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Sample records for associates molecular mechanisms

  1. Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Associative Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Koekkoek, Bas

    2004-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis primarily attempts to solve some long standing issues regarding classical eyelid conditioning. More specifically, what is the specific role of cerebellar LTD in classical eyeblink conditioning, and how does the answer change the view on cerebellar functioning on associative motor learning. The approach used in this thesis is a combination of the above mentioned genetic approach with classical conditioning experiments. The genetic techniques are by far best possible in mi...

  2. Molecular mechanisms of HIV-1 associated neurodegeneration

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hakan Ozdener

    2005-06-01

    Since identification of the human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1), numerous studies suggest a link between neurological impairments, in particular dementia, with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) with alarming occurrence worldwide. Approximately, 60% of HIV-infected people show some form of neurological impairment, and neuropathological changes are found in 90% of autopsied cases. Approximately 30% of untreated HIV-infected persons may develop dementia. The mechanisms behind these pathological changes are still not understood. Mounting data obtained by in vivo and in vitro experiments suggest that neuronal apoptosis is a major feature of HIV associated dementia (HAD), which can occur in the absence of direct infection of neurons. The major pathway of neuronal apoptosis occurs indirectly through release of neurotoxins by activated cells in the central nervous system (CNS) involving the induction of excitotoxicity and oxidative stress. In addition a direct mechanism induced by viral proteins in the pathogenesis of HAD may also play a role. This review focuses on the molecular mechanisms of HIV-associated dementia and possible therapeutic strategies.

  3. Molecular mechanisms of alcohol associated pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dahn; L; Clemens; Mark; A; Wells; Katrina; J; Schneider; Shailender; Singh

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol abuse is commonly associated with the development of both acute and chronic pancreatitis. Despite this close association, the fact that only a small percentage of human beings who abuse alcohol develop pancreatitis indicates that alcohol abuse alone is not sufficient to initiate clinical pancreatitis. This contention is further supported by the fact that administration of ethanol to experimental animals does not cause pancreatitis. Because of these findings, it is widely believed that ethanol sensitizes the pancreas to injury and additional factors trigger the development of overt pancreatitis. How ethanol sensitizes the pancreas to pancreatitis is not entirely known. Numerous studies have demonstrated that ethanol and its metabolites have a number of deleterious effects on acinar cells. Important acinar cells properties that are affected by ethanol include: calcium signaling, secretion of zymogens, autophagy, cellular regeneration, the unfolded protein response, and mitochondrial membrane integrity. In addition to the actions of ethanol on acinar cells, it is apparent that ethanol also affects pancreatic stellatecells. Pancreatic stellate cells have a critical role in normal tissue repair and the pathologic fibrotic response. Given that ethanol and its metabolites affect so many pancreatic functions, and that all of these effects occur simultaneously, it is likely that none of these effects is "THE" effect. Instead, it is most likely that the cumulative effect of ethanol on the pancreas predisposes the organ to pancreatitis. The focus of this article is to highlight some of the important mechanisms by which ethanol alters pancreatic functions and may predispose the pancreas to disease.

  4. Molecular mechanisms of tamoxifen-associated endometrial cancer (Review)

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Rong; Hilakivi-Clarke, Leena; Clarke, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Tamoxifen has been prescribed to millions of females for breast cancer prevention or treatment. However, tamoxifen is known to significantly enhance the risk of developing endometrial lesions, including hyperplasia, polyps, carcinomas, and sarcoma. Notably, tamoxifen-associated endometrial cancer often has a poor clinical outcome. Understanding the molecular mechanism of tamoxifen-induced endometrial cancer is essential for developing strategies that minimize tamoxifen’s effects on the endome...

  5. Effect of Transforming Viruses on Molecular Mechanisms Associated With Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    DAYARAM, TAJHAL; Marriott, Susan J.

    2008-01-01

    Viruses have been linked to approximately 20% of all human tumors worldwide. These transforming viruses encode viral oncoproteins that interact with cellular proteins to enhance viral replication. The transcriptional and post-transcriptional effects of these viral oncoproteins ultimately result in cellular transformation. Historically, viral research has been vital to the discovery of oncogenes and tumor suppressors with more current research aiding in unraveling some mechanisms of carcinogen...

  6. Molecular mechanisms associated with diabetic endothelial-erectile dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castela, Ângela; Costa, Carla

    2016-05-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a common complication of diabetes, affecting up to 75% of all diabetic men. Although the aetiology of diabetic ED is multifactorial, endothelial dysfunction is recognized as a mainstay in the pathophysiology of the disease. Endothelial dysfunction is induced by the detrimental actions of high glucose levels and increased oxidative stress on endothelial cells that make up the vascular lining. Besides directly injuring the endothelium, diabetes might also hamper vascular repair mechanisms of angiogenesis and vasculogenesis. These states exacerbate and maintain endothelial dysfunction, impairing vasorelaxation events and cavernosal blood perfusion, which are crucial for normal erectile function. PMID:26878803

  7. Molecular Mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Vanommeslaeghe, Kenno; Guvench, Olgun; Alexander D MacKerell

    2014-01-01

    Molecular Mechanics (MM) force fields are the methods of choice for protein simulations, which are essential in the study of conformational flexibility. Given the importance of protein flexibility in drug binding, MM is involved in most if not all Computational Structure-Based Drug Discovery (CSBDD) projects. This section introduces the reader to the fundamentals of MM, with a special emphasis on how the target data used in the parametrization of force fields determine their strengths and wea...

  8. Molecular mechanisms associated with Fluconazole resistance in clinical Candida albicans isolates from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mane, Arati; Vidhate, Pallavi; Kusro, Chanchal; Waman, Vaishali; Saxena, Vandana; Kulkarni-Kale, Urmila; Risbud, Arun

    2016-02-01

    Resistance to azole antifungals is a significant problem in Candida albicans. An understanding of resistance at molecular level is essential for the development of strategies to tackle resistance and rationale design of newer antifungals and target-based molecular approaches. This study presents the first evaluation of molecular mechanisms associated with fluconazole resistance in clinical C.albicans isolates from India. Target site (ERG11) alterations were determined by DNA sequencing, whereas real-time PCRs were performed to quantify target and efflux pump genes (CDR1, CDR2, MDR1) in 87 [Fluconazole susceptible (n = 30), susceptible-dose dependent (n = 30) and resistant (n = 27)] C.albicans isolates. Cross-resistance to fluconazole, ketoconazole and itraconazole was observed in 74.1% isolates. Six amino acid substitutions were identified, including 4 (E116D, F145L, E226D, I437V) previously reported ones and 2 (P406L, Q474H) new ones. CDR1 over-expression was seen in 77.7% resistant isolates. CDR2 was exclusively expressed with CDR1 and their concomitant over-expression was associated with azole cross-resistance. MDR1 and ERG11 over-expression did not seem to be associated with resistance. Our results show that drug efflux mediated by Adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette transporters, especially CDR1 is the predominant mechanism of fluconazole resistance and azole cross-resistance in C. albicans and indicate the need for research directed towards developing strategies to tackle efflux mediated resistance to salvage azoles. PMID:26648048

  9. Molecular mechanisms associated with ALA-PDT of brain tumor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqawi, Omar; Espiritu, Myrna; Singh, Gurmit

    2009-06-01

    Previous studies have shown that low-dose PDT using 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA)-induced photoporphyrin IX (PpIX) can induce apoptosis in tumor cells without causing necrosis. In this study we investigated the molecular mechanisms associated with apoptosis after ALA-PDT treatment in two brain glioma cell lines: human U87, and rat CNS-1cells. We used high energy light at a short time (acute PDT) and low energy light at a long time of exposure (metronomic PDT) to treat both cell lines. The cells were treated with 0.25 mM ALA at 5 joules for energy. We found that CNS-1 cells were more resistant to ALA-PDT than U87 cells when treated by both acute and metronomic PDT. To screen possible apoptosis mechanisms associated with acute and metronomic PDT, microarray analysis of gene expression was performed on RNA from glioblastoma cells treated with either acute or metronomic ALA-PDT. Within the set of genes that were negatively or positively regulated by both treatments are tumor necrosis factor receptors. The expression of TNF receptors was investigated further by RT-PCR and western blotting. The apoptosis mechanism of the cell death occurred through different pathways including BCL-2 and TNF receptors, and in part caused by cleaving caspase 3. Interestingly, metronomic ALA-PDT inhibited the expression of LTβR and the transcription factor NFκB. This inhibition was ALA concentration dependent at low concentrations.

  10. Molecular mechanisms underlying the close association between soil Burkholderia and fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stopnisek, Nejc; Zühlke, Daniela; Carlier, Aurélien; Barberán, Albert; Fierer, Noah; Becher, Dörte; Riedel, Katharina; Eberl, Leo; Weisskopf, Laure

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial species belonging to the genus Burkholderia have been repeatedly reported to be associated with fungi but the extent and specificity of these associations in soils remain undetermined. To assess whether associations between Burkholderia and fungi are widespread in soils, we performed a co-occurrence analysis in an intercontinental soil sample collection. This revealed that Burkholderia significantly co-occurred with a wide range of fungi. To analyse the molecular basis of the interaction, we selected two model fungi frequently co-occurring with Burkholderia, Alternaria alternata and Fusarium solani, and analysed the proteome changes caused by cultivation with either fungus in the widespread soil inhabitant B. glathei, whose genome we sequenced. Co-cultivation with both fungi led to very similar changes in the B. glathei proteome. Our results indicate that B. glathei significantly benefits from the interaction, which is exemplified by a lower abundance of several starvation factors that were highly expressed in pure culture. However, co-cultivation also gave rise to stress factors, as indicated by the increased expression of multidrug efflux pumps and proteins involved in oxidative stress response. Our data suggest that the ability of Burkholderia to establish a close association with fungi mainly lies in the capacities to utilize fungal-secreted metabolites and to overcome fungal defense mechanisms. This work indicates that beneficial interactions with fungi might contribute to the survival strategy of Burkholderia species in environments with sub-optimal conditions, including acidic soils. PMID:25989372

  11. Molecular mechanisms associated with breast cancer based on integrated gene expression profiling by bioinformatics analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Di; Han, Bing; Guo, Liang; Fan, Zhimin

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we aimed to gain more insights into the underlying molecular mechanisms responsible for breast cancer (BC) progression. Three gene expression profiles of human BC were integrated and used to screen the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between healthy breast samples and BC samples. Protein-protein interaction (PPI) network of DEGs was constructed by mapping DEGs into the Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes (STRING) database; then the subnetworks of PPI were constructed with plug-in, MCODE and DEGs in Subnetwork 1 were analysed based on Kyoto Encyclopaedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway database ( http://www.genome.jp/kegg /). In addition, co-expression network of DEGs was established using the Cytoscape. Totalally 931 DEGs were selected, including 340 up-regulated genes and 591 down-regulated genes. KEGG pathway analysis for DEGs in Subnetwork 1 showed that the pathogenesis of BC was associated with cell cycle, oocyte meiosis, progesterone-mediated oocyte maturation and p53 signalling pathways. Meanwhile, the most significant-related DEGs were found by co-expression network analysis of DEGs. In conclusion, CCNG1 might be involved in the progression of BC via inhibiting cell proliferation, and ADAMTS1 might play a crucial role in BC development through the regulation of angiogenesis. PMID:26804550

  12. Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms Elucidating Neurocognitive Basis of Functional Impairments Associated with Intellectual Disability in Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachidi, Mohammed; Lopes, Carmela

    2010-01-01

    Down syndrome, the most common genetic cause of intellectual disability, is associated with brain disorders due to chromosome 21 gene overdosage. Molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in the neuromorphological alterations and cognitive impairments are reported herein in a global model. Recent advances in Down syndrome research have lead to…

  13. Molecular Mechanism of Adult Neurogenesis and its Association with Human Brain Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, He; Song, Ni

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in neuroscience challenge the old dogma that neurogenesis occurs only during embryonic development. Mounting evidence suggests that functional neurogenesis occurs throughout adulthood. This review article discusses molecular factors that affect adult neurogenesis, including morphogens, growth factors, neurotransmitters, transcription factors, and epigenetic factors. Furthermore, we summarize and compare current evidence of associations between adult neurogenesis and human brain diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, and brain tumors. PMID:27375363

  14. Shigatoxin-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome: current molecular mechanisms and future therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keir LS

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Lindsay S Keir,1 Stephen D Marks,2 Jon Jin Kim21Academic Renal Unit, University of Bristol, Bristol; 2Department of Paediatric Nephrology, Great Ormond Street Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, United KingdomAbstract: Hemolytic uremic syndrome is the leading cause of acute kidney injury in childhood. Ninety percent of cases are secondary to gastrointestinal infection with shigatoxin-producing bacteria. In this review, we discuss the molecular mechanisms of shigatoxin leading to hemolytic uremic syndrome and the emerging role of the complement system and vascular endothelial growth factor in its pathogenesis. We also review the evidence for treatment options to date, in particular antibiotics, plasma exchange, and immunoadsorption, and link this to the molecular pathology. Finally, we discuss future avenues of treatment, including shigatoxin-binding agents and complement inhibitors, such as eculizumab.Keywords: hemolytic uremic syndrome, shigatoxin, diarrhea, Escherichia coli, complement, alternative pathway, eculizumab

  15. Physiological and molecular mechanisms associated with cross tolerance between hypoxia and low temperature in Thaumatotibia leucotreta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boardman, Leigh; Sørensen, Jesper G; Terblanche, John S

    2015-11-01

    Biochemical adaptations allow insects to withstand exposures to hypoxia and/or hypothermia. Exposure to hypoxia may interact either synergistically or antagonistically with standard low temperature stress responses yet this has not been systematically researched and no clear mechanism has been identified to date. Using larvae of false codling moth Thaumatotibia leucotreta, a pest of southern Africa, we investigated the physiological and molecular responses to hypoxia or temperature stress pre-treatments, followed by a standard low temperature exposure. Survival rates were significantly influenced by pre-treatment conditions, although T. leucotreta shows relatively high basal resistance to various stressors (4% variation in larval survival across all pre-treatments). Results showed that mild pre-treatments with chilling and hypoxia increased resistance to low temperatures and that these responses were correlated with increased membrane fluidity (increased UFA:SFA) and/or alterations in heat shock protein 70 (HSP70); while general mechanical stress (shaking) and heat (2h at 35°C) do not elicit cross tolerance (no change in survival or molecular responses). We therefore found support for some limited cold hardening and cross tolerance responses. Given that combined exposure to hypoxia and low temperature is used to sterilize commodities in post-harvest pest management programs, researchers can now exploit these mechanisms involved in cross tolerance to develop more targeted control methods. PMID:26376454

  16. Mechanism resulting in chemical imbalance due to cellular damage associated with mechanoporation: A molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliozberg, Yelena R.; Chantawansri, Tanya L.

    2016-05-01

    To elucidate the mechanism of ion transport through a transmembrane pore, all-atom molecular dynamics simulations were employed. A model membrane where a pore connects the intra- and extra-cellular compartment was considered. Pores with radii of 1.5 nm or less exhibited resealing over the course of 135 ns simulations, and ionic disturbance is minimal. Ion transport through a larger pore (2 nm radius) leads to a substantial change in the intra- and extra-cellular ionic concentrations. The influx of Na+ and Cl- ions down their concentration gradients is greater than the efflux of K+ leading to an osmotic influx of water.

  17. Physiological and molecular mechanisms associated with cross tolerance between hypoxia and low temperature in Thaumatotibia leucotreta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boardman, Leigh; Sørensen, Jesper Givskov; Terblanche, John S

    2015-01-01

    some limited cold hardening and cross tolerance responses. Given that combined exposure to hypoxia and low temperature is used to sterilize commodities in post-harvest pest management programs, researchers can now exploit these mechanisms involved in cross tolerance to develop more targeted control......Biochemical adaptations allow insects to withstand exposures to hypoxia and/or hypothermia. Exposure to hypoxia may interact either synergistically or antagonistically with standard low temperature stress responses yet this has not been systematically researched and no clear mechanism has been...... identified to date. Using larvae of false codling moth Thaumatotibia leucotreta, a pest of southern Africa, we investigated the physiological and molecular responses to hypoxia or temperature stress pre-treatments, followed by a standard low temperature exposure. Survival rates were significantly influenced...

  18. Exploring mechanisms of diet-colon cancer associations through candidate molecular interaction networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westergaard, David; Li, Jun; Jensen, Kasper;

    2014-01-01

    -nutrient interactions. Here, we used colon cancer as a proof-of-concept for understanding key regulatory sites of diet on the disease pathway. Results: We started from a unique vantage point by having a database of 158 plants positively associated to colon cancer reduction and their molecular composition (similar to 3......,500 unique compounds). We generated a comprehensive picture of the interaction profile of these edible and non-edible plants with a predefined candidate colon cancer target space consisting of similar to 1,900 proteins. This knowledge allowed us to study systematically the key components in colon cancer that...... are targeted synergistically by phytochemicals and identify statistically significant and highly correlated protein networks that could be perturbed by dietary habits. Conclusion: We propose here a framework for interrogating the critical targets in colon cancer processes and identifying plant...

  19. Molecular Mechanisms of Preeclampsia

    OpenAIRE

    Vitoratos, N.; Hassiakos, D.; C. Iavazzo

    2012-01-01

    Preeclampsia is one of the leading causes of maternal morbidity/mortality. The pathogenesis of preeclampsia is still under investigation. The aim of this paper is to present the molecular mechanisms implicating in the pathway leading to preeclampsia.

  20. Molecular mechanisms of cholangiocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fava, Giammarco

    2010-04-15

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CC), the malignant tumor of the epithelial cells lining the biliary ducts, has undergone a worldwide increase in incidence and mortality. The malignant transformation of the biliary cells originates from a multistep process evolving through chronic inflammation of the biliary tract to CC. In the last few years several advances have been towards understanding and clarifying the molecular mechanisms implicated in the cholangiocarcinogenesis process. However, many pathophysiologic aspects governing the growth of CC are still undefined. The poor prognosis of this tumor underlines the urgent need to codify the underlying molecular mechanisms involved in the growth and progression of CC in order to design effective preventive measures and valid treatment regimens. This review reports on progresses made in the last few years in clarifying the molecular pathways involved in the process of cholangiocarcinogenesis. PMID:21607138

  1. Molecular mechanisms in gliomagenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hulleman, Esther; Helin, Kristian

    2005-01-01

    , in order to design novel therapies and treatments for GBM, research has recently intensified to identify the cellular and molecular mechanisms leading to GBM formation. Modeling of astrocytomas by genetic manipulation of mice suggests that deregulation of the pathways that control gliogenesis during...... pathways. The expression of several of the components of these signaling cascades has been found altered in GBM, and recent data indicate that combinations of mutations in these pathways may contribute to GBM formation, although the exact mechanisms are still to be uncovered. Use of novel techniques...... including large-scale genomics and proteomics in combination with relevant mouse models will most likely provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying glioma formation and will hopefully lead to development of treatment modalities for GBM....

  2. Differential protein expression of hepatic cells associated with MeHg exposure: deepening into the molecular mechanisms of toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuello, Susana; Madrid, Yolanda; Luque-Garcia, Jose L.; Camara, Carmen [Complutense University of Madrid, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Madrid (Spain); Ramos, Sonia [Institute of Food Science, Technology and Nutrition, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), Madrid (Spain)

    2012-08-15

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying MeHg toxicity and the way in which this molecule interacts with living organisms is a critical point since MeHg represents a well-known risk to ecosystems and human health. We used a quantitative proteomic approach based on stable isotopic labeling by amino acids in cell culture in combination with SDS-PAGE and nanoflow LC-ESI-LTQ for analyzing the differential protein expression of hepatic cells associated to MeHg exposure. Seventy-eight proteins were found de-regulated by more than 1.5-fold. We identified a number of proteins involved in different essential biological processes including apoptosis, mitochondrial dysfunction, cellular trafficking and energy production. Among these proteins, we found several molecules whose de-regulation has been already related to MeHg exposure, thus confirming the usefulness of our discovery approach, and new ones that helped to gain a deeper insight into the biomolecular mechanisms related to MeHg-induced toxicity. Overexpression of several HSPs and the proteasome 26S subunit itself showed the proteasome system as a molecular target of toxic MeHg. As for the interaction networks, the top ranked was the nucleic acid metabolism, where many of the identified de-regulated proteins are involved. (orig.)

  3. Molecular mechanisms of cholangiocarcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Fava, Giammarco

    2010-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CC), the malignant tumor of the epithelial cells lining the biliary ducts, has undergone a worldwide increase in incidence and mortality. The malignant transformation of the biliary cells originates from a multistep process evolving through chronic inflammation of the biliary tract to CC. In the last few years several advances have been towards understanding and clarifying the molecular mechanisms implicated in the cholangiocarcinogenesis process. However, many pathophysio...

  4. Molecular mechanism for the involvement of nuclear receptor FXR in HBV-associated hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-dong Niu

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Farnesoid X receptor (FXR, also termed nuclear receptor NR1H4 is critically involved in the regulation of nascent bile formation and bile acid enterohepatic circulation. FXR and bile acids have been shown to play roles in liver regeneration and inflammatory responses. There is increasing evidence suggesting that FXR and the FXR signaling pathway are involved in the pathophysiology of a wide range of liver diseases, such as viral hepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Here we discuss the latest discoveries of FXR functions with relevance to bile acid metabolism and HBV-associated HCC. More specifically, the goal of this review is to discuss the roles of FXR and bile acids in regulating HBV replication and how disregulation of the FXR-bile acid signaling pathway is involved in HBV-associated hepatocarcinogenesis.

  5. Effects of Adaptogens on the Central Nervous System and the Molecular Mechanisms Associated with Their Stress—Protective Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg Wikman

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Adaptogens were initially defined as substances that enhance the “state of nonspecific resistance” in stress, a physiological condition that is linked with various disorders of the neuroendocrine-immune system. Studies on animals and isolated neuronal cells have revealed that adaptogens exhibit neuroprotective, anti-fatigue, antidepressive, anxiolytic, nootropic and CNS stimulating activity. In addition, a number of clinical trials demonstrate that adaptogens exert an anti-fatigue effect that increases mental work capacity against a background of stress and fatigue, particularly in tolerance to mental exhaustion and enhanced attention. Indeed, recent pharmacological studies of a number of adaptogens have provided a rationale for these effects also at the molecular level. It was discovered that the stress—protective activity of adaptogens was associated with regulation of homeostasis via several mechanisms of action, which was linked with the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and the regulation of key mediators of stress response, such as molecular chaperons (e.g., HSP70, stress-activated c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase 1 (JNK1, Forkhead box O (FOXO transcription factor DAF-16, cortisol and nitric oxide.

  6. Cellular and molecular-genetic mechanisms of symbiosis and associative interaction of microorganisms with plants in rhizosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lioshina L. G.

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The review contains the results of research on symbiotic and associative interaction of microorganisms and plants in rhizosphere. A special attention is given to the process of contact association of microorganisms and plants tissues including the concrete molecular structures and dominant role pertaining to protein-carbohydrate interaction. There are common features and distinctions at formation of arbuscular mycorhiza, rhizobia– legume symbiosis and association of non-leguminous plants with Azospirillum

  7. Anticancer Molecular Mechanisms of Resveratrol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varoni, Elena M.; Lo Faro, Alfredo Fabrizio; Sharifi-Rad, Javad; Iriti, Marcello

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol is a pleiotropic phytochemical belonging to the stilbene family. Though it is only significantly present in grape products, a huge amount of preclinical studies investigated its anticancer properties in a plethora of cellular and animal models. Molecular mechanisms of resveratrol involved signaling pathways related to extracellular growth factors and receptor tyrosine kinases; formation of multiprotein complexes and cell metabolism; cell proliferation and genome instability; cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase signaling (cytokine, integrin, and developmental pathways); signal transduction by the transforming growth factor-β super-family; apoptosis and inflammation; and immune surveillance and hormone signaling. Resveratrol also showed a promising role to counteract multidrug resistance: in adjuvant therapy, associated with 5-fluoruracyl and cisplatin, resveratrol had additive and/or synergistic effects increasing the chemosensitization of cancer cells. Resveratrol, by acting on diverse mechanisms simultaneously, has been emphasized as a promising, multi-target, anticancer agent, relevant in both cancer prevention and treatment.

  8. Molecular Mechanisms of Cardiovascular Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Meiliana

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The average lifespan of humans is increasing, and with it the percentage of people entering the 65 and older age group is growing rapidly and will continue to do so in the next 20 years. Within this age group, cardiovascular disease will remain the leading cause of death, and the cost associated with treatment will continue to increase. Aging is an inevitable part of life and unfortunately poses the largest risk factor for cardiovascular disease. CONTENT: We provide an overview of some of the molecular mechanisms involved in regulating lifespan and health, including mitochondria, telomeres, stem cells, sirtuins, Adenosine Monophosphate-activated Protein Kinase, Mammalian Target of Rapamycin and Insulin-like Growth Factor 1. We also provide future perspectives of lifespan and health, which are intimately linked fields. SUMMARY: Aging remains the biggest non-modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease. The biological, structural and mechanical changes in senescent cardiovascular system are thought to contribute in increasing incidence of cardiovascular disease in aging. Understanding the mechanisms contributing to such changes is therefore crucial for both prevention and development of treatment for cardiovascular diseases. KEYWORDS: cardiovascular aging, mitochondria, telomeres, sirtuin, stem cells.

  9. Mecanismos moleculares de resistencia antibiótica en Escherichia coli asociadas a diarrea Molecular mechanisms of antibiotic resistance in Escherichia coli- associated diarrhea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Mosquito

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available La resistencia antibiótica es un problema emergente a nivel mundial presente en diversas bacterias, en especial en la Escherichia coli, que tiene altos porcentajes de resistencia hacia ampicilina, trimetoprim-sulfametoxazol, tetraciclina, cloramfenicol y ácido nalidíxico, lo que supone grandes complicaciones en el tratamiento antibiótico cuando este es requerido. Este aumento de resistencia antibiótica se debe a la adquisición de diferentes mecanismos moleculares de resistencia mediante mutaciones puntuales a nivel cromosómico o transferencia horizontal de material genético entre especies relacionadas o diferentes, facilitada por algunos elementos genéticos tales como los integrones. Esta revisión discute los efectos de los mecanismos moleculares de resistencia más comunes en E.coli: inactivación enzimática, alteraciones en el sitio blanco y alteraciones de la permeabilidad. El conocer los mecanismos de resistencia implicados, como lo recomienda la Organización Mundial de la Salud, permitirá optimizar la vigilancia de resistencia y las políticas de control y uso de antibióticos a nivel nacional.Antibiotic resistance is an emerging problem worldwide present in many bacteria, specially in Escherichia coli, which has high percentages of resistance to ampicilline, thrimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, tetracycline, chloramphenicol and nalidixic acid, which implies important complications in antibiotic treatment when required. The increasing antibiotic resistance is due to the acquisition of different molecular mechanisms of resistance through point chromosomal mutations and /or horizontal transfer of genetic material between related or different species facilitated by some genetic elements such as integrons. This review discusses the effects of the most common molecular mechanisms of antibiotic resistance in E. coli: enzymatic inactivation, changes in the target site and permeability disturbances. Getting to know the mechanisms of

  10. Molecular mechanisms of rosacea pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davydova A.M.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The article presents possible molecular mechanisms for rosacea pathogenesis from current domestic and foreign clinical observations and laboratory research: regulation and expression defects of antimicrobial peptides, vascular endothelial growth factor, the effect of serine proteases, oxidative stress, reactive oxygen species and ferritin on the occurrence and course of rosacea. New developments in molecular biology and genetics are advanced for researching the interaction of multiple factors involved in rosacea pathogenesis, as well as providing the bases for potentially new therapies.

  11. Harmful molecular mechanisms in sepsis

    OpenAIRE

    Rittirsch, Daniel; Flierl, Michael A; Ward, Peter A.

    2008-01-01

    Sepsis and sepsis-associated multi-organ failure are major challenges for scientists and clinicians and are a tremendous burden for health-care systems. Despite extensive basic research and clinical studies, the pathophysiology of sepsis is still poorly understood. We are now beginning to understand that sepsis is a heterogeneous, dynamic syndrome caused by imbalances in the ‘inflammatory network’. In this Review, we highlight recent insights into the molecular interactions that occur during ...

  12. Molecular interaction of connexin 30.3 and connexin 31 suggests a dominant-negative mechanism associated with erythrokeratodermia variabilis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plantard, Laure; Huber, Marcel; Macari, Francoise;

    2003-01-01

    Connexins are homologous four-transmembrane-domain proteins and major components of gap junctions. We recently identified mutations in either GJB3 or GJB4 genes, encoding respectively connexin 31 (Cx31) or 30.3 (Cx30.3), as causally involved in erythrokeratodermia variabilis (EKV), a mostly...... epidermal connexin synthesis and polymerization, but also allow a novel molecular explanation for the similarity of EKV phenotypes....

  13. Gene expression profiling analysis of MENX-associated rat pituitary adenomas contributes to understand molecular mechanisms of human pituitary adenomas

    OpenAIRE

    ZHANG, HONGZHI; XU, CHUAN; SUN, NINGYANG; ZHOU, YINTING; Yu, Xiaofei; Yan, Xue; ZHANG, QIUJUAN

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to screen potential genes associated with pituitary adenomas to obtain further understanding with regard to the pathogenesis of pituitary adenomas. The microarray GSE23207 dataset, containing 16 pituitary adenoma samples from multiple endocrine neoplasia syndrome-associated rats and 5 normal pituitary tissue samples, was downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus. The Linear Models for Microarray Data package was used to identify the differentially-expressed genes (DEGs) ...

  14. Molecular mechanisms of amyloid self-regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Landreh, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Amyloid is associated with both pathological protein deposits and the formation of functional protein structures. Therefore, several strategies have evolved to control the formation or inhibition of amyloid in vivo. In this thesis, three separate systems were investigated in which amyloidogenic protein segments are coupled to regulatory elements that prevent or promote fibrillation. We describe the molecular mechanism for how (a) a propeptide segment prevents the uncontrolled a...

  15. Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Bacterial Persisters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maisonneuve, Etienne; Gerdes, Kenn

    2014-01-01

    All bacteria form persisters, cells that are multidrug tolerant and therefore able to survive antibiotic treatment. Due to the low frequencies of persisters in growing bacterial cultures and the complex underlying molecular mechanisms, the phenomenon has been challenging to study. However, recent...... technological advances in microfluidics and reporter genes have improved this scenario. Here, we summarize recent progress in the field, revealing the ubiquitous bacterial stress alarmone ppGpp as an emerging central regulator of multidrug tolerance and persistence, both in stochastically and environmentally...

  16. Mecanismos moleculares de resistencia antibiótica en Escherichia coli asociadas a diarrea Molecular mechanisms of antibiotic resistance in Escherichia coli- associated diarrhea

    OpenAIRE

    Susan Mosquito; Joaquim Ruiz; José Luis Bauer; Ochoa, Theresa J.

    2011-01-01

    La resistencia antibiótica es un problema emergente a nivel mundial presente en diversas bacterias, en especial en la Escherichia coli, que tiene altos porcentajes de resistencia hacia ampicilina, trimetoprim-sulfametoxazol, tetraciclina, cloramfenicol y ácido nalidíxico, lo que supone grandes complicaciones en el tratamiento antibiótico cuando este es requerido. Este aumento de resistencia antibiótica se debe a la adquisición de diferentes mecanismos moleculares de resistencia mediante mutac...

  17. Molecular mechanism of anticancer effect of Sclerotium rolfsii lectin in HT29 cells involves differential expression of genes associated with multiple signaling pathways: A microarray analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkeer, Srikanth; Guha, Nilanjan; Hothpet, Vishwanathreddy; Saligrama Adavigowda, Deepak; Hegde, Prajna; Padmanaban, Arunkumar; Yu, Lu-Gang; Swamy, Bale M; Inamdar, Shashikala R

    2015-12-01

    Sclerotium rolfsii lectin (SRL) is a lectin isolated from fungus S. rolfsii and has high binding specificity toward the oncofetal Thomsen-Friedenreich carbohydrate antigen (Galβ1-3GalNAc-α-O-Ser/Thr, T or TF), which is expressed in more than 90% of human cancers. Our previous studies have shown that binding of SRL to human colon, breast and ovarian cancer cells induces cell apoptosis in vitro and suppresses tumor growth in vivo. This study investigated the SRL-mediated cell signaling in human colon cancer HT29 cells by mRNA and miRNA microarrays. It was found that SRL treatment results in altered expression of several hundred molecules including mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and c-JUN-associated, apoptosis-associated and cell cycle and DNA replication-associated signaling molecules. Pathway analysis using GeneSpring 12.6.1 revealed that SRL treatment induces changes of MAPK and c-JUN-associated signaling pathways as early as 2 h while changes of cell cycle, DNA replication and apoptosis pathways were significantly affected only after 24 h. A significant change of cell miRNA expression was also observed after 12 h treatment of the cells with SRL. These changes were further validated by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction and immunoblotting. This study thus suggests that the presence of SRL affects multiple signaling pathways in cancer cells with early effects on cell proliferation pathways associated with MAPK and c-JUN, followed by miRNA-associated cell activity and apoptosis. This provides insight information into the molecular mechanism of the anticancer activity of this fungal lectin. PMID:26347523

  18. Pathological and molecular mechanisms underlying resistance to recombinant human erythropoietin therapy in the remnant kidney rat model of chronic kidney disease associated anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Sandra; Garrido, Patrícia; Fernandes, João; Vala, Helena; Rocha-Pereira, Petronila; Costa, Elísio; Belo, Luís; Reis, Flávio; Santos-Silva, Alice

    2016-06-01

    Anemia of chronic kidney disease (CKD) can be corrected by treatment with recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO); however, some patients become hyporesponsive. The molecular mechanisms underlying this resistance remain to be elucidated. Our aim was to study hyporesponsiveness to rHuEPO therapy using the remnant kidney rat model of anemia associated with CKD induced by 5/6 nephrectomy. At starting, male Wistar rats were divided in 3 groups, for a 3-week protocol: Sham, CRF (vehicle) and two rHuEPO (200 k/kg body weight [BW]/week) treated groups; at the end of protocol, the rHuEPO treated rats were subdivided in responders (CRF200) and non-responders (CRF200NR), according to their hematologic response; blood, cellular and tissue studies were performed. The CRF200 group achieved correction of anemia, while the CRF200NR group developed anemia, after an initial response (1st week) to rHuEPO therapy. CRF and CRF200NR groups presented a trend to higher serum CRP levels; CRF200NR showed also high levels of renal inflammatory markers, such as interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1β, nuclear factor kappa B, connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1); no changes were found in iron metabolism. Our data suggest that the development of anemia/rHuEPO hyporesponsiveness is associated with a higher systemic and renal inflammatory condition, favoring hypoxia and triggering an increase in renal expression of HIF-1α, TGF-β1 and CTGF that will further aggravate renal fibrosis, which will enhance the inflammatory response, creating a cycle that promotes disease progression. New therapeutic strategies to reduce inflammation in CKD patients could improve the response to rHuEPO therapy and reduce hyporesponsiveness. PMID:27039028

  19. Molecular mechanisms of curcumin action: gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishodia, Shishir

    2013-01-01

    Curcumin derived from the tropical plant Curcuma longa has a long history of use as a dietary agent, food preservative, and in traditional Asian medicine. It has been used for centuries to treat biliary disorders, anorexia, cough, diabetic wounds, hepatic disorders, rheumatism, and sinusitis. The preventive and therapeutic properties of curcumin are associated with its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer properties. Extensive research over several decades has attempted to identify the molecular mechanisms of curcumin action. Curcumin modulates numerous molecular targets by altering their gene expression, signaling pathways, or through direct interaction. Curcumin regulates the expression of inflammatory cytokines (e.g., TNF, IL-1), growth factors (e.g., VEGF, EGF, FGF), growth factor receptors (e.g., EGFR, HER-2, AR), enzymes (e.g., COX-2, LOX, MMP9, MAPK, mTOR, Akt), adhesion molecules (e.g., ELAM-1, ICAM-1, VCAM-1), apoptosis related proteins (e.g., Bcl-2, caspases, DR, Fas), and cell cycle proteins (e.g., cyclin D1). Curcumin modulates the activity of several transcription factors (e.g., NF-κB, AP-1, STAT) and their signaling pathways. Based on its ability to affect multiple targets, curcumin has the potential for the prevention and treatment of various diseases including cancers, arthritis, allergies, atherosclerosis, aging, neurodegenerative disease, hepatic disorders, obesity, diabetes, psoriasis, and autoimmune diseases. This review summarizes the molecular mechanisms of modulation of gene expression by curcumin. PMID:22996381

  20. Molecular mechanisms of glucocorticoid receptor signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Labeur

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This review highlights the most recent findings on the molecular mechanisms of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR. Most effects of glucocorticoids are mediated by the intracellular GR which is present in almost every tissue and controls transcriptional activation via direct and indirect mechanisms. Nevertheless the glucocorticoid responses are tissue -and gene- specific. GR associates selectively with corticosteroid ligands produced in the adrenal gland in response to changes of humoral homeostasis. Ligand interaction with GR promotes either GR binding to genomic glucocorticoid response elements, in turn modulating gene transcription, or interaction of GR monomers with other transcription factors activated by other signalling pathways leading to transrepression. The GR regulates a broad spectrum of physiological functions, including cell differentiation, metabolism and inflammatory responses. Thus, disruption or dysregulation of GR function will result in severe impairments in the maintenance of homeostasis and the control of adaptation to stress.

  1. Molecular deformation mechanisms in polyethylene.

    OpenAIRE

    Coutry, Sandry

    2001-01-01

    This work is concerned with details of the molecular changes caused by deformation and also establishes any conformational differences between linear and branched polyethylene before, during and after deformation. Four blends of isotopically labelled polymers of different types, rapidly quenched from the melt, have been studied by Mixed Crystal Infra-red Spectroscopy and Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS), in order to clarify any differences in the molecular basis of drawing...

  2. Molecular inhibitory mechanism of tricin on tyrosinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Yan; Li, Lin; Hu, Song-Qing

    2013-04-01

    Tricin was evaluated as a type of tyrosinase inhibitor with good efficacy compared to arbutin. Tricin functioned as a non-competitive inhibitor of tyrosinase, with an equilibrium constant of 2.30 mmol/L. The molecular mechanisms underlying the inhibition of tyrosinase by tricin were investigated by means of circular dichroism spectra, fluorescence quenching and molecular docking. These assays demonstrated that the interactions between tricin and tyrosinase did not change the secondary structure. The interaction of tricin with residues in the hydrophobic pocket of tyrosinase was revealed by fluorescence quenching; the complex was stabilized by hydrophobic associations and hydrogen bonding (with residues Asn80 and Arg267). Docking results implied that the possible inhibitory mechanisms may be attributed to the stereospecific blockade effects of tricin on substrates or products and flexible conformation alterations in the tyrosinase active center caused by weak interactions between tyrosinase and tricin. The application of this type of flavonoid as a tyrosinase inhibitor will lead to significant advances in the field of depigmentation.

  3. Polarization effects in molecular mechanical force fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cieplak, Piotr [Burnham Institute for Medical Research, 10901 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92120 (United States); Dupradeau, Francois-Yves [UMR CNRS 6219-Faculte de Pharmacie, Universite de Picardie Jules Verne, 1 rue des Louvels, F-80037 Amiens (France); Duan, Yong [Genome Center and Department of Applied Science, University of California, Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Wang Junmei, E-mail: pcieplak@burnham.or [Department of Pharmacology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, 6001 Forest Park Boulevard, ND9.136, Dallas, TX 75390-9050 (United States)

    2009-08-19

    The focus here is on incorporating electronic polarization into classical molecular mechanical force fields used for macromolecular simulations. First, we briefly examine currently used molecular mechanical force fields and the current status of intermolecular forces as viewed by quantum mechanical approaches. Next, we demonstrate how some components of quantum mechanical energy are effectively incorporated into classical molecular mechanical force fields. Finally, we assess the modeling methods of one such energy component-polarization energy-and present an overview of polarizable force fields and their current applications. Incorporating polarization effects into current force fields paves the way to developing potentially more accurate, though more complex, parameterizations that can be used for more realistic molecular simulations. (topical review)

  4. Polarization effects in molecular mechanical force fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieplak, Piotr; Dupradeau, François-Yves; Duan, Yong; Wang, Junmei

    2009-08-19

    The focus here is on incorporating electronic polarization into classical molecular mechanical force fields used for macromolecular simulations. First, we briefly examine currently used molecular mechanical force fields and the current status of intermolecular forces as viewed by quantum mechanical approaches. Next, we demonstrate how some components of quantum mechanical energy are effectively incorporated into classical molecular mechanical force fields. Finally, we assess the modeling methods of one such energy component-polarization energy-and present an overview of polarizable force fields and their current applications. Incorporating polarization effects into current force fields paves the way to developing potentially more accurate, though more complex, parameterizations that can be used for more realistic molecular simulations. PMID:21828594

  5. Quantum mechanics of molecular structures

    CERN Document Server

    Yamanouchi, Kaoru

    2012-01-01

    At a level accessible to advanced undergraduates, this textbook explains the fundamental role of quantum mechanics in determining the structure, dynamics, and other properties of molecules. Readers will come to understand the quantum-mechanical basis for harmonic oscillators, angular momenta and scattering processes. Exercises are provided to help readers deepen their grasp of the essential phenomena.

  6. Molecular deformation mechanisms in polyethylene

    CERN Document Server

    Coutry, S

    2001-01-01

    adjacent labelled stems is significantly larger when the DPE guest is a copolymer molecule. Our comparative studies on various types of polyethylene lead to the conclusion that their deformation behaviour under drawing has the same basis, with additional effects imputed to the presence of tie-molecules and branches. Three major points were identified in this thesis. The changes produced by drawing imply (1) the crystallisation of some of the amorphous polymer and the subsequent orientation of the newly formed crystals, (2) the re-orientation of the crystalline ribbons and (3) the beginning of crystallite break-up. However, additional effects were observed for the high molecular weight linear sample and the copolymer sample and were attributed, respectively, to the presence of tie-molecules and of branches. It was concluded that both the tie-molecules and the branches are restricting the molecular movement during deformation, and that the branches may be acting as 'anchors'. This work is concerned with details...

  7. Molecular mechanism of TNF signaling and beyond

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng-gang LIU

    2005-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is a proinflammatory cytokine that plays a critical role in diverse cellular events,including cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. TNF is also involved in many types of diseases. In recent years, the molecular mechanisms of TNF functions have been intensively investigated. Studies from many laboratories have demonstrated that the TNF-mediated diverse biological responses are achieved through activating multiple signaling pathways. Especially the activation of transcription factors NF-κB and AP-1 plays a critical role in mediating these cellular responses. Several proteins, including FADD, the death domain kinase RIP and the TNF receptor associated factor TRAF2 have been identified as the key effectors of TNF signaling. Recently, we found that the effector molecules of TNF signaling, such as RIP and TRAF2, are also involved in other cellular responses. These finding suggests that RIP and TRAF2 serve a broader role than as just an effector of TNF signaling.

  8. Molecular mechanistic associations of human diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stegmaier Philip

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The study of relationships between human diseases provides new possibilities for biomedical research. Recent achievements on human genetic diseases have stimulated interest to derive methods to identify disease associations in order to gain further insight into the network of human diseases and to predict disease genes. Results Using about 10000 manually collected causal disease/gene associations, we developed a statistical approach to infer meaningful associations between human morbidities. The derived method clustered cardiometabolic and endocrine disorders, immune system-related diseases, solid tissue neoplasms and neurodegenerative pathologies into prominent disease groups. Analysis of biological functions confirmed characteristic features of corresponding disease clusters. Inference of disease associations was further employed as a starting point for prediction of disease genes. Efforts were made to underpin the validity of results by relevant literature evidence. Interestingly, many inferred disease relationships correspond to known clinical associations and comorbidities, and several predicted disease genes were subjects of therapeutic target research. Conclusions Causal molecular mechanisms present a unifying principle to derive methods for disease classification, analysis of clinical disorder associations, and prediction of disease genes. According to the definition of causal disease genes applied in this study, these results are not restricted to genetic disease/gene relationships. This may be particularly useful for the study of long-term or chronic illnesses, where pathological derangement due to environmental or as part of sequel conditions is of importance and may not be fully explained by genetic background.

  9. Global gene expression analysis of rodent motor neurons following spinal cord injury associates molecular mechanisms with development of post-injury spasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wienecke, Jacob; Westerdahl, Ann-Charlotte; Hultborn, Hans;

    2010-01-01

    of endogenous plateau potentials in motor neurons and the development of spasticity after spinalization. To unravel the molecular mechanisms underlying the increased excitability of motor neurons and the return of plateau potentials below a spinal cord injury we investigated changes in gene...... complex together with cholinergic system is up-regulated and the GABAA receptor system is down-regulated. The genes of the pore-forming proteins Cav1.3 and Nav1.6 were not up-regulated, while genes of proteins such as non-pore forming subunits and intracellular pathways known to modulate receptor and...

  10. Molecular biological mechanism II. Molecular mechanisms of cell cycle regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cell cycle in eukaryotes is regulated by central cell cycle controlling protein kinase complexes. These protein kinase complexes consist of a catalytic subunit from the cyclin-dependent protein kinase family (CDK), and a regulatory subunit from the cyclin family. Cyclins are characterised by their periodic cell cycle related synthesis and destruction. Each cell cycle phase is characterised by a specific set of CDKs and cyclins. The activity of CDK/cyclin complexes is mainly regulated on four levels. It is controlled by specific phosphorylation steps, the synthesis and destruction of cyclins, the binding of specific inhibitor proteins, and by active control of their intracellular localisation. At several critical points within the cell cycle, named checkpoints, the integrity of the cellular genome is monitored. If damage to the genome or an unfinished prior cell cycle phase is detected, the cell cycle progression is stopped. These cell cycle blocks are of great importance to secure survival of cells. Their primary importance is to prevent the manifestation and heritable passage of a mutated genome to daughter cells. Damage sensing, DNA repair, cell cycle control and apoptosis are closely linked cellular defence mechanisms to secure genome integrity. Disregulation in one of these defence mechanisms are potentially correlated with an increased cancer risk and therefore in at least some cases with an increased radiation sensitivity. (orig.)

  11. Molecular mechanism of insulin resistance

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Samir Bhattacharya; Debleena Dey; Sib Sankar Roy

    2007-03-01

    Free fatty acids are known to play a key role in promoting loss of insulin sensitivity, thereby causing insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. However, the underlying mechanism involved is still unclear. In searching for the cause of the mechanism, it has been found that palmitate inhibits insulin receptor (IR) gene expression, leading to a reduced amount of IR protein in insulin target cells. PDK1-independent phosphorylation of PKCε causes this reduction in insulin receptor gene expression. One of the pathways through which fatty acid can induce insulin resistance in insulin target cells is suggested by these studies. We provide an overview of this important area, emphasizing the current status.

  12. Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Pituitary Pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapochnik, Melanie; Nieto, Leandro Eduardo; Fuertes, Mariana; Arzt, Eduardo

    2016-04-01

    During the last years, progress has been made on the identification of mechanisms involved in anterior pituitary cell transformation and tumorigenesis. Oncogene activation, tumor suppressor gene inactivation, epigenetic changes, and microRNAs deregulation contribute to the initiation of pituitary tumors. Despite the high prevalence of pituitary adenomas, they are mostly benign, indicating that intrinsic mechanisms may regulate pituitary cell expansion. Senescence is characterized by an irreversible cell cycle arrest and represents an important protective mechanism against malignancy. Pituitary tumor transforming gene (PTTG) is an oncogene involved in early stages of pituitary tumor development, and also triggers a senescence response by activating DNA-damage signaling pathway. Cytokines, as well as many other factors, play an important role in pituitary physiology, affecting not only cell proliferation but also hormone secretion. Special interest is focused on interleukin-6 (IL-6) because its dual function of stimulating pituitary tumor cell growth but inhibiting normal pituitary cells proliferation. It has been demonstrated that IL-6 has a key role in promoting and maintenance of the senescence program in tumors. Senescence, triggered by PTTG activation and mediated by IL-6, may be a mechanism for explaining the benign nature of pituitary tumors. PMID:26718581

  13. Cellular and molecular mechanisms in kidney fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffield, Jeremy S.

    2014-01-01

    Fibrosis is a characteristic feature of all forms of chronic kidney disease. Deposition of pathological matrix in the interstitial space and within the walls of glomerular capillaries as well as the cellular processes resulting in this deposition are increasingly recognized as important factors amplifying kidney injury and accelerating nephron demise. Recent insights into the cellular and molecular mechanisms of fibrogenesis herald the promise of new therapies to slow kidney disease progression. This review focuses on new findings that enhance understanding of cellular and molecular mechanisms of fibrosis, the characteristics of myofibroblasts, their progenitors, and molecular pathways regulating both fibrogenesis and its resolution. PMID:24892703

  14. Molecular mechanism of cisplatin resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Cisplatin is widely used in the treatment of many tumors,particularly in ovarian cancer.GST-π,metallothionein(MT), multidrug resistance associated proteins(MRPs), nucleotide excision repair(NER), mismatch repair(MMR) and oncogenes contribute to drug resistance of cisplatin.

  15. Molecular mechanics applied to single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Ferreira Ávila

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Single-walled carbon nanotubes, with stiffness of 1.0 TPa and strength of 60 GPa, are a natural choice for high strength materials. A problem, however, arises when experimental data are compiled. The large variability of experimental data leads to the development of numerical models denominated molecular mechanics, which is a "symbiotic" association of molecular dynamics and solid mechanics. This paper deals with molecular mechanics simulations of single-walled carbon nanotubes. To be able to evaluate the molecular mechanics model, the three major carbon nanotube configurations (armchair, zigzag and chiral were simulated. It was proven that the carbon nanotube configuration has influence on stiffness. By varying the radius, hence the curvature, the Young's modulus changed from 0.95 TPa to 5.5 TPa, and the Poisson's ratio ranged from 0.15 to 0.29. The numerical simulations were in good agreement with those presented in the literature.

  16. Molecular mechanisms of cryptococcal meningitis

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Tong-Bao; Perlin, David; Xue, Chaoyang

    2012-01-01

    Fungal meningitis is a serious disease caused by a fungal infection of the central nervous system (CNS) mostly in individuals with immune system deficiencies. Fungal meningitis is often fatal without proper treatment, and the mortality rate remains unacceptably high even with antifungal drug interventions. Currently, cryptococcal meningitis is the most common fungal meningitis in HIV-1/AIDS, and its disease mechanism has been extensively studied. The key steps for fungi to infect brain and ca...

  17. Molecular mechanisms of manganese mutagenesis.

    OpenAIRE

    el-Deiry, W S; Downey, K M; So, A G

    1984-01-01

    The mechanism by which DNA polymerase discriminates between complementary and noncomplementary nucleotides for insertion into a primer terminus has been investigated. Apparent kinetic constants for the insertion of dGTP and dATP into the hook polymer d(C)194-d(G)12 with Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I (large fragment) were determined. The results suggest that the high specificity of base selection by DNA polymerase I is achieved by utilization of both Km and Vmax differences between complem...

  18. Molecular insights into the mechanisms of liver-associated diseases in early-lactating dairy cows: hypothetical role of endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringseis, R; Gessner, D K; Eder, K

    2015-08-01

    The transition period represents the most critical period in the productive life of high-yielding dairy cows due to both metabolic and inflammatory stimuli, which challenge the liver and predispose dairy cows to develop liver-associated diseases such as fatty liver and ketosis. Despite the fact that all high-yielding dairy cows are affected by marked metabolic stress due to a severe negative energy balance (NEB) during early lactation, not all cows develop liver-associated diseases. Although the reason for this is largely unknown, this indicates that the capacity of the liver to cope with metabolic and inflammatory challenges varies between individual high-yielding dairy cows. Convincing evidence exists that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress plays a key role in the development of fatty liver, and it has been recently shown that ER stress occurs in the liver of high-yielding dairy cows. This indicates that ER stress may be involved in the development of liver-associated diseases in dairy cows. The present review shows that the liver of dairy cows during early lactation is exposed to several metabolic and inflammatory challenges, such as non-esterified fatty acids, tumour necrosis factor α, interleukin-1β, reactive oxygen species and lipopolysaccharides, which are known inducers of ER stress. Thus, ER stress may represent a molecular basis for fatty liver development and account for the frequent occurrence of fatty liver and ketosis in high-yielding dairy cows. Interindividual differences between dairy cows in the activation of hepatic stress response pathways, such as nuclear factor E2-related factor 2, which is activated during ER stress and reduces the sensitivity of tissues to oxidative and inflammatory damage, might provide an explanation at the molecular level for differences in the capacity to cope with pathological inflammatory challenges during early lactation and the susceptibility to develop liver-associated diseases between early-lactating dairy cows

  19. Molecular Mechanisms of Cardiovascular Aging

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Meiliana; Andi Wijaya

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The average lifespan of humans is increasing, and with it the percentage of people entering the 65 and older age group is growing rapidly and will continue to do so in the next 20 years. Within this age group, cardiovascular disease will remain the leading cause of death, and the cost associated with treatment will continue to increase. Aging is an inevitable part of life and unfortunately poses the largest risk factor for cardiovascular disease. CONTENT: We provide an overview of...

  20. Molecular mechanism of sweetness sensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuBois, Grant E

    2016-10-01

    The current understanding of peripheral molecular events involved in sweet taste sensation in humans is reviewed. Included are discussions of the sweetener receptor T1R2/T1R3, its agonists, antagonists, positive allosteric modulators, the transduction of its activation in taste bud cells and the coding of its signaling to the CNS. Areas of incomplete understanding include 1) signal communication with afferent nerve fibers, 2) contrasting concentration/response (C/R) functions for high-potency (HP) sweeteners (hyperbolic) and carbohydrate (CHO) sweeteners (linear), 3) contrasting temporal profiles for HP sweeteners (delayed onset and extinction) and CHO sweeteners (rapid onset and extinction) and 4) contrasting adaptation behaviors for HP sweeteners (moderate to strong adaptation) and CHO sweeteners (low adaptation). Evidence based on the sweet water aftertastes of several novel sweetness inhibitors is presented providing new support for constitutive activity in T1R2/T1R3. And a model is developed to rationalize the linear C/R functions of CHO sweeteners and hyperbolic C/R functions of HP sweeteners, where the former may activate T1R2/T1R3 by both binding and constitutive activity modulation (i.e., without binding) and the latter activate T1R2/T1R3 only by binding. PMID:26992959

  1. Molecular mechanism of cholangiocarcinoma carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maemura, Kosei; Natsugoe, Shoji; Takao, Sonshin

    2014-10-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is a highly malignant cancer of the biliary tract with a poor prognosis, which often arises from conditions causing long-term inflammation, injury, and reparative biliary epithelial cell proliferation. Several conditions are known to be major risk factors for cancer in the biliary tract or gallbladder, including primary sclerosing cholangitis, liver fluke infection, pancreaticobiliary maljunction, and chemical exposure in proof-printing workers. Abnormalities in various signaling cascades, molecules, and genetic mutations are involved in the pathogenesis of CCA. CCA is characterized by a series of highly recurrent mutations in genes, including KRAS, BRF, TP53, Smad, and p16(INK4a) . Cytokines that are affected by inflammatory environmental conditions, such as interleukin-6 (IL-6), transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), play an important role in cancer pathogenesis. Prominent signaling pathways important in carcinogenesis include TGF-β/Smad, IL-6/STAT-3, PI3K/AKT, Wnt, RAF/MEK/MAPK, and Notch. Additionally, some microRNAs regulate targets in critical pathways of CCA development and progression. This review article provides the understanding of the genetic and epigenetic mechanism(s) of carcinogenesis in CCA, which leads to the development of new therapeutic targets for the prevention and treatment of this devastating cancer. PMID:24895231

  2. Programming Molecular Association and Viscoelastic Behavior in Protein Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooling, Lawrence J; Buck, Maren E; Zhang, Wen-Bin; Tirrell, David A

    2016-06-01

    A set of recombinant artificial proteins that can be cross-linked, by either covalent bonds or association of helical domains or both, is described. The designed proteins can be used to construct molecular networks in which the mechanism of crosslinking determines the time-dependent responses to mechanical deformation. PMID:27061171

  3. Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Trepo

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocarcinogenesis is a complex process that remains still partly understood. That might be explained by the multiplicity of etiologic factors, the genetic/epigenetic heterogeneity of tumors bulks and the ignorance of the liver cell types that give rise to tumorigenic cells that have stem cell-like properties. The DNA stress induced by hepatocyte turnover, inflammation and maybe early oncogenic pathway activation and sometimes viral factors, leads to DNA damage response which activates the key tumor suppressive checkpoints p53/p21Cip1 and p16INK4a/pRb responsible of cell cycle arrest and cellular senescence as reflected by the cirrhosis stage. Still obscure mechanisms, but maybe involving the Wnt signaling and Twist proteins, would allow pre-senescent hepatocytes to bypass senescence, acquire immortality by telomerase reactivation and get the last genetic/epigenetic hits necessary for cancerous transformation. Among some of the oncogenic pathways that might play key driving roles in hepatocarcinogenesis, c-myc and the Wnt/β-catenin signaling seem of particular interest. Finally, antiproliferative and apoptosis deficiencies involving TGF-β, Akt/PTEN, IGF2 pathways for instance are prerequisite for cancerous transformation. Of evidence, not only the transformed liver cell per se but the facilitating microenvironment is of fundamental importance for tumor bulk growth and metastasis.

  4. Molecular mechanisms of induced mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genetic analysis has revealed that radiation and many chemical mutagens induce in bacteria an error-prone DNA repair process which is responsible for their mutagenic effect. The biochemical mechanism of this inducible error-prone repair has been studied by analysis of the first round of DNA synthesis on ultraviolet light-irradiated phiX174 DNA in both intact and ultraviolet light-irradiated host cells. Intracellular phiX174 DNA was extracted, subjected to isopycnic CsCl density-gradient analysis, hydroxylapatite chromatography and digestion by single-strand-specific endonuclease S1. Ultraviolet light-induced photolesions in viral DNA cause a permanent blockage of DNA synthesis in intact Escherichia coli cells. However, when host cells were irradiated and incubated to induce fully the error-prone repair system, a significant fraction of irradiated phiX174 DNA molecules can be fully replicated. Thus, inducible error-prone repair in E.coli is manifested by an increased capacity for DNA synthesis on damaged phiX174 DNA. Chloramphenicol (100 μ g/ml), which is an inhibitor of the inducible error-prone DNA repair, is also an inhibitor of this particular inducible DNA synthesis. (author)

  5. Molecular Mechanisms of Psychostimulant Addiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Chung Chen

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Drug addiction represents a pathological form of neuroplasticity along with the emergenceof aberrant behaviors involving a cascade of neurochemical changes mainly in thebrain’s rewarding circuitry. The aberrant behavioral phenotypes can be assessed by an animalmodel of drug-induced behavioral sensitization, which is characterized by an initiationstage that is formed in the ventral tegmental area and a behavioral expression stage determinedmainly in the nucleus accumbens. Numerous studies during past decades demonstratethat the mesocorticolimbic dopamine pathway plays an essential role in the development ofbehavioral sensitization. Moreover, a series of cellular signaling pathways and gene expressiondetermine the severity of addictive behaviors. In addition to the well-characterizeddopamine D1 receptor-mediated cAMP/protein kinase A up-regulation in the nucleus accumbens,recent reports indicate the cellular mediator dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoproteinof 32 kDa (DARPP-32 and transcription regulator ΔFosB are associated with theaccumbal PKA pathway to modulate the development of behavioral sensitization. The findingof cAMP-independent and dopamine D2 receptor-mediated Akt/GSK3 in activation inthe nucleus accumbens of behaviorally sensitized animals implies that a signal cascadedown-stream of both dopamine D1 and D2 receptors comprises the mainstay of the addictionnetwork. This review outlines the cellular pathways that have been demonstrated to participatein psychostimulant addiction, focused particularly in the nucleus accumbens.

  6. Cytosolic Double-Stranded DNA as a Damage-Associated Molecular Pattern Induces the Inflammatory Response in Rat Pancreatic Stellate Cells: A Plausible Mechanism for Tissue Injury-Associated Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taichi Nakamura

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease of unknown causes. There are many triggers causing pancreatitis, such as alcohol, common bile duct stone, virus and congenital or acquired stenosis of main pancreatic duct, which often involve tissue injuries. Pancreatitis often occurs in sterile condition, where the dead/dying pancreatic parenchymal cells and the necrotic tissues derived from self-digested-pancreas were observed. However, the causal relationship between tissue injury and pancreatitis and how tissue injury could induce the inflammation of the pancreas were not elucidated fully until now. This study demonstrates that cytosolic double-stranded DNA increases the expression of several inflammatory genes (cytokines, chemokines, type I interferon, and major histocompatibility complex in rat pancreatic stellate cells. Furthermore, these increase accompanied the multiple signal molecules genes, such as interferon regulatory factors, nuclear factor-kappa B, low-molecular-weight protein 2, and transporter associated with antigen processing 1. We suggest that this phenomenon is a plausible mechanism that might explain how cell damage of the pancreas or tissue injury triggers acute, chronic, and autoimmune pancreatitis; it is potentially relevant to host immune responses induced during alcohol consumption or other causes.

  7. Molecular mechanisms of DNA photodamage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starrs, S.M

    2000-05-01

    Photodamage in DNA, caused by ultraviolet (UV) light, can occur by direct excitation of the nucleobases or indirectly via the action of photosensitisers. Such, DNA photodamage can be potentially mutagenic or lethal. Among the methods available for detecting UV-induced DNA damage, gel sequencing protocols, utilising synthetic oligodeoxyribonucleotides as targets for UV radiation, allow photolesions to be mapped at nucleotide resolution. This approach has been applied to investigate both DNA damage mechanisms. Following a general overview of DNA photoreactivity, and a description of the main experimental procedures, Chapter 3 identifies the origin of an anomalous mobility shift observed in purine chemical sequence ladders that can confuse the interpretation of DNA cleavage results; measures to abolish this shift are also described. Chapters 4 and 5 examine the alkali-labile DNA damage photosensitised by representative nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and the fluoroquinolone antibiotics. Suprofen was the most photoactive NSAID studied, producing different patterns of guanine-specific damage in single-stranded and duplex DNA. Uniform modification of guanine bases, typifying attack by singlet oxygen, was observed in single-stranded oligodeoxyribonucleotides. In duplex molecules, modification was limited to the 5'-G of GG doublets, which is indicative of an electron transfer. The effect of quenchers and photoproduct analysis substantiated these findings. The quinolone, nalidixic acid, behaves similarly. The random base cleavage photosensitised by the fluoroquinolones, has been attributed to free radicals produced during their photodecomposition. Chapter 6 addresses the photoreactivity of purines within unusual DNA structures formed by the repeat sequences (GGA){sub n} and (GA){sub n}, and a minihairpin. There was no definitive evidence for enhanced purine reactivity caused by direct excitation. Finally, Chapter 7 investigates the mutagenic potential of a

  8. Molecular mechanisms of DNA photodamage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Photodamage in DNA, caused by ultraviolet (UV) light, can occur by direct excitation of the nucleobases or indirectly via the action of photosensitisers. Such, DNA photodamage can be potentially mutagenic or lethal. Among the methods available for detecting UV-induced DNA damage, gel sequencing protocols, utilising synthetic oligodeoxyribonucleotides as targets for UV radiation, allow photolesions to be mapped at nucleotide resolution. This approach has been applied to investigate both DNA damage mechanisms. Following a general overview of DNA photoreactivity, and a description of the main experimental procedures, Chapter 3 identifies the origin of an anomalous mobility shift observed in purine chemical sequence ladders that can confuse the interpretation of DNA cleavage results; measures to abolish this shift are also described. Chapters 4 and 5 examine the alkali-labile DNA damage photosensitised by representative nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and the fluoroquinolone antibiotics. Suprofen was the most photoactive NSAID studied, producing different patterns of guanine-specific damage in single-stranded and duplex DNA. Uniform modification of guanine bases, typifying attack by singlet oxygen, was observed in single-stranded oligodeoxyribonucleotides. In duplex molecules, modification was limited to the 5'-G of GG doublets, which is indicative of an electron transfer. The effect of quenchers and photoproduct analysis substantiated these findings. The quinolone, nalidixic acid, behaves similarly. The random base cleavage photosensitised by the fluoroquinolones, has been attributed to free radicals produced during their photodecomposition. Chapter 6 addresses the photoreactivity of purines within unusual DNA structures formed by the repeat sequences (GGA)n and (GA)n, and a minihairpin. There was no definitive evidence for enhanced purine reactivity caused by direct excitation. Finally, Chapter 7 investigates the mutagenic potential of a dimeric adenine

  9. Molecular mechanism of the sweet taste enhancers

    OpenAIRE

    Feng ZHANG; Klebansky, Boris; Fine, Richard M.; Liu, Haitian; Xu, Hong; Servant, Guy; Zoller, Mark; Tachdjian, Catherine; Li, Xiaodong

    2010-01-01

    Positive allosteric modulators of the human sweet taste receptor have been developed as a new way of reducing dietary sugar intake. Besides their potential health benefit, the sweet taste enhancers are also valuable tool molecules to study the general mechanism of positive allosteric modulations of T1R taste receptors. Using chimeric receptors, mutagenesis, and molecular modeling, we reveal how these sweet enhancers work at the molecular level. Our data argue that the sweet enhancers follow a...

  10. Molecular Mechanisms of Insulin Resistance Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vsevolod Arsen'evich Tkachuk

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance (IR is a phenomenon associated with an impaired ability of insulin to stimulate glucose uptake by target cells and to reduce the blood glucose level. A response increase in insulin secretion by the pancreas and hyperinsulinemia are compensatory reactions of the body. The development of IR leads to the inability of target cells to respond to insulin that results in developing type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM and metabolic syndrome. For this reason, the metabolic syndrome is defined in practice as a combination of IR with one or more pathologies such as T2DM, arterial hypertension, dyslipidemia, abdominal obesity, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and some others. However, a combination of high blood glucose and insulin levels always serves as its physiological criterion.IR should be considered as a systemic failure of the endocrine regulation in the body. Physiological causes of IR are diverse. The main ones are nutritional overload and accumulation of certain lipids and their metabolites in cells, low physical activity, chronic inflammation and stress of various nature, including oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum stress (impairment of damaged protein degradation in the cell. Recent studies have demonstrated that these physiological mechanisms likely act through a single intracellular scenario. This is the impairment of signal transduction from the insulin receptor to its targets via the negative feedback mechanism in intracellular insulin-dependent signaling cascades.This review describes the physiological and intracellular mechanisms of insulin action and focuses on their abnormalities upon IR development. Finally, feasible trends in early molecular diagnosis and therapy of IR are discussed.

  11. Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Psychological Stress and Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Kyeong Jin; Lee, Yu Jin; Yang, Yong Ryoul; Park, Seorim; Suh, Pann-Ghill; Follo, Matilde Yung; Cocco, Lucio; Ryu, Sung Ho

    2016-01-01

    Psychological stress is an emotion experienced when people are under mental pressure or encounter unexpected problems. Extreme or repetitive stress increases the risk of developing human disease, including cardiovascular disease (CVD), immune diseases, mental disorders, and cancer. Several studies have shown an association between psychological stress and cancer growth and metastasis in animal models and case studies of cancer patients. Stress induces the secretion of stress-related mediators, such as catecholamine, cortisol, and oxytocin, via the activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis or the sympathetic nervous system (SNS). These stress-related hormones and neurotransmitters adversely affect stress-induced tumor progression and cancer therapy. Catecholamine is the primary factor that influences tumor progression. It can regulate diverse cellular signaling pathways through adrenergic receptors (ADRs), which are expressed by several types of cancer cells. Activated ADRs enhance the proliferation and invasion abilities of cancer cells, alter cell activity in the tumor microenvironment, and regulate the interaction between cancer and its microenvironment to promote tumor progression. Additionally, other stress mediators, such as glucocorticoids and oxytocin, and their cognate receptors are involved in stress-induced cancer growth and metastasis. Here, we will review how each receptor-mediated signal cascade contributes to tumor initiation and progression and discuss how we can use these molecular mechanisms for cancer therapy. PMID:26916018

  12. Molecular dynamics investigation of mechanical mixing in mechanical alloying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular dynamic simulation is exploited to obtain a deep insight of atomic scale mixing and amorphization mechanisms happening during mechanical mixing. Impact-relaxation cycles are performed to simulate the mechanical alloying process. The results obtained by structural analysis shows that the final structure obtained through simulation of mechanical alloying is in an amorphous state. This analysis reveals that amorphization occurs concurrently with the attainment of a perfectly mixed alloy. The results indicate diffusion and deformation are two important mechanisms for mixing during mechanical alloying. The rate of diffusion is controlled by the temperature and by the density of defects in the structure. Deformation enhances mixing directly by sliding atomic layers on each other and increases the number of defects in the structure. The results agree with mechanical alloying experiments described in the literature

  13. Molecular dynamics investigation of mechanical mixing in mechanical alloying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali Nematollahi, Gh. [Department of Ceramic, Materials and Energy Research Center, Karaj, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: ali61gh@yahoo.com; Marzbanrad, E.; Aghaei, A.R. [Department of Ceramic, Materials and Energy Research Center, Karaj, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2008-09-25

    Molecular dynamic simulation is exploited to obtain a deep insight of atomic scale mixing and amorphization mechanisms happening during mechanical mixing. Impact-relaxation cycles are performed to simulate the mechanical alloying process. The results obtained by structural analysis shows that the final structure obtained through simulation of mechanical alloying is in an amorphous state. This analysis reveals that amorphization occurs concurrently with the attainment of a perfectly mixed alloy. The results indicate diffusion and deformation are two important mechanisms for mixing during mechanical alloying. The rate of diffusion is controlled by the temperature and by the density of defects in the structure. Deformation enhances mixing directly by sliding atomic layers on each other and increases the number of defects in the structure. The results agree with mechanical alloying experiments described in the literature.

  14. Ocular diseases: immunological and molecular mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jing; Huang, Yi-Fei; Zhang, Wen-Jing; Chen, Xiao-Fei; Guo, Yu-Mian

    2016-01-01

    Many factors, such as environmental, microbial and endogenous stress, antigen localization, can trigger the immunological events that affect the ending of the diverse spectrum of ocular disorders. Significant advances in understanding of immunological and molecular mechanisms have been researched to improve the diagnosis and therapy for patients with ocular inflammatory diseases. Some kinds of ocular diseases are inadequately responsive to current medications; therefore, immunotherapy may be a potential choice as an alternative or adjunctive treatment, even in the prophylactic setting. This article first provides an overview of the immunological and molecular mechanisms concerning several typical and common ocular diseases; second, the functions of immunological roles in some of systemic autoimmunity will be discussed; third, we will provide a summary of the mechanisms that dictate immune cell trafficking to ocular local microenvironment in response to inflammation.

  15. Molecular Thermodynamic Model for Associated Polymers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG,Chang-Jun(彭昌军); LIU,Hong-Lai(刘洪来); HU,Ying(胡英)

    2001-01-01

    A molecular thermedynmnic model for homopolyrner and copolymer systems with association segments was establishedby adopting the molecular thermodynamic model for hard-sphere-chain fluid as a reference,a perturbation term contributed by the square-well potential and a contribution of as sociation terms.The latter considers the multi-associated-seg-ments in a chain-like molecule based on the shield-sticky model of chemical association.The model can be used to correlate the pVT of melten homopolymer and copolymer.Good agree-ments with experimental data have been obtained.

  16. Molecular mechanism for the umami taste synergism

    OpenAIRE

    Feng ZHANG; Klebansky, Boris; Fine, Richard M.; Xu, Hong; Pronin, Alexey; Liu, Haitian; Tachdjian, Catherine; Li, Xiaodong

    2008-01-01

    Umami is one of the 5 basic taste qualities. The umami taste of L-glutamate can be drastically enhanced by 5′ ribonucleotides and the synergy is a hallmark of this taste quality. The umami taste receptor is a heteromeric complex of 2 class C G-protein-coupled receptors, T1R1 and T1R3. Here we elucidate the molecular mechanism of the synergy using chimeric T1R receptors, site-directed mutagenesis, and molecular modeling. We propose a cooperative ligand-binding model involving the Venus flytrap...

  17. Molecular mechanism and regulation of autophagy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ya-ping YANG; Zhong-qin LIANG; Zhen-lun GU; Zheng-hong QIN

    2005-01-01

    Autophagy is a major cellular pathway for the degradation of long-lived proteins and cytoplasmic organelles in eukaryotic cells. A large number of intracellular/extracellular stimuli, including amino acid starvation and invasion of microorganisms, are able to induce the autophagic response in cells. The discovery of the ATG genes in yeast has greatly advanced our understanding of the molecular mechanisms participating in autophagy and the genes involved in regulating the autophagic pathway. Many yeast genes have mammalian homologs,suggesting that the basic machinery for autophagy has been evolutionarily conserved along the eukaryotic phylum. The regulation of autophagy is a very complex process. Many signaling pathways, including target of rapamycin (TOR) or mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-I (PI3K-I)/PKB, GTPases, calcium and protein synthesis all play important roles in regulating autophagy. The molecular mechanisms and regulation of autophagy are discussed in this review.

  18. Molecular mechanisms of metastasis in prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Noel W.Clarke; Claire A.Hart; Mick D.Brown

    2009-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) preferentially metastasizes to the bone marrow stroma of the axial skeleton.This activity is the principal cause of PCa morbidity and mortality.The exact mechanism of PCa metastasis is currently unknown,although considerable progress has been made in determining the key players in this process.In this review,we present the current understanding of the molecular processes driving PCa metastasis to the bone.

  19. Cellular and molecular mechanisms in kidney fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Duffield, Jeremy S.

    2014-01-01

    Fibrosis is a characteristic feature of all forms of chronic kidney disease. Deposition of pathological matrix in the interstitial space and within the walls of glomerular capillaries as well as the cellular processes resulting in this deposition are increasingly recognized as important factors amplifying kidney injury and accelerating nephron demise. Recent insights into the cellular and molecular mechanisms of fibrogenesis herald the promise of new therapies to slow kidney disease progressi...

  20. Molecular Mechanism of Biological Proton Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pomes, R.

    1998-09-01

    Proton transport across lipid membranes is a fundamental aspect of biological energy transduction (metabolism). This function is mediated by a Grotthuss mechanism involving proton hopping along hydrogen-bonded networks embedded in membrane-spanning proteins. Using molecular simulations, the authors have explored the structural, dynamic, and thermodynamic properties giving rise to long-range proton translocation in hydrogen-bonded networks involving water molecules, or water wires, which are emerging as ubiquitous H{sup +}-transport devices in biological systems.

  1. Molecular mechanism of magnet formation in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, T; Sakaguchi, T

    2000-01-01

    Magnetic bacteria have an ability to synthesize intracellular ferromagnetic crystalline particles consisting of magnetite (Fe3O4) or greigite (Fe3S4) which occur within a specific size range (50-100 nm). Bacterial magnetic particles (BMPs) can be distinguished by the regular morphology and the presence of an thin organic membrane enveloping crystals from abiologically formed magnetite. The particle is the smallest magnetic crystal that has a regular morphology within the single domain size. Therefore, BMPs have an unfathomable amount of potential value for various technological applications not only scientific interests. However, the molecular and genetic mechanism of magnetite biomineralization is hardly understood although iron oxide formation occurs widely in many higher animals as well as microorganisms. In order to elucidate the molecular and genetic mechanisms of magnetite biomineralization, a magnetic bacterium Magnetospirillum sp. AMB-1, for which gene transfer and transposon mutagenesis techniques had been recently developed, has been used as a model organism. Several findings and information on the BMPs formation process have been obtained within this decade by means of studies with this model organism and its related one. Biomineralization mechanism and potential availability in biotechnology of bacterial magnets have been elucidated through molecular and genetic approach. PMID:16232810

  2. Mechanically induced luminescence changes in molecular assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagara, Yoshimitsu; Kato, Takashi

    2009-11-01

    Altering the shape and properties of a material through external factors such as heat, light, pressure, pH, electric or magnetic fields, or the introduction of a guest molecule, is an attractive prospect. In this Perspective, piezochromic luminescent materials - which change the colour of their luminescence in response to mechanical stimuli - are described. Such piezochromism has been observed for a few molecular materials that contain luminescent cores in liquid-crystalline and crystalline solid states, as well as for polymeric materials doped with dyes. These changes in photoluminescent colour can be activated by various types of mechanical pressure such as shearing, grinding or elongation, which can trigger different mechanisms of producing the colour. Such stimuli-responsive materials have potential for various applications, including sensors, memory and displays. PMID:21378953

  3. Molecular Mechanisms of Renal Ischemic Conditioning Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kierulf-Lassen, Casper; Nieuwenhuijs-Moeke, Gertrude J; Krogstrup, Nicoline V; Oltean, Mihai; Jespersen, Bente; Dor, Frank J M F

    2015-01-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury is the leading cause of acute kidney injury in a variety of clinical settings such as renal transplantation and hypovolemic and/or septic shock. Strategies to reduce ischemia-reperfusion injury are obviously clinically relevant. Ischemic conditioning is an inherent part of the renal defense mechanism against ischemia and can be triggered by short periods of intermittent ischemia and reperfusion. Understanding the signaling transduction pathways of renal ischemic conditioning can promote further clinical translation and pharmacological advancements in this era. This review summarizes research on the molecular mechanisms underlying both local and remote ischemic pre-, per- and postconditioning of the kidney. The different types of conditioning strategies in the kidney recruit similar powerful pro-survival mechanisms. Likewise, renal ischemic conditioning mobilizes many of the same protective signaling pathways as in other organs, but differences are recognized. PMID:26330099

  4. Molecular mechanisms for protein-encoded inheritance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiltzius, Jed J.W.; Landau, Meytal; Nelson, Rebecca; Sawaya, Michael R.; Apostol, Marcin I.; Goldschmidt, Lukasz; Soriaga, Angela B.; Cascio, Duilio; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta; Eisenberg, David; (Cornell); (HHMI)

    2009-12-01

    In prion inheritance and transmission, strains are phenotypic variants encoded by protein 'conformations'. However, it is unclear how a protein conformation can be stable enough to endure transmission between cells or organisms. Here we describe new polymorphic crystal structures of segments of prion and other amyloid proteins, which offer two structural mechanisms for the encoding of prion strains. In packing polymorphism, prion strains are encoded by alternative packing arrangements (polymorphs) of {beta}-sheets formed by the same segment of a protein; in segmental polymorphism, prion strains are encoded by distinct {beta}-sheets built from different segments of a protein. Both forms of polymorphism can produce enduring conformations capable of encoding strains. These molecular mechanisms for transfer of protein-encoded information into prion strains share features with the familiar mechanism for transfer of nucleic acid-encoded information into microbial strains, including sequence specificity and recognition by noncovalent bonds.

  5. Molecular Mechanisms in Exercise-Induced Cardioprotection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeid Golbidi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Physical inactivity is increasingly recognized as modifiable behavioral risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. A partial list of proposed mechanisms for exercise-induced cardioprotection include induction of heat shock proteins, increase in cardiac antioxidant capacity, expression of endoplasmic reticulum stress proteins, anatomical and physiological changes in the coronary arteries, changes in nitric oxide production, adaptational changes in cardiac mitochondria, increased autophagy, and improved function of sarcolemmal and/or mitochondrial ATP-sensitive potassium channels. It is currently unclear which of these protective mechanisms are essential for exercise-induced cardioprotection. However, most investigations focus on sarcolemmal KATP channels, NO production, and mitochondrial changes although it is very likely that other mechanisms may also exist. This paper discusses current information about these aforementioned topics and does not consider potentially important adaptations within blood or the autonomic nervous system. A better understanding of the molecular basis of exercise-induced cardioprotection will help to develop better therapeutic strategies.

  6. Molecular Association and Structure of Hydrogen Peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giguere, Paul A.

    1983-01-01

    The statement is sometimes made in textbooks that liquid hydrogen peroxide is more strongly associated than water, evidenced by its higher boiling point and greater heat of vaporization. Discusses these and an additional factor (the nearly double molecular mass of the peroxide), focusing on hydrogen bonds and structure of the molecule. (JN)

  7. Recent Advances in Molecular Mechanisms of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Annambhotla, Suman; Bourgeois, Sebastian; Wang, Xinwen; Lin, Peter H.; Yao, Qizhi; Chen, Changyi

    2008-01-01

    Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) is an increasingly common clinical condition with fatal implications. It is associated with advanced age, male gender, cigarette smoking, atherosclerosis, hypertension, and genetic predisposition. Although significant evidence has emerged in the last decade, the molecular mechanisms of AAA formation remains poorly understood. Currently, the treatment for AAA remains primarily surgical with the lone innovation of endovascular therapy. With advance in the human g...

  8. Integrated Physiological, Biochemical, and Molecular Analysis Identifies Important Traits and Mechanisms Associated with Differential Response of Rice Genotypes to Elevated Temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Sailaja, Boghireddy; Subrahmanyam, Desiraju; Neelamraju, Sarla; Vishnukiran, Turaga; Rao, Yadavalli Venkateswara; Vijayalakshmi, Pujarula; Voleti, Sitapati R.; Bhadana, Vijai P.; Mangrauthia, Satendra K.

    2015-01-01

    In changing climatic conditions, heat stress caused by high temperature poses a serious threat to rice cultivation. A multiple organizational analysis at physiological, biochemical, and molecular levels is required to fully understand the impact of elevated temperature in rice. This study was aimed at deciphering the elevated temperature response in 11 popular and mega rice cultivars widely grown in India. Physiological and biochemical traits specifically membrane thermostability (MTS), antio...

  9. Radioadaptive response and its molecular mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioadaptive response is a biological defense of which low dose ionizing radiation induces cellular resistance to the genotoxic effects of subsequent challenge irradiation. However, so for molecular mechanism of radioadaptive response remains obscure. Research is mainly involved in activation of the intracellular repair system, cell cycle regulation system, antioxidative stress system and stress-response protein. Signaling factors involved in cell response to radiation include protein kinase C, mitogen-activated protein kinase, p53 tumor suppressor' protein, ataxia-telansiectasia mutated, and DNA-dependent protein kinase. (authors)

  10. Thymic Output: Influence Factors and Molecular Mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rong Jin; Jun Zhang; Weifeng Chen

    2006-01-01

    Thymus is a primary lymphoid organ, able to generate mature T cells that eventually colonize secondary lymphoid organs, and is therefore essential for peripheral T cell renewal. Recent data showed that normal thymocyte export can be altered by several influence factors including several chemokines,sphingosinel-phosphate (S1P),transcription factors such as Foxjl, Kruppel-like transcription factor 2 (KLF2) and antigen stimulation, etc. In this review, we summarized the recent reports about study strategies, influence factors and possible molecular mechanisms in thymic output.

  11. Statistical mechanics and dynamics of molecular fragmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quack, M. (Goettingen Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Physikalische Chemie)

    1981-05-11

    The foundations of the use of statistical-mechanical equations of motion, in particular the Pauli equation, for the description of intramolecular processes and molecular fragmentation are discussed briefly. Quantum-mechanical trajectories for model systems illustrate how the statistical behaviour may emerge from the dynamical equations of motion. Product state distributions resulting from the fragmentation of strongly coupled, metastable intermediates in chemical-activation experiments can be calculated by using restricted equipartition, which applies as the long-time limit of the Pauli equation. A simple Pauli-equation model is proposed to calculate lifetimes of metastable intermediates. The consequences of the finite rate of intramolecular relaxation processes for the specific rate constants for fragmentation and possible deviations from microcanonical equilibrium are explored.

  12. Statistical mechanics and dynamics of molecular fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The foundations of the use of statistical-mechanical equations of motion, in particular the Pauli equation, for the description of intramolecular processes and molecular fragmentation are discussed briefly. Quantum-mechanical trajectories for model systems illustrate how the statistical behaviour may emerge from the dynamical equations of motion. Product state distributions resulting from the fragmentation of strongly coupled, metastable intermediates in chemical-activation experiments can be calculated by using restricted equipartition, which applies as the long-time limit of the Pauli equation. A simple Pauli-equation model is proposed to calculate lifetimes of metastable intermediates. The consequences of the finite rate of intramolecular relaxation processes for the specific rate constants for fragmentation and possible deviations from microcanonical equilibrium are explored. (author)

  13. Molecular Alterations Associated with Osteosarcoma Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosei Ando

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteosarcoma is the most frequent malignant primary bone tumor characterized by a high potency to form lung metastases which is the main cause of death. Unfortunately, the conventional chemotherapy is not fully effective on osteosarcoma metastases. The progression of a primary tumor to metastasis requires multiple processes, which are neovascularization, proliferation, invasion, survival in the bloodstream, apoptosis resistance, arrest at a distant organ, and outgrowth in secondary sites. Consequently, recent studies have revealed new insights into the molecular mechanisms of metastasis development. The understanding of the mechanism of molecular alterations can provide the identification of novel therapeutic targets and/or prognostic markers for osteosarcoma treatment to improve the clinical outcome.

  14. Integrated physiological, biochemical and molecular analysis identifies important traits and mechanisms associated with differential response of rice genotypes to elevated temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boghireddy eSailaja

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In changing climate, heat stress caused by high temperature poses a serious threat to rice cultivation. A multiple organizational analysis at physiological, biochemical and molecular level is required to fully understand the impact of elevated temperature in rice. This study was aimed at deciphering the elevated temperature response in eleven popular and mega rice cultivars widely grown in India. Physiological and biochemical traits specifically membrane thermostability (MTS, antioxidants, and photosynthesis were studied at vegetative and reproductive phases which were used to establish a correlation with grain yield under stress. Several useful traits in different genotypes were identified which will be important resource to develop high temperature tolerant rice cultivars. Interestingly, Nagina22 emerged as best performer in terms of yield as well as expression of physiological and biochemical traits at elevated temperature. It showed lesser relative injury, lesser reduction in chlorophyll content, increased super oxide dismutase, catalase and peroxidase activity, lesser reduction in net photosynthetic rate (PN, high transpiration rate (E and other photosynthetic/ fluorescence parameters contributing to least reduction in spikelet fertility and grain yield at elevated temperature. Further, expression of 14 genes including heat shock transcription factors and heat shock proteins was analyzed in Nagina22 (tolerant and Vandana (susceptible at flowering phase, strengthening the fact that N22 performs better at molecular level also during elevated temperature. This study shows that elevated temperature response is complex and involves multiple biological processes which are needed to be characterized to address the challenges of future climate extreme conditions.

  15. Molecular Mechanisms Regulating Macrophage Response to Hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Amit Rahat

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Monocytes and Macrophages (Mo/Mϕ exhibit great plasticity, as they can shift between different modes of activation and, driven by their immediate microenvironment, perform divergent functions. These include, among others, patrolling their surroundings and maintaining homeostasis (resident Mo/Mϕ, combating invading pathogens and tumor cells (classically activated or M1 Mo/Mϕ, orchestrating wound healing (alternatively activated or M2 Mo/Mϕ, and restoring homeostasis after an inflammatory response (resolution Mϕ. Hypoxia is an important factor in the Mϕ microenvironment, is prevalent in many physiological and pathological conditions, and is interdependent with the inflammatory response. Although Mo/Mϕ have been studied in hypoxia, the mechanisms by which hypoxia influences the different modes of their activation, and how it regulates the shift between them, remain unclear. Here we review the current knowledge about the molecular mechanisms that mediate this hypoxic regulation of Mϕ activation. Much is known about the hypoxic transcriptional regulatory network, which includes the master regulators HIF-1 and NF-κB, as well as other transcription factors (e.g. AP-1, Erg-1, but we also highlight the role of post-transcriptional and post-translational mechanisms. These mechanisms mediate hypoxic induction of Mϕ pro-angiogenic mediators, suppress M1 Mϕ by post-transcriptionally inhibiting pro-inflammatory mediators, and help shift the classically activated Mϕ into an activation state which approximate the alternatively activated or resolution Mϕ.

  16. 2004 Reversible Associations in Structure & Molecular Biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edward Eisenstein Nancy Ryan Gray

    2005-03-23

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on 2004 Gordon Research Conference on Reversible Associations in Structure & Molecular Biology was held at Four Points Sheraton, CA, 1/25-30/2004. The Conference was well attended with 82 participants (attendees list attached). The attendees represented the spectrum of endeavor in this field coming from academia, industry, and government laboratories, both U.S. and foreign scientists, senior researchers, young investigators, and students.

  17. Predicting cancer drug mechanisms of action using molecular network signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, Justin R; Bruno, Peter M; Hemann, Michael T; Lauffenburger, Douglas A

    2013-07-01

    Molecular signatures are a powerful approach to characterize novel small molecules and derivatized small molecule libraries. While new experimental techniques are being developed in diverse model systems, informatics approaches lag behind these exciting advances. We propose an analysis pipeline for signature based drug annotation. We develop an integrated strategy, utilizing supervised and unsupervised learning methodologies that are bridged by network based statistics. Using this approach we can: 1, predict new examples of drug mechanisms that we trained our model upon; 2, identify "New" mechanisms of action that do not belong to drug categories that our model was trained upon; and 3, update our training sets with these "New" mechanisms and accurately predict entirely distinct examples from these new categories. Thus, not only does our strategy provide statistical generalization but it also offers biological generalization. Additionally, we show that our approach is applicable to diverse types of data, and that distinct biological mechanisms characterize its resolution of categories across different data types. As particular examples, we find that our predictive resolution of drug mechanisms from mRNA expression studies relies upon the analog measurement of a cell stress-related transcriptional rheostat along with a transcriptional representation of cell cycle state; whereas, in contrast, drug mechanism resolution from functional RNAi studies rely upon more dichotomous (e.g., either enhances or inhibits) association with cell death states. We believe that our approach can facilitate molecular signature-based drug mechanism understanding from different technology platforms and across diverse biological phenomena. PMID:23287973

  18. Cardiovascular effects of cocaine: cellular, ionic and molecular mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turillazzi, E; Bello, S; Neri, M; Pomara, C; Riezzo, I; Fineschi, V

    2012-01-01

    Cocaine is a widely abused drug responsible for the majority of deaths ascribed to drug overdose. Many mechanisms have been proposed in order to explain the various cocaine associated cardiovascular complications. Conventionally, cocaine cardiotoxicity has been thought to be mediated indirectly through its sympathomimetic effect, i.e., by inhibiting the reuptake and thus increasing the levels of neuronal catecholamines at work on adrenoceptors. Increased oxidative stress, reactive oxygen species, and cocaine-induced apoptosis in the heart muscle have suggested a new way to understand the cardiotoxic effects of cocaine. More recent studies have led the attention to the interaction of cocaine and some metabolites with cardiac sodium, calcium and potassium channels. The current paper is aimed to investigate the molecular mechanisms of cocaine cardiotoxicity which have a specific clinical and forensic interest. From a clinical point of view the full knowledge of the exact mechanisms by which cocaine exerts cardio - vascular damage is essential to identify potential therapeutic targets and improve novel strategies for cocaine related cardiovascular diseases. From a forensic point of view, it is to be underlined that cocaine use is often associated to sudden death in young, otherwise healthy individuals. While such events are widely reported, the relationship between cardiac morphological alterations and molecular/cellular mechanisms is still controversial. In conclusion, the study of cocaine cardiovascular toxicity needs a strict collaboration between clinicians and pathologists which may be very effective in further dissecting the mechanisms underlying cocaine cardiotoxicity and understanding the cardiac cocaine connection. PMID:22856657

  19. Molecular mechanisms of bone formation in spondyloarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Chávez, Susana Aideé; Quiñonez-Flores, Celia María; Pacheco-Tena, César

    2016-07-01

    Spondyloarthritis comprise a group of inflammatory rheumatic diseases characterized by its association to HLA-B27 and the presence of arthritis and enthesitis. The pathogenesis involves both an inflammatory process and new bone formation, which eventually lead to ankylosis of the spine. To date, the intrinsic mechanisms of the pathogenic process have not been fully elucidated, and our progress is remarkable in the identification of therapeutic targets to achieve the control of the inflammatory process, yet our ability to inhibit the excessive bone formation is still insufficient. The study of new bone formation in spondyloarthritis has been mostly conducted in animal models of the disease and only few experiments have been done using human biopsies. The deregulation and overexpression of molecules involved in the osteogenesis process have been observed in bone cells, mesenchymal cells, and fibroblasts. The signaling associated to the excessive bone formation is congruent with those involved in the physiological processes of bone remodeling. Bone morphogenetic proteins and Wnt pathways have been found deregulated in this disease; however, the cause for uncontrolled stimulation remains unknown. Mechanical stress appears to play an important role in the pathological osteogenesis process; nevertheless, the association of other important factors, such as the presence of HLA-B27 and environmental factors, remains uncertain. The present review summarizes the experimental findings that describe the signaling pathways involved in the new bone formation process in spondyloarthritis in animal models and in human biopsies. The role of mechanical stress as the trigger of these pathways is also reviewed. PMID:26838262

  20. Screened Electrostatic Interactions in Molecular Mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Truhlar, Donald G

    2014-10-14

    In a typical application of molecular mechanics (MM), the electrostatic interactions are calculated from parametrized partial atomic charges treated as point charges interacting by radial Coulomb potentials. This does not usually yield accurate electrostatic interactions at van der Waals distances, but this is compensated by additional parametrized terms, for example Lennard-Jones potentials. In the present work, we present a scheme involving radial screened Coulomb potentials that reproduces the accurate electrostatics much more accurately. The screening accounts for charge penetration of one subsystem's charge cloud into that of another subsystem, and it is incorporated into the interaction potential in a way similar to what we proposed in a previous article (J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2010, 6, 3330) for combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) simulations, but the screening parameters are reoptimized for MM. The optimization is carried out with electrostatic-potential-fitted partial atomic charges, but the optimized parameters should be useful with any realistic charge model. In the model we employ, the charge density of an atom is approximated as the sum of a point charge representing the nucleus and inner electrons and a smeared charge representing the outermost electrons; in particular, for all atoms except hydrogens, the smeared charge represents the two outermost electrons in the present model. We find that the charge penetration effect can cause very significant deviations from the popular point-charge model, and by comparison to electrostatic interactions calculated by symmetry-adapted perturbation theory, we find that the present results are considerably more accurate than point-charge electrostatic interactions. The mean unsigned error in electrostatics for a large and diverse data set (192 interaction energies) decreases from 9.2 to 3.3 kcal/mol, and the error in the electrostatics for 10 water dimers decreases from 1.7 to 0.5 kcal

  1. Molecular mechanisms of mutagenesis and DNA repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most organisms including man have evolved ways to handle damage produce in DNA by environmental agents including chemical mutagens and carcinogens. The process of repair of some types of damage is highly regulated in a tissue and cell line-specific fashion and varies from organism to organism. Thus, the ultimate biological effects of the lesions depend not only on the extent of their formation but on the efficiency of their removal as well. The research objectives of this laboratory are to elucidate the mechanism and regulation of repair of damage in DNA produced by simple alkylating mutagens and carcinogens, as well as the mutagenic changes in DNA produced as a result of persistence of unrepaired lesions. Specifically, the current topics of the authors research are (1) to elucidate the enzymatic mechanism of the human repair enzyme, DNA-O6-methylguanine methyltransferase, and to determine the molecular mechanism of its regulation and (2) to study the nature of mutations induced by the presence of alkylated bases and ionizing radiation-damaged bases in DNA using shuttle plasmids that replicate both in human cells and E. coli. The following report on last year's experiments bear upon the first objective

  2. Molecular Mechanisms of Mouse Skin Tumor Promotion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rundhaug, Joyce E.; Fischer, Susan M., E-mail: smfischer@mdanderson.org [The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Science Park-Research Division, P.O. Box 389, Smithville, TX 78957 (United States)

    2010-04-13

    Multiple molecular mechanisms are involved in the promotion of skin carcinogenesis. Induction of sustained proliferation and epidermal hyperplasia by direct activation of mitotic signaling pathways or indirectly in response to chronic wounding and/or inflammation, or due to a block in terminal differentiation or resistance to apoptosis is necessary to allow clonal expansion of initiated cells with DNA mutations to form skin tumors. The mitotic pathways include activation of epidermal growth factor receptor and Ras/Raf/mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling. Chronic inflammation results in inflammatory cell secretion of growth factors and cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukins, as well as production of reactive oxygen species, all of which can stimulate proliferation. Persistent activation of these pathways leads to tumor promotion.

  3. Molecular mechanisms involved in intestinal iron absorption

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paul Sharp; Surjit Kaila Srai

    2007-01-01

    Iron is an essential trace metal in the human diet due to its obligate role in a number of metabolic processes.In the diet, iron is present in a number of different forms, generally described as haem (from haemoglobin and myoglobin in animal tissue) and non-haem iron (including ferric oxides and salts, ferritin and lactoferrin).This review describes the molecular mechanisms that co-ordinate the absorption of iron from the diet and its release into the circulation. While many components of the iron transport pathway have been elucidated, a number of key issues still remain to be resolved. Future work in this area will provide a clearer picture regarding the transcellular flux of iron and its regulation by dietary and humoral factors.

  4. Cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying radiation carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When considering and analyzing experimental material concerning cellular aspects of the problem of radiation carcinogenesis, the following conclusions can be made: neoplastic transformation of cells in a culture is caused already by small radiation doses, under the effect of which the level of DNA injury is quite insignificant; the frequency of cell transformation depends on the type of radiation, it is particularly pronounced under the effect of radiations with a high linear energy transfer; a correlation between the processes of postradiation recovery and radiogenic transformation of cells is detected, nonrepairable injures of DNA playing the most important role in radiation carcinogenesis; tumour promoters and anticarcinogenic agens produce a modifying effect on the transformation of irradiated cells. Molecular mechanisms of oncogene activation are thoroughly studied using the model of virus carcinogenesis, the problem of the nature of chemical and, in particular, radiation cell transformation remains scantily investigated

  5. Pilocytic astrocytoma: pathology, molecular mechanisms and markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, V Peter; Jones, David T W; Giannini, Caterina

    2015-06-01

    Pilocytic astrocytomas (PAs) were recognized as a discrete clinical entity over 70 years ago. They are relatively benign (WHO grade I) and have, as a group, a 10-year survival of over 90%. Many require merely surgical removal and only very infrequently do they progress to more malignant gliomas. While most show classical morphology, they may present a spectrum of morphological patterns, and there are difficult cases that show similarities to other gliomas, some of which are malignant and require aggressive treatment. Until recently, almost nothing was known about the molecular mechanisms involved in their development. The use of high-throughput sequencing techniques interrogating the whole genome has shown that single abnormalities of the mitogen-activating protein kinase (MAPK) pathway are exclusively found in almost all cases, indicating that PA represents a one-pathway disease. The most common mechanism is a tandem duplication of a ≈2 Mb-fragment of #7q, giving rise to a fusion between two genes, resulting in a transforming fusion protein, consisting of the N-terminus of KIAA1549 and the kinase domain of BRAF. Additional infrequent fusion partners have been identified, along with other abnormalities of the MAP-K pathway, affecting tyrosine kinase growth factor receptors at the cell surface (e.g., FGFR1) as well as BRAF V600E, KRAS, and NF1 mutations among others. However, while the KIAA1549-BRAF fusion occurs in all areas, the incidence of the various other mutations identified differs in PAs that develop in different regions of the brain. Unfortunately, from a diagnostic standpoint, almost all mutations found have been reported in other brain tumor types, although some retain considerable utility. These molecular abnormalities will be reviewed, and the difficulties in their potential use in supporting a diagnosis of PA, when the histopathological findings are equivocal or in the choice of individualized therapy, will be discussed. PMID:25792358

  6. How hyperglycemia promotes atherosclerosis: molecular mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rayfield Elliot J

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Both type I and type II diabetes are powerful and independent risk factors for coronary artery disease (CAD, stroke, and peripheral arterial disease. Atherosclerosis accounts for virtually 80% of all deaths among diabetic patients. Prolonged exposure to hyperglycemia is now recognized a major factor in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in diabetes. Hyperglycemia induces a large number of alterations at the cellular level of vascular tissue that potentially accelerate the atherosclerotic process. Animal and human studies have elucidated three major mechanisms that encompass most of the pathological alterations observed in the diabetic vasculature: 1 Nonenzymatic glycosylation of proteins and lipids which can interfere with their normal function by disrupting molecular conformation, alter enzymatic activity, reduce degradative capacity, and interfere with receptor recognition. In addition, glycosylated proteins interact with a specific receptor present on all cells relevant to the atherosclerotic process, including monocyte-derived macrophages, endothelial cells, and smooth muscle cells. The interaction of glycosylated proteins with their receptor results in the induction of oxidative stress and proinflammatory responses 2 oxidative stress 3 protein kinase C (PKC activation with subsequent alteration in growth factor expression. Importantly, these mechanisms may be interrelated. For example, hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress promotes both the formation of advanced glycosylation end products and PKC activation.

  7. Molecular mechanism of phototropin light signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okajima, Koji

    2016-03-01

    Phototropin (phot) is a blue light (BL) receptor kinase involved in the BL responses of several species, ranging from green algae to higher plants. Phot converts BL signals from the environment into biochemical signals that trigger cellular responses. In phot, the LOV1 and LOV2 domains of the N-terminal region utilize BL for cyclic photoreactions and regulate C-terminal serine/threonine kinase (STK) activity. LOV2-STK peptides are the smallest functional unit of phot and are useful for understanding regulation mechanisms. The combined analysis of spectroscopy and STK activity assay in Arabidopsis phots suggests that the decay speed of the photo-intermediate S390 in LOV2 is one of the factors contributing to light sensitive kinase activity. LOV2 and STK are thought to be adjacent to each other in LOV2-STK with small angle scattering (SAXS). BL irradiation induces LOV2-STK elongation, resulting in LOV2 shifting away from STK. The N- and C-terminal lateral regions of LOV2, A'α-helix, Jα-helix, and A'α/Aβ gap are responsible for the propagation of the BL signal to STK via conformational changes. The comparison between LOV2-STK and full-length phot from Chlamydomonas suggests that LOV1 is directly adjacent to LOV2 in LOV2-STK; therefore, LOV1 may indirectly regulate STK. The molecular mechanism of phot is discussed. PMID:26815763

  8. Genetic classification and molecular mechanisms of primary dystonia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xueping Chen; Huifang Shang; Zuming Luo

    2008-01-01

    genotype, respectively; the epsilon-sarcoglycan gene is involved in DYT11; Na+/K+-ATP enzyme α3 chain gene in DYT12; TATA-conjugated protein-associated factor 1 gene in DYT3; and myofibril regulatory factor gene in DYT8. ③ Different types of dystonia exhibit various clinical characteristics and specific clinical manifestations. ④ Many elements regarding the molecular mechanism of dystonia have been determined. However, many components remain poorly understood. For example, detailed pathogenesis remains unclear. Various forms of dystonia exhibit similar problems. Moreover, a single form of dystonia may be a result of two or more different chromosomal mutations. In addition, more studies are needed to fully understand chromosome apposition and virulence genes involved in dystonia. CONCLUSION: The discovery of virulence genes and localizations of newly classified forms of dystonia are beneficial to further understanding the molecular mechanisms of dystonia.

  9. [Progress in the molecular genetic mechanism of gonadoblastoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lili, Yu; Wanru, Dong; Minghui, Chen; Xiangyang, Kong

    2015-11-01

    Gonadoblastoma (GB), a rare in situ germ cell tumor derived from sex cord and germ cells, is closely associated with gonadal dysgenesis. About 80% of GB individuals exhibit 46, XY female phenotype while the others are 45, XY and 46, XX with disorders of sex development. Moreover, 35% of GB can eventually develop into malignant tumors, such as seminoma and dysgerminoma tumors. The molecular genetic mechanism of GB remains to be fully uncovered due to phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity. Increasing studies show that the formation of GB is closely related to genes regulating sexual differentiation and determination (e.g., SRY, WT1, SOX9, Foxl2, TSPY, etc), and is affected by the interaction of genetic and epigenetic regulation. Here we describe the clinical and pathological features, diagnosis and treatment of GB, and also summarize the molecular genetic and epigenetic mechanisms underlying the gonadal abnormalities that lead to GB. We analyze and construct the common gene regulatory networks related to the development of GB, and describe some obstacles and deficiencies in current studies to provide innovative perspectives on further studying the pathological and molecular mechanisms of GB. PMID:26582524

  10. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of muscle atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Bonaldo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle is a plastic organ that is maintained by multiple pathways regulating cell and protein turnover. During muscle atrophy, proteolytic systems are activated, and contractile proteins and organelles are removed, resulting in the shrinkage of muscle fibers. Excessive loss of muscle mass is associated with poor prognosis in several diseases, including myopathies and muscular dystrophies, as well as in systemic disorders such as cancer, diabetes, sepsis and heart failure. Muscle loss also occurs during aging. In this paper, we review the key mechanisms that regulate the turnover of contractile proteins and organelles in muscle tissue, and discuss how impairments in these mechanisms can contribute to muscle atrophy. We also discuss how protein synthesis and degradation are coordinately regulated by signaling pathways that are influenced by mechanical stress, physical activity, and the availability of nutrients and growth factors. Understanding how these pathways regulate muscle mass will provide new therapeutic targets for the prevention and treatment of muscle atrophy in metabolic and neuromuscular diseases.

  11. Molecular mechanisms for tumour resistance to chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Shu-Ting; Li, Zhi-Ling; He, Zhi-Xu; Qiu, Jia-Xuan; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2016-08-01

    Chemotherapy is one of the prevailing methods used to treat malignant tumours, but the outcome and prognosis of tumour patients are not optimistic. Cancer cells gradually generate resistance to almost all chemotherapeutic drugs via a variety of distinct mechanisms and pathways. Chemotherapeutic resistance, either intrinsic or acquired, is caused and sustained by reduced drug accumulation and increased drug export, alterations in drug targets and signalling transduction molecules, increased repair of drug-induced DNA damage, and evasion of apoptosis. In order to better understand the mechanisms of chemoresistance, this review highlights our current knowledge of the role of altered drug metabolism and transport and deregulation of apoptosis and autophagy in the development of tumour chemoresistance. Reduced intracellular activation of prodrugs (e.g. thiotepa and tegafur) or enhanced drug inactivation by Phase I and II enzymes contributes to the development of chemoresistance. Both primary and acquired resistance can be caused by alterations in the transport of anticancer drugs which is mediated by a variety of drug transporters such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp), multidrug resistance associated proteins, and breast cancer resistance protein. Presently there is a line of evidence indicating that deregulation of programmed cell death including apoptosis and autophagy is also an important mechanism for tumour resistance to anticancer drugs. Reversal of chemoresistance is likely via pharmacological and biological approaches. Further studies are warranted to grasp the full picture of how each type of cancer cells develop resistance to anticancer drugs and to identify novel strategies to overcome it. PMID:27097837

  12. Drugs meeting the molecular basis of diabetic kidney disease: bridging from molecular mechanism to personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambers Heerspink, Hiddo J; Oberbauer, Rainer; Perco, Paul; Heinzel, Andreas; Heinze, Georg; Mayer, Gert; Mayer, Bernd

    2015-08-01

    Diabetic kidney disease (DKD) is a complex, multifactorial disease and is associated with a high risk of renal and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Clinical practice guidelines for diabetes recommend essentially identical treatments for all patients without taking into account how the individual responds to the instituted therapy. Yet, individuals vary widely in how they respond to medications and therefore optimal therapy differs between individuals. Understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms of variability in drug response will help tailor optimal therapy. Polymorphisms in genes related to drug pharmacokinetics have been used to explore mechanisms of response variability in DKD, but with limited success. The complex interaction between genetic make-up and environmental factors on the abundance of proteins and metabolites renders pharmacogenomics alone insufficient to fully capture response variability. A complementary approach is to attribute drug response variability to individual variability in underlying molecular mechanisms involved in the progression of disease. The interplay of different processes (e.g. inflammation, fibrosis, angiogenesis, oxidative stress) appears to drive disease progression, but the individual contribution of each process varies. Drugs at the other hand address specific targets and thereby interfere in certain disease-associated processes. At this level, biomarkers may help to gain insight into which specific pathophysiological processes are involved in an individual followed by a rational assessment whether a specific drug's mode of action indeed targets the relevant process at hand. This article describes the conceptual background and data-driven workflow developed by the SysKid consortium aimed at improving characterization of the molecular mechanisms underlying DKD at the interference of the molecular impact of individual drugs in order to tailor optimal therapy to individual patients. PMID:26209732

  13. Molecular and cellular mechanisms of adipogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksander Dmitrievich Egorov

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The main components of metabolic syndrome include insulin resistance, hypertriglyceridemia and arterial hypertension. Obesity is the cause of metabolic syndrome, mainly as a consequence of the endocrine function of adipose tissue. The volume of adipose tissue depends on the size of individual adipocytes and on their number. The number of adipocytes increases as a result of enhanced adipocyte differentiation. The transcriptional cascade that regulates this differentiation has been well studied. The major adipogenic transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma is a ligand-activated nuclear receptor with essential roles in adipogenesis. Its ligands are used to treat metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The present article describes the basic molecular and cellular mechanisms of adipogenesis and discusses the impact of insulin, glucocorticoids, cyclic adenosine monophosphate-activating agents, nuclear receptors and transcription factors on the process of adipogenesis. New regulatory regions of the genome that are capable of binding multiple transcription factors are described, and the most promising drug targets for the treatment of metabolic syndrome and obesity, including the homeodomain proteins Pbx1 and Prep1, are discussed.

  14. Molecular mechanisms of radiation onco-genesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Induction of cancer is the most important somatic effect of radiation at dose level below 1 Gy (100 rad). Most of the data used to derive risk estimates for low-dose levels are obtained from exposures occurring at dose levels of 0.1 Gy (10 Rad) or above. Benign or malignant tumour induction, is viewed as a probable function of the dose received. This is known as a stochastic effect. When the radiation dose increases the probability of the effect is increased, but there is no effect on the severity. In order to allow that future extrapolation of high-dose epidemiological data may be made with confidence, it is important that a much more detailed picture be gained of the cellular and molecular processes that mediate oncogenic changes in mammalian cells. Many studies have been done in understanding the mechanisms of radiation onco-genesis Today we are just on the frontier of what is a fast-moving and complex research field. (author)

  15. Cellular and molecular mechanisms in liver fibrogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novo, Erica; Cannito, Stefania; Paternostro, Claudia; Bocca, Claudia; Miglietta, Antonella; Parola, Maurizio

    2014-04-15

    Liver fibrogenesis is a dynamic and highly integrated molecular, tissue and cellular process, potentially reversible, that drives the progression of chronic liver diseases (CLD) towards liver cirrhosis and hepatic failure. Hepatic myofibroblasts (MFs), the pro-fibrogenic effector cells, originate mainly from activation of hepatic stellate cells and portal fibroblasts being characterized by a proliferative and survival attitude. MFs also contract in response to vasoactive agents, sustain angiogenesis and recruit and modulate activity of cells of innate or adaptive immunity. Chronic activation of wound healing and oxidative stress as well as derangement of epithelial-mesenchymal interactions are "major" pro-fibrogenic mechanisms, whatever the etiology. However, literature has outlined a complex network of pro-fibrogenic factors and mediators proposed to modulate CLD progression, with some of them being at present highly debated in the field, including the role of epithelial to mesenchymal transition and Hedgehog signaling pathways. Hypoxia and angiogenesis as well as inflammasomes are recently emerged as ubiquitous pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrogenic determinants whereas adipokines are mostly involved in CLD related to metabolic disturbances (metabolic syndrome and/or obesity and type 2 diabetes). Finally, autophagy as well as natural killer and natural killer-T cells have been recently proposed to significantly affect fibrogenic CLD progression. PMID:24631571

  16. Molecular and genetic mechanisms of environmental mutagens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This program is primarily concerned with elucidation of the nature of DNA lesions produced by environmental and energy related mutagens, their mechanisms of action, and their repair. The main focus is on actions of chemical mutagens and electromagnetic radiations. Synergistic interactions between mutagens and the mutational processes that lead to synergism are being investigated. Mutagens are chosen for study on the basis of their potential for analysis of mutation (as genetic probes), for development of procedures for reducing mutational damage, for their potential importance to risk assessment, and for development of improved mutagen testing systems. Bacterial cells are used because of the rapidity and clarity of scientific results that can be obtained, the detailed genetic maps, and the many well-defined mutand strains available. The conventional tools of microbial and molecular genetics are used, along with intercomparison of genetically related strains. Advantage is taken of tcollective dose commitment will result in more attention being paid to potential releases of radionuclides at relatively short times after disposal

  17. Mechanics at the molecular scale: Insight into the physical mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neucheva, Olga A.; Temirov, Ruslan; Tautz, Stefan [Institut fuer Bio- und Nanosysteme (IBN-3) and JARA - Fundamental of Future Information Technology, Forschungszentrum Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    The manipulation of atoms and molecules is one of the problems under investigation in a surface science. The first successful attempt to transfer an atom from a surface with use of a scanning tunneling microscope has been realized by Eigler et al. An interest to understand the underlying physical mechanism from both experimental and theoretical points of view has led to investigations of many systems which can be used as atomic and molecular switches. In our work the behaviour of a single PTCDA molecule on Ag(111) has been investigated with a LT-STM. Two level fluctuations of the conductance of the junction have been observed within a narrow range of the tip heights and bias voltages. The bistability is related to reversible switching of one of the carboxylic oxygen atoms between the surface and the STM-tip. The current passing through the junction induces vibrations of the molecule leading to weakening and breaking of a chemical bond with the surface and establishing a new one with the tip and vice versa. The switching frequency strongly depends on the bias voltages and tip heights, following a non-linear dependence on the current.

  18. Molecular mechanisms of LRRK2 regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Philip Jeffrey

    Non-synonymous mutations in LRRK2 are the most common known cause of familial and sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD). The dominant inheritance of these mutations in familial PD suggests a gain-of-function mechanism. Increased kinase activity observed in the most common PD associated LRRK2 mutation G2019S suggests that kinase activity is central to disease. However, not all mutations associated with disease are reported to alter kinase activity and controversy exists in the literature about the effects of mutations appearing in the GTPase domain on kinase activity. The studies conducted as a part of this work aim to characterize the mechanisms that regulate LRRK2 kinase activity and the effects of mutations on enzymatic activity of LRRK2 protein. LRRK2 is a large protein with multiple predicted functional domains including two enzymatic domains in the same protein, the small ras-like GTPase domain and a serine-threonine protein kinase domain. Previous studies indicate that LRRK2 kinase is dependent on a functional GTPase domain and binding to GTP is required for kinase activity. Recent work detailed in this dissertation indicates a complex and reciprocal relationship between kinase and GTPase domains. LRRK2 kinase activity is dependent on adapting a homo-dimer that is augmented by PD mutations that increase LRRK2 kinase activity. Activated LRRK2 autophosphorylates the GTPase and c-terminus of Ras (COR) domains robustly. Phosphorylation of these domains is required for normal activity, as preventing autophosphorylation of these sites drastically lowers kinase activity and GTP binding while phosphorylation maintains baseline activity while still reducing GTP binding. Furthermore, we have developed antibodies specific to autophosphorylation residues that track with LRRK2 kinase activity in vitro. While no measurable activity was detected from treated LRRK2 in vivo, LRRK2 protein purified from brain tissue treated with inflammatory stimuli such as LPS, which increases

  19. Physiology and molecular mechanism of glucocorticoid action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Nagalski

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Endogenous glucocorticoids (GCs are secreted into the systemic circulation from the adrenal cortex. This release is under the control of the circadian clock and can be enhanced at any time in response to a stressor. The levels of circulating GC are regulated systemically by the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis and locally by access to target cells and pre-receptor metabolism by 11β-hydroxysteroids dehydrogenase enzymes. GCs mediate their genomic action by binding to two different ligand-inducible transcription factors: high-affinity mineralocorticoid receptor (MR and 10-fold lower affinity glucocorticoid receptors (GRs. Responses to GCs vary among individuals, cells, and tissues. The diversity and specificity in the steroid hormone’s response in the cell is controlled at different levels, including receptor translocation, interaction with specific transcription factors and coregulators, and the regulation of receptor protein levels by microRNA. Moreover, multiple GR isoforms are generated from one single GR gene by alternative splicing and alternative translation initiation. These isoforms all have unique tissue distribution patterns and transcriptional regulatory profiles. Furthermore, each is subjected to various post-translational modifications that affect receptor function. Deciphering the molecular mechanisms of GC action is further complicated by the realization that GCs can induce rapid, non-genomic effects within the cytoplasm. A tight regulation of GC secretion and their cell-specific activity is essential for proper organism function. This is particularly seen under conditions of GC deficiency or excess, as in Addison’s disease and Cushing’s syndrome, respectively.

  20. Molecular phenotypes associated with anomalous stamen development in Alternanthera philoxeroides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu eZhu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Alternanthera philoxeroides is a perennial amphibious weed native to South America but has now spread to diverse parts of the world. A. philoxeroides reproduces both sexually and asexually in its native range, but propagates solely through vegetative means in its introduced range. Traits associated with sexual reproduction become degraded for sexual dysfunction, with flowers possessing either pistillate stamens or male-sterile anthers. Degradations of sexual characters for loss of sexuality commonly take place in clonal plants. The underlying molecular-genetic processes remain largely unknown. We compared the gene expression profiles of abnormal stamens with that of normal stamens by RNA-Seq analysis, and identified a large number of differentially expressed genes between abnormal and normal stamens. In accordance with flower morphology, the expression of B-class MADS-box genes (ApAP3, ApTM6 and ApPI was markedly reduced in pistillate stamens. However, most of the genes involved in meiosis were expressed normally in stamens with male-sterile anthers. In addition to verifying the expression patterns of genes previously known to be related to stamen and pollen grain development, we also identified previously unknown molecular phenotypes associated with sexual dysfunction in A. philoxeroides, that is helpful for dissecting the molecular mechanisms underpinning various male-sterile phenotypes and the molecular processes underlying the transition from sexuality to asexuality in clonal plants.

  1. Molecular mechanisms in radiation carcinogenesis: introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular studies of radiation carcinogenesis are discussed in relation to theories for extrapolating from cellular and animal models to man. Skin cancer is emphasized because of sunlight-induced photochemical damage to DNA. It is emphasized that cellular and animal models are needed as well as molecular theories for quantitative evaluation of hazardous environmental agents. (U.S.)

  2. MATCH: An Atom- Typing Toolset for Molecular Mechanics Force Fields

    OpenAIRE

    Yesselman, Joseph D.; Price, Daniel J.; Knight, Jennifer L.; Brooks, Charles L.

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a toolset of program libraries collectively titled MATCH (Multipurpose Atom-Typer for CHARMM) for the automated assignment of atom types and force field parameters for molecular mechanics simulation of organic molecules. The toolset includes utilities for the conversion from multiple chemical structure file formats into a molecular graph. A general chemical pattern-matching engine using this graph has been implemented whereby assignment of molecular mechanics atom types, charges ...

  3. Instant Update: Considering the Molecular Mechanisms of Mutation & Natural Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubler, Tina; Adams, Patti; Scammell, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    The molecular basis of evolution is an important concept to understand but one that students and teachers often find challenging. This article provides training and guidance for teachers on how to present molecular evolution concepts so that students will associate molecular changes with the evolution of form and function in organisms. Included…

  4. Molecular mechanism of fluoroquinolones resistance in Mycoplasma hominis clinical isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Dong-Ya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the molecular mechanism of fluoroquinolones resistance in Mycoplasma hominis (MH clinical strains isolated from urogenital specimens. 15 MH clinical isolates with different phenotypes of resistance to fluoroquinolones antibiotics were screened for mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDRs of DNA gyrase (gyrA and gyrB and topoisomerase IV (parC and parE in comparison with the reference strain PG21, which is susceptible to fluoroquinolones antibiotics. 15 MH isolates with three kinds of quinolone resistance phenotypes were obtained. Thirteen out of these quinolone-resistant isolates were found to carry nucleotide substitutions in either gyrA or parC. There were no alterations in gyrB and no mutations were found in the isolates with a phenotype of resistance to Ofloxacin (OFX, intermediate resistant to Levofloxacin (LVX and Sparfloxacin (SFX, and those susceptible to all three tested antibiotics. The molecular mechanism of fluoroquinolone resistance in clinical isolates of MH was reported in this study. The single amino acid mutation in ParC of MH may relate to the resistance to OFX and LVX and the high-level resistance to fluoroquinolones for MH is likely associated with mutations in both DNA gyrase and the ParC subunit of topoisomerase IV.

  5. Quantum mechanics of molecular rate processes

    CERN Document Server

    Levine, Raphael D

    1999-01-01

    This survey of applications of the theory of collisions and rate processes to molecular problems explores collisions of molecules with internal structure, generalized Ehrenfest theorem, theory of reactive collisions, and role of symmetry. It also reviews partitioning technique, equivalent potentials and quasibound states, theory of direct reactions, more. 1969 edition.

  6. Molecular mechanisms in deformation of cross-linked hydrogel nanocomposite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathesan, Santhosh; Rath, Amrita; Ghosh, Pijush

    2016-02-01

    The self-folding behavior in response to external stimuli observed in hydrogels is potentially used in biomedical applications. However, the use of hydrogels is limited because of its reduced mechanical properties. These properties are enhanced when the hydrogels are cross-linked and reinforced with nanoparticles. In this work, molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is applied to perform uniaxial tension and pull out tests to understand the mechanism contributing towards the enhanced mechanical properties. Also, nanomechanical characterization is performed using quasi static nanoindentation experiments to determine the Young's modulus of hydrogels in the presence of nanoparticles. The stress-strain responses for chitosan (CS), chitosan reinforced with hydroxyapatite (HAP) and cross-linked chitosan are obtained from uniaxial tension test. It is observed that the Young's modulus and maximum stress increase as the HAP content increases and also with cross-linking process. Load displacement plot from pullout test is compared for uncross-linked and cross-linked chitosan chains on hydroxyapatite surface. MD simulation reveals that the variation in the dihedral conformation of chitosan chains and the evolution of internal structural variables are associated with mechanical properties. Additional results reveal that the formation of hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions is responsible for the above variations in different systems. PMID:26652360

  7. Characterization of molecular mechanisms of in vivo UVR induced cataract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galichanin, Konstantin; Talebizadeh, Nooshin; Söderberg, Per

    2012-01-01

    Cataract is the leading cause of blindness in the world (1). The World Health Organization defines cataract as a clouding of the lens of the eye which impedes the transfer of light. Cataract is a multi-factorial disease associated with diabetes, smoking, ultraviolet radiation (UVR), alcohol, ionizing radiation, steroids and hypertension. There is strong experimental (2-4) and epidemiological evidence (5,6) that UVR causes cataract. We developed an animal model for UVR B induced cataract in both anesthetized (7) and non-anesthetized animals (8). The only cure for cataract is surgery but this treatment is not accessible to all. It has been estimated that a delay of onset of cataract for 10 years could reduce the need for cataract surgery by 50% (9). To delay the incidence of cataract, it is needed to understand the mechanisms of cataract formation and find effective prevention strategies. Among the mechanisms for cataract development, apoptosis plays a crucial role in initiation of cataract in humans and animals (10). Our focus has recently been apoptosis in the lens as the mechanism for cataract development (8,11,12). It is anticipated that a better understanding of the effect of UVR on the apoptosis pathway will provide possibilities for discovery of new pharmaceuticals to prevent cataract. In this article, we describe how cataract can be experimentally induced by in vivo exposure to UVR-B. Further RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry are presented as tools to study molecular mechanisms of UVR-B induced cataract. PMID:23222480

  8. TOPICAL REVIEW: Polarization effects in molecular mechanical force fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieplak, Piotr; Dupradeau, François-Yves; Duan, Yong; Wang, Junmei

    2009-08-01

    The focus here is on incorporating electronic polarization into classical molecular mechanical force fields used for macromolecular simulations. First, we briefly examine currently used molecular mechanical force fields and the current status of intermolecular forces as viewed by quantum mechanical approaches. Next, we demonstrate how some components of quantum mechanical energy are effectively incorporated into classical molecular mechanical force fields. Finally, we assess the modeling methods of one such energy component—polarization energy—and present an overview of polarizable force fields and their current applications. Incorporating polarization effects into current force fields paves the way to developing potentially more accurate, though more complex, parameterizations that can be used for more realistic molecular simulations.

  9. From molecular signatures to predictive biomarkers: Modeling disease pathophysiology and drug mechanism of action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BerndMayer

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Omics profiling significantly expanded the molecular landscape describing clinical phenotypes. Association analysis resulted in first diagnostic and prognostic biomarker signatures entering clinical utility. However, utilizing Omics for deepening our understanding of disease pathophysiology, and further including specific interference with drug mechanism of action on a molecular process level still sees limited added value in the clinical setting. We exemplify a computational workflow for expanding from statistics-based association analysis towards deriving molecular pathway and process models for characterizing phenotypes and drug mechanism of action. Interference analysis on the molecular model level allows identification of predictive biomarker candidates for testing drug response. We discuss this strategy on diabetic nephropathy, a complex clinical phenotype triggered by diabetes and presenting with renal as well as cardiovascular endpoints. A molecular pathway map indicates involvement of multiple molecular mechanisms, and selected biomarker candidates reported as associated with disease progression are identified for specific molecular processes. Selective interference of drug mechanism of action and disease-associated processes is identified for drug classes in clinical use, in turn providing precision medicine hypotheses utilizing predictive biomarkers.

  10. Hyperpolarizabilities of extended molecular mechanical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harczuk, Ignat; Vahtras, Olav; Ågren, Hans

    2016-03-16

    We propose and evaluate algorithms for the calculation of molecular polarizabilities and hyperpolarizabilities of extended chemical systems. These algorithms are generalizations of the Silberstein-Applequist procedure involving interacting induced classical dipoles through the localized polarizabilities and hyperpolarizabilities. The models are evaluated in terms of interacting molecular units as well as interacting atomic units that result from the atomic decomposition scheme known as the LoProp transformation. We introduce a generalized LoProp scheme which applies to hyperpolarizabilities as well as to polarizabilities. The accuracy of the second-order Applequist method is tested for the first hyperpolarizability for the TIP3P water model using both Hartree-Fock and density functional theory evaluated with different basis sets. Possible applications and ramifications of the scheme are discussed. PMID:26954519

  11. Cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying muscular dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Rahimov, Fedik; Kunkel, Louis M

    2013-01-01

    The muscular dystrophies are a group of heterogeneous genetic diseases characterized by progressive degeneration and weakness of skeletal muscle. Since the discovery of the first muscular dystrophy gene encoding dystrophin, a large number of genes have been identified that are involved in various muscle-wasting and neuromuscular disorders. Human genetic studies complemented by animal model systems have substantially contributed to our understanding of the molecular pathomechanisms underlying ...

  12. Mechanisms of Spin-Mixing Instabilities in Antiferromagnetic Molecular Wheels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soncini, Alessandro; Chibotaru, Liviu F.

    2007-08-01

    The microscopic theory of field-induced spin-mixing instabilities in antiferromagnetic molecular wheels CsFe8 is proposed. The basic features of magnetic torque measurements [O. Waldmann , Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 027206 (2006)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.96.027206] are well explained by the interplay of three basic ingredients: the spin-mixing vibronic interaction with field-dependent vibronic constants, cooperative elastic interactions, and spin-mixing interactions independent from vibrations. The main contribution to spin mixing comes from second-order zero-field splitting mechanisms. At variance with previous interpretations, we find that the observed anomalies are not associated with a phase transition.

  13. Molecular mechanisms of water transport in the eye

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamann, Steffen; Hamann, Steffen Ellitsgaard

    2002-01-01

    general model for water transport in ocular epithelia. Some water-transporting membranes contain aquaporins, others do not. The ultrastructure is also variable among the cell layers and cannot be fitted into a general model. On the other hand, the direction of cotransport in symporters complies with the......The four major sites for ocular water transport, the corneal epithelium and endothelium, the ciliary epithelium, and the retinal pigment epithelium, are reviewed. The cornea has an inherent tendency to swell, which is counteracted by its two surface cell layers, the corneal epithelium and...... endothelium. The bilayered ciliary epithelium secretes the aqueous humor into the posterior chamber, and the retinal pigment epithelium transports water from the retinal to the choroidal site. For each epithelium, ion transport mechanisms are associated with fluid transport, but the exact molecular coupling...

  14. Symposium on molecular and cellular mechanisms of mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These proceedings contain abstracts only of the 21 papers presented at the Sympsoium. The papers dealt with molecular mechanisms of mutagenesis and cellular responses to chemical and physical mutagenic agents

  15. Associative Mechanisms and Drug-Related Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Weiss, Stanley J.; Reilly, Mark P.; Kearns, David N.

    2005-01-01

    This special issue of the International Journal of Comparative Psychology is based on presentations delivered at the Focus Session of the 2004 Winter Conference on Animal Learning and Behavior (WCALB) held in Winter Park, Colorado. The Associative Mechanisms and Drug-Related Behavior Focus Session began with an invited address by Shepard Siegel titled The Ghost in the Addict: Drug Anticipation and Drug Addiction. He described an impressive body of research showing that conditioning mechanisms...

  16. Molecular mechanisms of epithelial host defense in the airways

    OpenAIRE

    Vos, Joost Bastiaan

    2007-01-01

    Airway epithelial cells are indispensable for the host defense system in the lungs. Various strategies by which epithelial cells protect the lungs against inhaled pathogens have been described. In spite of that, the molecular mechanisms by which epithelial cells initiate and control the host defense response have not been explored systematically. In this thesis, the molecular mechanisms underlying the initiation and regulation of the early epithelial host defense response in the airways were ...

  17. Epigenetic regulatory mechanisms associated with infertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minocherhomji, Sheroy; Madon, Prochi F; Parikh, Firuza R

    2010-01-01

    Infertility is a complex human condition and is known to be caused by numerous factors including genetic alterations and abnormalities. Increasing evidence from studies has associated perturbed epigenetic mechanisms with spermatogenesis and infertility. However, there has been no consensus...... on whether one or a collective of these altered states is responsible for the onset of infertility. Epigenetic alterations involve changes in factors that regulate gene expression without altering the physical sequence of DNA. Understanding these altered epigenetic states at the genomic level along...... with the phenotype could further determine what possible mechanisms are involved. This paper reviews certain mechanisms of epigenetic regulation with particular emphasis on their possible role in infertility....

  18. Molecular and cellular mechanisms of cadmium carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadmium is a heavy metal, which is widely used in industry, affecting human health through occupational and environmental exposure. In mammals, it exerts multiple toxic effects and has been classified as a human carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. Cadmium affects cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis and other cellular activities. Cd2+ does not catalyze Fenton-type reactions because it does not accept or donate electrons under physiological conditions, and it is only weakly genotoxic. Hence, indirect mechanisms are implicated in the carcinogenicity of cadmium. In this review multiple mechanisms are discussed, such as modulation of gene expression and signal transduction, interference with enzymes of the cellular antioxidant system and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), inhibition of DNA repair and DNA methylation, role in apoptosis and disruption of E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion. Cadmium affects both gene transcription and translation. The major mechanisms of gene induction by cadmium known so far are modulation of cellular signal transduction pathways by enhancement of protein phosphorylation and activation of transcription and translation factors. Cadmium interferes with antioxidant defense mechanisms and stimulates the production of reactive oxygen species, which may act as signaling molecules in the induction of gene expression and apoptosis. The inhibition of DNA repair processes by cadmium represents a mechanism by which cadmium enhances the genotoxicity of other agents and may contribute to the tumor initiation by this metal. The disruption of E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion by cadmium probably further stimulates the development of tumors. It becomes clear that there exist multiple mechanisms which contribute to the carcinogenicity of cadmium, although the relative weights of these contributions are difficult to estimate

  19. Molecular mechanisms of carcinogenesis by vinyl chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogliotti, Eugenia

    2006-01-01

    In 1974 vinyl chloride (VC), a gas used in the plastics industry, was shown to be a human carcinogen, inducing a very rare type of tumor, angiosarcoma of the liver. The same type of tumor was induced in rodents exposed to VC thus providing an excellent model for mechanistic studies. Here, we review the numerous studies on the mechanism of action of VC with particular emphasis on the DNA products induced by this strong alkylating agent. In particular, the genotoxicity, repair mechanisms, in vivo formation and tumor mutation spectra by etheno-adducts will be analysed and possible approaches for future research suggested. PMID:17033136

  20. Molecular mechanisms of alternative estrogen receptor signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Björnström, Linda

    2003-01-01

    Estrogen is a key regulator of growth, differentiation and function in a broad range of target tissues, including the male and female reproductive tracts, mammary gland, bone, brain and the cardiovascular system. The biological effects of estrogen are mediated through estrogen receptor a (ERalpha) and estrogen receptor beta (ERbeta), which belong to a large superfamily of nuclear receptors that act as ligand-activated transcription factors. The classical mechanism of ER acti...

  1. Molecular Mechanisms of Green Tea Polyphenols

    OpenAIRE

    Dou, Q. Ping

    2009-01-01

    Tea, next to water, is the most popular beverage in the world. It has been suggested that tea consumption has the cancer-preventive effects. Epidemiological studies have indicated decreased cancer occurrence in people who regularly drink green tea. Research has also discovered numerous mechanisms of action to explain the biological effects of tea. The most abundant and popular compound studied in tea research is (−)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate or (−)-EGCG, which is a powerful antioxidant and c...

  2. Molecular Mechanisms of Sleep and Mood

    OpenAIRE

    Lagus, Markus

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Sleep disturbances and mood alterations are highly interrelated. The majority of patients suffering from depression report a reduced sleep quality. Inversely, people with sleep complaints are at elevated risk to develop depression. The complex regulation of these phenomena involves several brain areas and mechanisms. The susceptibility to change in this system is influenced by several factors, such as age and stressful lifestyle that are considered in this study. HYPOTHESIS The hyp...

  3. Molecular Mechanisms of Circadian Regulation During Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanello, Susana; Boyle, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Disruption of the regular environmental circadian cues in addition to stringent and demanding operational schedules are two main factors that undoubtedly impact sleep patterns and vigilant performance in the astronaut crews during spaceflight. Most research is focused on the behavioral aspects of the risk of circadian desynchronization, characterized by fatigue and health and performance decrement. A common countermeasure for circadian re-entrainment utilizes blue-green light to entrain the circadian clock and mitigate this risk. However, an effective countermeasure targeting the photoreceptor system requires that the basic circadian molecular machinery remains intact during spaceflight. The molecular clock consists of sets of proteins that perform different functions within the clock machinery: circadian oscillators (genes whose expression levels cycle during the day, keep the pass of cellular time and regulate downstream effector genes), the effector or output genes (those which impact the physiology of the tissue or organism), and the input genes (responsible for sensing the environmental cues that allow circadian entrainment). The main environmental cue is light. As opposed to the known photoreceptors (rods and cones), the non-visual light stimulus is received by a subset of the population of retinal ganglion cells called intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGC) that express melanopsin (opsin 4 -Opn4-) as the photoreceptor. We hypothesize that spaceflight may affect ipRGC and melanopsin expression, which may be a contributing cause of circadian disruption during spaceflight. To answer this question, eyes from albino Balb/cJ mice aboard STS-133 were collected for histological analysis and gene expression profiling of the retina at 1 and 7 days after landing. Both vivarium and AEM (animal enclosure module) mice were used as ground controls. Opn4 expression was analyzed by real time RT/qPCR and retinal sections were stained for Opn4

  4. J Wave Syndromes: Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Antzelevitch, Charles

    2013-01-01

    An early repolarization (ER) pattern in the ECG, consisting of J point elevation, distinct J wave with or without ST segment elevation or slurring of the terminal part of the QRS, was long considered a benign electrocardiographic manifestation. Experimental studies a dozen years ago suggested that an ER is not always benign, but may be associated with malignant arrhythmias. Validation of this hypothesis derives from recent case-control and population-based studies showing that an ER pattern i...

  5. Preeclampsia: from epidemiological observations to molecular mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    P. López-Jaramillo; Casas, J. P.; Serrano, N

    2001-01-01

    Preeclampsia is the main cause of maternal mortality and is associated with a five-fold increase in perinatal mortality in developing countries. In spite of this, the etiology of preeclampsia is unknown. The present article analyzes the contradictory results of the use of calcium supplementation in the prevention of preeclampsia, and tries to give an explanation of these results. The proposal of an integrative model to explain the clinical manifestations of preeclampsia is discussed. In this ...

  6. Molecular Mechanisms of Action of BPA

    OpenAIRE

    Acconcia, Filippo; Pallottini, Valentina; Marino, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) exposure has been associated with serious endocrine-disrupting effects in humans and wildlife. Toxicological and epidemiological studies evidenced that BPA increases body mass index and disrupts normal cardiovascular physiology by interfering with endogenous hormones in rodents, nonhuman primates, and cell culture test systems. The BPA concentration derived from these experiments were used by government regulatory agencies to determine the safe exposure levels of BPA in huma...

  7. Teratogenic mechanisms associated with prenatal medication exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gelder, Marleen M H J; van Rooij, Iris A L M; de Jong-van den Berg, Lolkje T W; Roeleveld, Nel

    2014-01-01

    Birth defects may originate through multiple mechanisms and may be caused by a variety of possible exposures, including medications in early pregnancy. In this review, we describe six principal teratogenic mechanisms suspected to be associated with medication use: folate antagonism, neural crest cell disruption, endocrine disruption, oxidative stress, vascular disruption, and specific receptor- or enzyme-mediated teratogenesis. Knowledge about these mechanisms, for some of which evidence is mainly derived from animal models, may not only be relevant for etiologic and post-marketing research, but may also have implications for prescribing behavior for women of reproductive age. Since combinations of seemingly unrelated medications may have effects through similar teratogenic mechanisms, the risk of birth defects may be strongly increased in multi-therapy. PMID:24698184

  8. Plant regeneration: cellular origins and molecular mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeuchi, Momoko; Ogawa, Yoichi; Iwase, Akira; Sugimoto, Keiko

    2016-05-01

    Compared with animals, plants generally possess a high degree of developmental plasticity and display various types of tissue or organ regeneration. This regenerative capacity can be enhanced by exogenously supplied plant hormones in vitro, wherein the balance between auxin and cytokinin determines the developmental fate of regenerating organs. Accumulating evidence suggests that some forms of plant regeneration involve reprogramming of differentiated somatic cells, whereas others are induced through the activation of relatively undifferentiated cells in somatic tissues. We summarize the current understanding of how plants control various types of regeneration and discuss how developmental and environmental constraints influence these regulatory mechanisms. PMID:27143753

  9. Molecular Mechanisms of Circadian Regulation During Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanello, S. B.; Boyle, R.

    2012-01-01

    The physiology of both vertebrates and invertebrates follows internal rhythms coordinated in phase with the 24-hour daily light cycle. This circadian clock is governed by a central pacemaker, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) in the brain. However, peripheral circadian clocks or oscillators have been identified in most tissues. How the central and peripheral oscillators are synchronized is still being elucidated. Light is the main environmental cue that entrains the circadian clock. Under the absence of a light stimulus, the clock continues its oscillation in a free-running condition. In general, three functional compartments of the circadian clock are defined. The vertebrate retina contains endogenous clocks that control many aspects of retinal physiology, including retinal sensitivity to light, neurohormone synthesis (melatonin and dopamine), rod disk shedding, signalling pathways and gene expression. Neurons with putative local circadian rhythm generation are found among all the major neuron populations in the mammalian retina. In the mouse, clock genes and function are more localized to the inner retinal and ganglion cell layers. The photoreceptor, however, secrete melatonin which may still serve a an important circadian signal. The reception and transmission of the non-visual photic stimulus resides in a small subpopulation (1-3%) or retinal ganglion cells (RGC) that express the pigment melanopsin (Opn4) and are called intrisically photoreceptive RGC (ipRGC). Melanopsin peak absorption is at 420 nm and all the axons of the ipRGC reach the SCN. A common countermeasure for circadian re-entrainment utilizes blue-green light to entrain the circadian clock and mitigate the risk of fatigue and health and performance decrement due to circadian rhythm disruption. However, an effective countermeasure targeting the photoreceptor system requires that the basic circadian molecular machinery remains intact during spaceflight. We hypothesize that spaceflight may affect ip

  10. Photodynamic therapy: Biophysical mechanisms and molecular responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Soumya

    In photodynamic therapy (PDT), photochemical reactions induced by optical activation of sensitizer molecules cause destruction of the target tissue. In this thesis we present results of several related studies, which investigated the influence of photophysical properties and photobleaching mechanisms of sensitizers and oxygen-dependent tissue optical properties on PDT treatment efficacy. The bleaching mechanism of the sensitizer meso-tetra hydroxyphenyl chlorin (mTHPC) is examined indirectly using measurements of photochemical oxygen consumption during PDT irradiation of multicell tumor spheroids. Analysis of the results with a theoretical model of oxygen diffusion that incorporates the effects of sensitizer photobleaching shows that mTHPC is degraded via a singlet-oxygen (1O2)-mediated bleaching process. The analysis allows us to extract photophysical parameters of mTHPC which are used to account for its enhanced clinical photodynamic potency in comparison to that of Photofrin. Evaluation of the spatially-resolved fluorescence in confocal optical sections of intact spheroids during PDT irradiation allows for the direct experimental verification of mTHPC's 1O2-mediated bleaching mechanism. The technique is also used to investigate the complex bleaching kinetics of Photofrin. The results allow us to successfully reconcile apparently contradictory experimental observations and to confirm the predictions of a new theoretical model in which both 1O2 and excited triplet sensitizer molecules are allowed to contribute to photobleaching. Based on studies performed in tissue-simulating erythrocyte phantoms and in a murine tumor model in vivo, we present clinically relevant results which indicate that a shift toward increased hemoglobin-oxygen saturation due to improved tissue oxygenation reduces PDT treatment beam attenuation and may allow for more effective treatment of deeper lesions. Finally, we investigate the induction of the stress protein, heat shock protein 70 (HSP

  11. Molecular pathogenefic mechanism of maternally inherited deafness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUAN Min-Xin

    2003-01-01

    Mutations in the mitochondrial DNA(mtDNA) have been shown to be one of the important causes of deafness.In particular, mutations in mitochondrial DNA(mtDNA)have been found to be associated with both syndromic and non-syndromic forms of sensorineural hearing loss.The deafness-linked mutations often occur in the mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene and the tRNA genes.The mutations in the 12S rRNA gene account for a significant number of cases of aminoglycoside ototoxicity.The other hot spot for mutations associated with hearing impairment is the tRNA Ser(UCN)gene,as five deafness-linked mutations have been identified.Non-syndromic deafness-linked mtDNA mutations are often homoplasmic or at high levels of heteroplasm,indicating a high threshold for pathogenicity.Phenotypic expression of these mtDNA mutations require the contribution of other factors,such as nuclear modifier gene(s),environmental factor(s) and mitochondrial haplotype(s).

  12. Molecular mechanisms of Tetranychus urticae chemical adaptation in hop fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piraneo, Tara G; Bull, Jon; Morales, Mariany A; Lavine, Laura C; Walsh, Douglas B; Zhu, Fang

    2015-01-01

    The two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae Koch is a major pest that feeds on >1,100 plant species. Many perennial crops including hop (Humulus lupulus) are routinely plagued by T. urticae infestations. Hop is a specialty crop in Pacific Northwest states, where 99% of all U.S. hops are produced. To suppress T. urticae, growers often apply various acaricides. Unfortunately T. urticae has been documented to quickly develop resistance to these acaricides which directly cause control failures. Here, we investigated resistance ratios and distribution of multiple resistance-associated mutations in field collected T. urticae samples compared with a susceptible population. Our research revealed that a mutation in the cytochrome b gene (G126S) in 35% tested T. urticae populations and a mutation in the voltage-gated sodium channel gene (F1538I) in 66.7% populations may contribute resistance to bifenazate and bifenthrin, respectively. No mutations were detected in Glutamate-gated chloride channel subunits tested, suggesting target site insensitivity may not be important in our hop T. urticae resistance to abamectin. However, P450-mediated detoxification was observed and is a putative mechanism for abamectin resistance. Molecular mechanisms of T. urticae chemical adaptation in hopyards is imperative new information that will help growers develop effective and sustainable management strategies. PMID:26621458

  13. Understanding molecular mechanism of higher plant plasticity under abiotic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Hong-Bo; Guo, Qing-Jie; Chu, Li-Ye; Zhao, Xi-Ning; Su, Zhong-Liang; Hu, Ya-Chen; Cheng, Jiang-Feng

    2007-01-15

    Higher plants play the most important role in keeping a stable environment on the earth, which regulate global circumstances in many ways in terms of different levels (molecular, individual, community, and so on), but the nature of the mechanism is gene expression and control temporally and spatially at the molecular level. In persistently changing environment, there are many adverse stress conditions such as cold, drought, salinity and UV-B (280-320 mm), which influence plant growth and crop production greatly. Plants differ from animals in many aspects, but the important may be that plants are more easily influenced by environment than animals. Plants have a series of fine mechanisms for responding to environmental changes, which has been established during their long-period evolution and artificial domestication. These mechanisms are involved in many aspects of anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, genetics, development, evolution and molecular biology, in which the adaptive machinery related to molecular biology is the most important. The elucidation of it will extremely and purposefully promote the sustainable utilization of plant resources and make the best use of its current potential under different scales. This molecular mechanism at least include environmental signal recognition (input), signal transduction (many cascade biochemical reactions are involved in this process), signal output, signal responses and phenotype realization, which is a multi-dimensional network system and contain many levels of gene expression and regulation. We will focus on the molecular adaptive machinery of higher plant plasticity under abiotic stresses. PMID:16914294

  14. Molecular imaging in neuroendocrine tumors : Molecular uptake mechanisms and clinical results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopmans, Klaas P.; Neels, Oliver N.; Kema, Ido P.; Elsinga, Philip H.; Links, Thera P.; de Vries, Elisabeth G. E.; Jager, Pieter L.

    2009-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors can originate almost everywhere in the body and consist of a great variety of subtypes. This paper focuses on molecular imaging methods using nuclear medicine techniques in neuroendocrine tumors, coupling molecular uptake mechanisms of radiotracers with clinical results. A non-

  15. Research on the molecular scale material removal mechanism in chemical mechanical polishing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG YongGuang; ZHAO YongWu

    2008-01-01

    This paper investigates a novel molecular scale material removal mechanism in chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) by incorporating the order-of-magnitude calculations,particle adhesion force,defect of wafer,thickness of newly formed oxidizedlayer,and large deformation of pad/particle not discussed by previous analysis.The theoretical analysis and experimental data show that the indentation depth,scratching depth and polishing surface roughness are on the order of molecular scale or less.There.fore,this novel mechanism has gained the support from wide order-of- magnitude calculations and experimental data.In addition,with the decrease in the particle size,the molecular scale removal mechanism is plausibly one of the most promising removal mechanisms to clarify the CMP polishing process.The results are useful to substantiating the molecular-scale mechanism of the CMP material removal in addition to its underlying theoretical foundation.

  16. Molecular Mechanisms of Cell-cell Recognition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jia-Huai

    2004-01-01

    Cell-cell recognition is the key for multicellular organisms to survive. This recognition critically depends on protein-protein interactions from opposing cell surfaces. Recent structural investigations reveal unique features of these cell surface receptors and how they interact. These interactions are specific, but usually relatively weak, with more hydrophilic forces involved in binding. The receptors appear to have specialized ways to present their key interacting elements for ligand-binding from the cell surface. Cell-cell contacts are multivalent. A large group of cell surface molecules are engaged in interactions. Characteristic weak interactions make possible for each individual molecule pair within the group to constantly associate-dissociate-reassociate, such that the cell-cell recognition becomes a dynamic process. The immunological synapse is a good example for immune receptors to be orchestrated in performing immunological function in a collective fashion.

  17. The molecular mechanisms between metabolic syndrome and breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi; Wen, Ya-Yuan; Li, Zhi-Rong; Luo, Dong-Lin; Zhang, Xiao-Hua

    2016-03-18

    Metabolic syndrome, which is extremely common in developed and some developing countries, is a clustering of at least three of five of the following medical conditions: abdominal obesity, elevated blood pressure, elevated fasting plasma glucose, high serum triglycerides, and low high-density lipoprotein levels. It has been proved that there is a strong association between metabolic syndrome and breast cancer. Metabolic syndrome could increase the risk of breast cancer and influence the prognosis of the breast cancer patients. Some characteristic of metabolic syndrome such as obesity and lack of physical exercise are all risk factors for developing breast cancer. The metabolic syndrome mainly include obesity, type 2 diabetes, hypercholesterolemia and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and each of them impacts the risk of breast cancer and the prognosis of the breast cancer patients in different ways. In this Review, we focus on recently uncovered aspects of the immunological and molecular mechanisms that are responsible for the development of this highly prevalent and serious disease. These studies bring new insight into the complex associations between metabolic syndrome and breast cancer and have led to the development of novel therapeutic strategies that might enable a personalized approach in the management of this disease. PMID:26891869

  18. Molecular mechanisms of asymmetric RAF dimer activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jambrina, Pablo G; Bohuszewicz, Olga; Buchete, Nicolae-Viorel; Kolch, Walter; Rosta, Edina

    2014-08-01

    Protein phosphorylation is one of the most common post-translational modifications in cell regulatory mechanisms. Dimerization plays also a crucial role in the kinase activity of many kinases, including RAF, CDK2 (cyclin-dependent kinase 2) and EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor), with heterodimers often being the most active forms. However, the structural and mechanistic details of how phosphorylation affects the activity of homo- and hetero-dimers are largely unknown. Experimentally, synthesizing protein samples with fully specified and homogeneous phosphorylation states remains a challenge for structural biology and biochemical studies. Typically, multiple changes in phosphorylation lead to activation of the same protein, which makes structural determination methods particularly difficult. It is also not well understood how the occurrence of phosphorylation and dimerization processes synergize to affect kinase activities. In the present article, we review available structural data and discuss how MD simulations can be used to model conformational transitions of RAF kinase dimers, in both their phosphorylated and unphosphorylated forms. PMID:25109958

  19. Molecular mechanisms of radioresistance: applications for head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A significant part of head and neck cancers is clinically radioresistant. The mechanisms of acquired or intrinsic radioresistance of head and neck tumors are still unclear. More recently molecular research focused on alterations in cell cycle control and resistance to programmed cell death in tumor cells as possible mechanisms of radioresistance. Some molecular targets of radiosensitivity or radioresistance (e.g. specific oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes) are known in specific tumor cells or tumor model systems. Such key targets for head and neck cancer cells are also emerging in in vitro studies. However, it is unclear so far if the modification of such molecular targets in vivo leads to an increased tumor selective radiosensitivity. Nevertheless, selected molecular targets could be potential novel tools for modifying radiosensitivity through gene therapy in patients with radioresistant head and neck cancers. (orig.)

  20. Molecular mechanisms in progressive idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Mark P; Schwartz, David A

    2013-01-01

    There is clear evidence that environmental exposures and genetic predisposition contribute to the pathogenesis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Cigarette smoking increases the risk of developing IPF several-fold, as do other exposures such as metal-fume and wood-dust exposure. Occupations that increase the risk of IPF are agricultural work, hairdressing, and stone polishing, supporting the role of environmental exposure in disease pathogenesis. Genetic predisposition to IPF is evident from its familial aggregation and the fact that pulmonary fibrosis develops in several rare genetic disorders. Mutations in surfactant proteins lead to pulmonary fibrosis and are associated with endoplasmic reticulum stress in alveolar type II epithelial cells. Mutations in telomerase have been found in several families with IPF, and shortened telomeres are found in sporadic cases of IPF. A common variant in mucin 5B predisposes to both familial and sporadic IPF and is present in the majority of cases, indicating sporadic IPF occurs in those with genetic predisposition. PMID:23020878

  1. Preeclampsia: from epidemiological observations to molecular mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. López-Jaramillo

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Preeclampsia is the main cause of maternal mortality and is associated with a five-fold increase in perinatal mortality in developing countries. In spite of this, the etiology of preeclampsia is unknown. The present article analyzes the contradictory results of the use of calcium supplementation in the prevention of preeclampsia, and tries to give an explanation of these results. The proposal of an integrative model to explain the clinical manifestations of preeclampsia is discussed. In this proposal we suggest that preeclampsia is caused by nutritional, environmental and genetic factors that lead to the creation of an imbalance between the free radicals nitric oxide, superoxide and peroxynitrate in the vascular endothelium. The adequate interpretation of this model would allow us to understand that the best way of preventing preeclampsia is the establishment of an adequate prenatal control system involving adequate antioxidant vitamin and mineral supplementation, adequate diagnosis and early treatment of asymptomatic urinary and vaginal infections. The role of infection in the genesis of preeclampsia needs to be studied in depth because it may involve a fundamental change in the prevention and treatment of preeclampsia.

  2. Mechanical feedback in the molecular ISM of luminous IR galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Loenen, A. F.; Spaans, M.; Baan, W. A.; Meijerink, R

    2008-01-01

    Aims: Molecular emission lines originating in the nuclei of luminous infra-red galaxies are used to determine the physical properties of the nuclear ISM in these systems. Methods: A large observational database of molecular emission lines is compared with model predictions that include heating by UV and X-ray radiation, mechanical heating, and the effects of cosmic rays. Results: The observed line ratios and model predictions imply a separation of the observedsystems into three groups: XDRs, ...

  3. Lactobacilli as multifaceted probiotics with poorly disclosed molecular mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Turpin, Williams; Humblot, Christèle; M. Thomas; Guyot, Jean-Pierre

    2010-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria and more particularly lactobacilli have been used for the production of fermented foods for centuries. Several lactobacilli have been recognized as probiotics due to their wide range of health-promoting effects in humans. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underpinning their probiotic functions. Here we reviewed the main beneficial effects of lactobacilli and discussed, when the information is available, the molecular machinery involved in their probi...

  4. Molecular basis for HLA-DQ associations with IDDM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nepom, G T; Kwok, W W

    1998-08-01

    Autoimmune diabetes is the clinical end point for a sequential cascade of immunologic events that occur in a genetically susceptible individual. Structural and functional analysis of the HLA class II susceptibility genes in IDDM suggests likely molecular mechanisms for several of the key steps in this cascade of autoimmune events. We outline a pathway in which the HLA-DQ genes associated with IDDM bias the immunologic repertoire toward autoimmune specificities, creating an autoimmune-prone individual, followed by amplification and triggering events that promote subsequent immune activation. There are several direct links between genetics and autoimmune disease in this pathway: the developmental maturation of T-cells in a genetically susceptible individual occurs through molecular interactions between the T-cell receptor and the HLA-peptide complex. Selection of T-cells with receptors likely to contribute to autoreactivity may preferentially occur in the context of specific HLA-DQ alleles that are diabetes prone, because of inefficiencies in the peptide-MHC structural interactions of these molecules. Subsequent activation of these T-cells in the context of recognizing islet-associated antigens can trigger a poorly regulated immune response that results in progressive islet destruction. These subsequent diabetes-specific events are also directed by specific HLA genes, most prominently by the binding of specific antigenic peptides by the disease-associated HLA molecules. In this sequential cascade, opportunities for environmental influences and modulation by non-HLA genes are identified that likely act in concert with the predominant genetic susceptibility contributed by the HLA molecules themselves. Clarification of the steps in this pathway extends our understanding of the prevailing role of HLA genes in IDDM pathogenesis and suggests opportunities to intervene at discrete initiating, disease-promoting, or regulatory steps in IDDM development. PMID:9703314

  5. Molecular Theory of the Living Cell Concepts, Molecular Mechanisms, and Biomedical Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Ji, Sungchul

    2012-01-01

    This book presents a comprehensive molecular theory of the living cell based on over thirty concepts, principles and laws imported from thermodynamics, statistical mechanics, quantum mechanics, chemical kinetics, informatics, computer science, linguistics, semiotics, and philosophy. The author formulates physically, chemically and enzymologically realistic molecular mechanisms to account for the basic living processes such as ligand-receptor interactions, protein folding, single-molecule enzymic catalysis, force-generating mechanisms in molecular motors, signal transduction, regulation of the genome-wide RNA metabolism, morphogenesis, the micro-macro coupling in coordination dynamics, the origin of life, and the mechanisms of biological evolution itself. Possible solutions to basic and practical problems facing contemporary biology and biomedical sciences have been suggested, including pharmacotheragnostics and personalized medicine.

  6. Mini-review: Molecular mechanisms of antifouling compounds

    KAUST Repository

    Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2013-04-01

    Various antifouling (AF) coatings have been developed to protect submerged surfaces by deterring the settlement of the colonizing stages of fouling organisms. A review of the literature shows that effective AF compounds with specific targets are ones often considered non-toxic. Such compounds act variously on ion channels, quorum sensing systems, neurotransmitters, production/release of adhesive, and specific enzymes that regulate energy production or primary metabolism. In contrast, AF compounds with general targets may or may not act through toxic mechanisms. These compounds affect a variety of biological activities including algal photosynthesis, energy production, stress responses, genotoxic damage, immunosuppressed protein expression, oxidation, neurotransmission, surface chemistry, the formation of biofilms, and adhesive production/release. Among all the targets, adhesive production/release is the most common, possibly due to a more extensive research effort in this area. Overall, the specific molecular targets and the molecular mechanisms of most AF compounds have not been identified. Thus, the information available is insufficient to draw firm conclusions about the types of molecular targets to be used as sensitive biomarkers for future design and screening of compounds with AF potential. In this review, the relevant advantages and disadvantages of the molecular tools available for studying the molecular targets of AF compounds are highlighted briefly and the molecular mechanisms of the AF compounds, which are largely a source of speculation in the literature, are discussed. © 2013 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

  7. Molecular and cellular mechanisms of aldosterone producing adenoma development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheerazed eBoulkroun

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Primary aldosteronism (PA is the most common form of secondary hypertension with an estimated prevalence of ~10% in referred patients. PA occurs as a result of a dysregulation of the normal mechanisms controlling adrenal aldosterone production. It is characterized by hypertension with low plasma renin and elevated aldosterone and often associated with hypokalemia. The two major causes of PA are unilateral aldosterone producing adenoma (APA and bilateral adrenal hyperplasia, accounting together for ~95% of cases. In addition to the well-characterized effect of excess mineralocorticoids on blood pressure, high levels of aldosterone also have cardiovascular, renal and metabolic consequences. Hence, long-term consequences of PA include increased risk of coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction, heart failure and atrial fibrillation. Despite recent progress in the management of patients with PA, critical issues related to diagnosis, subtype differentiation and treatment of non-surgically correctable forms still persist. A better understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms of the disease should lead to the identification of more reliable diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers for a more sensitive and specific screening and new therapeutic options. In this review we will summarize our current knowledge on the molecular and cellular mechanisms of APA development. On one hand, we will discuss how various animal models have improved our understanding of the pathophysiology of excess aldosterone production. On the other hand, we will summarize the major advances made during the last few years in the genetics of APA due to transcriptomic studies and whole exome sequencing. The identification of recurrent and somatic mutations in genes coding for ion channels (KCNJ5 and CACNA1D and ATPases (ATP1A1 and ATP2B3 allowed highlighting the central role of calcium signaling in autonomous aldosterone production by the adrenal.

  8. Reaction Mechanism of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Glutamine Synthetase Using Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Cátia; Ramos, Maria J; Fernandes, Pedro Alexandrino

    2016-06-27

    This paper is devoted to the understanding of the reaction mechanism of mycobacterium tuberculosis glutamine synthetase (mtGS) with atomic detail, using computational quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods at the ONIOM M06-D3/6-311++G(2d,2p):ff99SB//B3LYP/6-31G(d):ff99SB level of theory. The complete reaction undergoes a three-step mechanism: the spontaneous transfer of phosphate from ATP to glutamate upon ammonium binding (ammonium quickly loses a proton to Asp54), the attack of ammonia on phosphorylated glutamate (yielding protonated glutamine), and the deprotonation of glutamine by the leaving phosphate. This exothermic reaction has an activation free energy of 21.5 kcal mol(-1) , which is consistent with that described for Escherichia coli glutamine synthetase (15-17 kcal mol(-1) ). The participating active site residues have been identified and their role and energy contributions clarified. This study provides an insightful atomic description of the biosynthetic reaction that takes place in this enzyme, opening doors for more accurate studies for developing new anti-tuberculosis therapies. PMID:27225077

  9. Molecular distributions in interphases: statistical mechanical theory combined with molecular dynamics simulation of a model lipid bilayer.

    OpenAIRE

    Xiang, T X; Anderson, B D

    1994-01-01

    A mean-field statistical mechanical theory has been developed to describe molecular distributions in interphases. The excluded volume interaction has been modeled in terms of a reversible work that is required to create a cavity of the solute size against a pressure tensor exerted by the surrounding interphase molecules. The free energy change associated with this compression process includes the configuration entropy as well as the change in conformational energy of the surrounding chain mol...

  10. Molecular Mechanisms Controlling the Early Mouse Embryo Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Ivan

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Few are known about the molecular mechanism controlling the early embryo development. The reduce dimension of the embryos, only a few μm, the small quantities of proteins synthesized and the artificial environment influence makes difficult to decode the mechanisms controlling early embryonic stages of development. Although, in the last few years many genes have been showed to be active in the early embryonic stages of development, only a few have been characterized and found to be implicated in the molecular mechanism responsible of preimplantational embryos development. Ped gene (Preimplantational embryo development is considered to be involved in regulation of embryonic cleavage division and subsequent embryo survival. This review presents, based on a rich documentation, the main mechanisms involved in early embryo development.

  11. Insight into the molecular switch mechanism of human Rab5a from molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rab5a is currently a most interesting target because it is responsible for regulating the early endosome fusion in endocytosis and possibly the budding process. We utilized longtime-scale molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the internal motion of the wild-type Rab5a and its A30P mutant. It was observed that, after binding with GTP, the global flexibility of the two proteins is increasing, while the local flexibility in their sensitive sites (P-loop, switch I and II regions) is decreasing. Also, the mutation of Ala30 to Pro30 can cause notable flexibility variations in the sensitive sites. However, this kind of variations is dramatically reduced after binding with GTP. Such a remarkable feature is mainly caused by the water network rearrangements in the sensitive sites. These findings might be of use for revealing the profound mechanism of the displacements of Rab5a switch regions, as well as the mechanism of the GDP dissociation and GTP association.

  12. Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylene: Mechanics, Morphology, and Clinical Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Sobieraj, MC; Rimnac, CM

    2008-01-01

    Ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) is a semicrystalline polymer that has been used for over four decades as a bearing surface in total joint replacements. The mechanical properties and wear properties of UHMWPE are of interest with respect to the in vivo performance of UHMWPE joint replacement components. The mechanical properties of the polymer are dependent on both its crystalline and amorphous phases. Altering either phase (i.e., changing overall crystallinity, crystalline m...

  13. Molecular mechanisms of experience-dependent plasticity in visual cortex

    OpenAIRE

    Tropea, Daniela; Van Wart, Audra; Sur, Mriganka

    2008-01-01

    A remarkable amount of our current knowledge of mechanisms underlying experience-dependent plasticity during cortical development comes from study of the mammalian visual cortex. Recent advances in high-resolution cellular imaging, combined with genetic manipulations in mice, novel fluorescent recombinant probes, and large-scale screens of gene expression, have revealed multiple molecular mechanisms that underlie structural and functional plasticity in visual cortex. We situate these mechanis...

  14. The molecular mechanisms, diagnosis and management of congenital hyperinsulinism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senthil Senniappan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital hyperinsulinism (CHI is the result of unregulated insulin secretion from the pancreatic β-cells leading to severe hypoglycaemia. In these patients it is important to make an accurate diagnosis and initiate the appropriate management so as to avoid hypoglycemic episodes and prevent the potentially associated complications like epilepsy, neurological impairment and cerebral palsy. At a genetic level abnormalities in eight different genes (ABCC8, KCNJ11, GLUD1, GCK, HADH, SLC16A1, HNF4A and UCP2 have been reported with CHI. Loss of function mutations in ABCC8/KCNJ11 lead to the most severe forms of CHI which are usually medically unresponsive. At a histological level there are two major subgroups, diffuse and focal, each with a different genetic etiology. The focal form is sporadic in inheritance and is localized to a small region of the pancreas whereas the diffuse form is inherited in an autosomal recessive (or dominant manner. Imaging using a specialized positron emission tomography scan with the isotope fluroine-18 L-3, 4-dihydroxyphenyalanine (18F-DOPA-PET-CT is used to accurately locate the focal lesion pre-operatively and if removed can cure the patient from hypoglycemia. Understanding the molecular mechanisms, the histological basis, improvements in imaging modalities and surgical techniques have all improved the management of patients with CHI.

  15. [Molecular mechanisms underlying the formation of neuromuscular junction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Osamu; Yamanashi, Yuji

    2011-07-01

    The neuromuscular junction (NMJ) is a synapse between a motor neuron and skeletal muscle. The contraction of skeletal muscle is controlled by the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh), which is released from the motor nerve terminal. To achieve efficient neuromuscular transmission, acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) must be densely clustered on the muscle membrane of the NMJ. Failure of AChR clustering is associated with disorders of neuromuscular transmission such as congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMS) and myasthenia gravis (MG). Motoneuronal agrin and muscle-specific receptor tyrosine kinase (MuSK) are known to play essential roles in the formation and maintenance of NMJs in the central region of each muscle. However, it had been unclear how agrin activates MuSK. Recent studies have elucidated the roles of several key molecules, including the cytoplasmic adaptor protein Dok-7 and LDL receptor-related protein 4 (Lrp4), in agrin-induced MuSK activation. Moreover, new evidence indicates that cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) regulates postsynaptic differentiation. In this review, we summarize the latest developments in molecular mechanisms underlying NMJ formation in vertebrates. PMID:21747134

  16. Resveratrol and Calcium Signaling: Molecular Mechanisms and Clinical Relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey E. McCalley

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Resveratrol is a naturally occurring compound contributing to cellular defense mechanisms in plants. Its use as a nutritional component and/or supplement in a number of diseases, disorders, and syndromes such as chronic diseases of the central nervous system, cancer, inflammatory diseases, diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases has prompted great interest in the underlying molecular mechanisms of action. The present review focuses on resveratrol, specifically its isomer trans-resveratrol, and its effects on intracellular calcium signaling mechanisms. As resveratrol’s mechanisms of action are likely pleiotropic, its effects and interactions with key signaling proteins controlling cellular calcium homeostasis are reviewed and discussed. The clinical relevance of resveratrol’s actions on excitable cells, transformed or cancer cells, immune cells and retinal pigment epithelial cells are contrasted with a review of the molecular mechanisms affecting calcium signaling proteins on the plasma membrane, cytoplasm, endoplasmic reticulum, and mitochondria. The present review emphasizes the correlation between molecular mechanisms of action that have recently been identified for resveratrol and their clinical implications.

  17. Computing pKa Values with a Mixing Hamiltonian Quantum Mechanical/Molecular Mechanical Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Fan, Xiaoli; Jin, Yingdi; Hu, Xiangqian; Hu, Hao

    2013-09-10

    Accurate computation of the pKa value of a compound in solution is important but challenging. Here, a new mixing quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) Hamiltonian method is developed to simulate the free-energy change associated with the protonation/deprotonation processes in solution. The mixing Hamiltonian method is designed for efficient quantum mechanical free-energy simulations by alchemically varying the nuclear potential, i.e., the nuclear charge of the transforming nucleus. In pKa calculation, the charge on the proton is varied in fraction between 0 and 1, corresponding to the fully deprotonated and protonated states, respectively. Inspired by the mixing potential QM/MM free energy simulation method developed previously [H. Hu and W. T. Yang, J. Chem. Phys. 2005, 123, 041102], this method succeeds many advantages of a large class of λ-coupled free-energy simulation methods and the linear combination of atomic potential approach. Theory and technique details of this method, along with the calculation results of the pKa of methanol and methanethiol molecules in aqueous solution, are reported. The results show satisfactory agreement with the experimental data. PMID:26592414

  18. Molecular mechanism of adaptive response to low dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adaptive response is a term used to describe the ability of a low, priming dose of ionizing radiation to modify the effects of a subsequent higher, challenge dose. Molecular mechanism of adaptive response to low dose radiation is involved in signal transduction pathway, reactive oxygen species, DNA damage repair

  19. Dissection of molecular mechanisms underlying speech and language disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Fisher, S

    2005-01-01

    Developmental disorders affecting speech and language are highly heritable, but very little is currently understood about the neuromolecular mechanisms that underlie these traits. Integration of data from diverse research areas, including linguistics, neuropsychology, neuroimaging, genetics, molecular neuroscience, developmental biology, and evolutionary anthropology, is becoming essential for unraveling the relevant pathways. Recent studies of the FOXP2 gene provide a case in point. Mutation...

  20. In silico analysis of the molecular mechanism of postmenopausal osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanqing; Wang, Yueqiu; Yang, Nailong; Wu, Suning; Lv, Yanhua; Xu, Lili

    2015-11-01

    Postmenopausal osteoporosis (PO) is a common disease in females >50 years of age worldwide and is becoming an increasing burden to society. The present study aimed to assess the molecular mechanism of PO using bioinformatic methods. The gene expression data from patients with PO and normal controls were downloaded from the ArrayExpress database provided by European Bioinformatics Institute. Following the screening of the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) using the Limma package in R language, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathways enrichment analysis was performed using the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery online tools. Sequentially, modulators of the DEGs, including transcription factors (TFs) and microRNAs, were predicted by the ChIP Enrichment Analysis databases and WEB‑based GEne SeT AnaLysis Toolkit system, respectively. In addition, the protein‑protein interaction network of DEGs was constructed via the search tool for the retrieval of interacting genes and then the functional modules were further analyzed via the clusterMaker package and The Biological Networks Gene Ontology package within the Cytoscape software. A total of 482 DEGs, including 279 upregulated and 203 downregulated DEGs, were screened out. DEGs were predominantly enriched in the pathways of fatty acid metabolism, cardiac muscle contraction and DNA replication. TFs, including SMAD4, in addition to microRNAs, including the microRNA‑125 (miR‑125) family, miR‑331 and miR‑24, may be the modulators of the DEGs in PO. In addition, the five largest modules were identified with TTN, L1G1, ACADM, UQCRC2 and TRIM63 as the hub proteins, and they were associated with the biological processes of muscle contraction, DNA replication initiation, lipid modification, generation of precursor metabolites and energy, and regulation of acetyl‑CoA biosynthetic process, respectively. SMAD4, CACNG1 and TRIM63 are suggested to be important factors in the

  1. Catalytic mechanism of RNA backbone cleavage by ribonuclease H from quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosta, Edina; Nowotny, Marcin; Yang, Wei; Hummer, Gerhard

    2011-06-15

    We use quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulations to study the cleavage of the ribonucleic acid (RNA) backbone catalyzed by ribonuclease H. This protein is a prototypical member of a large family of enzymes that use two-metal catalysis to process nucleic acids. By combining Hamiltonian replica exchange with a finite-temperature string method, we calculate the free energy surface underlying the RNA-cleavage reaction and characterize its mechanism. We find that the reaction proceeds in two steps. In a first step, catalyzed primarily by magnesium ion A and its ligands, a water molecule attacks the scissile phosphate. Consistent with thiol-substitution experiments, a water proton is transferred to the downstream phosphate group. The transient phosphorane formed as a result of this nucleophilic attack decays by breaking the bond between the phosphate and the ribose oxygen. In the resulting intermediate, the dissociated but unprotonated leaving group forms an alkoxide coordinated to magnesium ion B. In a second step, the reaction is completed by protonation of the leaving group, with a neutral Asp132 as a likely proton donor. The overall reaction barrier of ∼15 kcal mol(-1), encountered in the first step, together with the cost of protonating Asp132, is consistent with the slow measured rate of ∼1-100/min. The two-step mechanism is also consistent with the bell-shaped pH dependence of the reaction rate. The nonmonotonic relative motion of the magnesium ions along the reaction pathway agrees with X-ray crystal structures. Proton-transfer reactions and changes in the metal ion coordination emerge as central factors in the RNA-cleavage reaction. PMID:21539371

  2. Kinetic analysis reveals the diversity of microscopic mechanisms through which molecular chaperones suppress amyloid formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arosio, Paolo; Michaels, Thomas C. T.; Linse, Sara; Månsson, Cecilia; Emanuelsson, Cecilia; Presto, Jenny; Johansson, Jan; Vendruscolo, Michele; Dobson, Christopher M.; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.

    2016-03-01

    It is increasingly recognized that molecular chaperones play a key role in modulating the formation of amyloid fibrils, a process associated with a wide range of human disorders. Understanding the detailed mechanisms by which they perform this function, however, has been challenging because of the great complexity of the protein aggregation process itself. In this work, we build on a previous kinetic approach and develop a model that considers pairwise interactions between molecular chaperones and different protein species to identify the protein components targeted by the chaperones and the corresponding microscopic reaction steps that are inhibited. We show that these interactions conserve the topology of the unperturbed reaction network but modify the connectivity weights between the different microscopic steps. Moreover, by analysing several protein-molecular chaperone systems, we reveal the striking diversity in the microscopic mechanisms by which molecular chaperones act to suppress amyloid formation.

  3. Investigation of deformation mechanisms of staggered nanocomposites using molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathiazhagan, S.; Anup, S.

    2016-08-01

    Biological materials with nanostructure of regularly or stair-wise staggered arrangements of hard platelets reinforced in a soft protein matrix have superior mechanical properties. Applications of these nanostructures to ceramic matrix composites could enhance their toughness. Using molecular dynamics simulations, mechanical behaviour of the bio-inspired nanocomposites is studied. Regularly staggered model shows better flow behaviour compared to stair-wise staggered model due to the symmetrical crack propagation along the interface. Though higher stiffness and strength are obtained for stair-wise staggered models, rapid crack propagation reduces the toughness. Arresting this crack propagation could lead to superior mechanical properties in stair-wise staggered models.

  4. Normal Mode Analysis with Molecular Geometry Restraints: Bridging Molecular Mechanics and Elastic Models

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Mingyang; Ma, Jianpeng

    2011-01-01

    A new method for normal mode analysis is reported for all-atom structures using molecular geometry restraints (MGR). Similar to common molecular mechanics force fields, the MGR potential contains short- and long-range terms. The short-range terms are defined by molecular geometry, i.e. bond lengths, angles and dihedrals; the long-range term is similar to that in elastic network models. Each interaction term uses a single force constant parameter, and is determined by fitting against a set of ...

  5. A Modiifed Molecular Structure Mechanics Method for Analysis of Graphene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUA Jun; LI Dongbo; ZHAO Dong; LIANG Shengwei; LIU Qinlong; JIA Ruiyan

    2015-01-01

    Based on molecular mechanics and the deformation characteristics of the atomic lattice structure of graphene, a modiifed molecular structure mechanics method was developed to improve the original one, that is, the semi-rigid connections were used to model the bond angle variations between the C-C bonds in graphene. The simulated results show that the equivalent space frame model with semi-rigid connections for graphene proposed in this article is a simple, efifcient, and accurate model to evaluate the equivalent elastic properties of graphene. Though the present computational model of the semi-rigid connected space frame is only applied to characterize the mechanical behaviors of the space lattices of graphene, it has more potential applications in the static and dynamic analyses of graphene and other nanomaterials.

  6. Electron transport properties of single molecular junctions under mechanical modulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron transport behaviors of single molecular junctions are very sensitive to the atomic scale molecule-metal electrode contact interfaces, which have been difficult to control. We used a modified scanning probe microscope-break junction technique (SPM-BJT) to control the dynamics of the contacts and simultaneously monitor both the conductance and force. First, by fitting the measured data into a modified multiple tunneling barrier model, the static contact resistances, corresponding to the different contact conformations of single alkanedithiol and alkanediamine molecular junctions, were identified. Second, the changes of contact decay constant were measured under mechanical extensions of the molecular junctions, which helped to classify the different single molecular conductance sets into specific microscopic conformations of the molecule-electrode contacts. Third, by monitoring the changes of force and contact decay constant with the mechanical extensions, the changes of conductance were found to be caused by the changes of contact bond length and by the atomic reorganizations near the contact bond. This study provides a new insight into the understanding of the influences of contact conformations, especially the effect of changes of dynamic contact conformation on electron transport through single molecular junctions. (paper)

  7. Molecular mechanisms in the regulation of adult neurogenesis during stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egeland, Martin; Zunszain, Patricia A; Pariante, Carmine M

    2015-04-01

    Coping with stress is fundamental for mental health, but understanding of the molecular neurobiology of stress is still in its infancy. Adult neurogenesis is well known to be regulated by stress, and conversely adult neurogenesis regulates stress responses. Recent studies in neurogenic cells indicate that molecular pathways activated by glucocorticoids, the main stress hormones, are modulated by crosstalk with other stress-relevant mechanisms, including inflammatory mediators, neurotrophic factors and morphogen signalling pathways. This Review discusses the pathways that are involved in this crosstalk and thus regulate this complex relationship between adult neurogenesis and stress. PMID:25790864

  8. Molecular Analysis of Bacterial Species Associated with Childhood Caries

    OpenAIRE

    Becker, Mitzi R.; Paster, Bruce J.; Leys, Eugene J.; Moeschberger, Melvin L.; Kenyon, Sarah G.; Galvin, Jamie L.; Boches, Susan K.; Dewhirst, Floyd E.; Griffen, Ann L.

    2002-01-01

    Although substantial epidemiologic evidence links Streptococcus mutans to caries, the pathobiology of caries may involve more complex communities of bacterial species. Molecular methods for bacterial identification and enumeration now make it possible to more precisely study the microbiota associated with dental caries. The purpose of this study was to compare the bacteria found in early childhood caries (ECC) to those found in caries-free children by using molecular identification methods. C...

  9. The origin of chiral discrimination: supersonic molecular beam experiments and molecular dynamics simulations of collisional mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The target of the present paper is the study of chirality effects in molecular dynamics from both a theoretical and an experimental point of view under the hypothesis of a molecular dynamics mechanism as the origin of chiral discrimination. This is a fundamental problem per se, and of possible relevance for the problem of the intriguing homochirality in Nature, so far lacking satisfactory explanations. We outline the steps that have been taken so far toward this direction, motivated by various experimental studies of supersonic molecular beams carried out in this laboratory, such as the detection of aligned oxygen in gaseous streams and further evidence on nitrogen, benzene and various hydrocarbons, showing the insurgence of molecular orientation in the dynamics of molecules in flows and in molecular collisions. Chiral effects are theoretically demonstrated to show up in the differential scattering of oriented molecules, also when impinging on surfaces. Focus on possible mechanisms for chiral bio-stereochemistry of oriented reactants may be of pre-biotical interest, for example when flowing in atmospheres of rotating bodies, specifically the planet Earth, as well as in vortex motions of celestial objects. Molecular dynamics simulations and experimental verifications of the hypothesis are reviewed and objectives of future research activity proposed.

  10. The origin of chiral discrimination: supersonic molecular beam experiments and molecular dynamics simulations of collisional mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aquilanti, Vincenzo; Grossi, Gaia; Lombardi, Andrea; Maciel, Glauciete S; Palazzetti, Federico [Dipartimento di Chimica, Universita di Perugia, Via Elce di Sotto 8, 06123 Perugia (Italy)], E-mail: abulafia@dyn.unipg.it

    2008-10-15

    The target of the present paper is the study of chirality effects in molecular dynamics from both a theoretical and an experimental point of view under the hypothesis of a molecular dynamics mechanism as the origin of chiral discrimination. This is a fundamental problem per se, and of possible relevance for the problem of the intriguing homochirality in Nature, so far lacking satisfactory explanations. We outline the steps that have been taken so far toward this direction, motivated by various experimental studies of supersonic molecular beams carried out in this laboratory, such as the detection of aligned oxygen in gaseous streams and further evidence on nitrogen, benzene and various hydrocarbons, showing the insurgence of molecular orientation in the dynamics of molecules in flows and in molecular collisions. Chiral effects are theoretically demonstrated to show up in the differential scattering of oriented molecules, also when impinging on surfaces. Focus on possible mechanisms for chiral bio-stereochemistry of oriented reactants may be of pre-biotical interest, for example when flowing in atmospheres of rotating bodies, specifically the planet Earth, as well as in vortex motions of celestial objects. Molecular dynamics simulations and experimental verifications of the hypothesis are reviewed and objectives of future research activity proposed.

  11. Molecular Mechanisms Behind the Chemopreventive Effects of Anthocyanidins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De-Xing Hou

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Anthocyanins are polyphenolic ring-based flavonoids, and are widespread in fruits and vegetables of red-blue color. Epidemiological investigations and animal experiments have indicated that anthocyanins may contribute to cancer chemoprevention. The studies on the mechanism have been done recently at molecular level. This review summarizes current molecular bases for anthocyanidins on several key steps involved in cancer chemoprevention: (i inhibition of anthocyanidins in cell transformation through targeting mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathway and activator protein 1 (AP-1 factor; (ii suppression of anthocyanidins in inflammation and carcinogenesis through targeting nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB pathway and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2 gene; (iii apoptotic induction of cancer cells by anthocyanidins through reactive oxygen species (ROS / c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK-mediated caspase activation. These data provide a first molecular view of anthocyanidins contributing to cancer chemoprevention.

  12. [Advances in molecular mechanism of bacterial reduction of hexavalent chromium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dou; Zhao, You-Cai; Song, Li-Yan; Yin, Ya-Jie; Wang, Yang-Qing; Xu, Zhong-Hui

    2014-04-01

    Cr(VI) has been causing serious environmental pollution due to its carcinogenicity, teratogenicity and strong migration. Reduction of Cr( VI) to Cr(III), a precipitation that is much less toxic, is an efficient strategy to control Cr pollution. Within the strategy, bacterial reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) has been considered as one of the best bioremediation methods because of its efficiency, environment friendly, and low cost; however, the molecular mechanism remains large unknown. This review summarizes Cr(VI) reduction bacterial species and its application in pollution control, elaborates the pathways of Cr( VI) reduction and functional proteins involved, concludes the molecular mechanism of baterial reduction Cr(VI), and discusses the orientation of the future research. PMID:24946623

  13. [Molecular mechanisms of the plague pathogenic agent interaction with invertebrates].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutyrev, V V; Eroshenko, G A; Popov, N V; Vidiaeva, N A; Konnov, N P

    2009-01-01

    Microbe Russian Anti-Plague Research Institute, Saratov, Russia The literature data and experimental results of the authors on the molecular basis of plague agent interaction with invertebrates are discussed. The details of the plague agent life cycle, its genome organization, and molecular genetic mechanisms of its survival in flea vector and on the nematode cuticule are discussed. The experimental data about the ability to form biofilms at abiotic and biotic surfaces in the Yersinia pestis strains of the main and non-main subspecies are presented. Mechanisms of horizontal and vertical transmission of plague agent are considered. The suggestion about participation of the new member in the complex parasitic biocenosis (nematode, vector parasite) is put forward. PMID:20050160

  14. AB071. The molecular mechanism of acrosome formation and globozoospermia

    OpenAIRE

    Gui, Yaoting

    2015-01-01

    Objective The acrosome is a specialized organelle that covers the anterior part of the sperm nucleus and plays an essential role in the process of fertilization. The present study is to review the molecular mechanism of acrosome formation and explore its relationship with globozoospermia Methods We reviewed the published papers from PubMed, and also report some research progress of acrosome formation in our laboratory. Results Acrosome formation can be divided into four stages: Golgi-phase, c...

  15. Molecular Mechanisms of Nasal Epithelium in Rhinitis and Rhinosinusitis

    OpenAIRE

    Toppila-Salmi, Sanna; van Drunen, Cornelis M; Fokkens, Wytske J; Golebski, Korneliuz; Mattila, Pirkko; Joenvaara, Sakari; Renkonen, Jutta; Renkonen, Risto

    2014-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis, nonallergic rhinitis, and chronic rhinosinusitis are multifactorial upper airway diseases with high prevalence. Several genetic and environmental factors are proposed to predispose to the pathogenesis of the inflammatory upper airway diseases. Still, the molecular mechanisms leading toward the onset and progression of upper airway diseases are largely unknown. The upper airway epithelium has an important role in sensing the environment and regulating the inhaled air. As suc...

  16. Molecular quantum mechanical observers, symmetry, and string theory

    OpenAIRE

    Dance, M.

    2010-01-01

    The paper \\cite{Dance0601} tentatively suggested a physical picture that might underlie string theories. The string parameters $\\tau $ and $\\sigma_i $ were interpreted as spacetime dimensions which a simple quantum mechanical observer can observe, while symmetries of the relevant observer states could limit the observability of other dimensions. An atomic observer was the focus of the discussion. The present paper extends the discussion of\\cite{Dance0601} to molecular observers, including the...

  17. Molecular mechanisms in muscular dystrophy: a gene expression profiling study.

    OpenAIRE

    Turk, Rolf

    2006-01-01

    The muscular dystrophies are a group of neuromuscular disorders characterized by progres¬sive muscle weakness and wasting. Although the underlying genetic defects of a large number of muscular dystrophies are now know, the molecular mechanisms resulting in the devastating effects of the disease are not yet clear. Furthermore, the muscular dystrophies differ in clinical presentation and severity. The processes responsible for this di¬vergence are largely unknown as well. In this thesis, gene e...

  18. Molecular mechanisms and treatment options for muscle wasting eiseases

    OpenAIRE

    Rüegg, Markus A.; Glass, David J.

    2010-01-01

    Loss of muscle mass can be the consequence of pathological changes, as observed in muscular dystrophies; or it can be secondary to cachexia-inducing diseases that cause muscle atrophy, such as cancer, heart disease, or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; or it can be a consequence of aging or simple disuse. Although muscular dystrophies are rare, muscle loss affects millions of people worldwide.Wediscuss the molecular mechanisms involved in muscular dystrophy and in muscle atrophy and pres...

  19. Molecular mechanism of signaling by tumor necrosis factor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    查纪坤; 舒红兵

    2002-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is an important cytokine with multiple biological effects,including cell growth,differentiation,apoptosis,immune regulation and induction of inflammation. The effects of TNF are mediated by two receptors,TNF-R1 and TNF-R2. The major signal transduction pathways triggered by TNF include those that lead to apoptosis,activation of transcription factor NF-??B and protein kinase JNK. This review will discuss the molecular mechanisms of these signaling pathways.

  20. The strawberry plant defense mechanism: a molecular review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amil-Ruiz, Francisco; Blanco-Portales, Rosario; Muñoz-Blanco, Juan; Caballero, José L

    2011-11-01

    Strawberry, a small fruit crop of great importance throughout the world, has been considered a model plant system for Rosaceae, and is susceptible to a large variety of phytopathogenic organisms. Most components and mechanisms of the strawberry defense network remain poorly understood. However, from current knowledge, it seems clear that the ability of a strawberry plant to respond efficiently to pathogens relies first on the physiological status of injured tissue (pre-formed mechanisms of defense) and secondly on the general ability to recognize and identify the invaders by surface plant receptors, followed by a broad range of induced mechanisms, which include cell wall reinforcement, production of reactive oxygen species, phytoalexin generation and pathogenesis-related protein accumulation. Dissection of these physiological responses at a molecular level will provide valuable information to improve future breeding strategies for new strawberry varieties and to engineer strawberry plants for durable and broad-spectrum disease resistance. In turn, this will lead to a reduction in use of chemicals and in environmental risks. Advances in the understanding of the molecular interplay between plant (mainly those considered model systems) and various classes of microbial pathogens have been made in the last two decades. However, major progress in the genetics and molecular biology of strawberry is still needed to uncover fully the way in which this elaborate plant innate immune system works. These fundamental insights will provide a conceptual framework for rational human intervention through new strawberry research approaches. In this review, we will provide a comprehensive overview and discuss recent advances in molecular research on strawberry defense mechanisms against pathogens. PMID:21984602

  1. Molecular mechanisms of TRAIL-induced apoptosis of cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@Tumor Necrosis Factor-related Apoptosis-inducing Ligand (TRAIL) is a recently identified member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) family[1]. Numerous studies indicate that TRAIL can induce apoptosis of cancer cells but not of normal cells, pointing to the possibility of de-veloping TRAIL into a cancer drug[2-4]. This review will summary the molecular mechanisms of TRAIL-induced apoptosis and discuss the questions to be resolved in this field.

  2. Molecular mechanism of fluoroquinolones resistance in Mycoplasma hominis clinical isolates

    OpenAIRE

    Meng Dong-Ya; Sun Chang-Jian; Yu Jing-Bo; Ma Jun; Xue Wen-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the molecular mechanism of fluoroquinolones resistance in Mycoplasma hominis (MH) clinical strains isolated from urogenital specimens. 15 MH clinical isolates with different phenotypes of resistance to fluoroquinolones antibiotics were screened for mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDRs) of DNA gyrase (gyrA and gyrB) and topoisomerase IV (parC and parE) in comparison with the reference strain PG21, which is susceptible to fluoroquinolones antibiotics. 15 ...

  3. Radiotracer studies on molecular mechanisms of death and resuscitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tracer techniques and artificial circulation were applied to rabbits after death by anoxia and deep hypothermia in order to study molecular mechanisms. 60 min after death the biosynthesis and disintegration of protein RNA and DNA practically stopped in all organs. In animals cooled post mortem the process of biosynthesis and degradation of protein, RNA and DNA, as well as the physiological functions of the whole organism, were restored. (author)

  4. Molecular dynamics simulation of nanocrystalline nickel: structure and mechanical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swygenhoven, H. van [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Caro, A. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina). Centro Atomico Bariloche

    1997-09-01

    Molecular dynamics computer simulations of low temperature elastic and plastic deformation of Ni nanophase samples (3-7 nm) are performed. The samples are polycrystals nucleated from different seeds, with random locations and orientations. Bulk and Young`s modulus, onset of plastic deformation and mechanism responsible for the plastic behaviour are studied and compared with the behaviour of coarse grained samples. (author) 1 fig., 3 refs.

  5. Mechanisms of ventricular arrhythmias: from molecular fluctuations to electrical turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Zhilin; Weiss, James N

    2015-01-01

    Ventricular arrhythmias have complex causes and mechanisms. Despite extensive investigation involving many clinical, experimental, and computational studies, effective biological therapeutics are still very limited. In this article, we review our current understanding of the mechanisms of ventricular arrhythmias by summarizing the state of knowledge spanning from the molecular scale to electrical wave behavior at the tissue and organ scales and how the complex nonlinear interactions integrate into the dynamics of arrhythmias in the heart. We discuss the challenges that we face in synthesizing these dynamics to develop safe and effective novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:25340965

  6. Underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms in childhood irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chumpitazi, Bruno P; Shulman, Robert J

    2016-12-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) affects a large number of children throughout the world. The symptom expression of IBS is heterogeneous, and several factors which may be interrelated within the IBS biopsychosocial model play a role. These factors include visceral hyperalgesia, intestinal permeability, gut microbiota, psychosocial distress, gut inflammation, bile acids, food intolerance, colonic bacterial fermentation, and genetics. The molecular and cellular mechanisms of these factors are being actively investigated. In this mini-review, we present updates of these mechanisms and, where possible, relate the findings to childhood IBS. Mechanistic elucidation may lead to the identification of biomarkers as well as personalized childhood IBS therapies. PMID:26883355

  7. Lignin biodegradation: experimental evidence, molecular, biochemical and physiological mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monties, B.

    1985-01-01

    A critical review is presented of English, French and some German language literature, mainly from 1983 onwards. It examines experimental evidence on the behaviour as barriers to biodegradation of lignins and phenolic polymers such as tannins and suberins. The different molecular mechanisms of lignolysis by fungi (mainly), actinomycetes and bacteria are examined. A new biochemical approach to the physiological mechanism of regulation of lignolytic activities is suggested based on the discoveries of ligniolytic enzymes: effects of nitrogen, oxygen and substrate are discussed. It is concluded that a better knowledge of the structure and reactivity of phenolic barriers is needed in order to control the process of lignolysis.

  8. Molecular Mechanisms of Neurodegeneration in Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Saif; Bhatia, Kanchan; Kannan, Annapoorna; Gangwani, Laxman

    2016-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive motor neuron disease with a high incidence and is the most common genetic cause of infant mortality. SMA is primarily characterized by degeneration of the spinal motor neurons that leads to skeletal muscle atrophy followed by symmetric limb paralysis, respiratory failure, and death. In humans, mutation of the Survival Motor Neuron 1 (SMN1) gene shifts the load of expression of SMN protein to the SMN2 gene that produces low levels of full-length SMN protein because of alternative splicing, which are sufficient for embryonic development and survival but result in SMA. The molecular mechanisms of the (a) regulation of SMN gene expression and (b) degeneration of motor neurons caused by low levels of SMN are unclear. However, some progress has been made in recent years that have provided new insights into understanding of the cellular and molecular basis of SMA pathogenesis. In this review, we have briefly summarized recent advances toward understanding of the molecular mechanisms of regulation of SMN levels and signaling mechanisms that mediate neurodegeneration in SMA. PMID:27042141

  9. Genomic and molecular mechanisms for efficient biodegradation of aromatic dye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Su; Xie, Shangxian; Chen, Hu; Cheng, Yanbing; Shi, Yan; Qin, Xing; Dai, Susie Y; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Yuan, Joshua S

    2016-01-25

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms for aromatic compound degradation is crucial for the development of effective bioremediation strategies. We report the discovery of a novel phenomenon for improved degradation of Direct Red 5B azo dye by Irpex lacteus CD2 with lignin as a co-substrate. Transcriptomics analysis was performed to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of aromatic degradation in white rot fungus by comparing dye, lignin, and dye/lignin combined treatments. A full spectrum of lignin degradation peroxidases, oxidases, radical producing enzymes, and other relevant components were up-regulated under DR5B and lignin treatments. Lignin induced genes complemented the DR5B induced genes to provide essential enzymes and redox conditions for aromatic compound degradation. The transcriptomics analysis was further verified by manganese peroxidase (MnP) protein over-expression, as revealed by proteomics, dye decolorization assay by purified MnP and increased hydroxyl radical levels, as indicated by an iron reducing activity assay. Overall, the molecular and genomic mechanisms indicated that effective aromatic polymer degradation requires synergistic enzymes and radical-mediated oxidative reactions to form an effective network of chemical processes. This study will help to guide the development of effective bioremediation and biomass degradation strategies. PMID:26476316

  10. Molecular structure and elastic properties of thermotropic liquid crystals: Integrated molecular dynamics—Statistical mechanical theory vs molecular field approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capar, M. Ilk; Nar, A.; Ferrarini, A.; Frezza, E.; Greco, C.; Zakharov, A. V.; Vakulenko, A. A.

    2013-03-01

    The connection between the molecular structure of liquid crystals and their elastic properties, which control the director deformations relevant for electro-optic applications, remains a challenging objective for theories and computations. Here, we compare two methods that have been proposed to this purpose, both characterized by a detailed molecular level description. One is an integrated molecular dynamics-statistical mechanical approach, where the bulk elastic constants of nematics are calculated from the direct correlation function (DCFs) and the single molecule orientational distribution function [D. A. McQuarrie, Statistical Mechanics (Harper & Row, New York, 1973)]. The latter is obtained from atomistic molecular dynamics trajectories, together with the radial distribution function, from which the DCF is then determined by solving the Ornstein-Zernike equation. The other approach is based on a molecular field theory, where the potential of mean torque experienced by a mesogen in the liquid crystal phase is parameterized according to its molecular surface. In this case, the calculation of elastic constants is combined with the Monte Carlo sampling of single molecule conformations. Using these different approaches, but the same description, at the level of molecular geometry and torsional potentials, we have investigated the elastic properties of the nematic phase of two typical mesogens, 4'-n-pentyloxy-4-cyanobiphenyl and 4'-n-heptyloxy-4-cyanobiphenyl. Both methods yield K3(bend) >K1 (splay) >K2 (twist), although there are some discrepancies in the average elastic constants and in their anisotropy. These are interpreted in terms of the different approximations and the different ways of accounting for the structural properties of molecules in the two approaches. In general, the results point to the role of the molecular shape, which is modulated by the conformational freedom and cannot be fully accounted for by a single descriptor such as the aspect ratio.

  11. Molecular structure and elastic properties of thermotropic liquid crystals: integrated molecular dynamics--statistical mechanical theory vs molecular field approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilk Capar, M; Nar, A; Ferrarini, A; Frezza, E; Greco, C; Zakharov, A V; Vakulenko, A A

    2013-03-21

    The connection between the molecular structure of liquid crystals and their elastic properties, which control the director deformations relevant for electro-optic applications, remains a challenging objective for theories and computations. Here, we compare two methods that have been proposed to this purpose, both characterized by a detailed molecular level description. One is an integrated molecular dynamics-statistical mechanical approach, where the bulk elastic constants of nematics are calculated from the direct correlation function (DCFs) and the single molecule orientational distribution function [D. A. McQuarrie, Statistical Mechanics (Harper & Row, New York, 1973)]. The latter is obtained from atomistic molecular dynamics trajectories, together with the radial distribution function, from which the DCF is then determined by solving the Ornstein-Zernike equation. The other approach is based on a molecular field theory, where the potential of mean torque experienced by a mesogen in the liquid crystal phase is parameterized according to its molecular surface. In this case, the calculation of elastic constants is combined with the Monte Carlo sampling of single molecule conformations. Using these different approaches, but the same description, at the level of molecular geometry and torsional potentials, we have investigated the elastic properties of the nematic phase of two typical mesogens, 4'-n-pentyloxy-4-cyanobiphenyl and 4'-n-heptyloxy-4-cyanobiphenyl. Both methods yield K3(bend) >K1 (splay) >K2 (twist), although there are some discrepancies in the average elastic constants and in their anisotropy. These are interpreted in terms of the different approximations and the different ways of accounting for the structural properties of molecules in the two approaches. In general, the results point to the role of the molecular shape, which is modulated by the conformational freedom and cannot be fully accounted for by a single descriptor such as the aspect ratio

  12. Molecular mechanism of glucocorticoid resistance in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sara De Iudicibus; Raffaella Franca; Stefano Martelossi; Alessandro Ventura; Giuliana Decorti

    2011-01-01

    Natural and synthetic glucocorticoids (GCs) are widely employed in a number of inflammatory, autoimmune and neoplastic diseases, and, despite the introduction of novel therapies, remain the first-line treatment for inducing remission in moderate to severe active Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. Despite their extensive therapeutic use and the proven effectiveness, consider-able clinical evidence of wide inter-individual differences in GC efficacy among patients has been reported, in particular when these agents are used in inflammatory diseases. In recent years, a detailed knowledge of the GC mechanism of action and of the genetic variants affecting GC activity at the molecular level has arisen from several studies. GCs interact with their cytoplasmic receptor, and are able to repress inflammatory gene expression through several distinct mechanisms. The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is therefore crucial for the effects of these agents: mutations in the GR gene (NR3C1, nuclear re-ceptor subfamily 3, group C, member 1) are the primary cause of a rare, inherited form of GC resistance; in ad-dition, several polymorphisms of this gene have been described and associated with GC response and toxicity. However, the GR is not self-standing in the cell and the receptor-mediated functions are the result of a complex interplay of GR and many other cellular partners. The latter comprise several chaperonins of the large coopera-tive hetero-oligomeric complex that binds the hormone-free GR in the cytosol, and several factors involved in the transcriptional machinery and chromatin remodeling, that are critical for the hormonal control of target genes transcription in the nucleus. Furthermore, variants in the principal effectors of GCs (e.g. cytokines and their regulators) have also to be taken into account for a com-prehensive evaluation of the variability in GC response. Polymorphisms in genes involved in the transport and/or metabolism of these hormones have also been

  13. Treating electrostatics with Wolf summation in combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojeda-May, Pedro; Pu, Jingzhi

    2015-11-01

    The Wolf summation approach [D. Wolf et al., J. Chem. Phys. 110, 8254 (1999)], in the damped shifted force (DSF) formalism [C. J. Fennell and J. D. Gezelter, J. Chem. Phys. 124, 234104 (2006)], is extended for treating electrostatics in combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) molecular dynamics simulations. In this development, we split the QM/MM electrostatic potential energy function into the conventional Coulomb r-1 term and a term that contains the DSF contribution. The former is handled by the standard machinery of cutoff-based QM/MM simulations whereas the latter is incorporated into the QM/MM interaction Hamiltonian as a Fock matrix correction. We tested the resulting QM/MM-DSF method for two solution-phase reactions, i.e., the association of ammonium and chloride ions and a symmetric SN2 reaction in which a methyl group is exchanged between two chloride ions. The performance of the QM/MM-DSF method was assessed by comparing the potential of mean force (PMF) profiles with those from the QM/MM-Ewald and QM/MM-isotropic periodic sum (IPS) methods, both of which include long-range electrostatics explicitly. For ion association, the QM/MM-DSF method successfully eliminates the artificial free energy drift observed in the QM/MM-Cutoff simulations, in a remarkable agreement with the two long-range-containing methods. For the SN2 reaction, the free energy of activation obtained by the QM/MM-DSF method agrees well with both the QM/MM-Ewald and QM/MM-IPS results. The latter, however, requires a greater cutoff distance than QM/MM-DSF for a proper convergence of the PMF. Avoiding time-consuming lattice summation, the QM/MM-DSF method yields a 55% reduction in computational cost compared with the QM/MM-Ewald method. These results suggest that, in addition to QM/MM-IPS, the QM/MM-DSF method may serve as another efficient and accurate alternative to QM/MM-Ewald for treating electrostatics in condensed-phase simulations of chemical reactions.

  14. Treating electrostatics with Wolf summation in combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Wolf summation approach [D. Wolf et al., J. Chem. Phys. 110, 8254 (1999)], in the damped shifted force (DSF) formalism [C. J. Fennell and J. D. Gezelter, J. Chem. Phys. 124, 234104 (2006)], is extended for treating electrostatics in combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) molecular dynamics simulations. In this development, we split the QM/MM electrostatic potential energy function into the conventional Coulomb r−1 term and a term that contains the DSF contribution. The former is handled by the standard machinery of cutoff-based QM/MM simulations whereas the latter is incorporated into the QM/MM interaction Hamiltonian as a Fock matrix correction. We tested the resulting QM/MM-DSF method for two solution-phase reactions, i.e., the association of ammonium and chloride ions and a symmetric SN2 reaction in which a methyl group is exchanged between two chloride ions. The performance of the QM/MM-DSF method was assessed by comparing the potential of mean force (PMF) profiles with those from the QM/MM-Ewald and QM/MM-isotropic periodic sum (IPS) methods, both of which include long-range electrostatics explicitly. For ion association, the QM/MM-DSF method successfully eliminates the artificial free energy drift observed in the QM/MM-Cutoff simulations, in a remarkable agreement with the two long-range-containing methods. For the SN2 reaction, the free energy of activation obtained by the QM/MM-DSF method agrees well with both the QM/MM-Ewald and QM/MM-IPS results. The latter, however, requires a greater cutoff distance than QM/MM-DSF for a proper convergence of the PMF. Avoiding time-consuming lattice summation, the QM/MM-DSF method yields a 55% reduction in computational cost compared with the QM/MM-Ewald method. These results suggest that, in addition to QM/MM-IPS, the QM/MM-DSF method may serve as another efficient and accurate alternative to QM/MM-Ewald for treating electrostatics in condensed-phase simulations of chemical reactions

  15. Treating electrostatics with Wolf summation in combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ojeda-May, Pedro; Pu, Jingzhi, E-mail: jpu@iupui.edu [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Indiana University–Purdue University Indianapolis, 402 N. Blackford Street, Indianapolis, Indiana 46202 (United States)

    2015-11-07

    The Wolf summation approach [D. Wolf et al., J. Chem. Phys. 110, 8254 (1999)], in the damped shifted force (DSF) formalism [C. J. Fennell and J. D. Gezelter, J. Chem. Phys. 124, 234104 (2006)], is extended for treating electrostatics in combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) molecular dynamics simulations. In this development, we split the QM/MM electrostatic potential energy function into the conventional Coulomb r{sup −1} term and a term that contains the DSF contribution. The former is handled by the standard machinery of cutoff-based QM/MM simulations whereas the latter is incorporated into the QM/MM interaction Hamiltonian as a Fock matrix correction. We tested the resulting QM/MM-DSF method for two solution-phase reactions, i.e., the association of ammonium and chloride ions and a symmetric SN{sub 2} reaction in which a methyl group is exchanged between two chloride ions. The performance of the QM/MM-DSF method was assessed by comparing the potential of mean force (PMF) profiles with those from the QM/MM-Ewald and QM/MM-isotropic periodic sum (IPS) methods, both of which include long-range electrostatics explicitly. For ion association, the QM/MM-DSF method successfully eliminates the artificial free energy drift observed in the QM/MM-Cutoff simulations, in a remarkable agreement with the two long-range-containing methods. For the SN{sub 2} reaction, the free energy of activation obtained by the QM/MM-DSF method agrees well with both the QM/MM-Ewald and QM/MM-IPS results. The latter, however, requires a greater cutoff distance than QM/MM-DSF for a proper convergence of the PMF. Avoiding time-consuming lattice summation, the QM/MM-DSF method yields a 55% reduction in computational cost compared with the QM/MM-Ewald method. These results suggest that, in addition to QM/MM-IPS, the QM/MM-DSF method may serve as another efficient and accurate alternative to QM/MM-Ewald for treating electrostatics in condensed-phase simulations of chemical

  16. The microtubule-associated molecular pathways may be genetically disrupted in patients with Bipolar Disorder. Insights from the molecular cascades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drago, Antonio; Crisafulli, Concetta; Sidoti, Antonina; Calabrò, Marco; Serretti, Alessandro

    2016-01-15

    Bipolar Disorder is a severe disease characterized by pathological mood swings from major depressive episodes to manic ones and vice versa. The biological underpinnings of Bipolar Disorder have yet to be defined. As a consequence, pharmacological treatments are suboptimal. In the present paper we test the hypothesis that the molecular pathways involved with the direct targets of lithium, hold significantly more genetic variations associated with BD. A molecular pathway approach finds its rationale in the polygenic nature of the disease. The pathways were tested in a sample of ∼ 7,000 patients and controls. Data are available from the public NIMH database. The definition of the pathways was conducted according to the National Cancer Institute (http://pid.nci.nih.gov/). As a result, 3 out of the 18 tested pathways related to lithium action resisted the permutation analysis and were found to be associated with BD. These pathways were related to Reelin, Integrins and Aurora. A pool of genes selected from the ones linked with the above pathways was further investigated in order to identify the fine molecular mechanics shared by our significant pathways and also their link with lithium mechanism of action. The data obtained point out to a possible involvement of microtubule-related mechanics. PMID:26551401

  17. Radiation toxins: molecular mechanisms of action and radiomimetic properties .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Dmitri; Maliev, Vecheslav

    Introduction: Acute Radiation Disease (ARD) or Acute Radiation Syndromes (ARS) were defined as a toxic poisonous with development of the acute pathological processes in irradi-ated animals: systemic inflammatory response syndrome(SIRS), toxic multiple organ injury (TMOI), toxic multiple organ dysfunction syndromes (TMOD), toxic multiple organ failure (TMOF). However, the nature of radiation toxins, their mechanisms of formation, molecular structure, and mechanism of actions remain uncertain. Moderate and high doses of radiation induce apoptotic necrosis of radiosensitive cells with formation of Radiation Toxins and in-flammation development. Mild doses of radiation induce apoptosis or controlled programmed death of radiosensitive cells without Radiation Toxins formation and development of inflam-mation processes. Only radiation induced apoptotic necrosis initiates formation of Radiation Toxins(RT). Radiation Toxins are playing an important role as the trigger mechanisms for in-flammation development and cell lysis. The systemic inflammatory response syndrome after radiation involves an influence of various endogenous agents and mediators of inflammation such as bradykinin, histamine, serotonin and phospholipases activation, prostaglandins biosyn-thesis. Although, formation of non-specific toxins such as Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) is an important pathological process at mild or high doses of radiation. Reactive Oxygen Species play an important role in molecules damage and development of peroxidation of lipids and pro-teins which are the structural parts of cell and mitochondrial membranes. ROS and bio-radicals induce damage of DNA and RNA and peroxidation of their molecules. But high doses of radia-tion, severe and extremely severe physiological stress, result in cells death by apoptotic necrosis and could be defined as the neuroimmune acute disease. Excitotoxicity is an important patho-logical mechanism which damages the central nervous system. We postulate that

  18. Mechanical tuning of molecular machines for nucleotide recognition at the air-water interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinoda Satoshi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Molecular machines embedded in a Langmuir monolayer at the air-water interface can be operated by application of lateral pressure. As part of the challenge associated with versatile sensing of biologically important substances, we here demonstrate discrimination of nucleotides by applying a cholesterol-armed-triazacyclononane host molecule. This molecular machine can discriminate ribonucleotides based on a twofold to tenfold difference in binding constants under optimized conditions including accompanying ions in the subphase and lateral surface pressures of its Langmuir monolayer. The concept of mechanical tuning of the host structure for optimization of molecular recognition should become a novel methodology in bio-related nanotechnology as an alternative to traditional strategies based on increasingly complex and inconvenient molecular design strategies.

  19. MOLECULAR MECHANISM OF URANIUM REDUCTION BY CLOSTRIDIA AND ITS MANIPULATION.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FRANCIS, A.J.; GAO, W.; CHIDAMBARAM, D.; DODGE, C.J.

    2006-11-16

    This research addresses the need for detailed studies of the enzymatic mechanisms for reduction of radionuclides and/or metals by fermentative microorganisms. The overall objective of this research is to elucidate systematically the molecular mechanisms involved in the reduction of uranium by Clostridia. We propose to (1) determine the role of hydrogenases in uranium reduction, (2) purify the enzymes involved in uranium reduction, (3) determine the mechanisms of reduction, e.g., one or two electron transfer reactions, and (4) elucidate the genetic control of the enzymes and cellular factors involved in uranium reduction. This is a collaborative study between BNL and Stanford University involving expertise in biomolecular science, biochemistry, microbiology, and electrochemistry.

  20. Molecular Mechanism of Uranium Reduction by Clostridia and its Manipulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. J. Francis; W. Gao, D. Chidambaram; C.J. Dodge

    2006-06-01

    This research addresses the need for detailed studies of the enzymatic mechanisms for reduction of radionuclides and/or metals by fermentative microorganisms. The overall objective of this research is to elucidate systematically the molecular mechanisms involved in the reduction of uranium by Clostridia. We propose to (1) determine the role of hydrogenases in uranium reduction, (22) purify the enzymes involved in uranium reduction, (3) determine the mechanisms of reduction, e.g., one or two electron transfer reactions, and (4) elucidate the genetic control of the enzymes and cellular factors involved in uranium reduction. This is a collaborative study between BNL and Stanford University involving expertise in biomolecular science, biochemistry, microbiology, and electrochemistry.

  1. T cell mediated pathogenesis in EAE: Molecular mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian C Kurschus

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available T cells are major initiators and mediators of disease in multiple sclerosis (MS and in its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE. EAE is an antigen-driven autoimmune model in which immunization against myelin autoantigens elicits strong T cell responses which initiate its pathology with CNS myelin destruction. T cells cause pathogenic events by several mechanisms; some work in a direct fashion in the CNS, such as direct cytokine-induced damage, granzyme-mediated killing, or glutamate-induced neurotoxicity, whereas most are indirect mechanisms, such as activation of other cell types like macrophages, B cells, or neutrophils. This review aims to describe and discuss the molecular effector mechanism by which T cells harm the CNS during EAE.

  2. Physiological, Molecular and Genetic Mechanisms of Long-Term Habituation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calin-Jageman, Robert J

    2009-09-12

    Work funded on this grant has explored the mechanisms of long-term habituation, a ubiquitous form of learning that plays a key role in basic cognitive functioning. Specifically, behavioral, physiological, and molecular mechanisms of habituation have been explored using a simple model system, the tail-elicited siphon-withdrawal reflex (T-SWR) in the marine mollusk Aplysia californica. Substantial progress has been made on the first and third aims, providing some fundamental insights into the mechanisms by which memories are stored. We have characterized the physiological correlates of short- and long-term habituation. We found that short-term habituation is accompanied by a robust sensory adaptation, whereas long-term habituation is accompanied by alterations in sensory and interneuron synaptic efficacy. Thus, our data indicates memories can be shifted between different sites in a neural network as they are consolidated from short to long term. At the molecular level, we have accomplished microarray analysis comparing gene expression in both habituated and control ganglia. We have identified a network of putatively regulated transcripts that seems particularly targeted towards synaptic changes (e.g. SNAP25, calmodulin) . We are now beginning additional work to confirm regulation of these transcripts and build a more detailed understanding of the cascade of molecular events leading to the permanent storage of long-term memories. On the third aim, we have fostered a nascent neuroscience program via a variety of successful initiatives. We have funded over 11 undergraduate neuroscience scholars, several of whom have been recognized at national and regional levels for their research. We have also conducted a pioneering summer research program for community college students which is helping enhance access of underrepresented groups to life science careers. Despite minimal progress on the second aim, this project has provided a) novel insight into the network mechanisms by

  3. Molecular mechanisms of foliar water uptake in a desert tree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xia; Zhou, Maoxian; Dong, Xicun; Zou, Songbing; Xiao, Honglang; Ma, Xiao-Fei

    2015-01-01

    Water deficits severely affect growth, particularly for the plants in arid and semiarid regions of the world. In addition to precipitation, other subsidiary water, such as dew, fog, clouds and small rain showers, may also be absorbed by leaves in a process known as foliar water uptake. With the severe scarcity of water in desert regions, this process is increasingly becoming a necessity. Studies have reported on physical and physiological processes of foliar water uptake. However, the molecular mechanisms remain less understood. As major channels for water regulation and transport, aquaporins (AQPs) are involved in this process. However, due to the regulatory complexity and functional diversity of AQPs, their molecular mechanism for foliar water uptake remains unclear. In this study, Tamarix ramosissima, a tree species widely distributed in desert regions, was investigated for gene expression patterns of AQPs and for sap flow velocity. Our results suggest that the foliar water uptake of T. ramosissima occurs in natural fields at night when the humidity is over a threshold of 85 %. The diurnal gene expression pattern of AQPs suggests that most AQP gene expressions display a circadian rhythm, and this could affect both photosynthesis and transpiration. At night, the PIP2-1 gene is also upregulated with increased relative air humidity. This gene expression pattern may allow desert plants to regulate foliar water uptake to adapt to extreme drought. This study suggests a molecular basis of foliar water uptake in desert plants. PMID:26567212

  4. Molecular mechanisms of IgE mediated food allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Verma, Alok Kumar; Das, Mukul; Dwivedi, Premendra D

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this review is to collate current knowledge and recent advances in molecular mechanism behind the immediate type hypersensitivity of foods. Food allergy is a growing concern of human health in developed as well as developing countries now days. Food allergic reactions are mostly IgE mediated and also known as immediate type hypersensitivity or type I reaction. This review encompasses a wide range of molecular events during IgE mediated reactions like primary exposure of allergens, processing of allergens by antigen presenting cells, role of transcription factors like GATA-3, STAT-6, NF-AT, c-maf, c-kit and NF-κB, Treg cells, toll like receptors, cytokines and chemokines, class switch to IgE, FcεR1 receptor, priming of IgE on mast cells or basophils, signaling events followed by secondary exposure of allergens, degranulation and release of mediators like leukotrienes, histamines, prostaglandins, β-hexosaminidase and ultimately anaphylaxis. This review may be helpful to beginners as well as experts working in the field of allergy and immunology because of the stepwise explanations of molecular mechanisms involved in IgE mediated reactions. PMID:22668720

  5. Studies on the molecular mechanisms of seed germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Chao; Yang, Pingfang

    2015-05-01

    Seed germination that begins with imbibition and ends with radicle emergence is the first step for plant growth. Successful germination is not only crucial for seedling establishment but also important for crop yield. After being dispersed from mother plant, seed undergoes continuous desiccation in ecosystem and selects proper environment to trigger germination. Owing to the contribution of transcriptomic, proteomic, and molecular biological studies, molecular aspect of seed germination is elucidated well in Arabidopsis. Recently, more and more proteomic and genetic studies concerning cereal seed germination were performed on rice (Oryza sativa) and barley (Hordeum vulgare), which possess completely different seed structure and domestication background with Arabidopsis. In this review, both the common features and the distinct mechanisms of seed germination are compared among different plant species including Arabidopsis, rice, and maize. These features include morphological changes, cell and its related structure recovery, metabolic activation, hormone behavior, and transcription and translation activation. This review will provide more comprehensive insights into the molecular mechanisms of seed germination. PMID:25597791

  6. Mechanisms of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Latency and Reactivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengchun Ye

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The life cycle of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV consists of latent and lytic replication phases. During latent infection, only a limited number of KSHV genes are expressed. However, this phase of replication is essential for persistent infection, evasion of host immune response, and induction of KSHV-related malignancies. KSHV reactivation from latency produces a wide range of viral products and infectious virions. The resulting de novo infection and viral lytic products modulate diverse cellular pathways and stromal microenvironment, which promote the development of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS. The mechanisms controlling KSHV latency and reactivation are complex, involving both viral and host factors, and are modulated by diverse environmental factors. Here, we review the cellular and molecular basis of KSHV latency and reactivation with a focus on the most recent advancements in the field.

  7. Molecular Mechanism and Potential Targets for Blocking HPV-Induced Lesion Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Guzmán-Olea

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Persistent infection with high-risk HPV is the etiologic agent associated with the development of cervical cancer (CC development. However, environmental, social, epidemiological, genetic, and host factors may have a joint influence on the risk of disease progression. Cervical lesions caused by HPV infection can be removed naturally by the host immune response and only a small percentage may progress to cancer; thus, the immune response is essential for the control of precursor lesions and CC. We present a review of recent research on the molecular mechanisms that allow HPV-infected cells to evade immune surveillance and potential targets of molecular therapy to inhibit tumor immune escape.

  8. Molecular Mechanism and Potential Targets for Blocking HPV-Induced Lesion Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán-Olea, E; Bermúdez-Morales, V H; Peralta-Zaragoza, O; Torres-Poveda, K; Madrid-Marina, V

    2012-01-01

    Persistent infection with high-risk HPV is the etiologic agent associated with the development of cervical cancer (CC) development. However, environmental, social, epidemiological, genetic, and host factors may have a joint influence on the risk of disease progression. Cervical lesions caused by HPV infection can be removed naturally by the host immune response and only a small percentage may progress to cancer; thus, the immune response is essential for the control of precursor lesions and CC. We present a review of recent research on the molecular mechanisms that allow HPV-infected cells to evade immune surveillance and potential targets of molecular therapy to inhibit tumor immune escape. PMID:22220169

  9. Molecular Mechanisms of Cognitive Dysfunction following Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kendall Rae Walker

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI results in significant disability due to cognitive deficits particularly in attention, learning and memory and higher-order executive functions. The role of TBI in chronic neurodegeneration and the development of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer’s disease (AD, Parkinson’s disease (PD, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS and most recently chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE is of particular importance. However, despite significant effort very few therapeutic options exist to prevent or reverse cognitive impairment following TBI. In this review we present experimental evidence of the known secondary injury mechanisms which contribute to neuronal cell loss, axonal injury and synaptic dysfunction and hence cognitive impairment both acutely and chronically following TBI. In particular we focus on the mechanisms linking TBI to the development of two forms of dementia: AD and CTE. We provide evidence of potential molecular mechanisms involved in modulating Aβ and Tau following TBI and provide evidence of the role of these mechanisms in AD pathology. Additionally we propose a mechanism by which Aβ generated as a direct result of TBI is capable of exacerbating secondary injury mechanisms thereby establishing a neurotoxic cascade that leads to chronic neurodegeneration.

  10. Mechanisms of Helicobacter pylori antibiotic resistance and molecular testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshihiro eNishizawa

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance in Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is the main factor affecting the efficacy of current treatment methods against infection caused by this organism. The traditional culture methods for testing bacterial susceptibility to antibiotics are expensive and require 10 to 14 days. Since resistance to clarithromycin, fluoroquinolone, and tetracycline seems to be exclusively caused by specific mutations in a small region of the responsible gene, molecular methods offer an attractive alternative to the above-mentioned techniques. The technique of polymerase chain reaction (PCR is an accurate and rapid method for the detection of mutations that confer antibiotic resistance. This review highlights the mechanisms of antibiotic resistance in H. pylori and the molecular methods for antibiotic susceptibility testing.

  11. Quantum Interactomics and Cancer Molecular Mechanisms: I. Report Outline

    CERN Document Server

    Baianu, I C

    2004-01-01

    Single cell interactomics in simpler organisms, as well as somatic cell interactomics in multicellular organisms, involve biomolecular interactions in complex signalling pathways that were recently represented in modular terms by quantum automata with ‘reversible behavior’ representing normal cell cycling and division. Other implications of such quantum automata, modular modeling of signaling pathways and cell differentiation during development are in the fields of neural plasticity and brain development leading to quantum-weave dynamic patterns and specific molecular processes underlying extensive memory, learning, anticipation mechanisms and the emergence of human consciousness during the early brain development in children. Cell interactomics is here represented for the first time as a mixture of ‘classical’ states that determine molecular dynamics subject to Boltzmann statistics and ‘steady-state’, metabolic (multi-stable) manifolds, together with ‘configuration’ spaces of metastable quant...

  12. Complement system part I - molecular mechanisms of activation and regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas eMerle

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Complement is a complex innate immune surveillance system, playing a key role in defense against pathogens and in host homeostasis. The complement system is initiated by conformational changes in recognition molecular complexes upon sensing danger signals. The subsequent cascade of enzymatic reactions is tightly regulated to assure that complement is activated only at specific locations requiring defense against pathogens, thus avoiding host tissue damage. Here we discuss the recent advances describing the molecular and structural basis of activation and regulation of the complement pathways and their implication on physiology and pathology. This article will review the mechanisms of activation of alternative, classical and lectin pathways, the formation of C3 and C5 convertases, the action of anaphylatoxins and the membrane attack complex. We will also discuss the importance of structure-function relationships using the example of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. Lastly we will discuss the development and benefits of therapies using complement inhibitors.

  13. Conduction mechanism of nitronyl-nitroxide molecular magnetic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotti, N.; Heintze, E.; Slota, M.; Hübner, R.; Wang, F.; Nuss, J.; Dressel, M.; Bogani, L.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the conduction mechanisms of nitronyl-nitroxide (NIT) molecular radicals, as useful for the creation of nanoscopic molecular spintronic devices, finding that it does not correspond to standard Mott behavior, as previously postulated. We provide a complete investigation using transport measurements, low-energy, sub-THz spectroscopy and introducing differently substituted phenyl appendages. We show that a nontrivial surface-charge-limited regime is present in addition to the standard low-voltage Ohmic conductance. Scaling analysis allows one to determine all the main transport parameters for the compounds and highlights the presence of charge-trapping effects. Comparison among the different compounds shows the relevance of intermolecular stacking between the aromatic ring of the phenyl appendix and the NIT motif in the creation of useful electron transport channels. The importance of intermolecular pathways is further highlighted by electronic structure calculations, which clarify the nature of the electronic channels and their effect on the Mott character of the compounds.

  14. Molecular mechanisms and treatment strategies for Dupuytren’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David B O’Gorman

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available David B O’Gorman1,2,3,4, Linda Vi1,2,5, Bing Siang Gan1,2,3,5,61Cell and Molecular Biology Laboratory, 2The Hand and Upper Limb Centre, St. Joseph’s Health Care London, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, 3Departments of Surgery, 4Biochemistry, 5Physiology and Pharmacology, 6Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, London, OT, CanadaAbstract: Dupuytren’s disease (DD is a common disease of the hand and is characterized by thickening of the palmar fascia and formation of tight collagenous disease cords. At present, the disease is incurable and the molecular pathophysiology of DD is unknown. Surgery remains the most commonly used treatment for DD, but this requires extensive postoperative therapy and is associated with high rates of recurrence. Over the past decades, more indepth exploration of the molecular basis of DD has raised the hopes of developing new treatment modalities. This paper reviews the clinical presentation and molecular pathophysiology of this disease, as well as current and emerging treatment. It also explores the implications of new findings in the laboratory for future treatment.Keywords: Dupuytren’s contracture, Dupuytren’s disease, fibrosis

  15. Ambient-Potential Composite Ewald Method for ab Initio Quantum Mechanical/Molecular Mechanical Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giese, Timothy J; York, Darrin M

    2016-06-14

    A new approach for performing Particle Mesh Ewald in ab initio quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) simulations with extended atomic orbital basis sets is presented. The new approach, the Ambient-Potential Composite Ewald (CEw) method, does not perform the QM/MM interaction with Mulliken charges nor electrostatically fit charges. Instead the nuclei and electron density interact directly with the MM environment, but in a manner that avoids the use of dense Fourier transform grids. By performing the electrostatics with the underlying QM density, the CEw method avoids self-consistent field instabilities that have been encountered with simple charge mapping procedures. Potential of mean force (PMF) profiles of the p-nitrophenyl phosphate dissociation reaction in explicit solvent are computed from PBE0/6-31G* QM/MM molecular dynamics simulations with various electrostatic protocols. The CEw profiles are shown to be stable with respect to real-space Ewald cutoff, whereas the PMFs computed from truncated and switched electrostatics produce artifacts. PBE0/6-311G**, AM1/d-PhoT, and DFTB2 QM/MM simulations are performed to generate two-dimensional PMF profiles of the phosphoryl transesterification reactions with ethoxide and phenoxide leaving groups. The semiempirical models incorrectly produce a concerted ethoxide mechanism, whereas PBE0 correctly produces a stepwise mechanism. The ab initio reaction barriers agree more closely to experiment than the semiempirical models. The failure of Mulliken-charge QM/MM-Ewald is analyzed. PMID:27171914

  16. Molecular mechanical properties of short-sequence peptide enzyme mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Tsukasa; Vo Ngo, Bao C; Xiao, Leyang; Arya, Gaurav; Heller, Michael J

    2016-03-01

    While considerable attempts have been made to recreate the high turnover rates of enzymes using synthetic enzyme mimics, most have failed and only a few have produced minimal reaction rates that can barely be considered catalytic. One particular approach we have focused on is the use of short-sequence peptides that contain key catalytic groups in close proximity. In this study, we designed six different peptides and tested their ability to mimic the catalytic mechanism of the cysteine proteases. Acetylation and deacylation by Ellman's Reagent trapping experiments showed the importance of having phenylalanine groups surrounding the catalytic sites in order to provide greater proximity between the cysteine, histidine, and aspartate amino acid R-groups. We have also carried out all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to determine the distance between these catalytic groups and the overall mechanical flexibility of the peptides. We found strong correlations between the magnitude of fluctuations in the Cys-His distance, which determines the flexibility and interactions between the cysteine thiol and histidine imidazole groups, and the deacylation rate. We found that, in general, shorter Cys-His distance fluctuations led to a higher deacylation rate constant, implying that greater confinement of the two residues will allow a higher frequency of the acetyl exchange between the cysteine thiol and histidine imidazole R-groups. This may be the key to future design of peptide structures with molecular mechanical properties that lead to viable enzyme mimics. PMID:25921736

  17. Steered Molecular Dynamics Methods Applied to Enzyme Mechanism and Energetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, C L; Martí, M A; Roitberg, A E

    2016-01-01

    One of the main goals of chemistry is to understand the underlying principles of chemical reactions, in terms of both its reaction mechanism and the thermodynamics that govern it. Using hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM)-based methods in combination with a biased sampling scheme, it is possible to simulate chemical reactions occurring inside complex environments such as an enzyme, or aqueous solution, and determining the corresponding free energy profile, which provides direct comparison with experimental determined kinetic and equilibrium parameters. Among the most promising biasing schemes is the multiple steered molecular dynamics method, which in combination with Jarzynski's Relationship (JR) allows obtaining the equilibrium free energy profile, from a finite set of nonequilibrium reactive trajectories by exponentially averaging the individual work profiles. However, obtaining statistically converged and accurate profiles is far from easy and may result in increased computational cost if the selected steering speed and number of trajectories are inappropriately chosen. In this small review, using the extensively studied chorismate to prephenate conversion reaction, we first present a systematic study of how key parameters such as pulling speed, number of trajectories, and reaction progress are related to the resulting work distributions and in turn the accuracy of the free energy obtained with JR. Second, and in the context of QM/MM strategies, we introduce the Hybrid Differential Relaxation Algorithm, and show how it allows obtaining more accurate free energy profiles using faster pulling speeds and smaller number of trajectories and thus smaller computational cost. PMID:27497165

  18. Molecular and Mechanical Causes of Microtubule Catastrophe and Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharov, Pavel; Gudimchuk, Nikita; Voevodin, Vladimir; Tikhonravov, Alexander; Ataullakhanov, Fazoil I; Grishchuk, Ekaterina L

    2015-12-15

    Tubulin polymers, microtubules, can switch abruptly from the assembly to shortening. These infrequent transitions, termed "catastrophes", affect numerous cellular processes but the underlying mechanisms are elusive. We approached this complex stochastic system using advanced coarse-grained molecular dynamics modeling of tubulin-tubulin interactions. Unlike in previous simplified models of dynamic microtubules, the catastrophes in this model arise owing to fluctuations in the composition and conformation of a growing microtubule tip, most notably in the number of protofilament curls. In our model, dynamic evolution of the stochastic microtubule tip configurations over a long timescale, known as the system's "aging", gives rise to the nonexponential distribution of microtubule lifetimes, consistent with experiment. We show that aging takes place in the absence of visible changes in the microtubule wall or tip, as this complex molecular-mechanical system evolves slowly and asymptotically toward the steady-state level of the catastrophe-promoting configurations. This new, to our knowledge, theoretical basis will assist detailed mechanistic investigations of the mechanisms of action of different microtubule-binding proteins and drugs, thereby enabling accurate control over the microtubule dynamics to treat various pathologies. PMID:26682815

  19. United polarizable multipole water model for molecular mechanics simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, Rui; Wang, Qiantao; Ren, Pengyu, E-mail: pren@mail.utexas.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Wang, Lee-Ping; Pande, Vijay S. [Department of Chemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2015-07-07

    We report the development of a united AMOEBA (uAMOEBA) polarizable water model, which is computationally 3–5 times more efficient than the three-site AMOEBA03 model in molecular dynamics simulations while providing comparable accuracy for gas-phase and liquid properties. In this coarse-grained polarizable water model, both electrostatic (permanent and induced) and van der Waals representations have been reduced to a single site located at the oxygen atom. The permanent charge distribution is described via the molecular dipole and quadrupole moments and the many-body polarization via an isotropic molecular polarizability, all located at the oxygen center. Similarly, a single van der Waals interaction site is used for each water molecule. Hydrogen atoms are retained only for the purpose of defining local frames for the molecular multipole moments and intramolecular vibrational modes. The parameters have been derived based on a combination of ab initio quantum mechanical and experimental data set containing gas-phase cluster structures and energies, and liquid thermodynamic properties. For validation, additional properties including dimer interaction energy, liquid structures, self-diffusion coefficient, and shear viscosity have been evaluated. The results demonstrate good transferability from the gas to the liquid phase over a wide range of temperatures, and from nonpolar to polar environments, due to the presence of molecular polarizability. The water coordination, hydrogen-bonding structure, and dynamic properties given by uAMOEBA are similar to those derived from the all-atom AMOEBA03 model and experiments. Thus, the current model is an accurate and efficient alternative for modeling water.

  20. United polarizable multipole water model for molecular mechanics simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the development of a united AMOEBA (uAMOEBA) polarizable water model, which is computationally 3–5 times more efficient than the three-site AMOEBA03 model in molecular dynamics simulations while providing comparable accuracy for gas-phase and liquid properties. In this coarse-grained polarizable water model, both electrostatic (permanent and induced) and van der Waals representations have been reduced to a single site located at the oxygen atom. The permanent charge distribution is described via the molecular dipole and quadrupole moments and the many-body polarization via an isotropic molecular polarizability, all located at the oxygen center. Similarly, a single van der Waals interaction site is used for each water molecule. Hydrogen atoms are retained only for the purpose of defining local frames for the molecular multipole moments and intramolecular vibrational modes. The parameters have been derived based on a combination of ab initio quantum mechanical and experimental data set containing gas-phase cluster structures and energies, and liquid thermodynamic properties. For validation, additional properties including dimer interaction energy, liquid structures, self-diffusion coefficient, and shear viscosity have been evaluated. The results demonstrate good transferability from the gas to the liquid phase over a wide range of temperatures, and from nonpolar to polar environments, due to the presence of molecular polarizability. The water coordination, hydrogen-bonding structure, and dynamic properties given by uAMOEBA are similar to those derived from the all-atom AMOEBA03 model and experiments. Thus, the current model is an accurate and efficient alternative for modeling water

  1. Molecular Mechanisms of Age-Related Sleep Loss in the Fruit Fly

    OpenAIRE

    Robertson, Meagan; Keene, Alex. C.

    2013-01-01

    Across phyla, aging is associated with reduced sleep duration and efficiency. Both aging and sleep involve complex genetic architecture and diverse cell types and are heavily influenced by diet and environment. Therefore, understanding the molecular mechanisms of age-dependent changes in sleep will require integrative approaches that go beyond examining these two processes independently. The fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, provides a genetically amenable system for dissecting the molecula...

  2. Molecular Mechanism of Allosteric Communication in Hsp70 Revealed by Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Chiappori, Federica; Merelli, Ivan; Colombo, Giorgio; Milanesi, Luciano; Morra, Giulia

    2012-01-01

    Author Summary Allostery, or the capability of proteins to respond to ligand binding events with a variation in structure or dynamics at a distant site, is a common feature for biomolecular function and regulation in a large number of proteins. Intra-protein connections and inter-residue coordinations underlie allosteric mechanisms and react to binding primarily through a finely tuned modulation of motions and structures at the microscopic scale. Hence, all-atom molecular dynamics simulations...

  3. Mechanical Properties of Gelatin Gels; Effect of Molecular Weight and Molecular Weight Distribution

    OpenAIRE

    Jonhard, Eysturskarð

    2010-01-01

    The goal of the gelatin manufacturer is to partial hydrolyze the covalent cross-linkages that organize the collagen molecules into a quarter staggered arrangement found in connective tissue, to minimize the hydrolysis of the peptide bonds and to obtain the appropriate molecular weigh distribution (MWD) for a specific application.The mechanical properties of the resulting gelatin are known to be influenced by the tissues and species from which it is produced as well as the pretreatment and ext...

  4. Prediction of organic molecular crystal geometries from MP2-level fragment quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, Kaushik D.; Beran, Gregory J. O.

    2012-11-01

    The fragment-based hybrid many-body interaction (HMBI) model provides a computationally affordable means of applying electronic structure wavefunction methods to molecular crystals. It combines a quantum mechanical treatment of individual molecules in the unit cell and their short-range pairwise interactions with a polarizable molecular mechanics force-field treatment of long-range and many-body interactions. Here, we report the implementation of analytic nuclear gradients for the periodic model to enable full relaxation of both the atomic positions and crystal lattice parameters. Using a set of five, chemically diverse molecular crystals, we compare the quality of the HMBI MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ-level structures with those obtained from dispersion-corrected periodic density functional theory, B3LYP-D*, and from the Amoeba polarizable force field. The MP2-level structures largely agree with the experimental lattice parameters to within 2%, and the root-mean-square deviations in the atomic coordinates are less than 0.2 Å. These MP2 structures are almost as good as those predicted from periodic B3LYP-D*/TZP and are significantly better than those obtained with B3LYP-D*/6-31G(d,p) or with the Amoeba force field.

  5. Buckling of microtubules: An insight by molecular and continuum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The molecular structural mechanics method has been extended to investigate the buckling of microtubules (MTs) with various configurations. The results indicate that for relative short MTs the shear deformation effect, rather than the nonlocal effect, is mainly responsible for the limitation of their widely used Euler beam description and the observed length-dependence of their bending stiffness. In addition, the configuration effect of MTs is also studied and considered as an explanation for the large scattering of the critical buckling force and bending stiffness observed in existing experiments. This configuration effect is also found to mainly originate from the geometry of the MTs and is mainly determined by the protofilament number.

  6. Mixed 2D molecular systems: Mechanic, thermodynamic and dielectric properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beňo, Juraj; Weis, Martin; Dobročka, Edmund; Haško, Daniel

    2008-08-01

    Study of Langmuir monolayers consisting of stearic acid (SA) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) molecules was done by surface pressure-area isotherms ( π- A), the Maxwell displacement current (MDC) measurement, X-ray reflectivity (XRR) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) to investigate the selected mechanic, thermodynamic and dielectric properties based on orientational structure of monolayers. On the base of π- A isotherms analysis we explain the creation of stable structures and found optimal monolayer composition. The dielectric properties represented by MDC generated monolayers were analyzed in terms of excess dipole moment, proposing the effect of dipole-dipole interaction. XRR and AFM results illustrate deposited film structure and molecular ordering.

  7. Mixed 2D molecular systems: Mechanic, thermodynamic and dielectric properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Study of Langmuir monolayers consisting of stearic acid (SA) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) molecules was done by surface pressure-area isotherms (π-A), the Maxwell displacement current (MDC) measurement, X-ray reflectivity (XRR) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) to investigate the selected mechanic, thermodynamic and dielectric properties based on orientational structure of monolayers. On the base of π-A isotherms analysis we explain the creation of stable structures and found optimal monolayer composition. The dielectric properties represented by MDC generated monolayers were analyzed in terms of excess dipole moment, proposing the effect of dipole-dipole interaction. XRR and AFM results illustrate deposited film structure and molecular ordering

  8. Molecular View of Protein Crystal Growth: Molecular Interactions, Surface Reconstruction and Growth Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadarajah, Arunan; Li, Huayu; Konnert, John H.; Pusey, Marc L.

    2000-01-01

    Studies of the growth and molecular packing of tetragonal lysozyme crystals suggest that there is an underlying molecular growth mechanism, in addition to the classical one involving screw dislocation/2D) nucleation growth. These crystals are constructed by strongly bonded molecular chains forming helices about the 43 axes. The helices are connected to each other by weaker bonds. Crystal growth proceeds by the formation of these 4(sub 3) helices, which would explain some unexpected observations by earlier investigators, such as bimolecular growth steps on the (110) face. Another consequence of these molecular considerations is that only one of two possible packing arrangements could occur on the crystal faces and that their growth unit was at least a tetramer corresponding to the 4(sub 3) helix. Two new high resolution atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques were developed to directly confirm these predictions on tetragonal lysozyme crystals. Most earlier investigations of protein crystal growth with AFM were in the low resolution mode which is adequate to investigate the classical growth mechanisms, but cannot resolve molecular features and mechanisms. Employing the first of the newly developed techniques, high resolution AFM images of the (110) face were compared with the theoretically constructed images for the two possible packing arrangements on this face. The prediction that the molecular packing arrangement of these faces corresponded to that for complete 4(sub 3) helices was confirmed in this manner. This investigation also showed the occurrence of surface reconstruction on protein crystals. The molecules on the surface of the (110) face were found to pack closer along the 4(sub 3) axes than those in the interior. The second new AFM technique was used to follow the growth process by measuring the dimensions of individual growth units on the (110) face. Linescans across a growth step, performed near the saturation limit of the crystals, allowed the growth

  9. Molecular Mechanism: ERK Signaling, Drug Addiction, and Behavioral Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei-Lun; Quizon, Pamela M; Zhu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Addiction to psychostimulants has been considered as a chronic psychiatric disorder characterized by craving and compulsive drug seeking and use. Over the past two decades, accumulating evidence has demonstrated that repeated drug exposure causes long-lasting neurochemical and cellular changes that result in enduring neuroadaptation in brain circuitry and underlie compulsive drug consumption and relapse. Through intercellular signaling cascades, drugs of abuse induce remodeling in the rewarding circuitry that contributes to the neuroplasticity of learning and memory associated with addiction. Here, we review the role of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), a member of the mitogen-activated protein kinase, and its related intracellular signaling pathways in drug-induced neuroadaptive changes that are associated with drug-mediated psychomotor activity, rewarding properties and relapse of drug seeking behaviors. We also discuss the neurobiological and behavioral effects of pharmacological and genetic interferences with ERK-associated molecular cascades in response to abused substances. Understanding the dynamic modulation of ERK signaling in response to drugs may provide novel molecular targets for therapeutic strategies to drug addiction. PMID:26809997

  10. Estimation of mechanical properties of single wall carbon nanotubes using molecular mechanics approach

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P Subba Rao; Sunil Anandatheertha; G Narayana Naik; G Gopalakrishnan

    2015-06-01

    Molecular mechanics based finite element analysis is adopted in the current work to evaluate the mechanical properties of Zigzag, Armchair and Chiral Single wall Carbon Nanotubes (SWCNT) of different diameters and chiralities. Three different types of atomic bonds, that is Carbon–Carbon covalent bond and two types of Carbon–Carbon van der Waals bonds are considered in the carbon nanotube system. The stiffness values of these bonds are calculated using the molecular potentials, namely Morse potential function and Lennard-Jones interaction potential function respectively and these stiffness’s are assigned to spring elements in the finite element model of the CNT. The geometry of CNT is built using a macro that is developed for the finite element analysis software. The finite element model of the CNT is constructed, appropriate boundary conditions are applied and the behavior of mechanical properties of CNT is studied.

  11. Molecular mechanisms for synchronous, asynchronous, and spontaneous neurotransmitter release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaeser, Pascal S; Regehr, Wade G

    2014-01-01

    Most neuronal communication relies upon the synchronous release of neurotransmitters, which occurs through synaptic vesicle exocytosis triggered by action potential invasion of a presynaptic bouton. However, neurotransmitters are also released asynchronously with a longer, variable delay following an action potential or spontaneously in the absence of action potentials. A compelling body of research has identified roles and mechanisms for synchronous release, but asynchronous release and spontaneous release are less well understood. In this review, we analyze how the mechanisms of the three release modes overlap and what molecular pathways underlie asynchronous and spontaneous release. We conclude that the modes of release have key fusion processes in common but may differ in the source of and necessity for Ca(2+) to trigger release and in the identity of the Ca(2+) sensor for release. PMID:24274737

  12. Molecular Mechanism Underlying Lymphatic Metastasis in Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiwen Xiao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As the most challenging human malignancies, pancreatic cancer is characterized by its insidious symptoms, low rate of surgical resection, high risk of local invasion, metastasis and recurrence, and overall dismal prognosis. Lymphatic metastasis, above all, is recognized as an early adverse event in progression of pancreatic cancer and has been described to be an independent poor prognostic factor. It should be noted that the occurrence of lymphatic metastasis is not a casual or stochastic but an ineluctable and designed event. Increasing evidences suggest that metastasis-initiating cells (MICs and the microenvironments may act as a double-reed style in this crime. However, the exact mechanisms on how they function synergistically for this dismal clinical course remain largely elusive. Therefore, a better understanding of its molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in pancreatic lymphatic metastasis is urgently required. In this review, we will summarize the latest advances on lymphatic metastasis in pancreatic cancer.

  13. Molecular mechanism of size control in development and human diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaolong Yang; Tian Xu

    2011-01-01

    How multicellular organisms control their size is a fundamental question that fascinated generations of biologists.In the past 10 years, tremendous progress has been made toward our understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying size control. Original studies from Drosophila showed that in addition to extrinsic nutritional and hormonal cues, intrinsic mechanisms also play important roles in the control of organ size during development. Several novel signaling pathways such as insulin and Hippo-LATS signaling pathways have been identified that control organ size by regulating cell size and/or cell number through modulation of cell growth, cell division, and cell death. Later studies using mammalian cell and mouse models also demonstrated that the signaling pathways identified in flies are also conserved in mammals. Significantly, recent studies showed that dysregulation of size control plays important roles in the development of many human diseases sucha as cancer,diabetes,and hypertrophy.

  14. Molecular Mechanisms of Survival Strategies in Extreme Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Migliardo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Today, one of the major challenges in biophysics is to disclose the molecular mechanisms underlying biological processes. In such a frame, the understanding of the survival strategies in extreme conditions received a lot of attention both from the scientific and applicative points of view. Since nature provides precious suggestions to be applied for improving the quality of life, extremophiles are considered as useful model-systems. The main goal of this review is to present an overview of some systems, with a particular emphasis on trehalose playing a key role in several extremophile organisms. The attention is focused on the relation among the structural and dynamic properties of biomolecules and bioprotective mechanisms, as investigated by complementary spectroscopic techniques at low- and high-temperature values.

  15. Anisotropic mechanical properties of graphene: a molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ming; Zeng, Anna; Zeng, Kevin

    2014-03-01

    The anisotropic mechanical properties of monolayer graphene with different shapes have been studied using an efficient quantum mechanics molecular dynamics scheme based on a semi-empirical Hamiltonian (refereed as SCED-LCAO) [PRB 74, 15540; PHYSE 42, 1]. We have found the anisotropic nature of the membrane stress. The stresses along the armchair direction are slightly stronger than that along the zigzag direction, showing strong direction selectivity. The graphene with the rectangular shape could sustain strong load (i . e ., 20%) in both armchair and zigzag directions. The graphene with the rhombus shape show large difference in the strain direction: it will quickly crack after 18 % of strain in armchair the direction, but slowly destroyed after 20% in the zigzag direction. The obtained 2D Young's modulus at infinitesimal strain and the third-order (effective nonlinear) elastic modulus are in good consistent with the experimental observation.

  16. Targeted therapies in epithelial ovarian cancer: Molecular mechanisms of action

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hiroaki; Itamochi

    2010-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death in women with gynecological cancer. Most patients are diagnosed at an advanced stage and have a poor prognosis.Currently, surgical tumor debulking, followed by platinum- and taxane-based chemotherapy is the standard treatment for advanced ovarian cancer. However, these patients are at great risk of recurrence and emerging drug resistance. Therefore, novel treatment strategies are required to improve outcomes for women with advanced ovarian cancer. A variety of molecular targeted agents, the majority of which are monoclonal antibodies and small-molecule protein-kinase inhibitors, have been explored in the management of ovarian cancer. The targets of these agents include angiogenesis, the human epidermal growth factor receptor family, ubiquitinproteasome pathway, epigenetic modulators, poly(ADPribose) polymerase (PARP), and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway, which are aberrant in tumor tissue. The antiangiogenic agent, bevacizumab, has been reported as the most effective targeted agent and should be included in the standard chemotherapeutic regimen for advanced ovarian cancer. PARP inhibitors, which are mainly used in breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility gene-mutated patients, and mTOR inhibitors are also attractive treatment strategies, either alone or combination with chemotherapy, for ovarian cancer. Understanding the tumor molecular biology and identification of predictive biomarkers are essential steps for selection of the best treatment strategies. This article reviews the molecular mechanisms of the most promising targeted agents that are under early phase clinical evaluation for ovarian cancer.

  17. A molecular understanding of the dynamic mechanism of aquaporin osmosis

    CERN Document Server

    Shua, Liangsuo; Qian, Xin; Wanga, Xiyun; Lin, Yixin; Tan, Kai; Shu, Chaohui; Jin, Shiping

    2014-01-01

    AQPs (aquaporins), the rapid water channels of cells, play a key role in maintaining osmotic equilibrium of cells. In this paper, we reported the dynamic mechanism of AQP osmosis at the molecular level. A theoretical model based on molecular dynamics was carried out and verified by the published experimental data. The reflection coefficients ({\\sigma}) of neutral molecules are mainly decided by their relative size with AQPs, and increase with a third power up to a constant value 1. This model also indicated that the reflection coefficient of a complete impermeable solute can be smaller than 1. The H+ concentration of solution can influence the driving force of the AQPs by changing the equivalent diameters of vestibules surrounded by loops with abundant polar amino acids. In this way, pH of solution can regulate water permeability of AQPs. Therefore, an AQP may not only work as a switch to open or close, but as a rapid response molecular valve to control its water flow. The vestibules can prevent the channel b...

  18. Molecular Mechanisms of Phosphorus Metabolism and Transport during Leaf Senescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyla A. Stigter

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Leaf senescence, being the final developmental stage of the leaf, signifies the transition from a mature, photosynthetically active organ to the attenuation of said function and eventual death of the leaf. During senescence, essential nutrients sequestered in the leaf, such as phosphorus (P, are mobilized and transported to sink tissues, particularly expanding leaves and developing seeds. Phosphorus recycling is crucial, as it helps to ensure that previously acquired P is not lost to the environment, particularly under the naturally occurring condition where most unfertilized soils contain low levels of soluble orthophosphate (Pi, the only form of P that roots can directly assimilate from the soil. Piecing together the molecular mechanisms that underpin the highly variable efficiencies of P remobilization from senescing leaves by different plant species may be critical for devising effective strategies for improving overall crop P-use efficiency. Maximizing Pi remobilization from senescing leaves using selective breeding and/or biotechnological strategies will help to generate P-efficient crops that would minimize the use of unsustainable and polluting Pi-containing fertilizers in agriculture. This review focuses on the molecular mechanisms whereby P is remobilized from senescing leaves and transported to sink tissues, which encompasses the action of hormones, transcription factors, Pi-scavenging enzymes, and Pi transporters.

  19. Molecular mechanisms of the plant heat stress response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qu, Ai-Li; Ding, Yan-Fei; Jiang, Qiong [China Jiliang University, Xueyuan Road 258, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Zhu, Cheng, E-mail: pzhch@cjlu.edu.cn [China Jiliang University, Xueyuan Road 258, Hangzhou 310018 (China)

    2013-03-08

    Highlights: ► This review elaborates the response networks of heat stress in plants. ► It elaborates proteins responding to heat stress in special physiological period. ► The proteins and pathways have formed a basic network of the heat stress response. ► Achievements of the various technologies are also combined. -- Abstract: High temperature has become a global concern, which seriously affects the growth and production of plants, particularly crops. Thus, the molecular mechanism of the heat stress response and breeding of heat-tolerant plants is necessary to protect food production and ensure crop safety. This review elaborates on the response networks of heat stress in plants, including the Hsf and Hsp response pathways, the response of ROS and the network of the hormones. In addition, the production of heat stress response elements during particular physiological periods of the plant is described. We also discuss the existing problems and future prospects concerning the molecular mechanisms of the heat stress response in plants.

  20. Molecular Mechanisms of Pulmonary Vascular Remodeling in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leopold, Jane A.; Maron, Bradley A.

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a devastating disease that is precipitated by hypertrophic pulmonary vascular remodeling of distal arterioles to increase pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance in the absence of left heart, lung parenchymal, or thromboembolic disease. Despite available medical therapy, pulmonary artery remodeling and its attendant hemodynamic consequences result in right ventricular dysfunction, failure, and early death. To limit morbidity and mortality, attention has focused on identifying the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying aberrant pulmonary artery remodeling to identify pathways for intervention. While there is a well-recognized heritable genetic component to PAH, there is also evidence of other genetic perturbations, including pulmonary vascular cell DNA damage, activation of the DNA damage response, and variations in microRNA expression. These findings likely contribute, in part, to dysregulation of proliferation and apoptosis signaling pathways akin to what is observed in cancer; changes in cellular metabolism, metabolic flux, and mitochondrial function; and endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition as key signaling pathways that promote pulmonary vascular remodeling. This review will highlight recent advances in the field with an emphasis on the aforementioned molecular mechanisms as contributors to the pulmonary vascular disease pathophenotype. PMID:27213345

  1. Hemolytic mechanism of dioscin proposed by molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fu; Wang, Renxiao

    2010-01-01

    Saponins are a class of compounds containing a triterpenoid or steroid core with some attached carbohydrate modules. Many saponins cause hemolysis. However, the hemolytic mechanism of saponins at the molecular level is not yet fully understood. In an attempt to explore this issue, we have studied dioscin-a saponin with high hemolytic activity-through extensive molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Firstly, all-atom MD simulations of 8 ns duration were conducted to study the stability of the dioscin-cholesterol complex and the cholesterol-cholesterol complex in water and in decane, respectively. MM-GB/SA computations indicate that the dioscin-cholesterol complex is energetically more favorable than the cholesterol-cholesterol complex in a non-polar environment. Next, several coarse-grained MD simulations of 400 ns duration were conducted to directly observe the distribution of multiple dioscin molecules on a DPPC-POPC-PSM-CHOL lipid bilayer. Our results indicate that dioscin can penetrate into the lipid bilayer, accumulate in the lipid raft micro-domain, and then bind cholesterol. This leads to the destabilization of lipid raft and consequent membrane curvature, which may eventually result in the hemolysis of red cells. This possible mechanism of hemolysis can well explain some experimental observations on hemolysis. PMID:19513766

  2. Molecular Mechanisms of Pulmonary Vascular Remodeling in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane A. Leopold

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH is a devastating disease that is precipitated by hypertrophic pulmonary vascular remodeling of distal arterioles to increase pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance in the absence of left heart, lung parenchymal, or thromboembolic disease. Despite available medical therapy, pulmonary artery remodeling and its attendant hemodynamic consequences result in right ventricular dysfunction, failure, and early death. To limit morbidity and mortality, attention has focused on identifying the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying aberrant pulmonary artery remodeling to identify pathways for intervention. While there is a well-recognized heritable genetic component to PAH, there is also evidence of other genetic perturbations, including pulmonary vascular cell DNA damage, activation of the DNA damage response, and variations in microRNA expression. These findings likely contribute, in part, to dysregulation of proliferation and apoptosis signaling pathways akin to what is observed in cancer; changes in cellular metabolism, metabolic flux, and mitochondrial function; and endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition as key signaling pathways that promote pulmonary vascular remodeling. This review will highlight recent advances in the field with an emphasis on the aforementioned molecular mechanisms as contributors to the pulmonary vascular disease pathophenotype.

  3. Polarizable Atomic Multipole-based Molecular Mechanics for Organic Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Pengyu; Wu, Chuanjie; Ponder, Jay W

    2011-10-11

    An empirical potential based on permanent atomic multipoles and atomic induced dipoles is reported for alkanes, alcohols, amines, sulfides, aldehydes, carboxylic acids, amides, aromatics and other small organic molecules. Permanent atomic multipole moments through quadrupole moments have been derived from gas phase ab initio molecular orbital calculations. The van der Waals parameters are obtained by fitting to gas phase homodimer QM energies and structures, as well as experimental densities and heats of vaporization of neat liquids. As a validation, the hydrogen bonding energies and structures of gas phase heterodimers with water are evaluated using the resulting potential. For 32 homo- and heterodimers, the association energy agrees with ab initio results to within 0.4 kcal/mol. The RMS deviation of hydrogen bond distance from QM optimized geometry is less than 0.06 Å. In addition, liquid self-diffusion and static dielectric constants computed from molecular dynamics simulation are consistent with experimental values. The force field is also used to compute the solvation free energy of 27 compounds not included in the parameterization process, with a RMS error of 0.69 kcal/mol. The results obtained in this study suggest the AMOEBA force field performs well across different environments and phases. The key algorithms involved in the electrostatic model and a protocol for developing parameters are detailed to facilitate extension to additional molecular systems. PMID:22022236

  4. The epidemiology and molecular mechanisms linking obesity, diabetes, and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Rosalyn D; Gallagher, Emily J; Scheinman, Eyal J; Damouni, Rawan; LeRoith, Derek

    2013-01-01

    The worldwide epidemic of obesity is associated with increasing rates of the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. Epidemiological studies have reported that these conditions are linked to increased rates of cancer incidence and mortality. Obesity, particularly abdominal obesity, is associated with insulin resistance and the development of dyslipidemia, hyperglycemia, and ultimately type 2 diabetes. Although many metabolic abnormalities occur with obesity and type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia appear to be central to these conditions and may contribute to dyslipidemia and altered levels of circulating estrogens and androgens. In this review, we will discuss the epidemiological and molecular links between obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cancer, and how hyperinsulinemia and dyslipidemia may contribute to cancer development. We will discuss how these metabolic abnormalities may interact with estrogen signaling in breast cancer growth. Finally, we will discuss the effects of type 2 diabetes medications on cancer risk. PMID:23810003

  5. Molecular and Epigenetic Mechanisms of MLL in Human Leukemogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballabio, Erica; Milne, Thomas A., E-mail: thomas.milne@imm.ox.ac.uk [MRC Molecular Haematology Unit, Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, John Radcliffe Hospital Headington, Oxford OX3 9DS (United Kingdom)

    2012-09-10

    Epigenetics is often defined as the study of heritable changes in gene expression or chromosome stability that don’t alter the underlying DNA sequence. Epigenetic changes are established through multiple mechanisms that include DNA methylation, non-coding RNAs and the covalent modification of specific residues on histone proteins. It is becoming clear not only that aberrant epigenetic changes are common in many human diseases such as leukemia, but that these changes by their very nature are malleable, and thus are amenable to treatment. Epigenetic based therapies have so far focused on the use of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors and DNA methyltransferase inhibitors, which tend to have more general and widespread effects on gene regulation in the cell. However, if a unique molecular pathway can be identified, diseases caused by epigenetic mechanisms are excellent candidates for the development of more targeted therapies that focus on specific gene targets, individual binding domains, or specific enzymatic activities. Designing effective targeted therapies depends on a clear understanding of the role of epigenetic mutations during disease progression. The Mixed Lineage Leukemia (MLL) protein is an example of a developmentally important protein that controls the epigenetic activation of gene targets in part by methylating histone 3 on lysine 4. MLL is required for normal development, but is also mutated in a subset of aggressive human leukemias and thus provides a useful model for studying the link between epigenetic cell memory and human disease. The most common MLL mutations are chromosome translocations that fuse the MLL gene in frame with partner genes creating novel fusion proteins. In this review, we summarize recent work that argues MLL fusion proteins could function through a single molecular pathway, but we also highlight important data that suggests instead that multiple independent mechanisms underlie MLL mediated leukemogenesis.

  6. Molecular and Epigenetic Mechanisms of MLL in Human Leukemogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas A. Milne

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetics is often defined as the study of heritable changes in gene expression or chromosome stability that don’t alter the underlying DNA sequence. Epigenetic changes are established through multiple mechanisms that include DNA methylation, non-coding RNAs and the covalent modification of specific residues on histone proteins. It is becoming clear not only that aberrant epigenetic changes are common in many human diseases such as leukemia, but that these changes by their very nature are malleable, and thus are amenable to treatment. Epigenetic based therapies have so far focused on the use of histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitors and DNA methyltransferase inhibitors, which tend to have more general and widespread effects on gene regulation in the cell. However, if a unique molecular pathway can be identified, diseases caused by epigenetic mechanisms are excellent candidates for the development of more targeted therapies that focus on specific gene targets, individual binding domains, or specific enzymatic activities. Designing effective targeted therapies depends on a clear understanding of the role of epigenetic mutations during disease progression. The Mixed Lineage Leukemia (MLL protein is an example of a developmentally important protein that controls the epigenetic activation of gene targets in part by methylating histone 3 on lysine 4. MLL is required for normal development, but is also mutated in a subset of aggressive human leukemias and thus provides a useful model for studying the link between epigenetic cell memory and human disease. The most common MLL mutations are chromosome translocations that fuse the MLL gene in frame with partner genes creating novel fusion proteins. In this review, we summarize recent work that argues MLL fusion proteins could function through a single molecular pathway, but we also highlight important data that suggests instead that multiple independent mechanisms underlie MLL mediated leukemogenesis.

  7. MOLECULAR MECHANISM OF MICROBIAL TECHNETIUM REDUCTION FINAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DiChristina, Thomas J. [Georgia Tech

    2013-04-30

    Microbial Tc(VII) reduction is an attractive alternative strategy for bioremediation of technetium-contaminated subsurface environments. Traditional ex situ remediation processes (e.g., adsorption or ion exchange) are often limited by poor extraction efficiency, inhibition by competing ions and production of large volumes of produced waste. Microbial Tc(VII) reduction provides an attractive alternative in situ remediation strategy since the reduced end-product Tc(IV) precipitates as TcO2, a highly insoluble hydrous oxide. Despite its potential benefits, the molecular mechanism of microbial Tc(VII) reduction remains poorly understood. The main goal of the proposed DOENABIR research project is to determine the molecular mechanism of microbial Tc(VII) reduction. Random mutagenesis studies in our lab have resulted in generation of a set of six Tc(VII) reduction-deficient mutants of Shewanella oneidensis. The anaerobic respiratory deficiencies of each Tc(VII) reduction-deficient mutant was determined by anaerobic growth on various combinations of three electron donors and 14 terminal electron acceptors. Results indicated that the electron transport pathways to Tc(VII), NO3 -, Mn(III) and U(VI) share common structural or regulatory components. In addition, we have recently found that wild-type Shewanella are also able to reduce Tc(IV) as electron acceptor, producing Tc(III) as an end-product. The recent genome sequencing of a variety of technetium-reducing bacteria and the anticipated release of several additional genome sequences in the coming year, provides us with an unprecedented opportunity to determine the mechanism of microbial technetium reduction across species and genus lines.

  8. Molecular and Epigenetic Mechanisms of MLL in Human Leukemogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epigenetics is often defined as the study of heritable changes in gene expression or chromosome stability that don’t alter the underlying DNA sequence. Epigenetic changes are established through multiple mechanisms that include DNA methylation, non-coding RNAs and the covalent modification of specific residues on histone proteins. It is becoming clear not only that aberrant epigenetic changes are common in many human diseases such as leukemia, but that these changes by their very nature are malleable, and thus are amenable to treatment. Epigenetic based therapies have so far focused on the use of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors and DNA methyltransferase inhibitors, which tend to have more general and widespread effects on gene regulation in the cell. However, if a unique molecular pathway can be identified, diseases caused by epigenetic mechanisms are excellent candidates for the development of more targeted therapies that focus on specific gene targets, individual binding domains, or specific enzymatic activities. Designing effective targeted therapies depends on a clear understanding of the role of epigenetic mutations during disease progression. The Mixed Lineage Leukemia (MLL) protein is an example of a developmentally important protein that controls the epigenetic activation of gene targets in part by methylating histone 3 on lysine 4. MLL is required for normal development, but is also mutated in a subset of aggressive human leukemias and thus provides a useful model for studying the link between epigenetic cell memory and human disease. The most common MLL mutations are chromosome translocations that fuse the MLL gene in frame with partner genes creating novel fusion proteins. In this review, we summarize recent work that argues MLL fusion proteins could function through a single molecular pathway, but we also highlight important data that suggests instead that multiple independent mechanisms underlie MLL mediated leukemogenesis

  9. Aging and Immune Function: Molecular Mechanisms to Interventions

    OpenAIRE

    Ponnappan, Subramaniam; Ponnappan, Usha

    2011-01-01

    The immune system of an organism is an essential component of the defense mechanism aimed at combating pathogenic stress. Age-associated immune dysfunction, also dubbed “immune senescence,” manifests as increased susceptibility to infections, increased onset and progression of autoimmune diseases, and onset of neoplasia. Over the years, extensive research has generated consensus in terms of the phenotypic and functional defects within the immune system in various organisms, including humans. ...

  10. Unravelling the molecular mechanisms of the canonical Wnt signalling pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Ng, S. S.

    2010-01-01

    The Canonical Wnt signaling pathway (Wnt/beta-catenin pathway) is required during embryonic development and maintenance of adult-renewing tissue homeostasis. Deregulation of this pathway is found associated with cancer and other diseases. The main goal of this thesis is to discern the regulation mechanisms of canonical Wnt signaling and thereby identify potential drug targets. We found that, neither the dissembled of Axin1, APC or GSK3 from the destruction complex nor inactivation of GSK3 and...

  11. Brain Metastases from Colorectal Cancer: Microenvironment and Molecular Mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Yi-Wen Zang; Xiao-Dong Gu; Jian-Bin Xiang; Zong-You Chen

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common digestive tract malignancies in the world. Owing to the newer and more effective systemic therapies, the life of colorectal cancer patients can be remarkably prolonged, and the incidence of brain metastases is increasing. However, little is known about the underlying mechanisms of brain metastasis from colorectal cancer. Here we review the tumor microenvironment and metastasis associated molecules in brain metastases from colorectal cancer. A furthe...

  12. Radiation toxins: molecular mechanisms of action and radiomimetic properties .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Dmitri; Maliev, Vecheslav

    Introduction: Acute Radiation Disease (ARD) or Acute Radiation Syndromes (ARS) were defined as a toxic poisonous with development of the acute pathological processes in irradi-ated animals: systemic inflammatory response syndrome(SIRS), toxic multiple organ injury (TMOI), toxic multiple organ dysfunction syndromes (TMOD), toxic multiple organ failure (TMOF). However, the nature of radiation toxins, their mechanisms of formation, molecular structure, and mechanism of actions remain uncertain. Moderate and high doses of radiation induce apoptotic necrosis of radiosensitive cells with formation of Radiation Toxins and in-flammation development. Mild doses of radiation induce apoptosis or controlled programmed death of radiosensitive cells without Radiation Toxins formation and development of inflam-mation processes. Only radiation induced apoptotic necrosis initiates formation of Radiation Toxins(RT). Radiation Toxins are playing an important role as the trigger mechanisms for in-flammation development and cell lysis. The systemic inflammatory response syndrome after radiation involves an influence of various endogenous agents and mediators of inflammation such as bradykinin, histamine, serotonin and phospholipases activation, prostaglandins biosyn-thesis. Although, formation of non-specific toxins such as Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) is an important pathological process at mild or high doses of radiation. Reactive Oxygen Species play an important role in molecules damage and development of peroxidation of lipids and pro-teins which are the structural parts of cell and mitochondrial membranes. ROS and bio-radicals induce damage of DNA and RNA and peroxidation of their molecules. But high doses of radia-tion, severe and extremely severe physiological stress, result in cells death by apoptotic necrosis and could be defined as the neuroimmune acute disease. Excitotoxicity is an important patho-logical mechanism which damages the central nervous system. We postulate that

  13. Altered brain protein expression profiles are associated with molecular neurological dysfunction in the PKU mouse model

    OpenAIRE

    Imperlini, Esther; Orrù, Stefania; Corbo, Claudia; Daniele, Aurora; Salvatore, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU), if not detected and treated in newborns, causes severe neurological dysfunction and cognitive and behavioral deficiencies. Despite the biochemical characterization of PKU, the molecular mechanisms underlying PKU-associated brain dysfunction remain poorly understood. The aim of this study was to gain insights into the pathogenesis of this neurological damage by analyzing protein expression profiles in brain tissue of Black and Tan BRachyury-PahEnu2 mice (a mouse model of...

  14. A density-based adaptive quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Mark P; Kumbhar, Sadhana; Yang, Jack

    2014-10-20

    We present a density-based adaptive quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (DBA-QM/MM) method, whereby molecules can switch layers from the QM to the MM region and vice versa. The adaptive partitioning of the molecular system ensures that the layer assignment can change during the optimization procedure, that is, on the fly. The switch from a QM molecule to a MM molecule is determined if there is an absence of noncovalent interactions to any atom of the QM core region. The presence/absence of noncovalent interactions is determined by analysis of the reduced density gradient. Therefore, the location of the QM/MM boundary is based on physical arguments, and this neatly removes some empiricism inherent in previous adaptive QM/MM partitioning schemes. The DBA-QM/MM method is validated by using a water-in-water setup and an explicitly solvated L-alanyl-L-alanine dipeptide. PMID:24954803

  15. Molecular gas associated with IRAS 10361-5830

    CERN Document Server

    Vazzano, M M; Vasquez, J; Rubio, M; Romero, G A; .,

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the distribution of the molecular gas and the dust in the molecular clump linked to IRAS 10361-5830, located in the environs of the bubble-shaped HII region Gum 31 in the Carina region, with the aim of determining the main parameters of the associated material and investigating the evolutionary state of the young stellar objects identified there. Using the APEX telescope, we mapped the molecular emission in the J=3-2 transition of three CO isotopologues, 12CO, 13CO and C18O, over a 1.5' x 1.5' region around the IRAS position. We also observed the high density tracers CS and HCO+ toward the source. The cold dust distribution was analyzed using submillimeter continuum data at 870 \\mu\\ obtained with the APEX telescope. Complementary IR and radio data at different wavelengths were used to complete the study of the ISM. The molecular gas distribution reveals a cavity and a shell-like structure of ~ 0.32 pc in radius centered at the position of the IRAS source, with some young stellar objects (YSOs) proj...

  16. Mechanical Properties of Nanostructured Materials Determined Through Molecular Modeling Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, Thomas C.; Gates, Thomas S.

    2005-01-01

    The potential for gains in material properties over conventional materials has motivated an effort to develop novel nanostructured materials for aerospace applications. These novel materials typically consist of a polymer matrix reinforced with particles on the nanometer length scale. In this study, molecular modeling is used to construct fully atomistic models of a carbon nanotube embedded in an epoxy polymer matrix. Functionalization of the nanotube which consists of the introduction of direct chemical bonding between the polymer matrix and the nanotube, hence providing a load transfer mechanism, is systematically varied. The relative effectiveness of functionalization in a nanostructured material may depend on a variety of factors related to the details of the chemical bonding and the polymer structure at the nanotube-polymer interface. The objective of this modeling is to determine what influence the details of functionalization of the carbon nanotube with the polymer matrix has on the resulting mechanical properties. By considering a range of degree of functionalization, the structure-property relationships of these materials is examined and mechanical properties of these models are calculated using standard techniques.

  17. The Role of Exercise in Cardiac Aging: From Physiology to Molecular Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Jason; Rhee, James; Chaudhari, Vinita; Rosenzweig, Anthony

    2016-01-22

    Aging induces structural and functional changes in the heart that are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease and impaired functional capacity in the elderly. Exercise is a diagnostic and therapeutic tool, with the potential to provide insights into clinical diagnosis and prognosis, as well as the molecular mechanisms by which aging influences cardiac physiology and function. In this review, we first provide an overview of how aging impacts the cardiac response to exercise, and the implications this has for functional capacity in older adults. We then review the underlying molecular mechanisms by which cardiac aging contributes to exercise intolerance, and conversely how exercise training can potentially modulate aging phenotypes in the heart. Finally, we highlight the potential use of these exercise models to complement models of disease in efforts to uncover new therapeutic targets to prevent or treat heart disease in the aging population. PMID:26838314

  18. Association Mechanism Between Propionic Acid and Trioctylamine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李振宇; 秦炜; 戴猷元

    2002-01-01

    Tertiary amines dissolved in diluents are attractive extractants for recovery of carboxylic acids from dilute aqueous solutions. Quantitative Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analysis of organic solutions containing various concentrations of trioctylamine (TOA), n-octanol, and propionic acid was carried out, and liquid-liquid equilibrium was investigated using TOA in n-octanol as the solvent. The fraction of ion-pair association between TOA and propionic acid in the organic phase was quantitatively determined by FTIR. The apparent reactive extraction equilibrium constant, K11, was calculated using the quantitative FTIR spectrum and the equilibrium data. The results show that the fraction of ion-pair association depends on diluent concentration, complex dissolution for propionic acid, and association between TOA and propionic acid. The K11 based on quantitative FTIR has the same loading trend as that from the equilibrium data.

  19. Functional variant disrupts insulin induction of USF1: mechanism for USF1-associated dyslipidemias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naukkarinen, J.; Nilsson, E.; Koistinen, H.A.; Soderlund, S.; Lyssenko, V.; Vaag, A.; Poulsen, P.; Groop, L.; Taskinen, M.R.; Peltonen, L.

    2009-01-01

    mutations have been described nor the functional consequences for risk allele carriers been reported at the cellular or tissue level. METHODS AND RESULTS: In this study, we aimed at describing the molecular mechanism through which the strongest associating intronic single-nucleotide polymorphism variant in...

  20. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of chemical synaptic transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millhorn, D E; Bayliss, D A; Erickson, J T; Gallman, E A; Szymeczek, C L; Czyzyk-Krzeska, M; Dean, J B

    1989-12-01

    During the last decade much progress has been made in understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which nerve cells communicate with each other and nonneural (e.g., muscle) target tissue. This review is intended to provide the reader with an account of this work. We begin with an historical overview of research on cell-to-cell communication and then discuss recent developments that, in some instances, have led to dramatic changes in the concept of synaptic transmission. For instance, the finding that single neurons often contain multiple messengers (i.e., neurotransmitters) invalidated the long-held theory (i.e., Dale's Law) that individual neurons contain and release one and only one type of neurotransmitter. Moreover, the last decade witnessed the inclusion of an entire group of compounds, the neuropeptides, as messenger molecules. Enormous progress has also been made in elucidating postsynaptic receptor complexes and biochemical intermediaries involved in synaptic transmission. Here the development of recombinant DNA technology has made it possible to clone and determine the molecular structure for a number of receptors. This information has been used to gain insight into how these receptors function either as a ligand-gated channel or as a G protein-linked ligand recognition molecule. Perhaps the most progress made during this era was in understanding the molecular linkage of G protein-linked receptors to intramembranous and cytoplasmic macromolecules involved in signal amplification and transduction. We conclude with a brief discussion of how synaptic transmission leads to immediate alterations in the electrical activity and, in some cases, to a change in phenotype by altering gene expression. These alterations in cellular behavior are believed to be mediated by phosphoproteins, the final biochemical product of signal transduction. PMID:2575357

  1. BATMAN-TCM: a Bioinformatics Analysis Tool for Molecular mechANism of Traditional Chinese Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhongyang; Guo, Feifei; Wang, Yong; Li, Chun; Zhang, Xinlei; Li, Honglei; Diao, Lihong; Gu, Jiangyong; Wang, Wei; Li, Dong; He, Fuchu

    2016-02-01

    Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), with a history of thousands of years of clinical practice, is gaining more and more attention and application worldwide. And TCM-based new drug development, especially for the treatment of complex diseases is promising. However, owing to the TCM’s diverse ingredients and their complex interaction with human body, it is still quite difficult to uncover its molecular mechanism, which greatly hinders the TCM modernization and internationalization. Here we developed the first online Bioinformatics Analysis Tool for Molecular mechANism of TCM (BATMAN-TCM). Its main functions include 1) TCM ingredients’ target prediction; 2) functional analyses of targets including biological pathway, Gene Ontology functional term and disease enrichment analyses; 3) the visualization of ingredient-target-pathway/disease association network and KEGG biological pathway with highlighted targets; 4) comparison analysis of multiple TCMs. Finally, we applied BATMAN-TCM to Qishen Yiqi dripping Pill (QSYQ) and combined with subsequent experimental validation to reveal the functions of renin-angiotensin system responsible for QSYQ’s cardioprotective effects for the first time. BATMAN-TCM will contribute to the understanding of the “multi-component, multi-target and multi-pathway” combinational therapeutic mechanism of TCM, and provide valuable clues for subsequent experimental validation, accelerating the elucidation of TCM’s molecular mechanism. BATMAN-TCM is available at http://bionet.ncpsb.org/batman-tcm.

  2. Study on multimers and their structures in molecular association mixture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAMAGUCHI; Yoshinori; OZAKI; Yukihiro

    2007-01-01

    Self-association system of(R)-1,3-butanediol in dilute carbon tetrachloride(CCl4)solution is studied as a model of molecular association mixture.Analysis methods including FSMWEFA(fixed-size moving window evolving factor analysis)combined with PCA(principal component analysis),SIMPLISMA (simple-to-use interactive self-modeling mixture analysis),and ITTFA(iterative target transformation factor analysis)are adopted to resolve infrared spectra of(R)-1,3-butanediol solution.Association number and equilibrium constant are computed.(R)-1,3-butanediol in dilute inert solution is determined as a monomer-trimer equilibrium system.Theoretical investigation of trimer structures is carried out with DFT(density functional theory),and structural factors are analyzed.

  3. A molecular mechanical model for N-heterocyclic carbenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrke, Sascha; Hollóczki, Oldamur

    2016-08-10

    In this work we present a set of force fields for nine synthetically relevant and/or structurally interesting N-heterocyclic carbenes, including imidazol-, thiazol-, triazol-, imidazolidin-, and pyridine-ylidenes. The bonding parameters were calculated by using a series of geometry optimizations by ab initio methods. For fitting the non-bonding interactions, a water molecule was employed as a probe. The interaction energy between the carbene and the probe molecule was sampled along two coordinates for each carbene, representing the interaction through the lone pair, or the π system of the molecule. The corresponding reference interaction energies were obtained by CCSD(T)/CBS calculations. To describe the direction dependence of the intermolecular potential energy, an extra, massless Coulombic interaction site was included for all carbenes, which represents the lone pair of the divalent carbon atom. The resulting fitted carbene force field (CaFF) showed a robust behavior regarding probe molecule, as changing the molecular mechanical water model, or employing, instead, an OPLS methanol molecule did not introduce significant deviations in the potential energies. The obtained CaFF models are easy to merge with standard OPLS or AMBER force fields, therefore the molecular simulations of a large number of N-heterocyclic carbenes becomes available. PMID:27426687

  4. Molecular mechanisms underlying phosphate sensing, signaling, and adaptation in plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhaoliang Zhang; Hong Liao; William J. Lucas

    2014-01-01

    As an essential plant macronutrient, the low availability of phosphorus (P) in most soils imposes serious limitation on crop production. Plants have evolved complex responsive and adaptive mechanisms for acquisition, remobiliza-tion and recycling of phosphate (Pi) to maintain P homeostasis. Spatio-temporal molecular, physiological, and biochemical Pi deficiency responses developed by plants are the consequence of local and systemic sensing and signaling pathways. Pi deficiency is sensed local y by the root system where hormones serve as important signaling components in terms of develop-mental reprogramming, leading to changes in root system architecture. Root-to-shoot and shoot-to-root signals, delivered through the xylem and phloem, respectively, involving Pi itself, hormones, miRNAs, mRNAs, and sucrose, serve to coordinate Pi deficiency responses at the whole-plant level. A combination of chromatin remodeling, transcriptional and posttranslational events contribute to global y regulating a wide range of Pi deficiency responses. In this review, recent advances are evaluated in terms of progress toward developing a comprehen-sive understanding of the molecular events underlying control over P homeostasis. Application of this knowledge, in terms of developing crop plants having enhanced attributes for P use efficiency, is discussed from the perspective of agricultural sustainability in the face of diminishing global P supplies.

  5. Molecular mechanisms of deformation and failure in glassy materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rottler, Joerg

    2004-03-01

    Understanding the molecular origins of macroscopic mechanical properties is a fundamental scientific challenge. Fracture of both amorphous and crystalline materials involves many length scales reaching from the continuum to atomic level processes near a crack tip. Using molecular simulations of simple models for amorphous glassy materials, we first study elastoplastic deformation and discuss the nature of the shear yield stress and its dependence on loading conditions, strain rate and temperature. We then focus on the deformation of glassy polymeric systems into crazes at large strains. In the craze, polymers ( 0.5 nm diameter) are bundled into an intricate network of 10 nm diameter fibrils that extends 10 micrometers on either side of a mm crack tip. Analysis of local geometry and stresses provide insight into the real-space nature of the entanglements that control craze formation as well as melt dynamics. Crazes are also shown to share many features with jammed systems such as granular media and foams, but are unique in jamming under a tensile load. This allows explanations for the exponential force distribution in jammed systems to be tested. The force distribution strongly influences the ultimate breakdown of the craze fibrils either through disentanglement or chain scission. We conclude by quantifying the contribution of crazing to the unusually large fracture energy of glassy polymers.

  6. Neuroprotection and its molecular mechanism following spinal cord injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nai-Kui Liu; Xiao-Ming Xu

    2012-01-01

    Acute spinal cord injury initiates a complex cascade of molecular events termed 'secondary injury', which leads to progressive degeneration ranging from early neuronal apoptosis at the lesion site to delayed degeneration of intact white matter tracts, and, ultimately, expansion of the initial injury. These secondary injury processes include, but are not limited to, inflammation, free radical-induced cell death, glutamate excitotoxicity, phospholipase A2 activation, and induction of extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways, which are important targets in developing neuroprotective strategies for treatment of spinal cord injury. Recently, a number of studies have shown promising results on neuroprotection and recovery of function in rodent models of spinal cord injury using treatments that target secondary injury processes including inflammation, phospholipase A2 activation, and manipulation of the PTEN-Akt/mTOR signaling pathway. The present review outlines our ongoing research on the molecular mechanisms of neuroprotection in experimental spinal cord injury and briefly summarizes our earlier findings on the therapeutic potential of pharmacological treatments in spinal cord injury.

  7. Molecular spectroscopic study for suggested mechanism of chrome tanned leather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nashy, Elshahat H. A.; Osman, Osama; Mahmoud, Abdel Aziz; Ibrahim, Medhat

    2012-03-01

    Collagen represents the structural protein of the extracellular matrix, which gives strength of hides and/or skin under tanning process. Chrome tan is the most important tanning agent all over the world. The methods for production of leather evolved over several centuries as art and engineering with little understanding of the underlying science. The present work is devoted to suggest the most probable mechanistic action of chrome tan on hide proteins. First the affect of Cr upon hide protein is indicated by the studied mechanical properties. Then the spectroscopic characterization of the hide protein as well as chrome tanned leather was carried out with Horizontal Attenuated Total Reflection (HATR) FT-IR. The obtained results indicate how the chromium can attached with the active sites of collagen. Molecular modeling confirms that chromium can react with amino as well as carboxylate groups. Four schemes were obtained to describe the possible interactions of chrome tan with hide proteins.

  8. Molecular mechanism for cavitation in water under tension

    CERN Document Server

    Menzl, Georg; Geiger, Philipp; Caupin, Frédéric; Abascal, Jose L F; Valeriani, Chantal; Dellago, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Despite its relevance in biology and engineering, the molecular mechanism driving cavitation in water remains unknown. Using computer simulations, we investigate the structure and dynamics of vapor bubbles emerging from metastable water at negative pressures. We find that in the early stages of cavitation, bubbles are irregularly shaped and become more spherical as they grow. Nevertheless, the free energy of bubble formation can be perfectly reproduced in the framework of classical nucleation theory (CNT) if the curvature dependence of the surface tension is taken into account. Comparison of the observed bubble dynamics to the predictions of the macroscopic Rayleigh--Plesset (RP) equation, augmented with thermal fluctuations, demonstrates that the growth of nanoscale bubbles is governed by viscous forces. Combining the dynamical prefactor determined from the RP equation with the free energy of CNT yields an analytical expression for the cavitation rate that reproduces the simulation results very well over a w...

  9. The molecular mechanisms of offspring effects from obese pregnancy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dowling, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of obesity, increased weight gain and the popularity of high-fat \\/ high-sugar diets are seriously impacting upon the global population. Billions of individuals are affected, and although diet and lifestyle are of paramount importance to the development of adult obesity, compelling evidence is emerging which suggests that maternal obesity and related disorders may be passed on to the next generation by non-genetic means. The processes acting within the uteri of obese mothers may permanently predispose offspring to a diverse plethora of diseases ranging from obesity and diabetes to psychiatric disorders. This review aims to summarise some of the molecular mechanisms and active processes currently known about maternal obesity and its effect on foetal and neonatal physiology and metabolism. Complex and multifactorial networks of molecules are intertwined and culminate in a pathologically synergistic manner to cause disruption and disorganisation of foetal physiology. This altered phenotype may potentiate the cycle of intergenerational transmission of obesity and related disorders.

  10. Quantum-Mechanical Calculations on Molecular Substructures Involved in Nanosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Szefler

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this review article, four ideas are discussed: (a aromaticity of fullerenes patched with flowers of 6-and 8-membered rings, optimized at the HF and DFT levels of theory, in terms of HOMA and NICS criteria; (b polybenzene networks, from construction to energetic and vibrational spectra computations; (c quantum-mechanical calculations on the repeat units of various P-type crystal networks and (d construction and stability evaluation, at DFTB level of theory, of some exotic allotropes of diamond D5, involved in hyper-graphenes. The overall conclusion was that several of the yet hypothetical molecular nanostructures herein described are serious candidates to the status of real molecules.

  11. PRDM Proteins: Molecular Mechanisms in Signal Transduction and Transcriptional Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Moncharmont

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available PRDM (PRDI-BF1 and RIZ homology domain containing protein family members are characterized by the presence of a PR domain and a variable number of Zn-finger repeats. Experimental evidence has shown that the PRDM proteins play an important role in gene expression regulation, modifying the chromatin structure either directly, through the intrinsic methyltransferase activity, or indirectly through the recruitment of chromatin remodeling complexes. PRDM proteins have a dual action: they mediate the effect induced by different cell signals like steroid hormones and control the expression of growth factors. PRDM proteins therefore have a pivotal role in the transduction of signals that control cell proliferation and differentiation and consequently neoplastic transformation. In this review, we describe pathways in which PRDM proteins are involved and the molecular mechanism of their transcriptional regulation.

  12. PRDM Proteins: Molecular Mechanisms in Signal Transduction and Transcriptional Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Zazzo, Erika; De Rosa, Caterina; Abbondanza, Ciro; Moncharmont, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    PRDM (PRDI-BF1 and RIZ homology domain containing) protein family members are characterized by the presence of a PR domain and a variable number of Zn-finger repeats. Experimental evidence has shown that the PRDM proteins play an important role in gene expression regulation, modifying the chromatin structure either directly, through the intrinsic methyltransferase activity, or indirectly through the recruitment of chromatin remodeling complexes. PRDM proteins have a dual action: they mediate the effect induced by different cell signals like steroid hormones and control the expression of growth factors. PRDM proteins therefore have a pivotal role in the transduction of signals that control cell proliferation and differentiation and consequently neoplastic transformation. In this review, we describe pathways in which PRDM proteins are involved and the molecular mechanism of their transcriptional regulation. PMID:24832654

  13. Microbe Associated Molecular Pattern Signaling in Guard Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Wenxiu; Murata, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Stomata, formed by pairs of guard cells in the epidermis of terrestrial plants, regulate gas exchange, thus playing a critical role in plant growth and stress responses. As natural openings, stomata are exploited by microbes as an entry route. Recent studies reveal that plants close stomata upon guard cell perception of molecular signatures from microbes, microbe associated molecular patterns (MAMPs), to prevent microbe invasion. The perception of MAMPs induces signal transduction including recruitment of second messengers, such as Ca(2+) and H2O2, phosphorylation events, and change of transporter activity, leading to stomatal movement. In the present review, we summarize recent findings in signaling underlying MAMP-induced stomatal movement by comparing with other signalings. PMID:27200056

  14. Molecular mechanisms underlying progesterone-enhanced breast cancer cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui-Chen; Lee, Wen-Sen

    2016-01-01

    Progesterone (P4) was demonstrated to inhibit migration in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), but to enhance migration in T47D breast cancer cells. To investigate the mechanism responsible for this switch in P4 action, we examined the signaling pathway responsible for the P4-induced migration enhancement in breast cancer cell lines, T47D and MCF-7. Here, we demonstrated that P4 activated the cSrc/AKT signaling pathway, subsequently inducing RSK1 activation, which in turn increased phosphorylation of p27 at T198 and formation of the p27pT198-RhoA complex in the cytosol, thereby preventing RhoA degradation, and eventually enhanced migration in T47D cells. These findings were confirmed in the P4-treated MCF-7. Comparing the P4-induced molecular events in between breast cancer cells and VSMCs, we found that P4 increased p27 phosphorylation at T198 in breast cancer cells through RSK1 activation, while P4 increased p27 phosphorlation at Ser10 in VSMCs through KIS activation. P27pT198 formed the complex with RhoA and prevented RhoA degradation in T47D cells, whereas p-p27Ser10 formed the complex with RhoA and caused RhoA degradation in VSMCs. The results of this study highlight the molecular mechanism underlying P4-enhanced breast cancer cell migration, and suggest that RSK1 activation is responsible for the P4-induced migration enhancement in breast cancer cells. PMID:27510838

  15. Stability mechanisms of a thermophilic laccase probed by molecular dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Niels Johan; Kepp, Kasper Planeta

    2013-01-01

    Laccases are highly stable, industrially important enzymes capable of oxidizing a large range of substrates. Causes for their stability are, as for other proteins, poorly understood. In this work, multiple-seed molecular dynamics (MD) was applied to a Trametes versicolor laccase in response to...... variable ionic strengths, temperatures, and glycosylation status. Near-physiological conditions provided excellent agreement with the crystal structure (average RMSD ∼0.92 Å) and residual agreement with experimental B-factors. The persistence of backbone hydrogen bonds was identified as a key descriptor of...... structural response to environment, whereas solvent-accessibility, radius of gyration, and fluctuations were only locally relevant. Backbone hydrogen bonds decreased systematically with temperature in all simulations (∼9 per 50 K), probing structural changes associated with enthalpy-entropy compensation...

  16. Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Changing Associations to Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Click, Benjamin; Whitcomb, David C

    2016-01-01

    Managing the health of individual patients suffering from complex disorders is a challenge and is costly. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a prototypic complex disorder of the small and large intestines. Susceptibility is complex, severity is variable, and response to treatment is unpredictable. Di Narzo et al. (Clin Transl Gastroenterol 7: e177; doi:10.1038/ctg.2016.34) bring diverse teams of physicians and scientists together to break down the mechanisms of IBD by linking pathogenic genetic variants with altered gene expression in specific cell types causing IBD. Framing new findings in the context of other complex diseases provides a roadmap for predictive medicine. PMID:27607898

  17. DMPD: Molecular mechanisms of the anti-inflammatory functions of interferons. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18086388 Molecular mechanisms of the anti-inflammatory functions of interferons. Ko...hanisms of the anti-inflammatory functions of interferons. PubmedID 18086388 Title Molecular mechanisms...varik P, Sauer I, Schaljo B. Immunobiology. 2007;212(9-10):895-901. Epub 2007 Nov 8. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Molecular mec

  18. Molecular mechanisms for interaction of glycine betaine with supra-molecular phycobiliprotein complexes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU XiuLing; LI Heng; XIE Jie; ZHAO JingQuan

    2009-01-01

    Glycine betaine (GB) is a biologically important small molecule protecting cells,proteins and enzymes in vivo and in vitro under environmental stresses.Recently,it was found that GB could also relax the structure and inactivate the function of phycobiliproteins and phycobilisome (PBS),a kind of supramolecular complexes,in cyanobacterial cells.The molecular mechanisms for the opposite phenomena are quite ambiguous.Taking PBS and a trimeric or monomeric C-phycocyanin (C-PC) as models,the molecular mechanism for the interaction of GB with supra-molecular complexes or nuclear proteins was investigated.The energetic decoupling of PBS components induced by GB suggests that the PBS core-membrane linking polypeptide was the most sensitive site while the rod-core linker was the next.Biochemistry analysis proves that PBS structure was loosened but not dissociated into the components.On the basis of the results and structure knowledge,it was proposed that GB screened the electrostatic attraction of the opposite charges on a linker and a protein leading to a much looser structure.It was observed that GB induced a spectral blue shift for trimeric C-PC but a red shift for s monomeric C-PC (a nuclear protein),which were ascribed to GB's screening of the electrostatic attraction of a linker to a protein and strengthening of the hydrophobic interaction between C-PC monomers.The trimers and monomers' forming of the same products under high concentration of GB was ascribed to a compromise of the opposite interaction forces.

  19. Molecular mechanisms for interaction of glycine betaine with supra-molecular phycobiliprotein complexes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Glycine betaine(GB) is a biologically important small molecule protecting cells,proteins and enzymes in vivo and in vitro under environmental stresses.Recently,it was found that GB could also relax the structure and inactivate the function of phycobiliproteins and phycobilisome(PBS),a kind of supramolecular complexes,in cyanobacterial cells.The molecular mechanisms for the opposite phenomena are quite ambiguous.Taking PBS and a trimeric or monomeric C-phycocyanin(C-PC) as models,the molecular mechanism for the interaction of GB with supra-molecular complexes or nuclear proteins was investigated.The energetic decoupling of PBS components induced by GB suggests that the PBS core-membrane linking polypeptide was the most sensitive site while the rod-core linker was the next.Biochemistry analysis proves that PBS structure was loosened but not dissociated into the components.On the basis of the results and structure knowledge,it was proposed that GB screened the electrostatic attraction of the opposite charges on a linker and a protein leading to a much looser structure.It was observed that GB induced a spectral blue shift for trimeric C-PC but a red shift for a monomeric C-PC(a nuclear protein),which were ascribed to GB’s screening of the electrostatic attraction of a linker to a protein and strengthening of the hydrophobic interaction between C-PC monomers.The trimers and monomers’ forming of the same products under high concentration of GB was ascribed to a compromise of the opposite interaction forces.

  20. Categorical prototyping: incorporating molecular mechanisms into 3D printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brommer, Dieter B.; Giesa, Tristan; Spivak, David I.; Buehler, Markus J.

    2016-01-01

    We apply the mathematical framework of category theory to articulate the precise relation between the structure and mechanics of a nanoscale system in a macroscopic domain. We maintain the chosen molecular mechanical properties from the nanoscale to the continuum scale. Therein we demonstrate a procedure to ‘protoype a model’, as category theory enables us to maintain certain information across disparate fields of study, distinct scales, or physical realizations. This process fits naturally with prototyping, as a prototype is not a complete product but rather a reduction to test a subset of properties. To illustrate this point, we use large-scale multi-material printing to examine the scaling of the elastic modulus of 2D carbon allotropes at the macroscale and validate our printed model using experimental testing. The resulting hand-held materials can be examined more readily, and yield insights beyond those available in the original digital representations. We demonstrate this concept by twisting the material, a test beyond the scope of the original model. The method developed can be extended to other methods of additive manufacturing.

  1. Molecular mechanisms of CRISPR-mediated microbial immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasiunas, Giedrius; Sinkunas, Tomas; Siksnys, Virginijus

    2014-02-01

    Bacteriophages (phages) infect bacteria in order to replicate and burst out of the host, killing the cell, when reproduction is completed. Thus, from a bacterial perspective, phages pose a persistent lethal threat to bacterial populations. Not surprisingly, bacteria evolved multiple defense barriers to interfere with nearly every step of phage life cycles. Phages respond to this selection pressure by counter-evolving their genomes to evade bacterial resistance. The antagonistic interaction between bacteria and rapidly diversifying viruses promotes the evolution and dissemination of bacteriophage-resistance mechanisms in bacteria. Recently, an adaptive microbial immune system, named clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and which provides acquired immunity against viruses and plasmids, has been identified. Unlike the restriction–modification anti-phage barrier that subjects to cleavage any foreign DNA lacking a protective methyl-tag in the target site, the CRISPR–Cas systems are invader-specific, adaptive, and heritable. In this review, we focus on the molecular mechanisms of interference/immunity provided by different CRISPR–Cas systems. PMID:23959171

  2. Molecular Mechanisms of HTLV-1 Cell-to-Cell Transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Gross

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The tumorvirus human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1, a member of the delta-retrovirus family, is transmitted via cell-containing body fluids such as blood products, semen, and breast milk. In vivo, HTLV-1 preferentially infects CD4+ T-cells, and to a lesser extent, CD8+ T-cells, dendritic cells, and monocytes. Efficient infection of CD4+ T-cells requires cell-cell contacts while cell-free virus transmission is inefficient. Two types of cell-cell contacts have been described to be critical for HTLV-1 transmission, tight junctions and cellular conduits. Further, two non-exclusive mechanisms of virus transmission at cell-cell contacts have been proposed: (1 polarized budding of HTLV-1 into synaptic clefts; and (2 cell surface transfer of viral biofilms at virological synapses. In contrast to CD4+ T-cells, dendritic cells can be infected cell-free and, to a greater extent, via viral biofilms in vitro. Cell-to-cell transmission of HTLV-1 requires a coordinated action of steps in the virus infectious cycle with events in the cell-cell adhesion process; therefore, virus propagation from cell-to-cell depends on specific interactions between cellular and viral proteins. Here, we review the molecular mechanisms of HTLV-1 transmission with a focus on the HTLV-1-encoded proteins Tax and p8, their impact on host cell factors mediating cell-cell contacts, cytoskeletal remodeling, and thus, virus propagation.

  3. Protein adduct formation as a molecular mechanism in neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopachin, Richard M; Decaprio, Anthony P

    2005-08-01

    Chemicals that cause nerve injury and neurological deficits are a structurally diverse group. For the majority, the corresponding molecular mechanisms of neurotoxicity are poorly understood. Many toxicants (e.g., hepatotoxicants) of other organ systems and/or their oxidative metabolites have been identified as electrophiles and will react with cellular proteins by covalently binding nucleophilic amino acid residues. Cellular toxicity occurs when adduct formation disrupts protein structure and/or function, which secondarily causes damage to submembrane organelles, metabolic pathways, or cytological processes. Since many neurotoxicants are also electrophiles, the corresponding pathophysiological mechanism might involve protein adduction. In this review, we will summarize the principles of covalent bond formation that govern reactions between xenobiotic electrophiles and biological nucleophiles. Because a neurotoxicant can form adducts with multiple nucleophilic residues on proteins, the challenge is to identify the mechanistically important adduct. In this regard, it is now recognized that despite widespread chemical adduction of tissue proteins, neurotoxicity can be mediated through binding of specific target nucleophiles in key neuronal proteins. Acrylamide and 2,5-hexanedione are prototypical neurotoxicants that presumably act through the formation of protein adducts. To illustrate both the promise and the difficulty of adduct research, these electrophilic chemicals will be discussed with respect to covalent bond formation, suspected protein sites of adduction, and proposed mechanisms of neurotoxicity. The goals of future investigations are to identify and quantify specific protein adducts that play a causal role in the generation of neurotoxicity induced by electrophilic neurotoxicants. This is a challenging but critical objective that will be facilitated by recent advances in proteomic methodologies. PMID:15901921

  4. Stereochemistry definition of small organic molecules in solution: [H-H] NOE + molecular mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheme of theoretical method of molecular configuration definition for small organic molecules in solution has been presented. The method bases on measurements of nuclear Overhauser effects for proton-proton interactions and molecular mechanics calculations

  5. Survivin-T34A: molecular mechanism and therapeutic potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan R Aspe

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Jonathan R Aspe, Nathan R WallCenter for Health Disparities Research and Molecular Medicine, Division of Biochemistry and Microbiology, Department of Basic Sciences, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA, USAAbstract: The inhibitor of apoptosis protein survivin's threonine 34 to alanine (T34A mutation abolishes a phosphorylation site for p34(cdc2–cyclin B1, resulting in initiation of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in cancer cells; however, it has little known direct effects on normal cells. The possibility that targeting survivin in this way may provide a novel approach for selective cancer gene therapy has yet to be fully evaluated. Although a flurry of work was undertaken in the late 1990s and early 2000s, only minor advances on this mutant have recently taken place. We recently described that cells generated to express a stable form of the mutant protein released this survivin-T34A to the conditioned medium. When this conditioned medium was collected and deposited on naive tumor cells, conditioned medium T34A was as effective as some chemotherapeutics in the induction of tumor cell apoptosis, and when combined with other forms of genotoxic stressors potentiated their killing effects. We hope with this review to revitalize the T34A field, as there is still much that needs to be investigated. In addition to determining the therapeutic dose and the duration of drug therapy required at the disease site, a better understanding of other key factors is also important. These include knowledge of target cell populations, cell-surface receptors, changes that occur in the target tissue at the molecular and cellular level with progression of the disease, and the mechanism and site of therapeutic action.Keywords: survivin, T34A, apoptosis, proliferation, therapy

  6. Quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) docking: an evaluation for known test systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beierlein, Frank; Lanig, Harald; Schürer, Gudrun; Horn, Anselm H. C.; Clark, Timothy

    A combined quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) docking approach for the investigation of protein-inhibitor complexes is presented. Starting points for QM/MM optimizations are generated with AutoDock. The subsequent semiempirical AM1 QM/MM optimization of the complex obtained by the docking procedure gives a more detailed description of the binding mode and the electronic properties of the ligand. As we use a flexible protein environment in the QM/MM optimizations, we are able to simulate limited structural changes of the enzyme upon binding a ligand, even within a simple geometry optimization. The method was validated using a set of structurally known protein-inhibitor complexes, whose crystallographic data were taken from the Protein Data Bank. In addition to protein structures taken directly from complexes with the inhibitors, structures of uncomplexed HIV-1-protease and thrombin were also used successfully for QM/MM docking experiments. By comparing the resulting structures with those obtained using protein structures from protein-inhibitor complexes, we find that the method is able to simulate the effect of the induced fit when a simple optimization is adequate to reproduce the protein movement. Describing the ligand quantum mechanically gives a detailed view of its electronic properties, for example its polarization within the active site of the enzyme. This study suggests strongly that a QM/MM molecular dynamics approach will be able to simulate the induced fit in general cases.

  7. Conformational analysis of methylphenidate: comparison of molecular orbital and molecular mechanics methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Kathleen M; Skawinski, William J; Misra, Milind; Paris, Kristina A; Naik, Neelam H; Buono, Ronald A; Deutsch, Howard M; Venanzi, Carol A

    2004-11-01

    Methylphenidate (MP) binds to the cocaine binding site on the dopamine transporter and inhibits reuptake of dopamine, but does not appear to have the same abuse potential as cocaine. This study, part of a comprehensive effort to identify a drug treatment for cocaine abuse, investigates the effect of choice of calculation technique and of solvent model on the conformational potential energy surface (PES) of MP and a rigid methylphenidate (RMP) analogue which exhibits the same dopamine transporter binding affinity as MP. Conformational analysis was carried out by the AM1 and AM1/SM5.4 semiempirical molecular orbital methods, a molecular mechanics method (Tripos force field with the dielectric set equal to that of vacuum or water) and the HF/6-31G* molecular orbital method in vacuum phase. Although all three methods differ somewhat in the local details of the PES, the general trends are the same for neutral and protonated MP. In vacuum phase, protonation has a distinctive effect in decreasing the regions of space available to the local conformational minima. Solvent has little effect on the PES of the neutral molecule and tends to stabilize the protonated species. The random search (RS) conformational analysis technique using the Tripos force field was found to be capable of locating the minima found by the molecular orbital methods using systematic grid search. This suggests that the RS/Tripos force field/vacuum phase protocol is a reasonable choice for locating the local minima of MP. However, the Tripos force field gave significantly larger phenyl ring rotational barriers than the molecular orbital methods for MP and RMP. For both the neutral and protonated cases, all three methods found the phenyl ring rotational barriers for the RMP conformers/invertamers (denoted as cte, tte, and cta) to be: cte, tte > MP > cta. Solvation has negligible effect on the phenyl ring rotational barrier of RMP. The B3LYP/6-31G* density functional method was used to calculate the

  8. Molecular mechanisms of recurrent acute obstructive bronchitis in infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abaturov A.E.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the clinical and immunological features and mechanisms of recurrent acute obstructive bronchitis in infants. We have examined 102 children aged from 6 months to 3 years with acute obstructive bronchitis and signs of respiratory insufficiency of the I-II degree. There were 28 children with recurrent acute obstructive bronchitis and 74 patients with acute obstructive bronchitis,developed for the first time. We determined the concentration of total IgE, content of IFN-і, IL-4, IL-12 and IL-13 in serum by ELISA and the expression of the transcription factor NF-єB in lymphocytes of peripheral blood by flow cytometry in all the children. High level of IL-12 as compared to physiological norms in the dynamics of the disease was the characteristic feature of the children of both groups. And it was the factor, which detected a voltage of cell-mediated immune response and inflammation. The second specific feature was the high concentration of IgE. It was shown that the transcription factor NF-єB determined the cytokine status at the beginning of the disease, and in the period of convalescence. That fact did not depend on the number of previous acute obstructive bronchitis. However, there were violations of the mechanisms of NF-єB-associated signaling pathways activation, which manifested itself in an advantageous enhancement of the chains, determining the production of Th2-associated cytokines in children with recurrent acute obstructive bronchitis.

  9. The promise of molecular epidemiology in defining the association between radiation and cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular epidemiology involves the inclusion in epidemiologic studies of biologic measurements made at a genetic and molecular level and aims to improve the current knowledge of disease etiology and risk. One of the goals of molecular epidemiology studies of cancer is to determine the role of environmental and genetic factors in initiation and progression of malignancies and to use this knowledge to develop preventive strategies. This approach promises extraordinary opportunities for revolutionizing the practice of medicine and reducing risk. However, this will be accompanied by the need to address and resolve many challenges, such as ensuring the appropriate interpretation of molecular testing and resolving associated ethical, legal, and social issues. Traditional epidemiologic approaches determined that exposure to ionizing radiation poses significantly increased risk of leukemia and several other types of cancer. Such studies provided the basis for setting exposure standards to protect the public and the workforce from potentially adverse effects of ionizing radiation. These standards were set by using modeling approaches to extrapolate from the biological effects observed in high-dose radiation studies to predicted, but mostly immeasurable, effects at low radiation doses. It is anticipated that the addition of the molecular parameters to the population-based studies will help identify the genes and pathways characteristic of cancers due to radiation exposure of individuals, as well as identify susceptible or resistant subpopulations. In turn, the information about the molecular mechanisms should aid to improve risk assessment. While studies on radiogenic concerns are currently limited to only a few candidate genes, the exponential growth of scientific knowledge and technology promises expansion of knowledge about identity of participating genes and pathways in the future. This article is meant to provide an introductory overview of recent advances in

  10. Retinoic acid receptors: from molecular mechanisms to cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Masi, Alessandra; Leboffe, Loris; De Marinis, Elisabetta; Pagano, Francesca; Cicconi, Laura; Rochette-Egly, Cécile; Lo-Coco, Francesco; Ascenzi, Paolo; Nervi, Clara

    2015-02-01

    Retinoic acid (RA), the major bioactive metabolite of retinol or vitamin A, induces a spectrum of pleiotropic effects in cell growth and differentiation that are relevant for embryonic development and adult physiology. The RA activity is mediated primarily by members of the retinoic acid receptor (RAR) subfamily, namely RARα, RARβ and RARγ, which belong to the nuclear receptor (NR) superfamily of transcription factors. RARs form heterodimers with members of the retinoid X receptor (RXR) subfamily and act as ligand-regulated transcription factors through binding specific RA response elements (RAREs) located in target genes promoters. RARs also have non-genomic effects and activate kinase signaling pathways, which fine-tune the transcription of the RA target genes. The disruption of RA signaling pathways is thought to underlie the etiology of a number of hematological and non-hematological malignancies, including leukemias, skin cancer, head/neck cancer, lung cancer, breast cancer, ovarian cancer, prostate cancer, renal cell carcinoma, pancreatic cancer, liver cancer, glioblastoma and neuroblastoma. Of note, RA and its derivatives (retinoids) are employed as potential chemotherapeutic or chemopreventive agents because of their differentiation, anti-proliferative, pro-apoptotic, and anti-oxidant effects. In humans, retinoids reverse premalignant epithelial lesions, induce the differentiation of myeloid normal and leukemic cells, and prevent lung, liver, and breast cancer. Here, we provide an overview of the biochemical and molecular mechanisms that regulate the RA and retinoid signaling pathways. Moreover, mechanisms through which deregulation of RA signaling pathways ultimately impact on cancer are examined. Finally, the therapeutic effects of retinoids are reported. PMID:25543955

  11. Molecular mechanisms of heavy metal tolerance and evolution n invertebrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Thierry K.S.Janssens; Dick Roelofs; Nico M.van Straalen

    2009-01-01

    Following the genomics revolution,our knowledge of the molecular mechanisms underlying defenses against stress has been greatly expanded.Under strong selective pressure many animals may evolve an enhanced stress tolerance.This can be achieved by altering the structure of proteins(through mutations in the coding regions of genes)or by altering the amount of protein(through changes in transcriptional regulation).The latter type of evolution Can be achieved by substitutions in the promoter of the gene of interest(cis-regulatory change)or by altering the structure or anaount of transcriptional regulator proteins (trans-regulatory change).The metallothionein system is one of the best studied stress response systems in the context of heavy metals.Metallothionein expression is assumed to be regulated by metal transcription factor 1(MTF-1);however,up to now the involvement of MTF-1 has only been proven for some vertebrates and Drosophila.Data on invertebrates such as nematodes and earthworms suggest that other mechanisms of metallothionein induction may be present.A detailed study of Cd tolerance was done for a species of soilliving springtail,Orchesella cincta.The metallothionein gene of this species is overexpressed in metal-exposed field populations.Analysis of the metallothionein promoter has demonstrated extensive polymorphisills that have a functional significance,as shown in bioreporter assays.In a study comparing 20 different populations,the frequency of a high-expresser promoter allele Was positively correlated with the concentration of metals in soil,especially Cd.The springtail study shows that cis-regulatory change of genes involved in the cellular stress response may contribute to evolution of metal tolerance.

  12. Molecular Mechanisms of HTLV-1 Cell-to-Cell Transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Christine; Thoma-Kress, Andrea K

    2016-01-01

    The tumorvirus human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1), a member of the delta-retrovirus family, is transmitted via cell-containing body fluids such as blood products, semen, and breast milk. In vivo, HTLV-1 preferentially infects CD4⁺ T-cells, and to a lesser extent, CD8⁺ T-cells, dendritic cells, and monocytes. Efficient infection of CD4⁺ T-cells requires cell-cell contacts while cell-free virus transmission is inefficient. Two types of cell-cell contacts have been described to be critical for HTLV-1 transmission, tight junctions and cellular conduits. Further, two non-exclusive mechanisms of virus transmission at cell-cell contacts have been proposed: (1) polarized budding of HTLV-1 into synaptic clefts; and (2) cell surface transfer of viral biofilms at virological synapses. In contrast to CD4⁺ T-cells, dendritic cells can be infected cell-free and, to a greater extent, via viral biofilms in vitro. Cell-to-cell transmission of HTLV-1 requires a coordinated action of steps in the virus infectious cycle with events in the cell-cell adhesion process; therefore, virus propagation from cell-to-cell depends on specific interactions between cellular and viral proteins. Here, we review the molecular mechanisms of HTLV-1 transmission with a focus on the HTLV-1-encoded proteins Tax and p8, their impact on host cell factors mediating cell-cell contacts, cytoskeletal remodeling, and thus, virus propagation. PMID:27005656

  13. Spin Configuration and Super-exchange Mechanism in Molecular Magnets Observed

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ Jointly supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China,Ministry of Science and Technology and Chinese Academy of Sciences,Ma Xucun's group in CAS Institute of Physics and Condensed Matter Physics National Lab,in cooperation with Xue Qikun's research team in the Department of Physics of Tsinghua University,studied the super exchange mechanism in cobalt phthalocyanine (CoPc) thin films by using a low temperature scanning tunneling microscope.With high energy-resolution spin-flip associated inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy,they explicitly identified the specific molecular orbitals that mediate the super exchange interaction between molecules.

  14. Final Report - Molecular Mechanisms of Bacterial Mercury Transformation - UCSF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Susan M. [UCSF

    2014-04-24

    The bacterial mercury resistance (mer) operon functions in Hg biogeochemistry and bioremediation by converting reactive inorganic Hg(II) and organic [RHg(II)]1+ mercurials to relatively inert monoatomic mercury vapor, Hg(0). Its genes regulate operon expression (MerR, MerD, MerOP), import Hg(II) (MerT, MerP, and MerC), and demethylate (MerB) and reduce (MerA) mercurials. We focus on how these components interact with each other and with the host cell to allow cells to survive and detoxify Hg compounds. Understanding how this ubiquitous detoxification system fits into the biology and ecology of its bacterial host is essential to guide interventions that support and enhance Hg remediation. In the current overall project we focused on two aspects of this system: (1) investigations of the energetics of Hg(II)-ligand binding interactions, and (2) both experimental and computational approaches to investigating the molecular mechanisms of Hg(II) acquisition by MerA and intramolecular transfer of Hg(II) prior to reduction within the MerA enzyme active site. Computational work was led by Prof. Jeremy Smith and took place at the University of Tennessee, while experimental work on MerA was led by Prof. Susan Miller and took place at the University of California San Francisco.

  15. Adriamycin increases podocyte permeability: evidence and molecular mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晓忠; 袁海涛; 张学光

    2003-01-01

    Objective To investigate the increased podocyte permeability by evidence of adriamycin (AD) and its molecular mechanism.Methods In this study, we explored the direct effects of AD on cultured mouse podocytes and the potential protection effects of Dexamethasome (Dex).Results After 24-hour AD (5×10-7 mol/L) treatment, albumin passage through podocyte monolayers was increased by 2.27-fold (P<0.01). AD caused a 62% decrease in Zonula Occluden -1 (ZO-1) protein (P<0.05), suggesting that AD might increase podocyte permeability by disrupting tight junctions. Dex (1×10-6 mol/L), co-administered with AD, protected podocytes from AD-induced increased albumin passage. This may be linked with an increased P-cadherin protein level to 1.93 fold of control (P<0.01).Conclusions AD has a direct, detrimental effect on podocyte permeability, probably through disrupting tight junctions; Dex could protect against AD-induced high podocyte permeability by upregulating adherent protein P-cadherin.

  16. Molecular mechanisms in the induction of chromosome aberrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In more recent years there have been attempts to understand the mechanisms giving rise to aberrations on a more molecular basis. This was initially stimulated by the demonstrations of enzyme repair systems in bacteria which repair mutagen-damaged DNA and the obvious suggestion that similar kinds of repair processes in eukaryotes could be responsible for spontaneous and mutagen-induced exchanges in somatic cells, and for recombinational exchanges in meiotic cells. This impetus has been maintained largely by discovery and the acquisition of information on five fronts: (i) increasing knowledge of the and organisation of the eukaryotic chromosome; (ii) a better understanding of the types of lesions induced in DNA by a wide variety of mutagens; (iii) the demonstrations of a variety of repair systems that restore damaged DNA in eukaryotes including man; (iv) the identification and characterisation of mutants defective in DNA repair and which give unusual reponses to aberration induction by specific mutagens; (v) the development of new techniques to visulise sister chromatid exchange and other facets of chromosome substructure. In this presentation some developments are considered and a picture is sketched of our current notions on how recent chromosomal aberrations are formed, by posing a number of questions and attempting to answer them. (Auth.)

  17. Molecular Mechanisms of Disease Pathogenesis Differ in Krabbe Disease Variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spratley, Samantha J; Hill, Chris H; Viuff, Agnete H; Edgar, James R; Skjødt, Karsten; Deane, Janet E

    2016-08-01

    Krabbe disease is a severe, fatal neurodegenerative disorder caused by defects in the lysosomal enzyme galactocerebrosidase (GALC). The correct targeting of GALC to the lysosome is essential for the degradation of glycosphingolipids including the primary lipid component of myelin. Over 100 different mutations have been identified in GALC that cause Krabbe disease but the mechanisms by which they cause disease remain unclear. We have generated monoclonal antibodies against full-length human GALC and used these to monitor the trafficking and processing of GALC variants in cell-based assays and by immunofluorescence microscopy. Striking differences in the secretion, processing and endosomal targeting of GALC variants allows the classification of these into distinct categories. A subset of GALC variants are not secreted by cells, not proteolytically processed, and remain trapped in the ER; these are likely to cause disease due to protein misfolding and should be targeted for pharmacological chaperone therapies. Other GALC variants can be correctly secreted by cells and cause disease due to catalytic defects in the enzyme active site, inappropriate post-translational modification or a potential inability to bind essential cofactors. The classification of disease pathogenesis presented here provides a molecular framework for appropriate targeting of future Krabbe disease therapies. PMID:27126738

  18. Unraveling the cellular and molecular mechanisms of repetitive magnetic stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Müller-Dahlhaus

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite numerous clinical studies, which have investigated the therapeutic potential of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS in various brain diseases, our knowledge of the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying rTMS-based therapies remains limited. Thus, a deeper understanding of rTMS-induced neural plasticity is required to optimize current treatment protocols. Studies in small animals or appropriate in vitro preparations (including models of brain diseases provide highly useful experimental approaches in this context. State-of-the-art electrophysiological and live-cell imaging techniques that are well established in basic neuroscience can help answering some of the major questions in the field, such as (i which neural structures are activated during TMS, (ii how does rTMS induce Hebbian plasticity, and (iii are other forms of plasticity (e.g., metaplasticity, structural plasticity induced by rTMS? We argue that data gained from these studies will support the development of more effective and specific applications of rTMS in clinical practice.

  19. Molecular mechanisms of pharmacological doses of ascorbate on cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venturelli, Sascha; Sinnberg, Tobias W; Niessner, Heike; Busch, Christian

    2015-06-01

    Intravenous application of high-dose ascorbate (vitamin C) has been used in complementary medicine since the 1970s to treat cancer patients. In recent years it became evident that high-dose ascorbate in the millimolar range bears selective cytotoxic effects on cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. This anticancer effect is dose dependent, catalyzed by serum components and mediated by reactive oxygen species and ascorbyl radicals, making ascorbate a pro-oxidative pro-drug that catalyzes hydrogen peroxide production in tissues instead of acting as a radical scavenger. It further depends on HIF-1 signaling and oxygen pressure, and shows a strong epigenetic signature (alteration of DNA-methylation and induction of tumor-suppressing microRNAs in cancer cells). The detailed understanding of ascorbate-induced antiproliferative molecular mechanisms warrants in-depth preclinical evaluation in cancer-bearing animal models for the optimization of an efficacious therapy regimen (e.g., combination with hyperbaric oxygen or O2-sensitizers) that subsequently need to be evaluated in clinical trials. PMID:26065536

  20. A Quantum-Mechanics Molecular-Mechanics scheme for extended systems

    CERN Document Server

    Hunt, Diego; Scherlis, Damian A

    2016-01-01

    We introduce and discuss a hybrid quantum-mechanics molecular-mechanics (QM-MM) approach for Car-Parrinello DFT simulations with pseudopotentials and planewaves basis, designed for the treatment of periodic systems. In this implementation the MM atoms are considered as additional QM ions having fractional charges of either sign, which provides conceptual and computational simplicity by exploiting the machinery already existing in planewave codes to deal with electrostatics in periodic boundary conditions. With this strategy, both the QM and MM regions are contained in the same supercell, which determines the periodicity for the whole system. Thus, while this method is not meant to compete with non-periodic QM-MM schemes able to handle extremely large but finite MM regions, it is shown that for periodic systems of a few hundred atoms, our approach provides substantial savings in computational times by treating classically a fraction of the particles. The performance and accuracy of the method is assessed throu...

  1. Artificial Bee Colony Optimization of Capping Potentials for Hybrid Quantum Mechanical/Molecular Mechanical Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffmann, Christoph; Sebastiani, Daniel

    2011-05-10

    We present an algorithmic extension of a numerical optimization scheme for analytic capping potentials for use in mixed quantum-classical (quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical, QM/MM) ab initio calculations. Our goal is to minimize bond-cleavage-induced perturbations in the electronic structure, measured by means of a suitable penalty functional. The optimization algorithm-a variant of the artificial bee colony (ABC) algorithm, which relies on swarm intelligence-couples deterministic (downhill gradient) and stochastic elements to avoid local minimum trapping. The ABC algorithm outperforms the conventional downhill gradient approach, if the penalty hypersurface exhibits wiggles that prevent a straight minimization pathway. We characterize the optimized capping potentials by computing NMR chemical shifts. This approach will increase the accuracy of QM/MM calculations of complex biomolecules. PMID:26610125

  2. Trends in nanoscale mechanics mechanics of carbon nanotubes, graphene, nanocomposites and molecular dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    This book contains a collection of the state-of-the-art reviews written by the leading researchers in the areas of nanoscale mechanics, molecular dynamics, nanoscale modeling of nanocomposites and mechanics of carbon nanotubes. No other book has reviews of the recent discoveries such as a nanoscale analog of the Pauli’s principle, i.e., effect of the spatial exclusion of electrons or the SEE effect, a new Registry Matrix Analysis for the nanoscale interfacial sliding and new data on the effective viscosity of interfacial electrons in nanoscale stiction at the interfaces. This volume is also an exceptional resource on the well tested nanoscale modeling of carbon nanotubes and nanocomposites, new nanoscale effects, unique evaluations of the effective thickness of carbon nanotubes under different loads, new data on which size of carbon nanotubes is safer and many other topics. Extensive bibliography concerning all these topics is included along with the lucid short reviews. Numerous illustrations are provided...

  3. Evaluation of carbohydrate molecular mechanical force fields by quantum mechanical calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hemmingsen, Lars Bo Stegeager; Madsen, D.E.; Esbensen, A.L.;

    2004-01-01

    the (gg, gt and tg) rotamers of methyl alpha-D-glucopyranoside and methyl alpha-D-galactopyranoside are (0.13, 0.00, 0.15) and (0.64, 0.00, 0.77) kcal/mol. respectively. The results of the quantum mechanical calculations are compared with the results of calculations using the 20 second...... monosaccharide carbohydrate benchmark systems. Selected results are: (i) The interaction energy of the alpha-D-alucopyranose-H2O heterodimer is estimated to be 4.9 kcal/mol, using a composite method including terms at highly correlated (CCSD(T)) level. Most molecular mechanics force fields are in error in this...

  4. Comparative Molecular Mechanics and Quantum Mechanics Study of Microhydration of Nucleic Acid Bases

    CERN Document Server

    Lino, J; Deriabina, A; Velasco, M; Poltev, V

    2013-01-01

    DNA is the most important biological molecule, and its hydration contributes essentially to the structure and functions of the double helix. We analyze the microhydration of the individual bases of nucleic acids and their methyl derivatives using methods of molecular mechanics (MM) with the Poltev-Malenkov (PM), AMBER and OPLS force fields, as well as ab initio Quantum Mechanics (QM) calculations at MP2/6-31G(d,p) level of theory. A comparison is made between the calculated interaction energies and the experimental enthalpies of microhydration of bases, obtained from mass spectrometry at low temperatures. Each local water-base interaction energy minimum obtained with MM corresponds to the minimum obtained with QM. General qualitative agreement was observed in the geometrical characteristics of the local minima obtained via the two groups of methods. MM minima correspond to slightly more coplanar structures than those obtained via QM methods, and the absolute MM energy values overestimate corresponding values ...

  5. First quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics studies of the inhibition mechanism of cruzain by peptidyl halomethyl ketones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arafet, Kemel; Ferrer, Silvia; Moliner, Vicent

    2015-06-01

    Cruzain is a primary cysteine protease expressed by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi during Chagas disease infection, and thus, the development of inhibitors of this protein is a promising target for designing an effective therapy against the disease. In this paper, the mechanism of inhibition of cruzain by two different irreversible peptidyl halomethyl ketones (PHK) inhibitors has been studied by means of hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics-molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to obtain a complete representation of the possible free energy reaction paths. These have been traced on free energy surfaces in terms of the potential of mean force computed at AM1d/MM and DFT/MM levels of theory. An analysis of the possible reaction mechanisms of the inhibition process has been performed showing that the nucleophilic attack of an active site cysteine, Cys25, on a carbon atom of the inhibitor and the cleavage of the halogen-carbon bond take place in a single step. PClK appears to be much more favorable than PFK from a kinetic point of view. This result would be in agreement with experimental studies in other papain-like enzymes. A deeper analysis of the results suggests that the origin of the differences between PClK and PFK can be the different stabilizing interactions established between the inhibitors and the residues of the active site of the protein. Any attempt to explore the viability of the inhibition process through a stepwise mechanism involving the formation of a thiohemiketal intermediate and a three-membered sulfonium intermediate has been unsuccessful. Nevertheless, a mechanism through a protonated thiohemiketal, with participation of His159 as a proton donor, appears to be feasible despite showing higher free energy barriers. Our results suggest that PClK can be used as a starting point to develop a proper inhibitor of cruzain. PMID:25965914

  6. An update on molecular biology and drug resistance mechanisms of multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutlu, Pelin; Kiraz, Yağmur; Gündüz, Ufuk; Baran, Yusuf

    2015-12-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM), a neoplasm of plasma cells, is the second most common hematological malignancy. Incidance rates increase after age 40. MM is most commonly seen in men and African-American population. There are several factors to this, such as obesity, environmental factors, family history, genetic factors and monoclonal gammopathies of undetermined significance (MGUS) that have been implicated as potentially etiologic. Development of MM involves a series of complex molecular events, including chromosomal abnormalities, oncogene activation and growth factor dysregulation. Chemotherapy is the most commonly used treatment strategy in MM. However, MM is a difficult disease to treat because of its marked resistance to chemotherapy. MM has been shown to be commonly multidrug resistance (MDR)-negative at diagnosis and associated with a high incidence of MDR expression at relapse. This review deals with the molecular aspects of MM, drug resistance mechanisms during treatment and also possible new applications for overcoming drug resistance. PMID:26235594

  7. The Molecular Genetics and Cellular Mechanisms Underlying Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv D. Machado

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH is an incurable disorder clinically characterised by a sustained elevation of mean arterial pressure in the absence of systemic involvement. As the adult circulation is a low pressure, low resistance system, PAH represents a reversal to a foetal state. The small pulmonary arteries of patients exhibit luminal occlusion resultant from the uncontrolled growth of endothelial and smooth muscle cells. This vascular remodelling is comprised of hallmark defects, most notably the plexiform lesion. PAH may be familial in nature but the majority of patients present with spontaneous disease or PAH associated with other complications. In this paper, the molecular genetic basis of the disorder is discussed in detail ranging from the original identification of the major genetic contributant to PAH and moving on to current next-generation technologies that have led to the rapid identification of additional genetic risk factors. The impact of identified mutations on the cell is examined, particularly, the determination of pathways disrupted in disease and critical to pulmonary vascular maintenance. Finally, the application of research in this area to the design and development of novel treatment options for patients is addressed along with the future directions PAH research is progressing towards.

  8. Molecular Mechanisms Regulating Muscle Fiber Composition Under Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Nadia A.

    1999-01-01

    The overall goal of this project is to reveal the molecular mechanisms underlying the selective and debilitating atrophy of specific skeletal muscle fiber types that accompanies sustained conditions of microgravity. Since little is currently known about the regulation of fiber-specific gene expression programs in mammalian muscle, elucidation of the basic mechanisms of fiber diversification is a necessary prerequisite to the generation of therapeutic strategies for attenuation of muscle atrophy on earth or in space. Vertebrate skeletal muscle development involves the fusion of undifferentiated mononucleated myoblasts to form multinucleated myofibers, with a concomitant activation of muscle-specific genes encoding proteins that form the force-generating contractile apparatus. The regulatory circuitry controlling skeletal muscle gene expression has been well studied in a number of vertebrate animal systems. The goal of this project has been to achieve a similar level of understanding of the mechanisms underlying the further specification of muscles into different fiber types, and the role played by innervation and physical activity in the maintenance and adaptation of different fiber phenotypes into adulthood. Our recent research on the genetic basis of fiber specificity has focused on the emergence of mature fiber types and have implicated a group of transcriptional regulatory proteins, known as E proteins, in the control of fiber specificity. The restriction of E proteins to selected muscle fiber types is an attractive hypothetical mechanism for the generation of muscle fiber-specific patterns of gene expression. To date our results support a model wherein different E proteins are selectively expressed in muscle cells to determine fiber-restricted gene expression. These studies are a first step to define the molecular mechanisms responsible for the shifts in fiber type under conditions of microgravity, and to determine the potential importance of E proteins as

  9. Mammalian life histories: their evolution and molecular-genetic mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sacher, G.A.

    1978-01-01

    Survival curves for various species of mammals are discussed and a table is presented to show recorded maximum life spans of about 30 species of mammals. The range of longevities is from one year for shrews and moles up to more than 80 years for the fin whale. The constitutional correlates of longevity are discussed with regard to body size, brain weight,metabolic rates, and body temperature. It is concluded that longevity evolved as a positive trait, associated with the evolution of large body size and brain size. Life table data for man, the thorough-bred horse, beagle dogs, and the laboratory rodents, Mus musculus and Peromyscus leucopus are discussed. The data show a pattern of exponential increase of death rate with age. A laboratory model using Mus musculus and Peromyscus leucopus for the study of the longevity-assurance mechanisms is described. (HLW)

  10. Molecular hydrogen formation by excited atom radiative association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latter, William B.; Black, John H.

    1991-01-01

    The results from a semiclassical calculation of the thermal rate coefficient for the radiative association process H(n = 2) + H(n = 1) - H2 + hv are presented (n is the principal quantum number of the separated hydrogen atoms). The relative importance of this reaction in various environments is briefly discussed. Models of the early universe around the epoch of recombination and protostellar winds have been calculated which include the excited atom process. Not surprisingly, it is shown that the excited atom process will not be important in the general interstellar medium, except possibly in environments where the amount of Ly-alpha photon trapping is large. Examples may be the material surrounding quasars, active galactic nuclei, and bright H II regions. The most likely application of this process might be within rapidly evolving systems where a large transient n = 2 population of neutral hydrogen could result in a burst of molecular hydrogen formation.

  11. Molecular signatures of age-associated chronic degeneration of shoulder muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raz, Yotam; Henseler, Jan Ferdinand; Kolk, Arjen; Tatum, Zuotian; Groosjohan, Niels Kuipers; Verwey, Nisha E.; Arindrarto, Wibowo; Kielbasa, Szymon M.; Nagels, Jochem; Hoen, Peter A. C. 't; Nelissen, Rob G. H. H.; Raz, Vered

    2016-01-01

    Chronic muscle diseases are highly prevalent in the elderly causing severe mobility limitations, pain and frailty. The intrinsic molecular mechanisms are poorly understood due to multifactorial causes, slow progression with age and variations between individuals. Understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms could lead to new treatment options which are currently limited. Shoulder complaints are highly common in the elderly, and therefore, muscles of the shoulder's rotator cuff could be considered as a model for chronic age-associated muscle degeneration. Diseased shoulder muscles were characterized by muscle atrophy and fatty infiltration compared with unaffected shoulder muscles. We confirmed fatty infiltration using histochemical analysis. Additionally, fibrosis and loss of contractile myosin expression were found in diseased muscles. Most cellular features, including proliferation rate, apoptosis and cell senescence, remained unchanged and genome-wide molecular signatures were predominantly similar between diseased and intact muscles. However, we found down-regulation of a small subset of muscle function genes, and up-regulation of extracellular region genes. Myogenesis was defected in muscle cell culture from diseased muscles but was restored by elevating MyoD levels. We suggest that impaired muscle functionality in a specific environment of thickened extra-cellular matrix is crucial for the development of chronic age-associated muscle degeneration. PMID:26885755

  12. Molecular signatures of age-associated chronic degeneration of shoulder muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raz, Yotam; Henseler, Jan Ferdinand; Kolk, Arjen; Tatum, Zuotian; Groosjohan, Niels Kuipers; Verwey, Nisha E; Arindrarto, Wibowo; Kielbasa, Szymon M; Nagels, Jochem; 't Hoen, Peter A C; Nelissen, Rob G H H; Raz, Vered

    2016-02-23

    Chronic muscle diseases are highly prevalent in the elderly causing severe mobility limitations, pain and frailty. The intrinsic molecular mechanisms are poorly understood due to multifactorial causes, slow progression with age and variations between individuals. Understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms could lead to new treatment options which are currently limited. Shoulder complaints are highly common in the elderly, and therefore, muscles of the shoulder's rotator cuff could be considered as a model for chronic age-associated muscle degeneration. Diseased shoulder muscles were characterized by muscle atrophy and fatty infiltration compared with unaffected shoulder muscles. We confirmed fatty infiltration using histochemical analysis. Additionally, fibrosis and loss of contractile myosin expression were found in diseased muscles. Most cellular features, including proliferation rate, apoptosis and cell senescence, remained unchanged and genome-wide molecular signatures were predominantly similar between diseased and intact muscles. However, we found down-regulation of a small subset of muscle function genes, and up-regulation of extracellular region genes. Myogenesis was defected in muscle cell culture from diseased muscles but was restored by elevating MyoD levels. We suggest that impaired muscle functionality in a specific environment of thickened extra-cellular matrix is crucial for the development of chronic age-associated muscle degeneration. PMID:26885755

  13. Mechanism of acute cadmium toxicity in the testis of the rat: a cellular and molecular inquiry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The more sensitive Sertoli cells were chosen as a model to investigate a molecular mechanism of toxicity. Primary rat Sertoli cells were exposed to sublethal concentrations of cadmium and the changes in [32P]-orthophosphate-labelled phosphoproteins using two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis were examined. Resultant autoradiograms showed a delayed dose- and time-dependent increase in intensity of two acidic proteins having identical molecular weights. These changes were most probably a result of increased synthesis of the proteins. Pretreatment of the cells with zinc, a cadmium antagonist, partially reduced the effect of cadmium. This research concludes that Sertoli cells are relatively more sensitive to the effects of cadmium than interstitial cells. A time- and dose dependent increase in [32P]-associated activity to two small Sertoli cell phosphoproteins was consistently seen after cadmium exposure, whereas no effect could be seen using essential, non-toxic metals. This response may be an early indicator in the disruption of cellular homeostasis by cadmium, and will hopefully contribute positive evidence in the search for a molecular mechanism of cadmium toxicity

  14. Molecular mechanisms of long noncoding RNAs on gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tianwen; Mo, Xiaoyan; Fu, Liyun; Xiao, Bingxiu; Guo, Junming

    2016-02-23

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are non-protein coding transcripts longer than 200 nucleotides. Aberrant expression of lncRNAs has been found associated with gastric cancer, one of the most malignant tumors. By complementary base pairing with mRNAs or forming complexes with RNA binding proteins (RBPs), some lncRNAs including GHET1, MALAT1, and TINCR may mediate mRNA stability and splicing. Other lncRNAs, such as BC032469, GAPLINC, and HOTAIR, participate in the competing endogenous RNA (ceRNA) network. Under certain circumstances, ANRIL, GACAT3, H19, MEG3, and TUSC7 exhibit their biological roles by associating with microRNAs (miRNAs). By recruiting histone-modifying complexes, ANRIL, FENDRR, H19, HOTAIR, MALAT1, and PVT1 may inhibit the transcription of target genes in cis or trans. Through these mechanisms, lncRNAs form RNA-dsDNA triplex. CCAT1, GAPLINC, GAS5, H19, MEG3, and TUSC7 play oncogenic or tumor suppressor roles by correlated with tumor suppressor P53 or onco-protein c-Myc, respectively. In conclusion, interaction with DNA, RNA and proteins is involved in lncRNAs' participation in gastric tumorigenesis and development. PMID:26788991

  15. Caenorhabditis elegans as a Model to Study the Molecular and Genetic Mechanisms of Drug Addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engleman, Eric A; Katner, Simon N; Neal-Beliveau, Bethany S

    2016-01-01

    Drug addiction takes a massive toll on society. Novel animal models are needed to test new treatments and understand the basic mechanisms underlying addiction. Rodent models have identified the neurocircuitry involved in addictive behavior and indicate that rodents possess some of the same neurobiologic mechanisms that mediate addiction in humans. Recent studies indicate that addiction is mechanistically and phylogenetically ancient and many mechanisms that underlie human addiction are also present in invertebrates. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has conserved neurobiologic systems with powerful molecular and genetic tools and a rapid rate of development that enables cost-effective translational discovery. Emerging evidence suggests that C. elegans is an excellent model to identify molecular mechanisms that mediate drug-induced behavior and potential targets for medications development for various addictive compounds. C. elegans emit many behaviors that can be easily quantitated including some that involve interactions with the environment. Ethanol (EtOH) is the best-studied drug-of-abuse in C. elegans and at least 50 different genes/targets have been identified as mediating EtOH's effects and polymorphisms in some orthologs in humans are associated with alcohol use disorders. C. elegans has also been shown to display dopamine and cholinergic system-dependent attraction to nicotine and demonstrate preference for cues previously associated with nicotine. Cocaine and methamphetamine have been found to produce dopamine-dependent reward-like behaviors in C. elegans. These behavioral tests in combination with genetic/molecular manipulations have led to the identification of dozens of target genes/systems in C. elegans that mediate drug effects. The one target/gene identified as essential for drug-induced behavioral responses across all drugs of abuse was the cat-2 gene coding for tyrosine hydroxylase, which is consistent with the role of dopamine neurotransmission

  16. Neurobiological mechanisms of treatment resistant depression: Functional, structural and molecular imaging studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.P. de Kwaasteniet

    2015-01-01

    This thesis investigated the neurobiological mechanisms of TRD using functional, structural and molecular imaging studies. First the neurobiological mechanisms of MDD were investigated and revealed decreased functional connectivity between the ventral and dorsal network. Thereafter, structural conne

  17. Molecular mechanism of reduction in pregnenolone synthesis by cigarette smoke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) facilitates the movement of cholesterol from the outer to inner mitochondrial membrane for the synthesis of pregnenolone. Here, we investigated the molecular mechanism of the reduction of pregnenolone synthesis by cigarette smoke condensate (CSC). Pre-exposure or post-exposure of cells with CSC led to reduced pregnenolone synthesis, in a fashion similar to its effect on isolated mitochondria. However, there was no difference in the expression of 30 kDa StAR in cells treated with moderately concentrated CSC by either regimen. The active form of 37 kDa StAR is degraded easily suggesting that the continuous presence of CSC reduces StAR expression. Mitochondrial import of 35S-methionine-labeled StAR followed by extraction of the StAR-mitochondrial complex with 1% digitonin showed similarly sized complexes in the CSC-treated and untreated mitochondria. Further analysis by sucrose density gradient centrifugation showed a specific complex, 'complex 2', in the untreated mitochondria but absent in the CSC-treated mitochondria. Mass spectrometric analysis revealed that complex 2 is the outer mitochondrial protein, VDAC1. Knockdown of VDAC1 expression by siRNA followed by co-transfection with StAR resulted in a lack of pregnenolone synthesis and 37 kDa StAR expression with reduced expression of the intermediate, 32 kDa StAR. Taken together, these results suggest that in the absence of VDAC1, active StAR expression is reduced indicating that VDAC1 expression is essential for StAR activity. In the absence of VDAC1-StAR interaction, cholesterol cannot be transported into mitochondria; thus the interaction with VDAC1 is a mandatory step for initiating steroidogenesis

  18. On The Molecular Mechanism Of Positive Novolac Resists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jian-Ping; Kwei, T. K.; Reiser, Arnost

    1989-08-01

    A molecular mechanism for the dissolution of novolac is proposed, based on the idea of a critical degree of deprotonation as being the condition for the transfer of polymer into solution. The rate at which the critical deprotonation condition is achieved is controlled by the supply of developer into a thin penetration zone, and depends in particular on the rate of diffusion of the base cations which are the developer component with the lowest mobility. The penetration zone contains phenolate ions and ion-bound water, but it retains the structure of a rigid polymer membrane, as evidenced by the diffusion coefficient of cations in the pene;tration zone which is several orders of magnitude slower than in an open gel of the same material. When the critical degree of deprotonation is reached, the membrane structure unravels and all subsequent events, chain rearrangement and transfer into solution, occur rapidly. The supralinear dependence of dissolution rate on base concentration and the effect of the size of the base cation are plausibly interpreted by the model. The diffusion of developer components is assumed to occur preferentially via hydrophilic sites in the polymer matrix. These sites define a diffusion path which acts like a hydrophilic diffusion channel. Suitably designed hydrophobic molecules can block some of the channels and in this way alter the dissolution rate. They reduce in effect the diffusion crossect ion of the material. Hydrophilic additives, on the other hand, introduce additional channels into the system and promote dissolution. The concept of diffusion channels appears to provide a unified interpretation for a number of common observations.

  19. The molecular mechanism of embryonic stem cell pluripotency maintenance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Qingzhong; LIU Yixun; HAN Chunsheng

    2005-01-01

    In vitro cultured embryonic stem (ES) cells are derived from the inner cell mass (ICM) of pre-implantation embryos, and are capable of giving rise to all cell and tissue types of the three germ layers upon being injected back into blastocysts. These cells are therefore said to possess pluripotency that can be maintained infinitely in culture under optimal conditions. Such pluripotency maintenance is believed to be due to the symmetrical cleavage of the cells in an undifferentiated state. The pluripotency of ES cells is the basis for their various practical and potential applications. ES cells can be used as donor cells to generate knockout or transgenic animals, as in vitro models of mammalian development, and as cell resources for cell therapy in regenerative medicine. The further success in these applications, particularly in the last two, is dependent on the establishment of a culture system with components in the medium clearly defined and the subsequent procedures for controlled differentiation of the cells into specific lineages. In turn, elucidating the molecular mechanism for pluripotency maintenance of ES cells is the prerequisite. This paper summarizes the recent progresses in this area, focusing mainly on the LIF/STAT3, BMPs/Smads, canonical Wnt, TGFβ/activin/nodal, PI3K and FGF signaling pathways and the genes such as oct4, nanog that are crucial in ES cell pluripotency maintenance. The regulatory systems of pluripotency maintenance in both mouse and human ES cells are also discussed. We believe that the cross-talkings between these signaling pathways, as well as the regulatory system underlying pluripotency maintenance will be the main focus in the area of ES cell researches in the future.

  20. Molecular mechanisms of extensive mitochondrial gene rearrangementin plethodontid salamanders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Rachel Lockridge; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2005-06-01

    Extensive gene rearrangement is reported in the mitochondrial genomes of lungless salamanders (Plethodontidae). In each genome with a novel gene order, there is evidence that the rearrangement was mediated by duplication of part of the mitochondrial genome, including the presence of both pseudogenes and additional, presumably functional, copies of duplicated genes. All rearrangement-mediating duplications include either the origin of light strand replication and the nearby tRNA genes or the regions flanking the origin of heavy strand replication. The latter regions comprise nad6, trnE, cob, trnT, an intergenic spacer between trnT and trnP and, in some genomes, trnP, the control region, trnF, rrnS, trnV, rrnL, trnL1, and nad1. In some cases, two copies of duplicated genes, presumptive regulatory regions, and/or sequences with no assignable function have been retained in the genome following the initial duplication; in other genomes, only one of the duplicated copies has been retained. Both tandem and non-tandem duplications are present in these genomes, suggesting different duplication mechanisms. In some of these mtDNAs, up to 25 percent of the total length is composed of tandem duplications of non-coding sequence that includes putative regulatory regions and/or pseudogenes of tRNAs and protein-coding genes along with otherwise unassignable sequences. These data indicate that imprecise initiation and termination of replication, slipped-strand mispairing, and intra-molecular recombination may all have played a role in generating repeats during the evolutionary history of plethodontid mitochondrial genomes.

  1. Angular momentum in molecular quantum mechanical integral evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlap, Brett I.

    2005-01-01

    Solid-harmonic derivatives of quantum-mechanical integrals over Gaussian transforms of scalar, or radial, atomic basis functions create angular momentum about each center. Generalized Gaunt coefficients limit the amount of cross differentiation for multi-center integrals to ensure that cross differentiation does not affect the total angular momentum. The generalized Gaunt coefficients satisfy a number of other selection rules, which are exploited in a new computer code for computing forces in analytic density-functional theory based on robust and variational fitting of the Kohn-Sham potential. Two-center exponents are defined for four or more solid-harmonic differentiations of matrix elements. Those differentiations can either build up angular momentum about the centers or give forces on molecular potential-energy surfaces, thus generalized Gaunt coefficients of order greater than the number of centers are considered. These 4- j generalized Gaunt coefficients and two-center exponents are used to compute the first derivatives of all integrals involving all the Gaussian exponents on a triplet of centers at once. First all angular factors are contracted with the corresponding part of the linear-combination-of-atomic-orbitals density matrix. This intermediate quantity is then reused for the nuclear attraction integral and the integrals corresponding to each basis function in the analytic fit of the Kohn-Sham potential in the muffin-tin-like, but analytic, Slater-Roothaan method that allows molecules to dissociate into atoms having any desired energy, including the experimental electronic energy. The energy is stationary in all respects and all forces precisely agree with a previous code in tests on small molecules. During geometry optimization of an icosahedral C 720 fullerene computing these angular factors and transforming them via the 4- j generalized Gaunt coefficient takes more than sixty percent of the total computer time. These same angular factors could be used

  2. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate an induced-fit mechanism for LSD1/CoREST-H3-histone molecular recognition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lysine Specific Demethylase (LSD1 or KDM1A) in complex with its co-repressor protein CoREST catalyzes the demethylation of the H3 histone N-terminal tail and is currently one of the most promising epigenetic targets for drug discovery against cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. Models of non-covalent binding, such as lock and key, induced-fit, and conformational selection could help explaining the molecular mechanism of LSD1/CoREST-H3-histone association, thus guiding drug discovery and design efforts. Here, we quantify the extent to which LSD1/CoREST substrate binding is consistent with these hypothetical models using LSD1/CoREST conformational ensembles obtained through extensive explicit solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We find that an induced-fit model is the most representative of LSD1/CoREST-H3-histone non-covalent binding and accounts for the local conformational changes occurring in the H3-histone binding site. We also show that conformational selection – despite in principle not ruled out by this finding – is minimal, and only relevant when global properties are considered, e.g. the nanoscale motion of the LSD1/CoREST clamp. The induced-fit mechanism revealed by our MD simulation study will aid the inclusion of protein dynamics for the discovery and design of LSD1 inhibitors targeting the H3-histone binding region. On a general basis, our study indicates the importance of using multiple metrics or selection schemes when testing alternative hypothetical mechanistic models of non-covalent binding

  3. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of human microtia via a pig model of HOXA1 syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruimin Qiao

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Microtia is a congenital malformation of the outer ears. Although both genetic and environmental components have been implicated in microtia, the genetic causes of this innate disorder are poorly understood. Pigs have naturally occurring diseases comparable to those in humans, providing exceptional opportunity to dissect the molecular mechanism of human inherited diseases. Here we first demonstrated that a truncating mutation in HOXA1 causes a monogenic disorder of microtia in pigs. We further performed RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq analysis on affected and healthy pig embryos (day 14.25. We identified a list of 337 differentially expressed genes (DEGs between the normal and mutant samples, shedding light on the transcriptional network involving HOXA1. The DEGs are enriched in biological processes related to cardiovascular system and embryonic development, and neurological, renal and urological diseases. Aberrant expressions of many DEGs have been implicated in human innate deformities corresponding to microtia-associated syndromes. After applying three prioritizing algorithms, we highlighted appealing candidate genes for human microtia from the 337 DEGs. We searched for coding variants of functional significance within six candidate genes in 147 microtia-affected individuals. Of note, we identified one EVC2 non-synonymous mutation (p.Asp1174Asn as a potential disease-implicating variant for a human microtia-associated syndrome. The findings advance our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying human microtia, and provide an interesting example of the characterization of human disease-predisposing variants using pig models.

  4. Protocatechuic acid and human disease prevention: biological activities and molecular mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masella, R; Santangelo, C; D'Archivio, M; Li Volti, G; Giovannini, C; Galvano, F

    2012-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence has shown that a high dietary intake of vegetables and fruit rich in polyphenols is associated with a reduction of cancer incidence and mortality from coronary heart disease. The healthy effects associated with polyphenol consumption have made the study of the mechanisms of action a matter of great importance. In particular, the hydroxybenzoic acid protocatechuic acid (PCA) has been eliciting a growing interest for several reasons. Firstly, PCA is one of the main metabolites of complex polyphenols such as anthocyanins and procyanidins that are normally found at high concentrations in vegetables and fruit, and are absorbed by animals and humans. Since the daily intake of anthocyanins has been estimated to be much higher than that of other polyphenols, the nutritional value of PCA is increasingly recognized. Secondly, a growing body of evidence supports the concept that PCA can exert a variety of biological effects by acting on different molecular targets. It has been shown that PCA possesses antioxidant, anti-inflammatory as well as antihyperglycemic and neuroprotective activities. Furthermore, PCA seems to have chemopreventive potential because it inhibits the in vitro chemical carcinogenesis and exerts pro-apoptotic and anti-proliferative effects in different tissues. This review is aimed at providing an up-dated and comprehensive report on PCA giving a special emphasis on its biological activities and the molecular mechanisms of action most likely responsible for a beneficial role in human disease prevention. PMID:22519395

  5. Characterization of the molecular mechanism of the bone-anabolic activity of carfilzomib in multiple myeloma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Hu

    Full Text Available Carfilzomib, the next generation of proteasome inhibitor, may increase osteoblast-related markers in patients with multiple myeloma, but the molecular mechanism of its effect on mesenchymal stem cell differentiation to osteoblasts remains unknown. Herein, we demonstrated that carfilzomib significantly promoted mesenchymal stem cell differentiation into osteoblasts. In osteoprogenitor cells and primary mesenchymal stem cells from patients with myeloma, carfilzomib induced increases in alkaline phosphatase activity, matrix mineralization, and calcium deposition via Wnt-independent activation of β-catenin/TCF signaling. Using affinity pull-down assays with immunoblotting analysis and immunofluorescence, we found that carfilzomib induced stabilization of both free and active forms of β-catenin in a time- and dose-dependent manner that was not associated with β-catenin transcriptional regulation. Nuclear translocation of β-catenin protein was associated with TCF transcriptional activity that was independent of the effects of GSK3β-activation and of signaling induced by 19 Wnt ligands, 10 Frizzled receptors, and LRP5/6 co-receptors. Blocking activation of β-catenin/TCF signaling by dominant negative TCF1 or TCF4 attenuated carfilzomib-induced matrix mineralization. Thus, carfilzomib induced osteoblast differentiation via Wnt-independent activation of the β-catenin/TCF pathway. These results provide a novel molecular mechanism critical to understanding the anabolic role of carfilzomib on myeloma-induced bone disease.

  6. Molecular clouds associated with compact HII regionsin Galactic plane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙锦; 沈家健; 孙艳春; 张燕平

    2002-01-01

    13CO (J = 1 - 0) emission of massive star forming region including 15 ultracompact and 4compact HII regions in Galactic plane was mapped with the 13.7 m millimeter wave telescope of Purple Mountain Observatory. The present observations provide the first complete structure of the clouds in 13CO with a higher spatial resolution and a wide-field coverage of 28′×45′. Combined with the images of far-infrared emission and dust color temperature obtained from ISSA, various possible dynamical connections between the compact HII regions and associated clouds were found. We presente some reasons to explain the formation of new dense cold core and molecular emission cavity in the massive star formation and early evolution. The luminosities of excitation stars for all HII regions and the main parameters of associated clouds are also derived. The results show that the newborn stars' luminosities are correlated with the 13CO column densities, masses (in 55"beam) and 13CO velocity widths obviously.``

  7. Measuring the Kinetics of Molecular Association by Isothermal Titration Calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Meulen, Kirk A; Horowitz, Scott; Trievel, Raymond C; Butcher, Samuel E

    2016-01-01

    The real-time power response inherent in an isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) experiment provides an opportunity to directly analyze association kinetics, which, together with the conventional measurement of thermodynamic quantities, can provide an incredibly rich description of molecular binding in a single experiment. Here, we detail our application of this method, in which interactions occurring with relaxation times ranging from slightly below the instrument response time constant (12.5s in this case) to as large as 600s can be fully detailed in terms of both the thermodynamics and kinetics. In a binding titration scenario, in the most general case an injection can reveal an association rate constant (kon). Under more restrictive conditions, the instrument time constant-corrected power decay following each injection is simply an exponential decay described by a composite rate constant (kobs), from which both kon and the dissociation rate constant (koff) can be extracted. The data also support the viability of this exponential approach, for kon only, for a slightly larger set of conditions. Using a bimolecular RNA folding model and a protein-ligand interaction, we demonstrate and have internally validated this approach to experiment design, data processing, and error analysis. An updated guide to thermodynamic and kinetic regimes accessible by ITC is provided. PMID:26794355

  8. Spatial memory in sedentary and trained diabetic rats: molecular mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diegues, João Carlos; Pauli, José Rodrigo; Luciano, Eliete; de Almeida Leme, José Alexandre Curiacos; de Moura, Leandro Pereira; Dalia, Rodrigo Augusto; de Araújo, Michel Barbosa; Sibuya, Clarice Yoshiko; de Mello, Maria Alice Rostom; Gomes, Ricardo José

    2014-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease that has been associated with memory loss, neurological disorders, and Alzheimer's disease. Some studies show the importance of physical exercise to prevent and minimize various neurological disorders. It is believed that the positive effects of exercise on brain functions are mediated by brain insulin and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) signaling. In this study, we investigate the role of swimming exercise training on hippocampus proteins related to insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathway in Type 1 diabetic rats and its effects on spatial memory. Wistar rats were divided into four groups namely sedentary control, trained control, sedentary diabetic (SD), and trained diabetic (TD). Diabetes was induced by Alloxan (ALX) (32 mg/kg b.w.). The training program consisted in swimming 5 days/week, 1 h/day, per 6 weeks, supporting an overload corresponding to 90% of the anaerobic threshold. We employed ALX-induced diabetic rats to explore learning and memory abilities using Morris water maze test. At the end of the training period, the rats were sacrificed 48 h after their last exercise bout when blood samples were collected for serum glucose, insulin, and IGF-1 determinations. Hippocampus was extracted to determinate protein expression (IR, IGF-1R, and APP) and phosphorylation (AKT-1, AKT-2, Tau, and β-amyloide proteins) by Western Blot analysis. All dependent variables were analyzed by two-way analysis of variance with significance level of 5%. Diabetes resulted in hyperglycemia and hypoinsulinemia in both SD and TD groups (P rats; however, exercise training improved this parameter in TD rats. Aerobic exercise decreased Tau phosphorylation and APP expression, and increased some proteins related to insulin/IGF-1 pathway in hippocampus of diabetic rats. Thus, these molecular adaptations from exercise training might contribute to improved spatial learning and memory in diabetic organisms. PMID:24916112

  9. Mechanical loss associated with silicate bonding of fused silica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on mechanical loss associated with hydroxy-catalysis (or 'silicate') bonding between fused silica substrates in the presence of potassium hydroxide or sodium silicate. We measured the mechanical quality factor of three fused silica samples, each composed of two half-rods bonded together on their flat surfaces and compared them to that of an unbonded half-rod. The measurements show a significant reduction of quality factor due to mechanical loss associated with the silicate bonds. We calculate the loss factor of the bonded region φbond and estimate that the effect of silicate bonding on thermal noise in the Advanced LIGO interferometers will be small

  10. Molecular Mechanisms of Bone Metastasis and Associated Muscle Weakness

    OpenAIRE

    Waning, David L.; Guise, Theresa A.

    2014-01-01

    Bone is a preferred site for breast cancer metastasis and leads to pathological bone loss due to increased osteoclast-induced bone resorption. The homing of tumor cells to the bone depends on the support of the bone microenvironment in which the tumor cells prime the pre-metastatic niche. The colonization and growth of tumor cells then depends on adaptations in the invading tumor cells to take advantage of normal physiological responses by mimicking bone marrow cells. This concerted effort by...

  11. A hypothesis regarding the molecular mechanism underlying dietary soy-induced effects on seizure propensity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cara Jean Westmark

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Numerous neurological disorders including fragile X syndrome, Down syndrome, autism and Alzheimer’s disease are comorbid with epilepsy. We have observed elevated seizure propensity in mouse models of these disorders dependent on diet. Specifically, soy-based diets exacerbate audiogenic-induced seizures in juvenile mice. We have also found potential associations between the consumption of soy-based infant formula and seizure incidence, epilepsy comorbidity and autism diagnostic scores in autistic children by retrospective analyses of medical record data. In total, these data suggest that consumption of high levels of soy protein during postnatal development may affect neuronal excitability. Herein, we present our theory regarding the molecular mechanism underlying soy-induced effects on seizure propensity. We hypothesize that soy phytoestrogens interfere with metabotropic glutamate receptor signaling through an estrogen receptor-dependent mechanism, which results in elevated production of key synaptic proteins and decreased seizure threshold.

  12. Model systems to unravel the molecular mechanisms of heavy metal tolerance in the ericoid mycorrhizal symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daghino, Stefania; Martino, Elena; Perotto, Silvia

    2016-05-01

    Ericoid mycorrhizal plants dominate in harsh environments where nutrient-poor, acidic soil conditions result in a higher availability of potentially toxic metals. Although metal-tolerant plant species and ecotypes are known in the Ericaceae, metal tolerance in these plants has been mainly attributed to their association with ericoid mycorrhizal fungi. The mechanisms underlying plant protection by the fungal symbiont are poorly understood, whereas some insights have been achieved regarding the molecular mechanisms of heavy metal tolerance in the fungal symbiont. This review will briefly introduce the general features of heavy metal tolerance in mycorrhizal fungi and will then focus on the use of "omics" approaches and heterologous expression in model organisms to reveal the molecular bases of fungal response to heavy metals. Functional complementation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae has allowed the identification of several ericoid mycorrhizal fungi genes (i.e., antioxidant enzymes, metal transporters, and DNA damage repair proteins) that may contribute to metal tolerance in a metal-tolerant ericoid Oidiodendron maius isolate. Although a powerful system, the use of the yeast complementation assay to study metal tolerance in mycorrhizal symbioses has limitations. Thus, O. maius has been developed as a model system to study heavy metal tolerance mechanisms in mycorrhizal fungi, thanks to its high metal tolerance, easy handling and in vitro mycorrhization, stable genetic transformation, genomics, transcriptomic and proteomic resources. PMID:26710764

  13. Molecular mechanics and quantum mechanical modeling of hexane soot structure and interactions with pyrene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kubicki JD

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Molecular simulations (energy minimizations and molecular dynamics of an n-hexane soot model developed by Smith and co-workers (M. S. Akhter, A. R. Chughtai and D. M. Smith, Appl. Spectrosc., 1985, 39, 143; ref. 1 were performed. The MM+ (N. L. Allinger, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 1977, 395, 157; ref. 2 and COMPASS (H. Sun, J. Phys. Chem., 1998, 102, 7338; ref. 3 force fields were tested for their ability to produce realistic soot nanoparticle structure. The interaction of pyrene with the model soot was simulated. Quantum mechanical calculations on smaller soot fragments were carried out. Starting from an initial 2D structure, energy minimizations are not able to produce the observed layering within soot with either force field. Results of molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the COMPASS force field does a reasonably accurate job of reproducing observations of soot structure. Increasing the system size from a 683 to a 2732 atom soot model does not have a significant effect on predicted structures. Neither does the addition of water molecules surrounding the soot model. Pyrene fits within the soot structure without disrupting the interlayer spacing. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH, such as pyrene, may strongly partition into soot and have slow desorption kinetics because the PAH-soot bonding is similar to soot–soot interactions. Diffusion of PAH into soot micropores may allow the PAH to be irreversibly adsorbed and sequestered so that they partition slowly back into an aqueous phase causing dis-equilibrium between soil organic matter and porewater.

  14. Study of effect of gamma radiation on molecular weight and mechanical properties of PHB and PHNV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of gamma radiation on molecular weight and mechanical properties (tensile and flexural) of PHB and PHBV samples was investigated. The values of stress and strain at the break point for both mechanical properties indicated that scission molecular reactions were predominant in PHB and PHBV samples submitted to gamma radiation. These results were confirmed by Size Exclusion Chromatography (SEC) analysis. (author)

  15. Epigenetics: Behavioral Influences on Gene Function, Part II--Molecular Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogren, Marilee P.; Lombroso, Paul J.

    2008-01-01

    A study presented on the effect of parenting on stress response and other behaviors show that animals exposed to a high degree of nurturing show a blunted response to stress. Molecular mechanisms responsible for these differences in the adult offspring as well as the molecular mechanisms by which epigenetic effects are propagated from one…

  16. Insights into the Thiamine Diphosphate Enzyme Activation Mechanism: Computational Model for Transketolase Using a Quantum Mechanical/Molecular Mechanical Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nauton, Lionel; Hélaine, Virgil; Théry, Vincent; Hecquet, Laurence

    2016-04-12

    We propose the first computational model for transketolase (TK), a thiamine diphosphate (ThDP)-dependent enzyme, using a quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical method on the basis of crystallographic TK structures from yeast and Escherichia coli, together with experimental kinetic data reported in the literature with wild-type and mutant TK. This model allowed us to define a new route for ThDP activation in the enzyme environment. We evidenced a strong interaction between ThDP and Glu418B of the TK active site, itself stabilized by Glu162A. The crucial point highlighted here is that deprotonation of ThDP C2 is not performed by ThDP N4' as reported in the literature, but by His481B, involving a HOH688A molecule bridge. Thus, ThDP N4' is converted from an amino form to an iminium form, ensuring the stabilization of the C2 carbanion or carbene. Finally, ThDP activation proceeds via an intermolecular process and not by an intramolecular one as reported in the literature. More generally, this proposed ThDP activation mechanism can be applied to some other ThDP-dependent enzymes and used to define the entire TK mechanism with donor and acceptor substrates more accurately. PMID:26998737

  17. A quantum-mechanics molecular-mechanics scheme for extended systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Diego; Sanchez, Veronica M; Scherlis, Damián A

    2016-08-24

    We introduce and discuss a hybrid quantum-mechanics molecular-mechanics (QM-MM) approach for Car-Parrinello DFT simulations with pseudopotentials and planewaves basis, designed for the treatment of periodic systems. In this implementation the MM atoms are considered as additional QM ions having fractional charges of either sign, which provides conceptual and computational simplicity by exploiting the machinery already existing in planewave codes to deal with electrostatics in periodic boundary conditions. With this strategy, both the QM and MM regions are contained in the same supercell, which determines the periodicity for the whole system. Thus, while this method is not meant to compete with non-periodic QM-MM schemes able to handle extremely large but finite MM regions, it is shown that for periodic systems of a few hundred atoms, our approach provides substantial savings in computational times by treating classically a fraction of the particles. The performance and accuracy of the method is assessed through the study of energetic, structural, and dynamical aspects of the water dimer and of the aqueous bulk phase. Finally, the QM-MM scheme is applied to the computation of the vibrational spectra of water layers adsorbed at the TiO2 anatase (1 0 1) solid-liquid interface. This investigation suggests that the inclusion of a second monolayer of H2O molecules is sufficient to induce on the first adsorbed layer, a vibrational dynamics similar to that taking place in the presence of an aqueous environment. The present QM-MM scheme appears as a very interesting tool to efficiently perform molecular dynamics simulations of complex condensed matter systems, from solutions to nanoconfined fluids to different kind of interfaces. PMID:27352028

  18. A quantum-mechanics molecular-mechanics scheme for extended systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Diego; Sanchez, Veronica M.; Scherlis, Damián A.

    2016-08-01

    We introduce and discuss a hybrid quantum-mechanics molecular-mechanics (QM-MM) approach for Car–Parrinello DFT simulations with pseudopotentials and planewaves basis, designed for the treatment of periodic systems. In this implementation the MM atoms are considered as additional QM ions having fractional charges of either sign, which provides conceptual and computational simplicity by exploiting the machinery already existing in planewave codes to deal with electrostatics in periodic boundary conditions. With this strategy, both the QM and MM regions are contained in the same supercell, which determines the periodicity for the whole system. Thus, while this method is not meant to compete with non-periodic QM-MM schemes able to handle extremely large but finite MM regions, it is shown that for periodic systems of a few hundred atoms, our approach provides substantial savings in computational times by treating classically a fraction of the particles. The performance and accuracy of the method is assessed through the study of energetic, structural, and dynamical aspects of the water dimer and of the aqueous bulk phase. Finally, the QM-MM scheme is applied to the computation of the vibrational spectra of water layers adsorbed at the TiO2 anatase (1 0 1) solid–liquid interface. This investigation suggests that the inclusion of a second monolayer of H2O molecules is sufficient to induce on the first adsorbed layer, a vibrational dynamics similar to that taking place in the presence of an aqueous environment. The present QM-MM scheme appears as a very interesting tool to efficiently perform molecular dynamics simulations of complex condensed matter systems, from solutions to nanoconfined fluids to different kind of interfaces.

  19. Interpretation of Association Behavior and Molecular Interactions in Binary Mixtures from Thermoacoustics and Molecular Compression Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Rajeev K.; Kumar, Atul; Srivastava, Urvashi; Srivastava, Kirti; Pandey, Vivek K.

    2016-09-01

    Density and acoustic velocity were measured for binary liquid mixtures of formamide, N-methylacetamide (NMA), dimethylformamide (DMF), and dimethylacetamide (DMA) with acetonitrile at atmospheric pressure and 293.15 K, 298.15 K, 303.15 K, 308.15 K, or 313.15 K over the concentration range 0.12 to 0.97. Models assuming association and nonassociation of the components of the mixtures were used to predict the behavior of the studied liquids, which would typically show weak interactions. The measured properties were fitted to the Redlich-Kister polynomial to estimate the binary coefficients and standard errors. The data were used to study the molecular interactions in the binary mixtures. Furthermore, the McAllister multibody interaction model was used to correlate the properties of the binary liquid mixtures. Testing of the nonassociation and association models for the different systems showed that, compared with the nonassociation model theoretical results, the association model theoretical results were more consistent with the experimental results.

  20. Differentiation and molecular heterogeneity of inhibitory and excitatory neurons associated with midbrain dopaminergic nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahti, Laura; Haugas, Maarja; Tikker, Laura; Airavaara, Mikko; Voutilainen, Merja H; Anttila, Jenni; Kumar, Suman; Inkinen, Caisa; Salminen, Marjo; Partanen, Juha

    2016-02-01

    Local inhibitory GABAergic and excitatory glutamatergic neurons are important for midbrain dopaminergic and hindbrain serotonergic pathways controlling motivation, mood, and voluntary movements. Such neurons reside both within the dopaminergic nuclei, and in adjacent brain structures, including the rostromedial and laterodorsal tegmental nuclei. Compared with the monoaminergic neurons, the development, heterogeneity, and molecular characteristics of these regulatory neurons are poorly understood. We show here that different GABAergic and glutamatergic subgroups associated with the monoaminergic nuclei express specific transcription factors. These neurons share common origins in the ventrolateral rhombomere 1, where the postmitotic selector genes Tal1, Gata2 and Gata3 control the balance between the generation of inhibitory and excitatory neurons. In the absence of Tal1, or both Gata2 and Gata3, the GABAergic precursors adopt glutamatergic fates and populate the glutamatergic nuclei in excessive numbers. Together, our results uncover developmental regulatory mechanisms, molecular characteristics, and heterogeneity of central regulators of monoaminergic circuits. PMID:26718003

  1. Molecular mechanisms involved in chemoresistance in paediatric acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanković Tatjana

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL is the most common paediatric cancer. Despite cure rates approaching 80%, resistance to treatment and disease relapse remain a significant clinical problem. Identification of the genes and biological pathways responsible for chemoresistance is therefore crucial for the design of novel therapeutic approaches aiming to improve patient survival. Mutations in the membrane transporter P-glycoprotein genes, genetic variations in drug-metabolising enzymes and defects in apoptotic pathways are mechanisms of chemoresistance common to a wide spectrum of cancers and also play a role in paediatric ALL. In addition, several recent microarray studies have identified transcriptional profiles specifically associated with chemoresistance and pointed to a number of potentially novel therapeutic targets. These microarray studies have shown that genes discriminating between clinically responsive and resistant leukaemias tend to be involved in cellular processes such as regulation of cell cycle, proliferation, and DNA repair. Here we review the outcomes of these microarray studies and also present our own investigations into apoptotic resistance to DNA double strand breaks (DSBs in paediatric ALL. We present stratification of paediatric ALL by the profile of DNA damage response following ionising radiation (IR in vitro. This approach allows classification of ALL tumours at presentation into IR-apoptotic sensitive and IR-apoptotic resistant. Furthermore, apoptotic resistant leukaemias exhibit abnormal response of NFkB pathway following irradiation and inhibition of this pathway can sensitise leukaemic cells to IR-induced DSBs.

  2. New molecular mechanisms of inter-organelle lipid transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drin, Guillaume; von Filseck, Joachim Moser; Čopič, Alenka

    2016-04-15

    Lipids are precisely distributed in cell membranes, along with associated proteins defining organelle identity. Because the major cellular lipid factory is the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), a key issue is to understand how various lipids are subsequently delivered to other compartments by vesicular and non-vesicular transport pathways. Efforts are currently made to decipher how lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) work either across long distances or confined to membrane contact sites (MCSs) where two organelles are at close proximity. Recent findings reveal that proteins of the oxysterol-binding protein related-proteins (ORP)/oxysterol-binding homology (Osh) family are not all just sterol transporters/sensors: some can bind either phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PtdIns(4)P) and sterol or PtdIns(4)P and phosphatidylserine (PS), exchange these lipids between membranes, and thereby use phosphoinositide metabolism to create cellular lipid gradients. Lipid exchange is likely a widespread mechanism also utilized by other LTPs to efficiently trade lipids between organelle membranes. Finally, the discovery of more proteins bearing a lipid-binding module (SMP or START-like domain) raises new questions on how lipids are conveyed in cells and how the activities of different LTPs are coordinated. PMID:27068959

  3. AMMOS: Automated Molecular Mechanics Optimization tool for in silico Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pajeva Ilza

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Virtual or in silico ligand screening combined with other computational methods is one of the most promising methods to search for new lead compounds, thereby greatly assisting the drug discovery process. Despite considerable progresses made in virtual screening methodologies, available computer programs do not easily address problems such as: structural optimization of compounds in a screening library, receptor flexibility/induced-fit, and accurate prediction of protein-ligand interactions. It has been shown that structural optimization of chemical compounds and that post-docking optimization in multi-step structure-based virtual screening approaches help to further improve the overall efficiency of the methods. To address some of these points, we developed the program AMMOS for refining both, the 3D structures of the small molecules present in chemical libraries and the predicted receptor-ligand complexes through allowing partial to full atom flexibility through molecular mechanics optimization. Results The program AMMOS carries out an automatic procedure that allows for the structural refinement of compound collections and energy minimization of protein-ligand complexes using the open source program AMMP. The performance of our package was evaluated by comparing the structures of small chemical entities minimized by AMMOS with those minimized with the Tripos and MMFF94s force fields. Next, AMMOS was used for full flexible minimization of protein-ligands complexes obtained from a mutli-step virtual screening. Enrichment studies of the selected pre-docked complexes containing 60% of the initially added inhibitors were carried out with or without final AMMOS minimization on two protein targets having different binding pocket properties. AMMOS was able to improve the enrichment after the pre-docking stage with 40 to 60% of the initially added active compounds found in the top 3% to 5% of the entire compound collection

  4. Molecular and Physiological Mechanisms of Membrane Receptor Systems Functioning

    OpenAIRE

    Severin, E.; Savvateeva, M.

    2011-01-01

    Molecular physiology is a new interdisciplinary field of knowledge that looks into how complicated biological systems function. The living cell is a relatively simple, but at the same time very sophisticated biological system. After the sequencing of the human genome, molecular physiology has endeavored to investigate the systems of cellular interactions at a completely new level based on knowledge of the spatial organization and functions of receptors, their ligands, and protein-protein inte...

  5. Death Associated Protein Kinases: Molecular Structure and Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Thornton

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Perinatal brain damage underlies an important share of motor and neurodevelopmental disabilities, such as cerebral palsy, cognitive impairment, visual dysfunction and epilepsy. Clinical, epidemiological, and experimental studies have revealed that factors such as inflammation, excitotoxicity and oxidative stress contribute considerably to both white and grey matter injury in the immature brain. A member of the death associated protein kinase (DAPk family, DAPk1, has been implicated in cerebral ischemic damage, whereby DAPk1 potentiates NMDA receptor-mediated excitotoxicity through interaction with the NR2BR subunit. DAPk1 also mediate a range of activities from autophagy, membrane blebbing and DNA fragmentation ultimately leading to cell death. DAPk mRNA levels are particularly highly expressed in the developing brain and thus, we hypothesize that DAPk1 may play a role in perinatal brain injury. In addition to reviewing current knowledge, we present new aspects of the molecular structure of DAPk domains, and relate these findings to interacting partners of DAPk1, DAPk-regulation in NMDA-induced cerebral injury and novel approaches to blocking the injurious effects of DAPk1.

  6. Factors associated with failure to wean children from mechanical ventilators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dyah Kanya Wati

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Patients with failure to wean from mechanical ventilators in 48 hours have increased risk of morbidity, however only a few protocols can be used for children. Objective To assess possible factors associated with failure to wean from mechanical ventilators in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU. Methods This cross sectional study performed from June 2011 to June 2012 had 124 subjects with 79 patients who were successfully weaned and 45 patients who fail to be weaned from mechanical ventilators. Data was analyzed by 2x2 contingency tables. Rresults with P value <0.05 were further analysis by logistic regression multivariate analysis. Results Factors associated with failure to wean from mechanical ventilators were abnormal electrolyte (P=0.001 and acid base status (P<0.001, lower ratio between tidal volume (TV/inspiration time (IT (P<0.001, lower mechanical load (P<0.001, and longer duration of mechanical ventilator use (P<0.001. Multivariate analyses revealed that the significant risk factors for failure to wean were TV/IT (OR 6.0; 95%CI 3.5 to 7.5; P=0.001, mechanical load (OR 11.5, 95%CI 10.3 to 15.5; P=0.002, and duration of mechanical ventilator use (OR 12.5; 95%CI 8.5 to 14.9; P=0.026. Conclusions Lower ratio of TV/IT and mechanical load, as well as longer duration of ventilator use are factors associated with failure to wean from a mechanical ventilator. [Paediatr Indones. 2013;53:59-64.].

  7. Molecular resemblance of an AIDS-associated lymphoma and endemic Burkitt lymphomas: Implications for their pathogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haluska, F.G.; Russo, G.; Croce, C.M. (Fels Institute for Cancer Research and Molecular Biology, Philadelphia, PA (USA)); Kant, J. (Univ. of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia (USA)); Andreef, M. (Memorial Sloan Kettering Institute, New York, NY (USA))

    1989-11-01

    Non-Hodgkin lymphoma is a common feature of AIDS. Approximately 30-40% of these tumors exhibit clinical features suggestive of endemic Burkitt lymphoma: they are aggressive malignancies that occur in association with Epstein-Barr virus infection, they arise in the setting of immunosuppression, and they carry t(8;14) translocations without detectable rearrangement of the MYC oncogene. To understand the molecular basis of these parallels, the authors analyzed a case of Epstein-Barr-positive AIDS-associated undifferentiated lymphoma. Southern blots show that the tumor exhibits immunoglobulin joining segment rearrangement but no rearrangement of the MYC oncogene. Cloning of the rearranged joining segment allowed the isolation of recombinant clones encompassing the translocation breakpoint, and sequencing of the translocation junction disclosed that the breakpoint is situated 7 base pairs from the chromosome 14 site involved in a previously described endemic Burkitt lymphoma translocation. Furthermore, the breakpoint is situated far from MYC on chromosome 8, a constant finding in endemic Burkitt lymphomas. That the molecular architecture of the translocation in this case is strikingly similar to previously analyzed translocations from endemic Burkitt lymphomas strongly suggests that common molecular mechanisms must be operative in the pathogenesis of these tumors.

  8. Molecular Cloning and Preliminary Analysis of a Fragile Site Associated Gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YI-WEN CAO; CHUAN-LU JIANG; TAO JIANG

    2006-01-01

    Objective To analyze the molecular colning of a fragile site-associated gene. Methods Genomic Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) DNA library was constructed using high molecular weight CHO DNA partially digested with MboI restriction enzyme from cultured CHO cells. Screening of genomic DNA library followed the established procedures. Genomic CHO in the positive clones was sequenced. Appropriate primers were designed for the reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCR). The RT-PCR products were cloned into a pCRⅡ TOPO vector and confirmed by DNA sequencing. Antibodies were prepared using synthetic peptides as antigens by immunizing the rabbits. Immunohistochemical analyses were performed to evaluate the expression of the novel gene in different tissues. Results To investigate the molecular mechanism underlying the initial events of mdrla amplification, we cloned 1q31 fragile site DNA. Strikingly, we found that this fragile site contained a novel gene which was designated as a fragile site-associated (FSA) gene. FSA encoded an unusually large mRNA of ~16 kb. Full-length human FSA cDNA was cloned. FSA mRNA was expressed in many cultured cells and tissue types. Immunohistochemical analyses also revealed an expression pattern of the encoded proteins in postmitotic, well-differentiated epithelial compartments of many organs, including colon, mammary glands, ovary, prostate, and bladder. Conclusion FSA plays an important role in regulating mammalian epithelial cell growth and differentiation.

  9. Molecular mechanics of the alpha-actinin rod domain: bending, torsional, and extensional behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javad Golji

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available alpha-Actinin is an actin crosslinking molecule that can serve as a scaffold and maintain dynamic actin filament networks. As a crosslinker in the stressed cytoskeleton, alpha-actinin can retain conformation, function, and strength. alpha-Actinin has an actin binding domain and a calmodulin homology domain separated by a long rod domain. Using molecular dynamics and normal mode analysis, we suggest that the alpha-actinin rod domain has flexible terminal regions which can twist and extend under mechanical stress, yet has a highly rigid interior region stabilized by aromatic packing within each spectrin repeat, by electrostatic interactions between the spectrin repeats, and by strong salt bridges between its two anti-parallel monomers. By exploring the natural vibrations of the alpha-actinin rod domain and by conducting bending molecular dynamics simulations we also predict that bending of the rod domain is possible with minimal force. We introduce computational methods for analyzing the torsional strain of molecules using rotating constraints. Molecular dynamics extension of the alpha-actinin rod is also performed, demonstrating transduction of the unfolding forces across salt bridges to the associated monomer of the alpha-actinin rod domain.

  10. Perfect/complete scattering experiments. Probing quantum mechanics on atomic and molecular collisions and coincidences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohmann, Bernd [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik 1; Grum-Grzhimailo, Alexei N. [Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation). Skobeltsyn Inst. of Nuclear Physics; Kleinpoppen, Hans

    2013-07-01

    Derives parameters for electrons, photons, atoms, ions, molecules calculated from theory. Delivers the quantum mechanical knowledge of atomic and molecular physics. Presents state-of-the-art experiments in atomic and molecular physics and related theoretical approaches. The main goal of this book is to elucidate what kind of experiment must be performed in order to determine the full set of independent parameters which can be extracted and calculated from theory, where electrons, photons, atoms, ions, molecules, or molecular ions may serve as the interacting constituents of matter. The feasibility of such perfect' and-or 'complete' experiments, providing the complete quantum mechanical knowledge of the process, is associated with the enormous potential of modern research techniques, both, in experiment and theory. It is even difficult to overestimate the role of theory in setting of the complete experiment, starting with the fact that an experiment can be complete only within a certain theoretical framework, and ending with the direct prescription of what, and in what conditions should be measured to make the experiment 'complete'. The language of the related theory is the language of quantum mechanical amplitudes and their relative phases. This book captures the spirit of research in the direction of the complete experiment in atomic and molecular physics, considering some of the basic quantum processes: scattering, Auger decay and photo-ionization. It includes a description of the experimental methods used to realize, step by step, the complete experiment up to the level of the amplitudes and phases. The corresponding arsenal includes, beyond determining the total cross section, the observation of angle and spin resolved quantities, photon polarization and correlation parameters, measurements applying coincidence techniques, preparing initially polarized targets, and even more sophisticated methods. The 'complete' experiment is

  11. Perfect/complete scattering experiments. Probing quantum mechanics on atomic and molecular collisions and coincidences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derives parameters for electrons, photons, atoms, ions, molecules calculated from theory. Delivers the quantum mechanical knowledge of atomic and molecular physics. Presents state-of-the-art experiments in atomic and molecular physics and related theoretical approaches. The main goal of this book is to elucidate what kind of experiment must be performed in order to determine the full set of independent parameters which can be extracted and calculated from theory, where electrons, photons, atoms, ions, molecules, or molecular ions may serve as the interacting constituents of matter. The feasibility of such perfect' and-or 'complete' experiments, providing the complete quantum mechanical knowledge of the process, is associated with the enormous potential of modern research techniques, both, in experiment and theory. It is even difficult to overestimate the role of theory in setting of the complete experiment, starting with the fact that an experiment can be complete only within a certain theoretical framework, and ending with the direct prescription of what, and in what conditions should be measured to make the experiment 'complete'. The language of the related theory is the language of quantum mechanical amplitudes and their relative phases. This book captures the spirit of research in the direction of the complete experiment in atomic and molecular physics, considering some of the basic quantum processes: scattering, Auger decay and photo-ionization. It includes a description of the experimental methods used to realize, step by step, the complete experiment up to the level of the amplitudes and phases. The corresponding arsenal includes, beyond determining the total cross section, the observation of angle and spin resolved quantities, photon polarization and correlation parameters, measurements applying coincidence techniques, preparing initially polarized targets, and even more sophisticated methods. The 'complete' experiment is, until today, hardly to perform

  12. Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms of Cardiovascular Disorders in Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Manasi S; Brownlee, Michael

    2016-05-27

    The clinical correlations linking diabetes mellitus with accelerated atherosclerosis, cardiomyopathy, and increased post-myocardial infarction fatality rates are increasingly understood in mechanistic terms. The multiple mechanisms discussed in this review seem to share a common element: prolonged increases in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in diabetic cardiovascular cells. Intracellular hyperglycemia causes excessive ROS production. This activates nuclear poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, which inhibits GAPDH, shunting early glycolytic intermediates into pathogenic signaling pathways. ROS and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase also reduce sirtuin, PGC-1α, and AMP-activated protein kinase activity. These changes cause decreased mitochondrial biogenesis, increased ROS production, and disturbed circadian clock synchronization of glucose and lipid metabolism. Excessive ROS production also facilitates nuclear transport of proatherogenic transcription factors, increases transcription of the neutrophil enzyme initiating NETosis, peptidylarginine deiminase 4, and activates the NOD-like receptor family, pyrin domain-containing 3 inflammasome. Insulin resistance causes excessive cardiomyocyte ROS production by increasing fatty acid flux and oxidation. This stimulates overexpression of the nuclear receptor PPARα and nuclear translocation of forkhead box O 1, which cause cardiomyopathy. ROS also shift the balance between mitochondrial fusion and fission in favor of increased fission, reducing the metabolic capacity and efficiency of the mitochondrial electron transport chain and ATP synthesis. Mitochondrial oxidative stress also plays a central role in angiotensin II-induced gap junction remodeling and arrhythmogenesis. ROS contribute to sudden death in diabetics after myocardial infarction by increasing post-translational protein modifications, which cause increased ryanodine receptor phosphorylation and downregulation of sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca

  13. Nuclear Magnetic Shielding Constants from Quantum Mechanical/Molecular Mechanical Calculations Using Polarizable Embedding: Role of the Embedding Potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinmann, Casper; Olsen, Jógvan Magnus Haugaard; Kongsted, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    We present NMR shielding constants obtained through quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) embedding calculations. Contrary to previous reports, we show that a relatively small QM region is sufficient, provided that a high-quality embedding potential is used. The calculated averaged NMR...

  14. Spectra modelling combining molecular dynamics and quantum mechanics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Novák, Vít; Bouř, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 1 (2015), s. 48. ISSN 1211-5894. [Discussions in Structural Molecular Biology. Annual Meeting of the Czech Society for Structural Biology /13./. 19.03.2015-21.03.2015, Nové Hrady] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP208/11/0105; GA ČR GA15-09072S Grant ostatní: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2010005; GA MŠk(CZ) ED3.2.00/08.0144 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : Raman scattering * molecular dynamics * autocorrelation function Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  15. Molecular Mechanism of Gastric Carcinogenesis in Helicobacter pylori-Infected Rodent Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Toyoda

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Since the discovery of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori, many efforts have been made to establish animal models for the investigation of the pathological features and molecular mechanisms of gastric carcinogenesis. Among the animal models, Mongolian gerbils and mice are particularly useful for the analysis of H. pylori-associated inflammatory reactions and gastric cancer development. Inhibitors of oxidative stress, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 and nuclear factor-κB, exert preventive effects on chronic gastritis and the development of adenocarcinomas in H. pylori-infected gerbils. Genetically-modified mouse models, including transgenic and knockout mice, have also revealed the importance of p53, COX-2/prostaglandin, Wnt/β-catenin, proinflammatory cytokines, gastrin and type III mucin in the molecular mechanisms of gastric carcinogenesis. Microarray technology is available for comprehensive gene analysis in the gastric mucosa of mouse models, and epigenetics, such as DNA methylation, could be an alternative approach to correlate the observations in animal models with the etiology in humans.

  16. The molecular mechanism of HOTAIR in tumorigenesis, metastasis, and drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaolong; Chen, Jin; Tang, Wenru

    2014-12-01

    Long non-coding RNAs have been reported to play an important role in cellular metabolism and development. Homeobox transcript antisense intergenic RNA (HOTAIR), a long non-coding RNA, is pervasively over-expressed in most human cancers compared with non-cancerous adjacent tissues. Although many articles have reported that HOTAIR is closely associated with metastasis, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, advanced pathological stage, drug resistance, and poor prognosis, the role of HOTAIR in gene regulation and tumor development is largely unknown, and the potential molecular mechanisms are not completely clear yet. In this review, we summarized the recent progress in the study of the major functions of HOTAIR. miR-331-3p, miR-130a, miR-7, miR-141, HER2, c-MYC, WIF-1, RBM38, PTEN, and Col-1 are involved in the HOTAIR regulation network. We tried to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of HOTAIR in the aspects of tumorigenesis, metastasis, drug resistance, and regulation. PMID:25385164

  17. Studies on the molecular mechanism of nucleotide excision repair in human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies in this laboratory have focused on attempts to define the mechanism of nucleotide excision repair of DNA in human cells, with a view to understanding the molecular pathogenesis of the disease XP. With the advent of recombinant DNA technology, they directed their efforts to the molecular cloning of human genes defective in XP, with a view to using the cloned genes to overexpress proteins of interest for biochemical investigations. Initial studies exploited the selectable phenotype of marked sensitivity to killing of XP group A cells by UV radiation and by other DNA damaging agents. However, except for a single report in 1982 there has been no reproducible demonstration of complementation of the UV sensitivity of XP cells by DNA-mediated transfection. The apparent difficulties associated with transfection of XP cells have been the subject of several recent studies. In view of the multiple problems associated with stable transfection of XP cells using total genomic DNA, they have embarked on an alternative strategy designed to facilitate the cloning of human XP genes. This strategy involves the transfer of single human chromosomes into XP cells and screening for this relatively high frequency event. The idea is to identify chromosomes on which particular XP genes reside and then to isolate non-complementing derivatives of these chromosomes so that highly enriched DNA pools containing genes of interest can be generated by employing one or more subtractive strategies

  18. MOLECULAR MECHANISMS OF ACTION OF MAGNESIUM OROTATE ON CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Yu. Torshin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Orotic acid is one of the intermediates in the pyrimidine biosynthesis. Mechanisms of physiological effects of orotic acid are poorly known. Analysis of data about these mechanisms is presented. Effects of orotic acid and magnesium orotate on cardiovascular system as well as therapeutic implementation of magnesium orotate in cardiology are discussed.

  19. Biochemical and Molecular Mechanisms of Desiccation Tolerance in Bryophytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryophytes, because they descend from the earliest branching events in the phylogeny of land plants, hold an important position in our investigations into the mechanisms by which plants respond to dehydration and by what paths such mechanisms have evolved. This is true regardless of what aspect of p...

  20. Molecular and Neuronal Plasticity Mechanisms in the Amygdala-Prefrontal Cortical Circuit: Implications for Opiate Addiction Memory Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura G Rosen

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The persistence of associative memories linked to the rewarding properties of drugs of abuse is a core underlying feature of the addiction process. Opiate class drugs in particular, possess potent euphorigenic effects which, when linked to environmental cues, can produce drug-related ‘trigger’ memories that may persist for lengthy periods of time, even during abstinence, in both humans and other animals. Furthermore, the transitional switch from the drug-naïve, non-dependent state to states of dependence and withdrawal, represents a critical boundary between distinct neuronal and molecular substrates associated with opiate-reward memory formation. Identifying the functional molecular and neuronal mechanisms related to the acquisition, consolidation, recall and extinction phases of opiate-related reward memories is critical for understanding, and potentially reversing, addiction-related memory plasticity characteristic of compulsive drug-seeking behaviors. The mammalian prefrontal cortex (PFC and basolateral nucleus of the amygdala (BLA share important functional and anatomical connections that are involved importantly in the processing of associative memories linked to drug reward. In addition, both regions share interconnections with the mesolimbic pathway’s ventral tegmental area (VTA and nucleus accumbens (NAc and can modulate dopamine (DA transmission and neuronal activity associated with drug-related DAergic signaling dynamics. In this review, we will summarize research from both human and animal modelling studies highlighting the importance of neuronal and molecular plasticity mechanisms within this circuitry during critical phases of opiate addiction-related learning and memory processing. Specifically, we will focus on two molecular signaling pathways known to be involved in both drug-related neuroadaptations and in memory-related plasticity mechanisms; the extracellular-signal-regulated kinase system (ERK and the Ca2+/calmodulin

  1. Molecular and quantum mechanical studies on the monomer recognition of a highly-regular β-helical antifreeze protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG; Zuoyin; JIA; Zongchao; LIU; Ruozhuang; CHEN; Guangj

    2004-01-01

    The possible interaction models for an antifreeze protein from Tenebrio molitar (TmAFP) have been systematically studied using the methods of molecular mechanics, molecular dynamics and quantum chemistry. It is hoped that these approaches would provide insights into the nature of interaction between protein monomers through sampling a number of interaction possibilities and evaluating their interaction energies between two monomers in the course of recognition. The results derived from the molecular mechanics indicate that monomer's β-sheets would be involved in interaction area and the side chains on two β-faces can match each other at the two-dimensional level. The results from molecular mechanics and ONIOM methods show that the strongest interaction energy could be gained through the formation of H-bonds when the two β-sheets are involved in the interaction model. Furthermore, the calculation of DFT and analysis of van der Waals bond charge density confirm further that recognition between the two TCTs mainly depends on inter-molecular hydroxyls. Therefore, our results demonstrate that during the course of interaction the most favorable association of TmAFPs is via their β-sheets.

  2. Plant Responses to Simultaneous Biotic and Abiotic Stress: Molecular Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ines Ben Rejeb

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Plants are constantly confronted to both abiotic and biotic stresses that seriously reduce their productivity. Plant responses to these stresses are complex and involve numerous physiological, molecular, and cellular adaptations. Recent evidence shows that a combination of abiotic and biotic stress can have a positive effect on plant performance by reducing the susceptibility to biotic stress. Such an interaction between both types of stress points to a crosstalk between their respective signaling pathways. This crosstalk may be synergistic and/or antagonistic and include among others the involvement of phytohormones, transcription factors, kinase cascades, and reactive oxygen species (ROS. In certain cases, such crosstalk can lead to a cross-tolerance and enhancement of a plant’s resistance against pathogens. This review aims at giving an insight into cross-tolerance between abiotic and biotic stress, focusing on the molecular level and regulatory pathways.

  3. Rapid Molecular Cloud and Star Formation: Mechanisms and Movies

    CERN Document Server

    Heitsch, Fabian

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate that the observationally inferred rapid onset of star formation after parental molecular clouds have assembled can be achieved by flow-driven cloud formation of atomic gas, using our previous three-dimensional numerical simulations. We post-process these simulations to approximate CO formation, which allows us to investigate the times at which CO becomes abundant relative to the onset of cloud collapse. We find that global gravity in a finite cloud has two crucial effects on cloud evolution. (a) Lateral collapse (perpendicular to the flows sweeping up the cloud) leads to rapidly increasing column densities above the accumulation from the one-dimensional flow. This in turn allows fast formation of CO, allowing the molecular cloud to ``appear'' rapidly. (b) Global gravity is required to drive the dense gas to the high pressures necessary to form solar-mass cores, in support of recent analytical models of cloud fragmentation. While the clouds still appear ``supersonically turbulent'', this turbule...

  4. The Molecular Mechanism of Iron(III) Oxide Nucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheck, Johanna; Wu, Baohu; Drechsler, Markus; Rosenberg, Rose; Van Driessche, Alexander E S; Stawski, Tomasz M; Gebauer, Denis

    2016-08-18

    A molecular understanding of the formation of solid phases from solution would be beneficial for various scientific fields. However, nucleation pathways are still not fully understood, whereby the case of iron (oxyhydr)oxides poses a prime example. We show that in the prenucleation regime, thermodynamically stable solute species up to a few nanometers in size are observed, which meet the definition of prenucleation clusters. Nucleation then is not governed by a critical size, but rather by the dynamics of the clusters that are forming at the distinct nucleation stages, based on the chemistry of the linkages within the clusters. This resolves a longstanding debate in the field of iron oxide nucleation, and the results may generally apply to oxides forming via hydrolysis and condensation. The (molecular) understanding of the chemical basis of phase separation is paramount for, e.g., tailoring size, shape and structure of novel nanocrystalline materials. PMID:27466739

  5. Molecular mechanisms of Strawberry Plant Defence against colletotrichum acutatum

    OpenAIRE

    Amil-Ruiz, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    This thesis is focused on strawberry molecular studies aimed by the strong economic impact and social staple that represents this crop. With an annual production of 500000 tons and an economic weigh of 650 million €, Spain is the third producing country in world (FAOSTAT Agriculture Data [http://faostat.fao.org/]). Important losses in strawberry yields occur due to diseases and pests. Although resistant cultivars are a priority of most strawberry breeding programs, completely r...

  6. Molecular and Metabolic Mechanisms of Carbon Sequestration in Marine Thrombolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobberley, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    The overall goal of my dissertation project has been to examine the molecular processes underlying carbon sequestration in lithifying microbial ecosystems, known as thrombolitic mats, and assess their feasibility for use in bioregenerative life support systems. The results of my research and education efforts funded by the Graduate Student Researchers Program can be summarized in four peer-reviewed research publication, one educational publication, two papers in preparation, and six research presentations at local and national science meetings (see below for specific details).

  7. Polarizable Atomic Multipole-based Molecular Mechanics for Organic Molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Ren, Pengyu; Wu, Chuanjie; Ponder, Jay W.

    2011-01-01

    An empirical potential based on permanent atomic multipoles and atomic induced dipoles is reported for alkanes, alcohols, amines, sulfides, aldehydes, carboxylic acids, amides, aromatics and other small organic molecules. Permanent atomic multipole moments through quadrupole moments have been derived from gas phase ab initio molecular orbital calculations. The van der Waals parameters are obtained by fitting to gas phase homodimer QM energies and structures, as well as experimental densities ...

  8. Modeling the molecular mechanism of the perception of smell

    OpenAIRE

    March, Claire de

    2015-01-01

    This research project is focused on the link between chemical structures of odorant molecules and their interactions with odorant receptors expressed in olfactory neurons. This basic research is of primary importance for building a physiologically-inspired “computational nose” that reproduces the function of the 400 types of odorant receptors involved in the perception of smells. Here, each odorant receptor is represented as a molecular system, reproduced atom per atom in a computational mode...

  9. Predicting cancer drug mechanisms of action using molecular network signatures

    OpenAIRE

    Pritchard, Justin R.; Bruno, Peter M.; Hemann, Michael T.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    2012-01-01

    Molecular signatures are a powerful approach to characterize novel small molecules and derivatized small molecule libraries. While new experimental techniques are being developed in diverse model systems, informatics approaches lag behind these exciting advances. We propose an analysis pipeline for signature based drug annotation. We develop an integrated strategy, utilizing supervised and unsupervised learning methodologies that are bridged by network based statistics. Using this approach we...

  10. Mechanical tuning of conductance and thermopower in helicene molecular junctions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vacek, Jaroslav; Vacek Chocholoušová, Jana; Stará, Irena G.; Starý, Ivo; Dubi, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 19 (2015), s. 8793-8802. ISSN 2040-3364 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP207/10/2207 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : helicene molecular junctions * quantum interference * stereoselective syntheses * nonlinear optical properties Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 7.394, year: 2014 http://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlepdf/2015/nr/c5nr01297j

  11. Molecular mechanics and microcalorimetric investigations of the effects of molecular water on the aggregation of asphaltenes in solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murgich, J.; Lira-Galeana, C.; Garcia, Daniel Merino; Andersen, Simon Ivar; del Rio-Garcia, J.M.

    2002-01-01

    The interaction of two model asphaltene molecules from the Athabasca sand oil with a water molecule in a toluene solution was studied by means of molecular mechanics calculations. It was found that water forms bridging H bonds between the heteroatoms of asphaltenes with a considerable span in ene...

  12. Nullspace Sampling with Holonomic Constraints Reveals Molecular Mechanisms of Protein Gαs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitar V Pachov

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Proteins perform their function or interact with partners by exchanging between conformational substates on a wide range of spatiotemporal scales. Structurally characterizing these exchanges is challenging, both experimentally and computationally. Large, diffusional motions are often on timescales that are difficult to access with molecular dynamics simulations, especially for large proteins and their complexes. The low frequency modes of normal mode analysis (NMA report on molecular fluctuations associated with biological activity. However, NMA is limited to a second order expansion about a minimum of the potential energy function, which limits opportunities to observe diffusional motions. By contrast, kino-geometric conformational sampling (KGS permits large perturbations while maintaining the exact geometry of explicit conformational constraints, such as hydrogen bonds. Here, we extend KGS and show that a conformational ensemble of the α subunit Gαs of heterotrimeric stimulatory protein Gs exhibits structural features implicated in its activation pathway. Activation of protein Gs by G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs is associated with GDP release and large conformational changes of its α-helical domain. Our method reveals a coupled α-helical domain opening motion while, simultaneously, Gαs helix α5 samples an activated conformation. These motions are moderated in the activated state. The motion centers on a dynamic hub near the nucleotide-binding site of Gαs, and radiates to helix α4. We find that comparative NMA-based ensembles underestimate the amplitudes of the motion. Additionally, the ensembles fall short in predicting the accepted direction of the full activation pathway. Taken together, our findings suggest that nullspace sampling with explicit, holonomic constraints yields ensembles that illuminate molecular mechanisms involved in GDP release and protein Gs activation, and further establish conformational coupling between key

  13. Molecular mechanisms of glucocorticoid receptor signaling Mecanismos moleculares de señalización del receptor de glucocorticoides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Labeur

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This review highlights the most recent findings on the molecular mechanisms of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR. Most effects of glucocorticoids are mediated by the intracellular GR which is present in almost every tissue and controls transcriptional activation via direct and indirect mechanisms. Nevertheless the glucocorticoid responses are tissue -and gene- specific. GR associates selectively with corticosteroid ligands produced in the adrenal gland in response to changes of humoral homeostasis. Ligand interaction with GR promotes either GR binding to genomic glucocorticoid response elements, in turn modulating gene transcription, or interaction of GR monomers with other transcription factors activated by other signalling pathways leading to transrepression. The GR regulates a broad spectrum of physiological functions, including cell differentiation, metabolism and inflammatory responses. Thus, disruption or dysregulation of GR function will result in severe impairments in the maintenance of homeostasis and the control of adaptation to stress.Esta revisión destaca los más recientes hallazgos sobre los mecanismos moleculares del receptor de glucocorticoides (GR. La mayoría de los efectos de los glucocorticoides son mediados por los GR intracelulares presentes en casi todos los tejidos y controlan la activación transcripcional por mecanismos directos e indirectos. Las respuestas a los glucocorticoides son específicas para cada gen y tejido. Los GR se asocian en forma selectiva con ligandos producidos en la glándula adrenal, corticosteroides, en respuesta a cambios neuroendocrinos. La interacción del ligando con el GR promueve: a la unión del GR a elementos genómicos de respuesta a glucocorticoides, modulando la transcripción; b la interacción de monómeros del GR con otros factores de transcripción activados por otras vías, llevando a la transrepresión. El GR regula un amplio espectro de funciones fisiológicas, incluyendo la

  14. Nucleon molecular orbitals and the transition mechanism between molecular orbitals in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The molecular orbitals of the nucleon(s) in nucleus-nucleus collisions are dynamically defined as a linear combination of nucleon single-particle orbits (LCNO) in a rotating frame by using the coupled-reaction-channel (CRC) theory. Nucleon molecular orbitals and the promotions of nucleon, - especially due to the Landau-Zener radial coupling are discussed with the method above mentioned. (author)

  15. Use of gadoxetate disodium for functional MRI based on its unique molecular mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, YoonSeok; Huh, Jimi; Woo, Dong-Cheol; Kim, Kyung Won

    2016-01-01

    Gadolinium ethoxybenzyl dimeglumine (gadoxetate) is a recently developed hepatocyte-specific MRI contrast medium. Gadoxetate demonstrates unique pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties, because its uptake in hepatocytes occurs via the organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP) transporter expressed at the sinusoidal membrane, and its biliary excretion via the multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs) at the canalicular membrane. Based on these characteristics, gadoxetate-enhanced MRI can provide functional information on hepatobiliary diseases, including liver function estimation, biliary drainage evaluation and characterization of hepatocarcinogenesis. In addition, understanding its mode of action can provide an opportunity to use gadoxetate for cellular and molecular imaging. Radiologists and imaging scientists should be familiar with the basic mechanism of gadoxetate and OATP/MRP transporters. PMID:26693795

  16. Molecular mechanism of crystallization impacting calcium phosphate cements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giocondi, J L; El-Dasher, B S; Nancollas, G H; Orme, C A

    2009-05-31

    In summary, SPM data has shown that (1) Mg inhibits growth on all steps but relatively high Mg/Ca ratios are needed. Extracting the mechanism of interaction requires more modeling of the kinetic data, but step morphology is consistent with incorporation. (2) Citrate has several effects depending on the citrate/Ca ratio. At the lowest concentrations, citrate increases the step free energy without altering the step kinetics; at higher concentrations, the polar step is slowed. (3) Oxalate also slows the polar step but additionally stabilizes a new facet, with a [100]{sub Cc} step. (4) Etidronate has the greatest kinetic impact of the molecules studied. At 7{micro}M concentrations, the polar step slows by 60% and a new polar step appears. However, at the same time the [10-1]{sub Cc} increases by 67%. It should be noted that all of these molecules complex calcium and can effect kinetics by altering the solution supersaturation or the Ca to HPO{sub 4}{sup 2-} ratio. For the SPM data shown, this effect was corrected for to distinguish the effect of the molecule at the crystal surface from the effect of the molecule on the solution speciation. The goal of this paper is to draw connections between fundamental studies of atomic step motion and potential strategies for materials processing. It is not our intent to promote the utility of SPM for investigating processes in cement dynamics. The conditions are spectacularly different in many ways. The data shown in this paper are fairly close to equilibrium (S=1.6) whereas the nucleation of cements is initiated at supersaturation ratios in the thousands to millions. Of course, after the initial nucleation phase, the growth will occur at more modest supersaturations and as the cement evolves towards equilibrium certainly some of the growth will occur in regimes such as shown here. In addition to the difference in supersaturation, cements tend to have lower additive to calcium ratios. As an example, the additive to Ca ratio is

  17. Molecular cross-talk between sponge host and associated microbes

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Wang, X.; Brandt, D.; Thakur, N.L.; Wiens, M.; Batel, R.; Schroder, H.C.; Muller, W.E.G.

    the Porifera as the most important animal phylum to be exploited as a source for the isolation of new potential drugs. First molecular biological strategies have been outlined to obtain those compounds in a sustainable way, by producing them recombinantly....

  18. Molecular and cellular mechanisms of vomeronasal signaling in mammals

    OpenAIRE

    Cichy, Annika

    2013-01-01

    The mouse vomeronasal organ plays a critical role in chemosensory communication and regulates diverse social and sexual behaviors. However, many physiological mechanisms underlying vomeronasal chemosensory signaling remain elusive. Therefore, the overall aim of my thesis was to gain a deeper understanding of the basic mechanisms that control VNO physiology. Specifically, my research focused on HCN channel-mediated vomeronasal proton-sensing and its potential role in sensory gain control of so...

  19. Adiponectin: Probe of the molecular paradigm associating diabetes and obesity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kakali Ghoshal; Maitree Bhattacharyya

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is an emerging health challenge all overthe world as a result of urbanization, high prevalenceof obesity, sedentary lifestyle and other stress relatedfactors compounded with the genetic prevalence. Thehealth consequences and economic burden of theobesity and related diabetes mellitus epidemic areenormous. Different signaling molecules secreted byadipocytes have been implicated in the developmentof obesity and associated insulin resistance in type2 diabetes. Human adiponectin, a 244-amino acidcollagen-like protein is solely secreted by adipocytes andacts as a hormone with anti-inflammatory and insulinsensitizingproperties. Adiponectin secretion, in contrastto secretion of other adipokines, is paradoxicallydecreased in obesity which may be attributable toinhibition of adiponectin gene transcription. Thereare several mechanisms through which adiponectinmay decrease the risk of type 2 diabetes, includingsuppression of hepatic gluconeogenesis, stimulation offatty acid oxidation in the liver, stimulation of fatty acidoxidation and glucose uptake in skeletal muscle, andstimulation of insulin secretion. To date, no systematicreview has been conducted that evaluate the potentialimportance of adiponectin metabolism in insulinresistance. In this review attempt has been made toexplore the relevance of adiponectin metabolism forthe development of diabetes mellitus. This article alsoidentifies this novel target for prospective therapeuticresearch aiming successful management of diabetesmellitus.

  20. Molecular Analysis of the Microflora Associated with Dental Caries

    OpenAIRE

    Munson, M A; Banerjee, A.; Watson, T.F.; Wade, W. G.

    2004-01-01

    Molecular techniques have revealed many novel, presumed unculturable, taxa in oral infections. The aim of this study was to characterize the bacterial community of the middle and advancing front of carious dental lesions by cultural and molecular analyses. Samples were collected with a hand excavator from five teeth with carious lesions involving dentine. Samples were cultured on blood agar and Rogosa agar incubated in air plus 5% CO2 and on fastidious anaerobe agar anaerobically. DNA was als...

  1. Molecular Mechanisms of Malignant Transformation by Low Dose Cadmium in Normal Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluz, Thomas; Cohen, Lisa; Shen, Steven S.; Costa, Max

    2016-01-01

    Cadmium is a carcinogenic metal, the mechanisms of which are not fully understood. In this study, human bronchial epithelial cells were transformed with sub-toxic doses of cadmium (0.01, 0.05, and 0.1 μM) and transformed clones were characterized for gene expression changes using RNA-seq, as well as other molecular measurements. 440 genes were upregulated and 47 genes were downregulated in cadmium clones relative to control clones over 1.25-fold. Upregulated genes were associated mostly with gene ontology terms related to embryonic development, immune response, and cell movement, while downregulated genes were associated with RNA metabolism and regulation of transcription. Several embryonic genes were upregulated, including the transcription regulator SATB2. SATB2 is critical for normal skeletal development and has roles in gene expression regulation and chromatin remodeling. Small hairpin RNA knockdown of SATB2 significantly inhibited growth in soft agar, indicating its potential as a driver of metal-induced carcinogenesis. An increase in oxidative stress and autophagy was observed in cadmium clones. In addition, the DNA repair protein O6-methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase was depleted by transformation with cadmium. MGMT loss caused significant decrease in cell viability after treatment with the alkylating agent temozolomide, demonstrating diminished capacity to repair such damage. Results reveal various mechanisms of cadmium-induced malignant transformation in BEAS-2B cells including upregulation of SATB2, downregulation of MGMT, and increased oxidative stress. PMID:27186882

  2. Cold Denaturation Unveiled: Molecular Mechanism of the Asymmetric Unfolding of Yeast Frataxin

    OpenAIRE

    Sanfelice, Domenico; Morandi, Edoardo; Pastore, Annalisa; Niccolai, Neri; Temussi, Piero Andrea

    2015-01-01

    What is the mechanism that determines the denaturation of proteins at low temperatures, which is, by now, recognized as a fundamental property of all proteins? We present experimental evidence that clarifies the role of specific interactions that favor the entrance of water into the hydrophobic core, a mechanism originally proposed by Privalov but never proved experimentally. By using a combination of molecular dynamics simulation, molecular biology, and biophysics, we identified a cluster of...

  3. Molecular regulatory mechanisms of osteoclastogenesis through cytoprotective enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Kanzaki

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available It has been reported that reactive oxygen species (ROS, such as hydrogen peroxide and superoxide, take part in osteoclast differentiation as intra-cellular signaling molecules. The current assumed signaling cascade from RANK to ROS production is RANK, TRAF6, Rac1, and then Nox. The target molecules of ROS in RANKL signaling remain unclear; however, several reports support the theory that NF-κB signaling could be the crucial downstream signaling molecule of RANKL-mediated ROS signaling. Furthermore, ROS exert cytotoxic effects such as peroxidation of lipids and phospholipids and oxidative damage to proteins and DNA. Therefore, cells have several protective mechanisms against oxidative stressors that mainly induce cytoprotective enzymes and ROS scavenging. Three well-known mechanisms regulate cytoprotective enzymes including Nrf2-, FOXO-, and sirtuin-dependent mechanisms. Several reports have indicated a crosslink between FOXO- and sirtuin-dependent regulatory mechanisms. The agonists against the regulatory mechanisms are reported to induce these cytoprotective enzymes successfully. Some of them inhibit osteoclast differentiation and bone destruction via attenuation of intracellular ROS signaling. In this review article, we discuss the above topics and summarize the current information available on the relationship between cytoprotective enzymes and osteoclastogenesis.

  4. Molecular regulatory mechanisms of osteoclastogenesis through cytoprotective enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanzaki, Hiroyuki; Shinohara, Fumiaki; Kanako, Itohiya; Yamaguchi, Yuuki; Fukaya, Sari; Miyamoto, Yutaka; Wada, Satoshi; Nakamura, Yoshiki

    2016-08-01

    It has been reported that reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as hydrogen peroxide and superoxide, take part in osteoclast differentiation as intra-cellular signaling molecules. The current assumed signaling cascade from RANK to ROS production is RANK, TRAF6, Rac1, and then Nox. The target molecules of ROS in RANKL signaling remain unclear; however, several reports support the theory that NF-κB signaling could be the crucial downstream signaling molecule of RANKL-mediated ROS signaling. Furthermore, ROS exert cytotoxic effects such as peroxidation of lipids and phospholipids and oxidative damage to proteins and DNA. Therefore, cells have several protective mechanisms against oxidative stressors that mainly induce cytoprotective enzymes and ROS scavenging. Three well-known mechanisms regulate cytoprotective enzymes including Nrf2-, FOXO-, and sirtuin-dependent mechanisms. Several reports have indicated a crosslink between FOXO- and sirtuin-dependent regulatory mechanisms. The agonists against the regulatory mechanisms are reported to induce these cytoprotective enzymes successfully. Some of them inhibit osteoclast differentiation and bone destruction via attenuation of intracellular ROS signaling. In this review article, we discuss the above topics and summarize the current information available on the relationship between cytoprotective enzymes and osteoclastogenesis. PMID:26795736

  5. Network analysis shows novel molecular mechanisms of action for copper-based chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús eEspinal-Enríquez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The understanding of the mechanisms associated with the action of chemotherapeutic agents is fundamental to assess and account for possible side-effects of such treatments. Casiope'inas have demonstrated a cytotoxic effect by activation of pro-apoptotic processes in malignant cells. Such processes have been proved to activate the apoptotic intrinsic route, as well as cell cycle arrest. Despite this knowledge, the whole mechanism of action of Casiope'inas is yet to be completely understood. In this work, we implement a systems biology approach based on two pathway analysis tools (Over-Representation Analysis and Causal Network Analysis, to observe changes in some hallmarks of cancer, induced by this copper-based chemotherapeutic agent in HeLa cell lines. We find that the metabolism of metal ions is exacerbated, as well as cell division processes being globally diminished. We also show that cellular migration and proliferation events are decreased. Moreover, the molecular mechanisms of liver protection are increased in the cell cultures under the actions of Casiope'inas, unlike the case in many other cytotoxic drugs. We argue that this chemotherapeutic agent may be promising, given its protective hepatic function, concomitant with its cytotoxic participation in the onset of apoptotic processes in malignant cells.

  6. Molecular mechanisms of fibroblast growth factor signaling in physiology and pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belov, Artur A; Mohammadi, Moosa

    2013-06-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) signal in a paracrine or endocrine fashion to mediate a myriad of biological activities, ranging from issuing developmental cues, maintaining tissue homeostasis, and regulating metabolic processes. FGFs carry out their diverse functions by binding and dimerizing FGF receptors (FGFRs) in a heparan sulfate (HS) cofactor- or Klotho coreceptor-assisted manner. The accumulated wealth of structural and biophysical data in the past decade has transformed our understanding of the mechanism of FGF signaling in human health and development, and has provided novel concepts in receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling. Among these contributions are the elucidation of HS-assisted receptor dimerization, delineation of the molecular determinants of ligand-receptor specificity, tyrosine kinase regulation, receptor cis-autoinhibition, and tyrosine trans-autophosphorylation. These structural studies have also revealed how disease-associated mutations highjack the physiological mechanisms of FGFR regulation to contribute to human diseases. In this paper, we will discuss the structurally and biophysically derived mechanisms of FGF signaling, and how the insights gained may guide the development of therapies for treatment of a diverse array of human diseases. PMID:23732477

  7. Molecular mechanisms of gravity perception and signal transduction in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesnikov, Yaroslav S; Kretynin, Serhiy V; Volotovsky, Igor D; Kordyum, Elizabeth L; Ruelland, Eric; Kravets, Volodymyr S

    2016-07-01

    Gravity is one of the environmental cues that direct plant growth and development. Recent investigations of different gravity signalling pathways have added complexity to how we think gravity is perceived. Particular cells within specific organs or tissues perceive gravity stimulus. Many downstream signalling events transmit the perceived information into subcellular, biochemical, and genomic responses. They are rapid, non-genomic, regulatory, and cell-specific. The chain of events may pass by signalling lipids, the cytoskeleton, intracellular calcium levels, protein phosphorylation-dependent pathways, proteome changes, membrane transport, vacuolar biogenesis mechanisms, or nuclear events. These events culminate in changes in gene expression and auxin lateral redistribution in gravity response sites. The possible integration of these signalling events with amyloplast movements or with other perception mechanisms is discussed. Further investigation is needed to understand how plants coordinate mechanisms and signals to sense this important physical factor. PMID:26215561

  8. Molecular mechanics work station for protein conformational studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interest in computational problems in Biology has intensified over the last few years, partly due to the development of techniques for the rapid cloning, sequencing, and mutagenesis of genes from organisims ranging from E. coli to Man. The central dogma of molecular biology; that DNA codes for mRNA which codes for protein, has been understood in a linear programming sense since the genetic code was cracked. But what is not understood at present is how a protein, once assembled as a long sequence of amino acids, folds back on itself to produce a three-dimensional structure which is unique to that protein and which dictates its chemical and biological activity. This folding process is purely physics, and involves the time evolution of a system of several thousand atoms which interact with each other and with atoms from the surrounding solvent. Molecular dynamics simulations on smaller molecules suggest that approaches which treat the protein as a classical ensemble of atoms interacting with each other via an empirical Hamiltonian can yield the kind of predictive results one would like when applied to proteins

  9. Molecular mechanisms of protein aggregation from global fitting of kinetic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisl, Georg; Kirkegaard, Julius B; Arosio, Paolo; Michaels, Thomas C T; Vendruscolo, Michele; Dobson, Christopher M; Linse, Sara; Knowles, Tuomas P J

    2016-02-01

    The elucidation of the molecular mechanisms by which soluble proteins convert into their amyloid forms is a fundamental prerequisite for understanding and controlling disorders that are linked to protein aggregation, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. However, because of the complexity associated with aggregation reaction networks, the analysis of kinetic data of protein aggregation to obtain the underlying mechanisms represents a complex task. Here we describe a framework, using quantitative kinetic assays and global fitting, to determine and to verify a molecular mechanism for aggregation reactions that is compatible with experimental kinetic data. We implement this approach in a web-based software, AmyloFit. Our procedure starts from the results of kinetic experiments that measure the concentration of aggregate mass as a function of time. We illustrate the approach with results from the aggregation of the β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides measured using thioflavin T, but the method is suitable for data from any similar kinetic experiment measuring the accumulation of aggregate mass as a function of time; the input data are in the form of a tab-separated text file. We also outline general experimental strategies and practical considerations for obtaining kinetic data of sufficient quality to draw detailed mechanistic conclusions, and the procedure starts with instructions for extensive data quality control. For the core part of the analysis, we provide an online platform (http://www.amylofit.ch.cam.ac.uk) that enables robust global analysis of kinetic data without the need for extensive programming or detailed mathematical knowledge. The software automates repetitive tasks and guides users through the key steps of kinetic analysis: determination of constraints to be placed on the aggregation mechanism based on the concentration dependence of the aggregation reaction, choosing from several fundamental models describing assembly into linear aggregates and

  10. Molecular mechanics of DNA bricks: in situ structure, mechanical properties and ionic conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slone, Scott Michael; Li, Chen-Yu; Yoo, Jejoong; Aksimentiev, Aleksei

    2016-05-01

    The DNA bricks method exploits self-assembly of short DNA fragments to produce custom three-dimensional objects with subnanometer precision. In contrast to DNA origami, the DNA brick method permits a variety of different structures to be realized using the same library of DNA strands. As a consequence of their design, however, assembled DNA brick structures have fewer interhelical connections in comparison to equivalent DNA origami structures. Although the overall shape of the DNA brick objects has been characterized and found to conform to the features of the target designs, the microscopic properties of DNA brick objects remain yet to be determined. Here, we use the all-atom molecular dynamics method to directly compare the structure, mechanical properties and ionic conductivity of DNA brick and DNA origami structures different only by internal connectivity of their consistituent DNA strands. In comparison to equivalent DNA origami structures, the DNA brick structures are found to be less rigid and less dense and have a larger cross-section area normal to the DNA helix direction. At the microscopic level, the junction in the DNA brick structures are found to be right-handed, similar to the structure of individual Holliday junctions (HJ) in solution, which contrasts with the left-handed structure of HJ in DNA origami. Subject to external electric field, a DNA brick plate is more leaky to ions than an equivalent DNA origami plate because of its lower density and larger cross-section area. Overall, our results indicate that the structures produced by the DNA brick method are fairly similar in their overall appearance to those created by the DNA origami method but are more compliant when subject to external forces, which likely is a consequence of their single crossover design.

  11. Mechanisms of two-color laser-induced field-free molecular orientation

    OpenAIRE

    Spanner, Michael; Patchkovskii, Serguei; Frumker, Eugene; Corkum, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Two mechanisms of two-color (\\omega + 2\\omega) laser-induced field-free molecular orientation, based on the hyperpolarizability and ionization depletion, are explored and compared. The CO molecule is used as a computational example. While the hyperpolarizability mechanism generates small amounts of orientation at intensities below the ionization threshold, ionization depletion quickly becomes the dominant mechanism as soon as ionizing intensities are reached. Only the ionization mechanism lea...

  12. Dissecting the molecular mechanisms of intraflagellar transport in Chlamydomonas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, L. B.; Geimer, S.; Rosenbaum, J. L.

    2006-01-01

    the IFT system have been identified and characterized, but the mechanisms by which these different components are coordinated and regulated at the flagellar base and tip are unclear. Results Using a variety of Chlamydomonas mutants, we confirm that cDynein1b requires kinesin-2 for transport toward the...

  13. Exploring host-guest complexation mechanisms by a molecular dynamics/quantum mechanics/continuum solvent model approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Renlong; Nie, Xuemei; Zhou, Yumei; Wong, Chung F.; Gong, Xuedong; Jiang, Wei; Tang, Weihua; Wang, Yan A.; Heine, Thomas; Zhou, Baojing

    2016-03-01

    We introduce a molecular dynamics/quantum mechanics/continuum solvent model (MD/QM/CSM) approach to investigate binding mechanisms of host-guest systems. The representative conformations of host, guest, and their complex generated from MD simulations at the molecular-mechanics level are used for binding free energy calculations based on a QM/CSM model. We use this approach to explore the binding mechanisms of β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) and 2, 6-di-methyl-β-CD (DM-β-CD) with various guest molecules. Our results suggest that solvent effects play a more important role in determining the relative binding affinities of DM-β-CD than those of β-CD mainly because the former is more flexible than the latter.

  14. Cell Death-Associated Molecular-Pattern Molecules: Inflammatory Signaling and Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Sangiuliano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis, necroptosis, and pyroptosis are different cellular death programs characterized in organs and tissues as consequence of microbes infection, cell stress, injury, and chemotherapeutics exposure. Dying and death cells release a variety of self-proteins and bioactive chemicals originated from cytosol, nucleus, endoplasmic reticulum, and mitochondria. These endogenous factors are named cell death-associated molecular-pattern (CDAMP, damage-associated molecular-pattern (DAMP molecules, and alarmins. Some of them cooperate or act as important initial or delayed inflammatory mediators upon binding to diverse membrane and cytosolic receptors coupled to signaling pathways for the activation of the inflammasome platforms and NF-κB multiprotein complexes. Current studies show that the nonprotein thiols and thiol-regulating enzymes as well as highly diffusible prooxidant reactive oxygen and nitrogen species released together in extracellular inflammatory milieu play essential role in controlling pro- and anti-inflammatory activities of CDAMP/DAMP and alarmins. Here, we provide an overview of these emerging concepts and mechanisms of triggering and maintenance of tissue inflammation under massive death of cells.

  15. Mechanisms of endothelial dysfunction in obesity-associated hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.S. Lobato

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is strongly associated with high blood pressure, dyslipidemia, and type 2 diabetes. These conditions synergistically increase the risk of cardiovascular events. A number of central and peripheral abnormalities can explain the development or maintenance of high blood pressure in obesity. Of great interest is endothelial dysfunction, considered to be a primary risk factor in the development of hypertension. Additional mechanisms also related to endothelial dysfunction have been proposed to mediate the development of hypertension in obese individuals. These include: increase in both peripheral vasoconstriction and renal tubular sodium reabsorption, increased sympathetic activity and overactivation of both the renin-angiotensin system and the endocannabinoid system and insulin resistance. The discovery of new mechanisms regulating metabolic and vascular function and a better understanding of how vascular function can be influenced by these systems would facilitate the development of new therapies for treatment of obesity-associated hypertension.

  16. Analysis of friction mechanism of surface films studied by molecular simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular simulation approaches to understand the mechanisms of solid lubrication are discussed. Pathway of the solid lubrication is based on surface coating and additives in lubricating oil. Then the formation of transfer layer and the surface modification with chemical reaction come to the topic which should be understood. For the basic understanding, the solid friction model due to lattice vibration is introduced. Then molecular dynamics simulations of boundary water film on the silanol covered surface, formation process of molybdenum disulfide layer, and formation of transfer film of graphene are introduced. Finally the low friction mechanism of graphene transfer layers studied by coarse-grain molecular simulation is discussed. (author)

  17. Molecular mechanisms of DNA recombination: testing mitotic and meiotic models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A hyperhaploid n + 1 strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (LBL1) disomic for chromosome VII was employed to isolate hyper-rec and hypo-rec mutations affecting spontaneous mitotic gene conversion and intergenic recombination. The genotype of LBL1 permits simultaneous and independent identification of rec mutations that enhance or diminish gene conversion and those that enhance or diminish intergenic recombination. Five phenotypic groups of rec mutants were isolated following ultraviolet light mutagenesis. Rec mutations that simultaneously abolish or enhance both classes of recombinational events were detected. These results demonstrate that gene conversion and intergenic recombination are under joint genetic control in mitotic cells. Conversion-specific and intergenic recombination-specific rec mutants were also recovered. Their properties indicate that conversion and intergenic recombination are separable pheonomena dependent upon discrete REC genes. The rec mutants isolated in LBL1 provide a method to test molecular models of mitotic and meiotic recombination

  18. Heat shock proteins in hepatocellular carcinoma: Molecular mechanism and therapeutic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cun; Zhang, Yurong; Guo, Kun; Wang, Ning; Jin, Haojie; Liu, Yinkun; Qin, Wenxin

    2016-04-15

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are highly conserved proteins, which are expressed at low levels under normal conditions, but significantly induced in response to cellular stresses. As molecular chaperones, HSPs play crucial roles in protein homeostasis, apoptosis, invasion and cellular signaling transduction. The induction of HSPs is an important part of heat shock response, which could help cancer cells to adapt to stress conditions. Because of the constant stress condition in tumor microenvironment, HSPs overexpression is widely reported in many human cancers. In light of the significance of HSPs for cancer cells to survive and obtain invasive phenotype under stress condition, HSPs are often associated with poor prognosis and treatment resistance in many types of human cancers. It has been described that upregulation of HSPs may serve as diagnostic and prognostic markers in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Targeting HSPs with specific inhibitor alone or in combination with chemotherapy regimens holds promise for the improvement of outcomes for HCC patients. In this review, we summarize the expression profiles, functions and molecular mechanisms of HSPs (HSP27, HSP70 and HSP90) as well as a HSP-like protein (clusterin) in HCC. In addition, we address progression and challenges in targeting these HSPs as novel therapeutic strategies in HCC. PMID:26853533

  19. Molecular mechanism of epididymal protease inhibitor modulating the liquafication of human semen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zengjun Wang; Wei Zhang; Hongfei Wu; Yuangeng Xu

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To study the molecular mechanism of epididymal protease inhibitor (Eppin) modulating the liquafication of semen.Methods: Human semenogelin cDNA (nucleotides 82-849) and Eppin cDNA (nucleotides 70-423) were generated by PCR and cloned into pET-100D/TOPO.Recombinant Eppin and Sg were produced by BL21 (DE3). The association of Eppin with Sg was studied by far-western and radioautography.In vitro the digestion of Sg by PSA in the presence or absence of recombinant Eppin was studied. The effect of anti-Q20E (N-terminal) and C-terminal of Eppin on Eppin-Sg binding was monitored. Results: Eppin binds Sg on the surface of human spermatozoa with C-terminal Eppin (aa75-133).Recombinant Sg was digested with PSA ,many low molecular weight fragments were produced, when Eppin is bound to Sg,then digested by PSA , producing incomplete digestion and a 14.5-14.8 kDa fragmen. Antibody binding to the N-terminal of Eppin did not affect Sg digestion. Addition of antibodies to the C-terminal of Eppin inhibited the modulating effects of Eppin. Conclusion: Eppin modulates the digestion activity of PSA through binding Sg. The active site locates at C-terminal.

  20. Molecular Mechanisms of Innate Immune Inhibition by Non-Segmented Negative-Sense RNA Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Srirupa; Basler, Christopher F; Amarasinghe, Gaya K; Leung, Daisy W

    2016-08-28

    The host innate immune system serves as the first line of defense against viral infections. Germline-encoded pattern recognition receptors detect molecular patterns associated with pathogens and activate innate immune responses. Of particular relevance to viral infections are those pattern recognition receptors that activate type I interferon responses, which establish an antiviral state. The order Mononegavirales is composed of viruses that possess single-stranded, non-segmented negative-sense (NNS) RNA genomes and are important human pathogens that consistently antagonize signaling related to type I interferon responses. NNS viruses have limited encoding capacity compared to many DNA viruses, and as a likely consequence, most open reading frames encode multifunctional viral proteins that interact with host factors in order to evade host cell defenses while promoting viral replication. In this review, we will discuss the molecular mechanisms of innate immune evasion by select NNS viruses. A greater understanding of these interactions will be critical in facilitating the development of effective therapeutics and viral countermeasures. PMID:27487481

  1. Multiple Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms of Action of Lycopene in Cancer Inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Trejo-Solís

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies suggest that including fruits, vegetables, and whole grains in regular dietary intake might prevent and reverse cellular carcinogenesis, reducing the incidence of primary tumours. Bioactive components present in food can simultaneously modulate more than one carcinogenic process, including cancer metabolism, hormonal balance, transcriptional activity, cell-cycle control, apoptosis, inflammation, angiogenesis and metastasis. Some studies have shown an inverse correlation between a diet rich in fruits, vegetables, and carotenoids and a low incidence of different types of cancer. Lycopene, the predominant carotenoid found in tomatoes, exhibits a high antioxidant capacity and has been shown to prevent cancer, as evidenced by clinical trials and studies in cell culture and animal models. In vitro studies have shown that lycopene treatment can selectively arrest cell growth and induce apoptosis in cancer cells without affecting normal cells. In vivo studies have revealed that lycopene treatment inhibits tumour growth in the liver, lung, prostate, breast, and colon. Clinical studies have shown that lycopene protects against prostate cancer. One of the main challenges in cancer prevention is the integration of new molecular findings into clinical practice. Thus, the identification of molecular biomarkers associated with lycopene levels is essential for improving our understanding of the mechanisms underlying its antineoplastic activity.

  2. Coupling of temperature with pressure induced initial decomposition mechanisms of two molecular crystals: An ab initio molecular dynamics study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    QIONG WU; DONG XIANG; GUOLIN XIONG; WEIHUA ZHU; HEMING XIAO

    2016-05-01

    Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations were performed to study the initiation of decompositionand formation of first products of two molecular crystals pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) and 5-nitro-2,4-dihydro-1,2,4-triazole-3-one (NTO) under thermal decomposition temperature (475 K for PETN and 531 Kfor NTO) coupled with different pressures (1-5 GPa). The pressure effects on the initial decomposition stepsand initially generated products on PETN and NTO were very different. PETN was triggered by C-H... O intermolecular hydrogen transfer. The initial decomposition mechanism was independent of the pressure. ForNTO, two different initial decomposition mechanisms were found. At 1, 2, and 3 GPa, it was triggered by NH....O intermolecular hydrogen transfer, while at 4 and 5 GPa, it was triggered by N-H.....N intermolecularhydrogen transfer. This indicates that the initial decomposition mechanism was dependent on the pressure.Our study may provide new insights into initial mechanisms and decomposition reactions of molecular crystalexplosives under thermal decomposition temperature coupled with different pressures with details at atomiclevel.

  3. New insight into the molecular mechanisms of the biological effects of DNA minor groove binders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinbo Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bisbenzimides, or Hoechst 33258 (H258, and its derivative Hoechst 33342 (H342 are archetypal molecules for designing minor groove binders, and widely used as tools for staining DNA and analyzing side population cells. They are supravital DNA minor groove binders with AT selectivity. H342 and H258 share similar biological effects based on the similarity of their chemical structures, but also have their unique biological effects. For example, H342, but not H258, is a potent apoptotic inducer and both H342 and H258 can induce transgene overexpression in in vitro studies. However, the molecular mechanisms by which Hoechst dyes induce apoptosis and enhance transgene overexpression are unclear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To determine the molecular mechanisms underlying different biological effects between H342 and H258, microarray technique coupled with bioinformatics analyses and multiple other techniques has been utilized to detect differential global gene expression profiles, Hoechst dye-specific gene expression signatures, and changes in cell morphology and levels of apoptosis-associated proteins in malignant mesothelioma cells. H342-induced apoptosis occurs in a dose-dependent fashion and is associated with morphological changes, caspase-3 activation, cytochrome c mitochondrial translocation, and cleavage of apoptosis-associated proteins. The antagonistic effect of H258 on H342-induced apoptosis indicates a pharmacokinetic basis for the two dyes' different biological effects. Differential global gene expression profiles induced by H258 and H342 are accompanied by unique gene expression signatures determined by DNA microarray and bioinformatics software, indicating a genetic basis for their different biological effects. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: A unique gene expression signature associated with H342-induced apoptosis provides a new avenue to predict and classify the therapeutic class of minor groove binders in the drug

  4. Molecular mechanisms of cell death in intervertebral disc degeneration (Review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fan; Zhao, Xueling; Shen, Hongxing; Zhang, Caiguo

    2016-06-01

    Intervertebral discs (IVDs) are complex structures that consist of three parts, namely, nucleus pulposus, annulus fibrosus and cartilage endplates. With aging, IVDs gradually degenerate as a consequence of many factors, such as microenvironment changes and cell death. Human clinical trial and animal model studies have documented that cell death, particularly apoptosis and autophagy, significantly contribute to IVD degeneration. The mechanisms underlying this phenomenon include the activation of apoptotic pathways and the regulation of autophagy in response to nutrient deprivation and multiple stresses. In this review, we briefly summarize recent progress in understanding the function and regulation of apoptosis and autophagy signaling pathways. In particular, we focus on studies that reveal the functional mechanisms of these pathways in IVD degeneration. PMID:27121482

  5. Anisotropic mechanical properties of graphene sheets from molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anisotropic mechanical properties are observed for a sheet of graphene along different load directions. The anisotropic mechanical properties are attributed to the hexagonal structure of the unit cells of the graphene. Under the same tensile loads, the edge bonds bear larger load in the longitudinal mode (LM) than in the transverse mode (TM), which causes fracture sooner in LM than in TM. The Young's modulus and the third order elastic modulus for the LM are slightly larger than that for the TM. Simulation also demonstrates that, for both LM and TM, the loading and unloading stress-strain response curves overlap as long as the graphene is unloaded before the fracture point. This confirms that graphene sustains complete elastic and reversible deformation in the elongation process.

  6. Molecular mechanisms of DNA repair inhibition by caffeine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caffeine potentiates the mutagenic and lethal effects of genotoxic agents. It is thought that this is due, at least in some organisms, to inhibition of DNA repair. However, direct evidence for inhibition of repair enzymes has been lacking. Using purified Escherichia coli DNA photolyase and (A)BC excinuclease, we show that the drug inhibits photoreactivation and nucleotide excision repair by two different mechanisms. Caffeine inhibits photoreactivation by interfering with the specific binding of photolyase to damaged DNA, and it inhibits nucleotide excision repair by promoting nonspecific binding of the damage-recognition subunit, UvrA, of (A)BC excinuclease. A number of other intercalators, including acriflavin and ethidium bromide, appear to inhibit the excinuclease by a similar mechanism--that is, by trapping the UvrA subunit in nonproductive complexes on undamaged DNA

  7. Biochemical and molecular mechanisms of acaricide resistance in Tetranychus urticae

    OpenAIRE

    Khajehali, Jahangir

    2010-01-01

    The two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae is an economically important pest in many agricultural crops worldwide. Its high reproductive potential and extremely short life cycle, combined with the frequent acaricide applications usually required to maintain the population below economic threshold, facilitates rapid resistance build-up. This has led to the development of resistance against almost all commercially used compounds. In this study we tried to unravel the mechanisms behind the ...

  8. Molecular mechanisms of clinical concentrating and diluting disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Schrier, Robert W.

    2008-01-01

    Impaired urinary dilution leading to water retention and hyponatremia may occur in patients with cardiac failure, cirrhosis, pregnancy, hypothyroidism, glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid deficiency. The mechanisms for these defects predominantly involve the non-osmotic stimulation of arginine vasopressin release with upregulation of aquaporin 2 water channel expression and trafficking to the apical membrane of the principal cells of the collecting duct. These perturbations are reversed by V...

  9. Proteases in cardiometabolic diseases: Pathophysiology, molecular mechanisms and clinical applications

    OpenAIRE

    Hua, Yinan; Nair, Sreejayan

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the U.S. and other developed country. Metabolic syndrome, including obesity, diabetes/insulin resistance, hypertension and dyslipidemia is major threat for public health in the modern society. It is well established that metabolic syndrome contributes to the development of cardiovascular disease collective called as cardiometabolic disease. Despite documented studies in the research field of cardiometabolic disease, the underlying mechan...

  10. Molecular-scale mechanisms of crystal growth in barite

    OpenAIRE

    Pina Martínez, Carlos Manuel; Becker, Udo; Risthaus, Peter; Bosbach, Dirk; Putnis, Andrew

    1998-01-01

    Models of crystal growth have been defined by comparing macroscopic growth kinetics with theoretical predictions for various growth mechanisms. The classic Burton–Cabrera–Frank (BCF) theory predicts that spiral growth at screw dislocations will dominate near equilibrium. Although this has often been observed, such growth is sometimes inhibited, which has been assumed to be due to the presence of impurities. At higher supersaturations, growth is commonly modelled by twodim...

  11. Molecular mechanisms promoting the pathogenesis of Schwann cell neoplasms

    OpenAIRE

    Carroll, Steven L.

    2011-01-01

    Neurofibromas, schwannomas and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) all arise from the Schwann cell lineage. Despite their common origin, these tumor types have distinct pathologies and clinical behaviors; a growing body of evidence indicates that they also arise via distinct pathogenic mechanisms. Identification of the genes that are mutated in genetic diseases characterized by the development of either neurofibromas and MPNSTs [neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1)] or schwannomas [ne...

  12. P-Glycoprotein-ATPase Modulation: The Molecular Mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Li-Blatter, Xiaochun; Beck, Andreas; Seelig, Anna

    2012-01-01

    P-glycoprotein-ATPase is an efflux transporter of broad specificity that counteracts passive allocrit influx. Understanding the rate of allocrit transport therefore matters. Generally, the rates of allocrit transport and ATP hydrolysis decrease exponentially with increasing allocrit affinity to the transporter. Here we report unexpectedly strong down-modulation of the P-glycoprotein-ATPase by certain detergents. To elucidate the underlying mechanism, we chose 34 electrically neutral and catio...

  13. Molecular mechanisms of recurrent acute obstructive bronchitis in infants

    OpenAIRE

    Abaturov A.E.; Rusakova E.A.

    2015-01-01

    The article discusses the clinical and immunological features and mechanisms of recurrent acute obstructive bronchitis in infants. We have examined 102 children aged from 6 months to 3 years with acute obstructive bronchitis and signs of respiratory insufficiency of the I-II degree. There were 28 children with recurrent acute obstructive bronchitis and 74 patients with acute obstructive bronchitis,developed for the first time. We determined the concentration of total IgE, content of IFN-і, IL...

  14. Size dependency and potential field influence on deriving mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes using molecular dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.G.S. Dilrukshi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A thorough understanding on the mechanical properties of carbon nanotube (CNT is essential in extending the advanced applications of CNT based systems. However, conducting experiments to estimate mechanical properties at this scale is extremely challenging. Therefore, development of mechanistic models to estimate the mechanical properties of CNTs along with the integration of existing continuum mechanics concepts is critically important. This paper presents a comprehensive molecular dynamics simulation study on the size dependency and potential function influence of mechanical properties of CNT. Commonly used reactive bond order (REBO and adaptive intermolecular reactive bond order (AIREBO potential functions were considered in this regard. Young’s modulus and shear modulus of CNTs are derived by integrating classical continuum mechanics concepts with molecular dynamics simulations. The results indicate that the potential function has a significant influence on the estimated mechanical properties of CNTs, and the influence of potential field is much higher when studying the torsional behaviour of CNTs than the tensile behaviour.

  15. Report of National Cancer Institute symposium: comparison of mechanisms of carcinogenesis by radiation and chemical agents. I. Common molecular mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borg, D.C.

    1984-01-01

    Some aspects of molecular mechanisms common to radiation and chemical carcinogenesis are discussed, particularly the DNA damage done by these agents. Emphasis is placed on epidemiological considerations and on dose-response models used in risk assessment to extrapolate from experimental data obtained at high doses to the effects from long-term, low-level exposures. 3 references, 6 figures. (ACR)

  16. Insights of asphaltene aggregation mechanism from molecular dynamics simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer De León

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Se estudió el proceso de agregación de asfaltenos utilizando té cnicas de dinámica molecular. Se utilizaron cuatro estructuras diferentes. Las primeras tres moléculas tienen una estructura continental, con núcleos aromáticos condensador, mientras que la cuarta pose e una estructura tipo archipiélago, con pequeños grupos de anillos ar omáticos conectados con cadenas saturadas. Las moléculas fueron construidas de manera atomística, en la cual cada átomo se desc ribe individualmente. Se calcula ron las fuerzas de interacción a 300 K y 200 atm; las fuerzas de Van der W aals y las interacciones elect rostáticas fueron evaluadas separadamente. Se calculó el paráme tro de solubilidad para las cuatro molécu las. Se encontró que las inte racciones de Van der Waals asoc iadas a los anillos aromáticos y las fuerzas electrostáticas ocasionadas princ ipalmente por la presencia de heteroátomos como oxígeno, azufr e y nitrógeno, son igualmente r elevantes en la agregación de moléculas de asfalteno. Para todas las molé culas se encontró que los sistemas de asfaltenos tienen menor e nergía en estado de agregación que en estado monomérico. Para las estruct uras continentales, la presencia de largas cadenas obstruye el proceso de formación de agregados. Para las estructuras tipo archipiélago, la flexibilidad de las moléculas facilita la agregación con ot ras estructuras. La presencia de heteroátomos ocasiona una fuerza repulsiva que dificulta la agregación. El volumen molecular y la energía de c ohesión también son sensibles a la confi guración geométrica y la compos ición de las especies, lo cual afecta el parámetro de solubilidad.

  17. Mechanism of fat taste perception: Association with diet and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dongli; Archer, Nicholas; Duesing, Konsta; Hannan, Garry; Keast, Russell

    2016-07-01

    Energy homeostasis plays a significant role in food consumption and body weight regulation with fat intake being an area of particular interest due to its palatability and high energy density. Increasing evidence from humans and animal studies indicate the existence of a taste modality responsive to fat via its breakdown product fatty acids. These studies implicate multiple candidate receptors and ion channels for fatty acid taste detection, indicating a complex peripheral physiology that is currently not well understood. Additionally, a limited number of studies suggest a reduced ability to detect fatty acids is associated with obesity and a diet high in fat reduces an individual's ability to detect fatty acids. To support this, genetic variants within candidate fatty acid receptors are also associated with obesity reduced ability to detect fatty acids. Understanding oral peripheral fatty acid transduction mechanisms and the association with fat consumption may provide the basis of novel approaches to control development of obesity. PMID:27155595

  18. Functional Genomics of PCOS: From GWAS to Molecular Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, Jan M.; Legro, Richard S.; Modi, Bhavi P.; Strauss, Jerome F.

    2015-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common endocrinopathy characterized by increased ovarian androgen biosynthesis, anovulation, and infertility. PCOS has a strong heritable component based on familial clustering and twin studies. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) identified several PCOS candidate loci including, DENND1A, LHCGR, FSHR, ZNF217, YAP1, INSR, RAB5B, and C9orf3. Here, we review the functional roles of strong PCOS candidate loci focusing on FSHR, LHCGR, INSR and DENND1A. We propose that these candidates comprise a hierarchical signaling network by which DENND1A, LHCGR, INSR, RAB5B, adapter proteins, and associated downstream signaling cascades converge to regulate theca cell androgen biosynthesis. Future elucidation of the functional gene networks predicted by the PCOS GWAS will result in new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for women with PCOS. PMID:25600292

  19. Functional Genomics of PCOS: From GWAS to Molecular Mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    McAllister, Jan M.; Legro, Richard S.; Modi, Bhavi P.; Strauss, Jerome F.

    2015-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common endocrinopathy characterized by increased ovarian androgen biosynthesis, anovulation, and infertility. PCOS has a strong heritable component based on familial clustering and twin studies. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) identified several PCOS candidate loci including, DENND1A, LHCGR, FSHR, ZNF217, YAP1, INSR, RAB5B, and C9orf3. Here, we review the functional roles of strong PCOS candidate loci focusing on FSHR, LHCGR, INSR and DENND1A. We p...

  20. Genetic, Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms Underlying the J Wave Syndromes

    OpenAIRE

    Antzelevitch, Charles

    2012-01-01

    An early repolarization (ER) pattern in the ECG, distinguished by J-point elevation, slurring of the terminal part of the QRS and ST-segment elevation has long been recognized and considered to be a benign electrocardiographic manifestation. Experimental studies conducted over a decade ago suggested that some cases of ER may be associated with malignant arrhythmias. Validation of this hypothesis was provided by recent studies demonstrating that an ER pattern in the inferior or inferolateral l...

  1. Molecular Mechanisms of Human Papillomavirus-Induced Carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Lehoux, Michaël; D’Abramo, Claudia M.; Archambault, Jacques

    2009-01-01

    Approximately 20% of all cancers are associated with infectious agents. Among them, human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are very common and are now recognized as the etiological agent of cervical cancer, the second most common cancer in women worldwide, and they are increasingly linked with other forms of dysplasia. Carcinogenesis is a complex and multistep process requiring the acquisition of several genetic and/or epigenetic alterations. HPV-induced neoplasia, however, is in part mediated by the ...

  2. The molecular mechanisms, diagnosis and management of congenital hyperinsulinism

    OpenAIRE

    Senthil Senniappan; Ved Bhushan Arya; Khalid Hussain

    2013-01-01

    Congenital hyperinsulinism (CHI) is the result of unregulated insulin secretion from the pancreatic β-cells leading to severe hypoglycaemia. In these patients it is important to make an accurate diagnosis and initiate the appropriate management so as to avoid hypoglycemic episodes and prevent the potentially associated complications like epilepsy, neurological impairment and cerebral palsy. At a genetic level abnormalities in eight different genes (ABCC8, KCNJ11, GLUD1, GCK, HADH, SLC16A1, HN...

  3. A novel proteotoxic stress associated mechanism for macular corneal dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaarniranta, Kai; Szalai, Eszter; Smedowski, Adrian; Hegyi, Zoltán; Kivinen, Niko; Viiri, Johanna; Wowra, Bogumil; Dobrowolski, Dariusz; Módis, László; Berta, András; Wylegala, Edward; Felszeghy, Szabolcs

    2015-08-01

    Macular corneal dystrophy is a rare autosomal recessive eye disease affecting primarily the corneal stroma. Abnormal accumulation of proteoglycan aggregates has been observed intra- and extracellularly in the stromal layer. In addition to the stromal keratocytes and corneal lamellae, deposits are also present in the basal epithelial cells, endothelial cells and Descemet's membrane. Misfolding of proteins has a tendency to gather into aggregating deposits. We studied interaction of molecular chaperones and proteasomal clearance in macular dystrophy human samples and in human corneal HCE-2 epithelial cells. Seven cases of macular corneal dystrophy and four normal corneal buttons collected during corneal transplantation were examined for their expression patterns of heat shock protein 70, ubiquitin protein conjugates and SQSTM1/p62. In response to proteasome inhibition the same proteins were analyzed by western blotting. Slit-lamp examination, in vivo confocal cornea microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were used for morphological analyses. Heat shock protein 70, ubiquitin protein conjugates and SQSTM1/p62 were upregulated in both the basal corneal epithelial cells and the stromal keratocytes in macular corneal dystrophy samples that coincided with an increased expression of the same molecules under proteasome inhibition in the HCE-2 cells in vitro. We propose a novel regulatory mechanism that connects the molecular chaperone and proteasomal clearance system in the pathogenesis of macular corneal dystrophy. PMID:25597745

  4. Molecular mechanisms of alkylation sensitivity in Indian muntjac cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musk, S R; Hatton, D H; Bouffler, S D; Margison, G P; Johnson, R T

    1989-07-01

    The responses of two Indian muntjac cell lines to two monofunctional alkylating agents were investigated. An SV40-transformed line (SVM) had an increased sensitivity to cell killing when compared to the other, euploid line (DM) after exposure both to methyl nitrosourea (MNU) and to dimethylsulphate (DMS) and also exhibited higher frequencies of sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) following alkylation. The hypersensitivity of SVM to DMS correlates with the defective repair of single-strand breaks that results in the generation of long-lived breaks in the DNA following exposure, leading eventually to the formation of chromosome aberrations. In contrast no difference is seen in the formation of long-lived breaks in the DNA of SVM and DM after treatment with biologically relevant doses of MNU; in this case hypersensitivity may be due to the loss of O6-alkylguanine-DNA-alkyltransferase activity. The conclusion that the hypersensitivites of SVM to MNU and to DMS have different molecular bases is supported by transfection of SVM with plasmids containing the protein coding region of the Escherichia coli ada+ gene; subsequent expression within the cell corrects its hypersensitivity to the cytotoxic and SCE-inducing effects of MNU but has very little influence upon the lethality, SCE induction or the repair of long-lived DNA strand breaks after exposure to DMS. PMID:2544312

  5. Lipoprotein(a: Cellular Effects and Molecular Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten Riches

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipoprotein(a (Lp(a is an independent risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD. Indeed, individuals with plasma concentrations >20 mg/dL carry a 2-fold increased risk of developing CVD, accounting for ~25% of the population. Circulating levels of Lp(a are remarkably resistant to common lipid lowering therapies, and there are currently no robust treatments available for reduction of Lp(a apart from plasma apheresis, which is costly and labour intensive. The Lp(a molecule is composed of two parts, an LDL/apoB-100 core and a unique glycoprotein, apolipoprotein(a (apo(a, both of which can interact with components of the coagulation cascade, inflammatory pathways, and cells of the blood vessel wall (smooth muscle cells (SMC and endothelial cells (EC. Therefore, it is of key importance to determine the molecular pathways by which Lp(a exerts its influence on the vascular system in order to design therapeutics to target its cellular effects. This paper will summarise the role of Lp(a in modulating cell behaviour in all aspects of the vascular system including platelets, monocytes, SMC, and EC.

  6. Urinary Tract Infection Molecular Mechanisms and Clinical Translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godaly, Gabriela; Ambite, Ines; Puthia, Manoj; Nadeem, Aftab; Ho, James; Nagy, Karoly; Huang, Yujing; Rydström, Gustav; Svanborg, Catharina

    2016-01-01

    Rapid developments in infection biology create new and exciting options for individualized diagnostics and therapy. Such new practices are needed to improve patient survival and reduce morbidity. Molecular determinants of host resistance to infection are being characterized, making it possible to identify susceptible individuals and to predict their risk for future morbidity. Immunotherapy is emerging as a new strategy to treat infections worldwide and controlled boosting of the host immune defense represents an important therapeutic alternative to antibiotics. In proof of concept studies, we have demonstrated that this approach is feasible. The long-term goal is not just to remove the pathogens but to also develop technologies that restore resistance to infection in disease-prone patients and devise personalized therapeutic interventions. Here, we discuss some approaches to reaching these goals, in patients with urinary tract infection (UTI). We describe critical host signaling pathways that define symptoms and pathology and the genetic control of innate immune responses that balance protection against tissue damage. For some of these genes, human relevance has been documented in clinical studies, identifying them as potential targets for immune-modulatory therapies, as a complement to antibiotics. PMID:26927188

  7. Unraveling the mechanism of a reversible photoactivated molecular proton crane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Loop, Tibert H; Ruesink, Freek; Amirjalayer, Saeed; Sanders, Hans J; Buma, Wybren J; Woutersen, S

    2014-11-13

    We study the structural dynamics of the photoactivated molecular proton crane 7-hydroxy-8-(morpholinomethyl)quinoline using femtosecond UV-pump IR-probe spectroscopy. Upon electronic excitation, a proton is transferred from the hydroxy to the amine group located on the rotatable morpholino side group. This morpholino group subsequently delivers the proton to the aromatic quinoline nitrogen by rotation around the C-C bond. Time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy allows us to study this process in unprecedented detail. We find that the transport of the proton involves multiple time scales. Upon photoexcitation, the OH proton is transferred within <300 fs to the morpholino side group. After this, the intramolecular hydrogen bond that locks the crane arm breaks with a time constant of 36 ± 1 ps. Subsequently, the protonated crane arm rotates with a time constant of 334 ± 12 ps to deliver the proton at the quinoline moiety. After the proton crane has returned to its electronic ground state with a time constant 700 ± 22 ps, the proton is transferred back from the quinoline nitrogen to the negatively charged O atom. The time constant of the back rotation is 39.8 ± 0.2 ns, about 200 times slower than the forward proton transfer. PMID:25319491

  8. Molecular mechanism of extrinsic factors affecting antiagingof stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tzyy Yue Wong; Mairim Alexandra Solis; Ying-Hui Chen; Lynn Ling-Huei Huang

    2015-01-01

    Scientific evidence suggests that stem cells possessthe anti-aging ability to self-renew and maintaindifferentiation potentials, and quiescent state. Theobjective of this review is to discuss the microenvironmentwhere stem cells reside in vivo , thesecreted factors to which stem cells are exposed, thehypoxic environment, and intracellular factors includinggenome stability, mitochondria integrity, epigeneticregulators, calorie restrictions, nutrients, and vitaminD. Secreted tumor growth factor-β and fibroblastgrowth factor-2 are reported to play a role in stem cellquiescence. Extracellular matrices may interact withcaveolin-1, the lipid raft on cell membrane to regulatequiescence. N-cadherin, the adhesive protein on nichecells provides support for stem cells. The hypoxicmicro-environment turns on hypoxia-inducible factor-1to prevent mesenchymal stem cells aging throughp16 and p21 down-regulation. Mitochondria expressglucosephosphate isomerase to undergo glycolysisand prevent cellular aging. Epigenetic regulators suchas p300, protein inhibitors of activated Stats and H19help maintain stem cell quiescence. In addition, calorierestriction may lead to secretion of paracrines cyclicADP-ribose by intestinal niche cells, which help maintainintestinal stem cells. In conclusion, it is crucial tounderstand the anti-aging phenomena of stem cells atthe molecular level so that the key to solving the agingmystery may be unlocked.

  9. Molecular mechanisms in DM1 - a focus on foci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pettersson, Olof Joakim; Aagaard, Lars; Jensen, Thomas G.; Damgaard, Christian Kroun

    2015-01-01

    -expanded RNA remains in the nuclear compartment, while in dividing cells such as fibroblasts a considerable fraction of the mutant RNA reaches the cytoplasm, consistent with findings that both nuclear and cytoplasmic events are mis-regulated in DM1. Recent evidence suggests that the nuclear aggregates, or...... ribonuclear foci, are more dynamic than previously anticipated and regulated by several proteins, including RNA helicases. In this review, we focus on the homeostasis of DMPK mRNA foci and discuss how their dynamic regulation may affect disease-causing mechanisms in DM1...

  10. [Review: plant polyphenols modulate lipid metabolism and related molecular mechanism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Yan-li; Zou, Yu-xiao; Liu, Fan; Li, Hong-zhi

    2015-11-01

    Lipid metabolism disorder is an important risk factor to obesity, hyperlipidemia and type 2 diabetes as well as other chronic metabolic disease. It is also a key target in preventing metabolic syndrome, chronic disease prevention. Plant polyphenol plays an important role in maintaining or improving lipid profile in a variety of ways. including regulating cholesterol absorption, inhibiting synthesis and secretion of triglyceride, and lowering plasma low density lipoprotein oxidation, etc. The purpose of this article is to review the lipid regulation effects of plant polyphenols and its related mechanisms. PMID:27071245

  11. Molecular mechanisms of D-cycloserine in facilitating fear extinction: insights from RNAseq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malan-Müller, Stefanie; Fairbairn, Lorren; Daniels, Willie M U; Dashti, Mahjoubeh Jalali Sefid; Oakeley, Edward J; Altorfer, Marc; Kidd, Martin; Seedat, Soraya; Gamieldien, Junaid; Hemmings, Sîan Megan Joanna

    2016-02-01

    D-cycloserine (DCS) has been shown to be effective in facilitating fear extinction in animal and human studies, however the precise mechanisms whereby the co-administration of DCS and behavioural fear extinction reduce fear are still unclear. This study investigated the molecular mechanisms of intrahippocampally administered D-cycloserine in facilitating fear extinction in a contextual fear conditioning animal model. Male Sprague Dawley rats (n = 120) were grouped into four experimental groups (n = 30) based on fear conditioning and intrahippocampal administration of either DCS or saline. The light/dark avoidance test was used to differentiate maladapted (MA) (anxious) from well-adapted (WA) (not anxious) subgroups. RNA extracted from the left dorsal hippocampus was used for RNA sequencing and gene expression data was compared between six fear-conditioned + saline MA (FEAR + SALINE MA) and six fear-conditioned + DCS WA (FEAR + DCS WA) animals. Of the 424 significantly downregulated and 25 significantly upregulated genes identified in the FEAR + DCS WA group compared to the FEAR + SALINE MA group, 121 downregulated and nine upregulated genes were predicted to be relevant to fear conditioning and anxiety and stress-related disorders. The majority of downregulated genes transcribed immune, proinflammatory and oxidative stress systems molecules. These molecules mediate neuroinflammation and cause neuronal damage. DCS also regulated genes involved in learning and memory processes, and genes associated with anxiety, stress-related disorders and co-occurring diseases (e.g., cardiovascular diseases, digestive system diseases and nervous system diseases). Identifying the molecular underpinnings of DCS-mediated fear extinction brings us closer to understanding the process of fear extinction. PMID:26400817

  12. Molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of acupuncture on neuropathic pain**

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ziyong Ju; Huashun Cui; Xiaohui Guo; Huayuan Yang; Jinsen He; Ke Wang

    2013-01-01

    Acupuncture has been used to treat neuropathic pain for a long time, but its mechanisms of action remain unknown. In this study, we observed the effects of electroacupuncture and manual acu-puncture on neuropathic pain and on ephrin-B/EphB signaling in rats models of chronic constriction injury-induced neuropathic pain. The results showed that manual acupuncture and elec-puncture significantly reduced mechanical hypersensitivity fol owing chronic constriction injury, es-pecial y electroacupuncture treatment. Real-time PCR results revealed that ephrin-B1/B3 and EphB1/B2 mRNA expression levels were significantly increased in the spinal dorsal horns of chronic constriction injury rats. Electroacupuncture and manual acupuncture suppressed the high sion of ephrin-B1 mRNA, and elevated EphB3/B4 mRNA expression. Electroacupuncture signifi-cantly enhanced the mRNA expression of ephrin-B3 and EphB3/B6 in the dorsal horns of neuro-pathic pain rats. Western blot results revealed that electroacupuncture in particular, and manual acupuncture, significantly up-regulated ephrin-B3 protein levels in rat spinal dorsal horns. The re-sults of this study suggest that acupuncture could activate ephrin-B/EphB signaling in neuropathic pain rats and improve neurological function.

  13. A theoretical study of the molecular mechanism of the GAPDH Trypanosoma cruzi enzyme involving iodoacetate inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, Agnaldo Silva; Lameira, Jerônimo; Alves, Cláudio Nahum

    2011-10-01

    The glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase enzyme (GAPDH) is an important biological target for the development of new chemotherapeutic agents against Chagas disease. In this Letter, the inhibition mechanism of GAPDH involving iodoacetate (IAA) inhibitor was studied using the hybrid quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) approach and molecular dynamic simulations. Analysis of the potential energy surface and potential of mean force show that the covalent attachment of IAA inhibitor to the active site of the enzyme occurs as a concerted process. In addition, the energy terms decomposition shows that NAD+ plays an important role in stabilization of the reagents and transition state.

  14. An ab initio molecular dynamics study of the roaming mechanism of the H2+HOC+ reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hua-Gen

    2011-08-01

    We report here a direct ab initio molecular dynamics study of the p-/o-H2+HOC+ reaction on the basis of the accurate SAC-MP2 potential energy surface. The quasi-classical trajectory method was employed. This work largely focuses on the study of reaction mechanisms. A roaming mechanism was identified for this molecular ion-molecule reaction. The driving forces behind the roaming mechanism were thoroughly investigated by using a trajectory dynamics approach. In addition, the thermal rate coefficients of the H2+HOC+ reaction were calculated in the temperature range [25, 300] K and are in good agreement with experiments.

  15. A molecular mechanics approach for analyzing tensile nonlinear deformation behavior of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Wang; Daining Fang; Ai Kah Soh; Bin Liu

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, by capturing the atomic informa-tion and reflecting the behaviour governed by the nonlin-ear potential function, an analytical molecular mechanics approach is proposed. A constitutive relation for single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT's) is established to describe the nonlinear stress-strain curve of SWCNT's and to predict both the elastic properties and breaking strain of SWCNT's during tensile deformation. An analysis based on the virtual internal bond (VIB) model proposed by P. Zhang et al. is also presented for comparison. The results indicate that the proposed molecular mechanics approach is indeed an acceptable analytical method for analyzing the mechanical behavior of SWCNT's.

  16. The challenges associated with molecular targeted therapies for glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jue, Toni Rose; McDonald, Kerrie L

    2016-05-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most aggressive malignant brain tumor in adults. Improvements in the treatment of GBM have remained static since the advent of the standard therapy which includes radiation with concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide treatment. Developing treatment and diagnostic or companion biomarker combinations is transforming the way we treat numerous cancers. However, can this emerging paradigm be also effective for GBM? Can GBM be treated the same way as other cancers? Here we review the challenges for a personalized molecular targeted therapeutic approach in GBM. The specific challenges for establishing a personalized molecular targeted medicine program for GBM patients include overcoming the blood brain barrier, unravelling the intra- and inter-heterogeneity that exists and the importance of developing more relevant animal models that recapitulate a patient's GBM tumor. PMID:26900075

  17. Molecular mechanisms of thyroid tumorigenesis; Molekulare Mechanismen der Schilddruesentumorgenese

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, K.; Fuehrer, D. [Universitaetsklinikum Leipzig (Germany). Abt. fuer Endokrinolgoie, Diabetologie und Nephrologie

    2008-09-15

    Thyroid nodules are the most frequent endocrine disorder and occur in approximately 30% of the German population. Thyroid nodular disease constitutes a very heterogeneous entity. A striking diversity of possible functional and morphological features of a thyroid tumour derived from the same thyroid ancestor cell, is a hallmark of thyroid tumorigenesis and is due to specific genetic alterations. Defects in known candidate genes can be found in up to 70% of differentiated thyroid carcinomas and determine the respective cancer phenotype. Papillary thyroid cancers (PTC) harbour BRAF (or much less frequently RAS) mutations in sporadically occurring tumours, while radiation-induced PTC display chromosomal rearrangements such as RET, TRK, APR9 / BRAF. These genetic events results in constitutive MAPKinase activation. Follicular thyroid cancers (FTC) harbour RAS mutations or PAX8/ PPAR{gamma} rearrangements, both of which, however have also been identified in follicular adenoma. In addition, recent studies show, that activation of PI3K/AKT signalling occurs with high frequency in follicular thyroid tumours. Undifferentiated (anaplastic) thyroid cancers (ATC) display genetic features of FTC or PTC, in addition to aberant activation of multiple tyrosinkinase pathways (overexpression or mutations in PI3K and MAPK pathways). This underscores the concept of a sequential evolution of ATC from differentiated thyroid cancer, a process widely conceived to be triggered by p53 inactivation. In contrast, the molecular pathogenesis of benign thyroid tumours, in particular cold thyroid nodules is less known, except for toxic thyroid nodules, which arise from constitutive activation of cAMP signalling, predominantly through TSHR mutations. (orig.)

  18. S-glutathionylation: from molecular mechanisms to health outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Ying; Uys, Joachim D; Tew, Kenneth D; Townsend, Danyelle M

    2011-07-01

    Redox homeostasis governs a number of critical cellular processes. In turn, imbalances in pathways that control oxidative and reductive conditions have been linked to a number of human disease pathologies, particularly those associated with aging. Reduced glutathione is the most prevalent biological thiol and plays a crucial role in maintaining a reduced intracellular environment. Exposure to reactive oxygen or nitrogen species is causatively linked to the disease pathologies associated with redox imbalance. In particular, reactive oxygen species can differentially oxidize certain cysteine residues in target proteins and the reversible process of S-glutathionylation may mitigate or mediate the damage. This post-translational modification adds a tripeptide and a net negative charge that can lead to distinct structural and functional changes in the target protein. Because it is reversible, S-glutathionylation has the potential to act as a biological switch and to be integral in a number of critical oxidative signaling events. The present review provides a comprehensive account of how the S-glutathionylation cycle influences protein structure/function and cellular regulatory events, and how these may impact on human diseases. By understanding the components of this cycle, there should be opportunities to intervene in stress- and aging-related pathologies, perhaps through prevention and diagnostic and therapeutic platforms. PMID:21235352

  19. Mechanisms of two-color laser-induced field-free molecular orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanner, Michael; Patchkovskii, Serguei; Frumker, Eugene; Corkum, Paul

    2012-09-14

    Two mechanisms of two-color (ω+2ω) laser-induced field-free molecular orientation, based on the hyperpolarizability and ionization depletion, are explored and compared. The CO molecule is used as a computational example. While the hyperpolarizability mechanism generates small amounts of orientation at intensities below the ionization threshold, ionization depletion quickly becomes the dominant mechanism as soon as ionizing intensities are reached. Only the ionization mechanism leads to substantial orientation (e.g., on the order of ≳0.1). For intensities typical of laser-induced molecular alignment and orientation experiments, the two mechanisms lead to robust, characteristic timings of the field-free orientation wave-packet revivals relative to the alignment revivals and the revival time. The revival timings can be used to detect the active orientation mechanism experimentally. PMID:23005623

  20. Mechanisms of two-color laser-induced field-free molecular orientation

    CERN Document Server

    Spanner, Michael; Frumker, Eugene; Corkum, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Two mechanisms of two-color (\\omega + 2\\omega) laser-induced field-free molecular orientation, based on the hyperpolarizability and ionization depletion, are explored and compared. The CO molecule is used as a computational example. While the hyperpolarizability mechanism generates small amounts of orientation at intensities below the ionization threshold, ionization depletion quickly becomes the dominant mechanism as soon as ionizing intensities are reached. Only the ionization mechanism leads to substantial orientation (e.g. on the order of || > 0.1). For intensities typical of laser-induced molecular alignment and orientation experiments, the two mechanism lead to robust, characteristic timings of the field-free orientation wave-packet revivals relative to the the alignment revivals and the revival time. The revival timings can be used to detect the active orientation mechanism experimentally.

  1. Molecular mechanisms of canalization: Hsp90 and beyond

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Neeraj Salathia; Christine Queitsch

    2007-04-01

    The Hsp90 chaperone machine facilitates the maturation of a diverse set of ‘client’ proteins. Many of these Hsp90 clients are essential nodes in signal transduction pathways and regulatory circuits, accounting for the important role Hsp90 plays in organismal development and responses to the environment. Recent findings suggest a broader impact of the chaperone on phenotype: fully functional Hsp90 canalizes wild-type phenotypes by suppressing underlying genetic and epigenetic variation. This variation can be expressed upon challenging the Hsp90 machinery by environmental stress, genetic or pharmaceutical targeting of Hsp90. The existence of Hsp90-buffered genetic and epigenetic variation together with plausible release mechanisms has wide-ranging implication for phenotype and possibly evolutionary processes. Here, we discuss the role of Hsp90 in canalization and organismal plasticity, and highlight important questions for future experimental inquiry.

  2. Uncovering molecular structural mechanisms of signaling mediated by the prion protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The glycosyl phosphatidylinositol (GPI) - anchored prion protein (PrPc), usually associated with neurodegenerative diseases, modulates various cellular responses and may scaffold multiprotein cell surface signaling complexes. Engagement of PrPc with the secretable cochaperone hop/STI 1 induces neurotrophic transmembrane signals through unknown molecular mechanisms. We addressed whether interaction of Pr Pc and hop STI 1 entails structural rearrangements relevant for signaling. Circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy showed that PrPc:hop/STI 1 interaction triggers loss of PrP helical structures, involving at least a perturbation of the Pr Pc143-153 beta-helix. Novel SAXS models revealed a significant C-terminal compaction of hop/STI 1 when bound to PrPc. Differing from a recent dimeric model of human hop/STI 1, both size exclusion chromatography and SAXS data support a monomeric form of free murine hop/STI 1. Changes in the Pr Pc143-153 beta-helix may engage the transmembrane signaling protein laminin receptor precursor and neural cell adhesion molecule, both of which bind that domain of Pr Pc, and further ligands may be engaged by the tertiary structural changes of hop/STI 1. These reciprocal structural modifications indicate a versatile mechanism for signaling mediated by Pr Pc:hop/STI 1 interaction, consistent with the hypothesis that Pr Pc scaffolds multiprotein signaling complexes at the cell surface. (author)

  3. Molecular Mechanisms of Chronic Kidney Transplant Rejection via Large-Scale Proteogenomic Analysis of Tissue Biopsies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakorchevsky, Aleksey; Hewel, Johannes A.; Kurian, Sunil M.; Mondala, Tony S.; Campbell, Daniel; Head, Steve R.; Marsh, Christopher L.; Yates, John R.

    2010-01-01

    The most common cause of kidney transplant failure is the poorly characterized histopathologic entity interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy (IFTA). There are no known unifying mechanisms, no effective therapy, and no proven preventive strategies. Possible mechanisms include chronic immune rejection, inflammation, drug toxicity, and chronic kidney injury from secondary factors. To gain further mechanistic insight, we conducted a large-scale proteogenomic study of kidney transplant biopsies with IFTA of varying severity. We acquired proteomic data using tandem mass spectrometry with subsequent quantification, analysis of differential protein expression, validation, and functional annotations to known molecular networks. We performed genome-wide expression profiling in parallel. More than 1400 proteins with unique expression profiles traced the progression from normal transplant biopsies to biopsies with mild to moderate and severe disease. Multiple sets of proteins were mapped to different functional pathways, many increasing with histologic severity, including immune responses, inflammatory cell activation, and apoptosis consistent with the chronic rejection hypothesis. Two examples include the extensive population of the alternative rather than the classical complement pathway, previously not appreciated for IFTA, and a comprehensive control network for the actin cytoskeleton and cell signaling of the acute-phase response. In summary, this proteomic effort using kidney tissue contributes mechanistic insight into several biologic processes associated with IFTA. PMID:20093355

  4. Perfect/complete scattering experiments probing quantum mechanics on atomic and molecular collisions and coincidences

    CERN Document Server

    Kleinpoppen, Hans; Grum-Grzhimailo, Alexei N

    2013-01-01

    The main goal of this book is to elucidate what kind of experiment must be performed in order to determine the full set of independent parameters which can be extracted and calculated from theory, where electrons, photons, atoms, ions, molecules, or molecular ions may serve as the interacting constituents of matter.  The feasibility of such perfect' and-or `complete' experiments, providing the complete quantum mechanical knowledge of the process, is associated with the enormous potential of modern research techniques, both, in experiment and theory.  It is even difficult to overestimate the role of theory in setting of the complete experiment, starting with the fact that an experiment can be complete only within a certain theoretical framework, and ending with the direct prescription of what, and in what conditions should be measured to make the experiment `complete'.  The language of the related theory is the language of quantum mechanical amplitudes and their relative phases.  This book captures the spi...

  5. Cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in the neurotoxicity of opioid and psychostimulant drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha-Oliveira, Teresa; Rego, Ana Cristina; Oliveira, Catarina R

    2008-06-01

    Substance abuse and addiction are the most costly of all the neuropsychiatric disorders. In the last decades, much progress has been achieved in understanding the effects of the drugs of abuse in the brain. However, efficient treatments that prevent relapse have not been developed. Drug addiction is now considered a brain disease, because the abuse of drugs affects several brain functions. Neurological impairments observed in drug addicts may reflect drug-induced neuronal dysfunction and neurotoxicity. The drugs of abuse directly or indirectly affect neurotransmitter systems, particularly dopaminergic and glutamatergic neurons. This review explores the literature reporting cellular and molecular alterations reflecting the cytotoxicity induced by amphetamines, cocaine and opiates in neuronal systems. The neurotoxic effects of drugs of abuse are often associated with oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, apoptosis and inhibition of neurogenesis, among other mechanisms. Understanding the mechanisms that underlie brain dysfunction observed in drug-addicted individuals may contribute to improve the treatment of drug addiction, which may have social and economic consequences. PMID:18440072

  6. Molecular Mechanisms in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: The Role of Angiogenin, a Secreted RNase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabela M. Aparicio-Erriu

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a fatal neurodegenerative disease caused by the loss of motoneurons. The precise molecular and cellular basis for neuronal death is not yet well established, but the contemporary view is that it is a culmination of multiple aberrant biological processes. Among the proposed mechanisms of motoneuron degeneration, alterations in the homeostasis of RNA binding proteins (RBP and the consequent changes in RNA metabolism have received attention recently.The ribonuclease, angiogenin was one of the first RBPs associated with familial and sporadic ALS. It is enriched in motoneurons under physiological conditions, and is required for motoneuron survival under stress conditions. Furthermore, delivery of angiogenin protects cultured motoneurons against stress-induced injury, and significantly increases the survival of motoneurons in SODG93A mice. In this overview on the role of angiogenin in RNA metabolism and in the control of motoneuron survival, we discuss potential pathogenic mechanisms of angiogenin dysfunction relevant to ALS and other neurodegenerative disorders. We also discuss recent evidence demonstrating that angiogenin secreted from stressed motoneurons may alter RNA metabolism in astrocytes.

  7. A density functional theory study on the molecular mechanism of the cycloaddition between (E)-methyl cinnamate and cyclopentadiene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, C.N. [Departamento de Quimica, Centro de Ciencias Exatas e Naturais Universidade Federal do Para, CP 11101, 66075-110, Belem, Para (Brazil)]. E-mail: nahum@ufpa.br; Camilo, F.F. [Departamento de Quimica Fundamental, Instituto de Quimica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, CP 26077, 05513-970 Sao Paulo SP (Brazil); Gruber, J. [Departamento de Quimica Fundamental, Instituto de Quimica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, CP 26077, 05513-970 Sao Paulo SP (Brazil); Silva, A.B.F. da [Departamento de Quimica e Fisica Molecular, Instituto de Quimica de Sao Carlos, Universidade de Sao Paulo, CP 780, 13560-970 Sao Carlos SP (Brazil)

    2004-11-15

    The molecular mechanism of the Diels-Alder reaction between (E)-methyl cinnamate and cyclopentadiene has been characterized by means of density functional theory method at the B3LYP/6-31G* theory level. Stationary points for two reactive channels, endo-cis and exo-cis, on potential energy surfaces, have been characterized. Three Lewis acids, boron trifluoride (BF{sub 3}), aluminum trichloride (AlCl{sub 3}) and catechol boron bromide (CBB), have been used as catalysts taking into account the formation of a complex between the boron or aluminum atom and the carbonyl oxygen of (E)-methyl cinnamate. The molecular mechanism of the uncatalyzed reaction corresponds to a concerted process. In the presence of BF{sub 3} and AlCl{sub 3}, enhancement of both the asynchronicity and charge transfer between diene and the dienophile, with small decreased energy barriers, were obtained. With CBB, the molecular mechanism changes and the reaction takes place along a stepwise mechanism. The inclusion of the CBB catalyst drastically decreases the energy barrier associated with the carbon-carbon bond formation of the first step relative to the concerted process. The results obtained in this work are compared with experimental data and AM1 semiempirical calculation.

  8. A density functional theory study on the molecular mechanism of the cycloaddition between (E)-methyl cinnamate and cyclopentadiene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The molecular mechanism of the Diels-Alder reaction between (E)-methyl cinnamate and cyclopentadiene has been characterized by means of density functional theory method at the B3LYP/6-31G* theory level. Stationary points for two reactive channels, endo-cis and exo-cis, on potential energy surfaces, have been characterized. Three Lewis acids, boron trifluoride (BF3), aluminum trichloride (AlCl3) and catechol boron bromide (CBB), have been used as catalysts taking into account the formation of a complex between the boron or aluminum atom and the carbonyl oxygen of (E)-methyl cinnamate. The molecular mechanism of the uncatalyzed reaction corresponds to a concerted process. In the presence of BF3 and AlCl3, enhancement of both the asynchronicity and charge transfer between diene and the dienophile, with small decreased energy barriers, were obtained. With CBB, the molecular mechanism changes and the reaction takes place along a stepwise mechanism. The inclusion of the CBB catalyst drastically decreases the energy barrier associated with the carbon-carbon bond formation of the first step relative to the concerted process. The results obtained in this work are compared with experimental data and AM1 semiempirical calculation

  9. Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Modeling of Drug Metabolism: Mexiletine N-Hydroxylation by Cytochrome P450 1A2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonsdale, Richard; Fort, Rachel M; Rydberg, Patrik; Harvey, Jeremy N; Mulholland, Adrian J

    2016-06-20

    The mechanism of cytochrome P450(CYP)-catalyzed hydroxylation of primary amines is currently unclear and is relevant to drug metabolism; previous small model calculations have suggested two possible mechanisms: direct N-oxidation and H-abstraction/rebound. We have modeled the N-hydroxylation of (R)-mexiletine in CYP1A2 with hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods, providing a more detailed and realistic model. Multiple reaction barriers have been calculated at the QM(B3LYP-D)/MM(CHARMM27) level for the direct N-oxidation and H-abstraction/rebound mechanisms. Our calculated barriers indicate that the direct N-oxidation mechanism is preferred and proceeds via the doublet spin state of Compound I. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the presence of an ordered water molecule in the active site assists in the binding of mexiletine in the active site, but this is not a prerequisite for reaction via either mechanism. Several active site residues play a role in the binding of mexiletine in the active site, including Thr124 and Phe226. This work reveals key details of the N-hydroxylation of mexiletine and further demonstrates that mechanistic studies using QM/MM methods are useful for understanding drug metabolism. PMID:27064685

  10. The Application of Micropipette Aspiration in Molecular Mechanics of Single Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Lap Man; Liu, Allen P.

    2014-01-01

    Micropipette aspiration is arguably the most classical technique in mechanical measurements and manipulations of single cells. Despite its simplicity, micropipette aspiration has been applied to a variety of experimental systems that span different length scales to study cell mechanics, nanoscale molecular mechanisms in single cells, bleb growth, and nucleus dynamics, to name a few. Enabled by micro/nanotechnology, several novel microfluidic devices have been developed recently with better ac...

  11. Molecular mechanisms for surfactant-aided oil removal from a solid surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shumeng; Li, Zhi; Liu, Bei; Zhang, Xianren; Yang, Qingyuan

    2015-12-01

    In this work, the detachment mechanism of oil molecules from the hydrophobic solid surface in the aqueous surfactant solution is studied with lattice Monte Carlo simulations. Three different mechanisms for oil removal, including oil carrying microemulsion model, oil film stripping model, and surfactant-aided diffusion model are identified. The molecular mechanisms that agree with experimental observations are found to be dependent sensitively on surfactant structure.

  12. Multiple mechanisms of cytokine action in neurodegenerative and psychiatric states: neurochemical and molecular substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayley, Shawn; Anisman, Hymie

    2005-01-01

    Neuroinflammatory processes appear to play a fundamental role in the pathology associated with a number of neurodegenerative and psychiatric conditions. In this respect, the immunocompetent brain microglia and peripheral macrophages release a host of proinflammatory cytokines that not only modulate immunological processes but also influence neuronal functioning and even survival. For instance, alterations of the cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, as well as several of the interferons and interleukins have been associated with Parkinson's disease (PD) and clinical depression. Importantly, anti-inflammatory treatments that block these cytokines may impart protection against behavioural pathology and neuronal damage in animal models of PD and depression involving exposure to environmental toxins and stressors, respectively. The present review highlights the involvement of inflammatory cells and cytokines in depression and PD and explores some of the potential cellular and molecular mechanisms through which the immunotransmitters affect neuronal functioning. Attention is also devoted to the possibility that cytokines may sensitize neuroinflammatory pathways that, in turn, favour long-term pathology. PMID:15777246

  13. Comparison of molecular mechanisms of rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis using gene microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongqiang; Hao, Zhenyong; Zhao, Liqiang; Liu, Wei; Han, Yanlong; Bai, Yunxing; Wang, Jian

    2016-06-01

    The present study aimed to compare the molecular mechanisms of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA). The microarray dataset no. GSE29746 was downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus. After data pre‑processing, differential expression analysis between the RA group and the control, as well as between the OA group and the control was performed using the LIMMA package in R and differentially expressed transcripts (DETs) with |log2fold change (FC)|>1 and P<0.01 were identified. DETs screened from each disease group were then subjected to functional annotation using DAVID. Next, DETs from each group were used to construct individual interaction networks using the BIND database, followed by sub‑network mining using clusterONE. Significant functions of nodes in each sub‑network were also investigated. In total, 19 and 281 DETs were screened from the RA and OA groups, respectively, with only six common DETs. DETs from the RA and OA groups were enriched in 8 and 130 gene ontology (GO) terms, respectively, with four common GO terms, of which to were associated with phospholipase C (PLC) activity. In addition, DETs screened from the OA group were enriched in immune response‑associated GO terms, and those screened from the RA group were largely associated with biological processes linked with the cell cycle and chromosomes. Genes involved in PLC activity and its regulation were indicated to be altered in RA as well as in OA. Alterations in the expression of cell cycle‑associated genes were indicated to be linked with the occurrence of OA, while genes participating in the immune response were involved in the occurrence of RA. PMID:27082252

  14. A Molecular Dynamics (MD and Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics (QM/MM Study on Ornithine Cyclodeaminase (OCD: A Tale of Two Iminiums

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James W. Gauld

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Ornithine cyclodeaminase (OCD is an NAD+-dependent deaminase that is found in bacterial species such as Pseudomonas putida. Importantly, it catalyzes the direct conversion of the amino acid L-ornithine to L-proline. Using molecular dynamics (MD and a hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM method in the ONIOM formalism, the catalytic mechanism of OCD has been examined. The rate limiting step is calculated to be the initial step in the overall mechanism: hydride transfer from the L-ornithine’s Cα–H group to the NAD+ cofactor with concomitant formation of a Cα=NH2+ Schiff base with a barrier of 90.6 kJ mol−1. Importantly, no water is observed within the active site during the MD simulations suitably positioned to hydrolyze the Cα=NH2+ intermediate to form the corresponding carbonyl. Instead, the reaction proceeds via a non-hydrolytic mechanism involving direct nucleophilic attack of the δ-amine at the Cα-position. This is then followed by cleavage and loss of the α-NH2 group to give the Δ1-pyrroline-2-carboxylate that is subsequently reduced to L-proline.

  15. Integrated molecular mechanism directing nucleosome reorganization by human FACT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsunaka, Yasuo; Fujiwara, Yoshie; Oyama, Takuji; Hirose, Susumu; Morikawa, Kosuke

    2016-03-15

    Facilitates chromatin transcription (FACT) plays essential roles in chromatin remodeling during DNA transcription, replication, and repair. Our structural and biochemical studies of human FACT-histone interactions present precise views of nucleosome reorganization, conducted by the FACT-SPT16 (suppressor of Ty 16) Mid domain and its adjacent acidic AID segment. AID accesses the H2B N-terminal basic region exposed by partial unwrapping of the nucleosomal DNA, thereby triggering the invasion of FACT into the nucleosome. The crystal structure of the Mid domain complexed with an H3-H4 tetramer exhibits two separate contact sites; the Mid domain forms a novel intermolecular β structure with H4. At the other site, the Mid-H2A steric collision on the H2A-docking surface of the H3-H4 tetramer within the nucleosome induces H2A-H2B displacement. This integrated mechanism results in disrupting the H3 αN helix, which is essential for retaining the nucleosomal DNA ends, and hence facilitates DNA stripping from histone. PMID:26966247

  16. Molecular mechanism underlying promiscuous polyamine recognition by spermidine acetyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Shigeru; Ishikawa, Sae; Tomitori, Hideyuki; Niiyama, Mayumi; Hirose, Mika; Miyazaki, Yuma; Higashi, Kyohei; Murata, Michio; Adachi, Hiroaki; Takano, Kazufumi; Murakami, Satoshi; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Mori, Yusuke; Kashiwagi, Keiko; Igarashi, Kazuei; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi

    2016-07-01

    Spermidine acetyltransferase (SAT) from Escherichia coli, which catalyses the transfer of acetyl groups from acetyl-CoA to spermidine, is a key enzyme in controlling polyamine levels in prokaryotic cells. In this study, we determined the crystal structure of SAT in complex with spermidine (SPD) and CoA at 2.5Å resolution. SAT is a dodecamer organized as a hexamer of dimers. The secondary structural element and folding topology of the SAT dimer resemble those of spermidine/spermine N(1)-acetyltransferase (SSAT), suggesting an evolutionary link between SAT and SSAT. However, the polyamine specificity of SAT is distinct from that of SSAT and is promiscuous. The SPD molecule is also located at the inter-dimer interface. The distance between SPD and CoA molecules is 13Å. A deep, highly acidic, water-filled cavity encompasses the SPD and CoA binding sites. Structure-based mutagenesis and in-vitro assays identified SPD-bound residues, and the acidic residues lining the walls of the cavity are mostly essential for enzymatic activities. Based on mutagenesis and structural data, we propose an acetylation mechanism underlying promiscuous polyamine recognition for SAT. PMID:27163532

  17. Nutritional Systems Biology Modeling: From Molecular Mechanisms to Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graaf, Albert A.; Freidig, Andreas P.; De Roos, Baukje; Jamshidi, Neema; Heinemann, Matthias; Rullmann, Johan A.C.; Hall, Kevin D.; Adiels, Martin; van Ommen, Ben

    2009-01-01

    The use of computational modeling and simulation has increased in many biological fields, but despite their potential these techniques are only marginally applied in nutritional sciences. Nevertheless, recent applications of modeling have been instrumental in answering important nutritional questions from the cellular up to the physiological levels. Capturing the complexity of today's important nutritional research questions poses a challenge for modeling to become truly integrative in the consideration and interpretation of experimental data at widely differing scales of space and time. In this review, we discuss a selection of available modeling approaches and applications relevant for nutrition. We then put these models into perspective by categorizing them according to their space and time domain. Through this categorization process, we identified a dearth of models that consider processes occurring between the microscopic and macroscopic scale. We propose a “middle-out” strategy to develop the required full-scale, multilevel computational models. Exhaustive and accurate phenotyping, the use of the virtual patient concept, and the development of biomarkers from “-omics” signatures are identified as key elements of a successful systems biology modeling approach in nutrition research—one that integrates physiological mechanisms and data at multiple space and time scales. PMID:19956660

  18. Nutritional systems biology modeling: from molecular mechanisms to physiology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert A de Graaf

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The use of computational modeling and simulation has increased in many biological fields, but despite their potential these techniques are only marginally applied in nutritional sciences. Nevertheless, recent applications of modeling have been instrumental in answering important nutritional questions from the cellular up to the physiological levels. Capturing the complexity of today's important nutritional research questions poses a challenge for modeling to become truly integrative in the consideration and interpretation of experimental data at widely differing scales of space and time. In this review, we discuss a selection of available modeling approaches and applications relevant for nutrition. We then put these models into perspective by categorizing them according to their space and time domain. Through this categorization process, we identified a dearth of models that consider processes occurring between the microscopic and macroscopic scale. We propose a "middle-out" strategy to develop the required full-scale, multilevel computational models. Exhaustive and accurate phenotyping, the use of the virtual patient concept, and the development of biomarkers from "-omics" signatures are identified as key elements of a successful systems biology modeling approach in nutrition research--one that integrates physiological mechanisms and data at multiple space and time scales.

  19. The Molecular Mechanisms of Vitamin A Deficiency in Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reza Dorosty-Motlagh, Ahmad; Mohammadzadeh Honarvar, Niyaz; Sedighiyan, Mohsen; Abdolahi, Mina

    2016-09-01

    Vitamin A, considered to be an essential nutrient, has important actions in immunological responses and the central nervous system (CNS). Neuroimmunological functions of vitamin A are mediated through its active metabolite, retinoic acid (RA). In the CNS, RA contributes to regeneration and plasticity, while also playing a key role in enhancing tolerance and reducing inflammatory responses by regulating T cell, B cell and dendritic cell populations. However, evidence has indicated lower plasma levels of vitamin A in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Vitamin A deficiency leads to dysregulation of immune tolerance and pathogenic immune cell production in this disease. Vitamin A may ameliorate MS pathogenesis through numerous mechanisms including a reduction in inflammatory processes by re-establishing the balance between pathogenic (Th1, Th17, Th9) and immunoprotective cells (Th2, Tregs), modulating B cell and dendritic cell function as well as increasing tolerance of autoimmunity and regeneration in the CNS. Thus, the results from the current review suggest that vitamin A can be considered as a potential treatment in MS disease management. PMID:27356515

  20. Molecular mechanism of biophylaxis for adverse factor in working environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been known that there exist some specific proteins in the pathway by which adverse environmental components are transferred to genes mediating the biophylaxis mechanism. Therefore, it seemed that information exchange might be made through interaction between such proteins and unknown proteins, and this step would be the key step of biophylaxis. In this study, construction of a recombinant protein was attempted to develop a detection method for such protein-protein interaction using radioisotopes. First, vectors that can express ZRF protein with S-tag at the N-terminal end in E.coli were constructed (pZRF29, pZRF30) and E.coli transfected with the vector was cultured to collect the recombinant protein. Thus obtained recombinant ZRF protein was analyzed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and detection was made by Coomassie staining. Using the two vectors, ZRF protein was produced. The protein could be obtained at much higher efficiency in the present system than the previous system. However, the expression level of β-galactosidase as the control was still higher than that of the ZRF protein. This would be due to the higher stability of β- galactosidase, suggesting that further improvement might be obtainable by stabilizing the ZRF protein at the time of expression. It was thought necessary to choose the optimum conditions of the system in respects of cell culture and induction of the recombinant protein as well as protein extraction. (M.N.)

  1. Molecular Mechanisms of Depression: Perspectives on New Treatment Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Undine E. Lang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Depression is a multicausal disorder and has been associated with the risk to develop cancer, dementia, diabetes, epilepsy and stroke. As a metabolic disorder depression has been associated with obesity, diabetes, insulin sensitivity, neuropeptide Y, glucose regulation, poor glycemic control, glucagone-like peptide-1, cholezystokinin, ghrelin, leptin, the endocannabinoid system, insulin-like growth factor and gastrin-releasing peptide. As a cardiovascular disease a close relationship exists between depression and blood pressure, heart rate, norepinephrine, sympathetic tone, vascular resistance, blood viscosity, plasma volume, intima thickness and atherosclerosis. Additionally blood coagulation, fibrinolysis, D-dimers, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 protein, platelet activation, VEGF, plasma nitric oxide and its synthase are changed in depressed patients. As an endocrinological and stress disorder depression has been connected with the concentration of free T4, TSH, CRH, arginine vasopressin, corticotrophin, corticosteroid release and ACTH. Depression as an inflammatory disorder is mediated by pro-inflammatory cytokines, interleukin-1, interleukin-6, TNF-alpha, soluble interleukin-2 receptors, interferon-alpha, interleukin 8, interleukin-10, hs-CRP, acute phase proteins, haptoglobin, toll like receptor 4, interleukin-1beta, mammalian target of rapamycin pathway, substance P, cyclooxygenase-2, prostaglandin-E2, lipid peroxidation levels and acid sphingomyelinase. Nutritional factors might influence depression risk, i.e. the consumption of folate, omega-3 fatty acids, monounsaturated fatty acids, olive oil, fish, fruits, vegetables, nuts, legumes, vitamin B6 and vitamin B12. The neurodegenerative hypothesis of depression explains decreased hippocampal volumes in depressed patients and changes of neurotrophic support by BDNF, erythropoietin, GDNF, FGF-2, NT3, NGF and growth hormone. In this context, a fast neuroprotective and antidepressant

  2. Molecular Mechanisms to Control Post-Transplantation Hepatitis B Recurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akinobu Takaki

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B often progresses to decompensated liver cirrhosis requiring orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT. Although newer nucleos(tide analogues result in >90% viral and hepatitis activity control, severely decompensated patients still need OLT because of drug-resistant virus, acute exacerbation, or hepatocellular carcinoma. Acute hepatitis B is also an indication for OLT, because it can progress to fatal acute liver failure. After OLT, the hepatitis B recurrence rate is >80% without prevention, while >90% of transplant recipients are clinically controlled with combined hepatitis B immunoglobulin (HBIG and nucleos(tide analogue treatment. However, long-term HBIG administration is associated with several unresolved issues, including limited availability and extremely high cost; therefore, several treatment protocols with low-dose HBIG, combined with nucleos(tide analogues, have been investigated. Another approach is to induce self-producing anti-hepatitis B virus (HBV antibodies using an HBV envelope (HBs antigen vaccine. Patients who are not HBV carriers, such as those with acutely infected liver failure, are good candidates for vaccination. For chronic HBV carrier liver cirrhosis patients, a successful vaccine response can only be achieved in selected patients, such as those treated with experimentally reduced immunosuppression protocols. The present protocol for post-OLT HBV control and the future prospects of newer treatment strategies are reviewed.

  3. Molecular Mechanisms Regulating Hepcidin Revealed by Hepcidin Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Camaschella

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron is essential for human life, but toxic if present in excess. To avoid iron overload and maintain iron homeostasis, all cells are able to regulate their iron content through the post-transcriptional control of iron genes operated by the cytosolic iron regulatory proteins that interact with iron responsive elements on iron gene mRNA. At the systemic level, iron homeostasis is regulated by the liver peptide hepcidin. Disruption of these regulatory loops leads to genetic diseases characterized by iron deficiency (iron-refractory iron-deficiency anemia or iron overload (hemochromatosis. Alterations of the same systems are also found in acquired disorders, such as iron-loading anemias characterized by ineffective erythropoiesis and anemia of chronic diseases (ACD associated with common inflammatory conditions. In ACD, iron is present in the body, but maldistributed, being deficient for erythropoiesis, but sequestered in macrophages. Studies of the hepcidin regulation by iron and inflammatory cytokines are revealing new pathways that might become targets of new therapeutic intervention in iron disorders.

  4. Molecular mechanism accounting for milder types of thalassemia major.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furbetta, M; Tuveri, T; Rosatelli, C; Angius, A; Falchi, A M; Cossu, P; Meloni, A; Giagu, N; Cao, A

    1983-07-01

    We carried out alpha-globin gene analysis by restriction endonuclease mapping in 91 Sardinians with homozygous transfusion-dependent beta 0-thalassemia and correlated the clinical findings with the alpha-globin genotype. In patients (n = 6) with deletion of two alpha-globin structural genes, disease onset and transfusion dependence occur later than in those (n = 50) with a full complement of alpha-globin genes. There was no statistically significant difference in the group of patients (n = 35) with deletion of only one alpha-globin gene. Patients with deletion of two alpha-globin genes had significantly higher Hb A2 levels than those with a full complement of alpha-structural genes and those with deletion of a single alpha-globin gene. From this and other studies, it seems that the deletion of two alpha-globin structural genes may convert the common severe clinical picture associated with homozygous beta 0-thalassemia to milder forms, ranging from a later occurring but still transfusion-dependent type to a non-transfusion-dependent form. PMID:6191017

  5. Molecular Basis of Factor H R1210C Association with Ocular and Renal Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recalde, Sergio; Tortajada, Agustin; Subias, Marta; Anter, Jaouad; Blasco, Miquel; Maranta, Ramona; Coco, Rosa; Pinto, Sheila; Noris, Marina; García-Layana, Alfredo; Rodríguez de Córdoba, Santiago

    2016-05-01

    The complement factor H (FH) mutation R1210C, which was described in association with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS), also confers high risk of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and associates with C3 glomerulopathy (C3G). To reveal the molecular basis of these associations and to provide insight into what determines the disease phenotype in FH-R1210C carriers, we identified FH-R1210C carriers in our aHUS, C3G, and AMD cohorts. Disease status, determined in patients and relatives, revealed an absence of AMD phenotypes in the aHUS cohort and, vice versa, a lack of renal disease in the AMD cohort. These findings were consistent with differences in the R1210C-independent overall risk for aHUS and AMD between mutation carriers developing one pathology or the other. R1210C is an unusual mutation that generates covalent complexes between FH and HSA. Using purified FH proteins and surface plasmon resonance analyses, we demonstrated that formation of these FH-HSA complexes impairs accessibility to all FH functional domains. These data suggest that R1210C is a unique C-terminal FH mutation that behaves as a partial FH deficiency, predisposing individuals to diverse pathologies with distinct underlying pathogenic mechanisms; the final disease outcome is then determined by R1210C-independent genetic risk factors. PMID:26376859

  6. Clinical and molecular studies in ANCA associated vasculitis

    OpenAIRE

    Wendt, Mårten

    2014-01-01

    ANCA associated vasculitis (AAV) is a heterogeneous group of diseases characterised by sterile pauci-immune systemic small vessel inflammation and closely associated with the presence of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmatic antibodies (ANCA). Although AAV can affect any organ, the kidney, skin, lungs and upper and lower airways are most commonly involved. In some patients there is granuloma formation and in some asthma and eosinophilia, and based on this patients can be further classi...

  7. Determination of molecular markers associated with anthesis-silking interval in maize

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maize lines contrasting in anthesis-silking, interval (ASI), a trait strongly linked to drought tolerance, have been analyzed under different water stress conditions in the field and with molecular markers. Correlation of marker and field data has revealed molecular markers strongly associated with flowering and yield traits. (author)

  8. The molecular mechanism for interaction of ceruloplasmin and myeloperoxidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhautdin, Bakytzhan; Bakhautdin, Esen Göksöy

    2016-04-01

    Ceruloplasmin (Cp) is a copper-containing ferroxidase with potent antioxidant activity. Cp is expressed by hepatocytes and activated macrophages and has been known as physiologic inhibitor of myeloperoxidase (MPO). Enzymatic activity of MPO produces anti-microbial agents and strong prooxidants such as hypochlorous acid and has a potential to damage host tissue at the sites of inflammation and infection. Thus Cp-MPO interaction and inhibition of MPO has previously been suggested as an important control mechanism of excessive MPO activity. Our aim in this study was to identify minimal Cp domain or peptide that interacts with MPO. We first confirmed Cp-MPO interaction by ELISA and surface plasmon resonance (SPR). SPR analysis of the interaction yielded 30 nM affinity between Cp and MPO. We then designed and synthesized 87 overlapping peptides spanning the entire amino acid sequence of Cp. Each of the peptides was tested whether it binds to MPO by direct binding ELISA. Two of the 87 peptides, P18 and P76 strongly interacted with MPO. Amino acid sequence analysis of identified peptides revealed high sequence and structural homology between them. Further structural analysis of Cp's crystal structure by PyMOL software unfolded that both peptides represent surface-exposed sites of Cp and face nearly the same direction. To confirm our finding we raised anti-P18 antisera in rabbit and demonstrated that this antisera disrupts Cp-MPO binding and rescues MPO activity. Collectively, our results confirm Cp-MPO interaction and identify two nearly identical sites on Cp that specifically bind MPO. We propose that inhibition of MPO by Cp requires two nearly identical sites on Cp to bind homodimeric MPO simultaneously and at an angle of at least 120 degrees, which, in turn, exerts tension on MPO and results in conformational change.

  9. The molecular mechanisms of the analgesic action of melatonin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Shu-hui; LI Xiao-hui

    2008-01-01

    Objective To analyse the potential involvement of the opioid receptor gene expression in the mechanisms of the analgesic action of melatonin. Methods A trauma-pain model was established in Wistar rats by combining right-hind limb amputation with 50 ℃ tail-flick test. Antinoeiception was determined by tail-flick latency to hot waster at 50 ℃. RT-PCR was used to observe the the expression of the M1OR and KOR gene. Results Melatonin produced the antinociceptive effect in dose-dependent manner after i. p or i. c. v. administration. Injected i. c. v. to rats, naloxone (10 μg) obviously antagonized the antinoeiceptive effect induced by i. p. melatonin. The expression of the M1OR gene in the rat hypothalamus and the KOR gene in the hippocampus was both significantly reduced at day 3 after injury, which was parallel to the reduction of the rat pain thresholds. However, the expression of the M1OR gene in the hippocampus and the KOR gene in the hypothalamus was not changed. Treatment of trauma-pain rats with melatonin (30-120 mg·kg-1) i. p. administrated induced the up-regulation of M1OR mRNA in the hypothalamus and the KOR mRNA in the hippocampus in a concentration-dependent manner. Conclusions The present observations suggest that Melatonin-induced antinociceptive effect may partially contribute to the up-regulation of M1OR mRNA level in the hypothalamus and the KOR mRNA level in the hippocampus.

  10. Molecular mechanism of interleukin-2-induced mucosal homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Jayshree; Waters, Christopher M; Kumar, Narendra

    2012-03-01

    Sustained damage to the mucosal lining in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) facilitates translocation of intestinal microbes to submucosal immune cells leading to chronic inflammation. Previously, we demonstrated the role of Jak3 in IL-2-induced intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) migration, one of the early events during intestinal wound repair. In this study, we demonstrate that IL-2 also plays a role in IEC homeostasis through concentration-dependent regulation of IEC proliferation and cell death. At lower concentrations (≤50 U/ml), IL-2 promoted proliferation, while at higher concentrations (100 U/ml), it promoted apoptosis. Activation by IL-2 led to tyrosine phosphorylation-dependent interactions between Jak3 and p52ShcA only at lower concentrations. Phosphatase SHP1 dephosphorylated IL-2-induced phosphorylated p52ShcA. Higher concentrations of IL-2 decreased the phosphorylation of Jak3 and p52ShcA, disrupted their interactions, redistributed Jak3 to the nucleus, and induced apoptosis in IEC. IL-2 also induced dose-dependent upregulation of p52shcA and downregulation of jak3-mRNA. Constitutive overexpression and mir-shRNA-mediated knockdown studies showed that expression of both Jak3 and p52ShcA were necessary for IL-2-induced proliferation of IEC. Doxycycline-regulated sh-RNA expression demonstrated that IL-2-induced downregulation of jak3-mRNA was responsible for higher IL-2-induced apoptosis in IEC. Collectively, these data demonstrate a novel mechanism of IL-2-induced mucosal homeostasis through posttranslational and transcriptional regulation of Jak3 and p52ShcA. PMID:22116305

  11. Early versus Late-Phase Consolidation of Opiate Reward Memories Requires Distinct Molecular and Temporal Mechanisms in the Amygdala-Prefrontal Cortical Pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Shervin Gholizadeh; Ninglei Sun; Xavier De Jaeger; Melanie Bechard; Lique Coolen; Laviolette, Steven R

    2013-01-01

    The consolidation of newly acquired memories involves the temporal transition from a recent, less stable trace to a more permanent consolidated form. Opiates possess potent rewarding effects and produce powerful associative memories. The activation of these memories is associated with opiate abuse relapse phenomena and the persistence of compulsive opiate dependence. However, the neuronal, molecular and temporal mechanisms by which associative opiate reward memories are consolidated are not c...

  12. Computation of Hydration Free Energies Using the Multiple Environment Single System Quantum Mechanical/Molecular Mechanical Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Gerhard; Mei, Ye; Pickard, Frank C; Simmonett, Andrew C; Miller, Benjamin T; Herbert, John M; Woodcock, H Lee; Brooks, Bernard R; Shao, Yihan

    2016-01-12

    A recently developed MESS-E-QM/MM method (multiple-environment single-system quantum mechanical molecular/mechanical calculations with a Roothaan-step extrapolation) is applied to the computation of hydration free energies for the blind SAMPL4 test set and for 12 small molecules. First, free energy simulations are performed with a classical molecular mechanics force field using fixed-geometry solute molecules and explicit TIP3P solvent, and then the non-Boltzmann-Bennett method is employed to compute the QM/MM correction (QM/MM-NBB) to the molecular mechanical hydration free energies. For the SAMPL4 set, MESS-E-QM/MM-NBB corrections to the hydration free energy can be obtained 2 or 3 orders of magnitude faster than fully converged QM/MM-NBB corrections, and, on average, the hydration free energies predicted with MESS-E-QM/MM-NBB fall within 0.10-0.20 kcal/mol of full-converged QM/MM-NBB results. Out of five density functionals (BLYP, B3LYP, PBE0, M06-2X, and ωB97X-D), the BLYP functional is found to be most compatible with the TIP3P solvent model and yields the most accurate hydration free energies against experimental values for solute molecules included in this study. PMID:26613419

  13. The folding mechanism of collagen-like model peptides explored through detailed molecular simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Stultz, Collin M.

    2006-01-01

    Collagen has a unique folding mechanism that begins with the formation of a triple-helical structure near its C terminus followed by propagation of this structure to the N terminus. To elucidate factors that affect the folding of collagen, we explored the folding pathway of collagen-like model peptides using detailed molecular simulations with explicit solvent. Using biased molecular dynamics we examined the latter stages of folding of a peptide model of native collagen, (Pro-Hyp-Gly)10, and ...

  14. Molecular mechanisms of cocaine reward: Combined dopamine and serotonin transporter knockouts eliminate cocaine place preference

    OpenAIRE

    Sora,Ichiro; Hall, F. Scott; Andrews, Anne M.; Itokawa, Masanari; Li, Xiao-Fei; Wei, Hong-Bing; Wichems, Christine; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Murphy, Dennis L.; Uhl, George R.

    2001-01-01

    Cocaine blocks uptake by neuronal plasma membrane transporters for dopamine (DAT), serotonin (SERT), and norepinephrine (NET). Cocaine reward/reinforcement has been linked to actions at DAT or to blockade of SERT. However, knockouts of neither DAT, SERT, or NET reduce cocaine reward/reinforcement, leaving substantial uncertainty about cocaine's molecular mechanisms for reward. Conceivably, the molecular bases of cocaine reward might display sufficient redundancy th...

  15. Molecular mechanism of ligand recognition by membrane transport protein, Mhp1

    OpenAIRE

    Simmons, KJ; Jackson, SM; Brueckner, F.; Patching, SG; Beckstein, O.; Ivanova, E.; Geng, T.; Weyand, S; Drew, D.; Lanigan, J; Sharples, DJ; Sansom, MS; Iwata, S; Fishwick, CW; Johnson, AP

    2014-01-01

    The hydantoin transporter Mhp1 is a sodium-coupled secondary active transport protein of the nucleobase-cation-symport family and a member of the widespread 5-helix inverted repeat superfamily of transporters. The structure of Mhp1 was previously solved in three different conformations providing insight into the molecular basis of the alternating access mechanism. Here, we elucidate detailed events of substrate binding, through a combination of crystallography, molecular dynamics, site-direct...

  16. Molecular hydrogen emission in L1448 associated with a highly collimated molecular outflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terebey, Susan

    1991-01-01

    A near-infrared camera was used to search for jets around low-luminosity embedded infrared sources in nearby molecular clouds. The near-infrared offers the advantage that the extinction is very low compared with the optical. A jet is detected in molecular hydrogen at 2.12 microns toward a source in L1448. Given the sample size this indicates a detection rate of no more than a couple percent. The average visual extinction in L1448 is roughly 5 mag. The properties of the molecular hydrogen emission are similar to those measured for known Herbig-Haro objects, suggesting the jet is a buried Herbig-Haro object/jet that would be visible in the optical if the extinction were lower. The L1448 jet coincides with the unusual CO outflow that is highly collimated and contains high-velocity CO 'bullets'. The properties of the L1448 source suggest it defines a transition case between molecular outflows and Herbig-Haro jets, combining the characteristics of both.

  17. Growth mechanism, electronic spectral investigation and molecular orbital studies of L-prolinium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaojing; Sun, Xin; Xu, Xijin; Sun, Ping

    2015-11-01

    By using atomic force microscopy, birth and spread has proved to be the primary growth mechanism for L-prolinium phosphate (LPP). The phenomenon of newly formed islands expanding to the edge of the preceding terrace was observed. The optimized molecular structure and the molecular properties were calculated by density functional theory method. Natural bond orbital analysis was carried out to demonstrate the various inter and intramolecular interactions that are responsible for the stabilization of LPP leading to high NLO activity. Molecular electrostatic potential, frontier molecular orbital analysis and thermodynamic properties were investigated to get a better insight of the molecular properties. Global and local reactivity descriptors were computed to predict the reactivity and reactive sites on the molecules. Non-linear optical (NLO) properties such as the total dipole moment (μ) and first order hyperopolarizability (β) were also calculated to predict NLO behavior. PMID:26067937

  18. Study on fluorescence spectra of molecular association of acetic acid-water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Caiqin Han; Ying Liu; Yang Yang; Xiaowu Ni; Jian Lu; Xiaosen Luo

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescence spectra of acetic acid-water solution excited by ultraviolet (UV) light are studied, and the relationship between fluorescence spectra and molecular association of acetic acid is discussed. The results indicate that when the exciting light wavelength is longer than 246 nm, there are two fluorescence peaks located at 305 and 334 nm, respectively. By measuring the excitation spectra, the optimal wavelengths of the two fluorescence peaks are obtained, which are 258 and 284 nm, respectively. Fluorescence spectra of acetic acid-water solution change with concentrations, which is primarily attributed to changes of molecular association of acetic acid in aqueous solution. Through theoretical analysis, three variations of molecular association have been obtained in acetic acid-water solution, which are the hydrated monomers, the linear dimers, and the water separated dimers. This research can provide references to studies of molecular association of acetic acid-water, especially studies of hydrogen bonds.

  19. Molecular Structures and Mechanical Properties of Microbe Rapid Coagulation Natural Rubber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Yue; HUANG Mao-Fang; ZENG Zong-Qiang

    2011-01-01

    In this work,molecular structures,dynamic mechanical properties and glass transition temperatures of microbe coagulated natural rubber(NR) samples were analyzed by using pyrolysis gas chromatography-mass spectrometry(py-GC/MS),rubber process analyzer(RPA) and dynamic mechanical thermal analysis(DMA).And the cross-linked network structures and mechanical properties of the corresponding NR vulcanizates were further determined by using nuclear magnetic resonance(NMR) crosslink density spectrometer(XLDS-15) and universal testing machines.The results show that NR raw rubber produced by rapidly coagulated with microorganism exhibits a simple molecular structure composition and good dynamic mechanical properties,and the corresponding NR vulcanizates possess the aggregation structure of high cross-linked density,a high glass transition temperature of-61.5 ℃ and high mechanical properties(tensile strength reaches 25.2 MPa),as compared with that coagulated with acetic acid.

  20. Molecular Alignment and Orientation From Laser-Induced Mechanisms to Optimal Control

    CERN Document Server

    Atabek, O

    2002-01-01

    Genetic algorithms, as implemented in optimal control strategies, are currently successfully exploited in a wide range of problems in molecular physics. In this context, laser control of molecular alignment and orientation remains a very promising issue with challenging applications extending from chemical reactivity to nanoscale design. We emphasize the complementarity between basic quantum mechanisms monitoring alignment/orientation processes and optimal control scenarios. More explicitly, if on one hand we can help the optimal control scheme to take advantage of such mechanisms by appropriately building the targets and delineating the parameter sampling space, on the other hand we expect to learn, from optimal control results, some robust and physically sound dynamical mechanisms. We present basic mechanisms for alignment and orientation, such as pendular states accommodated by the molecule-plus-field effective potential and the "kick" mechanism obtained by a sudden excitation. Very interestingly, an optim...