these variant enzymes to telomeres. We showed that activity and processivity of hTERT-T726M failed to be stimulated by TPP1-POT1 overexpression and that dGTP usage by this variant was less efficient compared with the wild-type enzyme. hTERT-P785L-expressing cells did not show growth defects, and this variant likely confers cell survival through increased DNA synthesis and robust activity stimulation by TPP1-POT1. Altogether, our data suggest that multiple mechanisms contribute to cell growth defects conferred by the IFD variants. PMID:26887940

  16. Rapid Evolution to Blast Crisis Associated with a Q252H ABL1 Kinase Domain Mutation in e19a2 BCR-ABL1 Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah L. McCarron

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A minority of chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML patients express variant transcripts of which the e19a2 BCR-ABL1 fusion is the most common. Instances of tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI resistance in e19a2 BCR-ABL1 CML patients have rarely been reported. A case of e19a2 BCR-ABL1 CML is described in whom imatinib resistance, associated with a Q252H ABL1 kinase domain mutation, became apparent soon after initiation of TKI therapy. The patient rapidly transformed to myeloid blast crisis (BC with considerable bone marrow fibrosis and no significant molecular response to a second generation TKI. The clinical course was complicated by comorbidities with the patient rapidly succumbing to advanced disease. This scenario of Q252H-associated TKI resistance with rapid BC transformation has not been previously documented in e19a2 BCR-ABL1 CML. This case highlights the considerable challenges remaining in the management of TKI-resistant BC CML, particularly in the elderly patient.

  17. Statistical radii associated with amino acids to determine the contact map: fixing the structure of a type I cohesin domain in the Clostridium thermocellum cellulosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chwastyk, Mateusz; Poma Bernaola, Adolfo; Cieplak, Marek

    2015-07-01

    We propose to improve and simplify protein refinement procedures through consideration of which pairs of amino acid residues should form native contacts. We first consider 11 330 proteins from the CATH database to determine statistical distributions of contacts associated with a given type of amino acid. The distributions are set across the distances between the α-C atoms that are in contact. Based on this data, we determine typical radii of effective spheres that can be placed on the α-C atoms in order to reconstruct the distribution of the contact lengths. This is done by checking for overlaps with enlarged van der Waals spheres associated with heavy atoms on other amino acids. The resulting contacts can be used to identify non-native contacts that may arise during the time evolution of structure-based models. Here, the radii are used to guide reconstruction of nine missing side chains in a type I cohesin domain with the Protein Data Bank code 1AOH. We first identify the likely missing contacts and then sculpt the corresponding side chains by standard refinement tools to achieve consistency with the expected contact map. One ambiguity in refinement is resolved by determining all-atom conformational energies.

  18. Polymorphisms of clip domain serine proteinase and serine proteinase homolog in the swimming crab Portunus trituberculatus and their association with Vibrio alginolyticus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Meng; Liu, Yuan; Hui, Min; Song, Chengwen; Cui, Zhaoxia

    2016-05-01

    Clip domain serine proteases (cSPs) and their homologs (SPHs) play an important role in various biological processes that are essential components of extracellular signaling cascades, especially in the innate immune responses of invertebrates. Here, polymorphisms of PtcSP and PtSPH from the swimming crab Portunus trituberculatus were investigated to explore their association with resistance/ susceptibility to Vibrio alginolyticus. Polymorphic loci were identified using Clustal X, and characterized with SPSS 16.0 software, and then the significance of genotype and allele frequencies between resistant and susceptible stocks was determined by a χ2 test. A total of 109 and 77 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified in the genomic fragments of PtcSP and PtSPH, respectively. Notably, nearly half of PtSPH polymorphisms were found in the non-coding exon 1. Fourteen SNPs investigated were significantly associated with susceptibility/resistance to V. alginolyticus (P<0.05). Among them, eight SNPs were observed in introns, and one synonymous, four non-synonymous SNPs and one ins-del were found in coding exons. In addition, five simple sequence repeats (SSRs) were detected in intron 3 of PtcSP. Although there was no statistically significant difference of allele frequencies, the SSRs showed different polymorphic alleles on the basis of the repeat number between resistant and susceptible stocks. After further validation, polymorphisms investigated here might be applied to select potential molecular markers of P. trituberculatus with resistance to V. alginolyticus.

  19. Oxidation of pseudo-single domain Fe3O4 particles and associated magnetic response examined by environmental TEM and off-axis electron holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, T.; Muxworthy, A. R.; Williams, W.

    2013-12-01

    In order to interpret palaeomagnetic measurements reliably, the mechanisms that induce and alter chemical remanent magnetisation (CRM) in naturally occurring magnetic recorders must be fully understood. Current models of CRM processes only exist for the smallest uniformly-magnetised single domain (SD) grains. However, magnetic signals from rocks are often dominated by larger grains that contain non-uniform pseudo-SD (PSD) magnetisation states. Magnetite (Fe3O4) is the most magnetic naturally occurring mineral on Earth, carrying the dominant magnetic signature in rocks and providing a critical tool in paleomagnetism. The oxidation of Fe3O4 to other iron oxides, such as maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) and hematite (α-Fe2O3), is of particular interest as it influences the preservation of remanence of the Earth's magnetic field by Fe3O4. The complementary use of environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM) and off-axis electron holography techniques can be used to reveal local changes in magnetisation in minerals as they alter during in situ heating in a controlled oxidising atmosphere. Such experiments can provide direct information about the relationship between magnetic domain structure and chemical alteration features, phase boundaries and crystalline microstructure. In the present study, synthetic Fe3O4 particles with sizes in the PSD range (dark-field imaging, electron diffraction and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. The associated alteration in CRM exhibited by individual Fe3O4 particles was investigated using off-axis electron holography, in the form of reconstructed magnetic induction maps.

  20. Defective Association of the Platelet Glycoprotein Ib-IX Complex with the Glycosphingolipid-Enriched Membrane Domain Inhibits Murine Thrombus and Atheroma Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hao; Ran, Yali; Da, Qi; Shaw, Tanner S; Shang, Dan; Reddy, Anilkumar K; López, José A; Ballantyne, Christie M; Ware, Jerry; Wu, Huaizhu; Peng, Yuandong

    2016-07-01

    Localization of the platelet glycoprotein Ib-IX complex to the membrane lipid domain is essential for platelet adhesion to von Willebrand factor and subsequent platelet activation in vitro. Yet, the in vivo importance of this localization has never been addressed. We recently found that the disulfide linkage between Ibα and Ibβ is critical for the association of Ibα with the glycosphingolipid-enriched membrane domain; in this study, we established a transgenic mouse model expressing this mutant human Ibα that is also devoid of endogenous Ibα (HαSSMα(-/-)). Characterization of this model demonstrated a similar dissociation of Ibα from murine platelet glycosphingolipid-enriched membrane to that expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells, which correlates well with the impaired adhesion of the transgenic platelets to von Willebrand factor ex vivo and in vivo. Furthermore, we bred our transgenic mice into an atherosclerosis-prone background (HαSSMα(-/-)ApoE(-/-) and HαWTMα(-/-)ApoE(-/-)). We observed that atheroma formation was significantly inhibited in mutant mice where fewer platelet-bound CD11c(+) leukocytes were circulating (CD45(+)/CD11c(+)/CD41(+)) and residing in atherosclerotic lesions (CD45(+)/CD11c(+)), suggesting that platelet-mediated adhesion and infiltration of CD11c(+) leukocytes may be one of the mechanisms. To our knowledge, these observations provide the first in vivo evidence showing that the membrane GEM is physiologically and pathophysiologically critical in the function of the glycoprotein Ib-IX complex. PMID:27206768

  1. 白氏文昌鱼FADD的克隆及功能研究%MOLECULAR CLONING AND CHARACTERIZATION OF FAS-ASSOCIATED DEATH DOMAIN (FADD) FROM BRANCHIOSTOMA BELCHERI

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张晶; 黄贝; 高谦; 聂品

    2009-01-01

    FADD (Fas-associated death domain protein) , also termed MORT1, plays a critical role in the apoptotic signaling pathways of both CD95 ( Fas/AP0-l ) and certain members of the tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) superfami-ly, and is well conserved in vertebrates, especially in mammals. To reveal the features of FADD in lower animals, we have characterized FADD from amphioxus, Branchiostoma belcheri (Chordata, Cephalochordata) , which is a model animal, and have an insight into the origin and evolution of apoptotic signaling system of the vertebrate. Branchiostoma belcheri FADD (bbFADD) cDNA and genomic DNA sequences were obtained by using RACE-PCR and Genomic Walking, respectively. The full-length cDNA of bbFADD consisted of 1239 base pairs (bp) encoding 217 amino acid residues (aa) with a death effector domain (DED) (12-95~(th); 84 aa) near the N-terminal and a death domain (DD) (129-211(st); 83 aa) by the C-terminal. bbFADD genomic sequence, the length of which was 2840 bp, consisted of three exons and two introns in the gene coding region. The structure of bbFADD gene was different from that of its vertebrate counterparts, with two exons. The result of multiple alignments among FADDs from various species supported that DED and DD regions were more conservative than other regions. Furthermore, the 33~(rd) phenylalanine residue ( F33) of bbFADD amino acid sequence, which was equivalent to the 25~(th) phenylalanine residue ( F25) in human FADD. This site, which was crucial to mediate FADD self-association, was well conserved through sea urchin and human. Homology analysis showed that the percent identity and the percent similarity between bbFADD and vertebrate FADDs were 27.5%-30.0% and 44.7%-55.3%, while 35.1%-36.9% and 51.1%-52.0% between bbFADD and sea urchin FADD, respectively. In NJ phylogenetic tree based on amino acid sequences of FADDs, B. belcheri was grouped with sea urchin with the suggestion that comparing with lower vertebrate, fish, amphioxus was

  2. Stability analysis of the inverse transmembrane potential problem in electrocardiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Martin; Mardal, Kent-André; Nielsen, Bjørn Fredrik

    2010-10-01

    In this paper we study some mathematical properties of an inverse problem arising in connection with electrocardiograms (ECGs). More specifically, we analyze the possibility for recovering the transmembrane potential in the heart from ECG recordings, a challenge currently investigated by a growing number of groups. Our approach is based on the bidomain model for the electrical activity in the myocardium, and leads to a parameter identification problem for elliptic partial differential equations (PDEs). It turns out that this challenge can be split into two subproblems: the task of recovering the potential at the heart surface from body surface recordings; the problem of computing the transmembrane potential inside the heart from the potential determined at the heart surface. Problem (1), which can be formulated as the Cauchy problem for an elliptic PDE, has been extensively studied and is well known to be severely ill-posed. The main purpose of this paper is to prove that problem (2) is stable and well posed if a suitable prior is available. Moreover, our theoretical findings are illuminated by a series of numerical experiments. Finally, we discuss some aspects of uniqueness related to the anisotropy in the heart.

  3. Transmembrane transport of peptidoglycan precursors across model and bacterial membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dam, Vincent; Sijbrandi, Robert; Kol, Matthijs; Swiezewska, Ewa; de Kruijff, Ben; Breukink, Eefjan

    2007-05-01

    Translocation of the peptidoglycan precursor Lipid II across the cytoplasmic membrane is a key step in bacterial cell wall synthesis, but hardly understood. Using NBD-labelled Lipid II, we showed by fluorescence and TLC assays that Lipid II transport does not occur spontaneously and is not induced by the presence of single spanning helical transmembrane peptides that facilitate transbilayer movement of membrane phospholipids. MurG catalysed synthesis of Lipid II from Lipid I in lipid vesicles also did not result in membrane translocation of Lipid II. These findings demonstrate that a specialized protein machinery is needed for transmembrane movement of Lipid II. In line with this, we could demonstrate Lipid II translocation in isolated Escherichia coli inner membrane vesicles and this transport could be uncoupled from the synthesis of Lipid II at low temperatures. The transport process appeared to be independent from an energy source (ATP or proton motive force). Additionally, our studies indicate that translocation of Lipid II is coupled to transglycosylation activity on the periplasmic side of the inner membrane. PMID:17501931

  4. Retromer-Mediated Trafficking of Transmembrane Receptors and Transporters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stine C. Klinger

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Transport between the endoplasmatic reticulum, the Golgi-network, the endo-lysosomal system and the cell surface can be categorized as anterograde or retrograde, describing traffic that goes forward or backward, respectively. Traffic going from the plasma membrane to endosomes and lysosomes or the trans-Golgi network (TGN constitutes the major retrograde transport routes. Several transmembrane proteins undergo retrograde transport as part of a recycling mechanism that contributes to reutilization and maintenance of a steady-state protein localization. In addition, some receptors are hijacked by exotoxins and used for entry and intracellular transport. The physiological relevance of retrograde transport cannot be overstated. Retrograde trafficking of the amyloid precursor protein determines the distribution between organelles, and hence the possibility of cleavage by γ-secretase. Right balancing of the pathways is critical for protection against Alzheimer’s disease. During embryonic development, retrograde transport of Wntless to the TGN is essential for the following release of Wnt from the plasma membrane. Furthermore, overexpression of Wntless has been linked to oncogenesis. Here, we review relevant aspects of the retrograde trafficking of mammalian transmembrane receptors and transporters, with focus on the retromer-mediated transport between endosomes and the TGN.

  5. Retromer-Mediated Trafficking of Transmembrane Receptors and Transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinger, Stine C; Siupka, Piotr; Nielsen, Morten S

    2015-01-01

    Transport between the endoplasmatic reticulum, the Golgi-network, the endo-lysosomal system and the cell surface can be categorized as anterograde or retrograde, describing traffic that goes forward or backward, respectively. Traffic going from the plasma membrane to endosomes and lysosomes or the trans-Golgi network (TGN) constitutes the major retrograde transport routes. Several transmembrane proteins undergo retrograde transport as part of a recycling mechanism that contributes to reutilization and maintenance of a steady-state protein localization. In addition, some receptors are hijacked by exotoxins and used for entry and intracellular transport. The physiological relevance of retrograde transport cannot be overstated. Retrograde trafficking of the amyloid precursor protein determines the distribution between organelles, and hence the possibility of cleavage by γ-secretase. Right balancing of the pathways is critical for protection against Alzheimer's disease. During embryonic development, retrograde transport of Wntless to the TGN is essential for the following release of Wnt from the plasma membrane. Furthermore, overexpression of Wntless has been linked to oncogenesis. Here, we review relevant aspects of the retrograde trafficking of mammalian transmembrane receptors and transporters, with focus on the retromer-mediated transport between endosomes and the TGN. PMID:26154780

  6. Transmembrane proteins--Mining the cattle tick transcriptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Sabine A; Stutzer, Christian; Bosman, Anna-Mari; Maritz-Olivier, Christine

    2015-09-01

    Managing the spread and load of pathogen-transmitting ticks is an important task worldwide. The cattle tick, Rhipicephalus microplus, not only impacts the economy through losses in dairy and meat production, but also raises concerns for human health in regards to the potential of certain transmitted pathogens becoming zoonotic. However, novel strategies to control R. microplus are hindered by lack of understanding tick biology and the discovery of suitable vaccine or acaricide targets. The importance of transmembrane proteins as vaccine targets are well known, as is the case in tick vaccines with Bm86 as antigen. In this study, we describe the localization and functional annotation of 878 putative transmembrane proteins. Thirty proteins could be confirmed in the R. microplus gut using LC-MS/MS analysis and their roles in tick biology are discussed. To the best of our knowledge, 19 targets have not been reported before in any proteomics study in various tick species and the possibility of using the identified proteins as targets for tick control are discussed. Although tissue expression of identified putative proteins through expansive proteomics is necessary, this study demonstrates the possibility of using bioinformatics for the identification of targets for further evaluation in tick control strategies. PMID:26096851

  7. Bioenergetics and mitochondrial transmembrane potential during differentiation of cultured osteoblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komarova, S. V.; Ataullakhanov, F. I.; Globus, R. K.

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the relationship between osteoblast differentiation and bioenergetics, cultured primary osteoblasts from fetal rat calvaria were grown in medium supplemented with ascorbate to induce differentiation. Before ascorbate treatment, the rate of glucose consumption was 320 nmol. h(-1). 10(6) cells(-1), respiration was 40 nmol. h(-1). 10(6) cells(-1), and the ratio of lactate production to glucose consumption was approximately 2, indicating that glycolysis was the main energy source for immature osteoblasts. Ascorbate treatment for 14 days led to a fourfold increase in respiration, a threefold increase in ATP production, and a fivefold increase in ATP content compared with that shown in immature cells. Confocal imaging of mitochondria stained with a transmembrane potential-sensitive vital dye showed that mature cells possessed abundant amounts of high-transmembrane-potential mitochondria, which were concentrated near the culture medium-facing surface. Acute treatment of mature osteoblasts with metabolic inhibitors showed that the rate of glycolysis rose to maintain the cellular energy supply constant. Thus progressive differentiation coincided with changes in cellular metabolism and mitochondrial activity, which are likely to play key roles in osteoblast function.

  8. Emerging role of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator - an epithelial chloride channel in gastrointestinal cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yuning; Guan, Xiaoqing; Yang, Zhe; Li, Chunying

    2016-03-15

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a glycoprotein with 1480 amino acids, has been well established as a chloride channel mainly expressed in the epithelial cells of various tissues and organs such as lungs, sweat glands, gastrointestinal system, and reproductive organs. Although defective CFTR leads to cystic fibrosis, a common genetic disorder in the Caucasian population, there is accumulating evidence that suggests a novel role of CFTR in various cancers, especially in gastroenterological cancers, such as pancreatic cancer and colon cancer. In this review, we summarize the emerging findings that link CFTR with various cancers, with focus on the association between CFTR defects and gastrointestinal cancers as well as the underlying mechanisms. Further study of CFTR in cancer biology may help pave a new way for the diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal cancers. PMID:26989463

  9. Effects of La3+ on H+ Transmembrane Gradient and Membrane Potential in Rice Seedling Roots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑海雷; 张春光; 赵中秋; 马建华; 李利

    2002-01-01

    The effects of LaCl3 on membrane potential and transmembrane proton gradient for rice (Oryza sativa) seedling roots were studied. Highly purified plasma membrane was isolated by aqueous two-phase partitioning method. Both the gradient of transmembrane proton and membrane potential were stimulated by certain low concentration of LaCl3 and depressed by high concentration of LaCl3. The optimal concentration of La3+ is around 40~60 μmolL-1 for transmembrane proton gradient and membrane potential. It shows that La3+ can influence the generations and maintenances of membrane potential and transmembrane proton gradient in rice seedling roots.

  10. WW domains of the yes-kinase-associated-protein (YAP) transcriptional regulator behave as independent units with different binding preferences for PPxY motif-containing ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias-Bexiga, Manuel; Castillo, Francisco; Cobos, Eva S; Oka, Tsutomu; Sudol, Marius; Luque, Irene

    2015-01-01

    YAP is a WW domain-containing effector of the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway, and the object of heightened interest as a potent oncogene and stemness factor. YAP has two major isoforms that differ in the number of WW domains they harbor. Elucidating the degree of co-operation between these WW domains is important for a full understanding of the molecular function of YAP. We present here a detailed biophysical study of the structural stability and binding properties of the two YAP WW domains aimed at investigating the relationship between both domains in terms of structural stability and partner recognition. We have carried out a calorimetric study of the structural stability of the two YAP WW domains, both isolated and in a tandem configuration, and their interaction with a set of functionally relevant ligands derived from PTCH1 and LATS kinases. We find that the two YAP WW domains behave as independent units with different binding preferences, suggesting that the presence of the second WW domain might contribute to modulate target recognition between the two YAP isoforms. Analysis of structural models and phage-display studies indicate that electrostatic interactions play a critical role in binding specificity. Together, these results are relevant to understand of YAP function and open the door to the design of highly specific ligands of interest to delineate the functional role of each WW domain in YAP signaling. PMID:25607641

  11. WW domains of the yes-kinase-associated-protein (YAP transcriptional regulator behave as independent units with different binding preferences for PPxY motif-containing ligands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Iglesias-Bexiga

    Full Text Available YAP is a WW domain-containing effector of the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway, and the object of heightened interest as a potent oncogene and stemness factor. YAP has two major isoforms that differ in the number of WW domains they harbor. Elucidating the degree of co-operation between these WW domains is important for a full understanding of the molecular function of YAP. We present here a detailed biophysical study of the structural stability and binding properties of the two YAP WW domains aimed at investigating the relationship between both domains in terms of structural stability and partner recognition. We have carried out a calorimetric study of the structural stability of the two YAP WW domains, both isolated and in a tandem configuration, and their interaction with a set of functionally relevant ligands derived from PTCH1 and LATS kinases. We find that the two YAP WW domains behave as independent units with different binding preferences, suggesting that the presence of the second WW domain might contribute to modulate target recognition between the two YAP isoforms. Analysis of structural models and phage-display studies indicate that electrostatic interactions play a critical role in binding specificity. Together, these results are relevant to understand of YAP function and open the door to the design of highly specific ligands of interest to delineate the functional role of each WW domain in YAP signaling.

  12. Death-domain associated protein-6 (DAXX) mediated apoptosis in hantavirus infection is counter-balanced by activation of interferon-stimulated nuclear transcription factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hantaviruses are negative strand RNA species that replicate predominantly in the cytoplasm. They also activate numerous cellular responses, but their involvement in nuclear processes is yet to be established. Using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), this study investigates the molecular finger-print of nuclear transcription factors during hantavirus infection. The viral-replication-dependent activation of pro-myelocytic leukemia protein (PML) was followed by subsequent localization in nuclear bodies (NBs). PML was also found in close proximity to activated Sp100 nuclear antigen and interferon-stimulated gene 20 kDa protein (ISG-20), but co-localization with death-domain associated protein-6 (DAXX) was not observed. These data demonstrate that hantavirus triggers PML activation and localization in NBs in the absence of DAXX-PLM-NB co-localization. The results suggest that viral infection interferes with DAXX-mediated apoptosis, and expression of interferon-activated Sp100 and ISG-20 proteins may indicate intracellular intrinsic antiviral attempts

  13. Death-domain associated protein-6 (DAXX) mediated apoptosis in hantavirus infection is counter-balanced by activation of interferon-stimulated nuclear transcription factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khaiboullina, Svetlana F., E-mail: sv.khaiboullina@gmail.com [Whittemore Peterson Institute, University of Nevada-Reno, Reno (United States); Morzunov, Sergey P. [Department of Pathology and Nevada State Health Laboratory, University of Nevada-Reno, Reno (United States); Boichuk, Sergei V. [Kazan State Medical University, Kazan (Russian Federation); Palotás, András [Asklepios-Med (private medical practice and research center), Szeged (Hungary); Jeor, Stephen St. [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Nevada-Reno, Reno (United States); Lombardi, Vincent C. [Whittemore Peterson Institute, University of Nevada-Reno, Reno (United States); Rizvanov, Albert A. [Department of Genetics, Kazan (Volga Region) Federal University, Kazan (Russian Federation)

    2013-09-01

    Hantaviruses are negative strand RNA species that replicate predominantly in the cytoplasm. They also activate numerous cellular responses, but their involvement in nuclear processes is yet to be established. Using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), this study investigates the molecular finger-print of nuclear transcription factors during hantavirus infection. The viral-replication-dependent activation of pro-myelocytic leukemia protein (PML) was followed by subsequent localization in nuclear bodies (NBs). PML was also found in close proximity to activated Sp100 nuclear antigen and interferon-stimulated gene 20 kDa protein (ISG-20), but co-localization with death-domain associated protein-6 (DAXX) was not observed. These data demonstrate that hantavirus triggers PML activation and localization in NBs in the absence of DAXX-PLM-NB co-localization. The results suggest that viral infection interferes with DAXX-mediated apoptosis, and expression of interferon-activated Sp100 and ISG-20 proteins may indicate intracellular intrinsic antiviral attempts.

  14. Electrostatics analysis of the mutational and pH effects of the N-terminal domain self-association of the major ampullate spidroin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barroso da Silva, Fernando Luís; Pasquali, Samuela; Derreumaux, Philippe; Dias, Luis Gustavo

    2016-07-01

    Spider silk is a fascinating material combining mechanical properties such as maximum strength and high toughness comparable or better than man-made materials, with biocompatible degradability characteristics. Experimental measurements have shown that pH triggers the dimer formation of the N-terminal domain (NTD) of the major ampullate spidroin 1 (MaSp 1). A coarse-grained model accounting for electrostatics, van der Waals and pH-dependent charge-fluctuation interactions, by means of Monte Carlo simulations, gave us a more comprehensive view of the NTD dimerization process. A detailed analysis of the electrostatic properties and free energy derivatives for the NTD homoassociation was carried out at different pH values and salt concentrations for the protein wild type and for several mutants. We observed an enhancement of dipole-dipole interactions at pH 6 due to the ionization of key amino acids, a process identified as the main driving force for dimerization. Analytical estimates based on the DVLO theory framework corroborate our findings. Molecular dynamics simulations using the OPEP coarse-grained force field for proteins show that the mutant E17Q is subject to larger structural fluctuations when compared to the wild type. Estimates of the association rate constants for this mutant were evaluated by the Debye-Smoluchowski theory and are in agreement with the experimental data when thermally relaxed structures are used instead of the crystallographic data. Our results can contribute to the design of new mutants with specific association properties. PMID:27250106

  15. Glycosylation and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glick Mary Catherine

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR has been known for the past 11 years to be a membrane glycoprotein with chloride channel activity. Only recently has the glycosylation of CFTR been examined in detail, by O'Riordan et al in Glycobiology. Using cells that overexpress wild-type (wtCFTR, the presence of polylactosamine was noted on the fully glycosylated form of CFTR. In the present commentary the results of that work are discussed in relation to the glycosylation phenotype of cystic fibrosis (CF, and the cellular localization and processing of ΔF508 CFTR. The significance of the glycosylation will be known when endogenous CFTR from primary human tissue is examined.

  16. TMC and EVER genes belong to a larger novel family, the TMC gene family encoding transmembrane proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutai Hideki

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations in the transmembrane cochlear expressed gene 1 (TMC1 cause deafness in human and mouse. Mutations in two homologous genes, EVER1 and EVER2 increase the susceptibility to infection with certain human papillomaviruses resulting in high risk of skin carcinoma. Here we report that TMC1, EVER1 and EVER2 (now TMC6 and TMC8 belong to a larger novel gene family, which is named TMC for trans membrane channel-like gene family. Results Using a combination of iterative database searches and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR experiments we assembled contigs for cDNA encoding human, murine, puffer fish, and invertebrate TMC proteins. TMC proteins of individual species can be grouped into three subfamilies A, B, and C. Vertebrates have eight TMC genes. The majority of murine TMC transcripts are expressed in most organs; some transcripts, however, in particular the three subfamily A members are rare and more restrictively expressed. Conclusion The eight vertebrate TMC genes are evolutionary conserved and encode proteins that form three subfamilies. Invertebrate TMC proteins can also be categorized into these three subfamilies. All TMC genes encode transmembrane proteins with intracellular amino- and carboxyl-termini and at least eight membrane-spanning domains. We speculate that the TMC proteins constitute a novel group of ion channels, transporters, or modifiers of such.

  17. Domain crossing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schraefel, M. C.; Rouncefield, Mark; Kellogg, Wendy; Ackerman, Mark; Marsden, Gary; Bødker, Susanne; Wyche, Susan; Reddy, Madhu

    In CSCW, how much do we need to know about another domain/culture before we observe, intersect and intervene with designs. What optimally would that other culture need to know about us? Is this a “how long is a piece of string” question, or an inquiry where we can consider a variety of contexts a...

  18. Reengineering a transmembrane protein to treat muscular dystrophy using exon skipping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Quan Q; Wyatt, Eugene; Goldstein, Jeff A; LoPresti, Peter; Castillo, Lisa M; Gazda, Alec; Petrossian, Natalie; Earley, Judy U; Hadhazy, Michele; Barefield, David Y; Demonbreun, Alexis R; Bönnemann, Carsten; Wolf, Matthew; McNally, Elizabeth M

    2015-11-01

    Exon skipping uses antisense oligonucleotides as a treatment for genetic diseases. The antisense oligonucleotides used for exon skipping are designed to bypass premature stop codons in the target RNA and restore reading frame disruption. Exon skipping is currently being tested in humans with dystrophin gene mutations who have Duchenne muscular dystrophy. For Duchenne muscular dystrophy, the rationale for exon skipping derived from observations in patients with naturally occurring dystrophin gene mutations that generated internally deleted but partially functional dystrophin proteins. We have now expanded the potential for exon skipping by testing whether an internal, in-frame truncation of a transmembrane protein γ-sarcoglycan is functional. We generated an internally truncated γ-sarcoglycan protein that we have termed Mini-Gamma by deleting a large portion of the extracellular domain. Mini-Gamma provided functional and pathological benefits to correct the loss of γ-sarcoglycan in a Drosophila model, in heterologous cell expression studies, and in transgenic mice lacking γ-sarcoglycan. We generated a cellular model of human muscle disease and showed that multiple exon skipping could be induced in RNA that encodes a mutant human γ-sarcoglycan. Since Mini-Gamma represents removal of 4 of the 7 coding exons in γ-sarcoglycan, this approach provides a viable strategy to treat the majority of patients with γ-sarcoglycan gene mutations. PMID:26457733

  19. How Phosphorylation and ATPase Activity Regulate Anion Flux though the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwick, Matthias; Esposito, Cinzia; Hellstern, Manuel; Seelig, Anna

    2016-07-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR, ABCC7), mutations of which cause cystic fibrosis, belongs to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter family and works as a channel for small anions, such as chloride and bicarbonate. Anion channel activity is known to depend on phosphorylation by cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) and CFTR-ATPase activity. Whereas anion channel activity has been extensively investigated, phosphorylation and CFTR-ATPase activity are still poorly understood. Here, we show that the two processes can be measured in a label-free and non-invasive manner in real time in live cells, stably transfected with CFTR. This study reveals three key findings. (i) The major contribution (≥90%) to the total CFTR-related ATP hydrolysis rate is due to phosphorylation by PKA and the minor contribution (≤10%) to CFTR-ATPase activity. (ii) The mutant CFTR-E1371S that is still conductive, but defective in ATP hydrolysis, is not phosphorylated, suggesting that phosphorylation requires a functional nucleotide binding domain and occurs in the post-hydrolysis transition state. (iii) CFTR-ATPase activity is inversely related to CFTR anion flux. The present data are consistent with a model in which CFTR is in a closed conformation with two ATPs bound. The open conformation is induced by ATP hydrolysis and corresponds to the post-hydrolysis transition state that is stabilized by phosphorylation and binding of chloride channel potentiators. PMID:27226582

  20. Photometric recording of transmembrane potential in outer hair cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Takashi; Oghalai, John S.; Saggau, Peter; Rabbitt, Richard D.; Brownell, William E.

    2006-06-01

    Cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs) are polarized epithelial cells that have mechanoelectrical transduction channels within their apical stereocilia and produce electromotile force along their lateral wall. Phase shifts, or time delays, in the transmembrane voltage occurring at different axial locations along the cell may contribute to our understanding of how these cells operate at auditory frequencies. We developed a method to optically measure the phase of the OHC transmembrane potential using the voltage-sensitive dye (VSD) di-8-ANEPPS. The exit aperture of a fibre-optic light source was driven in two dimensions so that a 24 µm spot of excitation light could be positioned along the length of the OHC. We used the whole-cell patch-clamp technique in the current-clamp mode to stimulate the OHC at the base. The photometric response and the voltage response were monitored with a photodetector and patch-clamp amplifier, respectively. The photometric response was used to measure the regional changes in the membrane potential in response to maintained (dc) and sinusoidal (ac) current stimuli applied at the base of the cell. We used a neutral density filter to lower the excitation light intensity and reduce phototoxicity. A sensitive detector and lock-in amplifier were used to measure the small ac VSD signal. This permitted measurements of the ac photometric response below the noise floor of the static fluorescence. The amplitude and phase components of the photometric response were recorded for stimuli up to 800 Hz. VSD data at 400-800 Hz show the presence of a small phase delay between the stimulus voltage at the base of the cell and the local membrane potential measured along the lateral wall. Results are consistent with the hypothesis that OHCs exhibit inhomogeneous membrane potentials that vary with position in analogy with the voltage in nerve axons.

  1. Synergistic transmembrane alignment of the antimicrobial heterodimer PGLa/magainin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremouilhac, Pierre; Strandberg, Erik; Wadhwani, Parvesh; Ulrich, Anne S

    2006-10-27

    The antimicrobial activity of amphipathic alpha-helical peptides is usually attributed to the formation of pores in bacterial membranes, but direct structural information about such a membrane-bound state is sparse. Solid state (2)H-NMR has previously shown that the antimicrobial peptide PGLa undergoes a concentration-dependent realignment from a surface-bound S-state to a tilted T-state. The corresponding change in helix tilt angle from 98 to 125 degrees was interpreted as the formation of PGLa/magainin heterodimers residing on the bilayer surface. Under no conditions so far, has an upright membrane-inserted I-state been observed in which a transmembrane helix alignment would be expected. Here, we have demonstrated that PGLa is able to assume such an I-state in a 1:1 mixture with magainin 2 at a peptide-to-lipid ratio as low as 1:100 in dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine/dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol model membranes. This (2)H-NMR analysis is based on seven orientational constraints from Ala-3,3,3-d(3) substituted in a non-perturbing manner for four native Ala residues as well as two Ile and one Gly. The observed helix tilt of 158 degrees is rationalized by the formation of heterodimers. This structurally synergistic effect between the two related peptides from the skin of Xenopus laevis correlates very well with their known functional synergistic mode of action. To our knowledge, this example of PGLa is the first case where an alpha-helical antimicrobial peptide is directly shown to assume a transmembrane state that is compatible with the postulated toroidal wormhole pore structure. PMID:16877761

  2. Transmembrane protein topology prediction using support vector machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nugent Timothy

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alpha-helical transmembrane (TM proteins are involved in a wide range of important biological processes such as cell signaling, transport of membrane-impermeable molecules, cell-cell communication, cell recognition and cell adhesion. Many are also prime drug targets, and it has been estimated that more than half of all drugs currently on the market target membrane proteins. However, due to the experimental difficulties involved in obtaining high quality crystals, this class of protein is severely under-represented in structural databases. In the absence of structural data, sequence-based prediction methods allow TM protein topology to be investigated. Results We present a support vector machine-based (SVM TM protein topology predictor that integrates both signal peptide and re-entrant helix prediction, benchmarked with full cross-validation on a novel data set of 131 sequences with known crystal structures. The method achieves topology prediction accuracy of 89%, while signal peptides and re-entrant helices are predicted with 93% and 44% accuracy respectively. An additional SVM trained to discriminate between globular and TM proteins detected zero false positives, with a low false negative rate of 0.4%. We present the results of applying these tools to a number of complete genomes. Source code, data sets and a web server are freely available from http://bioinf.cs.ucl.ac.uk/psipred/. Conclusion The high accuracy of TM topology prediction which includes detection of both signal peptides and re-entrant helices, combined with the ability to effectively discriminate between TM and globular proteins, make this method ideally suited to whole genome annotation of alpha-helical transmembrane proteins.

  3. Conservation of the Human Integrin-Type Beta-Propeller Domain in Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouhan, Bhanupratap; Denesyuk, Alexander; Heino, Jyrki; Johnson, Mark S.; Denessiouk, Konstantin

    2011-01-01

    Integrins are heterodimeric cell-surface receptors with key functions in cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion. Integrin α and β subunits are present throughout the metazoans, but it is unclear whether the subunits predate the origin of multicellular organisms. Several component domains have been detected in bacteria, one of which, a specific 7-bladed β-propeller domain, is a unique feature of the integrin α subunits. Here, we describe a structure-derived motif, which incorporates key features of each blade from the X-ray structures of human αIIbβ3 and αVβ3, includes elements of the FG-GAP/Cage and Ca2+-binding motifs, and is specific only for the metazoan integrin domains. Separately, we searched for the metazoan integrin type β-propeller domains among all available sequences from bacteria and unicellular eukaryotic organisms, which must incorporate seven repeats, corresponding to the seven blades of the β-propeller domain, and so that the newly found structure-derived motif would exist in every repeat. As the result, among 47 available genomes of unicellular eukaryotes we could not find a single instance of seven repeats with the motif. Several sequences contained three repeats, a predicted transmembrane segment, and a short cytoplasmic motif associated with some integrins, but otherwise differ from the metazoan integrin α subunits. Among the available bacterial sequences, we found five examples containing seven sequential metazoan integrin-specific motifs within the seven repeats. The motifs differ in having one Ca2+-binding site per repeat, whereas metazoan integrins have three or four sites. The bacterial sequences are more conserved in terms of motif conservation and loop length, suggesting that the structure is more regular and compact than those example structures from human integrins. Although the bacterial examples are not full-length integrins, the full-length metazoan-type 7-bladed β-propeller domains are present, and sometimes two tandem

  4. Conservation of the human integrin-type beta-propeller domain in bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhanupratap Chouhan

    Full Text Available Integrins are heterodimeric cell-surface receptors with key functions in cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion. Integrin α and β subunits are present throughout the metazoans, but it is unclear whether the subunits predate the origin of multicellular organisms. Several component domains have been detected in bacteria, one of which, a specific 7-bladed β-propeller domain, is a unique feature of the integrin α subunits. Here, we describe a structure-derived motif, which incorporates key features of each blade from the X-ray structures of human αIIbβ3 and αVβ3, includes elements of the FG-GAP/Cage and Ca(2+-binding motifs, and is specific only for the metazoan integrin domains. Separately, we searched for the metazoan integrin type β-propeller domains among all available sequences from bacteria and unicellular eukaryotic organisms, which must incorporate seven repeats, corresponding to the seven blades of the β-propeller domain, and so that the newly found structure-derived motif would exist in every repeat. As the result, among 47 available genomes of unicellular eukaryotes we could not find a single instance of seven repeats with the motif. Several sequences contained three repeats, a predicted transmembrane segment, and a short cytoplasmic motif associated with some integrins, but otherwise differ from the metazoan integrin α subunits. Among the available bacterial sequences, we found five examples containing seven sequential metazoan integrin-specific motifs within the seven repeats. The motifs differ in having one Ca(2+-binding site per repeat, whereas metazoan integrins have three or four sites. The bacterial sequences are more conserved in terms of motif conservation and loop length, suggesting that the structure is more regular and compact than those example structures from human integrins. Although the bacterial examples are not full-length integrins, the full-length metazoan-type 7-bladed β-propeller domains are present, and

  5. 调控黑色素瘤转移的新信号蛋白: Syntenin%Syntenin: a novel PDZ domain-containing scaffolding protein associated with human melanoma metastasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-bo Yang; James B. McCarthy

    2007-01-01

    Syntenin蛋白在多种肿瘤中表达增强,最近被认为是一个新的黑色素瘤转移调节因子.作为一类支架信号蛋白,Syntenin通过它的两个PDZ 功能基团可与许多细胞膜受体胞内末端或细胞内的信号分子结合,调控多种重要的细胞生理过程和信号传导途径,包括细胞膜受体的聚集,细胞内蛋白质的转运,细胞骨架的重建,转录因子的激活,以增强肿瘤细胞的生长、黏附以及肿瘤的血管生成、侵袭和转移能力.本文简要综述了syntenin的结构和功能,相关的信号途径,及其在黑色素瘤研究领域的最新进展.%Syntenin is overexpressed in multiple human cancers and is newly recognized as a novel regulator in melanoma metastasis. It functions as a scaffolding protein, via its two PDZ domains interacting with multiple transmembrane and cytoplasmic partners to regulate many of the major signaling pathways involved in various cellular processes, such as cell surface receptor clustering, protein trafficking, cytoskeleton remodeling, and activation of transcription factor, and results in the increased abilities for tumor cell growth, adhesion, angiogenesis, invasion and metastasis. The present article attempts to review the structure and functions of syntenin by summarizing our current knowledge on the interacting partners and diverse signaling pathways related to syntenin, and highlight the importance of syntenin as a new potential therapeutic target for the aggressive human melanoma.

  6. THE COMBINATION PREDICTION OF TRANSMEMBRANE REGIONS BASED ON DEMPSTER-SHAFER THEORY OF EVIDENCE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deng Xinyang; Xu Peida; Deng Yong

    2012-01-01

    Transmembrane proteins are some special and important proteins in cells.Because of their importance and specificity,the prediction of the transmembrane regions has very important theoretical and practical significance.At present,the prediction methods are mainly based on the physicochemical property and statistic analysis of amino acids.However,these methods are suitable for some environments but inapplicable for other environments.In this paper,the multi-sources information fusion theory has been introduced to predict the transmembrane regions.The proposed method is test on a data set of transmembrane proteins.The results show that the proposed method has the ability of predicting the transmembrane regions as a good performance and powerful tool.

  7. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator is an Epithelial Cell Receptor for Clearance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from the Lung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pier, Gerald B.; Grout, Martha; Zaidi, Tanweer S.

    1997-10-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a chloride ion channel, but its relationship to the primary clinical manifestation of CF, chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa pulmonary infection, is unclear. We report that CFTR is a cellular receptor for binding, endocytosing, and clearing P. aeruginosa from the normal lung. Murine cells expressing recombinant human wild-type CFTR ingested 30-100 times as many P. aeruginosa as cells lacking CFTR or expressing mutant Δ F508 CFTR protein. Purified CFTR inhibited ingestion of P. aeruginosa by human airway epithelial cells. The first extracellular domain of CFTR specifically bound to P. aeruginosa and a synthetic peptide of this region inhibited P. aeruginosa internalization in vivo, leading to increased bacterial lung burdens. CFTR clears P. aeruginosa from the lung, indicating a direct connection between mutations in CFTR and the clinical consequences of CF.

  8. "Affective contingencies in the affiliative domain: Physiological assessment, associations with the affiliation motive, and prediction of behavior": Correction to Dufner et al. (2015).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Reports an error in "Affective contingencies in the affiliative domain: Physiological assessment, associations with the affiliation motive, and prediction of behavior" by Michael Dufner, Ruben C. Arslan, Birk Hagemeyer, Felix D. Schönbrodt and Jaap J. A. Denissen (Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 2015[Oct], Vol 109[4], 662-676). In this article an erroneous statement was made regarding the high cutoff filter for the EMG raw signal. The high cutoff filter reported in Appendix B in the Technical Details of the EMG Recording Procedure section should be 300 Hz. (The following abstract of the original article appeared in record 2015-37761-001.) According to classical motive disposition theory, individuals differ in their propensity to derive pleasure from affiliative experiences. This propensity is considered a core process underlying the affiliation motive and a pervasive cause of motivated behavior. In this study, we tested these assumptions. We presented participants with positive affiliative stimuli and used electromyography to record changes in facial muscular activity that are indicative of subtle smiling. We were thus able to physiologically measure positive affect following affiliative cues. Individual differences in these affective contingencies were internally consistent and temporally stable. They converged with affiliation motive self- and informant reports and picture story exercise scores, indicating that they are partly accessible to the self, observable to outsiders, and overlap with implicit systems. Finally, they predicted affiliative behavior in terms of situation selection and modification across a wide variety of contexts (i.e., in daily life, the laboratory, and an online social network). These findings corroborate the long-held assumption that affective contingencies represent a motivational core aspect of affiliation. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27281355

  9. A human monoclonal autoantibody to breast cancer identifies the PDZ domain containing protein GIPC1 as a novel breast cancer-associated antigen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have been studying the native autoimmune response to cancer through the isolation of human monoclonal antibodies that are cancer specific from cancer patients. To facilitate this work we previously developed a fusion partner cell line for human lymphocytes, MFP-2, that fuses efficiently with both human lymph node lymphocytes and peripheral blood lymphocytes. Using this unique trioma fusion partner cell line we isolated a panel of autologous human monoclonal antibodies, from both peripheral blood and lymph node lymphocytes, which are representative of the native repertoire of anti-cancer specific antibodies from breast cancer patients. The current study employs immunocytochemistry, immunohistochemistry, Western blot analysis as well as Northern blots, Scatchard binding studies and finally SEREX analysis for target antigen identification. By application of an expression cloning technique known as SEREX, we determined that the target antigen for two monoclonal antibodies, 27.B1 and 27.F7, derived from lymph node B-cells of a breast cancer patient, is the PDZ domain-containing protein known as GIPC1. This protein is highly expressed not only in cultured human breast cancer cells, but also in primary and metastatic tumor tissues and its overexpression appears to be cancer cell specific. Confocal microscopy revealed cell membrane and cytoplasmic localization of the target protein, which is consistent with previous studies of this protein. We have determined that GIPC1 is a novel breast cancer-associated immunogenic antigen that is overexpressed in breast cancer. Its role, however, in the initiation and/or progression of breast cancer remains unclear and needs further clarification

  10. Exosome-related multi-pass transmembrane protein TSAP6 is a target of rhomboid protease RHBDD1-induced proteolysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunhua Wan

    Full Text Available We have previously reported that rhomboid domain containing 1 (RHBDD1, a mammalian rhomboid protease highly expressed in the testis, can cleave the Bcl-2 protein Bik. In this study, we identified a multi-pass transmembrane protein, tumor suppressor activated pathway-6 (TSAP6 as a potential substrate of RHBDD1. RHBDD1 was found to induce the proteolysis of TSAP6 in a dose- and activity-dependent manner. The cleavage of TSAP6 was not restricted to its glycosylated form and occurred in three different regions. In addition, mass spectrometry and mutagenesis analyses both indicated that the major cleavage site laid in the C-terminal of the third transmembrane domain of TSAP6. A somatic cell knock-in approach was used to genetically inactivate the endogenous RHBDD1 in HCT116 and RKO colon cancer cells. Exosome secretion was significantly elevated when RHBDD1 was inactivated in the two cells lines. The increased exosome secretion was verfied through the detection of certain exosomal components, including Tsg101, Tf-R, FasL and Trail. In addition, the elevation of exosome secretion by RHBDD1 inactivation was reduced when TSAP6 was knocked down, indicating that the role of RHBDD1 in regulating exosomal trafficking is very likely to be TSAP6-dependent. We found that the increase in FasL and Trail increased exosome-induced apoptosis in Jurkat cells. Taken together, our findings suggest that RHBDD1 is involved in the regulation of a nonclassical exosomal secretion pathway through the restriction of TSAP6.

  11. Structures of a minimal human CFTR first nucleotide-binding domain as a monomer, head-to-tail homodimer, and pathogenic mutant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atwell, Shane; Brouillette, Christie G.; Conners, Kris; Emtage, Spencer; Gheyi, Tarun; Guggino, William B.; Hendle, Jorg; Hunt, John F.; Lewis, Hal A.; Lu, Frances; Protasevich, Irina I.; Rodgers, Logan A.; Romero, Rich; Wasserman, Stephen R.; Weber, Patricia C.; Wetmore, Diana; Zhang, Feiyu F.; Zhao, Xun (Cystic); (UAB); (JHU); (Columbia); (Lilly)

    2010-04-26

    Upon removal of the regulatory insert (RI), the first nucleotide binding domain (NBD1) of human cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) can be heterologously expressed and purified in a form that remains stable without solubilizing mutations, stabilizing agents or the regulatory extension (RE). This protein, NBD1 387-646({Delta}405-436), crystallizes as a homodimer with a head-to-tail association equivalent to the active conformation observed for NBDs from symmetric ATP transporters. The 1.7-{angstrom} resolution X-ray structure shows how ATP occupies the signature LSGGQ half-site in CFTR NBD1. The {Delta}F508 version of this protein also crystallizes as a homodimer and differs from the wild-type structure only in the vicinity of the disease-causing F508 deletion. A slightly longer construct crystallizes as a monomer. Comparisons of the homodimer structure with this and previously published monomeric structures show that the main effect of ATP binding at the signature site is to order the residues immediately preceding the signature sequence, residues 542-547, in a conformation compatible with nucleotide binding. These residues likely interact with a transmembrane domain intracellular loop in the full-length CFTR channel. The experiments described here show that removing the RI from NBD1 converts it into a well-behaved protein amenable to biophysical studies yielding deeper insights into CFTR function.

  12. Control of Transmembrane Protein Diffusion within the Postsynaptic Density Assessed by Simultaneous Single-Molecule Tracking and Localization Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tuo P; Blanpied, Thomas A

    2016-01-01

    Postsynaptic transmembrane proteins are critical elements of synapses, mediating trans-cellular contact, sensitivity to neurotransmitters and other signaling molecules, and flux of Ca and other ions. Positioning and mobility of each member of this large class of proteins is critical to their individual function at the synapse. One critical example is that the position of glutamate receptors within the postsynaptic density (PSD) strongly modulates their function by aligning or misaligning them with sites of presynaptic vesicle fusion. In addition, the regulated ability of receptors to move in or out of the synapse is critical for activity-dependent plasticity. However, factors that control receptor mobility within the boundaries of the synapse are not well understood. Notably, PSD scaffold molecules accumulate in domains much smaller than the synapse. Within these nanodomains, the density of proteins is considerably higher than that of the synapse as a whole, so high that steric hindrance is expected to reduce receptor mobility substantially. However, while numerical modeling has demonstrated several features of how the varying protein density across the face of a single PSD may modulate receptor motion, there is little experimental information about the extent of this influence. To address this critical aspect of synaptic organizational dynamics, we performed single-molecule tracking of transmembrane proteins using universal point accumulation-for-imaging-in-nanoscale-topography (uPAINT) over PSDs whose internal structure was simultaneously resolved using photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM). The results provide important experimental confirmation that PSD scaffold protein density strongly influences the mobility of transmembrane proteins. A protein with a cytosolic domain that does not bind PSD-95 was still slowed in regions of high PSD-95 density, suggesting that crowding by scaffold molecules and perhaps other proteins is sufficient to stabilize

  13. Control of Transmembrane Protein Diffusion within the Postsynaptic Density Assessed by Simultaneous Single-Molecule Tracking and Localization Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tuo P.; Blanpied, Thomas A.

    2016-01-01

    Postsynaptic transmembrane proteins are critical elements of synapses, mediating trans-cellular contact, sensitivity to neurotransmitters and other signaling molecules, and flux of Ca and other ions. Positioning and mobility of each member of this large class of proteins is critical to their individual function at the synapse. One critical example is that the position of glutamate receptors within the postsynaptic density (PSD) strongly modulates their function by aligning or misaligning them with sites of presynaptic vesicle fusion. In addition, the regulated ability of receptors to move in or out of the synapse is critical for activity-dependent plasticity. However, factors that control receptor mobility within the boundaries of the synapse are not well understood. Notably, PSD scaffold molecules accumulate in domains much smaller than the synapse. Within these nanodomains, the density of proteins is considerably higher than that of the synapse as a whole, so high that steric hindrance is expected to reduce receptor mobility substantially. However, while numerical modeling has demonstrated several features of how the varying protein density across the face of a single PSD may modulate receptor motion, there is little experimental information about the extent of this influence. To address this critical aspect of synaptic organizational dynamics, we performed single-molecule tracking of transmembrane proteins using universal point accumulation-for-imaging-in-nanoscale-topography (uPAINT) over PSDs whose internal structure was simultaneously resolved using photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM). The results provide important experimental confirmation that PSD scaffold protein density strongly influences the mobility of transmembrane proteins. A protein with a cytosolic domain that does not bind PSD-95 was still slowed in regions of high PSD-95 density, suggesting that crowding by scaffold molecules and perhaps other proteins is sufficient to stabilize

  14. Effects of Transmembrane α-Helix Length and Concentration on Phase Behavior in Four-Component Lipid Mixtures: A Molecular Dynamics Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, David G; Feigenson, Gerald W

    2016-05-01

    We used coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations to examine the effects of transmembrane α-helical WALP peptides on the behavior of four-component lipid mixtures. These mixtures contain a high-melting temperature (high-Tm) lipid, a nanodomain-inducing low-Tm lipid, a macrodomain-inducing low-Tm lipid and cholesterol to model the outer leaflet of cell plasma membranes. In a series of simulations, we incrementally replace the nanodomain-inducing low-Tm lipid by the macrodomain-inducing low-Tm lipid and measure how lipid and phase properties are altered by the addition of WALPs of different length. Regardless of the ratio of the two low-Tm lipids, shorter WALPs increase domain size and all WALPs increase domain alignment between the two leaflets. These effects are smallest for the longest WALP tested, and increase with increasing WALP concentration. Thus, our simulations explain the experimental observation that WALPs induce macroscopic domains in otherwise nanodomain-forming lipid-only mixtures (unpublished). Since the cell plasma membrane contains a large fraction of transmembrane proteins, these findings link the behavior of lipid-only model membranes in vitro to phase behavior in vivo. PMID:27081858

  15. Structural basis of Smoothened regulation by its extracellular domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Eamon F. X.; Sircar, Ria; Miller, Paul S.; Hedger, George; Luchetti, Giovanni; Nachtergaele, Sigrid; Tully, Mark D.; Mydock-McGrane, Laurel; Covey, Douglas F.; Rambo, Robert P.; Sansom, Mark S. P.; Newstead, Simon; Rohatgi, Rajat; Siebold, Christian

    2016-07-01

    Developmental signals of the Hedgehog (Hh) and Wnt families are transduced across the membrane by Frizzled-class G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) composed of both a heptahelical transmembrane domain (TMD) and an extracellular cysteine-rich domain (CRD). How the large extracellular domains of GPCRs regulate signalling by the TMD is unknown. We present crystal structures of the Hh signal transducer and oncoprotein Smoothened, a GPCR that contains two distinct ligand-binding sites: one in its TMD and one in the CRD. The CRD is stacked atop the TMD, separated by an intervening wedge-like linker domain. Structure-guided mutations show that the interface between the CRD, linker domain and TMD stabilizes the inactive state of Smoothened. Unexpectedly, we find a cholesterol molecule bound to Smoothened in the CRD binding site. Mutations predicted to prevent cholesterol binding impair the ability of Smoothened to transmit native Hh signals. Binding of a clinically used antagonist, vismodegib, to the TMD induces a conformational change that is propagated to the CRD, resulting in loss of cholesterol from the CRD–linker domain–TMD interface. Our results clarify the structural mechanism by which the activity of a GPCR is controlled by ligand-regulated interactions between its extracellular and transmembrane domains.

  16. [Preparation of Transmembrane Fragments Growth Hormone Receptor GHR in a Cell-Free Expression System for Structural Studies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocharova, O V; Kuzmichev, P K; Urban, A S; Goncharuk, S A; Bocharov, E V; Arsenyev, A S

    2015-01-01

    Growth hormone somatotropin and its membrane receptor GHR, belonging to a superfamily of the type I receptors possessing tyrosine kinase activity, are involved in the intercellular signal transduction cascade and regulate a number of important physiological and pathological processes in humans. Binding with somatotropin triggers a transition of GHR between two alternative dimer states, resulting in an allosteric activation of JAK2 tyrosine kinase in the cell cytoplasm. Transmembrane domain of GHR directly involved in this complex conformational transition. It has presumably two dimerization interfaces corresponding to the "unliganded" and the active state of GHR. In order to study the molecular basis of biochemical signal transduction mechanism across the cell membrane, we have developed an efficient cell-free production system of a TM fragment of GHR, which contains its TM domain flanked by functionally important juxtamembrane regions (GHRtm residues 254-298). The developed system allows to obtain -1 mg per 1 ml of reaction mixture of 13C- and 15N-isotope-labeled protein for structural and dynamic studies of the GHR TM domain dimerization in the membrane-mimicking medium by high-resolution heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy. PMID:27125024

  17. Confined diffusion of transmembrane proteins and lipids induced by the same actin meshwork lining the plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Takahiro K; Iwasawa, Kokoro; Kalay, Ziya; Tsunoyama, Taka A; Watanabe, Yusuke; Umemura, Yasuhiro M; Murakoshi, Hideji; Suzuki, Kenichi G N; Nemoto, Yuri L; Morone, Nobuhiro; Kusumi, Akihiro

    2016-04-01

    The mechanisms by which the diffusion rate in the plasma membrane (PM) is regulated remain unresolved, despite their importance in spatially regulating the reaction rates in the PM. Proposed models include entrapment in nanoscale noncontiguous domains found in PtK2 cells, slow diffusion due to crowding, and actin-induced compartmentalization. Here, by applying single-particle tracking at high time resolutions, mainly to the PtK2-cell PM, we found confined diffusion plus hop movements (termed "hop diffusion") for both a nonraft phospholipid and a transmembrane protein, transferrin receptor, and equal compartment sizes for these two molecules in all five of the cell lines used here (actual sizes were cell dependent), even after treatment with actin-modulating drugs. The cross-section size and the cytoplasmic domain size both affected the hop frequency. Electron tomography identified the actin-based membrane skeleton (MSK) located within 8.8 nm from the PM cytoplasmic surface of PtK2 cells and demonstrated that the MSK mesh size was the same as the compartment size for PM molecular diffusion. The extracellular matrix and extracellular domains of membrane proteins were not involved in hop diffusion. These results support a model of anchored TM-protein pickets lining actin-based MSK as a major mechanism for regulating diffusion. PMID:26864625

  18. Domain Theory for Concurrency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Mikkel

    Concurrent computation can be given an abstract mathematical treatment very similar to that provided for sequential computation by domain theory and denotational semantics of Scott and Strachey. A simple domain theory for concurrency is presented. Based on a categorical model of linear logic and...... nondeterministic dataflow. The domain theory can be generalised to presheaf models, providing a more refined treatment of nondeterministic branching and supporting notions of bisimulation. The operational semantics for HOPLA is guided by the idea that derivations of transitions in the operational semantics should...... correspond to elements of the presheaf denotations. Similar guidelines lead to an operational semantics for the first-order fragment of Affine HOPLA. An extension of the operational semantics to the full language is based on a stable denotational semantics which associates to each computation the minimal...

  19. Synergistic Potentiation of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Gating by Two Chemically Distinct Potentiators, Ivacaftor (VX-770) and 5-Nitro-2-(3-Phenylpropylamino) Benzoate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wen-Ying; Sohma, Yoshiro; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang

    2016-09-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by loss-of-function mutations of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene encoding a phosphorylation-activated but ATP-gated chloride channel. Previous studies suggested that VX-770 [ivacaftor, N-(2,4-di-tert-butyl-5-hydroxyphenyl)-4-oxo-1,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxamide], a CFTR potentiator now used in clinics, increases the open probability of CFTR by shifting the gating conformational changes to favor the open channel configuration. Recently the chloride channel blocker and CFTR potentiator 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino) benzoate (NPPB) has been reported to enhance CFTR activity by a mechanism that exploits the ATP hydrolysis-driven, nonequilibrium gating mechanism unique to CFTR. Surprisingly however, NPPB increased the activity of nonhydrolytic G551D-CFTR, the third most common disease-associated mutation. Here, we further investigated the mechanism of NPPB's effects on CFTR gating by assessing its interaction with well-studied VX-770. Interestingly, once G551D-CFTR was maximally potentiated by VX-770, NPPB further increased its activity. However, quantitative analysis of this drug-drug interaction suggests that this pharmacologic synergism is not due to independent actions of NPPB and VX-770 on CFTR gating; instead, our data support a dependent mechanism involving two distinct binding sites. This latter idea is further supported by the observation that the locked-open time of a hydrolysis-deficient mutant K1250A was shortened by NPPB but prolonged by VX-770. In addition, the effectiveness of NPPB, but not of VX-770, was greatly diminished in a mutant whose second nucleotide-binding domain was completely removed. Interpreting these results under the framework of current understanding of CFTR gating not only reveals insights into the mechanism of action for different CFTR potentiators but also brings us one step forward to a more complete schematic for CFTR gating. PMID:27413118

  20. Trusted Domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Theis Solberg; Torbensen, Rune

    2012-01-01

    remote access via IP-based devices such as smartphones. The Trusted Domain platform fits existing legacy technologies by managing their interoperability and access controls, and it seeks to avoid the security issues of relying on third-party servers outside the home. It is a distributed system that......In the digital age of home automation and with the proliferation of mobile Internet access, the intelligent home and its devices should be accessible at any time from anywhere. There are many challenges such as security, privacy, ease of configuration, incompatible legacy devices, a wealth of...

  1. NMR studies of transmembrane electron transport in human erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Electron transport systems exist in the plasma membranes of all cells. These systems appear to play a role in cell growth and proliferation, intracellular signalling, hormone responses, apoptotic events, cell defence and perhaps most importantly they enable the cell to respond to changes in the redox state of both the intra- and extracellular environments. Previously, 13C NMR has been used to study transmembrane electron transport in human erythrocytes, specifically the reduction of extracellular 13C-ferricyanide. NMR is a particularly useful tool for studying such systems as changes in the metabolic state of the cell can be observed concomitantly with extracellular reductase activity. We investigated the oxidation of extracellular NADH by human erythrocytes using 1H and 31P NMR spectroscopy. Recent results for glucose-starved human erythrocytes indicate that, under these conditions, extracellular NADH can be oxidised at the plasma membrane with the electron transfer across the membrane resulting in reduction of intracellular NAD+. The activity is inhibited by known trans-plasma membrane electron transport inhibitors (capsaicin and atebrin) and is unaffected by inhibition of the erythrocyte Band 3 anion transporter. These results suggest that electron import from extracellular NADH allows the cell to re-establish a reducing environment after the normal redox balance is disturbed

  2. Expression of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator in Rat Ovary

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei JIN; Ruiling TANG

    2008-01-01

    Summary: The protein expression of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a cAMP-activated Cl- channel, in ovarian stimulated premature female rat ovary during a cycle of follicle development and corpus luteum formation was investigated. Animals were injected with 10 U pregnant Mare's serum gonadotropin (PMSG) and subsequently 10U hCG 48h later. Time-dependent immunohistochemistry and Western blotting experiments were performed before and 24, 48, 72h after hCG treatment. The immnnohistochemistry revealed that administration of PMSG stimulated the CFTR expression in theeal cell layer and granulosa cell layer of mature follicles 48 h post injection, coincident with the PMSG-induced peak in follicular estradiol. However, the expression of CFTR in the granuiose lutein cell layer and theeal lutein cell layer was time-dependently reduced following hCG injection, in accordance with the gradually increased progestogen level during luteum corpus formation. Western blotting analysis demonstrated that rat ovarian tissue expressed the special CFTR band at 170kD. It is concluded that cAMP-dependent Cl- channels are involved in regulation of follicle development and luteum formation.

  3. Transmembrane channel-like (tmc) gene regulates Drosophila larval locomotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yanmeng; Wang, Yuping; Zhang, Wei; Meltzer, Shan; Zanini, Damiano; Yu, Yue; Li, Jiefu; Cheng, Tong; Guo, Zhenhao; Wang, Qingxiu; Jacobs, Julie S; Sharma, Yashoda; Eberl, Daniel F; Göpfert, Martin C; Jan, Lily Yeh; Jan, Yuh Nung; Wang, Zuoren

    2016-06-28

    Drosophila larval locomotion, which entails rhythmic body contractions, is controlled by sensory feedback from proprioceptors. The molecular mechanisms mediating this feedback are little understood. By using genetic knock-in and immunostaining, we found that the Drosophila melanogaster transmembrane channel-like (tmc) gene is expressed in the larval class I and class II dendritic arborization (da) neurons and bipolar dendrite (bd) neurons, both of which are known to provide sensory feedback for larval locomotion. Larvae with knockdown or loss of tmc function displayed reduced crawling speeds, increased head cast frequencies, and enhanced backward locomotion. Expressing Drosophila TMC or mammalian TMC1 and/or TMC2 in the tmc-positive neurons rescued these mutant phenotypes. Bending of the larval body activated the tmc-positive neurons, and in tmc mutants this bending response was impaired. This implicates TMC's roles in Drosophila proprioception and the sensory control of larval locomotion. It also provides evidence for a functional conservation between Drosophila and mammalian TMCs. PMID:27298354

  4. Contributions of counter-charge in a potassium channel voltage-sensor domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pless, Stephan Alexander; Galpin, Jason D; Niciforovic, Ana P;

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-sensor domains couple membrane potential to conformational changes in voltage-gated ion channels and phosphatases. Highly coevolved acidic and aromatic side chains assist the transfer of cationic side chains across the transmembrane electric field during voltage sensing. We investigated the...

  5. Quantitative Analysis of the Association Angle between T-cell Receptor Vα/Vβ Domains Reveals Important Features for Epitope Recognition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Hoffmann

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available T-cell receptors (TCR play an important role in the adaptive immune system as they recognize pathogen- or cancer-based epitopes and thus initiate the cell-mediated immune response. Therefore there exists a growing interest in the optimization of TCRs for medical purposes like adoptive T-cell therapy. However, the molecular mechanisms behind T-cell signaling are still predominantly unknown. For small sets of TCRs it was observed that the angle between their Vα- and Vβ-domains, which bind the epitope, can vary and might be important for epitope recognition. Here we present a comprehensive, quantitative study of the variation in the Vα/Vβ interdomain-angle and its influence on epitope recognition, performing a systematic bioinformatics analysis based on a representative set of experimental TCR structures. For this purpose we developed a new, cuboid-based superpositioning method, which allows a unique, quantitative analysis of the Vα/Vβ-angles. Angle-based clustering led to six significantly different clusters. Analysis of these clusters revealed the unexpected result that the angle is predominantly influenced by the TCR-clonotype, whereas the bound epitope has only a minor influence. Furthermore we could identify a previously unknown center of rotation (CoR, which is shared by all TCRs. All TCR geometries can be obtained by rotation around this center, rendering it a new, common TCR feature with the potential of improving the accuracy of TCR structure prediction considerably. The importance of Vα/Vβ rotation for signaling was confirmed as we observed larger variances in the Vα/Vβ-angles in unbound TCRs compared to epitope-bound TCRs. Our results strongly support a two-step mechanism for TCR-epitope: First, preformation of a flexible TCR geometry in the unbound state and second, locking of the Vα/Vβ-angle in a TCR-type specific geometry upon epitope-MHC association, the latter being driven by rotation around the unique center of rotation.

  6. Characterization of two novel nuclear BTB/POZ domain zinc finger isoforms. Association with differentiation of hippocampal neurons, cerebellar granule cells, and macroglia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitchelmore, Cathy; Kjaerulff, Karen M; Pedersen, Hans C;

    2002-01-01

    BTB/POZ (broad complex tramtrack bric-a-brac/poxvirus and zinc finger) zinc finger factors are a class of nuclear DNA-binding proteins involved in development, chromatin remodeling, and cancer. However, BTB/POZ domain zinc finger factors linked to development of the mammalian cerebral cortex......, cerebellum, and macroglia have not been described previously. We report here the isolation and characterization of two novel nuclear BTB/POZ domain zinc finger isoforms, designated HOF(L) and HOF(S), that are specifically expressed in early hippocampal neurons, cerebellar granule cells, and gliogenic...

  7. Discovery of an essential nucleotidylating activity associated with a newly delineated conserved domain in the RNA polymerase-containing protein of all nidoviruses

    OpenAIRE

    Lehmann, Kathleen C.; Gulyaeva, Anastasia; Zevenhoven-Dobbe, Jessika C.; Janssen, George M. C.; Ruben, Mark; Overkleeft, Hermen S.; van Veelen, Peter A.; Samborskiy, Dmitry V.; Kravchenko, Alexander A.; Leontovich, Andrey M.; Sidorov, Igor A.; Snijder, Eric J.; Posthuma, Clara C.; Gorbalenya, Alexander E.

    2015-01-01

    RNA viruses encode an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) that catalyzes the synthesis of their RNA(s). In the case of positive-stranded RNA viruses belonging to the order Nidovirales, the RdRp resides in a replicase subunit that is unusually large. Bioinformatics analysis of this non-structural protein has now revealed a nidoviral signature domain (genetic marker) that is N-terminally adjacent to the RdRp and has no apparent homologs elsewhere. Based on its conservation profile, this domain ...

  8. A testis-specific gene, TPTE, encodes a putative transmembrane tyrosine phosphatase and maps to the pericentromeric region of human chromosomes 21 and 13, and to chromosomes 15, 22, and Y.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H; Rossier, C; Morris, M A; Scott, H S; Gos, A; Bairoch, A; Antonarakis, S E

    1999-11-01

    To contribute to the creation of a transcription map of human chromosome 21 (HC21) and to the identification of genes that may be involved in the pathogenesis of Down syndrome, exon trapping was performed from HC21-specific cosmids covering the entire chromosome. More than 700 exons have been identified to date. One such exon, hmc01a06, maps to YAC 831B6 which contains marker D21Z1 (alphoid repeats) and had previously been localized to the pericentromeric region of HC21. Northern-blot analysis revealed a 2.5-kb mRNA species strongly and exclusively expressed in the testis. We cloned the corresponding full-length cDNA, which encodes a predicted polypeptide of 551 amino acids with at least two potential transmembrane domains and a tyrosine phosphatase motif. The cDNA has sequence homology to chicken tensin, bovine auxilin and rat cyclin-G associated kinase (GAK). The entire polypeptide sequence also has significant homology to tumor suppressor PTEN/MMAC1 protein. We termed this novel gene/protein TPTE (transmembrane phosphatase with tensin homology). Polymerase chain reaction amplification, fluorescent in situ hybridization, Southern-blot and sequence analysis using monochromosomal somatic cell hybrids showed that this gene has highly homologous copies on HC13, 15, 22, and Y, in addition to its HC21 copy or copies. The estimated minimum number of copies of the TPTE gene in the haploid human genome is 7 in male and 6 in female. Zoo-blot analysis showed that TPTE is conserved between humans and other species. The biological function of the TPTE gene is presently unknown; however, its expression pattern, sequence homologies, and the presence of a potential tyrosine phosphatase domain suggest that it may be involved in signal transduction pathways of the endocrine or spermatogenetic function of the testis. It is also unknown whether all copies of TPTE are functional or whether some are pseudogenes. TPTE is, to our knowledge, the gene located closest to the human

  9. Transmembrane electric potential difference in the protein-pigment complex of photosystem 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamedov, M D; Kurashov, V N; Petrova, I O; Semenov, A Yu

    2012-09-01

    The protein-pigment complex of photosystem 2 (PS2) localized in the thylakoid membranes of higher plants, algae, and cyanobacteria is the main source of oxygen on Earth. The light-induced functioning of PS2 is directly linked to electron and proton transfer across the membrane, which results in the formation of transmembrane electric potential difference (ΔΨ). The major contribution to ΔΨ of the PS2 reaction center is due to charge separation between the primary chlorophyll donor P(680) and the quinone acceptor Q(A), accompanied by re-reduction of P(680)(+) by the redox-active tyrosine residue Y(Z). The processes associated with the uptake and release of protons on the acceptor and donor sides of the enzyme, respectively, are also coupled with ΔΨ generation. The objective of this work was to describe the mechanisms of ΔΨ generation associated with the S-state transitions of the water-oxidizing complex in intact PS2 complex and in PS2 preparation depleted of Mn(4)Ca cluster in the presence of artificial electron donors. The findings elucidate the mechanisms of electrogenic reactions on the PS2 donor side and may be a basis for development of an effective solar energy conversion system. PMID:23157254

  10. Toll-Like Receptor 4 (TLR4) of Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells Participates in Transmembrane Signaling in Response to Photoreceptor Outer Segments

    OpenAIRE

    Kindzelskii, Andrei L.; Elner, Victor M.; Elner, Susan G.; Yang, Dongli; Hughes, Bret A.; Petty, Howard R.

    2004-01-01

    Retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells mediate the recognition and clearance of effete photoreceptor outer segments (POS), a process central to the maintenance of normal vision. Given the emerging importance of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in transmembrane signaling in response to invading pathogens as well as endogenous substances, we hypothesized that TLRs are associated with RPE cell management of POS. TLR4 clusters on human RPE cells in response to human, but not bovine, POS. However, TLR4 ...

  11. Chemical synthesis of transmembrane peptide and its application for research on the transmembrane-juxtamembrane region of membrane protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Takeshi

    2016-11-01

    Membrane proteins possess one or more hydrophobic regions that span the membrane and interact with the lipids that constitute the membrane. The interactions between the transmembrane (TM) region and lipids affect the structure and function of these membrane proteins. Molecular characterization of synthetic TM peptides in lipid bilayers helps to understand how the TM region participates in the formation of the structure and in the function of membrane proteins. The use of synthetic peptides enables site-specific labeling and modification and allows for designing of an artificial TM sequence. Research involving such samples has resulted in significant increase in the knowledge of the mechanisms that govern membrane biology. In this review, the chemical synthesis of TM peptides has been discussed. The preparation of synthetic TM peptides is still not trivial; however, the accumulated knowledge summarized here should provide a basis for preparing samples for spectroscopic analyses. The application of synthetic TM peptides for gaining insights into the mechanism of signal transduction by receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) has also been discussed. RTK is a single TM protein and is one of the difficult targets in structural biology as crystallization of the full-length receptor has not been successful. This review describes the structural characterization of the synthetic TM-juxtamembrane sequence and proposes a possible scheme for the structural changes in this region for the activation of ErbBs, the epidermal growth factor receptor family. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 613-621, 2016. PMID:26573237

  12. Membrane protein stability can be compromised by detergent interactions with the extramembranous soluble domains

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Zhengrong; Wang, Chi; Zhou, Qingxian; An, Jianli; Hildebrandt, Ellen; Aleksandrov, Luba A.; Kappes, John C.; DeLucas, Lawrence J.; Riordan, John R.; Urbatsch, Ina L.; Hunt, John F.; Brouillette, Christie G.

    2014-01-01

    Detergent interaction with extramembranous soluble domains (ESDs) is not commonly considered an important determinant of integral membrane protein (IMP) behavior during purification and crystallization, even though ESDs contribute to the stability of many IMPs. Here we demonstrate that some generally nondenaturing detergents critically destabilize a model ESD, the first nucleotide-binding domain (NBD1) from the human cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a model IMP. Not...

  13. Protein domain organisation: adding order

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kummerfeld Sarah K

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Domains are the building blocks of proteins. During evolution, they have been duplicated, fused and recombined, to produce proteins with novel structures and functions. Structural and genome-scale studies have shown that pairs or groups of domains observed together in a protein are almost always found in only one N to C terminal order and are the result of a single recombination event that has been propagated by duplication of the multi-domain unit. Previous studies of domain organisation have used graph theory to represent the co-occurrence of domains within proteins. We build on this approach by adding directionality to the graphs and connecting nodes based on their relative order in the protein. Most of the time, the linear order of domains is conserved. However, using the directed graph representation we have identified non-linear features of domain organization that are over-represented in genomes. Recognising these patterns and unravelling how they have arisen may allow us to understand the functional relationships between domains and understand how the protein repertoire has evolved. Results We identify groups of domains that are not linearly conserved, but instead have been shuffled during evolution so that they occur in multiple different orders. We consider 192 genomes across all three kingdoms of life and use domain and protein annotation to understand their functional significance. To identify these features and assess their statistical significance, we represent the linear order of domains in proteins as a directed graph and apply graph theoretical methods. We describe two higher-order patterns of domain organisation: clusters and bi-directionally associated domain pairs and explore their functional importance and phylogenetic conservation. Conclusion Taking into account the order of domains, we have derived a novel picture of global protein organization. We found that all genomes have a higher than expected

  14. Enhancer-binding proteins with a forkhead-associated domain and the sigma(54) regulon in Myxococcus xanthus fruiting body development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelsbak, Lars; Givskov, Michael Christian; Kaiser, D.

    2005-01-01

    these genes, Mx4885, caused a cell autonomous aggregation and sporulation defect. In-frame deletion mutants showed that the FHA domain is necessary for proper Mx4885 function. The altered pattern of developmental gene expression in the mutant implied that Mx4885 is on the pathway of response to the...

  15. Natural variation of the amino-terminal glutamine-rich domain in Drosophila argonaute2 is not associated with developmental defects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Hain

    Full Text Available The Drosophila argonaute2 (ago2 gene plays a major role in siRNA mediated RNA silencing pathways. Unlike mammalian Argonaute proteins, the Drosophila protein has an unusual amino-terminal domain made up largely of multiple copies of glutamine-rich repeats (GRRs. We report here that the ago2 locus produces an alternative transcript that encodes a putative short isoform without this amino-terminal domain. Several ago2 mutations previously reported to be null alleles only abolish expression of the long, GRR-containing isoform. Analysis of drop out (dop mutations had previously suggested that variations in GRR copy number result in defects in RNAi and embryonic development. However, we find that dop mutations genetically complement transcript-null alleles of ago2 and that ago2 alleles with variant GRR copy numbers support normal development. In addition, we show that the assembly of the central RNAi machinery, the RISC (RNA induced silencing complex, is unimpaired in embryos when GRR copy number is altered. In fact, we find that GRR copy number is highly variable in natural D. melanogaster populations as well as in laboratory strains. Finally, while many other insects share an extensive, glutamine-rich Ago2 amino-terminal domain, its primary sequence varies drastically between species. Our data indicate that GRR variation does not modulate an essential function of Ago2 and that the amino-terminal domain of Ago2 is subject to rapid evolution.

  16. The Chinese Version of the Revised Creativity Domain Questionnaire (CDQ-R): First Evidence for Its Factorial Validity and Systematic Association with the Big Five

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Christian H.; Tang, Min; Kruse, Joachim; Kaufman, James C.; Spörrle, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    The present study examines the factor structure of a Chinese version of the Revised Creativity Domain Questionnaire (CDQ-R; Kaufman, Waterstreet, Ailaouni, Whitcomb, Roe, & Riggs, 2009) as well as its relation to Big Five personality traits within a Chinese sample (N = 787). Analyses indicate the appropriateness of the Chinese version of the…

  17. BCR-ABL isoforms associated with intrinsic or acquired resistance to imatinib : more heterogeneous than just ABL kinase domain point mutations?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gruber, Franz X.; Lundan, Tuija; Goll, Rasmus; Silye, Aleksandra; Mikkola, Ingvild; Rekvig, Ole Petter; Knuutila, Sakari; Remes, Kari; Gedde-Dahl, Tobias; Porkka, Kimmo; Hjorth-Hansen, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Imatinib, a small molecule inhibitor of ABL, PDGFR and C-KIT, has revolutionized treatment of chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML). However, resistance to treatment is of increasing importance and often is due to point mutations in the Abl kinase domain (Abl KD). Here, we analysed clinical outcome and mu

  18. [Polymethoxylated flavonoids activate cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Huan-Huan; Fang, Fang; Yu, Bo; Luan, Jian; Jiang, Yu; Yang, Hong

    2015-04-25

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a cAMP-dependent chloride channel, plays key roles in fluid secretion in serous epithelial cells. Previously, we identified two polymethoxylated flavonoids, 3',4',5,5',6,7-hexamethoxyflavone (HMF) and 5-hydroxy-6,7,3',4'-tetramethoxyflavone (HTF) which could potentiate CFTR chloride channel activities. The present study was aimed to investigate the potentiation effects of HMF and HTF on CFTR Cl(-) channel activities by using a cell-based fluorescence assay and the short circuit Ussing chamber assay. The results of cell-based fluorescence assay showed that both HMF and HTF could dose-dependently potentiate CFTR Cl(-) channel activities in rapid and reversible ways, and the activations could be reversed by the CFTR blocker CFTRinh-172. Notably, HMF showed the highest affinity (EC50 = 2 μmol/L) to CFTR protein among the flavonoid CFTR activators identified so far. The activation of CFTR by HMF or HTF was forskolin (FSK) dependent. Both compounds showed additive effect with FSK and 3-Isobutyl-1-methylx (IBMX) in the activation of CFTR, while had no additive effect with genistein (GEN). In ex vivo studies, HMF and HTF could stimulate transepithelial Cl(-) secretion in rat colonic mucosa and enhance fluid secretion in mouse trachea submucosal glands. These results suggest that HMF and HTF may potentiate CFTR Cl(-) channel activities through both elevation of cAMP level and binding to CFTR protein pathways. The results provide new clues in elucidating structure and activity relationship of flavonoid CFTR activators. HMF might be developed as a new drug in the therapy of CFTR-related diseases such as bronchiectasis and habitual constipation. PMID:25896054

  19. Structures of the human Pals1 PDZ domain with and without ligand suggest gated access of Crb to the PDZ peptide-binding groove

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanova, Marina E.; Fletcher, Georgina C.; O’Reilly, Nicola; Purkiss, Andrew G.; Thompson, Barry J. [Cancer Research UK, 44 Lincoln’s Inn Fields, London WC2A 3LY (United Kingdom); McDonald, Neil Q., E-mail: neil.mcdonald@cancer.org.uk [Cancer Research UK, 44 Lincoln’s Inn Fields, London WC2A 3LY (United Kingdom); Birkbeck College, University of London, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HX (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-01

    This study characterizes the interaction between the carboxy-terminal (ERLI) motif of the essential polarity protein Crb and the Pals1/Stardust PDZ-domain protein. Structures of human Pals1 PDZ with and without a Crb peptide are described, explaining the highly conserved nature of the ERLI motif and revealing a sterically blocked peptide-binding groove in the absence of ligand. Many components of epithelial polarity protein complexes possess PDZ domains that are required for protein interaction and recruitment to the apical plasma membrane. Apical localization of the Crumbs (Crb) transmembrane protein requires a PDZ-mediated interaction with Pals1 (protein-associated with Lin7, Stardust, MPP5), a member of the p55 family of membrane-associated guanylate kinases (MAGUKs). This study describes the molecular interaction between the Crb carboxy-terminal motif (ERLI), which is required for Drosophila cell polarity, and the Pals1 PDZ domain using crystallography and fluorescence polarization. Only the last four Crb residues contribute to Pals1 PDZ-domain binding affinity, with specificity contributed by conserved charged interactions. Comparison of the Crb-bound Pals1 PDZ structure with an apo Pals1 structure reveals a key Phe side chain that gates access to the PDZ peptide-binding groove. Removal of this side chain enhances the binding affinity by more than fivefold, suggesting that access of Crb to Pals1 may be regulated by intradomain contacts or by protein–protein interaction.

  20. Free energy barrier for melittin reorientation from a membrane-bound state to a transmembrane state

    OpenAIRE

    Irudayam, Sheeba J.; Pobandt, Tobias; Berkowitz, Max L.

    2013-01-01

    An important step in a phospholipid membrane pore formation by melittin antimicrobial peptide is a reorientation of the peptide from a surface into a transmembrane conformation. In this work we perform umbrella sampling simulations to calculate the potential of mean force (PMF) for the reorientation of melittin from a surface-bound state to a transmembrane state and provide a molecular level insight into understanding peptide and lipid properties that influence the existence of the free energ...

  1. Transmembrane Protein Diffusion in Gel-Supported Dual-Leaflet Membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Chih-Ying; Hill, Reghan J.

    2014-01-01

    Tools to measure transmembrane-protein diffusion in lipid bilayer membranes have advanced in recent decades, providing a need for predictive theoretical models that account for interleaflet leaflet friction on tracer mobility. Here we address the fully three-dimensional flows driven by a (nonprotruding) transmembrane protein embedded in a dual-leaflet membrane that is supported above and below by soft porous supports (e.g., hydrogel or extracellular matrix), each of which has a prescribed per...

  2. TMRPres2D: high quality visual representation of transmembrane protein models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spyropoulos, Ioannis C; Liakopoulos, Theodore D; Bagos, Pantelis G; Hamodrakas, Stavros J

    2004-11-22

    The 'TransMembrane protein Re-Presentation in 2-Dimensions' (TMRPres2D) tool, automates the creation of uniform, two-dimensional, high analysis graphical images/models of alpha-helical or beta-barrel transmembrane proteins. Protein sequence data and structural information may be acquired from public protein knowledge bases, emanate from prediction algorithms, or even be defined by the user. Several important biological and physical sequence attributes can be embedded in the graphical representation. PMID:15201184

  3. Expression of a Gibberellin-Induced Leucine-Rich Repeat Receptor-Like Protein Kinase in Deepwater Rice and Its Interaction with Kinase-Associated Protein Phosphatase1

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Knaap, Esther; Song, Wen-Yuan; Ruan, De-Ling; Sauter, Margret; Ronald, Pamela C.; Kende, Hans

    1999-01-01

    We identified in deepwater rice (Oryza sativa L.) a gene encoding a leucine-rich repeat receptor-like transmembrane protein kinase, OsTMK (O. sativa transmembrane kinase). The transcript levels of OsTMK increased in the rice internode in response to gibberellin. Expression of OsTMK was especially high in regions undergoing cell division and elongation. The kinase domain of OsTMK was enzymatically active, autophosphorylating on serine and threonine residues. A cDNA encoding a rice ortholog of a kinase-associated type 2C protein phosphatase (OsKAPP) was cloned. KAPPs are putative downstream components in kinase-mediated signal transduction pathways. The kinase interaction domain of OsKAPP was phosphorylated in vitro by the kinase domain of OsTMK. RNA gel-blot analysis indicated that the expression of OsTMK and OsKAPP was similar in different tissues of the rice plant. In protein-binding assays, OsKAPP interacted with a receptor-like protein kinase, RLK5 of Arabidopsis, but not with the protein kinase domains of the rice and maize receptor-like protein kinases Xa21 and ZmPK1, respectively. PMID:10364408

  4. Expression of a gibberellin-induced leucine-rich repeat receptor-like protein kinase in deepwater rice and its interaction with kinase-associated protein phosphatase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knaap, E. van der; Sauter, M.; Kende, H. (Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). DOE Plant Research Lab.); Song, W.Y.; Ruan, D.L.; Ronald, P.C. (Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Plant Pathology)

    1999-06-01

    The authors identified in deepwater rice (Oryza sativa L.) a gene encoding a leucine-rich repeat receptor-like transmembrane protein kinase, OsTMK (O. sativa transmembrane kinase). The transcript levels of OsTMK increased in the rice internode in response to gibberellin. Expression of OsTMK was especially high in regions undergoing cell division and elongation. The kinase domain of OsTMK was enzymatically active autophosphorylating on serine and threonine residues. A cDNA encoding a rice ortholog of a kinase-associated type 2C protein phosphatase (OsKAPP) was cloned. KAPPs are putative downstream components in kinase-mediated signal transduction pathways. The kinase interaction domain of OsKAPP was phosphorylated in vitro by the kinase domain of OsTMK. RNA gel-blot analysis indicated that the expression of OsTMK and OsKAPP was similar in different tissues of the rice plant. In protein-binding assays, OsKAPP interacted with a receptor-like protein kinase, RLK5 of Arabidopsis, but not with the protein kinase domains of the rice and maize receptor-like protein kinases Xa21 and ZmPK1, respectively.

  5. Somatic mutations, allele loss, and DNA methylation of the Cub and Sushi Multiple Domains 1 (CSMD1 gene reveals association with early age of diagnosis in colorectal cancer patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Austin Y Shull

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Cub and Sushi Multiple Domains 1 (CSMD1 gene, located on the short arm of chromosome 8, codes for a type I transmembrane protein whose function is currently unknown. CSMD1 expression is frequently lost in many epithelial cancers. Our goal was to characterize the relationships between CSMD1 somatic mutations, allele imbalance, DNA methylation, and the clinical characteristics in colorectal cancer patients. METHODS: We sequenced the CSMD1 coding regions in 54 colorectal tumors using the 454FLX pyrosequencing platform to interrogate 72 amplicons covering the entire coding sequence. We used heterozygous SNP allele ratios at multiple CSMD1 loci to determine allelic balance and infer loss of heterozygosity. Finally, we performed methylation-specific PCR on 76 colorectal tumors to determine DNA methylation status for CSMD1 and known methylation targets ALX4, RUNX3, NEUROG1, and CDKN2A. RESULTS: Using 454FLX sequencing and confirming with Sanger sequencing, 16 CSMD1 somatic mutations were identified in 6 of the 54 colorectal tumors (11%. The nonsynonymous to synonymous mutation ratio of the 16 somatic mutations was 15:1, a ratio significantly higher than the expected 2:1 ratio (p = 0.014. This ratio indicates a presence of positive selection for mutations in the CSMD1 protein sequence. CSMD1 allelic imbalance was present in 19 of 37 informative cases (56%. Patients with allelic imbalance and CSMD1 mutations were significantly younger (average age, 41 years than those without somatic mutations (average age, 68 years. The majority of tumors were methylated at one or more CpG loci within the CSMD1 coding sequence, and CSMD1 methylation significantly correlated with two known methylation targets ALX4 and RUNX3. C:G>T:A substitutions were significantly overrepresented (47%, suggesting extensive cytosine methylation predisposing to somatic mutations. CONCLUSIONS: Deep amplicon sequencing and methylation-specific PCR reveal that CSMD1

  6. Hydrophobic mismatch sorts SNARE proteins into distinct membrane domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milovanovic, Dragomir; Honigmann, Alf; Koike, Seiichi; Göttfert, Fabian; Pähler, Gesa; Junius, Meike; Müllar, Stefan; Diederichsen, Ulf; Janshoff, Andreas; Grubmüller, Helmut; Risselada, Herre J.; Eggeling, Christian; Hell, Stefan W.; van den Bogaart, Geert; Jahn, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    The clustering of proteins and lipids in distinct microdomains is emerging as an important principle for the spatial patterning of biological membranes. Such domain formation can be the result of hydrophobic and ionic interactions with membrane lipids as well as of specific protein-protein interactions. Here using plasma membrane-resident SNARE proteins as model, we show that hydrophobic mismatch between the length of transmembrane domains (TMDs) and the thickness of the lipid membrane suffices to induce clustering of proteins. Even when the TMDs differ in length by only a single residue, hydrophobic mismatch can segregate structurally closely homologous membrane proteins in distinct membrane domains. Domain formation is further fine-tuned by interactions with polyanionic phosphoinositides and homo and heterotypic protein interactions. Our findings demonstrate that hydrophobic mismatch contributes to the structural organization of membranes.

  7. Role for the Plasmodium sporozoite-specific transmembrane protein S6 in parasite motility and efficient malaria transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbuechel, Marion; Matuschewski, Kai

    2009-02-01

    Malaria transmission occurs by intradermal deposition of Plasmodium sporozoites during the infectious bite of a female Anopheles mosquito. After formation in midgut-associated oocysts sporozoites actively enter mosquito salivary glands and subsequently invade host hepatocytes where they transform into clinically silent liver stages. To date, two sporozoite-specific transmembrane proteins have been identified that perform vital functions in natural malaria transmission. The sporozoite invasin TRAP drives sporozoite motility and target cell entry whereas the adhesin MAEBL mediates sporozoite recognition of and attachment to salivary glands. Here, we demonstrate that the sporozoite-specific transmembrane protein S6 is required for efficient malaria transmission to the vertebrate host. Targeted deletion of S6 results in severe impairment of sporozoite gliding motility and invasion of mosquito salivary glands. During sporozoite maturation S6 expression is tightly regulated by transcriptional and translational control. We propose that S6 functions together with TRAP/MIC2 family invasins to direct fast, efficient and specific cell entry and, ultimately, life cycle progression of the malaria sporozoite. PMID:19016774

  8. Origin of the Diversity in DNA Recognition Domains in Phasevarion Associated modA Genes of Pathogenic Neisseria and Haemophilus influenzae

    OpenAIRE

    Gawthorne, Jayde A.; Beatson, Scott A.; Srikhanta, Yogitha N.; Fox, Kate L.; Jennings, Michael P.

    2012-01-01

    Phase variable restriction-modification (R-M) systems have been identified in a range of pathogenic bacteria. In some it has been demonstrated that the random switching of the mod (DNA methyltransferase) gene mediates the coordinated expression of multiple genes and constitutes a phasevarion (phase variable regulon). ModA of Neisseria and Haemophilus influenzae contain a highly variable, DNA recognition domain (DRD) that defines the target sequence that is modified by methylation and is used ...

  9. Mapping the laminin-binding and adhesive domain of the cell surface-associated Hlp/LBP protein from Mycobacterium leprae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares de Lima, Cristiana; Zulianello, Laurence; Marques, Maria Angela de Melo; Kim, Heejin; Portugal, Michelle Iespa; Antunes, Sérgio Luiz; Menozzi, Franco Dante; Ottenhoff, Tom Henricus Maria; Brennan, Patrick Joseph; Pessolani, Maria Cristina Vidal

    2005-07-01

    Binding of Mycobacterium leprae to and invasion of Schwann cells (SC) represent a crucial step that initiates nerve damage in leprosy. We and others have described that M. leprae colonization of the peripheral nerve system may be mediated in part by a surface-exposed histone-like protein (Hlp), characterized as a laminin-binding protein (LBP). Hlp/LBP has also been shown to play a role in the binding of mycobacteria to alveolar epithelial cells and macrophages. In the present study we report that M. leprae expresses Hlp/LBP protein during the course of human infection. Additionally, we analyzed the interaction of Hlp/LBP with the extracellular matrix and host cell surface. We show that Hlp/LBP, besides laminin, also binds heparin and heparan sulfate. Testing truncated recombinant Hlp molecules corresponding to the N-terminal (rHlp-N) and the C-terminal (rHlp-C) domains of the protein, we established that interaction of Hlp/LBP with laminin-2 and heparin is mainly mediated by the C-terminal domain of the protein. Moreover, the same domain was found to be involved in Hlp/LBP-mediating bacterial binding to human SC. Finally, evidence is shown suggesting that M. leprae produces a post-translationally modified Hlp/LBP containing methyllysine residues. Methylation of the lysine residues, however, seems not to affect the adhesive properties of Hlp/LBP. Taken together, our observations reinforce the involvement of Hlp/LBP as an adhesin in mycobacterial infections and define its highly positive C-terminal region as the major adhesive domain of this protein. PMID:15919224

  10. Mice deficient in transmembrane prostatic acid phosphatase display increased GABAergic transmission and neurological alterations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi O Nousiainen

    Full Text Available Prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP, the first diagnostic marker and present therapeutic target for prostate cancer, modulates nociception at the dorsal root ganglia (DRG, but its function in the central nervous system has remained unknown. We studied expression and function of TMPAP (the transmembrane isoform of PAP in the brain by utilizing mice deficient in TMPAP (PAP-/- mice. Here we report that TMPAP is expressed in a subpopulation of cerebral GABAergic neurons, and mice deficient in TMPAP show multiple behavioral and neurochemical features linked to hyperdopaminergic dysregulation and altered GABAergic transmission. In addition to increased anxiety, disturbed prepulse inhibition, increased synthesis of striatal dopamine, and augmented response to amphetamine, PAP-deficient mice have enlarged lateral ventricles, reduced diazepam-induced loss of righting reflex, and increased GABAergic tone in the hippocampus. TMPAP in the mouse brain is localized presynaptically, and colocalized with SNARE-associated protein snapin, a protein involved in synaptic vesicle docking and fusion, and PAP-deficient mice display altered subcellular distribution of snapin. We have previously shown TMPAP to reside in prostatic exosomes and we propose that TMPAP is involved in the control of GABAergic tone in the brain also through exocytosis, and that PAP deficiency produces a distinct neurological phenotype.

  11. Transmembrane prostatic acid phosphatase (TMPAP interacts with snapin and deficient mice develop prostate adenocarcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ileana B Quintero

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanisms underlying prostate carcinogenesis are poorly understood. Prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP, a prostatic epithelial secretion marker, has been linked to prostate cancer since the 1930's. However, the contribution of PAP to the disease remains controversial. We have previously cloned and described two isoforms of this protein, a secretory (sPAP and a transmembrane type-I (TMPAP. The goal in this work was to understand the physiological function of TMPAP in the prostate. We conducted histological, ultra-structural and genome-wide analyses of the prostate of our PAP-deficient mouse model (PAP(-/- with C57BL/6J background. The PAP(-/- mouse prostate showed the development of slow-growing non-metastatic prostate adenocarcinoma. In order to find out the mechanism behind, we identified PAP-interacting proteins byyeast two-hybrid assays and a clear result was obtained for the interaction of PAP with snapin, a SNARE-associated protein which binds Snap25 facilitating the vesicular membrane fusion process. We confirmed this interaction by co-localization studies in TMPAP-transfected LNCaP cells (TMPAP/LNCaP cells and in vivo FRET analyses in transient transfected LNCaP cells. The differential gene expression analyses revealed the dysregulation of the same genes known to be related to synaptic vesicular traffic. Both TMPAP and snapin were detected in isolated exosomes. Our results suggest that TMPAP is involved in endo-/exocytosis and disturbed vesicular traffic is a hallmark of prostate adenocarcinoma.

  12. A mathematical model of T lymphocyte calcium dynamics derived from single transmembrane protein properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Dorothee Schmeitz

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Fate decision processes of T lymphocytes are crucial for health and disease. Whether a T lymphocyte is activated, divides, gets anergic or initiates apoptosis depends on extracellular triggers and intracellular signalling. Free cytosolic calcium dynamics plays an important role in this context. The relative contributions of store-derived calcium entry and calcium entry from extracellular space to T lymphocyte activation are still a matter of debate. Here we develop a quantitative mathematical model of T lymphocyte calcium dynamics in order to establish a tool which allows to disentangle cause-effect relationships between ion fluxes and observed calcium time courses. The model is based on single transmembrane protein characteristics which have been determined in independent experiments. This reduces the number of unknown parameters in the model to a minimum and ensures the predictive power of the model. Simulation results are subsequently used for an analysis of whole cell calcium dynamics measured under various experimental conditions. The model accounts for a variety of these conditions, which supports the suitability of the modelling approach. The simulation results suggest a model in which calcium dynamics dominantly relies on the opening of channels in calcium stores while calcium entry through calcium-release activated channels (CRAC is more associated with the maintenance of the T lymphocyte calcium levels and prevents the cell from calcium depletion. Our findings indicate that CRAC guarantees a long-term stable calcium level which is required for cell survival and sustained calcium enhancement.

  13. Transmembrane collagen XVII modulates integrin dependent keratinocyte migration via PI3K/Rac1 signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Löffek

    Full Text Available The hemidesmosomal transmembrane component collagen XVII (ColXVII plays an important role in the anchorage of the epidermis to the underlying basement membrane. However, this adhesion protein seems to be also involved in the regulation of keratinocyte migration, since its expression in these cells is strongly elevated during reepithelialization of acute wounds and in the invasive front of squamous cell carcinoma, while its absence in ColXVII-deficient keratinocytes leads to altered cell motility. Using a genetic model of murine Col17a1⁻/⁻ keratinocytes we elucidated ColXVII mediated signaling pathways in cell adhesion and migration. Col17a1⁻/⁻ keratinocytes exhibited increased spreading on laminin 332 and accelerated, but less directed cell motility. These effects were accompanied by increased expression of the integrin subunits β4 and β1. The migratory phenotype, as evidenced by formation of multiple unstable lamellipodia, was associated with enhanced phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K activity. Dissection of the signaling pathway uncovered enhanced phosphorylation of the β4 integrin subunit and the focal adhesion kinase (FAK as activators of PI3K. This resulted in elevated Rac1 activity as a downstream consequence. These results provide mechanistic evidence that ColXVII coordinates keratinocyte adhesion and directed motility by interfering integrin dependent PI3K activation and by stabilizing lamellipodia at the leading edge of reepithelializing wounds and in invasive squamous cell carcinoma.

  14. Association of Academic Performance with Outcome Expectations and Its Domains in Nursing and Midwifery Students at Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sepideh Bakhtiari

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Outcome expectation is considered as a basic and significant variable in education. It is a cognitive-motivational component that takes the individual into account as an active and sensible decision-maker. The present study was conducted to investigate the correlation of outcome expectations with academic performance of students of nursing and midwifery in Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences. Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional study, the sample size included 218 nursing and midwifery students selected through convenient random sampling method. The instrument for data collection was the questionnaire of “outcome expectations of career decision-making and discovery targets”, which comprised of 13 questions in three domains of future orientation, job satisfaction and personal expectations. The questionnaires were coded after being completed and the obtained data were fed into SPSS-16 software and analyzed by descriptive statistics, t-test, Kolmogrov-Smirnov, ANOVA and Mann-Whitney tests. Results: The findings indicated no statistically significant difference between place of living (dormitory or home and outcome expectations along with its domains (39.4% and 60-6%. However, a significant correlation was reported between discipline, gender, admittance year and academic performance of the students (p0.05. Conclusion: The findings of this study indicated a positively positive significant relationship between students’ academic performance and outcome expectations along with its domains.

  15. CX3CL1, a chemokine finely tuned to adhesion: critical roles of the stalk glycosylation and the membrane domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariano A. Ostuni

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The multi-domain CX3CL1 transmembrane chemokine triggers leukocyte adherence without rolling and migration by presenting its chemokine domain (CD to its receptor CX3CR1. Through the combination of functional adhesion assays with structural analysis using FRAP, we investigated the functional role of the other domains of CX3CL1, i.e., its mucin stalk, transmembrane domain, and cytosolic domain. Our results indicate that the CX3CL1 molecular structure is finely adapted to capture CX3CR1 in circulating cells and that each domain has a specific purpose: the mucin stalk is stiffened by its high glycosylation to present the CD away from the membrane, the transmembrane domain generates the permanent aggregation of an adequate amount of monomers to guarantee adhesion and prevent rolling, and the cytosolic domain ensures adhesive robustness by interacting with the cytoskeleton. We propose a model in which quasi-immobile CX3CL1 bundles are organized to quickly generate adhesive patches with sufficiently high strength to capture CX3CR1+ leukocytes but with sufficiently low strength to allow their patrolling behavior.

  16. Solution structure of a syndecan-4 cytoplasmic domain and its interaction with phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, D; Oh, E S; Woods, A;

    1998-01-01

    ) region in their cytoplasmic domains, and that of syndecan-4 is critical to its interaction with protein kinase C and PIP2. Two oligopeptides corresponding to the variable region (4V) and whole domain (4L) of syndecan-4 cytoplasmic domain were synthesized for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies. Data...... from NMR and circular dichroism indicate that the cytoplasmic domain undergoes a conformational transition and forms a symmetric dimer in the presence of phospholipid activator PIP2. The solution conformations of both free and PIP2-complexed 4V have been determined by two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy...... cytoplasmic domain for transmembrane signaling and cell-matrix adhesion....

  17. Rapid and Robust Polyprotein Production Facilitates Single-Molecule Mechanical Characterization of β-Barrel Assembly Machinery Polypeptide Transport Associated Domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Toni; Tych, Katarzyna M; Crosskey, Thomas; Schiffrin, Bob; Brockwell, David J; Dougan, Lorna

    2015-09-22

    Single-molecule force spectroscopy by atomic force microscopy exploits the use of multimeric protein constructs, namely, polyproteins, to decrease the impact of nonspecific interactions, to improve data accumulation, and to allow the accommodation of benchmarking reference domains within the construct. However, methods to generate such constructs are either time- and labor-intensive or lack control over the length or the domain sequence of the obtained construct. Here, we describe an approach that addresses both of these shortcomings that uses Gibson assembly (GA) to generate a defined recombinant polyprotein rapidly using linker sequences. To demonstrate the feasibility of this approach, we used GA to make a polyprotein composed of alternating domains of I27 and TmCsp, (I27-TmCsp)3-I27)(GA), and showed the mechanical fingerprint, mechanical strength, and pulling speed dependence are the same as an analogous polyprotein constructed using the classical approach. After this benchmarking, we exploited this approach to facilitiate the mechanical characterization of POTRA domain 2 of BamA from E. coli (EcPOTRA2) by assembling the polyprotein (I27-EcPOTRA2)3-I27(GA). We show that, as predicted from the α + β topology, EcPOTRA2 domains are mechanically robust over a wide range of pulling speeds. Furthermore, we identify a clear correlation between mechanical robustness and brittleness for a range of other α + β proteins that contain the structural feature of proximal terminal β-strands in parallel geometry. We thus demonstrate that the GA approach is a powerful tool, as it circumvents the usual time- and labor-intensive polyprotein production process and allows for rapid production of new constructs for single-molecule studies. As shown for EcPOTRA2, this approach allows the exploration of the mechanical properties of a greater number of proteins and their variants. This improves our understanding of the relationship between structure and mechanical strength

  18. Bisociative Discovery of Interesting Relations between Domains

    OpenAIRE

    Nagel, Uwe; Thiel, Kilian; Kötter, Tobias; Piatek, Dawid; Berthold, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The discovery of surprising relations in large, heterogeneous information repositories is gaining increasing importance in real world data analysis. If these repositories come from diverse origins, forming different domains, domain bridging associations between otherwise weakly connected domains can provide insights into the data that can otherwise not be accomplished. In this paper, we propose a first formalization for the detection of such potentially interesting, domain-crossing relations ...

  19. Expression and characterization of the integral membrane domain of bacterial histidine kinase SCO3062 for structural studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacterial histidine kinases play an important role in the response to external stimuli. Structural studies of the histidine kinase transmembrane domain are challenging due to difficulties in protein expression and sample preparation. After carrying out expression screening of a series of histidine kinases, we investigated sample preparation methods for obtaining high quality samples of the periplasmic and transmembrane domain (PTD) of the bacterial histidine kinase SCO3062. Various sample conditions were tested for their ability to give homogeneous NMR spectra of the SCO3062 PTD with well-resolved resonances. Circular dichroism and 3D 15N-edited NOESY spectrum results demonstrate that the SCO3062 PTD is predominantly α-helical. This method should be applicable to the NMR analysis of other transmembrane proteins

  20. Expression and characterization of the integral membrane domain of bacterial histidine kinase SCO3062 for structural studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Kwon Joo; Kwak, Su-Nam; Kim, Hyun Jung; Cheong, Chaejoon; Kim, Myung Hee; Jeon, Young Ho

    2008-11-14

    Bacterial histidine kinases play an important role in the response to external stimuli. Structural studies of the histidine kinase transmembrane domain are challenging due to difficulties in protein expression and sample preparation. After carrying out expression screening of a series of histidine kinases, we investigated sample preparation methods for obtaining high quality samples of the periplasmic and transmembrane domain (PTD) of the bacterial histidine kinase SCO3062. Various sample conditions were tested for their ability to give homogeneous NMR spectra of the SCO3062 PTD with well-resolved resonances. Circular dichroism and 3D (15)N-edited NOESY spectrum results demonstrate that the SCO3062 PTD is predominantly alpha-helical. This method should be applicable to the NMR analysis of other transmembrane proteins. PMID:18789898

  1. Thermal unfolding simulations of NBD1 domain variants reveal structural motifs associated with the impaired folding of F508del-CFTR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estácio, Sílvia G; Martiniano, Hugo F M C; Faísca, Patrícia F N

    2016-08-16

    We employed high-temperature classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the unfolding process of the wild-type (WT) and F508del-NBD1 domains of CFTR protein, with and without second-site mutations. To rationalize the in vitro behavior of F508del-NBD1, namely its lower folding yield and higher aggregation propensity, we focused our analysis of the MD data on the existence of intermediate states with aggregation potential and/or stabilized by a significant number of non-native interactions (i.e. misfolded states). We find that the deletion of phenylalanine 508 is able to forcefully reshape the conformational space of the NBD1 domain to the extent that it uniquely populates intermediate states whose structural traits provide important insights into the molecular events that underlie the impaired folding of F508del-NBD1. In particular, our simulations predict the formation of a misfolded intermediate whose population is highly enhanced by deletion of residue 508. The stabilization of this intermediate is a direct consequence of the enhanced non-native coupling between various key regions of the α-helical subdomain and ATP-binding subdomain; it is singularly characterized by a set of non-native interactions within the ATP-binding subdomain and between that domain and the α-helical subdomain region. The formation of this intermediate is not blocked by second-site suppressor mutations which indicates a limited role of the latter in correcting the rather complex folding process of the CFTR protein missing residue 508. PMID:27354240

  2. Substrate-induced changes in domain interaction of vacuolar H⁺-pyrophosphatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Shen-Hsing; Lo, Yueh-Yu; Liu, Tseng-Huang; Pan, Yih-Jiuan; Huang, Yun-Tzu; Sun, Yuh-Ju; Hung, Cheng-Chieh; Tseng, Fan-Gang; Yang, Chih-Wei; Pan, Rong-Long

    2015-01-01

    Single molecule atomic force microscopy (smAFM) was employed to unfold transmembrane domain interactions of a unique vacuolar H(+)-pyrophosphatase (EC 3.6.1.1) from Vigna radiata. H(+)-Pyrophosphatase is a membrane-embedded homodimeric protein containing a single type of polypeptide and links PPi hydrolysis to proton translocation. Each subunit consists of 16 transmembrane domains with both ends facing the lumen side. In this investigation, H(+)-pyrophosphatase was reconstituted into the lipid bilayer in the same orientation for efficient fishing out of the membrane by smAFM. The reconstituted H(+)-pyrophosphatase in the lipid bilayer showed an authentically dimeric structure, and the size of each monomer was ∼4 nm in length, ∼2 nm in width, and ∼1 nm in protrusion height. Upon extracting the H(+)-pyrophosphatase out of the membrane, force-distance curves containing 10 peaks were obtained and assigned to distinct domains. In the presence of pyrophosphate, phosphate, and imidodiphosphate, the numbers of interaction curves were altered to 7, 8, and 10, respectively, concomitantly with significant modification in force strength. The substrate-binding residues were further replaced to verify these domain changes upon substrate binding. A working model is accordingly proposed to show the interactions between transmembrane domains of H(+)-pyrophosphatase in the presence and absence of substrate and its analog. PMID:25451931

  3. Functional identification of close proximity amino acid side chains within the transmembrane-spanning helixes of the P2X2 receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Liang

    Full Text Available The transition from the closed to open state greatly alters the intra- and inter-subunit interactions of the P2X receptor (P2XR. The interactions that occur in the transmembrane domain of the P2X2R remain unclear. We used substituted cysteine mutagenesis disulfide mapping to identify pairs of residues that are in close proximity within the transmembrane domain of rP2X2R and compared our results to the predicted positions of these amino acids obtained from a rat P2X2R homology model of the available open and closed zebrafish P2X4R structures. Alternations in channel function were measured as a change in the ATP-gated current before and after exposure to dithiothreitol. Thirty-six pairs of double mutants of rP2X2R expressed in HEK293 cells produced normal functioning channels. Thirty-five pairs of these mutants did not exhibit a functionally detectable disulfide bond. The double mutant H33C/S345C formed redox-dependent cross-links in the absence of ATP. Dithiothreitol ruptured the disulfide bond of H33C/S345C and induced a 2 to 3-fold increase in current. The EC50 for H33C/S345C before dithiothreitol treatment was ~2-fold higher than that after dithiothreitol treatment. Dithiothreitol reduced the EC50 to wild-type levels. Furthermore, expression of trimeric concatamer receptors with Cys mutations at some but not all six positions showed that the more disulfide bond formation sites within the concatamer, the greater current potentiation after dithiothreitol incubation. Immunoblot analysis of H33C/S345C revealed one monomer band under nonreducing conditions strongly suggesting that disulfide bonds are formed within single subunits (intra-subunit and not between two subunits (inter-subunit. Taken together, these data indicate that His33 and Ser345 are proximal to each other across an intra-subunit interface. The relative movement between the first transmembrane and the second transmembrane in the intra-subunit is likely important for transmitting the

  4. Novel mutation in the ligand-binding domain of the androgen receptor gene (1790p) associated with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Florina Raicu; Rossella Giuliani; Valentina Gatta; Chiara Palka; Paolo Guanciali Franchi; Pierluigi Lelli-Chiesa; Stefano Tumini; Liborio Stuppia

    2008-01-01

    Mutations in the X-linked androgen receptor (AR) gene cause androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS), resulting in an impaired embryonic sex differentiation in 46,XY genetic men. Complete androgen insensitivity (CAIS) produces a female external phenotype, whereas cases with partial androgen insensitivity (PAIS) have various ambiguities of the genitalia. Mild androgen insensitivity (MAIS) is characterized by undermasculinization and gynecomastia. Here we describe a 2-month-old 46,XY female patient, with all of the characteristics of CAIS. Defects in testosterone (T) and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) synthesis were excluded. Sequencing of the AR gene showed the presence in exon 6 of a T to C transition in the second base of codon 790, nucleotide position 2369, causing a novel missense Leu790Pro mutation in the ligand-binding domain of the AR protein. The identification of a novel AR mutation in a girl with CAIS provides significant information due to the importance of missense mutations in the ligand-binding domain of the AR, which are able to induce functional abnormalities in the androgen binding capability, stabilization of active conformation, or interaction with coactivators. (Asian J Androl 2008 Jul; 10: 687-691)

  5. Loss of Expression of Human Spectrin Src Homology Domain Binding Protein 1 is Associated with 10p Loss in Human Prostatic Adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill A. Macoska

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The gene encoding human spectrin Src homology domain binding protein 1, or Hssh3bpl, which is a marker of macropinocytic vesicles and a potential regulator of macropinocytosis, co-localizes to a YAC containing chromosome 10p sequences at loci D10S89 and D10S111 that are frequently deleted in prostate tumors. Expression of Hssh3bp1 was evaluated at the protein level in 17 paired normal and malignant prostate tumor samples using the monoclonal antibody 2G8 to Hssh3bpl. These experiments demonstrated that 4/6 tumors (67% with 10p deletion failed to express Hssh3bp1 protein compared to 5/11 (46% tumors with intact 10p. Thus, loss of Hssh3bp1 expression is concordant with allelic loss of adjacent 10p sequences in human prostate tumors. In addition, two prostate tumor cell lines contain an exon skipping mutation in the Hssh3bp1 gene that leads to the abnormal splicing of the mRNA and loss of a portion of Abl tyrosine kinase SH3 domain binding site in the protein. These data are consistent with a role for Hssh3bp1 as a candidate tumor suppressor gene inactivated during prostate tumorigenesis.

  6. Molecular Characterization of an Ice Nucleation Protein Variant (InaQ from Pseudomonas syringae and the Analysis of Its Transmembrane Transport Activity in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qianqian Li, Qi Yan, Jinsi Chen, Yan He, Jing Wang, Hongxing Zhang, Ziniu Yu, Lin Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The ice nucleation protein (INP of Pseudomonas syringae has gained scientific interest not only because of its pathogenicity of foliar necroses but also for its wide range of potential applications, such as in snow making, frozen food preparation, and surface-display system development. However, studies on the transport activity of INP remain lacking. In the present study, a newly identified INP-gene variant, inaQ, from a P. syringae MB03 strain was cloned. Its structural domains, signal sequences, and the hydrophilicity or hydrophobicity of each domain, were then characterized. The deduced amino acid sequence of InaQ shares similar protein domains with three P. syringae INPs, namely, InaK, InaZ, and InaV, which were identified as an N-terminal domain, a central repeating domain, and a C-terminal domain. The expression of the full-length InaQ and of various truncated variants was induced in Escherichia coli to analyze their transmembrane transport and surface-binding activities, while using the green fluorescence protein (GFP as the fusion partner. With two transmembrane segments and a weak secretion signal, the N-terminal domain (InaQ-N alone was found to be responsible for the transport process as well as for the binding to the outer membrane, whereas the C-terminal region was nonfunctional in protein transport. Increased membrane transport and surface-binding capacities were induced by a low isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactoside concentration (0.1 mmol/l but not by culture temperatures (15 ºC to 37 ºC. Furthermore, by constructing the GFP-fused proteins with a single InaQ-N, as well as two and three tandemly aligned InaQ-N molecules, the transport and membrane-binding activities of these proteins were compared using Western blot analysis, immmunofluorescence microscopy, and assays of the GFP specific fluorescence intensity of subcellular fractions and flow cytometry, which showed that the increase of InaQ-N repeats resulted in a coordinated

  7. The N-terminal extension domain of the C. elegans half-molecule ABC transporter, HMT-1, is required for protein-protein interactions and function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungjin Kim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Members of the HMT-1 (heavy metal tolerance factor 1 subfamily of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporter superfamily detoxify heavy metals and have unique topology: they are half-molecule ABC transporters that, in addition to a single transmembrane domain (TMD1 and a single nucleotide-binding domain (NBD1, possess a hydrophobic NH2-terminal extension (NTE. These structural features distinguish HMTs from other ABC transporters in different species including Drosophila and humans. Functional ABC transporters, however, are comprised of at least four-domains (two TMDs and two NDBs formed from either a single polypeptide or by the association of two or four separate subunits. Whether HMTs act as oligomers and what role the NTE domain plays in their function have not been determined. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we examined the oligomeric status of Caenorhabditis elegans HMT-1 and the functional significance of its NTE using gel-filtration chromatography in combination with the mating-based split-ubiquitin yeast two-hybrid system (mbSUS and functional in vivo assays. We found that HMT-1 exists in a protein complex in C. elegans. Studies in S. cerevisiae showed that HMT-1 at a minimum homodimerizes and that oligomerization is essential for HMT-1 to confer cadmium tolerance. We also established that the NTE domain plays an important structural and functional role: it is essential for HMT-1 oligomerization and Cd-detoxification function. However, the NTE itself was not sufficient for oligomerization suggesting that multiple structural features of HMT-1 must associate to form a functional transporter. CONCLUSIONS: The prominence of heavy metals as environmental toxins and the remarkable conservation of HMT-1 structural architecture and function in different species reinforce the value of continued studies of HMT-1 in model systems for identifying functional domains in HMT1 of humans.

  8. Latex-allergic patients sensitized to the major allergen hevein and hevein-like domains of class I chitinases show no increased frequency of latex-associated plant food allergy

    OpenAIRE

    Radauer, Christian; Adhami, Farzaneh; Fürtler, Irene; Wagner, Stefan; Allwardt, Dorothee; Scala, Enrico; Ebner, Christof; Hafner, Christine; Hemmer, Wolfgang; Mari, Adriano; Breiteneder, Heimo

    2011-01-01

    Allergies to certain fruits such as banana, avocado, chestnut and kiwi are described in 30–70% of latex-allergic patients. This association is attributed to the cross-reactivity between the major latex allergen hevein and hevein-like domains (HLDs) from fruit class I chitinases. We aimed to assess the extent of cross-reactivity between hevein and HLDs using sera from latex-allergic patients with and without plant food allergy. Hevein and HLDs of latex, banana, and avocado chitinases were expr...

  9. Enhancer-binding proteins with a forkhead-associated domain and the sigma(54) regulon in Myxococcus xanthus fruiting body development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelsbak, Lars; Givskov, Michael Christian; Kaiser, D.

    2005-01-01

    In response to starvation, Myxococcus xanthus initiates a developmental program that results in the formation of spore-filled, multicellular fruiting bodies. Many developmentally regulated genes in M. xanthus are transcribed from sigma(54) promoters, and these genes require enhancer-binding prote......In response to starvation, Myxococcus xanthus initiates a developmental program that results in the formation of spore-filled, multicellular fruiting bodies. Many developmentally regulated genes in M. xanthus are transcribed from sigma(54) promoters, and these genes require enhancer...... these genes, Mx4885, caused a cell autonomous aggregation and sporulation defect. In-frame deletion mutants showed that the FHA domain is necessary for proper Mx4885 function. The altered pattern of developmental gene expression in the mutant implied that Mx4885 is on the pathway of response to the...

  10. The Activation Domain of the Bovine Papillomavirus E2 Protein Mediates Association of DNA-Bound Dimers to form DNA Loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Jonathan D.; Li, Rong; Botchan, Michael

    1991-04-01

    The E2 transactivator protein of bovine papillomavirus binds its specific DNA target sequence as a dimer. We have found that E2 dimers, performed in solution independent of DNA, exhibit substantial cooperativity of DNA binding as detected by both nitrocellulose filter retention and footprint analysis techniques. If the binding sites are widely spaced, E2 forms stable DNA loops visible by electron microscopy. When three widely separated binding sites reside on te DNA, E2 condenses the molecule into a bow-tie structure. This implies that each E2 dimer has at least two independent surfaces for multimerization. Two naturally occurring shorter forms of the protein, E2C and D8/E2, which function in vivo as repressors of transcription, do not form such loops. Thus, the looping function of E2 maps to the 161-amino acid activation domain. These results support the looping model of transcription activation by enhancers.

  11. Docking ellipticine to the V-VI transmembrane domain of the Kv11.1 potassium channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipscomb, Dawn; Brancaleon, Lorenzo; Gentile, S.

    2011-03-01

    Ellipticines such as 9-methoxy-N-2-methylellipticinium acetate (MMEA) and 9-hydroxy-N-2-methylellipticinium acetate (NMEA, Celiptium ) are antineoplastic drugs exerting their selective cytotoxicity against leukemia and endometrial carcinoma. Ellipticine's action is also related to severe physical side effects, but the link between undesired effects and pharmacological application is not well understood. We investigated the binding of Ellipticine derivatives with the Kv11.1 potassium ion channel using Autodock and revealed that hydroxyellipticinium derivatives provide binding configurations with Kv11.1, but the energy, location and estimated dissociation constant varied. The binding energy is as follows: Chloroceliptium (-6.60 kcal/mol) Celiptium (- 6.37 kcal / mol) > Methoxyceliptium (- 6.20 kcal / mol) Datelliptium (-6.08 kcal/mol). The data shows that some configurations enable these molecules to bridge among channel subunits, thus potentially inhibiting the flow of ions.

  12. Effects of crossflow velocity and transmembrane pressure on microfiltration of oil-in-water emulsions

    CERN Document Server

    Darvishzadeh, Tohid

    2012-01-01

    This study addresses the issue of oil removal from water using hydrophilic porous membranes. The effective separation of oil-in-water dispersions involves high flux of water through the membrane and, at the same time, high rejection rate of the oil phase. The effects of transmembrane pressure and crossflow velocity on rejection of oil droplets and thin oil films by pores of different cross-section are investigated numerically by solving the Navier-Stokes equation. We found that in the absence of crossflow, the critical transmembrane pressure, which is required for the oil droplet entry into a circular pore of a given surface hydrophilicity, agrees well with analytical predictions based on the Young-Laplace equation. With increasing crossflow velocity, the shape of the oil droplet is strongly deformed near the pore entrance and the critical pressure of permeation increases. We determined numerically the phase diagram for the droplet rejection, permeation, and breakup depending of the transmembrane pressure and...

  13. High Affinity Binding of the Receptor-associated Protein D1D2 Domains with the Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor-related Protein (LRP1) Involves Bivalent Complex Formation: CRITICAL ROLES OF LYSINES 60 AND 191.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Joni M; Young, Patricia A; Strickland, Dudley K

    2016-08-26

    The LDL receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) is a large endocytic receptor that binds and mediates the endocytosis of numerous structurally diverse ligands. Currently, the basis for ligand recognition by LRP1 is not well understood. LRP1 requires a molecular chaperone, termed the receptor-associated protein (RAP), to escort the newly synthesized receptor from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi. RAP is a three-domain protein that contains the following two high affinity binding sites for LRP1: one is located within domains 1 and 2, and one is located in its third domain. Studies on the interaction of the RAP third domain with LRP1 reveal critical contributions by lysine 256 and lysine 270 for this interaction. From these studies, a model for ligand recognition by this class of receptors has been proposed. Here, we employed surface plasmon resonance to investigate the binding of RAP D1D2 to LRP1. Our results reveal that the high affinity of D1D2 for LRP1 results from avidity effects mediated by the simultaneous interactions of lysine 60 in D1 and lysine 191 in D2 with sites on LRP1 to form a bivalent D1D2-LRP1 complex. When lysine 60 and 191 are both mutated to alanine, the binding of D1D2 to LRP1 is ablated. Our data also reveal that D1D2 is able to bind to a second distinct site on LRP1 to form a monovalent complex. The studies confirm the canonical model for ligand recognition by this class of receptors, which is initiated by pairs of lysine residues that dock into acidic pockets on the receptor. PMID:27402839

  14. Membrane-Anchored Cytochrome P450 1A2-Cytochrome b5 Complex Features an X-Shaped Contact between Antiparallel Transmembrane Helices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeřábek, Petr; Florián, Jan; Martínek, Václav

    2016-04-18

    Eukaryotic cytochromes P450 (P450) are membrane-bound enzymes oxidizing a broad spectrum of hydrophobic substrates, including xenobiotics. Protein-protein interactions play a critical role in this process. In particular, the formation of transient complexes of P450 with another protein of the endoplasmic reticulum membrane, cytochrome b5 (cyt b5), dictates catalytic activities of several P450s. To lay a structural foundation for the investigation of these effects, we constructed a model of the membrane-bound full-length human P450 1A2-cyt b5 complex. The model was assembled from several parts using a multiscale modeling approach covering all-atom and coarse-grained molecular dynamics (MD). For soluble P450 1A2-cyt b5 complexes, these simulations yielded three stable binding modes (sAI, sAII, and sB). The membrane-spanning transmembrane domains were reconstituted with the phospholipid bilayer using self-assembly MD. The predicted full-length membrane-bound complexes (mAI and mB) featured a spontaneously formed X-shaped contact between antiparallel transmembrane domains, whereas the mAII mode was found to be unstable in the membrane environment. The mutual position of soluble domains in binding mode mAI was analogous to the sAI complex. Featuring the largest contact area, the least structural flexibility, the shortest electron transfer distance, and the highest number of interprotein salt bridges, mode mAI is the best candidate for the catalytically relevant full-length complex. PMID:26918755

  15. The clustered protocadherin endolysosomal trafficking motif mediates cytoplasmic association

    OpenAIRE

    Shonubi, Adam; Roman, Chantelle; Phillips, Greg R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Clustered protocadherins (Pcdhs) are a large family of neural cadherin-like proteins encoded by individual exons located within three gene clusters. Each exon codes an extracellular, transmembrane, and proximal cytoplasmic domain. These “variable” regions may be spliced to a constant cytoplasmic moiety encoded at the end of a cluster. Pcdh extracellular domains mediate homophilic cell-cell binding but their cytoplasmic domains cause intracellular retention and may negatively regula...

  16. Overproduction, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of human Fe65-PTB2 in complex with the amyloid precursor protein intracellular domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alzheimer’s disease is characterized by proteolytic processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP), which releases the aggregation-prone amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide and liberates the intracellular domain (AICD) that interacts with various adaptor proteins. The crystallized AICD–Fe65-PTB2 complex is of central importance for APP translocation, nuclear signalling, processing and Aβ generation. Alzheimer’s disease is associated with typical brain deposits (senile plaques) that mainly contain the neurotoxic amyloid β peptide. This peptide results from proteolytic processing of the type I transmembrane protein amyloid precursor protein (APP). During this proteolytic pathway the APP intracellular domain (AICD) is released into the cytosol, where it associates with various adaptor proteins. The interaction of the AICD with the C-terminal phosphotyrosine-binding domain of Fe65 (Fe65-PTB2) regulates APP translocation, signalling and processing. Human AICD and Fe65-PTB2 have been cloned, overproduced and purified in large amounts in Escherichia coli. A complex of Fe65-PTB2 with the C-terminal 32 amino acids of the AICD gave well diffracting hexagonal crystals and data have been collected to 2.1 Å resolution. Initial phases obtained by the molecular-replacement method are of good quality and revealed well defined electron density for the substrate peptide

  17. TMM@: a web application for the analysis of transmembrane helix mobility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonassen Inge

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To understand the mechanism by which a protein transmits a signal through the cell membrane, an understanding of the flexibility of its transmembrane (TM region is essential. Normal Mode Analysis (NMA has become the method of choice to investigate the slowest motions in macromolecular systems. It has been widely used to study transmembrane channels and pumps. It relies on the hypothesis that the vibrational normal modes having the lowest frequencies (also named soft modes describe the largest movements in a protein and are the ones that are functionally relevant. In particular NMA can be used to study dynamics of TM regions, but no tool making this approach available for non-experts, has been available so far. Results We developed the web-application TMM@ (TransMembrane α-helical Mobility analyzer. It uses NMA to characterize the propensity of transmembrane α-helices to be displaced. Starting from a structure file at the PDB format, the server computes the normal modes of the protein and identifies which helices in the bundle are the most mobile. Each analysis is performed independently from the others and results can be visualized using only a web browser. No additional plug-in or software is required. For users who would like to further analyze the output data with their favourite software, raw results can also be downloaded. Conclusion We built a novel and unique tool, TMM@, to study the mobility of transmembrane α-helices. The tool can be applied to for example membrane transporters and provides biologists studying transmembrane proteins with an approach to investigate which α-helices are likely to undergo the largest displacements, and hence which helices are most likely to be involved in the transportation of molecules in and out of the cell.

  18. Intrinsic potential of cell membranes: opposite effects of lipid transmembrane asymmetry and asymmetric salt ion distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gurtovenko, Andrey A; Vattulainen, Ilpo

    2009-01-01

    Using atomic-scale molecular dynamics simulations, we consider the intrinsic cell membrane potential that is found to originate from a subtle interplay between lipid transmembrane asymmetry and the asymmetric distribution of monovalent salt ions on the two sides of the cell membrane. It turns out...... that both the asymmetric distribution of phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) lipids across a membrane and the asymmetric distribution of NaCl and KCl induce nonzero drops in the transmembrane potential. However, these potential drops are opposite in sign. As the PC leaflet faces...

  19. Effects of several chinese crude drugs on 45Ca transmembrane influx in vascular smooth muscles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of several Chinese crude drugs including Crocus sativus, Carthamus tinctorius and Ginkgo biloba on Ca2+ transmembrane influx in rat aorta rings were studied. Resting 45Ca uptake was not markedly altered by these drugs, whereas the 45Ca influxes evoked by norepinephrine (1.2 μmol/L) and KCl (100 mmol/L) in rat aorta rings were significantly inhibited by Crocus and Carthamus in a concentration-dependent manner, not by Ginkgo. The results indicate that extracellular Ca2+ transmembrane influx through receptor-operated Ca2+ channels and potential-dependent Ca2+ channels can be blocked by Crocus and Carthamus

  20. Regulation of natural competence by the orphan two-component system sensor kinase ChiS involves a non-canonical transmembrane regulator in Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Shouji; Mitobe, Jiro; Ishikawa, Takahiko; Wai, Sun Nyunt; Ohnishi, Makoto; Watanabe, Haruo; Izumiya, Hidemasa

    2014-01-01

    In Vibrio cholerae, 41 chitin-inducible genes, including the genes involved in natural competence for DNA uptake, are governed by the orphan two-component system (TCS) sensor kinase ChiS. However, the mechanism by which ChiS controls the expression of these genes is currently unknown. Here, we report the involvement of a novel transcription factor termed 'TfoS' in this process. TfoS is a transmembrane protein that contains a large periplasmic domain and a cytoplasmic AraC-type DNA-binding domain, but lacks TCS signature domains. Inactivation of tfoS abolished natural competence as well as transcription of the tfoR gene encoding a chitin-induced small RNA essential for competence gene expression. A TfoS fragment containing the DNA-binding domain specifically bound to and activated transcription from the tfoR promoter. Intracellular TfoS levels were unaffected by disruption of chiS and coexpression of TfoS and ChiS in Escherichia coli recovered transcription of the chromosomally integrated tfoR::lacZ gene, suggesting that TfoS is post-translationally modulated by ChiS during transcriptional activation; however, this regulation persisted when the canonical phosphorelay residues of ChiS were mutated. The results presented here suggest that ChiS operates a chitin-induced non-canonical signal transduction cascade through TfoS, leading to transcriptional activation of tfoR. PMID:24236404

  1. The Popeye domain containing 2 (popdc2) gene in zebrafish is required for heart and skeletal muscle development

    OpenAIRE

    Kirchmaier, Bettina C.; Poon, Kar Lai; Schwerte, Thorsten; Huisken, Jan; Winkler, Christoph; Jungblut, Benno; Stainier, Didier Y.; Brand, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The Popeye domain containing (Popdc) genes encode a family of transmembrane proteins with an evolutionary conserved Popeye domain. These genes are abundantly expressed in striated muscle tissue, however their function is not well understood. In this study we have investigated the role of the popdc2 gene in zebrafish. Popdc2 transcripts were detected in the embryonic myocardium and transiently in the craniofacial and tail musculature. Morpholino oligonucleotide-mediated knockdown of popdc2 res...

  2. Modeling a dehalogenase fold into the 8-A density map for Ca(2+)-ATPase defines a new domain structure.

    OpenAIRE

    Stokes, D.L.; Green, N M

    2000-01-01

    Members of the large family of P-type pumps use active transport to maintain gradients of a wide variety of cations across cellular membranes. Recent structures of two P-type pumps at 8-A resolution have revealed the arrangement of transmembrane helices but were insufficient to reveal the architecture of the cytoplasmic domains. However, recent proposals of a structural homology with a superfamily of hydrolases offer a new basis for modeling these domains. In the current work, we have extende...

  3. Mutational Analysis of Intracellular Loops Identify Cross Talk with Nucleotide Binding Domains of Yeast ABC Transporter Cdr1p

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, Abdul Haseeb; Rawal, Manpreet Kaur; Dhamgaye, Sanjiveeni; Komath, Sneha Sudha; Saxena, Ajay Kumar; Prasad, Rajendra

    2015-01-01

    The ABC transporter Cdr1 protein (Cdr1p) of Candida albicans, which plays a major role in antifungal resistance, has two transmembrane domains (TMDs) and two nucleotide binding domains (NBDs) that are interconnected by extracellular (ECLs) and intracellular (ICLs) loops. To examine the communication interface between the NBDs and ICLs of Cdr1p, we subjected all four ICLs to alanine scanning mutagenesis, replacing each of the 85 residues with an alanine. The resulting ICL mutant library was an...

  4. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Activation by Roflumilast Contributes to Therapeutic Benefit in Chronic Bronchitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, James A.; Raju, S. Vamsee; Tang, Li Ping; McNicholas, Carmel M.; Li, Yao; Courville, Clifford A.; Farris, Roopan F.; Coricor, George E.; Smoot, Lisa H.; Mazur, Marina M.; Dransfield, Mark T.; Bolger, Graeme B.

    2014-01-01

    Cigarette smoking causes acquired cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) dysfunction and is associated with delayed mucociliary clearance and chronic bronchitis. Roflumilast is a clinically approved phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitor that improves lung function in patients with chronic bronchitis. We hypothesized that its therapeutic benefit was related in part to activation of CFTR. Primary human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells, Calu-3, and T84 monolayers were exposed to whole cigarette smoke (WCS) or air with or without roflumilast treatment. CFTR-dependent ion transport was measured in modified Ussing chambers. Airway surface liquid (ASL) was determined by confocal microscopy. Intestinal fluid secretion of ligated murine intestine was monitored ex vivo. Roflumilast activated CFTR-dependent anion transport in normal HBE cells with a half maximal effective concentration of 2.9 nM. Roflumilast partially restored CFTR activity in WCS-exposed HBE cells (5.3 ± 1.1 μA/cm2 vs. 1.2 ± 0.2 μA/cm2 [control]; P < 0.05) and was additive with ivacaftor, a specific CFTR potentiator approved for the treatment of CF. Roflumilast improved the depleted ASL depth of HBE monolayers exposed to WCS (9.0 ± 3.1 μm vs. 5.6 ± 2.0 μm [control]; P < 0.05), achieving 79% of that observed in air controls. CFTR activation by roflumilast also induced CFTR-dependent fluid secretion in murine intestine, increasing the wet:dry ratio and the diameter of ligated murine segments. Roflumilast activates CFTR-mediated anion transport in airway and intestinal epithelia via a cyclic adenosine monophosphate–dependent pathway and partially reverses the deleterious effects of WCS, resulting in augmented ASL depth. Roflumilast may benefit patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with chronic bronchitis by activating CFTR, which may also underlie noninfectious diarrhea caused by roflumilast. PMID:24106801

  5. Origin of the diversity in DNA recognition domains in phasevarion associated modA genes of pathogenic Neisseria and Haemophilus influenzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawthorne, Jayde A; Beatson, Scott A; Srikhanta, Yogitha N; Fox, Kate L; Jennings, Michael P

    2012-01-01

    Phase variable restriction-modification (R-M) systems have been identified in a range of pathogenic bacteria. In some it has been demonstrated that the random switching of the mod (DNA methyltransferase) gene mediates the coordinated expression of multiple genes and constitutes a phasevarion (phase variable regulon). ModA of Neisseria and Haemophilus influenzae contain a highly variable, DNA recognition domain (DRD) that defines the target sequence that is modified by methylation and is used to define modA alleles. 18 distinct modA alleles have been identified in H. influenzae and the pathogenic Neisseria. To determine the origin of DRD variability, the 18 modA DRDs were used to search the available databases for similar sequences. Significant matches were identified between several modA alleles and mod gene from distinct bacterial species, indicating one source of the DRD variability was via horizontal gene transfer. Comparison of DRD sequences revealed significant mosaicism, indicating exchange between the Neisseria and H. influenzae modA alleles. Regions of high inter- and intra-allele similarity indicate that some modA alleles had undergone recombination more frequently than others, generating further diversity. Furthermore, the DRD from some modA alleles, such as modA12, have been transferred en bloc to replace the DRD from different modA alleles. PMID:22457715

  6. Origin of the diversity in DNA recognition domains in phasevarion associated modA genes of pathogenic Neisseria and Haemophilus influenzae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayde A Gawthorne

    Full Text Available Phase variable restriction-modification (R-M systems have been identified in a range of pathogenic bacteria. In some it has been demonstrated that the random switching of the mod (DNA methyltransferase gene mediates the coordinated expression of multiple genes and constitutes a phasevarion (phase variable regulon. ModA of Neisseria and Haemophilus influenzae contain a highly variable, DNA recognition domain (DRD that defines the target sequence that is modified by methylation and is used to define modA alleles. 18 distinct modA alleles have been identified in H. influenzae and the pathogenic Neisseria. To determine the origin of DRD variability, the 18 modA DRDs were used to search the available databases for similar sequences. Significant matches were identified between several modA alleles and mod gene from distinct bacterial species, indicating one source of the DRD variability was via horizontal gene transfer. Comparison of DRD sequences revealed significant mosaicism, indicating exchange between the Neisseria and H. influenzae modA alleles. Regions of high inter- and intra-allele similarity indicate that some modA alleles had undergone recombination more frequently than others, generating further diversity. Furthermore, the DRD from some modA alleles, such as modA12, have been transferred en bloc to replace the DRD from different modA alleles.

  7. Tyrosine phosphorylation within the amino-terminal domain of pp60c-src molecules associated with polyoma virus middle-sized tumor antigen.

    OpenAIRE

    Yonemoto, W; Jarvis-Morar, M; Brugge, J S; Bolen, J B; Israel, M. A.

    1985-01-01

    We have examined the in vitro phosphorylation of cellular src protein (pp60c-src) molecules associated with the polyoma virus middle-sized tumor antigen in polyoma virus-transformed cells. These pp60c-src molecules possessed an enhanced tyrosyl kinase activity, migrated aberrantly on NaDodSO4/polyacrylamide gels, and contained a novel site of tyrosine phosphorylation within the amino-terminal region of the molecule. The pp60c-src molecules not associated with the middle-sized tumor antigen we...

  8. Structural basis of typhod: Salmonella typhi type IVb pilin (PilS) and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balakrishna, A.; Saxena, A; Mok, H; Swaminathan, K

    2009-01-01

    The type IVb pilus of the enteropathogenic bacteria Salmonella typhi is a major adhesion factor during the entry of this pathogen into gastrointestinal epithelial cells. Its target of adhesion is a stretch of 10 residues from the first extracellular domain of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). The crystal structure of the N-terminal 25 amino acid deleted S. typhi native PilS protein (PilS), which makes the pilus, was determined at 1.9 A resolution by the multiwavelength anomalous dispersion method. Also, the structure of the complex of PilS and a target CFTR peptide, determined at 1.8 A, confirms that residues 113-117 (NKEER) of CFTR are involved in binding with the pilin protein and gives us insight on the amino acids that are essential for binding. Furthermore, we have also explored the role of a conserved disulfide bridge in pilus formation. The subunit structure and assembly architecture are crucial for understanding pilus functions and designing suitable therapeutics against typhoid.

  9. Structural basis of typhoid: Salmonella typhi type IVb pilin (PiLS) and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balakrishna, A.M.; Saxena, A.; Mok, H. Y.-K.; Swaminathan, K.

    2009-11-01

    The type IVb pilus of the enteropathogenic bacteria Salmonella typhi is a major adhesion factor during the entry of this pathogen into gastrointestinal epithelial cells. Its target of adhesion is a stretch of 10 residues from the first extracellular domain of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). The crystal structure of the N-terminal 25 amino acid deleted S. typhi native PilS protein ({Delta}PilS), which makes the pilus, was determined at 1.9 {angstrom} resolution by the multiwavelength anomalous dispersion method. Also, the structure of the complex of {Delta}PilS and a target CFTR peptide, determined at 1.8 {angstrom}, confirms that residues 113-117 (NKEER) of CFTR are involved in binding with the pilin protein and gives us insight on the amino acids that are essential for binding. Furthermore, we have also explored the role of a conserved disulfide bridge in pilus formation. The subunit structure and assembly architecture are crucial for understanding pilus functions and designing suitable therapeutics against typhoid.

  10. Structural Basis of Typhoid: Salmonella typhi Type IVb pilin (PilS) and Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulatory Interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balakrishna, A.; Saxena, A; Mok, H; Swaminathan, K

    2009-01-01

    The type IVb pilus of the enteropathogenic bacteria Salmonella typhi is a major adhesion factor during the entry of this pathogen into gastrointestinal epithelial cells. Its target of adhesion is a stretch of 10 residues from the first extracellular domain of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). The crystal structure of the N-terminal 25 amino acid deleted S. typhi native PilS protein (PilS), which makes the pilus, was determined at 1.9 A resolution by the multiwavelength anomalous dispersion method. Also, the structure of the complex of PilS and a target CFTR peptide, determined at 1.8 A, confirms that residues 113-117 (NKEER) of CFTR are involved in binding with the pilin protein and gives us insight on the amino acids that are essential for binding. Furthermore, we have also explored the role of a conserved disulfide bridge in pilus formation. The subunit structure and assembly architecture are crucial for understanding pilus functions and designing suitable therapeutics against typhoid.

  11. Explaining Method Effects Associated with Negatively Worded Items in Trait and State Global and Domain-Specific Self-Esteem Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomas, Jose M.; Oliver, Amparo; Galiana, Laura; Sancho, Patricia; Lila, Marisol

    2013-01-01

    Several investigators have interpreted method effects associated with negatively worded items in a substantive way. This research extends those studies in different ways: (a) it establishes the presence of methods effects in further populations and particular scales, and (b) it examines the possible relations between a method factor associated…

  12. Survivability-enhancing routing scheme for multi-domain networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Xiaohua; Ruepp, Sarah Renée; Manolova, Anna Vasileva;

    2008-01-01

    domain level disjoint paths. Our work is based on the aggregated representation of transit domains. The aggregated scheme we use is obtaining the shortest path between each pair of border routers for the associated domain. We also propose to use a single node to represent the destination domain, thereby...

  13. Provenance of metasedimentary rocks from the Ceará Central Domain of Borborema Province, NE Brazil: implications for the significance of associated retrograded eclogites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ancelmi, Matheus Fernando; Santos, Ticiano José Saraiva dos; Amaral, Wagner da Silva; Fuck, Reinhardt Adolfo; Dantas, Elton Luiz; Zincone, Stefano Albino

    2015-03-01

    In the Forquilha area (NE Brazil), in NW Borborema Province, high to ultra-high pressure rocks are an important geological key to understanding West Gondwana amalgamation. U-Pb geochronological data for a retrograded eclogite sample yielded an upper intercept age of ca. 1520 Ma and a lower intercept age of ca. 620 Ma. These ages most likely represent the crystallization age of the basaltic protolith and the regional metamorphism, respectively. The retrograded eclogites are enclosed in migmatized quartz-feldspathic gneiss and sillimanite (after kyanite)-garnet-biotite gneiss. Detrital U-Pb zircon data for these paragneisses show only Paleoproterozoic zircon grains with ages clustering from ca. 1800 Ma (the maximum depositional age) to ca. 2480 Ma, and frequency peaks at 2.2-2.0 Ga. Combined with Nd isotopic data from the Forquilha paragneisses, one can assume a single Paleoproterozoic source. Basement rocks of the Ceará Central and the Rio Grande do Norte domains are the most likely candidates. The absence of Meso- and Neoproterozoic zircon grains suggest that the retrograded eclogite bodies possibly do not represent slivers of oceanic rocks captured in active margin sequences during subduction. It was identified that the high-pressure rocks of the Forquilha area are in tectonic contact with high-pressure granulite facies rocks of the Ceará Complex (Independência unit) that present detrital zircon records of an active margin setting, with ages ranging from ca. 660 Ma to 2200 Ma. Metamorphism of this sequence occurred at ca. 650 Ma. Considering previous studies, field relationships, and metamorphic paragenesis, a tectonic scenario is inferred, in which the Forquilha retrograded eclogites represent Mesoproterozoic basaltic rocks of an extensional event that were metamorphosed under eclogite facies conditions during Late Neoproterozoic continental subduction/collision, and juxtaposed to an active margin sequence during the exhumation process.

  14. RNA-Free and Ribonucleoprotein-Associated Influenza Virus Polymerases Directly Bind the Serine-5-Phosphorylated Carboxyl-Terminal Domain of Host RNA Polymerase II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Alonso, Mónica; Hengrung, Narin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Influenza viruses subvert the transcriptional machinery of their hosts to synthesize their own viral mRNA. Ongoing transcription by cellular RNA polymerase II (Pol II) is required for viral mRNA synthesis. By a process known as cap snatching, the virus steals short 5′ capped RNA fragments from host capped RNAs and uses them to prime viral transcription. An interaction between the influenza A virus RNA polymerase and the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the large subunit of Pol II has been established, but the molecular details of this interaction remain unknown. We show here that the influenza virus ribonucleoprotein (vRNP) complex binds to the CTD of transcriptionally engaged Pol II. Furthermore, we provide evidence that the viral polymerase binds directly to the serine-5-phosphorylated form of the Pol II CTD, both in the presence and in the absence of viral RNA, and show that this interaction is conserved in evolutionarily distant influenza viruses. We propose a model in which direct binding of the viral RNA polymerase in the context of vRNPs to Pol II early in infection facilitates cap snatching, while we suggest that binding of free viral polymerase to Pol II late in infection may trigger Pol II degradation. IMPORTANCE Influenza viruses cause yearly epidemics and occasional pandemics that pose a threat to human health, as well as represent a large economic burden to health care systems globally. Existing vaccines are not always effective, as they may not exactly match the circulating viruses. Furthermore, there are a limited number of antivirals available, and development of resistance to these is a concern. New measures to combat influenza are needed, but before they can be developed, it is necessary to better understand the molecular interactions between influenza viruses and their host cells. By providing further insights into the molecular details of how influenza viruses hijack the host transcriptional machinery, we aim to uncover novel targets for

  15. Sensitive detection of pre-existing BCR-ABL kinase domain mutations in CD34+ cells of newly diagnosed chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia patients is associated with imatinib resistance: implications in the post-imatinib era.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zafar Iqbal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: BCR-ABL kinase domain mutations are infrequently detected in newly diagnosed chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia (CML patients. Recent studies indicate the presence of pre-existing BCR-ABL mutations in a higher percentage of CML patients when CD34+ stem/progenitor cells are investigated using sensitive techniques, and these mutations are associated with imatinib resistance and disease progression. However, such studies were limited to smaller number of patients. METHODS: We investigated BCR-ABL kinase domain mutations in CD34+ cells from 100 chronic-phase CML patients by multiplex allele-specific PCR and sequencing at diagnosis. Mutations were re-investigated upon manifestation of imatinib resistance using allele-specific PCR and direct sequencing of BCR-ABL kinase domain. RESULTS: Pre-existing BCR-ABL mutations were detected in 32/100 patients and included F311L, M351T, and T315I. After a median follow-up of 30 months (range 8-48, all patients with pre-existing BCR-ABL mutations exhibited imatinib resistance. Of the 68 patients without pre-existing BCR-ABL mutations, 24 developed imatinib resistance; allele-specific PCR and BCR-ABL kinase domain sequencing detected mutations in 22 of these patients. All 32 patients with pre-existing BCR-ABL mutations had the same mutations after manifestation of imatinib-resistance. In imatinib-resistant patients without pre-existing BCR-ABL mutations, we detected F311L, M351T, Y253F, and T315I mutations. All imatinib-resistant patients except T315I and Y253F mutations responded to imatinib dose escalation. CONCLUSION: Pre-existing BCR-ABL mutations can be detected in a substantial number of chronic-phase CML patients by sensitive allele-specific PCR technique using CD34+ cells. These mutations are associated with imatinib resistance if affecting drug binding directly or indirectly. After the recent approval of nilotinib, dasatinib, bosutinib and ponatinib for treatment of chronic myeloid

  16. Overexpression of Antimicrobial, Anticancer, and Transmembrane Peptides in Escherichia coli through a Calmodulin-Peptide Fusion System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Hiroaki; Nguyen, Leonard T; Gopal, Ramamourthy; Aizawa, Tomoyasu; Vogel, Hans J

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, the increasing number of antibiotic-resistant bacteria has become a serious health concern. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are an important component of the innate immune system of most organisms. A better understanding of their structures and mechanisms of action would lead to the design of more potent and safer AMPs as alternatives for current antibiotics. For detailed investigations, effective recombinant production which allows the facile modification of the amino acid sequence, the introduction of unnatural amino acids, and labeling with stable isotopes for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies is desired. Several expression strategies have been introduced in previous reports; however, their effectiveness has been limited to a select few AMPs. Here, we have studied calmodulin (CaM) as a more universal carrier protein to express many types of AMPs in E. coli. We have discovered that the unique architecture of CaM, consisting of two independent target binding domains with malleable methionine-rich interaction surfaces, can accommodate numerous amino acid sequences containing basic and hydrophobic residues. This effectively masks the toxic antimicrobial activities of many amphipathic AMPs and protects them from degradation during expression and purification. Here, we demonstrate the expression of various AMPs using a CaM-fusion expression system, including melittin, fowlicidin-1, tritrpticin, indolicidin, puroindoline A peptide, magainin II F5W, lactoferrampin B, MIP3α51-70, and human β-defensin 3 (HBD-3), the latter requiring three disulfide bonds for proper folding. In addition, our approach was extended to the transmembrane domain of the cell adhesion protein l-selectin. We propose the use of the CaM-fusion system as a universal approach to express many cationic amphipathic peptides that are normally toxic and would kill the bacterial host cells. PMID:27502305

  17. Structure and Mechanism of Proton Transport Through the Transmembrane Tetrameric M2 Protein Bundle of the Influenza A Virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R Acharya; V Carnevale; G Fiorin; B Levine; A Polishchuk; V Balannick; I Samish; R Lamb; L Pinto; et al.

    2011-12-31

    The M2 proton channel from influenza A virus is an essential protein that mediates transport of protons across the viral envelope. This protein has a single transmembrane helix, which tetramerizes into the active channel. At the heart of the conduction mechanism is the exchange of protons between the His37 imidazole moieties of M2 and waters confined to the M2 bundle interior. Protons are conducted as the total charge of the four His37 side chains passes through 2{sup +} and 3{sup +} with a pK{sub a} near 6. A 1.65 {angstrom} resolution X-ray structure of the transmembrane protein (residues 25-46), crystallized at pH 6.5, reveals a pore that is lined by alternating layers of sidechains and well-ordered water clusters, which offer a pathway for proton conduction. The His37 residues form a box-like structure, bounded on either side by water clusters with well-ordered oxygen atoms at close distance. The conformation of the protein, which is intermediate between structures previously solved at higher and lower pH, suggests a mechanism by which conformational changes might facilitate asymmetric diffusion through the channel in the presence of a proton gradient. Moreover, protons diffusing through the channel need not be localized to a single His37 imidazole, but instead may be delocalized over the entire His-box and associated water clusters. Thus, the new crystal structure provides a possible unification of the discrete site versus continuum conduction models.

  18. Molecular dynamics study of the solvation of an alpha-helical transmembrane peptide by DMSO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duarte, A.M.; Mierlo, van C.P.M.; Hemminga, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    10-ns molecular dynamics study of the solvation of a hydrophobic transmembrane helical peptide in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is presented. The objective is to analyze how this aprotic polar solvent is able to solvate three groups of amino acid residues (i.e., polar, apolar, and charged) that are loca

  19. Order parameters of a transmembrane helix in a fluid Bilayer: case study of a WALP peptide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holt, A.; Rougier, L.; Réat, V.; Jolibois, F.; Saurel, O.; Czaplicki, J.; Killian, J.A.; Milon, A.

    2010-01-01

    A new solid-state NMR-based strategy is established for the precise and efficient analysis of orientation and dynamics of transmembrane peptides in fluid bilayers. For this purpose, several dynamically averaged anisotropic constraints, including 13C and 15N chemical shift anisotropies and 13C-15N di

  20. The trans-membrane potential of biological membranes in computer simulation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Melcr, Josef; Timr, Štěpán; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 44, Suppl 1 (2015), S170. ISSN 0175-7571. [EBSA European Biophysics Congress /10./. 18.07.2015-22.07.2015, Dresden] Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : molecular dynamics * trans-membrane potential Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  1. Advantages of combined transmembrane topology and signal peptide prediction--the Phobius web server

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Käll, Lukas; Krogh, Anders; Sonnhammer, Erik L L

    When using conventional transmembrane topology and signal peptide predictors, such as TMHMM and SignalP, there is a substantial overlap between these two types of predictions. Applying these methods to five complete proteomes, we found that 30-65% of all predicted signal peptides and 25-35% of al...

  2. Critical Role of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulation(CFTR)in Female Reproduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hsiao Chang CHAN

    2003-01-01

    @@ Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a cAMP-activated Cl- channel, mutations of which are responsible for defective Cl- and/or HCO-3 secretions seen in cystic fibrosis (CF), a common lethal genetic disease affecting most exocrine glands/organs, including the lungs, intestine, pancreas and reproductive tracts of both sexes.

  3. 21 CFR 866.5900 - Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutation detection system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... regulator (CFTR) gene mutation detection system. 866.5900 Section 866.5900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5900 Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutation detection system. (a) Identification. The CFTR gene mutation detection system is a...

  4. Transmembrane adaptor molecules: a new category of lymphoid-cell markers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tedoldi, S.; Paterson, J.C.; Hansmann, M.-L.; Natkunam, Y.; Rüdiger, T.; Angelisová, Pavla; Du, M.Q.; Roberton, H.; Roncador, G.; Sanchez, L.; Pozzobon, M.; Masir, N.; Barry, R.; Pileri, S.; Mason, D.Y.; Marafioti, T.; Hořejší, Václav

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 107, č. 1 (2006), s. 213-221. ISSN 0006-4971 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0506 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : transmembrane adaptors * PAG * LIME Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 10.370, year: 2006

  5. High prevalence of substance use and associated factors among high school adolescents in Woreta Town, Northwest Ethiopia: multi-domain factor analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Birhanu, Anteneh Messele; Bisetegn, Telake Azale; Woldeyohannes, Solomon Meseret

    2014-01-01

    Background Substance use is a major public health concern in global settings, and is very common during adolescence period leading to physical and/or mental health complications. This study assessed the prevalence of substance use and associated factors among high school adolescents in Woreta Town, Northwest Ethiopia, 2012. Methods A school based cross-sectional study was conducted from April 7 to April 15, 2012 amongst 684 9th to 12th grade high school students in the town of Woreta. Partici...

  6. Multiple transmembrane binding sites for p-trifluoromethyldiazirinyl-etomidate, a photoreactive Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptor allosteric inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamouda, Ayman K; Stewart, Deirdre S; Husain, S Shaukat; Cohen, Jonathan B

    2011-06-10

    Photoreactive derivatives of the general anesthetic etomidate have been developed to identify their binding sites in γ-aminobutyric acid, type A and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. One such drug, [(3)H]TDBzl-etomidate (4-[3-(trifluoromethyl)-3H-diazirin-3-yl]benzyl-[(3)H]1-(1-phenylethyl)-1H-imidazole-5-carboxylate), acts as a positive allosteric potentiator of Torpedo nACh receptor (nAChR) and binds to a novel site in the transmembrane domain at the γ-α subunit interface. To extend our understanding of the locations of allosteric modulator binding sites in the nAChR, we now characterize the interactions of a second aryl diazirine etomidate derivative, TFD-etomidate (ethyl-1-(1-(4-(3-trifluoromethyl)-3H-diazirin-3-yl)phenylethyl)-1H-imidazole-5-carboxylate). TFD-etomidate inhibited acetylcholine-induced currents with an IC(50) = 4 μM, whereas it inhibited the binding of [(3)H]phencyclidine to the Torpedo nAChR ion channel in the resting and desensitized states with IC(50) values of 2.5 and 0.7 mm, respectively. Similar to [(3)H]TDBzl-etomidate, [(3)H]TFD-etomidate bound to a site at the γ-α subunit interface, photolabeling αM2-10 (αSer-252) and γMet-295 and γMet-299 within γM3, and to a site in the ion channel, photolabeling amino acids within each subunit M2 helix that line the lumen of the ion channel. In addition, [(3)H]TFD-etomidate photolabeled in an agonist-dependent manner amino acids within the δ subunit M2-M3 loop (δIle-288) and the δ subunit transmembrane helix bundle (δPhe-232 and δCys-236 within δM1). The fact that TFD-etomidate does not compete with ion channel blockers at concentrations that inhibit acetylcholine responses indicates that binding to sites at the γ-α subunit interface and/or within δ subunit helix bundle mediates the TFD-etomidate inhibitory effect. These results also suggest that the γ-α subunit interface is a binding site for Torpedo nAChR negative allosteric modulators (TFD-etomidate) and for positive

  7. Genetic Conservation in gp36 Transmembrane Sequences of Indian HIV Type 2 Isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadhav, Sushama; Tripathy, Srikanth; Kulkarni, Smita; Chaturbhuj, Devidas; Ghare, Rucha; Bhattacharya, Jayanta; Paranjape, Ramesh

    2011-12-01

    HIV-2 group A is predominant in different parts of the world, especially Africa, Portugal, Spain, France, the United Kingdom, the United States, Korea, and India. Among the Asian countries, India accounts for about 95% of all HIV-2 infections. The prevalence of HIV-2 has been reported from various states of India such as Maharashtra, Goa, Tamil Nadu, West Bengal, and Uttar Pradesh. In the present study, we analyzed transmembrane region (gp36) sequences of 10 HIV-2 group A Indian strains, isolated from Indian HIV-2-seropositive individuals. HIV Blast analysis for the 1.0-Kb region of the gp36 transmembrane region has shown that all these sequences belong to HIV-2 group A. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the sequences cluster with HIV-2 group A sequences of Cameroon and Senegal. The epitope found at position 645-656 (YELQKLNSWDVF), previously reported as a broadly neutralizing determinant, was very well conserved in all 10 study sequences. The percentage similarity between Indian and South African HIV-2 group A gp36 sequences was 90% (range 86-100, SD 2.8) and with other nonsubtype A clades was 84% (range 77-100, SD 6.06) indicating overall less variability among the reported HIV-2 sequences. Similarly, the consensus amino acid sequences of the envelope transmembrane region of HIV-1 (gp41) and HIV-2 (gp36) is quite synonymous, indicating 87% similarity; however, limited information is available about the gp36 transmembrane region of the prevalent HIV 2 group A Indian strain. The rate of synonymous substitutions reported in the gp105 region was significantly higher, suggesting lower virulence of HIV-2, which does translate into a lower rate of evolution, while the dN/dS ratio for the gp36 transmembrane region was less than one, indicating its conservation and significance (p<0.05) in structural and functional constraints. PMID:21453135

  8. Electrochemical Platform for the Detection of Transmembrane Proteins Reconstituted into Liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacek, Jan; Zatloukalova, Martina; Geleticova, Jaroslava; Kubala, Martin; Modriansky, Martin; Fekete, Ladislav; Masek, Josef; Hubatka, Frantisek; Turanek, Jaroslav

    2016-04-19

    The development of new methods and strategies for the investigation of membrane proteins is limited by poor solubility of these proteins in an aqueous environment and hindered by a number of other problems linked to the instability of the proteins outside lipid bilayers. Therefore, current research focuses on an analysis of membrane proteins incorporated into model lipid membrane, most frequently liposomes. In this work, we introduce a new electrochemical methodology for the analysis of transmembrane proteins reconstituted into a liposomal system. The proposed analytical approach is based on proteoliposomal sample adsorption on the surface of working electrodes followed by analysis of the anodic and cathodic signals of the reconstituted proteins. It works based on the fact that proteins are electroactive species, in contrast to the lipid components of the membranes under the given experimental conditions. Electroanalytical experiments were performed with two transmembrane proteins; the Na(+)/K(+)ATPase that contains transmembrane as well as large extramembraneous segments and the mitochondrial uncoupling protein 1, which is a transmembrane protein essentially lacking extramembraneous segments. Electrochemical analyses of proteoliposomes were compared with analyses of both proteins solubilized with detergents (C12E8 and octyl-PoE) and supported by the following complementary methods: microscopy techniques, protein activity testing, molecular model visualizations, and immunochemical identification of both proteins. The label-free electrochemical platform presented here enables studies of reconstituted transmembrane proteins at the nanomolar level. Our results may contribute to the development of new electrochemical sensors and microarray systems applicable within the field of poorly water-soluble proteins. PMID:26980181

  9. Correlation of biological activity with computationally derived structural features from transmembrane hetero-dimers of HIV-1 Vpu with host factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li-Hua; Fischer, Wolfgang B

    2014-04-01

    Vpu is an 81 amino acid type I integral membrane protein encoded by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). It is identified to support viral release by potentially forming ion and substrate conducting channels and by modulating the function of host factors. The focus is on the interaction of the transmembrane domains of Vpu with those of host factors using a combination of molecular dynamics simulations and docking approach. Binding poses and adopted tilt angles of the dimers are analyzed and correlated with experimentally derived activity data from literature. Vpu activity is driven by dimerization with the host protein via its alanine rim Ala-8/11/15/19. Tight binding is shown by an almost parallel alignment of the helices in the dimers. Less parallel alignment is proposed to correlate with lower activity. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Viral Membrane Proteins - Channels for Cellular Networking. PMID:24036078

  10. Serum-dependent selective expression of EhTMKB1-9, a member of Entamoeba histolytica B1 family of transmembrane kinases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiteshu Shrimal

    Full Text Available Entamoeba histolytica transmembrane kinases (EhTMKs can be grouped into six distinct families on the basis of motifs and sequences. Analysis of the E. histolytica genome revealed the presence of 35 EhTMKB1 members on the basis of sequence identity (>or=95%. Only six homologs were full length containing an extracellular domain, a transmembrane segment and an intracellular kinase domain. Reverse transcription followed by polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR of the kinase domain was used to generate a library of expressed sequences. Sequencing of randomly picked clones from this library revealed that about 95% of the clones were identical with a single member, EhTMKB1-9, in proliferating cells. On serum starvation, the relative number of EhTMKB1-9 derived sequences decreased with concomitant increase in the sequences derived from another member, EhTMKB1-18. The change in their relative expression was quantified by real time PCR. Northern analysis and RNase protection assay were used to study the temporal nature of EhTMKB1-9 expression after serum replenishment of starved cells. The results showed that the expression of EhTMKB1-9 was sinusoidal. Specific transcriptional induction of EhTMKB1-9 upon serum replenishment was further confirmed by reporter gene (luciferase expression and the upstream sequence responsible for serum responsiveness was identified. EhTMKB1-9 is one of the first examples of an inducible gene in Entamoeba. The protein encoded by this member was functionally characterized. The recombinant kinase domain of EhTMKB1-9 displayed protein kinase activity. It is likely to have dual specificity as judged from its sensitivity to different kinase inhibitors. Immuno-localization showed EhTMKB1-9 to be a surface protein which decreased on serum starvation and got relocalized on serum replenishment. Cell lines expressing either EhTMKB1-9 without kinase domain, or EhTMKB1-9 antisense RNA, showed decreased cellular proliferation and target cell

  11. Self-association and domain rearrangements between complement C3 and C3u provide insight into the activation mechanism of C3

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Keying; Gor, Jayesh; Perkins, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Component C3 is the central protein of the complement system. During complement activation, the thioester group in C3 is slowly hydrolysed to form C3u, then the presence of C3u enables the rapid conversion of C3 to functionally-active C3b. C3u shows functional similarities to C3b. To clarify this mechanism, the self-association properties and solution structures of C3 and C3u were determined using analytical ultracentrifugation and X-ray scattering. Sedimentation coefficie...

  12. Structure and Function of KH Domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valverde, R.; Regan, E

    2008-01-01

    The hnRNP K homology (KH) domain was first identified in the protein human heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) 14 years ago. Since then, KH domains have been identified as nucleic acid recognition motifs in proteins that perform a wide range of cellular functions. KH domains bind RNA or ssDNA, and are found in proteins associated with transcriptional and translational regulation, along with other cellular processes. Several diseases, e.g. fragile X mental retardation syndrome and paraneoplastic disease, are associated with the loss of function of a particular KH domain. Here we discuss the progress made towards understanding both general and specific features of the molecular recognition of nucleic acids by KH domains. The typical binding surface of KH domains is a cleft that is versatile but that can typically accommodate only four unpaired bases. Van der Waals forces and hydrophobic interactions and, to a lesser extent, electrostatic interactions, contribute to the nucleic acid binding affinity. 'Augmented' KH domains or multiple copies of KH domains within a protein are two strategies that are used to achieve greater affinity and specificity of nucleic acid binding. Isolated KH domains have been seen to crystallize as monomers, dimers and tetramers, but no published data support the formation of noncovalent higher-order oligomers by KH domains in solution. Much attention has been given in the literature to a conserved hydrophobic residue (typically Ile or Leu) that is present in most KH domains. The interest derives from the observation that an individual with this Ile mutated to Asn, in the KH2 domain of fragile X mental retardation protein, exhibits a particularly severe form of the syndrome. The structural effects of this mutation in the fragile X mental retardation protein KH2 domain have recently been reported. We discuss the use of analogous point mutations at this position in other KH domains to dissect both structure and

  13. Adapting Mathematical Domain Reasoners

    CERN Document Server

    Heeren, Bastiaan

    2010-01-01

    Mathematical learning environments help students in mastering mathematical knowledge. Mature environments typically offer thousands of interactive exercises. Providing feedback to students solving interactive exercises requires domain reasoners for doing the exercise-specific calculations. Since a domain reasoner has to solve an exercise in the same way a student should solve it, the structure of domain reasoners should follow the layered structure of the mathematical domains. Furthermore, learners, teachers, and environment builders have different requirements for adapting domain reasoners, such as providing more details, disallowing or enforcing certain solutions, and combining multiple mathematical domains in a new domain. In previous work we have shown how domain reasoners for solving interactive exercises can be expressed in terms of rewrite strategies, rewrite rules, and views. This paper shows how users can adapt and configure such domain reasoners to their own needs. This is achieved by enabling users...

  14. D2 dopamine receptors colocalize regulator of G-protein signaling 9-2 (RGS9-2) via the RGS9 DEP domain, and RGS9 knock-out mice develop dyskinesias associated with dopamine pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovoor, Abraham; Seyffarth, Petra; Ebert, Jana; Barghshoon, Sami; Chen, Ching-Kang; Schwarz, Sigrid; Axelrod, Jeffrey D; Cheyette, Benjamin N R; Simon, Melvin I; Lester, Henry A; Schwarz, Johannes

    2005-02-23

    Regulator of G-protein signaling 9-2 (RGS9-2), a member of the RGS family of G GTPase accelerating proteins, is expressed specifically in the striatum, which participates in antipsychotic-induced tardive dyskinesia and in levodopa-induced dyskinesia. We report that RGS9 knock-out mice develop abnormal involuntary movements when inhibition of dopaminergic transmission is followed by activation of D2-like dopamine receptors (DRs). These abnormal movements resemble drug-induced dyskinesia more closely than other rodent models. Recordings from striatal neurons of these mice establish that activation of D2-like DRs abnormally inhibits glutamate-elicited currents. We show that RGS9-2, via its DEP domain (for Disheveled, EGL-10, Pleckstrin homology), colocalizes with D2DRs when coexpressed in mammalian cells. Recordings from oocytes coexpressing D2DR or the m2 muscarinic receptor and G-protein-gated inward rectifier potassium channels show that RGS9-2, via its DEP domain, preferentially accelerates the termination of D2DR signals. Thus, alterations in RGS9-2 may be a key factor in the pathway leading from D2DRs to the side effects associated with the treatment both of psychoses and Parkinson's disease. PMID:15728856

  15. Conformational stabilization of the membrane embedded targeting domain of the lysosomal peptide transporter TAPL for solution NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tumulka, Franz [Goethe-University Frankfurt, Institute of Biochemistry, Biocenter (Germany); Roos, Christian; Loehr, Frank [Goethe-University Frankfurt, Institute of Biophysical Chemistry, Biocenter (Germany); Bock, Christoph [Goethe-University Frankfurt, Institute of Biochemistry, Biocenter (Germany); Bernhard, Frank; Doetsch, Volker [Goethe-University Frankfurt, Institute of Biophysical Chemistry, Biocenter (Germany); Abele, Rupert, E-mail: abele@em.uni-frankfurt.de [Goethe-University Frankfurt, Institute of Biochemistry, Biocenter (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    The ATP binding cassette transporter TAPL translocates cytosolic peptides into the lumen of lysosomes driven by the hydrolysis of ATP. Functionally, this transporter can be divided into coreTAPL, comprising the transport function, and an additional N-terminal transmembrane domain called TMD0, which is essential for lysosomal targeting and mediates the interaction with the lysosomal associated membrane proteins LAMP-1 and LAMP-2. To elucidate the structure of this unique domain, we developed protocols for the production of high quantities of cell-free expressed TMD0 by screening different N-terminal expression tags. Independently of the amino acid sequence, high expression was detected for AU-rich sequences in the first seven codons, decreasing the free energy of RNA secondary structure formation at translation initiation. Furthermore, avoiding NGG codons in the region of translation initiation demonstrated a positive effect on expression. For NMR studies, conditions were optimized for high solubilization efficiency, long-term stability, and high quality spectra. A most critical step was the careful exchange of the detergent used for solubilization by the detergent dihexanoylphosphatidylcholine. Several constructs of different size were tested in order to stabilize the fold of TMD0 as well as to reduce the conformation exchange. NMR spectra with sufficient resolution and homogeneity were finally obtained with a TMD0 derivative only modified by a C-terminal His{sub 10}-tag and containing a codon optimized AT-rich sequence.

  16. Conformational stabilization of the membrane embedded targeting domain of the lysosomal peptide transporter TAPL for solution NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ATP binding cassette transporter TAPL translocates cytosolic peptides into the lumen of lysosomes driven by the hydrolysis of ATP. Functionally, this transporter can be divided into coreTAPL, comprising the transport function, and an additional N-terminal transmembrane domain called TMD0, which is essential for lysosomal targeting and mediates the interaction with the lysosomal associated membrane proteins LAMP-1 and LAMP-2. To elucidate the structure of this unique domain, we developed protocols for the production of high quantities of cell-free expressed TMD0 by screening different N-terminal expression tags. Independently of the amino acid sequence, high expression was detected for AU-rich sequences in the first seven codons, decreasing the free energy of RNA secondary structure formation at translation initiation. Furthermore, avoiding NGG codons in the region of translation initiation demonstrated a positive effect on expression. For NMR studies, conditions were optimized for high solubilization efficiency, long-term stability, and high quality spectra. A most critical step was the careful exchange of the detergent used for solubilization by the detergent dihexanoylphosphatidylcholine. Several constructs of different size were tested in order to stabilize the fold of TMD0 as well as to reduce the conformation exchange. NMR spectra with sufficient resolution and homogeneity were finally obtained with a TMD0 derivative only modified by a C-terminal His10-tag and containing a codon optimized AT-rich sequence

  17. Support Vector Machines for Predicting Membrane Protein Types by Using Functional Domain Composition

    OpenAIRE

    Cai, Yu-Dong; Zhou, Guo-Ping; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2003-01-01

    Membrane proteins are generally classified into the following five types: 1), type I membrane protein; 2), type II membrane protein; 3), multipass transmembrane proteins; 4), lipid chain-anchored membrane proteins; and 5), GPI-anchored membrane proteins. In this article, based on the concept of using the functional domain composition to define a protein, the Support Vector Machine algorithm is developed for predicting the membrane protein type. High success rates are obtained by both the self...

  18. Extracellular Domain N-Glycosylation Controls Human Thrombopoietin Receptor Cell Surface Levels

    OpenAIRE

    Albu, Roxana I.; Stefan N. Constantinescu

    2011-01-01

    The thrombopoietin receptor (TpoR) is a type I transmembrane protein that mediates the signaling functions of thrombopoietin (Tpo) in regulating megakaryocyte differentiation, platelet formation, and hematopoietic stem cell renewal. We probed the role of each of the four extracellular domain putative N-glycosylation sites for cell surface localization and function of the receptor. Single N-glycosylation mutants at any of the four sites were able to acquire the mature N-glycosylated pattern, b...

  19. Extracellular Domain N-Glycosylation Controls Human Thrombopoietin Receptor Cell Surface Levels

    OpenAIRE

    Stefan N. Constantinescu

    2011-01-01

    The thrombopoietin receptor (TpoR) is a type I transmembrane protein that mediates the signaling functions of thrombopoietin (Tpo) in regulating megakaryocyte differentiation, platelet formation and hematopoietic stem cell renewal. We probed the role of each of the four extracellular domain putative N-glycosylation sites for cell surface localization and function of the receptor. Single N-glycosylation mutants at any of the four sites were able to acquire the mature N-glycosylated pattern, bu...

  20. PheVI:09 (Phe6.44) as a sliding microswitch in seven-transmembrane (7TM) G protein-coupled receptor activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valentin-Hansen, Louise; Holst, Birgitte; Frimurer, Thomas M;

    2012-01-01

    In seven-transmembrane (7TM), G protein-coupled receptors, highly conserved residues function as microswitches, which alternate between different conformations and interaction partners in an extended allosteric interface between the transmembrane segments performing the large scale conformational...