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Sample records for associating transmembrane domains

  1. Requirement of transmembrane domain for CD154 association to lipid rafts and subsequent biological events.

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    Nadir Benslimane

    Full Text Available Interaction of CD40 with CD154 leads to recruitment of both molecules into lipid rafts, resulting in bi-directional cell activation. The precise mechanism by which CD154 is translocated into lipid rafts and its impact on CD154 signaling remain largely unknown. Our aim is to identify the domain of CD154 facilitating its association to lipid rafts and the impact of such association on signaling events and cytokine production. Thus, we generated Jurkat cell lines expressing truncated CD154 lacking the cytoplasmic domain or chimeric CD154 in which the transmembrane domain was replaced by that of transferrin receptor I, known to be excluded from lipid rafts. Our results show that cell stimulation with soluble CD40 leads to the association of CD154 wild-type and CD154-truncated, but not CD154-chimera, with lipid rafts. This is correlated with failure of CD154-chimera to activate Akt and p38 MAP kinases, known effectors of CD154 signaling. We also found that CD154-chimera lost the ability to promote IL-2 production upon T cell stimulation with anti-CD3/CD28 and soluble CD40. These results demonstrate the implication of the transmembrane domain of CD154 in lipid raft association, and that this association is necessary for CD154-mediated Akt and p38 activation with consequent enhancement of IL-2 production.

  2. Structural basis of transmembrane domain interactions in integrin signaling.

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    Ulmer, Tobias S

    2010-01-01

    Cell surface receptors of the integrin family are pivotal to cell adhesion and migration. The activation state of heterodimeric alphabeta integrins is correlated to the association state of the single-pass alpha and beta transmembrane domains. The association of integrin alphaIIbbeta3 transmembrane domains, resulting in an inactive receptor, is characterized by the asymmetric arrangement of a straight (alphaIIb) and tilted (beta3) helix relative to the membrane in congruence to the dissociated structures. This allows for a continuous association interface centered on helix-helix glycine-packing and an unusual alphaIIb(GFF) structural motif that packs the conserved Phe-Phe residues against the beta3 transmembrane helix, enabling alphaIIb(D723)beta3(R995) electrostatic interactions. The transmembrane complex is further stabilized by the inactive ectodomain, thereby coupling its association state to the ectodomain conformation. In combination with recently determined structures of an inactive integrin ectodomain and an activating talin/beta complex that overlap with the alphabeta transmembrane complex, a comprehensive picture of integrin bi-directional transmembrane signaling has emerged.

  3. The Immunogenicity of the Tumor-Associated Antigen α-Fetoprotein Is Enhanced by a Fusion with a Transmembrane Domain

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    Lucile Tran

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To investigate the ability of recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara (rMVA vector to induce an immune response against a well-tolerated self-antigen. Methods. rMVA vectors expressing different form of α-fetoprotein (AFP were produced and characterized. Naïve mice were vaccinated with MVA vectors expressing the AFP antigen in either a secreted, or a membrane-bound, or an intracellular form. The immune response was monitored by an IFNΓ ELISpot assay and antibody detection. Results. Vaccination with the membrane-associated form of AFP induced a stronger CD8+ T-cell response compared to the ones obtained with the MVA encoding the secreted or the intracellular forms of AFP. Moreover, the vaccination with the membrane-bound AFP elicited the production of AFP-specific antibodies. Conclusions. The AFP transmembrane form is more immunogenic. Expressing a membrane-bound form in the context of an MVA vaccination could enhance the immunogenicity of a self-antigen.

  4. Structure of transmembrane domain of lysosome-associated membrane protein type 2a (LAMP-2A) reveals key features for substrate specificity in chaperone-mediated autophagy.

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    Rout, Ashok K; Strub, Marie-Paule; Piszczek, Grzegorz; Tjandra, Nico

    2014-12-19

    Chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) is a highly regulated cellular process that mediates the degradation of a selective subset of cytosolic proteins in lysosomes. Increasing CMA activity is one way for a cell to respond to stress, and it leads to enhanced turnover of non-critical cytosolic proteins into sources of energy or clearance of unwanted or damaged proteins from the cytosol. The lysosome-associated membrane protein type 2a (LAMP-2A) together with a complex of chaperones and co-chaperones are key regulators of CMA. LAMP-2A is a transmembrane protein component for protein translocation to the lysosome. Here we present a study of the structure and dynamics of the transmembrane domain of human LAMP-2A in n-dodecylphosphocholine micelles by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). We showed that LAMP-2A exists as a homotrimer in which the membrane-spanning helices wrap around each other to form a parallel coiled coil conformation, whereas its cytosolic tail is flexible and exposed to the cytosol. This cytosolic tail of LAMP-2A interacts with chaperone Hsc70 and a CMA substrate RNase A with comparable affinity but not with Hsp40 and RNase S peptide. Because the substrates and the chaperone complex can bind at the same time, thus creating a bimodal interaction, we propose that substrate recognition by chaperones and targeting to the lysosomal membrane by LAMP-2A are coupled. This can increase substrate affinity and specificity as well as prevent substrate aggregation, assist in the unfolding of the substrate, and promote the formation of the higher order complex of LAMP-2A required for translocation.

  5. Inhibition of PlexA1-mediated brain tumor growth and tumor-associated angiogenesis using a transmembrane domain targeting peptide

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    Jacob, Laurent; Goetz, Jacky; Vermot, Julien; Fernandez, Aurore; Baumlin, Nadège; Aci-Sèche, Samia; Orend, Gertraud; Roussel, Guy; Crémel, Gérard; Genest, Monique; Hubert, Pierre; Bagnard, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    The neuropilin-plexin receptor complex regulates tumor cell migration and proliferation and thus is an interesting therapeutic target. High expression of neuropilin-1 is indeed associated with a bad prognosis in glioma patients. Q-RTPCR and tissue-array analyses showed here that Plexin-A1 is highly expressed in glioblastoma and that the highest level of expression correlates with the worse survival of patients. We next identified a developmental and tumor-associated pro-angiogenic role of Plexin-A1. Hence, by using molecular simulations and a two-hybrid like assay in parallel with biochemical and cellular assays we developed a specific Plexin-A1 peptidic antagonist disrupting transmembrane domain-mediated oligomerization of the receptor and subsequent signaling and functional activity. We found that this peptide exhibits anti-tumor activity in vivo on different human glioblastoma models including glioma cancer stem cells. Thus, screening Plexin-A1 expression and targeting Plexin-A1 in glioblastoma patients exhibit diagnostic and therapeutic value. PMID:27506939

  6. Localized lipid packing of transmembrane domains impedes integrin clustering.

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    Mehrdad Mehrbod

    Full Text Available Integrin clustering plays a pivotal role in a host of cell functions. Hetero-dimeric integrin adhesion receptors regulate cell migration, survival, and differentiation by communicating signals bidirectionally across the plasma membrane. Thus far, crystallographic structures of integrin components are solved only separately, and for some integrin types. Also, the sequence of interactions that leads to signal transduction remains ambiguous. Particularly, it remains controversial whether the homo-dimerization of integrin transmembrane domains occurs following the integrin activation (i.e. when integrin ectodomain is stretched out or if it regulates integrin clustering. This study employs molecular dynamics modeling approaches to address these questions in molecular details and sheds light on the crucial effect of the plasma membrane. Conducting a normal mode analysis of the intact αllbβ3 integrin, it is demonstrated that the ectodomain and transmembrane-cytoplasmic domains are connected via a membrane-proximal hinge region, thus merely transmembrane-cytoplasmic domains are modeled. By measuring the free energy change and force required to form integrin homo-oligomers, this study suggests that the β-subunit homo-oligomerization potentially regulates integrin clustering, as opposed to α-subunit, which appears to be a poor regulator for the clustering process. If α-subunits are to regulate the clustering they should overcome a high-energy barrier formed by a stable lipid pack around them. Finally, an outside-in activation-clustering scenario is speculated, explaining how further loading the already-active integrin affects its homo-oligomerization so that focal adhesions grow in size.

  7. Molecular Insights into the Transmembrane Domain of the Thyrotropin Receptor.

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    Vanessa Chantreau

    Full Text Available The thyrotropin receptor (TSHR is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR that is member of the leucine-rich repeat subfamily (LGR. In the absence of crystal structure, the success of rational design of ligands targeting the receptor internal cavity depends on the quality of the TSHR models built. In this subfamily, transmembrane helices (TM 2 and 5 are characterized by the absence of proline compared to most receptors, raising the question of the structural conformation of these helices. To gain insight into the structural properties of these helices, we carried out bioinformatics and experimental studies. Evolutionary analysis of the LGR family revealed a deletion in TM5 but provided no information on TM2. Wild type residues at positions 2.58, 2.59 or 2.60 in TM2 and/or at position 5.50 in TM5 were substituted to proline. Depending on the position of the proline substitution, different effects were observed on membrane expression, glycosylation, constitutive cAMP activity and responses to thyrotropin. Only proline substitution at position 2.59 maintained complex glycosylation and high membrane expression, supporting occurrence of a bulged TM2. The TSHR transmembrane domain was modeled by homology with the orexin 2 receptor, using a protocol that forced the deletion of one residue in the TM5 bulge of the template. The stability of the model was assessed by molecular dynamics simulations. TM5 straightened during the equilibration phase and was stable for the remainder of the simulations. Our data support a structural model of the TSHR transmembrane domain with a bulged TM2 and a straight TM5 that is specific of glycoprotein hormone receptors.

  8. The transmembrane domain of TACE regulates protein ectodomain shedding

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    Xiaojin Li; Liliana Pérez; Zui Pan; Huizhou Fan

    2007-01-01

    Numerous membrane proteins are cleaved by tumor necrosis factor-α converting enzyme (TACE), which causes the release of their ectodomains. An ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloprotease domain) family member, TACE contains several noncatalytic domains whose roles in ectodomain shedding have yet to be fully resolved. Here, we have explored the function of the transmembrane domain (TM) of TACE by coupling molecular engineering and functional analysis. A TM-free TACE construct that is anchored to the plasma membrane by a glycosylphosphatidylino-sitol (GPI)-binding polypeptide failed to restore shedding of transforming growth factor-α (TGF-α), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and L-selectin in cells lacking endogenous TACE activity. Substitution of the TACE TM with that of the prolactin receptor or platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) also resulted in severe loss of TGF-α shedding, but had no effects on the cleavage of TNF-α and L-selectin. Replacement of the TM in TGF-a with that of L-selectin enabled TGF-a shedding by the TACE mutants carrying the TM of prolactin receptor and PDGFR. Taken together, our observations suggest that anchorage of TACE to the lipid bilayer through a TM is required for efficient cleavage of a broad spectrum of substrates, and that the amino-acid sequence of TACE TM may play a role in regulatory specificity among TACE substrates.

  9. Corrector VX-809 stabilizes the first transmembrane domain of CFTR.

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    Loo, Tip W; Bartlett, M Claire; Clarke, David M

    2013-09-01

    Processing mutations that inhibit folding and trafficking of CFTR are the main cause of cystic fibrosis (CF). A potential CF therapy would be to repair CFTR processing mutants. It has been demonstrated that processing mutants of P-glycoprotein (P-gp), CFTR's sister protein, can be efficiently repaired by a drug-rescue mechanism. Many arginine suppressors that mimic drug-rescue have been identified in the P-gp transmembrane (TM) domains (TMDs) that rescue by forming hydrogen bonds with residues in adjacent helices to promote packing of the TM segments. To test if CFTR mutants could be repaired by a drug-rescue mechanism, we used truncation mutants to test if corrector VX-809 interacted with the TMDs. VX-809 was selected for study because it is specific for CFTR, it is the most effective corrector identified to date, but it has limited clinical benefit. Identification of the VX-809 target domain will help to develop correctors with improved clinical benefits. It was found that VX-809 rescued truncation mutants lacking the NBD2 and R domains. When the remaining domains (TMD1, NBD1, TMD2) were expressed as separate polypeptides, VX-809 only increased the stability of TMD1. We then performed arginine mutagenesis on TM6 in TMD1. Although the results showed that TM6 had distinct lipid and aqueous faces, CFTR was different from P-gp as no arginine promoted maturation of CFTR processing mutants. The results suggest that TMD1 contains a VX-809 binding site, but its mechanism differed from P-gp drug-rescue. We also report that V510D acts as a universal suppressor to rescue CFTR processing mutants.

  10. A unique phenylalanine in the transmembrane domain strengthens homodimerization of the syndecan-2 transmembrane domain and functionally regulates syndecan-2.

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    Kwon, Mi-Jung; Choi, Youngsil; Yun, Ji-Hye; Lee, Weontae; Han, Inn-Oc; Oh, Eok-Soo

    2015-02-27

    The syndecans are a type of cell surface adhesion receptor that initiates intracellular signaling events through receptor clustering mediated by their highly conserved transmembrane domains (TMDs). However, the exact function of the syndecan TMD is not yet fully understood. Here, we investigated the specific regulatory role of the syndecan-2 TMD. We found that syndecan-2 mutants in which the TMD had been replaced with that of syndecan-4 were defective in syndecan-2-mediated functions, suggesting that the TMD of syndecan-2 plays one or more specific roles. Interestingly, syndecan-2 has a stronger tendency to form sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-resistant homodimers than syndecan-4. Our structural studies showed that a unique phenylalanine residue (Phe(167)) enables an additional molecular interaction between the TMDs of the syndecan-2 homodimer. The presence of Phe(167) was correlated with a higher tendency toward oligomerization, and its replacement with isoleucine significantly reduced the SDS-resistant dimer formation and cellular functions of syndecan-2 (e.g. cell migration). Conversely, replacement of isoleucine with phenylalanine at this position in the syndecan-4 TMD rescued the defects observed in a mutant syndecan-2 harboring the syndecan-4 TMD. Taken together, these data suggest that Phe(167) in the TMD of syndecan-2 endows the protein with specific functions. Our work offers new insights into the signaling mediated by the TMD of syndecan family members.

  11. Neuregulin 1 expression and electrophysiological abnormalities in the Neuregulin 1 transmembrane domain heterozygous mutant mouse.

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    Leonora E Long

    Full Text Available The Neuregulin 1 transmembrane domain heterozygous mutant (Nrg1 TM HET mouse is used to investigate the role of Nrg1 in brain function and schizophrenia-like behavioural phenotypes. However, the molecular alterations in brain Nrg1 expression that underpin the behavioural observations have been assumed, but not directly determined. Here we comprehensively characterise mRNA Nrg1 transcripts throughout development of the Nrg1 TM HET mouse. In addition, we investigate the regulation of high-frequency (gamma electrophysiological oscillations in this mutant mouse to associate molecular changes in Nrg1 with a schizophrenia-relevant neurophysiological profile.Using exonic probes spanning the cysteine-rich, epidermal growth factor (EGF-like, transmembrane and intracellular domain encoding regions of Nrg1, mRNA levels were measured using qPCR in hippocampus and frontal cortex from male and female Nrg1 TM HET and wild type-like (WT mice throughout development. We also performed electrophysiological recordings in adult mice and analysed gamma oscillatory at baseline, in responses to auditory stimuli and to ketamine.In both hippocampus and cortex, Nrg1 TM HET mice show significantly reduced expression of the exon encoding the transmembrane domain of Nrg1 compared with WT, but unaltered mRNA expression encoding the extracellular bioactive EGF-like and the cysteine-rich (type III domains, and development-specific and region-specific reductions in the mRNA encoding the intracellular domain. Hippocampal Nrg1 protein expression was not altered, but NMDA receptor NR2B subunit phosphorylation was lower in Nrg1 TM HET mice. We identified elevated ongoing and reduced sensory-evoked gamma power in Nrg1 TM HET mice.We found no evidence to support the claim that the Nrg1 TM HET mouse represents a simple haploinsufficient model. Further research is required to explore the possibility that mutation results in a gain of Nrg1 function.

  12. Hendra virus fusion protein transmembrane domain contributes to pre-fusion protein stability.

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    Webb, Stacy; Nagy, Tamas; Moseley, Hunter; Fried, Michael; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis

    2017-02-17

    Enveloped viruses utilize fusion (F) proteins studding the surface of the virus to facilitate membrane fusion with a target cell membrane. Fusion of the viral envelope with a cellular membrane is required for release of viral genomic material so the virus can ultimately reproduce and spread. To drive fusion, the F protein undergoes an irreversible conformational change, transitioning from a meta-stable pre-fusion conformation to a more thermodynamically stable post-fusion structure. Understanding the elements which control stability of the pre-fusion state and triggering to the post-fusion conformation is important for understanding F protein function. Mutations in F protein transmembrane (TM) domains implicated the TM domain in the fusion process, but the structural and molecular details in fusion remain unclear. Previously, analytical ultracentrifugation was utilized to demonstrate that isolated TM domains of Hendra virus F protein associate in a monomer-trimer equilibrium (Smith EC, et al. Trimeric transmembrane domain interactions in paramyxovirus fusion proteins. 2013. J Biol Chem. 288, 35726). To determine factors driving this association, 140 paramyxovirus F protein TM domain sequences were analyzed. A heptad repeat of β-branched residues was found and analysis of the Hendra virus F TM domain revealed a heptad repeat leucine-isoleucine zipper motif (LIZ). Replacement of the LIZ with alanine resulted in dramatically reduced TM-TM association. Mutation of the LIZ in the whole protein resulted in decreased protein stability, including pre-fusion conformation stability. Together our data suggest that the heptad repeat LIZ contributed to TM-TM association and is important for F protein function and pre-fusion stability.

  13. Characterization of a single b-type heme, FAD, and metal binding sites in the transmembrane domain of six-transmembrane epithelial antigen of the prostate (STEAP) family proteins.

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    Kleven, Mark D; Dlakić, Mensur; Lawrence, C Martin

    2015-09-11

    Six-transmembrane epithelial antigen of the prostate 3 (Steap3) is the major ferric reductase in developing erythrocytes. Steap family proteins are defined by a shared transmembrane domain that in Steap3 has been shown to function as a transmembrane electron shuttle, moving cytoplasmic electrons derived from NADPH across the lipid bilayer to the extracellular face where they are used to reduce Fe(3+) to Fe(2+) and potentially Cu(2+) to Cu(1+). Although the cytoplasmic N-terminal oxidoreductase domain of Steap3 and Steap4 are relatively well characterized, little work has been done to characterize the transmembrane domain of any member of the Steap family. Here we identify high affinity FAD and iron biding sites and characterize a single b-type heme binding site in the Steap3 transmembrane domain. Furthermore, we show that Steap3 is functional as a homodimer and that it utilizes an intrasubunit electron transfer pathway through the single heme moiety rather than an intersubunit electron pathway through a potential domain-swapped dimer. Importantly, the sequence motifs in the transmembrane domain that are associated with the FAD and metal binding sites are not only present in Steap2 and Steap4 but also in Steap1, which lacks the N-terminal oxidoreductase domain. This strongly suggests that Steap1 harbors latent oxidoreductase activity.

  14. Modulation of Innate Immune Signalling by Lipid-Mediated MAVS Transmembrane Domain Oligomerization.

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    Luis Nobre

    Full Text Available RIG-I-like receptors detect viral RNA in infected cells and promote oligomerization of the outer mitochondrial membrane protein MAVS to induce innate immunity to viral infection through type I interferon production. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS have been shown to enhance anti-viral MAVS signalling, but the mechanisms have remained obscure. Using a biochemical oligomerization-reporter fused to the transmembrane domain of MAVS, we found that mROS inducers promoted lipid-dependent MAVS transmembrane domain oligomerization in the plane of the outer mitochondrial membrane. These events were mirrored by Sendai virus infection, which similarly induced lipid peroxidation and promoted lipid-dependent MAVS transmembrane domain oligomerization. Our observations point to a role for mROS-induced changes in lipid bilayer properties in modulating antiviral innate signalling by favouring the oligomerization of MAVS transmembrane domain in the outer-mitochondrial membrane.

  15. Structural and functional characterization of alternative transmembrane domain conformations in VEGF receptor 2 activation.

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    Manni, Sandro; Mineev, Konstantin S; Usmanova, Dinara; Lyukmanova, Ekaterina N; Shulepko, Mikhail A; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail P; Winter, Jonas; Matkovic, Milos; Deupi, Xavier; Arseniev, Alexander S; Ballmer-Hofer, Kurt

    2014-08-05

    Transmembrane signaling by receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) entails ligand-mediated dimerization and structural rearrangement of the extracellular domains. RTK activation also depends on the specific orientation of the transmembrane domain (TMD) helices, as suggested by pathogenic, constitutively active RTK mutants. Such mutant TMDs carry polar amino acids promoting stable transmembrane helix dimerization, which is essential for kinase activation. We investigated the effect of polar amino acids introduced into the TMD of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, regulating blood vessel homeostasis. Two mutants showed constitutive kinase activity, suggesting that precise TMD orientation is mandatory for kinase activation. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed that TMD helices in activated constructs were rotated by 180° relative to the interface of the wild-type conformation, confirming that ligand-mediated receptor activation indeed results from transmembrane helix rearrangement. A molecular dynamics simulation confirmed the transmembrane helix arrangement of wild-type and mutant TMDs revealed by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

  16. Metal bridges illuminate transmembrane domain movements during gating of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel.

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    El Hiani, Yassine; Linsdell, Paul

    2014-10-10

    Opening and closing of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator are controlled by ATP binding and hydrolysis by the cytoplasmic nucleotide-binding domains. Different conformational changes in the channel pore have been described during channel opening and closing; however, the relative importance of these changes to the process of gating the pore is not known. We have used patch clamp recording to identify high affinity Cd(2+) bridges formed between pairs of pore-lining cysteine residues introduced into different transmembrane α-helices (TMs). Seven Cd(2+) bridges were identified forming between cysteines in TMs 6 and 12. Interestingly, each of these Cd(2+) bridges apparently formed only in closed channels, and their formation stabilized the closed state. In contrast, a single Cd(2+) bridge identified between cysteines in TMs 1 and 12 stabilized the channel open state. Analysis of the pattern of Cd(2+) bridge formation in different channel states suggests that lateral separation and convergence of different TMs, rather than relative rotation or translation of different TMs, is the key conformational change that causes the channel pore to open and close.

  17. Species-specific activity of HIV-1 Vpu and positive selection of tetherin transmembrane domain variants.

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    Matthew W McNatt

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Tetherin/BST-2/CD317 is a recently identified antiviral protein that blocks the release of nascent retrovirus, and other virus, particles from infected cells. An HIV-1 accessory protein, Vpu, acts as an antagonist of tetherin. Here, we show that positive selection is evident in primate tetherin sequences and that HIV-1 Vpu appears to have specifically adapted to antagonize variants of tetherin found in humans and chimpanzees. Tetherin variants found in rhesus macaques (rh, African green monkeys (agm and mice were able to inhibit HIV-1 particle release, but were resistant to antagonism by HIV-1 Vpu. Notably, reciprocal exchange of transmembrane domains between human and monkey tetherins conferred sensitivity and resistance to Vpu, identifying this protein domain as a critical determinant of Vpu function. Indeed, differences between hu-tetherin and rh-tetherin at several positions in the transmembrane domain affected sensitivity to antagonism by Vpu. Two alterations in the hu-tetherin transmembrane domain, that correspond to differences found in rh- and agm-tetherin proteins, were sufficient to render hu-tetherin completely resistant to HIV-1 Vpu. Interestingly, transmembrane and cytoplasmic domain sequences in primate tetherins exhibit variation at numerous codons that is likely the result of positive selection, and some of these changes coincide with determinants of HIV-1 Vpu sensitivity. Overall, these data indicate that tetherin could impose a barrier to viral zoonosis as a consequence of positive selection that has been driven by ancient viral antagonists, and that the HIV-1 Vpu protein has specialized to target the transmembrane domains found in human/chimpanzee tetherin proteins.

  18. Species-specific activity of HIV-1 Vpu and positive selection of tetherin transmembrane domain variants.

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    McNatt, Matthew W; Zang, Trinity; Hatziioannou, Theodora; Bartlett, Mackenzie; Fofana, Ismael Ben; Johnson, Welkin E; Neil, Stuart J D; Bieniasz, Paul D

    2009-02-01

    Tetherin/BST-2/CD317 is a recently identified antiviral protein that blocks the release of nascent retrovirus, and other virus, particles from infected cells. An HIV-1 accessory protein, Vpu, acts as an antagonist of tetherin. Here, we show that positive selection is evident in primate tetherin sequences and that HIV-1 Vpu appears to have specifically adapted to antagonize variants of tetherin found in humans and chimpanzees. Tetherin variants found in rhesus macaques (rh), African green monkeys (agm) and mice were able to inhibit HIV-1 particle release, but were resistant to antagonism by HIV-1 Vpu. Notably, reciprocal exchange of transmembrane domains between human and monkey tetherins conferred sensitivity and resistance to Vpu, identifying this protein domain as a critical determinant of Vpu function. Indeed, differences between hu-tetherin and rh-tetherin at several positions in the transmembrane domain affected sensitivity to antagonism by Vpu. Two alterations in the hu-tetherin transmembrane domain, that correspond to differences found in rh- and agm-tetherin proteins, were sufficient to render hu-tetherin completely resistant to HIV-1 Vpu. Interestingly, transmembrane and cytoplasmic domain sequences in primate tetherins exhibit variation at numerous codons that is likely the result of positive selection, and some of these changes coincide with determinants of HIV-1 Vpu sensitivity. Overall, these data indicate that tetherin could impose a barrier to viral zoonosis as a consequence of positive selection that has been driven by ancient viral antagonists, and that the HIV-1 Vpu protein has specialized to target the transmembrane domains found in human/chimpanzee tetherin proteins.

  19. Membrane-spanning domain of bovine foamy virus transmembrane protein having cytotoxicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Yonggang; YU Hong; WANG Jinzhong; CHEN Qimin; GENG Yunqi

    2006-01-01

    Foamy viruses (FVs) have broad cellular tropism infecting vertebrates from fish to human being,which indicates that Env protein has a high capability for membrane fusion.Conservative features in all FV transmembrane (TM) proteins include a region of hydrophobic domain called membrane-spanning domain (MSD),which contains several stretches of hydrophobic amino acids.To investigate whether these features were associated with the cytotoxicity effect of TM on Escherichia coli,a series of mutants were constructed and expressed in the E.coli BL21 (DE3) using pET-32a (+) as expressing vector.The results showed that only TM3 without MSD was expressed in E.coli,whereas the other two containing full or part of the MSD (TM1 and TM2) could not be expressed.Furthermore,the bacterial amount and living bacteria analysis revealed that the cytotoxicity of TM was dependent on its MSD,especially on the stretches of hydrophobic amino acids.Western blotting analysis showed that TM3 protein was purified with affinity purification.

  20. Dimerization of the transmembrane domain of amyloid precursor proteins and familial Alzheimer's disease mutants

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    Fraser Paul E

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amyloid precursor protein (APP is enzymatically cleaved by γ-secretase to form two peptide products, either Aβ40 or the more neurotoxic Aβ42. The Aβ42/40 ratio is increased in many cases of familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD. The transmembrane domain (TM of APP contains the known dimerization motif GXXXA. We have investigated the dimerization of both wild type and FAD mutant APP transmembrane domains. Results Using synthetic peptides derived from the APP-TM domain, we show that this segment is capable of forming stable transmembrane dimers. A model of a dimeric APP-TM domain reveals a putative dimerization interface, and interestingly, majority of FAD mutations in APP are localized to this interface region. We find that FAD-APP mutations destabilize the APP-TM dimer and increase the population of APP peptide monomers. Conclusion The dissociation constants are correlated to both the Aβ42/Aβ40 ratio and the mean age of disease onset in AD patients. We also show that these TM-peptides reduce Aβ production and Aβ42/Aβ40 ratios when added to HEK293 cells overexpressing the Swedish FAD mutation and γ-secretase components, potentially revealing a new class of γ-secretase inhibitors.

  1. Trimerization of the HIV Transmembrane Domain in Lipid Bilayers Modulates Broadly Neutralizing Antibody Binding.

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    Reichart, Timothy M; Baksh, Michael M; Rhee, Jin-Kyu; Fiedler, Jason D; Sligar, Stephen G; Finn, M G; Zwick, Michael B; Dawson, Philip E

    2016-02-18

    The membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of HIV gp41 is an established target of antibodies that neutralize a broad range of HIV isolates. To evaluate the role of the transmembrane (TM) domain, synthetic MPER-derived peptides were incorporated into lipid nanoparticles using natural and designed TM domains, and antibody affinity was measured using immobilized and solution-based techniques. Peptides incorporating the native HIV TM domain exhibit significantly stronger interactions with neutralizing antibodies than peptides with a monomeric TM domain. Furthermore, a peptide with a trimeric, three-helix bundle TM domain recapitulates the binding profile of the native sequence. These studies suggest that neutralizing antibodies can bind the MPER when the TM domain is a three-helix bundle and this presentation could influence the binding of neutralizing antibodies to the virus. Lipid-bilayer presentation of viral antigens in Nanodiscs is a new platform for evaluating neutralizing antibodies.

  2. Molecular scaffolds regulate bidirectional crosstalk between Wnt and classical seven-transmembrane-domain receptor signaling pathways.

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    Force, Thomas; Woulfe, Kathleen; Koch, Walter J; Kerkelä, Risto

    2007-07-31

    Signaling downstream of classical seven-transmembrane domain receptors (7TMRs) had generally been thought to recruit factors that are in large part separate from those recruited by atypical 7TMRs, such as Frizzleds (Fzs), receptors for the Wnt family of glycoproteins. Classical 7TMRs are also known as G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and are mediated by signaling factors such as heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins), GPCR kinases (GRKs), and beta-arrestins. Over the past few years, it has become increasingly apparent that classical and atypical 7TMRs share these factors, which are often associated with mediating classical 7TMR signaling, as well as the scaffolding proteins that were initially thought to be involved in transmitting atypical 7TMR signals. This sharing of signaling components by agonists that bind classical 7TMRs and those binding to atypical 7TMRs establishes the possibility of extensive crosstalk between these receptor classes. We discuss the evidence for, and against, crosstalk, and examine mechanisms by which this can occur.

  3. Structure of FGFR3 transmembrane domain dimer: implications for signaling and human pathologies.

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    Bocharov, Eduard V; Lesovoy, Dmitry M; Goncharuk, Sergey A; Goncharuk, Marina V; Hristova, Kalina; Arseniev, Alexander S

    2013-11-05

    Fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) transduces biochemical signals via lateral dimerization in the plasma membrane, and plays an important role in human development and disease. Eight different pathogenic mutations, implicated in cancers and growth disorders, have been identified in the FGFR3 transmembrane segment. Here, we describe the dimerization of the FGFR3 transmembrane domain in membrane-mimicking DPC/SDS (9/1) micelles. In the solved NMR structure, the two transmembrane helices pack into a symmetric left-handed dimer, with intermolecular stacking interactions occurring in the dimer central region. Some pathogenic mutations fall within the helix-helix interface, whereas others are located within a putative alternative interface. This implies that although the observed dimer structure is important for FGFR3 signaling, the mechanism of FGFR3-mediated transduction across the membrane is complex. We propose an FGFR3 signaling mechanism that is based on the solved structure, available structures of isolated soluble FGFR domains, and published biochemical and biophysical data.

  4. Synthetic null-cysteine phospholamban analogue and the corresponding transmembrane domain inhibit the Ca-ATPase.

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    Karim, C B; Marquardt, C G; Stamm, J D; Barany, G; Thomas, D D

    2000-09-05

    Chemical synthesis, functional reconstitution, and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) have been used to analyze the structure and function of phospholamban (PLB), a 52-residue integral membrane protein that regulates the calcium pump (Ca-ATPase) in cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). PLB exists in equilibrium between monomeric and pentameric forms, as observed by SDS-PAGE, EPR, and fluorescence. It has been proposed that inhibition of the pump is due primarily to the monomeric form, with both pentameric stability and inhibition dependent primarily on the transmembrane (TM) domain. To test these hypotheses, we have studied the physical and functional properties of a synthetic null-cysteine PLB analogue that is entirely monomeric on SDS-PAGE, and compared it with the synthetic null-cysteine TM domain (residues 26-52). The TM domain was found to be primarily oligomeric on SDS-PAGE, and boundary lipid spin label analysis in lipid bilayers verified that the isolated TM domain is more oligomeric than the full-length parent molecule. These results indicate that the stability of the PLB pentamer is due primarily to attractive interactions between hydrophobic TM domains, overcoming the repulsive electrostatic interactions between the cationic cytoplasmic domains (residues 1-25). When reconstituted into liposomes containing the Ca-ATPase, the null-cysteine TM domain had the same inhibitory function as that of the full-length parent molecule. We conclude that the TM domain of PLB is sufficient for inhibitory function, the oligomeric stability of PLB does not determine its inhibitory activity, and the three Cys residues in the TM domain are not required for inhibitory function.

  5. FGFR4 transmembrane domain polymorphism and cancer risk: a meta-analysis including 8555 subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei; Li, Yan; Wang, Xueli; Chen, Bo; Wang, Yan; Liu, Shifeng; Xu, Jijun; Zhao, Weihong; Wu, Jianqing

    2010-12-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4), belonging to the receptor tyrosine kinase family, is involved in cancer initiation and progression. The FGFR4 Gly388Arg polymorphism in the transmembrane domain of the receptor was shown to contribute to genetic susceptibility to cancer but the results were inconsistent. We performed a meta-analysis using 12 eligible case-control studies with a total of 4892 patients and 3663 controls to summarise the data on the association between the FGFR4 Gly388Arg polymorphism and cancer risks. The overall odds ratio (OR) with a 95% confidence interval (CI) showed statistical association between the FGFR4 Gly388Arg polymorphism and cancer risks under homozygote comparison, allele contrast and the recessive genetic model. In the subgroup analysis by ethnicity, statistically significantly increased cancer risks were found among Asians for homozygote comparison (OR = 1.43, 95% CI = 1.13-1.80, P(heterogeneity)=0.24), allele contrast (OR = 1.16, 95% CI = 1.04-1.29, P(heterogeneity) = 0.25) and the recessive genetic model (OR = 1.47, 95% CI = 1.19-1.81, P(heterogeneity) = 0.15). In the subgroup analysis for different tumour types, Arg(388) allele had an effect of increasing the risks of breast (homozygote comparison OR = 1.57, 95% CI = 1.04-2.37, P(heterogeneity) = 0.83 and the recessive model OR = 1.51, 95% CI = 1.02-2.24, P(heterogeneity) = 0.80) and prostate cancer (Gly/Arg versus Gly/Gly: OR = 1.16, 95% CI = 1.02-1.32, P(heterogeneity)=0.74; Arg versus Gly: OR = 1.17, 95% CI = 1.07-1.29, P(heterogeneity) = 0.18 and the dominant model: OR = 1.20, 95% CI = 1.06-1.35, P(heterogeneity) = 0.89). Our meta-analysis suggests that the FGFR4 Gly388Arg polymorphism most likely contributes to susceptibility to cancer, especially in Asians. Besides, the Arg(388) allele might be associated with increased risks of breast and prostate cancer.

  6. Coordinated movement of cytoplasmic and transmembrane domains of RyR1 upon gating.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montserrat Samsó

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Ryanodine receptor type 1 (RyR1 produces spatially and temporally defined Ca2+ signals in several cell types. How signals received in the cytoplasmic domain are transmitted to the ion gate and how the channel gates are unknown. We used EGTA or neuroactive PCB 95 to stabilize the full closed or open states of RyR1. Single-channel measurements in the presence of FKBP12 indicate that PCB 95 inverts the thermodynamic stability of RyR1 and locks it in a long-lived open state whose unitary current is indistinguishable from the native open state. We analyzed two datasets of 15,625 and 18,527 frozen-hydrated RyR1-FKBP12 particles in the closed and open conformations, respectively, by cryo-electron microscopy. Their corresponding three-dimensional structures at 10.2 A resolution refine the structure surrounding the ion pathway previously identified in the closed conformation: two right-handed bundles emerging from the putative ion gate (the cytoplasmic "inner branches" and the transmembrane "inner helices". Furthermore, six of the identifiable transmembrane segments of RyR1 have similar organization to those of the mammalian Kv1.2 potassium channel. Upon gating, the distal cytoplasmic domains move towards the transmembrane domain while the central cytoplasmic domains move away from it, and also away from the 4-fold axis. Along the ion pathway, precise relocation of the inner helices and inner branches results in an approximately 4 A diameter increase of the ion gate. Whereas the inner helices of the K+ channels and of the RyR1 channel cross-correlate best with their corresponding open/closed states, the cytoplasmic inner branches, which are not observed in the K+ channels, appear to have at least as important a role as the inner helices for RyR1 gating. We propose a theoretical model whereby the inner helices, the inner branches, and the h1 densities together create an efficient novel gating mechanism for channel opening by relaxing two right

  7. All-Atom Structural Models of the Transmembrane Domains of Insulin and Type 1 Insulin-Like Growth Factor Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadiarani, Hossein; Vashisth, Harish

    2016-01-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinase superfamily comprises many cell-surface receptors including the insulin receptor (IR) and type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF1R) that are constitutively homodimeric transmembrane glycoproteins. Therefore, these receptors require ligand-triggered domain rearrangements rather than receptor dimerization for activation. Specifically, binding of peptide ligands to receptor ectodomains transduces signals across the transmembrane domains for trans-autophosphorylation in cytoplasmic kinase domains. The molecular details of these processes are poorly understood in part due to the absence of structures of full-length receptors. Using MD simulations and enhanced conformational sampling algorithms, we present all-atom structural models of peptides containing 51 residues from the transmembrane and juxtamembrane regions of IR and IGF1R. In our models, the transmembrane regions of both receptors adopt helical conformations with kinks at Pro961 (IR) and Pro941 (IGF1R), but the C-terminal residues corresponding to the juxtamembrane region of each receptor adopt unfolded and flexible conformations in IR as opposed to a helix in IGF1R. We also observe that the N-terminal residues in IR form a kinked-helix sitting at the membrane-solvent interface, while homologous residues in IGF1R are unfolded and flexible. These conformational differences result in a larger tilt-angle of the membrane-embedded helix in IGF1R in comparison to IR to compensate for interactions with water molecules at the membrane-solvent interfaces. Our metastable/stable states for the transmembrane domain of IR, observed in a lipid bilayer, are consistent with a known NMR structure of this domain determined in detergent micelles, and similar states in IGF1R are consistent with a previously reported model of the dimerized transmembrane domains of IGF1R. Our all-atom structural models suggest potentially unique structural organization of kinase domains in each receptor.

  8. Active conformation of the erythropoietin receptor: random and cysteine-scanning mutagenesis of the extracellular juxtamembrane and transmembrane domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiaohui; Gross, Alec W; Lodish, Harvey F

    2006-03-17

    In the absence of erythropoietin (Epo) cell surface Epo receptors (EpoR) are dimeric; dimerization is mediated mainly by the transmembrane domain. Binding of Epo changes the orientation of the two receptor subunits. This conformational change is transmitted through the juxtamembrane and transmembrane domains, leading to activation of JAK2 kinase and induction of proliferation and survival signals. To define the active EpoR conformation(s) we screened libraries of EpoRs with random mutations in the transmembrane domain and identified several point mutations that activate the EpoR in the absence of ligand, including changes of either of the first two transmembrane domain residues (Leu(226) and Ile(227)) to cysteine. Following this discovery, we performed cysteine-scanning mutagenesis in the EpoR juxtamembrane and transmembrane domains. Many mutants formed disulfide-linked receptor dimers, but only EpoR dimers linked by cysteines at positions 223, 226, or 227 activated EpoR signal transduction pathways and supported proliferation of Ba/F3 cells in the absence of cytokines. These data suggest that activation of dimeric EpoR by Epo binding is achieved by reorienting the EpoR transmembrane and the connected cytosolic domains and that certain disulfide-bonded dimers represent the activated dimeric conformation of the EpoR, constitutively activating downstream signaling. Based on our data and the previously determined structure of Epo bound to a dimer of the EpoR extracellular domain, we present a model of the active and inactive conformations of the Epo receptor.

  9. Implications of the differing roles of the β1 and β3 transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains for integrin function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhenwei; Mathew, Sijo; Chen, Jiang; Hadziselimovic, Arina; Palamuttam, Riya; Hudson, Billy G; Fässler, Reinhard; Pozzi, Ambra; Sanders, Charles R; Zent, Roy

    2016-12-08

    Integrins are transmembrane receptors composed of α and β subunits. Although most integrins contain β1, canonical activation mechanisms are based on studies of the platelet integrin, αIIbβ3. Its inactive conformation is characterized by the association of the αIIb transmembrane and cytosolic domain (TM/CT) with a tilted β3 TM/CT that leads to activation when disrupted. We show significant structural differences between β1 and β3 TM/CT in bicelles. Moreover, the 'snorkeling' lysine at the TM/CT interface of β subunits, previously proposed to regulate αIIbβ3 activation by ion pairing with nearby lipids, plays opposite roles in β1 and β3 integrin function and in neither case is responsible for TM tilt. A range of affinities from almost no interaction to the relatively high avidity that characterizes αIIbβ3 is seen between various α subunits and β1 TM/CTs. The αIIbβ3-based canonical model for the roles of the TM/CT in integrin activation and function clearly does not extend to all mammalian integrins.

  10. Transmembrane Domain Targeting Peptide Antagonizing ErbB2/Neu Inhibits Breast Tumor Growth and Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexia Arpel

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is still a deadly disease despite major achievements in targeted therapies designed to block ligands or ligand-binding subunits of major tyrosine kinase receptors. Relapse is significant and metastases deleterious, which demands novel strategies for fighting this disease. Here, we report a proof-of-concept experiment demonstrating that small peptides interfering with the transmembrane domain of the tyrosine kinase epidermal growth factor receptor ErbB2 exhibit anticancer properties when used at micromolar dosages in a genetically engineered mouse model of breast cancer. Different assays demonstrate the specificity of the ErbB2-targeting peptide, which induces long-term reduction of ErbB2 phosphorylation and Akt signaling consistent with reduced tumor cell proliferation and increased survival. Microcomputed tomography analysis established the antimetastatic activity of the peptide and its impact on primary tumor growth. This reveals the interior of the cell membrane as an unexplored dimension for drug design.

  11. Mutagenesis of bacteriophage IKe major coat protein transmembrane domain: role of an interfacial proline residue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, K A; Deber, C M

    1993-10-15

    The transmembrane (TM) domain of the 53-residue major coat protein of the M13-related bacteriophage IKe (residues 24-42: LISQTWPVVTTVVVAGVLI) has been subjected to randomized mutagenesis to probe the conformation and stability of the TM domain, as well as the effect of structurally-important residues such as proline. TM mutants were obtained by the Eckstein method of site-directed mutagenesis using the IKe genome as template so as to eliminate the need for subcloning. Over 40 single- and double-site viable mutants of bacteriophage IKe were isolated. Every residue in the TM segment, except the highly conserved Trp29, could be mutated to at least one other residue; polar and charged mutations occurred in the TM segment adjacent to the N-terminal domain (residues 24-28), while non-polar substitutions predominated in the C-terminal portion (residues 30-42). The Pro30 locus tolerated four mutations-Ala, Gly, Cys, and Ser- which represent the four side chains of least volume. Mutant coat proteins obtained directly from the phage in milligram quantities were studied by circular dichroism spectroscopy and SDS-PAGE gels. Wild type IKe coat protein solubilized in sodium deoxycholate micelles was found to occur as an alpha-helical, monomeric species which is stable at 95 degrees C, whereas the mutant Pro30-->Gly undergoes an irreversible conformational transition at ca. 90 degrees C to an aggregated beta-sheet structure. The result that Pro30 stabilizes the TM helix in the micellar membrane suggests a sterically-restricted location for the wild type Pro pyrrolidine side chain in the bulky Trp-Pro-Val triad, where it may be positioned to direct the initiation of the subsequent TM core domain helix.

  12. Structural and thermodynamic insight into the process of "weak" dimerization of the ErbB4 transmembrane domain by solution NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocharov, Eduard V; Mineev, Konstantin S; Goncharuk, Marina V; Arseniev, Alexander S

    2012-09-01

    Specific helix-helix interactions between the single-span transmembrane domains of receptor tyrosine kinases are believed to be important for their lateral dimerization and signal transduction. Establishing structure-function relationships requires precise structural-dynamic information about this class of biologically significant bitopic membrane proteins. ErbB4 is a ubiquitously expressed member of the HER/ErbB family of growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases that is essential for the normal development of various adult and fetal human tissues and plays a role in the pathobiology of the organism. The dimerization of the ErbB4 transmembrane domain in membrane-mimicking lipid bicelles was investigated by solution NMR. In a bicellar DMPC/DHPC environment, the ErbB4 membrane-spanning α-helices (651-678)(2) form a right-handed parallel dimer through the N-terminal double GG4-like motif A(655)GxxGG(660) in a fashion that is believed to permit proper kinase domain activation. During helix association, the dimer subunits undergo a structural adjustment (slight bending) with the formation of a network of inter-monomeric polar contacts. The quantitative analysis of the observed monomer-dimer equilibrium provides insights into the kinetics and thermodynamics of the folding process of the helical transmembrane domain in the model environment that may be directly relevant to the process that occurs in biological membranes. The lipid bicelles occupied by a single ErbB4 transmembrane domain behave as a true ("ideal") solvent for the peptide, while multiply occupied bicelles are more similar to the ordered lipid microdomains of cellular membranes and appear to provide substantial entropic enhancement of the weak helix-helix interactions, which may be critical for membrane protein activity.

  13. Organization and Dynamics of Fas Transmembrane Domain in Raft Membranes and Modulation by Ceramide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Bruno M.; de Almeida, Rodrigo F.M.; Goormaghtigh, Erik; Fedorov, Aleksander; Prieto, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    To comprehend the molecular processes that lead to the Fas death receptor clustering in lipid rafts, a 21-mer peptide corresponding to its single transmembrane domain (TMD) was reconstituted into mammalian raft model membranes composed of an unsaturated glycerophospholipid, sphingomyelin, and cholesterol. The peptide membrane lateral organization and dynamics, and its influence on membrane properties, were studied by steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence techniques and by attenuated total reflection Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy. Our results show that Fas TMD is preferentially localized in liquid-disordered membrane regions and undergoes a strong reorganization as the membrane composition is changed toward the liquid-ordered phase. This results from the strong hydrophobic mismatch between the length of the peptide hydrophobic stretch and the hydrophobic thickness of liquid-ordered membranes. The stability of nonclustered Fas TMD in liquid-disordered domains suggests that its sequence may have a protective function against nonligand-induced Fas clustering in lipid rafts. It has been reported that ceramide induces Fas oligomerization in lipid rafts. Here, it is shown that neither Fas TMD membrane organization nor its conformation is affected by ceramide. These results are discussed within the framework of Fas membrane signaling events. PMID:21961589

  14. The Conserved Phenylalanine in the Transmembrane Domain Enhances Heteromeric Interactions of Syndecans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Mi-Jung; Park, Jisu; Jang, Sinae; Eom, Chi-Yong; Oh, Eok-Soo

    2016-01-01

    The transmembrane domain (TMD) of the syndecans, a family of transmembrane heparin sulfate proteoglycans, is involved in forming homo- and heterodimers and oligomers that transmit signaling events. Recently, we reported that the unique phenylalanine in TMD positively regulates intramolecular interactions of syndecan-2. Besides the unique phenylalanine, syndecan-2 contains a conserved phenylalanine (SDC2-Phe-169) that is present in all syndecan TMDs, but its function has not been determined. We therefore investigated the structural role of SDC2-Phe-169 in syndecan TMDs. Replacement of SDC2-Phe-169 by tyrosine (S2F169Y) did not affect SDS-resistant homodimer formation but significantly reduced SDS-resistant heterodimer formation between syndecan-2 and -4, suggesting that SDC2-Phe-169 is involved in the heterodimerization/oligomerization of syndecans. Similarly, in an in vitro binding assay, a syndecan-2 mutant (S2(F169Y)) showed a significantly reduced interaction with syndecan-4. FRET assays showed that heteromolecular interactions between syndecan-2 and -4 were reduced in HEK293T cells transfected with S2(F169Y) compared with syndecan-2. Moreover, S2(F169Y) reduced downstream reactions mediated by the heterodimerization of syndecan-2 and -4, including Rac activity, cell migration, membrane localization of PKCα, and focal adhesion formation. The conserved phenylalanine in syndecan-1 and -3 also showed heterodimeric interaction with syndecan-2 and -4. Taken together, these findings suggest that the conserved phenylalanine in the TMD of syndecans is crucial in regulating heteromeric interactions of syndecans.

  15. Targeting the PDZ domains of molecular scaffolds of transmembrane ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piserchio, Andrea; Spaller, Mark; Mierke, Dale F

    2006-06-02

    The family of multidomain proteins known as the synaptic associated proteins (SAPs) act as molecular scaffolds, playing an important role in the signaling and maintenance of several receptors and channels. The SAPs consist of 5 individual protein domains: 3 PDZ (PSD95, Disc Large, Zo1) domains, an SH3 domain, and an inactive guanyl kinase (GK) domain. The 3 PDZ domains bind the C-termini of specific receptors and channels, leading to the transient association with cytoskeletal and signaling proteins. Molecules targeting specific domains of the SAPs may provide a novel route for the regulation of channel and receptor function. Here we describe a structural-based approach for the development of such inhibitors for the PDZ domains of SAP90. The high sequence homology of the 3 domains has necessitated targeting regions outside the canonical binding pocket. The structural features of the PDZ domains with the C-termini of different receptors (GluR6), channels (Kv1.4), and cytoskeletal proteins (CRIPT) provide insight into targeting these regions.

  16. VX-809 corrects folding defects in cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein through action on membrane-spanning domain 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Hong Yu; Grove, Diane E; De La Rosa, Oxana; Houck, Scott A; Sopha, Pattarawut; Van Goor, Fredrick; Hoffman, Beth J; Cyr, Douglas M

    2013-10-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a fatal genetic disorder associated with defective hydration of lung airways due to the loss of chloride transport through the CF transmembrane conductance regulator protein (CFTR). CFTR contains two membrane-spanning domains (MSDs), two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs), and a regulatory domain, and its channel assembly requires multiple interdomain contacts. The most common CF-causing mutation, F508del, occurs in NBD1 and results in misfolding and premature degradation of F508del-CFTR. VX-809 is an investigational CFTR corrector that partially restores CFTR function in people who are homozygous for F508del-CFTR. To identify the folding defect(s) in F508del-CFTR that must be repaired to treat CF, we explored the mechanism of VX-809 action. VX-809 stabilized an N-terminal domain in CFTR that contains only MSD1 and efficaciously restored function to CFTR forms that have missense mutations in MSD1. The action of VX-809 on MSD1 appears to suppress folding defects in F508del-CFTR by enhancing interactions among the NBD1, MSD1, and MSD2 domains. The ability of VX-809 to correct F508del-CFTR is enhanced when combined with mutations that improve F508del-NBD1 interaction with MSD2. These data suggest that the use of VX-809 in combination with an additional CFTR corrector that suppresses folding defects downstream of MSD1 may further enhance CFTR function in people with F508del-CFTR.

  17. The cytoplasmic and the transmembrane domains are not sufficient for class I MHC signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gur, H; Geppert, T D; Wacholtz, M C; Lipsky, P E

    1999-02-01

    Class I MHC molecules deliver activation signals to T cells. To analyze the role of the cytoplasmic and the transmembrane (TM) domains of class I MHC molecules in T cell activation, Jurkat cells were transfected with genes for truncated class I MHC molecules which had only four intracytoplasmic amino acids and no potential phosphorylation sites or native molecules or both. Cross-linking either the native or the truncated molecules induced IL-2 production even under limiting stimulation conditions of low engagement of the stimulating mAb. Moreover, direct comparison of transfected truncated and native class I MHC molecules expressed on the same cell revealed significant stimulation induced by cross-linking the truncated molecules, despite low expression. In addition, truncated class I MHC molecules were as able to synergize with CD3, CD2, or CD28 initiated IL-2 production as native molecules. In further experiments, hybrid constructs made of the extracellular portion of the murine CD8 alpha chain and of the TM and the intracytoplasmic domains of H-2Kk class I MHC molecule were transfected into Jurkat T cells. The expression of the transfected hybrid molecules was comparable to that of the native HLA-B7 molecules. Cross-linking the intact monomorphic HLA-A,B,C epitope or the polymorphic HLA-B7 epitope induced IL-2 production upon costimulation with PMA. In contrast, cross-linking the hybrid molecules generated neither an increase in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) nor stimulated IL-2 production. By contrast, cross-linking intact murine class I MHC molecules induced [Ca2+]i, signal and IL-2 production in transfected Jurkat cells. The data therefore indicate that unlike many other signaling molecules, signaling via class I MHC molecules does not involve the cytoplasmic and the TM portions of the molecule, but rather class I MHC signal transduction is likely to be mediated by the extracellular domain of the molecule.

  18. The second transmembrane domain of P2X7 contributes to dilated pore formation.

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    Chengqun Sun

    Full Text Available Activation of the purinergic receptor P2X7 leads to the cellular permeability of low molecular weight cations. To determine which domains of P2X7 are necessary for this permeability, we exchanged either the C-terminus or portions of the second transmembrane domain (TM2 with those in P2X1 or P2X4. Replacement of the C-terminus of P2X7 with either P2X1 or P2X4 prevented surface expression of the chimeric receptor. Similarly, chimeric P2X7 containing TM2 from P2X1 or P2X4 had reduced surface expression and no permeability to cationic dyes. Exchanging the N-terminal 10 residues or C-terminal 14 residues of the P2X7 TM2 with the corresponding region of P2X1 TM2 partially restored surface expression and limited pore permeability. To further probe TM2 structure, we replaced single residues in P2X7 TM2 with those in P2X1 or P2X4. We identified multiple substitutions that drastically changed pore permeability without altering surface expression. Three substitutions (Q332P, Y336T, and Y343L individually reduced pore formation as indicated by decreased dye uptake and also reduced membrane blebbing in response to ATP exposure. Three others substitutions, V335T, S342G, and S342A each enhanced dye uptake, membrane blebbing and cell death. Our results demonstrate a critical role for the TM2 domain of P2X7 in receptor function, and provide a structural basis for differences between purinergic receptors.

  19. The second transmembrane domain of P2X7 contributes to dilated pore formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chengqun; Heid, Michelle E; Keyel, Peter A; Salter, Russell D

    2013-01-01

    Activation of the purinergic receptor P2X7 leads to the cellular permeability of low molecular weight cations. To determine which domains of P2X7 are necessary for this permeability, we exchanged either the C-terminus or portions of the second transmembrane domain (TM2) with those in P2X1 or P2X4. Replacement of the C-terminus of P2X7 with either P2X1 or P2X4 prevented surface expression of the chimeric receptor. Similarly, chimeric P2X7 containing TM2 from P2X1 or P2X4 had reduced surface expression and no permeability to cationic dyes. Exchanging the N-terminal 10 residues or C-terminal 14 residues of the P2X7 TM2 with the corresponding region of P2X1 TM2 partially restored surface expression and limited pore permeability. To further probe TM2 structure, we replaced single residues in P2X7 TM2 with those in P2X1 or P2X4. We identified multiple substitutions that drastically changed pore permeability without altering surface expression. Three substitutions (Q332P, Y336T, and Y343L) individually reduced pore formation as indicated by decreased dye uptake and also reduced membrane blebbing in response to ATP exposure. Three others substitutions, V335T, S342G, and S342A each enhanced dye uptake, membrane blebbing and cell death. Our results demonstrate a critical role for the TM2 domain of P2X7 in receptor function, and provide a structural basis for differences between purinergic receptors.

  20. Conserved allosteric hot spots in the transmembrane domains of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) channels and multidrug resistance protein (MRP) pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Shipeng; Roessler, Bryan C; Chauvet, Sylvain; Guo, Jingyu; Hartman, John L; Kirk, Kevin L

    2014-07-18

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are an ancient family of transmembrane proteins that utilize ATPase activity to move substrates across cell membranes. The ABCC subfamily of the ABC transporters includes active drug exporters (the multidrug resistance proteins (MRPs)) and a unique ATP-gated ion channel (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)). The CFTR channel shares gating principles with conventional ligand-gated ion channels, but the allosteric network that couples ATP binding at its nucleotide binding domains (NBDs) with conformational changes in its transmembrane helices (TMs) is poorly defined. It is also unclear whether the mechanisms that govern CFTR gating are conserved with the thermodynamically distinct MRPs. Here we report a new class of gain of function (GOF) mutation of a conserved proline at the base of the pore-lining TM6. Multiple substitutions of this proline promoted ATP-free CFTR activity and activation by the weak agonist, 5'-adenylyl-β,γ-imidodiphosphate (AMP-PNP). TM6 proline mutations exhibited additive GOF effects when combined with a previously reported GOF mutation located in an outer collar of TMs that surrounds the pore-lining TMs. Each TM substitution allosterically rescued the ATP sensitivity of CFTR gating when introduced into an NBD mutant with defective ATP binding. Both classes of GOF mutations also rescued defective drug export by a yeast MRP (Yor1p) with ATP binding defects in its NBDs. We conclude that the conserved TM6 proline helps set the energy barrier to both CFTR channel opening and MRP-mediated drug efflux and that CFTR channels and MRP pumps utilize similar allosteric mechanisms for coupling conformational changes in their translocation pathways to ATP binding at their NBDs.

  1. Solution structure of the transmembrane domain of the insulin receptor in detergent micelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qingxin; Wong, Ying Lei; Kang, CongBao

    2014-05-01

    The insulin receptor (IR) binds insulin and plays important roles in glucose homeostasis by regulating the tyrosine kinase activity at its C-terminus. Its transmembrane domain (TMD) is shown to be important for transferring conformational changes induced by insulin across the cell membrane to regulate kinase activity. In this study, a construct IR(940-988) containing the TMD was expressed and purified for structural studies. Its solution structure in dodecylphosphocholine (DPC) micelles was determined. The sequence containing residues L962 to Y976 of the TMD of the IR in micelles adopts a well-defined helical structure with a kink formed by glycine and proline residues present at its N-terminus, which might be important for its function. Paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) and relaxation experimental results suggest that residues following the TMD are flexible and expose to aqueous solution. Although purified IR(940-988) in micelles existed mainly as a monomeric form verified by gel filtration and relaxation analysis, cross-linking study suggests that it may form a dimer or oligomers under micelle conditions.

  2. Relevance of lysine snorkeling in the outer transmembrane domain of small viral potassium ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebhardt, Manuela; Henkes, Leonhard M; Tayefeh, Sascha; Hertel, Brigitte; Greiner, Timo; Van Etten, James L; Baumeister, Dirk; Cosentino, Cristian; Moroni, Anna; Kast, Stefan M; Thiel, Gerhard

    2012-07-17

    Transmembrane domains (TMDs) are often flanked by Lys or Arg because they keep their aliphatic parts in the bilayer and their charged groups in the polar interface. Here we examine the relevance of this so-called "snorkeling" of a cationic amino acid, which is conserved in the outer TMD of small viral K(+) channels. Experimentally, snorkeling activity is not mandatory for Kcv(PBCV-1) because K29 can be replaced by most of the natural amino acids without any corruption of function. Two similar channels, Kcv(ATCV-1) and Kcv(MT325), lack a cytosolic N-terminus, and neutralization of their equivalent cationic amino acids inhibits their function. To understand the variable importance of the cationic amino acids, we reanalyzed molecular dynamics simulations of Kcv(PBCV-1) and N-terminally truncated mutants; the truncated mutants mimic Kcv(ATCV-1) and Kcv(MT325). Structures were analyzed with respect to membrane positioning in relation to the orientation of K29. The results indicate that the architecture of the protein (including the selectivity filter) is only weakly dependent on TMD length and protonation of K29. The penetration depth of Lys in a given protonation state is independent of the TMD architecture, which leads to a distortion of shorter proteins. The data imply that snorkeling can be important for K(+) channels; however, its significance depends on the architecture of the entire TMD. The observation that the most severe N-terminal truncation causes the outer TMD to move toward the cytosolic side suggests that snorkeling becomes more relevant if TMDs are not stabilized in the membrane by other domains.

  3. Distinct neurobehavioural effects of cannabidiol in transmembrane domain neuregulin 1 mutant mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonora E Long

    Full Text Available The cannabis constituent cannabidiol (CBD possesses anxiolytic and antipsychotic properties. We have previously shown that transmembrane domain neuregulin 1 mutant (Nrg1 TM HET mice display altered neurobehavioural responses to the main psychoactive constituent of cannabis, Δ(9-tetrahydrocannabinol. Here we investigated whether Nrg1 TM HET mice respond differently to CBD and whether CBD reverses schizophrenia-related phenotypes expressed by these mice. Adult male Nrg1 TM HET and wild type-like littermates (WT received vehicle or CBD (1, 50 or 100 mg/kg i.p. for 21 days. During treatment and 48 h after withdrawal we measured behaviour, whole blood CBD concentrations and autoradiographic receptor binding. Nrg1 HET mice displayed locomotor hyperactivity, PPI deficits and reduced 5-HT(2A receptor binding density in the substantia nigra, but these phenotypes were not reversed by CBD. However, long-term CBD (50 and 100 mg/kg selectively enhanced social interaction in Nrg1 TM HET mice. Furthermore, acute CBD (100 mg/kg selectively increased PPI in Nrg1 TM HET mice, although tolerance to this effect was manifest upon repeated CBD administration. Long-term CBD (50 mg/kg also selectively increased GABA(A receptor binding in the granular retrosplenial cortex in Nrg1 TM HET mice and reduced 5-HT(2A binding in the substantia nigra in WT mice. Nrg1 appears necessary for CBD-induced anxiolysis since only WT mice developed decreased anxiety-related behaviour with repeated CBD treatment. Altered pharmacokinetics in mutant mice could not explain our findings since no genotype differences existed in CBD blood concentrations. Here we demonstrate that Nrg1 modulates acute and long-term neurobehavioural effects of CBD, which does not reverse the schizophrenia-relevant phenotypes.

  4. Structural mutants of dengue virus 2 transmembrane domains exhibit host-range phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Gwynneth S

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are over 700 known arboviruses and at least 80 immunologically distinct types that cause disease in humans. Arboviruses are transmitted among vertebrates by biting insects, chiefly mosquitoes and ticks. These viruses are widely distributed throughout the world, depending on the presence of appropriate hosts (birds, horses, domestic animals, humans and vectors. Mosquito-borne arboviruses present some of the most important examples of emerging and resurgent diseases of global significance. Methods A strategy has been developed by which host-range mutants of Dengue virus can be constructed by generating deletions in the transmembrane domain (TMD of the E glycoprotein. The host-range mutants produced and selected favored growth in the insect hosts. Mouse trials were conducted to determine if these mutants could initiate an immune response in an in vivo system. Results The DV2 E protein TMD defined as amino acids 452SWTMKILIGVIITWIG467 was found to contain specific residues which were required for the production of this host-range phenotype. Deletion mutants were found to be stable in vitro for 4 sequential passages in both host cell lines. The host-range mutants elicited neutralizing antibody above that seen for wild-type virus in mice and warrant further testing in primates as potential vaccine candidates. Conclusions Novel host-range mutants of DV2 were created that have preferential growth in insect cells and impaired infectivity in mammalian cells. This method for creating live, attenuated viral mutants that generate safe and effective immunity may be applied to many other insect-borne viral diseases for which no current effective therapies exist.

  5. Identification of MarvelD3 as a tight junction-associated transmembrane protein of the occludin family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balda Maria S

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tight junctions are an intercellular adhesion complex of epithelial and endothelial cells, and form a paracellular barrier that restricts the diffusion of solutes on the basis of size and charge. Tight junctions are formed by multiprotein complexes containing cytosolic and transmembrane proteins. How these components work together to form functional tight junctions is still not well understood and will require a complete understanding of the molecular composition of the junction. Results Here we identify a new transmembrane component of tight junctions: MarvelD3, a four-span transmembrane protein. Its predicted transmembrane helices form a Marvel (MAL and related proteins for vesicle traffic and membrane link domain, a structural motif originally discovered in proteins involved in membrane apposition and fusion events, such as the tight junction proteins occludin and tricellulin. In mammals, MarvelD3 is expressed as two alternatively spliced isoforms. Both isoforms exhibit a broad tissue distribution and are expressed by different types of epithelial as well as endothelial cells. MarvelD3 co-localises with occludin at tight junctions in intestinal and corneal epithelial cells. RNA interference experiments in Caco-2 cells indicate that normal MarvelD3 expression is not required for the formation of functional tight junctions but depletion results in monolayers with increased transepithelial electrical resistance. Conclusions Our data indicate that MarvelD3 is a third member of the tight junction-associated occludin family of transmembrane proteins. Similar to occludin, normal expression of MarvelD3 is not essential for the formation of functional tight junctions. However, MarvelD3 functions as a determinant of epithelial paracellular permeability properties.

  6. The HIV-1 Envelope Transmembrane Domain Binds TLR2 through a Distinct Dimerization Motif and Inhibits TLR2-Mediated Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotem, Etai; Schwarzter, Roland; Gramatica, Andrea; Futerman, Anthony H.; Shai, Yechiel

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 uses a number of means to manipulate the immune system, to avoid recognition and to highjack signaling pathways. HIV-1 infected cells show limited Toll-Like Receptor (TLR) responsiveness via as yet unknown mechanisms. Using biochemical and biophysical approaches, we demonstrate that the trans-membrane domain (TMD) of the HIV-1 envelope (ENV) directly interacts with TLR2 TMD within the membrane milieu. This interaction attenuates TNFα, IL-6 and MCP-1 secretion in macrophages, induced by natural ligands of TLR2 both in in vitro and in vivo models. This was associated with decreased levels of ERK phosphorylation. Furthermore, mutagenesis demonstrated the importance of a conserved GxxxG motif in driving this interaction within the membrane milieu. The administration of the ENV TMD in vivo to lipotechoic acid (LTA)/Galactosamine-mediated septic mice resulted in a significant decrease in mortality and in tissue damage, due to the weakening of systemic macrophage activation. Our findings suggest that the TMD of ENV is involved in modulation of the innate immune response during HIV infection. Furthermore, due to the high functional homology of viral ENV proteins this function may be a general character of viral-induced immune modulation. PMID:25121610

  7. The HIV-1 envelope transmembrane domain binds TLR2 through a distinct dimerization motif and inhibits TLR2-mediated responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuven, Eliran Moshe; Ali, Mohammad; Rotem, Etai; Schwarzer, Roland; Schwarzter, Roland; Gramatica, Andrea; Futerman, Anthony H; Shai, Yechiel

    2014-08-01

    HIV-1 uses a number of means to manipulate the immune system, to avoid recognition and to highjack signaling pathways. HIV-1 infected cells show limited Toll-Like Receptor (TLR) responsiveness via as yet unknown mechanisms. Using biochemical and biophysical approaches, we demonstrate that the trans-membrane domain (TMD) of the HIV-1 envelope (ENV) directly interacts with TLR2 TMD within the membrane milieu. This interaction attenuates TNFα, IL-6 and MCP-1 secretion in macrophages, induced by natural ligands of TLR2 both in in vitro and in vivo models. This was associated with decreased levels of ERK phosphorylation. Furthermore, mutagenesis demonstrated the importance of a conserved GxxxG motif in driving this interaction within the membrane milieu. The administration of the ENV TMD in vivo to lipotechoic acid (LTA)/Galactosamine-mediated septic mice resulted in a significant decrease in mortality and in tissue damage, due to the weakening of systemic macrophage activation. Our findings suggest that the TMD of ENV is involved in modulation of the innate immune response during HIV infection. Furthermore, due to the high functional homology of viral ENV proteins this function may be a general character of viral-induced immune modulation.

  8. The HIV-1 envelope transmembrane domain binds TLR2 through a distinct dimerization motif and inhibits TLR2-mediated responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliran Moshe Reuven

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 uses a number of means to manipulate the immune system, to avoid recognition and to highjack signaling pathways. HIV-1 infected cells show limited Toll-Like Receptor (TLR responsiveness via as yet unknown mechanisms. Using biochemical and biophysical approaches, we demonstrate that the trans-membrane domain (TMD of the HIV-1 envelope (ENV directly interacts with TLR2 TMD within the membrane milieu. This interaction attenuates TNFα, IL-6 and MCP-1 secretion in macrophages, induced by natural ligands of TLR2 both in in vitro and in vivo models. This was associated with decreased levels of ERK phosphorylation. Furthermore, mutagenesis demonstrated the importance of a conserved GxxxG motif in driving this interaction within the membrane milieu. The administration of the ENV TMD in vivo to lipotechoic acid (LTA/Galactosamine-mediated septic mice resulted in a significant decrease in mortality and in tissue damage, due to the weakening of systemic macrophage activation. Our findings suggest that the TMD of ENV is involved in modulation of the innate immune response during HIV infection. Furthermore, due to the high functional homology of viral ENV proteins this function may be a general character of viral-induced immune modulation.

  9. Transmembrane domain V plays a stabilizing role in the function of human bile acid transporter SLC10A2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Robyn H; Chothe, Paresh; Swaan, Peter W

    2013-07-30

    The human apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (hASBT, SLC10A2), primarily expressed in the ileum, is involved in both the recycling of bile acids and cholesterol homeostasis. In this study, the structure-function relationship of transmembrane domain 5 (TM5) residues involved in transport is elucidated. Cysteine scanning mutagenesis of each consecutive residue on TM5 resulted in 96% of mutants having a significantly decreased transport activity, although each was expressed at the cell surface. Specifically, G197 and I208 were no longer functional, and G201 and G212 functioned at a level of Conservative alanine mutations of the four residues displayed a higher activity in all but G197A, indicating its functional importance. G197 and G201 form a GxxxG motif, which has been found to be important in helix-helix interactions. According to our model, G197 and G201 face transmembrane domain 4 (TM4) residues G179 and P175, respectively. Similarly, G212 faces G237, which forms part of a GxxxG domain in transmembrane domain 6 (TM6). It is possible that these GxxxG domains and their interacting partners are responsible for maintaining the structure of the helices and their interactions with one another. I205 and I208 are both in positions to anchor the GxxxG domains and direct the change in interaction of TM5 from TM4 to TM6. Combined, the results suggest that residues along TM5 are critical for ASBT function but are not directly involved in substrate translocation.

  10. A conserved gene family encodes transmembrane proteins with fibronectin, immunoglobulin and leucine-rich repeat domains (FIGLER

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    Haga Christopher L

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In mouse the cytokine interleukin-7 (IL-7 is required for generation of B lymphocytes, but human IL-7 does not appear to have this function. A bioinformatics approach was therefore used to identify IL-7 receptor related genes in the hope of identifying the elusive human cytokine. Results Our database search identified a family of nine gene candidates, which we have provisionally named fibronectin immunoglobulin leucine-rich repeat (FIGLER. The FIGLER 1–9 genes are predicted to encode type I transmembrane glycoproteins with 6–12 leucine-rich repeats (LRR, a C2 type Ig domain, a fibronectin type III domain, a hydrophobic transmembrane domain, and a cytoplasmic domain containing one to four tyrosine residues. Members of this multichromosomal gene family possess 20–47% overall amino acid identity and are differentially expressed in cell lines and primary hematopoietic lineage cells. Genes for FIGLER homologs were identified in macaque, orangutan, chimpanzee, mouse, rat, dog, chicken, toad, and puffer fish databases. The non-human FIGLER homologs share 38–99% overall amino acid identity with their human counterpart. Conclusion The extracellular domain structure and absence of recognizable cytoplasmic signaling motifs in members of the highly conserved FIGLER gene family suggest a trophic or cell adhesion function for these molecules.

  11. Pyridoxal phosphate as a probe of the cytoplasmic domains of transmembrane proteins: Application to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Ramirez, B.; Martinez-Carrion, M. (Univ. of Missouri, Kansas City (USA))

    1989-06-13

    A novel procedure has been developed to specifically label the cytoplasmic domains of transmembrane proteins with the aldehyde pyridoxal 5-phosphate (PLP). Torpedo californica acetylcholine receptor (AcChR) vesicles were loaded with ({sup 3}H)pyridoxine 5-phosphate (({sup 3}H)PNP) and pyridoxine-5-phosphate oxidase, followed by intravesicular enzymatic oxidation of ({sup 3}H)PNP at 37{degree}C in the presence of externally added cytochrome c as a scavenger of possible leaking PLP product. The four receptor subunits were labeled whether the reaction was carried out on the internal surface or separately designed to mark the external one. On the other hand, the relative pyridoxylation of the subunits differed in both cases, reflecting differences in accessible lysyl residues in each side of the membrane. Even though there are no large differences in the total lysine content among the subunits and there are two copies of the {alpha}-subunit, internal surface labeling by PLP was greatest for the highest molecular weight ({delta}) subunit, reinforcing the concept that the four receptor subunits are transmembranous and may protrude into the cytoplasmic face in a fashion that is proportional to their subunit molecular weight. Yet, the labeling data do not fit well to any of the models proposed for AcChR subunit folding. The method described can be used for selective labeling of the cytoplasmic domains of transmembrane proteins in sealed membrane vesicles.

  12. Differential Contribution of Transmembrane Domains IV, V, VI, and VII to Human Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Homomer Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Brent M; Nguyen, Elaine; Chedrawe, Matthew A J; Rainey, Jan K; Dupré, Denis J

    2017-02-24

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) play an important role in drug therapy and represent one of the largest families of drug targets. The angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) is notable as it has a central role in the treatment of cardiovascular disease. Blockade of AT1R signaling has been shown to alleviate hypertension and improve outcomes in patients with heart failure. Despite this, it has become apparent that our initial understanding of AT1R signaling is oversimplified. There is considerable evidence to suggest that AT1R signaling is highly modified in the presence of receptor-receptor interactions, but there is very little structural data available to explain this phenomenon even with the recent elucidation of the AT1R crystal structure. The current study investigates the involvement of transmembrane domains in AT1R homomer assembly with the goal of identifying hydrophobic interfaces that contribute to receptor-receptor affinity. A recently published crystal structure of the AT1R was used to guide site-directed mutagenesis of outward-facing hydrophobic residues within the transmembrane region of the AT1R. Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer was employed to analyze how receptor mutation affects the assembly of AT1R homomers with a specific focus on hydrophobic residues. Mutations within transmembrane domains IV, V, VI, and VII had no effect on angiotensin-mediated β-arrestin1 recruitment; however, they exhibited differential effects on the assembly of AT1R into oligomeric complexes. Our results demonstrate the importance of hydrophobic amino acids at the AT1R transmembrane interface and provide the first glimpse of the requirements for AT1R complex assembly.

  13. Structural and functional studies of the HAMP domain of EnvZ, an osmosensing transmembrane histidine kinase in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishii, Ryuta; Falzon, Liliana; Yoshida, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Inouye, Masayori

    2007-09-07

    The HAMP domain plays an essential role in signal transduction not only in histidine kinase but also in a number of other signal-transducing receptor proteins. Here we expressed the EnvZ HAMP domain (Arg(180)-Thr(235)) with the R218K mutation (termed L(RK)) or with L(RK) connected with domain A (Arg(180)-Arg(289)) (termed LA(RK)) of EnvZ, an osmosensing transmembrane histidine kinase in Escherichia coli, by fusing it with protein S. The L(RK) and LA(RK) proteins were purified after removing protein S. The CD analysis of the isolated L protein revealed that it consists of a random structure or is unstructured. This suggests that the EnvZ HAMP domain by itself is unable to form a stable structure and that this structural fragility may be important for its role in signal transduction. Interestingly the substitution of Ala(193) in the EnvZ HAMP domain with valine or leucine in Tez1A1, a chimeric protein of Tar and EnvZ, caused a constitutive OmpC phenotype. The CD analysis of LA(RK)(A193L) revealed that this mutated HAMP domain possesses considerable secondary structures and that the thermostability of this entire LA(RK)(A193L) became substantially lower than that of LA(RK) or just domain A, indicating that the structure of the HAMP domain with the A193L mutation affects the stability of downstream domain A. This results in cooperative thermodenaturation of domain A with the mutated HAMP domain. These results are discussed in light of the recently solved NMR structure of the HAMP domain from a thermophilic bacterium (Hulko, M., Berndt, F., Gruber, M., Linder, J. U., Truffault, V., Schultz, A., Martin, J., Schultz, J. E., Lupas, A. N., and Coles, M. (2006) Cell 126, 929-940).

  14. The Cucumber leaf spot virus p25 auxiliary replicase protein binds and modifies the endoplasmic reticulum via N-terminal transmembrane domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghoshal, Kankana [University of British Columbia, Faculty of Land and Food Systems, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada V6T 1Z4 (Canada); Theilmann, Jane; Reade, Ron; Sanfacon, Helene [Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada Pacific Agri-Food Research Centre, 4200 Hwy 97, Summerland, British Columbia, Canada V0H 1Z0 (Canada); Rochon, D’Ann, E-mail: dann.rochon@agr.gc.ca [University of British Columbia, Faculty of Land and Food Systems, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada V6T 1Z4 (Canada); Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada Pacific Agri-Food Research Centre, 4200 Hwy 97, Summerland, British Columbia, Canada V0H 1Z0 (Canada)

    2014-11-15

    Cucumber leaf spot virus (CLSV) is a member of the Aureusvirus genus, family Tombusviridae. The auxiliary replicase of Tombusvirids has been found to localize to endoplasmic reticulum (ER), peroxisomes or mitochondria; however, localization of the auxiliary replicase of aureusviruses has not been determined. We have found that the auxiliary replicase of CLSV (p25) fused to GFP colocalizes with ER and that three predicted transmembrane domains (TMDs) at the N-terminus of p25 are sufficient for targeting, although the second and third TMDs play the most prominent roles. Confocal analysis of CLSV infected 16C plants shows that the ER becomes modified including the formation of punctae at connections between ER tubules and in association with the nucleus. Ultrastructural analysis shows that the cytoplasm contains numerous vesicles which are also found between the perinuclear ER and nuclear membrane. It is proposed that these vesicles correspond to modified ER used as sites for CLSV replication. - Highlights: • The CLSV p25 auxiliary replicase targets the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). • Targeting of CLSV p25 is associated with ER restructuring. • Restructuring of the ER occurs during CLSV infection. • CLSV p25 contains 3 predicted transmembrane domains 2 of which are required for ER targeting. • Vesicles derived from the ER may be sites of CLSV replication.

  15. Combined effect of cortical cytoskeleton and transmembrane proteins on domain formation in biomembranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sikder, K. U.; Stone, K. A.; Kumar, P. B. S.;

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the combined effects of transmembrane proteins and the subjacent cytoskeleton on the dynamics of phase separation in multicomponent lipid bilayers using computer simulations of a particle-based implicit solvent model for lipid membranes with soft-core interactions. We find that mic...... that microphase separation can be achieved by the protein confinement by the cytoskeleton. Our results have relevance to the finite size of lipid rafts in the plasma membrane of mammalian cells. (C) 2014 AIP Publishing LLC.......We investigate the combined effects of transmembrane proteins and the subjacent cytoskeleton on the dynamics of phase separation in multicomponent lipid bilayers using computer simulations of a particle-based implicit solvent model for lipid membranes with soft-core interactions. We find...

  16. Combined effect of cortical cytoskeleton and transmembrane proteins on domain formation in biomembranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikder, Md. Kabir Uddin; Stone, Kyle A.; Kumar, P. B. Sunil; Laradji, Mohamed

    2014-08-01

    We investigate the combined effects of transmembrane proteins and the subjacent cytoskeleton on the dynamics of phase separation in multicomponent lipid bilayers using computer simulations of a particle-based implicit solvent model for lipid membranes with soft-core interactions. We find that microphase separation can be achieved by the protein confinement by the cytoskeleton. Our results have relevance to the finite size of lipid rafts in the plasma membrane of mammalian cells.

  17. Assembly of the transmembrane domain of E. coli PhoQ histidine kinase: implications for signal transduction from molecular simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmin, Thomas; Soto, Cinque S; Clinthorne, Graham; DeGrado, William F; Dal Peraro, Matteo

    2013-01-01

    The PhoQP two-component system is a signaling complex essential for bacterial virulence and cationic antimicrobial peptide resistance. PhoQ is the histidine kinase chemoreceptor of this tandem machine and assembles in a homodimer conformation spanning the bacterial inner membrane. Currently, a full understanding of the PhoQ signal transduction is hindered by the lack of a complete atomistic structure. In this study, an atomistic model of the key transmembrane (TM) domain is assembled by using molecular simulations, guided by experimental cross-linking data. The formation of a polar pocket involving Asn202 in the lumen of the tetrameric TM bundle is crucial for the assembly and solvation of the domain. Moreover, a concerted displacement of the TM helices at the periplasmic side is found to modulate a rotation at the cytoplasmic end, supporting the transduction of the chemical signal through a combination of scissoring and rotational movement of the TM helices.

  18. Assembly of the transmembrane domain of E. coli PhoQ histidine kinase: implications for signal transduction from molecular simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Lemmin

    Full Text Available The PhoQP two-component system is a signaling complex essential for bacterial virulence and cationic antimicrobial peptide resistance. PhoQ is the histidine kinase chemoreceptor of this tandem machine and assembles in a homodimer conformation spanning the bacterial inner membrane. Currently, a full understanding of the PhoQ signal transduction is hindered by the lack of a complete atomistic structure. In this study, an atomistic model of the key transmembrane (TM domain is assembled by using molecular simulations, guided by experimental cross-linking data. The formation of a polar pocket involving Asn202 in the lumen of the tetrameric TM bundle is crucial for the assembly and solvation of the domain. Moreover, a concerted displacement of the TM helices at the periplasmic side is found to modulate a rotation at the cytoplasmic end, supporting the transduction of the chemical signal through a combination of scissoring and rotational movement of the TM helices.

  19. Modeling transmembrane domain dimers/trimers of plexin receptors: implications for mechanisms of signal transmission across the membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liqun Zhang

    Full Text Available Single-pass transmembrane (TM receptors transmit signals across lipid bilayers by helix association or by configurational changes within preformed dimers. The structure determination for such TM regions is challenging and has mostly been accomplished by NMR spectroscopy. Recently, the computational prediction of TM dimer structures is becoming recognized for providing models, including alternate conformational states, which are important for receptor regulation. Here we pursued a strategy to predict helix oligomers that is based on packing considerations (using the PREDDIMER webserver and is followed by a refinement of structures, utilizing microsecond all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. We applied this method to plexin TM receptors, a family of 9 human proteins, involved in the regulation of cell guidance and motility. The predicted models show that, overall, the preferences identified by PREDDIMER are preserved in the unrestrained simulations and that TM structures are likely to be diverse across the plexin family. Plexin-B1 and -B3 TM helices are regular and tend to associate, whereas plexin-A1, -A2, -A3, -A4, -C1 and -D1 contain sequence elements, such as poly-Glycine or aromatic residues that distort helix conformation and association. Plexin-B2 does not form stable dimers due to the presence of TM prolines. No experimental structural information on the TM region is available for these proteins, except for plexin-C1 dimeric and plexin-B1 - trimeric structures inferred from X-ray crystal structures of the intracellular regions. Plexin-B1 TM trimers utilize Ser and Thr sidechains for interhelical contacts. We also modeled the juxta-membrane (JM region of plexin-C1 and plexin-B1 and show that it synergizes with the TM structures. The structure and dynamics of the JM region and TM-JM junction provide determinants for the distance and distribution of the intracellular domains, and for their binding partners relative to the membrane. The

  20. Transmembrane domain II of the human bile acid transporter SLC10A2 coordinates sodium translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabit, Hairat; Mallajosyula, Sairam S; MacKerell, Alexander D; Swaan, Peter W

    2013-11-01

    Human apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (hASBT, SLC10A2) is responsible for intestinal reabsorption of bile acids and plays a key role in cholesterol homeostasis. We used a targeted and systematic approach to delineate the role of highly conserved transmembrane helix 2 on the expression and function of hASBT. Cysteine mutation significantly depressed transport activity for >60% of mutants without affecting cell surface localization of the transporter. All mutants were inaccessible toward chemical modification by membrane-impermeant MTSET reagent, strongly suggesting that transmembrane 2 (TM2) plays an indirect role in bile acid substrate translocation. Both bile acid uptake and sodium dependence of TM2 mutants revealed a distinct α-helical periodicity. Kinetic studies with conservative and non-conservative mutants of sodium sensitive residues further underscored the importance of Gln(75), Phe(76), Met(79), Gly(83), Leu(86), Phe(90), and Asp(91) in hASBT function. Computational analysis indicated that Asp(91) may coordinate with sodium during the transport cycle. Combined, our data propose that a consortium of sodium-sensitive residues along with previously reported residues (Thr(134), Leu(138), and Thr(149)) from TM3 may form the sodium binding and translocation pathway. Notably, residues Gln(75), Met(79), Thr(82), and Leu(86) from TM2 are highly conserved in TM3 of a putative remote bacterial homologue (ASBTNM), suggesting a universal mechanism for the SLC10A transporter family.

  1. Graph-Theoretic Models of Mutations in the Nucleotide Binding Domain 1 of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debra J. Knisley

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis is one of the most common inherited diseases and is caused by a mutation in a membrane protein, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR. This protein serves as a chloride channel and regulates the viscosity of mucus lining the ducts of a number of organs. Although much has been learned about the consequences of mutations on the energy landscape and the resulting disrupted folding pathway of CFTR, a level of understanding needed to correct the misfolding has not been achieved. The most common mutations of CFTR are located in one of two nucleotide binding domains, namely, the nucleotide binding domain 1 (NBD1. We model NBD1 using a nested graph model. The vertices in the lowest layer each represent an atom in the structure of an amino acid residue, while the vertices in the mid layer each represent the residue. The vertices in the top layer each represent a subdomain of the nucleotide binding domain. We use this model to quantify the effects of a single point mutation on the protein domain. We compare the wildtype structure with eight of the most common mutations. The graph-theoretic model provides insight into how a single point mutation can have such profound structural consequences.

  2. R76 in transmembrane domain 3 of the aspartate:alanine transporter AspT is involved in substrate transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Satomi; Nanatani, Kei; Abe, Keietsu

    2016-01-01

    The L-aspartate:L-alanine antiporter of Tetragenococcus halophilus (AspT) possesses an arginine residue (R76) within the GxxxG motif in the central part of transmembrane domain 3 (TM3)-a residue that has been estimated to transport function. In this study, we carried out amino acid substitutions of R76 and used proteoliposome reconstitution for analyzing the transport function of each substitution. Both l-aspartate and l-alanine transport assays showed that R76K has higher activity than the AspT-WT (R76), whereas R76D and R76E have lower activity than the AspT-WT. These results suggest that R76 is involved in AspT substrate transport.

  3. Lipid-protein nanodiscs promote in vitro folding of transmembrane domains of multi-helical and multimeric membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenkarev, Zakhar O; Lyukmanova, Ekaterina N; Butenko, Ivan O; Petrovskaya, Lada E; Paramonov, Alexander S; Shulepko, Mikhail A; Nekrasova, Oksana V; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail P; Arseniev, Alexander S

    2013-02-01

    Production of helical integral membrane proteins (IMPs) in a folded state is a necessary prerequisite for their functional and structural studies. In many cases large-scale expression of IMPs in cell-based and cell-free systems results in misfolded proteins, which should be refolded in vitro. Here using examples of the bacteriorhodopsin ESR from Exiguobacterium sibiricum and full-length homotetrameric K(+) channel KcsA from Streptomyces lividans we found that the efficient in vitro folding of the transmembrane domains of the polytopic and multimeric IMPs could be achieved during the protein encapsulation into the reconstructed high-density lipoprotein particles, also known as lipid-protein nanodiscs. In this case the self-assembly of the IMP/nanodisc complexes from a mixture containing apolipoprotein, lipids and the partially denatured protein solubilized in a harsh detergent induces the folding of the transmembrane domains. The obtained folding yields showed significant dependence on the properties of lipids used for nanodisc formation. The largest recovery of the spectroscopically active ESR (~60%) from the sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was achieved in the nanodiscs containing anionic saturated lipid 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPG) and was approximately twice lower in the zwitterionic DMPC lipid. The reassembly of tetrameric KcsA from the acid-dissociated monomer solubilized in SDS was the most efficient (~80%) in the nanodiscs containing zwitterionic unsaturated lipid 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC). The charged and saturated lipids provided lower tetramer quantities, and the lowest yield (<20%) was observed in DMPC. The overall yield of the ESR and KcsA folding was mainly restricted by the efficiency of the protein encapsulation into the nanodiscs.

  4. Deacylation of the transmembrane domains of Sindbis virus envelope glycoproteins E1 and E2 does not affect low-pH-induced viral membrane fusion activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, JM; Bittman, R; Wilschut, J

    2001-01-01

    The envelope glycoproteins E1 and E2 of Sindbis virus are palmitoylated at cysteine residues within their transmembrane domains (E1 at position 430, and E2 at positions 388 and 390), Here, we investigated the in vitro membrane fusion activity of Sindbis virus variants (derived from the Tote 1101 inf

  5. Two seven-transmembrane domain MILDEW RESISTANCE LOCUS O proteins cofunction in Arabidopsis root thigmomorphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhongying; Noir, Sandra; Kwaaitaal, Mark; Hartmann, H Andreas; Wu, Ming-Jing; Mudgil, Yashwanti; Sukumar, Poornima; Muday, Gloria; Panstruga, Ralph; Jones, Alan M

    2009-07-01

    Directional root expansion is governed by nutrient gradients, positive gravitropism and hydrotropism, negative phototropism and thigmotropism, as well as endogenous oscillations in the growth trajectory (circumnutation). Null mutations in phylogenetically related Arabidopsis thaliana genes MILDEW RESISTANCE LOCUS O 4 (MLO4) and MLO11, encoding heptahelical, plasma membrane-localized proteins predominantly expressed in the root tip, result in aberrant root thigmomorphogenesis. mlo4 and mlo11 mutant plants show anisotropic, chiral root expansion manifesting as tightly curled root patterns upon contact with solid surfaces. The defect in mlo4 and mlo11 mutants is nonadditive and dependent on light and nutrients. Genetic epistasis experiments demonstrate that the mutant phenotype is independently modulated by the Gbeta subunit of the heterotrimeric G-protein complex. Analysis of expressed chimeric MLO4/MLO2 proteins revealed that the C-terminal domain of MLO4 is necessary but not sufficient for MLO4 action in root thigmomorphogenesis. The expression of the auxin efflux carrier fusion, PIN1-green fluorescent protein, the pattern of auxin-induced gene expression, and acropetal as well as basipetal auxin transport are altered at the root tip of mlo4 mutant seedlings. Moreover, addition of auxin transport inhibitors or the loss of EIR1/AGR1/PIN2 function abolishes root curling of mlo4, mlo11, and wild-type seedlings. These results demonstrate that the exaggerated root curling phenotypes of the mlo4 and mlo11 mutants depend on auxin gradients and suggest that MLO4 and MLO11 cofunction as modulators of touch-induced root tropism.

  6. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of P30, the transmembrane domain of pertactin, an autotransporter from Bordetella pertussis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Yanshi; Black, Isobel; Roszak, Aleksander W.; Isaacs, Neil W., E-mail: n.isaacs@chem.gla.ac.uk [Department of Chemistry and WestChem, Glasgow Biomedical Research Centre, University of Glasgow, 120 University Place, Glasgow G12 8TA,Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2007-07-01

    P30, the transmembrane C-terminal domain of pertactin from B. pertussis has been crystallized after refolding in vitro. Preliminary X-ray crystallographic data are reported. P30, the 32 kDa transmembrane C-terminal domain of pertactin from Bordetella pertussis, is supposed to form a β-barrel inserted into the outer membrane for the translocation of the passenger domain. P30 was cloned and expressed in inclusion bodies in Escherichia coli. After refolding and purification, the protein was crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method at 292 K. The crystals diffract to a resolution limit of 3.5 Å using synchrotron radiation and belong to the hexagonal space group P6{sub 1}22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 123.27, c = 134.43 Å.

  7. Impact of the [delta]F508 Mutation in First Nucleotide-binding Domain of Human Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator on Domain Folding and Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Hal A.; Zhao, Xun; Wang, Chi; Sauder, J. Michael; Rooney, Isabelle; Noland, Brian W.; Lorimer, Don; Kearins, Margaret C.; Conners, Kris; Condon, Brad; Maloney, Peter C.; Guggino, William B.; Hunt, John F.; Emtage, Spencer (SG); (Columbia); (JHU)

    2010-07-19

    Cystic fibrosis is caused by defects in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), commonly the deletion of residue Phe-508 (DeltaF508) in the first nucleotide-binding domain (NBD1), which results in a severe reduction in the population of functional channels at the epithelial cell surface. Previous studies employing incomplete NBD1 domains have attributed this to aberrant folding of DeltaF508 NBD1. We report structural and biophysical studies on complete human NBD1 domains, which fail to demonstrate significant changes of in vitro stability or folding kinetics in the presence or absence of the DeltaF508 mutation. Crystal structures show minimal changes in protein conformation but substantial changes in local surface topography at the site of the mutation, which is located in the region of NBD1 believed to interact with the first membrane spanning domain of CFTR. These results raise the possibility that the primary effect of DeltaF508 is a disruption of proper interdomain interactions at this site in CFTR rather than interference with the folding of NBD1. Interestingly, increases in the stability of NBD1 constructs are observed upon introduction of second-site mutations that suppress the trafficking defect caused by the DeltaF508 mutation, suggesting that these suppressors might function indirectly by improving the folding efficiency of NBD1 in the context of the full-length protein. The human NBD1 structures also solidify the understanding of CFTR regulation by showing that its two protein segments that can be phosphorylated both adopt multiple conformations that modulate access to the ATPase active site and functional interdomain interfaces.

  8. Characterization of a novel five-transmembrane domain cholecystokinin-2 receptor splice variant identified in human tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Claire; Escrieut, Chantal; Clerc, Pascal; Gigoux, Véronique; Waser, Beatrice; Reubi, Jean Claude; Fourmy, Daniel

    2012-02-26

    The cholecystokinin-2 receptor (CCK2R), is expressed in cancers where it contributes to tumor progression. The CCK2R is over-expressed in a sub-set of tumors, allowing its use in tumor targeting with a radiolabel ligand. Since discrepancies between mRNA levels and CCK2R binding sites were noticed, we searched for abnormally spliced variants in tumors from various origins having been previously reported to frequently express cholecystokinin receptors, such as medullary thyroid carcinomas, gastrointestinal stromal tumors, leiomyomas and leiomyosarcomas, and gastroenteropancreatic tumors. A variant of the CCK2R coding for a putative five-transmembrane domains receptor has been cloned. This variant represented as much as 6% of CCK2R levels. Ectopic expression in COS-7 cells revealed that this variant lacks biological activity due to its sequestration in endoplasmic reticulum. When co-expressed with the CCK2R, this variant diminished membrane density of the CCK2R and CCK2R-mediated activity (phospholipase-C and ERK activation). In conclusion, a novel splice variant acting as a dominant negative on membrane density of the CCK2R may be of importance for the pathophysiology of certain tumors and for their in vivo CCK2R-targeting.

  9. Short transmembrane domains with high-volume exoplasmic halves determine retention of Type II membrane proteins in the Golgi complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroga, Rodrigo; Trenchi, Alejandra; González Montoro, Ayelén; Valdez Taubas, Javier; Maccioni, Hugo J F

    2013-12-01

    It is still unclear why some proteins that travel along the secretory pathway are retained in the Golgi complex whereas others make their way to the plasma membrane. Recent bioinformatic analyses on a large number of single-spanning membrane proteins support the hypothesis that specific features of the transmembrane domain (TMD) are relevant to the sorting of these proteins to particular organelles. Here we experimentally test this hypothesis for Golgi and plasma membrane proteins. Using the Golgi SNARE protein Sft1 and the plasma membrane SNARE protein Sso1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae as model proteins, we modified the length of their TMDs and the volume of their exoplasmic hemi-TMD, and determined their subcellular localization both in yeast and mammalian cells. We found that short TMDs with high-volume exoplasmic hemi-TMDs confer Golgi membrane residence, whereas TMDs with low-volume exoplasmic hemi-TMDs, either short or long, confer plasma membrane residence to these proteins. Results indicate that the shape of the exoplasmic hemi-TMD, in addition to the length of the entire TMD, determine retention in the Golgi or exit to the plasma membrane of Type II membrane proteins.

  10. The matrix metalloproteinase stromelysin-3 cleaves laminin receptor at two distinct sites between the transmembrane domain and laminin binding sequence within the extracellular domain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tosikazu AMANO; Olivia KWAK; Liezhen FU; Anastasia MARSHAK; Yun-Bo SHI

    2005-01-01

    The matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) stromelysin-3 (ST3) has long been implicated to play an important role in extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling and cell fate determination during normal and pathological processes. However,like other MMPs, the molecular basis of ST3 function in vivo remains unclear due to the lack of information on its physiological substrates. Furthermore, ST3 has only weak activities toward all tested ECM proteins. Using thyroid hormone-dependent Xenopus laevis metamorphosis as a model, we demonstrated previously that ST3 is important for apoptosis and tissue morphogenesis during intestinal remodeling. Here, we used yeast two-hybrid screen with mRNAs from metamorphosing tadpoles to identify potential substrate of ST3 during development. We thus isolated the 37 kd laminin receptor precursor (LR). We showed that LR binds to ST3 in vitro and can be cleaved by ST3 at two sites,distinct from where other MMPs cleave. Through peptide sequencing, we determined that the two cleavage sites are in the extracellular domain between the transmembrane domain and laminin binding sequence. Furthermore, we demonstrated that these cleavage sites are conserved in human LR. These results together with high levels of human LR and ST3 expression in carcinomas suggest that LR is a likely in vivo substrate of ST3 and that its cleavage by ST3 may alter cell-extracellular matrix interaction, thus, playing a role in mediating the effects of ST3 on cell fate and behavior observed during development and pathogenesis.

  11. Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Investigation of the Structural Topology and Lipid Interactions of a Viral Fusion Protein Chimera Containing the Fusion Peptide and Transmembrane Domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Hongwei; Lee, Myungwoon; Liao, Shu-Yu; Hong, Mei

    2016-12-13

    The fusion peptide (FP) and transmembrane domain (TMD) of viral fusion proteins play important roles during virus-cell membrane fusion, by inducing membrane curvature and transient dehydration. The structure of the water-soluble ectodomain of viral fusion proteins has been extensively studied crystallographically, but the structures of the FP and TMD bound to phospholipid membranes are not well understood. We recently investigated the conformations and lipid interactions of the separate FP and TMD peptides of parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5) fusion protein F using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance. These studies provide structural information about the two domains when they are spatially well separated in the fusion process. To investigate how these two domains are structured relative to each other in the postfusion state, when the ectodomain forms a six-helix bundle that is thought to force the FP and TMD together in the membrane, we have now expressed and purified a chimera of the FP and TMD, connected by a Gly-Lys linker, and measured the chemical shifts and interdomain contacts of the protein in several lipid membranes. The FP-TMD chimera exhibits α-helical chemical shifts in all the membranes examined and does not cause strong curvature of lamellar membranes or membranes with negative spontaneous curvature. These properties differ qualitatively from those of the separate peptides, indicating that the FP and TMD interact with each other in the lipid membrane. However, no (13)C-(13)C cross peaks are observed in two-dimensional correlation spectra, suggesting that the two helices are not tightly associated. These results suggest that the ectodomain six-helix bundle does not propagate into the membrane to the two hydrophobic termini. However, the loosely associated FP and TMD helices are found to generate significant negative Gaussian curvature to membranes that possess spontaneous positive curvature, consistent with the notion that the FP-TMD assembly may

  12. Cysteine mutagenesis reveals alternate proximity between transmembrane domain 2 and hairpin loop 1 of the glutamate transporter EAAT1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunlong; Zhang, Xiuping; Qu, Shaogang

    2014-07-01

    Excitatory amino acid transporter 1 (EAAT1) plays an important role in restricting the neurotoxicity of glutamate. Previous structure-function studies have provided evidence that reentrant helical hairpin loop (HP) 1 has predominant function during the transport cycle. The proposed internal gate HP1 is packed against transmembrane domain (TM) 2 and TM5 in its closed state, and two residues located in TM2 and HP2 of EAAT1 are in close proximity. However, the spatial relationship between TM2 and HP1 during the transport cycle remains unknown. In this study, we used chemical cross-linking of introduced cysteine pair (V96C and S366C) in a cysteine-less version of EAAT1 to assess the proximity of TM2 and HP1. Here, we show that inhibition of transport by copper(II)(1,10-phenanthroline)3 (CuPh) and cadmium ion (Cd(2+)) were observed in the V96C/S366C mutant. Glutamate or potassium significantly protected against the inhibition of transport activity of V96C/S366C by CuPh, while TBOA potentiated the inhibition of transport activity of V96C/S366C by CuPh. We also checked the kinetic parameters of V96C/S366C treated with or without CuPh in the presence of NaCl, NaCl + L-glutamate, NaCl + TBOA, and KCl, respectively. The sensitivity of V96C and S366C to membrane-impermeable sulfhydryl reagent MTSET [(2-trimethylammonium) methanethiosulfonate] was attenuated by glutamate or potassium. TBOA had no effect on the sensitivity of V96C and S366C to MTSET. These data suggest that the spatial relationship between Val-96 of TM2 and Ser-366 of HP1 is altered in the transport cycle.

  13. The stability of the three transmembrane and the four transmembrane human vitamin K epoxide reductase models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Sangwook

    2016-04-01

    The three transmembrane and the four transmembrane helix models are suggested for human vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR). In this study, we investigate the stability of the human three transmembrane/four transmembrane VKOR models by employing a coarse-grained normal mode analysis and molecular dynamics simulation. Based on the analysis of the mobility of each transmembrane domain, we suggest that the three transmembrane human VKOR model is more stable than the four transmembrane human VKOR model.

  14. VAMP-associated Proteins (VAP) as Receptors That Couple Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) Proteostasis with Lipid Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Wayne L; Shome, Kuntala; Wu, Christine C; Gong, Xiaoyan; Frizzell, Raymond A; Aridor, Meir

    2016-03-04

    Unesterified cholesterol accumulates in late endosomes in cells expressing the misfolded cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). CFTR misfolding in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) or general activation of ER stress led to dynein-mediated clustering of cholesterol-loaded late endosomes at the Golgi region, a process regulated by ER-localized VAMP-associated proteins (VAPs). We hypothesized that VAPs serve as intracellular receptors that couple lipid homeostasis through interactions with two phenylalanines in an acidic track (FFAT) binding signals (found in lipid sorting and sensing proteins, LSS) with proteostasis regulation. VAPB inhibited the degradation of ΔF508-CFTR. The activity was mapped to the ligand-binding major sperm protein (MSP) domain, which was sufficient in regulating CFTR biogenesis. We identified mutations in an unstructured loop within the MSP that uncoupled VAPB-regulated CFTR biogenesis from basic interactions with FFAT. Using this information, we defined functional and physical interactions between VAPB and proteostasis regulators (ligands), including the unfolded protein response sensor ATF6 and the ER degradation cluster that included FAF1, VCP, BAP31, and Derlin-1. VAPB inhibited the degradation of ΔF508-CFTR in the ER through interactions with the RMA1-Derlin-BAP31-VCP pathway. Analysis of pseudoligands containing tandem FFAT signals supports a competitive model for VAP interactions that direct CFTR biogenesis. The results suggest a model in which VAP-ligand binding couples proteostasis and lipid homeostasis leading to observed phenotypes of lipid abnormalities in protein folding diseases.

  15. Two Predicted Transmembrane Domains Exclude Very Long Chain Fatty acyl-CoAs from the Active Site of Mouse Wax Synthase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen Kawelke

    Full Text Available Wax esters are used as coatings or storage lipids in all kingdoms of life. They are synthesized from a fatty alcohol and an acyl-CoA by wax synthases. In order to get insights into the structure-function relationships of a wax synthase from Mus musculus, a domain swap experiment between the mouse acyl-CoA:wax alcohol acyltransferase (AWAT2 and the homologous mouse acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase 2 (DGAT2 was performed. This showed that the substrate specificity of AWAT2 is partially determined by two predicted transmembrane domains near the amino terminus of AWAT2. Upon exchange of the two domains for the respective part of DGAT2, the resulting chimeric enzyme was capable of incorporating up to 20% of very long acyl chains in the wax esters upon expression in S. cerevisiae strain H1246. The amount of very long acyl chains in wax esters synthesized by wild type AWAT2 was negligible. The effect was narrowed down to a single amino acid position within one of the predicted membrane domains, the AWAT2 N36R variant. Taken together, we provide first evidence that two predicted transmembrane domains in AWAT2 are involved in determining its acyl chain length specificity.

  16. Lysosomal-associated transmembrane protein 5 (LAPTM5 is a molecular partner of CD1e.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Angénieux

    Full Text Available The CD1e protein participates in the presentation of lipid antigens in dendritic cells. Its transmembrane precursor is transported to lysosomes where it is cleaved into an active soluble form. In the presence of bafilomycin, which inhibits vacuolar ATPase and consequently the acidification of endosomal compartments, CD1e associates with a 27 kD protein. In this work, we identified this molecular partner as LAPTM5. The latter protein and CD1e colocalize in trans-Golgi and late endosomal compartments. The quantity of LAPTM5/CD1e complexes increases when the cells are treated with bafilomycin, probably due to the protection of LAPTM5 from lysosomal proteases. Moreover, we could demonstrate that LAPTM5/CD1e association occurs under physiological conditions. Although LAPTM5 was previously shown to act as a platform recruiting ubiquitin ligases and facilitating the transport of receptors to lysosomes, we found no evidence that LATPM5 controls either CD1e ubiquitination or the generation of soluble lysosomal CD1e proteins. Notwithstanding these last observations, the interaction of LAPTM5 with CD1e and their colocalization in antigen processing compartments both suggest that LAPTM5 might influence the role of CD1e in the presentation of lipid antigens.

  17. Repositioning antimicrobial agent pentamidine as a disruptor of the lateral interactions of transmembrane domain 5 of EBV latent membrane protein 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaohui; Fiorini, Zeno; Smith, Christina; Zhang, Yingning; Li, Jing; Watkins, Linda R; Yin, Hang

    2012-01-01

    The lateral transmembrane protein-protein interactions (PPI) have been regarded as "undruggable" despite their importance in many essential biological processes. The homo-trimerization of transmembrane domain 5 (TMD-5) of latent membrane protein 1 (LMP-1) is critical for the constitutive oncogenic activation of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). Herein we repurpose the antimicrobial agent pentamidine as a regulator of LMP-1 TMD-5 lateral interactions. The results of ToxR assay, tryptophan fluorescence assay, courmarin fluorescence dequenching assay, and Bis-Tris sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) consistently show pentamidine disrupts LMP-1 TMD-5 lateral interactions. Furthermore, pentamidine inhibits LMP-1 signaling, inducing cellular apoptosis and suppressing cell proliferation in the EBV infected B cells. In contrast, EBV negative cells are less susceptible to pentamidine. This study provides a novel non-peptide small molecule agent for regulating LMP-1 TMD-5 lateral interactions.

  18. Repositioning antimicrobial agent pentamidine as a disruptor of the lateral interactions of transmembrane domain 5 of EBV latent membrane protein 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohui Wang

    Full Text Available The lateral transmembrane protein-protein interactions (PPI have been regarded as "undruggable" despite their importance in many essential biological processes. The homo-trimerization of transmembrane domain 5 (TMD-5 of latent membrane protein 1 (LMP-1 is critical for the constitutive oncogenic activation of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV. Herein we repurpose the antimicrobial agent pentamidine as a regulator of LMP-1 TMD-5 lateral interactions. The results of ToxR assay, tryptophan fluorescence assay, courmarin fluorescence dequenching assay, and Bis-Tris sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE consistently show pentamidine disrupts LMP-1 TMD-5 lateral interactions. Furthermore, pentamidine inhibits LMP-1 signaling, inducing cellular apoptosis and suppressing cell proliferation in the EBV infected B cells. In contrast, EBV negative cells are less susceptible to pentamidine. This study provides a novel non-peptide small molecule agent for regulating LMP-1 TMD-5 lateral interactions.

  19. The H-loop in the Second Nucleotide-binding Domain of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator is Required for Efficient Chloride Channel Closing

    OpenAIRE

    Kloch, Monika; Milewski, Michał; Nurowska, Ewa; Dworakowska, Beata; Cutting, Garry R.; Dołowy, Krzysztof

    2010-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter that functions as a cAMP-activated chloride channel. The recent model of CFTR gating predicts that the ATP binding to both nucleotide-binding domains (NBD1 and NBD2) of CFTR is required for the opening of the channel, while the ATP hydrolysis at NBD2 induces subsequent channel closing. In most ABC proteins, efficient hydrolysis of ATP requires the presence of the invariant histidine res...

  20. Mutation G805R in the transmembrane domain of the LDL receptor gene causes familial hypercholesterolemia by inducing ectodomain cleavage of the LDL receptor in the endoplasmic reticulum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thea Bismo Strøm

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available More than 1700 mutations in the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR gene have been found to cause familial hypercholesterolemia (FH. These are commonly divided into five classes based upon their effects on the structure and function of the LDLR. However, little is known about the mechanism by which mutations in the transmembrane domain of the LDLR gene cause FH. We have studied how the transmembrane mutation G805R affects the function of the LDLR. Based upon Western blot analyses of transfected HepG2 cells, mutation G805R reduced the amounts of the 120 kDa precursor LDLR in the endoplasmic reticulum. This led to reduced amounts of the mature 160 kDa LDLR at the cell surface. However, significant amounts of a secreted 140 kDa G805R-LDLR ectodomain fragment was observed in the culture media. Treatment of the cells with the metalloproteinase inhibitor batimastat largely restored the amounts of the 120 and 160 kDa forms in cell lysates, and prevented secretion of the 140 kDa ectodomain fragment. Together, these data indicate that a metalloproteinase cleaved the ectodomain of the 120 kDa precursor G805R-LDLR in the endoplasmic reticulum. It was the presence of the polar Arg805 and not the lack of Gly805 which led to ectodomain cleavage. Arg805 also prevented γ-secretase cleavage within the transmembrane domain. It is conceivable that introducing a charged residue within the hydrophobic membrane lipid bilayer, results in less efficient incorporation of the 120 kDa G805R-LDLR in the endoplasmic reticulum membrane and makes it a substrate for metalloproteinase cleavage.

  1. Transmembrane recognition of the semaphorin co-receptors neuropilin 1 and plexin A1: coarse-grained simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samia Aci-Sèche

    Full Text Available The cancer associated class 3 semaphorins require direct binding to neuropilins and association to plexins to trigger cell signaling. Here, we address the role of the transmembrane domains of neuropilin 1 and plexin A1 for the dimerization of the two receptors by characterizing the assembly in lipid bilayers using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. From experimental evidence using a two-hybrid system showing the biochemical association of the two receptors transmembrane domains, we performed molecular simulations in DOPC and POPC demonstrating spontaneously assembly to form homodimers and heterodimers with a very high propensity for right-handed packing of the helices. Inversely, left-handed packing was observed with a very low propensity. This mode of packing was observed uniquely when the plexin A1 transmembrane domain was involved in association. Potential of mean force calculations were used to predict a hierarchy of self-association for the monomers: the two neuropilin 1 transmembrane domains strongly associated, neuropilin 1 and plexin A1 transmembrane domains associated less and the two plexin A1 transmembrane domains weakly but significantly associated. We demonstrated that homodimerization and heterodimerization are driven by GxxxG motifs, and that the sequence context modulates the packing mode of the plexin A1 transmembrane domains. This work presents major advances towards our understanding of membrane signaling platforms assembly through membrane domains and provides exquisite information for the design of antagonist drugs defining a novel class of therapeutic agents.

  2. Transmembrane recognition of the semaphorin co-receptors neuropilin 1 and plexin A1: coarse-grained simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aci-Sèche, Samia; Sawma, Paul; Hubert, Pierre; Sturgis, James N; Bagnard, Dominique; Jacob, Laurent; Genest, Monique; Garnier, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    The cancer associated class 3 semaphorins require direct binding to neuropilins and association to plexins to trigger cell signaling. Here, we address the role of the transmembrane domains of neuropilin 1 and plexin A1 for the dimerization of the two receptors by characterizing the assembly in lipid bilayers using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. From experimental evidence using a two-hybrid system showing the biochemical association of the two receptors transmembrane domains, we performed molecular simulations in DOPC and POPC demonstrating spontaneously assembly to form homodimers and heterodimers with a very high propensity for right-handed packing of the helices. Inversely, left-handed packing was observed with a very low propensity. This mode of packing was observed uniquely when the plexin A1 transmembrane domain was involved in association. Potential of mean force calculations were used to predict a hierarchy of self-association for the monomers: the two neuropilin 1 transmembrane domains strongly associated, neuropilin 1 and plexin A1 transmembrane domains associated less and the two plexin A1 transmembrane domains weakly but significantly associated. We demonstrated that homodimerization and heterodimerization are driven by GxxxG motifs, and that the sequence context modulates the packing mode of the plexin A1 transmembrane domains. This work presents major advances towards our understanding of membrane signaling platforms assembly through membrane domains and provides exquisite information for the design of antagonist drugs defining a novel class of therapeutic agents.

  3. The signal for clathrin-mediated endocytosis of the paramyxovirus SV5 HN protein resides at the transmembrane domain-ectodomain boundary region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leser, G P; Ector, K J; Ng, D T; Shaughnessy, M A; Lamb, R A

    1999-09-15

    The hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) glycoprotein of the paramyxovirus SV5 is internalized from the cell surface via clathrin-coated pits. However, the cytoplasmic domain of SV5 HN does not contain a previously characterized internalization motif. A cell-surface-expressed chimeric protein (APK), consisting of the cytoplasmic tail, transmembrane (TM) domain, and 12 residues of the ectodomain of HN joined to the cytoplasmic protein pyruvate kinase is internalized, indicating that the N-terminal region of HN contains an internalization signal. Although SV5 HN is internalized at a rate similar to that of influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) mutant Y543, which contains a degenerate tyrosine-based signal in its cytoplasmic tail, the elimination of the majority of the HN cytoplasmic tail, or substitution of the HN TM domain with leucine residues, did not affect the rate of HN internalization. The HN protein of the closely related virus, Newcastle disease virus (NDV), is not internalized from the cell surface. Working under the usual convention that the TM domain consists of the hydrophobic residues bounded by two charged residues, analysis of internalization of mutant and chimeric NDV HN molecules indicates that the first seven SV5 HN ectodomain residues are critical for internalization of HN. A glutamic acid residue (E37) that abuts this presumptive HN TM domain/ectodomain boundary is important for SV5 HN internalization.

  4. MAST205 competes with cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)-associated ligand for binding to CFTR to regulate CFTR-mediated fluid transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Aixia; Zhang, Weiqiang; Yarlagadda, Sunitha; Sinha, Chandrima; Arora, Kavisha; Moon, Chang-Suk; Naren, Anjaparavanda P

    2013-04-26

    The PDZ (postsynaptic density-95/discs large/zona occludens-1) domain-based interactions play important roles in regulating the expression and function of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Several PDZ domain-containing proteins (PDZ proteins for short) have been identified as directly or indirectly interacting with the C terminus of CFTR. To better understand the regulation of CFTR processing, we conducted a genetic screen and identified MAST205 (a microtubule-associated serine/threonine kinase with a molecular mass of 205 kDa) as a new CFTR regulator. We found that overexpression of MAST205 increased the expression of CFTR and augmented CFTR-mediated fluid transport in a dose-dependent manner. Conversely, knockdown of MAST205 inhibited CFTR function. The PDZ motif of CFTR is required for the regulatory role of MAST205 in CFTR expression and function. We further demonstrated that MAST205 and the CFTR-associated ligand competed for binding to CFTR, which facilitated the processing of CFTR and consequently up-regulated the expression and function of CFTR at the plasma membrane. More importantly, we found that MAST205 could facilitate the processing of F508del-CFTR mutant and augment its quantity and channel function at the plasma membrane. Taken together, our data suggest that MAST205 plays an important role in regulating CFTR expression and function. Our findings have important clinical implications for treating CFTR-associated diseases such as cystic fibrosis and secretory diarrheas.

  5. The Atomic Structure of the HIV-1 gp41 Transmembrane Domain and Its Connection to the Immunogenic Membrane-proximal External Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apellániz, Beatriz; Rujas, Edurne; Serrano, Soraya; Morante, Koldo; Tsumoto, Kouhei; Caaveiro, Jose M M; Jiménez, M Ángeles; Nieva, José L

    2015-05-22

    The membrane-proximal external region (MPER) C-terminal segment and the transmembrane domain (TMD) of gp41 are involved in HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein-mediated fusion and modulation of immune responses during viral infection. However, the atomic structure of this functional region remains unsolved. Here, based on the high resolution NMR data obtained for peptides spanning the C-terminal segment of MPER and the TMD, we report two main findings: (i) the conformational variability of the TMD helix at a membrane-buried position; and (ii) the existence of an uninterrupted α-helix spanning MPER and the N-terminal region of the TMD. Thus, our structural data provide evidence for the bipartite organization of TMD predicted by previous molecular dynamics simulations and functional studies, but they do not support the breaking of the helix at Lys-683, as was suggested by some models to mark the initiation of the TMD anchor. Antibody binding energetics examined with isothermal titration calorimetry and humoral responses elicited in rabbits by peptide-based vaccines further support the relevance of a continuous MPER-TMD helix for immune recognition. We conclude that the transmembrane anchor of HIV-1 envelope is composed of two distinct subdomains: 1) an immunogenic helix at the N terminus also involved in promoting membrane fusion; and 2) an immunosuppressive helix at the C terminus, which might also contribute to the late stages of the fusion process. The unprecedented high resolution structural data reported here may guide future vaccine and inhibitor developments.

  6. Transmembrane Signaling Proteoglycans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, John R

    2010-01-01

    Virtually all metazoan cells contain at least one and usually several types of transmembrane proteoglycans. These are varied in protein structure and type of polysaccharide, but the total number of vertebrate genes encoding transmembrane proteoglycan core proteins is less than 10. Some core...... proteins, including those of the syndecans, always possess covalently coupled glycosaminoglycans; others do not. Syndecan has a long evolutionary history, as it is present in invertebrates, but many other transmembrane proteoglycans are vertebrate inventions. The variety of proteins......, and linkage to PDZ protein networks. Many transmembrane proteoglycans associate on the cell surface with metzincin proteases and can be shed by them. Work with model systems in vivo and in vitro reveal roles in growth, adhesion, migration, and metabolism. Furthermore, a wide range of phenotypes for the core...

  7. Partial agonism through a zinc-Ion switch constructed between transmembrane domains III and VII in the tachykinin NK(1) receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, B; Elling, C E; Schwartz, T W

    2000-01-01

    Partly due to lack of detailed knowledge of the molecular recognition of ligands the structural basis for partial versus full agonism is not known. In the beta(2)-adrenergic receptor the agonist binding site has previously been structurally and functionally exchanged with an activating metal......-ion site located between AspIII:08-or a His residue introduced at this position in transmembrane domain (TM)-III-and a Cys residue substituted for AsnVII:06 in TM-VII. Here, this interhelical, bidentate metal-ion site is without loss of Zn(2+) affinity transferred to the tachykinin NK(1) receptor....... In contrast to the similarly mutated beta(2)-adrenergic receptor, signal transduction-i.e., inositol phosphate turnover-could be stimulated by both Zn(2+) and by the natural agonist, Substance P in the mutated NK(1) receptor. The metal-ion acted as a 25% partial agonist through binding to the bidentate zinc...

  8. Distinct phenotypes of new transmembrane-domain neuregulin 1 mutant mice and the rescue effects of valproate on the observed schizophrenia-related cognitive deficits.

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    Ju-Chun ePei

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence suggests that neuregulin 1 (NRG1 might be involved in the neurodevelopment, neural plasticity, GABAergic neurotransmission and pathogenesis of schizophrenia. NRG1 is abundantly expressed in the hippocampus, and emerging studies have begun to reveal the link between NRG1 signaling and cognitive deficits in schizophrenic patients. Because the transmembrane domain of NRG1 is vital for both forward and reverse signaling cascades, new Nrg1-deficient mice that carry a truncation of the transmembrane domain of the Nrg1 gene were characterized and used in this study to test a NRG1 loss-of-function hypothesis for schizophrenia. Both male and female Nrg1 heterozygous mutant mice and their wild-type littermates were used in a series of 4 experiments to characterize the impact of Nrg1 on behavioral phenotypes and to determine the importance of Nrg1 in the regulation of hippocampal neuromorphology and local GABAergic interneurons. First, a comprehensive battery of behavioral tasks indicated that male Nrg1-deficient mice exhibited significant impairments in cognitive functions. Second, pharmacological challenges were conducted and revealed that Nrg1 haploinsufficiency altered GABAergic activity in males. Third, although no genotype-specific neuromorphological alterations were found in the hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons, significant reductions in the hippocampal expressions of GAD67 and parvalbumin were revealed in the Nrg1-deficient males. Fourth, chronic treatment with valproate rescued the observed behavioral deficits and hippocampal GAD67 reduction in Nrg1-deficient males. Collectively, these results indicate the potential therapeutic effect of valproate and the importance of Nrg1 in the regulation of cognitive functions and hippocampal GABAergic interneurons, especially in males.

  9. Lysosomal-associated protein multispanning transmembrane 5 gene (LAPTM5 is associated with spontaneous regression of neuroblastomas.

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    Jun Inoue

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neuroblastoma (NB is the most frequently occurring solid tumor in children, and shows heterogeneous clinical behavior. Favorable tumors, which are usually detected by mass screening based on increased levels of catecholamines in urine, regress spontaneously via programmed cell death (PCD or mature through differentiation into benign ganglioneuroma (GN. In contrast, advanced-type NB tumors often grow aggressively, despite intensive chemotherapy. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of PCD during spontaneous regression in favorable NB tumors, as well as identifying genes with a pro-death role, is a matter of urgency for developing novel approaches to the treatment of advanced-type NB tumors. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found that the expression of lysosomal associated protein multispanning transmembrane 5 (LAPTM5 was usually down-regulated due to DNA methylation in an NB cell-specific manner, but up-regulated in degenerating NB cells within locally regressing areas of favorable tumors detected by mass-screening. Experiments in vitro showed that not only a restoration of its expression but also the accumulation of LAPTM5 protein, was required to induce non-apoptotic cell death with autophagic vacuoles and lysosomal destabilization with lysosomal-membrane permeabilization (LMP in a caspase-independent manner. While autophagy is a membrane-trafficking pathway to degrade the proteins in lysosomes, the LAPTM5-mediated lysosomal destabilization with LMP leads to an interruption of autophagic flux, resulting in the accumulation of immature autophagic vacuoles, p62/SQSTM1, and ubiqitinated proteins as substrates of autophagic degradation. In addition, ubiquitin-positive inclusion bodies appeared in degenerating NB cells. CONCLUSIONS: We propose a novel molecular mechanism for PCD with the accumulation of autophagic vacuoles due to LAPTM5-mediated lysosomal destabilization. LAPTM5-induced cell death is lysosomal cell death with impaired autophagy

  10. Structural investigation of the transmembrane C domain of the mannitol permease from Escherichia coli using 5-FTrp fluorescence spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opacic, Milena; Hesp, Ben H.; Fusetti, Fabrizia; Dijkstra, Bauke; Broos, Jaap

    2012-01-01

    The mannitol transporter EIImtl from Escherichia coli is responsible for the uptake of mannitol over the inner membrane and its concomitant phosphorylation. EIImtl is functional as a dimer and its membrane-embedded C domain, IICmtl, harbors one high affinity mannitol binding site. To characterize th

  11. Role of the extracellular transmembrane domain interface in gating and pharmacology of a heteromeric neuronal nicotinic receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldea, Marcos; Castillo, Mar; Mulet, José; Sala, Salvador; Criado, Manuel; Sala, Francisco

    2010-05-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) transmit the agonist signal to the channel gate through a number of extracellular domains. We have previously shown that particular details of the process of coupling binding to gating could be quantitative and qualitatively different in muscle and neuronal type nAChRs. We have extended previous studies on homomeric alpha7 nAChRs to heteromeric alpha3beta4 nAChRs, by mutating residues located at loops 2 and 7, and M2-M3 linker of both alpha3 and beta4 subunits which, in order to monitor surface expression, were modified to bind alpha-bungarotoxin, and expressed in Xenopus oocytes. We show that, in general, mutations in these domains of both alpha3 and beta4 subunits affect the gating function, although the effects are slightly larger if they are inserted in the alpha3 subunit. However, the involvement of a previously reported intrasubunit interaction in coupling (Gln48-Ile130) seems to be restricted to the beta4 subunit. We also show that mutations at these domains, particularly loop 2 of the alpha3 subunit, change the pharmacological profile of alpha3beta4 nAChRs, decreasing nicotine's and increasing cytisine's effectiveness relative to acetylcholine. It is concluded that, unlike muscle nAChRs, the non-alpha subunits play a relevant role in the coupling process of neuronal alpha3beta4 nAChRs.

  12. Prokaryotic expression and purification of fibronectin leucine rich transmembrane protein 3 C-terminal domain proteins in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Cai; Jing Yang; He Huang; Fang Li; Ganqiu Wu; Jing Yang; Xuegang Luo

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies have suggested that fibronectin leucine-rich transmembrane protein 3 (FLRT3) is related to injury and regeneration of the nervous system. However, the expression and biological characteristics of these proteins remain poorly understood.OBJECTIVE: To obtain FLRT3 C-terminal gene fragments, to effectively express and purify the target proteins.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: An observational study of cellular and molecular biology was performed at the laboratory of Histology and Embryology in Xiangya School of Medicine, Central South University between October 2007 and June 2008.MATERIALS: Three Sprague Dawley adult rats were used to extract total RNA from rat brains. The pGEX4T3 and Escherichia coli (E. Coli) JM109 were purchased from Promega. E. Coil BL21 was provided by Novagen.METHODS: FLRT3 protein coding C-terminal DNA fragments, at a length of 786 bp, were amplified using RT-PCR technique from rat total RNA. The amplified products were cloned into the expression vector pGEX4T3. A recombinant expression vector was then constructed and introduced into E. Coli BL21. IsopropyI-D-thiogalactopyranoside was applied to induce expression of recombinant GST fusion proteins, followed by isolation, purification, and renaturation of inclusion bodies that comprised recombinant proteins. Finally, the purified recombinant protein was obtained.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Determination of FLRT3 C-terminal DNA sequence; expression of target proteins was assayed by SDS-PAGE electrophoresis; purified recombinant protein was identified with Western blot methods.RESULTS: FLRT3 protein coding C-terminal DNA fragments, at a length of 786 bp, were successfully harvested through RT-PCR amplification, and were then cloned into the prokaryotic expression vector pGEX4T3. The results of the sequence were consistent with the known gene sequence. SDS-PAGE analysis demonstrated that there was a specific protein band in the recombinant GST fusion proteins at a relative molecular mass

  13. Structural investigation of the transmembrane C domain of the mannitol permease from Escherichia coli using 5-FTrp fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opačić, Milena; Hesp, Ben H; Fusetti, Fabrizia; Dijkstra, Bauke W; Broos, Jaap

    2012-03-01

    The mannitol transporter EII(mtl) from Escherichia coli is responsible for the uptake of mannitol over the inner membrane and its concomitant phosphorylation. EII(mtl) is functional as a dimer and its membrane-embedded C domain, IIC(mtl), harbors one high affinity mannitol binding site. To characterize this domain in more detail the microenvironments of thirteen residue positions were explored by 5-fluorotryptophan (5-FTrp) fluorescence spectroscopy. Because of the simpler photophysics of 5-FTrp compared to Trp, one can distinguish between the two 5-FTrp probes present in dimeric IIC(mtl). At many labeled positions, the microenvironment of the 5-FTrps in the two protomers differs. Spectroscopic properties of three mutants labeled at positions 198, 251, and 260 show that two conserved motifs (Asn194-His195 and Gly254-Ile255-His256-Glu257) are located in well-structured parts of IIC(mtl). Mannitol binding has a large impact on the structure around position 198, while only minor changes are induced at positions 251 and 260. Phosphorylation of the cytoplasmic B domain of EII(mtl) is sensed by 5-FTrp at positions 30, 42, 251 and 260. We conclude that many parts of the IIC(mtl) structure are involved in the sugar translocation. The structure of EII(mtl), as investigated in this work, differs from the recently solved structure of a IIC protein transporting diacetylchitobiose, ChbC, and also belonging to the glucose superfamily of EII sugar transporters. In EII(mtl), the sugar binding site is more close to the periplasmic face and the structure of the 2 protomers in the dimer is different, while both protomers in the ChbC dimer are essentially the same.

  14. The interaction between the first transmembrane domain and the thumb of ASIC1a is critical for its N-glycosylation and trafficking.

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    Lan Jing

    Full Text Available Acid-sensing ion channel-1a (ASIC1a, the primary proton receptor in the brain, contributes to multiple diseases including stroke, epilepsy and multiple sclerosis. Thus, a better understanding of its biogenesis will provide important insights into the regulation of ASIC1a in diseases. Interestingly, ASIC1a contains a large, yet well organized ectodomain, which suggests the hypothesis that correct formation of domain-domain interactions at the extracellular side is a key regulatory step for ASIC1a maturation and trafficking. We tested this hypothesis here by focusing on the interaction between the first transmembrane domain (TM1 and the thumb of ASIC1a, an interaction known to be critical in channel gating. We mutated Tyr71 and Trp287, two key residues involved in the TM1-thumb interaction in mouse ASIC1a, and found that both Y71G and W287G decreased synaptic targeting and surface expression of ASIC1a. These defects were likely due to altered folding; both mutants showed increased resistance to tryptic cleavage, suggesting a change in conformation. Moreover, both mutants lacked the maturation of N-linked glycans through mid to late Golgi. These data suggest that disrupting the interaction between TM1 and thumb alters ASIC1a folding, impedes its glycosylation and reduces its trafficking. Moreover, reducing the culture temperature, an approach commonly used to facilitate protein folding, increased ASIC1a glycosylation, surface expression, current density and slowed the rate of desensitization. These results suggest that correct folding of extracellular ectodomain plays a critical role in ASIC1a biogenesis and function.

  15. Transmembrane and ubiquitin-like domain-containing protein 1 (Tmub1/HOPS facilitates surface expression of GluR2-containing AMPA receptors.

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    Hyunjeong Yang

    Full Text Available Some ubiquitin-like (UBL domain-containing proteins are known to play roles in receptor trafficking. Alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid receptors (AMPARs undergo constitutive cycling between the intracellular compartment and the cell surface in the central nervous system. However, the function of UBL domain-containing proteins in the recycling of the AMPARs to the synaptic surface has not yet been reported.Here, we report that the Transmembrane and ubiquitin-like domain-containing 1 (Tmub1 protein, formerly known as the Hepatocyte Odd Protein Shuttling (HOPS protein, which is abundantly expressed in the brain and which exists in a synaptosomal membrane fraction, facilitates the recycling of the AMPAR subunit GluR2 to the cell surface. Neurons transfected with Tmub1/HOPS-RNAi plasmids showed a significant reduction in the AMPAR current as compared to their control neurons. Consistently, the synaptic surface expression of GluR2, but not of GluR1, was significantly decreased in the neurons transfected with the Tmub1/HOPS-RNAi and increased in the neurons overexpressing EGFP-Tmub1/HOPS. The altered surface expression of GluR2 was speculated to be due to the altered surface-recycling of the internalized GluR2 in our recycling assay. Eventually, we found that GluR2 and glutamate receptor interacting protein (GRIP were coimmunoprecipitated by the anti-Tmub1/HOPS antibody from the mouse brain. Taken together, these observations show that the Tmub1/HOPS plays a role in regulating basal synaptic transmission; it contributes to maintain the synaptic surface number of the GluR2-containing AMPARs by facilitating the recycling of GluR2 to the plasma membrane.

  16. Interactions between S4-S5 linker and S6 transmembrane domain modulate gating of HERG K+ channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tristani-Firouzi, Martin; Chen, Jun; Sanguinetti, Michael C

    2002-05-24

    Outward movement of the voltage sensor is coupled to activation in voltage-gated ion channels; however, the precise mechanism and structural basis of this gating event are poorly understood. Potential insight into the coupling mechanism was provided by our previous finding that mutation to Lys of a single residue (Asp(540)) located in the S4-S5 linker endowed HERG (human ether-a-go-go-related gene) K(+) channels with the unusual ability to open in response to membrane depolarization and hyperpolarization in a voltage-dependent manner. We hypothesized that the unusual hyperpolarization-induced gating occurred through an interaction between Lys(540) and the C-terminal end of the S6 domain, the region proposed to form the activation gate. Therefore, we mutated six residues located in this region of S6 (Ile(662)-Tyr(667)) to Ala in D540K HERG channels. Mutation of Arg(665), but not the other five residues, prevented hyperpolarization-dependent reopening of D540K HERG channels. Mutation of Arg(665) to Gln or Asp also prevented reopening. In addition, D540R and D540K/R665K HERG reopened in response to hyperpolarization. Together these findings suggest that a single residue (Arg(665)) in the S6 domain interacts with Lys(540) by electrostatic repulsion to couple voltage sensing to hyperpolarization-dependent opening of D540K HERG K(+) channels. Moreover, our findings suggest that the C-terminal ends of S4 and S6 are in close proximity at hyperpolarized membrane potentials.

  17. Impact of charged amino acid substitution in the transmembrane domain of L-alanine exporter, AlaE, of Escherichia coli on the L-alanine export.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seryoung; Ihara, Kohei; Katsube, Satoshi; Ando, Tasuke; Isogai, Emiko; Yoneyama, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    The Escherichia coli alaE gene encodes the L-alanine exporter, AlaE, that catalyzes active export of L-alanine using proton electrochemical potential. The transporter comprises only 149 amino acid residues and four predicted transmembrane domains (TMs), which contain three charged amino acid residues. The AlaE-deficient L-alanine non-metabolizing cells (ΔalaE cells) appeared hypersusceptible to L-alanyl-L-alanine showing a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 2.5 µg/ml for the dipeptide due to a toxic accumulation of L-alanine. To elucidate the mechanism by which AlaE exports L-alanine, we replaced charged amino acid residues in the TMs, glutamic acid-30 (TM-I), arginine-45 (TM-II), and aspartic acid-84 (TM-III) with their respective charge-conserved amino acid or a net neutral cysteine. The ΔalaE cells producing R45K or R45C appeared hypersusceptible to the dipeptide, indicating that arginine-45 is essential for AlaE activity. MIC of the dipeptide in the ΔalaE cells expressing E30D and E30C was 156 µg/ml and >10,000 µg/ml, respectively, thereby suggesting that a negative charge at this position is not essential. The ΔalaE cells expressing D84E or D84C showed an MIC >10,000 and 78 µg/ml, respectively, implying that a negative charge is required at this position. These results were generally consistent with that of the L-alanine accumulation experiments in intact cells. We therefore concluded that charged amino acid residues (R45 and D84) in the AlaE transmembrane domain play a pivotal role in L-alanine export. Replacement of three cysteine residues at C22, C28 (both in TM-I), and C135 (C-terminal region) with alanine showed only a marginal effect on L-alanine export.

  18. RNF185 is a novel E3 ligase of endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD) that targets cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Khouri, Elma; Le Pavec, Gwenaëlle; Toledano, Michel B; Delaunay-Moisan, Agnès

    2013-10-25

    In the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), misfolded or improperly assembled proteins are exported to the cytoplasm and degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway through a process called ER-associated degradation (ERAD). ER-associated E3 ligases, which coordinate substrate recognition, export, and proteasome targeting, are key components of ERAD. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is one ERAD substrate targeted to co-translational degradation by the E3 ligase RNF5/RMA1. RNF185 is a RING domain-containing polypeptide homologous to RNF5. We show that RNF185 controls the stability of CFTR and of the CFTRΔF508 mutant in a RING- and proteasome-dependent manner but does not control that of other classical ERAD model substrates. Reciprocally, its silencing stabilizes CFTR proteins. Turnover analyses indicate that, as RNF5, RNF185 targets CFTR to co-translational degradation. Importantly, however, simultaneous depletion of RNF5 and RNF185 profoundly blocks CFTRΔF508 degradation not only during translation but also after synthesis is complete. Our data thus identify RNF185 and RNF5 as a novel E3 ligase module that is central to the control of CFTR degradation.

  19. Core Transmembrane Domain 6 Plays a Pivotal Role in the Transport Cycle of the Sodium/Proline Symporter PutP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracher, Susanne; Schmidt, Claudia C; Dittmer, Sophie I; Jung, Heinrich

    2016-12-09

    Crystal structures of transporters with a LeuT-type structural fold assign core transmembrane domain 6 (TM6') a central role in substrate binding and translocation. Here, the function of TM6' in the sodium/proline symporter PutP, a member of the solute/sodium symporter family, was investigated. A complete scan of TM6' identified eight amino acids as particularly important for PutP function. Of these residues, Tyr-248, His-253, and Arg-257 impact sodium binding, whereas Arg-257 and Ala-260 may participate in interactions leading to closure of the inner gate. Furthermore, the previous suggestion of an involvement of Trp-244, Tyr-248, and Pro-252 in proline binding is further supported. In addition, substitution of Gly-245, Gly-247, and Gly-250 affects the amount of PutP in the membrane. A Cys accessibility analysis suggests an involvement of the inner half of TM6' in the formation of a hydrophilic pathway that is open to the inside in the absence of ligands and closed in the presence of sodium and proline. In conclusion, the results demonstrate that TM6' plays a central role in substrate binding and release on the inner side of the membrane also in PutP and extend the knowledge on functionally relevant amino acids in transporters with a LeuT-type structural fold.

  20. Influenza bivalent vaccine comprising recombinant H3 hemagglutinin (HA) and H1 HA containing replaced H3 hemagglutinin transmembrane domain exhibited improved heterosubtypic protection immunity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiliang; Xue, Chunyi; Zheng, Jing; Liu, Kang; Wang, Yang; Wei, Ying; Liu, George Dacai; Cao, Yongchang

    2015-07-31

    Influenza caused by infection of influenza viruses is still a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in human. Vaccination is the main defense against influenza virus, but current influenza trivalent or quatrivalent vaccines (TIV/QIV) would lose their effectiveness when vaccine strains are mismatched with circulating strains. Our early study showed that recombinant influenza Hx-TM HA proteins containing H3 HA transmembrane domain(TM) had improved immunogenicity and heterosubtypic protection over corresponding wild-type Hx-WT HA proteins. In present study, bivalent vaccines containing H3-WT+Hx-TM were investigated for their immune responses and heterosubtypic protection immunities. The data showed that the bivalent vaccines containing H3-WT and H5-TM or H1-TM had improved immune responses and heterosubtypic protection over the bivalent vaccines containing H3-WT and H5-WT or H1-WT respectively. These results demonstrated that the improved immune responses and heterosubtypic protection of Hx-TM HA proteins could be translated into bivalent vaccines, suggesting a feasible strategy of improving the immune responses and heterosubtypic protection of influenza multivalent vaccines such as TIV and QIV.

  1. Web-based toolkits for topology prediction of transmembrane helical proteins, fold recognition, structure and binding scoring, folding-kinetics analysis and comparative analysis of domain combinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hongyi; Zhang, Chi; Liu, Song; Zhou, Yaoqi

    2005-07-01

    We have developed the following web servers for protein structural modeling and analysis at http://theory.med.buffalo.edu: THUMBUP, UMDHMM(TMHP) and TUPS, predictors of transmembrane helical protein topology based on a mean-burial-propensity scale of amino acid residues (THUMBUP), hidden Markov model (UMDHMM(TMHP)) and their combinations (TUPS); SPARKS 2.0 and SP3, two profile-profile alignment methods, that match input query sequence(s) to structural templates by integrating sequence profile with knowledge-based structural score (SPARKS 2.0) and structure-derived profile (SP3); DFIRE, a knowledge-based potential for scoring free energy of monomers (DMONOMER), loop conformations (DLOOP), mutant stability (DMUTANT) and binding affinity of protein-protein/peptide/DNA complexes (DCOMPLEX & DDNA); TCD, a program for protein-folding rate and transition-state analysis of small globular proteins; and DOGMA, a web-server that allows comparative analysis of domain combinations between plant and other 55 organisms. These servers provide tools for prediction and/or analysis of proteins on the secondary structure, tertiary structure and interaction levels, respectively.

  2. A form of mitofusin 2 (Mfn2) lacking the transmembrane domains and the COOH-terminal end stimulates metabolism in muscle and liver cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segalés, Jessica; Paz, José C; Hernández-Alvarez, María Isabel; Sala, David; Muñoz, Juan Pablo; Noguera, Eduard; Pich, Sara; Palacín, Manuel; Enríquez, José Antonio; Zorzano, Antonio

    2013-11-15

    Mitofusin 2 (Mfn2), a protein that participates in mitochondrial fusion, is required to maintain normal mitochondrial metabolism in skeletal muscle and liver. Given that muscle Mfn2 is repressed in obese or type 2 diabetic subjects, this protein may have a potential pathophysiological role in these conditions. To evaluate whether the metabolic effects of Mfn2 can be dissociated from its function in mitochondrial dynamics, we studied a form of human Mfn2, lacking the two transmembrane domains and the COOH-terminal coiled coil (ΔMfn2). This form localized in mitochondria but did not alter mitochondrial morphology in cells or in skeletal muscle fibers. The expression of ΔMfn2 in mouse skeletal muscle stimulated glucose oxidation and enhanced respiratory control ratio, which occurred in the absence of changes in mitochondrial mass. ΔMfn2 did not stimulate mitochondrial respiration in Mfn2-deficient muscle cells. The expression of ΔMfn2 in mouse liver or in hepatoma cells stimulated gluconeogenesis. In addition, ΔMfn2 activated basal and maximal respiration both in muscle and liver cells. In all, we show that a form of Mfn2 lacking mitochondrial fusion activity stimulates mitochondrial function and enhances glucose metabolism in muscle and liver tissues. This study suggests that Mfn2 regulates metabolism independently of changes in mitochondrial morphology.

  3. Long-range coupling between the extracellular gates and the intracellular ATP binding domains of multidrug resistance protein pumps and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Shipeng; Roessler, Bryan C; Icyuz, Mert; Chauvet, Sylvain; Tao, Binli; Hartman, John L; Kirk, Kevin L

    2016-03-01

    The ABCC transporter subfamily includes pumps, the long and short multidrug resistance proteins (MRPs), and an ATP-gated anion channel, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). We show that despite their thermodynamic differences, these ABCC transporter subtypes use broadly similar mechanisms to couple their extracellular gates to the ATP occupancies of their cytosolic nucleotide binding domains. A conserved extracellular phenylalanine at this gate was a prime location for producing gain of function (GOF) mutants of a long MRP in yeast (Ycf1p cadmium transporter), a short yeast MRP (Yor1p oligomycin exporter), and human CFTR channels. Extracellular gate mutations rescued ATP binding mutants of the yeast MRPs and CFTR by increasing ATP sensitivity. Control ATPase-defective MRP mutants could not be rescued by this mechanism. A CFTR double mutant with an extracellular gate mutation plus a cytosolic GOF mutation was highly active (single-channel open probability >0.3) in the absence of ATP and protein kinase A, each normally required for CFTR activity. We conclude that all 3 ABCC transporter subtypes use similar mechanisms to couple their extracellular gates to ATP occupancy, and highly active CFTR channels that bypass defects in ATP binding or phosphorylation can be produced.

  4. The H-loop in the second nucleotide-binding domain of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator is required for efficient chloride channel closing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloch, Monika; Milewski, Michał; Nurowska, Ewa; Dworakowska, Beata; Cutting, Garry R; Dołowy, Krzysztof

    2010-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter that functions as a cAMP-activated chloride channel. The recent model of CFTR gating predicts that the ATP binding to both nucleotide-binding domains (NBD1 and NBD2) of CFTR is required for the opening of the channel, while the ATP hydrolysis at NBD2 induces subsequent channel closing. In most ABC proteins, efficient hydrolysis of ATP requires the presence of the invariant histidine residue within the H-loop located in the C-terminal part of the NBD. However, the contribution of the corresponding region (H-loop) of NBD2 to the CFTR channel gating has not been examined so far. Here we report that the alanine substitution of the conserved dipeptide HR motif (HR-->AA) in the H-loop of NBD2 leads to prolonged open states of CFTR channel, indicating that the H-loop is required for efficient channel closing. On the other hand, the HR-->AA substitution lead to the substantial decrease of CFTR-mediated current density (pA/pF) in transfected HEK 293 cells, as recorded in the whole-cell patch-clamp analysis. These results suggest that the H-loop of NBD2, apart from being required for CFTR channel closing, may be involved in regulating CFTR trafficking to the cell surface.

  5. Biophysical Characterization of a Vaccine Candidate against HIV-1: The Transmembrane and Membrane Proximal Domains of HIV-1 gp41 as a Maltose Binding Protein Fusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Gong

    Full Text Available The membrane proximal region (MPR, residues 649-683 and transmembrane domain (TMD, residues 684-705 of the gp41 subunit of HIV-1's envelope protein are highly conserved and are important in viral mucosal transmission, virus attachment and membrane fusion with target cells. Several structures of the trimeric membrane proximal external region (residues 662-683 of MPR have been reported at the atomic level; however, the atomic structure of the TMD still remains unknown. To elucidate the structure of both MPR and TMD, we expressed the region spanning both domains, MPR-TM (residues 649-705, in Escherichia coli as a fusion protein with maltose binding protein (MBP. MPR-TM was initially fused to the C-terminus of MBP via a 42 aa-long linker containing a TEV protease recognition site (MBP-linker-MPR-TM. Biophysical characterization indicated that the purified MBP-linker-MPR-TM protein was a monodisperse and stable candidate for crystallization. However, crystals of the MBP-linker-MPR-TM protein could not be obtained in extensive crystallization screens. It is possible that the 42 residue-long linker between MBP and MPR-TM was interfering with crystal formation. To test this hypothesis, the 42 residue-long linker was replaced with three alanine residues. The fusion protein, MBP-AAA-MPR-TM, was similarly purified and characterized. Significantly, both the MBP-linker-MPR-TM and MBP-AAA-MPR-TM proteins strongly interacted with broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies 2F5 and 4E10. With epitopes accessible to the broadly neutralizing antibodies, these MBP/MPR-TM recombinant proteins may be in immunologically relevant conformations that mimic a pre-hairpin intermediate of gp41.

  6. Conformational response of influenza A M2 transmembrane domain to amantadine drug binding at low pH (pH 5.5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elka R. Georgieva

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The M2 protein from influenza A plays important roles in its viral cycle. It contains a single transmembrane helix, which oligomerizes into a homotetrameric proton channel that conducts in the low-pH environment of the host-cell endosome and Golgi apparatus, leading to virion uncoating at an early stage of infection. We studied conformational rearrangements that occur in the M2 core transmembrane domain residing on the lipid bilayer, flanked by juxtamembrane residues (M2TMD21-49 fragment, upon its interaction with amantadine drug at pH 5.5 when M2 is conductive. We also tested the role of specific mutation and lipid chain length. Electron spin resonance (ESR spectroscopy and electron microscopy were applied to M2TMD21-49, labeled at the residue L46C with either nitroxide spin-label or Nanogold® reagent, respectively. Electron microscopy confirmed that M2TMD21-49 reconstituted into DOPC/POPS at 1:10,000 peptide-to-lipid molar ratio (P/L either with or without amantadine, is an admixture of monomers, dimers, and tetramers, confirming our model based on a dimer intermediate in the assembly of M2TMD21-49. As reported by double electron-electron resonance (DEER, in DOPC/POPS membranes amantadine shifts oligomer equilibrium to favor tetramers, as evidenced by an increase in DEER modulation depth for P/L’s ranging from 1:18,000 to 1:160. Furthermore, amantadine binding shortens the inter-spin distances (for nitroxide labels by 5-8 Å, indicating drug induced channel closure on the C-terminal side. No such effect was observed for the thinner membrane of DLPC/DLPS, emphasizing the role of bilayer thickness. The analysis of continuous wave (cw ESR spectra of spin-labeled L46C residue provides additional support to a more compact helix bundle in amantadine-bound M2TMD21-49 through increased motional ordering. In contrast to wild-type M2TMD21-49, the amantadine-bound form does not exhibit noticeable conformational changes in the case of G34A mutation

  7. Inhibition of discoidin domain receptor 2-mediated lung cancer cells progression by gold nanoparticle-aptamer-assisted delivery of peptides containing transmembrane-juxtamembrane 1/2 domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Daehwan; Yeom, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Boeun; Lee, Kangseok [Department of Life Science, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Jeehyeon, E-mail: jeehyeon@cau.ac.kr [Department of Pharmacy, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Rhee, Sangmyung, E-mail: sangmyung.rhee@cau.ac.kr [Department of Life Science, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-21

    The delivery of biologically functional peptides into mammalian cells can be a direct and effective method for cancer therapy and treatment of other diseases. Discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) is a collagen-induced receptor tyrosine kinase recently identified as a novel therapeutic target in lung cancer. In this study, we report that peptides containing the functional domain of DDR2 can be efficiently delivered into lung malignant cancer cells via a gold nanoparticle-DNA aptamer conjugate (AuNP-Apt)-based system. Peptide delivery resulted in the abrogation of DDR2 activation triggered by collagen. Moreover, the peptide delivered by the AuNP-Apt system inhibited cancer cell proliferation and invasion mediated by DDR2 activation. Thus, these results suggest that peptide loaded onto AuNP-Apt conjugates can be used for the development of peptide-based biomedical applications for the treatment of DDR2-positive cancer. - Highlights: • TM-JM1/2 peptides are efficiently delivered into cells by AuNP-Apt-conjugates. • TM-JM1/2 peptides loaded onto AuNP-Apt conjugates inhibit DDR2 activation. • Inhibition of DDR2 activation by TM-JM1/2 peptides decreases tumor progression.

  8. Characterization of a region of the lutropin receptor extracellular domain near transmembrane helix 1 that is important in ligand-mediated signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, C A; Narayan, P; Huang, J; Puett, D

    1999-04-01

    The lutropin receptor (LHR), a member of the G protein-coupled receptor family, contains a relatively large N-terminal extracellular domain, accounting for about half of the receptor and responsible for high affinity ligand binding, and a standard heptahelical portion with connecting loops and a C-terminal tail. LHR and the other two glycoprotein hormone receptors, i.e. the follitropin and TSH receptors, contain an invariant 10-amino acid residue sequence, FNPCEDIMGY (residues 328-337 in rat LHR), in the extracellular domain separated by only a few amino acid residues from the beginning of transmembrane helix 1. In view of the invariant nature of this region in the three glycoprotein hormone receptors and preliminary data in the literature on the importance of Glu332 and Asp333 in signal transduction, we undertook a systematic investigation of all 10 amino acid residues because this region may function as a switch or trigger for communicating ligand binding to the extracellular domain with a conformational change of the membrane-embedded C-terminal half of the receptor to activate G proteins, particularly Gs. A total of 36 single, double, and multiple replacements, as well as two deletions, of LHR were prepared and characterized in transiently transfected COS-7 cells. Of these mutants LHRs, 26 expressed on the cell surface in sufficient numbers that quantitative assessments could be made of human choriogonadotropin binding and ligand-mediated cAMP production. Replacements of Cys331 abolished ligand binding to intact cells, although binding could be detected after solubilization of the cells. Replacements of the other nine amino acid residues that did not interfere with receptor folding or trafficking had no significant effect on ligand binding affinity; however, replacements of Pro330, Glu332, and Asp333 resulted in diminished signaling, especially for the two acidic residues. An interesting observation was made in which replacement of Tyr337 with Ala or Asp, while

  9. System and methods for predicting transmembrane domains in membrane proteins and mining the genome for recognizing G-protein coupled receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trabanino, Rene J; Vaidehi, Nagarajan; Hall, Spencer E; Goddard, William A; Floriano, Wely

    2013-02-05

    The invention provides computer-implemented methods and apparatus implementing a hierarchical protocol using multiscale molecular dynamics and molecular modeling methods to predict the presence of transmembrane regions in proteins, such as G-Protein Coupled Receptors (GPCR), and protein structural models generated according to the protocol. The protocol features a coarse grain sampling method, such as hydrophobicity analysis, to provide a fast and accurate procedure for predicting transmembrane regions. Methods and apparatus of the invention are useful to screen protein or polynucleotide databases for encoded proteins with transmembrane regions, such as GPCRs.

  10. Identification of a cluster of residues in transmembrane segment 6 of domain III of the cockroach sodium channel essential for the action of pyrethroid insecticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yuzhe; Lee, Jung-Eun; Nomura, Yoshiko; Zhang, Tianxiang; Zhorov, Boris S; Dong, Ke

    2009-04-15

    A phenylalanine residue (Phe1519) in the sixth transmembrane segment of domain III (IIIS6) of the cockroach BgNa(v) sodium channel is required for the binding and action of pyrethroids. However, whether or not other residues in IIIS6 participate in the action of pyrethroids remains to be determined. In the present study, we conducted a systematic analysis of 20 residues in IIIS6 of the BgNa(v) channel using alanine-scanning mutagenesis. Our results show that alanine substitutions of four residues, Ile1514, Gly1516, Phe1518 and Asn1522, altered sodium channel sensitivity to pyrethroid insecticides. Whereas the G1516A, F1518A and N1522A substitutions diminished sodium channel sensitivity to all seven pyrethroids examined, including four type I (lacking the alpha-cyano group at the phenoxybenzyl alcohol) and three type II (containing the alpha-cyano group) pyrethroids, the I1514A substitution enhanced sodium channel sensitivity to four type I and type II pyrethroids that contain the phenoxybenzyl alcohol only. We also show that alanine/lysine substitutions of Leu1521 and Ser1517 affected the action of BTX (batrachotoxin), but not pyrethroids. In the Kv1.2-based homology model of the open sodium channel, side chains of Ile1514, Phe1518 and Asn1522 are exposed towards helix IIS5 and linker IIS4-IIS5, which contain previously identified pyrethroid-interacting residues, whereas Ser1517 and Leu1521 face the inner pore where the BTX receptor is located. Thus the present study provides further evidence for structural models in which pyrethroids bind to the lipid-exposed interface formed by helices IIIS6, IIS5 and linker helix IIS4-IIS5, whereas BTX binds to the pore-exposed side of the IIIS6 helix.

  11. One motif to bind them: A small-XXX-small motif affects transmembrane domain 1 oligomerization, function, localization, and cross-talk between two yeast GPCRs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lock, Antonia; Forfar, Rachel; Weston, Cathryn; Bowsher, Leo; Upton, Graham J G; Reynolds, Christopher A; Ladds, Graham; Dixon, Ann M

    2014-12-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the largest family of cell-surface receptors in mammals and facilitate a range of physiological responses triggered by a variety of ligands. GPCRs were thought to function as monomers, however it is now accepted that GPCR homo- and hetero-oligomers also exist and influence receptor properties. The Schizosaccharomyces pombe GPCR Mam2 is a pheromone-sensing receptor involved in mating and has previously been shown to form oligomers in vivo. The first transmembrane domain (TMD) of Mam2 contains a small-XXX-small motif, overrepresented in membrane proteins and well-known for promoting helix-helix interactions. An ortholog of Mam2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Ste2, contains an analogous small-XXX-small motif which has been shown to contribute to receptor homo-oligomerization, localization and function. Here we have used experimental and computational techniques to characterize the role of the small-XXX-small motif in function and assembly of Mam2 for the first time. We find that disruption of the motif via mutagenesis leads to reduction of Mam2 TMD1 homo-oligomerization and pheromone-responsive cellular signaling of the full-length protein. It also impairs correct targeting to the plasma membrane. Mutation of the analogous motif in Ste2 yielded similar results, suggesting a conserved mechanism for assembly. Using co-expression of the two fungal receptors in conjunction with computational models, we demonstrate a functional change in G protein specificity and propose that this is brought about through hetero-dimeric interactions of Mam2 with Ste2 via the complementary small-XXX-small motifs. This highlights the potential of these motifs to affect a range of properties that can be investigated in other GPCRs.

  12. The conservative cysteines in transmembrane domain of AtVKOR/LTO1 are critical for photosynthetic growth and photosystem II activity in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Jia eDu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Thylakoid protein vitamin K epoxide reductase (AtVKOR/LTO1 is involved in oxidoreduction. The deficiency of this compound causes pleiotropic defects in Arabidopsis thaliana, such as severely stunted growth, smaller sized leaves, and delay of flowering. Transgenic complementation of wild-type AtVKOR (VKORWT to vkor mutant lines ultimately demonstrates that the phenotype changes are due to this gene. However, whether AtVKOR functions in Arabidopsis through its protein oxidoreduction is unknown. To further study the redox-active sites of AtVKOR in vivo, a series of plasmids containing cysteine-mutant VKORs were constructed and transformed into vkor deficient lines. Compared with transgenic AtVKORWT plants, the size of the transgenic plants with a single conservative cysteine mutation (VKORC109A, VKORC116A, VKORC195A, and VKORC198A were smaller, and two double-cysteine mutations (VKORC109AC116A and VKORC195AC198A showed significantly stunted growth, similar with the vkor mutant line. However, mutations of two nonconservative cysteines (VKORC46A and VKORC230A displayed little obvious changes in the phenotypes of Arabidopsis. Consistently, the maximum and actual efficiency of photosystem II in double-cysteine mutation plants decreased significantly to the level similar to that of the vkor mutant line both under normal growth light and high light. A significantly decreased amount of D1 protein and increased accumulation of reactive oxygen species were observed in two double-cysteine mutations under high light. All of the results above indicated that the conservative cysteines in transmembrane domains were the functional sites of AtVKOR in Arabidopsis and that the oxidoreductase activities of AtVKOR were directly related to the autotrophic photosynthetic growth and photosystem II activity of Arabidopsis thaliana.

  13. Human cytomegalovirus gH stability and trafficking are regulated by ER-associated degradation and transmembrane architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Thomas J; Hernandez, Rosmel E; Noriega, Vanessa M; Tortorella, Domenico

    2016-03-30

    The prototypic betaherpesvirus human cytomegalovirus (CMV) establishes life-long persistence within its human host. While benign in healthy individuals, CMV poses a significant threat to the immune compromised, including transplant recipients and neonates. The CMV glycoprotein complex gH/gL/gO mediates infection of fibroblasts, and together with the gH/gL/UL128/130/131 a pentameric complex permits infection of epithelial, endothethial, and myeloid cells. Given the central role of the gH/gL complex during infection, we were interested in studying cellular trafficking of the gH/gL complex through generation of human cells that stably express gH and gL. When expressed alone, CMV gH and gL were degraded through the ER-associated degradation (ERAD) pathway. However, co-expression of these proteins stabilized the polypeptides and enhanced their cell-surface expression. To further define regulatory factors involved in gH/gL trafficking, a CMV gH chimera in which the gH transmembrane and cytoplasmic tail were replaced with that of human CD4 protein permitted cell surface gH expression in absence of gL. We thus demonstrate the ability of distinct cellular processes to regulate the trafficking of viral glycoproteins. Collectively, the data provide insight into the processing and trafficking requirements of CMV envelope protein complexes and provide an example of the co-opting of cellular processes by CMV.

  14. Molecular dynamics simulation of human serum paraoxonase 1 in DPPC bilayer reveals a critical role of transmembrane helix H1 for HDL association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Mahesh Chandra; Rath, Surya Narayan; Pradhan, Sukanta Kumar; Maharana, Jitendra; De, Sachinandan

    2014-01-01

    Serum paraoxonase 1 (PON1) is a high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-bound mammalian enzyme exhibiting antiatherosclerotic activity. Despite years of research, an accurate model for the binding interaction between PON1 and HDL has not been established. However, it is reported that anchoring of PON1 to HDL is mainly governed by an N-terminal alpha helix H1 and another short helix H2. Here, we studied the molecular association of full-length human PON1 (huPON1) with a HDL-mimetic dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayer using homology modeling and molecular dynamics simulations. Our results indicate that H1 is the highly dynamic part of huPON1, showing clockwise rotation of up to 30° within the DPPC bilayer. However, without phospholipid molecules, H1 experiences helical distortions, illustrating an incompatible HDL-anchoring conformation. Snorkeling interactions of K3, R18, and R27 together with aromatic locks formed by Y187, Y190, W194, and W202 are highly essential for anchoring of huPON1 to HDL's surface. Molecular mechanics/Poisson-Boltzmann solvent-accessible surface area (MM/PBSA) binding free energy calculation revealed that H1 displays greater binding affinity towards lipid molecules compared with H2 and H3, suggesting that H1 is the most probable HDL-binding domain of PON1. Binding free energy decomposition showed that K3, R18, and R27 interact with polar headgroups of DPPC membrane through electrostatic interaction. Moreover, Y187, Y190, W194, and W202 interact with DPPC lipids mainly through van der Waals interaction. Taken together, these results show that the transmembrane helix H1 along with the interfacial positively charged and aromatic resides were crucial for PON1's association with HDL particle. The current study will be useful towards understanding the antiatherosclerotic and bioscavenging properties of this promiscuous enzyme.

  15. Stabilization of Nucleotide Binding Domain Dimers Rescues ABCC6 Mutants Associated with Pseudoxanthoma Elasticum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, Yanchao; Thibodeau, Patrick H

    2017-02-03

    ABC transporters are polytopic membrane proteins that utilize ATP binding and hydrolysis to facilitate transport across biological membranes. Forty-eight human ABC transporters have been identified in the genome, and the majority of these are linked to heritable disease. Mutations in the ABCC6 (ATP binding cassette transporter C6) ABC transporter are associated with pseudoxanthoma elasticum, a disease of altered elastic properties in multiple tissues. Although ∼200 mutations have been identified in pseudoxanthoma elasticum patients, the underlying structural defects associated with the majority of these are poorly understood. To evaluate the structural consequences of these missense mutations, a combination of biophysical and cell biological approaches were applied to evaluate the local and global folding and assembly of the ABCC6 protein. Structural and bioinformatic analyses suggested that a cluster of mutations, representing roughly 20% of the patient population with identified missense mutations, are located in the interface between the transmembrane domain and the C-terminal nucleotide binding domain. Biochemical and cell biological analyses demonstrate these mutations influence multiple steps in the biosynthetic pathway, minimally altering local domain structure but adversely impacting ABCC6 assembly and trafficking. The differential impacts on local and global protein structure are consistent with hierarchical folding and assembly of ABCC6. Stabilization of specific domain-domain interactions via targeted amino acid substitution in the catalytic site of the C-terminal nucleotide binding domain restored proper protein trafficking and cell surface localization of multiple biosynthetic mutants. This rescue provides a specific mechanism by which chemical chaperones could be developed for the correction of ABCC6 biosynthetic defects.

  16. Chemically modified peptide scaffolds target the CFTR-associated ligand PDZ domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanine F Amacher

    Full Text Available PDZ domains are protein-protein interaction modules that coordinate multiple signaling and trafficking pathways in the cell and that include active therapeutic targets for diseases such as cancer, cystic fibrosis, and addiction. Our previous work characterized a PDZ interaction that restricts the apical membrane half-life of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR. Using iterative cycles of peptide-array and solution-binding analysis, we targeted the PDZ domain of the CFTR-Associated Ligand (CAL, and showed that an engineered peptide inhibitor rescues cell-surface expression of the most common CFTR disease mutation ΔF508. Here, we present a series of scaffolds containing chemically modifiable side chains at all non-motif positions along the CAL PDZ domain binding cleft. Concordant equilibrium dissociation constants were determined in parallel by fluorescence polarization, isothermal titration calorimetry, and surface plasmon resonance techniques, confirming robust affinity for each scaffold and revealing an enthalpically driven mode of inhibitor binding. Structural studies demonstrate a conserved binding mode for each peptide, opening the possibility of combinatorial modification. Finally, we diversified one of our peptide scaffolds with halogenated substituents that yielded modest increases in binding affinity. Overall, this work validates our approach and provides a stereochemical foundation for further CAL inhibitor design and screening.

  17. Chemically modified peptide scaffolds target the CFTR-associated ligand PDZ domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amacher, Jeanine F; Zhao, Ruizhi; Spaller, Mark R; Madden, Dean R

    2014-01-01

    PDZ domains are protein-protein interaction modules that coordinate multiple signaling and trafficking pathways in the cell and that include active therapeutic targets for diseases such as cancer, cystic fibrosis, and addiction. Our previous work characterized a PDZ interaction that restricts the apical membrane half-life of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Using iterative cycles of peptide-array and solution-binding analysis, we targeted the PDZ domain of the CFTR-Associated Ligand (CAL), and showed that an engineered peptide inhibitor rescues cell-surface expression of the most common CFTR disease mutation ΔF508. Here, we present a series of scaffolds containing chemically modifiable side chains at all non-motif positions along the CAL PDZ domain binding cleft. Concordant equilibrium dissociation constants were determined in parallel by fluorescence polarization, isothermal titration calorimetry, and surface plasmon resonance techniques, confirming robust affinity for each scaffold and revealing an enthalpically driven mode of inhibitor binding. Structural studies demonstrate a conserved binding mode for each peptide, opening the possibility of combinatorial modification. Finally, we diversified one of our peptide scaffolds with halogenated substituents that yielded modest increases in binding affinity. Overall, this work validates our approach and provides a stereochemical foundation for further CAL inhibitor design and screening.

  18. The ectodomains but not the transmembrane domains of the fusion proteins of subtypes A and B avian pneumovirus are conserved to a similar extent as those of human respiratory syncytial virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, C J; Britton, P; Cavanagh, D

    1998-06-01

    The fusion glycoprotein (F(B)) gene of five strains of the B subtype of avian pneumovirus (APV; turkey rhinotracheitis virus) has been sequenced. The length of the F(B) protein was 538 amino acids, identical to that of the F protein of subtype A virus, with which it had 74% and 83% overall nucleotide and deduced amino acid identities, respectively. The F(B) and F(A) ectodomains had 90% amino acid identity, very similar to the 91% identity between the ectodomains of the F proteins of subtype A and B human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV). As with HRSV, the F2 polypeptide was less conserved (83% identity) than F1 (94%). In contrast to the ectodomain, the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of the two APV subtypes were much less conserved (30% and 48% identity, respectively) than those of HRSV (92% and 87%, respectively). Comparisons within all the genera of the Paramyxoviridae (Pneumovirus, Morbillivirus, Paramyxovirus and Rubullavirus) show that low amino acid identity between F protein transmembrane domains is a feature of different species of virus rather than of strain differences. This may indicate that the two subtypes of APV have evolved in different geographical regions and/or different avian species. This is the first report of an F gene sequence from a subtype B APV.

  19. Energetics and Structure Prediction of the Network of Homo- and Hetero-Oligomers Formed by the Transmembrane Domains of the ErbReceptor Family of Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-01

    DNA sequence was verified by double-stranded DNA sequencing. The Cys-to- Ser mutation (immediately before the KKR) was introduced using the QuickChange...amino acid residue motif, Small-x-x-Large-G/A, consist- ing of a small residue (Gly, Ala, Ser , Thr, or Pro) in the zero position, a large aliphatic...Partridge, A. W. & Deber , C. M. (2001). 772 Weak Interactions of the ErbB TMsRetention of native-like oligomerization states in transmembrane segment

  20. Phosphorylation by cAMP-dependent protein kinase causes a conformational change in the R domain of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulhanty, A M; Riordan, J R

    1994-04-05

    Individuals with cystic fibrosis have a defect in the CFTR protein, a chloride channel regulated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). The majority of the phosphorylation sites of PKA are located in the R domain of CFTR. It has been postulated that this domain may act as a gate for the chloride channel. Of the many possible mechanisms whereby the R domain could gate the channel, including interdomain interactions, charge distribution, or conformational change, we investigated the possibility that phosphorylation leads to conformational changes in the R domain. To test this hypothesis, a protocol for purification of human R domain peptide synthesized in a bacterial expression system was developed. Purified R domain was phosphorylated by PKA, and CD spectra were obtained. As a result of phosphorylation by PKA, a significant spectral change, indicative of a reduction in the alpha-helical content, was found. CD spectra of the R domain of a shark homologue of CFTR indicated similar changes in conformation as a result of phosphorylation by PKA. In contrast, phosphorylation of the human R domain by PKC, which has only a small influence on CFTR channel activity, failed to elicit CD spectral changes, indicating no conformational change comparable to those induced by PKA phosphorylation. These observations provide the first structural characterization of the R domain and suggest that the gating of the CFTR chloride channel by PKA may involve a conformational change in the R domain.

  1. Protein domains and architectural innovation in plant-associated Proteobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Downie J Allan

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evolution of new complex biological behaviour tends to arise by novel combinations of existing building blocks. The functional and evolutionary building blocks of the proteome are protein domains, the function of a protein being dependent on its constituent domains. We clustered completely-sequenced proteomes of prokaryotes on the basis of their protein domain content, as defined by Pfam (release 16.0. This revealed that, although there was a correlation between phylogeny and domain content, other factors also have an influence. This observation motivated an investigation of the relationship between an organism's lifestyle and the complement of domains and domain architectures found within its proteome. Results We took a census of all protein domains and domain combinations (architectures encoded in the completely-sequenced proteobacterial genomes. Nine protein domain families were identified that are found in phylogenetically disparate plant-associated bacteria but are absent from non-plant-associated bacteria. Most of these are known to play a role in the plant-associated lifestyle, but they also included domain of unknown function DUF1427, which is found in plant symbionts and pathogens of the alpha-, beta- and gamma-Proteobacteria, but not known in any other organism. Further, several domains were identified as being restricted to phytobacteria and Eukaryotes. One example is the RolB/RolC glucosidase family, which is found only in Agrobacterium species and in plants. We identified the 0.5% of Pfam protein domain families that were most significantly over-represented in the plant-associated Proteobacteria with respect to the background frequencies in the whole set of available proteobacterial proteomes. These included guanylate cyclase, domains implicated in aromatic catabolism, cellulase and several domains of unknown function. We identified 459 unique domain architectures found in phylogenetically diverse plant pathogens

  2. Lysosomal-associated Transmembrane Protein 4B (LAPTM4B) Decreases Transforming Growth Factor β1 (TGF-β1) Production in Human Regulatory T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huygens, Caroline; Liénart, Stéphanie; Dedobbeleer, Olivier; Stockis, Julie; Gauthy, Emilie; Coulie, Pierre G; Lucas, Sophie

    2015-08-14

    Production of active TGF-β1 is one mechanism by which human regulatory T cells (Tregs) suppress immune responses. This production is regulated by glycoprotein A repetitions predominant (GARP), a transmembrane protein present on stimulated Tregs but not on other T lymphocytes (Th and CTLs). GARP forms disulfide bonds with proTGF-β1, favors its cleavage into latent inactive TGF-β1, induces the secretion and surface presentation of GARP·latent TGF-β1 complexes, and is required for activation of the cytokine in Tregs. We explored whether additional Treg-specific protein(s) associated with GARP·TGF-β1 complexes regulate TGF-β1 production in Tregs. We searched for such proteins by yeast two-hybrid assay, using GARP as a bait to screen a human Treg cDNA library. We identified lysosomal-associated transmembrane protein 4B (LAPTM4B), which interacts with GARP in mammalian cells and is expressed at higher levels in Tregs than in Th cells. LAPTM4B decreases cleavage of proTGF-β1, secretion of soluble latent TGF-β1, and surface presentation of GARP·TGF-β1 complexes by Tregs but does not contribute to TGF-β1 activation. Therefore, LAPTM4B binds to GARP and is a negative regulator of TGF-β1 production in human Tregs. It may play a role in the control of immune responses by decreasing Treg immunosuppression.

  3. A single base insertion in the putative transmembrane domain of the tyrosinase gene as a cause for tyrosinase-negative oculocutaneous albinism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chintamaneni, C.D.; Kobayashi, Y.; Kwon, B.S. (Indiana Univ. School of Medicine, Indianapolis (United States)); Halaban, R. (Yale Univ. School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States)); Witkop, C.J. Jr. (Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis (United States))

    1991-06-15

    The authors have determined a molecular defect to be the likely basis for inactivity of the tyrosinase from a patient with tyrosinase-negative oculocutaneous albinism. A single base (thymine) was inserted in exon 5 of the tyrosinase gene following codon 471 in the putative transmembrane coding region. This insertion caused a shift in the reading frame of 19 amino acids at the 3{prime} end and introduced a premature termination signal that would be expected to truncate the protein by 21 amino acids at the carboxyl terminus. The albino tyrosinase was not recognized by antibodies directed to the carboxyl terminus of tyrosinase. Furthermore, as shown by gel electrophoresis of the immunoprecipitated protein, the tyrosinase was {approx} 3kDa smaller than normal. Similar immunoprecipitation data were obtained when cloned normal and mutant tyrosinases were expressed in COS-1 cells.

  4. Expression cloning and chromosomal mapping of the leukocyte activation antigen CD97, a new seven-span transmembrane molecule of the secretin receptor superfamily with an unusual extracellular domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamann, J. [Univ. of Amsterdam (Netherlands)]|[Max Planck Society, Berlin-Buch (Germany); Hamann, D.; Lier, R.A.W. [Univ. of Amsterdam (Netherlands)] [and others

    1995-08-15

    CD97 is a monomeric glycoprotein of 75 to 85 kDa that is induced rapidly on the surface of most leukocytes upon activation. We herein report the isolation of a cDNA encoding human CD97 by expression cloning in COS cells. The 3-kb cDNA clone encodes a mature polypeptide chain of 722 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 79 kDa. Within the C-terminal part of the protein, a region with seven hydrophobic segments was identified, suggesting that CD97 is a seven-span transmembrane molecule. Sequence comparison indicates that CD97 is the first leukocyte Ag in a recently described superfamily that includes the receptors for secretin, calcitonin, and other mammalian and insect peptide hormones. Different from these receptors, CD97 has an extended extracellular region of 433 amino acids that possesses three N-terminal epidermal growth factor-like domains, two of them with a calcium-binding site, and single Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) motif. The existence of structural elements characteristic for extracellular matrix proteins in a seven-span transmembrane molecule makes CD97 a receptor potentially involved in both adhesion and signaling processes early after leukocyte activation. The gene encoding CD97 is localized on chromosome 19 (19p13.12-13.2).

  5. MGC9753 gene, located within PPP1R1B-STARD3-ERBB2-GRB7 amplicon on human chromosome 17q12, encodes the seven-transmembrane receptor with extracellular six-cystein domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoh, Masuko; Katoh, Masaru

    2003-06-01

    MYC, ERBB2, MET, FGFR2, CCNE1, MYCN, WNT2, CD44, MDM2, NCOA3, IQGAP1 and STK6 loci are amplified in human gastric cancer. It has been reported that the gene corresponding to EST H16094 is co-amplified with ERBB2 gene in human gastric cancer. Here, we identified and characterized the gene corresponding to EST H16094 by using bioinformatics. BLAST programs revealed that EST H16094 was derived from the uncharacterized MGC9753 gene. Two ORFs were predicted within human MGC9753 mRNA, and ORF1 (nucleotide position 18-980 of NM_033419.1) was predicted as the coding region of human MGC9753 mRNA based on comparative genomics. Nucleotide sequence of mouse Mgc9753 mRNA was next determined in silico by modification of AK052486 cDNA (deleting C at the nucleotide position 37). Human MGC9753 and mouse Mgc9753 proteins were 320-amino-acid seven-transmembrane receptors with the N-terminal six-cysteine domain and an N-glycosylation site (85.0% total-amino-acid identity). Human MGC9753 protein showed 90.6% total-amino-acid identity with human CAB2 aberrant protein, which lacked the third-transmembrane domain of MGC9753 due to frame shifts within ORF. Human MGC9753 gene, consisting of eight exons, were clustered with PPP1R1B, STARD3, TCAP, PNMT, ERBB2, MGC14832 and GRB7 genes within the 120-kb region. PPP1R1B, STARD3, MGC9753, ERBB2 and GRB7 genes are co-amplified in several cases of gastric cancer. This is the first report on comprehensive characterization of the amplicon around the PPP1R1B-STARD3-TCAP-PNMT-MGC9753-ERBB2-MGC14832-GRB7 locus on human chromosome 17q12.

  6. Molecular determinants of interactions between the N-terminal domain and the transmembrane core that modulate hERG K+ channel gating.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Fernández-Trillo

    Full Text Available A conserved eag domain in the cytoplasmic amino terminus of the human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG potassium channel is critical for its slow deactivation gating. Introduction of gene fragments encoding the eag domain are able to restore normal deactivation properties of channels from which most of the amino terminus has been deleted, and also those lacking exclusively the eag domain or carrying a single point mutation in the initial residues of the N-terminus. Deactivation slowing in the presence of the recombinant domain is not observed with channels carrying a specific Y542C point mutation in the S4-S5 linker. On the other hand, mutations in some initial positions of the recombinant fragment also impair its ability to restore normal deactivation. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET analysis of fluorophore-tagged proteins under total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF conditions revealed a substantial level of FRET between the introduced N-terminal eag fragments and the eag domain-deleted channels expressed at the membrane, but not between the recombinant eag domain and full-length channels with an intact amino terminus. The FRET signals were also minimized when the recombinant eag fragments carried single point mutations in the initial portion of their amino end, and when Y542C mutated channels were used. These data suggest that the restoration of normal deactivation gating by the N-terminal recombinant eag fragment is an intrinsic effect of this domain directed by the interaction of its N-terminal segment with the gating machinery, likely at the level of the S4-S5 linker.

  7. Structure and function of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M. Morales

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis (CF is a lethal autosomal recessive genetic disease caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR. Mutations in the CFTR gene may result in a defective processing of its protein and alter the function and regulation of this channel. Mutations are associated with different symptoms, including pancreatic insufficiency, bile duct obstruction, infertility in males, high sweat Cl-, intestinal obstruction, nasal polyp formation, chronic sinusitis, mucus dehydration, and chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus lung infection, responsible for 90% of the mortality of CF patients. The gene responsible for the cellular defect in CF was cloned in 1989 and its protein product CFTR is activated by an increase of intracellular cAMP. The CFTR contains two membrane domains, each with six transmembrane domain segments, two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs, and a cytoplasmic domain. In this review we discuss the studies that have correlated the role of each CFTR domain in the protein function as a chloride channel and as a regulator of the outwardly rectifying Cl- channels (ORCCs.

  8. Simian-Human immunodeficiency viruses expressing chimeric subtype B/C Vpu proteins demonstrate the importance of the amino terminal and transmembrane domains in the rate of CD4(+) T cell loss in macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Autumn; Schmitt, Kimberly; Culley, Nathan; Stephens, Edward B

    2013-01-20

    Previously, we reported that simian-human immunodeficiency viruses expressing either the lab adapted subtype B (SHIV(KU-1bMC33)) or subtype C (SHIV(SCVpu)) Vpu proteins of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) had different rates of CD4(+) T cell loss following inoculation into macaques. In this study, we have generated SHIVs that express either the subtype B or subtype C N-terminal (NTD) and transmembrane (TMD) domains and the opposing cytoplasmic domain (SHIV(VpuBC), SHIV(VpuCB)). In culture systems, SHIV(VpuBC) replicated faster than SHIV(VpuCB) while both proteins exhibited similar ability to down-modulate CD4 surface expression. Following inoculation into macaques, SHIV(VpuBC) resulted in rapid CD4(+) T cell loss similar to the parental SHIV(KU-1bMC33), while the rate of CD4(+) T cell loss in those inoculated with SHIV(VpuCB) was intermediate of SHIV(SCVpu) and SHIV(KU-1bMC33). These results emphasize the importance of the Vpu NTD/TMD region in the rate of CD4(+) T cell loss in the pathogenic X4 SHIV/macaque model.

  9. Molecular Motions Involved in Na-K-Cl Cotransporter-mediated Ion Transport and Transporter Activation Revealed by Internal Cross-linking between Transmembrane Domains 10 and 11/12*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monette, Michelle Y.; Somasekharan, Suma; Forbush, Biff

    2014-01-01

    We examined the relationship between transmembrane domain (TM) 10 and TM11/12 in NKCC1, testing homology models based on the structure of AdiC in the same transporter superfamily. We hypothesized that introduced cysteine pairs would be close enough for disulfide formation and would alter transport function: indeed, evidence for cross-link formation with low micromolar concentrations of copper phenanthroline or iodine was found in 3 of 8 initially tested pairs and in 1 of 26 additionally tested pairs. Inhibition of transport was observed with copper phenanthroline and iodine treatment of P676C/A734C and I677C/A734C, consistent with the proximity of these residues and with movement of TM10 during the occlusion step of ion transport. We also found Cu2+ inhibition of the single-cysteine mutant A675C, suggesting that this residue and Met382 of TM3 are involved in a Cu2+-binding site. Surprisingly, cross-linking of P676C/I730C was found to prevent rapid deactivation of the transporter while not affecting the dephosphorylation rate, thus uncoupling the phosphorylation and activation steps. Consistent with this, (a) cross-linking of P676C/I730C was dependent on activation state, and (b) mutants lacking the phosphoregulatory domain could still be activated by cross-linking. These results suggest a model of NKCC activation that involves movement of TM12 relative to TM10, which is likely tied to movement of the large C terminus, a process somehow triggered by phosphorylation of the regulatory domain in the N terminus. PMID:24451383

  10. ACRATA: a novel electron transfer domain associated to apoptosis and cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinez-A Carlos

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, several members of a vertebrate protein family containing a six trans-membrane (6TM domain and involved in apoptosis and cancer (e.g. STEAP, STAMP1, TSAP6, have been identified in Golgi and cytoplasmic membranes. The exact function of these proteins remains unknown. Methods We related this 6TM domain to distant protein families using intermediate sequences and methods of iterative profile sequence similarity search. Results Here we show for the first time that this 6TM domain is homolog to the 6TM heme binding domain of both the NADPH oxidase (Nox family and the YedZ family of bacterial oxidoreductases. Conclusions This finding gives novel insights about the existence of a previously undetected electron transfer system involved in apoptosis and cancer, and suggests further steps in the experimental characterization of these evolutionarily related families.

  11. Transmembrane and ubiquitin-like domain containing 1 (Tmub1 regulates locomotor activity and wakefulness in mice and interacts with CAMLG.

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    Wandong Zhang

    Full Text Available Tmub1 (C7orf21/HOPS encodes a protein containing a ubiquitin-like domain. Tmub1 is highly expressed in the nervous system. To study its physiological function, we generated mice with Tmub1 deleted by homologous recombination. The knockout mice were grossly normal and viable. In a comprehensive behavioral testing battery, the only knockout phenotype displayed was a strong increase in home cage locomotor activity during the dark phase (subjective day of the light:dark (L:D cycle. There were no changes in activity during the light period. There were no changes in locomotor activity observed in other assays, e.g. novel open-field. The increase in dark phase locomotor activity persisted during a seven day D:D (complete darkness challenge, and remained largely confined to the normally dark period. Telemetric recording in freely moving subjects for one 24 hr L:D cycle, revealed the same increase in locomotor activity in the dark phase. In addition, EEG analysis showed that the knockout mice exhibited increased waking and decreased NREM & REM times during the dark phase, but the EEG was otherwise normal. Using lacZ as a reporter we found Tmub1 expression prominent in a few brain structures including the thalamus, a region known to drive wakefulness and arousal via its projections to the cortex. We identified calcium modulating cyclophilin ligand CAMLG/CAML as a binding partner by a yeast two-hybrid screen of a brain library. The interaction of Tmub1 and CAMLG was confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation assays in HEK cells. The two proteins were also found to be co-localized to the cytoplasm when expressed in HEK cells. Both Tmub1 and CAMLG have been recently described in the regulation of membrane trafficking of specific receptors. Taken together our results implicate Tmub1 in the regulation of locomotor activity and wakefulness and suggest that Tmub1 binds to and functions together with CAMLG.

  12. The specificity of association of the IgD molecule with the accessory proteins BAP31/BAP29 lies in the IgD transmembrane sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, T; Schamel, W W; Kim, K M; Watanabe, T; Becker, B; Nielsen, P J; Reth, M

    1996-04-01

    Mature B cells co-express on their cell surface two classes of antigen receptor, the IgM and IgD immunoglobulins. The structural and functional differences between the two receptor classes are poorly understood. Recently two proteins of 29 and 31 kDa (BAP29 and BAP31) have been described that are preferentially associated with membrane IgD but only weakly with membrane IgM. We describe here the cloning of full-length murine and human BAP31 cDNAs encoding proteins of 245 and 246 amino acids respectively. The two BAP31 proteins are 95% identical. The BAP31 gene is ubiquitously expressed in murine tissues and is located on the X chromosome in both mouse and man. The murine BAP31 protein has 43% sequence identity to murine BAP29. Both proteins have a hydrophobic N-terminus and an alpha-helical C-terminus which ends with a KKXX motif implicated in vesicular transport. By a mutational analysis we have identified amino acids in the transmembrane sequence of the delta m chain that are critical for binding to BAP31/BAP29. A structural model of the BAPs and their potential functions are discussed.

  13. From the sequence to the conformation of the unabridged transmembrane domains TM1 and TM2 of the cASIC1a ion channel - a parallel tempering approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietra, Francesco

    2015-03-01

    This work was devised to unravel, along replica-exchange molecular-dynamics (REMD) simulations, the conformation in solution of the TM1 and TM2 transmembrane domains of the homotrimeric cASIC1a ion channel. This includes the head of TM1 and tail of TM2 that had previously defied X-ray diffraction analysis in the crystal. The structure of the open-channel complex of cASIC1a with psalmotoxin 1 (PcTx1) was chosen here as a basis, although, to make the simulations affordable, the procedure was limited to the missing portions, including a few adjacent α-helical turns. The latter were held fixed during the simulations. Reassembling the whole subunit, by superimposition of the fixed portions, resulted in diving of both TM1 and TM2 as continuous α-helices into the cytoplasm. At completion of this work, it appeared, from similar X-ray diffraction studies, that TM2 for both the complex of cASIC1a with the coral snake MitTx toxin, and the isolated desensitized ion channel, is discontinuous, with the triad G443-A444-S445 taking an extended, belt-like conformation. In this way, a filter ring against hydrated ions is formed by G443 in the trimer. Our REMD examination of this complex revealed a strong resistance by G443, and only that residue, to take dihedral-angle values compatible with an α-helical conformation. This suggests that the flexibility of glycine alone does not explain formation of the extended, belt-like conformation of the triad G443-A444-S445. This also requires cooperation in the trimer.

  14. A specific interface between integrin transmembrane helices and affinity for ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Bing-Hao; Springer, Timothy A; Takagi, Junichi

    2004-06-01

    Conformational communication across the plasma membrane between the extracellular and intracellular domains of integrins is beginning to be defined by structural work on both domains. However, the role of the alpha and beta subunit transmembrane domains and the nature of signal transmission through these domains have been elusive. Disulfide bond scanning of the exofacial portions of the integrin alpha(IIbeta) and beta(3) transmembrane domains reveals a specific heterodimerization interface in the resting receptor. This interface is lost rather than rearranged upon activation of the receptor by cytoplasmic mutations of the alpha subunit that mimic physiologic inside-out activation, demonstrating a link between activation of the extracellular domain and lateral separation of transmembrane helices. Introduction of disulfide bridges to prevent or reverse separation abolishes the activating effect of cytoplasmic mutations, confirming transmembrane domain separation but not hinging or piston-like motions as the mechanism of transmembrane signaling by integrins.

  15. The MUC1 extracellular domain subunit is found in nuclear speckles and associates with spliceosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyadarsini Kumar

    Full Text Available MUC1 is a large transmembrane glycoprotein and oncogene expressed by epithelial cells and overexpressed and underglycosylated in cancer cells. The MUC1 cytoplasmic subunit (MUC1-C can translocate to the nucleus and regulate gene expression. It is frequently assumed that the MUC1 extracellular subunit (MUC1-N does not enter the nucleus. Based on an unexpected observation that MUC1 extracellular domain antibody produced an apparently nucleus-associated staining pattern in trophoblasts, we have tested the hypothesis that MUC1-N is expressed inside the nucleus. Three different antibodies were used to identify MUC1-N in normal epithelial cells and tissues as well as in several cancer cell lines. The results of immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy analyses as well as subcellular fractionation, Western blotting, and siRNA/shRNA studies, confirm that MUC1-N is found within nuclei of all cell types examined. More detailed examination of its intranuclear distribution using a proximity ligation assay, subcellular fractionation, and immunoprecipitation suggests that MUC1-N is located in nuclear speckles (interchromatin granule clusters and closely associates with the spliceosome protein U2AF65. Nuclear localization of MUC1-N was abolished when cells were treated with RNase A and nuclear localization was altered when cells were incubated with the transcription inhibitor 5,6-dichloro-1-b-d-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole (DRB. While MUC1-N predominantly associated with speckles, MUC1-C was present in the nuclear matrix, nucleoli, and the nuclear periphery. In some nuclei, confocal microscopic analysis suggest that MUC1-C staining is located close to, but only partially overlaps, MUC1-N in speckles. However, only MUC1-N was found in isolated speckles by Western blotting. Also, MUC1-C and MUC1-N distributed differently during mitosis. These results suggest that MUC1-N translocates to the nucleus where it is expressed in nuclear speckles and that MUC1-N and MUC

  16. Expression of lysosome-associated protein transmembrane 4B-35 in cancer and its correlation with the differentiation status of hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cong Peng; Rou-Li Zhou; Gen-Ze Shao; Jing-An Rui; Shao-Bin Wang; Ming Lin; Sha Zhang; Zi-Feng Gao

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To produce high-quality polydonal antibody to lysosome associated protein transmembrane 4B-35 and to identify LAPTM4B-35 expression in cancer tissues and its correlation with differentiation status of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).METHODS: The 297 bp 5' end of LAPTM4BcDNA was obtained by PCR and inserted into prokaryotic expression vector pGEXKG. Then the recombinant pGEX-KG-N1-99 was transformedinto E. coli JM109 to express GST-fusion protein. The fusion protein was purified by glutathione sepharoseTM 4B agarose. The purified GST-LAPTM4B-N1-99 was characterized by SDSPAGE, and used to immunize rabbits. The titer and specificity of antisera were detected by ELISA and Western blot, respectively. The correlation between the expression levels of LAPTM4B-35 and the differentiation status of HCC was analyzed via Western blot. The expression of LAPTM4B35 in HCC and other six cancer tissues was investigated via tissue chip and immunohistochemical analysis. RESULTS: About 6.2 mg of pure GST-LAPTM4B-N1-99 was isolated from 1 L of bacteria. The GST-LAPTM4B-N1-99produced high titer antisera in rabbits and showed good immunity. Western blot showed specific reactions for the antibody to the LAPTM4B-35 in the total proteins from HCC tissues and BEL-7402 cells, also to the fusion protein purified or in the transformed bacteria. LAPTM4B-35 was remarkably expressed in several cancers, such as HCC, breast cancer, gastric carcinoma, lung cancer, and colon carcinoma, but not commonly expressed in esophageal cancer and rectum carcinoma. Notably, the expression levels of LAPTM4B-35 were significantly and inversely correlated to the differentiation of HCCs in a 20 case analysis. CONCLUSION: Specific polyclonal antibody (LAPTM4B-N1-99-pAb) to LAPTM4B-35 was produced. It identified the expression of LAPTM4B-35 in some cancer tissues originated from single layer cuboidal and columnar epithelial cells and firmly demonstrated that the expression of LAPTM4B-35 in HCC was inversely

  17. Mechanisms for quality control of misfolded transmembrane proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Houck, Scott A.; Cyr, Douglas M.

    2011-01-01

    To prevent the accumulation of misfolded and aggregated proteins, the cell has developed a complex network of cellular quality control (QC) systems to recognize misfolded proteins and facilitate their refolding or degradation. The cell faces numerous obstacles when performing quality control on transmembrane proteins. Transmembrane proteins have domains on both sides of a membrane and QC systems in distinct compartments must coordinate to monitor the folding status of the protein. Additionall...

  18. Expression of genes encoding multi-transmembrane proteins in specific primate taste cell populations.

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    Bryan D Moyer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Using fungiform (FG and circumvallate (CV taste buds isolated by laser capture microdissection and analyzed using gene arrays, we previously constructed a comprehensive database of gene expression in primates, which revealed over 2,300 taste bud-associated genes. Bioinformatics analyses identified hundreds of genes predicted to encode multi-transmembrane domain proteins with no previous association with taste function. A first step in elucidating the roles these gene products play in gustation is to identify the specific taste cell types in which they are expressed. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using double label in situ hybridization analyses, we identified seven new genes expressed in specific taste cell types, including sweet, bitter, and umami cells (TRPM5-positive, sour cells (PKD2L1-positive, as well as other taste cell populations. Transmembrane protein 44 (TMEM44, a protein with seven predicted transmembrane domains with no homology to GPCRs, is expressed in a TRPM5-negative and PKD2L1-negative population that is enriched in the bottom portion of taste buds and may represent developmentally immature taste cells. Calcium homeostasis modulator 1 (CALHM1, a component of a novel calcium channel, along with family members CALHM2 and CALHM3; multiple C2 domains; transmembrane 1 (MCTP1, a calcium-binding transmembrane protein; and anoctamin 7 (ANO7, a member of the recently identified calcium-gated chloride channel family, are all expressed in TRPM5 cells. These proteins may modulate and effect calcium signalling stemming from sweet, bitter, and umami receptor activation. Synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2B (SV2B, a regulator of synaptic vesicle exocytosis, is expressed in PKD2L1 cells, suggesting that this taste cell population transmits tastant information to gustatory afferent nerve fibers via exocytic neurotransmitter release. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Identification of genes encoding multi-transmembrane domain proteins

  19. The Role of Domain Satisfaction in Explaining the Paradoxical Association between Life Satisfaction and Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAdams, Kimberly K.; Lucas, Richard E.; Donnellan, M. Brent

    2012-01-01

    Although aging is associated with declines in many life domains, overall life satisfaction does not appear to decline sharply with age. One explanation for this paradoxical finding is that several life domains improve with age such that increases in certain domains balance the decreases in others. Because different issues are problematic at…

  20. CFTR anion channel modulates expression of human transmembrane mucin MUC3 through the PDZ protein GOPC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelaseyed, Thaher; Hansson, Gunnar C

    2011-09-15

    The transmembrane mucins in the enterocyte are type 1 transmembrane proteins with long and rigid mucin domains, rich in proline, threonine and serine residues that carry numerous O-glycans. Three of these mucins, MUC3, MUC12 and MUC17 are unique in harboring C-terminal class I PDZ motifs, making them suitable ligands for PDZ proteins. A screening of 123 different human PDZ domains for binding to MUC3 identified a strong interaction with the PDZ protein GOPC (Golgi-associated PDZ and coiled-coil motif-containing protein). This interaction was mediated by the C-terminal PDZ motif of MUC3, binding to the single GOPC PDZ domain. GOPC is also a binding partner for cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) that directs CFTR for degradation. Overexpression of GOPC downregulated the total levels of MUC3, an effect that was reversed by introducing CFTR. The results suggest that CFTR and MUC3 compete for binding to GOPC, which in turn can regulate levels of these two proteins. For the first time a direct coupling between mucins and the CFTR channel is demonstrated, a finding that will shed further light on the still poorly understood relationship between cystic fibrosis and the mucus phenotype of this disease.

  1. Continuous monitoring of membrane protein micro-domain association during cell signaling

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Heng

    2011-01-01

    Central to understanding membrane bound cell signaling is to quantify how the membrane ultra-structure consisting of transient spatial domains modulates signaling and how the signaling influences this ultra-structure. Yet, measuring the association of membrane proteins with domains in living, intact cells poses considerable challenges. Here, we describe a non-destructive method to quantify protein-lipid domain and protein cytoskeleton interactions in single, intact cells enabling continuous monitoring of the protein domains interaction over time during signaling.

  2. [Efficient extraction of transmembrane proteins using ProteoExtract Transmembrane Protein Extraction Kit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Błachnio, Karina

    2010-01-01

    Detergents commonly used for solubilization of membrane proteins may be ionic or non-ionic. Exposing membrane proteins to detergents, however, can adversely affect their native structure, which can be a major hindrance for functional studies. This is especially true for proteins with multiple transmembrane domains. The ProteoExtract Transmembrane Protein Extraction Kit (TM-PEK), offered by Merck, provides a detergent-free novel reagents to enable the mild and efficient extraction of proteins containing seven transmembrane domains, such as GPCRs (G-Protein Coupled Receptors) e.g.: Frizzled-4 and CELSR-3, from mammalian cells. The fraction enriched in transmembrane proteins using TM-PEK is directly compatible with enzyme assays, non-denaturing gel electrophoresis, 1- and 2-D SDS-PAGE, MS analysis, Western blotting, immunoprecipitation and ELISA. Unlike many alternatives, TM-PEK extraction procedure does not require sonication, extended rigorous vortexing, ultracentrifugation, or incubation of samples at elevated temperatures--thus minimizing the risk of post-extraction degradation or modifications.

  3. C2 domain of synaptotagminⅠassociates with lipid rafts of plasma membrane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L(U) JiHua; HE Li; SUI SenFang

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we report that the C2 domain of synaptotagmin I (syt I) could associate with lipid rafts of plasma membrane. We demonstrate that phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) in the target membrane and Ca2+ are the key factors to enhance the raft association of the C2 domain. We also found that the raft association of the C2 domain could be fulfilled by either C2A or C2B alone, suggesting that their raft association might be complementary. Finally, we indicate that destroying lipid rafts or blocking syt I-raft association could significantly reduce the Ca2+-driven release of glutamates. Our data indicate that the raft association of the C2 domain might play an important role in the regulated exocytosis.

  4. Familial CJD associated PrP mutants within transmembrane region induced Ctm-PrP retention in ER and triggered apoptosis by ER stress in SH-SY5Y cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Genetic prion diseases are linked to point and inserted mutations in the prion protein (PrP gene that are presumed to favor conversion of the cellular isoform of PrP (PrP(C to the pathogenic one (PrP(Sc. The pathogenic mechanisms and the subcellular sites of the conversion are not completely understood. Here we introduce several PRNP gene mutations (such as, PrP-KDEL, PrP-3AV, PrP-A117V, PrP-G114V, PrP-P102L and PrP-E200K into the cultured cells in order to explore the pathogenic mechanism of familial prion disease. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To address the roles of aberrant retention of PrP in endoplasmic reticulum (ER, the recombinant plasmids expressing full-length human PrP tailed with an ER signal peptide at the COOH-terminal (PrP-KDEL and PrP with three amino acids exchange in transmembrane region (PrP-3AV were constructed. In the preparations of transient transfections, 18-kD COOH-terminal proteolytic resistant fragments (Ctm-PrP were detected in the cells expressing PrP-KDEL and PrP-3AV. Analyses of the cell viabilities in the presences of tunicamycin and brefeldin A revealed that expressions of PrP-KDEL and PrP-3AV sensitized the transfected cells to ER stress stimuli. Western blots and RT-PCR identified the clear alternations of ER stress associated events in the cells expressing PrP-KDEL and PrP-3AV that induced ER mediated apoptosis by CHOP and caspase-12 apoptosis pathway. Moreover, several familial CJD related PrP mutants were transiently introduced into the cultured cells. Only the mutants within the transmembrane region (G114V and A117V induced the formation of Ctm-PrP and caused the ER stress, while the mutants outside the transmembrane region (P102L and E200K failed. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The data indicate that the retention of PrP in ER through formation of Ctm-PrP results in ER stress and cell apoptosis. The cytopathic activities caused by different familial CJD associated PrP mutants may vary, among them

  5. The CRM domain: an RNA binding module derived from an ancient ribosome-associated protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkan, Alice; Klipcan, Larik; Ostersetzer, Oren; Kawamura, Tetsuya; Asakura, Yukari; Watkins, Kenneth P

    2007-01-01

    The CRS1-YhbY domain (also called the CRM domain) is represented as a stand-alone protein in Archaea and Bacteria, and in a family of single- and multidomain proteins in plants. The function of this domain is unknown, but structural data and the presence of the domain in several proteins known to interact with RNA have led to the proposal that it binds RNA. Here we describe a phylogenetic analysis of the domain, its incorporation into diverse proteins in plants, and biochemical properties of a prokaryotic and eukaryotic representative of the domain family. We show that a bacterial member of the family, Escherichia coli YhbY, is associated with pre-50S ribosomal subunits, suggesting that YhbY functions in ribosome assembly. GFP fused to a single-domain CRM protein from maize localizes to the nucleolus, suggesting that an analogous activity may have been retained in plants. We show further that an isolated maize CRM domain has RNA binding activity in vitro, and that a small motif shared with KH RNA binding domains, a conserved "GxxG" loop, contributes to its RNA binding activity. These and other results suggest that the CRM domain evolved in the context of ribosome function prior to the divergence of Archaea and Bacteria, that this function has been maintained in extant prokaryotes, and that the domain was recruited to serve as an RNA binding module during the evolution of plant genomes.

  6. Structural and Functional Importance of Transmembrane Domain 3 (TM3) in the Aspartate:Alanine Antiporter AspT: Topology and Function of the Residues of TM3 and Oligomerization of AspT▿

    OpenAIRE

    Nanatani, Kei; Maloney, Peter C.; Abe, Keietsu

    2009-01-01

    AspT, the aspartate:alanine antiporter of Tetragenococcus halophilus, a membrane protein of 543 amino acids with 10 putative transmembrane (TM) helices, is the prototype of the aspartate:alanine exchanger (AAE) family of transporters. Because TM3 (isoleucine 64 to methionine 85) has many amino acid residues that are conserved among members of the AAE family and because TM3 contains two charged residues and four polar residues, it is thought to be located near (or to form part of) the substrat...

  7. Use of carbonate extraction in analyzing moderately hydrophobic transmembrane proteins in the mitochondrial inner membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hayoung; Botelho, Salomé Calado; Park, Kwangjin; Kim, Hyun

    2015-12-01

    Resistance to sodium carbonate extraction is regarded as a canonical way to distinguish integral membrane proteins (MPs) from other membrane-associated proteins. However, it has been observed that carbonate extraction releases some mitochondrial integral MPs. Here, by analyzing both artificially designed and native mitochondrial inner MPs containing transmembrane domains (TMDs) of different hydrophobicities, we show that carbonate treatment can release moderately hydrophobic TMDs from the mitochondrial inner membrane. These results suggest that resistance and sensitivity to carbonate extraction may be interpreted with caution when analyzing the nature of mitochondrial inner MPs.

  8. Novel predicted RNA-binding domains associated with the translation machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravind, L; Koonin, E V

    1999-03-01

    Two previously undetected domains were identified in a variety of RNA-binding proteins, particularly RNA-modifying enzymes, using methods for sequence profile analysis. A small domain consisting of 60-65 amino acid residues was detected in the ribosomal protein S4, two families of pseudouridine synthases, a novel family of predicted RNA methylases, a yeast protein containing a pseudouridine synthetase and a deaminase domain, bacterial tyrosyl-tRNA synthetases, and a number of uncharacterized, small proteins that may be involved in translation regulation. Another novel domain, designated PUA domain, after PseudoUridine synthase and Archaeosine transglycosylase, was detected in archaeal and eukaryotic pseudouridine synthases, archaeal archaeosine synthases, a family of predicted ATPases that may be involved in RNA modification, a family of predicted archaeal and bacterial rRNA methylases. Additionally, the PUA domain was detected in a family of eukaryotic proteins that also contain a domain homologous to the translation initiation factor eIF1/SUI1; these proteins may comprise a novel type of translation factors. Unexpectedly, the PUA domain was detected also in bacterial and yeast glutamate kinases; this is compatible with the demonstrated role of these enzymes in the regulation of the expression of other genes. We propose that the S4 domain and the PUA domain bind RNA molecules with complex folded structures, adding to the growing collection of nucleic acid-binding domains associated with DNA and RNA modification enzymes. The evolution of the translation machinery components containing the S4, PUA, and SUI1 domains must have included several events of lateral gene transfer and gene loss as well as lineage-specific domain fusions.

  9. The Epc-N domain: a predicted protein-protein interaction domain found in select chromatin associated proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perry Jason

    2006-01-01

    -protein interaction module found in chromatin associated proteins. It is possible that the Epc-N domain serves as a direct link between histone acetylation and methylation statuses. The unusual phyletic distribution of Epc-N-containing proteins may provide a conduit for future insight into how different organisms form, perceive and respond to epigenetic information.

  10. Comparative molecular field analysis using selectivity fields reveals residues in the third transmembrane helix of the serotonin transporter associated with substrate and antagonist recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walline, Crystal C; Nichols, David E; Carroll, F Ivy; Barker, Eric L

    2008-06-01

    The human serotonin transporter (hSERT) regulates the spatial and temporal actions of serotonin (5-HT) neurotransmission by removing 5-HT from the synapse. Previous studies have identified residues in the third transmembrane helix (TMH) that may be important for substrate translocation or antagonist recognition. We identified hSERT residues in TMH III that are divergent from Drosophila SERT and used species-scanning mutagenesis to generate reciprocal mutants. Transport inhibition assays suggest that the potency of substituted amphetamines was decreased for the hSERT mutants A169D, I172M, and S174M. In addition, there was a loss of potency for several antidepressants and 3-phenyltropane analogs for the I172M mutant. These results suggest that residues in TMH III may contribute to antagonist recognition. We carried out comparative molecular field analyses using selectivity fields to directly visualize the mutation-induced effects of antagonist potency for antidepressants, 3-phenyltropane analogs, and amphetamines. The hSERT I172M selectivity field analysis for the 3-phenyltropane analogs revealed that electrostatic interactions resulted in decreased potency. The amphetamine and antidepressant selectivity field analyses reveal the observed decreases in potencies for the hSERT I172M mutant are due to a change in tertiary structure of the hSERT protein and are not due to disruption of a direct binding site. Finally, the hSERT mutant A169D displayed altered kinetics for sodium binding, indicating that this residue may lie near the putative sodium binding site. A SERT homology model developed from the Aquifex aeolicus leucine transporter structure provides a structural context for further interpreting the results of the TMH III mutations.

  11. Structure of the GH1 domain of guanylate kinase-associated protein from Rattus norvegicus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, Junsen; Yang, Huiseon [College of Pharmacy, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of); Eom, Soo Hyun [School of Life Sciences, Steitz Center for Structural Biology, and Department of Chemistry, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Chun, ChangJu, E-mail: cchun1130@jnu.ac.kr [College of Pharmacy, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of); Im, Young Jun, E-mail: imyoungjun@jnu.ac.kr [College of Pharmacy, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-12

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The crystal structure of GKAP homology domain 1 (GH1) was determined. • GKAP GH1 is a three-helix bundle connected by short flexible loops. • The predicted helix α4 associates weakly with the helix α3, suggesting dynamic nature of the GH1 domain. - Abstract: Guanylate-kinase-associated protein (GKAP) is a scaffolding protein that links NMDA receptor-PSD-95 to Shank–Homer complexes by protein–protein interactions at the synaptic junction. GKAP family proteins are characterized by the presence of a C-terminal conserved GKAP homology domain 1 (GH1) of unknown structure and function. In this study, crystal structure of the GH1 domain of GKAP from Rattus norvegicus was determined in fusion with an N-terminal maltose-binding protein at 2.0 Å resolution. The structure of GKAP GH1 displays a three-helix bundle connected by short flexible loops. The predicted helix α4 which was not visible in the crystal structure associates weakly with the helix α3 suggesting dynamic nature of the GH1 domain. The strict conservation of GH1 domain across GKAP family members and the lack of a catalytic active site required for enzyme activity imply that the GH1 domain might serve as a protein–protein interaction module for the synaptic protein clustering.

  12. Structure and functional dynamics characterization of the ion channel of the human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) small hydrophobic protein (SH) transmembrane domain by combining molecular dynamics with excited normal modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Gabriela C; Silva, Ricardo H T; Scott, Luis P B; Araujo, Alexandre S; Souza, Fatima P; de Oliveira, Ronaldo Junio

    2016-12-01

    The human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) is the major cause of lower respiratory tract infection in children and elderly people worldwide. Its genome encodes 11 proteins including SH protein, whose functions are not well known. Studies show that SH protein increases RSV virulence degree and permeability to small compounds, suggesting it is involved in the formation of ion channels. The knowledge of SH structure and function is fundamental for a better understanding of its infection mechanism. The aim of this study was to model, characterize, and analyze the structural behavior of SH protein in the phospholipids bilayer environment. Molecular modeling of SH pentameric structure was performed, followed by traditional molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the protein immersed in the lipid bilayer. Molecular dynamics with excited normal modes (MDeNM) was applied in the resulting system in order to investigate long time scale pore dynamics. MD simulations support that SH protein is stable in its pentameric form. Simulations also showed the presence of water molecules within the bilayer by density distribution, thus confirming that SH protein is a viroporin. This water transport was also observed in MDeNM studies with histidine residues of five chains (His22 and His51), playing a key role in pore permeability. The combination of traditional MD and MDeNM was a very efficient protocol to investigate functional conformational changes of transmembrane proteins that act as molecular channels. This protocol can support future investigations of drug candidates by acting on SH protein to inhibit viral infection. Graphical Abstract The ion channel of the human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) small hydrophobic protein (SH) transmembrane domainᅟ.

  13. A Protein Domain and Family Based Approach to Rare Variant Association Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Tom G.; Shihab, Hashem A.; Rivas, Manuel A.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Campbell, Colin; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Gaunt, Tom R.

    2016-01-01

    Background It has become common practice to analyse large scale sequencing data with statistical approaches based around the aggregation of rare variants within the same gene. We applied a novel approach to rare variant analysis by collapsing variants together using protein domain and family coordinates, regarded to be a more discrete definition of a biologically functional unit. Methods Using Pfam definitions, we collapsed rare variants (Minor Allele Frequency ≤ 1%) together in three different ways 1) variants within single genomic regions which map to individual protein domains 2) variants within two individual protein domain regions which are predicted to be responsible for a protein-protein interaction 3) all variants within combined regions from multiple genes responsible for coding the same protein domain (i.e. protein families). A conventional collapsing analysis using gene coordinates was also undertaken for comparison. We used UK10K sequence data and investigated associations between regions of variants and lipid traits using the sequence kernel association test (SKAT). Results We observed no strong evidence of association between regions of variants based on Pfam domain definitions and lipid traits. Quantile-Quantile plots illustrated that the overall distributions of p-values from the protein domain analyses were comparable to that of a conventional gene-based approach. Deviations from this distribution suggested that collapsing by either protein domain or gene definitions may be favourable depending on the trait analysed. Conclusion We have collapsed rare variants together using protein domain and family coordinates to present an alternative approach over collapsing across conventionally used gene-based regions. Although no strong evidence of association was detected in these analyses, future studies may still find value in adopting these approaches to detect previously unidentified association signals. PMID:27128313

  14. A Protein Domain and Family Based Approach to Rare Variant Association Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom G Richardson

    Full Text Available It has become common practice to analyse large scale sequencing data with statistical approaches based around the aggregation of rare variants within the same gene. We applied a novel approach to rare variant analysis by collapsing variants together using protein domain and family coordinates, regarded to be a more discrete definition of a biologically functional unit.Using Pfam definitions, we collapsed rare variants (Minor Allele Frequency ≤ 1% together in three different ways 1 variants within single genomic regions which map to individual protein domains 2 variants within two individual protein domain regions which are predicted to be responsible for a protein-protein interaction 3 all variants within combined regions from multiple genes responsible for coding the same protein domain (i.e. protein families. A conventional collapsing analysis using gene coordinates was also undertaken for comparison. We used UK10K sequence data and investigated associations between regions of variants and lipid traits using the sequence kernel association test (SKAT.We observed no strong evidence of association between regions of variants based on Pfam domain definitions and lipid traits. Quantile-Quantile plots illustrated that the overall distributions of p-values from the protein domain analyses were comparable to that of a conventional gene-based approach. Deviations from this distribution suggested that collapsing by either protein domain or gene definitions may be favourable depending on the trait analysed.We have collapsed rare variants together using protein domain and family coordinates to present an alternative approach over collapsing across conventionally used gene-based regions. Although no strong evidence of association was detected in these analyses, future studies may still find value in adopting these approaches to detect previously unidentified association signals.

  15. ESTIMATION OF ATTRACTION DOMAIN AND EXPONENTIAL CONVERGENCE RATE OF CONTINUOUS FEEDBACK ASSOCIATIVE MEMORY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周冬明; 曹进德; 李继彬

    2001-01-01

    The attraction domain of memory patterns and exponential convergence rate of the network trajectories to memory patterns for continuous feedback associative memory are estimated again by using of some analysis techniques and Liapunov method, some new re sults are obtained, that can be used for evaluation of fault-tolerance capability and the syn thesis procedures for continuous feedback associative memory neural networks.

  16. A C-terminal membrane association domain of phototropin 2 is necessary for chloroplast movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Sam-Geun; Kagawa, Takatoshi; Wada, Masamitsu; Nagatani, Akira

    2013-01-01

    Phototropins (phot1 and phot2), plant-specific blue light receptor kinases, mediate a range of physiological responses in Arabidopsis, including phototropism, chloroplast photorelocation movement, stomatal opening and leaf flattening. Phototropins consist of two photoreceptive domains at their N-terminus, LOV1 (light, oxygen or voltage 1) and LOV2, and a serine/threonine kinase domain at their C-terminus. Here, we determined the molecular moiety for the membrane association of phototropins using the yeast CytoTrap and Arabidopsis protoplast systems. We then examined the physiological significance of the membrane association of phototropins. This detailed study with serial deletions narrowed down the association domain to a relatively small part of the C-terminal domain of phototropin. The functional analysis of phot2 deletion mutants in the phot2-deficient Adiantum and Arabidopsis mutants revealed that the ability to mediate the chloroplast avoidance response correlated well with phot2's membrane association, especially with the Golgi apparatus. Taken together, our data suggest that a small part of the C-terminal domain of phototropins is necessary not only for membrane association but also for the physiological activities that elicit phototropin-specific responses.

  17. Evolution of vertebrate interferon inducible transmembrane proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hickford Danielle

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interferon inducible transmembrane proteins (IFITMs have diverse roles, including the control of cell proliferation, promotion of homotypic cell adhesion, protection against viral infection, promotion of bone matrix maturation and mineralisation, and mediating germ cell development. Most IFITMs have been well characterised in human and mouse but little published data exists for other animals. This study characterised IFITMs in two distantly related marsupial species, the Australian tammar wallaby and the South American grey short-tailed opossum, and analysed the phylogeny of the IFITM family in vertebrates. Results Five IFITM paralogues were identified in both the tammar and opossum. As in eutherians, most marsupial IFITM genes exist within a cluster, contain two exons and encode proteins with two transmembrane domains. Only two IFITM genes, IFITM5 and IFITM10, have orthologues in both marsupials and eutherians. IFITM5 arose in bony fish and IFITM10 in tetrapods. The bone-specific expression of IFITM5 appears to be restricted to therian mammals, suggesting that its specialised role in bone production is a recent adaptation specific to mammals. IFITM10 is the most highly conserved IFITM, sharing at least 85% amino acid identity between birds, reptiles and mammals and suggesting an important role for this presently uncharacterised protein. Conclusions Like eutherians, marsupials also have multiple IFITM genes that exist in a gene cluster. The differing expression patterns for many of the paralogues, together with poor sequence conservation between species, suggests that IFITM genes have acquired many different roles during vertebrate evolution.

  18. Self-association of TPR domains: Lessons learned from a designed, consensus-based TPR oligomer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krachler, Anne Marie; Sharma, Amit; Kleanthous, Colin

    2010-07-01

    The tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) motif is a protein-protein interaction module that acts as an organizing centre for complexes regulating a multitude of biological processes. Despite accumulating evidence for the formation of TPR oligomers as an additional level of regulation there is a lack of structural and solution data explaining TPR self-association. In the present work we characterize the trimeric TPR-containing protein YbgF, which is linked to the Tol system in Gram-negative bacteria. By subtracting previously identified TPR consensus residues required for stability of the fold from residues conserved across YbgF homologs, we identified residues involved in oligomerization of the C-terminal YbgF TPR domain. Crafting these residues, which are located in loop regions between TPR motifs, onto the monomeric consensus TPR protein CTPR3 induced the formation of oligomers. The crystal structure of this engineered oligomer shows an asymmetric trimer where stacking interactions between the introduced tyrosines and displacement of the C-terminal hydrophilic capping helix, present in most TPR domains, are key to oligomerization. Asymmetric trimerization of the YbgF TPR domain and CTPR3Y3 leads to the formation of higher order oligomers both in the crystal and in solution. However, such open-ended self-association does not occur in full-length YbgF suggesting that the protein's N-terminal coiled-coil domain restricts further oligomerization. This interpretation is borne out in experiments where the coiled-coil domain of YbgF was engineered onto the N-terminus of CTPR3Y3 and shown to block self-association beyond trimerization. Our study lays the foundations for understanding the structural basis for TPR domain self-association and how such self-association can be regulated in TPR domain-containing proteins.

  19. Associations among Adolescent Risk Behaviours and Self-Esteem in Six Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Lauren G.; Flisher, Alan J.; Bhana, Arvin; Lombard, Carl

    2004-01-01

    Background: This study investigated associations among adolescents' self-esteem in 6 domains (peers, school, family, sports/athletics, body image and global self-worth) and risk behaviours related to substance use, bullying, suicidality and sexuality. Method: A multistage stratified sampling strategy was used to select a representative sample of…

  20. Ligand association rates to the inner-variable-domain of a dual-variable-domain immunoglobulin are significantly impacted by linker design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Digiammarino, Enrico L; Harlan, John E; Walter, Karl A; Ladror, Uri S; Edalji, Rohinton P; Hutchins, Charles W; Lake, Marc R; Greischar, Amy J; Liu, Junjian; Ghayur, Tariq; Jakob, Clarissa G

    2011-01-01

    The DVD-Ig (TM) protein is a dual-specific immunoglobulin. Each of the two arms of the molecule contains two variable domains, an inner variable domain and an outer variable domain linked in tandem, each with binding specificity for different targets or epitopes. One area of on-going research involves determining how the proximity of the outer variable domain affects the binding of ligands to the inner variable domain. To explore this area, we prepared a series of DVD-Ig proteins with binding specificities toward TNFα and an alternate therapeutic target. Kinetic measurements of TNFα binding to this series of DVD-Ig proteins were used to probe the effects of variable domain position and linker design on ligand on- and off-rates. We found that affinities for TNFα are generally lower when binding to the inner domain than to the outer domain and that this loss of affinity is primarily due to reduced association rate. This effect could be mitigated, to some degree, by linker design. We show several linker sequences that mitigate inner domain affinity losses in this series of DVD-Ig proteins. Moreover, we show that single chain proteolytic cleavage between the inner and outer domains, or complete outer domain removal, can largely restore inner domain TNFα affinity to that approaching the reference antibody. Taken together, these results suggest that a loss of affinity for inner variable domains in this set of DVD-Ig proteins may be largely driven by simple steric hindrance effects and can be reduced by careful linker design.

  1. Rigidity of transmembrane proteins determines their cluster shape

    CERN Document Server

    Jafarinia, Hamidreza; Jalali, Mir Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Protein aggregation in cell membrane is vital for majority of biological functions. Recent experimental results suggest that transmembrane domains of proteins such as $\\alpha$-helices and $\\beta$-sheets have different structural rigidity. We use molecular dynamics simulation of a coarse-grained model of protein-embedded lipid membranes to investigate the mechanisms of protein clustering. For a variety of protein concentrations, our simulations in thermal equilibrium conditions reveal that the structural rigidity of transmembrane domains dramatically affects interactions and changes the shape of the cluster. We have observed stable large aggregates even in the absence of hydrophobic mismatch which has been previously proposed as the mechanism of protein aggregation. According to our results, semi-flexible proteins aggregate to form two-dimensional clusters while rigid proteins, by contrast, form one-dimensional string-like structures. By assuming two probable scenarios for the formation of a two-dimensional tr...

  2. Molecular cloning of cDNA for the human tumor-associated antigen CO-029 and identification of related transmembrane antigens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szala, S.; Kasai, Yasushi; Steplewski, Z.; Rodeck, U.; Koprowski, H.; Linnenbach, A.J. (Wistar Inst. of Anatomy and Biology, Philadelphia, PA (USA))

    1990-09-01

    The human tumor-associated antigen CO-029 is a monoclonal antibody-defined cell surface glycoprotein of 27-34 kDa. By using the high-efficiency COS cell expression system, a full-length cDNA clone for CO-029 was isolated. When transiently expressed in COS cells, the cDNA clone directed the synthesis of an antigen reactive to monoclonal antibody CO-029 in mixed hemadsorption and immunoblot assays. Sequence analysis revealed that CO-029 belongs to a family of cell surface antigens that includes the melanoma-associated antigen ME491, the leukocyte cell surface antigen CD37, and the Sm23 antigen of the parasitic helminth Schistosoma mansoni. CO-029 and ME491 antigen expression and the effect of their corresponding monoclonal antibodies on cell growth were compared in human tumor cell lines of various histologic origins.

  3. Structural and Functional Importance of Transmembrane Domain 3 (TM3) in the Aspartate:Alanine Antiporter AspT: Topology and Function of the Residues of TM3 and Oligomerization of AspT▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanatani, Kei; Maloney, Peter C.; Abe, Keietsu

    2009-01-01

    AspT, the aspartate:alanine antiporter of Tetragenococcus halophilus, a membrane protein of 543 amino acids with 10 putative transmembrane (TM) helices, is the prototype of the aspartate:alanine exchanger (AAE) family of transporters. Because TM3 (isoleucine 64 to methionine 85) has many amino acid residues that are conserved among members of the AAE family and because TM3 contains two charged residues and four polar residues, it is thought to be located near (or to form part of) the substrate translocation pathway that includes the binding site for the substrates. To elucidate the role of TM3 in the transport process, we carried out cysteine-scanning mutagenesis. The substitutions of tyrosine 75 and serine 84 had the strongest inhibitory effects on transport (initial rates of l-aspartate transport were below 15% of the rate for cysteine-less AspT). Considerable but less-marked effects were observed upon the replacement of methionine 70, phenylalanine 71, glycine 74, arginine 76, serine 83, and methionine 85 (initial rates between 15% and 30% of the rate for cysteine-less AspT). Introduced cysteine residues at the cytoplasmic half of TM3 could be labeled with Oregon green maleimide (OGM), whereas cysteines close to the periplasmic half (residues 64 to 75) were not labeled. These results suggest that TM3 has a hydrophobic core on the periplasmic half and that hydrophilic residues on the cytoplasmic half of TM3 participate in the formation of an aqueous cavity in membranes. Furthermore, the presence of l-aspartate protected the cysteine introduced at glycine 62 against a reaction with OGM. In contrast, l-aspartate stimulated the reactivity of the cysteine introduced at proline 79 with OGM. These results demonstrate that TM3 undergoes l-aspartate-induced conformational alterations. In addition, nonreducing sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analyses and a glutaraldehyde cross-linking assay suggest that functional AspT forms homo-oligomers as a

  4. Structural and functional importance of transmembrane domain 3 (TM3) in the aspartate:alanine antiporter AspT: topology and function of the residues of TM3 and oligomerization of AspT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanatani, Kei; Maloney, Peter C; Abe, Keietsu

    2009-04-01

    AspT, the aspartate:alanine antiporter of Tetragenococcus halophilus, a membrane protein of 543 amino acids with 10 putative transmembrane (TM) helices, is the prototype of the aspartate:alanine exchanger (AAE) family of transporters. Because TM3 (isoleucine 64 to methionine 85) has many amino acid residues that are conserved among members of the AAE family and because TM3 contains two charged residues and four polar residues, it is thought to be located near (or to form part of) the substrate translocation pathway that includes the binding site for the substrates. To elucidate the role of TM3 in the transport process, we carried out cysteine-scanning mutagenesis. The substitutions of tyrosine 75 and serine 84 had the strongest inhibitory effects on transport (initial rates of l-aspartate transport were below 15% of the rate for cysteine-less AspT). Considerable but less-marked effects were observed upon the replacement of methionine 70, phenylalanine 71, glycine 74, arginine 76, serine 83, and methionine 85 (initial rates between 15% and 30% of the rate for cysteine-less AspT). Introduced cysteine residues at the cytoplasmic half of TM3 could be labeled with Oregon green maleimide (OGM), whereas cysteines close to the periplasmic half (residues 64 to 75) were not labeled. These results suggest that TM3 has a hydrophobic core on the periplasmic half and that hydrophilic residues on the cytoplasmic half of TM3 participate in the formation of an aqueous cavity in membranes. Furthermore, the presence of l-aspartate protected the cysteine introduced at glycine 62 against a reaction with OGM. In contrast, l-aspartate stimulated the reactivity of the cysteine introduced at proline 79 with OGM. These results demonstrate that TM3 undergoes l-aspartate-induced conformational alterations. In addition, nonreducing sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analyses and a glutaraldehyde cross-linking assay suggest that functional AspT forms homo-oligomers as a

  5. The specificity of association of the IgD molecule with the accessory proteins BAP31/BAP29 lies in the IgD transmembrane sequence.

    OpenAIRE

    Adachi, T.; Schamel, W W; Kim, K. M.; Watanabe, T; Becker, B.; Nielsen, P J; Reth, M

    1996-01-01

    Mature B cells co-express on their cell surface two classes of antigen receptor, the IgM and IgD immunoglobulins. The structural and functional differences between the two receptor classes are poorly understood. Recently two proteins of 29 and 31 kDa (BAP29 and BAP31) have been described that are preferentially associated with membrane IgD but only weakly with membrane IgM. We describe here the cloning of full-length murine and human BAP31 cDNAs encoding proteins of 245 and 246 amino acids re...

  6. The association of heavy and light chain variable domains in antibodies: implications for antigen specificity.

    KAUST Repository

    Chailyan, Anna

    2011-06-28

    The antigen-binding site of immunoglobulins is formed by six regions, three from the light and three from the heavy chain variable domains, which, on association of the two chains, form the conventional antigen-binding site of the antibody. The mode of interaction between the heavy and light chain variable domains affects the relative position of the antigen-binding loops and therefore has an effect on the overall conformation of the binding site. In this article, we analyze the structure of the interface between the heavy and light chain variable domains and show that there are essentially two different modes for their interaction that can be identified by the presence of key amino acids in specific positions of the antibody sequences. We also show that the different packing modes are related to the type of recognized antigen.

  7. Responses of Transmembrane Peptide and Lipid Chains to Hydrophobic Mismatch

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Lei; LI Jian-tao; QI Hai-yan; LI Fei

    2012-01-01

    Hydrophobic mismatch between the hydrophobic length of membrane proteins and hydrophobic thickness of membranes is a crucial factor in controlling protein function and assembly.We combined fluorescence with circular dichroism(CD) and attenuated total reflection infrared(ATR-IR) spectroscopic methods to investigate the behaviors of the peptide and lipids under hydrophobic mismatch using a model peptide from the fourth transmembrane domain of natural resistance-associated macrophage protein 1 (Nramp 1),the phosphatidylcholines(PCs) and phosphatidylglycerols(PGs) with different lengths of acyl chains(14:0,16:0 and 18:0).In all PG lipid membranes,the peptide forms stable α-helix structure,and the helix axis is parallel to lipid chains.The helical span and orientation hardly change in varying thickness of PG membranes,while the lipid chains can deform to accommodate to the hydrophobic surface of embedded peptide.By comparison,the helical structures of the model peptide in PC lipid membranes are less stable.Upon incorporation with PC lipid membranes,the peptide can deform itself to accommodate to the hydrophobic thickness of lipid membranes in response to hydrophobic mismatch.In addition,hydrophobic mismatch can increase the aggregation propensity of the peptide in both PC and PG lipid membranes and the peptide in PC membranes has more aggregation tendency than that in PG membranes.

  8. A Novel Type III Endosome Transmembrane Protein, TEMP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohan D. Teasdale

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available As part of a high-throughput subcellular localisation project, the protein encoded by the RIKEN mouse cDNA 2610528J11 was expressed and identified to be associated with both endosomes and the plasma membrane. Based on this, we have assigned the name TEMP for Type III Endosome Membrane Protein. TEMP encodes a short protein of 111 amino acids with a single, alpha-helical transmembrane domain. Experimental analysis of its membrane topology demonstrated it is a Type III membrane protein with the amino-terminus in the lumenal, or extracellular region, and the carboxy-terminus in the cytoplasm. In addition to the plasma membrane TEMP was localized to Rab5 positive early endosomes, Rab5/Rab11 positive recycling endosomes but not Rab7 positive late endosomes. Video microscopy in living cells confirmed TEMP's plasma membrane localization and identified the intracellular endosome compartments to be tubulovesicular. Overexpression of TEMP resulted in the early/recycling endosomes clustering at the cell periphery that was dependent on the presence of intact microtubules. The cellular function of TEMP cannot be inferred based on bioinformatics comparison, but its cellular distribution between early/recycling endosomes and the plasma membrane suggests a role in membrane transport.

  9. NMR derived model of GTPase effector domain (GED self association: relevance to dynamin assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swagata Chakraborty

    Full Text Available Self-association of dynamin to form spiral structures around lipidic vesicles during endocytosis is largely mediated by its 'coiled coil' GTPase Effector Domain (GED, which, in vitro, self-associates into huge helical assemblies. Residue-level structural characterizations of these assemblies and understanding the process of association have remained a challenge. It is also impossible to get folded monomers in the solution phase. In this context, we have developed here a strategy to probe the self-association of GED by first dissociating the assembly using Dimethyl Sulfoxide (DMSO and then systematically monitoring the refolding into helix and concomitant re-association using NMR spectroscopy, as DMSO concentration is progressively reduced. The short segment, Arg109 - Met116, acts as the nucleation site for helix formation and self-association. Hydrophobic and complementary charge interactions on the surfaces drive self-association, as the helices elongate in both the directions resulting in an antiparallel stack. A small N-terminal segment remains floppy in the assembly. Following these and other published results on inter-domain interactions, we have proposed a plausible mode of dynamin self assembly.

  10. A novel extracellular metallopeptidase domain shared by animal host-associated mutualistic and pathogenic microbes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirintra Nakjang

    Full Text Available The mucosal microbiota is recognised as an important factor for our health, with many disease states linked to imbalances in the normal community structure. Hence, there is considerable interest in identifying the molecular basis of human-microbe interactions. In this work we investigated the capacity of microbes to thrive on mucosal surfaces, either as mutualists, commensals or pathogens, using comparative genomics to identify co-occurring molecular traits. We identified a novel domain we named M60-like/PF13402 (new Pfam entry PF13402, which was detected mainly among proteins from animal host mucosa-associated prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbes ranging from mutualists to pathogens. Lateral gene transfers between distantly related microbes explained their shared M60-like/PF13402 domain. The novel domain is characterised by a zinc-metallopeptidase-like motif and is distantly related to known viral enhancin zinc-metallopeptidases. Signal peptides and/or cell surface anchoring features were detected in most microbial M60-like/PF13402 domain-containing proteins, indicating that these proteins target an extracellular substrate. A significant subset of these putative peptidases was further characterised by the presence of associated domains belonging to carbohydrate-binding module family 5/12, 32 and 51 and other glycan-binding domains, suggesting that these novel proteases are targeted to complex glycoproteins such as mucins. An in vitro mucinase assay demonstrated degradation of mammalian mucins by a recombinant form of an M60-like/PF13402-containing protein from the gut mutualist Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron. This study reveals that M60-like domains are peptidases targeting host glycoproteins. These peptidases likely play an important role in successful colonisation of both vertebrate mucosal surfaces and the invertebrate digestive tract by both mutualistic and pathogenic microbes. Moreover, 141 entries across various peptidase families described

  11. Ligand-mediated negative regulation of a chimeric transmembrane receptor tyrosine phosphatase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Desai, D M; Sap, J; Schlessinger, J;

    1993-01-01

    CD45, a transmembrane protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTPase), is required for TCR signaling. Multiple CD45 isoforms, differing in the extracellular domain, are expressed in a tissue- and activation-specific manner, suggesting an important function for this domain. We report that a chimeric protein...

  12. Structural matching of ferroelectric domains and associated distortion in potassium titanyl phosphate crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Pernot-Rejmankova, P; Cloetens, P; Lyford, T; Baruchel, J

    2003-01-01

    The surface deformation and atomic-level distortions associated with crystal structural matching at ferroelectric inversion domain walls are investigated in periodically poled potassium titanyl phosphate (KTP) crystals. A deformation, of the order of 10 sup - sup 8 m in scale and having the periodicity of the domains, is observed at the surfaces by optical interferometry. It is discussed in terms of the piezoelectric effect. The matching of the crystal structures at the domain walls is studied by combining the hard x-ray Fresnel phase-imaging technique with Bragg diffraction imaging methods ('Bragg-Fresnel imaging') and using synchrotron radiation. Quantitative analysis of the contrast of the Bragg-Fresnel images recorded as a function of the propagation distance is demonstrated to allow the determination of how the domains are matched at the atomic (unit cell) level, even though the spatial resolution of the images is on the scale of micrometres. The atom P(1) is determined as the linking atom for connecting...

  13. NMR-based approach to measure the free energy of transmembrane helix-helix interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mineev, Konstantin S; Lesovoy, Dmitry M; Usmanova, Dinara R; Goncharuk, Sergey A; Shulepko, Mikhail A; Lyukmanova, Ekaterina N; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail P; Bocharov, Eduard V; Arseniev, Alexander S

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of the energetic parameters of transmembrane helix-helix interactions is necessary for the establishment of a structure-energy relationship for α-helical membrane domains. A number of techniques have been developed to measure the free energies of dimerization and oligomerization of transmembrane α-helices, and all of these have their advantages and drawbacks. In this study we propose a methodology to determine the magnitudes of the free energy of interactions between transmembrane helices in detergent micelles. The suggested approach employs solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to determine the population of the oligomeric states of the transmembrane domains and introduces a new formalism to describe the oligomerization equilibrium, which is based on the assumption that both the dimerization of the transmembrane domains and the dissociation of the dimer can occur only upon the collision of detergent micelles. The technique has three major advantages compared with other existing approaches: it may be used to analyze both weak and relatively strong dimerization/oligomerization processes, it works well for the analysis of complex equilibria, e.g. when monomer, dimer and high-order oligomer populations are simultaneously present in the solution, and it can simultaneously yield both structural and energetic characteristics of the helix-helix interaction under study. The proposed methodology was applied to investigate the oligomerization process of transmembrane domains of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) and vascular endothelium growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2), and allowed the measurement of the free energy of dimerization of both of these objects. In addition the proposed method was able to describe the multi-state oligomerization process of the VEGFR2 transmembrane domain.

  14. Decision support methods for finding phenotype--disorder associations in the bone dysplasia domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razan Paul

    Full Text Available A lack of mature domain knowledge and well established guidelines makes the medical diagnosis of skeletal dysplasias (a group of rare genetic disorders a very complex process. Machine learning techniques can facilitate objective interpretation of medical observations for the purposes of decision support. However, building decision support models using such techniques is highly problematic in the context of rare genetic disorders, because it depends on access to mature domain knowledge. This paper describes an approach for developing a decision support model in medical domains that are underpinned by relatively sparse knowledge bases. We propose a solution that combines association rule mining with the Dempster-Shafer theory (DST to compute probabilistic associations between sets of clinical features and disorders, which can then serve as support for medical decision making (e.g., diagnosis. We show, via experimental results, that our approach is able to provide meaningful outcomes even on small datasets with sparse distributions, in addition to outperforming other Machine Learning techniques and behaving slightly better than an initial diagnosis by a clinician.

  15. Structural determinants for the membrane insertion of the transmembrane peptide of hemagglutinin from influenza virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victor, Bruno L; Baptista, António M; Soares, Cláudio M

    2012-11-26

    Membrane fusion is a process involved in a high range of biological functions, going from viral infections to neurotransmitter release. Fusogenic proteins increase the slow rate of fusion by coupling energetically downhill conformational changes of the protein to the kinetically unfavorable fusion of the membrane lipid bilayers. Hemagglutinin is an example of a fusogenic protein, which promotes the fusion of the membrane of the influenza virus with the membrane of the target cell. The N-terminus of the HA2 subunit of this protein contains a fusion domain described to act as a destabilizer of the target membrane bilayers, leading eventually to a full fusion of the two membranes. On the other hand, the C-terminus of the same subunit contains a helical transmembrane domain which was initially described to act as the anchor of the protein to the membrane of the virus. However, in recent years the study of this peptide segment has been gaining more attention since it has also been described to be involved in the membrane fusion process. Yet, the structural characterization of the interaction of such a protein domain with membrane lipids is still very limited. Therefore, in this work, we present a study of this transmembrane peptide domain in the presence of DMPC membrane bilayers, and we evaluate the effect of several mutations, and the effect of peptide oligomerization in this interaction process. Our results allowed us to identify and confirm amino acid residue motifs that seem to regulate the interaction between the segment peptide and membrane bilayers. Besides these sequence requirements, we have also identified length and tilt requirements that ultimately contribute to the hydrophobic matching between the peptide and the membrane. Additionally, we looked at the association of several transmembrane peptide segments and evaluated their direct interaction and stability inside a membrane bilayer. From our results we could conclude that three independent TM peptide

  16. Transmembrane and secreted MUC1 probes show trafficking-dependent changes in O-glycan core profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelmann, Katja; Kinlough, Carol L; Müller, Stefan; Razawi, Hani; Baldus, Stephan E; Hughey, Rebecca P; Hanisch, Franz-Georg

    2005-11-01

    The human mucin MUC1 is expressed both as a transmembrane heterodimeric protein complex that recycles via the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and as a secreted isoform. To determine whether differences in cellular trafficking might influence the O-glycosylation profiles on these isoforms, we developed a model system consisting of membrane-bound and secretory-recombinant glycosylation probes. Secretory MUC1-S contains only a truncated repeat domain, whereas in MUC1-M constructs this domain is attached to the native transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of MUC1 either directly (M0) or via an intermitting nonfunctional (M1) or functional sperm protein-enterokinase-agrin (SEA) module (M2); the SEA module contains a putative proteolytic cleavage site and is associated with proteins receiving extensive O-glycosylation. We showed that MUC1-M2 simulates endogenous MUC1 by recycling from the cell surface of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) mutant ldlD14 cells through intracellular compartments where its glycosylation continues. The profiles of O-linked glycans on MUC1-S secreted by epithelial EBNA-293 and MCF-7 breast cancer cells revealed patterns dominated by core 2-based oligosaccharides. In contrast, the respective membrane-shed probes expressed in the same cells showed a complete shift to patterns dominated by sialyl core 1. In conclusion, glycan core profiles reflected the subcellular trafficking pathways of the secretory or membranous probes and the modifying activities of the resident glycosyltransferases.

  17. A Novel Topology of Proline-rich Transmembrane Protein 2 (PRRT2): HINTS FOR AN INTRACELLULAR FUNCTION AT THE SYNAPSE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Pia; Sterlini, Bruno; Castroflorio, Enrico; Marte, Antonella; Onofri, Franco; Valtorta, Flavia; Maragliano, Luca; Corradi, Anna; Benfenati, Fabio

    2016-03-18

    Proline-rich transmembrane protein 2 (PRRT2) has been identified as the single causative gene for a group of paroxysmal syndromes of infancy, including epilepsy, paroxysmal movement disorders, and migraine. On the basis of topology predictions, PRRT2 has been assigned to the recently characterized family of Dispanins, whose members share the two-transmembrane domain topology with a large N terminus and short C terminus oriented toward the outside of the cell. Because PRRT2 plays a role at the synapse, it is important to confirm the exact orientation of its N and C termini with respect to the plasma membrane to get clues regarding its possible function. Using a combination of different experimental approaches, including live immunolabeling, immunogold electron microscopy, surface biotinylation and computational modeling, we demonstrate a novel topology for this protein. PRRT2 is a type II transmembrane protein in which only the second hydrophobic segment spans the plasma membrane, whereas the first one is associated with the internal surface of the membrane and forms a helix-loop-helix structure without crossing it. Most importantly, the large proline-rich N-terminal domain is not exposed to the extracellular space but is localized intracellularly, and only the short C terminus is extracellular (N cyt/C exo topology). Accordingly, we show that PRRT2 interacts with the Src homology 3 domain-bearing protein Intersectin 1, an intracellular protein involved in synaptic vesicle cycling. These findings will contribute to the clarification of the role of PRRT2 at the synapse and the understanding of pathogenic mechanisms on the basis of PRRT2-related neurological disorders.

  18. Obif, a Transmembrane Protein, Is Required for Bone Mineralization and Spermatogenesis in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Mizuhashi

    Full Text Available Various kinds of transmembrane and secreted proteins play pivotal roles in development through cell-cell communication. We previously reported that Obif (Osteoblast induction factor, Tmem119, encoding a single transmembrane protein, is expressed in differentiating osteoblasts, and that Obif-/- mice exhibit significantly reduced bone volume in the femur. In the current study, we characterized the Obif protein and further investigated the biological phenotypes of a variety of tissues in Obif-/- mice.First, we found that O-glycosylation of the Obif protein occurs at serine residue 36 in the Obif extracellular domain. Next, we observed that Obif-/- mice exhibit bone dysplasia in association with significantly increased osteoid volume per osteoid surface (OV/OS and osteoid maturation time (Omt, and significantly decreased mineral apposition rate (MAR and bone formation rate per bone surface (BFR/BS. In addition, we observed that Obif-/- mice show a significant decrease in testis weight as well as in sperm number. By histological analysis, we found that Obif is expressed in spermatocytes and spermatids in the developing testis and that spermatogenesis is halted at the round spermatid stage in the Obif-/- testis that lacks sperm. However, the number of litters fathered by male mice was slightly reduced in Obif-/- mice compared with wild-type mice, although this was not statistically significant.Our results, taken together with previous observations, indicate that Obif is a type Ia transmembrane protein whose N-terminal region is O-glycosylated. In addition, we found that Obif is required for normal bone mineralization and late testicular differentiation in vivo. These findings suggest that Obif plays essential roles in the development of multiple tissues.

  19. Transmembrane protein aptamers that inhibit CCR5 expression and HIV coreceptor function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheideman, Elizabeth H; Marlatt, Sara A; Xie, Yanhua; Hu, Yani; Sutton, Richard E; DiMaio, Daniel

    2012-10-01

    We have exploited the ability of transmembrane domains to engage in highly specific protein-protein interactions to construct a new class of small proteins that inhibit HIV infection. By screening a library encoding hundreds of thousands of artificial transmembrane proteins with randomized transmembrane domains (termed "traptamers," for transmembrane aptamers), we isolated six 44- or 45-amino-acid proteins with completely different transmembrane sequences that inhibited cell surface and total expression of the HIV coreceptor CCR5. The traptamers inhibited transduction of human T cells by HIV reporter viruses pseudotyped with R5-tropic gp120 envelope proteins but had minimal effects on reporter viruses with X4-tropic gp120. Optimization of two traptamers significantly increased their activity and resulted in greater than 95% inhibition of R5-tropic reporter virus transduction without inhibiting expression of CD4, the primary HIV receptor, or CXCR4, another HIV coreceptor. In addition, traptamers inhibited transduction mediated by a mutant R5-tropic gp120 protein resistant to maraviroc, a small-molecule CCR5 inhibitor, and they dramatically inhibited replication of an R5-tropic laboratory strain of HIV in a multicycle infection assay. Genetic experiments suggested that the active traptamers specifically interacted with the transmembrane domains of CCR5 and that some of the traptamers interacted with different portions of CCR5. Thus, we have constructed multiple proteins not found in nature that interfere with CCR5 expression and inhibit HIV infection. These proteins may be valuable tools to probe the organization of the transmembrane domains of CCR5 and their relationship to its biological activities, and they may serve as starting points to develop new strategies to inhibit HIV infection.

  20. Kinase Associated-1 Domains Drive MARK/PAR1 Kinases to Membrane Targets by Binding Acidic Phospholipids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moravcevic, Katarina; Mendrola, Jeannine M.; Schmitz, Karl R.; Wang, Yu-Hsiu; Slochower, David; Janmey, Paul A.; Lemmon, Mark A. (UPENN-MED)

    2011-09-28

    Phospholipid-binding modules such as PH, C1, and C2 domains play crucial roles in location-dependent regulation of many protein kinases. Here, we identify the KA1 domain (kinase associated-1 domain), found at the C terminus of yeast septin-associated kinases (Kcc4p, Gin4p, and Hsl1p) and human MARK/PAR1 kinases, as a membrane association domain that binds acidic phospholipids. Membrane localization of isolated KA1 domains depends on phosphatidylserine. Using X-ray crystallography, we identified a structurally conserved binding site for anionic phospholipids in KA1 domains from Kcc4p and MARK1. Mutating this site impairs membrane association of both KA1 domains and intact proteins and reveals the importance of phosphatidylserine for bud neck localization of yeast Kcc4p. Our data suggest that KA1 domains contribute to coincidence detection, allowing kinases to bind other regulators (such as septins) only at the membrane surface. These findings have important implications for understanding MARK/PAR1 kinases, which are implicated in Alzheimer's disease, cancer, and autism.

  1. Crystal structure of the actin binding domain of the cyclase-associated protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodatko, Tetyana; Fedorov, Alexander A; Grynberg, Marcin; Patskovsky, Yury; Rozwarski, Denise A; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Aronoff-Spencer, Eliah; Kondraskina, Elena; Irving, Tom; Godzik, Adam; Almo, Steven C

    2004-08-24

    Cyclase-associated protein (CAP or Srv2p) is a modular actin monomer binding protein that directly regulates filament dynamics and has been implicated in a number of complex developmental and morphological processes, including mRNA localization and the establishment of cell polarity. The crystal structure of the C-terminal dimerization and actin monomer binding domain (C-CAP) reveals a highly unusual dimer, composed of monomers possessing six coils of right-handed beta-helix flanked by antiparallel beta-strands. Domain swapping, involving the last two strands of each monomer, results in the formation of an extended dimer with an extensive interface. This structural and biochemical characterization provides new insights into the organization and potential mechanistic properties of the multiprotein assemblies that integrate dynamic actin processes into the overall physiology of the cell. An unanticipated finding is that the unique tertiary structure of the C-CAP monomer provides a structural model for a wide range of molecules, including RP2 and cofactor C, proteins involved in X-linked retinitis pigmentosa and tubulin maturation, respectively, as well as several uncharacterized proteins that exhibit very diverse domain organizations. Thus, the unusual right-handed beta-helical fold present in C-CAP appears to support a wide range of biological functions.

  2. Transmembrane amyloid-related proteins in CSF as potential biomarkers for Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inmaculada eLopez-Font

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In the continuing search for new cerebrospinal fluid (CSF biomarkers for Alzheimer’s disease (AD, reasonable candidates are the secretase enzymes involved in the processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP, as well as the large proteolytic cleavage fragments sAPPα and sAPPβ. The enzymatic activities of some of these secretases, such as BACE1 and TACE, have been investigated as potential AD biomarkers, and it has been assumed that these activities present in human CSF result from the soluble truncated forms of the membrane-bound enzymes. However, we and others recently identified soluble forms of BACE1 and APP in CSF containing the intracellular domains, as well as the multi-pass transmembrane presenilin-1 (PS1 and other subunits of γ-secretase. We also review recent findings that suggest that most of these soluble transmembrane proteins could display self-association properties based on hydrophobic and/or ionic interactions leading to the formation of heteromeric complexes. The oligomerization state of these potential new biomarkers needs to be taken into consideration for assessing their real potential as CSF biomarkers for AD by adequate molecular tools.

  3. Structure of the integrin beta3 transmembrane segment in phospholipid bicelles and detergent micelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Tong-Lay; Partridge, Anthony W; Ginsberg, Mark H; Ulmer, Tobias S

    2008-04-01

    Integrin adhesion receptors transduce bidirectional signals across the plasma membrane, with the integrin transmembrane domains acting as conduits in this process. Here, we report the first high-resolution structure of an integrin transmembrane domain. To assess the influence of the membrane model system, structure determinations of the beta3 integrin transmembrane segment and flanking sequences were carried out in both phospholipid bicelles and detergent micelles. In bicelles, a 30-residue linear alpha-helix, encompassing residues I693-H772, is adopted, of which I693-I721 appear embedded in the hydrophobic bicelle core. This relatively long transmembrane helix implies a pronounced helix tilt within a typical lipid bilayer, which facilitates the snorkeling of K716's charged side chain out of the lipid core while simultaneously immersing hydrophobic L717-I721 in the membrane. A shortening of bicelle lipid hydrocarbon tails does not lead to the transfer of L717-I721 into the aqueous phase, suggesting that the reported embedding represents the preferred beta3 state. The nature of the lipid headgroup affected only the intracellular part of the transmembrane helix, indicating that an asymmetric lipid distribution is not required for studying the beta3 transmembrane segment. In the micelle, residues L717-I721 are also embedded but deviate from linear alpha-helical conformation in contrast to I693-K716, which closely resemble the bicelle structure.

  4. RNA-binding domain in the nucleocapsid protein of gill-associated nidovirus of penaeid shrimp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chumporn Soowannayan

    Full Text Available Gill-associated virus (GAV infects Penaeus monodon shrimp and is the type species okavirus in the Roniviridae, the only invertebrate nidoviruses known currently. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs using His(6-tagged full-length and truncated proteins were employed to examine the nucleic acid binding properties of the GAV nucleocapsid (N protein in vitro. The EMSAs showed full-length N protein to bind to all synthetic single-stranded (ssRNAs tested independent of their sequence. The ssRNAs included (+ and (- sense regions of the GAV genome as well as a (+ sense region of the M RNA segment of Mourilyan virus, a crustacean bunya-like virus. GAV N protein also bound to double-stranded (dsRNAs prepared to GAV ORF1b gene regions and to bacteriophage M13 genomic ssDNA. EMSAs using the five N protein constructs with variable-length N-terminal and/or C-terminal truncations localized the RNA binding domain to a 50 amino acid (aa N-terminal sequence spanning Met(11 to Arg(60. Similarly to other RNA binding proteins, the first 16 aa portion of this sequence was proline/arginine rich. To examine this domain in more detail, the 18 aa peptide (M(11PVRRPLPPQPPRNARLI(29 encompassing this sequence was synthesized and found to bind nucleic acids similarly to the full-length N protein in EMSAs. The data indicate a fundamental role for the GAV N protein proline/arginine-rich domain in nucleating genomic ssRNA to form nucleocapsids. Moreover, as the synthetic peptide formed higher-order complexes in the presence of RNA, the domain might also play some role in protein/protein interactions stabilizing the helical structure of GAV nucleocapsids.

  5. Interfacial binding and aggregation of lamin A tail domains associated with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinowski, Agnieszka; Yaron, Peter N; Qin, Zhao; Shenoy, Siddharth; Buehler, Markus J; Lösche, Mathias; Dahl, Kris Noel

    2014-12-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome is a premature aging disorder associated with the expression of ∆50 lamin A (∆50LA), a mutant form of the nuclear structural protein lamin A (LA). ∆50LA is missing 50 amino acids from the tail domain and retains a C-terminal farnesyl group that is cleaved from the wild-type LA. Many of the cellular pathologies of HGPS are thought to be a consequence of protein-membrane association mediated by the retained farnesyl group. To better characterize the protein-membrane interface, we quantified binding of purified recombinant ∆50LA tail domain (∆50LA-TD) to tethered bilayer membranes composed of phosphatidylserine and phosphocholine using surface plasmon resonance. Farnesylated ∆50LA-TD binds to the membrane interface only in the presence of Ca(2+) or Mg(2+) at physiological ionic strength. At extremely low ionic strength, both the farnesylated and non-farnesylated forms of ∆50LA-TD bind to the membrane surface in amounts that exceed those expected for a densely packed protein monolayer. Interestingly, the wild-type LA-TD with no farnesylation also associates with membranes at low ionic strength but forms only a single layer. We suggest that electrostatic interactions are mediated by charge clusters with a net positive charge that we calculate on the surface of the LA-TDs. These studies suggest that the accumulation of ∆50LA at the inner nuclear membrane observed in cells is due to a combination of aggregation and membrane association rather than simple membrane binding; electrostatics plays an important role in mediating this association.

  6. Domain dependent associations between cognitive functioning and regular voluntary exercise behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swagerman, Suzanne C; de Geus, Eco J C; Koenis, Marinka M G; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E; Boomsma, Dorret I; Kan, Kees-Jan

    2015-07-01

    Regular exercise has often been suggested to have beneficial effects on cognition, but empirical findings are mixed because of heterogeneity in sample composition (age and sex); the cognitive domain being investigated; the definition and reliability of exercise behavior measures; and study design (e.g., observational versus experimental). Our aim was to scrutinize the domain specificity of exercise effects on cognition, while controlling for the other sources of heterogeneity. In a population based sample consisting of 472 males and 668 females (aged 10-86 years old) we administered the Computerized Neurocognitive Battery (CNB), which provided accuracy and speed measures of abstraction and mental flexibility, attention, working memory, memory (verbal, face, and spatial), language and nonverbal reasoning, spatial ability, emotion identification, emotion- and age differentiation, sensorimotor speed, and motor speed. Using univariate and multivariate regression models, CNB scores were associated with participants' average energy expenditure per week (weekly METhours), which were derived from a questionnaire on voluntary regular leisure time exercise behavior. Univariate models yielded generally positive associations between weekly METhours and cognitive accuracy and speed, but multivariate modeling demonstrated that direct relations were small and centered around zero. The largest and only significant effect size (β = 0.11, p effects of voluntary regular leisure time exercise on cognition are limited. Only a relation between exercise and attention inspires confidence.

  7. Longitudinal associations between activity and cognition vary by age, activity type, and cognitive domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielak, Allison A M; Gerstorf, Denis; Anstey, Kaarin J; Luszcz, Mary A

    2014-12-01

    The demonstration of correlated change is critical to understanding the relationship between activity engagement and cognitive functioning in older adulthood. Changes in activity have been shown to be related to changes in cognition, but little attention has been devoted to how this relationship may vary between specific activity types, cognitive domains, and age groups. Participants initially aged 65-98 years (M = 77.46 years) from the Australian Longitudinal Study of Ageing (n = 1,321) completed measurements of activity (i.e., cognitive, group social, one-on-one social, and physical) and cognition (i.e., perceptual speed, and immediate and delayed episodic memory) at baseline, 2, 8, 11, and 15 years later. Bivariate latent growth curve models covarying for education, sex, and baseline age and medical conditions revealed multiple positive-level relations between activity and cognitive performance, but activity level was not related to later cognitive change. Change in perceptual speed over 15 years was positively associated with change in cognitive activity, and change in immediate episodic memory was positively associated with change in one-on-one social activity. Old-old adults showed a stronger change-change covariance for mentally stimulating activity in relation to perceptual speed than did young-old adults. The differentiation by activity type, cognitive domain, and age contributes to the growing evidence that there is variation in the way cognitive ability at different ages is related to activity.

  8. Biophysical Aspects of Transmembrane Signaling

    CERN Document Server

    Damjanovich, Sandor

    2005-01-01

    Transmembrane signaling is one of the most significant cell biological events in the life and death of cells in general and lymphocytes in particular. Until recently biochemists and biophysicists were not accustomed to thinking of these processes from the side of a high number of complex biochemical events and an equally high number of physical changes at molecular and cellular levels at the same time. Both types of researchers were convinced that their findings are the most decisive, having higher importance than the findings of the other scientist population. Both casts were wrong. Life, even at cellular level, has a number of interacting physical and biochemical mechanisms, which finally build up the creation of an "excited" cell that will respond to particular signals from the outer or inner world. This book handles both aspects of the signalling events, and in some cases tries to unify our concepts and help understand the signals that govern the life and death of our cells. Not only the understanding, bu...

  9. TWEAK-independent Fn14 self-association and NF-κB activation is mediated by the C-terminal region of the Fn14 cytoplasmic domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharron A N Brown

    Full Text Available The tumor necrosis factor (TNF superfamily member TNF-like weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK is a pro-inflammatory and pro-angiogenic cytokine implicated in physiological tissue regeneration and wound repair. TWEAK binds to a 102-amino acid type I transmembrane cell surface receptor named fibroblast growth factor-inducible 14 (Fn14. TWEAK:Fn14 engagement activates several intracellular signaling cascades, including the NF-κB pathway, and sustained Fn14 signaling has been implicated in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory diseases and cancer. Although several groups are developing TWEAK- or Fn14-targeted agents for therapeutic use, much more basic science research is required before we fully understand the TWEAK/Fn14 signaling axis. For example, we and others have proposed that TWEAK-independent Fn14 signaling may occur in cells when Fn14 levels are highly elevated, but this idea has never been tested directly. In this report, we first demonstrate TWEAK-independent Fn14 signaling by showing that an Fn14 deletion mutant that is unable to bind TWEAK can activate the NF-κB pathway in transfected cells. We then show that ectopically-expressed, cell surface-localized Fn14 can self-associate into Fn14 dimers, and we show that Fn14 self-association is mediated by an 18-aa region within the Fn14 cytoplasmic domain. Endogenously-expressed Fn14 as well as ectopically-overexpressed Fn14 could also be detected in dimeric form when cell lysates were subjected to SDS-PAGE under non-reducing conditions. Additional experiments revealed that Fn14 dimerization occurs during cell lysis via formation of an intermolecular disulfide bond at cysteine residue 122. These findings provide insight into the Fn14 signaling mechanism and may aid current studies to develop therapeutic agents targeting this small cell surface receptor.

  10. Mutation in the sixth immunoglobulin domain of L1CAM is associated with migrational brain anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shieh, Christine; Moser, Franklin; Graham, John M.; Watiker, Valerie

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To describe the phenotype of a patient with classical features of X-linked L1 syndrome associated with novel brain malformations. Methods: Diagnostic analysis included physical and dysmorphology examinations, MRI of the brain, and exome sequencing of the family trio. Results: We report a 2.5-year-old boy with developmental delay, dysmorphic facies, and adducted thumbs. MRI of the brain showed a truncated corpus callosum and periventricular heterotopias associated with polymicrogyria (PMG). Variant segregation analysis with exome sequencing discovered a novel maternally derived hemizygous variant in exon 14 of the L1CAM gene (c.1759 G>C; p.G587R). Conclusions: This novel L1CAM mutation was located in the protein's sixth immunoglobin domain and involved glycine-587, a key residue in the structure of L1CAM because of its interactions with lysine-606, which indicates that any mutation at this site would likely affect the secondary structure and function of the protein. The replacement of the small nonpolar glycine residue with a large basic arginine would have an even more dramatic result. The presentation of periventricular nodular heterotopias with overlying PMG is very uncommon, and its association with L1CAM may provide insight into other similar cases. Furthermore, this presentation indicates the important role that L1CAM plays in neuronal migration and brain development and extends the phenotype associated with L1CAM-associated disorders. PMID:27066571

  11. Membrane topology of transmembrane proteins: determinants and experimental tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hunsang; Kim, Hyun

    2014-10-17

    Membrane topology refers to the two-dimensional structural information of a membrane protein that indicates the number of transmembrane (TM) segments and the orientation of soluble domains relative to the plane of the membrane. Since membrane proteins are co-translationally translocated across and inserted into the membrane, the TM segments orient themselves properly in an early stage of membrane protein biogenesis. Each membrane protein must contain some topogenic signals, but the translocation components and the membrane environment also influence the membrane topology of proteins. We discuss the factors that affect membrane protein orientation and have listed available experimental tools that can be used in determining membrane protein topology.

  12. Association of oxytocin receptor (OXTR) gene variants with multiple phenotype domains of autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Daniel B; Datta, Dibyadeep; Jones, Shaine T; Batey Lee, Evon; Sutcliffe, James S; Hammock, Elizabeth A D; Levitt, Pat

    2011-06-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is characterized by core deficits in social behavior, communication, and behavioral flexibility. Several lines of evidence indicate that oxytocin, signaling through its receptor (OXTR), is important in a wide range of social behaviors. In attempts to determine whether genetic variations in the oxytocin signaling system contribute to ASD susceptibility, seven recent reports indicated association of common genetic polymorphisms in the OXTR gene with ASD. Each involved relatively small sample sizes (57 to 436 families) and, where it was examined, failed to identify association of OXTR polymorphisms with measures of social behavior in individuals with ASD. We report genetic association analysis of 25 markers spanning the OXTR locus in 1,238 pedigrees including 2,333 individuals with ASD. Association of three markers previously implicated in ASD susceptibility, rs2268493 (P = 0.043), rs1042778 (P = 0.037), and rs7632287 (P = 0.016), was observed. Further, these genetic markers were associated with multiple core ASD phenotypes, including social domain dysfunction, measured by standardized instruments used to diagnose and describe ASD. The data suggest association of OXTR genetic polymorphisms with ASD, although the results should be interpreted with caution because none of the significant associations would survive appropriate correction for multiple comparisons. However, the current findings of association in a large independent cohort are consistent with previous results, and the biological plausibility of participation of the oxytocin signaling system in modulating social disruptions characteristic of ASD, suggest that functional polymorphisms of OXTR may contribute to ASD risk in a subset of families.

  13. Expression of chemokine like factor-like myelin and lymphocyte and related proteins for vesicle trafficking and membrane link transmembrane domain-containing protein 2 in rats with varicocele%人类趋化素样因子超家族2在精索静脉曲张大鼠模型中的表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张晓威; 顿耀军; 唐旭; 殷华奇; 胡志平; 赵永平; 徐涛; 李清

    2016-01-01

    目的:通过建立精索静脉曲张大鼠模型,探讨人类趋化素样因子超家族2(chemokine like factor-like myelin and lymphocyte and related proteins for vesicle trafficking and membrane link transmembrane domain-containing protein 2, CMTM2)对精索静脉曲张大鼠生精过程的影响。方法:选取雄性 SD 大鼠40只(体重220~330 g,6~7周龄),将大鼠随机分为精索静脉曲张持续4、12周后处死取样组,和相应的接受假手术处理的对照组,每组均为10只大鼠。通过手术进行左肾静脉缩窄建立左侧精索静脉曲张的大鼠模型。将实验组和对照组大鼠于4周或12周后处死,取出左侧睾丸,游离附睾中精子,观察并计算精子密度与活力,测量生精小管外径、内径及上皮直径改变,并进行免疫组织化学分析以判断 CMTM2蛋白的表达状况。结果:与对照组相比,精索静脉曲张4周组中大鼠的精子密度[(63.9±7.1)×106/mL vs.(74.3±5.0)×106/mL]和活力[(58.7%±7.9%)vs.(66.1%±4.3%)]轻度下降(t =1.432,1.563;P =0.076,0.059),精索静脉曲张12周组中大鼠的精子密度[(40.5±7.2)×106/mL vs.(71.1±4.5)×106/mL]和活力[(35.2%±8.5%)vs.(63.4%±4.1%)]显著下降(t =3.754,3.933;P =0.004,0.002)。此外,CMTM2蛋白的表达水平在精索静脉曲张组也出现明显下降,对照组 CMTM2水平为精索静脉曲张12周组的(2.3±0.4)倍(t =1.978;P =0.039)。4周时,精索静脉曲张组生精小管外径出现轻度降低[(271.1±8.4)μm vs.(280.0±8.1)μm,t =1.361,P =0.132],而12周组则出现明显降低[(198.2±10.2)μm vs.(255.8±12.7)μm,t =2.125,P =0.003],此外,精索静脉曲张12周组的生精小管上皮直径出现明显下降[(54.1±1.5)μm vs

  14. Angiogenesis-associated crosstalk between collagens, CXC chemokines, and thrombospondin domain-containing proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Corban G; Bader, Joel S; Popel, Aleksander S

    2011-08-01

    Excessive vascularization is a hallmark of many diseases including cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, diabetic nephropathy, pathologic obesity, age-related macular degeneration, and asthma. Compounds that inhibit angiogenesis represent potential therapeutics for many diseases. Karagiannis and Popel [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 105(37):13775-13780, 2008] used a bioinformatics approach to identify more than 100 peptides with sequence homology to known angiogenesis inhibitors. The peptides could be grouped into families by the conserved domain of the proteins they were derived from. The families included type IV collagen fibrils, CXC chemokine ligands, and type I thrombospondin domain-containing proteins. The relationships between these families have received relatively little attention. To investigate these relationships, we approached the problem by placing the families of proteins in the context of the human interactome including >120,000 physical interactions among proteins, genes, and transcripts. We built on a graph theoretic approach to identify proteins that may represent conduits of crosstalk between protein families. We validated these findings by statistical analysis and analysis of a time series gene expression data set taken during angiogenesis. We identified six proteins at the center of the angiogenesis-associated network including three syndecans, MMP9, CD44, and versican. These findings shed light on the complex signaling networks that govern angiogenesis phenomena.

  15. Characterization and Evolution of the Cell Cycle-Associated Mob Domain-Containing Proteins in Eukaryotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Vitulo

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The MOB family includes a group of cell cycle-associated proteins highly conserved throughout eukaryotes, whose founding members are implicated in mitotic exit and co-ordination of cell cycle progression with cell polarity and morphogenesis. Here we report the characterization and evolution of the MOB domain-containing proteins as inferred from the 43 eukaryotic genomes so far sequenced. We show that genes for Mob-like proteins are present in at least 41 of these genomes, confi rming the universal distribution of this protein family and suggesting its prominent biological function. The phylogenetic analysis reveals fi ve distinct MOB domain classes, showing a progressive expansion of this family from unicellular to multicellular organisms, reaching the highest number in mammals. Plant Mob genes appear to have evolved from a single ancestor, most likely after the loss of one or more genes during the early stage of Viridiplantae evolutionary history. Three of the Mob classes are widespread among most of the analyzed organisms. The possible biological and molecular function of Mob proteins and their role in conserved signaling pathways related to cell proliferation, cell death and cell polarity are also presented and critically discussed.

  16. A Business Intelligence Model to Predict Bankruptcy using Financial Domain Ontology with Association Rule Mining Algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, A; Venkatesan, Dr V Prasanna

    2011-01-01

    Today in every organization financial analysis provides the basis for understanding and evaluating the results of business operations and delivering how well a business is doing. This means that the organizations can control the operational activities primarily related to corporate finance. One way that doing this is by analysis of bankruptcy prediction. This paper develops an ontological model from financial information of an organization by analyzing the Semantics of the financial statement of a business. One of the best bankruptcy prediction models is Altman Z-score model. Altman Z-score method uses financial rations to predict bankruptcy. From the financial ontological model the relation between financial data is discovered by using data mining algorithm. By combining financial domain ontological model with association rule mining algorithm and Zscore model a new business intelligence model is developed to predict the bankruptcy.

  17. The Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR)

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenberg, Mark F.; O'Ryan, Liam P.; Hughes, Guy; Zhao, Zhefeng; Aleksandrov, Luba A.; Riordan, John R.; Ford, Robert C.

    2011-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis affects about 1 in 2500 live births and involves loss of transmembrane chloride flux due to a lack of a membrane protein channel termed the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). We have studied CFTR structure by electron crystallography. The data were compared with existing structures of other ATP-binding cassette transporters. The protein was crystallized in the outward facing state and resembled the well characterized Sav1866 transporter. We identified ...

  18. Robust Face Recognition by Hierarchical Kernel Associative Memory Models Based on Spatial Domain Gabor Transforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bai-ling Zhang

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Face recognition can be studied as an associative memory (AM problem and kernel-based AM models have been proven efficient. In this paper, a hierarchical Kernel Associative Memory (KAM face recognition scheme with a multiscale Gabor transform, is proposed. The pyramidal multiscale Gabor decomposition proposed by Nestares, Navarro, Portilla and Tabernero not only provides a very efficient implementation of the Gabor transform in the spatial domain, but also permits a fast reconstruction of images. In our method, face images of each person are first decomposed into their multiscale representations by a quasicomplete Gabor transform, which are then modelled by Kernel Associative Memories. In the recognition stage, a query face image is also represented by a Gabor multiresolution pyramid and the reconstructions from different KAM models corresponding to even Gabor channels are then simply summed to give the recall. The recognition scheme was thoroughly tested using several benchmarking face datasets, including the AR faces, UMIST faces, JAFFE faces and Yale A faces, which include different kind of face variations from occlusions, pose, expression and illumination. The experiment results show that the proposed method demonstrated strong robustness in recognizing faces under different conditions, particularly under occlusions, pose alterations and expression changes.

  19. Association of Patient-Provider Communication Domains with Lung Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jenny J.; Lake, Jessica; Wall, Melanie M.; Berman, Andrew R.; Salazar-Schicchi, John; Powell, Charles; Keller, Steven M.; Halm, Ethan A.; Leventhal, Howard; Wisnivesky, Juan P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Patient-physician communication is critical for helping patients understand and complete the complex steps needed to diagnose stage and treat lung cancer. We assessed which domains of patient-physician communication about lung cancer and its treatment are associated with receipt of disease-directed, stage-appropriate treatment. Methods Patients with recently-diagnosed lung cancer were recruited from four medical centers in New York City from 2008 to 2011. Participants were surveyed about discussions with physicians regarding treatment, symptoms and needs. Multiple regression analysis and structural equation modeling were used to assess which communication factors were associated with disease treatment. Results Of the 352 participants, 191 (54%) received disease-directed, stage-appropriate treatment. Unadjusted associations between communication items and treatment found that participants who felt that their physicians explained the risks and disadvantages of lung cancer treatment (P0.05 for both comparisons). Conclusions These data suggest that treatment information is particularly important for increasing the probability of cancer-directed therapy among lung cancer patients. Clinicians should ensure that they clearly discuss treatment goals and options with patients while maintaining empathy, supporting patient needs, and addressing symptoms. PMID:25122421

  20. A transmembrane ubiquitin ligase required to sort membrane proteins into multivesicular bodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reggiori, Fulvio; Pelham, Hugh R B; Reggiori, Fulvio

    2002-01-01

    Membrane proteins with transmembrane domains (TMDs) that contain polar residues exposed to the lipid bilayer are selectively sorted into multivesicular bodies (MVBs) and delivered to the yeast vacuole. Sorting of some, although not all, proteins into these structures is mediated by ubiquitination. W

  1. Exploiting hydrophobicity for efficient production of transmembrane helices for structure determination by NMR spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bugge, Katrine Østergaard; Steinocher, Helena; Brooks, Andrew J.;

    2015-01-01

    -labeled protein. In this work, we have exploited the hydrophobic nature of membrane proteins to develop a simple and efficient production scheme for isotope-labeled single-pass transmembrane domains (TMDs) with or without intrinsically disordered regions. We have evaluated the applicability and limitations...... of single-pass TMDs, which are difficult to solve by other means....

  2. Structural Dynamics of Insulin Receptor and Transmembrane Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatulian, Suren A

    2015-09-15

    The insulin receptor (IR) is a (αβ)2-type transmembrane tyrosine kinase that plays a central role in cell metabolism. Each αβ heterodimer consists of an extracellular ligand-binding α-subunit and a membrane-spanning β-subunit that comprises the cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase (TK) domain and the phosphorylation sites. The α- and β-subunits are linked via a single disulfide bridge, and the (αβ)2 tetramer is formed by disulfide bonds between the α-chains. Insulin binding induces conformational changes in IR that reach the intracellular β-subunit followed by a protein phosphorylation and activation cascade. Defects in this signaling process, including IR dysfunction caused by mutations, result in type 2 diabetes. Rational drug design aimed at treatment of diabetes relies on knowledge of the detailed structure of IR and the dynamic structural transformations during transmembrane signaling. Recent X-ray crystallographic studies have provided important clues about the mode of binding of insulin to IR, the resulting structural changes and their transmission to the TK domain, but a complete understanding of the structural basis underlying insulin signaling has not been achieved. This review presents a critical analysis of the current status of the structure-function relationship of IR, with a comparative assessment of the other IR family receptors, and discusses potential advancements that may provide insight into the molecular mechanism of insulin signaling.

  3. Atomic Structure of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhe; Chen, Jue

    2016-12-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is an anion channel evolved from the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter family. In this study, we determined the structure of zebrafish CFTR in the absence of ATP by electron cryo-microscopy to 3.7 Å resolution. Human and zebrafish CFTR share 55% sequence identity, and 42 of the 46 cystic-fibrosis-causing missense mutational sites are identical. In CFTR, we observe a large anion conduction pathway lined by numerous positively charged residues. A single gate near the extracellular surface closes the channel. The regulatory domain, dephosphorylated, is located in the intracellular opening between the two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs), preventing NBD dimerization and channel opening. The structure also reveals why many cystic-fibrosis-causing mutations would lead to defects either in folding, ion conduction, or gating and suggests new avenues for therapeutic intervention.

  4. Fatty acyl chain-dependent but charge-independent association of the SH4 domain of Lck with lipid membranes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anoop Rawat; Avaronnan Harishchandran; Ramakrishnan Nagaraj

    2013-03-01

    The SH4 domain of Src family of nonreceptor protein tyrosine kinases represents the extreme N-terminal 1–16 amino acid region which mediates membrane association of these proteins and facilitates their functions. The SH4 domains among Src members lack well-defined sequence consensus and vary in the net charge. However, they readily anchor to the cytoplasmic face of the plasma membrane upon fatty acid acylation. Here, we report the membrane association of differentially acylated SH4 domain of Lck kinase, which has net negative charge at physiological pH. Our results suggest that despite the net negative charge, the SH4 domain of Lck associates with membranes upon fatty acid acylation. While myristoylation at the N-terminus is sufficient for providing membrane anchorage, multiple acylation determines orientation of the peptide chain with respect to the lipid bilayer. Hence, fatty acylation serves more than just a lipid anchor. It has an important role in regulating the spatial orientation of the peptide domain with respect to the lipid bilayer, which could be important for the interaction of the other domains of these kinases with their partners.

  5. [Bacterial synthesis, purification, and solubilization of transmembrane segments of ErbB family members].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncharuk, M V; Shul'ga, A A; Ermoliuk, Ia S; Tkach, E N; Goncharuk, S A; Pustovalova, Iu E; Mineev, K S; Bocharov, É V; Maslennikov, I V; Arsen'ev, A S; Kirpichnikov, M P

    2011-01-01

    A family of epidermal growth factor receptors, ErbB, represents an important class of receptor tyrosine kinases, playing a leading role in cellular growth, development and differentiation. Transmembrane domains of these receptors transduce biochemical signals across plasma membrane via lateral homo- and heterodimerization. Relatively small size of complexes of ErbB transmembrane domains with detergents or lipids allows one to study their detailed spatial structure using three-dimensional heteronuclear high-resolution NMR spectroscopy. Here, we describe the effective expression system and purification procedure for preparative-scale production of transmembrane peptides from four representatives of ErbB family, ErbB1, ErbB2, ErbB3, ErbB4, for structural studies. The recombinant peptides were produced in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3)pLysS as C-terminal extensions of thioredoxin A. The fusion protein cleavage was accomplished with the light subunit of human enterokinase. Several (10-30) milligrams of purified isotope-labeled transmembrane peptides were isolated with the use of a simple and convenient procedure, which consists of consecutive steps of immobilized metal affinity chromatography and cation-exchange chromatography. The purified peptides were reconstituted in lipid/detergent environment (micelles or bicelles) and characterized using dynamic light scattering, CD and NMR spectroscopy. The data obtained indicate that the purified ErbB transmembrane peptides are suitable for structural and dynamic studies of their homo- and heterodimer complexes using high resolution NMR spectroscopy.

  6. Transcription start site associated RNAs (TSSaRNAs are ubiquitous in all domains of life.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia S Zaramela

    Full Text Available A plethora of non-coding RNAs has been discovered using high-resolution transcriptomics tools, indicating that transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation is much more complex than previously appreciated. Small RNAs associated with transcription start sites of annotated coding regions (TSSaRNAs are pervasive in both eukaryotes and bacteria. Here, we provide evidence for existence of TSSaRNAs in several archaeal transcriptomes including: Halobacterium salinarum, Pyrococcus furiosus, Methanococcus maripaludis, and Sulfolobus solfataricus. We validated TSSaRNAs from the model archaeon Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1 by deep sequencing two independent small-RNA enriched (RNA-seq and a primary-transcript enriched (dRNA-seq strand-specific libraries. We identified 652 transcripts, of which 179 were shown to be primary transcripts (∼7% of the annotated genome. Distinct growth-associated expression patterns between TSSaRNAs and their cognate genes were observed, indicating a possible role in environmental responses that may result from RNA polymerase with varying pausing rhythms. This work shows that TSSaRNAs are ubiquitous across all domains of life.

  7. CEACAM1 Long Cytoplasmic Domain Isoform is Associated with Invasion and Recurrence of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiriyama, Shigehisa; Yokoyama, Shozo; Ueno, Masaki; Hayami, Shinya; Ieda, Junji; Yamamoto, Naoyuki; Yamaguchi, Shunsuke; Mitani, Yasuyuki; Nakamura, Yasushi; Tani, Masaji; Mishra, Lopa; Shively, John E.; Yamaue, Hiroki

    2014-01-01

    Background The two isoforms of carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1), 1 with a long cytoplasmic domain (CEACAM1-L) and 1 with a short (CEACAM1-S), are involved in different signaling pathways. β2-spectrin (β2SP) is an adaptor protein that plays critical roles in the proper control of Smad access to activate receptors involved in regulation of TGF-β signaling. In this study, we examined the association between CEACAM1 isoform balance and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) malignant potential and investigated the possibility of a molecular interaction between CEACAM1 and β2SP. Methods Immunohistochemical analysis was carried out with CEACAM1-L or CEACAM1-S antibodies on 154 HCC tissues to correlate with the factors of malignancy. Invasion assay was performed for the effect of CEACAM1 expression on HCC cell lines. Moreover, immunohistochemical analysis and immunoprecipitation analysis were performed to investigate the association between CEACAM1 isoform balance and β2SP. Results In immunohistochemical analysis, CEACAM1-L expression dominance was a risk factor for HCC recurrence (p = 0.04) and was significantly associated with a shorter survival compared with CEACAM1-S expression dominance. Invasion assay indicated that CEACAM1-4L-transfected HLF and PLC/PRF/5 cells showed significantly increased invasion (p<0.0001) and CEACAM1-4S-transfected HLF cells showed significantly decreased invasion. Immunohistochemical analysis of β2SP suggested that the HCCs with CEACAM1-L-dominant expression were more strongly stained with β2SP than the HCCs with CEACAM1-S-dominant expression (p = 0.013), and coprecipitation assays indicated that CEACAM1-L could bind to β2SP. Conclusions CEACAM1-L may enhance the HCC invasiveness through an interaction with β2SP and subsequent effects on TGF-β signaling. PMID:24390710

  8. Individual and Contextual Parameters Associated with Adolescents' Domain Specific Self-Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokkinos, Constantinos M.; Hatzinikolaou, Stamatia

    2011-01-01

    The present study examined the role of adolescents' self-esteem and perceptions of family and classroom contexts on their domain specific self-perceptions. 345 Greek junior high school adolescents aged 14-16 completed measures of domain specific self-perceptions, self-esteem, parenting styles and classroom climate. Hierarchical regression analyses…

  9. New Insights into Molecular Organization of Human Neuraminidase-1: Transmembrane Topology and Dimerization Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurice, Pascal; Baud, Stéphanie; Bocharova, Olga V.; Bocharov, Eduard V.; Kuznetsov, Andrey S.; Kawecki, Charlotte; Bocquet, Olivier; Romier, Beatrice; Gorisse, Laetitia; Ghirardi, Maxime; Duca, Laurent; Blaise, Sébastien; Martiny, Laurent; Dauchez, Manuel; Efremov, Roman G.; Debelle, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Neuraminidase 1 (NEU1) is a lysosomal sialidase catalyzing the removal of terminal sialic acids from sialyloconjugates. A plasma membrane-bound NEU1 modulating a plethora of receptors by desialylation, has been consistently documented from the last ten years. Despite a growing interest of the scientific community to NEU1, its membrane organization is not understood and current structural and biochemical data cannot account for such membrane localization. By combining molecular biology and biochemical analyses with structural biophysics and computational approaches, we identified here two regions in human NEU1 - segments 139–159 (TM1) and 316–333 (TM2) - as potential transmembrane (TM) domains. In membrane mimicking environments, the corresponding peptides form stable α-helices and TM2 is suited for self-association. This was confirmed with full-size NEU1 by co-immunoprecipitations from membrane preparations and split-ubiquitin yeast two hybrids. The TM2 region was shown to be critical for dimerization since introduction of point mutations within TM2 leads to disruption of NEU1 dimerization and decrease of sialidase activity in membrane. In conclusion, these results bring new insights in the molecular organization of membrane-bound NEU1 and demonstrate, for the first time, the presence of two potential TM domains that may anchor NEU1 in the membrane, control its dimerization and sialidase activity. PMID:27917893

  10. New Insights into Molecular Organization of Human Neuraminidase-1: Transmembrane Topology and Dimerization Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurice, Pascal; Baud, Stéphanie; Bocharova, Olga V.; Bocharov, Eduard V.; Kuznetsov, Andrey S.; Kawecki, Charlotte; Bocquet, Olivier; Romier, Beatrice; Gorisse, Laetitia; Ghirardi, Maxime; Duca, Laurent; Blaise, Sébastien; Martiny, Laurent; Dauchez, Manuel; Efremov, Roman G.; Debelle, Laurent

    2016-12-01

    Neuraminidase 1 (NEU1) is a lysosomal sialidase catalyzing the removal of terminal sialic acids from sialyloconjugates. A plasma membrane-bound NEU1 modulating a plethora of receptors by desialylation, has been consistently documented from the last ten years. Despite a growing interest of the scientific community to NEU1, its membrane organization is not understood and current structural and biochemical data cannot account for such membrane localization. By combining molecular biology and biochemical analyses with structural biophysics and computational approaches, we identified here two regions in human NEU1 - segments 139-159 (TM1) and 316-333 (TM2) - as potential transmembrane (TM) domains. In membrane mimicking environments, the corresponding peptides form stable α-helices and TM2 is suited for self-association. This was confirmed with full-size NEU1 by co-immunoprecipitations from membrane preparations and split-ubiquitin yeast two hybrids. The TM2 region was shown to be critical for dimerization since introduction of point mutations within TM2 leads to disruption of NEU1 dimerization and decrease of sialidase activity in membrane. In conclusion, these results bring new insights in the molecular organization of membrane-bound NEU1 and demonstrate, for the first time, the presence of two potential TM domains that may anchor NEU1 in the membrane, control its dimerization and sialidase activity.

  11. Secreted and Transmembrane αKlotho Isoforms Have Different Spatio-Temporal Profiles in the Brain during Aging and Alzheimer's Disease Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massó, Anna; Sánchez, Angela; Gimenez-Llort, Lydia; Lizcano, Jose Miguel; Cañete, Manuel; García, Belen; Torres-Lista, Virginia; Puig, Meritxell; Bosch, Assumpció; Chillon, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    The Klotho protein is a β-glucuronidase, and its overexpression is associated with life extension. Its mechanism of action is not fully understood, although it has been recently reported that αKlotho improves synaptic and cognitive functions, and it may also influence a variety of structures and functions during CNS maturation and aging. The αKlotho gene has two transcripts, one encoding a transmembrane isoform (m-KL), and the other a putative secreted isoform (s-KL). Unfortunately, little is known about the secreted αKlotho isoform, since available antibodies cannot discriminate s-KL from the KL1 domain cleaved from the transmembrane isoform. This study shows, for the first time, that the klotho transcript produced by alternative splicing generates a stable protein (70 kDa), and that in contrast to the transmembrane Klotho isoform, it is ten times more abundant in the brain than in the kidney suggesting that the two isoforms may have different functions. We also studied whether klotho expression in the CNS was influenced by aging, Alzheimer's disease (AD), or a healthy lifestyle, such as voluntary moderate continuous exercise. We observed a strong correlation between high expression levels of the two klotho transcripts and the healthy status of the animals. Expression of Klotho in brain areas decayed more rapidly in the 3xTg-AD model of AD than in healthy animals, whilst moderate continuous exercise in adulthood prevents the decline in expression of both klotho transcripts. PMID:26599613

  12. Secreted and Transmembrane αKlotho Isoforms Have Different Spatio-Temporal Profiles in the Brain during Aging and Alzheimer's Disease Progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Massó

    Full Text Available The Klotho protein is a β-glucuronidase, and its overexpression is associated with life extension. Its mechanism of action is not fully understood, although it has been recently reported that αKlotho improves synaptic and cognitive functions, and it may also influence a variety of structures and functions during CNS maturation and aging. The αKlotho gene has two transcripts, one encoding a transmembrane isoform (m-KL, and the other a putative secreted isoform (s-KL. Unfortunately, little is known about the secreted αKlotho isoform, since available antibodies cannot discriminate s-KL from the KL1 domain cleaved from the transmembrane isoform. This study shows, for the first time, that the klotho transcript produced by alternative splicing generates a stable protein (70 kDa, and that in contrast to the transmembrane Klotho isoform, it is ten times more abundant in the brain than in the kidney suggesting that the two isoforms may have different functions. We also studied whether klotho expression in the CNS was influenced by aging, Alzheimer's disease (AD, or a healthy lifestyle, such as voluntary moderate continuous exercise. We observed a strong correlation between high expression levels of the two klotho transcripts and the healthy status of the animals. Expression of Klotho in brain areas decayed more rapidly in the 3xTg-AD model of AD than in healthy animals, whilst moderate continuous exercise in adulthood prevents the decline in expression of both klotho transcripts.

  13. Design and production in Aspergillus niger of a chimeric protein associating a fungal feruloyl esterase and a clostridial dockerin domain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levasseur, A.; Pagès, S.; Fierobe, H.-P.; Navarro, D.; Punt, P.; Belaïch, J.-P.; Asther, M.; Record, E.

    2004-01-01

    A chimeric enzyme associating feruloyl esterase A (FAEA) from Aspergilhis niger and dockerin from Clostridium thermocellum was produced in A. niger. A completely truncated form was produced when the dockerin domain was located downstream of the FAEA (FAEA-Doc), whereas no chimeric protein was produc

  14. Activation of p115-RhoGEF requires direct association of Gα13 and the Dbl homology domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhe; Guo, Liang; Hadas, Jana; Gutowski, Stephen; Sprang, Stephen R; Sternweis, Paul C

    2012-07-20

    RGS-containing RhoGEFs (RGS-RhoGEFs) represent a direct link between the G(12) class of heterotrimeric G proteins and the monomeric GTPases. In addition to the canonical Dbl homology (DH) and pleckstrin homology domains that carry out the guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) activity toward RhoA, these RhoGEFs also possess RGS homology (RH) domains that interact with activated α subunits of G(12) and G(13). Although the GEF activity of p115-RhoGEF (p115), an RGS-RhoGEF, can be stimulated by Gα(13), the exact mechanism of the stimulation has remained unclear. Using combined studies with small angle x-ray scattering, biochemistry, and mutagenesis, we identify an additional binding site for activated Gα(13) in the DH domain of p115. Small angle x-ray scattering reveals that the helical domain of Gα(13) docks onto the DH domain, opposite to the surface of DH that binds RhoA. Mutation of a single tryptophan residue in the α3b helix of DH reduces binding to activated Gα(13) and ablates the stimulation of p115 by Gα(13). Complementary mutations at the predicted DH-binding site in the αB-αC loop of the helical domain of Gα(13) also affect stimulation of p115 by Gα(13). Although the GAP activity of p115 is not required for stimulation by Gα(13), two hydrophobic motifs in RH outside of the consensus RGS box are critical for this process. Therefore, the binding of Gα(13) to the RH domain facilitates direct association of Gα(13) to the DH domain to regulate its exchange activity. This study provides new insight into the mechanism of regulation of the RGS-RhoGEF and broadens our understanding of G protein signaling.

  15. Structure of Staphylococcal α-Hemolysin, a Heptameric Transmembrane Pore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Langzhou; Hobaugh, Michael R.; Shustak, Christopher; Cheley, Stephen; Bayley, Hagan; Gouaux, J. Eric

    1996-12-01

    The structure of the Staphylococcus aureus α-hemolysin pore has been determined to 1.9 overset{circ}{mathrm A} resolution. Contained within the mushroom-shaped homo-oligomeric heptamer is a solvent-filled channel, 100 overset{circ}{mathrm A} in length, that runs along the sevenfold axis and ranges from 14 overset{circ}{mathrm A} to 46 overset{circ}{mathrm A} in diameter. The lytic, transmembrane domain comprises the lower half of a 14-strand antiparallel β barrel, to which each protomer contributes two β strands, each 65 overset{circ}{mathrm A} long. The interior of the β barrel is primarily hydrophilic, and the exterior has a hydrophobic belt 28 overset{circ}{mathrm A} wide. The structure proves the heptameric subunit stoichiometry of the α-hemolysin oligomer, shows that a glycine-rich and solvent-exposed region of a water-soluble protein can self-assemble to form a transmembrane pore of defined structure, and provides insight into the principles of membrane interaction and transport activity of β barrel pore-forming toxins.

  16. Intrinsic Disorder in Transmembrane Proteins: Roles in Signaling and Topology Prediction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérôme Bürgi

    Full Text Available Intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs are peculiar stretches of amino acids that lack stable conformations in solution. Intrinsic Disorder containing Proteins (IDP are defined by the presence of at least one large IDR and have been linked to multiple cellular processes including cell signaling, DNA binding and cancer. Here we used computational analyses and publicly available databases to deepen insight into the prevalence and function of IDRs specifically in transmembrane proteins, which are somewhat neglected in most studies. We found that 50% of transmembrane proteins have at least one IDR of 30 amino acids or more. Interestingly, these domains preferentially localize to the cytoplasmic side especially of multi-pass transmembrane proteins, suggesting that disorder prediction could increase the confidence of topology prediction algorithms. This was supported by the successful prediction of the topology of the uncharacterized multi-pass transmembrane protein TMEM117, as confirmed experimentally. Pathway analysis indicated that IDPs are enriched in cell projection and axons and appear to play an important role in cell adhesion, signaling and ion binding. In addition, we found that IDP are enriched in phosphorylation sites, a crucial post translational modification in signal transduction, when compared to fully ordered proteins and to be implicated in more protein-protein interaction events. Accordingly, IDPs were highly enriched in short protein binding regions called Molecular Recognition Features (MoRFs. Altogether our analyses strongly support the notion that the transmembrane IDPs act as hubs in cellular signal events.

  17. p59fyn tyrosine kinase associates with multiple T-cell receptor subunits through its unique amino-terminal domain.

    OpenAIRE

    1992-01-01

    Several lines of evidence link the protein tyrosine kinase p59fyn to the T-cell receptor. The molecular basis of this interaction has not been established. Here we show that the tyrosine kinase p59fyn can associate with chimeric proteins that contain the cytoplasmic domains of CD3 epsilon, gamma, zeta (zeta), and eta. Mutational analysis of the zeta cytoplasmic domain demonstrated that the membrane-proximal 41 residues of zeta are sufficient for p59fyn binding and that at least two p59fyn bin...

  18. Pleckstrin homology domain containing 6 protein (PLEKHA6) polymorphisms are associated with psychopathology and response to treatment in schizophrenic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spellmann, Ilja; Rujescu, Dan; Musil, Richard; Meyerwas, Sebastian; Giegling, Ina; Genius, Just; Zill, Peter; Dehning, Sandra; Cerovecki, Anja; Seemüller, Florian; Schennach, Rebecca; Hartmann, Annette M; Schäfer, Martin; Müller, Norbert; Möller, Hans-Jürgen; Riedel, Michael

    2014-06-03

    Pleckstrin homology domain (PH domain) comprises approximately 120 amino acids and is integrated in a wide range of proteins involved in intracellular signaling or as constituents of the cytoskeleton. This domain can bind phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-triphosphate and phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-biphosphate and proteins such as the βγ-subunits of heterotrimeric G proteins and protein kinase C. Associations with psychiatric diseases have not been investigated yet. To identify genes involved in response to antipsychotics, mice were treated with haloperidol (1mg/kg, n = 11) or saline (n = 12) for one week. By analyzing microarray data, we observed an increase of pleckstrin homology domain containing 6 (PLEKHA6) gene expression. Furthermore, we genotyped 263 schizophrenic patients, who were treated monotherapeutically with different antipsychotics within randomized-controlled trials. Psychopathology was measured weekly using the PANSS for a minimum of four and a maximum of twelve weeks. Correlations between PANSS subscale scores at baseline and PANSS improvement scores after four weeks of treatment and genotypes were calculated by using a linear model for all investigated SNPs. We found associations between four PLEKHA6 polymorphisms (rs17333933 (T/G), rs3126209 (C/T), rs4951338 (A/G) and rs100900571 (T/C)) and different PANSS subscales at baseline. Furthermore two different polymorphisms (rs7513240 (T/C), rs4951353 (A/G)) were found to be associated with therapy response in terms of a significant correlation with different PANSS improvement subscores after four weeks of antipsychotic treatment. Our observation of an association between genetic polymorphisms of a protein of the PH domain and psychopathology data in schizophrenic patients might be indicative for an involvement of PLEKHA6 in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and the therapy response towards antipsychotics.

  19. Structure of the N-terminal domain of the adenylyl cyclase-associated protein (CAP) from Dictyostelium discoideum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ksiazek, Dorota; Brandstetter, Hans; Israel, Lars; Bourenkov, Gleb P; Katchalova, Galina; Janssen, Klaus-Peter; Bartunik, Hans D; Noegel, Angelika A; Schleicher, Michael; Holak, Tad A

    2003-09-01

    Cyclase-associated proteins (CAPs) are widely distributed and highly conserved proteins that regulate actin remodeling in response to cellular signals. The N termini of CAPs play a role in Ras signaling and bind adenylyl cyclase; the C termini bind to G-actin and thereby alter the dynamic rearrangements of the microfilament system. We report here the X-ray structure of the core of the N-terminal domain of the CAP from Dictyostelium discoideum, which comprises residues 51-226, determined by a combination of single isomorphous replacement with anomalous scattering (SIRAS). The overall structure of this fragment is an alpha helix bundle composed of six antiparallel helices. Results from gel filtration and crosslinking experiments for CAP(1-226), CAP(255-464), and the full-length protein, together with the CAP N-terminal domain structure and the recently determined CAP C-terminal domain structure, provide evidence that the functional structure of CAP is multimeric.

  20. The Antitumor Effect of Single-domain Antibodies Directed Towards Membrane-associated Catalase and Superoxide Dismutase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Georg; Motz, Manfred

    2016-11-01

    Neutralizing single-domain antibodies directed towards catalase or superoxide dismutase (SOD) caused efficient reactivation of intercellular reactive oxygen species/reactive nitrogen species (ROS/RNS)-dependent apoptosis-inducing signaling specifically in human tumor cells. Single-domain antibodies targeted tumor cell-specific membrane-associated SOD and catalase, but not the corresponding intracellular enzymes. They were shown to be about 200-fold more effective than corresponding classical recombinant antigen-binding fragments and more than four log steps more efficient than monoclonal antibodies. Combined addition of single-domain antibodies against catalase and SOD caused a remarkable synergistic effect. Proof-of-concept experiments in immunocompromised mice using human tumor xenografts and single-domain antibodies directed towards SOD showed an inhibition of tumor growth. Neutralizing single-domain antibodies directed to catalase and SOD also caused a very strong synergistic effect with the established chemotherapeutic agent taxol, indicating an overlap of signaling pathways. This effect might also be useful in order to avoid unwanted side-effects and to drastically lower the costs for taxol-based therapy.

  1. Binding of PTEN to specific PDZ domains contributes to PTEN protein stability and phosphorylation by microtubule-associated serine/threonine kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiente, Miguel; Andrés-Pons, Amparo; Gomar, Beatriz; Torres, Josema; Gil, Anabel; Tapparel, Caroline; Antonarakis, Stylianos E; Pulido, Rafael

    2005-08-12

    The tumor suppressor phosphatase PTEN is a key regulator of cell growth and apoptosis that interacts with PDZ domains from regulatory proteins, including MAGI-1/2/3, hDlg, and MAST205. Here we identified novel PTEN-binding PDZ domains within the MAST205-related proteins, syntrophin-associated serine/threonine kinase and MAST3, characterized the regions of PTEN involved in its interaction with distinctive PDZ domains, and analyzed the functional consequences on PTEN of PDZ domain binding. Using a panel of PTEN mutations, as well as PTEN chimeras containing distinct domains of the related protein TPTE, we found that the PTP and C2 domains of PTEN do not affect PDZ domain binding and that the C-terminal tail of PTEN (residues 350-403) provides selectivity to recognize specific PDZ domains from MAGI-2, hDlg, and MAST205. Binding of PTEN to the PDZ-2 domain from MAGI-2 increased PTEN protein stability. Furthermore, binding of PTEN to the PDZ domains from microtubule-associated serine/threonine kinases facilitated PTEN phosphorylation at its C terminus by these kinases. Our results suggest an important role for the C-terminal region of PTEN in the selective association with scaffolding and/or regulatory molecules and provide evidence that PDZ domain binding stabilizes PTEN and targets this tumor suppressor for phosphorylation by microtubule-associated serine/threonine kinases.

  2. Paget disease of bone-associated UBA domain mutations of SQSTM1 exert distinct effects on protein structure and function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goode, Alice; Long, Jed E.; Shaw, Barry; Ralston, Stuart H.; Visconti, Micaela Rios; Gianfrancesco, Fernando; Esposito, Teresa; Gennari, Luigi; Merlotti, Daniela; Rendina, Domenico; Rea, Sarah L.; Sultana, Melanie; Searle, Mark S.; Layfield, Robert

    2014-01-01

    SQSTM1 mutations are common in patients with Paget disease of bone (PDB), with most affecting the C-terminal ubiquitin-associated (UBA) domain of the SQSTM1 protein. We performed structural and functional analyses of two UBA domain mutations, an I424S mutation relatively common in UK PDB patients, and an A427D mutation associated with a severe phenotype in Southern Italian patients. Both impaired SQSTM1's ubiquitin-binding function in pull-down assays and resulted in activation of basal NF-κB signalling, compared to wild-type, in reporter assays. We found evidence for a relationship between the ability of different UBA domain mutants to activate NF-κB signalling in vitro and number of affected sites in vivo in 1152 PDB patients from the UK and Italy, with A427D-SQSTM1 producing the greatest level of activation (relative to wild-type) of all PDB mutants tested to date. NMR and isothermal titration calorimetry studies were able to demonstrate that I424S is associated with global structural changes in the UBA domain, resulting in 10-fold weaker UBA dimer stability than wild-type and reduced ubiquitin-binding affinity of the UBA monomer. Our observations provide insights into the role of SQSTM1-mediated NF-κB signalling in PDB aetiology, and demonstrate that different mutations in close proximity within loop 2/helix 3 of the SQSTM1 UBA domain exert distinct effects on protein structure and stability, including indirect effects at the UBA/ubiquitin-binding interface. PMID:24642144

  3. Mutations in the KDM5C ARID Domain and Their Plausible Association with Syndromic Claes-Jensen-Type Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunhui Peng

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in KDM5C gene are linked to X-linked mental retardation, the syndromic Claes-Jensen-type disease. This study focuses on non-synonymous mutations in the KDM5C ARID domain and evaluates the effects of two disease-associated missense mutations (A77T and D87G and three not-yet-classified missense mutations (R108W, N142S, and R179H. We predict the ARID domain’s folding and binding free energy changes due to mutations, and also study the effects of mutations on protein dynamics. Our computational results indicate that A77T and D87G mutants have minimal effect on the KDM5C ARID domain stability and DNA binding. In parallel, the change in the free energy unfolding caused by the mutants A77T and D87G were experimentally measured by urea-induced unfolding experiments and were shown to be similar to the in silico predictions. The evolutionary conservation analysis shows that the disease-associated mutations are located in a highly-conserved part of the ARID structure (N-terminal domain, indicating their importance for the KDM5C function. N-terminal residues’ high conservation suggests that either the ARID domain utilizes the N-terminal to interact with other KDM5C domains or the N-terminal is involved in some yet unknown function. The analysis indicates that, among the non-classified mutations, R108W is possibly a disease-associated mutation, while N142S and R179H are probably harmless.

  4. Ras-association domain family 1C protein promotes breast cancer cell migration and attenuates apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aragon Robert J

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Ras association domain family 1 (RASSF1 gene is a Ras effector encoding two major mRNA forms, RASSF1A and RASSF1C, derived by alternative promoter selection and alternative mRNA splicing. RASSF1A is a tumor suppressor gene. However, very little is known about the function of RASSF1C both in normal and transformed cells. Methods Gene silencing and over-expression techniques were used to modulate RASSF1C expression in human breast cancer cells. Affymetrix-microarray analysis was performed using T47D cells over-expressing RASSF1C to identify RASSF1C target genes. RT-PCR and western blot techniques were used to validate target gene expression. Cell invasion and apoptosis assays were also performed. Results In this article, we report the effects of altering RASSF1C expression in human breast cancer cells. We found that silencing RASSF1C mRNA in breast cancer cell lines (MDA-MB231 and T47D caused a small but significant decrease in cell proliferation. Conversely, inducible over-expression of RASSF1C in breast cancer cells (MDA-MB231 and T47D resulted in a small increase in cell proliferation. We also report on the identification of novel RASSF1C target genes. RASSF1C down-regulates several pro-apoptotic and tumor suppressor genes and up-regulates several growth promoting genes in breast cancer cells. We further show that down-regulation of caspase 3 via overexpression of RASSF1C reduces breast cancer cells' sensitivity to the apoptosis inducing agent, etoposide. Furthermore, we found that RASSF1C over-expression enhances T47D cell invasion/migration in vitro. Conclusion Together, our findings suggest that RASSF1C, unlike RASSF1A, is not a tumor suppressor, but instead may play a role in stimulating metastasis and survival in breast cancer cells.

  5. SPOC: A widely distributed domain associated with cancer, apoptosis and transcription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinez-A Carlos

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Split ends (Spen family are large proteins characterised by N-terminal RNA recognition motifs (RRMs and a conserved SPOC (Spen paralog and ortholog C-terminal domain. The aim of this study is to characterize the family at the sequence level. Results We describe undetected members of the Spen family in other lineages (Plasmodium and Plants and localise SPOC in a new domain context, in a family that is common to all eukaryotes using profile-based sequence searches and structural prediction methods. Conclusions The widely distributed DIO (Death inducer-obliterator family is related to cancer and apoptosis and offers new clues about SPOC domain functionality.

  6. Advantages and limitations of the Five Domains model for assessing welfare impacts associated with vertebrate pest control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beausoleil, N J; Mellor, D J

    2015-01-01

    Many pest control activities have the potential to impact negatively on the welfare of animals, and animal welfare is an important consideration in the development, implementation and evaluation of ethically defensible vertebrate pest control. Thus, reliable and accurate methods for assessing welfare impacts are required. The Five Domains model provides a systematic method for identifying potential or actual welfare impacts associated with an event or situation in four physical or functional domains (nutrition, environment, health or functional status, behaviour) and one mental domain (overall mental or affective state). Here we evaluate the advantages and limitations of the Five Domains model for this purpose and illustrate them using specific examples from a recent assessment of the welfare impacts of poisons used to lethally control possums in New Zealand. The model has a number of advantages which include the following: the systematic identification of a wide range of impacts associated with a variety of control tools; the production of relative rankings of tools in terms of their welfare impacts; the easy incorporation of new information into assessments; and the highlighting of additional information needed. For example, a recent analysis of sodium fluoroacetate (1080) poisoning in possums revealed the need for more information on the period from the onset of clinical signs to the point at which consciousness is lost, as well as on the level of consciousness during or after the occurrence of muscle spasms and seizures. The model is also valuable because it clearly separates physical or functional and affective impacts, encourages more comprehensive consideration of negative affective experiences than has occurred in the past, and allows development and evaluation of targeted mitigation strategies. Caution must be used in interpreting and applying the outputs of the model, most importantly because relative rankings or grades are fundamentally qualitative in

  7. Unexpected diversity in Shisa-like proteins suggests the importance of their roles as transmembrane adaptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Jimin; Grishin, Nick V

    2012-03-01

    The Shisa family of single-transmembrane proteins is characterized by an N-terminal cysteine-rich domain and a proline-rich C-terminal region. Its founding member, Xenopus Shisa, promotes head development by antagonizing Wnt and FGF signaling. Recently, a mouse brain-specific Shisa protein CKAMP44 (Shisa9) was shown to play an important role in AMPA receptor desensitization. We used sequence similarity searches against protein, genome and EST databases to study the evolutionary origin and phylogenetic distribution of Shisa homologs. In addition to nine Shisa subfamilies in vertebrates, we detected distantly related Shisa homologs that possess an N-terminal domain with six conserved cysteines. These Shisa-like proteins include FAM159 and KIAA1644 mainly from vertebrates, and members from various bilaterian invertebrates and Porifera, suggesting their presence in the last common ancestor of Metazoa. Shisa-like genes have undergone large expansions in Branchiostoma floridae and Saccoglossus kowalevskii, and appear to have been lost in certain insects. Pattern-based searches against eukaryotic proteomes also uncovered several other families of predicted single-transmembrane proteins with a similar cysteine-rich domain. We refer to these proteins (Shisa/Shisa-like, WBP1/VOPP1, CX, DUF2650, TMEM92, and CYYR1) as STMC6 proteins (single-transmembrane proteins with conserved 6 cysteines). STMC6 genes are widespread in Metazoa, with the human genome containing 17 members. Frequent occurrences of PY motifs in STMC6 proteins suggest that most of them could interact with WW-domain-containing proteins, such as the NEDD4 family E3 ubiquitin ligases, and could play critical roles in protein degradation and sorting. STMC6 proteins are likely transmembrane adaptors that regulate membrane proteins such as cell surface receptors.

  8. Transmembrane Protein 147 (TMEM147) Is a Novel Component of the Nicalin-NOMO Protein Complex*

    OpenAIRE

    Dettmer, Ulf; Kuhn, Peer-Hendrik; Abou-Ajram, Claudia; Lichtenthaler, Stefan F.; Krüger, Marcus; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Haass, Christian; Haffner, Christof

    2010-01-01

    Nicastrin and its relative Nicalin (Nicastrin-like protein) are both members of larger protein complexes, namely γ-secretase and the Nicalin-NOMO (Nodal modulator) complex. The γ-secretase complex, which contains Presenilin, APH-1, and PEN-2 in addition to Nicastrin, catalyzes the proteolytic cleavage of the transmembrane domain of various proteins including the β-amyloid precursor protein and Notch. Nicalin and its binding partner NOMO form a complex that was shown to modulate Nodal signalin...

  9. Structural evidence for variable oligomerization of the N-terminal domain of cyclase-associated protein (CAP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusof, Adlina Mohd; Hu, Nien-Jen; Wlodawer, Alexander; Hofmann, Andreas

    2005-02-01

    Cyclase-associated protein (CAP) is a highly conserved and widely distributed protein that links the nutritional response signaling to cytoskeleton remodeling. In yeast, CAP is a component of the adenylyl cyclase complex and helps to activate the Ras-mediated catalytic cycle of the cyclase. While the N-terminal domain of CAP (N-CAP) provides a binding site for adenylyl cyclase, the C-terminal domain (C-CAP) possesses actin binding activity. Our attempts to crystallize full-length recombinant CAP from Dictyostelium discoideum resulted in growth of orthorhombic crystals containing only the N-terminal domain (residues 42-227) due to auto-proteolytic cleavage. The structure was solved by molecular replacement with data at 2.2 A resolution. The present crystal structure allows the characterization of a head-to-tail N-CAP dimer in the asymmetric unit and a crystallographic side-to-side dimer. Comparison with previously published structures of N-CAP reveals variable modes of dimerization of this domain, but the presence of a common interface for the side-to-side dimer.

  10. Differential Associations between Domains of Sibling Conflict and Adolescent Emotional Adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campione-Barr, Nicole; Greer, Kelly Bassett; Kruse, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Issues of equality and fairness and invasion of the personal domain, 2 previously identified topic areas of adolescent sibling conflict (N. Campione-Barr & J. G. Smetana, 2010), were examined in 145 dyads ("M" [subscript first-born] = 14.97, "SD" = 1.69 years; "M" [subscript second-born] = 12.20,…

  11. Designing Inhibitors against HOX domain mutations of PDX-1 and studying its association in Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allam Appa Rao

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes mellitus was formally known as IDDM, type I, or juvenile onset diabetes. Type 1 DM can occur at any age. In this study,we analyzed the involvement of HOX domain of PDX-1 protein.The homeodomain transcription factor, pancreas duodenum homeobox (PDX-1, encoded by PDX-1 gene, which is a transcriptional activator of several genes, including insulin, somatostatin, glucokinase, islet amyloid polypeptide, and glucose transporter type 2 and essential for pancreas development, insulin production, and glucose homeostasis.[1,13]. HOX domain has a length of 63aa and control developmental patterns and cell differentiation in vertebrates by acting positive or negative regulators[4,9,16]. Different approached had been applied to identify the mutational hot spot region of HOX domain and calculate mutational frequency of the amino acids which resides in the hotspot region. Binding site of the domain had been identified and found that THR208, GLN246 ,VAL247, ASN253 involved in interaction with ligand. Potential Inhibitors had been screened on the basis of various criteria and bioactivity score had been calculated. Energy optimization was done by applying AMBER force field and steepest descent method. Docking was performed by CCDC GOLD, Molegro, HEX, and Argus lab to find the best potent inhibitor and increase the accuracy of the docking process. Sitagliptin showed satisfactory result on both docking and bioactivity analysis. It showed a GOLD fitness score of 49.8386 and had a moldock score of -122.919 with a ligand efficiency -4.33692. Compound had a bioactivity score of 0.56 for protease inhibitor. Sitagliptin showed good binding affinity to the target, which helps to work the pancreas in proper way and to secret insulin.

  12. Angiogenesis-associated crosstalk between collagens, CXC chemokines, and thrombospondin domain-containing proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Rivera, Corban G; Bader, Joel S.; Popel, Aleksander S

    2011-01-01

    Excessive vascularization is a hallmark of many diseases including cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, diabetic nephropathy, pathologic obesity, age-related macular degeneration, and asthma. Compounds that inhibit angiogenesis represent potential therapeutics for many diseases. Karagiannis and Popel (PNAS, 2008) used a bioinformatics approach to idenify more than 100 peptides with sequence homology to known angiogenesis inhibitors. The peptides could be grouped into families by the conserved domain...

  13. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator: a chloride channel gated by ATP binding and hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bompadre, Silvia G; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang

    2007-08-25

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a chloride channel that belongs to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily. Defective function of CFTR is responsible for cystic fibrosis (CF), the most common lethal autosomal recessive disorder in Caucasian populations. The disease is manifested in defective chloride transport across the epithelial cells in various tissues. To date, more than 1400 different mutations have been identified as CF-associated. CFTR is regulated by phosphorylation in its regulatory (R) domain, and gated by ATP binding and hydrolysis at its two nucleotide-binding domains (NBD1 and NBD2). Recent studies reveal that the NBDs of CFTR may dimerize as observed in other ABC proteins. Upon dimerization of CFTR's two NBDs, in a head-to-tail configuration, the two ATP-binding pockets (ABP1 and ABP2) are formed by the canonical Walker A and B motifs from one NBD and the signature sequence from the partner NBD. Mutations of the amino acids that interact with ATP reveal that the two ABPs play distinct roles in controlling ATP-dependent gating of CFTR. It was proposed that binding of ATP to the ABP2, which is formed by the Walker A and B in NBD2 and the signature sequence in NBD1, is critical for catalyzing channel opening. While binding of ATP to the ABP1 alone may not increase the opening rate, it does contribute to the stabilization of the open channel conformation. Several disease-associated mutations of the CFTR channel are characterized by gating defects. Understanding how CFTR's two NBDs work together to gate the channel could provide considerable mechanistic information for future pharmacological studies, which could pave the way for tailored drug design for therapeutical interventions in CF.

  14. Individual and contextual parameters associated with adolescents' domain specific self-perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokkinos, Constantinos M; Hatzinikolaou, Stamatia

    2011-04-01

    The present study examined the role of adolescents' self-esteem and perceptions of family and classroom contexts on their domain specific self-perceptions. 345 Greek junior high school adolescents aged 14-16 completed measures of domain specific self-perceptions, self-esteem, parenting styles and classroom climate. Hierarchical regression analyses revealed that both family and classroom contexts predicted students' self-perceptions, after students' demographics, academic achievement and self-esteem were controlled for. However, different patterns emerged in the relationship between family, classroom climate and self-esteem depending on domain specific self-perceptions. Academic self-perceptions (scholastic, mathematics and language competences) were predicted by classroom climate dimensions (order and organization, student involvement, rule clarity), whereas self-perceptions regarding relations with parents, close friends and behaviour conduct, were predicted by parenting styles. Given the fact that adolescence is a period of fluctuation in self-understanding which renders self-perceptions particularly malleable, the results support the critical role of the social environments where adolescents operate.

  15. Sequence-specific conformational flexibility of SNARE transmembrane helices probed by hydrogen/deuterium exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelzer, Walter; Poschner, Bernhard C; Stalz, Holger; Heck, Albert J; Langosch, Dieter

    2008-08-01

    SNARE proteins mediate fusion of intracellular eukaryotic membranes and their alpha-helical transmembrane domains are known to contribute to lipid bilayer mixing. Synthetic transmembrane domain peptides were previously shown to mimic the function of SNARE proteins in that they trigger liposome fusion in a sequence-specific fashion. Here, we performed a detailed investigation of the conformational dynamics of the transmembrane helices of the presynaptic SNAREs synaptobrevin II and syntaxin 1a. To this end, we recorded deuterium/hydrogen-exchange kinetics in isotropic solution as well as in the membrane-embedded state. In solution, the exchange kinetics of each peptide can be described by three different classes of amide deuteriums that exchange with different rate constants. These are likely to originate from exchange at different domains of the helices. Interestingly, the rate constants of each class vary with the TMD sequence. Thus, the exchange rate is position-specific and sequence-specific. Further, the rate constants correlate with the previously determined membrane fusogenicities. In membranes, exchange is retarded and a significant proportion of amide hydrogens are protected from exchange. We conclude that the conformational dynamics of SNARE TMD helices is mechanistically linked to their ability to drive lipid mixing.

  16. Body image and personality among British men: associations between the Big Five personality domains, drive for muscularity, and body appreciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benford, Karis; Swami, Viren

    2014-09-01

    The present study examined associations between the Big Five personality domains and measures of men's body image. A total of 509 men from the community in London, UK, completed measures of drive for muscularity, body appreciation, the Big Five domains, and subjective social status, and provided their demographic details. The results of a hierarchical regression showed that, once the effects of participant body mass index (BMI) and subjective social status had been accounted for, men's drive for muscularity was significantly predicted by Neuroticism (β=.29). In addition, taking into account the effects of BMI and subjective social status, men's body appreciation was significantly predicted by Neuroticism (β=-.35) and Extraversion (β=.12). These findings highlight potential avenues for the development of intervention approaches based on the relationship between the Big Five personality traits and body image.

  17. NMR structural characterization of the N-terminal domain of the adenylyl cyclase-associated protein (CAP) from Dictyostelium discoideum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mavoungou, Chrystelle [Max Planck Institute for Biochemistry (Germany); Israel, Lars [Ludwig Maximilians-University, Adolf Butenandt Institute, Cell Biology (Germany); Rehm, Till; Ksiazek, Dorota; Krajewski, Marcin; Popowicz, Grzegorz [Max Planck Institute for Biochemistry (Germany); Noegel, Angelika A. [University of Cologne, Institute for Biochemistry (Germany); Schleicher, Michael [Ludwig Maximilians-University, Adolf Butenandt Institute, Cell Biology (Germany); Holak, Tad A. [Max Planck Institute for Biochemistry (Germany)

    2004-05-15

    Cyclase-associated proteins (CAPs) are highly conserved, ubiquitous actin binding proteins that are involved in microfilament reorganization. The N-termini of CAPs play a role in Ras signaling and bind adenylyl cyclase; the C-termini bind to G-actin. We report here the NMR characterization of the amino-terminal domain of CAP from Dictyostelium discoideum (CAP(1-226)). NMR data, including the steady state {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N heteronuclear NOE experiments, indicate that the first 50 N-terminal residues are unstructured and that this highly flexible serine-rich fragment is followed by a stable, folded core starting at Ser 51. The NMR structure of the folded core is an {alpha}-helix bundle composed of six antiparallel helices, in a stark contrast to the recently determined CAP C-terminal domain structure, which is solely built by {beta}-strands.

  18. NMR structural characterization of the N-terminal domain of the adenylyl cyclase-associated protein (CAP) from Dictyostelium discoideum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavoungou, Chrystelle; Israel, Lars; Rehm, Till; Ksiazek, Dorota; Krajewski, Marcin; Popowicz, Grzegorz; Noegel, Angelika A; Schleicher, Michael; Holak, Tad A

    2004-05-01

    Cyclase-associated proteins (CAPs) are highly conserved, ubiquitous actin binding proteins that are involved in microfilament reorganization. The N-termini of CAPs play a role in Ras signaling and bind adenylyl cyclase; the C-termini bind to G-actin. We report here the NMR characterization of the amino-terminal domain of CAP from Dictyostelium discoideum (CAP(1-226)). NMR data, including the steady state (1)H-(15)N heteronuclear NOE experiments, indicate that the first 50 N-terminal residues are unstructured and that this highly flexible serine-rich fragment is followed by a stable, folded core starting at Ser 51. The NMR structure of the folded core is an alpha-helix bundle composed of six antiparallel helices, in a stark contrast to the recently determined CAP C-terminal domain structure, which is solely built by beta-strands.

  19. Domains of the growth hormone receptor required for association and activation of JAK2 tyrosine kinase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    VanderKuur, J A; Wang, X; Zhang, L

    1994-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) has recently been shown to activate the GH receptor (GHR)-associated tyrosine kinase JAK2. In the present study, regions of the GHR required for JAK2 association with GHR were identified. GH-dependent JAK2 association with GHR was detected in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells...

  20. Use of Molecular Dynamics Data in Biochemistry Courses: An Amphipathy Scale to Determine Protein [alpha]-Helix Transmembrane Segments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazze, Fernanda M.; Fuzo, Carlos A.; Degreve, Leo; Ciancaglini, Pietro

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this manuscript is to explain the application of an amphipathy scale obtained from molecular dynamics simulations and to demonstrate how it can be useful in the protein structure field. It is shown that this scale is easy to be used with the advantage of revealing domains of transmembrane [alpha]-helix of proteins without the need of…

  1. The E3 Ubiquitin Ligase TMEM129 Is a Tri-Spanning Transmembrane Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael L. van de Weijer

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Misfolded proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER are transported back into the cytosol for degradation via the ubiquitin-proteasome system. The human cytomegalovirus protein US11 hijacks this ER-associated protein degradation (ERAD pathway to downregulate human leukocyte antigen (HLA class I molecules in virus-infected cells, thereby evading elimination by cytotoxic T-lymphocytes. Recently, we identified the E3 ubiquitin ligase transmembrane protein 129 (TMEM129 as a key player in this process, where interference with TMEM129 activity in human cells completely abrogates US11-mediated class I degradation. Here, we set out to further characterize TMEM129. We show that TMEM129 is a non-glycosylated protein containing a non-cleaved signal anchor sequence. By glycosylation scanning mutagenesis, we show that TMEM129 is a tri-spanning ER-membrane protein that adopts an Nexo–Ccyto orientation. This insertion in the ER membrane positions the C-terminal really interesting new gene (RING domain of TMEM129 in the cytosol, making it available to catalyze ubiquitination reactions that are required for cytosolic degradation of secretory proteins.

  2. Transmembrane and Juxtamembrane Structure of αL Integrin in Bicelles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahyu Surya

    Full Text Available The accepted model for the interaction of α and β integrins in the transmembrane (TM domain is based on the pair αIIbβ3. This involves the so-called outer and inner membrane association clasps (OMC and IMC, respectively. In the α chain, the OMC involves a GxxxG-like motif, whereas in the IMC a conserved juxtamembrane GFFKR motif experiences a backbone reversal that partially fills the void generated by TM separation towards the cytoplasmic half. However, the GFFKR motif of several α integrin cytoplasmic tails in non-bicelle environments has been shown to adopt an α-helical structure that is not membrane-embedded and which was shown to bind a variety of cytoplasmic proteins. Thus it is not known if a membrane-embedded backbone reversal is a conserved structural feature in α integrins. We have studied the system αLβ2 because of its importance in leukocytes, where integrin deactivation is particularly important. Herein we show that the backbone reversal feature is not only present in αIIb but also in αL-TM when reconstituted in bicelles. Additionally, titration with β2 TM showed eight residues clustering along one side of αL-TM, forming a plausible interacting face with β2. The latter orientation is consistent with a previously predicted reported polar interaction between αL Ser-1071 and β2 Thr-686.

  3. Transmembrane and Juxtamembrane Structure of αL Integrin in Bicelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surya, Wahyu; Li, Yan; Millet, Oscar; Diercks, Tammo; Torres, Jaume

    2013-01-01

    The accepted model for the interaction of α and β integrins in the transmembrane (TM) domain is based on the pair αIIbβ3. This involves the so-called outer and inner membrane association clasps (OMC and IMC, respectively). In the α chain, the OMC involves a GxxxG-like motif, whereas in the IMC a conserved juxtamembrane GFFKR motif experiences a backbone reversal that partially fills the void generated by TM separation towards the cytoplasmic half. However, the GFFKR motif of several α integrin cytoplasmic tails in non-bicelle environments has been shown to adopt an α-helical structure that is not membrane-embedded and which was shown to bind a variety of cytoplasmic proteins. Thus it is not known if a membrane-embedded backbone reversal is a conserved structural feature in α integrins. We have studied the system αLβ2 because of its importance in leukocytes, where integrin deactivation is particularly important. Herein we show that the backbone reversal feature is not only present in αIIb but also in αL-TM when reconstituted in bicelles. Additionally, titration with β2 TM showed eight residues clustering along one side of αL-TM, forming a plausible interacting face with β2. The latter orientation is consistent with a previously predicted reported polar interaction between αL Ser-1071 and β2 Thr-686.

  4. SAP-like domain in nucleolar spindle associated protein mediates mitotic chromosome loading as well as interphase chromatin interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verbakel, Werner, E-mail: werner.verbakel@chem.kuleuven.be [Laboratory of Biomolecular Dynamics, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200G, Bus 2403, 3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Carmeliet, Geert, E-mail: geert.carmeliet@med.kuleuven.be [Laboratory of Experimental Medicine and Endocrinology, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Herestraat 49, Bus 902, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Engelborghs, Yves, E-mail: yves.engelborghs@fys.kuleuven.be [Laboratory of Biomolecular Dynamics, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200G, Bus 2403, 3001 Heverlee (Belgium)

    2011-08-12

    Highlights: {yields} The SAP-like domain in NuSAP is a functional DNA-binding domain with preference for dsDNA. {yields} This SAP-like domain is essential for chromosome loading during early mitosis. {yields} NuSAP is highly dynamic on mitotic chromatin, as evident from photobleaching experiments. {yields} The SAP-like domain also mediates NuSAP-chromatin interaction in interphase nucleoplasm. -- Abstract: Nucleolar spindle associated protein (NuSAP) is a microtubule-stabilizing protein that localizes to chromosome arms and chromosome-proximal microtubules during mitosis and to the nucleus, with enrichment in the nucleoli, during interphase. The critical function of NuSAP is underscored by the finding that its depletion in HeLa cells results in various mitotic defects. Moreover, NuSAP is found overexpressed in multiple cancers and its expression levels often correlate with the aggressiveness of cancer. Due to its localization on chromosome arms and combination of microtubule-stabilizing and DNA-binding properties, NuSAP takes a special place within the extensive group of spindle assembly factors. In this study, we identify a SAP-like domain that shows DNA binding in vitro with a preference for dsDNA. Deletion of the SAP-like domain abolishes chromosome arm binding of NuSAP during mitosis, but is not sufficient to abrogate its chromosome-proximal localization after anaphase onset. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments revealed the highly dynamic nature of this NuSAP-chromatin interaction during mitosis. In interphase cells, NuSAP also interacts with chromatin through its SAP-like domain, as evident from its enrichment on dense chromatin regions and intranuclear mobility, measured by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. The obtained results are in agreement with a model where NuSAP dynamically stabilizes newly formed microtubules on mitotic chromosomes to enhance chromosome positioning without immobilizing these microtubules. Interphase Nu

  5. Sex-specific associations between Neutrophil Gelatinase-Associated Lipocalin (NGAL) and cognitive domains in late-life depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naude, P.J.; Boer, J.A. den; Comijs, H.C.; Bosker, F.J.; Zuidersma, M.; Groenewold, N.A.; Deyn, P.P. de; Luiten, P.G.M.; Eisel, U.L.; Oude Voshaar, R.C.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although it is well established that late-life depression is associated with both systemic low-graded inflammation and cognitive impairment, the relation between inflammation and cognition in depressed older persons is still equivocal. The objective of this study is to examine the associ

  6. Carbohydrate Binding Module 74 is a novel starch binding domain associated with large and multi-domain α-amylase enzymes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valk, Vincent; Lammerts van Bueren, Alicia; van der Kaaij, Rachel M; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert

    2016-01-01

    Microbacterium aurum B8.A is a bacterium that originates from a potato starch-processing plant and employs a GH13 α-amylase (MaAmyA) enzyme that forms pores in potato starch granules. MaAmyA is a large and multi-modular protein that contains a novel domain at its C-terminus (Domain 2). Deletion of D

  7. Expression and Purification of Functional HuGALNT3 without the Transmembrane Domain (huGALNT3-sol) in Pichia pastoris%重组人GALNT3-sol蛋白在毕赤酵母中的高效表达和活性鉴定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孔蕴; 郜海涛; 李树芳; 王鹏; 顾国锋; 顾黎

    2012-01-01

    目的:为了获得有催化活性的人乙酰半乳糖胺转移酶3(GALNT3),构建了GALNT3可溶性区域(GALNT3-sol)的真核分泌表达载体,在巴斯德毕赤酵母中表达并纯化GALNT3-sol蛋白,体外检测其转糖基活性.方法:以构建好的pET15b/GALNT3-sol为模板进行PCR,扩增编码人GALNT3-sol的cDNA片段(1755 bp),将其克隆至真核表达载体pPIC9K,载体线性化后采用电击法转化毕赤酵母GS115.通过MD平板和G418平板筛选出阳性高拷贝重组菌株.阳性菌株经过甲醇诱导表达人GALNT3-sol重组蛋白,表达上清进行Ni-NAT分离纯化.分别采用SDS-PAGE和Western blot鉴定纯化的重组蛋白,并使用HPLC和MALDI-TOF/MS分析其转糖基化反应的活性.结果:成功构建了能够分泌表达GALNT3-sol的毕赤酵母菌株.阳性表达菌株在BMMY培养基(pH 6.0)中20℃培养,经0.5%甲醇诱导表达96 h,摇瓶表达量可达5mg/L.SDS-PAGE和Western blot结果显示表达重组蛋白为糖基化形式.活性检测显示表达的重组蛋白具有转糖基活性.结论:成功获得可以高效分泌表达具有活性的人GALNT3-sol蛋白的毕赤酵母菌株,为进一步研究人GALNT3的性质及其应用提供了基础.%Objective: In order to research the bioactivity of GALNT3, the truncated part of GALNT3 (huGALNT3-sol) which was deleted of the hydrophobic trans-membrane domain were obtained using Pichia pastoris expression system, and assayed the transferring GalNAc activity of recombinant huGALNT3-sol. Methods; The gene of human GALNT3-sol (1 755 bp)was amplified from pET15b/ GALNTi-sol and cloned into expression vector pPIC9k, and the recombinant plasmid was transformed into Pichia pastoris GS115 strain through electroporation. The high copy recombinant strains with high-level huGALNT3-sol production were screened out by MD plate and G418. High level of huGALNT3-sol was obtained in BMMY medium the induction of methanol, and purified from the supernatant with Ni-NAT. The identity of

  8. Crystal Structure of an Invasivity-Associated Domain of SdrE in S. aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongpeng; Yang, Wei; Zhu, Zhongliang; Chen, Ke; Bai, Lei; Wei, Jie; Huang, Ailong; Wang, Deqiang

    2017-01-01

    The surface protein SdrE, a microbial surface components recognizing adhesive matrix molecule (MSCRAMM) family protein expressed on the surface of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), can recognize human complement regulator Factor H and C4BP, thus making it a potentially promising vaccine candidate. In this study, SdrE278-591 was found to directly affect S. aureus host cell invasion. Additionally, the crystal structure of SdrE278-591 at a resolution of 1.25 Å was established, with the three-dimensional structure revealing N2-N3 domains which fold in a manner similar to an IgG fold. Furthermore, a putative ligand binding site located at a conserved charged groove formed by the interface between N2 and N3 domains was identified, with β2 suspected to occupy the ligand recognizing site and undergo a structural rearrangement to allow ligand binding. Overall, these findings have further contributed to the understanding of SdrE as a key factor for S. aureus invasivity and will enable a better understanding of bacterial infection processes. PMID:28125581

  9. Differences in conformational stability of the two alpha domains of the disease-associated and non-disease-associated subtypes of HLA-B27.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Manish Kumar; Luthra-Guptasarma, Manni

    2017-01-01

    The MHC Class I molecule, HLA-B27, is strongly linked with development of the inflammatory arthritic disease, ankylosing spondylitis (AS); whereas the B*2705 subtype shows strong association, B*2709 is not associated with disease, even though the two subtypes differ in only a single residue at position 116. Currently, attention is focused on the misfolding propensities of these two subtypes, including studies of disulfide-linked dimers and non-covalently formed high molecular weight (HMW) aggregates. Using mutants retaining only a single cysteine at positions C67 or C164, and using a cysteine-reactive, environment-sensitive, fluorescence probe (acrylodan), we find that within the same overall population of identical single-cysteine HLA-B27 molecules, there exist sub-populations which (a) possess free cysteines which react with acrylodan, (b) form disulfide-linked dimers, and (c) form HMW aggregates. Further, using acrylodan fluorescence, we find (d) that the α1 and α2 domains unfold independently of each other in HMW aggregates, (e) that these two domains of B*2709 are less stable to chemical and thermal denaturation than the corresponding domains of B*2705, suggesting easier clearance of misfolded molecules in the former, and (f) C67 is much more exposed in B*2705 than in B*2709, which could potentially explain how B*2705 more easily forms C67-mediated disulfide-bonded dimers.

  10. An α/β hydrolase and associated Per-ARNT-Sim domain comprise a bipartite sensing module coupled with diverse output domains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene V Nadezhdin

    Full Text Available The RsbQ α/β hydrolase and RsbP serine phosphatase form a signaling pair required to activate the general stress factor σ(B of Bacillus subtilis in response to energy limitation. RsbP has a predicted N-terminal Per-ARNT-Sim (PAS domain, a central coiled-coil, and a C-terminal protein phosphatase M (PPM domain. Previous studies support a model in which RsbQ provides an activity needed for PAS to regulate the phosphatase domain via the coiled-coil. RsbQ and the PAS domain (RsbP-PAS therefore appear to form a sensory module. Here we test this hypothesis using bioinformatic and genetic analysis. We found 45 RsbQ and RsbP-PAS homologues encoded by adjacent genes in diverse bacteria, with PAS and a predicted coiled-coil fused to one of three output domains: PPM phosphatase (Gram positive bacteria, histidine protein kinase (Gram negative bacteria, and diguanylate cyclase (both lineages. Multiple alignment of the RsbP-PAS homologues suggested nine residues that distinguish the class. Alanine substitutions at four of these conferred a null phenotype in B. subtilis, indicating their functional importance. The F55A null substitution lay in the Fα helix of an RsbP-PAS model. F55A inhibited interaction of RsbP with RsbQ in yeast two-hybrid and pull-down assays but did not significantly affect interaction of RsbP with itself. We propose that RsbQ directly contacts the PAS domains of an RsbP oligomer to provide the activating signal, which is propagated to the phosphatase domains via the coiled-coil. A similar mechanism would allow the RsbQ-PAS module to convey a common input signal to structurally diverse output domains, controlling a variety of physiological responses.

  11. Evidence for physical and functional interactions among two Saccharomyces cerevisiae SH3 domain proteins, an adenylyl cyclase-associated protein and the actin cytoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lila, T; Drubin, D G

    1997-02-01

    In a variety of organisms, a number of proteins associated with the cortical actin cytoskeleton contain SH3 domains, suggesting that these domains may provide the physical basis for functional interactions among structural and regulatory proteins in the actin cytoskeleton. We present evidence that SH3 domains mediate at least two independent functions of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae actin-binding protein Abp1p in vivo. Abp1p contains a single SH3 domain that has recently been shown to bind in vitro to the adenylyl cyclase-associated protein Srv2p. Immunofluorescence analysis of Srv2p subcellular localization in strains carrying mutations in either ABP1 or SRV2 reveals that the Abp1p SH3 domain mediates the normal association of Srv2p with the cortical actin cytoskeleton. We also show that a site in Abp1p itself is specifically bound by the SH3 domain of the actin-associated protein Rvs167p. Genetic analysis provides evidence that Abp1p and Rvs167p have functions that are closely interrelated. Abp1 null mutations, like rvs167 mutations, result in defects in sporulation and reduced viability under certain suboptimal growth conditions. In addition, mutations in ABP1 and RVS167 yield similar profiles of genetic "synthetic lethal" interactions when combined with mutations in genes encoding other cytoskeletal components. Mutations which specifically disrupt the SH3 domain-mediated interaction between Abp1p and Srv2p, however, show none of the shared phenotypes of abp1 and rvs167 mutations. We conclude that the Abp1p SH3 domain mediates the association of Srv2p with the cortical actin cytoskeleton, and that Abp1p performs a distinct function that is likely to involve binding by the Rvs167p SH3 domain. Overall, work presented here illustrates how SH3 domains can integrate the activities of multiple actin cytoskeleton proteins in response to varying environmental conditions.

  12. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR): CLOSED AND OPEN STATE CHANNEL MODELS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corradi, Valentina; Vergani, Paola; Tieleman, D Peter

    2015-09-18

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily. CFTR controls the flow of anions through the apical membrane of epithelia. Dysfunctional CFTR causes the common lethal genetic disease cystic fibrosis. Transitions between open and closed states of CFTR are regulated by ATP binding and hydrolysis on the cytosolic nucleotide binding domains, which are coupled with the transmembrane (TM) domains forming the pathway for anion permeation. Lack of structural data hampers a global understanding of CFTR and thus the development of "rational" approaches directly targeting defective CFTR. In this work, we explored possible conformational states of the CFTR gating cycle by means of homology modeling. As templates, we used structures of homologous ABC transporters, namely TM(287-288), ABC-B10, McjD, and Sav1866. In the light of published experimental results, structural analysis of the transmembrane cavity suggests that the TM(287-288)-based CFTR model could correspond to a commonly occupied closed state, whereas the McjD-based model could represent an open state. The models capture the important role played by Phe-337 as a filter/gating residue and provide structural information on the conformational transition from closed to open channel.

  13. Are total, intensity- and domain-specific physical activity levels associated with life satisfaction among university students?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Željko Pedišić

    Full Text Available Thorough information about the relationship between physical activity (PA and life satisfaction is still lacking. Therefore, this study examined the cross-sectional relationships between life satisfaction and meeting the World Health Organization (WHO moderate to vigorous-intensity PA recommendations, total volume and duration of PA, intensity-specific PA (walking, moderate- and vigorous-intensity, domain-specific PA (work, transport-related, domestic, and leisure-time, and 11 domain and intensity-specific PA types among university students. Additionally, we examined the associations between life satisfaction and gender, age, disposable income, community size, smoking, alcohol intake, body mass index (BMI, and self-rated health.The study included a random sample of 1750 university students in Zagreb, Croatia (response rate = 71.7%; 62.4% females; mean age 21.5 ± 1.8 years, using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire-long form and the Satisfaction with Life Scale.Higher life satisfaction was associated with female gender (β = 0.13; p = <0.001, younger age (β = -0.07; p = 0.024, higher disposable income (β = 0.10; p = 0.001, and better self-rated health (β = 0.30; p = <0.001. No significant association was found between life satisfaction and size of community (p = 0.567, smoking status (p = 0.056, alcohol consumption (p = 0.058, or BMI (p = 0.508. Among all PA variables, only leisure-time vigorous-intensity PA was significantly associated with life satisfaction after adjustments for socio-demographic characteristics, lifestyle and self-rated general health (β = 0.06; p = 0.045.This study indicated a weak positive relationship between leisure-time vigorous-intensity PA and life satisfaction, whilst no such association was found for other PA variables. These findings underscore the importance of analyzing domain and intensity-specific PA levels in future studies among university students, as drawing conclusions about the

  14. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography morphology in optic disc pit associated maculopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz Michalewski

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Our purpose was to study the clinical manifestation and course of optic pit maculopathy using Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SD- OCT images. Materials and Methods: We used SD-OCT to examine 20 eyes of 19 patients with a macular detachment in combination with an optic. Results: We observed five different fovea appearances in regard to fluid localization. In five eyes, we recorded changes in the fluid distribution with SD-OCT. In 17/20 eyes, we noted a communication between the perineural and subretinal and/or intraretinal space at the margin of the optic disc. Conclusion: 3-dimensional SD-OCT (3D-SDOCT scans revealed a three-fold connection, between subretinal and intraretinal space, perineural space, and the vitreous cavity. Therefore, we suppose that intraretinal or subretinal fluid in optic pit maculopathy may have both a vitreous and cerebrospinal origin. A membrane, covering the optic nerve was noted in 14 cases. Even if it seems intact in some B-scans, it is not complete in others several micrometers apart. Additionally, we observed fluid accumulation below the margin of the optic disc and hyperreflective porous tissue in the optic disc excavation. Those findings do not influence the course of maculopathy.

  15. The wheat grain contains pectic domains exhibiting specific spatial and development-associated distribution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Laure Chateigner-Boutin

    Full Text Available Cell walls are complex structures surrounding plant cells with a composition that varies among species and even within a species between organs, cell types and development stages. For years, cell walls in wheat grains were described as simple walls consisting mostly of arabinoxylans and mixed-linked beta glucans. Proteomic and transcriptomic studies identified enzyme families involved in the synthesis of many more cell wall polysaccharides in the wheat grains. Here we describe the discovery of pectic domains in wheat grain using monoclonal antibodies and enzymatic treatment to degrade the major cell wall polymers. Distinct spatial distributions were observed for rhamnogalacturonan I present in the endosperm and mostly in the aleurone layer and homogalacturonan especially found in the outer layers, and tight developmental regulations were unveiled. We also uncovered a massive deposition of homogalacturonan via large vesicular bodies in the seed coat (testa beneath a thick cuticle during development. Our findings raise questions about the function of pectin in wheat grain.

  16. ABC transporter architecture and regulatory roles of accessory domains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biemans-Oldehinkel, E; Doeven, MK; Poolman, B

    2006-01-01

    We present an overview of the architecture of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters and dissect the systems in core and accessory domains. The ABC transporter core is formed by the transmembrane domains (TMDs) and the nucleotide binding domains (NBDs) that constitute the actual translocator. The a

  17. The Evolutionary History of MAPL (Mitochondria-Associated Protein Ligase and Other Eukaryotic BAM/GIDE Domain Proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy G Wideman

    Full Text Available MAPL (mitochondria-associated protein ligase, also called MULAN/GIDE/MUL1 is a multifunctional mitochondrial outer membrane protein found in human cells that contains a unique BAM (beside a membrane domain and a C-terminal RING-finger domain. MAPL has been implicated in several processes that occur in animal cells such as NF-kB activation, innate immunity and antiviral signaling, suppression of PINK1/parkin defects, mitophagy in skeletal muscle, and caspase-dependent apoptosis. Previous studies demonstrated that the BAM domain is present in diverse organisms in which most of these processes do not occur, including plants, archaea, and bacteria. Thus the conserved function of MAPL and its BAM domain remains an open question. In order to gain insight into its conserved function, we investigated the evolutionary origins of MAPL by searching for homologues in predicted proteomes of diverse eukaryotes. We show that MAPL proteins with a conserved BAM-RING architecture are present in most animals, protists closely related to animals, a single species of fungus, and several multicellular plants and related green algae. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that eukaryotic MAPL proteins originate from a common ancestor and not from independent horizontal gene transfers from bacteria. We also determined that two independent duplications of MAPL occurred, one at the base of multicellular plants and another at the base of vertebrates. Although no other eukaryote genome examined contained a verifiable MAPL orthologue, BAM domain-containing proteins were identified in the protists Bigelowiella natans and Ectocarpus siliculosis. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that these proteins are more closely related to prokaryotic BAM proteins and therefore likely arose from independent horizontal gene transfers from bacteria. We conclude that MAPL proteins with BAM-RING architectures have been present in the holozoan and viridiplantae lineages since their very beginnings

  18. Molecular dynamics simulation of the transmembrane subunit of BtuCD in the lipid bilayer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Based on the crystal structure of the vitamin B12 transporter protein of Escherichia coli(BtuCD) a system consisting of the BtuCD transmembrane domain(BtuC) and the palmitoyloleoyl phosphatidylcholine(POPC) lipid bilayer was constructed in silica,and a more-than-57-nanosecond molecular dynamics(MD) simulation was performed on it to reveal the intrinsic functional motions of BtuC.The results showed that a stable protein-lipid bilayer was obtained and the POPC lipid bilayer was able to adjust its thickness to match the embedded BtuC which underwent relatively complicated motions.These results may help to understand the mechanism of transmembrane substrate transport at the atomic level.

  19. Childhood trauma and dimensions of depression: a specific association with the cognitive domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar A. Vares

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate associations between a history of childhood trauma and dimensions of depression in a sample of clinically depressed patients. Methods: A sample of 217 patients from a mood-disorder outpatient unit was investigated with the Beck Depression Inventory, the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, the CORE Assessment of Psychomotor Change, and the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire. A previous latent model identifying six depressive dimensions was used for analysis. Path analysis and Multiple Indicators Multiple Causes (MIMIC models were used to investigate associations between general childhood trauma and childhood maltreatment modalities (emotional, sexual, and physical abuse; emotional and physical neglect with dimensions of depression (sexual, cognition, insomnia, appetite, non-interactiveness/retardation, and agitation. Results: The overall childhood trauma index was uniquely associated with cognitive aspects of depression, but not with any other depressive dimension. An investigation of childhood maltreatment modalities revealed that emotional abuse was consistently associated with depression severity in the cognitive dimension. Conclusion: Childhood trauma, and specifically emotional abuse, could be significant risk factors for the subsequent development of cognitive symptoms of major depression. These influences might be specific to this depressive dimension and not found in any other dimension, which might have conceptual and therapeutic implications for clinicians and researchers alike.

  20. Virus-Encoded 7 Transmembrane Receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølleskov-Jensen, Ann-Sofie; Oliveira, MarthaTrindade; Farrell, Helen Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Herpesviruses are an ancient group which have exploited gene capture of multiple cellular modulators of the immune response. Viral homologues of 7 transmembrane receptors (v7TMRs) are a consistent feature of beta- and gammaherpesviruses; the majority of the v7TMRs are homologous to cellular...... chemokine receptors (CKRs). Conserved families of v7TMRs distinguish between beta- versus gammaherpesviruses; furthermore, significant divisions within these subfamilies, such as between genera of the gammaherpesviruses or between the primate and rodent cytomegaloviruses, coincide with specific v7TMR gene...... families. Divergence of functional properties between the viral 7TMR and their cellular counterparts is likely, therefore, to reflect adaptation supporting various aspects of the viral lifecycle with concomitant effects upon viral pathogenesis. Consistent with their long evolutionary history, the v7TMRs...

  1. Transmembrane protein sorting driven by membrane curvature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strahl, H.; Ronneau, S.; González, B. Solana; Klutsch, D.; Schaffner-Barbero, C.; Hamoen, L. W.

    2015-11-01

    The intricate structure of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells depends on the ability to target proteins to specific cellular locations. In most cases, we have a poor understanding of the underlying mechanisms. A typical example is the assembly of bacterial chemoreceptors at cell poles. Here we show that the classical chemoreceptor TlpA of Bacillus subtilis does not localize according to the consensus stochastic nucleation mechanism but accumulates at strongly curved membrane areas generated during cell division. This preference was confirmed by accumulation at non-septal curved membranes. Localization appears to be an intrinsic property of the protein complex and does not rely on chemoreceptor clustering, as was previously shown for Escherichia coli. By constructing specific amino-acid substitutions, we demonstrate that the preference for strongly curved membranes arises from the curved shape of chemoreceptor trimer of dimers. These findings demonstrate that the intrinsic shape of transmembrane proteins can determine their cellular localization.

  2. Molecular mechanisms for generating transmembrane proton gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunner, M R; Amin, Muhamed; Zhu, Xuyu; Lu, Jianxun

    2013-01-01

    Membrane proteins use the energy of light or high energy substrates to build a transmembrane proton gradient through a series of reactions leading to proton release into the lower pH compartment (P-side) and proton uptake from the higher pH compartment (N-side). This review considers how the proton affinity of the substrates, cofactors and amino acids are modified in four proteins to drive proton transfers. Bacterial reaction centers (RCs) and photosystem II (PSII) carry out redox chemistry with the species to be oxidized on the P-side while reduction occurs on the N-side of the membrane. Terminal redox cofactors are used which have pKas that are strongly dependent on their redox state, so that protons are lost on oxidation and gained on reduction. Bacteriorhodopsin is a true proton pump. Light activation triggers trans to cis isomerization of a bound retinal. Strong electrostatic interactions within clusters of amino acids are modified by the conformational changes initiated by retinal motion leading to changes in proton affinity, driving transmembrane proton transfer. Cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) catalyzes the reduction of O2 to water. The protons needed for chemistry are bound from the N-side. The reduction chemistry also drives proton pumping from N- to P-side. Overall, in CcO the uptake of 4 electrons to reduce O2 transports 8 charges across the membrane, with each reduction fully coupled to removal of two protons from the N-side, the delivery of one for chemistry and transport of the other to the P-side.

  3. Childhood trauma and dimensions of depression: a specific association with the cognitive domain

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate associations between a history of childhood trauma and dimensions of depression in a sample of clinically depressed patients. Methods: A sample of 217 patients from a mood-disorder outpatient unit was investigated with the Beck Depression Inventory, the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, the CORE Assessment of Psychomotor Change, and the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire. A previous latent model identifying six depressive dimensions was used for analysis. Path analysis ...

  4. Promiscuous and specific phospholipid binding by domains in ZAC, a membrane-associated Arabidopsis protein with an ARF GAP zinc finger and a C2 domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, R B; Lykke-Andersen, K; Frandsen, G I

    2000-01-01

    containing the ZAC-C2 domain bind anionic phospholipids non-specifically, with some variance in Ca2+ and salt dependence. Similar assays demonstrated specific affinity of the ZAC N-terminal region (residues 1-174) for phosphatidylinositol 3-monophosphate (PI-3-P). Binding was dependent in part on an intact...... zinc finger motif, but proteins containing only the zinc finger domain (residues 1-105) did not bind PI-3-P. Recombinant ZAC possessed GTPase-activating activity on Arabidopsis ARF proteins. These data identify a novel PI-3-P-binding protein region and thereby provide evidence...

  5. Cancer associated E17K mutation causes rapid conformational drift in AKT1 pleckstrin homology (PH domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambuj Kumar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: AKT1 (v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homologue 1 kinase is one of the most frequently activated proliferated and survival pathway of cancer. Recently it has been shown that E17K mutation in the Pleckstrin Homology (PH domain of AKT1 protein leads to cancer by amplifying the phosphorylation and membrane localization of protein. The mutant has shown resistance to AKT1/2 inhibitor VIII drug molecule. In this study we have demonstrated the detailed structural and molecular consequences associated with the activity regulation of mutant protein. METHODS: The docking score exhibited significant loss in the interaction affinity to AKT1/2 inhibitor VIII drug molecule. Furthermore, the molecular dynamics simulation studies presented an evidence of rapid conformational drift observed in mutant structure. RESULTS: There was no stability loss in mutant as compared to native structure and the major cation-π interactions were also shown to be retained. Moreover, the active residues involved in membrane localization of protein exhibited significant rise in NHbonds formation in mutant. The rise in NHbond formation in active residues accounts for the 4-fold increase in the membrane localization potential of protein. CONCLUSION: The overall result suggested that, although the mutation did not induce any stability loss in structure, the associated pathological consequences might have occurred due to the rapid conformational drifts observed in the mutant AKT1 PH domain. GENERAL SIGNIFICANCE: The methodology implemented and the results obtained in this work will facilitate in determining the core molecular mechanisms of cancer-associated mutations and in designing their potential drug inhibitors.

  6. Societal and individual burden of illness among fibromyalgia patients in France: Association between disease severity and OMERACT core domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perrot Serge

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with fibromyalgia (FM report widespread pain, fatigue, and other functional limitations. This study aimed to provide an assessment of the burden of illness associated with FM in France and its association with disease severity and core domains as defined by Outcome Measures in Rheumatology Clinical Trials (OMERACT for FM. Methods This cross-sectional, observational study recruited patients with a prior diagnosis of FM from 18 community-based physician offices in France. Patients completed questions about FM impact (Fibromyalgia-Impact Questionnaire [FIQ], core symptoms (defined by OMERACT, health-related quality of life (EQ-5D, current overall health status (rated on a scale from 0 to 100, productivity, treatment satisfaction, and out-of-pocket expenses related to FM. Site staff recorded patients' treatment and health resource use based on medical record review. Costs were extrapolated from 4-week patient-reported data and 3-month clinical case report form data and calculated in 2008 Euros using a societal perspective. Tests of significance used the Kruskal-Wallis test or Fisher's Exact test where P Results Eighty-eight patients (mean 55.2 y; female:male 74:14 were recruited. The majority of patients (84.1% were prescribed medications for FM. Patients mainly described medications as a little/not at all effective (40.0% or somewhat effective (52.9%. Current Overall Health rating was 52.9 (± 17.8 and FIQ total score was 54.8 (± 17.3. FIQ total score was used to define FM severity, and 17 patients scored 0- Conclusions In a sample of 88 patients with FM from France, we found that FM poses a substantial economic and human burden on patients and society. FM severity level was significantly associated with patients' health status and core symptom domains.

  7. Characterization of amyloid-β precursor protein intracellular domain-associated transcriptional complexes in SH-SY5Y neurocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wulin Yang; Amy Yong Chen Lau; Shuizhong Luo; Qian Zhu3; Li Lu

    2012-01-01

    [Objective] Alzheimer's disease (AD) is one of the major disorders worldwide.Recent research suggests that the amyloid-β precursor protein intracellular domain (AICD) is a potential contributor to AD development and progression.The small AICD is rapidly degraded after processing from the full-length protein.The present study aimed to apply a highly efficient biotinylation approach in vitro to study AICD-associated complexes in neurocytes.[Methods] By coexpressing Escherichia coli biotin ligase with biotinyl-tagged AICD in the SH-SY5Y neuronal cell line,the effects of AICD overexpression on cell proliferation and apoptosis were analyzed.Besides,AICD-associated nuclear transcriptional complexes were purified and then examined by mass spectrometry.[Results] Our data showed that AICD overexpression not only affected cell proliferation but also led to apoptosis in differentiated SH-SY5Y cells.Moreover,biotinylation allowed single-step purification of biotinylated AICD-associated complexes from total nuclear extract via high-affinity biotin-streptavidin binding.Following this by mass spectrometry,we identified physically associated proteins,some reported previously and other novel binding partners,CUX1 and SPT5.[Conclusion]Based on these [Results],a map of theAICD-associated nuclear interactome was depicted.Specifically,AICD can activate CUXI transcriptional activity,which may be associated with AICD-dependent neuronal cell death.This work helps to understand the AICD-associated biologicalevents in AD progression and provides novel insights into the development of AD.

  8. Cdc73 subunit of the Paf1 complex contains a C-terminal Ras-like domain that promotes association of Paf1 complex with chromatin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amrich C. G.; Heroux A.; Davis, C. P.; Rogal, W. P.; Shirra, M. K.; Gardner, R. G.; Arndt, K. M.; VanDemark, A. P.

    2012-03-30

    The conserved Paf1 complex localizes to the coding regions of genes and facilitates multiple processes during transcription elongation, including the regulation of histone modifications. However, the mechanisms that govern Paf1 complex recruitment to active genes are undefined. Here we describe a previously unrecognized domain within the Cdc73 subunit of the Paf1 complex, the Cdc73 C-domain, and demonstrate its importance for Paf1 complex occupancy on transcribed chromatin. Deletion of the C-domain causes phenotypes associated with elongation defects without an apparent loss of complex integrity. Simultaneous mutation of the C-domain and another subunit of the Paf1 complex, Rtf1, causes enhanced mutant phenotypes and loss of histone H3 lysine 36 trimethylation. The crystal structure of the C-domain reveals unexpected similarity to the Ras family of small GTPases. Instead of a deep nucleotide-binding pocket, the C-domain contains a large but comparatively flat surface of highly conserved residues, devoid of ligand. Deletion of the C-domain results in reduced chromatin association for multiple Paf1 complex subunits. We conclude that the Cdc73 C-domain probably constitutes a protein interaction surface that functions with Rtf1 in coupling the Paf1 complex to the RNA polymerase II elongation machinery.

  9. A role for the extracellular domain of Crumbs in morphogenesis of Drosophila photoreceptor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Mélisande; Muschalik, Nadine; Grawe, Ferdi; Ozüyaman, Susann; Knust, Elisabeth

    2009-12-01

    Morphogenesis of Drosophila photoreceptor cells includes the subdivision of the apical membrane into the photosensitive rhabdomere and the associated stalk membrane, as well as a considerable elongation of the cell. Drosophila Crumbs (Crb), an evolutionarily conserved transmembrane protein, organizes an apical protein scaffold, which is required for elongation of the photoreceptor cell and extension of the stalk membrane. To further elucidate the role played by different Crb domains during eye morphogenesis, we performed a structure-function analysis in the eye. The analysis showed that the three variants tested, namely full-length Crb, the membrane-bound intracellular domain and the extracellular domain were able to rescue the elongation defects of crb mutant rhabdomeres. However, only full-length Crb and the membrane-bound intracellular domain could partially restore the length of the stalk membrane, while the extracellular domain failed to do so. This failure was associated with the inability of the extracellular domain to recruit beta(Heavy)-spectrin to the stalk membrane. These results highlight the functional importance of the extracellular domain of Crb in the Drosophila eye. They are in line with previous observations, which showed that mutations in the extracellular domain of human CRB1 are associated with retinitis pigmentosa 12 and Leber congenital amaurosis, two severe forms of retinal dystrophy.

  10. Protein domain prediction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ingolfsson, Helgi; Yona, Golan

    2008-01-01

    Domains are considered to be the building blocks of protein structures. A protein can contain a single domain or multiple domains, each one typically associated with a specific function. The combination of domains determines the function of the protein, its subcellular localization and the interacti

  11. Regulatory elements associated with paternally-expressed genes in the imprinted murine Angelman/Prader-Willi syndrome domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Rodriguez-Jato

    Full Text Available The Angelman/Prader-Willi syndrome (AS/PWS domain contains at least 8 imprinted genes regulated by a bipartite imprinting center (IC associated with the SNRPN gene. One component of the IC, the PWS-IC, governs the paternal epigenotype and expression of paternal genes. The mechanisms by which imprinting and expression of paternal genes within the AS/PWS domain - such as MKRN3 and NDN - are regulated by the PWS-IC are unclear. The syntenic region in the mouse is organized and imprinted similarly to the human domain with the murine PWS-IC defined by a 6 kb interval within the Snrpn locus that includes the promoter. To identify regulatory elements that may mediate PWS-IC function, we mapped the location and allele-specificity of DNase I hypersensitive (DH sites within the PWS-IC in brain cells, then identified transcription factor binding sites within a subset of these DH sites. Six major paternal-specific DH sites were detected in the Snrpn gene, five of which map within the 6 kb PWS-IC. We postulate these five DH sites represent functional components of the murine PWS-IC. Analysis of transcription factor binding within multiple DH sites detected nuclear respiratory factors (NRF's and YY1 specifically on the paternal allele. NRF's and YY1 were also detected in the paternal promoter region of the murine Mrkn3 and Ndn genes. These results suggest that NRF's and YY1 may facilitate PWS-IC function and coordinately regulate expression of paternal genes. The presence of NRF's also suggests a link between transcriptional regulation within the AS/PWS domain and regulation of respiration. 3C analyses indicated Mkrn3 lies in close proximity to the PWS-IC on the paternal chromosome, evidence that the PWS-IC functions by allele-specific interaction with its distal target genes. This could occur by allele-specific co-localization of the PWS-IC and its target genes to transcription factories containing NRF's and YY1.

  12. Mapping the self-association domains of ataxin-1: identification of novel non overlapping motifs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh P. Menon

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The neurodegenerative disease spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1 is caused by aggregation and misfolding of the ataxin-1 protein. While the pathology correlates with mutations that lead to expansion of a polyglutamine tract in the protein, other regions contribute to the aggregation process as also non-expanded ataxin-1 is intrinsically aggregation-prone and forms nuclear foci in cell. Here, we have used a combined approach based on FRET analysis, confocal microscopy and in vitro techniques to map aggregation-prone regions other than polyglutamine and to establish the importance of dimerization in self-association/foci formation. Identification of aggregation-prone regions other than polyglutamine could greatly help the development of SCA1 treatment more specific than that based on targeting the low complexity polyglutamine region.

  13. Plasmodium falciparum double C2 domain protein, PfDOC2, binds to calcium when associated with membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean, Sophonie; Zapata-Jenks, Mónica A; Farley, Julie M; Tracy, Erin; Mayer, D C Ghislaine

    2014-09-01

    The pathogenesis of malaria is strongly correlated with secretion of the micronemes, the apical organelles which contain the adhesins required for invasion of Plasmodium falciparum into human erythrocytes. A critical event in P. falciparum erythrocyte invasion is the production of calcium transients. After entering the cell, Ca(2+) binds to soluble Ca(2+)-binding proteins, such as the double C2 domains (DOC2). Recently, deletion of a P. falciparum DOC2 protein, PfDOC2, was shown to cause impairment in microneme secretion. However, PfDOC2 remains poorly characterized. Here, we report that PfDOC2 is expressed throughout the erythrocytic cycle and demonstrate that it is associated with membrane fractions and binds to calcium when it is part of these membranous structures. In summary, we show that PfDOC2 is a calcium lipid-binding protein of the protein kinase C type of DOC2 proteins.

  14. A conserved proline-rich region of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae cyclase-associated protein binds SH3 domains and modulates cytoskeletal localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, N L; Lila, T; Mintzer, K A; Chen, Z; Pahk, A J; Ren, R; Drubin, D G; Field, J

    1996-02-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae cyclase-associated protein (CAP or Srv2p) is multifunctional. The N-terminal third of CAP binds to adenylyl cyclase and has been implicated in adenylyl cyclase activation in vivo. The widely conserved C-terminal domain of CAP binds to monomeric actin and serves an important cytoskeletal regulatory function in vivo. In addition, all CAP homologs contain a centrally located proline-rich region which has no previously identified function. Recently, SH3 (Src homology 3) domains were shown to bind to proline-rich regions of proteins. Here we report that the proline-rich region of CAP is recognized by the SH3 domains of several proteins, including the yeast actin-associated protein Abp1p. Immunolocalization experiments demonstrate that CAP colocalizes with cortical actin-containing structures in vivo and that a region of CAP containing the SH3 domain binding site is required for this localization. We also demonstrate that the SH3 domain of yeast Abp1p and that of the yeast RAS protein guanine nucleotide exchange factor Cdc25p complex with adenylyl cyclase in vitro. Interestingly, the binding of the Cdc25p SH3 domain is not mediated by CAP and therefore may involve direct binding to adenylyl cyclase or to an unidentified protein which complexes with adenylyl cyclase. We also found that CAP homologous from Schizosaccharomyces pombe and humans bind SH3 domains. The human protein binds most strongly to the SH3 domain from the abl proto-oncogene. These observations identify CAP as an SH3 domain-binding protein and suggest that CAP mediates interactions between SH3 domain proteins and monomeric actin.

  15. SHANK-associated RH domain interacting protein (SHARPIN) is required for optimal NLRP3 inflammasome activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurung, Prajwal; Lamkanfi, Mohamed; Kanneganti, Thirumala-Devi

    2015-01-01

    The NLRP3 inflammasome is a multimeric protein complex assembled in response to a wide array of pathogens and danger-associated molecular patterns. Despite the ability of NLRP3 to respond to diverse cues, the mechanisms controlling assembly of this complex are contested. Recently published studies show that HOIL-1, a member of the linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex (LUBAC), contributes to activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome. SHARPIN, along with HOIP and HOIL-1 assembles the LUBAC complex. Herein, we examined whether SHARPIN is required for the activation of NLRP3 inflammasome. Utilizing Sharpincpdm macrophages (deficient in SHARPIN expression), we demonstrate that SHARPIN is required for optimal activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome by both canonical and non-canonical stimuli. Furthermore, Sharpincpdm macrophages had dramatic defects in both NFκB and MAP kinase pathways, suggesting a role in transcriptional priming of the NLRP3 inflammasome. In conclusion, our study identified SHARPIN as a novel regulator of the NLRP3 inflammasome. PMID:25637014

  16. Association between SAP and FynT: Inducible SH3 domain-mediated interaction controlled by engagement of the SLAM receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Riyan; Latour, Sylvain; Shi, Xiaochu; Veillette, André

    2006-08-01

    SAP is an intracellular adaptor molecule composed almost exclusively of an SH2 domain. It is mutated in patients with X-linked lymphoproliferative disease, a human immunodeficiency. Several immune abnormalities were also identified in SAP-deficient mice. By way of its SH2 domain, SAP interacts with tyrosine-based motifs in the cytoplasmic domain of SLAM family receptors. SAP promotes SLAM family receptor-induced protein tyrosine phosphorylation, due to its capacity to recruit the Src-related kinase FynT. This unusual property relies on the existence of a second binding surface in the SAP SH2 domain, centered on arginine 78 of SAP, that binds directly to the FynT SH3 domain. Herein, we wanted to further understand the mechanisms controlling the interaction between SLAM-SAP and FynT. Our experiments showed that, unlike conventional associations mediated by SH3 domains, the interaction of the FynT SH3 domain with SLAM-SAP was strictly inducible. It was absolutely dependent on engagement of SLAM by extracellular ligands. We obtained evidence that this inducibility was not due to increased binding of SLAM to SAP following SLAM engagement. Furthermore, it could occur independently of any appreciable SLAM-dependent biochemical signal. In fact, our data indicated that the induced association of the FynT SH3 domain with SLAM-SAP was triggered by a change in the conformation of SLAM-associated SAP caused by SLAM engagement. Together, these data elucidate further the events initiating SLAM-SAP signaling in immune cells. Moreover, they identify a strictly inducible interaction mediated by an SH3 domain.

  17. A comprehensive proteomics and genomics analysis reveals novel transmembrane proteins in human platelets and mouse megakaryocytes including G6b-B, a novel immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senis, Yotis A; Tomlinson, Michael G; García, Angel; Dumon, Stephanie; Heath, Victoria L; Herbert, John; Cobbold, Stephen P; Spalton, Jennifer C; Ayman, Sinem; Antrobus, Robin; Zitzmann, Nicole; Bicknell, Roy; Frampton, Jon; Authi, Kalwant S; Martin, Ashley; Wakelam, Michael J O; Watson, Stephen P

    2007-03-01

    The platelet surface is poorly characterized due to the low abundance of many membrane proteins and the lack of specialist tools for their investigation. In this study we identified novel human platelet and mouse megakaryocyte membrane proteins using specialist proteomics and genomics approaches. Three separate methods were used to enrich platelet surface proteins prior to identification by liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry: lectin affinity chromatography, biotin/NeutrAvidin affinity chromatography, and free flow electrophoresis. Many known, abundant platelet surface transmembrane proteins and several novel proteins were identified using each receptor enrichment strategy. In total, two or more unique peptides were identified for 46, 68, and 22 surface membrane, intracellular membrane, and membrane proteins of unknown subcellular localization, respectively. The majority of these were single transmembrane proteins. To complement the proteomics studies, we analyzed the transcriptome of a highly purified preparation of mature primary mouse megakaryocytes using serial analysis of gene expression in view of the increasing importance of mutant mouse models in establishing protein function in platelets. This approach identified all of the major classes of platelet transmembrane receptors, including multitransmembrane proteins. Strikingly 17 of the 25 most megakaryocyte-specific genes (relative to 30 other serial analysis of gene expression libraries) were transmembrane proteins, illustrating the unique nature of the megakaryocyte/platelet surface. The list of novel plasma membrane proteins identified using proteomics includes the immunoglobulin superfamily member G6b, which undergoes extensive alternate splicing. Specific antibodies were used to demonstrate expression of the G6b-B isoform, which contains an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibition motif. G6b-B undergoes tyrosine phosphorylation and association with the SH2 domain-containing phosphatase

  18. Characterization of the GXXXG motif in the first transmembrane segment of Japanese encephalitis virus precursor membrane (prM) protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ying-Ju; Peng, Jia-Guan; Wu, Suh-Chin

    2010-05-24

    The interaction between prM and E proteins in flavivirus-infected cells is a major driving force for the assembly of flavivirus particles. We used site-directed mutagenesis to study the potential role of the transmembrane domains of the prM proteins of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) in prM-E heterodimerization as well as subviral particle formation. Alanine insertion scanning mutagenesis within the GXXXG motif in the first transmembrane segment of JEV prM protein affected the prM-E heterodimerization; its specificity was confirmed by replacing the two glycines of the GXXXG motif with alanine, leucine and valine. The GXXXG motif was found to be conserved in the JEV serocomplex viruses but not other flavivirus groups. These mutants with alanine inserted in the two prM transmembrane segments all impaired subviral particle formation in cell cultures. The prM transmembrane domains of JEV may play importation roles in prM-E heterodimerization and viral particle assembly.

  19. Domains and domain loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haberland, Hartmut

    2005-01-01

    The domain concept, originally suggested by Schmidt-Rohr in the 1930’s (as credited in Fishman’s writings in the 1970s), was an attempt to sort out different areas of language use in multilingual societies, which are relevant for language choice. In Fishman’s version, domains were considered...... not described in terms of domains, and recent research e.g. about the multilingual communities in the Danish-German border area seems to confirm this....

  20. Channel Gating Regulation by the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) First Cytosolic Loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrhardt, Annette; Chung, W Joon; Pyle, Louise C; Wang, Wei; Nowotarski, Krzysztof; Mulvihill, Cory M; Ramjeesingh, Mohabir; Hong, Jeong; Velu, Sadanandan E; Lewis, Hal A; Atwell, Shane; Aller, Steve; Bear, Christine E; Lukacs, Gergely L; Kirk, Kevin L; Sorscher, Eric J

    2016-01-22

    In this study, we present data indicating a robust and specific domain interaction between the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) first cytosolic loop (CL1) and nucleotide binding domain 1 (NBD1) that allows ion transport to proceed in a regulated fashion. We used co-precipitation and ELISA to establish the molecular contact and showed that binding kinetics were not altered by the common clinical mutation F508del. Both intrinsic ATPase activity and CFTR channel gating were inhibited severely by CL1 peptide, suggesting that NBD1/CL1 binding is a crucial requirement for ATP hydrolysis and channel function. In addition to cystic fibrosis, CFTR dysregulation has been implicated in the pathogenesis of prevalent diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, acquired rhinosinusitis, pancreatitis, and lethal secretory diarrhea (e.g. cholera). On the basis of clinical relevance of the CFTR as a therapeutic target, a cell-free drug screen was established to identify modulators of NBD1/CL1 channel activity independent of F508del CFTR and pharmacologic rescue. Our findings support a targetable mechanism of CFTR regulation in which conformational changes in the NBDs cause reorientation of transmembrane domains via interactions with CL1 and result in channel gating.

  1. Modeling the structure of SARS 3a transmembrane protein using a minimum unfavorable contact approach

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Ramakrishna; Siladitya Padhi; U Deva Priyakumar

    2015-12-01

    3a is an accessory protein from SARS coronavirus that is known to play a significant role in the proliferation of the virus by forming tetrameric ion channels. Although the monomeric units are known to consist of three transmembrane (TM) domains, there are no solved structures available for the complete monomer. The present study proposes a structural model for the transmembrane region of the monomer by employing our previously tested approach, which predicts potential orientations of TM -helices by minimizing the unfavorable contact surfaces between the different TM domains. The best model structure comprising all three -helices has been subjected to MD simulations to examine its quality. The TM bundle was found to form a compact and stable structure with significant intermolecular interactions. The structural features of the proposed model of 3a account for observations from previous experimental investigations on the activity of the protein. Further analysis indicates that residues from the TM2 and TM3 domains are likely to line the pore of the ion channel, which is in good agreement with a recent experimental study. In the absence of an experimental structure for the protein, the proposed structure can serve as a useful model for inferring structure-function relationships about the protein.

  2. The Origins of Transmembrane Ion Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Wilson, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    Even though membrane proteins that mediate transport of ions and small molecules across cell walls are among the largest and least understood biopolymers in contemporary cells, it is still possible to shed light on their origins and early evolution. The central observation is that transmembrane portions of most ion channels are simply bundles of -helices. By combining results of experimental and computer simulation studies on synthetic models and natural channels, mostly of non-genomic origin, we show that the emergence of -helical channels was protobiologically plausible, and did not require highly specific amino acid sequences. Despite their simple structure, such channels could possess properties that, at the first sight, appear to require markedly larger complexity. Specifically, we explain how the antiamoebin channels, which are made of identical helices, 16 amino acids in length, achieve efficiency comparable to that of highly evolved channels. We further show that antiamoebin channels are extremely flexible, compared to modern, genetically coded channels. On the basis of our results, we propose that channels evolved further towards high structural complexity because they needed to acquire stable rigid structures and mechanisms for precise regulation rather than improve efficiency. In general, even though architectures of membrane proteins are not nearly as diverse as those of water-soluble proteins, they are sufficiently flexible to adapt readily to the functional demands arising during evolution.

  3. Transmembrane potentials of canine AV junctional tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, W W

    1986-06-01

    The atrioventricular (AV) junction comprises the AV node, His bundle (HB), and specialized tissues proximal to the node called paranodal fibers (PNF). In the present study, an in vitro, dissection-exposed canine right atrial (RA), transitional fiber (TF), AV junctional preparation was used. The TF and PNF formed a pathway running along the base of the septal cusp of the tricuspid valve (SCTV). In the first experiment, impulses elicited at the RA were monitored to propagate sequentially through the TF, PNF, AV node, and then the HB. This functional evidence supports the concept that a conduction pathway connecting the RA and the AV node exists along the base of the SCTV. This internodal pathway is referred to as the septal cusp pathway. In another experiment, transmembrane potentials and Vmax were determined on each of the AV junctional tissues. Results showed that PNF had the lowest Vmax (2.5 V/sec), followed by AV node (7.0 V/sec) and HB (33 V/sec). This finding showed that PNF, and not the AV node, has the lowest Vmax, suggesting that the PNF has the lowest conductivity among the AV junctional tissues, and this study advances our understanding on the mechanism of AV conduction delay in dog hearts.

  4. Poxvirus-encoded TNF decoy receptors inhibit the biological activity of transmembrane TNF

    OpenAIRE

    Pontejo, Sergio M; Alejo, Alí; Alcamí, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 The Authors. Poxviruses encode up to four different soluble TNF receptors, named cytokine response modifier B (CrmB), CrmC, CrmD and CrmE. These proteins mimic the extracellular domain of the cellular TNF receptors to bind and inhibit the activity of TNF and, in some cases, other TNF superfamily ligands. Most of these ligands are released after the enzymic cleavage of a membrane precursor. However, transmembrane TNF (tmTNF) is not only a precursor of soluble TNF but also exerts specifi...

  5. The SET2-RPB1 interaction domain of human RECQ5 is important for transcription-associated genome stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Xu, Xiaohua; Liu, Yilun

    2011-05-01

    The conserved RECQ5 DNA helicase is a tumor suppressor in mammalian cells. Defects in RECQ5 lead to the accumulation of spontaneous DNA double-stranded breaks (DSBs) during replication, despite the fact that these cells are proficient in DSB repair by homologous recombination (HR). The reason for this is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that these DSBs are linked to RNA polymerase II (RNAPII)-dependent transcription. In human RECQ5-depleted cells, active RNAPII accumulates on chromatin, and DNA breaks are associated with an RNAPII-dependent transcribed locus. Hence, transcription inhibition eliminates both active RNAPII and spontaneous DSB formation. In addition, the regulatory effect of RECQ5 on transcription and its interaction with RNAPII are enhanced in S-phase cells, supporting a role for RECQ5 in preventing transcription-associated DSBs during replication. Finally, we show that the SET2-RPB1 interaction (SRI) domain of human RECQ5 is important for suppressing spontaneous DSBs and the p53-dependent transcription stress response caused by the stalling of active RNAPII on DNA. Thus, our studies provide novel insights into a mechanism by which RECQ5 regulates the transcription machinery via its dynamic interaction with RNAPII, thereby preventing genome instability.

  6. The identification of putative RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain associated proteins in red and green algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chunlin; Hager, Paul W; Stiller, John W

    2014-01-01

    A tandemly repeated C-terminal domain (CTD) of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II is functionally essential and strongly conserved in many organisms, including animal, yeast and plant models. Although present in simple, ancestral red algae, CTD tandem repeats have undergone extensive modifications and degeneration during the evolutionary transition to developmentally complex rhodophytes. In contrast, CTD repeats are conserved in both green algae and their more complex land plant relatives. Understanding the mechanistic differences that underlie these variant patterns of CTD evolution requires knowledge of CTD-associated proteins in these 2 lineages. To provide an initial baseline comparison, we bound potential phospho-CTD associated proteins (PCAPs) to artificially synthesized and phosphorylated CTD repeats from the unicellular red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae and green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Our results indicate that red and green algae share a number of PCAPs, including kinases and proteins involved in mRNA export. There also are important taxon-specific differences, including mRNA splicing-related PCAPs recovered from Chlamydomonas but not Cyanidioschyzon, consistent with the relative intron densities in green and red algae. Our results also offer the first experimental indication that different proteins bind 2 distinct types of repeats in Cyanidioschyzon, suggesting a division of function between the proximal and distal CTD, similar to patterns identified in more developmentally complex model organisms.

  7. Biochemical studies of pigments from a pathogenic fungus Microsporum cookei. V. Evidence for the transmembrane permeability of xanthomegnin across phospholipid bilayer membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, K; Akita, T; Nozawa, Y

    1978-08-15

    Direct evidence is provided for the transmembrane permeation of xanthomegnin across phospholipid bilayer membranes using ascorbate-loaded liposomes. This process may be associated with an uncoupling effect on the oxidative phosphorylation of mitochondria.

  8. Acquired resistance of lung adenocarcinomas to gefitinib or erlotinib is associated with a second mutation in the EGFR kinase domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Pao

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lung adenocarcinomas from patients who respond to the tyrosine kinase inhibitors gefitinib (Iressa or erlotinib (Tarceva usually harbor somatic gain-of-function mutations in exons encoding the kinase domain of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR. Despite initial responses, patients eventually progress by unknown mechanisms of "acquired" resistance. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We show that in two of five patients with acquired resistance to gefitinib or erlotinib, progressing tumors contain, in addition to a primary drug-sensitive mutation in EGFR, a secondary mutation in exon 20, which leads to substitution of methionine for threonine at position 790 (T790M in the kinase domain. Tumor cells from a sixth patient with a drug-sensitive EGFR mutation whose tumor progressed on adjuvant gefitinib after complete resection also contained the T790M mutation. This mutation was not detected in untreated tumor samples. Moreover, no tumors with acquired resistance had KRAS mutations, which have been associated with primary resistance to these drugs. Biochemical analyses of transfected cells and growth inhibition studies with lung cancer cell lines demonstrate that the T790M mutation confers resistance to EGFR mutants usually sensitive to either gefitinib or erlotinib. Interestingly, a mutation analogous to T790M has been observed in other kinases with acquired resistance to another kinase inhibitor, imatinib (Gleevec. CONCLUSION: In patients with tumors bearing gefitinib- or erlotinib-sensitive EGFR mutations, resistant subclones containing an additional EGFR mutation emerge in the presence of drug. This observation should help guide the search for more effective therapy against a specific subset of lung cancers.

  9. Penetration of three transmembrane segments of Slc11a1 in lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Haiyan; Wang, Ying; Chu, Hongtao; Wang, Wenhua; Mao, Qidong

    2014-03-25

    Slc11a1 is a divalent metal cation transporter with 12 putative transmembrane domains (TM) and plays a role in host defense. In present work, we investigated the secondary structure and topology of the peptides associated to Slc11a1-TM2, TM3 and TM4 (wildtype peptides and function-relating mutants) in the phospholipid vesicles (DMPC, DMPG and their mixtures) using circular dichroism, fluorescence spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. We found that TM3 is obviously different in secondary structure and topology from TM2 to TM4 in the lipid membranes. The peptide TM3 is less structured and embedded in the lipid membranes less deeply than TM2 and TM4 at pH 5.5 and 7. The insertion position of TM3 in the lipid membranes is adjusted by pH, more deeply at more acidic pH environment, whereas the locations of TM2 and TM4 in the lipid membranes are less changed with pH. The E139A substitution of TM3 significantly impairs the pH dependence of the buried depth of TM3 and causes a pronounced increase in helicity in all DMPG-containing lipid vesicles at pH 5.5 and 7 and in DMPC at pH 4. In contrast, TM2 and TM4 are similar in topology. The G169D mutation has little effect on the topological arrangement of TM4 in membranes. The property of headgroups of the phospholipids has an effect on the secondary structure and topology of the peptides. All peptides could be structured with more helicity and embedded more deeply in DMPG-containing lipid vesicles than in DMPC membrane at pH 5.5 and 7.

  10. The minimal essential unit for cadherin-mediated intercellular adhesion comprises extracellular domains 1 and 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shan, Weisong; Yagita, Yoshiki; Wang, Zhaohui

    2004-01-01

    N-cadherin comprises five homologous extracellular domains, a transmembrane, and a cytoplasmic domain. The extracellular domains of N-cadherin play important roles in homophilic cell adhesion, but the contribution of each domain to this phenomenon has not been fully evaluated. In particular, the ...

  11. Association of protein kinase Cmu with type II phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase and type I phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate 5-kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, K; Toker, A; Wong, K; Marignani, P A; Johannes, F J; Cantley, L C

    1998-09-04

    Protein kinase Cmu (PKCmu), also named protein kinase D, is an unusual member of the PKC family that has a putative transmembrane domain and pleckstrin homology domain. This enzyme has a substrate specificity distinct from other PKC isoforms (Nishikawa, K., Toker, A., Johannes, F. J., Songyang, Z., and Cantley, L. C. (1997) J. Biol. Chem. 272, 952-960), and its mechanism of regulation is not yet clear. Here we show that PKCmu forms a complex in vivo with a phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase and a phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate 5-kinase. A region of PKCmu between the amino-terminal transmembrane domain and the pleckstrin homology domain is shown to be involved in the association with the lipid kinases. Interestingly, a kinase-dead point mutant of PKCmu failed to associate with either lipid kinase activity, indicating that autophosphorylation may be required to expose the lipid kinase interaction domain. Furthermore, the subcellular distribution of the PKCmu-associated lipid kinases to the particulate fraction depends on the presence of the amino-terminal region of PKCmu including the predicted transmembrane region. These results suggest a novel model in which the non-catalytic region of PKCmu acts as a scaffold for assembly of enzymes involved in phosphoinositide synthesis at specific membrane locations.

  12. Two separate functions are encoded by the carboxyl-terminal domains of the yeast cyclase-associated protein and its mammalian homologs. Dimerization and actin binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelicof, A; Protopopov, V; David, D; Lin, X Y; Lustgarten, V; Gerst, J E

    1996-07-26

    The yeast adenylyl cyclase-associated protein, CAP, was identified as a component of the RAS-activated cyclase complex. CAP consists of two functional domains separated by a proline-rich region. One domain, which localizes to the amino terminus, mediates RAS signaling through adenylyl cyclase, while a domain at the carboxyl terminus is involved in the regulation of cell growth and morphogenesis. Recently, the carboxyl terminus of yeast CAP was shown to sequester actin, but whether this function has been conserved, and is the sole function of this domain, is unclear. Here, we demonstrate that the carboxyl-terminal domains of CAP and CAP homologs have two separate functions. We show that carboxyl-terminals of both yeast CAP and a mammalian CAP homolog, MCH1, bind to actin. We also show that this domain contains a signal for dimerization, allowing both CAP and MCH1 to form homodimers and heterodimers. The properties of actin binding and dimerization are mediated by separate regions on the carboxyl terminus; the last 27 amino acids of CAP being critical for actin binding. Finally, we present evidence that links a segment of the proline-rich region of CAP to its localization in yeast. Together, these results suggest that all three domains of CAP proteins are functional.

  13. Functional characterization of a StyS sensor kinase reveals distinct domains associated with intracellular and extracellular sensing of styrene in P. putida CA-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Niall D; Mooney, Aisling; O'Mahony, Mark; Dobson, Alan DW

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial two-component systems (TCSs) are of vital importance in the translation of rapidly changing environmental conditions into appropriate cellular regulatory responses enabling adaptation, growth, and survival. The diverse range of environmental signals that TCSs can process, coupled with discrete modular domains within TCS proteins, offers considerable potential for the rational design of bio-sensor and/or bio-reporter strains. In this study we functionally characterize the multi-domain StyS sensor kinase associated with sensing of the aromatic pollutant styrene by Pseudomonas putida CA-3. Deletion analysis of discrete domains was performed and the ability of the truncated StyS sensor proteins to activate a cognate reporter system in an E. coli host assessed. The essential histidine kinase and PAS input domains were identified for StyS dependent activation of the reporter system. However, co-expression of an ABC-transporter protein StyE, previously linked to styrene transport in P. putida CA-3, enabled activation of the reporter system with a StyS construct containing a non-essential PAS input domain, suggesting a novel role for intracellular detection and/or activation. Site directed mutagenesis and amino acid deletions were employed to further characterize the PAS sensing domains of both input regions. The potential implications of these findings in the use of multi-domain sensor kinases in rational design strategies and the potential link between transport and intracellular sensing are discussed. PMID:24637704

  14. Structural determinants of protein partitioning into ordered membrane domains and lipid rafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorent, Joseph Helmuth; Levental, Ilya

    2015-11-01

    Increasing evidence supports the existence of lateral nanoscopic lipid domains in plasma membranes, known as lipid rafts. These domains preferentially recruit membrane proteins and lipids to facilitate their interactions and thereby regulate transmembrane signaling and cellular homeostasis. The functionality of raft domains is intrinsically dependent on their selectivity for specific membrane components; however, while the physicochemical determinants of raft association for lipids are known, very few systematic studies have focused on the structural aspects that guide raft partitioning of proteins. In this review, we describe biophysical and thermodynamic aspects of raft-mimetic liquid ordered phases, focusing on those most relevant for protein partitioning. Further, we detail the variety of experimental models used to study protein-raft interactions. Finally, we review the existing literature on mechanisms for raft targeting, including lipid post-translational modifications, lipid binding, and transmembrane domain features. We conclude that while protein palmitoylation is a clear raft-targeting signal, few other general structural determinants for raft partitioning have been revealed, suggesting that many discoveries lie ahead in this burgeoning field.

  15. Translocation domain mutations affecting cellular toxicity identify the Clostridium difficile toxin B pore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhifen; Park, Minyoung; Tam, John; Auger, Anick; Beilhartz, Greg L; Lacy, D Borden; Melnyk, Roman A

    2014-03-11

    Disease associated with Clostridium difficile infection is caused by the actions of the homologous toxins TcdA and TcdB on colonic epithelial cells. Binding to target cells triggers toxin internalization into acidified vesicles, whereupon cryptic segments from within the 1,050-aa translocation domain unfurl and insert into the bounding membrane, creating a transmembrane passageway to the cytosol. Our current understanding of the mechanisms underlying pore formation and the subsequent translocation of the upstream cytotoxic domain to the cytosol is limited by the lack of information available regarding the identity and architecture of the transmembrane pore. Here, through systematic perturbation of conserved sites within predicted membrane-insertion elements of the translocation domain, we uncovered highly sensitive residues--clustered between amino acids 1,035 and 1,107--that when individually mutated, reduced cellular toxicity by as much as >1,000-fold. We demonstrate that defective variants are defined by impaired pore formation in planar lipid bilayers and biological membranes, resulting in an inability to intoxicate cells through either apoptotic or necrotic pathways. These findings along with the unexpected similarities uncovered between the pore-forming "hotspots" of TcdB and the well-characterized α-helical diphtheria toxin translocation domain provide insights into the structure and mechanism of formation of the translocation pore for this important class of pathogenic toxins.

  16. Transmembrane helices in "classical" nuclear reproductive steroid receptors: a perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrill, Gene A; Kostellow, Adele B; Gupta, Raj K

    2015-01-01

    Steroid receptors of the nuclear receptor superfamily are proposed to be either: 1) located in the cytosol and moved to the cell nucleus upon activation, 2) tethered to the inside of the plasma membrane, or 3) retained in the nucleus until free steroid hormone enters and activates specific receptors. Using computational methods to analyze peptide receptor topology, we find that the "classical" nuclear receptors for progesterone (PRB/PGR), androgen (ARB/AR) and estrogen (ER1/ESR1) contain two transmembrane helices (TMH) within their ligand-binding domains (LBD).The MEMSAT-SVM algorithm indicates that ARB and ER2 (but not PRB or ER1) contain a pore-lining (channel-forming) region which may merge with other pore-lining regions to form a membrane channel. ER2 lacks a TMH, but contains a single pore-lining region. The MemBrain algorithm predicts that PRB, ARB and ER1 each contain one TMH plus a half TMH separated by 51 amino acids.ER2 contains two half helices. The TM-2 helices of ARB, ER1 and ER2 each contain 9-13 amino acid motifs reported to translocate the receptor to the plasma membrane, as well as cysteine palmitoylation sites. PoreWalker analysis of X-ray crystallographic data identifies a pore or channel within the LBDs of ARB and ER1 and predicts that 70 and 72 residues are pore-lining residues, respectively. The data suggest that (except for ER2), cytosolic receptors become anchored to the plasma membrane following synthesis. Half-helices and pore-lining regions in turn form functional ion channels and/or facilitate passive steroid uptake into the cell. In perspective, steroid-dependent insertion of "classical" receptors containing pore-lining regions into the plasma membrane may regulate permeability to ions such as Ca(2+), Na(+) or K(+), as well as facilitate steroid translocation into the nucleus.

  17. Ahcyl2 upregulates NBCe1-B via multiple serine residues of the PEST domain-mediated association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Pil Whan; Ahn, Jeong Yeal; Yang, Dongki

    2016-07-01

    Inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate [IP3] receptors binding protein released with IP3 (IRBIT) was previously reported as an activator of NBCe1-B. Recent studies have characterized IRBIT homologue S-Adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase-like 2 (AHCYL2). AHCYL2 is highly homologous to IRBIT (88%) and heteromerizes with IRBIT. The two important domains in the N-terminus of AHCYL2 are a PEST domain and a coiled-coil domain which are highly comparable to those in IRBIT. Therefore, in this study, we tried to identify the role of those domains in mouse AHCYL2 (Ahcyl2), and we succeeded in identifying PEST domain of Ahcyl2 as a regulation region for NBCe1-B activity. Site directed mutagenesis and coimmunoprecipitation assay showed that NBCe1-B binds to the N-terminal Ahcyl2-PEST domain, and its binding is determined by the phosphorylation of 4 critical serine residues (Ser151, Ser154, Ser157, and Ser160) in Ahcyl2 PEST domain. Also we revealed that 4 critical serine residues in Ahcyl2 PEST domain are indispensable for the activation of NBCe1-B using measurement of intracellular pH experiment. Thus, these results suggested that the NBCe1-B is interacted with 4 critical serine residues in Ahcyl2 PEST domain, which play an important role in intracellular pH regulation through NBCe1-B.

  18. Lipid bilayer microarray for parallel recording of transmembrane ion currents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Pioufle, Bruno; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Tabata, Kazuhito V; Noji, Hiroyuki; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a multiwell biochip for simultaneous parallel recording of ion current through transmembrane pores reconstituted in planar lipid bilayer arrays. Use of a thin poly(p-xylylene) (parylene) film having micrometer-sized apertures (phi=15-50 microm, t=20 microm) led to formation of highly stable bilayer lipid membranes (BLMs) for incorporation of transmembrane pores; thus, a large number of BLMs could be arrayed without any skillful technique. We optically confirmed the simultaneous formation of BLMs in a 5x5 matrix, and in our durability test, the BLM lasted more than 15 h. Simultaneous parallel recording of alamethicin and gramicidin transmembrane pores in multiple contiguous recording sites demonstrated the feasibility of high-throughput screening of transmembrane ion currents in artificial lipid bilayers.

  19. The role of lipophilicity in transmembrane anion transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saggiomo, Vittorio; Otto, Sijbren; Marques, Igor; Felix, Vitor; Torroba, Tomas; Quesada, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    The transmembrane anion transport activity of a series of synthetic molecules inspired by the structure of tambjamine alkaloids can be tuned by varying the lipophilicity of the receptor, with carriers within a certain log P range performing best.

  20. TSSOM:Transmembrane Segments Prediction by Self—Organizing Map

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIUQi; ZHUYisheng; WANGBaohua; LIYixue

    2003-01-01

    A novel method ealled TSSOM(Transmembrane segments prediction by self-organizing map)is presented in the paper.The main idea of the method lies in the application of self-organizing feature map together with special visualization techniques to classify the multivariate "time" series of transmembrane proteins into flve classes.Through the analysis of resulting trajectories on the map,frequent patterns of transmembrane segments are detected and even some kind of "new"knowledge about membrane insertion mechanism is acquired.The discovered patterns and the knowledge are then used to predict transmembrane segments for auery sequence.The prediction results not only show that the method is powerful,but also prove that the patterns and the knowledge about the interaction bwtween the patterns are effective and acceptable.

  1. Hepatitis C virus NS4B carboxy terminal domain is a membrane binding domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spaan Willy JM

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV induces membrane rearrangements during replication. All HCV proteins are associated to membranes, pointing out the importance of membranes for HCV. Non structural protein 4B (NS4B has been reported to induce cellular membrane alterations like the membranous web. Four transmembrane segments in the middle of the protein anchor NS4B to membranes. An amphipatic helix at the amino-terminus attaches to membranes as well. The carboxy-terminal domain (CTD of NS4B is highly conserved in Hepaciviruses, though its function remains unknown. Results A cytosolic localization is predicted for the NS4B-CTD. However, using membrane floatation assays and immunofluorescence, we now show targeting of the NS4B-CTD to membranes. Furthermore, a profile-profile search, with an HCV NS4B-CTD multiple sequence alignment, indicates sequence similarity to the membrane binding domain of prokaryotic D-lactate dehydrogenase (d-LDH. The crystal structure of E. coli d-LDH suggests that the region similar to NS4B-CTD is located in the membrane binding domain (MBD of d-LDH, implying analogy in membrane association. Targeting of d-LDH to membranes occurs via electrostatic interactions of positive residues on the outside of the protein with negative head groups of lipids. To verify that anchorage of d-LDH MBD and NS4B-CTD is analogous, NS4B-CTD mutants were designed to disrupt these electrostatic interactions. Membrane association was confirmed by swopping the membrane contacting helix of d-LDH with the corresponding domain of the 4B-CTD. Furthermore, the functionality of these residues was tested in the HCV replicon system. Conclusion Together these data show that NS4B-CTD is associated to membranes, similar to the prokaryotic d-LDH MBD, and is important for replication.

  2. The rice HGW gene encodes a ubiquitin-associated (UBA domain protein that regulates heading date and grain weight.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Li

    Full Text Available Heading date and grain weight are two determining agronomic traits of crop yield. To date, molecular factors controlling both heading date and grain weight have not been identified. Here we report the isolation of a hemizygous mutation, heading and grain weight (hgw, which delays heading and reduces grain weight in rice. Analysis of hgw mutant phenotypes indicate that the hemizygous hgw mutation decreases latitudinal cell number in the lemma and palea, both composing the spikelet hull that is known to determine the size and shape of brown grain. Molecular cloning and characterization of the HGW gene showed that it encodes a novel plant-specific ubiquitin-associated (UBA domain protein localized in the cytoplasm and nucleus, and functions as a key upstream regulator to promote expressions of heading date- and grain weight-related genes. Moreover, co-expression analysis in rice and Arabidopsis indicated that HGW and its Arabidopsis homolog are co-expressed with genes encoding various components of ubiquitination machinery, implying a fundamental role for the ubiquitination pathway in heading date and grain weight control.

  3. Conformational change upon ligand binding and dynamics of the PDZ domain from leukemia-associated Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiangxin; Zhang, Jiahai; Yang, Yinshan; Huang, Hongda; Shen, Weiqun; Hu, Qi; Wang, Xingsheng; Wu, Jihui; Shi, Yunyu

    2008-06-01

    Leukemia-associated Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor (LARG) is a RhoA-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) that can activate RhoA. The PDZ (PSD-95/Disc-large/ZO-1 homology) domain of LARG interacts with membrane receptors, which can relay extracellular signals to RhoA signal transduction pathways. Until now there is no structural and dynamic information about these interactions. Here we report the NMR structures of the LARG PDZ in the apo form and in complex with the plexin-B1 C-terminal octapeptide. Unobservable resonances of the residues in betaB/betaC and betaE/alphaB loops in apo state were observed in the complex state. A distinct region of the binding groove in the LARG PDZ was found to undergo conformational change compared with other PDZs. Analysis of the (15)N relaxation data using reduced spectral density mapping shows that the apo LARG PDZ (especially its ligand-binding groove) is flexible and exhibits internal motions on both picosecond to nanosecond and microsecond to millisecond timescales. Mutagenesis and thermodynamic studies indicate that the conformation of the betaB/betaC and betaE/alphaB loops affects the PDZ-peptide interaction. It is suggested that the conformational flexibility could facilitate the change of structures upon ligand binding.

  4. The Involvement of TNF-α in Cognitive Dysfunction Associated with Major Depressive Disorder: An Opportunity for Domain Specific Treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortolato, Beatrice; Carvalho, Andre F; Soczynska, Joanna K; Perini, Giulia I; McIntyre, Roger S

    2015-01-01

    Major depressive disorder is a highly prevalent, chronic and recurring disorder, associated with substantial impairment in cognitive and interpersonal functions. Accumulating evidence suggests that inflammatory processes play an important role in the etio-pathogenesis, phenomenology, comorbidity and treatment of MDD. Suboptimal remission rates and the persistence of cognitive deficits contribute to functional impairment in MDD inviting the need for the development of mechanistically novel and domain specific treatment approaches. The MEDLINE/ Pubmed database was searched from inception to February, 9th, 2014 with combinations of the following search terms: 'TNF-alpha', 'depression', 'infliximab', 'etanercept', 'adalimumab', 'golimumab' and 'certolizumab'. Preclinical and clinical evidence linking TNF-α to MDD pathophysiology were reviewed as well as the current status of TNF-α modulators as novel agents for the treatment of MDD. Experimental models and clinical studies provide encouraging preliminary evidence for the efficacy of TNF- α antagonists in mitigating depressive symptoms and improving cognitive deficits. Further studies are warranted to confirm these data in larger randomized controlled trials in primary psychiatric populations. Translational research provides a promising perspective that may aid the development and/or repurposing of mechanism-based treatments for depressive symptoms and cognitive impairment in MDD.

  5. PorcineLEM domain-containing 3:Molecular cloning, functional characterization, and polymorphism associated with ear size

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Jing; SHI Hui-bi; ZHANG Qin; WANGLi-xian; LI Na; ZHANG Long-chao; WANGLi-gang; LIU Xin; ZHAO Ke-bin; YAN Hua; PU Lei; ZHANG Yue-bo

    2016-01-01

    Ear size exhibits remarkable diversity in pig breeds.LEM domain-containing 3 (LEMD3) on chromosome 5 is considered as an important candidate for porcine ear size. This is the ifrst study on cloning and characterization ofLEMD3 cDNA. The complete cDNA contains 4843 bp, including a 2736-bp open reading frame (ORF), a 37-bp 5´-untranslated region (UTR) and a 2070-bp 3´-UTR. The completeLEMD3 gene is 126241-bp and contains 13 exons and 12 introns. The ORF encodes a deduced LEMD3 protein of 911 amino acids, which shares 82–94% nucleic acid and 51–96% amino acid identity with other species. A phylogenetic tree constructed based on the amino acid sequences revealed that the porcine LEMD3 protein was closely related with cattle LEMD3. Resequencing of the ORF and promoter ofLEMD3 from Minzhu pig and Large White revealed three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs): L964C>A in the complete coding region, L4625A>G in the 3´ UTR, and L-394T>C in the promoter region. Genome-wide association study (GWAS) revealed that al of SNPs were shown signiifcant association with ear size in Large White×Minzhu pig intercross population. With conditional GWAS, –log10(P-value) decreased by more than 80% when each of three SNPs was included as a ifxed effect. These results suggested direct involvement ofLEMD3 or close linkage to the causative mutation for ear size. The ifndings of this study might form the basis for understanding the genetic mechanism of ear size variation in pigs and provide potential molecular markers for screening ear size diversity in pig breeds.

  6. Popeye domain containing 1 (Popdc1/Bves is a caveolae-associated protein involved in ischemia tolerance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yifat Alcalay

    Full Text Available Popeye domain containing1 (Popdc1, also named Bves, is an evolutionary conserved membrane protein. Despite its high expression level in the heart little is known about its membrane localization and cardiac functions. The study examined the hypothesis that Popdc1 might be associated with the caveolae and play a role in myocardial ischemia tolerance. To address these issues, we analyzed hearts and cardiomyocytes of wild type and Popdc1-null mice. Immunoconfocal microscopy revealed co-localization of Popdc1 with caveolin3 in the sarcolemma, intercalated discs and T-tubules and with costameric vinculin. Popdc1 was co-immunoprecipitated with caveolin3 from cardiomyocytes and from transfected COS7 cells and was co-sedimented with caveolin3 in equilibrium density gradients. Caveolae disruption by methyl-β-cyclodextrin or by ischemia/reperfusion (I/R abolished the cellular co-localization of Popdc1 with caveolin3 and modified their density co-sedimentation. The caveolin3-rich fractions of Popdc1-null hearts redistributed to fractions of lower buoyant density. Electron microscopy showed a statistically significant 70% reduction in caveolae number and a 12% increase in the average diameter of the remaining caveolae in the mutant hearts. In accordance with these changes, Popdc1-null cardiomyocytes displayed impaired [Ca(+2]i transients, increased vulnerability to oxidative stress and no pharmacologic preconditioning. In addition, induction of I/R injury to Langendorff-perfused hearts indicated a significantly lower functional recovery in the mutant compared with wild type hearts while their infarct size was larger. No improvement in functional recovery was observed in Popdc1-null hearts following ischemic preconditioning. The results indicate that Popdc1 is a caveolae-associated protein important for the preservation of caveolae structural and functional integrity and for heart protection.

  7. Popeye domain containing 1 (Popdc1/Bves) is a caveolae-associated protein involved in ischemia tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcalay, Yifat; Hochhauser, Edith; Kliminski, Vitaly; Dick, Julia; Zahalka, Muayad A; Parnes, Doris; Schlesinger, Hadassa; Abassi, Zaid; Shainberg, Asher; Schindler, Roland F R; Brand, Thomas; Kessler-Icekson, Gania

    2013-01-01

    Popeye domain containing1 (Popdc1), also named Bves, is an evolutionary conserved membrane protein. Despite its high expression level in the heart little is known about its membrane localization and cardiac functions. The study examined the hypothesis that Popdc1 might be associated with the caveolae and play a role in myocardial ischemia tolerance. To address these issues, we analyzed hearts and cardiomyocytes of wild type and Popdc1-null mice. Immunoconfocal microscopy revealed co-localization of Popdc1 with caveolin3 in the sarcolemma, intercalated discs and T-tubules and with costameric vinculin. Popdc1 was co-immunoprecipitated with caveolin3 from cardiomyocytes and from transfected COS7 cells and was co-sedimented with caveolin3 in equilibrium density gradients. Caveolae disruption by methyl-β-cyclodextrin or by ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) abolished the cellular co-localization of Popdc1 with caveolin3 and modified their density co-sedimentation. The caveolin3-rich fractions of Popdc1-null hearts redistributed to fractions of lower buoyant density. Electron microscopy showed a statistically significant 70% reduction in caveolae number and a 12% increase in the average diameter of the remaining caveolae in the mutant hearts. In accordance with these changes, Popdc1-null cardiomyocytes displayed impaired [Ca(+2)]i transients, increased vulnerability to oxidative stress and no pharmacologic preconditioning. In addition, induction of I/R injury to Langendorff-perfused hearts indicated a significantly lower functional recovery in the mutant compared with wild type hearts while their infarct size was larger. No improvement in functional recovery was observed in Popdc1-null hearts following ischemic preconditioning. The results indicate that Popdc1 is a caveolae-associated protein important for the preservation of caveolae structural and functional integrity and for heart protection.

  8. The two-pore domain K+ channel TASK-1 is closely associated with brain barriers and meninges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanjhan, Refik; Pow, David V; Noakes, Peter G; Bellingham, Mark C

    2010-12-01

    Impairment of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), the blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier and brain-CSF barrier has been implicated in neuropathology of several brain disorders, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, cerebral edema, multiple sclerosis, neural inflammation, ischemia and stroke. Two-pore domain weakly inward rectifying K+ channel (TWIK)-related acid-sensitive potassium (TASK)-1 channels (K2p3.1; KCNK3) are among the targets that contribute to the development of these pathologies. For example TASK-1 activity is inhibited by acidification, ischemia, hypoxia and several signaling molecules released under pathologic conditions. We have used immuno-histochemistry to examine the distribution of the TASK-1 protein in structures associated with the BBB, blood-CSF barrier, brain-CSF barrier, and in the meninges of adult rat. Dense TASK-1 immuno-reactivity (TASK-1-IR) was observed in ependymal cells lining the fourth ventricle at the brain-CSF interface, in glial cells that ensheath the walls of blood vessels at the glio-vascular interface, and in the meninges. In these structures, TASK-1-IR often co-localized with glial fibrillary associated protein (GFAP) or vimentin. This study provides anatomical evidence for localization of TASK-1 K+ channels in cells that segregate distinct fluid compartments within and surrounding the brain. We suggest that TASK-1 channels, in coordination with other ion channels (e.g., aquaporins and chloride channels) and transporters (e.g., Na+-K+-ATPase and Na+-K+-2Cl⁻ and by virtue of its heterogeneous distribution, may differentially contribute to the varying levels of K+ vital for cellular function in these compartments. Our findings are likely to be relevant to recently reported roles of TASK-1 in cerebral ischemia, stroke and inflammatory brain disorders.

  9. Simultaneous prediction of protein secondary structure and transmembrane spans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leman, Julia Koehler; Mueller, Ralf; Karakas, Mert; Woetzel, Nils; Meiler, Jens

    2013-07-01

    Prediction of transmembrane spans and secondary structure from the protein sequence is generally the first step in the structural characterization of (membrane) proteins. Preference of a stretch of amino acids in a protein to form secondary structure and being placed in the membrane are correlated. Nevertheless, current methods predict either secondary structure or individual transmembrane states. We introduce a method that simultaneously predicts the secondary structure and transmembrane spans from the protein sequence. This approach not only eliminates the necessity to create a consensus prediction from possibly contradicting outputs of several predictors but bears the potential to predict conformational switches, i.e., sequence regions that have a high probability to change for example from a coil conformation in solution to an α-helical transmembrane state. An artificial neural network was trained on databases of 177 membrane proteins and 6048 soluble proteins. The output is a 3 × 3 dimensional probability matrix for each residue in the sequence that combines three secondary structure types (helix, strand, coil) and three environment types (membrane core, interface, solution). The prediction accuracies are 70.3% for nine possible states, 73.2% for three-state secondary structure prediction, and 94.8% for three-state transmembrane span prediction. These accuracies are comparable to state-of-the-art predictors of secondary structure (e.g., Psipred) or transmembrane placement (e.g., OCTOPUS). The method is available as web server and for download at www.meilerlab.org.

  10. Copper Metabolism Domain-Containing 1 Represses Genes That Promote Inflammation and Protects Mice From Colitis and Colitis-Associated Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Haiying; Chan, Lillienne; Bartuzi, Paulina; Melton, Shelby D.; Weber, Axel; Ben-Shlomo, Shani; Varol, Chen; Raetz, Megan; Mao, Xicheng; Starokadomskyy, Petro; van Sommeren, Suzanne; Mokadem, Mohamad; Schneider, Heike; Weisberg, Reid; Westra, Harm-Jan; Esko, Tonu; Metspalu, Andres; Magadi Gopalaiah, Vinod Kumar; Faubion, William A.; Yarovinsky, Felix; Hofker, Marten; Wijmenga, Cisca; Kracht, Michael; Franke, Lude; Aguirre, Vincent; Weersma, Rinse K.; Gluck, Nathan; van de Sluis, Bart; Burstein, Ezra

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappa B) has been associated with the development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Copper metabolism MURR1 domain containing 1 (COMMD1), a regulator of various transport pathways, has been shown to limit NF-kapp

  11. Is CD36 gene polymorphism in region encoding lipid-binding domain associated with early onset CAD?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rać, Monika; Safranow, Krzysztof; Kurzawski, Grzegorz; Krzystolik, Andrzej; Chlubek, Dariusz

    2013-11-01

    CD36 is a fatty acid translocase in striated muscle cells and cardiomyocytes. Some study suggested that alterations in CD36 gene may be associated with coronary artery disease (CAD) risk. The aim of the current study was to compare the frequency of CD36 variants in region encoding lipid-binding domain in Caucasian patients with early-onset CAD, no-CAD adult controls and neonates. The study group comprised 100 patients with early onset CAD. The genetic control groups were 306 infants and 40 no-CAD adults aged over 70years. Exons 4, 5 and 6 including fragments of flanking introns were studied using the denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography technique and direct sequencing. Changes detected in analyzed fragment of CD36: IVS3-6 T/C (rs3173798), IVS4-10 G/A (rs3211892), C311T (Thr104Ile, not described so far) in exon 5, G550A (Asp184Asn, rs138897347), C572T (Pro191Leu, rs143150225), G573A (Pro191Pro, rs5956) and A591T (Thr197Thr, rs141680676) in exon 6. No significant differences in the CD36 genotype, allele and haplotype frequencies were found between the three groups. Only borderline differences (p=0.066) were found between early onset CAD patients and newborns in the frequencies of 591T allele (2.00% vs 0.50%) and CGCGCGT haplotype (2.00% vs 0.50%) with both IVS3-6C and 591T variant alleles. In conclusion, CD36 variants: rs3173798, rs3211892, rs138897347, rs5956, rs143150225 rs141680676 and C311T do not seem to be involved in the risk of early-onset CAD in Caucasian population.

  12. Structure and Function of the Intracellular Region of the Plexin-B1 Transmembrane Receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, Yufeng; Hota, Prasanta K.; Penachioni, Junia Y.; Hamaneh, Mehdi B.; Kim, SoonJeung; Alviani, Rebecca S.; Shen, Limin; He, Hao; Tempel, Wolfram; Tamagnone, Luca; Park, Hee-Won; Buck, Matthias; (Torino); (Toronto); (Case Western U.-Med)

    2010-02-11

    Members of the plexin family are unique transmembrane receptors in that they interact directly with Rho family small GTPases; moreover, they contain a GTPase-activating protein (GAP) domain for R-Ras, which is crucial for plexin-mediated regulation of cell motility. However, the functional role and structural basis of the interactions between the different intracellular domains of plexins remained unclear. Here we present the 2.4 {angstrom} crystal structure of the complete intracellular region of human plexin-B1. The structure is monomeric and reveals that the GAP domain is folded into one structure from two segments, separated by the Rho GTPase binding domain (RBD). The RBD is not dimerized, as observed previously. Instead, binding of a conserved loop region appears to compete with dimerization and anchors the RBD to the GAP domain. Cell-based assays on mutant proteins confirm the functional importance of this coupling loop. Molecular modeling based on structural homology to p120{sup GAP} {center_dot}H-Ras suggests that Ras GTPases can bind to the plexin GAP region. Experimentally, we show that the monomeric intracellular plexin-B1 binds R-Ras but not H-Ras. These findings suggest that the monomeric form of the intracellular region is primed for GAP activity and extend a model for plexin activation.

  13. Two memory associated genes regulated by amyloid precursor protein intracellular domain ovel insights into the pathogenesis of learning and memory impairment in Alzheimer's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chuandong Zheng; Xi Gu; Zhimei Zhong; Rui Zhu; Tianming Gao; Fang Wang

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we employed chromatin immunoprecipitation, a useful method for studying the locations of transcription factors bound to specific DNA regions in specific cells, to investigate amyloid precursor protein intracellular domain binding sites in chromatin DNA from hippocampal neurons of rats, and to screen out five putative genes associated with the learning and memory functions. The promoter regions of the calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II alpha and glutamate receptor-2 genes were amplified by PCR from DNA products immunoprecipitated by amyloid precursor protein intracellular domain. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay and western blot analysis suggested that the promoter regions of these two genes associated with learning and memory were bound by amyloid precursor protein intracellular domain (in complex form). Our experimental findings indicate that the amyloid precursor protein intracellular domain is involved in the transcriptional regulation of learning- and memory-associated genes in hippocampal neurons. These data may provide new insights into the molecular mechanism underlying the symptoms of progressive memory loss in Alzheimer's disease.

  14. Characterization of the interaction between Actinin-Associated LIM Protein (ALP and the rod domain of α-actinin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Permi Perttu

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The PDZ-LIM proteins are a family of signalling adaptors that interact with the actin cross-linking protein, α-actinin, via their PDZ domains or via internal regions between the PDZ and LIM domains. Three of the PDZ-LIM proteins have a conserved 26-residue ZM motif in the internal region, but the structure of the internal region is unknown. Results In this study, using circular dichroism and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR, we showed that the ALP internal region (residues 107–273 was largely unfolded in solution, but was able to interact with the α-actinin rod domain in vitro, and to co-localize with α-actinin on stress fibres in vivo. NMR analysis revealed that the titration of ALP with the α-actinin rod domain induces stabilization of ALP. A synthetic peptide (residues 175–196 that contained the N-terminal half of the ZM motif was found to interact directly with the α-actinin rod domain in surface plasmon resonance (SPR measurements. Short deletions at or before the ZM motif abrogated the localization of ALP to actin stress fibres. Conclusion The internal region of ALP appeared to be largely unstructured but functional. The ZM motif defined part of the interaction surface between ALP and the α-actinin rod domain.

  15. Mutations of C19orf12, coding for a transmembrane glycine zipper containing mitochondrial protein, cause mis-localization of the protein, inability to respond to oxidative stress and increased mitochondrial Ca²⁺.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venco, Paola; Bonora, Massimo; Giorgi, Carlotta; Papaleo, Elena; Iuso, Arcangela; Prokisch, Holger; Pinton, Paolo; Tiranti, Valeria

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in C19orf12 have been identified in patients affected by Neurodegeneration with Brain Iron Accumulation (NBIA), a clinical entity characterized by iron accumulation in the basal ganglia. By using western blot analysis with specific antibody and confocal studies, we showed that wild-type C19orf12 protein was not exclusively present in mitochondria, but also in the Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) and MAM (Mitochondria Associated Membrane), while mutant C19orf12 variants presented a different localization. Moreover, after induction of oxidative stress, a GFP-tagged C19orf12 wild-type protein was able to relocate to the cytosol. On the contrary, mutant isoforms were not able to respond to oxidative stress. High mitochondrial calcium concentration and increased H2O2 induced apoptosis were found in fibroblasts derived from one patient as compared to controls. C19orf12 protein is a 17 kDa mitochondrial membrane-associated protein whose function is still unknown. Our in silico investigation suggests that, the glycine zipper motifs of C19orf12 form helical regions spanning the membrane. The N- and C-terminal regions with respect to the transmembrane portion, on the contrary, are predicted to rearrange in a structural domain, which is homologs to the N-terminal regulatory domain of the magnesium transporter MgtE, suggesting that C19orf12 may act as a regulatory protein for human MgtE transporters. The mutations here described affect respectively one glycine residue of the glycine zipper motifs, which are involved in dimerization of transmembrane helices and predicted to impair the correct localization of the protein into the membranes, and one residue present in the regulatory domain, which is important for protein-protein interaction.

  16. Mutations of C19orf12, coding for a transmembrane glycine zipper containing mitochondrial protein, cause mis-localization of the protein, inability to respond to oxidative stress and increased mitochondrial Ca2+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venco, Paola; Bonora, Massimo; Giorgi, Carlotta; Papaleo, Elena; Iuso, Arcangela; Prokisch, Holger; Pinton, Paolo; Tiranti, Valeria

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in C19orf12 have been identified in patients affected by Neurodegeneration with Brain Iron Accumulation (NBIA), a clinical entity characterized by iron accumulation in the basal ganglia. By using western blot analysis with specific antibody and confocal studies, we showed that wild-type C19orf12 protein was not exclusively present in mitochondria, but also in the Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) and MAM (Mitochondria Associated Membrane), while mutant C19orf12 variants presented a different localization. Moreover, after induction of oxidative stress, a GFP-tagged C19orf12 wild-type protein was able to relocate to the cytosol. On the contrary, mutant isoforms were not able to respond to oxidative stress. High mitochondrial calcium concentration and increased H2O2 induced apoptosis were found in fibroblasts derived from one patient as compared to controls. C19orf12 protein is a 17 kDa mitochondrial membrane-associated protein whose function is still unknown. Our in silico investigation suggests that, the glycine zipper motifs of C19orf12 form helical regions spanning the membrane. The N- and C-terminal regions with respect to the transmembrane portion, on the contrary, are predicted to rearrange in a structural domain, which is homologs to the N-terminal regulatory domain of the magnesium transporter MgtE, suggesting that C19orf12 may act as a regulatory protein for human MgtE transporters. The mutations here described affect respectively one glycine residue of the glycine zipper motifs, which are involved in dimerization of transmembrane helices and predicted to impair the correct localization of the protein into the membranes, and one residue present in the regulatory domain, which is important for protein-protein interaction. PMID:26136767

  17. The axon-dendrite targeting of Kv3 (Shaw) channels is determined by a targeting motif that associates with the T1 domain and ankyrin G.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Mingxuan; Cao, Ruifeng; Xiao, Rui; Zhu, Michael X; Gu, Chen

    2007-12-19

    Kv3 (Shaw) channels regulate rapid spiking, transmitter release and dendritic integration of many central neurons. Crucial to functional diversity are the complex targeting patterns of channel proteins. However, the targeting mechanisms are not known. Here we report that the axon-dendrite targeting of Kv3.1 is controlled by a conditional interaction of a C-terminal axonal targeting motif (ATM) with the N-terminal T1 domain and adaptor protein ankyrin G. In cultured hippocampal neurons, although the two splice variants of Kv3.1, Kv3.1a and Kv3.1b, are differentially targeted to the somatodendritic and axonal membrane, respectively, the lysine-rich ATM is surprisingly common for both splice variants. The ATM not only directly binds to the T1 domain in a Zn2+-dependent manner, but also associates with the ankyrin-repeat domain of ankyrin G. However, the full-length channel proteins of Kv3.1b display stronger association to ankyrin G than those of Kv3.1a, suggesting that the unique splice domain at Kv3.1b C terminus influences ATM binding to T1 and ankyrin G. Because ankyrin G mainly resides at the axon initial segment, we propose that it may function as a barrier for axon-dendrite targeting of Kv3.1 channels. In support of this idea, disrupting ankyrin G function either by over-expressing a dominant-negative mutant or by siRNA knockdown decreases polarized axon-dendrite targeting of both Kv3.1a and Kv3.1b. We conclude that the conditional ATM masked by the T1 domain in Kv3.1a is exposed by the splice domain in Kv3.1b, and is subsequently recognized by ankyrin G to target Kv3.1b into the axon.

  18. The structure of the cysteine protease and lectin-like domains of Cwp84, a surface layer-associated protein from Clostridium difficile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradshaw, William J. [University of Bath, Claverton Down, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom); Public Health England, Porton Down, Salisbury SP4 0JG (United Kingdom); Kirby, Jonathan M. [Public Health England, Porton Down, Salisbury SP4 0JG (United Kingdom); Thiyagarajan, Nethaji [University of Bath, Claverton Down, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom); Chambers, Christopher J.; Davies, Abigail H. [University of Bath, Claverton Down, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom); Public Health England, Porton Down, Salisbury SP4 0JG (United Kingdom); Roberts, April K.; Shone, Clifford C. [Public Health England, Porton Down, Salisbury SP4 0JG (United Kingdom); Acharya, K. Ravi, E-mail: bsskra@bath.ac.uk [University of Bath, Claverton Down, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-01

    The crystal structure of Cwp84, an S-layer protein from Clostridium difficile is presented for the first time. The cathepsin L-like fold of cysteine protease domain, a newly observed ‘lectin-like’ domain and several other features are described. Clostridium difficile is a major problem as an aetiological agent for antibiotic-associated diarrhoea. The mechanism by which the bacterium colonizes the gut during infection is poorly understood, but undoubtedly involves a myriad of components present on the bacterial surface. The mechanism of C. difficile surface-layer (S-layer) biogenesis is also largely unknown but involves the post-translational cleavage of a single polypeptide (surface-layer protein A; SlpA) into low- and high-molecular-weight subunits by Cwp84, a surface-located cysteine protease. Here, the first crystal structure of the surface protein Cwp84 is described at 1.4 Å resolution and the key structural components are identified. The truncated Cwp84 active-site mutant (amino-acid residues 33–497; C116A) exhibits three regions: a cleavable propeptide and a cysteine protease domain which exhibits a cathepsin L-like fold followed by a newly identified putative carbohydrate-binding domain with a bound calcium ion, which is referred to here as a lectin-like domain. This study thus provides the first structural insights into Cwp84 and a strong base to elucidate its role in the C. difficile S-layer maturation mechanism.

  19. TmpL, a transmembrane protein required for intracellular redox homeostasis and virulence in a plant and an animal fungal pathogen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang-Hyung Kim

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The regulation of intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS is critical for developmental differentiation and virulence of many pathogenic fungi. In this report we demonstrate that a novel transmembrane protein, TmpL, is necessary for regulation of intracellular ROS levels and tolerance to external ROS, and is required for infection of plants by the necrotroph Alternaria brassicicola and for infection of mammals by the human pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus. In both fungi, tmpL encodes a predicted hybrid membrane protein containing an AMP-binding domain, six putative transmembrane domains, and an experimentally-validated FAD/NAD(P-binding domain. Localization and gene expression analyses in A. brassicicola indicated that TmpL is associated with the Woronin body, a specialized peroxisome, and strongly expressed during conidiation and initial invasive growth in planta. A. brassicicola and A. fumigatus DeltatmpL strains exhibited abnormal conidiogenesis, accelerated aging, enhanced oxidative burst during conidiation, and hypersensitivity to oxidative stress when compared to wild-type or reconstituted strains. Moreover, A. brassicicola DeltatmpL strains, although capable of initial penetration, exhibited dramatically reduced invasive growth on Brassicas and Arabidopsis. Similarly, an A. fumigatus DeltatmpL mutant was dramatically less virulent than the wild-type and reconstituted strains in a murine model of invasive aspergillosis. Constitutive expression of the A. brassicicola yap1 ortholog in an A. brassicicola DeltatmpL strain resulted in high expression levels of genes associated with oxidative stress tolerance. Overexpression of yap1 in the DeltatmpL background complemented the majority of observed developmental phenotypic changes and partially restored virulence on plants. Yap1-GFP fusion strains utilizing the native yap1 promoter exhibited constitutive nuclear localization in the A. brassicicola DeltatmpL background. Collectively, we

  20. Mycobacterium marinum MMAR_2380, a predicted transmembrane acyltransferase, is essential for the presence of the mannose cap on lipoarabinomannan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driessen, Nicole N; Stoop, Esther J M; Ummels, Roy; Gurcha, Sudagur S; Mishra, Arun K; Larrouy-Maumus, Gérald; Nigou, Jérôme; Gilleron, Martine; Puzo, Germain; Maaskant, Janneke J; Sparrius, Marion; Besra, Gurdyal S; Bitter, Wilbert; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, Christina M J E; Appelmelk, Ben J

    2010-11-01

    Lipoarabinomannan (LAM) is a major glycolipid in the mycobacterial cell envelope. LAM consists of a mannosylphosphatidylinositol (MPI) anchor, a mannan core and a branched arabinan domain. The termini of the arabinan branches can become substituted with one to three α(1→2)-linked mannosyl residues, the mannose cap, producing ManLAM. ManLAM has been associated with a range of different immunomodulatory properties of Mycobacterium tuberculosis during infection of the host. In some of these effects, the presence of the mannose cap on ManLAM appears to be crucial for its activity. So far, in the biosynthesis of the mannose cap on ManLAM, two enzymes have been reported to be involved: a mannosyltransferase that adds the first mannosyl residue of the mannose caps to the arabinan domain of LAM, and another mannosyltransferase that elongates the mannose cap up to three mannosyl residues. Here, we report that a third gene is involved, MMAR_2380, which is the Mycobacterium marinum orthologue of Rv1565c. MMAR_2380 encodes a predicted transmembrane acyltransferase. In M. marinum ΔMMAR_2380, the LAM arabinan domain is still intact, but the mutant LAM lacks the mannose cap. Additional effects of mutation of MMAR_2380 on LAM were observed: a higher degree of branching of both the arabinan domain and the mannan core, and a decreased incorporation of [1,2-(14)C]acetate into the acyl chains in mutant LAM as compared with the wild-type form. This latter effect was also observed for related lipoglycans, i.e. lipomannan (LM) and phosphatidylinositol mannosides (PIMs). Furthermore, the mutant strain showed increased aggregation in liquid cultures as compared with the wild-type strain. All phenotypic traits of M. marinum ΔMMAR_2380, the deficiency in the mannose cap on LAM and changes at the cell surface, could be reversed by complementing the mutant strain with MMAR_2380. Strikingly, membrane preparations of the mutant strain still showed enzymic activity for the arabinan mannose

  1. SEC14 and spectrin domains 1 (Sestd1) and Dapper antagonist of catenin 1 (Dact1) scaffold proteins cooperatively regulate the Van Gogh-like 2 (Vangl2) four-pass transmembrane protein and planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway during embryonic development in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, XiaoYong; Cheyette, Benjamin N R

    2013-07-12

    The planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway is a conserved non-canonical (β-catenin-independent) branch of Wnt signaling crucial to embryogenesis, during which it regulates cell polarity and polarized cell movements. Disruption of PCP components in mice, including Vangl2 and Dact1, results in defective neural tube closure and other developmental defects. Here, we show that Sestd1 is a novel binding partner of Vangl2 and Dact1. The Sestd1-Dact1 interface is formed by circumscribed regions of Sestd1 (the carboxyl-terminal region) and Dact1 (the amino-terminal region). Remarkably, we show that loss of Sestd1 precisely phenocopies loss of Dact1 during embryogenesis in mice, leading to a spectrum of birth malformations, including neural tube defects, a shortened and/or curly tail, no genital tubercle, blind-ended colons, hydronephrotic kidneys, and no bladder. Moreover, as with Dact1, a knock-out mutation at the Sestd1 locus exhibits reciprocal genetic rescue interactions during development with a semidominant mutation at the Vangl2 locus. Consistent with this, examination of Wnt pathway activities in Sestd1 mutant mouse embryonic tissue reveals disrupted PCP pathway biochemistry similar to that characterized in Dact1 mutant embryos. The Sestd1 protein is a divergent member of the Trio family of GTPase regulatory proteins that lacks a guanine nucleotide exchange factor domain. Nonetheless, in cell-based assays the Sestd1-Dact1 interaction can induce Rho GTPase activation. Together, our data indicate that Sestd1 cooperates with Dact1 in Vangl2 regulation and in the PCP pathway during mammalian embryonic development.

  2. Role for the A domain of unprocessed accumulation-associated protein (Aap) in the attachment phase of the Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conlon, Brian P; Geoghegan, Joan A; Waters, Elaine M; McCarthy, Hannah; Rowe, Sarah E; Davies, Julia R; Schaeffer, Carolyn R; Foster, Timothy J; Fey, Paul D; O'Gara, James P

    2014-12-01

    The polysaccharide intercellular adhesin or the cell wall-anchored accumulation-associated protein (Aap) mediates cellular accumulation during Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm maturation. Mutation of sortase, which anchors up to 11 proteins (including Aap) to the cell wall, blocked biofilm development by the cerebrospinal fluid isolate CSF41498. Aap was implicated in this phenotype when Western blots and two-dimensional (2D) electrophoresis revealed increased levels of the protein in culture supernatants. Unexpectedly, reduced levels of primary attachment were associated with impaired biofilm formation by CSF41498 srtA and aap mutants. In contrast to previous studies, which implicated Aap proteolytic cleavage and, specifically, the Aap B domains in biofilm accumulation, the CSF41498 Aap protein was unprocessed. Furthermore, aap appeared to play a less important role in the biofilm phenotype of S. epidermidis 1457, in which the Aap protein is processed. Anti-Aap A-domain IgG inhibited primary attachment and biofilm formation in strain CSF41498 but not in strain 1457. The nucleotide sequences of the aap gene A-domain region and cleavage site in strains CSF41498 and 1457 were identical, implicating altered protease activity in the differential Aap processing results in the two strains. These data reveal a new role for the A domain of unprocessed Aap in the attachment phase of biofilm formation and suggest that extracellular protease activity can influence whether Aap contributes to the attachment or accumulation phases of the S. epidermidis biofilm phenotype.

  3. Human ClC-6 is a late endosomal glycoprotein that associates with detergent-resistant lipid domains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofie Ignoul

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The mammalian CLC protein family comprises nine members (ClC-1 to -7 and ClC-Ka, -Kb that function either as plasma membrane chloride channels or as intracellular chloride/proton antiporters, and that sustain a broad spectrum of cellular processes, such as membrane excitability, transepithelial transport, endocytosis and lysosomal degradation. In this study we focus on human ClC-6, which is structurally most related to the late endosomal/lysomal ClC-7. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a polyclonal affinity-purified antibody directed against a unique epitope in the ClC-6 COOH-terminal tail, we show that human ClC-6, when transfected in COS-1 cells, is N-glycosylated in a region that is evolutionary poorly conserved between mammalian CLC proteins and that is located between the predicted helices K and M. Three asparagine residues (N410, N422 and N432 have been defined by mutagenesis as acceptor sites for N-glycosylation, but only two of the three sites seem to be simultaneously N-glycosylated. In a differentiated human neuroblastoma cell line (SH-SY5Y, endogenous ClC-6 colocalizes with LAMP-1, a late endosomal/lysosomal marker, but not with early/recycling endosomal markers such as EEA-1 and transferrin receptor. In contrast, when transiently expressed in COS-1 or HeLa cells, human ClC-6 mainly overlaps with markers for early/recycling endosomes (transferrin receptor, EEA-1, Rab5, Rab4 and not with late endosomal/lysosomal markers (LAMP-1, Rab7. Analogously, overexpression of human ClC-6 in SH-SY5Y cells also leads to an early/recycling endosomal localization of the exogenously expressed ClC-6 protein. Finally, in transiently transfected COS-1 cells, ClC-6 copurifies with detergent-resistant membrane fractions, suggesting its partitioning in lipid rafts. Mutating a juxtamembrane string of basic amino acids (amino acids 71-75: KKGRR disturbs the association with detergent-resistant membrane fractions and also affects the segregation of ClC-6

  4. Optimizing an emperical scoring function for transmembrane protein structure determination.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, Malin M.; Sale, Kenneth L.; Gray, Genetha Anne; Kolda, Tamara Gibson

    2003-10-01

    We examine the problem of transmembrane protein structure determination. Like many other questions that arise in biological research, this problem cannot be addressed by traditional laboratory experimentation alone. An approach that integrates experiment and computation is required. We investigate a procedure which states the transmembrane protein structure determination problem as a bound constrained optimization problem using a special empirical scoring function, called Bundler, as the objective function. In this paper, we describe the optimization problem and some of its mathematical properties. We compare and contrast results obtained using two different derivative free optimization algorithms.

  5. The protein kinase C-responsive inhibitory domain of CARD11 functions in NF-kappaB activation to regulate the association of multiple signaling cofactors that differentially depend on Bcl10 and MALT1 for association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCully, Ryan R; Pomerantz, Joel L

    2008-09-01

    The activation of NF-kappaB by T-cell receptor (TCR) signaling is critical for T-cell activation during the adaptive immune response. CARD11 is a multidomain adapter that is required for TCR signaling to the IkappaB kinase (IKK) complex. During TCR signaling, the region in CARD11 between the coiled-coil and PDZ domains is phosphorylated by protein kinase Ctheta (PKCtheta) in a required step in NF-kappaB activation. In this report, we demonstrate that this region functions as an inhibitory domain (ID) that controls the association of CARD11 with multiple signaling cofactors, including Bcl10, TRAF6, TAK1, IKKgamma, and caspase-8, through an interaction that requires both the caspase recruitment domain (CARD) and the coiled-coil domain. Consistent with the ID-mediated control of their association, we demonstrate that TRAF6 and caspase-8 associate with CARD11 in T cells in a signal-inducible manner. Using an RNA interference rescue assay, we demonstrate that the CARD, linker 1, coiled-coil, linker 3, SH3, linker 4, and GUK domains are each required for TCR signaling to NF-kappaB downstream of ID neutralization. Requirements for the CARD, linker 1, and coiled-coil domains in signaling are consistent with their roles in the association of CARD11 with Bcl10, TRAF6, TAK1, caspase-8, and IKKgamma. Using Bcl10- and MALT1-deficient cells, we show that CARD11 can recruit signaling cofactors independently of one another in a signal-inducible manner.

  6. Structural insight into the transmembrane segments 3 and 4 of the hERG potassium channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qingxin; Wong, Ying Lei; Ng, Hui Qi; Gayen, Shovanlal; Kang, CongBao

    2014-12-01

    The hERG (human ether-a-go-go related gene) potassium channel is a voltage-gated potassium channel containing an N-terminal domain, a voltage-sensor domain, a pore domain and a C-terminal domain. The transmembrane segment 4 (S4) is important for sensing changes of membrane potentials through positively charge residues. A construct containing partial S2-S3 linker, S3, S4 and the S4-S5 linker of the hERG channel was purified into detergent micelles. This construct exhibits good quality NMR spectrum when it was purified in lyso-myristoyl phosphatidylglycerol (LMPG) micelles. Structural study showed that S3 contains two short helices with a negatively charged surface. The S4 and S4-S5 linker adopt helical structures. The six positively charged residues in S4 localize at different sides, suggesting that they may have different functions in channel gating. Relaxation studies indicated that S3 is more flexible than S4. The boundaries of S3-S4 and S4-S4-S5 linker were identified. Our results provided structural information of the S3 and S4, which will be helpful to understand their roles in channel gating.

  7. The role of the PHP domain associated with DNA polymerase X from Thermus thermophilus HB8 in base excision repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakane, Shuhei; Nakagawa, Noriko; Kuramitsu, Seiki; Masui, Ryoji

    2012-11-01

    Base excision repair (BER) is one of the most commonly used DNA repair pathways involved in genome stability. X-family DNA polymerases (PolXs) play critical roles in BER, especially in filling single-nucleotide gaps. In addition to a polymerase core domain, bacterial PolXs have a polymerase and histidinol phosphatase (PHP) domain with phosphoesterase activity which is also required for BER. However, the role of the PHP domain of PolX in bacterial BER remains unresolved. We found that the PHP domain of Thermus thermophilus HB8 PolX (ttPolX) functions as two types of phosphoesterase in BER, including a 3'-phosphatase and an apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease. Experiments using T. thermophilus HB8 cell lysates revealed that the majority of the 3'-phosphatase and AP endonuclease activities are attributable to the another phosphoesterase in T. thermophilus HB8, endonuclease IV (ttEndoIV). However, ttPolX possesses significant 3'-phosphatase activity in ΔttendoIV cell lysate, indicating possible complementation. Our experiments also reveal that there are only two enzymes that display the 3'-phosphatase activity in the T. thermophilus HB8 cell, ttPolX and ttEndoIV. Furthermore, phenotypic analysis of ΔttpolX, ΔttendoIV, and ΔttpolX/ΔttendoIV using hydrogen peroxide and sodium nitrite supports the hypothesis that ttPolX functions as a backup for ttEndoIV in BER.

  8. Functional and Modeling Studies of the Transmembrane Region of the TRPM8 Channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidaux, Gabriel; Sgobba, Miriam; Lemonnier, Loic; Borowiec, Anne-Sophie; Noyer, Lucile; Jovanovic, Srdan; Zholos, Alexander V; Haider, Shozeb

    2015-11-03

    Members of the transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channel family act as polymodal cellular sensors, which aid in regulating Ca(2+) homeostasis. Within the TRP family, TRPM8 is the cold receptor that forms a nonselective homotetrameric cation channel. In the absence of TRPM8 crystal structure, little is known about the relationship between structure and function. Inferences of TRPM8 structure have come from mutagenesis experiments coupled to electrophysiology, mainly regarding the fourth transmembrane helix (S4), which constitutes a moderate voltage-sensing domain, and about cold sensor and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate binding sites, which are both located in the C-terminus of TRPM8. In this study, we use a combination of molecular modeling and experimental techniques to examine the structure of the TRPM8 transmembrane and pore helix region including the conducting conformation of the selectivity filter. The model is consistent with a large amount of functional data and was further tested by mutagenesis. We present structural insight into the role of residues involved in intra- and intersubunit interactions and their link with the channel activity, sensitivity to icilin, menthol and cold, and impact on channel oligomerization.

  9. Transmembrane signal transduction by peptide hormones via family B G protein-coupled receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly J Culhane

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Although family B G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs contain only 15 members, they play key roles in transmembrane signal transduction of hormones. Family B GPCRs are drug targets for developing therapeutics for diseases ranging from metabolic to neurological disorders. Despite their importance, the molecular mechanism of activation of family B GPCRs remains largely unexplored due to the challenges in expression and purification of functional receptors to the quantity for biophysical characterization. Currently, there is no crystal structure available of a full-length family B GPCR. However, structures of key domains, including the extracellular ligand binding regions and seven-helical transmembrane regions, have been solved by X-ray crystallography and NMR, providing insights into the mechanisms of ligand recognition and selectivity, and helical arrangements within the cell membrane. Moreover, biophysical and biochemical methods have been used to explore functions, key residues for signaling, and the kinetics and dynamics of signaling processes. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the signal transduction mechanism of family B GPCRs at the molecular level and comments on the challenges and outlook for mechanistic studies of family B GPCRs.

  10. Evolution of the α-Subunit of Na/K-ATPase from Paramecium to Homo sapiens: Invariance of Transmembrane Helix Topology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrill, Gene A; Kostellow, Adele B; Liu, Lijun; Gupta, Raj K; Askari, Amir

    2016-05-01

    Na/K-ATPase is a key plasma membrane enzyme involved in cell signaling, volume regulation, and maintenance of electrochemical gradients. The α-subunit, central to these functions, belongs to a large family of P-type ATPases. Differences in transmembrane (TM) helix topology, sequence homology, helix-helix contacts, cell signaling, and protein domains of Na/K-ATPase α-subunit were compared in fungi (Beauveria), unicellular organisms (Paramecia), primitive multicellular organisms (Hydra), and vertebrates (Xenopus, Homo sapiens), and correlated with evolution of physiological functions in the α-subunit. All α-subunits are of similar length, with groupings of four and six helices in the N- and C-terminal regions, respectively. Minimal homology was seen for protein domain patterns in Paramecium and Hydra, with high correlation between Hydra and vertebrates. Paramecium α-subunits display extensive disorder, with minimal helix contacts. Increases in helix contacts in Hydra approached vertebrates. Protein motifs known to be associated with membrane lipid rafts and cell signaling reveal significant positional shifts between Paramecium and Hydra vulgaris, indicating that regional membrane fluidity changes occur during evolution. Putative steroid binding sites overlapping TM-3 occurred in all species. Sites associated with G-protein-receptor stimulation occur both in vertebrates and amphibia but not in Hydra or Paramecia. The C-terminus moiety "KETYY," necessary for the Na(+) activation of pump phosphorylation, is not present in unicellular species indicating the absence of classical Na(+)/K(+)-pumps. The basic protein topology evolved earliest, followed by increases in protein domains and ordered helical arrays, correlated with appearance of α-subunit regions known to involve cell signaling, membrane recycling, and ion channel formation.

  11. Bap31 is an itinerant protein that moves between the peripheral endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and a juxtanuclear compartment related to ER-associated Degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakana, Yuichi; Takai, Sawako; Nakajima, Ken-Ichi; Tani, Katsuko; Yamamoto, Akitsugu; Watson, Peter; Stephens, David J; Hauri, Hans-Peter; Tagaya, Mitsuo

    2008-05-01

    Certain endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated degradation (ERAD) substrates with transmembrane domains are segregated from other ER proteins and sorted into a juxtanuclear subcompartment, known as the ER quality control compartment. Bap31 is an ER protein with three transmembrane domains, and it is assumed to be a cargo receptor for ER export of some transmembrane proteins, especially those prone to ERAD. Here, we show that Bap31 is a component of the ER quality control compartment and that it moves between the peripheral ER and a juxtanuclear ER or ER-related compartment distinct from the conventional ER-Golgi intermediate compartment. The third and second transmembrane domains of Bap31 are principally responsible for the movement to and recycling from the juxtanuclear region, respectively. This cycling was blocked by depolymerization of microtubules and disruption of dynein-dynactin function. Overexpression of Sar1p and Arf1 mutants affected Bap31 cycling, suggesting that this cycling pathway is related to the conventional vesicular transport pathways.

  12. Involvement of the heterodimeric interface region of the nucleotide binding domain-2 (NBD2) in the CFTR quaternary structure and membrane stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micoud, Julien; Chauvet, Sylvain; Scheckenbach, Klaus Ernst Ludwig; Alfaidy, Nadia; Chanson, Marc; Benharouga, Mohamed

    2015-10-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is the only member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily that functions as a chloride channel. The predicted structure of CFTR protein contains two membrane-spanning domains (MSDs), each followed by a nucleotide binding domain (NBD1 and NBD2). The opening of the Cl- channel is directly linked to ATP-driven tight dimerization of CFTR's NBD1 and NBD2 domains. The presence of a heterodimeric interfaces (HI) region in NBD1 and NBD2 generated a head to tail orientation necessary for channel activity. This process was also suggested to promote important conformational changes in the associated transmembrane domains of CFTR, which may impact the CFTR plasma membrane stability. To better understand the role of the individual HI region in this process, we generated recombinant CFTR protein with suppressed HI-NBD1 and HI-NBD2. Our results indicate that HI-NBD2 deletion leads to the loss of the dimerization profile of CFTR that affect its plasma membrane stability. We conclude that, in addition to its role in Cl- transport, HI-NBD2 domain confers membrane stability of CFTR by consolidating its quaternary structure through interactions with HI-NBD1 region.

  13. A hidden Markov model for prediction transmembrane helices in proteinsequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnhammer, Erik L.L.; von Heijne, Gunnar; Krogh, Anders Stærmose

    1998-01-01

    and constraints involved. Models were estimated both by maximum likelihood and a discriminative method, and a method for reassignment of the membrane helix boundaries were developed. In a cross validated test on single sequences, our transmembrane HMM, TMHMM, correctly predicts the entire topology for 77...

  14. The Lantibiotic Nisin Induces Transmembrane Movement of a Fluorescent Phospholipid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moll, Gert N.; Konings, Wil N.; Driessen, Arnold J.M.

    1998-01-01

    Nisin is a pore-forming antimicrobial peptide. The capacity of nisin to induce transmembrane movement of a fluorescent phospholipid in lipid vesicles was investigated. Unilamellar phospholipid vesicles that contained a fluorescent phospholipid (1-acyl-2-{6-[(7-nitro-2-1,3-benzoxadiazol-4-yl)amino]ca

  15. Modelling of a transmembrane evaporation module for desalination of seawater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guijt, Caroliene M.; Rácz, Imre G.; Heuven, van Jan Willem; Reith, Tom; Haan, de André B.

    1999-01-01

    Transmembrane evaporation (often called membrane distillation) carried out in a countercurrent flow module, in which incoming cold seawater is heated by the condensing product water flow, is a promising technology for low-cost seawater desalination. This paper presents a model for preliminary design

  16. Regulation of cytoskeletal organization by syndecan transmembrane proteoglycans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yoneda, Atsuko; Couchman, John R

    2003-01-01

    Syndecans, a family of transmembrane proteoglycans, interact with numerous extracellular ligands through specific sequences in their heparan sulfate chains and have been considered to be co-receptors for matrix molecules and growth factors. In addition to their roles as co-receptors, many studies...

  17. Activation of p115-RhoGEF Requires Direct Association of G[alpha subscript 13] and the Dbl Homology Domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Zhe; Guo, Liang; Hadas, Jana; Gutowski, Stephen; Sprang, Stephen R.; Sternweis, Paul C. (IIT); (UTSMC); (Montana)

    2012-09-05

    RGS-containing RhoGEFs (RGS-RhoGEFs) represent a direct link between the G{sub 12} class of heterotrimeric G proteins and the monomeric GTPases. In addition to the canonical Dbl homology (DH) and pleckstrin homology domains that carry out the guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) activity toward RhoA, these RhoGEFs also possess RGS homology (RH) domains that interact with activated {alpha} subunits of G{sub 12} and G{sub 13}. Although the GEF activity of p115-RhoGEF (p115), an RGS-RhoGEF, can be stimulated by G{alpha}{sub 13}, the exact mechanism of the stimulation has remained unclear. Using combined studies with small angle x-ray scattering, biochemistry, and mutagenesis, we identify an additional binding site for activated G{alpha}{sub 13} in the DH domain of p115. Small angle x-ray scattering reveals that the helical domain of G{alpha}{sub 13} docks onto the DH domain, opposite to the surface of DH that binds RhoA. Mutation of a single tryptophan residue in the {alpha}3b helix of DH reduces binding to activated G{alpha}{sub 13} and ablates the stimulation of p115 by G{alpha}{sub 13}. Complementary mutations at the predicted DH-binding site in the {alpha}B-{alpha}C loop of the helical domain of G{alpha}{sub 13} also affect stimulation of p115 by G{alpha}{sub 13}. Although the GAP activity of p115 is not required for stimulation by G{alpha}{sub 13}, two hydrophobic motifs in RH outside of the consensus RGS box are critical for this process. Therefore, the binding of G{alpha}{sub 13} to the RH domain facilitates direct association of G{alpha}{sub 13} to the DH domain to regulate its exchange activity. This study provides new insight into the mechanism of regulation of the RGS-RhoGEF and broadens our understanding of G protein signaling.

  18. Phosphopeptide analysis reveals two discrete clusters of phosphorylation in the N-terminus and the Roc domain of the Parkinson-disease associated protein kinase LRRK2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloeckner, Christian Johannes; Boldt, Karsten; von Zweydorf, Felix; Helm, Sandra; Wiesent, Ludwig; Sarioglu, Hakan; Ueffing, Marius

    2010-04-05

    Mutations in leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) that increase its kinase activity associate with familial forms of Parkinson disease (PD). As phosphorylation determines the functional state of most protein kinases, we systematically mapped LRRK2 phosphorylation sites by mass spectrometry. Our analysis revealed a high degree of constitutive phosphorylation in a narrow serine-rich region preceding the LRR-domain. Allowing de novo autophosphorylation of purified LRRK2 in an in vitro autokinase assay prior to mass spectrometric analysis, we discovered multiple sites of autophosphorylation. Solely serine and threonine residues were found phosphorylated suggesting LRRK2 as a true serine threonine kinase. Autophosphorylation mainly targets the ROC GTPase domain and its clustering around the GTP binding pocket of ROC suggests cross-regulatory activity between kinase and Roc domain. In conclusion, the phosphoprotein LRRK2 functions as an autocatalytically active serine threonine kinase. Clustering of phosphosites within two discrete domains suggest that phosphorylation may regulate its biological functions in a yet unknown fashion.

  19. High-Throughput Live-Cell Microscopy Analysis of Association Between Chromosome Domains and the Nucleolus in S. cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Renjie; Normand, Christophe; Gadal, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Spatial organization of the genome has important impacts on all aspects of chromosome biology, including transcription, replication, and DNA repair. Frequent interactions of some chromosome domains with specific nuclear compartments, such as the nucleolus, are now well documented using genome-scale methods. However, direct measurement of distance and interaction frequency between loci requires microscopic observation of specific genomic domains and the nucleolus, followed by image analysis to allow quantification. The fluorescent repressor operator system (FROS) is an invaluable method to fluorescently tag DNA sequences and investigate chromosome position and dynamics in living cells. This chapter describes a combination of methods to define motion and region of confinement of a locus relative to the nucleolus in cell's nucleus, from fluorescence acquisition to automated image analysis using two dedicated pipelines.

  20. Unprecedented multiplicity of Ig transmembrane and secretory mRNA forms in the cartilaginous fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumfelt, Lynn L; Diaz, Marilyn; Lohr, Rebecca L; Mochon, Evonne; Flajnik, Martin F

    2004-07-15

    In most jawed vertebrates including cartilaginous fish, membrane-bound IgM is expressed as a five Ig superfamily (Igsf)-domain H chain attached to a transmembrane (Tm) region. Heretofore, bony fish IgM was the one exception with IgM mRNA spliced to produce a four-domain Tm H chain. We now demonstrate that the Tm and secretory (Sec) mRNAs of the novel cartilaginous fish Ig isotypes, IgW and IgNAR, are present in multiple forms, most likely generated by alternative splicing. In the nurse shark, Ginglymostoma cirratum, and horn shark, Heterodontus francisci, alternative splicing of Tm exons to the second or the fourth constant (C(H)) exons produces two distinct IgW Tm cDNAs. Although the seven-domain IgW Sec cDNA form contains a canonical secretory tail shared with IgM, IgNAR, and IgA, we report a three-domain cDNA form of shark IgW (IgW(short)) having an unusual Sec tail, which is orthologous to skate IgX(short) cDNA. The IgW and IgW(short) Sec transcripts are restricted in their tissue distribution and expression levels vary among individual sharks, with all forms expressed early in ontogeny. IgNAR mRNA is alternatively spliced to produce a truncated four-domain Tm cDNA and a second Tm cDNA is expressed identical in Igsf domains as the Sec form. PBL is enriched in the Tm cDNA of these Igs. These molecular data suggest that cartilaginous fish have augmented their humoral immune repertoire by diversifying the sizes of their Ig isotypes. Furthermore, these Tm cDNAs are prototypical and the truncated variants may translate as more stable protein at the cell surface.

  1. Confirmatory factor analysis of the Adult Asperger Assessment: the association of symptom domains within a clinical population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuenssberg, Renate; McKenzie, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a behaviourally defined disorder characterised by impairments in three domains of social interaction, communication, and repetitive, stereotyped behaviours and activities. Proposed changes to diagnostic criteria suggest that the diagnostic triad may no longer fit as the best way to conceptualise ASD, and that social and communication impairments should be considered as a single domain. The aim of this study was to examine the structure of symptom domains within the Adult Asperger Assessment (AAA; Baron-Cohen, Wheelwright, Robinson, & Woodbury-Smith, 2005), a diagnostic tool for high functioning adults. As theoretical models already exist, confirmatory factor analysis was used to examine data from a clinical population of adults (n = 153) diagnosed with Asperger Syndrome (AS) and High Functioning Autism (HFA). Confirmatory factor analysis was used to fit different models based on the structure proposed by the authors of the AAA, the traditional triad and the newly proposed diagnostic dyad. Analysis suggested that none of the tested models were a good fit on the AAA dataset. However, it did highlight very high correlations between social and communication factors (r > 0.9) within unmodified models. The results of the analysis provide tentative support for the move towards considering ASD as a dyad of 'social-communication' impairments and repetitive/restricted interests behaviours and activities, rather than the traditional triad.

  2. A novel family of plant nuclear envelope-associated proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawar, Vidya; Poulet, Axel; Détourné, Gwénaëlle; Tatout, Christophe; Vanrobays, Emmanuel; Evans, David E; Graumann, Katja

    2016-10-01

    This paper describes the characterisation of a new family of higher plant nuclear envelope-associated proteins (NEAPs) that interact with other proteins of the nuclear envelope. In the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, the family consists of three genes expressed ubiquitously (AtNEAP1-3) and a pseudogene (AtNEAP4). NEAPs consist of extensive coiled-coil domains, followed by a nuclear localisation signal and a C-terminal predicted transmembrane domain. Domain deletion mutants confirm the presence of a functional nuclear localisation signal and transmembrane domain. AtNEAP proteins localise to the nuclear periphery as part of stable protein complexes, are able to form homo- and heteromers, and interact with the SUN domain proteins AtSUN1 and AtSUN2, involved in the linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton (LINC) complex. An A. thaliana cDNA library screen identified a putative transcription factor called AtbZIP18 as a novel interactor of AtNEAP1, which suggest a connection between NEAP and chromatin. An Atneap1 Atneap3 double-knockout mutant showed reduced root growth, and altered nuclear morphology and chromatin structure. Thus AtNEAPs are suggested as inner nuclear membrane-anchored coiled-coil proteins with roles in maintaining nuclear morphology and chromatin structure.

  3. Crystal structure of AcrB in complex with a single transmembrane subunit reveals another twist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Törnroth-Horsefield, Susanna; Gourdon, Pontus; Horsefield, Rob; Brive, Lars; Yamamoto, Natsuko; Mori, Hirotada; Snijder, Arjan; Neutze, Richard

    2007-12-01

    Bacterial drug resistance is a serious concern for human health. Multidrug efflux pumps export a broad variety of substrates out of the cell and thereby convey resistance to the host. In Escherichia coli, the AcrB:AcrA:TolC efflux complex forms a principal transporter for which structures of the individual component proteins have been determined in isolation. Here, we present the X-ray structure of AcrB in complex with a single transmembrane protein, assigned by mass spectrometry as YajC. A specific rotation of the periplasmic porter domain of AcrB is also revealed, consistent with the hypothesized "twist-to-open" mechanism for TolC activation. Growth experiments with yajc-deleted E. coli reveal a modest increase in the organism's susceptibility to beta-lactam antibiotics, but this effect could not conclusively be attributed to the loss of interactions between YajC and AcrB.

  4. EMR1, an unusual member in the family of hormone receptors with seven transmembrane segments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baud, V; Chissoe, S L; Viegas-Péquignot, E; Diriong, S; N'Guyen, V C; Roe, B A; Lipinski, M

    1995-03-20

    Proteins with seven transmembrane segments (7TM) define a superfamily of receptors (7TM receptors) sharing the same topology: an extracellular N-terminus, three extramembranous loops on either side of the plasma membrane, and a cytoplasmic C-terminal tail. Upon ligand binding, cytoplasmic portions of the activated receptor interact with heterotrimeric G-coupled proteins to induce various second messengers. A small group, recently recognized on the basis of homologous primary amino acid sequences, comprises receptors to hormones of the secretin/vasoactive intestinal peptide/glucagon family, parathyroid hormone and parathyroid hormone-related peptides, growth hormone-releasing factor, corticotropin-releasing factor, and calcitonin. A cDNA, extracted from a neuroectodermal cDNA library, was predicted to encode a new 886-amino-acid protein with three distinct domains. The C-terminal third contains the seven hydrophobic segments and characteristic residues that allow the protein to be readily aligned with the various hormone receptors in the family. Six egf-like modules, at the N-terminus of the predicted mature protein, are separated from the transmembrane segments by a serine/threonine-rich domain, a feature reminiscent of mucin-like, single-span, integral membrane glycoproteins with adhesive properties. Because of its unique characteristics, this putative egf module-containing, mucin-like hormone receptor has been named EMR1. Southern analysis of a panel of somatic cell hybrids and fluorescence in situ hybridization have assigned the EMR1 gene to human chromosome 19p13.3.

  5. Complete re-sequencing of a 2Mb topological domain encompassing the FTO/IRXB genes identifies a novel obesity-associated region upstream of IRX5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hunt, Lilian E; Noyvert, Boris; Bhaw-Rosun, Leena;

    2015-01-01

    it recalcitrant to functional interpretation. Furthermore, the FTO gene is located within a complex cis-regulatory landscape defined by a topologically associated domain that includes the IRXB gene cluster, a trio of developmental regulators. Consequently, at least three genes in this interval have been...... in an expanded male cohort and an independent female study group. Finally, we compare our variant data with a previous study describing IRX3 and FTO interactions in this region. RESULTS: We obtain deep coverage across the entire region, allowing accurate and unequivocal determination of almost every single...... that chromatin architectures play a role in regulating gene expression levels across topological domains while our targeted sequence approach represents a widely applicable methodology for high-resolution analysis of regional variation across candidate genomic loci....

  6. Formyl peptide receptor chimeras define domains involved in ligand binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, H D; Holmes, R; Vilander, L R; Adams, R R; Manzana, W; Jolley, D; Andrews, W H

    1993-02-05

    We have begun to study the structural requirements for the binding of formyl peptides to their specific receptors. As an initial approach, we constructed C5a-formyl peptide receptor chimeras. Unique (and identical) restriction sites were introduced within the transmembrane domains of these receptors that allowed for the exchange of specific areas. Four types of chimeric receptors were generated. 1) The C5a receptor was progressively substituted by the formyl peptide receptor. 2) The formyl peptide receptor was progressively substituted by the C5a receptor. 3) Specific domains of the C5a receptor were substituted by the corresponding domain of the formyl peptide receptor. 4) Specific domains of the formyl peptide receptor were replaced by the same corresponding domain of the C5a receptor. Wild type and chimeric receptors were transfected into COS 7 cells and their ability to bind formyl peptide determined, taking into account efficiency of transfection and expression of chimeric protein. Based on these results, a ligand binding model is presented in which the second, third, and fourth extracellular (and/or their transmembrane) domains together with the first transmembrane domain form a ligand binding pocket for formyl peptides. It is proposed that the amino-terminal domain plays a role by presumably providing a "lid" to the pocket. The carboxyl-terminal cytoplasmic tail appears to modulate ligand binding by regulating receptor affinity.

  7. The N-terminal domain of the Drosophila retinoblastoma protein Rbf1 interacts with ORC and associates with chromatin in an E2F independent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Ahlander

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The retinoblastoma (Rb tumor suppressor protein can function as a DNA replication inhibitor as well as a transcription factor. Regulation of DNA replication may occur through interaction of Rb with the origin recognition complex (ORC. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We characterized the interaction of Drosophila Rb, Rbf1, with ORC. Using expression of proteins in Drosophila S2 cells, we found that an N-terminal Rbf1 fragment (amino acids 1-345 is sufficient for Rbf1 association with ORC but does not bind to dE2F1. We also found that the C-terminal half of Rbf1 (amino acids 345-845 interacts with ORC. We observed that the amino-terminal domain of Rbf1 localizes to chromatin in vivo and associates with chromosomal regions implicated in replication initiation, including colocalization with Orc2 and acetylated histone H4. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest that Rbf1 can associate with ORC and chromatin through domains independent of the E2F binding site. We infer that Rbf1 may play a role in regulating replication directly through its association with ORC and/or chromatin factors other than E2F. Our data suggest an important role for retinoblastoma family proteins in cell proliferation and tumor suppression through interaction with the replication initiation machinery.

  8. Association study of 167 candidate genes for schizophrenia selected by a multi-domain evidence-based prioritization algorithm and neurodevelopmental hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhongming; Webb, Bradley T; Jia, Peilin; Bigdeli, T Bernard; Maher, Brion S; van den Oord, Edwin; Bergen, Sarah E; Amdur, Richard L; O'Neill, Francis A; Walsh, Dermot; Thiselton, Dawn L; Chen, Xiangning; Pato, Carlos N; Riley, Brien P; Kendler, Kenneth S; Fanous, Ayman H

    2013-01-01

    Integrating evidence from multiple domains is useful in prioritizing disease candidate genes for subsequent testing. We ranked all known human genes (n=3819) under linkage peaks in the Irish Study of High-Density Schizophrenia Families using three different evidence domains: 1) a meta-analysis of microarray gene expression results using the Stanley Brain collection, 2) a schizophrenia protein-protein interaction network, and 3) a systematic literature search. Each gene was assigned a domain-specific p-value and ranked after evaluating the evidence within each domain. For comparison to this ranking process, a large-scale candidate gene hypothesis was also tested by including genes with Gene Ontology terms related to neurodevelopment. Subsequently, genotypes of 3725 SNPs in 167 genes from a custom Illumina iSelect array were used to evaluate the top ranked vs. hypothesis selected genes. Seventy-three genes were both highly ranked and involved in neurodevelopment (category 1) while 42 and 52 genes were exclusive to neurodevelopment (category 2) or highly ranked (category 3), respectively. The most significant associations were observed in genes PRKG1, PRKCE, and CNTN4 but no individual SNPs were significant after correction for multiple testing. Comparison of the approaches showed an excess of significant tests using the hypothesis-driven neurodevelopment category. Random selection of similar sized genes from two independent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of schizophrenia showed the excess was unlikely by chance. In a further meta-analysis of three GWAS datasets, four candidate SNPs reached nominal significance. Although gene ranking using integrated sources of prior information did not enrich for significant results in the current experiment, gene selection using an a priori hypothesis (neurodevelopment) was superior to random selection. As such, further development of gene ranking strategies using more carefully selected sources of information is warranted.

  9. Structure-function study of the fourth transmembrane segment of the GABAρ1 receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada-Mondragón, Argel; Reyes-Ruiz, Jorge Mauricio; Martínez-Torres, Ataúlfo; Miledi, Ricardo

    2010-01-01

    The Cys-loop family of receptors mediates synaptic neurotransmission in the central nervous system of vertebrates. These receptors share several structural characteristics and assemble in the plasma membrane as multimers with fivefold symmetry. Of these, the ionotropic GABA receptors are key players in the pathogenesis of diseases like epilepsy, anxiety, and schizophrenia. Different experimental approaches have shed some light on the mechanisms behind the function of these receptors; but little is known about their structure at high resolution. Sequence homology with the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor predicts that ionotropic GABA receptors possess four transmembrane segments (TM1–4) and that TM2 forms the wall of the ion channel. However, the role of the other three segments is unclear. The GABAρ1 receptor plays a fundamental role in the regulation of neurotransmission along the visual pathway, is highly sensitive to GABA, and exhibits little desensitization. In our recent investigations of the role of TM4 in receptor function, a key residue in this domain (W475) was found to be involved in activation of the receptor. Here we have generated a structural model of the GABAρ1 receptor in silico and assessed its validity by electrophysiologically testing nine amino acid substitutions of W475 and deletions of the neighboring residues (Y474 and S476). The results identify a critical linkage between the ligand-binding domain and the TM4 domain and provide a framework for more detailed structure-function analyses of ionotropic GABA receptors. PMID:20876117

  10. Cloning and characterization of SCART1, a novel scavenger receptor cysteine-rich type I transmembrane molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Dorte; Fink, Dorte Rosenbek; Grønlund, Jørn

    2009-01-01

    We have cloned and characterized a novel murine transmembrane molecule, mSCART1 belonging to the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich superfamily. The cDNA encodes a polypeptide chain of 989 amino acids, organized as a type I transmembrane protein that contains eight extracellular SRCR domains followed...... splicing. The murine SCART1 gene maps to chromosome 7 band F5 and the analysis of the genomic organization showed that the gene spans 12.86 kb and contains 14 exons. Quantitative real-time PCR analyses on murine tissues showed high mSCART1 mRNA expression in the lymph node, the trachea, and the lung......, and low expression was found in the thymus, the spleen, the skin, and in tissues throughout the gastrointestinal tract. Comparative studies of the domain organization as well as the cytoplasmic domain of mSCART1 with the other members of the SRCR superfamily show that mSCART1 is highly related to the WC1...

  11. Association of the formiminotransferase N-terminal sub-domain containing gene and thrombospondin, type 1, domain-containing 7A gene with the prevalence of vertebral fracture in 2427 consecutive autopsy cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Heying; Mori, Seijiro; Kou, Ikuyo; Fuku, Noriyuki; Naka Mieno, Makiko; Honma, Naoko; Arai, Tomio; Sawabe, Motoji; Tanaka, Masashi; Ikegawa, Shiro; Ito, Hideki

    2013-02-01

    We previously reported 2 osteoporosis-susceptibility genes--formiminotransferase N-terminal sub-domain containing gene (FONG) and thrombospondin, type 1, domain-containing 7A (THSD7A)--in which we identified two common single-nucleotide polymorphisms, rs7605378 (FONG) and rs12673692 (THSD7A). The former was associated with a predisposition to osteoporosis and the latter with bone mineral density. To further elucidate the importance of these polymorphisms in the pathogenesis of osteoporosis, we examined their association with the incidence of vertebral fracture. DNA extracted from the renal cortex of 2427 consecutive Japanese autopsies (1331 men, mean age: 79 years; 1096 women, mean age: 82 years) were examined in this study. The presence or absence of vertebral fracture during each subject's lifetime was determined by a thorough examination of the clinical records, as well as autopsy reports. After adjustments for sex and age at autopsy, logistic regression analysis revealed that homozygotes for the risk alleles of rs7605378 (A-allele) or rs12673629 (A-allele) possess an increased risk of vertebral fracture. The subjects simultaneously homozygous for both the risk alleles of rs7605378 (AA genotype) and rs12673629 (AA genotype) showed significantly higher risk of vertebral fracture (odds ratio 2.401, 95% confidence interval 1.305-4.416, P = 0.0048) than those who had at least one non-risk allele of either rs7605378 (AC/CC genotypes) or rs12673629 (AG/GG genotypes). The results suggest that Japanese subjects homozygous for the risk alleles of rs7605378 and rs12673629 have a higher risk of vertebral fracture.

  12. Cancer-associated p53 tetramerization domain mutants: quantitative analysis reveals a low threshold for tumor suppressor inactivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamada, R.; Anderson, C.; Nomura, T.; Sakaguchi, K.

    2011-01-07

    The tumor suppressor p53, a 393-amino acid transcription factor, induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in response to genotoxic stress. Its inactivation via the mutation of its gene is a key step in tumor progression, and tetramer formation is critical for p53 post-translational modification and its ability to activate or repress the transcription of target genes vital in inhibiting tumor growth. About 50% of human tumors have TP53 gene mutations; most are missense ones that presumably lower the tumor suppressor activity of p53. In this study, we explored the effects of known tumor-derived missense mutations on the stability and oligomeric structure of p53; our comprehensive, quantitative analyses encompassed the tetramerization domain peptides representing 49 such substitutions in humans. Their effects on tetrameric structure were broad, and the stability of the mutant peptides varied widely ({Delta}T{sub m} = 4.8 {approx} -46.8 C). Because formation of a tetrameric structure is critical for protein-protein interactions, DNA binding, and the post-translational modification of p53, a small destabilization of the tetrameric structure could result in dysfunction of tumor suppressor activity. We suggest that the threshold for loss of tumor suppressor activity in terms of the disruption of the tetrameric structure of p53 could be extremely low. However, other properties of the tetramerization domain, such as electrostatic surface potential and its ability to bind partner proteins, also may be important.

  13. DNA sequence polymorphisms within the bovine guanine nucleotide-binding protein Gs subunit alpha (Gsα-encoding (GNAS genomic imprinting domain are associated with performance traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mullen Michael P

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genes which are epigenetically regulated via genomic imprinting can be potential targets for artificial selection during animal breeding. Indeed, imprinted loci have been shown to underlie some important quantitative traits in domestic mammals, most notably muscle mass and fat deposition. In this candidate gene study, we have identified novel associations between six validated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs spanning a 97.6 kb region within the bovine guanine nucleotide-binding protein Gs subunit alpha gene (GNAS domain on bovine chromosome 13 and genetic merit for a range of performance traits in 848 progeny-tested Holstein-Friesian sires. The mammalian GNAS domain consists of a number of reciprocally-imprinted, alternatively-spliced genes which can play a major role in growth, development and disease in mice and humans. Based on the current annotation of the bovine GNAS domain, four of the SNPs analysed (rs43101491, rs43101493, rs43101485 and rs43101486 were located upstream of the GNAS gene, while one SNP (rs41694646 was located in the second intron of the GNAS gene. The final SNP (rs41694656 was located in the first exon of transcripts encoding the putative bovine neuroendocrine-specific protein NESP55, resulting in an aspartic acid-to-asparagine amino acid substitution at amino acid position 192. Results SNP genotype-phenotype association analyses indicate that the single intronic GNAS SNP (rs41694646 is associated (P ≤ 0.05 with a range of performance traits including milk yield, milk protein yield, the content of fat and protein in milk, culled cow carcass weight and progeny carcass conformation, measures of animal body size, direct calving difficulty (i.e. difficulty in calving due to the size of the calf and gestation length. Association (P ≤ 0.01 with direct calving difficulty (i.e. due to calf size and maternal calving difficulty (i.e. due to the maternal pelvic width size was also observed at the rs

  14. Long-chain GM1 gangliosides alter transmembrane domain registration through interdigitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manna, Moutusi; Javanainen, Matti; Monne, Hector Martinez Seara

    2017-01-01

    together. Based on atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, we find that long-chain GM1 in the extracellular leaflet exhibits a strong tendency to protrude into the opposing bilayer leaflet. This interdigitation modulates the order in the cytosolic monolayer and thereby strengthens the interaction...... effect, the situation is altered with long-chain GM1. Here, the significant interdigitation induced by long-chain GM1 modulates the behavior in the cytosolic GM1-free leaflet, weakening and slowing down the membrane registration process. The observed physical interaction mechanism provides a possible...

  15. Structural mutants of dengue virus 2 transmembrane domains exhibit host-range phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background There are over 700 known arboviruses and at least 80 immunologically distinct types that cause disease in humans. Arboviruses are transmitted among vertebrates by biting insects, chiefly mosquitoes and ticks. These viruses are widely distributed throughout the world, depending on the presence of appropriate hosts (birds, horses, domestic animals, humans) and vectors. Mosquito-borne arboviruses present some of the most important examples of emerging and resurgent diseases o...

  16. Structural and biochemical analysis of nuclease domain of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-associated protein 3 (Cas3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulepati, Sabin; Bailey, Scott

    2011-09-09

    RNA transcribed from clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) protects many prokaryotes from invasion by foreign DNA such as viruses, conjugative plasmids, and transposable elements. Cas3 (CRISPR-associated protein 3) is essential for this CRISPR protection and is thought to mediate cleavage of the foreign DNA through its N-terminal histidine-aspartate (HD) domain. We report here the 1.8 Å crystal structure of the HD domain of Cas3 from Thermus thermophilus HB8. Structural and biochemical studies predict that this enzyme binds two metal ions at its active site. We also demonstrate that the single-stranded DNA endonuclease activity of this T. thermophilus domain is activated not by magnesium but by transition metal ions such as manganese and nickel. Structure-guided mutagenesis confirms the importance of the metal-binding residues for the nuclease activity and identifies other active site residues. Overall, these results provide a framework for understanding the role of Cas3 in the CRISPR system.

  17. Secondary PDZ domain-binding site on class B plexins enhances the affinity for PDZ-RhoGEF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascoe, Heath G; Gutowski, Stephen; Chen, Hua; Brautigam, Chad A; Chen, Zhe; Sternweis, Paul C; Zhang, Xuewu

    2015-12-01

    PDZ domains are abundant protein interaction modules and typically recognize a short motif at the C terminus of their ligands, with a few residues in the motif endowing the binding specificity. The sequence-based rules, however, cannot fully account for the specificity between the vast number of PDZ domains and ligands in the cell. Plexins are transmembrane receptors that regulate processes such as axon guidance and angiogenesis. Two related guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), PDZ-RhoGEF and leukemia-associated RhoGEF (LARG), use their PDZ domains to bind class B plexins and play critical roles in signaling. Here, we present the crystal structure of the full-length cytoplasmic region of PlexinB2 in complex with the PDZ domain of PDZ-RhoGEF. The structure reveals that, in addition to the canonical C-terminal motif/PDZ interaction, the 3D domain of PlexinB2 forms a secondary interface with the PDZ domain. Our biophysical and cell-based assays show that the secondary interface contributes to the specific interaction between plexin and PDZ-RhoGEF and to signaling by plexin in the cell. Formation of secondary interfaces may be a general mechanism for increasing affinity and specificity of modular domain-mediated interactions.

  18. Secondary PDZ domain-binding site on class B plexins enhances the affinity for PDZ–RhoGEF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascoe, Heath G.; Gutowski, Stephen; Chen, Hua; Brautigam, Chad A.; Chen, Zhe; Sternweis, Paul C.; Zhang, Xuewu

    2015-01-01

    PDZ domains are abundant protein interaction modules and typically recognize a short motif at the C terminus of their ligands, with a few residues in the motif endowing the binding specificity. The sequence-based rules, however, cannot fully account for the specificity between the vast number of PDZ domains and ligands in the cell. Plexins are transmembrane receptors that regulate processes such as axon guidance and angiogenesis. Two related guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), PDZ–RhoGEF and leukemia-associated RhoGEF (LARG), use their PDZ domains to bind class B plexins and play critical roles in signaling. Here, we present the crystal structure of the full-length cytoplasmic region of PlexinB2 in complex with the PDZ domain of PDZ–RhoGEF. The structure reveals that, in addition to the canonical C-terminal motif/PDZ interaction, the 3D domain of PlexinB2 forms a secondary interface with the PDZ domain. Our biophysical and cell-based assays show that the secondary interface contributes to the specific interaction between plexin and PDZ–RhoGEF and to signaling by plexin in the cell. Formation of secondary interfaces may be a general mechanism for increasing affinity and specificity of modular domain-mediated interactions. PMID:26627240

  19. Transcriptome analysis reveals transmembrane targets on transplantable midbrain dopamine progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bye, Chris R; Jönsson, Marie E; Björklund, Anders; Parish, Clare L; Thompson, Lachlan H

    2015-04-14

    An important challenge for the continued development of cell therapy for Parkinson's disease (PD) is the establishment of procedures that better standardize cell preparations for use in transplantation. Although cell sorting has been an anticipated strategy, its application has been limited by lack of knowledge regarding transmembrane proteins that can be used to target and isolate progenitors for midbrain dopamine (mDA) neurons. We used a "FACS-array" approach to identify 18 genes for transmembrane proteins with high expression in mDA progenitors and describe the utility of four of these targets (Alcam, Chl1, Gfra1, and Igsf8) for isolating mDA progenitors from rat primary ventral mesencephalon through flow cytometry. Alcam and Chl1 facilitated a significant enrichment of mDA neurons following transplantation, while targeting of Gfra1 allowed for robust separation of dopamine and serotonin neurons. Importantly, we also show that mDA progenitors isolated on the basis of transmembrane proteins are capable of extensive, functional innervation of the host striatum and correction of motor impairment in a unilateral model of PD. These results are highly relevant for current efforts to establish safe and effective stem cell-based procedures for PD, where clinical translation will almost certainly require safety and standardization measures in order to deliver well-characterized cell preparations.

  20. Resolving the biophysics of axon transmembrane polarization in a single closed-form description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melendy, Robert F.

    2015-12-01

    When a depolarizing event occurs across a cell membrane there is a remarkable change in its electrical properties. A complete depolarization event produces a considerably rapid increase in voltage that propagates longitudinally along the axon and is accompanied by changes in axial conductance. A dynamically changing magnetic field is associated with the passage of the action potential down the axon. Over 75 years of research has gone into the quantification of this phenomenon. To date, no unified model exist that resolves transmembrane polarization in a closed-form description. Here, a simple but formative description of propagated signaling phenomena in the membrane of an axon is presented in closed-form. The focus is on using both biophysics and mathematical methods for elucidating the fundamental mechanisms governing transmembrane polarization. The results presented demonstrate how to resolve electromagnetic and thermodynamic factors that govern transmembrane potential. Computational results are supported by well-established quantitative descriptions of propagated signaling phenomena in the membrane of an axon. The findings demonstrate how intracellular conductance, the thermodynamics of magnetization, and current modulation function together in generating an action potential in a unified closed-form description. The work presented in this paper provides compelling evidence that three basic factors contribute to the propagated signaling in the membrane of an axon. It is anticipated this work will compel those in biophysics, physical biology, and in the computational neurosciences to probe deeper into the classical and quantum features of membrane magnetization and signaling. It is hoped that subsequent investigations of this sort will be advanced by the computational features of this model without having to resort to numerical methods of analysis.

  1. Resolving the biophysics of axon transmembrane polarization in a single closed-form description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melendy, Robert F., E-mail: rfmelendy@liberty.edu [School of Engineering and Computational Sciences, Liberty University, Lynchburg, Virginia 24515 (United States)

    2015-12-28

    When a depolarizing event occurs across a cell membrane there is a remarkable change in its electrical properties. A complete depolarization event produces a considerably rapid increase in voltage that propagates longitudinally along the axon and is accompanied by changes in axial conductance. A dynamically changing magnetic field is associated with the passage of the action potential down the axon. Over 75 years of research has gone into the quantification of this phenomenon. To date, no unified model exist that resolves transmembrane polarization in a closed-form description. Here, a simple but formative description of propagated signaling phenomena in the membrane of an axon is presented in closed-form. The focus is on using both biophysics and mathematical methods for elucidating the fundamental mechanisms governing transmembrane polarization. The results presented demonstrate how to resolve electromagnetic and thermodynamic factors that govern transmembrane potential. Computational results are supported by well-established quantitative descriptions of propagated signaling phenomena in the membrane of an axon. The findings demonstrate how intracellular conductance, the thermodynamics of magnetization, and current modulation function together in generating an action potential in a unified closed-form description. The work presented in this paper provides compelling evidence that three basic factors contribute to the propagated signaling in the membrane of an axon. It is anticipated this work will compel those in biophysics, physical biology, and in the computational neurosciences to probe deeper into the classical and quantum features of membrane magnetization and signaling. It is hoped that subsequent investigations of this sort will be advanced by the computational features of this model without having to resort to numerical methods of analysis.

  2. Partial association of restriction polymorphism of the ligand binding domain of human androgen receptor in prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Hessien

    2016-04-01

    Conclusion: Our results indicate that the loss of the restriction integrity in the C-terminal part (exons: 7 and 8 of the LBD is associated with the progression of benign prostatic hyperplasia to prostate cancer.

  3. The LAR transmembrane protein tyrosine phosphatase and a coiled-coil LAR-interacting protein co-localize at focal adhesions.

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    Focal adhesions are sites of cell-extracellular matrix interactions that function in anchoring stress fibers to the plasma membrane and in adhesion-mediated signal transduction. Both focal adhesion structure and signaling ability involve protein tyrosine phosphorylation. LAR is a broadly expressed transmembrane protein tyrosine phosphatase comprised of a cell adhesion-like ectodomain and two intracellular protein tyrosine phosphatase domains. We have identified a novel cytoplasmic 160 kDa pho...

  4. Evidence for intersubunit interactions between S4 and S5 transmembrane segments of the Shaker potassium channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neale, Edward J; Elliott, David J S; Hunter, Malcolm; Sivaprasadarao, Asipu

    2003-08-01

    Voltage-gated potassium channels are transmembrane proteins made up of four subunits, each comprising six transmembrane (S1-S6) segments. S1-S4 form the voltage-sensing domain and S5-S6 the pore domain with its central pore. The sensor domain detects membrane depolarization and transmits the signal to the activation gates situated in the pore domain, thereby leading to channel opening. An understanding of the mechanism by which the sensor communicates the signal to the pore requires knowledge of the structure of the interface between the voltage-sensing and pore domains. Toward this end, we have introduced single cysteine mutations into the extracellular end of S4 (positions 356 and 357) in conjunction with a cysteine in S5 (position 418) of the Shaker channel and expressed the mutants in Xenopus oocytes. We then examined the propensity of each pair of engineered cysteines to form a metal bridge or a disulfide bridge, respectively, by examining the effect of Cd2+ ions and copper phenanthroline on the K+ conductance of a whole oocyte. Both reagents reduced currents through the S357C,E418C double mutant channel, presumably by restricting the movements necessary for coupling the voltage-sensing function to pore opening. This inhibitory effect was seen in the closed state of the channel and with heteromers composed of S357C and E418C single mutant subunits; no effect was seen with homomers of any of the single mutant channels. These data indicate that the extracellular end of S4 lies in close proximity to the extracellular end of the S5 of the neighboring subunit in closed channels.

  5. Free energetics of rigid body association of ubiquitin binding domains: a biochemical model for binding mediated by hydrophobic interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Di; Ou, Shuching; Patel, Sandeep

    2014-07-01

    Weak intermolecular interactions, such as hydrophobic associations, underlie numerous biomolecular recognition processes. Ubiquitin is a small protein that represents a biochemical model for exploring thermodynamic signatures of hydrophobic association as it is widely held that a major component of ubiquitin's binding to numerous partners is mediated by hydrophobic regions on both partners. Here, we use atomistic molecular dynamics simulations in conjunction with the Adaptive Biasing Force sampling method to compute potentials of mean force (the reversible work, or free energy, associated with the binding process) to investigate the thermodynamic signature of complexation in this well-studied biochemical model of hydrophobic association. We observe that much like in the case of a purely hydrophobic solute (i.e., graphene, carbon nanotubes), association is favored by entropic contributions from release of water from the interprotein regions. Moreover, association is disfavored by loss of enthalpic interactions, but unlike in the case of purely hydrophobic solutes, in this case protein-water interactions are lost and not compensated for by additional water-water interactions generated upon release of interprotein and moreso, hydration, water. We further find that relative orientations of the proteins that mutually present hydrophobic regions of each protein to its partner are favored over those that do not. In fact, the free energy minimum as predicted by a force field based method recapitulates the experimental NMR solution structure of the complex.

  6. Sites of proteolytic processing and noncovalent association of the distal C-terminal domain of CaV1.1 channels in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulme, Joanne T; Konoki, Keiichi; Lin, Teddy W-C; Gritsenko, Marina A; Camp, David G; Bigelow, Diana J; Catterall, William A

    2005-04-05

    In skeletal muscle cells, voltage-dependent potentiation of Ca2+ channel activity requires phosphorylation by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) anchored via an A-kinase anchoring protein (AKAP15), and the most rapid sites of phosphorylation are located in the C-terminal domain. Surprisingly, the site of interaction of the complex of PKA and AKAP15 with the alpha1-subunit of Ca(V)1.1 channels lies in the distal C terminus, which is cleaved from the remainder of the channel by in vivo proteolytic processing. Here we report that the distal C terminus is noncovalently associated with the remainder of the channel via an interaction with a site in the proximal C-terminal domain when expressed as a separate protein in mammalian nonmuscle cells. Deletion mapping of the C terminus of the alpha1-subunit using the yeast two-hybrid assay revealed that a distal C-terminal peptide containing amino acids 1802-1841 specifically interacts with a region in the proximal C terminus containing amino acid residues 1556-1612. Analysis of the purified alpha1-subunit of Ca(V)1.1 channels from skeletal muscle by saturation sequencing of the intracellular peptides by tandem mass spectrometry identified the site of proteolytic processing as alanine 1664. Our results support the conclusion that a noncovalently associated complex of the alpha1-subunit truncated at A1664 with the proteolytically cleaved distal C-terminal domain, AKAP15, and PKA is the primary physiological form of Ca(V)1.1 channels in skeletal muscle cells.

  7. The potato virus X TGBp2 protein association with the endoplasmic reticulum plays a role in but is not sufficient for viral cell-to-cell movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Ruchira; Krishnamurthy, Konduru; Blancaflor, Elison; Payton, Mark; Nelson, Richard S.; Verchot-Lubicz, Jeanmarie

    2003-01-01

    Potato virus X (PVX) TGBp1, TGBp2, TGBp3, and coat protein are required for virus cell-to-cell movement. Plasmids expressing GFP fused to TGBp2 were bombarded to leaf epidermal cells and GFP:TGBp2 moved cell to cell in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves but not in Nicotiana tabacum leaves. GFP:TGBp2 movement was observed in TGBp1-transgenic N. tabacum, indicating that TGBp2 requires TGBp1 to promote its movement in N. tabacum. In this study, GFP:TGBp2 was detected in a polygonal pattern that resembles the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) network. Amino acid sequence analysis revealed TGBp2 has two putative transmembrane domains. Two mutations separately introduced into the coding sequences encompassing the putative transmembrane domains within the GFP:TGBp2 plasmids and PVX genome, disrupted membrane binding of GFP:TGBp2, inhibited GFP:TGBp2 movement in N. benthamiana and TGBp1-expressing N. tabacum, and inhibited PVX movement. A third mutation, lying outside the transmembrane domains, had no effect on GFP:TGBp2 ER association or movement in N. benthamiana but inhibited GFP:TGBp2 movement in TGBp1-expressing N. tabacum and PVX movement in either Nicotiana species. Thus, ER association of TGBp2 may be required but not be sufficient for virus movement. TGBp2 likely provides an activity for PVX movement beyond ER association.

  8. Identification of Nucleolus-Associated Chromatin Domains Reveals a Role for the Nucleolus in 3D Organization of the A. thaliana Genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontvianne, Frédéric; Carpentier, Marie-Christine; Durut, Nathalie; Pavlištová, Veronika; Jaške, Karin; Schořová, Šárka; Parrinello, Hugues; Rohmer, Marine; Pikaard, Craig S; Fojtová, Miloslava; Fajkus, Jiří; Sáez-Vásquez, Julio

    2016-08-01

    The nucleolus is the site of rRNA gene transcription, rRNA processing, and ribosome biogenesis. However, the nucleolus also plays additional roles in the cell. We isolated nucleoli using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and identified nucleolus-associated chromatin domains (NADs) by deep sequencing, comparing wild-type plants and null mutants for the nucleolar protein NUCLEOLIN 1 (NUC1). NADs are primarily genomic regions with heterochromatic signatures and include transposable elements (TEs), sub-telomeric regions, and mostly inactive protein-coding genes. However, NADs also include active rRNA genes and the entire short arm of chromosome 4 adjacent to them. In nuc1 null mutants, which alter rRNA gene expression and overall nucleolar structure, NADs are altered, telomere association with the nucleolus is decreased, and telomeres become shorter. Collectively, our studies reveal roles for NUC1 and the nucleolus in the spatial organization of chromosomes as well as telomere maintenance.

  9. The Action of Discoidin Domain Receptor 2 in Basal Tumor Cells and Stromal Cancer-Associated Fibroblasts Is Critical for Breast Cancer Metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsa, Callie A S; Brenot, Audrey; Grither, Whitney R; Van Hove, Samantha; Loza, Andrew J; Zhang, Kun; Ponik, Suzanne M; Liu, Yuming; DeNardo, David G; Eliceiri, Kevin W; Keely, Patricia J; Longmore, Gregory D

    2016-06-14

    High levels of collagen deposition in human and mouse breast tumors are associated with poor outcome due to increased local invasion and distant metastases. Using a genetic approach, we show that, in mice, the action of the fibrillar collagen receptor discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) in both tumor and tumor-stromal cells is critical for breast cancer metastasis yet does not affect primary tumor growth. In tumor cells, DDR2 in basal epithelial cells regulates the collective invasion of tumor organoids. In stromal cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), DDR2 is critical for extracellular matrix production and the organization of collagen fibers. The action of DDR2 in CAFs also enhances tumor cell collective invasion through a pathway distinct from the tumor-cell-intrinsic function of DDR2. This work identifies DDR2 as a potential therapeutic target that controls breast cancer metastases through its action in both tumor cells and tumor-stromal cells at the primary tumor site.

  10. Frequent silencing of popeye domain-containing genes, BVES and POPDC3, is associated with promoter hypermethylation in gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mirang; Jang, Hay-Ran; Haam, Keeok; Kang, Tae-Wook; Kim, Jeong-Hwan; Kim, Seon-Young; Noh, Seung-Moo; Song, Kyu-Sang; Cho, June-Sik; Jeong, Hyun-Yong; Kim, Jin Cheon; Yoo, Hyang-Sook; Kim, Yong Sung

    2010-09-01

    The Popeye domain-containing (POPDC) genes BVES, POPDC2 and POPDC3 encode proteins that regulate cell-cell adhesion and cell migration during development. Herein, we report the frequent downregulation of BVES and POPDC3 by promoter hypermethylation in gastric cancer. POPDC expression in 11 gastric cancer cell lines and 96 paired gastric tumor and normal adjacent tissues was analyzed with quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The methylation status of BVES and POPDC3 was analyzed with methylated DNA immunoprecipitation sequencing, bisulfite sequencing and pyrosequencing. Expression of BVES and POPDC3 was downregulated in 73% of the gastric cancer cell lines and in 69% (BVES) and 87% (POPDC3) of the gastric cancer tissues. The BVES and POPDC3 promoter regions were hypermethylated in the gastric cancer cell lines in which they were silenced. Combined treatment with a DNA methylation inhibitor and a histone deacetylase inhibitor strongly induced BVES and POPDC3 expression. BVES and POPDC3 were hypermethylated in 69% (BVES) and 64% (POPDC3) of the gastric cancer tissues. We knocked down POPDC3 expression with short hairpin RNAs and examined the consequences on cell migration and invasion. Knockdown of POPDC3 in SNU-216 cells caused increased cell migration and invasion. Thus, epigenetic inactivation of BVES and POPDC3 occurs frequently in gastric tumors and may promote gastric cancer cell migration and invasion.

  11. Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 domain cassettes 8 and 13 are associated with severe malaria in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lavstsen, Thomas; Turner, Louise; Saguti, Fredy

    2012-01-01

    on the surface of infected erythrocytes to anchor these to the vascular lining. Although var2csa, the var gene encoding the PfEMP1 associated with placental malaria, was discovered in 2003, the identification of the var/PfEMP1 variants associated with severe malaria in children has remained elusive. To identify...... var/PfEMP1 variants associated with severe disease outcome, we compared var transcript levels in parasites from 88 children with severe malaria and 40 children admitted to the hospital with uncomplicated malaria. Transcript analysis was performed by RT-quantitative PCR using a set of 42 primer pairs...... amplifying var subtype-specific loci covering most var/PfEMP1 subtypes. In addition, we characterized the near-full-length sequence of the most prominently expressed var genes in three patients diagnosed with severe anemia and/or cerebral malaria. The combined analysis showed that severe malaria syndromes...

  12. Common variant of PDZ domain containing 1 (PDZK1) gene is associated with gout susceptibility: A replication study and meta-analysis in Japanese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashino, Toshihide; Matsuo, Hirotaka; Sakiyama, Masayuki; Nakayama, Akiyoshi; Nakamura, Takahiro; Takada, Tappei; Ogata, Hiraku; Kawamura, Yusuke; Kawaguchi, Makoto; Naito, Mariko; Kawai, Sayo; Takada, Yuzo; Ooyama, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Shinomiya, Nariyoshi

    2016-12-01

    PDZ domain containing 1 (PDZK1) is a scaffold protein that organizes a transportsome and regulates several transporters' functions including urate and drug transporters. Therefore, PDZK1 in renal proximal tubules may affect serum uric acid levels through PDZK1-binding renal urate transporters. Two previous studies in Japanese male population reported that a PDZK1 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs12129861, was not associated with gout. In the present study, we performed a further association analysis between gout and rs12129861 in a different large-scale Japanese male population and a meta-analysis with previous Japanese population studies. We genotyped rs12129861 in 1210 gout cases and 1224 controls of a Japanese male population by TaqMan assay. As a result, we showed that rs12129861 was significantly associated with gout susceptibility (P = 0.016, odds ratio [OR] = 0.80, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.67-0.96). The result of the meta-analysis among Japanese populations also showed a significant association (P = 0.013, OR = 0.85, 95%CI 0.75-0.97). Our findings show the significant association between gout susceptibility and common variant of PDZK1 which reportedly regulates the functions of urate transporters in the urate transportsome.

  13. Positive and negative social exchanges and cognitive aging in young-old adults: differential associations across family, friend, and spouse domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windsor, Tim D; Gerstorf, Denis; Pearson, Elissa; Ryan, Lindsay H; Anstey, Kaarin J

    2014-03-01

    We examined how positive and negative social exchanges with friends, family, and spouses were related to cognitive aging in episodic and working memory, and perceptual speed. To do so, we used a large sample of cognitively intact young-old participants from the PATH Through Life Study (PATH; aged 60 to 64 years at baseline, n = 1,618) who were assessed on 3 occasions over 8 years. Additional replication analyses were conducted using the Health and Retirement Study (HRS), which provided data on episodic memory. The main analysis of PATH Through Life showed that positive exchanges with friends and family were associated with less decline in perceptual speed, with these associations attenuated by adjustment for physical functioning and depressive symptoms. Negative exchanges with spouses were associated with poorer working memory performance. Positive exchanges with friends were associated with better initial episodic memory in both PATH and HRS. More frequent negative exchanges with friends and family were associated with better episodic memory in the PATH sample. However, these findings were not replicated in HRS. Our findings provide indirect support for the role of social exchange quality in contributing to cognitive enrichment. However, the inconsistent pattern of results across cognitive and social exchange domains points to possibilities of reverse causality, and may also indicate that social exchange quality plays a less important role for cognitive enrichment than other psychosocial characteristics.

  14. Multi-objective Numeric Association Rules Mining via Ant Colony Optimization for Continuous Domains without Specifying Minimum Support and Minimum Confidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parisa Moslehi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Currently, all search algorithms which use discretization of numeric attributes for numeric association rule mining, work in the way that the original distribution of the numeric attributes will be lost. This issue leads to loss of information, so that the association rules which are generated through this process are not precise and accurate. Based on this fact, algorithms which can natively handle numeric attributes would be interesting. Since association rule mining can be considered as a multi-objective problem, rather than a single objective one, a new multi-objective algorithm for numeric association rule mining is presented in this paper, using Ant Colony Optimization for Continuous domains (ACOR. This algorithm mines numeric association rules without any need to specify minimum support and minimum confidence, in one step. In order to do this we modified ACOR for generating rules. The results show that we have more precise and accurate rules after applying this algorithm and the number of rules is more than the ones resulted from previous works.

  15. The conserved PA14 domain of cell wall-associated fungal adhesins governs their glycan-binding specificity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, P.W.J.; Klis, F.M.

    2008-01-01

    Yeast cell wall-associated, lectin-like adhesins form large families that mediate flocculation and host cell recognition. The glycan specificity of individual adhesins is largely unknown. Zupancic et al. (this issue of Molecular Microbiology) used glycan microarrays to compare the glycan-binding cha

  16. Walking speed and balance performance are associated with Short-Form 8 bodily pain domain in Brazilian older female

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Aurélio Carvalho Sampaio

    2015-09-01

    Conclusion: In summary, bodily pain is significantly associated with poor maximum walking speed, balance, and QOL physical functioning; these findings are reflective of poor QOL. Assessing bodily pain is simple and can help diagnose further problems. Moreover, improvements in physical conditioning may promote greater health and QOL in this population.

  17. The GTPase activating Rap/RanGAP domain-like 1 gene is associated with chicken reproductive traits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Shen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Abundant evidence indicates that chicken reproduction is strictly regulated by the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonad (HPG axis, and the genes included in the HPG axis have been studied extensively. However, the question remains as to whether any other genes outside of the HPG system are involved in regulating chicken reproduction. The present study was aimed to identify, on a genome-wide level, novel genes associated with chicken reproductive traits. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: Suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH, genome-wide association study (GWAS, and gene-centric GWAS were used to identify novel genes underlying chicken reproduction. Single marker-trait association analysis with a large population and allelic frequency spectrum analysis were used to confirm the effects of candidate genes. Using two full-sib Ningdu Sanhuang (NDH chickens, GARNL1 was identified as a candidate gene involved in chicken broodiness by SSH analysis. Its expression levels in the hypothalamus and pituitary were significantly higher in brooding chickens than in non-brooding chickens. GWAS analysis with a NDH two tail sample showed that 2802 SNPs were significantly associated with egg number at 300 d of age (EN300. Among the 2802 SNPs, 2 SNPs composed a block overlapping the GARNL1 gene. The gene-centric GWAS analysis with another two tail sample of NDH showed that GARNL1 was strongly associated with EN300 and age at first egg (AFE. Single marker-trait association analysis in 1301 female NDH chickens confirmed that variation in this gene was related to EN300 and AFE. The allelic frequency spectrum of the SNP rs15700989 among 5 different populations supported the above associations. Western blotting, RT-PCR, and qPCR were used to analyze alternative splicing of the GARNL1 gene. RT-PCR detected 5 transcripts and revealed that the transcript, which has a 141 bp insertion, was expressed in a tissue-specific manner. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings

  18. Regulation of Voltage-Activated K(+) Channel Gating by Transmembrane β Subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaohui; Zaydman, Mark A; Cui, Jianmin

    2012-01-01

    Voltage-activated K(+) (K(V)) channels are important for shaping action potentials and maintaining resting membrane potential in excitable cells. K(V) channels contain a central pore-gate domain (PGD) surrounded by four voltage-sensing domains (VSDs). The VSDs will change conformation in response to alterations of the membrane potential thereby inducing the opening of the PGD. Many K(V) channels are heteromeric protein complexes containing auxiliary β subunits. These β subunits modulate channel expression and activity to increase functional diversity and render tissue specific phenotypes. This review focuses on the K(V) β subunits that contain transmembrane (TM) segments including the KCNE family and the β subunits of large conductance, Ca(2+)- and voltage-activated K(+) (BK) channels. These TM β subunits affect the voltage-dependent activation of K(V) α subunits. Experimental and computational studies have described the structural location of these β subunits in the channel complexes and the biophysical effects on VSD activation, PGD opening, and VSD-PGD coupling. These results reveal some common characteristics and mechanistic insights into K(V) channel modulation by TM β subunits.

  19. Regulation of KV channel voltage-dependent activation by transmembrane β subunits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohui eSun

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-activated K+ (KV channels are important for shaping action potentials and maintaining resting membrane potential in excitable cells. KV channels contain a central pore-gate domain (PGD surrounded by four voltage-sensing domains (VSD. The VSDs will change conformation in response to alterations of the membrane potential thereby inducing the opening of the PGD. Many KV channels are heteromeric protein complexes containing auxiliary β subunits. These β subunits modulate channel expression and activity to increase functional diversity and render tissue specific phenotypes. This review focuses on the KV β subunits that contain transmembrane (TM segments including the KCNE family and the β subunits of large conductance, Ca2+- and voltage-activated K+ (BK channels. These TM β subunits affect the voltage-dependent activation of KV α subunits. Experimental and computational studies have described the structural location of these β subunits in the channel complexes and the biophysical effects on VSD activation, PGD opening and VSD-PGD coupling. These results reveal some common characteristics and mechanistic insights into KV channel modulation by TM β subunits.

  20. Transmembrane Protein 147 (TMEM147) Is a Novel Component of the Nicalin-NOMO Protein Complex*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettmer, Ulf; Kuhn, Peer-Hendrik; Abou-Ajram, Claudia; Lichtenthaler, Stefan F.; Krüger, Marcus; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Haass, Christian; Haffner, Christof

    2010-01-01

    Nicastrin and its relative Nicalin (Nicastrin-like protein) are both members of larger protein complexes, namely γ-secretase and the Nicalin-NOMO (Nodal modulator) complex. The γ-secretase complex, which contains Presenilin, APH-1, and PEN-2 in addition to Nicastrin, catalyzes the proteolytic cleavage of the transmembrane domain of various proteins including the β-amyloid precursor protein and Notch. Nicalin and its binding partner NOMO form a complex that was shown to modulate Nodal signaling in developing zebrafish embryos. Because its experimentally determined native size (200–220 kDa) could not be satisfyingly explained by the molecular masses of Nicalin (60 kDa) and NOMO (130 kDa), we searched in affinity-purified complex preparations for additional components in the low molecular mass range. A ∼22-kDa protein was isolated and identified by mass spectrometry as transmembrane protein 147 (TMEM147), a novel, highly conserved membrane protein with a putative topology similar to APH-1. Like Nicalin and NOMO, it localizes to the endoplasmic reticulum and is expressed during early zebrafish development. Overexpression and knockdown experiments in cultured cells demonstrate a close relationship between the three proteins and suggest that they are components of the same complex. We present evidence that, similar to γ-secretase, its assembly is hierarchical starting with the formation of a Nicalin-NOMO intermediate. Nicalin appears to represent the limiting factor regulating the assembly rate by stabilizing the other two components. We conclude that TMEM147 is a novel core component of the Nicalin-NOMO complex, further emphasizing its similarity with γ-secretase. PMID:20538592

  1. Transmembrane protein 147 (TMEM147) is a novel component of the Nicalin-NOMO protein complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettmer, Ulf; Kuhn, Peer-Hendrik; Abou-Ajram, Claudia; Lichtenthaler, Stefan F; Krüger, Marcus; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Haass, Christian; Haffner, Christof

    2010-08-20

    Nicastrin and its relative Nicalin (Nicastrin-like protein) are both members of larger protein complexes, namely gamma-secretase and the Nicalin-NOMO (Nodal modulator) complex. The gamma-secretase complex, which contains Presenilin, APH-1, and PEN-2 in addition to Nicastrin, catalyzes the proteolytic cleavage of the transmembrane domain of various proteins including the beta-amyloid precursor protein and Notch. Nicalin and its binding partner NOMO form a complex that was shown to modulate Nodal signaling in developing zebrafish embryos. Because its experimentally determined native size (200-220 kDa) could not be satisfyingly explained by the molecular masses of Nicalin (60 kDa) and NOMO (130 kDa), we searched in affinity-purified complex preparations for additional components in the low molecular mass range. A approximately 22-kDa protein was isolated and identified by mass spectrometry as transmembrane protein 147 (TMEM147), a novel, highly conserved membrane protein with a putative topology similar to APH-1. Like Nicalin and NOMO, it localizes to the endoplasmic reticulum and is expressed during early zebrafish development. Overexpression and knockdown experiments in cultured cells demonstrate a close relationship between the three proteins and suggest that they are components of the same complex. We present evidence that, similar to gamma-secretase, its assembly is hierarchical starting with the formation of a Nicalin-NOMO intermediate. Nicalin appears to represent the limiting factor regulating the assembly rate by stabilizing the other two components. We conclude that TMEM147 is a novel core component of the Nicalin-NOMO complex, further emphasizing its similarity with gamma-secretase.

  2. Myxococcus xanthus, a gram-negative bacterium, contains a transmembrane protein serine/threonine kinase that blocks the secretion of beta-lactamase by phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udo, H; Munoz-Dorado, J; Inouye, M; Inouye, S

    1995-04-15

    A gene, pkn2, encoding a Myxococcus xanthus protein with significant similarities to eukaryotic protein serine/threonine kinases, was cloned using the polymerase chain reaction. The open reading frame for the protein, beginning with a GUG initiation codon, consists of 830 amino acids. The amino-terminal 279 residues show 37% identity to catalytic domain of Pkn1, another protein serine/threonine kinase expressed during the development at the onset of sporulation. The catalytic domain of Pkn2 contains 27% and 25% identity to rat Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase and Bos taurus rhodopsin kinase, respectively. In the middle of the carboxy-terminal regulatory domain, there is a typical transmembrane domain consisting of 18 hydrophobic residues. The gene product, Pkn2, produced in Escherichia coli under a T7 promoter was phosphorylated at both serine and threonine residues. TEM-beta-lactamase produced in E. coli was found to serve as an effective substrate for Pkn2, phosphorylated only at threonine residues, shifting its apparent molecular mass from 29 to 44 kD. The phosphorylated beta-lactamase was unable to be secreted into the periplasmic space and localized in the cytoplasmic and membrane fractions. Analysis of phoA fusions with pkn2 demonstrated that Pkn2 is a transmembrane protein with the kinase domain in the cytoplasm and the 207-residue carboxy-terminal domain outside the cytoplasmic membrane. Disruption of pkn2 showed no effect on vegetative growth but reduced the yield of myxospores by 30%-50%. On the basis of the present results, we propose that Pkn2 is a transmembrane protein serine/threonine kinase that regulates the activity of endogenous beta-lactamase or related enzymes in response to an external signal yet to be identified.

  3. High-throughput synthesis of stable isotope-labeled transmembrane proteins for targeted transmembrane proteomics using a wheat germ cell-free protein synthesis system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemori, Nobuaki; Takemori, Ayako; Matsuoka, Kazuhiro; Morishita, Ryo; Matsushita, Natsuki; Aoshima, Masato; Takeda, Hiroyuki; Sawasaki, Tatsuya; Endo, Yaeta; Higashiyama, Shigeki

    2015-02-01

    Using a wheat germ cell-free protein synthesis system, we developed a high-throughput method for the synthesis of stable isotope-labeled full-length transmembrane proteins as proteoliposomes to mimic the in vivo environment, and we successfully constructed an internal standard library for targeted transmembrane proteomics by using mass spectrometry.

  4. High constitutive activity of a virus-encoded seven transmembrane receptor in the absence of the conserved DRY motif (Asp-Arg-Tyr) in transmembrane helix 3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, Mette M; Kledal, Thomas N; Schwartz, Thue W

    2005-01-01

    The highly conserved Arg in the so-called DRY motif (Asp-Arg-Tyr) at the intracellular end of transmembrane helix 3 is in general considered as an essential residue for G protein coupling in rhodopsin-like seven transmembrane (7TM) receptors. In the open reading frame 74 (ORF74) receptor encoded ...

  5. Functional Diversity of Tandem Substrate-Binding Domains in ABC Transporters from Pathogenic Bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fulyani, Faizah; Schuurman-Wolters, Gea K.; Vujicic - Zagar, Andreja; Guskov, Albert; Slotboom, Dirk-Jan; Poolman, Bert

    2013-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter GInPQ is an essential uptake system for amino acids in gram-positive pathogens and related nonpathogenic bacteria. The transporter has tandem substrate-binding domains (SBDs) fused to each transmembrane domain, giving rise to four SBDs per functional transp

  6. Intact transmembrane isoforms of the neural cell adhesion molecule are released from the plasma membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, M; Krog, L; Edvardsen, K;

    1993-01-01

    Three soluble neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) polypeptide classes of M(r) values 190,000 (NCAM-s1), 135,000 (NCAM-s2) and 115,000-110,000 (NCAM-s3) have been demonstrated in rat brain and cerebrospinal fluid [Krog, Olsen, Dalseg, Roth and Bock (1992) J. Neurochem. 59, 838-847]. NCAM-s3...... is known to arise from released glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-linked NCAM [He, Finne and Goridis (1987) J. Cell. Biol. 105, 2489-2500] as well as from extracellularly cleaved transmembrane NCAM isoforms [Nybroe, Linnemann and Bock (1989) J. Neurochem. 53, 1372-1378]. In this study the origin of NCAM......-s1 and NCAM-s2 and the function of soluble NCAM forms were investigated. It was shown that all three soluble forms could be released from brain membranes with M(r) values identical to the three major membrane-associated forms: the large transmembrane 190,000-M(r) form (NCAM-A), the smaller...

  7. Molecular modeling of transmembrane delivery of paclitaxel by shock waves with nanobubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xue-mei; Yuan, Bing; Zhang, Xian-ren; Yang, Kai; Ma, Yu-qiang

    2017-01-01

    The development of advanced delivery strategies for anticancer drugs that can permeate through cellular membranes is urgently required for biomedical applications. In this work, we investigated the dynamic transmembrane behavior of paclitaxel (PTX), a powerful anticancer drug, under the combined impact of shock waves and nanobubbles, by using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. Our simulations show that the PTX molecule experiences complicated motion modes during the action process with the membrane, as a consequence of its interplay with the lipid bilayer and water, under the joint effect of the shock wave and nanobubble. Moreover, it was found that the transmembrane movement of PTX is closely associated with the conformation changes of PTX, as well as the structural changes of the membrane (e.g., compression and poration in membrane). The nanobubble collapse induced by the shock wave, the proper PTX location with respect to the nanobubble, and a suitable nanobubble size and shock impulse are all necessary for the delivery of PTX into the cell. This work provides a molecular understanding of the interaction mechanism between drug molecules and cell membranes under the influence of shock waves and nanobubbles, and paves the way for exploiting targeted drug delivery systems that combine nanobubbles and ultrasound.

  8. Mutational Analysis of Region-cytotoxicity Relationship in Human Transmembrane Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENGFang; GONGFeili; LIZhuoya; JIANGXiaodan; XIONGPing; FENGWei; XUYong

    2002-01-01

    Objective:To determine the region of human transmembrane tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TM-TNFa), essential for cytotoxic activity a-gainst human breast cancer cell line MCF-7. Methods:Single amino-acid-substituted TM-TNFα mutant proteins (muteins) were produced by in vitro transcription linked translation techniques. The cDNA of TM-TNFα was site-directed mutagenized by recombinant PCR. Results:13 single amino-acid substituted TM-TNFα muteins were generated and assayed for cytotoxic activity. The cytotoxic activities of TM-TNFα muteins, eg, TM-TNFα-71/Lys, -28/Phe and 117/Leu were significantly decreased (P<0.01) compared to that of parent TM-TNFα, 143/Tyr decreased 4-folds, and-17/Thr,-39/Ser,ll9/His,35/Gly,95/Cys and 147/Phe decreased 1.5-2.5-folds, respectively. However, the cytotoxic activities of TM-TNFα-8/Arg, 31/Gly and 87/Phe showed no significant change. Conclusion:These results indicate that the regions associated with cytotoxic-activity of TM-TNFα are different with that of secretory TNF-lpha (S-TNFα). The inner cell region and transmembrane region of TM-TNFα are related to the cytotoxic activity of TM-TNFα.

  9. The carboxyl terminus of human cytomegalovirus-encoded 7 transmembrane receptor US28 camouflages agonism by mediating constitutive endocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waldhoer, Maria; Casarosa, Paola; Rosenkilde, Mette M;

    2003-01-01

    US28 is one of four 7 transmembrane (7TM) chemokine receptors encoded by human cytomegalovirus and has been shown to both signal and endocytose in a ligand-independent, constitutively active manner. Here we show that the constitutive activity and constitutive endocytosis properties of US28...... that the cytoplasmic tail domain of US28 per se regulates receptor endocytosis, independent of the signaling ability of the core domain of US28. The constitutive endocytic property of the US28 c-tail was transposable to other 7TM receptors, the herpes virus 8-encoded ORF74 and the tachykinin NK1 receptor (ORF74-US28......-ctail and NK1-US28-ctail). Deletion of the US28 C terminus resulted in reduced constitutive endocytosis and consequently enhanced signaling capacity of all receptors tested as assessed by inositol phosphate turnover, NF-kappa B, and cAMP-responsive element-binding protein transcription assays. We...

  10. Differential splicing of the apoptosis-associated speck like protein containing a caspase recruitment domain (ASC regulates inflammasomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rojanasakul Yon

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The apoptotic speck-like protein containing a caspase recruitment domain (ASC is the essential adaptor protein for caspase 1 mediated interleukin (IL-1β and IL-18 processing in inflammasomes. It bridges activated Nod like receptors (NLRs, which are a family of cytosolic pattern recognition receptors of the innate immune system, with caspase 1, resulting in caspase 1 activation and subsequent processing of caspase 1 substrates. Hence, macrophages from ASC deficient mice are impaired in their ability to produce bioactive IL-1β. Furthermore, we recently showed that ASC translocates from the nucleus to the cytosol in response to inflammatory stimulation in order to promote an inflammasome response, which triggers IL-1β processing and secretion. However, the precise regulation of inflammasomes at the level of ASC is still not completely understood. In this study we identified and characterized three novel ASC isoforms for their ability to function as an inflammasome adaptor. Methods To establish the ability of ASC and ASC isoforms as functional inflammasome adaptors, IL-1β processing and secretion was investigated by ELISA in inflammasome reconstitution assays, stable expression in THP-1 and J774A1 cells, and by restoring the lack of endogenous ASC in mouse RAW264.7 macrophages. In addition, the localization of ASC and ASC isoforms was determined by immunofluorescence staining. Results The three novel ASC isoforms, ASC-b, ASC-c and ASC-d display unique and distinct capabilities to each other and to full length ASC in respect to their function as an inflammasome adaptor, with one of the isoforms even showing an inhibitory effect. Consistently, only the activating isoforms of ASC, ASC and ASC-b, co-localized with NLRP3 and caspase 1, while the inhibitory isoform ASC-c, co-localized only with caspase 1, but not with NLRP3. ASC-d did not co-localize with NLRP3 or with caspase 1 and consistently lacked the ability to function as an

  11. Impaired dermal wound healing in discoidin domain receptor 2-deficient mice associated with defective extracellular matrix remodeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olaso Elvira

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The wounding response relies on tightly regulated crosstalk between recruited fibroblasts and the collagenous extracellular matrix (ECM. Discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2 is a tyrosine kinase receptor for fibrillar collagen expressed during pathologic scarring, for example wound healing, arthritis and cancer. We have previously shown that DDR2 phosphorylation drives key wounding responses in skin fibroblasts including proliferation, chemotactic migration and secretion of both metalloproteinases and fibrillar collagen. In this study we compared healing of cutaneous wounds in DDR2+/+ and DDR2-/- mice and analyzed specific fibroblast responses. Results Cutaneous wound healing was significantly delayed in DDR2-/- mice compared with DDR2+/+ animals. Reduced α-smooth muscle actin (αSMA expression and matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2 activity in the DDR2-/- wound extracts indicated defective recruitment of skin fibroblasts. DDR2-/- wounds showed decreased tensile strength during healing, which correlated with a significant reduction in collagen content and defective collagen crosslinking. Non-wounded skin in DDR2-/- mice expressed less mRNA of the crosslinking enzymes lysyl oxidase (LOX, lysyl hydroxylase1 (LH1 and matricellular 'secreted protein, acidic and rich in cysteine' (SPARC; also known as osteonectin. Skin fibroblasts isolated from DDR2-/- mice displayed altered mRNA expression of a cluster of collagens, proteoglycans, integrins and MMPs that have been previously correlated with DDR2 expression, and reduced LOX, LH1 and SPARC mRNA levels and proteins. Stable reconstitution of wild-type DDR2 by retroviral infection restored LOX, LH1 and SPARC mRNA and protein levels in DDR2-/- fibroblasts. Contraction of collagen gels was reduced in DDR2-/- fibroblasts, accompanied by significantly reduced phosphorylated SrcY418. Inhibition of either LOX activity by β-aminoproprionitrile or MMP activity by N-[(2R-2-(hydroxamido

  12. A separable domain of the p150 subunit of human chromatin assembly factor-1 promotes protein and chromosome associations with nucleoli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Corey L; Matheson, Timothy D; Trombly, Daniel J; Sun, Xiaoming; Campeau, Eric; Han, Xuemei; Yates, John R; Kaufman, Paul D

    2014-09-15

    Chromatin assembly factor-1 (CAF-1) is a three-subunit protein complex conserved throughout eukaryotes that deposits histones during DNA synthesis. Here we present a novel role for the human p150 subunit in regulating nucleolar macromolecular interactions. Acute depletion of p150 causes redistribution of multiple nucleolar proteins and reduces nucleolar association with several repetitive element-containing loci. Of note, a point mutation in a SUMO-interacting motif (SIM) within p150 abolishes nucleolar associations, whereas PCNA or HP1 interaction sites within p150 are not required for these interactions. In addition, acute depletion of SUMO-2 or the SUMO E2 ligase Ubc9 reduces α-satellite DNA association with nucleoli. The nucleolar functions of p150 are separable from its interactions with the other subunits of the CAF-1 complex because an N-terminal fragment of p150 (p150N) that cannot interact with other CAF-1 subunits is sufficient for maintaining nucleolar chromosome and protein associations. Therefore these data define novel functions for a separable domain of the p150 protein, regulating protein and DNA interactions at the nucleolus.

  13. Insertion of short transmembrane helices by the Sec61 translocon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaud, Simon; Fernández-Vidal, Mónica; Nilsson, Ingmarie; Meindl-Beinker, Nadja M; Hübner, Nadja C; Tobias, Douglas J; von Heijne, Gunnar; White, Stephen H

    2009-07-14

    The insertion efficiency of transmembrane (TM) helices by the Sec61 translocon depends on helix amino acid composition, the positions of the amino acids within the helix, and helix length. We have used an in vitro expression system to examine systematically the insertion efficiency of short polyleucine segments (L(n), n = 4 ... 12) flanked at either end by 4-residue sequences of the form XXPX-L(n)-XPXX with X = G, N, D, or K. Except for X = K, insertion efficiency (p) is snorkeling) and by partial unfolding.

  14. Molecular pharmacology of promiscuous seven transmembrane receptors sensing organic nutrients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wellendorph, Petrine; Johansen, Lars Dan; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2009-01-01

    A number of highly promiscuous seven transmembrane (7TM) receptors have been cloned and characterized within the last few years. It is noteworthy that many of these receptors are activated broadly by amino acids, proteolytic degradation products, carbohydrates, or free fatty acids and are expressed...... drug targets, to treat, for example, type II diabetes by mimicking food intake by potent agonists or positive allosteric modulators. The ligand-receptor interactions of the promiscuous receptors of organic nutrients thus remain an interesting subject of emerging functional importance....

  15. Transmembrane anion transport and cytotoxicity of synthetic tambjamine analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernando, Elsa; Soto-Cerrato, Vanessa; Cortés-Arroyo, Susana; Pérez-Tomás, Ricardo; Quesada, Roberto

    2014-03-21

    Ten synthetic analogs of the marine alkaloids tambjamines, bearing aromatic enamine moieties, have been synthesized. These compounds proved to be highly efficient transmembrane anion transporters in model liposomes. Changes in the electronic nature of the substituents of the aromatic enamine or the alkoxy group of the central pyrrole group did not affect this anionophore activity. The in vitro activity of these compounds has also been studied. They trigger apoptosis in several cancer cell lines with IC50 values in the low micromolar range as well as modify the intracellular pH, inducing the basification of acidic organelles.

  16. Multiple protein domains mediate interaction between Bcl10 and MALT1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langel, Felicia D; Jain, Nidhi A; Rossman, Jeremy S; Kingeter, Lara M; Kashyap, Anuj K; Schaefer, Brian C

    2008-11-21

    Bcl10 and MALT1 are essential mediators of NF-kappaB activation in response to the triggering of a diverse array of transmembrane receptors, including antigen receptors. Additionally, both proteins are translocation targets in MALT lymphoma. Thus, a detailed understanding of the interaction between these mediators is of considerable biological importance. Previous studies have indicated that a 13-amino acid region downstream of the Bcl10 caspase recruitment domain (CARD) is responsible for interacting with the immunoglobulin-like domains of MALT1. We now provide evidence that the death domain of MALT1 and the CARD of Bcl10 also contribute to Bcl10-MALT1 interactions. Although a direct interaction between the MALT1 death domain and Bcl10 cannot be detected via immunoprecipitation, FRET data strongly suggest that the death domain of MALT1 contributes significantly to the association between Bcl10 and MALT1 in T cells in vivo. Furthermore, analysis of point mutants of conserved residues of Bcl10 shows that the Bcl10 CARD is essential for interaction with the MALT1 N terminus. Mutations that disrupt proper folding of the Bcl10 CARD strongly impair Bcl10-MALT1 interactions. Molecular modeling and functional analyses of Bcl10 point mutants suggest that residues Asp(80) and Glu(84) of helix 5 of the Bcl10 CARD directly contact MALT1. Together, these data demonstrate that the association between Bcl10 and MALT1 involves a complex interaction between multiple protein domains. Moreover, the Bcl10-MALT1 interaction is the second reported example of interactions between a CARD and a non-CARD protein region, which suggests that many signaling cascades may utilize CARD interactions with non-CARD domains.

  17. The pervasive effects of racism: experiences of racial discrimination in New Zealand over time and associations with multiple health domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Ricci; Cormack, Donna; Tobias, Martin; Yeh, Li-Chia; Talamaivao, Natalie; Minster, Joanna; Timutimu, Roimata

    2012-02-01

    Self-reported experience of racial discrimination has been linked to a range of health outcomes in various countries and for different ethnic groups. This study builds on previous work in New Zealand to further investigate the prevalence of self-reported experience of racial discrimination by ethnicity, changes over time and associations with multiple health measures. The study uses data from the 2002/03 (n=12,500) and 2006/07 (n=12,488) New Zealand Health Surveys, nationally representative population-based surveys of adults (15+ years). Reported experience of racial discrimination was measured in both surveys and covered 5 items: experience of an ethnically motivated physical or verbal attack; and unfair treatment because of ethnicity by a health professional, in work, or when gaining housing. Ethnicity was classified as Maori, Pacific, Asian or European. Health indicators included measures of: mental health (SF36 mental health scale, psychological distress, doctor diagnosed mental health condition); physical health (self-rated health, SF36 physical functioning scale, cardiovascular disease); and health risk (smoking, hazardous drinking, excess body fat). Logistic regression was used to examine changes in prevalence of reported experience of racial discrimination over time and associations with health. Reported experience of racial discrimination increased between 2002/03 (28.1% ever) and 2006/07 (35.0% ever) among Asian peoples but remained largely unchanged for other ethnic groupings (Maori 29.5%, Pacific 23.0%, European 13.5%). Experience of racial discrimination was associated with all negative health measures except excess body fat. Where there were significant associations, a dose-response relationship was also evident. We conclude that racial discrimination experienced across a range of settings has the potential to impact on a wide range of health outcomes and risk factors. While ongoing research is needed to understand the multifarious nature of racism

  18. Crystal structure of the conserved domain of the DC lysosomal associated membrane protein: implications for the lysosomal glycocalyx

    OpenAIRE

    Wilke Sonja; Krausze Joern; Büssow Konrad

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The family of lysosome-associated membrane proteins (LAMP) comprises the multifunctional, ubiquitous LAMP-1 and LAMP-2, and the cell type-specific proteins DC-LAMP (LAMP-3), BAD-LAMP (UNC-46, C20orf103) and macrosialin (CD68). LAMPs have been implicated in a multitude of cellular processes, including phagocytosis, autophagy, lipid transport and aging. LAMP-2 isoform A acts as a receptor in chaperone-mediated autophagy. LAMP-2 deficiency causes the fatal Danon disease. The ...

  19. Membrane-Associated RING-CH proteins associate with Bap31 and target CD81 and CD44 to lysosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Bartee

    Full Text Available Membrane-associated RING-CH (MARCH proteins represent a family of transmembrane ubiquitin ligases modulating intracellular trafficking and turnover of transmembrane protein targets. While homologous proteins encoded by gamma-2 herpesviruses and leporipoxviruses have been studied extensively, limited information is available regarding the physiological targets of cellular MARCH proteins. To identify host cell proteins targeted by the human MARCH-VIII ubiquitin ligase we used stable isotope labeling of amino-acids in cell culture (SILAC to monitor MARCH-dependent changes in the membrane proteomes of human fibroblasts. Unexpectedly, we observed that MARCH-VIII reduced the surface expression of Bap31, a chaperone that predominantly resides in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. We demonstrate that Bap31 associates with the transmembrane domains of several MARCH proteins and controls intracellular transport of MARCH proteins. In addition, we observed that MARCH-VIII reduced the surface expression of the hyaluronic acid-receptor CD44 and both MARCH-VIII and MARCH-IV sequestered the tetraspanin CD81 in endo-lysosomal vesicles. Moreover, gene knockdown of MARCH-IV increased surface levels of endogenous CD81 suggesting a constitutive involvement of this family of ubiquitin ligases in the turnover of tetraspanins. Our data thus suggest a role of MARCH-VIII and MARCH-IV in the regulated turnover of CD81 and CD44, two ubiquitously expressed, multifunctional proteins.

  20. Membrane-Associated RING-CH proteins associate with Bap31 and target CD81 and CD44 to lysosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartee, Eric; Eyster, Craig A; Viswanathan, Kasinath; Mansouri, Mandana; Donaldson, Julie G; Früh, Klaus

    2010-12-02

    Membrane-associated RING-CH (MARCH) proteins represent a family of transmembrane ubiquitin ligases modulating intracellular trafficking and turnover of transmembrane protein targets. While homologous proteins encoded by gamma-2 herpesviruses and leporipoxviruses have been studied extensively, limited information is available regarding the physiological targets of cellular MARCH proteins. To identify host cell proteins targeted by the human MARCH-VIII ubiquitin ligase we used stable isotope labeling of amino-acids in cell culture (SILAC) to monitor MARCH-dependent changes in the membrane proteomes of human fibroblasts. Unexpectedly, we observed that MARCH-VIII reduced the surface expression of Bap31, a chaperone that predominantly resides in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We demonstrate that Bap31 associates with the transmembrane domains of several MARCH proteins and controls intracellular transport of MARCH proteins. In addition, we observed that MARCH-VIII reduced the surface expression of the hyaluronic acid-receptor CD44 and both MARCH-VIII and MARCH-IV sequestered the tetraspanin CD81 in endo-lysosomal vesicles. Moreover, gene knockdown of MARCH-IV increased surface levels of endogenous CD81 suggesting a constitutive involvement of this family of ubiquitin ligases in the turnover of tetraspanins. Our data thus suggest a role of MARCH-VIII and MARCH-IV in the regulated turnover of CD81 and CD44, two ubiquitously expressed, multifunctional proteins.

  1. Direct association of occludin with ZO-1 and its possible involvement in the localization of occludin at tight junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuse, M; Itoh, M; Hirase, T; Nagafuchi, A; Yonemura, S; Tsukita, S; Tsukita, S

    1994-12-01

    Occludin is an integral membrane protein localizing at tight junctions (TJ) with four transmembrane domains and a long COOH-terminal cytoplasmic domain (domain E) consisting of 255 amino acids. Immunofluorescence and laser scan microscopy revealed that chick full-length occludin introduced into human and bovine epithelial cells was correctly delivered to and incorporated into preexisting TJ. Further transfection studies with various deletion mutants showed that the domain E, especially its COOH-terminal approximately 150 amino acids (domain E358/504), was necessary for the localization of occludin at TJ. Secondly, domain E was expressed in Escherichia coli as a fusion protein with glutathione-S-transferase, and this fusion protein was shown to be specifically bound to a complex of ZO-1 (220 kD) and ZO-2 (160 kD) among various membrane peripheral proteins. In vitro binding analyses using glutathione-S-transferase fusion proteins of various deletion mutants of domain E narrowed down the sequence necessary for the ZO-1/ZO-2 association into the domain E358/504. Furthermore, this region directly associated with the recombinant ZO-1 produced in E. coli. We concluded that occludin itself can localize at TJ and directly associate with ZO-1. The coincidence of the sequence necessary for the ZO-1 association with that for the TJ localization suggests that the association with underlying cytoskeletons through ZO-1 is required for occludin to be localized at TJ.

  2. Analysis of Medical Domain Using CMARM: Confabulation Mapreduce Association Rule Mining Algorithm for Frequent and Rare Itemsets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Jyoti Gautam

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In Human Life span, disease is a major cause of illness and death in the modern society. There are various factors that are responsible for diseases like work environment, living and working conditions, agriculture and food production, housing, unemployment, individual life style etc. The early diagnosis of any disease that frequently and rarely occurs with the growing age can be helpful in curing the disease completely or to some extent. The long-term prognosis of patient records might be useful to find out the causes that are responsible for particular diseases. Therefore, human being can take early preventive measures to minimize the risk of diseases that may supervene with the growing age and hence increase the life expectancy chances. In this paper, a new CMARM: Confabulation-MapReduce based association rule mining algorithm is proposed for the analysis of medical data repository for both rare and frequent itemsets using an iterative MapReduce based framework inspired by cogency. Cogency is the probability of the assumed facts being true if the conclusion is true, means it is based on pairwise item conditional probability, so the proposed algorithm mine association rules by only one pass through the file. The proposed algorithm is also valuable for dealing with infrequent items due to its cogency inspired approach.

  3. Partial deletion of the αC-domain in the Fibrinogen Perth variant is associated with thrombosis, increased clot strength and delayed fibrinolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westbury, Sarah K; Duval, Cédric; Philippou, Helen; Brown, Rebecca; Lee, Kurtis R; Murden, Sherina L; Phillips, Emma; Reilly-Stitt, Christopher; Whalley, Daniel; Ariëns, Robert A; Mumford, Andrew D

    2013-12-01

    Genetic fibrinogen (FGN) variants that are associated with bleeding or thrombosis may be informative about fibrin polymerisation, structure and fibrinolysis. We report a four generation family with thrombosis and heritable dysfibrinogenaemia segregating with a c.[1541delC];[=] variation in FGA (FGN-Perth). This deletion predicts a truncated FGN αC-domain with an unpaired terminal Cys at residue 517 of FGN-Aα. In keeping with this, SDS-PAGE of purified FGN-Perth identified a truncated FGN-Aα chain with increased co-purification of albumin, consistent with disulphide bonding to the terminal Cys of the variant FGN-Aα. Clot visco-elastic strength in whole blood containing FGN-Perth was greater than controls and tPA-mediated fibrinolysis was delayed. In FGN-Perth plasma and in purified FGN-Perth, there was markedly reduced final turbidity after thrombin-mediated clot generation. Consistent with this, FGN-Perth formed tighter, thinner fibrin fibres than controls indicating defective lateral aggregation of protofibrils. Clots generated with thrombin in FGN-Perth plasma were resistant to tPA-mediated fibrinolysis. FGN-Perth clot also displayed impaired tPA-mediated plasmin generation but incorporated α2-antiplasmin at a similar rate to control. Impaired fibrinolysis because of defective plasmin generation potentially explains the FGN-Perth clinical phenotype. These findings highlight the importance of the FGN αC-domain in the regulation of clot formation and fibrinolysis.

  4. SGTA Recognizes a Noncanonical Ubiquitin-like Domain in the Bag6-Ubl4A-Trc35 Complex to Promote Endoplasmic Reticulum-Associated Degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Xu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Elimination of aberrantly folded polypeptides from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER by the ER-associated degradation (ERAD system promotes cell survival under stress conditions. This quality control mechanism requires movement of misfolded proteins across the ER membrane for targeting to the cytosolic proteasome, a process facilitated by a “holdase” complex, consisting of Bag6 and the cofactors Ubl4A and Trc35. This multiprotein complex also participates in several other protein quality control processes. Here, we report SGTA as a component of the Bag6 system, which cooperates with Bag6 to channel dislocated ERAD substrates that are prone to aggregation. Using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and biochemical assays, we demonstrate that SGTA contains a noncanonical ubiquitin-like-binding domain that interacts specifically with an unconventional ubiquitin-like protein/domain in Ubl4A at least in part via electrostatics. This interaction helps recruit SGTA to Bag6, enhances substrate loading to Bag6, and thus prevents the formation of nondegradable protein aggregates in ERAD.

  5. Human LINE1 endonuclease domain as a putative target of SARS-associated autoantibodies involved in the pathogenesis of severe acute respiratory syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Wei-ping; SHU Cui-li; LI Bo-an; ZHAO Jun; CHENG Yun

    2008-01-01

    Background Severe acute respiratory syndrome(SARS)is a disease with a mortality of 9.56%.Although SARS is etiologically linked to a new coronavirus(SARS-CoV)and functional cell receptor has been identified,the pathogenesis of the virus infection is largely unclear.Methods The clinical specimens were processed and analyzed using an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in-house.Further investigations of target antigen included reviews of phage display technique,rapid amplification of cDNA ends(RACE)technique,protein expression and purification,Western blotting validation,serological and immunohistochemical staining in postmortem tissue.Results A type of medium or low titer anti-lung tissue antibodies were found in the sera of SARS patients at the early stage of the disease.Human long interspersed nuclear element 1(LINE1)gene endonuclease(EN)domain protein was one of the target autoantigens and it was aberrantly expressed in the lung tissue of SARS patients.Anti-EN antibody was positive in the sera of 40.9% of SARS patients.Conclusions Human LINE1 endonuclease domain was identified as a putative target of SARS-associated autoantibodies,which were presented in the serum of SARS patients and may be involved in the pathogenesis of SARS.

  6. SENESCENCE-SUPPRESSED PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE Directly Interacts with the Cytoplasmic Domain of SENESCENCE-ASSOCIATED RECEPTOR-LIKE KINASE and Negatively Regulates Leaf Senescence in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Dong; Cui, Yanjiao; Xu, Fan; Xu, Xinxin; Gao, Guanxiao; Wang, Yaxin; Guo, Zhaoxia; Wang, Dan; Wang, Ning Ning

    2015-10-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation mediated by protein kinases and phosphatases plays an important role in the regulation of leaf senescence. We previously reported that the leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase SENESCENCE-ASSOCIATED RECEPTOR-LIKE KINASE (AtSARK) positively regulates leaf senescence in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Here, we report the involvement of a protein serine/threonine phosphatase 2C-type protein phosphatase, SENESCENCE-SUPPRESSED PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE (SSPP), in the negative regulation of Arabidopsis leaf senescence. SSPP transcript levels decreased greatly during both natural senescence and SARK-induced precocious senescence. Overexpression of SSPP significantly delayed leaf senescence in Arabidopsis. Protein pull-down and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays demonstrated that the cytosol-localized SSPP could interact with the cytoplasmic domain of the plasma membrane-localized AtSARK. In vitro assays showed that SSPP has protein phosphatase function and can dephosphorylate the cytosolic domain of AtSARK. Consistent with these observations, overexpression of SSPP effectively rescued AtSARK-induced precocious leaf senescence and changes in hormonal responses. All our results suggested that SSPP functions in sustaining proper leaf longevity and preventing early senescence by suppressing or perturbing SARK-mediated senescence signal transduction.

  7. Genetic Analysis and Species Specific Amplification of the Artemisinin Resistance-Associated Kelch Propeller Domain in P. falciparum and P. vivax.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eldin Talundzic

    Full Text Available Plasmodium falciparum resistance to artemisinin has emerged in the Greater Mekong Subregion and now poses a threat to malaria control and prevention. Recent work has identified mutations in the kelch propeller domain of the P. falciparum K13 gene to be associated artemisinin resistance as defined by delayed parasite clearance and ex vivo ring stage survival assays. Species specific primers for the two most prevalent human malaria species, P. falciparum and P. vivax, were designed and tested on multiple parasite isolates including human, rodent, and non- humans primate Plasmodium species. The new protocol described here using the species specific primers only amplified their respective species, P. falciparum and P. vivax, and did not cross react with any of the other human malaria Plasmodium species. We provide an improved species specific PCR and sequencing protocol that could be effectively used in areas where both P. falciparum and P. vivax are circulating. To design this improved protocol, the kelch gene was analyzed and compared among different species of Plasmodium. The kelch propeller domain was found to be highly conserved across the mammalian Plasmodium species.

  8. Substitution within erythropoietin receptor gene D1 domain associated with litter size in Beijing Black pig, Sus scrofa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Longchao; Wang, Ligang; Li, Yong; Li, Wen; Yan, Hua; Liu, Xin; Zhao, Kebin; Wang, Lixian

    2011-10-01

    Studies of uterine capacity and litter size in swine have suggested that erythropoietin receptor (EPOR) plays an important role in fetal survival through maturation of red blood cells. In this study, we screened the porcine EPOR gene for mutations and identified three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs): two missense mutations and one synonymous mutation. We then genotyped 272 Beijing Black sows, Sus scrofa, and compared this data with litter sizes from a total of 1523 parities among the sows. The G allele of the nonsynonymous SNP, EPOR c.434A>G, was associated with greater litter size at both first parity (P G could be a useful genetic marker to improve litter size in swine.

  9. The matrix-binding domain of microfibril-associated glycoprotein-1 targets active connective tissue growth factor to a fibroblast-produced extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinbaum, Justin S; Tranquillo, Robert T; Mecham, Robert P

    2010-11-10

    It is advantageous to use biomaterials in tissue engineering that stimulate extracellular matrix (ECM) production by the cellular component. Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) stimulates type I collagen (COL1A1) transcription, but is functionally limited as a free molecule. Using a matrix-binding domain (MBD) from microfibril-associated glycoprotein-1, the fusion protein MBD-CTGF was targeted to the ECM and tested for COL1A1 transcriptional activation. MBD-CTGF produced by the ECM-synthesizing fibroblasts, or provided exogenously, localized to the elastic fiber ECM. MBD-CTGF, but not CTGF alone, led to a two-fold enhancement of COL1A1 expression. This study introduces a targeting technology that can be used to elevate collagen transcription in engineered tissues and thereby improve tissue mechanics.

  10. Stability analysis of the inverse transmembrane potential problem in electrocardiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Martin; Mardal, Kent-André; Nielsen, Bjørn Fredrik

    2010-10-01

    In this paper we study some mathematical properties of an inverse problem arising in connection with electrocardiograms (ECGs). More specifically, we analyze the possibility for recovering the transmembrane potential in the heart from ECG recordings, a challenge currently investigated by a growing number of groups. Our approach is based on the bidomain model for the electrical activity in the myocardium, and leads to a parameter identification problem for elliptic partial differential equations (PDEs). It turns out that this challenge can be split into two subproblems: the task of recovering the potential at the heart surface from body surface recordings; the problem of computing the transmembrane potential inside the heart from the potential determined at the heart surface. Problem (1), which can be formulated as the Cauchy problem for an elliptic PDE, has been extensively studied and is well known to be severely ill-posed. The main purpose of this paper is to prove that problem (2) is stable and well posed if a suitable prior is available. Moreover, our theoretical findings are illuminated by a series of numerical experiments. Finally, we discuss some aspects of uniqueness related to the anisotropy in the heart.

  11. Eps15 homology domain containing protein of Plasmodium falciparum (PfEHD) associates with endocytosis and vesicular trafficking towards neutral lipid storage site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Vandana; Asad, Mohd; Jain, Shaifali; Hossain, Mohammad E; Gupta, Akanksha; Kaur, Inderjeet; Rathore, Sumit; Ali, Shakir; Khan, Nida J; Mohmmed, Asif

    2015-11-01

    The human malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, takes up numerous host cytosolic components and exogenous nutrients through endocytosis during the intra-erythrocytic stages. Eps15 homology domain-containing proteins (EHDs) are conserved NTPases, which are implicated in membrane remodeling and regulation of specific endocytic transport steps in eukaryotic cells. In the present study, we have characterized the dynamin-like C-terminal Eps15 homology domain containing protein of P. falciparum (PfEHD). Using a GFP-targeting approach, we studied localization and trafficking of PfEHD in the parasite. The PfEHD-GFP fusion protein was found to be a membrane bound protein that associates with vesicular network in the parasite. Time-lapse microscopy studies showed that these vesicles originate at parasite plasma membrane, migrate through the parasite cytosol and culminate into a large multi-vesicular like structure near the food-vacuole. Co-staining of food vacuole membrane showed that the multi-vesicular structure is juxtaposed but outside the food vacuole. Labeling of parasites with neutral lipid specific dye, Nile Red, showed that this large structure is neutral lipid storage site in the parasites. Proteomic analysis identified endocytosis modulators as PfEHD associated proteins in the parasites. Treatment of parasites with endocytosis inhibitors obstructed the development of PfEHD-labeled vesicles and blocked their targeting to the lipid storage site. Overall, our data suggests that the PfEHD is involved in endocytosis and plays a role in the generation of endocytic vesicles at the parasite plasma membrane, that are subsequently targeted to the neutral lipid generation/storage site localized near the food vacuole.

  12. Positional cloning of zinc finger domain transcription factor Zfp69, a candidate gene for obesity-associated diabetes contributed by mouse locus Nidd/SJL.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Scherneck

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Polygenic type 2 diabetes in mouse models is associated with obesity and results from a combination of adipogenic and diabetogenic alleles. Here we report the identification of a candidate gene for the diabetogenic effect of a QTL (Nidd/SJL, Nidd1 contributed by the SJL, NON, and NZB strains in outcross populations with New Zealand Obese (NZO mice. A critical interval of distal chromosome 4 (2.1 Mbp conferring the diabetic phenotype was identified by interval-specific congenic introgression of SJL into diabetes-resistant C57BL/6J, and subsequent reporter cross with NZO. Analysis of the 10 genes in the critical interval by sequencing, qRT-PCR, and RACE-PCR revealed a striking allelic variance of Zfp69 encoding zinc finger domain transcription factor 69. In NZO and C57BL/6J, a retrotransposon (IAPLTR1a in intron 3 disrupted the gene by formation of a truncated mRNA that lacked the coding sequence for the KRAB (Krüppel-associated box and Znf-C2H2 domains of Zfp69, whereas the diabetogenic SJL, NON, and NZB alleles generated a normal mRNA. When combined with the B6.V-Lep(ob background, the diabetogenic Zfp69(SJL allele produced hyperglycaemia, reduced gonadal fat, and increased plasma and liver triglycerides. mRNA levels of the human orthologue of Zfp69, ZNF642, were significantly increased in adipose tissue from patients with type 2 diabetes. We conclude that Zfp69 is the most likely candidate for the diabetogenic effect of Nidd/SJL, and that retrotransposon IAPLTR1a contributes substantially to the genetic heterogeneity of mouse strains. Expression of the transcription factor in adipose tissue may play a role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes.

  13. Positional cloning of zinc finger domain transcription factor Zfp69, a candidate gene for obesity-associated diabetes contributed by mouse locus Nidd/SJL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherneck, Stephan; Nestler, Matthias; Vogel, Heike; Blüher, Matthias; Block, Marcel-Dominique; Berriel Diaz, Mauricio; Herzig, Stephan; Schulz, Nadja; Teichert, Marko; Tischer, Sina; Al-Hasani, Hadi; Kluge, Reinhart; Schürmann, Annette; Joost, Hans-Georg

    2009-07-01

    Polygenic type 2 diabetes in mouse models is associated with obesity and results from a combination of adipogenic and diabetogenic alleles. Here we report the identification of a candidate gene for the diabetogenic effect of a QTL (Nidd/SJL, Nidd1) contributed by the SJL, NON, and NZB strains in outcross populations with New Zealand Obese (NZO) mice. A critical interval of distal chromosome 4 (2.1 Mbp) conferring the diabetic phenotype was identified by interval-specific congenic introgression of SJL into diabetes-resistant C57BL/6J, and subsequent reporter cross with NZO. Analysis of the 10 genes in the critical interval by sequencing, qRT-PCR, and RACE-PCR revealed a striking allelic variance of Zfp69 encoding zinc finger domain transcription factor 69. In NZO and C57BL/6J, a retrotransposon (IAPLTR1a) in intron 3 disrupted the gene by formation of a truncated mRNA that lacked the coding sequence for the KRAB (Krüppel-associated box) and Znf-C2H2 domains of Zfp69, whereas the diabetogenic SJL, NON, and NZB alleles generated a normal mRNA. When combined with the B6.V-Lep(ob) background, the diabetogenic Zfp69(SJL) allele produced hyperglycaemia, reduced gonadal fat, and increased plasma and liver triglycerides. mRNA levels of the human orthologue of Zfp69, ZNF642, were significantly increased in adipose tissue from patients with type 2 diabetes. We conclude that Zfp69 is the most likely candidate for the diabetogenic effect of Nidd/SJL, and that retrotransposon IAPLTR1a contributes substantially to the genetic heterogeneity of mouse strains. Expression of the transcription factor in adipose tissue may play a role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes.

  14. Retinoic acid-induced gene-I (RIG-I) associates with nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-2 (NOD2) to negatively regulate inflammatory signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morosky, Stefanie A; Zhu, Jianzhong; Mukherjee, Amitava; Sarkar, Saumendra N; Coyne, Carolyn B

    2011-08-12

    Cytoplasmic caspase recruiting domain (CARD)-containing molecules often function in the induction of potent antimicrobial responses in order to protect mammalian cells from invading pathogens. Retinoic acid-induced gene-I (RIG-I) and nucleotide binding oligomerization domain 2 (NOD2) serve as key factors in the detection of viral and bacterial pathogens, and in the subsequent initiation of innate immune signals to combat infection. RIG-I and NOD2 share striking similarities in their cellular localization, both localize to membrane ruffles in non-polarized epithelial cells and both exhibit a close association with the junctional complex of polarized epithelia. Here we show that RIG-I and NOD2 not only colocalize to cellular ruffles and cell-cell junctions, but that they also form a direct interaction that is mediated by the CARDs of RIG-I and multiple regions of NOD2. Moreover, we show that RIG-I negatively regulates ligand-induced nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling mediated by NOD2, and that NOD2 negatively regulates type I interferon induction by RIG-I. We also show that the three main Crohn disease-associated mutants of NOD2 (1007fs, R702W, G908R) form an interaction with RIG-I and negatively regulate its signaling to a greater extent than wild-type NOD2. Our results show that in addition to their role in innate immune recognition, RIG-I and NOD2 form a direct interaction at actin-enriched sites within cells and suggest that this interaction may impact RIG-I- and NOD2-dependent innate immune signaling.

  15. Phospholipase D family member 4, a transmembrane glycoprotein with no phospholipase D activity, expression in spleen and early postnatal microglia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumio Yoshikawa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Phospholipase D (PLD catalyzes conversion of phosphatidylcholine into choline and phosphatidic acid, leading to a variety of intracellular signal transduction events. Two classical PLDs, PLD1 and PLD2, contain phosphatidylinositide-binding PX and PH domains and two conserved His-x-Lys-(x(4-Asp (HKD motifs, which are critical for PLD activity. PLD4 officially belongs to the PLD family, because it possesses two HKD motifs. However, it lacks PX and PH domains and has a putative transmembrane domain instead. Nevertheless, little is known regarding expression, structure, and function of PLD4. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: PLD4 was analyzed in terms of expression, structure, and function. Expression was analyzed in developing mouse brains and non-neuronal tissues using microarray, in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry, and immunocytochemistry. Structure was evaluated using bioinformatics analysis of protein domains, biochemical analyses of transmembrane property, and enzymatic deglycosylation. PLD activity was examined by choline release and transphosphatidylation assays. Results demonstrated low to modest, but characteristic, PLD4 mRNA expression in a subset of cells preferentially localized around white matter regions, including the corpus callosum and cerebellar white matter, during the first postnatal week. These PLD4 mRNA-expressing cells were identified as Iba1-positive microglia. In non-neuronal tissues, PLD4 mRNA expression was widespread, but predominantly distributed in the spleen. Intense PLD4 expression was detected around the marginal zone of the splenic red pulp, and splenic PLD4 protein recovered from subcellular membrane fractions was highly N-glycosylated. PLD4 was heterologously expressed in cell lines and localized in the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus. Moreover, heterologously expressed PLD4 proteins did not exhibit PLD enzymatic activity. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Results showed that PLD4 is a non

  16. Annexin A5 anticoagulant activity in children with systemic lupus erythematosus and the association with antibodies to domain I of β2-glycoprotein I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahezi, D M; Ilowite, N T; Wu, X X; Pelkmans, L; Laat, B; Schanberg, L E; Rand, J H

    2013-06-01

    Children with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have a high prevalence of antiphospholipid (aPL) antibodies and are at increased risk for aPL-related thrombosis. We investigated the association between annexin A5 anticoagulant activity and antibodies to the domain I portion of β2-glycoprotein I (anti-DI antibodies), and propose a potential mechanism for the pathogenesis of aPL-related thrombosis. Using samples from 183 children with SLE collected during the Atherosclerosis Prevention in Pediatric Lupus Erythematosus (APPLE) trial, we examined resistance to the anticoagulant effects of annexin A5, using the annexin A5 resistance (A5R) assay, and evaluated for anti-DI IgG antibodies. Children with SLE had higher frequency of anti-D1 antibodies (p = 0.014) and significantly reduced A5R compared to pediatric controls: mean A5R = 172 ± 30% versus 242 ± 32% (p antibodies had significantly lower mean A5R levels compared to those with negative anti-DI antibodies: mean A5R = 155 ± 24% versus 177 ± 30% (p antibodies (p = 0.013) and lupus anticoagulant (LA) (p = 0.036) were both independently associated with reduced A5R. Children with SLE have significantly reduced annexin A5 anticoagulant activity that is associated with the presence of LA and anti-DI antibodies.

  17. JMJD5 (Jumonji Domain-containing 5) Associates with Spindle Microtubules and Is Required for Proper Mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhimin; Wu, Junyu; Su, Xiaonan; Zhang, Ye; Pan, Lixia; Wei, Huimin; Fang, Qiang; Li, Haitao; Wang, Da-Liang; Sun, Fang-Lin

    2016-02-26

    Precise mitotic spindle assembly is a guarantee of proper chromosome segregation during mitosis. Chromosome instability caused by disturbed mitosis is one of the major features of various types of cancer. JMJD5 has been reported to be involved in epigenetic regulation of gene expression in the nucleus, but little is known about its function in mitotic process. Here we report the unexpected localization and function of JMJD5 in mitotic progression. JMJD5 partially accumulates on mitotic spindles during mitosis, and depletion of JMJD5 results in significant mitotic arrest, spindle assembly defects, and sustained activation of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC). Inactivating SAC can efficiently reverse the mitotic arrest caused by JMJD5 depletion. Moreover, JMJD5 is found to interact with tubulin proteins and associate with microtubules during mitosis. JMJD5-depleted cells show a significant reduction of α-tubulin acetylation level on mitotic spindles and fail to generate enough interkinetochore tension to satisfy the SAC. Further, JMJD5 depletion also increases the susceptibility of HeLa cells to the antimicrotubule agent. Taken together, these results suggest that JMJD5 plays an important role in regulating mitotic progression, probably by modulating the stability of spindle microtubules.

  18. Sialidase NEU3 dynamically associates to different membrane domains specifically modifying their ganglioside pattern and triggering Akt phosphorylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Bonardi

    Full Text Available Lipid rafts are known to regulate several membrane functions such as signaling, trafficking and cellular adhesion. The local enrichment in sphingolipids and cholesterol together with the low protein content allows their separation by density gradient flotation after extraction with non-ionic detergent at low temperature. These structures are also referred to as detergent resistant membranes (DRM. Among sphingolipids, gangliosides play important roles in different biological events, including signal transduction and tumorigenesis. Sialidase NEU3 shows high enzymatic specificity toward gangliosides. Moreover, the enzyme is present both at the cell surface and in endosomal structures and cofractionates with caveolin. Although changes in the expression level of NEU3 have been correlated to different tumors, little is known about the precise distribution of the protein and its ability in modifying the ganglioside composition of DRM and non-DRM, thus regulating intracellular events. By means of inducible expression cell system we found that i newly synthesized NEU3 is initially associated to non-DRM; ii at steady state the protein is equally distributed between the two membrane subcompartments, i.e., DRM and non-DRM; iii NEU3 is degraded via the proteasomal pathway; iv the enzyme specifically modifies the ganglioside composition of the membrane areas where it resides; and v NEU3 triggers phosphorylation of Akt, even in absence of exogenously administered EGF. Taken together our data demonstrate that NEU3 regulates the DRM ganglioside content and it can be considered as a modulator of Akt phosphorylation, further supporting the role of this enzyme in cancer and tumorigenesis.

  19. Association of different cognitive domains with lifetime history of psychosis and reported antipsychotic-treatment adverse events in bipolar disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kałwa, Agnieszka

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the study. The present work aimed to assess the association between cognitive functions, the lifetime occurrence of psychotic symptoms, and reported adverse effects of antipsychotic treatments inpatients with bipolar disorders.Methods. In the present work, 44 bipolar disorder inpatients hospitalized in the Affective Disorders Unit of the Institute of Psychiatry and Neurology in Warsaw, were investigated. All of them met the criteria of remission and were prepared for release from the hospital unit. Twenty-two patients were hospitalized in the manic stage of the illness, and 22 were in the depressive stage of illness. Both groups were assessed using adequate psychiatric rating scales (HDRS or YMRS and CAMRS and neuropsychological tests (WCST, TMT, Stroop Test and Verbal Fluency Test.Results. Patients who had a prior history of psychotic symptoms had poorer verbal functioning in comparison to subjects without such a history. However, individuals hospitalized in the manic state of disease, and who reported more adverse events after antipsychotic medication during the whole course of illness, had worse results in some parameters of executive function measurements in the WCST test, namely occurring in a greater percentage of nonperseverative errors and a lower number of completed categories.Discussion. Generally the results confirm findings according to which, patients with the history of psychosis performe worse on neurocognitive tasks. However, the nature of dysfunctions found, generates questions about its relations with the experience of psychosis and antipsychotic treatment. Conclusion: Different aspects of cognitive dysfunctions may be related to the experience of psychosis and antipsychotic treatment in patients with bipolar disorders.

  20. The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR): three-dimensional structure and localization of a channel gate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Mark F; O'Ryan, Liam P; Hughes, Guy; Zhao, Zhefeng; Aleksandrov, Luba A; Riordan, John R; Ford, Robert C

    2011-12-09

    Cystic fibrosis affects about 1 in 2500 live births and involves loss of transmembrane chloride flux due to a lack of a membrane protein channel termed the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). We have studied CFTR structure by electron crystallography. The data were compared with existing structures of other ATP-binding cassette transporters. The protein was crystallized in the outward facing state and resembled the well characterized Sav1866 transporter. We identified regions in the CFTR map, not accounted for by Sav1866, which were potential locations for the regulatory region as well as the channel gate. In this analysis, we were aided by the fact that the unit cell was composed of two molecules not related by crystallographic symmetry. We also identified regions in the fitted Sav1866 model that were missing from the map, hence regions that were either disordered in CFTR or differently organized compared with Sav1866. Apart from the N and C termini, this indicated that in CFTR, the cytoplasmic end of transmembrane helix 5/11 and its associated loop could be partly disordered (or alternatively located).

  1. Emerging role of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator- an epithelial chloride channel in gastrointestinal cancers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuning Hou; Xiaoqing Guan; Zhe Yang; Chunying Li

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator(CFTR), a glycoprotein with 1480 amino acids, has been well established as a chloride channel mainly expressed in the epithelial cells of various tissues and organs such as lungs, sweat glands, gastrointestinal system, and reproductive organs. Although defective CFTR leads to cystic fibrosis, a common genetic disorder in the Caucasian population, there is accumulating evidence that suggests a novel role of CFTR in various cancers, especially in gastroenterological cancers, such as pancreatic cancer and colon cancer. In this review, we summarize the emerging findings that link CFTR with various cancers, with focus on the association between CFTR defects and gastrointestinal cancers as well as the underlying mechanisms. Further study of CFTR in cancer biology may help pave a new way for the diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal cancers.

  2. Effects of La3+ on H+ Transmembrane Gradient and Membrane Potential in Rice Seedling Roots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑海雷; 张春光; 赵中秋; 马建华; 李利

    2002-01-01

    The effects of LaCl3 on membrane potential and transmembrane proton gradient for rice (Oryza sativa) seedling roots were studied. Highly purified plasma membrane was isolated by aqueous two-phase partitioning method. Both the gradient of transmembrane proton and membrane potential were stimulated by certain low concentration of LaCl3 and depressed by high concentration of LaCl3. The optimal concentration of La3+ is around 40~60 μmolL-1 for transmembrane proton gradient and membrane potential. It shows that La3+ can influence the generations and maintenances of membrane potential and transmembrane proton gradient in rice seedling roots.

  3. Structure and dynamics of nano-sized raft-like domains on the plasma membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Fernando E.; Pantano, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    Cell membranes are constitutively composed of thousands of different lipidic species, whose specific organization leads to functional heterogeneities. In particular, sphingolipids, cholesterol and some proteins associate among them to form stable nanoscale domains involved in recognition, signaling, membrane trafficking, etc. Atomic-detail information in the nanometer/second scale is still elusive to experimental techniques. In this context, molecular simulations on membrane systems have provided useful insights contributing to bridge this gap. Here we present the results of a series of simulations of biomembranes representing non-raft and raft-like nano-sized domains in order to analyze the particular structural and dynamical properties of these domains. Our results indicate that the smallest (5 nm) raft domains are able to preserve their distinctive structural and dynamical features, such as an increased thickness, higher ordering, lower lateral diffusion, and specific lipid-ion interactions. The insertion of a transmembrane protein helix into non-raft, extended raft-like, and raft-like nanodomain environments result in markedly different protein orientations, highlighting the interplay between the lipid-lipid and lipid-protein interactions.

  4. Association of genetic variations of genes encoding thrombospondin, type 1, domain-containing 4 and 7A with low bone mineral density in Japanese women with osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Seijiro; Kou, Ikuyo; Sato, Hidenori; Emi, Mitsuru; Ito, Hideki; Hosoi, Takayuki; Ikegawa, Shiro

    2008-01-01

    Twins and family studies have shown that genetic factors are important determinants of bone mass. Important aspects of bone mineral density (BMD) regulation are endocrine systems, notably hormonal regulation of adrenal corticoids, as indicated by clinical knowledge of glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis. Glucocorticoid is known to negatively regulate bone mass in vivo, and glucocorticoid increases thrombospondin messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) levels. We studied single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes encoding thrombospondin, type 1, domain-containing 4 and 7A (THSD4 and THSD7A) for possible association with lumbar and femoral BMD among 337 Japanese women with osteoporosis who participated in the BioBank Japan project. Genetic variations of THSD4 and THSD7A loci displayed significant association with lumbar and femoral BMD. Most significant correlation was observed for THSD7A SNP rs12673692 with lumbar BMD (P = 0.00017). Homozygous carriers of the major (G) allele had the highest BMD [0.886 +/- 0.011 g/cm2, mean +/- standard deviation (SD)], whereas heterozygous carriers were intermediate (0.872 +/- 0.013 g/cm2) and homozygous A-allele carriers had the lowest (0.753 +/- 0.023 g/cm2). THSD4 SNP rs10851839 also displayed strong association with lumbar BMD (P = 0.0092). In addition, both THSD7A and THSD4 displayed significant association with femoral BMD in a recessive model (P = 0.036 and P = 0.0046, respectively). Results suggest that variations of THSD7A and THSD4 loci may be important determinants of osteoporosis in Japanese women.

  5. Intramolecular cross-linking in a bacterial homolog of mammalian SLC6 neurotransmitter transporters suggests an evolutionary conserved role of transmembrane segments 7 and 8

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kniazeff, Julie; Loland, Claus Juul; Goldberg, Naomi;

    2005-01-01

    The extracellular concentration of the neurotransmitters dopamine, serotonin, norepinephrine, GABA and glycine is tightly controlled by plasma membrane transporters belonging to the SLC6 gene family. A very large number of putative transport proteins with a remarkable homology to the SLC6...... transporters has recently been identified in prokaryotes. Here we have probed structural relationships in a 'microdoman' corresponding to the extracellular ends of transmembrane segments (TM) 7 and 8 in one of these homologs, the tryptophan transporter TnaT from Symbiobacterium thermophilum. We found...... proximity between TM 7 and 8 in the tertiary structure of TnaT as previously suggested for the mammalian counterparts. Furthermore, the inhibition of uptake upon cross-linking the two cysteines provides indirect support for a conserved conformational role of these transmembrane domains in the transport...

  6. Progress on type Ⅱ transmembrane serine protease%Ⅱ型跨膜丝氨酸蛋白酶的最新研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高利娟; 董宁征; 吴庆宇

    2013-01-01

    The type Ⅱ transmembrane serine protease (TTSP) family includes a group of trypsin-like enzymes that are anchored on the cell surface via an integral transmembrane domain near the N-terminus.The activated TTSPs cleave their specific substrates to participate in a variety of physiological and pathological processes.Dysregulation of these TTSPs may lead to serious diseases such as cancer,hearing loss,anemia and cardiovascular disease.%Ⅱ型跨膜丝氨酸蛋白酶(TTSPs)是一类通过氨基末端跨膜区域锚定在细胞膜上的丝氨酸蛋白酶.激活后的TTSPs通过其特异性底物参与多种生理和病理过程,功能异常可导致肿瘤、耳聋、缺铁性贫血、心血管疾病等.

  7. Regulation of Renal Organic Anion Transporter 3 (SLC22A8 Expression and Function by the Integrity of Lipid Raft Domains and their Associated Cytoskeleton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chutima Srimaroeng

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: In humans and rodents, organic anion transporter 3 (Oat3 is highly expressed on the basolateral membrane of renal proximal tubules and mediates the secretion of exogenous and endogenous anions. Regulation of Oat3 expression and function has been observed in both expression system and intact renal epithelia. However, information on the local membrane environment of Oat3 and its role is limited. Lipid raft domains (LRD; cholesterol-rich domains of the plasma membrane play important roles in membrane protein expression, function and targeting. In the present study, we have examined the role of LRD-rich membranes and their associated cytoskeletal proteins on Oat3 expression and function. Methods: LRD-rich membranes were isolated from rat renal cortical tissues and from HEK-293 cells stably expressing human OAT3 (hOAT3 by differential centrifugation with triton X-100 extraction. Western blots were subsequently analyzed to determine protein expression. In addition, the effect of disruption of LRD-rich membranes was examined on functional Oat3 mediated estrone sulfate (ES transport in rat renal cortical slices. Cytoskeleton disruptors were investigated in both hOAT3 expressing HEK-293 cells and rat renal cortical slices. Results: Lipid-enriched membranes from rat renal cortical tissues and hOAT3-expressing HEK-293 cells showed co-expression of rOat3/hOAT3 and several lipid raft-associated proteins, specifically caveolin 1 (Cav1, β-actin and myosin. Moreover, immunohistochemistry in hOAT3-expressing HEK-293 cells demonstrated that these LRD-rich proteins co-localized with hOAT3. Potassium iodide (KI, an inhibitor of protein-cytoskeletal interaction, effectively detached cytoskeleton proteins and hOAT3 from plasma membrane, leading to redistribution of hOAT3 into non-LRD-rich compartments. In addition, inhibition of cytoskeleton integrity and membrane trafficking processes significantly reduced ES uptake mediated by both human and rat

  8. The Kaposi Sarcoma Herpesvirus Latency-associated Nuclear Antigen DNA Binding Domain Dorsal Positive Electrostatic Patch Facilitates DNA Replication and Episome Persistence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shijun; Tan, Min; Juillard, Franceline; Ponnusamy, Rajesh; Correia, Bruno; Simas, J Pedro; Carrondo, Maria A; McVey, Colin E; Kaye, Kenneth M

    2015-11-20

    Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) has a causative role in several human malignancies. KSHV latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) mediates persistence of viral episomes in latently infected cells. LANA mediates KSHV DNA replication and segregates episomes to progeny nuclei. The structure of the LANA DNA binding domain was recently solved, revealing a positive electrostatic patch opposite the DNA binding surface, which is the site of BET protein binding. Here we investigate the functional role of the positive patch in LANA-mediated episome persistence. As expected, LANA mutants with alanine or glutamate substitutions in the central, peripheral, or lateral portions of the positive patch maintained the ability to bind DNA by EMSA. However, all of the substitution mutants were deficient for LANA DNA replication and episome maintenance. Mutation of the peripheral region generated the largest deficiencies. Despite these deficiencies, all positive patch mutants concentrated to dots along mitotic chromosomes in cells containing episomes, similar to LANA. The central and peripheral mutants, but not the lateral mutants, were reduced for BET protein interaction as assessed by co-immunoprecipitation. However, defects in BET protein binding were independent of episome maintenance function. Overall, the reductions in episome maintenance closely correlated with DNA replication deficiencies, suggesting that the replication defects account for the reduced episome persistence. Therefore, the electrostatic patch exerts a key role in LANA-mediated DNA replication and episome persistence and may act through a host cell partner(s) other than a BET protein or by inducing specific structures or complexes.

  9. Electrostatics analysis of the mutational and pH effects of the N-terminal domain self-association of the major ampullate spidroin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barroso da Silva, Fernando Luís; Pasquali, Samuela; Derreumaux, Philippe; Dias, Luis Gustavo

    2016-07-07

    Spider silk is a fascinating material combining mechanical properties such as maximum strength and high toughness comparable or better than man-made materials, with biocompatible degradability characteristics. Experimental measurements have shown that pH triggers the dimer formation of the N-terminal domain (NTD) of the major ampullate spidroin 1 (MaSp 1). A coarse-grained model accounting for electrostatics, van der Waals and pH-dependent charge-fluctuation interactions, by means of Monte Carlo simulations, gave us a more comprehensive view of the NTD dimerization process. A detailed analysis of the electrostatic properties and free energy derivatives for the NTD homoassociation was carried out at different pH values and salt concentrations for the protein wild type and for several mutants. We observed an enhancement of dipole-dipole interactions at pH 6 due to the ionization of key amino acids, a process identified as the main driving force for dimerization. Analytical estimates based on the DVLO theory framework corroborate our findings. Molecular dynamics simulations using the OPEP coarse-grained force field for proteins show that the mutant E17Q is subject to larger structural fluctuations when compared to the wild type. Estimates of the association rate constants for this mutant were evaluated by the Debye-Smoluchowski theory and are in agreement with the experimental data when thermally relaxed structures are used instead of the crystallographic data. Our results can contribute to the design of new mutants with specific association properties.

  10. Identification of Nucleolus-Associated Chromatin Domains Reveals a Role for the Nucleolus in 3D Organization of the A. thaliana Genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Pontvianne

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The nucleolus is the site of rRNA gene transcription, rRNA processing, and ribosome biogenesis. However, the nucleolus also plays additional roles in the cell. We isolated nucleoli using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS and identified nucleolus-associated chromatin domains (NADs by deep sequencing, comparing wild-type plants and null mutants for the nucleolar protein NUCLEOLIN 1 (NUC1. NADs are primarily genomic regions with heterochromatic signatures and include transposable elements (TEs, sub-telomeric regions, and mostly inactive protein-coding genes. However, NADs also include active rRNA genes and the entire short arm of chromosome 4 adjacent to them. In nuc1 null mutants, which alter rRNA gene expression and overall nucleolar structure, NADs are altered, telomere association with the nucleolus is decreased, and telomeres become shorter. Collectively, our studies reveal roles for NUC1 and the nucleolus in the spatial organization of chromosomes as well as telomere maintenance.

  11. 领域本体中概念间语义相关度的概率估计%Probability estimation for semantic association on domain ontology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田萱; 李冬梅

    2011-01-01

    A probability model based on Bayesian principles is given to measure the semantic association from a concept to its direct-related concept in domain ontology.The model is based on different semantic relationships,and is estimated according to maximum likelihood estimation. Semantic distance is used to estimate semantic relationships in estimating period.Based on the proposed model,a method to measure semantic association of any two concepts in ontology is given.Experiment results of semantic retrieval on open data show that semantic query expansion performs better than classic semantic query expansion.%根据贝叶斯定理提出一种衡量领域本体中概念间语义相关度的概率模型.该模型定义在不同语义关系之上,基于极大似然估计法利用语义距离来对语义关系进行参数估计.并在此基础给出一种计算任意两个概念之间语义相关度的方法.公开数据集上的实验结果表明该方法估计出的概念语义相关度具有相当的有效性,应用在语义查询扩展中可明显提高检索效果.

  12. Polymorphisms of clip domain serine proteinase and serine proteinase homolog in the swimming crab Portunus trituberculatus and their association with Vibrio alginolyticus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Meng; Liu, Yuan; Hui, Min; Song, Chengwen; Cui, Zhaoxia

    2017-03-01

    Clip domain serine proteases (cSPs) and their homologs (SPHs) play an important role in various biological processes that are essential components of extracellular signaling cascades, especially in the innate immune responses of invertebrates. Here, polymorphisms of PtcSP and PtSPH from the swimming crab Portunus trituberculatus were investigated to explore their association with resistance/susceptibility to Vibrio alginolyticus. Polymorphic loci were identified using Clustal X, and characterized with SPSS 16.0 software, and then the significance of genotype and allele frequencies between resistant and susceptible stocks was determined by a χ 2 test. A total of 109 and 77 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified in the genomic fragments of PtcSP and PtSPH, respectively. Notably, nearly half of PtSPH polymorphisms were found in the non-coding exon 1. Fourteen SNPs investigated were significantly associated with susceptibility/resistance to V. alginolyticus ( P statistically significant difference of allele frequencies, the SSRs showed different polymorphic alleles on the basis of the repeat number between resistant and susceptible stocks. After further validation, polymorphisms investigated here might be applied to select potential molecular markers of P. trituberculatus with resistance to V. alginolyticus.

  13. Rapid Evolution to Blast Crisis Associated with a Q252H ABL1 Kinase Domain Mutation in e19a2 BCR-ABL1 Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah L. McCarron

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A minority of chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML patients express variant transcripts of which the e19a2 BCR-ABL1 fusion is the most common. Instances of tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI resistance in e19a2 BCR-ABL1 CML patients have rarely been reported. A case of e19a2 BCR-ABL1 CML is described in whom imatinib resistance, associated with a Q252H ABL1 kinase domain mutation, became apparent soon after initiation of TKI therapy. The patient rapidly transformed to myeloid blast crisis (BC with considerable bone marrow fibrosis and no significant molecular response to a second generation TKI. The clinical course was complicated by comorbidities with the patient rapidly succumbing to advanced disease. This scenario of Q252H-associated TKI resistance with rapid BC transformation has not been previously documented in e19a2 BCR-ABL1 CML. This case highlights the considerable challenges remaining in the management of TKI-resistant BC CML, particularly in the elderly patient.

  14. Polymorphisms of clip domain serine proteinase and serine proteinase homolog in the swimming crab Portunus trituberculatus and their association with Vibrio alginolyticus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Meng; Liu, Yuan; Hui, Min; Song, Chengwen; Cui, Zhaoxia

    2016-05-01

    Clip domain serine proteases (cSPs) and their homologs (SPHs) play an important role in various biological processes that are essential components of extracellular signaling cascades, especially in the innate immune responses of invertebrates. Here, polymorphisms of PtcSP and PtSPH from the swimming crab Portunus trituberculatus were investigated to explore their association with resistance/ susceptibility to Vibrio alginolyticus. Polymorphic loci were identified using Clustal X, and characterized with SPSS 16.0 software, and then the significance of genotype and allele frequencies between resistant and susceptible stocks was determined by a χ2 test. A total of 109 and 77 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified in the genomic fragments of PtcSP and PtSPH, respectively. Notably, nearly half of PtSPH polymorphisms were found in the non-coding exon 1. Fourteen SNPs investigated were significantly associated with susceptibility/resistance to V. alginolyticus (P<0.05). Among them, eight SNPs were observed in introns, and one synonymous, four non-synonymous SNPs and one ins-del were found in coding exons. In addition, five simple sequence repeats (SSRs) were detected in intron 3 of PtcSP. Although there was no statistically significant difference of allele frequencies, the SSRs showed different polymorphic alleles on the basis of the repeat number between resistant and susceptible stocks. After further validation, polymorphisms investigated here might be applied to select potential molecular markers of P. trituberculatus with resistance to V. alginolyticus.

  15. The Action of Discoidin Domain Receptor 2 in Basal Tumor Cells and Stromal Cancer-Associated Fibroblasts Is Critical for Breast Cancer Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Callie A.S. Corsa

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available High levels of collagen deposition in human and mouse breast tumors are associated with poor outcome due to increased local invasion and distant metastases. Using a genetic approach, we show that, in mice, the action of the fibrillar collagen receptor discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2 in both tumor and tumor-stromal cells is critical for breast cancer metastasis yet does not affect primary tumor growth. In tumor cells, DDR2 in basal epithelial cells regulates the collective invasion of tumor organoids. In stromal cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs, DDR2 is critical for extracellular matrix production and the organization of collagen fibers. The action of DDR2 in CAFs also enhances tumor cell collective invasion through a pathway distinct from the tumor-cell-intrinsic function of DDR2. This work identifies DDR2 as a potential therapeutic target that controls breast cancer metastases through its action in both tumor cells and tumor-stromal cells at the primary tumor site.

  16. Cloning and characterization of a cDNA coding for the lipoprotein-associated coagulation inhibitor shows that it consists of three tandem Kunitz-type inhibitory domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wun, T.C.; Kretzmer, K.K.; Girard, T.J.; Miletich, J.P.; Broze, G.J. Jr.

    1988-05-05

    Human plasma contains a lipoprotein-associated coagulation inhibitor (LACI) which inactivates factor X/sub a/ directly, and in a X/sub a/-dependent fashion also inhibits the VII/sub a/-tissue factor complex of the extrinsic coagulation pathway. Rabbit polyclonal anti-LACI antiserum was used to screen human placental and fetal liver lambdagt11 cDNA libraries for the expression of LACI antigens. Immunologically positive clones were further tested for their ability to bind /sup 125/I-factor X/sub a/. Seven clones were obtained which are immunologically and functionally active. The longest cDNA insert (lambdaP9) of these isolates is 1.4 kilobases (kb) while other clones are 1.0 kb in length. Nucleotide sequence analysis shows that lambdaP9 consists of 1431 bases that include a 5'-noncoding sequence of 132 nucleotides, an open reading frame of 912 nucleotides, and a 3'-noncoding region of 387 nucleotides. The predicted sequence of mature LACI contains 18 cysteines and three potential N-linked glycosylation sites. The amino acid sequence analysis of purified LACI's NH/sub 2/ terminus and two of its proteolytic fragments match exactly those deduced from the cDNA sequence, indicating that the cDNA codes for LACI. The translated amino acid sequence of LACI shows several discernible domains, including a highly negatively charged NH/sub 2/ terminus, three tandem Kunitz-type inhibitory domains, and a highly positively charged carboxyl terminus. Northern blot analysis shows that the following liver-derived cell lines, Chang liver, HepG2 hepatoma, and SK hepatoma all, contain two major species of mRNA which hybridize with LACI cDNA.

  17. Large-Conductance Transmembrane Porin Made from DNA Origami.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göpfrich, Kerstin; Li, Chen-Yu; Ricci, Maria; Bhamidimarri, Satya Prathyusha; Yoo, Jejoong; Gyenes, Bertalan; Ohmann, Alexander; Winterhalter, Mathias; Aksimentiev, Aleksei; Keyser, Ulrich F

    2016-09-27

    DNA nanotechnology allows for the creation of three-dimensional structures at nanometer scale. Here, we use DNA to build the largest synthetic pore in a lipid membrane to date, approaching the dimensions of the nuclear pore complex and increasing the pore-area and the conductance 10-fold compared to previous man-made channels. In our design, 19 cholesterol tags anchor a megadalton funnel-shaped DNA origami porin in a lipid bilayer membrane. Confocal imaging and ionic current recordings reveal spontaneous insertion of the DNA porin into the lipid membrane, creating a transmembrane pore of tens of nanosiemens conductance. All-atom molecular dynamics simulations characterize the conductance mechanism at the atomic level and independently confirm the DNA porins' large ionic conductance.

  18. ATPase activity of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, C; Ramjeesingh, M; Wang, W; Garami, E; Hewryk, M; Lee, D; Rommens, J M; Galley, K; Bear, C E

    1996-11-08

    The gene mutated in cystic fibrosis codes for the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a cyclic AMP-activated chloride channel thought to be critical for salt and water transport by epithelial cells. Plausible models exist to describe a role for ATP hydrolysis in CFTR channel activity; however, biochemical evidence that CFTR possesses intrinsic ATPase activity is lacking. In this study, we report the first measurements of the rate of ATP hydrolysis by purified, reconstituted CFTR. The mutation CFTRG551D resides within a motif conserved in many nucleotidases and is known to cause severe human disease. Following reconstitution the mutant protein exhibited both defective ATP hydrolysis and channel gating, providing direct evidence that CFTR utilizes ATP to gate its channel activity.

  19. Hkat, a novel nutritionally regulated transmembrane protein in adipose tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ren

    2012-01-01

    White adipose tissue is an active endocrine organ regulating many aspects of whole body physiology and pathology. Adipogenesis, a process in which premature cells differentiate into adipocytes, is a complex process that includes orchestrated changes in gene expression and cell morphology in response to various nutritional and hormonal stimuli. To profile transcriptome changes in response to nutritional stimulation, we performed RNA-seq on fat in mice treated with either a high-fat diet or fasting. We identified a novel nutritionally regulated gene, Gm12824, named Hkat (heart, kidney, adipose-enriched transmembrane protein). We show that both fasting and obesity dramatically reduce Hkat in white adipose tissue, and that fasting reduces while obesity increases its expression in brown fat. Hkat is localized to the plasma membrane and induced during adipogenesis. Therefore, Hkat is a novel nutritionally regulated gene that is potentially involved in metabolism.

  20. Glycosylation and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glick Mary Catherine

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR has been known for the past 11 years to be a membrane glycoprotein with chloride channel activity. Only recently has the glycosylation of CFTR been examined in detail, by O'Riordan et al in Glycobiology. Using cells that overexpress wild-type (wtCFTR, the presence of polylactosamine was noted on the fully glycosylated form of CFTR. In the present commentary the results of that work are discussed in relation to the glycosylation phenotype of cystic fibrosis (CF, and the cellular localization and processing of ΔF508 CFTR. The significance of the glycosylation will be known when endogenous CFTR from primary human tissue is examined.

  1. Impact of histidine residues on the transmembrane helices of viroporins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Park, Sang Ho; Tian, Ye; Opella, Stanley J

    2013-11-01

    Abstract The role of histidine in channel-forming transmembrane (TM) helices was investigated by comparing the TM helices from Virus protein 'u' (Vpu) and the M2 proton channel. Both proteins are members of the viroporin family of small membrane proteins that exhibit ion channel activity, and have a single TM helix that is capable of forming oligomers. The TM helices from both proteins have a conserved tryptophan towards the C-terminus. Previously, alanine 18 of Vpu was mutated to histidine in order to artificially introduce the same HXXXW motif that is central to the proton channel activity of M2. Interestingly, the mutated Vpu TM resulted in an increase in helix tilt angle of 11° in lipid bilayers compared to the wild-type Vpu TM. Here, we find the reverse, when histidine 37 of the HXXXW motif in M2 was mutated to alanine, it decreased the helix tilt by 10° from that of wild-type M2. The tilt change is independent of both the helix length and the presence of tryptophan. In addition, compared to wild-type M2, the H37A mutant displayed lowered sensitivity to proton concentration. We also found that the solvent accessibility of histidine-containing M2 is greater than without histidine. This suggests that the TM helix may increase the solvent exposure by changing its tilt angle in order to accommodate a polar/charged residue within the hydrophobic membrane region. The comparative results of M2, Vpu and their mutants demonstrated the significance of histidine in a transmembrane helix and the remarkable plasticity of the function and structure of ion channels stemming from changes at a single amino acid site.

  2. Magnetic resonance study of the transmembrane nitrite diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samouilov, A; Woldman, Ya Yu; Zweier, J L; Khramtsov, V V

    2007-05-01

    Nitrite (NO(2)-), being a product of metabolism of both nitric oxide (NO(*)) and nitrate (NO(3)-), can accumulate in tissues and regenerate NO() by several mechanisms. The effect of NO(2)- on ischemia/reperfusion injury was also reported. Nevertheless, the mechanisms of intracellular NO(2)- accumulation are poorly understood. We suggested significant role of nitrite penetration through biological membranes in the form of undissociated nitrous acid (HNO(2)). This hypothesis has been tested using large unilamellar phosphatidylcholine liposomes and several spectroscopic techniques. HNO(2) transport across the phospholipid bilayer of liposomes facilitates proton transfer resulting in intraliposomal acidification, which was measured using pH-sensitive probes. NO(2)(-)-mediated intraliposomal acidification was confirmed by EPR spectroscopy using membrane-impermeable pH-sensitive nitroxide, AMC (2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-1-yloxy-2,5-dihydro-1H-imidazol-3-ium-4-yl)-aminomethanesulfonic acid (pK 5.25), and by (31)P NMR spectroscopy using inorganic phosphate (pK 6.9). Nitrite accumulates inside liposomes in concentration exceeding its concentration in the bulk solution, when initial transmembrane pH gradient (alkaline inside) is applied. Intraliposomal accumulation of NO(2)- was observed by direct measurement using chemiluminescence technique. Perfusion of isolated rat hearts with buffer containing 4 microM NO(2)- was performed. The nitrite concentrations in the effluent and in the tissue, measured after 1 min perfusion, were close, supporting fast penetration of the nitrite through the tissue. Measurements of the nitrite/nitrate showed that total concentration of NO(x) in myocardium increased from initial 7.8 to 24.7 microM after nitrite perfusion. Physiological significance of passive transmembrane transport of NO(2)- and its coupling with intraliposomal acidification are discussed.

  3. Team work at its best – TAPL and its two domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zollmann, Tina; Bock, Christoph; Graab, Philipp; Abele, Rupert

    2015-09-01

    The transporter associated with antigen processing (TAPL, ABCB9) is a homodimeric ABC transporter, shuttling cytosolic polypeptides into the lumen of lysosomes energized by ATP hydrolysis. Here we give a short overview of the superfamily of ABC transporters and summarize the current state of knowledge on TAPL in detail. The architecture of TAPL and its substrate specificity are described and we discuss the function of an extra N-terminal transmembrane domain, called TMD0, in respect of subcellular targeting and interaction with proteins, contributing to long-term stability. As TAPL shows – besides a ubiquitous basal expression – an elevated expression in antigen presenting cells, we present models of TAPL function in adaptive immunity.

  4. Caenorhabditis elegans SMA-10/LRIG is a conserved transmembrane protein that enhances bone morphogenetic protein signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina L Gumienny

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP pathways control an array of developmental and homeostatic events, and must themselves be exquisitely controlled. Here, we identify Caenorhabditis elegans SMA-10 as a positive extracellular regulator of BMP-like receptor signaling. SMA-10 acts genetically in a BMP-like (Sma/Mab pathway between the ligand DBL-1 and its receptors SMA-6 and DAF-4. We cloned sma-10 and show that it has fifteen leucine-rich repeats and three immunoglobulin-like domains, hallmarks of an LRIG subfamily of transmembrane proteins. SMA-10 is required in the hypodermis, where the core Sma/Mab signaling components function. We demonstrate functional conservation of LRIGs by rescuing sma-10(lf animals with the Drosophila ortholog lambik, showing that SMA-10 physically binds the DBL-1 receptors SMA-6 and DAF-4 and enhances signaling in vitro. This interaction is evolutionarily conserved, evidenced by LRIG1 binding to vertebrate receptors. We propose a new role for LRIG family members: the positive regulation of BMP signaling by binding both Type I and Type II receptors.

  5. How Phosphorylation and ATPase Activity Regulate Anion Flux though the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwick, Matthias; Esposito, Cinzia; Hellstern, Manuel; Seelig, Anna

    2016-07-08

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR, ABCC7), mutations of which cause cystic fibrosis, belongs to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter family and works as a channel for small anions, such as chloride and bicarbonate. Anion channel activity is known to depend on phosphorylation by cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) and CFTR-ATPase activity. Whereas anion channel activity has been extensively investigated, phosphorylation and CFTR-ATPase activity are still poorly understood. Here, we show that the two processes can be measured in a label-free and non-invasive manner in real time in live cells, stably transfected with CFTR. This study reveals three key findings. (i) The major contribution (≥90%) to the total CFTR-related ATP hydrolysis rate is due to phosphorylation by PKA and the minor contribution (≤10%) to CFTR-ATPase activity. (ii) The mutant CFTR-E1371S that is still conductive, but defective in ATP hydrolysis, is not phosphorylated, suggesting that phosphorylation requires a functional nucleotide binding domain and occurs in the post-hydrolysis transition state. (iii) CFTR-ATPase activity is inversely related to CFTR anion flux. The present data are consistent with a model in which CFTR is in a closed conformation with two ATPs bound. The open conformation is induced by ATP hydrolysis and corresponds to the post-hydrolysis transition state that is stabilized by phosphorylation and binding of chloride channel potentiators.

  6. TMC and EVER genes belong to a larger novel family, the TMC gene family encoding transmembrane proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutai Hideki

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations in the transmembrane cochlear expressed gene 1 (TMC1 cause deafness in human and mouse. Mutations in two homologous genes, EVER1 and EVER2 increase the susceptibility to infection with certain human papillomaviruses resulting in high risk of skin carcinoma. Here we report that TMC1, EVER1 and EVER2 (now TMC6 and TMC8 belong to a larger novel gene family, which is named TMC for trans membrane channel-like gene family. Results Using a combination of iterative database searches and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR experiments we assembled contigs for cDNA encoding human, murine, puffer fish, and invertebrate TMC proteins. TMC proteins of individual species can be grouped into three subfamilies A, B, and C. Vertebrates have eight TMC genes. The majority of murine TMC transcripts are expressed in most organs; some transcripts, however, in particular the three subfamily A members are rare and more restrictively expressed. Conclusion The eight vertebrate TMC genes are evolutionary conserved and encode proteins that form three subfamilies. Invertebrate TMC proteins can also be categorized into these three subfamilies. All TMC genes encode transmembrane proteins with intracellular amino- and carboxyl-termini and at least eight membrane-spanning domains. We speculate that the TMC proteins constitute a novel group of ion channels, transporters, or modifiers of such.

  7. Bacterial Synthesis and Purification of Normal and Mutant Forms of Human FGFR3 Transmembrane Segment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncharuk, S A; Goncharuk, M V; Mayzel, M L; Lesovoy, D M; Chupin, V V; Bocharov, E V; Arseniev, A S; Kirpichnikov, M P

    2011-07-01

    The fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) is a protein belonging to the family of receptor tyrosine kinases. FGFR3 plays an important role in human skeletal development. Mutations in this protein, including Gly380Arg or Ala391Glu substitutions in the transmembrane (TM) region, can cause different disorders in bone development. The determination of the spatial structure of the FGFR3 TM domain in a normal protein and in a protein with single Gly380Arg and Ala391Glu mutations is essential in order to understand the mechanisms that control dimerization and signal transduction by receptor tyrosine kinases. The effective system of expression of eukaryotic genes in bacteria and the purification protocol for the production of milligram amounts of both normal TM fragments of FGFR3 and those with single pathogenic mutations Gly380Arg and Ala391Glu, as well as their(15)N- and [(15)N,(13)C]-isotope-labelled derivatives, were described. Each peptide was produced inEscherichia coliBL21(DE3)pLysS cells as a C-terminal extension of thioredoxin A. The purification protocol involved immobilized metal affinity chromatography and cation- and anion-exchange chromatography, as well as the fusion protein cleavage with the light subunit of human enterokinase. The efficiency of the incorporation of target peptides into DPC/SDS and DPC/DPG micelles was confirmed using NMR spectroscopy. The described methodology of production of the native FGFR3 TM domain in norma and with single Gly380Arg and Ala391Glu mutations enables one to study their spatial structure using high-resolution heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy.

  8. Domain crossing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schraefel, M. C.; Rouncefield, Mark; Kellogg, Wendy

    2012-01-01

    In CSCW, how much do we need to know about another domain/culture before we observe, intersect and intervene with designs. What optimally would that other culture need to know about us? Is this a “how long is a piece of string” question, or an inquiry where we can consider a variety of contexts a...

  9. Advances in tumor-associated gene thioredoxin domain containing protein 5%肿瘤相关基因TXNDC5的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李春梅; 张林; 李楠

    2014-01-01

    Thioredoxin domain containing protein 5 (TXNDC5) is located on chromosome 6p24 and encodes a protein-disulfide isomerase containing 3 thioredoxin motifs which can compensate for a loss of PDI function in yeast. It has been shown that the expression level of TXNDC5 gene is higher in carcinoma tissues than in normal tissues. Following is a review of the advances in tumor-associated TXNDC5.%TXNDC5基因定位于染色体6p24.3上并且具有编码蛋白二硫键异构酶的功能。其所编码的蛋白含有3个硫氧还蛋白结构域并且可以补偿二硫键异构酶在酵母中功能的损失。研究发现TXNDC5基因在一些癌组织中的表达水平明显高于正常组织。本文主要就TXNDC5在肿瘤领域的最新研究进展进行综述。

  10. Characterization of Mutants of Human Small Heat Shock Protein HspB1 Carrying Replacements in the N-Terminal Domain and Associated with Hereditary Motor Neuron Diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia K Muranova

    Full Text Available Physico-chemical properties of the mutations G34R, P39L and E41K in the N-terminal domain of human heat shock protein B1 (HspB1, which have been associated with hereditary motor neuron neuropathy, were analyzed. Heat-induced aggregation of all mutants started at lower temperatures than for the wild type protein. All mutations decreased susceptibility of the N- and C-terminal parts of HspB1 to chymotrypsinolysis. All mutants formed stable homooligomers with a slightly larger apparent molecular weight compared to the wild type protein. All mutations analyzed decreased or completely prevented phosphorylation-induced dissociation of HspB1 oligomers. When mixed with HspB6 and heated, all mutants yielded heterooligomers with apparent molecular weights close to ~400 kDa. Finally, the three HspB1 mutants possessed lower chaperone-like activity towards model substrates (lysozyme, malate dehydrogenase and insulin compared to the wild type protein, conversely the environmental probe bis-ANS yielded higher fluorescence with the mutants than with the wild type protein. Thus, in vitro the analyzed N-terminal mutations increase stability of large HspB1 homooligomers, prevent their phosphorylation-dependent dissociation, modulate their interaction with HspB6 and decrease their chaperoning capacity, preventing normal functioning of HspB1.

  11. Death-domain associated protein-6 (DAXX) mediated apoptosis in hantavirus infection is counter-balanced by activation of interferon-stimulated nuclear transcription factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khaiboullina, Svetlana F., E-mail: sv.khaiboullina@gmail.com [Whittemore Peterson Institute, University of Nevada-Reno, Reno (United States); Morzunov, Sergey P. [Department of Pathology and Nevada State Health Laboratory, University of Nevada-Reno, Reno (United States); Boichuk, Sergei V. [Kazan State Medical University, Kazan (Russian Federation); Palotás, András [Asklepios-Med (private medical practice and research center), Szeged (Hungary); Jeor, Stephen St. [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Nevada-Reno, Reno (United States); Lombardi, Vincent C. [Whittemore Peterson Institute, University of Nevada-Reno, Reno (United States); Rizvanov, Albert A. [Department of Genetics, Kazan (Volga Region) Federal University, Kazan (Russian Federation)

    2013-09-01

    Hantaviruses are negative strand RNA species that replicate predominantly in the cytoplasm. They also activate numerous cellular responses, but their involvement in nuclear processes is yet to be established. Using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), this study investigates the molecular finger-print of nuclear transcription factors during hantavirus infection. The viral-replication-dependent activation of pro-myelocytic leukemia protein (PML) was followed by subsequent localization in nuclear bodies (NBs). PML was also found in close proximity to activated Sp100 nuclear antigen and interferon-stimulated gene 20 kDa protein (ISG-20), but co-localization with death-domain associated protein-6 (DAXX) was not observed. These data demonstrate that hantavirus triggers PML activation and localization in NBs in the absence of DAXX-PLM-NB co-localization. The results suggest that viral infection interferes with DAXX-mediated apoptosis, and expression of interferon-activated Sp100 and ISG-20 proteins may indicate intracellular intrinsic antiviral attempts.

  12. p63cdc13, a B-type cyclin, is associated with both the nucleolar and chromatin domains of the fission yeast nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, I M; Alfa, C E; Hyams, J S

    1993-11-01

    The cellular distribution of the fission yeast mitotic cyclin B, p63cdc13, was investigated by a combination of indirect immunofluorescence light microscopy, immunogold electron microscopy, and nuclear isolation and fractionation. Immunofluorescence microscopy of wild-type cells and the cold-sensitive mutant dis2.11 with a monospecific anti-p63cdc13 antiserum was consistent with the association of a major subpopulation of fission yeast M-phase protein kinase with the nucleolus. Immunogold electron microscopy of freeze-substituted wild-type cells identified two nuclear populations of p63cdc13, one associated with the nucleolus, the other with the chromatin domain. To investigate the cell cycle regulation of nuclear labeling, the mutant cdc25.22 was synchronized through mitosis by temperature arrest and release. Immunogold labeling of cells arrested at G2M revealed gold particles present abundantly over the nucleolus and less densely over the chromatin region of the nucleus. Small vesicles around the nucleus were also labeled by anti-p63cdc13, but few gold particles were detected over the cytoplasm. Labeling of all cell compartments declined to zero through mitosis. Cell fractionation confirmed that p63cdc13 was substantially enriched in both isolated nuclei and in a fraction containing small vesicles and organelles. p63cdc13 was not extracted from nuclei by treatment with RNase A, Nonidet P40 (NP-40), Triton X-100, and 0.1 M NaCl, although partial solubilization was observed with DNase I and 1 M NaCl. A known nucleolar protein NOP1, partitioned in a similar manner to p63cdc13, as did p34cdc2, the other subunit of the M-phase protein kinase. We conclude that a major subpopulation of the fission yeast mitotic cyclin B is targeted to structural elements of the nucleus and nucleolus.

  13. A secreted WNT-ligand-binding domain of FZD5 generated by a frameshift mutation causes autosomal dominant coloboma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chunqiao; Widen, Sonya A; Williamson, Kathleen A; Ratnapriya, Rinki; Gerth-Kahlert, Christina; Rainger, Joe; Alur, Ramakrishna P; Strachan, Erin; Manjunath, Souparnika H; Balakrishnan, Archana; Floyd, James A; Li, Tiansen; Waskiewicz, Andrew; Brooks, Brian P; Lehmann, Ordan J; FitzPatrick, David R; Swaroop, Anand

    2016-04-01

    Ocular coloboma is a common eye malformation resulting from incomplete fusion of the optic fissure during development. Coloboma is often associated with microphthalmia and/or contralateral anophthalmia. Coloboma shows extensive locus heterogeneity associated with causative mutations identified in genes encoding developmental transcription factors or components of signaling pathways. We report an ultra-rare, heterozygous frameshift mutation in FZD5 (p.Ala219Glufs*49) that was identified independently in two branches of a large family with autosomal dominant non-syndromic coloboma. FZD5 has a single-coding exon and consequently a transcript with this frameshift variant is not a canonical substrate for nonsense-mediated decay. FZD5 encodes a transmembrane receptor with a conserved extracellular cysteine rich domain for ligand binding. The frameshift mutation results in the production of a truncated protein, which retains the Wingless-type MMTV integration site family member-ligand-binding domain, but lacks the transmembrane domain. The truncated protein was secreted from cells, and behaved as a dominant-negative FZD5 receptor, antagonizing both canonical and non-canonical WNT signaling. Expression of the resultant mutant protein caused coloboma and microphthalmia in zebrafish, and disruption of the apical junction of the retinal neural epithelium in mouse, mimicking the phenotype of Fz5/Fz8 compound conditional knockout mutants. Our studies have revealed a conserved role of Wnt-Frizzled (FZD) signaling in ocular development and directly implicate WNT-FZD signaling both in normal closure of the human optic fissure and pathogenesis of coloboma.

  14. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator is an Epithelial Cell Receptor for Clearance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from the Lung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pier, Gerald B.; Grout, Martha; Zaidi, Tanweer S.

    1997-10-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a chloride ion channel, but its relationship to the primary clinical manifestation of CF, chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa pulmonary infection, is unclear. We report that CFTR is a cellular receptor for binding, endocytosing, and clearing P. aeruginosa from the normal lung. Murine cells expressing recombinant human wild-type CFTR ingested 30-100 times as many P. aeruginosa as cells lacking CFTR or expressing mutant Δ F508 CFTR protein. Purified CFTR inhibited ingestion of P. aeruginosa by human airway epithelial cells. The first extracellular domain of CFTR specifically bound to P. aeruginosa and a synthetic peptide of this region inhibited P. aeruginosa internalization in vivo, leading to increased bacterial lung burdens. CFTR clears P. aeruginosa from the lung, indicating a direct connection between mutations in CFTR and the clinical consequences of CF.

  15. Structural basis of Smoothened regulation by its extracellular domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Eamon F. X.; Sircar, Ria; Miller, Paul S.; Hedger, George; Luchetti, Giovanni; Nachtergaele, Sigrid; Tully, Mark D.; Mydock-McGrane, Laurel; Covey, Douglas F.; Rambo, Robert P.; Sansom, Mark S. P.; Newstead, Simon; Rohatgi, Rajat; Siebold, Christian

    2016-07-01

    Developmental signals of the Hedgehog (Hh) and Wnt families are transduced across the membrane by Frizzled-class G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) composed of both a heptahelical transmembrane domain (TMD) and an extracellular cysteine-rich domain (CRD). How the large extracellular domains of GPCRs regulate signalling by the TMD is unknown. We present crystal structures of the Hh signal transducer and oncoprotein Smoothened, a GPCR that contains two distinct ligand-binding sites: one in its TMD and one in the CRD. The CRD is stacked atop the TMD, separated by an intervening wedge-like linker domain. Structure-guided mutations show that the interface between the CRD, linker domain and TMD stabilizes the inactive state of Smoothened. Unexpectedly, we find a cholesterol molecule bound to Smoothened in the CRD binding site. Mutations predicted to prevent cholesterol binding impair the ability of Smoothened to transmit native Hh signals. Binding of a clinically used antagonist, vismodegib, to the TMD induces a conformational change that is propagated to the CRD, resulting in loss of cholesterol from the CRD-linker domain-TMD interface. Our results clarify the structural mechanism by which the activity of a GPCR is controlled by ligand-regulated interactions between its extracellular and transmembrane domains.

  16. Disease-associated mutations in the actin-binding domain of filamin B cause cytoplasmic focal accumulations correlating with disease severity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daniel, Philip B; Morgan, Tim; Alanay, Yasemin;

    2012-01-01

    repeats surrounding the flexible hinge 1 region of the FLNB rod domain. Despite being positioned in domains that bind actin, it is unknown if these mutations perturb cytoskeletal structure. Expression of several full-length FLNB constructs containing ABD mutations resulted in the appearance of actin...

  17. Exosome-related multi-pass transmembrane protein TSAP6 is a target of rhomboid protease RHBDD1-induced proteolysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunhua Wan

    Full Text Available We have previously reported that rhomboid domain containing 1 (RHBDD1, a mammalian rhomboid protease highly expressed in the testis, can cleave the Bcl-2 protein Bik. In this study, we identified a multi-pass transmembrane protein, tumor suppressor activated pathway-6 (TSAP6 as a potential substrate of RHBDD1. RHBDD1 was found to induce the proteolysis of TSAP6 in a dose- and activity-dependent manner. The cleavage of TSAP6 was not restricted to its glycosylated form and occurred in three different regions. In addition, mass spectrometry and mutagenesis analyses both indicated that the major cleavage site laid in the C-terminal of the third transmembrane domain of TSAP6. A somatic cell knock-in approach was used to genetically inactivate the endogenous RHBDD1 in HCT116 and RKO colon cancer cells. Exosome secretion was significantly elevated when RHBDD1 was inactivated in the two cells lines. The increased exosome secretion was verfied through the detection of certain exosomal components, including Tsg101, Tf-R, FasL and Trail. In addition, the elevation of exosome secretion by RHBDD1 inactivation was reduced when TSAP6 was knocked down, indicating that the role of RHBDD1 in regulating exosomal trafficking is very likely to be TSAP6-dependent. We found that the increase in FasL and Trail increased exosome-induced apoptosis in Jurkat cells. Taken together, our findings suggest that RHBDD1 is involved in the regulation of a nonclassical exosomal secretion pathway through the restriction of TSAP6.

  18. Low Resolution Structure of a Bacterial SLC26 Transporter Reveals Dimeric Stoichiometry and Mobile Intracellular Domains*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compton, Emma L. R.; Karinou, Eleni; Naismith, James H.; Gabel, Frank; Javelle, Arnaud

    2011-01-01

    The SLC26/SulP (solute carrier/sulfate transporter) proteins are a superfamily of anion transporters conserved from bacteria to man, of which four have been identified in human diseases. Proteins within the SLC26/SulP family exhibit a wide variety of functions, transporting anions from halides to carboxylic acids. The proteins comprise a transmembrane domain containing between 10–12 transmembrane helices followed a by C-terminal cytoplasmic sulfate transporter and anti-sigma factor antagonist (STAS) domain. These proteins are expected to undergo conformational changes during the transport cycle; however, structural information for this family remains sparse, particularly for the full-length proteins. To address this issue, we conducted an expression and detergent screen on bacterial Slc26 proteins. The screen identified a Yersinia enterocolitica Slc26A protein as the ideal candidate for further structural studies as it can be purified to homogeneity. Partial proteolysis, co-purification, and analytical size exclusion chromatography demonstrate that the protein purifies as stable oligomers. Using small angle neutron scattering combined with contrast variation, we have determined the first low resolution structure of a bacterial Slc26 protein without spectral contribution from the detergent. The structure confirms that the protein forms a dimer stabilized via its transmembrane core; the cytoplasmic STAS domain projects away from the transmembrane domain and is not involved in dimerization. Supported by additional biochemical data, the structure suggests that large movements of the STAS domain underlie the conformational changes that occur during transport. PMID:21659513

  19. ADAM-15 Disintegrin-Like Domain Structure and Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Lu

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The ADAM (a disintegrin-like and metalloproteinase proteins are a family of transmembrane cell-surface proteins with important functions in adhesion and proteolytic processing in all animals. Human ADAM-15 is the only member of the ADAM family with the integrin binding motif Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD in its disintegrin-like domain. This motif is also found in most snake venom disintegrins and other disintegrin-like proteins. This unique RGD motif within ADAM-15 serves as an integrin ligand binding site, through which it plays a pivotal role in interacting with integrin receptors, a large family of heterodimeric transmembrane glycoproteins. This manuscript will present a review of the RGD-containing disintegrin-like domain structures and the structural features responsible for their activity as antagonists of integrin function in relation to the canonical RGD template.

  20. Control of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator expression by BAP31.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, G; Becker, B; Schreiber, R; Boucherot, A; Reth, M; Kunzelmann, K

    2001-06-08

    Expression of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is stringently controlled by molecular chaperones participating in formation of the quality control system. It has been shown that about 75% of all CFTR protein and close to 100% of the [DeltaPhe(508)] CFTR variant are rapidly degraded before leaving the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). B cell antigen receptor-associated proteins (BAPs) are ubiquitously expressed integral membrane proteins that may control association with the cytoskeleton, vesicular transport, or retrograde transport from the cis Golgi to the ER. The present study delivers evidence for cytosolic co-localization of both BAP31 and CFTR and for the control of expression of recombinant CFTR in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells and Xenopus oocytes by BAP31. Antisense inhibition of BAP31 in various cell types increased expression of both wild-type CFTR and [DeltaPhe(508)]CFTR and enabled cAMP-activated Cl(-) currents in [DeltaPhe(508)]CFTR-expressing CHO cells. Coexpression of CFTR together with BAP31 attenuated cAMP-activated Cl(-) currents in Xenopus oocytes. These data therefore suggest association of BAP31 with CFTR that may control maturation or trafficking of CFTR and thus expression in the plasma membrane.

  1. Confined diffusion of transmembrane proteins and lipids induced by the same actin meshwork lining the plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Takahiro K; Iwasawa, Kokoro; Kalay, Ziya; Tsunoyama, Taka A; Watanabe, Yusuke; Umemura, Yasuhiro M; Murakoshi, Hideji; Suzuki, Kenichi G N; Nemoto, Yuri L; Morone, Nobuhiro; Kusumi, Akihiro

    2016-04-01

    The mechanisms by which the diffusion rate in the plasma membrane (PM) is regulated remain unresolved, despite their importance in spatially regulating the reaction rates in the PM. Proposed models include entrapment in nanoscale noncontiguous domains found in PtK2 cells, slow diffusion due to crowding, and actin-induced compartmentalization. Here, by applying single-particle tracking at high time resolutions, mainly to the PtK2-cell PM, we found confined diffusion plus hop movements (termed "hop diffusion") for both a nonraft phospholipid and a transmembrane protein, transferrin receptor, and equal compartment sizes for these two molecules in all five of the cell lines used here (actual sizes were cell dependent), even after treatment with actin-modulating drugs. The cross-section size and the cytoplasmic domain size both affected the hop frequency. Electron tomography identified the actin-based membrane skeleton (MSK) located within 8.8 nm from the PM cytoplasmic surface of PtK2 cells and demonstrated that the MSK mesh size was the same as the compartment size for PM molecular diffusion. The extracellular matrix and extracellular domains of membrane proteins were not involved in hop diffusion. These results support a model of anchored TM-protein pickets lining actin-based MSK as a major mechanism for regulating diffusion.

  2. Trusted Domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Theis Solberg; Torbensen, Rune

    2012-01-01

    In the digital age of home automation and with the proliferation of mobile Internet access, the intelligent home and its devices should be accessible at any time from anywhere. There are many challenges such as security, privacy, ease of configuration, incompatible legacy devices, a wealth...... remote access via IP-based devices such as smartphones. The Trusted Domain platform fits existing legacy technologies by managing their interoperability and access controls, and it seeks to avoid the security issues of relying on third-party servers outside the home. It is a distributed system...... of wireless standards, limited resources of embedded systems, etc. Taking these challenges into account, we present a Trusted Domain home automation platform, which dynamically and securely connects heterogeneous networks of Short-Range Wireless devices via simple non-expert user. interactions, and allows...

  3. Transmembrane oligomeric form of Vibrio cholerae cytolysin triggers TLR2/TLR6-dependent proinflammatory responses in monocytes and macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khilwani, Barkha; Mukhopadhaya, Arunika; Chattopadhyay, Kausik

    2015-02-15

    Vibrio cholerae cytolysin (VCC) kills target eukaryotic cells by forming transmembrane oligomeric β-barrel pores. Once irreversibly converted into the transmembrane oligomeric form, VCC acquires an unusual structural stability and loses its cytotoxic property. It is therefore possible that, on exertion of its cytotoxic activity, the oligomeric form of VCC retained in the disintegrated membrane fractions of the lysed cells would survive within the host cellular milieu for a long period, without causing any further cytotoxicity. Under such circumstances, VCC oligomers may potentially be recognized by the host immune cells. Based on such a hypothesis, in the present study we explored the interaction of the transmembrane oligomeric form of VCC with the monocytes and macrophages of the innate immune system. Our study shows that the VCC oligomers assembled in the liposome membranes elicit potent proinflammatory responses in monocytes and macrophages, via stimulation of the toll-like receptor (TLR)2/TLR6-dependent signalling cascades that involve myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88)/interleukin-1-receptor-associated kinase (IRAK)1/tumour-necrosis-factor-receptor-associated factor (TRAF)6. VCC oligomer-mediated proinflammatory responses critically depend on the activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor-κB. Proinflammatory responses induced by the VCC oligomers also require activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family member c-Jun N-terminal kinase, which presumably acts via stimulation of the transcription factor activator protein-1. Notably, the role of the MAPK p38 could not be documented in the process.

  4. Expression of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator in rat ovary.

    Science.gov (United States)