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Sample records for assisted living facilities

  1. Assisted Living Facilities - MDC_NursingHome

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Label (point) feature class of Miami-Dade County Nursing Homes Facilities. As of May 2004 the Office of Emergency Management (OEM) will provide updates for Nursing...

  2. Sleep disturbance among older adults in assisted living facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Constance H; Martin, Jennifer L; Chung, Carol; Fiorentino, Lavinia; Mitchell, Michael; Josephson, Karen R; Jouldjian, Stella; Alessi, Cathy

    2012-06-01

    To evaluate whether objectively and subjectively measured sleep disturbances persist among older adults in assisted living facilities (ALFs) and to identify predictors of sleep disturbance in this setting. Prospective, observational cohort study. A total of 121 residents, age ≥ 65 years, in 18 ALFs in the Los Angeles area. Objective (actigraphy) and subjective (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index) sleep measures were collected at baseline and 3- and 6-month follow-up. Predictors of baseline sleep disturbance tested in bivariate analyses and multiple regression models included demographics, Mini-Mental State Examination score, number of comorbidities, nighttime sedating medication use, functional status (activities of daily living; instrumental activities of daily living), restless legs syndrome, and sleep apnea risk. Objective and subjective sleep measures were similar at baseline and 3- and 6-month follow-up (objective nighttime total sleep [hours] 6.3, 6.5, and 6.4; objective nighttime percent sleep 77.2, 77.7, and 78.3; and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index total score 8.0, 7.8, and 7.7, respectively). The mean baseline nighttime percent sleep decreased by 2% for each additional unit increase in baseline comorbid conditions (measured as the number of conditions), and increased by 4.5% for each additional unit increase in baseline activities of daily living (measured as the number of activities of daily living), in a multiple regression model. In this study, we found that objectively and subjectively measured sleep disturbances are persistent among ALF residents and are related to a greater number of comorbidities and poorer functional status at baseline. Interventions are needed to improve sleep in this setting.

  3. Resident-to-resident relational aggression and subjective well-being in assisted living facilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trompetter, H.R.; Scholte, R.H.J.; Westerhof, G.J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Research in settings similar to assisted living facilities suggests that relational aggression, an indirect and mature form of aggression, might occur in assisted living facilities. This empirical study investigates the existence of relational aggression in a sample of residents and the

  4. Infection Prevention and Control Standards in Assisted Living Facilities: Are Residents Needs Being Met?

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    Kossover, Rachel; Chi, Carolyn; Wise, Matthew; Tran, Alvin; Chande, Neha; Perz, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Background Assisted Living Facilities (ALFs) provide housing and care to persons unable to live independently, and who often have increasing medical needs. Disease outbreaks illustrate challenges of maintaining adequate resident protections in these facilities. Objectives Describe current state laws on assisted living admissions criteria, medical oversight, medication administration, vaccination requirements, and standards for infection control training. Methods We abstracted laws and regulations governing assisted living facilities for the 50 states using a structured abstraction tool. Selected characteristics were compared according to the time period in which the regulation took effect. Selected state health departments were queried regarding outbreaks identified in assisted living facilities. Results Of the 50 states, 84% specify health-based admissions criteria to assisted living facilities. 60% require licensed healthcare professionals to oversee medical care. 88% specifically allow subcontracting with outside entities to provide routine medical services onsite, and 64% address medication administration by assisted living facility staff. 54% specify requirements for some form of initial infection control training for all staff; 50% require reporting of disease outbreaks to the health department. 30% offered or required vaccines to staff; 15% of states offered or required vaccines to residents. Eleven states identified approximately 1500 outbreaks from 2010–2013, with influenza or norovirus infections predominating. Conclusions There is wide variation in how assisted living facilities are regulated in the United States. States may wish to consider regulatory changes that assure safe healthcare delivery, and minimize risks of infections, outbreaks of disease, and other forms of harm among assisted living residents. PMID:24239014

  5. Infection prevention and control standards in assisted living facilities: are residents' needs being met?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossover, Rachel A; Chi, Carolyn J; Wise, Matthew E; Tran, Alvin H; Chande, Neha D; Perz, Joseph F

    2014-01-01

    Assisted living facilities (ALFs) provide housing and care to persons unable to live independently, and who often have increasing medical needs. Disease outbreaks illustrate challenges of maintaining adequate resident protections in these facilities. Describe current state laws on assisted living admissions criteria, medical oversight, medication administration, vaccination requirements, and standards for infection control training. We abstracted laws and regulations governing assisted living facilities for the 50 states using a structured abstraction tool. Selected characteristics were compared according to the time period in which the regulation took effect. Selected state health departments were queried regarding outbreaks identified in assisted living facilities. Of the 50 states, 84% specify health-based admissions criteria to assisted living facilities; 60% require licensed health care professionals to oversee medical care; 88% specifically allow subcontracting with outside entities to provide routine medical services onsite; 64% address medication administration by assisted living facility staff; 54% specify requirements for some form of initial infection control training for all staff; 50% require reporting of disease outbreaks to the health department; 18% specify requirements to offer or require vaccines to staff; 30% specify requirements to offer or require vaccines to residents. Twelve states identified approximately 1600 outbreaks from 2010 to 2013, with influenza or norovirus infections predominating. There is wide variation in how assisted living facilities are regulated in the United States. States may wish to consider regulatory changes that ensure safe health care delivery, and minimize risks of infections, outbreaks of disease, and other forms of harm among assisted living residents. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Assisted Living Facilities, Locations of Assisted Living Facilities identifed visually and placed on the Medical Multi-Hazard Mitigation layer., Published in 2006, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, Noble County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Assisted Living Facilities dataset current as of 2006. Locations of Assisted Living Facilities identifed visually and placed on the Medical Multi-Hazard Mitigation...

  7. The Desirable Scale", impact of scale on group mix and social quality in assisted living facilities.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dort Spierings

    2012-01-01

    In order to be able to age in place, Dutch elderly are being housed in Assisted Living Facilities (ALFs) for over 25 years. Here they can live independently and rely on care and services. The physical scale of ALFs ranges from 30 up to 300 residents. This paper presents the findings of a multiple

  8. Validation of an integral conceptual model of frailty in older residents of assisted living facilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gobbens, Robbert J J; Krans, Anita; van Assen, Marcel A L M

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this cross-sectional study was to examine the validity of an integral model of the associations between life-course determinants, disease(s), frailty, and adverse outcomes in older persons who are resident in assisted living facilities. Methods: Between June 2013 and May 2014

  9. Validation of an integral conceptual model of frailty in older residents of assisted living facilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gobbens, R.J.J.; Krans, A.; van Assen, M.A.L.M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this cross-sectional study was to examine the validity of an integral model of the associations between life-course determinants, disease(s), frailty, and adverse outcomes in older persons who are resident in assisted living facilities. Methods Between June 2013 and May 2014

  10. Hospice Care in Assisted Living Facilities Versus at Home: Results of a Multisite Cohort Study.

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    Dougherty, Meredith; Harris, Pamela S; Teno, Joan; Corcoran, Amy M; Douglas, Cindy; Nelson, Jackie; Way, Deborah; Harrold, Joan E; Casarett, David J

    2015-06-01

    To compare residents of assisted living facilities receiving hospice with people receiving hospice care at home. Electronic health record-based retrospective cohort study. Nonprofit hospices in the Coalition of Hospices Organized to Investigate Comparative Effectiveness network. Individuals admitted to hospice between January 1, 2008, and May 15, 2012 (N = 85,581; 7,451 (8.7%) assisted living facility, 78,130 (91.3%) home). Hospice length of stay, use of opioids for pain, and site of death. The assisted living population was more likely than the home hospice population to have a diagnosis of dementia (23.5% vs 4.7%; odds ratio (OR) = 13.3, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 12.3-14.4; P < .001) and enroll in hospice closer to death (median length of stay 24 vs 29 days). Assisted living residents were less likely to receive opioids for pain (18.1% vs 39.7%; OR = 0.33, 95% CI = 0.29-0.39, P < .001) and less likely to die in an inpatient hospice unit (9.3% vs 16.1%; OR = 0.53, 95% CI = 0.49-0.58, P < .001) or a hospital (1.3% vs 7.6%; OR = 0.16, 95% CI = 0.13-0.19, P < .001). Three are several differences between residents of assisted living receiving hospice care and individuals living at home receiving hospice care. A better understanding of these differences could allow hospices to develop guidelines for better coordination of end-of-life care for the assisted living population. © 2015, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2015, The American Geriatrics Society.

  11. Microbiological evaluation of foodservice contact surfaces in Iowa assisted-living facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneed, Jeannie; Strohbehn, Catherine; Gilmore, Shirley A; Mendonca, Aubrey

    2004-11-01

    A study of 40 assisted-living facilities in Iowa was conducted to assess the microbiological quality of food-contact surfaces (work tables/counters, cooking equipment such as mixing bowls, and cutting boards) and a surface that could cross-contaminate food (refrigerator or freezer handles) to determine the effectiveness of cleaning and sanitation. Standards were set for foodservice for aerobic plate count, Enterobacteriaceae, and Staphylococcus aureus . Two facilities met standards for all five surfaces for each of the three tests. Fewer facilities met the standard for aerobic plate count than for the other two tests, and nearly three fourths of the facilities failed to meet the aerobic plate count for cutting boards. Critically, cross-contamination from these surfaces could result in contamination of food; thus, attention needs to be given to training and supervision to ensure proper hand washing and appropriate cleaning and sanitation procedures to reduce or eliminate cross-contamination.

  12. Assisted Living Facilities, This file contains the name, address, contact and some licensing information for the Assisted Living Facilites for the State of Maryland., Published in 2010, Smaller than 1:100000 scale, Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — Assisted Living Facilities dataset current as of 2010. This file contains the name, address, contact and some licensing information for the Assisted Living Facilites...

  13. Perceived resident-facility fit and sense of control in assisted living.

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    Pirhonen, Jari; Pietilä, Ilkka

    2016-08-01

    The concept of resident-facility fit has largely been used to illustrate whether a residential care facility and a resident are together able to meet requirements set by only the hampering functional abilities of the latter. The purpose of this paper is to study how assisted living residents perceive resident-facility fit. The data were gathered ethnographically from both observations and resident interviews in a sheltered home in Finland during 2013-2014. Perceived resident-facility fit is based on several relational factors that connect to both the residents as individuals and their surroundings. This fit seems also to be partly conditional and indeed depends on residents' trust in having their own potential to act. Good resident-facility fit results in feeling at home in a facility, whereas poor fit can even result in residents' feeling imprisoned. Care providers can thus utilize our results to affirm residents' quality of life in residential facilities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Pharmacist-based intervention to prepare residents of assisted-living facilities for emergencies.

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    Feret, Brett; Bratberg, Jeffrey

    2008-01-01

    To assess views of disaster preparation and readiness of assisted-living residents after a comprehensive program developed and presented by pharmacists on the importance of preparing for an emergency, specifically regarding organizing of medical information. Four assisted-living facilities were identified throughout Rhode Island to participate in a 30-minute program conducted by two pharmacists who were involved in disaster preparedness on both a national and state level. A survey assessed the participants' possession of a disaster kit, medical form, and personal plan, as well as their knowledge of their facilities' possession of a kit, form, and plan. Participants were also surveyed on their attitudes regarding current preparedness and on the disasters (e.g, hurricanes, bioterrorism, avian influenza, floods, fire) about which they were most concerned before the program began. Student pharmacists and faculty assisted residents in the completion of the survey. At the conclusion of the program, all participants were asked to retake the survey to assess the impact of the program. 58 preprogram and 42 postprogram surveys were returned anonymously. A statistically significant change in preparedness was observed for hurricane, avian influenza, bioterrorism, and flood, and a statistically significant change in concern was seen for avian influenza and bioterrorism. Elderly assisted-living residents are at increased risk of adverse effects in disasters; however, this growing population lacks baseline preparedness items such as a simple emergency preparedness kit. Educational programs by pharmacists can increase levels of preparedness for and defuse concerns about disasters in this population. Pharmacists also can educate elderly patients about preparedness for potential disasters specific to their location.

  15. Going digital: adoption of electronic health records in assisted living facilities.

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    Holup, Amanda A; Dobbs, Debra; Temple, April; Hyer, Kathryn

    2014-06-01

    This pilot study examines the associations between structural characteristics and the adoption and subsequent use of electronic health records (EHR; resident demographics, clinical notes, medication lists, problem lists, discharge summaries, and advance directives) as a process characteristic in assisted living facilities (ALFs). The study is guided conceptually by Donabedian's Structure-Process-Outcome (SPO) model. Primary survey data were collected from a randomly selected sample (N = 76) in Florida during 2009-2010. Analysis included descriptive and bivariate statistics. Descriptive results indicated that ALFs most frequently used an EHR to record medication lists. Characteristics, including size, profit status, resident case mix, and staffing, were associated at the bivariate level with the use of one or more functional domains of an EHR. Thus, the use of EHRs in ALFs is correlated with facility characteristics.

  16. Wii-Fit for Improving Gait and Balance in an Assisted Living Facility: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpana P. Padala

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To determine the effects on balance and gait of a Wii-Fit program compared to a walking program in subjects with mild Alzheimer’s dementia (AD. Methods. A prospective randomized (1 : 1 pilot study with two intervention arms was conducted in an assisted living facility with twenty-two mild AD subjects. In both groups the intervention occurred under supervision for 30 minutes daily, five times a week for eight weeks. Repeated measures ANOVA and paired t-tests were used to analyze changes. Results. Both groups showed improvement in Berg Balance Scale (BBS, Tinetti Test (TT and Timed Up and Go (TUG over 8 weeks. However, there was no statistically significant difference between the groups over time. Intragroup analysis in the Wii-Fit group showed significant improvement on BBS (P=0.003, and TT (P=0.013. The walking group showed a trend towards improvement on BBS (P=0.06 and TUG (P=0.07 and significant improvement in TT (P=0.006. Conclusion. This pilot study demonstrates the safety and efficacy of Wii-Fit in an assisted living facility in subjects with mild AD. Use of Wii-Fit resulted in significant improvements in balance and gait comparable to those in the robust monitored walking program. These results need to be confirmed in a larger, methodologically sound study.

  17. Dentition, nutritional status and adequacy of dietary intake among older residents in assisted living facilities.

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    Saarela, Riitta K T; Lindroos, Eeva; Soini, Helena; Hiltunen, Kaija; Muurinen, Seija; Suominen, Merja H; Pitkälä, Kaisu H

    2016-06-01

    We examined the relationships between dentition, nutritional status and dietary intakes of energy, protein and micronutrients among older people in assisted living facilities in Helsinki. Poor dentition is associated with malnutrition. Less is known about how dentition is associated with detailed nutrient intakes in institutionalised older people. This cross-sectional study assessed 343 participants (mean age 83 years). Dentition was assessed by trained ward nurses and divided into edentulous participants without dentures (group 1), edentulous participants with removable dentures (group 2) and those with any natural teeth (group 3). Nutritional status was assessed by Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA). The energy, protein and nutrient intakes were calculated from detailed 1-day food diaries and compared with the recommendations of the Finnish National Nutrition Council as a measure of dietary adequacy. Assessment included also participants' cognitive and functional status. Of the participants, 8.2, 39.1 and 52.8% were in groups 1, 2 and 3, respectively. Altogether 22% were malnourished according to MNA. Group 1 had the poorest nutritional status. A large proportion of participants consumed less than the recommended amounts of energy, protein or micronutrients. Half of the participants consumed older people with multiple disabilities in assisted living facilities. Assessment of dental status should be part of good nutritional care in long-term care. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Association. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Variation in Hospice Services by Location of Care: Nursing Home Versus Assisted Living Facility Versus Home.

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    Unroe, Kathleen T; Bernard, Brittany; Stump, Timothy E; Tu, Wanzhu; Callahan, Christopher M

    2017-07-01

    To describe differences in hospice services for patients living at home, in nursing homes or in assisted living facilities, including the overall number and duration of visits by different hospice care providers across varying lengths of stay. Retrospective cohort study using hospice patient electronic medical record data. Large, national hospice provider. Data from 32,605 hospice patients who received routine hospice care from 2009 to 2014 were analyzed. Descriptive statistics were calculated for utilization measures for each type of provider and by location of care. Frequency and duration of service contacts were standardized to a 1 week period and pairwise comparisons were used to detect differences in care provided between the three settings. Minimal differences were found in overall intensity of service contacts across settings, however, the mix of services were different for patients living at home versus nursing home versus assisted living facility. Overall, more nurse care was provided at the beginning and end of the hospice episode; intensity of aide care services was higher in the middle portion of the hospice episode. Nearly 43% of the sample had hospice stays less than 2 weeks and up to 20% had stays greater than 6 months. There are significant differences between characteristics of hospice patients in different settings, as well as the mix of services they receive. Medicare hospice payment methodology was revised starting in 2016. While the new payment structure is in greater alignment with the U shape distribution of services, it will be important to evaluate the impact of the new payment methodology on length of stay and mix of services by different providers across settings of care. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  19. Assisted Living

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in other supported-living environments. Adult Foster Care Foster care homes generally provide room, board, and some help with activities of daily living. This is provided by the sponsoring family or other paid caregivers, who usually live on ...

  20. An integrated model to measure service management and physical constraints' effect on food consumption in assisted-living facilities.

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    Huang, Hui-Chun; Shanklin, Carol W

    2008-05-01

    The United States is experiencing remarkable growth in the elderly population, which provides both opportunities and challenges for assisted-living facilities. The objective of this study was to explore how service management influences residents' actual food consumption in assisted-living facilities. Physical factors influencing residents' service evaluation and food consumption also were investigated. A total of 394 questionnaires were distributed to assisted-living residents in seven randomly selected facilities. The questionnaire was developed based on an in-depth literature review and pilot study. Residents' perceived quality evaluations, satisfaction, and physical constraints were measured. Residents' actual food consumption was measured using a plate waste technique. A total of 118 residents in five facilities completed both questionnaires and food consumption assessments. Descriptive, multivariate analyses and structural equation modeling techniques were employed. Service management, including food and service quality and customer satisfaction, was found to significantly influence residents' food consumption. Physical constraints associated with aging, including a decline in health status, chewing problems, sensory loss, and functional disability, also significantly influenced residents' food consumption. A significant relationship was found between physical constraints and customer satisfaction. Foodservice that provides good food and service quality increases customer satisfaction and affects residents' actual food consumption. Physical constraints also influence residents' food consumption directly, or indirectly through satisfaction. The findings suggest that food and nutrition professionals in assisted-living should consider the physical profiles of their residents to enhance residents' satisfaction and nutrient intake. Recommendations for exploring residents' perspectives are discussed.

  1. High rates of hospital admission among older residents in assisted living facilities: opportunities for intervention and impact on acute care.

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    Hogan, David B; Amuah, Joseph E; Strain, Laurel A; Wodchis, Walter P; Soo, Andrea; Eliasziw, Misha; Gruneir, Andrea; Hagen, Brad; Teare, Gary; Maxwell, Colleen J

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about health or service use outcomes for residents of Canadian assisted living facilities. Our objectives were to estimate the incidence of admission to hospital over 1 year for residents of designated (i.e., publicly funded) assisted living (DAL) facilities in Alberta, to compare this rate with the rate among residents of long-term care facilities, and to identify individual and facility predictors of hospital admission for DAL residents. Participants were 1066 DAL residents (mean age ± standard deviation 84.9 ± 7.3 years) and 976 longterm care residents (85.4 ± 7.6 years) from the Alberta Continuing Care Epidemiological Studies (ACCES). Research nurses completed a standardized comprehensive assessment for each resident and interviewed family caregivers at baseline (2006 to 2008) and 1 year later. We used standardized interviews with administrators to generate facility- level data. We determined hospital admissions through linkage with the Alberta Inpatient Discharge Abstract Database. We used multivariable Cox proportional hazards models to identify predictors of hospital admission. The cumulative annual incidence of hospital admission was 38.9% (95% confidence interval [CI] 35.9%- 41.9%) for DAL residents and 13.7% (95% CI 11.5%-15.8%) for long-term care residents. The risk of hospital admission was significantly greater for DAL residents with greater health instability, fatigue, medication use (11 or more medications), and 2 or more hospital admissions in the preceding year. The risk of hospital admission was also significantly higher for residents from DAL facilities with a smaller number of spaces, no licensed practical and/ or registered nurses on site (or on site less than 24 hours a day, 7 days a week), no chain affiliation, and from select health regions. The incidence of hospital admission was about 3 times higher among DAL residents than among long-term care residents, and the risk of hospital admission was associated with a number of

  2. Treatment adherence in patients living with HIV/AIDS assisted at a specialized facility in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyada, Simone; Garbin, Artênio José Ísper; Gatto, Renata Colturato Joaquim; Garbin, Cléa Adas Saliba

    2017-01-01

    In the 1990s, Brazil adopted a public policy that allowed for universal, free access to antiretroviral therapy (ART). Since then, treatment adherence has become a new challenge for administrators of sexually transmitted disease/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (STD/AIDS) policies. This study quantified adherence to ART and verified whether there is an association between sociodemographic variables and clinical/laboratory data in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. This was a cross-sectional, exploratory study with a quantitative approach that was conducted over 8 months. The target population contained patients who were assisted at the ambulatory care facility specialized in STD/AIDS of a medium-size city located in Northwest São Paulo. In order to verify the level of adherence to ART, a validated CEAT-VIH (Assessment of Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy Questionnaire) questionnaire was used. Sociodemographic aspects and clinical/laboratory data were obtained from the medical records. The results were analyzed using the Student's t-test and Pearson's coefficient. Herein, 109 patients were interviewed, 56% of whom were male. The age of the population ranged 18-74 years (mean 45.67 years). Adherence to ART was classified as insufficient in 80.7% of cases. There was an association between ART adherence and presence of symptoms and/or opportunistic infection (p=0.008) and economic status (ptreatment adherence than those who needed to take more than 3 pills a day.

  3. Outbreak of hepatitis B virus infections associated with assisted monitoring of blood glucose in an assisted living facility-Virginia, 2010.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas John Bender

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: In January 2010, the Virginia Department of Health received reports of 2 hepatitis B virus (HBV infections (1 acute, 1 chronic among residents of a single assisted living facility (ALF. Both infected residents had diabetes and received assisted monitoring of blood glucose (AMBG at the facility. An investigation was initiated in response. OBJECTIVE: To determine the extent and mechanism of HBV transmission among ALF residents. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study. SETTING: An ALF that primarily housed residents with neuropsychiatric disorders in 2 adjacent buildings in Virginia. PARTICIPANTS: Residents of the facility as of March 2010. MEASUREMENTS: HBV serologic testing, relevant medical history, and HBV genome sequences. Risk ratios (RR and 95% confidence intervals (CIs were used to identify risk factors for HBV infection. RESULTS: HBV serologic status was determined for 126 (91% of 139 residents. Among 88 susceptible residents, 14 became acutely infected (attack rate, 16%, and 74 remained uninfected. Acute HBV infection developed among 12 (92% of 13 residents who received AMBG, compared with 2 (3% of 75 residents who did not (RR  = 35; 95% CI, 8.7, 137. Identified infection control breaches during AMBG included shared use of fingerstick devices for multiple residents. HBV genome sequencing demonstrated 2 building-specific phylogenetic infection clusters, each having 99.8-100% sequence identity. LIMITATIONS: Transfer of residents out of the facility prior to our investigation might have contributed to an underestimate of cases. Resident interviews provided insufficient information to fully assess behavioral risk factors for HBV infection. CONCLUSIONS: Failure to adhere to safe practices during AMBG resulted in a large HBV outbreak. Protection of a growing and vulnerable ALF population requires improved training of staff and routine facility licensing inspections that scrutinize infection control practices.

  4. Outbreak of hepatitis B virus infections associated with assisted monitoring of blood glucose in an assisted living facility-Virginia, 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Thomas John; Wise, Matthew E; Utah, Okey; Moorman, Anne C; Sharapov, Umid; Drobeniuc, Jan; Khudyakov, Yury; Fricchione, Marielle; White-Comstock, Mary Beth; Thompson, Nicola D; Patel, Priti R

    2012-01-01

    In January 2010, the Virginia Department of Health received reports of 2 hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections (1 acute, 1 chronic) among residents of a single assisted living facility (ALF). Both infected residents had diabetes and received assisted monitoring of blood glucose (AMBG) at the facility. An investigation was initiated in response. To determine the extent and mechanism of HBV transmission among ALF residents. Retrospective cohort study. An ALF that primarily housed residents with neuropsychiatric disorders in 2 adjacent buildings in Virginia. Residents of the facility as of March 2010. HBV serologic testing, relevant medical history, and HBV genome sequences. Risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to identify risk factors for HBV infection. HBV serologic status was determined for 126 (91%) of 139 residents. Among 88 susceptible residents, 14 became acutely infected (attack rate, 16%), and 74 remained uninfected. Acute HBV infection developed among 12 (92%) of 13 residents who received AMBG, compared with 2 (3%) of 75 residents who did not (RR  = 35; 95% CI, 8.7, 137). Identified infection control breaches during AMBG included shared use of fingerstick devices for multiple residents. HBV genome sequencing demonstrated 2 building-specific phylogenetic infection clusters, each having 99.8-100% sequence identity. Transfer of residents out of the facility prior to our investigation might have contributed to an underestimate of cases. Resident interviews provided insufficient information to fully assess behavioral risk factors for HBV infection. Failure to adhere to safe practices during AMBG resulted in a large HBV outbreak. Protection of a growing and vulnerable ALF population requires improved training of staff and routine facility licensing inspections that scrutinize infection control practices.

  5. Reducing inappropriate, anticholinergic and psychotropic drugs among older residents in assisted living facilities: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

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    Pitkala Kaisu H

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Use of inappropriate drugs is common among institutionalized older people. Rigorous trials investigating the effect of the education of staff in institutionalized settings on the harm related to older people’s drug treatment are still scarce. The aim of this trial is to investigate whether training professionals in assisted living facilities reduces the use of inappropriate drugs among residents and has an effect on residents’ quality of life and use of health services. Methods and design During years 2011 and 2012, a sample of residents in assisted living facilities in Helsinki (approximately 212 will be recruited, having offered to participate in a trial aiming to reduce their harmful drugs. Their wards will be randomized into two arms: one, those in which staff will be trained in two half-day sessions, including case studies to identify inappropriate, anticholinergic and psychotropic drugs among their residents, and two, a control group with usual care procedures and delayed training. The intervention wards will have an appointed nurse who will be responsible for taking care of the medication of the residents on her ward, and taking any problems to the consulting doctor, who will be responsible for the overall care of the patient. The trial will last for twelve months, the assessment time points will be zero, six and twelve months. The primary outcomes will be the proportion of persons using inappropriate, anticholinergic, or more than two psychotropic drugs, and the change in the mean number of inappropriate, anticholinergic and psychotropic drugs among residents. Secondary endpoints will be, for example, the change in the mean number of drugs, the proportion of residents having significant drug-drug interactions, residents' health-related quality of life (HRQOL according to the 15D instrument, cognition according to verbal fluency and clock-drawing tests and the use and cost of health services, especially

  6. Assisted Living Facilities - CARE_LONG_TERM_FACILITIES_ISDH_IN: Residential Care Facilities, Nursing Homes, and Hospices in Indiana in 2007 (Indiana State Department of Health, Point Shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — CARE_LONG_TERM_FACILITIES_ISDH_IN is a point shapefile showing the locations of 86 residential care facilities, 525 long-term care facilities (nursing homes), and 81...

  7. Food and nutrition care indicators: experts' views on quality indicators for food and nutrition services in assisted-living facilities for older adults.

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    Chao, Shirley Y; Houser, Robert F; Tennstedt, Sharon; Jacques, Paul; Dwyer, Johanna T

    2007-09-01

    This study assessed the views of 153 national experts in nutrition, health, and aging services in assisted-living facilities; including gerontological nutrition (39%), foodservice (14%), aging and disability (22%), geriatric medicine (9%), and assisted living (16%); on the practices that serve as indicators of the quality of food and nutrition services provided in assisted-living facilities and ascertained the most favored style of service delivery: health, amenities, or both. An 88-item Food and Nutrition Care Indicators survey was developed from assisted-living facility regulations in 50 states and other quality indicators of nutrition services. Respondents rated each item on a scale from 1 (not important) to 5 (extremely important). Results show that at least 80% of experts rated the majority of indicators in each domain as highly important (57% of dining room, 67% of foodservice indicators, 65% of general nutrition, and 70% of therapeutic nutrition indicators). Most experts (89%) rated a combination of indicators that included both health (general and therapeutic) and amenities service styles as being highly important. The 57 items rated most important were consolidated into a checklist. A service model that incorporates all of these elements appears to be most appropriate.

  8. Pilot Study for Implementing an Osteoporosis Education and Exercise Program in an Assisted Living Facility and Senior Community.

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    Nanduri, Aparna P; Fullman, Sally; Morell, Lori; Buyske, Steve; Wagner, Mary L

    2016-10-01

    Project Healthy Bones (PHB) is a 24-week, peer-led exercise and education program for older adults at risk of osteoporosis. Residents from an assisted living and senior community program were enrolled after medical clearance. Participant demographics, geriatric fitness assessments, exercise logs, quizzes, and surveys were collected at baseline and 24 weeks. Data were analyzed using paired t tests and ANOVA of change scores for the pooled data within the R statistical environment. Forty of the 53 enrolled participants completed the program. Participants improved their strength, balance, posture, and flexibility, resulting in a reduced risk of falls and fractures. In addition, their knowledge of bone health, nutrition, and fall prevention increased. Offering low-cost disease-specific programs such as PHB helps minimize the complications of osteoporosis and improve the overall health of participants. Implementing disease-specific public health programs in assisted living centers can increase access to programs.

  9. [Daily living activities and oral condition among care facility residents with severe intellectual disabilities. Comparative analyses between residents receiving tooth-brushing assistance and those not receiving tooth-brushing assistance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiwata, Kaoru; Takeda, Fumi

    2007-06-01

    To clarify 1) differences in daily living activities and oral condition among care facility residents with severe intellectual disabilities and 2) chronological changes in daily living activities and oral condition for residents receiving tooth-brushing assistance and those never receiving tooth-brushing assistance. Subjects were 44 residents at a care facility for individuals with severe intellectual disabilities, who underwent dental screening in July 1994 and October 2003. At each time point, daily living activities, behavior during oral health guidance, behavior during dental health screening and oral condition were compared between residents receiving tooth-brushing assistance (assistance group) and those not receiving tooth-brushing assistance (independent group). Furthermore, chronological changes were analyzed for residents requiring assistance at both screenings, those requiring assistance only at the second screening, and those not requiring assistance at either screening. 1) In the assistance group, 100% and 36.4% of residents were unable to brush their teeth independently in 1994 and 2003, respectively. Significant differences between the assistance and independent groups were observed in all items of behavior during dental health screening in 1994, but not in 2003. No significant intergroup differences in oral condition were observed in 1994, but differences were seen in 2003; when compared to the assistance group, the number of lost teeth was significantly higher in the independent group, while the number of remaining teeth was lower. 2) Regarding changes over the nine-year period, a significantly greater proportion of residents not requiring assistance at either screening and those requiring assistance only at the second screening finally required assistance in bathing. As for oral condition, no significant changes in healthy teeth were observed in residents requiring assistance at both screening time points, while significant increases in dental

  10. National Center for Assisted Living

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... spread. Looking for more information reguarding Prefered Provider Program Quality Care Book Store ​​ ​ ​​​ ​ ​​​ Featured Video Intergenerational Programming ​ Learn how Golden Oaks, an assisted living ...

  11. A power-assisted exercise intervention in people with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities living in a residential facility: a pilot randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossink, Leontien Wm; van der Putten, Annette Aj; Waninge, Aly; Vlaskamp, Carla

    2017-09-01

    To assess the feasibility of conducting a randomised controlled trial to determine the effectiveness of a twenty-week power-assisted exercise intervention in people with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities and to evaluate the potential beneficial effects of this intervention. Pilot randomised controlled trial. A large-scale twenty-four-hour residential facility in the Netherlands. Thirty-seven persons with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities. Participants in the intervention group received a power-assisted exercise intervention three times a week for thirty minutes over a twenty-week period. Participants in the control group received care as usual. Trial feasibility by recruitment process and outcomes completion rates; intervention feasibility by programme compliance rates; potential outcomes by functional abilities, alertness, body composition, muscle tone, oxygen saturation, cardiovascular fitness and quality of life. Thirty-seven participants were recruited ( M age = 32.1, SD = 14.6) and were randomly allocated to intervention ( n = 19) and control ( n = 18) groups. Programme compliance rates ranged from 54.2% to 97.7% with a mean (SD) of 81.5% (13.4). Oxygen saturation significantly increased in the intervention group. Standardised effect sizes on the difference between groups in outcome varied between 0.02 and 0.62. The power-assisted exercise intervention and the trial design were feasible and acceptable to people with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities living in a residential facility. This pilot study suggests that the intervention improves oxygen saturation, but further implementation with the aim of improving other outcomes should be considered with caution.

  12. Assisted living nursing practice: admission assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitty, Ethel; Flores, Sandi

    2007-01-01

    Admission assessment, generally conducted by a registered nurse, is autonomous, without opportunity for dialogue with colleagues and other health care professionals and bounded by the nurse's knowledge and skills, state regulations, facility practices, and marketing. The fact that some states permit admission and retention of nursing home level-of-care residents and provision of end-of-life care means that the assessment has to be able to predict the resident's likely trajectory of well-being as well as chronic illness exacerbation. The nurse must have a clear perspective on staff competencies and judge whether additional education or training will be necessary. This article reviews assessment standards of practice as put forth by the American Assisted Living Nurses Association as part of its application for recognition of assisted living nursing as specialty nursing practice by the American Nurses Association. The role of the Licensed Practical Nurse/Licensed Vocational Nurse in resident assessment is also discussed.

  13. Changes in malnutrition and quality of nutritional care among aged residents in all nursing homes and assisted living facilities in Helsinki 2003-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saarela, Riitta K T; Muurinen, Seija; Suominen, Merja H; Savikko, Niina N; Soini, Helena; Pitkälä, Kaisu H

    2017-09-01

    While nutritional problems have been recognized as common in institutional settings for several decades, less is known about how nutritional care and nutrition has changed in these settings over time. To describe and compare the nutritional problems and nutritional care of residents in all nursing homes (NH) in 2003 and 2011 and residents in all assisted living facilities (ALF) in 2007 and 2011, in Helsinki, Finland. We combined four cross-sectional datasets of (1) residents from all NHs in 2003 (N=1987), (2) residents from all ALFs in 2007 (N=1377), (3) residents from all NHs in 2011 (N=1576) and (4) residents from all ALFs in 2011 (N=1585). All participants at each time point were assessed using identical methods, including the Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA). The mean age of both samples from 2011 was higher and a larger proportion suffered from dementia, compared to earlier collected samples. A larger proportion of the residents in 2011 were assessed either malnourished or at-risk for malnutrition, according to the MNA, than in 2003 (NH: 93.5% vs. 88.9%, p<0.001) and in 2007 (ALF: 82.1% vs. 78.1%, p=0.007). The use of nutritional, vitamin D and calcium supplements, and snacks between meals was significantly more common in the 2011 residents, compared to the respective earlier samples. In 2011, institutionalized residents were more disabled and more prone to malnourishment than in 2003 or 2007. Institutions do seem to be more aware of good nutritional care for vulnerable older people, although there is still room for improvement. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. A smart kitchen for ambient assisted living

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Blasco, Rubén; Marco, Álvaro; Casas, Roberto; Cirujano, Diego; Picking, Richard

    .... Moreover, it is the place where old people suffer from most domestic injuries. This paper presents a novel design, implementation and assessment of a Smart Kitchen which provides Ambient Assisted Living services...

  15. Cognitive assisted living ambient system: a survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruijiao Li

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The demographic change towards an aging population is creating a significant impact and introducing drastic challenges to our society. We therefore need to find ways to assist older people to stay independently and prevent social isolation of these population. Information and Communication Technologies (ICT provide various solutions to help older adults to improve their quality of life, stay healthier, and live independently for a time. Ambient Assisted Living (AAL is a field to investigate innovative technologies to provide assistance as well as healthcare and rehabilitation to impaired seniors. The paper provides a review of research background and technologies of AAL.

  16. Learning from an Ambient Assisted Living Lab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bygholm, Ann; Kanstrup, Anne Marie

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents methodological lessons learned from an Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) lab exploring the use of intelligent beds in a nursing home. The living lab study was conducted over a period of three month. 20 intelligent beds were installed. Data was collected via self-registration, diar......This paper presents methodological lessons learned from an Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) lab exploring the use of intelligent beds in a nursing home. The living lab study was conducted over a period of three month. 20 intelligent beds were installed. Data was collected via self......-registration, diaries, observations, interviews and workshops with residents, nurses, nursing assistants, management, building officers, and purchasers from the Municipality. The paper presents an analysis within the overall themes of technology, use, and care, which is discussed by use of the SWOT framework presenting...

  17. Disseminating Ambient Assisted Living in Rural Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitner, Gerhard; Felfernig, Alexander; Fercher, Anton J.; Hitz, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The smart home, ambient intelligence and ambient assisted living have been intensively researched for decades. Although rural areas are an important potential market, because they represent about 80% of the territory of the EU countries and around 125 million inhabitants, there is currently a lack of applicable AAL solutions. This paper discusses the theoretical foundations of AAL in rural areas. This discussion is underlined by the achievements of the empirical field study, Casa Vecchia, which has been carried out over a four-year period in a rural area in Austria. The major goal of Casa Vecchia was to evaluate the feasibility of a specific form of AAL for rural areas: bringing AAL technology to the homes of the elderly, rather than moving seniors to special-equipped care facilities. The Casa Vecchia project thoroughly investigated the possibilities, challenges and drawbacks of AAL related to this specific approach. The findings are promising and somewhat surprising and indicate that further technical, interactional and socio-psychological research is required to make AAL in rural areas reasonable in the future. PMID:25068862

  18. Disseminating Ambient Assisted Living in Rural Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhard Leitner

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The smart home, ambient intelligence and ambient assisted living have been intensively researched for decades. Although rural areas are an important potential market, because they represent about 80% of the territory of the EU countries and around 125 million inhabitants, there is currently a lack of applicable AAL solutions. This paper discusses the theoretical foundations of AAL in rural areas. This discussion is underlined by the achievements of the empirical field study, Casa Vecchia, which has been carried out over a four-year period in a rural area in Austria. The major goal of Casa Vecchia was to evaluate the feasibility of a specific form of AAL for rural areas: bringing AAL technology to the homes of the elderly, rather than moving seniors to special-equipped care facilities. The Casa Vecchia project thoroughly investigated the possibilities, challenges and drawbacks of AAL related to this specific approach. The findings are promising and somewhat surprising and indicate that further technical, interactional and socio-psychological research is required to make AAL in rural areas reasonable in the future.

  19. [Attitudes towards assisted living inAustria-A qualitative study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggatz, Thomas; Lechner, Cornelia

    2015-08-01

    Surveys in German speaking countries identified motives for choosing assisted living, but their importance in the context of decision making remains unclear. This study aimed to identify types of attitudes towards assisted living among older persons in Austria that result from the interplay of single motives. A comparative qualitative study with semi-structured interviews was conduCted in the land Salzburg among residents of assisted living facilities and home dwelling older adults. Data were analysed by using qualitative content analysis according to Mayring and subsequent construction of types. Among residents types of attitudes were "proactive users" who expected more safety or comfort and persons who "moved m due to external circumstances" like taking the opportunity of available place or feeling forced by functional/imitations or be ing influenced by significant others. Types of attitudes among home dwelling older persons were "conditional acceptance';"rejection" and ;'indecisiveness':Vague ideas about assisted living often prevented an informed decision. Choice of assisted living only depends to some extent on specific expectations. Better information,advice by significant others and availability of a place may favour a decision to move in.

  20. A power-assisted exercise intervention in people with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities living in a residential facility : A pilot randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bossink, Leontien W.M.; van der Putten, Annette A.J.; Waninge, Aly; Vlaskamp, Carla

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To assess the feasibility of conducting a randomised controlled trial to determine the effectiveness of a twenty-week power-assisted exercise intervention in people with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities and to evaluate the potential beneficial effects of this intervention.

  1. Advantage and choice: social relationships and staff assistance in assisted living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burge, Stephanie; Street, Debra

    2010-05-01

    OBJECTIVES. To understand how "cumulative inequality" (CI), expressed as individual advantage and choice, and "external social supports" contribute to the quality of social relationships and perceptions of staff assistance for older individuals in different assisted living (AL) settings. Data are from 429 cognitively intact AL residents aged 60 years and older interviewed for the Florida Study of Assisted Living. Bivariate and multivariate statistical analyses show how individual advantage and choice and external social networks influence respondents' social relationships and staff assistance in AL. Controlling for resident and facility characteristics, being able to pay privately enhances resident satisfaction with staff assistance and having control over the move to AL is positively associated with perceptions of staff relationships and assistance. Maintaining contact with pre-AL friends predicts quality of coresident relationships, as does family contact. Regular contact with family buffers some of the disadvantages associated with CI for perceptions of staff relationships but not perceptions of staff assistance. Discussion. Individual advantage and choice influence the quality of staff relationships and assistance for AL residents but matter little for coresident relationships. External social relationships buffer some of the risks associated with CI for perceptions of staff relationships but not perceived quality of staff assistance. Findings highlight outcomes associated with CI, including predictable risks that disadvantaged elders face in particular types of AL settings, differential advantages others enjoy that influence positive perceptions of staff relationships and staff assistance, and the enduring importance of supportive social relationships.

  2. Medication Reconciliation in Long-Term Care and Assisted Living Facilities: Opportunity for Pharmacists to Minimize Risks Associated with Transitions of Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooen, Linda G

    2017-05-01

    The transitions of care process involves pharmacists and other members of the health care team who are in a position to collect, review, and analyze medications lists to help improve health care outcomes. Medication reconciliation is a complex process, especially when providing care to elderly population due to increased medication use, the movement of the patient from one health care setting to another, the number of acute and chronic illnesses, and the intervention of multiple health care providers in different facilities. The use of electronic health records can provide many benefits. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The Living Challenges of Ambient Assisted Living - A Literature Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bygholm, Ann; Kanstrup, Anne Marie

    2015-01-01

    Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) is a rapidly evolving research and development area propelled by scarcity of health resources caused by an aging workforce and increase of Citizens in need of health care and health assistance on a regular basis. This paper presents a literature review of the current...... state-of-the-art of AAL. The objective is to point towards methodological actions to be taken into account in AAL research on this basis. Searches were conducted in five research databases. The search identified 86 papers. 10 of these papers were review papers chosen for analysis. The analysis presents...

  4. 7th Ambient Assisted Living Congress

    CERN Document Server

    Klausing, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    In this book, leading authors in the field discuss developments of Ambient Assisted Living. The contributions have been chosen and invited at the 7th AAL congress, Berlin. It presents new technological developments which support the autonomy and independence of individuals with special needs. As the technological innovation raises also social issues, the book addresses micro and macro economical aspects of assistive systems and puts an additional emphasis on the ethical and legal discussion. The presentation is supported by real world examples and applications.

  5. Nursing delegation and medication administration in assisted living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitty, Ethel; Resnick, Barbara; Allen, Josh; Bakerjian, Debra; Hertz, Judith; Gardner, Wendi; Rapp, Mary Pat; Reinhard, Susan; Young, Heather; Mezey, Mathy

    2010-01-01

    Assisted living (AL) residences are residential long-term care settings that provide housing, 24-hour oversight, personal care services, health-related services, or a combination of these on an as-needed basis. Most residents require some assistance with activities of daily living and instrumental activities of daily living, such as medication management. A resident plan of care (ie, service agreement) is developed to address the health and psychosocial needs of the resident. The amount and type of care provided, and the individual who provides that care, vary on the basis of state regulations and what services are provided within the facility. Some states require that an RN hold a leadership position to oversee medication management and other aspects of care within the facility. A licensed practical nurse/licensed vocational nurse can supervise the day-to-day direct care within the facility. The majority of direct care in AL settings is provided by direct care workers (DCWs), including certified nursing assistants or unlicensed providers. The scope of practice of a DCW varies by state and the legal structure within that state. In some states, the DCW is exempt from the nurse practice act, and in some states, the DCW may practice within a specific scope such as being a medication aide. In most states, however, the DCW scope of practice is conscribed, in part, by the delegation of responsibilities (such as medication administration) by a supervising RN. The issue of RN delegation has become the subject of ongoing discussion for AL residents, facilities, and regulators and for the nursing profession. The purpose of this article is to review delegation in AL and to provide recommendations for future practice and research in this area.

  6. A Smart Kitchen for Ambient Assisted Living

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasco, Rubén; Marco, Álvaro; Casas, Roberto; Cirujano, Diego; Picking, Richard

    2014-01-01

    The kitchen environment is one of the scenarios in the home where users can benefit from Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) applications. Moreover, it is the place where old people suffer from most domestic injuries. This paper presents a novel design, implementation and assessment of a Smart Kitchen which provides Ambient Assisted Living services; a smart environment that increases elderly and disabled people's autonomy in their kitchen-related activities through context and user awareness, appropriate user interaction and artificial intelligence. It is based on a modular architecture which integrates a wide variety of home technology (household appliances, sensors, user interfaces, etc.) and associated communication standards and media (power line, radio frequency, infrared and cabled). Its software architecture is based on the Open Services Gateway initiative (OSGi), which allows building a complex system composed of small modules, each one providing the specific functionalities required, and can be easily scaled to meet our needs. The system has been evaluated by a large number of real users (63) and carers (31) in two living labs in Spain and UK. Results show a large potential of system functionalities combined with good usability and physical, sensory and cognitive accessibility. PMID:24445412

  7. Defining Quality in Assisted Living: Comparing Apples, Oranges, and Broccoli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawes, Catherine; Phillips, Charles D.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to discuss and describe various measures of quality, quality indicators, and uses of information on quality with specific reference to the role or purpose of assisted living. Design and Methods: We reviewed a variety of major studies of assisted living quality. We elaborated models of assisted living based…

  8. Enhancing Assisted Living Technology with Extended Visual Memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joo-Hwee Lim

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Human vision and memory are powerful cognitive faculties by which we understand the world. However, they are imperfect and further, subject to deterioration with age. We propose a cognitive-inspired computational model, Extended Visual Memory (EVM, within the Computer-Aided Vision (CAV framework, to assist human in vision-related tasks. We exploit wearable sensors such as cameras, GPS and ambient computing facilities to complement a user's vision and memory functions by answering four types of queries central to visual activities, namely, Retrieval, Understanding, Navigation and Search. Learning of EVM relies on both frequency-based and attention-driven mechanisms to store view-based visual fragments (VF, which are abstracted into high-level visual schemas (VS, both in the visual long-term memory. During inference, the visual short-term memory plays a key role in visual similarity computation between input (or its schematic representation and VF, exemplified from VS when necessary. We present an assisted living scenario, termed EViMAL (Extended Visual Memory for Assisted Living, targeted at mild dementia patients to provide novel functions such as hazard-warning, visual reminder, object look-up and event review. We envisage EVM having the potential benefits in alleviating memory loss, improving recall precision and enhancing memory capacity through external support.

  9. Falls Prevention Process in Assisted Living Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlin, DaRae; Nordman-Oliveira, Susan E; Schlaak, Mary; Ford, James H

    2017-12-01

    Falls are a significant issue for older adults, and many older adults who once received care in nursing homes now reside in assisted living communities (ALCs). ALC staff needs to address resident falls prevention; however, federal or state requirements or oversight are limited. This research explores falls prevention in Wisconsin ALCs in the context of the Kotter Change Model to identify strategies and inform efforts to establish a more consistent, proactive falls prevention process for ALCs. A mixed methods approach demonstrated inconsistency and variability in the use of falls risk assessments and prevention programs, which led to the development of standardized, proactive falls prevention process flowcharts. This process, as delineated, provides ALCs with an approach to organize a comprehensive falls reduction strategy. Findings highlight the importance of educating staff regarding assessments, resident motivation, falls prevention programs, and feedback, all key components of the falls prevention process.

  10. Ambient Assisted Living : Italian forum 2013

    CERN Document Server

    Siciliano, Pietro; Germani, Michele; Monteriù, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    This book presents the refereed proceedings of the Fourth Italian Forum on Ambient Assisted Living (AAL), held in Ancona, Italy, in October 2013. A wide range of issues are covered, and new technological developments are described which will support the autonomy and independence of individuals with special needs through an innovative and integrated approach, designed to respond to the socio-economic challenges of an aging population. Topics addressed include: health and well-being, prevention and rehabilitation, and support for care providers; active aging and its social implications; services for the frail elderly with health problems and their families; nutrition; ICT platforms/technologies for the benefit of the elderly; home automation and control technologies (autonomy, safety, and energy saving); smart cities and smart communities; telemedicine, telerehabilitation, and telecare; mobility, participation, and social inclusion; games and fun for the elderly; building design; social housing; interface desig...

  11. Does Assisted Living Capacity Influence Case Mix at Nursing Homes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan P. Clement PhD

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Assisted living facilities (ALFs have grown over the past few decades. If they attract residents with lower care needs away from nursing homes (NHs, NHs may be left with higher case mix residents. We study the relationship between ALF bed market capacity and NH case mix in a state (Virginia where ALF bed capacity stabilized after a period of growth. Similarly, NH capacity and use had been stable. While it is interesting to study markets in flux, for planning purposes, it is also important to examine what happens after periods of turbulence and adaptation. Our findings show some substitution of ALF for NH care, but the relationship is not linear with ALF market capacity. Communities need to consider the interplay of ALFs and NHs in planning for long-term care services and supports. Policies supporting ALFs may enable care needs to be met in a lower cost setting than the NH.

  12. Living labs an arena for development and testing Ambient Assisted living technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Anna Marie; Bangshaab, Jette

    2016-01-01

    Background: This gives an example of Living labs as an arena for development/testing Ambient Assisted Living technology (AAL-technology). The selected Living lab is part of an EU-supported development project in collaboration with practice and concerns a Living lab that has developed an implement......Background: This gives an example of Living labs as an arena for development/testing Ambient Assisted Living technology (AAL-technology). The selected Living lab is part of an EU-supported development project in collaboration with practice and concerns a Living lab that has developed...

  13. Osteoporosis risk in frail older adults in assisted living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Anne M; Smith, JoAnne; Noteroglu, Emre; Waynik, Ilana Y; Ellis, Cynthia; Kleppinger, Alison; Annis, Kristen; Dauser, Debrorah; Walsh, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    To compare osteoporosis risk in residents of assisted living (AL) with that of age- and sex-matched community-dwelling adults. Cross-sectional. Community and AL facilities in Connecticut. One hundred seven individuals (77 control, 37 AL). Fracture and osteoporosis evaluation history, qualitative heel ultrasound (QUS), 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD), parathyroid hormone (PTH), and physical function measures, including walking speed, chair rise time, 6-minute walk, Berg Balance Scale, Get Up and Go, and handgrip strength. Participants' mean age was 82.7+/-5.7. There were no group differences in reported fracture, diagnosis of osteoporosis, or previous bone mineral density (BMD) assessment. QUS T-scores were -1.0+/-1.5 for community living and -1.9+/-1.3 for AL (P=.002), 25OHD levels were 113.0+/-40.1 nnmol/L for community living and 81.8+/-36.9 for AL (Posteoporosis than those from the community, but risk factors measured directly were significantly different, including lower BMD and 25OHD and more impairment in measures of physical function. These data suggest that residents of AL are at greater risk for osteoporotic fracture and that measures to diminish risk (optimizing vitamin D status, implementing fall prevention strategies, incorporating exercise to improve physical performance) should be considered and studied for benefit.

  14. Vision impairment and nutritional status among older assisted living residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muurinen, Seija M; Soini, Helena H; Suominen, Merja H; Saarela, Riitta K T; Savikko, Niina M; Pitkälä, Kaisu H

    2014-01-01

    Vision impairment is common among older persons. It is a risk factor for disability, and it may be associated with nutritional status via decline in functional status. However, only few studies have examined the relationship between vision impairment and nutritional status, which was investigated in this cross-sectional study. The study included all residents living in the assisted living facilities in Helsinki and Espoo in 2007. Residents in temporary respite care were excluded (5%). Of permanent residents (N=2214), 70% (N=1475) consented. Trained nurses performed a personal interview and assessment of each resident including the Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA), functional and health status. Patient records were used to confirm demographic data and medical history. Mortality in 2010 was retrieved from central registers. Of the residents, 17.5% (N=245) had vision impairment and they were not able to read regular print. Those with vision impairment were older, more often females, and malnourished according to MNA. They had lower BMI, and suffered more often from dementia and chewing problems than those without vision impairment. In logistic regression analysis controlling for age, gender, chewing problems and dementia, vision impairment was independently associated with resident's malnutrition (OR 2.51, 95% CI 1.80-3.51). According to our results older residents in assisted living with vision impairment are at high risk for malnutrition. Therefore it is important to assess nutritional status of persons with vision impairment. It would be beneficial to repeat this kind of a study also in elderly community population. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Hospice in Assisted Living: Promoting Good Quality Care at End of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright, Juliana C.; Miller, Lois; Volpin, Miriam

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe good quality care at the end of life (EOL) for hospice-enrolled residents in assisted living facilities (ALFs). Design and Methods: A qualitative descriptive design was used to obtain detailed descriptions of EOL care provided by ALF medication aides, caregivers, nurses, and hospice nurses in…

  16. 9th Ambient Assisted Living Congress

    CERN Document Server

    Mand, Beate

    2017-01-01

    In this book, leading authors in the field discuss the habitats of tomorrow. These habitats will be connected through autonomous and assistive systems, turning habitats into health resorts. This book discusses how assistance technologies enable a smooth transition from comfortable health support to medical or nursing care. The contributions have been chosen and invited at the 9th AAL congress, Frankfurt. .

  17. The DFKI Competence Center for Ambient Assisted Living

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Jochen; Stahl, Christoph; Röfer, Thomas; Krieg-Brückner, Bernd; Alexandersson, Jan

    The DFKI Competence Center for Ambient Assisted Living (CCAAL) is a cross-project and cross-department virtual organization within the German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence coordinating and conducting research and development in the area of Ambient Assisted Living (AAL). Our demonstrators range from multimodal speech dialog systems to fully instrumented environments allowing the development of intelligent assistant systems, for instance an autonomous wheelchair, or the recognition and processing of everyday activities in a smart home. These innovative technologies are then tested, evaluated and demonstrated in DFKI's living labs.

  18. Human monitoring, smart health and assisted living techniques and technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Longhi, Sauro; Freddi, Alessandro

    2017-01-01

    This book covers the three main scientific and technological areas critical for improving people's quality of life - namely human monitoring, smart health and assisted living - from both the research and development points of view.

  19. 5th Italian Forum on Ambient Assisted Living

    CERN Document Server

    Siciliano, Pietro; Marletta, Vincenzo; Monteriù, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    This book documents the state of the art in the field of ambient assisted living (AAL), highlighting the impressive potential of novel methodologies and technologies to enhance well-being and promote active ageing. The coverage is wide ranging, with sections on assistive devices, elderly people monitoring, home rehabilitation, ICT solutions for AAL, living with chronic conditions, robotic assistance for the elderly, sensing technologies for AAL, and smart housing. The book comprises a selection of the best papers presented at the Fifth Italian Forum on Ambient Assisted Living, which was held in Catania, Italy, in September 2014 and brought together end users, technology teams, and policy makers to develop a consensus on how to improve provision for elderly and impaired people. Readers will find that the expert contributions offer clear insights into the ways in which the most recent exciting advances may be expected to assist in addressing the needs of the elderly and those with chronic conditions.

  20. Evidence of empowerment in resident council groups: an examination of two leadership models in assisted living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonifas, Robin P; Hedgpeth, Jay; Kramer, Christie

    2013-01-01

    Individuals living in long-term care facilities and the professionals working with them are seeking methods to enhance resident choice and self-direction in personal care and internal community planning. This article presents findings from a study examining the incidence of empowerment opportunities in two resident council groups in assisted living facilities; one group used a resident leadership model and the other used an administrative leadership model by residents' choice. Results indicate that even with health and mental health challenges, residents were able to exercise choice in complicated situations under both leadership models, suggesting that resident council groups are a beneficial empowerment strategy.

  1. Common Ambient Assisted Living Home Platform for Seamless Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Stefan Rahr; Stenner, Rene; Memon, Mukhtiar

    The CareStore project is investigating the feasibility of creating an open and flexible infrastructure for facilitating seamless deployment of assisted living devices and applications on heterogeneous platforms. The Common Ambient Assisted Living Home Platform (CAALHP) is intended to be the main...... user interface for patients and healthcare staff in the CareStore eco system. The aim of this abstract is to demonstrate the currently implemented features and outline relevant perspectives and future work in the CareStore project....

  2. [Animal- assisted therapy in health care facilities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jofré M, Leonor

    2005-09-01

    Animal-assisted therapy is a novel interventional program with important benefits in the management of patients with chronic diseases and prolonged hospitalization. The relationship between animals and patients facilitates adaptation to a new, stressing hospital environment, helps in diminishing anxiety, stress, pain and blood pressure and increases mobility and muscular strength. This therapy can be developed by pets themselves or by specially trained animals. Dogs are the most frequently used animals because of their training and sociability skills. Patients and animals participating in these programs require special care in order to avoid transmission of infectious diseases associated with pets, hypersensitivity and accidents during their visits. Implementation of animal - assisted therapy in care centers requires a permanent revision of suggested guidelines and program objectives.

  3. Strangers and Friends: Residents’ Social Careers in Assisted Living

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. This study examines coresident relationships in assisted living (AL) and identifies factors influencing relationships. Methods. We draw on qualitative data collected from 2008 to 2009 from three AL communities varying in size, location, and resident characteristics. Data collection methods included participant observation, and informal and formal, in-depth interviews with residents, administrators, and AL staff. Data analysis was guided by principles of grounded theory method, an iterative approach that seeks to discover core categories, processes, and patterns and link these together to construct theory. Results. The dynamic, evolutionary nature of relationships and the individual patterns that comprise residents’ overall experiences with coresidents are captured by our core category, “negotiating social careers in AL.” Across facilities, relationships ranged from stranger to friend. Neighboring was a common way of relating and often involved social support, but was not universal. We offer a conceptual model explaining the multilevel factors influencing residents’ relationships and social careers. Discussion. Our explanatory framework reveals the dynamic and variable nature of coresident relationships and raises additional questions about social career variability, trajectories, and transitions. We discuss implications for practice including the need for useable spaces, thoughtful activity programming, and the promotion of neighboring through staff and family involvement. PMID:22511342

  4. "Maintaining connections but wanting more": the continuity of familial relationships among assisted-living residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tompkins, Catherine J; Ihara, Emily S; Cusick, Alison; Park, Nan Sook

    2012-01-01

    Social support is a key component of well-being for older adults, particularly for those who have moved from independent living to assisted living involving a transformation of roles, relationships, and responsibilities. Twenty-nine assisted-living facility residents were interviewed to understand the perceived continuity of relationships with family and friends. An inductive approach to thematic analysis revealed 1 main theme and 3 subthemes. The main theme that emerged was: maintaining connections but wanting more. Residents appreciated maintaining connections with family and friends, but often expressed feelings of discontentment with the continuity of former relationships. The subthemes included: appreciating family and friends, waiting for more, and losing control. Implications for research and practice are discussed.

  5. Smart Tales: An Awareness Game for Ambient Assisted Living

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sernani, Paolo; Dalpiaz, Fabiano; Dragoni, Aldo Franco; Brinkkemper, Sjaak

    2015-01-01

    Despite the progress in ambient assisted living (AAL), the general audience is still mostly unaware of this term as well as of its purpose, enabling technologies, and potential. As a consequence, there are often misconceptions about AAL and smart homes, and the acceptance of AAL technologies is

  6. Social Support and Successful Aging in Assisted Living Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howie, Laura Odell; Troutman-Jordan, Meredith; Newman, Ann M.

    2014-01-01

    Successful aging has been associated with adequate social support. However, impaired functionality, increased dependence, multiple comorbidities, and reduced social interactions place older assisted living community (ALC) residents at risk for poorer social support and less successful aging. This cross-sectional descriptive study used the revised…

  7. An integrated smart system for ambient-assisted living

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Foko, Thato E

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available customised to the South African environment to support ambient assisted living. The technology takes advantage of South Africa’s digitalisation programme to provide broadband access in the support of AAL. Digital television as a gateway to internet access...

  8. Indoor Localization for Optimized Ambient Assisted Living Services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitev, Miroslav; Mihovska, Albena Dimitrova; Poulkov, Vladimir

    Indoor localization is very critical for the provision of Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) services, such as e-Health, smart home, etc. The success of deploying a real-time localization system depends on selecting the right performance characteristics. Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) is a technology, which...

  9. 7th Italian Forum on Ambient Assisted Living

    CERN Document Server

    Marletta, Vincenzo; Monteriù, Andrea; Siciliano, Pietro

    2017-01-01

    This book documents the state of the art in the field of ambient assisted living (AAL), highlighting the impressive potential of novel methodologies and technologies to enhance well-being and promote active ageing. The coverage is wide ranging, with sections on assistive devices, elderly people monitoring, home rehabilitation, ICT solutions for AAL, living with chronic conditions, robotic assistance for the elderly, sensing technologies for AAL, and smart housing. The book comprises a selection of the best papers presented at the 7th Italian Forum on Ambient Assisted Living (ForitAAL 2016), which was held in Pisa, Italy, in June 2016 and brought together end users, technology teams, and policy makers to develop a consensus on how to improve provision for elderly and impaired people. Readers will find that the expert contributions offer clear insights into the ways in which the most recent exciti ng advances may be expected to assist in addressing the needs of the elderly and those with chronic conditions.

  10. LIVING USABILITY LAB METHODOLOGY FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF AMBIENT ASSISTED LIVING SYSTEMS AND SERVICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Queirós

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper aims to present the research work associated with the consolidation of the Living Usability Lab (LUL, an ecosystem devoted to the development of Ambient Assisted Living (AAL systems and services. The paper refers the motivations behind the development of LUL and presents its goals and its constituent entities: i stakeholders; ii methodological approaches; iii applications; iv development platform and v logical and physical infrastructure. In particular, it presents the Living Usability Lab methodology, which aims the active involvement of potential end users and other stakeholders in all phases of the AAL systems and services development in order to optimize them in terms of usability, effectiveness and acceptance. Keywords: Usability, Ambient Assisted Living, Living Lab Methodology.

  11. Assistant Personal Robot (APR): Conception and Application of a Tele-Operated Assisted Living Robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clotet, Eduard; Martínez, Dani; Moreno, Javier; Tresanchez, Marcel; Palacín, Jordi

    2016-04-28

    This paper presents the technical description, mechanical design, electronic components, software implementation and possible applications of a tele-operated mobile robot designed as an assisted living tool. This robotic concept has been named Assistant Personal Robot (or APR for short) and has been designed as a remotely telecontrolled robotic platform built to provide social and assistive services to elderly people and those with impaired mobility. The APR features a fast high-mobility motion system adapted for tele-operation in plain indoor areas, which incorporates a high-priority collision avoidance procedure. This paper presents the mechanical architecture, electrical fundaments and software implementation required in order to develop the main functionalities of an assistive robot. The APR uses a tablet in order to implement the basic peer-to-peer videoconference and tele-operation control combined with a tactile graphic user interface. The paper also presents the development of some applications proposed in the framework of an assisted living robot.

  12. Older peoples' experiences of living in a residential aged care facility in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Helen; Paliadelis, Penelope

    2016-09-01

    The objectives of the study were to investigate the lived experience of older people in residential aged care facilities (RACFs) in Australia, to explore their perceptions of their lives in RACFs and how care might be improved. This qualitative study used a phenomenological approach to explore the lived experience of older persons in RACFs across two Australian states. In-depth interviews regarding independence, dignity, autonomy, communication and relationships were conducted with 18 participants. The interviews were audiotaped, transcribed and thematically analysed. Three themes emerged reflecting the reality of RACF life for these participants: (i) loss of autonomy, dignity and control; (ii) valuing important relationships; and (iii) resigned acceptance. Older people were not included in decision-making and found it difficult to maintain their autonomy and dignity, and forge meaningful relationships. They traded their independence and dignity for the safety and assistance they needed; however, they accepted this trade-off with stoicism and remained positive. © 2016 AJA Inc.

  13. 78 FR 53821 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-30

    ... Facilities To Assist the Homeless; Notice #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 78 , No. 169 / Friday, August 30... Facilities To Assist the Homeless AGENCY: Office of the Assistant Secretary for Community Planning and... surplus Federal property reviewed by HUD for suitability for use to assist the homeless. FOR FURTHER...

  14. A Configurable Sensor Network Applied to Ambient Assisted Living

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan J. Villacorta

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The rising older people population has increased the interest in Ambient Assisted Living systems. This article presents a system for monitoring the disabled or older persons developed from an existing surveillance system. The modularity and adaptability characteristics of the system allow an easy adaptation for a different purpose. The proposed system uses a network of sensors capable of motion detection that includes fall warning, identification of persons and a configurable control system which allows its use in different scenarios.

  15. Big data, smart homes and ambient assisted living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vimarlund, V; Wass, S

    2014-08-15

    To discuss how current research in the area of smart homes and ambient assisted living will be influenced by the use of big data. A scoping review of literature published in scientific journals and conference proceedings was performed, focusing on smart homes, ambient assisted living and big data over the years 2011-2014. The health and social care market has lagged behind other markets when it comes to the introduction of innovative IT solutions and the market faces a number of challenges as the use of big data will increase. First, there is a need for a sustainable and trustful information chain where the needed information can be transferred from all producers to all consumers in a structured way. Second, there is a need for big data strategies and policies to manage the new situation where information is handled and transferred independently of the place of the expertise. Finally, there is a possibility to develop new and innovative business models for a market that supports cloud computing, social media, crowdsourcing etc. The interdisciplinary area of big data, smart homes and ambient assisted living is no longer only of interest for IT developers, it is also of interest for decision makers as customers make more informed choices among today's services. In the future it will be of importance to make information usable for managers and improve decision making, tailor smart home services based on big data, develop new business models, increase competition and identify policies to ensure privacy, security and liability.

  16. Enhanced neurorehabilitation techniques in the DVBIC Assisted Living Pilot Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Stuart W; Shesko, Kristina; Harrison, Catherine R

    2010-01-01

    Traumatic Brain Injury has been labeled the "silent epidemic" in our current wars. Both CBO and the RAND reports predict that the costs of these injuries will be both extensive and enduring. The projected costs are based not only upon the loss contribution of these warriors to our economy, but also the long-term medical and assistive care that will be needed to support these veterans for decades to come. Thus, the primary goal of the Assisted Living Pilot Project (ALPP) at the Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center - Johnstown (DVBIC-J) is to promote the ability of the injured warrior to move from assisted living to living independently and to be self-supporting by providing a continuum of care. To accomplish this goal the DVBIC-J ALPP is providing full set of traditional services (physical, occupational, speech, psychological/cognitive, social/familial, vocational, and spiritual), along with "cutting-edge" rehabilitative treatment technologies. These cutting-edge therapies include transdisciplinary clinical consultations, interactive patient and family counseling, and telemedicine-teleconferencing for clinical evaluations and family/significant other care participation. These services will be available to those who require assisted living through their progression to community re-entry. The ALPP also serves as a vehicle for clinical trials to investigate the effects of an enriched environment (e.g., recreational therapies, massage, multisensory stimulation, etc.) on neurorehabilitation therapy, rural telemedicine for servicemembers with traumatic brain injury, and long-term outcome measures of those who have received neurorehabilitation services at the DVBIC-J site. DVBIC-J is also developing collaborative projects with universities and private industry to create an incubator for new rehabilitation technologies. The technologies that DVBIC-J will be focusing on will include assistive technologies (to assist cognitive, physical, and communicative impairments

  17. Integration of RFID and web service for assisted living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unluturk, Mehmet S; Kurtel, Kaan

    2012-08-01

    The number of people over 65 years old throughout most stable and prosperous countries in the world is increasing. Availability of their care in their own homes is imperative because of the economic reasons and their choices where to live (World Health Organization, Definition of an older or elderly person. http://www.who.int/healthinfo/survey/ageingdefnolder/en/ ; EQUIP-European Framework for Qualifications in Home Care Services for Older People, http://www.equip-project.com ; Salonen, 2009). "Recent advancement in wireless communications and electronics has enabled the development of low-cost sensor networks. The sensor networks can be utilized in various application areas." (Akyildiz, et al. 2002) These two statements show that there is a great promise in wireless technology and utilizing it in assisted living might be very beneficial to the elderly people. In this paper, we propose software architecture called Location Windows Service (LWS) which integrates the Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology and the web service to build an assisted living system for elderly people at home. This architecture monitors the location of elderly people without interfering in their daily activities. Location information messages that are generated as the elderly move from room to room indicate that the elderly person is fit and healthy and going about their normal life. The communication must be timely enough to follow elderly people as they move from room to room without missing a location. Unacknowledged publishing, subscription filtering and short location change messages are also included in this software model to reduce the network traffic in large homes. We propose some defense schemes being applied to the network environment of the assisted living system to prevent any external attacks.

  18. Organizational culture and work-related attitudes among staff in assisted living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikorska-Simmons, Elzbieta

    2006-02-01

    In this study, the author examines the relationship between staff perceptions of organizational culture and their work-related attitudes in assisted living. Data were collected from 317 staff in 61 facilities using self-administered questionnaires. Staff who had more favorable perceptions of organizational culture reported greater job satisfaction, coworker satisfaction, and organizational commitment. Among the dimensions of organizational culture, perceptions of teamwork had the strongest influence on satisfaction with coworkers, and perceptions of organizational morale had the strongest influence on job satisfaction and organizational commitment. Those who want to improve staff attitudes should focus on creating organizational cultures that promote teamwork and high organizational morale.

  19. Big Data, Smart Homes and Ambient Assisted Living

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wass, S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objectives To discuss how current research in the area of smart homes and ambient assisted living will be influenced by the use of big data. Methods A scoping review of literature published in scientific journals and conference proceedings was performed, focusing on smart homes, ambient assisted living and big data over the years 2011-2014. Results The health and social care market has lagged behind other markets when it comes to the introduction of innovative IT solutions and the market faces a number of challenges as the use of big data will increase. First, there is a need for a sustainable and trustful information chain where the needed information can be transferred from all producers to all consumers in a structured way. Second, there is a need for big data strategies and policies to manage the new situation where information is handled and transferred independently of the place of the expertise. Finally, there is a possibility to develop new and innovative business models for a market that supports cloud computing, social media, crowdsourcing etc. Conclusions The interdisciplinary area of big data, smart homes and ambient assisted living is no longer only of interest for IT developers, it is also of interest for decision makers as customers make more informed choices among today’s services. In the future it will be of importance to make information usable for managers and improve decision making, tailor smart home services based on big data, develop new business models, increase competition and identify policies to ensure privacy, security and liability. PMID:25123734

  20. Assistant Personal Robot (APR: Conception and Application of a Tele-Operated Assisted Living Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduard Clotet

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the technical description, mechanical design, electronic components, software implementation and possible applications of a tele-operated mobile robot designed as an assisted living tool. This robotic concept has been named Assistant Personal Robot (or APR for short and has been designed as a remotely telecontrolled robotic platform built to provide social and assistive services to elderly people and those with impaired mobility. The APR features a fast high-mobility motion system adapted for tele-operation in plain indoor areas, which incorporates a high-priority collision avoidance procedure. This paper presents the mechanical architecture, electrical fundaments and software implementation required in order to develop the main functionalities of an assistive robot. The APR uses a tablet in order to implement the basic peer-to-peer videoconference and tele-operation control combined with a tactile graphic user interface. The paper also presents the development of some applications proposed in the framework of an assisted living robot.

  1. Behavioral Biometrics in Assisted Living: A Methodology for Emotion Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Xefteris

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Behavioral biometrics aim at providing algorithms for the automatic recognition of individual behavioral traits, stemming from a person’s actions, attitude, expressions and conduct. In the field of ambient assisted living, behavioral biometrics find an important niche. Individuals suffering from the early stages of neurodegenerative diseases (MCI, Alzheimer’s, dementia need supervision in their daily activities. In this context, an unobtrusive system to monitor subjects and alert formal and informal carers providing information on both physical and emotional status is of great importance and positively affects multiple stakeholders. The primary aim of this paper is to describe a methodology for recognizing the emotional status of a subject using facial expressions and to identify its uses, in conjunction with pre-existing risk-assessment methodologies, for its integration into the context of a smart monitoring system for subjects suffering from neurodegenerative diseases. Paul Ekman’s research provided the background on the universality of facial expressions as indicators of underlying emotions. The methodology then makes use of computational geometry, image processing and graph theory algorithms for the detection of regions of interest and then a neural network is used for the final classification. Findings are coupled with previous published work for risk assessment and alert generation in the context of an ambient assisted living environment based on Service oriented architecture principles, aimed at remote web-based estimation of the cognitive and physical status of MCI and dementia patients.

  2. Understanding Sexual Freedom and Autonomy in Assisted Living: Discourse of Residents' Rights Among Staff and Administrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmon, Christina; Burgess, Elisabeth O; Bender, Alexis A; Moorhead, James R

    2017-05-01

    In contrast to nursing homes, assisted living (AL) facilities emphasize independence and autonomy as part of their mission. However, we do not know to what extent this extends to sexual freedom and autonomy. Using grounded theory methodology and symbolic interactionism, we examine how staff and administrators in AL facilities discuss residents' rights to sexual freedom and how this influences the environment of AL. Staff and administrators engage in a contradictory discourse of residents' rights that simultaneously affirms the philosophy of AL while behaving in ways that create an environment of surveillance and undermine those rights. A discourse of residents' rights masks a significant conflict between autonomy and protection in regards to sexual freedom in AL.

  3. Special Considerations for Mass Violence Events in Senior Living Facilities: A Case Report on the Pinelake Health and Rehab Center Shooting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Cody; Powell, David

    2017-02-01

    The 2009 Pinelake Health and Rehab Center shooting in Carthage, North Carolina, presents a unique case study for examining the specific considerations for mass violence events in senior living facilities. A variety of factors, including reduced sensory perception, reduced mobility, and cognitive decline, may increase the vulnerability of the populations of senior living facilities during mass violence events. Management of response aspects such as evacuation, relocation, and reunification also require special consideration in the context of mass violence at senior living facilities. Better awareness of these vulnerabilities and response considerations can assist facility administrators and emergency managers when preparing for potential mass violence events at senior living facilities. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2017;11:150-152).

  4. 76 FR 32269 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-03

    ... Facilities To Assist the Homeless; Notice #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 76 , No. 107 / Friday, June 3, 2011... Assist the Homeless AGENCY: Office of the Assistant Secretary for Community Planning and Development, HUD... property reviewed by HUD for suitability for possible use to assist the homeless. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION...

  5. 76 FR 12227 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-04

    ... Facilities To Assist the Homeless; Notice #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 76 , No. 43 / Friday, March 4, 2011... Assist the Homeless AGENCY: Office of the Assistant Secretary for Community Planning and Development, HUD... property reviewed by HUD for suitability for possible use to assist the homeless. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION...

  6. Assisted living nursing practice: health literacy and chronic illness management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitty, Ethel; Flores, Sandi

    2008-01-01

    Functional illiteracy is an inability to read sufficient to function in society. In the high-tech, information-dependent environment of postindustrial society, being illiterate is being at risk. Health literacy is the ability to access, understand, and use basic information about health conditions and services that is necessary to make informed decisions. Older adults (>/=65 years of age) have lower health literacy than all other age groups. Limited health literacy is associated with greater use of emergency department visits, increased rates of hospitalization, and failure to take important diagnostic tests. To maintain independence and self-determination, assisted living (AL) residents need to be able to understand a new or changed diagnosis, as well as oral and written instructions, especially with regard to their medication management. This article discusses health literacy, "plain language," and assessment and interventions to maintain health literacy.

  7. Examining key factors and influential actors involved in the decision to relocate into assisted living: A sample funding proposal

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, Ashleigh Leah Davidson

    2013-01-01

    This capstone project presents a conceptually grounded, methodologically appropriate and logistically feasible Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) funding proposal. By examining key factors and influential actors involved in the decision to relocate into an assisted living facility (ALF), the proposed study will provide insight into and a rich description of the decision making process as it unfolds. Presented in the format of a CIHR pilot study grant, the proposal details a qualita...

  8. 75 FR 6997 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-12

    ... classification of each property controlled by the Agencies that were published by HUD as suitable and available... Housing and Urban Development Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless; Notice #0;#0... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless AGENCY: Office of the...

  9. Public Computer Assisted Learning Facilities for Children with Visual Impairment: Universal Design for Inclusive Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siu, Kin Wai Michael; Lam, Mei Seung

    2012-01-01

    Although computer assisted learning (CAL) is becoming increasingly popular, people with visual impairment face greater difficulty in accessing computer-assisted learning facilities. This is primarily because most of the current CAL facilities are not visually impaired friendly. People with visual impairment also do not normally have access to…

  10. Assisted living nursing practice: medication management: part 2 supervision and monitoring of medication administration by unlicensed assistive personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitty, Ethel; Flores, Sandi

    2007-01-01

    More than half the states permit assistance with or administration of medications by unlicensed assistive personnel or med techs. Authorization of this nursing activity (or task) is more likely because of state assisted living regulation than by support and approval of the state Board of Nursing. In many states, the definition of "assistance with" reads exactly like "administration of" thereby raising concern with regard to delegation, accountability, and liability for practice. It is, as well, a hazardous path for the assisted living nurse who must monitor and evaluate the performance of the individual performing this nursing task. This article, the second in a series on medication management, addresses delegation, standards of practice of medication administration, types of medication errors, the components of a performance evaluation tool, and a culture of safety. Maintaining professional standards of assisted living nursing practice courses throughout the suggested recommendations.

  11. 75 FR 77954 - Transfer of Federally Assisted Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-14

    ... The facility is a former bus operations and maintenance building situated on an approximately 41,245... maintenance. The facility is a flex-type building which includes a front office and/or administration section... Charlottesville Facilities Maintenance Division of Public Works. The facility and land sit within a secure Public...

  12. 78 FR 57874 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities to Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-20

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Federal Property Suitable as Facilities to Assist the Homeless AGENCY: Office of the... for use to assist the homeless. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Juanita Perry, Department of Housing...: In accordance with 24 CFR part 581 and section 501 of the Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance Act...

  13. 78 FR 24764 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-26

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless AGENCY: Office of the... for use to assist the homeless. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Juanita Perry, Department of Housing...: In accordance with 24 CFR part 581 and section 501 of the Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance Act...

  14. 77 FR 26566 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-04

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless AGENCY: Office of the... for use to assist the homeless. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Juanita Perry, Department of Housing...: In accordance with 24 CFR part 581 and section 501 of the Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance Act...

  15. 76 FR 68498 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-04

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless AGENCY: Office of the... for use to assist the homeless. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Juanita Perry, Department of Housing... INFORMATION: In accordance with 24 CFR part 581 and section 501 of the Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance...

  16. 76 FR 18231 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless AGENCY: Office of the... for possible use to assist the homeless. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Juanita Perry, Department of... INFORMATION: In accordance with 24 CFR part 581 and section 501 of the Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance...

  17. 78 FR 52559 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-23

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless AGENCY: Office of the... for use to assist the homeless. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Juanita Perry, Department of Housing...: In accordance with 24 CFR part 581 and section 501 of the Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance Act...

  18. 76 FR 10610 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-25

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless AGENCY: Office of the... for possible use to assist the homeless. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Juanita Smith, Department of... INFORMATION: In accordance with 24 CFR part 581 and section 501 of the Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance...

  19. 78 FR 13883 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless AGENCY: Office of the... for use to assist the homeless. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Juanita Perry, Department of Housing...: In accordance with 24 CFR part 581 and section 501 of the Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance Act...

  20. 78 FR 27417 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-10

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless AGENCY: Office of the... for use to assist the homeless. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Juanita Perry, Department of Housing...: In accordance with 24 CFR part 581 and section 501 of the Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance Act...

  1. 77 FR 35993 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-15

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless AGENCY: Office of the... for use to assist the homeless. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Juanita Perry, Department of Housing...: In accordance with 24 CFR part 581 and section 501 of the Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance Act...

  2. 75 FR 22831 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-30

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless AGENCY: Office of the... for possible use to assist the homeless. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Kathy Ezzell, Department of... INFORMATION: In accordance with 24 CFR part 581 and section 501 of the Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance...

  3. 77 FR 9681 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-17

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless AGENCY: Office of the... for use to assist the homeless. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Juanita Perry, Department of Housing...: In accordance with 24 CFR part 581 and section 501 of the Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance Act...

  4. 78 FR 41945 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities to Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-12

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Federal Property Suitable as Facilities to Assist the Homeless AGENCY: Office of the... for use to assist the homeless. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Juanita Perry, Department of Housing...: In accordance with 24 CFR Part 581 and section 501 of the Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance Act...

  5. 78 FR 29147 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-17

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless AGENCY: Office of the... for use to assist the homeless. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Juanita Perry, Department of Housing...: In accordance with 24 CFR part 581 and section 501 of the Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance Act...

  6. 78 FR 17703 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-22

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless AGENCY: Office of the... for use to assist the homeless. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Juanita Perry, Department of Housing...: In accordance with 24 CFR part 581 and section 501 of the Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance Act...

  7. 77 FR 20838 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-06

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless AGENCY: Office of the... the Steward B. McKinney Homeless Assistance Act, as amended, HUD publishes a weekly Federal Register... suitability for use to assist the homeless. HUD generally publishes this weekly report each Friday. Today's...

  8. 78 FR 9408 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities to Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-08

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Federal Property Suitable as Facilities to Assist the Homeless AGENCY: Office of the... for use to assist the homeless. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Juanita Perry, Department of Housing...: In accordance with 24 CFR part 581 and section 501 of the Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance Act...

  9. 78 FR 73554 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-06

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless AGENCY: Office of the... for use to assist the homeless. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Juanita Perry, Department of Housing...: In accordance with 24 CFR part 581 and section 501 of the Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance Act...

  10. 78 FR 39004 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-28

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless AGENCY: Office of the... for use to assist the homeless. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Juanita Perry, Department of Housing...: In accordance with 24 CFR part 581 and section 501 of the Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance Act...

  11. 75 FR 30847 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-02

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless AGENCY: Office of the... for possible use to assist the homeless. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Kathy Ezzell, Department of... INFORMATION: In accordance with 24 CFR part 581 and section 501 of the Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance...

  12. 76 FR 2702 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-14

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless AGENCY: Office of the... for possible use to assist the homeless. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Juanita Perry, Department of... INFORMATION: In accordance with 24 CFR part 581 and section 501 of the Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance...

  13. 77 FR 22335 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-13

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless AGENCY: Office of the... for use to assist the homeless. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Juanita Perry, Department of Housing...: In accordance with 24 CFR part 581 and section 501 of the Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance Act...

  14. 78 FR 47000 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-02

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless AGENCY: Office of the... for use to assist the homeless. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Juanita Perry, Department of Housing...: In accordance with 24 CFR part 581 and section 501 of the Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance Act...

  15. A Multi-Collaborative Ambient Assisted Living Service Description Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcó, Jorge L.; Vaquerizo, Esteban; Artigas, José Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    Collaboration among different stakeholders is a key factor in the design of Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) environments and services. Throughout several AAL projects we have found repeated difficulties in this collaboration and have learned lessons by the experience of solving real situations. This paper highlights identified critical items for collaboration among technicians, users, company and institutional stakeholders and proposes as a communication tool for a project steering committee a service description tool which includes information from the different fields in comprehensible format for the others. It was first generated in the MonAMI project to promote understanding among different workgroups, proven useful there, and further tested later in some other smaller AAL projects. The concept of scalable service description has proven useful for understanding of different disciplines and for participatory decision making throughout the projects to adapt to singularities and partial successes or faults of each action. This paper introduces such tool, relates with existing methodologies in cooperation in AAL and describes it with a example to offer to AAL community. Further work on this tool will significantly improve results in user-centered design of sustainable services in AAL. PMID:24897409

  16. A Multi-Collaborative Ambient Assisted Living Service Description Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge L. Falcó

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Collaboration among different stakeholders is a key factor in the design of Ambient Assisted Living (AAL environments and services. Throughout several AAL projects we have found repeated difficulties in this collaboration and have learned lessons by the experience of solving real situations. This paper highlights identified critical items for collaboration among technicians, users, company and institutional stakeholders and proposes as a communication tool for a project steering committee a service description tool which includes information from the different fields in comprehensible format for the others. It was first generated in the MonAMI project to promote understanding among different workgroups, proven useful there, and further tested later in some other smaller AAL projects. The concept of scalable service description has proven useful for understanding of different disciplines and for participatory decision making throughout the projects to adapt to singularities and partial successes or faults of each action. This paper introduces such tool, relates with existing methodologies in cooperation in AAL and describes it with a example to offer to AAL community. Further work on this tool will significantly improve results in user-centered design of sustainable services in AAL.

  17. Ambient Assisted Living Healthcare Frameworks, Platforms, Standards, and Quality Attributes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukhtiar Memon

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Ambient Assisted Living (AAL is an emerging multi-disciplinary field aiming at exploiting information and communication technologies in personal healthcare and telehealth systems for countering the effects of growing elderly population. AAL systems are developed for personalized, adaptive, and anticipatory requirements, necessitating high quality-of-service to achieve interoperability, usability, security, and accuracy. The aim of this paper is to provide a comprehensive review of the AAL field with a focus on healthcare frameworks, platforms, standards, and quality attributes. To achieve this, we conducted a literature survey of state-of-the-art AAL frameworks, systems and platforms to identify the essential aspects of AAL systems and investigate the critical issues from the design, technology, quality-of-service, and user experience perspectives. In addition, we conducted an email-based survey for collecting usage data and current status of contemporary AAL systems. We found that most AAL systems are confined to a limited set of features ignoring many of the essential AAL system aspects. Standards and technologies are used in a limited and isolated manner, while quality attributes are often addressed insufficiently. In conclusion, we found that more inter-organizational collaboration, user-centered studies, increased standardization efforts, and a focus on open systems is needed to achieve more interoperable and synergetic AAL solutions.

  18. Progress in ambient assisted systems for independent living by the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shaqi, Riyad; Mourshed, Monjur; Rezgui, Yacine

    2016-01-01

    One of the challenges of the ageing population in many countries is the efficient delivery of health and care services, which is further complicated by the increase in neurological conditions among the elderly due to rising life expectancy. Personal care of the elderly is of concern to their relatives, in case they are alone in their homes and unforeseen circumstances occur, affecting their wellbeing. The alternative; i.e. care in nursing homes or hospitals is costly and increases further if specialized care is mobilized to patients' place of residence. Enabling technologies for independent living by the elderly such as the ambient assisted living systems (AALS) are seen as essential to enhancing care in a cost-effective manner. In light of significant advances in telecommunication, computing and sensor miniaturization, as well as the ubiquity of mobile and connected devices embodying the concept of the Internet of Things (IoT), end-to-end solutions for ambient assisted living have become a reality. The premise of such applications is the continuous and most often real-time monitoring of the environment and occupant behavior using an event-driven intelligent system, thereby providing a facility for monitoring and assessment, and triggering assistance as and when needed. As a growing area of research, it is essential to investigate the approaches for developing AALS in literature to identify current practices and directions for future research. This paper is, therefore, aimed at a comprehensive and critical review of the frameworks and sensor systems used in various ambient assisted living systems, as well as their objectives and relationships with care and clinical systems. Findings from our work suggest that most frameworks focused on activity monitoring for assessing immediate risks, while the opportunities for integrating environmental factors for analytics and decision-making, in particular for the long-term care were often overlooked. The potential for

  19. Predictors of providing informed consent or assent for research participation in assisted living residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Betty S; Brandt, Jason; Rabins, Peter V; Samus, Quincy M; Steele, Cynthia D; Lyketsos, Constantine G; Rosenblatt, Adam

    2008-01-01

    This study's goal was to identify factors associated with providing either informed consent or assent for research in individuals at high risk for cognitive impairment. Cross-sectional baseline data were used to identify predictors of consent or assent status. The study was conducted at 22 assisted living facilities in Maryland. A stratified random sample of 198 assisted living residents participated in the study. Residents' consent or assent status was documented as providing informed consent, written assent, or verbal assent/no objection. Potential predictors included residents' demographic characteristics, measures of physical and mental health status, and neuropsychological test performance. Most participants provided written assent (32.8%) or verbal assent/no objection (30.3%) rather than informed consent (36.9%). Although many resident characteristics correlated with consent or assent status based on bivariate analyses, few variables distinguished those who provided written assent from those in the verbal assent/no objection group. On the basis of multiple discriminant analysis, the best predictors of consent or assent status were Mini-Mental State Exam scores, impairments in instrumental activities of daily living, and dementia diagnosis, which together classified correctly 63.6% of residents. The relatively small proportion of participants who could provide informed consent highlights the importance of assessing decisional capacity for research in a high-risk population and identifying an appropriate surrogate decision maker to provide proxy consent if needed. Consensus on how to define assent is lacking, and specific measures of assent capabilities are needed to better characterize the assent capacity continuum.

  20. Relational Autonomy in Assisted Living: A Focus on Diverse Care Settings for Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Molly M; Ball, Mary M; Whittington, Frank J; Hollingsworth, Carole

    2012-04-01

    Consistent with Western cultural values, the traditional liberal theory of autonomy, which places emphasis on self-determination, liberty of choice, and freedom from interference by others, has been a leading principle in health care discourse for several decades. In context to aging, chronic illness, disability, and long-term care, increasingly there has been a call for a relational conception of autonomy that acknowledges issues of dependency, interdependence, and care relationships. Although autonomy is a core philosophy of assisted living (AL) and a growing number of studies focus on this issue, theory development in this area is lagging and little research has considered race, class, or cultural differences, despite the growing diversity of AL. We present a conceptual model of autonomy in AL based on over a decade of research conducted in diverse facility settings. This relational model provides an important conceptual lens for understanding the dynamic linkages between varieties of factors at multiple levels of social structure that shape residents' ability to maintain a sense of autonomy in this often socially challenging care environment. Social and institutional change, which is ongoing, as well as the multiple and ever-changing cultural contexts within which residents are embedded, are important factors that shape residents' experiences over time and impact resident-facility fit and residents' ability to age in place.

  1. Valuing hydrological forecasts for a pumped storage assisted hydro facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Guangzhi; Davison, Matt

    2009-07-01

    SummaryThis paper estimates the value of a perfectly accurate short-term hydrological forecast to the operator of a hydro electricity generating facility which can sell its power at time varying but predictable prices. The expected value of a less accurate forecast will be smaller. We assume a simple random model for water inflows and that the costs of operating the facility, including water charges, will be the same whether or not its operator has inflow forecasts. Thus, the improvement in value from better hydrological prediction results from the increased ability of the forecast using facility to sell its power at high prices. The value of the forecast is therefore the difference between the sales of a facility operated over some time horizon with a perfect forecast, and the sales of a similar facility operated over the same time horizon with similar water inflows which, though governed by the same random model, cannot be forecast. This paper shows that the value of the forecast is an increasing function of the inflow process variance and quantifies how much the value of this perfect forecast increases with the variance of the water inflow process. Because the lifetime of hydroelectric facilities is long, the small increase observed here can lead to an increase in the profitability of hydropower investments.

  2. 75 FR 41510 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-16

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless AGENCY: Office of the... for possible use to assist the homeless. DATES: Effective Date: July 16, 2010. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION... National Coalition for the Homeless v. Veterans Administration, No. 88-2503-OG (D.D.C.), HUD publishes a...

  3. 76 FR 9588 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-18

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless AGENCY: Office of the... for possible use to assist the homeless. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Juanita Perry, Department of... INFORMATION: In accordance with the December 12, 1988 court order in National Coalition for the Homeless v...

  4. 75 FR 62414 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-08

    ... Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless AGENCY: Office of the Assistant Secretary for... the homeless. DATES: Effective Date: October 8, 2010. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Kathy Ezzell... INFORMATION: In accordance with the December 12, 1988 court order in National Coalition for the Homeless v...

  5. 76 FR 44033 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-22

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless AGENCY: Office of the... for possible use to assist the homeless. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Juanita Perry, Department of... INFORMATION: In accordance with the December 12, 1988 court order in National Coalition for the Homeless v...

  6. 76 FR 51997 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-19

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless AGENCY: Office of the... for possible use to assist the homeless. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Juanita Perry, Department of... INFORMATION: In accordance with the December 12, 1988 court order in National Coalition for the Homeless v...

  7. 78 FR 65698 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless AGENCY: Office of the... for possible use to assist the homeless. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Juanita Perry, Department of... INFORMATION: In accordance with the December 12, 1988 court order in National Coalition for the Homeless v...

  8. 76 FR 75554 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities to Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-02

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Federal Property Suitable as Facilities to Assist the Homeless AGENCY: Office of the... for possible use to assist the homeless. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Juanita Perry, Department of... INFORMATION: In accordance with the December 12, 1988 court order in National Coalition for the Homeless v...

  9. 76 FR 1189 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-07

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless AGENCY: Office of the... for possible use to assist the homeless. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Juanita Perry, Department of... INFORMATION: In accordance with the December 12, 1988 court order in National Coalition for the Homeless v...

  10. 77 FR 64347 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-19

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless AGENCY: Office of the... for possible use to assist the homeless. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Juanita Perry, Department of... INFORMATION: In accordance with the December 12, 1988 court order in National Coalition for the Homeless v...

  11. 75 FR 63501 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-15

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless AGENCY: Office of the... for possible use to assist the homeless. DATES: Effective Date: October 15, 2010. FOR FURTHER... in National Coalition for the Homeless v. Veterans Administration, No. 88-2503-OG (D.D.C.), HUD...

  12. 76 FR 47606 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-05

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless AGENCY: Office of the... for possible use to assist the homeless. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Juanita Perry, Department of... INFORMATION: In accordance with the December 12, 1988 court order in National Coalition for the Homeless v...

  13. 77 FR 11149 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-24

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless AGENCY: Office of the... for possible use to assist the homeless. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Juanita Perry, Department of... INFORMATION: In accordance with the December 12, 1988 court order in National Coalition for the Homeless v...

  14. 78 FR 70066 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-22

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless AGENCY: Office of the... for possible use to assist the homeless. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Juanita Perry, Department of... INFORMATION: In accordance with the December 12, 1988 court order in National Coalition for the Homeless v...

  15. 77 FR 37700 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-22

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless AGENCY: Office of the... for possible use to assist the homeless. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Juanita Perry, Department of... INFORMATION: In accordance with the December 12, 1988 court order in National Coalition for the Homeless v...

  16. 75 FR 6047 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities to Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-05

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Federal Property Suitable as Facilities to Assist the Homeless AGENCY: Office of the... for possible use to assist the homeless. DATES: Effective Date: February 5, 2010. FOR FURTHER... in National Coalition for the Homeless v. Veterans Administration, No. 88-2503-OG (D.D.C.), HUD...

  17. 76 FR 70155 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-10

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless AGENCY: Office of the... for possible use to assist the homeless. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Juanita Perry, Department of... INFORMATION: In accordance with the December 12, 1988 court order in National Coalition for the Homeless v...

  18. 75 FR 2558 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-15

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless AGENCY: Office of the... for possible use to assist the homeless. DATES: Effective Date: January 15, 2010. FOR FURTHER... in National Coalition for the Homeless v. Veterans Administration, No. 88-2503-OG (D.D.C.), HUD...

  19. 75 FR 49512 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-13

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless AGENCY: Office of the... for possible use to assist the homeless. DATES: Effective Date: August 13, 2010. FOR FURTHER... in National Coalition for the Homeless v. Veterans Administration, No. 88-2503-OG (D.D.C.), HUD...

  20. 75 FR 36435 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-25

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless AGENCY: Office of the... for possible use to assist the homeless. DATES: Effective Date: June 25, 2010. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION... National Coalition for the Homeless v. Veterans Administration, No. 88-2503-OG (D.D.C.), HUD publishes a...

  1. 76 FR 16802 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-25

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless AGENCY: Office of the... for possible use to assist the homeless. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Juanita Perry, Department of... INFORMATION: In accordance with the December 12, 1988 court order in National Coalition for the Homeless v...

  2. 75 FR 76999 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-10

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless AGENCY: Office of the... for possible use to assist the homeless. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Juanita Perry, Department of... INFORMATION: In accordance with the December 12, 1988 court order in National Coalition for the Homeless v...

  3. 76 FR 28058 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless AGENCY: Office of the... for possible use to assist the homeless. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Juanita Perry, Department of... INFORMATION: In accordance with the December 12, 1988 court order in National Coalition for the Homeless v...

  4. 75 FR 44975 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-30

    ... Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless AGENCY: Office of the Assistant Secretary for Community... homeless. DATES: Effective Date: July 30, 2010. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Kathy Ezzell, Department... INFORMATION: In accordance with the December 12, 1988 court order in National Coalition for the Homeless v...

  5. 76 FR 66948 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-28

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless AGENCY: Office of the... for possible use to assist the homeless. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Juanita Perry, Department of... INFORMATION: In accordance with the December 12, 1988 court order in National Coalition for the Homeless v...

  6. 75 FR 47616 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-06

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless AGENCY: Office of the... for possible use to assist the homeless. DATES: Effective Date: August 6, 2010. FOR FURTHER... in National Coalition for the Homeless v. Veterans Administration, No. 88-2503-OG (D.D.C.), HUD...

  7. 78 FR 68858 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-15

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless AGENCY: Office of the... for possible use to assist the homeless. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Juanita Perry, Department of... INFORMATION: In accordance with the December 12, 1988 court order in National Coalition for the Homeless v...

  8. 75 FR 4836 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-29

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless AGENCY: Office of the... for possible use to assist the homeless. DATES: Effective Date: January 29, 2010. FOR FURTHER... in National Coalition for the Homeless v. Veterans Administration, No. 88-2503-OG (D.D.C.), HUD...

  9. 77 FR 4337 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-27

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless AGENCY: Office of the... for possible use to assist the homeless. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Juanita Perry, Department of... INFORMATION: In accordance with the December 12, 1988 court order in National Coalition for the Homeless v...

  10. 78 FR 54905 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-06

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless AGENCY: Office of the... for possible use to assist the homeless. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Juanita Perry, Department of... INFORMATION: In accordance with the December 12, 1988 court order in National Coalition for the Homeless v...

  11. 76 FR 60855 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-30

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless AGENCY: Office of the... for possible use to assist the homeless. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Juanita Perry, Department of... INFORMATION: In accordance with the December 12, 1988 court order in National Coalition for the Homeless v...

  12. 75 FR 34753 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities to Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-18

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Federal Property Suitable as Facilities to Assist the Homeless AGENCY: Office of the... for possible use to assist the homeless. DATES: Effective Date: June 18, 2010. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION... National Coalition for the Homeless v. Veterans Administration, No. 88-2503-OG (D.D.C.), HUD publishes a...

  13. Male and female alcohol consumption and live birth after assisted reproductive technology treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vittrup, Ida; Petersen, Gitte Lindved; Kamper-Jørgensen, Mads

    2017-01-01

    The objective was to assess the potential association between female and male alcohol consumption and probability of achieving a live birth after assisted reproductive treatment. From a nationwide Danish register-based cohort information on alcohol consumption at assisted reproductive treatment.......99-1.01) and 0.99 (95% CI 0.97-1.01) for every one-unit increase in female and male weekly alcohol consumption at assisted reproductive treatment initiation, respectively. In conclusion, this study did not show significant associations between male or female alcohol consumption and odds of live birth after...... assisted reproductive treatment....

  14. Reasoning Exercises in Assisted Living: a cluster randomized trial to improve reasoning and everyday problem solving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams K

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Kristine Williams,1 Ruth Herman,2 Daniel Bontempo3 1College of Nursing, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA; 2School of Nursing, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS, USA; 3The Schiefelbusch Institute for Life Span Studies, University of Kansas, Dole Human Development Center, Lawrence, KS, USA Purpose of the study: Assisted living (AL residents are at risk for cognitive and functional declines that eventually reduce their ability to care for themselves, thereby triggering nursing home placement. In developing a method to slow this decline, the efficacy of Reasoning Exercises in Assisted Living (REAL, a cognitive training intervention that teaches everyday reasoning and problem-solving skills to AL residents, was tested. Design and methods: At thirteen randomized Midwestern facilities, AL residents whose Mini Mental State Examination scores ranged from 19–29 either were trained in REAL or a vitamin education attention control program or received no treatment at all. For 3 weeks, treated groups received personal training in their respective programs. Results: Scores on the Every Day Problems Test for Cognitively Challenged Elders (EPCCE and on the Direct Assessment of Functional Status (DAFS showed significant increases only for the REAL group. For EPCCE, change from baseline immediately postintervention was +3.10 (P<0.01, and there was significant retention at the 3-month follow-up (d=2.71; P<0.01. For DAFS, change from baseline immediately postintervention was +3.52 (P<0.001, although retention was not as strong. Neither the attention nor the no-treatment control groups had significant gains immediately postintervention or at follow-up assessments. Post hoc across-group comparison of baseline change also highlights the benefits of REAL training. For EPCCE, the magnitude of gain was significantly larger in the REAL group versus the no-treatment control group immediately postintervention (d=3.82; P<0.01 and at the 3-month

  15. Policies on assisted suicide in Dutch psychiatric facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haverkate, I; van der Wal, G

    1998-01-01

    Recent jurisprudence in the Netherlands challenges psychiatric hospitals to formulate policies on how to approach requests for assisted suicide. This study examined whether such policies exist in Dutch psychiatric hospitals and general hospitals with psychiatric wards. The directors of patient care in 38 of the country's 52 psychiatric hospitals and 42 of the 59 general hospitals with psychiatric wards responded to a mail survey. Five psychiatric hospitals and six general hospitals had written policies. Almost half of the psychiatric hospitals had a verbal policy only. The majority of the hospitals with policies had a tolerant or permissive policy toward assisted suicide.

  16. Assistant Personal Robot (APR): Conception and Application of a Tele-Operated Assisted Living Robot

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Clotet, Eduard; Martínez, Dani; Moreno, Javier; Tresanchez, Marcel; Palacín, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    .... This robotic concept has been named Assistant Personal Robot (or APR for short) and has been designed as a remotely telecontrolled robotic platform built to provide social and assistive services to elderly people and those with impaired mobility...

  17. Technohubs in Teacher Education: The Lived Experience of Assisting Peers with Instructional Technology Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rook, Michael Montalto

    2014-01-01

    This study examined prospective teachers' lived experiences of assisting peers with instructional technology issues. The study built upon one of ISTE's (2003) essential conditions for integrating technology in education: technical assistance for using technology. Through a review of relevant literature, an argument was made for the study based on…

  18. The incidence of depression among residents of assisted living: prevalence and related risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almomani FM

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Fidaa M Almomani,1 Wegdan Bani-issa2 1Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Faculty of Applied Medical Sciences, Jordan University of Science and Technology, Irbid, Jordan; 2Department of Nursing, College of Health Sciences, University of Sharjah, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates Aim: This study aims to recognize and estimate the prevalence of depression and its risk factors among residents of assisted living facilities (ALs in Jordan.Background: Depression is commonly experienced by residents of ALs. The condition is, however, often misunderstood as a part of normal aging and may be overlooked by health care professionals. Little is known about the extent of depression and its risk factors among AL residents in Jordan.Subjects and methods: A national representative sample of 221 residents selected from all AL units across Jordan was recruited to the study. Data on expected risk factors for depression were collected, including sociodemographics; smoking status; number of roommates; number of family members; assessments for cognitive functioning, for lower limb functioning, for hand, shoulder, and arm impairments; and oral health status. Levels of depression among the sample respondents were also assessed.Results: The study found that around 60% of the participants reported depressive manifestations, with 48.0% of AL residents exhibiting impaired cognitive functions, one-third (33.2% having >50% upper limb disability, two-thirds (63.2% being at moderate risk of falls, and 69.7% having fair to poor oral health status. Being female, and having a higher level of education, disability of the upper limbs, and impairment of cognitive functions were found to be independent risk factors for depression in participants.Conclusion: Depression is relatively common among residents of AL units in Jordan. Health care professionals, nurses, physiotherapists, and dentists working in these facilities need to work cooperatively to identify the manifestations of

  19. An Ethnographic Study of Stigma and Ageism in Residential Care or Assisted Living

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbs, Debra; Eckert, J. Kevin; Rubinstein, Bob; Keimig, Lynn; Clark, Leanne; Frankowski, Ann Christine; Zimmerman, Sheryl

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This study explored aspects of stigmatization for older adults who live in residential care or assisted living (RC-AL) communities and what these settings have done to address stigma. Design and Methods: We used ethnography and other qualitative data-gathering and analytic techniques to gather data from 309 participants (residents, family…

  20. NFC based provisioning of instructional videos to assist with instrumental activities of daily living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafferty, Joseph; Nugent, Chris; Liming Chen; Jun Qi; Dutton, Rachael; Zirk, Anna; Boye, Lars Thomas; Kohn, Michael; Hellman, Riitta

    2014-01-01

    Existing assistive living and prompting based solutions have adopted a relatively complex approach to supporting individuals. These solutions have involved sensor based monitoring, activity recognition and assistance provisioning. Traditionally they have suffered from a number of issues rooted in scalability and performance levels associated with the activity recognition process. This paper introduces a simplistic approach to assistive living within a user's residence through the use of NFC tags and smart devices. The core concept of this approach is presented and is subsequently placed within the context of related work. A description of the architecture is provided and results following technical evaluation of the first system prototype are discussed.

  1. Use of health services by residents at a seniors-only living facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elen Ferraz Teston

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to compare the use of medical and dental services by seniors residing at a seniors-only living facility and in the general community. It was a quantitative study, among 50 residents of the living facility and 173 in the general community. The data were collected between November 2011 and February 2012 through a questionnaire, and subjected to statistical analysis. Performance of clinical exams and satisfaction with health services was greater among seniors living in the general community; however, physical therapy treatment was more common among those living in the facility. The use of medical and dental services showed a statistically significant difference. The seniors in both groups need oral health monitoring and those living in the facility also require coverage by the Family Health Strategy. The presence of professionals with the right profile to adequately serve residents and the network of available services are determining factors for the success of this new housing policy.

  2. Mental Illness in Assisted Living: Challenges for Quality of Life and Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Leslie A; Perez, Rosa; Frankowski, Ann Christine; Nemec, Mary; Bennett, Colleen R

    2016-01-01

    An unknown number of mentally ill elders in the U.S. receive care in assisted living [AL], along with persons facing physical or cognitive challenges. While dementia is familiar in AL, our data indicate that neither staff nor residents are prepared to work or live with the mentally ill. Challenges are created for professionals, since these residents bring diverse needs. Daily inter-resident interactions are also disrupted or stressful. Qualitative data describe the impacts on quality of resident life as well as care and management dilemmas identified within five assisted living settings having varying presence of mental illness among residents.

  3. Classroom Live: a software-assisted gamification tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Freitas, Adrian A.; de Freitas, Michelle M.

    2013-06-01

    Teachers have come to rely on a variety of approaches in order to elicit and sustain student interest in the classroom. One particular approach, known as gamification, seeks to improve student engagement by transforming the traditional classroom experience into a competitive multiplayer game. Initial attempts at classroom gamification relied on the teacher manually tracking student progress. At the US Air Force Academy, we wanted to experiment with a software gamification tool. Our client/server suite, dubbed Classroom Live, streamlines the gamification process for the teacher by simplifying common tasks. Simultaneously, the tool provides students with an esthetically pleasing user interface that offers in game rewards in exchange for their participation. Classroom Live is still in development, but our initial experience using the tool has been extremely positive and confirms our belief that students respond positively to gamification, even at the undergraduate level.

  4. Insomnia, Sleepiness, and Depression in Adolescents Living in Residential Care Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, Vincent; Belanger, Lynda; Begin, Gilles; Morin, Charles M.

    2009-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to document sleep patterns and disturbances reported by youths temporarily living in residential care facilities. A secondary objective was to examine the relationships between sleep disturbances and mood and daytime sleepiness. A self-reported questionnaire on sleep patterns and habits assessing duration,…

  5. Acceptance and perceived usefulness of robots to assist with activities of daily living and healthcare tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Amanda K; Backonja, Uba; Painter, Ian; Cakmak, Maya; Sung, Minjung; Lau, Timothy; Thompson, Hilaire J; Demiris, George

    2017-11-29

    As the number of older adults living with chronic conditions continues to rise, they will require assistance with activities of daily living (ADL) and healthcare tasks to continue living independently in their homes. One proposed solution to assist with the care needs of an aging population and a shrinking healthcare workforce is robotic technology. Using a cross-sectional survey design, we purposively sampled adults (≥18 years old) to assess generational acceptance and perceived usefulness of robots to assist with ADLs, healthcare tasks, and evaluate acceptance of robotic healthcare assistance across different settings. A total of 499 adults (age range [years] 18-98, Mean = 38.7, SD = 22.7) responded to the survey. Significant differences were found among young, middle-aged, and older adults on perceived usefulness of robots for cleaning, escorting them around town, acting as companionship, delivering meals, assessing sadness and calling for help, providing medical advice, taking vital sign assessments, and assisting with personal care (p robot to provide healthcare assistance in the hospital, compared to middle-aged and older adults (p robots to assist adults of all ages with useful tasks.

  6. 78 FR 54478 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities to Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT Federal Property Suitable as Facilities to Assist the Homeless Correction In notice document 2013-20287, appearing on pages 52559 through 52560 in the issue of Friday, August 23, 2013, make the following corrections: 1. On page 52560...

  7. 78 FR 40491 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-05

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless AGENCY: Office of the... and Urban Development, 451 Seventh Street SW., Room 7266, Washington, DC 20410; telephone (202) 402...--PNW Research Station Corvallis Forestry Sciences Lab Corvallis OR 97331 Landholding Agency...

  8. 76 FR 21387 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-15

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless AGENCY: Office of the... Housing and Urban Development, 451 Seventh Street, SW., Room 7266, Washington, DC 20410; telephone (202... Directions: Adjoining the village of Rockcastle. Comments: 2.57 acres; rolling and wooded. Tract 2709-10 and...

  9. A Caregiver Support Platform within the Scope of an Ambient Assisted Living Ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Costa

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The Ambient Assisted Living (AAL area is in constant evolution, providing new technologies to users and enhancing the level of security and comfort that is ensured by house platforms. The Ambient Assisted Living for All (AAL4ALL project aims to develop a new AAL concept, supported on a unified ecosystem and certification process that enables a heterogeneous environment. The concepts of Intelligent Environments, Ambient Intelligence, and the foundations of the Ambient Assisted Living are all presented in the framework of this project. In this work, we consider a specific platform developed in the scope of AAL4ALL, called UserAccess. The architecture of the platform and its role within the overall AAL4ALL concept, the implementation of the platform, and the available interfaces are presented. In addition, its feasibility is validated through a series of tests.

  10. Assisted hatching and live births in first-cycle frozen embryo transfers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudtson, Jennifer F; Failor, Courtney M; Gelfond, Jonathan A; Goros, Martin W; Chang, Tiencheng Arthur; Schenken, Robert S; Robinson, Randal D

    2017-10-01

    To assess the effect of assisted hatching (AH) on live-birth rates in a retrospective cohort of patients undergoing first-cycle, autologous frozen embryo transfer (FET). Longitudinal cohort using cycles reported to the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology Clinic Outcomes Reporting System between 2004 and 2013. Not applicable. Women who underwent first-cycle, autologous FET with (n = 70,738) and without (n = 80,795) AH reported from 2004 to 2013. None. Live births. Propensity matching was used to account for confounding covariates, and a logistic regression model was constructed to identify the predictors of live-birth rates in relationship to AH. In all first-cycle FETs, there was a slight but statistically significant decrease in the live-birth rate with AH compared with no AH (34.2% vs. 35.4%). In older patients and in the years 2012-2013 AH was associated with decreased live births. Live-birth rates and the number of AH cycles performed before FET vary by the geographic location of clinics. Assisted hatching slightly decreases the live-birth rate in first-cycle, autologous FET. Its use should be carefully considered, especially in patients 38 years old and older. Prospective, clinical studies are needed to improve our knowledge of the impact of AH. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The lived experiences of resilience in Iranian adolescents living in residential care facilities: A hermeneutic phenomenological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manijeh Nourian

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Resilience is one of the main factors affecting human health, and perceiving its meaning for high-risk adolescents is of particular importance in initiating preventive measures and providing resilience care. Objectives: This qualitative study was conducted to explain the meaning of resilience in the lived experiences of Iranian adolescents living in governmental residential care facilities. Materials and methods: This study was conducted using the hermeneutic phenomenological method. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with eight adolescents aged 13–17 living in governmental residential care facilities of Tehran province affiliated to the Welfare Organization of Iran who articulated their experiences of resilience. Sampling lasted from May 2014 to July 2015 and continued until new themes were no longer emerging. The researchers analyzed the verbatim transcripts using Van Manen's six-step method of phenomenology. Results: The themes obtained in this study included “going through life's hardships,” “aspiring for achievement,” “self-protection,” “self-reliance,” and “spirituality.” Conclusion: Our study indicates that the meaning of resilience coexists with self-reliance in adolescents’ lived experiences. Adolescents look forward to a better future. They always trust God in the face of difficulties and experience resilience by keeping themselves physically and mentally away from difficulties. Adverse and bitter experiences of the past positively affected their positive view on life and its difficulties and also their resilience. The five themes that emerged from the findings describe the results in detail. The findings of this study enable nurses, health administrators, and healthcare providers working with adolescents to help this vulnerable group cope better with their stressful life conditions and improve their health through increasing their capacity for resilience.

  12. Legal concerns regarding AmI assisted living in the elderly, worldwide and in Romania

    OpenAIRE

    Annicchiarico, Roberta; Cortés García, Claudio Ulises; Spiru, Luiza; Stefan, Lucian; Turcu, Ileana; Ghita, Camelia; Ioancio, Ioana; Nuta, Costin; Blaciotti, Mona; Martin, Mariana

    2009-01-01

    The recent concepts developed in order to meet the specific technology-related needs of older people are “Ambient Intelligence” and "Ambient Assisted Living". The major aim of AmI is to prolong the time older people can live decently in their own homes with an increased autonomy and selfconfidence. One category of patients that would necessarily require intelligent ambient assistance devices in the future is the old one, characterized by a high incidence of co-morbid conditions and diseases, ...

  13. A Behaviour Monitoring System (BMS for Ambient Assisted Living

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samih Eisa

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Unusual changes in the regular daily mobility routine of an elderly person at home can be an indicator or early symptom of developing health problems. Sensor technology can be utilised to complement the traditional healthcare systems to gain a more detailed view of the daily mobility of a person at home when performing everyday tasks. We hypothesise that data collected from low-cost sensors such as presence and occupancy sensors can be analysed to provide insights on the daily mobility habits of the elderly living alone at home and to detect routine changes. We validate this hypothesis by designing a system that automatically learns the daily room-to-room transitions and permanence habits in each room at each time of the day and generates alarm notifications when deviations are detected. We present an algorithm to process the sensors’ data streams and compute sensor-driven features that describe the daily mobility routine of the elderly as part of the developed Behaviour Monitoring System (BMS. We are able to achieve low detection delay with confirmation time that is high enough to convey the detection of a set of common abnormal situations. We illustrate and evaluate BMS with synthetic data, generated by a developed data generator that was designed to mimic different user’s mobility profiles at home, and also with a real-life dataset collected from prior research work. Results indicate BMS detects several mobility changes that can be symptoms of common health problems. The proposed system is a useful approach for learning the mobility habits at the home environment, with the potential to detect behaviour changes that occur due to health problems, and therefore, motivating progress toward behaviour monitoring and elder’s care.

  14. A Behaviour Monitoring System (BMS) for Ambient Assisted Living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisa, Samih; Moreira, Adriano

    2017-08-24

    Unusual changes in the regular daily mobility routine of an elderly person at home can be an indicator or early symptom of developing health problems. Sensor technology can be utilised to complement the traditional healthcare systems to gain a more detailed view of the daily mobility of a person at home when performing everyday tasks. We hypothesise that data collected from low-cost sensors such as presence and occupancy sensors can be analysed to provide insights on the daily mobility habits of the elderly living alone at home and to detect routine changes. We validate this hypothesis by designing a system that automatically learns the daily room-to-room transitions and permanence habits in each room at each time of the day and generates alarm notifications when deviations are detected. We present an algorithm to process the sensors' data streams and compute sensor-driven features that describe the daily mobility routine of the elderly as part of the developed Behaviour Monitoring System (BMS). We are able to achieve low detection delay with confirmation time that is high enough to convey the detection of a set of common abnormal situations. We illustrate and evaluate BMS with synthetic data, generated by a developed data generator that was designed to mimic different user's mobility profiles at home, and also with a real-life dataset collected from prior research work. Results indicate BMS detects several mobility changes that can be symptoms of common health problems. The proposed system is a useful approach for learning the mobility habits at the home environment, with the potential to detect behaviour changes that occur due to health problems, and therefore, motivating progress toward behaviour monitoring and elder's care.

  15. Facile synthesis of fluorescent porous zinc sulfide nanospheres and their application for potential drug delivery and live cell imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Ruimin; Liu, Shanhu

    2012-05-01

    Fabrication of intrinsically fluorescent porous nanocarriers that are simultaneously stable in aqueous solutions and photostable is critical for their application in drug delivery and optical imaging but remains a challenge. In this study, fluorescent porous zinc sulfide nanospheres were synthesized by a facile gum arabic-assisted hydrothermal procedure. The morphology, composition and properties of the nanospheres have been characterized by field-emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, N2 adsorption-desorption analysis, thermal gravimetric analysis, fourier transform infrared spectrograph, optical measurement, dynamic light scattering, and cytotoxicity assay. They exhibit larger surface area, excellent colloidal stability, photostable fluorescent signals, and good biocompatibility, which makes them promising hosts for drug delivery and cellular imaging. The fluorescent dye safranine-T was employed as a drug model and loaded into the porous nanospheres, which were delivered to human cervical cancer HeLa cells in vitro for live cell imaging.Fabrication of intrinsically fluorescent porous nanocarriers that are simultaneously stable in aqueous solutions and photostable is critical for their application in drug delivery and optical imaging but remains a challenge. In this study, fluorescent porous zinc sulfide nanospheres were synthesized by a facile gum arabic-assisted hydrothermal procedure. The morphology, composition and properties of the nanospheres have been characterized by field-emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, N2 adsorption-desorption analysis, thermal gravimetric analysis, fourier transform infrared spectrograph, optical measurement, dynamic light scattering, and cytotoxicity assay. They exhibit larger surface area, excellent colloidal stability, photostable fluorescent signals, and good biocompatibility, which makes them promising

  16. Práticas de cuidados produzidas no serviço de residências terapêuticas: percorrendo os trilhos de retorno à sociedade Las prácticas de cuidados ofrecidos en el servicio de residencias terapéuticas: recorriendo los caminos de retorno a la sociedad Health-care practices performed at assisted living facilities: pursuing the paths back to society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hudson Pires de Oliveira Santos Junior

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Esta pesquisa objetivou buscar a visão dos profissionais do Serviço de Residências Terapêuticas, sobre a prática de cuidado produzida neste dispositivo de atenção à saúde mental. Para isso, optou-se pela abordagem qualitativa, exploratória e analítica. Os instrumentos para a coleta de dados foram: formulário de observação sistemática, diário de campo e roteiro de entrevista semiestruturada, realizada com 10 profissionais atuantes nas residências. Como resultado, foi encontrado que o cuidado na moradia se dá de modo mais humanizado, valorizando a singularidade dos moradores, seus valores e crenças, tentando (reestabelecer as relações sociais dos indivíduos e estimulá-los para a prática do autocuidado. Percebe-se que esse modo de atenção vem alcançando uma (recidadanização e valorização da vida dos sofredores psíquicos.Esta investigación objetivó buscar la perspectiva de los profesionales del Servicio de Residencias Terapéuticas, sobre la práctica del cuidado ofrecida en este dispositivo de atención a la salud mental. Para esto, se optó por el abordaje cualitativo, exploratorio y analítico. Los instrumentos para la recolección de datos fueron: formulario de observación sistemática, diario de campo y guión de entrevista semiestructurada, realizada con 10 profesionales actuantes en las residencias. Como resultado, fue encontrado que el cuidado en la residencia se ofrece de modo más humanizado, valorizando la singularidad de los residentes, sus valores y creencias, tratando de (reestablecer las relaciones sociales de los individuos y estimularlos para practicar el auto cuidado. Se percibe que ese modo de atención viene alcanzando una (reciudadanización y valorización de la vida de los que sufren psíquicamente.The objective of this exploratory study was to understand the perspective of professionals working at assisted living facilities about the healthcare practices performed in the mental health

  17. Everyday Functioning Benefits from an Assisted Living Platform amongst Frail Older Adults and Their Caregivers

    OpenAIRE

    Lucile Dupuy; Charlotte Froger; Charles Consel; Hélène Sauzéon

    2017-01-01

    Ambient assisted living technologies (AAL) are regarded as a promising solution to support aging in place. Yet, their efficacy has to be demonstrated in terms of benefits for independent living and for work conditions of caregivers. Hence, the purpose of this study was to assess the benefits of a multi-task AAL platform for both Frail older Individuals (FIs) and professional caregivers with respect to everyday functioning and caregiver burden. In this context, a 6-month field study involved 3...

  18. Everyday Functioning Benefits from an Assisted Living Platform amongst Frail Older Adults and Their Caregivers

    OpenAIRE

    Dupuy, Lucile; Froger, Charlotte; Consel, Charles; Sauzéon, Hélène

    2017-01-01

    International audience; Ambient assisted living technologies (AAL) are regarded as a promising solution to support aging in place. Yet, their efficacy has to be demonstrated in terms of benefits for independent living and for work conditions of caregivers. Hence, the purpose of this study was to assess the benefits of a multi-task AAL platform for both Frail older Individuals (FIs) and professional caregivers with respect to everyday functioning and caregiver burden. In this context, a 6-mont...

  19. Using the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology Clinic Outcome System morphological measures to predict live birth after assisted reproductive technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, Barbara; Brown, Morton B; Stern, Judy E; Jindal, Sangita K; Racowsky, Catherine; Ball, G David

    2014-11-01

    To model morphological assessments of embryo quality that are predictive of live birth. Longitudinal cohort using cycles reported in the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology Clinic Outcomes Reporting System (SART CORS) between 2007 and 2011. Clinic-based data. Fresh autologous assisted reproductive technology (ART) cycles with ETs on day 3 or day 5 and morphological assessments reported (25,409 cycles with one embryo transferred and 96,093 cycles with two embryos transferred). Live-birth rates were modeled by morphological assessments using backward-stepping logistic regression for cycle 1 and over five cycles, separately for day 3 and day 5 transfers and number of embryos transferred (1 or 2). Additional models for each day of transfer also included the number of oocytes retrieved and the number of embryos cryopreserved. None. Live births. Morphological assessments of grade, stage, fragmentation, and symmetry were significant for the day 3 models; grade, stage, and trophectoderm were significant in the day 5 model; inner-cell mass was significant in the models when two embryos were transferred. Number of oocytes retrieved and number of embryos cryopreserved were significant for both day 3 and day 5 models. These findings confirm the significant association between embryo quality parameters reported to SART CORS and live-birth rate after ART. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Social Relations and Resident Health in Assisted Living: An Application of the Convoy Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Molly M.; Ball, Mary M.; Kemp, Candace L.; Hollingsworth, Carole

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This article, based on analysis of data from a mixed methods study, builds on a growing body of assisted living (AL) research focusing on the link between residents' social relationships and health. A key aim of this analysis, which uses the social convoy model as a conceptual and methodological framework, was to examine the relative…

  1. An extended view on benefits and barriers of ambient assisted living solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaschinski, Christina; Allouch, S.B.

    2015-01-01

    Motivated by the older adults’ desire to age in their trusted home environment and the increasing financial pressure on the healthcare system, Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) technologies are designed to facilitate healthy and autonomous aging in place. To aid the acceptance of these still immature

  2. Ambient Assisted Living : Benefits and Barriers From a User-Centered Perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaschinski, Christina; Ben Allouch, Soumaya

    2014-01-01

    Older adults have a growing desire to remain independent and age in their own home environment. Policy makers support this wish, as the quality and quantity of institutional care cannot be guaranteed with the present health care budget. Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) technologies can meet the

  3. Chapter 21. Intelligent light therapy for older adults: Ambient assisted living.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.B.C. Aries; J. van Hoof; M.P.J. Aarts; B. Schrader; MD E.J.M. Wouters; A.C. Westerlaken; H.T.G. Weffers

    2013-01-01

    van Hoof, J., Wouters, E.J.M., Schräder, B, Weffers, H.T.G., Aarts, M.P.J., Aries, M.B.C., Westerlaken, A.C. (2013) Chapter 21. Intelligent light therapy for older adults: Ambient assisted living. In: Agah, A. (ed.) Medical Applications of Artificial Intelligence. CRC Press/Taylor & Francis Group,

  4. Ambient assisted living : Towards a model of technology adoption and use among elderly users

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaschinski, Christina

    2014-01-01

    Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) technologies offer a promising perspective on autonomous aging in place. This is in the interest of the older adults themselves, overburdened caregivers and policy makers who try to control health care budgets in the face of the ever growing older population. However,

  5. Ambient Assisted Living Systems in the Context of Human Centric Sensing and IoT Concept

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zaric, Nicola; Pejanovic-Djurisic, Milica; Mihovska, Albena Dimitrova

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes the concept of Human Centric Sensing in the context of Internet of Things and Ambient Assisted Living. The paper uses a case study to present and analyze the proposed idea, and identifies the main challenges and open issues that require research and policy attention....

  6. 25 CFR 20.502 - Can Child Assistance funds be used to place Indian children in residential care facilities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... children in residential care facilities? 20.502 Section 20.502 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT... in residential care facilities? You, the social service program, can use Child Assistance funds to purchase or contract for room and board in licensed residential care facilities. (a) You can use Child...

  7. Assistance Dogs: Historic Patterns and Roles of Dogs Placed by ADI or IGDF Accredited Facilities and by Non-Accredited U.S. Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, Sandra; Yamamoto, Mariko; Thigpen, Abigail Paige; Garcia, Anaissa; Willits, Neil H; Hart, Lynette A

    2017-01-01

    Dogs' roles to support people with disabilities are increasing. Existing U.S. laws and regulations pertaining to the use of dogs for people with disabilities are only minimally enforced. Pushback legislation against some aspects of uses of assistance dogs currently is being passed or proposed in several states. Further, the U.S. Department of the Army and the Veterans' Administration support only dogs trained by an Assistance Dogs International (ADI) or International Guide Dog Federation (IGDF) accredited facility. Lacking a mandatory national process for screening the selection, training, and placement of assistance dogs with persons who have disabilities, the U.S. offers a creative but confusing opportunity for people to train their own dogs for any disability. While no U.S. surveillance system monitors assistance dogs, other countries generally have a legislated or regulatory process for approving assistance dogs or a cultural convention for obtaining dogs from accredited facilities. We conducted an online survey investigating current demographics of assistance dogs placed in 2013 and 2014 with persons who have disabilities, by facilities worldwide that are associated with ADI or IGDF and by some non-accredited U.S. facilities. Placement data from ADI and IGDF facilities revealed that in most countries aside from the U.S., guide dogs were by far the main type of assistance dog placed. In the U.S., there were about equal numbers of mobility and guide dogs placed, including many placed by large older facilities, along with smaller numbers of other types of assistance dogs. In non-accredited U.S. facilities, psychiatric dogs accounted for most placements. Dogs for families with an autistic child were increasing in all regions around the world. Of dog breeds placed, accredited facilities usually mentioned Labrador Retrievers and Golden Retrievers, and sometimes, German Shepherd Dogs. The facilities bred their dogs in-house, or acquired them from certain breeders

  8. Assistance Dogs: Historic Patterns and Roles of Dogs Placed by ADI or IGDF Accredited Facilities and by Non-Accredited U.S. Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, Sandra; Yamamoto, Mariko; Thigpen, Abigail Paige; Garcia, Anaissa; Willits, Neil H.; Hart, Lynette A.

    2017-01-01

    Dogs’ roles to support people with disabilities are increasing. Existing U.S. laws and regulations pertaining to the use of dogs for people with disabilities are only minimally enforced. Pushback legislation against some aspects of uses of assistance dogs currently is being passed or proposed in several states. Further, the U.S. Department of the Army and the Veterans’ Administration support only dogs trained by an Assistance Dogs International (ADI) or International Guide Dog Federation (IGDF) accredited facility. Lacking a mandatory national process for screening the selection, training, and placement of assistance dogs with persons who have disabilities, the U.S. offers a creative but confusing opportunity for people to train their own dogs for any disability. While no U.S. surveillance system monitors assistance dogs, other countries generally have a legislated or regulatory process for approving assistance dogs or a cultural convention for obtaining dogs from accredited facilities. We conducted an online survey investigating current demographics of assistance dogs placed in 2013 and 2014 with persons who have disabilities, by facilities worldwide that are associated with ADI or IGDF and by some non-accredited U.S. facilities. Placement data from ADI and IGDF facilities revealed that in most countries aside from the U.S., guide dogs were by far the main type of assistance dog placed. In the U.S., there were about equal numbers of mobility and guide dogs placed, including many placed by large older facilities, along with smaller numbers of other types of assistance dogs. In non-accredited U.S. facilities, psychiatric dogs accounted for most placements. Dogs for families with an autistic child were increasing in all regions around the world. Of dog breeds placed, accredited facilities usually mentioned Labrador Retrievers and Golden Retrievers, and sometimes, German Shepherd Dogs. The facilities bred their dogs in-house, or acquired them from certain breeders

  9. Influence of the environment and phototoxicity of the live cell imaging system at IMP microbeam facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenjing; Du, Guanghua; Guo, Jinlong; Wu, Ruqun; Wei, Junzhe; Chen, Hao; Li, Yaning; Zhao, Jing; Li, Xiaoyue

    2017-08-01

    To investigate the spatiotemporal dynamics of DNA damage and repair after the ion irradiation, an online live cell imaging system has been established based on the microbeam facility at Institute of Modern Physics (IMP). The system could provide a sterile and physiological environment by making use of heating plate and live cell imaging solution. The phototoxicity was investigated through the evaluation of DNA repair protein XRCC1 foci formed in HT1080-RFP cells during the imaging exposure. The intensity of the foci induced by phototoxicity was much lower compared with that of the foci induced by heavy ion hits. The results showed that although spontaneous foci were formed due to RFP exposure during live cell imaging, they had little impact on the analysis of the recruitment kinetics of XRCC1 in the foci induced by the ion irradiation.

  10. The meaning of assisted feeding for people living with spinal cord injury: a phenomenological study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinsen, B.; Harder, I.; Biering-Sørensen, Fin

    2008-01-01

    AIM: This paper is a report of a study to explore the meaning of assisted feeding through the experiences of people with high cervical spinal cord injury. Background. Eating difficulties are known to affect a person's self-image and transform social lives. Little is known about the experience...... the phenomenological guidelines by Dahlberg and colleagues. FINDINGS: The essence of the phenomenon assisted feeding was described as a constructed pattern based on coordinated attention between the person with high cervical spinal cord injury and the helper. The constituents of the essence were: paralysis...... to each individual person. Fixed procedures or routines should be avoided and assistive devices used with care. We recommend that continuity in the cooperation between the parties involved in assisted feeding is given priority, and that personal standard and social norms around meals are acknowledged...

  11. Designing assisted living technologies ‘in the wild’: preliminary experiences with cultural probe methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wherton Joseph

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is growing interest in assisted living technologies to support independence at home. Such technologies should ideally be designed ‘in the wild’ i.e. taking account of how real people live in real homes and communities. The ATHENE (Assistive Technologies for Healthy Living in Elders: Needs Assessment by Ethnography project seeks to illuminate the living needs of older people and facilitate the co-production with older people of technologies and services. This paper describes the development of a cultural probe tool produced as part of the ATHENE project and how it was used to support home visit interviews with elders with a range of ethnic and social backgrounds, family circumstances, health conditions and assisted living needs. Method Thirty one people aged 60 to 98 were visited in their homes on three occasions. Following an initial interview, participants were given a set of cultural probe materials, including a digital camera and the ‘Home and Life Scrapbook’ to complete in their own time for one week. Activities within the Home and Life Scrapbook included maps (indicating their relationships to people, places and objects, lists (e.g. likes, dislikes, things they were concerned about, things they were comfortable with, wishes (things they wanted to change or improve, body outline (indicating symptoms or impairments, home plan (room layouts of their homes to indicate spaces and objects used and a diary. After one week, the researcher and participant reviewed any digital photos taken and the content of the Home and Life Scrapbook as part of the home visit interview. Findings The cultural probe facilitated collection of visual, narrative and material data by older people, and appeared to generate high levels of engagement from some participants. However, others used the probe minimally or not at all for various reasons including limited literacy, physical problems (e.g. holding a pen, lack of time or energy

  12. A qualitative exploration of resilience in pre-adolescent AIDS orphans living in a residential care facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pienaar, Anja; Swanepoel, Zendré; van Rensburg, Hendrik; Heunis, Christo

    2011-01-01

    This article presents the findings of a study among a small group of South African AIDS orphans living in a residential care facility, Lebone Land. The research was conducted between June and September 2006. A qualitative, exploratory study consisting of in-depth, semistructured interviews with eight children and seven key informants aimed to identify and investigate developmental assets operating in the children's lives to help them cope amid exposure to adversities. The findings indicate that the developmental assets that facilitate coping and foster resilience in these children relate to four main components: external stressors and challenges, external supports, inner strengths and interpersonal and problem-solving skills. Emerging key themes relate to the experience of illness, death, poverty and violence, as well as the important roles of morality, social values, resistance skills, religion and faith in assisting these children in defining their purpose in life. To this end, constructive use of time, commitment to learning, goal-setting, problem-solving ability and self-efficacy are fundamental in the children's attainment of their future projections. Therefore, qualities such as optimism, perseverance and hope seem to permeate the children's process of recovery. Strong networks of support, particularly friendships with other children, also seem to contribute to developing and sustaining resilience.

  13. Assistive Technology Needs and Measurement of the Psychosocial Impact of Assistive Technologies for Independent Living of Older Hispanics: Lessons Learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orellano-Colón, Elsa M; Jutai, Jeffrey; Santiago, Angélica; Torres, Víctor; Benítez, Keyla; Torres, Mayra

    2016-09-01

    (1) Knowledge about the assistive technology (AT) needs and psychosocial impact of AT in different populations is needed because the adoption, retention, or abandonment of AT may be influenced by the psychosocial impact that AT has on its users. The aims of this study were to: (a) identify the AT needs of a sample of Hispanic older adults with functional limitations, (b) describe the psychosocial impact of these technologies on the sample's quality of life, and (c) describe the methodological challenges in using the Puerto Rican version of the Psychosocial Impact of Assistive Device Scale (PR-PIADS) with a Hispanic sample. (2) Methods: This study used a cross-sectional design conducted with a sample of 60 participants. Data was collected using the Assistive Technology Card Assessment Questionnaire (ATCAQ) and the PR-PIADS. Data analyses included descriptive statistics and bivariate analysis. (3) Results: The sample's most frequently reported needs for AT devices were in the areas of cooking, home tasks, and home safety activities. The sample reported a positive impact of AT use in their quality of life. Several methodological challenges of the PIADS were identified. (4) Conclusions: The sample has unmet needs for using AT devices to overcome difficulties in daily living activities.

  14. The own body as a nurse's living experience on assisting others in their dying process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Santana, Maria Teresa B Mariotti; Jorge, Maria Salete Bessa

    2007-01-01

    It refers to the study of the researcher's perception when analyzing her own existence, aiming to learn the sense and meaning of her own body as a living experience while assisting the other in the process of dying. The Merleau-Ponty phenomenology and the new hermeneutic approaches were chosen. A point of contact was established between the living experience of the approximation of the object, unveiled by the own body inserted in the world, the object and the subject of the study. The themes that emerged were about the magical-religious knowledge influences of the perceived world, the real knowledge and the teaching-learning process. The phenomenon elaborated, result of the study, allowed the learning of the thesis of the existence of a sense and meaning for the own body of health professionals when assisting others in the dying process.

  15. Social Relations and Resident Health in Assisted Living: An Application of the Convoy Model

    OpenAIRE

    Perkins, Molly M.; Ball, Mary M.; Kemp, Candace L.; Hollingsworth, Carole

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This article, based on analysis of data from a mixed methods study, builds on a growing body of assisted living (AL) research focusing on the link between residents’ social relationships and health. A key aim of this analysis, which uses the social convoy model as a conceptual and methodological framework, was to examine the relative importance of coresident relationships and other network ties to residents’ subjective well-being. Design and Methods: We analyzed data from structured ...

  16. Hands-On Experiences in Deploying Cost-Effective Ambient-Assisted Living Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Athanasios Dasios; Damianos Gavalas; Grammati Pantziou; Charalampos Konstantopoulos

    2015-01-01

    Older adults’ preferences to remain independent in their own homes along with the high costs of nursing home care have motivated the development of Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) technologies which aim at improving the safety, health conditions and wellness of the elderly. This paper reports hands-on experiences in designing, implementing and operating UbiCare, an AAL based prototype system for elderly home care monitoring. The monitoring is based on the recording of environmental parameters l...

  17. Vision based assistive technology for people with dementia performing activities of daily living (ADLs): an overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    As'ari, M. A.; Sheikh, U. U.

    2012-04-01

    The rapid development of intelligent assistive technology for replacing a human caregiver in assisting people with dementia performing activities of daily living (ADLs) promises in the reduction of care cost especially in training and hiring human caregiver. The main problem however, is the various kinds of sensing agents used in such system and is dependent on the intent (types of ADLs) and environment where the activity is performed. In this paper on overview of the potential of computer vision based sensing agent in assistive system and how it can be generalized and be invariant to various kind of ADLs and environment. We find that there exists a gap from the existing vision based human action recognition method in designing such system due to cognitive and physical impairment of people with dementia.

  18. Intuitive adaptive orientation control of assistive robots for people living with upper limb disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Dinh-Son; Allard, Ulysse Cote; Gosselin, Clement; Routhier, Francois; Gosselin, Benoit; Campeau-Lecours, Alexandre

    2017-07-01

    Robotic assistive devices enhance the autonomy of individuals living with physical disabilities in their day-to-day life. Although the first priority for such devices is safety, they must also be intuitive and efficient from an engineering point of view in order to be adopted by a broad range of users. This is especially true for assistive robotic arms, as they are used for the complex control tasks of daily living. One challenge in the control of such assistive robots is the management of the end-effector orientation which is not always intuitive for the human operator, especially for neophytes. This paper presents a novel orientation control algorithm designed for robotic arms in the context of human-robot interaction. This work aims at making the control of the robot's orientation easier and more intuitive for the user, in particular, individuals living with upper limb disabilities. The performance and intuitiveness of the proposed orientation control algorithm is assessed through two experiments with 25 able-bodied subjects and shown to significantly improve on both aspects.

  19. RESTful Discovery and Eventing for Service Provisioning in Assisted Living Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Parra

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Service provisioning in assisted living environments faces distinct challenges due to the heterogeneity of networks, access technology, and sensing/actuation devices in such an environment. Existing solutions, such as SOAP-based web services, can interconnect heterogeneous devices and services, and can be published, discovered and invoked dynamically. However, it is considered heavier than what is required in the smart environment-like context and hence suffers from performance degradation. Alternatively, REpresentational State Transfer (REST has gained much attention from the community and is considered as a lighter and cleaner technology compared to the SOAP-based web services. Since it is simple to publish and use a RESTful web service, more and more service providers are moving toward REST-based solutions, which promote a resource-centric conceptualization as opposed to a service-centric conceptualization. Despite such benefits of REST, the dynamic discovery and eventing of RESTful services are yet considered a major hurdle to utilization of the full potential of REST-based approaches. In this paper, we address this issue, by providing a RESTful discovery and eventing specification and demonstrate it in an assisted living healthcare scenario. We envisage that through this approach, the service provisioning in ambient assisted living or other smart environment settings will be more efficient, timely, and less resource-intensive.

  20. Using data from ambient assisted living and smart homes in electronic health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knaup, P; Schöpe, L

    2014-01-01

    This editorial is part of the Focus Theme of Methods of Information in Medicine on "Using Data from Ambient Assisted Living and Smart Homes in Electronic Health Records". To increase efficiency in the health care of the future, data from innovative technology like it is used for ambient assisted living (AAL) or smart homes should be available for individual health decisions. Integrating and aggregating data from different medical devices and health records enables a comprehensive view on health data. The objective of this paper is to present examples of the state of the art in research on information management that leads to a sustainable use and long-term storage of health data provided by innovative assistive technologies in daily living. Current research deals with the perceived usefulness of sensor data, the participatory design of visual displays for presenting monitoring data, and communication architectures for integrating sensor data from home health care environments with health care providers either via a regional health record bank or via a telemedical center. Integrating data from AAL systems and smart homes with data from electronic patient or health records is still in an early stage. Several projects are in an advanced conceptual phase, some of them exploring feasibility with the help of prototypes. General comprehensive solutions are hardly available and should become a major issue of medical informatics research in the near future.

  1. Effect of Embryo Banking on U.S. National Assisted Reproductive Technology Live Birth Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushnir, Vitaly A; Barad, David H; Albertini, David F; Darmon, Sarah K; Gleicher, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) reports generated by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) exclude embryo banking cycles from outcome calculations. We examined data reported to the CDC in 2013 for the impact of embryo banking exclusion on national ART outcomes by recalculating autologous oocyte ART live birth rates. Inflation of reported fresh ART cycle live birth rates was assessed for all age groups of infertile women as the difference between fresh cycle live births with reference to number of initiated fresh cycles (excluding embryo banking cycles), as typically reported by the CDC, and fresh cycle live births with reference to total initiated fresh ART cycles (including embryo banking cycles). During 2013, out of 121,351 fresh non-donor ART cycles 27,564 (22.7%) involved embryo banking. The proportion of banking cycles increased with female age from 15.5% in women 44 years. Concomitantly, the proportion of thawed cycles decreased with advancing female age (P banking cycles led to inflation of live birth rates in fresh ART cycles, increasing in size in parallel to advancing female age and utilization of embryo banking, reaching 56.3% in women age >44. The inflation of live birth rates in thawed cycles could not be calculated from the publically available CDC data but appears to be even greater. Utilization of embryo banking increased during 2013 with advancing female age, suggesting a potential age selection bias. Exclusion of embryo banking cycles from national ART outcome reports significantly inflated national ART success rates, especially among older women. Exclusion of embryo banking cycles from US National Assisted Reproductive Technology outcome reports significantly inflates reported success rates especially in older women.

  2. Inpatient hospitalizations in women with and without assisted reproductive technology live birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Judy E; Gopal, Daksha; Diop, Hafsatou; Missmer, Stacey A; Coddington, Charles C; Luke, Barbara

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate frequency of hospitalization before, during, and after assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatment by cycle outcome. Six thousand and one hundred thirty women residing in Massachusetts undergoing 17,135 cycles of ART reported to the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology Clinic Outcome Reporting System (SARTCORS) from 2004 to 2011 were linked to hospital discharges and vital records. Women were grouped according to ART treatment cycle outcome as: no pregnancy (n = 1840), one or more pregnancies but no live birth (n = 968), or one or more singleton live births (n = 3322). Hospital delivery discharges during 1998-2011 were categorized as occurring before, during, or after the ART treatment. The most prevalent ICD-9 codes for non-delivery hospital discharges were compared. Groups were compared using chi square test using SAS 9.3 software. The proportion of any hospitalization was 57.0, 58.3, and 91.3% for women with no pregnancy, no live birth, and ART singleton live birth, respectively; the proportion of non-delivery hospitalizations was 30.4, 31.0, and 28.3%, respectively. The non-ART delivery proportion after ART treatment did not differ by group (33.4, 36.2, and 36.9%, respectively, p = 0.17). Most frequent non-delivery diagnoses (including fibroids, obesity, ectopic pregnancy, depression, and endometriosis) also did not differ by group. A secondary analysis limited to only women with no delivery discharges before the first ART cycle showed similar results. All groups had live birth deliveries during the study period, suggesting an important contribution of non-ART treatment or treatment-independent conception to overall delivery and live births. Hospitalizations not associated with delivery suggested similarity in morbidity for all ART patients regardless of success with ART treatment.

  3. Laparoscopy-Assisted Spleen-Preserving Distal Pancreatectomy for Living-Donor Pancreas Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Date, S; Noguchi, H; Kaku, K; Kurihara, K; Miyasaka, Y; Okabe, Y; Nakamura, U; Ohtsuka, T; Nakamura, M

    2017-06-01

    Living pancreas transplantation plays an important role in the treatment of patients with severe type 1 diabetes. However, pancreatectomy is very invasive for the donor, and less-invasive surgical procedures are needed. Although some reports have described hand-assisted laparoscopic surgery for distal pancreatectomy in living-donor operations, less-invasive laparoscopy-assisted (LA) procedures are expected to increase the donor pool. We herein report the outcomes of four cases of LA spleen-preserving distal pancreatectomy (Warshaw technique [WT]) in living pancreas donors. Four living pancreas donors underwent LA-WT at our institution from September 2010 to January 2013. All donors fulfilled the donor criteria established by the Japan Society for Pancreas and Islet Transplantation. The median donor age was 54 years. Two donors underwent left nephrectomy in addition to LA-WT for simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation. The median donor operation time for pancreatectomy was 340.5 minutes. The median pancreas warm ischemic time was 3 minutes. The median donor blood loss was 246 g. All recipients immediately achieved insulin independence. One donor required reoperation because of obstructive ileus resulting from a port-site hernia. Another donor developed a pancreatic fistula (International Study Group of Pancreatic Fistula grade B), which was controlled with conservative management. After a maximum follow-up of 73 months, no clinically relevant adverse events had occurred. These results were comparable with those of previous studies concerning living-donor pancreas transplantation. The LA-WT is a safe and acceptable operation for living-donor pancreas transplantation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The relation between detention length, living group climate, coping, and treatment motivation among juvenile delinquents in a youth correctional facility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Helm, P.; Beunk, L.; Stams, G.J.; van der Laan, P.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between detention length, living group climate, coping, and treatment motivation among 59 juvenile delinquents in a Dutch youth correctional facility. Longer detention was associated with the perception of a more open living group climate, but proved to be

  5. Live birth rates and safety profile using dydrogesterone for luteal phase support in assisted reproductive techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadarajah, Ravichandran; Rajesh, Hemashree; Wong, Ker Yi; Faisal, Fazlin; Yu, Su Ling

    2017-06-01

    Assisted reproductive techniques (ARTs) result in a deficient luteal phase, requiring the administration of intramuscular, intravaginal or oral exogenous progesterone. Dydrogesterone, an oral retroprogesterone with good bioavailability, has been used in assisted reproductive cycles with outcomes that are comparable to those of vaginal or intramuscular progesterone. However, there are limited reviews on its use for luteal phase support in ARTs, in terms of pregnancy outcomes and associated fetal anomalies. This study aimed to review the live birth rates and associated fetal anomalies of women who were given dydrogesterone for luteal phase support in assisted reproductive cycles at a tertiary hospital in Singapore. This retrospective descriptive study included 1,050 women who underwent in vitro fertilisation/intracytoplasmic sperm injection at the Centre for Assisted Reproduction of Singapore General Hospital between 2000 and 2011. The women were given dydrogesterone for luteal phase support. The main outcome measures were rates of pregnancy, live birth, miscarriage and fetal anomalies. The pregnancy and live birth rates were 34.7% and 27.7%, respectively. Among those who achieved pregnancy, 17.0% miscarried, 0.8% had ectopic pregnancies and 0.3% had molar pregnancies. Fetal anomalies were detected in 1.9% of pregnancies, all of which were terminated by choice. Since the outcomes of dydrogesterone are comparable to those of intramuscular and vaginal progesterone, it is a reasonable option to provide luteal phase support for women who are uncomfortable with injections or vaginal insertions. Randomised controlled studies are needed to determine the optimal dosage of dydrogesterone for luteal phase support in ARTs.

  6. The feasibility of measuring social networks among older adults in assisted living and dementia special care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Katherine M; Bettger, Janet Prvu; Hampton, Keith N; Kohler, Hans-Peter

    2015-03-01

    Studies indicate that social integration has a significant influence on physical and mental health. Older adults experience an increased risk of social isolation as their social networks decline with fewer traditional opportunities to add new social relationships. Deaths of similar aged friends, cognitive and functional impairments, and relocating to a nursing home (NH) or assisted-living (AL) facility contribute to difficulties in maintaining one's social network. Due to the paucity of research examining the social networks of people residing in AL and NH, this study was designed to develop and test the feasibility of using a combination of methodological approaches to capture social network data among older adults living in AL and a dementia special care unit NH. Social network analysis of both egocentric and sociocentric networks was conducted to visualize the social networks of 15 residents of an AL neighborhood and 12 residents of a dementia special care unit NH and to calculate measures network size, centrality, and reciprocity. The combined egocentric and sociocentric method was feasible and provided a robust indicator of resident social networks highlighting individuals who were socially integrated as well as isolated. © The Author(s) 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  7. Developing a national research and development centre in assistive technologies for independent living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, David A; Close, Jo K; Downing, Andrew R; Reynolds, Karen J; Walker, Lloyd T

    2009-02-01

    Assistive technology (AT) plays a pivotal role in the lives of people who require assistance with one or more aspects of daily living. Ranging from simple devices such as an augmented fork to complex devices like a power wheelchair with integrated environmental control, AT is a broad term to describe a range of products and services that provide assistance. Historically used in the "disability sector", in recent years AT devices have merged into the ageing sector as more Australians develop an impairment through "age-related disability", creating a larger market for equipment that provides independence or restores lost/reduced functionality. Despite the national focus on ageing, Australia lacks a nationally coordinated and cohesive AT sector - most AT equipment and devices are imported and the sector struggles for local research, development, and commercialisation funding. In an attempt to address this issue, a network of rehabilitation engineering and AT centres, universities, and industry players formed a collaboration to submit a Cooperative Research Centre (CRC) proposal to drive Australian AT products and services. The main focus was on developing Australian capacity within the sector and creating innovative products that met Australian needs, leading to import replacement. A secondary focus was on providing a national education program to provide ongoing AT training and development across multiple disciplines associated with both disability and ageing.

  8. Deployment of assistive living technology in a nursing home environment: methods and lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloulou, Hamdi; Mokhtari, Mounir; Tiberghien, Thibaut; Biswas, Jit; Phua, Clifton; Kenneth Lin, Jin Hong; Yap, Philip

    2013-04-08

    With an ever-growing ageing population, dementia is fast becoming the chronic disease of the 21st century. Elderly people affected with dementia progressively lose their autonomy as they encounter problems in their Activities of Daily Living (ADLs). Hence, they need supervision and assistance from their family members or professional caregivers, which can often lead to underestimated psychological and financial stress for all parties. The use of Ambient Assistive Living (AAL) technologies aims to empower people with dementia and relieve the burden of their caregivers.The aim of this paper is to present the approach we have adopted to develop and deploy a system for ambient assistive living in an operating nursing home, and evaluate its performance and usability in real conditions. Based on this approach, we emphasise on the importance of deployments in real world settings as opposed to prototype testing in laboratories. We chose to conduct this work in close partnership with end-users (dementia patients) and specialists in dementia care (professional caregivers). Our trial was conducted during a period of 14 months within three rooms in a nursing home in Singapore, and with the participation of eight dementia patients and two caregivers. A technical ambient assistive living solution, consisting of a set of sensors and devices controlled by a software platform, was deployed in the collaborating nursing home. The trial was preceded by a pre-deployment period to organise several observation sessions with dementia patients and focus group discussions with professional caregivers. A process of ground truth and system's log data gathering was also planned prior to the trial and a system performance evaluation was realised during the deployment period with the help of caregivers. An ethical approval was obtained prior to real life deployment of our solution. Patients' observations and discussions allowed us to gather a set of requirements that a system for elders with

  9. CDC-reported assisted reproductive technology live-birth rates may mislead the public.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushnir, Vitaly A; Choi, Jennifer; Darmon, Sarah K; Albertini, David F; Barad, David H; Gleicher, Norbert

    2017-08-01

    The Centre for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) publicly reports assisted reproductive technology live-birth rates (LBR) for each US fertility clinic under legal mandate. The 2014 CDC report excluded 35,406 of 184,527 (19.2%) autologous assisted reproductive technology cycles that involved embryo or oocyte banking from LBR calculations. This study calculated 2014 total clinic LBR for all patients utilizing autologous oocytes two ways: including all initiated assisted reproductive technology cycles or excluding banking cycles, as done by the CDC. The main limitation of this analysis is the CDC report did not differentiate between cycles involving long-term banking of embryos or oocytes for fertility preservation from cycles involving short-term embryo banking. Twenty-seven of 458 (6%) clinics reported over 40% of autologous cycles involved banking, collectively performing 12% of all US assisted reproductive technology cycles. LBR in these outlier clinics calculated by the CDC method, was higher than the other 94% of clinics (33.1% versus 31.1%). However, recalculated LBR including banking cycles in the outlier clinics was lower than the other 94% of clinics (15.5% versus 26.6%). LBR calculated by the two methods increasingly diverged based on proportion of banking cycles performed by each clinic reaching 4.5-fold, thereby, potentially misleading the public. Copyright © 2017 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. An Indoor Monitoring System for Ambient Assisted Living Based on Internet of Things Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonçalo Marques

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The study of systems and architectures for ambient assisted living (AAL is undoubtedly a topic of great relevance given the aging of the world population. The AAL technologies are designed to meet the needs of the aging population in order to maintain their independence as long as possible. As people typically spend more than 90% of their time in indoor environments, indoor air quality (iAQ is perceived as an imperative variable to be controlled for the inhabitants’ wellbeing and comfort. Advances in networking, sensors, and embedded devices have made it possible to monitor and provide assistance to people in their homes. The continuous technological advancements make it possible to build smart objects with great capabilities for sensing and connecting several possible advancements in ambient assisted living systems architectures. Indoor environments are characterized by several pollutant sources. Most of the monitoring frameworks instantly accessible are exceptionally costly and only permit the gathering of arbitrary examples. iAQ is an indoor air quality system based on an Internet of Things paradigm that incorporates in its construction Arduino, ESP8266, and XBee technologies for processing and data transmission and micro sensors for data acquisition. It also allows access to data collected through web access and through a mobile application in real time, and this data can be accessed by doctors in order to support medical diagnostics. Five smaller scale sensors of natural parameters (air temperature, moistness, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and glow were utilized. Different sensors can be included to check for particular contamination. The results reveal that the system can give a viable indoor air quality appraisal in order to anticipate technical interventions for improving indoor air quality. Indeed indoor air quality might be distinctively contrasted with what is normal for a quality living environment.

  11. An Indoor Monitoring System for Ambient Assisted Living Based on Internet of Things Architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Gonçalo; Pitarma, Rui

    2016-11-17

    The study of systems and architectures for ambient assisted living (AAL) is undoubtedly a topic of great relevance given the aging of the world population. The AAL technologies are designed to meet the needs of the aging population in order to maintain their independence as long as possible. As people typically spend more than 90% of their time in indoor environments, indoor air quality (iAQ) is perceived as an imperative variable to be controlled for the inhabitants' wellbeing and comfort. Advances in networking, sensors, and embedded devices have made it possible to monitor and provide assistance to people in their homes. The continuous technological advancements make it possible to build smart objects with great capabilities for sensing and connecting several possible advancements in ambient assisted living systems architectures. Indoor environments are characterized by several pollutant sources. Most of the monitoring frameworks instantly accessible are exceptionally costly and only permit the gathering of arbitrary examples. iAQ is an indoor air quality system based on an Internet of Things paradigm that incorporates in its construction Arduino, ESP8266, and XBee technologies for processing and data transmission and micro sensors for data acquisition. It also allows access to data collected through web access and through a mobile application in real time, and this data can be accessed by doctors in order to support medical diagnostics. Five smaller scale sensors of natural parameters (air temperature, moistness, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and glow) were utilized. Different sensors can be included to check for particular contamination. The results reveal that the system can give a viable indoor air quality appraisal in order to anticipate technical interventions for improving indoor air quality. Indeed indoor air quality might be distinctively contrasted with what is normal for a quality living environment.

  12. Meanings and experiences of assistive technologies in everyday lives of older citizens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahler, Anne Marie; Maling Rasmussen, Dorte; Andersen, Pernille Tanggaard

    2016-01-01

    was conducted, using predetermined search strategies. Exclusion criteria were, in accordance with the meta-interpretive approach, developed iteratively during the reading of abstracts and articles. Interpretations from the included studies were used as data for thematic analysis and synthesis of findings......Purpose: The purpose of this study was to synthesize the available qualitative studies on the meanings of assistive technologies (AT) in elderly people's everyday lives in order to identify central concepts, themes, and findings from existing research. Method: A systematic search of the literature...

  13. Personalized use of ICT--from telemonitoring to ambient assisted living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norgall, Thomas; Wichert, Reiner

    2013-01-01

    Individual availability of information and communications technology (ICT) has enabled "Personal Health" applications like the continuous ubiquitous telemonitoring of vital signs. The concept of Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) goes beyond health and care applications utilizing home automation technology for supporting individuals with specific needs, particularly enabling elderly to live in their accustomed home as long as possible. These users usually suffer from more than one disease and need compensation of several impairments. Most current AAL projects and products however provide insulated solutions addressing only a small selection of these user needs. For comprehensive dynamic system adaptation to changing user needs an open platform supporting interoperable components is required. While the industry-driven Continua Health Alliance developed a corresponding Personal Health ecosystem, the ongoing European project universAAL aims at a universal platform for both AAL and Personal Health applications.

  14. Wellness protocol for smart homes an integrated framework for ambient assisted living

    CERN Document Server

    Ghayvat, Hemant

    2017-01-01

    This book focuses on the development of wellness protocols for smart home monitoring, aiming to forecast the wellness of individuals living in ambient assisted living (AAL) environments. It describes in detail the design and implementation of heterogeneous wireless sensors and networks as applied to data mining and machine learning, which the protocols are based on. Further, it shows how these sensor and actuator nodes are deployed in the home environment, generating real-time data on object usage and other movements inside the home, and therefore demonstrates that the protocols have proven to offer a reliable, efficient, flexible, and economical solution for smart home systems. Documenting the approach from sensor to decision making and information generation, the book addresses various issues concerning interference mitigation, errors, security and large data handling. As such, it offers a valuable resource for researchers, students and practitioners interested in interdisciplinary studies at the intersecti...

  15. A Radar-Based Smart Sensor for Unobtrusive Elderly Monitoring in Ambient Assisted Living Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Diraco

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Continuous in-home monitoring of older adults living alone aims to improve their quality of life and independence, by detecting early signs of illness and functional decline or emergency conditions. To meet requirements for technology acceptance by seniors (unobtrusiveness, non-intrusiveness, and privacy-preservation, this study presents and discusses a new smart sensor system for the detection of abnormalities during daily activities, based on ultra-wideband radar providing rich, not privacy-sensitive, information useful for sensing both cardiorespiratory and body movements, regardless of ambient lighting conditions and physical obstructions (through-wall sensing. The radar sensing is a very promising technology, enabling the measurement of vital signs and body movements at a distance, and thus meeting both requirements of unobtrusiveness and accuracy. In particular, impulse-radio ultra-wideband radar has attracted considerable attention in recent years thanks to many properties that make it useful for assisted living purposes. The proposed sensing system, evaluated in meaningful assisted living scenarios by involving 30 participants, exhibited the ability to detect vital signs, to discriminate among dangerous situations and activities of daily living, and to accommodate individual physical characteristics and habits. The reported results show that vital signs can be detected also while carrying out daily activities or after a fall event (post-fall phase, with accuracy varying according to the level of movements, reaching up to 95% and 91% in detecting respiration and heart rates, respectively. Similarly, good results were achieved in fall detection by using the micro-motion signature and unsupervised learning, with sensitivity and specificity greater than 97% and 90%, respectively.

  16. Presence of Legionella and Free-Living Amoebae in Composts and Bioaerosols from Composting Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conza, Lisa; Pagani, Simona Casati; Gaia, Valeria

    2013-01-01

    Several species of Legionella cause Legionnaires’ disease (LD). Infection may occur through inhalation of Legionella or amoebal vesicles. The reservoirs of Legionella are water, soil, potting soil and compost. Some species of free-living amoebae (FLA) that are naturally present in water and soil were described as hosts for Legionella. This study aimed to understand whether or not the composting facilities could be sources of community-acquired Legionella infections after development of bioaerosols containing Legionella or FLA. We looked for the presence of Legionella (by co-culture) and FLA (by culture) in composts and bioaerosols collected at four composting facilities located in southern Switzerland. We investigated the association between the presence of Legionella and compost and air parameters and presence of FLA. Legionella spp. (including L. pneumophila) were detected in 69.3% (61/88) of the composts and FLA (mainly Acanthamoeba, Vermamoeba, Naegleria and Stenamoeba) in 92.0% (81/88). L. pneumophila and L. bozemanii were most frequently isolated. FLA as potential host for Legionella spp. were isolated from 40.9% (36/88) of the composts in all facilities. In Legionella-positive samples the temperature of compost was significantly lower (P = 0.012) than in Legionella-negative samples. Of 47 bioaerosol samples, 19.1% (9/47) were positive for FLA and 10.6% (5/47) for L. pneumophila. Composts (62.8%) were positive for Legionella and FLA contemporaneously, but both microorganisms were never detected simultaneously in bioaerosols. Compost can release bioaerosol containing FLA or Legionella and could represent a source of infection of community-acquired Legionella infections for workers and nearby residents. PMID:23844174

  17. Variability in glycosylated hemoglobin values in diabetic patients living in long-term care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Roberta M; Broton, Jay C; Woo-Rippe, Kathleen W; Lindquist, Sara A; Cen, Ye-Ying

    2007-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence of diabetes and mean A1C of patients in long-term care facilities (LTCFs); to determine differences in A1C values based on patient characteristics; and to examine the self-reported practices of providers regarding diabetes management goals. Twelve-month retrospective review of patient charts; survey of physicians and nurse practitioners providing care to these patients. Nursing facility practice of an urban teaching hospital. Participants included 168 diabetic patients living in 20 nursing facilities and 18 physician and nurse practitioners in one practice providing care to these patients. The prevalence of diabetes was 21.6% (168 of 778 patients). Mean A1C was 7.1% +/- 1.2%for 135 patients who had AIC values measured during the study interval. A1C varied by age, with patients younger than 65 having higher A1C values than patients older than 65. Higher A1C values were associated with insulin use, frequent glucose monitoring, and attending a diabetes clinic. Although a survey of providers identified modifying A1C target ranges for LTCF compared with ambulatory patients, they did not reach consensus on the actual target A1C. No association between provider perception of either patient health status or patient life expectancy and A1C values was found. Relatively low A1C values were obtainable in LTCF patients without diabetes specialty clinic use. Providers identified modifying target A1C values for LTCF patients, but achieved relatively low A1C values and did not agree on a target A1C value for LTCF patients.

  18. Live birth outcome, spontaneous pregnancy and adoption up to five years after undergoing assisted reproductive technology treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Volgsten, Helena; Schmidt, Lone

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: This study is part of a longitudinal cohort undertaken in both women and men to describe live birth outcome after undergoing assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatment in a clinical setting. Another objective was to follow women and men living with children from other...

  19. Production of exotic, short lived carbon isotopes in ISOL-type facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Franberg, Hanna; Köster, Ulli; Ammann, Markus

    2008-01-01

    The beam intensities of short-lived carbon isotopes at Isotope Separation On-Line (ISOL) facilities have been limited in the past for technical reasons. The production of radioactive ion beams of carbon isotopes is currently of high interest for fundamental nuclear physics research. To produce radioactive ions a target station consisting of a target in a container connected to an ion source via a transfer line is commonly used. The target is heated to vaporize the product for transport. Carbon in elementary form is a very reactive element and react strongly with hot metal surfaces. Due to the strong chemisorption interaction, in the target and ion source unit, the atoms undergo significant retention on their way from the target to the ion source. Due to this the short lived isotopes decays and are lost leading to low ion yields. A first approach to tackle these limitations consists of incorporating the carbon atoms into less reactive molecules and to use materials for the target housing and the transfer line ...

  20. Co-Designing Ambient Assisted Living (AAL Environments: Unravelling the Situated Context of Informal Dementia Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy S. Hwang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ambient assisted living (AAL aims to help older persons “age-in-place” and manage everyday activities using intelligent and pervasive computing technology. AAL research, however, has yet to explore how AAL might support or collaborate with informal care partners (ICPs, such as relatives and friends, who play important roles in the lives and care of persons with dementia (PwDs. In a multiphase codesign process with six (6 ICPs, we envisioned how AAL could be situated to complement their care. We used our codesigned “caregiver interface” artefacts as triggers to facilitate envisioning of AAL support and unpack the situated, idiosyncratic context within which AAL aims to assist. Our findings suggest that AAL should be designed to support ICPs in fashioning “do-it-yourself” solutions that complement tacitly improvised care strategies and enable them to try, observe, and adapt to solutions over time. In this way, an ICP could decide which activities to entrust to AAL support, when (i.e., scheduled or spontaneous and how a system should provide support (i.e., using personalized prompts based on care experience, and when adaptations to system support are needed (i.e., based alerting patterns and queried reports. Future longitudinal work employing participatory, design-oriented methods with care dyads is encouraged.

  1. Tele-care robot for assisting independent senior citizens who live at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Reuven

    2015-01-01

    In the last twenty years most developed countries face dramatic demographic changes, and predominantly the rapid aging of their population. As the share of elderly people is climbing while the number of care providers is declining, the aging problem is becoming an increasingly important social and economic challenge. The supply of care at home, utilizing affordable tele-care systems and smart home technologies, is one of the promising strategies to cope with challenges posed by these demographic changes. The goal of this paper is to present a tele-care robot (TCR) aimed to assist Senior citizens who live independently at their home, that need assistance in daily life activities. The idea of the proposed system is that a caregiver, operating from a central location, will be able to service between 10 to 20 patients living at their home, by using the tele-care robot. The robot will possess motion control capabilities to move inside the house of each patient and alert in case that emergency events occur. The robot will allow the care provider to communicate remotely with the patient using audio and video equipment installed on the robot. By using the robot, the caregiver will be able to examine several times during the day the well-being of the patient, his medication consumption, and his overall functionality.

  2. Software-assisted live visualization system for subjacent blood vessels in endonasal endoscopic approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lempe, B.; Taudt, Ch.; Maschke, R.; Gruening, J.; Ernstberger, M.; Basan, F.; Baselt, T.; Grunert, R.; Hartmann, P.

    2013-02-01

    Minimal invasive surgery methods have received growing attention in recent years. In vital important areas, it is crucial for the surgeon to have a precise knowledge of the tissue structure. Especially the visualization of arteries is desirable, as the destruction of the same can be lethal to the patient. In order to meet this requirement, the study presents a novel assistance system for endoscopic surgery. While state-of-the art systems rely on pre-operational data like computer-tomographic maps and require the use of radiation, the goal of the presented approach is to provide the clarification of subjacent blood vessels on live images of the endoscope camera system. Based on the transmission and reflection spectra of various human tissues, a prototype system with a NIR illumination unit working at 808 nm was established. Several image filtering, processing and enhancement techniques have been investigated and evaluated on the raw pictures in order to obtain high quality results. The most important were increasing contrast and thresholding by difference of Gaussian method. Based on that, it is possible to rectify a fragmented artery pattern and extract geometrical information about the structure in terms of position and orientation. By superposing the original image and the extracted segment, the surgeon is assisted with valuable live pictures of the region of interest. The whole system has been tested on a laboratory scale. An outlook on the integration of such a system in a clinical environment and obvious benefits are discussed.

  3. What is quality in assisted living technology? The ARCHIE framework for effective telehealth and telecare services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhalgh, Trisha; Procter, Rob; Wherton, Joe; Sugarhood, Paul; Hinder, Sue; Rouncefield, Mark

    2015-04-23

    We sought to define quality in telehealth and telecare with the aim of improving the proportion of patients who receive appropriate, acceptable and workable technologies and services to support them living with illness or disability. This was a three-phase study: (1) interviews with seven technology suppliers and 14 service providers, (2) ethnographic case studies of 40 people, 60 to 98 years old, with multi-morbidity and assisted living needs and (3) 10 co-design workshops. In phase 1, we explored barriers to uptake of telehealth and telecare. In phase 2, we used ethnographic methods to build a detailed picture of participants' lives, illness experiences and technology use. In phase 3, we brought users and their carers together with suppliers and providers to derive quality principles for assistive technology products and services. Interviews identified practical, material and organisational barriers to smooth introduction and continued support of assistive technologies. The experience of multi-morbidity was characterised by multiple, mutually reinforcing and inexorably worsening impairments, producing diverse and unique care challenges. Participants and their carers managed these pragmatically, obtaining technologies and adapting the home. Installed technologies were rarely fit for purpose. Support services for technologies made high (and sometimes oppressive) demands on users. Six principles emerged from the workshops. Quality telehealth or telecare is 1) ANCHORED in a shared understanding of what matters to the user; 2) REALISTIC about the natural history of illness; 3) CO-CREATIVE, evolving and adapting solutions with users; 4) HUMAN, supported through interpersonal relationships and social networks; 5) INTEGRATED, through attention to mutual awareness and knowledge sharing; 6) EVALUATED to drive system learning. Technological advances are important, but must be underpinned by industry and service providers following a user-centred approach to design and

  4. The lived experiences and social support needs of first-time mothers at health care facilities in the City of Tshwane, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mmajapi E.T. Masala-Chokwe

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Social support refers to the assistance people receive from others, and it is divided into four types of support. Given the increasing mortality and morbidity rates of mothers and neonates postpartum, this study intended to determine whether the social support needs of the first-time mothers were met after early discharge from health care facilities.Objectives: The objective of the study was to explore the lived experiences and social support needs of the first-time mothers after an early discharge from health care facilities in the City of Tshwane, Gauteng.Method: A qualitative explorative study was conducted to explore the lived experiences and social support needs of the first-time mothers. The population were first-time mothers who had a vaginal delivery and were discharged within 6–12 hours of delivery from health care facilities. Purposive sampling was performed and 14 semi-structured interviews were conducted, with those mothers who came for the prescribed three postnatal check-ups at the three health care facilities identified according to maternity services provided. Saturation of data for the three health care facilities was reached at the 14th interview. Data analysis was performed using the hermeneutic interpretive approach.Results: Almost all participants had completed grades 11 or 12, but most were unemployed. The needs identified included the need for social support, lack of confidence, knowledge and skill to care for themselves and their newborn babies after early discharge.Conclusion: There is need to identify alternative types of social support for the first-time mothers, to ensure a normal adjustment to motherhood.

  5. The lived experiences and social support needs of first-time mothers at health care facilities in the City of Tshwane, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masala-Chokwe, Mmajapi E T; Ramukumba, Tendani S

    2017-09-22

    Social support refers to the assistance people receive from others, and it is divided into four types of support. Given the increasing mortality and morbidity rates of mothers and neonates postpartum, this study intended to determine whether the social support needs of the first-time mothers were met after early discharge from health care facilities. The objective of the study was to explore the lived experiences and social support needs of the first-time mothers after an early discharge from health care facilities in the City of Tshwane, Gauteng. A qualitative explorative study was conducted to explore the lived experiences and social support needs of the first-time mothers. The population were first-time mothers who had a vaginal delivery and were discharged within 6-12 hours of delivery from health care facilities. Purposive sampling was performed and 14 semi-structured interviews were conducted, with those mothers who came for the prescribed three postnatal check-ups at the three health care facilities identified according to maternity services provided. Saturation of data for the three health care facilities was reached at the 14th interview. Data analysis was performed using the hermeneutic interpretive approach. Almost all participants had completed grades 11 or 12, but most were unemployed. The needs identified included the need for social support, lack of confidence, knowledge and skill to care for themselves and their newborn babies after early discharge. There is need to identify alternative types of social support for the first-time mothers, to ensure a normal adjustment to motherhood.

  6. Developing the Family Involvement Questionnaire-Long-Term Care: A Measure of Familial Involvement in the Lives of Residents at Long-Term Care Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fast, Christopher T; Houlihan, Daniel; Buchanan, Jeffrey A

    2018-01-03

    Existing measures designed to assess family involvement in the lives of older adults residing in long-term care facilities are basic, using visitation frequency as the prominent gauge of involvement in a situation specific fashion. The purpose of this study was to design and validate a measure of family involvement that could be used to gauge more aspects of family involvement than visitation alone and be useful in a variety of settings for both researchers and long-term care facility administrators. Long-term facility staff were asked to assist in creating a 40-item questionnaire that used 4-point Likert scales to measure various aspects of family involvement. The finalized Family Involvement Questionnaire-Long-Term Care (FIQ-LTC) was distributed to the family members of older adults residing in long-term care facilities around the country. A total of 410 participants responded. Researchers found that the FIQ-LTC was highly reliable (α = .965). Results also indicated that a significant correlation between distance and overall involvement (r = -.121, p = .015) was no longer significant (r = .17, p = .740) when the effect of a question asking the frequency of visitation was controlled for. These results indicate that existing measures that use visitation frequency as the sole measure of involvement are insufficient. The newly developed FIQ-LTC can serve as a more complete measure of family involvement.

  7. Everyday Functioning Benefits from an Assisted Living Platform amongst Frail Older Adults and Their Caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuy, Lucile; Froger, Charlotte; Consel, Charles; Sauzéon, Hélène

    2017-01-01

    Ambient assisted living technologies (AAL) are regarded as a promising solution to support aging in place. Yet, their efficacy has to be demonstrated in terms of benefits for independent living and for work conditions of caregivers. Hence, the purpose of this study was to assess the benefits of a multi-task AAL platform for both Frail older Individuals (FIs) and professional caregivers with respect to everyday functioning and caregiver burden. In this context, a 6-month field study involved 32 FIs living at home (half of them were equipped by the platform and the remaining half were not, as a control condition) and their caregivers. Everyday functioning measures were reported by frail participants and caregivers. Self-reported burden measures of caregiver were also collected. The main results showed that the caregiver's estimates of everyday functioning of equipped participants were unchanged across time, while they decreased for the control participants. Also, a reduction of self-reported objective burden was obtained after 6 months of AAL intervention for the equipped group, compared to the control group. Overall, these results highlighted the potential of AAL as a relevant environmental support for preventing both functional losses in FIs and objective burden professional caregiver.

  8. Everyday Functioning Benefits from an Assisted Living Platform amongst Frail Older Adults and Their Caregivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucile Dupuy

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Ambient assisted living technologies (AAL are regarded as a promising solution to support aging in place. Yet, their efficacy has to be demonstrated in terms of benefits for independent living and for work conditions of caregivers. Hence, the purpose of this study was to assess the benefits of a multi-task AAL platform for both Frail older Individuals (FIs and professional caregivers with respect to everyday functioning and caregiver burden. In this context, a 6-month field study involved 32 FIs living at home (half of them were equipped by the platform and the remaining half were not, as a control condition and their caregivers. Everyday functioning measures were reported by frail participants and caregivers. Self-reported burden measures of caregiver were also collected. The main results showed that the caregiver's estimates of everyday functioning of equipped participants were unchanged across time, while they decreased for the control participants. Also, a reduction of self-reported objective burden was obtained after 6 months of AAL intervention for the equipped group, compared to the control group. Overall, these results highlighted the potential of AAL as a relevant environmental support for preventing both functional losses in FIs and objective burden professional caregiver.

  9. An Indoor Positioning System Based on Wearables for Ambient-Assisted Living

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Óscar Belmonte-Fernández

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The urban population is growing at such a rate that by 2050 it is estimated that 84% of the world’s population will live in cities, with flats being the most common living place. Moreover, WiFi technology is present in most developed country urban areas, with a quick growth in developing countries. New Ambient-Assisted Living applications will be developed in the near future having user positioning as ground technology: elderly tele-care, energy consumption, security and the like are strongly based on indoor positioning information. We present an Indoor Positioning System for wearable devices based on WiFi fingerprinting. Smart-watch wearable devices are used to acquire the WiFi strength signals of the surrounding Wireless Access Points used to build an ensemble of Machine Learning classification algorithms. Once built, the ensemble algorithm is used to locate a user based on the WiFi strength signals provided by the wearable device. Experimental results for five different urban flats are reported, showing that the system is robust and reliable enough for locating a user at room level into his/her home. Another interesting characteristic of the presented system is that it does not require deployment of any infrastructure, and it is unobtrusive, the only device required for it to work is a smart-watch.

  10. An Indoor Positioning System Based on Wearables for Ambient-Assisted Living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belmonte-Fernández, Óscar; Puertas-Cabedo, Adrian; Torres-Sospedra, Joaquín; Montoliu-Colás, Raúl; Trilles-Oliver, Sergi

    2016-12-25

    The urban population is growing at such a rate that by 2050 it is estimated that 84% of the world's population will live in cities, with flats being the most common living place. Moreover, WiFi technology is present in most developed country urban areas, with a quick growth in developing countries. New Ambient-Assisted Living applications will be developed in the near future having user positioning as ground technology: elderly tele-care, energy consumption, security and the like are strongly based on indoor positioning information. We present an Indoor Positioning System for wearable devices based on WiFi fingerprinting. Smart-watch wearable devices are used to acquire the WiFi strength signals of the surrounding Wireless Access Points used to build an ensemble of Machine Learning classification algorithms. Once built, the ensemble algorithm is used to locate a user based on the WiFi strength signals provided by the wearable device. Experimental results for five different urban flats are reported, showing that the system is robust and reliable enough for locating a user at room level into his/her home. Another interesting characteristic of the presented system is that it does not require deployment of any infrastructure, and it is unobtrusive, the only device required for it to work is a smart-watch.

  11. Health and safety risk at a skilled nursing facility. Nursing assistants' perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofie, Jennifer; Belza, Basia; Young, Heather

    2003-02-01

    Little is known about the perceptions nursing assistants certified (NAC) have related to their occupational health and safety risks and how these perceptions influence the safety precautions taken. The purpose of this study was to describe the perceptions of the occupational health and safety risks perceived by NAC, along with determining the protective mechanisms they used to prevent injury and illness. Ten NAC employed by a skilled nursing facility were interviewed using a semi-structured interview guide. Numerous hazards and protective mechanisms were identified and these were categorized and environmental, physical or cognitive in nature. Based on the NAC perceptions of their occupational hazards, there were a number of areas in which they were ignorant to concepts the administration believed to be readily available. While the facility has a number of health promotion and safety programs already in place, these alone seem inadequate to meet the perceived needs of the NAC. Strategies are needed in three specific areas to address the knowledge deficits and enhance the overall effectiveness of improving the health and safety of the NAC--communication, fostering teamwork, and educational and training opportunities.

  12. A cross-sectional study of prescribing patterns in chronic psychiatric patients living in sheltered housing facilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schorr, S. G.; Loonen, A. J. M.; Brouwers, J. R. B. J.; Taxis, K.

    Objective: To analyze prescribing patterns of chronic psychiatric patients living in sheltered housing facilities, to identify the extent of polypharmacy and to estimate associated risks in this patient group. Methods: In a retrospective cross-sectional study the prescription data of 323 chronic

  13. An Approach for Representing Sensor Data to Validate Alerts in Ambient Assisted Living

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Andrés; Serrano, Emilio; Villa, Ana; Valdés, Mercedes; Botía, Juan A.

    2012-01-01

    The mainstream of research in Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) is devoted to developing intelligent systems for processing the data collected through artificial sensing. Besides, there are other elements that must be considered to foster the adoption of AAL solutions in real environments. In this paper we focus on the problem of designing interfaces among caregivers and AAL systems. We present an alert management tool that supports carers in their task of validating alarms raised by the system. It generates text-based explanations—obtained through an argumentation process—of the causes leading to alarm activation along with graphical sensor information and 3D models, thus offering complementary types of information. Moreover, a guideline to use the tool when validating alerts is also provided. Finally, the functionality of the proposed tool is demonstrated through two real cases of alert. PMID:22778642

  14. Does age of the sperm donor influence live birth outcome in assisted reproduction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghuman, N K; Mair, E; Pearce, K; Choudhary, M

    2016-03-01

    Does age of the sperm donor have an effect on reproductive outcomes (live birth rate and miscarriage occurrence) of donor insemination or in vitro fertilization treatment using donated sperm? Live birth and miscarriage occurrence in assisted reproduction treatment using donor sperms was not found to be affected by the age of sperm donors up to 45 years old. Literature on the effect of sperm donor age on outcome of medically assisted reproduction is scarce. Most researchers agree that semen parameters deteriorate with increasing paternal age. However, there is no substantial evidence to suggest that this deterioration adversely affects the reproductive outcomes in couples undergoing medically assisted reproduction. This retrospective cohort study analysed 46 078 first donor insemination treatments and fresh in vitro fertilization (IVF)/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) cycles using donated sperm from 1991 to 2012. The first fresh donor insemination and IVF/ICSI treatment cycles (46 078 treatment cycles) using donated sperm from the long-term anonymized data registry from 1991 to 2012 of the HFEA, the UK regulator, were analysed by the binary logistic modelling technique for association between sperm donor age and reproductive outcomes (live birth occurrence and miscarriage occurrence). The statistical package SPSS (version 21) was used for analysis and results were considered to be statistically significant if the P-value was 0.05). The miscarriage occurrence (i.e. number of miscarriages per 100 women commencing treatment) was 1.3% in 18-34 year old women, 1.9% in 35-37 year old women and 1.9% in 38-50 year old women undergoing donor insemination treatment. In the sperm donation IVF/ICSI treatment group, these figures were 5.7, 8.4 and 6.8% respectively. The results were not suggestive of any unfavourable effect of advancing sperm donor age on the odds of miscarriage occurrence (P > 0.05). As sperm donors are a select population based on good semen indices

  15. Design and Implementation of a Prototype with a Standardized Interface for Transducers in Ambient Assisted Living

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Dorronzoro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Solutions in the field of Ambient Assisted Living (AAL do not generally use standards to implement a communication interface between sensors and actuators. This makes these applications isolated solutions because it is so difficult to integrate them into new or existing systems. The objective of this research was to design and implement a prototype with a standardized interface for sensors and actuators to facilitate the integration of different solutions in the field of AAL. Our work is based on the roadmap defined by AALIANCE, using motes with TinyOS telosb, 6LoWPAN, sensors, and the IEEE 21451 standard protocol. This prototype allows one to upgrade sensors to a smart status for easy integration with new applications and already existing ones. The prototype has been evaluated for autonomy and performance. As a use case, the prototype has been tested in a serious game previously designed for people with mobility problems, and its advantages and disadvantages have been analysed.

  16. Context management: toward assessing quality of context parameters in a ubiquitous ambient assisted living environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Cabral Nazário

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides an approach to assessing Quality of Context (QoC parameters in a ubiquitous Ambient Assisted Living (AAL environment. Initially, the study presents a literature review on QoC, generating taxonomy. Then it introduces the context management architecture used. The proposal is verified with the Siafu simulator in an AAL scenario where the user’s health is monitored with information about blood pressure, heart rate and body temperature. Considering some parameters, the proposed QoC assessment allows verifying the extent to which the context information is up-to-date, valid, accurate, complete and significant. The implementation of this proposal might mean a big social impact and a technological innovation applied to AAL, at the disposal and support of a significant number of individuals such as elderly or sick people, and with a more precise technology.

  17. Ambient assisted living devices interoperability based on OSGi and the X73 standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damas, Miguel; Pomares, Hector; Gonzalez, Sergio; Olivares, Alberto; Rojas, Ignacio

    2013-01-01

    The need for interoperability among devices is an issue of vital importance in current telemedicine systems. Although a completely standardized system is an ideal solution, most commercially available devices include their own software and communication protocols, which cause serious problems and hinder the application of a standard. Patients' telemonitoring at home requires a wide variety of biometric and ambient sensors and devices that usually present a set of very specific features and characteristics. The present article introduces a system based on the Open Services Gateway Initiative architecture, which offers plug-and-play connectivity of ambient assisted living devices. Using a data model inspired by the X73 standard, we describe a set of bundles that reduces the interoperability problem and allows the data stored in the platform to be independent from the connected devices.

  18. Wireless Sensors Grouping Proofs for Medical Care and Ambient Assisted-Living Deployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trček, Denis

    2016-01-02

    Internet of Things (IoT) devices are rapidly penetrating e-health and assisted living domains, and an increasing proportion among them goes on the account of computationally-weak devices, where security and privacy provisioning alone are demanding tasks, not to mention grouping proofs. This paper, therefore, gives an extensive analysis of such proofs and states lessons learnt to avoid possible pitfalls in future designs. It sticks with prudent engineering techniques in this field and deploys in a novel way the so called non-deterministic principle to provide not only grouping proofs, but (among other) also privacy. The developed solution is analyzed by means of a tangible metric and it is shown to be lightweight, and formally for security.

  19. Wireless Sensors Grouping Proofs for Medical Care and Ambient Assisted-Living Deployment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Trček

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Internet of Things (IoT devices are rapidly penetrating e-health and assisted living domains, and an increasing proportion among them goes on the account of computationally-weak devices, where security and privacy provisioning alone are demanding tasks, not to mention grouping proofs. This paper, therefore, gives an extensive analysis of such proofs and states lessons learnt to avoid possible pitfalls in future designs. It sticks with prudent engineering techniques in this field and deploys in a novel way the so called non-deterministic principle to provide not only grouping proofs, but (among other also privacy. The developed solution is analyzed by means of a tangible metric and it is shown to be lightweight, and formally for security.

  20. An Internet of Things platform architecture for supporting ambient assisted living environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsirmpas, Charalampos; Kouris, Ioannis; Anastasiou, Athanasios; Giokas, Kostas; Iliopoulou, Dimitra; Koutsouris, Dimitris

    2017-01-01

    Internet of Things (IoT) is the logical further development of today's Internet, enabling a huge amount of devices to communicate, compute, sense and act. IoT sensors placed in Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) environments, enable the context awareness and allow the support of the elderly in their daily routines, ultimately allowing an independent and safe lifestyle. The vast amount of data that are generated and exchanged between the IoT nodes require innovative context modeling approaches that go beyond currently used models. Current paper presents and evaluates an open interoperable platform architecture in order to utilize the technical characteristics of IoT and handle the large amount of generated data, as a solution to the technical requirements of AAL applications.

  1. Physical Function, Relocation, and Mortality Outcomes in Residential Care and Assisted Living Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Lorraine J; Leary, Emily; Blankenship, Jody; Zimmerman, Sheryl

    2017-11-01

    This study aimed to identify predictors of 6-month physical function and 12-month relocation or death in 272 residents of 34 residential care/assisted communities. Measures collected at baseline, 6, and 12 months included health and demographic characteristics; self-reported pain, fatigue, and depressive symptoms; exercise self-efficacy, barriers, and expectations; attitudes on aging; performance-based physical function and physical activity; and community demographics, programs, and policies. GLIMMIX procedures for regression analyses with community as a random effect were run. Better baseline physical function and grip strength, female sex, and residential care community predicted better 6-month physical function. At 12 months, 25.6% had relocated or died. The odds of 12-month relocation or death for 1-point increase in physical function score was 0.84 and for 1-point increase in depression score was 1.16. Targets to promote longer tenure in residential care/assisted living include programs to ameliorate functional decline and depression screening and treatment.

  2. Potential and requirements of IT for ambient assisted living technologies. Results of a Delphi study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitalewsky, K; Rochon, J; Ganzinger, M; Knaup, P

    2013-01-01

    Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) technologies are developed to enable elderly to live independently and safely. Innovative information technology (IT) can interconnect personal devices and offer suitable user interfaces. Often dedicated solutions are developed for particular projects. The aim of our research was to identify major IT challenges for AAL to enable generic and sustainable solutions. Delphi Survey. An online questionnaire was sent to 1800 members of the German Innovation Partnership AAL. The first round was qualitative to collect statements. Statements were reduced to items by qualitative content analysis. Items were assessed in the following two rounds by a 5-point Likert-scale. Quantitative analyses for second and third round: descriptive statistics, factor analysis and ANOVA. 81 in first, 173 in second and 70 in third round. All items got a rather high assessment. Medical issues were rated as having a very high potential. Items related to user-friendliness were regarded as most important requirements. Common requirements to all AAL-solutions are reliability, robustness, availability, data security, data privacy, legal issues, ethical requirements, easy configuration. The complete list of requirements can be used as framework for customizing future AAL projects. A wide variety of IT issues have been assessed important for AAL. The extensive list of requirements makes obvious that it is not efficient to develop dedicated solutions for individual projects but to provide generic methods and reusable components. Experiences and results from medical informatics research can be used to advance AAL solutions (e.g. eHealth and knowledge-based approaches).

  3. Male and female alcohol consumption and live birth after assisted reproductive technology treatment: a nationwide register-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vittrup, Ida; Petersen, Gitte Lindved; Kamper-Jørgensen, Mads; Pinborg, Anja; Schmidt, Lone

    2017-08-01

    The objective was to assess the potential association between female and male alcohol consumption and probability of achieving a live birth after assisted reproductive treatment. From a nationwide Danish register-based cohort information on alcohol consumption at assisted reproductive treatment initiation was linked to information on births and abortions. From 1 January 2006 to 30 September 2010, 12,981 women and their partners went through 29,834 treatment cycles. Of these, 22.4% and 20.4% led to a live birth for female abstainers and heavy consumers (>7 drinks/week), respectively. Concerning men, 22.6% and 20.2% of cycles resulted in a live birth for abstainers and heavy consumers (>14 drinks/week), respectively. No statistically significant associations between alcohol consumption and live birth were observed. Adjusted odds ratios from trend analyses were 1.00 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.99-1.01) and 0.99 (95% CI 0.97-1.01) for every one-unit increase in female and male weekly alcohol consumption at assisted reproductive treatment initiation, respectively. In conclusion, this study did not show significant associations between male or female alcohol consumption and odds of live birth after assisted reproductive treatment. Copyright © 2017 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. 20 CFR 416.1142 - If you live in a public assistance household.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... a public assistance household. (a) Definition. A public assistance household is one in which every... IV-A of the Social Security Act (Temporary Assistance for Needy Families); (2) Title XVI of the...

  5. Animal-assisted interventions: A national survey of health and safety policies in hospitals, eldercare facilities, and therapy animal organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, Deborah E; Siebens, Hannah C; Mueller, Megan K; Gibbs, Debra M; Freeman, Lisa M

    2017-08-01

    Animal-assisted intervention (AAI) programs are increasing in popularity, but it is unknown to what extent therapy animal organizations that provide AAI and the hospitals and eldercare facilities they work with implement effective animal health and safety policies to ensure safety of both animals and humans. Our study objective was to survey hospitals, eldercare facilities, and therapy animal organizations on their AAI policies and procedures. A survey of United States hospitals, eldercare facilities, and therapy animal organizations was administered to assess existing health and safety policies related to AAI programs. Forty-five eldercare facilities, 45 hospitals, and 27 therapy animal organizations were surveyed. Health and safety policies varied widely and potentially compromised human and animal safety. For example, 70% of therapy animal organizations potentially put patients at risk by allowing therapy animals eating raw meat diets to visit facilities. In general, hospitals had stricter requirements than eldercare facilities. This information suggests that there are gaps between the policies of facilities and therapy animal organizations compared with recent guidelines for animal visitation in hospitals. Facilities with AAI programs need to review their policies to address recent AAI guidelines to ensure the safety of animals and humans involved. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Is a change in functional capacity or dependency in activities of daily living associated with a change in mental health among older people living in residential care facilities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conradsson, Mia; Littbrand, Håkan; Boström, Gustaf; Lindelöf, Nina; Gustafson, Yngve; Rosendahl, Erik

    2013-01-01

    Aim Functional capacity and dependency in activities of daily living (ADL) could be important mediators for an association between physical exercise and mental health. The aim of this study was to investigate whether a change in functional capacity or dependency in ADL is associated with a change in depressive symptoms and psychological well-being among older people living in residential care facilities, and whether dementia can be a moderating factor for this association. Methods A prospective cohort study was undertaken. Participants were 206 older people, dependent in ADL, living in residential care facilities, 115 (56%) of whom had diagnosed dementia. Multivariate linear regression, with comprehensive adjustment for potential confounders, was used to investigate associations between differences over 3 months in Berg Balance Scale (BBS) and Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-15) scores, and in BBS and Philadelphia Geriatric Center Morale Scale (PGCMS) scores. Associations were also investigated between differences in Barthel ADL Index and GDS-15 scores, and in Barthel ADL Index and PGCMS scores. Results There were no significant associations between changes in scores over 3 months; the unstandardized β for associations between BBS and GDS-15 was 0.026 (P=0.31), BBS and PGCMS 0.045 (P=0.14), Barthel ADL Index and GDS-15 0.123 (P=0.06), and Barthel ADL Index and PGCMS −0.013 (P=0.86). There were no interaction effects for dementia. Conclusion A change in functional capacity or dependency in ADL does not appear to be associated with a change in depressive symptoms or psychological well-being among older people living in residential care facilities. These results may offer one possible explanation as to why studies of physical exercise to influence these aspects of mental health have not shown effects in this group of older people. PMID:24379657

  7. The use of assistive technology in the everyday lives of young people living with dementia and their caregivers. Can a simple remote control make a difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jentoft, Rita; Holthe, Torhild; Arntzen, Cathrine

    2014-12-01

    This study was a part of a larger study exploring the impact of assistive technology on the lives of young people living with dementia (YPD). This paper focuses on one of the most useful devices, the simple remote control (SRC). The objective was to explore the reason why the SRC is significant and beneficial in the everyday lives of YPD and their caregivers. This qualitative longitudinal study had a participatory design. Eight participants received an SRC. The range for using it was 0-15 months. In-depth interviews and observations were conducted at baseline and repeated every third month up to 18 months. A situated learning approach was used in the analysis to provide a deeper understanding of the significance and use of SRC. Young people having dementia spend a substantial amount of time alone. Watching television was reported to be important, but handling remote controls was challenging and created a variety of problems. YPD learned to use SRC, which made important differences in the everyday lives of all family members. Comprehensive support from caregivers and professionals was important for YPD in the learning process. The SRC was deemed a success because it solved challenges regarding the use of television in everyday lives of families. The design was recognizable and user-friendly, thus allowing YPD to learn its operation. Access to professional support and advice regarding assistive technology is vital for establishing a system for follow-up and continued collaboration to make future adaptations and adjustments.

  8. A pilot study exploring staff acceptability of a socially assistive robot in a residential care facility that accommodates people under 65 years old.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loi, Samantha M; Bennett, Alice; Pearce, Marta; Nguyen, Khanh; Lautenschlager, Nicola T; Khosla, Rajiv; Velakoulis, Dennis

    2017-12-04

    Socially assistive robots have successfully been trialed in residential care facilities (RCFs) for older adults. These robots may have potential for younger adults (i.e. under 65 years old) who also live in RCFs. However, it is important to investigate staff acceptability and ease-of-use of these robots. This pilot study used the Technology Acceptance Model to investigate how staff working in a specialized RCF for younger adults accept Betty, a socially assistive robot who was introduced in the facility for 12 weeks. Twenty-four staff completed pre-questionnaires, reporting that they thought Betty would have the ability to engage and entertain the residents they cared for. While there were only eight staff who completed the post-questionnaires, there were significant improvements compared to the pre-questionnaire results in areas such as residents enjoying the contact and activities. Impacting on ease-of use were technical difficulties. Although this study had limitations and could be improved by a better response rate and investigating the residents' acceptability of Betty, this study is one of the first to report that this novel technology may have much potential for engaging adults in RCFs.

  9. Is a change in functional capacity or dependency in activities of daily living associated with a change in mental health among older people living in residential care facilities?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conradsson M

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Mia Conradsson,1 Håkan Littbrand,1,2 Gustaf Boström,1 Nina Lindelöf,1 Yngve Gustafson,1 Erik Rosendahl1,2 1Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden; 2Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden Aim: Functional capacity and dependency in activities of daily living (ADL could be important mediators for an association between physical exercise and mental health. The aim of this study was to investigate whether a change in functional capacity or dependency in ADL is associated with a change in depressive symptoms and psychological well-being among older people living in residential care facilities, and whether dementia can be a moderating factor for this association. Methods: A prospective cohort study was undertaken. Participants were 206 older people, dependent in ADL, living in residential care facilities, 115 (56% of whom had diagnosed dementia. Multivariate linear regression, with comprehensive adjustment for potential confounders, was used to investigate associations between differences over 3 months in Berg Balance Scale (BBS and Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-15 scores, and in BBS and Philadelphia Geriatric Center Morale Scale (PGCMS scores. Associations were also investigated between differences in Barthel ADL Index and GDS-15 scores, and in Barthel ADL Index and PGCMS scores. Results: There were no significant associations between changes in scores over 3 months; the unstandardized β for associations between BBS and GDS-15 was 0.026 (P=0.31, BBS and PGCMS 0.045 (P=0.14, Barthel ADL Index and GDS-15 0.123 (P=0.06, and Barthel ADL Index and PGCMS -0.013 (P=0.86. There were no interaction effects for dementia. Conclusion: A change in functional capacity or dependency in ADL does not appear to be associated with a change in depressive symptoms or psychological well-being among older people living in residential care

  10. Motivational determinants of exergame participation for older people in assisted living facilities : Mixed-methods study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meekes, W.M.A.; Stanmore, E.K.

    2017-01-01

    Exergames (exercise-based videogames) for delivering strength and balance exercise for older people are growing in popularity with the emergence of new Kinect-based technologies; however, little is known about the factors affecting their uptake and usage by older people.The aim of this study was to

  11. Live birth and adverse birth outcomes in women with ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease receiving assisted reproduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgård, Bente Mertz; Larsen, P V; Fedder, J

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the chance of live births and adverse birth outcomes in women with ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD) compared with women without inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) who have undergone assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatments. METHODS: This was a nationwide...

  12. Measuring end-of-life care and outcomes in residential care/assisted living and nursing homes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmerman, S.; Cohen, L.; Steen, J.T. van der; Reed, D.; Soest-Poortvliet, M.C. van; Hanson, L.C.; Sloane, P.D.

    2015-01-01

    CONTEXT: The two primary residential options for older adults who require supportive care are nursing homes and residential care/assisted living. More than one-quarter of all deaths in the U.S. occur in these settings. Although the information available on end of life in long-term care has been

  13. Concordance of Family and Staff Member Reports about End of Life in Assisted Living and Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Shayna E.; Williams, Christianna S.; Zimmerman, Sheryl

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To identify differences in perspectives that may complicate the process of joint decision making at the end of life, this study determined the agreement of family and staff perspectives about end-of-life experiences in nursing homes and residential care/assisted living communities and whether family and staff roles, involvement in care,…

  14. Measuring End-of-Life Care and Outcomes in Residential Care/Assisted Living and Nursing Homes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmerman, S.; Cohen, L.; van der Steen, J.T.; Reed, D.; van Soest-Poortvliet, M.C.; Hanson, L.C.; Sloane, P.D.

    2015-01-01

    Context The two primary residential options for older adults who require supportive care are nursing homes and residential care/assisted living. More than one-quarter of all deaths in the U.S. occur in these settings. Although the information available on end of life in long-term care has been

  15. Examining Success of Communication Strategies Used by Formal Caregivers Assisting Individuals with Alzheimer's Disease during an Activity of Daily Living

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Rozanne; Rochon, Elizabeth; Mihailidis, Alex; Leonard, Carol

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To examine how formal (i.e., employed) caregivers' use verbal and nonverbal communication strategies while assisting individuals with moderate to severe Alzheimer's disease (AD) during the successful completion of an activity of daily living (ADL). Based on the literature, the authors hypothesized that caregivers' use of 1 proposition,…

  16. The Volcano Disaster Assistance Program—Helping to save lives worldwide for more than 30 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowenstern, Jacob B.; Ramsey, David W.

    2017-10-20

    What do you do when a sleeping volcano roars back to life? For more than three decades, countries around the world have called upon the U.S. Geological Survey’s (USGS) Volcano Disaster Assistance Program (VDAP) to contribute expertise and equipment in times of crisis. Co-funded by the USGS and the U.S. Agency for International Development’s Office of U.S. Foreign Disaster Assistance (USAID/OFDA), VDAP has evolved and grown over the years, adding newly developed monitoring technologies, training and exchange programs, and eruption forecasting methodologies to greatly expand global capabilities that mitigate the impacts of volcanic hazards. These advances, in turn, strengthen the ability of the United States to respond to its own volcanic events.VDAP was formed in 1986 in response to the devastating volcanic mudflow triggered by an eruption of Nevado del Ruiz volcano in Colombia. The mudflow destroyed the city of Armero on the night of November 13, 1985, killing more than 25,000 people in the city and surrounding areas. Sadly, the tragedy was avoidable. Better education of the local population and clear communication between scientists and public officials could have allowed warnings to be received, understood, and acted upon prior to the disaster.VDAP strives to ensure that such a tragedy will never happen again. The program’s mission is to assist foreign partners, at their request, in volcano monitoring and empower them to take the lead in mitigating hazards at their country’s threatening volcanoes. Since 1986, team members have responded to over 70 major volcanic crises at more than 50 volcanoes and have strengthened response capacity in 12 countries. The VDAP team consists of approximately 20 geologists, geophysicists, and engineers, who are based out of the USGS Cascades Volcano Observatory in Vancouver, Washington. In 2016, VDAP was a finalist for the Samuel J. Heyman Service to America Medal for its work in improving volcano readiness and warning

  17. Barriers to benefit from integration of building information with live data from IOT devices during the facility management phase

    OpenAIRE

    POURZOLFAGHAR, ZOHREH; McDonnell, Peter; Helfert, Markus

    2017-01-01

    The building information is invaluable in the facility management industry in order to provide and deliver a timely and professional analysis and consulting support for more effective management services, (e.g. energy management). Nowadays, buildings are equipped with immense number of Internet of Things (IoT) and smart devices. These devices are producing a vast amount of live data about the building. Typically, the captured information from different information sources are stored in hetero...

  18. Human behavior understanding for assisted living by means of hierarchical context free grammars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosani, A.; Conci, N.; De Natale, F. G. B.

    2014-03-01

    Human behavior understanding has attracted the attention of researchers in various fields over the last years. Recognizing behaviors with sufficient accuracy from sensors analysis is still an unsolved problem, because of many reasons, including the low accuracy of the data, differences in the human behaviors as well as the gap between low-level sensors data and high-level scene semantics. In this context, an application that is attracting the interest of both public and industrial entities is the possibility to allow elderly or physically impaired people conducting a normal life at home. Ambient intelligence (AmI) technologies, intended as the possibility of automatically detecting and reacting to the status of the environment and of the persons, is probably the major enabling factor for the achievement of such an ambitious objective. AmI technologies require suitable networks of sensors and actuators, as well as adequate processing and communication technologies. In this paper we propose a solution based on context free grammars for human behavior understanding with an application to assisted living. First, the grammars of the different actions performed by a person in his/her daily life are discovered. Then, a longterm analysis of the behavior is used to generate a control grammar, taking care of the context when an action is performed, and adding semantics. The proposed framework is tested on a dataset acquired in a real environment and compared with state of the art methods already available for the problem considered.

  19. Active in-database processing to support ambient assisted living systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Morais, Wagner O; Lundström, Jens; Wickström, Nicholas

    2014-08-12

    As an alternative to the existing software architectures that underpin the development of smart homes and ambient assisted living (AAL) systems, this work presents a database-centric architecture that takes advantage of active databases and in-database processing. Current platforms supporting AAL systems use database management systems (DBMSs) exclusively for data storage. Active databases employ database triggers to detect and react to events taking place inside or outside of the database. DBMSs can be extended with stored procedures and functions that enable in-database processing. This means that the data processing is integrated and performed within the DBMS. The feasibility and flexibility of the proposed approach were demonstrated with the implementation of three distinct AAL services. The active database was used to detect bed-exits and to discover common room transitions and deviations during the night. In-database machine learning methods were used to model early night behaviors. Consequently, active in-database processing avoids transferring sensitive data outside the database, and this improves performance, security and privacy. Furthermore, centralizing the computation into the DBMS facilitates code reuse, adaptation and maintenance. These are important system properties that take into account the evolving heterogeneity of users, their needs and the devices that are characteristic of smart homes and AAL systems. Therefore, DBMSs can provide capabilities to address requirements for scalability, security, privacy, dependability and personalization in applications of smart environments in healthcare.

  20. Hands-On Experiences in Deploying Cost-Effective Ambient-Assisted Living Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasios, Athanasios; Gavalas, Damianos; Pantziou, Grammati; Konstantopoulos, Charalampos

    2015-01-01

    Older adults’ preferences to remain independent in their own homes along with the high costs of nursing home care have motivated the development of Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) technologies which aim at improving the safety, health conditions and wellness of the elderly. This paper reports hands-on experiences in designing, implementing and operating UbiCare, an AAL based prototype system for elderly home care monitoring. The monitoring is based on the recording of environmental parameters like temperature and light intensity as well as micro-level incidents which allows one to infer daily activities like moving, sitting, sleeping, usage of electrical appliances and plumbing components. The prototype is built upon inexpensive, off-the-shelf hardware (e.g., various sensors, Arduino microcontrollers, ZigBee-compatible wireless communication modules) and license-free software, thereby ensuring low system deployment costs. The network comprises nodes placed in a house’s main rooms or mounted on furniture, one wearable node, one actuator node and a centralized processing element (coordinator). Upon detecting significant deviations from the ordinary activity patterns of individuals and/or sudden falls, the system issues automated alarms which may be forwarded to authorized caregivers via a variety of communication channels. Furthermore, measured environmental parameters and activity incidents may be monitored through standard web interfaces. PMID:26094631

  1. Association between Sedentary Behaviour and Physical, Cognitive, and Psychosocial Status among Older Adults in Assisted Living

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pet-Ming Leung

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Identification of the factors that influence sedentary behaviour in older adults is important for the design of appropriate intervention strategies. In this study, we determined the prevalence of sedentary behaviour and its association with physical, cognitive, and psychosocial status among older adults residing in Assisted Living (AL. Methods. Participants (n=114, mean age = 86.7 from AL sites in British Columbia wore waist-mounted activity monitors for 7 consecutive days, after being assessed with the Timed Up and Go (TUG, Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA, Short Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS, and Modified Fall Efficacy Scale (MFES. Results. On average, participants spent 87% of their waking hours in sedentary behaviour, which accumulated in 52 bouts per day with each bout lasting an average of 13 minutes. Increased sedentary behaviour associated significantly with scores on the TUG (r=0.373, p<0.001 and MFES (r=-0.261, p=0.005, but not with the MoCA or GDS. Sedentary behaviour also associated with male gender, use of mobility aid, and multiple regression with increased age. Conclusion. We found that sedentary behaviour among older adults in AL associated with TUG scores and falls-related self-efficacy, which are modifiable targets for interventions to decrease sedentary behaviour in this population.

  2. Hands-On Experiences in Deploying Cost-Effective Ambient-Assisted Living Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athanasios Dasios

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Older adults’ preferences to remain independent in their own homes along with the high costs of nursing home care have motivated the development of Ambient Assisted Living (AAL technologies which aim at improving the safety, health conditions and wellness of the elderly. This paper reports hands-on experiences in designing, implementing and operating UbiCare, an AAL based prototype system for elderly home care monitoring. The monitoring is based on the recording of environmental parameters like temperature and light intensity as well as micro-level incidents which allows one to infer daily activities like moving, sitting, sleeping, usage of electrical appliances and plumbing components. The prototype is built upon inexpensive, off-the-shelf hardware (e.g., various sensors, Arduino microcontrollers, ZigBee-compatible wireless communication modules and license-free software, thereby ensuring low system deployment costs. The network comprises nodes placed in a house’s main rooms or mounted on furniture, one wearable node, one actuator node and a centralized processing element (coordinator. Upon detecting significant deviations from the ordinary activity patterns of individuals and/or sudden falls, the system issues automated alarms which may be forwarded to authorized caregivers via a variety of communication channels. Furthermore, measured environmental parameters and activity incidents may be monitored through standard web interfaces.

  3. Hands-On Experiences in Deploying Cost-Effective Ambient-Assisted Living Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasios, Athanasios; Gavalas, Damianos; Pantziou, Grammati; Konstantopoulos, Charalampos

    2015-06-18

    Older adults' preferences to remain independent in their own homes along with the high costs of nursing home care have motivated the development of Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) technologies which aim at improving the safety, health conditions and wellness of the elderly. This paper reports hands-on experiences in designing, implementing and operating UbiCare, an AAL based prototype system for elderly home care monitoring. The monitoring is based on the recording of environmental parameters like temperature and light intensity as well as micro-level incidents which allows one to infer daily activities like moving, sitting, sleeping, usage of electrical appliances and plumbing components. The prototype is built upon inexpensive, off-the-shelf hardware (e.g., various sensors, Arduino microcontrollers, ZigBee-compatible wireless communication modules) and license-free software, thereby ensuring low system deployment costs. The network comprises nodes placed in a house's main rooms or mounted on furniture, one wearable node, one actuator node and a centralized processing element (coordinator). Upon detecting significant deviations from the ordinary activity patterns of individuals and/or sudden falls, the system issues automated alarms which may be forwarded to authorized caregivers via a variety of communication channels. Furthermore, measured environmental parameters and activity incidents may be monitored through standard web interfaces.

  4. Web of Objects Based Ambient Assisted Living Framework for Emergency Psychiatric State Prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Md Golam Rabiul; Abedin, Sarder Fakhrul; Al Ameen, Moshaddique; Hong, Choong Seon

    2016-09-06

    Ambient assisted living can facilitate optimum health and wellness by aiding physical, mental and social well-being. In this paper, patients' psychiatric symptoms are collected through lightweight biosensors and web-based psychiatric screening scales in a smart home environment and then analyzed through machine learning algorithms to provide ambient intelligence in a psychiatric emergency. The psychiatric states are modeled through a Hidden Markov Model (HMM), and the model parameters are estimated using a Viterbi path counting and scalable Stochastic Variational Inference (SVI)-based training algorithm. The most likely psychiatric state sequence of the corresponding observation sequence is determined, and an emergency psychiatric state is predicted through the proposed algorithm. Moreover, to enable personalized psychiatric emergency care, a service a web of objects-based framework is proposed for a smart-home environment. In this framework, the biosensor observations and the psychiatric rating scales are objectified and virtualized in the web space. Then, the web of objects of sensor observations and psychiatric rating scores are used to assess the dweller's mental health status and to predict an emergency psychiatric state. The proposed psychiatric state prediction algorithm reported 83.03 percent prediction accuracy in an empirical performance study.

  5. Active In-Database Processing to Support Ambient Assisted Living Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner O. de Morais

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available As an alternative to the existing software architectures that underpin the development of smart homes and ambient assisted living (AAL systems, this work presents a database-centric architecture that takes advantage of active databases and in-database processing. Current platforms supporting AAL systems use database management systems (DBMSs exclusively for data storage. Active databases employ database triggers to detect and react to events taking place inside or outside of the database. DBMSs can be extended with stored procedures and functions that enable in-database processing. This means that the data processing is integrated and performed within the DBMS. The feasibility and flexibility of the proposed approach were demonstrated with the implementation of three distinct AAL services. The active database was used to detect bed-exits and to discover common room transitions and deviations during the night. In-database machine learning methods were used to model early night behaviors. Consequently, active in-database processing avoids transferring sensitive data outside the database, and this improves performance, security and privacy. Furthermore, centralizing the computation into the DBMS facilitates code reuse, adaptation and maintenance. These are important system properties that take into account the evolving heterogeneity of users, their needs and the devices that are characteristic of smart homes and AAL systems. Therefore, DBMSs can provide capabilities to address requirements for scalability, security, privacy, dependability and personalization in applications of smart environments in healthcare.

  6. Animal-Assisted Therapies and Dementia: A Systematic Mapping Review Using the Lived Environment Life Quality (LELQ) Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Wendy; Fields, Beth; Rose, Michelle; McLure, Merinda

    The authors mapped the literature on animal-assisted therapies (AATs) and institutionalized adults with dementia onto the Lived Environment Life Quality (LELQ) Model as a guide for future services and research. Refereed literature addressing AATs and institutionalized people with dementia was comprehensively gathered, described, categorized, and synthesized in this systematic mapping review. From 1,342 screened records, the authors included 10 research articles that incorporated dogs in therapy for institutionalized adults with dementia. These canine-assisted therapies offered occupational opportunities and environmental supports conducive to experiences of relative well-being, occupational engagement, and optimal functioning. The findings offer proof of the concept that canine-assisted therapies are feasible and can elicit positive quality-of-life experiences in institutionalized people with dementia. Researchers and practitioners need to elucidate the theoretical foundations of AATs. The LELQ Model may serve as a guide for client-centered, occupation-focused, and ecologically valid approaches to animal-assisted occupational therapy.

  7. SCALS: a fourth-generation study of assisted living technologies in their organisational, social, political and policy context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhalgh, Trisha; Shaw, Sara; Wherton, Joe; Hughes, Gemma; Lynch, Jenni; A'Court, Christine; Hinder, Sue; Fahy, Nick; Byrne, Emma; Finlayson, Alexander; Sorell, Tom; Procter, Rob; Stones, Rob

    2016-02-15

    Research to date into assisted living technologies broadly consists of 3 generations: technical design, experimental trials and qualitative studies of the patient experience. We describe a fourth-generation paradigm: studies of assisted living technologies in their organisational, social, political and policy context. Fourth-generation studies are necessarily organic and emergent; they view technology as part of a dynamic, networked and potentially unstable system. They use co-design methods to generate and stabilise local solutions, taking account of context. SCALS (Studies in Co-creating Assisted Living Solutions) consists (currently) of 5 organisational case studies, each an English health or social care organisation striving to introduce technology-supported services to support independent living in people with health and/or social care needs. Treating these cases as complex systems, we seek to explore interdependencies, emergence and conflict. We employ a co-design approach informed by the principles of action research to help participating organisations establish, refine and evaluate their service. To that end, we are conducting in-depth ethnographic studies of people's experience of assisted living technologies (micro level), embedded in evolving organisational case studies that use interviews, ethnography and document analysis (meso level), and exploring the wider national and international context for assisted living technologies and policy (macro level). Data will be analysed using a sociotechnical framework developed from structuration theory. Research ethics approval for the first 4 case studies has been granted. An important outcome will be lessons learned from individual co-design case studies. We will document the studies' credibility and rigour, and assess the transferability of findings to other settings while also recognising unique aspects of the contexts in which they were generated. Academic outputs will include a cross-case analysis and

  8. Factors Associated With Leisure Participation Among the Elderly Living in Long-term Care Facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Li

    2010-06-01

    Conclusion: Based on the self-reported interests, health status and level of cognitive skill of elderly residents, long-term care facilities should arrange appropriate leisure activities to prevent depression and to improve quality of life.

  9. Managing the wandering behaviour of people living in a residential aged care facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgkinson, Brent; Koch, Susan; Nay, Rhonda; Lewis, Matthew

    2007-12-01

    Background  Wandering behaviour is frequently seen in older people with cognitive impairment. The prevalence of patients exhibiting wandering behaviour has been estimated to be 11.6% on traditional units and 52.7% on Alzheimer's units. Wandering is one of the core behavioural characteristics that impact on familial carers and is likely to influence the decision to place a family member in an aged care environment. Considering the possible risks associated with wandering behaviour, the successful identification and management of wandering is essential. Wandering is also a problem for caregivers in the institutionalised setting, in terms of containment, usually being addressed by securing the environment. There has been some research conducted to assist in the understanding and management of wandering behaviour; however, the findings have been diverse resulting in a level of confusion about the best approaches to take. Objectives  This review aims to present the best available evidence on the management of wandering in older adults who reside in an aged care facility (both high and low care). Search strategy  An extensive search of keywords contained in the title and abstract, and relevant MeSH headings and descriptor terms was performed on the following databases: MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsychINFO, AGELINE, Cochrane Library, Embase, APAIS Health, Current Contents, Dare, Dissertation Abstracts, Personal Communication, Social Science Index. Selection criteria  Papers were selected if they focused on the treatment of wandering in an institutional setting. Some studies were not specifically examining wanderers over the age of 65 years as per the protocol requirements, but were included as it was felt that their findings could be applied to this age group. Data collection and analysis  Study design and quality were tabulated and relative risks, odds ratios, mean differences and associated 95% confidence intervals were calculated from individual comparative studies

  10. Triblock and pentablock terpolymers by sequential base-assisted living cationic copolymerization of functionalized vinyl ethers

    KAUST Repository

    Bouchekif, Hassen

    2015-01-01

    A series of novel, well-defined triblock (PnBVE-b-PCEVE-b-PSiDEGVE) and pentablock (PSiDEGVE-b-PCEVE-b-PnBVE-b-PCEVE-b-PSiDEGVE) terpolymers of n-butyl vinyl ether (nBVE), 2-chloroethyl vinyl ether (CEVE) and tert-butyldimethylsilyl ethylene glycol vinyl ether (SiEGVE) were synthesized by sequential base-assisted living cationic polymerization. The living character of the homopolymerization of the three VE monomers and the crossover reaction resulting in the formation of well-defined block copolymers were investigated in various solvents (toluene, dichloromethane and n-hexane) using either a monofunctional [nBVE-acetic acid adduct (nBEA), CEVE-acetic acid adduct (CEEA) and SiDEGVE-acetic acid adduct (SiDEGEA)] or a difunctional [1,4-cyclohexane-1,4-diyl bis(2-methoxyethyl acetate) (cHDMEA)] initiator. All initiators are structurally equivalent to the dormant species of the corresponding monomers in order to achieve fast initiation. The optimal conditions of polymerization were achieved in n-hexane at -20 °C, in the presence of 1 M AcOEt (base). Good control over the number average molecular weight (Mn) and the polydispersity index (PDI) was obtained only at [Et3Al2Cl3]0 = [Chain-end]0 ≤ 10 mM. 2,6-Di-tert-butylpyridine (DtBP) was used as a non-nucleophilic proton trap to suppress any protonic initiation from moisture (i.e., Et3Al2Cl3·H2O). Well-defined PnBVEn-b-PCEVEp-b-PSiDEGVEq and PSiDEGVEq-b-PCEVEp-b-PnBVEn-b-PCEVEp-b-PSiDEGVEq terpolymers with a high crossover efficiency, no PCEVE-induced physical gelation, and predictable Mn and PDI < 1.15 were synthesized successfully provided that the targeted DPCEVE/DPnBVE ratio (i.e., p/n) did not exceed 2 and 0.2, respectively. The quantitative desilylation of the PSiEGVE by n-Bu4N+F- in THF at 0 °C led to triblock and pentablock terpolymers in which the PCEVE is the central block and the polyalcohol is the outer block. The thermal properties of the synthesized materials were examined by differential scanning

  11. Live birth outcome, spontaneous pregnancy and adoption up to five years after undergoing assisted reproductive technology treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volgsten, Helena; Schmidt, Lone

    2017-08-01

    This study is part of a longitudinal cohort undertaken in both women and men to describe live birth outcome after undergoing assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatment in a clinical setting. Another objective was to follow women and men living with children from other alternatives after ART, such as adoption. A total of 439 (80.5%) women and 423 (77.6%) men were included in the baseline cohort (2005-2007). Live birth rate after ART was 24.8% at baseline. Up to 5 years later (2010-2011) the same participants were sent individual postal questionnaires (n = 439). Overall, 278 (63.3%) women and 183 (41.7%) men filled in and returned the questionnaire at follow up. The majority of women (91.7%) and men (93.4%) were living with children. A total of 225 (80.9%) women had a live birth at follow up. Of these, almost three of four (71.6%) had a live birth after ART and more than one of four (28.0%) after spontaneous pregnancies or both. Of these, 52 (26.1%) women had a subsequent live birth after successful ART and 26 (32.9%) women after unsuccessful ART. Nineteen (6.8%) women and 13 (7.1%) men had a child after adoption. Almost one of five (19.1%) women had no live birth at follow up. The majority of women and men were living with children, resulting from a live birth after ART, spontaneous pregnancy and/or adoption up to 5 years later. However, almost one of five had no live birth at follow up. © 2017 The Authors. Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology (NFOG).

  12. A cloud-based Internet of Things platform for ambient assisted living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubo, Javier; Nieto, Adrián; Pimentel, Ernesto

    2014-08-04

    A common feature of ambient intelligence is that many objects are inter-connected and act in unison, which is also a challenge in the Internet of Things. There has been a shift in research towards integrating both concepts, considering the Internet of Things as representing the future of computing and communications. However, the efficient combination and management of heterogeneous things or devices in the ambient intelligence domain is still a tedious task, and it presents crucial challenges. Therefore, to appropriately manage the inter-connection of diverse devices in these systems requires: (1) specifying and efficiently implementing the devices (e.g., as services); (2) handling and verifying their heterogeneity and composition; and (3) standardizing and managing their data, so as to tackle large numbers of systems together, avoiding standalone applications on local servers. To overcome these challenges, this paper proposes a platform to manage the integration and behavior-aware orchestration of heterogeneous devices as services, stored and accessed via the cloud, with the following contributions: (i) we describe a lightweight model to specify the behavior of devices, to determine the order of the sequence of exchanged messages during the composition of devices; (ii) we define a common architecture using a service-oriented standard environment, to integrate heterogeneous devices by means of their interfaces, via a gateway, and to orchestrate them according to their behavior; (iii) we design a framework based on cloud computing technology, connecting the gateway in charge of acquiring the data from the devices with a cloud platform, to remotely access and monitor the data at run-time and react to emergency situations; and (iv) we implement and generate a novel cloud-based IoT platform of behavior-aware devices as services for ambient intelligence systems, validating the whole approach in real scenarios related to a specific ambient assisted living application.

  13. A review of contemporary work on the ethics of ambient assisted living technologies for people with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novitzky, Peter; Smeaton, Alan F; Chen, Cynthia; Irving, Kate; Jacquemard, Tim; O'Brolcháin, Fiachra; O'Mathúna, Dónal; Gordijn, Bert

    2015-06-01

    Ambient assisted living (AAL) technologies can provide assistance and support to persons with dementia. They might allow them the possibility of living at home for longer whilst maintaining their comfort and security as well as offering a way towards reducing the huge economic and personal costs forecast as the incidence of dementia increases worldwide over coming decades. However, the development, introduction and use of AAL technologies also trigger serious ethical issues. This paper is a systematic literature review of the on-going scholarly debate about these issues. More specifically, we look at the ethical issues involved in research and development, clinical experimentation, and clinical application of AAL technologies for people with dementia and related stakeholders. In the discussion we focus on: (1) the value of the goals of AAL technologies, (2) the special vulnerability of persons with dementia in their private homes, (3) the complex question of informed consent for the usage of AAL technologies.

  14. 75 FR 34249 - Centers for Independent Living Program-Training and Technical Assistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-16

    ... program is to maximize independence, productivity, empowerment, and leadership of individuals with... alternatives to institutionalization; assisting transition-age youths to succeed after secondary school; and...

  15. Wearable EEG headband using printed electrodes and powered by energy harvesting for emotion monitoring in ambient assisted living

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matiko, Joseph W.; Wei, Yang; Torah, Russel; Grabham, Neil; Paul, Gordon; Beeby, Stephen; Tudor, John

    2015-12-01

    Globally, human life expectancy is steadily increasing causing an increase in the elderly population and consequently increased costs of supporting them. Ambient assisted living is an active research area aimed at supporting elderly people to live independently in their preferred living environment. This paper presents the design and testing of a self-powered wearable headband for electroencephalogram (EEG) based detection of emotions allowing the evaluation of the quality of life of assisted people. Printed active electrode fabrication and testing is discussed followed by the design of an energy harvester for powering the headband. The results show that the fabricated electrodes have similar performance to commercial electrodes and that the electronics embedded into the headband, as well as the wireless sensor node used for processing the EEG, can be powered by energy harvested from solar panels integrated on the headband. An average real time emotion classification accuracy of 90 (±9) % was obtained from 12 subjects. The results show that the self-powered wearable headband presented in this paper can be used to measure the wellbeing of assisted people with good accuracy.

  16. Application of computer-assisted three-dimensional quantitative assessment and a surgical planning tool for living donor liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Lin; Zhu, Zhi-Jun; Lü, Yi; Jiang, Wen-Tao; Gao, Wei; Zeng, Zhi-Gui; Shen, Zhong-Yang

    2013-04-01

    Precise evaluation of the live donor's liver is the most important factor for the donor's safety and the recipient's prognosis in living donor liver transplantation (LDLT). Our study assessed the clinical value of computer-assisted three-dimensional quantitative assessment and a surgical planning tool for donor evaluation in LDLT. Computer-assisted three-dimensional (3D) quantitative assessment was used to prospectively provide quantitative assessment of the graft volume for 123 consecutive donors of LDLT and its accuracy and efficiency were compared with that of the standard manual-traced method. A case of reduced monosegmental LDLT was also assessed and a surgical planning tool displayed the precise surgical plan to avoid large-for-size syndrome. There was no statistically significant difference between the detected graft volumes with computer-assisted 3D quantitative assessment and manual-traced approaches ((856.76 ± 162.18) cm(3) vs. (870.64 ± 172.54) cm(3), P = 0.796). Estimated volumes by either method had good correlation with the actual graft weight (r-manual-traced method: 0.921, r-3D quantitative assessment method: 0.896, both P computer-assisted 3D quantitative assessment approach was significantly more efficient taking half the time of the manual-traced method ((16.91 ± 1.375) minutes vs. (39.27 ± 2.102) minutes, P Computer-assisted 3D quantitative assessment provided precise evaluation of the graft volume. It also assisted surgeons with a better understanding of the hepatic 3D anatomy and was useful for the individual surgical planning tool.

  17. Comparing frailty measures in their ability to predict adverse outcome among older residents of assisted living

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hogan David B

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few studies have directly compared the competing approaches to identifying frailty in more vulnerable older populations. We examined the ability of two versions of a frailty index (43 vs. 83 items, the Cardiovascular Health Study (CHS frailty criteria, and the CHESS scale to accurately predict the occurrence of three outcomes among Assisted Living (AL residents followed over one year. Methods The three frailty measures and the CHESS scale were derived from assessment items completed among 1,066 AL residents (aged 65+ participating in the Alberta Continuing Care Epidemiological Studies (ACCES. Adjusted risks of one-year mortality, hospitalization and long-term care placement were estimated for those categorized as frail or pre-frail compared with non-frail (or at high/intermediate vs. low risk on CHESS. The area under the ROC curve (AUC was calculated for select models to assess the predictive accuracy of the different frailty measures and CHESS scale in relation to the three outcomes examined. Results Frail subjects defined by the three approaches and those at high risk for decline on CHESS showed a statistically significant increased risk for death and long-term care placement compared with those categorized as either not frail or at low risk for decline. The risk estimates for hospitalization associated with the frailty measures and CHESS were generally weaker with one of the frailty indices (43 items showing no significant association. For death and long-term care placement, the addition of frailty (however derived or CHESS significantly improved on the AUC obtained with a model including only age, sex and co-morbidity, though the magnitude of improvement was sometimes small. The different frailty/risk models did not differ significantly from each other in predicting mortality or hospitalization; however, one of the frailty indices (83 items showed significantly better performance over the other measures in predicting long

  18. Preliminary Evaluation of a Personal Healthcare System Prototype for Cognitive eRehabilitation in a Living Assistance Domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Pastorino

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The integration of rehabilitation systems in an ambient assisted living environment can provide a powerful and versatile tool for long-term stroke rehabilitation goals. This paper introduces a novel concept of a personalized cognitive rehabilitation system in a naturalistic setting. The proposed platform was developed within the CogWatch project, with the intent of fostering independence in activities of daily living in patients with apraxia and action disorganization syndrome. Technical usability was evaluated in a series of pilot experiments, which illustrate how this approach may help to retrain patients in activities of daily living. The first system prototype has been tested with 36 participants divided into three groups, providing an exploratory evaluation of the usability of this solution and its acceptability. The technical solutions used within the CogWatch project are targeted to meet both the end users’ needs from the interaction and usability point of views and the clinical requirements associated with the use of such systems. The challenges behind the development of ambient assisted living systems for cognitive rehabilitation are discussed.

  19. The prevalence of malnutrition in elderly residents in a warden-assisted setting compared with a home-living environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riches, Kerry; Jeanes, Yvonne

    2014-07-01

    Malnutrition in elderly people is associated with many adverse clinical outcomes. However, few studies exist investigating malnutrition in the community setting. This study aimed to report the prevalence of malnutrition in elderly people living in warden-assisted (WA) accommodation compared with those living at home. A total of 20 WA and 20 home-living (HL) participants were assessed using hand-grip strength and the Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA). Some 30% of the WA group were malnourished, compared with 10% of the HL group. This study demonstrates an alarmingly large proportion of individuals in WA accommodation to be either malnourished or at risk of malnutrition. This is a relatively small study, and further research into the key factors influencing malnutrition and interventions to minimise malnutrition with WA accommodation are clearly warranted.

  20. 77 FR 34056 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-08

    ... w/out comprising nat'l security Reasons: Secured Area Indiana Facilities 99 & 1371 Stor Igloos Terre...: Secured Area 6 Buildings BE Stor Shed Randolph AFB TX Landholding Agency: Air Force Property Number...

  1. Adolescent Mothers in a Transitional Living Facility: An Exploratory Study of Support Networks and Attachment Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Ann E.; McRoy, Ruth G.; Downs, A. Chris

    2004-01-01

    Most of the research literature on attachment and adolescent transitions has addressed youth in family settings. This article explores these issues with a sample of 25 pregnant and parenting teens living in a transitional shelter. Using case records and interview data as well as results of standardized measures of depression, self-esteem, child…

  2. Multilevel Examination of Facility Characteristics, Social Integration, and Health for Older Adults Living in Nursing Homes

    OpenAIRE

    Skye N. Leedahl; Rosemary K. Chapin; Little, Todd D.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Testing a model based on past research and theory, this study assessed relationships between facility characteristics (i.e., culture change efforts, social workers) and residents’ social networks and social support across nursing homes; and examined relationships between multiple aspects of social integration (i.e., social networks, social capital, social engagement, social support) and mental and functional health for older adults in nursing homes.

  3. Facile functionalization and assembly of live cells with microcontact-printed polymeric biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhibin; Xia, Junfei; Yan, Yuanwei; Tsai, Ang-Chen; Li, Yan; Ma, Teng; Guan, Jingjiao

    2015-01-01

    The functionalization and assembly of live cells with microfabricated polymeric biomaterials have attracted considerable interest in recent years, but the conventional methods suffer from high cost, high complexity, long processing time or inadequate capability. The present study reports on the development of a novel method for functionalizing and assembling live cells by integrating microcontact printing of polymeric biomaterials with a temperature-sensitive sacrificial layer prepared by spin-coating. This method has been used not only to functionalize live cells with microscopic polyelectrolyte and thermoplastic structures of various sizes and shapes, but also to assemble the cells into macroscopic stripes and sheets. The method is applicable to multiple types of cells, including human leukemic cells, mouse embryonic stem cells and human mesenchymal stem cells in the forms of single cells and cell aggregates. In addition, the microcontact-printed structures can be prepared using biodegradable and biocompatible polyelectrolytes and thermoplastic. The unique combination of low cost, ease of use and high versatility renders this method potentially useful for diverse biomedical applications, including drug delivery, cell tracking and tissue engineering. Copyright © 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Electromechanical and robot-assisted arm training for improving arm function and activities of daily living after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrholz, Jan; Platz, Thomas; Kugler, Joachim; Pohl, Marcus

    2008-10-08

    Electromechanical and robot-assisted arm training devices are used in rehabilitation and might help to improve arm function after stroke. To assess the effectiveness of electromechanical and robot-assisted arm training for improving activities of daily living and arm function and motor strength of patients after stroke, and the acceptability and safety of the therapy. We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (last searched October 2007), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library, Issue 3, 2007), MEDLINE (1950 to October 2007), EMBASE (1980 to October 2007), CINAHL (1982 to October 2007), AMED (1985 to October 2007), SPORTDiscus (1949 to October 2007), PEDro (searched October 2007), COMPENDEX (1972 to October 2007) and INSPEC (1969 to October 2007). We also handsearched relevant conference proceedings, searched trials and research registers, checked reference lists, and contacted trialists, experts and researchers in our field, and manufacturers of commercial devices. Randomised controlled trials comparing electromechanical and robot-assisted arm training for recovery of arm function with other rehabilitation interventions or no treatment for patients after stroke. Two review authors independently selected trials for inclusion, assessed trial quality and extracted data. We contacted trialists for additional information. We analysed the results as standardised mean differences (SMDs) for continuous variables and relative risk differences (RD) for dichotomous variables. We included 11 trials (328 participants) in this review. Electromechanical and robot-assisted arm training did not improve activities of daily living (SMD = 0.29; 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.47 to 1.06; P = 0.45; I(2 )= 85%). Arm motor function and arm motor strength improved (SMD = 0.68, 95% CI 0.24 to 1.11; P = 0.002; I(2 )= 56% and SMD = 01.03, 95% CI 0.29 to 1.78; P = 0.007; I(2 )= 79% respectively). Electromechanical and robot-assisted arm training

  5. Information technologies for active and assisted living-Influences to the quality of life of an ageing society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Christian; Dorner, Thomas Ernst

    2017-04-01

    The current and upcoming demographic change in industrial countries is a challenge for our society, economically as well as socially. The aim of this article is to explore the influences of information and communication technologies applied to contribute to these trends and describe its impact to the quality of life and subjective health of elderly. In a structured literature review on (a) scientific publications and (b) outcome reports of ambient assisted living projects, we investigated these associations. The results are summarized according to the multidimensional approach of quality of life considering the bio-psycho-social model of health. The project outcomes of current initiatives are consolidated and recommendations for future research in the field of active and assisted living were issued. Current research efforts show that assistive information and communication technologies can successfully contribute to all dimensions of elderly's quality of life. As example technologies can empower them to control their health problems, compensate functional disabilities and increase their safety. Otherwise, remote-communication could lead to reduced face-to-face communication and social exclusion. More research using adequate methods: and instruments is needed to demonstrate the identified effects and to deliver evidence of the impact to the life of the heterogeneous population group of elderly. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Native American Technical Assistance and Training for Renewable Energy Resource Development and Electrical Generation Facilities Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. David Lester

    2008-10-17

    The Council of Energy Resource Tribes (CERT) will facilitate technical expertise and training of Native Americans in renewable energy resource development for electrical generation facilities, and distributed generation options contributing to feasibility studies, strategic planning and visioning. CERT will also provide information to Tribes on energy efficiency and energy management techniques.This project will provide facilitation and coordination of expertise from government agencies and private industries to interact with Native Americans in ways that will result in renewable energy resource development, energy efficiency program development, and electrical generation facilities management by Tribal entities. The intent of this cooperative agreement is to help build capacity within the Tribes to manage these important resources.

  7. Multilevel examination of facility characteristics, social integration, and health for older adults living in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leedahl, Skye N; Chapin, Rosemary K; Little, Todd D

    2015-01-01

    Testing a model based on past research and theory, this study assessed relationships between facility characteristics (i.e., culture change efforts, social workers) and residents' social networks and social support across nursing homes; and examined relationships between multiple aspects of social integration (i.e., social networks, social capital, social engagement, social support) and mental and functional health for older adults in nursing homes. Data were collected at nursing homes using a planned missing data design with random sampling techniques. Data collection occurred at the individual-level through in-person structured interviews with older adult nursing home residents (N = 140) and at the facility-level (N = 30) with nursing home staff. The best fitting multilevel structural equation model indicated that the culture change subscale for relationships significantly predicted differences in residents' social networks. Additionally, social networks had a positive indirect relationship with mental and functional health among residents primarily via social engagement. Social capital had a positive direct relationship with both health outcomes. To predict better social integration and mental and functional health outcomes for nursing homes residents, study findings support prioritizing that close relationships exist among staff, residents, and the community as well as increased resident social engagement and social trust. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Recommendations on Physical Activity and Exercise for Older Adults Living in Long-Term Care Facilities: A Taskforce Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souto Barreto, Philipe; Morley, John E; Chodzko-Zajko, Wojtek; H Pitkala, Kaisu; Weening-Djiksterhuis, Elizabeth; Rodriguez-Mañas, Leocadio; Barbagallo, Mario; Rosendahl, Erik; Sinclair, Alan; Landi, Francesco; Izquierdo, Mikel; Vellas, Bruno; Rolland, Yves

    2016-05-01

    A taskforce, under the auspices of The International Association of Gerontology and Geriatrics-Global Aging Research Network (IAGG-GARN) and the IAGG European Region Clinical Section, composed of experts from the fields of exercise science and geriatrics, met in Toulouse, in December 2015, with the aim of establishing recommendations of physical activity and exercise for older adults living in long-term care facilities (LTCFs). Due to the high heterogeneity in terms of functional ability and cognitive function that characterizes older adults living in LTCFs, taskforce members established 2 sets of recommendations: recommendations for reducing sedentary behaviors for all LTCF residents and recommendations for defining specific, evidence-based guidelines for exercise training for subgroups of LTCF residents. To promote a successful implementation of recommendations, taskforce experts highlighted the importance of promoting residents' motivation and pleasure, the key factors that can be increased when taking into account residents' desires, preferences, beliefs, and attitudes toward physical activity and exercise. The importance of organizational factors related to LTCFs and health care systems were recognized by the experts. In conclusion, this taskforce report proposes standards for the elaboration of strategies to increase physical activity as well as to prescribe exercise programs for older adults living in LTCFs. This report should be used as a guide for professionals working in LTCF settings. Copyright © 2016 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. An Exceptionally Facile Two-Step Structural Isomerization and Detoxication via a Water-Assisted Double Lossen Rearrangement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feng; Huang, Chun-Hua; Xie, Lin-Na; Qu, Na; Shao, Jie; Shao, Bo; Zhu, Ben-Zhan

    2016-12-01

    N-hydroxyphthalimide (NHPI), which is best known as an organocatalyst for efficient C-H activation, has been found to be oxidized by quinoid compounds to its corresponding catalytically active nitroxide-radical. Here, we found that NHPI can be isomerized into isatoic anhydride by an unusually facile two-step method using tetrachloro-1,4-benzoquinone (TCBQ, p-chloranil), accompanied by a two-step hydrolytic dechlorination of highly toxic TCBQ into the much less toxic dihydroxylation product, 2,5-dichloro-3,6-dihydroxy-1,4-benzoquinone (chloranilic acid). Interestingly, through the complementary application of oxygen-18 isotope-labeling, HPLC combined with electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight and high resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometric studies, we determined that water was the source and origin of oxygen for isatoic anhydride. Based on these data, we proposed that nucleophilic attack with a subsequent water-assisted Lossen rearrangement coupled with rapid intramolecular addition and cyclization in two consecutive steps was responsible for this unusual structural isomerization of NHPI and concurrent hydroxylation/detoxication of TCBQ. This is the first report of an exceptionally facile double-isomerization of NHPI via an unprecedented water-assisted double-Lossen rearrangement under normal physiological conditions. Our findings may have broad implications for future research on hydroxamic acids and polyhalogenated quinoid carcinogens, two important classes of compounds of major chemical and biological interest.

  10. Aqueous metal-catalyzed living radical polymerization: highly active water-assisted catalysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Makoto Ouchi; Hiroaki Yoda; Takaya Terashima; Mitsuo Sawamoto

    2012-01-01

    ...) methacrylate and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) in conjunction with a chlorine initiator [H-(MMA) 2 -Cl]. The catalytic system allowed very fast living polymerizations, block copolymerizations and syntheses of high-molecular-weight polymers...

  11. A wireless sensor network for IOT-based ambient assisted living services

    OpenAIRE

    Guerra, Claudio

    2017-01-01

    The scientific activity of the PhD focused on the AAL (Active and Assited Living) framework, and in particular on its application on the home-automation field. The activity was mainly directed towards developing wireless (ZigBee-based) devices to monitor the activities of the daily living at home, and their connection to a local server. Furthermore, it has been implemented the capability of identifying the user triggering the sensor, by exploiting the communication between the environmental d...

  12. Life cycle assessment of facile microwave-assisted zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Papadaki, D

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The life cycle assessment of several zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures, fabricated by a facile microwave technique, is presented. Key synthesis parameters such as annealing temperature, varied from 90 °C to 220 °C, and microwave power, varied from 110...

  13. 75 FR 52821 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-27

    ...: 310 sq. ft., 1 story stone structure, no sanitary or heating facilities, Natl Register of Historic... Comments: 2.57 acres; rolling and wooded Tract 2709-10 and 2710-2 Barkley Lake, Kentucky and Tennessee... from the village of Rockcastle Comments: 3.59 acres; rolling and wooded; no utilities Tract 2800...

  14. 78 FR 79000 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-27

    ..., HHS, Room 12-07, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857; (301) 443-2265. (This is not a toll-free... properties identified in this Notice (i.e., acreage, floor plan, existing sanitary facilities, exact street... Agriculture for more information. New York Former TSG Harold Lockwood US Army Reserves Center 111 Finney...

  15. 78 FR 77697 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-24

    ..., HHS, room 12-07, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857; (301) 443-2265. (This is not a toll-free... properties identified in this Notice (i.e., acreage, floor plan, existing sanitary facilities, exact street... Agriculture for more information. New York Former TSG Harold Lockwood US Army Reserves Center 111 Finney...

  16. 77 FR 25189 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-27

    ... real property that HUD has reviewed for suitability for use to assist the homeless. The properties were... underutilized buildings and real property controlled by such agencies or by GSA regarding its inventory of... property number. For more information regarding particular properties identified in this Notice (i.e...

  17. 75 FR 60777 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... other real property that HUD has reviewed for suitability for use to assist the homeless. The properties... and underutilized buildings and real property controlled by such agencies or by GSA regarding its... Register, the landholding agency, and the property number. For more information regarding particular...

  18. 77 FR 40078 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-06

    ... real property that HUD has reviewed for suitability for use to assist the homeless. The properties were... underutilized buildings and real property controlled by such agencies or by GSA regarding its inventory of... the property number. For more information regarding particular properties identified in this Notice (i...

  19. 75 FR 43194 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-23

    ... other real property that HUD has reviewed for suitability for use to assist the homeless. The properties... and underutilized buildings and real property controlled by such agencies or by GSA regarding its... Register, the landholding agency, and the property number. For more information regarding particular...

  20. 76 FR 6489 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-04

    ... other real property that HUD has reviewed for suitability for use to assist the homeless. The properties... and underutilized buildings and real property controlled by such agencies or by GSA regarding its... Register, the landholding agency, and the property number. For more information regarding particular...

  1. 76 FR 78294 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities to Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-16

    ... other real property that HUD has reviewed for suitability for use to assist the homeless. The properties... and underutilized buildings and real property controlled by such agencies or by GSA regarding its... Federal Register, the landholding agency, and the property number. For more information regarding...

  2. 75 FR 65366 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-22

    ... other real property that HUD has reviewed for suitability for use to assist the homeless. The properties... and underutilized buildings and real property controlled by such agencies or by GSA regarding its... Register, the landholding agency, and the property number. For more information regarding particular...

  3. 77 FR 31376 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities to Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-25

    ... real property that HUD has reviewed for suitability for use to assist the homeless. The properties were... underutilized buildings and real property controlled by such agencies or by GSA regarding its inventory of... landholding agency, and the property number. For more information regarding particular properties identified...

  4. 77 FR 5525 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities to Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-03

    ... other real property that HUD has reviewed for suitability for use to assist the homeless. The properties... and underutilized buildings and real property controlled by such agencies or by GSA regarding its... Federal Register, the landholding agency, and the property number. For more information regarding...

  5. 75 FR 70941 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-19

    ... other real property that HUD has reviewed for suitability for use to assist the homeless. The properties... and underutilized buildings and real property controlled by such agencies or by GSA regarding its... Register, the landholding agency, and the property number. For more information regarding particular...

  6. 77 FR 66184 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-02

    ... real property that HUD has reviewed for suitability for use to assist the homeless. The properties were... underutilized buildings and real property controlled by such agencies or by GSA regarding its inventory of... property number. For more information regarding particular properties identified in this Notice (i.e...

  7. 76 FR 62434 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-07

    ... real property that HUD has reviewed for suitability for use to assist the homeless. The properties were... underutilized buildings and real property controlled by such agencies or by GSA regarding its inventory of... landholding agency, and the property number. For more information regarding particular properties identified...

  8. 77 FR 27790 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-11

    ... real property that HUD has reviewed for suitability for use to assist the homeless. The properties were... underutilized buildings and real property controlled by such agencies or by GSA regarding its inventory of... property number. For more information regarding particular properties identified in this Notice (i.e...

  9. 75 FR 10347 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-05

    ... other real property that HUD has reviewed for suitability for use to assist the homeless. The properties... and underutilized buildings and real property controlled by such agencies or by GSA regarding its... Register, the landholding agency, and the property number. For more information regarding particular...

  10. 77 FR 58565 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-21

    ... real property that HUD has reviewed for suitability for use to assist the homeless. The properties were... underutilized buildings and real property controlled by such agencies or by GSA regarding its inventory of... property number. For more information regarding particular properties identified in this Notice (i.e...

  11. 75 FR 39573 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-09

    ... other real property that HUD has reviewed for suitability for use to assist the homeless. The properties... and underutilized buildings and real property controlled by such agencies or by GSA regarding its... Register, the landholding agency, and the property number. For more information regarding particular...

  12. 75 FR 16822 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-02

    ... other real property that HUD has reviewed for suitability for use to assist the homeless. The properties... and underutilized buildings and real property controlled by such agencies or by GSA regarding its... Register, the landholding agency, and the property number. For more information regarding particular...

  13. 75 FR 33321 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-11

    ... other real property that HUD has reviewed for suitability for use to assist the homeless. The properties... and underutilized buildings and real property controlled by such agencies or by GSA regarding its... Register, the landholding agency, and the property number. For more information regarding particular...

  14. 78 FR 7442 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    ... real property that HUD has reviewed for suitability for use to assist the homeless. The properties were... underutilized buildings and real property controlled by such agencies or by GSA regarding its inventory of... the property number. For more information regarding particular properties identified in this Notice (i...

  15. 76 FR 34093 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-10

    ... other real property that HUD has reviewed for suitability for use to assist the homeless. The properties... and underutilized buildings and real property controlled by such agencies or by GSA regarding its... Register, the landholding agency, and the property number. For more information regarding particular...

  16. 75 FR 55342 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-10

    ... other real property that HUD has reviewed for suitability for use to assist the homeless. The properties... and underutilized buildings and real property controlled by such agencies or by GSA regarding its... Register, the landholding agency, and the property number. For more information regarding particular...

  17. 77 FR 41441 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-13

    ... real property that HUD has reviewed for suitability for use to assist the homeless. The properties were... underutilized buildings and real property controlled by such agencies or by GSA regarding its inventory of... property number. For more information regarding particular properties identified in this Notice (i.e...

  18. 75 FR 54236 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-03

    ... other real property that HUD has reviewed for suitability for use to assist the homeless. The properties... and underutilized buildings and real property controlled by such agencies or by GSA regarding its... Register, the landholding agency, and the property number. For more information regarding particular...

  19. 76 FR 82317 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-30

    ... other real property that HUD has reviewed for suitability for use to assist the homeless. The properties... and underutilized buildings and real property controlled by such agencies or by GSA regarding its... Federal Register, the landholding agency, and the property number. For more information regarding...

  20. 78 FR 16521 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-15

    ... real property that HUD has reviewed for suitability for use to assist the homeless. The properties were... underutilized buildings and real property controlled by such agencies or by GSA regarding its inventory of... property number. For more information regarding particular properties identified in this Notice (i.e...

  1. 77 FR 44262 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-27

    ... real property that HUD has reviewed for suitability for use to assist the homeless. The properties were... underutilized buildings and real property controlled by such agencies or by GSA regarding its inventory of... property number. For more information regarding particular properties identified in this Notice (i.e...

  2. 75 FR 14612 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-26

    ... other real property that HUD has reviewed for suitability for use to assist the homeless. The properties... and underutilized buildings and real property controlled by such agencies or by GSA regarding its... Register, the landholding agency, and the property number. For more information regarding particular...

  3. 76 FR 76984 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-09

    ... other real property that HUD has reviewed for suitability for use to assist the homeless. The properties... and underutilized buildings and real property controlled by such agencies or by GSA regarding its... Federal Register, the landholding agency, and the property number. For more information regarding...

  4. 77 FR 15788 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-16

    ... real property that HUD has reviewed for suitability for use to assist the homeless. The properties were... underutilized buildings and real property controlled by such agencies or by GSA regarding its inventory of... property number. For more information regarding particular properties identified in this Notice (i.e...

  5. 76 FR 59150 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-23

    ... real property that HUD has reviewed for suitability for use to assist the homeless. The properties were... underutilized buildings and real property controlled by such agencies or by GSA regarding its inventory of... property number. For more information regarding particular properties identified in this Notice (i.e...

  6. 76 FR 40386 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-08

    ... real property that HUD has reviewed for suitability for use to assist the homeless. The properties were... underutilized buildings and real property controlled by such agencies or by GSA regarding its inventory of... property number. For more information regarding particular properties identified in this Notice (i.e...

  7. 77 FR 65397 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-26

    ... real property that HUD has reviewed for suitability for use to assist the homeless. The properties were... underutilized buildings and real property controlled by such agencies or by GSA regarding its inventory of... property number. For more information regarding particular properties identified in this Notice (i.e...

  8. 77 FR 14411 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-09

    ... real property that HUD has reviewed for suitability for use to assist the homeless. The properties were... underutilized buildings and real property controlled by such agencies or by GSA regarding its inventory of... property number. For more information regarding particular properties identified in this Notice (i.e...

  9. 77 FR 53212 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-31

    ... real property that HUD has reviewed for suitability for use to assist the homeless. The properties were... underutilized buildings and real property controlled by such agencies or by GSA regarding its inventory of... property number. For more information regarding particular properties identified in this Notice (i.e...

  10. 75 FR 68374 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-05

    ... other real property that HUD has reviewed for suitability for use to assist the homeless. The properties... and underutilized buildings and real property controlled by such agencies or by GSA regarding its... Register, the landholding agency, and the property number. For more information regarding particular...

  11. 76 FR 3921 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-21

    ... other real property that HUD has reviewed for suitability for use to assist the homeless. The properties... and underutilized buildings and real property controlled by such agencies or by GSA regarding its... Register, the landholding agency, and the property number. For more information regarding particular...

  12. 76 FR 45592 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-29

    ... real property that HUD has reviewed for suitability for use to assist the homeless. The properties were... underutilized buildings and real property controlled by such agencies or by GSA regarding its inventory of... property number. For more information regarding particular properties identified in this Notice (i.e...

  13. 75 FR 3750 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-22

    ... other real property that HUD has reviewed for suitability for use to assist the homeless. The properties... and underutilized buildings and real property controlled by such agencies or by GSA regarding its... Register, the landholding agency, and the property number. For more information regarding particular...

  14. 77 FR 71435 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-30

    ... other real property that HUD has reviewed for suitability for use to assist the homeless. The properties... and underutilized buildings and real property controlled by such agencies or by GSA regarding its... Register, the landholding agency, and the property number. For more information regarding particular...

  15. 77 FR 38850 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities to Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-29

    ... real property that HUD has reviewed for suitability for use to assist the homeless. The properties were... underutilized buildings and real property controlled by such agencies or by GSA regarding its inventory of... property number. For more information regarding particular properties identified in this Notice (i.e...

  16. 76 FR 55933 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-09

    ... real property that HUD has reviewed for suitability for use to assist the homeless. The properties were... underutilized buildings and real property controlled by such agencies or by GSA regarding its inventory of... property number. For more information regarding particular properties identified in this Notice (i.e...

  17. 75 FR 75487 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-03

    ... other real property that HUD has reviewed for suitability for use to assist the homeless. The properties... and underutilized buildings and real property controlled by such agencies or by GSA regarding its... Register, the landholding agency, and the property number. For more information regarding particular...

  18. 76 FR 57754 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-16

    ... real property that HUD has reviewed for suitability for use to assist the homeless. The properties were... underutilized buildings and real property controlled by such agencies or by GSA regarding its inventory of... property number. For more information regarding particular properties identified in this Notice (i.e...

  19. 77 FR 801 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-06

    ... other real property that HUD has reviewed for suitability for use to assist the homeless. The properties... and underutilized buildings and real property controlled by such agencies or by GSA regarding its... Federal Register, the landholding agency, and the property number. For more information regarding...

  20. 76 FR 54781 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-02

    ... real property that HUD has reviewed for suitability for use to assist the homeless. The properties were... underutilized buildings and real property controlled by such agencies or by GSA regarding its inventory of... property number. For more information regarding particular properties identified in this Notice (i.e...

  1. 75 FR 28634 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-21

    ... other real property that HUD has reviewed for suitability for use to assist the homeless. The properties... and underutilized buildings and real property controlled by such agencies or by GSA regarding its... Federal Register, the landholding agency, and the property number. For more information regarding...

  2. 76 FR 13425 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-11

    ... other real property that HUD has reviewed for suitability for use to assist the homeless. The properties... and underutilized buildings and real property controlled by such agencies or by GSA regarding its... Register, the landholding agency, and the property number. For more information regarding particular...

  3. 78 FR 48710 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-09

    ... Assistant Secretary for Community Planning and Development, HUD. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This Notice... Georgia Mobile Lab Trailer; 660400B005 RPUID 03.55443 Lab 20406; Site 00: Nat'l Peanut Research Shellman... Black Canyon Office, Warehouse & Classroom 3999 E. Black Canyon Hwy Emmett ID 83617 Landholding Agency...

  4. Levels of physical activity and sleep patterns among older people with dementia living in long-term care facilities: A 24-h snapshot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyle, Wendy; Jones, Cindy; Murfield, Jenny; Draper, Brian; Beattie, Elizabeth; Shum, David; Thalib, Lukman; O'Dwyer, Siobhan; Mervin, Cindy M

    2017-08-01

    To objectively measure over a 24-h period the daytime and nighttime levels of physical activity and sleep patterns of older people with dementia living in long-term care facilities. Nested within a larger research program, this cross-sectional study involved 415 residents, aged ≥60 years, with a documented diagnosis of dementia, from 28 long-term care facilities in south-east Queensland, Australia. Residents wore SenseWear® activity armbands continuously for 24h, with data recorded for: step count; total energy expenditure; metabolic equivalent of task (MET); and the amount of time spent physically active, lying down, awake, and asleep. Residents' levels of cognitive impairment (assessed using the Rowland Universal Dementia Assessment Scale) and agitation (assessed using the Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory-Short Form), and demographic data were also collected. From a total of 415 residents monitored with the SenseWear® activity armbands, 192 met the valid wear-time of 21h or more, and had activity and sleep data recorded. These residents were largely inactive during the daytime (engaged in an average of 1.8h of light physical activity), but achieved recommended amounts of sleep at night (average of 6.8h). There was considerable variation within the sample, and activity and sleep differed by sex (plong-term care clinicians to assist in planning interventions and care approaches which promote physical activity and good sleep practices, and are individualized to physical and cognitive capabilities. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ACTRN12614000508673). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Tuberculosis case finding and isoniazid preventive therapy among people living with HIV at public health facilities of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: a cross-sectional facility based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denegetu, Amenu Wesen; Dolamo, Bethabile Lovely

    2014-01-18

    Activities to decrease the burden of tuberculosis (TB) among people living with HIV (PLHIV) include intensified TB case-finding (ICF), Isoniaizid (INH) preventive therapy (IPT) and infection control in health-care and congregate settings (IC). Information about the status of collaborative TB/HIV care services which decreases the burden of TB among PLHIV in Ethiopia is limited. The purpose of the study was to assess TB case finding and provision of IPT among PLHIV in Addis Ababa. A cross sectional, facility-based survey was conducted between June 2011 and August 2011. Data was collected by interviewing 849 PLHIV from ten health facilities in Addis Ababa. Both descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyze findings and the results are described in this report. The proportion of PLHIV who have been screened for TB during any one of their follow-up cares was 92.8%. Eighty eight (10.4%) of the study participants have been diagnosed for TB during their HIV follow-up cares. PLHIV who had never been diagnosed for TB before they knew their positive HIV status were nearly four times more likely to be diagnosed for TB during follow-up cares than those diagnosed before (AOR [95% CI]: 3.78 [1.69-8.43]). Nearly a third (28.7%) of all interviewed PLHIV self reported that they had been treated with IPT. It can be concluded that ICF for TB and IPT among PLHIV in Addis Ababa need boosting. Hence, it is recommended to put into practice the national and global guidelines to improve ICF and IPT among PLHIV in the city.

  6. A descriptive study of older bipolar disorder residents living in New York City's adult congregate facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheeran, Thomas; Greenberg, Rebecca L; Davan, Laura A; Dealy, Jennifer A; Young, Robert C; Bruce, Martha L

    2012-11-01

    Much of the research on geriatric bipolar disorder is from outpatient populations or epidemiological surveys with small samples. In contrast, in this study a descriptive analysis was conducted of geriatric and younger adult residents with bipolar disorder or mania in non-clinical adult congregate facilities (ACFs) in the greater New York City region. A total of 2602 ACF residents were evaluated in 19 facilities, across multiple demographic and health domains. Within this sample, 200 residents had chart diagnoses of bipolar disorder or mania. Among these, 50 geriatric residents (age ≥ 60) were compared to 50 younger adult residents (age < 50) on a number of demographic and health measures.   Based on chart diagnoses, the overall prevalence of bipolar disorder was 7.8%. Compared to other studies of outpatient, epidemiological, and census samples, both older and younger residents with bipolar disorder had higher rates of cognitive impairment, impairment in executive functioning, vision impairment, and proportion of residents who had never been married. The younger group also had higher rates of obesity and the elderly group had a greater proportion of residents without high-school education. Both age groups had rates of lithium or valproate use comparable to those found in outpatient studies. Comparing the two age groups, the elderly sample had lower overall cognitive and executive functioning, and was using a larger number of medication classes than the younger group. The elderly group also had a larger proportion of residents who were separated/divorced or widowed compared to the younger group, which had higher rates of never-married residents. Overall, both age groups had relatively high rates of bipolar disorder, with significant cognitive impairment, medical burden, obesity, mental health service use, and lower education levels, as compared to outpatient, epidemiological, and census samples. Of note was the significant cognitive impairment across age groups

  7. Interacting with and via mobile devices and mobile robots in an assisted living setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Dagioglou

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Using robotic home assistants as a platform for remote health monitoring offers several advantages, but also presents considerable challenges related to both the technical immaturity of home robotics and to user acceptance issues. In this paper we explore tablets and similar mobile devices as the medium of communication between robots and their users, presenting relevant current and planned research in humanrobot interaction that can help the telehealth community circumvent technical shortcomings, improve user acceptance, and maximize the quality of the data collected by robotic home assistants.

  8. 77 FR 20369 - Applications for New Awards; Centers for Independent Living-Training and Technical Assistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-04

    ..., empowerment, independence, and productivity of individuals with significant disabilities, and to integrate... also increase the efficiency of the training and technical assistance by reducing administrative costs...: (a) The Education Department General Administrative Regulations (EDGAR) in 34 CFR parts 74, 75, 77...

  9. Live Authority in the Classroom in Video Conference-Based Synchronous Distance Education: The Teaching Assistant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karal, Hasan; Çebi, Ayça; Turgut, Yigit Emrah

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to define the role of the assistant in a classroom environment where students are taught using video conference-based synchronous distance education. Qualitative research approach was adopted and, among purposeful sampling methods, criterion sampling method was preferred in the scope of the study. The study was carried…

  10. A facile and green microwave-assisted synthesis of new functionalized picolinium-based ionic liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mouslim Messali

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A facile preparation of a series of 17 new functionalized picolinium-based ionic liquids under “green chemistry” conditions is described. For the first time, target ionic liquids were prepared using standard methodology and under microwave irradiation in short duration of time with quantitative yields. Their structures were characterized by FT-IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, 11B, 19F, 31P and mass spectra.

  11. Norovirus Disease in Older Adults Living in Long-Term Care Facilities: Strategies for Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yingxi; Hall, Aron J; Kirk, Martyn D

    2017-01-01

    Noroviruses are the most common cause of gastroenteritis outbreaks in long-term care facility (LTCFs). This review summarizes the most up-to-date knowledge on norovirus infection in LTCFs with the aim of identifying potential strategies for management. LTCF residents are at greater risk of norovirus infection. Early identification of norovirus infection and prompt initiation of appropriate supportive therapy are required to reduce morbidity and mortality. Measures to prevent outbreaks and reduce the risk of norovirus infection in LTCFs include timely diagnosis and implementation of infection control interventions to limit virus transmission. Current guidelines for prevention and control are based on generic principles of infection control. Real-time reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays have been the gold standard for the rapid and sensitive detection of noroviruses. With the recent breakthroughs of human norovirus in vitro culture, doors are now opened to evaluate the efficacy of environmental disinfectants and hand hygiene options. Additionally, development of licensed vaccines against noroviruses may provide another important tool for infection prevention among high-risk individuals.

  12. Linking household surveys and health facility assessments to estimate intervention coverage for the Lives Saved Tool (LiST).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanyangarara, Mufaro; Chou, Victoria B

    2017-11-07

    Calls have been made for improved measurement of coverage for maternal, newborn and child health interventions. Recently, methods linking household and health facility surveys have been used to improve estimation of intervention coverage. However, linking methods rely the availability of household and health facility surveys which are temporally matched. Because nationally representative health facility assessments are not yet routinely conducted in many low and middle income countries, estimates of intervention coverage based on linking methods can be produced for only a subset of countries. Estimates of intervention coverage are a critical input for modelling the health impact of intervention scale-up in the Lives Saved Tool (LiST). The purpose of this study was to develop a data-driven approach to estimate coverage for a subset of antenatal care interventions modeled in LiST. Using a five-step process, estimates of population level coverage for syphilis detection and treatment, case management of diabetes, malaria infection, hypertensive disorders, and pre-eclampsia, were computed by linking household and health facility surveys. Based on data characterizing antenatal care and estimates of coverage derived from the linking approach, predictive models for intervention coverage were developed. Updated estimates of coverage based on the predictive models were compared, first with current default proxies, then with estimates based on the linking approach. Model fit and accuracy were assessed using three measures: the coefficient of determination, Pearson's correlation coefficient, and the root mean square error (RMSE). The ability to predict intervention coverage was fairly accurate across all interventions considered. Predictive models accounted for 20-63% of the variance in intervention coverages, and correlation coefficients ranged from 0.5 to 0.83. The predictive model used to estimate coverage of management of pre-eclampsia performed relatively better (RMSE

  13. The proposed TITAN facility at ISAC for very precise mass measurements on highly charged short-lived isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Dilling, J; Smith, M; Kluge, H J

    2003-01-01

    One of the necessary experimental quantities required for the test of unitarity of the fundamental Cabbibo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) quark mixing matrix can be gained from nuclear beta decay. However, the short-lived beta-decaying nuclei have to be produced on-line in order to provide a large enough sample to carry out the experiments. At the new ISAC (Isotope Separator and Accelerator) facility at the TRIUMF national laboratory in Vancouver, Canada, ideal conditions are provided for the production of some of the most interesting nuclides in that respect. The experimental information that is needed are branching ratio, half-life and Q-value of the specific beta decay. For the first two components experiments have already been carried out or are in preparation at ISAC (Ball et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 86 (2001) 1454, and experiments E823 and E909 approved at TRIUMF), for the third one, we are proposing to set up a unique facility capable of high accuracy mass measurements delta m/m<=1x10 sup - sup 8 on very shor...

  14. 75 FR 13521 - Centers for Independent Living Program-Training and Technical Assistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-22

    ... of Program: The purpose of the CIL program is to maximize independence, productivity, empowerment... transition from school to living independently, and two provide general, comprehensive training and technical... from school to postsecondary education, employment, and IL; and to better serve individuals with...

  15. Orphanage and Senior Citizen Assisted Living Center Erbil, Iraq. Sustainment Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-21

    quality workmanship. The auditorium was furnished by MOSA with commercial-grade furniture . In addition to providing furniture , MOSA provided...grade furniture . Site Photo 8. Multi-purpose building auditorium Site...children’s residential houses; however, the building was configured as one complete unit. The elderly housing unit contains three floors with a living

  16. Mediator-assisted Simultaneous probing of Cytosolic and Mitochondrial Redox activity in living cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiskanen, Arto; Spegel, Christer; Kostesha, Natalie

    2009-01-01

    This work describes an electron transfer mediator-assisted amperometric flow injection method for assessing redox enzyme activity in different subcellular compartments of the phosphoglucose isomerase deletion mutant strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, EBY44. The method is demonstrated using...... either fructose or glucose as the carbon source, yielding either NADH or NADPH through the glycolytic or pen-rose phosphate pathway, respectively. Respiratory noncompetent cells show greater inhibition of cytosolic menadione-reducing enzymes when NADH rather than NADPH is produced. Spectrophotometric...

  17. Robot-assisted surgery in cervical cancer patients reduces the time to normal activities of daily living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asciutto, Katrin C; Kalapotharakos, Grigorios; Löfgren, Mats; Högberg, Thomas; Borgfeldt, Christer

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate current surgical cervical cancer treatment in Sweden 2008-12. Analysis of data in the Swedish National Quality Register for Gynecological Surgery (GynOP). A total of 249 cervical cancer patients undergoing surgery. Analysis of prospectively gathered preoperative and postoperative data including patient-reported information. Mean operating time, blood loss/transfusion, length of hospital stay, return to activities of daily living. The patients undergoing laparoscopic robot-assisted surgery (n = 64) or laparotomy (n = 185) did not differ in age, body mass index, American Society of Anesthesiologists score, International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage or mean operating time. Blood loss was higher in the laparotomy group (p activities of daily living was longer in the laparotomy than the robot group (13.4 days vs. 9.7 days, p = 0.04). Laparoscopic robotic-assisted surgery is preferable to laparotomy for cervical cancer patients because it entails a significantly shorter hospital stay, less blood loss, fewer intraoperative complications and shorter time to normal daily activities. © 2014 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  18. Poor nutritional status is associated with urinary tract infection among older people living in residential care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, M; Håglin, L; Rosendahl, E; Gustafson, Y

    2013-02-01

    To investigate factors associated with poor nutritional status in older people living in residential care facilities. 188 residents (136 women, 52 men) with physical and cognitive impairments participated. Mean age was 84.7 y (range 65-100). The Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA), Barthel ADL Index, Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE), and Geriatric Depression Scale were used to evaluate nutritional status, activities of daily living, cognitive status and depressive symptoms. Medical conditions, clinical characteristics and prescribed drugs were recorded. Univariate and multivariate regressions were used to investigate associations with MNA scores. The mean MNA score was 20.5 ± 3.7 (range 5.5-27) and the median was 21 (interquartile range (IQR) 18.8-23.0). Fifteen per cent of participants were classified as malnourished and 66% at risk of malnutrition. Lower MNA scores were independently associated with urinary tract infection (UTI) during the preceding year (β = - 0.21, P = 0.006), lower MMSE scores (β = 0.16, P = 0.030), and dependent in feeding (β = - 0.14, P = 0.040). The majority of participants were at risk of or suffering from malnutrition. Urinary tract infection during the preceding year was independently associated with poor nutritional status. Dependence in feeding was also associated with poor nutritional status as were low MMSE scores for women. Prospective observations and randomized controlled trials are necessary to gain an understanding of a causal association between malnutrition and UTI.

  19. SHiP: a new facility for searching for long-lived neutral particles and studying the tau neutrino properties

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)658186

    2016-01-01

    SHiP (Search for Hidden Particles) is a new general purpose fixed target facility, proposed at the CERN SPS accelerator. In its initial phase, the 400 GeV proton beam will be dumped on a heavy target, integrating $2\\times 10^{20}$ protons on target in 5 years. A dedicated detector located downstream of the target, based on a long vacuum tank and a spectrometer and particle identification detectors, will allow probing a variety of models with light long-lived neutral and very weakly interacting particles and masses below 10 GeV. The main focus will be the physics of the so-called Hidden Portals, i.e. search for Dark Photons, Light scalars and pseudo-scalars, and Heavy Neutrinos. The sensitivity to Heavy Neutrinos will allow for the first time to probe, in the mass range between the kaon and the charm meson mass, a coupling range for which the baryon asymmetry of the Universe could be explained. Direct detection of light and long-lived SUSY particles, such as RPV neutralinos and pseudo-Dirac gauginos could als...

  20. Way-Finding Assistance System for Underground Facilities Using Augmented Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoi, K.; Yabuki, N.; Fukuda, T.; Michikawa, T.; Motamedi, A.

    2015-05-01

    Way-finding is one of main challenges for pedestrians in large subterranean spaces with complex network of connected labyrinths. This problem is caused by the loss of their sense of directions and orientation due to the lack of landmarks that are occluded by ceilings, walls, and skyscraper. This paper introduces an assistance system for way-finding problem in large subterranean spaces using Augmented Reality (AR). It suggests displaying known landmarks that are invisible in indoor environments on tablet/handheld devices to assist users with relative positioning and indoor way-finding. The location and orientation of the users can be estimated by the indoor positioning systems and sensors available in the common tablet or smartphones devices. The constructed 3D model of a chosen landmark that is in the field of view of the handheld's camera is augmented on the camera's video feed. A prototype system has been implemented to demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed system for way-finding.

  1. LIVE AUTHORITY IN THE CLASSROOM IN VIDEO CONFERENCE-BASED SYNCHRONOUS DISTANCE EDUCATION: The Teaching Assistant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan KARAL

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to define the role of the assistant in a classroom environment where students are taught using video conference-based synchronous distance education. Qualitative research approach was adopted and, among purposeful sampling methods, criterion sampling method was preferred in the scope of the study. The study was carried out during the spring semester of the 2008-2009 academic years. A teaching assistant and a total of 9 sophomore or senior students from the Department of City and Regional Development, Faculty of Architecture, Karadeniz Technical University, participated as subjects. The students included in the study sampling were taking lessons from the Middle East Technical University on the basis of synchronous distance education. Among the qualitative research methods, case study method was used and the study data were obtained from the semi-structured interview and observation results. Study data were analyzed with descriptive analysis methods. Data obtained at the end of the study were found to support the suggestion that there should be an authority in the video conference-based synchronous distance education. Findings obtained during the interviews made with the students revealed that some of the teacher’s classroom management related responsibilities are transferred to the assistant present in the classroom during the synchronous distance education. It was concluded at the end of the interviews that a teaching assistant’s presence should be obligatory in the undergraduate synchronous distance classroom environment. However, it was also concluded that there may not be any need for an authority in the classroom environment at the postgraduate education level due to the profile and expectations of the student, which differ from those of students at lower educational levels.

  2. A Review of Smart House Analysis Methods for Assisting Older People Living Alone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veralia Gabriela Sanchez

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Smart Houses are a prominent field of research referring to environments adapted to assist people in their everyday life. Older people and people with disabilities would benefit the most from the use of Smart Houses because they provide the opportunity for them to stay in their home for as long as possible. In this review, the developments achieved in the field of Smart Houses for the last 16 years are described. The concept of Smart Houses, the most used analysis methods, and current challenges in Smart Houses are presented. A brief introduction of the analysis methods is given, and their implementation is also reported.

  3. Students’ Knowledge Comprehension after Implementation of Live Conventional Demonstration, Video Teaching and Video-Assisted Instruction Methods in Endodontic Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadzadeh Akhlaghi, Nahid; Khalilak, Zohreh; Vatanpour, Mehdi; Moshari, Amirabbas; Ghaffari, Saman; Namazikhah, Mohammad Sadegh

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Video-assisted clinical instruction (VACID) has been found to be a beneficial teaching tool for various fields in dentistry. The aim of this interventional study was to compare the efficacy of live conventional demonstration (CD), video teaching, and VACID (video with explanation) methods in teaching of root canal treatment to undergraduate dental students. Methods and Materials: Forty-two undergraduate senior dental students participated in this study. The students experienced this course for the first time and were randomly divided into three groups (n=14). Group A attended live CD on a patient; group B watched a professionally produced demonstration video without any verbal explanation during 1 h; and finally group C watched the same video alongside live explanation by a mentor during the 1.5 h (VACID). The whole process was performed by an experienced endodontist on maxillary central incisors. All of The students carried out a multiple choice question exam to evaluate their comprehension. The mean score of the experimental groups were compared using ANOVA test and multiple comparisons were carried out with Tamhane test. The level of significance was set at 0.05. Results: There was significant difference among three groups according to the ANOVA test (Pendodontic training in undergraduate dental students. PMID:28512486

  4. Dynamic nano-imaging of label-free living cells using electron beam excitation-assisted optical microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuta, Masahiro; Kanamori, Satoshi; Furukawa, Taichi; Nawa, Yasunori; Inami, Wataru; Lin, Sheng; Kawata, Yoshimasa; Terakawa, Susumu

    2015-01-01

    Optical microscopes are effective tools for cellular function analysis because biological cells can be observed non-destructively and non-invasively in the living state in either water or atmosphere condition. Label-free optical imaging technique such as phase-contrast microscopy has been analysed many cellular functions, and it is essential technology for bioscience field. However, the diffraction limit of light makes it is difficult to image nano-structures in a label-free living cell, for example the endoplasmic reticulum, the Golgi body and the localization of proteins. Here we demonstrate the dynamic imaging of a label-free cell with high spatial resolution by using an electron beam excitation-assisted optical (EXA) microscope. We observed the dynamic movement of the nucleus and nano-scale granules in living cells with better than 100 nm spatial resolution and a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) around 10. Our results contribute to the development of cellular function analysis and open up new bioscience applications. PMID:26525841

  5. Chromophore-assisted light inactivation of HaloTag fusion proteins labeled with eosin in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemoto, Kiwamu; Matsuda, Tomoki; McDougall, Mark; Klaubert, Dieter H; Hasegawa, Akira; Los, Georgyi V; Wood, Keith V; Miyawaki, Atsushi; Nagai, Takeharu

    2011-05-20

    Chromophore-assisted light inactivation (CALI) is a potentially powerful tool for the acute disruption of a target protein inside living cells with high spatiotemporal resolution. This technology, however, has not been widely utilized, mainly because of the lack of an efficient chromophore as the photosensitizing agent for singlet oxygen ((1)O(2)) generation and the difficulty of covalently labeling the target protein with the chromophore. Here we choose eosin as the photosensitizing chromophore showing 11-fold more production of ((1)O(2)) than fluorescein and about 5-fold efficiency in CALI of β-galactosidase by using an eosin-labeled anti-β-galactosidase antibody compared with the fluorescein-labeled one. To covalently label target protein with eosin, we synthesize a membrane-permeable eosin ligand for HaloTag technology, demonstrating easy labeling and efficient inactivation of HaloTag-fused PKC-γ and aurora B in living cells. These antibody- and HaloTag-based CALI techniques using eosin promise effective biomolecule inactivation that is applicable to many cell biological assays in living cells.

  6. Dynamic nano-imaging of label-free living cells using electron beam excitation-assisted optical microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuta, Masahiro; Kanamori, Satoshi; Furukawa, Taichi; Nawa, Yasunori; Inami, Wataru; Lin, Sheng; Kawata, Yoshimasa; Terakawa, Susumu

    2015-11-03

    Optical microscopes are effective tools for cellular function analysis because biological cells can be observed non-destructively and non-invasively in the living state in either water or atmosphere condition. Label-free optical imaging technique such as phase-contrast microscopy has been analysed many cellular functions, and it is essential technology for bioscience field. However, the diffraction limit of light makes it is difficult to image nano-structures in a label-free living cell, for example the endoplasmic reticulum, the Golgi body and the localization of proteins. Here we demonstrate the dynamic imaging of a label-free cell with high spatial resolution by using an electron beam excitation-assisted optical (EXA) microscope. We observed the dynamic movement of the nucleus and nano-scale granules in living cells with better than 100 nm spatial resolution and a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) around 10. Our results contribute to the development of cellular function analysis and open up new bioscience applications.

  7. Sandia Pulsed Reactor Facility (SPRF) calculator-assisted pulse analysis and display system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estes, B.F.; Berry, D.T.

    1980-02-01

    Two solid-metal fast burst type reactors (SPR II and SPR III) are operated at the Sandia Pulsed Reactor Facility. Since startup of the reactors, oscilloscope traces have been used to record (by camera) the pulse (power) shape while log N systems have measured initial reactor period. Virtually no other pulse information is available. A decision was made to build a system that could collect the basic input data available from the reactor - fission chambers, photodiodes, and thermocouples - condition the signals and output the various parameters such as power, energy, temperature, period and lifetime on hard copy that would provide a record for operations personnel as well as the experimenter. Because the reactors operate in short time frames - pulse operation - it is convenient to utilize the classical Nordheim-Fuchs approximation of the diffusion equation to describe reactor behavior. This report describes the work performed to date in developing the calculator system and analytical models for computing the desired parameters.

  8. Renal artery clip dislodgement during hand-assisted laparoscopic living donor nephrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maartense, S; Heintjes, R J; Idu, M; Bemelman, F J; Bemelman, W A

    2003-11-01

    The main reason for conversion in laparoscopic donor nephrectomy (LDN) is peroperative bleeding. One of the advantages of hand-assisted laparoscopic donor nephrectomy (HDLN) is facilitated control in case of bleeding. This report describes two methods to avert conversion in HLDN in the case of abrupt major arterial bleeding. In the first case, during left HLDN the clips placed on the renal artery dislodged, and the surgeon managed to control the bleeding by compressing the focus of the bleeding with his finger. A balloon occlusion catheter was inserted through a groin incision in the aorta and advanced to the origo of the renal artery. Due to control of the hemorrhage, it was possible to close the renal artery stump by laparoscopic suturing, and a conversion was averted. The patient was discharged after 5 days, without signs of damage to the remaining kidney. In the second case, during right HLDN, the clips on the renal artery dislodged during stapling of the renal vein. The bleeding was controlled by finger compression and new clips were placed. The cuff of the artery was long enough to be clipped again. The patient was discharged after 5 days. Graft function was excellent in both cases. Major arterial bleeding can be controlled and managed in hand-assisted laparoscopic surgery. The use of a balloon occlusion catheter is an elegant way to avert conversion.

  9. The effects of animal-assisted therapy on loneliness in an elderly population in long-term care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Marian R; Banks, William A

    2002-07-01

    Animal-assisted therapy (AAT) is claimed to have a variety of benefits, but almost all published results are anecdotal. We characterized the resident population in long-term care facilities desiring AAT and determined whether AAT can objectively improve loneliness. Of 62 residents, 45 met inclusion criteria for the study. These 45 residents were administered the Demographic and Pet History Questionnaire (DPHQ) and Version 3 of the UCLA Loneliness Scale (UCLA-LS). They were then randomized into three groups (no AAT; AAT once/week; AAT three times/week; n = 15/group) and retested with the UCLA-LS near the end of the 6-week study. Use of the DPHQ showed residents volunteering for the study had a strong life-history of emotional intimacy with pets and wished that they currently had a pet. AAT was shown by analysis of covariance followed by pairwise comparison to have significantly reduced loneliness scores in comparison with the no AAT group. The desire for AAT strongly correlates with previous pet ownership. AAT reduces loneliness in residents of long-term care facilities.

  10. Facile Hydrothermal Synthesis of Monodispersed MoS2 Ultrathin Nanosheets Assisted by Ionic Liquid Brij56

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guan-Qun Han

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Monodispersed MoS2 ultrathin nanosheets have been successfully fabricated by a facile hydrothermal process assisted by ionic liquid Brij56. The effect of Brij56 on the morphology and structure of MoS2 has been obviously observed. XRD shows that the as-prepared MoS2 assisted by Brij56 has the weak and broad peak of (002 planes, which implies the small size and well dispersed structure of MoS2 nanosheets. TEM and SEM images reveal that MoS2 ultrathin nanosheets have small size and few stacking layers with the adding of Brij56. HRTEM images prove that MoS2 appears to have a highly monodispersed morphology and to be monolayer ultrathin nanosheets with the length about 5–8 nm, which can provide more exposed rims and edges as active sites for hydrogen evolution reaction. Brij56 has played a crucial role in preparing monodispersed MoS2 ultrathin nanosheets as excellent electrocatalysts. The growth mechanism of monodispersed MoS2 has been discussed in detail.

  11. Daily living with distress and enrichment: the moral experience of families with ventilator-assisted children at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnevale, Franco A; Alexander, Eren; Davis, Michael; Rennick, Janet; Troini, Rita

    2006-01-01

    " and "bad things" are determined in their world. Parents described their life as a very unfair situation, yet there was nothing that they could do about it. Finally, an overarching phenomenon that best characterizes these families' experiences was identified: daily living with distress and enrichment. Virtually every aspect of the lives of these families was highly complicated and frequently overwhelming. An immediate interpretation of these findings is that families should be fully informed of the demands and hardships that would await them, encouraging parents perhaps to decide otherwise. This would be but a partial reading of the findings, because despite the enormous difficulties described by these families, they also reported deep enrichments and rewarding experiences that they could not imagine living without. Life with a child who requires assisted ventilation at home involves living every day with a complex tension between the distresses and enrichments that arise out of this experience. The conundrum inherent in this situation is that there are no simple means for reconciling this tension. This irreconcilability is particularly stressful for these families. Having their child permanently institutionalized or "disconnected" from ventilation (and life) would eliminate both the distresses and the enrichments. These options are outside the realm of what these families could live with, aside from the 1 family whose child is now permanently hospitalized, at a tremendous cost of guilt to the family. These findings make important contributions by (1) advancing our understanding of the moral experiences of this group of families; (2) speaking to the larger context of other technology-dependent children who require home care; (3) relating home care experiences to neonatal, critical care, and other hospital services, suggesting that these settings examine their approaches to this population that may impose preventable burdens on the lives of these children and their

  12. Live birth and adverse birth outcomes in women with ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease receiving assisted reproduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgård, Bente Mertz; Larsen, P V; Fedder, J

    2016-01-01

    , the OR of preterm birth was 5.29 (95% CI 2.41 to 11.63) in analyses including singletons and multiple births; restricted to singletons the OR was 1.80, 95% CI 0.49 to 6.62. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that women with UC and CD receiving ART treatments cannot expect the same success for each embryo transfer......OBJECTIVE: To examine the chance of live births and adverse birth outcomes in women with ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD) compared with women without inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) who have undergone assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatments. METHODS: This was a nationwide...... cohort study based on Danish health registries, comprising all women with an embryo transfer during 1 January 1994 through 2013. The cohorts comprised 1360 ART treatments in 432 women with UC, 554 ART treatments in 182 women with CD and 148 540 treatments in 52 489 women without IBD. Our primary outcome...

  13. Fall Detection on Ambient Assisted Living using a Wireless Sensor Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel FELGUEIRAS

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a distributed system for fall detection is presented. The proposed system was designed to monitor activities of the daily living of elderly people and to inform the caregivers when a falls event occurs. This system uses a scalable wireless sensor networks to collect the data and transmit it to a control center. Also, an intelligent algorithm is used to process the data collected by the sensor networks and calculate if an event is, or not, a fall. A statistical method is used to improve this algorithm and to reduce false positives. The system presented has the capability to learn with past events and to adapt is behavior with new information collected from the monitored elders. The results obtained show that the system has an accuracy above 98%. 

  14. Fall Detection on Ambient Assisted Living using a Wireless Sensor Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    António PEREIRA

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a distributed system for fall detection is presented. The proposed system was designed to monitor activities of the daily living of elderly people and to inform the caregivers when a falls event occurs. This system uses a scalable wireless sensor networks to collect the data and transmit it to a control center. Also, an intelligent algorithm is used to process the data collected by the sensor networks and calculate if an event is, or not, a fall. A statistical method is used to improve this algorithm and to reduce false positives. The system presented has the capability to learn with past events and to adapt is behavior with new information collected from the monitored elders. The results obtained show that the system has an accuracy above 98%.  

  15. [The effects of multimedia-assisted instruction on the skin care learning of nurse aides in long-term care facilities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yu-Ling; Kao, Yu-Hsiu

    2014-08-01

    Skin care is an important responsibility of nurse aides in long-term care facilities, and the nursing knowledge, attitudes, and skills of these aides significantly affects quality of care. However, the work schedule of nurse aides often limits their ability to obtain further education and training. Therefore, developing appropriate and effective training programs for nurse aides is critical to maintaining and improving quality of care in long-term care facilities. This study investigates the effects of multimedia assisted instruction on the skin care learning of nurse aides working in long-term care facilities. A quasi-experimental design and convenient sampling were adopted in this study. Participants included 96 nurse aides recruited from 5 long-term care facilities in Taoyuan County, Taiwan. The experimental group received 3 weeks of multimedia assisted instruction. The control group did not receive this instruction. The Skin Care Questionnaire for Nurse Aides in Long-term Care Facilities and the Skin Care Behavior Checklist were used for assessment before and after the intervention. (1) Posttest scores for skin care knowledge, attitudes, behavior, and the skin care checklist were significantly higher than pretest scores for the intervention group. There was no significant difference between pretest and posttest scores for the control group. (2) A covariance analysis of pretest scores for the two groups showed that the experimental group earned significantly higher average scores than their control group peers for skin care knowledge, attitudes, behavior, and the skin care checklist. The multimedia assisted instruction demonstrated significant and positive effects on the skin care leaning of nurse aides in long-term care facilities. This finding supports the use of multimedia assisted instruction in the education and training of nurse aides in long-term care facilities in the future.

  16. Physician-Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia: Can You Even Imagine Teaching Medical Students How to End Their Patients' Lives?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudreau, J Donald

    2011-01-01

    The peer-reviewed literature includes numerous well-informed opinions on the topics of euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide. However, there is a paucity of commentary on the interface of these issues with medical education. This is surprising, given the universal assumption that in the event of the legalization of euthanasia, the individuals on whom society expects to confer the primary responsibility for carrying out these acts are members of the medical profession. Medical students and residents would inevitably and necessarily be implicated. It is my perspective that everyone in the profession, including those charged with educating future generations of physicians, has a critical interest in participating in this ongoing debate. I explore potential implications for medical education of a widespread sanctioning of physician-inflicted and physician-assisted death. My analysis, which uses a consequential-basis approach, leads me to conclude that euthanasia, when understood to include physician aid in hastening death, is incommensurate with humanism and the practice of medicine that considers healing as its overriding mandate. I ask readers to imagine the consequences of being required to teach students how to end their patients' lives and urge medical educators to remain cognizant of their responsibility in upholding long-entrenched and foundational professional values. PMID:22319424

  17. [Deficiency and BPC: what changes in the lives of people assisted?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Wederson Rufino

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this article is to analyze the impact of well-being provoked in the life of the disabled people after the Cash Benefit to Disabled People (BPC). The BPC is a social assistance benefit consisting in an unconditional and monthly transference of the equivalent of a minimum wage, to poor people with deficiency and elders with more than 65 years. The methodology used was a case study with qualitative and quantitative techniques of data collection and analysis. BPC performed interviews guided by a semi-structuralized questionnaire with 30 people with deficiency. The results showed that: (1) BPC is an important mechanism of security of income in the consumption of basic goods of feeding, health treatments and expenses with housing of deficient and its families; (2) disabled people had related the concession of the benefit to the increase of social and financial independence in relation to their families, contributing to expand the idea of autonomy and citizenship; (3) it is an instrument capable of protecting the benefited ones and their families of the situation of social vulnerability result of the poverty, although the mothers of the deficient children leave the work market to take care of their children and do not receive any kind of social protection from the State.

  18. Assessment of Activity of Daily Living Among Older Adult Patients in Home Healthcare and Skilled Nursing Facilities: An Integrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osakwe, Zainab Toteh; Larson, Elaine; Agrawal, Mansi; Shang, Jinjing

    2017-05-01

    Older adult's ability to self-manage illness is dependent on their ability to perform activities of daily living (ADL). Forty-five percent of those older than 65 years will have ongoing clinical needs after hospital discharge and require postacute care (PAC) services in settings such as home healthcare (HHC) and skilled nursing facilities (SNF). The Improving Medicare Post-Acute Care Transformation Act of 2014 requires PAC providers to begin collecting and reporting ADL data to build a coordinated approach to payment and standardize patient assessments and quality measurement. The aim of this integrative review was to compare the methods of assessing ADLs in HHC to SNF. The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses statement was used to ensure results were reported systematically. A scientific literature search without date restriction within the PubMed and Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature databases was conducted. Two independent investigators assessed study quality using the quality appraisal instrument developed by Kmet et al. Study quality was high. Of the 18,749 articles identified by the search, 8 met inclusion criteria and four tools were identified that are used to assess ADLs in SNF and HHC. Although SNF and HHC collect similar ADL information, the range of content covered, item definitions, scoring, and psychometrics are not comparable across settings.

  19. Violent behavior of patients living in psychiatric residential facilities: a comparison of male patients with different violence histories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candini, Valentina; Buizza, Chiara; Ferrari, Clarissa; Boero, Maria Elena; Giobbio, Gian Marco; Goldschmidt, Nicoletta; Greppo, Stefania; Iozzino, Laura; Maggi, Paolo; Melegari, Anna; Pasqualetti, Patrizio; Rossi, Giuseppe; de Girolamo, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    People with severe mental disorders and a history of violence are often seen as a difficult-to-manage segment of the population. In addition, this group is usually characterized by a high risk of crime recidivism, and poor compliance with community and aftercare programs. To investigate a sample of male patients living in Residential Facilities (RFs) with a history of violent behavior against people and to compare their characteristics with those of never-violent residents; to analyze the associations between aggressive behaviors in the last two years and a history of previous violence; and, to assess the predictors of aggressive behaviors. This study is part of a prospective observational cohort study which involved 23 RFs in Northern Italy. A comprehensive set of sociodemographic, clinical, and treatment-related information was gathered, and standardized assessments were administered to each participant. Also a detailed assessment of aggressive behaviors in the past two years was carried out. The study involved 268 males: 81 violent and 187 never-violent. Compared to never-violent patients, violent patients were younger, with a higher proportion of personality disorders, and have displayed an increased number of aggressive behaviors in the last two years. The presence of a history of violent behavior in the past significantly increases the probability of committing aggressive acts in the future. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. A Randomized Comparison of Bougie-Assisted and TracheoQuick Plus Cricothyrotomies on a Live Porcine Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Henlin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Cricothyrotomy is a rescue procedure in “cannot intubate, cannot oxygenate” scenarios where other methods of nonsurgical airway management have failed. We compared 2 cuffed cricothyrotomy sets, bougie-assisted cricothyrotomy (BACT and novel percutaneous TracheoQuick Plus, on a live porcine model in a simulated periarrest situation. Methods. Thirty-four anesthetized minipigs were randomly allocated into two groups: BACT technique (n=17 and TracheoQuick Plus (n=17. The primary outcome was duration of cricothyrotomy while secondary outcomes were total success rate, number of attempts, location of incision, changes in heart rate, oxygen saturation, and the incidence of complications. Results. BACT was significantly faster than TracheoQuick Plus cricothyrotomy, with a median time of 69 sec (IQR 56–85 versus 178 sec (IQR 152–272. The total success rate was without difference. 94% of BACT was performed successfully on the first attempt, while in the TracheoQuick Plus group, it was only 18% (P<0.001. Trauma to the posterior tracheal wall was observed once in the BACT group and 5 times in the TracheoQuick Plus group. Oxygen saturation was significantly higher in the BACT group both during and after the procedure. Conclusions. BACT is superior to TracheoQuick Plus cricothyrotomy on a live animal model.

  1. The lived experience of moral distress: nurses who assisted with elective abortions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Debra R

    2005-01-01

    The concept of moral distress has been studied mainly as an occupational issue and has not been developed for use in clinical practice. This study was designed to bridge prior studies of occupational moral distress with future clinical investigations of moral distress. Study aims were to discover the essence, properties, and full content domain of the concept of moral distress in order to develop a universal definition of the concept. A modified phenomenological study of nurses' experience of a particular moral issue was conducted. A maximum variation sampling strategy was used to recruit a final sample of registered nurses (N = 10). Interior aversion is the essential act of moral distress. Five properties of the lived experience of moral distress were identified: perception, pain, valuing, altered participation, and perspective. Three types of moral distress identified in this study were: shocked, muted, and suppressed (persistent). Type of moral distress was related to situational conditions, recognition of moral ends, quality of coping processes, and temporal breadth. Negative outcomes of moral distress, which probably exist, were undetectable with this study design. The definition has been composed in universal terms, but remains tentative, since the full content domain of moral distress was largely but not definitively identified.

  2. Toward the Facile and Ecofriendly Fabrication of Quantum Dot-Sensitized Solar Cells via Thiol Coadsorbent Assistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jia-Yaw; Li, Chen-Hei; Chiang, Ya-Han; Chen, Chia-Hung; Li, Pei-Ni

    2016-07-27

    This paper reports a facile and environmentally friendly approach to the preparation of highly efficient quantum dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs) based on a combination of aqueous CuInS2 quantum dots (QDs) and thiol coadsorbents. The photovoltaic properties of the QDSSCs were found to be dependent on the type and concentration of the thiol coadsorbent. The incorporation of thiol coadsorbents results in improved JSC and VOC because (1) they provide disulfide reductants during the QD sensitization process and (2) the coadsorbent molecules are anchored on the TiO2 surface, thus affecting the movement of the conduction band of TiO2. To the best of the our knowledge, this is the first demonstrated use of various thiol coadsorbents as reducing agents in the fabrication of high-efficiency QDSSCs. CuInS2 QDSSCs fabricated with the assistance of thioglycolic acid coadsorbents exhibited efficiencies as high as 5.90%, which is 20 times higher than that of the control device without thiol coadsorbents (0.29%). In addition, the photovoltaic properties of a device fabricated using the colloidal CuInS2 QDs coated with different bifunctional linkers were investigated for comparison. The versatility of this facile fabrication process was demonstrated in the preparation of solar cells sensitized with aqueous AgInS2 or CdSeTe QDs. The AgInS2 QDSSC showed a conversion efficiency of 2.72%, which is the highest reported for Ag-based metal sulfides QDSSCs thus far.

  3. Disability, residential environment and social participation: factors influencing daily mobility of persons living in residential care facilities in two regions of France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapegno, Noémie; Ravaud, Jean-François

    2017-09-29

    Despite the context of individualization of public policies and promotion of independent living, residential care facilities (RCFs) (called "établissements medico-sociaux" in France) still represent the main system used by disabled people. Through a study of their daily mobility, this article proposes a geographical approach to the examination of factors influencing the social participation of disabled persons with motor impairments who live in residential care facilities. The data were collected in three stages from several sources. We first carried out 24 semi-directive interviews among supervisory staff in all the institutions in two regions of France (Greater Paris and Upper Normandy) to better understand the nature of services offered by medico-social facilities. We next did field work in greater detail in 10 of these institutions. We selected residents by random sampling. These first stages then allowed us to study the mobility of residents and record their perceptions. We conducted participant observation and interviews with 81 disabled residents within the 10 RCF. Data analysis enabled consideration not only of the role of the residential environment in people's daily mobility, but the role of the institutions as well. We identified three typical profiles of mobility practices depending on the facilities: "the islanders", living in isolated facilities far from public transportation, or in so-called "difficult" neighborhoods; people who alternate individual and group mobility in a more or less large area; and "the navigators" who have high mobility over a very large area, often living in facilities located in urban areas. The study also enabled an analysis of the obstacles and facilitators inside and outside the residential facilities. These place restrictions on social participation by disabled adults. However, possibilities for individual negotiation may enable bypassing some obstacles. The three ideal-type profiles of mobility analyzed constitute

  4. Measuring end-of-life care and outcomes in residential care/assisted living and nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Sheryl; Cohen, Lauren; van der Steen, Jenny T; Reed, David; van Soest-Poortvliet, Mirjam C; Hanson, Laura C; Sloane, Philip D

    2015-04-01

    The two primary residential options for older adults who require supportive care are nursing homes and residential care/assisted living. More than one-quarter of all deaths in the U.S. occur in these settings. Although the information available on end of life in long-term care has been growing, the comparative suitability of various measures to guide this work is unknown. To determine the optimal measures to assess end-of-life care and outcomes in nursing homes and residential care/assisted living. A total of 264 family members of decedents from 118 settings were interviewed and provided data on 11 instruments that have been used in, but not necessarily developed for, long-term care populations; Overall, 20 scales and subscales/indices were evaluated. Measures were compared on their psychometric properties and the extent to which they discriminated among important resident, family, and setting characteristics. Prioritizing measures that distinguish the assessment of care from the assessment of dying, and secondarily that exhibit an acceptable factor structure, this study recommends two measures of care-the Family Perceptions of Physician-Family Caregiver Communication and the End of Life in Dementia (EOLD)-Satisfaction With Care-and two measures of outcomes-the EOLD-Symptom Management and the EOLD-Comfort Assessment in Dying. An additional measure to assess outcomes is the Mini-Suffering State Examination (MSSE). The care measures and the MSSE are especially valuable as they discriminate between decedents who were and were not transferred immediately before death, an important outcome, and whether the family expected the death, a useful target for intervention. Despite these recommendations, measurement selection should be informed not only on the basis of psychometric properties but also by specific clinical and research needs. The data in this manuscript will help researchers, clinicians, and administrators understand the implications of choosing various

  5. Attitudes towards and Limitations to ICT Use in Assisted and Independent Living Communities: Findings from a Specially-Designed Technological Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkowsky, Ronald W.; Cotton, Shelia R.; Yost, Elizabeth A.; Winstead, Vicki P.

    2013-01-01

    Much literature has been devoted to theoretical explanations of the learning processes of older adults and to the methods of teaching best utilized in older populations. However, there has been less focus on the education of older adults who reside in assisted and independent living communities (AICs), especially with regards to information and…

  6. Changing the Impact of Nursing Assistants' Education in Seniors' Care: the Living Classroom in Long-Term Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boscart, Veronique M; d'Avernas, Josie; Brown, Paul; Raasok, Marlene

    2017-03-01

    Evidence-informed care to support seniors is based on strong knowledge and skills of nursing assistants (NAs). Currently, there are insufficient NAs in the workforce, and new graduates are not always attracted to nursing home (NH) sectors because of limited exposure and lack of confidence. Innovative collaborative approaches are required to prepare NAs to care for seniors. A 2009 collaboration between a NH group and a community college resulted in the Living Classroom (LC), a collaborative approach to integrated learning where NA students, college faculty, NH teams, residents, and families engage in a culture of learning. This approach situates the learner within the NH where knowledge, team dynamics, relationships, behaviours, and inter-professional (IP) practice are modelled. As of today, over 300 NA students have successfully completed this program. NA students indicate high satisfaction with the LC and have an increased intention to seek employment in NHs. Faculty, NH teams, residents, and families have increased positive beliefs towards educating students in a NH. The LC is an effective learning approach with a positive and high impact learning experience for all. The LC is instrumental in contributing to a capable workforce caring for seniors.

  7. Ergonomics and design for sustainability in healthcare: ambient assisted living and the social-environmental impact of patients lifestyle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreoni, Giuseppe; Arslan, Pelin; Costa, Fiammetta; Muschiato, Sabrina; Romero, Maximiliano

    2012-01-01

    This work presents considerations on Ergonomics and Design for Sustainability in the healthcare field based on research experiences of the Technology and Design for Healthcare (TeDH) research group of INDACO (Industrial design, communication, arts and fashion) department of Politecnico di Milano. In order to develop a multidisciplinary approach to design able to answer to specific user needs such as elderly in an environmental sustainable way (1) this paper shows the results we achieved concerning ergonomics and environmental impact in product development (2), the extension of this approach to interior and home design and the advantage of the application of Information Communication Technologies (ICT). ICT can help people with special needs to make their everyday life easier and more safe, at the same time, ICT can make social-environmental impact of everyday behavior evident and can be applied to manage sustainability. The specific theme is thus to integrate ergonomics and sustainability competences in the development of Ambient Assisted Living through a Product- Service System approach. The concept of product service system has the potential to improve product performances and services, establish new relations and networks with different actors in order to satisfy user needs and apply a systems approach considering environmental, social and economic factors in the users' environment.

  8. Cross-sectional relationship between physical fitness components and functional performance in older persons living in long-term care facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Mechelen Willem

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The age-related deterioration of physiological capacities such as muscle strength and balance is associated with increased dependence. Understanding the contribution of physical fitness components to functional performance facilitates the development of adequate exercise interventions aiming at preservation of function and independence of older people. The aim of the study was to investigate the relationship between physical fitness components and functional performance in older people living in long-term care facilities. Methods Design cross-sectional study Subjects 226 persons living in long-term care facilities (mean age: 81.6 ± 5.6. Outcome measures Physical fitness and functional performance were measured by performance-based tests. Results Knee and elbow extension strength were significantly higher in men (difference = 44.5 and 50.0 N, respectively, whereas women were more flexible (difference sit & reach test = 7.2 cm. Functional performance was not significantly different between the genders. In men, motor coordination (eye-hand coordination and measures of strength were the main contributors to functional performance, whereas in women flexibility (sit and reach test and motor coordination (tandem stance and eye-hand coordination played a major role. Conclusion The results of this study show that besides muscle strength, fitness components such as coordination and flexibility are associated with functional performance of older people living in long-term care facilities. This suggests that men and women living in long-term care facilities, differ considerably concerning the fitness factors contributing to functional performance. Women and men may, therefore, need exercise programs emphasizing different fitness aspects in order to improve functional performance.

  9. Perspectives of older people living in long-term care facilities and of their family members toward advance care planning discussions: a systematic review and thematic synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Mignani V; Ingravallo F; Mariani E; Chattat R

    2017-01-01

    Veronica Mignani,1 Francesca Ingravallo,1 Elena Mariani,2 Rabih Chattat2 1Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, University of Bologna, Via Irnerio, Bologna, Italy; 2Department of Psychology, University of Bologna, Viale Berti Pichat, Bologna, Italy Objective: We aimed to search and synthesize qualitative studies exploring the perspectives of older people living in long-term care facilities and of their family members about advance care planning (ACP) discussions. Methods: The enhanci...

  10. A Mobile Virtual Butler to Bridge the Gap between Users and Ambient Assisted Living: A Smart Home Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuno Costa

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Ambient Intelligence promises to transform current spaces into electronic environments that are responsive, assistive and sensitive to human presence. Those electronic environments will be fully populated with dozens, hundreds or even thousands of connected devices that share information and thus become intelligent. That massive wave of electronic devices will also invade everyday objects, turning them into smart entities, keeping their native features and characteristics while seamlessly promoting them to a new class of thinking and reasoning everyday objects. Although there are strong expectations that most of the users’ needs can be fulfilled without their intervention, there are still situations where interaction is required. This paper presents work being done in the field of human-computer interaction, focusing on smart home environments, while being a part of a larger project called Aging Inside a Smart Home. This initiative arose as a way to deal with a large scourge of our country, where lots of elderly persons live alone in their homes, often with limited or no physical mobility. The project relies on the mobile agent computing paradigm in order to create a Virtual Butler that provides the interface between the elderly and the smart home infrastructure. The Virtual Butler is receptive to user questions, answering them according to the context and knowledge of the AISH. It is also capable of interacting with the user whenever it senses that something has gone wrong, notifying next of kin and/or medical services, etc. The Virtual Butler is aware of the user location and moves to the computing device which is closest to the user, in order to be always present. Its avatar can also run in handheld devices keeping its main functionality in order to track user when s/he goes out. According to the evaluation carried out, the Virtual Butler is assessed as a very interesting and loved digital friend, filling the gap between the user and the

  11. A mobile Virtual Butler to bridge the gap between users and ambient assisted living: a Smart Home case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Nuno; Domingues, Patricio; Fdez-Riverola, Florentino; Pereira, António

    2014-08-06

    Ambient Intelligence promises to transform current spaces into electronic environments that are responsive, assistive and sensitive to human presence. Those electronic environments will be fully populated with dozens, hundreds or even thousands of connected devices that share information and thus become intelligent. That massive wave of electronic devices will also invade everyday objects, turning them into smart entities, keeping their native features and characteristics while seamlessly promoting them to a new class of thinking and reasoning everyday objects. Although there are strong expectations that most of the users' needs can be fulfilled without their intervention, there are still situations where interaction is required. This paper presents work being done in the field of human-computer interaction, focusing on smart home environments, while being a part of a larger project called Aging Inside a Smart Home. This initiative arose as a way to deal with a large scourge of our country, where lots of elderly persons live alone in their homes, often with limited or no physical mobility. The project relies on the mobile agent computing paradigm in order to create a Virtual Butler that provides the interface between the elderly and the smart home infrastructure. The Virtual Butler is receptive to user questions, answering them according to the context and knowledge of the AISH. It is also capable of interacting with the user whenever it senses that something has gone wrong, notifying next of kin and/or medical services, etc. The Virtual Butler is aware of the user location and moves to the computing device which is closest to the user, in order to be always present. Its avatar can also run in handheld devices keeping its main functionality in order to track user when s/he goes out. According to the evaluation carried out, the Virtual Butler is assessed as a very interesting and loved digital friend, filling the gap between the user and the smart home. The

  12. A Mobile Virtual Butler to Bridge the Gap between Users and Ambient Assisted Living: A Smart Home Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Nuno; Domingues, Patricio; Fdez-Riverola, Florentino; Pereira, António

    2014-01-01

    Ambient Intelligence promises to transform current spaces into electronic environments that are responsive, assistive and sensitive to human presence. Those electronic environments will be fully populated with dozens, hundreds or even thousands of connected devices that share information and thus become intelligent. That massive wave of electronic devices will also invade everyday objects, turning them into smart entities, keeping their native features and characteristics while seamlessly promoting them to a new class of thinking and reasoning everyday objects. Although there are strong expectations that most of the users' needs can be fulfilled without their intervention, there are still situations where interaction is required. This paper presents work being done in the field of human-computer interaction, focusing on smart home environments, while being a part of a larger project called Aging Inside a Smart Home. This initiative arose as a way to deal with a large scourge of our country, where lots of elderly persons live alone in their homes, often with limited or no physical mobility. The project relies on the mobile agent computing paradigm in order to create a Virtual Butler that provides the interface between the elderly and the smart home infrastructure. The Virtual Butler is receptive to user questions, answering them according to the context and knowledge of the AISH. It is also capable of interacting with the user whenever it senses that something has gone wrong, notifying next of kin and/or medical services, etc. The Virtual Butler is aware of the user location and moves to the computing device which is closest to the user, in order to be always present. Its avatar can also run in handheld devices keeping its main functionality in order to track user when s/he goes out. According to the evaluation carried out, the Virtual Butler is assessed as a very interesting and loved digital friend, filling the gap between the user and the smart home. The

  13. Facile "living" radical polymerization of methyl methacrylate in the presence of iniferter agents: homogeneous and highly efficient catalysis from copper(II) acetate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hongjuan; Zhang, Lifen; Jiang, Xiaowu; Bao, Xiaoguang; Cheng, Zhenping; Zhu, Xiulin

    2014-08-01

    A facile homogeneous polymerization system involving the iniferter agent 1-cyano-1-methylethyl diethyldithiocarbamate (MANDC) and copper(II) acetate (Cu(OAc)2 ) is successfully developed in bulk using methyl methacylate (MMA) as a model monomer. The detailed polymerization kinetics with different molar ratios (e.g., [MMA]0 /[MANDC]0 /[Cu(OAc)2 ]0 = 500/1/x (x = 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1.0)) demonstrate that this system has the typical "living"/controlled features of "living" radical polymerization, even with ppm level catalyst Cu(OAc)2 , first order polymerization kinetics, a linear increase in molecular weight with monomer conversion and narrow molecular weight distributions for the resultant PMMA. (1) H NMR spectra and chain-extension experiments further confirm the "living" characteristics of this process. A plausible mechanism is discussed. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. [The development and application of computer assisted photogrammetric-system of facial soft tissue running under multiple facilities for taking image].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, B; Yu, S; Tan, J

    1997-08-01

    The photogrammetric-system was developed by using multimedia computer, colour television camera, SE100 video blaster, Newsketch 1212 HR digitizer and by using Visual Basic language. It ran under Windows 3.1 and Windows 95. The features of this system: 1. It had three kinds of functions: photogrammetric function for frontal and profile facial soft tissue, function for managing file and function for forming dynamic data base. 2. It ran under different facilities for taking image (television camera with video blaster, digitizer, scanner) speedily and specificly, and had very friendly interface, and was of multimedia. The application of this system: 1. assisting diagnosing, making plan for treatment and observing results of treatment in clinic of orthodontics, orthopedics and facial plastics, 2. assisting analysing the features of facial soft tissue about certain people, 3. assisting the multimedia teaching.

  15. Should hand-assisted retroperitoneoscopic nephrectomy replace the standard laparoscopic technique for living donor nephrectomy? A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmaraezy, Ahmed; Abushouk, Abdelrahman Ibrahim; Kamel, Moaz; Negida, Ahmed; Naser, Omar

    2017-04-01

    We performed this meta-analysis to compare hand-assisted retroperitoneoscopic (HARP) and traditional laparoscopic (TLS) techniques for living donor nephrectomy. We searched PubMed, Cochrane Central, EMBASE, and Web of science for prospective studies, comparing HARP and TLS techniques. Data were extracted from eligible studies and pooled as risk ratios (RR) or standardized mean difference (SMD), using RevMan software (version 5.3 for windows). We performed a sensitivity analysis to test the robustness of our evidence and a subgroup analysis to stratify intraoperative complications on Clavien-Dindo score. Seven studies (498 patients) were included in the final analysis. HARP was superior to TLS in terms of shortening the operative duration (SMD = -0.84, 95% CI [-1.18 to -0.50]) and warm ischemia time (SMD = -0.93, 95% CI [-1.13 to -0.72]). There was no significant difference between HARP and TLS in terms of blood loss (SMD = 0.13, 95% CI [-0.50 to 0.76]), hospital stay (SMD = -0.27, 95% CI [-0.70 to 0.15]) or graft survival (RR = 0.97, 95% CI [0.92 to 1.02]). The overall risk ratio of intraoperative complications did not differ significantly between the two groups (RR = 0.62, 95% CI [0.31 to 1.21]). Our meta-analysis shows that HARP was associated with a shorter surgery duration and less warm ischemia time than TLS. However, no significant differences were found between the two groups in terms of graft survival or intraoperative complication rates. We recommend HARP over TLS for living donor nephrectomy; however, future studies with larger sample sizes are recommended to compare both techniques in terms of operative safety and quality of life outcomes. Copyright © 2017 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparisons of social interaction and activities of daily living between long-term care facility and community-dwelling stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jeong-Ae; Park, Se-Gwan; Roh, Hyo-Lyun

    2015-10-01

    [Purpose] This study was conducted to compare the correlation between social interaction and activities of daily living (ADL) between community-dwelling and long-term care facility stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] The Subjects were 65 chronic stroke patients (32 facility-residing, 33 community-dwelling). The Evaluation Social Interaction (ESI) tool was used to evaluate social interaction and the Assessment of Motor and Process Skills (AMPS) measure was used to evaluate ADL. [Results] Both social interaction and ADL were higher in community-dwelling than facility-residing stroke patients. There was a correlation between ESI and ADL for both motor and process skills among facility-residing patients, while only ADL process skills and ESI correlated among community-dwelling patients. In a partial correlation analysis using ADL motor and process skills as control variables, only process skills correlated with ESI. [Conclusion] For rehabilitation of stroke patients, an extended treatment process that combines ADL and social activities is likely to be required. Furthermore, treatment programs and institutional systems that can improve social interaction and promote health maintenance for community-dwelling and facility-residing chronic stroke patients are needed throughout the rehabilitation process.

  17. Ubiquitous Computing at its best: Serious exercise games for older adults in ambient assisted living environments – a technology acceptance perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Brauner

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Ubiquitous computing and ambient assisted living environments offer promising solutions to meet the demographic change. An example are serious games for health care: Regular exercises mediated through games increase health, well-being, and autonomy of the residents whilst at the same time reducing the costs for caregiving. To understand which factors contribute to an increased acceptance of such exercise games in ambient assisted living environments, a prototypic game was evaluated with 32 younger and 32 older players. Game performance is influenced by age, need for achievement, and also gender. Acceptance and projected use are related to the believe in making the game a habit, current gaming frequency, and social influences. Notably, the game increased the perceived health of the subjects, which is an important issue. This article concludes with guidelines to successfully introduce serious exercise games into health care and future ideas to realize social inclusion in game design.

  18. Efficacy of an Exercise and Nutritional Supplement Program on Physical Performance and Nutritional Status in Older Adults With Mobility Limitations Residing at Senior Living Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, Michael P; Nelson, Miriam E; Sacheck, Jennifer M; Reid, Kieran F; Kirn, Dylan; Fielding, Roger A; Chui, Kenneth K H; Folta, Sara C

    2017-07-01

    This cluster-randomized trial was designed to determine the efficacy of a 6-month exercise-nutritional supplement program (ENP) on physical function and nutritional status for older adults and the feasibility of implementing this program in a senior living setting. Twenty senior-living facilities were randomized to either a 3 day per week group-based ENP led by a trained facility staff member or a health education program (SAP). Participants (N = 121) completed a short physical performance battery, 400-m walk, handgrip strength test, and mini-nutrition assessment. 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D], insulin-like growth-factor 1 (IGF-1), and activity level were also measured. The ENP did not significantly improve physical function or nutritional status compared with the SAP. Compared with baseline, participants in the ENP engaged in 39 min less physical activity per week at 6 months. Several facility characteristics hindered implementation of the ENP. This study highlights the complexity of implementing an evidence-based program in a field setting.

  19. Antimüllerian hormone as a predictor of live birth following assisted reproduction: an analysis of 85,062 fresh and thawed cycles from the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology Clinic Outcome Reporting System database for 2012-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tal, Reshef; Seifer, David B; Wantman, Ethan; Baker, Valerie; Tal, Oded

    2018-02-01

    To determine if serum antimüllerian hormone (AMH) is associated with and/or predictive of live birth assisted reproductive technology (ART) outcomes. Retrospective analysis of Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology Clinic Outcome Reporting System database from 2012 to 2013. Not applicable. A total of 69,336 (81.8%) fresh and 15,458 (18.2%) frozen embryo transfer (FET) cycles with AMH values. None. Live birth. A total of 85,062 out of 259,499 (32.7%) fresh and frozen-thawed autologous non-preimplantation genetic diagnosis cycles had AMH reported for cycles over this 2-year period. Of those, 70,565 cycles which had embryo transfers were included in the analysis. Serum AMH was significantly associated with live birth outcome per transfer in both fresh and FET cycles. Multiple logistic regression demonstrated that AMH is an independent predictor of live birth in fresh transfer cycles and FET cycles when controlling for age, body mass index, race, day of transfer, and number of embryos transferred. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves demonstrated that the areas under the curve (AUC) for AMH as predictors of live birth in fresh cycles and thawed cycles were 0.631 and 0.540, respectively, suggesting that AMH alone is a weak independent predictor of live birth after ART. Similar ROC curves were obtained also when elective single-embryo transfer (eSET) cycles were analyzed separately in either fresh (AUC 0.655) or FET (AUC 0.533) cycles, although AMH was not found to be an independent predictor in eSET cycles. AMH is a poor independent predictor of live birth outcome in either fresh or frozen embryo transfer for both eSET and non-SET transfers. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Comparison of activities of daily living after osteoporotic hip fracture surgery in patients admitted from home and from geriatric health service facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horikawa A

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Akira Horikawa,1 Naohisa Miyakoshi,2 Yoichi Shimada,2 Hiroyuki Kodama1 1South Akita Orthopedic Clinic, Katagami, 2Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Akita University Graduate School of Medicine, Akita, Japan Abstract: With the population and proportion of the elderly increasing each year, ­difficulties with postoperative treatment outcomes after osteoporotic hip fracture are increasing. This study focused on activities of daily living (ADL in patients who underwent surgery for hip fracture through an investigation of living arrangements, the presence of dementia, and other complications of aging. Information from 99 patients who lived either at home or in geriatric health service facilities was collected for this trial. Most patients were over 65 years of age and female, and about half of them had dementia. The postoperative ADL score (focusing on patients’ walking ability was significant for those living at home than for those living in facilities. In addition, patients with dementia were divided into the following two categories: an early-rising group, comprising patients who were able to use a wheelchair within 48 hours of their operation; and a late-rising group, who did not start using a wheelchair until more than 48 hours after surgery. The ADL scores for the two groups were compared. Although the preoperative ADL scores were not significantly different between the two groups, postoperative ADL scores were significantly higher in the early-rising group than in the late-rising group, especially in patients who had undergone hemiarthroplasty. These data suggest that ADL in dementia patients following hip fracture depends on the surgical procedure performed and whether they are late or early risers after surgery. Keywords: delirium, dementia, rehabilitation, elderly

  1. Undergoing varicocele repair before assisted reproduction improves pregnancy rate and live birth rate in azoospermic and oligospermic men with a varicocele: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, E Will; Wiener, Laura Elizabeth; Rajanahally, Saneal; Crowell, Karen; Coward, Robert M

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate how varicocele repair (VR) impacts pregnancy (PRs) and live birth rates in infertile couples undergoing assisted reproduction wherein the male partner has oligospermia or azoospermia and a history of varicocele. Systematic review and meta-analysis. Not applicable. Azoospermic and oligospermic males with varicoceles and in couples undergoing assisted reproductive technology (ART) with IUI, IVF, or testicular sperm extraction (TESE) with IVF and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). Measurement of PRs, live birth, and sperm extraction rates. Odds ratios for the impact of VR on PRs, live birth, and sperm extraction rates for couples undergoing ART. Seven articles involving a total of 1,241 patients were included. Meta-analysis showed that VR improved live birth rates for the oligospermic (odds ratio [OR] = 1.699) and combined oligospermic/azoospermic groups (OR = 1.761). Pregnancy rates were higher in the azoospermic group (OR = 2.336) and combined oligospermic/azoospermic groups (OR = 1.760). Live birth rates were higher for patients undergoing IUI after VR (OR = 8.360). Sperm retrieval rates were higher in persistently azoospermic men after VR (OR = 2.509). Oligospermic and azoospermic patients with clinical varicocele who undergo VR experience improved live birth rates and PRs with IVF or IVF/ICSI. For persistently azoospermic men after VR requiring TESE for IVF/ICSI, VR improves sperm retrieval rates. Therefore, VR should be considered to have substantial benefits for couples with a clinical varicocele even if oligospermia or azoospermia persists after repair and ART is required. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Can Dogs Assist Children with Severe Autism Spectrum Disorder in Complying with Challenging Demands? An Exploratory Experiment with a Live and a Robotic Dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Karine; Lima, Mariely; Santos-Magalhães, André; Fafiães, Carla; de Sousa, Liliana

    2017-11-08

    Prompted by the need to find effective ways to enhance compliance in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and building on the increasing interest in dog-assisted interventions for this population, this study provides an exploratory test on whether dogs may assist children with severe ASD in complying with challenging demands while also decreasing behavioral and cardiovascular distress. A within-subject design was used. Depending on condition, participants were allowed to engage with a particular stimulus-their preferred toy, a live dog, or a robotic dog-before being exposed to a demanding task in which they had to wait for permission to eat a desired food item ("prohibition task"). Although inactive, the stimulus remained present during the prohibition task. Ten male children, aged between 6 and 9 years and diagnosed with severe ASD, participated in this study. All were clinically referred as having serious compliance difficulties in everyday routines. Testing occurred at participants' homes. Participants' emotional expressions, latency to distress, compliance levels, and behaviors that were shown during committed compliance were assessed during the prohibition task. In addition, cardiovascular reactivity to the task was monitored. Obtained data revealed significant differences between conditions for some of the considered measures. Latency to distress was higher in the live dog than in the toy condition. Committed compliance was higher in the live dog than in the toy and robot conditions. Quiet waiting during committed compliance was higher in the live dog condition than in the toy condition, and tension release behaviors were lower. In addition, heart rate reactivity was lower in the live dog condition than in the toy condition. The live dog condition appeared to have a calming effect on the participants, hypothetically facilitating compliance. Although promising, these findings are only preliminary and their clinical significance needs to be assessed in

  3. Contributing influences of work environment on sleep quantity and quality of nursing assistants in long-term care facilities: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuan; Punnett, Laura; McEnany, Geoffry Phillips; Gore, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    The effect of shift work on nurses' sleep is well-studied, but there are other challenging aspects of health care work that might also affect the sleep of direct caregivers. This study examined the influence of the long-term care work environment on sleep quantity and quality of nursing assistants. A cross-sectional survey collected data from 650 nursing assistants in 15 long-term care facilities; 46% reported short sleep duration and 23% reported poor sleep quality. A simple additive index of the number of beneficial work features (up to 7) was constructed for analysis with Poisson regression. With each unit increase of beneficial work features, nursing assistants were 7% less likely to report short sleep duration and 17% less likely to report poor sleep quality. These results suggest that effective workplace interventions should address a variety of work stressors, not only work schedule arrangements, in order to improve nursing assistants' sleep health. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The Design of New Technology Supporting Wellbeing, Independence and Social Participation, for Older Adults Domiciled in Residential Homes and/or Assisted Living Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Cahill

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study is to identify and validate the requirements for new technology supporting wellness, independence and social participation for older people domiciled in residential homes and/or assisted-living communities. Method: This research adopts a stakeholder evaluation approach to requirements elicitation and user interface design. Specifically, the study design combines several qualitative human–machine interaction (HMI design frameworks/methods, including realist ethnography, scenario-based design, persona-based design, and participatory design. Findings: New technology should reflect positive values around ageing and link to psychosocial models of successful ageing, and biopsychosocial models of health and wellbeing. Resident autonomy, wellness and social participation cannot be conceptualized outside an understanding of the relationships older adults have with others. The design remit for this technology is to enable a resident experience that is similar to living at home. New technologies should facilitate wellness and communication/connection, and not simply risk assessment. New technology provides an opportunity to bridge existing information gaps between care planning, care assessments and daily care. Overall this technology needs to be intuitive and uphold the resident’s dignity and rights. Person-to-person interaction is central to care delivery. The introduction of new technology should enhance this interaction, and not threaten it. Conclusions: Future assisted-living (AL technology should be premised by biopsychosocial models of wellness and support relationships between older adults and members of the personal and professional community. New assisted-living technology affords the possibility for improved social relationships, enhanced wellbeing, better quality of care, and independence. Such technologies require careful consideration in relation to adapting to age/condition and managing issues

  5. Hepatitis A among refugees, asylum seekers and migrants living in hosting facilities, Greece, April to December 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellou, Kassiani; Chrisostomou, Anthi; Sideroglou, Theologia; Georgakopoulou, Theano; Kyritsi, Maria; Hadjichristodoulou, Christos; Tsiodras, Sotirios

    2017-01-26

    An increased number of hepatitis A cases among refugees, asylum seekers and migrants residing in hosting facilities in Greece were recorded between April and December 2016. In total, 177 laboratory-confirmed symptomatic cases were reported; of these, 149 (84%) occurred in hosting camps mostly among Syrian children under 15 years. All cases reported symptom onset after their entry into the country. Public health interventions focused on hygiene measures and vaccination. This article is copyright of The Authors, 2017.

  6. Hepatitis A among refugees, asylum seekers and migrants living in hosting facilities, Greece, April to December 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellou, Kassiani; Chrisostomou, Anthi; Sideroglou, Theologia; Georgakopoulou, Theano; Kyritsi, Maria; Hadjichristodoulou, Christos; Tsiodras, Sotirios

    2017-01-01

    An increased number of hepatitis A cases among refugees, asylum seekers and migrants residing in hosting facilities in Greece were recorded between April and December 2016. In total, 177 laboratory-confirmed symptomatic cases were reported; of these, 149 (84%) occurred in hosting camps mostly among Syrian children under 15 years. All cases reported symptom onset after their entry into the country. Public health interventions focused on hygiene measures and vaccination. PMID:28181904

  7. Urinary Concentrations of Bisphenols and Their Association with Biomarkers of Oxidative Stress in People Living Near E-Waste Recycling Facilities in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Xue, Jingchuan; Gao, Chuan-zi; Qiu, Rong-liang; Li, Yan-xi; Li, Xiao; Huang, Ming-zhi; Kannan, Kurunthachalam

    2016-04-05

    In this study, concentrations of bisphenol A (BPA) and seven other bisphenols (BPs) were measured in urine samples collected from people living in and around e-waste dismantling facilities, and in matched reference population from rural and urban areas in China. BPA, bisphenol S (BPS), and bisphenol F (BPF) were frequently detected (detection frequencies: > 90%) in urine samples collected from individuals who live near e-waste facilities, with geometric mean (GM) concentrations of 2.99 (or 3.75), 0.361 (or 0.469), and 0.349 (or 0.435) ng/mL (or μg/g Cre), respectively; the other five BPs were rarely found in urine samples, regardless of the sampling location. The urinary concentrations of BPA and BPF, but not BPS, were significantly higher in individuals from e-waste recycling locations than did individuals from a rural reference location. Our findings indicated that e-waste dismantling activities contribute to human exposure to BPA and BPF. 8-Hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) was measured in urine as a marker of oxidative stress. In the e-waste dismantling location, urinary 8-OHdG was significantly and positively correlated (p < 0.001) with urinary BPA and BPS, but not BPF; a similar correlation was also observed in reference sites. These findings suggest that BPA and BPS exposures are associated with elevated oxidative stress.

  8. Perspectives of older people living in long-term care facilities and of their family members toward advance care planning discussions: a systematic review and thematic synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mignani, Veronica; Ingravallo, Francesca; Mariani, Elena; Chattat, Rabih

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to search and synthesize qualitative studies exploring the perspectives of older people living in long-term care facilities and of their family members about advance care planning (ACP) discussions. The enhancing transparency in reporting the synthesis of qualitative research (ENTREQ) framework was used to guide the review and report its results. PubMed, CINAHL, and PsycINFO were searched for studies published between January 2000 and November 2015. All included studies were assessed for comprehensiveness of reporting, and a thematic synthesis of their results was performed. The nine included studies differed in terms of qualitative method used, comprehensiveness of reporting, and geographical origin. The thematic synthesis led to the identification of four main themes: 1) plans already made; 2) end-of-life care and decision-making; 3) opinions and attitudes toward ACP; and 4) how, when, about what, and with whom to do ACP. Despite their willingness to be involved in a shared decision-making process, older residents and their families still have little experience with ACP. In view of implementing ACP for elders living in long-term care facilities, it would be important to rethink ACP and also to incorporate their nonmedical preferences, according to their own priorities.

  9. Electromechanical and robot-assisted arm training for improving generic activities of daily living, arm function, and arm muscle strength after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrholz, Jan; Hädrich, Anja; Platz, Thomas; Kugler, Joachim; Pohl, Marcus

    2012-06-13

    Electromechanical and robot-assisted arm training devices are used in rehabilitation, and might help to improve arm function after stroke. To assess the effectiveness of electromechanical and robot-assisted arm training for improving generic activities of daily living, arm function, and arm muscle strength in patients after stroke. We will also assess the acceptability and safety of the therapy. We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group's Trials Register (last searched July 2011), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2011, Issue 7), MEDLINE (1950 to July 2011), EMBASE (1980 to July 2011), CINAHL (1982 to July 2011), AMED (1985 to July 2011), SPORTDiscus (1949 to July 2011), PEDro (searched August 2011), COMPENDEX (1972 to July 2011), and INSPEC (1969 to July 2011). We also handsearched relevant conference proceedings, searched trials and research registers, checked reference lists, and contacted trialists, experts and researchers in our field, as well as manufacturers of commercial devices. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing electromechanical and robot-assisted arm training for recovery of arm function with other rehabilitation or placebo interventions, or no treatment, for patients after stroke. Two review authors independently selected trials for inclusion, assessed trial quality, and extracted data. We contacted trialists for additional information. We analysed the results as standardised mean differences (SMDs) for continuous variables and risk differences (RDs) for dichotomous variables. We included 19 trials (involving 666 participants) in this update of our review. Electromechanical and robot-assisted arm training did improve activities of daily living (SMD 0.43, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.11 to 0.75, P = 0.009, I(2) = 67%) as well as arm function (SMD 0.45, 95% CI 0.20 to 0.69, P = 0.0004, I(2) = 45%), but arm muscle strength did not improve (SMD 0.48, 95% CI -0.06 to 1.03, P = 0.08, I(2) = 79

  10. Perspectives of older people living in long-term care facilities and of their family members toward advance care planning discussions: a systematic review and thematic synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mignani V

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Veronica Mignani,1 Francesca Ingravallo,1 Elena Mariani,2 Rabih Chattat2 1Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, University of Bologna, Via Irnerio, Bologna, Italy; 2Department of Psychology, University of Bologna, Viale Berti Pichat, Bologna, Italy Objective: We aimed to search and synthesize qualitative studies exploring the perspectives of older people living in long-term care facilities and of their family members about advance care planning (ACP discussions. Methods: The enhancing transparency in reporting the synthesis of qualitative research (ENTREQ framework was used to guide the review and report its results. PubMed, CINAHL, and PsycINFO were searched for studies published between January 2000 and November 2015. All included studies were assessed for comprehensiveness of reporting, and a thematic synthesis of their results was performed. Results: The nine included studies differed in terms of qualitative method used, comprehensiveness of reporting, and geographical origin. The thematic synthesis led to the identification of four main themes: 1 plans already made; 2 end-of-life care and decision-making; 3 opinions and attitudes toward ACP; and 4 how, when, about what, and with whom to do ACP. Conclusion: Despite their willingness to be involved in a shared decision-making process, older residents and their families still have little experience with ACP. Practical implications: In view of implementing ACP for elders living in long-term care facilities, it would be important to rethink ACP and also to incorporate their nonmedical preferences, according to their own priorities. Keywords: advance care planning, frail elderly, caregivers, residential facilities, qualitative research

  11. Health risks for the population living in the vicinity of an Integrated Waste Management Facility: Screening environmental pollutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domingo, José L., E-mail: joseluis.domingo@urv.cat [Laboratory of Toxicology and Environmental Health, School of Medicine, IISPV, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Sant Llorenç 21, 43201 Reus, Catalonia (Spain); Rovira, Joaquim [Laboratory of Toxicology and Environmental Health, School of Medicine, IISPV, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Sant Llorenç 21, 43201 Reus, Catalonia (Spain); Departament d' Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Av. Països Catalans 26, 43007 Tarragona, Catalonia (Spain); Vilavert, Lolita; Nadal, Martí [Laboratory of Toxicology and Environmental Health, School of Medicine, IISPV, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Sant Llorenç 21, 43201 Reus, Catalonia (Spain); Figueras, María J. [Microbiology Unit, School of Medicine, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Sant Llorenç 21, 43201 Reus, Catalonia (Spain); Schuhmacher, Marta [Laboratory of Toxicology and Environmental Health, School of Medicine, IISPV, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Sant Llorenç 21, 43201 Reus, Catalonia (Spain); Departament d' Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Av. Països Catalans 26, 43007 Tarragona, Catalonia (Spain)

    2015-06-15

    We performed a screening investigation to assess the human health risks of the Integrated Waste Management Facility (IWMF: mechanical–biological treatment (MBT) plant plus municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI); Ecoparc-3) of Barcelona (Spain). Air concentrations of pollutants potentially released by the MBT plant (VOCs and bioaerosols) and the MSWI (trace elements, PCDD/Fs and PCBs) were determined. Trace elements, PCDD/Fs and PCBs were also analyzed in soil samples. The concentrations of trace elements and bioaerosols were similar to those previously reported in other areas of similar characteristics, while formaldehyde was the predominant VOC. Interestingly, PCDD/F concentrations in soil and air were the highest ever reported near a MSWI in Catalonia, being maximum concentrations 10.8 ng WHO-TEQ/kg and 41.3 fg WHO-TEQ/m{sup 3}, respectively. In addition, there has not been any reduction in soils, even after the closure of a power plant located adjacently. Human health risks of PCDD/F exposure in the closest urban nucleus located downwind the MSWI are up to 10-times higher than those nearby other MSWIs in Catalonia. Although results must be considered as very preliminary, they are a serious warning for local authorities. We strongly recommend to conduct additional studies to confirm these findings and, if necessary, to implement measures to urgently mitigate the impact of the MSWI on the surrounding environment. We must also state the tremendous importance of an individual evaluation of MSWIs, rather than generalizing their environmental and health risks. - Highlights: • Health risks of an Integrated Waste Management Facility in Catalonia are assessed. • PCDD/F exposure near this facility is up to 10-times higher than that near others. • Environmental monitoring of incineration plants should be performed case-by-case. • Since results are very preliminary, confirmatory studies should be conducted.

  12. The new asylums in the community: severely ill psychiatric patients living in psychiatric supported housing facilities. A Danish register-based study of prognostic factors, use of psychiatric services, and mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordentoft, Merete; Pedersen, Marianne G; Pedersen, Carsten B

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Reorganization of psychiatric treatment in Denmark involved a declining number of psychiatric long-stay beds and an increasing number of psychiatric supported housing facilities in the community. Very few studies have focused on the population in such facilities. METHODS: Information...... was generated combining addresses of supported psychiatric housing facilities with information from the Danish Civil Registration System to create a case register of persons living in supported psychiatric housing facilities. Through linkage with the Danish Psychiatric Central Register, we examined predictors...... of becoming a resident in a psychiatric housing facility, use of psychiatric services around the time of entrance to a supported psychiatric housing facility, and mortality rates for residents in a psychiatric housing facility compared to non-residents and to persons in the general population who never...

  13. The value of the CoughAssist® in the daily lives of children with neuromuscular disorders: Experiences of families, children and physiotherapists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travlos, Vivienne; Drew, Kate; Patman, Shane

    2016-10-01

    We explored parents', children's and physiotherapists' experiences of regular CoughAssist® use, along with their perceptions of its value as an adjunct to in their daily, home respiratory management. All children in the care of a specialist neuromuscular service who regularly used a CoughAssist® device at home participated. Qualitative case study methods involved semi-structured interviews with three children with neuromuscular disorders (NMD), their parents and physiotherapist. Data were analysed using thematic content analysis. Participants (n = 9) perceived the CoughAssist® held benefits for physical, social and emotional aspects of living with NMD. Poor adherence was identified as the major barrier to effective use, governed by factors including child's resistance, time constraints, treatment preference, practitioner support and fear of pressure trauma. Barriers to regular CoughAssist® use must be identified and individually addressed to enable uptake into respiratory care, accurately measure its effectiveness and realise its perceived benefits to children with NMD.

  14. As Long as They Keep Away From Me: Attitudes Toward Non-heterosexual Sexual Orientation Among Residents Living in Spanish Residential Aged Care Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar, Feliciano; Serrat, Rodrigo; Fabà, Josep; Celdrán, Montserrat

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to shed light on the attitudes of older people living in residential aged care facilities (RACFs) toward non-heterosexual sexual orientation. Forty-seven residents living in 5 RACFs located in Catalonia (Spain) were interviewed in relation to the way they would think and react if another resident told them he/she felt sexually attracted to people of the same gender and that he/she had maintained sexual relationships with another man/woman in the home, and whether they would have any problem in sharing common spaces or a room with this resident. Most residents expressed some kind of negative reaction ranging from staying away from the resident in question to extreme rejection, although positive and neutral reactions also emerged. Participants were far more reluctant to share a room with that resident than to share common spaces. The prevalence of homophobic attitudes among older people living in RACFs seems to be high. This may be a barrier for LGB residents, making the expression of their sexual identity more difficult and leading to discriminatory practices. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Electromechanical and robot-assisted arm training for improving activities of daily living, arm function, and arm muscle strength after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrholz, Jan; Pohl, Marcus; Platz, Thomas; Kugler, Joachim; Elsner, Bernhard

    2015-11-07

    Electromechanical and robot-assisted arm training devices are used in rehabilitation, and may help to improve arm function after stroke. To assess the effectiveness of electromechanical and robot-assisted arm training for improving activities of daily living, arm function, and arm muscle strength in people after stroke. We also assessed the acceptability and safety of the therapy. We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group's Trials Register (last searched February 2015), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (the Cochrane Library 2015, Issue 3), MEDLINE (1950 to March 2015), EMBASE (1980 to March 2015), CINAHL (1982 to March 2015), AMED (1985 to March 2015), SPORTDiscus (1949 to March 2015), PEDro (searched April 2015), Compendex (1972 to March 2015), and Inspec (1969 to March 2015). We also handsearched relevant conference proceedings, searched trials and research registers, checked reference lists, and contacted trialists, experts, and researchers in our field, as well as manufacturers of commercial devices. Randomised controlled trials comparing electromechanical and robot-assisted arm training for recovery of arm function with other rehabilitation or placebo interventions, or no treatment, for people after stroke. Two review authors independently selected trials for inclusion, assessed trial quality and risk of bias, and extracted data. We contacted trialists for additional information. We analysed the results as standardised mean differences (SMDs) for continuous variables and risk differences (RDs) for dichotomous variables. We included 34 trials (involving 1160 participants) in this update of our review. Electromechanical and robot-assisted arm training improved activities of daily living scores (SMD 0.37, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.11 to 0.64, P = 0.005, I² = 62%), arm function (SMD 0.35, 95% CI 0.18 to 0.51, P training did not increase the risk of participant drop-out (RD 0.00, 95% CI -0.02 to 0.03, P = 0.84, I² = 0%) with moderate

  16. Effect of male body mass index on live-birth sex ratio of singletons after assisted reproduction technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jinliang; Tang, Wenhao; Mao, Jiaming; Li, Junsheng; Zhuang, Xinjie; Liu, Ping; Qiao, Jie

    2015-12-01

    To determine the effect of male body mass index (BMI) on the probability of achieving a live birth and the sex ratio of singletons at birth after IVF and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) treatment. A retrospective cohort study. University-affiliated infertility center. Patients seeking infertility treatment who received IVF or ICSI treatment with autologous oocytes from January 2009 to December 2013. None. Live-birth sex ratio of singletons at birth stratified by male BMI and adjusted by parental age, parental BMI, type of infertility, parity, embryo culture media, and cause of infertility. A total of 8,490 couples undergoing IVF or ICSI treatment resulted in 39.12% live births and gave birth to 2,377 live birth singletons and 943 twins. There was no significant difference in the live birth rate between groups stratified by BMI. The probability of live births for overweight and obese groups were not decreased compared with the normal-weight group; similar null findings existed in the IVF and ICSI subgroups. Of note, the sex ratio of offspring in the overweight and obese male groups was significantly higher than in the normal-weight group (1.27 vs. 1.07). Male BMI was significantly associated with sex ratio of singletons after adjusting for confounders. In twins, incidences of twins with male-male infants in the overweight/obese group were not different from the normal-weight group. Increased male BMI has no effect on live birth success, but has an increased probability of giving birth to male singletons. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The low to intermediate activity and short living waste storage facility. For a controlled management of radioactive wastes; Le centre de stockage des dechets de faible et moyenne activite a vie courte. Pour une gestion controlee des dechets radioactifs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    Sited at about 50 km of Troyes (France), the Aube facility started in 1992 and has taken over the Manche facility for the surface storage of low to intermediate and short living radioactive wastes. The Aube facility (named CSFMA) is the answer to the safe management of these wastes at the industrial scale and for 50 years onward. This brochure presents the facility specifications, the wastes stored at the center, the surface storage concept, the processing and conditioning of waste packages, and the environmental monitoring performed in the vicinity of the site. (J.S.)

  18. Quality of life of seniors living in the community and in long term care facilities: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitorino, Luciano Magalhães; Paskulin, Lisiane Manganelli Girardi; Vianna, Lucila Amaral Carneiro

    2013-01-01

    to compare the perceptions of quality of life (QOL) and to identify factors associated with QOL among seniors living in the community in Porto Alegre, RS and institutionalized seniors from the countryside of Minas Gerais, Brazil. this study used secondary data from two cross-sectional epidemiological studies. The sample consisted of 288 seniors living in the community and 76 institutionalized seniors. An instrument addressing socio-demographic data and the WHOQOL-BREF were administered. bivariate analysis showed that age, gender, schooling, self-reported health, and leisure presented statistically significant differences between institutionalized and non-institutionalized seniors. The Psychological and Social Relationships domains also presented statistically significant differences. The variables that presented significant correlation in multivariate analysis in relation to the Psychological domain were education, assessments of health, leisure and in relation to the Social domain, education and age. being institutionalized did not influence the older adults' perceptions of QOL, but the socio-demographic characteristics and self-assessments of health did.

  19. Investigating the Efficacy of a Computerized Prompting Device to Assist Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder with Activities of Daily Living

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bimbrahw, Justin; Boger, Jennifer; Mihailidis, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Learning to perform self-care skills can pose a major challenge for children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) as well as the parents and caregivers who support them. The computerized device described in this paper has been used by children with ASD and their carers to autonomously assist with self-care activities. The device uses computer…

  20. An Exceptionally Facile Two-Step Structural Isomerization and Detoxication via a Water-Assisted Double Lossen Rearrangement

    OpenAIRE

    Feng Li; Chun-Hua Huang; Lin-Na Xie; Na Qu; Jie Shao; Bo Shao; Ben-Zhan Zhu

    2016-01-01

    N-hydroxyphthalimide (NHPI), which is best known as an organocatalyst for efficient C-H activation, has been found to be oxidized by quinoid compounds to its corresponding catalytically active nitroxide-radical. Here, we found that NHPI can be isomerized into isatoic anhydride by an unusually facile two-step method using tetrachloro-1,4-benzoquinone (TCBQ, p-chloranil), accompanied by a two-step hydrolytic dechlorination of highly toxic TCBQ into the much less toxic dihydroxylation product, 2...

  1. Coherence and decoherence in biological systems: principles of noise-assisted transport and the origin of long-lived coherences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, A W; Huelga, S F; Plenio, M B

    2012-08-13

    The quantum dynamics of transport networks in the presence of noisy environments has recently received renewed attention with the discovery of long-lived coherences in different photosynthetic complexes. This experimental evidence has raised two fundamental questions: firstly, what are the mechanisms supporting long-lived coherences; and, secondly, how can we assess the possible functional role that the interplay of noise and quantum coherence might play in the seemingly optimal operation of biological systems under natural conditions? Here, we review recent results, illuminate them by means of two paradigmatic systems (the Fenna-Matthew-Olson complex and the light-harvesting complex LHII) and present new progress on both questions.

  2. "It broke our hearts": understanding parents' lived experiences of their child's admission to an acute mental health care facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Louise; Gwinner, Karleen

    2014-07-01

    This article reports the evaluative findings of an Early Psychosis Education Program (EPEP) designed to support parents caring for their child who was recently admitted to the psychiatric intensive care unit of an inpatient mental health care facility in Australia. The EPEP offered education on mental illness, treatment options, and medication, as well as information on the recovery model of care. The EPEP was facilitated by two RNs and was evaluated for educational effectiveness using a simple pre- and postevaluation questionnaire. The evaluation revealed two themes expressed by parents: "We didn't see it coming," and "Hopelessness and helplessness." The themes highlighted the parents' lack of mental health care knowledge prior to the EPEP, which had a significant impact on the parents' experiences and well-being. The evaluative findings highlighted a need for a nurse-led EPEP within the community. A community EPEP has the potential to strengthen the partnership between parents, families, and mental health service providers and to help with the provision of a recovery framework of care. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  3. The influence of female and male body mass index on live births after assisted reproductive technology treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Gitte Lindved; Schmidt, Lone; Pinborg, Anja

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the independent and combined associations between female and male body mass index (BMI) on the probability of achieving a live birth after treatments with in vitro fertilization (IVF) or intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) under adjustment for relevant covariates. DE...

  4. A Mobile Virtual Butler to Bridge the Gap between Users and Ambient Assisted Living: A Smart Home Case Study

    OpenAIRE

    Nuno Costa; Patricio Domingues; Florentino Fdez-Riverola; António Pereira

    2014-01-01

    Ambient Intelligence promises to transform current spaces into electronic environments that are responsive, assistive and sensitive to human presence. Those electronic environments will be fully populated with dozens, hundreds or even thousands of connected devices that share information and thus become intelligent. That massive wave of electronic devices will also invade everyday objects, turning them into smart entities, keeping their native features and characteristics while seamlessly pro...

  5. Predicting the role of assistive technologies in the lives of people with dementia using objective care recipient factors

    OpenAIRE

    Czarnuch, Stephen; Ricciardelli, Rose; Mihailidis, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Background The population of people with dementia is not homogeneous. People with dementia exhibit a wide range of needs, each characterized by diverse factors including age, sex, ethnicity, and place of residence. These needs and characterizing factors may influence the applicability, and ultimately the acceptance, of assistive technologies developed to support the independence of people with dementia. Accordingly, predicting the needs of users before developing the technologies may increase...

  6. Facile Synthesis of In-Chain, Multicomponent, Functionalized Polymers via Living Anionic Copolymerization through the Ugi Four-Component Reaction (Ugi-4CR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Heyu; Ma, Hongwei; Liu, Pibo; Huang, Wei; Han, Li; Li, Chao; Li, Yang

    2017-09-01

    By combining living anionic polymerization and the highly efficient Ugi four-component reaction (Ugi-4CR), in-chain, multicomponent, functionalized polymers are facilely synthesized with efficient conversation and abundant functionality. l-[4-[N,N-Bis(trimethylsilyl)-amino]phenyl]-l-phenylethylene, which is redefined as Ugi-DPE, is anionically copolymerized to synthesize the well-defined in-chain, multi-amino functionalized polystyrene (P(St/DPE-NH 2 )), the backbone for the Ugi-4CR, via hydrolysis of the copolymerization (P(St/Ugi-DPE)). Subsequently, several functionalized components are facilely clicked onto P(St/DPE-NH 2 ) to investigate the model reactions of the in-chain, multicomponent functionalization via the Ugi-4CR. In contrast to conventional postpolymerization modifications, this approach proceeds under mild reaction conditions without the use of a catalyst and meanwhile an efficient conversation is obtained. Finally, the modified experimental results investigated in this research show the promising potential of the combination of well-defined amino functionalized polymers and Ugi-4CR in the field of multicomponent, functionalized postpolymerization modification. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Multivariate analysis of factors affecting probability of pregnancy and live birth with in vitro fertilization: an analysis of the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology Clinic Outcomes Reporting System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Valerie L; Luke, Barbara; Brown, Morton B; Alvero, Ruben; Frattarelli, John L; Usadi, Rebecca; Grainger, David A; Armstrong, Alicia Y

    2010-09-01

    To evaluate factors predictive of clinical pregnancy and of pregnancy loss from assisted reproductive technology (ART) using data from the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology database for 2004-2006. Retrospective cohort. Clinic-based data. The study population included 225,889 fresh embryo transfer cycles using autologous oocytes and partner semen. None. Clinical intrauterine gestation (presence of gestational sac) and live birth (>or=22 weeks gestation and >or=300 g birth weight). Increasing maternal age was significantly associated with a reduced odds of conception and increased fetal loss until 19 weeks gestation, but not with later pregnancy loss. Intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), assisted hatching, and increasing number of embryos transferred had significant positive effects on the odds of conception and pregnancy continuation through the first trimester, but did not affect the risk of later loss. Blacks, Asians, and Hispanics had significantly lower odds of clinical pregnancy compared with whites. Also compared with whites, Hispanics and Asians had a significantly greater risk of pregnancy loss in the second and third trimesters, and blacks had a significantly greater risk of pregnancy loss in all trimesters. Certain demographic and ART treatment parameters influenced chance of conception and early pregnancy loss, whereas black race and Hispanic ethnicity were also significantly associated with late pregnancy loss in ART-conceived pregnancies. Copyright (c) 2010 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Does duration of abstinence affect the live-birth rate after assisted reproductive technology? A retrospective analysis of 1,030 cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periyasamy, Anurekha J; Mahasampath, Gowri; Karthikeyan, Muthukumar; Mangalaraj, Ann M; Kunjummen, Aleyamma T; Kamath, Mohan S

    2017-12-01

    To study influence of abstinence period on the live-birth rate after assisted reproductive technology (ART). Retrospective cohort study. Reproductive medicine unit, university-level hospital. A total 1,030 ART cycles evaluated from 2011 to 2015. Group I, abstinence period 2-7 days, and group II, abstinence period >7 days, were compared. Two subgroups Ia (2-4 days) and Ib (5-7 days) were also compared with group II. Primary outcome was live birth per ET. Secondary outcomes included implantation, clinical pregnancy, and miscarriage rates. The live-birth rate (34.1 % vs. 24.1%; odds ratio [OR], 1.6; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1-2.4), clinical pregnancy rate (44.4 % vs. 32.7%; OR, 1.6; 95% CI, 1.1-2.3), and implantation rate (26.4% vs. 18.2%) were significantly higher in group I compared with group II. Other secondary outcomes of fertilization rate and miscarriage rate did not differ between groups I and II. The adjusted odds ratio (aOR) for live birth (aOR, 1.6; 95% CI, 1.1-2.5) and clinical pregnancy rates (aOR, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.2-2.5) were significantly higher for group I compared with group II. The live-birth rate was significantly higher in group Ia (36.1% vs. 24.1%) compared with group II. An abstinence period of more than 7 days may impact ART outcomes adversely when compared with an abstinence period of 2-7 days. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. When being 'tired of living' plays an important role in a request for euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide: patient characteristics and the physician's decision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rurup, Mette L; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, Bregje D; Jansen-van der Weide, Marijke C; van der Wal, Gerrit

    2005-10-01

    In the Netherlands physicians are allowed to grant requests for euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide (EAS) if they meet several requirements of due care. According to jurisprudence, a physician is not allowed to end the life of a patient whose request for EAS is based on being 'tired of living', because such a request falls outside the medical domain. Our previous studies have shown that in spite of this, such requests are made approximately 400 times a year. To learn more about patients who request EAS because they are tired of living, and about factors that influence the decision of the physician. Questionnaires (n=4842) completed by general practitioners (n=3994). According to the physicians, 17% of patients who requested EAS were 'tired of living'. Of 139 patients in whose request for EAS being tired of living played a major role, 47% suffered from cancer, 25% suffered from another severe disease and 28% had no severe disease. In all three groups the same three symptoms occurred most frequently, 'feeling bad', 'tired', and 'not active'. Each of these symptoms occurred in more than half of the patients in each group. Most of the requests from patients with cancer were granted, but those from patients who had some other severe disease, or no severe disease at all, were refused. Factors that were related to granting a request were: the presence of unbearable and hopeless suffering, the absence of alternatives, and the absence of depressive symptoms. Being tired of living can play a major role in requests for EAS, both in the absence and the presence of a severe disease. The high occurrence of symptoms in the absence of a classifiable severe disease implies that physical symptoms are prevalent in this group of patients, leaving the legal requirement for EAS of 'a medical cause' open to interpretation in the more complex medical practice.

  10. How a Model of Communication Can Assist Nurses to Foster Hope When Communicating with Patients Living with a Terminal Prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Petley

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Nurses play a central role in joint decision-making and person-centred care, whereby care is focused on the needs of an individual patient. A key part of person-centred care is the way nurses engage with patients because good communication can impact on a person’s spiritual wellbeing, particularly in relation to their ability to have hope. The way nurses communicate can be even more pertinent for people living with a terminal prognosis as the issues discussed can in themselves significantly influence a person’s spiritual wellbeing. This paper combines contemporary research on how health professionals can foster hope in patients living with a terminal prognosis with The Awareness Context Theory described by Glaser and Strauss in 1965. A model of communication is then used to demonstrate how the research on hope and The Awareness Context Theory can be applied to practice.

  11. Facile One-Step Microwave-Assisted Route towards Ni Nanospheres/Reduced Graphene Oxide Hybrids for Non-Enzymatic Glucose Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojiao Zhou

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a facile one-step microwave-assisted method for deposition of monodisperse Ni nanospheres on reduced graphene oxide (rGO sheets to form Ni-rGO nanohybrids is discussed. In the presence of hydrazine monohydrate, Ni nanospheres are grown onto rGO sheets using nickel precursor and GO as starting materials in ethylene glycol (EG solution under a low level of microwave irradiation (300 W for 20 min, during which GO is also reduced to rGO. The as-prepared nanohybrids exhibit well-dispersed Ni nanosphere (about 80 nm in diameter loadings and effective reduction of graphene oxide. The resulting Ni-rGO nanohybrids-modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE shows significantly improved electrochemical performance in nonenzymatic amperometric glucose detection. In addition, interference from the oxidation of common interfering species under physiological conditions, such as ascorbic acid (AA and uric acid (UA, is effectively avoided.

  12. Facile one-step microwave-assisted route towards Ni nanospheres/reduced graphene oxide hybrids for non-enzymatic glucose sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhigang; Hu, Yong; Yang, Wenlong; Zhou, Mojiao; Hu, Xiao

    2012-01-01

    In this work, a facile one-step microwave-assisted method for deposition of monodisperse Ni nanospheres on reduced graphene oxide (rGO) sheets to form Ni-rGO nanohybrids is discussed. In the presence of hydrazine monohydrate, Ni nanospheres are grown onto rGO sheets using nickel precursor and GO as starting materials in ethylene glycol (EG) solution under a low level of microwave irradiation (300 W) for 20 min, during which GO is also reduced to rGO. The as-prepared nanohybrids exhibit well-dispersed Ni nanosphere (about 80 nm in diameter) loadings and effective reduction of graphene oxide. The resulting Ni-rGO nanohybrids-modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) shows significantly improved electrochemical performance in nonenzymatic amperometric glucose detection. In addition, interference from the oxidation of common interfering species under physiological conditions, such as ascorbic acid (AA) and uric acid (UA), is effectively avoided.

  13. [Potential analysis for research on Advanced Practice Nursing (APN) for persons with dementia living in long-term care facilities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Sabine; Fleischer, Steffen

    2014-01-01

    translated into the context of the German healthcare system. Furthermore, feasibility of the intervention in general has to be investigated. This includes acceptance of GAPNs in practice and the necessary prerequisites, especially concerning a comprehensive commitment of one APN to more than one long-term care facility. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  14. Symptom Clusters in People Living with HIV Attending Five Palliative Care Facilities in Two Sub-Saharan African Countries: A Hierarchical Cluster Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moens, Katrien; Siegert, Richard J; Taylor, Steve; Namisango, Eve; Harding, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Symptom research across conditions has historically focused on single symptoms, and the burden of multiple symptoms and their interactions has been relatively neglected especially in people living with HIV. Symptom cluster studies are required to set priorities in treatment planning, and to lessen the total symptom burden. This study aimed to identify and compare symptom clusters among people living with HIV attending five palliative care facilities in two sub-Saharan African countries. Data from cross-sectional self-report of seven-day symptom prevalence on the 32-item Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale-Short Form were used. A hierarchical cluster analysis was conducted using Ward's method applying squared Euclidean Distance as the similarity measure to determine the clusters. Contingency tables, X2 tests and ANOVA were used to compare the clusters by patient specific characteristics and distress scores. Among the sample (N=217) the mean age was 36.5 (SD 9.0), 73.2% were female, and 49.1% were on antiretroviral therapy (ART). The cluster analysis produced five symptom clusters identified as: 1) dermatological; 2) generalised anxiety and elimination; 3) social and image; 4) persistently present; and 5) a gastrointestinal-related symptom cluster. The patients in the first three symptom clusters reported the highest physical and psychological distress scores. Patient characteristics varied significantly across the five clusters by functional status (worst functional physical status in cluster one, pART (highest proportions for clusters two and three, p=0.012); global distress (F=26.8, p<0.001), physical distress (F=36.3, p<0.001) and psychological distress subscale (F=21.8, p<0.001) (all subscales worst for cluster one, best for cluster four). The greatest burden is associated with cluster one, and should be prioritised in clinical management. Further symptom cluster research in people living with HIV with longitudinally collected symptom data to test cluster

  15. Phonon Assisted Multimagnon Optical Absorption and Long Lived Two-Magnon States in Undoped Lamellar Copper Oxides

    CERN Document Server

    Lorenzana, J

    1995-01-01

    We calculate the effective charge for multimagnon infrared (IR) absorption assisted by phonons in the parent insulating compounds of cuprate superconductors and the spectra for two-magnon absorption using interacting spin-wave theory. Recent measured bands in the mid IR [Perkins et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. {\\bf 71} 1621 (1993)] are interpreted as involving one phonon plus a two-magnon virtual bound state, and one phonon plus higher multimagnon absorption processes. The virtual bound state consists of a narrow resonance occurring when the magnon pair has total momentum close to $(\\pi,0)$.

  16. AMARGAN LIVING: THE PSYCHOPATH OF PERNAMBUCO'S DIVISION OF ASSISTANCE IN THE FIRST YEARS OF THE 30'S

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CARLOS ALBERTO CUNHA MIRANDA

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The article is part of an investigation about the strategies used by institutional psychiatry in Pernambuco that emerged in the first Ii ve years of the l930's. The "División for the Assistance to Psychopaths", at the time directed by the doctor Ulysses Pernambucano, is taken as a specifically interesting context. Toe objective is to analyze the new forms of control exercised over the patients of psychiatric hospitals and followers of afro­Brazilian religions by the "Mental Hygiene Servial", as well as lo show the tactics used by these subjects as a reacuon to the strong power exercised by the same institution.

  17. Acceptance of an assistive robot in older adults: a mixed-method study of human–robot interaction over a 1-month period in the Living Lab setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ya-Huei; Wrobel, Jérémy; Cornuet, Mélanie; Kerhervé, Hélène; Damnée, Souad; Rigaud, Anne-Sophie

    2014-01-01

    Background There is growing interest in investigating acceptance of robots, which are increasingly being proposed as one form of assistive technology to support older adults, maintain their independence, and enhance their well-being. In the present study, we aimed to observe robot-acceptance in older adults, particularly subsequent to a 1-month direct experience with a robot. Subjects and methods Six older adults with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and five cognitively intact healthy (CIH) older adults were recruited. Participants interacted with an assistive robot in the Living Lab once a week for 4 weeks. After being shown how to use the robot, participants performed tasks to simulate robot use in everyday life. Mixed methods, comprising a robot-acceptance questionnaire, semistructured interviews, usability-performance measures, and a focus group, were used. Results Both CIH and MCI subjects were able to learn how to use the robot. However, MCI subjects needed more time to perform tasks after a 1-week period of not using the robot. Both groups rated similarly on the robot-acceptance questionnaire. They showed low intention to use the robot, as well as negative attitudes toward and negative images of this device. They did not perceive it as useful in their daily life. However, they found it easy to use, amusing, and not threatening. In addition, social influence was perceived as powerful on robot adoption. Direct experience with the robot did not change the way the participants rated robots in their acceptance questionnaire. We identified several barriers to robot-acceptance, including older adults’ uneasiness with technology, feeling of stigmatization, and ethical/societal issues associated with robot use. Conclusion It is important to destigmatize images of assistive robots to facilitate their acceptance. Universal design aiming to increase the market for and production of products that are usable by everyone (to the greatest extent possible) might help to

  18. The impact of a food assistance program on nutritional status, disease progression, and food security among people living with HIV in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawat, Rahul; Faust, Elizabeth; Maluccio, John A; Kadiyala, Suneetha

    2014-05-01

    Although the last decade has seen increased access to antiretroviral therapy across the developing world, widespread food insecurity and undernutrition continue to compromise an effective response to the AIDS epidemic. Limited evidence exists on the potential benefit of food security and nutrition interventions to people living with HIV (PLHIV). We capitalized on an existing intervention to PLHIV in Uganda and conducted a prospective quasi-experimental study evaluating the impact of a monthly household food basket, provided to food insecure antiretroviral therapy-naive PLHIVs for 12 months. The outcomes of interest measured at baseline and follow-up were nutritional status [body mass index; mid-upper arm circumference and hemoglobin (Hb) concentrations], disease severity (CD4 count), and 2 measures of food security: diet quality (Individual Dietary Diversity Score) and food access (Household Food Insecurity Access Scale). We used difference-in-difference propensity score matching to examine the impact of food assistance. Over 12 months, food assistance significantly increased body mass index by 0.6 kg/m (P < 0.01) and mid-upper arm circumference by 6.7 mm (P < 0.05). We found no impact on CD4 count, Hb concentrations, or Individual Dietary Diversity Score. Restricting the analysis to individuals with CD4 counts of greater than 350 cells per microliter, there were significant impacts on Hb concentrations (1.0 g/dL; P < 0.05). At the household level, food assistance increased the Household Food Insecurity Access Scale, by 2.1 points (P < 0.01). This study demonstrates the potential for food assistance programming to be part of the standard of care for PLHIV in areas of widespread food insecurity.

  19. Acceptance of an assistive robot in older adults: a mixed-method study of human–robot interaction over a 1-month period in the Living Lab setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu YH

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Ya-Huei Wu,1,2 Jérémy Wrobel,1,2 Mélanie Cornuet,1,2 Hélène Kerhervé,1,2 Souad Damnée,1,2 Anne-Sophie Rigaud1,21Hôpital Broca, Assistance Publique – Hôpitaux de Paris, 2Research Team 4468, Faculté de Médecine, Université Paris Descartes, Paris, FranceBackground: There is growing interest in investigating acceptance of robots, which are increasingly being proposed as one form of assistive technology to support older adults, maintain their independence, and enhance their well-being. In the present study, we aimed to observe robot-acceptance in older adults, particularly subsequent to a 1-month direct experience with a robot.Subjects and methods: Six older adults with mild cognitive impairment (MCI and five cognitively intact healthy (CIH older adults were recruited. Participants interacted with an assistive robot in the Living Lab once a week for 4 weeks. After being shown how to use the robot, participants performed tasks to simulate robot use in everyday life. Mixed methods, comprising a robot-acceptance questionnaire, semistructured interviews, usability-performance measures, and a focus group, were used.Results: Both CIH and MCI subjects were able to learn how to use the robot. However, MCI subjects needed more time to perform tasks after a 1-week period of not using the robot. Both groups rated similarly on the robot-acceptance questionnaire. They showed low intention to use the robot, as well as negative attitudes toward and negative images of this device. They did not perceive it as useful in their daily life. However, they found it easy to use, amusing, and not threatening. In addition, social influence was perceived as powerful on robot adoption. Direct experience with the robot did not change the way the participants rated robots in their acceptance questionnaire. We identified several barriers to robot-acceptance, including older adults’ uneasiness with technology, feeling of stigmatization, and ethical

  20. A facile microwave assisted one pot synthesis of novel xanthene derivatives as potential anti-inflammatory and analgesic agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupam G. Banerjee

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Microwave assisted irradiation of resorcinol and substituted aryl aldehydes using sulfamic acid as catalyst afforded novel 9-aryl-9H-xanthene-3,6-diol derivatives (1a–f in good yields. The newly synthesized compounds which were previously selected on the basis of PASS prediction were tested for anti-inflammatory activity using carrageenan-induced rat paw edema and analgesic activity using acetic acid induced writhing and formalin-induced paw edema in mice along with the estimation of gastric ulcerogenicity index. Compounds 1e and 1f exhibited significant anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities as compared to standard drug. The study also revealed that compounds (1a–f showed minimum or no ulcerogenicity in mice as that of the standard drug.

  1. Facile Synthesis of N-Doped BiOCl Photocatalyst by an Ethylenediamine-Assisted Hydrothermal Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guihua Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A nitrogen doped BiOCl (N-BiOCl photocatalyst was synthesized and characterized using an ethylenediamine-assisted hydrothermal method. The N-BiOCl sample demonstrated the same tetragonal crystal structure as the as-prepared pure BiOCl sample. SEM results indicated that N-BiOCl sample was self-assembled by nanoplates to provide an aggregated flower-like microstructure. Doped nitrogen was substituted for oxygen in the crystal lattice of BiOCl, causing a red shift for N-BiOCl sample compared to BiOCl sample. The N-BiOCl sample exhibited higher photocatalytic activity in the degradation of Rhodamine B under visible light than observed in BiOCl sample, and the stability of the sample was verified. Meanwhile, speculative causes for the enhancement in the photocatalytic activity of N-BiOCl sample were also proposed.

  2. Eco-friendly and facile integrated biological-cum-photo assisted electrooxidation process for degradation of textile wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravind, Priyadharshini; Subramanyan, Vasudevan; Ferro, Sergio; Gopalakrishnan, Rajagopal

    2016-04-15

    The present article reports an integrated treatment method viz biodegradation followed by photo-assisted electrooxidation, as a new approach, for the abatement of textile wastewater. In the first stage of the integrated treatment scheme, the chemical oxygen demand (COD) of the real textile effluent was reduced by a biodegradation process using hydrogels of cellulose-degrading Bacillus cereus. The bio-treated effluent was then subjected to the second stage of the integrated scheme viz indirect electrooxidation (InDEO) as well as photo-assisted indirect electro oxidation (P-InDEO) process using Ti/IrO2-RuO2-TiO2 and Ti as electrodes and applying a current density of 20 mA cm(-2). The influence of cellulose in InDEO has been reported here, for the first time. UV-Visible light of 280-800 nm has been irradiated toward the anode/electrolyte interface in P-InDEO. The effectiveness of this combined treatment process in textile effluent degradation has been probed by chemical oxygen demand (COD) measurements and (1)H - nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). The obtained results indicate that the biological treatment allows obtaining a 93% of cellulose degradation and 47% of COD removal, increasing the efficiency of the subsequent InDEO by a 33%. In silico molecular docking analysis ascertained that cellulose fibers affect the InDEO process by interacting with the dyes that are responsible of the COD. On the other hand, P-InDEO resulted in both 95% of decolorization and 68% of COD removal, as a result of radical mediators. Free radicals generated during P-InDEO were characterized as oxychloride (OCl) by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR). This form of coupled approach is especially suggested for the treatment of textile wastewater containing cellulose. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Facile Br{sup -} assisted hydrothermal synthesis of Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} nanoplates with enhanced visible-light photocatalytic activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Peng [Yangtze Normal University, Chongqing Key Laboratory of Inorganic Special Functional Materials, Chongqing (China); Yangtze Normal University, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chongqing (China); Teng, Xiaoxu; Liu, Dongsheng; Fu, Liang; Xie, Hualin [Yangtze Normal University, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chongqing (China); Zhang, Guoqing [Yangtze Normal University, Chongqing Key Laboratory of Inorganic Special Functional Materials, Chongqing (China); Ding, Shimin [Yangtze Normal University, Collaborative Innovation Center for Green Development in Wuling Mountain Areas, Chongqing (China)

    2017-10-15

    Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} nanoplates have been controllably synthesized via a facile hydrothermal process with the assistance of Br{sup -} containing surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) or KBr. A remarkable enhancement in the visible-light-driven photocatalytic degradation of Rhodamine B was observed. It was found that reaction temperature and surfactant play crucial roles in the formation and properties of the Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} nanoplates. The best results as photocatalyst were obtained with the sample hydrothermally synthesized at 150 C with the assistance of CTAB. The improved photocatalytic performance could be ascribed to the {001}-oriented nanostructure of the Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} nanoplates. KBr-templated Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} nanoplates also showed better photocatalytic efficiency compared with that of flower-like Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} but inferior to that of CTAB-templated Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} nanoplates. (orig.)

  4. The predictive accuracy of anti-Müllerian hormone for live birth after assisted conception: a systematic review and meta-analysis of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliodromiti, Stamatina; Kelsey, Thomas W; Wu, Olivia; Anderson, Richard A; Nelson, Scott M

    2014-01-01

    Anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) is an established marker of ovarian reserve and a good predictor of poor or excessive ovarian response after controlled hyperstimulation. However, it is unclear whether it can predict the ultimate outcome of assisted conception, live birth. We undertook a systematic review and meta-analysis to examine whether AMH is a predictor of live birth in women undergoing assisted conception. The study was conducted according to the PRISMA guidelines. PubMed, Embase, Medline, Web of Knowledge and the Cochrane trial register and unpublished literature were searched. Studies fulfilling the eligibility criteria were included in the systematic review and those with extractable data were included in the meta-analysis. Quality assessment was performed with the QUADAS 2 checklist. A summary estimate of diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) was derived using the random effects model for binary data. A hierarchical summary receiver operating characteristic model provided pooled estimates before and after adjusting for age and AMH assay as covariates. Out of 361 non-duplicate studies, 47 were selected; 17 met the eligibility criteria and 13 had extractable data and thus were included in the meta-analysis. Three out of the 13 studies included only women with expected low ovarian reserve and were analysed individually from the remaining 10 to minimize heterogeneity. The DOR for women with unknown ovarian reserve (n = 5764 women) was 2.39 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.85-3.08). After adjustment for age the DOR was little changed at 2.48 (95% CI: 1.81-3.22) and the DOR adjusted for AMH assay was almost identical at 2.42 (95% CI: 1.86-3.14). For women with expected low ovarian reserve (n = 542 women) the DOR was 4.63 (95% CI: 2.75-7.81). AMH, independently of age, has some association with predicting live birth after assisted conception and may be helpful when counselling couples before undergoing fertility treatment. However, its predictive accuracy is poor. © The

  5. An HL7-FHIR-based Object Model for a Home-Centered Data Warehouse for Ambient Assisted Living Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartze, Jonas; Jansen, Lars; Schrom, Harald; Wolf, Klaus-Hendrik; Haux, Reinhold; Marschollek, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Current AAL environments focus on assisting a single person with seperated technologies. There is no interoperability between sub-domains in home environments, like building energy management or housing industry services. BASIS (Building Automation by a Scalable and Intelligent System) aims to integrate all sensors and actuators into a single, efficient home bus. First step is to create a semtically enriched data warehouse object model. We choose FHIR and built an object model mainly based on the Observation, Device and Location resources with minor extensions needed by AAL-foreign sub domains. FHIR turned out to be very flexible and complete for other home related sub-domains. The object model is implemented in a separated software-partition storing all structural and procedural data of BASIS.

  6. Recruitment of mobility limited older adults into a facility-led exercise-nutrition study: the effect of social involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purpose of the Study: Older adults are among the most challenging population groups to enroll into health-related research. This article describes two methods used by investigators to recruit mobility limited older adults residing at assisted living or senior housing (SH) facilities into a facility-...

  7. Facile and rapid one-pot microwave-assisted synthesis of Pd-Ni magnetic nanoalloys confined in mesoporous carbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez de Yuso, Alicia; Le Meins, Jean-Marc [Université de Strasbourg, Université de Haute-Alsace, Institut de Science des Matériaux de Mulhouse, CNRS UMR (France); Oumellal, Yassine; Paul-Boncour, Valérie; Zlotea, Claudia [Institut de Chimie et des Matériaux Paris Est, UMR 7182, CNRS-UPEC (France); Matei Ghimbeu, Camelia, E-mail: camelia.ghimbeu@uha.fr [Université de Strasbourg, Université de Haute-Alsace, Institut de Science des Matériaux de Mulhouse, CNRS UMR (France)

    2016-12-15

    An easy and rapid one-pot microwave-assisted soft-template synthesis method for the preparation of Pd-Ni nanoalloys confined in mesoporous carbon is reported. This approach allows the formation of mesoporous carbon and the growth of the particles at the same time, under short microwave irradiation (4 h) compared to the several days spent for the classical approach. In addition, the synthesis steps are diminished and no thermopolymerization step or reduction treatment being required. The influence of the Pd-Ni composition on the particle size and on the carbon characteristics was investigated. Pd-Ni solid solutions in the whole composition range could be obtained, and the metallic composition proved to have an important effect on the nanoparticle size but low influence on carbon textural properties. Small and uniformly distributed nanoparticles were confined in mesoporous carbon with uniform pore size distribution, and dependence between the nanoparticle size and the nanoalloy composition was observed, i.e., increase of the particle size with increasing the Ni content (from 5 to 14 nm). The magnetic properties of the materials showed a strong nanoparticle size and/or composition effect. The blocking temperature of Pd-Ni nanoalloys increases with the increase of Ni amount and therefore of particle size. The magnetization values are smaller than the bulk counterpart particularly for the Ni-rich compositions due to the formed graphitic shells surrounding the particles inducing a dead magnetic layer.

  8. A Facile and Green Biosynthesis of Silver Nanostructures by Aqueous Extract of Suaeda Acuminata after Microwave Assisted Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Reza Rajabi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, a simple, efficient and fast synthetic strategy was reported for the green biosynthesis of silver nanostructures (i.e. nanoroads and nanoparticles by the extract of Suaeda Acuminata plant, without any catalyst, template or surfactant. Aqueous extracts were obtained by maceration and microwave assisted extraction (MAE methods. In MAE procedure, the effect of microwave power on the extracted compounds was studied at 90, 270 and 450 W. Colloidal nano-scaled silver samples were synthesized by reacting aqueous silver nitrate with Suaeda Acuminata leaf extract at non-photomediated conditions. Comparative characterizations of the prepared Ag nanostructures were carried out by different techniques including UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and FT-IR spectroscopy. The SEM images showed that it can be synthesized Ag nanoroads and nanoparticles with the average size of 132 nm and 73 nm, by maceration and MAE methods, respectively. According to UV-Vis absorption spectra, a broad absorption peak around 400 nm was observed for all prepared Ag nanostructure samples synthesized by maceration and MAE methods, at different reaction times and irradiation microwave powers. The band can be corresponded to the plasmon absorbance of nano-scaled silver samples.

  9. A facile synthesis of ZnWO{sub 4} nanoparticles by microwave assisted technique and its application in photocatalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garadkar, K.M., E-mail: kmg_chem@unishivaji.ac.in [Nanomaterials Research Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Shivaji University, Kolhapur 416 004, MS (India); Ghule, L.A. [Nanomaterials Research Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Shivaji University, Kolhapur 416 004, MS (India); Sapnar, K.B.; Dhole, S.D. [Microtron Accelerator Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune 411 007, MS (India)

    2013-03-15

    Highlights: ► Nanocrystalline ZnWO{sub 4} particles were successfully prepared by a microwave method. ► Spherical morphology with a 10 nm size. ► The band is 3.4 eV. ► The photodegradation of RhB was 95% within 25 min. - Abstract: A simple microwave assisted technique has been successfully developed to synthesize ZnWO{sub 4} nanoparticles. The X-ray diffraction results indicated that the synthesized nanoparticles exhibited only wolframite structure. Structural, morphological and optical properties of ZnWO{sub 4} nanoparticles have been analyzed by XRD, SEM, TEM EDAX, UV–vis and FT-IR spectral measurements. The transmission electron microscopy (TEM) image revealed that particle size of ZnWO{sub 4} nanoparticles was found to be 10 nm, the band-gap of ZnWO{sub 4} nanoparticles was found to be 3.4 eV. The photocatalytic activities for aqueous Rhodamine B and Methylene Blue samples were investigated and observed that ZnWO{sub 4} nanoparticles exhibited highly enhanced photocatalytic activity towards RhB than MB.

  10. Ubiquitous and ambient-assisted living eHealth platforms for Down's syndrome and palliative care in the Republic of Panama: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldaña Barrios, Juan Jose; Mendoza, Luis; Pitti, Edgardo; Vargas, Miguel

    2016-10-21

    In this work, the authors present two eHealth platforms that are examples of how health systems are migrating from client-server architecture to the web-based and ubiquitous paradigm. These two platforms were modeled, designed, developed and implemented with positive results. First, using ambient-assisted living and ubiquitous computing, the authors enhance how palliative care is being provided to the elderly patients and patients with terminal illness, making the work of doctors, nurses and other health actors easier. Second, applying machine learning methods and a data-centered, ubiquitous, patient's results' repository, the authors intent to improve the Down's syndrome risk estimation process with more accurate predictions based on local woman patients' parameters. These two eHealth platforms can improve the quality of life, not only physically but also psychologically, of the patients and their families in the country of Panama. © The Author(s) 2016.

  11. Living in the hands of God. English Sunni e-fatwas on (non-)voluntary euthanasia and assisted suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Branden, Stef; Broeckaert, Bert

    2011-02-01

    Ever since the start of the twentieth century, a growing interest and importance of studying fatwas can be noted, with a focus on Arabic printed fatwas (Wokoeck 2009). The scholarly study of end-of-life ethics in these fatwas is a very recent feature, taking a first start in the 1980s (Anees 1984; Rispler-Chaim 1993). Since the past two decades, we have witnessed the emergence of a multitude of English fatwas that can easily be consulted through the Internet ('e-fatwas'), providing Muslims worldwide with a form of Islamic normative guidance on a huge variety of topics. Although English online fatwas do provide guidance for Muslims and Muslim minorities worldwide on a myriad of topics including end-of-life issues, they have hardly been studied. This study analyses Islamic views on (non-)voluntary euthanasia and assisted suicide as expressed in English Sunni fatwas published on independent--i.e. not created by established organisations--Islamic websites. We use Tyan's definition of a fatwa to distinguish between fatwas and other types of texts offering Islamic guidance through the Internet. The study of e-fatwas is framed in the context of Bunt's typology of Cyber Islamic Environments (Bunt 2009) and in the framework of Roy's view on the virtual umma (Roy 2002). '(Non-)voluntary euthanasia and assisted suicide' are defined using Broeckaert's conceptual framework on treatment decisions at the end of life (Broeckaert 2008). We analysed 32 English Sunni e-fatwas. All of the e-fatwas discussed here firmly speak out against every form of active termination of life. They often bear the same structure, basing themselves solely on Quranic verses and prophetic traditions, leaving aside classical jurisprudential discussions on the subject. In this respect they share the characteristics central in Roy's typology of the fatwa in the virtual umma. On the level of content, they are in line with the international literature on Islamic end-of-life ethics. English Sunni e-fatwas make

  12. Facile microwave-assisted synthesis of Te-doped hydroxyapatite nanorods and nanosheets and their characterizations for bone cement applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahia, I S; Shkir, Mohd; AlFaify, S; Ganesh, V; Zahran, H Y; Kilany, Mona

    2017-03-01

    In this work, the authors have fabricated the nanorods and nanosheets of pure and Te-doped HAp with different Te concentrations (0.04, 0.08, 0.16, 0.24wt%) by microwave-assisted technique at low temperature. The crystallite size, degree of crystallinity and lattice parameters are calculated. FE-SEM study confirms that the fabricated nanostructures are nanorods of diameter about 10nm in undoped and at low concentration of Te doping. However, at and higher concentration, it becomes nanosheets of about 5nm thickness. X-ray diffraction, FT-IR and FT-Raman studies shows that the prepared products are of HAp and Te has been successfully incorporated. From EDX the Ca/P molar ratio of the pure HAp is about 1.740, while this ratio for 0.04, 0.08, 0.16, 0.24 wt% Te doped is about 1.53, 1.678, 1.724, 1.792, respectively. Crystallite size was found to be increased with Te doping from 15nm to 62nm. The value of dielectric constant is found to be enhanced at higher concentrations of Te. The values of linear absorption coefficient were also determined and show that the prepared material with Te doping is more absorbable than pure and will be highly applicable in radiation detection applications. Furthermore, the antimicrobial potential of pure and Te doped HAp was examined against some Gram- negative and positive bacteria and fungi by agar disk diffusion method. The results demonstrated that the antimicrobial activity of Te doped HAp is stronger than that of pure HAp where it exhibited the highest activity against Bacillus subtilis>Candida albicans>Shigella dysenteriae. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. High yield and facile microwave-assisted synthesis of conductive H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} doped polyanilines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gizdavic-Nikolaidis, Marija R., E-mail: m.gizdavic@auckland.ac.nz [School of Chemical Sciences, The University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland Mail Centre, Auckland, 1142 (New Zealand); Faculty of Physical Chemistry, Studentski Trg 12-16, PO Box 137, 11001, Belgrade (Serbia); Jevremovic, Milutin M. [Public Company Nuclear Facilities of Serbia, 12-14 Mike Petrovica Alasa, Vinca, 11351, Belgrade (Serbia); Milenkovic, Maja [Faculty of Physical Chemistry, Studentski Trg 12-16, PO Box 137, 11001, Belgrade (Serbia); Allison, Morgan C. [School of Chemical Sciences, The University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland Mail Centre, Auckland, 1142 (New Zealand); Stanisavljev, Dragomir R. [Faculty of Physical Chemistry, Studentski Trg 12-16, PO Box 137, 11001, Belgrade (Serbia); Bowmaker, Graham A. [School of Chemical Sciences, The University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland Mail Centre, Auckland, 1142 (New Zealand); Zujovic, Zoran D. [School of Chemical Sciences, The University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland Mail Centre, Auckland, 1142 (New Zealand); MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, Victoria University of Wellington, PO Box 600, Wellington, 6140 (New Zealand); Institute of General and Physical Chemistry, Studentski Trg 12-16, 11001, Belgrade (Serbia)

    2016-04-15

    The microwave-assisted synthesis of polyaniline (PANI) was performed using ammonium persulphate (APS) as oxidizing agent in 0.5 M–2.5 M concentration range of aqueous sulphuric acid (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) at 93 W applied microwave power of 10 min duration. The microwave (MW) synthesized PANIs had 3 times higher yield in comparison to PANI samples prepared using a classical method, CS (0 W MW power) at the same temperature for 10 min synthesis duration period. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) and UV–Vis spectroscopies confirmed the formation of PANI structure in all products. The influence of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} acid dopant on the spin concentration of MW and CS H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} doped PANI samples were examined by EPR spectroscopy, while the morphological characteristics were investigated by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). XRD results showed amorphous phases in both MW and CS H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} doped PANI samples. Conductivity measurements revealed ∼1.5 times higher conductivity values for MW H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} doped PANI samples in comparison with PANI samples prepared by the CS method under same condition. The influence of sulfate anion in comparison to chloride anion as a dopant on morphological, dopant levels and conductivity properties of MW PANI samples were also investigated. - Highlights: • Nanoporous microwave synthesized doped polyanilines as chemical sensor material. • Morphology and physical properties of polyanilines depend on acid concentration. • Spin concentration is determined by the nature of the polyaniline synthesis.

  14. Predictors of fertility desire among people living with HIV attending anti-retroviral clinic in a tertiary health facility in Sokoto, Northern Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A U Kaoje

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The pressure on couples and particularly women to have children is strong in developing countries where a childless woman is considered a social pariah. This study aimed to determine the predictors of fertility desire among people living with HIV. Materials and Methods : This is a descriptive cross-sectional study conducted among 400 HIV-positive clients receiving follow-up care at anti-retroviral (ART clinic in a tertiary health facility in Sokoto. A list of clients that came to the clinic was compiled and served as sampling frame. A two stage sampling method was used to select study respondents from the sampling frame. Interviewer- administered closed-ended questionnaire was used to collect the required data from the respondents. Ethical approval was granted for the conduct of the study and informed consent was obtained from the respondents. Descriptive, bivariate and multivariate analyses were carried out. Results : Majority (56.2% of the respondents were females. The overall mean age was 34.5 ± 0.4 years (male 38.4 ± 0.5 years, and (females, 31.4 ± 0.4 years. A large proportion of the respondents (67.7% reported desire to have children in future. Using logistic regression analysis, younger age (adjusted odd ratio [aOR] = 2.0, P = 0.023, marital status (aOR = 1.9, P < 0.001 and number of living children (aOR = 0.7, P < 0.001 were the key factors influencing respondents desire for children. Conclusion : Many HIV-positive clients in the clinic reported desire to have children. It is recommended that full reproductive health services be provided in the clinic to help them achieve their reproductive goal without risk to their partners and new born.

  15. Associations between polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) exposure and oxidative stress in people living near e-waste recycling facilities in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shao-You; Li, Yan-Xi; Zhang, Jian-Qing; Zhang, Tao; Liu, Gui-Hua; Huang, Ming-Zhi; Li, Xiao; Ruan, Ju-Jun; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Qiu, Rong-Liang

    2016-09-01

    Emission of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from e-waste recycling activities in China is known. However, little is known on the association between PAH exposure and oxidative damage to DNA and lipid content in people living near e-waste dismantling sites. In this study, ten hydroxylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (OH-PAHs) and two biomarkers [8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and malondialdehyde (MDA)] of oxidative stress were investigated in urine samples collected from people living in and around e-waste dismantling facilities, and in reference population from rural and urban areas in China. The urinary levels of ∑10OH-PAHs determined in e-waste recycling area (GM: 25.4μg/g Cre) were significantly higher (pe-waste workers (36.6μg/g Cre) showed significantly higher (pe-waste recycling site. The differences in urinary Σ10OH-PAHs levels between smokers (23.4μg/g Cre) and non-smokers (24.7μg/g Cre) were not significant (p>0.05) in e-waste dismantling sites, while these differences were significant (pe-waste dismantling site. Furthermore, we found that urinary concentrations of Σ10OH-PAHs and individual OH-PAHs were significantly associated with elevated 8-OHdG, in samples collected from e-waste dismantling site; the levels of urinary 1-hydroxypyrene (1-PYR) (r=0.284, pe-waste dismantling site may have an effect on oxidative damage to DNA among selected participants, but this needs to be validated in large studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Use of Potentially Harmful Medications and Health-Related Quality of Life among People with Dementia Living in Residential Aged Care Facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascalle R. Bosboom

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Use of potentially harmful medications (PHMs is common in people with dementia living in Residential Aged Care Facilities (RACFs and increases the risk of adverse health outcomes. Debate persists as to how PHM use and its association with quality of life should be measured. We designed this study to determine the association of exposure to PHM, operationalized by three different measures, with self-reported Health-Related Quality of Life among people with dementia residing in RACFs. Methods: Cross-sectional study of 351 people aged >65 years diagnosed with dementia residing in RACFs and with MMSE ≤24. The primary outcome measure was the self-rated Quality of Life – Alzheimer’s disease questionnaire (QoL-AD. We collected data on patients’ medications, age, gender, MMSE total score, Neuropsychiatric Inventory total score, and comorbidities. Using regression analyses, we calculated crude and adjusted mean differences between groups exposed and not exposed to PHM according to potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs; identified by Modified Beers criteria, Drug Burden Index (DBI >0 and polypharmacy (i.e. ≥5 medications. Results: Of 226 participants able to rate their QoL-AD, 56.41% were exposed to at least one PIM, 82.05% to medication contributing to DBI >0, and 91.74% to polypharmacy. Exposure to PIMs was not associated with self-reported QoL-AD ratings, while exposure to DBI >0 and polypharmacy were (also after adjustment; exposure to DBI >0 tripled the odds of lower QoL-AD ratings. Conclusion: Exposure to PHM, as identified by DBI >0 and by polypharmacy (i.e. ≥5 medications, but not by PIMs (Modified Beers criteria, is inversely associated with self-reported health-related quality of life for people with dementia living in RACFs.

  17. SmartSenior@home: Acceptance of an integrated ambient assisted living system. Results of a clinical field trial in 35 households.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gövercin, M; Meyer, S; Schellenbach, M; Steinhagen-Thiessen, E; Weiss, B; Haesner, M

    2016-12-01

    The primary objective of the SmartSenior@home study was to examine the acceptance of the SmartSenior system by older adults. Twenty-eight partners from industry and research, including the health care sector, worked collaboratively to implement services aiming to maximize independence in old age. The prospective cohort study was conducted in Potsdam, Germany, with n = 35 older adults between 55 and 88 years of age in their apartments. All participants underwent extensive pre- and post-study visits with in-home interviews, functional assessments for cognition, fine motor skills, and mobility as well as responding to questionnaires on user acceptance and quality of life. The results indicate moderate-to-high user acceptance for the SmartSenior system. In particular, the services for general assistance and health, such as audio/video communication, blood pressure monitoring, and communication with a health professional, were rated as very attractive. Less used and less accepted services were those promoting social interaction and reminder services. Besides reliable functioning of the SmartSenior system, the availability of a confidant seems to be the most significant acceptance factor. As one conclusion of this trial, it is possible to develop, integrate, and test an infrastructure for ambient assisted living services in real life.

  18. Donor Complications Following Laparoscopic Compared to Hand-Assisted Living Donor Nephrectomy: An Analysis of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whitney R. Halgrimson

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available There are two approaches to laparoscopic donor nephrectomy: standard laparoscopic donor nephrectomy (LDN and hand-assisted laparoscopic donor nephrectomy (HALDN. In this study we report the operative statistics and donor complications associated with LDN and HALDN from large-center peer-reviewed publications. Methods. We conducted PubMed and Ovid searches to identify LDN and HALDN outcome studies that were published after 2004. Results. There were 37 peer-reviewed studies, each with more than 150 patients. Cumulatively, over 9000 patients were included in this study. LDN donors experienced a higher rate of intraoperative complications than HALDN donors (5.2% versus. 2.0%, <.001. Investigators did not report a significant difference in the rate of major postoperative complications between the two groups (LDN 0.5% versus HALDN 0.7%, =.111. However, conversion to open procedures from vascular injury was reported more frequently in LDN procedures (0.8% versus 0.4%, =.047. Conclusion. At present there is no evidence to support the use of one laparoscopic approach in preference to the other. There are trends in the data suggesting that intraoperative injuries are more common in LDN while minor postoperative complications are more common in HALDN.

  19. On the Prototyping of an ICT-Enhanced Toilet System for Assisting Older Persons Living Independently and Safely at Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panek, Paul; Fazekas, Gabor; Lüftenegger, Theresa; Mayer, Peter; Pilissy, Tamas; Raffaelli, Matteo; Rist, Atilla; Rosenthal, Ramona; Savanovic, Arso; Sobjak, Anna; Sonntag, Franziska; Toth, Andras; Unger, Birgit

    2017-01-01

    Standard toilets often do not meet the needs of a significant number of older persons and persons with disabilities. The EU funded iToilet project aims at design and development of a new type of ICT enhanced modular toilet system which shall be able to support autonomy, dignity and safety of older persons living at home. Methodologically the project started with gathering user requirements by means of questionnaires, interviews and focus group discussion involving a total of 74 persons, thereof 41 subjects with movement disorders (primary users), 21 caregivers (secondary users) and 12 healthcare managers (tertiary users). Most important wishes were bilateral removable handrails, height and tilt adjustment, emergency detection, simplicity. In parallel to the ongoing technical development participatory design activities have been carried out at user test sites in order to continuously involve users into the design process and to allow quick feedback with regards to early prototype parts. The project currently is working on the finalization of the first prototype ready to enter the lab trial stage in spring 2017. The experiences will be used for redesigning a prototype 2 which is planned to be tested in real life settings early 2018.

  20. How would I live with a disability? Expectations of bio-psychosocial consequences and assistive technology use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parant, Aymeric; Schiano-Lomoriello, Sandrine; Marchan, Francis

    2017-10-01

    It is widely accepted that social dimensions are crucial when facing a disability. More specifically, a normative incentive to conceal one's disability, which can lead to abandonment of assistive technology devices (ATD), is often reported. This study seeks to examine this norm. The expected consequences of having a disability were measured using a sample of 549 able-bodied students from three groups. The results showed that the expected consequences of having a disability and therefore the descriptive norms associated with disability were less negative for the participants who were familiar with disability, but higher for sports students. Furthermore, the relation between objective and subjective consequences (having a disability and feeling disabled, respectively) and public and private use of ATD were modelled. The model shows that both higher objective and lower subjective consequences were linked to higher ATD use in public and, indirectly, in private. The present study contributes to the literature on the normative elements related to the use of ATD. Indeed, it shows that when a person makes his/her disability a part of him/herself, she/he is expected to hide it and therefore to avoid using ATD. However, this assessment proves to be context-dependent and calls for the implementation of handicap awareness programs. Implications for Rehabilitation If faced with a disability, expecting to feel disabled and expecting lower objective consequences are linked to lower ATD use. Expected ATD use in private seems to be related to ATD use in public but not to the expected consequences of the disability. Expectations and therefore social norms about having a disability are highly context-dependent which encourages the implementation of handicap awareness programs.

  1. Don't ask me what's the matter, ask me what matters: Acute mental health facility experiences of people living with autism spectrum conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloret, P; Scott, T

    2017-10-27

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: There is a growing body of evidence that many people with an autism spectrum condition suffer anxiety in their daily life and a realization among practitioners that admission to a mental health unit for this population is usually a negative anxiety-inducing experience. Anxiety is driven by the intolerance of uncertainty that is being unsure of what is going to happen, how long the uncertainty will exist and the insistence of sameness which, when compromised, can be anxiety provoking. Equally, confusion in understanding personal emotional responses and those of others is a source of anxiety. WHAT THIS PAPER ADDS TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: This paper builds upon existing understanding of anxiety as a causative factor of mental ill-health for people with an autism spectrum condition. Specifically, this paper explores the potentially anxiety-inducing experience of mental health unit admission; how anxiety is felt, triggered, expressed and managed. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: As many different anxiety responses could be exhibited during hospitalization, including violent acts and self-harming, for mental health practitioners working in the inpatient units, it is essential that the thoughts, feelings and responses of the patient with an autistic spectrum condition (ASC) are better understood and that support offered during their stay in a mental health facility is from an informed position. Background This qualitative study explored how mental health inpatients with autistic spectrum conditions (ASCs) experience and cope with anxiety when admitted to an acute mental health inpatient facility in the United Kingdom. Anxiety is a common characteristic for people who live with ASCs and whilst a plethora of studies on anxiety in this population is published which correlate anxiety with mental health service experience, little is known about the actual triggers of anxiety and its manifestations. This study adds to a body of evidence

  2. Current overview of pregnancy complications and live-birth outcome of assisted reproductive technology in mainland China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaokui; Li, Ying; Li, Changdong; Zhang, Weiyuan

    2014-02-01

    To survey the proportion of births born after assisted reproductive technology (ART) and compare the obstetric and prenatal complications between ART and spontaneous pregnancy in women in mainland China. Retrospective analysis. Thirty-nine hospitals. A total of 112,403 deliveries from 14 provinces and 39 different hospitals composed our retrospective study. A multiprovince, hospital-based survey was performed. The prevalence of obstetric complications, mode of delivery, and prenatal outcomes were compared between ART and spontaneous pregnancy. For each group, data included singleton and twin deliveries. The proportion of infants born as a result of ART in mainland China was about 1.013% in 2011. The incidence of hypertensive disorder in pregnancy (11.0%, odds ratio [OR], 1.27, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.04-1.60), premature delivery (27.0%, OR, 4.53, 95% CI 3.91-5.25), gestational diabetes mellitus (15.1%, OR 3.05, 95% CI 2.57-3.60), and placenta previa (4.5%, OR 2.18, 95% CI 1.62-2.94) were markedly increased in women who conceived using ART. The cesarean section rate in the ART pregnancy group was 85.3%, which is significantly higher than spontaneous pregnancies (54.0%). Compared with spontaneous pregnancy, ART pregnancy had a significantly increased incidence of low birth weight babies (29.7%) and birth gestational age of less than 37 weeks (30.0%). Infants conceived by ART have increased low 5-minute Apgar and mortality. This population-based survey demonstrates that the proportion of births from ART in mainland China was about 1.013% in 2011. Multiple gestation is significantly increased in ART pregnancies, relative to spontaneous pregnancies. The increasing incidence and risk of maternal complications in ART pregnancies (e.g., premature delivery, placenta previa, gestational diabetes mellitus) are found in singleton and twin gestations in ART. A higher cesarean section rate, low birth weight infants, and higher infant mortality rate were also observed in

  3. Accurate Analysis and Evaluation of Acidic Plant Growth Regulators in Transgenic and Nontransgenic Edible Oils with Facile Microwave-Assisted Extraction-Derivatization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mengge; Chen, Guang; Guo, Hailong; Fan, Baolei; Liu, Jianjun; Fu, Qiang; Li, Xiu; Lu, Xiaomin; Zhao, Xianen; Li, Guoliang; Sun, Zhiwei; Xia, Lian; Zhu, Shuyun; Yang, Daoshan; Cao, Ziping; Wang, Hua; Suo, Yourui; You, Jinmao

    2015-09-16

    Determination of plant growth regulators (PGRs) in a signal transduction system (STS) is significant for transgenic food safety, but may be challenged by poor accuracy and analyte instability. In this work, a microwave-assisted extraction-derivatization (MAED) method is developed for six acidic PGRs in oil samples, allowing an efficient (<1.5 h) and facile (one step) pretreatment. Accuracies are greatly improved, particularly for gibberellin A3 (-2.72 to -0.65%) as compared with those reported (-22 to -2%). Excellent selectivity and quite low detection limits (0.37-1.36 ng mL(-1)) are enabled by fluorescence detection-mass spectrum monitoring. Results show the significant differences in acidic PGRs between transgenic and nontransgenic oils, particularly 1-naphthaleneacetic acid (1-NAA), implying the PGRs induced variations of components and genes. This study provides, for the first time, an accurate and efficient determination for labile PGRs involved in STS and a promising concept for objectively evaluating the safety of transgenic foods.

  4. Antifungal activity of magnetically separable Fe3O4/ZnO/AgBr nanocomposites prepared by a facile microwave-assisted method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolghasem Hoseinzadeh

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, magnetically separable Fe3O4/ZnO/AgBr nanocomposites with different weight ratios of Fe3O4 to ZnO/AgBr were prepared by a facile microwave-assisted method. The resultant samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (EDX, and vibrating sample magnetometery (VSM. Antifungal activity of the as-prepared samples was evaluated against Fusarium graminearum and Fusarium oxysporum as two phytopathogenic fungi. Among the nanocomposites, the sample with 1:8 weight ratio of Fe3O4 to ZnO/AgBr was selected as the best nanocomposite. This nanocomposite inactivates Fusarium graminearum and Fusarium oxysporum at 120 and 60 min, respectively. Moreover, it was observed that the microwave irradiation time has considerable influence on the antifungal activity and the sample prepared by irradiation for 10 min showed the best activity. Moreover, the nanocomposite without any thermal treatment displayed the superior activity.

  5. A Facile Vortex-Assisted Dispersive Liquid-Liquid Microextraction Method for the Determination of Uranyl Ion at Low Levels by Spectrophotometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corazza, Marcela Zanetti; Pires, Igor Matheus Ruiz; Diniz, Kristiany Moreira; Segatelli, Mariana Gava; Tarley, César Ricardo Teixeira

    2015-08-01

    A facile and reliable UV-Vis spectrophotometric method associated with vortex-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction has been developed and applied to the determination of U(VI) at low levels in water samples. It was based on preconcentration of 24.0 mL sample at pH 8.0 in the presence of 7.4 µmol L(-1) 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol, 1.0 mL of methanol as disperser solvent and 1.0 mL of chloroform as extraction solvent. A high preconcentration factor was achieved (396 times), thus providing a wide analytical curve from 6.9 up to 75.9 µg L(-1) (r=0.9982) and limits of detection and quantification of 0.40 and 1.30 µg L(-1), respectively. When necessary, EDTA or KCN can be used to remove interferences of foreign ions. The method was applied to the analysis of real water samples, such as tap, mineral and lake waters with good recovery values.

  6. Microwave assisted facile synthesis of reduced graphene oxide-silver (RGO-Ag) nanocomposite and their application as active SERS substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wadhwa, Heena, E-mail: heenawadhwa1988@gmail.com; Kumar, Devender, E-mail: devkumsaroha@kuk.ac.in; Mahendia, Suman, E-mail: mahendia@gmail.com; Kumar, Shyam, E-mail: profshyam@gmail.com

    2017-06-15

    The present paper represents the facile and rapid synthesis of reduced graphene oxide-silver (RGO-Ag) nanocomposite with the help of microwave irradiation. The graphene oxide (GO) solution has been prepared in bulk using Hummer's method followed by microwave assisted in-situ reduction of GO and silver nitrate (AgNO{sub 3}) by hydrazine hydrate in a short spam of 5 min. The prepared nanocomposite has been characterized using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and UV–Visible spectroscopy. TEM analysis shows that Ag nanoparticles with average size 32 nm are uniformly entangled with in RGO layers. The UV–Visible absorption spectrum of nanocomposite depicts the reduction of GO to RGO along with the formation of Ag nanoparticles with the presence of characteristic surface Plasmon resonance (SPR) peak of Ag nanoparticles at 422 nm. The performance of prepared nanocomposite has been tested as the active Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) substrate for Rhodamine 6G with detection limit 0.1 μM. - Highlights: • The RGO and RGO-Ag nanocomposite were synthesized with microwave irradiation. • Ag nanoparticles of average size 32 nm are uniformly entangled within RGO layers. • RGO itself is a florescence quencher with SERS detection limit 1 μM for R6G. • RGO-Ag nanocomposite show good SERS activity for R6G with detection limit 0.1 μM.

  7. Anterior chamber perfusion versus posterior chamber perfusion does not influence measurement of aqueous outflow facility in living mice by constant flow infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Navita N; Patel, Gaurang C; Raychaudhuri, Urmimala; Aryal, Subhash; Phan, Tien N; Clark, Abbot F; Millar, J Cameron

    2017-11-01

    Mice are now routinely utilized in studies of aqueous humor outflow dynamics. In particular, conventional aqueous outflow facility (C) is routinely measured via perfusion of the aqueous chamber by a number of laboratories. However, in mouse eyes perfused ex-vivo, values for C are variable depending upon whether the perfusate is introduced into the posterior chamber (PC) versus the anterior chamber (AC). Perfusion via the AC leads to posterior bowing of the iris, and traction on the iris root/scleral spur, which may increase C. Perfusion via the PC does not yield this effect. But the equivalent situation in living mice has not been investigated. We sought to determine whether AC versus PC perfusion of the living mouse eye may lead to different values for C. All experiments were conducted in C57BL/6J mice (all ♀) between the ages of 20 and 30 weeks. Mice were divided into groups of 3-4 animals each. In all groups, both eyes were perfused. C was measured in groups 1 and 2 by constant flow infusion (from a 50 μL microsyringe) via needle placement in the AC, and in the PC, respectively. To investigate the effect of ciliary muscle (CM) tone on C, groups 3 and 4 were perfused live via the AC or PC with tropicamide (muscarinic receptor antagonist) added to the perfusate at a concentration of 100 μM. To investigate immediate effect of euthanasia, groups 5 and 6 were perfused 15-30 min after death via the AC or PC. To investigate the effect of CM tone on C immediately following euthanasia, groups 7 and 8 were perfused 15-30 min after death via the AC or PC with tropicamide added to the perfusate at a concentration of 100 μM. C in Groups 1 (AC perfusion) and 2 (PC perfusion) was computed to be 19.5 ± 0.8 versus 21.0 ± 2.1 nL/min/mmHg, respectively (mean ± SEM, p > 0.4, not significantly different). In live animals in which tropicamide was present in the perfusate, C in Group 3 (AC perfusion) was significantly greater than C in Group 4 (PC perfusion) (22

  8. High loading MnO2 nanowires on graphene paper: facile electrochemical synthesis and use as flexible electrode for tracking hydrogen peroxide secretion in live cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Shuang; Xi, Jiangbo; Wu, Yanan; Liu, Hongwei; Fu, Chaoyang; Liu, Hongfang; Xiao, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Recent progress in flexible and lightweight electrochemical sensor systems requires the development of paper-like electrode materials. Here, we report a facile and green synthesis of a new type of MnO2 nanowires-graphene nanohybrid paper by one-step electrochemical method. This strategy demonstrates a collection of unique features including the effective electrochemical reduction of graphene oxide (GO) paper and the high loading of MnO2 nanowires on electrochemical reduced GO (ERGO) paper. When used as flexible electrode for nonenzymatic detection of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), MnO2-ERGO paper exhibits high electrocatalytic activity toward the redox of H2O2 as well as excellent stability, selectivity and reproducibility. The amperometric responses are linearly proportional to H2O2 concentration in the range 0.1-45.4 mM, with a detection limit of 10 μM (S/N=3) and detection sensitivity of 59.0 μA cm(-2) mM(-1). These outstanding sensing performances enable the practical application of MnO2-ERGO paper electrode for the real-time tracking H2O2 secretion by live cells macrophages. Therefore, the proposed graphene-based nanohybrid paper electrode with intrinsic flexibility, tailorable shapes and adjustable properties can contribute to the full realization of high-performance flexible electrode material used in point-of-care testing devices and portable instruments for in-vivo clinical diagnostics and on-site environmental monitoring. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Identification of Bacillus spp. colonizing the nasal mucosa of healthy adults living in the suburban area using the matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosikowska Urszula

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus spp. can be regarded as a rare component of the nasal mucosa microflora. The aim of this study was to identify Bacillus spp. from the nasal mucosa of healthy adults living in the suburban area near Lublin using the matrix-assisted laser desorptionionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS system.

  10. Fuzzy logic-based risk of fall estimation using smartwatch data as a means to form an assistive feedback mechanism in everyday living activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iakovakis, Dimitrios E; Papadopoulou, Fotini A; Hadjileontiadis, Leontios J

    2016-12-01

    This Letter aims to create a fuzzy logic-based assistive prevention tool for falls, based on accessible sensory technology, such as smartwatch, resulting in monitoring of the risk factors of falls caused by orthostatic hypotension (OH); a drop in systolic blood pressure (DSBP) >20 mmHg due to postural changes. Epidemiological studies have shown that OH is a high risk factor for falls and has a strong impact in quality of life (QoL) of the elderly's, especially for some cases such as Parkinsonians. Based on smartwatch data, it is explored here how statistical features of heart rate variability (HRV) can lead to DSBP prediction and estimation of the risk of fall. In this vein, a pilot study was conducted in collaboration with five Greek Parkinson's Foundation patients and ten healthy volunteers. Taking into consideration, the estimated DSBP and additional statistics of the user's medical/behavioural history, a fuzzy logic inference system was developed, to estimate the instantaneous risk of fall. The latter is fed back to the user with a mechanism chosen by him/her (i.e. vibration and/or sound), to prevent a possible fall, and also sent to the attentive carers and/or healthcare professionals for a home-based monitoring beyond the clinic. The proposed approach paves the way for effective exploitation of the contribution of smartwatch data, such as HRV, in the sustain of QoL in everyday living activities.

  11. Effects of resistance and all-round, functional training on quality of life, vitality and depression of older adults living in long-term care facilities: a 'randomized' controlled trial [ISRCTN87177281

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Mechelen Willem

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regular physical activity may improve different aspects of wellbeing in older people, such as quality of life, vitality and depression. However, there is little experimental evidence to support this assumption. Therefore, we examined the effect of different training protocols on quality of life, vitality and depression of older adults living in long-term care facilities. Methods Subjects (n = 173, aged 64 to 94 years, living in long-term care facilities, were randomized to six months of three different moderate-intensity group exercise training protocols, or to an 'educational' control condition. Exercise consisted of two 45–60-minute training sessions per week of 1 resistance training; 2 all-round, functional training; or 3 a combination of both. Perceived health, the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS, the Vitality Plus Scale (VPS and the Dementia Quality of Life questionnaire (DQoL were administered at baseline and after six months. Results In the combined training group a small but significant decline was seen in perceived health, DQoL and VPS score compared to the control group. Conclusions We conclude that neither strength training nor all-round, functional training of moderate intensity is effective in improving quality of life, vitality or depression of older people living in long-term care facilities.

  12. A cross-sectional, facility based study of comorbid non-communicable diseases among adults living with HIV infection in Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magodoro, Itai M; Esterhuizen, Tonya M; Chivese, Tawanda

    2016-08-02

    Increased antiretroviral therapy uptake in sub-Saharan Africa has resulted in improved survival of the infected. Opportunistic infections are declining as leading causes of morbidity and mortality. Though comprehensive data are lacking, concern has been raised about the rapid emergence of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in the African HIV care setting. We therefore set out to characterise the NCD/HIV burden among adults living and ageing with HIV infection in Zimbabwe. We conducted a cross-sectional study among patients receiving care in a public sector facility. We reviewed patient records and determined the prevalence of comorbid and multi-morbid NCDs. Associations with patient characteristics were evaluated using univariate and multi-variate logistic regression modelling. Significance testing was done using 2-sided p values and 95 % confidence intervals calculated. We recruited 1033 participants. 31 % were men. Significant gender differences included: older median age, more advanced disease at baseline, and greater use of stavudine and protease inhibitor containing regimens in men compared to women. The prevalence of comorbidity and multi-morbidity were, respectively, 15.3 % (95 % CI 13.3-17.7 %) and 4.5 % (95 % CI 3.4-6.0 %). Women had higher rates than men of both co-morbidity and multi-morbid ity: 21.8 vs. 14.9 %; p = 0.010 and 5.3 vs. 2.9 %; p = 0.025 respectively. The commonly observed individual NCDs were hypertension [10.2 %; (95 % CI 8.4-12.2 %)], asthma [4.3 % (95 % CI 3.1-5.8 %)], type 2 diabetes mellitus [2.1 % (95 % CI 1.3-3.2 %)], cancer [1.8 % (95 % CI 1.1-2.8 %)], and congestive cardiac failure [1.5 % (95 % CI 0.9-2.5 %)]. After adjusting for confounding, only age categories 45-≤55 years (AOR 2.25; 95 % CI 1.37-3.69) and >55 years (AOR 5.42; 95 % CI 3.17-9.26), and female gender (AOR 2.12; 95 % CI 1.45-3.11) remained significantly and strongly associated with comorbidity risk. We found a substantial burden of

  13. SCFA lead lab technical assistance at Oak Ridge Y-12 nationalsecurity complex: Evaluation of treatment and characterizationalternatives of mixed waste soil and debris at disposal area remedialaction DARA solids storage facility (SSF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazen, Terry

    2002-08-26

    On July 17-18, 2002, a technical assistance team from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area (SCFA) met with the Bechtel Jacobs Company Disposal Area Remedial Action (DARA) environmental project leader to review treatment and characterization options for the baseline for the DARA Solids Storage Facility (SSF). The technical assistance request sought suggestions from SCFA's team of technical experts with experience and expertise in soil treatment and characterization to identify and evaluate (1) alternative treatment technologies for DARA soils and debris, and (2) options for analysis of organic constituents in soil with matrix interference. Based on the recommendations, the site may also require assistance in identifying and evaluating appropriate commercial vendors.

  14. [Interventions based on exercise and physical environment for preventing falls in cognitively impaired older people living in long-term care facilities: A systematic review and meta-analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Román, Loreto; Bagur-Calafat, Caritat; Urrútia-Cuchí, Gerard; Garrido-Pedrosa, Jèssica

    2016-01-01

    This systematic review aims to report the effectiveness of interventions based on exercise and/or physical environment for reducing falls in cognitively impaired older adults living in long-term care facilities. In July 2014, a literature search was conducted using main databases and specialised sources. Randomised controlled trials assessing the effectiveness of fall prevention interventions, which used exercise or physical environment among elderly people with cognitive impairment living in long-term care facilities, were selected. Two independent reviewers checked the eligibility of the studies, and evaluated their methodological quality. If it was adequate, data were gathered. Fourteen studies with 3,539 participants using exercise and/or physical environment by a single or combined approach were included. The data gathered from studies that used both interventions showed a significant reduction in fall rate. Further research is needed to demonstrate the effectiveness of those interventions for preventing falls in the elderly with cognitive impairment living in long-term care establishments. Copyright © 2015 SEGG. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  15. The association between high recreational physical activity and physical activity as a part of daily living in adolescents and availability of local indoor sports facilities and sports clubs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niclasen, B.; Petzold, M.; Schnohr, Christina Warrer

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to examine how vigorous physical activity (recreational physical activity) (VPA) and moderate to vigorous physical activity as a part of daily life (MVPA) is associated with structural characteristics (availability of sports facilities and sports clubs with child...... members) in Greenlandic adolescents. Material and methods: Data from the 2006 Health Behaviour in School-aged Children survey including 2,430 children aged 11-17 years was used. Logistic regression models were developed with dichotomous measures on VPA and MVPA as outcomes, number of indoor sports...... facilities and of sports clubs with child members as independent variables, and adjusted for age, gender, family affluence (FAS), and type of habitation (capital, town or village). Results: High VPA increased with access to indoor facilities, while high MVPA was less likely (odds ratio (OR) 0.54 (0...

  16. The association between high recreational physical activity and physical activity as a part of daily living in adolescents and availability of local indoor sports facilities and sports clubs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niclasen, Birgit; Petzold, Max; Schnohr, Christina W

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study was to examine how vigorous physical activity (recreational physical activity) (VPA) and moderate to vigorous physical activity as a part of daily life (MVPA) is associated with structural characteristics (availability of sports facilities and sports clubs with child members) in Greenlandic adolescents. Data from the 2006 Health Behaviour in School-aged Children survey including 2,430 children aged 11-17 years was used. Logistic regression models were developed with dichotomous measures on VPA and MVPA as outcomes, number of indoor sports facilities and of sports clubs with child members as independent variables, and adjusted for age, gender, family affluence (FAS), and type of habitation (capital, town or village). High VPA increased with access to indoor facilities, while high MVPA was less likely (odds ratio (OR) 0.54 (0.42-0.70)) if indoor sports facilities were present, both unadjusted and adjusted. Access to a local sports club increased OR for high VPA both unadjusted and adjusted to about 2.3 for five or more clubs, while access to sports clubs was not associated with unadjusted MVPA, negatively associated if adjusted for age, gender and FAS but positively associated if also adjusted for indoor sports facilities. Access to indoor sports facilities itself had a positive association with high VPA, but was persistently negatively associated with high MVPA. Presence of sports clubs with child members was positively associated with high VPA while the association with high MVPA was more complex. The findings have implications for public health planning.

  17. Cumulative pregnancy and live birth rates through assisted reproduction in women 44-45 years of age: is there any hope?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raz, Nili; Shalev, Amir; Horowitz, Eran; Weissman, Ariel; Mizrachi, Yossi; Ganer Herman, Hadass; Raziel, Arieh

    2017-12-07

    The purpose of the study is to calculate the cumulative pregnancy rate and cumulative live birth rate in women undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF) at ages 44-45. The study calculated cumulative live pregnancy rate and cumulative live birth rate of 124 women aged 44 to 45 years old who commenced IVF treatment. The main outcome measures are cumulative live pregnancy rate and cumulative live birth rate. Cumulative live pregnancy rates following 1, 2, 3, and 4 cycles were 5.6, 11, 17, and 20%, respectively, with no additional pregnancies in further cycles. Cumulative live birth rates following 1, 2, and 3 cycles were 1.6, 3, and 7%, respectively, with no additional live births in further cycles. The cumulative pregnancy rate rises during the first 4 cycles and cumulative live birth rate rises during the first 3 cycles, with no additional rise in pregnancies or deliveries thereafter, suggesting that it is futile to offer more than 3 cycles of treatment to 44-45-year-old women.

  18. A facile one-pot oxidation-assisted dealloying protocol to massively synthesize monolithic core-shell architectured nanoporous copper@cuprous oxide nanonetworks for photodegradation of methyl orange

    OpenAIRE

    Wenbo Liu; Long Chen; Xin Dong; Jiazhen Yan; Ning Li; Sanqiang Shi; Shichao Zhang

    2016-01-01

    In this report, a facile and effective one-pot oxidation-assisted dealloying protocol has been developed to massively synthesize monolithic core-shell architectured nanoporous copper@cuprous oxide nanonetworks (C-S NPC@Cu2O NNs) by chemical dealloying of melt-spun Al 37 at.% Cu alloy in an oxygen-rich alkaline solution at room temperature, which possesses superior photocatalytic activity towards photodegradation of methyl orange (MO). The experimental results show that the as-prepared nanocom...

  19. National collection of embryo morphology data into Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology Clinic Outcomes Reporting System: associations among day 3 cell number, fragmentation and blastomere asymmetry, and live birth rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racowsky, Catherine; Stern, Judy E; Gibbons, William E; Behr, Barry; Pomeroy, Kimball O; Biggers, John D

    2011-05-01

    To evaluate the validity of collecting day 3 embryo morphology variables into the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology Clinic Outcomes Reporting System (SART CORS). Retrospective. National database-SART CORS. Fresh autologous assisted reproductive technology (ART) cycles from 2006-2007 in which embryos were transferred singly (n=1,020) or in pairs (n=6,508) and embryo morphology was collected. None. Relationship between live birth, maternal age, and morphology of transferred day 3 embryos as defined by cell number, fragmentation, and blastomere symmetry. Logistic multiple regressions and receiver operating characteristic curve analyses were applied to determine specificity and sensitivity for correctly classifying embryos as either failures or successes. Live birth rate was positively associated with increasing cell number up to eight cells (8 cells: 16.2%), but was negatively associated with maternal age, increasing fragmentation, and asymmetry scores. An area under the receiver operating curve of 0.753 (95% confidence interval 0.740-0.766) was derived, with a sensitivity of 45.0%, a specificity of 83.2%, and 76.4% of embryos being correctly classified with a cutoff probability of 0.3. This analysis provides support for the validity of collecting morphology fields for day 3 embryos into SART CORS. Standardization of morphology collections will assist in controlling for embryo quality in future database analyses. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Address Points, Points of Interest: AIRPORT_PRIVATE, AIRPORT_PUBLIC, ARMORY, ASSISTED LIVING, CAMPGROUND, CHILD CARE CENTERS, CHURCH, COLLEGE, COMMUNITY ENTRANCE, COMMUNITY REC CENTER, COURT, FARMERS MARKET, FIRE DEPT, GOVERNMENT BUILDING, HEALTH CENTER, HOSPITAL, etc, Published in 2011, 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, Anne Arundal County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Address Points dataset current as of 2011. Points of Interest: AIRPORT_PRIVATE, AIRPORT_PUBLIC, ARMORY, ASSISTED LIVING, CAMPGROUND, CHILD CARE CENTERS, CHURCH,...

  1. Facility Head | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facility HeadConfocal Microscopy Core FacilityLaboratory of Cancer Biology and Genetics The Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Genetics (LCBG), Center for Cancer Research (CCR), NCI, NIH, HHS is looking for a motivated and skilled microscopist to fill a Facility Head position to lead its Confocal Microscopy Core Facility. The CCR Microscopy Core provides microscopy equipment and support to approximately 150 active users representing over 20 NCI laboratories. The Core places an emphasis on training independent users, but the staff is available to assist in all phases of experiments. This includes experimental design, data acquisition, and data analysis. The Core provides state-of-the-art microscopic analyses to better understand critical biological structures and cellular processes involved in cancer. The Facility Head will also be expected to participate in the CCR Microscopy Core meetings and to interact extensively with the other microscopy facilities in CCR. Light microscopic techniques and analytic methods currently used in this facility include, but are not limited to: 1) co-localization of fluorescent fusion proteins with organelles; 2) demonstration of membrane ruffling, cytoskeletal organization, focal adhesions and other cell morphology; 3) live time-lapse translocation of fluorescent fusion proteins; 4) fluorescent indicators of oxidative stress in live cells; 5) 4D imaging of cell division; 6) Super-Resolution imaging; 7) tiling; 8) Fluorescent Recovery After Photobleaching (FRAP) and Fluorescent Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET); 9) Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS); 10) Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging (FLIM); and, 11) Second Harmonic Generation imaging (SHG) of whole live tissue/organ. The Facility's equipment includes a Zeiss LSM 710 NLO for two-photon imaging, a Zeiss LSM 780 for higher sensitivity imaging, a Zeiss LSM 780/ELYRA for super-resolution imaging of fixed cells, and the Zeiss LSM 880/Airyscan for super-resolution imaging of live and

  2. Enhanced living environments from models to technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Dobre, Ciprian; Ganchev, Ivan; Garcia, Nuno; Goleva, Rossitza Ivanova

    2017-01-01

    Enhanced living environments employ information and communications technologies to support true ambient assisted living for people with disabilities. This book provides an overview of today's architectures, techniques, protocols, components, and cloud-based solutions related to ambient assisted living and enhanced living environments.

  3. When being 'tired of living' plays an important role in a request for euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide: patient characteristics and the physician's decision

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rurup, M.L.; Philipsen, B.D.; van der Weide, M.C.; van der Wal, G.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND:: In the Netherlands physicians are allowed to grant requests for euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide (EAS) if they meet several requirements of due care. According to jurisprudence, a physician is not allowed to end the life of a patient whose request for EAS is based on being

  4. Facile synthesis of terminal-alkyne bioorthogonal molecules for live -cell surface-enhanced Raman scattering imaging through Au-core and silver/dopamine-shell nanotags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Meng; Zhang, Ling; Yang, Bo; Gao, Mingxia; Zhang, Xiangmin

    2018-02-03

    Alkyne is unique, specific and biocompatible in the Raman-silent region of the cell, but there still remains a challenge to achieve ultrasensitive detection in living systems due to its weak Raman scattering. Herein, a terminal alkyne ((E)-2-[4-(ethynylbenzylidene)amino]ethane-1-thiol (EBAE)) with surface-enhanced Raman scattering is synthesized. The EBAE molecule possesses S- and C-termini, which can be directly bonded to gold nanoparticles and dopamine/silver by forming the Au-S chemical bond and the carbon-metal bond, respectively. The distance between Raman reporter and AuNPs/AgNPs can be reduced, contributing to forming hot-spot-based SERS substrate. The alkyne functionalized nanoparticles are based on Au core and encapsulating polydopamine shell, defined as Au-core and dopamine/Ag-shell (ACDS). The bimetallic ACDS induce strong SERS signals for molecular imaging that arise from the strong electromagnetic field. Furthermore, the EBAE provides a distinct peak in the cellular Raman-silent region with nearly zero background interference. The EBAE Raman signals could be tremendously enhanced when the Raman reporter is located at the middle of the Au-core and dopamine/Ag-shell. Therefore, this work could have huge potential benefits for the highly sensitive detection of intercellular information delivery by connecting the recognition molecules in biomedical diagnostics. Graphical abstract Terminal-alkyne-functionalized Au-core and silver/dopamine-shell nanotags for live-cell surface-enhanced Raman scattering imaging.

  5. Application of Universal Design for Learning (Udl1) and Living (Udl2) in Virtual Dolphin-Assisted Intervention (Vdai) for Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, Noel Kok Hwee; Kee, Norman Kiak Nam

    2014-01-01

    In Singapore, the Special Education for Autism (SEA) calls for a more focused, systematically structured framework to cater to the needs of children with autism in schools. As autism is a syndrome with co-morbid subtypes and different degrees of severity, a universal design for both learning and living becomes necessary to meet all the various…

  6. Changes in activities of daily living, physical fitness, and depressive symptoms after six-month periodic well-rounded exercise programs for older adults living in nursing homes or special nursing facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Pei; Yatsuya, Hiroshi; Toyoshima, Hideaki; Otsuka, Rei; Wada, Keiko; Matsushita, Kunihiro; Ishikawa, Miyuki; Yuanying, Li; Hotta, Yo; Mitsuhashi, Hirotsugu; Muramatsu, Takashi; Kasuga, Norikatsu; Tamakoshi, Koji

    2009-09-01

    A 6-month, twice weekly, well-rounded exercise program (47 sessions in total) comprised of a combination of aerobic, resistance and flexibility training was provided for institutionalized older adults aged 60 to 93. We analyzed the data of 18 older adults who could stand and had attended more than 10% of the classes (mean participation rate: 54%) to examine changes in activities of daily living (ADL), physical fitness tests and depressive moods. The mean (+/- standard deviation, range) age of the participants was 71.3 (+/- 15.6, 60-93) in men and 85.9 (+/- 5.8, 72-93) in women. Significant improvement in ADL of the hand manipulation domain and borderline significant improvement in ADL of the mobility domain were observed (McNemar test p = 0.011 and 0.072, respectively). A 6-minute walk distance increased significantly from 151.6 m to 236.6 m (p = 0.01, paired t-test), and the result of the Soda Pop test, which tests hand-eye coordination, also improved significantly from 35.2 sec to 25.3 sec (p = 0.01, paired t-test). These findings suggest that such a program could be effective in improving the ADL and physical fitness of the elderly.

  7. Lot-to-lot consistency of live attenuated SA 14-14-2 Japanese encephalitis vaccine manufactured in a good manufacturing practice facility and non-inferiority with respect to an earlier product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, K; Naser, Abu Mohd; Power, Maureen; Yaich, Mansour; Zhang, Lei; Ginsburg, Amy Sarah; Luby, Stephen P; Rahman, Mahmudur; Hills, Susan; Bhardwaj, Mukesh; Flores, Jorge

    2014-10-21

    We conducted a four-arm, double-blind, randomized controlled trial among 818 Bangladeshi infants between 10 and 12 months of age to establish equivalence among three lots of live attenuated SA 14-14-2 JE vaccine manufactured by the China National Biotec Group's Chengdu Institute of Biological Products (CDIBP) in a new Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) facility and to evaluate non-inferiority of the product with a lot of the same vaccine manufactured in CDIBP's original facility. The study took place in two sites in Bangladesh, rural Matlab and Mirpur in urban Dhaka. We collected pre-vaccination (Day 0) and post-vaccination Day 28 (-4 to +14 days) blood samples to assess neutralizing anti-JE virus antibody titers in serum by plaque reduction neutralization tests (PRNT). Seroprotection following vaccination was defined as a PRNT titer ≥1:10 at Day 28 in participants non-immune at baseline. Follow-up for reactogenicity and safety was conducted through home visits at Day 7 and monitoring for serious adverse events through Day 28. Seroprotection rates ranged from 80.2% to 86.3% for all four lots of vaccine. Equivalence of the seroprotection rates between pairs of vaccine lots produced in the new GMP facility was satisfied at the pre-specified 10% margin of the 95% confidence interval (CI) for two of the three pairwise comparisons, but not for the third (-4.3% observed difference with 95% CI of -11.9 to 3.3%). Nevertheless, the aggregate seroprotection rate for all three vaccine lots manufactured in the GMP facility was calculated and found to be within the non-inferiority margin (within 10%) to the vaccine lot produced in the original facility. All four lots of vaccine were safe and well tolerated. These study results should facilitate the use of SA 14-14-2 JE vaccine as a routine component of immunization programs in Asian countries. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act ( ARRA) FEMP Technical Assistance, U.S. General Services Administration - Project 194 U.S. Custom Cargo Inspection Facility, Detroit, MI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arends, J.; Sandusky, William F.

    2010-05-31

    This report documents the findings of an on-site audit of the U.S. Customs Cargo Inspection Facility (CIF) in Detroit, Michigan. The federal landlord for this building is the General Services Administration (GSA). The focus of the audit was to identify various no-cost or low-cost energy-efficiency opportunities that, once implemented, would reduce electrical and gas consumption and increase the operational efficiency of the building. This audit also provided an opportunity to identify potential capital cost projects that should be considered in the future to acquire additional energy (electric and gas) and water savings to further increase the operational efficiency of the building.

  9. Enhancing resiliency for elderly populations : Shelter-in-place planning and training at facilities serving elderly populations through the Rhode Island Senior Resiliency Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Richard; Mozzer, Michael; Albanese, Joseph; Paturas, James; Gold, Julia

    2017-06-01

    Elderly populations are disproportionately affected by disasters. In part, this is true because for many older adults, special assistance is needed to mitigate the consequences of disasters on their health and wellbeing. In addition, many older adults may reside in diverse living complexes such as long-term care facilities, assisted living facilities and independent-living senior housing complexes. Planning for each type of facility is different and the unique features of these facilities must be considered to develop readiness to deal with disasters. Based on this, the Rhode Island Department of Health established the Senior Resiliency Project to bolster the level of resiliency for the types of living facilities housing older adults. The project involves performing onsite assessments of energy resources, developing site-specific sheltering-inplace and energy resiliency plans, and educating and training facility employees and residents on these plans and steps they can take to be better prepared. Based on the feasibility of conducting these activities within a variety of facilities housing older adults, the project is segmented into three phases. This paper describes survey findings, outcomes of interventions, challenges and recommendations for bridging gaps observed in phases 1 and 2 of the project.

  10. Tailored lighting intervention improves measures of sleep, depression, and agitation in persons with Alzheimer's disease and related dementia living in long-term care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiro, Mariana G; Plitnick, Barbara A; Lok, Anna; Jones, Geoffrey E; Higgins, Patricia; Hornick, Thomas R; Rea, Mark S

    2014-01-01

    Light therapy has shown great promise as a nonpharmacological method to improve symptoms associated with Alzheimer's disease and related dementias (ADRD), with preliminary studies demonstrating that appropriately timed light exposure can improve nighttime sleep efficiency, reduce nocturnal wandering, and alleviate evening agitation. Since the human circadian system is maximally sensitive to short-wavelength (blue) light, lower, more targeted lighting interventions for therapeutic purposes, can be used. The present study investigated the effectiveness of a tailored lighting intervention for individuals with ADRD living in nursing homes. Low-level "bluish-white" lighting designed to deliver high circadian stimulation during the daytime was installed in 14 nursing home resident rooms for a period of 4 weeks. Light-dark and rest-activity patterns were collected using a Daysimeter. Sleep time and sleep efficiency measures were obtained using the rest-activity data. Measures of sleep quality, depression, and agitation were collected using standardized questionnaires, at baseline, at the end of the 4-week lighting intervention, and 4 weeks after the lighting intervention was removed. The lighting intervention significantly (Psleep scores from the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, and increased total sleep time and sleep efficiency. The lighting intervention also increased phasor magnitude, a measure of the 24-hour resonance between light-dark and rest-activity patterns, suggesting an increase in circadian entrainment. The lighting intervention significantly (Plighting intervention, tailored to increase daytime circadian stimulation, can be used to increase sleep quality and improve behavior in patients with ADRD. The present field study, while promising for application, should be replicated using a larger sample size and perhaps using longer treatment duration.

  11. Tailored lighting intervention improves measures of sleep, depression, and agitation in persons with Alzheimer’s disease and related dementia living in long-term care facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiro, Mariana G; Plitnick, Barbara A; Lok, Anna; Jones, Geoffrey E; Higgins, Patricia; Hornick, Thomas R; Rea, Mark S

    2014-01-01

    Background Light therapy has shown great promise as a nonpharmacological method to improve symptoms associated with Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias (ADRD), with preliminary studies demonstrating that appropriately timed light exposure can improve nighttime sleep efficiency, reduce nocturnal wandering, and alleviate evening agitation. Since the human circadian system is maximally sensitive to short-wavelength (blue) light, lower, more targeted lighting interventions for therapeutic purposes, can be used. Methods The present study investigated the effectiveness of a tailored lighting intervention for individuals with ADRD living in nursing homes. Low-level “bluish-white” lighting designed to deliver high circadian stimulation during the daytime was installed in 14 nursing home resident rooms for a period of 4 weeks. Light–dark and rest–activity patterns were collected using a Daysimeter. Sleep time and sleep efficiency measures were obtained using the rest–activity data. Measures of sleep quality, depression, and agitation were collected using standardized questionnaires, at baseline, at the end of the 4-week lighting intervention, and 4 weeks after the lighting intervention was removed. Results The lighting intervention significantly (Plighting intervention also increased phasor magnitude, a measure of the 24-hour resonance between light–dark and rest–activity patterns, suggesting an increase in circadian entrainment. The lighting intervention significantly (Plighting intervention, tailored to increase daytime circadian stimulation, can be used to increase sleep quality and improve behavior in patients with ADRD. The present field study, while promising for application, should be replicated using a larger sample size and perhaps using longer treatment duration. PMID:25246779

  12. Facilities & Leadership

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The facilities web service provides VA facility information. The VA facilities locator is a feature that is available across the enterprise, on any webpage, for the...

  13. Facile solid-phase ruthenium assisted azide-alkyne cycloaddition (RuAAC) utilizing the Cp*RuCl(COD)-catalyst

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engholm, Ebbe; sgz228, sgz228; Blixt, Klas Ola

    2017-01-01

    The ruthenium assisted azide-alkyne cycloaddition (RuAAC) reaction is a well-established method for the generation of 1,5- and 1,4,5-substituted 1,2,3-triazoles, which we have extended to the solid-phase synthesis of 1,2,3-triazole-peptides. The 1,2,3-triazole moieties were formed upon the reaction...... of alkynes with a solid-phase bound secondary azide in the presence of the Cp*RuCl(COD) catalyst at room temperature. Both terminal and internal alkynes underwent highly regioselective cycloaddition reactions under mild conditions, facilitating release of the peptide construct from the resin with intact side...

  14. Microwave assisted facile one pot synthesis of novel 5-carboxamido substituted analogues of 1,4-benzodiazepin-2-one of medicinal interest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sirohi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available A novel synthetic approach developed by the use of a microwave (MW assisted one pot protocol to the synthesis of methyl-1,4-benzodiazepin-2-one-5-carboxylate (2 derivatives for which N-chloroacetylisatin was employed with an elegant success to afford the formation of 5-methyl carboxylate derivatives of 1,4-benzodiazepines from its reaction with methanolic hexamine. We have utilized MW technique in the present work in conducting the reaction of carboxylate ester derivative (2 with several selected primary and secondary amines 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8 which had the previous history of being biologically active in the literature, to generate the corresponding carboxamide derivatives (9-14.

  15. A facile green synthesis of Sm2O3 nanoparticles via microwave-assisted urea precipitation route and their optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Hansong; Zhang, Weina; Li, Xinyu; You, Xiaochang; Rao, Jinsong; Pan, FuSheng

    2017-05-01

    Samarium oxide (Sm2O3) nanoparticles with a narrow size distribution were successfully synthesized by microwave-assisted using urea as precipitant without surfactant or template. The Sm2O3 particles were characterized using X-ray diffraction analysis, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, field-emission transmission electron microscopy and ultraviolet-visible-near-infrared spectrophotometer. The results showed that the samples prepared with different concentration of urea had different particle sizes. When the concentration of urea was 1.2 mol/L, the sample had the smallest particle size. A possible mechanism for the formation of the nanoparticles was proposed. Optical properties of Sm2O3 nanoparticles showed that the nanoparticles had a strong absorption property in the deep ultraviolet region between 200 nm and 270 nm. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  16. Biochemistry Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Biochemistry Facility provides expert services and consultation in biochemical enzyme assays and protein purification. The facility currently features 1) Liquid...

  17. Tailored lighting intervention improves measures of sleep, depression, and agitation in persons with Alzheimer’s disease and related dementia living in long-term care facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Figueiro MG

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Mariana G Figueiro,1 Barbara A Plitnick,1 Anna Lok,1 Geoffrey E Jones,1 Patricia Higgins,2,3 Thomas R Hornick,3,4 Mark S Rea1 1Lighting Research Center, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, USA; 2School of Nursing, 3School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, 4Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, Louis Stokes Cleveland Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Cleveland, OH, USABackground: Light therapy has shown great promise as a nonpharmacological method to improve symptoms associated with Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias (ADRD, with preliminary studies demonstrating that appropriately timed light exposure can improve nighttime sleep efficiency, reduce nocturnal wandering, and alleviate evening agitation. Since the human circadian system is maximally sensitive to short-wavelength (blue light, lower, more targeted lighting interventions for therapeutic purposes, can be used. Methods: The present study investigated the effectiveness of a tailored lighting intervention for individuals with ADRD living in nursing homes. Low-level “bluish-white” lighting designed to deliver high circadian stimulation during the daytime was installed in 14 nursing home resident rooms for a period of 4 weeks. Light–dark and rest–activity patterns were collected using a Daysimeter. Sleep time and sleep efficiency measures were obtained using the rest–activity data. Measures of sleep quality, depression, and agitation were collected using standardized questionnaires, at baseline, at the end of the 4-week lighting intervention, and 4 weeks after the lighting intervention was removed. Results: The lighting intervention significantly (P<0.05 decreased global sleep scores from the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, and increased total sleep time and sleep efficiency. The lighting intervention also increased phasor magnitude, a measure of the 24-hour resonance between light–dark and rest–activity patterns, suggesting an increase

  18. Graphene oxide-assisted facile synthesis of platinum-tellurium nanocubes with enhanced catalytic activity for formic acid electro-oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yichun; Chen, Jinwei; Zhou, Feilong; Zhang, Jie; Wei, Xiaoyang; Luo, Rui; Wang, Gang; Wang, Ruilin

    2017-08-01

    In order to obtain a loaded Pt-based catalyst with enhanced high activity and stability towards formic acid electro-oxidation (FAO), PtTe nanoparticles loaded on graphene oxide (GO) were fabricated by a facile and scalable method. XRD and HRTEM results show that the morphology of PtTe particles could be affected by the additive amount of GO and Te. It is observed that the supported PtTe particles are cubic. The XPS results show the change in the Pt electronic structure after the incorporation of Te, which impedes the chemisorption of the CO intermediate and promotes the dehydrogenation pathway of FAO. By electrochemical analysis, the performance towards FAO is greatly enhanced. The mass activity of PtTe/GO-67 is 2165.53 {{mA}} {{{mg}}}{{Pt}}-1 at 0.45 V (versus SCE), which is 11.5 times as high as that of Pt/C (188.44 {{mA}} {{{mg}}}{{Pt}}-1). The incorporation of Te atoms and the content of GO are two major parameters for tuning the crystal structure and morphology and enhancing catalytic activity.

  19. Ultrasound-assisted facile synthesis of a new tantalum(V) metal-organic framework nanostructure: Design, characterization, systematic study, and CO{sub 2} adsorption performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sargazi, Ghasem, E-mail: g.sargazi@gmail.com [Department of Nanotechnology Engineering, Mineral Industries Research Center, Shahid Bahonar University of Kerman, Kerman, Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Young Researchers Society, Shahid Bahonar University of Kerman, Kerman, Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Afzali, Daryoush, E-mail: daryoush_afzali@yahoo.com [Department of Nanotechnology, Graduate University of Advanced Technology, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mostafavi, Ali [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, Shahid Bahonar University of Kerman, Kerman, Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ebrahimipour, S. Yousef [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, Shahid Bahonar University of Kerman, Kerman, Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Pistachio Safety Research Center, Rafsanjan University of Medical Sciences, Rafsanjan, Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    This work presents a fast route for the preparation of a new Ta(V) metal-organic framework nanostructure with high surface area, significant porosity, and small size distribution. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Transition electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS), thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), CHNS/O elemental analyser, and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area analysis were applied to characterize the synthesized product. Moreover, the influences of ultrasonic irradiation including temperature, time, and power on different features of the final products were systematically studied using 2{sup k-1} factorial design experiments, and the response surface optimization was used for determining the best welding parameter combination. The results obtained from analyses of variances showed that ultrasonic parameters affected the size distribution, thermal behaviour, and surface area of Ta-MOF samples. Based on response surface methodology, Ta-MOF could be obtained with mean diameter of 55 nm, thermal stability of 228 °C, and high surface area of 2100 m{sup 2}/g. The results revealed that the synthesized products could be utilized in various applications such as a novel candidate for CO{sub 2} adsorption. - Graphical abstract: A facile route was used for fabrication of a new metal -organic framework based on tantalum nanostructures that have high surface area, considerable porosity, homogenous morphology, and small size distribution.

  20. Facile Synthesis of MgO-Modified Carbon Adsorbents with Microwave- Assisted Methods: Effect of MgO Particles and Porosities on CO2 Capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Young-Jung; Park, Soo-Jin

    2017-07-18

    In this study, magnesium oxide (MgO)-modified carbon adsorbents were fabricated using a nitrogen-enriched carbon precursor by microwave-assisted irradiation for CO2 capture. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns showed the characteristic diffraction peaks of MgO at 43° and 62.5°, and no impurities were apparent. By changing the microwave reaction time, the spherical structure of the parent material was transformed to a hybrid structure with MgO crystalline particles in a carbon matrix. The morphology evolution and properties of the prepared materials were also investigated using transmission electron microscopy and N2 adsorption, respectively. On optimising the conditions, the prepared sample attained a high CO2 uptake of 1.22 mmol/g (5.3 wt.%) under flue gas conditions (15% CO2 in N2). It was found that MgO affected the CO2 capture behaviour by enhancing the fundamental characteristics of the carbon surfaces.