WorldWideScience

Sample records for assisted silicon dioxide

  1. Stress in ion-beam assisted silicon dioxide and tantalum pentoxide thin films

    CERN Document Server

    Sirotkina, N

    2003-01-01

    Ta sub 2 O sub 5 and SiO sub 2 thin films, deposited at room temperature by ion-beam sputtering (IBS) and dual ion-beam sputtering (DIBS), and SiO sub 2 films, deposited by reactive e-beam evaporation and ion-assisted deposition, were studied. The energy (150-600 eV) and ion-to-atom arrival ratio (0.27-2.0) of assisting argon and oxygen ions were varied. Influence of deposition conditions (deposition system geometry, nature and amount of gas in the chamber, substrate cleaning and ion-assistance parameters) on films properties (stress, composition, refractive index n sub 5 sub 0 sub 0 sub n sub m and extinction coefficient k sub 5 sub 0 sub 0 sub n sub m) was investigated. A scanning method, based on substrate curvature measurements by laser reflection and stress calculation using the Stoney equation, was employed. RBS showed that stoichiometric Ta sub 2 O sub 5 films contain impurities of Ar, Fe and Mo. Stoichiometric SiO sub 2 films also contain Ta impurity. Argon content increases with ion bombardment and, ...

  2. 21 CFR 573.940 - Silicon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Silicon dioxide. 573.940 Section 573.940 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... Listing § 573.940 Silicon dioxide. The food additive silicon dioxide may be safely used in animal feed in...

  3. 21 CFR 172.480 - Silicon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Silicon dioxide. 172.480 Section 172.480 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Agents § 172.480 Silicon dioxide. The food additive silicon dioxide may be safely used in food in...

  4. Thermal Oxidation of Structured Silicon Dioxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas Lehrmann; Hansen, Ole; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2014-01-01

    The topography of thermally oxidized, structured silicon dioxide is investigated through simulations, atomic force microscopy, and a proposed analytical model. A 357 nm thick oxide is structured by removing regions of the oxide in a masked etch with either reactive ion etching or hydrofluoric acid...

  5. Bias-assisted KOH etching of macroporous silicon membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathwig, K; Geilhufe, M; Müller, F; Gösele, U

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an improved technique to fabricate porous membranes from macroporous silicon as a starting material. A crucial step in the fabrication process is the dissolution of silicon from the backside of the porous wafer by aqueous potassium hydroxide to open up the pores. We improved this step by biasing the silicon wafer electrically against the KOH. By monitoring the current–time characteristics a good control of the process is achieved and the yield is improved. Also, the etching can be stopped instantaneously and automatically by short-circuiting Si and KOH. Moreover, the bias-assisted etching allows for the controlled fabrication of silicon dioxide tube arrays when the silicon pore walls are oxidized and inverted pores are released.

  6. 21 CFR 175.390 - Zinc-silicon dioxide matrix coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Zinc-silicon dioxide matrix coatings. 175.390... COATINGS Substances for Use as Components of Coatings § 175.390 Zinc-silicon dioxide matrix coatings. Zinc-silicon dioxide matrix coatings may be safely used as the food-contact surface of articles intended for...

  7. Modulation Doping of Silicon using Aluminium-induced Acceptor States in Silicon Dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Dirk; Hiller, Daniel; Gutsch, Sebastian; Zacharias, Margit; Smith, Sean

    2017-01-01

    All electronic, optoelectronic or photovoltaic applications of silicon depend on controlling majority charge carriers via doping with impurity atoms. Nanoscale silicon is omnipresent in fundamental research (quantum dots, nanowires) but also approached in future technology nodes of the microelectronics industry. In general, silicon nanovolumes, irrespective of their intended purpose, suffer from effects that impede conventional doping due to fundamental physical principles such as out-diffusion, statistics of small numbers, quantum- or dielectric confinement. In analogy to the concept of modulation doping, originally invented for III-V semiconductors, we demonstrate a heterostructure modulation doping method for silicon. Our approach utilizes a specific acceptor state of aluminium atoms in silicon dioxide to generate holes as majority carriers in adjacent silicon. By relocating the dopants from silicon to silicon dioxide, Si nanoscale doping problems are circumvented. In addition, the concept of aluminium-induced acceptor states for passivating hole selective tunnelling contacts as required for high-efficiency photovoltaics is presented and corroborated by first carrier lifetime and tunnelling current measurements. PMID:28425460

  8. Modulation Doping of Silicon using Aluminium-induced Acceptor States in Silicon Dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Dirk; Hiller, Daniel; Gutsch, Sebastian; Zacharias, Margit; Smith, Sean

    2017-04-01

    All electronic, optoelectronic or photovoltaic applications of silicon depend on controlling majority charge carriers via doping with impurity atoms. Nanoscale silicon is omnipresent in fundamental research (quantum dots, nanowires) but also approached in future technology nodes of the microelectronics industry. In general, silicon nanovolumes, irrespective of their intended purpose, suffer from effects that impede conventional doping due to fundamental physical principles such as out-diffusion, statistics of small numbers, quantum- or dielectric confinement. In analogy to the concept of modulation doping, originally invented for III-V semiconductors, we demonstrate a heterostructure modulation doping method for silicon. Our approach utilizes a specific acceptor state of aluminium atoms in silicon dioxide to generate holes as majority carriers in adjacent silicon. By relocating the dopants from silicon to silicon dioxide, Si nanoscale doping problems are circumvented. In addition, the concept of aluminium-induced acceptor states for passivating hole selective tunnelling contacts as required for high-efficiency photovoltaics is presented and corroborated by first carrier lifetime and tunnelling current measurements.

  9. Silicon Dioxide Thin Film Mediated Single Cell Nucleic Acid Isolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanov, Evgeny; Dominova, Irina; Shusharina, Natalia; Botman, Stepan; Kasymov, Vitaliy; Patrushev, Maksim

    2013-01-01

    A limited amount of DNA extracted from single cells, and the development of single cell diagnostics make it necessary to create a new highly effective method for the single cells nucleic acids isolation. In this paper, we propose the DNA isolation method from biomaterials with limited DNA quantity in sample, and from samples with degradable DNA based on the use of solid-phase adsorbent silicon dioxide nanofilm deposited on the inner surface of PCR tube. PMID:23874571

  10. Properties of silicon nanocrystals with boron and phosphorus doping fabricated via silicon rich oxide and silicon dioxide bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien-Jen Yang, Terry; Nomoto, Keita; Puthen-Veettil, Binesh; Lin, Ziyun; Wu, Lingfeng; Zhang, Tian; Jia, Xuguang; Conibeer, Gavin; Perez-Wurfl, Ivan

    2017-07-01

    Effects of boron and phosphorus doping on the structural, electrical, and optical properties of silicon nanocrystals in superlattice thin films were investigated. Silicon nanocrystals were fabricated via magnetron sputtering of stoichiometric silicon rich oxide and silicon dioxide bilayers followed by high temperature annealing at 1100 degrees Celsius. The characterization techniques used include: high-resolution transmission electron microscopy with energy filtering, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, Raman, photoluminescence, and photothermal deflection spectroscopy, as well as electrical measurements. Results showed that phosphorus doping causes the loss of the bilayer structure and an increase in the average size of the silicon nanocrystals due to softening of the silicon dioxide matrix during post-sputter annealing. The result was a decrease in quantum confinement and a redshift in photoluminescence spectrum with an absorption profile similar to crystalline silicon. The undoped (intrinsic) sample maintained its bilayer structure and displayed stronger quantum confinement with higher photoluminescence peak energy and higher absorption coefficient. In-between, the boron doped sample was more similar structurally to the intrinsic sample, although merging between bilayers resulted in an extensive silicon nanocrystalline network. Optically, it displayed different effects due to photoluminescence quenching and free carrier absorption. Finally, both doped samples exhibited a decrease in electrical resistivity.

  11. [Research progress about the relationship between nanoparticles silicon dioxide and lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Chun; Huang, Yunchao; Zhou, Yongchun

    2014-10-20

    Nano-silicon dioxide widely distributed in plastic, rubber, ceramics, paint, adhesives, and many other fields, and it is the product of coal combustion. A growing evidence shows that nano-silicon dioxide has certain correlation with respiratory system disease. In this paper, we synthesized existing researches of domestic and abroad, summarized the lung toxicity of nanoparticles. This article are reviewed from the physical and chemical properties of nanoparticles silicon dioxide, exposure conditions and environment, and the pathogenic mechanism of nano-silicon dioxide.

  12. Research Progress about the Relationship between Nanoparticles Silicon Dioxide and Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun DAI

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Nano-silicon dioxide widely distributed in plastic, rubber, ceramics, paint, adhesives, and many other fields, and it is the product of coal combustion. A growing evidence shows that nano-silicon dioxide has certain correlation with respiratory system disease. In this paper, we synthesized existing researches of domestic and abroad, summarized the lung toxicity of nanoparticles. This article are reviewed from the physical and chemical properties of nanoparticles silicon dioxide, exposure conditions and environment, and the pathogenic mechanism of nano-silicon dioxide.

  13. Generation of neutron scattering cross sections for silicon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos, R; Marquez Damian, J.I; Granada, J.R.; Cantargi, F

    2009-01-01

    A set of neutron scattering cross sections for silicon and oxygen bound in silicon dioxide were generated and validated. The cross sections were generated in the ACE format for MCNP using the nuclear data processing system NJOY, and the validation was done with published experimental data. This cross section library was applied to the calculation of five critical configurations published in the benchmark Critical Experiments with Heterogeneous Compositions of Highly Enriched Uranium, Silicon Dioxide and Polyethylene. The original calculations did not use the thermal scattering libraries generated in this work and presented significant differences with the experimental results. For this reason, the newly generated library was added to the input and the multiplication factor for each configuration was recomputed. The utilization of the thermal scattering libraries did not result in an improvement of the computational results. Based on this we conclude that integral experiments to validate this type of thermal cross sections need to be designed with a higher influence of thermal scattering in the measured result, and the experiments have to be performed under more controlled conditions. [es

  14. Ion assisted deposition of SiO2 film from silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Tuan. H.; Dang, Cu. X.

    2005-09-01

    Silicon dioxide, SiO2, is one of the preferred low index materials for optical thin film technology. It is often deposited by electron beam evaporation source with less porosity and scattering, relatively durable and can have a good laser damage threshold. Beside these advantages the deposition of critical optical thin film stacks with silicon dioxide from an E-gun was severely limited by the stability of the evaporation pattern or angular distribution of the material. The even surface of SiO2 granules in crucible will tend to develop into groove and become deeper with the evaporation process. As the results, angular distribution of the evaporation vapor changes in non-predicted manner. This report presents our experiments to apply Ion Assisted Deposition process to evaporate silicon in a molten liquid form. By choosing appropriate process parameters we can get SiO2 film with good and stable property.

  15. Molecular dynamics simulations on surface properties of silicon dioxide melts

    CERN Document Server

    Röder, A

    2000-01-01

    In the present thesis the surface properties of a silicon dioxide melt were studied. As first systems drops (i.e. sytems without periodic boundary conditions) of N=432, 1536, as well as 4608 atoms were considered. The second analyzed geometry corresponds to that of a thin film, i. e. periodic boundary conditions in x- and y-direction were present, while in z-direction one had a free surface. In this case a system of N=1152 atoms was considered. As model potential the two-body potential proposed by Beest, Kramer, and van Santen was applied. For both geometries five temperatures were considered, which lied in the range of 3000 K

  16. Ballistic Phonon Penetration Depth in Amorphous Silicon Dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lin; Zhang, Qian; Cui, Zhiguang; Gerboth, Matthew; Zhao, Yang; Xu, Terry T; Walker, D Greg; Li, Deyu

    2017-12-13

    Thermal transport in amorphous silicon dioxide (a-SiO 2 ) is traditionally treated as random walks of vibrations owing to its greatly disordered structure, which results in a mean free path (MFP) approximately the same as the interatomic distance. However, this picture has been debated constantly and in view of the ubiquitous existence of thin a-SiO 2 layers in nanoelectronic devices, it is imperative to better understand this issue for precise thermal management of electronic devices. Different from the commonly used cross-plane measurement approaches, here we report on a study that explores the in-plane thermal conductivity of double silicon nanoribbons with a layer of a-SiO 2 sandwiched in-between. Through comparing the thermal conductivity of the double ribbon samples with that of corresponding single ribbons, we show that thermal phonons can ballistically penetrate through a-SiO 2 of up to 5 nm thick even at room temperature. Comprehensive examination of double ribbon samples with various oxide layer thicknesses and van der Waals bonding strengths allows for extraction of the average ballistic phonon penetration depth in a-SiO 2 . With solid experimental data demonstrating ballistic phonon transport through a-SiO 2 , this work should provide important insight into thermal management of electronic devices.

  17. Nanoparticulate cerium dioxide and cerium dioxide-titanium dioxide composite thin films on glass by aerosol assisted chemical vapour deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qureshi, Uzma; Dunnill, Charles W.; Parkin, Ivan P.

    2009-01-01

    Two series of composite thin films were deposited on glass by aerosol assisted chemical vapour deposition (AACVD)-nanoparticulate cerium dioxide and nanoparticulate cerium dioxide embedded in a titanium dioxide matrix. The films were analysed by a range of techniques including UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive analysis by X-rays. The AACVD prepared films showed the functional properties of photocatalysis and super-hydrophilicity. The CeO 2 nanoparticle thin films displaying photocatalysis and photo-induced hydrophilicity almost comparable to that of anatase titania.

  18. Modeling chemical vapor deposition of silicon dioxide in microreactors at atmospheric pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konakov, S.A.; Krzhizhanovskaya, V.V.

    2015-01-01

    We developed a multiphysics mathematical model for simulation of silicon dioxide Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) from tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) and oxygen mixture in a microreactor at atmospheric pressure. Microfluidics is a promising technology with numerous applications in chemical synthesis

  19. Low-Roughness Plasma Etching of HgCdTe Masked with Patterned Silicon Dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Z. H.; Hu, W. D.; Yin, W. T.; Huang, J.; Lin, C.; Hu, X. N.; Ding, R. J.; Chen, X. S.; Lu, W.; He, L.

    2011-08-01

    A novel mask technique utilizing patterned silicon dioxide films has been exploited to perform mesa etching for device delineation and electrical isolation of HgCdTe third-generation infrared focal-plane arrays (IRFPAs). High-density silicon dioxide films were deposited at temperature of 80°C, and a procedure for patterning and etching of HgCdTe was developed by standard photolithography and wet chemical etching. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that the surfaces of inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etched samples were quite clean and smooth. Root-mean-square (RMS) roughness characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM) was less than 1.5 nm. The etching selectivity between a silicon dioxide film and HgCdTe in the samples masked with patterned silicon dioxide films was greater than 30:1. These results show that the new masking technique is readily available and promising for HgCdTe mesa etching.

  20. Time-Efficient High-Resolution Large-Area Nano-Patterning of Silicon Dioxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Li; Ou, Yiyu; Aagesen, Martin

    2017-01-01

    A nano-patterning approach on silicon dioxide (SiO2) material, which could be used for the selective growth of III-V nanowires in photovoltaic applications, is demonstrated. In this process, a silicon (Si) stamp with nanopillar structures was first fabricated using electron-beam lithography (EBL...

  1. Anti-pepsin activity of silicon dioxide nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein Kadhem Al-Hakeim

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available SiO2NPs as an inhibitor of pepsin enzyme for treatment of gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD was used. Silicon dioxide nanoparticles (pepsin coated SiO2NPs are among the safest nanoparticles that can be used inside the human body. The activity of pepsin before and after the addition of certain amounts of the NPs to the reaction mixture was measured spectrophotometrically. Furthermore, these experiments were repeated at different temperatures, different weights of NPs, and different ionic strengths. The kinetic aparameters (Km & Vmax of the pepsin catalyzed reactions were calculated from the Lineweaver-Burke plots. The results showed that there is a significant reduction of pepsin activity by SiO2NPs (Vmax of free pepsin = 4.82 U and Vmax of the immobilizedpepsin = 2.90 U. The results also indicated that the presence of ionic strength causes remarkable reduction of pepsin activity. It can be concluded the best condition for inhibition of pepsin activity is by using a combination of SiO2NPs and high concentration NaCl at 37 °C.

  2. Effect of helium ion beam treatment on wet etching of silicon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Yu. V.; Grigoryev, E. A.; Sharov, T. V.; Baraban, A. P.

    2018-03-01

    We investigated the effect of helium ion beam treatment on the etching rate of silicon dioxide in a water based solution of hydrofluoric acid. A 460-nm-thick silicon dioxide film on silicon was irradiated with helium ions having energies of 20 keV and 30 keV with ion fluences ranging from 1014 cm-2 to 1017 cm-2. The dependence of the etching rate on depth was obtained and compared with the depth distribution of ion-induced defects, which was obtained from numerical simulation. Irradiation with helium ions results in an increase of the etching rate of silicon dioxide. The dependence of the etching rate on the calculated concentration of ion-induced defects is described.

  3. Segregation of boron implanted into silicon on angular configurations of silicon/silicon dioxide oxidation interface

    CERN Document Server

    Tarnavskij, G A; Obrekht, M S

    2001-01-01

    One studies segregation of boron implanted into silicon when a wave (interface) of oxidation moves within it. There are four types of angular configurations of SiO sub 2 /Si oxidation interface, that is: direct and reverse shoulders, trench type cavities and a square. By means of computer-aided simulation one obtained and analyzed complex patterns of B concentration distribution within Si, SiO sub 2 domains and at SiO sub 2 /Si interface for all types of angular configurations of the oxidation interface

  4. Coulombic and neutral trapping centers in silicon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, D. A.; Fischetti, M. V.; Dimaria, D. J.

    1991-01-01

    Metal-oxide-semiconductor structures incorporating thermally grown silicon dioxide films were implanted with arsenic ions and then annealed at high temperatures. The subsequent trapping sites produced are amphoteric. Coulombic-attractive traps (for electrons) were produced with the avalanche injection of holes from the silicon substrate and the subsequent capture of some of these holes on the arsenic-related sites. During internal photoemission of electrons from a thin aluminum gate, the voltage shifts due to hole annihilation by electrons were recorded and the effective capture cross section was determined. This capture cross section was found to vary from ~10-12 to 3×10-15 cm2 for average electric fields ranging from 2×105 to 3×106 V/cm. An average field threshold (~1.2×106 V/cm) was found, below which the capture-cross-section-average-field dependence follows a power law with an exponent of approximately -1.5. Above the average field threshold, the power-law exponent was found to be approximately -3.0. Also, when the amphoteric arsenic-related sites are empty, they can form neutral trapping sites for electrons. For these trapping centers, it is found that the neutral capture cross section is relatively independent of the average electric field. For average fields ranging from 5×105 to 6×106 V/cm, the neutral cross section is found to be approximately constant at (1-2)×10-15 cm2. For the Coulombic electron traps, classical and quantum-mechanical Monte Carlo simulations agree qualitatively with the experimental results. These simulations suggest that the heating of the electron-energy distribution and tunnel detrapping are the primary cause of the decrease in the effective capture cross section in the high-field regime. For the neutral traps in the low-field regime, the classical Monte Carlo simulation also agrees with the experimental results. However, for fields above the electron-heating threshold, the simulation predicts an increase in the capture cross

  5. Biplot Analysis of Silicon Dioxide on Early Growth of Sunflower

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabaghnia Naser

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Research into nanotechnology has advanced in almost all fields of technology and the aim of this study was to evaluate the role of nano-silicon dioxide (nano-SiO2 in germination performance sunflower. Germination and seedling growth are the most important stage of plant development and are critical factors to crop production and are essential to achieve optimum performance. The effects of pre-germination hydration in solutions of nano-SiO2 (0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, 1 and 1.2 mM for 8 h on germination characteristics of sunflower were investigated. The trait by treatment (TT biplot explained 93% of the total variation of the standardized data (77% and 16% for the first and second principal components, respectively. According to polygon-view of TT biplot, T2 (0.2 mM had the highest values for all of the measured traits except mean germination time and the time to 50% germination. The germination percentage was determined as the best trait and showed the high association with promptness index, energy of germination and germination rate traits. The results of the present study indicated that pre-sowing seed treatments with low concentration of nano-SiO2 had favorable effect sunflower seed germination and seedling early growth. Such a similar outcome could be applied in the future to outline other crops in response to nano-particles as well as to help define tolerance tools for recommendations in stressful conditions in the world.

  6. Raman Spectra of High-κ Dielectric Layers Investigated with Micro-Raman Spectroscopy Comparison with Silicon Dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Borowicz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Three samples with dielectric layers from high-κ dielectrics, hafnium oxide, gadolinium-silicon oxide, and lanthanum-lutetium oxide on silicon substrate were studied by Raman spectroscopy. The results obtained for high-κ dielectrics were compared with spectra recorded for silicon dioxide. Raman spectra suggest the similarity of gadolinium-silicon oxide and lanthanum-lutetium oxide to the bulk nondensified silicon dioxide. The temperature treatment of hafnium oxide shows the evolution of the structure of this material. Raman spectra recorded for as-deposited hafnium oxide are similar to the results obtained for silicon dioxide layer. After thermal treatment especially at higher temperatures (600°C and above, the structure of hafnium oxide becomes similar to the bulk non-densified silicon dioxide.

  7. Biocompatibility of cerium dioxide and silicon dioxide nanoparticles with endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Strobel

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Cerium dioxide (CeO2 and silicon dioxide (SiO2 nanoparticles are of widespread use in modern life. This means that human beings are markedly exposed to them in their everyday life. Once passing biological barriers, these nanoparticles are expected to interact with endothelial cells, leading to systemic alterations with distinct influences on human health. In the present study we observed the metabolic impact of differently sized CeO2 (8 nm; 35 nm and SiO2 nanoparticles (117 nm; 315 nm on immortalized human microvascular (HMEC-1 and primary macrovascular endothelial cells (HUVEC, with particular focus on the CeO2 nanoparticles. The characterization of the CeO2 nanoparticles in cell culture media with varying serum content indicated a steric stabilization of nanoparticles due to interaction with proteins. After cellular uptake, the CeO2 nanoparticles were localized around the nucleus in a ring-shaped manner. The nanoparticles revealed concentration and time, but no size-dependent effects on the cellular adenosine triphosphate levels. HUVEC reacted more sensitively to CeO2 nanoparticle exposure than HMEC-1. This effect was also observed in relation to cytokine release after nanoparticle treatment. The CeO2 nanoparticles exhibited a specific impact on the release of diverse proteins. Namely, a slight trend towards pro-inflammatory effects, a slight pro-thrombotic impact, and an increase of reactive oxygen species after nanoparticle exposure were observed with increasing incubation time. For SiO2 nanoparticles, concentration- and time-dependent effects on the metabolic activity as well as pro-inflammatory reactions were detectable. In general, the effects of the investigated nanoparticles on endothelial cells were rather insignificant, since the alterations on the metabolic cell activity became visible at a nanoparticle concentration that is by far higher than those expected to occur in the in vivo situation (CeO2 nanoparticles: 100 µg/mL; SiO2

  8. Criticality characteristics of mixtures of plutonium, silicon dioxide, Nevada tuff, and water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, R.; Myers, W.; Hayes, D.

    1997-01-01

    The nuclear criticality characteristics of mixtures of plutonium, silicon dioxide, and water (Part A) or plutonium, silicon dioxide, Nevada Yucca Mountain tuff, and water (Part B) have become of interest because of the appearance of recent papers on the subject. These papers postulate that if excess weapons plutonium is vitrified into a silicate log and buried underground, a self-sustaining neutron chain reaction may develop given sufficient time and interaction with the burial medium. Moreover, given specific geologic actions resulting in postulated configurations, the referenced papers state that nuclear explosions could occur with multi-kiloton yields or yields equivalent to hundreds of tons of TNT

  9. Field assisted photoemission by silicon photocathodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aboubacar, A.; Dupont, M.; El Manouni, A.; Querrou, M.; Says, L.P.

    1991-01-01

    Silicon photocathodes with arrays of tips have been prepared using microlithographic techniques. Current emission due to field effect has been measured in the case of heavy and weakly doped boron Silicon. An Argon continuous laser has been used to produce photocurrent. An instantaneous current (600 μA) with a moderate laser power (83 mW), has been produced on weakly doped photocathodes. This current corresponds to an average quantum yield (purely photoelectric) of about 1.7%, and a local current density in the range of a few 10 6 A m -2

  10. Investigations of the surface conductivity of silicon dioxide and methods to reduce it

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voorthuyzen, J.A.; Keskin, K.; Bergveld, Piet

    1987-01-01

    In this paper we describe our investigations of the electrical conductivity of the silicon dioxide-air interface. It appears that this conductivity is caused by the adsorption of water vapour on the oxide surface and strongly depends on the relative humidity of the surrounding air. Considering this

  11. Follow the track : The effects of silicon dioxide on GTA welding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middel, W.; Den Ouden, G.; Schrauwers, A.

    2001-01-01

    Silicon dioxide, in other words sand, turns out to be a highly useful helper for arc welding processes. It can be used as a tracer for a welding robot to follow the weld line and it can also make welding go faster and "deeper". At the Materials Science department of the Delft University of

  12. Study of Dielectric Properties and Morphology of Epoxy Resin with Silicon Dioxide Microparticles and Nanoparticles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hudec, Jiří; Neděla, Vilém

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 22, S3 (2016), s. 1896-1897 ISSN 1431-9276 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : epoxy resin ESEM * Nanoparticles * silicon dioxide * ESEM Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.891, year: 2016

  13. Modulation Doping of Silicon using Aluminium-induced Acceptor States in Silicon Dioxide

    OpenAIRE

    K?nig, Dirk; Hiller, Daniel; Gutsch, Sebastian; Zacharias, Margit; Smith, Sean

    2017-01-01

    All electronic, optoelectronic or photovoltaic applications of silicon depend on controlling majority charge carriers via doping with impurity atoms. Nanoscale silicon is omnipresent in fundamental research (quantum dots, nanowires) but also approached in future technology nodes of the microelectronics industry. In general, silicon nanovolumes, irrespective of their intended purpose, suffer from effects that impede conventional doping due to fundamental physical principles such as out-diffusi...

  14. Electrochemical removal of segregated silicon dioxide impurities from yttria stabilized zirconia surfaces at elevated temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas; Hansen, Karin Vels; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2011-01-01

    Here we report on the electrochemical removal of segregated silicon dioxide impurities from Yttria Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) surfaces at elevated temperatures studied under Ultra High Vacuum (UHV) conditions. YSZ single crystals were heated in vacuum by an applied 18kHz a.c. voltage using the ion....... This was demonstrated by silicon enrichment of a gold foil placed behind the YSZ crystal surface while annealed. The results suggest a fast way to clean YSZ for trace silicon dioxide impurities found in the bulk of the cleanest crystals commercially available....... conductivity of YSZ. The crystals were annealed in vacuum and atmospheres of water or oxygen from 10−5 mbar to 100mbar in the temperature range of 1100°C to 1275°C. The surface was after annealing analyzed by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) without exposing the crystal to atmosphere between annealing...... and XPS analysis. Silicon enrichment of the surface was only observed at oxygen and water vapor partial pressures above 25mbar and 10mbar, respectively. No silicon was observed on crystals annealed in vacuum and at oxygen and water vapor partial pressures below 10mbar. The YSZ seems to get partially...

  15. Free Energy Minimization Calculation of Complex Chemical Equilibria. Reduction of Silicon Dioxide with Carbon at High Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wai, C. M.; Hutchinson, S. G.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the calculation of free energy in reactions between silicon dioxide and carbon. Describes several computer programs for calculating the free energy minimization and their uses in chemistry classrooms. Lists 16 references. (YP)

  16. Directed gas phase formation of silicon dioxide and implications for the formation of interstellar silicates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tao; Thomas, Aaron M; Dangi, Beni B; Kaiser, Ralf I; Mebel, Alexander M; Millar, Tom J

    2018-02-22

    Interstellar silicates play a key role in star formation and in the origin of solar systems, but their synthetic routes have remained largely elusive so far. Here we demonstrate in a combined crossed molecular beam and computational study that silicon dioxide (SiO 2 ) along with silicon monoxide (SiO) can be synthesized via the reaction of the silylidyne radical (SiH) with molecular oxygen (O 2 ) under single collision conditions. This mechanism may provide a low-temperature path-in addition to high-temperature routes to silicon oxides in circumstellar envelopes-possibly enabling the formation and growth of silicates in the interstellar medium necessary to offset the fast silicate destruction.

  17. Mid-infrared optical properties of thin films of aluminum oxide, titanium dioxide, silicon dioxide, aluminum nitride, and silicon nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kischkat, Jan; Peters, Sven; Gruska, Bernd; Semtsiv, Mykhaylo; Chashnikova, Mikaela; Klinkmüller, Matthias; Fedosenko, Oliana; Machulik, Stephan; Aleksandrova, Anna; Monastyrskyi, Gregorii; Flores, Yuri; Masselink, W Ted

    2012-10-01

    The complex refractive index components, n and k, have been studied for thin films of several common dielectric materials with a low to medium refractive index as functions of wavelength and stoichiometry for mid-infrared (MIR) wavelengths within the range 1.54-14.29 μm (700-6500 cm(-1)). The materials silicon oxide, silicon nitride, aluminum oxide, aluminum nitride, and titanium oxide are prepared using room temperature reactive sputter deposition and are characterized using MIR variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry. The investigation shows how sensitive the refractive index functions are to the O2 and N2 flow rates, and for which growth conditions the materials deposit homogeneously. It also allows conclusions to be drawn on the degree of amorphousness and roughness. To facilitate comparison of the materials deposited in this work with others, the index of refraction was also determined and provided for the near-IR and visible ranges of the spectrum. The results presented here should serve as a useful information base for designing optical coatings for the MIR part of the electromagnetic spectrum. The results are parameterized to allow them to be easily used for coating design.

  18. Silicon dioxide with a silicon interfacial layer as an insulating gate for highly stable indium phosphide metal-insulator-semiconductor field effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, V. J.; Shokrani, M.

    1991-01-01

    A novel gate insulator consisting of silicon dioxide (SiO2) with a thin silicon (Si) interfacial layer has been investigated for high-power microwave indium phosphide (InP) metal-insulator-semiconductor field effect transistors (MISFETs). The role of the silicon interfacial layer on the chemical nature of the SiO2/Si/InP interface was studied by high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results indicated that the silicon interfacial layer reacted with the native oxide at the InP surface, thus producing silicon dioxide, while reducing the native oxide which has been shown to be responsible for the instabilities in InP MISFETs. While a 1.2-V hysteresis was present in the capacitance-voltage (C-V) curve of the MIS capacitors with silicon dioxide, less than 0.1 V hysteresis was observed in the C-V curve of the capacitors with the silicon interfacial layer incorporated in the insulator. InP MISFETs fabricated with the silicon dioxide in combination with the silicon interfacial layer exhibited excellent stability with drain current drift of less than 3 percent in 10,000 sec, as compared to 15-18 percent drift in 10,000 sec for devices without the silicon interfacial layer. High-power microwave InP MISFETs with Si/SiO2 gate insulators resulted in an output power density of 1.75 W/mm gate width at 9.7 GHz, with an associated power gain of 2.5 dB and 24 percent power added efficiency.

  19. The fabrication and visible-near-infrared optical modulation of vanadium dioxide/silicon dioxide composite photonic crystal structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jiran; Li, Peng; Song, Xiaolong; Zhou, Liwei

    2017-12-01

    We demonstrated a visible and near-infrared light tunable photonic nanostructure, which is composed of vanadium dioxide (VO2) thin film and silicon dioxide (SiO2) ordered nanosphere arrays. The vanadium films were sputtered on two-dimensional (2D) SiO2 sphere arrays. VO2 thin films were prepared by rapid thermal annealing (RTA) method with different oxygen flow rates. The close-packed VO2 shell formed a continuous surface, the composition of VO2 films in the structure changed when the oxygen flow rates increased. The 2D VO2/SiO2 composite photonic crystal structure exhibited transmittance trough tunability and near-infrared (NIR) transmittance modulation. When the oxygen flow rate increased from 3 slpm to 4 slpm, the largest transmittance trough can be regulated from 904 to 929 nm at low temperature, the transmittance troughs also appear blue shift when the VO2 phase changes from insulator to metal. The composite nanostructure based on VO2 films showed visible transmittance tunability, which would provide insights into the glass color changing in smart windows.

  20. Formation and properties of the buried isolating silicon-dioxide layer in double-layer “porous silicon-on-insulator” structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolotov, V. V.; Knyazev, E. V.; Ponomareva, I. V.; Kan, V. E., E-mail: kan@obisp.oscsbras.ru; Davletkildeev, N. A.; Ivlev, K. E.; Roslikov, V. E. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Omsk Scientific Center, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)

    2017-01-15

    The oxidation of mesoporous silicon in a double-layer “macroporous silicon–mesoporous silicon” structure is studied. The morphology and dielectric properties of the buried insulating layer are investigated using electron microscopy, ellipsometry, and electrical measurements. Specific defects (so-called spikes) are revealed between the oxidized macropore walls in macroporous silicon and the oxidation crossing fronts in mesoporous silicon. It is found that, at an initial porosity of mesoporous silicon of 60%, three-stage thermal oxidation leads to the formation of buried silicon-dioxide layers with an electric-field breakdown strength of E{sub br} ~ 10{sup 4}–10{sup 5} V/cm. Multilayered “porous silicon-on-insulator” structures are shown to be promising for integrated chemical micro- and nanosensors.

  1. Dielectrophoretic trapping of multilayer DNA origami nanostructures and DNA origami-induced local destruction of silicon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Boxuan; Linko, Veikko; Dietz, Hendrik; Toppari, J Jussi

    2015-01-01

    DNA origami is a widely used method for fabrication of custom-shaped nanostructures. However, to utilize such structures, one needs to controllably position them on nanoscale. Here we demonstrate how different types of 3D scaffolded multilayer origamis can be accurately anchored to lithographically fabricated nanoelectrodes on a silicon dioxide substrate by DEP. Straight brick-like origami structures, constructed both in square (SQL) and honeycomb lattices, as well as curved "C"-shaped and angular "L"-shaped origamis were trapped with nanoscale precision and single-structure accuracy. We show that the positioning and immobilization of all these structures can be realized with or without thiol-linkers. In general, structural deformations of the origami during the DEP trapping are highly dependent on the shape and the construction of the structure. The SQL brick turned out to be the most robust structure under the high DEP forces, and accordingly, its single-structure trapping yield was also highest. In addition, the electrical conductivity of single immobilized plain brick-like structures was characterized. The electrical measurements revealed that the conductivity is negligible (insulating behavior). However, we observed that the trapping process of the SQL brick equipped with thiol-linkers tended to induce an etched "nanocanyon" in the silicon dioxide substrate. The nanocanyon was formed exactly between the electrodes, that is, at the location of the DEP-trapped origami. The results show that the demonstrated DEP-trapping technique can be readily exploited in assembling and arranging complex multilayered origami geometries. In addition, DNA origamis could be utilized in DEP-assisted deformation of the substrates onto which they are attached. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Capacitance‐Assisted Sustainable Electrochemical Carbon Dioxide Mineralisation

    OpenAIRE

    Lamb, Katie J.; Dowsett, Mark R.; Chatzipanagis, Konstantinos; Scullion, Zhan Wei; Kröger, Roland; Lee, James D.; Aguiar, Pedro M.; North, Michael; Parkin, Alison

    2017-01-01

    Abstract An electrochemical cell comprising a novel dual‐component graphite and Earth‐crust abundant metal anode, a hydrogen producing cathode and an aqueous sodium chloride electrolyte was constructed and used for carbon dioxide mineralisation. Under an atmosphere of 5 % carbon dioxide in nitrogen, the cell exhibited both capacitive and oxidative electrochemistry at the anode. The graphite acted as a supercapacitive reagent concentrator, pumping carbon dioxide into aqueous solution as hydrog...

  3. Capacitance-Assisted Sustainable Electrochemical Carbon Dioxide Mineralisation

    OpenAIRE

    Lamb, Katie J.; Dowsett, Mark R.; Chatzipanagis, Konstantinos; Scullion, Zhan Wei; Kröger, Roland; Lee, James D.; Aguiar, Pedro M.; North, Michael; Parkin, Alison

    2018-01-01

    An electrochemical cell comprising a novel dual-component graphite and Earth-crust abundant metal anode, a hydrogen producing cathode and an aqueous sodium chloride electrolyte was constructed and used for carbon dioxide mineralisation. Under an atmosphere of 5 % carbon dioxide in nitrogen, the cell exhibited both capacitive and oxidative electrochemistry at the anode. The graphite acted as a supercapacitive reagent concentrator, pumping carbon dioxide into aqueous solution as hydrogen carbon...

  4. Modeling of flame assisted chemical vapor deposition of silicon films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masi, M.; Cavallotti, C.; Raffa, E. [Dipartimento di Chimica, Materiali e Ingegneria Chimica, Politecnico di Milano, via Mancinelli 7, 20131 Milano (Italy)

    2011-08-15

    The simulation of a flame assisted chemical vapor deposition (FACVD) process is here proposed with reference to the growth of silicon thin films through the silane/chlorosilanes/hydrogen/chlorine route. The goal is to design a reactor able to deposit micromorphous or multicrystalline films at the high growth rates necessary for photovoltaic applications. In fact, since FACVD processes can operate in atmospheric conditions and in auto-thermal mode, they present significant energetic advantages with respect to the plasma assisted technology used today. This work is in particular devoted to illustrate the multi-hierarchical modeling procedure adopted to determine the process optimal operating conditions and to design the deposition chamber. Different burner geometries (single, porous or multiple nozzles burner) were investigated in order to exploit the advantages of the two classical stagnation flow and Bunsen stretched flames. (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  5. Defects and defect generation in oxide layer of ion implanted silicon-silicon dioxide structures

    CERN Document Server

    Baraban, A P

    2002-01-01

    One studies mechanism of generation of defects in Si-SiO sub 2 structure oxide layer as a result of implantation of argon ions with 130 keV energy and 10 sup 1 sup 3 - 3.2 x 10 sup 1 sup 7 cm sup - sup 2 doses. Si-SiO sub 2 structures are produced by thermal oxidation of silicon under 950 deg C temperature. Investigations were based on electroluminescence technique and on measuring of high-frequency volt-farad characteristics. Increase of implantation dose was determined to result in spreading of luminosity centres and in its maximum shifting closer to boundary with silicon. Ion implantation was shown, as well, to result in increase of density of surface states at Si-SiO sub 2 interface. One proposed model of defect generation resulting from Ar ion implantation into Si-SiO sub 2

  6. Capacitance-Assisted Sustainable Electrochemical Carbon Dioxide Mineralisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Katie J; Dowsett, Mark R; Chatzipanagis, Konstantinos; Scullion, Zhan Wei; Kröger, Roland; Lee, James D; Aguiar, Pedro M; North, Michael; Parkin, Alison

    2018-01-10

    An electrochemical cell comprising a novel dual-component graphite and Earth-crust abundant metal anode, a hydrogen producing cathode and an aqueous sodium chloride electrolyte was constructed and used for carbon dioxide mineralisation. Under an atmosphere of 5 % carbon dioxide in nitrogen, the cell exhibited both capacitive and oxidative electrochemistry at the anode. The graphite acted as a supercapacitive reagent concentrator, pumping carbon dioxide into aqueous solution as hydrogen carbonate. Simultaneous oxidation of the anodic metal generated cations, which reacted with the hydrogen carbonate to give mineralised carbon dioxide. Whilst conventional electrochemical carbon dioxide reduction requires hydrogen, this cell generates hydrogen at the cathode. Carbon capture can be achieved in a highly sustainable manner using scrap metal within the anode, seawater as the electrolyte, an industrially relevant gas stream and a solar panel as an effective zero-carbon energy source. © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  7. Use of anionic surfactants for selective polishing of silicon dioxide over silicon nitride films using colloidal silica-based slurries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penta, Naresh K.; Amanapu, H. P.; Peethala, B. C.; Babu, S. V.

    2013-10-01

    Four different anionic surfactants, sodium dodecyl sulfate, dodecyl benzene sulfonic acid (DBSA), dodecyl phosphate and Sodium lauroyl sarcosine, selected from the sulfate, phosphate, and carboxylic family, were investigated as additives in silica dispersions for selective polishing of silicon dioxide over silicon nitride films. We found that all these anionic surfactants suppress the nitride removal rates (RR) for pH ≤4 while more or less maintaining the oxide RRs, resulting in high oxide-to-nitride RR selectivity. The RR data obtained as a function of pH were explained based on pH dependent distributions of surfactant species, change in the zeta potentials of oxide and nitride surfaces, and thermogravimetric data. It appears that the negatively charged surfactant species preferentially adsorb on the positively charged nitride surface below IEP through its electrostatic interactions and form a bilayer adsorption, resulting in the suppression of nitride RRs. In contrast to the surfactants, K2SO4 interacts only weakly with the nitride surface and hence cannot suppress its RR.

  8. Engineering Interfacial Silicon Dioxide for Improved Metal-Insulator-Semiconductor Silicon Photoanode Water Splitting Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satterthwaite, Peter F; Scheuermann, Andrew G; Hurley, Paul K; Chidsey, Christopher E D; McIntyre, Paul C

    2016-05-25

    Silicon photoanodes protected by atomic layer deposited (ALD) TiO2 show promise as components of water splitting devices that may enable the large-scale production of solar fuels and chemicals. Minimizing the resistance of the oxide corrosion protection layer is essential for fabricating efficient devices with good fill factor. Recent literature reports have shown that the interfacial SiO2 layer, interposed between the protective ALD-TiO2 and the Si anode, acts as a tunnel oxide that limits hole conduction from the photoabsorbing substrate to the surface oxygen evolution catalyst. Herein, we report a significant reduction of bilayer resistance, achieved by forming stable, ultrathin (ALD-TiO2 protected anodes were employed: (1) TiO2 deposition directly on an HF-etched Si(100) surface, (2) TiO2 deposition after SiO2 atomic layer deposition on an HF-etched Si(100) surface, and (3) oxygen scavenging, post-TiO2 deposition to decompose the SiO2 layer using a Ti overlayer. Each of these methods provides a progressively superior means of reliably thinning the interfacial SiO2 layer, enabling the fabrication of efficient and stable water oxidation silicon anodes.

  9. Same-Side Platinum Electrodes for Metal Assisted Etching of Porous Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Platinum Electrodes for Metal Assisted Etching of Porous Silicon by Matthew H Ervin and Brian Isaacson Sensors and Electron Devices Directorate...SUBTITLE Same-Side Platinum Electrodes for Metal Assisted Etching of Porous Silicon 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT

  10. Silicone rubbers for dielectric elastomers with improved dielectric and mechanical properties as a result of substituting silica with titanium dioxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Liyun; Skov, Anne Ladegaard

    2016-01-01

    metal oxide filled elastomer may contain too much filler. We therefore explore the replacement of silica with titanium dioxide to ensure a relatively low concentration of filler. Liquid silicone rubber (LSR) has relatively low viscosity, which is favorable for loading inorganic fillers. In the present...... and dynamic viscosity. Filled silicone elastomers with high loadings of nano-sized titanium dioxide (TiO2) particles were also studied. The best overall performing formulation had 35 wt.% TiO2 nanoparticles in the POWERSIL® XLR LSR, where the excellent ensemble of relative dielectric permittivity of 4.9 at 0...

  11. Targeting thyroid cancer with acid-triggered release of doxorubicin from silicon dioxide nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li SJ

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Shijie Li,1 Daqi Zhang,1 Shihou Sheng,2 Hui Sun1 1Department of Thyroid Surgery, 2Department of Gastrointestinal Colorectal and Anal Surgery, China–Japan Union Hospital of Jilin University, Chang Chun, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Currently, therapy for thyroid cancer mainly involves surgery and radioiodine therapy. However, chemotherapy can be used in advanced and aggressive thyroid cancer that cannot be treated by other options. Nevertheless, a major obstacle to the successful treatment of thyroid cancer is the delivery of drugs to the thyroid gland. Here, we present an example of the construction of silicon dioxide nanoparticles with thyroid–stimulating-hormone receptor-targeting ligand that can specifically target the thyroid cancer. Doxorubicin nanoparticles can be triggered by acid to release the drug payload for cancer therapy. These nanoparticles shrink the tumor size in vivo with less toxic side effects. This research paves the way toward effective chemotherapy for thyroid cancer. Keywords: thyroid cancer, silicon dioxide nanoparticle, doxorubicin, acid-triggered release

  12. Food applications and the toxicological and nutritional implications of amorphous silicon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villota, R; Hawkes, J G

    1986-01-01

    The chemical and physical characteristics of the different types of amorphous silicon dioxide contribute to the versatility of these compounds in a variety of commercial applications. Traditionally, silicas have had a broad spectra of product usage including such areas as viscosity control agents in inks, paints, corrosion-resistant coatings, etc. and as excipients in pharmaceuticals and cosmetics. In the food industry, the most important application has been as an anticaking agent in powdered mixes, seasonings, and coffee whiteners. However, amorphous silica has multifunctional properties that would allow it to act as a viscosity control agent, emulsion stabilizer, suspension and dispersion agent, desiccant, etc. The utilization of silicas in these potential applications, however, has not been undertaken, partially because of the limited knowledge of their physiochemical interactions with other food components and partially due to their controversial status from a toxicological point of view. The main goal of this review is to compile current information on the incorporation of amorphous silicon dioxide as a highly functional and viable additive in the food processing industry as well as to discuss the most recent toxicological investigations of silica in an attempt to present some of the potential food applications and their concomitant toxicological implications. Some of the more significant differences between various silicas and their surface chemistries are presented to elucidate some of their mechanisms of interaction with food components and other biological systems and to aid in the prediction of their rheological or toxicological behavior.

  13. Nanostructured porous silicon by laser assisted electrochemical etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J.; Lu, C.; Hu, X. K.; Yang, Xiujuan; Loboda, A. V.; Lipson, R. H.

    2009-08-01

    Nanostructured porous silicon (pSi) was fabricated by combining electrochemical etching with 355 nm laser processing. pSi prepared in this way proves to be an excellent substrate for desorption/ionization on silicon (DIOS) mass spectrometry (MS). Surfaces prepared by electrochemical etching and laser irradiation exhibit strong quantum confinement as evidenced by the observation of a red shift in the Si Raman band at ~520-500 cm-1. The height of the nanostructured columns produced by electrochemical etching and laser processing is on the order of microns compared with tens of nanometers obtained without laser irradiation. The threshold for laser desorption and ionization of 12 mJ/cm2 using the pSi substrates prepared in this work is lower than that obtained for conventional matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI)-MS using a standard matrix compound such as [alpha]-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA; 30 mJ/cm2). Furthermore, the substrates prepared by etching and laser irradiation appear to resist laser damage better than those prepared by etching alone. These results enhance the capability of pSi for the detection of small molecular weight analytes by DIOS-MS.

  14. Tuning the conductivity of vanadium dioxide films on silicon by swift heavy ion irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Hofsäss

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate the generation of a persistent conductivity increase in vanadium dioxide thin films grown on single crystal silicon by irradiation with 1 GeV 238U swift heavy ions at room temperature. VO2 undergoes a temperature driven metal-insulator-transition (MIT at 67 °C. After room temperature ion irradiation with high electronic energy loss of 50 keV/nm the conductivity of the films below the transition temperature is strongly increased proportional to the ion fluence of 5·109 U/cm2 and 1·1010 U/cm2. At high temperatures the conductivity decreases slightly. The ion irradiation slightly reduces the MIT temperature. This observed conductivity change is persistent and remains after heating the samples above the transition temperature and subsequent cooling. Low temperature measurements down to 15 K show no further MIT below room temperature. Although the conductivity increase after irradiation at such low fluences is due to single ion track effects, atomic force microscopy (AFM measurements do not show surface hillocks, which are characteristic for ion tracks in other materials. Conductive AFM gives no evidence for conducting ion tracks but rather suggests the existence of conducting regions around poorly conducting ion tracks, possible due to stress generation. Another explanation of the persistent conductivity change could be the ion-induced modification of a high resistivity interface layer formed during film growth between the vanadium dioxide film and the n-Silicon substrate. The swift heavy ions may generate conducting filaments through this layer, thus increasing the effective contact area. Swift heavy ion irradiation can thus be used to tune the conductivity of VO2 films on silicon substrates.

  15. Electronic transport through organophosphonate monolayers on silicon/silicon dioxide substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bora, Achyut; Pathak, Anshuma; Tornow, Marc [Institut fuer Halbleitertechnik, TU Braunschweig (Germany); Liao, Kung-Ching; Schwartz, Jeffrey [Department of Chemistry, Princeton University, NJ (United States); Cattani-Scholz, Anna; Abstreiter, Gerhard [Walter Schottky Institut, TU Muenchen (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Understanding the electronic transport through layered systems of organic functional layers on semiconductor surfaces is of major importance for future applications in nanoelectronics, photovoltaics and sensors. We have prepared self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of 9,10-diphenyl-2,6-diphosphono-anthracene and 11-hydroxyundecyl phosphonic acid precursors on highly p-doped silicon surfaces coated with a 1 nm SiO{sub 2} layer. Contact angle, AFM and ellipsometry evidenced the homogeneity of the formed SAMs, and their thickness was determined to be 0.82{+-}0.07 nm and 1.13{+-}0.09 nm, respectively. We provided large area electrical contacts on top of the SAMs by a hanging Hg drop electrode. The measured I-V characteristics revealed an enhanced conductance of the aromatic vs. the aliphatic compounds, with current densities of the order of 10 A/m{sup 2} and 0.01 A/m{sup 2}, at 0.5 V, respectively. We analyzed the data in terms of non-resonant tunneling through the combined oxide-SAM barrier and found good qualitative agreement up to 0.2 V bias. Preliminary measurements on organized bilayers of anthracene bisphosphonates that were grown using techniques of coordination chemistry are discussed, too.

  16. Blocking germanium diffusion inside silicon dioxide using a co-implanted silicon barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barba, D.; Wang, C.; Nélis, A.; Terwagne, G.; Rosei, F.

    2018-04-01

    We investigate the effect of co-implanting a silicon sublayer on the thermal diffusion of germanium ions implanted into SiO2 and the growth of Ge nanocrystals (Ge-ncs). High-resolution imaging obtained by transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy measurements supported by Monte-Carlo calculations shows that the Si-enriched region acts as a diffusion barrier for Ge atoms. This barrier prevents Ge outgassing during thermal annealing at 1100 °C. Both the localization and the reduced size of Ge-ncs formed within the sample region co-implanted with Si are observed, as well as the nucleation of mixed Ge/Si nanocrystals containing structural point defects and stacking faults. Although it was found that the Si co-implantation affects the crystallinity of the formed Ge-ncs, this technique can be implemented to produce size-selective and depth-ordered nanostructured systems by controlling the spatial distribution of diffusing Ge. We illustrate this feature for Ge-ncs embedded within a single SiO2 monolayer, whose diameters were gradually increased from 1 nm to 5 nm over a depth of 100 nm.

  17. Ultrathin silicon dioxide layers with a low leakage current density formed by chemical oxidation of Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asuha,; Kobayashi, Takuya; Maida, Osamu; Inoue, Morio; Takahashi, Masao; Todokoro, Yoshihiro; Kobayashi, Hikaru

    2002-10-01

    Chemical oxidation of Si by use of azeotrope of nitric acid and water can form 1.4-nm-thick silicon dioxide layers with a leakage current density as low as those of thermally grown SiO2 layers. The capacitance-voltage (C-V) curves for these ultrathin chemical SiO2 layers have been measured due to the low leakage current density. The leakage current density is further decreased to approx1/5 (cf. 0.4 A/cm2 at the forward gate bias of 1 V) by post-metallization annealing at 200 degC in hydrogen. Photoelectron spectroscopy and C-V measurements show that this decrease results from (i) increase in the energy discontinuity at the Si/SiO2 interface, and (ii) elimination of Si/SiO2 interface states and SiO2 gap states.

  18. Comparison of ceria nanoparticle concentrations in effluent from chemical mechanical polishing of silicon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zazzera, Larry; Mader, Brian; Ellefson, Mark; Eldridge, Jess; Loper, Steve; Zabasajja, John; Qian, Julie

    2014-11-18

    This work measured and compared the effluent from the chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) of silicon dioxide using ceria slurry and ceria fixed abrasive. CMP waste streams were tested for total solids, cerium, silicon, and 6 nm to 20 μm diameter particles. The concentration of cerium and total solids in the effluent were very different for the two polishes studied. The fixed abrasive polish produced 94% less CeO2 emissions per SiO2 removed. The higher ceria levels in the slurry effluent are associated with 99-279 nm particles, and attributed to ceria abrasive. The lower concentration of ceria in the effluent from the fixed abrasive process is due to the lower wear rate of mineral from the fixed abrasive, compared to the more environmentally mobile mineral in the slurry. These results support the "bonded" nature of the abrasive particles in fixed abrasive polishing and are relevant to sustainability strategies that seek to reduce particle emissions in surface conditioning technology.

  19. Simulating liquid and amorphous silicon dioxide using real-space pseudopotentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minjung; Khoo, K. H.; Chelikowsky, James R.

    2012-08-01

    We present ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of liquid and amorphous silicon dioxide. The interatomic forces in our simulations are calculated using real-space pseudopotentials, which were constructed using density-functional theory. Our simulations are carried out using Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (i.e., the electronic structure problem is solved by performing fully self-consistent calculations for each time step). Using a subspace filtering iteration technique, we avoid solving the Kohn-Sham eigenvalue with “standard” diagonalization methods. We consider systems with up to 192 atoms (64 SiO2 units) in a periodic supercell for simulations over 20 ps. The liquid and amorphous ensembles are formed by thermally quenching random configurations of silicon and oxygen atoms. We compare our liquid and amorphous simulations with previously performed Car-Parrinello molecular dynamic simulations and with experiment. In particular, we examine the possible formation of two-membered rings, which were not observed in previous simulations using quantum forces. We attribute this difference to a “biased” initial configuration, which inhibits the formation of two-membered rings. We also compare the structural properties of our simulated amorphous systems with neutron diffraction measurements and find good agreement.

  20. Metal assisted photochemical etching of 4H silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitgeb, Markus; Zellner, Christopher; Schneider, Michael; Schwab, Stefan; Hutter, Herbert; Schmid, Ulrich

    2017-11-01

    Metal assisted photochemical etching (MAPCE) of 4H-silicon carbide (SiC) in Na2S2O8/HF and H2O2/HF aqueous solutions is investigated with platinum as metallic cathode. The formation process of the resulting porous layer is studied with respect to etching time, concentration and type of oxidizing agent. From the experiments it is concluded that the porous layer formation is due to electron hole pairs generated in the semiconductor, which stem from UV light irradiation. The generated holes are consumed during the oxidation of 4H-SiC and the formed oxide is dissolved by HF. To maintain charge balance, the oxidizing agent has to take up electrons at the Pt/etching solution interface. Total dissolution of the porous layers is achieved when the oxidizing agent concentration decreases during MAPCE. In combination with standard photolithography, the definition of porous regions is possible. Furthermore chemical micromachining of 4 H-SiC at room temperature is possible.

  1. Copper-assisted, anti-reflection etching of silicon surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toor, Fatima; Branz, Howard

    2014-08-26

    A method (300) for etching a silicon surface (116) to reduce reflectivity. The method (300) includes electroless deposition of copper nanoparticles about 20 nanometers in size on the silicon surface (116), with a particle-to-particle spacing of 3 to 8 nanometers. The method (300) includes positioning (310) the substrate (112) with a silicon surface (116) into a vessel (122). The vessel (122) is filled (340) with a volume of an etching solution (124) so as to cover the silicon surface (116). The etching solution (124) includes an oxidant-etchant solution (146), e.g., an aqueous solution of hydrofluoric acid and hydrogen peroxide. The silicon surface (116) is etched (350) by agitating the etching solution (124) with, for example, ultrasonic agitation, and the etching may include heating (360) the etching solution (124) and directing light (365) onto the silicon surface (116). During the etching, copper nanoparticles enhance or drive the etching process.

  2. Self-assembled monolayer resists and nanoscale lithography of silicon dioxide thin films by chemically enhanced vapor etching (CEVE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, M.; Yun, M.; Kozicki, M. N.; Whidden, T. K.

    1996-10-01

    We report on the use of electron-beam exposed monolayers of undecylenic acid in the etch rate enhancement of silicon dioxide films in HF vapor for the formation of nanoscale features in the oxide. Variations of the etching characteristics with electron beam parameters are examined and the results analyzed in terms of proposed models of the etching mechanism. Apparent variations in the relative concentrations of etch initiator with the thermal history of the samples prior to etching provides support for the dominant etch initiator within this system as the carboxylic acid moiety bound at the oxide surface. Other variations in the etching characteristics are discussed in terms of differences in localized concentrations of hydrocarbon crosslinks and the effect that this has upon the etch initiation. The process has been employed in the production of features in silicon dioxide surface masks with sizes down to 50 nm.

  3. A Novel Electro Conductive Graphene/Silicon-Dioxide Thermo-Electric Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Ataur; Abdi, Yusuf

    2017-03-01

    Thermoelectric generators are all solid-state devices that convert heat energy into electrical energy. The total energy (fuel) supplied to the engine, approximately 30 to 40% is converted into useful mechanical work; whereas the remaining is expelled to the environment as heat through exhaust gases and cooling systems, resulting in serious green house gas (GHG) emission. By converting waste energy into electrical energy is the aim of this manuscript. The technologies reported on waste heat recovery from exhaust gas of internal combustion engines (ICE) are thermo electric generators (TEG) with finned type, Rankine cycle (RC) and Turbocharger. This paper has presented an electro-conductive graphene oxide/silicon-dioxide (GO-SiO2) composite sandwiched by phosphorus (P) and boron (B) doped silicon (Si) TEG to generate electricity from the IC engine exhaust heat. Air-cooling and liquid cooling techniques adopted conventional TEG module has been tested individually for the electricity generation from IC engine exhausts heat at engine speed of 1000-3000rpm. For the engine speed of 7000 rpm, the maximum voltage was recorded as 1.12V and 4.00V for the air-cooling and liquid cooling respectively. The GO-SiO2 simulated result shows that it’s electrical energy generation is about 80% more than conventional TEG for the exhaust temperature of 500°C. The GO-SiO2 composite TEG develops 524W to 1600W at engine speed 1000 to 5000 rpm, which could contribute to reduce the 10-12% of engine total fuel consumption and improve emission level by 20%.

  4. The effects of carbon dioxide exposure on permeation behavior in silicone rubber and glassy polycarbonates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, S.M.

    1989-01-01

    Permeation measurements are reported for both rubbery and glassy polymers in the presence of various pure (He, CH{sub 4}, CO{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}) and mixed gas (O{sub 2}/N{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4}, He/CO{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2}) feed streams up to 1000 psia. The polymers studied were silicone rubber and glassy bisphenol-A polycarbonate, tetramethyl polycarbonate and hexafluoro polycarbonate. Large hysteresis was observed in permeation when comparing the pressurization and depressurization responses of the glassy samples in the presence of carbon dioxide above 300 psia exposure pressure. The magnitude of the hysteresis was related to the maximum CO{sub 2} conditioning pressure used. The conditioning treatment resulted in long-lived increases in the permeability of the conditioned films and appeared to be semi-permanent if the conditioning agent was not totally removed. For CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} mixed gas feed streams, the conditioning treatment resulted in enhancements in flux without a significant loss in permselectivity. For the silicone rubber sample, no permeability hysteresis was observed. Exchange experiments showed that it was possible to condition a glassy polymer with CO{sub 2} to increase its permeability and to maintain a state of increased permeability even if the CO{sub 2} was replaced by another gas of sufficient solubility such as methane or air. The CO{sub 2} conditioning treatment was not apparent if the CO{sub 2} was replaced by helium without any intervening exposure to vacuum. The inability of helium to detect the effects of the CO{sub 2}-induced conditioning sensed by larger penetrants is discussed and hypothetical explanations for these unexpected results are given.

  5. Modeling of thorium (IV) ions adsorption onto a novel adsorbent material silicon dioxide nano-balls using response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaynar, Ümit H; Şabikoğlu, Israfil; Kaynar, Sermin Çam; Eral, Meral

    2016-09-01

    The silicon dioxide nano-balls (nano-SiO2) were prepared for the adsorption of thorium (IV) ions from aqueous solution. The synthesized silicon dioxide nano-balls were characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy/Energy Dispersive X-ray, X-ray Diffraction, Fourier Transform Infrared and BET surface area measurement spectroscopy. The effects of pH, concentration, temperature and the solid-liquid ratio on the adsorption of thorium by nano-balls were optimized using central composite design of response surface methodology. The interaction between four variables was studied and modelled. Furthermore, the statistical analysis of the results was done. Analysis of variance revealed that all of the single effects found statistically significant on the sorption of Th(IV). Probability F-values (F=4.64-14) and correlation coefficients (R(2)=0.99 for Th(IV)) indicate that model fit the experimental data well. The ability of this material to remove Th(IV) from aqueous solution was characterized by Langmuir, Freunlinch and Temkin adsorption isotherms. The adsorption capacity of thorium (IV) achieved 188.2mgg(-1). Thermodynamic parameters were determined and discussed. The batch adsorption condition with respect to interfering ions was tested. The results indicated that silicon dioxide nano-balls were suitable as sorbent material for adsorption and recovery of Th(IV) ions from aqueous solutions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Stress-assisted diffusion of boron and arsenic in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manda, M.L.; Shepard, M.L.; Fair, R.B.; Massoud, H.Z.

    1985-01-01

    The diffusion of B and As in mechanically stressed silicon has been investigated for initial implant doses of 10 13 , 10 14 , and 10 15 cm -2 , over a range of annealing temperatures. At stresses near the silicon yield point, no significant enhancement or retardation was observed. This was true even in plastically deformed samples with dislocation densities >1x10 7 cm -2 . The results are consistent with the multiple charge state vacancy model of impurity diffusion in silicon. The B diffusivity appears to agree with the accepted activation energy of 3.59 eV and pre-exponential of 3.17 cm 2 /sec for intrinsic B diffusion

  7. Nano-silicon dioxide toxicological characterization on two human kidney cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paget, V; Sergent, J A; Chevillard, S

    2011-01-01

    Silicon dioxide nanoparticles (n-SiO 2 ) have recently encountered a wide variety of applications in medicine or engineering but their toxicological effects are poorly understood. In this study, we have used SiO 2 -25 nm and SiO 2 -100 nm mono-dispersed nanoparticles labeled with Rhodamine B and TMPyP respectively. These two fluorophores were incorporated during synthesis in order to track nanoparticles cell incorporation. Up-to-date, no evaluation of the toxicological effects of these nanoparticles upon human kidney has been published. As kidney is one of the major traditional retention organs, the aim of our study is to evaluate the potential toxicity of these nanoparticles on two human cell lines from proximal tubule (Caki-1 and Hek293). Our results report that the two cell lines do not show similar responses after 24 hours of exposure to SiO 2 -nanoparticles disregarding a similar origin in the kidney. Interestingly, our results indicate that for both tested SiO 2 -nanoparticles, Caki-1 cells present a higher sensitivity in terms of cytotoxicity and genotoxicity than Hek293 cells. Furthermore, our results show that for similar concentration of exposure, SiO 2 -25 nm seems to be more cytotoxic and genotoxic than SiO 2 -100nm for both tested cell lines.

  8. Nano-silicon dioxide toxicological characterization on two human kidney cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paget, V; Sergent, J A; Chevillard, S, E-mail: sylvie.chevillard@cea.fr [Laboratory of Experimental Cancerology, Institute of Cellular and Molecular Radiobiology, CEA, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2011-07-06

    Silicon dioxide nanoparticles (n-SiO{sub 2}) have recently encountered a wide variety of applications in medicine or engineering but their toxicological effects are poorly understood. In this study, we have used SiO{sub 2}-25 nm and SiO{sub 2}-100 nm mono-dispersed nanoparticles labeled with Rhodamine B and TMPyP respectively. These two fluorophores were incorporated during synthesis in order to track nanoparticles cell incorporation. Up-to-date, no evaluation of the toxicological effects of these nanoparticles upon human kidney has been published. As kidney is one of the major traditional retention organs, the aim of our study is to evaluate the potential toxicity of these nanoparticles on two human cell lines from proximal tubule (Caki-1 and Hek293). Our results report that the two cell lines do not show similar responses after 24 hours of exposure to SiO{sub 2}-nanoparticles disregarding a similar origin in the kidney. Interestingly, our results indicate that for both tested SiO{sub 2}-nanoparticles, Caki-1 cells present a higher sensitivity in terms of cytotoxicity and genotoxicity than Hek293 cells. Furthermore, our results show that for similar concentration of exposure, SiO{sub 2}-25 nm seems to be more cytotoxic and genotoxic than SiO{sub 2}-100nm for both tested cell lines.

  9. Properties of hydrogen, helium, and silicon dioxide mixtures in giant planet interiors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soubiran, François; Militzer, Burkhard; Driver, Kevin P.; Zhang, Shuai

    2017-04-01

    Recent observations of Jupiter and Saturn provided by spacecraft missions, such as Juno and Cassini, compel us to revise and improve our models of giant planet interiors. Even though hydrogen and helium are by far the dominant species in these planets, heavy elements can play a significant role in the structure and evolution of the planet. For instance, giant-planet cores may be eroded by their surrounding fluid, which would result in a significantly increased concentration of heavy elements in the hydrogen-helium envelope. Furthermore, the heavy elements could inhibit convection by creating a stabilizing gradient of composition. In order to explore the effects of core erosion, we performed ab initio simulations to study structural, diffusion, and viscosity properties of dense multicomponent mixtures of hydrogen, helium, and silicon dioxide at relevant pressure-temperature conditions. We computed radial distribution functions to identify changes in the chemical behavior of the mixture and to reveal dissociation trends with pressure and temperature. The computed diffusion coefficients of the different species as well as the viscosity provide constraints for the time scale of the dynamics of the core erosion and the mixing of its constituents into the envelope, which will help improve planetary models.

  10. Characterization of magnetic biochar amended with silicon dioxide prepared at high temperature calcination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baig Shams Ali

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Calcination is considered to increase the hardness of composite material and prevent its breakage for the effective applications in environmental remediation. In this study, magnetic biochar amended with silicon dioxide was calcined at high temperature under nitrogen environment and characterized using various techniques. X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis revealed elimination of Fe3O4 peaks under nitrogen calcination and formation of Fe3Si and iron as major constituents of magnetic biochar-SiO2 composite, which demonstrated its superparamagnetic behavior (>80 A2·kg−1 comparable to magnetic biochar. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA revealed that both calcined samples generated higher residual mass (>96 % and demonstrated better thermal stability. The presence of various bands in Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR was more obvious and the elimination of H–O–H bonding was observed at high temperature calcination. In addition, scanning electron microscopy (SEM images revealed certain morphological variation among the samples and the presence of more prominent internal and external pores, which then judged the surface area and pore volume of samples. Findings from this study suggests that the selective calcination process could cause useful changes in the material composites and can be effectively employed in environmental remediation measures.

  11. Nano-silicon dioxide mitigates the adverse effects of salt stress on Cucurbita pepo L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Manzer H; Al-Whaibi, Mohamed H; Faisal, Mohammad; Al Sahli, Abdulaziz A

    2014-11-01

    Research into nanotechnology, an emerging science, has advanced in almost all fields of technology. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of nano-silicon dioxide (nano-SiO2 ) in plant resistance to salt stress through improvement of the antioxidant system of squash (Cucurbita pepo L. cv. white bush marrow). Seeds treated with NaCl showed reduced germination percentage, vigor, length, and fresh and dry weights of the roots and shoots. However, nano-SiO2 improved seed germination and growth characteristics by reducing malondialdehyde and hydrogen peroxide levels as well as electrolyte leakage. In addition, application of nano-SiO2 reduced chlorophyll degradation and enhanced the net photosynthetic rate (Pn ), stomatal conductance (gs ), transpiration rate, and water use efficiency. The increase in plant germination and growth characteristics through application of nano-SiO2 might reflect a reduction in oxidative damage as a result of the expression of antioxidant enzymes, such as catalase, peroxidase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione reductase, and ascorbate peroxidase. These results indicate that nano-SiO2 may improve defense mechanisms of plants against salt stress toxicity by augmenting the Pn , gs , transpiration rate, water use efficiency, total chlorophyll, proline, and carbonic anhydrase activity in the leaves of plants. © 2014 SETAC.

  12. Silicon-Doped Titanium Dioxide Nanotubes Promoted Bone Formation on Titanium Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xijiang; Wang, Tao; Qian, Shi; Liu, Xuanyong; Sun, Junying; Li, Bin

    2016-02-26

    While titanium (Ti) implants have been extensively used in orthopaedic and dental applications, the intrinsic bioinertness of untreated Ti surface usually results in insufficient osseointegration irrespective of the excellent biocompatibility and mechanical properties of it. In this study, we prepared surface modified Ti substrates in which silicon (Si) was doped into the titanium dioxide (TiO₂) nanotubes on Ti surface using plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) technology. Compared to TiO₂ nanotubes and Ti alone, Si-doped TiO₂ nanotubes significantly enhanced the expression of genes related to osteogenic differentiation, including Col-I, ALP, Runx2, OCN, and OPN, in mouse pre-osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells and deposition of mineral matrix. In vivo, the pull-out mechanical tests after two weeks of implantation in rat femur showed that Si-doped TiO₂ nanotubes improved implant fixation strength by 18% and 54% compared to TiO₂-NT and Ti implants, respectively. Together, findings from this study indicate that Si-doped TiO₂ nanotubes promoted the osteogenic differentiation of osteoblastic cells and improved bone-Ti integration. Therefore, they may have considerable potential for the bioactive surface modification of Ti implants.

  13. Structural and magnetic properties of the nanocomposite materials based on a mesoporous silicon dioxide matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigor’eva, N. A., E-mail: natali@lns.pnpi.spb.ru [St. Petersburg State University (Russian Federation); Eckerlebe, H. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht (Germany); Eliseev, A. A.; Lukashin, A. V.; Napol’skii, K. S. [Moscow State University (Russian Federation); Kraje, M. [Reactor Institute Delft (Netherlands); Grigor’ev, S. V. [St. Petersburg State University (Russian Federation)

    2017-03-15

    The structural and magnetic properties of the mesoporous systems based on silicon dioxide with a regular hexagonal arrangement of pores several microns in length and several nanometers in diameter, which are filled with iron compound nanofilaments in various chemical states, are studied in detail. The studies are performed using the following mutually complementary methods: transmission electron microscopy, SQUID magnetometry, electron spin resonance, Mössbauer spectroscopy, polarized neutron small-angle diffraction, and synchrotron radiation diffraction. It is shown that the iron nanoparticles in pores are mainly in the γ phase of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} with a small addition of the α phase and atomic iron clusters. The effective magnetic field acting on a nanofilament from other nanofilaments is 11 mT and has a dipole nature, the ferromagnetic–paramagnetic transition temperature is in the range 76–94 K depending on the annealing temperature of the samples, and the temperature that corresponds to the change in the magnetic state of the iron oxide nanofilaments is T ≈ 50–60 K at H = 0 and T ≈ 80 K at H = 300 mT. It is also shown that the magnetization reversal of an array of nanofilaments is caused by the magnetostatic interaction between nanofilaments at the fields that are lower than the saturation field.

  14. Non-negligible Contributions to Thermal Conductivity From Localized Modes in Amorphous Silicon Dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Wei; Henry, Asegun

    2016-10-21

    Thermal conductivity is important for almost all applications involving heat transfer. The theory and modeling of crystalline materials is in some sense a solved problem, where one can now calculate their thermal conductivity from first principles using expressions based on the phonon gas model (PGM). However, modeling of amorphous materials still has many open questions, because the PGM itself becomes questionable when one cannot rigorously define the phonon velocities. In this report, we used our recently developed Green-Kubo modal analysis (GKMA) method to study amorphous silicon dioxide (a-SiO 2 ). The predicted thermal conductivities exhibit excellent agreement with experiments and anharmonic effects are included in the thermal conductivity calculation for all the modes in a-SiO 2 for the first time. Previously, localized modes (locons) have been thought to have a negligible contribution to thermal conductivity, due to their highly localized nature. However, in a-SiO 2 our results indicate that locons contribute more than 10% to the total thermal conductivity from 400 K to 800 K and they are largely responsible for the increase in thermal conductivity of a-SiO 2 above room temperature. This is an effect that cannot be explained by previous methods and therefore offers new insight into the nature of phonon transport in amorphous/glassy materials.

  15. Adsorption of acids and bases from aqueous solutions onto silicon dioxide particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zengin, Huseyin; Erkan, Belgin

    2009-12-30

    The adsorption of acids and bases onto the surface of silicon dioxide (SiO(2)) particles was systematically studied as a function of several variables, including activation conditions, contact time, specific surface area, particle size, concentration and temperature. The physical properties of SiO(2) particles were investigated, where characterizations were carried out by FT-IR spectroscopy, and morphology was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The SEM of samples showed good dispersion and uniform SiO(2) particles with an average diameter of about 1-1.5 microm. The adsorption results revealed that SiO(2) surfaces possessed effective interactions with acids and bases, and greatest adsorption capacity was achieved with NaOH, where the best fit isotherm model was the Freundlich adsorption model. The adsorption properties of raw SiO(2) particles were further improved by ultrasonication. Langmuir monolayer adsorption capacity of NaOH adsorbate at 25 degrees C on sonicated SiO(2) (182.6 mg/g) was found to be greater than that of the unsonicated SiO(2) (154.3mg/g). The spontaneity of the adsorption process was established by decreases in DeltaG(ads)(0), which varied from -10.5 to -13.6 kJ mol(-1), in the temperature range 283-338K.

  16. Effects of nano-sized silicon dioxide on the structures and activities of three functional proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Zhen; Wang Shilong; Gao Hongwen

    2010-01-01

    Nanomaterials are finding increasing use in industrial production and daily life. However, human exposure to them may cause health risks. Nano-SiO 2 was selected as a representative nanomaterial and its potential effects were investigated in terms of its interactions with cytochrome c (cyt c), deoxyribonuclease (DNase II) and hemoglobin (Hb). The interactions accorded with Langmuir isothermal adsorption; the saturation binding numbers for cyt c, DNase II and Hb were 42 ± 5, 24 ± 2 and 1.1 ± 0.1 μmol/g nano-SiO 2 particle at pH 7.4, respectively, and the corresponding stability constants were 6.15 x 105, 1.79 x 106 and 2.6 x 107 M -1 . On the basis of the binding constants and of ζ-potential fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) measurements and scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), it was found that the three functional proteins can bridge nano-SiO 2 particles via charge attraction and hydrogen bonding and aggregate them into coralloid forms. The interactions also changed the secondary structures of the proteins and inhibited their static and dynamic activities. It may reasonably be deduced that exposure to nano-size silicon dioxide particles e.g. as drug carriers may have an unfavorable effect on human health by inactivating functional proteins.

  17. Silicone rubbers for dielectric elastomers with improved dielectric and mechanical properties as a result of substituting silica with titanium dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liyun Yu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available One prominent method of modifying the properties of dielectric elastomers (DEs is by adding suitable metal oxide fillers. However, almost all commercially available silicone elastomers are already heavily filled with silica to reinforce the otherwise rather weak silicone network and the resulting metal oxide filled elastomer may contain too much filler. We therefore explore the replacement of silica with titanium dioxide to ensure a relatively low concentration of filler. Liquid silicone rubber (LSR has relatively low viscosity, which is favorable for loading inorganic fillers. In the present study, four commercial LSRs with varying loadings of silica and one benchmark room-temperature vulcanizable rubber (RTV were investigated. The resulting elastomers were evaluated with respect to their dielectric permittivity, tear and tensile strengths, electrical breakdown, thermal stability and dynamic viscosity. Filled silicone elastomers with high loadings of nano-sized titanium dioxide (TiO2 particles were also studied. The best overall performing formulation had 35 wt.% TiO2 nanoparticles in the POWERSIL® XLR LSR, where the excellent ensemble of relative dielectric permittivity of 4.9 at 0.1 Hz, breakdown strength of 160 V µm−1, tear strength of 5.3 MPa, elongation at break of 190%, a Young’s modulus of 0.85 MPa and a 10% strain response (simple tension in a 50 V μm−1 electric field was obtained.

  18. Aerosol-assisted extraction of silicon nanoparticles from wafer slicing waste for lithium ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hee Dong; Kim, Hyekyoung; Chang, Hankwon; Kim, Jiwoong; Roh, Kee Min; Choi, Ji-Hyuk; Cho, Bong-Gyoo; Park, Eunjun; Kim, Hansu; Luo, Jiayan; Huang, Jiaxing

    2015-03-30

    A large amount of silicon debris particles are generated during the slicing of silicon ingots into thin wafers for the fabrication of integrated-circuit chips and solar cells. This results in a significant loss of valuable materials at about 40% of the mass of ingots. In addition, a hazardous silicon sludge waste is produced containing largely debris of silicon, and silicon carbide, which is a common cutting material on the slicing saw. Efforts in material recovery from the sludge and recycling have been largely directed towards converting silicon or silicon carbide into other chemicals. Here, we report an aerosol-assisted method to extract silicon nanoparticles from such sludge wastes and their use in lithium ion battery applications. Using an ultrasonic spray-drying method, silicon nanoparticles can be directly recovered from the mixture with high efficiency and high purity for making lithium ion battery anode. The work here demonstrated a relatively low cost approach to turn wafer slicing wastes into much higher value-added materials for energy applications, which also helps to increase the sustainability of semiconductor material and device manufacturing.

  19. Elevated carbon dioxide and warming impact silicon and phenolic-based defences differently in native and exotic grasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Scott N; Hartley, Susan E

    2017-11-03

    Global climate change may increase invasions of exotic plant species by directly promoting the success of invasive/exotic species or by reducing the competitive abilities of native species. Changes in plant chemistry, leading to altered susceptibility to stress, could mediate these effects. Grasses are hyper-accumulators of silicon, which play a crucial function in the alleviation of diverse biotic and abiotic stresses. It is unknown how predicted increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) and air temperature affect silicon accumulation in grasses, especially in relation to primary and secondary metabolites. We tested how elevated CO 2 (eCO 2 ) (+240 ppm) and temperature (eT) (+4°C) affected chemical composition (silicon, phenolics, carbon and nitrogen) and plant growth in eight grass species, either native or exotic to Australia. eCO 2 increased phenolic concentrations by 11%, but caused silicon accumulation to decline by 12%. Moreover, declines in silicon occurred mainly in native species (-19%), but remained largely unchanged in exotic species. Conversely, eT increased silicon accumulation in native species (+19%) but decreased silicon accumulation in exotic species (-10%). Silicon and phenolic concentrations were negatively correlated with each other, potentially reflecting a defensive trade-off. Moreover, both defences were negatively correlated with plant mass, compatible with a growth-defence trade-off. Grasses responded in a species-specific manner, suggesting that the relative susceptibility of different species may differ under future climates compared to current species rankings of resource quality. For example, the native Microlaena stipoides was less well defended under eCO 2 in terms of both phenolics and silicon, and thus could suffer greater vulnerability to herbivores. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of the impacts of eCO 2 and eT on silicon accumulation in grasses. We speculate that the greater plasticity in silicon uptake

  20. Investigation of silicon dioxide films by neutron activation analysis and autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rausch, H.

    1978-01-01

    Activation analysis and surface autoradiography were used to determine the concentration distribution and precipitation of contaminants in the internal part of the films and on the surfaces. The origin of the contaminants was studied by sampling each technological product following oxidation doped oxide deposition, heating and metallizing. Samples were irradiated at a thermal neutron flux of 3.2 . 10 13 n . cm -2 . s -1 . Irradiation times of 30 hrs and cooling times of about 24 hrs were used. After irradiation, samples were treated by 3N hydrochloric acid at 60 deg C to remove the surface contamination. The removal of the successive regions of the oxide films was carried out by chemical etching, using an NH 4 F-HF-H 2 O solution (90 cm 3 conc. HF, 300 g NH 4 F, 600 cm 3 H 2 O, NH 4 OH to ph=4.5), which has an etching rate of 200 A/min at 0 deg C. By this technique picein coating is used to protect parts other than the analyzed oxide film. For NAA measurements, slices were etched in 25 ml polyethene beakers containing 10 cm 3 of solution in which the etchant was to be gamma-counted. For the autoradiography, Kodak AR 10 Striping film and ORWO RD 3-4 dosimeter film were used. The exposure times varied in the range of 24-72 hrs according to the activity of the samples. The distribution of the density of the autoradiography was determined by microdensitometry. Under the given conditions, the following detection limits of impurities could be obtained in silicon dioxide films: Na=80 ppb, Cu=20 ppb and Au=5 ppb. (T.G.)

  1. Soil microbial community responses to contamination with silver, aluminium oxide and silicon dioxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, C F; Storey, S; Clipson, N; Doyle, E

    2017-04-01

    Soil microorganisms are key contributors to nutrient cycling and are essential for the maintenance of healthy soils and sustainable agriculture. Although the antimicrobial effects of a broad range of nanoparticulate substances have been characterised in vitro, little is known about the impact of these compounds on microbial communities in environments such as soil. In this study, the effect of three widely used nanoparticulates (silver, silicon dioxide and aluminium oxide) on bacterial and fungal communities in an agricultural pastureland soil was examined in a microcosm-based experiment using a combination of enzyme analysis, molecular fingerprinting and amplicon sequencing. A relatively low concentration of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) significantly reduced total soil dehydrogenase and urease activity, while Al 2 O 3 and SiO 2 nanoparticles had no effect. Amplicon sequencing revealed substantial shifts in bacterial community composition in soils amended with AgNPs, with significant decreases in the relative abundance of Acidobacteria and Verrucomicrobia and an increase in Proteobacteria. In particular, the relative abundance of the Proteobacterial genus Dyella significantly increased in AgNP amended soil. The effects of Al 2 O 3 and SiO 2 NPs on bacterial community composition were less pronounced. AgNPs significantly reduced bacterial and archaeal amoA gene abundance in soil, with the archaea more susceptible than bacteria. AgNPs also significantly impacted soil fungal community structure, while Al 2 O 3 and SiO 2 NPs had no effect. Several fungal ribotypes increased in soil amended with AgNPs, compared to control soil. This study highlights the need to consider the effects of individual nanoparticles on soil microbial communities when assessing their environmental impact.

  2. Cluster-assisted nucleation of silicon phase in hypoeutectic Al–Si alloy with further inoculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yong; Zheng, Hongliang; Liu, Yue; Shi, Lei; Xu, Rongfu; Tian, Xuelei

    2014-01-01

    The paper discusses the responses of eutectic silicon and eutectic cells in Al–10Si alloy upon inoculation with an Al–10Si–2Fe master alloy. The further inoculation hardly destroys the modification effect of Sr but significantly refines the eutectic cells in Sr-modified samples, while in unmodified samples, it stimulates the occurrences of polyhedral silicon particles and divorced eutectic. Thermal analysis, scanning electron microscopy, (high-resolution) transmission electron microscopy and scanning and transmission electron microscopy have been used to elucidate the underlying mechanism. A cluster-assisted nucleation mechanism responsible for the enhanced nucleation of silicon phase upon inoculation is proposed. Icosahedral (AlFeSi) clusters are speculated to evolve from the added Al–10Si–2Fe master alloy in Al–10Si melt, around which aggregations of silicon atoms form. Through a series of structural evolutions, these clusters transform into precursors of a silicon crystal. The subsequent formation of silicon particles is achieved by the agglomerations and attachments of these precursors and individual silicon atoms. This hypothesis is further consolidated by the increased characteristic temperatures of eutectic and the anomalous appearance of a high density of nanoscale particles, as well as the abnormal disappearance of Sr-induced twins in further inoculated silicon particles. The increased characteristic temperatures are strong indications of the enhanced nucleation of the silicon phase. The high density of nanoscale particles with an indeterminate crystal structure are the survivors of these precursors. In an Sr-modified and further inoculated sample, the formation of Sr-induced twins is consequently inhibited due to the participation of these precursors during the growth of silicon particles. Furthermore, based on the proposed nucleation mechanism, the dependence of eutectic cell size on Sr level is elucidated in detail

  3. Insights into gold-catalyzed plasma-assisted CVD growth of silicon nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Wanghua, E-mail: wanghua.chen@polytechnique.edu; Roca i Cabarrocas, Pere [LPICM, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, Université Paris-Saclay, 91128 Palaiseau (France)

    2016-07-25

    Understanding and controlling effectively the behavior of metal catalyst droplets during the Vapor-Liquid-Solid growth of nanowires are crucial for their applications. In this work, silicon nanowires are produced by plasma-assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition using gold as a catalyst. The influence of hydrogen plasma on nanowire growth is investigated experimentally and theoretically. Interestingly, in contrast to conventional chemical vapor deposition, the growth rate of silicon nanowires shows a decrease as a function of their diameters, which is consistent with the incorporation of silicon via sidewall diffusion. We show that Ostwald ripening of catalyst droplets during nanowire growth is inhibited in the presence of a hydrogen plasma. However, when the plasma is off, the diffusion of Au atoms on the nanowire sidewall can take place. Based on this observation, we have developed a convenient method to grow silicon nanotrees.

  4. Immunotoxicity of silicon dioxide nanoparticles with different sizes and electrostatic charge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Hyun; Kim, Cheol-Su; Ignacio, Rosa Mistica Coles; Kim, Dong-Heui; Sajo, Ma Easter Joy; Maeng, Eun Ho; Qi, Xu-Feng; Park, Seong-Eun; Kim, Yu-Ri; Kim, Meyoung-Kon; Lee, Kyu-Jae; Kim, Soo-Ki

    2014-01-01

    Silicon dioxide (SiO2) nanoparticles (NPs) have been widely used in the biomedical field, such as in drug delivery and gene therapy. However, little is known about the biological effects and potential hazards of SiO2. Herein, the colloidal SiO2 NPs with two different sizes (20 nm and 100 nm) and different charges (L-arginine modified: SiO2 (EN20[R]), SiO2 (EN100[R]); and negative: SiO2 (EN20[-]), SiO2 (EN100[-]) were orally administered (750 mg/kg/day) in female C57BL/6 mice for 14 days. Assessments of immunotoxicity include hematology profiling, reactive oxygen species generation and their antioxidant effect, stimulation assays for B- and T-lymphocytes, the activity of natural killer (NK) cells, and cytokine profiling. In vitro toxicity was also investigated in the RAW 264.7 cell line. When the cellularity of mouse spleen was evaluated, there was an overall decrease in the proliferation of B- and T-cells for all the groups fed with SiO2 NPs. Specifically, the SiO2 (EN20(-)) NPs showed the most pronounced reduction. In addition, the nitric oxide production and NK cell activity in SiO2 NP-fed mice were significantly suppressed. Moreover, there was a decrease in the serum concentration of inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-12 (p70), IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interferon-γ. To elucidate the cytotoxicity mechanism of SiO2 in vivo, an in vitro study using the RAW 264.7 cell line was performed. Both the size and charge of SiO2 using murine macrophage RAW 264.7 cells decreased cell viability dose-dependently. Collectively, our data indicate that different sized and charged SiO2 NPs would cause differential immunotoxicity. Interestingly, the small-sized and negatively charged SiO2 NPs showed the most potent in vivo immunotoxicity by way of suppressing the proliferation of lymphocytes, depressing the killing activity of NK cells, and decreasing proinflammatory cytokine production, thus leading to immunosuppression.

  5. Carbon dioxide rebreathing caused by deformed silicon leaflet in the expiratory unidirectional valve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arumugam Vasudevan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Rebreathing of carbon dioxide caused by incompetent ′cage and disc′ unidirectional valves has been reported earlier. Some manufacturers have changed the design of unidirectional valves to ′flexible leaflets′. We report a series of cases where a deformed membrane leaflet in expiratory unidirectional valves led to rebreathing of carbon dioxide.

  6. Bilayer–metal assisted chemical etching of silicon microwire arrays for photovoltaic applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. W. Wu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Silicon microwires with lateral dimension from 5 μm to 20 μm and depth as long as 20 μm are prepared by bilayer metal assisted chemical etching (MaCE. A bilayer metal configuration (Metal 1 / Metal 2 was applied to assist etching of Si where metal 1 acts as direct catalyst and metal 2 provides mechanical support. Different metal types were investigated to figure out the influence of metal catalyst on morphology of etched silicon. We find that silicon microwires with vertical side wall are produced when we use Ag/Au bilayer, while cone–like and porous microwires formed when Pt/Au is applied. The different micro-/nano-structures in as-etched silicon are demonstrated to be due to the discrepancy of work function of metal catalyst relative to Si. Further, we constructed a silicon microwire arrays solar cells in a radial p–n junction configurations in a screen printed aluminum paste p–doping process.

  7. Facile synthesis of silicon carbide-titanium dioxide semiconducting nanocomposite using pulsed laser ablation technique and its performance in photovoltaic dye sensitized solar cell and photocatalytic water purification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondal, M. A.; Ilyas, A. M.; Baig, Umair

    2016-08-01

    Separation of photo-generated charge carriers (electron and holes) is a major approach to improve the photovoltaic and photocatalytic performance of metal oxide semiconductors. For harsh environment like high temperature applications, ceramic like silicon carbide is very prominent. In this work, 10%, 20% and 40% by weight of pre-oxidized silicon carbide was coupled with titanium dioxide (TiO2) to form nanocomposite semiconductor via elegant pulsed laser ablation in liquid technique using second harmonic 532 nm wavelength of neodymium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet (Nd-YAG) laser. In addition, the effect of silicon carbide concentration on the performance of silicon carbide-titanium dioxide nanocomposite as photo-anode in dye sensitized solar cell and as photocatalyst in photodegradation of methyl orange dye in water was also studied. The result obtained shows that photo-conversion efficiency of the dye sensitized solar cell was improved from 0.6% to 1.65% and the percentage of methyl orange dye removed was enhanced from 22% to 77% at 24 min under ultraviolet-visible solar spectrum in the nanocomposite with 10% weight of silicon carbide. This remarkable performance enhancement could be due to the improvement in electron transfer phenomenon by the presence of silicon carbide on titanium dioxide.

  8. Flexible Carbon Dioxide Laser Fiber Versus Ultrasonic Scalpel in Robot-Assisted Laparoscopic Myomectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choussein, Souzana; Srouji, Serene S; Farland, Leslie V; Gargiulo, Antonio R

    2015-01-01

    To compare the effectiveness and safety of a flexible carbon dioxide (CO2) laser fiber to the ultrasonic scalpel when employed through a robotic surgical system. Retrospective cohort study. Level II-2 evidence. Reproductive surgery practice at an academic hospital. Two hundred thirty-six women who had undergone robot-assisted laparoscopic myomectomy with either CO2 laser (n = 85) or the ultrasonic scalpel (n = 151). Robot-assisted laparoscopic myomectomy employing either a flexible CO2 laser fiber or a robotic ultrasonic scalpel as the primary energy tool. Perioperative outcomes (estimated blood loss, operative time, length of hospital stay) of patients undergoing robot-assisted myomectomy with a flexible laser fiber or ultrasonic scalpel. Estimated blood loss and operative time were comparable (p = .95 and p = .55, respectively) between the 2 groups after adjusting for all confounders, whereas length of hospital stay remained significantly different (p = .004). Odds ratio for complications was 0.35 (95% confidence interval 0.08-1.56; p = .17), which denotes no difference in the risk for complications between the 2 groups. Robot-assisted laparoscopic myomectomy with a flexible CO2 laser fiber is safe and has comparable operative outcomes to the ultrasonic scalpel. The small size and flexibility of this device allows robotic surgeons to employ safe focal energy without sacrificing operative ergonomics. Copyright © 2015 AAGL. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Errantum: Treatment of human astrocytoma U87 cells with silicon dioxide nanoparticles lowers their survival and alters their expression of mitochondrial and cell signaling proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lai JCK

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Lai JCK, Ananthakrishnan G, Jandhyam S, et al. Treatment of human astrocytoma U87 cells with silicon dioxide nanoparticles lowers their survival and alters their expression of mitochondrial and cell signaling proteins. Int J Nanomedicine. 2010;5:715–723.The wrong image was used in Figure 5 on page 719.

  10. Computer-Assisted Design of Imidazolate-Based Ionic Liquids for Improving Sulfur Dioxide Capture, Carbon Dioxide Capture, and Sulfur Dioxide/Carbon Dioxide Selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Guokai; Zhao, Ning; Wang, Jianji; Wang, Congmin

    2017-11-02

    A new strategy involving the computer-assisted design of substituted imidazolate-based ionic liquids (ILs) through tuning the absorption enthalpy as well as the basicity of the ILs to improve SO 2 capture, CO 2 capture, and SO 2 /CO 2 selectivity was explored. The best substituted imidazolate-based ILs as absorbents for different applications were first predicted. During absorption, high SO 2 capacities up to ≈5.3 and 2.4 molSO2  mol IL -1 could be achieved by ILs with the methylimidazolate anions under 1.0 and 0.1 bar (1 bar=0.1 MPa), respectively, through tuning multiple N⋅⋅⋅S interactions between SO 2 and the N atoms in the imidazolate anion with different substituents. In addition, CO 2 capture by the imidazolate-based ILs could also be easily tuned through changing the substituents of the ILs, and 4-bromoimidazolate IL showed a high CO 2 capacity but a low absorption enthalpy. Furthermore, a high selectivity for SO 2 /CO 2 could be reached by IL with 4,5-dicyanoimidazolate anion owing to its high SO 2 capacity but low CO 2 capacity. The results put forward in this work are in good agreement with the predictions. Quantum-chemical calculations and FTIR and NMR spectroscopy analysis methods were used to discuss the SO 2 and CO 2 absorption mechanisms. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Study on chemical mechanical polishing of silicon wafer with megasonic vibration assisted.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Ke; He, Qing; Li, Liang; Ren, Yi

    2017-09-01

    Chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) is the primary method to realize the global planarization of silicon wafer. In order to improve this process, a novel method which combined megasonic vibration to assist chemical mechanical polishing (MA-CMP) is developed in this paper. A matching layer structure of polishing head was calculated and designed. Silicon wafers are polished by megasonic assisted chemical mechanical polishing and traditional chemical mechanical polishing respectively, both coarse polishing and precision polishing experiments were carried out. With the use of megasonic vibration, the surface roughness values Ra reduced from 22.260nm to 17.835nm in coarse polishing, and the material removal rate increased by approximately 15-25% for megasonic assisted chemical mechanical polishing relative to traditional chemical mechanical polishing. Average Surface roughness values Ra reduced from 0.509nm to 0.387nm in precision polishing. The results show that megasonic assisted chemical mechanical polishing is a feasible method to improve polishing efficiency and surface quality. The material removal and finishing mechanisms of megasonic vibration assisted polishing are investigated too. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Investigations of the interactions of silicon dioxide with copper-aluminum alloy used as an adhesion promoter and diffusion barrier for copper metallization on silicon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pei-I.

    This study explores the concept of alloying copper with Al in order to impart properties that will make Cu useful for interconnect applications in ICs. The advantages of using Al as the alloying element lies in the thermodynamically favored interaction of Al with the underlying dielectric and with the O 2 at the surface of pure Cu thus achieving both the adhesion and passivation. This approach has been shown to generate an ultra thin interfacial layer, which acts as an adhesion promoter and diffusion barrier against Cu migration in the dielectric, without significantly affecting the resistivity of Cu. An emphasis has been placed to examine (a) the interaction of Al (from the Cu-Al alloy) with SiO2 at the alloy-SiO2 interface, (b) the Al migration to surface of the alloy or pure Cu if used, and (c) the impact of such migration on the bulk Cu film and passivation on the surface. In this work, sputtered Cu-Al (1--5 at%), with a resistivity in the range of 5--6 muO-cm, were studied as diffusion barriers/adhesion promoters between SiO2 and pure Cu. The films were examined in as-deposited state and after anneal at different temperatures for varying times and in different ambients by the use of surface and interface characterization techniques, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS), and resistance measurements together with metal-oxide-silicon (MOS) capacitor studies. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were also used to elucidate the structure. The results elucidate the mechanisms of Al movement and interaction with the interface SiO2 and O2 on surface and indicate that films of Cu doped with Al do act as a suitable diffusion barrier and adhesion promoter between SiO2 and Cu.

  13. Morphological and structural evolution of the anatase phase of silicon modified titanium dioxide obtained by Sol-gel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopes, S.A.; Oliveira, C.T.; Ciola, R.A.; Cavalheiro, A.A.

    2011-01-01

    The photonic efficiency of the titanium dioxide photocatalyst is dependent on the crystalline structure and the anatase phase presents high efficiency in the border region between the UV-B and UV-A, with a redox potential sufficient to generate hydroxyl radicals and superoxide ion in order to oxidate organic compounds. In spite of the organic matter degradation effectiveness, the efficiency can be reduced substantially due to the presence of crystalline defects, which act as premature recombination centers of the electron-hole pair. The increasing of calcining temperature allows the elimination of most of these defects, but the structural ordering at temperatures around 600°C eventually leads to the phase transition toward rutile, which is not photoactive. In this work, it was demonstrated through FTIR and XRD that the silicon modifier presence stabilizes the anatase phase even at temperatures as high as 900°C. (author)

  14. Microwave-irradiation-assisted hybrid chemical approach for titanium dioxide nanoparticle synthesis: microbial and cytotoxicological evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan, Shivendu; Dasgupta, Nandita; Rajendran, Bhavapriya; Avadhani, Ganesh S; Ramalingam, Chidambaram; Kumar, Ashutosh

    2016-06-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TNPs) are widely used in the pharmaceutical and cosmetics industries. It is used for protection against UV exposure due to its light-scattering properties and high refractive index. Though TNPs are increasingly used, the synthesis of TNPs is tedious and time consuming; therefore, in the present study, microwave-assisted hybrid chemical approach was used for TNP synthesis. In the present study, we demonstrated that TNPs can be synthesized only in 2.5 h; however, the commonly used chemical approach using muffle furnace takes 5 h. The activity of TNP depends on the synthetic protocol; therefore, the present study also determined the effect of microwave-assisted hybrid chemical approach synthetic protocol on microbial and cytotoxicity. The results showed that TNP has the best antibacterial activity in decreasing order from Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, and Staphylococcus aureus. The IC50 values of TNP for HCT116 and A549 were found to be 6.43 and 6.04 ppm, respectively. Cell death was also confirmed from trypan blue exclusion assay and membrane integrity loss was observed. Therefore, the study determines that the microwave-assisted hybrid chemical approach is time-saving; hence, this technique can be upgraded from lab scale to industrial scale via pilot plant scale. Moreover, it is necessary to find the mechanism of action at the molecular level to establish the reason for greater bacterial and cytotoxicological toxicity. Graphical abstract A graphical representation of TNP synthesis.

  15. Extraction of curcumin from Curcuma longa L. using ultrasound assisted supercritical carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimthet, Chhouk; Wahyudiono, Kanda, Hideki; Goto, Motonobu

    2017-05-01

    Curcumin is one of phenolic compounds, which has been recently shown to have useful pharmacological properties such as anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial, anti-carcinogenic, antifungal, and antimicrobial activities. The objective of this research is to extract the curcumin from Curcuma longa L. using ultrasound assisted supercritical carbon dioxide extraction (USC-CO2). The extraction was performed at 50°C, 25 MPa, CO2 flow rate of 3 mL/min with 10% cosolvent. The result of extraction, thermogravimetry (TG), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) showed that ultrasound power could disrupt cell wall and release the target compounds from Curcuma longa L. USC-CO2 could provide higher curcumin content in the extracts and faster extraction compared to SC-CO2 extraction without ultrasound.

  16. Effective synthesis of silicon carbide nanotubes by microwave heating of blended silicon dioxide and multi-walled carbon nanotube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tony, Voo Chung Sung; Voon, Chun Hong; Lee, Chang Chuan and others, E-mail: chvoon@unimap.edu.my [Institute of Nano Electronic Engineering, University Malaysia (Malaysia)

    2017-11-15

    Silicon carbide nanotube (SiCNTs) has been proven as a suitable material for wide applications in high power, elevated temperature and harsh environment. For the first time, we reported in this article an effective synthesis of SiCNTs by microwave heating of SiO{sub 2} and MWCNTs in molar ratio of 1:1, 1:3, 1:5 and 1:7. Blend of SiO{sub 2} and MWCNTs in the molar ratio of 1:3 was proven to be the most suitable for the high yield synthesis of β-SiCNTs as confirmed by X-ray diffraction pattern. Only SiCNTs were observed from the blend of MWCNTs and SiO{sub 2} in the molar ratio of 1:3 from field emission scanning electron microscopy imaging. High magnification transmission electron microscopy showed that tubular structure of MWCNT was preserved with the inter-planar spacing of 0.25 nm. Absorption bands of Si-C bond were detected at 803 cm-1 in Fourier transform infrared spectrum. Thermal gravimetric analysis revealed that SiCNTs from ratio of 1:3 showed the lowest weight loss. Thus, our synthetic process indicates high yield conversion of SiO{sub 2} and MWCNTs to SiCNTs was achieved for blend of SiO{sub 2} and MWCNTs in molar ratio of 1:3. (author)

  17. Tin dioxide sol-gel derived thin films deposited on porous silicon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cobianu, C.; Savaniu, Cristian; Buiu, Octavian; Zaharescu, Maria; Parlog, Constanta; van den Berg, Albert; Pecz, Bela; Dascula, Dan

    1996-01-01

    Undoped and Sb-doped SnO2 sol–gel derived thin films have been prepared for the first time from tin (IV) ethoxide precursor and SbCl3 in order to be utilised for gas sensing applications where porous silicon is used as a substrate. Transparent, crack-free and adherent layers were obtained on

  18. Tin dioxide sol-gel derived thin films deposited on porous silicon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cobianu, C.; Savaniu, Cristian; Buiu, Octavian; Dascalu, Dan; Zaharescu, Maria; Parlog, Constanta; van den Berg, Albert; Pecz, Bela

    1997-01-01

    Undoped and Sb-doped SnO2 sol¿gel derived thin films have been prepared for the first time from tin (IV) ethoxide precursor and SbCl3 in order to be utilised for gas sensing applications where porous silicon is used as a substrate. Transparent, crack-free and adherent layers were obtained on

  19. Controllable chemical vapor deposition of large area uniform nanocrystalline graphene directly on silicon dioxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Jie; Lindvall, Niclas; Cole, Matthew T.

    2012-01-01

    Metal-catalyst-free chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of large area uniform nanocrystalline graphene on oxidized silicon substrates is demonstrated. The material grows slowly, allowing for thickness control down to monolayer graphene. The as-grown thin films are continuous with no observable pinhol...

  20. Improved metal assisted chemical etching method for uniform, vertical and deep silicon structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miao, Bin; Ding, Xiangzhen; Wu, Dongmin; Li, Jiadong; Zhang, Jian; Wu, Yihui; Lu, Wenhui

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a preliminary result about ultra-deep etched microstructures on 〈1 0 0〉 silicon wafer based on metal assisted chemical etching (MaCE). Honeycomb hole arrays with 50 µ m width were successfully etched, as deep as 280 µ m. The porous defects on the patterned surface and the lateral etching on the sidewall were effectively suppressed by optimizing the etchant solution. The results in this paper indicate that 〈1 0 0〉 silicon can be etched vertically with smooth sidewalls by an etchant solution containing ethanol, instead of the conventional aqueous-based solution. This improved method of MaCE has potential application in large-scale Si etching as a supplementary method to the expensive and complicated dry etching method. (paper)

  1. Laser-assisted turning of components made of silicon-nitride ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klocke, F.; Bausch, S.

    2001-01-01

    The manufacture of high-precision parts made of silicon-nitride ceramic, such as roller bearing rings or valves, currently involves finishing in the form of time and cost intensive grinding operations. This has resulted in demands for the development of more efficient machining techniques and for the subsequent provision of these within a manufacturing environment. A prototype of a precision lathe with an integrated high power diode laser for laser-assisted turning has been developed at the Fraunhofer IPT in close co-operation with industrial partners. When the workpiece is heated continuously by the laser, the resultant localized material softening enables the ceramic to be machined using a defined cutting edge. The application of this technique allows complex silicon nitride ceramic parts with surface qualities of up to R a = 0.3 μm to be produced considerably more flexibly than before, with no requirement for cooling lubricant. (author)

  2. Carbon mediated reduction of silicon dioxide and growth of copper silicide particles in uniform width channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pizzocchero, Filippo; Bøggild, Peter; Booth, Tim

    2013-01-01

    We show that surface arc-discharge deposited carbon plays a critical intermediary role in the breakdown of thermally grown oxide diffusion barriers of 90 nm on a silicon wafer at 1035°C in an Ar/H2 atmosphere, resulting in the formation of epitaxial copper silicide particles in ≈ 10 μm wide...... electron microscopy of focused ion beam fabricated lammelas and trenches in the structure to elucidate the process of their formation....

  3. Facile synthesis of silicon carbide-titanium dioxide semiconducting nanocomposite using pulsed laser ablation technique and its performance in photovoltaic dye sensitized solar cell and photocatalytic water purification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gondal, M.A., E-mail: magondal@kfupm.edu.sa [Laser Research Group, Physics Department & Center of Excellence in Nanotechnology, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Ilyas, A.M. [Laser Research Group, Physics Department & Center of Excellence in Nanotechnology, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Baig, Umair [Laser Research Group, Physics Department & Center of Excellence in Nanotechnology, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Center of Excellence for Scientific Research Collaboration with MIT, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • SiC–TiO{sub 2} semiconducting nanocomposites synthesized by nanosecond PLAL technique. • Synthesized nanocomposites were morphologically and optically characterized. • Nanocomposites were applied for the photocatalytic degradation of toxic organic dye. • Photovoltaic performance was investigated in dye sensitized solar cell. - Abstract: Separation of photo-generated charge carriers (electron and holes) is a major approach to improve the photovoltaic and photocatalytic performance of metal oxide semiconductors. For harsh environment like high temperature applications, ceramic like silicon carbide is very prominent. In this work, 10%, 20% and 40% by weight of pre-oxidized silicon carbide was coupled with titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) to form nanocomposite semiconductor via elegant pulsed laser ablation in liquid technique using second harmonic 532 nm wavelength of neodymium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet (Nd-YAG) laser. In addition, the effect of silicon carbide concentration on the performance of silicon carbide-titanium dioxide nanocomposite as photo-anode in dye sensitized solar cell and as photocatalyst in photodegradation of methyl orange dye in water was also studied. The result obtained shows that photo-conversion efficiency of the dye sensitized solar cell was improved from 0.6% to 1.65% and the percentage of methyl orange dye removed was enhanced from 22% to 77% at 24 min under ultraviolet–visible solar spectrum in the nanocomposite with 10% weight of silicon carbide. This remarkable performance enhancement could be due to the improvement in electron transfer phenomenon by the presence of silicon carbide on titanium dioxide.

  4. Quantitativeness in laser-assisted atom probe analysis of boron and carbon codoped in silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinno, Teruyuki; Sasaki, Tomokazu; Tomita, Mitsuhiro; Ohkubo, Tadakatsu

    2017-11-01

    Boron and carbon codoped in polysilicon thin films and carbon implanted in silicon substrates have been examined by laser-assisted atom probe tomography (La-APT). Clusters of dopants were observed in annealed samples. Compared with the results obtained by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), significant miscounts of both boron and carbon were found in La-APT results. On the basis of measurements using two different La-APT systems, it was suggested that the insufficiency of the multihit capability of the detection systems is an important origin of the miscounts.

  5. Electrical and Optical Characterization of Sputtered Silicon Dioxide, Indium Tin Oxide, and Silicon Dioxide/Indium Tin Oxide Antireflection Coating on Single-Junction GaAs Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Jeng Ho

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study characterized the electrical and optical properties of single-junction GaAs solar cells coated with antireflective layers of silicon dioxide (SiO2, indium tin oxide (ITO, and a hybrid layer of SiO2/ITO applied using Radio frequency (RF sputtering. The conductivity and transparency of the ITO film were characterized prior to application on GaAs cells. Reverse saturation-current and ideality factor were used to evaluate the passivation performance of the various coatings on GaAs solar cells. Optical reflectance and external quantum efficiency response were used to evaluate the antireflective performance of the coatings. Photovoltaic current-voltage measurements were used to confirm the efficiency enhancement obtained by the presence of the anti-reflective coatings. The conversion efficiency of the GaAs cells with an ITO antireflective coating (23.52% exceeded that of cells with a SiO2 antireflective coating (21.92%. Due to lower series resistance and higher short-circuit current-density, the carrier collection of the GaAs cell with ITO coating exceeded that of the cell with a SiO2/ITO coating.

  6. Numerical modeling and experimental investigation of laser-assisted machining of silicon nitride ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xinwei

    Laser-assisted machining (LAM) is a promising non-conventional machining technique for advanced ceramics. However, the fundamental machining mechanism which governs the LAM process is not well understood so far. Hence, the main objective of this study is to explore the machining mechanism and provide guidance for future LAM operations. In this study, laser-assisted milling (LAMill) of silicon nitride ceramics is focused. Experimental experience reveals that workpiece temperature in LAM of silicon nitride ceramics determines the surface quality of the machined workpiece. Thus, in order to know the thermal features of the workpiece in LAM, the laser-silicon nitride interaction mechanism is investigated via heating experiments. The trends of temperature affected by the key parameters (laser power, laser beam diameter, feed rate, and preheat time) are obtained through a parametric study. Experimental results show that high operating temperature leads to low cutting force, good surface finish, small edge chipping, and low residual stress. The temperature range for brittle-to-ductile transition should be avoided due to the rapid increase of fracture toughness. In order to know the temperature distribution at the cutting zone in the workpiece, a transient three-dimensional thermal model is developed using finite element analysis (FEA) and validated through experiments. Heat generation associated with machining is considered and demonstrated to have little impact on LAM. The model indicates that laser power is one critical parameter for successful operation of LAM. Feed and cutting speed can indirectly affect the operating temperatures. Furthermore, a machining model is established with the distinct element method (or discrete element method, DEM) to simulate the dynamic process of LAM. In the microstructural modeling of a beta-type silicon nitride ceramic, clusters are used to simulate the rod-like grains of the silicon nitride ceramic and parallel bonds act as the

  7. Nanocomposited coatings produced by laser-assisted process to prevent silicone hydogels from protein fouling and bacterial contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Guobang; Chen, Yi; Zhang, Jin, E-mail: jzhang@eng.uwo.ca

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Nanocomposited-coating was deposited on silicone hydrogel by using the matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) process. The ZnO–PEG nanocomposited coating reduces over 50% protein absorption on silicone hydrogel, and can inhibit the bacterial growth efficiently. - Highlights: • We developed a nanocomposited coating to prevent silicone hydrogel from biofouling. • Matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation can deposit inorganic–organic nanomaterials. • The designed nanocomposited coating reduces protein absorption by over 50%. • The designed nanocomposited coating shows significant antimicrobial efficiency. - Abstract: Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles incorporating with polyethylene glycol (PEG) were deposited together on the surface of silicone hydrogel through matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE). In this process, frozen nanocomposites (ZnO–PEG) in isopropanol were irradiated under a pulsed Nd:YAG laser at 532 nm for 1 h. Our results indicate that the MAPLE process is able to maintain the chemical backbone of polymer and prevent the nanocomposite coating from contamination. The ZnO–PEG nanocomposited coating reduces over 50% protein absorption on silicone hydrogel. The cytotoxicity study shows that the ZnO–PEG nanocomposites deposited on silicone hydrogels do not impose the toxic effect on mouse NIH/3T3 cells. In addition, MAPLE-deposited ZnO–PEG nanocomposites can inhibit the bacterial growth significantly.

  8. Macro and quasi-mesoporous silicon by self-assembling and metal assisted etching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boarino, L.; Enrico, E.; De Leo, N.; Celegato, F.; Tiberto, P. [NanoFacility Piemonte, Electromagnetism Division, Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica, Strada delle Cacce 91, 10135 Turin (Italy); Sparnacci, Katia; Laus, M. [Dipartimento di Scienze dell' Ambiente e della Vita, Universita del Piemonte Orientale Amedeo Avogadro, Viale Teresa Michel 11, Alessandria (Italy)

    2011-06-15

    The combination of two recent techniques developed in the last years demonstrates the possibility to obtain regular and semi-ordered macro and mesopores on any type of silicon substrates and with holes diameter ranging from 800 to 60 nm and less. Self-assembling of polystyrene nanospheres (PSNS) is obtained by floating technique, then the 2D crystal is lifted on a silicon substrate with a 30 nm silver thin film deposited by thermal evaporation or sputtering. The nanospheres are then reduced in diameter by reactive ion etching (RIE) in oxygen plasma, then the samples are exposed to Ar ions sputter-etching (SE) for thin film structuration. At this point of the process the polystyrene nanosphere mask is removed and a metal assisted etching (MAE) of few minutes is performed. Ordered and regular pores of diameters ranging from 500 to 60 nm have been obtained. Macropores (450 nm) obtained by self-assembly nanolithography and metal assisted etching. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  9. Application of Aloe vera gel instead of silicon dioxide as organic dielectric material in microelectronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rana Sardar Masud

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Organic materials are now being used in a wide range of microelectronic applications in parallel with inorganic materials, because of their superior properties, environmental safety, and low cost. This paper describes the characterization of Aloe vera gel (AVG, a new organic dielectric material. The surface morphology, spatial distribution of elements, and structural characteristics of an AVG layer were examined using scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX, and X-ray diffraction (XRD, respectively. The resistance of the AVG layer, determined using a four-probe station, was 640 Ω EDX showed that the elements contained in the layer were carbon, oxygen, aluminum, silicon, calcium, potassium, and copper. The XRD results suggested that the sample primarily consisted of bornite (Cu5FeS4, geerite (Cu8S5, sal ammoniac (NH4Cl, and carobbite (KF.

  10. Role of Silicon Dioxide Filler on Mechanical and Dry Sliding Wear Behaviour of Glass-Epoxy Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveed Anjum

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical properties and dry sliding wear behaviour of glass fabric reinforced epoxy (G-E composite with varying weight percentage of silicon dioxide (SiO2 filler have been studied in the present work. The influence of sliding distance, velocity, and applied normal load on dry sliding wear behaviour has been considered using Taguchi's L9 orthogonal array. Addition of SiO2 increased the density, hardness, flexural, and impact strengths of G-E composite. Results of dry sliding wear tests showed increasing wear volume with increase in sliding distance, load, and sliding velocity for G-E and SiO2 filled G-E composites. Taguchi's results indicate that the sliding distance played a significant role followed by applied load, sliding velocity, and SiO2 loading. Scanning electron micrographs of the worn surfaces of composite samples at different test parameters show smooth surface, microploughing, and fine grooves under low load and velocity. However, severe damage of matrix with debonding and fiber breakage was seen at high load and velocity especially in unfilled G-E composite.

  11. Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy and Calculation of Charge Transport in a Graphene/Silicon Dioxide System at Different Relative Humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konečný, Martin; Bartošík, Miroslav; Mach, Jindřich; Švarc, Vojtěch; Nezval, David; Piastek, Jakub; Procházka, Pavel; Cahlík, Aleš; Šikola, Tomáš

    2018-04-11

    The article shows how the dynamic mapping of surface potential (SP) measured by Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) in combination with calculation by a diffusion-like equation and the theory based on the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) model of water condensation and electron hopping can provide the information concerning the resistivity of low conductive surfaces and their water coverage. This is enabled by a study of charge transport between isolated and grounded graphene sheets on a silicon dioxide surface at different relative humidity (RH) with regard to the use of graphene in ambient electronic circuits and especially in sensors. In the experimental part, the chemical vapor-deposited graphene is precisely patterned by the mechanical atomic force microscopy (AFM) lithography and the charge transport is studied through a surface potential evolution measured by KPFM. In the computational part, a quantitative model based on solving the diffusion-like equation for the charge transport is used to fit the experimental data and thus to find the SiO 2 surface resistivity ranging from 10 7 to 10 10 Ω and exponentially decreasing with the RH increase. Such a behavior is explained using the formation of water layers predicted by the BET adsorption theory and electron-hopping theory that for the SiO 2 surface patterned by AFM predicts a high water coverage even at low RHs.

  12. Pilot-Scale Silicone Process for Low-Cost Carbon Dioxide Capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farnum, Rachel; Perry, Robert; Wood, Benjamin

    2014-12-31

    GE Global Research is developing technology to remove carbon dioxide (CO 2) from the flue gas of coal-fired powerplants. A mixture of 3-aminopropyl end-capped polydimethylsiloxane (GAP-1m) and triethylene glycol (TEG) is the preferred CO2-capture solvent. GE Global Research was contracted by the Department of Energy to test a pilot-scale continuous CO2 absorption/desorption system using a GAP-1m/TEG mixture as the solvent. As part of that effort, an Environmental, Health, and Safety (EH&S) assessment for a CO2-capture system for a 550 MW coal-fired powerplant was conducted. Five components of the solvent, CAS#2469-55-8 (GAP-0), CAS#106214-84-0 (GAP-1-4), TEG, and methanol and xylene (minor contaminants from the aminosilicone) are included in this assessment. One by-product, GAP- 1m/SOX salt, and dodecylbenzenesulfonicacid (DDBSA) were also identified foranalysis. An EH&S assessment was also completed for the manufacturing process for the GAP-1m solvent. The chemicals associated with the manufacturing process include methanol, xylene, allyl chloride, potassium cyanate, sodium hydroxide (NaOH), tetramethyldisiloxane (TMDSO), tetramethyl ammonium hydroxide, Karstedt catalyst, octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4), Aliquat 336, methyl carbamate, potassium chloride, trimethylamine, and (3-aminopropyl) dimethyl silanol. The toxicological effects of each component of both the CO2 capture system and the manufacturing process were defined, and control mechanisms necessary to comply with U.S. EH&S regulations are summarized. Engineering and control systems, including environmental abatement, are described for minimizing exposure and release of the chemical components. Proper handling and storage recommendations are made for each chemical to minimize risk to workers and the surrounding community.

  13. Patterning human neuronal networks on photolithographically engineered silicon dioxide substrates functionalized with glial analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Mark A; Brennan, Paul M; Bunting, Andrew S; Cameron, Katherine; Murray, Alan F; Shipston, Mike J

    2014-05-01

    Interfacing neurons with silicon semiconductors is a challenge being tackled through various bioengineering approaches. Such constructs inform our understanding of neuronal coding and learning and ultimately guide us toward creating intelligent neuroprostheses. A fundamental prerequisite is to dictate the spatial organization of neuronal cells. We sought to pattern neurons using photolithographically defined arrays of polymer parylene-C, activated with fetal calf serum. We used a purified human neuronal cell line [Lund human mesencephalic (LUHMES)] to establish whether neurons remain viable when isolated on-chip or whether they require a supporting cell substrate. When cultured in isolation, LUHMES neurons failed to pattern and did not show any morphological signs of differentiation. We therefore sought a cell type with which to prepattern parylene regions, hypothesizing that this cellular template would enable secondary neuronal adhesion and network formation. From a range of cell lines tested, human embryonal kidney (HEK) 293 cells patterned with highest accuracy. LUHMES neurons adhered to pre-established HEK 293 cell clusters and this coculture environment promoted morphological differentiation of neurons. Neurites extended between islands of adherent cell somata, creating an orthogonally arranged neuronal network. HEK 293 cells appear to fulfill a role analogous to glia, dictating cell adhesion, and generating an environment conducive to neuronal survival. We next replaced HEK 293 cells with slower growing glioma-derived precursors. These primary human cells patterned accurately on parylene and provided a similarly effective scaffold for neuronal adhesion. These findings advance the use of this microfabrication-compatible platform for neuronal patterning. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Pilot-Scale Silicone Process for Low-Cost Carbon Dioxide Capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Surinder; Spiry, Irina; Wood, Benjamin; Hancu, Dan; Chen, Wei

    2014-07-01

    This report presents system and economicanalysis for a carbon-capture unit which uses an aminosilicone-based solvent for CO₂ capture in a pulverized coal (PC) boiler. The aminosilicone solvent is a 60/40 wt/wt mixture of 3-aminopropyl end-capped polydimethylsiloxane (GAP-1m) with tri-ethylene glycol (TEG) as a co-solvent. Forcomparison purposes, the report also shows results for a carbon-capture unit based on a conventional approach using mono-ethanol amine (MEA). The first year removal cost of CO₂ for the aminosilicone-based carbon-capture process is $46.04/ton of CO₂ as compared to $60.25/ton of CO₂ when MEA is used. The aminosilicone- based process has <77% of the CAPEX of a system using MEA solvent. The lower CAPEX is due to several factors, including the higher working capacity of the aminosilicone solvent compared the MEA, which reduces the solvent flow rate required, reducing equipment sizes. If it is determined that carbon steel can be used in the rich-lean heat exchanger in the carbon capture unit, the first year removal cost of CO₂ decreases to $44.12/ton. The aminosilicone-based solvent has a higherthermal stability than MEA, allowing desorption to be conducted at higher temperatures and pressures, decreasing the number of compressor stages needed. The aminosilicone-based solvent also has a lowervapor pressure, allowing the desorption to be conducted in a continuous-stirred tank reactor versus a more expensive packed column. The aminosilicone-based solvent has a lowerheat capacity, which decreases the heat load on the desorber. In summary, the amino-silicone solvent has significant advantages overconventional systems using MEA.

  15. Characteristics of laser assisted machining for silicon nitride ceramic according to machining parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Do; Lee, Su Jin; Suh, Jeong

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the Laser Assisted Machining (LAM) that cuts and removes softened parts by locally heating the ceramic with laser. Silicon nitride ceramics can be machined with general machining tools as well, because YSiAlON, which was made up ceramics, is soften at about 1,000 .deg. C. In particular, the laser, which concentrates on highly dense energy, can locally heat materials and very effectively control the temperature of the heated part of specimen. Therefore, this paper intends to propose an efficient machining method of ceramic by deducing the machining governing factors of laser assisted machining and understanding its mechanism. While laser power is the machining factor that controls the temperature, the CBN cutting tool could cut the material more easily as the material gets deteriorated from the temperature increase by increasing the laser power, but excessive oxidation can negatively affect the quality of the material surface after machining. As the feed rate and cutting depth increase, the cutting force increases and tool lifespan decreases, but surface oxidation also decreases. In this experiment, the material can be cut to 3 mm of cutting depth. And based on the results of the experiment, the laser assisted machining mechanism is clarified

  16. Enhanced Serum Carbon Dioxide Measurements with a Silicone Rubber-Based Carbonate Ion-Selective Electrode and a High-pH Dilution Buffer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, J H; Sakong, D S; Nam, H; Cha, G S

    1996-01-01

    A new silicone rubber matrix carbonate-selective membrane and a high-pH buffer diluent are used to enhance the performance of the electrode measurements for serum carbon dioxide. The proposed membrane employs one-component silicone rubber as the matrix and trifluoroacetyl-p-decylbenzene as the neutral ionophore. The optimized membrane formulation incorporates as high as 21.9 wt % plasticizer (e.g., bis(2-ethylhexyl) adipate). The highly plasticized silicone rubber membranes not only function equivalently, in terms of the carbonate response, to the conventional PVC matrix membranes, but they also exhibit substantially reduced interfering response toward salicylate. Furthermore, the silicone rubber membrane exhibits better adhesion to the solid surface than do PVC or PU membranes. The use of higher pH buffers (e.g., 2-amino-2-methyl-1-propanol (AMP)-H(2)SO(4), pH 9.5-10.5) further enhances the selectivity of the carbonate electrode measurement system for total CO(2) species over other anions. It is shown that the combined use of the silicone rubber matrix membrane and the high-pH AMP buffer provides a carbonate sensor system that is substantially less subject to interference from salicylate and chloride than is the conventional measurement system employing the PVC-based electrode with the lower pH (8.4-8.8) buffer diluent.

  17. Biological functionalization and patterning of porous silicon prepared by Pt-assisted chemical etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong-Fang; Han, Huan-Mei; Wu, Ya-Guang; Xiao, Shou-Jun

    2010-04-01

    Porous silicon fabricated via Pt-assisted chemical etching of p-type Si (1 0 0) in 1:1:1 EtOH/HF/H 2O 2 solution possesses a longer durability in air and in aqueous media than anodized one, which is advantageous for biomedical applications. Its surface SiH x ( x = 1 and 2) species can react with 10-undecylenic acid completely under microwave irradiation, and subsequent derivatizations of the end carboxylic acid result in affinity capture of proteins. We applied two approaches to produce protein microarrays: photolithography and spotting. The former provides a homogeneous microarray with a very low fluorescence background, while the latter presents an inhomogeneous microarray with a high noise background.

  18. Biological functionalization and patterning of porous silicon prepared by Pt-assisted chemical etching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Hongfang; Han Huanmei; Wu Yaguang; Xiao Shoujun

    2010-01-01

    Porous silicon fabricated via Pt-assisted chemical etching of p-type Si (1 0 0) in 1:1:1 EtOH/HF/H 2 O 2 solution possesses a longer durability in air and in aqueous media than anodized one, which is advantageous for biomedical applications. Its surface SiHx (x = 1 and 2) species can react with 10-undecylenic acid completely under microwave irradiation, and subsequent derivatizations of the end carboxylic acid result in affinity capture of proteins. We applied two approaches to produce protein microarrays: photolithography and spotting. The former provides a homogeneous microarray with a very low fluorescence background, while the latter presents an inhomogeneous microarray with a high noise background.

  19. Extraordinary transmission through gain-assisted silicon-based nanohole arrays in telecommunication regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavil, Mehdi Afshari; Deng, Qingzhong; Zhou, Zhiping

    2014-08-01

    Extraordinary gain-assisted transmission in telecommunication regimes through circular nanohole arrays drilled on a metallic film is investigated theoretically. Silicon-compatible Er-Yb silicate, which has a photoluminescence peak in the telecommunication regime, was selected for optical amplification purposes. Geometrical parameters were optimized analytically in order to present transmission resonances at telecommunication regions. The required gain value for lossless propagation was determined by considering the surface-plasmon dispersion relation. Simulation results show that the predicted gain for lossless propagation cannot completely compensate the loss. By increasing gain value, absorption becomes zero and transmission approaches unit through a laser with a pumping power of 372 mW at 1480 nm.

  20. Microwave-assisted ionothermal synthesis of nanostructured anatase titanium dioxide/activated carbon composite as electrode material for capacitive deionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Po-I; Chung, Li-Ching; Shao, Hsin; Liang, Teh-Ming; Horng, Ren-Yang; Ma, Chen-Chi M.; Chang, Min-Chao

    2013-01-01

    The nanostructured anatase titanium dioxide/activated carbon composite material for capacitive deionization electrode was prepared in a short time by a lower temperature two-step microwave-assisted ionothermal (sol–gel method in the presence of ionic liquid) synthesis method. This method includes a reaction and a crystallization step. In the crystallization step, the ionic liquid plays a hydrothermal analogy role in driving the surface anatase crystallization of amorphous titanium dioxide nanoparticles formed in the reaction step. The energy dispersive spectroscopic study of the composite indicates that the anatase titanium dioxide nanoparticles are evenly deposited in the matrix of activated carbon. The electrochemical property of the composite electrode was investigated. In comparison to the pristine activated carbon electrode, higher specific capacitance was observed for the nanostructured anatase titanium dioxide/activated carbon composite electrode, especially when the composite was prepared with a molar ratio of titanium tetraisopropoxide/H 2 O equal to 1:15. Its X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic result indicates that it has the highest amount of Ti-OH. The Ti-OH group can enhance the wetting ability and the specific capacitance of the composite electrode. The accompanying capacitive deionization result indicates that the decay of electrosorption capacity of this composite electrode is insignificant after five cycle tests. It means that the ion electrosorption–desorption becomes a reversible process

  1. Influence of colloidal silicon dioxide on gel strength, robustness, and adhesive properties of diclofenac gel formulation for topical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zheng; Fassihi, Reza

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study is to identify the extent of stiffness, adhesiveness, and thixotropic character of a three-dimensional gel network of a 1% diclofenac sodium topical gel formulation in the presence and absence of colloidal silicon dioxide (CSD) and assess its ease of application and adhesiveness using both objective and subjective analysis. The 1% diclofenac gel was mixed with different amounts of CSD (e.g., 0.5, 1, 2, 3, and 5% w/w) and allowed to equilibrate prior to testing. The texture analyzer in combination with a cone-cap assembly was used to objectively investigate the changes in spreadability and adhesiveness of the gel system before and after addition of CSD. Results indicate that an increase in pliability and adhesiveness at levels ≥2 to ≤5% w/w of CSD dispersed in the gel ensues. For subjective analysis, gels with (2% w/w) CSD and in the absence of CSD were uniformly applied to a 20-cm(2) (5 cm × 4 cm) surface area on the forearms of healthy volunteers and vehicle preferences by the volunteers regarding ease of application, durability on the skin, compliance, and feelings concerning its textural properties were assessed. It appears that changes in the gel formulation with the addition of CSD enhance gel viscosity and bonding to the skin. Results further show that changes in physical and rheological characteristics of gel containing 2% w/w CSD did not significantly change subject preferences for the gel preparations. These findings may help formulators to have additional options to develop more robust and cost-effective formulations.

  2. Preparation and characterization of flame retardant n-hexadecane/silicon dioxide composites as thermal energy storage materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Guiyin; Li, Hui; Chen, Zhi; Liu, Xu

    2010-09-15

    Flame retardant n-hexadecane/silicon dioxide (SiO(2)) composites as thermal energy storage materials were prepared using sol-gel methods. In the composites, n-hexadecane was used as the phase change material for thermal energy storage, and SiO(2) acted as the supporting material that is fire resistant. In order to further improve flame retardant property of the composites, the expanded graphite (EG) was added in the composites. Fourier transformation infrared spectroscope (FT-IR), X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and scanning electronic microscope (SEM) were used to determine chemical structure, crystalloid phase and microstructure of flame retardant n-hexadecane/SiO(2) composites, respectively. The thermal properties and thermal stability were investigated by a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) and a thermogravimetric analysis apparatus (TGA), respectively. The SEM results showed that the n-hexadecane was well dispersed in the porous network of the SiO(2). The DSC results indicated that the melting and solidifying latent heats of the composites are 147.58 and 145.10 kJ/kg when the mass percentage of the n-hexadecane in the composites is 73.3%. The TGA results showed that the loading of the EG increased the charred residue amount of the composites at 700 degrees C, contributing to the improved thermal stability of the composites. It was observed from SEM photographs that the homogeneous and compact charred residue structure after combustion improved the flammability of the composites. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Influence of polyvinylpyrrolidone, microcrystalline cellulose and colloidal silicon dioxide on technological characteristics of a high-dose Petiveria alliacea tablet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Pérez, Martha-Estrella; Lemus-Rodríguez, Zoe; Hung-Arbelo, Mario; Vistel-Vigo, Marlen

    2017-12-01

    Petiveria alliacea L. (Phytolaccaceae) is a perennial shrub used by its immunomodulatory, anticancerogenic and anti-inflammatory properties. This study determined the influence of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), colloidal silicon dioxide (CSD) and microcrystalline cellulose (MC) on the technological characteristic of a high-dose P. alliacea tablet prepared by the wet granulation method. The botanical and pharmacognostic analysis of the plant material was firstly performed, followed by a 2 3 factorial design considering three factors at two levels: (a) the binder (PVP) incorporated in formulation at 10% and 15% (w/w); (b) the compacting agent (CSD) added at 10% and 15% (w/w) and; (c) the diluent (MC) included at 7.33% and 12.46% (w/w). The analysis of pharmaceutical performance and the accelerated and long-term stability of the best prototype were also completed. The binder, compacting agent and the interaction binder/diluent had a significant impact on breaking force of high-dose P. alliacea tablet. The optimum formula was found to contain 15% (w/w) of CSD, 7.33% (w/w) of MC and 10% (w/w) of PVP. At these conditions, the tablet shows a breaking force of 77.96 N, a friability of 0.39%, a total phenol content of 1.30 mg/tablet and a maximum disintegration time of 6 min. The use of adequate amounts of PVP, MC and CSD as per the factorial design allowed the preparation of a tablet suitable for administration, despite the inappropriate flow and compressibility properties of the P. alliacea powder.

  4. Evaluation of carbon dioxide rebreathing during exercise assisted by noninvasive ventilation with plateau exhalation valve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ou YE

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Yong-er Ou,* Zhi-min Lin,* Dong-ming Hua, Ying Jiang, Ya-ting Huo, Qun Luo, Rong-Chang Chen State Key Laboratory of Respiratory Disease, National Clinical Research Center for Respiratory Disease, Guangzhou Institute of Respiratory Disease, First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Noninvasive ventilation with a plateau exhalation valve (PEV is often used as an adjunct to exercise to achieve a physiologic training effect in severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD patients. However, during exercise, with the increase of exhalation flow and respiratory rate and limited capability of PEV to exhale gases out of the circuit, it is still unknown whether CO2 rebreathing occurs in COPD patients ventilated during exercise assisted by single-limb circuit with a PEV. A maximal symptom-limited cycle exercise test was performed while ventilated on pressure support (inspiratory:expiratory pressure 14:4 cmH2O in 18 male patients with stable severe COPD (mean ± standard deviation, forced expiratory volume in 1 s: 29.5%±6.9% predicted. At rest and during exercise, breathing pattern, mean expiratory flow, mean expiratory flow of PEV, and the mean inspiratory fraction of CO2 (tidal fractional concentration of inspired CO2 [FiCO2] reinsufflated from the circuit was measured for each breath. In comparison with rest, with the significant increase of mean expiratory flow (0.39±0.15 vs 0.82±0.27 L/s, fractional concentration of end-tidal CO2 (2.6%±0.7% vs 5.5%±0.6%, and the significant decrease of mean expiratory flow of PEV (0.41±0.02 vs 0.39±0.03 L/s, tidal FiCO2 significantly increased at peak exercise (0.48%±0.19% vs 1.8%±0.6% in patients with stable severe COPD. The inflection point of obvious CO2 rebreathing was 0.67±0.09 L/s (95% confidence interval 0.60–0.73 L/s. Ventilated by a single-limb tubing with PEV caused CO2

  5. Adverse effect of nano-silicon dioxide on lung function of rats with or without ovalbumin immunization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Han

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The great advances of nanomaterials have brought out broad important applications, but their possible nanotoxicity and risks have not been fully understood. It is confirmed that exposure of environmental particulate matter (PM, especially ultrafine PM, are responsible for many lung function impairment and exacerbation of pre-existing lung diseases. However, the adverse effect of nanoparticles on allergic asthma is seldom investigated and the mechanism remains undefined. For the first time, this work investigates the relationship between allergic asthma and nanosized silicon dioxide (nano-SiO₂. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Ovalbumin (OVA-treated and saline-treated control rats were daily intratracheally administered 0.1 ml of 0, 40 and 80 µg/ml nano-SiO₂ solutions, respectively for 30 days. Increased nano-SiO₂ exposure results in adverse changes on inspiratory and expiratory resistance (Ri and Re, but shows insignificant effect on rat lung dynamic compliance (Cldyn. Lung histological observation reveals obvious airway remodeling in 80 µg/ml nano-SiO₂-introduced saline and OVA groups, but the latter is worse. Additionally, increased nano-SiO₂ exposure also leads to more severe inflammation. With increasing nano-SiO₂ exposure, IL-4 in lung homogenate increases and IFN-γ shows a reverse but insignificant change. Moreover, at a same nano-SiO₂ exposure concentration, OVA-treated rats exhibit higher (significant IL-4 and lower (not significant IFN-γ compared with the saline-treated rats. The percentages of eosinophil display an unexpected result, in which higher exposure results lower eosinophil percentages. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This was a preliminary study which for the first time involved the effect of nano-SiO₂ to OVA induced rat asthma model. The results suggested that intratracheal administration of nano-SiO₂ could lead to the airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR and the airway remolding with or without OVA

  6. The influence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration to the structure of silicon nanowire growth by metal-assisted chemical etching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omar, Hafsa, E-mail: mrshafsaomar@gmail.com [NANO-SciTech Centre, Institute of Science, Universiti Teknologi MARA(UiTM), 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Jani, Abdul Mutalib Md., E-mail: abdmutalib@perlis.uitm.edu.my; Abdullah, Saifollah, E-mail: saifollah@salam.utm.edu.my [Faculty of Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA(UiTM), 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Rusop, Mohamad, E-mail: nanouitm@gmail.com [NANO-SciTech Centre, Institute of Science, Universiti Teknologi MARA(UiTM), 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi MARA(UiTM), p40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2016-07-06

    A simple and low cost method to produce well aligned silicon nanowires at large areas using Ag-assisted chemical etching at room temperature were presented. The structure of silicon nanowires growth by metal-assisted chemical etching was observed. Prior to the etching, the silicon nanowires were prepared by electroless metal deposited (EMD) in solution containing hydrofluoric acid and hydrogen peroxide in Teflon vessel. The silver particle was deposited on substrate by immersion in hydrofluoric acid and silver nitrate solution for sixty second. The silicon nanowires were growth in different hydrogen peroxide concentration which are 0.3M, 0.4M, 0.5M and 0.6M and 0.7M.The influence of hydrogen peroxide concentration to the formation of silicon nanowires was studied. The morphological properties of silicon nanowires were investigated using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS).

  7. Removal of giant intraocular foreign body with the assistance of silicone oil tamponade in 23G vitrectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong-Ping Chen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To evaluate the outcomes and safety of minimally invasive 23G pars plana vitrectomy(PPVcombined with silicone oil tamponade for the removal of giant intraocular foreign body(IOFB. METHODS: A total of 12 cases diagnosed with giant IOFB were included in this retrospective study in which 11 eyes of 11 males and 1 eye of 1 female were treated in Changsha Aier Eye Hospital between February 2012 and March 2015. Among these patients, the preoperative best corrected visual acuity varied from light perception to 0.1 with retinal detachment identified in all 12 eyes. All patients underwent 23G minimally invasive PPV. After the vitreous was removed and the damaged retina was repaired, silicone oil was filled, and then the scleral incision was extended to remove the giant IOFB. Lens extraction and intraocular lens implantation were performed in some patients when necessary. Silicone oil was removed 6mo later. RESULTS: The giant IOFB was removed successfully just with 1 attempt in each of 12 eyes, and no IOFB fell and reinjured the retina or damaged the cornea during the procedure. All retinas were reattached and no endophthalmitis was observed in any patients postoperatively. The silicone oil was removed successfully after 6mo, and by then the visual acuity was improved in all cases. Sixty-seven percent of patients became free of blindness and 25% free of visual disability. CONCLUSION: Removing giant IOFB through 23G PPV assisted with silicone oil tamponade is safe and effective.

  8. Rapid drug detection in oral samples by porous silicon assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Rachel D; Guild, Georgia E; Harpas, Peter; Kirkbride, Paul; Hoffmann, Peter; Voelcker, Nicolas H; Kobus, Hilton

    2009-11-01

    The demand for analysis of oral fluid for illicit drugs has arisen with the increased adoption of roadside testing, particularly in countries where changes in legislation allow random roadside testing of drivers for the presence of a palette of illicit drugs such as methamphetamine (MA), 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) and Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). Oral samples are currently tested for such drugs at the roadside using an immunoassay-based commercial test kit. Positive roadside tests are sent for confirmatory laboratory analysis, traditionally by means of gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). We present here an alternative rapid analysis technique, porous silicon assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (pSi LDI-MS), for the high-throughput analysis of oral fluids. This technique alleviates the need for sample derivatization, requires only sub-microliter sample volumes and allows fast analysis (of the order of seconds). In this study, the application of the technique is demonstrated with real samples from actual roadside testing. The analysis of oral samples resulted in detection of MA and MDMA with no extraction and analysis of THC after ethyl acetate extraction. We propose that, subject to miniaturization of a suitable mass spectrometer, this technique is well suited to underpin the deployment of oral fluid testing in the clinic, workplace and on the roadside. Copyright 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Ion-beam assisted deposition of C-, Ti-, Zr-, Mo-based thin films on silicon substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tashlykov, I.S.; Vesh, V.; Vendler, Eh.

    2004-01-01

    With the help pf RBS/channeling method and scattering spectrum computer simulation C-, Ti-, Zr- and Mo-based coatings deposited by ion beam assisted deposition technique on Si substrate have been investigated. Si, O, C, and H atoms were found to be incorporated into the coatings composition. Radiation damage of silicon near the coating-substrate interface region does not depend on the mass of bombarding ions [ru

  10. Optimal carbon dioxide insufflation pressure during robot-assisted thyroidectomy in patients with various benign and malignant thyroid diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Hoon

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Currently, data are not available concerning a safe insufflation pressure that provides a proper view of the surgical field without adverse metabolic and hemodynamic changes in humans undergoing the robot-assisted thyroidectomy bilateral axillo-breast approach (BABA using the da Vinci robotic surgical system. The purpose of this study was to determine the optimal carbon dioxide (CO2 insufflation pressure in patients with various benign and malignant thyroid diseases when using the da Vinci robotic surgical system. Methods A total of 32 patients underwent thyroid surgery at 6 (n = 15, 9 (n = 15, and 12 (n = 2 mmHg. The partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO2, pH, cardiac output, heart rate, and mean arterial pressure were measured at baseline, 30 min and 1, 1.5, and 2 hours after CO2 insufflation, and 30 min after desufflation. Results CO2 insufflation of 12 mmHg caused severe facial subcutaneous emphysema, hypercarbia, and acidosis during robot-assisted thyroidectomy with BABA. The study was stopped before completion for the patients’ safety in accordance with the study protocol. Applying 6- or 9- mmHg of CO2 insufflation pressure caused increases in PaCO2 and decreases in arterial pH. However, vital signs were stable and pH and PaCO2 were within the physiologic range during the surgery in the 6- and 9-mmHg groups. Conclusions We propose that a CO2 insufflation pressure under 10 mmHg in robot-assisted thyroidectomy with BABA is the optimal insufflation pressure for patient safety.

  11. Glow Discharge Plasma-Assisted Preparation of Nickel-Based Catalyst for Carbon Dioxide Reforming of Methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Fang; Chu, Wei; Xu, Jun-qiang; Zhong, Lin

    2008-10-01

    A plasma-assisted method was employed to prepare Ni/γ-Al2O3 catalyst for carbon dioxide reforming of methane reaction. The novel catalyst possessed higher activity and better coke-suppression performance than those of the conventional calcination catalyst. To achieve the same CH4 conversion, the conventional catalyst needed higher reaction temperature, about 50°C higher than that of the N2 plasma-treated catalyst. After the evaluation test, the deactivation rate of the novel catalyst was 1.7%, compared with 15.2% for the conventional catalyst. Different from the characterization results of the calcined catalyst, a smaller average pore diameter and a higher specific surface area were obtained for the plasma-treated catalyst. The variations of the reduction peak temperatures and areas indicated that the catalyst reducibility was promoted by plasma assistance. The dispersion of nickel was also remarkably improved, which was helpful for controlling the ensemble size of metal atoms on the catalyst surface. The modification effect of plasma-assisted preparation on the surface property of alumina supported catalyst was speculated to account for the concentration increase of absorbed CO2. An enhancement of CO2 adsorption was propitious to the inhibition of carbon formation. The coke amount deposited on plasma treated catalyst was much smaller than that on the conventional catalyst.

  12. Activation and fluoride-assisted phosphating of aluminum-silicon-coated steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Paul; Sigel, Reinhard; Lange, Miriam M; Beier, Frank; Renner, Frank U; Erbe, Andreas

    2013-05-22

    Phosphating is a crucial process in the corrosion protection of metals. Here, activation and fluoride-assisted tricationic phosphating is investigated on aluminum-silicon (AS) coated steel surfaces. Dynamic light scattering results from the activation bath show a bimodal size distribution, with hydrodynamic radii of ~400 nm and ~10 μm. For the smaller particle fraction, static light scattering results are consistent with the interpretation of disklike particles as scattering objects. Particles of the larger fraction sediment with time. In the presence of electrolyte, the scattering intensity from the larger particle fraction increases. Coagulation with time is suggested to be related to the decrease in activity of the activation bath. Scanning Auger microscopy (SAM) shows a higher phosphorus concentration after titanium phosphate activation in the Al-rich areas compared to the Si-rich areas of the AS coatings. There is no correlation between the size of the species in the activation bath, and the size of the phosphate-containing regions on the activated surface. Phosphating was performed in the presence of hexafluorosilicic acid, H2SiF6, ammonium hydrogen difluoride, NH4HF2, and both, at an initial pH of 2.5. The absence of crystals after phosphating with H2SiF6 is an indication that SiF6(2-) is the final product of the oxide dissolution in the presence of fluoride. In the presence of NH4HF2, the Si-rich regions of the surface are phosphated before the Si-poor (Al-rich) regions. Hence, the phosphate distribution after activation and after phosphating are opposite. These results show that a high surface concentration of phosphate after activation is not sufficient for a high coverage with phosphate crystals after phosphating.

  13. Optimization of silver-assisted nano-pillar etching process in silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azhari, Ayu Wazira; Sopian, Kamaruzzaman; Desa, Mohd Khairunaz Mat; Zaidi, Saleem H.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, a respond surface methodology (RSM) model is developed using three-level Box-Behnken experimental design (BBD) technique. This model is developed to investigate the influence of metal-assisted chemical etching (MACE) process variables on the nanopillars profiles created in single crystalline silicon (Si) substrate. Design-Expert® software (version 7.1) is employed in formulating the RSM model based on five critical process variables: (A) concentration of silver (Ag), (B) concentration of hydrofluoric acid (HF), (C) concentration of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), (D) deposition time, and (E) etching time. This model is supported by data from 46 experimental configurations. Etched profiles as a function of lateral etching rate, vertical etching rate, height, size and separation between the Si trenches and etching uniformity are characterized using field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM). A quadratic regression model is developed to correlate critical process variables and is validated using the analysis of variance (ANOVA) methodology. The model exhibits near-linear dependence of lateral and vertical etching rates on both the H2O2 concentration and etching time. The predicted model is in good agreement with the experimental data where R2 is equal to 0.80 and 0.67 for the etching rate and lateral etching respectively. The optimized result shows minimum lateral etching with the average pore size of about 69 nm while the maximum etching rate is estimated at around 360 nm/min. The model demonstrates that the etching process uniformity is not influenced by either the etchant concentration or the etching time. This lack of uniformity could be attributed to the surface condition of the wafer. Optimization of the process parameters show adequate accuracy of the model with acceptable percentage errors of 6%, 59%, 1.8%, 38% and 61% for determination of the height, separation, size, the pore size and the etching rate respectively.

  14. Correlation between oxidant concentrations, morphological aspects and etching kinetics of silicon nanowires during silver-assist electroless etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moumni, Besma; Jaballah, Abdelkader Ben

    2017-12-01

    Silicon porosification by silver assisted chemical etching (Ag-ACE) for a short range of H2O2 concentration is reported. We experimentally show that porous silicon (PSi) is obtained for 1% H2O2, whereas silicon nanowires (SiNWs) appeared by simply tuning the concentration of H2O2 to relatively high concentrations up to 8%. The morphological aspects are claimed by scanning electron microscopy proving that the kinetics of SiNWs formation display nonlinear relationships versus H2O2 concentration and etching time. A semi-qualitative electrochemical etching model based on local anodic, Ic, and cathodic, Ia, currents is proposed to explain the different morphological changes, and to unveil the formation pathways of both PS and SiNWs. More importantly, an efficient antireflective character for silicon solar cell (reflectance close to 2%) is realized at 8% H2O2. In addition, the luminescence of the prepared Si-nanostructures is claimed by photoluminescence which exhibit a large enhancement of the intensity and a blue shift for narrow and deep SiNWs.

  15. Incubation behavior of silicon nanowire growth investigated by laser-assisted rapid heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Sang-gil; Kim, Eunpa; Grigoropoulos, Costas P., E-mail: cgrigoro@berkeley.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720-1740 (United States); Allen, Frances I.; Minor, Andrew M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720-1740 (United States); National Center for Electron Microscopy, Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Hwang, David J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    We investigate the early stage of silicon nanowire growth by the vapor-liquid-solid mechanism using laser-localized heating combined with ex-situ chemical mapping analysis by energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy. By achieving fast heating and cooling times, we can precisely determine the nucleation times for nanowire growth. We find that the silicon nanowire nucleation process occurs on a time scale of ∼10 ms, i.e., orders of magnitude faster than the times reported in investigations using furnace processes. The rate-limiting step for silicon nanowire growth at temperatures in the vicinity of the eutectic temperature is found to be the gas reaction and/or the silicon crystal growth process, whereas at higher temperatures it is the rate of silicon diffusion through the molten catalyst that dictates the nucleation kinetics.

  16. The Effect of Annealing on the Structural and Optical Properties of Titanium Dioxide Films Deposited by Electron Beam Assisted PVD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaser M. Abdulraheem

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Titanium dioxide thin films were deposited on crystalline silicon substrates by electron beam physical vapor deposition. The deposition was performed under vacuum ranging from 10−5 to 10−6 Torr without process gases, resulting in homogeneous TiO2-x layers with a thickness of around 100 nm. Samples were then annealed at high temperatures ranging from 500°C to 800°C for 4 hours under nitrogen, and their structural and optical properties along with their chemical structure were characterized before and after annealing. The chemical and structural characterization revealed a substoichiometric TiO2-x film with oxygen vacancies, voids, and an interface oxide layer. It was found from X-ray diffraction that the deposited films were amorphous and crystallization to anatase phase occurred for annealed samples and was more pronounced for annealing temperatures above 700°C. The refractive index obtained through spectroscopic ellipsometry ranged between 2.09 and 2.37 in the wavelength range, 900 nm to 400 nm for the as-deposited sample, and jumped to the range between 2.23 and 2.65 for samples annealed at 800°C. The minimum surface reflectance changed from around 0.6% for the as-deposited samples to 2.5% for the samples annealed at 800°C.

  17. Preparation of polysiloxane modified perfluorosulfonic acid composite membranes assisted by supercritical carbon dioxide for direct methanol fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Lijun; Li, Lei; Li, Hong; Tang, Junkun; Zhang, Yongming; Yu, Wei; Zhou, Chixing

    Polysiloxane modified perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) composite membranes are prepared by using (3-mercaptopropyl) methyldimethoxysilane (MPMDMS) as a precursor of silicon alkoxide in supercritical carbon dioxide (Sc-CO 2) system. In the Sc-CO 2 system with the presence of water, Sc-CO 2 is not only used as a solvent and swelling agent, but also functioned as an acid catalyst for the condensation polymerization of MPMDMS. Characteristics of the modified composite membranes are investigated by using attenuated total reflection-infrared spectra, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The modified membrane with 13.9 wt.% poly(MPMDMS) is the best one among all the modified membranes, whose methanol permeability is extremely lower and selectivity (ratio of proton conductivity to methanol permeability) is about 5.49 times higher than that of pristine membrane and 5.88 times than that of Nafion ® 117, respectively. This modified PFSA membrane still can maintain its higher selectivity value than that of Nafion ® 117 in the temperature range of 25-65 °C. Therefore, the modified membranes prepared in Sc-CO 2 system may be the suitable candidate electrolytes for direct methanol fuel cell applications.

  18. Evolvement of cell-substrate interaction over time for cells cultivated on a 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (γ-APTES) modified silicon dioxide (SiO2) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chung-Ping; Hsu, Po-Yen; Wu, You-Lin; Hsu, Wan-Yun; Lin, Jing-Jenn

    2012-09-01

    Since cell-substrate interaction is directly related to the traction force of the cell, the cell property can be judged from the imprint it leaves on the soft substrate surface onto which the cell is cultured. In this letter, the evolvement of the cell-substrate interaction over time was observed by cultivating cells on a 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (γ-APTES) modified silicon dioxide (SiO2) surface for different periods of time. The cell-substrate interaction property as a function of time can then be found from the post-cell-removal surface morphology profiles determined by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Different surface morphology profiles were found between normal cells and cancer cells. It was found that the cancer cells tend to form deeper trenches along the circumference of the imprints, while the normal cells do not. In addition, our results indicated that normal cells involve cell-substrate interaction mechanisms that are different from those for cancer cells.

  19. Silicon dioxide and low-k material sputtering in dual frequency inductive discharge by argon ions with energies from 16 to 200 eV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopaev, D. V.; Rakhimova, T. V.; Rakhimov, A. T.; Zotovich, A. I.; Zyryanov, S. M.; Baklanov, M. R.

    2018-01-01

    Thermal and PECVD deposited silicon dioxide and organosilicate low-k materials with porosity from 24 to 44% and corresponding k values from 2.5 to 2.0 were sputtered in dual frequency inductive discharge by argon ions with energies from 16 to 200 eV. The film thickness was measured in process by laser ellipsometry and controlled before and after plasma treatment by spectroscopic ellipsometry. Sputtering rate and yield dependencies on ion energy were measured. It was shown that SiO2 sputtering threshold in plasma is significantly lower (charging of the material surface leading to the reduction of ion energy. For low-k sputtering it is shown that the sputtering yield can be significantly higher than that of SiO2 and also  -CH3 group removal by vacuum ultraviolet photons from the discharge significantly influences material sputtering rate.

  20. Blending Novatein¯ thermoplastic protein with PLA for carbon dioxide assisted batch foaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walallavita, Anuradha; Verbeek, Casparus J. R.; Lay, Mark

    2016-03-01

    The convenience of polymeric foams has led to their widespread utilisation in everyday life. However, disposal of synthetic petroleum-derived foams has had a detrimental effect on the environment which needs to be addressed. This study uses a clean and sustainable approach to investigate the foaming capability of a blend of two biodegradable polymers, polylactic acid (PLA) and Novatein® Thermoplastic Protein (NTP). PLA, derived from corn starch, can successfully be foamed using a batch technique developed by the Biopolymer Network Ltd. NTP is a patented formulation of bloodmeal and chemical additives which can be extruded and injection moulded similar to other thermoplastics. However, foaming NTP is a new area of study and its interaction with blowing agents in the batch process is entirely unknown. Subcritical and supercritical carbon dioxide have been examined individually in two uniquely designed pressure vessels to foam various compositions of NTP-PLA blends. Foamed material were characterised in terms of expansion ratio, cell size, and cellular morphology in order to study how the composition of NTP-PLA affects foaming with carbon dioxide. It was found that blends with 5 wt. % NTP foamed using subcritical CO2 expanded up to 11 times due to heterogeneous nucleation. Morphology analysis using scanning electron microscopy showed that foams blown with supercritical CO2 had a finer cell structure with consistent cell size, whereas, foams blown with subcritical CO2 ranged in cell size and showed cell wall rupture. Ultimately, this research would contribute to the production of a biodegradable foam material to be used in packaging applications, thereby adding to the application potential of NTP.

  1. Blending Novatein{sup ®} thermoplastic protein with PLA for carbon dioxide assisted batch foaming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walallavita, Anuradha, E-mail: asw15@students.waikato.ac.nz; Verbeek, Casparus J. R., E-mail: jverbeek@waikato.ac.nz; Lay, Mark, E-mail: mclay@waikato.ac.nz [University of Waikato, Hamilton 3240 (New Zealand)

    2016-03-09

    The convenience of polymeric foams has led to their widespread utilisation in everyday life. However, disposal of synthetic petroleum-derived foams has had a detrimental effect on the environment which needs to be addressed. This study uses a clean and sustainable approach to investigate the foaming capability of a blend of two biodegradable polymers, polylactic acid (PLA) and Novatein® Thermoplastic Protein (NTP). PLA, derived from corn starch, can successfully be foamed using a batch technique developed by the Biopolymer Network Ltd. NTP is a patented formulation of bloodmeal and chemical additives which can be extruded and injection moulded similar to other thermoplastics. However, foaming NTP is a new area of study and its interaction with blowing agents in the batch process is entirely unknown. Subcritical and supercritical carbon dioxide have been examined individually in two uniquely designed pressure vessels to foam various compositions of NTP-PLA blends. Foamed material were characterised in terms of expansion ratio, cell size, and cellular morphology in order to study how the composition of NTP-PLA affects foaming with carbon dioxide. It was found that blends with 5 wt. % NTP foamed using subcritical CO{sub 2} expanded up to 11 times due to heterogeneous nucleation. Morphology analysis using scanning electron microscopy showed that foams blown with supercritical CO{sub 2} had a finer cell structure with consistent cell size, whereas, foams blown with subcritical CO{sub 2} ranged in cell size and showed cell wall rupture. Ultimately, this research would contribute to the production of a biodegradable foam material to be used in packaging applications, thereby adding to the application potential of NTP.

  2. Surface-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization of Low Molecular Organic Substances on Oxidized Porous Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shmigol, I. V.; Alekseev, S. A.; Lavrynenko, O. Yu.; Zaitsev, V. N.; Barbier, D.; Pokrovskiy, V. A.

    Desorption/ionization on silicon (DIOS) mass spectra of methylene blue (MB+Cl-) were studied using p+-type oxidized monofunctional porous silicon (PS-OX mono ) free layers. Reduction/protonation processes of methylene blue (MB) dye were investigated. It was shown that SiH x terminal sites on oxidized surface of porous silicon (PS-OX) are not the rate-determining factor for the reduction/protonation in DIOS. Tunneling of electron through the dielectric layer of nanostructures on silicon surface under effect of local electrostatic and electromagnetic fields is considered to be the most significant factor of adsorbate-adsorbent electron exchange and further laser-induced ion formation.

  3. Video-assisted thoracoscopic thymectomy using 5-mm ports and carbon dioxide insufflation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, René Horsleben

    2016-01-01

    complications overall with similar outcomes regarding survival, recurrence of thymoma and complete remission (CR) for myasthenia gravis patients. A variety of different approaches have been described previously. This is a detailed description of video-assisted thoracoscopic thymectomy using three 5 mm ports...

  4. Influence of instrument conditions on the evaporation behavior of uranium dioxide with UV laser-assisted atom probe tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valderrama, B.; Henderson, H.B.; Gan, J.; Manuel, M.V.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Effect of temperature, laser energy, and detection rate on the evaporation of UO 2 was investigated. • Laser energy can significantly affect the evaporation behavior of UO 2 . • Proper experimental conditions allows for an accurate investigation of UO 2 with APT. - Abstract: Atom probe tomography (APT) provides the ability to detect subnanometer chemical variations spatially, with high accuracy. However, it is known that compositional accuracy can be affected by experimental conditions. A study of the effect of laser energy, specimen base temperature, and detection rate is performed on the evaporation behavior of uranium dioxide (UO 2 ). In laser-assisted mode, tip geometry and standing voltage also contribute to the evaporation behavior. In this investigation, it was determined that modifying the detection rate and temperature did not affect the evaporation behavior as significantly as laser energy. It was also determined that three laser evaporation regimes are present in UO 2 . Very low laser energy produces a behavior similar to DC-field evaporation, moderate laser energy produces the desired laser-assisted field evaporation characteristic and high laser energy induces thermal effects, negatively altering the evaporation behavior. The need for UO 2 to be analyzed under moderate laser energies to produce accurate stoichiometry distinguishes it from other oxides. The following experimental conditions providing the best combination of mass resolving power, accurate stoichiometry, and uniform evaporation behavior: 50 K, 10 pJ laser energy, a detection rate of 0.003 atoms per pulse, and a 100 kHz repetition rate

  5. Optimization of silver-assisted nano-pillar etching process in silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azhari, Ayu Wazira, E-mail: ayuwazira@unimap.edu.my [Solar Energy Research Institute, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Bangi, Selangor 43650 (Malaysia); School of Environmental Engineering, Universiti Malaysia Perlis, 01000, Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Sopian, Kamaruzzaman [Solar Energy Research Institute, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Bangi, Selangor 43650 (Malaysia); Desa, Mohd Khairunaz Mat [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Nibong Tebal, Pulau Pinang, 14300 (Malaysia); Zaidi, Saleem H. [Solar Energy Research Institute, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Bangi, Selangor 43650 (Malaysia)

    2015-12-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Statistical analysis for synthesis of nano-pillar in crystalline Si substrates is presented. • Model is in good agreement with experimental for the etching rate and lateral etching respectively. • Optimum values for all parameters in fabrication of nanostructured Si are attained. - Abstract: In this study, a respond surface methodology (RSM) model is developed using three-level Box–Behnken experimental design (BBD) technique. This model is developed to investigate the influence of metal-assisted chemical etching (MACE) process variables on the nanopillars profiles created in single crystalline silicon (Si) substrate. Design-Expert{sup ®} software (version 7.1) is employed in formulating the RSM model based on five critical process variables: (A) concentration of silver (Ag), (B) concentration of hydrofluoric acid (HF), (C) concentration of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}), (D) deposition time, and (E) etching time. This model is supported by data from 46 experimental configurations. Etched profiles as a function of lateral etching rate, vertical etching rate, height, size and separation between the Si trenches and etching uniformity are characterized using field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM). A quadratic regression model is developed to correlate critical process variables and is validated using the analysis of variance (ANOVA) methodology. The model exhibits near-linear dependence of lateral and vertical etching rates on both the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration and etching time. The predicted model is in good agreement with the experimental data where R{sup 2} is equal to 0.80 and 0.67 for the etching rate and lateral etching respectively. The optimized result shows minimum lateral etching with the average pore size of about 69 nm while the maximum etching rate is estimated at around 360 nm/min. The model demonstrates that the etching process uniformity is not influenced by either the etchant

  6. Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Assisted Processing of Silica/PMMA Nanocomposite Foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rende, Deniz; Schadler, Linda S.; Ozisik, Rahmi

    2012-02-01

    Polymer nanocomposite foams receive considerable attention in both scientific and industrial communities. These structures are defined as closed or open cells (pores) surrounded by bulk material and are widely observed in nature in the form of bone structure, sponge, corals and natural cork. Inspired by these materials, polymer nanocomposite foams are widely used in advanced applications, such as bone scaffolds, food packaging and transportation materials due to their lightweight and enhanced mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties compared to bulk polymer foams. The presence of the nanosized fillers facilitates heterogeneous bubble nucleation as a result, the number of bubbles increases while the average bubble size decreases. Therefore, the foam morphology can be controlled by the size, concentration, and surface chemistry of the nanofiller. In the current study, we used supercritical carbon dioxide as a foaming agent for silica/poly(methyl methacrylate), PMMA, foams. The silica nanoparticles were chemically modified by fluoroalkane chains to make them CO2-philic. The surface coverage was controlled via tethering density, and the effect of silica surface coverage and concentration on foam morphology was investigated through scanning electron microscopy and image processing. Results indicated that nanofiller concentration and filler surface chemistry (CO2-philicity) had tremendous effect on foam morphology but surface coverage did not have any effect.

  7. Potassium iodate assisted synthesis of titanium dioxide nanoparticles with superior water-dispersibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yawen; Duo, Fangfang; Peng, Shiqi; Jia, Falong; Fan, Caimei

    2014-09-15

    In this paper, we report a novel polyol process to synthesize highly water-dispersible anatase titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles (∼5 nm) by the introduction of inorganic oxidizing agent--KIO3. The obtained TiO2 nanoparticles are well dispersible in water at pH≥5.0 and the resulting aqueous dispersion remains stable over months. The superior water-dispersibility of as-formed TiO2 is ascribed to the electrostatic repulsion from carboxylic acid group modified on TiO2 nanoparticles, which is the oxidation product of solvent diethylene glycol (DEG) by KIO3. Based on the characterization results, the formation processes of water-dispersibility TiO2 nanoparticles are proposed. Meanwhile, the synthesized TiO2 nanoparticles are found to be doped by iodine and exhibit excellent photocatalytic activity on degradation of rhodamine-B (RhB) under visible-light irradiation. The further tests demonstrate that the O(2-) is the main active species during photodegradation of RhB. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Fabrication of ultra-high aspect ratio (>160:1) silicon nanostructures by using Au metal assisted chemical etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hailiang; Ye, Tianchun; Shi, Lina; Xie, Changqing

    2017-12-01

    We present a facile and effective approach for fabricating high aspect ratio, dense and vertical silicon nanopillar arrays, using a combination of metal etching following electron-beam lithography and Au metal assisted chemical etching (MacEtch). Ti/Au nanostructures used as catalysts in MacEtch are formed by single layer resist-based electron-beam exposure followed by ion beam etching. The effects of MacEtch process parameters, including half period, etching time, the concentrations of H2O2 and HF, etching temperature and drying method are systematically investigated. Especially, we demonstrate an enhancement of etching quality by employing cold MacEtch process, and an enhancement in preventing the collapse of high aspect ratio nanostructures by employing low surface tension rinse liquid and natural evaporation in the drying stage. Using an optimized MacEtch process, vertical silicon nanopillar arrays with a period of 250 nm and aspect ratio up to 160:1 are realized. Our results should be instructive for exploring the achievable aspect ratio limit in silicon nanostructures and may find potential applications in photovoltaic devices, thermoelectric devices and x-ray diffractive optics.

  9. Bainite transformation of low carbon Mn-Si TRIP-assisted multiphase steels: influence of silicon content on cementite precipitation and austenite retention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacques, P.; Catlin, T.; Geerlofs, N.; Kop, T.; Zwaag, S. van der; Delannay, F.

    1999-01-01

    Studies dealing with TRIP-assisted multiphase steels have emphasized the crucial role of the bainite transformation of silicon-rich intercritical austenite in the achievement of a good combination of strength and ductility. The present work deals with the bainite transformation in two steels differing in their silicon content. It is shown that both carbon enrichment of residual austenite and cementite precipitation influences the kinetics of the bainite transformation. A minimum silicon content is found to be necessary in order to prevent cementite precipitation from austenite during the formation of bainitic ferrite in such a way as to allow stabilisation of austenite by carbon enrichment. (orig.)

  10. Cavity-Assisted Manipulation of Freely Rotating Silicon Nanorods in High Vacuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Stefan; Asenbaum, Peter; Kosloff, Alon; Sclafani, Michele; Stickler, Benjamin A; Nimmrichter, Stefan; Hornberger, Klaus; Cheshnovsky, Ori; Patolsky, Fernando; Arndt, Markus

    2015-08-12

    Optical control of nanoscale objects has recently developed into a thriving field of research with far-reaching promises for precision measurements, fundamental quantum physics and studies on single-particle thermodynamics. Here, we demonstrate the optical manipulation of silicon nanorods in high vacuum. Initially, we sculpture these particles into a silicon substrate with a tailored geometry to facilitate their launch into high vacuum by laser-induced mechanical cleavage. We manipulate and trace their center-of-mass and rotational motion through the interaction with an intense intracavity field. Our experiments show that the anisotropy of the nanorotors leads to optical forces that are three times stronger than on silicon nanospheres of the same mass. The optical torque experienced by the spinning rods will enable cooling of the rotational motion and torsional optomechanics in a dissipation-free environment.

  11. Sugarcane Bagasse Pyrolysis in a Carbon Dioxide Atmosphere with Conventional and Microwave-Assisted Heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Bo-Jhih; Chen, Wei-Hsin

    2015-01-01

    Pyrolysis is an important thermochemical method to convert biomass into bio-oil. In this study, the pyrolysis of sugarcane bagasse in a CO 2 atmosphere under conventional and microwave-assisted heating is investigated to achieve CO 2 utilization. In the microwave pyrolysis, charcoal is used as the microwave absorber to aid in pyrolysis reactions. The results indicate that the yields of pyrolysis products are greatly influenced by the heating modes. In the conventional heating, the prime product is bio-oil and its yield is in the range of 51–54 wt%, whereas biochar is the major product in microwave-assisted heating and its yield ranges from 61 to 84 wt%. Two different absorber blending ratios of 0.1 and 0.3 are considered in the microwave pyrolysis. The solid yield decreases when the absorber blending ratio decreases from 0.3 to 0.1, while the gas and liquid yields increase. This is attributed to more energy consumed for bagasse pyrolysis at the lower blending ratio. Hydrogen is produced under the microwave pyrolysis and its concentration is between 2 and 12 vol%. This arises from the fact that the secondary cracking of vapors and the secondary decomposition of biochar in an environment with microwave irradiation is easier than those with conventional heating.

  12. Growth of Gold-assisted Gallium Arsenide Nanowires on Silicon Substrates via Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramon M. delos Santos

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Gallium arsenide nanowires were grown on silicon (100 substrates by what is called the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS growth mechanism using a molecular beam epitaxy (MBE system. Good quality nanowires with surface density of approximately 108 nanowires per square centimeter were produced by utilizing gold nanoparticles, with density of 1011 nanoparticles per square centimeter, as catalysts for nanowire growth. X-ray diffraction measurements, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy revealed that the nanowires are epitaxially grown on the silicon substrates, are oriented along the [111] direction and have cubic zincblende structure.

  13. Plasma assisted chemical vapor deposited tantalum silicon nitride thin films for applications in nanoscale devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Wanxue

    The scaling issues resulting from diminishing device feature sizes have prompted the investigation of alternative materials and deposition techniques for copper diffusion barrier applications. As device sizes shrink to sub 100-nm technology nodes, the allowable copper diffusion barrier thickness falls to less than 10 nm. In this respect, novel materials are needed to stop copper diffusion into surrounding materials. TaSiN has been regarded as one of the most promising materials for copper diffusion barrier applications, owing to its excellent thermal stability, amorphous structure, and low resistivity. In this respect, a plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition (PACVD) process using TaF5, SiI4, N2, H2, and in-situ radio frequency (RF) plasma was optimized for depositing ultrathin TaSiN films, employing a design of experiments (DOE) approach. Film properties were characterized using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), nuclear reaction analysis (NRA), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), x-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), four-point resistivity probe, and cross-section scanning electron microscopy (CS-SEM). The TaSiN films, deposited via optimized process conditions, exhibited low resistivity, low contamination levels, smooth surface morphology, good step coverage, excellent thermal stability, and amorphous structure. The copper diffusion barrier performance of optimized PACVD TaSiN films was assessed in Cu/TaSiN/Si structures using traditional high temperature annealing methods and in Cu/TaSiN/SiO2/Si structures using a triangular voltage sweep (TVS) method. The results from the former technique show that the diffusion barrier performance of TaSiN films with higher silicon concentration, corresponding to a more prevalent amorphous structure, leads to worse Cu diffusion barrier performance. The results from the TaSiN barrier testing also show that thinner TaSiN films (≤5 nm) performed better as Cu diffusion barriers than thicker Ta

  14. Properties of form-stable paraffin/silicon dioxide/expanded graphite phase change composites prepared by sol–gel method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Min; Wu, Zhishen; Tan, Jinmiao

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Paraffin/SiO 2 /EG composite PCM was prepared with sol–gel method. ► The thermal conductivity of SiO 2 /paraffin/EG is 94.7% higher than paraffin. ► The latent heat of paraffin/SiO 2 /EG composite is 104.4 J/g. -- Abstract: A form-stable paraffin/silicon dioxide (SiO 2 )/expanded graphite (EG) composite phase change material (PCM) was prepared by sol–gel method. Silica gel acts as the supporting material and EG is used to increase the thermal conductivity. The mass fractions of silicon oxide and graphite are 20.8% and 7.2%, respectively. The composite PCM was characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) method. Thermal properties and thermal stability of the composite PCM were studied using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The result shows that paraffin was well dispersed in the network of silica gel and there is no chemical reaction between them. The phase change temperature of the paraffin/SiO 2 composite and the paraffin/SiO 2 /EG composite are 27.53 °C and 27.72 °C, respectively. The latent heat of the paraffin/SiO 2 composite and the paraffin/SiO 2 /EG composite are 112.8 J/g and 104.4 J/g, respectively. The thermal conductivity of the SiO 2 /paraffin composite and the SiO 2 /paraffin/EG composite are 28.2% and 94.7% higher than that of paraffin.

  15. Optimization of conditions for growth of vanadium dioxide thin films on silicon by pulsed-laser deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keisuke Shibuya

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We systematically examined the effects of the substrate temperature (TS and the oxygen pressure (PO2 on the structural and optical properties polycrystalline V O2 films grown directly on Si(100 substrates by pulsed-laser deposition. A rutile-type V O2 phase was formed at a TS ≥ 450 °C at PO2 values ranging from 5 to 20 mTorr, whereas other structures of vanadium oxides were stabilized at lower temperatures or higher oxygen pressures. The surface roughness of the V O2 films significantly increased at growth temperatures of 550 °C or more due to agglomeration of V O2 on the surface of the silicon substrate. An apparent change in the refractive index across the metal–insulator transition (MIT temperature was observed in V O2 films grown at a TS of 450 °C or more. The difference in the refractive index at a wavelength of 1550 nm above and below the MIT temperature was influenced by both the TS and PO2, and was maximal for a V O2 film grown at 450 °C under 20 mTorr. Based on the results, we derived the PO2 versus 1/TS phase diagram for the films of vanadium oxides, which will provide a guide to optimizing the conditions for growth of V O2 films on silicon platforms.

  16. Silicon dioxide obtained by Polymeric Precursor Method; Obtencao de dioxido de silicio pelo Metodo dos Precursores Polimericos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, C.T.; Granado, S.R.; Lopes, S.A.; Cavalheiro, A.A., E-mail: cinthia_quimica@hotmail.com [Universidade Estadual de Mato Grosso do Sul (CPTREN/UEMS), Navirai, MS (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas Tecnologicas em Recursos Naturais

    2011-07-01

    The Polymeric Precursor Method is able for obtaining several oxide material types with high surface area even obtained in particle form. Several MO{sub 2} oxide types such as titanium, silicon and zirconium ones can be obtained by this methodology. In this work, the synthesis of silicon oxide was monitored by thermal analysis, XRD and surface area analysis in order to demonstrate the influence of the several synthesis and calcining parameters. Surface area values as higher as 370m2/g and increasing in the micropore volume nm were obtained when the material was synthesized by using ethylene glycol as polymerizing agent. XRD analysis showed that the material is amorphous when calcinated at 600°C in despite of the time of calcining, but the material morphology is strongly influenced by the polymeric resin composition. Using Glycerol as polymerizing agent, the pore size increase and the surface area goes down with the increasing in decomposition time, when compared to ethylene glycol. (author)

  17. Optimization of conditions for growth of vanadium dioxide thin films on silicon by pulsed-laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibuya, Keisuke; Sawa, Akihito

    2015-10-01

    We systematically examined the effects of the substrate temperature (TS) and the oxygen pressure (PO2) on the structural and optical properties polycrystalline V O2 films grown directly on Si(100) substrates by pulsed-laser deposition. A rutile-type V O2 phase was formed at a TS ≥ 450 °C at PO2 values ranging from 5 to 20 mTorr, whereas other structures of vanadium oxides were stabilized at lower temperatures or higher oxygen pressures. The surface roughness of the V O2 films significantly increased at growth temperatures of 550 °C or more due to agglomeration of V O2 on the surface of the silicon substrate. An apparent change in the refractive index across the metal-insulator transition (MIT) temperature was observed in V O2 films grown at a TS of 450 °C or more. The difference in the refractive index at a wavelength of 1550 nm above and below the MIT temperature was influenced by both the TS and PO2, and was maximal for a V O2 film grown at 450 °C under 20 mTorr. Based on the results, we derived the PO2 versus 1/TS phase diagram for the films of vanadium oxides, which will provide a guide to optimizing the conditions for growth of V O2 films on silicon platforms.

  18. Surface toughness of silicon nitride bioceramics: I, Raman spectroscopy-assisted micromechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzotti, Giuseppe; Enomoto, Yuto; Zhu, Wenliang; Boffelli, Marco; Marin, Elia; McEntire, Bryan J

    2016-02-01

    Indentation micro-fracture is revisited as a tool for evaluating the surface toughness of silicon nitride (Si3N4) bioceramics for artificial joint applications. Despite being unique and practical from an experimental perspective, a quantitative assessment of surface fracture toughness using this method is challenging. An improved method has been developed, consisting of coupling indentation with confocal (spatially resolved) Raman piezo-spectroscopy. Empowered by the Raman microprobe, the indentation micro-fracture method was found to be capable of providing reliable surface toughness measurements in silicon nitride biomaterials. In designing the microstructures of bioceramic bearing couples for improved tribological performance, surface toughness must be considered as a fundamentally different and distinct parameter from bulk toughness. The coupling of indention crack opening displacements (COD) with local stress field assessments by spectroscopy paves the way to reliably compare the structural properties of bioceramics and to quantitatively monitor their evolution during environmental exposure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Synergistically Enhanced Performance of Ultrathin Nanostructured Silicon Solar Cells Embedded in Plasmonically Assisted, Multispectral Luminescent Waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sung-Min; Dhar, Purnim; Chen, Huandong; Montenegro, Angelo; Liaw, Lauren; Kang, Dongseok; Gai, Boju; Benderskii, Alexander V; Yoon, Jongseung

    2017-04-25

    Ultrathin silicon solar cells fabricated by anisotropic wet chemical etching of single-crystalline wafer materials represent an attractive materials platform that could provide many advantages for realizing high-performance, low-cost photovoltaics. However, their intrinsically limited photovoltaic performance arising from insufficient absorption of low-energy photons demands careful design of light management to maximize the efficiency and preserve the cost-effectiveness of solar cells. Herein we present an integrated flexible solar module of ultrathin, nanostructured silicon solar cells capable of simultaneously exploiting spectral upconversion and downshifting in conjunction with multispectral luminescent waveguides and a nanostructured plasmonic reflector to compensate for their weak optical absorption and enhance their performance. The 8 μm-thick silicon solar cells incorporating a hexagonally periodic nanostructured surface relief are surface-embedded in layered multispectral luminescent media containing organic dyes and NaYF 4 :Yb 3+ ,Er 3+ nanocrystals as downshifting and upconverting luminophores, respectively, via printing-enabled deterministic materials assembly. The ultrathin nanostructured silicon microcells in the composite luminescent waveguide exhibit strongly augmented photocurrent (∼40.1 mA/cm 2 ) and energy conversion efficiency (∼12.8%) than devices with only a single type of luminescent species, owing to the synergistic contributions from optical downshifting, plasmonically enhanced upconversion, and waveguided photon flux for optical concentration, where the short-circuit current density increased by ∼13.6 mA/cm 2 compared with microcells in a nonluminescent medium on a plain silver reflector under a confined illumination.

  20. Silicon ribbon technology assessment 1978-1986 - A computer-assisted analysis using PECAN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kran, A.

    1978-01-01

    The paper presents a 1978-1986 economic outlook for silicon ribbon technology based on the capillary action shaping technique. The outlook is presented within the framework of two sets of scenarios, which develop strategy for approaching the 1986 national energy capacity cost objective of $0.50/WE peak. The PECAN (Photovoltaic Energy Conversion Analysis) simulation technique is used to develop a 1986 sheet material price ($50/sq m) which apparently can be attained without further scientific breakthrough.

  1. Preparation and properties of lauric acid/silicon dioxide composites as form-stable phase change materials for thermal energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang Guiyin, E-mail: gyfang@nju.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Hankou Road 22, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210093 (China); Li Hui [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Liu Xu [Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Hankou Road 22, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210093 (China)

    2010-08-01

    Form-stable lauric acid (LA)/silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}) composite phase change materials were prepared using sol-gel methods. The LA was used as the phase change material for thermal energy storage, with the SiO{sub 2} acting as the supporting material. The structural analysis of these form-stable LA/SiO{sub 2} composite phase change materials was carried out using Fourier transformation infrared spectroscope (FT-IR). The microstructure of the form-stable composite phase change materials was observed by a scanning electronic microscope (SEM). The thermal properties and thermal stability were investigated by a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) and a thermogravimetric analysis apparatus (TGA), respectively. The SEM results showed that the LA was well dispersed in the porous network of SiO{sub 2}. The DSC results indicated that the melting latent heat of the form-stable composite phase change material is 117.21 kJ kg{sup -1} when the mass percentage of the LA in the SiO{sub 2} is 64.8%. The results of the TGA showed that these materials have good thermal stability. The form-stable composite phase change materials can be used for thermal energy storage in waste heat recovery and solar heating systems.

  2. Effect of nanosilicon dioxide on growth performance, egg quality, liver histopathology and concentration of calcium, phosphorus and silicon in egg, liver and bone in laying quails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faryadi, Samira; Sheikhahmadi, Ardashir

    2017-11-01

    This experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of different levels of nanosilicon dioxide (nSiO2) on performance, egg quality, liver histopathology and concentration of calcium (Ca), phosphorus and silicon (Si) in egg, liver and bone in laying quails. The experiment was administered using 60 laying quails at 16-26 weeks of age with five treatments [0 (control), 500, 1000, 2000 and 4000 mg nSiO2 per kg of diet] and four replicates in a completely randomized design. During the experiment, the amount of feed intake was recorded weekly and performance parameters were measured. During the last 3 days of the experiment, all of the eggs in each replicate were collected and egg quality parameters were measured. At the end of 26 weeks of age, the birds were sacrificed and blood samples were collected. Liver samples from each treatment were fixed in 10% buffered formalin for histopathological assessment. The right thigh bone and a portion of liver were inserted in plastic bags and stored at - 20. The results showed that nSiO2 supplementation significantly affected egg weight and egg mass ( P liver enzymes in plasma and the liver tissue histopathology were not significantly affected ( P > 0.05) by dietary treatments. In conclusion, the results indicated that dietary supplementation of nSiO2 could improve bone density and performance without any adverse effect on the health of laying quails.

  3. Thermal annealing effects on the interface state density of metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors with electron cyclotron resonance plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition Silicon dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maiolo, L. [Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie (IFN), CNR, Via Cineto Romano 42, 00156 Rome (Italy)], E-mail: lmaiolo@ifn.cnr.it; Pecora, A.; Cuscuna, M.; Fortunato, G. [Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie (IFN), CNR, Via Cineto Romano 42, 00156 Rome (Italy)

    2007-07-16

    Silicon dioxide films (SiO{sub 2}), deposited at room temperature by electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma reactor from a gas phase combination of O{sub 2}, SiH{sub 4} and He, present excellent structural and electrical properties. However, when fabricating field effect devices it is also crucial to minimize the defect density at the semiconductor/insulator interface. We show that the interface state density, investigated in Al/SiO{sub 2}/Si MOS capacitors, can be substantially reduced performing post-deposition annealing. In particular we studied the effects of annealing temperature and time in different gas ambient: vacuum, nitrogen and forming gas (5% H{sub 2} + N{sub 2}). We found that interface state passivation mainly occurs when thermal annealing is performed after Al-contact deposition and that it is quite insensitive to the annealing atmosphere. The present results clearly suggest that the hydrogen passivation mechanism is driven by the H-containing species present in the film and a possible mechanism to explain the results is proposed.

  4. Thermal annealing effects on the interface state density of metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors with electron cyclotron resonance plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition Silicon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maiolo, L.; Pecora, A.; Cuscuna, M.; Fortunato, G.

    2007-01-01

    Silicon dioxide films (SiO 2 ), deposited at room temperature by electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma reactor from a gas phase combination of O 2 , SiH 4 and He, present excellent structural and electrical properties. However, when fabricating field effect devices it is also crucial to minimize the defect density at the semiconductor/insulator interface. We show that the interface state density, investigated in Al/SiO 2 /Si MOS capacitors, can be substantially reduced performing post-deposition annealing. In particular we studied the effects of annealing temperature and time in different gas ambient: vacuum, nitrogen and forming gas (5% H 2 + N 2 ). We found that interface state passivation mainly occurs when thermal annealing is performed after Al-contact deposition and that it is quite insensitive to the annealing atmosphere. The present results clearly suggest that the hydrogen passivation mechanism is driven by the H-containing species present in the film and a possible mechanism to explain the results is proposed

  5. Preparation and properties of lauric acid/silicon dioxide composites as form-stable phase change materials for thermal energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Guiyin; Li Hui; Liu Xu

    2010-01-01

    Form-stable lauric acid (LA)/silicon dioxide (SiO 2 ) composite phase change materials were prepared using sol-gel methods. The LA was used as the phase change material for thermal energy storage, with the SiO 2 acting as the supporting material. The structural analysis of these form-stable LA/SiO 2 composite phase change materials was carried out using Fourier transformation infrared spectroscope (FT-IR). The microstructure of the form-stable composite phase change materials was observed by a scanning electronic microscope (SEM). The thermal properties and thermal stability were investigated by a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) and a thermogravimetric analysis apparatus (TGA), respectively. The SEM results showed that the LA was well dispersed in the porous network of SiO 2 . The DSC results indicated that the melting latent heat of the form-stable composite phase change material is 117.21 kJ kg -1 when the mass percentage of the LA in the SiO 2 is 64.8%. The results of the TGA showed that these materials have good thermal stability. The form-stable composite phase change materials can be used for thermal energy storage in waste heat recovery and solar heating systems.

  6. Carbon nanotubes@silicon dioxide nanohybrids coating for solid-phase microextraction of organophosphorus pesticides followed by gas chromatography-corona discharge ion mobility spectrometric detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraji, Mohammad; Jafari, Mohammad Taghi; Mossaddegh, Mehdi

    2016-01-15

    A high efficiency solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fiber coated with porous carbon nanotubes-silicon dioxide (CNTs-SiO2) nanohybrids was synthesized and applied for the determination of some organophosphorus pesticides (OPPs) in vegetables, fruits and water samples. Gas chromatography-corona discharge ion mobility spectrometry was used as the detection system. Glucose, as a biocompatible compound, was used for connecting CNT and SiO2 during a hydrothermal process. The electrospinning technique was also applied for the fiber preparation. The parameters affecting the efficiency of extraction, including stirring rate, salt effect, extraction temperature, extraction time, desorption temperature and desorption time, were investigated and optimized. The developed CNTs@SiO2 fiber presented better extraction efficiency than the commercial SPME fibers (PA, PDMS, and PDMS-DVB). The intra- and inter-day relative standard deviations were found to be lower than 6.2 and 9.0%, respectively. For water samples, the limits of detection were in the range of 0.005-0.020 μg L(-1) and the limits of quantification were between 0.010 and 0.050 μg L(-1). The results showed a good linearity in the range of 0.01-3.0 μg L(-1) for the analytes. The spiking recoveries ranged from 79 (± 9) to 99 (± 8). The method was successfully applied for the determination of OPPs in real samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Solid phase extraction with silicon dioxide microsphere adsorbents in combination with gas chromatography-electron capture detection for the determination of DDT and its metabolites in water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qingxiang; Wu, Wei; Xie, Guohong

    2013-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to investigate the feasibility of silicon dioxide (SiO(2)) microspheres without special modification to enrich dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and its main metabolites, p,p'-dichlorodiphenyl-2,2-dichloroethylene (p,p'-DDD) and p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE) in combination with gas chromatography-electron-capture detection. The experimental results indicated that an excellent linear relationship between the recoveries and the concentrations of DDT and its main metabolites was obtained in the range of 0.2-30 ng mL(-1) and the correlation coefficients were in the range of 99.96-99.99%. The detection limits based on the ratio of signal to the baseline noise (S/N = 3) were 2.2, 2.9, 3.8 and 4.1 ng L(-1) for p,p'-DDD, p,p'-DDT, o,p'-DDT, and p,p'-DDE, respectively. The precisions of the proposed method were all below 10% (n = 6). Four real water samples were utilized for validation of the proposed method, and satisfactory spiked recoveries in the range of 72.4-112.9% were achieved. These results demonstrated that the developed method was a simple, sensitive, and robust analytical method for the monitoring of pollutants in the environment.

  8. Adsorption, desorption, and film formation of quinacridone and its thermal cracking product indigo on clean and carbon-covered silicon dioxide surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scherwitzl, Boris; Lassnig, Roman; Truger, Magdalena; Resel, Roland; Leising, Günther; Winkler, Adolf

    2016-01-01

    The evaporation of quinacridone from a stainless steel Knudsen cell leads to the partial decomposition of this molecule in the cell, due to its comparably high sublimation temperature. At least one additional type of molecules, namely indigo, could be detected in the effusion flux. Thermal desorption spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy have been used to study the co-deposition of these molecules on sputter-cleaned and carbon-covered silicon dioxide surfaces. Desorption of indigo appears at temperatures of about 400 K, while quinacridone desorbs at around 510 K. For quinacridone, a desorption energy of 2.1 eV and a frequency factor for desorption of 1 × 10 19 s −1 were calculated, which in this magnitude is typical for large organic molecules. A fraction of the adsorbed quinacridone molecules (∼5%) decomposes during heating, nearly independent of the adsorbed amount, resulting in a surface composed of small carbon islands. The sticking coefficients of indigo and quinacridone were found to be close to unity on a carbon covered SiO 2 surface but significantly smaller on a sputter-cleaned substrate. The reason for the latter can be attributed to insufficient energy dissipation for unfavorably oriented impinging molecules. However, due to adsorption via a hot-precursor state, the sticking probability is increased on the surface covered with carbon islands, which act as accommodation centers.

  9. Minimizing Isolate Catalyst Motion in Metal-Assisted Chemical Etching for Deep Trenching of Silicon Nanohole Array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Lingyu; Zhao, Yunshan; Dasgupta, Binayak; Ren, Yi; Hippalgaonkar, Kedar; Li, Xiuling; Chim, Wai Kin; Chiam, Sing Yang

    2017-06-21

    The instability of isolate catalysts during metal-assisted chemical etching is a major hindrance to achieve high aspect ratio structures in the vertical and directional etching of silicon (Si). In this work, we discussed and showed how isolate catalyst motion can be influenced and controlled by the semiconductor doping type and the oxidant concentration ratio. We propose that the triggering event in deviating isolate catalyst motion is brought about by unequal etch rates across the isolate catalyst. This triggering event is indirectly affected by the oxidant concentration ratio through the etching rates. While the triggering events are stochastic, the doping concentration of silicon offers a good control in minimizing isolate catalyst motion. The doping concentration affects the porosity at the etching front, and this directly affects the van der Waals (vdWs) forces between the metal catalyst and Si during etching. A reduction in the vdWs forces resulted in a lower bending torque that can prevent the straying of the isolate catalyst from its directional etching, in the event of unequal etch rates. The key understandings in isolate catalyst motion derived from this work allowed us to demonstrate the fabrication of large area and uniformly ordered sub-500 nm nanoholes array with an unprecedented high aspect ratio of ∼12.

  10. Modified silicone sling assisted temporalis muscle transfer in the management of lagophthalmos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh C Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim : To evaluate the efficacy of modified temporalis muscle transfer (TMT by silicone sling for the management of paralytic lagophthalmos. Settings and Design: Prospective interventional study. Materials and Methods : Ten patients of lagophthalmos due to facial palsy underwent modified TMT using silicone sling. The patients were followed-up for a period of 3 months. Palpebral aperture in primary gaze and during eye closure were assessed both pre- and postoperatively along with problems associated with lagophthalmos like exposure keratopathy and lacrimation. Statistical Analysis : Paired t-test was applied to measure the statistical outcome. Results : Eight patients achieved full correction of lagophthalmos with no lid gap on closing the eye. The mean (standard deviation (SD lid gap on eye closure was 7.7 (0.86 mm preoperatively, 0.5 (0.47 mm at 1 st postoperative day, and 0.7 (0.75 mm at 3 rd month. There was a reduction in mean lid gap on eye closure of 7 mm at 3 months (P < 0.0001 which is highly significant. The mean (SD vertical interpalpebral distance during primary gaze was 12.05 (1.12 mm preoperatively, 10 (0.94 mm at 1 st postoperative day, and 10.35 (1.08 mm at 3 rd month. There was a reduction in mean vertical inter palpebral distance of 1.7 mm at 3 months (P = 0.001 which is significant. Exposure keratitis decreased in five out of six patients at 3 months. Conclusion : Modified TMT by silicone sling is a useful procedure with lesser morbidity and good outcomes for the treatment of paralytic lagophthalmos due to long standing facial palsy.

  11. Synthesis and corrosion properties of silicon nitride films by ion beam assisted deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, K.; Hatada, R.; Emmerich, R.; Enders, B.; Wolf, G. K.

    1995-12-01

    Silicon nitride films SiN x were deposited on 316L austenitic stainless steel substrates by silicon evaporation and simultaneous nitrogen ion irradiation with an acceleration voltage of 2 kV. In order to study the influence of the nitrogen content on changes in stoichiometry, structure, morphology, thermal oxidation behaviour and corrosion behaviour, the atom to ion transport ratio was systematically varied. The changes of binding states and the stoichiometry were evaluated with XPS and AES analysis. A maximum nitrogen content was reached with a {Si}/{N} transport ratio lower than 2. The films are chemically inert when exposed to laboratory atmosphere up to a temperature of more than 1000°C. XRD and SEM measurements show amorphous and featureless films for transport ratios {Si}/{N} from 1 up to 10. The variation of the corrosion behaviour of coated stainless steel substrates in sulphuric acid and hydrochloric acid shows a minimum at medium transport ratios. This goes parallel with changes in porosity and adhesion. Additional investigations showed that titanium implantation as an intermediate step improves the corrosion resistance considerably.

  12. Pilot-Scale Silicone Process for Low-Cost Carbon Dioxide Capture Preliminary Techno-Economic Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Surinder; Spiry, Irina; Wood, Benjamin; Hance, Dan; Chen, Wei; Kehmna, Mark; McDuffie, Dwayne

    2014-03-31

    This report presents system and economic analysis for a carbon-capture unit which uses an aminosilicone-based solvent for CO{sub 2} capture in a pulverized coal (PC) boiler. The aminosilicone solvent is a 60/40 wt/wt mixture of 3-aminopropyl end-capped polydimethylsiloxane (GAP-1m) with tri-ethylene glycol (TEG) as a co-solvent. For comparison purposes, the report also shows results for a carbon-capture unit based on a conventional approach using mono-ethanol amine (MEA). The first year removal cost of CO{sub 2} for the aminosilicone-based carbon-capture process is $46.04/ton of CO2 as compared to $60.25/ton of CO{sub 2} when MEA is used. The aminosilicone-based process has <77% of the CAPEX of a system using MEA solvent. The lower CAPEX is due to several factors, including the higher working capacity of the aminosilicone solvent compared the MEA, which reduces the solvent flow rate required, reducing equipment sizes. If it is determined that carbon steel can be used in the rich-lean heat exchanger in the carbon capture unit, the first year removal cost of CO{sub 2} decreases to $44.12/ton. The aminosilicone-based solvent has a higher thermal stability than MEA, allowing desorption to be conducted at higher temperatures and pressures, decreasing the number of compressor stages needed. The aminosilicone-based solvent also has a lower vapor pressure, allowing the desorption to be conducted in a continuous-stirred tank reactor versus a more expensive packed column. The aminosilicone-based solvent has a lower heat capacity, which decreases the heat load on the desorber. In summary, the amino-silicone solvent has significant advantages over conventional systems using MEA.

  13. [Investigation on damage of bovine serum albumin (BSA) catalyzed by nano-sized silicon dioxide (SiO2) under ultrasonic irradiation using spectral methods].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Ding, Na; Zhang, Zhao-hong; Guo, Ying; Wang, Shi-xian; Xu, Rui; Zhang, Xiang-dong

    2009-04-01

    The damage of bovine serum albumin (BSA) molecules under ultrasonic irradiation in the presence of nano-sized silicon dioxide (SiO2) particles was studied by UV-Vis and fluorescence spectra. In addition, the influences of ultrasonic irradiation time, nano-sized SiO2 addition amount, solution acidity (pH) and ultrasonic irradiation power on the damage of BSA molecules in aqueous solution were also detected. For BSA solution of 1.0 x 10(-5) mol x L(-1) at (37.0+/-0.2) degrees C, the UV-Vis spectra of BSA solutions showed that the absorption peaks of BSA displayed obvious hyperchromic effect with the increase in some influence factors such as ultrasonic irradiation time, nano-sized SiO2 addition amount, pH value and ultrasonic irradiation power. However, the fluorescence spectra of BSA solutions showed the phenomenon of fluorescence quenching with the increase in ultrasonic irradiation time, nano-sized SiO2 addition amount, pH value and ultrasonic irradiation power. Moreover, the possible mechanism behind the damage of BSA molecule in the presence of nano-sized SiO2 powders under ultrasonic irradiation was discussed. It was considered that the damage of BSA molecules was attributed to the formation of *OH radicals resulting from the sonoluminescence and high-heat excitation of ultrasonic cavitation. The research results could be of great significance to using sonocatalytic method to treat tumour in clinic application and for developing nano-sized drug in the future.

  14. Implantation of silicon dioxide-based nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite and pure phase beta-tricalciumphosphate bone substitute granules in caprine muscle tissue does not induce new bone formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghanaati Shahram

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteoinductive bone substitutes are defined by their ability to induce new bone formation even at heterotopic implantation sites. The present study was designed to analyze the potential osteoinductivity of two different bone substitute materials in caprine muscle tissue. Materials and methods One gram each of either a porous beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP or an hydroxyapatite/silicon dioxide (HA/SiO2-based nanocrystalline bone substitute material was implanted in several muscle pouches of goats. The biomaterials were explanted at 29, 91 and 181 days after implantation. Conventional histology and special histochemical stains were performed to detect osteoblast precursor cells as well as mineralized and unmineralized bone matrix. Results Both materials underwent cellular degradation in which tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP-positive osteoclast-like cells and TRAP-negative multinucleated giant cells were involved. The ß-TCP was completely resorbed within the observation period, whereas some granules of the HA-groups were still detectable after 180 days. Neither osteoblasts, osteoblast precursor cells nor extracellular bone matrix were found within the implantation bed of any of the analyzed biomaterials at any of the observed time points. Conclusions This study showed that ß-TCP underwent a faster degradation than the HA-based material. The lack of osteoinductivity for both materials might be due to their granular shape, as osteoinductivity in goat muscle has been mainly attributed to cylindrical or disc-shaped bone substitute materials. This hypothesis however requires further investigation to systematically analyze various materials with comparable characteristics in the same experimental setting.

  15. Reliability of new poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) membranes treated with oxygen plasma plus silicon dioxide layers for pre-prosthetic guided bone regeneration processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Dalí, G; Castillo-Oyagüe, R; Batista-Cruzado, A; López-Santos, C; Rodríguez-González-Elipe, A; Saffar, J-L; Lynch, C-D; Gutiérrez-Pérez, J-L; Torres-Lagares, D

    2017-03-01

    The use of cold plasmas may improve the surface roughness of poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) membranes, which may stimulate the adhesion of osteogenic mediators and cells, thus accelerating the biodegradation of the barriers. Moreover, the incorporation of metallic-oxide particles to the surface of these membranes may enhance their osteoinductive capacity. Therefore, the aim of this paper was to evaluate the reliability of a new PLGA membrane after being treated with oxygen plasma (PO2) plus silicon dioxide (SiO2) layers for guided bone regeneration (GBR) processes. Circumferential bone defects (diameter: 11 mm; depth: 3 mm) were created on the top of eight experimentation rabbits' skulls and were randomly covered with: (1) PLGA membranes (control), or (2) PLGA/PO2/SiO2 barriers. The animals were euthanized two months afterwards. A micromorphologic study was then performed using ROI (region of interest) colour analysis. Percentage of new bone formation, length of mineralised bone, concentration of osteoclasts, and intensity of ostheosynthetic activity were assessed and compared with those of the original bone tissue. The Kruskal-Wallis test was applied for between-group com Asignificance level of a=0.05 was considered. The PLGA/PO2/SiO2 membranes achieved the significantly highest new bone formation, length of mineralised bone, concentration of osteoclasts, and ostheosynthetic activity. The percentage of regenerated bone supplied by the new membranes was similar to that of the original bone tissue. Unlike what happened in the control group, PLGA/PO2/SiO2 membranes predominantly showed bone layers in advanced stages of formation. The addition of SiO2 layers to PLGA membranes pre-treated with PO2 improves their bone-regeneration potential. Although further research is necessary to corroborate these conclusions in humans, this could be a promising strategy to rebuild the bone architecture prior to rehabilitate edentulous areas.

  16. Video-Assisted Thoracoscopic Resection of a Noninvasive Thymoma in a Cat with Myasthenia Gravis Using Low-Pressure Carbon Dioxide Insufflation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Maureen A; Sutton, Jessie S; Hunt, Geraldine B; Pypendop, Bruno H; Mayhew, Philipp D

    2016-11-01

    To report the use of low-pressure carbon dioxide insufflation during video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery for resection of a noninvasive thymoma in a cat with secondary myasthenia gravis. Clinical case report. Client-owned cat. An 11-year-old castrated male domestic shorthair cat was examined for generalized weakness, voice change, hypersalivation, hyporexia, vomiting, coughing, and gagging. Thoracic ultrasound revealed a cranial mediastinal mass for which cytology was consistent with a thymoma (or lymphoid tissue). Acetylcholine receptor antibody concentration was elevated at 3.16 mmol/L (reference interval thymoma with paraneoplastic myasthenia gravis was made and surgical resection of both mediastinal masses was recommended. Video-assisted thoracoscopic resection of the cranial mediastinal mass and sternal lymph node were performed with low-pressure carbon dioxide insufflation maintained at an intrathoracic pressure of 2-3 mmHg. The cat recovered from surgery without serious complications. Nineteen months after surgery, the cat developed hind limb stiffness. Thoracic radiographs ruled out a cranial mediastinal mass or megaesophagus. Acetylcholine receptor antibody concentration remained elevated at 2.72 mmol/L. Low-pressure thoracic insufflation facilitated video-assisted thoracoscopic resection of cranial mediastinal masses in this cat. © Copyright 2016 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  17. Protected Light-Trapping Silicon by a Simple Structuring Process for Sunlight-Assisted Water Splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santinacci, Lionel; Diouf, Maïmouna W; Barr, Maïssa K S; Fabre, Bruno; Joanny, Loïc; Gouttefangeas, Francis; Loget, Gabriel

    2016-09-21

    Macroporous layers are grown onto n-type silicon by successive photoelectrochemical etching in HF-containing solution and chemical etching in KOH. This specific latter treatment gives highly antireflective properties of the Si surface. The duration of the chemical etching is optimized to render the surface as absorbent as possible, and the morphology of the as-grown layer is characterized by scanning electron microscopy. Further functionalization of such structured Si surface is carried out by atomic layer deposition of a thin conformal and homogeneous TiO2 layer that is crystallized by an annealing at 450 °C. This process allows using such surfaces as photoanodes for water oxidation. The 40 nm thick TiO2 film acts indeed as an efficient protective layer against the photocorrosion of the porous Si in KOH, enhances its wettability, and improves the light absorption of the photoelectrode. The macroporous dual-absorber TiO2/Si has a beneficial effect on water oxidation in 1 M KOH and leads to a considerable negative shift of the onset potential of ∼400 mV as well as a 50% increase in photocurrent at 1 V vs SCE.

  18. Polycrystalline indium phosphide on silicon by indium assisted growth in hydride vapor phase epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metaferia, Wondwosen; Sun, Yan-Ting, E-mail: yasun@kth.se; Lourdudoss, Sebastian [Laboratory of Semiconductor Materials, Department of Materials and Nano Physics, KTH—Royal Institute of Technology, Electrum 229, 164 40 Kista (Sweden); Pietralunga, Silvia M. [CNR-Institute for Photonics and Nanotechnologies, P. Leonardo da Vinci, 32 20133 Milano (Italy); Zani, Maurizio; Tagliaferri, Alberto [Department of Physics Politecnico di Milano, P. Leonardo da Vinci, 32 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2014-07-21

    Polycrystalline InP was grown on Si(001) and Si(111) substrates by using indium (In) metal as a starting material in hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) reactor. In metal was deposited on silicon substrates by thermal evaporation technique. The deposited In resulted in islands of different size and was found to be polycrystalline in nature. Different growth experiments of growing InP were performed, and the growth mechanism was investigated. Atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy for morphological investigation, Scanning Auger microscopy for surface and compositional analyses, powder X-ray diffraction for crystallinity, and micro photoluminescence for optical quality assessment were conducted. It is shown that the growth starts first by phosphidisation of the In islands to InP followed by subsequent selective deposition of InP in HVPE regardless of the Si substrate orientation. Polycrystalline InP of large grain size is achieved and the growth rate as high as 21 μm/h is obtained on both substrates. Sulfur doping of the polycrystalline InP was investigated by growing alternating layers of sulfur doped and unintentionally doped InP for equal interval of time. These layers could be delineated by stain etching showing that enough amount of sulfur can be incorporated. Grains of large lateral dimension up to 3 μm polycrystalline InP on Si with good morphological and optical quality is obtained. The process is generic and it can also be applied for the growth of other polycrystalline III–V semiconductor layers on low cost and flexible substrates for solar cell applications.

  19. First human hNT neurons patterned on parylene-C/silicon dioxide substrates: Combining an accessible cell line and robust patterning technology for the study of the pathological adult human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unsworth, C P; Graham, E S; Delivopoulos, E; Dragunow, M; Murray, A F

    2010-12-15

    In this communication, we describe a new method which has enabled the first patterning of human neurons (derived from the human teratocarcinoma cell line (hNT)) on parylene-C/silicon dioxide substrates. We reveal the details of the nanofabrication processes, cell differentiation and culturing protocols necessary to successfully pattern hNT neurons which are each key aspects of this new method. The benefits in patterning human neurons on silicon chip using an accessible cell line and robust patterning technology are of widespread value. Thus, using a combined technology such as this will facilitate the detailed study of the pathological human brain at both the single cell and network level. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Twisted graphene-assisted photocarrier transfer from HgSe colloidal quantum dots into silicon with enhanced collection and transport efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xin; Wu, Guang Fu; Lai, King Wai Chiu

    2017-06-01

    We report a strategy to realize and facilitate the photocarrier transport from mercury selenium colloidal quantum dots (HgSe CQDs) into silicon with the assistance of twisted graphene. A nanocomposite material consisting of HgSe CQDs and twisted graphene has been synthesized. By bringing the nanocomposites into contact with silicon, a HgSe CQD-twisted graphene nanocomposite/silicon junction was fabricated and demonstrated photoresponses in the long-wave infrared range. In the nanocomposites, the surface of twisted graphene was decorated with HgSe CQDs. Benefiting from the twisted structure in the nanocomposites, the active sensing area and light-matter interaction length are greatly increased. Driven by the interfacial built-in potential, photocarriers directly transfer from HgSe CQDs into the twist graphene, which serves as a fast carrier transport pathway to silicon, leading to high photocarrier collection efficiency. Compared with vertically stacked HgSe CQD film/flat graphene, the application of HgSe CQD-twisted graphene nanocomposites avoids photocarriers transporting via the hopping mechanism and over 2700% enhancement ratio of spectral responsivity was achieved, reaching 31.5 mA/W@9 μm. The interfacial energy band diagram was deduced for a better understanding of the photocarrier transfer process occurring at the interface between HgSe colloidal quantum dots, twist graphene, and silicon.

  1. Computer assisted design of poly-silicon gated enhancement-mode, lateral double quantum dot devices for quantum computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Nathaniel; Young, Ralph; Borras Pinilla, Carlos; Stalford, Harold; Nielsen, Erik; Muller, Richard; Rahman, Rajib; Tracy, Lisa; Wendt, Joel; Lilly, Michael; Carroll, Malcolm

    2012-02-01

    We discuss trade-offs of different double quantum dot and charge sensor lay-outs using computer assisted design (CAD). We use primarily a semi-classical model, augmented with a self-consistent configuration interaction method. Although CAD for quantum dots is difficult due to uncontrolled factors (e.g., disorder), different ideal designs can still be compared. Comparisons of simulation and measured dot characteristics, such as capacitance, show that CAD can agree well with experiment for relevant cases. CAD results comparing several different designs will be discussed including a comparison to measurement results from the same designs. Trade-offs between poly-silicon and metal gate lay-outs will also be discussed. This work was performed, in part, at the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, a U.S. DOE, Office of Basic Energy Sciences user facility. The work was supported by the Sandia National Laboratories Directed Research and Development Program. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  2. Silicon nanowires with controlled sidewall profile and roughness fabricated by thin-film dewetting and metal-assisted chemical etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azeredo, B. P.; Sadhu, J.; Ma, J.; Jacobs, K.; Kim, J.; Lee, K.; Eraker, J. H.; Li, X.; Sinha, S.; Fang, N.; Ferreira, P.; Hsu, K.

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents a non-lithographic approach to generate wafer-scale single crystal silicon nanowires (SiNWs) with controlled sidewall profile and surface morphology. The approach begins with silver (Ag) thin-film thermal dewetting, gold (Au) deposition and lift-off to generate a large-scale Au mesh on Si substrates. This is followed by metal-assisted chemical etching (MacEtch), where the Au mesh serves as a catalyst to produce arrays of smooth Si nanowires with tunable taper up to 13°. The mean diameter of the thus fabricated SiNWs can be controlled to range from 62 to 300 nm with standard deviations as small as 13.6 nm, and the areal coverage of the wire arrays can be up to 46%. Control of the mean wire diameter is achieved by controlling the pore diameter of the metallic mesh which is, in turn, controlled by adjusting the initial thin-film thickness and deposition rate. To control the wire surface morphology, a post-fabrication roughening step is added to the approach. This step uses Au nanoparticles and slow-rate MacEtch to produce rms surface roughness up to 3.6 nm.

  3. Structural and optical properties of thin films porous amorphous silicon carbide formed by Ag-assisted photochemical etching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boukezzata, A.; Keffous, A.; Cheriet, A.; Belkacem, Y.; Gabouze, N.; Manseri, A.; Nezzal, G.; Kechouane, M.; Bright, A.; Guerbous, L.; Menari, H.

    2010-01-01

    In this work, we present the formation of porous layers on hydrogenated amorphous SiC (a-SiC: H) by Ag-assisted photochemical etching using HF/K 2 S 2 O 8 solution under UV illumination at 254 nm wavelength. The amorphous films a-SiC: H were elaborated by d.c. magnetron sputtering using a hot pressed polycrystalline 6H-SiC target. Because of the high resistivity of the SiC layer, around 1.6 MΩ cm and in order to facilitate the chemical etching, a thin metallic film of high purity silver (Ag) has been deposited under vacuum onto the thin a-SiC: H layer. The etched surface was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, secondary ion mass spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy and photoluminescence. The results show that the morphology of etched a-SiC: H surface evolves with etching time. For an etching time of 20 min the surface presents a hemispherical crater, indicating that the porous SiC layer is perforated. Photoluminescence characterization of etched a-SiC: H samples for 20 min shows a high and an intense blue PL, whereas it has been shown that the PL decreases for higher etching time. Finally, a dissolution mechanism of the silicon carbide in 1HF/1K 2 S 2 O 8 solution has been proposed.

  4. Experimental validation of a fuel additive assisted regeneration model in silicon carbide diesel filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stratakis, G.A.; Pontikakis, G.N.; Stamatelos, A.M. [University of Thessaly, Volos (Greece). Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Dept.

    2004-07-01

    In this paper, an experimental validation procedure is applied to an improved one-dimensional model of fuel additive assisted regeneration of a diesel particulate filter. Full-scale tests on an engine bench of the regeneration behaviour of a diesel filter fitted to a modern diesel engine run on catalyst-doped fuel are employed for this purpose. The main objectives of the validation procedure concern the ability of the model to predict the effects of exhaust mass flowrate, initial soot loading mass, volatile organic fraction of the soot and additive concentration in the fuel. The results of the validation procedure are intended to demonstrate the scope and extent of applicability of models of this type to real-world design and optimization studies with diesel filters. (author)

  5. Template-Assisted Wet-Combustion Synthesis of Fibrous Nickel-Based Catalyst for Carbon Dioxide Methanation and Methane Steam Reforming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghayan, M; Potemkin, D I; Rubio-Marcos, F; Uskov, S I; Snytnikov, P V; Hussainova, I

    2017-12-20

    Efficient capture and recycling of CO 2 enable not only prevention of global warming but also the supply of useful low-carbon fuels. The catalytic conversion of CO 2 into an organic compound is a promising recycling approach which opens new concepts and opportunities for catalytic and industrial development. Here we report about template-assisted wet-combustion synthesis of a one-dimensional nickel-based catalyst for carbon dioxide methanation and methane steam reforming. Because of a high temperature achieved in a short time during reaction and a large amount of evolved gases, the wet-combustion synthesis yields homogeneously precipitated nanoparticles of NiO with average particle size of 4 nm on alumina nanofibers covered with a NiAl 2 O 4 nanolayer. The as-synthesized core-shell structured fibers exhibit outstanding activity in steam reforming of methane and sufficient activity in carbon dioxide methanation with 100% selectivity toward methane formation. The as-synthesized catalyst shows stable operation under the reaction conditions for at least 50 h.

  6. The effects of plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition process variables on the properties of amorphous silicon carbide films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskowitz, Illa Lorren

    Amorphous hydrogenated carbon films containing silicon are of considerable interest for a variety of applications including window layers for solar cells, anti-abrasion coatings, masks for x-ray photolithography and biomedical applications. Plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition (PACVD) is one of the preferred techniques for depositing these films. a-Si:C:H films were deposited by PACVD using a plasma reactor with capacitively coupled parallel plate configuration operating at 13.56 MHz. The following film properties were studied: intrinsic stress (from the curvature of the substrates), micro-hardness (obtained from nanoindentation), surface roughness and morphology (studied using atomic force microscopy), surface energy (obtained from wetting angle measurements) and the optical constants of the films (as obtained from computer modeling of ellipsometric data). The composition of the films was established from Rutherford backscattering experiments and the hydrogen content was measured using nuclear reaction analysis. By investigating the process variables of the PACVD system using a 2-level factorial experimental design, a better understanding of this complex deposition process has been gained. From this study some of the relationships between the process variables of the PACVD system and physical characteristics of the deposited films such as surface roughness, film stress and optical properties have been established. For example, increasing the energy of bombarding ions produced an increase in the surface roughness under certain conditions, but produced a decrease in roughness under other conditions. In another case, changing the composition of the source gas produced a significant change in the refractive index of the films when the ion energy was high, but had little effect when the ion energy was low. Values obtained for the surface roughness of the films and the dispersion functions of n and k obtained from the ellipsometric modeling were in general

  7. Formation of porous silicon oxide from substrate-bound silicon rich silicon oxide layers by continuous-wave laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Nan; Fricke-Begemann, Th.; Peretzki, P.; Ihlemann, J.; Seibt, M.

    2018-03-01

    Silicon nanocrystals embedded in silicon oxide that show room temperature photoluminescence (PL) have great potential in silicon light emission applications. Nanocrystalline silicon particle formation by laser irradiation has the unique advantage of spatially controlled heating, which is compatible with modern silicon micro-fabrication technology. In this paper, we employ continuous wave laser irradiation to decompose substrate-bound silicon-rich silicon oxide films into crystalline silicon particles and silicon dioxide. The resulting microstructure is studied using transmission electron microscopy techniques with considerable emphasis on the formation and properties of laser damaged regions which typically quench room temperature PL from the nanoparticles. It is shown that such regions consist of an amorphous matrix with a composition similar to silicon dioxide which contains some nanometric silicon particles in addition to pores. A mechanism referred to as "selective silicon ablation" is proposed which consistently explains the experimental observations. Implications for the damage-free laser decomposition of silicon-rich silicon oxides and also for controlled production of porous silicon dioxide films are discussed.

  8. Morphological and structural evolution of the anatase phase of silicon modified titanium dioxide obtained by Sol-gel; Evolucao estrutural e morfologica da fase anatase de dioxido de titanio modificada com silicio obtido pelo Metodo Sol-Gel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes, S.A.; Oliveira, C.T.; Ciola, R.A.; Cavalheiro, A.A., E-mail: silvanicelopes@gmail.com [Universidade Estadual de Mato Grosso do Sul (CPTREN/UEMS), Navirai, MS (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas Tecnologicas em Recursos Naturais

    2011-07-01

    The photonic efficiency of the titanium dioxide photocatalyst is dependent on the crystalline structure and the anatase phase presents high efficiency in the border region between the UV-B and UV-A, with a redox potential sufficient to generate hydroxyl radicals and superoxide ion in order to oxidate organic compounds. In spite of the organic matter degradation effectiveness, the efficiency can be reduced substantially due to the presence of crystalline defects, which act as premature recombination centers of the electron-hole pair. The increasing of calcining temperature allows the elimination of most of these defects, but the structural ordering at temperatures around 600°C eventually leads to the phase transition toward rutile, which is not photoactive. In this work, it was demonstrated through FTIR and XRD that the silicon modifier presence stabilizes the anatase phase even at temperatures as high as 900°C. (author)

  9. Sub-parts per million NO2 chemi-transistor sensors based on composite porous silicon/gold nanostructures prepared by metal-assisted etching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainato, Michela; Strambini, Lucanos Marsilio; Rella, Simona; Mazzotta, Elisabetta; Barillaro, Giuseppe

    2015-04-08

    Surface doping of nano/mesostructured materials with metal nanoparticles to promote and optimize chemi-transistor sensing performance represents the most advanced research trend in the field of solid-state chemical sensing. In spite of the promising results emerging from metal-doping of a number of nanostructured semiconductors, its applicability to silicon-based chemi-transistor sensors has been hindered so far by the difficulties in integrating the composite metal-silicon nanostructures using the complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology. Here we propose a facile and effective top-down method for the high-yield fabrication of chemi-transistor sensors making use of composite porous silicon/gold nanostructures (cSiAuNs) acting as sensing gate. In particular, we investigate the integration of cSiAuNs synthesized by metal-assisted etching (MAE), using gold nanoparticles (NPs) as catalyst, in solid-state junction-field-effect transistors (JFETs), aimed at the detection of NO2 down to 100 parts per billion (ppb). The chemi-transistor sensors, namely cSiAuJFETs, are CMOS compatible, operate at room temperature, and are reliable, sensitive, and fully recoverable for the detection of NO2 at concentrations between 100 and 500 ppb, up to 48 h of continuous operation.

  10. Evolution mechanism of mesoporous silicon nanopillars grown by metal-assisted chemical etching and nanosphere lithography: correlation of Raman spectra and red photoluminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadan, Prajith; John, Siju; Anappara, Aji A.; Narayana, Chandrabhas; Barshilia, Harish C.

    2016-07-01

    We have fabricated highly ordered, vertically aligned, high aspect ratio silicon nanopillars (SiNPLs) of diameter ~80 nm by combining metal-assisted chemical etching and nanosphere lithography. The evolution of surface morphology of porous silicon nanopillars has been explained, and the presence of mesoporous structures was detected on the top of silicon nanopillars using field emission scanning electron microscopy. The mesoporosity of the SiNPLs is confirmed by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller measurements. The peak shift and the splitting of optical phonon modes into LO and TO modes in the micro-Raman spectra of mesoporous SiNPLs manifest the presence of 2-3 nm porous Si nanocrystallites ( P-SiNCs) on the top of SiNPLs and the size of crystallites was calculated using bond polarizability model for spherical phonon confinement. The origin of red luminescence is explained using quantum confinement (QC) and QC luminescent center models for the P-SiNCs, which is correlated with the micro-Raman spectra. Finally, we confirmed the origin of the red luminescence is from the P-SiNCs formed on surface of SiNPLs, highly desired for LED devices by suitably tailoring the substrate.

  11. Effect of hydrofluoric acid concentration on the evolution of photoluminescence characteristics in porous silicon nanowires prepared by Ag-assisted electroless etching method

    KAUST Repository

    Najar, Adel

    2012-01-01

    We report on the structural and optical properties of porous silicon nanowires (PSiNWs) fabricated using silver (Ag) ions assisted electroless etching method. Silicon nanocrystallites with sizes <5 nm embedded in amorphous silica have been observed from PSiNW samples etched using the optimum hydrofluoric acid (HF) concentration. The strongest photoluminescence (PL) signal has been measured from samples etched with 4.8 M of HF, beyond which a significant decreasing in PL emission intensity has been observed. A qualitative model is proposed for the formation of PSiNWs in the presence of Ag catalyst. This model affirms our observations in PL enhancement for samples etched using HF <4.8 M and the eventual PL reduction for samples etched beyond 4.8 M of HF concentration. The enhancement in PL signals has been associated to the formation of PSiNWs and the quantum confinement effect in the Si nanocrystallites. Compared to PSiNWs without Si-O x, the HF treated samples exhibited significant blue PL peak shift of 100 nm. This effect has been correlated to the formation of defect states in the surface oxide. PSiNWs fabricated using the electroless etching method can find useful applications in optical sensors and as anti-reflection layer in silicon-based solar cells. © 2012 American Institute of Physics.

  12. A study on the edge chipping according to spindle speed and inclination angle of workpiece in laser-assisted milling of silicon nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Wan-Sik; Lee, Choon-Man

    2018-02-01

    Ceramics are difficult to machine due to their high hardness and brittleness. As an effective method for machining ceramics, laser-assisted machining (LAM) has been studied by many researchers. In particular, many studies of methods to improve the machinability of silicon nitride using LAM have been performed. However, there is little research on the effect of the inclination angle of the workpiece, because varying the angle increases the difficulty of controlling the laser preheating and tool path. This paper investigates the effect of preheating temperature, spindle speed and inclination angle of the workpiece on edge chipping of silicon nitride in an effort to obtain an enhanced surface finish using laser-assisted milling (LAMill). The machining conditions were determined by considering the parameters that can reduce edge chipping using related theory. Experimental results showed a reduction in edge chipping based on increases in preheating temperature, spindle speed and inclination angle of the workpiece. Also, by increasing the spindle speed and the inclination angle of the workpiece, surface roughness was decreased due to reduction in the cutting force. The energy efficiency of LAMill by comparing the specific cutting energy according to the machining conditions is analyzed.

  13. UV-Assisted Alcohol Sensors using Gallium Nitride Nanowires Functionalized with Zinc Oxide and Tin Dioxide Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajpai, Ritu

    The motivation behind this work has been to address two of the most challenging issues posed to semiconductor gas sensors--- tuning the device selectivity and sensitivity to a wide variety of gases. In a chemiresistor type nanowire sensor, the sensitivity and selectivity depend on the interaction of different chemical analytes with the nanowire surface. Constrained by the surface properties of the nanowire material, most nanowire sensors can detect only specific type of analytes. In order to make a nano-sensor array for a wide range of analytes, there is a need to tune the device sensitivity and selectivity towards different chemicals. Employing the inherent advantages of nanostructure based sensing such as large surface area, miniature size, low power consumption, and nmol/mol (ppb) sensitivity, an attempt has been made to propose a device with tunable selectivity and sensitivity. The idea proposed in this work is to functionalize GaN nanowires which have relatively inactive surface properties (i.e., with no chemiresistive sensitivity to different classes of organic vapors), with analyte dependent active metal oxides. The selectivity of the sensor devices is controlled independent of the surface properties of the nanowire itself. It is the surface properties of the functionalizing metal oxides which determine the selectivity of these sensors. Further facilitated by the proposed fabrication technique, these sensors can be easily tuned to detect different gases. The prototype developed in this work is that of a UV assisted alcohol sensor using GaN nanowires functionalized with ZnO and SnO2 nanoparticles. As opposed to the widely demonstrated metal oxide based sensors assisted by elevated temperature, the operation of photoconductive semiconductor sensor devices such as those fabricated in this work, can also be assisted by UV illumination at room temperature. Temperature assisted sensing requires an integrated on-chip heater, which could impose constraints on the

  14. Enhanced Metal-Insulator Transition Performance in Scalable Vanadium Dioxide Thin Films Prepared Using a Moisture-Assisted Chemical Solution Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Weizheng; Gao, Min; Lu, Chang; Zhang, Zhi; Chan, Cheuk Ho; Zhuge, Lanjian; Dai, Jiyan; Yang, Hao; Chen, Chonglin; Park, Bae Ho; Jia, Quanxi; Lin, Yuan

    2018-03-07

    Vanadium dioxide (VO 2 ) is a strong-correlated metal-oxide with a sharp metal-insulator transition (MIT) for a range of applications. However, synthesizing epitaxial VO 2 films with desired properties has been a challenge because of the difficulty in controlling the oxygen stoichiometry of VO x , where x can be in the range of 1 < x < 2.5 and V has multiple valence states. Herein, a unique moisture-assisted chemical solution approach has been developed to successfully manipulate the oxygen stoichiometry, to significantly broaden the growth window, and to significantly enhance the MIT performance of VO 2 films. The obvious broadening of the growth window of stoichiometric VO 2 thin films, from 4 to 36 °C, is ascribed to a self-adjusted process for oxygen partial pressure at different temperatures by introducing moisture. A resistance change as large as 4 orders of magnitude has been achieved in VO 2 thin films with a sharp transition width of less than 1 °C. The much enhanced MIT properties can be attributed to the higher and more uniform oxygen stoichiometry. This technique is not only scientifically interesting but also technologically important for fabricating wafer-scaled VO 2 films with uniform properties for practical device applications.

  15. Determination of Pb in river water samples by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry after ultrasound-assisted co-precipitation with manganese dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sousa Bispo, Marcia; Santos da Boa Morte, Elane; Korn das Gracas Andrade, Maria; Sena Gomes Teixeira, Leonardo; Korn, Mauro; Costa, Antonio Celso Spinola

    2005-01-01

    A simple and efficient procedure for separation and pre-concentration using ultrasound-assisted co-precipitation with manganese dioxide was developed for Pb determination by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES). The optimization process was carried out using a two-level factorial design and a Doehlert matrix. Three variables (i.e. concentration of oxidizing solution-KMnO 4 , concentration of MnSO 4 solution and time of ultrasonic irradiation) were used as factors in the optimization. The recoveries, based on the analysis of spiked samples, were between 90% and 105%, and the precision was ≤ 5%. The detection limit and quantification limit for Pb determination were 3.2 and 10.7 μg L -1 , respectively. The proposed method was applied for the determination of Pb in water samples from a river heavily polluted by industrial effluents. The recovery measured by analyte addition technique showed that the proposed pre-concentration method had good accuracy

  16. [Synergetic effects of silicon carbide and molecular sieve loaded catalyst on microwave assisted catalytic oxidation of toluene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Hui; Bo, Long-Li; Liu, Hai-Nan; Zhang, Hao; Sun, Jian-Yu; Yang, Li; Cai, Li-Dong

    2013-06-01

    Molecular sieve loaded catalyst was prepared by impregnation method, microwave-absorbing material silicon carbide and the catalyst were investigated for catalytic oxidation of toluene by microwave irradiation. Research work examined effects of silicon carbide and molecular sieve loading Cu-V catalyst's mixture ratio as well as mixed approach changes on degradation of toluene, and characteristics of catalyst were measured through scanning electron microscope, specific surface area test and X-ray diffraction analysis. The result showed that the fixed bed reactor had advantages of both thermal storage property and low-temperature catalytic oxidation when 20% silicon carbide was filled at the bottom of the reactor, and this could effectively improve the utilization of microwave energy as well as catalytic oxidation efficiency of toluene. Under microwave power of 75 W and 47 W, complete-combustion temperatures of molecular sieve loaded Cu-V catalyst and Cu-V-Ce catalyst to toluene were 325 degrees C and 160 degrees C, respectively. Characteristics of the catalysts showed that mixture of rare-earth element Ce increased the dispersion of active components in the surface of catalyst, micropore structure of catalyst effectively guaranteed high adsorption capacity for toluene, while amorphous phase of Cu and V oxides increased the activity of catalyst greatly.

  17. Bisphosphine dioxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moloy, Kenneth G. (Charleston, WV)

    1990-01-01

    A process for the production of organic bisphosphine dioxides from organic bisphosphonates. The organic bisphosphonate is reacted with a Grignard reagent to give relatively high yields of the organic bisphosphine dioxide.

  18. Bisphosphine dioxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moloy, K.G.

    1990-02-20

    A process is described for the production of organic bisphosphine dioxides from organic bisphosphonates. The organic bisphosphonate is reacted with a Grignard reagent to give relatively high yields of the organic bisphosphine dioxide.

  19. Two-Photon Laser-Assisted Device Alteration in Silicon Integrated Circuits (Open Access, Publisher’s Version)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-18

    2199–2207 (2003). 17. K. A. Serrels, E. Ramsay, R. J. Warburton, and D. T. Reid, “Nanoscale optical microscopy in the vectorial focusing regime,” Nat...was a proprietary 28 nm bulk-silicon test device (Vdd = 0.8 V, clock frequency = 50 MHz) containing production logic blocks. To exercise the device, a... production scan test, lasting 21 μs, was modified to engineer a race condition – as illustrated in Fig. 1. Data were launched through a data-path

  20. Synthesis and Evaluation of Microspherical Li1.2Mn0.54Co0.13Ni0.13O2 through Carbon Dioxides-assisted Co-precipitation Method for Lithium-ion Battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Wenchao; Jiang, Jicheng; Liu, Wei; Yan, Xiao; Sun, Deye; Jin, Yongcheng; Wang, Jing; Xiang, Lan; Munakata, Hirokazu; Kanamura, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Lithium-rich layered electrode materials are of interest as a promising candidate of cathodes for lithium-ion batteries because of their excellent electrochemical properties. The electrochemical performance of these materials is mainly regulated by preparation conditions during synthesis and calcination process. Here, microspherical Li 1.2 Mn 0.54 Co 0.13 Ni 0.13 O 2 (LMNCO) particles are synthesized through steady pH value control with carbon dioxides bubbling method in co-precipitation process using a simple reactor. SEM images present that CP-LMNCO sample prepared through the assistance of carbon dioxides has spherical particle morphology, while sample (TP-LMNCO) without carbon dioxides assistance shows large nanoparticles agglomeration. The CP-LMNCO electrode demonstrates superior electrochemical performance, which exhibits capacity retention of 97.76% after 100 cycles compared with only 81.94% for TP-LMNCO electrode at 1C (250 mA g −1 ). Even at a higher current density (5C), the CP-LMNCO electrode shows reversible capacity up to 105.4 mA h g −1 . The remarkably improved electrochemical performance of CP-LMNCO electrode is ascribed to spherical morphology with small surface area which decreases side reactions with electrolyte during cycling and smaller primary sizes which reduce lithium ion (Li + ) diffusion distance. Furthermore, the synthesis of spherical materials using metal sulfate with high concentration (up to 5 M) as starting agents are attempted under carbon dioxides assisted conditions, and as-prepared materials also show improved performance.

  1. Deposition of thin layers of boron nitrides and hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon assisted by high current direct current arc plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franz, D.

    1999-09-01

    In the frame of this thesis, a high current direct current arc (HCDCA) used for the industrial deposition of diamond, has been adapted to study the deposition of two types of coatings: a) boron nitride, whose cubic phase is similar to diamond, for tribological applications, b) hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon, for applications in the semiconductor fields (flat panel displays, solar cells,...). For the deposition of these coatings, the substrates were placed in the diffusion region of the arc. The substrate heating is mainly due to atomic species recombining on its surface. The deposition temperature, varying from 300 to 900 o C according to the films deposited, is determined by the substrate position, the arc power and the injected gas fluxes, without the use of any external heating or cooling system. Measurements performed on the arc plasma show that the electronic temperature is around 2 eV (23'000 K) while the gas temperature is lower than 5500 K. Typical electronic densities are in the range of 10 12 -10 1' 3 cm -3 . For the deposition of boron nitride films, different boron precursors were used and a wide parameter range was investigated. The extreme difficulty of synthesising cubic boron nitride films by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) did not allow to stabilize the cubic phase of boron nitride in HCDCA. Coatings resulted in hexagonal or amorphous boron nitride with a chemical composition close to stoichiometric. The presence of hydrogen leads to the deposition of rough and porous films. Negative biasing of the samples, for positive ion bombardment, is commonly used to stabilize the cubic phase. In HCDCA and in our biasing range, only a densification of the films could be observed. A boron nitride deposition plasma study by infrared absorption spectroscopy in a capacitive radio frequency reactor has demonstrated the usefulness of this diagnostic for the understanding of the various chemical reactions which occur in this kind of plasma. Diborane

  2. The influence of initial defects on mechanical stress and deformation distribution in oxidized silicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulinich O. A.

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The near-surface silicon layers in silicondioxide silicon systems with modern methods of research are investigated. It is shown that these layers have compound structure and their parameters depend on oxidation and initial silicon parameters. It is shown the influence of initial defects on mechanical stress and deformation distribution in oxidized silicon.

  3. Effective dopant activation by susceptor-assisted microwave annealing of low energy boron implanted and phosphorus implanted silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Zhao; Vemuri, Rajitha N. P.; Alford, T. L., E-mail: TA@asu.edu [School of Matter, Transport, and Energy, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); David Theodore, N. [CHD-Fab, Freescale Semiconductor Inc., 1300 N. Alma School Rd., Chandler, Arizona 85224 (United States); Lu, Wei; Lau, S. S. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California, San Diego, California 92093 (United States); Lanz, A. [Department of Mathematics, Norfolk State University, Norfolk, Virginia 23504 (United States)

    2013-12-28

    Rapid processing and reduced end-of-range diffusion result from susceptor-assisted microwave (MW) annealing, making this technique an efficient processing alternative for electrically activating dopants within ion-implanted semiconductors. Sheet resistance and Hall measurements provide evidence of electrical activation. Susceptor-assisted MW annealing, of ion-implanted Si, enables more effective dopant activation and at lower temperatures than required for rapid thermal annealing (RTA). Raman spectroscopy and ion channeling analyses are used to monitor the extent of ion implantation damage and recrystallization. The presence and behavior of extended defects are monitored by cross-section transmission electron microscopy. Phosphorus implanted Si samples experience effective electrical activation upon MW annealing. On the other hand, when boron implanted Si is MW annealed, the growth of extended defects results in reduced crystalline quality that hinders the electrical activation process. Further comparison of dopant diffusion resulting from MW annealing and rapid thermal annealing is performed using secondary ion mass spectroscopy. MW annealed ion implanted samples show less end-of-range diffusion when compared to RTA samples. In particular, MW annealed P{sup +} implanted samples achieve no visible diffusion and equivalent electrical activation at a lower temperature and with a shorter time-duration of annealing compared to RTA. In this study, the peak temperature attained during annealing does not depend on the dopant species or dose, for susceptor-assisted MW annealing of ion-implanted Si.

  4. Direct Production of Silicones From Sand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larry N. Lewis; F.J. Schattenmann: J.P. Lemmon

    2001-09-30

    Silicon, in the form of silica and silicates, is the second most abundant element in the earth's crust. However the synthesis of silicones (scheme 1) and almost all organosilicon chemistry is only accessible through elemental silicon. Silicon dioxide (sand or quartz) is converted to chemical-grade elemental silicon in an energy intensive reduction process, a result of the exceptional thermodynamic stability of silica. Then, the silicon is reacted with methyl chloride to give a mixture of methylchlorosilanes catalyzed by cooper containing a variety of tract metals such as tin, zinc etc. The so-called direct process was first discovered at GE in 1940. The methylchlorosilanes are distilled to purify and separate the major reaction components, the most important of which is dimethyldichlorosilane. Polymerization of dimethyldichlorosilane by controlled hydrolysis results in the formation of silicone polymers. Worldwide, the silicones industry produces about 1.3 billion pounds of the basic silicon polymer, polydimethylsiloxane.

  5. Transformational silicon electronics

    KAUST Repository

    Rojas, Jhonathan Prieto

    2014-02-25

    In today\\'s traditional electronics such as in computers or in mobile phones, billions of high-performance, ultra-low-power devices are neatly integrated in extremely compact areas on rigid and brittle but low-cost bulk monocrystalline silicon (100) wafers. Ninety percent of global electronics are made up of silicon. Therefore, we have developed a generic low-cost regenerative batch fabrication process to transform such wafers full of devices into thin (5 μm), mechanically flexible, optically semitransparent silicon fabric with devices, then recycling the remaining wafer to generate multiple silicon fabric with chips and devices, ensuring low-cost and optimal utilization of the whole substrate. We show monocrystalline, amorphous, and polycrystalline silicon and silicon dioxide fabric, all from low-cost bulk silicon (100) wafers with the semiconductor industry\\'s most advanced high-κ/metal gate stack based high-performance, ultra-low-power capacitors, field effect transistors, energy harvesters, and storage to emphasize the effectiveness and versatility of this process to transform traditional electronics into flexible and semitransparent ones for multipurpose applications. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  6. Stem-loop DNA-assisted silicon nanowires-based biochemical sensors with ultra-high sensitivity, specificity, and multiplexing capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Juan; Jiang, Xiangxu; Zhong, Yiling; Lu, Yimei; Wang, Siyi; Wei, Xinpan; Su, Yuanyuan; He, Yao

    2014-07-01

    A class of stem-loop DNA-assisted silicon nanowires (SiNWs)-based fluorescent biosensor is presented in this report. Significantly, the sensor enables rapid and sensitive detection of DNA targets with a concentration as low as 1 pM. Moreover, the large planar surface of SiNWs facilitates simultaneous assembly with different DNA strands, which is favorable for multiplexed DNA detection. On the other hand, the SiNWs-based sensor is highly efficacious for detecting heavy metal ions. Mercury ions (Hg2+) of low concentrations (e.g., 5 pM) are readily identified from its mixture with over 10 kinds of interfering metal ions, even in real water samples. Given that SiNWs can be fabricated in a facile, reproducible and low-cost manner, this kind of SiNWs-based high-performance sensor is expected to be a practical analytical tool for a variety of biological and environment-protection applications.A class of stem-loop DNA-assisted silicon nanowires (SiNWs)-based fluorescent biosensor is presented in this report. Significantly, the sensor enables rapid and sensitive detection of DNA targets with a concentration as low as 1 pM. Moreover, the large planar surface of SiNWs facilitates simultaneous assembly with different DNA strands, which is favorable for multiplexed DNA detection. On the other hand, the SiNWs-based sensor is highly efficacious for detecting heavy metal ions. Mercury ions (Hg2+) of low concentrations (e.g., 5 pM) are readily identified from its mixture with over 10 kinds of interfering metal ions, even in real water samples. Given that SiNWs can be fabricated in a facile, reproducible and low-cost manner, this kind of SiNWs-based high-performance sensor is expected to be a practical analytical tool for a variety of biological and environment-protection applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr01097c

  7. Maskless and resist-free rapid prototyping of three-dimensional structures through electron beam induced deposition (EBID) of carbon in combination with metal-assisted chemical etching (MaCE) of silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rykaczewski, Konrad; Hildreth, Owen J; Kulkarni, Dhaval; Henry, Matthew R; Kim, Song-Kil; Wong, Ching Ping; Tsukruk, Vladimir V; Fedorov, Andrei G

    2010-04-01

    In this work, we introduce a maskless, resist-free rapid prototyping method to fabricate three-dimensional structures using electron beam induced deposition (EBID) of amorphous carbon (aC) from a residual hydrocarbon precursor in combination with metal-assisted chemical etching (MaCE) of silicon. We demonstrate that EBID-made patterned aC coating, with thickness of even a few nanometers, acts as a negative "mask" for the etching process and is sufficient for localized termination of the MaCE of silicon. Optimal aC deposition settings and gold film thickness for fabrication of high-aspect-ratio nanoscale 3D silicon structures are determined. The speed necessary for optimal aC feature deposition is found to be comparable to the writing speed of standard Electron Beam Lithography and the MaCE etching rate is found to be comparable to standard deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) rate.

  8. Silicone metalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maghribi, Mariam N. (Livermore, CA); Krulevitch, Peter (Pleasanton, CA); Hamilton, Julie (Tracy, CA)

    2008-12-09

    A system for providing metal features on silicone comprising providing a silicone layer on a matrix and providing a metal layer on the silicone layer. An electronic apparatus can be produced by the system. The electronic apparatus comprises a silicone body and metal features on the silicone body that provide an electronic device.

  9. Effect of Rheology and Poloxamers Properties on Release of Drugs from Silicon Dioxide Gel-Filled Hard Gelatin Capsules-A Further Enhancement of Viability of Liquid Semisolid Matrix Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultana, Misbah; Butt, Mobashar Ahmad; Saeed, Tariq; Mahmood, Rizwan; Ul Hassan, Saeed; Hussain, Khalid; Raza, Syed Atif; Ahsan, Muhammad; Bukhari, Nadeem Irfan

    2017-08-01

    The liquid and semisolid matrix technology, filling liquids, semi-solids and gels in hard gelatin capsule are promising, thus, there is a need of enhanced research interest in the technology. Therefore, the present study was aimed to investigate isoniazid (freely soluble) and metronidazole (slightly soluble) gels filled in hard gelatin capsules for the effect of poloxamers of different viscosities on release of the drugs. Gel of each drug (10% w/w, particle size 180-250 μm), prepared by mixing poloxamer and 8% w/w hydrophilic silicon dioxide (Aerosil® A200), was assessed for rheology, dispersion stability and release profile. Both the drugs remained dispersed in majority of gels for more than 30 days, and dispersions were depended on gels' viscosity, which was further depended on viscosity of poloxamers. A small change in viscosity was noted in gels on storage. FTIR spectra indicated no interactions between components of the gels. The gels exhibited thixotropic and shear-thinning behaviour, which were suitable for filling in hard gelatin capsules without any leakage from the capsules. The release of both drugs from the phase-stable gels for 30 days followed first-order kinetics and was found to be correlated to drugs' solubility, poloxamers' viscosity, polyoxyethylene contents and proportion of block copolymer (poloxamers) in the gels. The findings of the present study indicated that release of drugs of different solubilities (isoniazid and metronidazole) might be modified from gels using different poloxamers and Aerosil® A200.

  10. Microwave assisted synthesis and structure-activity relationship of 4-hydroxy-N'-[1-phenylethylidene]-2H/2-methyl-1,2-benzothiazine-3-carbohydrazide 1,1-dioxides as anti-microbial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Naveed; Zia-ur-Rehman, Muhammad; Siddiqui, Hamid Latif; Ullah, Muhammad Fasih; Parvez, Masood

    2011-06-01

    A series of 4-hydroxy-N'-[1-phenylethylidene]-2H/2-methyl, 1,2-benzothiazine-3-carbohydrazide 1,1-dioxides was synthesized from commercially available sodium saccharin. Base catalyzed ring expansion of methyl (1,1-dioxido-3-oxo-1,2-benzisothiazol-2(3H)-yl)acetate followed by ultrasound mediated hydrazinolysis and subsequent reaction with 1-phenylethanones under the influence of microwaves yielded the title compounds. Besides, microwave assisted synthesis of 1,4-dihydropyrazolo[4,3-c][1,2]benzothiazin-3-ol 5,5-dioxide and 4-methyl-1,4-dihydropyrazolo[4,3-c][1,2]benzothiazin-3-ol 5,5-dioxide is also discussed. Most of the synthesized compounds were found to possess moderate to significant anti-microbial (anti-bacterial and anti-fungal) activities. It is found that compounds with greater lipophilicity (N-methyl analogues) possessed higher anti-bacterial activities. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Collagen-embedded hydroxylapatite-beta-tricalcium phosphate-silicon dioxide bone substitute granules assist rapid vascularization and promote cell growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghanaati, Shahram M; Thimm, Benjamin W; Unger, Ronald E; Orth, Carina; Barbeck, Mike; Kirkpatrick, C James [Institute of Pathology, Johannes Gutenberg-University Mainz, Langenbeckstr.1, 55101 Mainz (Germany); Kohler, Thomas; Mueller, Ralph, E-mail: ghanaati@uni-mainz.d [Institute for Biomechanics, ETH Zuerich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Str.10, 8093 Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2010-04-15

    In the present study we assessed the biocompatibility in vitro and in vivo of a low-temperature sol-gel-manufactured SiO{sub 2}-based bone graft substitute. Human primary osteoblasts and the osteoblastic cell line, MG63, cultured on the SiO{sub 2} biomatrix in monoculture retained their osteoblastic morphology and cellular functionality in vitro. The effect of the biomaterial in vivo and its vascularization potential was tested subcutaneously in Wistar rats and demonstrated both rapid vascularization and good integration within the peri-implant tissue. Scaffold degradation was progressive during the first month after implantation, with tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive macrophages being present and promoting scaffold degradation from an early stage. This manuscript describes successful osteoblastic growth promotion in vitro and a promising biomaterial integration and vasculogenesis in vivo for a possible therapeutic application of this biomatrix in future clinical studies.

  12. Characterization of aluminum oxide films on p- type silicon substrate prepared by glass assisted CO2 laser technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Y. M.; Saied, E. A.

    2014-01-01

    Aluminum oxide (Al2O3) films were deposited on p- type Si substrate using glass assisted CO2 laser technique. Aluminum trichloride AlCl3 and O2 were used as aluminum and oxygen sources respectively and Ar was used as a carrier gas for AlCl3. The films were deposited at different substrate temperatures ranging from 480 to 830 °C. The effect of thermal annealing on low deposited substrate temperature films was carried out in argon environment. Chemical compositions of the films were studied by using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. FTIR spectra showed some characteristic bands of aluminum silicate corresponding to bending and stretching bonds of aluminum oxide in the range 650-750 and 750-850 cm-1 respectively. Energy dispersive X-ray showed presence of aluminum in the films. Capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurements were carried out on MOS devices made of these films. Results indicated density of interface traps D it in the range 1012-1013 eV-1 cm-2. The current density-voltage (J-V ) curves of devices suggested Poole-Frenkel and Shcottcky emission mechanisms for carrier transport in MOS devices.

  13. Development of Doped Microcrystalline Silicon Oxide and its Application to Thin‑Film Silicon Solar Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambertz, A.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study is the development of doped microcrystalline silicon oxide (µc‑SiOx:H) alloys and its application in thin‑film silicon solar cells. The doped µc‑SiOx:H material was prepared from carbon dioxide (CO2), silane (SiH4), hydrogen (H2) gas mixtures using plasma enhanced

  14. Subattoampere current induced by single ions in silicon oxide layers of nonvolatile memory cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cellere, G.; Paccagnella, A.; Larcher, L.; Visconti, A.; Bonanomi, M.

    2006-01-01

    A single ion impinging on a thin silicon dioxide layer generates a number of electron/hole pairs proportional to its linear energy transfer coefficient. Defects generated by recombination can act as a conductive path for electrons that cross the oxide barrier, thanks to a multitrap-assisted mechanism. We present data on the dependence of this phenomenon on the oxide thickness by using floating gate memory arrays. The tiny number of excess electrons stored in these devices allows for extremely high sensitivity, impossible with any direct measurement of oxide leakage current. Results are of particular interest for next generation devices

  15. Potassium ions in SiO2: electrets for silicon surface passivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonilla, Ruy S.; Wilshaw, Peter R.

    2018-01-01

    This manuscript reports an experimental and theoretical study of the transport of potassium ions in thin silicon dioxide films. While alkali contamination was largely researched in the context of MOSFET instability, recent reports indicate that potassium ions can be embedded into oxide films to produce dielectric materials with permanent electric charge, also known as electrets. These electrets are integral to a number of applications, including the passivation of silicon surfaces for optoelectronic devices. In this work, electric field assisted migration of ions is used to rapidly drive K+ into SiO2 and produce effective passivation of silicon surfaces. Charge concentrations of up to ~5  ×  1012 e cm‑2 have been achieved. This charge was seen to be stable for over 1500 d, with decay time constants as high as 17 000 d, producing an effectively passivated oxide–silicon interface with SRV  <  7 cm s‑1, in 1 Ω cm n-type material. This level of charge stability and passivation effectiveness has not been previously reported. Overall, this is a new and promising methodology to enhance surface passivation for the industrial manufacture of silicon optoelectronic devices.

  16. Removal of foreign bodies embedded in the urinary bladder wall by a combination of laparoscopy and carbon dioxide cystoscopic assistance: Case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengyue Jin

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To report a case of combined laparoscopic and carbon dioxide partial cystectomy and foreign body removal and to review the existing literature on the topic. Materials and Methods: A 43-year-old Asian woman was found to have an intrauterine device embedded in the bladder wall during evaluation for chronic pelvic pain and urinary tract infection. She underwent cystoscopic-laparoscopic partial cystectomy, with an uncomplicated postoperative course. She had normal renal function during the follow-up period. This case demonstrates the possibility and safety of performing cystoscopic-laparoscopic partial cystectomy for the removal of a partially implanted intravesical foreign body. Results: The patient recovered without incident and was discharged 7 days after surgery. No abnormalities were noted in the urine output or renal function in the postoperative follow-up period. No complications due to retrograde flow of carbon dioxide up the ureters or air embolism were noted during the procedure or postoperatively. Conclusions: The combination of laparoscopy and air cystoscopy has been shown to be an optimal method for retracting foreign bodies embedded in the bladder wall. Also, air cystoscopy can be used to give doctors a better view in cases in which vision is compromised under water-contrast cystoscopy.

  17. Removal of foreign bodies embedded in the urinary bladder wall by a combination of laparoscopy and carbon dioxide cystoscopic assistance: Case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Chengyue; Fan, Yu; Zhang, Qian; Wang, Yu; Wu, Shiliang; Jin, Jie

    2016-11-01

    To report a case of combined laparoscopic and carbon dioxide partial cystectomy and foreign body removal and to review the existing literature on the topic. A 43-year-old Asian woman was found to have an intrauterine device embedded in the bladder wall during evaluation for chronic pelvic pain and urinary tract infection. She underwent cystoscopic-laparoscopic partial cystectomy, with an uncomplicated postoperative course. She had normal renal function during the follow-up period. This case demonstrates the possibility and safety of performing cystoscopic-laparoscopic partial cystectomy for the removal of a partially implanted intravesical foreign body. The patient recovered without incident and was discharged 7 days after surgery. No abnormalities were noted in the urine output or renal function in the postoperative follow-up period. No complications due to retrograde flow of carbon dioxide up the ureters or air embolism were noted during the procedure or postoperatively. The combination of laparoscopy and air cystoscopy has been shown to be an optimal method for retracting foreign bodies embedded in the bladder wall. Also, air cystoscopy can be used to give doctors a better view in cases in which vision is compromised under water-contrast cystoscopy.

  18. Encapsulated liquid sorbents for carbon dioxide capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vericella, John J; Baker, Sarah E; Stolaroff, Joshuah K; Duoss, Eric B; Hardin, James O; Lewicki, James; Glogowski, Elizabeth; Floyd, William C; Valdez, Carlos A; Smith, William L; Satcher, Joe H; Bourcier, William L; Spadaccini, Christopher M; Lewis, Jennifer A; Aines, Roger D

    2015-02-05

    Drawbacks of current carbon dioxide capture methods include corrosivity, evaporative losses and fouling. Separating the capture solvent from infrastructure and effluent gases via microencapsulation provides possible solutions to these issues. Here we report carbon capture materials that may enable low-cost and energy-efficient capture of carbon dioxide from flue gas. Polymer microcapsules composed of liquid carbonate cores and highly permeable silicone shells are produced by microfluidic assembly. This motif couples the capacity and selectivity of liquid sorbents with high surface area to facilitate rapid and controlled carbon dioxide uptake and release over repeated cycles. While mass transport across the capsule shell is slightly lower relative to neat liquid sorbents, the surface area enhancement gained via encapsulation provides an order-of-magnitude increase in carbon dioxide absorption rates for a given sorbent mass. The microcapsules are stable under typical industrial operating conditions and may be used in supported packing and fluidized beds for large-scale carbon capture.

  19. Diamond deposition on siliconized stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, F.; Reinoso, M.; Huck, H.; Rosenbusch, M.

    2010-01-01

    Silicon diffusion layers in AISI 304 and AISI 316 type stainless steels were investigated as an alternative to surface barrier coatings for diamond film growth. Uniform 2 μm thick silicon rich interlayers were obtained by coating the surface of the steels with silicon and performing diffusion treatments at 800 deg. C. Adherent diamond films with low sp 2 carbon content were deposited on the diffused silicon layers by a modified hot filament assisted chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) method. Characterization of as-siliconized layers and diamond coatings was performed by energy dispersive X-ray analysis, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy.

  20. pRotective vEntilation with veno-venouS lung assisT in respiratory failure: A protocol for a multicentre randomised controlled trial of extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal in patients with acute hypoxaemic respiratory failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamee, J J; Gillies, M A; Barrett, N A; Agus, A M; Beale, R; Bentley, A; Bodenham, A; Brett, S J; Brodie, D; Finney, S J; Gordon, A J; Griffiths, M; Harrison, D; Jackson, C; McDowell, C; McNally, C; Perkins, G D; Tunnicliffe, W; Vuylsteke, A; Walsh, T S; Wise, M P; Young, D; McAuley, D F

    2017-05-01

    One of the few interventions to demonstrate improved outcomes for acute hypoxaemic respiratory failure is reducing tidal volumes when using mechanical ventilation, often termed lung protective ventilation. Veno-venous extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal (vv-ECCO 2 R) can facilitate reducing tidal volumes. pRotective vEntilation with veno-venouS lung assisT (REST) is a randomised, allocation concealed, controlled, open, multicentre pragmatic trial to determine the clinical and cost-effectiveness of lower tidal volume mechanical ventilation facilitated by vv-ECCO 2 R in patients with acute hypoxaemic respiratory failure. Patients requiring intubation and mechanical ventilation for acute hypoxaemic respiratory failure will be randomly allocated to receive either vv-ECCO 2 R and lower tidal volume mechanical ventilation or standard care with stratification by recruitment centre. There is a need for a large randomised controlled trial to establish whether vv-ECCO 2 R in acute hypoxaemic respiratory failure can allow the use of a more protective lung ventilation strategy and is associated with improved patient outcomes.

  1. Photo-Electrical Characterization of Silicon Micropillar Arrays with Radial p/n Junctions Containing Passivation and Anti-Reflection Coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vijselaar, Wouter; Elbersen, R.; Tiggelaar, Roald M.; Gardeniers, Han; Huskens, Jurriaan

    2017-01-01

    In order to assess the contributions of anti-reflective and passivation effects in microstructured silicon-based solar light harvesting devices, thin layers of aluminum oxide (Al2O3), silicon dioxide (SiO2), silicon-rich silicon nitride (SiNx), and indium tin oxide (ITO), with a thickness ranging

  2. An ionic liquid-based nanofluid of titanium dioxide nanoparticles for effervescence-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid extraction for acaricide detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaoling; Li, Xin; Yang, Miyi; Zeng, Haozhe; Zhang, Sanbing; Lu, Runhua; Gao, Haixiang; Xu, Donghui

    2017-05-12

    Phytophagous mites are usually considered a difficult problem for agricultural planting, and acaricides are applied to control diseases and pests. However, the overdose and misusage of acaricides causes pesticide residues. In this work, a simple and practical ionic liquid-based TiO 2 nanofluid, effervescence-assisted, dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (EA-DLLME) method was developed to detect acaricides in honey and tea by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC-DAD). Oleophilic TiO 2 nanoparticles were synthesized by a facile solvothermal method to obtain greater stability of the nanofluid. The experimental parameters were optimized by a one-factor-at-a-time approach and included the effervescent tablet composition, ionic liquid selection, extractant composition, nanofluid volume, extraction temperature, extraction time and desorption conditions. Under the optimized conditions, the linear ranges of this proposed method were 0.5-500μgL -1 , with correlation coefficients in the range of 0.9985-1.0000. The extraction efficiencies for the target analytes varied from 70.70 to 84.58%. The detection and quantitation limits were in the ranges of 0.04-0.18μgL -1 and 0.13-0.60μgL -1 , respectively. The intra- and inter-day relative standard deviations (n=3) were found to range from 2.32 to 5.71%, which showed perfect repeatability. Overall, the EA-DLLME method was time-saving and environmentally friendly, with future potential for microextraction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Atomic scale investigation of silicon nanowires and nanoclusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gourbilleau Fabrice

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this study, we have performed nanoscale characterization of Si-clusters and Si-nanowires with a laser-assisted tomographic atom probe. Intrinsic and p-type silicon nanowires (SiNWs are elaborated by chemical vapor deposition method using gold as catalyst, silane as silicon precursor, and diborane as dopant reactant. The concentration and distribution of impurity (gold and dopant (boron in SiNW are investigated and discussed. Silicon nanoclusters are produced by thermal annealing of silicon-rich silicon oxide and silica multilayers. In this process, atom probe tomography (APT provides accurate information on the silicon nanoparticles and the chemistry of the nanolayers.

  4. CT-assisted versus silicone rubber cast morphometry of the lower respiratory tract in healthy amazons (genus Amazona) and grey parrots (genus Psittacus)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krautwald-Junghanns, M.E.; Valerius, K.P.; Duncker, H.R.; Sohn, H.G.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the normal respiratory tract of grey parrots and amazons by using two different methods. The lower respiratory tract of five amazons and four grey parrots, all healthy, were investigated applying computerised tomography (CT). Volumes and densities of the body, the body cavities, the normal lungs, and the airsacs in the living animals were defined as reference values of healthy birds to give a basis for future CT-diagnosis of respiratory diseases and their precise locations in parrots. In a parallel study, the lung and air sac volumes of six amazons and two grey parrots were measured using silicone rubber casts produced after the method described byH.-R. Duncker. Values for identical respiratory structures gained by these different methods were compared

  5. Microwave- assisted Rapid Self- Assembly of Lamellar Forming Poly (styrene-b- lactic acid) (PS-b-PLA) Block Copolymer for Fabrication of Silicon Nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokarian-Tabari, Parvaneh; Cummins, Cian; Rasappa, Sozaraj; Holmes, Justin D.; Morris, Michael M.

    2013-03-01

    Photolithography has been a fundamental process in the production of integrated circuits, but it is reaching its physical limit for generating ultra-small feature sizes. Block copolymers have a great potential as mask templates for fabricating nano features. Although ordered sub 20 nm features utilising BCPs have been achieved, lengthy annealing times (hours to days) are currently employed. Here we use microwave annealing, a new emerging technique, to achieve lateral phase separation in a lamellar forming PS-b-PLA. Having optimised the microwave conditions such as power, temperature, anneal holding time, solvents etc, a long range order line pattern was formed in less than two minutes on Si, Ge and Al substrates. The etched pattern (PLA removed by Ar/O2 RIE) was transferred to silicon substrate resulting in 18nm Si nanowires.

  6. Emission Spectral Control of a Silicon Light Emitting Diode Fabricated by Dressed-Photon-Phonon Assisted Annealing Using a Short Pulse Pair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadashi Kawazoe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We fabricated a high-efficiency infrared light emitting diode (LED via dressed-photon-phonon (DPP assisted annealing of a p-n homojunctioned bulk Si crystal. The center wavelength in the electroluminescence (EL spectrum of this LED was determined by the wavelength of a CW laser used in the DPP-assisted annealing. We have proposed a novel method of controlling the EL spectral shape by additionally using a pulsed light source in order to control the number of phonons for the DPP-assisted annealing. In this method, the Si crystal is irradiated with a pair of pulses having an arrival time difference between them. The number of coherent phonons created is increased (reduced by tuning (detuning this time difference. A Si-LED was subjected to DPP-assisted annealing using a 1.3 μm (hν=0.94 eV CW laser and a mode-locked pulsed laser with a pulse width of 17 fs. When the number of phonons was increased, the EL emission spectrum broadened toward the high-energy side by 200 meV or more. The broadening towards the low-energy side was reduced to 120 meV.

  7. Ion beam studied of silicon oxynitride and silicon nitroxide thin layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oude Elferink, J.B.

    1989-01-01

    In this the processes occurring during high temperature treatments of silicon oxynitride and silicon oxide layers are described. Oxynitride layers with various atomic oxygen to nitrogen concentration ration (O/N) are considered. The high energy ion beam techniques Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, elastic recoil detection and nuclear reaction analysis have been used to study the layer structures. A detailed discussion of these ion beam techniques is given. Numerical methods used to obtain quantitative data on elemental compositions and depth profiles are described. The electrical compositions and depth profiles are described. The electrical properties of silicon nitride films are known to be influenced by the behaviour of hydrogen in the film during high temperature anneling. Investigations of the behaviour of hydrogen are presented. Oxidation of silicon (oxy)nitride films in O 2 /H 2 0/HCl and nitridation of silicon dioxide films in NH 3 are considered since oxynitrides are applied as an oxidation mask in the LOCOS (Local oxidation of silicon) process. The nitridation of silicon oxide layers in an ammonia ambient is considered. The initial stage and the dependence on the oxide thickness of nitrogen and hydrogen incorporation are discussed. Finally, oxidation of silicon oxynitride layers and of silicon oxide layers are compared. (author). 76 refs.; 48 figs.; 1 tab

  8. High temperature corrosion of silicon carbide and silicon nitride in the presence of chloride compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNallan, M.

    1993-01-01

    Silicon carbide and silicon nitride are resistant to oxidation because a protective silicon dioxide films on their surfaces in most oxidizing environments. Chloride compounds can attack the surface in two ways: 1) chlorine can attack the silicon directly to form a volatile silicon chloride compound or 2) alkali compounds combined with the chlorine can be transported to the surface where they flux the silica layer by forming stable alkali silicates. Alkali halides have enough vapor pressure that a sufficient quantity of alkali species to cause accelerated corrosion can be transported to the ceramic surface without the formation of a chloride deposit. When silicon carbide is attacked simultaneously by chlorine and oxygen, the corrosion products include both volatile and condensed spices. Silicon nitride is much more resistance to this type of attack than silicon carbide. Silicon based ceramics are exposed to oxidizing gases in the presence of alkali chloride vapors, the rate of corrosion is controlled primarily by the driving force for the formation of alkali silicate, which can be quantified as the activity of the alkali oxide in equilibrium with the corrosive gas mixture. In a gas mixture containing a fixed partial pressure of KCl, the rate of corrosion is accelerated by increasing the concentration of water vapor and inhibited by increasing the concentration of HCl. Similar results have been obtained for mixtures containing other alkalis and halogens. (Orig./A.B.)

  9. Silicon Qubits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ladd, Thaddeus D. [HRL Laboratories, LLC, Malibu, CA (United States); Carroll, Malcolm S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2018-02-28

    Silicon is a promising material candidate for qubits due to the combination of worldwide infrastructure in silicon microelectronics fabrication and the capability to drastically reduce decohering noise channels via chemical purification and isotopic enhancement. However, a variety of challenges in fabrication, control, and measurement leaves unclear the best strategy for fully realizing this material’s future potential. In this article, we survey three basic qubit types: those based on substitutional donors, on metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) structures, and on Si/SiGe heterostructures. We also discuss the multiple schema used to define and control Si qubits, which may exploit the manipulation and detection of a single electron charge, the state of a single electron spin, or the collective states of multiple spins. Far from being comprehensive, this article provides a brief orientation to the rapidly evolving field of silicon qubit technology and is intended as an approachable entry point for a researcher new to this field.

  10. Numerical studies of temperature profile and hydrodynamic phenomena during excimer laser assisted heteroepitaxial growth of patterned silicon and germanium bi-layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conde, J.C.; Chiussi, S.; Martin, E.; Gontad, F.; Fornarini, L.; Leon, B.

    2010-01-01

    In this manuscript, a 3-D axisymmetric model for the heteroepitaxial growth induced by irradiating thin patterned amorphous hydrogenated silicon (a-Si:H) and germanium (a-Ge:H) bi-layers on Si (100) with pulsed UV-laser radiation, is presented. For reducing optimization steps, an efficient simulation of the laser induced processes that include rapid heating and solidification phenomena in the range of several tenth of nanoseconds, must be performed, if alloy composition and quality has to be adjusted. In this study, the effects of various laser energy densities on different amorphous Si/Ge bi-layer structures has been predicted and adjusted to obtain the desired Ge concentration profiles for applications as sacrificial layers, i.e. a Ge containing film buried under a Si rich surface layer. The numerical model includes the temperature dependent variations of the thermophysical properties and takes the coupled effects of temperature and hydrodynamic phenomena for a Boussinesq fluid, to estimate the element interdiffusion during the process and predicting the concentration profiles.

  11. Liquid carbon dioxide absorbents, methods of using the same, and related systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, Michael Joseph; Perry, Robert James; Lam, Tunchiao Hubert; Soloveichik, Grigorii Lev; Kniajanski, Sergei; Lewis, Larry Neil; Rubinsztajn, Malgorzata Iwona; Hancu, Dan

    2016-09-13

    A carbon dioxide absorbent composition is described, including (i) a liquid, nonaqueous silicon-based material, functionalized with one or more groups that either reversibly react with CO.sub.2 or have a high-affinity for CO.sub.2; and (ii) a hydroxy-containing solvent that is capable of dissolving both the silicon-based material and a reaction product of the silicon-based material and CO.sub.2. The absorbent may be utilized in methods to reduce carbon dioxide in an exhaust gas, and finds particular utility in power plants.

  12. A Paleogene Silicon Stable Isotope Record: Long-Term Carbon and Silicon Cycling Interaction Revealed By Sponges and Radiolarians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontorbe, G.; De La Rocha, C. L.; Hendry, K. R.; Frings, P.; Conley, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    Silicon and carbon cycling are related both on short time scales via the uptake of carbon dioxide and dissolved silica (DSi) by diatoms, and on geological time scales via weathering of silicate rocks consuming carbon dioxide. Long-term changes in oceanic silicon cycling and DSi concentration have been mostly attributed to the evolution of siliceous organisms, especially the colonization of the surface waters by diatoms and their diversification. Thus, impacts of geological mechanisms and changes in carbon cycling have been, in our opinion, overlooked. During the past decade, progress has been made in using silicon isotopes in marine archives to investigate the paleo-silicon cycle. Silicon isotope fractionation in siliceous sponges is closely related to ambient DSi concentration. It follows from this relationship that sponge spicules from marine sediment cores provide a good proxy for reconstructing the paleo-DSi concentration and isotopic composition. The Paleogene period (65.5 to 23Ma) is highly relevant for studying the long-term silicon and carbon cycling relationship due to radiance of diatoms, high variability in the carbon cycle and initiation of the Himalayan orogeny. Here, we will present a sponge spicules and radiolarian silicon isotopes record from ODP Leg 171B (Blake Nose, Western North Atlantic) spanning most of the Paleogene. Our data show similar patterns in both foraminiferal carbon and spicule silicon stable isotopes, providing information on the mechanisms coupling the long-term silicon and carbon cycle.

  13. Polarized electroluminescence from silicon nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagraev, Nikolay; Danilovsky, Eduard; Gets, Dmitry; Klyachkin, Leonid; Kudryavtsev, Andrey; Kuzmin, Roman; Malyarenko, Anna [Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, 194021 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Mashkov, Vladimir [St. Petersburg State Polytechnical University, 195251 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2012-05-15

    We present the first findings of the circularly polarized electroluminescence (CPEL) from silicon nanostructures which are the p-type ultra-narrow silicon quantum well (Si-QW) confined by {delta}-barriers heavily doped with boron. The CPEL dependences on the forward current and lateral electric field show the circularly polarized light emission which appears to be caused by the exciton recombination through the negative-U dipole boron centers at the Si-QW-{delta}-barriers interface with the assistance of phosphorus donors. (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  14. Synthesis and properties of ferromagnetic nanostructures embedded within a high-quality crystalline silicon matrix via ion implantation and nanocavity assisted gettering processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malladi, Girish; Huang, Mengbing, E-mail: mhuang@albany.edu; Murray, Thomas; Novak, Steven; Matsubayashi, Akitomo; LaBella, Vincent; Bakhru, Hassaram [SUNY College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, Albany, New York 12203 (United States)

    2014-08-07

    Integrating magnetic functionalities with silicon holds the promise of developing, in the most dominant semiconductor, a paradigm-shift information technology based on the manipulation and control of electron spin and charge. Here, we demonstrate an ion implantation approach enabling the synthesis of a ferromagnetic layer within a defect free Si environment by exploiting an additional implant of hydrogen in a region deep below the metal implanted layer. Upon post-implantation annealing, nanocavities created within the H-implanted region act as trapping sites for gettering the implanted metal species, resulting in the formation of metal nanoparticles in a Si region of excellent crystal quality. This is exemplified by the synthesis of magnetic nickel nanoparticles in Si implanted with H{sup +} (range: ∼850 nm; dose: 1.5 × 10{sup 16 }cm{sup −2}) and Ni{sup +} (range: ∼60 nm; dose: 2 × 10{sup 15 }cm{sup −2}). Following annealing, the H implanted regions populated with Ni nanoparticles of size (∼10–25 nm) and density (∼10{sup 11}/cm{sup 2}) typical of those achievable via conventional thin film deposition and growth techniques. In particular, a maximum amount of gettered Ni atoms occurs after annealing at 900 °C, yielding strong ferromagnetism persisting even at room temperature, as well as fully recovered crystalline Si environments adjacent to these Ni nanoparticles. Furthermore, Ni nanoparticles capsulated within a high-quality crystalline Si layer exhibit a very high magnetic switching energy barrier of ∼0.86 eV, an increase by about one order of magnitude as compared to their counterparts on a Si surface or in a highly defective Si environment.

  15. Silicon Micro- and Nanofabrication for Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fine, Daniel; Goodall, Randy; Bansal, Shyam S.; Chiappini, Ciro; Hosali, Sharath; van de Ven, Anne L.; Srinivasan, Srimeenkashi; Liu, Xuewu; Godin, Biana; Brousseau, Louis; Yazdi, Iman K.; Fernandez-Moure, Joseph; Tasciotti, Ennio; Wu, Hung-Jen; Hu, Ye; Klemm, Steve; Ferrari, Mauro

    2013-01-01

    This manuscript constitutes a review of several innovative biomedical technologies fabricated using the precision and accuracy of silicon micro- and nanofabrication. The technologies to be reviewed are subcutaneous nanochannel drug delivery implants for the continuous tunable zero-order release of therapeutics, multi-stage logic embedded vectors for the targeted systemic distribution of both therapeutic and imaging contrast agents, silicon and porous silicon nanowires for investigating cellular interactions and processes as well as for molecular and drug delivery applications, porous silicon (pSi) as inclusions into biocomposites for tissue engineering, especially as it applies to bone repair and regrowth, and porous silica chips for proteomic profiling. In the case of the biocomposites, the specifically designed pSi inclusions not only add to the structural robustness, but can also promote tissue and bone regrowth, fight infection, and reduce pain by releasing stimulating factors and other therapeutic agents stored within their porous network. The common material thread throughout all of these constructs, silicon and its associated dielectrics (silicon dioxide, silicon nitride, etc.), can be precisely and accurately machined using the same scalable micro- and nanofabrication protocols that are ubiquitous within the semiconductor industry. These techniques lend themselves to the high throughput production of exquisitely defined and monodispersed nanoscale features that should eliminate architectural randomness as a source of experimental variation thereby potentially leading to more rapid clinical translation. PMID:23584841

  16. Novel silicone elastomer formulations for DEAPs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Anne Ladegaard; Vudayagiri, Sindhu; Benslimane, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate that the force output and work density of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) based dielectric elastomer transducers can be significantly enhanced by the addition of high permittivity titanium dioxide nanoparticles which was also shown by Stoyanov et al[1] for pre-stretched elastomers...... and by Carpi et al for RTV silicones[2]. Furthermore the elastomer matrix is optimized to give very high breakdown strengths. We obtain an increase in the dielectric permittivity of a factor of approximately 2 with a loading of 12% TiO2 particles compared to the pure modified silicone elastomer with breakdown...

  17. Study of Silicon Nitrate and Tin Dioxide carbon nanotube composite as lithium-ion battery anode, gas sensor and the self-assembly of carbon nanotubes on copper substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Lugo, Dionne M.

    Carbon nanotubes since their discovery have been used for many applications. They are predicted to reinforce novel composite materials because of their structural perfection, excellent mechanical properties and low density. CNT can be made into nanowires of different materials or as part of a composite making them beneficial for the incorporation into electrochemical devices. Carbon nanotubes in this study were gown directly on a copper substrate employing hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD). Bamboo-like carbon nanotubes were made into electrodes reducing the use of inactive materials on the development of working electrodes for electrochemical application. This BCNT were tested as lithium-ion battery anodes assembled together with high capacity materials such as Silicon and Tin Oxide (4200mAh/g and 782 mAh/g). On this study BCNT served as a conductive matrix as well as buffer matrix for the volume expansion brought by cycling silicon and tin oxide. The composite structural properties enhance the surface-to-volume ratio of the electrode demonstrating a desirable electrochemical performance for a lithium-ion battery anode. As a gas sensor electrode CNT was assembled with tin-oxide directly on a copper substrate for the detection of ethanol, methanol, ammonia and H2S. CNT gave a higher surface area and a conductive matrix aiding to the sensing capabilities of the SnO2 increasing the effectiveness of the matrix material for gas detection. Copper is known to produce CNT with a disturb structure. To develop an electrode on copper with well-ordered CNT other techniques need to be used. One way to do this is by chemical modification of the copper substrate with a molecule able to react with the carbon nanotube. For the attachment of well-ordered carbon nanotubes such as SWCNT a self-assembly monolayer technique is chosen. On this study 4-aminothiophenol served as the linker between the copper substrate and the carbon nanotubes. This study let to chemically

  18. Comparison of subsurface damages on mono-crystalline silicon between traditional nanoscale machining and laser-assisted nanoscale machining via molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Houfu; Li, Shaobo; Chen, Genyu

    2018-01-01

    Molecular dynamics is employed to compare nanoscale traditional machining (TM) with laser-assisted machining (LAM). LAM is that the workpiece is locally heated by an intense laser beam prior to material removal. We have a comprehensive comparison between LAM and TM in terms of atomic trajectories, phase transformation, radial distribution function, chips, temperature distribution, number of atoms in different temperature, grinding temperature, grinding force, friction coefficient and atomic potential energy. It can be found that there is a decrease of atoms with five and six nearest neighbors, and LAM generates more chips than that in the TM. It indicates that LAM reduces the subsurface damage of workpiece, gets a better-qualified ground surface and improves the material removal rate. Moreover, laser energy makes the materials fully softened before being removed, the number of atoms with temperature above 500 K is increased, and the average temperature of workpiece higher and faster to reach the equilibrium in LAM. It means that LAM has an absolute advantage in machining materials and greatly reduces the material resistance. Not only the tangential force (Fx) and the normal force (Fy) but also friction coefficients become smaller as laser heating reduces the strength and hardness of the material in LAM. These results show that LAM is a promising technique since it can get a better-qualified workpiece surface with larger material removal rates, less grinding force and lower friction coefficient.

  19. Charge on luminous bodies resembling natural ball lightning produced via electrical arcs through lump silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Christina L.; Miley, Galen P.; Griffiths, David J.; Sánchez, Erik

    2014-12-01

    A phenomenon resembling natural ball lightning can be produced via electrical arcing through silicon. We use lump silicon instead of silicon wafers to achieve higher production rates and larger, longer-lived luminous balls than previously reported. The luminous balls consist of a silicon core surrounded by a porous network of loosely bound silicon dioxide nanoparticles. We find that the balls carry a small net charge on the order of 10-12 C and propose that the nanoparticles are electrostatically bound to the core due to this charge.

  20. kinetics of the coupled gas-iron reactions involving silicon and carbon

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    1985-09-01

    Sep 1, 1985 ... The rate-limiting factors seem to be the surface chemical reactions, with rate of supply of silicon monoxide probably contributing. 1. INTRODUCTION. In order to gain an insight into the nature of the coupled reactions existing between carbon and silicon when a gas phase containing carbon dioxide, carbon.

  1. Kinetics of the Coupled Gas-Iron Reactions Involving Silicon and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The kinetic study of coupled gas-iron reactions at 15600 has been carried out for the system involving liquid iron containing carbon and silicon and a gas phase consisting carbon monoxide, silicon monoxide and carbon dioxide. The coupled reactions are: (1) 200(g) = CO2 + C. (2) SiO (g) + CO (g) = Si ¸ CO (g). (3) SiO (g) + ...

  2. Carbon dioxide as chemical feedstock

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Aresta, M

    2010-01-01

    ... Dioxide as an Inert Solvent for Chemical Syntheses 15 Alessandro Galia and Giuseppe Filardo Introduction 15 Dense Carbon Dioxide as Solvent Medium for Chemical Processes 15 Enzymatic Catalysis in Dense Carbon Dioxide 18 Other Reactions in Dense Carbon Dioxide 19 Polymer Synthesis in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide 20 Chain Polymerizations: Synt...

  3. Sampling Artifacts from Conductive Silicone Tubing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timko, Michael T.; Yu, Zhenhong; Kroll, Jesse; Jayne, John T.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Miake-Lye, Richard C.; Onasch, Timothy B.; Liscinsky, David; Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Destaillats, Hugo; Holder, Amara L.; Smith, Jared D.; Wilson, Kevin R.

    2009-05-15

    We report evidence that carbon impregnated conductive silicone tubing used in aerosol sampling systems can introduce two types of experimental artifacts: 1) silicon tubing dynamically absorbs carbon dioxide gas, requiring greater than 5 minutes to reach equilibrium and 2) silicone tubing emits organic contaminants containing siloxane that adsorb onto particles traveling through it and onto downstream quartz fiber filters. The consequence can be substantial for engine exhaust measurements as both artifacts directly impact calculations of particulate mass-based emission indices. The emission of contaminants from the silicone tubing can result in overestimation of organic particle mass concentrations based on real-time aerosol mass spectrometry and the off-line thermal analysis of quartz filters. The adsorption of siloxane contaminants can affect the surface properties of aerosol particles; we observed a marked reduction in the water-affinity of soot particles passed through conductive silicone tubing. These combined observations suggest that the silicone tubing artifacts may have wide consequence for the aerosol community and should, therefore, be used with caution. Gentle heating, physical and chemical properties of the particle carriers, exposure to solvents, and tubing age may influence siloxane uptake. The amount of contamination is expected to increase as the tubing surface area increases and as the particle surface area increases. The effect is observed at ambient temperature and enhanced by mild heating (<100 oC). Further evaluation is warranted.

  4. Silicon: A Review of Its Potential Role in the Prevention and Treatment of Postmenopausal Osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles T. Price

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Physicians are aware of the benefits of calcium and vitamin D supplementation. However, additional nutritional components may also be important for bone health. There is a growing body of the scientific literature which recognizes that silicon plays an essential role in bone formation and maintenance. Silicon improves bone matrix quality and facilitates bone mineralization. Increased intake of bioavailable silicon has been associated with increased bone mineral density. Silicon supplementation in animals and humans has been shown to increase bone mineral density and improve bone strength. Dietary sources of bioavailable silicon include whole grains, cereals, beer, and some vegetables such as green beans. Silicon in the form of silica, or silicon dioxide (SiO2, is a common food additive but has limited intestinal absorption. More attention to this important mineral by the academic community may lead to improved nutrition, dietary supplements, and better understanding of the role of silicon in the management of postmenopausal osteoporosis.

  5. Classification of titanium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macias B, L.R.; Garcia C, R.M.; Maya M, M.E.; Ita T, A. De; Palacios G, J.

    2002-01-01

    In this work the X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (Sem) and the X-ray Dispersive Energy Spectroscopy techniques are used with the purpose to achieve a complete identification of phases and mixture of phases of a crystalline material as titanium dioxide. The problem for solving consists of being able to distinguish a sample of titanium dioxide being different than a titanium dioxide pigment. A standard sample of titanium dioxide with NIST certificate is used, which indicates a purity of 99.74% for the TiO 2 . The following way is recommended to proceed: a)To make an analysis by means of X-ray diffraction technique to the sample of titanium dioxide pigment and on the standard of titanium dioxide waiting not find differences. b) To make a chemical analysis by the X-ray Dispersive Energy Spectroscopy via in a microscope, taking advantage of the high vacuum since it is oxygen which is analysed and if it is concluded that the aluminium oxide appears in a greater proportion to 1% it is established that is a titanium dioxide pigment, but if it is lesser then it will be only titanium dioxide. This type of analysis is an application of the nuclear techniques useful for the tariff classification of merchandise which is considered as of difficult recognition. (Author)

  6. Uranium dioxide pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zawidzki, T.W.

    1979-01-01

    Sintered uranium dioxide pellets composed of particles of size > 50 microns suitable for power reactor use are made by incorporating a small amount of sulphur into the uranium dioxide before sintering. The increase in grain size achieved results in an improvement in overall efficiency when such pellets are used in a power reactor. (author)

  7. Surface texture of single-crystal silicon oxidized under a thin V{sub 2}O{sub 5} layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikitin, S. E., E-mail: nikitin@mail.ioffe.ru; Verbitskiy, V. N.; Nashchekin, A. V.; Trapeznikova, I. N.; Bobyl, A. V.; Terukova, E. E. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical–Technical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2017-01-15

    The process of surface texturing of single-crystal silicon oxidized under a V{sub 2}O{sub 5} layer is studied. Intense silicon oxidation at the Si–V{sub 2}O{sub 5} interface begins at a temperature of 903 K which is 200 K below than upon silicon thermal oxidation in an oxygen atmosphere. A silicon dioxide layer 30–50 nm thick with SiO{sub 2} inclusions in silicon depth up to 400 nm is formed at the V{sub 2}O{sub 5}–Si interface. The diffusion coefficient of atomic oxygen through the silicon-dioxide layer at 903 K is determined (D ≥ 2 × 10{sup –15} cm{sup 2} s{sup –1}). A model of low-temperature silicon oxidation, based on atomic oxygen diffusion from V{sub 2}O{sub 5} through the SiO{sub 2} layer to silicon, and SiO{sub x} precipitate formation in silicon is proposed. After removing the V{sub 2}O{sub 5} and silicon-dioxide layers, texture is formed on the silicon surface, which intensely scatters light in the wavelength range of 300–550 nm and is important in the texturing of the front and rear surfaces of solar cells.

  8. Silicone chain extender

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to a silicone chain extender, more particularly a chain extender for silicone polymers and copolymers, to a chain extended silicone polymer or copolymer and to a functionalized chain extended silicone polymer or copolymer, to a method for the preparation thereof...

  9. Silicon plasmonics at midinfrared using silicon-insulator-silicon platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamal, Rania; Shafaay, Sarah; Ismail, Yehea; Swillam, Mohamed A.

    2017-01-01

    We propose devices based on doped silicon. Doped silicon is designed to act as a plasmonic medium in the midinfrared (MIR) range. The surface plasmon frequency of the doped silicon can be tuned within the MIR range, which gives rise to useful properties in the material's dispersion. We propose various plasmonic configurations that can be utilized for silicon on-chip applications in MIR. These devices have superior performance over conventional silicon devices and provide unique functionalities such as 90-sharp degree bends, T- and X-junction splitters, and stubs. These devices are CMOS-compatible and can be easily integrated with other electronic devices. In addition, the potential for biological and environmental sensing using doped silicon nanowires is demonstrated.

  10. Carbon dioxide removal process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Richard W.; Da Costa, Andre R.; Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A.

    2003-11-18

    A process and apparatus for separating carbon dioxide from gas, especially natural gas, that also contains C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons. The invention uses two or three membrane separation steps, optionally in conjunction with cooling/condensation under pressure, to yield a lighter, sweeter product natural gas stream, and/or a carbon dioxide stream of reinjection quality and/or a natural gas liquids (NGL) stream.

  11. Silicon oxynitride: A field emission suppression coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodore, Nimel D.

    We have studied coatings deposited using our inductively-coupled RF plasma ion implantation and desposition system to suppress field emission from large, 3-D electrode structures used in high voltage applications, like those used by Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in their DC-field photoelectron gun. Currently time and labor-intensive hand-polishing procedures are used to minimize field emission from these structures. Previous work had shown that the field emission from polished stainless steel (27 muA of field-emitted current at 15 MV/m) could be drastically reduced with simultaneous deposition of sputtered silicon dioxide during nitrogen implantation (167 pA of field-emitted current at 30 MV/m). We have determined that this unique implantation and deposition procedure produces high-purity silicon oxynitride films that can suppress field emission from stainless steel regardless of their initial surface polish. However, when this implantation procedure was applied to large, 3-D substrates, arcs occurred, damaging the coating and causing unreliable and unrepeatable field emission suppression. We have developed a novel reactive sputtering procedure to deposit high-purity silicon oxynitride coatings without nitrogen ion implantation. We can control the stoichometry and deposition rate of these coatings by adjusting the nitrogen pressure and incident RF-power. Using profilometry, Auger electron spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, elastic recoil detection analysis, and current-voltage measurements, we have determined that the elemental composition, chemical bonding, density, and electrical properties of the reactively-sputtered silicon oxynitride coatings are similar to those produced by nitrogen implantation during silicon dioxide deposition. Furthermore, high voltage tests determined that both coatings similarly suppress field emission from 6" diameter, polished

  12. Exceptional plasticity of silicon nanobridges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishida, Tadashi; Sato, Takaaki; Toshiyoshi, Hiroshi; Collard, Dominique; Fujita, Hiroyuki [University of Tokyo, Institute of Industrial Science, 4-6-1 Komaba Meguro, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); Cleri, Fabrizio [Institut d' Electronique Microelectronique et Nanotechnologie (CNRS UMR 8520), Universite de Lille I, Avenue Poincare BP60069 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Kakushima, Kuniyuki [Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259, Nagatsuda, Midori, Yokohama, Kanagawa 226-8502 (Japan); Mita, Makoto [Department of Spacecraft Engineering, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1, Yoshinodai, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 229-8510 (Japan); Miyata, Masaki; Itamura, Noriaki; Sasaki, Naruo [Department of Materials and Life Sciences, Seikei University, 3-3-1, Kitamachi, Kichijoji, Musashino, Tokyo 180-8633 (Japan); Endo, Junji, E-mail: tadashii@iis.u-tokyo.ac.jp [FK Optical laboratory, 1-13-4 Nakano Niiza Saitama, 352-0005 (Japan)

    2011-09-02

    The plasticity of covalently bonded materials is a subject at the forefront of materials science, bearing on a wide range of technological and fundamental aspects. However, covalent materials fracture in a brittle manner when the deformation exceeds just a few per cent. It is predicted that a macroscopically brittle material like silicon can show nanoscale plasticity. Here we report the exceptional plasticity observed in silicon nanocontacts ('nanobridges') at room temperature using a special experimental setup combining a transmission electron microscope and a microelectromechanical system. When accounting for surface diffusion, we succeeded in elongating the nanocontact into a wire-like structure, with a fivefold increase in volume, up to more than twenty times the original length. Such a large plasticity was caused by the stress-assisted diffusion and the sliding of the intergranular, amorphous-like material among the nanocrystals.

  13. Material Analysis of Coated Siliconized Silicon Carbide (SiSiC Honeycomb Structures for Thermochemical Hydrogen Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Pitz-Paal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, thermochemical water splitting with siliconized silicon carbide (SiSiC honeycombs coated with a zinc ferrite redox material was investigated. The small scale coated monoliths were tested in a laboratory test-rig and characterized by X-ray diffractometry (XRD and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM with corresponding micro analysis after testing in order to characterize the changes in morphology and composition. Comparison of several treated monoliths revealed the formation of various reaction products such as SiO2, zircon (ZrSiO4, iron silicide (FeSi and hercynite (FeAl2O4 indicating the occurrence of various side reactions between the different phases of the coating as well as between the coating and the SiSiC substrate. The investigations showed that the ferrite is mainly reduced through reaction with silicon (Si, which is present in the SiSiC matrix, and silicon carbide (SiC. These results led to the formulation of a new redox mechanism for this system in which Zn-ferrite is reduced through Si forming silicon dioxide (SiO2 and through SiC forming SiO2 and carbon monoxide. A decline of hydrogen production within the first 20 cycles is suggested to be due to the growth of a silicon dioxide and zircon layer which acts as a diffusion barrier for the reacting specie.

  14. Electron-beam deposition of vanadium dioxide thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marvel, R.E.; Appavoo, K. [Vanderbilt University, Interdisciplinary Materials Science Program, Nashville, TN (United States); Choi, B.K. [Vanderbilt University, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Nashville, TN (United States); Nag, J. [Vanderbilt University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nashville, TN (United States); Haglund, R.F. [Vanderbilt University, Interdisciplinary Materials Science Program, Nashville, TN (United States); Vanderbilt University, Institute for Nanoscale Science and Engineering, Nashville, TN (United States); Vanderbilt University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nashville, TN (United States)

    2013-06-15

    Developing a reliable and efficient fabrication method for phase-transition thin-film technology is critical for electronic and photonic applications. We demonstrate a novel method for fabricating polycrystalline, switchable vanadium dioxide thin films on glass and silicon substrates and show that the optical switching contrast is not strongly affected by post-processing annealing times. The method relies on electron-beam evaporation of a nominally stoichiometric powder, followed by fast annealing. As a result of the short annealing procedure we demonstrate that films deposited on silicon substrates appear to be smoother, in comparison to pulsed laser deposition and sputtering. However, optical performance of e-beam evaporated film on silicon is affected by annealing time, in contrast to glass. (orig.)

  15. HOLE-BLOCKING LAYERS FOR SILICON/ORGANIC HETEROJUNCTIONS: A NEW CLASS OF HIGH-EFFICIENCY LOW-COST PV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sturm, James [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    2017-12-04

    This project is the first investigation of the use of thin titanium dioxide layers on silicon as a hole-blocking / electron-transparent selective contact to silicon. The work was motivated by the goal of a high-efficiency low-cost silicon-based solar cells that could be processed entirely at low temperature (300 Degree Celsius) or less, without requiring plasma-processing.

  16. Carbon nanotube network-silicon oxide non-volatile switches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Albert D; Araujo, Paulo T; Xu, Runjie; Dresselhaus, Mildred S

    2014-12-08

    The integration of carbon nanotubes with silicon is important for their incorporation into next-generation nano-electronics. Here we demonstrate a non-volatile switch that utilizes carbon nanotube networks to electrically contact a conductive nanocrystal silicon filament in silicon dioxide. We form this device by biasing a nanotube network until it physically breaks in vacuum, creating the conductive silicon filament connected across a small nano-gap. From Raman spectroscopy, we observe coalescence of nanotubes during breakdown, which stabilizes the system to form very small gaps in the network~15 nm. We report that carbon nanotubes themselves are involved in switching the device to a high resistive state. Calculations reveal that this switching event occurs at ~600 °C, the temperature associated with the oxidation of nanotubes. Therefore, we propose that, in switching to a resistive state, the nanotube oxidizes by extracting oxygen from the substrate.

  17. Preparation of micro-pored silicone elastomer through radiation crosslinking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Xiaoling; Gu Mei; Xie Xubing; Huang Wei

    2013-01-01

    The radiation crosslinking was adopted to prepare the micro-pored silicone elastomer, which was performed by vulcanization and foaming respectively. Radiation crosslinking is a new method to prepare micro-pored material with high performance by use of radiation technology. Silicon dioxide was used as filler, and silicone elastomer was vulcanized by electron beams, then the micro-pored material was made by heating method at a high temperature. The effects of absorbed dose and filler content on the performance and morphology were investigated. The structure and distribution of pores were observed by SEM. The results show that the micro-pored silicon elastomer can be prepared successfully by controlling the absorbed dose and filler content. It has a smooth surface similar to a rubber meanwhile the pores are round and unconnected to each other with the minimum size of 14 μm. And the good mechanical performance can be suitable for further uses. (authors)

  18. Thermoelectrics from silicon nanoparticles: the influence of native oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petermann, Nils; Stötzel, Julia; Stein, Niklas; Kessler, Victor; Wiggers, Hartmut; Theissmann, Ralf; Schierning, Gabi; Schmechel, Roland

    2015-06-01

    Thermoelectric materials were synthesized by current-assisted sintering of doped silicon nanoparticles produced in a microwave-plasma reactor. Due to their affinity to oxygen, the nanoparticles start to oxidize when handled in air and even a thin surface layer of native silicon oxide leads to a significant increase in the oxide volume ratio. This results in a considerable incorporation of oxygen into the sintered pellets, thus affecting the thermoelectric performance. To investigate the necessity of inert handling of the raw materials, the thermoelectric transport properties of sintered nanocrystalline silicon samples were characterized with respect to their oxygen content. An innovative method allowing a quantitative silicon oxide analysis by means of electron microscopy was applied: the contrast between areas of high and low electrical conductivity was attributed to the silicon matrix and silicon oxide precipitates, respectively. Thermoelectric characterization revealed that both, electron mobility and thermal conductivity decrease with increasing silicon oxide content. A maximum figure of merit with zT = 0.45 at 950 °C was achieved for samples with a silicon oxide mass fraction of 9.5 and 21.4% while the sample with more than 25% of oxygen clearly indicates a negative impact of the oxygen on the electron mobility. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Silicon and Silicon-related Materials for Thermoelectricity", edited by Dario Narducci.

  19. Uranium dioxide preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watt, G.W.; Baugh, D.W. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    An actinide dioxide, e.g., uranium dioxide, is prepared by reacting an actinide nitrate or hydrate or tetrahydrofuranate thereof, e.g., uranyl nitrate, a hydrate of uranyl nitrate, or a tetrahydrofuranate of uranyl nitrate with an alkali or alkaline earth metal adduct of a monocyclic or polycyclic hydrocarbon in the presence of an inert organic solvent. Typically, the starting material may be uranyl nitrate dihydrate or uranyl nitrate ditetrahydrofuranate (the latter material is a novel composition of matter) with a reactant such as the sodium adduct of naphthalene in the presence of a solvent such as tetrahydrofuran. The resultant uranium dioxide may be further purified by heating it in the presence of hydrogen. 15 claims

  20. Interaction between silicon dioxide and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd, Hur Munawar Kabir; Ahmad, Ainee Fatimah; Radiman, Shahidan; Mohamed, Faizal; Rosli, Nur Ratasha Alia Md; Ayob, Muhammad Taqiyuddin Mawardi; Rahman, Irman Abdul

    2014-09-01

    Many of the cellular process depend on the ability of the membrane to separate areas while allowing exchange and tightly regulated transport of material within and across the membrane to occur, which is the driving principle behind cell communication. The complexity of biological membranes has motivated the development of a wide variety of simpler model systems whose size, geometry and composition can be tailored with precision. This study was conducted to investigate the interactions between silica nanoparticles and Dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) vesicles. The size range of DPPC vesicles formed was from 50 to 150 nm. Concentration of silica added to the vesicles was varied from 0.25 to 1.5 mg/ml. The change in vesicle size distribution, localization and positioning of silica nanoparticles in vesicles was studied via transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC).

  1. Random Surface Texturing of Silicon Dioxide Using Gold Agglomerates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    etched using an inductively coupled plasma system . The result is a textured surface structure, which can then be used as a light-trapping top layer...Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. 1 1. Introduction The US Army has been developing new types of photovoltaic (PV) devices—solar...mechanisms contribute to energy losses in solar cells, including heat loss, recombination loss, and reflective loss. Of those, reflection of incident

  2. Complete coverage of reduced graphene oxide on silicon dioxide substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jingfeng Huang; Hu Chen; Yoong Alfred Tok Iing; Larisika, Melanie; Nowak, Christoph; Faulkner, Steve; Nimmo, Myra A.

    2014-01-01

    Reduced graphene oxide (RGO) has the advantage of an aqueous and industrial-scale production route. No other approaches can rival the RGO field effect transistor platform in terms of cost (

  3. Rupture Pathway of Phosphatidylcholine Liposomes on Silicon Dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fredrik Höök

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the pathway by which unilamellar POPC liposomes upon adsorption undergo rupture and form a supported lipid bilayer (SLB on a SiO2 surface. Biotinylated lipids were selectively incorporated in the outer monolayer of POPC liposomes to create liposomes with asymmetric lipid compositions in the outer and inner leaflets. The specific binding of neutravidin and anti-biotin to SLBs formed by liposome fusion, prior to and after equilibrated flip-flop between the upper and lower monolayers in the SLB, were then investigated. It was concluded that the lipids in the outer monolayer of the vesicle predominantly end up on the SLB side facing the SiO2 substrate, as demonstrated by having maximum 30-40% of lipids in the liposome outer monolayer orienting towards the bulk after forming the SLB.

  4. Silicon dioxide etching yield measurements with inductively coupled fluorocarbon plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chae, Heeyeop; Vitale, Steven A.; Sawin, Herbert H.

    2003-01-01

    Oxide etching yield has been measured directly with inductively coupled fluorocarbon plasmas. The yields measurement technique of this work can provide useful information for feature profile evolution modeling, which is essential to understand various issues in oxide etching such as reactive ion etching (RIE) lag, inverse RIE lag, etch stop, microtrenching, bowing, etc. Etching and deposition yields per ion were measured using quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) as a function of ion bombardment energy, ion-to-neutral flux ratio, and ion-impinging angle. C 2 HF 5 , C 2 F 6 , C 2 H 4 F 2 , and C 4 F 8 were used for the oxide etching. Oxide etching mechanism with those gases is complex because etching and deposition are involved at the same time. In highly selective processes fluorocarbon deposition plays important role in determining etching characteristics. Two fluorocarbon deposition mechanisms are identified in this work: neutral deposition and ion-enhanced deposition. The low-energy ions are believed to enhance the deposition rates by creating active sites and fluorocarbon neutrals deposit on the active sites with higher sticking probability. A surface kinetic model is suggested to explain the ion-enhanced mechanism and shows good agreement with experimental data. Angular yield measurement shows that when fluorocarbon deposition is relatively severe, etching yield decreases significantly as the incident angle increases and deposit fluorocarbon at a high incident angle above 60 deg. C

  5. Adsorption studies of DNA origami on silicon dioxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albrechts, Björn; Hautzinger, Daniel S.; Krüger, Michael; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt; Müller, Kristian M.; Korvink, Jan G.

    2010-01-01

    Self-assembled DNA nanostructures promise low-cost ways to create nanoscale shapes. DNA nanostructures can also be used to position particles with nanometer precision. Yet, reliable and low-cost ways of integrating the structures with MEMS technology still have to be developed and innovations are of

  6. Carbon dioxide and climate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-10-01

    Global climate change is a serious environmental concern, and the US has developed ''An Action Agenda'' to deal with it. At the heart of the US effort is the US Global Change Research Program (USGCRP), which has been developed by the Committee on Earth and Environmental Sciences (CEES) of the Federal Coordinating Council for Sciences, Engineering, and Technology (FCCSET). The USGCRP will provide the scientific basis for sound policy making on the climate-change issue. The DOE contribution to the USGCRP is the Carbon Dioxide Research Program, which now places particular emphasis on the rapid improvement of the capability to predict global and regional climate change. DOE's Carbon Dioxide Research Program has been addressing the carbon dioxide-climate change connection for more than twelve years and has provided a solid scientific foundation for the USGCRP. The expansion of the DOE effort reflects the increased attention that the Department has placed on the issue and is reflected in the National Energy Strategy (NES) that was released in 1991. This Program Summary describes projects funded by the Carbon Dioxide Research Program during FY 1991 and gives a brief overview of objectives, organization, and accomplishments. The Environmental Sciences Division of the Office of Health and Environmental Research, Office of Energy Research supports a Carbon Dioxide Research Program to determine the scientific linkage between the rise of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, especially carbon dioxide, and climate and vegetation change. One facet is the Core CO 2 Program, a pioneering program that DOE established more than 10 years ago to understand and predict the ways that fossil-fuel burning could affect atmospheric CO 2 concentration, global climate, and the Earth's biosphere. Major research areas are: global carbon cycle; climate detection and models of climate change; vegetation research; resource analysis; and, information and integration

  7. Silicon: electrochemistry and luminescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooij, Ernst Stefan

    1997-01-01

    The electrochemistry of crystalline and porous silicon and the luminescence from porous silicon has been studied. One chapter deals with a model for the anodic dissolution of silicon in HF solution. In following chapters both the electrochemistry and various ways of generating visible

  8. Electrochemically exfoliated graphene as a novel microwave susceptor: the ultrafast microwave-assisted synthesis of carbon-coated silicon-graphene film as a lithium-ion battery anode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong Min; Ko, Dongjin; Oh, Jiseop; Lee, Jeongyeon; Hwang, Taejin; Jeon, Youngmoo; Hooch Antink, Wytse; Piao, Yuanzhe

    2017-10-19

    Graphene nanocomposites have attracted much attention in many applications due to their superior properties. However, preparing graphene nanocomposites requires a time-consuming thermal treatment to reduce the graphene or synthesize nanomaterials, in most cases. We present an ultrafast synthesis of a carbon-coated silicon-graphene nanocomposite using a commercial microwave system. Electrochemically exfoliated graphene is used as a novel microwave susceptor to deliver efficient microwave energy conversion. Unlike graphene oxide, it does not require a time-consuming pre-thermal reduction or toxic chemical reduction to absorb microwave radiation efficiently. A carbon-coated silicon nanoparticle-electrochemically exfoliated graphene nanocomposite film was prepared by a few seconds' microwave irradiation. The sp 2 domains of graphene absorb microwave radiation and generate heat to simultaneously reduce the graphene and carbonize the polydopamine carbon precursor. The as-prepared N-doped carbon-coated silicon-graphene film was used as a lithium-ion battery anode. The N-doped carbon coating decreases the contact resistance between silicon nanoparticles and graphene provides a wide range conductive network. Consequently, it exhibited a reversible capacity of 1744 mA h g -1 at a current density of 0.1 A g -1 and 662 mA h g -1 at 1.0 A g -1 after 200 cycles. This method can potentially be a general approach to prepare various graphene nanocomposites in an extremely short time.

  9. Excellent Silicon Surface Passivation Achieved by Industrial Inductively Coupled Plasma Deposited Hydrogenated Intrinsic Amorphous Silicon Suboxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Ge

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an alternative method of depositing a high-quality passivation film for heterojunction silicon wafer solar cells, in this paper. The deposition of hydrogenated intrinsic amorphous silicon suboxide is accomplished by decomposing hydrogen, silane, and carbon dioxide in an industrial remote inductively coupled plasma platform. Through the investigation on CO2 partial pressure and process temperature, excellent surface passivation quality and optical properties are achieved. It is found that the hydrogen content in the film is much higher than what is commonly reported in intrinsic amorphous silicon due to oxygen incorporation. The observed slow depletion of hydrogen with increasing temperature greatly enhances its process window as well. The effective lifetime of symmetrically passivated samples under the optimal condition exceeds 4.7 ms on planar n-type Czochralski silicon wafers with a resistivity of 1 Ωcm, which is equivalent to an effective surface recombination velocity of less than 1.7 cms−1 and an implied open-circuit voltage (Voc of 741 mV. A comparison with several high quality passivation schemes for solar cells reveals that the developed inductively coupled plasma deposited films show excellent passivation quality. The excellent optical property and resistance to degradation make it an excellent substitute for industrial heterojunction silicon solar cell production.

  10. The chemistry of silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Rochow, E G; Emeléus, H J; Nyholm, Ronald

    1975-01-01

    Pergamon Texts in Organic Chemistry, Volume 9: The Chemistry of Silicon presents information essential in understanding the chemical properties of silicon. The book first covers the fundamental aspects of silicon, such as its nuclear, physical, and chemical properties. The text also details the history of silicon, its occurrence and distribution, and applications. Next, the selection enumerates the compounds and complexes of silicon, along with organosilicon compounds. The text will be of great interest to chemists and chemical engineers. Other researchers working on research study involving s

  11. Carbon dioxide recycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    The recycling of carbon dioxide to methanol and dimethyl ether is seen to offer a substantial route to renewable and environmentally carbon neutral fuels. One of the authors has championed the “Methanol Economy" in articles and a book. By recycling ambient CO2, the authors argue ...

  12. Bench Remarks: Carbon Dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bent, Henry A.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the properties of carbon dioxide in its solid "dry ice" stage. Suggests several demonstrations and experiments that use dry ice to illustrate Avogadro's Law, Boyle's Law, Kinetic-Molecular Theory, and the effects of dry ice in basic solution, in limewater, and in acetone. (TW)

  13. Balancing atmospheric carbon dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goreau, T.J. (Discovery Bay Marine Laboratory, Univ. of the West Indies (JM))

    1990-01-01

    Rising carbon dioxide and global temperatures are causing increasing worldwide concern, and pressure towards an international law of the atmosphere is rapidly escalating, yet widespread misconceptions about the greenhouse effect's inevitability, time scale, and causes have inhibited effective consensus and action. Observations from Antarctic ice cores, Amazonian rain forests, and Carribean coral reefs suggest that the biological effects of climate change may be more severe than climate models predict. Efforts to limit emissions from fossil-fuel combustion alone are incapable of stabilizing levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. Stabilizing atmospheric carbon dioxide requires coupled measures to balance sources and sinks of the gas, and will only be viable with large-scale investments in increased sustainable productivity on degraded tropical soils, and in long-term research on renewable energy and biomass product development in the developing countries. A mechanism is outlined which directly links fossil-fuel combustion sources of carbon dioxide to removal via increasing biotic productivity and storage. A preliminary cost-benefit analysis suggests that such measures are very affordable, costing far less than inaction. (With 88 refs.).

  14. Macroporous silicon for high-capacitance devices using metal electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Didac; Reina, Jordi; Martí, Ferran; Pavón, Ramón; Rodríguez, Angel

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, high-capacity energy storage devices based on macroporous silicon are demonstrated. Small footprint devices with large specific capacitances up to 100 nF/mm(2), and an absolute capacitance above 15 μF, have been successfully fabricated using standard microelectronics and MEMS techniques. The fabricated devices are suitable for high-density system integration. The use of 3-D silicon structures allows achieving a large surface to volume ratio. The macroporous silicon structures are fabricated by electrochemical etching of silicon. This technique allows creating large structures of tubes with either straight or modulated radial profiles in depth. Furthermore, a very large aspect ratio is possible with this fabrication method. Macroporous silicon grown this way permits well-controlled structure definition with excellent repeatability and surface quality. Additionally, structure geometry can be accurately controlled to meet designer specifications. Macroporous silicon is used as one of the electrodes over which a silicon dioxide insulating layer is grown. Several insulator thicknesses have been tested. The second capacitor electrode is a solid nickel filling of the pores prepared by electroplating in a low-temperature industry standard process. The use of high-conductivity materials allows reaching small equivalent series resistance near 1 Ω. Thanks to these improvements, the presented devices are capable of operating up to 10 kHz. 84.32.Tt; 81.15.Pq; 81.05.Rm.

  15. Preparation of electrochemically active silicon nanotubes in highly ordered arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Grünzel

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Silicon as the negative electrode material of lithium ion batteries has a very large capacity, the exploitation of which is impeded by the volume changes taking place upon electrochemical cycling. A Si electrode displaying a controlled porosity could circumvent the difficulty. In this perspective, we present a preparative method that yields ordered arrays of electrochemically competent silicon nanotubes. The method is based on the atomic layer deposition of silicon dioxide onto the pore walls of an anodic alumina template, followed by a thermal reduction with lithium vapor. This thermal reduction is quantitative, homogeneous over macroscopic samples, and it yields amorphous silicon and lithium oxide, at the exclusion of any lithium silicides. The reaction is characterized by spectroscopic ellipsometry for thin silica films, and by nuclear magnetic resonance and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy for nanoporous samples. After removal of the lithium oxide byproduct, the silicon nanotubes can be contacted electrically. In a lithium ion electrolyte, they then display the electrochemical waves also observed for other bulk or nanostructured silicon systems. The method established here paves the way for systematic investigations of how the electrochemical properties (capacity, charge/discharge rates, cyclability of nanoporous silicon negative lithium ion battery electrode materials depend on the geometry.

  16. Thermodynamic and transport properties of plasmas including silicon-based compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colonna, G.; D’Angola, A.; Pietanza, L. D.; Capitelli, M.; Pirani, F.; Stevanato, E.; Laricchiuta, A.

    2018-01-01

    The characterization of the thermodynamic and transport properties of plasmas including silicon species could be of great interest for the investigation of many different systems containing the product of the ablation of silicon-based materials. Different plasma systems (pure silicon, silicon–argon, silicon dioxide and silicon carbide) have been investigated in a wide temperature range (103–4 104 K) and for different pressures (1, 10, 30 and 100 atm), relying on the construction of accurate and extended databases of internal energy levels and binary-interaction transport cross sections for the silicon compounds. The results have been compared with the available results in the literature also studying the dependence on the ratio of components.

  17. Carbon dioxide dangers demonstration model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venezky, Dina; Wessells, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Carbon dioxide is a dangerous volcanic gas. When carbon dioxide seeps from the ground, it normally mixes with the air and dissipates rapidly. However, because carbon dioxide gas is heavier than air, it can collect in snowbanks, depressions, and poorly ventilated enclosures posing a potential danger to people and other living things. In this experiment we show how carbon dioxide gas displaces oxygen as it collects in low-lying areas. When carbon dioxide, created by mixing vinegar and baking soda, is added to a bowl with candles of different heights, the flames are extinguished as if by magic.

  18. Electrochemistry of silicon in chloro-fluoride and carbonate melts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devyatkin S.V.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The electrochemical behavior of K2SiF6 in chloro-fluoride melts and that of SiO2 in carbonate melts has been studied. Silicon, titanium silicides, boron silicide and ternary compounds Ti-Si-B have been deposited from chloro-fluoride melts. Only SiC was deposited from carbonate-silica melts under carbon dioxide atmosphere (that is, excessive pressure of CO2.

  19. CARBON DIOXIDE FIXATION.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FUJITA,E.

    2000-01-12

    Solar carbon dioxide fixation offers the possibility of a renewable source of chemicals and fuels in the future. Its realization rests on future advances in the efficiency of solar energy collection and development of suitable catalysts for CO{sub 2} conversion. Recent achievements in the efficiency of solar energy conversion and in catalysis suggest that this approach holds a great deal of promise for contributing to future needs for fuels and chemicals.

  20. Breast Implants: Saline vs. Silicone

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... differ in material and consistency, however. Saline breast implants Saline implants are filled with sterile salt water. ... of any age for breast reconstruction. Silicone breast implants Silicone implants are pre-filled with silicone gel — ...

  1. Advantages of N-Type Hydrogenated Microcrystalline Silicon Oxide Films for Micromorph Silicon Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amornrat Limmanee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on the development and application of n-type hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon oxide films (n μc-SiO:H in hydrogenated amorphous silicon oxide/hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon (a-SiO:H/μc-Si:H micromorph solar cells. The n μc-SiO:H films with high optical bandgap and low refractive index could be obtained when a ratio of carbon dioxide (CO2 to silane (SiH4 flow rate was raised; however, a trade-off against electrical property was observed. We applied the n μc-SiO:H films in the top a-SiO:H cell and investigated the changes in cell performance with respect to the electrical and optical properties of the films. It was found that all photovoltaic parameters of the micromorph silicon solar cells using the n top μc-SiO:H layer enhanced with increasing the CO2/SiH4 ratio up to 0.23, where the highest initial cell efficiency of 10.7% was achieved. The enhancement of the open circuit voltage (Voc was likely to be due to a reduction of reverse bias at subcell connection—n top/p bottom interface—and a better tunnel recombination junction contributed to the improvement in the fill factor (FF. Furthermore, the quantum efficiency (QE results also have demonstrated intermediate-reflector function of the n μc-SiO:H films.

  2. Strontium zirconate as silicon and aluminum scavenger in yttria stabilized zirconia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas; Hansen, Karin Vels; Chorkendorff, Ib

    2011-01-01

    Here we report on strontium zirconate as a getter for silicon dioxide and aluminum oxide in yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) single crystals for cleaning purposes. YSZ single crystals were covered with strontium zirconate powder and heat treated at 1450°C in water vapor. After treatment the YSZ...... by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) the interface region between bump and YSZ single crystal bulk was examined. EDS showed a homogeneous distribution of silicon and aluminum through the cross section of a bump. The results suggest strontium zirconate as a good getter for silicon and aluminum from bulk...

  3. Fully-depleted, back-illuminated charge-coupled devices fabricated on high-resistivity silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holland, Stephen E.; Groom, Donald E.; Palaio, Nick P.; Stover, Richard J.; Wei, Mingzhi

    2002-03-28

    Charge-coupled devices (CCD's) have been fabricated on high-resistivity silicon. The resistivity, on the order of 10,000 {Omega}-cm, allows for depletion depths of several hundred microns. Fully-depleted, back-illuminated operation is achieved by the application of a bias voltage to a ohmic contact on the wafer back side consisting of a thin in-situ doped polycrystalline silicon layer capped by indium tin oxide and silicon dioxide. This thin contact allows for good short wavelength response, while the relatively large depleted thickness results in good near-infrared response.

  4. Origin of interfacial charging in irradiated silicon nitride capacitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, R.C.

    1984-01-01

    Many experiments show that when metal-silicon nitride-silicon dioxide-silicon (MNOS) devices are irradiated in short circuit, a large interfacial charge builds up near the nitride-SiO 2 -Si interface. This effect cannot be explained by simple models of radiation-induced conductivity of the nitride, but it is reported here that inclusion of carrier diffusion and recombination in the photoconductivity equations can predict the observed behavior. Numerical solutions on a computer are required, however, when these complications are added. The simulations account for the magnitude and radiation dose dependence of the results, as well as the occurrence of a steady state during the irradiation. The location of the excess trapped charge near the interface is also predicted, along with the large number of new traps which must be introduced to influence the steady-state charge distribution

  5. NEW METHOD OF PRODUCTION OF ALUNINUM SILICON ALLOYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. K. Afanasiev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new approach to the preparation of aluminum-silicon alloys, based on the concept of the leading role of hydrogen in determining the structure and properties of alloys consists in using as charge materials of silicon dioxide (silica and hydrogen instead of crystalline silicon was described. Practical ways to implement the new method were proposed on the example of industrial alloys prepared on charge synthetic alloy. It is shown that the application of the proposed method allows to improve the mechanical properties and reduce the coefficient of thermal expansion alloys, Al-Si. The effect of heat treatment on mechanical properties, density and thermal expansion of synthetic alloys was researched.

  6. Nanoscale density variations induced by high energy heavy ions in amorphous silicon nitride and silicon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota-Santiago, P.; Vazquez, H.; Bierschenk, T.; Kremer, F.; Nadzri, A.; Schauries, D.; Djurabekova, F.; Nordlund, K.; Trautmann, C.; Mudie, S.; Ridgway, M. C.; Kluth, P.

    2018-04-01

    The cylindrical nanoscale density variations resulting from the interaction of 185 MeV and 2.2 GeV Au ions with 1.0 μm thick amorphous SiN x :H and SiO x :H layers are determined using small angle x-ray scattering measurements. The resulting density profiles resembles an under-dense core surrounded by an over-dense shell with a smooth transition between the two regions, consistent with molecular-dynamics simulations. For amorphous SiN x :H, the density variations show a radius of 4.2 nm with a relative density change three times larger than the value determined for amorphous SiO x :H, with a radius of 5.5 nm. Complementary infrared spectroscopy measurements exhibit a damage cross-section comparable to the core dimensions. The morphology of the density variations results from freezing in the local viscous flow arising from the non-uniform temperature profile in the radial direction of the ion path. The concomitant drop in viscosity mediated by the thermal conductivity appears to be the main driving force rather than the presence of a density anomaly.

  7. Nonlinear silicon photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghi, M.; Castellan, C.; Signorini, S.; Trenti, A.; Pavesi, L.

    2017-09-01

    Silicon photonics is a technology based on fabricating integrated optical circuits by using the same paradigms as the dominant electronics industry. After twenty years of fervid development, silicon photonics is entering the market with low cost, high performance and mass-manufacturable optical devices. Until now, most silicon photonic devices have been based on linear optical effects, despite the many phenomenologies associated with nonlinear optics in both bulk materials and integrated waveguides. Silicon and silicon-based materials have strong optical nonlinearities which are enhanced in integrated devices by the small cross-section of the high-index contrast silicon waveguides or photonic crystals. Here the photons are made to strongly interact with the medium where they propagate. This is the central argument of nonlinear silicon photonics. It is the aim of this review to describe the state-of-the-art in the field. Starting from the basic nonlinearities in a silicon waveguide or in optical resonator geometries, many phenomena and applications are described—including frequency generation, frequency conversion, frequency-comb generation, supercontinuum generation, soliton formation, temporal imaging and time lensing, Raman lasing, and comb spectroscopy. Emerging quantum photonics applications, such as entangled photon sources, heralded single-photon sources and integrated quantum photonic circuits are also addressed at the end of this review.

  8. ALICE silicon strip module

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2006-01-01

    This small silicon detector strip will be inserted into the inner tracking system (ITS) on the ALICE detector at CERN. This detector relies on state-of-the-art particle tracking techniques. These double-sided silicon strip modules have been designed to be as lightweight and delicate as possible as the ITS will eventually contain five square metres of these devices.

  9. Magnetically assisted bilayer composites for soft bending actuators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jang, S.H.; Na, Seon Hong; Park, Yong Lae

    2017-01-01

    This article presents a soft pneumatic bending actuator using a magnetically assisted bilayer composite composed of silicone polymer and ferromagnetic particles. Bilayer composites were fabricated by mixing ferromagnetic particles to a prepolymer state of silicone in a mold and asymmetrically

  10. A highly integratable silicon thermal gas flow sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Kristoffer; Kratz, Henrik; Nguyen, Hugo; Thornell, Greger

    2012-06-01

    Thermal flow sensors have been designed, fabricated, and characterized. All bulk material in these devices is silicon so that they are integratable in silicon-based microsystems. To mitigate heat losses and to allow for use of corrosive gases, the heating and sensing thin film titanium/platinum elements, injecting and extracting heat, respectively, from the flow, are placed outside the channel on top of a membrane consisting of alternating layers of stress-balancing silicon dioxide and silicon nitride. For the fabrication, an unconventional bond surface protection method using sputter-deposited aluminum instead of thermal silicon dioxide is used in the process steps prior to silicon fusion bonding. A method for performing lift-off on top of the transparent membrane was also developed. The sensors, measuring 9.5 × 9.5 mm2, are characterized in calorimetric and time-of-flight modes with nitrogen flow rates between 0 sccm and 300 sccm. The maximum calorimetric sensor flow signal and sensitivity are 0.95 mV and 29 µV sccm-1, respectively, with power consumption less than 40 mW. The time-of-flight mode is found to have a wider detectable flow range compared with calorimetric mode, and the time of flight measured indicates a response time of the sensor in the millisecond range. The design and operation of a sensor with high sensitivity and large flow range are discussed. A key element of this discussion is the configuration of the array of heaters and gauges along the channel to obtain different sensitivities and extend the operational range. This means that the sensor can be tailored to different flow ranges.

  11. Black silicon integrated aperture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tianbo; Dickensheets, David L.

    2017-10-01

    This paper describes the incorporation of nanotextured black silicon as an optical absorbing material into silicon-based micro-optoelectromechanical systems devices to reduce stray light and increase optical contrast during imaging. Black silicon is created through a maskless dry etch process and characterized for two different etch conditions, a cold etch performed at 0°C and a cryogenic etch performed at -110°C. We measure specular reflection at visible wavelengths to be black velvet paint used to coat optical baffles and compare favorably with other methods to produce black surfaces from nanotextured silicon or using carbon nanotubes. We illustrate the use of this material by integrating a black silicon aperture around the perimeter of a deformable focus-control mirror. Imaging results show a significant improvement in contrast and image fidelity due to the effective reduction in stray light achieved with the self-aligned black aperture.

  12. Advances in silicon nanophotonics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvam, Jørn Märcher; Pu, Minhao

    plasma effect have been tested up to 40 Gbit/s, and hybrid evanescent silicon lasers have been realized both in the form of distributed feed-back lasers and micro-disk lasers. For enhancing the impact of silicon photonics in future ultrafast and energy-efficient all-optical signal processing, e.......g. in high-bit-rate optical communication circuits and networks, it is vital that the nonlinear optical effects of silicon are being strongly enhanced. This can among others be achieved in photonic-crystal slow-light waveguides and in nano-engineered photonic-wires (Fig. 1). In this talk I shall present some......Silicon has long been established as an ideal material for passive integrated optical circuitry due to its high refractive index, with corresponding strong optical confinement ability, and its low-cost CMOS-compatible manufacturability. However, the inversion symmetry of the silicon crystal lattice...

  13. Silicone-containing composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Mustafa

    2012-01-24

    A silicone-containing composition comprises the reaction product of a first component and an excess of an isocyanate component relative to the first component to form an isocyanated intermediary. The first component is selected from one of a polysiloxane and a silicone resin. The first component includes a carbon-bonded functional group selected from one of a hydroxyl group and an amine group. The isocyanate component is reactive with the carbon-bonded functional group of the first component. The isocyanated intermediary includes a plurality of isocyanate functional groups. The silicone-containing composition comprises the further reaction product of a second component, which is selected from the other of the polysiloxane and the silicone resin. The second component includes a plurality of carbon-bonded functional groups reactive with the isocyanate functional groups of the isocyanated intermediary for preparing the silicone-containing composition.

  14. Silicon germanium mask for deep silicon etching

    KAUST Repository

    Serry, Mohamed

    2014-07-29

    Polycrystalline silicon germanium (SiGe) can offer excellent etch selectivity to silicon during cryogenic deep reactive ion etching in an SF.sub.6/O.sub.2 plasma. Etch selectivity of over 800:1 (Si:SiGe) may be achieved at etch temperatures from -80 degrees Celsius to -140 degrees Celsius. High aspect ratio structures with high resolution may be patterned into Si substrates using SiGe as a hard mask layer for construction of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) devices and semiconductor devices.

  15. Formation of ultra Si/Ti nano thin film for enhancing silicon solar cell efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, T.; Dhahi, T. S.; Mohammed, M.; Al-Hajj, A. M.; Hashim, U.

    2017-10-01

    An alternative electrical source has l has become the major quest of every researchers due to it numerous advantages and applications of power supply and as electronic devices are becoming more and more portable. A highly efficient power supply is become inevitable. Thus. in this study, present ultrasonic based assisted fabrication of electrochemical silicon-Titanium nano thin film by in-house simple technique, uniformly silicon Nano film was fabricated and etched with HF (40%): C2H5OH (99%):1:1, < 20 nm pore diameter of silicon was fabricated. The surface and morphology reveal that the method produce uniform nano silicon porous layer with smaller silicon pores with high etching efficiency. The silicon-Titanium integrated nano porous exhibited excellent observation properties with low reflection index ~ 1.1 compared to silicon alone thin film.

  16. Recycling of silicon: from industrial waste to biocompatible nanoparticles for nanomedicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlov, N. K.; Natashina, U. A.; Tamarov, K. P.; Gongalsky, M. B.; Solovyev, V. V.; Kudryavtsev, A. A.; Sivakov, V.; Osminkina, L. A.

    2017-09-01

    The formation of photoluminescent porous silicon (PSi) nanoparticles (NPs) is usually based on an expensive semiconductor grade wafers technology. Here, we report a low-cost method of PSi NPs synthesis from the industrial silicon waste remained after the wafer production. The proposed method is based on metal-assisted wet-chemical etching (MACE) of the silicon surface of cm-sized metallurgical grade silicon stones which leads to a nanostructuring of the surface due to an anisotropic etching, with subsequent ultrasound fracturing in water. The obtained PSi NPs exhibit bright red room temperature photoluminescence (PL) and demonstrate similar microstructure and physical characteristics in comparison with the nanoparticles synthesized from semiconductor grade Si wafers. PSi NPs prepared from metallurgical grade silicon stones, similar to silicon NPs synthesized from high purity silicon wafer, show low toxicity to biological objects that open the possibility of using such type of NPs in nanomedicine.

  17. Carbon dioxide and climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-10-01

    Scientific and public interest in greenhouse gases, climate warming, and global change virtually exploded in 1988. The Department's focused research on atmospheric CO{sub 2} contributed sound and timely scientific information to the many questions produced by the groundswell of interest and concern. Research projects summarized in this document provided the data base that made timely responses possible, and the contributions from participating scientists are genuinely appreciated. In the past year, the core CO{sub 2} research has continued to improve the scientific knowledge needed to project future atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations, to estimate climate sensitivity, and to assess the responses of vegetation to rising concentrations of CO{sub 2} and to climate change. The Carbon Dioxide Research Program's goal is to develop sound scientific information for policy formulation and governmental action in response to changes of atmospheric CO{sub 2}. The Program Summary describes projects funded by the Carbon Dioxide Research Program during FY 1990 and gives a brief overview of objectives, organization, and accomplishments.

  18. The Affordable Pre-Finishing of Silicon Carbide for Optical Applications, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Creare proposes to develop a novel, laser-assisted, pre-finishing process for chemical vapor deposition (CVD) coated silicon-carbide ceramics. Our innovation will...

  19. Characterization and electrochemical performance of lithium-active titanium dioxide inlaid LiNi0.5Co0.2Mn0.3O2 material prepared by lithium residue-assisted method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Lingjun; Chen, Zhaoyong; Song, Liubin; Xu, Ming; Zhu, Huali; Gong, Li; Zhang, Kaili

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • LiTiO 2 -inlaid LiNi 0.5 Co 0.2 Mn 0.3 O 2 is prepared by lithium residue-assisted method. • The unique inlaid architecture inherits the advantages of coating and doping. • LiTiO 2 inlaying enhances the pristine at high cyclability and rate properties. • Excess LiTiO 2 modification results in low Li + diffusion coefficient. • The 3 mol% LiTiO 2 inlaid sample exhibits the best electrochemical performance. - Abstract: The lithium residues are consumed as raw materials to in-situ synthesize the LiTiO 2 -inlaid LiNi 0.5 Co 0.2 Mn 0.3 O 2 composites. The effects of various LiTiO 2 contents on the morphology, structure, and electrochemical properties of LiNi 0.5 Co 0.2 Mn 0.3 O 2 materials are investigated in detail. Energy dispersive spectrometer mapping, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and fast Fourier transform analysis confirm that the spherical particles of LiNi 0.5 Co 0.2 Mn 0.3 O 2 are completely coated by crystalline LiTiO 2 phase; X-ray diffraction, cross-section SEM and corresponding EDS results indicate that Ti ions are also doped into the bulk LiNi 0.5 Co 0.2 Mn 0.3 O 2 with gradient distribution. Electrochemical tests show that the LiTiO 2 -inlaid samples exhibit excellent reversible capacity, enhanced cyclability, superior lithium diffusion coefficient and rate properties. Specially, the 3 mol% LiTiO 2 inlaid sample maintains 153.7 mA h g −1 with 94.4% capacity retention after 100 cycles between 2.7–4.4 V at 1 C, take 30% advantage than that of the pristine one (118.2 mA h g −1 ). This improvement can be attributed to the removal of lithium residues and suitable LiTiO 2 inlaying. The absence of lithium residue is helpful to retard the decomposition of LiPF 6 . While, suitable LiTiO 2 inlaying can protect the bulk from directly contacting the electrolyte, buffer the volume change of core and shell during cycles, increase the surface electronic conductivity and offer a 3D path for Li + diffusion from the bulk to

  20. Hydrogen in amorphous silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peercy, P.S.

    1980-01-01

    The structural aspects of amorphous silicon and the role of hydrogen in this structure are reviewed with emphasis on ion implantation studies. In amorphous silicon produced by Si ion implantation of crystalline silicon, the material reconstructs into a metastable amorphous structure which has optical and electrical properties qualitatively similar to the corresponding properties in high-purity evaporated amorphous silicon. Hydrogen studies further indicate that these structures will accomodate less than or equal to 5 at.% hydrogen and this hydrogen is bonded predominantly in a monohydride (SiH 1 ) site. Larger hydrogen concentrations than this can be achieved under certain conditions, but the excess hydrogen may be attributed to defects and voids in the material. Similarly, glow discharge or sputter deposited amorphous silicon has more desirable electrical and optical properties when the material is prepared with low hydrogen concentration and monohydride bonding. Results of structural studies and hydrogen incorporation in amorphous silicon were discussed relative to the different models proposed for amorphous silicon

  1. Process for making silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Harry (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A reactor apparatus (10) adapted for continuously producing molten, solar grade purity elemental silicon by thermal reaction of a suitable precursor gas, such as silane (SiH.sub.4), is disclosed. The reactor apparatus (10) includes an elongated reactor body (32) having graphite or carbon walls which are heated to a temperature exceeding the melting temperature of silicon. The precursor gas enters the reactor body (32) through an efficiently cooled inlet tube assembly (22) and a relatively thin carbon or graphite septum (44). The septum (44), being in contact on one side with the cooled inlet (22) and the heated interior of the reactor (32) on the other side, provides a sharp temperature gradient for the precursor gas entering the reactor (32) and renders the operation of the inlet tube assembly (22) substantially free of clogging. The precursor gas flows in the reactor (32) in a substantially smooth, substantially axial manner. Liquid silicon formed in the initial stages of the thermal reaction reacts with the graphite or carbon walls to provide a silicon carbide coating on the walls. The silicon carbide coated reactor is highly adapted for prolonged use for production of highly pure solar grade silicon. Liquid silicon (20) produced in the reactor apparatus (10) may be used directly in a Czochralski or other crystal shaping equipment.

  2. Spectrophotometric determination of sulphur dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parashar, D C; Raman, V; Singh, M

    1987-01-01

    Sulphur dioxide, an important industrial gas and air pollutant, is usually estimated using mercury salts. The authors have developed a method in which hazardous mercury salts are avoided. Sulphur dioxide is trapped in aqueous morpholine and mixed with the excess of dichromate solution in acidic medium. The hexavalent chromium in dichromate is reduced to trivalent chromium by sulphur dioxide and the excess of hexavalent chromium is determined with diphenylcarbazide which yields a soluble red-violet complex with an absorption maximum at 540 nm. The decrease in the absorbance values of the red-violet complex formed after reduction, when compared to that of a reagent control, is proportional to the concentration of sulphur dioxide used for reduction. Beer's law operates between 0.4 and 4 microg ml(-1) concentration of sulphur dioxide in solution.

  3. Silicon applications in photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelenski, A. M.; Gawlik, G.; Wesolowski, M.

    2005-09-01

    Silicon technology enabled the miniaturization of computers and other electronic system for information storage, transmission and transformation allowing the development of the Knowledge Based Information Society. Despite the fact that silicon roadmap indicates possibilities for further improvement, already now the speed of electrons and the bandwidth of electronic circuits are not sufficient and photons are commonly utilized for signal transmission through optical fibers and purely photonic circuits promise further improvements. However materials used for these purposes II/V semiconductor compounds, glasses make integration of optoelectronic circuits with silicon complex an expensive. Therefore research on light generation, transformation and transmission in silicon is very active and recently, due to nanotechnology some spectacular results were achieved despite the fact that mechanisms of light generation are still discussed. Three topics will be discussed. Porous silicon was actively investigated due to its relatively efficient electroluminescence enabling its use in light sources. Its index of refraction, differs considerably from the index of silicon, and this allows its utilization for Bragg mirrors, wave guides and photonic crystals. The enormous surface enables several applications on medicine and biotechnology and in particular due to the effective chemo-modulation of its refracting index the design of optical chemosensors. An effective luminescence of doped and undoped nanocrystalline silicon opened another way for the construction of silicon light sources. Optical amplification was already discovered opening perspectives for the construction of nanosilicon lasers. Luminescences was observed at red, green and blue wavelengths. The used technology of silica and ion implantation are compatible with commonly used CMOS technology. Finally the recently developed and proved idea of optically pumped silicon Raman lasers, using nonlinearity and vibrations in the

  4. Steps towards silicon optoelectronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starovoytov, A

    1999-07-01

    This thesis addresses the issue of a potential future microelectronics technology, namely the possibility of utilising the optical properties of nanocrystalline silicon for optoelectronic circuits. The subject is subdivided into three chapters. Chapter 1 is an introduction. It formulates the oncoming problem for microelectronic development, explains the basics of Integrated Optoelectronics, introduces porous silicon as a new light-emitting material and gives a brief review of other competing light-emitting material systems currently under investigation. Examples of existing porous silicon devices are given. Chapter 2 reviews the basic physics relevant to the subject of this thesis and in-forms on the present situation in this field of research, including both experimental and theoretical knowledge gained up-to-date. The chapter provides the necessary background for correct interpretation of the results reported in Chapter 3 and for a realistic decision on the direction for future work. Chapter 3 describes my own experimental and computational results within the framework of the subject, obtained at De Montfort University. These include: one-step preparation of laterally structured porous silicon with photoluminescence and microscopy characterisation, Raman spectroscopy of porous silicon, a polarisation study of the photoluminescence from porous silicon, computer simulations of the conductivity of two-component media and of laser focused atomic deposition for nanostructure fabrication. Thus, this thesis makes a dual contribution to the chosen field: it summarises the present knowledge on the possibility of utilising optical properties of nanocrystalline silicon in silicon-based electronics, and it reports new results within the framework of the subject. The main conclusion is that due to its promising optoelectronic properties nanocrystalline silicon remains a prospective competitor for the cheapest and fastest microelectronics of the next century. (author)

  5. Microstructure analysis of silicon nanocrystals formed from silicon rich oxide with high excess silicon: Annealing and doping effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomoto, K.; Yang, T. C. J.; Ceguerra, A. V.; Zhang, T.; Lin, Z.; Breen, A.; Wu, L.; Puthen-Veettil, B.; Jia, X.; Conibeer, G.; Perez-Wurfl, I.; Ringer, S. P.

    2017-07-01

    Thin films consisting of silicon nanocrystals fabricated by high silicon content in silicon rich oxide show unique properties of decreasing resistivity and increasing light absorption while maintaining quantum confinement effects. With that said, the effect of the annealing temperature and doping element on the microscopic structure of silicon nanocrystals (Si NCs) and the film are still under research. In this study, individual intrinsic, boron-, and phosphorus-doped films are annealed at various temperatures, and their structural properties are analyzed via atom probe tomography together with glancing incidence x-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy (Raman), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and energy filtered TEM. In addition, photoluminescence (PL) is performed and linked with their microstructural properties. The Si NC growth is confirmed at annealing temperatures of 1000 °C and 1100 °C. The microstructure of the Si NCs in the whole film is dramatically changed by increasing the annealing temperature from 1000 °C to 1100 °C. In addition, doping changes the arrangement of the Si NCs by assisting their penetration across the SiO2 barrier layers. This study helps to understand the relationship between the microscopic and macroscopic properties of the Si NC film, showing that the size and distribution of the Si NCs are correlated with the obtained PL profiles.

  6. Recrystallization of polycrystalline silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lall, C.; Kulkarni, S. B.; Graham, C. D., Jr.; Pope, D. P.

    1981-01-01

    Optical metallography is used to investigate the recrystallization properties of polycrystalline semiconductor-grade silicon. It is found that polycrystalline silicon recrystallizes at 1380 C in relatively short times, provided that the prior deformation is greater than 30%. For a prior deformation of about 40%, the recrystallization process is essentially complete in about 30 minutes. Silicon recrystallizes at a substantially slower rate than metals at equivalent homologous temperatures. The recrystallized grain size is insensitive to the amount of prestrain for strains in the range of 10-50%.

  7. Silicon etch process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Day, D.J.; White, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    A silicon etch process wherein an area of silicon crystal surface is passivated by radiation damage and non-planar structure produced by subsequent anisotropic etching. The surface may be passivated by exposure to an energetic particle flux - for example an ion beam from an arsenic, boron, phosphorus, silicon or hydrogen source, or an electron beam. Radiation damage may be used for pattern definition and/or as an etch stop. Ethylenediamine pyrocatechol or aqueous potassium hydroxide anisotropic etchants may be used. The radiation damage may be removed after etching by thermal annealing. (author)

  8. Silicon nanowire hybrid photovoltaics

    KAUST Repository

    Garnett, Erik C.

    2010-06-01

    Silicon nanowire Schottky junction solar cells have been fabricated using n-type silicon nanowire arrays and a spin-coated conductive polymer (PEDOT). The polymer Schottky junction cells show superior surface passivation and open-circuit voltages compared to standard diffused junction cells with native oxide surfaces. External quantum efficiencies up to 88% were measured for these silicon nanowire/PEDOT solar cells further demonstrating excellent surface passivation. This process avoids high temperature processes which allows for low-cost substrates to be used. © 2010 IEEE.

  9. All-solid-state supercapacitors on silicon using graphene from silicon carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Bei; Ahmed, Mohsin; Iacopi, Francesca, E-mail: f.iacopi@griffith.edu.au [Environmental Futures Research Institute, Griffith University, Nathan 4111 (Australia); Wood, Barry [Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Queensland, St. Lucia 4072 (Australia)

    2016-05-02

    Carbon-based supercapacitors are lightweight devices with high energy storage performance, allowing for faster charge-discharge rates than batteries. Here, we present an example of all-solid-state supercapacitors on silicon for on-chip applications, paving the way towards energy supply systems embedded in miniaturized electronics with fast access and high safety of operation. We present a nickel-assisted graphitization method from epitaxial silicon carbide on a silicon substrate to demonstrate graphene as a binder-free electrode material for all-solid-state supercapacitors. We obtain graphene electrodes with a strongly enhanced surface area, assisted by the irregular intrusion of nickel into the carbide layer, delivering a typical double-layer capacitance behavior with a specific area capacitance of up to 174 μF cm{sup −2} with about 88% capacitance retention over 10 000 cycles. The fabrication technique illustrated in this work provides a strategic approach to fabricate micro-scale energy storage devices compatible with silicon electronics and offering ultimate miniaturization capabilities.

  10. All-solid-state supercapacitors on silicon using graphene from silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bei; Ahmed, Mohsin; Wood, Barry; Iacopi, Francesca

    2016-05-01

    Carbon-based supercapacitors are lightweight devices with high energy storage performance, allowing for faster charge-discharge rates than batteries. Here, we present an example of all-solid-state supercapacitors on silicon for on-chip applications, paving the way towards energy supply systems embedded in miniaturized electronics with fast access and high safety of operation. We present a nickel-assisted graphitization method from epitaxial silicon carbide on a silicon substrate to demonstrate graphene as a binder-free electrode material for all-solid-state supercapacitors. We obtain graphene electrodes with a strongly enhanced surface area, assisted by the irregular intrusion of nickel into the carbide layer, delivering a typical double-layer capacitance behavior with a specific area capacitance of up to 174 μF cm-2 with about 88% capacitance retention over 10 000 cycles. The fabrication technique illustrated in this work provides a strategic approach to fabricate micro-scale energy storage devices compatible with silicon electronics and offering ultimate miniaturization capabilities.

  11. Fluorescent Silicon Clusters and Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    von Haeften, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    The fluorescence of silicon clusters is reviewed. Atomic clusters of silicon have been at the focus of research for several decades because of the relevance of size effects for material properties, the importance of silicon in electronics and the potential applications in bio-medicine. To date numerous examples of nanostructured forms of fluorescent silicon have been reported. This article introduces the principles and underlying concepts relevant for fluorescence of nanostructured silicon su...

  12. Uranium dioxide electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willit, James L [Batavia, IL; Ackerman, John P [Prescott, AZ; Williamson, Mark A [Naperville, IL

    2009-12-29

    This is a single stage process for treating spent nuclear fuel from light water reactors. The spent nuclear fuel, uranium oxide, UO.sub.2, is added to a solution of UCl.sub.4 dissolved in molten LiCl. A carbon anode and a metallic cathode is positioned in the molten salt bath. A power source is connected to the electrodes and a voltage greater than or equal to 1.3 volts is applied to the bath. At the anode, the carbon is oxidized to form carbon dioxide and uranium chloride. At the cathode, uranium is electroplated. The uranium chloride at the cathode reacts with more uranium oxide to continue the reaction. The process may also be used with other transuranic oxides and rare earth metal oxides.

  13. Production of uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knudsen, I.E.

    1977-01-01

    A three stage fluidized bed process is described for converting uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) to a ceramic-grade uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) powder by first, reacting hydrogen and steam with UF 6 in a first fluidized bed in a temperature range of from about 475 to 600 0 C to form solid intermediate products UO 2 F 2 and U 3 O 8 ; second, reacting hydrogen and steam with the intermediate products in a second fluidized bed at a temperature ranging from about 575 to about 675 0 C to produce a second group of intermediate products including UO 2 F 2 , U 3 O 8 , and UO 2 ; and, third, reacting hydrogen and steam with the second group of intermediate products in a third fluidized bed as a temperature of 575 to 675 0 C to produce ceramic grade UO 2 powder having low residual content of fluorides and other foreign materials. 9 claims, 1 figure

  14. Uranium dioxide pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zawidzki, T.W.

    1982-01-01

    A process for the preparation of a sintered, high density, large crystal grain size uranium dioxide pellet is described which involves: (i) reacting a uranyl nitrate of formula UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2 .6H 2 O with a sulphur source, at a temperature of from about 300 deg. C to provide a sulphur-containing uranium trioxide; (ii) reacting the thus-obtained modified uranium trioxide with ammonium nitrate to form an insoluble sulphur-containing ammonium uranate; (iii) neutralizing the thus-formed slurry with ammonium hydroxide to precipitate out as an insoluble ammonium uranate the remaining dissolved uranium; (iv) recovering the thus-formed precipitates in a dry state; (v) reducing the dry precipitate to UO 2 , and forming it into 'green' pellets; and (vi) sintering the pellets in a hydrogen atmosphere at an elevated temperature

  15. Forecasting carbon dioxide emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaobing; Du, Ding

    2015-09-01

    This study extends the literature on forecasting carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions by applying the reduced-form econometrics approach of Schmalensee et al. (1998) to a more recent sample period, the post-1997 period. Using the post-1997 period is motivated by the observation that the strengthening pace of global climate policy may have been accelerated since 1997. Based on our parameter estimates, we project 25% reduction in CO2 emissions by 2050 according to an economic and population growth scenario that is more consistent with recent global trends. Our forecasts are conservative due to that we do not have sufficient data to fully take into account recent developments in the global economy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Optothermal response of a single silicon nanotip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vella, A.; Shinde, D.; Houard, J.; Silaeva, E.; Arnoldi, L.; Blum, I.; Rigutti, L.; Pertreux, E.; Maioli, P.; Crut, A.; Del Fatti, N.

    2018-02-01

    The optical properties and thermal dynamics of conical single silicon nanotips are experimentally and theoretically investigated. The spectral and spatial dependencies of their optical extinction are quantitatively measured by spatial modulation spectroscopy (SMS). A nonuniform optical extinction along the tip axis and an enhanced near-infrared absorption, as compared to bulk crystalline silicon, are evidenced. This information is a key input for computing the thermal response of single silicon nanotips under ultrafast laser illumination, which is investigated by laser assisted atom probe tomography (La-APT) used as a highly sensitive temperature probe. A combination of these two experimental techniques and comparison with modeling also permits us to elucidate the impact of thermal effects on the laser assisted field evaporation process. Extension of this coupled approach opens up future perspectives for the quantitative study of the optical and thermal properties of a wide class of individual nano-objects, in particular elongated ones such as nanotubes, nanowires, and nanocones, which constitute promising nanosources for electron and/or ion emission.

  17. Photoluminescence and electrical properties of silicon oxide and silicon nitride superlattices containing silicon nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shuleiko, D V; Ilin, A S

    2016-01-01

    Photoluminescence and electrical properties of superlattices with thin (1 to 5 nm) alternating silicon-rich silicon oxide or silicon-rich silicon nitride, and silicon oxide or silicon nitride layers containing silicon nanocrystals prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition with subsequent annealing were investigated. The entirely silicon oxide based superlattices demonstrated photoluminescence peak shift due to quantum confinement effect. Electrical measurements showed the hysteresis effect in the vicinity of zero voltage due to structural features of the superlattices from SiOa 93 /Si 3 N 4 and SiN 0 . 8 /Si 3 N 4 layers. The entirely silicon nitride based samples demonstrated resistive switching effect, comprising an abrupt conductivity change at about 5 to 6 V with current-voltage characteristic hysteresis. The samples also demonstrated efficient photoluminescence with maximum at ∼1.4 eV, due to exiton recombination in silicon nanocrystals. (paper)

  18. Porous Silicon Nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yongquan; Zhou, Hailong; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2011-01-01

    In this minreview, we summarize recent progress in the synthesis, properties and applications of a new type of one-dimensional nanostructures — single crystalline porous silicon nanowires. The growth of porous silicon nanowires starting from both p- and n-type Si wafers with a variety of dopant concentrations can be achieved through either one-step or two-step reactions. The mechanistic studies indicate the dopant concentration of Si wafers, oxidizer concentration, etching time and temperature can affect the morphology of the as-etched silicon nanowires. The porous silicon nanowires are both optically and electronically active and have been explored for potential applications in diverse areas including photocatalysis, lithium ion battery, gas sensor and drug delivery. PMID:21869999

  19. Porous silicon based anode material formed using metal reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anguchamy, Yogesh Kumar; Masarapu, Charan; Deng, Haixia; Han, Yongbong; Venkatachalam, Subramanian; Kumar, Sujeet; Lopez, Herman A.

    2015-09-22

    A porous silicon based material comprising porous crystalline elemental silicon formed by reducing silicon dioxide with a reducing metal in a heating process followed by acid etching is used to construct negative electrode used in lithium ion batteries. Gradual temperature heating ramp(s) with optional temperature steps can be used to perform the heating process. The porous silicon formed has a high surface area from about 10 m.sup.2/g to about 200 m.sup.2/g and is substantially free of carbon. The negative electrode formed can have a discharge specific capacity of at least 1800 mAh/g at rate of C/3 discharged from 1.5V to 0.005V against lithium with in some embodiments loading levels ranging from about 1.4 mg/cm.sup.2 to about 3.5 mg/cm.sup.2. In some embodiments, the porous silicon can be coated with a carbon coating or blended with carbon nanofibers or other conductive carbon material.

  20. The DELPHI silicon tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Pernegger, H

    1997-01-01

    The DELPHI collaboration has upgraded the Silicon Vertex Detector in order to cope with the physics requirements for LEP200. The new detector consists of a barrel section with three layers of microstrip detectors and a forward extension made of hybrid pixel and large pitch strip detectors. The layout of the detector and the techniques used for the different parts of the new silicon detector shall be described.

  1. Study on Silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gervino, G.; Boero, M.; Manfredotti, C.; Icardi, M.; Gabutti, A.; Bagnolatti, E.; Monticone, E.

    1990-01-01

    Prototypes of Silicon microstrip detectors and Silicon large area detectors (3x2 cm 2 ), realized directly by our group, either by ion implantation or by diffusion are presented. The physical detector characteristics and their performances determined by exposing them to different radioactive sources and the results of extensive tests on passivation, where new technological ways have been investigated, are discussed. The calculation of the different terms contributing to the total dark current is reported

  2. Dynamic Silicon Nanophotonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-31

    sensitive to fabrication imperfections and small temperature changes, therefore they are challenging to integrate into high yield mass production ... Cocoa Beach, Florida, September 2012. 15. Ali Wanis Elshaari, “Photon Manipulation in Silicon Nanophotonic Circuits,” Ph.D. Dissertation, Rochester...1.5-micron Light using Silicon Nanocrystals,” 2012 IEEE Avionics, Fiber Optics and Photonics Conference (AVFOP 2012), ThB3, Cocoa Beach, Florida

  3. Gluteal Black Market Silicone-induced Renal Failure: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matson, Andrea; Faibisoff, Burt

    2017-11-01

    Very few cases of successful surgical treatment for renal failure due to gluteal silicone injections have been reported in the literature. The silicone toxicity and subsequent renal failure seem to follow repetitive silicone injections and silicone injections in large quantities. This is a case of a 31-year-old woman who developed renal failure after 6 years of gluteal silicone injections who underwent radical resection of bilateral gluteal regions in an attempt to mitigate her impending complete renal failure. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed database and with assistance from medical library staff to conduct keyword searches for "Silicone," "Renal failure," "Silicone emboli syndrome," "Silicone granuloma," and "Silicone end organ toxicity." The search results were reviewed by the authors and selected based on the relevance to the case report presented. Extensive literature relating to silicone granulomas and their systemic effects supports the use of steroids for immediate treatment and eventual surgical resection for cure of the various silicone-related end-organ toxicities including renal failure.

  4. Silicon microphotonic waveguides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ta'eed, V.; Steel, M.J.; Grillet, C.; Eggleton, B.; Du, J.; Glasscock, J.; Savvides, N.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Silicon microphotonic devices have been drawing increasing attention in the past few years. The high index-difference between silicon and its oxide (Δn = 2) suggests a potential for high-density integration of optical functions on to a photonic chip. Additionally, it has been shown that silicon exhibits strong Raman nonlinearity, a necessary property as light interaction can occur only by means of nonlinearities in the propagation medium. The small dimensions of silicon waveguides require the design of efficient tapers to couple light to them. We have used the beam propagation method (RSoft BeamPROP) to understand the principles and design of an inverse-taper mode-converter as implemented in several recent papers. We report on progress in the design and fabrication of silicon-based waveguides. Preliminary work has been conducted by patterning silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers using optical lithography and reactive ion etching. Thus far, only rib waveguides have been designed, as single-mode ridge-waveguides are beyond the capabilities of conventional optical lithography. We have recently moved to electron beam lithography as the higher resolutions permitted will provide the flexibility to begin fabricating sub-micron waveguides

  5. Silicon mediated biochemical changes in wheat under salinized and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-01-10

    Jan 10, 2012 ... Silicon (Si) can alleviate salinity damage, a major threat to agriculture that causes instability in wheat production. We report on ... inclusion into the growth medium is of assistance for wheat growth by maintaining plant water status, .... unit of SOD was defined as the amount of enzyme required to cause 50% ...

  6. Amorphous silicon crystalline silicon heterojunction solar cells

    CERN Document Server

    Fahrner, Wolfgang Rainer

    2013-01-01

    Amorphous Silicon/Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells deals with some typical properties of heterojunction solar cells, such as their history, the properties and the challenges of the cells, some important measurement tools, some simulation programs and a brief survey of the state of the art, aiming to provide an initial framework in this field and serve as a ready reference for all those interested in the subject. This book helps to "fill in the blanks" on heterojunction solar cells. Readers will receive a comprehensive overview of the principles, structures, processing techniques and the current developmental states of the devices. Prof. Dr. Wolfgang R. Fahrner is a professor at the University of Hagen, Germany and Nanchang University, China.

  7. Oxygen defect processes in silicon and silicon germanium

    KAUST Repository

    Chroneos, A.

    2015-06-18

    Silicon and silicon germanium are the archetypical elemental and alloy semiconductor materials for nanoelectronic, sensor, and photovoltaic applications. The investigation of radiation induced defects involving oxygen, carbon, and intrinsic defects is important for the improvement of devices as these defects can have a deleterious impact on the properties of silicon and silicon germanium. In the present review, we mainly focus on oxygen-related defects and the impact of isovalent doping on their properties in silicon and silicon germanium. The efficacy of the isovalent doping strategies to constrain the oxygen-related defects is discussed in view of recent infrared spectroscopy and density functional theory studies.

  8. Colloidal characterization of ultrafine silicon carbide and silicon nitride powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitman, Pamela K.; Feke, Donald L.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of various powder treatment strategies on the colloid chemistry of aqueous dispersions of silicon carbide and silicon nitride are examined using a surface titration methodology. Pretreatments are used to differentiate between the true surface chemistry of the powders and artifacts resulting from exposure history. Silicon nitride powders require more extensive pretreatment to reveal consistent surface chemistry than do silicon carbide powders. As measured by titration, the degree of proton adsorption from the suspending fluid by pretreated silicon nitride and silicon carbide powders can both be made similar to that of silica.

  9. Silicon-Based Light Sources for Silicon Integrated Circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Pavesi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Silicon the material per excellence for electronics is not used for sourcing light due to the lack of efficient light emitters and lasers. In this review, after having introduced the basics on lasing, I will discuss the physical reasons why silicon is not a laser material and the approaches to make it lasing. I will start with bulk silicon, then I will discuss silicon nanocrystals and Er3+ coupled silicon nanocrystals where significant advances have been done in the past and can be expected in the near future. I will conclude with an optimistic note on silicon lasing.

  10. TXRF analysis of trace metals in thin silicon nitride films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vereecke, G.; Arnauts, S.; Verstraeten, K.; Schaekers, M.; Heyrts, M.M.

    2000-01-01

    As critical dimensions of integrated circuits continue to decrease, high dielectric constant materials such as silicon nitride are being considered to replace silicon dioxide in capacitors and transistors. The achievement of low levels of metal contamination in these layers is critical for high performance and reliability. Existing methods of quantitative analysis of trace metals in silicon nitride require high amounts of sample (from about 0.1 to 1 g, compared to a mass of 0.2 mg for a 2 nm thick film on a 8'' silicon wafer), and involve digestion steps not applicable to films on wafers or non-standard techniques such as neutron activation analysis. A novel approach has recently been developed to analyze trace metals in thin films with analytical techniques currently used in the semiconductor industry. Sample preparation consists of three steps: (1) decomposition of the silicon nitride matrix by moist HF condensed at the wafer surface to form ammonium fluosilicate. (2) vaporization of the fluosilicate by a short heat treatment at 300 o C. (3) collection of contaminants by scanning the wafer surface with a solution droplet (VPD-DSC procedure). The determination of trace metals is performed by drying the droplet on the wafer and by analyzing the residue by TXRF, as it offers the advantages of multi-elemental analysis with no dilution of the sample. The lower limits of detection for metals in 2 nm thick films on 8'' silicon wafers range from about 10 to 200 ng/g. The present study will focus on the matrix effects and the possible loss of analyte associated with the evaporation of the fluosilicate salt, in relation with the accuracy and the reproducibility of the method. The benefits of using an internal standard will be assessed. Results will be presented from both model samples (ammonium fluoride contaminated with metallic salts) and real samples (silicon nitride films from a production tool). (author)

  11. Assistive Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Page Resize Text Printer Friendly Online Chat Assistive Technology Assistive technology (AT) is any service or tool that helps ... be difficult or impossible. For older adults, such technology may be a walker to improve mobility or ...

  12. Assisted Living

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assisted living is for adults who need help with everyday tasks. They may need help with dressing, bathing, ... don't need full-time nursing care. Some assisted living facilities are part of retirement communities. Others are ...

  13. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Karthik

    2011-12-01

    Silicon Photonics is quickly proving to be a suitable interconnect technology for meeting the future goals of on-chip bandwidth and low power requirements. However, it is not clear how silicon photonics will be integrated into CMOS chips, particularly microprocessors. The issue of integrating photonic circuits into electronic IC fabrication processes to achieve maximum flexibility and minimum complexity and cost is an important one. In order to minimize usage of chip real estate, it will be advantageous to integrate in three-dimensions. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) is emerging as a promising material for the 3-D integration of silicon photonics for on-chip optical interconnects. In addition, a-Si:H film can be deposited using CMOS compatible low temperature plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process at any point in the fabrication process allowing maximum flexibility and minimal complexity. In this thesis, we demonstrate a-Si:H as a high performance alternate platform to crystalline silicon, enabling backend integration of optical interconnects in a hybrid photonic-electronic network-on-chip architecture. High quality passive devices are fabricated on a low-loss a-Si:H platform enabling wavelength division multiplexing schemes. We demonstrate a broadband all-optical modulation scheme based on free-carrier absorption effect, which can enable compact electro-optic modulators in a-Si:H. Furthermore, we comprehensively characterize the optical nonlinearities in a-Si:H and observe that a-Si:H exhibits enhanced nonlinearities as compared to crystalline silicon. Based on the enhanced nonlinearities, we demonstrate low-power four-wave mixing in a-Si:H waveguides enabling high speed all-optical devices in an a-Si:H platform. Finally, we demonstrate a novel data encoding scheme using thermal and all-optical tuning of silicon waveguides, increasing the spectral efficiency in an interconnect link.

  14. Recuperative supercritical carbon dioxide cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonwane, Chandrashekhar; Sprouse, Kenneth M; Subbaraman, Ganesan; O'Connor, George M; Johnson, Gregory A

    2014-11-18

    A power plant includes a closed loop, supercritical carbon dioxide system (CLS-CO.sub.2 system). The CLS-CO.sub.2 system includes a turbine-generator and a high temperature recuperator (HTR) that is arranged to receive expanded carbon dioxide from the turbine-generator. The HTR includes a plurality of heat exchangers that define respective heat exchange areas. At least two of the heat exchangers have different heat exchange areas.

  15. Method for carbon dioxide sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yifeng; Bryan, Charles R.; Dewers, Thomas; Heath, Jason E.

    2017-12-05

    A method for geo-sequestration of a carbon dioxide includes selection of a target water-laden geological formation with low-permeability interbeds, providing an injection well into the formation and injecting supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO.sub.2) and water or bine into the injection well under conditions of temperature, pressure and density selected to cause the fluid to enter the formation and splinter and/or form immobilized ganglia within the formation.

  16. Assisted Living

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it, too. Back to top What is the Cost for Assisted Living? Although assisted living costs less than nursing home ... Primarily, older persons or their families pay the cost of assisted living. Some health and long-term care insurance policies ...

  17. Accounts Assistant

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    CHITRA

    (Not more than three months old). Annexure 1. Indian Academy of Sciences. C V Raman Avenue, Bengaluru 560 080. Application for the Post of: Accounts Assistant / Administrative Assistant Trainee / Assistant – Official Language. Implementation Policy / Temporary Copy Editor and Proof Reader / Social Media Manager. 1.

  18. Indentation fatigue in silicon nitride, alumina and silicon carbide ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    ceramics viz. a hot pressed silicon nitride (HPSN), sintered alumina of two different grain sizes viz. 1 µm and. 25 µm, and a sintered silicon ... the sintered silicon carbide was found out to be linked to its previous thermal history. Keywords. Indentation fatigue .... This presence of a grain size effect in the RIF behaviour of the ...

  19. Low-temperature formation of silicon and silicon oxide structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ishihara, R.; Trifunovic, M.; Van der Zwan, M.

    2016-01-01

    A method for low-temperature formation of a silicon/silicon-oxide structure on a substrate is described wherein the method comprises: forming a first (poly)silane layer over at least part of a substrate; transforming said first (poly)silane layer directly into a (crystalline) silicon layer by

  20. Performance improvement of silicon solar cells by nanoporous silicon coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dzhafarov T. D.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper the method is shown to improve the photovoltaic parameters of screen-printed silicon solar cells by nanoporous silicon film formation on the frontal surface of the cell using the electrochemical etching. The possible mechanisms responsible for observed improvement of silicon solar cell performance are discussed.

  1. The effects of silicon and titanium on safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L. growth under moisture deficit condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Janmohammadi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Safflower is one of important crop in semi-arid regions of the world, where the precipitations are limited. In order to investigate the effect of foliar spray of nano-silicon dioxide (10 and 20 mM and nano titanium dioxide (25 and 50 mM and water-deficit stress (irrigation after 110 mm evaporation on growth parameters and yield components of spring safflower a field experiment was carried out at the highland semi-arid region, in, North West of Iran. Water deficit stress significantly reduced morpho-physiological traits such as ground cover, canopy width, leaf fresh mass, leaf are and plant height as well as yield components (e.g. capitulum diameter, seed mass and seed number per capitulum. However, the plants grown under water deficit condition showed the higher harvest index than well irrigated plants. Comparison of the foliar treatments showed that the both nano-particles (silicon and titanium improved the plant growth and yield components over the control. However, the effect of nano-silicon was more prominent than titanium. The highest amount of seed oil was recorded under well irrigated condition (irrigation after 60 mm evaporation with foliar application of nano-titanium. The percentage of palmitic acid, arachidic acid and myristic acid in seed increased by nano-titanium application. Altogether, principal component analysis indicated that spray of 10 mM nano silicon dioxide was best foliar treatments under all moisture regimes.

  2. Techniques for hot embossing microstructures on liquid silicone rubbers with fillers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vudayagiri, Sindhu; Yu, Liyun; Skov, Anne Ladegaard

    2015-01-01

    the versatility of this method that has been established for softer silicone elastomers. Also, as a proof of concept, a microstructured metal (nickel (Ni)) plate is used as an embosser for the films successfully. The ideal condition for hot embossing the LSR formulation (XLR 630 with titanium dioxide fillers......Embossing is an established process for the thermoplastic elastomers but not yet for the thermosetting elastomers. It has already been shown that hot embossing is a viable technology for imprinting microstructures in addition to curing thin silicone films at their gel point. It is one...... of the simplest, most cost-effective, and time-saving methods for replicating microstructures. In the present study, films made fromliquid silicone rubber (LSR) formulations containing fillers are hot embossed under modified operating conditions. The use of such relatively hard silicone elastomers shows...

  3. The electrophotonic silicon biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juan-Colás, José; Parkin, Alison; Dunn, Katherine E.; Scullion, Mark G.; Krauss, Thomas F.; Johnson, Steven D.

    2016-09-01

    The emergence of personalized and stratified medicine requires label-free, low-cost diagnostic technology capable of monitoring multiple disease biomarkers in parallel. Silicon photonic biosensors combine high-sensitivity analysis with scalable, low-cost manufacturing, but they tend to measure only a single biomarker and provide no information about their (bio)chemical activity. Here we introduce an electrochemical silicon photonic sensor capable of highly sensitive and multiparameter profiling of biomarkers. Our electrophotonic technology consists of microring resonators optimally n-doped to support high Q resonances alongside electrochemical processes in situ. The inclusion of electrochemical control enables site-selective immobilization of different biomolecules on individual microrings within a sensor array. The combination of photonic and electrochemical characterization also provides additional quantitative information and unique insight into chemical reactivity that is unavailable with photonic detection alone. By exploiting both the photonic and the electrical properties of silicon, the sensor opens new modalities for sensing on the microscale.

  4. Silicon containing copolymers

    CERN Document Server

    Amiri, Sahar; Amiri, Sanam

    2014-01-01

    Silicones have unique properties including thermal oxidative stability, low temperature flow, high compressibility, low surface tension, hydrophobicity and electric properties. These special properties have encouraged the exploration of alternative synthetic routes of well defined controlled microstructures of silicone copolymers, the subject of this Springer Brief. The authors explore the synthesis and characterization of notable block copolymers. Recent advances in controlled radical polymerization techniques leading to the facile synthesis of well-defined silicon based thermo reversible block copolymers?are described along with atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP), a technique utilized to develop well-defined functional thermo reversible block copolymers. The brief also focuses on Polyrotaxanes and their great potential as stimulus-responsive materials which produce poly (dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS) based thermo reversible block copolymers.

  5. The LHCb Silicon Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Adeva, B; Pérez Trigo, E; Rodríguez Pérez, P; Amhis, Y; Bay, A; Blanc, F; Cowan, G; Dupertuis, F; Fave, V; Haefeli, G; Komarov, I; Luisier, J; Märki, R; Muster, B; Nakada, T; Schneider, O; Tobin, M; Tran, M T; Anderson, J; Bursche, A; Chiapolini, N; De Cian, M; Elsasser, Ch; Salzmann, C; Saornil, S; Steiner, S; Steinkamp, O; Straumann, U; Vollhardt, V; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Britsch, M; Schmelling, M; Voss, H; Iakovenko, V; Okhrimenko, O; Pugatch, V

    2013-01-01

    The LHCb experiment is designed to perform high-precision measurements of CP violation and search for new physics using the enormous flux of beauty and charm hadrons produced at the LHC. The LHCb detector is a single-arm spectrometer with excellent tracking and particle identification capabilities. The Silicon Tracker is part of the tracking system and measures very precisely the particle trajectories coming from the interaction point in the region of high occupancies around the beam axis. The LHCb Silicon Tracker covers a total sensitive area of about 12 M$^2$ using silicon micro-strip detectors with long readout strips. It consists of one four-layer tracking station before the LHCb dipole magnet and three stations after. The detector has performed extremely well since the start of the LHC operation despite the fact that the experiment is collecting data at instantaneous lum...

  6. Floating Silicon Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kellerman, Peter

    2013-12-21

    The Floating Silicon Method (FSM) project at Applied Materials (formerly Varian Semiconductor Equipment Associates), has been funded, in part, by the DOE under a “Photovoltaic Supply Chain and Cross Cutting Technologies” grant (number DE-EE0000595) for the past four years. The original intent of the project was to develop the FSM process from concept to a commercially viable tool. This new manufacturing equipment would support the photovoltaic industry in following ways: eliminate kerf losses and the consumable costs associated with wafer sawing, allow optimal photovoltaic efficiency by producing high-quality silicon sheets, reduce the cost of assembling photovoltaic modules by creating large-area silicon cells which are free of micro-cracks, and would be a drop-in replacement in existing high efficiency cell production process thereby allowing rapid fan-out into the industry.

  7. Silicon photonic integration in telecommunications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Richard Doerr

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Silicon photonics is the guiding of light in a planar arrangement of silicon-based materials to perform various functions. We focus here on the use of silicon photonics to create transmitters and receivers for fiber-optic telecommunications. As the need to squeeze more transmission into a given bandwidth, a given footprint, and a given cost increases, silicon photonics makes more and more economic sense.

  8. Silicon microphones - a Danish perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouwstra, Siebe; Storgaard-Larsen, Torben; Scheeper, Patrick

    1998-01-01

    Two application areas of microphones are discussed, those for precision measurement and those for hearing instruments. Silicon microphones are under investigation for both areas, and Danish industry plays a key role in both. The opportunities of silicon, as well as the challenges and expectations......, are discussed. For precision measurement the challenge for silicon is large, while for hearing instruments silicon seems to be very promising....

  9. Multiparametric Porous Silicon Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Pavesi

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the possibility of using several sensing parameters from porous silicon in order to improve gas selectivity. By fabricating porous silicon optical microcavities, three independent quantities can be measured, i.e. the electrical conductance, the photoluminescence intensity, and the wavelength of the optical resonance. We monitored the change of these three parameters as a function of NO2 (0.5-5 ppm, ethanol (300-15000 ppm and relative humidity (0-100%. Preliminary results confirm that the examined species affect the parameters in a different way, both as a relative change and as dynamic.

  10. The CMS Silicon Strip Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Azzurri, P

    2005-01-01

    With over 200 square meters of sensitive Silicon and almost 10 million readout channels, the Silicon Strip Tracker of the CMS experiment at the LHC will be the largest Silicon strip detector ever built. The design, construction and expected performance of the CMS Tracker is reviewed in the following.

  11. Materials and fabrication sequences for water soluble silicon integrated circuits at the 90 nm node

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Lan; Harburg, Daniel V.; Rogers, John A., E-mail: jrogers@illinois.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, and Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 104 S Goodwin Ave., Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Bozler, Carl [Lincoln Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 244 Wood Street, Lexington, Massachusetts 02420 (United States); Omenetto, Fiorenzo [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Department of Physics, Tufts University, 4 Colby St., Medford, Massachusetts 02155 (United States)

    2015-01-05

    Tungsten interconnects in silicon integrated circuits built at the 90 nm node with releasable configurations on silicon on insulator wafers serve as the basis for advanced forms of water-soluble electronics. These physically transient systems have potential uses in applications that range from temporary biomedical implants to zero-waste environmental sensors. Systematic experimental studies and modeling efforts reveal essential aspects of electrical performance in field effect transistors and complementary ring oscillators with as many as 499 stages. Accelerated tests reveal timescales for dissolution of the various constituent materials, including tungsten, silicon, and silicon dioxide. The results demonstrate that silicon complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor circuits formed with tungsten interconnects in foundry-compatible fabrication processes can serve as a path to high performance, mass-produced transient electronic systems.

  12. Materials and fabrication sequences for water soluble silicon integrated circuits at the 90 nm node

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, Lan; Harburg, Daniel V.; Rogers, John A.; Bozler, Carl; Omenetto, Fiorenzo

    2015-01-01

    Tungsten interconnects in silicon integrated circuits built at the 90 nm node with releasable configurations on silicon on insulator wafers serve as the basis for advanced forms of water-soluble electronics. These physically transient systems have potential uses in applications that range from temporary biomedical implants to zero-waste environmental sensors. Systematic experimental studies and modeling efforts reveal essential aspects of electrical performance in field effect transistors and complementary ring oscillators with as many as 499 stages. Accelerated tests reveal timescales for dissolution of the various constituent materials, including tungsten, silicon, and silicon dioxide. The results demonstrate that silicon complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor circuits formed with tungsten interconnects in foundry-compatible fabrication processes can serve as a path to high performance, mass-produced transient electronic systems

  13. Novel photodefined polymer-embedded vias for silicon interposers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thadesar, Paragkumar A; Bakir, Muhannad S

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the fabrication and characterization of novel photodefined polymer-embedded vias for silicon interposers. The fabricated polymer-embedded vias can help obtain ∼3.8× reduction in via-to-via capacitance as well as a reduction in insertion loss compared to TSVs with a silicon dioxide liner. Polymer-embedded vias 100 μm in diameter, 270 μm tall and at 250 μm pitch were fabricated. Resistance and leakage measurements were performed for the fabricated polymer-embedded vias. The average value of the measured resistance for 20 polymer-embedded vias is 2.54 mΩ and the maximum measured via-to-via leakage current for 10 pairs of polymer-embedded vias is 80.8 pA for an applied voltage of 200 V. (paper)

  14. Silicon protected with atomic layer deposited TiO2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seger, Brian; Tilley, David S.; Pedersen, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The semiconducting materials used for photoelectrochemical (PEC) water splitting must withstand the corrosive nature of the aqueous electrolyte over long time scales in order to be a viable option for large scale solar energy conversion. Here we demonstrate that atomic layer deposited titanium...... dioxide (TiO2) overlayers on silicon-based photocathodes generate extremely stable electrodes. These electrodes can produce an onset potential of +0.510 V vs. RHE and a hydrogen evolution saturation current of 22 mA cm−2 using the red part of the AM1.5 solar spectrum (λ > 635 nm, 38.6 mW cm−2). A PEC...

  15. ALICE Silicon Strip Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Nooren, G

    2013-01-01

    The Silicon Strip Detector (SSD) constitutes the two outermost layers of the Inner Tracking System (ITS) of the ALICE Experiment. The SSD plays a crucial role in the tracking of the particles produced in the collisions connecting the tracks from the external detectors (Time Projection Chamber) to the ITS. The SSD also contributes to the particle identification through the measurement of their energy loss.

  16. ALICE Silicon Pixel Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Manzari, V

    2013-01-01

    The Silicon Pixel Detector (SPD) forms the innermost two layers of the 6-layer barrel Inner Tracking System (ITS). The SPD plays a key role in the determination of the position of the primary collision and in the reconstruction of the secondary vertices from particle decays.

  17. Ultrasmall silicon quantum dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwanenburg, F.A.; Van Loon, A.A.; Steele, G.A.; Rijmenam, C.E.W.M.; Balder, T.; Fang, Y.; Lieber, C.M.; Kouwenhoven, L.P.

    2009-01-01

    We report the realization of extremely small single quantum dots in p-type silicon nanowires, defined by Schottky tunnel barriers with Ni and NiSi contacts. Despite their ultrasmall size the NiSi–Si–NiSi nanowire quantum dots readily allow spectroscopy of at least ten consecutive holes, and

  18. On nanostructured silicon success

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigmund, Ole; Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard; Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn

    2016-01-01

    Recent Letters by Piggott et al. 1 and Shen et al. 2 claim the smallest ever dielectric wave length and polarization splitters. The associated News & Views article by Aydin3 states that these works “are the first experimental demonstration of on-chip, silicon photonic components based on complex...

  19. Silicon in beer and brewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Troy R; Bamforth, Charles W

    2010-04-15

    It has been claimed that beer is one of the richest sources of silicon in the diet; however, little is known of the relationship between silicon content and beer style and the manner in which beer is produced. The purpose of this study was to measure silicon in a diversity of beers and ascertain the grist selection and brewing factors that impact the level of silicon obtained in beer. Commercial beers ranged from 6.4 to 56.5 mg L(-1) in silicon. Products derived from a grist of barley tended to contain more silicon than did those from a wheat-based grist, likely because of the high levels of silica in the retained husk layer of barley. Hops contain substantially more silicon than does grain, but quantitatively hops make a much smaller contribution than malt to the production of beer and therefore relatively less silicon in beer derives from them. During brewing the vast majority of the silicon remains with the spent grains; however, aggressive treatment during wort production in the brewhouse leads to increased extraction of silicon into wort and much of this survives into beer. It is confirmed that beer is a very rich source of silicon. (c) 2010 Society of Chemical Industry.

  20. Three-dimensional ordered titanium dioxide-zirconium dioxide film-based microfluidic device for efficient on-chip phosphopeptide enrichment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, De; He, Zhongyuan; Wang, Gang; Wang, Hongzhi; Zhang, Qinghong; Li, Yaogang

    2016-09-15

    Microfluidic technology plays a significant role in separating biomolecules, because of its miniaturization, integration, and automation. Introducing micro/nanostructured functional materials can improve the properties of microfluidic devices, and extend their application. Inverse opal has a three-dimensional ordered net-like structure. It possesses a large surface area and exhibits good mass transport, making it a good candidate for bio-separation. This study exploits inverse opal titanium dioxide-zirconium dioxide films for on-chip phosphopeptide enrichment. Titanium dioxide-zirconium dioxide inverse opal film-based microfluidic devices were constructed from templates of 270-, 340-, and 370-nm-diameter poly(methylmethacrylate) spheres. The phosphopeptide enrichments of these devices were determined by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry. The device constructed from the 270-nm-diameter sphere template exhibited good comprehensive phosphopeptide enrichment, and was the best among these three devices. Because the size of opal template used in construction was the smallest, the inverse opal film therefore had the smallest pore sizes and the largest surface area. Enrichment by this device was also better than those of similar devices based on nanoparticle films and single component films. The titanium dioxide-zirconium dioxide inverse opal film-based device provides a promising approach for the efficient separation of various biomolecules. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Arsenic implantation into polycrystalline silicon and diffusion to silicon substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukamoto, K.; Akasaka, Y.; Horie, K.

    1977-01-01

    Arsenic implantation into polycrystalline silicon and drive-in diffusion to silicon substrate have been investigated by MeV He + backscattering analysis and also by electrical measurements. The range distributions of arsenic implanted into polycrystalline silicon are well fitted to Gaussian distributions over the energy range 60--350 keV. The measured values of R/sub P/ and ΔR/sub P/ are about 10 and 20% larger than the theoretical predictions, respectively. The effective diffusion coefficient of arsenic implanted into polycrystalline silicon is expressed as D=0.63 exp[(-3.22 eV/kT)] and is independent of the arsenic concentration. The drive-in diffusion of arsenic from the implanted polycrystalline silicon layer into the silicon substrate is significantly affected by the diffusion atmosphere. In the N 2 atmosphere, a considerable amount of arsenic atoms diffuses outward to the ambient. The outdiffusion can be suppressed by encapsulation with Si 3 N 4 . In the oxidizing atmosphere, arsenic atoms are driven inward by growing SiO 2 due to the segregation between SiO 2 and polycrystalline silicon, and consequently the drive-in diffusion of arsenic is enhanced. At the interface between the polycrystalline silicon layer and the silicon substrate, arsenic atoms are likely to segregate at the polycrystalline silicon side

  2. Coiled tubing drilling with supercritical carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolle , Jack J.

    2002-01-01

    A method for increasing the efficiency of drilling operations by using a drilling fluid material that exists as supercritical fluid or a dense gas at temperature and pressure conditions existing at a drill site. The material can be used to reduce mechanical drilling forces, to remove cuttings, or to jet erode a substrate. In one embodiment, carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) is used as the material for drilling within wells in the earth, where the normal temperature and pressure conditions cause CO.sub.2 to exist as a supercritical fluid. Supercritical carbon dioxide (SC--CO.sub.2) is preferably used with coiled tube (CT) drilling equipment. The very low viscosity SC--CO.sub.2 provides efficient cooling of the drill head, and efficient cuttings removal. Further, the diffusivity of SC--CO.sub.2 within the pores of petroleum formations is significantly higher than that of water, making jet erosion using SC--CO.sub.2 much more effective than water jet erosion. SC--CO.sub.2 jets can be used to assist mechanical drilling, for erosion drilling, or for scale removal. A choke manifold at the well head or mud cap drilling equipment can be used to control the pressure within the borehole, to ensure that the temperature and pressure conditions necessary for CO.sub.2 to exist as either a supercritical fluid or a dense gas occur at the drill site. Spent CO.sub.2 can be vented to the atmosphere, collected for reuse, or directed into the formation to aid in the recovery of petroleum.

  3. Photoluminescence and hydrogen gas-sensing properties of titanium dioxide nanostructures synthesized by hydrothermal treatments

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Sikhwivhilu, LM

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanostructures were synthesized by microwave-assisted and conventionally heated hydrothermal treatment of TiO2 powder. The tubular structures were converted to a rodlike shape by sintering the samples at various temperatures...

  4. 21 CFR 73.1575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Titanium dioxide. 73.1575 Section 73.1575 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1575 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity and specifications. (1) The color additive titanium dioxide shall conform in identity and specifications to the requirements...

  5. 40 CFR 180.1195 - Titanium dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Titanium dioxide. 180.1195 Section 180.1195 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS... Titanium dioxide. Titanium dioxide is exempted from the requirement of a tolerance for residues in or on...

  6. 21 CFR 73.2575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Titanium dioxide. 73.2575 Section 73.2575 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2575 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive titanium dioxide shall conform in identity and specifications to the requirements...

  7. 21 CFR 73.575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Titanium dioxide. 73.575 Section 73.575 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.575 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive titanium dioxide is synthetically prepared TiO2, free from admixture with other substances. (2) Color...

  8. 21 CFR 73.3126 - Titanium dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Titanium dioxide. 73.3126 Section 73.3126 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3126 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive titanium dioxide (CAS Reg. No. 13463-67-7), Color Index No. 77891, shall...

  9. Silicon nitride films deposited with an electron beam created plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, D. C.; Emery, K. A.; Rocca, J. J.; Thompson, L. R.; Zamani, H.; Collins, G. J.

    1984-01-01

    The electron beam assisted chemical vapor deposition (EBCVD) of silicon nitride films using NH3, N2, and SiH4 as the reactant gases is reported. The films have been deposited on aluminum, SiO2, and polysilicon film substrates as well as on crystalline silicon substrates. The range of experimental conditions under which silicon nitrides have been deposited includes substrate temperatures from 50 to 400 C, electron beam currents of 2-40 mA, electron beam energies of 1-5 keV, total ambient pressures of 0.1-0.4 Torr, and NH3/SiH4 mass flow ratios of 1-80. The physical, electrical, and chemical properties of the EBCVD films are discussed.

  10. Fluorescence and thermoluminescence in silicon oxide films rich in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berman M, D.; Piters, T. M.; Aceves M, M.; Berriel V, L. R.; Luna L, J. A.

    2009-10-01

    In this work we determined the fluorescence and thermoluminescence (TL) creation spectra of silicon rich oxide films (SRO) with three different silicon excesses. To study the TL of SRO, 550 nm of SRO film were deposited by Low Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition technique on N-type silicon substrates with resistivity in the order of 3 to 5 Ω-cm with silicon excess controlled by the ratio of the gases used in the process, SRO films with Ro= 10, 20 and 30 (12-6% silicon excess) were obtained. Then, they were thermally treated in N 2 at high temperatures to diffuse and homogenize the silicon excess. In the fluorescence spectra two main emission regions are observed, one around 400 nm and one around 800 nm. TL creation spectra were determined by plotting the integrated TL intensity as function of the excitation wavelength. (Author)

  11. Technical assistance for development of thermally conductive nitride filler for epoxy molding compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Ho Jin; Song, Kee Chan; Jung, In Ha

    2005-07-15

    Technical assistance was carried out to develop nitride filler for thermally conductive epoxy molding compounds. Carbothermal reduction method was used to fabricate silicon nitride powder from mixtures of silica and graphite powders. Microstructure and crystal structure were observed by using scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction technique. Thermal properties of epoxy molding compounds containing silicon nitride were measured by using laser flash method. Fabrication process of silicon nitride nanowire was developed and was applied to a patent.

  12. Magnetically Assisted Bilayer Composites for Soft Bending Actuators

    OpenAIRE

    Jang, Sung-Hwan; Na, Seon-Hong; Park, Yong-Lae

    2017-01-01

    This article presents a soft pneumatic bending actuator using a magnetically assisted bilayer composite composed of silicone polymer and ferromagnetic particles. Bilayer composites were fabricated by mixing ferromagnetic particles to a prepolymer state of silicone in a mold and asymmetrically distributed them by applying a strong non-uniform magnetic field to one side of the mold during the curing process. The biased magnetic field induces sedimentation of the ferromagnetic particles toward o...

  13. The photocatalytic and cytotoxic effects of titanium dioxide particles used in sunscreen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampaul, Ashti

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles are used in sunscreens to reflect UV radiation from the skin. However, titanium dioxide as anatase and rutile crystal forms is a well-known photocatalyst. The nanoparticles are surface coated with inert inorganic oxides such as silica and alumina or organics such as organosilanes or silicone polymers and more recently, have been doped with manganese oxide. These modifications to the titanium dioxide particles are purported to prevent the production of harmful reactive oxygen species. A range of sunscreens was tested with crystal form and modification type identified via XRD, Raman Spectroscopy, XPS and SSNMR. The particle modification and crystal form determined whether the particles were inert or rapidly degraded methylene blue dye, and killed or protected cultured human epithelium cells. Novel solid state Electron Paramagnetic Resonance analysis showed that the greatest amount of superoxide anions was formed during UVA irradiation of the mixed anatase and rutile crystal forms coated with an organosilane. These particles also degraded methylene blue at a similar rate to Degussa P25, a standard uncoated titanium dioxide powder and produced an increase in UVA induced apoptosis of human keratinocytes. Double Stranded Breaks were observed extensively in cells exposed to UVA irradiated mixed anatase and rutile titanium dioxide with organosilane. A new apoptotic-like cell death mechanism may have been recognised during the UVA irradiation of animal and human cells in the presence of titanium dioxide. This research concludes that mixed anatase and rutile crystal forms of titanium dioxide coated with organosilane or dimethicone may not be safe to use in sunscreen lotions. A less harmful alternative for sunscreen formulations is the manganese doped rutile particles or the alumina coated rutile powders, both of which exhibited a protective effect on cultured epithelial cells.

  14. Silicon nanowire transistors

    CERN Document Server

    Bindal, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    This book describes the n and p-channel Silicon Nanowire Transistor (SNT) designs with single and dual-work functions, emphasizing low static and dynamic power consumption. The authors describe a process flow for fabrication and generate SPICE models for building various digital and analog circuits. These include an SRAM, a baseband spread spectrum transmitter, a neuron cell and a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) platform in the digital domain, as well as high bandwidth single-stage and operational amplifiers, RF communication circuits in the analog domain, in order to show this technology’s true potential for the next generation VLSI. Describes Silicon Nanowire (SNW) Transistors, as vertically constructed MOS n and p-channel transistors, with low static and dynamic power consumption and small layout footprint; Targets System-on-Chip (SoC) design, supporting very high transistor count (ULSI), minimal power consumption requiring inexpensive substrates for packaging; Enables fabrication of different types...

  15. Selfsupported epitaxial silicon films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazarovici, D.; Popescu, A.

    1975-01-01

    The methods of removing the p or p + support of an n-type epitaxial silicon layer using electrochemical etching are described. So far, only n + -n junctions have been processed. The condition of anodic dissolution for some values of the support and layer resistivity are given. By this method very thin single crystal selfsupported targets of convenient areas can be obtained for channeling - blocking experiments

  16. Structure of Silicon Clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, Jun; Bahel, Atul; Ramakrishna, Mushti V.

    1995-01-01

    We determined the structures of silicon clusters in the 11-14 atom size range using the tight-binding molecular dynamics method. These calculations reveal that \\Si{11} is an icosahedron with one missing cap, \\Si{12} is a complete icosahedron, \\Si{13} is a surface capped icosahedron, and \\Si{14} is a 4-4-4 layer structure with two caps. The characteristic feature of these clusters is that they are all surface.

  17. Numerical study of self-heating effects of small-size MOSFETs fabricated on silicon-on-aluminum nitride substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Yanfang; Zhu Ziqiang; Zhu Ming; Lin Chenglu

    2006-01-01

    Compared with bulk-silicon technology, silicon-on-insulator (SOI) technology possesses many advantages but it is inevitable that the buried silicon dioxide layer also thermally insulates the metal-oxide-silicon field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) from the bulk due to the low thermal conductivity. One of the alternative insulator to replace the buried oxide layer is aluminum nitride (MN), which has a thermal conductivity that is about 200 times higher than that of SiO 2 (320 W·m -1 ·K -1 versus 1.4 W·m -1 ·K -l ). To investigate the self-heating effects of small-size MOSFETs fabricated on silicon-on-aluminum nitride (SOAN) substrate, a two-dimensional numerical analysis is performed by using a device simulator called MEDICI run on a Solaris workstation to simulate the electrical characteristics and temperature distribution by comparing with those of bulk and standard SOI MOSFETs. Our study suggests that AIN is a suitable alternative to silicon dioxide as a buried dielectric in SOI and expands the applications of SOI to high temperature conditions. (authors)

  18. Photovoltaic characteristics of porous silicon /(n+ - p) silicon solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzhafarov, T.D.; Aslanov, S.S.; Ragimov, S.H.; Sadigov, M.S.; Nabiyeva, A.F.; Yuksel, Aydin S.

    2012-01-01

    Full text : The purpose of this work is to improve the photovoltaic parameters of the screen-printed silicon solar cells by formation the nano-porous silicon film on the frontal surface of the cell. The photovoltaic characteristics of two type silicon solar cells with and without porous silicon layer were measured and compared. A remarkable increment of short-circuit current density and the efficiency by 48 percent and 20 percent, respectively, have been achieved for PS/(n + - pSi) solar cell comparing to (n + - p)Si solar cell without PS layer

  19. Thermometry of Silicon Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mecklenburg, Matthew; Zutter, Brian; Regan, B. C.

    2018-01-01

    Current thermometry techniques lack the spatial resolution required to see the temperature gradients in typical, highly scaled modern transistors. As a step toward addressing this problem, we measure the temperature dependence of the volume plasmon energy in silicon nanoparticles from room temperature to 1250 °C , using a chip-style heating sample holder in a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) equipped with electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). The plasmon energy changes as expected for an electron gas subject to the thermal expansion of silicon. Reversing this reasoning, we find that measurements of the plasmon energy provide an independent measure of the nanoparticle temperature consistent with that of the heater chip's macroscopic, dual-function heater-and-thermometer to within the 5% accuracy of the thermometer's calibration. Thus, silicon has the potential to provide its own high-spatial-resolution thermometric readout signal via measurements of its volume plasmon energy. Furthermore, nanoparticles can, in general, serve as convenient nanothermometers for in situ electron-microscopy experiments.

  20. Development and characterization of Undoped Silicon Glass (USG) using chemical vapour deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Jagadeesha T; Louis Kim; Joseph Gonsalvis,; Thammaiah Gowda

    2011-01-01

    Sub atmospheric chemical vapour deposition (SACVD) is a widely used technique in semiconductor integrated circuit (IC) manufacturing, especially to form inter-metal silicon (IMD) dioxide thin films. It was designed for commercially available tools in order to satisfy the gap filling requirements necessary for 0.18 and 0.15 lm technology ICs, but it has been successfully extended also for 0.13 lm technological node and over. SACVD technique has a potential impact on device electrical character...

  1. Metal-Semiconductor Reaction Phenomena and Microstructural Investigations of Laser Induced Regrowth of Silicon on Insulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    tion. 3 _.34 5.0 LASER ASSISTED DIFFUSION AND ACTIVATION OF TIN FROM AN SnO 2/SiO 2 SOURCE The diffusion of impurities into a semiconductor substrate...11111.0 2 25 l22 1111111 . 12L5 .4 51 METAL- SEMICONDUCTOR REACTION PHENOMENA AND MICROSTRUCTURAL INVESTIGATIONS OF LASER INDUCED REGROWTH OF SILICON... Semiconductor Reaction Phenomena and Final Report Microstructural Investigations of Laser-Induced _Jan. I_9 t0_njani92 _ Regrowth of Silicon on

  2. Silicon photonics fundamentals and devices

    CERN Document Server

    Deen, M Jamal

    2012-01-01

    The creation of affordable high speed optical communications using standard semiconductor manufacturing technology is a principal aim of silicon photonics research. This would involve replacing copper connections with optical fibres or waveguides, and electrons with photons. With applications such as telecommunications and information processing, light detection, spectroscopy, holography and robotics, silicon photonics has the potential to revolutionise electronic-only systems. Providing an overview of the physics, technology and device operation of photonic devices using exclusively silicon and related alloys, the book includes: * Basic Properties of Silicon * Quantum Wells, Wires, Dots and Superlattices * Absorption Processes in Semiconductors * Light Emitters in Silicon * Photodetectors , Photodiodes and Phototransistors * Raman Lasers including Raman Scattering * Guided Lightwaves * Planar Waveguide Devices * Fabrication Techniques and Material Systems Silicon Photonics: Fundamentals and Devices outlines ...

  3. Special Issue: The Silicon Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittler, Martin; Yang, Deren

    2006-03-01

    The present issue of physica status solidi (a) contains a collection of articles about different aspects of current silicon research and applications, ranging from basic investigations of mono- and polycrystalline silicon materials and nanostructures to technologies for device fabrication in silicon photovoltaics, micro- and optoelectronics. Guest Editors are Martin Kittler and Deren Yang, the organizers of a recent Sino-German symposium held in Cottbus, Germany, 19-24 September 2005.The cover picture shows four examples of The Silicon Age: the structure of a thin film solar cell on low-cost SSP (silicon sheet from powder) substrate (upper left image) [1], a high-resolution transmission electron microscopy image and diffraction pattern of a single-crystalline Si nanowire (upper right) [2], a carrier lifetime map from an n-type multicrystalline silicon wafer after gettering by a grain boundary (lower left) [3], and a scanning acoustic microscopy image of a bonded 150 mm diameter wafer pair (upper right) [4].

  4. Radiation Hardening of Silicon Detectors

    CERN Multimedia

    Leroy, C; Glaser, M

    2002-01-01

    %RD48 %title\\\\ \\\\Silicon detectors will be widely used in experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider where high radiation levels will cause significant bulk damage. In addition to increased leakage current and charge collection losses worsening the signal to noise, the induced radiation damage changes the effective doping concentration and represents the limiting factor to long term operation of silicon detectors. The objectives are to develop radiation hard silicon detectors that can operate beyond the limits of the present devices and that ensure guaranteed operation for the whole lifetime of the LHC experimental programme. Radiation induced defect modelling and experimental results show that the silicon radiation hardness depends on the atomic impurities present in the initial monocrystalline material.\\\\ \\\\ Float zone (FZ) silicon materials with addition of oxygen, carbon, nitrogen, germanium and tin were produced as well as epitaxial silicon materials with epilayers up to 200 $\\mu$m thickness. Their im...

  5. Metal-assisted etch combined with regularizing etch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yim, Joanne; Miller, Jeff; Jura, Michael; Black, Marcie R.; Forziati, Joanne; Murphy, Brian; Magliozzi, Lauren

    2018-03-06

    In an aspect of the disclosure, a process for forming nanostructuring on a silicon-containing substrate is provided. The process comprises (a) performing metal-assisted chemical etching on the substrate, (b) performing a clean, including partial or total removal of the metal used to assist the chemical etch, and (c) performing an isotropic or substantially isotropic chemical etch subsequently to the metal-assisted chemical etch of step (a). In an alternative aspect of the disclosure, the process comprises (a) performing metal-assisted chemical etching on the substrate, (b) cleaning the substrate, including removal of some or all of the assisting metal, and (c) performing a chemical etch which results in regularized openings in the silicon substrate.

  6. Electrochemical characteristics of bundle-type silicon nanorods as an anode material for lithium ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Si Hieu; Lim, Jong Choo; Lee, Joong Kee

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A metal-assisted chemical etching technique was performed on Si thin films. ► The etching process resulted in the formation of bundle-type Si nanorods. ► The morphology of Si electrodes closely relate to electrochemical characteristics. - Abstract: In order to prepare bundle-type silicon nanorods, a silver-assisted chemical etching technique was used to modify a 1.6 μm silicon thin film, which was deposited on Cu foil by Electron Cyclotron Resonance Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition. The bundle-type silicon nanorods on Cu foil were employed as anodes for a lithium secondary battery, without further treatment. The electrochemical characteristics of the pristine silicon thin film anodes and the bundle-type silicon nanorod anodes are different from one another. The electrochemical performance of the bundle-type silicon nanorod anodes exceeded that of the pristine Si thin film anodes. The specific capacity of the bundle-type silicon nanorod anodes is much higher than 3000 mAh g −1 at the first charge (Li insertion) cycle. The coulombic efficiency of bundle-type silicon anodes was stable at more than 97%, and the charge capacity remained at 1420 mAh g −1 , even after 100 cycles of charging and discharging. The results from the differential voltage analysis showed a side reaction at around 0.44–0.5 V, and the specific potential of this side reaction decreased after each cycle. The apparent diffusion coefficients of the two anode types were in the range of 10 −13 –10 −16 cm 2 s −1 in the first cycle. In subsequent charge cycles, these values for the silicon thin film anodes and the silicon nanorod bundle anode were approximately 10 −12 –10 −14 and 10 −13 –10 −15 cm 2 s −1 , respectively.

  7. Non-Lithographic Silicon Micromachining Using Inkjet and Chemical Etching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasha Hoshian

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a non-lithographical and vacuum-free method to pattern silicon. The method combines inkjet printing and metal assisted chemical etching (MaCE; we call this method “INKMAC”. A commercial silver ink is printed on top of a silicon surface to create the catalytic patterns for MaCE. The MaCE process leaves behind a set of silicon nanowires in the shape of the inkjet printed micrometer scale pattern. We further show how a potassium hydroxide (KOH wet etching process can be used to rapidly etch away the nanowires, producing fully opened cavities and channels in the shape of the original printed pattern. We show how the printed lines (width 50–100 µm can be etched into functional silicon microfluidic channels with different depths (10–40 µm with aspect ratios close to one. We also used individual droplets (minimum diameter 30 µm to produce cavities with a depth of 60 µm and an aspect ratio of two. Further, we discuss using the structured silicon substrate as a template for polymer replication to produce superhydrophobic surfaces.

  8. Unveiling the Formation Pathway of Single Crystalline Porous Silicon Nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Xing; Qu, Yongquan; Lin, Yung-Chen; Liao, Lei; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2011-01-01

    Porous silicon nanowire is emerging as an interesting material system due to its unique combination of structural, chemical, electronic, and optical properties. To fully understand their formation mechanism is of great importance for controlling the fundamental physical properties and enabling potential applications. Here we present a systematic study to elucidate the mechanism responsible for the formation of porous silicon nanowires in a two-step silver-assisted electroless chemical etching method. It is shown that silicon nanowire arrays with various porosities can be prepared by varying multiple experimental parameters such as the resistivity of the starting silicon wafer, the concentration of oxidant (H2O2) and the amount of silver catalyst. Our study shows a consistent trend that the porosity increases with the increasing wafer conductivity (dopant concentration) and oxidant (H2O2) concentration. We further demonstrate that silver ions, formed by the oxidation of silver, can diffuse upwards and re-nucleate on the sidewalls of nanowires to initiate new etching pathways to produce porous structure. The elucidation of this fundamental formation mechanism opens a rational pathway to the production of wafer-scale single crystalline porous silicon nanowires with tunable surface areas ranging from 370 m2·g−1 to 30 m2·g−1, and can enable exciting opportunities in catalysis, energy harvesting, conversion, storage, as well as biomedical imaging and therapy. PMID:21244020

  9. Laboratory course on silicon sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Crescio, E; Roe, S; Rudge, A

    2003-01-01

    The laboratory course consisted of four different mini sessions, in order to give the student some hands-on experience on various aspects of silicon sensors and related integrated electronics. The four experiments were. 1. Characterisation of silicon diodes for particle detection 2. Study of noise performance of the Viking readout circuit 3. Study of the position resolution of a silicon microstrip sensor 4. Study of charge transport in silicon with a fast amplifier The data in the following were obtained during the ICFA school by the students.

  10. Silicon processing for photovoltaics II

    CERN Document Server

    Khattak, CP

    2012-01-01

    The processing of semiconductor silicon for manufacturing low cost photovoltaic products has been a field of increasing activity over the past decade and a number of papers have been published in the technical literature. This volume presents comprehensive, in-depth reviews on some of the key technologies developed for processing silicon for photovoltaic applications. It is complementary to Volume 5 in this series and together they provide the only collection of reviews in silicon photovoltaics available.The volume contains papers on: the effect of introducing grain boundaries in silicon; the

  11. Silicone Gel-Filled Breast Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Prosthetics Breast Implants Silicone Gel-Filled Breast Implants Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... it Email Print Description: Silicone gel-filled breast implants have a silicone outer shell that is filled ...

  12. Designing low permeability, optical-grade silicone systems: guidelines for choosing a silicone based on transmission rates for barrier applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velderrain, Michelle

    2012-03-01

    Unprotected electronic components exposed to moisture from high humidity may fail due to corrosion of metal leads or other unfavorable reactions on chemically sensitive components. This is of high interest for silicones that encapsulate Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) dies. For these applications, moisture and oxygen may react with materials, such as phosphor, used to make white LEDs for back-lighting applications and decrease or change the light output and color over time. Of the polymeric adhesives and sealants commercially available, silicones are used for their thermal stability, clarity, and comparably low modulus that provides stress relief during thermal cycling. In addition, silicones are also known to be very permeable to low molecular weight gases such as water vapor and oxygen. Recently, several types of silicones were tested for the oxygen and water vapor transmission rates, and it was found that they can have drastically different results. Silicone properties strongly affecting permeability are polymer backbone chemistry, crosslink density and fillers. Phenyl (C6H5) and trifluoropropyl (CF3CH2) groups are used to optimize the refractive index of optically clear silicones. The effect of chemical composition on the water vapor transfer rate (WVTR) and the oxygen transfer rate (OTR) at 400 C and 90% Relative Humidity was investigated on several silicones with various refractive indices and compared to polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) with similar durometers. It was found that polymer backbone chemistry had a significant influence on the permeation rates and will assist in material selection when designing for low-permeable barriers to improve package reliability.

  13. Composite materials and bodies including silicon carbide and titanium diboride and methods of forming same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillo, Thomas M.; Chu, Henry S.; Harrison, William M.; Bailey, Derek

    2013-01-22

    Methods of forming composite materials include coating particles of titanium dioxide with a substance including boron (e.g., boron carbide) and a substance including carbon, and reacting the titanium dioxide with the substance including boron and the substance including carbon to form titanium diboride. The methods may be used to form ceramic composite bodies and materials, such as, for example, a ceramic composite body or material including silicon carbide and titanium diboride. Such bodies and materials may be used as armor bodies and armor materials. Such methods may include forming a green body and sintering the green body to a desirable final density. Green bodies formed in accordance with such methods may include particles comprising titanium dioxide and a coating at least partially covering exterior surfaces thereof, the coating comprising a substance including boron (e.g., boron carbide) and a substance including carbon.

  14. Carbon dioxide retention in divers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Florio, J.T.; Mackenzie, D.A.R.; McKenzie, R.S. [ARE Physiological Laboratory, Gosport (United Kingdom)

    1998-04-01

    This report summarises the work carried out at the ARE Physiological Laboratory (ARE(PL)) between July 1978 and December 1983. The work was intended to examine the proposition that some divers have a low ventilatory response to carbon dioxide; that this results in a low ventilatory response to exercise with consequent hypercapnia; and that these characteristics put the diver at a greater-than-normal risk by increasing the individual`s susceptibility to oxygen toxicity and to other hazards associated with diving (e.g. nitrogen narcosis, decompression sickness and hypothermia). The specific aims of the project can be summarised as follows: (a) to demonstrate the existence of divers who exhibit the tendency to `retain carbon dioxide` when working in hyperbaric conditions; (b) to define the circumstances under which such individuals are at risk; (c) to assess the magnitude of the risk; and (d) to recommend ways to eliminate or to reduce the risk. (author)

  15. Indentation fatigue in silicon nitride, alumina and silicon carbide ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Repeated indentation fatigue (RIF) experiments conducted on the same spot of different structural ceramics viz. a hot pressed silicon nitride (HPSN), sintered alumina of two different grain sizes viz. 1 m and 25 m, and a sintered silicon carbide (SSiC) are reported. The RIF experiments were conducted using a Vicker's ...

  16. CARBON DIOXIDE AS A FEEDSTOCK.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CREUTZ,C.; FUJITA,E.

    2000-12-09

    This report is an overview on the subject of carbon dioxide as a starting material for organic syntheses of potential commercial interest and the utilization of carbon dioxide as a substrate for fuel production. It draws extensively on literature sources, particularly on the report of a 1999 Workshop on the subject of catalysis in carbon dioxide utilization, but with emphasis on systems of most interest to us. Atmospheric carbon dioxide is an abundant (750 billion tons in atmosphere), but dilute source of carbon (only 0.036 % by volume), so technologies for utilization at the production source are crucial for both sequestration and utilization. Sequestration--such as pumping CO{sub 2} into sea or the earth--is beyond the scope of this report, except where it overlaps utilization, for example in converting CO{sub 2} to polymers. But sequestration dominates current thinking on short term solutions to global warming, as should be clear from reports from this and other workshops. The 3500 million tons estimated to be added to the atmosphere annually at present can be compared to the 110 million tons used to produce chemicals, chiefly urea (75 million tons), salicylic acid, cyclic carbonates and polycarbonates. Increased utilization of CO{sub 2} as a starting material is, however, highly desirable, because it is an inexpensive, non-toxic starting material. There are ongoing efforts to replace phosgene as a starting material. Creation of new materials and markets for them will increase this utilization, producing an increasingly positive, albeit small impact on global CO{sub 2} levels. The other uses of interest are utilization as a solvent and for fuel production and these will be discussed in turn.

  17. Electrodeposition of uranium dioxide films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maya, L.; Gonzalez, B.D.; Lance, M.J.; Holcomb, D.E.

    2004-01-01

    Uranium dioxide films in a hydrated form are electrodeposited unto nickel plates starting with a uranyl nitrate solution in ammonium sulfate. The process is incidental to water splitting which is the dominant electrochemical pathway and as a consequence, the uranium deposition is highly dependent on experimental parameters that require close control such as the pH and concentration of the supporting electrolyte as well as current density, and the cell design. (author)

  18. Manufacture of uranium dioxide powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, M.

    1976-01-01

    Uranium dioxide powder is prepared by the AUC (ammonium uranyl carbonate) method. Supplementing the known process steps, the AUC, after separation from the mother liquor, is washed with an ammonium hydrogen carbonate or an NH 4 OH solution and is subsequently post-treated with a liquid which reduces the surface tension of the residual water in an AUC. Such a liquid is, for instance, alcohol

  19. Properties of indium tin oxide films deposited on unheated polymer substrates by ion beam assisted deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Zhinong; Li Yuqiong; Xia Fan; Zhao Zhiwei; Xue Wei

    2009-01-01

    The optical, electrical and mechanical properties of indium tin oxide (ITO) films prepared on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates by ion beam assisted deposition at room temperature were investigated. The properties of ITO films can be improved by introducing a buffer layer of silicon dioxide (SiO 2 ) between the ITO film and the PET substrate. ITO films deposited on SiO 2 -coated PET have better crystallinity, lower electrical resistivity, and improved resistance stability under bending than those deposited on bare PET. The average transmittance and the resistivity of ITO films deposited on SiO 2 -coated PET are 85% and 0.90 x 10 -3 Ω cm, respectively, and when the films are bent, the resistance remains almost constant until a bending radius of 1 cm and it increases slowly under a given bending radius with an increase of the bending cycles. The improved resistance stability of ITO films deposited on SiO 2 -coated PET is mainly attributed to the perfect adhesion of ITO films induced by the SiO 2 buffer layer.

  20. Preparation of fluorescent nanodiamond suspensions using bead-assisted ultrasonic disintegration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Głowacki, Maciej J.; Gardas, Mateusz; Ficek, Mateusz; Sawczak, Mirosław; Bogdanowicz, Robert

    2017-08-01

    Nitrogen-vacancy (N-V) centers are the most widely studied crystallographic defect in the diamond lattice since their presence causes strong and stable fluorescence. The negative charge state of the defect (NV-) is especially desired because of its potential for quantum information processing. In this study, fluorescent suspensions of diamond particles have been produced by microbead-assisted ultrasonic disintegration of commercially obtained diamond powder containing N-V color centers. Zirconium dioxide ZrO2 was chosen as an abrasive and a mixture of deionized water and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) was used as a solvent. Raman spectrum of the starting material has been obtained and the resulting liquids have been measured in terms of photoluminescence. Moreover, thin layer of the diamond particles has been deposited on a silicon substrate and examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). During the course of the experiment a new method, which uses sodium chloride NaCl as an abrasive, has been proposed. The results of fluorescence measurements of the suspension prepared using this technique are highly promising.

  1. Low cost silicon solar array project silicon materials task

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    A program was established to develop a high temperature silicon production process using existing electric arc heater technology. Silicon tetrachloride and a reductant will be injected into an arc heated mixture of hydrogen and argon. Under these high temperature conditions, a very rapid reaction is expected to occur and proceed essentially to completion, yielding silicon and gaseous sodium chloride. Techniques for high temperature separation and collection of the molten silicon will be developed using standard engineering approaches, and the salt vapor will later be electrolytically separated into its elemental constituents for recycle. Preliminary technical evaluations and economic projections indicate not only that this process appears to be feasible, but that it also has the advantages of rapid, high capacity production of good quality molten silicon at a nominal cost.

  2. Carbon dioxide capture and storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durand, B.

    2011-01-01

    The author first highlights the reasons why storing carbon dioxide in geological formations could be a solution in the struggle against global warming and climate change. Thus, he comments various evolutions and prospective data about carbon emissions or fossil energy consumption as well as various studies performed by international bodies and agencies which show the interest of carbon dioxide storage. He comments the evolution of CO 2 contributions of different industrial sectors and activities, notably in France. He presents the different storage modes and methods which concern different geological formations (saline aquifers, abandoned oil or gas fields, not exploitable coal seams) and different processes (sorption, carbonation). He discusses the risks associated with these storages, the storable quantities, evokes some existing installations in different countries. He comments different ways to capture carbon dioxide (in post-combustion, through oxy-combustion, by pre-combustion) and briefly evokes some existing installations. He evokes the issue of transport, and discusses efficiency and cost aspects, and finally has few words on legal aspects and social acceptability

  3. Internal friction in uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulin Filho, Pedro Iris

    1979-01-01

    The uranium dioxide inelastic properties were studied measuring internal friction at low frequencies (of the order of 1 Hz). The work was developed in the 160 to 400 deg C temperature range. The effect of stoichiometry variation was studied oxidizing the sample with consequent change of the defect structure originally present in the non-stoichiometric uranium dioxide. The presence of a wide and irregular peak due to oxidation was observed at low temperatures. Activation energy calculations indicated the occurrence of various relaxation processes and assuming the existence of a peak between - 80 and - 70 deg C , the absolute value obtained for the activation energy (0,54 eV) is consistent with the observed values determined at medium and high frequencies for the stress induced reorientation of defects. The microstructure effect on the inelastic properties was studied for stoichiometric uranium dioxide, by varying grain size and porosity. These parameters have influence on the high temperature measurements of internal friction. The internal friction variation for temperatures higher than 340 deg C is thought to be due to grain boundary relaxation phenomena. (author)

  4. Wafer scale formation of monocrystalline silicon-based Mie resonators via silicon-on-insulator dewetting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbarchi, Marco; Naffouti, Meher; Vial, Benjamin; Benkouider, Abdelmalek; Lermusiaux, Laurent; Favre, Luc; Ronda, Antoine; Bidault, Sébastien; Berbezier, Isabelle; Bonod, Nicolas

    2014-11-25

    Subwavelength-sized dielectric Mie resonators have recently emerged as a promising photonic platform, as they combine the advantages of dielectric microstructures and metallic nanoparticles supporting surface plasmon polaritons. Here, we report the capabilities of a dewetting-based process, independent of the sample size, to fabricate Si-based resonators over large scales starting from commercial silicon-on-insulator (SOI) substrates. Spontaneous dewetting is shown to allow the production of monocrystalline Mie-resonators that feature two resonant modes in the visible spectrum, as observed in confocal scattering spectroscopy. Homogeneous scattering responses and improved spatial ordering of the Si-based resonators are observed when dewetting is assisted by electron beam lithography. Finally, exploiting different thermal agglomeration regimes, we highlight the versatility of this technique, which, when assisted by focused ion beam nanopatterning, produces monocrystalline nanocrystals with ad hoc size, position, and organization in complex multimers.

  5. Development of Thin-Window Silicon Drift Detector for X-ray Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, W.; Carini, G.A.; De Geronimo, G.; Fried, J.; Gaskin, J.A.; Keister, J.W.; Li, Z.; Ramsey, B.D.; Rehak, P.; Siddons, D.P.

    2009-10-01

    A new set of thin-window silicon drift detectors composed of an array of hexagonal shaped detectors has been designed, constructed and tested for X-ray spectroscopy. Each individual ThinWinSDD has a thin entrance window on one side and a spiral shaped hexagonal cathode around a center anode on the other side. To produce the thin entrance window a 10 keV implantation of boron through a 500 A silicon dioxide was used. The implantation was followed by an annealing at 700 C for 30 min and a reactive ion etching step to ensure the removal of silicon dioxide from the smallest feature (5 mum). An aluminum layer is coated in the same vacuum system after back-sputtering. This step involves removing the native oxide that has formed on the top of the silicon substrate and then sputtering a 1100 A thick layer of aluminum onto the X-ray entrance window. The aluminum layer must be thick enough to block visible light, but thin enough to be transparent to soft X-rays down to 280 eV. We discuss first test results that include detector leakage current measurements and the response for multiple detectors exposed to the National Synchrotron Light Source's UV beam line U3C located at Brookhaven National Laboratory for X-ray energies as low as 280 eV.

  6. Development of Thin-Window Silicon Drift Detector for X-ray Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, W.; Carini, G.; De Geronimo, G; Fried, J.; Gaskin, J.A.; Keister, J.W.; Li, Z.; Ramsey, B.D.; Rehak, P.; Siddons, D.P.

    2008-01-22

    A new set of Thin-Window Silicon Drift Detectors composed of an array of hexagonal shaped detectors has been designed, constructed and tested for X-ray spectroscopy. Each individual ThinWinSDD has a thin entrance window on one side and a spiral shaped hexagonal cathode around a center anode on the other side. To produce the thin entrance window a 10 keV implantation of boron through a 500 {angstrom} silicon dioxide was used. The implantation was followed by an annealing at 700 C for 30 min and a reactive ion etching step to ensure the removal of silicon dioxide from the smallest feature (5 {micro}m). An aluminum layer is coated in the same vacuum system after back-sputtering. This step involves removing the native oxide that has formed on the top of the silicon substrate and then sputtering a 1100 {angstrom} thick layer of aluminum onto the X-ray entrance window. The aluminum layer must be thick enough to block visible light, but thin enough to be transparent to soft x-rays down to 280 eV. We discuss first test results that include detector leakage current measurements and the response for multiple detectors exposed to the National Synchrotron Light Source's UV beam line U3C located at Brookhaven National Laboratory for X-ray energies as low as 280 eV.

  7. Separation and Detection of Toxic Gases with a Silicon Micromachined Gas Chromatography System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesar, Edward S.; Reston, Rocky R.

    1995-01-01

    A miniature gas chromatography (GC) system was designed and fabricated using silicon micromachining and integrated circuit (IC) processing techniques. The silicon micromachined gas chromatography system (SMGCS) is composed of a miniature sample injector that incorporates a 10 microliter sample loop; a 0.9 meter long, rectangular shaped (300 micrometer width and 10 micrometer height) capillary column coated with a 0.2 micrometer thick copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) stationary phase; and a dual detector scheme based upon a CuPc-coated chemiresistor and a commercially available 125 micrometer diameter thermal conductivity detector (TCD) bead. Silicon micromachining was employed to fabricate the interface between the sample injector and the GC column, the column itself, and the dual detector cavity. A novel IC thin-film processing technique was developed to sublime the CuPc stationary phase coating on the column walls that were micromachined in the host silicon wafer substrate and Pyrex (r) cover plate, which were then electrostatically bonded together. The SMGCS can separate binary gas mixtures composed of parts-per-million (ppm) concentrations of ammonia (NH3) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) when isothermally operated (55-80 degrees C). With a helium carrier gas and nitrogen diluent, a 10 microliter sample volume containing ammonia and nitrogen dioxide injected at 40 psi ((2.8 x 10(exp 5)Pa)) can be separated in less than 30 minutes.

  8. Carbon Dioxide Removal via Passive Thermal Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Michael; Hanford, Anthony; Conger, Bruce; Anderson, Molly

    2011-01-01

    A paper describes a regenerable approach to separate carbon dioxide from other cabin gases by means of cooling until the carbon dioxide forms carbon dioxide ice on the walls of the physical device. Currently, NASA space vehicles remove carbon dioxide by reaction with lithium hydroxide (LiOH) or by adsorption to an amine, a zeolite, or other sorbent. Use of lithium hydroxide, though reliable and well-understood, requires significant mass for all but the shortest missions in the form of lithium hydroxide pellets, because the reaction of carbon dioxide with lithium hydroxide is essentially irreversible. This approach is regenerable, uses less power than other historical approaches, and it is almost entirely passive, so it is more economical to operate and potentially maintenance- free for long-duration missions. In carbon dioxide removal mode, this approach passes a bone-dry stream of crew cabin atmospheric gas through a metal channel in thermal contact with a radiator. The radiator is pointed to reject thermal loads only to space. Within the channel, the working stream is cooled to the sublimation temperature of carbon dioxide at the prevailing cabin pressure, leading to formation of carbon dioxide ice on the channel walls. After a prescribed time or accumulation of carbon dioxide ice, for regeneration of the device, the channel is closed off from the crew cabin and the carbon dioxide ice is sublimed and either vented to the environment or accumulated for recovery of oxygen in a fully regenerative life support system.

  9. Silicon carbide sewing thread

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawko, Paul M. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Composite flexible multilayer insulation systems (MLI) were evaluated for thermal performance and compared with currently used fibrous silica (baseline) insulation system. The systems described are multilayer insulations consisting of alternating layers of metal foil and scrim ceramic cloth or vacuum metallized polymeric films quilted together using ceramic thread. A silicon carbide thread for use in the quilting and the method of making it are also described. These systems provide lightweight thermal insulation for a variety of uses, particularly on the surface of aerospace vehicles subject to very high temperatures during flight.

  10. The LHCb Silicon Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Elsasser, Ch; Gallas Torreira, A; Pérez Trigo, A; Rodríguez Pérez, P; Bay, A; Blanc, F; Dupertuis, F; Haefeli, G; Komarov, I; Märki, R; Muster, B; Nakada, T; Schneider, O; Tobin, M; Tran, M T; Anderson, J; Bursche, A; Chiapolini, N; Saornil, S; Steiner, S; Steinkamp, O; Straumann, U; Vollhardt, A; Britsch, M; Schmelling, M; Voss, H; Okhrimenko, O; Pugatch, V

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the LHCb experiment is to study rare heavy quark decays and CP vio- lation with the high rate of beauty and charmed hadrons produced in $pp$ collisions at the LHC. The detector is designed as a single-arm forward spectrometer with excellent tracking and particle identification performance. The Silicon Tracker is a key part of the tracking system to measure the particle trajectories to high precision. This paper reports the performance as well as the results of the radiation damage monitoring based on leakage currents and on charge collection efficiency scans during the data taking in the LHC Run I.

  11. Silicon: Potential to Promote Direct and Indirect Effects on Plant Defense Against Arthropod Pests in Agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Olivia L.; Padula, Matthew P.; Zeng, Rensen; Gurr, Geoff M.

    2016-01-01

    Silicon has generally not been considered essential for plant growth, although it is well recognized that many plants, particularly Poaceae, have substantial plant tissue concentrations of this element. Recently, however, the International Plant Nutrition Institute [IPNI] (2015), Georgia, USA has listed it as a “beneficial substance”. This reflects that numerous studies have now established that silicon may alleviate both biotic and abiotic stress. This paper explores the existing knowledge and recent advances in elucidating the role of silicon in plant defense against biotic stress, particularly against arthropod pests in agriculture and attraction of beneficial insects. Silicon confers resistance to herbivores via two described mechanisms: physical and biochemical/molecular. Until recently, studies have mainly centered on two trophic levels; the herbivore and plant. However, several studies now describe tri-trophic effects involving silicon that operate by attracting predators or parasitoids to plants under herbivore attack. Indeed, it has been demonstrated that silicon-treated, arthropod-attacked plants display increased attractiveness to natural enemies, an effect that was reflected in elevated biological control in the field. The reported relationships between soluble silicon and the jasmonic acid (JA) defense pathway, and JA and herbivore-induced plant volatiles (HIPVs) suggest that soluble silicon may enhance the production of HIPVs. Further, it is feasible that silicon uptake may affect protein expression (or modify proteins structurally) so that they can produce additional, or modify, the HIPV profile of plants. Ultimately, understanding silicon under plant ecological, physiological, biochemical, and molecular contexts will assist in fully elucidating the mechanisms behind silicon and plant response to biotic stress at both the bi- and tri-trophic levels. PMID:27379104

  12. Silicon: Potential to Promote Direct and Indirect Effects on Plant Defense Against Arthropod Pests in Agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Olivia L; Padula, Matthew P; Zeng, Rensen; Gurr, Geoff M

    2016-01-01

    Silicon has generally not been considered essential for plant growth, although it is well recognized that many plants, particularly Poaceae, have substantial plant tissue concentrations of this element. Recently, however, the International Plant Nutrition Institute [IPNI] (2015), Georgia, USA has listed it as a "beneficial substance". This reflects that numerous studies have now established that silicon may alleviate both biotic and abiotic stress. This paper explores the existing knowledge and recent advances in elucidating the role of silicon in plant defense against biotic stress, particularly against arthropod pests in agriculture and attraction of beneficial insects. Silicon confers resistance to herbivores via two described mechanisms: physical and biochemical/molecular. Until recently, studies have mainly centered on two trophic levels; the herbivore and plant. However, several studies now describe tri-trophic effects involving silicon that operate by attracting predators or parasitoids to plants under herbivore attack. Indeed, it has been demonstrated that silicon-treated, arthropod-attacked plants display increased attractiveness to natural enemies, an effect that was reflected in elevated biological control in the field. The reported relationships between soluble silicon and the jasmonic acid (JA) defense pathway, and JA and herbivore-induced plant volatiles (HIPVs) suggest that soluble silicon may enhance the production of HIPVs. Further, it is feasible that silicon uptake may affect protein expression (or modify proteins structurally) so that they can produce additional, or modify, the HIPV profile of plants. Ultimately, understanding silicon under plant ecological, physiological, biochemical, and molecular contexts will assist in fully elucidating the mechanisms behind silicon and plant response to biotic stress at both the bi- and tri-trophic levels.

  13. Impurity doping processes in silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, FFY

    1981-01-01

    This book introduces to non-experts several important processes of impurity doping in silicon and goes on to discuss the methods of determination of the concentration of dopants in silicon. The conventional method used is the discussion process, but, since it has been sufficiently covered in many texts, this work describes the double-diffusion method.

  14. Readout of silicon strip detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Dabrowski, W

    2003-01-01

    Various architectural and technological options of readout electronics for silicon strip detectors in vertex and tracking applications are discussed briefly. The ABCD3T ASIC for the readout of silicon strip detectors in the ATLAS semiconductor tracker is presented. The architecture of the chip, some design issues and radiation effects are discussed.

  15. Radiation damage in silicon detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Bruzzi, Mara

    2000-01-01

    This work presents an overview of the most important mechanisms of radiation damage in silicon detectors to be used for high energy experiments in LHC. The changes in the shallow concentration have been studied by Thermally Stimulated Currents (TSC) after proton and neutron irradiation with fluences up to 1015 cm-2 to investigate the role of thermal donors and the donor-removal effect in standard and oxygen enriched silicon with different resistivities. Deep defects in irradiated silicon have been analysed by Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (DLTS) and Photo Induced Current Transient Spectroscopy (P1CTS) in the same materials. The radiation-induced microscopic disorder has been related with the carrier transport properties of irradiated silicon measured by Hall effect, by capacitance and current vs. voltage characteristics and with charge collection efficiency. The dependence of the irradiated silicon detectors performances on crystal orientation, on incident particle type and on the starting concentration o...

  16. Silicone materials for LED packaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadur, Maneesh; Norris, Ann W.; Zarisfi, Afrooz; Alger, James S.; Windiate, Christopher C.

    2006-08-01

    Silicone based materials have attracted considerable attention from light emitting diode (LED) manufacturers for use as encapsulants and lenses for many high brightness LED (HB LED) devices. Currently silicones function in two key roles in HB LED devices, (1) as protective lenses and (2) stress relieving encapsulants for wire bond protection. The key attributes of silicones that make them attractive as light path materials for high brightness HB LEDs include their high transparency in the UV-visible region, controlled refractive index (RI), stable thermo-mechanical properties, and tuneable modulus from soft gels to hard resins. This paper will describe recent developments in moldable silicone hard resin materials. Progress on cavity moldable and liquid injection moldable (LIM) silicone compositions for discreet components is described. Also, an example of liquid injection overmolding is presented.

  17. Droplet-Assisted Laser Direct Nanoscale Writing on Silicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Jen Chang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Nano-structuring using laser direct writing technology has shown great potential for industrial applications. A novel application of water droplets to this technology is proposed in this paper. With a hydrophobic layer and a controlled substrate temperature, a layer of randomly distributed water droplets with a high contact angle is formed on the substrate. These liquid droplets can be used as lenses to enhance the laser intensity at the bottom of the droplets. As a result, nanoscale holes can be fabricated on the substrate by controlling the laser energy density. We successfully fabricated holes with a diameter of 600 nm at a substrate temperature of 12 ∘C and a power density of 1.2 × 108 W/cm2 in our experiments. We also found that the hole diameter was around a ninth of the water droplet diameter. Meanwhile, the machined holes are not affected much by the focal length of the lens, but a hole with less than 100 nm in diameter at the center was observed.

  18. The Silicon Lattice Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, J

    2003-11-24

    Previously, the generalized luminosity L was defined and calculated for all incident channels based on an NLC e{sup +}e{sup -} design. Alternatives were then considered to improve the differing beam-beam effects in the e{sup -}e{sup -}, e{gamma} and {gamma}{gamma} channels. One example was tensor beams composed of bunchlets n{sub ijk} implemented with a laser-driven, silicon accelerator based on micromachining techniques. Problems were considered and expressions given for radiative broadening due to bunchlet manipulation near the final focus to optimize luminosity via charge enhancement, neutralization or bunch shaping. Because the results were promising, we explore fully integrated structures that include sources, optics (for both light and particles) and acceleration in a common format--an accelerator-on-chip. Acceptable materials (and wavelengths) must allow velocity synchronism between many laser and electron pulses with optimal efficiency in high radiation environments. There are obvious control and cost advantages that accrue from using silicon structures if radiation effects can be made acceptable and the structures fabricated. Tests related to deep etching, fabrication and radiation effects on candidate amorphous and crystalline materials indicate Si(1.2 < {lambda}{sub L} < 10 {micro}m) and fused c-SiO{sub 2}(0.3 < {lambda}{sub L} < 4 {micro}m) to be ideal.

  19. Micromachined silicon seismic transducers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barron, C.C.; Fleming, J.G.; Sniegowski, J.J.; Armour, D.L.; Fleming, R.P.

    1995-08-01

    Batch-fabricated silicon seismic transducers could revolutionize the discipline of CTBT monitoring by providing inexpensive, easily depolyable sensor arrays. Although our goal is to fabricate seismic sensors that provide the same performance level as the current state-of-the-art ``macro`` systems, if necessary one could deploy a larger number of these small sensors at closer proximity to the location being monitored in order to compensate for lower performance. We have chosen a modified pendulum design and are manufacturing prototypes in two different silicon micromachining fabrication technologies. The first set of prototypes, fabricated in our advanced surface- micromachining technology, are currently being packaged for testing in servo circuits -- we anticipate that these devices, which have masses in the 1--10 {mu}g range, will resolve sub-mG signals. Concurrently, we are developing a novel ``mold`` micromachining technology that promises to make proof masses in the 1--10 mg range possible -- our calculations indicate that devices made in this new technology will resolve down to at least sub-{mu}G signals, and may even approach to 10{sup {minus}10} G/{radical}Hz acceleration levels found in the low-earth-noise model.

  20. SILICON AND BONE HEALTH

    Science.gov (United States)

    JUGDAOHSINGH, R.

    2009-01-01

    Low bone mass (osteoporosis) is a silent epidemic of the 21st century, which presently in the UK results in over 200,000 fractures annually at a cost of over one billion pounds. Figures are set to increase worldwide. Understanding the factors which affect bone metabolism is thus of primary importance in order to establish preventative measures or treatments for this condition. Nutrition is an important determinant of bone health, but the effects of the individual nutrients and minerals, other than calcium, is little understood. Accumulating evidence over the last 30 years strongly suggest that dietary silicon is beneficial to bone and connective tissue health and we recently reported strong positive associations between dietary Si intake and bone mineral density in US and UK cohorts. The exact biological role(s) of silicon in bone health is still not clear, although a number of possible mechanisms have been suggested, including the synthesis of collagen and/or its stabilization, and matrix mineralization. This review gives an overview of this naturally occurring dietary element, its metabolism and the evidence of its potential role in bone health. PMID:17435952

  1. Haematic silicon in drowning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierucci, Giovanni; Merlano, Federica; Chen, Yao; Sturini, Michela; Maraschi, Federica; Profumo, Antonella

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this paper was to evaluate silicon (Si) concentration in human whole ventricular blood as a further potential chemical marker in the diagnosis of drowning. We employed an acidic digestion for the extraction of soluble Si, and an alkaline digestion for the determination of total Si, including particulate matter, both arising from drowning medium. 29 suspected drowning situations, 24 in fresh water (Fw) and 5 in seawater (Sw), were examined. The difference in Si concentration between the left and right ventricular blood (Si ΔL-R) was measured and alkaline Si ΔL-R seems, indeed, a potentially significant complementary tool in the diagnosis of Fw drowning, because insoluble silicon fraction does not undergo hemo-dilution or hemo-concentration, and the ΔL-R is not affected by exogenous factors. In spite of the limited number of cases investigated, a good correlation was observed between the analytical results and the macro-microscopic autoptic findings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  2. ATLAS Silicon Microstrip Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Haefner, Petra; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    The SemiConductor Tracker (SCT), made up from silicon micro-strip detectors is the key precision tracking device in ATLAS, one of the experiments at CERN LHC. The completed SCT is in very good shape: 99.3% of the SCT strips are operational, noise occupancy and hit efficiency exceed the design specifications. In the talk the current status of the SCT will be reviewed. We will report on the operation of the detector and observed problems, with stress on the sensor and electronics performance. TWEPP Summary In December 2009 the ATLAS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) recorded the first proton- proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 900 GeV and this was followed by the unprecedented energy of 7 TeV in March 2010. The SemiConductor Tracker (SCT) is the key precision tracking device in ATLAS, made up from silicon micro-strip detectors processed in the planar p-in-n technology. The signal from the strips is processed in the front-end ASICS ABCD3TA, working in the binary readout mode. Data i...

  3. Chalcogen donnors in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scolfaro, L.M.R.

    1985-01-01

    The electronic stucture of chalcogen impurities in silicon which give rise to deep levels in the forbidden band gap of that semiconductor is studied. The molecular cluster model within the formalism of the multiple scattering method in the Xα local density approximation was used . The surface orbitals were treated by using the Watson sphere model. Studies were carried out for the isolated substitutional sulfur and selenium impurities (Si:S and Si:Se). A pioneer investigation was performed for the nearest-neighbor impurity pairs of sulfur and selenium (Si:S 2 and Si:Se 2 ). All the systems were also analysed in the positive charge states (Si:S + , Si:Se + and Si:Se 2 + ) and for the isolated impurities the calculations were carried out to the spin polarized limit. The obtained results were used to interpret recent photoconductivity, photocapitance, EPR and DLTS data on these centers. It was observed that the adopted model is able to provide a satisfactory description of the electronic structure of the chalcogen impurity centers in silicon. (autor) [pt

  4. Absorption of carbon dioxide in waste tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobbs, D.T.

    1987-01-01

    Air flow rates and carbon dioxide concentrations of air entering and exiting eight H-Area waste tanks were monitored for a period of one year. The average instanteous concentration of carbon dioxide in air is within the range reported offsite, and therefore is not affect by operation of the coal-fired power plant adjacent to the tank farm. Waste solutions in each of the tanks were observed to be continuously absorbing carbon dioxide. The rate of absorption of carbon dioxide decreased linearly with the pH of the solution. Personnel exposure associated with the routine sampling and analysis of radioactive wastes stored at SRP to determine the levels of corrosion inhibitors in solution could be reduced by monitoring the absorption of carbon dioxide and using the relationship between pH and carbon dioxide absorption to determine the free hydroxide concentration in solution

  5. Carbon dioxide production in animal houses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Søren; Blanes-Vidal, Victoria; Joergensen, H.

    2008-01-01

    , when used in full scale animal buildings as basis for estimation of ventilation flow. Based on the data reviewed in this study, we recommend adding 10% carbon dioxide production to the laboratory based carbon dioxide production for animal houses with slatted or solid floors, provided that indoor manure......This article deals with carbon dioxide production from farm animals; more specifically, it addresses the possibilities of using the measured carbon dioxide concentration in animal houses as basis for estimation of ventilation flow (as the ventilation flow is a key parameter of aerial emissions from......C) has often been used. The article shows that the carbon dioxide production per hpu increases with increasing respiration quotient. As the respiration quotient increases with body mass for growing animals, the carbon dioxide production per heat production unit also increases with increased body mass...

  6. Hydrophobic recovery of repeatedly plasma-treated silicone rubber .2. A comparison of the hydrophobic recovery in air, water, or liquid nitrogen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Everaert, EP; VanderMei, HC; Busscher, HJ

    1996-01-01

    Surfaces of medical grade silicone rubber (Q7-4750, Dow Coming) were modified by repeated (six times) RF plasma treatments using various discharge gases: oxygen, argon, carbon dioxide, and ammonia. The treated samples were stored for a period of 3 months in ambient air, water, or liquid nitrogen.

  7. Selective emitter using porous silicon for crystalline silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Inyong; Kim, Kyunghae; Kim, Youngkuk; Han, Kyumin; Kyeong, Doheon; Kwon, Taeyoung; Vinh Ai, Dao; Lee, Jeongchul; Yi, Junsin [School of Information and Communication Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Chunchun-dong, Jangan-Gu, Suwon-City, Kyunggi-Do 440-746 (Korea); Thamilselvan, M. [School of Information and Communication Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Chunchun-dong, Jangan-Gu, Suwon-City, Kyunggi-Do 440-746 (Korea); Government College of Technology, Coimbatore, Tamilnadu (India); Ju, Minkyu; Lee, Kyungsoo [KPE Ins. Chunchun-dong, Jangan-Gu, Suwon-City, Kyunggi-Do 440-746 (Korea)

    2009-06-15

    This study is devoted to the formation of high-low-level-doped selective emitter for crystalline silicon solar cells for photovoltaic application. We report here the formation of porous silicon under chemical reaction condition. The chemical mixture containing hydrofluoric and nitric acid, with de-ionized water, was used to make porous on the half of the silicon surface of size 125 x 125 cm. Porous and non-porous areas each share half of the whole silicon surface. H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}:methanol gives the best deposited layer with acceptable adherence and uniformity on the non-porous and porous areas of the silicon surface to get high- and low-level-doped regions. The volume concentration of H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} does not exceed 10% of the total volume emulsion. Phosphoric acid was used as an n-type doping source to make emitter for silicon solar cells. The measured emitter sheet resistances at the high- and low-level-doped regions were 30-35 and 97-474 {omega}/{open_square} respectively. A simple process for low- and high-level doping has been achieved by forming porous and porous-free silicon surface, in this study, which could be applied for solar cells selective emitter doping. (author)

  8. Ceramic matrix composites by microwave assisted CVI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currier, R.P.; Devlin, D.J.

    1993-01-01

    Chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) processes for producing continuously reinforced ceramic composites are reviewed. Potential advantages of microwave assisted CVI are noted and numerical studies of microwave assisted CVI are reviewed. The models predict inverted thermal gradients in fibrous ceramic preforms subjected to microwave radiation and suggest processing strategies for achieving uniformly dense composites. Comparisons are made to experimental results on silicon-based composite systems. The role played by the relative ability of fiber and matrix to dissipate microwave energy is noted. Results suggest that microwave induced inverted gradients can be exploited to promote inside-out densification. 10 refs., 2 figs

  9. Modeling of the non-monotonous viscoplastic behavior of uranium dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauter, F.; Leclercq, S.

    2003-10-01

    In order to evaluate the stress level during pellet cladding mechanical interaction (PCMI), Electricité de France is involved in a large program of investigation of the mechanical properties of both fuel pellets and claddings. In this paper, we focus on the mechanical behavior of uranium dioxide. These pellets exhibit a yield point during strain hardening tests and sigmoı̈dal creep curves, that is inflection points characteristic of a non-monotonous viscoplastic flow in the first stages of the tests. Inspired by Alexander and Haasen's work upon single crystal silicon, we develop a dislocation-based model that is able to describe the viscoplasticity of uranium dioxide in the range of temperature and stress of the PCMI. After developing this model, we introduce it into the Pilvin's polycrystalline approach. The self-consistency of the polycrystalline approach in the case of a non-monotonous viscoplastic flow is demonstrated in an independent article.

  10. A METHOD OF PREPARING URANIUM DIOXIDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, F.A.; Mudge, L.K.

    1963-12-17

    A process of purifying raw, in particular plutonium- and fission- products-containing, uranium dioxide is described. The uranium dioxide is dissolved in a molten chloride mixture containing potassium chloride plus sodium, lithium, magnesium, or lead chloride under anhydrous conditions; an electric current and a chlorinating gas are passed through the mixture whereby pure uranium dioxide is deposited on and at the same time partially redissolved from the cathode. (AEC)

  11. Made-to-order metal-organic frameworks for trace carbon dioxide removal and air capture

    KAUST Repository

    Shekhah, Osama

    2014-06-25

    Direct air capture is regarded as a plausible alternate approach that, if economically practical, can mitigate the increasing carbon dioxide emissions associated with two of the main carbon polluting sources, namely stationary power plants and transportation. Here we show that metal-organic framework crystal chemistry permits the construction of an isostructural metal-organic framework (SIFSIX-3-Cu) based on pyrazine/copper(II) two-dimensional periodic 4 4 square grids pillared by silicon hexafluoride anions and thus allows further contraction of the pore system to 3.5 versus 3.84 for the parent zinc(II) derivative. This enhances the adsorption energetics and subsequently displays carbon dioxide uptake and selectivity at very low partial pressures relevant to air capture and trace carbon dioxide removal. The resultant SIFSIX-3-Cu exhibits uniformly distributed adsorption energetics and offers enhanced carbon dioxide physical adsorption properties, uptake and selectivity in highly diluted gas streams, a performance, to the best of our knowledge, unachievable with other classes of porous materials. 2014 Macmillan Publishers Limited.

  12. Made-to-order metal-organic frameworks for trace carbon dioxide removal and air capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekhah, Osama; Belmabkhout, Youssef; Chen, Zhijie; Guillerm, Vincent; Cairns, Amy; Adil, Karim; Eddaoudi, Mohamed

    2014-06-25

    Direct air capture is regarded as a plausible alternate approach that, if economically practical, can mitigate the increasing carbon dioxide emissions associated with two of the main carbon polluting sources, namely stationary power plants and transportation. Here we show that metal-organic framework crystal chemistry permits the construction of an isostructural metal-organic framework (SIFSIX-3-Cu) based on pyrazine/copper(II) two-dimensional periodic 4(4) square grids pillared by silicon hexafluoride anions and thus allows further contraction of the pore system to 3.5 versus 3.84 Å for the parent zinc(II) derivative. This enhances the adsorption energetics and subsequently displays carbon dioxide uptake and selectivity at very low partial pressures relevant to air capture and trace carbon dioxide removal. The resultant SIFSIX-3-Cu exhibits uniformly distributed adsorption energetics and offers enhanced carbon dioxide physical adsorption properties, uptake and selectivity in highly diluted gas streams, a performance, to the best of our knowledge, unachievable with other classes of porous materials.

  13. Silicon Self-Diffusion in Isotope Heterostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bracht, H.; Haller, E.E.; Clark-Phelps, R.

    1998-01-01

    Self-diffusion of silicon is measured between 855 and 1388thinsp degree C in highly isotopically enriched 28 Si layers. The profiles of 29 Si and 30 Si are determined by secondary ion mass spectrometry. Temperature dependence of the self-diffusion coefficients is accurately described over seven orders of magnitude with one diffusion enthalpy of 4.75thinspthinspeV. This single enthalpy indicates that self-interstitials dominate self-diffusion. The high accuracy of our data enables us to estimate an upper bound for the vacancy-assisted diffusion enthalpy of 4.14thinspthinspeV, which agrees with recent theoretical calculations. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  14. Combined effect of sulfur dioxide and carbon dioxide gases on mold fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kochurova, A.I.; Karpova, T.N.

    1974-01-01

    Sulfur dioxide at 0.08% killed Penicillium expansum, Stemphylium macrosporium, and Botrytis cinerea within 24 hours. At 0.2%, it killed P. citrinum, Alternaria tenuis, and Fusarium moniliforme. Sulfur dioxide (at 0.04%) and Sulfur dioxide-carbon dioxide mixtures (at 0.02 and 5% respectively) completely suppressed the growth of P. citrinum, P. expansum, P. rubrum, A. tenuis, S. macrosporium, B. cinerea, and F. moniliforme in laboratory experiments. 1 table.

  15. Relationship between silicon concentration and creatinine clearance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, Y.; Nakai, K.; Itoh, C.; Horikiri, J.; Sera, K.; Sato, M.

    1998-01-01

    Silicon levels in dialysis patients are markedly increasing. Using PIXE we determined the relationship between silicon concentration and creatinine clearance in 30 samples. Urine silicon concentration were significantly correlated to creatinine clearance (p<0.001). And also serum silicon concentration were significantly correlated to creatinine clearance (p<0.0001). (author)

  16. Extracting Silicon From Sodium-Process Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapur, V.; Sanjurjo, A.; Sancier, K. M.; Nanis, L.

    1982-01-01

    New acid leaching process purifies silicon produced in reaction between silicon fluoride and sodium. Concentration of sodium fluoride and other impurities and byproducts remaining in silicon are within acceptable ranges for semi-conductor devices. Leaching process makes sodium reduction process more attractive for making large quantities of silicon for solar cells.

  17. Apparatus for making molten silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Harry (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A reactor apparatus (10) adapted for continuously producing molten, solar grade purity elemental silicon by thermal reaction of a suitable precursor gas, such as silane (SiH.sub.4), is disclosed. The reactor apparatus (10) includes an elongated reactor body (32) having graphite or carbon walls which are heated to a temperature exceeding the melting temperature of silicon. The precursor gas enters the reactor body (32) through an efficiently cooled inlet tube assembly (22) and a relatively thin carbon or graphite septum (44). The septum (44), being in contact on one side with the cooled inlet (22) and the heated interior of the reactor (32) on the other side, provides a sharp temperature gradient for the precursor gas entering the reactor (32) and renders the operation of the inlet tube assembly (22) substantially free of clogging. The precursor gas flows in the reactor (32) in a substantially smooth, substantially axial manner. Liquid silicon formed in the initial stages of the thermal reaction reacts with the graphite or carbon walls to provide a silicon carbide coating on the walls. The silicon carbide coated reactor is highly adapted for prolonged use for production of highly pure solar grade silicon. Liquid silicon (20) produced in the reactor apparatus (10) may be used directly in a Czochralski or other crystal shaping equipment.

  18. Evaluation of the Effect of Silicone Contamination on Various Bond Systems and the Feasibility of Removing the Contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Stephanie D.

    2008-01-01

    Silicone is a contaminant that can cause catastrophic failure of a bond system depending on the materials and processes used to fabricate the bond system, Unfortunately, more and more materials are fabricated using silicone. The purpose of this testing was to evaluate which bond systems are sensitive to silicone contamination and whether or not a cleaning process could be utilized to remove the silicone to bring the bond system performance back to baseline. Due to the extensive nature of the testing attempts will be made to generalize the understanding within classes of substrates, bond systems, and surface preparation and cleaning methods. This study was done by contaminating various meta! (steel, inconel, and aluminum), phenolic (carbon cloth phenolic and glass cloth phenolic), and rubber (natural rubber, asbestos-silicone dioxide filled natural butyldiene rubber, silica-filled ethylene propylenediene monomer, and carbon-filled ethylene propylenediene monomer) substrates which were then bonded using various adhesives and coatings (epoxy-based adhesives, paints, ablative compounds, and Chemlok adhesives) to determine the effect silicone contamination has on a given bond system's performance. The test configurations depended on the bond system being evaluated. The study also evaluated the feasibility of removing the silicone contamination by cleaning the contaminated substrate prior to bonding. The cleaning processes also varied depending on bond system.

  19. Estimation of Future Demand for Neutron-Transmutation-Doped Silicon Caused by Development of Hybrid Electric Vehicle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Myong Seop; Park, Sang Jun

    2008-01-01

    By using this doping method, silicon semiconductors with an extremely uniform dopant distribution can be produced. They are usually used for high power devices such as thyristor (SCR), IGBT, IGCT and GTO. Now, the demand for high power semiconductor devices has increased rapidly due to the rapid increase of the green energy technologies. Among them, the productions of hybrid cars or fuel cell engines are excessively increased to reduce the amount of discharged air pollution substances, such as carbon dioxide which causes global warming. It is known that the neutron-transmutation-doped floating-zone (FZ) silicon wafers are used in insulated-gate bipolar transistors (IGBTs) which control the speed of the electric traction motors equipped in hybrid or fuel cell vehicles. Therefore, inevitably, it can be supposed that the demand of the NTD silicon is considerably increased. However, it is considered likely that the irradiation capacity will not be large enough to meet the increasing demand. After all, the large irradiation capacity for NTD such as a reactor dedicated to the silicon irradiation will be constructed depending on the industrial demand for NTD silicon. In this work, we investigated the relationship between the hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) industry and the NTD silicon production. Also, we surveyed the prospect for the production of the HEV. Then, we deduced the worldwide demand for the NTD silicon associated with the HEV production. This work can be utilized as the basic material for the construction of the new irradiation facility such as NTD-dedicated neutron source

  20. Sources and delivery of carbon dioxide for enhanced oil recovery. Final report, October 1977--December 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hare, M.; Perlich, H.; Robinson, R.; Shah, M.; Zimmerman, F.

    1978-12-01

    Results are presented from a comprehensive study by Pullman Kellogg, with assistance from Gulf Universities Research Consortium (GURC) and National Cryo-Chemics Incorporated (NCI), of the carbon dioxide supply situation for miscible flooding operations to enhance oil recovery. A survey of carbon dioxide sources within the geographic areas of potential EOR are shown on four regional maps with the tabular data for each region to describe the sources in terms of quantity and quality. Evaluation of all the costs, such as purchase, production, processing, and transportation, associated with delivering the carbon dioxide from its source to its destination are presented. Specific cases to illustrate the use of the maps and cost charts generated in this study have been examined.

  1. Process for forming retrograde profiles in silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Kurt H.; Sigmon, Thomas W.

    1996-01-01

    A process for forming retrograde and oscillatory profiles in crystalline and polycrystalline silicon. The process consisting of introducing an n- or p-type dopant into the silicon, or using prior doped silicon, then exposing the silicon to multiple pulses of a high-intensity laser or other appropriate energy source that melts the silicon for short time duration. Depending on the number of laser pulses directed at the silicon, retrograde profiles with peak/surface dopant concentrations which vary from 1-1e4 are produced. The laser treatment can be performed in air or in vacuum, with the silicon at room temperature or heated to a selected temperature.

  2. Electrochemical characterization of carbon coated bundle-type silicon nanorod for anode material in lithium ion secondary batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halim, Martin; Kim, Jung Sub; Choi, Jeong-Gil; Lee, Joong Kee

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Bundle-type silicon nanorods (BSNR) were synthesized by metal assisted chemical etching. • Novel bundle-type nanorods electrode showed self-relaxant characteristics. • The self-relaxant property was enhanced by increasing the silver concentration. • PAA binder enhanced the self-relaxant property of the silicon material. • Carbon coated BSNR (BSNR@C) has evidently provided better cycle performance. - Abstract: Nanostructured silicon synthesis by surface modification of commercial micro-powder silicon was investigated in order to reduce the maximum volume change over cycle. The surface of micro-powder silicon was modified using an Ag metal-assisted chemical etching technique to produce nanostructured material in the form of bundle-type silicon nanorods. The volume change of the electrode using the nanostructured silicon during cycle was investigated using an in-situ dilatometer. Our result shows that nanostructured silicon synthesized using this method showed a self-relaxant characteristic as an anode material for lithium ion battery application. Moreover, binder selection plays a role in enhancing self-relaxant properties during delithiation via strong hydrogen interaction on the surface of the silicon material. The nanostructured silicon was then coated with carbon from propylene gas and showed higher capacity retention with the use of polyacrylic acid (PAA) binder. While the nano-size of the pore diameter control may significantly affect the capacity fading of nanostructured silicon, it can be mitigated via carbon coating, probably due to the prevention of Li ion penetration into 10 nano-meter sized pores

  3. Silicon in cereal straw

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murozuka, Emiko

    Silicon (Si) is known to be a beneficial element for plants. However, when plant residues are to be used as feedstock for second generation bioenergy, Si may reduce the suitability of the biomass for biochemical or thermal conversion technologies. The objective of this PhD study was to investigate...... how Si influences cell wall composition in cereal straw and, consequently, the enzymatic saccharification efficiency. Considering the importance of Nitrogen (N) fertilization in cereal production, an additional objective was to elucidate the effect of N supply on Si concentration and cell wall...... composition. The Si concentration in wheat straw differed significantly among genotypes and growth locations. Wheat straw with high Si concentration released less xylose during enzymatic saccharification suggesting inhibition by Si deposited in hemicelluloses. N supply had a distinct effect on Si...

  4. Silicon radiation detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benc, I.; Kerhart, J.; Kopecky, J.; Krca, P.; Veverka, V.; Weidner, M.; Weinova, H.

    1992-01-01

    The silicon radiation detector, which is designed for the detection of electrons with energies above 500 eV and of radiation within the region of 200 to 1100 nm, comprises a PIN or PNN + type photodiode. The active acceptor photodiode is formed by a detector surface of shallow acceptor diffusion surrounded by a collector band of deep acceptor diffusion. The detector surface of shallow P-type diffusion with an acceptor concentration of 10 15 to 10 17 atoms/cm 3 reaches a depth of 40 to 100 nm. One sixth to one eighth of the collector band width is overlapped by the P + collector band at a width of 150 to 300 μm with an acceptor concentration of 10 20 to 10 21 atoms/cm 3 down a depth of 0.5 to 3 μm. This band is covered with a conductive layer, of NiCr for instance. (Z.S.)

  5. Silicon force sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galambos, Paul C.; Crenshaw, Thomas B.; Nishida, Erik E.; Burnett, Damon J.; Lantz, Jeffrey W.

    2016-07-05

    The various technologies presented herein relate to a sensor for measurement of high forces and/or high load shock rate(s), whereby the sensor utilizes silicon as the sensing element. A plate of Si can have a thinned region formed therein on which can be formed a number of traces operating as a Wheatstone bridge. The brittle Si can be incorporated into a layered structure comprising ductile and/or compliant materials. The sensor can have a washer-like configuration which can be incorporated into a nut and bolt configuration, whereby tightening of the nut and bolt can facilitate application of a compressive preload upon the sensor. Upon application of an impact load on the bolt, the compressive load on the sensor can be reduced (e.g., moves towards zero-load), however the magnitude of the preload can be such that the load on the sensor does not translate to tensile stress being applied to the sensor.

  6. Fluidized bed silicon deposition from silane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, George (Inventor); Levin, Harry (Inventor); Hogle, Richard A. (Inventor); Praturi, Ananda (Inventor); Lutwack, Ralph (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A process and apparatus for thermally decomposing silicon containing gas for deposition on fluidized nucleating silicon seed particles is disclosed. Silicon seed particles are produced in a secondary fluidized reactor by thermal decomposition of a silicon containing gas. The thermally produced silicon seed particles are then introduced into a primary fluidized bed reactor to form a fludized bed. Silicon containing gas is introduced into the primary reactor where it is thermally decomposed and deposited on the fluidized silicon seed particles. Silicon seed particles having the desired amount of thermally decomposed silicon product thereon are removed from the primary fluidized reactor as ultra pure silicon product. An apparatus for carrying out this process is also disclosed.

  7. Crucible Grows Wide Silicon Ribbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidensticker, R.

    1982-01-01

    Inexpensive manufacture of solar cells may require quality silicon ribbon crystals. One way to produce them is by growing wide dendritic webs, which can be very long and have high structural perfection. Dendrites grow from supercooled melt, so width of ribbon depends on how wide a region of supercooled molten silicon can be maintained in crucible. Elongated geometry of suscepter/crucible/lid assembly allows molten silicon to supercool over a wider region -- a necessary condition for the growth of wide dendritic crystal ribbon.

  8. Foreign assistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-07-01

    This paper reports that providing energy assistance to developing countries remains a relatively low priority of the Agency for International Development. AID is helping some developing countries meet their energy needs, but this assistance varies substantially because of the agency's decentralized structure. Most AID energy funding has gone to a handful of countries-primarily Egypt and Pakistan. With limited funding in most other countries, AID concentrates on providing technical expertise and promoting energy policy reforms that will encourage both energy efficiency and leverage investment by the private sector and other donors. Although a 1989 congressional directive to pursue a global warming initiative has had a marginal impact on the agency's energy programming, many AID energy programs, including those directed at energy conservation, help address global warming concerns

  9. Analysis of self-heating of thermally assisted spin-transfer torque magnetic random access memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Austin Deschenes

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Thermal assistance has been shown to significantly reduce the required operation power for spin torque transfer magnetic random access memory (STT-MRAM. Proposed heating methods include modified material stack compositions that result in increased self-heating or external heat sources. In this work we analyze the self-heating process of a standard perpendicular magnetic anisotropy STT-MRAM device through numerical simulations in order to understand the relative contributions of Joule, thermoelectric Peltier and Thomson, and tunneling junction heating. A 2D rotationally symmetric numerical model is used to solve the coupled electro-thermal equations including thermoelectric effects and heat absorbed or released at the tunneling junction. We compare self-heating for different common passivation materials, positive and negative electrical current polarity, and different device thermal anchoring and boundaries resistance configurations. The variations considered are found to result in significant differences in maximum temperatures reached. Average increases of 3 K, 10 K, and 100 K for different passivation materials, positive and negative polarity, and different thermal anchoring configurations, respectively, are observed. The highest temperatures, up to 424 K, are obtained for silicon dioxide as the passivation material, positive polarity, and low thermal anchoring with thermal boundary resistance configurations. Interestingly it is also found that due to the tunneling heat, Peltier effect, device geometry, and numerous interfacial layers around the magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ, most of the heat is dissipated on the lower potential side of the magnetic junction. This asymmetry in heating, which has also been observed experimentally, is important as thermally assisted switching requires heating of the free layer specifically and this will be significantly different for the two polarity operations, set and reset.

  10. Analysis of self-heating of thermally assisted spin-transfer torque magnetic random access memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschenes, Austin; Muneer, Sadid; Akbulut, Mustafa; Gokirmak, Ali; Silva, Helena

    2016-01-01

    Thermal assistance has been shown to significantly reduce the required operation power for spin torque transfer magnetic random access memory (STT-MRAM). Proposed heating methods include modified material stack compositions that result in increased self-heating or external heat sources. In this work we analyze the self-heating process of a standard perpendicular magnetic anisotropy STT-MRAM device through numerical simulations in order to understand the relative contributions of Joule, thermoelectric Peltier and Thomson, and tunneling junction heating. A 2D rotationally symmetric numerical model is used to solve the coupled electro-thermal equations including thermoelectric effects and heat absorbed or released at the tunneling junction. We compare self-heating for different common passivation materials, positive and negative electrical current polarity, and different device thermal anchoring and boundaries resistance configurations. The variations considered are found to result in significant differences in maximum temperatures reached. Average increases of 3 K, 10 K, and 100 K for different passivation materials, positive and negative polarity, and different thermal anchoring configurations, respectively, are observed. The highest temperatures, up to 424 K, are obtained for silicon dioxide as the passivation material, positive polarity, and low thermal anchoring with thermal boundary resistance configurations. Interestingly it is also found that due to the tunneling heat, Peltier effect, device geometry, and numerous interfacial layers around the magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ), most of the heat is dissipated on the lower potential side of the magnetic junction. This asymmetry in heating, which has also been observed experimentally, is important as thermally assisted switching requires heating of the free layer specifically and this will be significantly different for the two polarity operations, set and reset.

  11. Selective recovery of titanium dioxide from low grade sources

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Vuuren, DS

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available There are a number of readily available, large reserves of titanium dioxide bearing minerals from which the titanium dioxide cannot currently be economically recovered via current commercial recovery processes due to: The grade of titanium dioxide...

  12. Radiation resistant passivation of silicon solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swanson, R.M.; Gan, J.Y.; Gruenbaum, P.E.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes a silicon solar cell having improved stability when exposed to concentrated solar radiation. It comprises a body of silicon material having a major surface for receiving radiation, a plurality of p and n conductivity regions in the body for collecting electrons and holes created by impinging radiation, and a passivation layer on the major surface including a first layer of silicon oxide in contact with the body and a polycrystalline silicon layer on the first layer of silicon oxide

  13. Sulfur Dioxide Analyzer Instrument Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Springston, Stephen R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-05-01

    The Sulfur Dioxide Analyzer measures sulfur dioxide based on absorbance of UV light at one wavelength by SO2 molecules which then decay to a lower energy state by emitting UV light at a longer wavelength. Specifically, SO2 + hυ1 →SO2 *→SO2 + hυ2 The emitted light is proportional to the concentration of SO2 in the optical cell. External communication with the analyzer is available through an Ethernet port configured through the instrument network of the AOS systems. The Model 43i-TLE is part of the i-series of Thermo Scientific instruments. The i-series instruments are designed to interface with external computers through the proprietary Thermo Scientific iPort Software. However, this software is somewhat cumbersome and inflexible. Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has written an interface program in National Instruments LabView that both controls the Model 43i-TLE Analyzer AND queries the unit for all measurement and housekeeping data. The LabView vi (the software program written by BNL) ingests all raw data from the instrument and outputs raw data files in a uniform data format similar to other instruments in the AOS and described more fully in Section 6.0 below.

  14. Sonochemical reduction of carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, H

    1998-06-01

    Sonolysis of carbon dioxide dissolved in water was performed from a standpoint of reducing this material in atmosphere. During one hour of sonication, the amount of CO2 decreased to about half at 5 degrees C under CO2-Ar atmosphere. The decreasing rate for CO2 followed the order Ar > He > H2 > N2 and it was down with increasing temperature in the range of 5-45 degrees C. The most favorable concentration for reducing CO2 was 0.03 (mole fraction of CO2 in gas phase). This concentration in gas phase means an equal mixture of CO2 and Ar in water, because CO2 is more soluble than Ar. Since carbon dioxide dissolved in water would be partly ionized, the roles of ions on the sonolysis were also examined. Gaseous reaction products were CO, H2 and a small amount of O2. Carbon monoxide and hydrogen might be obtained from CO2 and H2O by sonolysis, respectively. Both gases are fuel and react each other to C1 compounds such as methanol, and so on. Therefore, irradiation of ultrasonic waves should be an important technique for reducing CO2.

  15. Potentialities of silicon nanowire forests for thermoelectric generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimaggio, Elisabetta; Pennelli, Giovanni

    2018-04-01

    Silicon is a material with very good thermoelectric properties, with regard to Seebeck coefficient and electrical conductivity. Low thermal conductivities, and hence high thermal to electrical conversion efficiencies, can be achieved in nanostructures, which are smaller than the phonon mean free path but large enough to preserve the electrical conductivity. We demonstrate that it is possible to fabricate a leg of a thermoelectric generator based on large collections of long nanowires, placed perpendicularly to the two faces of a silicon wafer. The process exploits the metal assisted etching technique which is simple, low cost, and can be easily applied to large surfaces. Copper can be deposited by electrodeposition on both faces, so that contacts can be provided, on top of the nanowires. Thermal conductivity of silicon nanowire forests with more than 107 nanowires mm-2 have been measured; the result is comparable with that achieved by several groups on devices based on few nanowires. On the basis of the measured parameters, numerical calculations of the efficiency of silicon-based thermoelectric generators are reported, and the potentialities of these devices for thermal to electrical energy conversion are shown. Criteria to improve the conversion efficiency are suggested and described.

  16. Carbon dioxide sequestration by mineral carbonation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijgen, W.J.J.

    2007-01-01

    The increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration, mainly caused by fossil fuel combustion, has lead to concerns about global warming. A possible technology that can contribute to the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions is CO2 sequestration by mineral carbonation. The basic concept

  17. Carbon Dioxide for pH Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagonner, R.C.

    2001-08-16

    Cardox, the major supplier of carbon dioxide, has developed a diffuser to introduce carbon dioxide into a water volume as small bubbles to minimize reagent loss to the atmosphere. This unit is integral to several configurations suggested for treatment to control alkalinity in water streams.

  18. Pressure pumping of carbon dioxide from soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    E. S. Takle; J. R. Brandle; R. A. Schmidt; R. Garcia; I. V. Litvina; G. Doyle; X. Zhou; Q. Hou; C. W. Rice; W. J. Massman

    2000-01-01

    Recent interest in atmospheric increases in carbon dioxide have heightened the need for improved accuracy in measurements of fluxes of carbon dioxide from soils. Diffusional movement has long been considered the dominant process by which trace gases move from the subsurface source to the surface, although there has been some indication that atmospheric pressure...

  19. Thermoexpanded graphite modification by titanium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semko, L.S.; Gorbik, P.P.; Chujko, O.O.; Kruchek, Ya.Yi.; Dzyubenko, L.S.; Orans'ka, O.Yi.

    2006-01-01

    A method of the synthesis of thermoexpanded graphite (TEG) powders coated by titanium dioxide is developed. The conversion of n-buthylorthotitanate into TiO 2 on the TEG surface is investigated. The optimal parameters of the synthesis and the structure of titanium dioxide clusters on the TEG surface are determined

  20. Evanescent field phase shifting in a silicon nitride waveguide using a coupled silicon slab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Asger Sellerup; Oxenløwe, Leif Katsuo; Green, William M. J.

    2015-01-01

    An approach for electrical modulation of low-loss silicon nitride waveguides is proposed, using a silicon nitride waveguide evanescently loaded with a thin silicon slab. The thermooptic phase-shift characteristics are investigated in a racetrack resonator configuration....

  1. Silicon pressure transducers: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aceves M, M.; Sandoval I, F.

    1994-01-01

    We present a review of the pressure sensors, which use the silicon piezo resistive effect and micro machining technique. Typical pressure sensors, applications, design and other different structures are presented. (Author)

  2. Imprinted silicon-based nanophotonics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borel, Peter Ingo; Olsen, Brian Bilenberg; Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn

    2007-01-01

    We demonstrate and optically characterize silicon-on-insulator based nanophotonic devices fabricated by nanoimprint lithography. In our demonstration, we have realized ordinary and topology-optimized photonic crystal waveguide structures. The topology-optimized structures require lateral pattern...

  3. Scattering characteristics from porous silicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sabet-Dariani

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available   Porous silicon (PS layers come into existance as a result of electrochemical anodization on silicon. Although a great deal of research has been done on the formation and optical properties of this material, the exact mechanism involved is not well-understood yet.   In this article, first, the optical properties of silicon and porous silicon are described. Then, previous research and the proposed models about reflection from PS and the origin of its photoluminescence are reveiwed. The reflecting and scattering, absorption and transmission of light from this material, are then investigated. These experiments include,different methods of PS sample preparation their photoluminescence, reflecting and scattering of light determining different characteristics with respect to Si bulk.

  4. Silicon Solar Cell Turns 50

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perlin, J.

    2004-08-01

    This short brochure describes a milestone in solar (or photovoltaic, PV) research-namely, the 50th anniversary of the invention of the first viable silicon solar cell by three researchers at Bell Laboratories.

  5. Characterization of Czochralski Silicon Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Luukka, Panja-Riina

    2012-01-01

    This thesis describes the characterization of irradiated and non-irradiated segmenteddetectors made of high-resistivity (>1 kΩcm) magnetic Czochralski (MCZ) silicon. It isshown that the radiation hardness (RH) of the protons of these detectors is higher thanthat of devices made of traditional materials such as Float Zone (FZ) silicon or DiffusionOxygenated Float Zone (DOFZ) silicon due to the presence of intrinsic oxygen (> 5 x1017 cm-3). The MCZ devices therefore present an interesting alternative for future highenergy physics experiments. In the large hadron collider (LHC), the RH of the detectorsis a critical issue due to the high luminosity (1034 cm-2s-1) corresponding to the expectedtotal fluencies of fast hadrons above 1015 cm-2. This RH improvement is important sinceradiation damage in the detector bulk material reduces the detector performance andbecause some of the devices produced from standard detector-grade silicon, e.g. FZsilicon with negligible oxygen concentration, might not survive the plann...

  6. Dietary Silicon Intake of Korean Young Adult Males and Its Relation to their Bone Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Mi-Kyeong; Kim, Mi-Hyun

    2017-03-01

    Accumulated data suggests a positive effect of silicon on bone health; however, limited research exists on the silicon content of foods. To further the understanding of the relationship between dietary silicon intake and bone health, a food composition database of commonly consumed foods in Korea is required. For quantitative data on the intake levels of silicon, we analyzed the silicon content of 365 food items commonly consumed in Korea using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry following microwave-assisted digestion. To investigate the dietary silicon intake status and to examine the potential role of dietary silicon intake in the bone status of men, a total of 400 healthy Korean adult males aged 19-25 were observed for their diet intake and calcaneus bone density using the 24-h recall method and quantitative ultrasound, respectively. Clinical markers reflecting bone metabolism such as serum total alkaline phosphatase, N-mid osteocalcin, and type 1 collagen C-terminal telopeptide concentrations were also analyzed. Silicon intake of the subjects was estimated as 37.5 ± 22.2 mg/day. Major food sources of dietary silicon in the Korean male were cereal and cereal products (25.6 % of total silicon intake), vegetables (22.7 %), beverages and liquors (21.2 %), and milk and milk products (7.0 %). Silicon intake correlated positively with age, weight, energy intake, protein intake, calcium intake, and alcohol intake. After adjusted for age, weight, energy intake, protein intake, calcium intake, alcohol intake, smoking cigarettes, and regular exercise status, daily total silicon intake had no correlation with calcaneus bone density and the bone metabolism markers, but silicon intake from vegetables had a positive correlation with serum total alkaline phosphatase activity, a bone formation maker. These findings show the possible positive relationship between dietary silicon intake from vegetables and the bone formation of young adult males. Further

  7. Carbon dioxide disposal in solid form

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lackner, K.S.; Butt, D.P.; Sharp, D.H. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Wendt, C.H. [Auxon Corp., (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Coal reserves can provide for the world`s energy needs for centuries. However, coal`s long term use may be severely curtailed if the emission of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere is not eliminated. We present a safe and permanent method of carbon dioxide disposal that is based on combining carbon dioxide chemically with abundant raw materials to form stable carbonate minerals. We discuss the availability of raw materials and potential process designs. We consider our initial rough cost estimate of about 3{cents}/kWh encouraging. The availability of a carbon dioxide fixation technology would serve as insurance in case global warming, or the perception of global warming, causes severe restrictions on carbon dioxide emissions. If the increased energy demand of a growing world population is to be satisfied from coal, the implementation of such a technology would quite likely be unavoidable.

  8. Improved passivation effect in multicrystalline black silicon by chemical solution pre-treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ye; Shen, Honglie; Pu, Tian; Zheng, Chaofan

    2018-04-01

    Though black silicon has excellent anti-reflectance property, its passivation is one of the main technical bottlenecks due to its large specific surface area. In this paper, multicrystalline black silicon is fabricated by metal assisted chemical etching, and is rebuilt in low concentration alkali solution. Different solution pre-treatment is followed to make surface modification on black silicon before Al2O3 passivation by atomic layer deposition. HNO3 and H2SO4 + H2O2 solution pre-treatment makes the silicon surface become hydrophilic, with contact angle decrease from 117.28° to about 30°. It is demonstrated that when the pre-treatment solution is nitric acid, formed ultrathin SiO x layer between Al2O3 layer and black silicon is found to increase effective carrier lifetime to 72.64 µs, which is obviously higher than that of the unpassivated black silicon. The passivation stacks of SiO x /Al2O3 are proved to be effective double layers for nanoscaled multicrystalline silicon surface.

  9. Topological Order in Silicon Photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-07

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2017-0037 Topological orders in Silicon photonics Mohammad Hafezi MARYLAND UNIV COLLEGE PARK 3112 LEE BLDG COLLEGE PARK, MD 20742...15 SEP 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Topological Order in Silicon Photonics 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER FA-9550-14-1-0267 5c. PROGRAM...matter to ultra cold gases. Recently, photonic systems have been under investigation to explore various types of topological orders and to potentially

  10. Silicone nanocomposite coatings for fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberts, Kenneth (Inventor); Lee, Stein S. (Inventor); Singhal, Amit (Inventor); Ou, Runqing (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A silicone based coating for fabrics utilizing dual nanocomposite fillers providing enhanced mechanical and thermal properties to the silicone base. The first filler includes nanoclusters of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and a metal oxide and a second filler of exfoliated clay nanoparticles. The coating is particularly suitable for inflatable fabrics used in several space, military, and consumer applications, including airbags, parachutes, rafts, boat sails, and inflatable shelters.

  11. Silicon nanowires: structure and properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nezhdanov, A.V.; Mashin, A.I.; Razuvaev, A.G.; Ershov, A.V.; Ignatov, S.K.

    2006-01-01

    An attempt to grow silicon nanowires has been made by electron beam evaporation on highly oriented pyrolytic substrate. Needle-like objects are located along the normal to a substrate (density 2 x 10 11 cm -2 ). For modeling quasi-one-dimensional objects calculations of nuclear structure and energy spectra have been accomplished. A fullerene-like structure Si 24 is proposed as a basic atomic configuration of silicon nanowires [ru

  12. Laser tests of silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolezal, Zdenek; Escobar, Carlos; Gadomski, Szymon; Garcia, Carmen; Gonzalez, Sergio; Kodys, Peter; Kubik, Petr; Lacasta, Carlos; Marti, Salvador; Mitsou, Vasiliki A.; Moorhead, Gareth F.; Phillips, Peter W.; Reznicek, Pavel; Slavik, Radan

    2007-01-01

    This paper collects experiences from the development of a silicon sensor laser testing setup and from tests of silicon strip modules (ATLAS End-cap SCT), pixel modules (DEPFET) and large-area diodes using semiconductor lasers. Lasers of 1060 and 680 nm wavelengths were used. A sophisticated method of focusing the laser was developed. Timing and interstrip properties of modules were measured. Analysis of optical effects involved and detailed discussion about the usability of laser testing for particle detectors are presented

  13. Porous Silicon for Chemical Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsamis, C.; Nassiopoulou, A. G.

    In this work we highlight the advantages of using Porous Silicon (PS) as a material for chemical sensors. Two different applications of PS are investigated: (a) as a matrix for the inclusion of catalytic materials, such as Pd or Pt, and (b) as a material for the fabrication of suspended micro hotplates, for improved thermal isolation. For the first application, the catalytic behavior of Pd-doped PS samples is estimated and the parameters that influence the kinetics of the chemical reaction are evaluated. It is found that the catalytic activity of Pd-doped porous silicon is significantly higher than that of a planar surface covered with Pd. On the other hand, the effectiveness of PS for local thermal isolation on a silicon substrate is examined and the thermal properties of suspended porous silicon (PS) micro-hotplates are investigated. The micro-hotplates are fabricated by a novel technique, based on the isotropic etching of silicon under a PS layer, in a high density plasma reactor. Very high local temperatures on the micro-hotplates (higher than 600°C) with very low power consumption (only a few tens of mW) have been obtained, due to the very low thermal conductivity of PS, which is comparable to that of thermal oxide and it is much lower than that of silicon nitride, typically used for thermal sensor applications.

  14. A MEMS Infrared Thermopile Fabricated from Silicon-On-Insulator with Phononic Crystal Structures and Carbon Nanotube Absorption Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Kory Forrest

    The goal of this project was to examine the possibility of creating a novel thermal infrared detector based on silicon CMOS technology that has been enhanced by the latest nano-engineering discoveries. Silicon typically is not thought as an efficient thermoelectric material. However recent advancements in nanotechnology have improved the potential for a highly sensitive infrared detector based on nano-structured silicon. The thermal conductivity of silicon has been shown to be reduced from 150 W/mK down to 60 W/mK just by decreasing the scale of the silicon from bulk down to the sub-micron scale. Further reduction of the thermal conductivity has been shown by patterning silicon with a phonon crystal structure which has been reported to have thermal conductivities down to 10 W/mK. The phonon crystal structure consists of a 2D array of holes that are etched into the silicon. The size and pitch of the holes are on the order of the mean free path of the phonons in silicon which is approximately 200-500nm. This particular device had 200nm holes on a 400nm pitch. The Seebeck coefficient of silicon can also be enhanced by the reduction of the material from the bulk to sub-micron scale and with degenerate level doping. The combination of decreased thermal conductivity and increased Seebeck coefficient allow silicon to be a promising material for thermoelectric infrared detectors. The highly doped silicon is desired to reduce the electrical resistance of the device. The low electrical resistance is required to reduce the Johnson noise of the device which is the dominant noise source for most thermal detectors. This project designed a MEMS thermopile using a silicon-on-insulator substrate, and a CMOS compatible process. The basic thermopile consists of a silicon dioxide membrane with phononic crystal patterned silicon thermocouples around the edges of the membrane. Vertical aligned, multi-walled, carbon nanotubes were used as the infrared absorption layer. A MEMS

  15. Assisted Vaginal Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Assisted Vaginal Delivery Home For Patients Search FAQs Assisted Vaginal Delivery ... Delivery FAQ192, February 2016 PDF Format Assisted Vaginal Delivery Labor, Delivery, and Postpartum Care What is assisted ...

  16. Back-contacted back-junction silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangersnes, Krister

    2010-10-15

    have developed a two-dimensional BC-BJ silicon solar cell device model. The simulations, which are based on the finite element method, have been performed with the ATLAS device simulator within the Silvaco simulation framework from Silvaco Inc., USA. The device model has been used to optimize the design of a BC-BJ silicon solar cell based on experimental results obtained during the work with this thesis. The model is able to quantitatively predict the performance of cells with different designs, qualities, and dimensions through optical and electrical simulations, and thereby giving us a good indication of the efficiency potential of the cell structure. It has also given us valuable insight into the physics determining the performance of a BC-BJ silicon solar cell. From this insight, important conclusions regarding the design rules of this type of solar cell devices could be drawn. Finally, the device model was used to investigate quantum mechanical tunneling mechanisms in the junction between the adjacent, highly-doped regions of opposite polarity on the backside of the cell. Through the simulations we found some simple design rules that need to be followed in order to avoid shunting-like behavior due to unwanted trap-assisted tunneling in the lateral tunneling junction. At the same time, band-to-band tunneling entails potential current breakdowns at low to moderate reverse biases. This implies that local hot-spots can be avoided since the heat distribution under reverse bias will be distributed throughout the whole junction area. Thus, by careful optimization and tailoring of the doping profiles, the tunneling may enable the use of back-junction silicon solar cells in a solar module without the need for bypass diodes. (Author)

  17. Erbium diffusion in titanium dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Basse

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The diffusivity of erbium in the anatase phase of titanium dioxide (TiO2 has been studied for various temperatures ranging from 800 °C to 1, 000 °C. Samples of TiO2, with a 10 nm thick buried layer containing 0.5 at% erbium, were fabricated by radio-frequency magnetron sputtering and subsequently heat treated. The erbium concentration profiles were measured by secondary ion mass spectrometry, allowing for determination of the temperature-dependent diffusion coefficients. These were found to follow an Arrhenius law with an activation energy of ( 2.1 ± 0.2 eV. X-ray diffraction revealed that the TiO2 films consisted of polycrystalline grains of size ≈ 100 nm.

  18. Silicon oxide sacrificial layers deposited by pulsed-DC magnetron sputtering for MEMS applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Castilla, Sheila; Olivares, Jimena; Clement, Marta; Vergara, Lucía; Pulido, Laura; Iborra, Enrique; Sangrador, Jesús

    2009-05-01

    Surface micromachining requires the use of easily-removable sacrificial layers fully compatible with all the materials and technological processes involved. Silicon dioxide films, thermally grown on silicon substrates or deposited by CVD, are commonly used as sacrificial layers in surface micromachining technologies, despite their low lateral etch rate in conventional fluorinate solutions. The development of silicon oxide layers with high etch rates poses a great technological challenge. In this work we have investigated the possibility of obtaining easily removable silicon oxide layers by pulsed-DC magnetron reactive sputtering. We have carried out a comprehensive study of the influence of the deposition parameters (total pressure and gas composition) on the composition, residual stress and lateral etch rate in fluorine wet solutions of the films. This study has allowed to determine the sputtering conditions to deposit, at very high rates (up to 0.1 μm/min), silicon oxide films with excellent characteristics for their use as sacrificial layers. Films with roughness around 5 nm rms, residual stress below 100 MPa and very high etch rate (up to 5 μm/min in the lateral directions), around 70 times greater than for thermal silicon oxide, have been achieved. The structural characteristics of these easily removable silicon oxide layers have been assessed by infrared spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy, which have revealed that the films exhibit some kind of porous structure, related to very specific sputter conditions. Finally, the viability of these films has been demonstrated by using them as sacrificial layer in the fabrication process of AlN-based microresonators.

  19. A DLTS study of hydrogen doped czochralski-grown silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jelinek, M. [Infineon Technologies Austria AG, 9500 Villach (Austria); Laven, J.G. [Infineon Technologies AG, 81726 Munich (Germany); Kirnstoetter, S. [Institute of Solid State Physics, Graz University of Technology, 8010 Graz (Austria); Schustereder, W. [Infineon Technologies Austria AG, 9500 Villach (Austria); Schulze, H.-J. [Infineon Technologies AG, 81726 Munich (Germany); Rommel, M. [Fraunhofer Institute of Integrated Systems and Devices IISB, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Frey, L. [Fraunhofer Institute of Integrated Systems and Devices IISB, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Chair of Electron Devices, FAU Erlangen-Nuremberg, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    In this study we examine proton implanted and subsequently annealed commercially available CZ wafers with the DLTS method. Depth-resolved spreading resistance measurements are shown, indicating an additional peak in the induced doping profile, not seen in the impurity-lean FZ reference samples. The additional peak lies about 10–15 μm deeper than the main peak near the projected range of the protons. A DLTS characterization in the depth of the additional peak indicates that it is most likely not caused by classical hydrogen-related donors known also from FZ silicon but by an additional donor complex whose formation is assisted by the presence of silicon self-interstitials.

  20. Low temperature phonon boundary scattering in slightly rough Silicon nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghossoub, Marc; Valavala, Krishna; Seong, Myunghoon; Azeredo, Bruno; Sadhu, Jyothi S.; Sinha, Sanjiv

    2013-03-01

    Nanostructured materials have lower thermal conductivities than the bulk and are promising candidates for thermoelectric applications. In particular, measurements on single silicon nanowires show a reduction in thermal conductivity below the Casimir limit. This reduction increases with surface roughness but the trend and its connection to phonon boundary scattering are still elusive. Here, we measure the thermal conductivity of single silicon nanowires fabricated using metal-assisted chemical etching. High resolution TEM imaging shows crystalline wires with slightly rough surfaces. Their statistical correlation lengths (5-15 nm) and RMS heights (0.8-1.5 nm) are in a range where perturbation-based wave scattering theory is still applicable. We use the thermal conductivity data to extract the frequency dependence of phonon boundary scattering at low temperatures (10-40 K) and show agreement with multiple scattering theory. This work provides insight into enhancing the thermoelectric performance of nanostructures.

  1. Collimation: a silicon solution

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Silicon crystals could be used very efficiently to deflect high-energy beams. Testing at CERN has produced conclusive results, which could pave the way for a new generation of collimators. The set of five crystals used to test the reflection of the beams. The crystals are 0.75 mm wide and their alignment is adjusted with extreme precision. This figure shows the deflection of a beam by channelling and by reflection in the block of five crystals. Depending on the orientation of the crystals: 1) The beam passes without "seeing" the crystals and is not deflected 2) The beam is deflected by channelling (with an angle of around 100 μrad) 3) The beam is reflected (with an angle of around 50 μrad). The intensity of the deflected beam is illustrated by the intensity of the spot. The spot of the reflected beam is clearly more intense than that one of the channelled beam, demonstrating the efficiency of t...

  2. Fabrication of TiO2 nanostructures on porous silicon for thermoelectric application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahrizal, F. N.; Ahmad, M. K.; Ramli, N. M.; Ahmad, N.; Fakhriah, R.; Mohamad, F.; Nafarizal, N.; Soon, C. F.; Ameruddin, A. S.; Faridah, A. B.; Shimomura, M.; Murakami, K.

    2017-09-01

    Nowadays, technology is moving by leaps and bounds over the last several decades. This has created new opportunities and challenge in the research fields. In this study, the experiment is about to investigate the potential of Titanium Dioxide (TiO2) nanostructures that have been growth onto a layer of porous silicon (pSi) for their thermoelectric application. Basically, it is divided into two parts, which is the preparation of the porous silicon (pSi) substrate by electrochemical-etching process and the growth of the Titanium Dioxide (TiO2) nanostructures by hydrothermal method. This sample have been characterize by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) to visualize the morphology of the TiO2 nanostructures area that formed onto the porous silicon (pSi) substrate. Besides, the sample is also used to visualize their cross-section images under the FESEM microscopy. Next, the sample is characterized by the X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) machine. The XRD machine is used to get the information about the chemical composition, crystallographic structure and physical properties of materials.

  3. Next generation structural silicone glazing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles D. Clift

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an advanced engineering evaluation, using nonlinear analysis of hyper elastic material that provides significant improvement to structural silicone glazing (SSG design in high performance curtain wall systems. Very high cladding wind pressures required in hurricane zones often result in bulky SSG profile dimensions. Architectural desire for aesthetically slender curtain wall framing sight-lines in combination with a desire to reduce aluminium usage led to optimization of silicone material geometry for better stress distribution.To accomplish accurate simulation of predicted behaviour under structural load, robust stress-strain curves of the silicone material are essential. The silicone manufacturer provided physical property testing via a specialized laboratory protocol. A series of rigorous curve fit techniques were then made to closely model test data in the finite element computer analysis that accounts for nonlinear strain of hyper elastic silicone.Comparison of this advanced design technique to traditional SSG design highlights differences in stress distribution contours in the silicone material. Simplified structural engineering per the traditional SSG design method does not provide accurate forecasting of material and stress optimization as shown in the advanced design.Full-scale specimens subject to structural load testing were performed to verify the design capacity, not only for high wind pressure values, but also for debris impact per ASTM E1886 and ASTM E1996. Also, construction of the test specimens allowed development of SSG installation techniques necessitated by the unique geometry of the silicone profile. Finally, correlation of physical test results with theoretical simulations is made, so evaluation of design confidence is possible. This design technique will introduce significant engineering advancement to the curtain wall industry.

  4. Silicon-to-silicon wafer bonding using evaporated glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weichel, Steen; Reus, Roger De; Lindahl, M.

    1998-01-01

    of silicon/glass structures in air around 340 degrees C for 15 min leads to stress-free structures. Bonded wafer pairs, however, show no reduction in stress and always exhibit compressive stress. The bond yield is larger than 95% for bonding temperatures around 350 degrees C and is above 80% for bonding......Anodic bending of silicon to silicon 4-in. wafers using an electron-beam evaporated glass (Schott 8329) was performed successfully in air at temperatures ranging from 200 degrees C to 450 degrees C. The composition of the deposited glass is enriched in sodium as compared to the target material....... The roughness of the as-deposited films was below 5 nm and was found to be unchanged by annealing at 500 degrees C for 1 h in air. No change in the macroscopic edge profiles of the glass film was found as a function of annealing; however, small extrusions appear when annealing above 450 degrees C. Annealing...

  5. Colloidal characterization of silicon nitride and silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feke, Donald L.

    1986-01-01

    The colloidal behavior of aqueous ceramic slips strongly affects the forming and sintering behavior and the ultimate mechanical strength of the final ceramic product. The colloidal behavior of these materials, which is dominated by electrical interactions between the particles, is complex due to the strong interaction of the solids with the processing fluids. A surface titration methodology, modified to account for this interaction, was developed and used to provide fundamental insights into the interfacial chemistry of these systems. Various powder pretreatment strategies were explored to differentiate between true surface chemistry and artifacts due to exposure history. The colloidal behavior of both silicon nitride and carbide is dominated by silanol groups on the powder surfaces. However, the colloid chemistry of silicon nitride is apparently influenced by an additional amine group. With the proper powder treatments, silicon nitride and carbide powder can be made to appear colloidally equivalent. The impact of these results on processing control will be discussed.

  6. Electrohydraulic ventricular assist device development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diegel, P D; Mussivand, T; Holfert, J W; Nahon, D; Miller, J; Maclean, G K; Santerre, J P; Bearnson, G B; Juretich, J; Hansen, A C

    1991-01-01

    A 64 ml (effective stroke volume) in vitro electrohydraulic ventricular assist device (VAD) prototype has been built. The energy converter is an axial flow pump driven by a brushless direct current (DC) motor. Systole begins as silicone oil is pumped from the volume displacement chamber (VDC) into the ventricle, displacing the flexing diaphragm separating the oil and the blood. In diastole, the motor reverses, providing active filling by pumping oil from the ventricle into the VDC. The surface mount electronic internal controller provides motor commutator, energy management, telemetry, and physiologic control functions. Energy is supplied externally by either a 12 V DC power supply or a 12 V DC rechargeable battery and is transmitted through the skin by a transcutaneous energy transformer (TET). Energy can also be supplied by a 12 V DC rechargeable internal battery. Bidirectional infrared telemetry is used to transmit information between the internal and external controllers.

  7. Implantation damage in silicon devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicholas, K.H.

    1977-01-01

    Ion implantation, is an attractive technique for producing doped layers in silicon devices but the implantation process involves disruption of the lattice and defects are formed, which can degrade device properties. Methods of minimizing such damage are discussed and direct comparisons made between implantation and diffusion techniques in terms of defects in the final devices and the electrical performance of the devices. Defects are produced in the silicon lattice during implantation but they are annealed to form secondary defects even at room temperature. The annealing can be at a low temperature ( 0 C) when migration of defects in silicon in generally small, or at high temperature when they can grow well beyond the implanted region. The defect structures can be complicated by impurity atoms knocked into the silicon from surface layers by the implantation. Defects can also be produced within layers on top of the silicon and these can be very important in device fabrication. In addition to affecting the electrical properties of the final device, defects produced during fabrication may influence the chemical properties of the materials. The use of these properties to improve devices are discussed as well as the degradation they can cause. (author)

  8. Silicon-micromachined microchannel plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beetz, Charles P. E-mail: NanoSystem@aol.com; Boerstler, Robert; Steinbeck, John; Lemieux, Bryan; Winn, David R. E-mail: winn@fair1.fairfield.edu

    2000-03-11

    Microchannel plates (MCP) fabricated from standard silicon wafer substrates using a novel silicon micromachining process, together with standard silicon photolithographic process steps, are described. The resulting SiMCP microchannels have dimensions of {approx}0.5 to {approx}25 {mu}m, with aspect ratios up to 300, and have the dimensional precision and absence of interstitial defects characteristic of photolithographic processing, compatible with positional matching to silicon electronics readouts. The open channel areal fraction and detection efficiency may exceed 90% on plates up to 300 mm in diameter. The resulting silicon substrates can be converted entirely to amorphous quartz (qMCP). The strip resistance and secondary emission are developed by controlled depositions of thin films, at temperatures up to 1200 deg. C, also compatible with high-temperature brazing, and can be essentially hydrogen, water and radionuclide-free. Novel secondary emitters and cesiated photocathodes can be high-temperature deposited or nucleated in the channels or the first strike surface. Results on resistivity, secondary emission and gain are presented.

  9. Silicon-micromachined microchannel plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beetz, Charles P.; Boerstler, Robert; Steinbeck, John; Lemieux, Bryan; Winn, David R.

    2000-03-01

    Microchannel plates (MCP) fabricated from standard silicon wafer substrates using a novel silicon micromachining process, together with standard silicon photolithographic process steps, are described. The resulting SiMCP microchannels have dimensions of ˜0.5 to ˜25 μm, with aspect ratios up to 300, and have the dimensional precision and absence of interstitial defects characteristic of photolithographic processing, compatible with positional matching to silicon electronics readouts. The open channel areal fraction and detection efficiency may exceed 90% on plates up to 300 mm in diameter. The resulting silicon substrates can be converted entirely to amorphous quartz (qMCP). The strip resistance and secondary emission are developed by controlled depositions of thin films, at temperatures up to 1200°C, also compatible with high-temperture brazing, and can be essentially hydrogen, water and radionuclide-free. Novel secondary emitters and cesiated photocathodes can be high-temperature deposited or nucleated in the channels or the first strike surface. Results on resistivity, secondary emission and gain are presented.

  10. Silicon-micromachined microchannel plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beetz, Charles P.; Boerstler, Robert; Steinbeck, John; Lemieux, Bryan; Winn, David R.

    2000-01-01

    Microchannel plates (MCP) fabricated from standard silicon wafer substrates using a novel silicon micromachining process, together with standard silicon photolithographic process steps, are described. The resulting SiMCP microchannels have dimensions of ∼0.5 to ∼25 μm, with aspect ratios up to 300, and have the dimensional precision and absence of interstitial defects characteristic of photolithographic processing, compatible with positional matching to silicon electronics readouts. The open channel areal fraction and detection efficiency may exceed 90% on plates up to 300 mm in diameter. The resulting silicon substrates can be converted entirely to amorphous quartz (qMCP). The strip resistance and secondary emission are developed by controlled depositions of thin films, at temperatures up to 1200 deg. C, also compatible with high-temperature brazing, and can be essentially hydrogen, water and radionuclide-free. Novel secondary emitters and cesiated photocathodes can be high-temperature deposited or nucleated in the channels or the first strike surface. Results on resistivity, secondary emission and gain are presented

  11. 49 CFR 173.217 - Carbon dioxide, solid (dry ice).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Carbon dioxide, solid (dry ice). 173.217 Section... Class 7 § 173.217 Carbon dioxide, solid (dry ice). (a) Carbon dioxide, solid (dry ice), when offered for... marked on two sides “WARNING CO2 SOLID (DRY ICE).” (2) Other packagings containing solid carbon dioxide...

  12. Multifractal characterization of epitaxial silicon carbide on silicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ţălu Ştefan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the topography of silicon carbide films at two steps of growth. The topography was measured by atomic force microscopy. The data were processed for extraction of information about surface condition and changes in topography during the films growth. Multifractal geometry was used to characterize three-dimensional micro- and nano-size features of the surface. X-ray measurements and Raman spectroscopy were performed for analysis of the films composition. Two steps of morphology evolution during the growth were analyzed by multifractal analysis. The results contribute to the fabrication of silicon carbide large area substrates for micro- and nanoelectronic applications.

  13. Characterization of silicon-oxide interfaces and organic monolayers by IR-UV ellipsometry and FTIR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, P.; Patzner, P.; Osipov, A. V.; Hu, Z. G.; Lingenfelser, D.; Prunici, P.; Schmohl, A.

    2006-08-01

    VUV-laser-induced oxidation of Si(111)-(1×1):H, Si(100):H, and a-Si:H at 157 nm (F II laser) in pure O II and pure H IIO atmospheres was studied between 30°C and 250°C. The oxidation process was monitored in real time by spectroscopic ellipsometry (NIR-UV) and FTIR spectroscopy. The ellipsometric measurements could be simulated with a three-layer model, providing detailed information on the variation of the suboxide interface with the nature of the silicon substrate surface. Besides the silicon-dioxide and suboxide layer, a dense, disordered, roughly monolayer thick silicon layer was included, as found previously by molecular dynamics calculations. The deviations from the classical Deal-Grove mechanism and the self-limited growth of the ultrathin dioxide layers (TMS) groups and n-alkylthiol monolayers on gold-coated silicon. The C-H stretching vibrations of the methylene and methyl groups could be identified by FTIR spectroscopy and IR ellipsometry.

  14. The effect of silicon powder characteristics on the combustion of silicon/Teflon/Viton nanoenergetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Brandon C.

    Due to its thin passivation layer, potentially good aging characteristics, and ease of surface functionalization nanoscale silicon (nSi) may offer some advantages over nanoaluminum as a reactive fuel in nanoenergetic compositions, particularly with fluorine-based oxidizers. Currently, Si nanopowder can be quite expensive and the quality of commercial powders has been found to vary drastically. As a result limited efforts have focused on the role specific surface area, active content, morphology, and dominant particle size of the powder have on the combustion performance. This work investigates the effect of such characteristics on the combustion of silicon (Si)/polytetrafluoroethylene (Teflon)/FC-2175 (Viton) (SiTV) nanoenergetics. A cost effective combustion synthesis route, salt assisted combustion synthesis, was used to produce several Si powders and these were directly compared to commercial nanoscale Si powders. Reactive mixtures of SiTV were burned at atmospheric conditions and burning rates, combustion temperatures, spectral intensities, and effective plume emissivities were measured. Measured combustion temperatures ranged from 1664 to 2380 K and were limited by Si powder active content. This was found to drive plume emissivity and maximum spectral intensity, which had values ranging from 0.10 to 0.55 for effective plume emissivity and 17.6 to 48.1 kW m -2-sr-1-mum-1 for maximum spectral intensity. Burning rates ranged from 0.7 to 3.4 mm s-1 and were found to be dependent on the dominant particle size of the powder. Powders synthesized with salt assisted combustion resulted in comparable burning rate, plume emissivity and maximum spectral intensity to commercial porous Si powder (Vesta Ceramics).

  15. Effects of phosphorus doping on structural and optical properties of silicon nanocrystals in a SiO2 matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao, X.J.; Cho, E.-C.; Scardera, G.; Bellet-Amalric, E.; Bellet, D.; Shen, Y.S.; Huang, S.; Huang, Y.D.; Conibeer, G.; Green, M.A.

    2009-01-01

    Promise of Si nanocrystals highly depends on tailoring their behaviour through doping. Phosphorus-doped silicon nanocrystals embedded in a silicon dioxide matrix have been realized by a co-sputtering process. The effects of phosphorus-doping on the properties of Si nanocrystals are investigated. Phosphorus diffuses from P-P and/or P-Si to P-O upon high temperature annealing. The dominant X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy P 2p signal attributable to Si-P and/or P-P (130 eV) at 1100 o C indicates that the phosphorus may exist inside Si nanocrystals. It is found that existence of phosphorus enhances phase separation of silicon rich oxide and thereby Si crystallization. In addition, phosphorus has a considerable effect on the optical absorption and photoluminescence properties as a function of annealing temperature.

  16. Determinations of silicon and phosphorus in Pepperbush standard reference material by neutron activation and x-ray fluorescence methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizumoto, Yoshihiko; Nishio, Hirofumi; Hayashi, Takeshi; Kusakabe, Toshio; Iwata, Shiro.

    1987-01-01

    Silicon and phosphorus contents in Pepperbush standard reference material were determined by neutron activation and X-ray fluorescence methods. In neutron activation analysis, β-ray spectra of 32 P produced by 31 P(n,γ) 32 P reaction on Pepperbush and standard samples were measured by a low background β-ray spectrometer. In X-ray fluorescence analysis, the standard samples were prepared by mixing the Pepperbush powder with silicon dioxide and diammonium hydrogenphosphate. Characteristic X-rays from the samples were analyzed by a wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer. From the β and X-ray intensities, silicon and phosphorus contents in Pepperbush were determined to be 1840 ± 80 and 1200 ± 50 μg g -1 , respectively. (author)

  17. Computer simulation for the formation of the insulator layer of silicon-on-insulator devices by N sup + and O sup + Co-implantation

    CERN Document Server

    Lin Qing; Xie Xin Yun; Lin Chenglu; Liu Xiang Hua

    2002-01-01

    A buried sandwiched layer consisting of silicon dioxide (upper part), silicon oxynitride (medium part) and silicon nitride (lower part) is formed by N sup + and O sup + co-implantation in silicon wafers at a constant temperature of 550 degree C. The microstructure is performed by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy. To predict the quality of the buried sandwiched layer, the authors study the computer simulation for the formation of the SIMON (separated by implantation of oxygen and nitrogen) structure. The simulation program for SIMOX (separated by implantation of oxygen) is improved in order to be applied in O sup + and N sup + co-implantation on the basis of different formation mechanism between SIMOX and SIMNI (separated by implantation of nitrogen) structures. There is a good agreement between experiment and simulation results verifying the theoretical model and presumption in the program

  18. Reactive Capture of Carbon Dioxide Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this Phase I SBIR, Reactive Innovations, LLC (RIL) proposes to develop a compact and lightweight electrochemical to capture carbon dioxide in the martian...

  19. Carbon Dioxide Collection and Pressurization Technology Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Reactive Innovations, LLC, proposes a Phase I SBIR program to develop a compact and lightweight electrochemical reactor to separate and pressurize carbon dioxide...

  20. Life Support Systems: Carbon Dioxide Removal

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Life Support Systems project Carbon Dioxide Removal and Management task includes development of systems that remove CO2 from a...