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Sample records for assisted molecular beam

  1. Tin-Assisted Synthesis of ɛ -Ga2O3 by Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kracht, M.; Karg, A.; Schörmann, J.; Weinhold, M.; Zink, D.; Michel, F.; Rohnke, M.; Schowalter, M.; Gerken, B.; Rosenauer, A.; Klar, P. J.; Janek, J.; Eickhoff, M.

    2017-11-01

    The synthesis of ɛ -Ga2O3 and β -Ga2O3 by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy on (001 )Al2O3 substrates is studied. The growth window of β -Ga2O3 in the Ga-rich regime, usually limited by the formation of volatile gallium suboxide, is expanded due to the presence of tin during the growth process, which stabilizes the formation of gallium oxides. X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, time-of-flight secondary-ion mass spectrometry, Raman spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy are used to analyze the influence of tin on the layer formation. We demonstrate that it allows the synthesis of phase-pure ɛ -Ga2O3 . A growth model based on the oxidation of gallium suboxide by reduction of an intermediate sacrificial tin oxide is suggested.

  2. Si Incorporation in InP Nanowires Grown by Au-Assisted Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Rigutti

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on the growth, structural characterization, and conductivity studies of Si-doped InP nanowires grown by Au-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. It is shown that Si doping reduces the mean diffusion length of adatoms on the lateral nanowire surface and consequently reduces the nanowire growth rate and promotes lateral growth. A resistivity as low as 5.1±0.3×10−5 Ω⋅cm is measured for highly doped nanowires. Two dopant incorporation mechanisms are discussed: incorporation via catalyst particle and direct incorporation on the nanowire sidewalls. The first mechanism is shown to be less efficient than the second one, resulting in inhomogeneous radial dopant distribution.

  3. In situ XPS analysis of various iron oxide films grown by NO2-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fujii, T.; Groot, F.M.F. de; Sawatzky, G.A.; Voogt, F.C.; Hibma, T.; Okada, K.

    1999-01-01

    We report on a systematic analysis of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) core- and valence-level spectra of clean and well-characterized iron oxide films, i.e., a-Fe2O3, y-Fe2O3, Fe3- dO4, and Fe3O4. All iron oxide films were prepared epitaxially by NO2-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy on

  4. Growth of cubic InN on InAs(0 0 1) by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, A. P.; Tabata, A.; Leite, J. R.; Kaiser, S.; Schikora, D.; Schöttker, B.; Frey, T.; As, D. J.; Lischka, K.

    1999-05-01

    Cubic InN layers were grown on the top of InAs buffer films on GaAs(0 0 1) substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The growth of the c-InN films was initiated by a nitridation of the InAs overlayers at 450°C. The lattice constant of c-InN, measured by X-ray, is equal to (4.98±0.01) Å, in agreement to RHEED measurements made during the growth. Transmission electron microscopy measurements detected stacking faults in the InN layers parallel to the {1 1 1} InN planes.

  5. Single-Crystal N-polar GaN p-n Diodes by Plasma-Assisted Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Yongjin; Hu, Zongyang; Nomoto, Kazuki; Xing, Huili Grace; Jena, Debdeep

    2017-01-01

    N-polar GaN p-n diodes are realized on single-crystal N-polar GaN bulk wafers by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy growth. The current-voltage characteristics show high-quality rectification and electroluminescence characteristics with a high on/off current ratio and interband photon emission. The measured electroluminescence spectrum is dominated by strong near-band edge emission, while deep level luminescence is greatly suppressed. A very low dislocation density leads to a high reverse...

  6. Growth study of self-assembled GaN nanocolumns on silica glass by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liudi Mulyo, Andreas; Konno, Yuta; Nilsen, Julie S.; van Helvoort, Antonius T. J.; Fimland, Bjørn-Ove; Weman, Helge; Kishino, Katsumi

    2017-12-01

    We demonstrate GaN nanocolumn growth on fused silica glass by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The effect of the substrate temperature, Ga flux and N2 flow rate on the structural and optical properties are studied. At optimum growth conditions, GaN nanocolumns are vertically aligned and well separated with an average diameter, height and density of 72 nm, 1.2 μm and 1.6 × 109 cm-2, respectively. The nanocolumns exhibit wurtzite crystal structure with no threading dislocations, stacking faults or twinning and grow in the [0 0 0 1] direction. At the interface adjacent to the glass, there is a few atom layers thick intermediate phase with ABC stacking order (zinc blende). Photoluminescence measurements evidence intense and narrow excitonic emissions, along with the absence of any defect-related zinc blende and yellow luminescence emission.

  7. Single-crystal N-polar GaN p-n diodes by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, YongJin; Hu, Zongyang; Nomoto, Kazuki; Xing, Huili Grace; Jena, Debdeep

    2017-06-01

    N-polar GaN p-n diodes are realized on single-crystal N-polar GaN bulk wafers by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy growth. The current-voltage characteristics show high-quality rectification and electroluminescence characteristics with a high on currents ˜10 kA/cm2, low off currents 109, and interband photon emission. The measured electroluminescence spectrum is dominated by a strong near-band edge emission, while deep level luminescence is greatly suppressed. A very low dislocation density leads to a high reverse breakdown electric field of ˜2.2 MV/cm without fields plates—the highest reported for N-polar epitaxial structures. The low leakage current N-polar diodes open up several potential applications in polarization-engineered photonic and electronic devices.

  8. VO2 Thermochromic Films on Quartz Glass Substrate Grown by RF-Plasma-Assisted Oxide Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Zhang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Vanadium dioxide (VO2 thermochromic thin films with various thicknesses were grown on quartz glass substrates by radio frequency (RF-plasma assisted oxide molecular beam epitaxy (O-MBE. The crystal structure, morphology and chemical stoichiometry were investigated systemically by X-ray diffraction (XRD, atomic force microscopy (AFM, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS analyses. An excellent reversible metal-to-insulator transition (MIT characteristics accompanied by an abrupt change in both electrical resistivity and optical infrared (IR transmittance was observed from the optimized sample. Remarkably, the transition temperature (TMIT deduced from the resistivity-temperature curve was reasonably consistent with that obtained from the temperature-dependent IR transmittance. Based on Raman measurement and XPS analyses, the observations were interpreted in terms of residual stresses and chemical stoichiometry. This achievement will be of great benefit for practical application of VO2-based smart windows.

  9. GaN Schottky diodes with single-crystal aluminum barriers grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, H. Y.; Yang, W. C.; Lee, P. Y.; Lin, C. W.; Cheng, Kai-Yuan; Hsieh, K. C.; Cheng, K. Y.; Hsu, C.-H.

    2016-08-01

    GaN-based Schottky barrier diodes (SBDs) with single-crystal Al barriers grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy are fabricated. Examined using in-situ reflection high-energy electron diffractions, ex-situ high-resolution x-ray diffractions, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, it is determined that epitaxial Al grows with its [111] axis coincident with the [0001] axis of the GaN substrate without rotation. In fabricated SBDs, a 0.2 V barrier height enhancement and 2 orders of magnitude reduction in leakage current are observed in single crystal Al/GaN SBDs compared to conventional thermal deposited Al/GaN SBDs. The strain induced piezoelectric field is determined to be the major source of the observed device performance enhancements.

  10. Room temperature Ultraviolet B emission from InAlGaN films synthesized by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, W., E-mail: wei.kong@duke.edu; Jiao, W. Y.; Kim, T. H.; Brown, A. S. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Roberts, A. T. [Charles Bowden Laboratory, Army Aviation and Missile RD& E Center, Redstone Arsenal, Alabama 35898 (United States); Fournelle, J. [Department of Geoscience, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Losurdo, M. [CNR-NANOTEC, Istituto di Nanotecnologia, via Orabona, 4-70126 Bari (Italy); Everitt, H. O. [Charles Bowden Laboratory, Army Aviation and Missile RD& E Center, Redstone Arsenal, Alabama 35898 (United States); Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States)

    2015-09-28

    Thin films of the wide bandgap quaternary semiconductor In{sub x}Al{sub y}Ga{sub (1−x−y)}N with low In (x = 0.01–0.05) and high Al composition (y = 0.40–0.49) were synthesized on GaN templates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. High-resolution X-ray diffraction was used to correlate the strain accommodation of the films to composition. Room temperature ultraviolet B (280 nm–320 nm) photoluminescence intensity increased with increasing In composition, while the Stokes shift remained relatively constant. The data suggest a competition between radiative and non-radiative recombination occurs for carriers, respectively, localized at centers produced by In incorporation and at dislocations produced by strain relaxation.

  11. UVB-emitting InAlGaN multiple quantum well synthesized using plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Kong

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A high Al-content (y > 0.4 multi-quantum-well (MQW structure with a quaternary InxAlyGa(1-x-yN active layer was synthesized using plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The MQW structure exhibits strong carrier confinement and room temperature ultraviolet-B (UVB photoluminescence an order of magnitude stronger than that of a reference InxAlyGa(1-x-yN thin film with comparable composition and thickness. The samples were characterized using spectroscopic ellipsometry, atomic force microscopy, and high-resolution X-ray diffraction. Numerical simulations suggest that the UVB emission efficiency is limited by dislocation-related non-radiative recombination centers in the MQW and at the MQW - buffer interface. Emission efficiency can be significantly improved by reducing the dislocation density from 109cm−2 to 107cm−2 and by optimizing the width and depth of the quantum wells.

  12. Direct growth of graphene on in situ epitaxial hexagonal boron nitride flakes by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Zhongguang; Zheng, Renjing; Khanaki, Alireza; Zuo, Zheng; Liu, Jianlin, E-mail: jianlin@ece.ucr.edu [Quantum Structures Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Riverside, California 92521 (United States)

    2015-11-23

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) single-crystal domains were grown on cobalt (Co) substrates at a substrate temperature of 850–900 °C using plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Three-point star shape h-BN domains were observed by scanning electron microscopy, and confirmed by Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The h-BN on Co template was used for in situ growth of multilayer graphene, leading to an h-BN/graphene heterostructure. Carbon atoms preferentially nucleate on Co substrate and edges of h-BN and then grow laterally to form continuous graphene. Further introduction of carbon atoms results in layer-by-layer growth of graphene on graphene and lateral growth of graphene on h-BN until it may cover entire h-BN flakes.

  13. Ion beam assisted film growth

    CERN Document Server

    Itoh, T

    2012-01-01

    This volume provides up to date information on the experimental, theoretical and technological aspects of film growth assisted by ion beams.Ion beam assisted film growth is one of the most effective techniques in aiding the growth of high-quality thin solid films in a controlled way. Moreover, ion beams play a dominant role in the reduction of the growth temperature of thin films of high melting point materials. In this way, ion beams make a considerable and complex contribution to film growth. The volume will be essential reading for scientists, engineers and students working in thi

  14. Catalyst-free III-nitride Nanowires by Plasma-assisted Molecular Beam Epitaxy: Growth, Characterization, and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnevale, Santino D.

    In the past twenty years, III-nitride devices have had an enormous impact on semiconductor-based technologies. This impact is seen in both optoelectronic and electronic devices. The aim of this dissertation is to take advantage of III-nitride nanowires grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy to form heterostructures that are difficult or impossible to achieve in traditional, thin films. To do this, it is first necessary to establish the growth phase diagrams that correlate the characteristics of GaN nanowires to MBE growth conditions. By using the information in these growth maps we can control growth kinetics and the resulting nanowire structures by making strategic, timely changes to growth conditions. Using this control electronic and optoelectronic III-nitride nanowire devices are created. First, coaxially-oriented AlN/GaN nanowire resonant tunneling diodes are formed on Si substrates. Second, polarization-induced nanowire light emitting diodes (PINLEDs) are fabricated that exhibit electroluminescence at wavelengths from the deep UV into the visible. Because these PINLEDs utilize polarization doping, they can be formed with and without the use of dopants. Device and structural characterization are provided, including a detailed investigation of the mixed material polarity in these nanowires. Finally, the dissertation closes with a discussion of recent work and future ideas for optimizing the PINLED design.

  15. Photoluminescence properties of p-type InGaAsN grown by RF plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, S.Y. [Nanyang Technological University, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Singapore (Singapore); Yoon, S.F.; Wang, S.Z. [Nanyang Technological University, Singapore-MIT Alliance (SMA), Singapore (Singapore)

    2005-10-01

    We have investigated the photoluminescence (PL) properties of p-type InGaAsN epilayers grown by a radio frequency (RF) plasma-assisted nitrogen source in a molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) system. The low temperature PL spectra exhibited both a LE emission peak at around 1000 nm and a broad deep band at 1200-1700 nm. As temperature increases, the LE peak position redshifts and its intensity becomes weaker and disappears at 100 K. The deep PL band may originate from recombinations associated with N-related traps. The hole concentration dependence of the integrated intensity ratio of the LE emission peak to the deep PL band at 5 K can be separated into two doping regimes. At light doping regime (1.0 x 10{sup 16} cm{sup -3}

  16. Integration of GaN Crystals on Micropatterned Si(001) Substrates by Plasma-Assisted Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isa, Fabio; Cheze, Caroline; Siekacz, Marcin; Hauswald, Christian; Lähnemann, Jonas; Fernandez-Garrido, Sergio; Kreiliger, Thomas; Ramsteiner, Manfred; Dasilva, Yadira Arroyo Rojas; Brandt, Oliver; Isella, Giovanni; Erni, Rolf; Calarco, Raffaella; Riechert, Henning; Miglio, Leo

    2015-10-01

    We present an innovative approach to integrate arrays of isolated, strain-free GaN crystals on patterned Si substrates. First, micrometer-sized pillars are patterned onto Si(0 0 1) substrates. Subsequently, 2.5 mu m Si substrates are deposited by low-energy plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition, forming crystals mostly bounded by {1 1 1}, {1 1 3}, and {15 3 23} facets. Plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy is then used for GaN deposition. GaN crystals with slanted {0 0 0 1} facets having a root-mean-square surface roughness of 0.7 nm are obtained for a deposited material thickness of >3 mu m. Microphotoluminescence measurements performed at room and cryogenic temperature show no yellow luminescence and a neutral donor-bound A exciton transition at 3.471 eV (10 K) with a full width at half-maximum of 10 meV. Microphotoluminescence and micro-Raman spectra reveal that GaN grown on Si pillars is strain-free. Our results indicate that the shape of GaN crystals can be tuned by the pattern periodicity and that a reduction of threading dislocations is achieved in their top part.

  17. InN nanorods prepared with CrN nanoislands by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Sheng-Joue

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The authors report the influence of CrN nanoisland inserted on growth of baseball-bat InN nanorods by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy under In-rich conditions. By inserting CrN nanoislands between AlN nucleation layer and the Si (111 substrate, it was found that we could reduce strain form Si by inserting CrN nanoisland, FWHM of the x-ray rocking curve measured from InN nanorods from 3,299 reduced to 2,115 arcsec. It is due to the larger strain from lattice miss-match of the film-like InN structure; however, the strain from lattice miss-match was obvious reduced owing to CrN nanoisland inserted. The TEM images confirmed the CrN structures and In droplets dissociation from InN, by these results, we can speculate the growth mechanism of baseball-bat-like InN nanorods.

  18. Direct growth of hexagonal boron nitride/graphene heterostructures on cobalt foil substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Zhongguang; Khanaki, Alireza; Tian, Hao; Zheng, Renjing; Suja, Mohammad; Liu, Jianlin, E-mail: jianlin@ece.ucr.edu [Quantum Structures Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Riverside, California 92521 (United States); Zheng, Jian-Guo [Irvine Materials Research Institute, University of California, Irvine, California 92697-2800 (United States)

    2016-07-25

    Graphene/hexagonal boron nitride (G/h-BN) heterostructures have attracted a great deal of attention because of their exceptional properties and wide variety of potential applications in nanoelectronics. However, direct growth of large-area, high-quality, and stacked structures in a controllable and scalable way remains challenging. In this work, we demonstrate the synthesis of h-BN/graphene (h-BN/G) heterostructures on cobalt (Co) foil by sequential deposition of graphene and h-BN layers using plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. It is found that the coverage of h-BN layers can be readily controlled on the epitaxial graphene by growth time. Large-area, uniform-quality, and multi-layer h-BN films on thin graphite layers were achieved. Based on an h-BN (5–6 nm)/G (26–27 nm) heterostructure, capacitor devices with Co(foil)/G/h-BN/Co(contact) configuration were fabricated to evaluate the dielectric properties of h-BN. The measured breakdown electric field showed a high value of ∼2.5–3.2 MV/cm. Both I-V and C-V characteristics indicate that the epitaxial h-BN film has good insulating characteristics.

  19. Microstructure of GaN layers grown on (001) GaAs by plasma assisted molecular-beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruvimov, Sergei; Liliental-Weber, Zuzanna; Washburn, Jack; Drummond, Timothy J.; Hafich, Michael; Lee, Stephen R.

    1997-11-01

    High resolution electron microscopy has been applied to characterize the structure of β-GaN epilayers grown on (001) GaAs substrates by plasma-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy. An rf plasma source was used to promote chemically active nitrogen. An exposure of the layer surface to the As flux during the growth of the first few monolayers was shown to result in remarkably flat GaN-GaAs interface. The best quality GaN layers were achieved by near-stoichiometric nucleation with optimal Ga-to-N ratio. Deviation from these nucleation conditions leads to interface roughening and formation of the wurtzite phase within the GaN layer. All the layers contained a high density of stacking faults near the interface which sharply decreases toward the surface. Stacking faults were anisotropically distributed within the GaN layer probably due to different properties of α compared to β dislocations in cubic GaN. The majority of stacking faults intersect the interface along lines parallel to the major flat of the GaAs wafer. The stacking faults are often associated with atomic steps at the GaN-GaAs interface.

  20. Effect of growth temperature on defects in epitaxial GaN film grown by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Kushvaha

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We report the effect of growth temperature on defect states of GaN epitaxial layers grown on 3.5 μm thick GaN epi-layer on sapphire (0001 substrates using plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The GaN samples grown at three different substrate temperatures at 730, 740 and 750 °C were characterized using atomic force microscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The atomic force microscopy images of these samples show the presence of small surface and large hexagonal pits on the GaN film surfaces. The surface defect density of high temperature grown sample is smaller (4.0 × 108 cm−2 at 750 °C than that of the low temperature grown sample (1.1 × 109 cm−2 at 730 °C. A correlation between growth temperature and concentration of deep centre defect states from photoluminescence spectra is also presented. The GaN film grown at 750 °C exhibits the lowest defect concentration which confirms that the growth temperature strongly influences the surface morphology and affects the optical properties of the GaN epitaxial films.

  1. Effect of growth temperature on defects in epitaxial GaN film grown by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kushvaha, S. S., E-mail: kushvahas@nplindia.org; Pal, P.; Shukla, A. K.; Joshi, Amish G.; Gupta, Govind; Kumar, M.; Singh, S.; Gupta, Bipin K.; Haranath, D. [CSIR- National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K. S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi, India 110012 (India)

    2014-02-15

    We report the effect of growth temperature on defect states of GaN epitaxial layers grown on 3.5 μm thick GaN epi-layer on sapphire (0001) substrates using plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The GaN samples grown at three different substrate temperatures at 730, 740 and 750 °C were characterized using atomic force microscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The atomic force microscopy images of these samples show the presence of small surface and large hexagonal pits on the GaN film surfaces. The surface defect density of high temperature grown sample is smaller (4.0 × 10{sup 8} cm{sup −2} at 750 °C) than that of the low temperature grown sample (1.1 × 10{sup 9} cm{sup −2} at 730 °C). A correlation between growth temperature and concentration of deep centre defect states from photoluminescence spectra is also presented. The GaN film grown at 750 °C exhibits the lowest defect concentration which confirms that the growth temperature strongly influences the surface morphology and affects the optical properties of the GaN epitaxial films.

  2. Molecular beam epitaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Pamplin, Brian R

    1980-01-01

    Molecular Beam Epitaxy introduces the reader to the use of molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) in the generation of III-V and IV-VI compounds and alloys and describes the semiconductor and integrated optics reasons for using the technique. Topics covered include semiconductor superlattices by MBE; design considerations for MBE systems; periodic doping structure in gallium arsenide (GaAs); nonstoichiometry and carrier concentration control in MBE of compound semiconductors; and MBE techniques for IV-VI optoelectronic devices. The use of MBE to fabricate integrated optical devices and to study semicond

  3. Steady-State and Transient Photoconductivity in c-Axis GaN Nanowires Grown by Nitrogen-Plasma-Assisted Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    Wide-bandgap III- nitride nanowires NWs are gaining increased attention for applications involving nanophotonics and nanoelectronics.1–3 GaN NW...results in a greater barrier to thermionic emission. This approximate model neglects other possible trap states, tunneling of carri- ers through the...Steady-state and transient photoconductivity in c-axis GaN nanowires grown by nitrogen-plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy N. A. Sanford,1,a P. T

  4. Electrically conductive ZnO/GaN distributed Bragg reflectors grown by hybrid plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjort, Filip; Hashemi, Ehsan; Adolph, David; Ive, Tommy; Haglund, Àsa

    2017-02-01

    III-nitride-based vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers have so far used intracavity contacting schemes since electrically conductive distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) have been difficult to achieve. A promising material combination for conductive DBRs is ZnO/GaN due to the small conduction band offset and ease of n-type doping. In addition, this combination offers a small lattice mismatch and high refractive index contrast, which could yield a mirror with a broad stopband and a high peak reflectivity using less than 20 DBR-pairs. A crack-free ZnO/GaN DBR was grown by hybrid plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The ZnO layers were approximately 20 nm thick and had an electron concentration of 1×1019 cm-3, while the GaN layers were 80-110 nm thick with an electron concentration of 1.8×1018 cm-3. In order to measure the resistance, mesa structures were formed by dry etching through the top 3 DBR-pairs and depositing non-annealed Al contacts on the GaN-layers at the top and next to the mesas. The measured specific series resistance was dominated by the lateral and contact contributions and gave an upper limit of 10-3Ωcm2 for the vertical resistance. Simulations show that the ZnO electron concentration and the cancellation of piezoelectric and spontaneous polarization in strained ZnO have a large impact on the vertical resistance and that it could be orders of magnitudes lower than what was measured. This is the first report on electrically conductive ZnO/GaN DBRs and the upper limit of the resistance reported here is close to the lowest values reported for III-nitride-based DBRs.

  5. A compact molecular beam machine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, P.; Chandler, D.W.; Strecker, K.E.

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a compact, low cost, modular, crossed molecular beam machine. The new apparatus utilizes several technological advancements in molecular beams valves, ion detection, and vacuum pumping to reduce the size, cost, and complexity of a molecular beam apparatus. We apply these

  6. A compact molecular beam machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Paul; Chandler, David W; Strecker, Kevin E

    2009-08-01

    We have developed a compact, low cost, modular, crossed molecular beam machine. The new apparatus utilizes several technological advancements in molecular beams valves, ion detection, and vacuum pumping to reduce the size, cost, and complexity of a molecular beam apparatus. We apply these simplifications to construct a linear molecular beam machine as well as a crossed-atomic and molecular beam machine. The new apparatus measures almost 50 cm in length, with a total laboratory footprint less than 0.25 m(2) for the crossed-atomic and molecular beam machine. We demonstrate the performance of the apparatus by measuring the rotational temperature of nitric oxide from three common molecular beam valves and by observing collisional energy transfer in nitric oxide from a collision with argon.

  7. Molecular-beam scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vernon, M.F.

    1983-07-01

    The molecular-beam technique has been used in three different experimental arrangements to study a wide range of inter-atomic and molecular forces. Chapter 1 reports results of a low-energy (0.2 kcal/mole) elastic-scattering study of the He-Ar pair potential. The purpose of the study was to accurately characterize the shape of the potential in the well region, by scattering slow He atoms produced by expanding a mixture of He in N/sub 2/ from a cooled nozzle. Chapter 2 contains measurements of the vibrational predissociation spectra and product translational energy for clusters of water, benzene, and ammonia. The experiments show that most of the product energy remains in the internal molecular motions. Chapter 3 presents measurements of the reaction Na + HCl ..-->.. NaCl + H at collision energies of 5.38 and 19.4 kcal/mole. This is the first study to resolve both scattering angle and velocity for the reaction of a short lived (16 nsec) electronic excited state. Descriptions are given of computer programs written to analyze molecular-beam expansions to extract information characterizing their velocity distributions, and to calculate accurate laboratory elastic-scattering differential cross sections accounting for the finite apparatus resolution. Experimental results which attempted to determine the efficiency of optically pumping the Li(2/sup 2/P/sub 3/2/) and Na(3/sup 2/P/sub 3/2/) excited states are given. A simple three-level model for predicting the steady-state fraction of atoms in the excited state is included.

  8. Molecular beam epitaxy of GaAs nanowires and their sustainability for optoelectronic applications. Comparing Au- and self-assisted growth methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breuer, Steffen

    2011-09-28

    In this work the synthesis of GaAs nanowires by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) using the vapour-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism is investigated. A comparison between Au- and self-assisted VLS growth is at the centre of this thesis. While the Au-assisted method is established as a versatile tool for nanowire growth, the recently developed self-assisted variation results from the exchange of Au by Ga droplets and thus eliminates any possibility of Au incorporation. By both methods, we achieve nanowires with epitaxial alignment to the Si(111) substrates. Caused by differences during nanowire nucleation, a parasitic planar layer grows between the nanowires by the Au-assisted method, but can be avoided by the self-assisted method. Au-assisted nanowires grow predominantly in the metastable wurtzite crystal structure, while their self-assisted counterparts have the zincblende structure. All GaAs nanowires are fully relaxed and the strain arising from the lattice mismatch between GaAs and Si of 4.1 % is accommodated by misfit dislocations at the interface. Self-assisted GaAs nanowires are generally found to have vertical and non-polar side facets, while tilted and polar nanofacets were described for Au-assisted GaAs nanowires. We employ VLS nucleation theory to understand the effect of the droplet material on the lateral facets. Optoelectronic applications require long minority carrier lifetimes at room temperature. We fabricate GaAs/(Al,Ga)As core-shell nanowires and analyse them by transient photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. The results are 2.5 ns for the self-assisted nanowires as well as 9 ps for the Au-assisted nanowires. By temperature-dependent PL measurements we find a characteristic activation energy of 77 meV that is present only in the Au-assisted nanowires. We conclude that most likely Au is incorporated from the droplets into the GaAs nanowires and acts as a deep, non-radiative recombination centre.

  9. Epitaxial growth of M-plane GaN on ZnO micro-rods by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Shuo-Ting; Lo, Ikai; Tsai, Jenn-Kai; Shih, Cheng-Hung

    2015-12-01

    We have studied the GaN grown on ZnO micro-rods by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. From the analyses of GaN microstructure grown on non-polar M-plane ZnO surface ( 10 1 ¯ 0 ) by scanning transmission electron microscope, we found that the ZnGa2O4 compound was formed at the M-plane hetero-interface, which was confirmed by polarization-dependent photoluminescence. We demonstrated that the M-plane ZnO micro-rod surface can be used as an alternative substrate to grow high quality M-plane GaN epi-layers.

  10. Epitaxial growth of M-plane GaN on ZnO micro-rods by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuo-Ting You

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We have studied the GaN grown on ZnO micro-rods by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. From the analyses of GaN microstructure grown on non-polar M-plane ZnO surface ( 10 1 ̄ 0 by scanning transmission electron microscope, we found that the ZnGa2O4 compound was formed at the M-plane hetero-interface, which was confirmed by polarization-dependent photoluminescence. We demonstrated that the M-plane ZnO micro-rod surface can be used as an alternative substrate to grow high quality M-plane GaN epi-layers.

  11. Room temperature photoluminescence from In{sub x}Al{sub (1−x)}N films deposited by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, W., E-mail: wei.kong@duke.edu; Jiao, W. Y.; Kim, T. H.; Brown, A. S. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Mohanta, A. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Research Participation Program, U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development and Engineering Center (AMRDEC), Redstone Arsenal, Alabama 35898 (United States); Roberts, A. T. [Charles Bowden Research Lab, Army Aviation and Missile RD and E Center, Redstone Arsenal, Alabama 35898 (United States); Fournelle, J. [Department of Geoscience, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Losurdo, M. [Plasma Chemistry Research Center-CNR, via Orabona, 4-70126 Bari (Italy); Everitt, H. O. [Charles Bowden Research Lab, Army Aviation and Missile RD and E Center, Redstone Arsenal, Alabama 35898 (United States); Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States)

    2014-09-29

    InAlN films deposited by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy exhibited a lateral composition modulation characterized by 10–12 nm diameter, honeycomb-shaped, columnar domains with Al-rich cores and In-rich boundaries. To ascertain the effect of this microstructure on its optical properties, room temperature absorption and photoluminescence characteristics of In{sub x}Al{sub (1−x)}N were comparatively investigated for indium compositions ranging from x = 0.092 to 0.235, including x = 0.166 lattice matched to GaN. The Stokes shift of the emission was significantly greater than reported for films grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition, possibly due to the phase separation in these nanocolumnar domains. The room temperature photoluminescence also provided evidence of carrier transfer from the InAlN film to the GaN template.

  12. Stress in (Al, Ga)N heterostructures grown on 6H-SiC and Si substrates byplasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshelev, O. A.; Nechaev, D. V.; Sitnikova, A. A.; Ratnikov, V. V.; Ivanov, S. V.; Jmerik, V. N.

    2017-11-01

    The paper describes experimental results on low temperature plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy of GaN/AlN heterostructures on both 6H-SiC and Si(111) substrates. We demonstrate that application of migration enhanced epitaxy and metal-modulated epitaxy for growth of AlN nucleation and buffer layers lowers the screw and edge(total)threading dislocation (TD) densities down to 1.7·108 and 2·109 cm-2, respectively, in a 2.8-μm-thick GaN buffer layer grown atop of AlN/6H-SiC. The screw and total TD densities of 1.2·109 and 7.4·109 cm-2, respectively, were achieved in a 1-μm-thickGaN/AlNheterostructure on Si(111). Stress generation and relaxation in GaN/AlN heterostructures were investigated by using multi-beam optical stress sensor (MOSS) to achieve zero substrate curvature at room temperature. It is demonstrated that a 1-μm-thick GaN/AlN buffer layer grown by PA MBE provides planar substrate morphology in the case of growth on Si substrates whereas 5-μm-thick GaN buffer layers have to be used to achieve the same when growing on 6H-SiC substrates.

  13. Temperature- and Al/N ratio-dependent AlN seed layer formation on (110) Si substrates by using plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, Young-Kyun; Park, Chul-Hyun; Oh, Jae-Eung [Hanyang University, Ansan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang-Tae; Kim, Moon-Deock [Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    AlN seed layers with a thickness of 50 nm were grown by using nitrogen plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy on (110) Si substrates with different V/III ratios in the temperature range from 850 .deg. C to 940 .deg. C. In varying the Al/N ratio and the growth temperature, distinct surface morphologies emerge, which are quite different from those observed in AlN growth on (111) Si substrates. Under N-rich conditions, AlN films exhibits randomly distributed islands with different sizes ranging from 10 nm to 1 m. In Al-rich conditions, two distinct surface morphologies, (1) closely-packed islands preferentially aligned along the [1120]{sub AIN} /[110]{sub Si} azimuth and (2) smooth flat surfaces, are observed at various growth temperatures. The observed morphology transition is attributed to the asymmetric strain distribution between hexagonal symmetric AlN layers and rectangular (110) Si substrates and to varying surface adatom migration rates present at different growth temperatures.

  14. On the optical and microstrain analysis of graded InGaN/GaN MQWs based on plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    KAUST Repository

    Mishra, Pawan

    2016-05-23

    In this paper, c-plane stepped- and graded- InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs) are grown using plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE) by in situ surface stoichiometry monitoring (i-SSM). Such a technique considerably reduces the strain build-up due to indium clustering within and across graded-MQWs; especially for QW closer to the top which results in mitigation of the quantum-confined Stark effect (QCSE). This is validated by a reduced power dependent photoluminescence blueshift of 10 meV in graded-MQWs as compared to a blueshift of 17 meV for stepped-MQWs. We further analyze microstrain within the MQWs, using Raman spectroscopy and geometrical phase analysis (GPA) on high-angle annular dark-field (HAADF)-scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) images of stepped- and graded-MQWs, highlighting the reduction of ~1% strain in graded-MQWs over stepped-MQWs. Our analysis provides direct evidence of the advantage of graded-MQWs for the commercially viable c-plane light-emitting and laser diodes. © 2016 Optical Society of America.

  15. Raman scattering study of cubic GaN and GaMnN epilayers grown by plasma- assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarcón-Lladó, E.; Ibáñez, J.; Cuscó, R.; Artús, L.; Novikov, S. V.; Foxon, C. T.

    2009-11-01

    We perform visible and ultraviolet (UV) Raman-scattering experiments to study a series of undoped and Mn-doped c-GaN thin films grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy under Ga-rich and N-rich conditions. The visible, non-resonant experiments confirm that the Ga-rich growth yields the improved crystal quality. New Raman features, most probably related to Mn-induced disorder, show up in the spectra of the c-GaMnN epilayers grown under N-rich conditions. We find that the introduction of an AlN buffer favors the growth of the hexagonal phase. In the UV spectra of the samples with better crystal quality, we detect multiphonon mA1(LO) peaks up to m = 4 together with strong PL signal from c-GaN. In the more disordered samples the PL emission is quenched, and this allows us to detect multiphonons up to m = 6. The intensity of the multiphonon peaks can be used to assess the crystal quality of the c-GaN and c-GaMnN samples.

  16. Effects of growth temperature on high-quality In0.2Ga0.8N layers by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Dongyan; Zheng Xinhe; Li Xuefei; Wu Yuanyuan; Wang Jianfeng; Yang Hui

    2012-01-01

    High-quality In0.2Ga0.8N epilayers were grown on a GaN template at temperatures of 520 and 580 ℃ via plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy.The X-ray rocking curve full widths at half maximum (FWHM) of (10.2)reflections is 936 arcsec for the 50-nm-thick InGaN layers at the lower temperature.When the growth temperature increases to 580 ℃,the FWHM of (00.2) reflections for these samples is very narrow and keeps similar,while significant improvement of(10.2) reflections with an FWHM value of 612 arcsec has been observed.This improved quality in InGaN layers grown at 580 ℃ is also reflected by the much larger size of the crystalline column from the AFM results,stronger emission intensity as well as a decreased FWHM of room temperature PL from 136 to 93.9 meV.

  17. Effects of RF plasma parameters on the growth of InGaN/GaN heterostructures using plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Shim Kyu Ha; Kim, K H; Hong, S U; Cho, K I; Lee, H G; Kim, J

    1999-01-01

    The effects of rf plasma power on the structural/optical properties of GaN-based nitride epilayers grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy have been investigated. Atomic force microscopy and high-resolution x-ray diffraction analyses revealed that the sharp interface of In sub 0 sub . sub 2 Ga sub 0 sub . sub 8 N/GaN heterostructures could be obtained by suppressing the surface roughening at high rf power. photoluminescence data suggest that the formation of damaged subsurface due to energetic particles was alleviated in the InGaN growth in comparison with the GaN growth. In our experimental set-up, the rf power of 400 W appeared to properly suppress the 3D island formation without causing defects at the subsurface of In sub 0 sub . sub 2 Ga sub 0 sub . sub 8 N. The phenomena associated with the indium incorporation could be explained by an inequality with two kinetic processes of the surface diffusion and the plasma stimulated desorption.

  18. Schottky barrier height of Ni to β-(AlxGa1-x)2O3 with different compositions grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Elaheh; Oshima, Yuichi; Wu, Feng; Speck, James S.

    2017-03-01

    Coherent β-(AlxGa1-x)2O3 films (x = 0, 0.038, 0.084, 0.164) were grown successfully on a Sn-doped β-Ga2O3 (010) substrate using plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Atom probe tomography, transmission electron microscopy, and high resolution x-ray diffraction were used to verify the alloy composition and high quality of the films. Schottky diodes were then fabricated using Ni as the Schottky metal. Capacitance-voltage measurements revealed a very low (current-voltage (I-V) measurements performed at temperatures varying from 300 K to 500 K on the Schottky diodes. These measurements revealed that the apparent Schottky barrier height could have similar values for different compositions of β-(AlxGa1-x)2O3. We believe this is attributed to the lateral fluctuation in the alloy’s composition. This results in a lateral variation in the barrier height. Therefore, the average Schottky barrier height extracted from I-V measurements could be similar for β-(AlxGa1-x)2O3 films with different compositions.

  19. Strain control of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor structures on silicon (111) by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aidam, Rolf; Diwo, Elke; Rollbühler, Nicola; Kirste, Lutz; Benkhelifa, Fouad

    2012-06-01

    This paper reports on the use of plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy of AlGaN/GaN-based high electron mobility transistor structures grown on 4 in. Si (111) substrates. In situ measurements of wafer curvature during growth proved to be a very powerful method to analyze the buffer layer's thickness dependent strain. The Ga/N ratio at the beginning of growth of the GaN buffer layer is the critical parameter to control the compressive strain of the entire grown structure. An engineered amount of compressive strain must be designed into the structure to perfectly compensate for the tensile strain caused by differences in the thermal expansion coefficient between the epi-layer and substrate during sample cool down from growth temperatures. A maximum film thickness of 4.2 μm was achieved without the formation of any cracks and a negligible bow of the wafers below 10 μm. Measurement of the as-grown wafers revealed depth profiles of the charge carrier concentration comparable to values achieved on SiC substrates and mobility values of the two dimensional electron gas in the range 1230 to 1350 cm2/Vs at a charge carrier concentration of 6.5-7 1012/cm2. First results on processed wafers with 2 μm thick buffer layer indicate very promising results with a resistance of the buffer, measured on 200 μm long contacts with 15 μm pitch, in the range of R > 109 Ω at 100 V and breakdown voltages up to 550 V.

  20. Bandgap measurements and the peculiar splitting of E2H phonon modes of InxAl1-xN nanowires grown by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    KAUST Repository

    Tangi, Malleswararao

    2016-07-26

    The dislocation free Inx Al 1-xN nanowires (NWs) are grown on Si(111) by nitrogen plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy in the temperature regime of 490 °C–610 °C yielding In composition ranges over 0.50 ≤ x ≤ 0.17. We study the optical properties of these NWs by spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE), photoluminescence, and Raman spectroscopies since they possesses minimal strain with reduced defects comparative to the planar films. The optical bandgap measurements of Inx Al 1-xN NWs are demonstrated by SE where the absorption edges of the NW samples are evaluated irrespective of substrate transparency. A systematic Stoke shift of 0.04–0.27 eV with increasing x was observed when comparing the micro-photoluminescence spectra with the Tauc plot derived from SE. The micro-Raman spectra in the NWs with x = 0.5 showed two-mode behavior for A1(LO) phonons and single mode behavior for E2 H phonons. As for x = 0.17, i.e., high Al content, we observed a peculiar E2 H phonon mode splitting. Further, we observe composition dependent frequency shifts. The 77 to 600 K micro-Raman spectroscopy measurements show that both AlN- and InN-like modes of A1(LO) and E2 H phonons in Inx Al 1-xN NWs are redshifted with increasing temperature, similar to that of the binary III group nitride semiconductors. These studies of the optical properties of the technologically important Inx Al 1-xN nanowires will path the way towards lasers and light-emitting diodes in the wavelength of the ultra-violet and visible range.

  1. Photoionization studies with molecular beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, C.Y.

    1976-09-01

    A molecular beam photoionization apparatus which combines the advantages of both the molecular beam method with photoionization mass spectrometry has been designed and constructed for carrying out some unique photoionization experiments. Rotational cooling during the supersonic expansion has resulted in high resolution photoionization efficiency curves for NO, ICl, C/sub 2/H/sub 2/ and CH/sub 3/I. The analysis of these spectra has yielded ionization potentials for these molecules to an accuracy of +- 3 MeV. Detailed autoionization structures were also resolved. This allows the investigation of the selection rules for autoionization, and the identification of the Rydberg series which converge to the excited states of the molecular ions. The degree of relaxation for thermally populated excited states has been examined using NO and ICl as examples. As a result of adiabatic cooling, a small percentage of dimers is also formed during the expansion. The photoionization efficiency curves for (NO)/sub 2/, ArICl, Ar/sub 2/, Kr/sub 2/ and Xe/sub 2/ have been obtained near the thresholds. Using the known dissociation energies of the (NO)/sub 2/, Ar/sub 2/, Kr/sub 2/ and Xe/sub 2/ van der Waals molecules, the corresponding dissociation energies for NO-NO/sup +/, Ar/sub 2//sup +/, Kr/sub 2//sup +/, and Xe/sub 2//sup +/ have been determined. The ionization mechanisms for this class of molecules are examined and discussed.

  2. Effect of substrate temperature on self-assisted GaAs nanowires grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy on GaAs (111)B substrates without SiO2 layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorathamrong, Samatcha; Ratanathammaphan, Somchai; Panyakeow, Somsak; Praserthdam, Piyasan; Tongyam, Chiraporn

    2017-11-01

    In this work, we demonstrate a self-assisted VLS growth of GaAs nanowires directly on GaAs (111)B substrates without assistance of SiO2 layer. We believe that with this technique, we can overcome some inherent problems that usually occur in conventional self-assisted VLS growth and simplify the process. Moreover, to study the effect of substrate temperature, each nanowire sample was fabricated at the different temperature from 400 °C to 600 °C using Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) technique. Surface morphology, elemental composition, and crystal structure of nanowire samples were characterized by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and X-ray Diffraction Analysis (XRD) respectively.

  3. 14th international symposium on molecular beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses research being conducted with molecular beams. The general topic areas are as follows: Clusters I; reaction dynamics; atomic and molecular spectroscopy; clusters II; new techniques; photodissociation dynamics; and surfaces.

  4. 14th international symposium on molecular beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-09-01

    This report discusses research being conducted with molecular beams. The general topic areas are as follows: Clusters I; reaction dynamics; atomic and molecular spectroscopy; clusters II; new techniques; photodissociation & dynamics; and surfaces.

  5. Incorporation model of N into GaInNAs alloys grown by radio-frequency plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aho, A.; Korpijärvi, V.-M.; Tukiainen, A.; Puustinen, J.; Guina, M. [Optoelectronics Research Centre, Tampere University of Technology, Korkeakoulunkatu 3, FI-33720 Tampere (Finland)

    2014-12-07

    We present a Maxwell-Boltzmann electron energy distribution based model for the incorporation rate of nitrogen into GaInNAs grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) using a radio frequency plasma source. Nitrogen concentration is predicted as a function of radio-frequency system primary resistance, N flow, and RF power, and group III growth rate. The semi-empirical model is shown to be repeatable with a maximum error of 6%. The model was validated for two different MBE systems by growing GaInNAs on GaAs(100) with variable nitrogen composition of 0%–6%.

  6. Atomic and molecular beams production and collimation

    CERN Document Server

    Lucas, Cyril Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Atomic and molecular beams are employed in physics and chemistry experiments and, to a lesser extent, in the biological sciences. These beams enable atoms to be studied under collision-free conditions and allow the study of their interaction with other atoms, charged particles, radiation, and surfaces. Atomic and Molecular Beams: Production and Collimation explores the latest techniques for producing a beam from any substance as well as from the dissociation of hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, and the halogens.The book not only provides the basic expressions essential to beam design but also offers

  7. Molecular beams with a tunable velocity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heiner, C.E.; Bethlem, H.L.; Meijer, G.

    2006-01-01

    The merging of molecular beam methods with those of accelerator physics has yielded new tools to manipulate the motion of molecules. Over the last few years, decelerators, lenses, bunchers, traps, and storage rings for neutral molecules have been demonstrated. Molecular beams with a tunable velocity

  8. Role of dislocations and carrier concentration in limiting the electron mobility of InN films grown by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangi, Malleswararao; De, Arpan; Shivaprasad, S. M.

    2018-01-01

    We report the molecular beam epitaxy growth of device quality InN films on GaN epilayer and nano-wall network (NWN) templates deposited on c-sapphire by varying the film thickness up to 1 μm. The careful experiments are directed towards obtaining high mobility InN layers having a low band gap with improved crystal quality. The dislocation density is quantified by using high resolution X-ray diffraction rocking curve broadening values of symmetric and asymmetric reflections, respectively. We observe that the dislocation density of the InN films grown on GaN NWN is less than that of the films grown on the GaN epilayer. This is attributed to the nanoepitaxial lateral overlayer growth (ELOG) process, where the presence of voids at the interface of InN/GaN NWN prevents the propagation of dislocation lines into the InN epilayers, thereby causing less defects in the overgrown InN films. Thus, this new adaptation of the nano-ELOG growth process enables us to prepare InN layers with high electron mobility. The obtained electron mobility of 2121 cm2/Vs for 1 μm thick InN/GaN NWN is comparable with the literature values of similar thickness InN films. Furthermore, in order to understand the reasons that limit electron mobility, the charge neutrality condition is employed to study the variation of electron mobility as a function of dislocation density and carrier concentration. Overall, this study provides a route to attaining improved crystal quality and electronic properties of InN films.

  9. Materials fundamentals of molecular beam epitaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Tsao, Jeffrey Y

    1992-01-01

    The technology of crystal growth has advanced enormously during the past two decades. Among, these advances, the development and refinement of molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) has been among the msot important. Crystals grown by MBE are more precisely controlled than those grown by any other method, and today they form the basis for the most advanced device structures in solid-state physics, electronics, and optoelectronics. As an example, Figure 0.1 shows a vertical-cavity surface emitting laser structure grown by MBE. * Provides comprehensive treatment of the basic materials and surface science principles that apply to molecular beam epitaxy * Thorough enough to benefit molecular beam epitaxy researchers * Broad enough to benefit materials, surface, and device researchers * Referenes articles at the forefront of modern research as well as those of historical interest.

  10. Deceleration of molecular beams of NO radicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klenner, Alexander; Kirste, Moritz; Schewe, Christian; Scharfenberg, Ludwig; Meijer, Gerard; Meerakker, Sebastian Y.T. van de [Fritz-Haber-Institut, Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Berlin (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    The motion of neutral molecules in a beam can be manipulated with inhomogeneous electric and magnetic fields. Time-varying fields can be used to decelerate or accelerate beams of molecules to any desired velocity. Molecular beams with a tunable velocity find applications in experiments such as the production and investigation of cold molecules or crossed beam collision studies. Molecules with an open shell structure like the OH(X2{pi}3/2,J=3/2) radical are of special interest and have often been used. The NO (X2{pi}1/2,J=1/2) radical would be the ideal molecule in these experiments, as beams of NO can be produced with superior number densities and can be detected more sensitively than OH. But Stark deceleration of NO radicals appears only feasible in the X2{pi}3/2,J=3/2 state, that is not populated under normal conditions. We present the production of intense beams of NO radicals in the X2{pi}3/2,J=3/2 state by stimulated emission pumping of ground-state NO(X2{pi}1/2,J=1/2) radicals via the A 2{sigma}{sup -} state. This state also has a large magnetic dipole moment, and we discuss the prospects for the Zeeman deceleration of NO(X2{pi}3/2,J=3/2) radicals.

  11. Imaging with MCP in molecular beam experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Rodionov, I; Shilov, I

    2001-01-01

    The main goal of the fast molecular beam experiments is the measurement of differential cross sections of the most actual gas-phase reactions within a wide range of translational energies of reagents. For setting up such experiments the R and D Center 'Reagent' scientific group designed a series of particle and photon detectors. By way of complexity and historically these detectors place as follows:(1) 0D--one element scanning detectors; (2) 2D-position-sensitive detectors (PSD) based on microchannel plate; (3) 2D+T-time and position-sensitive detectors (TPSD); (4) 2D+2D+delta T-Multiparticle position-sensitive detectors (MTPSD); (5) 2D+T-the fluorescent photon TPSD with photocathodes. We report the development of the methods for particles and photons detection in the fast molecular beam experiments. The results of measurements on the basis of such detectors are also considered.

  12. Molecular beam simulation of planetary atmospheric entry: Some recent results

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, J. B.; Reid, N. M.

    1972-01-01

    Molecular beam sources for producing fast beams containing CO2 and atomic oxygen are discussed. Results pertinent to the design and calibration of mass spectrometer ion source for measurement of the Martian atmosphere during the free molecule portion of the entry trajectory are also presented. The shortcomings and advantages of the simulation technique are discussed. It is shown that an open cavity configuration retains sensitivity to atomic oxygen, provides reasonable signal enhancement from the stagnation effect, is not highly sensitive to pitch and yaw effects, and presents no unforeseen problems in measuring CO2 or atomic oxygen. The simulation techniques used provide assistance in designing, developing, and (potentially) in testing and calibrating the required flight instrument.

  13. Perspective: Oxide molecular-beam epitaxy rocks!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darrell G. Schlom

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE is the “gold standard” synthesis technique for preparing semiconductor heterostructures with high purity, high mobility, and exquisite control of layer thickness at the atomic-layer level. Its use for the growth of multicomponent oxides got off to a rocky start 30 yr ago, but in the ensuing decades, it has become the definitive method for the preparation of oxide heterostructures too, particularly when it is desired to explore their intrinsic properties. Examples illustrating the unparalleled achievements of oxide MBE are given; these motivate its expanding use for exploring the potentially revolutionary states of matter possessed by oxide systems.

  14. Crossed molecular beams: apparatus and data analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freedman, A.

    1977-01-01

    A crossed molecular beams apparatus designed to perform experiments involving elastic, inelastic, and reactive scattering of particles under single collision conditions is described. Included is a description of a high temperature oven capable of heating samples to 2000/sup 0/K under vacuum conditions. Analysis of data obtained in these experiments is discussed in detail; special emphasis is placed on evaluating data involving particle velocities measured with a time-of-flight technique. Appropriate detector response functions concerning this technique are derived and their effect on velocity resolution discussed.

  15. Photoelectron spectroscopy of supersonic molecular beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollard, J.E.

    1982-05-01

    A new technique for performing high resolution molecular photoelectron spectroscopy is described, beginning with its conceptual development, through the construction of a prototypal apparatus, to the initial applications on a particularly favorable molecular system. The distinguishing features of this technique are: (1) the introduction of the sample in the form of a collimated supersonic molecular beam; and (2) the use of an electrostatic deflection energy analyzer which is carefully optimized in terms of sensitivity and resolution. This combination makes it possible to obtain photoelectron spectra at a new level of detail for many small molecules. Three experiments are described which rely on the capability to perform rotationally-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy on the hydrogen molecule and its isotopes. The first is a measurement of the ionic vibrational and rotational spectroscopic constants and the vibrationally-selected photoionization cross sections. The second is a determination of the photoelectron asymmetry parameter, ..beta.., for selected rotational transitions. The third is an investigation of the rotational relaxation in a free jet expansion, using photoelectron spectroscopy as a probe of the rotational state population distributions. In the closing chapter an assessment is made of the successes and limitations of the technique, and an indication is given of areas for further improvement in future spectrometers.

  16. The use of molecular beam epitaxy for the synthesis of high purity III-V nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spirkoska, D; Colombo, C; Heiss, M; Abstreiter, G; Fontcuberta i Morral, A [Walter Schottky Institut, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2008-11-12

    The synthesis methods and properties of catalyst-free III-V nanowires with molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) are reviewed. The two main techniques are selective-area epitaxy (SAE) and gallium-assisted synthesis. The excellent structure and ultra-high purity characteristics of the grown nanowires are presented by Raman and photoluminescence spectroscopy.

  17. Origin of Spontaneous Core-Shell AIGaAs Nanowires Grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dubrovskii, V. G.; Shtrom, I. V.; Reznik, R. R.

    2016-01-01

    Based on the high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy studies, we unravel the origin of spontaneous core shell AlGaAs nanowires grown by gold-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Our AlGaAs nanowires have a cylindrical core...

  18. Molecular beam studies of reaction dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y.T. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The major thrust of this research project is to elucidate detailed dynamics of simple elementary reactions that are theoretically important and to unravel the mechanism of complex chemical reactions or photochemical processes that play important roles in many macroscopic processes. Molecular beams of reactants are used to study individual reactive encounters between molecules or to monitor photodissociation events in a collision-free environment. Most of the information is derived from measurement of the product fragment energy, angular, and state distributions. Recent activities are centered on the mechanisms of elementary chemical reactions involving oxygen atoms with unsaturated hydrocarbons, the dynamics of endothermic substitution reactions, the dependence of the chemical reactivity of electronically excited atoms on the alignment of excited orbitals, the primary photochemical processes of polyatomic molecules, intramolecular energy transfer of chemically activated and locally excited molecules, the energetics of free radicals that are important to combustion processes, the infrared-absorption spectra of carbonium ions and hydrated hydronium ions, and bond-selective photodissociation through electric excitation.

  19. Characterizing and optimizing a laser-desorption molecular beam source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teschmit, Nicole; Długołecki, Karol; Gusa, Daniel; Rubinsky, Igor; Horke, Daniel A.; Küpper, Jochen

    2017-10-01

    The design and characterization of a new laser-desorption molecular beam source, tailored for use in x-ray free-electron laser and ultrashort-pulse laser imaging experiments, is presented. It consists of a single mechanical unit containing all source components, including the molecular-beam valve, the sample, and the fiber-coupled desorption laser, which is movable in five axes, as required for experiments at central facilities. Utilizing strong-field ionization, we characterize the produced molecular beam and evaluate the influence of desorption laser pulse energy, relative timing of valve opening and desorption laser, sample bar height, and which part of the molecular packet is probed on the sample properties. Strong-field ionization acts as a universal probe and allows detecting all species present in the molecular beam, and hence enables us to analyze the purity of the produced molecular beam, including molecular fragments. We present optimized experimental parameters for the production of the purest molecular beam, containing the highest yield of intact parent ions, which we find to be very sensitive to the placement of the desorbed-molecule plumes within the supersonic expansion.

  20. Molecular characterization of microbial mutations induced by ion beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichida, Hiroyuki [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Chiba University, Matsudo, Chiba 271-8510 (Japan); Accelerator Applications Research Group, Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)], E-mail: ichida@riken.jp; Matsuyama, Tomoki [Cellular Biochemistry Laboratory, Discovery Research Institute, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Ryuto, Hiromichi [Accelerator Operation Group, Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Hayashi, Yoriko [Accelerator Applications Research Group, Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Fukunishi, Nobuhisa [Accelerator Operation Group, Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Abe, Tomoko [Accelerator Applications Research Group, Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Koba, Takato [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Chiba University, Matsudo, Chiba 271-8510 (Japan)

    2008-03-01

    A positive selection system for gene disruption using a sucrose-sensitive transgenic rhizobium was established and used for the molecular characterization of mutations induced by ion beam irradiations. Single nucleotide substitutions, insertions, and deletions were found to occur in the sucrose sensitivity gene, sacB, when the reporter line was irradiated with highly accelerated carbon and iron ion beams. In all of the insertion lines, fragments of essentially the same sequence and of approximately 1188 bp in size were identified in the sacB regions. In the deletion lines, iron ions showed a tendency to induce larger deletions than carbon ions, suggesting that higher LET beams cause larger deletions. We found also that ion beams, particularly 'heavier' ion beams, can produce single gene disruptions and may present an effective alternative to transgenic approaches.

  1. Molecular beam simulation of planetary atmospheric entry - Some recent results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, J. B.; Reid, N. M.; Nier, A. O.; Hayden, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    Progress is reported in the development of molecular beam techniques to simulate entry into planetary atmospheres. Molecular beam sources for producing fast beams containing CO2 and atomic oxygen are discussed. Results pertinent to the design and calibration of a mass spectrometer ion source for measurement of the Martian atmosphere during the free molecule portion of the entry trajectory are also presented. The shortcomings and advantages of this simulation technique are discussed, and it is demonstrated that even with certain inadequacies much information useful to the ion source design was obtained. Particularly, it is shown that an open-cavity configuration retains sensitivity to atomic oxygen, provides reasonable signal enhancement from the stagnation effect, is not highly sensitive to pitch and yaw effects, and presents no unforeseen problems in measuring CO2 or atomic oxygen.

  2. Direct detection of momentum flux in atomic and molecular beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, J. G.; Hayden, J. S.; O'Connor, M. T.; Diebold, G. J.

    1981-10-01

    We describe the use of a microphone for detection of atomic and molecular beams in a high-vacuum environment. Two experiments were carried out to demonstrate this detection method. Pulsed beams of argon were detected using a conventional electret microphone where the output of the microphone was displayed directly on an oscilloscope or processed with a boxcar averager to remove the transient oscillations of the microphone diaphragm. Amplitude modulated, continuous beams of atomic argon were also detected using a lock-in amplifier. The microphone possesses a response to the pressure or momentum flux in the beam that appears to be unique among beam detectors. We use the classical equipartition theorem to calculate the magnitude of the random fluctuations in the output voltage of the microphone that is used to give an expression for the minimum detectable momentum flux in the beam. For a typical microphone we find this to be 3×10-8 Pa, (in a 1-Hz bandwidth), which corresponds to a minimum number density of 1×106 cm-3 for an effusive argon beam at 300 K.

  3. Electron impact mass spectrometry of alkanes in supersonic molecular beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagan, S; Amirav, A

    1995-02-01

    The electron impact mass spectrometry of straight chain alkanes C8H18-C40H82, squalane, methylstearate, 1-chlorohexadecane, 1-bromohexadecane, and dioctylphthalate was studied by sampling them with supersonic molecular beams. A fly-through Brink-type electron impact ion source was used, utilizing a vacuum background ion filtration technique based on differences between the kinetic energy of the supersonic beam species and that of thermal molecules. The 70-eV electron impact mass spectra of all the alkanes were characterized by a pronounced or dominant molecular weight peak together with all the fragment ions normally exhibited by the standard thermal 70-eV EI mass spectra. In contrast, the NIST library of most of these molecules did not show any molecular weight peak. By eliminating tile intramolecular thermal vibrational energy we gained control over the degree of molecular ion fragmentation by the electron energy. At an electron energy of 18 eV the molecular ion dissociation was further reduced considerably, with only a small absolute reduction in the peak height by less than a factor of 2. The effect of vibrational cooling increased with the molecular size and number of atoms. Pronounced differences were observed between the mass spectra of the straight chain triacontane and its branched isomer squalane. Similar mass spectra of octacosane (C28H58) achieved with 70-eV EI in a supersonic molecular beam were obtained with a magnetic sector mass spectrometer by using an electron energy of 14 eV and an ion source temperature of 150 °C. However, this ion source temperature precluded the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) of octacosane. The GC-MS of alkanes was studied with an ion trap gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer at an ion source temperature of 230 °C. Thermal peak tailing was observed for C20H42 and heavier alkanes, whereas for C28H58 and heavier alkanes the severe peak tailing made quantitative GC-MS impractical. In contrast, no peak tailing

  4. Multialkali photocathodes grown by molecular beam epitaxy technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubovoi, I. A.; Chernikov, A. S.; Prokhorov, Alexander M.; Schelev, Mikhail Y.; Ushakov, Victor N.

    1991-04-01

    A new technique of bialkali photocathodes growth by molecular beam epitaxy (MI3E) has been developed. The photocathode film was deposited onto the substrate from molecular beams produced by simultaneously operating molecular sources of Sb, Na and K. Thus suggested procedure is noticeably differed from the classical one. Growth rate was about 1 A/sec and complete cycle of photocathode fabrication was 15-20 minutes. A special ultra high vacuum (UHV) chamber for MBE of multialkali photocathodes has been designed. The chamber is a part of UHV system consisting of an analysis vessel supplied with Auger and ESCA electron spectrometer and low energy electron diffractometer (LEED), the MBE chamber itself and a chamber for cold sealing of photocathodes with device body through indium ring. The system gives a possibility to carry out investigations of multialkali photocathode physics and to produce commercial devices. Developed technique can be used for fabrication of vacuum devices including streak tubes.

  5. Molecular beam sampling system with very high beam-to-background ratio: The rotating skimmer concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedikt, J.; Ellerweg, D.; von Keudell, A.

    2009-05-01

    A novel method of reducing the background pressure in a vacuum system used for sampling a molecular beam from a high pressure region is presented. A triple differential pumping stage is constructed with a chopper with rotating skimmer within the first pumping stage, which serves effectively as a valve separating periodically the vacuum system from the ambient environment. The mass spectrometry measurement of the species in the molecular beam show an excellent beam-to-background ratio of 14 and a detection limit below 1 ppm. The potential of this method for detection of low density reactive species in atmospheric pressure plasmas is demonstrated for the detection of oxygen atoms generated in an atmospheric pressure microplasma source.

  6. Growth of strontium ruthenate films by hybrid molecular beam epitaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick B. Marshall

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We report on the growth of epitaxial Sr2RuO4 films using a hybrid molecular beam epitaxy approach in which a volatile precursor containing RuO4 is used to supply ruthenium and oxygen. The use of the precursor overcomes a number of issues encountered in traditional molecular beam epitaxy that uses elemental metal sources. Phase-pure, epitaxial thin films of Sr2RuO4 are obtained. At high substrate temperatures, growth proceeds in a layer-by-layer mode with intensity oscillations observed in reflection high-energy electron diffraction. Films are of high structural quality, as documented by x-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The method should be suitable for the growth of other complex oxides containing ruthenium, opening up opportunities to investigate thin films that host rich exotic ground states.

  7. Pulsed rotating supersonic source used with merged molecular beams

    CERN Document Server

    Sheffield, L; Krasovitskiy, V; Rathnayaka, K D D; Lyuksyutov, I F; Herschbach, D R

    2012-01-01

    We describe a pulsed rotating supersonic beam source, evolved from an ancestral device [M. Gupta and D. Herschbach, J. Phys. Chem. A 105, 1626 (2001)]. The beam emerges from a nozzle near the tip of a hollow rotor which can be spun at high-speed to shift the molecular velocity distribution downward or upward over a wide range. Here we consider mostly the slowing mode. Introducing a pulsed gas inlet system, cryocooling, and a shutter gate eliminated the main handicap of the original device, in which continuous gas flow imposed high background pressure. The new version provides intense pulses, of duration 0.1-0.6 ms (depending on rotor speed) and containing ~10^12 molecules at lab speeds as low as 35 m/s and ~ 10^15 molecules at 400 m/s. Beams of any molecule available as a gas can be slowed (or speeded); e.g., we have produced slow and fast beams of rare gases, O2, Cl2, NO2, NH3, and SF6. For collision experiments, the ability to scan the beam speed by merely adjusting the rotor is especially advantageous when...

  8. Shading correction assisted iterative cone-beam CT reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chunlin; Wu, Pengwei; Gong, Shutao; Wang, Jing; Lyu, Qihui; Tang, Xiangyang; Niu, Tianye

    2017-11-01

    Recent advances in total variation (TV) technology enable accurate CT image reconstruction from highly under-sampled and noisy projection data. The standard iterative reconstruction algorithms, which work well in conventional CT imaging, fail to perform as expected in cone beam CT (CBCT) applications, wherein the non-ideal physics issues, including scatter and beam hardening, are more severe. These physics issues result in large areas of shading artifacts and cause deterioration to the piecewise constant property assumed in reconstructed images. To overcome this obstacle, we incorporate a shading correction scheme into low-dose CBCT reconstruction and propose a clinically acceptable and stable three-dimensional iterative reconstruction method that is referred to as the shading correction assisted iterative reconstruction. In the proposed method, we modify the TV regularization term by adding a shading compensation image to the reconstructed image to compensate for the shading artifacts while leaving the data fidelity term intact. This compensation image is generated empirically, using image segmentation and low-pass filtering, and updated in the iterative process whenever necessary. When the compensation image is determined, the objective function is minimized using the fast iterative shrinkage-thresholding algorithm accelerated on a graphic processing unit. The proposed method is evaluated using CBCT projection data of the Catphan© 600 phantom and two pelvis patients. Compared with the iterative reconstruction without shading correction, the proposed method reduces the overall CT number error from around 200 HU to be around 25 HU and increases the spatial uniformity by a factor of 20 percent, given the same number of sparsely sampled projections. A clinically acceptable and stable iterative reconstruction algorithm for CBCT is proposed in this paper. Differing from the existing algorithms, this algorithm incorporates a shading correction scheme into the low

  9. Use of molecular beams for kinetic measurements of chemical reactions on solid surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaera, Francisco

    2017-05-01

    In this review we survey the contributions that molecular beam experiments have provided to our understanding of the dynamics and kinetics of chemical interactions of gas molecules with solid surfaces. First, we describe the experimental details of the different instrumental setups and approaches available for the study of these systems under the ultrahigh vacuum conditions and with the model planar surfaces often used in modern surface-science experiments. Next, a discussion is provided of the most important fundamental aspects of the dynamics of chemical adsorption that have been elucidated with the help of molecular beam experiments, which include the development of potential energy surfaces, the determination of the different channels for energy exchange between the incoming molecules and the surface, the identification of adsorption precursor states, the understanding of dissociative chemisorption, the determination of the contributions of corrugation, steps, and other structural details of the surface to the adsorption process, the effect to molecular steering, the identification of avenues for assisting adsorption, and the molecular details associated with the kinetics of the uptake of adsorbates as a function of coverage. We follow with a summary of the work directed at the determination of kinetic parameters and mechanistic details of surface reactions associated with catalysis, mostly those promoted by late transition metals. This discussion we initiate with an overview of what has been learned about simple bimolecular reactions such as the oxidation of CO and H2 with O2 and the reaction of CO with NO, and continue with the review of the studies of more complex systems such as the oxidation of alcohols, the conversion of organic acids, the hydrogenation and isomerization of olefins, and the oxidative activation of alkanes under conditions of short contact times. Sections 6 and 7 of this review deal with the advances made in the use of molecular beams with

  10. Compact in-place gate valve for molecular-beam experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Küpper, J.; Haak, H.; Wohlfart, K.; Meijer, G.

    2006-01-01

    A high vacuum gate valve for skimmed molecular beam experiments is described. It is designed with a very short extent of only 10 mm along the molecular beam axis to minimize the distance between the molecular beam source and the experiment to provide the maximum molecular flux to the experiment. At the same time it provides free space on both sides of the skimmer to not disturb the supersonic expansion in front of the skimmer, to give optical access to the full distance between beam source an...

  11. Neutral Molecular ZnX (X = O, OH, N) Compounds In A Molecular Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cannavo, D.; Knopp, G.; Radi, P.; Beaud, P.; Tulej, M.; Bodek, P.; Gerber, T.; Wokaun, A.

    2005-03-01

    Neutral ZnO and ZnOH molecules could be produced in a molecular beam by expansion of laser ablated zinc together with H{sub 2}O, O{sub 2} or N{sub 2}O seeded in a rare gas (Ar, Ne, He). The abundance of ZnOH produced in our experiments exceeds the one of ZnO and ZnN by orders of magnitude if H{sub 2}O is present in the sys-tem. Small quantities of (ZnO)2H and Zn{sub 2}(OH)3 compounds could also be observed. To our knowledge this is the first evidence for the occurrence of neutral ZnO and ZnOH molecules in a molecular beam. (author)

  12. Experimental Results of Network-Assisted Interference Suppression Scheme Using Adaptive Beam-Tilt Switching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoki Murakami

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a network-assisted interference suppression scheme using beam-tilt switching per frame for wireless local area network systems and its effectiveness in an actual indoor environment. In the proposed scheme, two access points simultaneously transmit to their own desired station by adjusting angle of beam-tilt including transmit power assisted from network server for the improvement of system throughput. In the conventional researches, it is widely known that beam-tilt is effective for ICI suppression in the outdoor scenario. However, the indoor effectiveness of beam-tilt for ICI suppression has not yet been indicated from the experimental evaluation. Thus, this paper indicates the effectiveness of the proposed scheme by analyzing multiple-input multiple-output channel matrices from experimental measurements in an office environment. The experimental results clearly show that the proposed scheme offers higher system throughput than the conventional scheme using just transmit power control.

  13. Flow-assisted single-beam optothermal manipulation of microparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yangyang; Poon, Andrew W

    2010-08-16

    An optothermal tweezer was developed with a single-beam laser at 1550 nm for manipulation of colloidal microparticles. Strong absorption in water can thermally induce a localized flow, which exerts a Stokes' drag on the particles that complements the gradient force. Long-range capturing of 6 microm polystyrene particles over approximately 176 microm was observed with a tweezing power of approximately 7 mW. Transportation and levitation, targeted deposition and selective levitation of particles were explored to experimentally demonstrate the versatility of the optothermal tweezer as a multipurpose particle manipulation tool.

  14. Laser-assisted control of molecular orientation at high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhdanov, Dmitry V.; Zadkov, Victor N.

    2008-01-01

    A method of laser-assisted field-free dynamic molecular orientation employing a short, moderately intense three-color phase-locked laser pulse is proposed. Numerical simulations show that it provides an exceedingly effective control of orientation in molecular gases even at room temperatures. The underlying mechanism is based on the specific laser-induced orientation-dependent selective excitation of molecules and subsequent self-transformation of the induced geometrical orientation into a dynamical one. It is shown that this mechanism is significantly more powerful than the widely investigated kick mechanism.

  15. Measurement of the density profile of pure and seeded molecular beams by femtosecond ion imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meng, C.; Janssen, M.H.M.

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report on femtosecond ion imaging experiments to measure the density profile of a pulsed supersonic molecular beam. Ion images are measured for both a molecular beam and bulk gas under identical experimental conditions via femtosecond multiphoton ionization of Xe atoms. We report the

  16. AlGaAs and AlGaAs/GaAs/AlGaAs nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy on silicon substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cirlin, G E; Reznik, R R; Shtrom, I V

    2017-01-01

    The data on growth peculiarities and physical properties of GaAs insertions embedded in AlGaAs nanowires grown on different (1 1 1) substrates by Au-assisted molecular beam epitaxy are presented. The influence of nanowires growth conditions on structural and optical properties is studied in detail...

  17. Characterisation of molecular thin films grown by organic molecular beam deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Bayliss, S M

    2000-01-01

    This work concerns the growth and characterisation of molecular thin films in an ultra high vacuum regime by organic molecular beam deposition (OMBD). Films of three different molecular materials are grown, namely free base phthalocyanine (H sub 2 Pc), perylene 3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) and aluminium tris-8-hydroxyquinoline (Alq sub 3). The relationship between the growth parameters such as film thickness, growth rate, and substrate temperature during and after growth, and the structural, optical and morphological properties of the film are investigated. These investigations are carried out using various ex-situ techniques. X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and electronic absorption spectroscopy are used to probe the bulk film characteristics, whilst Nomarski microscopy and atomic force microscopy are used to study the surface morphology. Three different levels of influence of the growth parameters on the film properties are observed. In the case of H sub 2 Pc, two crystal phases are fo...

  18. Investigations of ice nanoparticles and aerosols in molecular beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnik, Michal

    2015-03-01

    We have recently set up a versatile experiment which allows for different experiments with molecular clusters and nanoparticles in molecular beams. Here we concentrate on the experiments with ice nanoparticles (large water clusters (H2O)N, N ~ 102-103) doped with atmospherically relevant molecules, e.g., hydrogen halides, CFCs, nitric acid, NxOy, etc. Such species are relevant to ozone depletion and other atmospheric processes. We investigate (1) the UV-photochemistry using velocity map imaging techniques, and (2) the uptake cross section for the molecules on the ice nanoparticles from velocity measurements. In addition, we record (3) mass spectra of the particles implementing different ionization methods: electron ionization (EI) at variable electron energies, photoionization, and special method of electron photodetachment after Na-doping (NaPI). The unique combination of all these different methods performed with the same nanoparticles provides detailed molecular level information about the studied species and their (photo)physics and chemistry. In particular, an investigation of mixed water-nitric acid particles by means of EI and NaPI revealed the prominent role of the HNO3 molecule as the condensation nuclei. The uptake of atmospheric molecules by ice nanoparticles has been studied, and the pickup cross sections for some molecules exceed significantly the geometrical sizes of the ice nanoparticles. It has been argued that the large particles composed of several hundred water molecules which grow in the supersonic expansions tend to have highly irregular shapes -nanosnowflakes. Photodissociation of hydrogen halides on ice nanoparticles has been investigated, and shown to proceed via excitation of acidically dissociated ion pair and subsequent biradical generation and H3O dissociation. The photodissociation of CF2Cl2 molecules in clusters leads to efficient Cl-fragment caging caused by formation of halogen bond. Grant agency of the Czech Republic, Grant No.: 14

  19. Vapor-solid-solid grown Ge nanowires at integrated circuit compatible temperature by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhongyunshen; Song, Yuxin; Zhang, Zhenpu; Sun, Hao; Han, Yi; Li, Yaoyao; Zhang, Liyao; Xue, Zhongying; Di, Zengfeng; Wang, Shumin

    2017-09-01

    We demonstrate Au-assisted vapor-solid-solid (VSS) growth of Ge nanowires (NWs) by molecular beam epitaxy at the substrate temperature of ˜180 °C, which is compatible with the temperature window for Si-based integrated circuit. Low temperature grown Ge NWs hold a smaller size, similar uniformity, and better fit with Au tips in diameter, in contrast to Ge NWs grown at around or above the eutectic temperature of Au-Ge alloy in the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth. Six ⟨110⟩ growth orientations were observed on Ge (110) by the VSS growth at ˜180 °C, differing from only one vertical growth direction of Ge NWs by the VLS growth at a high temperature. The evolution of NWs dimension and morphology from the VLS growth to the VSS growth is qualitatively explained by analyzing the mechanism of the two growth modes.

  20. Position controlled self-catalyzed growth of GaAs nanowires by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Benedikt; Rudolph, Andreas; Soda, Marcello; Zweck, Josef; Schuh, Dieter; Reiger, Elisabeth [Institute for Experimental and Applied Physics, University of Regensburg, D-93053 Regensburg (Germany); Fontcuberta i Morral, Anna, E-mail: elisabeth.reiger@physik.uni-regensburg.de [Laboratoire des Materiaux Semiconducteurs, Institut des Materiaux, Ecole polytechnique federale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2010-10-29

    GaAs nanowires are grown by molecular beam epitaxy using a self-catalyzed, Ga-assisted growth technique. Position control is achieved by nano-patterning a SiO{sub 2} layer with arrays of holes with a hole diameter of 85 nm and a hole pitch varying between 200 nm and 2 {mu}m. Gallium droplets form preferentially at the etched holes acting as catalyst for the nanowire growth. The nanowires have hexagonal cross-sections with {l_brace}110{r_brace} side facets and crystallize predominantly in zincblende. The interdistance dependence of the nanowire growth rate indicates a change of the III/V ratio towards As-rich conditions for large hole distances inhibiting NW growth.

  1. Automated Geometry assisted PEC for electron beam direct write nanolithography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ocola, Leonidas E.; Gosztola, David J.; Rosenmann, Daniel; Lopez, Gerald Gabriel

    2015-12-01

    Nanoscale geometry assisted proximity effect correction (NanoPEC) is demonstrated to improve PEC for nanoscale structures over standard PEC, in terms of feature sharpness for sub-100 nm structures. The method was implemented onto an existing commercially available PEC software. Plasmonic arrays of crosses were fabricated using regular PEC and NanoPEC, and optical absorbance was measured. Results confirm that the improved sharpness of the structures leads to increased sharpness in the optical absorbance spectrum features. We also demonstrated that this method of PEC is applicable to arbitrary shaped structures beyond crosses.

  2. Nanoscale geometry assisted proximity effect correction (NanoPEC) for electron beam direct write nanolithography.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ocola, L. E. (Center for Nanoscale Materials)

    2009-11-01

    Nanoscale geometry assisted proximity effect correction is presented for nanoscale structures and the results clearly show improvements in feature sharpness down to 20 nm structures. The design rule is simple to implement onto existing PEC software and enables implementation of PEC down to the resolution limits of electron beam lithography.

  3. Molecular beam photoionization and gas-surface scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ceyer, S.T.

    1979-09-01

    The energetics of the ethylene ion-molecule reactions was investigated in more detail than previously possible in two body collision experiments by photoionization of the neutral van der Waals ethylene dimer. The stability of the (C/sub 2/H/sub 4/)/sup +/C/sub 2/H/sub 4/ ion-molecule collision complex has been determined to be 18.2 +- 0.5 kcal. The highest potential barriers along the reaction coordinate for decomposition of this collision complex into C/sub 4/H/sub 7//sup +/ + H and C/sub 3/H/sub 5//sup +/ + CH/sub 3/ have been determined to be 0 +- 1.5 and 8.7 +- 1.5 kcal. In a similar manner, the energetics of the solvated ethylene dimer ion was investigated by the photoionization of the ethylene trimer. The absolute proton affinity of NH/sub 3/ (203.6 +- 1.3 kcal/mole) and the proton solvation energies by more than one NH/sub 3/ have been determined by molecular beam photoionization. In addition, the NH/sub 3//sup +/-NH/sub 3/ interaction energy (0.79 +- 0.05 eV) was measured by photoionization of the neutral van der Waals dimer. These experiments have shown that photoionization of van der Waals clusters is a very powerful method of determining the energetics of gas phase proton solvation. The scattering of helium atomic beams from a high Miller index platinum surface that exhibits ordered, periodic steps on the atomic scale to probe the effect of atomic steps on the scattering distribution is explored. Rainbow scattering is observed when the step edges are perpendicular to the incident helium atoms. The design, construction and operation of a beam-surface scattering apparatus are described. The first data obtained in this apparatus are presented and the interesting dynamical aspects of the oxidation of D, D/sub 2/ and CO are discussed. 75 references.

  4. Electron beam lithographic modeling assisted by artificial intelligence technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayamada, Noriaki; Nishimura, Rieko; Miura, Satoru; Nomura, Haruyuki; Kamikubo, Takashi

    2017-07-01

    We propose a new concept of tuning a point-spread function (a "kernel" function) in the modeling of electron beam lithography using the machine learning scheme. Normally in the work of artificial intelligence, the researchers focus on the output results from a neural network, such as success ratio in image recognition or improved production yield, etc. In this work, we put more focus on the weights connecting the nodes in a convolutional neural network, which are naturally the fractions of a point-spread function, and take out those weighted fractions after learning to be utilized as a tuned kernel. Proof-of-concept of the kernel tuning has been demonstrated using the examples of proximity effect correction with 2-layer network, and charging effect correction with 3-layer network. This type of new tuning method can be beneficial to give researchers more insights to come up with a better model, yet it might be too early to be deployed to production to give better critical dimension (CD) and positional accuracy almost instantly.

  5. High efficiency laser-assisted H- charge exchange for microsecond duration beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousineau, Sarah; Rakhman, Abdurahim; Kay, Martin; Aleksandrov, Alexander; Danilov, Viatcheslav; Gorlov, Timofey; Liu, Yun; Long, Cary; Menshov, Alexander; Plum, Michael; Shishlo, Andrei; Webster, Andrew; Johnson, David

    2017-12-01

    Laser-assisted stripping is a novel approach to H- charge exchange that overcomes long-standing limitations associated with the traditional, foil-based method of producing high-intensity, time-structured beams of protons. This paper reports on the first successful demonstration of the laser stripping technique for microsecond duration beams. The experiment represents a factor of 1000 increase in the stripped pulse duration compared with the previous proof-of-principle demonstration. The central theme of the experiment is the implementation of methods to reduce the required average laser power such that high efficiency stripping can be accomplished for microsecond duration beams using conventional laser technology. The experiment was performed on the Spallation Neutron Source 1 GeV H- beam using a 1 MW peak power UV laser and resulted in ˜95 % stripping efficiency.

  6. Topological Insulator Film Growth by Molecular Beam Epitaxy: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa P. Ginley

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we will review recent progress in the growth of topological insulator (TI thin films by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE. The materials we focus on are the V2-VI3 family of TIs. These materials are ideally bulk insulating with surface states housing Dirac excitations which are spin-momentum locked. These surface states are interesting for fundamental physics studies (such as the search for Majorana fermions as well as applications in spintronics and other fields. However, the majority of TI films and bulk crystals exhibit significant bulk conductivity, which obscures these states. In addition, many TI films have a high defect density. This review will discuss progress in reducing the bulk conductivity while increasing the crystal quality. We will describe in detail how growth parameters, substrate choice, and growth technique influence the resulting TI film properties for binary and ternary TIs. We then give an overview of progress in the growth of TI heterostructures. We close by discussing the bright future for TI film growth by MBE.

  7. Laser and optical system for laser assisted hydrogen ion beam stripping at SNS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Rakhman, A.; Menshov, A.; Webster, A.; Gorlov, T.; Aleksandrov, A.; Cousineau, S.

    2017-03-01

    Recently, a high-efficiency laser assisted hydrogen ion (H-) beam stripping was successfully carried out in the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accelerator. The experiment was not only an important step toward foil-less H- stripping for charge exchange injection, it also set up a first example of using megawatt ultraviolet (UV) laser source in an operational high power proton accelerator facility. This paper reports in detail the design, installation, and commissioning result of a macro-pulsed multi-megawatt UV laser system and laser beam transport line for the laser stripping experiment.

  8. Electron beam excitation assisted optical microscope with ultra-high resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inami, Wataru; Nakajima, Kentaro; Miyakawa, Atsuo; Kawata, Yoshimasa

    2010-06-07

    We propose electron beam excitation assisted optical microscope, and demonstrated its resolution higher than 50 nm. In the microscope, a light source in a few nanometers size is excited by focused electron beam in a luminescent film. The microscope makes it possible to observe dynamic behavior of living biological specimens in various surroundings, such as air or liquids. Scan speed of the nanometric light source is faster than that in conventional near-field scanning optical microscopes. The microscope enables to observe optical constants such as absorption, refractive index, polarization, and their dynamic behavior on a nanometric scale. The microscope opens new microscopy applications in nano-technology and nano-science.

  9. Metallic impurities in gallium nitride grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McHugo, S.A.; Krueger, J.; Kisielowski, C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Transition metals are often encountered in trace amounts in semiconductors. They have been extensively studied in most elemental and compound systems, since they form deep donor and/or acceptor levels which usually degrade the electronic and optical material properties. Only very little is known about transition metals in recent III-V semiconducting materials, such as GaN, AlN and InN. These few studies have been done exclusively on Metal-Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD) or Hybrid Vapor Phase Epitaxy HVPE-grown GaN. Preliminary x-ray fluorescence studies at the Advanced Light Source, beamline 10.3.1, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have revealed that GaN materials grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) have Fe, Ni and Cr as the dominant transition metal contaminants. This finding is commensurate with the extremely high concentrations of hydrogen, carbon and oxygen (up to 10{sup 20} cm{sup {minus}3}) measured by Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS). Preliminary work using the mapping capabilities of the x-ray fluorescence microprobe revealed the metal impurities were inhomogeneously distributed over the film. Future work of this collaboration will be to find a correlation between the existence of transition metals in MBE films, as revealed by x-ray fluorescence, and Photoluminescence (PL) spectra taken in the infrared region. Also, the authors will make use of the 1 {mu}m spatial resolution of x-ray microprobe to locate the contaminants in relation to structural defects in the GaN films. Because of the large strain caused by the lattice mismatch between the GaN films and the substrates, the films grow in a columnar order with high densities of grain boundaries and dislocations. These structural defects offer preferential sites for metal precipitation or agglomeration which could degrade the optical properties of this material more so than if the impurities were left dissolved in the GaN.

  10. Measurement of the density profile of pure and seeded molecular beams by femtosecond ion imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Congsen [LaserLaB Amsterdam, VU University Amsterdam, de Boelelaan 1083, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Physics, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); Janssen, Maurice H. M. [LaserLaB Amsterdam, VU University Amsterdam, de Boelelaan 1083, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-02-15

    Here, we report on femtosecond ion imaging experiments to measure the density profile of a pulsed supersonic molecular beam. Ion images are measured for both a molecular beam and bulk gas under identical experimental conditions via femtosecond multiphoton ionization of Xe atoms. We report the density profile of the molecular beam, and the measured absolute density is compared with theoretical calculations of the centre line beam density. Subsequently, we discuss reasons accounting for the differences between measurements and calculations and propose that strong skimmer interference is the most probable cause for the differences. Furthermore, we report on experiments measuring the centre line density of seeded supersonic beams. The femtosecond ion images show that seeding the heavy Xe atom at low relative seed fractions (1%-10%) in a light carrier gas like Ne results in strong relative enhancements of up to two orders of magnitude.

  11. Emission control of InGaN nanocolumns grown by molecular-beam epitaxy on Si(111) substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert, S.; Bengoechea-Encabo, A.; Sanchez-Garcia, M. A.; Calleja, E. [ISOM and Departamento de Ingenieria Electronica, ETSI Telecomunicacion, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Lefebvre, P. [ISOM and Departamento de Ingenieria Electronica, ETSI Telecomunicacion, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Universite Montpellier 2, F-34095 Montpellier, Cedex 5 (France); Jahn, U.; Trampert, A. [Paul-Drude-Institut fuer Festkoeperelektronik, Hausvogteiplatz 5-7, 10117 Berlin (Germany)

    2011-09-26

    This work studies the effect of the growth temperature on the morphology and emission characteristics of self-assembled InGaN nanocolumns grown by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Morphology changes are assessed by scanning electron microscopy, while emission is measured by photoluminescence. Within the growth temperature range of 750 to 650 deg. C, an increase in In incorporation for decreasing temperature is observed. This effect allows tailoring the InGaN nanocolumns emission line shape by using temperature gradients during growth. Depending on the gradient rate, span, and sign, broad emission line shapes are obtained, covering the yellow to green range, even yielding white emission.

  12. Manipulation and analysis of atomic and molecular beams using transmission gratings and Fresnel zone plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grisenti, R.E.

    2000-06-01

    In this thesis experimental results on the diffraction of rare gas atoms (He, Ne, Ar, Kr) and molecular (D{sub 2}) beams by a 100 nm period transmission grating and on the focusing of a helium atom beam through a Fresnel zone plate have been reported. (orig.)

  13. Observation of strong leakage reduction in crystal assisted collimation of the SPS beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Scandale

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In ideal two-stage collimation systems, the secondary collimator–absorber should have its length sufficient to exclude practically the exit of halo particles with large impact parameters. In the UA9 experiments on the crystal assisted collimation of the SPS beam a 60 cm long tungsten bar is used as a secondary collimator–absorber which is insufficient for the full absorption of the halo protons. Multi-turn simulation studies of the collimation allowed to select the position for the beam loss monitor downstream the collimation area where the contribution of particles deflected by the crystal in channeling regime but emerging from the secondary collimator–absorber is considerably reduced. This allowed observation of a strong leakage reduction of halo protons from the SPS beam collimation area, thereby approaching the case with an ideal absorber.

  14. Stress in ion-beam assisted silicon dioxide and tantalum pentoxide thin films

    CERN Document Server

    Sirotkina, N

    2003-01-01

    Ta sub 2 O sub 5 and SiO sub 2 thin films, deposited at room temperature by ion-beam sputtering (IBS) and dual ion-beam sputtering (DIBS), and SiO sub 2 films, deposited by reactive e-beam evaporation and ion-assisted deposition, were studied. The energy (150-600 eV) and ion-to-atom arrival ratio (0.27-2.0) of assisting argon and oxygen ions were varied. Influence of deposition conditions (deposition system geometry, nature and amount of gas in the chamber, substrate cleaning and ion-assistance parameters) on films properties (stress, composition, refractive index n sub 5 sub 0 sub 0 sub n sub m and extinction coefficient k sub 5 sub 0 sub 0 sub n sub m) was investigated. A scanning method, based on substrate curvature measurements by laser reflection and stress calculation using the Stoney equation, was employed. RBS showed that stoichiometric Ta sub 2 O sub 5 films contain impurities of Ar, Fe and Mo. Stoichiometric SiO sub 2 films also contain Ta impurity. Argon content increases with ion bombardment and, ...

  15. Shaping of intensive secondary pulsed molecular beam and production of accelerated molecules and radicals in it

    CERN Document Server

    Makarov, G N

    2001-01-01

    The method is described for shaping the intensive secondary pulsed molecular beam, wherein the molecules kinetic energy may be controlled through the powerful IR laser radiation by means of the molecules oscillatory excitation in the source itself. The thickening jump (the shock wave), which is formed by interaction of the intensive pulsed supersonic molecular beam (or flux) with a solid surface, is used as the secondary beam source. The intensive (>= 10 sup 2 sup 0 molecules/stere. s) beams of the SF sub 6 and CF sub 3 I molecules with the kinetic energy correspondingly equal to approximately 1.5 eV and 1.2 eV without gas-carrier and molecular SF sub 6 beams with kinetic energy approx = 2.5 eV are obtained. The spectral and energy characteristics of the SF sub 6 molecules acceleration in the secondary beam are studied. The possibility of obtaining the accelerated radicals in the secondary molecular beam is indicated

  16. Production of radioactive molecular beams for CERN-ISOLDE

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)703149; Kröll, Thorsten

    SOLDE, the Isotope Separation On-Line facility, at CERN is a leading facility for the production of beams of exotic radioactive isotopes. Currently over 1000 different isotopes with half lives down to milliseconds can be extracted with beam intensities of up to 10^11 ions per second. However, due to the reactive target environment not all isotopes are extractable in sufficient amounts. In this work the extraction of short lived carbon and boron isotopes is investigated. Therefore a variety of experimental and computanional techniques have been used.

  17. Production of radioactive molecular beams for CERN-ISOLDE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seiffert, Christoph

    2015-06-15

    ISOLDE, the Isotope Separation On-Line facility, at CERN is a leading facility for the production of beams of exotic radioactive isotopes. Currently over 1000 different isotopes with half lives down to milliseconds can be extracted with beam intensities of up to 10{sup 11} ions per second. However, due to the reactive target environment not all isotopes are extractable in sufficient amounts. In this work the extraction of short lived carbon and boron isotopes is investigated. Therefore a variety of experimental and computational techniques have been used.

  18. Excipient-assisted vinpocetine nanoparticles: experiments and molecular dynamic simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cai-Xia; Wang, Hao-Bo; Oppong, Daniel; Wang, Jie-Xin; Chen, Jian-Feng; Le, Yuan

    2014-11-03

    Hydrophilic excipients can be used to increase the solubility and bioavailability of poorly soluble drugs. In this work, the conventional water-soluble pharmaceutical excipients hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC), polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), and lactose (LAC) were used as solid supports to prevent drug nanoparticles from aggregation and enhance drug dissolution. Excipient-assisted vinpocetine (VIN) nanoparticles were prepared by reactive precipitation. The analysis results indicated that HPMC was a suitable excipient to prepare VIN nanoparticles. VIN/HPMC nanoparticles had a mean size of 130 nm within a narrow distribution. The dissolution rate of VIN nanoparticles was significantly faster than those of a physical mixture of VIN/HPMC and raw VIN. VIN/HPMC nanoparticles had a higher dissolution profile than VIN/PVP and VIN/LAC nanoparticles. Besides, molecular dynamics (MD) simulation was applied to investigate the molecular interactions between VIN and excipients. The calculated results revealed that VIN interacted with excipients by Coulomb and Lennard-Jones (LJ) interactions. Few hydrogen bonds were formed between VIN and excipients. The HPMC affording smaller particle size may be a result of the stronger interactions between VIN and HPMC (mainly LJ interaction) and the property of HPMC. These characteristics may greatly influence the adsorption behavior and may be the crucial parameter for the better performance of HPMC.

  19. Irradiation-Assisted Stress-Corrosion Cracking of Nitinol During eBeam Sterilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Stuart A.; Gause, Brock; Plumley, David; Drexel, Masao J.

    2012-12-01

    Medical device fractures during gamma and electron beam (eBeam) sterilization have been reported. Two common factors in these device fractures were a constraining force and the presence of fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP). This study investigated the effects of eBeam sterilization on constrained light-oxide nitinol wires in FEP. The goal was to recreate these fractures and determine their root cause. Superelastic nitinol wires were placed inside FEP tubes and constrained with nominal outer fiber strains of 10, 15, and 20%. These samples were then subjected to a range of eBeam sterilization doses up to 400 kGy and compared with unconstrained wires also subjected to sterilization. Fractures were observed at doses of >100 kGy. Analysis of the fracture surfaces indicated that the samples failed due to irradiation-assisted stress-corrosion cracking (IASCC). This same effect was also observed to occur with PTFE at 400 kGy. These results suggest that nitinol is susceptible to IASCC when in the presence of a constraining stress, fluorinated polymers, and irradiation.

  20. Growth and magnetic property of antiperovskite manganese nitride films doped with Cu by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Fengmei; Ren, Lizhu; Meng, Meng; Wang, Yunjia; Yang, Mei; Wu, Shuxiang; Li, Shuwei

    2014-04-01

    Manganese nitrides thin films on MgO (100) substrates with and without Cu-doping have been fabricated by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Antiperovskite compounds Mn3.6Cu0.4N have been grown in the case of Cu-doping, and the pure Mn3N2 single crystal has been obtained without Cu-doping. The Mn3.6Cu0.4N exhibits ferrimagnetism, and the magnetization of Mn3.6Cu0.4N increases upon the temperature decreasing from 300 K to 5 K, similar to Mn4N. The exchange bias (EB) effects emerge in the Mn3.6Cu0.4N films. The EB behavior is originated from the interfaces between ferrimagnetic Mn3.6Cu0.4N and antiferromagnetic metal Mn, which is verified to be formed by the data of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The present results not only provide a strategy for producing functional antiperovskite manganese nitrides, but also shed promising light on fabricating the exchange bias part of spintronic devices.

  1. Growth and magnetic property of antiperovskite manganese nitride films doped with Cu by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Fengmei, E-mail: yufengmei401@126.com [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, School of Physics and Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Automation College, Zhongkai University of Agriculture and Engineering, Guangzhou 510225 (China); Ren, Lizhu; Meng, Meng; Wang, Yunjia; Yang, Mei; Wu, Shuxiang; Li, Shuwei, E-mail: stslsw@mail.sysu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, School of Physics and Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China)

    2014-04-07

    Manganese nitrides thin films on MgO (100) substrates with and without Cu-doping have been fabricated by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Antiperovskite compounds Mn{sub 3.6}Cu{sub 0.4}N have been grown in the case of Cu-doping, and the pure Mn{sub 3}N{sub 2} single crystal has been obtained without Cu-doping. The Mn{sub 3.6}Cu{sub 0.4}N exhibits ferrimagnetism, and the magnetization of Mn{sub 3.6}Cu{sub 0.4}N increases upon the temperature decreasing from 300 K to 5 K, similar to Mn{sub 4}N. The exchange bias (EB) effects emerge in the Mn{sub 3.6}Cu{sub 0.4}N films. The EB behavior is originated from the interfaces between ferrimagnetic Mn{sub 3.6}Cu{sub 0.4}N and antiferromagnetic metal Mn, which is verified to be formed by the data of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The present results not only provide a strategy for producing functional antiperovskite manganese nitrides, but also shed promising light on fabricating the exchange bias part of spintronic devices.

  2. Ion mass and energy selective hyperthermal ion-beam assisted deposition setup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlach, J. W.; Schumacher, P.; Mensing, M.; Rauschenbach, S.; Cermak, I.; Rauschenbach, B.

    2017-06-01

    For the synthesis of high-quality thin films, ion-beam assisted deposition (IBAD) is a frequently used technique providing precise control over several substantial film properties. IBAD typically relies on the use of a broad-beam ion source. Such ion sources suffer from the limitation that they deliver a blend of ions with different ion masses, each of them possessing a certain distribution of kinetic energy. In this paper, a compact experimental setup is presented that enables the separate control of ion mass and ion kinetic energy in the region of hyperthermal energies (few 1 eV - few 100 eV). This ion energy region is of increasing interest not only for ion-assisted film growth but also for the wide field of preparative mass spectrometry. The setup consists of a constricted glow-discharge plasma beam source and a tailor-made, compact quadrupole system equipped with entry and exit ion optics. It is demonstrated that the separation of monoatomic and polyatomic nitrogen ions (N+ and N2+) is accomplished. For both ion species, the kinetic energy is shown to be selectable in the region of hyperthermal energies. At the sample position, ion current densities are found to be in the order of 1 μA/cm2 and the full width at half maximum of the ion beam profile is in the order of 10 mm. Thus, the requirements for homogeneous deposition processes in sufficiently short periods of time are fulfilled. Finally, employing the described setup, for the first time in practice epitaxial GaN films were deposited. This opens up the opportunity to fundamentally study the influence of the simultaneous irradiation with hyperthermal ions on the thin film growth in IBAD processes and to increase the flexibility of the technique.

  3. Highly textured zinc oxide films by room temperature ion beam assisted deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koehl, D.; Wuttig, M. [I. Institute of Physics, RWTH Aachen University (Germany); Luysberg, M. [Ernst Ruska-Zentrum fuer Mikroskopie und Spektroskopie mit Elektronen/IFF, Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany)

    2009-10-15

    A new ion beam assisted sputter deposition technique has been developed which facilitates room temperature fabrication of thin ZnO films with exceptional structural order. The well-defined texture of these films is comparable to films deposited at elevated temperatures of typically 200-300 C in standard sputter processes. Structural investigations reveal that the applied Xe{sup +} ion bombardment mainly affects the nucleation of ZnO crystallites. The high structural order of the nucleation layer is maintained in subsequent stages of film growth. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  4. A free jet (supersonic), molecular beam source with automatized, 50 nm precision nozzle-skimmer positioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eder, S. D.; Samelin, B.; Bracco, G.; Ansperger, K.; Holst, B.

    2013-09-01

    Low energy (thermal) free jet (supersonic) molecular beams are used in a range of applications from surface science and surface deposition to quantum coherence and gas kinetics experiments. A free jet molecular beam is created by a gas expansion from a high pressure reservoir through a small aperture (nozzle). The nozzle typically has a diameter of 2-20 μm. The central part of the beam is selected using a skimmer, typically up to 500 μm in diameter. Recent years have seen the introduction of highly spatially confined beam sources based on micrometer skimmers and micrometer or even sub-micrometer nozzles. Such sources have been applied, for example, in the investigation of superfluidity and in neutral helium microscopy. However, up till now no source design allowing the precise positioning of the micro-skimmer relative to the nozzle has been available. This is an important issue because the relative position of skimmer and nozzle can influence the beam properties considerably. Here we present the design and implementation of a new molecular beam source, which allows an automatized, 50 nm precision positioning of the skimmer relative to the nozzle. The source is liquid nitrogen cooled and the temperature can be controlled between 110 K and 350 K with a temperature fluctuation of less than ±0.1 K over several hours. Beam intensity measurements using a 5 μm nozzle and a skimmer 5 μm in diameter are presented for stagnation pressures po in the range 3-180 bars. A 2D beam profile scan, using a 9.5 μm skimmer and a 5 μm nozzle is presented as a further documentation of the versatility of the new design and as an illustration of the influence of the relative skimmer-nozzle position on the beam properties.

  5. Ion - beam assisted process in the physical deposition of organic thin layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimov, D; Spassova, E; Assa, J; Danev, G [Acad. J .Malinowski Central Laboratory of Photoprocesses, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bonchev Str., Bl.109, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Georgiev, A, E-mail: dean@clf.bas.b [University of Chemical Technology and Metallurgy, 8 Kl. Ohridski Blvd., 1756 Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2010-04-01

    A novel method was developed for physical deposition of thin polyimide layers by applying an argon plasma assisted process. The influence was investigated of the plasma on the combined molecular flux of the two thermally evaporated precursors - oxydianiline and pyromellitic dianhydride. The effects observed on the properties of the deposited films are explained with the increased energy of the precursor molecules resulting from the ion-molecular collisions. As could be expected, molecules with higher energy possess higher mobility and thus determine the modification of the films structure and their electrical properties.

  6. Quantum state specific reactant preparation in a molecular beam by rapid adiabatic passage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chadwick, Helen, E-mail: helen.chadwick@epfl.ch; Hundt, P. Morten; Reijzen, Maarten E. van; Yoder, Bruce L.; Beck, Rainer D. [Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Moléculaire, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2014-01-21

    Highly efficient preparation of molecules in a specific rovibrationally excited state for gas/surface reactivity measurements is achieved in a molecular beam using tunable infrared (IR) radiation from a single mode continuous wave optical parametric oscillator (cw-OPO). We demonstrate that with appropriate focusing of the IR radiation, molecules in the molecular beam crossing the fixed frequency IR field experience a Doppler tuning that can be adjusted to achieve complete population inversion of a two-level system by rapid adiabatic passage (RAP). A room temperature pyroelectric detector is used to monitor the excited fraction in the molecular beam and the population inversion is detected and quantified using IR bleaching by a second IR-OPO. The second OPO is also used for complete population transfer to an overtone or combination vibration via double resonance excitation using two spatially separated RAP processes.

  7. Peculiarities of fullerenes condensation from molecular beam in vacuum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neluba P. L.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available There was investigated С60 fullerenes condensation in vacuum on unheated Si, GaAs, isinglass stone substrates. There were used atomic-force microscopy, Raman scattering and measurement of mechanical stresses in films. It is established that the С60 molecule can decay on the substrates with the formation of other carbon structures in the condensate without supplementary physical effects on the sublimated beam in «evaporator — substrate» space. The possibility was found to increase the grain size and reduce the mechanical stresses in the condensate.

  8. Molecular Beam Studies of Hot Atom Chemical Reactions: Reactive Scattering of Energetic Deuterium Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Continetti, R. E.; Balko, B. A.; Lee, Y. T.

    1989-02-01

    A brief review of the application of the crossed molecular beams technique to the study of hot atom chemical reactions in the last twenty years is given. Specific emphasis is placed on recent advances in the use of photolytically produced energetic deuterium atoms in the study of the fundamental elementary reactions D + H{sub 2} -> DH + H and the substitution reaction D + C{sub 2}H{sub 2} -> C{sub 2}HD + H. Recent advances in uv laser and pulsed molecular beam techniques have made the detailed study of hydrogen atom reactions under single collision conditions possible.

  9. Molecular beam studies of hot atom chemical reactions: Reactive scattering of energetic deuterium atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Continetti, R.E.; Balko, B.A.; Lee, Y.T.

    1989-02-01

    A brief review of the application of the crossed molecular beams technique to the study of hot atom chemical reactions in the last twenty years is given. Specific emphasis is placed on recent advances in the use of photolytically produced energetic deuterium atoms in the study of the fundamental elementary reactions D + H/sub 2/ /minus/> DH + H and the substitution reaction D + C/sub 2/H/sub 2/ /minus/> C/sub 2/HD + H. Recent advances in uv laser and pulsed molecular beam techniques have made the detailed study of hydrogen atom reactions under single collision conditions possible. 18 refs., 9 figs.

  10. Texture evolution of transition-metal nitride thin films by ion beam assisted deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, C.-H.; Huang, J.-H.; Chen, Haydn

    2004-01-15

    TiN, VN and CrN were systematically deposited on silicon substrates using ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD) technique at temperatures and ion (N{sub 2}{sup +}) energy ranging from 300 deg. C to 500 deg. C and 100 eV to 650 eV, respectively. The results showed that the texture could be controlled by the ion beam energy, flux, and its incident angle, in conjunction with the deposition temperature. For the 0 deg. angle of ion incidence, fiber textures were formed and could be controlled between (111) and (200) surface plane orientation by adjusting ion flux or ion energy. Three types of in-plane textures were produced, when the ion beam was incident at 45 deg. angle, for which cases ion channeling played an important role in the formation of in-plane texture. Using the strain-energy perturbation method, the stability of texture can be further understood. Among the three in-plane textures, the (200) in-plane texture is strain-energy stable, and the others are not.

  11. Collision dynamics of methyl radicals and highly vibrationally excited molecules using crossed molecular beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, P.M.Y.

    1991-10-01

    The vibrational to translational (V{yields}T) energy transfer in collisions between large highly vibrationally excited polyatomics and rare gases was investigated by time-of-flight techniques. Two different methods, UV excitation followed by intemal conversion and infrared multiphoton excitation (IRMPE), were used to form vibrationally excited molecular beams of hexafluorobenzene and sulfur hexafluoride, respectively. The product translational energy was found to be independent of the vibrational excitation. These results indicate that the probability distribution function for V{yields}T energy transfer is peaked at zero. The collisional relaxation of large polyatomic molecules with rare gases most likely occurs through a rotationally mediated process. Photodissociation of nitrobenzene in a molecular beam was studied at 266 nm. Two primary dissociation channels were identified including simple bond rupture to produce nitrogen dioxide and phenyl radical and isomerization to form nitric oxide and phenoxy radical. The time-of-flight spectra indicate that simple bond rupture and isomerization occurs via two different mechanisms. Secondary dissociation of the phenoxy radicals to carbon monoxide and cyclopentadienyl radicals was observed as well as secondary photodissociation of phenyl radical to give H atom and benzyne. A supersonic methyl radical beam source is developed. The beam source configuration and conditions were optimized for CH{sub 3} production from the thermal decomposition of azomethane. Elastic scattering of methyl radical and neon was used to differentiate between the methyl radicals and the residual azomethane in the molecular beam.

  12. Collision dynamics of methyl radicals and highly vibrationally excited molecules using crossed molecular beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, Pamela Mei-Ying [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1991-10-01

    The vibrational to translational (V→T) energy transfer in collisions between large highly vibrationally excited polyatomics and rare gases was investigated by time-of-flight techniques. Two different methods, UV excitation followed by intemal conversion and infrared multiphoton excitation (IRMPE), were used to form vibrationally excited molecular beams of hexafluorobenzene and sulfur hexafluoride, respectively. The product translational energy was found to be independent of the vibrational excitation. These results indicate that the probability distribution function for V→T energy transfer is peaked at zero. The collisional relaxation of large polyatomic molecules with rare gases most likely occurs through a rotationally mediated process. Photodissociation of nitrobenzene in a molecular beam was studied at 266 nm. Two primary dissociation channels were identified including simple bond rupture to produce nitrogen dioxide and phenyl radical and isomerization to form nitric oxide and phenoxy radical. The time-of-flight spectra indicate that simple bond rupture and isomerization occurs via two different mechanisms. Secondary dissociation of the phenoxy radicals to carbon monoxide and cyclopentadienyl radicals was observed as well as secondary photodissociation of phenyl radical to give H atom and benzyne. A supersonic methyl radical beam source is developed. The beam source configuration and conditions were optimized for CH3 production from the thermal decomposition of azomethane. Elastic scattering of methyl radical and neon was used to differentiate between the methyl radicals and the residual azomethane in the molecular beam.

  13. Production of a slit skimmer for use in cold supersonic molecular beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Ranga; Sulkes, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Cold molecular beams generated by skimming pulsed supersonic gas expansions normally employ conical skimmers. The use of slit shaped skimmers instead of conical skimmers can afford significant signal enhancements. At this time, however, slit shaped skimmers are not available commercially. We describe a straightforward method for producing functional slit skimmers.

  14. History of Molecular Beam Research: Personal Reminiscences of the Important Evolutionary Period 1919-1933

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estermann, Immanuel

    1975-01-01

    Describes the early historical period of the molecular beam method, including the Stern-Gerlach experiment, the work of Davisson and Germer, and the magnetic moment determinations for the proton, neutron, and deuteron. Contains some amusing historical sidelights on the research personalities that dominated that period. (MLH)

  15. Molecular beam epitaxy growth of InSb1−xBix thin films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Yuxin; Wang, Shumin; Saha Roy, Ivy

    2013-01-01

    Molecular beam epitaxy growth for InSb1−xBix thin films on (100) GaAs substrates is reported. Successful Bi incorporation for 2% is achieved, and up to 70% of the incorporated Bi atoms are at substitutional sites. The effects of growth parameters on Bi incorporation and surface morphology...

  16. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Studies of Topological Insulators Grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Qikun

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We summarize our recent scanning tunneling microscopy (STM study of topological insulator thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE, which includes the observation of electron standing waves on topological insulator surface and the Landau quantization of topological surface states. The work has provided valuable information to the understanding of intriguing properties of topological insulators, as predicted by theory.

  17. Next Generation Molecular Histology Using Highly Multiplexed Ion Beam Imaging (MIBI) of Breast Cancer Tissue Specimens for Enhanced Clinical Guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH- 14-1-0192 TITLE: Next-Generation Molecular Histology Using Highly Multiplexed Ion Beam Imaging (MIBI) of Breast Cancer...DATES COVERED 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Next-Generation Molecular Histology Using Highly Multiplexed Ion Beam Imaging (MIBI) of Breast Cancer Tissue

  18. GaN-based LEDs grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Averbeck, Robert; Graber, A.; Tews, H.; Bernklau, D.; Barnhoefer, Ulrich; Riechert, Henning

    1998-04-01

    We report on the growth of GaN, InGaN and GaN/InGaN/GaN pn- junctions grown on sapphire by RF-plasma assisted MBE. MBE allows us to grow high quality nitrides with growth rates around 1 micrometers /h at relatively low temperatures. Thereby p- type doping with Mg and the incorporation of In in InGaN are greatly facilitated. Device-typical n- and p-type doping levels yield room temperature mobilities of 220 cm2/Vs and 10 cm2/Vs, respectively. InGaN with In contents of more than 40 percent is readily achieved. LEDs fabricated from heterostructures with a 4 nm InGaN layer show bright blue or green electroluminescence depending on the In content. Various effects in the electroluminescence caused by fluctuations in the conduction and valence band will be discussed, the most striking one a reduction in linewidth with increasing temperature.

  19. Incorporation and optical properties of magnesium in cubic GaN epilayers grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    As, D. J.; Simonsmeier, T.; Schöttker, B.; Frey, T.; Schikora, D.; Kriegseis, W.; Burkhardt, W.; Meyer, B. K.

    1998-09-01

    The incorporation and optical properties of Mg in cubic GaN (c-GaN) epilayers grown by rf plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy on (100) GaAs are investigated by secondary ion mass spectroscopy and low-temperature photoluminescence (PL). By varying the Mg flux by more than four orders of magnitude, the incorporation of Mg saturates at high Mg flux and is limited to a value of about 5×1018cm-3 due to the high volatility of Mg at growth temperature. In addition, we observe an accumulation of Mg at the GaN/GaAs interface due to a diffusion of Mg to the GaAs substrate. Low-temperature PL spectra reveal several well-separated lines. Besides a shallow acceptor level at EA≅0.230 eV, additional Mg-related deep defect levels indicate an incorporation of Mg at off-gallium sites or as complexes.

  20. Electron collisions and internal excitation in stored molecular ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buhr, H.

    2006-07-26

    In storage ring experiments the role, which the initial internal excitation of a molecular ion can play in electron collisions, and the effect of these collisions on the internal excitation are investigated. Dissociative recombination (DR) and inelastic and super-elastic collisions are studied in the system of He{sup +}{sub 2}. The DR rate coefficient at low energies depends strongly on the initial vibrational excitation in this system. Therefore changes in the DR rate coefficient are a very sensitive probe for changes in the vibrational excitation in He{sup +}{sub 2}, which is used to investigate the effects of collisions with electrons and residual gas species. The low-energy DR of HD{sup +} is rich with resonances from the indirect DR process, when certain initial rotational levels in the molecular ion are coupled to levels in neutral Rydberg states lying below the ion state. Using new procedures for high-resolution electron-ion collision spectroscopy developed here, these resonances in the DR cross section can be measured with high energy sensitivity. This allows a detailed comparison with results of a MQDT calculation in an effort to assign some or all of the resonances to certain intermediate Rydberg levels. (orig.)

  1. Ultra high resolution molecular beam cars spectroscopy with application to planetary atmospheric molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byer, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    The measurement of high resolution pulsed and continuous wave (CW) coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) measurements in pulsed and steady state supersonic expansions were demonstrated. Pulsed molecular beam sources were characterized, and saturation of a Raman transition and, for the first time, the Raman spectrum of a complex molecular cluster were observed. The observation of CW CARS spectra in a molecular expansion and the effects of transit time broadening is described. Supersonic expansion is established as a viable technique for high resolution Raman spectroscopy of cold molecules with resolutions of 100 MH2.

  2. Cluster beam steering onto silicon surfaces studied by molecular dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Mazzone, A M

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of the impact conditions on cluster deposition in silicon and is motivated by recent results obtained using a variable incidence angle during deposition of metallic clusters and atoms. Therefore deposition of silicon clusters with a kinetic energy in the range from 0.5 to 10 eV/atom directed at normal and grazing incidence onto crystalline silicon has been studied using a molecular dynamics simulation method. The influence of other relevant parameters, such as the interatomic forces and the cluster size and shape, has also been investigated. This study shows that the physics of deposition is almost entirely dictated by the nature of the interatomic forces. When using potentials with the four-fold coordination typical of bulk a clear dependence on the size N is observed and the spreading index eta decreases with the increase of N for all incidence conditions. The cluster binding strength is perceptibly increased when using a potential accounting for the c...

  3. Tilting of carbon encapsulated metallic nanocolumns in carbon-nickel nanocomposite films by ion beam assisted deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, Matthias [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, PF-510119, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Technische Universitaet Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Muecklich, Arndt; Zschornak, Matthias; Wintz, Sebastian; Gemming, Sibylle; Abrasonis, Gintautas [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, PF-510119, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Oates, Thomas W. H. [Leibniz-Institut fuer Analytische Wissenschaft, ISAS e.V., Albert-Einstein-Str. 9, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Luis Endrino, Jose [Surfaces and Coatings Department, Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, c/Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Baehtz, Carsten; Shalimov, Artem [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, PF-510119, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Rossendorf Beamline, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, F-38043 Grenoble (France)

    2012-07-30

    The influence of assisting low-energy ({approx}50-100 eV) ion irradiation effects on the morphology of C:Ni ({approx}15 at. %) nanocomposite films during ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD) is investigated. It is shown that IBAD promotes the columnar growth of carbon encapsulated metallic nanoparticles. The momentum transfer from assisting ions results in tilting of the columns in relation to the growing film surface. Complex secondary structures are obtained, in which a significant part of the columns grows under local epitaxy via the junction of sequentially deposited thin film fractions. The influence of such anisotropic film morphology on the optical properties is highlighted.

  4. Molecular Beam Optical Study of Gold Sulfide and Gold Oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruohan; Yu, Yuanqin; Steimle, Timothy

    2016-06-01

    Gold-sulfur and gold-oxygen bonds are key components to numerous established and emerging technologies that have applications as far ranging as medical imaging, catalysis, electronics, and material science. A major theoretical challenge for describing this bonding is correctly accounting for the large relativistic and electron correlation effects. Such effects are best studied in diatomic, AuX, molecules. Recently, the observed AuS electronic state energy ordering was measured and compared to a simple molecular orbital diagram prediction. Here we more thoroughly investigate the nature of the electronic states of both AuS and AuO from the analysis of high-resolution (FWHM\\cong35MHz) optical Zeeman spectroscopy of the (0,0){B}2Σ--{X}2Π3/2 bands. The determined fine and hyperfine parameters for the {B}2Σ- state of AuO differ from those extracted from the analysis of a hot, Doppler-limited, spectrum. It is demonstrated that the nature of the {B}2Σ- states of AuO and AuS are radically different. The magnetic tuning of AuO and AuS indicates that the {B}2Σ- states are heavily contaminated. Supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No.1265885. D. L. Kokkin, R. Zhang, T. C. Steimle, I. A. Wyse, B. W. Pearlman and T. D. Varberg, J. Phys. Chem. A., 119(48), 4412, 2015. L. C. O'Brien, B. A. Borchert, A. Farquhar, S. Shaji, J. J. O'Brien and R. W. Field, J. Mol. Spectrosc., 252(2), 136, 2008

  5. Comparison of the optical properties of Er{sup 3+} doped gallium nitride prepared by metalorganic molecular beam epitaxy (MOMBE) and solid source molecular beam epitaxy (SSMBE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoemmerich, U.; Seo, J.T.; MacKenzie, J.D.; Abernathy, C.R.; Birkhahn, R.; Steckl, A.J.; Zavada, J.M.

    2000-07-01

    The authors report on the luminescence properties of Er doped GaN grown prepared by metalorganic molecular beam epitaxy (MOMBE) and solid-source molecular beam epitaxy (SSMBE) on Si substrates. Both types of samples emitted characteristic 1.54 {micro}m PL resulting from the intra-4f Er{sup 3+} transition {sup 4}I{sub 13/2} {yields} {sup 4}I{sub 15/2}. Under below-gap excitation the samples exhibited very similar 1.54 {micro}m PL intensities. On the contrary, under above-gap excitation GaN:Er (SSMBE) showed {approximately}80 times more intense 1.54 {micro}m PL than GaN:Er (MOMBE). In addition, GaN:Er (SSMBE) also emitted intense green luminescence at 537 nm and 558 nm, which was not observed from GaN:Er (MOMBE). The average lifetime of the green PL was determined to be 10.8 {micro}s at 15 K and 5.5 {micro}s at room temperature. A preliminary lifetime analysis suggests that the decrease in lifetime is mainly due to the strong thermalization between the {sup 2}H{sub 11/2} and {sup 4}S{sub 3/2} excited states. Nonradiative decay processes are expected to only weakly affect the green luminescence.

  6. Improved stability of organic light-emitting diode with aluminum cathodes prepared by ion beam assisted deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soon Moon Jeong, Deuk Yeon Lee, Won Hoe Koo, Sang Hun Choi, Hong Koo Baik, Se-Jong Lee and Kie Moon Song

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We have fabricated highly stable organic electroluminescent devices based on spin-coated poly-p-phenylene-vynylene (PPV thin films. The electrical properties of aluminum cathode, prepared by ion beam assisted deposition, on PPV have been investigated and compared to those by thermal evaporation. Although energetic particles of Al assisted by Ar+ ion may damage the organic material, I–V–L characteristics are improved by applying thin Al buffer layer. In addition, a dense Al cathode inhibits the permeation of H2O and O2 into PPV film through pinhole defects, and thus retards dark spot growth. It may be deduced from highly packed structure of Al cathode with an increase in the contact area between Al and PPV that reduce the contact resistance. In conclusion, the lifetime of organic light-emitting device (OLED has been extended effectively by dense Al film through ion beam assisted deposition process.

  7. Molecular beam epitaxial growth of layered Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlom, D. G.; Marshall, A. F.; Sizemore, J. T.; Chen, Z. J.; Eckstein, J. N.

    1990-05-01

    The in situ epitaxial growth of Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O films by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) is reported. The suitability of various oxidants for the MBE growth of cuprate superconductors is discussed, and the use of ozone described. Molecular beams of the constituents were periodically shuttered to grow various Bi2Sr2Ca(n-1)Cu(n)O(x) phases, including 2201, 2212, 2223, 2245, and layered 2212/2223 and 2223/2234 mixtures. Some of the films grown in this way were superconducting as grown. The ability of MBE to grow layered, probably metastable Bi2Sr2Ca(n-1)Cu(n)O(x) films is demonstrated.

  8. Gas Source Techniques for Molecular Beam Epitaxy of Highly Mismatched Ge Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad A. Stephenson

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Ge and its alloys are attractive candidates for a laser compatible with silicon integrated circuits. Dilute germanium carbide (Ge1−xCx offers a particularly interesting prospect. By using a precursor gas with a Ge4C core, C can be preferentially incorporated in substitutional sites, suppressing interstitial and C cluster defects. We present a method of reproducible and upscalable gas synthesis of tetrakis(germylmethane, or (H3Ge4C, followed by the design of a hybrid gas/solid-source molecular beam epitaxy system and subsequent growth of defect-free Ge1−xCx by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and contactless electroreflectance confirm the presence of carbon with very high crystal quality resulting in a decrease in the direct bandgap energy. This technique has broad applicability to growth of highly mismatched alloys by MBE.

  9. An effusive molecular beam technique for studies of polyatomic gas-surface reactivity and energy transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushing, G. W.; Navin, J. K.; Valadez, L.; Johánek, V.; Harrison, I.

    2011-04-01

    An effusive molecular beam technique is described to measure alkane dissociative sticking coefficients, S(Tg, Ts; ϑ), on metal surfaces for which the impinging gas temperature, Tg, and surface temperature, Ts, can be independently varied, along with the angle of incidence, ϑ, of the impinging gas. Effusive beam experiments with Tg = Ts = T allow for determination of angle-resolved dissociative sticking coefficients, S(T; ϑ), which when averaged over the cos (ϑ)/π angular distribution appropriate to the impinging flux from a thermal ambient gas yield the thermal dissociative sticking coefficient, S(T). Nonequilibrium S(Tg, Ts; ϑ) measurements for which Tg ≠ Ts provide additional opportunities to characterize the transition state and gas-surface energy transfer at reactive energies. A resistively heated effusive molecular beam doser controls the Tg of the impinging gas striking the surface. The flux of molecules striking the surface from the effusive beam is determined from knowledge of the dosing geometry, chamber pressure, and pumping speed. Separate experiments with a calibrated leak serve to fix the chamber pumping speed. Postdosing Auger electron spectroscopy is used to measure the carbon of the alkyl radical reaction product that is deposited on the surface as a result of alkane dissociative sticking. As implemented in a typical ultrahigh vacuum chamber for surface analysis, the technique has provided access to a dynamic range of roughly 6 orders of magnitude in the initial dissociative sticking coefficient for small alkanes on Pt(111).

  10. High breakdown single-crystal GaN p-n diodes by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Meng; Nomoto, Kazuki; Zhu, Mingda; Hu, Zongyang; Zhao, Yuning; Protasenko, Vladimir; Song, Bo; Yan, Xiaodong; Li, Guowang; Verma, Jai; Bader, Samuel; Fay, Patrick; Xing, Huili Grace; Jena, Debdeep

    2015-12-01

    Molecular beam epitaxy grown GaN p-n vertical diodes are demonstrated on single-crystal GaN substrates. A low leakage current GaN. Single-crystal GaN substrates with very low dislocation densities enable the low leakage current and the high breakdown field in the diodes, showing significant potential for MBE growth to attain near-intrinsic performance when the density of dislocations is low.

  11. Molecular depth profiling of trehalose using a C{sub 60} cluster ion beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wucher, Andreas [Department of Physics, University of Duisburg-Essen, D-47048 Duisburg (Germany)], E-mail: andreas.wucher@uni-due.de; Cheng Juan; Winograd, Nicholas [Department of Chemistry, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2008-12-15

    Molecular depth profiling of organic overlayers was performed using a mass selected fullerene ion beam in conjunction with time-of-flight (TOF-SIMS) mass spectrometry. The characteristics of depth profiles acquired on a 300-nm trehalose film on Si were studied as a function of the impact kinetic energy and charge state of the C{sub 60} projectile ions. We find that the achieved depth resolution depends only weakly upon energy.

  12. Ion beams application to modification of surface layer of solids with particular regard to IBAD method - ion beam assisted deposition realized in the INP; Zastosowanie wiazek jonowych do modyfikowania warstwy wierzchniej cial stalych, ze szczegolnym uwzglednieniem metody IBAD - Ion Beam Assisted Deposition, realizowanej w IFJ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drwiega, M.; Lipinska, E.

    1992-12-31

    The different trends in ion engineering such as: dynamic ion mixing, ionized cluster beam deposition and ion beam assisted deposition are described. Some examples of properties of surface coatings are given and their applications are presented. The future of ion engineering is described. 48 refs, 12 figs, 4 tabs.

  13. Hybrid AlGaAs/GaAs/AlGaAs nanowires with a quantum dot grown by molecular beam epitaxy on silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cirlin, G. E., E-mail: cirlin@beam.ioffe.ru; Shtrom, I. V.; Reznik, R. R.; Samsonenko, Yu. B.; Khrebtov, A. I.; Bouravleuv, A. D.; Soshnikov, I. P. [St. Petersburg Academic University, Russian Academy of Sciences (Russian Federation)

    2016-11-15

    Data on the growth features and physical properties of GaAs inserts embedded in AlGaAs nanowires grown on Si(111) substrates by Au-assisted molecular beam epitaxy are presented. It is shown that by varying the growth parameters it is possible to form structures like quantum dots emitting in a wide wavelength range for both active and barrier regions. The technology proposed opens up new possibilities for the integration of direct-band III–V materials on silicon.

  14. Interaction of polar molecules with resonant radio frequency electric fields: imaging of the NO molecular beam splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cáceres, J O; Morato, M; González Ureña, A

    2006-12-28

    The interaction between a NO supersonic beam and a resonant radio frequency (RF) field is investigated using laser ionization coupled to imaging techniques. It is shown how the resonant interaction leads to a beam splitting of +/-0.2 degrees toward both positive and negative direction perpendicular to the beam propagation axis. This phenomenon is rationalized using a model based on molecular interferences produced by the action of the resonant RF electric field.

  15. Customized atomic force microscopy probe by focused-ion-beam-assisted tip transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Andrew; Butte, Manish J., E-mail: manish.butte@stanford.edu [Department of Pediatrics, Division of Immunology, Allergy and Rheumatology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2014-08-04

    We present a technique for transferring separately fabricated tips onto tipless atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers, performed using focused ion beam-assisted nanomanipulation. This method addresses the need in scanning probe microscopy for certain tip geometries that cannot be achieved by conventional lithography. For example, in probing complex layered materials or tall biological cells using AFM, a tall tip with a high-aspect-ratio is required to avoid artifacts caused by collisions of the tip's sides with the material being probed. We show experimentally that tall (18 μm) cantilever tips fabricated by this approach reduce squeeze-film damping, which fits predictions from hydrodynamic theory, and results in an increased quality factor (Q) of the fundamental flexural mode. We demonstrate that a customized tip's well-defined geometry, tall tip height, and aspect ratio enable improved measurement of elastic moduli by allowing access to low-laying portions of tall cells (T lymphocytes). This technique can be generally used to attach tips to any micromechanical device when conventional lithography of tips cannot be accomplished.

  16. Electron transfer processes of atomic and molecular doubly charged ions: information from beam experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Zdenek

    2013-07-01

    Single-electron transfer reactions in collisions of atomic and molecular doubly charged ions, with atoms and molecules, were investigated in a series of crossed-beam scattering, translational spectroscopy and product luminescence experiments. Investigation of a series of atomic dication-atom electron transfer at collision energies of 0.1-10 eV provided data on differential and relative total cross sections of state-to-state processes. Populations of electronic and vibrational states and rotational temperatures of molecular product ions were obtained from studies of non-dissociative electron transfer in systems containing simple molecular dications and/or molecular targets. The product electronic states populated with highest probability were those for which the translational energy release was 3-5 eV, indicating that the 'reaction window' concept, based on the Landau-Zener formalism, is applicable also to molecular systems. Population of the vibrational states of the molecular products could be described by Franck-Condon factors of the vertical transitions between the reactant and product states, especially at higher (keV) collision energies. Rotational temperature of the product molecular cations was found to be surprisingly low, mostly 400-500 K, practically the temperature of the ion source.

  17. Marker-assisted selection of high molecular weight glutenin alleles ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bread-making quality in hexaploid wheats is a complex trait. It has been shown that the amount and composition of protein can influence dough rheological properties. The high-molecular-weight (HMW) glutenins are encoded by a complex locus, Glu-1, on the long arm of group-1 homoeologus chromosome of the A, B and ...

  18. Laser-assisted electron diffraction for femtosecond molecular imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morimoto, Yuya; Kanya, Reika [Department of Chemistry, School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Yamanouchi, Kaoru, E-mail: kaoru@chem.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Chemistry, School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); NANOQUINE, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2014-02-14

    We report the observation of laser-assisted electron diffraction (LAED) through the collision of 1 keV electrons with gas-phase CCl{sub 4} molecules in a femtosecond near-infrared laser field. In the angular distribution of the scattered electrons with the energy shifts of ±ℏω, we observed clear diffraction patterns which reflect the geometrical structure of the molecules at the moment of laser irradiation. Our results demonstrate that ultrafast nuclear dynamics of molecules can be probed by LAED with the high temporal (<10 fs) and spatial (∼0.01 Å) resolutions.

  19. Intense electron beams from GaAs photocathodes as a tool for molecular and atomic physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krantz, Claude

    2009-10-28

    We present cesium-coated GaAs photocathodes as reliable sources of intense, quasi-monoenergetic electron beams in atomic and molecular physics experiments. In long-time operation of the Electron Target of the ion storage ring TSR in Heidelberg, cold electron beams could be realised at steadily improving intensity and reliability. Minimisation of processes degrading the quantum efficiency allowed to increase the extractable current to more than 1mA at usable cathode lifetimes of 24 h or more. The benefits of the cold electron beam with respect to its application to electron cooling and electron-ion recombination experiments are discussed. Benchmark experiments demonstrate the superior cooling force and energy resolution of the photoelectron beam compared to its thermionic counterparts. The long period of operation allowed to study the long-time behaviour of the GaAs samples during multiple usage cycles at the Electron Target and repeated in-vacuum surface cleaning by atomic hydrogen exposure. An electron emission spectroscopy setup has been implemented at the photocathode preparation chamber of the Electron Target. Among others, this new facility opened the way to a novel application of GaAs (Cs) photocathodes as robust, ultraviolet-driven electron emitters. Based on this principle, a prototype of an electron gun, designed for implementation at the HITRAP setup at GSI, has been built and taken into operation successfully. (orig.)

  20. Molecular beam study of the kinetics of the fluorine--uranium dioxide reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machiels, A.J.

    1976-12-01

    The kinetics of uranium dioxide fluorination were studied using an experimental system in which a molecular beam of fluorine was directed at a heated uranium dioxide single crystal wafer maintained in high vacuum. Gaseous reaction products desorbed from the uranium dioxide were monitored by a quadrupole mass spectrometer with an off-axis electron multiplier. The fluorine beam was modulated; ac phase-lock detection and pulse counting were employed to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio. The uranium dioxide targets were heated from the rear by electron bombardment to a maximum of 1800/sup 0/K. Fluorination of the uranium dioxide was found to produce uranium tetrafluoride in the 900/sup 0/ to 1600/sup 0/K temperature range, confirming the results obtained from thermodynamic considerations (quasi-equilibrium analysis). Fluorination of the uranium dioxide was found to be affected by some process acting as a flywheel smoothing the phase response of the interaction as the modulation frequency was varied.

  1. Free vibration analysis of microtubules based on the molecular mechanics and continuum beam theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin; Wang, Chengyuan

    2016-10-01

    A molecular structural mechanics (MSM) method has been implemented to investigate the free vibration of microtubules (MTs). The emphasis is placed on the effects of the configuration and the imperfect boundaries of MTs. It is shown that the influence of protofilament number on the fundamental frequency is strong, while the effect of helix-start number is almost negligible. The fundamental frequency is also found to decrease as the number of the blocked filaments at boundaries decreases. Subsequently, the Euler-Bernoulli beam theory is employed to reveal the physics behind the simulation results. Fitting the Euler-Bernoulli beam into the MSM data leads to an explicit formula for the fundamental frequency of MTs with various configurations and identifies a possible correlation between the imperfect boundary conditions and the length-dependent bending stiffness of MTs reported in experiments.

  2. Radiative deflection of a BaF molecular beam via optical cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tao; Bu, Wenhao; Yan, Bo

    2017-11-01

    We demonstrate a quasioptical cycling for the X (v =0 ) →A (v'=0 ) transition and a radiative force-induced deflection on the buffer-gas-cooled BaF molecular beam. The laser-induced fluorescence enhancement with additional sidebands and a polarization modulation scheme indicates that the hyperfine states and the Zeeman sublevels are closed. The quasioptical cycling by repumping the X (v =1 ) →A (v'=0 ) leads to an ˜0.8 -mm deflection of the beam via scattering ˜150 photons per molecule, in good agreement with the predictions from our multilevel rate equation model. Further improvement by closing the leakage X (v =2 ) and Δ state allows scattering of thousands of photons and laser cooling and slowing of BaF.

  3. A Versatile Molecular Beam Epitaxy System for Low-Temperature STM: Instrument Design and Initial Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Adam; Ding, Hao; Jeon, Sangjun; Yazdani, Ali

    Efficient combination of molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) with scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) is essential for engineering and studying new materials with topological and superconducting properties. Particularly valuable are the capabilities to grow clean material interfaces, single monolayer films, and 2D systems with proximitized superconductivity. A new MBE system designed for STM was constructed to allow reliable ultra-high vacuum sample transfer, growth between 77 K and 1500 K, direct current sample flashing, and RHEED surface monitoring. Six Knudsen cells and electron beam evaporators allow growth of a variety of superconducting, topological, and metallic films. UHV transfer from the MBE via a vacuum suitcase can be accomplished within an hour to preserve clean surfaces. Initial low-temperature STM results on bismuth and monolayer iron selenide (FeSe) films will be presented. This work is supported by the Moore Foundation, ONR, and NSF.

  4. Homoepitaxial growth of gallium nitride films using seeded supersonic molecular beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinnis, Arthur J.

    Homoepitaxial GaN thin films were grown on MOCVD GaN(0001)/A1N/6H-SiC substrates using NH3, elemental Ga and TEG. The GaN growth kinetics were probed using NH3-seeded and TEG-seeded supersonic molecular beams. A GaN surface kinetics model for growth using NH3 and elemental Ga was fitted with the data to find the zero-coverage NH3 sticking coefficient. Growth rates measured under NH3-limited conditions using hyperthermal NH3 beams with kinetic energies of 0.08--1.8 eV indicate decreasing nitrogen incorporation efficiency with increasing incident kinetic energy. The results indicate that NH3 chemisorption on GaN(0001) is unactivated and occurs via a precursor-mediated pathway. The surface morphology is controlled by the Ga surface diffusion length, which in turn, is controlled primarily by the GaN growth rate. Scaling analysis indicates surface diffusion as the dominant transport mechanism that competes with stochastic roughening. NH3 incident kinetic energies in the 0.4--1.8 eV range did not have a direct effect on surface morphology but an indirect influence via NH3 reactivity modulation. Two-dimensional GaN films were grown by chemical beam epitaxy using TEG-seeded supersonic molecular beams and NH3 from a leak valve. TEM analysis indicated that GaN films were homoepitaxially grown on GaN(0001) substrates but have a high density of planar defects. Substrate temperature was the primary variable in reducing carbon contamination in the films. The dissociative chemisorption pathway of triethylgallium on GaN(0001) also appears to be precursor-mediated.

  5. Molecular beam mass spectrometry with tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golan, Amir; Ahmed, Musahid

    2012-01-01

    Tunable soft ionization coupled to mass spectroscopy is a powerful method to investigate isolated molecules, complexes and clusters and their spectroscopy and dynamics.[1-4] Fundamental studies of photoionization processes of biomolecules provide information about electronic structure of these systems. Furthermore determinations of ionization energies and other properties of biomolecules in the gas phase are not trivial, and these experiments provide a platform to generate these data. We have developed a thermal vaporization technique coupled with supersonic molecular beams that provides a gentle way to transport these species into the gas phase. Judicious combination of source gas and temperature allows for formation of dimers and higher clusters of the DNA bases. The focus of this particular work is on the effects of non-covalent interactions, i.e., hydrogen bonding, stacking, and electrostatic interactions, on the ionization energies and proton transfer of individual biomolecules, their complexes and upon micro-hydration by water.[1, 5-9] We have performed experimental and theoretical characterization of the photoionization dynamics of gas-phase uracil and 1,3-methyluracil dimers using molecular beams coupled with synchrotron radiation at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline[10] located at the Advanced Light Source and the experimental details are visualized here. This allowed us to observe the proton transfer in 1,3-dimethyluracil dimers, a system with pi stacking geometry and with no hydrogen bonds[1]. Molecular beams provide a very convenient and efficient way to isolate the sample of interest from environmental perturbations which in return allows accurate comparison with electronic structure calculations[11, 12]. By tuning the photon energy from the synchrotron, a photoionization efficiency (PIE) curve can be plotted which informs us about the cationic electronic states. These values can then be compared to theoretical models and calculations and in turn, explain

  6. The origin of optical gain in cubic InGaN grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holst, J.-Chr.; Hoffmann, A.; Rudloff, D.; Bertram, F.; Riemann, T.; Christen, J.; Frey, T.; As, D. J.; Schikora, D.; Lischka, K.

    2000-05-01

    The optical properties of cubic InGaN samples with varying In content are investigated to provide insight into the processes responsible for optical amplification. The samples were grown by molecular beam epitaxy on GaAs substrates. The structural and optical properties were studied by means of time-resolved and time-integrated photoluminescence spectroscopy and cathodoluminescence microscopy, as well as gain measurements at various temperatures. From these measurements, localized states are proposed to be responsible as recombination mechanism. The cathodoluminescence measurements evidence a direct correlation of the degree of In fluctuation and the efficiency of optical amplification of the samples.

  7. Reaction Mechanism of Oxygen Atoms with Unsaturated Hydrocarbons by the Crossed-Molecular-Beams Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buss, R. J.; Baseman, R. J.; Guozhong, H.; Lee, Y. T.

    1982-04-01

    From a series of studies of the reaction of oxygen atoms with unsaturated hydrocarbons using the crossed molecular beam method, the dominant reaction mechanisms were found to be the simple substitution reactions with oxygen atoms replacing H, Cl, Br atom or alkyl groups. Complication due to secondary reaction was avoided by carrying out experiments under single collisions and observing primary products directly. Primary products were identified by measuring the angular and velocity distributions of products at all the mass numbers which could be detected by the mass spectrometer, and from comparison of these distributions, applying the requirement of energy and momentum conservation.

  8. Hopping conduction in GaAs layers grown by molecular-beam epitaxy at low temperatures

    OpenAIRE

    Shimogishi, F.; Mukai, K; Fukushima, S; Otsuka, N.

    2002-01-01

    The electrical conductivity of GaAs layers grown by molecular-beam epitaxy at low temperatures was studied by using the van der Pauw method. The electrical conductivity of thick GaAs layers grown at temperatures above 200 °C changes with the concentration of antisite As atoms following the nearest-neighbor hopping model. From the dependence of the conductivity on the average spacing of antisite As atoms, the Bohr radius of the donor wave function in the hydrogen like model was estimated to be...

  9. Precision bragg reflectors obtained by molecular beam epitaxy under in situ tunable dynamic reflectometry control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bardinal, V.; Legros, R.; Fontaine, C.

    1995-12-31

    Highly accurate layer thickness are required for multilayers involved in photonic devices, such as Bragg reflectors. In this letter, we demonstrate that precise, real-time monitoring of molecular beam epitaxy growing layers can be achieved by near-normal incidence dynamic reflectometry with a tunable sapphire-titanium laser used as a source. The advantage of this new technique lies in the possibility of synchronizing the material changes and the reflectivity extrema by selecting adequate analysis wavelengths. This technique is shown to provide 885 nm GaAs-AlAs Bragg reflectors with a layer thickness accuracy in excess of 1%. (author). 17 refs.

  10. Antiperovskite Sr3 PbO thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samal, Debakanta; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Takagi, Hidenori

    Several antiperovskite compounds have recently been predicted to host bulk three dimensional Dirac dispersion as well as surface states protected by crystal symmetry. Here, we present fabrication of cubic antiperovskite Sr3PbO films epitaxially grown on LaAlO3 by molecular beam epitaxy. Fabricated films were capped with polymer without breaking vacuum to facilitate ex-situ transport characterization. All of the films showed metallic temperature dependence. The Hall effect measurement suggests that the carrier type is hole, whose density is around 5 ×1019 cm-3. Details of magnetotransport at low temperature is also described.

  11. Perspective: Extremely fine tuning of doping enabled by combinatorial molecular-beam epitaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Wu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Chemical doping provides an effective method to control the electric properties of complex oxides. However, the state-of-art accuracy in controlling doping is limited to about 1%. This hampers elucidation of the precise doping dependences of physical properties and phenomena of interest, such as quantum phase transitions. Using the combinatorial molecular beam epitaxy, we improve the accuracy in tuning the doping level by two orders of magnitude. We illustrate this novel method by two examples: a systematic investigation of the doping dependence of interface superconductivity, and a study of the competing ground states in the vicinity of the insulator-to-superconductor transition.

  12. Bandgap engineering of semiconductor heterostructures by molecular beam epitaxy: Physics and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capasso, Federico; Cho, Alfred Y. (AT and T Bell Laboratories, Murray Hill, NJ (United States))

    1994-01-01

    Bandgap engineering is a powerful technique for the design of new semiconductor materials and devices. Heterojunctions and molecular beam epitaxy allow band diagrams with nearly arbitrary and continuous bandgap variations to be made. In this way the transport and optical properties of these artificially structured semiconductors can be tailored at will. Interesting new phenomena have been discovered in these materials and a new generation of devices with unique capabilities is emerging from this approach. Finally, the tunability of band discontinuities via doping interface dipoles is discussed

  13. In situ photoelectron spectroscopy of molecular-beam-epitaxy grown surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Oshima, M; Okabayashi, J; Ono, K

    2003-01-01

    Two in situ high-resolution synchrotron radiation photoelectron spectroscopy (SRPES) systems combined with a molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) chamber for III-V compound semiconductors and a laser MBE chamber for strongly correlated oxide films, respectively, have been designed and fabricated to analyze intrinsic and surface/interface electronic structures of these unique materials. The importance of the in situ SRPES has been demonstrated by the results of 1) Si surface nanostructures, 2) GaAs surfaces/interfaces and nanostructures, 3) MnAs magnetic nanostructures, and 4) strongly-correlated La sub 1 sub - sub x Sr sub x MnO sub 3 surfaces/interfaces and superstructures.

  14. Note: A versatile mass spectrometer chamber for molecular beam and temperature programmed desorption experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonks, James P., E-mail: james.tonks@awe.co.uk [Department of Mechanical Engineering Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); AWE Plc, Aldermaston, Reading, Berkshire RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Galloway, Ewan C., E-mail: ewan.galloway@awe.co.uk; King, Martin O. [AWE Plc, Aldermaston, Reading, Berkshire RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Kerherve, Gwilherm [VACGEN Ltd, St. Leonards-On-Sea, East Sussex TN38 9NN (United Kingdom); Watts, John F. [Department of Mechanical Engineering Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2016-08-15

    A dual purpose mass spectrometer chamber capable of performing molecular beam scattering (MBS) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) is detailed. Two simple features of this design allow it to perform these techniques. First, the diameter of entrance aperture to the mass spectrometer can be varied to maximize signal for TPD or to maximize angular resolution for MBS. Second, the mass spectrometer chamber can be radially translated so that it can be positioned close to the sample to maximize signal or far from the sample to maximize angular resolution. The performance of this system is described and compares well with systems designed for only one of these techniques.

  15. Investigation of InN layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy on GaN templates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilalta-Clemente, A.; Mutta, G.R.; Chauvat, M.P.; Morales, M.; Doualan, J.L.; Ruterana, P. [CIMAP UMR 6252 CNRS-ENSICAEN-CEA-UCBN, Caen (France); Grandal, J.; Sanchez-Garcia, M.A.; Calle, F. [ISOM y Department de Ingenieria Electronica, E.T.S.I. Telecomunicacion, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria (Spain); Valcheva, E.; Kirilov, K. [Faculty of Physics, Sofia University (Bulgaria)

    2010-05-15

    An investigation of InN layers grown on GaN templates by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) has been carried out by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy (RS) and photoluminescence (PL). A good correlation is noticed between their crystalline quality and optical properties. The best samples exhibit a PL emission between 0.6 and 0.7 eV. The surface structure was quite different from one sample to the other, pointing out to a critical role of the growth conditions, which probably need to be tightly optimized for a good reproducibility. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  16. Lutetium-doped EuO films grown by molecular-beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melville, A.; Heeg, T. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Mairoser, T.; Schmehl, A. [Zentrum fuer elektronische Korrelationen und Magnetismus, Universitaet Augsburg, Universitaetsstrasse 1, D-86159 Augsburg (Germany); Shai, D. E.; Monkman, E. J.; Harter, J. W. [Laboratory of Atomic and Solid State Physics, Department of Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Hollaender, B.; Schubert, J. [Peter Gruenberg Institute, PGI 9-IT, JARA-FIT, Research Centre Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Shen, K. M. [Laboratory of Atomic and Solid State Physics, Department of Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Kavli Institute at Cornell for Nanoscale Science, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Mannhart, J. [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Schlom, D. G. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Kavli Institute at Cornell for Nanoscale Science, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States)

    2012-05-28

    The effect of lutetium doping on the structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of epitaxial EuO thin films grown by reactive molecular-beam epitaxy is experimentally investigated. The behavior of Lu-doped EuO is contrasted with doping by lanthanum and gadolinium. All three dopants are found to behave similarly despite differences in electronic configuration and ionic size. Andreev reflection measurements on Lu-doped EuO reveal a spin-polarization of 96% in the conduction band, despite non-magnetic carriers introduced by 5% lutetium doping.

  17. The role of molecular markers and marker assisted selection in breeding for organic agriculture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lammerts van Bueren, E.T.; Backes, G.; de Vriend, H.

    2010-01-01

    Plant geneticists consider molecular marker assisted selection a useful additional tool in plant breeding programs to make selection more efficient. Standards for organic agriculture do not exclude the use of molecular markers as such, however for the organic sector the appropriateness of molecular...... markers is not self-evident and is often debated. Organic and low-input farming conditions require breeding for robust and flexible varieties, which may be hampered by too much focus on the molecular level. Pros and contras for application of molecular markers in breeding for organic agriculture...... was the topic of a recent European plant breeding workshop. The participants evaluated strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats of the use of molecular markers and we formalized their inputs into breeder’s perspectives and perspectives seen from the organic sector’s standpoint. Clear strengths were...

  18. Selective-area growth of GaN nanowires on SiO{sub 2}-masked Si (111) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruse, J. E.; Doundoulakis, G. [Department of Physics, University of Crete, P. O. Box 2208, 71003 Heraklion (Greece); Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology–Hellas, N. Plastira 100, 70013 Heraklion (Greece); Lymperakis, L. [Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung, Max-Planck-Straße 1, 40237 Düsseldorf (Germany); Eftychis, S.; Georgakilas, A., E-mail: alexandr@physics.uoc.gr [Department of Physics, University of Crete, P. O. Box 2208, 71003 Heraklion (Greece); Adikimenakis, A.; Tsagaraki, K.; Androulidaki, M.; Konstantinidis, G. [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology–Hellas, N. Plastira 100, 70013 Heraklion (Greece); Olziersky, A.; Dimitrakis, P.; Ioannou-Sougleridis, V.; Normand, P. [Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, NCSR Demokritos, Patriarchou Grigoriou and Neapoleos 27, 15310 Aghia Paraskevi, Athens (Greece); Koukoula, T.; Kehagias, Th.; Komninou, Ph. [Department of Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2016-06-14

    We analyze a method to selectively grow straight, vertical gallium nitride nanowires by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) at sites specified by a silicon oxide mask, which is thermally grown on silicon (111) substrates and patterned by electron-beam lithography and reactive-ion etching. The investigated method requires only one single molecular beam epitaxy MBE growth process, i.e., the SiO{sub 2} mask is formed on silicon instead of on a previously grown GaN or AlN buffer layer. We present a systematic and analytical study involving various mask patterns, characterization by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and photoluminescence spectroscopy, as well as numerical simulations, to evaluate how the dimensions (window diameter and spacing) of the mask affect the distribution of the nanowires, their morphology, and alignment, as well as their photonic properties. Capabilities and limitations for this method of selective-area growth of nanowires have been identified. A window diameter less than 50 nm and a window spacing larger than 500 nm can provide single nanowire nucleation in nearly all mask windows. The results are consistent with a Ga diffusion length on the silicon dioxide surface in the order of approximately 1 μm.

  19. Measuring the Density of a Molecular Cluster Injector via Visible Emission from an Electron Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundberg, D. P.; Kaita, R.; Majeski, R. M.; Stotler, D. P.

    2010-06-28

    A method to measure the density distribution of a dense hydrogen gas jet is pre- sented. A Mach 5.5 nozzle is cooled to 80K to form a flow capable of molecular cluster formation. A 250V, 10mA electron beam collides with the jet and produces Hα emission that is viewed by a fast camera. The high density of the jet, several 1016cm-3, results in substantial electron depletion, which attenuates the Hα emission. The attenuated emission measurement, combined with a simplified electron-molecule collision model, allows us to determine the molecular density profile via a simple iterative calculation.

  20. Electron ionization LC-MS with supersonic molecular beams--the new concept, benefits and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seemann, Boaz; Alon, Tal; Tsizin, Svetlana; Fialkov, Alexander B; Amirav, Aviv

    2015-11-01

    A new type of electron ionization LC-MS with supersonic molecular beams (EI-LC-MS with SMB) is described. This system and its operational methods are based on pneumatic spray formation of the LC liquid flow in a heated spray vaporization chamber, full sample thermal vaporization and subsequent electron ionization of vibrationally cold molecules in supersonic molecular beams. The vaporized sample compounds are transferred into a supersonic nozzle via a flow restrictor capillary. Consequently, while the pneumatic spray is formed and vaporized at above atmospheric pressure the supersonic nozzle backing pressure is about 0.15 Bar for the formation of supersonic molecular beams with vibrationally cold sample molecules without cluster formation with the solvent vapor. The sample compounds are ionized in a fly-though EI ion source as vibrationally cold molecules in the SMB, resulting in 'Cold EI' (EI of vibrationally cold molecules) mass spectra that exhibit the standard EI fragments combined with enhanced molecular ions. We evaluated the EI-LC-MS with SMB system and demonstrated its effectiveness in NIST library sample identification which is complemented with the availability of enhanced molecular ions. The EI-LC-MS with SMB system is characterized by linear response of five orders of magnitude and uniform compound independent response including for non-polar compounds. This feature improves sample quantitation that can be approximated without compound specific calibration. Cold EI, like EI, is free from ion suppression and/or enhancement effects (that plague ESI and/or APCI) which facilitate faster LC separation because full separation is not essential. The absence of ion suppression effects enables the exploration of fast flow injection MS-MS as an alternative to lengthy LC-MS analysis. These features are demonstrated in a few examples, and the analysis of the main ingredients of Cannabis on a few Cannabis flower extracts is demonstrated. Finally, the advantages of

  1. An ultra-compact, high-throughput molecular beam epitaxy growth system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, A. A.; Hesjedal, T. [Clarendon Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Diamond Light Source, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Braun, W., E-mail: w.braun@fkf.mpg.de, E-mail: fischer@createc.de; Rembold, S.; Fischer, A., E-mail: w.braun@fkf.mpg.de, E-mail: fischer@createc.de [CreaTec Fischer and Co. GmbH, Industriestr. 9, 74391 Erligheim (Germany); Gassler, G. [Dr. Gassler Electron Devices GmbH, List Str. 4, 89079 Ulm (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    We present a miniaturized molecular beam epitaxy (miniMBE) system with an outer diameter of 206 mm, optimized for flexible and high-throughput operation. The three-chamber system, used here for oxide growth, consists of a sample loading chamber, a storage chamber, and a growth chamber. The growth chamber is equipped with eight identical effusion cell ports with linear shutters, one larger port for either a multi-pocket electron beam evaporator or an oxygen plasma source, an integrated cryoshroud, retractable beam-flux monitor or quartz-crystal microbalance, reflection high energy electron diffraction, substrate manipulator, main shutter, and quadrupole mass spectrometer. The system can be combined with ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) end stations on synchrotron and neutron beamlines, or equivalently with other complex surface analysis systems, including low-temperature scanning probe microscopy systems. Substrate handling is compatible with most UHV surface characterization systems, as the miniMBE can accommodate standard surface science sample holders. We introduce the design of the system, and its specific capabilities and operational parameters, and we demonstrate the epitaxial thin film growth of magnetoelectric Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} on c-plane sapphire and ferrimagnetic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} on MgO (001)

  2. Cleavage and formation of molecular dinitrogen in a single system assisted by molybdenum complexes bearing ferrocenyldiphosphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Takamasa; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Tanabe, Yoshiaki; Yuki, Masahiro; Nakajima, Kazunari; Yoshizawa, Kazunari; Nishibayashi, Yoshiaki

    2014-10-20

    The N≡N bond of molecular dinitrogen bridging two molybdenum atoms in the pentamethylcyclopentadienyl molybdenum complexes that bear ferrocenyldiphosphine as an auxiliary ligand is homolytically cleaved under visible light irradiation at room temperature to afford two molar molybdenum nitride complexes. Conversely, the bridging molecular dinitrogen is reformed by the oxidation of the molybdenum nitride complex at room temperature. This result provides a successful example of the cleavage and formation of molecular dinitrogen induced by a pair of two different external stimuli using a single system assisted by molybdenum complexes bearing ferrocenyldiphosphine under ambient conditions. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. In situ surface/interface x-ray diffractometer for oxide molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J. H.; Freeland, J. W.; Hong, Hawoong, E-mail: hhong@aps.anl.gov [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Tung, I. C. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Chang, S.-H.; Bhattacharya, A.; Fong, D. D. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    In situ studies of oxide molecular beam epitaxy by synchrotron x-ray scattering has been made possible by upgrading an existing UHV/molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) six-circle diffractometer system. For oxide MBE growth, pure ozone delivery to the chamber has been made available, and several new deposition sources have been made available on a new 12 in. CF (ConFlat, a registered trademark of Varian, Inc.) flange. X-ray diffraction has been used as a major probe for film growth and structures for the system. In the original design, electron diffraction was intended for the secondary diagnostics available without the necessity of the x-ray and located at separate positions. Deposition of films was made possible at the two diagnostic positions. And, the aiming of the evaporation sources is fixed to the point between two locations. Ozone can be supplied through two separate nozzles for each location. Also two separate thickness monitors are installed. Additional features of the equipment are also presented together with the data taken during typical oxide film growth to illustrate the depth of information available via in situ x-ray techniques.

  4. In situ surface/interface x-ray diffractometer for oxide molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J. H. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA; Tung, I. C. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA; Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208, USA; Chang, S. -H. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA; Bhattacharya, A. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA; Fong, D. D. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA; Freeland, J. W. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA; Hong, Hawoong [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA

    2016-01-01

    In situ studies of oxide molecular beam epitaxy by synchrotron x-ray scattering has been made possible by upgrading an existing UHV/molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) six-circle diffractometer system. For oxide MBE growth, pure ozone delivery to the chamber has been made available, and several new deposition sources have been made available on a new 12 in. CF (ConFlat, a registered trademark of Varian, Inc.) flange. X-ray diffraction has been used as a major probe for film growth and structures for the system. In the original design, electron diffraction was intended for the secondary diagnostics available without the necessity of the x-ray and located at separate positions. Deposition of films was made possible at the two diagnostic positions. And, the aiming of the evaporation sources is fixed to the point between two locations. Ozone can be supplied through two separate nozzles for each location. Also two separate thickness monitors are installed. Additional features of the equipment are also presented together with the data taken during typical oxide film growth to illustrate the depth of information available via in situ x-ray techniques.

  5. Growth of gallium nitride on silicon by molecular beam epitaxy incorporating a chromium nitride interlayer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Kuang-Wei [Institute of Electro-Optical Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Young, Sheng-Joue, E-mail: shengjoueyoung@gmail.com [Department of Electronic Engineering, National Formosa University, Huwei, Yunlin 632, Taiwan (China); Chang, Shoou-Jinn, E-mail: changsj@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Institute of Electro-Optical Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Institute of Microelectronics and Department of Electrical Engineering, Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, Advanced Optoelectronic Technology Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Hsueh, Tao-Hung [Institute of Electro-Optical Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Hung, Hung; Chen, Shi-Xiang [Institute of Microelectronics and Department of Electrical Engineering, Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, Advanced Optoelectronic Technology Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Chen, Yue-Zhang [Institute of Nanotechnology and Microsystems Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)

    2012-01-15

    Highlights: > This study grew GaN epilayers on Si(1 1 1) substrate by molecular beam epitaxy with CrN interlayer fabricated through nitridation process. > The results of auger electron spectroscopy showed that the concentration of electrons was relatively low in the samples grown with a CrN interlayer, due to CrN prevented Si atoms diffusing into the GaN epilayer, thereby reducing the concentration of electrons. > Photoluminescence spectra indicated that DAP emission was not generated in the GaN with a CrN interlayer, due to improved crystalline quality, and a reduction in the concentration of electrons. - Abstract: This study grew GaN epilayers on Si(1 1 1) substrate via molecular beam epitaxy, with a CrN interlayer fabricated through a nitridation process. The X-ray diffraction results showed two peaks corresponding to CrN(1 1 1) and GaN(0 0 0 2). The results of auger electron spectroscopy showed that the concentration of electrons was relatively low in the samples grown with a CrN interlayer, due to CrN preventing Si atoms from diffusing into the GaN epilayer, thereby reducing electron concentration. Photoluminescence spectra indicated that donor-accepter pair recombination (DAP) emission was not generated in the GaN with a CrN interlayer because of improved crystalline quality and a reduction in electron concentration.

  6. Functional Genomic Investigation of the Molecular Biological Impact of Electron Beam Radiation in Lymphoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopal, Ramani; Rani, Usha; Murugesan, Ram; Kumar, Kirushna; Sanjeev, Ganesh; Ganesan, Kumaresan

    2016-05-01

    The biological response of electron beam radiation (EBR) in tumors remains underexplored. This study describes the molecular biological and genomic impact of EBR on tumor cells. A mouse model bearing Dalton's lymphoma ascites cells was exposed to an 8-MeV pulsed electron beam, at a dose rate of 2 Gy/min using a microtron, a linear accelerator. The radiation-induced changes were assessed by histopathology, fluorescence-activated cell sorting, signaling pathway-focused reporter assays, and gene expression by microarray analysis. EBR was found to increase apoptosis and G2-M cell cycle arrest with concomitant tumor regression in vivo. The microarray data revealed that EBR induced tumor regression, apoptosis, and cell cycle arrest mediated by p53, PPAR, and SMAD2/3/4 signaling pathways. Activation of interferon regulatory factor and NFkB signaling were also found upon EBR. Chemo-genomics exploration revealed the possibility of drugs that can be effectively used in combination with EBR. For the first time, an 8-MeV pulse EBR induced genomic changes, and their consequence in molecular and biological processes were identified in lymphoma cells. The comprehensive investigation of radiation-mediated responses in cancer cells also revealed the potential therapeutic features of EBR. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Fabrication of bright and thin Zn₂SiO₄ luminescent film for electron beam excitation-assisted optical microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Taichi; Kanamori, Satoshi; Fukuta, Masahiro; Nawa, Yasunori; Kominami, Hiroko; Nakanishi, Yoichiro; Sugita, Atsushi; Inami, Wataru; Kawata, Yoshimasa

    2015-07-13

    We fabricated a bright and thin Zn₂SiO₄ luminescent film to serve as a nanometric light source for high-spatial-resolution optical microscopy based on electron beam excitation. The Zn₂SiO₄ luminescent thin film was fabricated by annealing a ZnO film on a Si₃N₄ substrate at 1000 °C in N₂. The annealed film emitted bright cathodoluminescence compared with the as-deposited film. The film is promising for nano-imaging with electron beam excitation-assisted optical microscopy. We evaluated the spatial resolution of a microscope developed using this Zn₂SiO₄ luminescent thin film. This is the first report of the investigation and application of ZnO/Si₃N₄ annealed at a high temperature (1000 °C). The fabricated Zn₂SiO₄ film is expected to enable high-frame-rate dynamic observation with ultra-high resolution using our electron beam excitation-assisted optical microscopy.

  8. Defects, strain relaxation, and compositional grading in high indium content InGaN epilayers grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazioti, C.; Kehagias, Th.; Pavlidou, E.; Komninou, Ph.; Karakostas, Th.; Dimitrakopulos, G. P., E-mail: gdim@auth.gr [Physics Department, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, GR 541 24 Thessaloniki (Greece); Papadomanolaki, E.; Iliopoulos, E. [Microelectronics Research Group (MRG), IESL, FORTH, P.O. Box 1385, 71110 Heraklion Crete, Greece and Physics Department, University of Crete, Heraklion Crete (Greece); Walther, T. [Department of Electronic & Electrical Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Smalc-Koziorowska, J. [Institute of High Pressure Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Sokolowska 29/37, 01-142 Warsaw (Poland)

    2015-10-21

    We investigate the structural properties of a series of high alloy content InGaN epilayers grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy, employing the deposition temperature as variable under invariant element fluxes. Using transmission electron microscopy methods, distinct strain relaxation modes were observed, depending on the indium content attained through temperature adjustment. At lower indium contents, strain relaxation by V-pit formation dominated, with concurrent formation of an indium-rich interfacial zone. With increasing indium content, this mechanism was gradually substituted by the introduction of a self-formed strained interfacial InGaN layer of lower indium content, as well as multiple intrinsic basal stacking faults and threading dislocations in the rest of the film. We show that this interfacial layer is not chemically abrupt and that major plastic strain relaxation through defect introduction commences upon reaching a critical indium concentration as a result of compositional pulling. Upon further increase of the indium content, this relaxation mode was again gradually succeeded by the increase in the density of misfit dislocations at the InGaN/GaN interface, leading eventually to the suppression of the strained InGaN layer and basal stacking faults.

  9. Growth of defect-free GaAsSbN axial nanowires via self-catalyzed molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Manish; Deshmukh, Prithviraj; Kasanaboina, Pavan; Reynolds, C. Lewis, Jr.; Liu, Yang; Iyer, Shanthi

    2017-12-01

    Bandgap reduction of 10% by incorporation of a dilute amount of N is reported for the first time, in axial GaAsSb nanowires (NWs) grown on Si (111) via Ga-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Impact of N incorporation on the surface morphology, NW growth kinetics, and their structural and optical properties were examined. Dilute nitride NWs with Sb composition of 7 at% did not exhibit any noticeable planar defects, as revealed by the absence of satellite twin peaks in the selected-area diffraction pattern and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy imaging. Point defects were also minimal in as-grown dilute nitride NWs, as ascertained from the comparison of low-temperature photoluminescence spectra as well as the shape and shift of Raman modes, with in situ annealed NWs in different ambients. Evidence of enhanced incorporation of N was found in the NWs in situ annealed in N ambient, but with deteriorated optical quality due to simultaneous creation of N-induced defects. The lack of any noticeable defects in the as-grown GaAsSbN NWs demonstrates the advantage of the vapor–liquid–solid mechanism responsible for growth of axial configuration over the vapor–solid growth mechanism for core–shell NWs as well as their thin film counterpart, which commonly exhibit N-induced point defects.

  10. Development of a Silicon Carbide Molecular Beam Nozzle for Simulation Planetary Flybys and Low-Earth Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, E. L.; Earle, G. D.; Kasprzak, W. T.; Mahaffy, Paul R.

    2008-01-01

    From commercial origins as a molybdenum molecular beam nozzle, a ceramic nozzle of silicon carbide (SiC) was developed for space environment simulation. The nozzle is mechanically stable under extreme conditions of temperature and pressure. A heated, continuous, supersonically-expanded hydrogen beam with a 1% argon seed produced an argon beam component of nearly 4 km/s, with an argon flux exceeding 1x1014 /cm2.s. This nozzle was part of a molecular beam machine used in the Atmospheric Experiments Branch at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center to characterize the performance of the University of Texas at Dallas Ram Wind Sensor (RWS) aboard the Air Force Communications/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) launched in the Spring of 2008.

  11. Proof-of-principle demonstration of high efficiency laser-assisted H^{-} beam conversion to protons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Danilov

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Thin carbon foils are used as strippers for charge exchange injection into high intensity proton rings. However, the stripping foils become radioactive and produce uncontrolled beam loss, which is one of the main factors limiting beam power in high intensity proton rings. Recently, we presented a scheme for laser stripping an H^{-} beam for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS ring. First, H^{-} atoms are converted to H^{0} by a magnetic field, then H^{0} atoms are excited from the ground state to the upper levels by a laser, and the excited states are converted to protons by a magnetic field. In this paper we report on the proof-of-principle demonstration of this scheme to give high efficiency (around 90% conversion of H^{-} beam into protons at SNS in Oak Ridge. The experimental setup is described, and comparison of the experimental data with simulations is presented.

  12. Heavy-ion beam induced effects in enriched gadolinium target films prepared by molecular plating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayorov, D. A.; Tereshatov, E. E.; Werke, T. A.; Frey, M. M.; Folden, C. M.

    2017-09-01

    A series of enriched gadolinium (Gd, Z = 64) targets was prepared using the molecular plating process for nuclear physics experiments at the Cyclotron Institute at Texas A&M University. After irradiation with 48Ca and 45Sc projectiles at center-of-target energies of Ecot = 3.8-4.7 MeV/u, the molecular films displayed visible discoloration. The morphology of the films was examined and compared to the intact target surface. The thin films underwent a heavy-ion beam-induced density change as identified by scanning electron microscopy and α-particle energy loss measurements. The films became thinner and more homogenous, with the transformation occurring early on in the irradiation. This transformation is best described as a crystalline-to-amorphous phase transition induced by atomic displacement and destruction of structural order of the original film. The chemical composition of the thin films was surveyed using energy dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction, with the results confirming the complex chemistry of the molecular films previously noted in other publications.

  13. Molecular beam epitaxy of cubic III-nitrides on GaAs substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    As, D.J.; Schikora, D.; Lischka, K. [Dept. of Physics, Univ. of Paderborn, Paderborn (Germany)

    2003-07-01

    Molecular beam epitaxy has successfully been used to grow crystalline layers of group III-nitrides (GaN, AlN and InN) with cubic (zinc-blende) structure on GaAs substrates. In this article, we discuss these efforts that, despite inherent difficulties due to the metastability of the c-III nitrides, led to substantial improvements of the structural, electrical and optical quality of these wide gap semiconductors. We review experimental work concerned with the epitaxy of c-GaN and the control of the growth process in-situ, the important issue of p- and n-type doping of c-GaN and investigations of the structural and optical properties of c-InGaN and c-AlGaN. (orig.)

  14. Ge/GeSn heterostructures grown on Si (100) by molecular-beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadofyev, Yu. G., E-mail: sadofyev@hotmail.com; Martovitsky, V. P.; Bazalevsky, M. A.; Klekovkin, A. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation); Averyanov, D. V.; Vasil’evskii, I. S. [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Russian Federation)

    2015-01-15

    The growth of GeSn layers by molecular-beam epitaxy on Si (100) wafers coated with a germanium buffer layer is investigated. The properties of the fabricated structures are controlled by reflection high-energy electron diffraction, atomic-force microscopy, X-ray diffractometry, Rutherford backscattering, and Raman scattering. It is shown that GeSn layers with thicknesses up to 0.5 μm and Sn molar fractions up to 0.073 manifest no sign of plastic relaxation upon epitaxy. The lattice constant of the GeSn layers within the growth plane is precisely the same as that of Ge. The effect of rapid thermal annealing on the conversion of metastable elastically strained GeSn layers into a plastically relaxed state is examined. Ge/GeSn quantum wells with Sn molar fraction up to 0.11 are obtained.

  15. Molecular dynamics and dynamic Monte-Carlo simulation of irradiation damage with focused ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohya, Kaoru

    2017-03-01

    The focused ion beam (FIB) has become an important tool for micro- and nanostructuring of samples such as milling, deposition and imaging. However, this leads to damage of the surface on the nanometer scale from implanted projectile ions and recoiled material atoms. It is therefore important to investigate each kind of damage quantitatively. We present a dynamic Monte-Carlo (MC) simulation code to simulate the morphological and compositional changes of a multilayered sample under ion irradiation and a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation code to simulate dose-dependent changes in the backscattering-ion (BSI)/secondary-electron (SE) yields of a crystalline sample. Recent progress in the codes for research to simulate the surface morphology and Mo/Si layers intermixing in an EUV lithography mask irradiated with FIBs, and the crystalline orientation effect on BSI and SE yields relating to the channeling contrast in scanning ion microscopes, is also presented.

  16. Formation of GeSn alloy on Si(100) by low-temperature molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talochkin, A. B., E-mail: tal@isp.nsc.ru [A. V. Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Lavrentyev Avenue 13, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Mashanov, V. I. [A. V. Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Lavrentyev Avenue 13, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-29

    GeSn alloys grown on Si(100) by the low-temperature (100 °C) molecular beam epitaxy are studied using scanning tunneling microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. It is found that the effect of Sn as a surfactant modifies substantially the low-temperature growth mechanism of Ge on Si. Instead of the formation of small Ge islands surrounded by amorphous Ge, in the presence of Sn, the growth of pure Ge islands appears via the Stranski-Krastanov growth mode, and a partially relaxed Ge{sub 1−x}Sn{sub x} alloy layer with the high Sn-fraction up to 40 at. % is formed in the area between them. It is shown that the observed growth mode induced by high surface mobility of Sn and the large strain of the pseudomorphic state of Ge to Si ensures the minimum elastic-strain energy of the structure.

  17. Real-time reflectance-difference spectroscopy of GaAs molecular beam epitaxy homoepitaxial growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lastras-Martínez, A., E-mail: alm@cactus.iico.uaslp.mx, E-mail: alastras@gmail.com; Ortega-Gallegos, J.; Guevara-Macías, L. E.; Nuñez-Olvera, O.; Balderas-Navarro, R. E.; Lastras-Martínez, L. F. [Instituto de Investigación en Comunicación Optica, Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, Alvaro Obregón 64, San Luis Potosí, SLP 78000 (Mexico); Lastras-Montaño, L. A. [IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States); Lastras-Montaño, M. A. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    2014-03-01

    We report on real time-resolved Reflectance-difference (RD) spectroscopy of GaAs(001) grown by molecular beam epitaxy, with a time-resolution of 500 ms per spectrum within the 2.3–4.0 eV photon energy range. Through the analysis of transient RD spectra we demonstrated that RD line shapes are comprised of two components with different physical origins and determined their evolution during growth. Such components were ascribed to the subsurface strain induced by surface reconstruction and to surface stoichiometry. Results reported in this paper render RD spectroscopy as a powerful tool for the study of fundamental processes during the epitaxial growth of zincblende semiconductors.

  18. Acceptor states in heteroepitaxial CdHgTe films grown by molecular-beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mynbaev, K. D.; Shilyaev, A. V., E-mail: mynkad@mail.ioffe.ru; Bazhenov, N. L. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Izhnin, A. I.; Izhnin, I. I. [R& D Institute for Materials SRC Carat (Ukraine); Mikhailov, N. N.; Varavin, V. S.; Dvoretsky, S. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)

    2015-03-15

    The photoluminescence method is used to study acceptor states in CdHgTe heteroepitaxial films (HEFs) grown by molecular-beam epitaxy. A comparison of the photoluminescence spectra of HEFs grown on GaAs substrates (CdHgTe/GaAs) with the spectra of CdHgTe/Si HEFs demonstrates that acceptor states with energy depths of about 18 and 27 meV are specific to CdHgTe/GaAs HEFs. The possible nature of these states and its relation to the HEF synthesis conditions and, in particular, to the vacancy doping occurring under conditions of a mercury deficiency during the course of epitaxy and postgrowth processing are discussed.

  19. Intense terahertz emission from molecular beam epitaxy-grown GaAs/GaSb(001)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadia, Cyril P.; Laganapan, Aleena Maria; Agatha Tumanguil, Mae; Estacio, Elmer; Somintac, Armando; Salvador, Arnel [National Institute of Physics, University of the Philippines Diliman, Quezon City 1101 (Philippines); Que, Christopher T. [Physics Department, De La Salle University, 2401 Taft Avenue, Manila 1004 (Philippines); Yamamoto, Kohji; Tani, Masahiko [Research Center for Development of Far-Infrared Region, University of Fukui, Fukui 910-8507 (Japan)

    2012-12-15

    Intense terahertz (THz) electromagnetic wave emission was observed in undoped GaAs thin films deposited on (100) n-GaSb substrates via molecular beam epitaxy. GaAs/n-GaSb heterostructures were found to be viable THz sources having signal amplitude 75% that of bulk p-InAs. The GaAs films were grown by interruption method during the growth initiation and using various metamorphic buffer layers. Reciprocal space maps revealed that the GaAs epilayers are tensile relaxed. Defects at the i-GaAs/n-GaSb interface were confirmed by scanning electron microscope images. Band calculations were performed to infer the depletion region and electric field at the i-GaAs/n-GaSb and the air-GaAs interfaces. However, the resulting band calculations were found to be insufficient to explain the THz emission. The enhanced THz emission is currently attributed to a piezoelectric field induced by incoherent strain and defects.

  20. Optical band gap of BiFeO3 grown by molecular-beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihlefeld, J. F.; Podraza, N. J.; Liu, Z. K.; Rai, R. C.; Xu, X.; Heeg, T.; Chen, Y. B.; Li, J.; Collins, R. W.; Musfeldt, J. L.; Pan, X. Q.; Schubert, J.; Ramesh, R.; Schlom, D. G.

    2008-04-01

    BiFeO3 thin films have been deposited on (001) SrTiO3 substrates by adsorption-controlled reactive molecular-beam epitaxy. For a given bismuth overpressure and oxygen activity, single-phase BiFeO3 films can be grown over a range of deposition temperatures in accordance with thermodynamic calculations. Four-circle x-ray diffraction reveals phase-pure, epitaxial films with ω rocking curve full width at half maximum values as narrow as 29arcsec (0.008°). Multiple-angle spectroscopic ellipsometry reveals a direct optical band gap at 2.74eV for stoichiometric as well as 5% bismuth-deficient single-phase BiFeO3 films.

  1. Adsorption-controlled growth of BiMnO3 films by molecular-beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J. H.; Ke, X.; Misra, R.; Ihlefeld, J. F.; Xu, X. S.; Mei, Z. G.; Heeg, T.; Roeckerath, M.; Schubert, J.; Liu, Z. K.; Musfeldt, J. L.; Schiffer, P.; Schlom, D. G.

    2010-06-01

    We have developed the means to grow BiMnO3 thin films with unparalleled structural perfection by reactive molecular-beam epitaxy and determined its band gap. Film growth occurs in an adsorption-controlled growth regime. Within this growth window bounded by oxygen pressure and substrate temperature at a fixed bismuth overpressure, single-phase films of the metastable perovskite BiMnO3 may be grown by epitaxial stabilization. X-ray diffraction reveals phase-pure and epitaxial films with ω rocking curve full width at half maximum values as narrow as 11 arc sec (0.003°). Optical absorption measurements reveal that BiMnO3 has a direct band gap of 1.1±0.1 eV.

  2. Adsorption-controlled molecular-beam epitaxial growth of BiFeO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihlefeld, J. F.; Kumar, A.; Gopalan, V.; Schlom, D. G.; Chen, Y. B.; Pan, X. Q.; Heeg, T.; Schubert, J.; Ke, X.; Schiffer, P.; Orenstein, J.; Martin, L. W.; Chu, Y. H.; Ramesh, R.

    2007-08-01

    BiFeO3 thin films have been deposited on (111) SrTiO3 single crystal substrates by reactive molecular-beam epitaxy in an adsorption-controlled growth regime. This is achieved by supplying a bismuth overpressure and utilizing the differential vapor pressures between bismuth oxides and BiFeO3 to control stoichiometry. Four-circle x-ray diffraction reveals phase-pure, untwinned, epitaxial, (0001)-oriented films with rocking curve full width at half maximum values as narrow as 25arcsec (0.007°). Second harmonic generation polar plots combined with diffraction establish the crystallographic point group of these untwinned epitaxial films to be 3m at room temperature.

  3. Real-time reflectance-difference spectroscopy of GaAs molecular beam epitaxy homoepitaxial growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Lastras-Martínez

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We report on real time-resolved Reflectance-difference (RD spectroscopy of GaAs(001 grown by molecular beam epitaxy, with a time-resolution of 500 ms per spectrum within the 2.3–4.0 eV photon energy range. Through the analysis of transient RD spectra we demonstrated that RD line shapes are comprised of two components with different physical origins and determined their evolution during growth. Such components were ascribed to the subsurface strain induced by surface reconstruction and to surface stoichiometry. Results reported in this paper render RD spectroscopy as a powerful tool for the study of fundamental processes during the epitaxial growth of zincblende semiconductors.

  4. Systematic study of molecular beam epitaxy growth and magnetic properties of Fe on Au(111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, J.; Howson, M. A.; Hucknall, P.; Hickey, B. J.; Venkataraman, R.; Hammond, C.; Walker, M. J.; Greig, D.

    1997-04-01

    We have grown a series of Fe samples on Au(111) by molecular beam epitaxy. Fe was grown on Au at 30 °C and shows clear reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) oscillations up to 8 monolayers, suggesting layer-by-layer growth on Au. A combined study of RHEED, medium energy ion scattering, and x-ray diffraction scans has strongly indicated that Fe initially grew as fcc(111) on Au(111) below the thickness of 3 monolayer and for the subsequent growth the Fe bcc(110) structure begins to form. Magneto-optical Kerr effect measurement has shown that the magnetization easy axis lies in the plane of the film for the thickness range from 3 to 20 Å and there is a perpendicular anisotropy when the thickness of Fe is about one monolayer.

  5. Perpendicular resistance of Co/Cu multilayers prepared by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    List, N. J.; Pratt, W. P.; Howson, M. A.; Xu, J.; Walker, M. J.; Greig, D.

    1995-07-01

    The magnetoresistance (MR) of layered metal systems with the current in a direction perpendicular to the plane of the layers (CPP) is studied. The technique for measuring the resulting very small resistances utilises a SQUID to act as a high-precision current comparator. The samples are Co/Cu multilayers grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV). Perpendicular resistance measurements are reported for Nb/Cu/X/Cu/Nb where X is the Co/Cu multilayer. The Co is fixed at a nominal value of 1.5 nm while the Cu is varied between 1 and 5 nm. These measurements show large oscillations in the CPP-MR as the Cu thickness in increased. A comparison is made between MBE and sputtered samples.

  6. Reduction in the crystal defect density of Zn Se layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez L, M.; Perez C, A.; Luyo A, J.; Melendez L, M.; Tamura, M. [Departamento de Fisica, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del instituto politecnico Nacional, A.P. 14-740, 07000 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Mendez G, V.H.; Vidal, M.A. [Instituto de Investigacion en Comunicacion Optica, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, Alvaro Obregon 64, 78000 San Luis Potosi (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    We present a study of the molecular beam epitaxial (MBE) grown of Zn Se layers on Ga-As and Si substrates. For the growth on GaAs substrates we investigated the effects of introducing buffer layers of Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x} As and In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x} As with x = 0.01. Moreover, an analysis by secondary ion mass spectroscopy revealed that the use of AlGaAs buffer layers effectively suppress the Ga segregation onto the Zn Se layers surface. On the other hand, for the growth of Zn Se on Si substrates, we achieved a significant improvement in the crystal quality of Zn Se by irradiating the Si substrates with plasma of nitrogen prior to the growth. (Author)

  7. High-mobility BaSnO3 grown by oxide molecular beam epitaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh Raghavan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available High-mobility perovskite BaSnO3 films are of significant interest as new wide bandgap semiconductors for power electronics, transparent conductors, and as high mobility channels for epitaxial integration with functional perovskites. Despite promising results for single crystals, high-mobility BaSnO3 films have been challenging to grow. Here, we demonstrate a modified oxide molecular beam epitaxy (MBE approach, which supplies pre-oxidized SnOx. This technique addresses issues in the MBE of ternary stannates related to volatile SnO formation and enables growth of epitaxial, stoichiometric BaSnO3. We demonstrate room temperature electron mobilities of 150 cm2 V−1 s−1 in films grown on PrScO3. The results open up a wide range of opportunities for future electronic devices.

  8. High-mobility BaSnO{sub 3} grown by oxide molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raghavan, Santosh; Schumann, Timo; Kim, Honggyu; Zhang, Jack Y.; Cain, Tyler A.; Stemmer, Susanne, E-mail: stemmer@mrl.ucsb.edu [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106-5050 (United States)

    2016-01-01

    High-mobility perovskite BaSnO{sub 3} films are of significant interest as new wide bandgap semiconductors for power electronics, transparent conductors, and as high mobility channels for epitaxial integration with functional perovskites. Despite promising results for single crystals, high-mobility BaSnO{sub 3} films have been challenging to grow. Here, we demonstrate a modified oxide molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) approach, which supplies pre-oxidized SnO{sub x}. This technique addresses issues in the MBE of ternary stannates related to volatile SnO formation and enables growth of epitaxial, stoichiometric BaSnO{sub 3}. We demonstrate room temperature electron mobilities of 150 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1} in films grown on PrScO{sub 3}. The results open up a wide range of opportunities for future electronic devices.

  9. Molecular-Beam Epitaxially Grown MgB2 Thin Films and Superconducting Tunnel Junctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Baptiste Laloë

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the discovery of its superconducting properties in 2001, magnesium diboride has generated terrific scientific and engineering research interest around the world. With a of 39 K and two superconducting gaps, MgB2 has great promise from the fundamental point of view, as well as immediate applications. Several techniques for thin film deposition and heterojunction formation have been established, each with its own advantages and drawbacks. Here, we will present a brief overview of research based on MgB2 thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy coevaporation of Mg and B. The films are smooth and highly crystalline, and the technique allows for virtually any heterostructure to be formed, including all-MgB2 tunnel junctions. Such devices have been characterized, with both quasiparticle and Josephson tunneling reported. MgB2 remains a material of great potential for a multitude of further characterization and exploration research projects and applications.

  10. High quality atomically thin PtSe2 films grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Mingzhe; Wang, Eryin; Zhou, Xue; Zhang, Guangqi; Zhang, Hongyun; Zhang, Kenan; Yao, Wei; Lu, Nianpeng; Yang, Shuzhen; Wu, Shilong; Yoshikawa, Tomoki; Miyamoto, Koji; Okuda, Taichi; Wu, Yang; Yu, Pu; Duan, Wenhui; Zhou, Shuyun

    2017-12-01

    Atomically thin PtSe2 films have attracted extensive research interests for potential applications in high-speed electronics, spintronics and photodetectors. Obtaining high quality thin films with large size and controlled thickness is critical. Here we report the first successful epitaxial growth of high quality PtSe2 films by molecular beam epitaxy. Atomically thin films from 1 ML to 22 ML have been grown and characterized by low-energy electron diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and x-ray photoemission spectroscopy. Moreover, a systematic thickness dependent study of the electronic structure is revealed by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), and helical spin texture is revealed by spin-ARPES. Our work provides new opportunities for growing large size single crystalline films to investigate the physical properties and potential applications of PtSe2.

  11. Growth mode of tensile-strained Ge quantum dots grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z. P.; Song, Y. X.; Chen, Q. M.; Wu, X. Y.; Zhu, Z. Y. S.; Zhang, L. Y.; Li, Y. Y.; Wang, S. M.

    2017-11-01

    Growth mode of tensile-strained Ge quantum dots on different III–V buffers by molecular beam epitaxy is studied by a combination of reflection high-energy electron diffraction, atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The Ge-QDs growth on the InAlAs buffer lattice matched to InP and on InAs buffer on GaSb follows the Volmer–Weber growth mode with round Ge QDs and no Ge wetting layer, while it obeys the Stranski–Krastanov growth mode on GaSb, AlSb and AlGaSb on GaSb substrates, showing rectangular shaped platelets and a clear Ge wetting layer. The discovery of the Volmer–Weber growth mode is essential to avoid forming a wetting layer and the subsequent antiphase-domain defects when capping III–Vs on Ge-QDs, important for potential optoelectronic applications.

  12. Surface reconstructions in molecular beam epitaxy of SrTiO{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kajdos, Adam P.; Stemmer, Susanne [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106-5050 (United States)

    2014-11-10

    We show that reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) can be used as a highly sensitive tool to track surface and resulting film stoichiometry in adsorption-limited molecular beam epitaxy of (001) SrTiO{sub 3} thin films. Even under growth conditions that yield films with a lattice parameter that is identical to that of stoichiometric bulk crystals within the detection limit of high-resolution x-ray diffraction (XRD), changes in surface reconstruction occur from (1 × 1) to (2 × 1) to c(4 × 4) as the equivalent beam pressure of the Ti metalorganic source is increased. These surface reconstructions are correlated with a shift from mixed SrO/TiO{sub 2} termination to pure TiO{sub 2} termination. The crossover to TiO{sub 2} surface termination is also apparent in a phase shift in RHEED oscillations observed at the beginning of growth. Comparison with prior results for carrier mobilities of doped films shows that the best films are grown under conditions of a TiO{sub 2}-saturated surface [c(4 × 4) reconstruction] within the XRD growth window.

  13. Numerical modeling of molecular-motor-assisted transport of adenoviral vectors in a spherical cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, A V; Avramenko, A A; Blinov, D G

    2008-06-01

    Viral gene delivery in a spherical cell is investigated numerically. The model of intracellular trafficking of adenoviruses is based on molecular-motor-assisted transport equations suggested by Smith and Simmons. These equations are presented in spherical coordinates and extended by accounting for the random component of motion of viral particles bound to filaments. This random component is associated with the stochastic nature of molecular motors responsible for locomotion of viral particles bound to filaments. The equations are solved numerically to simulate viral transport between the cell membrane and cell nucleus during initial stages of viral infection.

  14. Disorder and defect formation mechanisms in molecular-beam-epitaxy grown silicon epilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akbari-Sharbaf, Arash [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada N6A 3K7 (Canada); Baribeau, Jean-Marc; Wu, Xiaohua; Lockwood, David J. [Institute for Microstructural Sciences, National Research Council, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1A 0R6 (Canada); Fanchini, Giovanni, E-mail: gfanchin@uwo.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada N6A 3K7 (Canada); Department of Chemistry, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada N6A 5B7 (Canada)

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the role of disorder, stress and crystallite size in determining the density of defects in disordered and partially ordered silicon thin films deposited at low or moderate temperatures by molecular beam epitaxy. We find that the paramagnetic defect density measured by electron spin resonance (ESR) is strongly dependent on the growth temperature of the films, decreasing from ∼ 2 · 10{sup 19} cm{sup −3} at 98 °C to ∼ 1 · 10{sup 18} cm{sup −3} at 572 °C. The physical nature of the defects is strongly dependent on the range of order in the films: ESR spectra consistent with dangling bonds in an amorphous phase are observed at the lowest temperatures, while the ESR signal gradually becomes more anisotropic as medium-range order improves and the stress level (measured both by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy) is released in more crystalline films. Anisotropic ESR spectra consistent with paramagnetic defects embedded in an epitaxial phase are observed at the highest growth temperature (572 °C). - Highlights: ► Disordered Si epilayers were grown by molecular beam epitaxy. ► Growth has been carried out at temperatures T = 98 °C–514 °C. ► A correlation between defect density and disorder in the films has been found. ► Lack of medium range order and stress cause the formation of defects at low T. ► At high T, defects are associated to grain boundaries and oriented stacking faults.

  15. Patterned growth of InGaN/GaN quantum wells on freestanding GaN grating by molecular beam epitaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Yongjin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report here the epitaxial growth of InGaN/GaN quantum wells on freestanding GaN gratings by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE. Various GaN gratings are defined by electron beam lithography and realized on GaN-on-silicon substrate by fast atom beam etching. Silicon substrate beneath GaN grating region is removed from the backside to form freestanding GaN gratings, and the patterned growth is subsequently performed on the prepared GaN template by MBE. The selective growth takes place with the assistance of nanoscale GaN gratings and depends on the grating period P and the grating width W. Importantly, coalescences between two side facets are realized to generate epitaxial gratings with triangular section. Thin epitaxial gratings produce the promising photoluminescence performance. This work provides a feasible way for further GaN-based integrated optics devices by a combination of GaN micromachining and epitaxial growth on a GaN-on-silicon substrate. PACS 81.05.Ea; 81.65.Cf; 81.15.Hi.

  16. Molecular Beam Surface Scattering of Formaldehyde from Au(111): Characterization of the Direct Scatter and Trapping-Desorption Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Bastian C.; Park, Barratt; Meyer, Sven; Wagner, Roman J. V.; Wodtke, Alec; Schaefer, Tim

    2017-06-01

    Quantum state resolved molecular beam scattering studies of small polyatomic molecules from metal surfaces present new challenges for experimentalists, but provide unprecedented new opportunities for detailed study of polyatomic molecular dynamics at surfaces. In the current work, we report preliminary characterization of the scattering of formaldehyde from the Au(111) surface. We report the measured desorption energy (0.31 eV), and characterize the distinct trapping-desorption and direct scattering channels, via the dependence of the scattered velocity and rotational distributions on surface temperature and incident molecular beam energy. Finally, we estimate the trapping probability as a function of incidence energy, which indicates the importance of molecular degrees of freedom in the mechanism for trapping.

  17. Molecular and morphological characterization of hydrochar produced by microwave-assisted hydrothermal carbonization of cellulose.

    OpenAIRE

    Marcela Guiotoku; Fabricio Augusto Hansel; Etelvino Henrique Novotny; Claudia Maria Branco de Freitas Maia

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this work was to characterize the morphology and molecular composition of the hydrochar produced by microwave-assisted hydrothermal carbonization of cellulose. The produced hydrochar consists mainly of aggregate microspheres with about 2.0 µm in diameter, with aliphatic and aromatic structures and the presence of carbonyl functional groups. The aromatic groups are formed mainly by benzofuran-like structures, being chemically different from common cellulose char. Microwave-ass...

  18. Progress in computer-assisted diagnosis and control of neutral beam lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theil, E.; Elischer, V.; Fiddler, J.; Jacobs, N.J.D.; Jacobson, V.; Lawhorn, R.; Uber, D.; Wilner, D.

    1980-09-01

    This paper discusses the principles that have guided the development of a computerized diagnostic and control system for both the Neutral Beam Systems Test Facility at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and the Doublet III neutral beams at the General Atomic Company. The emphasis is not on the particular details of the implementation, but on general considerations which have influenced the design criteria for the system. Foremost among these are the requirements of an appropriate human interface to the system, and effective use of a relational data base. Examples are used to illustrate how these principles are carried out in practice. A systems view of diagnostic programs is suggested in the light of our experience.

  19. Laser-assisted correction of eye cornea refraction with ring-shaped laser beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Olga; Yuzhakov, Aleksey; Omelchenko, Alexander; Bolshunov, Andrey; Siplivy, Vladimir; Sobol, Emil

    2017-07-01

    A new method for non-ablative correction of cornea shape is based on thermo-mechanical effect of laser radiation with ring-shaped laser beam. The results obtained demonstrated that the new method for correction of eye refraction yields a significant alteration in the eye refraction and the ring-shaped laser beam with various ring diameters for correction of the eye refraction allows obtaining controllable alterations of the eye refraction with axial symmetry without any pathological changes in central part of cornea.

  20. Durable Silver Mirror Coating Via Ion Assisted, Electron Beam Evaporation For Large Aperture Optics Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In the Phase I research, Surface Optics Corporation (SOC) demonstrated a durable silver mirror coating based an ion assisted, thermal evaporation process. The recipe...

  1. The chemical states of As 3d in highly doped ZnO grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy and annealed in different atmospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Przezdziecka, E., E-mail: eilczuk@ifpan.edu.pl [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Stachowicz, M. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Lisowski, W. [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, M. Kasprzaka 44/52, 01-224 Warsaw (Poland); Guziewicz, E. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Sobczak, J.W. [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, M. Kasprzaka 44/52, 01-224 Warsaw (Poland); Jakieła, R. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Jablonski, A. [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, M. Kasprzaka 44/52, 01-224 Warsaw (Poland); Jarosz, D.; Kozanecki, A. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland)

    2016-04-30

    Arsenic doped ZnO films were grown by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy and post-growth annealed at 700 °C in oxygen, nitrogen or argon atmosphere. The high resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) studies of the ZnO:As films revealed that the As3d core level spectra is formed by three components located at about 41 eV, 44.5 eV and 45.5 eV below the Fermi level which we ascribe to As{sub O}, As{sub Zn}‐2V{sub Zn} and As{sub Zn,} respectively. The relative intensity of the three XPS contributions strongly depends on an annealing atmosphere, but in any case none of the contributions clearly dominates, which is a fingerprint of complicated nature of arsenic states in ZnO. This conclusion is also confirmed by the temperature dependent photoluminescence (PL) studies. Differences in the dominant PL peak positions and in their relative intensities are present and suggest different acceptor states in the examined samples. - Highlights: • Arsenic-doped zinc oxide has been grown by molecular beam epitaxy. • The annealing atmosphere strongly affects the properties of ZnO:As thin films. • Three As-derived components have been observed by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy. • Photoluminescence measurements confirm complex nature of As-acceptors.

  2. Molecular beam epitaxy growth of InSb1-xBix thin films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuxin Song; Shumin Wang; Saha Roy, Ivy

    2013-01-01

    Molecular beam epitaxy growth for InSb1-xBix thin films on (100) GaAs substrates is reported. Successful Bi incorporation for 2% is achieved, and up to 70% of the incorporated Bi atoms are at substitutional sites. The effects of growth parameters on Bi incorporation and surface morphology...

  3. Methods for assisting recovery of damaged brain and spinal cord and treating various diseases using arrays of x-ray microplanar beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilmanian, F Avraham [Yaphank, NY; Anchel, David J [Rocky Point, NY; Gaudette, Glenn [Holden, MA; Romanelli, Pantaleo [Monteroduni, IT; Hainfeld, James [Shoreham, NY

    2010-06-29

    A method of assisting recovery of an injury site of the central nervous system (CNS) or treating a disease includes providing a therapeutic dose of X-ray radiation to a target volume through an array of parallel microplanar beams. The dose to treat CNS injury temporarily removes regeneration inhibitors from the irradiated site. Substantially unirradiated cells surviving between beams migrate to the in-beam portion and assist recovery. The dose may be staggered in fractions over sessions using angle-variable intersecting microbeam arrays (AVIMA). Additional doses are administered by varying the orientation of the beams. The method is enhanced by injecting stem cells into the injury site. One array or the AVIMA method is applied to ablate selected cells in a target volume associated with disease for palliative or curative effect. Atrial fibrillation is treated by irradiating the atrial wall to destroy myocardial cells while continuously rotating the subject.

  4. AlGaAs and AlGaAs/GaAs/AlGaAs nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy on silicon substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirlin, G. E.; Reznik, R. R.; Shtrom, I. V.; Khrebtov, A. I.; Soshnikov, I. P.; Kukushkin, S. A.; Leandro, L.; Kasama, T.; Akopian, Nika

    2017-12-01

    The data on growth peculiarities and physical properties of GaAs insertions embedded in AlGaAs nanowires grown on different (1 1 1) substrates by Au-assisted molecular beam epitaxy are presented. The influence of nanowires growth conditions on structural and optical properties is studied in detail. It is shown that by varying the growth parameters it is possible to form structures like quantum dots that emit in a wide wavelengths range. These quantum dots show sharp and intense emission lines when an optical signal is collected from a single nanowire. The technology proposed opens new possibilities for integration of direct-band A III B V materials on silicon platform.

  5. Realization of Cu-Doped p-Type ZnO Thin Films by Molecular Beam Epitaxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suja, Mohammad; Bashar, Sunayna B; Morshed, Muhammad M; Liu, Jianlin

    2015-04-29

    Cu-doped p-type ZnO films are grown on c-sapphire substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Photoluminescence (PL) experiments reveal a shallow acceptor state at 0.15 eV above the valence band edge. Hall effect results indicate that a growth condition window is found for the formation of p-type ZnO thin films, and the best conductivity is achieved with a high hole concentration of 1.54 × 10(18) cm(-3), a low resistivity of 0.6 Ω cm, and a moderate mobility of 6.65 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) at room temperature. Metal oxide semiconductor capacitor devices have been fabricated on the Cu-doped ZnO films, and the characteristics of capacitance-voltage measurements demonstrate that the Cu-doped ZnO thin films under proper growth conditions are p-type. Seebeck measurements on these Cu-doped ZnO samples lead to positive Seebeck coefficients and further confirm the p-type conductivity. Other measurements such as X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron, Raman, and absorption spectroscopies are also performed to elucidate the structural and optical characteristics of the Cu-doped p-type ZnO films. The p-type conductivity is explained to originate from Cu substitution of Zn with a valency of +1 state. However, all p-type samples are converted to n-type over time, which is mostly due to the carrier compensation from extrinsic defects of ZnO.

  6. Molecular beam epitaxy of GaNAs alloys with high As content for potential photoanode applications in hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novikov, S. V.; Staddon, C. R.; Foxon, C. T.; Yu, K. M.; Broesler, R.; Hawkridge, M.; Liliental-Weber, Z.; Walukiewicz, W.; Denlinger, J.; Demchenko, I.

    2009-10-06

    The authors have succeeded in growing GaN1?xAsx alloys over a large composition range (0 < x < 0.8) by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The enhanced incorporation of As was achieved by growing the films with high As{sub 2} flux at low (as low as 100 C) growth temperatures, which is much below the normal GaN growth temperature range. Using x-ray and transmission electron microscopy, they found that the GaNAs alloys with high As content x > 0.17 are amorphous. Optical absorption measurements together with x-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy results reveal a continuous gradual decrease in band gap from -3.4 to < 1 eV with increasing As content. The energy gap reaches its minimum of -0.8 eV at x - 0.8. The composition dependence of the band gap of the crystalline GaN{sub 1?x}As{sub x} alloys follows the prediction of the band anticrossing model (BAC). However, our measured band gap of amorphous GaN{sub 1?x}As{sub x} with 0.3 < x < 0.8 are larger than that predicted by BAC. The results seem to indicate that for this composition range the amorphous GaN{sub 1?x}As{sub x} alloys have short-range ordering that resembles random crystalline GaN{sub 1?x}As{sub x} alloys. They have demonstrated the possibility of the growth of amorphous GaN{sub 1?x}As{sub x} layers with variable As content on glass substrates

  7. Nitric oxide assisted C60 secondary ion mass spectrometry for molecular depth profiling of polyelectrolyte multilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zappalà, G; Motta, V; Tuccitto, N; Vitale, S; Torrisi, A; Licciardello, A

    2015-12-15

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) with polyatomic primary ions provides a successful tool for molecular depth profiling of polymer systems, relevant in many technological applications. Widespread C60 sources, however, cause in some polymers extensive damage with loss of molecular information along depth. We study a method, based on the use of a radical scavenger, for inhibiting ion-beam-induced reactions causing sample damage. Layered polystyrene sulfonate and polyacrylic acid based polyelectrolyte films, behaving differently towards C60 beam-induced damage, were selected and prepared as model systems. They were depth profiled by means of time-of-flight (TOF)-SIMS in dual beam mode, using fullerene ions for sputtering. Nitric oxide was introduced into the analysis chamber as a radical scavenger. The effect of sample cooling combined with NO-dosing on the quality of depth profiles was explored. NO-dosing during C60-SIMS depth profiling of >1 micrometer-thick multilayered polyelectrolytes allows detection, along depth, of characteristic fragments from systems otherwise damaged by C60 bombardment, and increases sputtering yield by more than one order of magnitude. By contrast, NO has little influence on those layers that are well profiled with C60 alone. Such leveling effect, more pronounced at low temperature, leads to a dramatic improvement of profile quality, with a clear definition of interfaces. NO-dosing provides a tool for extending the applicability, in SIMS depth profiling, of the widely spread fullerene ion sources. In view of the acceptable erosion rates on inorganics, obtainable with C60, the method could be of relevance also in connection with the 3D-imaging of hybrid polymer/inorganic systems. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Highly flexible transparent and conductive ZnS/Ag/ZnS multilayer films prepared by ion beam assisted deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Zhinong, E-mail: znyu@bit.edu.cn [School of Optoelectronics, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Leng Jian [School of Optoelectronics, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Key Laboratory of Optical Thin Films, Tianjin Jinhang Institute of Technical Physics, Tianjin 300192 (China); Xue Wei; Zhang Ting; Jiang Yurong; Zhang Jie; Zhang Dongpu [School of Optoelectronics, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2012-01-15

    ZnS/Ag/ZnS (ZAZ) multilayer films were prepared on polyethene terephthalate (PET) by ion beam assisted deposition at room temperature. The structural, optical and electrical characteristics of ZAZ multilayers dependent on the thickness of silver layer were investigated. The ZAZ multilayers exhibit a low sheet resistance of about 10 {Omega}/sq., a high transmittance of 92.1%, and the improved resistance stabilities when subjected to bending. When the inserted Ag thickness is over 12 nm, the ZAZ multilayers show good resistance stabilities due to the existence of a ductile Ag metal layer. The results suggest that ZAZ film has better optoelectrical and anti-deflection characteristics than conventional indium tin oxide (ITO) single layer.

  9. Gas cluster ion beam assisted NiPt germano-silicide formation on SiGe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozcan, Ahmet S., E-mail: asozcan@us.ibm.com [IBM Almaden Research Center, 650 Harry Road, San Jose, California 95120 (United States); Lavoie, Christian; Jordan-Sweet, Jean [IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, 1101 Kitchawan Road, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States); Alptekin, Emre; Zhu, Frank [IBM Semiconductor Research and Development Center, 2070 Route 52, Hopewell Junction, New York 12533 (United States); Leith, Allen; Pfeifer, Brian D.; LaRose, J. D.; Russell, N. M. [TEL Epion Inc., 900 Middlesex Turnpike, Bldg. 6, Billerica, Massachusetts 01821 (United States)

    2016-04-21

    We report the formation of very uniform and smooth Ni(Pt)Si on epitaxially grown SiGe using Si gas cluster ion beam treatment after metal-rich silicide formation. The gas cluster ion implantation process was optimized to infuse Si into the metal-rich silicide layer and lowered the NiSi nucleation temperature significantly according to in situ X-ray diffraction measurements. This novel method which leads to more uniform films can also be used to control silicide depth in ultra-shallow junctions, especially for high Ge containing devices, where silicidation is problematic as it leads to much rougher interfaces.

  10. Structure and properties of carbon nitride thin films synthesized by nitrogen-ion-beam-assisted pulsed laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Z. Y.; Zhao, J. P.; Yano, T.; Shinozaki, T.; Ooie, T.

    2002-09-01

    Carbon nitride films were deposited by pulsed KrF excimer laser ablation of graphite with assistance of low energy nitrogen-ion-beam bombardment. The nitrogen to carbon ratio, bonding state, microstructure, and surface morphology of the deposited carbon nitride films were characterized by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, micro-Raman spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy, respectively. The irradiation effect of the nitrogen ion beam with various ion currents on the synthesis of carbon nitride films was investigated. XPS and FTIR analyses indicate that the bonding state between carbon and nitrogen in the deposited films is influenced by nitrogen irradiation with different ion currents during deposition. The carbon-nitrogen bonding of C-N and CDouble_BondN is observed in the films. High nitrogen ion current is proposed to promote the desired N-sp3C bonds, i.e., the C3N4 phase. In addition, tribological properties of the carbon nitride films deposited on TiN coated stainless steel substrates were also studied in both dry and oil environments, which exhibits a low friction coefficient compared with hard TiN film. copyright 2002 American Vacuum Society.

  11. Crystalline magnetic carbon nanoparticle assisted photothermal delivery into cells using CW near-infrared laser beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Ling; Koymen, Ali R; Mohanty, Samarendra K

    2014-05-29

    Efficient and targeted delivery of impermeable exogenous material such as small molecules, proteins, and plasmids into cells in culture as well as in vivo is of great importance for drug, vaccine and gene delivery for different therapeutic strategies. Though advent of optoporation by ultrafast laser microbeam has allowed spatial targeting in cells, the requirement of high peak power to create holes on the cell membrane is not practical and also challenging in vivo. Here, we report development and use of uniquely non-reactive crystalline magnetic carbon nanoparticles (CMCNPs) for photothermal delivery (PTD) of impermeable dyes and plasmids encoding light-sensitive proteins into cells using low power continuous wave near-infrared (NIR) laser beam. Further, we utilized the magnetic nature of these CMCNPs to localize them in desired region by external magnetic field, thus minimizing the required number of nanoparticles. We discovered that irradiation of the CMCNPs near the desired cell(s) with NIR laser beam leads to temperature rise that not only stretch the cell-membrane to ease delivery, it also creates fluid flow to allow mobilization of exogenous substances to the delivery. Due to significant absorption properties of the CMCNPs in the NIR therapeutic window, PTD under in vivo condition is highly possible.

  12. In-situ spectral reflectance for improving molecular beam epitaxy device growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breiland, W.G. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Chemical Processing Sciences Dept.; Hammons, B.E.; Hou, H.Q.; Killeen, K.P.; Klem, J.F.; Reno, J.L.; Sherwin, M.

    1997-05-01

    This report summarizes the development of in situ spectral reflectance as a tool for improving the quality, reproducibility, and yield of device structures grown from compound semiconductors. Although initially targeted at MBE (Molecular Beam Epitaxy) machines, equipment difficulties forced the authors to test most of their ideas on a MOCVD (Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition) reactor. A pre-growth control strategy using in situ reflectance has led to an unprecedented demonstration of process control on one of the most difficult device structures that can be grown with compound semiconductor materials. Hundreds of vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSEL`s) were grown with only {+-} 0.3% deviations in the Fabry-Perot cavity wavelength--a nearly ten-fold improvement over current calibration methods. The success of the ADVISOR (Analysis of Deposition using Virtual Interfaces and Spectroscopic Optical Reflectance) method has led to a great deal of interest from the commercial sector, including use by Hewlett Packard and Honeywell. The algorithms, software and reflectance design are being evaluated for patents and/or license agreements. A small company, Filmetrics, Inc., is incorporating the ADVISOR analysis method in its reflectometer product.

  13. Study on Oxidation of Cu and Cu3Au Surfaces with Hyperthermal Oxygen Molecular Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Michio; Teraoka, Yuden

    Corrosion wastes more than a few percent of the world's GDP every year. The initial stage of the corrosion is one of the central topics in material science. The oxidation is one of the major corrosion processes of metals. Thus, the study of the oxidation process on metal surfaces is generally interesting in various fields of science and technology. The growth of a protective thin surface layer, which prevents further oxidation into bulk of a metal, requires the formation of a homogeneous film. One simple way for the protection of underlying metals is surface alloying, combining different substances to form multi-component surfaces. The surface alloying leads to the formation of a protective oxide layer due to the preferential oxidation of one component, possibly with surface segregation. Copper and copper alloys have wide industrial applications, and therefore are of interest for studies of oxidation mechanism, especially in the Cu2O formation. Cu forms the stable Cu2O, while Au does not form a stable oxide and is not soluble into stable Cu2O. Thus, the Cu-Au alloy system is ideal for investigating the effect of alloying on the formation of protective layer against further oxidation into bulk. Here, we introduce our recent comparative studies of the oxidation of Cu(100) and Cu3Au(100) with hyperthermal O2 molecular beam and discuss why Cu3Au(100) is protective against the oxidation.

  14. Molecular beam epitaxy growth of germanium junctions for multi-junction solar cell applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, T.; Faucher, J.; Lee, M. L.

    2016-11-01

    We report on the molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) growth and device characteristics of Ge solar cells. Integrating a Ge bottom cell beneath a lattice-matched triple junction stack grown by MBE could enable ultra-high efficiencies without metamorphic growth or wafer bonding. However, a diffused junction cannot be readily formed in Ge by MBE due to the low sticking coefficient of group-V molecules on Ge surfaces. We therefore realized Ge junctions by growth of homo-epitaxial n-Ge on p-Ge wafers within a standard III-V MBE system. We then fabricated Ge solar cells, finding growth temperature and post-growth annealing to be key factors for achieving high efficiency. Open-circuit voltage and fill factor values of ~0.175 V and ~0.59 without a window layer were obtained, both of which are comparable to diffused Ge junctions formed by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy. We also demonstrate growth of high-quality, single-domain GaAs on the Ge junction, as needed for subsequent growth of III-V subcells, and that the surface passivation afforded by the GaAs layer slightly improves the Ge cell performance.

  15. Thin film growth of CaFe2As2 by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatano, T.; Kawaguchi, T.; Fujimoto, R.; Nakamura, I.; Mori, Y.; Harada, S.; Ujihara, T.; Ikuta, H.

    2016-01-01

    Film growth of CaFe2As2 was realized by molecular beam epitaxy on six different substrates that have a wide variation in the lattice mismatch to the target compound. By carefully adjusting the Ca-to-Fe flux ratio, we obtained single-phase thin films for most of the substrates. Interestingly, an expansion of the CaFe2As2 lattice to the out-of-plane direction was observed for all films, even when an opposite strain was expected. A detailed microstructure observation of the thin film grown on MgO by transmission electron microscope revealed that it consists of cube-on-cube and 45°-rotated domains. The latter domains were compressively strained in plane, which caused a stretching along the c-axis direction. Because the domains were well connected across the boundary with no appreciable discontinuity, we think that the out-of-plane expansion in the 45°-rotated domains exerted a tensile stress on the other domains, resulting in the unexpectedly large c-axis lattice parameter, despite the apparently opposite lattice mismatch.

  16. Radical-source molecular beam epitaxy of ZnO-based heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadofiev, Sergey

    2009-10-27

    This work focuses on the development of the novel growth approaches for the fabrication of Group II-oxide materials in the form of epitaxial films and heterostructures. It is shown that molecular-beam epitaxial growth far from thermal equilibrium allows one to overcome the standard solubility limit and to alloy ZnO with MgO or CdO in strict wurtzite phase up to mole fractions of several 10 %. In this way, a band-gap range from 2.2 to 4.4 eV can be covered. A clear layer-by-layer growth mode controlled by oscillations in reflection high-energy electron diffraction makes it possible to fabricate atomically smooth heterointerfaces and well-defined quantum well structures exhibiting prominent band-gap related light emission in the whole composition range. On appropriately designed structures, laser action from the ultraviolet down to green wavelengths and up to room temperature is achieved. The properties and potential of the ''state-of-the-art'' materials are discussed in relation to the advantages for their applications in various optoelectronic devices. (orig.)

  17. Hybrid molecular beam epitaxy for the growth of stoichiometric BaSnO{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prakash, Abhinav, E-mail: praka019@umn.edu; Dewey, John; Yun, Hwanhui; Jeong, Jong Seok; Mkhoyan, K. Andre; Jalan, Bharat, E-mail: bjalan@umn.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Owing to its high room-temperature electron mobility and wide bandgap, BaSnO{sub 3} has recently become of significant interest for potential room-temperature oxide electronics. A hybrid molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) approach for the growth of high-quality BaSnO{sub 3} films is developed in this work. This approach employs hexamethylditin as a chemical precursor for tin, an effusion cell for barium, and a radio frequency plasma source for oxygen. BaSnO{sub 3} films were thus grown on SrTiO{sub 3} (001) and LaAlO{sub 3} (001) substrates. Growth conditions for stoichiometric BaSnO{sub 3} were identified. Reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) intensity oscillations, characteristic of a layer-by-layer growth mode were observed. A critical thickness of ∼1 nm for strain relaxation was determined for films grown on SrTiO{sub 3} using in situ RHEED. Scanning transmission electron microscopy combined with electron energy-loss spectroscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy confirmed the cube-on-cube epitaxy and composition. The importance of precursor chemistry is discussed in the context of the MBE growth of BaSnO{sub 3}.

  18. MgO epitaxy on GaN (0002) surfaces by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craft, H. S.; Ihlefeld, J. F.; Losego, M. D.; Collazo, R.; Sitar, Z.; Maria, J.-P.

    2006-05-01

    We report on the epitaxial deposition of magnesium oxide films with [111] crystallographic orientation on (0002) GaN by molecular beam epitaxy. Specifically, we use an adsorption controlled growth mechanism to initiate the growth process. Electron diffraction shows a spotty intense pattern without intensity fluctuations during growth and evidence of in-plane twinning. X-ray diffraction reveals the films to be epitaxial with full width at half maximum values of 0.3°, 0.5°, and 1° in 2θ, ϕ, and χ circles, respectively. Wet etching of the GaN surface with a HCl:HF mixture prior to growth is critical for achieving high crystalline quality. Epitaxial growth is observed between room temperature and 650°C, with negligible changes in crystalline quality with increased temperature. Atomic force microscopy analysis shows grainy surfaces with feature sizes near 10nm and rms roughness values of 1.4Å over 1μm2 areas. X-ray diffraction analysis suggests MgO film stability up to 850°C in ex situ air annealing.

  19. Heterojunction Stripe Geometry Lead Salt Diode Lasers Grown By Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partin, D. L.

    1985-04-01

    Abstract. Lead-rare earth-chalcogenide diode lasers have been grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Emission wavelengths shorter than 5 to 6 Am have been obtained from lead-europium-selenide-telluride (Pb1 -xEuxSeyTe1-y) double heterojunction diode lasers grown lattice-matched to PbTe substrates. Mesa diodes with -25 um wide stripes have been fabricated that have a wide range of single longitudinal mode emission at up to -1 mW/facet output power. These diodes have operated at up to 147 K cw, which to our knowledge is the highest cw operating temperature ever achieved with lead-chalcogenide diode lasers. The wavelength coverage of the PbTe system has so far been extended to 4.06 um cw. Longer wavelength coverage is obtained from double heterojunction diode lasers with Ma1-ySnyTe active regions lattice-matched to (Pb1-ySny)1-xYbxTe confinement layers. I n preliminary studies of diodes with x = 0.034, y = 0.14, the cw emission wavelength varied from 10.7 µm (at 10 K) to 7.1 µm (at 128 K).

  20. Molecular beam epitaxy of Cd3As2 on a III-V substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timo Schumann

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Epitaxial, strain-engineered Dirac semimetal heterostructures promise tuning of the unique properties of these materials. In this study, we investigate the growth of thin films of the recently discovered Dirac semimetal Cd3As2 by molecular beam epitaxy. We show that epitaxial Cd3As2 layers can be grown at low temperatures (110 °C–220 °C, in situ, on (111 GaSb buffer layers deposited on (111 GaAs substrates. The orientation relationship is described by ( 112 Cd 3 As 2 || (111 GaSb and [ 1 1 ¯ 0 ] Cd 3 As 2 || [ 1 ¯ 01 ] GaSb . The films are shown to grow in the low-temperature, vacancy ordered, tetragonal Dirac semimetal phase. They exhibit high room temperature mobilities of up to 19300 cm2/Vs, despite a three-dimensional surface morphology indicative of island growth and the presence of twin variants. The results indicate that epitaxial growth on more closely lattice matched buffer layers, such as InGaSb or InAlSb, which allow for imposing different degrees of epitaxial coherency strains, should be possible.

  1. Growth of layered superconductor β-PdBi{sub 2} films using molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denisov, N.V., E-mail: denisov@iacp.dvo.ru [Institute of Automation and Control Processes FEB RAS, 5 Radio Street, 690041 Vladivostok (Russian Federation); Matetskiy, A.V.; Tupkalo, A.V. [Institute of Automation and Control Processes FEB RAS, 5 Radio Street, 690041 Vladivostok (Russian Federation); Zotov, A.V. [Institute of Automation and Control Processes FEB RAS, 5 Radio Street, 690041 Vladivostok (Russian Federation); School of Natural Sciences, Far Eastern Federal University, 690950 Vladivostok (Russian Federation); Department of Electronics, Vladivostok State University of Economics and Service, 690600 Vladivostok (Russian Federation); Saranin, A.A. [Institute of Automation and Control Processes FEB RAS, 5 Radio Street, 690041 Vladivostok (Russian Federation); School of Natural Sciences, Far Eastern Federal University, 690950 Vladivostok (Russian Federation)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • Bulk β-PdBi{sub 2} is layered material with advanced properties of topological superconductor. • We present a method for growing β-PdBi{sub 2} films of a desired thickness. • Method utilizes MBE growth of β-PdBi{sub 2}, using Bi(111) film on Si(111) as a template. • Electronic and superconducting properties of the films are similar to those of bulk β-PdBi{sub 2}. - Abstract: Bulk β-PdBi{sub 2} layered material exhibits advanced properties and is supposed to be probable topological superconductor. We present a method based on molecular beam epitaxy that allows us to grow β-PdBi{sub 2} films from a single β-PdBi{sub 2} triple layer up to the dozens of triple layers, using Bi(111) film on Si(111) as a template. The grown films demonstrate structural, electronic and superconducting properties similar to those of bulk β-PdBi{sub 2} crystals. Ability to grow the β-PdBi{sub 2} films of desired thickness opens the promising possibilities to explore fascinating properties of this advanced material.

  2. Optical Spectroscopy of Europium doped Gallium Nitride prepared by Solid Source Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyein, Ei Ei; Seo, J. T.; Bluiett, A.; Anderson, J.; Hommerich, U. H.; Heikenfeld, J.; Garter, M.; Lee, D. S.; Steckl, A. J.

    2001-04-01

    Thin Film Electroluminescence Displays (TEFL’s) are all solid-state devices and offer several advantages over well known LCD’s including increased brightness and viewing angle. We are currently investigating Eu doped GaN as a potential red phosphor for TEFL display applications. Eu doped GaN films were grown by solid source molecular beam epitaxy on Si (111) substates. The material was optically characterized through temperature dependent emission spectroscopy using a He-Cd laser at 325 nm for above band gap excitation. A strong red emission was obtained at 622 nm, which corresponds to an Eu^3+ inner 4f-shell transition from the ^5D 0 to ^7F2 state. A temperature dependent study of the red Eu^3+ line showed that the integrated emission intensity decreased by roughly a factor of 20 between 77K and room temperature. On the contrary, the emission lifetime changed only slightly ( 10-20non-radiative decay processes are small. Therefore, the observed thermal quenching of red Eu emission is assigned to a strongly temperature dependent pumping process.

  3. Single orientation graphene synthesized on iridium thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dangwal Pandey, A., E-mail: arti.pandey@desy.de; Grånäs, E.; Shayduk, R.; Noei, H.; Vonk, V. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Krausert, K.; Franz, D.; Müller, P.; Keller, T. F.; Stierle, A., E-mail: andreas.stierle@desy.de [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Fachbereich Physik, Universität Hamburg, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-08-21

    Heteroepitaxial iridium thin films were deposited on (0001) sapphire substrates by means of molecular beam epitaxy, and subsequently, one monolayer of graphene was synthesized by chemical vapor deposition. The influence of the growth parameters on the quality of the Ir films, as well as of graphene, was investigated systematically by means of low energy electron diffraction, x-ray reflectivity, x-ray diffraction, Auger electron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. Our study reveals (111) oriented iridium films with high crystalline quality and extremely low surface roughness, on which the formation of large-area epitaxial graphene is achieved. The presence of defects, like dislocations, twins, and 30° rotated domains in the iridium films is also discussed. The coverage of graphene was found to be influenced by the presence of 30° rotated domains in the Ir films. Low iridium deposition rates suppress these rotated domains and an almost complete coverage of graphene was obtained. This synthesis route yields inexpensive, air-stable, and large-area graphene with a well-defined orientation, making it accessible to a wider community of researchers for numerous experiments or applications, including those which use destructive analysis techniques or irreversible processes. Moreover, this approach can be used to tune the structural quality of graphene, allowing a systematic study of the influence of defects in various processes like intercalation below graphene.

  4. Preparation and Optical Properties of GeBi Films by Using Molecular Beam Epitaxy Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dainan; Liao, Yulong; Jin, Lichuan; Wen, Qi-Ye; Zhong, Zhiyong; Wen, Tianlong; Xiao, John Q.

    2017-12-01

    Ge-based alloys have drawn great interest as promising materials for their superior visible to infrared photoelectric performances. In this study, we report the preparation and optical properties of germanium-bismuth (Ge1-xBix) thin films by using molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). GeBi thin films belong to the n-type conductivity semiconductors, which have been rarely reported. With the increasing Bi-doping content from 2 to 22.2%, a series of Ge1-xBix thin film samples were obtained and characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. With the increase of Bi content, the mismatch of lattice constants increases, and the GeBi film shifts from direct energy band-gaps to indirect band-gaps. The moderate increase of Bi content reduces optical reflectance and promotes the transmittance of extinction coefficient in infrared wavelengths. The absorption and transmittance of GeBi films in THz band increase with the increase of Bi contents.

  5. Molecular beam epitaxy growth and magnetic properties of Cr-Co-Ga Heusler alloy films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Wuwei, E-mail: wfeng@cugb.edu.cn; Wang, Weihua [School of Materials Science and Technology, China University of Geosciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Zhao, Chenglong [Key Laboratory for Renewable Energy, Beijing Key Laboratory for New Energy Materials and Devices, Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Van Quang, Nguyen; Cho, Sunglae, E-mail: slcho@ulsan.ac.kr [Department of Physics, University of Ulsan, Ulsan 680-749 (Korea, Republic of); Dung, Dang Duc [Department of General Physics, School of Engineering Physics, Ha Noi University of Science and Technology, 1 Dai Co Viet Road, Ha Noi (Viet Nam)

    2015-11-15

    We have re-investigated growth and magnetic properties of Cr{sub 2}CoGa films using molecular beam epitaxy technique. Phase separation and precipitate formation were observed experimentally again in agreement with observation of multiple phases separation in sputtered Cr{sub 2}CoGa films by M. Meinert et al. However, significant phase separation could be suppressed by proper control of growth conditions. We showed that Cr{sub 2}CoGa Heusler phase, rather than Co{sub 2}CrGa phase, constitutes the majority of the sample grown on GaAs(001) at 450 {sup o}C. The measured small spin moment of Cr{sub 2}CoGa is in agreement with predicted HM-FCF nature; however, its Curie temperature is not as high as expected from the theoretical prediction probably due to the off-stoichiometry of Cr{sub 2}CoGa and the existence of the disorders and phase separation.

  6. Growth, structural, and electrical properties of germanium-on-silicon heterostructure by molecular beam epitaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aheli Ghosh

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The growth, morphological, and electrical properties of thin-film Ge grown by molecular beam epitaxy on Si using a two-step growth process were investigated. High-resolution x-ray diffraction analysis demonstrated ∼0.10% tensile-strained Ge epilayer, owing to the thermal expansion coefficient mismatch between Ge and Si, and negligible epilayer lattice tilt. Micro-Raman spectroscopic analysis corroborated the strain-state of the Ge thin-film. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy revealed the formation of 90  ° Lomer dislocation network at Ge/Si heterointerface, suggesting the rapid and complete relaxation of Ge epilayer during growth. Atomic force micrographs exhibited smooth surface morphology with surface roughness < 2 nm. Temperature dependent Hall mobility measurements and the modelling thereof indicated that ionized impurity scattering limited carrier mobility in Ge layer. Capacitance- and conductance-voltage measurements were performed to determine the effect of epilayer dislocation density on interfacial defect states (Dit and their energy distribution. Finally, extracted Dit values were benchmarked against published Dit data for Ge MOS devices, as a function of threading dislocation density within the Ge layer. The results obtained were comparable with Ge MOS devices integrated on Si via alternative buffer schemes. This comprehensive study of directly-grown epitaxial Ge-on-Si provides a pathway for the development of Ge-based electronic devices on Si.

  7. Growth, structural, and electrical properties of germanium-on-silicon heterostructure by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Aheli; Clavel, Michael B.; Nguyen, Peter D.; Meeker, Michael A.; Khodaparast, Giti A.; Bodnar, Robert J.; Hudait, Mantu K.

    2017-09-01

    The growth, morphological, and electrical properties of thin-film Ge grown by molecular beam epitaxy on Si using a two-step growth process were investigated. High-resolution x-ray diffraction analysis demonstrated ˜0.10% tensile-strained Ge epilayer, owing to the thermal expansion coefficient mismatch between Ge and Si, and negligible epilayer lattice tilt. Micro-Raman spectroscopic analysis corroborated the strain-state of the Ge thin-film. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy revealed the formation of 90° Lomer dislocation network at Ge/Si heterointerface, suggesting the rapid and complete relaxation of Ge epilayer during growth. Atomic force micrographs exhibited smooth surface morphology with surface roughness < 2 nm. Temperature dependent Hall mobility measurements and the modelling thereof indicated that ionized impurity scattering limited carrier mobility in Ge layer. Capacitance- and conductance-voltage measurements were performed to determine the effect of epilayer dislocation density on interfacial defect states (Dit) and their energy distribution. Finally, extracted Dit values were benchmarked against published Dit data for Ge MOS devices, as a function of threading dislocation density within the Ge layer. The results obtained were comparable with Ge MOS devices integrated on Si via alternative buffer schemes. This comprehensive study of directly-grown epitaxial Ge-on-Si provides a pathway for the development of Ge-based electronic devices on Si.

  8. Molecular-beam epitaxially grown spatial light modulators with charge-coupled-device addressing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodhue, W. D.; Burke, B. E.; Aull, B. F.; Nichols, K. B.

    1988-08-01

    Molecular-beam epitaxy has been used to grow the first spatial light modulators which combine charge-coupled-device addressing and electroabsorption effects in multiple quantum wells. Charge packets are used to control the electric field across an underlying multiple-quantum-well structure, causing a change in the optical absorption properties of the device. It was demonstrataed that the intensity of an optical signal propagating through the device normal to the quantum wells can be significantly modulated. Both 16- and 32-stage one-dimensional and 16 X 16-stage two-dimensional devices have been fabricated. Devices with GaAs and AlGaAs epitaxial layers have been operated in the 850-nm region, and devices with InGaAs and GaAs epitaxial layers have been operated above 900 nm. One-dimensional GaAs/AlGaAs devices exhibit an intensity modulation of 1.45 to 1 at 847 nm, and one-dimensional InGaAs/GaAs devices exhibit an intensity modulation of 1.18 to 1 at 965 nm. The large optical modulation achieved by these devices make them excellent candidates for use in optical signal processing and the emerging field of optical computing.

  9. Molecular-beam sampling study of extinguishment of methane-air flames by dry chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knuth, E. L.; Ni, W.-F.; Seeger, C.

    1982-01-01

    The use of Al2O3, NaHCO3, KHCO3, NH4H2PO4 and KCl powders for the inhibition of a methane/oxygen diffusion flame is studied through measurement of composition and temperature profiles, using a molecular beam mass spectrometer sampling system. In order to obtain significant inhibition without extinguishing the flame, a powder feeding rate of 2 mg/liter of gas was used for KCl and Al2O3, and of 3 mg/liter of gas for the remaining powders. CH4, O2, N2, H2O and CO2 concentrations were measured by the mass spectrometer, while temperature was measured by the time-of-flight technique. For the powder feeding rates used, Al2O3 was the least and KCl and NH2H4PO2 the most effective in reducing temperature; in reaction-inhibition effectiveness, Al2O3 was again lowest while KCl was superior to all others. Because the KCl concentration was only 2/3 that of NH4H2PO4, it is recommended as the most effective temperature reducer and reaction inhibitor.

  10. Polarized infrared reflectance study of free standing cubic GaN grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S.C., E-mail: saicheonglee86@yahoo.com [Nano-Optoelectronics Research Laboratory, School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Penang (Malaysia); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Ng, S.S.; Hassan, H. Abu; Hassan, Z.; Zainal, N. [Nano-Optoelectronics Research Laboratory, School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Penang (Malaysia); Novikov, S.V.; Foxon, C.T.; Kent, A.J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-01

    Optical properties of free standing cubic gallium nitride grown by molecular beam epitaxy system are investigated by a polarized infrared (IR) reflectance technique. A strong reststrahlen band, which reveals the bulk-like optical phonon frequencies, is observed. Meanwhile, continuous oscillation fringes, which indicate the sample consists of two homogeneous layers with different dielectric constants, are observed in the non-reststrahlen region. By obtaining the first derivative of polarized IR reflectance spectra measured at higher angles of incidence, extra phonon resonances are identified at the edges of the reststrahlen band. The observations are verified with the theoretical results simulated based on a multi-oscillator model. - Highlights: • First time experimental studies of IR optical phonons in bulk like, cubic GaN layer. • Detection of extra phonon modes of cubic GaN by polarized IR reflectance technique. • Revelation of IR multiphonon modes of cubic GaN by first derivative numerical method. • Observation of multiphonon modes requires very high angle of incidence. • Resonance splitting effect induced by third phonon mode is a qualitative indicator.

  11. Growth of N-polar GaN by ammonia molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fireman, M. N.; Li, Haoran; Keller, Stacia; Mishra, Umesh K.; Speck, James S.

    2018-01-01

    The homoepitaxial growth of N-polar GaN was investigated by ammonia molecular beam epitaxy. Systematic growth studies varying the V/III flux ratio and the growth temperature indicated that the strongest factor in realizing morphologically smooth films was the growth temperature; N-face films needed to be grown approximately 100 °C or greater than Ga-face films provided the same metal flux. Smooth N-face films could also be grown at temperatures only 50 °C greater than Ga-face films, albeit under reduced metal flux. Too high a growth temperature and too low a metal flux resulted in dislocation mediated pitting of the surface. The unintentional impurity incorporation of such films was also studied by secondary mass ion spectroscopy and most importantly revealed an oxygen content in the mid 1017 to the mid 1018 cm-3 range. Hall measurements confirmed that this oxygen impurity resulted in n-type films, with carrier concentrations and mobilities comparable to those of intentionally silicon doped GaN.

  12. The impact of treatment density and molecular weight for fractional laser-assisted drug delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haak, Christina S; Bhayana, Brijesh; Farinelli, William A

    2012-01-01

    Ablative fractional lasers (AFXL) facilitate uptake of topically applied drugs by creating narrow open micro-channels into the skin, but there is limited information on optimal laser settings for delivery of specific molecules. The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of laser...... treatment density (% of skin occupied by channels) and molecular weight (MW) for fractional CO(2) laser-assisted drug delivery. AFXL substantially increased intra- and transcutaneous delivery of polyethylene glycols (PEGs) in a MW range from 240 to 4300 Da (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, p...

  13. Scattering of thermal He beams by crossed atomic and molecular beams. III. Anisotropic intermolecular potentials for He + N/sub 2/, O/sub 2/, CO, and NO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keil, M.; Slankas, J.T.; Kuppermann, A.

    1979-01-01

    Differential scattering cross sections are measured for He + N/sub 2/, O/sub 2/, CO, and NO, using the crossed molecular beams technique. These data, which are sensitive to the van der Waals attractive minima and adjacent regions of the intermolecular potentials, are analyzed in terms of both central-field and anisotropic models. Little evidence is found for quenching of the observed diffraction oscillations, and anisotropic contributions are determined to be small:The spherical averages of these anisotropic potentials are indistinguishable, within experimental error, from the potentials obtained by a central-field analysis. This study thus provides a quantitative, empirical validation of the central-field assumption for molecular scattering in weakly anisotropic systems.

  14. Deposition of hetero-epitaxial In{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taga, N.; Maekawa, M. [Asahi Glass Co., Ltd., Yokohama (Japan). Research Center; Shigesato, Y.; Yasui, I. [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). Inst. of Industrial Science; Haynes, T.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Solid State Div.

    1996-05-01

    Highly oriented thin film In{sub 2}O{sub 3} was heteroepitaxially grown on optically polished (100) plane of single crystalline yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) substrate using Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE). Full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of X-ray rocking-curve showed 0.08{degree} for In{sub 2}O{sub 3} 200 nm thick layers indicating that excellent uniformity orientation compared with the heteroepitaxially-grown In{sub 2}O{sub 3} epitaxially deposited by the conventional methods such as electron-beam (e-beam) evaporation or sputtering method. The minimum yield ({chi}{sub min}) of the MBE grown in In{sub 2}O{sub 3} film of Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) was also extremely small value 3.1%, implying the very high crystallinity.

  15. Effect of Zn and Te beam intensity upon the film quality of ZnTe layers on severely lattice mismatched sapphire substrates by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakasu, Taizo; Sun, W.; Kobayashi, M.; Asahi, T.

    2017-06-01

    Zinc telluride layers were grown on highly-lattice-mismatched sapphire substrates by molecular beam epitaxy, and their crystallographic properties were studied by means of X-ray diffraction pole figures. The crystal quality of the ZnTe thin film was further studied by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray rocking curves and low-temperature photoluminescence measurements. These methods show that high-crystallinity (111)-oriented single domain ZnTe layers with the flat surface and good optical properties are realized when the beam intensity ratio of Zn and Te beams is adjusted. The migration of Zn and Te was inhibited by excess surface material and cracks were appeared. In particular, excess Te inhibited the formation of a high-crystallinity ZnTe film. The optical properties of the ZnTe layer revealed that the exciton-related features were dominant, and therefore the film quality was reasonably high even though the lattice constants and the crystal structures were severely mismatched.

  16. Angle-resolved molecular beam scattering of NO at the gas-liquid interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zutz, Amelia; Nesbitt, David J.

    2017-08-01

    This study presents first results on angle-resolved, inelastic collision dynamics of thermal and hyperthermal molecular beams of NO at gas-liquid interfaces. Specifically, a collimated incident beam of supersonically cooled NO (2 Π 1/2, J = 0.5) is directed toward a series of low vapor pressure liquid surfaces ([bmim][Tf2N], squalane, and PFPE) at θinc = 45(1)°, with the scattered molecules detected with quantum state resolution over a series of final angles (θs = -60°, -30°, 0°, 30°, 45°, and 60°) via spatially filtered laser induced fluorescence. At low collision energies [Einc = 2.7(9) kcal/mol], the angle-resolved quantum state distributions reveal (i) cos(θs) probabilities for the scattered NO and (ii) electronic/rotational temperatures independent of final angle (θs), in support of a simple physical picture of angle independent sticking coefficients and all incident NO thermally accommodating on the surface. However, the observed electronic/rotational temperatures for NO scattering reveal cooling below the surface temperature (Telec liquids, indicating a significant dependence of the sticking coefficient on NO internal quantum state. Angle-resolved scattering at high collision energies [Einc = 20(2) kcal/mol] has also been explored, for which the NO scattering populations reveal angle-dependent dynamical branching between thermal desorption and impulsive scattering (IS) pathways that depend strongly on θs. Characterization of the data in terms of the final angle, rotational state, spin-orbit electronic state, collision energy, and liquid permit new correlations to be revealed and investigated in detail. For example, the IS rotational distributions reveal an enhanced propensity for higher J/spin-orbit excited states scattered into near specular angles and thus hotter rotational/electronic distributions measured in the forward scattering direction. Even more surprisingly, the average NO scattering angle (⟨θs⟩) exhibits a remarkably strong

  17. Angle-resolved molecular beam scattering of NO at the gas-liquid interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zutz, Amelia; Nesbitt, David J.

    2017-08-01

    This study presents first results on angle-resolved, inelastic collision dynamics of thermal and hyperthermal molecular beams of NO at gas-liquid interfaces. Specifically, a collimated incident beam of supersonically cooled NO (2 Π 1/2, J = 0.5) is directed toward a series of low vapor pressure liquid surfaces ([bmim][Tf2N], squalane, and PFPE) at θinc = 45(1)°, with the scattered molecules detected with quantum state resolution over a series of final angles (θs = -60°, -30°, 0°, 30°, 45°, and 60°) via spatially filtered laser induced fluorescence. At low collision energies [Einc = 2.7(9) kcal/mol], the angle-resolved quantum state distributions reveal (i) cos(θs) probabilities for the scattered NO and (ii) electronic/rotational temperatures independent of final angle (θs), in support of a simple physical picture of angle independent sticking coefficients and all incident NO thermally accommodating on the surface. However, the observed electronic/rotational temperatures for NO scattering reveal cooling below the surface temperature (Telec < Trot < TS) for all three liquids, indicating a significant dependence of the sticking coefficient on NO internal quantum state. Angle-resolved scattering at high collision energies [Einc = 20(2) kcal/mol] has also been explored, for which the NO scattering populations reveal angle-dependent dynamical branching between thermal desorption and impulsive scattering (IS) pathways that depend strongly on θs. Characterization of the data in terms of the final angle, rotational state, spin-orbit electronic state, collision energy, and liquid permit new correlations to be revealed and investigated in detail. For example, the IS rotational distributions reveal an enhanced propensity for higher J/spin-orbit excited states scattered into near specular angles and thus hotter rotational/electronic distributions measured in the forward scattering direction. Even more surprisingly, the average NO scattering angle (

  18. Cubic GaN epilayers grown by molecular beam epitaxy on thin β-SiC/Si (001) substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    As, D. J.; Frey, T.; Schikora, D.; Lischka, K.; Cimalla, V.; Pezoldt, J.; Goldhahn, R.; Kaiser, S.; Gebhardt, W.

    2000-03-01

    The molecular beam epitaxy of cubic GaN on Si(001) substrates, which were covered by a 4 nm thick β-SiC layer, is reported. The structural and optical properties of the cubic GaN epilayers were studied by transmission electron microscopy, high-resolution x-ray diffraction, and low-temperature photoluminescence measurements. We find clear evidence for the growth of cubic GaN layers almost free of hexagonal inclusions. The density of extended defects and the near band edge photoluminescence of the cubic GaN layers grown at substrate temperatures of 835 °C is comparable to that of high quality cubic GaN epilayers grown by molecular beam epitaxy on GaAs (001) substrates.

  19. Combinatorial screening of halide perovskite thin films and solar cells by mask-defined IR laser molecular beam epitaxy

    OpenAIRE

    Kawashima, Kazuhiro; Okamoto, Yuji; Annayev, Orazmuhammet; Toyokura, Nobuo; Takahashi, Ryota; Lippmaa, Mikk; Itaka, Kenji; Suzuki, Yoshikazu; Matsuki, Nobuyuki; Koinuma, Hideomi

    2017-01-01

    Abstract As an extension of combinatorial molecular layer epitaxy via ablation of perovskite oxides by a pulsed excimer laser, we have developed a laser molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) system for parallel integration of nano-scaled thin films of organic?inorganic hybrid materials. A pulsed infrared (IR) semiconductor laser was adopted for thermal evaporation of organic halide (A-site: CH3NH3I) and inorganic halide (B-site: PbI2) powder targets to deposit repeated A/B bilayer films where the thic...

  20. Molecular beam epitaxy of germanium nanoclusters and indium gallium nitride thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bing

    Molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) is an important method of growth of thin crystalline films. In this thesis, I study MBE of Ge on Si(100) substrates and InGaN on silicon and sapphire substrates. Formation and evolution of three-dimensional Ge/Si(100) islands of diameters between 10 to 150 nm are first investigated. Three types of Ge clusters are identified ex situ by atomic force microscopy. These are (i) pyramidal islands with four {105} facets, (ii) dome-type islands with steeper facets of {113}, and (iii) very large and strain relaxed "superdome" islands of {112}, {125} and {215} facets. The island size, shape, and spatial distributions are examined as functions of major growth parameters such as substrate temperature, Ge beam flux, and time of annealing. The growth of Ge on Si(100) is divided into different regimes according to the total coverage. In the low and moderate coverage (10 monolayers) regime, formation of pyramidal islands is a kinetically favored process. These pyramids can evolve into larger dome type islands by several kinetic pathways including coarsening and coalescence. By appropriate low temperature annealing, an ensemble of pyramids can reach a local equilibrium state where the islands can have a narrow size distribution and a locally ordered spatial distribution. This can be useful for growth of self-assembled quantum dot devices. At higher coverages, very large superdome-type islands could form and grow at the expense of the nearby small pyramids and domes. However, the superdome island formation can also be suppressed by using high Ge beam fluxes. The mechanisms of the evolution of the Ge islands and the transition of one type of islands to another type of islands in each growth regime are discussed. After I obtain an overall understanding of the growth and evolution of Ge nanoclusters on flat Si(100) surfaces, lateral alignment of Ge/Si(100) islands is explored using pre-patterned Si(100) substrates as the growth templates. The patterns are

  1. Investigations into molecular beam epitaxial growth of Indium Arsenide/Gallium antimonide superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Lee Michael

    InAs/GaSb superlattices are a material system well suited to growth via molecular beam epitaxy. The ability to tune the band gap over the entire mid and long wave infrared spectrum gives a large number of applications for devices made from InAs/GaSb superlattice material. The growth of high quality InAs/GaSb superlattice material requires a careful study of the parameters used during epitaxial growth. This work investigates the growth of tunnel junctions for InAs/GaSb based superlattice light emitting diodes, the presence of defects in GaSb homoepitaxial layers, and variations in the growth rate of InAs/GaSb superlattice samples. Tunnel junctions in cascaded structures must provide adequate barriers to prevent carriers from leaking from one emission region to the next without first recombining radiatively, while at the same time remain low in tunneling resistance for current recycling. A variety of tunnel junction designs are compared in otherwise identical four stage InAs/GaSb superlattice light emitting diodes, which past studies have found hole confinement to be problematic. GaSb was used on the p-side of the junction, while various materials were used on the n-side. Al0.20In0.80As0.73Sb0.27 tunnel junctions function best due to the combination of favorable band alignment and ease of growth. Pyramidal defects have been observed in layers of GaSb grown by molecular beam epitaxy on GaSb substrates. These defects are typically 3-8 nanometers high, 1-3 microns in diameter, and shaped like pyramids. Their occurrence in the growth of GaSb buffer layers can propagate into subsequent layers. Defects are nucleated during the early stages of growth after the thermal desorption of native oxide from the GaSb substrate. These defects grow into pyramids due to a repulsive Ehrlich-Schwoebel potential on atomic step edges leading to an upward adatom current. The defects reduce in density with growth of GaSb. The insertion of a thin AlAsSb layer into the early stages of the Ga

  2. Foreign-catalyst-free growth of InAs/InSb axial heterostructure nanowires on Si (111) by molecular-beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Hyok; Pan, Dong; Li, Lixia; Zhao, Jianhua

    2017-03-01

    Epitaxial high-quality InAs/InSb axial heterostructure nanowires are of great interest due to their distinct advantages in fundamental research as well as applications in semiconductor electronic and quantum devices. Currently, nearly all the growth of InAs/InSb axial heterostructure nanowires is assisted with foreign catalysts such as Au, and work on foreign-catalyst-free growth of InAs/InSb axial heterostructure nanowires is lacking. Here we report on the growth of InAs/InSb axial heterostructure nanowires on Si (111) substrates by molecular-beam epitaxy without using any foreign catalysts. The Sb/In beam equivalent pressure (BEP) ratio is found to have important influence on the heterostructure nanowire morphology, and InSb nanowires can be epitaxially grown on InAs nanowire stems with a hexagonal prism and nanosheet-like shapes when the Sb/In BEP ratio varies from 10 to 20. Transmission electron microscopy studies reveal that the InAs nanowire stems have a mixture of zincblende (ZB) and wurtzite (WZ) crystal structures, while InSb nanowire parts have a pure ZB crystal structure free of stacking faults. Composition analysis of axial heterostructure nanowires provides clear evidence that the InSb nanowires are epitaxially grown on InAs nanowires in an In self-assisted vapor-liquid-solid manner. This study paves a new route for growing narrow-gap semiconductor heterostructures with strong spin-orbit interaction for the study of topological states, and the growth manner presented here is expected to be used to grow other In-based axial heterostructure nanowires.

  3. Excitonic emission of colloidal nano-crystals embedded in Molecular Beam Epitaxy grown ZnSe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rashad, M; Pawlis, A; Schikora, D; Lischka, K [Department Physik, Universitaet Paderborn, Paderborn (Germany); Schoeps, O; Artemyev, M V; Woggon, U, E-mail: mahmed@mail.uni-paderborn.d [Technische Universitaet Berlin, Berlin (Germany)

    2010-09-01

    We combine ZnSe layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy with colloidal CdSe core, CdSe/ZnSe and CdSe/ZnS core/shell nano-crystals (NCs) to achieve monolithic NC-semiconductor heterostructures. The NCs are prepared in solution and deposited by spray-coating on ZnSe buffer layers and subsequently overgrown by ZnSe. We find a blue shift of the photoluminescence of core/shell dots when they are overgrown by ZnSe. Rapid thermal annealing is used to improve the interface region between the NCs and the ZnSe matrix. The effect of different annealing temperatures on the optical properties of CdSe core, CdSe/ZnSe and CdSe/ZnS core/shell NCs overgrown with a cap layer of ZnSe is investigated. After annealing at 673 K the photoluminescence of these samples is red-shifted as compared to unprocessed samples. All photoluminescence results are explained by a model calculation with the following assumption about the 3D confining potential of the NCs: (i) the shell of core/shell NCs dissolves during ZnSe overgrowth, (ii) after overgrowth NCs are separated from the ZnSe matrix by an interface barrier, (iii) the height of this barrier is significantly reduced by annealing. For all three types of NCs we find an excellent quantitative agreement between the experimental and calculated NC transition energies. The absence of the barrier after annealing is further demonstrated by low temperature photoluminescence data of annealed samples which show enhanced diffusion of electron-hole pairs from ZnSe into the NCs.

  4. Molecular-beam epitaxy of mercury-iron selenide layers and quantum wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schikora, D.; Widmer, Th.; Lischka, K.; Schäfer, P.; Machel, G.; Luther, S.; von Ortenberg, M.

    1996-02-01

    Epitaxial layers and single quantum wells (SQW) of Fermi-level pinned mercury-iron selenide (HgSe:Fe) have been grown by molecular beam epitaxy on ZnTe buffer layers and characterised by in- situ high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) and high-field magnetospectroscopy investigations. The onset of strain relaxation at the critical thickness has been determined by time-dependent intensity-profile analysis of different reflections in the RHEED pattern. A growth mode transition has been identified from 2D- to a 3D growth mode, which coincides exactly with the critical thickness equilibrium value of about 61 nm predicted by the Matthews-Blakeslee theory. Hall effect measurements have been performed to determine the iron concentration in the HgSe layers below and above the Fermi-level pinning threshold-concentration. With increasing iron concentration a pronounced increase of the mobility has been found in the layers according to the predictions of a short-range correlation theory (SRC). The maximum carrier mobility of about 2.7 × 10 5cm -3 measured in a 1.5 μm thick HgSe:Fe-layer indicates that long-range correlations have also to be considered in the transport mechanism of mercury-iron selenide. Different types of HgSe:Fe-SQW and a {HgSe:Fe}/{HgSe} superlattice have been analyzed by Shubnikov-de Haas (SdH) measurements and Hall effect measurements in magnetic fields up to 30 T. The existence of a two-dimensional electron system (Q2D) in the SQW has been confirmed by the cosine dependence of the SdH-oscillation period. The dependence of the subband splitting in the SQW on the quantum well width has been investigated by Hall-resistance measurements.

  5. Structural and magnetic properties of Ni nanofilms on Ge(001) by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocirnea, Amelia Elena; Costescu, Ruxandra Maria; Pasuk, Iuliana; Lungu, George Adrian; Teodorescu, Cristian Mihail

    2017-12-01

    Ni films of 20 nm nominal thickness were grown on Ge(001) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy at several different temperatures from room temperature up to 400 °C. X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveal the nucleation of Ni-Ge compounds (NiGe, Ni2Ge, Ni5Ge2) as well as a departure from the fcc Ni structure exhibited by the films at and beyond a temperature of 100 °C. The binding energy of the Ni 2p peak increases from the RT value (852.7 eV) by 0.5-1.1 eV for the Ni/Ge(001) samples, while the Ge 2p binding energy changes by 0.6-0.7 eV after Ni growth compared to a clean Ge(001) substrate (there is only a ±0.15 eV shift among the samples grown on substrates at higher temperatures). By increasing substrate temperature, we obtained higher intermixing of Ni and Ge, but rather than both Ni and Ge interdiffusing, we find that Ni diffuses further into the germanium with higher substrate temperature, forming increasingly Ni-rich Ni-Ge compounds diluted into the Ge matrix. Based on Magneto-optic Kerr Effect measurements, Ni/Ge(001) grown on substrates at 100 and 200 °C does not exhibit a hysteresis loop, while the samples on 300 and 400 °C substrates show magnetic behavior, which we attribute to the magnetic character of hexagonal Ni5Ge2 (which is determined here for the first time to be a ferromagnetic phase).

  6. Minority carrier lifetime in iodine-doped molecular beam epitaxy-grown HgCdTe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madni, I.; Umana-Membreno, G. A.; Lei, W.; Gu, R.; Antoszewski, J.; Faraone, L. [School of Electrical, Electronic and Computer Engineering, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, Western Australia 6009 (Australia)

    2015-11-02

    The minority carrier lifetime in molecular beam epitaxy grown layers of iodine-doped Hg{sub 1−x}Cd{sub x}Te (x ∼ 0.3) on CdZnTe substrates has been studied. The samples demonstrated extrinsic donor behavior for carrier concentrations in the range from 2 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −3} to 6 × 10{sup 17} cm{sup −3} without any post-growth annealing. At a temperature of 77 K, the electron mobility was found to vary from 10{sup 4} cm{sup 2}/V s to 7 × 10{sup 3} cm{sup 2}/V s and minority carrier lifetime from 1.6 μs to 790 ns, respectively, as the carrier concentration was increased from 2 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −3} to 6 × 10{sup 17} cm{sup −3}. The diffusion of iodine is much lower than that of indium and hence a better alternative in heterostructures such as nBn devices. The influence of carrier concentration and temperature on the minority carrier lifetime was studied in order to characterize the carrier recombination mechanisms. Measured lifetimes were also analyzed and compared with the theoretical models of the various recombination processes occurring in these materials, indicating that Auger-1 recombination was predominant at higher doping levels. An increase in deep-level generation-recombination centers was observed with increasing doping level, which suggests that the increase in deep-level trap density is associated with the incorporation of higher concentrations of iodine into the HgCdTe.

  7. Magnetization reversal in YIG/GGG(111) nanoheterostructures grown by laser molecular beam epitaxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krichevtsov, Boris B; Gastev, Sergei V; Suturin, Sergey M; Fedorov, Vladimir V; Korovin, Alexander M; Bursian, Viktor E; Banshchikov, Alexander G; Volkov, Mikhail P; Tabuchi, Masao; Sokolov, Nikolai S

    2017-01-01

    Thin (4-20 nm) yttrium iron garnet (Y3Fe5O12, YIG) layers have been grown on gadolinium gallium garnet (Gd3Ga5O12, GGG) 111-oriented substrates by laser molecular beam epitaxy in 700-1000 °C growth temperature range. The layers were found to have atomically flat step-and-terrace surface morphology with step height of 1.8 Å characteristic for YIG(111) surface. As the growth temperature is increased from 700 to 1000 °C the terraces become wider and the growth gradually changes from layer by layer to step-flow regime. Crystal structure studied by electron and X-ray diffraction showed that YIG lattice is co-oriented and laterally pseudomorphic to GGG with small rhombohedral distortion present perpendicular to the surface. Measurements of magnetic moment, magneto-optical polar and longitudinal Kerr effect (MOKE), and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) were used for study of magnetization reversal for different orientations of magnetic field. These methods and ferromagnetic resonance studies have shown that in zero magnetic field magnetization lies in the film plane due to both shape and induced anisotropies. Vectorial MOKE studies have revealed the presence of an in-plane easy magnetization axis. In-plane magnetization reversal was shown to occur through combination of reversible rotation and abrupt irreversible magnetization jump, the latter caused by domain wall nucleation and propagation. The field at which the flip takes place depends on the angle between the applied magnetic field and the easy magnetization axis and can be described by the modified Stoner-Wohlfarth model taking into account magnetic field dependence of the domain wall energy. Magnetization curves of individual tetrahedral and octahedral magnetic Fe3+ sublattices were studied by XMCD.

  8. Impact of N-plasma and Ga-irradiation on MoS2 layer in molecular beam epitaxy

    KAUST Repository

    Mishra, Pawan

    2017-01-03

    Recent interest in two-dimensional materials has resulted in ultra-thin devices based on the transfer of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) onto other TMDs or III-nitride materials. In this investigation, we realized p-type monolayer (ML) MoS2, and intrinsic GaN/p-type MoS2 heterojunction by the GaN overgrowth on ML-MoS2/c-sapphire using the plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. A systematic nitrogen plasma (N∗2N2*) and gallium (Ga) irradiation studies are employed to understand the individual effect on the doping levels of ML-MoS2, which is evaluated by micro-Raman and high-resolution X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HRXPS) measurements. With both methods, p-type doping was attained and was verified by softening and strengthening of characteristics phonon modes E12gE2g1 and A1gA1g from Raman spectroscopy. With adequate N∗2N2*-irradiation (3 min), respective shift of 1.79 cm−1 for A1gA1g and 1.11 cm−1 for E12gE2g1 are obtained while short term Ga-irradiated (30 s) exhibits the shift of 1.51 cm−1 for A1gA1g and 0.93 cm−1 for E12gE2g1. Moreover, in HRXPS valence band spectra analysis, the position of valence band maximum measured with respect to the Fermi level is determined to evaluate the type of doping levels in ML-MoS2. The observed values of valance band maximum are reduced to 0.5, and 0.2 eV from the intrinsic value of ≈1.0 eV for N∗2N2*- and Ga-irradiated MoS2 layers, which confirms the p-type doping of ML-MoS2. Further p-type doping is verified by Hall effect measurements. Thus, by GaN overgrowth, we attained the building block of intrinsic GaN/p-type MoS2 heterojunction. Through this work, we have provided the platform for the realization of dissimilar heterostructure via monolithic approach.

  9. Growth and structural characterization of III-V nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dheeraj, D.L.

    2010-10-15

    Heterostructured semiconductor nanowires (NWs) have attracted considerable attention in recent years because of their potential in future nano-electronic and nano-photonic device applications. NWs are usually grown by vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth mechanism using techniques such as metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy, chemical beam epitaxy and molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Of all the available techniques, MBE is known to be the technique which yields highest purity materials. In this study, the growth of GaAs NWs, GaAsSb NWs, as well as GaAs/GaAsSb axial and GaAs/AlGaAs radial heterostructured NWs on GaAs(111)B substrates by MBE is demonstrated. The structural and optical properties of the NWs grown are characterized by electron microscopy techniques such as scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and micro-photoluminescence, respectively. Firstly, the optimum growth conditions to obtain rod shaped GaAs NWs on GaAs(111)B substrates by MBE is determined. It has been found that in-addition to the V/III ratio and substrate temperature, buffer growth conditions also play an important role on the orientation of the NWs. The effect of V/III ratio, substrate temperature, and the arsenic species (As{sub 2}/As{sub 4}) on the morphology of GaAs NWs has been determined. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) characterization of NWs revealed that GaAs in NW form exhibit wurtzite (WZ) crystal phase in contrast to zinc blende (ZB) phase adapted in its bulk form. Since WZ crystal phase is a metastable phase of GaAs, the WZ GaAs NWs often exhibit stacking faults. The stacking faults are known to be a detrimental problem, if not properly controlled. To gain more insight on the growth kinetics of GaAs NWs grown by MBE, several samples such as GaAs NWs grown for different time durations, and GaAs NWs with three GaAsSb inserts, where GaAsSb inserts acts as markers, have been grown. Interestingly, the growth rates of the GaAs segments and GaAsSb inserts were observed to vary

  10. European Conference on Molecular Beam Epitaxy and Related Growth Methods (6th) Held in Tampere, Finland on 21-14 April 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-04-24

    GaAs on Si with aSi Fp9 Layer by layer molecular beam 12.20- buffer layer 12.45- epitaxy of BiSrCaCuO: Study of 12.25 A. Georgakilas’, J. Stoemenos 2...Abstract submitted to the European MBE Workshop 1991 Fp9 LAYER BY LAYER MOLECULAR BEAM EPITAXY OF BiSrCaCuO: STUDY OF THE BISMUTH INCORPORATION M. Laguds, L

  11. Next-Generation Molecular Histology Using Highly Multiplexed Ion Beam Imaging (MIBI) of Breast Cancer Tissue Specimens for Enhanced Clinical Guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    channels specific for each region of interest. Histone H3 and dsDNA are being used as nuclear markers; lamin A/C and nuclear pore complex are...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0180 TITLE: Next-Generation Molecular Histology Using Highly Multiplexed Ion Beam Imaging (MIBI) of Breast Cancer Tissue...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Next-Generation Molecular Histology Using Highly Multiplexed Ion Beam Imaging (MIBI) of Breast Cancer Tissue Specimens for

  12. Regulating Molecular Recognition with C-Shaped Strips Attained by Chirality-Assisted Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoxi; Weinert, Zackariah J; Sharafi, Mona; Liao, Chenyi; Li, Jianing; Schneebeli, Severin T

    2015-10-19

    Chirality-assisted synthesis (CAS) is a general approach to control the shapes of large molecular strips. CAS is based on enantiomerically pure building blocks that are designed to strictly couple in a single geometric orientation. Fully shape-persistent structures can thus be created, even in the form of linear chains. With CAS, selective recognition between large host and guest molecules can reliably be designed de novo. To demonstrate this concept, three C-shaped strips that can embrace a pillar[5]arene macrocycle were synthesized. The pillar[5]arene bound to the strips was a better host for electron-deficient guests than the free macrocycle. Experimental and computational evidence is provided for these unique cooperative interactions to illustrate how CAS could open the door towards the precise positioning of functional groups for regulated supramolecular recognition and catalysis. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Clinical and molecular analyses of Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome: Comparison between spontaneous conception and assisted reproduction techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenorio, Jair; Romanelli, Valeria; Martin-Trujillo, Alex; Fernández, García-Moya; Segovia, Mabel; Perandones, Claudia; Pérez Jurado, Luis A; Esteller, Manel; Fraga, Mario; Arias, Pedro; Gordo, Gema; Dapía, Irene; Mena, Rocío; Palomares, María; Pérez de Nanclares, Guiomar; Nevado, Julián; García-Miñaur, Sixto; Santos-Simarro, Fernando; Martinez-Glez, Víctor; Vallespín, Elena; Monk, David; Lapunzina, Pablo

    2016-10-01

    Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) is an overgrowth syndrome characterized by an excessive prenatal and postnatal growth, macrosomia, macroglossia, and hemihyperplasia. The molecular basis of this syndrome is complex and heterogeneous, involving genes located at 11p15.5. BWS is correlated with assisted reproductive techniques. BWS in individuals born following assisted reproductive techniques has been found to occur four to nine times higher compared to children with to BWS born after spontaneous conception. Here, we report a series of 187 patients with to BWS born either after assisted reproductive techniques or conceived naturally. Eighty-eight percent of BWS patients born via assisted reproductive techniques had hypomethylation of KCNQ1OT1:TSS-DMR in comparison with 49% for patients with BWS conceived naturally. None of the patients with BWS born via assisted reproductive techniques had hypermethylation of H19/IGF2:IG-DMR, neither CDKN1 C mutations nor patUPD11. We did not find differences in the frequency of multi-locus imprinting disturbances between groups. Patients with BWS born via assisted reproductive techniques had an increased frequency of advanced bone age, congenital heart disease, and decreased frequency of earlobe anomalies but these differences may be explained by the different molecular background compared to those with BWS and spontaneous fertilization. We conclude there is a correlation of the molecular etiology of BWS with the type of conception. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. High-temperature tribological characteristics of silver and gold coatings on ceramics prepared by ion-beam-assisted deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdemir, A.; Erck, R.A.; Fenske, G.R.; Nichols, F.A.

    1992-04-01

    An ion-beam-assisted deposition (IBAD) system was used to deposit silver and gold coatings on polycrystalline {alpha}-alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) substrates for tribological studies at temperatures to 400{degrees}C. The wear tests were performed with an oscillating ball-on-flat type of test apparatus as a partial simulation of ring/liner motion and contact geometry in actual engine systems. The test results showed that without a surface coating, both the wear rates and the friction coefficients of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} test pairs were quite high, and increased substantially with temperature. In contract, the wear of flats coated with silver and gold was at unmeasurable levels, even after sliding tests of 110,000 passes. The wear of balls (uncoated) sliding against the Ag- and Au-coated flats was reduced by factors of 45 to more than 500 depending on coating type and ambient temperature. The friction coefficients of pairs with an IBAD-Ag or Au coating were in the range of 0.32--0.5.

  15. Dynamic nano-imaging of label-free living cells using electron beam excitation-assisted optical microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuta, Masahiro; Kanamori, Satoshi; Furukawa, Taichi; Nawa, Yasunori; Inami, Wataru; Lin, Sheng; Kawata, Yoshimasa; Terakawa, Susumu

    2015-01-01

    Optical microscopes are effective tools for cellular function analysis because biological cells can be observed non-destructively and non-invasively in the living state in either water or atmosphere condition. Label-free optical imaging technique such as phase-contrast microscopy has been analysed many cellular functions, and it is essential technology for bioscience field. However, the diffraction limit of light makes it is difficult to image nano-structures in a label-free living cell, for example the endoplasmic reticulum, the Golgi body and the localization of proteins. Here we demonstrate the dynamic imaging of a label-free cell with high spatial resolution by using an electron beam excitation-assisted optical (EXA) microscope. We observed the dynamic movement of the nucleus and nano-scale granules in living cells with better than 100 nm spatial resolution and a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) around 10. Our results contribute to the development of cellular function analysis and open up new bioscience applications. PMID:26525841

  16. Synthesis and characterization of c-BN films prepared by ion beam assisted deposition and triode sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben el Mekki, M.; Djouadi, M.A.; Mortet, V.; Guiot, E. [ENSAM, Cluny (France). Lab. Bourguignon des Mater. et Procedes; Nouet, G. [LERMAT, ISMRA, Caen (France); Mestres, N. [Institut de Ciencia de Materials de Barcelona, (CSIC), E-08193, Bellaterra (Spain)

    1999-11-01

    Boron nitride films deposited on unheated c-Si substrates by ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD) and triode sputtering (TS) techniques are studied. The composition, microstructure and crystallinity of the films obtained by the two techniques are compared The methods of characterization used in this study are: X-ray photo-electron, infrared, and Raman spectroscopies. High-resolution cross sectional TEM is used to confirm the optical results. In the case of films prepared by IBAD, the ion energy was 350-500 eV. The films were prepared from different gas mixtures of nitrogen and argon, boron was supplied by evaporation of elemental boron. TS films were prepared with 100% of nitrogen, the boron was supplied by sputtering a pure boron target. This study shows that, in comparison with TS samples, IBAD samples have higher chemical and physical stability. The particle-size dependence of frequencies and damping of optical phonons is studied for all samples from the analysis of Raman scattering and infrared spectra. A very important difference between the particle-sizes of IBAD and TS samples is observed. A progressive chemical etching by nitric acid at 80 C combined with infrared characterization was successfully performed on IBAD samples deposited at low ion flux and announces a mixture of sp{sup 2} and sp{sup 3} phases with high content of sp{sup 3} structure. All results are in full agreements with TEM results. (orig.)

  17. Dynamic nano-imaging of label-free living cells using electron beam excitation-assisted optical microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuta, Masahiro; Kanamori, Satoshi; Furukawa, Taichi; Nawa, Yasunori; Inami, Wataru; Lin, Sheng; Kawata, Yoshimasa; Terakawa, Susumu

    2015-11-03

    Optical microscopes are effective tools for cellular function analysis because biological cells can be observed non-destructively and non-invasively in the living state in either water or atmosphere condition. Label-free optical imaging technique such as phase-contrast microscopy has been analysed many cellular functions, and it is essential technology for bioscience field. However, the diffraction limit of light makes it is difficult to image nano-structures in a label-free living cell, for example the endoplasmic reticulum, the Golgi body and the localization of proteins. Here we demonstrate the dynamic imaging of a label-free cell with high spatial resolution by using an electron beam excitation-assisted optical (EXA) microscope. We observed the dynamic movement of the nucleus and nano-scale granules in living cells with better than 100 nm spatial resolution and a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) around 10. Our results contribute to the development of cellular function analysis and open up new bioscience applications.

  18. Topological insulator engineering of Bi2Se3 through molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Seongshik

    2013-03-01

    Despite numerous reports proving the presence of the surface states on various topological insulator (TI) materials, all existing TI materials suffer from the bulk conductance problem at various levels. Therefore, achieving a truly insulating bulk state without degrading the surface state in their transport properties is one of the most important tasks of the TI materials research. In this talk, I will present how we address this problem by utilizing various molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) schemes with focus on Bi2Se3 family of materials. Considering that the bulk conductance problem originates mostly from the selenium vacancies in Bi2Se3, the typical MBE growth condition characterized by low growth temperature and high selenium vapor pressure is ideal for solving this bulk conductance problem. Moreover, thin films have another advantage of naturally reduced bulk effect due to the enhanced surface-to-bulk ratio. These intrinsic advantages of MBE-grown TI thin films recently led to a number of new findings. High quality Bi2Se3 thin films did show the expected dominant surface transport characters with negligible bulk conductance. However, the strong tendency toward downward band bending in undoped Bi2Se3 introduces trivial surface transport channels in addition to the topological surface states, leading to complications in the interpretations of transport results. Furthermore, even if reducing the thickness of TI samples helps reveal the surface transport channels by reducing the bulk contribution, it does not really solve the bulk conductance problem because regardless of how small it may be, the bulk state still remains metallic, shorting the top and bottom surfaces. According to the Mott-criterion of metal-insulator transition, in order to implement a truly insulating bulk state in the current generation TI materials, it is necessary to suppress the defect density below ~ 1014 cm-3, which might be fundamentally impossible considering the weak Van der Waals bonding

  19. Molecular Beam Epitaxy-Grown InGaN Nanowires and Nanomushrooms for Solid State Lighting

    KAUST Repository

    Gasim, Anwar A.

    2012-05-01

    InGaN is a promising semiconductor for solid state lighting thanks to its bandgap which spans the entire visible regime of the electromagnetic spectrum. InGaN is grown heteroepitaxially due to the absence of a native substrate; however, this results in a strained film and a high dislocation density—two effects that have been associated with efficiency droop, which is the disastrous drop in efficiency of a light-emitting diode (LED) as the input current increases. Heteroepitaxially grown nanowires have recently attracted great interest due to their property of eliminating the detrimental effects of the lattice mismatch and the corollary efficiency droop. In this study, InGaN nanowires were grown on a low-cost Si (111) substrate via molecular beam epitaxy. Unique nanostructures, taking the form of mushrooms, have been observed in localized regions on the samples. These nanomushrooms consist of a nanowire body with a wide cap on top. Photoluminescence characterization revealed that the nanowires emit violet-blue, whilst the nanomushrooms emit a broad yellow-orange-red luminescence. The simultaneous emission from the nanowires and nanomushrooms forms white light. Structural characterization of a single nanomushroom via transmission electron microscopy revealed a simultaneous increase in indium and decrease in gallium at the interface between the body and the cap. Furthermore, the cap itself was found to be indium-rich, confirming it as the source of the longer wavelength yellow-orange-red luminescence. It is believed that the nanomushroom cap formed as a consequence of the saturation of growth on the c-plane of the nanowire. It is proposed that the formation of an indium droplet on the tip of the nanowire saturated growth on the c-plane, forcing the indium and gallium adatoms to incorporate on the sidewall m-planes instead, but only at the nanowire tip. This resulted in the formation of a mushroom-like cap on the tip. How and why the indium droplets formed is not

  20. Growth of Atomic Hexagonal Boron Nitride Layers and Graphene/Hexagonal Boron Nitride Heterostructures by Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhongguang

    Graphene, as a famous Van der Waals material, has attracted intensive attention from research group and industry all over the world after 2004, while hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), as an excellent two-dimensional (2D) dielectric layer, has been studied intensively mainly for its compatibility with graphene and other 2D materials. To realize the technological potential of 2D system, it is essential to synthesize large-area, high-quality 2D thin films through a scalable and controllable method in order to investigate novel phenomenon in fundamental physics and promising device applications. In this thesis, the growth of graphene, h-BN and their vertical and lateral heterostructures by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) is mainly discussed. In addition, the growth mechanism, fundamental physics and possible applications are also studied. In-situ epitaxial growth of graphene/h-BN heterostructures on cobalt (Co) film substrate was achieved by using plasma-assisted MBE in Chapter 2. We demonstrated a solution for direct fabricating graphene/h-BN vertical stacking structures. Various characterizations, such as Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), were carried out to confirm and evaluate the heterostructures. Wafer-scale heterostructures consisting of single-layer/bilayer graphene and multilayer h-BN were achieved. The mismatch angle between graphene and h-BN is below 1°. Chapter 3 studied the growth of graphene/h-BN heterostructures on Co foil substrate by plasma-assisted MBE. It is found that the coverage of h-BN layers on the epitaxial thin graphite layer is growth-time dependent. Large-area, uniform-quality h-BN film was successfully deposited on thin graphite layer. Based on the as-grown h-BN (5-6 nm)/G (26-27 nm) heterostructure, without using any transferring process, we fabricated capacitor devices with Co(foil)/G/h-BN/Co(contact) configuration to evaluate the

  1. Pulsed laser-assisted focused electron-beam-induced etching of titanium with XeF2: enhanced reaction rate and precursor transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, J H; Fowlkes, J D; Timilsina, R; Stanford, M G; Lewis, B B; Rack, P D

    2015-02-25

    In order to enhance the etch rate of electron-beam-induced etching, we introduce a laser-assisted focused electron-beam-induced etching (LA-FEBIE) process which is a versatile, direct write nanofabrication method that allows nanoscale patterning and editing. The results demonstrate that the titanium electron stimulated etch rate via the XeF2 precursor can be enhanced up to a factor of 6 times with an intermittent pulsed laser assist. The evolution of the etching process is correlated to in situ stage current measurements and scanning electron micrographs as a function of time. The increased etch rate is attributed to photothermally enhanced Ti-F reaction and TiF4 desorption and in some regimes enhanced XeF2 surface diffusion to the reaction zone.

  2. Molecular beam epitaxy of SrTiO3 on Si (001): Early stages of the growth and strain relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, G.; Saint-Girons, G.; Vilquin, B.; Delhaye, G.; Maurice, J.-L.; Botella, C.; Robach, Y.; Hollinger, G.

    2009-08-01

    The molecular beam epitaxy of SrTiO3 (STO) layers on Si (001) is studied, focusing on the early stages of the growth and on the strain relaxation process. Evidence is given that even for optimized growth conditions, STO grows initially amorphous on silicon and recrystallizes, leading to the formation of an atomically abrupt heterointerface with silicon. Just after recrystallization, STO is partially strained. Further increase in its thickness leads to the onset of a progressive plastic relaxation mechanism. STO recovers its bulk lattice parameter for thicknesses of the order of 30 ML.

  3. Oscillations in the exchange coupling for (111)-oriented Co/Cu magnetic multilayers grown by molecular-beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howson, M. A.; Hickey, B. J.; Xu, J.; Greig, D.; Wiser, Nathan

    1993-07-01

    We present experimental evidence for oscillations in the strength of the exchange coupling between Co layers for (111)-oriented Co/Cu magnetic multilayers grown by molecular-beam epitaxy. The evidence comes from an analysis of the approach to saturation of the magnetization data for a series of epitaxial multilayers for which the Cu spacer thickness varies from 5 to 20 Å. We also find that, even for those samples having the maximum exchange coupling strength, only about 20% of the volume of the sample is antiferromagnetically coupled.

  4. Peculiarly strong room-temperature ferromagnetism from low Mn-doping in ZnO grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Zuo

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Strong room-temperature ferromagnetism is demonstrated in single crystalline Mn-doped ZnO thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Very low Mn doping concentration is investigated, and the measured magnetic moment is much larger than what is expected for an isolated ion based on Hund's rules. The ferromagnetic behavior evolves with Mn concentration. Both magnetic anisotropy and anomalous Hall effect confirm the intrinsic nature of ferromagnetism. While the Mn dopant plays a crucial role, another entity in the system is needed to explain the observed large magnetic moments.

  5. Growth window and effect of substrate symmetry in hybrid molecular beam epitaxy of a Mott insulating rare earth titanate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moetakef, Pouya; Zhang, Jack Y.; Raghavan, Santosh; Kajdos, Adam P.; Stemmer, Susanne [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California, 93106-5050 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    The conditions for the growth of stoichiometric GdTiO{sub 3} thin films by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) are investigated. It is shown that relatively high growth temperatures (>750 Degree-Sign C) are required to obtain an MBE growth window in which only the stoichiometric film grows for a range of cation flux ratios. This growth window narrows with increasing film thickness. It is also shown that single-domain films are obtained by the growth on a symmetry-matched substrate. The influence of lattice mismatch strain on the electrical and magnetic characteristics of the GdTiO{sub 3} thin film is investigated.

  6. Influence of substrate orientation on the structural quality of GaAs nanowires in molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi; Shi, Sui-Xing; Chen, Ping-Ping; Lu, Wei; Zou, Jin

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the effect of substrate orientation on the structural quality of Au-catalyzed epitaxial GaAs nanowires grown by a molecular beam epitaxy reactor has been investigated. It was found that the substrate orientations can be used to manipulate the nanowire catalyst composition and the catalyst surface energy and, therefore, to alter the structural quality of GaAs nanowires grown on different substrates. Defect-free wurtzite-structured GaAs nanowires grown on the GaAs (110) substrate have been achieved under our growth conditions.

  7. Molecular chaperone assisted expression systems: obtaining pure soluble and active recombinant proteins for structural and therapeutic purposes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Makhoba, XH

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available during recombinant proteins production in E. coli. Molecular chaperones are proteins that are known to assist the newly synthesized proteins to complete their folding stages. This system has improved various proteins that are difficult to produce in E...

  8. Mechanical Properties and Thermal Stability of TiN/Ta Multilayer Film Deposited by Ion Beam Assisted Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongfei Shang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available TiN/Ta multilayer film with a modulation period of 5.6 nm and modulation ratio of 1 : 1 was produced by ion beam assisted deposition. Microstructure of the as-deposited TiN/Ta multilayer film was observed by transmission electron microscopy and mechanical properties were investigated. Residual stress in the TiN/Ta multilayer film was about 72% of that of a TiN monolayer film with equivalent thickness deposited under the same conditions. Partial residual stress was released in the Ta sublayers during deposition, which led to the decrease of the residual stress of the TiN/Ta multilayer film. Nanohardness (H of the TiN/Ta multilayer film was 24 GPa, 14% higher than that of the TiN monolayer film. It is suggested that the increase of the nanohardness is due to the introduction of the Ta layers which restrained the growth of TiN crystal and led to the decrease of the grain size. A significant increase (3.5 times of the H3/E2 (E elastic modulus value indicated that the TiN/Ta multilayer film has higher elasticity than the TiN monolayer film. The Lc (critical load in nano-scratch test value of the TiN monolayer film was 45 mN, which was far lower than that of the TiN/Ta multilayer film (around 75 mN. Results of the indentation test showed a higher fracture toughness of the TiN/Ta multilayer film than that of the TiN monolayer film. Results of differential scanning calorimetric (DSC and thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA indicate that the TiN/Ta multilayer film has better thermal stability than the TiN monolayer film.

  9. Structure investigation of BN films grown by ion-beam-assisted deposition by means of polarised IR and Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben el Mekki, M.; Djouadi, M.A.; Guiot, E.; Mortet, V. [ENSAM, Cluny (France). Lab. Bourguignon des Materiaux et Procedes; Pascallon, J.; Stambouli, V.; Bouchier, D. [Institut d' Electronique Fondamentale, Universite Paris-Sud, Orsay (France); Mestres, N. [Institut de Ciencia de Materials de Barcelona (CSIC), E-08193, Bellaterra (Spain); Nouet, G. [LERMAT, ISMRA, Caen (France)

    1999-09-01

    We present an optical investigation, by means of polarised infrared (IR) spectroscopy and Raman scattering, of the microstructure and crystallinity of mixed films of hexagonal and cubic boron nitride (h-BN and c-BN, respectively). The films were deposited on an unheated silicon substrate by the ion-beam-assisted deposition method (IBAD) at low energy (400-500 eV). The deposition temperature, due to the ion bombardment, was in the range 200-250 C at the end of the deposition process. Different film types were grown on a silicon substrate of dimensions 75 mm x 15 mm by changing the ion (nitrogen+argon) to atom (thermal boron) arrival ratio, {phi}{sub ion}/{phi}{sub B}, in the range 0.69-3. Polarised IR reflectivity (PIRR) spectra were acquired at different positions on the BN film (different arrival ratios {phi}{sub ion}/{phi}{sub B}) and show an important upwards shift of transverse optical (TO) and longitudinal optical (LO) phonons of the twofold degenerated mode E{sub 1u} of the sp{sup 2} phase at the transition zone from sp{sup 2} to sp{sup 3} phases. Several processes can shift the IR phonon peaks, including the degree of crystallinity, film thickness, film stoichiometry and intrinsic stress. The micro-Raman results and the full-width at half-maximum values of TO phonons of the E{sub 1u} mode show that the BN film has a similar crystallinity in all regions. The effect of the film thickness was shown by using a microstructure-dependent model for the IR anisotropic effective dielectric function of thin films. (orig.)

  10. Ultraviolet photodetectors based on aluminum gallium nitride films grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Mira

    2000-10-01

    GaN-AlN alloys are an important class of materials for ultraviolet photodetectors. The focus of this work was to develop photoconducting and photovoltaic detectors based on AlxGa1-xN films, grown by molecular beam epitaxy. GaN photoconducting detectors were fabricated and characterized. Mobility-lifetime products of the films were determined from measurement of photoconductive gain. They varied from 10-2cm2/V to 10 -7cm2/V as resistivity changed from 10 2W-cm to 107W-cm. Spectral response showed a sharp transition at 365nm and three orders of magnitude visible light rejection. Semi-insulating films exhibited fast response time of 20ns. Dynamic range was linear over five orders of magnitude. Low frequency noise spectra were dominated by l/f noise in the 0--100Hz range and by generation-recombination noise in the 100Hz--10KHz range. A trap at DE = 0.32eV was identified from the temperature dependence of the noise spectrum. The noise equivalent power was determined to be 3 x 10-14W/Hz 1/2 at 10KHz for the semi-insulating detectors. Solar-blind UV photoconductive detectors were fabricated using Al xGa1-xN films with Al mole fraction x = 0--0.45. Detectors fabricated on films with Al mole fraction x = 0.45, corresponding to true solar-blind detection, exhibited mobility-lifetime products of 10 -5cm2/V, which is two orders of magnitude higher than that of GaN films of comparable resistivity. These films also exhibited the highest degree of long range atomic ordering. The enhanced photoconductive gain is accounted for by a model, which considers band offsets between the ordered and random domains in the partially ordered alloys, causing spatial separation of photo-carriers and consequently, long recombination lifetimes. Schottky barrier photovoltaic detectors (n-GaN/Ni-Pt), with a mesa-etched vertical geometry, were fabricated. These photodiodes exhibit a responsivity of 0.18A/W at 325nm and NEP of 1.3 x 10-9W/Hz 1/2 at 1KHz. Doping concentrations and barrier heights were

  11. Non-adiabatic ab initio molecular dynamics of supersonic beam epitaxy of silicon carbide at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taioli, Simone [Interdisciplinary Laboratory for Computational Science, FBK-Center for Materials and Microsystems and University of Trento, Trento (Italy); Department of Physics, University of Trento, Trento (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Perugia (Italy); Department of Chemistry, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Garberoglio, Giovanni [Interdisciplinary Laboratory for Computational Science, FBK-Center for Materials and Microsystems and University of Trento, Trento (Italy); Simonucci, Stefano [Interdisciplinary Laboratory for Computational Science, FBK-Center for Materials and Microsystems and University of Trento, Trento (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Perugia (Italy); Department of Physics, University of Camerino, Camerino (Italy); Beccara, Silvio a [Interdisciplinary Laboratory for Computational Science, FBK-Center for Materials and Microsystems and University of Trento, Trento (Italy); Department of Physics, University of Trento, Trento (Italy); Aversa, Lucrezia [Institute of Materials for Electronics and Magnetism, IMEM-CNR, Trento (Italy); Nardi, Marco [Institute of Materials for Electronics and Magnetism, IMEM-CNR, Trento (Italy); Institut fuer Physik, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Verucchi, Roberto [Institute of Materials for Electronics and Magnetism, FBK-CNR, Trento (Italy); Iannotta, Salvatore [Institute of Materials for Electronics and Magnetism, IMEM-CNR, Parma (Italy); Dapor, Maurizio [Interdisciplinary Laboratory for Computational Science, FBK-Center for Materials and Microsystems and University of Trento, Trento (Italy); Department of Materials Engineering and Industrial Technologies, University of Trento, Trento (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Padova (Italy); and others

    2013-01-28

    In this work, we investigate the processes leading to the room-temperature growth of silicon carbide thin films by supersonic molecular beam epitaxy technique. We present experimental data showing that the collision of fullerene on a silicon surface induces strong chemical-physical perturbations and, for sufficient velocity, disruption of molecular bonds, and cage breaking with formation of nanostructures with different stoichiometric character. We show that in these out-of-equilibrium conditions, it is necessary to go beyond the standard implementations of density functional theory, as ab initio methods based on the Born-Oppenheimer approximation fail to capture the excited-state dynamics. In particular, we analyse the Si-C{sub 60} collision within the non-adiabatic nuclear dynamics framework, where stochastic hops occur between adiabatic surfaces calculated with time-dependent density functional theory. This theoretical description of the C{sub 60} impact on the Si surface is in good agreement with our experimental findings.

  12. Interface kinetics in phase-field models: isothermal transformations in binary alloys and step dynamics in molecular-beam epitaxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boussinot, G; Brener, Efim A

    2013-08-01

    We present a unified description of interface kinetic effects in phase-field models for isothermal transformations in binary alloys and steps dynamics in molecular-beam-epitaxy. The phase-field equations of motion incorporate a kinetic cross-coupling between the phase field and the concentration field. This cross-coupling generalizes the phenomenology of kinetic effects and was omitted until recently in classical phase-field models. We derive general expressions (independent of the details of the phase-field model) for the kinetic coefficients within the corresponding macroscopic approach using a physically motivated reduction procedure. The latter is equivalent to the so-called thin-interface limit but is technically simpler. It involves the calculation of the effective dissipation that can be ascribed to the interface in the phase-field model. We discuss in detail the possibility of a nonpositive definite matrix of kinetic coefficients, i.e., a negative effective interface dissipation, although being in the range of stability of the underlying phase-field model. Numerically we study the step-bunching instability in molecular-beam-epitaxy due to the Ehrlich-Schwoebel effect, present in our model due to the cross-coupling. Using the reduction procedure we compare the results of the phase-field simulations with the analytical predictions of the macroscopic approach.

  13. Molecular beam studies of unimolecular and bimolecular chemical reaction dynamics using VUV synchrotron radiation as a product probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blank, David Andrew [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1997-08-01

    This dissertation describes the use of a new molecular beam apparatus designed to use tunable VUV synchrotron radiation for photoionization of the products from scattering experiments. The apparatus was built at the recently constructed Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, a third generation 1-2 GeV synchrotron radiation source. The new apparatus is applied to investigations of the dynamics of unimolecular reactions, photodissociation experiments, and bimolecular reactions, crossed molecular beam experiments. The first chapter describes the new apparatus and the VUV radiation used for photoionization. This is followed by a number of examples of the many advantages provided by using VUV photoionization in comparison with the traditional technique of electron bombardment ionization. At the end of the chapter there is a discussion of the data analysis employed in these scattering experiments. The remaining four chapters are complete investigations of the dynamics of four chemical systems using the new apparatus and provide numerous additional examples of the advantages provided by VUV photoionizaiton of the products. Chapters 2-4 are photofragment translational spectroscopy studies of the photodissociation dynamics of dimethyl sulfoxide, acrylonitrile, and vinyl chloride following absorption at 193 mn. All of these systems have multiple dissociation channels and provide good examples of the ability of the new apparatus to unravel the complex UV photodissociation dynamics that can arise in small polyatomic molecules.

  14. Structural and magnetic phase transitions in chromium nitride thin films grown by rf nitrogen plasma molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Khan; Disseler, Steven M.; Ratcliff, William D.; Borchers, Julie A.; Ponce-Pérez, Rodrigo; Cocoletzi, Gregorio H.; Takeuchi, Noboru; Foley, Andrew; Richard, Andrea; Ingram, David C.; Smith, Arthur R.

    2017-09-01

    A magnetostructural phase transition is investigated in single-crystal chromium nitride (CrN) thin films grown by rf plasma molecular beam epitaxy on MgO(001) substrates. While still within the vacuum environment following molecular beam epitaxy growth, in situ low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy, and in situ variable low-temperature reflection high-energy electron diffraction are applied, revealing an atomically smooth and metallic CrN(001) surface, and an in-plane structural transition from 1 ×1 (primitive CrN unit cell) to √{2 }×√{2 }-R 45∘ with a transition temperature of (278 ±3 ) K, respectively. Ex situ temperature-dependent measurements using neutron diffraction are also performed, looking at the structural peaks and likewise revealing a first-order structural transition along the [111] out-of-plane direction, with transition temperatures of (268 ± 3) K. Turning to the magnetic peaks, neutron diffraction confirms a clear magnetic transition from paramagnetic at room temperature to antiferromagnetic at low temperatures with a sharp, first-order phase transition and a Néel temperature of (270 ±2 ) K or (280 ±2 ) K for two different films. In addition to the experimental measurements of structural and magnetic ordering, we also discuss results from first-principles theoretical calculations which explore various possible magnetostructural models.

  15. Ultraviolet light emitting diodes by ammonia molecular beam epitaxy on metamorphic (KAUST Repository

    Young, Erin C.

    2015-09-01

    © 2015. In this paper we demonstrate ultraviolet (UV) light emitting diodes (LEDs) grown on metamorphic AlGaN buffers on freestanding GaN (202-1) substrates by ammonia assisted molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Misfit and related threading dislocations were confined to the stress relaxed, compositionally graded buffer layers, and single quantum well devices emitting at 355, 310 and 274. nm were grown on top of the graded buffers. The devices showed excellent structural and electrical (I-. V) characteristics.

  16. Protective Sliding Carbon-Based Nanolayers Prepared by Argon or Nitrogen Ion-Beam Assisted Deposition on Ti6Al4V Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Vlcak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The microstructure and the surface properties of samples coated by carbon-based nanolayer were investigated in an effort to increase the surface hardness and reduce the coefficient of friction of the Ti6Al4V alloy. Protective carbon-based nanolayers were fabricated by argon or nitrogen ion-beam assisted deposition at ion energy of 700 eV on Ti6Al4V substrates. The Raman spectra indicated that nanolayers had a diamond-like carbon character with sp2 rich bonds. The TiC and TiN compounds formed in the surface area were detected by X-ray diffraction. Nanoscratch tests showed increased adhesion of a carbon-based nanolayer deposited with ion assistance in comparison with a carbon nanolayer deposited without ion assistance. The results showed that argon ion assistance leads to greater nanohardness than a sample coated by a carbon-based nanolayer with nitrogen ion assistance. A more than twofold increase in nanohardness and a more than fivefold decrease in the coefficient of friction were obtained for samples coated by a carbon-based nanolayer with ion assistance, in comparison with the reference sample.

  17. Morphological and microstructural stability of N-polar InAlN thin films grown on free-standing GaN substrates by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, Matthew T., E-mail: matthew.hardy.ctr@nrl.navy.mil; Storm, David F.; Downey, Brian P.; Katzer, D. Scott; Meyer, David J. [Electronics Science and Technology Division, Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Avenue SW, Washington DC 20375 (United States); McConkie, Thomas O.; Smith, David J. [Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-1504 (United States); Nepal, Neeraj [Sotera Defense Solutions, 2200 Defense Hwy Suite 405, Crofton, Maryland 21114 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    The sensitivity of the surface morphology and microstructure of N-polar-oriented InAlN to variations in composition, temperature, and layer thickness for thin films grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE) has been investigated. Lateral compositional inhomogeneity is present in N-rich InAlN films grown at low temperature, and phase segregation is exacerbated with increasing InN fraction. A smooth, step-flow surface morphology and elimination of compositional inhomogeneity can be achieved at a growth temperature 50 °C above the onset of In evaporation (650 °C). A GaN/AlN/GaN/200-nm InAlN heterostructure had a sheet charge density of 1.7 × 10{sup 13 }cm{sup −2} and no degradation in mobility (1760 cm{sup 2}/V s) relative to 15-nm-thick InAlN layers. Demonstration of thick-barrier high-electron-mobility transistors with good direct-current characteristics shows that device quality, thick InAlN layers can be successfully grown by PAMBE.

  18. Referencing of markerless CT data sets with cone beam subvolume including registration markers to ease computer-assisted surgery - a clinical and technical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essig, Harald; Rana, Majeed; Kokemueller, Horst; Zizelmann, Christoph; von See, Constantin; Ruecker, Martin; Tavassol, Frank; Gellrich, Nils-Claudius

    2013-09-01

    As a prerequisite in navigation-assisted surgery, a three-dimensional image data set with registration marker is necessary. Often patients are presented, not being aware of facing a computer-assisted surgical intervention (CAS), with an already performed computed tomography (CT) data set without marker. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of a new method which allows performing CAS by enhancing the initial markerless data set with a marked subvolume gained by cone beam (CBCT) scan. Therefore four registration markers are inserted and afterwards the patient is strongly limited to the field of interest scanned by CBCT scan (marked data set). Superimposed with the initial data set, a data set with reference markers and with full information is obtained. Registration procedure was performed with group A (25 patients, superimposed marked CBCT scan) and group B (25 patients, initially marked CT scan) using BrainLab® navigation by two observers and overall system accuracy was measured using the registration landmarks and additional intraoperative landmarks (tooth cusps). Adequate image quality assumed, no significant difference between group A and B was detected. Enhancing an initially performed data set with registration marker by using a marked subvolume could improve the workflow for navigation-assisted surgery due to the availability of cone beam scan technology, provide excellent resolution with reduced metal artifacts nearby dental restorations, and reduce radiation dose for the patient. Regarding the advantages of the new method which allows performing CAS by enhancing the initial markerless data set with a marked subvolume gained by cone beam (CBCT) scan, this technique will play a major part in navigation-assisted surgery and will address widespread general methodological solutions that are of great interest in multidisciplinary treatment. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Crossed Molecular Beam Study of the Reactions of Oxygen and Fluorine Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-03-01

    products (i.e., benzaldehyde , cresol, anisole, and benzyl alcohol). Supersonic beams of O(3 P) atoms produced in a radiofrequency dis- charge I0 and toluene ...used to clarify the reaction mechanism. The reaction of O(3p) with another aromatic hydrocarbon toluene , results in competition between two...substitution channels, loss of H atom and loss of CH5. In contrast to the 0 + C6H6 reaction, no stabilized oxygen- toluene adduct was observed., The development

  20. Small pulmonary nodule localization with cone beam computed tomography during video-assisted thoracic surgery: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouzé, Simon; de Latour, Bertrand; Flécher, Erwan; Guihaire, Julien; Castro, Miguel; Corre, Romain; Haigron, Pascal; Verhoye, Jean-Philippe

    2016-06-01

    To describe a non-invasive guidance procedure, using intraoperative cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and augmented fluoroscopy to guide lung resection during video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS). Patients with solitary or multiple lung nodules between 5 and 20 mm in size were included. Under general anaesthesia, a moderate pneumothorax allowing the CBCT acquisition was first performed. Then a segmentation of the lesion was performed on a 3D reconstruction. A projection of this 3D reconstruction was then integrated into the digital workspace and automatically registered into the fluoroscopic images, creating an augmented fluoroscopy. The procedure was continued under classic video-thoracoscopic vision taking account of the augmented fluoroscopy to locate the targeted nodule. Eight patients were included (mean age 61 ± 11.7 years): 7 patients had an isolated lesion and 1 patient had two lesions (mean size 13.2 ± 5.1 mm). Their mean depth to the pleura was 21.4 ± 10.7 mm. Four patients underwent a wedge resection associated with lymph node resection. Two patients had an initial wedge resection followed by a complementary lobectomy associated with lymph node resection (primary lung tumour). One patient had a wedge resection in the upper lobe and a lobectomy of the inferior lobe associated with lymph node resection. One patient underwent a conversion and a bilobectomy due to vascular injury. The mean global operating time was 100.6 ± 36.7 min. All the nodules have been identified on the CBCT acquisitions. The segmentation of the lesion has been performed in all cases. We have been able to detect all the nodules and to successfully perform the resection in all cases owing to the augmented fluoroscopy. The mean fluoroscopic time was 134.2 ± 55.0 s. The mean imaging time, between the incision and the final nodule localization, was 11.8 ± 3.8 min. This paper is the first describing a clinical application of CBCT performed during thoracic surgery. Associated with

  1. Molecular depth profiling of organic photovoltaic heterojunction layers by ToF-SIMS: comparative evaluation of three sputtering beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouhib, T; Poleunis, C; Wehbe, N; Michels, J J; Galagan, Y; Houssiau, L; Bertrand, P; Delcorte, A

    2013-11-21

    With the recent developments in secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), it is now possible to obtain molecular depth profiles and 3D molecular images of organic thin films, i.e. SIMS depth profiles where the molecular information of the mass spectrum is retained through the sputtering of the sample. Several approaches have been proposed for "damageless" profiling, including the sputtering with SF5(+) and C60(+) clusters, low energy Cs(+) ions and, more recently, large noble gas clusters (Ar500-5000(+)). In this article, we evaluate the merits of these different approaches for the in depth analysis of organic photovoltaic heterojunctions involving poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) as the electron donor and [6,6]-phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) as the acceptor. It is demonstrated that the use of 30 keV C60(3+) and 500 eV Cs(+) (500 eV per atom) leads to strong artifacts for layers in which the fullerene derivative PCBM is involved, related to crosslinking and topography development. In comparison, the profiles obtained using 10 keV Ar1700(+) (∼6 eV per atom) do not indicate any sign of artifacts and reveal fine compositional details in the blends. However, increasing the energy of the Ar cluster beam beyond that value leads to irreversible damage and failure of the molecular depth profiling. The profile qualities, apparent interface widths and sputtering yields are analyzed in detail. On the grounds of these experiments and recent molecular dynamics simulations, the discussion addresses the issues of damage and crater formation induced by the sputtering and the analysis ions in such radiation-sensitive materials, and their effects on the profile quality and the depth resolution. Solutions are proposed to optimize the depth resolution using either large Ar clusters or low energy cesium projectiles for sputtering and/or analysis.

  2. Adsorption of n-butane on graphene/Ru(0001)—A molecular beam scattering study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivapragasam, Nilushni; Nayakasinghe, Mindika T.; Burghaus, Uwe, E-mail: uwe.burghaus@ndsu.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, North Dakota State University, Fargo, North Dakota 58108 (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Adsorption kinetics/dynamics of n-butane on graphene, physical vapor deposited on Ru(0001) (hereafter G/Ru), and bare Ru(0001) (hereafter Ru) are discussed. The chemical activity of the supported-graphene as well as the support was probed by thermal desorption spectroscopy (adsorption kinetics). In addition and to the best of our knowledge, for the first time, molecular beam scattering data of larger molecules were collected for graphene (probing the adsorption dynamics). Furthermore, samples were inspected by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy. At the measuring conditions used here, n-butane adsorption kinetics/dynamics are molecular and nonactivated. Binding energies of butane on Ru and G/Ru are indistinguishable within experimental uncertainty. Thus, G/Ru is “kinetically transparent.” Initial adsorption probabilities, S{sub 0}, of n-butane decrease with increasing impact energy (0.76–1.72 eV) and are adsorption temperature independent for both Ru and G/Ru, again consistent with molecular adsorption. Also, S{sub 0} of Ru and G/Ru are indistinguishable within experimental uncertainty. Thus, G/Ru is “dynamically transparent.” Coverage dependent adsorption probabilities indicate precursor effects for graphene/Ru.

  3. Enhanced Etching, Surface Damage Recovery, and Submicron Patterning of Hybrid Perovskites using a Chemically Gas-Assisted Focused-Ion Beam for Subwavelength Grating Photonic Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Alias, Mohd Sharizal

    2015-12-22

    The high optical gain and absorption of organic–inorganic hybrid perovskites have attracted attention for photonic device applications. However, owing to the sensitivity of organic moieties to solvents and temperature, device processing is challenging, particularly for patterning. Here, we report the direct patterning of perovskites using chemically gas-assisted focused-ion beam (GAFIB) etching with XeF2 and I2 precursors. We demonstrate etching enhancement in addition to controllability and marginal surface damage compared to focused-ion beam (FIB) etching without precursors. Utilizing the GAFIB etching, we fabricated a uniform and periodic submicron perovskite subwavelength grating (SWG) absorber with broadband absorption and nanoscale precision. Our results demonstrate the use of FIB as a submicron patterning tool and a means of providing surface treatment (after FIB patterning to minimize optical loss) for perovskite photonic nanostructures. The SWG absorber can be patterned on perovskite solar cells to enhance the device efficiency through increasing light trapping and absorption.

  4. Enhanced Etching, Surface Damage Recovery, and Submicron Patterning of Hybrid Perovskites using a Chemically Gas-Assisted Focused-Ion Beam for Subwavelength Grating Photonic Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alias, Mohd S; Yang, Yang; Ng, Tien K; Dursun, Ibrahim; Shi, Dong; Saidaminov, Makhsud I; Priante, Davide; Bakr, Osman M; Ooi, Boon S

    2016-01-07

    The high optical gain and absorption of organic-inorganic hybrid perovskites have attracted attention for photonic device applications. However, owing to the sensitivity of organic moieties to solvents and temperature, device processing is challenging, particularly for patterning. Here, we report the direct patterning of perovskites using chemically gas-assisted focused-ion beam (GAFIB) etching with XeF2 and I2 precursors. We demonstrate etching enhancement in addition to controllability and marginal surface damage compared to focused-ion beam (FIB) etching without precursors. Utilizing the GAFIB etching, we fabricated a uniform and periodic submicron perovskite subwavelength grating (SWG) absorber with broadband absorption and nanoscale precision. Our results demonstrate the use of FIB as a submicron patterning tool and a means of providing surface treatment (after FIB patterning to minimize optical loss) for perovskite photonic nanostructures. The SWG absorber can be patterned on perovskite solar cells to enhance the device efficiency through increasing light trapping and absorption.

  5. Application of Taguchi Method to the Optimization of a-C:H Coatings Deposited Using Ion Beam Assisted Physical Vapor Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. H. Kao

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The Taguchi design method is used to optimize the adhesion, hardness, and wear resistance properties of a-C:H coatings deposited on AISI M2 steel substrates using the ion beam assisted physical vapor deposition method. The adhesion strength of the coatings is evaluated by means of scratch tests, while the hardness is measured using a nanoindentation tester. Finally, the wear resistance is evaluated by performing cyclic ball-on-disc wear tests. The Taguchi experimental results show that the optimal deposition parameters are as follows: a substrate bias voltage of 90 V, an ion beam voltage of 1 kV, an acetylene flow rate of 21 sccm, and a working distance of 7 cm. Given these optimal processing conditions, the a-C:H coating has a critical load of 99.8 N, a hardness of 25.5 GPa, and a wear rate of 0.4 × 10−6 mm3/Nm.

  6. Spatial resolution and cathodoluminescence intensity dependence on acceleration voltage in electron beam excitation assisted optical microscopy using Y2O3:Eu3+ film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Yu; Kamiya, Masashi; Sugita, Atsushi; Inami, Wataru; Kawata, Yoshimasa; Kominami, Hiroko; Nakanishi, Yoichiro

    2017-11-01

    This study presents relationship between acceleration voltage and spatial resolution of electron-beam assisted (EXA) optical microscope. The nanometric illumination light sources of the present EXA microscope was red-emitting cathodoluminescence (CL) in the Y2O3:Eu3+ thin film excited by focused electron beam. Our experimental results demonstrated that the spatial resolutions of the EXA microscope were higher as the acceleration voltage was higher. We managed to make images of the scattered gold particles with approximately 90 nm-resolutions at the voltages higher than 20 kV. The dependence of the spatial resolution on the acceleration voltage was explained by the distribution of simulated electron scattering trajectories in the luminescent thin film. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. 1.142 mu m GaAsBi/GaAs Quantum Well Lasers Grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Xiaoyan; Pan, Wenwu; Zhang, Zhenpu

    2017-01-01

    As a promising new class of near-infrared light emitters, GaAsBi laser diodes (LDs) are considered to have a high energy efficiency and an insensitive temperature dependence of the band gap. In this paper, we realize the longest ever reported lasing wavelength up to 1.142 mu m at room temperature...... in GaAsBi0.058/GaAs quantum well LDs grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The output power is up to 127 mW at 300 K under pulsed mode. We also demonstrate continuous wave mode operation up to 273 K for the first time. The temperature coefficient of the GaAsBi/GaAs LD is 0.26 nm/K in the temperature range...

  8. High Growth Rate Metal-Organic Molecular Beam Epitaxy for the Fabrication of GaAs Space Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freundlich, A.; Newman, F.; Monier, C.; Street, S.; Dargan, P.; Levy, M.

    2005-01-01

    In this work it is shown that high quality GaAs photovoltaic devices can be produced by Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) with growth rates comparable to metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) through the subsitution of group III solid sources by metal-organic compounds. The influence the III/V flux-ratio and growth temperatures in maintaining a two dimensional layer by layer growth mode and achieving high growth rates with low residual background impurities is investigated. Finally subsequent to the study of the optimization of n- and p doping of such high growth rate epilayers, results from a preliminary attempt in the fabrication of GaAs photovoltaic devices such as tunnel diodes and solar cells using the proposed high growth rate approach are reported.

  9. Antimony segregation and n-type doping in Si/Si(111) films grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurasov, D. V.; Drozdov, M. N.; Schmagin, V. B.; Yunin, P. A.; Novikov, A. V.

    2017-10-01

    The temperature dependence of antimony segregation in Si/Si(111) films grown by molecular-beam epitaxy was investigated experimentally. The obtained results were found to be qualitatively similar to the previously reported data for Si(001) case, but rather significant quantitative differences were observed. It was obtained that segregation ratio, which is defined as surface-to-bulk impurity concentration ratio, varies by nearly 5 orders of magnitude in the relatively narrow temperature interval of 500-675 °C for Si(111). This finding allowed to disseminate the previously proposed technique of selective doping of Si(001) to the Si(111) case. Using this technique selectively n-type doped Si films were fabricated which have abrupt boundaries of the antimony concentration profiles. A profile abruptness as low as 1.5 nm/decade was obtained.

  10. Exploiting kinetics and thermodynamics to grow phase-pure complex oxides by molecular-beam epitaxy under continuous codeposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Eva H.; Ihlefeld, Jon F.; Heikes, Colin A.; Paik, Hanjong; Nie, Yuefeng; Adamo, Carolina; Heeg, Tassilo; Liu, Zi-Kui; Schlom, Darrell G.

    2017-07-01

    We report the growth of PbTiO3 thin films by molecular-beam epitaxy utilizing continuous codeposition. In addition to the requirements from thermodynamics, whether the resulting film is single-phase PbTiO3 or not at a particular temperature depends strongly on the film growth rate and the incident fluxes of all species, including titanium. We develop a simple theory for the kinetics of lead oxidation on the growing film surface and find that it qualitatively explains the manner in which the adsorption-controlled growth window of PbTiO3 depends on lead flux, oxidant flux, and titanium flux. We successfully apply the kinetic theory to the dependence of the growth of BiFeO3 on oxidant type and surmise that the theory may be generally applicable to the adsorption-controlled growth of complex oxides by MBE.

  11. A detailed study of self-assembled (Al,Ga)InP quantum dots grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumann, Vasilij; Roedel, Reinhold; Heidemann, Matthias; Schneider, Christian; Kamp, Martin; Hoefling, Sven [Technische Physik, Physikalisches Institut, Wilhelm Conrad Roentgen Research Center for Complex Material Systems, Universitaet Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2014-11-15

    We report on the structural and optical properties of self-assembled (Al,Ga)InP quantum dots (QDs) with varying material composition embedded in a (Al{sub 0.30}Ga{sub 0.70}){sub 0.51}In{sub 0.49}P matrix. The samples were grown by gas-source molecular beam epitaxy. Atomic force microscopy was used to study the structural properties of the quantum dots, revealing a strong dependence of the morphology on the material composition. Low-temperature ensemble photoluminescence was observed between 590 nm and 720 nm. Temperature and excitation power dependent, as well as time resolved measurements were performed, indicating a significantly reduced electron confinement and a reduced overlap of the electron/hole wavefunctions for Al- and/or Ga-rich compositions. (copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  12. Molecular Beam-Thermal Desorption Spectrometry (MB-TDS) Monitoring of Hydrogen Desorbed from Storage Fuel Cell Anodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Rui F M; Santos, Diogo M F; Sequeira, Cesar A C; Ribeiro, Jorge H F

    2012-02-06

    Different types of experimental studies are performed using the hydrogen storage alloy (HSA) MlNi3.6Co0.85Al0.3Mn0.3 (Ml: La-rich mischmetal), chemically surface treated, as the anode active material for application in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). The recently developed molecular beam-thermal desorption spectrometry (MB-TDS) technique is here reported for detecting the electrochemical hydrogen uptake and release by the treated HSA. The MB-TDS allows an accurate determination of the hydrogen mass absorbed into the hydrogen storage alloy (HSA), and has significant advantages in comparison with the conventional TDS method. Experimental data has revealed that the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) using such chemically treated alloy presents an enhanced surface capability for hydrogen adsorption.

  13. Band offsets of La2O3 on (0001) GaN grown by reactive molecular-beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihlefeld, Jon F.; Brumbach, Michael; Atcitty, Stanley

    2013-04-01

    La2O3 films were prepared on (0001)-oriented GaN substrates via reactive molecular-beam epitaxy. Film orientation and phase were assessed using reflection high-energy electron and X-ray diffraction. Films were observed to grow as predominantly hexagonal La2O3 for thicknesses less than 10 nm while film thickness greater than 10 nm favored mixed cubic and hexagonal symmetries. Band offsets were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy on hexagonally symmetric films and valence band offsets of 0.63 ± 0.04 eV at the La2O3/GaN interface were measured. A conduction band offset of approximately 1.5 eV could be inferred from the measured valence band offset.

  14. Interfacial characteristics of Y2O3/GaSb(001) grown by molecular beam epitaxy and atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Y. H.; Lin, K. Y.; Hsueh, W. J.; Young, L. B.; Chang, T. W.; Chyi, J. I.; Pi, T. W.; Kwo, J.; Hong, M.

    2017-11-01

    High quality Y2O3 on GaSb was achieved using both molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and atomic layer deposition (ALD) with interfacial characteristics studied by in-situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) electrical measurements. Ga-oxide and stoichiometric Sb-oxides were obtained in the MBE-Y2O3/GaSb and non-stoichiometric Sb2Ox (x<4) was found in the ALD-Y2O3/GaSb according to the XPS spectra. From the capacitance-voltage (CV) measurements, MBE-Y2O3 provides lower interfacial trap density (Dit) grown at elevated temperature of 200°C, while ALD-grown Y2O3 shows smaller hysteresis and higher dielectric constant.

  15. Structure and optical band gaps of (Ba,Sr)SnO{sub 3} films grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schumann, Timo; Raghavan, Santosh; Ahadi, Kaveh; Kim, Honggyu; Stemmer, Susanne, E-mail: stemmer@mrl.ucsb.edu [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106-5050 (United States)

    2016-09-15

    Epitaxial growth of (Ba{sub x}Sr{sub 1−x})SnO{sub 3} films with 0 ≤ x ≤ 1 using molecular beam epitaxy is reported. It is shown that SrSnO{sub 3} films can be grown coherently strained on closely lattice and symmetry matched PrScO{sub 3} substrates. The evolution of the optical band gap as a function of composition is determined by spectroscopic ellipsometry. The direct band gap monotonously decreases with x from to 4.46 eV (x = 0) to 3.36 eV (x = 1). A large Burnstein-Moss shift is observed with La-doping of BaSnO{sub 3} films. The shift corresponds approximately to the increase in Fermi level and is consistent with the low conduction band mass.

  16. Adsorption-controlled growth of La-doped BaSnO3 by molecular-beam epitaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanjong Paik

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Epitaxial La-doped BaSnO3 films were grown in an adsorption-controlled regime by molecular-beam epitaxy, where the excess volatile SnOx desorbs from the film surface. A film grown on a (001 DyScO3 substrate exhibited a mobility of 183 cm2 V−1 s−1 at room temperature and 400 cm2 V−1 s−1 at 10 K despite the high concentration (1.2 × 1011 cm−2 of threading dislocations present. In comparison to other reports, we observe a much lower concentration of (BaO2 Ruddlesden-Popper crystallographic shear faults. This suggests that in addition to threading dislocations, other defects—possibly (BaO2 crystallographic shear defects or point defects—significantly reduce the electron mobility.

  17. Ge films grown on Si substrates by molecular-beam epitaxy below 450 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J.; Kim, H. J.; Hul'ko, O.; Xie, Y. H.; Sahni, S.; Bandaru, P.; Yablonovitch, E.

    2004-07-01

    Ge thin films are grown on Si(001) substrates by molecular-beam epitaxy at 370 °C. The low-temperature epitaxial growth is compatible with the back-end thermal budget of current generation complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor technology, which is restricted to less than 450 °C. Reflection high-energy electron diffraction shows that single-crystal Ge thin films with smooth surfaces could be achieved below 450 °C. Double-axis x-ray θ/2θ scans also show that the epitaxial Ge films are almost fully strain-relaxed. As expected, cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy shows a network of dislocations at the interface. Hydrogen and oxide desorption techniques are proved to be necessary for improving the quality of the Ge films, which is reflected in improved minority carrier diffusion lengths and exceptionally low leakage currents.

  18. Characteristics of AlN/GaN nanowire Bragg mirror grown on (001) silicon by molecular beam epitaxy

    KAUST Repository

    Heo, Junseok

    2013-10-01

    GaN nanowires containing AlN/GaN distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) heterostructures have been grown on (001) silicon substrate by molecular beam epitaxy. A peak reflectance of 70% with normal incidence at 560 nm is derived from angle resolved reflectance measurements on the as-grown nanowire DBR array. The measured peak reflectance wavelength is significantly blue-shifted from the ideal calculated value. The discrepancy is explained by investigating the reflectance of the nanoscale DBRs with a finite difference time domain technique. Ensemble nanowire microcavities with In0.3Ga 0.7N nanowires clad by AlN/GaN DBRs have also been characterized. Room temperature emission from the microcavity exhibits considerable linewidth narrowing compared to that measured for unclad In0.3Ga0.7N nanowires. The resonant emission is characterized by a peak wavelength and linewidth of 575 nm and 39 nm, respectively. © 2013 AIP Publishing LLC.

  19. Molecular beam epitaxial growth of BaTiO3 single crystal on Ge-on-Si(001) substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merckling, C.; Saint-Girons, G.; Botella, C.; Hollinger, G.; Heyns, M.; Dekoster, J.; Caymax, M.

    2011-02-01

    Thin films of perovskite type BaTiO3 (BTO) oxide have been grown epitaxially directly on Ge(001) surface at high temperature using molecular beam epitaxy. A stable (2×1) BaGex surface periodicity is the critical enabling template for subsequent BTO heteroepitaxy on Ge(001). Reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) and transmission electron microscopy indicate that high quality heteroepitaxy on Ge-on-Si(001) take place with ⟨100⟩BTO(001)∥⟨110⟩Ge(001) confirming a 45° rotation epitaxial relationship. X-ray diffraction has been used to study the BTO lattice parameters and we evidenced that both tetragonal and cubic phases of BTO are present in the epilayer.

  20. Low-relaxation spin waves in laser-molecular-beam epitaxy grown nanosized yttrium iron garnet films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutsev, L. V., E-mail: l-lutsev@mail.ru; Korovin, A. M.; Bursian, V. E.; Gastev, S. V.; Fedorov, V. V.; Suturin, S. M.; Sokolov, N. S. [Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, 194021 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2016-05-02

    Synthesis of nanosized yttrium iron garnet (Y{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12}, YIG) films followed by the study of ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) and spin wave propagation in these films is reported. The YIG films were grown on gadolinium gallium garnet substrates by laser molecular beam epitaxy. It has been shown that spin waves propagating in YIG deposited at 700 °C have low damping. At the frequency of 3.29 GHz, the spin-wave damping parameter is less than 3.6 × 10{sup −5}. Magnetic inhomogeneities of the YIG films give the main contribution to the FMR linewidth. The contribution of the relaxation processes to the FMR linewidth is as low as 1.2%.

  1. Formation of GaN quantum dots by molecular beam epitaxy using NH{sub 3} as nitrogen source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damilano, B., E-mail: bd@crhea.cnrs.fr; Brault, J.; Massies, J. [CRHEA-CNRS, Centre de Recherche sur l' Hétéro-Epitaxie et ses Applications, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Rue B. Grégory, Valbonne 06560 (France)

    2015-07-14

    Self-assembled GaN quantum dots (QDs) in Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N (0.3 ≤ x ≤ 1) were grown on c-plane sapphire and Si (111) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy using ammonia as nitrogen source. The QD formation temperature was varied from 650 °C to 800 °C. Surprisingly, the density and size of QDs formed in this temperature range are very similar. This has been explained by considering together experimental results obtained from reflection high-energy electron diffraction, atomic force microscopy, and photoluminescence to discuss the interplay between thermodynamics and kinetics in the QD formation mechanisms. Finally, possible ways to better control the QD optical properties are proposed.

  2. Strain compensation of InGaAs/GaAs SDL gain mirrors grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranta, S.; Leinonen, T.; Tavast, M.; Hakkarainen, T. V.; Suominen, I.; Guina, M.

    2012-03-01

    We analyze the effect of strain compensation on the crystalline quality of InGaAs/GaAs quantum well gain mirrors that are designed for emission above 1100 nm. The gain mirrors used in this study were grown by molecular beam epitaxy and they utilize GaAsP strain compensation. The effect of strain compensation has been assessed by measuring the curvature of the wafers and by mapping photoluminescence to identify non-emissive dark areas. We present that about 70 % strain compensation is sufficient to prevent dark line defect generation for gain mirrors designed for up to 1170 nm operation. Rapid thermal annealing studies revealed that the strain compensation is efficient in preventing appearance of dark lines even for samples that have been annealed at temperatures as high as 700 °C for a considerable time. Finally, we demonstrate multi-watt operation at 1115-1190 nm using 70-90 % strain compensated gain mirrors.

  3. Effects of growth temperature and device structure on GaP solar cells grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaisman, M.; Tomasulo, S.; Masuda, T.; Lang, J. R.; Faucher, J.; Lee, M. L. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06511 (United States)

    2015-02-09

    Gallium phosphide (GaP) is an attractive candidate for wide-bandgap solar cell applications, possessing the largest bandgap of the III-arsenide/phosphides without aluminum. However, GaP cells to date have exhibited poor internal quantum efficiency (IQE), even for photons absorbed by direct transitions, motivating improvements in material quality and device structure. In this work, we investigated GaP solar cells grown by molecular beam epitaxy over a range of substrate temperatures, employing a much thinner emitter than in prior work. Higher growth temperatures yielded the best solar cell characteristics, indicative of increased diffusion lengths. Furthermore, the inclusion of an AlGaP window layer improved both open-circuit voltage and short wavelength IQE.

  4. Effect of thermal annealing on structural properties of GeSn thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z. P.; Song, Y. X.; Li, Y. Y.; Wu, X. Y.; Zhu, Z. Y. S.; Han, Y.; Zhang, L. Y.; Huang, H.; Wang, S. M.

    2017-10-01

    GeSn alloy with 7.68% Sn concentration grown by molecular beam epitaxy has been rapidly annealed at different temperatures from 300°C to 800°C. Surface morphology and roughness annealed below or equal to 500°C for 1 min have no obvious changes, while the strain relaxation rate increasing. When the annealing temperature is above or equal to 600°C, significant changes occur in surface morphology and roughness, and Sn precipitation is observed at 700°C. The structural properties are analyzed by reciprocal space mapping in the symmetric (004) and asymmetric (224) planes by high resolution X-ray diffraction. The lateral correlation length and the mosaic spread are extracted for the epi-layer peaks in the asymmetric (224) diffraction. The most suitable annealing temperature to improve both the GeSn lattice quality and relaxation rate is about 500°C.

  5. Precipitation growth of graphene under exfoliated hexagonal boron nitride to form heterostructures on cobalt substrate by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Renjing; Khanaki, Alireza; Tian, Hao; He, Yanwei; Cui, Yongtao; Xu, Zhongguang; Liu, Jianlin

    2017-07-01

    Research on graphene/hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) heterostructures has attracted much attention for band engineering and device performance optimization of graphene. However, the growth of graphene/h-BN heterostructure is still challenging, which usually requires high growth temperature and long growth duration. In this paper, we demonstrate graphene/h-BN heterostructures by growing graphene onto the substrates which consist of exfoliated h-BN flakes on Co thin films using molecular beam epitaxy. The heterostructure samples grown at different temperatures and growth times were characterized by Raman, optical microscopy, atomic force microscopy, microwave impedance microscopy, and scanning tunneling microscopy. It is found that the graphene/h-BN heterostructures were formed by the formation of graphene underneath rather than on top of the h-BN flakes. The growth mechanism is discussed.

  6. The residual effects of germanium as an n-type dopant for GaAs during molecular beam epitaxial growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ai-zhen; Milnes, A. G.

    1983-06-01

    In the molecular beam epitaxy of GaAs, the use of Ge as an n-type dopant results in a residual doping effect of the order of 10 16 cm -3, that can prevent the achievement of an abrupt doping change when the Ge effusion cell is shuttered. The extent of the problem is examined and it is shown that the parasitic doping may persist over a substantial part of a μm of growth under certain conditions. Interruption of the growth, with continued pumping of the growth chamber and maintenance of the arsenic flux, is found to be a method of minimizing the memory effect. From thermodynamic considerations it is suggested that the cause of the residual doping effect is a scavenging of Ge from the growth chamber in a series of reactions involving principally O 2, GeO, CO and As 2, C and H 2.

  7. Large-format multi-wafer production of 5" GaSb-based photodetectors by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loubychev, Dmitri; Fastenau, Joel M.; Kattner, Michael; Frey, Phillip; Liu, Amy W. K.; Furlong, Mark J.

    2017-02-01

    GaSb and its heterostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) have received much attention given their application in a wide range of mid-wave and long-wave IR photodetector applications. With the maturation of the MBE growth process, focus is now turned to improving manufacturing readiness and the transition to the production of large-format wafers. We will discuss the transition from the development of early detector layer structures on 2" diameter GaSb substrates, through today's 3"/4" production standard, and to the onset of 5" pilot production from the perspective of volume compound semiconductor manufacturing. We will report on the growth of 5" GaSb-based MWIR nBn detector structures using a large format 5×5" production MBE platform. Structural and optical properties, as well as electrical data from large-area mesa diodes will be presented and compared with results achieved with smaller batch size MBE reactor platform.

  8. Growth of wurtzite InP/GaP core-shell nanowires by metal-organic molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halder, Nripendra N.; Kelrich, Alexander; Kauffmann, Yaron; Cohen, Shimon; Ritter, Dan

    2017-04-01

    We report on the selective area vapor-liquid-solid (SA-VLS) growth of InP/GaP core shell nano-wires (NWs) by metal organic molecular beam epitaxy. Wurtzite crystal structure of the core InP was transferred to the GaP shell through layer by layer radial growth which eliminated bending of the NWs in random directions. Low growth temperature restricted surface segregation and kept the shell free from indium. Strain in the GaP shell was partially relaxed through formation of periodic misfit dislocations. From the periodicity of Moiré fringes and splitting of the fast-Fourier-transform of the transmission electron micrographs, the radial and axial strain were determined as 4.5% and 6.2%, respectively.

  9. Substrate temperature dependence of ZnTe epilayers grown on GaAs(0 0 1) by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jie; Zeng, Yiping; Liu, Chao; Li, Yanbo

    2010-04-01

    ZnTe thin films have been grown on GaAs(0 0 1) substrates at different temperatures with constant Zn and Te beam equivalent pressures (BEPs) by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). In situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) observation indicates that two-dimensional (2D) growth mode can be established after around one-minute three-dimensional (3D) nucleation by increasing the substrate temperature to 340 °C. We found that Zn desorption from the ZnTe surface is much greater than that of Te at higher temperatures, and estimated the Zn sticking coefficient by the evolution of growth rate. The Zn sticking coefficient decreases from 0.93 to 0.58 as the temperature is elevated from 320 to 400 °C. The ZnTe epilayer grown at 360 °C displays the narrowest full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of 660 arcsec from (0 0 4) reflection in double-crystal X-ray rocking curve (DCXRC) measurements. The surface morphology of ZnTe epilayers is strongly dependent on the substrate temperature, and the root-mean-square (RMS) roughness diminishes drastically with the increase in temperature.

  10. A combined crossed molecular beams and theoretical study of the reaction CN + C{sub 2}H{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balucani, Nadia, E-mail: nadia.balucani@unipg.it [Dipartimento di Chimica, Biologia e Biotecnologie, Università degli Studi di Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Leonori, Francesca; Petrucci, Raffaele [Dipartimento di Chimica, Biologia e Biotecnologie, Università degli Studi di Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Wang, Xingan [Dipartimento di Chimica, Biologia e Biotecnologie, Università degli Studi di Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Department of Chemical Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Casavecchia, Piergiorgio [Dipartimento di Chimica, Biologia e Biotecnologie, Università degli Studi di Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Skouteris, Dimitrios [Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa (Italy); Albernaz, Alessandra F. [Instituto de Física, Universidade de Brasília, Brasília (Brazil); Gargano, Ricardo [Instituto de Física, Universidade de Brasília, Brasília (Brazil); Departments of Chemistry and Physics, University of Florida, Quantum Theory Project, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Highlights: • The CN + C{sub 2}H{sub 4} reaction was investigated in crossed beam experiments. • Electronic structure calculations of the potential energy surface were performed. • RRKM estimates qualitatively reproduce the experimental C{sub 2}H{sub 3}NC yield. - Abstract: The CN + C{sub 2}H{sub 4} reaction has been investigated experimentally, in crossed molecular beam (CMB) experiments at the collision energy of 33.4 kJ/mol, and theoretically, by electronic structure calculations of the relevant potential energy surface and Rice–Ramsperger–Kassel–Marcus (RRKM) estimates of the product branching ratio. Differently from previous CMB experiments at lower collision energies, but similarly to a high energy study, we have some indication that a second reaction channel is open at this collision energy, the characteristics of which are consistent with the channel leading to CH{sub 2}CHNC + H. The RRKM estimates using M06L electronic structure calculations qualitatively support the experimental observation of C{sub 2}H{sub 3}NC formation at this and at the higher collision energy of 42.7 kJ/mol of previous experiments.

  11. Label-free cellular structure imaging with 82 nm lateral resolution using an electron-beam excitation-assisted optical microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuta, Masahiro; Masuda, Yuriko; Inami, Wataru; Kawata, Yoshimasa

    2016-07-25

    We present label-free and high spatial-resolution imaging for specific cellular structures using an electron-beam excitation-assisted optical microscope (EXA microscope). Images of the actin filament and mitochondria of stained HeLa cells, obtained by fluorescence and EXA microscopy, were compared to identify cellular structures. Based on these results, we demonstrated the feasibility of identifying label-free cellular structures at a spatial resolution of 82 nm. Using numerical analysis, we calculated the imaging depth region and determined the spot size of a cathodoluminescent (CL) light source to be 83 nm at the membrane surface.

  12. Production of molecular sideband radioisotope beams at CERN-ISOLDE using a Helicon-type plasma ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kronberger, M., E-mail: matthias.kronberger@gmx.at [European Organization for Nuclear Research, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Department of Physics, University of Jyväskylä, Survontie 9, FI-40014 (Finland); Gottberg, A. [European Organization for Nuclear Research, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Instituto de Estructura de la Materia CSIC, E28006 Madrid (Spain); Mendonca, T.M. [European Organization for Nuclear Research, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); IFIMUP and IN – Institute of Nanosciences and Nanotechnologies, University of Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 687, PT-4169-007 (Portugal); Ramos, J.P. [European Organization for Nuclear Research, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, CH-1015 (Switzerland); Seiffert, C.; Suominen, P.; Stora, T. [European Organization for Nuclear Research, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • We present a novel radioactive ion source concept for nuclear physics experiments. • Molecular sideband beams are produced by an RF discharge in a magnetized plasma. • Ionization efficiencies of 2.5% and 4% were measured for CO{sup +} and Ar, respectively. • Using a HfO{sub 2} fibre target, 17-CO{sup +} was produced for the first time at ISOLDE. • Up to 50 × gain was achieved by using a nanostructured CaO target and He as buffer gas. -- Abstract: In order to account for the increasing demand for strong molecular beams for nuclear physics experiments at ISOLDE, a new radioactive ion source concept based on an RF discharge in a magnetized plasma was developed at CERN. Experimental studies at the ISOLDE offline separator show that the optimum conditions for CO{sup +} and CO{sub 2}{sup +} ion production are given when the ion source is operated with He plasma, in line with expectations based on their electron impact ionization cross-sections. At optimum tuning, ionization efficiencies of 2.5% and 4% were measured for CO{sup +} and Ar{sup +}, respectively. The capability of the Helicon ion source prototype for ISOL operation was evaluated during two online runs at the General Purpose Separator of CERN-ISOLDE, yielding the first observation of {sup 17}CO{sup +} with a HfO{sub 2} fibre target, and a more than 50-fold enhancement of the {sup 10}CO{sup +} and {sup 11}CO{sup +} yields with a nanostructured CaO target and an upgraded ion source prototype.

  13. Molecular-beam epitaxy growth and structural characterization of semiconductor-ferromagnet heterostructures by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satapathy, D.K.

    2005-12-19

    The present work is devoted to the growth of the ferromagnetic metal MnAs on the semiconductor GaAs by molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE). The MnAs thin films are deposited on GaAs by molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE). Grazing incidence diffraction (GID) and reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) are used in situ to investigate the nucleation, evolution of strain, morphology and interfacial structure during the MBE growth. Four stages of the nucleation process during growth of MnAs on GaAs(001) are revealed by RHEED azimuthal scans. GID shows that further growth of MnAs films proceed via the formation of relaxed islands at a nominal thickness of 2.5 ML which increase in size and finally coalesce to form a continuous film. Early on, an ordered array of misfit dislocations forms at the interface releasing the misfit strain even before complete coalescence occurs. The fascinating complex nucleation process of MnAs on GaAs(0 0 1) contains elements of both Volmer-Weber and Stranski-Krastanov growth. A nonuniform strain amounting to 0.66%, along the [1 -1 0] direction and 0.54%, along the [1 1 0] direction is demonstrated from x-ray line profile analysis. A high correlation between the defects is found along the GaAs[1 1 0] direction. An extremely periodic array of misfit dislocations with a period of 4.95{+-}0.05 nm is formed at the interface along the [1 1 0] direction which releases the 7.5% of misfit. The inhomogeneous strain due to the periodic dislocations is confined at the interface within a layer of 1.6 nm thickness. The misfit along the [1 -1 0] direction is released by the formation of a coincidence site lattice. (orig.)

  14. Ionization and dissociation of molecular ion beams caused by ultrashort intense laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Itzhak, I; Sayler, A M; Wang, P Q; McKenna, J; Gaire, B; Johnson, N G; Leonard, M; Parke, E; Carnes, K D; Anis, F; Esry, B D [J.R. Macdonald Laboratory, Department of Physics, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506 (United States)

    2007-11-15

    Studies of the simplest one-electron molecule, H{sub 2}{sup +}, are the first step towards understanding the interaction of ultrashort intense laser pulses with molecules. We conduct coincidence 3D imaging measurements of H{sub 2}{sup +} beams following their exposure to intense ultrashort laser pulses. These measurements are compared with our time-dependent calculations as well as a simple model we recently proposed. Our findings include above threshold Coulomb explosion - a surprising structure in the energy spectrum near the ionization appearance intensity; above threshold dissociation (ATD) of the excited electronic states of H{sub 2}{sup +}; and enhanced high-order ATD - involving the net absorption of at least 3 photons - brought about by closing the 2-photon channel.

  15. A buffer gas beam source for short, intense and slow molecular pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truppe, S.; Hambach, M.; Skoff, S. M.; Bulleid, N. E.; Bumby, J. S.; Hendricks, R. J.; Hinds, E. A.; Sauer, B. E.; Tarbutt, M. R.

    2018-02-01

    Experiments with cold molecules usually begin with a molecular source. We describe the construction and characteristics of a cryogenic buffer gas source of CaF molecules. The source emits pulses with a typical duration of 240 $\\mu$s, a mean speed of about 150 m/s, and a flux of $5\\times 10^{10}$ molecules per steradian per pulse in a single rotational state.

  16. A short pulse (7 micros FWHM) and high repetition rate (dc-5 kHz) cantilever piezovalve for pulsed atomic and molecular beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irimia, Daniel; Dobrikov, Dimitar; Kortekaas, Rob; Voet, Han; van den Ende, Daan A; Groen, Wilhelm A; Janssen, Maurice H M

    2009-11-01

    In this paper we report on the design and operation of a novel piezovalve for the production of short pulsed atomic or molecular beams. The high speed valve operates on the principle of a cantilever piezo. The only moving part, besides the cantilever piezo itself, is a very small O-ring that forms the vacuum seal. The valve can operate continuous (dc) and in pulsed mode with the same drive electronics. Pulsed operation has been tested at repetition frequencies up to 5 kHz. The static deflection of the cantilever, as mounted in the valve body, was measured as a function of driving field strength with a confocal microscope. The deflection and high speed dynamical response of the cantilever can be easily changed and optimized for a particular nozzle diameter or repetition rate by a simple adjustment of the free cantilever length. Pulsed molecular beams with a full width at half maximum pulse width as low as 7 micros have been measured at a position 10 cm downstream of the nozzle exit. This represents a gas pulse with a length of only 10 mm making it well matched to for instance experiments using laser beams. Such a short pulse with 6 bar backing pressure behind a 150 microm nozzle releases about 10(16) particles/pulse and the beam brightness was estimated to be 4x10(22) particles/(s str). The short pulses of the cantilever piezovalve result in a much reduced gas load in the vacuum system. We demonstrate operation of the pulsed valve with skimmer in a single vacuum chamber pumped by a 520 l/s turbomolecular pump maintaining a pressure of 5x10(-6) Torr, which is an excellent vacuum to have the strong and cold skimmed molecular beam interact with laser beams only 10 cm downstream of the nozzle to do velocity map slice imaging with a microchannel-plate imaging detector in a single chamber. The piezovalve produces cold and narrow (Delta v/v=2%-3%) velocity distributions of molecules seeded in helium or neon at modest backing pressures of only 6 bar. The low gas load of the

  17. A short pulse (7 μs FWHM) and high repetition rate (dc-5kHz) cantilever piezovalve for pulsed atomic and molecular beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irimia, Daniel; Dobrikov, Dimitar; Kortekaas, Rob; Voet, Han; van den Ende, Daan A.; Groen, Wilhelm A.; Janssen, Maurice H. M.

    2009-11-01

    In this paper we report on the design and operation of a novel piezovalve for the production of short pulsed atomic or molecular beams. The high speed valve operates on the principle of a cantilever piezo. The only moving part, besides the cantilever piezo itself, is a very small O-ring that forms the vacuum seal. The valve can operate continuous (dc) and in pulsed mode with the same drive electronics. Pulsed operation has been tested at repetition frequencies up to 5 kHz. The static deflection of the cantilever, as mounted in the valve body, was measured as a function of driving field strength with a confocal microscope. The deflection and high speed dynamical response of the cantilever can be easily changed and optimized for a particular nozzle diameter or repetition rate by a simple adjustment of the free cantilever length. Pulsed molecular beams with a full width at half maximum pulse width as low as 7 μs have been measured at a position 10 cm downstream of the nozzle exit. This represents a gas pulse with a length of only 10 mm making it well matched to for instance experiments using laser beams. Such a short pulse with 6 bar backing pressure behind a 150 μm nozzle releases about 1016 particles/pulse and the beam brightness was estimated to be 4×1022 particles/(s str). The short pulses of the cantilever piezovalve result in a much reduced gas load in the vacuum system. We demonstrate operation of the pulsed valve with skimmer in a single vacuum chamber pumped by a 520 l/s turbomolecular pump maintaining a pressure of 5×10-6 Torr, which is an excellent vacuum to have the strong and cold skimmed molecular beam interact with laser beams only 10 cm downstream of the nozzle to do velocity map slice imaging with a microchannel-plate imaging detector in a single chamber. The piezovalve produces cold and narrow (Δv /v=2%-3%) velocity distributions of molecules seeded in helium or neon at modest backing pressures of only 6 bar. The low gas load of the cantilever

  18. A short pulse (7 μs FWHM) and high repetition rate (dc-5kHz) cantilever piezovalve for pulsed atomic and molecular beams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Irimia, D.; Dobrikov, D.; Kortekaas, R.; Voet, H.; Ende, D.A. van den; Groen, W.A.; Janssen, M.H.M.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we report on the design and operation of a novel piezovalve for the production of short pulsed atomic or molecular beams. The high speed valve operates on the principle of a cantilever piezo. The only moving part, besides the cantilever piezo itself, is a very small O-ring that forms

  19. A short pulse (7 micros FWHM) and high repetition rate (dc-5 kHz) cantilever piezovalve for pulsed atomic and molecular beams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Irimia, D.; Dobrikov, D.H.; Kortekaas, R.; van der Voet, H.; van den Ende, D.A.; Groen, W.E.; Janssen, M.H.M.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we report on the design and operation of a novel piezovalve for the production of short pulsed atomic or molecular beams. The high speed valve operates on the principle of a cantilever piezo. The only moving part, besides the cantilever piezo itself, is a very small O-ring that forms

  20. Effect of Al /N ratio during nucleation layer growth on Hall mobility and buffer leakage of molecular-beam epitaxy grown AlGaN /GaN heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storm, D. F.; Katzer, D. S.; Binari, S. C.; Shanabrook, B. V.; Zhou, Lin; Smith, David J.

    2004-10-01

    AlGaN /GaN high electron mobility transistor structures have been grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy on semi-insulating 4H-SiC utilizing an AlN nucleation layer. The electron Hall mobility of these structures increases from 1050cm2/Vs to greater than 1450cm2/Vs when the Al /N flux ratio during the growth of the nucleation layer is increased from 0.90 to 1.07. Buffer leakage currents increase abruptly by nearly three orders of magnitude when the Al /N ratio increases from below to above unity. Transmission electron microscopy indicates that high buffer leakage is correlated with the presence of stacking faults in the nucleation layer and cubic phase GaN in the buffer, while low mobilities are correlated with high dislocation densities.

  1. Critical issues for homoepitaxial GaN growth by molecular beam epitaxy on hydride vapor-phase epitaxy-grown GaN substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storm, D. F.; Hardy, M. T.; Katzer, D. S.; Nepal, N.; Downey, B. P.; Meyer, D. J.; McConkie, Thomas O.; Zhou, Lin; Smith, David J.

    2016-12-01

    While the heteroepitaxial growth of gallium nitride-based materials and devices on substrates such as SiC, sapphire, and Si has been well-documented, the lack of a cost-effective source of bulk GaN crystals has hindered similar progress on homoepitaxy. Nevertheless, freestanding GaN wafers are becoming more widely available, and there is great interest in growing GaN films and devices on bulk GaN substrates, in order to take advantage of the greatly reduced density of threading dislocations, particularly for vertical devices. However, homoepitaxial GaN growth is far from a trivial task due to the reactivity and different chemical sensitivities of N-polar (0001) and Ga-polar (0001) GaN surfaces, which can affect the microstructure and concentrations of impurities in homoepitaxial GaN layers. In order to achieve high quality, high purity homoepitaxial GaN, it is necessary to investigate the effect of the ex situ wet chemical clean, the use of in situ cleaning procedures, the sensitivity of the GaN surface to thermal decomposition, and the effect of growth temperature. We review the current understanding of these issues with a focus on homoepitaxial growth of GaN by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on c-plane surfaces of freestanding GaN substrates grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE), as HVPE-grown substrates are most widely available. We demonstrate methods for obtaining homoepitaxial GaN layers by plasma-assisted MBE in which no additional threading dislocations are generated from the regrowth interface and impurity concentrations are greatly reduced.

  2. The formation of hexagonal-shaped InGaN-nanodisk on GaN-nanowire observed in plasma source molecular beam epitaxy

    KAUST Repository

    Ng, Tien Khee

    2014-03-08

    We report on the properties and growth kinetics of defect-free, photoluminescence (PL) efficient mushroom-like nanowires (MNWs) in the form of ~30nm thick hexagonal-shaped InGaN-nanodisk on GaN nanowires, coexisting with the conventional rod-like InGaN-on-GaN nanowires (RNWs) on (111)-silicon-substrate. When characterized using confocal microscopy (CFM) with 458nm laser excitation, while measuring spontaneous-emission at fixed detection wavelengths, the spatial intensity map evolved from having uniform pixelated emission, to having only an emission ring, and then a round emission spot. This corresponds to the PL emission with increasing indium composition; starting from emission mainly from the RNW, and then the 540 nm emission from one MNWs ensemble, followed by the 590 nm emission from a different MNW ensemble, respectively. These hexagonal-shaped InGaN-nano-disks ensembles were obtained during molecular-beam-epitaxy (MBE) growth. On the other hand, the regular rod-like InGaN-on-GaN nanowires (RNWs) were emitting at a shorter peak wavelength of 490 nm. While the formation of InGaN rod-like nanowire is well-understood, the formation of the hexagonal-shaped InGaN-nanodisk-on-GaN-nanowire requires further investigation. It was postulated to arise from the highly sensitive growth kinetics during plasma-assisted MBE of InGaN at low temperature, i.e. when the substrate temperature was reduced from 800 °C (GaN growth) to <600 °C (InGaN growth), during which sparsely populated metal-droplet formation prevails and further accumulated more indium adatoms due to a higher cohesive bond between metallic molecules. © (2014) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.

  3. Accurate calibration of a molecular beam time-of-flight mass spectrometer for on-line analysis of high molecular weight species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apicella, B; Wang, X; Passaro, M; Ciajolo, A; Russo, C

    2016-10-15

    Time-of-Flight (TOF) Mass Spectrometry is a powerful analytical technique, provided that an accurate calibration by standard molecules in the same m/z range of the analytes is performed. Calibration in a very large m/z range is a difficult task, particularly in studies focusing on the detection of high molecular weight clusters of different molecules or high molecular weight species. External calibration is the most common procedure used for TOF mass spectrometric analysis in the gas phase and, generally, the only available standards are made up of mixtures of noble gases, covering a small mass range for calibration, up to m/z 136 (higher mass isotope of xenon). In this work, an accurate calibration of a Molecular Beam Time-of Flight Mass Spectrometer (MB-TOFMS) is presented, based on the use of water clusters up to m/z 3000. The advantages of calibrating a MB-TOFMS with water clusters for the detection of analytes with masses above those of the traditional calibrants such as noble gases were quantitatively shown by statistical calculations. A comparison of the water cluster and noble gases calibration procedures in attributing the masses to a test mixture extending up to m/z 800 is also reported. In the case of the analysis of combustion products, another important feature of water cluster calibration was shown, that is the possibility of using them as "internal standard" directly formed from the combustion water, under suitable experimental conditions. The water clusters calibration of a MB-TOFMS gives rise to a ten-fold reduction in error compared to the traditional calibration with noble gases. The consequent improvement in mass accuracy in the calibration of a MB-TOFMS has important implications in various fields where detection of high molecular mass species is required. In combustion products analysis, it is also possible to obtain a new calibration spectrum before the acquisition of each spectrum, only modifying some operative conditions. Copyright © 2016

  4. Initial oxidation behavior of Ni{sub 3}Al (210) surface induced by supersonic oxygen molecular beam at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Ya, E-mail: XU.Ya@nims.go.jp [Hydrogen Materials Unit, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Sakurai, Junya [Hydrogen Materials Unit, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Teraoka, Yuden; Yoshigoe, Akitaka [Quantum Beam Science Center, Japan Atomic Energy Research Agency, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Demura, Masahiko; Hirano, Toshiyuki [Hydrogen Materials Unit, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan)

    2017-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Initial oxidation of Ni{sub 3}Al (210) induced by O{sub 2} beam was investigated. • This was done using real-time synchrotron radiation XPS. • Both the Al and the Ni atoms on the surface were oxidized. • Oxidation of Al progressed much faster than that of Ni. - Abstract: The initial oxidation behavior of a clean Ni{sub 3}Al (210) surface was studied at 300 K using a supersonic O{sub 2} molecular beam (O{sub 2} SSMB) having an O{sub 2} translational energy of 2.3 eV, and real-time photoemission spectroscopy performed with high-brilliance synchrotron radiation. The evolution behaviors of the O 1s, Ni 2p, Al 2p, and Ni 3p spectra were examined during irradiation with the O{sub 2} SSMB. The spectral analysis revealed that both the Al atoms and the Ni atoms on the surface were oxidized; however, the oxidation of Al progressed much faster than that of Ni. The oxidation of Al began to occur and AlO{sub x} was formed at an oxygen coverage of 0.26 monolayer (ML) (1 ML was defined as the atomic density of the Ni{sub 3}Al (210) surface) and saturated at an oxygen coverage of 2.5 ML. In contrast, the oxidation of Ni commenced a little late at an oxygen coverage of 1.6 ML and slowly progressed to saturation, which occurred at an oxygen coverage of 4.89 ML.

  5. Selective extraction of triazine herbicides based on a combination of membrane assisted solvent extraction and molecularly imprinted solid phase extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimuka, Luke; van Pinxteren, Manuela; Billing, Johan; Yilmaz, Ecevit; Jönsson, Jan Åke

    2011-02-04

    A selective extraction technique based on the combination of membrane assisted solvent extraction and molecularly imprinted solid phase extraction for triazine herbicides in food samples was developed. Simazine, atrazine, prometon, terbumeton, terbuthylazine and prometryn were extracted from aqueous food samples into a hydrophobic polypropylene membrane bag containing 1000μL of toluene as the acceptor phase along with 100mg of MIP particles. In the acceptor phase, the compounds were re-extracted onto MIP particles. The extraction technique was optimised for the type of organic acceptor solvent, amount of molecularly imprinted polymers particles in the organic acceptor phase, extraction time and addition of salt. Toluene as the acceptor phase was found to give higher triazine binding onto MIP particles compared to hexane and cyclohexane. Extraction time of 120min and 100mg of MIP were found to be optimum parameters. Addition of salt increased the extraction efficiency for more polar triazines. The selectivity of the technique was demonstrated by extracting spiked cow pea and corn extracts where clean chromatograms were obtained compared to only membrane assisted solvent extraction or only molecularly imprinted solid phase extraction. The study revealed that this combination may be a simple way of selectively extracting compounds in complex samples. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Efficient upconversion polymer-inorganic nanocomposite thin film emitters prepared by the double beam matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (DB-MAPLE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwish, Abdalla M.; Burkett, Allan; Blackwell, Ashley; Taylor, Keylantra; Walker, Vernell; Sarkisov, Sergey; Koplitz, Brent

    2014-09-01

    We report on fabrication and investigation of optical and morphological properties of highly efficient (a quantum yield of 1%) upconversion polymer-inorganic nanocomposite thin film emitters prepared by the new technique of double beam matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (DB-MAPLE). Polymer poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) host was evaporated on a silicon substrate using a 1064-nm pulsed laser beam using a target made of frozen (to the temperature of liquid nitrogen) solution of PMMA in chlorobenzene. Concurrently, the second 532-nm pulsed beam from the same laser was used to impregnate the polymer host with the inorganic nanoparticulate made of the rare earth upconversion compounds NaYF4: Yb3+, Er3+, NaYF4: Yb3+, Ho3+, and NaYF4: Yb3+, Tm3+. The compounds were initially synthesized using the wet process, baked, and compressed in solid pellet targets. The proposed DB-MAPLE method has the advantage of making highly homogeneous nanocomposite films with precise control of the doping rate due to the optimized overlapping of the plumes produced by the ablation of the organic and inorganic target with the infrared and visible laser beams respectively. X-ray diffraction, electron and atomic force microscopy, and optical fluorescence spectroscopy indicated that the inorganic nanoparticulate preserved its crystalline structure and upconversion properties (strong emission in green, red, and blue bands upon illumination with 980-nm laser diode) after being transferred from the target in the polymer nanocomposite film. The produced films can be used in applications varying from the efficiency enhancement of the photovoltaic cells, optical sensors and biomarkers to anti-counterfeit labels.

  7. Chaperone-Assisted Formation of Cucurbit[8]uril-Based Molecular Porous Materials with One-Dimensional Channel Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wei; Wang, Chen; Lan, Yue; Li, Jian; Wang, Hui; Gao, Ning; Ji, Jingwei; Li, Guangtao

    2016-09-06

    Exploiting "chaperone molecule" to navigate the successful assembly energy landscapes has been extensively used in biological systems, whereas in artifical supramolecular systems the "chaperone-assisted" assembly strategy to be used for the synthesis of materials with novel structures or the structures to be hardly prepared by "conventional" methods are still far from realizing the potential functions. In this work, we present a new example of small organic molecule acting as "chaperone molecule" in the facile formation of organic molecular porous materials. This porous material is composed of pure cucurbit[8]uril (CB[8]) macrocycle and possesses a honeycomb-like structure with an isolated and relatively large one-dimensional (1D) nanochannel. Moreover, it has good chemical and thermal stability, and shows a good adsorption capability for large molecule loading. Importantly, with the assistance of chaperone molecules, pure CB[8] could also be recycled even from a complex aqueous solution, demonstrating a powerful purification method of CB[8] from complex systems.

  8. Growing high-quality ternary CdMnTe epilayers by molecular beam epitaxy on Si substrates and its mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jyh-Shyang, E-mail: jswang@cycu.edu.tw [Department of Physics, Chung Yuan Christian University, Taoyuan City 32023, Taiwan (China); Center for Nano-Technology, Chung Yuan Christian University, Taoyuan City 32023, Taiwan (China); Tong, Shih-Chang; Tsai, Yu-Hsuan; Tsai, Wei-jiun [Department of Physics, Chung Yuan Christian University, Taoyuan City 32023, Taiwan (China); Yang, Chu-Shou; Chang, Yi-Hsin [Graduate Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, Tatung University, Taipei 10452, Taiwan (China); Cheng, Yung-Chen [Department of Materials Science, National University of Tainan, Tainan 70005, Taiwan (China); Wu, Chih-Hung [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Longtan 32546, Taiwan (China); Yuan, Chi-Tsu; Shen, Ji-Lin [Department of Physics, Chung Yuan Christian University, Taoyuan City 32023, Taiwan (China); Center for Nano-Technology, Chung Yuan Christian University, Taoyuan City 32023, Taiwan (China)

    2015-10-15

    Cd(Mn,Zn)Te-based ternary compound semiconductors with wide band-gaps are important in the detection of radiation and photovoltaic applications. This study characterizes Cd{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}Te epilayers on Si substrates with various Mn compositions grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The surface smoothness, crystallinity and optical quality all are significantly improved with increasing Mn content. The Cd{sub 0.61}Mn{sub 0.39}Te epilayer with a thickness of only about 500 nm yields a full width at half maximum of the X-ray rocking curve of 165 arcsec. Photoluminescence spectra at 10 K show that the intensity of defect-related emissions is much lower than that of binary CdTe epilayers, reaching zero from the samples with high Mn content, while the integral intensity of the exciton-related emissions is increased by more than two orders of magnitude. Raman scattering spectra reveal that the intensity of the Te–Te related defect vibration modes falls significantly as the Mn content increase, even disappearing altogether in the samples with high Mn content. This work proposes that incorporating Mn atoms during epitaxial growth can promote the decomposition of Te{sub 2} sources, owing to the high sticking coefficient of Mn and the high cohesive energy of the Mn–Te bond, and then reduce the number of Te–Te related stacking fault defects, yielding high-quality CdMnTe epilayers. Our results herein demonstrate that the CdMnTe ternary epilayers are much more promising in terms of material quality than the CdZnTe ternary epilayers. - Highlights: • High-quality ternary CdMnTe were grown on Si substrates by molecular beam epitaxy. • The material qualities were significantly improved with increasing Mn content. • The Te–Te related defects were greatly reduced with increasing Mn content. • We report an enhanced growth of CdTe-based epilayers by the incorporation of Mn atoms.

  9. Low-energy oxygen ion beam assisted growth of BaO/EuBa2Cu3O7-δ multilayers in ultrahigh vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pindoria, Govind; Kawaguchi, K.; Morishita, Tadataka

    1996-07-01

    Molecular beam epitaxial growth of cuprate oxide superconducting thin films using a mass separated, low energy, O+ beam source, is discussed. The mono-valent O+ ion is chemically, highly reactive, and its kinetic energy at 10's of electron volts, is significant. It allows the growth of REBa2Cu3O7-(delta ) (REBCO) thin films at low pressures and temperatures. The effective over-pressure of the O+ ions at the substrate being 2 X 10-7 Torr, and the optimum growth temperature 500 degrees C. These conditions are below the currently accepted stability line for the growth of REBCO thin films. We characterize the physical and chemical properties of the O+ ion beam, and its effect on superconducting thin films. We have grown highly crystalline BaO and EuBa2Cu3O7-(delta ) (EBCO) thin films on SrTiO3 substrates. The full width at half maximum of the rocking curves for BaO(002) equals 0.07 degrees and that for the EBCO (005) peak equals 0.05 degrees. Also, we found that BaO is a good insulating material (1.7 X 1013 (Omega) m at 4K), with an excellent lattice match to EBCO, therefore a suitable candidate as an insulating layer in multilayer structures. The results of the first growth studies of BaO/EBCO multilayers are discussed.

  10. Robot Assisted Radical Prostatectomy in A Patient with Previous Abdominoperineal Resection and Pelvic External Beam Radiation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cem, Basatac; Haluk, Akpinar

    2017-12-26

    Though previous major abdominal surgery and pelvic irradiation may be a significant drawback of subsequent laparoscopic procedure, technological advances such as better visualization and more controlled finer movementsof robotic arms allowing better dissection in robotic-assisted laparoscopic surgery may reduce some of these challenges. However, limited data are available on the effect and safety of robotic surgery in these patients. The aim of this case report is to present efficacy and safety of robot assisted radical prostatectomy in a patient who has rectal and concurrent prostate cancer with the history of abdominoperineal resection, pelvic irradiation and adjuvantchemotherapy.

  11. Cone Beam Computed Tomography Assisted Endodontic Management of a Rare Case of Mandibular First Premolar with Three Roots

    OpenAIRE

    Balakasireddy, K; Kumar, K. Pavan; John, Gijo; Gagan, C

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the morphological anatomy of the root and root canal systems of the teeth increases the success rate of endodontic therapy. Advanced diagnostic imaging techniques like cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) are an essential aid in understanding the anatomy of teeth especially in mandibular premolars. Most commonly mandibular first and second premolars have a single root and a single canal. However, multiple root and canals have also been reported. The present case report discusses...

  12. Febrifugine analogues as Leishmania donovani trypanothione reductase inhibitors: binding energy analysis assisted by molecular docking, ADMET and molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Rajan Kumar; Kumbhar, Bajarang Vasant; Srivastava, Shubham; Malik, Ruchi; Sundar, Shyam; Kunwar, Ambarish; Prajapati, Vijay Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis affects people from 70 countries worldwide, mostly from Indian, African and south American continent. The increasing resistance to antimonial, miltefosine and frequent toxicity of amphotericin B drives an urgent need to develop an antileishmanial drug with excellent efficacy and safety profile. In this study we have docked series of febrifugine analogues (n = 8813) against trypanothione reductase in three sequential docking modes. Extra precision docking resulted into 108 ligands showing better docking score as compared to two reference ligand. Furthermore, 108 febrifugine analogues and reference inhibitor clomipramine were subjected to ADMET, QikProp and molecular mechanics, the generalized born model and solvent accessibility study to ensure the toxicity caused by compounds and binding-free energy, respectively. Two best ligands (FFG7 and FFG2) qualifying above screening parameters were further subjected to molecular dynamics simulation. Conducting these studies, here we confirmed that 6-chloro-3-[3-(3-hydroxy-2-piperidyl)-2-oxo-propyl]-7-(4-pyridyl) quinazolin-4-one can be potential drug candidate to fight against Leishmania donovani parasites.

  13. Control of tensile strain and interdiffusion in Ge/Si(001) epilayers grown by molecular-beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luong, T. K. P.; Dau, M. T.; Zrir, M. A.; Le Thanh, V.; Petit, M. [Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS CINaM-UMR 7325, F-13288 Marseille Cedex 09 (France); Stoffel, M.; Rinnert, H. [Université de Lorraine, Institut Jean Lamour, CNRS UMR 7198, Nancy-Université, BP 70239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy Cedex (France); Ghrib, A.; El Kurdi, M.; Boucaud, P. [Institut d' Electronique Fondamentale, CNRS UMR 8622, Université Paris-Sud, Ba-carett. 220, 91405 Orsay (France); Murota, J. [Research Institute of Electrical Communications, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2013-08-28

    Tensile-strained and n-doped Ge has emerged as a potential candidate for the realization of optoelectronic devices that are compatible with the mainstream silicon technology. Tensile-strained Ge/Si epilayers can be obtained by using the difference of thermal expansion coefficients between Ge and Si. We have combined various surface, structural, and compositional characterizations to investigate the growth mode and the strain state in Ge/Si epilayers grown by molecular-beam epitaxy. The Ge growth was carried out using a two-step approach: a low-temperature growth to produce relaxed and smooth buffer layers, which is followed by a high-temperature growth to get high quality Ge layers. The existence of a substrate temperature window from 260 to 300 °C is evidenced, which allows to completely suppress the Ge/Si Stranski-Krastanov growth. As a consequence of the high temperature growth, a tensile strain lying in the range of 0.22%–0.24% is obtained. Concerning the effect of thermal annealing, it is shown that cyclic annealing may allow increasing the tensile strain up to 0.30%. Finally, we propose an approach to use carbon adsorption to suppress Si/Ge interdiffusion, which represents one of the main obstacles to overcome in order to realize pure Ge-based optoelectronic devices.

  14. Manipulation of morphology and structure of the top of GaAs nanowires grown by molecular-beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lixia; Pan, Dong; Yu, Xuezhe; So, Hyok; Zhao, Jianhua

    2017-10-01

    Self-catalyzed GaAs nanowires (NWs) are grown on Si (111) substrates by molecular-beam epitaxy. The effect of different closing sequences of the Ga and As cell shutters on the morphology and structural phase of GaAs NWs is investigated. For the sequences of closing the Ga and As cell shutters simultaneously or closing the As cell shutter 1 min after closing the Ga cell shutter, the NWs grow vertically to the substrate surface. In contrast, when the As cell shutter is closed first, maintaining the Ga flux is found to be critical for the following growth of GaAs NWs, which can change the growth direction from [111] to . The evolution of the morphology and structural phase transition at the tips of these GaAs NWs confirm that the triple-phase-line shift mode is at work even for the growth with different cell shutter closing sequences. Our work will provide new insights for better understanding of the growth mechanism and realizing of the morphology and structure control of the GaAs NWs. Project supported partly by the MOST of China (No. 2015CB921503), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61504133, 61334006, 61404127), and Youth Innovation Promotion Association, CAS (No. 2017156).

  15. Epitaxial growth of rocksalt Zn1-xMgxO on MgO (100) substrate by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, M. C.; Lu, S. A.; Chang, L.; Chou, M. M. C.; Ploog, K. H.

    2017-11-01

    Zn1-xMgxO films with x=0.22-0.87 were grown on MgO (100) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy at 400 and 600 °C respectively. The films containing 85% or less ZnO grow epitaxially and retain entirely the rocksalt (rs) crystal structure. The rs-Zn1-xMgxO epilayers have a tunable bandgap energy of 4.5-6.2 eV. In addition, the rs-Zn1-xMgxO epilayer grown at 600 °C exhibits a lower FWHM value of its (200) rocking curve as compared to its low- temperature counterpart. The lattice constant of rs-ZnO at ambient pressure and temperature is obtained to be 4.2766 Å. The sticking coefficient of Mg atoms on rs-ZMO is approximately four times higher than that of ZnO atoms regardless of the growth temperature in the range of 400-600 °C.

  16. Epitaxial CuInSe2 thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy and migration enhanced epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abderrafi, K.; Ribeiro-Andrade, R.; Nicoara, N.; Cerqueira, M. F.; Gonzalez Debs, M.; Limborço, H.; Salomé, P. M. P.; Gonzalez, J. C.; Briones, F.; Garcia, J. M.; Sadewasser, S.

    2017-10-01

    While CuInSe2 chalcopyrite materials are mainly used in their polycrystalline form to prepare thin film solar cells, epitaxial layers have been used for the characterization of defects. Typically, epitaxial layers are grown by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy or molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Here we present epitaxial layers grown by migration enhanced epitaxy (MEE) and compare the materials quality to MBE grown layers. CuInSe2 layers were grown on GaAs (0 0 1) substrates by co-evaporation of Cu, In, and Se using substrate temperatures of 450 °C, 530 °C, and 620 °C. The layers were characterized by high resolution X-ray diffraction (HR-XRD), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), Raman spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy (AFM). HR-XRD and HR-TEM show a better crystalline quality of the MEE grown layers, and Raman scattering measurements confirm single phase CuInSe2. AFM shows the previously observed faceting of the (0 0 1) surface into {1 1 2} facets with trenches formed along the [1 1 0] direction. The surface of MEE-grown samples appears smoother compared to MBE-grown samples, a similar trend is observed with increasing growth temperature.

  17. Growth and characterization of InP ringlike quantum-dot molecules grown by solid-source molecular beam epitaxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jevasuwan, Wipakorn; Boonpeng, Poonyasiri; Panyakeow, Somsak; Ratanathammaphan, Somchai

    2010-11-01

    In this paper, we have studied the fabrication of InP ringlike quantum-dot molecules on GaAs(001) substrate grown by solid-source molecular beam epitaxy using droplet epitaxy technique and the effect of In deposition rate on the physical and optical properties of InP ringlike quantum-dot molecules. The In deposition rate is varied from 0.2 ML/s to 0.4, 0.8 and 1.6 ML/s. The surface morphology and cross-section were examined by ex-situ atomic force microscope and transmission electron microscope, respectively. The increasing of In deposition rate results in the decreasing of outer and inner diameters of InP ringlike quantum-dot molecules and height of InP quantum dots but increases the InP quantum dot and ringlike quantum-dot molecule densities. The photoluminescence peaks of InP ringlike quantum-dot molecules are blue-shifted and FWHM is narrower when In deposition rate is bigger.

  18. Epitaxial growth and characterization of CuGa2O4 films by laser molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hongling; Chen, Zhengwei; Wu, Zhenping; Cui, Wei; Huang, Yuanqi; Tang, Weihua

    2017-11-01

    Ga2O3 with a wide bandgap of ˜ 4.9 eV can crystalize in five crystalline phases. Among those phases, the most stable monoclinic β-Ga2O3 has been studied most, however, it is hard to find materials lattice matching with β-Ga2O3 to grown epitaxial thin films for optoelectronic applications. In this work, CuGa2O4 bulk were prepared by solid state reaction as target, and the films were deposited on sapphire substrates by laser molecular beam epitaxy (L-MBE) at different substrate temperatures. The influences of substrate temperature on structural and optical properties have been systematically investigated by means of X-ray diffraction, Transmission electron microscope and UV-vis absorption spectra. High quality cubic structure and [111] oriented CuGa2O4 film can be obtained at substrate temperature of 750 °C. It's also demonstrated that the CuGa2O4 film has a bandgap of ˜ 4.4 eV and a best crystal quality at 750 °C, suggesting that CuGa2O4 film is a promising candidate for applications in ultraviolet optoelectronic devices.

  19. Physicochemical analysis of Bi2Te3 - (Fe, Eu) - Bi2Te3 junctions grown by molecular beam epitaxy method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balin, K.; Rapacz, R.; Weis, M.; Szade, J.

    2017-05-01

    Topological insulators (TI) are a class of materials gaining in importance due to their unique spin/electronic properties, which may allow for the generation of quasiparticles and electronic states which are not accessible in classical condensed-matter systems. Not surprisingly, TI are considered as promising materials for multiple applications in next generation electronic or spintronic devices, as well as for applications in energy conversion, such as thermo-electrics. In this study, we examined the practical challenges associated with the formation of a well-defined junction between a model 3D topological insulator, Bi2Te3, and a metal, Fe or Eu, from which spin injection could potentially be realized. The properties of multilayer systems grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), with Fe or Eu thin films sandwiched between two Bi2Te3 layers, were studied in-situ using electron diffraction and photoelectron spectroscopy. Their magnetic properties were measured using a SQUID magnetometer, while the in-depth chemical structure was assessed using secondary ion mass spectroscopy. An examination of impact of Bi2Te3 structure on chemical stability of the junction area has been realized. For Fe, we found that despite room temperature growth, a reaction between the Fe film and Bi2Te3 takes place, leading to the formation of FeTe and also the precipitation of metallic Bi. For the Eu tri-layer, a reaction also occurs, but the Te chemical state remains intact.

  20. Epitaxial growth and characterization of CuGa2O4 films by laser molecular beam epitaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongling Wei

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Ga2O3 with a wide bandgap of ∼ 4.9 eV can crystalize in five crystalline phases. Among those phases, the most stable monoclinic β-Ga2O3 has been studied most, however, it is hard to find materials lattice matching with β-Ga2O3 to grown epitaxial thin films for optoelectronic applications. In this work, CuGa2O4 bulk were prepared by solid state reaction as target, and the films were deposited on sapphire substrates by laser molecular beam epitaxy (L-MBE at different substrate temperatures. The influences of substrate temperature on structural and optical properties have been systematically investigated by means of X-ray diffraction, Transmission electron microscope and UV-vis absorption spectra. High quality cubic structure and [111] oriented CuGa2O4 film can be obtained at substrate temperature of 750 °C. It’s also demonstrated that the CuGa2O4 film has a bandgap of ∼ 4.4 eV and a best crystal quality at 750 °C, suggesting that CuGa2O4 film is a promising candidate for applications in ultraviolet optoelectronic devices.

  1. Carrier Lifetimes of Iodine-Doped CdMgTe/CdSeTe Double Heterostructures Grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohal, S.; Edirisooriya, M.; Ogedengbe, O. S.; Petersen, J. E.; Swartz, C. H.; LeBlanc, E. G.; Myers, T. H.; Li, J. V.; Holtz, M.

    2017-09-01

    Iodine-doped CdMgTe/CdSeTe double heterostructures (DHs) have been grown by molecular beam epitaxy and studied using time-resolved photoluminescence (PL), focusing on absorber layer thickness of 2 μm. The n-type free carrier concentration was varied to ˜7 × 1015 cm-3, 8.4 × 1016 cm-3, and 8.4 × 1017 cm-3 using iodine as dopant in DHs. Optical injection at 1 × 1010 photons/pulse/cm2 to 3 × 1011 photons/pulse/cm2, corresponding to initial injection of photocarriers up to ˜8 × 1015 cm-3, was applied to examine the effects of excess carrier concentration on the PL lifetimes. Iodine-doped DHs exhibited an initial rapid decay followed by a slower decay at free carrier concentration of 7 × 1015 cm-3 and 8.4 × 1016 cm-3. The optical injection dependence of the carrier lifetimes for DHs was interpreted based on the Shockley-Read-Hall model. The observed decrease in lifetime with increasing n is consistent with growing importance of radiative recombination.

  2. Growth and electro-optical characterization of ZnMgTe/ZnTe waveguide by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, W.; Nakasu, T.; Taguri, K.; Aiba, T.; Yamashita, S. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Waseda University, Tokyo (Japan); Kobayashi, M. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Waseda University, Tokyo (Japan); Laboratory of Materials Science and Technology, Waseda University, Tokyo (Japan); Togo, H. [Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Corporation, Atsugi (Japan); Asahi, T. [JX Nippon Oil and Energy, Hitachi (Japan)

    2014-07-15

    ZnMgTe/ZnTe/ZnMgTe thin film waveguide with high crystal quality were grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The in-plane mismatch between the ZnMgTe cladding layers and ZnTe core layer was about 0.02% which was measured by X-ray reciprocal space mapping (RSM). It indicated that films were grown coherently with high crystal quality. The Electro-Optical characterization of waveguide was evaluated using 1.55 μm polarized lights and bias applied on the waveguide device from -15 V to +15 V. The dependence of light phase shift passed though the waveguide on the applied voltage bias was studied. The electro-optical characterization of the waveguide device was about 7% of the theoretical calculation. It could be improved by increasing the resistance ratio between the ZnMgTe/ZnTe/ZnMgTe waveguide structure and substrate so that the electric field applied on the waveguide structure could be improved. It was indicated that the ZnMgTe/ZnTe/ZnMgTe thin film waveguide has the potential to become a high efficiency electro-optical device. (copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  3. P-type ZnO thin films prepared by plasma molecular beam epitaxy using radical NO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, H.W.; Lu, Y.M.; Shen, D.Z.; Liu, Y.C.; Yan, J.F.; Li, B.H.; Zhang, Z.Z.; Zhang, J.Y.; Fan, X.W. [Key Laboratory of Excited State Processes, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 16-Dongnanhu Road, Changchun 130033 (China); Shan, C.X. [Department of Physics, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong (China)

    2005-05-01

    N-doped p-type ZnO thin films were grown by plasma molecular beam epitaxy (P-MBE) on c-plane sapphire (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) using radical NO as oxygen source and nitrogen dopant. The reproducible ZnO thin films have maximum net hole concentration (N{sub A}-N{sub D}) of 1.2 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} and minimum resistivity of 9.36 {omega} cm. The influence of N incorporation on the quality of the ZnO thin films was studied using X-ray diffraction and absorption spectra. The photoluminescence spectra at 77 K of p-type ZnO thin films are dominated by the emission from donor-acceptor pair recombination. The formation mechanism of p-type ZnO is explained by the optical emission spectra of radical N{sub 2} and radical NO. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  4. Automated angle-scanning photoemission end-station with molecular beam epitaxy at KEK-PF BL-1C

    CERN Document Server

    Ono, K; Horiba, K; Oh, J H; Nakazono, S; Kihara, T; Nakamura, K; Mano, T; Mizuguchi, M; Oshima, M; Aiura, Y; Kakizaki, A

    2001-01-01

    In order to satisfy demands to study the electronic structure of quantum nanostructures, a VUV beamline and a high-resolution and high-throughput photoemission end-station combined with a molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) system have been constructed at the BL-1C of the Photon Factory. An angle-resolved photoemission spectrometer, having high energy- and angular-resolutions; VG Microtech ARUPS10, was installed. The total energy resolution of 31 meV at the 60 eV of photon energy is achieved. For the automated angle-scanning photoemission, the electron spectrometer mounted on a two-axis goniometer can be rotated in vacuum by the computer-controlled stepping motors. Another distinctive feature of this end-station is a connection to a MBE chamber in ultahigh vacuum (UHV). In this system, MBE-grown samples can be transferred into the photoemission chamber without breaking UHV. Photoemission spectra of MBE-grown GaAs(0 0 1) surfaces were measured with high-resolution and bulk and surface components are clearly resolved.

  5. Interfacial Misfit Array Technique for GaSb Growth on GaAs (001) Substrate by Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benyahia, D.; Kubiszyn, Ł.; Michalczewski, K.; Kębłowski, A.; Martyniuk, P.; Piotrowski, J.; Rogalski, A.

    2018-01-01

    Undoped GaSb epilayers, deposited at low growth temperature (440°C), have been grown on GaAs (001) substrate with 2° offcut towards [110], by a molecular beam epitaxy system. Interfacial misfit array (IMF) growth mode has been used in order to impede the propagation of the threading dislocations through the GaSb epilayer. Under optimized growth parameters, both transmission electron microscopy (TEM) measurements and high-resolution x-ray diffraction (HRXRD) revealed the presence of a periodic array of pure 90° edge dislocations along [110]. Furthermore, HRXRD shows a full width at half maximum of a 2- μm-thick GaSb epilayer peak as low as 195 arcsec. In addition, the GaSb layer is found to be 99.8% relaxed, with a residual strain of 1.4 × 10-4. Moreover, based on TEM measurements, the dislocations spacing or the period of the IMF was found to be 5-5.2 nm.

  6. Investigation of the High-Energy Oxidation of FiberForm from DSMC Analysis of Molecular Beam Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borner, A.; Swaminathan-Gopalan, K.; Stephani, Kelly; Poovathingal, S.; Murray, V. J.; Minton, T. K.; Panerai, F.; Mansour, N. N.

    2017-01-01

    A collaborative effort between the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC), NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) and Montana State University (MSU) succeeded at developing a new finite-rate carbon oxidation model from molecular beam scattering experiments on vitreous carbon (VC). We now aim to use the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) code SPARTA to apply the model to each fiber of the porous fibrous Thermal Protection Systems (TPS) material FiberForm (FF). The detailed micro-structure of FF was obtained from X-ray micro-tomography and then used in DSMC. Both experiments and simulations show that the CO/O products ratio increased at all temperatures from VC to FF. We postulate this is due to the larger number of collisions an O atom encounters inside the porous FF material compared to the flat surface of VC. For the simulations, we particularly focused on the lowest and highest temperatures studied experimentally, 1023 K and 1823 K, and found good agreement between the finite-rate DSMC simulations and experiments.

  7. Avoiding polar catastrophe in the growth of polarly orientated nickel perovskite thin films by reactive oxide molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, H. F.; Liu, Z. T.; Fan, C. C.; Xiang, P.; Zhang, K. L.; Li, M. Y.; Liu, J. S. [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology (SIMIT), Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Yao, Q. [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology (SIMIT), Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); State Key Laboratory of Surface Physics, Department of Physics, and Advanced Materials Laboratory, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Shen, D. W., E-mail: dwshen@mail.sim.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology (SIMIT), Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); CAS Center for Excellence in Superconducting Eletronics (CENSE), Shanghai 200050 (China); CAS-Shanghai Science Research Center, Shanghai 201203 (China)

    2016-08-15

    By means of the state-of-the-art reactive oxide molecular beam epitaxy, we synthesized (001)- and (111)-orientated polar LaNiO{sub 3} thin films. In order to avoid the interfacial reconstructions induced by polar catastrophe, screening metallic Nb-doped SrTiO{sub 3} and iso-polarity LaAlO{sub 3} substrates were chosen to achieve high-quality (001)-orientated films in a layer-by-layer growth mode. For largely polar (111)-orientated films, we showed that iso-polarity LaAlO{sub 3} (111) substrate was more suitable than Nb-doped SrTiO{sub 3}. In situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction, ex situ high-resolution X-ray diffraction, and atomic force microscopy were used to characterize these films. Our results show that special attentions need to be paid to grow high-quality oxide films with polar orientations, which can prompt the explorations of all-oxide electronics and artificial interfacial engineering to pursue intriguing emergent physics like proposed interfacial superconductivity and topological phases in LaNiO{sub 3} based superlattices.

  8. Sn - Induced decomposition of SiGeSn alloys grown on Si by molecular-beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talochkin, A. B.; Timofeev, V. A.; Gutakovskii, A. K.; Mashanov, V. I.

    2017-11-01

    Structural features of Si1-x-yGexSny alloy layers grown on Si by molecular-beam epitaxy are studied. These layers with the thickness of 2.0 nm, the nominal Ge composition of x0 ≈ 0.3, and the Sn-content of y ≈ 2-6 at.% have been grown at low temperatures (100-150 °C). We have used high-resolution transmission electron microscopy to analyze atomic structure of grown layers and Raman spectroscopy to evaluate the real Ge-content x from the observed optical phonon frequencies. It is found that the x value coincides with the nominal one at low Sn-content (2-3 at.%), and when it is increased (y ≥ 5 at.%), the decomposition of alloys into two fractions occurs. One of them is enriched by Ge with x up to 0.6 and the other fraction is Si-enriched. It is shown that the observed decomposition is Sn-induced and related to increase in Ge adatoms mobility in the growth process. This mechanism is similar to that theoretically predicted by Venezuela and Tersoff (Phys. Rev. 58, 10871 (1998)) for the case of high growth temperature.

  9. Magnetic properties of single-crystal {110} iron films grown on GaAs by molecular beam epitaxy (invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinz, G. A.; Rado, G. T.; Krebs, J. J.

    1982-03-01

    Single-crystal {110} Fe films, grown for the first time by molecular beam epitaxy on GaAs, have been studied by a variety of techniques in order to determine the dependence of the magnetic properties upon film thickness L and quality, and an overview of these results is presented. The dependence of the ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) field upon its orientation in the (11¯0) plane was measured at 16.4 GHz and shows that the magnetically easy axis is [110] for L<50 Å and [001] for L≳150 Å. A theory of FMR which incorporates magnetocrystalline surface anisotropy is outlined. It successfully interprets the thickness dependence of the FMR data in the ultrathin (L≲50 Å) regime and shows them to be surface dominated. FMR data at 9.2 GHz, which contain both aligned and nonaligned resonance branches, are presented as a function L. In addition, the dependence of the branches on frequency f for 8 GHz

  10. Surface potential, charging and local current transport of individual Ge quantum dots grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singha, R. K.; Manna, S.; Bar, R.; Das, S.; Ray, S. K.

    2017-06-01

    It is fundamentally important to understand the nanoscale electronic properties of a single quantum dot (QD) contrary to an ensemble of QDs. Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) and conductive atomic force microscopy (CAFM) are two important tools, which could be employed to probe surface potential, charging phenomena, and current transport mechanism of individual QD. We demonstrate the aforementioned characteristics of self-assembled Ge QDs, which was grown on Si substrates by solid source molecular beam epitaxy driven by the Stranski-Krastanov method. Study reveals that each Ge QD acts as charge storage node even at zero applied bias. The shape, size and density of QDs could be well probed by CAFM and KPFM, whereas QD facets could be better resolved by the conductive tip. The CAFM investigation further reveals that there exists a composition gradient within the QDs and Ge core can be charged more efficiently than the Si-Ge periphery at low level of bias. Schematic energy band diagram at the tip-sample contact is presented to explain the current transport mechanism, charging/discharging characteristics and the threshold voltages of I-V characteristics of the individual Ge QDs.

  11. Low temperature sapphire nitridation: A clue to optimize GaN layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widmann, F.; Feuillet, G.; Daudin, B.; Rouvière, J. L.

    1999-02-01

    The sapphire nitridation temperature is investigated as a possible parameter to improve the properties of GaN epilayers grown by molecular beam epitaxy using a radio frequency plasma source. It is found out that lowering the nitridation temperature to values as low as 200 °C allows us to drastically improve the GaN structural and optical properties. Careful examination of the interface by transmission electron microscopy reveals that, in this case, the interface between the nitridated sapphire and the AlN buffer consists of an ordered array of pure edge dislocations. In contrast, high nitridation temperatures result in a perturbed interface with the occurrence of cubic crystallites in the AlN buffer. These results, complemented by a thorough reflection high-energy electron diffraction analysis of the nitridation procedure and a secondary ion mass spectrometry investigation, are interpreted in the framework of a model whereby a higher oxygen concentration is extracted from the substrate at high nitridation temperature, leading to the formation of cubic grains with a smaller lattice parameter than the surrounding matrix and to the concomitant occurrence of defects within the buffer.

  12. Effects of calcium phosphate coating to SLA surface implants by the ion-beam-assisted deposition method on self-contained coronal defect healing in dogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Heun-Joo; Song, Ji-Eun; Um, Yoo-Jung; Chae, Gyung Joon; Jung, Ui-Won; Kim, Chang-Sung; Choi, Seong-Ho [Department of Periodontology, Research Institute for Periodontal Regeneration, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, 134 Shinchon-Dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Sung-Min [Dentium Co., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, In-Seop, E-mail: shchoi726@yuhs.a [Institute of Physics and Applied Physics, Atomic-scale Surface Science Research Center, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-08-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the healing of self-contained coronal defects on a sand-blasted, large-grit, acid-etched (SLA) surface implant, which had a calcium phosphate (CaP) coating applied by ion-beam-assisted deposition (IBAD). We also evaluated the effect of heating the coating to different temperatures. The CaP-coated SLA implants exhibited a slightly larger bone healing capacity in the self-contained coronal defect than SLA implants, indicating that combining SLA surface implants and a CaP coating by the IBAD method had synergistic effects on bone healing. There was no difference in the healing capacity between 350 deg. C and 450 deg. C heat treatment of the coating layer.

  13. Thickness Dependence of Optoelectrical Properties of Mo-Doped In2O3 Films Deposited on Polyethersulfone Substrates by Ion-Beam-Assisted Evaporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Chiuan Kuo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Indium molybdenum oxide (IMO films were deposited onto the polyethersulfone (PES substrates by ion-beam-assisted evaporation (IBAE deposition at low temperature in this study. The effects of film thickness on their optical and electrical properties were investigated. The results show that the deposited IMO films exhibit a preferred orientation of B(222. The electrical resistivity of the deposited film initially reduces then subsequently increases with film thickness. The IMO film with the lowest resistivity of 7.61 × 10−4 ohm-cm has been achieved when the film thickness is 120 nm. It exhibits a satisfactory surface roughness pv of 8.75 nm and an average visible transmittance of 78.7%.

  14. Reel-to-reel preparation of ion-beam assisted deposition (IBAD)-MgO based coated conductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreiskott, Sascha; Arendt, Paul N; Coulter, J Yates; Dowden, Paul C; Foltyn, Stephen R; Gibbons, Brady J; Matias, Vladimir; Sheehan, Chris J [Superconductivity Technology Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2004-05-01

    We report on our efforts in developing and scaling-up the systems for IBAD-MgO based coated conductor fabrication. The overall fabrication process involves a number of different processes including: electropolishing of the substrates; barrier-layer, seed-layer, and IBAD-MgO deposition by e-beam evaporation; and pulsed laser deposition of buffer and YBCO layers. All processes are realized in reel-to-reel processing systems. Latest results have shown that the IBAD-MgO approach yields coated conductor performance comparable to the best results achieved elsewhere to date.

  15. Hydrogen bonding-assisted interaction between amitriptyline hydrochloride and hemoglobin: spectroscopic and molecular dynamics studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurya, Neha; Maurya, Jitendra Kumar; Kumari, Meena; Khan, Abbul Bashar; Dohare, Ravins; Patel, Rajan

    2017-05-01

    Herein, we have explored the interaction between amitriptyline hydrochloride (AMT) and hemoglobin (Hb), using steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy, UV-visible spectroscopy, and circular dichroism spectroscopy, in combination with molecular docking and molecular dynamic (MD) simulation methods. The steady-state fluorescence reveals the static quenching mechanism in the interaction system, which was further confirmed by UV-visible and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. The binding constant, number of binding sites, and thermodynamic parameters viz. ΔG, ΔH, ΔS are also considered; result confirms that the binding of the AMT with Hb is a spontaneous process, involving hydrogen bonding and van der Waals interactions with a single binding site, as also confirmed by molecular docking study. Synchronous fluorescence, CD data, and MD simulation results contribute toward understanding the effect of AMT on Hb to interpret the conformational change in Hb upon binding in aqueous solution.

  16. Evaluation of opening pattern and bone neoformation at median palatal suture area in patients submitted to surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion (SARME through cone beam computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Gomes SALGUEIRO

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstractSurgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion (SARME is the treatment of choice to adult patients even with severe transversal maxillary discrepancies. However, the adequate retention period to achieve the bone remodeling, thus assuring treatment stability, is controversial.Objective To evaluate the opening pattern and bone neoformation process at the midpalatal suture in patients submitted to surgically assisted (SARME through cone beam computed tomography (CBCT.Material and Methods Fourteen patients were submitted to SARME through subtotal Le Fort I osteotomy. Both the opening pattern and the mean bone density at midpalatal suture area to evaluate bone formation were assessed pre- and post-operatively (15, 60 and 180 days through CBCT.Results Type I opening pattern (from anterior to posterior nasal spine occurred in 12 subjects while type II opening pattern (from anterior nasal spine to transverse palatine suture occurred in 2 individuals. The 180-day postoperative mean (PO 180 of bone density value was 49.9% of the preoperative mean (Pre value.Conclusions The opening pattern of midpalatal suture is more related to patients’ age (23.9 years in type I and 33.5 years in type II and surgical technique. It was not possible to observe complete bone formation at midpalatal suture area at the ending of the retention period studied (180 days.

  17. Influence of PVP molecular weight on the microwave assisted in situ amorphization of indomethacin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doreth, Maria; Löbmann, Korbinian; Priemel, Petra

    2018-01-01

    In situ amorphization is an approach that enables a phase transition of a crystalline drug to its amorphous form immediately prior to administration. In this study, three different polyvinylpyrrolidones (PVP K12, K17 and K25) were selected to investigate the influence of the molecular weight of t...

  18. Beam-beam instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chao, A.W.

    1983-08-01

    The subject of beam-beam instability has been studied since the invention of the colliding beam storage rings. Today, with several colliding beam storage rings in operation, it is not yet fully understood and remains an outstanding problem for the storage ring designers. No doubt that good progress has been made over the years, but what we have at present is still rather primitive. It is perhaps possible to divide the beam-beam subject into two areas: one on luminosity optimization and another on the dynamics of the beam-beam interaction. The former area concerns mostly the design and operational features of a colliding beam storage ring, while the later concentrates on the experimental and theoretical aspects of the beam-beam interaction. Although both areas are of interest, our emphasis is on the second area only. In particular, we are most interested in the various possible mechanisms that cause the beam-beam instability.

  19. Growth and characterization of metamorphic InAs/GaSb tunnel heterojunction on GaAs by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jheng-Sin; Clavel, Michael B.; Hudait, Mantu K., E-mail: mantu.hudait@vt.edu [Advanced Devices and Sustainable Energy Laboratory (ADSEL), Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States); Pandey, Rahul [Electrical Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Datta, Suman [Electrical Engineering, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States); Meeker, Michael; Khodaparast, Giti A. [Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States)

    2016-06-28

    The structural, morphological, optical, and electrical transport characteristics of a metamorphic, broken-gap InAs/GaSb p-i-n tunnel diode structure, grown by molecular beam epitaxy on GaAs, were demonstrated. Precise shutter sequences were implemented for the strain-balanced InAs/GaSb active layer growth on GaAs, as corroborated by high-resolution X-ray analysis. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and detailed micrograph analysis demonstrated strain relaxation primarily via the formation of 90° Lomer misfit dislocations (MDs) exhibiting a 5.6 nm spacing and intermittent 60° MDs at the GaSb/GaAs heterointerface, which was further supported by a minimal lattice tilt of 180 arc sec observed during X-ray analysis. Selective area diffraction and Fast Fourier Transform patterns confirmed the full relaxation of the GaSb buffer layer and quasi-ideal, strain-balanced InAs/GaSb heteroepitaxy. Temperature-dependent photoluminescence measurements demonstrated the optical band gap of the GaSb layer. Strong optical signal at room temperature from this structure supports a high-quality material synthesis. Current–voltage characteristics of fabricated InAs/GaSb p-i-n tunnel diodes measured at 77 K and 290 K demonstrated two bias-dependent transport mechanisms. The Shockley–Read–Hall generation–recombination mechanism at low bias and band-to-band tunneling transport at high bias confirmed the p-i-n tunnel diode operation. This elucidated the importance of defect control in metamorphic InAs/GaSb tunnel diodes for the implementation of low-voltage and high-performance tunnel field effect transistor applications.

  20. Growth and characterization of metamorphic InAs/GaSb tunnel heterojunction on GaAs by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jheng-Sin; Clavel, Michael B.; Pandey, Rahul; Datta, Suman; Meeker, Michael; Khodaparast, Giti A.; Hudait, Mantu K.

    2016-06-01

    The structural, morphological, optical, and electrical transport characteristics of a metamorphic, broken-gap InAs/GaSb p-i-n tunnel diode structure, grown by molecular beam epitaxy on GaAs, were demonstrated. Precise shutter sequences were implemented for the strain-balanced InAs/GaSb active layer growth on GaAs, as corroborated by high-resolution X-ray analysis. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and detailed micrograph analysis demonstrated strain relaxation primarily via the formation of 90° Lomer misfit dislocations (MDs) exhibiting a 5.6 nm spacing and intermittent 60° MDs at the GaSb/GaAs heterointerface, which was further supported by a minimal lattice tilt of 180 arc sec observed during X-ray analysis. Selective area diffraction and Fast Fourier Transform patterns confirmed the full relaxation of the GaSb buffer layer and quasi-ideal, strain-balanced InAs/GaSb heteroepitaxy. Temperature-dependent photoluminescence measurements demonstrated the optical band gap of the GaSb layer. Strong optical signal at room temperature from this structure supports a high-quality material synthesis. Current-voltage characteristics of fabricated InAs/GaSb p-i-n tunnel diodes measured at 77 K and 290 K demonstrated two bias-dependent transport mechanisms. The Shockley-Read-Hall generation-recombination mechanism at low bias and band-to-band tunneling transport at high bias confirmed the p-i-n tunnel diode operation. This elucidated the importance of defect control in metamorphic InAs/GaSb tunnel diodes for the implementation of low-voltage and high-performance tunnel field effect transistor applications.

  1. beam-beam interaction

    CERN Multimedia

    2017-01-01

    The Beam 1 (represented in blue) and the Beam 2 (represented in red) are colliding with an angle at the Interaction Point (IP). The angle is needed to avoid unwanted multiple collisions along the interaction region. Despite of the separation introduced by the angle, the two beams interact via their electromagnetic field, the so called "beam-beam" interaction.

  2. A Self-Assisting Protein Folding Model for Teaching Structural Molecular Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, Jodi; Pique, Michael; Getzoff, Elizabeth; Huntoon, Jon; Gardner, Adam; Olson, Arthur

    2017-04-04

    Structural molecular biology is now becoming part of high school science curriculum thus posing a challenge for teachers who need to convey three-dimensional (3D) structures with conventional text and pictures. In many cases even interactive computer graphics does not go far enough to address these challenges. We have developed a flexible model of the polypeptide backbone using 3D printing technology. With this model we have produced a polypeptide assembly kit to create an idealized model of the Triosephosphate isomerase mutase enzyme (TIM), which forms a structure known as TIM barrel. This kit has been used in a laboratory practical where students perform a step-by-step investigation into the nature of protein folding, starting with the handedness of amino acids to the formation of secondary and tertiary structure. Based on the classroom evidence we collected, we conclude that these models are valuable and inexpensive resource for teaching structural molecular biology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Molecular Lifting, Twisting, and Curling during Metal-Assisted Polycyclic Hydrocarbon Dehydrogenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curcio, Davide; Omiciuolo, Luca; Pozzo, Monica; Lacovig, Paolo; Lizzit, Silvano; Jabeen, Naila; Petaccia, Luca; Alfè, Dario; Baraldi, Alessandro

    2016-03-16

    The atomistic understanding of the dissociation mechanisms for large molecules adsorbed on surfaces is still a challenge in heterogeneous catalysis. This is especially true for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, which represent an important class of organic compounds used to produce novel graphene-based architectures. Here, we show that coronene molecules adsorbed on Ir(111) undergo major conformational changes during dissociation. They first tilt upward with respect to the surface, still keeping their planar configuration, and subsequently experience a rotation, which changes the molecular axis orientation. Upon lifting, the internal C-C strain is initially relieved; as the dehydrogenation proceeds, the molecules experience a progressive increase in the average interatomic distance and gradually settle to form dome-shaped nanographene flakes. Our results provide important insight into the complex mechanism of molecular breakup, which could have implications in the synthesis of new carbon-based nanostructured materials.

  4. Crystallinity enhancement of Nafion electrolyte membranes assisted by a molecular gelator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenjing; Yue, Po-Lock; Gao, Ping

    2011-08-02

    Nanocrystallites, acting as physical cross-links in Nafion membranes, play a crucial role in building blocks for improving mechanical durability and stopping fuel crossover. However, Nafion membranes suffer from low crystallinity due to the irregular pendent side chains, which hinder self-aggregation of the poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) backbones. For the first time, a molecular gelator was introduced in the membrane casting process to enhance the rate of self-assembly of PTFE backbones so as to increase the membrane's crystallinity as well as proton conductivity without sacrificing the purity of Nafion. The molecular gelator used was 3,4-dimethylbenzaldehyde (DMBA). Addition of 0.5 wt % DMBA led to a 42% increase in crystallinity, a 32% increase in yield strength, a 22% increase in tensile modulus and an 18% increase in proton conductivity at 60 °C and 90% relative humidity. Additionally, the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) prepared from the membranes cast from the solution containing 0.5 wt % DMBA also showed an increase of 17% in maximum power density in comparison to the MEA prepared from pure Nafion membrane in a single cell polarization test without any external humidification. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and molecular dynamics simulation were used to elucidate the structural changes in Nafion membrane due to the introduction of DMBA. It was observed that the presence of DMBA gives wider crystalline regions under TEM. The molecular dynamics simulation at 500 K shows that the PTFE backbones become elongated in the presence of DMBA due to the enhanced mobility. This is consistent with the observed increase in crystallinity in the membrane as it means reduced entropic change upon crystallization.

  5. Redox considerations in female reproductive function and assisted reproduction: from molecular mechanisms to health implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Ashok; Gupta, Sajal; Sekhon, Lucky; Shah, Rani

    2008-08-01

    Physiological levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an important regulatory role through various signaling transduction pathways in folliculogenesis, oocyte maturation, endometrial cycle, luteolysis, implantation, embryogenesis, and pregnancy. Persistent and elevated generation of ROS leads to a disturbance of redox potential that in turn causes oxidative stress (OS). Our literature review captures the role of ROS in modulating a range of physiological functions and pathological processes affecting the female reproductive life span and even thereafter (i.e., menopause). The role of OS in female reproduction is becoming increasingly important, as recent evidence suggest that it plays a part in conditions such as polycystic ovarian disease, endometriosis, spontaneous abortions, preeclampsia, hydatidiform mole, embryopathies, preterm labor, and intrauterine growth retardation. OS has been implicated in different reproductive scenarios and is detrimental to both natural and assisted fertility. Many extrinsic and intrinsic conditions exist in assisted reproduction settings that can be tailored to reduce the toxic effects of ROS. Laboratory personnel should avoid procedures that are known to be deleterious, especially when safer procedures that can prevent OS are available. Although antioxidants such as folate, zinc, and thiols may help enhance fertility, the available data are contentious and must be evaluated in controlled studies with larger populations.

  6. Growth and Doping of Al(x)Ga(1-x)N Films by Electron Cyclotron Resonance Assisted Molecular Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-08-31

    13."Reactive Ion Etching of GaN Thin Films" M.J. Manfra, S.J. Berkowitz, R.J. Molnar, A.M. Clark, T.D. Moustakas and W.J. Skocpol , Mat. Res. Soc. Symp...Berkowitz’, Richard Molnar2, Anna Clark’, T.D. Moustakas 2 and W.J. Skocpol ’ ’Department of Physics, Boston University, Boston Ma 02215 2Department of

  7. Accuracy and speed of robotic assisted needle interventions using a modern cone beam computed tomography intervention suite: a phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, Boris [Goethe University Hospital, Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt (Germany); Goethe University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt (Germany); Eichler, Katrin; Siebenhandl, Petra; Gruber-Rouh, Tatjana; Vogl, Thomas Josef; Zangos, Stephan [Goethe University Hospital, Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt (Germany); Czerny, Christoph [Goethe University Hospital, Department of Trauma Surgery, Frankfurt (Germany)

    2013-01-15

    To analyse the feasibility and accuracy of robotic aided interventions on a phantom when using a modern C-arm-mounted cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) device in combination with needle guidance software. A small robotic device capable of holding and guiding needles was attached to the intervention table. After acquiring a 3D data set the access path was planned on the CBCT workstation and shown on the intervention monitor. Then the robot was aligned to the live fluoroscopic image. A total of 40 punctures were randomly conducted on a phantom armed with several targets (diameter 2 mm) in single and double oblique trajectory (n = 20 each). Target distance, needle deviation and time for the procedures were analysed. All phantom interventions (n = 40) could be performed successfully. Mean target access path within the phantom was 8.5 cm (min 4.2 cm, max 13.5 cm). Average needle tip deviation was 1.1 mm (min 0 mm, max 4.5 mm), time duration was 3:59 min (min 2:07 min, max 10:37 min). When using the proposed robot device in a CBCT intervention suite, highly accurate needle-based interventional punctures are possible in a reasonable timely manner in single as well as in double oblique trajectories. (orig.)

  8. The Effect of Annealing on the Structural and Optical Properties of Titanium Dioxide Films Deposited by Electron Beam Assisted PVD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaser M. Abdulraheem

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Titanium dioxide thin films were deposited on crystalline silicon substrates by electron beam physical vapor deposition. The deposition was performed under vacuum ranging from 10−5 to 10−6 Torr without process gases, resulting in homogeneous TiO2-x layers with a thickness of around 100 nm. Samples were then annealed at high temperatures ranging from 500°C to 800°C for 4 hours under nitrogen, and their structural and optical properties along with their chemical structure were characterized before and after annealing. The chemical and structural characterization revealed a substoichiometric TiO2-x film with oxygen vacancies, voids, and an interface oxide layer. It was found from X-ray diffraction that the deposited films were amorphous and crystallization to anatase phase occurred for annealed samples and was more pronounced for annealing temperatures above 700°C. The refractive index obtained through spectroscopic ellipsometry ranged between 2.09 and 2.37 in the wavelength range, 900 nm to 400 nm for the as-deposited sample, and jumped to the range between 2.23 and 2.65 for samples annealed at 800°C. The minimum surface reflectance changed from around 0.6% for the as-deposited samples to 2.5% for the samples annealed at 800°C.

  9. Influence of phonon-assisted tunneling on the linear thermoelectric transport through molecular quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khedri, A.; Meden, V.; Costi, T. A.

    2017-11-01

    We investigate the effect of vibrational degrees of freedom on the linear thermoelectric transport through a single-level quantum dot described by the spinless Anderson-Holstein impurity model. To study the effects of strong electron-phonon coupling, we use the nonperturbative numerical renormalization group approach. We also compare our results, at weak to intermediate coupling, with those obtained by employing the functional renormalization group method, finding good agreement in this parameter regime. When applying a gate voltage at finite temperatures, the inelastic scattering processes, induced by phonon-assisted tunneling, result in an interesting interplay between electrical and thermal transport. We explore different parameter regimes and identify situations for which the thermoelectric power as well as the dimensionless figure of merit are significantly enhanced via a Mahan-Sofo type of mechanism. We show, in particular, that this occurs at strong electron-phonon coupling and in the antiadiabatic regime.

  10. High-molecular-weight glutenin subunit-deficient mutants induced by ion beam and the effects of Glu-1 loci deletion on wheat quality properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lujun; Chen, Qiufang; Su, Mingjie; Yan, Biao; Zhang, Xiangqi; Jiao, Zhen

    2016-03-15

    High-molecular-weight glutenin subunits (HMW-GSs) play a critical role in determining the viscoelastic properties of wheat. Mutations induced by ion beam radiation have been applied to improve the yield and quality of crop. In this study, HMW-GS-deficient mutant lines were selected and the effects of Glu-1 loci deletion on wheat quality properties were illustrated according to the analysis of dry seeds of common wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) Xiaoyan 81 treated with a nitrogen ion beam. Three HMW-GS-deficient mutant lines were obtained and then detected by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Large-chromosome-fragment deletion resulted in specific deficiencies, and the deleted region sizes were determined using molecular markers. Agronomic characters, quantity and proportion of glutenins and dough microstructure of the deletion lines all proved to be quite different from those of wild-type Xiaoyan 81. Analysis of quality properties suggested that GluA1(-) had superior property parameters, while GluB1(-) and GluD1(-) both showed a significant decrease in quality properties compared with Xiaoyan 81. The effects of the three Glu-1 loci on flour and dough quality-related parameters should be Glu-D1 > Glu-B1 > Glu-A1. Ion beam radiation can be used as a mutagen to create new crop mutants. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  11. Rapid microwave-assisted synthesis of molecularly imprinted polymers on carbon quantum dots for fluorescent sensing of tetracycline in milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Juan; Li, Huiyu; Wang, Long; Zhang, Ping; Zhou, Tianyu; Ding, Hong; Ding, Lan

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a novel, selective and eco-friendly sensor for the detection of tetracycline was developed by grafting imprinted polymers onto the surface of carbon quantum dots. A simple microwave-assisted approach was utilized to fabricate the fluorescent imprinted composites rapidly for the first time, which could shorten the polymerization time and simplify the experimental procedure dramatically. The novel composites not only demonstrated excellent fluorescence stability and special binding sites, but also could selectively accumulate target analytes. Under optimal conditions, the relative fluorescence intensity of the composites decreased linearly with increasing the concentration of tetracycline from 20 nM to 14 µM. The detection limit of tetracycline was 5.48 nM. The precision and reproducibility of the proposed sensor were also acceptable. Significantly, the practicality of this ultrasensitive sensor for tetracycline detection in milk was further validated, revealing the advantages of simplicity, sensitivity, selectivity and low cost. This approach combines the high selective adsorption property of molecular imprinted polymers and the sensitivity of fluorescence detection. It is envisioned that the development of fluorescent molecularly imprinted composites will offer a new way of thinking for rapid analysis in complex samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Self-assembly of InAs quantum dots on GaAs(001) by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ju; Jin, Peng

    2015-02-01

    Currently, the nature of self-assembly of three-dimensional epitaxial islands or quantum dots (QDs) in a lattice-mismatched heteroepitaxial growth system, such as InAs/GaAs(001) and Ge/Si(001) as fabricated by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), is still puzzling. The purpose of this article is to discuss how the self-assembly of InAs QDs in MBE InAs/GaAs(001) should be properly understood in atomic scale. First, the conventional kinetic theories that have traditionally been used to interpret QD self-assembly in heteroepitaxial growth with a significant lattice mismatch are reviewed briefly by examining the literature of the past two decades. Second, based on their own experimental data, the authors point out that InAs QD self-assembly can proceed in distinctly different kinetic ways depending on the growth conditions and so cannot be framed within a universal kinetic theory, and, furthermore, that the process may be transient, or the time required for a QD to grow to maturity may be significantly short, which is obviously inconsistent with conventional kinetic theories. Third, the authors point out that, in all of these conventional theories, two well-established experimental observations have been overlooked: i) A large number of "floating" indium atoms are present on the growing surface in MBE InAs/GaAs(001); ii) an elastically strained InAs film on the GaAs(001) substrate should be mechanically unstable. These two well-established experimental facts may be highly relevant and should be taken into account in interpreting InAs QD formation. Finally, the authors speculate that the formation of an InAs QD is more likely to be a collective event involving a large number of both indium and arsenic atoms simultaneously or, alternatively, a morphological/structural transformation in which a single atomic InAs sheet is transformed into a three-dimensional InAs island, accompanied by the rehybridization from the sp 2-bonded to sp 3-bonded atomic configuration of both indium

  13. Conventional and pendeo-epitaxial growth of III-nitride thin films by molecular beam and metalorganic vapor phase techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linthicum, Kevin James

    Reactive gas-source molecular beam epitaxy was employed for the growth of monocrystalline GaN(0001) thin films. On-surface cracking of ammonia at 800°C was the method of choice for obtaining reactive nitrogen-containing species and growth rates of 2500A/hr were achieved. Pendeo-epitaxy, a general form of selective lateral growth, was developed for the organometallic vapor phase epitaxy growth of GaN and AlGaN thin films on GaN/AlN/6H-SiC(0001) substrates. In this technique, selective lateral growth was forced to initiate from the (1120) sidewalls of etched GaN seed forms by incorporating a silicon nitride seed mask atop the forms and employing the SiC substrate as a pseudo-mask. Coalescence over and between the seed forms was achieved. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that all vertically threading defects stemming from the GaN/AlN and AlN/SiC interfaces were contained within the seed forms and that a substantial reduction in the dislocation density of the laterally grown GaN was achieved. To achieve pendeo-epitaxial growth of monocrystalline GaN films on Si(111) substrates, a series of additional process steps was required, including the formation of a SiC chemical/reaction barrier. Single-crystal beta-SiC(111) thin films were obtained via carburization of the near-surface regions of vicinal Si(111). The thickness of the converted layers was approximately 5nm. Thick (500nm), epitaxial 3C-SiC layers grown via atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition were also used in tandem with the carburized silicon substrates. Monocrystalline AlN(0001) layers were grown on the SiC/Si substrates at 1100°C via MOVPE. Single-crystal wurtzitic GaN(0001) seed layers were grown on the AlN(0001) layers. The FWHM of the GaN(0002) x-ray diffraction and the photoluminescence band-edge emission peaks were 1443 arcsec and 19 meV, respectively. Pendeo-epitaxial growth of GaN on GaN/AlN/3C-SiC/Si(111) raised stripes was achieved. Crystallographic tilting of 0.2°(720 arcsec

  14. Surface potential, charging and local current transport of individual Ge quantum dots grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singha, R.K. [Department of Physics, Visva-Bharati, Santiniketan 731235 (India); Manna, S.; Bar, R.; Das, S. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology-Kharagpur, Kharagpur 721302 (India); Ray, S.K., E-mail: physkr@phy.iitkgp.ernet.in [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology-Kharagpur, Kharagpur 721302 (India)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: We have elaborately explained the individual Ge QD charging phenomena and current transport, which is very important to understand the Ge/Si nano devices. This paper will give a flavor to properly understand these phenomena linked together along with the photocurrent mechanism which is related to the Ge/Si valence band offset. • Both the CAFM and KPFM techniques point out the functionality of doping nature of the underneath Si substrate on the aforementioned characteristics of Ge QDs. • Analysis of the surface potential mapping using KPFM technique yields an approximate valence band offset measurement which is required to understand the intra-valence transition of holes for the realization of long wavelength infrared photodetector. • KPFM and CAFM can be utilized to explore the charging/discharging phenomena of dots and their composition variations. • Current-voltage (I–V) characteristics of the individual Ge QD strongly depends on the individual QD size. • Energy band diagrams for diamond tip and Ge QD shows the higher barrier for electrons and lower barrier for holes allowing the easy tunneling for holes to dominate the transport. - Abstract: It is fundamentally important to understand the nanoscale electronic properties of a single quantum dot (QD) contrary to an ensemble of QDs. Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) and conductive atomic force microscopy (CAFM) are two important tools, which could be employed to probe surface potential, charging phenomena, and current transport mechanism of individual QD. We demonstrate the aforementioned characteristics of self-assembled Ge QDs, which was grown on Si substrates by solid source molecular beam epitaxy driven by the Stranski-Krastanov method. Study reveals that each Ge QD acts as charge storage node even at zero applied bias. The shape, size and density of QDs could be well probed by CAFM and KPFM, whereas QD facets could be better resolved by the conductive tip. The CAFM investigation

  15. Growth by molecular beam epitaxy and characterization of Al(x)Ga(1-x)N alloys and heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korakakis, Dimitris

    Research in semiconductors has recently been focusing on III-V nitrides due to their potential optoelectronic applications in the visible and ultraviolet. This thesis studies AlsbxGasb1-xN thin films and heterostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy over the entire alloy composition. The study addresses heteroepitaxial growth onto a variety of substrates (sapphire and 6H-SiC), n- and p-type doping, film structure and optoelectronic properties. Reflection high energy electron diffraction and atomic force microscopy were used to probe the early stages of epitaxial growth. Techniques were developed for the growth of AlsbxGasb1-xN films directly on 6H-SiC without a buffer layer. The as-grown films had no cubic domains and the dislocation density close to the interface was 2 x 10sp9 cmsp{-2}. The initial stages of growth on sapphire were found to have a pronounced effect on the films' optoelectronic properties. X-ray diffraction was used to study issues related to strain, long range atomic ordering and superlattice effects. For the first time, kinetic conditions were identified for the growth of ordered AlsbxGasb1-xN films over the entire alloy composition. Superlattice structures of AlsbxGasb1-xN/GaN were grown and characterized. X-ray diffraction studies on off-axis peaks showed that the superlattices were strained but coherent. Furthermore, the in-plane lattice parameters of the superlattices assumed the in-plane lattice constant of the underlying bulk film. The diffraction pattern of on-axis peaks indicated that the interfaces of the structures were abrupt. The optoelectronic properties of the AlsbxGasb1-xN films grown were investigated. Photoluminescence and transmission experiments showed that the bandgap of these materials varied linearly with the c-lattice parameter. The films were doped n- and p-type with Si and Mg respectively. The donor activation energy was found to increase with Al concentration while the electron mobility decreased as the AlN mole

  16. Computer-assisted design and synthesis of molecularly imprinted polymers for the simultaneous determination of six carbamate pesticides from environmental water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Peipei; Wang, Xiangyun; Wang, Xinquan; Zhang, Hu; Xu, Hao; Jiang, Kezhi; Wang, Qiang

    2014-10-01

    The computer-assisted design and synthesis of molecularly imprinted polymers for the simultaneous capture of six carbamate pesticides from environmental water are reported in this work. The quantum mechanical computational approach was employed to design the molecularly imprinted polymers with carbofuran as template. The interaction energies between the template molecule and different functional monomers in various solvents were calculated to assist in the selection of the functional monomer and porogen. The optimised molecularly imprinted polymer was subsequently used as a class-selective sorbent in solid-phase extraction for pre-concentration and determination of carbamates from environmental water. The parameters influencing the extraction efficiency of the molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction procedure were systematically investigated to facilitate the class-selective extraction. For the proposed method, linearity was observed over the range of 2-500 ng/mL with the correlation coefficient ranging from 0.9760 to 1.000. The limits of detection ranged from 0.2 to 1.2 ng/mL, and the limit of quantification was 4 ng/mL. These results confirm that computer-assisted design is an effective evaluation tool for molecularly imprinted polymers synthesis, and that molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction can be applied to the simultaneous analysis of carbamates in environmental water. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Accuracy of software-assisted contour propagation from planning CT to cone beam CT in head and neck radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hvid, Christian A; Elstrøm, Ulrik V; Jensen, Kenneth; Alber, Markus; Grau, Cai

    2016-11-01

    Autocontouring improves workflow in computed tomography (CT)-based dose planning, but could also potentially play a role for optimal use of daily cone beam CT (CBCT) in adaptive radiotherapy. This study aims to determine the accuracy of a deformable image registration (DIR) algorithm for organs at risk (OAR) in the neck region, when applied to CBCT. For 30 head and neck cancer (HNC) patients 14 OARs including parotid glands, swallowing structures and spinal cord were delineated. Contours were propagated by DIR from CT to the CBCTs of the first and last treatment fraction. An indirect approach, propagating contours to the first CBCT and from there to the last CBCT was also tested. Propagated contours were compared to manually corrected contours by Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and Hausdorff distance (HD). Dose was recalculated on CBCTs and dosimetric consequences of uncertainties in DIR were reviewed. Mean DSC values of ≥0.8 were considered adequate and were achieved in tongue base (0.91), esophagus (0.85), glottic (0.81) and supraglottic larynx (0.83), inferior pharyngeal constrictor muscle (0.84), spinal cord (0.89) and all salivary glands in the first CBCT. For the last CBCT by direct propagation, adequate DSC values were achieved for tongue base (0.85), esophagus (0.84), spinal cord (0.87) and all salivary glands. Using indirect propagation only tongue base (0.80) and parotid glands (0.87) were ≥0.8. Mean relative dose difference between automated and corrected contours was within ±2.5% of planed dose except for esophagus inlet (-4.5%) and esophagus (5.0%) for the last CBCT using indirect propagation. Compared to manually corrected contours, the DIR algorithm was accurate for use in CBCT images of HNC patients and the minor inaccuracies had little consequence for mean dose in most clinically relevant OAR. The method can thus enable a more automated segmentation of CBCT for use in adaptive radiotherapy.

  18. Molecular depth profiling of organic photovoltaic heterojunction layers by ToF-SIMS: comparative evaluation of three sputtering beams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mouhib, T.; Poleunis, C.; Wehbe, N.; Michels, J.J.; Galagan, Y.; Houssiau, L.; Bertrand, P.; Delcorte, A.

    2013-01-01

    With the recent developments in secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), it is now possible to obtain molecular depth profiles and 3D molecular images of organic thin films, i.e. SIMS depth profiles where the molecular information of the mass spectrum is retained through the sputtering of the sample.

  19. Induction-assisted laser beam welding of a thermomechanically rolled HSLA S500MC steel: A microstructure and residual stress assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coelho, R.S. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Straße 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Former at Max-Planck Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH, Max-Planck-Str. 1, 40237 Düsseldorf (Germany); Corpas, M. [Former at Max-Planck Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH, Max-Planck-Str. 1, 40237 Düsseldorf (Germany); Moreto, J.A. [Universidade de São Paulo, Escola de Engenharia de São Carlos, CEP 13566-590 São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Jahn, A.; Standfuß, J. [Fraunhofer-Institut für Werkstoff- und Strahltechnik IWS, Winterbergstr. 28, 01277 Dresden (Germany); Kaysser-Pyzalla, A. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Straße 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Former at Max-Planck Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH, Max-Planck-Str. 1, 40237 Düsseldorf (Germany); Pinto, H., E-mail: haroldo@sc.usp.br [Former at Max-Planck Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH, Max-Planck-Str. 1, 40237 Düsseldorf (Germany); Universidade de São Paulo, Escola de Engenharia de São Carlos, CEP 13566-590 São Carlos, SP (Brazil)

    2013-08-20

    The present work deals with the effect of different combinations of induction heating and autogenous CO{sub 2} laser welding on the gradients of microstructure, microhardness and residual stresses in butt-joints of thermomechanically processed S500MC steel grade. Five strategies were pursued by varying the inductor position with respect to the laser beam. This enabled in-line pre-, post-, and simultaneous pre- and post-heating as well as annealing of the fusion and heat-affected zones. The induction-assisted CO{sub 2} laser welding strategies were compared to individual CO{sub 2} and Nd:YAG fiber welding procedures. The results demonstrate that induction heating can be combined to laser welding in order to effectively increase the cooling times. Martensite formation could be suppressed within the fusion and heat-affected zones and smooth hardness distributions were obtained by pre-heating and combined pre- and post-heating. The tensile residual stresses are, however, still of significance because of the high transformation temperatures (>500 °C) observed for the S500MC steel. This allowed for extensive thermal contraction after exhaustion of the austenite to ferrite transformation.

  20. Ion energy effects on the intrinsic stress in B sub x N sub y layers deposited by ion-beam-assisted evaporation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stambouli, V.; Burat, O.; Bouchier, D.; Gautherin, G. (Inst. d' Electronique Fondamentale, Univ. Paris-Sud, 91 - Orsay (France))

    1990-12-05

    The intrinsic stress {sigma} of boron nitride (B{sub x}N{sub y}) films deposited at room temperature by ion-beam-assisted deposition has been investigated as a function of the atomic flux ratio and film composition for different N{sub 2}{sup +} energy values ranging from 0.25 to 2 keV. The value of {sigma} was evaluated by an interferometric Newton's rings method. The stress reverses and becomes compressive for an atomic flux ratio N:B less than 0.3 which is the lowest value we have examined. Two domains of composition can be emphasized following the stress behaviour as a function of the ion energy. The first domain is that of nitrogen-poor films where the absolute value of the stress decreases (from -2.4 to -0.45 GPa) when the energy is increased. The creation of vacancies in the deposit depth or an ''ion annealing'' effect is proposed to explain the corresponding stress behaviour which is correlated with density measurements. The second domain is that of nitrogen-rich films in which the compressive stress increases drastically to -4.8 GPa with the ion energy. In this domain, according to the ion peening model proposed by Windischmann, the stress varies in proportion to the nuclear stopping power of the deposited material. (orig.).

  1. Plasmon assisted control of photo-induced excitation energy transfer in a molecular chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Luxia; May, Volkhard

    2017-08-01

    The strong and ultrafast laser pulse excitation of a molecular chain in close vicinity to a spherical metal nano-particle (MNP) is studied theoretically. Due to local-field enhancement around the MNP, pronounced excited-state formation has to be expected for the part of the chain which is in proximity to the MNP. Here, the description of this phenomenon will be based on a uniform quantum theory of the MNP-molecule system. It accounts for local-field effects due to direct consideration of the strong excitation energy transfer coupling between the MNP and the various molecules. The molecule-MNP distances are chosen in such a way as to achieve a correct description of the MNP via dipole-plasmon excitations. Short plasmon life-times are incorporated in the framework of a density matrix approach. By extending earlier work the present description allows for multi-exciton formation and multiple dipole-plasmon excitation. The region of less intense and not-too-short optical excitation is identified as being best suited for excitation energy localization in the chain.

  2. Ion assisted structural collapse of a single stranded DNA: A molecular dynamics approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Soumadwip; Dixit, Himanshu; Chakrabarti, Rajarshi, E-mail: rajarshi@chem.iitb.ac.in

    2015-09-28

    Highlights: • The dynamics of a single-stranded DNA in presence of different concentrations of Mg{sup 2+} is investigated. • The initial DNA chain collapse is characterized by the formation of non-sequentially stacked base pairs. • The DNA chain re-swells at high concentrations of Mg{sup 2+} as a consequence of overcharging. - Abstract: The structure and dynamics of negatively charged nucleic acids strongly correlate with the concentration and charge of the oppositely charged counterions. It is well known that the structural collapse of DNA is favoured in the presence of additional salt, a source of excess oppositely charged ions. Under such conditions single stranded DNA adopts a collapsed coil like conformation, typically characterized by stacking base pairs. Using atomistic molecular dynamics simulation, we demonstrate that in the presence of additional divalent salt (MgCl{sub 2}) single stranded DNA with base sequence 5′-CGCGAATTCGCG-3′ (Dickerson Drew dodecamer) initially collapses and then expands with increasing salt concentration. This is due to the overcharging induced DNA chain swelling, a dominant factor at a higher divalent salt concentration. In a nutshell, our simulations show how in the presence of divalent salt, non-sequential base stacking and overcharging competes and affect single stranded DNA dynamics unlike a monovalent salt.

  3. High efficiency green/yellow and red InGaN/AlGaN nanowire light-emitting diodes grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R. Philip

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We report on the achievement of high efficiency green, yellow, and red InGaN/AlGaN dot-in-a-wire nanowire light-emitting diodes grown on Si(111 by molecular beam epitaxy. The peak emission wavelengths were altered by varying the growth conditions, including the substrate temperature, and In/Ga flux ratio. The devices demonstrate relatively high (>40% internal quantum efficiency at room temperature, relative to that measured at 5 K. Moreover, negligible blue-shift in peak emission spectrum associated with no efficiency droop was measured when injection current was driven up to 556 A/cm2.

  4. Submilliampere threshold current pseudomorphic InGaAs/AlGaAs buried-heterostructure quantum well lasers grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    OpenAIRE

    Eng, L. E.; Chen, T. R.; Sanders, S.; Zhuang, Y. H.; Zhao, B.; Yariv, A.; Morkoç, H.

    1989-01-01

    We report on low threshold current strained InGaAs/AlGaAs single quantum well lasers grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Broad-area threshold current densities of 114 A/cm2 at 990 nm were measured for 1540-µm-long lasers. Threshold currents of 2.4 mA at 950 nm were obtained for an uncoated buried-heterostructure device with a 2-µm-wide stripe and 425-µm-long cavity. With reflective coatings the best device showed 0.9 mA threshold current (L=225 µm). Preliminary modulation measurements show bandw...

  5. Microwave-assisted RAFT polymerization of well-constructed magnetic surface molecularly imprinted polymers for specific recognition of benzimidazole residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fangfang; Wang, Jiayu; Chen, Huiru; Lu, Ruicong; Xie, Xiaoyu

    2018-03-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles have been widely used as support core for fast separation, which could be directly separated from complicated matrices using an external magnet in few minutes. Surface imprinting based on magnetic core has shown favorable adsorption and separation performance, including good adsorption capacity, fast adsorption kinetics and special selectivity adsorption. Reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) is an ideal choice for producing well-defined complex architecture with mild reaction conditions. We herein describe the preparation of well-constructed magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers (MMIPs) for the recognition of benzimidazole (BMZ) residues via the microwave-assisted RAFT polymerization. The merits of RAFT polymerization assisting with microwave heating allowed successful and more efficient preparation of well-constructed imprinted coats. Moreover, the polymerization time dramatically shortened and was just 1/24th of the time taken by conventional heating. The results indicated that a uniform nanoscale imprinted layer was formed on the Fe3O4 core successfully, and enough saturation magnetization of MMIPs (16.53 emu g-1) was got for magnetic separation. The desirable adsorption capacity (30.18 μmol g-1) and high selectivity toward template molecule with a selectivity coefficient (k) of 13.85 of MMIPs were exhibited by the adsorption isothermal assay and competitive binding assay, respectively. A solid phase extraction enrichment approach was successfully established for the determination of four BMZ residues from apple samples using MMIPs coupled to HPLC. Overall, this study provides a versatile approach for highly efficient fabrication of well-constructed MMIPs for enrichment and determination of target molecules from complicated samples.

  6. In silico carbon molecular beam epitaxial growth of graphene on the h-BN substrate: carbon source effect on van der Waals epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jonghoon; Varshney, Vikas; Park, Jeongho; Farmer, Barry L.; Roy, Ajit K.

    2016-05-01

    Against the presumption that hexagonal boron-nitride (h-BN) should provide an ideal substrate for van der Waals (vdW) epitaxy to grow high quality graphene films, carbon molecular beam epitaxy (CMBE) techniques using solid carbon sublimation have reported relatively poor quality of the graphene. In this article, the CMBE growth of graphene on the h-BN substrate is numerically studied in order to identify the effect of the carbon source on the quality of the graphene film. The carbon molecular beam generated by the sublimation of solid carbon source materials such as graphite and glassy carbon is mostly composed of atomic carbon, carbon dimers and carbon trimers. Therefore, the graphene film growth becomes a complex process involving various deposition characteristics of a multitude of carbon entities. Based on the study of surface adsorption and film growth characteristics of these three major carbon entities comprising graphite vapour, we report that carbon trimers convey strong traits of vdW epitaxy prone to high quality graphene growth, while atomic carbon deposition is a surface-reaction limited process accompanied by strong chemisorption. The vdW epitaxial behaviour of carbon trimers is found to be substantial enough to nucleate and develop into graphene like planar films within a nanosecond of high flux growth simulation, while reactive atomic carbons tend to impair the structural integrity of the crystalline h-BN substrate upon deposition to form an amorphous interface between the substrate and the growing carbon film. The content of reactive atomic carbons in the molecular beam is suspected to be the primary cause of low quality graphene reported in the literature. A possible optimization of the molecular beam composition towards the synthesis of better quality graphene films is suggested.Against the presumption that hexagonal boron-nitride (h-BN) should provide an ideal substrate for van der Waals (vdW) epitaxy to grow high quality graphene films, carbon

  7. Computationally-assisted approach to the vibrational spectra of molecular crystals: study of hydrogen-bonding and pseudo-polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolasco, Mariela M; Amado, Ana M; Ribeiro-Claro, Paulo J A

    2006-10-13

    A new computationally-assisted methodology (PiMM), which accounts for the effects of intermolecular interactions in the crystal, is applied to the complete assignment of the Raman and infrared vibrational spectra of room temperature forms of crystalline caffeine, theobromine, and theophylline. The vibrational shifts due to crystal packing interactions are evaluated from ab initio calculations for a set of suitable molecular pairs, using the B3LYP/6-31G* approach. The proposed methodology provides an answer to the current demand for a reliable assignment of the vibrational spectra of these methyl-xanthines, and clarifies several misleading assignments. The most relevant intermolecular interactions in each system and their effect on the vibrational spectra are considered and discussed. Based on these results, significant insights are obtained for the structure of caffeine in the anhydrous form (stable at room temperature), for which no X-ray structure has been reported. A possible structure based on C((8))--H...N((9)) and C((1,3))--H...O intermolecular interactions is suggested.

  8. Improving surface smoothness and photoluminescence of CdTe(1 1 1)A on Si(1 1 1) substrates grown by molecular beam epitaxy using Mn atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jyh-Shyang, E-mail: jswang@cycu.edu.tw [Department of Physics, Chung Yuan Christian University, Chung-Li 32023, Taiwan (China); Center for Nano-Technology, Chung Yuan Christian University, Chung-Li 32023, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Yu-Hsuan; Chen, Chang-Wei; Dai, Zi-Yuan; Tong, Shih-Chang [Department of Physics, Chung Yuan Christian University, Chung-Li 32023, Taiwan (China); Yang, Chu-Shou [Graduate Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, Tatung University, Taipei 10452, Taiwan (China); Wu, Chih-Hung [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Longtan 32546, Taiwan (China); Yuan, Chi-Tsu; Shen, Ji-Lin [Department of Physics, Chung Yuan Christian University, Chung-Li 32023, Taiwan (China); Center for Nano-Technology, Chung Yuan Christian University, Chung-Li 32023, Taiwan (China)

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • CdTe(1 1 1)A epilayers were grown on Si(1 1 1) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy. • We report an enhanced growth using Mn atoms. • The significant improvements in surface quality and optical properties were found. - Abstract: This work demonstrates an improvement of the molecular beam epitaxial growth of CdTe(1 1 1)A epilayer on Si(1 1 1) substrates using Mn atoms. The reflection high-energy electron diffraction patterns show that the involvement of some Mn atoms in the growth of CdTe(1 1 1)A is even more effective than the use of a buffer layer with a smooth surface for forming good CdTe(1 1 1)A epilayers. 10 K Photoluminescence spectra show that the incorporation of only 2% Mn significantly reduced the intensity of defect-related emissions and considerably increased the integral intensity of exciton-related emissions by a large factor of about 400.

  9. Structural and optical properties of self-catalytic GaAs:Mn nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy on silicon substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gas, Katarzyna; Sadowski, Janusz; Kasama, Takeshi

    2013-01-01

    Mn-doped GaAs nanowires were grown in the self-catalytic growth mode on the oxidized Si(100) surface by molecular beam epitaxy and characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, Raman scattering, photoluminescence, cathodoluminescence, and electron transport measurements. The tra......Mn-doped GaAs nanowires were grown in the self-catalytic growth mode on the oxidized Si(100) surface by molecular beam epitaxy and characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, Raman scattering, photoluminescence, cathodoluminescence, and electron transport measurements.......e., it is much lower than the Mn/Ga flux ratio (about 3%) used during the MBE growth. The resistivity measurements of individual nanowires confirmed that they are conductive, in accordance with the photoluminescence measurements which showed the presence of Mn2+ acceptors located at Ga sites of the GaAs host...... lattice of the nanowires. An anomalous temperature dependence of the photoluminescence related to excitons was demonstrated for Mn-doped GaAs nanowires....

  10. Self-Catalyzed Growth of Axial GaAs/GaAsSb Nanowires by Molecular Beam Epitaxy for Photodetectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Compositional variation of Sb in Ga Assisted Axial GaAs/GaAsSb/GaAs Heterostructure Nanowires on Chemically Etched Si Substrate...reported which is claimed to be the longest cutoff wavelength for any nanowire device so far[69]. Hence these heterostructured NWs are suited in the MWIR...of Sb in Ga Assisted Axial GaAs/GaAsSb/GaAs Heterostructure Nanowires on Chemically Etched Si Substrate 8.1 Introduction GaAs/GaAsSb NWs have been

  11. Lipid-assisted protein transport: A diffusion-reaction model supported by kinetic experiments and molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Rosa, Carmelo; Scalisi, Silvia; Lolicato, Fabio; Pannuzzo, Martina; Raudino, Antonio

    2016-05-01

    The protein transport inside a cell is a complex phenomenon that goes through several difficult steps. The facilitated transport requires sophisticated machineries involving protein assemblies. In this work, we developed a diffusion-reaction model to simulate co-transport kinetics of proteins and lipids. We assume the following: (a) there is always a small lipid concentration of order of the Critical Micellar Concentration (CMC) in equilibrium with the membrane; (b) the binding of lipids to proteins modulates the hydrophobicity of the complexes and, therefore, their ability to interact and merge with the bilayer; and (c) some lipids leave the bilayer to replenish those bound to proteins. The model leads to a pair of integral equations for the time-evolution of the adsorbed proteins in the lipid bilayer. Relationships between transport kinetics, CMC, and lipid-protein binding constants were found. Under particular conditions, a perturbation analysis suggests the onset of kinks in the protein adsorption kinetics. To validate our model, we performed leakage measurements of vesicles composed by either high or low CMC lipids interacting with Islet Amyloid PolyPeptide (IAPP) and Aβ (1-40) used as sample proteins. Since the lipid-protein complex stoichiometry is not easily accessible, molecular dynamics simulations were performed using monomeric IAPP interacting with an increasing number of phospholipids. Main results are the following: (a) 1:1 lipid-protein complexes generally show a faster insertion rate proportional to the complex hydrophobicity and inversely related to lipid CMC; (b) on increasing the number of bound lipids, the protein insertion rate decreases; and (c) at slow lipids desorption rate, the lipid-assisted proteins transport might exhibit a discontinuous behavior and does non-linearly depend on protein concentration.

  12. Molecular dynamics study of the effect of substrate temperature and Ar ion assisted deposition on the deposition of amorphous TiO{sub 2} films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xian, E-mail: mus_c@qq.com [Science and Technology on Analog Integrated Circuit Laboratory, ChongQing, 401332 (China); Zhang, Jing [Science and Technology on Analog Integrated Circuit Laboratory, ChongQing, 401332 (China); Zhao, Yu-Qing [Key Laboratory for Physical Electronics and Devices of the Ministry of Education, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi’AN, 710049 (China)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • The surface roughness of a-TiO{sub 2} films is decreased with the increment of the Ar ion assisted energy. • The surface roughness of a-TiO{sub 2} films is decreased with higher substrate temperature when the substrate has an island structure. • The assisted Ar ion has power of making a flat surface and increasing the local temperature. • The assisted Ar ion will influence the growth mode with the change of surface atom mobility. • The Volmer-Weber (island) growth mode is inhibited with a high assisted Ar ion energy. - Abstract: This paper has investigated the impact of the substrate temperature and Ar ion assisted deposition on the surface structure formation mechanism and the film properties during the amorphous TiO{sub 2} thin film deposition process with the molecular dynamics simulation method. The results show that the reduction of the surface roughness happen when the energy of Ar ions assisted is increased or the substrate temperature rises, and also the film density on surface is changed with the increasing of Ar ions energy and substrate temperature. It is also found that the Volmer-Weber (island) growth mode of films is promoted by the lower Ar ion energy and higher substrate temperature when the substrate has an island structure. The assisted Ar ion has power of making a flat surface and increasing the local temperature. Besides, it will influence the growth mode with the change of surface atom mobility. With a high assisted Ar ion energy the Volmer-Weber (island) growth mode is inhibited, which will be conducive to the formation of more smooth film surface.

  13. Electron-beam lithography and molecular liftoff for directed attachment of DNA nanostructures on silicon: top-down meets bottom-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillers, Michelle; Goss, Valerie; Lieberman, Marya

    2014-06-17

    CONSPECTUS: Our work on lithographic patterning of DNA nanostructures was inspired by a collaboration on molecular electronic devices known as quantum-dot cellular automata or QCA. QCA is a paradigm for computation in which information is transmitted and processed through the interaction of coupled electrical charges or magnetic dipoles. We began to explore the idea of molecular scale QCA and found that ab initio methods, a thermodynamic Ising model, and larger scale circuit design work suggested that circuits that did computationally interesting things could function at room temperature if made from molecular QCA cells of chemically reasonable design. But how could the QCA cells be patterned to form the complex arrays needed for computationally interesting circuitry, and how could those arrays of molecular circuitry be integrated with conventional electronic inputs and outputs? Top-down methods lacked the spatial resolution and high level of parallelism needed to make molecular circuits. Bottom-up chemical synthesis lacked the ability to fabricate arbitrary and heterogeneous structures tens to hundreds of nanometers in size. Chemical self-assembly at the time could produce structures in the right size scale, but was limited to homogeneous arrays. A potential solution to this conundrum was just being demonstrated in the late 1990s and early 2000s: DNA nanostructures self-assembled from oligonucleotides, whose high information density could handle the creation of arbitrary structures and chemical inhomogeneity. Our group became interested in whether DNA nanostructures could function as self-assembling circuit boards for electrical or magnetic QCA systems. This Account focuses on what we learned about the interactions of DNA nanostructures with silicon substrates and, particularly, on how electron-beam lithography could be used to direct the binding of DNA nanostructures on a variety of functional substrates.

  14. Computationally-Assisted Approach to the Vibrational Spectra of Molecular Crystals: Study of Hydrogen-Bonding and Pseudo-Polymorphism13

    OpenAIRE

    Nolasco, Mariela M.; Amado, Ana M.; Ribeiro-Claro, Paulo J. A.

    2006-01-01

    A new computationally-assisted methodology (PiMM), which accounts for the effects of intermolecular interactions in the crystal, is applied to the complete assignment of the Raman and infrared vibrational spectra of room temperature forms of crystalline caffeine, theobromine, and theophylline. The vibrational shifts due to crystal packing interactions are evaluated from ab initio calculations for a set of suitable molecular pairs, using the B3LYP/6-31G* approach.The proposed methodology provi...

  15. Free radical hydrogen atom abstraction from saturated hydrocarbons: A crossed-molecular-beams study of the reaction Cl + C{sub 3}H{sub 8} {yields} HCl + C{sub 3}H{sub 7}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blank, D.A.; Hemmi, N.; Suits, A.G.; Lee, Y.T. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    The abstraction of hydrogen atoms from saturated hydrocarbons are reactions of fundamental importance in combustion as well as often being the rate limiting step in free radical substitution reactions. The authors have begun studying these reactions under single collision conditions using the crossed molecular beam technique on beamline 9.0.2.1, utilizing VUV undulator radiation to selectively ionize the scattered hydrocarbon free radical products (C{sub x}H{sub 2x+1}). The crossed molecular beam technique involves two reactant molecular beams fixed at 90{degrees}. The molecular beam sources are rotatable in the plane defined by the two beams. The scattered neutral products travel 12.0 cm where they are photoionized using the VUV undulator radiation, mass selected, and counted as a function of time. In the authors initial investigations they are using halogen atoms as protypical free radicals to abstract hydrogen atoms from small alkanes. Their first study has been looking at the reaction of Cl + propane {r_arrow} HCl + propyl radical. In their preliminary efforts the authors have measured the laboratory scattering angular distribution and time of flight spectra for the propyl radical products at collision energies of 9.6 kcal/mol and 14.9 kcal/mol.

  16. Studies of hydrocarbon cracking by molecular beam injection in He plasmas in the TJ-II stellarator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabares, F.L. [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusion, Asociacion EURATOM/Ciemat, 28040 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: tabares@ciemat.es; Tafalla, D.; Wurgie, T.G.; Ferreira, J.A. [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusion, Asociacion EURATOM/Ciemat, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2009-06-15

    Hydrocarbons (CH{sub 4} and C{sub 2}H{sub 4}) have been injected in TJ-II He plasmas by means of the supersonic helium beam set-up typically used for the edge characterization in hydrogen plasmas. The radial profiles of the emission of the CH(A-X) band and H{alpha} were recorded along the hydrocarbon penetration. For all cases, the emission profiles of the recorder species can be fitted to a simple model with one single parameter, related to the velocity along the observation line of the CH and H radicals resulting from the initial cracking of the hydrocarbon. A H{sub 2} beam was also used for reference of velocity distribution. The penetration of H atoms, which emit H{alpha}, is in the case of hydrocarbon cracking twice as large as in H{sub 2} dissociation, depending on hydrocarbon. A similar radial profile of the CH radicals was found for both hydrocarbons, thus suggesting the existence of a common precursor. The ratio of H{alpha}/CH(A-X) photon emissions for the two hydrocarbons investigated is compatible with a reaction stoichiometry yielding 3 H atoms per CH.

  17. Ohmic contact formation mechanism of the PdGeAu system on n-type GaSb grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, A.; Simon, A.; Hartnagel, H. L.; Schikora, J.; Buschmann, V.; Rodewald, M.; Fuess, H.; Fascko, S.; Koerdt, C.; Kurz, H.

    1998-06-01

    We have fabricated Pd/Ge/Au/Pt/Au ohmic contacts on n-type GaSb grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The annealed contacts show specific contact resistivities which are as low as 4.9×10-6 Ω-cm2 at an annealing temperature of 300 °C for 45 s. The resistivity is very sensitive to the annealing conditions and the thickness of the constituents. The surface remains smooth after annealing. Microstructure analysis with cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and sputtered neutral mass spectrometry elucidates the solid phase reactions and interdiffusion of the constituents. The formation of a PdGe phase and the diffusion of Ge into GaSb seem to be the decisive and annealing-dependent processes leading to the ohmic behavior.

  18. Photoluminescence and photocurrent from InP nanowires with InAsP quantum dots grown on Si by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuyanov, P.; LaPierre, R. R.

    2015-08-01

    InP nanowires with InAsP quantum dots (QDs) were grown by molecular beam epitaxy on a Si (111) substrates. The structure of the InAsP QDs were studied using transmission electron microscopy, allowing the development of a model where QD growth occurs by group V desorption from the surrounding substrate surface. Micro-photoluminescence was performed at 10 K showing emission at 1.47-1.49 eV from the InP wurtzite structure, and various emission peaks between 0.93 and 1.33 eV attributed to the QDs. The emission was tuned by the QD composition. The effectiveness of an AlInP passivation shell was demonstrated via an improvement in the photoluminescence intensity. Spectrally-resolved photocurrent measurements at room temperature demonstrated infrared response due to absorption within the QDs. The absorption red-shifted with increasing As composition of the QD.

  19. Domain formation due to surface steps in topological insulator Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} thin films grown on Si (111) by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borisova, S.; Kampmeier, J.; Mussler, G.; Grützmacher, D. [Peter Grünberg Institute-9, Forschungszentrum Jülich, Jülich 52425 (Germany); Jülich Aachen Research Alliance, Fundamentals of Future Information Technologies, Jülich 52425 (Germany); Luysberg, M. [Peter Grünberg Institute-5 and Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Forschungszentrum Jülich, Jülich 52425 (Germany)

    2013-08-19

    The atomic structure of topological insulators Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} thin films on Si (111) substrates grown in van der Waals mode by molecular beam epitaxy has been investigated by in situ scanning tunneling microscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy. Besides single and multiple quintuple layer (QL) steps, which are typical for the step-flow mode of growth, a number of 0.4 QL steps is observed. We determine that these steps originate from single steps at the substrate surface causing domain boundaries in the Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} film. Due to the peculiar structure of these domain boundaries the domains are stable and penetrate throughout the entire film.

  20. Stacking InAs quantum dots over ErAs semimetal nanoparticles on GaAs (0 0 1) using molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuanchang; Eyink, Kurt G.; Grazulis, Lawrence; Hill, Madelyn; Peoples, Joseph; Mahalingam, Krishnamurthy

    2017-11-01

    Hybrid nanostructures are known to elicit an enhanced optical response. We study the directed alignment of ErAs metal nanoparticle (NP) and InAs quantum dot (QD) using molecular beam eptaxy (MBE) in a GaAs matrix. Due to high surface free energy caused by the crystal structure difference, overgrowth of an ErAs NP with GaAs forms a depression that condenses subsequent InAs adatoms to form an inverted QD self-aligned to the underlying ErAs NP. The ErAs NP growth, GaAs overgrowth, and InAs QD deposition were carefully controlled and studied with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) to investigate their effects on the QD-NP alignment.

  1. Growth of Ga- and N-polar GaN layers on O face ZnO substrates by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Y.; Brault, J.; Vennéguès, P.; Nemoz, M.; Teisseire, M.; Leroux, M.; Chauveau, J.-M.

    2014-02-01

    Gallium nitride (GaN) epitaxial layers have been grown on O face (0001bar) zinc oxide (ZnO) substrates by ammonia source molecular beam epitaxy. By adjusting the growth temperature and the III/V ratio during the nucleation stage, GaN layers with Ga (0001) or N (0001bar) polarities have been obtained. We show that low growth temperatures (600 °C) and N-rich conditions lead to N-polar layers. Furthermore, the formation of a zinc gallate (ZnGa2O4) interfacial layer between GaN and ZnO has been evidenced, which is responsible for the growth of Ga-polar GaN layers. The structural and optical properties of Ga- and N-polar GaN layers have been characterized and Ga-polar GaN layers exhibit higher crystal quality.

  2. Band offsets of La{sub 2}O{sub 3} on (0001) GaN grown by reactive molecular-beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ihlefeld, Jon F.; Brumbach, Michael; Atcitty, Stanley [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

    2013-04-22

    La{sub 2}O{sub 3} films were prepared on (0001)-oriented GaN substrates via reactive molecular-beam epitaxy. Film orientation and phase were assessed using reflection high-energy electron and X-ray diffraction. Films were observed to grow as predominantly hexagonal La{sub 2}O{sub 3} for thicknesses less than 10 nm while film thickness greater than 10 nm favored mixed cubic and hexagonal symmetries. Band offsets were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy on hexagonally symmetric films and valence band offsets of 0.63 {+-} 0.04 eV at the La{sub 2}O{sub 3}/GaN interface were measured. A conduction band offset of approximately 1.5 eV could be inferred from the measured valence band offset.

  3. Dependence of the Mg-related acceptor ionization energy with the acceptor concentration in p-type GaN layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brochen, Stephane; Brault, Julien; Chenot, Sebastien; Dussaigne, Amelie; Leroux, Mathieu; Damilano, Benjamin [CNRS-CRHEA, Rue Bernard Gregory, F-06560 Valbonne (France)

    2013-07-15

    Hall effect and capacitance-voltage C(V) measurements were performed on p-type GaN:Mg layers grown on GaN templates by molecular beam epitaxy with a high range of Mg-doping concentrations. The free hole density and the effective dopant concentration N{sub A}-N{sub D} as a function of magnesium incorporation measured by secondary ion mass spectroscopy clearly reveal both a magnesium doping efficiency up to 90% and a strong dependence of the acceptor ionization energy Ea with the acceptor concentration N{sub A}. These experimental observations highlight an isolated acceptor binding energy of 245{+-}25 meV compatible, at high acceptor concentration, with the achievement of p-type GaN:Mg layers with a hole concentration at room temperature close to 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}.

  4. Superparamagnetism and different growth mechanisms of Co/Au(111) and Co/Cu(111) multilayers grown by molecular-beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, J.; Howson, M. A.; Hickey, B. J.; Greig, D.; Kolb, E.; Veillet, P.; Wiser, N.

    1997-01-01

    The magnetization of Co/Au(111) and Co/Cu(111) multilayers grown by molecular-beam epitaxy has been measured. For ultrathin Co layers, superparamagnetic behavior is observed, very similar to that reported previously for granular samples. For somewhat thicker Co layers, hysteresis effects occur, indicating the absence of superparamagnetism. The clear transition seen between these two modes of behavior is attributed to the growth of the Co particles from very small superparamagnetic clusters to larger islands and ultimately to a film, as the thickness of the Co layers is increased. Different magnetic properties are found for the Co/Au(111) and the Co/Cu(111) systems during the transition from granular to continuous layers. An investigation by reflection high-energy electron diffraction suggests that this difference is mainly due to the different growth modes of Co on Au(111) and on Cu(111).

  5. X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy Study of GaAs (001) and InP (001) Cleaning Procedures Prior to Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contour, J. P.; Massies, J.; Saletes, A.

    1985-07-01

    The effect of chemical etching by H2S04/H202/H20 (5/1/1) mixtures and of mechanopolishing by bromine-methanol diluted solution on GaAs (001) and InP (001) substrates for molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) has been studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The final rinse in running deionized water does not produce any passivating oxide layer on the substrate surface. Oxidation observed on GaAs and InP after these cleaning procedures occurs during substrate handling in air. The H2S04/H202/H20 mixture produces arsenic rich surface layers having an atomic ratio As/Ga of 1.15, whereas the bromine-methanol mechanopolishing leads to an arsenic or phosphorus depleted surface with atomic ratios As/Ga=0.7 and P/In=0.65.

  6. Layer-by-layer shuttered molecular-beam epitaxial growth of superconducting Sr{sub 1-x}La{sub x}CuO{sub 2} thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maritato, L. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Informazione, Ingegneria Elettrica e Matematica Applicata-DIEM,University of Salerno and CNR-SPIN, 84084 Fisciano (Italy); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Galdi, A.; Orgiani, P. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Informazione, Ingegneria Elettrica e Matematica Applicata-DIEM, University of Salerno and CNR-SPIN, 84084 Fisciano (Italy); Harter, J. W. [Laboratory of Atomic and Solid State Physics, Department of Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Schubert, J. [Forschungszentrum Julich, Institute of Bio- and Nano-systems IBN, D-52425 Julich (Germany) and Forschungszentrum Julich, JARA Fundamentals of Future Information Technology, D-52425 Julich (Germany); Shen, K. M. [Laboratory of Atomic and Solid State Physics, Department of Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Kavli Institute at Cornell for Nanoscale Science, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Schlom, D. G. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Kavli Institute at Cornell for Nanoscale Science, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States)

    2013-02-07

    Superconducting Sr{sub 1-x}La{sub x}CuO{sub 2} thin films have been grown on GdScO{sub 3} substrates by reflection high-energy electron diffraction calibrated layer-by-layer molecular-beam epitaxy. X-ray diffraction analysis has confirmed the infinite layer structure after an in situ vacuum annealing step. In situ photoemission spectroscopy indicates that the vacuum annealing step employed immediately after film growth to achieve superconducting films results in oxygen loss from the films. The superconducting critical temperature depends on the La content x, with the highest value obtained for x{approx}0.10. Resistivity as a function of temperature {rho}(T) curves of optimally doped samples show a T{sup 2} temperature dependence characteristic of a scattering process where electron-electron interactions dominate.

  7. Study of the conduction-type conversion in Si-doped (631)A GaAs layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz-Hernandez, E.; Vazquez-Cortes, D.; Mendez-Garcia, V.H. [Coordinacion para la Innovacion y Aplicacion de la Ciencia y Tecnologia, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, Av. Sierra Leona 550, Col. Lomas 2a. Seccion, San Luis Potosi, S.L.P. 78210 (Mexico); Shimomura, S. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Ehime University, 3 Bukyo-cho, Matsuyama, Ehime 790-8577 (Japan); Lopez-Lopez, M. [Physics Department, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Apartado Postal 14-740, Mexico DF 07000 (Mexico)

    2011-02-15

    We report the Si-doping of GaAs (631)A layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy under different As overpressure. From Hall effect measurements, we have found that the increase of the As pressure induces conduction conversion from p- to n-type, which is presumably related to lattice site switching of Si occupying an As site (where Si is acceptor) to a Ga site (where Si acts as a donor). This conversion is also studied by photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. The sharp conductivity conversion, at a critical As pressure value of 1.4-1.7 x 10{sup -5} mbar is reflected in the optical properties of the samples by a change of As vacancy defects into pairs of Ga vacancy and Ga antisite defects. (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  8. Crossed molecular beams study of the reaction D+H2 --> DH+H at collision energies of 0.53 and 1.01 eV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Continetti, R. E.; Balko, B. A.; Lee, Y. T.

    1990-10-01

    This paper reports the first product differential cross section (DCS) measurements for the D+H2→DH+H reaction as a function of laboratory (LAB) scattering angle with sufficient resolution to resolve product DH vibrational states. Using a D-atom beam produced by the photodissociation of DI at 248 nm, product velocity and angular distributions were measured at 12 LAB angles at a nominal collision energy of 0.53 eV and at 22 LAB angles at a nominal collision energy of 1.01 eV with a crossed molecular beams apparatus. After correction of the raw product time-of-flight (TOF) spectra for modulated background, a comparison with recent exact quantum mechanical scattering calculations was made using a Monte Carlo simulation of the experimental conditions. The simulation showed that although the theoretical predictions agree qualitatively with the measurements, some significant discrepancies exist. Using the Monte Carlo simulation, a best-fit set of DH(v,j) DCS's which showed good agreement with the measurements was found. At the detailed level of the state-to-state DCS, significant differences were observed between theory and experiment for rotationally excited DH(v, j) products. The discrepancies observed suggest that some regions of the current ab initio H3 potential energy surfaces, particularly the bending potential at high energies, may need further examination.

  9. Crystal and molecular structures of sixteen charge-assisted hydrogen bond-mediated diisopropylammonium salts from different carboxylic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhihao; Hu, Kaikai; Jin, Shouwen; Ding, Aihua; Wang, Yining; Dong, Lingfeng; Gao, Xingjun; Wang, Daqi

    2017-10-01

    Cocrystallization of the commonly available organic amine, diisopropylamine, with a series of carboxylic acids gave a total of sixteen molecular salts with the compositions: diisopropylaminium 2-methyl-2-phenoxypropanate [(Hdpa)+ · (mpa-), mpa- = 2-methyl-2-phenoxypropanoate] (1), diisopropylaminium 2-methyl-2-(naphthalen-2-yloxy)-propionate [(Hdpa)+ · (npa-), npa- = 2-methyl-2-(naphthalen-2-yloxy)-propionate] (2), diisopropylaminium indole-3-acetate [(Hdpa)+ · (iaa-), iaa- = indole-3-acetate] (3), diisopropylaminium 4-chlorophenoxyacetate [(Hdpa)+ · (cpa-), cpa- = 4-chlorophenoxyacetate] (4), diisopropylaminium 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetate [(Hdpa)+ · (dcpa-), dcpa- = 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetate] (5), diisopropylaminium 4-hydroxybenzoate [(Hdpa)+ · (hba-), hba- = 4-hydroxybenzoate] (6), diisopropylaminium 4-aminobenzoate [(Hdpa)+ · (aba-), aba- = 4-aminobenzoate] (7), tetra(diisopropylaminium) tetra(1-hydroxy-2-naphthoate) trihydrate [(Hdpa)44+ · (2-hnpa)44- · 3H2O, 2-hnpa = 1-hydroxy-2-naphthoate] (8), diisopropylaminium 2-hydroxy-3-naphthoate [(Hdpa)+ · (3-hnpa-), 3-hnpa- = 2-hydroxy-3-naphthoate] (9), diisopropylaminium 5-bromosalicylate [(Hdpa)+ · (bsa-), bsa- = 5-bromosalicylate] (10), diisopropylaminium 3,5-dinitrobenzoate [(Hdpa)+ · (dna-), dna- = 3,5-dinitrobenzoate] (11), diisopropylaminium 3,5-dinitrosalicylate [(Hdpa)+ · (3,5-dns-), 3,5-dns- = 3,5-dinitrosalicylate] (12), tetra(diisopropylaminium) bis(m-phthalate) monohydrate [(Hdpa+)4 · (mpta2-)2 · H2O, mpta2- = m-phthalate] (13), bis(diisopropylaminium) dihydrogen 1,2,3,4-butane tetracarboxylate [(Hdpa+)2 · (H2Bta2-), H2Bta2- = dihydrogen 1,2,3,4-butane tetracarboxylate] (14), bis(diisopropylaminium) mucate [(Hdpa+)2 · (muc2-), muc2- = mucate] (15), and diisopropylaminium hydrogen 1,2-phenylenediacetate [(Hdpa) · (Hpda-), Hpda- = hydrogen 1,2-phenylenediacetate] (16). The sixteen salts have been characterised by XRD technique, IR, and elemental analysis, and the melting points of all the

  10. Thickness dependence of magnetic properties and giant magneto-impedance effect in amorphous Co{sub 73}Si{sub 12}B{sub 15} thin films prepared by Dual-Ion beam assisted deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yu [School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); BISSE/BUAA-SPNEE joint Laboratory Magnetism and Sperconducting technology on Spacecraft, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Wang, San-sheng, E-mail: wangssh@buaa.edu.cn [School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); BISSE/BUAA-SPNEE joint Laboratory Magnetism and Sperconducting technology on Spacecraft, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Hu, Teng [School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); He, Tong-fu [School of Instrumentation Science and Opto-electronics Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Chen, Zi-yu [School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Yi, Zhong; Meng, Li-Fei [Science and Technology on Reliability and Environmental Engineering Laboratory, Beijing Institute of Spacecraft Environment Engineering, Beijing 100094 (China); BISSE/BUAA-SPNEE joint Laboratory Magnetism and Sperconducting technology on Spacecraft, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2017-03-15

    Dual-Ion Beam Assisted Deposition is a suitable method for the preparation of giant magneto-impedance (GMI) materials. In this paper, Co{sub 73}Si{sub 12}B{sub 15} thin films with different thicknesses were prepared by Dual-Ion Beam Assisted Deposition, and the influences of film thickness on magnetic properties and GMI effect were investigated. It was found that the asymmetric magnetic hysteresis loop in the prepared Co{sub 73}Si{sub 12}B{sub 15} thin films occurs at ambient temperature, and the shift behavior of hysteresis loop associated with film thickness. With the film thickness increasing, the values of shift field and coercive field and other parameters such as remanence and shift ratio appeared complex variation. At a certain frequency, the large GMI effect is only observed in some films, which have good magnetic properties including low coercivity, low remanence ratio and high shift ratio. The results indicated that the thickness dependence of magnetic properties nonlinearly determined the GMI effect in Co{sub 73}Si{sub 12}B{sub 15} thin films. - Highlights: • The relationship between film thickness and ΔZ/Z, ΔR/R, ΔX/X ratio of CoSiB film exhibits a complex behavior as the film thickness increases from 1.33 to 7.34 µm. The maximum value of GMI ratio is observed when the film thickness was 1.56, 2.48, 3.81 or 7.34 µm. • With the increase of film thickness, the peak frequency shifts to lower frequency, but does not decrease following the t-power law. • The above thickness phenomenon is due to the different magnetic properties of thin films. • The Dual-Ion Beam Assisted Deposition is introduced to prepare the GMI materials.

  11. Scattering of thermal He beams by crossed atomic and molecular beams. IV. Spherically symmetric intermolecular potentials for He+CH/sub 4/, NH/sub 3/, H/sub 2/O, SF/sub 6/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slankas, J.T.; Keil, M.; Kuppermann, A.

    1979-02-01

    Differential scattering cross sections are measured for He+CH/sub 4/, NH/sub 3/, H/sub 2/O, and SF/sub 6/, using the crossed molecular beams technique. These data, which are sensitive to the van der Waals attractive minima and adjacent regions of the intermolecular potential, are interpreted in terms of central-field models. No evidence is found for quenching of the observed diffraction oscillations. The interactions of the isoelectronic hydrides CH/sub 4/, NH/sub 3/, H/sub 2/O with He are found to have decreasing van der Waals radii in this sequence, and their attractive wells all have similar depths. However, the He+SF/sub 6/ attractive well is found to be anomalously deep, and provides a counter example to the supposition that only the polarizability of the least polarizable of the interacting partners (atoms or molecules) correlates with the van der Waals well depth. Simple combination rules for predicting unlike-pair potential parameters from the corresponding like-pair ones are tested and found inadequate.

  12. ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS: Radiation forces on a three-level atom in the high-order Bessel beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zheng-Ling; Yin, Jian-Ping

    2008-07-01

    The general expressions of the average dissipative and dipole forces acting on a Λ-configuration three-level atom in an arbitrary light field are derived by means of the optical Bloch equations based on the atomic density matrix elements, and the general properties of the average dissipative and dipole forces on a three-level atom in the linearly-polarized high-order Bessel beams (HBBs) are analysed. We find a resonant property (with two resonant peaks) of the dissipative force and a non-resonant property (with two pairs of non-resonant peaks) of the dipole force on the three-level atom, which are completely different from those on the two-level atom. Meanwhile we find a saturation effect of the average dissipative force in the HBB, which comes from the saturation of the upper-level population. Our study shows that the general expressions of the average dissipative and dipole forces on the three-level atom will be simplified to those of the two-level atom under the approximation of large detuning. Finally, we study the axial and azimuthal Doppler cooling of atoms in 1D optical molasses composed of two counter-propagating HBBs and discuss the azimuthal influence of the HBB on the Doppler cooling limit. We also find that the Doppler limit of atoms in the molasses HBB is slightly below the conventional Doppler limit of ħΓ(2κB) due to the orbital angular momentum lħ of the HBB.

  13. Physical fundaments of supersonic molecular beams; Fondamenti fisici dei fasci molecolari supersonici. Parte 7: Il getto libero supersonico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomassetti, G. [L' Aquila Univ., L' Aquila (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica; Sanna, G.

    1999-07-01

    The structure of the free jet emitted by a converging nozzle as obtained by the method of characteristics by Ashkenas and Sherman is described in details. In particular the dependence of the field variable by the distance from the nozzle is given. The transition from continuum to molecular free regime is then considered and the sudden freeze approximation is introduced. The processing of monoatomic and polyatomic gasses is also considered. [Italian] Le caratteristiche del campo di flusso in regime continuo di un getto libero supersonico ottenute col metodo delle caratteristiche da Askenas e Sherman sono messe in evidenza. In particolare le relazioni analitiche per i parametri di flusso in funzione della distanza dal nozzle sono riportate. Viene poi considerata la transazione al regime molecolare ed e' introdotta la sudden freeze approximation. Vengono anche considerate le situazioni di non equilibrio tra gradi di liberta' interni ed esterni.

  14. Molecular Beam-Thermal Desorption Spectrometry (MB-TDS Monitoring of Hydrogen Desorbed from Storage Fuel Cell Anodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge H. F. Ribeiro

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Different types of experimental studies are performed using the hydrogen storage alloy (HSA MlNi3.6Co0.85Al0.3Mn0.3 (Ml: La-rich mischmetal, chemically surface treated, as the anode active material for application in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC. The recently developed molecular beam—thermal desorption spectrometry (MB-TDS technique is here reported for detecting the electrochemical hydrogen uptake and release by the treated HSA. The MB-TDS allows an accurate determination of the hydrogen mass absorbed into the hydrogen storage alloy (HSA, and has significant advantages in comparison with the conventional TDS method. Experimental data has revealed that the membrane electrode assembly (MEA using such chemically treated alloy presents an enhanced surface capability for hydrogen adsorption.

  15. Molecular Beam-Thermal Desorption Spectrometry (MB-TDS) Monitoring of Hydrogen Desorbed from Storage Fuel Cell Anodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Rui F. M.; Santos, Diogo M. F.; Sequeira, Cesar A. C.; Ribeiro, Jorge H. F.

    2012-01-01

    Different types of experimental studies are performed using the hydrogen storage alloy (HSA) MlNi3.6Co0.85Al0.3Mn0.3 (Ml: La-rich mischmetal), chemically surface treated, as the anode active material for application in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). The recently developed molecular beam—thermal desorption spectrometry (MB-TDS) technique is here reported for detecting the electrochemical hydrogen uptake and release by the treated HSA. The MB-TDS allows an accurate determination of the hydrogen mass absorbed into the hydrogen storage alloy (HSA), and has significant advantages in comparison with the conventional TDS method. Experimental data has revealed that the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) using such chemically treated alloy presents an enhanced surface capability for hydrogen adsorption. PMID:28817043

  16. The interaction of C60 on Si(111 7x7 studied by Supersonic Molecular Beams: interplay between precursor kinetic energy and substrate temperature in surface activated processes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucrezia eAversa

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Buckminsterfullerene (C60 is a molecule fully formed of carbon that can be used, owing to its electronic and mechanical properties, as clean precursor for the growth of carbon-based materials, ranging from -conjugated systems (graphenes to synthesized species, e.g. carbides such as silicon carbide (SiC. To this goal, C60 cage rupture is the main physical process that triggers material growth. Cage breaking can be obtained either thermally by heating up the substrate to high temperatures (630°C, after C60 physisorption, or kinetically by using Supersonic Molecular Beam Epitaxy (SuMBE techniques. In this work, aiming at demonstrating the growth of SiC thin films by C60 supersonic beams, we present the experimental investigation of C60 impacts on Si(111 7x7 kept at 500°C for translational kinetic energies ranging from 18 to 30 eV. The attained kinetically activated synthesis of SiC submonolayer films is probed by in-situ surface electron spectroscopies (XPS and UPS. Furthermore, in these experimental conditions the C60-Si(111 7×7 collision has been studied by computer simulations based on a tight-binding approximation to Density Functional Theory, DFT. Our theoretical and experimental findings point towards a kinetically driven growth of SiC on Si, where C60 precursor kinetic energy plays a crucial role, while temperature is relevant only after cage rupture to enhance Si and carbon reactivity. In particular, we observe a counterintuitive effect in which for low kinetic energy (below 22 eV, C60 bounces back without breaking more effectively at high temperature due to energy transfer from excited phonons. At higher kinetic energy (22 < K < 30 eV, for which cage rupture occurs, temperature enhances reactivity without playing a major role in the cage break. These results are in good agreement with ab-initio molecular dynamics simulations. SuMBE is thus a technique able to drive materials growth at low temperature regime.

  17. Investigation of microstructure and morphology for the Ge on porous silicon/Si substrate hetero-structure obtained by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gouder, S. [IM2NP Aix-Marseille Universités, UMR CNRS n°7334, Faculté des Sciences St-Jérôme - Case 142, 13397 Marseille Cedex 20 France (France); Electronics Department, University Hadj Lakhdar, Batna 05000 (Algeria); Mahamdi, R. [Electronics Department, University Hadj Lakhdar, Batna 05000 (Algeria); Aouassa, M.; Escoubas, S.; Favre, L.; Ronda, A.; Berbezier, I. [IM2NP Aix-Marseille Universités, UMR CNRS n°7334, Faculté des Sciences St-Jérôme - Case 142, 13397 Marseille Cedex 20 France (France)

    2014-01-01

    Thick porous silicon (PS) buffer layers are used as sacrificial layers to epitaxially grow planar and fully relaxed Ge membranes. The single crystal Ge layers have been deposited by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on PS substrate. During deposition, the pore network of PS layers has been filled with Ge. We investigate the structure and morphology of PS as fabricated and after annealing at various temperatures. We show that the PS crystalline lattice is distorted and expanded in the direction perpendicular to the substrate plane due to the presence of chemisorbed –OH. An annealing at high temperature (> 500 °C), greatly changes the PS morphology and structure. This change is marked by an increase of the pore diameter while the lattice parameter becomes tensily strained in the plane (compressed in the direction perpendicular). The morphology and structure of Ge layers are investigated by transmission electron microscopy, high resolution X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy as a function of the deposition temperature and deposited thickness. The results show that the surface roughness, level of relaxation and Si-Ge intermixing (Ge content) depend on the growth temperature and deposited thickness. Two sub-layers are distinguished: the layer incorporated inside the PS pores (high level of intermixing) and the layer on top of the PS surface (low level of intermixing). When deposited at temperature > 500 °C, the Ge layers are fully relaxed with a top Si{sub 1−x}Ge{sub x} layer x = 0.74 and a very flat surface. Such layer can serve as fully relaxed ultra-thin SiGe pseudo-substrate with high Ge content. The epitaxy of Ge on sacrificial soft PS pseudo-substrate in the experimental conditions described here provides an easy way to fabricate fully relaxed SiGe pseudo-substrates. Moreover, Ge thin films epitaxially deposited by MBE on PS could be used as relaxed pseudo-substrate in conventional microelectronic technology. - Highlights: • We have developed a rapid

  18. Cost of New Technologies in Prostate Cancer Treatment: Systematic Review of Costs and Cost Effectiveness of Robotic-assisted Laparoscopic Prostatectomy, Intensity-modulated Radiotherapy, and Proton Beam Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeck, Florian Rudolf; Jacobs, Bruce L; Bhayani, Sam B; Nguyen, Paul L; Penson, David; Hu, Jim

    2017-11-01

    Some of the high costs of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and proton beam therapy may be offset by better outcomes or less resource use during the treatment episode. To systematically review the literature to identify the key economic trade-offs implicit in a particular treatment choice for prostate cancer. We systematically reviewed the literature according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses (PRISMA) statement and protocol. We searched Medline, Embase, and Web of Science for articles published between January 2001 and July 2016, which compared the treatment costs of RARP, IMRT, or proton beam therapy to the standard treatment. We identified 37, nine, and three studies, respectively. RARP is costlier than radical retropubic prostatectomy for hospitals and payers. However, RARP has the potential for a moderate cost advantage for payers and society over a longer time horizon when optimal cancer and quality-of-life outcomes are achieved. IMRT is more expensive from a payer's perspective compared with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, but also more cost effective when defined by an incremental cost effectiveness ratio new versus traditional technologies is costlier. However, given the low quality of evidence and the inconsistencies across studies, the precise difference in costs remains unclear. Attempts to estimate whether this increased cost is worth the expense are hampered by the uncertainty surrounding improvements in outcomes, such as cancer control and side effects of treatment. If the new technologies can consistently achieve better outcomes, then they may be cost effective. We review the cost and cost effectiveness of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy, intensity-modulated radiotherapy, and proton beam therapy in prostate cancer treatment. These technologies are costlier than their traditional counterparts. It remains unclear whether their use is associated

  19. Investigation of colloidal graphite as a matrix for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry of low molecular weight analytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Alexander D; Conway, Ulric; Arthur, Christopher J; Gates, Paul J

    2016-07-01

    The analysis of low molecular weight compounds by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry is problematic due to the interference and suppression of analyte ionisation by the matrices typically employed - which are themselves low molecular weight compounds. The application of colloidal graphite is demonstrated here as an easy to use matrix that can promote the ionisation of a wide range of analytes including low molecular weight organic compounds, complex natural products and inorganic complexes. Analyte ionisation with colloidal graphite is compared with traditional organic matrices along with various other sources of graphite (e.g. graphite rods and charcoal pencils). Factors such as ease of application, spectra reproducibility, spot longevity, spot-to-spot reproducibility and spot homogeneity (through single spot imaging) are explored. For some analytes, considerable matrix suppression effects are observed resulting in spectra completely devoid of matrix ions. We also report the observation of radical molecular ions [M(-●) ] in the negative ion mode, particularly with some aromatic analytes. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Mechanochemical Ring-Opening Polymerization of Lactide: Liquid-Assisted Grinding for the Green Synthesis of Poly(lactic acid) with High Molecular Weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohn, Nuri; Shin, Jihoon; Kim, Sung Sik; Kim, Jeung Gon

    2017-09-22

    Mechanochemical polymerization of lactide is carried out by using ball milling. Mechanical energy from collisions between the balls and the vessel efficiently promotes an organic-base-mediated metal- and solvent-free solid-state polymerization. Investigation of the parameters of the ball-milling synthesis revealed that the degree of lactide ring-opening polymerization could be modulated by the ball-milling time, vibration frequency, mass of the ball media, and liquid-assisted grinding. Liquid-assisted grinding was found to be an especially important factor for achieving a high degree of mechanochemical polymerization. Although polymer-chain scission from the strong collision energy prevented mechanical-force-driven high-molecular-weight polymer synthesis, the addition of only a small amount of liquid enabled sufficient energy dissipation and poly(lactic acid) was thereby obtained with a molecular weight of over 1×105  g mol-1 . © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Clinical application of a microfluidic chip for immunocapture and quantification of circulating exosomes to assist breast cancer diagnosis and molecular classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Shimeng; Tian, Hongzhu; Li, Xiancheng; Jin, Dong; Li, Xiaojie; Kong, Jing; Yang, Chun; Yang, Xuesong; Lu, Yao; Luo, Yong; Lin, Bingcheng; Niu, Weidong; Liu, Tingjiao

    2017-01-01

    Increasing attention has been attracted by exosomes in blood-based diagnosis because cancer cells release more exosomes in serum than normal cells and these exosomes overexpress a certain number of cancer-related biomarkers. However, capture and biomarker analysis of exosomes for clinical application are technically challenging. In this study, we developed a microfluidic chip for immunocapture and quantification of circulating exosomes from small sample volume and applied this device in clinical study. Circulating EpCAM-positive exosomes were measured in 6 cases breast cancer patients and 3 healthy controls to assist diagnosis. A significant increase in the EpCAM-positive exosome level in these patients was detected, compared to healthy controls. Furthermore, we quantified circulating HER2-positive exosomes in 19 cases of breast cancer patients for molecular classification. We demonstrated that the exosomal HER2 expression levels were almost consistent with that in tumor tissues assessed by immunohistochemical staining. The microfluidic chip might provide a new platform to assist breast cancer diagnosis and molecular classification.

  2. Polylactosaminoglycan Glycomics: Enhancing the Detection of High-molecular-weight N-glycans in Matrix-assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Time-of-flight Profiles by Matched Filtering*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bern, Marshall; Brito, Alejandro E.; Pang, Poh-Choo; Rekhi, Angad; Dell, Anne; Haslam, Stuart M.

    2013-01-01

    For over 30 years, protocols based on the mass spectrometry (MS) of permethylated derivatives, complemented by enzymatic degradations, have underpinned glycomic experiments aimed at defining the structures of individual glycans present in the complex mixtures that are characteristic of biological samples. Both MS instrumentation and sample handling have improved markedly in recent years, enabling greater sensitivity and better signal-to-noise ratios, thereby facilitating the detection of glycans at much higher masses than could be achieved in the past. The latter is especially important for the characterization of the biologically important class of N-glycans that carry polylactosaminoglycan chains. Such advances in data acquisition heighten the need for informatics tools to assist in glycan structure assignment. Here, utilizing mouse lung tissue as a model system, we present evidence of polylactosaminoglycan-containing N-glycans with permethylated molecular weights exceeding 13 kDa. We show that antennae branching patterns and lengths can be successfully determined at these high masses via MS/MS experiments, even when MS ion counts are very low. We also describe the development and application of a matched filtering algorithm for assisting high-molecular-weight glycan detection and structure assignment. PMID:23325768

  3. Probing the dynamics of polyatomic multichannel elementary reactions by crossed molecular beam experiments with soft electron-ionization mass spectrometric detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casavecchia, Piergiorgio; Leonori, Francesca; Balucani, Nadia; Petrucci, Raffaele; Capozza, Giovanni; Segoloni, Enrico

    2009-01-07

    In this Perspective we highlight developments in the field of chemical reaction dynamics. Focus is on the advances recently made in the investigation of the dynamics of elementary multichannel radical-molecule and radical-radical reactions, as they have become possible using an improved crossed molecular beam scattering apparatus with universal electron-ionization mass spectrometric detection and time-of-flight analysis. These improvements consist in the implementation of (a) soft ionization detection by tunable low-energy electrons which has permitted us to reduce interfering signals originating from dissociative ionization processes, usually representing a major complication, (b) different beam crossing-angle set-ups which have permitted us to extend the range of collision energies over which a reaction can be studied, from very low (a few kJ mol(-1), as of interest in astrochemistry or planetary atmospheric chemistry) to quite high energies (several tens of kJ mol(-1), as of interest in high temperature combustion systems), and (c) continuous supersonic sources for producing a wide variety of atomic and molecular radical reactant beams. Exploiting these new features it has become possible to tackle the dynamics of a variety of polyatomic multichannel reactions, such as those occurring in many environments ranging from combustion and plasmas to terrestrial/planetary atmospheres and interstellar clouds. By measuring product angular and velocity distributions, after having suppressed or mitigated, when needed, the problem of dissociative ionization of interfering species (reactants, products, background gases) by soft ionization detection, essentially all primary reaction products can be identified, the dynamics of each reaction channel characterized, and the branching ratios determined as a function of collision energy. In general this information, besides being of fundamental relevance, is required for a predictive description of the chemistry of these

  4. Structural properties of Bi{sub 2−x}Mn{sub x}Se{sub 3} thin films grown via molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babakiray, Sercan; Johnson, Trent A.; Borisov, Pavel; Holcomb, Mikel B.; Lederman, David, E-mail: david.lederman@mail.wvu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506-6315 (United States); Marcus, Matthew A. [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Tarafder, Kartick [Department of Physics, BITS-Pilani Hyderabad Campus, Secunderabad, Andhra Pradesh 500078 (India)

    2015-07-28

    The effects of Mn doping on the structural properties of the topological insulator Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} in thin film form were studied in samples grown via molecular beam epitaxy. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure measurements, supported by density functional theory calculations, indicate that preferential incorporation occurs substitutionally in Bi sites across the entire film volume. This finding is consistent with x-ray diffraction measurements which show that the out of plane lattice constant expands while the in plane lattice constant contracts as the Mn concentration is increased. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicates that the Mn valency is 2+ and that the Mn bonding is similar to that in MnSe. The expansion along the out of plane direction is most likely due to weakening of the Van der Waals interactions between adjacent Se planes. Transport measurements are consistent with this Mn{sup 2+} substitution of Bi sites if additional structural defects induced by this substitution are taken into account.

  5. Pyrolysis of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE). 1. Experimental study with molecular-beam mass spectrometry and tunable synchrotron VUV photoionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Taichang; Wang, Jing; Yuan, Tao; Hong, Xin; Zhang, Lidong; Qi, Fei

    2008-10-23

    An experimental study of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) pyrolysis (3.72% MTBE in argon) has been performed at low pressure (267 Pa) within the temperature range from 700 to 1420 K. The pyrolysis process was detected with the tunable synchrotron vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization and molecular-beam mass spectrometry (MBMS). About thirty intermediates are identified from near-threshold measurements of photoionization mass spectrum and photoionization efficiency spectrum. Among them, H2, CO, CH4, CH3OH and C4H8 are the major pyrolysis products. The radicals such as methyl, methoxy, propargyl, allyl, C4H5 and C4H7 are detected. The isomers of pyrolysis products are identified as well, i.e., propyne and allene, 1,2,3-butatriene and vinylacetylene, isobutene and 1-butene, propanal and acetone. Furthermore, the mole fractions of the pyrolysis products have been evaluated under various temperatures. Meanwhile, the initial formation temperatures of different pyrolysis products can be obtained. This work is anticipated to present a new experimental method for pyrolysis study and help understand the pyrolysis and combustion chemistry of MTBE and other oxygenated fuels.

  6. Molecular beam epitaxy growth of [CrGe/MnGe/FeGe] superlattices: Toward artificial B20 skyrmion materials with tunable interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Adam S.; Esser, Bryan D.; Rowland, James; McComb, David W.; Kawakami, Roland K.

    2017-06-01

    Skyrmions are localized magnetic spin textures whose stability has been shown theoretically to depend on material parameters including bulk Dresselhaus spin orbit coupling (SOC), interfacial Rashba SOC, and magnetic anisotropy. Here, we establish the growth of a new class of artificial skyrmion materials, namely B20 superlattices, where these parameters could be systematically tuned. Specifically, we report the successful growth of B20 superlattices comprised of single crystal thin films of FeGe, MnGe, and CrGe on Si(1 1 1) substrates. Thin films and superlattices are grown by molecular beam epitaxy and are characterized through a combination of reflection high energy electron diffraction, X-ray diffraction, and cross-sectional scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (XEDS) distinguishes layers by elemental mapping and indicates good interface quality with relatively low levels of intermixing in the [CrGe/MnGe/FeGe] superlattice. This demonstration of epitaxial, single-crystalline B20 superlattices is a significant advance toward tunable skyrmion systems for fundamental scientific studies and applications in magnetic storage and logic.

  7. Gas source molecular beam epitaxy and thermal stability of Si{sub 1-x} Ge{sub x}/Si superlattice materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, L.F.; Acosta-Ortiz, S.E. [Centro de Investigaciones en Optica A.C. Unidad Aguascalientes. Juan de Montoro No. 207. Zona Centro, 20000 Aguascalientes (Mexico); Zou, L.X. [Computer Science Department, Zhongnan University for Nationalities Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); Regalado, L.E. [Centro de Investigaciones en Optica, Loma del Bosque No. 115, Loma del Campestre C.P. 37000, Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico); Sun, D.Z.; Wang, Z.G. [Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083 (China)

    1998-12-31

    Gas source molecular beam epitaxy has been used to grow Si{sub 1-x} Ge{sub x} alloys and Si{sub 1-x} Ge{sub x}/Si multi-quantum wells (MQWs) on (100) Si substrates with Si{sub 2}H{sub 6} and GeH{sub 4} as sources. Heterostructures and MQWs with mirror-like surface morphology, good crystalline quality, and abrupt interfaces have been studied by a variety of in situ and ex situ techniques. The structural stability and strain relaxation in Si{sub 1-x} Ge{sub x}/ Si heterostructures have been investigated, and compared to that in the As ion-implanted Si{sub 1-x} Ge{sub x} epilayers. The results show that the strain relaxation mechanism of the non-implanted Si{sub 1-x} Ge{sub x} epilayers is different form that of the As ion-implanted Si{sub 1-x} Ge{sub x} epilayers. (Author)

  8. Binding energies of the π-stacked anisole dimer: new molecular beam-laser spectroscopy experiments and CCSD(T) calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Řezáč, Jan; Nachtigallová, Dana; Mazzoni, Federico; Pasquini, Massimiliano; Pietraperzia, Giangaetano; Becucci, Maurizio; Müller-Dethlefs, Klaus; Hobza, Pavel

    2015-04-27

    Among noncovalent interactions, π-π stacking is a very important binding motif governed mainly by London dispersion. Despite its importance, for instance, for the structure of bio-macromolecules, the direct experimental measurement of binding energies in π-π stacked complexes has been elusive for a long time. Only recently, an experimental value for the binding energy of the anisole dimer was presented, determined by velocity mapping ion imaging in a two-photon resonant ionisation molecular beam experiment. However, in that paper, a discrepancy was already noted between the obtained experimental value and a theoretical estimate. Here, we present an accurate recalculation of the binding energy based on the combination of the CCSD(T)/CBS interaction energy and a DFT-D3 vibrational analysis. This proves unambiguously that the previously reported experimental value is too high and a new series of measurements with a different, more sensitive apparatus was performed. The new experimental value of 1800±100 cm(-1) (5.15±0.29 kcal mol(-1)) is close to the present theoretical prediction of 5.04±0.40 kcal mol(-1). Additional calculations of the properties of the cationic and excited states involved in the photodissociation of the dimer were used to identify and rationalise the difficulties encountered in the experimental work. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. CONDENSED MATTER: STRUCTURE, MECHANICAL AND THERMAL PROPERTIES: Structural and Electrical Properties of Single Crystalline Ga-Doped ZnO Thin Films Grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhong-Lin; Zou, Wen-Qin; Xu, Ming-Xiang; Zhang, Feng-Ming; Du, You-Wei

    2009-11-01

    High-quality Ga-doped ZnO (ZnO:Ga) single crystalline films with various Ga concentrations are grown on a-plane sapphire substrates using molecular-beam epitaxy. The site configuration of doped Ga atoms is studied by means of x-ray absorption spectroscopy. It is found that nearly all Ga can substitute into ZnO lattice as electrically active donors, a generating high density of free carriers with about one electron per Ga dopant when the Ga concentration is no more than 2%. However, further increasing the Ga doping concentration leads to a decrease of the conductivity due to partial segregation of Ga atoms to the minor phase of the spinel ZnGa2O4 or other intermediate phase. It seems that the maximum solubility of Ga in the ZnO single crystalline film is about 2 at.% and the lowest resistivity can reach 1.92 × 10-4 Ω·cm at room temperature, close to the best value reported. In contrast to ZnO:Ga thin film with 1% or 2% Ga doping, the film with 4% Ga doping exhibits a metal semiconductor transition at 80 K. The scattering mechanism of conducting electrons in single crystalline ZnO:Ga thin film is discussed.

  10. Exceptionally large migration length of carbon and topographically-facilitated self-limiting molecular beam epitaxial growth of graphene on hexagonal boron nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plaut, Annette S.; Wurstbauer, Ulrich; Wang, Sheng; Levy, Antonio L.; Fernandes dos Santos, Lara; Wang, Lei; Pfeiffer, Loren N.; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Dean, Cory R.; Hone, James; Pinczuk, Aron; Garcia, Jorge M.

    2017-04-01

    We demonstrate growth of single-layer graphene (SLG) on hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), only limited in area by the finite size of the h-BN flakes. Using atomic force microscopy and micro-Raman spectroscopy, we show that for growth over a wide range of temperatures (500 °C – 1000 °C) the deposited carbon atoms spill off the edge of the h-BN flakes. We attribute this spillage to the very high mobility of the carbon atoms on the BN basal plane, consistent with van der Waals MBE. The h-BN flakes vary in size from 30 μm to 100 μm, thus demonstrating that the migration length of carbon atoms on h-BN is greater than 100 μm. When sufficient carbon is supplied to compensate for this loss, which is largely due to this fast migration of the carbon atoms to and off the edges of the h-BN flake, we find that the best growth temperature for MBE SLG on h-BN is ~950 °C. Self-limiting graphene growth appears to be facilitated by topographic h-BN surface features: We have thereby grown MBE self-limited SLG on an h-BN ridge. This opens up future avenues for precisely tailored fabrication of nano- and hetero-structures on pre-patterned h-BN surfaces for device applications.

  11. AlN grown on Si(1 1 1) by ammonia-molecular beam epitaxy in the 900-1200 °C temperature range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamariz, Sebastian; Martin, Denis; Grandjean, Nicolas

    2017-10-01

    We present a comprehensive study of AlN growth on Si(1 1 1) substrate by gas source molecular beam epitaxy with ammonia as nitrogen precursor in the high temperature range. We first demonstrate that the observation of the silicon 7 × 7 surface reconstruction by reflection high energy electron diffraction can be misleading as this technique is not sensitive to low density surface defects like SiC crystallites. A careful in situ cleaning procedure with annealing cycles at 1100 °C allows getting rid of any surface defects, as shown by atomic force microscopy imaging. Then, we explore the effect of the growth temperature on the surface morphology and structural properties of 100 nm thick AlN epilayers. At 1200 °C, the growth proceeds with the step flow mode regime, which induces spiral-growth around screw-type dislocations and therefore surface roughening. On the other hand, a smooth surface morphology can be achieved by setting the temperature at 1100 °C, which corresponds to the growth mode transition from two-dimensional nucleation to step flow. A further decrease of the growth temperature to 900 °C leads to surface defects ascribed to polarity inversion domains. Similar defects are observed for growths performed at 1100 °C when the NH3 flow is reduced below 100 sccm. This points out the sensitivity of AlN to the surface stoichiometry.

  12. Doping control of GaAsPN alloys by molecular beam epitaxy for monolithic III-V/Si tandem solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamane, Keisuke; Sato, Kento; Sekiguchi, Hiroto; Okada, Hiroshi; Wakahara, Akihiro

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents intentional doping of n- and p-type GaAs0.19P0.76N0.05 alloys by molecular beam epitaxy, followed by rapid thermal annealing (RTA). Sulfur and magnesium were respectively used as n- and p-type dopants. The carrier concentrations were controllable between 1017 and 1019 cm-3 by adjusting the dopant cell temperature. It was revealed that Hall mobility of the n-type GaAsPN alloys was increased by the RTA process compared to as-grown ones, whereas no significant difference was apparent in the p-type alloys. It is believed that improvement of the conduction band spatial uniformity was mainly responsible for the Hall mobility increase of the n-type GaAsPN alloys by RTA. Finally, a p-i-n GaAsPN diode structure was grown on n-type GaP substrates. A current-voltage characteristic showed a typical rectifying curve with a built-in voltage of 1.8 V and an ideality factor of 1.45. The reverse saturation current was estimated to be less than 10 nA/cm2.

  13. Growth of strained Si/relaxed SiGe heterostructures on Si(110) substrates using solid-source molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arimoto, Keisuke; Nakazawa, Hiroki; Mitsui, Shohei; Utsuyama, Naoto; Yamanaka, Junji; Hara, Kosuke O.; Usami, Noritaka; Nakagawa, Kiyokazu

    2017-11-01

    A strained Si/relaxed SiGe heterostructure grown on Si(110) substrate is attractive as a platform for high-hole-mobility Si-based electronic devices. To improve the electrical property, a smoother surface is desirable. In this study, we investigated surface morphology and microstructural aspects of strained Si/relaxed SiGe/Si(110) heterostructures grown by solid-source (SS) molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). It was revealed that SSMBE provides a way to grow strained Si/relaxed SiGe heterostructures with smooth surfaces. In addition, it was found that the strain in the SiGe layer of the SSMBE-grown sample is highly anisotropic whereas that of the GSMBE-grown sample is almost biaxially relaxed. Along with the surface morphology, the symmetry in degree of strain relaxation has implications for the electrical property. Results of a calculation shows that anisotropic strain is preferable for device application since it confines holes solely in the strained Si layer where hole mobility is enhanced.

  14. Electron Traps in GaAs Grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy on On-axis (100 and Off-axis Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sarmiento

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS was used to characterize the electron traps present in the bulkGaAs grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE on on-axis (100 and off-axis (4° towards the (111 Adirection substrates. Two electron traps were obtained for each sample having identical correspondingpeak locations in the DLTS spectra. The layer grown on the on-axis substrate has electron traps withactivation energies of EC–0.454 eV and EC–0.643 eV and capture cross-sections of 1.205 x 10-14 cm2 and3.88 x 10-15 cm2, respectively. The layer grown on the off-axis substrate has traps with activation energiesof EC–0.454 eV and EC–0.723 eV and capture cross-sections of 2.060 x 10-14 cm2 and 4.40 x 10-14 cm2.The electron traps are possibly the M4 (or EL3 and EL2 (or EB4 traps commonly found in GaAs layers.Due to the high trap concentrations obtained and to the non-uniform trap concentration profile, Asdesorption may be considerable during growth.

  15. X-ray photoelectron diffraction study of thin Al2O3 films grown on Si(111) by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Kazzi, M.; Grenet, G.; Merckling, C.; Saint-Girons, G.; Botella, C.; Marty, O.; Hollinger, G.

    2009-05-01

    The in-plane and out-of-plane crystallographic orientations of Al2O3 films grown by molecular beam epitaxy on Si(111) have been determined by combining x-ray photoelectron diffraction (XPD) with transmission electron microscopy (TEM). On the one hand, polar and azimuth XPD curves for Al2p , O1s , and Si2p core levels (recorded on a 6-nm-thick film) clearly indicate that Al2O3 grows (111) oriented on Si(111) but with two in-plane orientations: a “direct” one, i.e., [112¯]Al2O3//[112¯]Si(111) and a “mirror” one, i.e., [1¯1¯2]Al2O3(111)//[112¯]Si(111) . On the other hand, a close inspection of the 404¯Al2O3 TEM diffraction spots (recorded on a 2-nm-thick film) reveals that these two in-plane orientations are slightly rotated with respect to the Si(111) orientations. These two results are consistent with an oxygen plane as the interfacial plane between Al2O3(111) and Si(111).

  16. Electrical spin injection into InGaAs/GaAs quantum wells: A comparison between MgO tunnel barriers grown by sputtering and molecular beam epitaxy methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barate, P.; Zhang, T. T.; Vidal, M.; Renucci, P.; Marie, X.; Amand, T. [Université de Toulouse, INSA-CNRS-UPS, LPCNO, 135 avenue de Rangueil, 31077 Toulouse (France); Liang, S.; Devaux, X.; Hehn, M.; Mangin, S.; Lu, Y., E-mail: yuan.lu@univ-lorraine.fr [Institut Jean Lamour, UMR 7198, CNRS-Nancy Université, BP 239, 54506 Vandoeuvre (France); Frougier, J.; Jaffrès, H.; George, J. M. [Unité Mixte de Physique CNRS/Thales and Université Paris-Sud 11, 1 avenue A. Fresnel, 91767 Palaiseau (France); Xu, B.; Wang, Z. [Key Laboratory of Semiconductor Materials Science, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 912, Beijing 100083 (China); Zheng, Y. [Institut des NanoSciences de Paris, UPMC, CNRS UMR 7588, 4 place Jussieu, 75005 Paris (France); Tao, B. [Institut Jean Lamour, UMR 7198, CNRS-Nancy Université, BP 239, 54506 Vandoeuvre (France); Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 603, Beijing 100190 (China); Han, X. F. [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 603, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2014-07-07

    An efficient electrical spin injection into an InGaAs/GaAs quantum well light emitting diode is demonstrated thanks to a CoFeB/MgO spin injector. The textured MgO tunnel barrier is fabricated by two different techniques: sputtering and molecular beam epitaxy. The maximal spin injection efficiency is comparable for both methods. Additionally, the effect of annealing is also investigated for the two types of samples. Both samples show the same trend: an increase of the electroluminescence circular polarization (P{sub c}) with the increase of annealing temperature, followed by a saturation of P{sub c} beyond 350 °C annealing. Since the increase of P{sub c} starts well below the crystallization temperature of the full CoFeB bulk layer, this trend could be mainly due to an improvement of chemical structure at the top CoFeB/MgO interface. This study reveals that the control of CoFeB/MgO interface is essential for an optimal spin injection into semiconductor.

  17. Reflectance-anisotropy study of the dynamics of molecular beam epitaxy growth of GaAs and InGaAs on GaAs(001)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega-Gallegos, J.; Lastras-Martinez, A.; Lastras-Martinez, L.F. [Instituto de Investigacion en Comunicacion Optica, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi. Alvaro Obregon 64, San Luis Potosi (Mexico); Balderas-Navarro, R.E. [Instituto de Investigacion en Comunicacion Optica, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi. Alvaro Obregon 64, San Luis Potosi (Mexico); Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi. Alvaro Obregon 64, San Luis Potosi (Mexico)

    2008-07-01

    Reflectance-Anisotropy (RA) observations during the Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) growth of zincblende semiconductors films were carried out using the E{sub 1} optical transition as a probe. We follow the kinetics of the deposition of GaAs and In{sub 0.3}Ga{sub 0.7}As on GaAs(001) at growth rates of 0.2 and 0.25 ML/s, respectively. During growth we used a constant As{sub 4} or As{sub 2} flux pressure of 5 x 10{sup -6} Torr. Clear RA-oscillations were observed during growth with a period that nearly coincides with the growth period for a Ga-As bilayer. RHEED was used as an auxiliary technique in order to obtain a correlation between RHEED and RA oscillations. On the basis of our results, we argue that RAS oscillations are mainly associated to periodic changes in surface atomic structure. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  18. Thermal stability and relaxation mechanisms in compressively strained Ge{sub 0.94}Sn{sub 0.06} thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleischmann, C.; Lieten, R. R.; Shimura, Y.; Vandervorst, W. [Instituut voor Kern-en Stralingsfysica, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); imec, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Hermann, P.; Hönicke, P.; Beckhoff, B. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Abbestraße 2-12, 10587 Berlin (Germany); Seidel, F. [Instituut voor Kern-en Stralingsfysica, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); imec, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Institut für Elektronik-und Sensormaterialien, TU Bergakademie Freiberg, Gustav-Zeuner-Str. 3, 09599 Freiberg (Germany); Richard, O.; Bender, H. [imec, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Zaima, S. [Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Uchida, N. [Nanoelectronics Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba West SCR, 16-1 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8569 (Japan); Temst, K.; Vantomme, A. [Instituut voor Kern-en Stralingsfysica, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, 3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2016-08-28

    Strained Ge{sub 1-x}Sn{sub x} thin films have recently attracted a lot of attention as promising high mobility or light emitting materials for future micro- and optoelectronic devices. While they can be grown nowadays with high crystal quality, the mechanism by which strain energy is relieved upon thermal treatments remains speculative. To this end, we investigated the evolution (and the interplay) of composition, strain, and morphology of strained Ge{sub 0.94}Sn{sub 0.06} films with temperature. We observed a diffusion-driven formation of Sn-enriched islands (and their self-organization) as well as surface depressions (pits), resulting in phase separation and (local) reduction in strain energy, respectively. Remarkably, these compositional and morphological instabilities were found to be the dominating mechanisms to relieve energy, implying that the relaxation via misfit generation and propagation is not intrinsic to compressively strained Ge{sub 0.94}Sn{sub 0.06} films grown by molecular beam epitaxy.

  19. Strain in epitaxial high-index Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3}(221) films grown by molecular-beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Bin [Physics Department, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road (Hong Kong); Chen, Weiguang [College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Henan Normal University, Xinxiang, Henan 453007 (China); School of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Zhengzhou Normal University, Zhengzhou, Henan 450044 (China); Guo, Xin; Ho, Wingkin [Physics Department, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road (Hong Kong); Dai, Xianqi [College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Henan Normal University, Xinxiang, Henan 453007 (China); School of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Zhengzhou Normal University, Zhengzhou, Henan 450044 (China); Jia, Jinfeng [Key Laboratory of Artificial Structures and Quantum Control (Ministry of Education), Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiaotong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200240 (China); Xie, Maohai, E-mail: mhxie@hku.hk [Physics Department, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road (Hong Kong)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • High-index, off c-axis, Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} has been grown by molecular beam epitaxy on In{sub 2}Se{sub 3}. • A retarded strain relaxation process in such high-index Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} is observed, enabling experimentally probe strain effect on topological insulators. • It has been shown by calculation that the Dirac electrons participate in chemical bonding at the heterointerface. - Abstract: High-index Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3}(221) film has been grown on In{sub 2}Se{sub 3}-buffered GaAs(001), in which a much retarded strain relaxation dynamics is recorded. The slow strain-relaxation process of in epitaxial Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3}(221) can be attributed to the layered structure of Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} crystal, where the epifilm grown along [221] is like a pile of weakly-coupled quintuple layer slabs stacked side-by-side on substrate. Finally, we reveal strong chemical bonding at the interface of Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} and In{sub 2}Se{sub 3} by plotting differential charge contour calculated by first-principle method. This study points to the feasibility of achieving strained TIs for manipulating the properties of topological systems.

  20. A modified gradient approach for the growth of low-density InAs quantum dot molecules by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Nandlal; Reuter, Dirk

    2017-11-01

    Two vertically stacked quantum dots that are electronically coupled, so called quantum dot molecules, are of great interest for the realization of solid state building blocks for quantum communication networks. We present a modified gradient approach to realize InAs quantum dot molecules with a low areal density so that single quantum dot molecules can be optically addressed. The individual quantum dot layers were prepared by solid source molecular beam epitaxy depositing InAs on GaAs(100). The bottom quantum dot layer has been grown without substrate rotation resulting in an In-gradient across the surface, which translated into a density gradient with low quantum dot density in a certain region of the wafer. For the top quantum dot layer, separated from the bottom quantum dot layer by a 6 nm thick GaAs barrier, various InAs amounts were deposited without an In-gradient. In spite of the absence of an In-gradient, a pronounced density gradient is observed for the top quantum dots. Even for an In-amount slightly below the critical thickness for a single dot layer, a density gradient in the top quantum dot layer, which seems to reproduce the density gradient in the bottom layer, is observed. For more or less In, respectively, deviations from this behavior occur. We suggest that the obvious influence of the bottom quantum dot layer on the growth of the top quantum dots is due to the strain field induced by the buried dots.

  1. Velocity selection and mass spectrometric detection of an H2S molecular beam and a collisional study of its interactions with rare gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquilanti, Vincenzo; Cappelletti, David; Pirani, Fernando; Roncaratti, Luiz F.

    2009-02-01

    Total integral cross section experiments, for collisions of rotationally hot H2S projectile molecules by He and Xe targets, have been performed in the thermal energy range by using a molecular beam apparatus, which operates under high resolution conditions and exploits a quadrupole mass spectrometer as a detector. Information on the radial dependence of the intermolecular interaction, averaged over all relative orientations of colliding partners, is obtained. This study completes the investigation of H2S-rare gas family [see D. Cappelletti, A.F.A. Vilela, P.R.P. Barreto, R. Gargano, F. Pirani, V. Aquilanti, J. Chem. Phys. 125 (2006) 133111, for Ne, Ar and Kr] and permits us to discover similarities and differences with the analogous H2O-Rg series of systems. In particular, the analysis of the scattering data suggests that while the complexes of H2S-rare gases from He to Kr are essentially bound by nearly isotropic noncovalent interactions of van der Waals type, the H2S-Xe system exhibits a weak, but measurable, additional component which emerges at intermediate intermolecular distance (in proximity of the potential well), and provides a bond stabilization. This observation is of possible interest for the investigation of the phenomenology of the hydrogen bond formation.

  2. Fabrication and characterization of silicon nanowires by means of molecular beam epitaxy; Herstellung und Charakterisierung von Silizium-Nanodraehten mittels Molekularstrahlepitaxie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schubert, Luise

    2007-06-19

    In this work, basic processes of silicon whisker growth were examined. For the first time, Si nanowhiskers were produced under UHV conditions by Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) and characterized by different analysis methods afterwards. The existence of Au/Si droplets on a Si(111) substrate surface is a precondition of this growth method. Analyses of the temporal development of the Au/Si droplets during the whisker growth show a decrease of the number of small droplets resp. whiskers during the whisker growth with increasing growth time. This behaviour, i.e. the dissolution of smaller droplets/whiskers and the growth of larger ones in parallel can be explained by Ostwald ripenning. The diffusion-determined material transition of gold, which occurs during this process, is theoretically described by the Lifshitz-Slyozov-Wagner (LSW)-Theory. After this theory only whiskers grow which radii are larger than the critical radius. The whisker radii are temperature dependend whereas analogous whisker radii exist for identical growth times. Electron microscopy analysis show that all whiskers possess a hexagonal but no cylindrical habitus. The planes that form during the growth are crystallographic (111) planes. The growth of Si nanowhiskers under MBE conditions is determined by the Vapour Liquid Solid (VLS) mechanism and by surface diffusion of Si atoms. (orig.)

  3. Dislocation density and strain-relaxation in Ge1-xSnx layers grown on Ge/Si (0 0 1) by low-temperature molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khiangte, Krista R.; Rathore, Jaswant S.; Sharma, Vaibhav; Bhunia, Swagata; Das, Sudipta; Fandan, Rajveer S.; Pokharia, Ravinder S.; Laha, Apurba; Mahapatra, Suddhasatta

    2017-07-01

    The density and origin of dislocations in a variety of molecular-beam-epitaxy-(MBE)-grown Ge1-xSnx/Ge/Si (0 0 1) heterostructures, with Sn-content varying from 0.4 to 5.2%, have been investigated systematically by high resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD). In particular, using the approach due to Kaganer et al. (V.M. Kaganer et al., Phys. Rev. B 72, 045423 (2005)) for the first time to the Ge1-xSnx alloy, it is demonstrated that reliable estimates of both edge and screw dislocation densities can be obtained from HRXRD data. Based on the correlations of strain relaxation and dislocation densities of the alloy epilayers and the underlying Ge buffer layers, we observe that dislocations threading from the latter predominantly contribute to the strain relaxation of the former. Thus, Ge1-xSnx epilayers of sub-critical thicknesses can be made to relax significantly by growing them on partially-relaxed, relatively-thin Ge buffer layers. This may be promising for the realization of Ge1-xSnx epilayers with direct electronic band gap.

  4. Effects of in situ annealing of GaAs(100) substrates on the subsequent growth of InAs quantum dots by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales-Cortes, H; Mejia-Garcia, C [Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas del IPN, UPALM, Edif. 9, Col. Lindavista, Mexico DF 07738 (Mexico); Mendez-GarcIa, V H; Vazquez-Cortes, D [Coordinacion para la Innovacion y la Aplicacion de la Ciencia y la TecnologIa, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, Alvaro Obregon 64, San Luis PotosI, S L P 78000 (Mexico); Rojas-Ramirez, J S; Contreras-Guerrero, R; RamIrez-Lopez, M; Martinez-Velis, I; Lopez-Lopez, M, E-mail: mlopez@fis.cinvestav.mx [Physics Department, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Apartado Postal 14-740, Mexico DF 07000 (Mexico)

    2010-04-02

    In the present work, we study the growth by molecular beam epitaxy of InAs self-assembling quantum dots (SAQDs) on GaAs(100) substrates subjected to an in situ annealing treatment. The annealing process consists of the exposition of the GaAs buffer layer surface to high temperatures for a few seconds with the shutter of an arsenic Knudsen cell closed. The purpose of the annealing is to obtain a better uniformity of the SAQD sizes. In our study we prepared different samples using the Stranski-Krastanov growth method to obtain InAs/GaAs(100) quantum dot samples with different annealing times and temperatures. Their structural and optical properties were studied by reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED), high-resolution scanning electron microscopy (HRSEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and photoreflectance spectroscopy (PR). According to the results of AFM and HRSEM, by the thermal treatment we obtained a better distribution of quantum dot sizes in comparison with a reference sample with no treatment. The PR spectra from 0.9 to 1.35 eV presented two transitions associated with SAQDs. The energy transitions were obtained by fitting the PR spectra using the third derivative model.

  5. AlxIn1-xAsySb1-y alloys lattice matched to InAs(1 0 0) grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Ramirez, J. S.; Wang, S.; Contreras-Guerrero, R.; Caro, M.; Bhatnagar, K.; Holland, M.; Oxland, R.; Doornbos, G.; Passlack, M.; Diaz, C. H.; Droopad, R.

    2015-09-01

    AlxIn1-xAsySb1-y quaternary alloys lattice-matched to InAs were successfully grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) for use as buffer layers for substrate isolation in InAs channel devices. The use of In-containing quaternary buffer layers with 5% In was found to dramatically improve the heterointerface between the buffer and a surface InAs channel layer. The composition of these alloys and the extent of lattice matching were accurately determined by double crystal X-ray measurements. A simple model was used to estimate the variation of critical thickness with lattice mismatch for AlInAsSb epitaxially grown on an InAs substrate. Layers with high Al content and low As mole fraction were grown by modulated MBE technique which was found to significantly improve the surface morphology and the composition control of the alloys. In contrast, quaternary alloys with low Al content were grown by conventional MBE and had an rms roughness of less than 0.2 nm.

  6. [Synergetic effects of silicon carbide and molecular sieve loaded catalyst on microwave assisted catalytic oxidation of toluene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Hui; Bo, Long-Li; Liu, Hai-Nan; Zhang, Hao; Sun, Jian-Yu; Yang, Li; Cai, Li-Dong

    2013-06-01

    Molecular sieve loaded catalyst was prepared by impregnation method, microwave-absorbing material silicon carbide and the catalyst were investigated for catalytic oxidation of toluene by microwave irradiation. Research work examined effects of silicon carbide and molecular sieve loading Cu-V catalyst's mixture ratio as well as mixed approach changes on degradation of toluene, and characteristics of catalyst were measured through scanning electron microscope, specific surface area test and X-ray diffraction analysis. The result showed that the fixed bed reactor had advantages of both thermal storage property and low-temperature catalytic oxidation when 20% silicon carbide was filled at the bottom of the reactor, and this could effectively improve the utilization of microwave energy as well as catalytic oxidation efficiency of toluene. Under microwave power of 75 W and 47 W, complete-combustion temperatures of molecular sieve loaded Cu-V catalyst and Cu-V-Ce catalyst to toluene were 325 degrees C and 160 degrees C, respectively. Characteristics of the catalysts showed that mixture of rare-earth element Ce increased the dispersion of active components in the surface of catalyst, micropore structure of catalyst effectively guaranteed high adsorption capacity for toluene, while amorphous phase of Cu and V oxides increased the activity of catalyst greatly.

  7. Reaction Dynamics of O((3)P) + Propyne: I. Primary Products, Branching Ratios, and Role of Intersystem Crossing from Crossed Molecular Beam Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanuzzo, Gianmarco; Balucani, Nadia; Leonori, Francesca; Stranges, Domenico; Nevrly, Vaclav; Falcinelli, Stefano; Bergeat, Astrid; Casavecchia, Piergiorgio; Cavallotti, Carlo

    2016-07-14

    We performed synergic experimental/theoretical studies on the mechanism of the O((3)P) + propyne reaction by combining crossed molecular beams experiments with mass-spectrometric detection and time-of-flight analysis at 9.2 kcal/mol collision energy (Ec) with ab initio electronic structure calculations at a high level of theory of the relevant triplet and singlet potential energy surfaces (PESs) and statistical calculations of branching ratios (BRs) taking into account intersystem crossing (ISC). In this paper (I) we report the results of the experimental investigation, while the accompanying paper (II) shows results of the theoretical investigation with comparison to experimental results. By exploiting soft electron ionization detection to suppress/mitigate the effects of the dissociative ionization of reactants, products, and background gases, product angular and velocity distributions at different charge-to-mass ratios were measured. From the laboratory data angular and translational energy distributions in the center-of-mass system were obtained for the five competing most important product channels, and product BRs were derived. The reactive interaction of O((3)P) with propyne under single collision conditions is mainly leading to the rupture of the three-carbon atom chain, with production of the radical products methylketenyl + atomic hydrogen (BR = 0.04), methyl + ketenyl (BR = 0.10), and vinyl + formyl (BR = 0.11) and the molecular products ethylidene/ethylene + carbon monoxide (BR = 0.74) and propandienal + molecular hydrogen (BR = 0.01). Because some of the products can only be formed via ISC from the entrance triplet to the low-lying singlet PES, we infer from their BRs an amount of ISC larger than 80%. This value is dramatically large when compared to the negligible ISC reported for the O((3)P) reaction with the simplest alkyne, acetylene. At the same time, it is much larger than that (∼20%) recently observed in the related reaction of the three

  8. Growth and characterization of β-Ga2O3 thin films by molecular beam epitaxy for deep-UV photodetectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghose, Susmita; Rahman, Shafiqur; Hong, Liang; Rojas-Ramirez, Juan Salvador; Jin, Hanbyul; Park, Kibog; Klie, Robert; Droopad, Ravi

    2017-09-01

    The growth of high quality epitaxial beta-gallium oxide (β-Ga2O3) using a compound source by molecular beam epitaxy has been demonstrated on c-plane sapphire (Al2O3) substrates. The compound source provides oxidized gallium molecules in addition to oxygen when heated from an iridium crucible in a high temperature effusion cell enabling a lower heat of formation for the growth of Ga2O3, resulting in a more efficient growth process. This source also enabled the growth of crystalline β-Ga2O3 without the need for additional oxygen. The influence of the substrate temperatures on the crystal structure and quality, chemical bonding, surface morphology, and optical properties has been systematically evaluated by x-ray diffraction, scanning transmission electron microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, spectroscopic ellipsometry, and UV-vis spectroscopy. Under optimized growth conditions, all films exhibited pure (" separators="|2 ¯01 ) oriented β-Ga2O3 thin films with six-fold rotational symmetry when grown on a sapphire substrate. The thin films demonstrated significant absorption in the deep-ultraviolet (UV) region with an optical bandgap around 5.0 eV and a refractive index of 1.9. A deep-UV photodetector fabricated on the high quality β-Ga2O3 thin film exhibits high resistance and small dark current (4.25 nA) with expected photoresponse for 254 nm UV light irradiation suggesting that the material grown using the compound source is a potential candidate for deep-ultraviolet photodetectors.

  9. Self-catalyzed core-shell GaAs/GaNAs nanowires grown on patterned Si (111) by gas-source molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    La, Rui; Liu, Ren; Yao, Weichuan; Chen, Renjie; Jansson, Mattias; Pan, Janet L.; Buyanova, Irina A.; Xiang, Jie; Dayeh, Shadi A.; Tu, Charles W.

    2017-08-01

    We report structural studies on the epitaxial growth of GaAs/GaNAs core-shell nanowires (NWs) on patterned Si (111) substrates by self-catalyzed selective area growth using Gas-Source Molecular Beam Epitaxy. Epitaxial growth conditions were obtained using a combination of dry and time-sensitive wet etching of the SiO2 growth mask and native SiO2 layer, respectively. We found that higher growth temperatures resulted in a higher yield for the epitaxial growth of patterned self-catalyzed GaAs NWs on Si with an optimal temperature of 690 °C. The GaNAs shell growth at 500 °C was found to be conformal and maintained an epitaxial and dislocation-free interface with both the Si substrate and the GaAs nanowire. The micro-photoluminescence (μ-PL) measurement at 6 K revealed two bands peaking at 1.45 and 1.17 eV, which could be emission from the GaAs core and GaNAs shell. Transmission electron microscopy showed the zincblende crystal structure of GaAs and GaAs/GaNAs core-shell NWs with minimal twinning near the base of the GaAs nanowires and at the tips of the GaAs/GaNAs core/shell nanowires. This study illustrates the feasibility of the epitaxial growth of patterned GaAs with dilute nitride shells on Si substrates, which would have potential for Si-friendly intermediate band solar cells and telecom emitters.

  10. Growth of GaP and AlGaP on GaP(1 1 1)B using gas-source molecular-beam-epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barakat, J.-B.; Dadgostar, S.; Hestroffer, K.; Bierwagen, O.; Trampert, A.; Hatami, F.

    2017-11-01

    We present an initial study of the influence of the growth parameters on the surface morphology and on the interface quality of homoepitaxial GaP(1 1 1) and heteroepitaxial GaP/AlGaP(1 1 1) grown on GaP(1 1 1)B substrates using Gas-Source Molecular Beam Epitaxy (GSMBE). Three different surface reconstructions are identified in the RHEED patterns during the growth runs. The Root Mean Square (RMS) surface roughness measured post-growth by AFM ranges from 3 to 10 nm over 10 × 10 μm2 areas, for a film thickness of 100-600 nm. The results of 2θ-ω XRD scans on (1 1 1) and (3 1 1) planes reveal a stacking disorder in the AlGaP layer and further XRD phi-scan measurements on GaP (3 1 1) show strong peaks with 3-fold rotational symmetry and additional of 3-fold weak peaks indicating only a negligible fraction of the twinned crystal orientation in the substrate. TEM images of these samples show a smooth interface between the AlGaP layer and GaP substrate, and reveal the presence of a high density of extended defects such as stacking faults, twinning and dislocations lines in AlGaP layer whereas the GaP layer appears as pure Zinc-Blende. Further TEM analysis reveals composition and local strain variations for GaP/AlGaP samples associated with an undulated surface.

  11. Low temperature p-type doping of (Al)GaN layers using ammonia molecular beam epitaxy for InGaN laser diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malinverni, M., E-mail: marco.malinverni@epfl.ch; Lamy, J.-M.; Martin, D.; Grandjean, N. [ICMP, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Feltin, E.; Dorsaz, J. [NOVAGAN AG, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Castiglia, A.; Rossetti, M.; Duelk, M.; Vélez, C. [EXALOS AG, CH-8952 Schlieren (Switzerland)

    2014-12-15

    We demonstrate state-of-the-art p-type (Al)GaN layers deposited at low temperature (740 °C) by ammonia molecular beam epitaxy (NH{sub 3}-MBE) to be used as top cladding of laser diodes (LDs) with the aim of further reducing the thermal budget on the InGaN quantum well active region. Typical p-type GaN resistivities and contact resistances are 0.4 Ω cm and 5 × 10{sup −4} Ω cm{sup 2}, respectively. As a test bed, we fabricated a hybrid laser structure emitting at 400 nm combining n-type AlGaN cladding and InGaN active region grown by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy, with the p-doped waveguide and cladding layers grown by NH{sub 3}-MBE. Single-mode ridge-waveguide LD exhibits a threshold voltage as low as 4.3 V for an 800 × 2 μm{sup 2} ridge dimension and a threshold current density of ∼5 kA cm{sup −2} in continuous wave operation. The series resistance of the device is 6 Ω and the resistivity is 1.5 Ω cm, confirming thereby the excellent electrical properties of p-type Al{sub 0.06}Ga{sub 0.94}N:Mg despite the low growth temperature.

  12. Calcium impurity as a source of non-radiative recombination in (In,Ga)N layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    KAUST Repository

    Young, E. C.

    2016-11-23

    Ca as an unintentional impurity has been investigated in III-nitride layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). It is found that Ca originates from the substrate surface, even if careful cleaning and rinsing procedures are applied. The initial Ca surface coverage is ∼1012 cm−2, which is consistent with previous reports on GaAs and silicon wafers. At the onset of growth, the Ca species segregates at the growth front while incorporating at low levels. The incorporation rate is strongly temperature dependent. It is about 0.03% at 820 °C and increases by two orders of magnitude when the temperature is reduced to 600 °C, which is the typical growth temperature for InGaN alloy. Consequently, [Ca] is as high as 1018 cm−3 in InGaN/GaN quantum well structures. Such a huge concentration might be detrimental for the efficiency of light emitting diodes (LEDs) if one considers that Ca is potentially a source of Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) defects. We thus developed a specific growth strategy to reduce [Ca] in the MBE grown LEDs, which consisted of burying Ca in a low temperature InGaN/GaN superlattice (SL) before the growth of the active region. Finally, two LED samples with and without an SL were fabricated. An increase in the output power by one order of magnitude was achieved when Ca was reduced in the LED active region, providing evidence for the role of Ca in the SRH recombination.

  13. Electron transport in unipolar InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well structures grown by NH3 molecular beam epitaxy

    KAUST Repository

    Browne, David A.

    2015-05-14

    © 2015 AIP Publishing LLC. Unipolar-light emitting diode like structures were grown by NH3 molecular beam epitaxy on c plane (0001) GaN on sapphire templates. Studies were performed to experimentally examine the effect of random alloy fluctuations on electron transport through quantum well active regions. These unipolar structures served as a test vehicle to test our 2D model of the effect of compositional fluctuations on polarization-induced barriers. Variables that were systematically studied included varying quantum well number from 0 to 5, well thickness of 1.5 nm, 3 nm, and 4.5 nm, and well compositions of In0.14Ga0.86N and In0.19Ga0.81N. Diode-like current voltage behavior was clearly observed due to the polarization-induced conduction band barrier in the quantum well region. Increasing quantum well width and number were shown to have a significant impact on increasing the turn-on voltage of each device. Temperature dependent IV measurements clearly revealed the dominant effect of thermionic behavior for temperatures from room temperature and above. Atom probe tomography was used to directly analyze parameters of the alloy fluctuations in the quantum wells including amplitude and length scale of compositional variation. A drift diffusion Schrödinger Poisson method accounting for two dimensional indium fluctuations (both in the growth direction and within the wells) was used to correctly model the turn-on voltages of the devices as compared to traditional 1D simulation models.

  14. Enhancement of open circuit voltage in InGaAsP-inverted thin-film solar cells grown by solid-source molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, Ryuji; Makita, Kikuo; Tayagaki, Takeshi; Sugaya, Takeyoshi

    2017-11-01

    Because InGaAsP alloys grown on InP substrates with 1.05 eV bandgap are often susceptible to compositional fluctuations owing to spinodal-like decomposition due to the miscibility gap, the corresponding open circuit voltage (VOC) for InGaAsP solar cells is typically smaller than the empirically expected value. In this study, we investigate the impact of the device structure on the VOC of In0.83Ga0.17As0.36P0.64 solar cells grown by solid-source molecular beam epitaxy. In comparison to the upright homojunction cell as a baseline, a reverse saturation current density (J0) for the upright heterojunction cell was effectively reduced from 3.2×10-4 to 1.5×10-6 mA/cm2 using the n-InP emitter with higher electron mobility, resulting in an enhancement of VOC from 0.557 to 0.568 V. Owing to the reduction of J0 to 2.8×10-7 mA/cm2, the VOC was further enhanced to 0.590 V for the inverted heterojunction cell. For the reduction of J0, a longer radiative lifetime of 20.2 ns obtained for the inverted heterojunction cell by photoluminescence decay at room temperature, presumably caused by light trapping, was responsible. Consequently, the efficiency was enhanced from 9.5% for the upright homojunction cell to 12.1% for the inverted heterojunction cell. Using the inverted InGaAsP cell, we demonstrated the mechanically stacked InGaP/GaAs//inverted-InGaAsP (// denotes the bonded interface) triple-junction solar cells with enhanced VOC of 2.64 V.

  15. GaAsBi/GaAs multi-quantum well LED grown by molecular beam epitaxy using a two-substrate-temperature technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisan Patil, Pallavi; Luna, Esperanza; Matsuda, Teruyoshi; Yamada, Kohki; Kamiya, Keisuke; Ishikawa, Fumitaro; Shimomura, Satoshi

    2017-03-01

    We report a GaAs0.96Bi0.04/GaAs multiple quantum well (MQW) light emitting diode (LED) grown by molecular beam epitaxy using a two-substrate-temperature (TST) technique. In particular, the QWs and the barriers in the intrinsic region were grown at the different temperatures of {T}{{GaAsBi}} = 350 °C and {T}{{GaAs}} = 550 ^\\circ {{C}}, respectively. Investigations of the microstructure using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) reveal homogeneous MQWs free of extended defects. Furthermore, the local determination of the Bi distribution profile across the MQWs region using TEM techniques confirm the uniform Bi distribution, while revealing a slightly chemically graded GaAs-on-GaAsBi interface due to Bi surface segregation. Despite this small broadening, we found that Bi segregation is significantly reduced (up to 18% reduction) compared to previous reports on Bi segregation in GaAsBi/GaAs MQWs. Hence, the TST procedure proves as a very efficient method to reduce Bi segregation and thus increase the quality of the layers and interfaces. These improvements positively reflect in the optical properties. Room temperature photoluminescence and electroluminescence (EL) at 1.23 μm emission wavelength are successfully demonstrated using TST MQWs containing less Bi content than in previous reports. Finally, LED fabricated using the present TST technique show current-voltage (I-V) curves with a forward voltage of 3.3 V at an injection current of 130 mA under 1.0 kA cm-2 current excitation. These results not only demonstrate that TST technique provides optical device quality GaAsBi/GaAs MQWs but highlight the relevance of TST-based growth techniques on the fabrication of future heterostructure devices based on dilute bismides.

  16. Real-time spectroscopic ellipsometry and its application to the processing of yttrium barium copper oxide films by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, Brady J.

    The major issues which currently limit the use of YBCO in devices based on Josephson junction technology are related to the properties of the interfaces between YBCO and other materials. Specifically, oxygen deficiency at the interface severely degrades the properties of a junction. In this thesis, both ex situ and real-time spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE and RTSE) have been explored for use as tools to understand this effect. Initially, the sensitivity of SE to the oxygen content in the near surface region of a YBCO film was studied. It was found that for atomically smooth c-axis oriented YBCO films, SE is sensitive to the oxygen concentration within one unit cell, even when the profile is graded. The sensitivity to small changes in the surface concentration of oxygen was also determined. This was done for both a- and c-axis oriented films that were exposed or buried under a normal metal layer. SE was then used to determine the reference dielectric function data for five common YBCO substrate materials; LaAlO3,/ NdGaO3,/ (LaAlO3)0.3- (Sr2AlTaO6)0.7,/ LaSrGaO4 and 9.5 mol% Y2O3-ZrO2. Also, data for one known reaction layer material, BaZrO3, was determined. An RTSE was constructed for a molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) deposition system for observation of the processing of YBCO and one of its constituent oxides. The instrument was used to monitor the deposition of Y2O3 on Si. The thickness derived from the RTSE measurement showed excellent agreement with the thickness determined by in situ flux measurements, as well as with Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. From comparison of the cation incorporation vs. the arrival rate, a sticking coefficient of ≈1.00 ± 0.07 was obtained for Y. Finally, SE was used to study the diffusion of oxygen in YBCO. The activation energy (Ea) for the diffusion of oxygen in YBCO was found by heating an initially oxygen deficient film at various rates in a 10% O3/90% O2 atmosphere and observing the temperature at which oxidation was

  17. Analysis of low molecular weight acids by negative mode matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shroff, Rohit; Muck, Alexander; Svatos, Ales

    2007-01-01

    Free 9-aminoacridine base is demonstrated to be a suitable matrix for negative mode matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometric (MALDI-TOFMS) analysis of a wide range of low molecular weight organic acids including aliphatic (from acetic to palmitic acid), aromatic acids, phytohormones (e.g. jasmonic and salicylic acids), and amino acids. Low limits of quantitation in the femtomolar range (jasmonic - 250 fmol; caffeic - 160 fmol and salicylic - 12.5 fmol) and linear detector response over two concentration orders in the pico- and femtomolar range are extremely encouraging for the direct study of such acids in complex biological matrices. Copyright (c) 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. An ultrasonic atomization assisted synthesis of self-assembled manganese oxide octahedral molecular sieve nanostructures and their application in catalysis and water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Aparna; Kuo, Chung-Hao; Dharmarathna, Saminda; Luo, Zhu; Rathnayake, Dinithi; He, Junkai; Suib, Steven L

    2017-04-13

    Manganese oxides of octahedral molecular sieve (OMS-2) type have important applications in oxidation catalysis, adsorption, and as battery materials. The synthesis methods employed determine their morphology and textural properties which markedly affect their catalytic activity. In this work, a room temperature ultrasonic atomization assisted synthesis of OMS-2 type materials is demonstrated. This synthesis differs from previously reported methods in that it is a simple, no-heat application that leads to a striking morphological characteristic of uniformly sized OMS-2 fibers and their self-assembly into dense as well as hollow spheres. Control of various parameters in the ultrasonic atomization assisted synthesis led to OMS-2 with high surface areas (between 136-160 m(2) g(-1)) and mesoporosity. Catalytically these materials have higher activities in the oxidation of hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), a bio-based chemical, (65% conversion of HMF vs. 14% with conventional OMS-2 catalyst) and a higher adsorption of lead from aqueous solutions (70% vs. 12% in conventional OMS-2 materials).

  19. Differentiation and classification of beers with flame atomic spectrometry and molecular absorption spectrometry and sample preparation assisted by microwaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellido-Milla, Dolores; Moreno-Perez, Juana M.; Hernández-Artiga, María. P.

    2000-07-01

    The characterization of beer samples has a lot of interest because their composition can affect the taste and stability of beer and consumer health. Flame atomic absorption spectrometry was used to determine Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, Mg, Ca and Al. Sodium and K were determined by flame atomic emission spectrometry. A sample preparation method was developed, based on treatment with HNO 3 and H 2O 2 in a microwave oven. This has many advantages over the methods found in the literature. The combination of the results of atomic spectrometry and the spectrum obtained by molecular absorption spectrometry provides information on the inorganic and organic components of the samples. The application of chemometric techniques to chemical composition data could be extremely useful for food quality control. The metal concentrations, the molecular absorption spectrum, the pH and conductivity of each sample were subject to analysis of variance and linear discriminant analysis. Twenty-five different beer samples were used to differentiate and classify different types of beers.

  20. Discovery of Novel Inhibitors for Nek6 Protein through Homology Model Assisted Structure Based Virtual Screening and Molecular Docking Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Srinivasan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nek6 is a member of the NIMA (never in mitosis, gene A-related serine/threonine kinase family that plays an important role in the initiation of mitotic cell cycle progression. This work is an attempt to emphasize the structural and functional relationship of Nek6 protein based on homology modeling and binding pocket analysis. The three-dimensional structure of Nek6 was constructed by molecular modeling studies and the best model was further assessed by PROCHECK, ProSA, and ERRAT plot in order to analyze the quality and consistency of generated model. The overall quality of computed model showed 87.4% amino acid residues under the favored region. A 3 ns molecular dynamics simulation confirmed that the structure was reliable and stable. Two lead compounds (Binding database ID: 15666, 18602 were retrieved through structure-based virtual screening and induced fit docking approaches as novel Nek6 inhibitors. Hence, we concluded that the potential compounds may act as new leads for Nek6 inhibitors designing.

  1. Application of nonpolar matrices for the analysis of low molecular weight nonpolar synthetic polymers by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macha; Limbach; Savickas

    2000-08-01

    The application of nonpolar matrices for the analysis of low molecular weight nonpolar synthetic polymers using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) is demonstrated. Anthracene, pyrene, and acenaphthene were utilized as nonpolar matrices for the analysis of polybutadiene, polyisoprene, and polystyrene samples of various average molecular weights ranging from about 700 to 5,000. The standard MALDI-MS approach for the analysis of these types of polymers involves the use of conventional acidic matrices, such as all-trans-retinoic acid, with an additional cationization reagent. The nonpolar matrices used in this study are shown to be as equally effective as the conventional matrices. The uniform mixing of the nonpolar matrices and the nonpolar analytes enhances the MALDI-MS spectral reproducibility. Silver salts were found to be the best cationization reagents for all of the cases studied. Copper salts worked well for polystyrene, poorly for polyisoprene, and not at all for polybutadiene samples. These matrices should be useful for the characterization of hydrocarbon polymers and other analytes, such as modified polymers, which may potentially be sensitive to acidic matrices.

  2. Improving Blast Resistance of a Thermo-Sensitive Genic Male Sterile Rice Line GD-8S by Molecular Marker-Assisted Selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu-ge LIU

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The broad-spectrum blast resistance gene Pi-1, from donor line BL122, was introduced into a thermo-sensitive genic male sterile rice line GD-8S, which possessed good grain quality but high susceptibility to rice blast, by using backcross breeding and molecular marker-assisted selection. Five elite improved male sterile lines, RGD8S-1, RGD8S-2, RGD8S-3, RGD8S-4 and RGD8S-5, were selected based on the results of molecular marker analysis, spikelet sterility, recovery rate of genetic background and agronomic traits. Thirty-three representative blast isolates collected from Guangdong Province, China were used to inoculate the improved lines and the original line GD-8S artificially. The resistance frequencies of the improved lines ranged from 76.47% to 100%, much higher than that of the original line GD-8S (9.09%. On the agronomic characters, there were no significant differences between the improved lines and GD-8S except for flag leaf length and panicle number per plant. The improved lines could be used for breeding hybrid rice with high blast resistance.

  3. Marker-Assisted Molecular Profiling, Deletion Mutant Analysis, and RNA-Seq Reveal a Disease Resistance Cluster Associated with Uromyces appendiculatus Infection in Common Bean Phaseolus vulgaris L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Antonette R; Donofrio, Nicole; Sripathi, Venkateswara R; McClean, Phillip E; Lee, Rian K; Pastor-Corrales, Marcial; Kalavacharla, Venu Kal

    2017-05-23

    Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is an important legume, useful for its high protein and dietary fiber. The fungal pathogen Uromyces appendiculatus (Pers.) Unger can cause major loss in susceptible varieties of the common bean. The Ur-3 locus provides race specific resistance to virulent strains or races of the bean rust pathogen along with Crg, (Complements resistance gene), which is required for Ur-3-mediated rust resistance. In this study, we inoculated two common bean genotypes (resistant "Sierra" and susceptible crg) with rust race 53 of U. appendiculatus, isolated leaf RNA at specific time points, and sequenced their transcriptomes. First, molecular markers were used to locate and identify a 250 kb deletion on chromosome 10 in mutant crg (which carries a deletion at the Crg locus). Next, we identified differential expression of several disease resistance genes between Mock Inoculated (MI) and Inoculated (I) samples of "Sierra" leaf RNA within the 250 kb delineated region. Both marker assisted molecular profiling and RNA-seq were used to identify possible transcriptomic locations of interest regarding the resistance in the common bean to race 53. Identification of differential expression among samples in disease resistance clusters in the bean genome may elucidate significant genes underlying rust resistance. Along with preserving favorable traits in the crop, the current research may also aid in global sustainability of food stocks necessary for many populations.

  4. An automated spin-assisted approach for molecular layer-by-layer assembly of crosslinked polymer thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Edwin P; Lee, Jung-Hyun; Chung, Jun Young; Stafford, Christopher M

    2012-11-01

    We present the design of an automated spin-coater that facilitates fabrication of polymer films based on molecular layer-by-layer (mLbL) assembly. Specifically, we demonstrate the synthesis of ultrathin crosslinked fully-aromatic polyamide (PA) films that are chemically identical to polymer membranes used in water desalination applications as measured by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. X-ray reflectivity measurements indicate that the automated mLbL assembly creates films with a constant film growth rate and minimal roughness compared with the traditional interfacial polymerization of PA. This automated spin-coater improves the scalability and sample-to-sample consistency by reducing human involvement in the mLbL assembly.

  5. An automated spin-assisted approach for molecular layer-by-layer assembly of crosslinked polymer thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Edwin P.; Chung, Jun Young; Stafford, Christopher M. [Polymers Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Lee, Jung-Hyun [Center for Materials Architecturing, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    We present the design of an automated spin-coater that facilitates fabrication of polymer films based on molecular layer-by-layer (mLbL) assembly. Specifically, we demonstrate the synthesis of ultrathin crosslinked fully-aromatic polyamide (PA) films that are chemically identical to polymer membranes used in water desalination applications as measured by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. X-ray reflectivity measurements indicate that the automated mLbL assembly creates films with a constant film growth rate and minimal roughness compared with the traditional interfacial polymerization of PA. This automated spin-coater improves the scalability and sample-to-sample consistency by reducing human involvement in the mLbL assembly.

  6. Optimized Solid Phase-Assisted Synthesis of Dendrons Applicable as Scaffolds for Radiolabeled Bioactive Multivalent Compounds Intended for Molecular Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Fischer

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic structures, being highly homogeneous and symmetric, represent ideal scaffolds for the multimerization of bioactive molecules and thus enable the synthesis of compounds of high valency which are e.g., applicable in radiolabeled form as multivalent radiotracers for in vivo imaging. As the commonly applied solution phase synthesis of dendritic scaffolds is cumbersome and time-consuming, a synthesis strategy was developed that allows for the efficient assembly of acid amide bond-based highly modular dendrons on solid support via standard Fmoc solid phase peptide synthesis protocols. The obtained dendritic structures comprised up to 16 maleimide functionalities and were derivatized on solid support with the chelating agent DOTA. The functionalized dendrons furthermore could be efficiently reacted with structurally variable model thiol-bearing bioactive molecules via click chemistry and finally radiolabeled with 68Ga. Thus, this solid phase-assisted dendron synthesis approach enables the fast and straightforward assembly of bioactive multivalent constructs for example applicable as radiotracers for in vivo imaging with Positron Emission Tomography (PET.

  7. Novel microfabrication stage allowing for one-photon and multi-photon light assisted molecular immobilization and for multi-photon microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Odete; Snider, Scott; Zadoyan, Ruben; Nguyen, Quoc-Thang; Vorum, Henrik; Petersen, Steffen B.; Neves-Petersen, Maria Teresa

    2017-02-01

    Light Assisted Molecular Immobilization (LAMI) results in spatially oriented and localized covalent coupling of biomolecules onto thiol reactive surfaces. LAMI is possible due to the conserved spatial proximity between aromatic residues and disulfide bridges in proteins. When aromatic residues are excited with UV light (275-295nm), disulphide bridges are disrupted and the formed thiol groups covalently bind to surfaces. Immobilization hereby reported is achieved in a microfabrication stage coupled to a fs-laser, through one- or multi-photon excitation. The fundamental 840nm output is tripled to 280nm and focused onto the sample, leading to one-photon excitation and molecular immobilization. The sample rests on a xyz-stage with micrometer step resolution and is illuminated according to a pattern uploaded to the software controlling the stage and the shutter. Molecules are immobilized according to such pattern, with micrometer spatial resolution. Spatial masks inserted in the light path lead to light diffraction patterns used to immobilize biomolecules with submicrometer spatial resolution. Light diffraction patterns are imaged by an inbuilt microscope. Two-photon microscopy and imaging of the fluorescent microbeads is shown. Immobilization of proteins, e.g. C-reactive protein, and of an engineered molecular beacon has been successfully achieved. The beacon was coupled to a peptide containing a disulfide bridge neighboring a tryptophan residue, being this way possible to immobilize the beacon on a surface using one-photon LAMI. This technology is being implemented in the creation of point-of-care biosensors aiming at the detection of cancer and cardiovascular disease markers.

  8. Beam Diagnostics

    CERN Document Server

    Raich, U

    2013-01-01

    As soon as the first particles emerge from an ion source, the source characteristics need to be determined. The total beam intensity, the transverse particle distributions, the beam divergence and emittance as well as the longitudinal parameters of the beam must be measured. This chapter provides an overview of typical measurement methods and the instruments used, and shows the results obtained.

  9. Molecular-beam epitaxial growth of tensile-strained and n-doped Ge/Si(001) films using a GaP decomposition source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luong, T.K.P. [Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS CINaM-UMR 7325, F-13288 Marseille Cedex 09 (France); Ghrib, A. [Institut d' Electronique Fondamentale, CNRS UMR 8622, Université Paris-Sud, Bât. 220, F-91405 Orsay (France); Dau, M.T.; Zrir, M.A. [Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS CINaM-UMR 7325, F-13288 Marseille Cedex 09 (France); Stoffel, M. [Université de Lorraine, Institut Jean Lamour, UMR CNRS 7198, Nancy-Université, BP 70239, F-54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy Cedex (France); Le Thanh, V., E-mail: lethanh@cinam.univ.mrs.fr [Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS CINaM-UMR 7325, F-13288 Marseille Cedex 09 (France); Daineche, R. [Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS IM2NP-UMR 6242, F-13397 Marseille Cedex 20 (France); Le, T.G.; Heresanu, V.; Abbes, O.; Petit, M. [Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS CINaM-UMR 7325, F-13288 Marseille Cedex 09 (France); El Kurdi, M.; Boucaud, P. [Institut d' Electronique Fondamentale, CNRS UMR 8622, Université Paris-Sud, Bât. 220, F-91405 Orsay (France); Rinnert, H. [Université de Lorraine, Institut Jean Lamour, UMR CNRS 7198, Nancy-Université, BP 70239, F-54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy Cedex (France); Murota, J. [Res. Inst. Elec. Comm., Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2014-04-30

    We have combined numerous characterization techniques to investigate the growth of tensile-strained and n-doped Ge films on Si(001) substrates by means of solid-source molecular-beam epitaxy. The Ge growth was carried out using a two-step growth method: a low-temperature growth to produce strain relaxed and smooth buffer layers, followed by a high-temperature growth to get high crystalline quality Ge layers. It is shown that the Ge/Si Stranski–Krastanov growth mode can be completely suppressed when the growth is performed at substrate temperatures ranging between 260 °C and 300 °C. X-ray diffraction measurements indicate that the Ge films grown at temperatures of 700–770 °C are tensile-strained with typical values lying in the range of 0.22–0.24%. Cyclic annealing allows further increase in the tensile strain up to 0.30%, which represents the highest value ever reported in the Ge/Si system. n-Doping of Ge was carried out using a GaP decomposition source. It is shown that heavy n-doping levels are obtained at low substrate temperatures (210–250 °C). For a GaP source temperature of 725 °C and a substrate temperature of 210 °C, a phosphorus concentration of about 10{sup 19} cm{sup −3} can be obtained. Photoluminescence measurements reveal an intensity enhancement of about 16 times of the direct band gap emission and display a redshift of 25 meV that can be attributed to band gap narrowing due to a high n-doping level. Finally, we discuss about growth strategies allowing optimizing the Ge growth/doping process for optoelectronic applications. - Highlights: • We investigate the effect of tensile strain and n-doping on Ge optical properties. • We show that cyclic annealing allows getting a tensile strain up to 0.30% in Ge. • n-Doping of Ge/Si films is performed using a GaP decomposition source. • We show that n-doping is more important to enhance the photoluminescence intensity. • We present new growth strategies to develop Ge

  10. Catalytic Steam Reforming of Gasifier Tars: On-Line Monitoring of Tars with a Transportable Molecular-Beam Mass Spectrometer; Milestone Completion Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpenter, D.; Ratcliff, M.; Dayton, D.

    2002-05-01

    A method for evaluating catalytic tar decomposition in real time is presented. The effectiveness of two catalysts are compared. A key technical and economic barrier to commercialization of biomass gasification technologies is the removal of tars that are unavoidably formed in this thermochemical process. Tars contain fuel value; however, they are problematic in gas engines (both reciprocating and turbine) because they condense in the fuel delivery system, forming deposits that negatively affect operation and efficiency. These tars also combust with high luminosity, potentially forming soot particles. The conventional technology for tar removal is wet scrubbing. Although this approach has shown some success, there are significant equipment and operating costs associated with it. In order to prevent the generation of toxic wastewater, the tars must be separated and either disposed as hazardous waste or, preferably, combusted in the gasification plant. A conceptually better approach is catalytic steam reforming of the tars to hydrogen and carbon monoxide (CO), effectively increasing the gasification efficiency and eliminating the problems mentioned above. In FY2000, Battelle Columbus Laboratories attempted to demonstrate integrated gasification-gas turbine operation using catalytic steam reforming of tars. NREL participated in those tests using the transportable molecular-beam mass spectrometer (TMBMS) to monitor the catalytic reactor's performance on-line [10]. Unfortunately, the pilot plant tests encountered operational problems that prevented conclusive determination of the efficacy of the selected catalyst (Battelle's DN34). In FY2001, NREL performed on-site tar steam reforming tests using a slip-stream of hot pyrolysis gas from the Thermochemical Process Development Unit (TCPDU), which was directed to a bench-scale fluidized bed reactor system designed expressly for this purpose. Supporting this effort, the TMBMS was employed to provide on-line analysis

  11. Characterization of Polar, Semi-Polar, and Non-Polar p-n Homo and Hetero-junctions grown by Ammonia Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurni, Christophe Antoine

    Widespread interest in the group III-Nitrides began with the achievement of p-type conductivity in the early 1990s in Mg-doped GaN films grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) by Nakamura et al. Indeed, MOCVD-grown Mg-doped GaN is insulating as-grown, because of the formation of neutral Mg-H complexes. Nakamura et al. showed that a rapid thermal anneal removes the hydrogen and enables p-conductivity. Shortly after this discovery, the first LEDs and lasers were demonstrated by Nakamura et al. The necessary annealing step is problematic for devices which need a buried p-layer, such as hetero-junction bipolar transistors. Ammonia molecular beam epitaxy (NH3-MBE) has a great potential for growing vertical III-Nitrides-based devices, thank to its N-rich growth conditions and all the usual advantages of MBE, which include a low-impurity growth environment, in situ monitoring techniques as well as the ability to grow sharp interfaces. We first investigated the growth of p-GaN by NH3-MBE. We found that the hole concentration strongly depends on the growth temperature. Thanks to comprehensive Hall and transfer length measurements, we found evidences for a compensating donor defects in NH3-MBE-grown Mg-doped GaN films. High-quality p-n junctions with very low reverse current and close to unity ideality factor were also grown and investigated. For the design of heterojunction devices such as laser diodes, light emitting diodes or heterojunction bipolar transistors, hetero-interface's characteristics such as the band offset or interface charges are fundamental. A technique developed by Kroemer et al. uses capacitance-voltage (C-V) profiling to extract band-offsets and charges at a hetero-interface. We applied this technique to the III-Nitrides. We discovered that for the polar III-Nitrides, the technique is not applicable because of the very large polarization charge. We nevertheless successfully measured the polarization charge at the AlGaN/GaN hetero

  12. Molecular beam epitaxy of GeTe-Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} phase change materials studied by X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shayduk, Roman

    2010-05-20

    The integration of phase change materials into semiconductor heterostructures may lead to the development of a new generation of high density non-volatile phase change memories. Epitaxial phase change materials allow to study the detailed structural changes during the phase transition and to determine the scaling limits of the memory. This work is dedicated to the epitaxial growth of Ge-Sb-Te phase change alloys on GaSb(001). We deposit Ge-Sb-Te (GST) films on GaSb(001) substrates by means of molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The film orientation and lattice constant evolution is determined in real time during growth using grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GID). The nucleation stage of the growth is studied in situ using reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED). Four growth regimes of GST on GaSb(001) were observed: amorphous, polycrystalline, incubated epitaxial and direct epitaxial. Amorphous film grows for substrate temperatures below 100 C. For substrate temperatures in the range 100-160 C, the film grows in polycrystalline form. Incubated epitaxial growth is observed at temperatures from 180 to 210 C. This growth regime is characterized by an initial 0.6nm thick amorphous layer formation, which crystallizes epitaxially as the film thickness increases. The determined lattice constant of the films is 6.01 A, very close to that of the metastable GST phase. The films predominantly possess an epitaxial cube-on-cube relationship. At higher temperatures the films grow epitaxially, however the growth rate is rapidly decreasing with temperature. At temperatures above 270 C the growth rate is zero. The composition of the grown films is close to 2:2:5 for Ge, Sb and Te, respectively. The determined crystal structure of the films is face centered cubic (FCC) with a rhombohedral distortion. The analysis of X-ray peak widths gives a value for the rhombohedral angle of 89.56 . We observe two types of reflections in reciprocal space indicating two FCC sublattices in

  13. Comparison of single junction AlGaInP and GaInP solar cells grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masuda, T; Tomasulo, S; Lang, JR; Lee, ML

    2015-03-07

    We have investigated similar to 2.0 eV (AlxGa1-x)(0.51)In0.49P and similar to 1.9 eV Ga0.51In0.49P single junction solar cells grown on both on-axis and misoriented GaAs substrates by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Although lattice-matched (AlxGa1-x)(0.51)In0.49P solar cells are highly attractive for space and concentrator photovoltaics, there have been few reports on the MBE growth of such cells. In this work, we demonstrate open circuit voltages (V-oc) ranging from 1.29 to 1.30 V for Ga0.51In0.49P cells, and 1.35-1.37 V for (AlxGa1-x)(0.51)In0.49P cells. Growth on misoriented substrates enabled the bandgap-voltage offset (W-oc = E-g/q - V-oc) of Ga0.51In0.49P cells to decrease from similar to 575 mV to similar to 565 mV, while that of (AlxGa1-x)(0.51)In0.49P cells remained nearly constant at 620 mV. The constant Woc as a function of substrate offcut for (AlxGa1-x)(0.51)In0.49P implies greater losses from non-radiative recombination compared with the Ga0.51In0.49P devices. In addition to larger Woc values, the (AlxGa1-x)(0.51)In0.49P cells exhibited significantly lower internal quantum efficiency (IQE) values than Ga0.51In0.49P cells due to recombination at the emitter/window layer interface. A thin emitter design is experimentally shown to be highly effective in improving IQE, particularly at short wavelengths. Our work shows that with further optimization of both cell structure and growth conditions, MBE-grown (AlxGa1-x)(0.51)In0.49P will be a promising wide-bandgap candidate material for high-efficiency, lattice-matched multi-junction solar cells. (C) 2015 AIP Publishing LLC.

  14. Deep levels in a-plane, high Mg-content Mg{sub x}Zn{sub 1-x}O epitaxial layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guer, Emre [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Atatuerk University, Erzurum 25240 (Turkey); 205 Dreese Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University, 2015 Neil Avenue, Columbus, Ohio 43210-1272 (United States); Tabares, G.; Hierro, A. [Dpto. Ingenieria Electronica and ISOM, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Arehart, A.; Ringel, S. A. [205 Dreese Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ohio State University, 2015 Neil Avenue, Columbus, Ohio 43210-1272 (United States); Chauveau, J. M. [CRHEA-CNRS, 06560 Valbonne (France); University of Nice Sophia Antipolis, ParcValrose, 06102 Nice Cedex 2 (France)

    2012-12-15

    Deep level defects in n-type unintentionally doped a-plane Mg{sub x}Zn{sub 1-x}O, grown by molecular beam epitaxy on r-plane sapphire were fully characterized using deep level optical spectroscopy (DLOS) and related methods. Four compositions of Mg{sub x}Zn{sub 1-x}O were examined with x = 0.31, 0.44, 0.52, and 0.56 together with a control ZnO sample. DLOS measurements revealed the presence of five deep levels in each Mg-containing sample, having energy levels of E{sub c} - 1.4 eV, 2.1 eV, 2.6 V, and E{sub v} + 0.3 eV and 0.6 eV. For all Mg compositions, the activation energies of the first three states were constant with respect to the conduction band edge, whereas the latter two revealed constant activation energies with respect to the valence band edge. In contrast to the ternary materials, only three levels, at E{sub c} - 2.1 eV, E{sub v} + 0.3 eV, and 0.6 eV, were observed for the ZnO control sample in this systematically grown series of samples. Substantially higher concentrations of the deep levels at E{sub v} + 0.3 eV and E{sub c} - 2.1 eV were observed in ZnO compared to the Mg alloyed samples. Moreover, there is a general invariance of trap concentration of the E{sub v} + 0.3 eV and 0.6 eV levels on Mg content, while at least and order of magnitude dependency of the E{sub c} - 1.4 eV and E{sub c} - 2.6 eV levels in Mg alloyed samples.

  15. Progressing towards more quantitative analytical pyrolysis of soil organic matter using molecular beam mass spectroscopy of whole soils and added standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haddix, Michelle L.; Magrini-Bair, Kim; Evans, Robert J.; Conant, Richard T.; Wallenstein, Matthew D.; Morris, Sherri J.; Calderón, Francisco; Paul, Eldor A.

    2016-12-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) is extremely complex. It is composed of hundreds of different organic substances and it has been difficult to quantify these diverse substances in a dynamic-ecosystem functioning standpoint. Analytical pyrolysis has been used to compare chemical differences between soils, but its ability to measure the absolute amount of a specific compound in the soil is still in question. Our objective was to assess whether utilizing pyrolysis-molecular beam mass spectroscopy (py-MBMS) to define the signature of known reference compounds (adenine, indole, palmitic acid, etc.) and biological samples (chitin, fungi, cellulose, etc.) separately and when added to whole soils it was possible to make py-MBMS more quantitative. Reference compounds, spanning a wide variety of compound categories, and biological samples, expected to be present in SOM, were added to three soils from Colorado, Ohio, and Massachusetts that have varying total C, % clay, and clay type. Py-MBMS, a rapid analysis technique originally developed to analyze complex biomolecules, flash pyrolyzes soil organic matter to form products that are often considered characteristic of the original molecular structure. Samples were pyrolyzed at 550 degrees C by py-MBMS. All samples were weighed and %C and %N determined both before and after pyrolysis to evaluate mass loss, C loss, and N loss for the samples.An average relationship of r2 = 0.76 (P = 0.005) was found for the amount of cellulose added to soil at 25, 50, and 100% of soil C relative to the ion intensity of select mass/charge of the compound.There was a relationship of r2 = 0.93 (P < 0.001) for the amount of indole added to soil at 25, 50, and 100% of soil C and the ion intensity of the associated mass variables (mass/charge). Comparing spectra of pure compounds with the spectra of the compounds added to soil and isolated clay showed that interference could occur based on soil type and compound with the Massachusetts soil with high C (55

  16. Current understanding of PrnP Genetics: A tool for Molecular Assisted Selection in Sheep Populations (A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viorica Cosier

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Scrapie is a neurodegenerative prion disease of sheep, goats and mouflons, belonging to the group of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs, which affects humans as well. Even though classical scrapie has been known for over 250 years, the 1985 BSE crisis related to the advent of new forms of the Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD in humans imposed the implementation of rapid coercive legal measures of prevention, control and eradication of TSEs. According to the prion hypothesis, the transmissible agent is the pathological isoform (PrPSc of cellular prion protein (PrPC. Specific polymorphisms of the gene that encodes cell prion protein (PrnP in sheep have been associated with resistance / natural susceptibility to the development and progression of the disease. Combinations of alleles at three adjacent codons (136 [A/V], 154 [H/R], 171 [H/Q/R] underpin the classification of 15 possible genotypes in risk classes, applicable in selection schemes where the maximum resistance is conferred by ARR allele, and the minimum by the VRQ allele. Although, after applying these programmes, the genetic structure of sheep populations has changed favourably, genotype association studies showed that no genotype is completely resistant to the infection, including homozygote ARR / ARR. With the discovery of atypical scrapie (Nor98, it became evident that the connection between the genetics of prion protein gene polymorphisms and susceptibility to the disease must be re-evaluated individually for each breed. In scrapie monitoring and control programmes, three diagnostic categories of the disease are observed: classical scrapie, atypical scrapie and BSE scrapie in small ruminant. This review shows the chronology of progress in the fight for the eradication of TSEs in sheep, 30 years after the BSE epidemic outburst, focusing especially on the link between the molecular diagnostic forms and the genetics of the disease.

  17. Molecular Weight Cut-Off and Structural Analysis of Vacuum-Assisted Titania Membranes for Water Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Nurehan Abd Jalil

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This work investigates the structural formation and analyses of titania membranes (TM prepared using different vacuum exposure times for molecular weight (MW cut-off performance and oil/water separation. Titania membranes were synthesized via a sol-gel method and coated on macroporous alumina tubes followed by exposure to a vacuum between 30 and 1200 s and then calcined at 400 °C. X-ray diffraction and nitrogen adsorption analyses showed that the crystallite size and particle size of titania increased as a function of vacuum time. All the TM membranes were mesoporous with an average pore diameter of ~3.6 nm with an anatase crystal morphology. Water, glucose, sucrose, and polyvinylpyrrolidone with 40 and 360 kDa (PVP-40 kDa and PVP-360 kDa were used as feed solutions for MW cut-off and hexadecane solution for oil filtration investigation. The TM membranes were not able to separate glucose and sucrose, thus indicating the membrane pore sizes are larger than the kinetic diameter of sucrose of 0.9 nm, irrespective of vacuum exposure time. They also showed only moderate rejection (20% of the smaller PVP-40 kDa, however, all the membranes were able to obtain an excellent rejection of near 100% for the larger PVP-360 kDa molecule. Furthermore, the TM membranes were tested for the separation of oil emulsions with a high concentration of oil (3000 ppm, reaching high oil rejections of more than 90% of oil. In general, the water fluxes increased with the vacuum exposure time indicating a pore structural tailoring effect. It is therefore proposed that a mechanism of pore size tailoring was formed by an interconnected network of Ti–O–Ti nanoparticles with inter-particle voids, which increased as TiO2 nanoparticle size increased as a function of vacuum exposure time, and thus reduced the water transport resistance through the TM membranes.

  18. Micro-Photoluminescence (micro-PL) Study of Core Shell GaAs/GaAsSb Nanowires Grown by Self-Assisted Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-18

    on the optical properties of GaAs/GaAsSb heterostructured nanowires are reported. Twins are found along the sides of the inserts which affected the...Dheeraj, H. Zhou, A. Moses, T. Hoang, A. v. Helvoort, B. Fimland and H. Weman, " Heterostructured III-V Nanowires with Mixed Crystal Phases Grown by Au...Goldoni and A. G., "High mobility one- and two-dimensional electron systems in nanowire -based quantum heterostructures .," Nano Lett., vol. 13, no. 12

  19. Some optical and electron microscope comparative studies of excimer laser-assisted and nonassisted molecular-beam epitaxically grown thin GaAs films on Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lao, Pudong; Tang, Wade C.; Rajkumar, K. C.; Guha, S.; Madhukar, A.; Liu, J. K.; Grunthaner, F. J.

    1990-01-01

    The quality of GaAs thin films grown via MBE under pulsed excimer laser irradiation on Si substrates is examined in both laser-irradiated and nonirradiated areas using Raman scattering, Rayleigh scattering, and by photoluminescence (PL), as a function of temperature, and by TEM. The temperature dependence of the PL and Raman peak positions indicates the presence of compressive stress in the thin GaAs films in both laser-irradiated and nonirradiated areas. This indicates incomplete homogeneous strain relaxation by dislocations at the growth temperature. The residual compressive strain at the growth temperature is large enough such that even with the introduction of tensile strain arising from the difference in thermal expansion coefficients of GaAs and Si, a compressive strain is still present at room temperature for these thin GaAs/Si films.

  20. Electric field-tunable Ba{sub x}Sr{sub 1-x}TiO{sub 3} films with high figures of merit grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikheev, Evgeny; Kajdos, Adam P.; Hauser, Adam J.; Stemmer, Susanne [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106-5050 (United States)

    2012-12-17

    We report on the dielectric properties of Ba{sub x}Sr{sub 1-x}TiO{sub 3} (BST) films grown by molecular beam epitaxy on epitaxial Pt bottom electrodes. Paraelectric films (x Less-Than-Or-Equivalent-To 0.5) exhibit dielectric losses that are similar to those of BST single crystals and ceramics. Films with device quality factors greater than 1000 and electric field tunabilities exceeding 1:5 are demonstrated. The results provide evidence for the importance of stoichiometry control and the use of a non-energetic deposition technique for achieving high figures of merit of tunable devices with BST thin films.

  1. Beam Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, E

    2013-01-01

    This document is part of Subvolume C 'Accelerators and Colliders' of Volume 21 'Elementary Particles' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I 'Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms'. It contains the Chapter '2 Beam Dynamics' with the content: 2 Beam Dynamics 2.1 Linear Transverse Beam Dynamics 2.2 Coupling 2.3 Liouville's Theorem 2.4 Momentum Dependent Transverse Motion 2.5 Longitudinal Motion

  2. Hydrophilic interaction chromatography coupled matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry for molecular analysis of organic compounds in medicines, tea, and coffee

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Renqi

    2013-01-01

    Natural occurring organic compounds from food, natural organic matter, as well as metabolic products have received intense attention in current chemical and biological studies. Examination of unknown compounds in complex sample matrices is hampered by the limited choices for data readout and molecular elucidation. Herein, we report a generic method of hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) coupled with matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) for the rapid characterization of ingredients in pharmaceutical compounds, tea, and coffee. The analytes were first fractionated using a cationic HILIC column prior to MALDI-MS analyses. It was found that the retention times of a compound arising from different samples were consistent under the same conditions. Accordingly, molecules can be readily characterized by both the mass and chromatographic retention time. The retention behaviors of acidic and basic compounds on the cationic HILIC column were found to be significantly influenced by the pH of mobile phases, whereas neutral compounds depicted a constant retention time at different pH. The general HILIC-MALDI-MS method is feasible for fast screening of naturally occurring organic compounds. A series of homologs can be determined if they have the same retention behavior. Their structural features can be elucidated by considering their mass differences and hydrophilic properties as determined by HILIC chromatogram. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  3. Hydrophilic interaction chromatography coupled matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry for molecular analysis of organic compounds in medicines, tea, and coffee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ren-Qi; Bao, Kai; Croué, Jean-Philippe; Ng, Siu Choon

    2013-11-21

    Natural occurring organic compounds from food, natural organic matter, as well as metabolic products have received intense attention in current chemical and biological studies. Examination of unknown compounds in complex sample matrices is hampered by the limited choices for data readout and molecular elucidation. Herein, we report a generic method of hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) coupled with matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) for the rapid characterization of ingredients in pharmaceutical compounds, tea, and coffee. The analytes were first fractionated using a cationic HILIC column prior to MALDI-MS analyses. It was found that the retention times of a compound arising from different samples were consistent under the same conditions. Accordingly, molecules can be readily characterized by both the mass and chromatographic retention time. The retention behaviors of acidic and basic compounds on the cationic HILIC column were found to be significantly influenced by the pH of mobile phases, whereas neutral compounds depicted a constant retention time at different pH. The general HILIC-MALDI-MS method is feasible for fast screening of naturally occurring organic compounds. A series of homologs can be determined if they have the same retention behavior. Their structural features can be elucidated by considering their mass differences and hydrophilic properties as determined by HILIC chromatogram.

  4. Salting-out assisted liquid-liquid extraction and partial least squares regression to assay low molecular weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons leached from soils and sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressan, Lucas P.; do Nascimento, Paulo Cícero; Schmidt, Marcella E. P.; Faccin, Henrique; de Machado, Leandro Carvalho; Bohrer, Denise

    2017-02-01

    A novel method was developed to determine low molecular weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in aqueous leachates from soils and sediments using a salting-out assisted liquid-liquid extraction, synchronous fluorescence spectrometry and a multivariate calibration technique. Several experimental parameters were controlled and the optimum conditions were: sodium carbonate as the salting-out agent at concentration of 2 mol L- 1, 3 mL of acetonitrile as extraction solvent, 6 mL of aqueous leachate, vortexing for 5 min and centrifuging at 4000 rpm for 5 min. The partial least squares calibration was optimized to the lowest values of root mean squared error and five latent variables were chosen for each of the targeted compounds. The regression coefficients for the true versus predicted concentrations were higher than 0.99. Figures of merit for the multivariate method were calculated, namely sensitivity, multivariate detection limit and multivariate quantification limit. The selectivity was also evaluated and other polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons did not interfere in the analysis. Likewise, high performance liquid chromatography was used as a comparative methodology, and the regression analysis between the methods showed no statistical difference (t-test). The proposed methodology was applied to soils and sediments of a Brazilian river and the recoveries ranged from 74.3% to 105.8%. Overall, the proposed methodology was suitable for the targeted compounds, showing that the extraction method can be applied to spectrofluorometric analysis and that the multivariate calibration is also suitable for these compounds in leachates from real samples.

  5. Effects of vibration frequency on vibration-assisted nano-scratch process of mono-crystalline copper via molecular dynamics simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Zhu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available It has always been a critical issue to understand the material removal behavior of Vibration-Assisted Machining (VAM, especially on atomic level. To find out the effects of vibration frequency on material removal response, a three-dimensional molecular dynamics (MD model has been established in this research to investigate the effects of scratched groove, crystal defects on the surface quality, comparing with the Von Mises shear strain and tangential force in simulations during nano-scratching process. Comparisons are made among the results of simulations from different vibration frequency with the same scratching feed, depth, amplitude and crystal orientation. Copper potential in this simulation is Embedded-Atom Method (EAM potential. Interaction between copper and carbon atoms is Morse potential. Simulational results show that higher frequency can make groove smoother. Simulation with high frequency creates more dislocations to improve the machinability of copper specimen. The changing frequency does not have evident effects on Von Mises shear strain. Higher frequency can decrease the tangential force to reduce the consumption of cutting energy and tool wear. In conclusion, higher vibration frequency in VAM on mono-crystalline copper has positive effects on surface finish, machinablility and tool wear reduction.

  6. On the evolution of InAs thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy on the GaAs(001) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grabowski, Jan

    2010-12-14

    Semiconductor nanostructures are currently of high interest for a wide variety of electronic and optoelectronic applications. A large number of devices, in particular for the optical data transmission in the long-wavelength range, essential in modern communication, are based on InAs/GaAs quantum dot (QD) structures. Though the properties of the InAs/GaAs QDs have been extensively studied, only little is known about the formation and structure of the wetting layer (WL) yet. In the present work, the pathway of the InAs WL evolution is studied in detail. For this purpose, InAs thin films in the range of one monolayer (ML) are deposited on the GaAs(001) surface by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and studied by reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) and in particular by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The InAs thin films are grown in both typical growth regimes, on the GaAs-c(4 x 4) and the GaAs-{beta}2(2 x 4) reconstructed surface, in a variety of thicknesses starting from submonolayers with 0.09 ML of InAs up to 1.65 ML of InAs exceeding the critical thickness for QD growth. In principle, three growth stages are found. At low InAs coverages, the indium adsorbs in agglomerations of typically eight In atoms at energetically preferable surface sites. In the STM images, the signatures of these In agglomerations appear with a clear bright contrast. A structural model for the initial formation of these signatures is presented, and its electronic and strain related properties are discussed. At an InAs coverage of about 0.67ML the initial surface transforms into a (4 x 3) reconstructed In{sub 2/3}Ga{sub 1/3}As ML and the detailed structure and strain properties of this surface are unraveled. On top of the InGaAs ML further deposited InAs forms a second layer, characterized by a typical zig-zag alignment of (2 x 4) reconstructed unit cells, with an alternating {alpha}2/{alpha}2-m configuration. In contrast to the previous surface reconstructions, where

  7. Comparison of single junction AlGaInP and GaInP solar cells grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masuda, Taizo, E-mail: taizo.masuda@yale.edu; Tomasulo, Stephanie; Lang, Jordan R.; Lee, Minjoo Larry [Department of Electrical Engineering, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06511 (United States)

    2015-03-07

    We have investigated ∼2.0 eV (Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}){sub 0.51}In{sub 0.49}P and ∼1.9 eV Ga{sub 0.51}In{sub 0.49}P single junction solar cells grown on both on-axis and misoriented GaAs substrates by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Although lattice-matched (Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}){sub 0.51}In{sub 0.49}P solar cells are highly attractive for space and concentrator photovoltaics, there have been few reports on the MBE growth of such cells. In this work, we demonstrate open circuit voltages (V{sub oc}) ranging from 1.29 to 1.30 V for Ga{sub 0.51}In{sub 0.49}P cells, and 1.35–1.37 V for (Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}){sub 0.51}In{sub 0.49}P cells. Growth on misoriented substrates enabled the bandgap-voltage offset (W{sub oc} = E{sub g}/q − V{sub oc}) of Ga{sub 0.51}In{sub 0.49}P cells to decrease from ∼575 mV to ∼565 mV, while that of (Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}){sub 0.51}In{sub 0.49}P cells remained nearly constant at 620 mV. The constant W{sub oc} as a function of substrate offcut for (Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}){sub 0.51}In{sub 0.49}P implies greater losses from non-radiative recombination compared with the Ga{sub 0.51}In{sub 0.49}P devices. In addition to larger W{sub oc} values, the (Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}){sub 0.51}In{sub 0.49}P cells exhibited significantly lower internal quantum efficiency (IQE) values than Ga{sub 0.51}In{sub 0.49}P cells due to recombination at the emitter/window layer interface. A thin emitter design is experimentally shown to be highly effective in improving IQE, particularly at short wavelengths. Our work shows that with further optimization of both cell structure and growth conditions, MBE-grown (Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}){sub 0.51}In{sub 0.49}P will be a promising wide-bandgap candidate material for high-efficiency, lattice-matched multi-junction solar cells.

  8. Terahertz circular Airy vortex beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Changming; Liu, Jinsong; Niu, Liting; Wei, Xuli; Wang, Kejia; Yang, Zhengang

    2017-06-20

    Vortex beams have received considerable research interests both in optical and millimeter-wave domain since its potential to be utilized in the wireless communications and novel imaging systems. Many well-known optical beams have been demonstrated to carry orbital angular momentum (OAM), such as Laguerre-Gaussian beams and high-order Bessel beams. Recently, the radially symmetric Airy beams that exhibit an abruptly autofocusing feature are also demonstrated to be capable of carrying OAM in the optical domain. However, due to the lack of efficient devices to manipulate terahertz (THz) beams, it could be a challenge to demonstrate the radially symmetric Airy beams in the THz domain. Here we demonstrate the THz circular Airy vortex beams (CAVBs) with a 0.3-THz continuous wave through 3D printing technology. Assisted by the rapidly 3D-printed phase plates, individual OAM states with topological charge l ranging from l = 0 to l = 3 and a multiplexed OAM state are successfully imposed into the radially symmetric Airy beams. We both numerically and experimentally investigate the propagation dynamics of the generated THz CAVBs, and the simulations agree well with the observations.

  9. Next-Generation Molecular Histology Using Highly Multiplexed Ion Beam Imaging (MIBI) of Breast Cancer Tissue Specimens for Enhanced Clinical Guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    protein expression in tissue microarrays. Nat Med 2002;8:1323–1327. 6. Fountaine TJ, Wincovitch SM, Geho DH, et al. Multispectral imaging of...ion beam imaging (MIBI) of human breast tumors Michael Angelo1,2, Sean C. Bendall1, Rachel Finck1, Matthew B. Hale1, Chuck Hitzman3, Alexander D

  10. Beam diagnostics

    CERN Document Server

    Raich, U

    2006-01-01

    The instrumentation measuring beam parameters constitutes an important part of any particle accelerator. These lectures aim at giving an overview of detection and measurement techniques without going too much into details of implementation. Instruments for linear accelerators, transfer lines, and small synchrotrons are described with an emphasis on opportunities and problems specific to low-energy particle beams.

  11. Status and Challenges in Beam Crystallization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Jie; Yu, Peicheng; Okamoto, Hiromi; Yuri, Yosuke; Li, Xiao-Ping; Sessler, Andrew M.

    2009-05-04

    During the past several decades, beam crystallization has been studied both theoretically and experimentally. Theoretical investigations have been numerical, mainly using computer modeling based on the method of molecular dynamics (MD), and analytical, based on phonon theory. Experimental investigations involve both ion storage rings and ion traps using both electron and laser beam cooling. Topics of interests include crystal stability in various accelerator lattices and under different beam conditions, colliding crystalline beams, crystalline beam formation in shear-free ring lattices with both magnets and electrodes, experimental simulation of alternating-gradient conditions with an ion trap, tapered cooling and coupled cooling, and beam dynamics at different temperature regime as the beam is cooled from high to low temperature. In this paper, we first review theoretical approaches and major conclusions pertaining to beam crystallization. Then, we analyze conditions and methods of the various major experiments. Finally, we discuss, both theoretically and experimentally, some improvements, open questions, and challenges in beam crystallization.

  12. Beam diagnostics

    CERN Document Server

    Raich, U

    2008-01-01

    Most beam measurements are based on the electro-magnetic interaction of fields induced by the beam with their environment. Beam current transformers as well as beam position monitors are based on this principle. The signals induced in the sensors must be amplified and shaped before they are converted into numerical values. These values are further treated numerically in order to extract meaningful machine parameter measurements. The lecture introduces the architecture of an instrument and shows where in the treatment chain digital signal analysis can be introduced. Then the use of digital signal processing is presented using tune measurements, orbit and trajectory measurements as well as beam loss detection and longitudinal phase space tomography as examples. The hardware as well as the treatment algorithms and their implementation on Digital Signal Processors (DSPs) or in Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) are presented.

  13. Molecular fountain.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strecker, Kevin E.; Chandler, David W.

    2009-09-01

    A molecular fountain directs slowly moving molecules against gravity to further slow them to translational energies that they can be trapped and studied. If the molecules are initially slow enough they will return some time later to the position from which they were launched. Because this round trip time can be on the order of a second a single molecule can be observed for times sufficient to perform Hz level spectroscopy. The goal of this LDRD proposal was to construct a novel Molecular Fountain apparatus capable of producing dilute samples of molecules at near zero temperatures in well-defined user-selectable, quantum states. The slowly moving molecules used in this research are produced by the previously developed Kinematic Cooling technique, which uses a crossed atomic and molecular beam apparatus to generate single rotational level molecular samples moving slowly in the laboratory reference frame. The Kinematic Cooling technique produces cold molecules from a supersonic molecular beam via single collisions with a supersonic atomic beam. A single collision of an atom with a molecule occurring at the correct energy and relative velocity can cause a small fraction of the molecules to move very slowly vertically against gravity in the laboratory. These slowly moving molecules are captured by an electrostatic hexapole guiding field that both orients and focuses the molecules. The molecules are focused into the ionization region of a time-of-flight mass spectrometer and are ionized by laser radiation. The new molecular fountain apparatus was built utilizing a new design for molecular beam apparatus that has allowed us to miniaturize the apparatus. This new design minimizes the volumes and surface area of the machine allowing smaller pumps to maintain the necessary background pressures needed for these experiments.

  14. Elucidation of the Molecular Interaction between miRNAs and the Gene, Involved in Acute Myeloid Leukemia, by the Assistance of Argonaute Protein through a Computational Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohit Pritam Das

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute myeloid leukemia is a well characterized blood cancer in which the unnatural growth of immature white blood cell takes place, where several genes transcription is regulated by the micro RNAs (miRNAs. Argonaute (AGO protein is a protein family that binds to the miRNAs and mRNA complex where a strong binding affinity is crucial for its RNA silencing function. By understanding pattern recognition between the miRNAs-mRNA complex and its binding affinity with AGO protein, one can decipher the regulation of a particular gene and develop suitable siRNA for the same in disease condition. In the current work, HOXA9 gene has been selected from literature, whose deregulation is well-established in acute myeloid leukemia. Four miRNAs (mir-145, mir-126, let-7a, and mir-196b have been selected to target mRNA of HOXA9 (NCBI accession No. NM_152739.3. The binding interaction between mRNAs and mRNA of HOXA9 gene was studied computationally. From result, it was observed mir-145 has highest affinity for HOXA9 gene. Furthermore, the interaction between miRNAs-mRNA duplex of all chosen miRNAs are docked with AGO protein (PDB ID: 3F73, chain A to study their interaction at molecular level through an in silico approach. The residual interaction and hydrogen bonding are inspected in Discovery Studio 3.5 suites. The current investigation throws light on understanding of AGO-assisted miRNA based gene silencing mechanism in HOXA9 gene associated in acute myeloid leukemia computationally.

  15. Ultrasound assisted combined molecularly imprinted polymer for selective extraction of nicotinamide in human urine and milk samples: Spectrophotometric determination and optimization study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asfaram, Arash; Ghaedi, Mehrorang; Dashtian, Kheibar

    2017-01-01

    Ultrasound-assisted dispersive solid phase microextraction followed by UV-vis spectrophotometer (UA-DSPME-UV-vis) was designed for extraction and preconcentration of nicotinamide (vitamin B3) by HKUST-1 metal organic framework (MOF) based molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP). This new material was characterized by FTIR and FE-SEM techniques. The preliminary Plackett-Burman design was used for screening and subsequently the central composite design justifies significant terms and possible construction of mathematical equation which give the individual and cooperative contribution of variables like HKUST-1-MOF-NA-MIP mass, sonication time, temperature, eluent volume, pH and vortex time. Accordingly the optimum condition was set as: 2.0mg HKUST-1-MOF-NA-MIP, 200μL eluent and 5.0min sonication time in center points other variables were determined as the best conditions to reach the maximum recovery of the analyte. The UA-DSPME-UV-vis method performances like excellent linearity (LR), limits of detection (LOD), limits of quantification of 10-5000μgL(-1) with R(2) of 0.99, LOD (1.96ngmL(-1)), LOQ (6.53μgL(-1)), respectively show successful and accurate applicability of the present method for monitoring analytes with within- and between-day precision of 0.96-3.38%. The average absolute recoveries of the nicotinamide extracted from the urine, milk and water samples were 95.85-101.27%. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Water-assisted self-photoredox of 2-(1-hydroxyethyl)-9,10-anthraquinone through a triplet excited state intra-molecular proton transfer pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Jingze; Han, Juan; Chen, Xuebo; Fang, Weihai; Ma, Jiani; Phillips, David Lee

    2015-10-28

    Using multi-configurational perturbation theory (CASPT2//CASSCF), a novel self-photoredox reaction for 2-(1-hydroxyethyl)-9,10-anthraquinone was proposed to effectively occur through two steps of triplet excited state intra-molecular proton transfer (ESIPT) reaction aided by water wires without the introduction of an external oxidant or reductant. The photoinduced charge transfer along the desired direction was determined to be the major driving force for the occurrence of the energetically favorable ESIPT in the triplet state, in which the water wires function as an effective proton relay and photocatalyst to lower the reaction barrier. The computational results provide convincing evidence that the deprotonation of the hydroxyl group in the triplet state and connecting water molecule(s) between that hydroxyl group and the carbonyl group that is protonated by a nearby water molecule in the water wire is the initial reaction step that triggers the protonation of the carbonyl group seen in the previously reported time-resolved spectroscopy experiments that produces a protonated carbonyl triplet intermediate that then undergoes a subsequent deprotonation of the methylene C-H in the triplet and ground states to complete the self-photoredox reaction of anthraquinone. Comparison of the theoretical results with previously reported results from time-resolved spectroscopy experiments indicate the photoredox reactions can occur either via a concerted or non-concerted deprotonation-protonation of distal sites of the molecule assisted by the connecting water molecules. These new insights will help provide benchmarks to elucidate the photochemistry of the anthraquinone and benzophenone compounds in acidic and/or neutral aqueous solutions.

  17. Beam collimator

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    A four-block collimator installed on a control table for positioning the alignment reference marks. Designed for use with SPS secondary beams, the collimator operates under vacuum conditions. See Annual Report 1976 p. 121 and photo 7701014.

  18. Endogamia e limite de seleção em populações sob seleção assistida por marcadores moleculares Endogamy and its selection limit in populations under assisted selection by molecular markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Jangarelli

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Foram utilizados diferentes níveis de significância genômica na seleção assistida por marcadores para estimar a endogamia média e o limite de seleção, assim como os valores fenotípicos, em características quantitativas de baixa, média e alta herdabilidade. Uma comparação entre os níveis de 1%, 5%, 10% e 20% foi realizada por meio do sistema computacional de simulação genética (GENESYS, utilizado para a simulação de três genomas (cada qual constituído de um único caráter de baixa, média ou alta herdabilidade, e das populações base e inicial. Os resultados indicaram superioridade dos níveis de significância de maior magnitude (10% e 20% com relação aos valores fenotípicos, resultante de menor média endogâmica, além de menor limite de seleção ao longo das gerações sob seleção para estes níveis. Estes resultados foram observados para todas as três características, embora de forma mais expressiva para o caráter de baixa herdabilidade. Assim, apesar de os níveis de 1% e 5% apresentarem maior precisão na detecção de marcadores ligados a quantitative trait loci (QTL, eles conduzem a maiores médias endogâmicas e limite de seleção, propiciando ganhos fenotípicos menores.Different levels of genomic significance were used in the selection assisted by molecular markers to estimate the medium endogamy and the selection limit, as well as the phenotypic value, for quantitative traits of low, medium, and high heritability. A comparison among the levels of genomic significance of 1%, 5%, 10%, and 20% was accomplished by a computer system of genetic simulation (GENESYS, used to simulate three genomes, each of them constituted by only one character of low, medium and high heritability, and to simulate the base and the initial populations. The results suggest superiority of higher significance levels (10% and 20% for all phenotypic values, as a consequence of lower endogamy, and lower selection limit for low

  19. A 3D printed beam splitter for polar neutral molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Gordon, Sean D S

    2016-01-01

    We describe a beam splitter for polar neutral molecules. An electrostatic hexapole initially confines and guides a supersonic expansion of ammonia, and it then smoothly transforms into two bent quadrupole guides, thus splitting the molecular beam in two correlated fractions. This paves the way towards molecular beam experiments wherein one beam is modified through interactions with, e.g. a laser beam or another molecular beam, while the other one remains unmodified and serves as a reference. Because both beams originate from the same parent beam, such differential experiments can dramatically enhance the sensitivity. The highly complex electrode structure required for the beam splitter would be very difficult to build by traditional means. Instead, we introduce a new method of production: 3D printing of a plastic piece, followed by electroplating. The 3D printed piece can take any desired shape and, since the entire structure can be printed as a single piece, provides inherently precise alignment. Electroplat...

  20. Control of Anion in Corporation in the Molecular Beam Epitaxy of Ternary Antimonide Superlattices for Very Long Wavelength Infrared Detection (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    this study, significantly impacting the absorption coefficient. Therefore, the ternary SL materials are still important for VLWIR detection. In this...anion fluxes, the V/III beam equivalent pressure ( BEP ) ratio was set at 3 for both GaInSb and InAs layer depositions and the growth rates of 1.6 and...selectively impact the Tg, where the photoresponse was optimized. At Tsb¼850 1C, the photoresponse was the strongest at 410 1C, while at Tsb¼950 1C the