WorldWideScience

Sample records for assistant medical technicians

  1. Medical Laboratory Technician--Microbiology (AFSC 90470).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Joselyn H.

    This four-volume student text is designed for use by Air Force personnel enrolled in a self-study extension course for medical laboratory technicians. Covered in the individual volumes are laboratory procedures in clinical bacteriology (the history of bacteriology; aseptic techniques and sterilization procedures; bacterial morphology and…

  2. A System Approach to Navy Medical Education and Training. Appendix 37. Competency Curricula for Respiratory Therapy Assistant and Respiratory Therapy Technician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-08-31

    of Intermittent Positive Pressure Breathing Treatment . . . . . . . . ... 13 5. Chest Physiotherapy ...... . .. . . . . . 14 6. Respiratory Exercises ...12 4 Administration of Intermittent Positive Pressure Breathing Treatment . . .. .. . . . 13 5 Chest Physiotherapy ................... 14...6 Respiratory Exercises ..... ............. .. 15 7 Aerosol/Fumidity Therapy . . . ......... 16 8 Medical Gas Administration ... .......... 17 9

  3. Development of new core competencies for Taiwanese Emergency Medical Technicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yu-Tung; Tsai, Kuang-Chau; Williams, Brett

    2018-01-01

    Core competencies are considered the foundation for establishing Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) and paramedic curricula, and for ensuring performance standards in the delivery of prehospital care. This study surveyed EMT instructors and medical directors to identify the most desirable core competencies for all levels of EMTs in Taiwan. A principal components analysis with Varimax rotation was conducted. An online questionnaire was distributed to obtain perspectives of EMT instructors and medical directors on the most desirable core competencies for EMTs. The target population was EMT training-course instructors and medical directors of fire departments in Taiwan. The questionnaire comprised 61 competency items, and multiple-choice and open-ended questions were used to obtain respondents' perspectives of the Taiwanese EMT training and education system. The results identified three factors at EMT-1 and EMT-2 levels and five factors at the EMT-Paramedic level. The factors for EMT-1 and EMT-2 were similar, and those for EMT-Paramedics identified further comprehensive competence perspectives. The key factors that appear to influence the development of the Taiwanese Emergency Medical Services (EMS) education system are the attitude of authorities, the licensure system, and legislation. The findings present new core competencies for the Taiwanese EMT system and provide capacity to redesign curricula and reconsider roles for EMT-1 and EMT-2 technicians. At the EMT-Paramedic level, the findings demonstrate the importance of incorporating competency standards in the current skills-based curriculum. Moreover, the core-competencies gap that exists between Taiwanese EMT-1s, EMT-2s, and EMT-Paramedics and internationally recognized core competencies needs to be addressed. By identifying the key factors that potentially impact the development of the EMS education system, such as the attitude of authorities, the licensure system, and legislation, these findings will inform

  4. Medication reconciliation and prescribing reviews by pharmacy technicians in a geriatric ward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buck, Thomas Croft; Gronkjaer, Louise Smed; Duckert, Marie-Louise

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Incomplete medication histories obtained on hospital admission are responsible for more than 25% of prescribing errors. This study aimed to evaluate whether pharmacy technicians can assist hospital physicians' in obtaining medication histories by performing medication reconciliation...... Department. FINDINGS: In total, 629 discrepancies were detected during the conducted medication reconciliations, in average 3 for each patient. About 45% of the prescribing discrepancies were accepted and corrected by the physicians. "Medication omission" was the most frequently detected discrepancy (46......% of total). During the prescribing reviews, a total of 860 prescription errors were detected, approximately one per medication review. Almost all of the detected prescription errors were later accepted and/or corrected by the physicians. "Dosage and time interval errors" were the most frequently detected...

  5. Development of new core competencies for Taiwanese Emergency Medical Technicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang YT

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Yu-Tung Chang,1,2 Kuang-Chau Tsai,2 Brett Williams1,3 1Department of Community Emergency Health and Paramedic Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash University, Frankston, VIC, Australia; 2Department of Emergency Medicine, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, New Taipei City, Taiwan; 3Division of Paramedicine, University of Tasmania, Hobart, TAS, Australia Objectives: Core competencies are considered the foundation for establishing Emergency Medical Technician (EMT and paramedic curricula, and for ensuring performance standards in the delivery of prehospital care. This study surveyed EMT instructors and medical directors to identify the most desirable core competencies for all levels of EMTs in Taiwan. Methods: A principal components analysis with Varimax rotation was conducted. An online questionnaire was distributed to obtain perspectives of EMT instructors and medical directors on the most desirable core competencies for EMTs. The target population was EMT training-course instructors and medical directors of fire departments in Taiwan. The questionnaire comprised 61 competency items, and multiple-choice and open-ended questions were used to obtain respondents’ perspectives of the Taiwanese EMT training and education system. Results: The results identified three factors at EMT-1 and EMT-2 levels and five factors at the EMT-Paramedic level. The factors for EMT-1 and EMT-2 were similar, and those for EMT-Paramedics identified further comprehensive competence perspectives. The key factors that appear to influence the development of the Taiwanese Emergency Medical Services (EMS education system are the attitude of authorities, the licensure system, and legislation. Conclusion: The findings present new core competencies for the Taiwanese EMT system and provide capacity to redesign curricula and reconsider roles for EMT-1 and EMT-2 technicians. At the EMT-Paramedic level, the findings demonstrate the importance of

  6. Pharmacy-based medication reconciliation program utilizing pharmacists and technicians: a process improvement initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Stephanie B; Mango, Michael D

    2013-02-01

    Pharmacists and pharmacy technicians have an opportunity to impact the quality of the medication histories and improve patient safety by ensuring accurate medication lists are obtained and complete reconciliation has occurred with the admission medication orders by owning the admission medication reconciliation process. To compare the quality of a pharmacy-based medication reconciliation program on admission utilizing pharmacists and technicians to the usual multidisciplinary process. This was a retrospective chart review process improvement study at a 186-bed tertiary care inpatient facility. Primary outcomes included both the accuracy of pre-admission medications listed and the reconciliation of those medications with admission inpatient orders. Technicians obtained patient medication histories. Pharmacists checked the technician-obtained medication histories and ensured reconciliation of those medications with admission orders. Medication accuracy increased from 45.8% to 95% per patient (P process improvement data collection.

  7. Syringe Administration of Epinephrine by Emergency Medical Technicians for Anaphylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latimer, Andrew J; Husain, Sofia; Nolan, Jonathan; Doreswamy, Vinod; Rea, Thomas D; Sayre, Michael R; Eisenberg, Mickey S

    2018-01-15

    In recent years, the costs of epinephrine autoinjectors (EAIs) in the United States have risen substantially. King County Emergency Medical Services implemented the "Check and Inject" program to replace EAIs by teaching emergency medical technicians (EMTs) to manually aspirate epinephrine from a single-use 1 mg/mL epinephrine vial using a needle and syringe followed by prehospital intramuscular administration of the correct adult or pediatric dose of epinephrine for anaphylaxis or serious allergic reaction. Treatment was guided by an EMT protocol that required a trigger and symptoms. We sought to determine if the "Check and Inject" program was safely implemented by EMTs treating presumed prehospital anaphylaxis or serious allergic reaction. We conducted a prospective investigation of all cases treated as part of the "Check and Inject" program from July 2014 through December 2016 in suburban King County, Washington, and January 2016 through December 2016 within the city of Seattle. All cases were prospectively collected using a custom quality improvement data form completed by the first responding EMTs. Two physicians completed a structured review of each EMS medical record to determine if the EMTs followed the Check and Inject protocol and determine if epinephrine was clinically-indicated based on physician review. Of the 411 cases eligible for analysis, EMTs followed the protocol appropriately in 367 (89.3%) cases. In the remaining 44 (10.7%) cases, the EMS incident report form failed to document either a clear inciting allergic trigger or an appropriate symptom from the protocol list. Physician review determined that epinephrine was clinically indicated in 36 of the 44 cases. Among the remaining 8 cases (1.9%) that did not meet protocol criteria and were not clinically-indicated based on physician review, none had a documented adverse reaction to the epinephrine. We observed that EMTs successfully implemented the manual "Check and Inject" program for severe

  8. Downtime after Critical Incidents in Emergency Medical Technicians/Paramedics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janice Halpern

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Effective workplace-based interventions after critical incidents (CIs are needed for emergency medical technicians (EMT/paramedics. The evidence for a period out of service post-CI (downtime is sparse; however it may prevent posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD and burnout symptoms. We examined the hypothesis that downtime post-CI is associated with fewer symptoms of four long-term emotional sequelae in EMT/paramedics: depression, PTSD, burnout, and stress-related emotional symptoms (accepted cut-offs defined high scores. Two hundred and one paramedics completed questionnaires concerning an index CI including downtime experience, acute distress, and current emotional symptoms. Nearly 75% received downtime; 59% found it helpful; 84% spent it with peers. Downtime was associated only with lower depression symptoms, not with other outcomes. The optimal period for downtime was between 1 day being less effective. Planned testing of mediation of the association between downtime and depression by either calming acute post-CI distress or feeling helped by others was not performed because post-CI distress was not associated with downtime and perceived helpfulness was not associated with depression. These results suggest that outcomes of CIs follow different pathways and may require different interventions. A brief downtime is a relatively simple and effective strategy in preventing later depression symptoms.

  9. The law for radiation and x-ray technicians engaging in medical treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The law is intended to define the qualifications of radiation and X-ray technicians engaging in medical treatment, and to regulate so as to maintain the proper operation of their business in order to help the popularization and development of medical treatment and public health. The radiations in this law include the following electromagnetic waves and particle beams: alpha-ray, beta-ray, gamma-ray, the electron beam with energy of more than a million electron volts, X-ray and other specified electromagnetic waves and particle beams. The terms of radiation and X-ray technicians engaging in medical treatment are stipulated, respectively. Any person who is going to be a radiation technician shall pass the examination for such technicians, and get a license from the Minister of Health and Welfare. Any person who is going to be an X-ray technician shall pass the examination for such technicians, and get a license from a prefectural governor. An insane, deaf, dumb or blind person can not receive the license. The license is realized through the registration of memberships of such technicians. A license certificate is delivered to a licensed technician by the Minister of Health and Welfare or a prefectural governor. The license is withdrawn or suspended in the occasions stipulated respectively. The examinations and practices of such technicians are specified in detail. (Okada, K.)

  10. Internet treatment for depression: a randomized controlled trial comparing clinician vs. technician assistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nickolai Titov

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy (iCBT for depression is effective when guided by a clinician, less so if unguided. QUESTION: Would guidance from a technician be as effective as guidance from a clinician? METHOD: Randomized controlled non-inferiority trial comparing three groups: Clinician-assisted vs. technician-assisted vs. delayed treatment. Community-based volunteers applied to the VirtualClinic (www.virtualclinic.org.au research program, and 141 participants with major depressive disorder were randomized. Participants in the clinician- and technician-assisted groups received access to an iCBT program for depression comprising 6 online lessons, weekly homework assignments, and weekly supportive contact over a treatment period of 8 weeks. Participants in the clinician-assisted group also received access to a moderated online discussion forum. The main outcome measures were the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II and the Patient Health QUESTIONnaire-9 Item (PHQ-9. Completion rates were high, and at post-treatment, both treatment groups reduced scores on the BDI-II (p<0.001 and PHQ-9 (p<0.001 compared to the delayed treatment group but did not differ from each other. Within group effect sizes on the BDI-II were 1.27 and 1.20 for the clinician- and technician-assisted groups respectively, and on the PHQ-9, were 1.54 and 1.60 respectively. At 4-month follow-up participants in the technician group had made further improvements and had significantly lower scores on the PHQ-9 than those in the clinician group. A total of approximately 60 minutes of clinician or technician time was required per participant during the 8-week treatment program. CONCLUSIONS: Both clinician- and technician-assisted treatment resulted in large effect sizes and clinically significant improvements comparable to those associated with face-to-face treatment, while a delayed treatment control group did not improve. These results provide support for large

  11. Measuring teamwork and conflict among emergency medical technician personnel.

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    Patterson, P Daniel; Weaver, Matthew D; Weaver, Sallie J; Rosen, Michael A; Todorova, Gergana; Weingart, Laurie R; Krackhardt, David; Lave, Judith R; Arnold, Robert M; Yealy, Donald M; Salas, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    We sought to develop a reliable and valid tool for measuring teamwork among emergency medical technician (EMT) partnerships. We adapted existing scales and developed new items to measure components of teamwork. After recruiting a convenience sample of 39 agencies, we tested a 122-item draft survey tool (EMT-TEAMWORK). We performed a series of exploratory factor analyses (EFAs) and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) to test reliability and construct validity, describing variation in domain and global scores using descriptive statistics. We received 687 completed surveys. The EFAs identified a nine-factor solution. We labeled these factors 1) Team Orientation, 2) Team Structure & Leadership, 3) Partner Communication, Team Support, & Monitoring, 4) Partner Trust and Shared Mental Models, 5) Partner Adaptability & Back-Up Behavior, 6) Process Conflict, 7) Strong Task Conflict, 8) Mild Task Conflict, and 9) Interpersonal Conflict. We tested a short-form (30-item SF) and long-form (45-item LF) version. The CFAs determined that both the SF and the LF possess positive psychometric properties of reliability and construct validity. The EMT-TEAMWORK-SF has positive internal consistency properties, with a mean Cronbach's alpha coefficient ≥0.70 across all nine factors (mean = 0.84; minimum = 0.78, maximum = 0.94). The mean Cronbach's alpha coefficient for the EMT-TEAMWORK-LF was 0.87 (minimum = 0.79, maximum = 0.94). There was wide variation in weighted scores across all nine factors and the global score for the SF and LF. Mean scores were lowest for the Team Orientation factor (48.1, standard deviation [SD] 21.5, SF; 49.3, SD 19.8, LF) and highest (more positive) for the Interpersonal Conflict factor (87.7, SD 18.1, for both SF and LF). We developed a reliable and valid survey to evaluate teamwork between EMT partners.

  12. Measuring teamwork and conflict among Emergency Medical Technician personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, P. Daniel; Weaver, Matthew D.; Weaver, Sallie J.; Rosen, Michael A.; Todorova, Gergana; Weingart, Laurie R.; Krackhardt, David; Lave, Judith R.; Arnold, Robert M.; Yealy, Donald M.; Salas, Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    Objective We sought to develop a reliable and valid tool for measuring teamwork among Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) partnerships. Methods We adapted existing scales and developed new items to measure components of teamwork. After recruiting a convenience sample of 39 agencies, we tested a 122-item draft survey tool. We performed a series of Exploratory Factor Analyses (EFA) and Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) to test reliability and construct validity, describing variation in domain and global scores using descriptive statistics. Results We received 687 completed surveys. The EFA analyses identified a 9-factor solution. We labeled these factors [1] Team Orientation, [2] Team Structure & Leadership, [3] Partner Communication, Team Support, & Monitoring, [4] Partner Trust and Shared Mental Models, [5] Partner Adaptability & Back-Up Behavior, [6] Process Conflict, [7] Strong Task Conflict, [8] Mild Task Conflict, and [9] Interpersonal Conflict. We tested a short form (30-item SF) and long form (45-item LF) version. The CFA analyses determined that both the SF and LF versions possess positive psychometric properties of reliability and construct validity. The EMT-TEAMWORK-SF has positive internal consistency properties with a mean Cronbach’s alpha coefficient ≥0.70 across all 9-factors (mean=0.84; min=0.78, max=0.94). The mean Cronbach’s alpha coefficient for the EMT-TEAMWORK-LF version was 0.87 (min=0.79, max=0.94). There was wide variation in weighted scores across all 9 factors and the global score for the SF and LF versions. Mean scores were lowest for the Team Orientation factor (48.1, SD 21.5 SF; 49.3 SD 19.8 LF) and highest (more positive) for the Interpersonal Conflict factor (87.7 SD 18.1 for both SF and LF). Conclusions We developed a reliable and valid survey to evaluate teamwork between EMT partners. PMID:22128909

  13. Technicians assist STS-47 MS Jemison prior to JSC bailout training

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    STS-47 Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105, Mission Specialist (MS) Mae C. Jemison, assisted by technicians, adjusts a strap on her launch and entry suit (LES) prior to launch emergency egress (bailout) exercises in JSC's Mockup and Integration Laboratory Bldg 9A. Jemison is making her first flight in space.

  14. Chemotherapy Order Entry by a Clinical Support Pharmacy Technician in an Outpatient Medical Day Unit.

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    Neville, Heather; Broadfield, Larry; Harding, Claudia; Heukshorst, Shelley; Sweetapple, Jennifer; Rolle, Megan

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacy technicians are expanding their scope of practice, often in partnership with pharmacists. In oncology, such a shift in responsibilities may lead to workflow efficiencies, but may also cause concerns about patient risk and medication errors. The primary objective was to compare the time spent on order entry and order-entry checking before and after training of a clinical support pharmacy technician (CSPT) to perform chemotherapy order entry. The secondary objectives were to document workflow interruptions and to assess medication errors. This before-and-after observational study investigated chemotherapy order entry for ambulatory oncology patients. Order entry was performed by pharmacists before the process change (phase 1) and by 1 CSPT after the change (phase 2); order-entry checking was performed by a pharmacist during both phases. The tasks were timed by an independent observer using a personal digital assistant. A convenience sample of 125 orders was targeted for each phase. Data were exported to Microsoft Excel software, and timing differences for each task were tested with an unpaired t test. Totals of 143 and 128 individual orders were timed for order entry during phase 1 (pharmacist) and phase 2 (CSPT), respectively. The mean total time to perform order entry was greater during phase 1 (1:37 min versus 1:20 min; p = 0.044). Totals of 144 and 122 individual orders were timed for order-entry checking (by a pharmacist) in phases 1 and 2, respectively, and there was no difference in mean total time for order-entry checking (1:21 min versus 1:20 min; p = 0.69). There were 33 interruptions not related to order entry (totalling 39:38 min) during phase 1 and 25 interruptions (totalling 30:08 min) during phase 2. Three errors were observed during order entry in phase 1 and one error during order-entry checking in phase 2; the errors were rated as having no effect on patient care. Chemotherapy order entry by a trained CSPT appeared to be just as safe and

  15. National Training Course. Emergency Medical Technician. Paramedic. Instructor's Lesson Plans. Module XV. Telemetry and Communications.

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    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    This instructor's lesson plan guide on telemetry and communications is one of fifteen modules designed for use in the training of emergency medical technicians (paramedics). Two units of study are presented: (1) emergency medical services communications systems (items of equipment and such radio communications concepts as frequency allocation,…

  16. The enforcement regulation for the law for radiation technicians engaging in medical treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    The ordinance is set up under the provisions of the law concerning radiation and x-ray technicians engaging in medical treatment, to enforce it. An application for the license of such a technician shall be filed according to the form prescribed, attached with a copy or an abstract of the census register of the applicant and a medical certificate of a doctor concerning whether the applicant is an insane, deaf or blind person, or a case of epidemic. The membership registration of such a technician shall include the number and date of the registration, the prefecture of his legal domicile, name birth date and sex distinction, the year and month of his success in the examination for such technicains, the items concerning the cancellation of the license or the suspension of the business, etc. The subjects of the examination for such technicians are physics, radiological physics, electrical engineering, chemistry, general basic medical science, radiological biology, photographing technology, treatment technics and others. An application for the examination for such technicians shall be filed to the Minister of Health and Welfare, attached with a personal history, a study certificate or a diploma of graduation, a photograph of the applicant and other specified documents. (Kubozono, M.)

  17. The validation of the Utrecht work engagement scale for emergency medical technicians in Gauteng

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    JLP Naudé

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to validate the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (UWES for emergency medical technicians in the Gauteng Province of South Africa and to determine its construct equivalence and bias for different language groups. A cross-sectional survey design was used with a convenient sample (N = 318 of emergency medical technicians in Gauteng. The UWES and a biographical questionnaire were administered. A two-factor model of work engagement, consisting of Vigour/Dedication and Absorption was found. Exploratory factor analysis with target rotations confirmed the construct equivalence of the work engagement construct for white and black employees.

  18. Emergency Victim Care. A Training Manual for Emergency Medical Technicians. Module 3--Anatomy and Physiology. Revised.

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    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This student manual, the third in a set of 14 modules, is designed to train emergency medical technicians (EMTs) in Ohio. The module contains one section covering the following topics: general anatomical terms, the body cavities and contents, the integumentary system, the skeletal system, the muscular system, the nervous system, the respiratory…

  19. Medical Laboratory Technician--Hematology, Serology, Blood Banking, and Immunohematology (AFSC 90470).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Joselyn H.

    This three-volume student text is designed for use by Air Force personnel enrolled in a self-study extension course for medical laboratory technicians. Covered in the individual volumes are hematology (the physiology of blood, complete blood counts and related studies, erythrocyte studies, leukocyte and thrombocyte maturation, and blood…

  20. National Training Course. Emergency Medical Technician. Paramedic. Instructor's Lesson Plans. Module IV. General Pharmacology.

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    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    This instructor's lesson plan guide on general pharmacology is one of fifteen modules designed for use in the training of emergency medical technicians (paramedics). Five units of study are presented: (1) the sources of drugs, drug names, solids and liquids, and the different forms in which drugs may be dispersed; (2) the action (effects) of…

  1. National Training Course. Emergency Medical Technician. Paramedic. Instructor's Lesson Plans. Module V. Respiratory System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    This instructor's lesson plan guide on the respiratory system is one of fifteen modules designed for use in the training of emergency medical technicians (paramedics). Five units of study are presented: (1) anatomy and physiology of the respiratory system; (2) pathophysiology assessment of the patient; (3) pathophysiology and management of…

  2. Medical Laboratory Technician--Microbiology, 10-3. Military Curriculum Materials for Vocational and Technical Education.

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    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This course, the second of three courses in the medical laboratory technician field adapted from military curriculum materials for use in vocational and technical education, was designed as a refresher course for student self-study and evaluation. It is suitable for use by advanced students or beginning students participating in a supervised…

  3. National Training Course. Emergency Medical Technician. Paramedic. Instructor's Lesson Plans. Module XI. Obstetric/Gynecologic Emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    This instructor's lesson plan guide on obstetric/gynecologic emergencies is one of fifteen modules designed for use in the training of emergency medical technicians (paramedics). Six units of study are presented: (1) anatomy and physiology of the female reproductive system; (2) patient assessment; (3) pathophysiology and management of gynecologic…

  4. Doctors or technicians: assessing quality of medical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayyab Hasan

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Tayyab HasanPAPRSB Institute of Health Sciences, University Brunei Darussalam, Bandar Seri Begawan, BruneiAbstract: Medical education institutions usually adapt industrial quality management models that measure the quality of the process of a program but not the quality of the product. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the impact of industrial quality management models on medical education and students, and to highlight the importance of introducing a proper educational quality management model. Industrial quality management models can measure the training component in terms of competencies, but they lack the educational component measurement. These models use performance indicators to assess their process improvement efforts. Researchers suggest that the performance indicators used in educational institutions may only measure their fiscal efficiency without measuring the quality of the educational experience of the students. In most of the institutions, where industrial models are used for quality assurance, students are considered as customers and are provided with the maximum services and facilities possible. Institutions are required to fulfill a list of recommendations from the quality control agencies in order to enhance student satisfaction and to guarantee standard services. Quality of medical education should be assessed by measuring the impact of the educational program and quality improvement procedures in terms of knowledge base development, behavioral change, and patient care. Industrial quality models may focus on academic support services and processes, but educational quality models should be introduced in parallel to focus on educational standards and products.Keywords: educational quality, medical education, quality control, quality assessment, quality management models

  5. An Audiovisual Teaching Module to Assist Examiners in the Administration of a Practical Performance Examination for the Emergency Medical Technician-Ambulance (EMT-A). Consisting of a 90-Minute Audiovisual Presentation In Either 16mm Sound or 3/4" Video-Cassette Plus a "User's Guide" Describing in Detail the Total Examination Procedure. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians, Columbus, OH.

    A structured, time-referenced, performance examination was designed as part of the certification procedure for Emergency Medical Technicians-Ambulance in an attempt to increase objectivity and standardization. This examination is based on a model developed by the University of Southern California, School of Medicine, Department of Emergency…

  6. The relationship between managers' leadership styles and emergency medical technicians' job satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbanian, Azimeh; Bahadori, Mohammadkarim; Nejati, Mostafa

    2012-01-01

    Leadership plays a crucial role in many professions, especially in challenging positions such as emergency medical service jobs. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between managers' leadership styles and emergency medical technicians' job satisfaction. This is a descriptive and cross-sectional study that was carried out in 2010. The research population included 21 managers and 87 emergency medical technicians working in 23 stations in Isfahan city, Iran. The main tools used for data accumulation were the Multiple Leadership Questionnaire for evaluating leadership styles and the Job Descriptive Index for measuring job satisfaction levels. Also, the Pearson correlation analysis test was used to evaluate the relationship between leadership style and job satisfaction. Among both managers and technicians, the highest mean score related to the transformational management style, whereas the lowest mean score related to the laissez-faire management style. Moreover, a significant relationship (Pjob satisfaction. However, no significant relationship was observed between the laissez-faire management style and job satisfaction. Considering the importance of job satisfaction in medical emergencies, it is recommended that health sector policy makers should provide the groundwork for implementing the transformational leadership style to enhance job satisfaction of the medical emergency staff.

  7. Emergency Medical Technician Training During Medical School: Benefits for the Hidden Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russ-Sellers, Rebecca; Blackwell, Thomas H

    2017-07-01

    Medical schools are encouraged to introduce students to clinical experiences early, to integrate biomedical and clinical sciences, and to expose students to interprofessional health providers and teams. One important goal is for students to gain a better understanding of the patients they will care for in the future and how their social and behavioral characteristics may affect care delivery. To promote early clinical exposure and biomedical integration, in 2012 the University of South Carolina School of Medicine Greenville incorporated emergency medical technician (EMT) training into the curriculum. This report describes the program; outlines changes (made after year 1) to improve biomedical integration; and provides a brief analysis and categorization of comments from student reflections to determine whether particular themes, especially related to the hidden curriculum, appeared. Medical students wrote frequently about EMT-related experiences: 29% of reflections in the charter year (1.2 per student) and 38% of reflections in the second year (1.5 per student) focused on EMT-related experiences. Reflections related to patient care, professionalism, systems-based practice, and communication/interpersonal skills. The frequency of themes in student reflections may provide insight into a medical program's hidden curriculum. This information may serve to inform curricula that focus on biosocial elements such as professionalism and communication with the goal of enhancing future physicians' tolerance, empathy, and patient-centeredness. The authors plan to conduct further qualitative analysis of student reflections to iteratively revise curricula to address gaps both in learning and in the differences between the explicit curriculum and actual experiences.

  8. Impact of a pharmacy technician-centered medication reconciliation program on medication discrepancies and implementation of recommendations

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    Kraus SK

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate the impact of a pharmacy-technician centered medication reconciliation (PTMR program by identifying and quantifying medication discrepancies and outcomes of pharmacist medication reconciliation recommendations. Methods: A retrospective chart review was performed on two-hundred patients admitted to the internal medicine teaching services at Cooper University Hospital in Camden, NJ. Patients were selected using a stratified systematic sample approach and were included if they received a pharmacy technician medication history and a pharmacist medication reconciliation at any point during their hospital admission. Pharmacist identified medication discrepancies were analyzed using descriptive statistics, bivariate analyses. Potential risk factors were identified using multivariate analyses, such as logistic regression and CART. The priority level of significance was set at 0.05. Results: Three-hundred and sixty-five medication discrepancies were identified out of the 200 included patients. The four most common discrepancies were omission (64.7%, non-formulary omission (16.2%, dose discrepancy (10.1%, and frequency discrepancy (4.1%. Twenty-two percent of pharmacist recommendations were implemented by the prescriber within 72 hours. Conclusion: A PTMR program with dedicated pharmacy technicians and pharmacists identifies many medication discrepancies at admission and provides opportunities for pharmacist reconciliation recommendations.

  9. Safety and efficiency of prehospital pain management with fentanyl administered by emergency medical technicians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Niels Dalsgaard; Brogaard, Kjeld; Dahl, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: In our region Advanced Emergency Medical Technicians (AEMTs) respond to acutely ill or injured patients in rural areas. The AEMTs have been authorized to administer fentanyl intravenously in doses up to 2 μg/kg to selected groups of patients in pain. Higher doses can be allowed...... by a physician after a teleconference. We examined the effect of intravenous (IV) fentanyl treatment, expressed as pain reduction on a 10-point Numeric Rating Scale (NRS). Moreover we examined the occurrence of negative coincident events to assess whether it was safe to let non-medical staff administer potent...... opioids intravenously.   Methods: Retrospectively we collected the case sheets for all patients treated with IV fentanyl by the AEMTs in 2005 and 2006. We excluded all patients where a physician had been directly involved in the prehospital treatment. We recorded the IV fentanyl dose, NRS-score before...

  10. The enforcement regulation for the law for radiation and x-ray technicians engaging in medical treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The ordinance is set up under the provisions of the law concerning radiation and X-ray technicians engaging in medical treatment, to enforce it. An application for the license of such a technician shall be filed according to the form prescribed, attached with a copy or an abstract of the census register of the applicant and a medical certificate of a doctor concerning whether the applicant is an insane, deaf or blind person, or a case of epidemic. The membership registration of such a technician shall include the number and date of the registration, the prefecture of his legal domicile, name, birth date and sex distinction, the year and month of his success in the examination for such technicains, the items concerning the cancellation of the license or the suspension of the business, etc. The subjects of the examination for such technicians are physics, radiological physics, electrical engineering, chemistry, general basic medical science, radiological biology, photographing technology, treatment technics and others. An application for the examination for such technicians shall be filed to the Minister of Health and Welfare, attached with a personal history, a study certificate or a diploma of graduation, a photograph of the applicant and other specified documents. (Okada, K.)

  11. NASA Worldwide Emergency Medical Assistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, George A.; Tipton, David A.; Long, Irene D.

    1997-01-01

    In an effort to maintain employee health and welfare, ensure customer satisfaction, and to deliver high quality emergency medical care when necessary to employees located overseas, NASA has instituted a new contract with International SOS Assistance INC. International SOS Assistance INC. will provide civil servants and contractors engaged in official NASA business with many services upon request during a medical or personal emergency. Through the years, International SOS Assistance INC. has developed the expertise necessary to provide medical service in all remote areas of the world. One phone call connects you to the SOS network of multilingual staff trained to help resolve travel, medical, legal, and security problems. The SOS network of critical care and aeromedical specialists operates 24 hours a day, 365 days a year from SOS Alarm Centers around the world. This exhibit illustrates the details of the NASA-International SOS Assistance INC. agreement.

  12. Assisted Medical Procedures (AMP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — DOCUMENTATION, DEVELOPMENT, AND PROGRESS The AMP was initially being developed as part the Advanced Integrated Clinical System (AICS)-Guided Medical Procedure System...

  13. Medical Laboratory Technician--Hematology, Serology, Blood Banking & Immunohematology, 10-4. Military Curriculum Materials for Vocational and Technical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This course, the third of three courses in the medical laboratory technician field adapted from military curriculum materials for use in vocational and technical education, was designed as a refresher course for student self-study and evaluation. It is suitable for use by advanced students or beginning students participating in a supervised…

  14. Exposure of Iranian emergency medical technicians to workplace violence: a cross-sectional analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmani, Azad; Hassankhani, Hadi; Mills, Jane; Dadashzadeh, Abbas

    2012-02-01

    Emergency medical technicians (EMTs) in Iran experience concerning levels of workplace violence, although until now there has been no investigation of this phenomenon. The objectives of the present study were to describe the exposure of Iranian EMTs to workplace violence and to identify the importance of related factors from their viewpoint. In this descriptive, exploratory study, 160 EMTs agreed to participate in a survey that collected data regarding their exposure to the following forms of workplace violence: verbal abuse, physical assault, cultural harassment, sexual harassment and sexual assault. A total of 138 questionnaires were returned, representing a response rate of 86%. The majority of participants 75% (n = 103) experienced at least one form of workplace violence in the 12 months before completing the questionnaire. The most frequently reported form of workplace violence was verbal abuse (71%), followed by physical assault (38%) and cultural harassment (9%). Violence resulting in serious injuries was reported by only 4% of participants, with no more than 8% of participants experiencing workplace violence that included the use of weapons. The most reported response to workplace violence was to 'invite the offender to calm down'. Participants took this approach because they believed that 'follow up of workplace violence is ineffectual' (34%), considered the workplace violence as a common in their job (30%), and did not know whom to report workplace violence to (13%). Iranian EMTs experience a considerable amount of workplace violence. The present study highlights the recommendation for formal training programmes and clearer protocols about how to manage workplace violence, especially verbal abuse in the Iranian prehospital setting. © 2011 The Authors. EMA © 2011 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  15. What are the educational and curriculum needs for emergency medical technicians in Taiwan? A scoping review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang YT

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Yu-Tung Chang,1,2 Kuang-Chau Tsai,2 Brett Williams1 1Department of Community Emergency Health and Paramedic Practice, School of Primary and Allied Health Care, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash University, Frankston, VIC, Australia; 2Emergency Medicine Department, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, New Taipei City, Taiwan Purpose: The development of emergency medical services (EMS training in Taiwan is in a transitional phase because of increasing demand for, and advancements in, clinical skill sets. The aim of this study is to review the current literature to compare the key factors of EMS training and education development in different countries in order to provide a new curricula blueprint for the Taiwanese EMS training system.Method: The method follows Arksey and O’Malley’s six stages of scoping review.Results: Five databases were searched for relevant articles: MEDLINE, EMBASE, Allied and Complementary Medicine Database; Education Resources Information Center, and Google Scholar. The initial search of five databases produced 1,230 articles, of which title and abstract screening excluded 1,156 articles. The 74 remaining articles underwent a full-text screening process, which further reduced the number of articles to 22. Researching references and citations produced an additional 23 articles, national curriculum standards produced a further six documents, and one article derived from emergency medical technician (EMT regulation in Taiwan. In total, 52 articles were included in the study, categorized by competency and standards, EMT education and learning environment, curriculum design, and teaching and learning method.Conclusion: This study reviewed international EMS training and education literature and documents to summarize the essential elements for developing an EMS education system: for example, core competencies and standards, education environment, curriculum design, and teaching and learning method. By

  16. The practice of medical radiology. Diagnostics, radiotherapy, radiation protection. For physicians, medical students, and X-ray medical technicians. With a guide for radiation protection instructions for medical radiography. 6. completely rev. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laubenberger, T.; Laubenberger, J.

    1994-01-01

    This book is intended for physicians, medical students, X-ray medical technicians, and medical technicians in general, and presents a concise but nevertheless comprehensive introduction to the practice of medical radiology. This 4th edition has been enriched by information on new imaging techniques and an outline of digital radiography and NMR imaging. The chapter on radiotherapy has been fully revised and extended to cover the current state of the art. Special attention has been given to the explanation of regulations and technical methods for better radiation protection. Physicians will find an introduction to radiation protection instructions. (orig.). 398 figs., 98 tabs [de

  17. A System Approach to Navy Medical Education and Training. Appendix 17. Preventive Medicine Technician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-08-31

    CLEAR PLASTIC ( ACRYLIC RESIN ) 20 ICALCULATE LAB/DIAGNOSTIC TEST RESULTS 21 ICHECK/COPRECT CALCULATIONS PERFORMED BY OTHER TECHNICIANS 22 #ASSESS...STATEMENTS BELCW 1% LEFT S!)E OF PAGE 01 I OF RESPONSE BVOKLET I ICLEAN AND DISINFECT WORKING AREA 2 ICHEMICALLY TREAT EXCRETA FROM ISOLATION UNjITS FOR...ASEPTIC TECHNIQUES 6 IRECOMMEND CONCURRENT/TERMINAL DISINFECTION METHODS FOP CONTAGION IWARD 7 IFOG AREA WITH BACTERICIDE 8 1DO HOUSEKEEPING/CLEANING

  18. Medication management roles in assisted living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikma, Suzanne K; Young, Heather M; Reinhard, Susan C; Munroe, Donna J; Cartwright, Juliana; McKenzie, Glenise

    2014-06-01

    Residents in assisted living (AL) frequently need assistance with medication management. Rooted in a social model, AL serves people facing increasing health management challenges as they "age in place." This study explored roles in AL medication management and satisfaction with unlicensed assistive personnel (UAP) as medication aides, a cost-effective staffing approach that is used frequently. The sample included 112 participants representing all parties involved in medication administration (residents, medication aides, administrators, RNs and licensed practical nurses, pharmacists, and primary care providers) in 15 AL settings in four states. Results include description of medication management roles; empirical validation of existing AL nursing professional standards; and satisfaction with the role of UAP as medication aide from all perspectives. Clinical implications include creating a supportive environment for medication aides (i.e., UAPs); the importance of the RN role as facilitator of AL medication management; and the need for collaboration and interprofessional team development across disparate settings. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  19. Welding Technician

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ken

    2009-01-01

    About 95% of all manufactured goods in this country are welded or joined in some way. These welded products range in nature from bicycle handlebars and skyscrapers to bridges and race cars. The author discusses what students need to know about careers for welding technicians--wages, responsibilities, skills needed, career advancement…

  20. Field Organization and Disaster Medical Assistance Teams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim ARZIMAN

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY: Disasters cause an acute deterioration in all stages of life. An area affected by the disaster in which the normal activities of life are disrupted is described as a “Field” in disaster terminology. Although it is not easy to define the borders of this zone, the area where there is normally functioning society is accepted as the boundary. Disaster management is the responsibility of the local government. However, in many large disaster responses many non-governmental and international organizations play a role. A Disaster Medical Team is a trained, mobile, self-contained, self-sufficient, multidisciplinary medical team that can act in the acute phase of a sudden-onset disaster (48 to 72 hours after its occurrence to provide medical treatment in the affected area. The medical team can include physicians, nurses, paramedics and EMTS, technicians, personnel to manage logistics, security and others. Various models of Disaster Medical Teams can be observed around the world. There is paucity of evidence based literature regarding DMTs. There is a need for epidemiological studies with rigorous designs and sampling. In this section of the special edition of the journal, field organizations in health management during disasters will be summarized, with emphasis on preparedness and response phases, and disaster medical teams will be discussed. Keywords: Field organization, disaster, medical team, DMAT

  1. Emergency Victim Care. A Training Manual for Emergency Medical Technicians. Module 12. Water Accidents, Electrical Emergencies, Hazardous Materials and Radiation Accidents. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This training manual for emergency medical technicians, one of 14 modules that comprise the Emergency Victim Care textbook, covers water accidents, electrical emergencies, and hazardous materials and radiation accidents. Objectives stated for the three chapters are for the students to be able to describe: emergency care for specified water…

  2. A System Approach to Navy Medical Education and Training. Appendix 8 Occupational/Physical Therapy Technician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-08-31

    LEGS TO DETECT/RULE OUT CALF TENDERNESS/ VARICOSE VEINS B ICHECK SKIN TURGOR (ELASTICITY| 9 iCHECK PATIENT’S RESPONSE TO PAINFUL STIMULUS AND TEMPERATURE... Nurse Training Task Analysis Dentist Training Curri cul um Development 20. ABSTRACT (Continu- on reverse side it neces a.end i ntiy by block ne,,er...activity data from enlisted job incumbents, and data relating to task sharing and delegation from officers of the Medical, Nurse and Dental Corps. A data

  3. Assisted Medical Procedures (AMP) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Documentation and Development: The AMP was initially being developed as part the Advanced Integrated Clinical System (AICS)-Guided Medical Procedure System for the...

  4. Toward cognitive pipelines of medical assistance algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philipp, Patrick; Maleshkova, Maria; Katic, Darko; Weber, Christian; Götz, Michael; Rettinger, Achim; Speidel, Stefanie; Kämpgen, Benedikt; Nolden, Marco; Wekerle, Anna-Laura; Dillmann, Rüdiger; Kenngott, Hannes; Müller, Beat; Studer, Rudi

    2016-09-01

    Assistance algorithms for medical tasks have great potential to support physicians with their daily work. However, medicine is also one of the most demanding domains for computer-based support systems, since medical assistance tasks are complex and the practical experience of the physician is crucial. Recent developments in the area of cognitive computing appear to be well suited to tackle medicine as an application domain. We propose a system based on the idea of cognitive computing and consisting of auto-configurable medical assistance algorithms and their self-adapting combination. The system enables automatic execution of new algorithms, given they are made available as Medical Cognitive Apps and are registered in a central semantic repository. Learning components can be added to the system to optimize the results in the cases when numerous Medical Cognitive Apps are available for the same task. Our prototypical implementation is applied to the areas of surgical phase recognition based on sensor data and image progressing for tumor progression mappings. Our results suggest that such assistance algorithms can be automatically configured in execution pipelines, candidate results can be automatically scored and combined, and the system can learn from experience. Furthermore, our evaluation shows that the Medical Cognitive Apps are providing the correct results as they did for local execution and run in a reasonable amount of time. The proposed solution is applicable to a variety of medical use cases and effectively supports the automated and self-adaptive configuration of cognitive pipelines based on medical interpretation algorithms.

  5. Is medically assisted death a special obligation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-López, Eduardo

    2017-06-01

    Several distinct arguments conclude that terminally ill patients have a right to a medically assisted death; two are especially influential: the autonomy argument and the non-harm argument. Both have proven convincing to many, but not to those who view the duty not to kill as an (almost) absolute constraint. Some philosophers see the source of such a constraint in general (deontological) moral principles, other in the nature of the medical profession. My aim in this paper is not to add one further argument in favour of medically assisted death. Rather, I want to shed light on a kind of reason that, to my mind, has not been previously highlighted or defended, and that might shake the principled conviction that doctors are never allowed to actively assist their patients to die. Specifically, my purpose is to show that doctors (as members of the medical profession) have a special duty to provide medically assisted death to consenting terminally ill patients, because (and insofar as) they have been participants in the process leading to the situation in which a patient can reasonably ask to die. In some specific ways (to be explained), they are involved in the tragic fate of those patients and, therefore, are not morally allowed to straightforwardly refuse to assist them to die. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  6. A qualitative assessment of practitioner perspectives post-introduction of the first Continuous Professional Competence (CPC) guidelines for emergency medical technicians in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Knox, Shane

    2015-01-01

    In November 2013, the Irish Regulator for emergency medical technicians (EMTs) introduced the first mandatory requirement for registrants to demonstrate evidence of continuous professional development (CPD)\\/continuous professional competence (CPC). This qualitative study assessed the experience of practitioners with CPC-related materials provided to them by the Regulator in addition to identifying perceived or encountered practical challenges and suggested improvements six months following introduction of the requirement.

  7. Abstract 20854: A Tale of Self-Fulfilling Prophecies in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: Emergency Medical Technicians Deliberately Perform Substandard CPR When Anticipating Poor Prognosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødtker, Henrik; Klausen, Troels M; Lauridsen, Kasper G

    2017-01-01

    Background: Emergency medical technicians (EMTs) play a crucial role in resuscitating patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Perception of prognosis may affect level and quality of treatment. The aim of this study was to investigate if EMTs delay start of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR...... and resuscitation attempt characteristics.Author Disclosures: H. Bødtker: None. T.M. Klausen: None. K.G. Lauridsen: None. A. Jæger: None. M.B. Mortensen: None. B. Løfgren: None....

  8. Determinants of General Health, Work-Related Strain, and Burnout in Public Versus Private Emergency Medical Technicians in Istanbul.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunaligil, Verda; Dokucu, Ali Ihsan; Erdogan, Mehmet Sarper

    2016-07-01

    This study investigated the impact of working for public versus private ambulance services in Turkey and elaborated on predictors of mental, physical, and emotional well-being in emergency medical technicians (EMT-Bs). In this observational cross-sectional study, an 81-question self-report survey was used to gather data about employee demographics, socioeconomic status, educational background, working conditions, and occupational health and workplace safety (OHS), followed by the 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12), the Work-Related Strain Inventory (WRSI), and the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) with three subscales: Emotional Exhaustion (MBI-EE), Depersonalization (MBI-DP), and Diminished Personal Accomplishment (MBI-PA). In 2011, 1,038 EMT-Bs worked for publicly operated and 483 EMT-Bs worked for privately owned ambulance services in Istanbul, Turkey, of which 606 (58.4%) and 236 (48.9%) participated in the study (overall participation rate = 55.4%), respectively. On all scales, differences between total mean scores in both sectors were statistically insignificant (p > .05). In the public sector, work locations, false accusations, occupational injuries and diseases, work-related permanent disabilities, and organizational support were found to significantly influence self-reported perceptions of well-being (p < .05). In the private sector, commute time to and from work (p < .05), false accusations (p < .05), vocational training and education (p < .05), informed career choices (p < .05), and work-related permanent disabilities (p < .05) were found to significantly influence self-reported perceptions of well-being. EMT-Bs were asked about aspects of their working lives that need improvement; priority expectations in the public and private sectors were higher earnings (17.5%; 16.7%) and better social opportunities (17.4%; 16.8%). Working conditions, vocational training, and OHS emerged as topics that merit priority attention. © 2016 The Author(s).

  9. Medical anthropology and the physician assistant profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Lisa R

    2015-01-01

    Medical anthropology is a subfield of anthropology that investigates how culture influences people's ideas and behaviors regarding health and illness. Medical anthropology contributes to the understanding of how and why health systems operate the way they do, how different people understand and interact with these systems and cultural practices, and what assets people use and challenges they may encounter when constructing perceptions of their own health conditions. The goal of this article is to highlight the methodological tools and analytical insights that medical anthropology offers to the study of physician assistants (PAs). The article discusses the field of medical anthropology; the advantages of ethnographic and qualitative research; and how medical anthropology can explain how PAs fit into improved health delivery services by exploring three studies of PAs by medical anthropologists.

  10. A formative evaluation of problem-based learning as an instructional strategy in a medical laboratory technician course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Diane Patricia

    2002-09-01

    This study is a formative evaluation of problem-based learning as an effective course delivery strategy in a second year introductory Medical Laboratory Technician discipline-specific hematology course. This strategy can serve two purposes in this type of course: discipline specific content knowledge and process skills learning. A needs study identified that students required additional workplace skills as they entered the clinical internship. Students tested well on the national registry examinations, discipline-specific content knowledge, but group process skills needed improvement in the areas of collaboration, communication, and critical reasoning. Problem-based learning was identified as an change intervention to help provide these skills. A search of the literature revealed that the Baker College cultural and physical environment would support this intervention. Twelve cases were written, situated in a clinical laboratory environment, addressing learning issues identified in a modified Delphi survey of laboratory personnel e.g. fiscal responsibility, turn-around time, invasiveness of laboratory techniques, and holistic view of healthcare environment. A hematology class of 13 students received the intervention. The cases were structured to proceed from instructor-centered (guided) learning issues to learner-centered learning issues. Observations of the in-group collaboration processes were documented, as well as oral presentations and critical reasoning, with students given periodic feedback on these skills. Student surveys provided data about satisfaction, attitude to PBL process, and self-efficacy. Multiple choice discipline-specific content examinations were given and compared with classes from the previous four years. The study found that students receiving the PBL treatment scored as well as or better than students from previous years on traditional multiple choice exams. Recall questions showed positive significance and application/analysis questions

  11. Should Pharmacy Technicians Administer Immunizations?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dylan Atkinson

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To describe the potential role for pharmacy technicians in administering immunizations – limited for this discussion to specifically inserting the needle into the patient’s arm and pressing down on the plunger – at the discretion of a supervising pharmacist as a way to enhance patient care and workflow efficiency. Summary. Pharmacy technicians currently play an important role in facilitating pharmacy-based immunization programs. Technicians routinely perform non-clinical tasks related to pharmacy-based immunizations, though nearly all states prohibit technicians from administering vaccines. Several studies demonstrate that untrained laypersons can safely administer intranasal or intradermal vaccines, and laypersons routinely administer medications through intramuscular or subcutaneous routes (e.g., patients with diabetes or rheumatic conditions. It stands to reason that a trained pharmacy technician could perform comparably on these techniques that laypersons have mastered. One state has adopted rules to allow pharmacy technicians to administer immunizations if the technician has completed specific training on administration techniques and on basic life support. This task is performed at the discretion of the supervising pharmacist, and the pharmacist would still be responsible for clinical aspects of immunizing such as prescribing the right vaccine to the right patient. Additional considerations factoring into the decision as to whether or not to involve pharmacy technicians in immunization administration are also summarized. Conclusion. If safety can be reasonably assured through training and supervision, it may be appropriate to delegate vaccine administration to appropriately trained pharmacy technicians. Such delegation may enhance workflow efficiency, which may confer added value for patient care and potentially improve access to community pharmacy-based immunizations.   Type: Commentary

  12. Modern conducted labor is medically assisted

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prvulović Mirjana B.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: First child delivery stage lasts 12-16 hours not including any medications, while the second child delivery stage and grand multiparity last a couple of hours shorter. Oxytocin (Syntocinon® is drug that facilitates well-fed delivery, therefore, induced labor assisted by peridural lasts approximately 4 hours less than natural labor not supported by any medication. Aim: To make quantitative analysis of the medically assisted childbirth and spontaneous vertex delivery within three years (2014-2016. Methodology: This paper is part of a non-commercial, retrospective, IV phase epidemiological study. The study was conducted at the Clinical Centre ‘Dr Dragiša Mišović, Dedinje’, Hospital for Gynecology and Obstetrics. The data are obtained from the ZIS Monthly-Yearly Heliant Reports of the Hospital for Gynecology and Obstetrics, Delivery room. Results: In the Clinical Centre ‘Dr Dragiša Mišović, Dedinje’, Hospital for Gynecology and Obstetrics, Delivery room there is over 2000 childbirths annually. Number of pharmacologically assisted labors was 1290 or (62% in 2014, in 2015 was 1318 or (61% and in 2016 was 1286 or (60%.Using syntocinon, there was 585 or (28% in 2014, in 2015, 513 or (28% and in 2016, 639 or (30% cesarean sections, urgent, planned and elective labors. Of the total 80% of newborns received Apgar score 9 (nine. Conclusions: Labor induced by medication is a joint choice of a midwifes and doctors health team because the flow of labor can be anticipated and influenced at any moment.

  13. Forensic Science Technician

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tech Directions, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Forensic science technicians, also called crime laboratory technicians or police science technicians, help solve crimes. They examine and identify physical evidence to reconstruct a crime scene. This article discusses everything students need to know about careers for forensic science technicians--wages, responsibilities, skills needed, career…

  14. A qualitative study about experiences and emotions of emergency medical technicians and out-of-hospital emergency nurses after performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation resulting in death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Aedo, I; Pérez-Urdiales, I; Unanue-Arza, S; García-Azpiazu, Z; Ballesteros-Peña, S

    To explore the experiences, emotions and coping skills among emergency medical technicians and emergency nurses after performing out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation manoeuvres resulting in death. An exploratory qualitative research was performed. Seven emergency medical technicians and six emergency nurses were selected by non-probability sampling among emergency medical system workers. The meetings took place up to information saturation, achieved after six individual interviews and a focal group. The meetings were then transcribed and a manual and inductive analysis of the contents performed. After a failed resuscitation several short and long-term reactions appear. They can be negatives, such as sadness or uncertainty, or positives, such as the feeling of having done everything possible to save the patient's life. Emotional stress increases when ambulance staff have to talk with the deceased's family or when the patient is a child. The workers don't know of a coping strategy other than talking about their emotions with their colleagues. Death after a failed resuscitation can be viewed as a traumatic experience for rescuers. Being in contact with the suffering of others is an emotional, stress-generating factor with direct repercussions on the working and personal lives of emergency staff. Nevertheless, structured coping techniques are not common among those professionals. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Enfermería Intensiva y Unidades Coronarias (SEEIUC). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. A Comparison between the Effects of Scenario and Lecture-based Education Methods on Knowledge and Attitude of Emergency Medical Technicians towards Patients with Chest Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Parvaresh Masoud

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Education is one of the fundamental pillars of development of capabilities, skills, and competencies in different sectors of society. Application of modern education methods seems to be necessary due to rapid changes of social requirements. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of scenario and lecture-based education methods on knowledge and attitude of emergency medical technicians towards patients with chest trauma. Methods: A total of 160 emergency medical technicians were participated in this quasi-experimental research. The participants were divided into two groups of scenario- and lecture-based education. Required information were collected by knowledge and attitude questionnaire before and after the intervention. Data were then analyzed by paired t- and chi-square tests. Results: The mean of knowledge (p<0/001 and attitude (p<0.001 scores significantly increased in the scenario-based education group. Conclusion: Considering the effect of scenario-based education and its role in utilization of learner’s intellectual capability and creativity, it seems that scenario-based education is an appropriate alternative for traditional education methods.

  16. Shift and Duty Scheduling of Surgical Technicians in Naval Hospitals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nurse, Nigel

    2004-01-01

    Surgical technicians at Naval hospitals provide a host of services related to surgical procedures that include handing instruments to surgeons, assisting operating room nurses, prepping and cleaning...

  17. Cost analysis of medical assistance in dying in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trachtenberg, Aaron J; Manns, Braden

    2017-01-23

    The legalization of medical assistance in dying will affect health care spending in Canada. Our aim was to determine the potential costs and savings associated with the implementation of medical assistance in dying. Using published data from the Netherlands and Belgium, where medically assisted death is legal, we estimated that medical assistance in dying will account for 1%-4% of all deaths; 80% of patients will have cancer; 50% of patients will be aged 60-80 years; 55% will be men; 60% of patients will have their lives shortened by 1 month; and 40% of patients will have their lives shortened by 1 week. We combined current mortality data for the Canadian population with recent end-of-life cost data to calculate a predicted range of savings associated with the implementation of medical assistance in dying. We also estimated the direct costs associated with offering medically assisted death, including physician consultations and drug costs. Medical assistance in dying could reduce annual health care spending across Canada by between $34.7 million and $138.8 million, exceeding the $1.5-$14.8 million in direct costs associated with its implementation. In sensitivity analyses, we noted that even if the potential savings are overestimated and costs underestimated, the implementation of mdedical assistance in dying will likely remain at least cost neutral. Providing medical assistance in dying in Canada should not result in any excess financial burden to the health care system, and could result in substantial savings. Additional data on patients who choose medical assistance in dying in Canada should be collected to enable more precise estimates of the impact of medically assisted death on health care spending and to enable further economic evaluation. © 2017 Canadian Medical Association or its licensors.

  18. Association between workarounds and medication administration errors in bar-code-assisted medication administration in hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Veen, Willem; van den Bemt, Patricia M L A; Wouters, Hans; Bates, David W; Twisk, Jos W R; de Gier, Johan J; Taxis, Katja

    Objective: To study the association of workarounds with medication administration errors using barcode-assisted medication administration (BCMA), and to determine the frequency and types of workarounds and medication administration errors. Materials and Methods: A prospective observational study in

  19. Factors that influence the acceptance of telemetry by emergency medical technicians in ambulances: an application of the extended technology acceptance model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Ji Young; Kim, Ki Young; Lee, Kang Hyun

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the study was to verify the effects of patient factors perceived by emergency medical technicians (EMTs) as well as their social and organizational factors on prehospital telemetry use intention based on the technology use intention and elaboration likelihood models. This is a retrospective empirical study. Questionnaires were developed on the basis of clinical factors of 72,907 patients assessed by prehospital telemetry from January 1, 2009 to April 30, 2012 by reviewing their prehospital medical care records and in-hospital medical records. Questionnaires regarding the social and organizational factors of EMTs were created on the basis of a literature review. To verify which factors affect the utilization of telemetry, we developed a partial least-squares route model on the basis of each characteristic. In total, 136 EMTs who had experience in using prehospital telemetry were surveyed from April 1 to April 7, 2013. Reliability, validity, hypotheses, and the model goodness of fit of the study tools were tested. The clinical factors of the patients (path coefficient=-0.12; t=2.38), subjective norm (path coefficient=0.18; t=2.63), and job fit (path coefficient=0.45; t=5.29) positively affected the perceived usefulness (ptelemetry by EMTs in ambulances included patients' clinical factors, as well as complex organizational and environmental factors surrounding the EMTs' occupational environments. This suggests that the rapid use intention and dissemination of such systems require EMTs to be supported at both the technical and organizational levels.

  20. Requirements for medication monitoring in assisted living facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonson, William; Novak, Rachel; Jennewine, Trevor

    2013-09-01

    To determine requirements for medication monitoring in assisted living in the United States. Comprehensive list maintained by the National Center for Assisted Living reporting individual state entities that are responsible for oversight of assisted living facilities. Reviews of respective entity Web sites were performed July to September 2011. Web sites of all 50 states reporting statutes and regulations pertaining to assisted living and medication review. Appropriate state Web sites were reviewed to determine state-specific definitions, statutes, and regulations pertaining to requirements for medication review in assisted living and persons or entities responsible for this review. Telephone interviews were conducted with appropriate individuals when questions existed or clarifications were needed. Forty states recognize or define the living environment of assisted living, and 10 describe it using other terms. Thirty states have specific requirements for medication review in assisted living facilities, which vary greatly by required frequency, health care discipline responsible for conducting medication monitoring, and non-time-dependent criteria that trigger the review. Considerable diversity exists among states in requirements for medication review in the assisted living environment. The requirements in some states resemble national nursing facility standards of practice for pharmacy services, while others have few or no requirements for medication review. Regulations do not always require a pharmacist to perform this review.

  1. Act No. 25 of 31 January 1983 amending Act No. 1103 of 4 August 1965 and Decree No. 680 of 6 March 1968 on regulations governing the activities of technicians in medical radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    This Act amends Act No. 1103 of 4 August 1965 and Decree No. 680 of 6 March 1968 of the President of the Republic regulating the activities of auxiliary personnel engaged in medical radiology. It establishes new conditions for training and qualifications of such technicians in respect of radiodiagnosis, radiotherapy and nuclear medicine. (NEA) [fr

  2. Diesel Engine Technician

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tech Directions, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Diesel engine technicians maintain and repair the engines that power transportation equipment such as heavy trucks, trains, buses, and locomotives. Some technicians work mainly on farm machines, ships, compressors, and pumps. Others work mostly on construction equipment such as cranes, power shovels, bulldozers, and paving machines. This article…

  3. Electric Vehicle Technician

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Pam

    2011-01-01

    With President Obama's goal to have one million electric vehicles (EV) on the road by 2015, the electric vehicle technician should have a promising and busy future. "The job force in the car industry is ramping up for a revitalized green car industry," according to Greencareersguide.com. An electric vehicle technician will safely troubleshoot and…

  4. Medical assistance in case of nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodig, D.; Tezak, S.; Kasal, B.; Huic, D.; Medvedec, M.; Loncaric, S.; Grosev, D.; Rozman, B.; Popovic, S.

    1996-01-01

    Medical service is a prerequisite for work license of nuclear installation. Every nuclear installation incorporate in their safety procedure also medical emergency plan. Usually the medical emergency plan consists of several degrees of action: 1. First aid, 2. First medical treatment, 3. Treatment in regional hospital, 4. Treatment in special institution (centre for radiation medicine). This paper discusses organization and activities of Centre for Radiation Medicine and Protection - Clinical Hospital Centre Zagreb

  5. Evolving ethics in medically assisted reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennings, Guido; de Wert, Guido

    2003-01-01

    Ethical problems arising from the application of assisted reproductive technology are discussed for four specific areas, namely embryo research, multiple pregnancies, preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for social sexing, and finally PGD with HLA typing.

  6. Medication errors and penalties in assisted living facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charboneau, Aubri L; Shelton, Penny S; Brickley, Jan B; Rich, Wesley

    2011-08-01

    To determine the percentage of medication-related proposed penalties for licensed assisted living facilities in North Carolina. This retrospective, cross-sectional study examined all proposed penalties and related case-file narratives stemming from annual surveys of licensed assisted living facilities conducted by the state between July 2007 and December 2008. The percentage of medication-related deficiencies and proposed penalties were calculated. Associations between the medication-related proposed penalties and facility size, location, and penalty type were explored using chi-square tests. Assisted living facilities in North Carolina. Percentage of medication- and non-medication-related penalties. A total of 1,256 licensed assisted living facilities (51% adult care homes, 59% metropolitan) were surveyed during the study period. There were 88 proposed penalties (51% medication-related) among 60 facilities. No association between medication-related proposed penalties and facility size or location was detected. However, an association (P = 0.002) was found between type of penalty (A or B) and whether the proposed penalty was medication- or non-medication-related (37.3% and 70.3% of Type A and B penalties, respectively, were medication related). Medications commonly cited were insulin, cardiovascular agents, supplements, anticonvulsants, and antipsychotics. Common categories of medication errors were drug not administered and wrong dose administered. Medication errors, regardless of facility size or location, were contributing factors in approximately one-half of violations sufficient enough to warrant a penalty proposal among the licensed assisted living facilities in North Carolina. These findings demonstrate a need for continued regulation and increased pharmacist involvement to improve medication safety.

  7. Clinicians’ Evaluation of Computer-Assisted Medication Summarization of Electronic Medical Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xinxin; Cimin, James J.

    2014-01-01

    Each year thousands of patients die of avoidable medication errors. When a patient is admitted to, transferred within, or discharged from a clinical facility, clinicians should review previous medication orders, current orders and future plans for care, and reconcile differences if there are any. If medication reconciliation is not accurate and systematic, medication errors such as omissions, duplications, dosing errors, or drug interactions may occur and cause harm. Computer-assisted medication applications showed promise as an intervention to reduce medication summarization inaccuracies and thus avoidable medication errors. In this study, a computer-assisted medication summarization application, designed to abstract and represent multi-source time-oriented medication data, was introduced to assist clinicians with their medication reconciliation processes. An evaluation study was carried out to assess clinical usefulness and analyze potential impact of such application. Both quantitative and qualitative methods were applied to measure clinicians' performance efficiency and inaccuracy in medication summarization process with and without the intervention of computer-assisted medication application. Clinicians' feedback indicated the feasibility of integrating such a medication summarization tool into clinical practice workflow as a complementary addition to existing electronic health record systems. The result of the study showed potential to improve efficiency and reduce inaccuracy in clinician performance of medication summarization, which could in turn improve care efficiency, quality of care, and patient safety. PMID:24393492

  8. Clinicians' evaluation of computer-assisted medication summarization of electronic medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xinxin; Cimino, James J

    2015-04-01

    Each year thousands of patients die of avoidable medication errors. When a patient is admitted to, transferred within, or discharged from a clinical facility, clinicians should review previous medication orders, current orders and future plans for care, and reconcile differences if there are any. If medication reconciliation is not accurate and systematic, medication errors such as omissions, duplications, dosing errors, or drug interactions may occur and cause harm. Computer-assisted medication applications showed promise as an intervention to reduce medication summarization inaccuracies and thus avoidable medication errors. In this study, a computer-assisted medication summarization application, designed to abstract and represent multi-source time-oriented medication data, was introduced to assist clinicians with their medication reconciliation processes. An evaluation study was carried out to assess clinical usefulness and analyze potential impact of such application. Both quantitative and qualitative methods were applied to measure clinicians' performance efficiency and inaccuracy in medication summarization process with and without the intervention of computer-assisted medication application. Clinicians' feedback indicated the feasibility of integrating such a medication summarization tool into clinical practice workflow as a complementary addition to existing electronic health record systems. The result of the study showed potential to improve efficiency and reduce inaccuracy in clinician performance of medication summarization, which could in turn improve care efficiency, quality of care, and patient safety. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The effect of the number and level of emergency medical technicians on patient outcomes following out of hospital cardiac arrest in Taipei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jen-Tang; Chiang, Wen-Chu; Hsieh, Ming-Ju; Huang, Edward Pei-Chuan; Yang, Wen-Shuo; Chien, Yu-Chun; Wang, Yao-Cheng; Lee, Bin-Chou; Sim, Shyh-Shyong; Tsai, Kuang-Chao; Ma, Matthew Huei-Ming; Chen, Lee-Wei

    2018-01-01

    The effect of the number and level of on-scene emergency medical technicians (EMTs) on the outcomes of patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) remains unclear. We aimed to test the association between the number and level of EMTs and the outcomes of patients with OHCA. We analysed Utstein-based registry data on OHCA in Taipei from 2011 to 2015. The eligible patients were adults, aged ≥20 years, with non-traumatic OHCA who underwent resuscitation attempts. The exposures were the total number of EMTs or the EMT-Paramedic (EMT-P) ratio >50%. The outcome of interest was survival to discharge. During study period, total 8262 OHCA cases were included, of which 1085 (13.1%) were approached by crews with an EMT-P ratio >50%. While an increase in the number of EMTs on-scene was not associated with better chances of survival (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 0.98, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.89-1.08), an EMT-P ratio >50% was significantly associated with improved outcome (aOR 1.36, 95% CI 1.06-1.76). Subgroup analyses showed that EMT-P >50% significantly benefited survival in witnessed OHCA cases with non-shockable rhythm (aOR 1.69, 95% CI 1.01-2.58). Survival was the highest among cases seen by four EMTs with an EMT-P ratio >50% (aOR 2.54, 95% CI 1.43-4.50). An on-scene EMT-P ratio >50% was associated with improved survival to discharge of OHCA cases, especially in those with witnessed, non-shockable rhythm. The presence of four EMTs with an EMT-P ratio >50% at the scene of OHCA was associated with the best outcome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The medical physics of ventricular assist devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, Houston G; Throckmorton, Amy L; Untaroiu, Alexandrina; Song Xinwei

    2005-01-01

    Millions of patients, from infants to adults, are diagnosed with congestive heart failure each year all over the world. A limited number of donor hearts available for these patients results in a tremendous demand for alternative, supplemental circulatory support in the form of artificial heart pumps or ventricular assist devices (VADs). The development procedure for such a device requires careful consideration of biophysical factors, such as biocompatibility, haemolysis, thrombosis, implantability, physiologic control feasibility and pump performance. Conventional pump design equations based on Newton's law and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) are readily used for the initial design of VADs. In particular, CFD can be employed to predict the pressure-flow performance, hydraulic efficiencies, flow profile through the pump, stress levels and biophysical factors, such as possible blood cell damage. These computational flow simulations may involve comprehensive steady and transient flow analyses. The transient simulations involve time-varying boundary conditions and virtual modelling of the impeller rotation in the blood pumps. After prototype manufacture, laser flow measurements with sophisticated optics and mock circulatory flow loop testing assist with validation of pump design and identification of irregular flow patterns for optimization. Additionally, acute and chronic animal implants illustrate the blood pump's ability to support life physiologically. These extensive design techniques, coupled with fundamental principles of physics, ensure a reliable and effective VAD for thousands of heart failure patients each year

  11. The medical physics of ventricular assist devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Houston G [Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department, Virginia Artificial Heart Institute, 122 Engineers Way, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Throckmorton, Amy L [Biomedical Engineering Department, Virginia Artificial Heart Institute, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Untaroiu, Alexandrina [Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department, Virginia Artificial Heart Institute, 122 Engineers Way, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Song Xinwei [Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department, Virginia Artificial Heart Institute, 122 Engineers Way, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2005-03-01

    Millions of patients, from infants to adults, are diagnosed with congestive heart failure each year all over the world. A limited number of donor hearts available for these patients results in a tremendous demand for alternative, supplemental circulatory support in the form of artificial heart pumps or ventricular assist devices (VADs). The development procedure for such a device requires careful consideration of biophysical factors, such as biocompatibility, haemolysis, thrombosis, implantability, physiologic control feasibility and pump performance. Conventional pump design equations based on Newton's law and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) are readily used for the initial design of VADs. In particular, CFD can be employed to predict the pressure-flow performance, hydraulic efficiencies, flow profile through the pump, stress levels and biophysical factors, such as possible blood cell damage. These computational flow simulations may involve comprehensive steady and transient flow analyses. The transient simulations involve time-varying boundary conditions and virtual modelling of the impeller rotation in the blood pumps. After prototype manufacture, laser flow measurements with sophisticated optics and mock circulatory flow loop testing assist with validation of pump design and identification of irregular flow patterns for optimization. Additionally, acute and chronic animal implants illustrate the blood pump's ability to support life physiologically. These extensive design techniques, coupled with fundamental principles of physics, ensure a reliable and effective VAD for thousands of heart failure patients each year.

  12. Radiological Control Technician: Standardized technician Qualification Standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-10-01

    The Qualification Standard states and defines the knowledge and skill requirements necessary for successful completion of the Radiological Control Technician Training Program. The standard is divided into three phases: Phase I concerns RCT Academic training. There are 13 lessons associated with the core academics program and 19 lessons associated with the site academics program. The staff member should sign the appropriate blocks upon successful completion of the examination for that lesson or group of lessons. In addition, facility specific lesson plans may be added to meet the knowledge requirements in the Job Performance Measures (JPM) of the practical program. Phase II concerns RCT core/site practical (JPMs) training. There are thirteen generic tasks associated with the core practical program. Both the trainer/evaluator and student should sign the appropriate block upon successful completion of the JPM. In addition, facility specific tasks may be added or generic tasks deleted based on the results of the facility job evaluation. Phase III concerns the oral examination board successful completion of the oral examination board is documented by the signature of the chairperson of the board. Upon completion of all of the standardized technician qualification requirements, final qualification is verified by the student and the manager of the Radiological Control Department and acknowledged by signatures on the qualification standard. The completed Qualification Standard shall be maintained as an official training record

  13. Association between workarounds and medication administration errors in bar-code-assisted medication administration in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Veen, Willem; van den Bemt, Patricia M L A; Wouters, Hans; Bates, David W; Twisk, Jos W R; de Gier, Johan J; Taxis, Katja; Duyvendak, Michiel; Luttikhuis, Karen Oude; Ros, Johannes J W; Vasbinder, Erwin C; Atrafi, Maryam; Brasse, Bjorn; Mangelaars, Iris

    2018-04-01

    To study the association of workarounds with medication administration errors using barcode-assisted medication administration (BCMA), and to determine the frequency and types of workarounds and medication administration errors. A prospective observational study in Dutch hospitals using BCMA to administer medication. Direct observation was used to collect data. Primary outcome measure was the proportion of medication administrations with one or more medication administration errors. Secondary outcome was the frequency and types of workarounds and medication administration errors. Univariate and multivariate multilevel logistic regression analysis were used to assess the association between workarounds and medication administration errors. Descriptive statistics were used for the secondary outcomes. We included 5793 medication administrations for 1230 inpatients. Workarounds were associated with medication administration errors (adjusted odds ratio 3.06 [95% CI: 2.49-3.78]). Most commonly, procedural workarounds were observed, such as not scanning at all (36%), not scanning patients because they did not wear a wristband (28%), incorrect medication scanning, multiple medication scanning, and ignoring alert signals (11%). Common types of medication administration errors were omissions (78%), administration of non-ordered drugs (8.0%), and wrong doses given (6.0%). Workarounds are associated with medication administration errors in hospitals using BCMA. These data suggest that BCMA needs more post-implementation evaluation if it is to achieve the intended benefits for medication safety. In hospitals using barcode-assisted medication administration, workarounds occurred in 66% of medication administrations and were associated with large numbers of medication administration errors.

  14. Electronics for technicians

    CERN Document Server

    Crane, P W

    2013-01-01

    Electronics for Technicians covers the basic fundamentals of electronics, including the operation of devices and circuits. The book is meant to help the technician to obtain numerical answers to actual circuit problems. This volume consists of seven chapters, the first of which introduces the reader to the basic rules for circuits containing resistive and reactive elements. Charge and discharge of a capacitor through a resistor is discussed, along with charge and discharge of an inductance through a resistance, application of sinusoidal voltages to simple networks, and series and parallel LCR

  15. A System Approach to Navy Medical Education and Training. Appendix 40. Competency Curricula for Pharmacy Assistant and Pharmacy Technician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-08-31

    source Technique to read a thermometer Temperature conversion from Celsius, Fahrenheit Safety precautions and procedures Use, operation and maintenance of...physical incompatibilities of substances used in compounding Procedures and techniques for compounding syrups, collodion, waters, spirits, mucilages ...laboratory tests from reference table/book g. Research material for projects, e.g., compile statistics/gather data from different sources PERFORMANCE

  16. TRAINING NUCLEAR TECHNICIANS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    KOVNER, EDGAR A.

    PROBLEMS CONFRONTED BY PLANNERS OF NUCLEAR PROGRAMS AT THE TECHNICIAN LEVEL INCLUDE (1) LACK OF PRECEDENT IN CURRICULUM, COURSE OUTLINES, AND GRADUATE PLACEMENT, (2) DIFFICULTY IN DETERMINING COSTS OF LABORATORY CONSTRUCTION, EQUIPMENT, AND OPERATION, AND (3) REQUIREMENT OF ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION LICENSES IN NUCLEAR OCCUPATIONS. A 92-SEMESTER…

  17. Pervasive Electronic Medical Record

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nafiisah

    doctors, nurses, physician's assistants, emergency medical technicians and other caregivers. PEMR, a platform-independent solution, integrates RFID and other wireless networks to provide the required infrastructure for transmitting critical medical information anywhere and anytime using either existing network or ad hoc.

  18. Variables of job satisfaction in medical assistant profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duma, Olga-Odetta; Roşu, Solange Tamara; Manole, M; Manole, Alina; Constantin, Brânduşa

    2013-01-01

    To identify the key favorable issues, showing a high degree of job satisfaction, and also the adverse issues that may affect the work performance among medical assistants. This research is a type of inquiry-based opinion survey carried out by administering a self-managed, anonymous questionnaire, consisting of five sections with 25 items. The study group included 175 medical assistants from all specialties, working in public hospitals in the city of Iasi, who answered the questionnaires. A number of 167 subjects have responded, the return rate being of 95.4%. The respondents were asked to indicate the amount of agreement or disagreement on a typical five-level Likert scale. The study has identified some positive aspects: positive perception of the medical assistant profession (76.6%); concern about personal growth and career development (86.3%); good rel ationships established with other colleagues (71.2%), and some negative aspects: inappropriate work conditions and equipments (70%); the income compared to the volume of work was perceived by majority as an important source of dissatisfaction (80.8%); willingness to work abroad (53.9%). The findings of the present research focused on the variables of job satisfaction in the medical assistant profession and should be a real concern for managers, because the job dissatisfaction may affect the employee's productivity.

  19. May Christians request medically assisted suicide and euthanasia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Etienne de Villiers

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the question: ‘Is it morally acceptable for terminally ill Christians to voluntarily request medically assisted suicide or euthanasia?’ After a brief discussion of relevant changes in the moral landscape over the last century, two influential, but opposite views on the normative basis for the Christian ethical assessment of medically assisted suicide and voluntary euthanasia are critically discussed. The inadequacy of both the view that the biblical message entails an absolute prohibition against these two practices, and the view that Christians have to decide on them on the basis of their own autonomy, is argued. An effort is made to demonstrate that although the biblical message does not entail an absolute prohibition it does have normative ethical implications for deciding on medically assisted suicide and voluntary euthanasia. Certain Christian beliefs encourage terminally ill Christians to live a morally responsible life until their death and cultivate a moral prejudice against taking the life of any human being. This moral prejudice can, however, in exceptional cases be outweighed by moral considerations in favour of medically assisted suicide or voluntary euthanasia.

  20. Multiple Learning Strategies Project. Medical Assistant. Visually Impaired. [Vol. 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varney, Beverly; And Others

    This instructional package, one of two designed for visually impaired students, focuses on the vocational area of medical assistant. Contained in this document are twelve learning modules organized into five units: language; receptioning; asepsis; supplies and equipment maintenance; and diagnostic tests. Each module, printed in block type,…

  1. A Medical Student Perspective on Physician-Assisted Suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, John Y; Callaghan, Katharine A; Allen, Philip; Stahl, Amanda; Brown, Martin T; Tsoi, Alexandra; McInerney, Grace; Dumitru, Ana-Maria G

    2017-09-01

    Physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia (PAS/E) has been increasingly discussed and debated in the public arena, including in professional medical organizations. However, the medical student perspective on the debate has essentially been absent. We present a medical student perspective on the PAS/E debate as future doctors and those about to enter the profession. We argue that PAS/E is not in line with the core principles of medicine and that the focus should be rather on providing high-quality end-of-life and palliative care. Copyright © 2017 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Veterinary Technician Program Director Leadership Style and Program Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renda-Francis, Lori A.

    2012-01-01

    Program directors of American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) accredited veterinary technician programs may have little or no training in leadership. The need for program directors of AVMA-accredited veterinary technician programs to understand how leadership traits may have an impact on student success is often overlooked. The purpose of…

  3. A System Approach to Navy Medical Education and Training. Appendix 42. Competency Curricula for Medical/Dental Equipment Repair Assistant and Medical/Dental Equipment Repair Technician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-08-31

    Plaster Cast Saw and Cast Cutters . . . . * . . 40 7. Whirlpools and Whirlpool Baths . . . . . . . . . 41 8. Circo -Electric Bed . * * * * * . . * . 42 9...39 6 Plaster Cast Saw and Cast Cutters .. ..... 40 7 Whirlpools and Whirlpool Baths ......... .. 41 8 Circo -Electric Bed...MODULE 8: CIRCO -ELECTRIC BED TASKS a. Check condition of belt, canvas, rubber pulleys and accessories b. Check motor for proper operation PERFOrMANCE

  4. [Dental technician's pneumoconiosis; a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaman Eyüboğlu, Canan; Itil, Oya; Gülşen, Aşkin; Kargi, Aydanur; Cimrin, Arif

    2008-01-01

    Since 1939, it has been known that, silicosis and extrinsic allergic alveolitis can be seen among dental technicians. The interstitial disease caused by the exposure to complex substances used by dental technicians is classified as a special group called dental technician's pneumoconiosis. A 36-year-old man, who has no smoking history, presented with severe dyspnea. He had worked in different dental laboratories for 22 years, but he did not have respiratory symptoms until five years ago. After that date, he had hospitalized and had been examined for respiratory pathologies for many times. He had came to our clinic, because of the progression of his dyspnea. Diffuse pulmonary parenchymal infiltrates which can be related with pneumoconiosis and chronic type 1 respiratory deficiency had been diagnosed as the result of the examinations. While he has no history of smoking or any other risk factors or diseases in his medical history, the case was accepted as dental technician's pneumoconiosis. The factors related with the pathogenesis of dental technician's pneumoconiosis are; the complex compound of the substances (metal dusts, silica, plaster, wax and resins, chemical liquids, methyl methacrylate) used in this sector and their effects on the lung parenchyma. Extrinsic allergic alveolitis related with methyl methacrylate has been reported. The most important factor to acquire an occupational lung disease is a complex occupational exposure. The insufficient workplace airing and the lack of preventive measures added on this exposure, the risks become much more greater.

  5. Radiation emergency medical preparedness and assistance network in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, E. S.; Kong, H. J.; Noh, J. H.; Lim, Y. K.; Kim, C. S.

    2003-01-01

    Nationwide Medical Preparedness for Nuclear Accidents as an integral part of nuclear safety system has been discussed for several years and Radiation Health Research Institute (RHRI) of Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co. was established on July, 1999. The National Radiation Emergency Medical Center (NREMC) of Korea Cancer Center Hospital was also founded on September, 2002. Two organizations have established Radiation Emergency Medical Preparedness and Assistance Network in Korea to cope with accidental situations in nuclear power plants and also in handling sites of radionuclides. In order to construct an effective Nationwide Emergency Medical Network System they maintain good cooperation among regional hospitals. RHRI is going to make three types of medical groups, that is to say, the collaboration of the regional (primary appointed) hospital group around the nuclear power plants, the regional core (secondary appointed) hospital group and the central core hospital (RHRI). NREMC is also playing a central role in collaboration with 10 regional hospitals. Two cores are working key role for the maintenance of the network. Firstly, They maintain a radiological emergency response team consisting of physicians, nurses, health physicists, coordinators, and necessary support personnel to provide first-line responders with consultative or direct medical and radiological assistance at their facility or at the accident site. Secondly, they serves educational programs for the emergency personnel of collaborating hospitals not only as a treatment facility but also as a central training and demonstration unit. Regularly scheduled courses for the physician and nurse, and health/medical physicists are conducted. Therefore, to activate Nationwide Emergency Medical Network System and to maintain it for a long time, well-trained specialists and budgetary supports are indispensable

  6. Physician assistants and the disclosure of medical error.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Douglas M; Quella, Alicia; Lipira, Lauren; Lu, Dave W; Gallagher, Thomas H

    2014-06-01

    Evolving state law, professional societies, and national guidelines, including those of the American Medical Association and Joint Commission, recommend that patients receive transparent communication when a medical error occurs. Recommendations for error disclosure typically consist of an explanation that an error has occurred, delivery of an explicit apology, an explanation of the facts around the event, its medical ramifications and how care will be managed, and a description of how similar errors will be prevented in the future. Although error disclosure is widely endorsed in the medical and nursing literature, there is little discussion of the unique role that the physician assistant (PA) might play in these interactions. PAs are trained in the medical model and technically practice under the supervision of a physician. They are also commonly integrated into interprofessional health care teams in surgical and urgent care settings. PA practice is characterized by widely varying degrees of provider autonomy. How PAs should collaborate with physicians in sensitive error disclosure conversations with patients is unclear. With the number of practicing PAs growing rapidly in nearly all domains of medicine, their role in the error disclosure process warrants exploration. The authors call for educational societies and accrediting agencies to support policy to establish guidelines for PA disclosure of error. They encourage medical and PA researchers to explore and report best-practice disclosure roles for PAs. Finally, they recommend that PA educational programs implement trainings in disclosure skills, and hospitals and supervising physicians provide and support training for practicing PAs.

  7. Nursing delegation and medication administration in assisted living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitty, Ethel; Resnick, Barbara; Allen, Josh; Bakerjian, Debra; Hertz, Judith; Gardner, Wendi; Rapp, Mary Pat; Reinhard, Susan; Young, Heather; Mezey, Mathy

    2010-01-01

    Assisted living (AL) residences are residential long-term care settings that provide housing, 24-hour oversight, personal care services, health-related services, or a combination of these on an as-needed basis. Most residents require some assistance with activities of daily living and instrumental activities of daily living, such as medication management. A resident plan of care (ie, service agreement) is developed to address the health and psychosocial needs of the resident. The amount and type of care provided, and the individual who provides that care, vary on the basis of state regulations and what services are provided within the facility. Some states require that an RN hold a leadership position to oversee medication management and other aspects of care within the facility. A licensed practical nurse/licensed vocational nurse can supervise the day-to-day direct care within the facility. The majority of direct care in AL settings is provided by direct care workers (DCWs), including certified nursing assistants or unlicensed providers. The scope of practice of a DCW varies by state and the legal structure within that state. In some states, the DCW is exempt from the nurse practice act, and in some states, the DCW may practice within a specific scope such as being a medication aide. In most states, however, the DCW scope of practice is conscribed, in part, by the delegation of responsibilities (such as medication administration) by a supervising RN. The issue of RN delegation has become the subject of ongoing discussion for AL residents, facilities, and regulators and for the nursing profession. The purpose of this article is to review delegation in AL and to provide recommendations for future practice and research in this area.

  8. A review of computer assisted learning in medical undergraduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Lisha J

    2013-04-01

    Laboratory based practical classes, have been the corner stone of undergraduate pharmacology learning. Ethical issues with the use of animals and rapid development of information technology has led to newer trends in teaching and learning such as computer assisted learning. Computer assisted learning (CAL) software includes computer based packages, focusing on interactive instruction in a specific subject area, collection of animal experiments that encourage students to understand concepts in pharmacology. CAL offers a number of advantages to both students and teachers; most important being meeting the learning objectives. Few disadvantages and pitfalls to implementation in medical schools are also associated with CAL sessions. This article reviews the trend of CAL in pharmacology, advantages, disadvantages and pitfalls to the implementation of CAL.

  9. Assisted reproductive technologies: medical safety issues in the older woman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segev, Yakir; Riskin-Mashiah, Shlomit; Lavie, Ofer; Auslender, Ron

    2011-06-01

    Abstract Previous study has shown that in the United States, most maternal deaths and severe obstetric complications due to chronic disease are potentially preventable through improved medical care before conception. Many women who need assisted reproductive technology (ART) because of infertility are older than the average pregnant woman. Risks for such chronic diseases as obesity, diabetes mellitus, chronic hypertension, cardiovascular disease (CVD), and malignancy greatly increase with maternal age. Chronic illness increases the risk of the in vitro fertilization (IVF) procedure and is also associated with increased obstetric risk and even death. The objective of this review is to outline the potential risks for older women who undergo ART procedures and pregnancy and to characterize guidelines for evaluation before enrollment in ART programs. A PubMed search revealed that very few studies have related to pre-ART medical evaluation. Therefore, we suggest a pre-ART medical assessment, comparable to the recommendations of the American Heart Association before noncompetitive physical activity and the American Society of Anesthesiologists before elective surgery. This assessment should include a thorough medical questionnaire and medical examination. Further evaluation and treatment should follow to ensure the safety of ART procedures and of ensuing pregnancies.

  10. Medical practitioners' attitudes towards animal assisted interventions. An Italian survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Anna; De Santis, Marta; Moretti, Carlo; Farina, Luca; Ravarotto, Licia

    2017-08-01

    The present study had a dual purpose: to obtain a comprehensive picture of the Italian medical practitioners' opinions, professional experiences, training needs and knowledge of Animal Assisted Interventions (AAI); and to provide a detailed description of the medical practitioners who are characterized by a strongly positive attitude towards AAI. An online survey addressed to Italian medical practitioners was carried out using a 35-items structured questionnaire. Data obtained from the survey were analysed through appropriate summary statistics, analysis of variance (ANOVA) and logistic regression analysis. 670 medical practitioners participated in the online survey. Among them, 508 stated that they knew of AAI. 93.7% of these described themselves fully favourable towards the use of the human-animal relationship for therapeutic purposes, 84.4% defined themselves as confident and interested in studying the theme. A positive attitude towards AAI was greater in females, in people between 45 and 54 years old, in those who are pet owners and in those who believe that conferences are the most suitable tool to share information on AAI. The chance of having a positive attitude towards AAI is higher in respondents with specific characteristics. Data collected could be used as a starting point to promote and implement communication and training activities on AAI addressed to medical practitioners. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Medical guidelines for the patient: introducing the life assistance protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez, David; Fernández, Carlos; Meneu, Teresa; Mocholí, Juan Bautista; Serafin, Riccardo

    2008-01-01

    This paper introduces our preliminary results in the modeling of Life Assistance Protocols, a new vision of medical guidelines and protocols through the lenses of p-Health. In this context the patient's role in the process is emphasized, the actions to be performed less defined and not only clinical situations considered, but also healthier lifestyle promotion processes accounted for, where the person's preferences and motivations play a key role. We propose a complete framework, balancing on classical clinical guideline models and covering both the theoretical and the practical aspects of the problem, describing it from conceptualization to the execution environment.

  12. Medications to Assist in Tobacco Cessation for Dental Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Joshua M; Abramowicz, Shelly

    2016-04-01

    Smoking is the leading cause of preventable illness in the United States. Without assistance, only 3% to 6% of smokers successfully quit after 1 year. Nicotine replacement therapy (NRT), buproprion, and varenicline are first-line pharmacologic therapies. These medications function by reducing nicotine withdrawal symptoms and the desire to smoke. When first-line therapy does not lead to successful smoking cessation, combinations of varenicline with NRT, buproprion with NRT, and varenicline with buproprion may be efficacious. Behavioral therapy also plays a role in smoking cessation and the combination of pharmacologic therapy with behavioral therapy is more effective than either therapy alone. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Data analyst technician: an innovative role for the pharmacy technician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ervin, K C; Skledar, S; Hess, M M; Ryan, M

    2001-10-01

    The development of an innovative role for the pharmacy technician is described. The role of the pharmacy technician was based on a needs assessment and the expertise of the pharmacy technician selected. Initial responsibilities of the technician included chart reviews, benchmarking surveys, monthly financial impact analysis, initiative assessment, and quality improvement reporting. As the drug-use and disease-state management (DUDSM) program expanded, pharmacist activities increased, requiring the expansion of data analyst technician (DAT) duties. These new responsibilities included participation in patient assessment, data collection and interpretation, and formulary enforcement. Most recently, technicians' expanded duties include maintenance of a physician compliance profiling database, quality improvement reporting and graphing, active role in patient risk assessment and database management for adult vaccination, and support of financial impact monitoring for other institutions within the health system. This pharmacist-technician collaboration resulted a threefold increase in patient assessments completed per day. In addition, as the DUDSM program continues to expand across the health system, an increase in DAT resources from 0.5 to 1.0 full-time equivalent was obtained. The role of the DAT has increased the efficiency of the DUDSM program and has provided an innovative role for the pharmacy technician.

  14. Nuclear instrument technician training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wollesen, E.S.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on Nuclear Instrument Technician (NIT) training that has developed at an accelerated rate over the past three decades. During the 1960's commercial nuclear power plants were in their infancy. For that reason, there is little wonder that NIT training had little structure and little creditability. NIT training, in many early plants, was little more than On-The Job Training (OJT). The seventies brought changes in Instrumentation and Controls as well as emphasis on the requirements for more in depth training and documentation. As in the seventies, the eighties saw not only changes in technologies but tighter requirements, standardized training and the development of accredited Nuclear Instrument Training; thus the conclusion: Nuclear Instrument Training Isn't What It Used To Be

  15. Cost of medical education, financial assistance and medical school demographics in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, C L; Tambyah, P A; Wong, C Y

    2009-05-01

    Medical tuition fees have been rising in many countries, including in Singapore. No formal study has been conducted to evaluate the financial situation of medical students in relation to the cost of medical education in Singapore. This study was conducted to determine the financial profile of Singaporean medical students and the financial expenses they incur over the five-year duration of their undergraduate medical course. A questionnaire study was conducted among Year one to Year five medical students in the Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore. The following quantifiable parameters were analysed: monthly household income, financial assistance, monthly allowances and expenses. 64.3 percent (735) of the 1,143 undergraduates completed the survey. 21.9 percent came from families with a monthly income of less than S$3,000, with another 26.2 percent from families with monthly incomes of S$3,000-S$5,000. The total tuition fees for a five-year medical course amounted to S$87,450. The average annual expenditure of medical students amounted to S$4,470. 31.1 percent of respondents were on loans. 14.6 percent received scholarships or bursaries. A five-year medical course can cost more than S$100,000 and pose a significant financial burden for students. The proportion of students who came from lower-income families was lower in medical school than at the national level, while the proportion from high-income families was significantly higher than at the national level. A significant proportion of students took loans to pay for tuition, and a smaller percentage was under scholarships and bursaries. More substantial financial assistance is required, particularly for students from lower-income families.

  16. Prevalence and Medication Management of Dementia by a Medical Practice Providing Onsite Care in Assisted Living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronhaus, Alan; Fuller, Steven; Zimmerman, Sheryl; Reed, David

    2016-07-01

    Assisted living (AL) is an important provider of long-term residential care to people with dementia, but little research has used clinician's records-arguably the most reliable and valid source of medically related information. This article uses clinician records to examine the prevalence of dementia, treatment with dementia-specific medications and antipsychotic medications, and how prescribing varies by assisted living residence (ALR) and resident characteristics. Analysis of medical records from a long-term care medical practice. Ninety ALRs that had onsite care provided to some or all of their residents by one group practice that specializes in home-based primary care. Records for 3175 AL residents. Thirty-six variables related to the ALR, resident demographics, and medical conditions and pharmaceutical treatment. Seventy-six percent of patients had a documented diagnosis of dementia, 41% who were treated with a medication for dementia other than an antipsychotic, and 37% who received an antipsychotic. Dementia medications were more likely to be prescribed to patients with dementia living in ALRs that had a memory care unit, and also to patients who were not Medicaid beneficiaries. Antipsychotic prescribing was similarly more common for residents with dementia living in ALRs that had memory care units. The 76% prevalence rate of dementia in ALRs larger than 25 beds may be a more accurate reflection of the prevalence of dementia reported elsewhere, because it is based on diagnoses documented by patients' primary care clinicians. The reporting of treatment rates for dementia medications and antipsychotics, and how they vary in relation to ALR and resident characteristics, is meant to generate discussion about "best practices" and standards of care in the medication management of dementia and its behavioral comorbidities-topics that have received scant attention to date other than widespread attention to the need to reduce antipsychotic prescribing. Copyright

  17. Physician perspectives on medical care delivery in assisted living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloane, Philip D; Zimmerman, Sheryl; Perez, Rosa; Reed, David; Harris-Wallace, Brandy; Khandelwal, Christine; Beeber, Anna Song; Mitchell, C Madeline; Schumacher, John

    2011-12-01

    To describe the provision of medical care in assisted living (AL) as provided by physicians who are especially active in providing care to older adults and AL residents; to identify characteristics associated with physician confidence in AL staff; and to ask physicians a variety of questions about their experience providing care to AL residents and how it compares with providing care in the nursing home and home care settings. Cross-sectional descriptive study. AL communities in 27 states. One hundred sixty-five physicians and administrators of 125 AL settings in which they had patients. Interviews and questionnaires containing open- and close-ended questions regarding demographics, care arrangements, attitudes, and behaviors in managing medical problems. Most respondents were certified in internal medicine (46%) or family medicine (47%); 32% were certified in geriatrics and 30% in medical directorship. In this select sample, 48% visited the AL setting once a year or less, and 19% visited once a week or more. Mean physician confidence in AL staff was 3.3 (somewhat confident), with greater confidence associated with smaller AL community size, nursing presence, and the physician being the medical director. Qualitative analyses identified differences between settings including lack of vital sign assessment in the home setting, concern about the ability of AL staff to assess and monitor problems, and greater administrative and regulatory requirements in AL than in the other settings. Providing medical care for AL residents presents unique challenges and opportunities for physicians. Nursing presence and physician oversight and familiarity and communicating with AL staff who are highly familiar with a given resident and can monitor care may facilitate care. © 2011, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2011, The American Geriatrics Society.

  18. Peer-assisted learning: a medical student perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fallaha MA

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Mohammad Amre Fallaha, Aalia Pagarkar, Nicholas LucasFaculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, UKWe read the paper by Kazzazi et al1 with great interest. The original paper was informative, and as penultimate year medical students at Imperial College, we want to share our unique perspective regarding student learning and the benefits of peer-assisted learning (PAL. We find that many subjects, including embryology as outlined in the paper,1 are complex and typically taught through lecture-based formats. While this may be understandable to readers of respective specialties, students may find certain concepts abstract and not easily grasped through lectures alone.View the original paper by Kazzazi and Bartlett.

  19. [Medical-assisted reproduction and protection of the person].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compagnoni, F

    1998-01-01

    The position of the Catholic community on medical assisted procreation is here put forward. The two values that need to be upheld are: the protection of human life from before the birth and its conception within marriage. These values need to be incorporated into juridical norms, which, in a pluralistic society, cannot involve anything other than a long process of reapproachment between varying positions towards an agreed text. The absolute nature of the values defended by catholics do not require "legislative rigidity", but allow collaboration towards the common good of all those involved. The United Nations' declaration on human rights and the nascent international conventions on bioethics provide us with negative limits at the least and encourage the political community to take on their proper legislative responsibilities in the field.

  20. Comparing Burnout Across Emergency Physicians, Nurses, Technicians, and Health Information Technicians Working for the Same Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schooley, Benjamin; Hikmet, Neset; Tarcan, Menderes; Yorgancioglu, Gamze

    2016-03-01

    Studies on the topic of burnout measure the effects of emotional exhaustion (EE), depersonalization (DP) (negative or cynical attitudes toward work), and reduced sense of personal accomplishment (PA). While the prevalence of burnout in practicing emergency medicine (EM) professionals has been studied, little is known of the prevalence and factors across physicians, nurses, technicians, and health information technicians working for the same institution. The aim of this study was to assess burnout differences across EM professional types.The total population of 250 EM professionals at 2 public urban hospitals in Turkey were surveyed using the Maslach Burnout Inventory and basic social- and work-related demographics. Descriptive statistics, ANOVA, and additional post hoc tests were computed.Findings show that EE and DP scores were high across all occupational groups, while scores on PA were low. There was a statistically significant difference between nurses and medical technicians (P nurses and medical technicians (P Burnout can be high across occupational groups in the emergency department. Burnout is important for EM administrators to assess across human resources. Statistically significant differences across socio-demographic groups vary across occupational groups. However, differences between occupational groups may not be explained effectively by the demographic factors assessed in this or other prior studies. Rather, the factors associated with burnout are incomplete and require further institutional, cultural, and organizational analyses including differentiating between job tasks carried out by each EM job type.

  1. A System Approach to Navy Medical Education and Training. Appendix 25. Competency Curricula for Clinical Laboratory Assistant and Medical Laboratory Technician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-08-31

    Nurse and Dental Corps. A data management sub-system was devised to process incumbent data, then carry out needed analyses. The development of...established prior to inventory preparation, including the setting of provisional sample target sizes. Since overall data attrition was forecast to...Bacterial Identification Using DifferentialMedia . . . . .o --.. 29 9. Antimicrobial Susceptibility . 30 10. Bacteriologic Decontamination

  2. New Roles for Medical Assistants in Innovative Primary Care Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Susan A; Blash, Lisel K

    2017-02-01

    To identify and describe new roles for medical assistants (MAs) in innovative care models that improve care while providing training and career advancement opportunities for MAs. Primary data collected at 15 case study sites; 173 key informant interviews and de-identified secondary data on staffing, wages, patient satisfaction, and health outcomes. Researchers used snowball sampling and screening calls to identify 15 organizations using MAs in new roles. Conducted site visits from 2010 to 2012 and updated information in 2014. Thematic analysis explored key topics: factors driving MA role innovation, role description, training required, and wage gains. Categorized outcome data in patient and staff satisfaction, quality of care, and efficiency. New MA roles included health coach, medical scribe, dual role translator, health navigator, panel manager, cross-trained flexible role, and supervisor. Implementation of new roles required extensive training. MA incentives and enhanced compensation varied by role type. New MA roles are part of a larger attempt to reform workflow and relieve primary care providers. Despite some evidence of success, spread has been limited. Key challenges to adoption included leadership and provider resistance to change, cost of additional MA training, and lack of reimbursement for nonbillable services. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  3. Improving job satisfaction and enlarging the role of technicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spooner, S H; Britton, M E; Erskine, L M; Verschoor, B A; Williams, P A

    1991-01-01

    The process used in preparing this administrative report provided the means of documenting departmental support of technician task expansion, cost benefits, increased availability of professional time, and the need for a dynamic department. Some of the benefits to St. Luke's Regional Medical Center and its Pharmacy Department were an increase in technician job satisfaction, improved quality of patient care attributable to the increased scope of pharmacy service, and up to 8554 hours per year of professional time available for more clinically oriented responsibilities. If technician turnover were decreased by half, technician pricing errors eliminated, and technicians assumed the identified technical tasks, potential monetary benefits could be as much as +116,900 per year. The departmental cost of implementing these recommendations would be an additional 4.16 technician FTEs, and the professional time for training, supervising, and coordinating technicians and functions. These recommendations were well received by pharmacy administration, and the committee was asked to develop a list of priorities and an implementation plan for administrative approval.

  4. Radiation protection technician job task analysis manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-03-01

    This manual was developed to assist all DOE contractors in the design and conduct of job task analysis (JTA) for the radiation protection technician. Experience throughout the nuclear industry and the DOE system has indicated that the quality and efficiency in conducting a JTA at most sites is greatly enhanced by using a generic task list for the position, and clearly written guidelines on the JTA process. This manual is designed to provide this information for personnel to use in developing and conducting site-specific JTAs. (VC)

  5. A Study to Determine a Training Plan for the Medical Record Technicians of Naval Hospital, San Diego in Preparation for the Implementation of the Diagnosis Related Group System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-12-13

    om0 Stufflebeam et al, stated that evaluation is "the 0 process of delineating, obtaining, and providing useful < z information for judging decision...in the Medical Records M z Department. Hospitals, pp. 100, 102, 104. K z -4 m Stufflebeam , D. (1971). Educational Evaluation and z Decision Making

  6. TRENDS IN ENGINEERING TECHNICIAN ENROLLMENTS AND GRADUATES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ALDEN, JOHN D.

    TECHNICIAN ENROLLMENTS AND GRADUATES WERE SURVEYED (1965-66) IN FIVE CLASSIFICATIONS WITH VARYING EDUCATIONAL REQUIREMENTS--(1) ENGINEERING TECHNICIAN, (2) PHYSICIAL SCIENCE TECHNICIAN, (3) INDUSTRIAL TECHNICIAN, (4) PRE-ENGINEERING TRANSFER, AND (5) BACHELOR OF TECHNOLOGY. THE DATA WERE USED TO DETERMINE PRESENT TRENDS IN MANPOWER TRAINING AND…

  7. 30 CFR 75.1713 - Emergency medical assistance; first-aid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... trained in first-aid and first-aid training shall be made available to all miners. Each coal mine shall... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Emergency medical assistance; first-aid. 75... Emergency medical assistance; first-aid. [Statutory Provisions] Each operator shall make arrangements in...

  8. Physician and Nurse Acceptance of Technicians to Screen for Geriatric Syndromes in the Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian F Gage

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The objective of this study was to evaluate emergency medicine physician and nurse acceptance of nonnurse, nonphysician screening for geriatric syndromes. Methods: This was a single-center emergency department (ED survey of physicians and nurses after an 8-month project. Geriatric technicians were paid medical student research assistants evaluating consenting ED patients older than 65 years for cognitive dysfunction, fall risk, or functional decline. The primary objective of this anonymous survey was to evaluate ED nurse and physician perceptions about the geriatric screener feasibility and barriers to implementation. In addition, as a secondary objective, respondents reported ongoing geriatric screening efforts independent of the research screeners. Results: The survey was completed by 72% of physicians and 33% of nurses. Most nurses and physicians identified geriatric technicians as beneficial to patients without impeding ED throughput. Fewer than 25% of physicians routinely screen for any geriatric syndromes. Nurses evaluated for fall risk significantly more often than physicians, but no other significant differences were noted in ongoing screening efforts. Conclusion: Dedicated geriatric technicians are perceived by nurses and physicians as beneficial to patients with the potential to improve patient safety and clinical outcomes. Most nurses and physicians are not currently screening for any geriatric syndromes. [West J Emerg Med. 2011;12(4:489–495.

  9. Heating, Air-Conditioning, and Refrigeration Technician. National Skill Standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vocational Technical Education Consortium of States, Decatur, GA.

    This guide contains information on the knowledge and skills identified by industry as essential to the job performance of heating, air-conditioning, and refrigeration technicians. It is intended to assist training providers in public and private institutions, as well as in industry, to develop and implement training that will provide workers with…

  10. Environmental sampling technician training program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreland, W.M.

    1988-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is currently involved in extensive environmental monitoring activities to characterize various active/inactive waste sites that exist at the facility. There are also considerable reporting requirements that ORNL must meet on a continuing basis in order to remain in compliance with existing permit requirements under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), the Clean Air Act (CAA), and the Clean Water Act (CWA). Much of the environmental monitoring data that is used to characterize waste sites or is required in reports is obtained by environmental sampling technicians who must take samples at various locations throughout ORNL as well as other DOE installations. Because of the quality control and assurance measures included under NQA-1, ORNL has developed an Environmental Sampling Technician Training program. This presentation will describe how the Environmental Sampling Technician Training Program was developed and review the specific materials used in conducting the training

  11. Team-based primary care: The medical assistant perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, Bethany; Chien, Alyna T; Peters, Antoinette S; Rosenthal, Meredith B; Brooks, Joanna Veazey; Singer, Sara J

    Team-based care has the potential to improve primary care quality and efficiency. In this model, medical assistants (MAs) take a more central role in patient care and population health management. MAs' traditionally low status may give them a unique view on changing organizational dynamics and teamwork. However, little empirical work exists on how team-based organizational designs affect the experiences of low-status health care workers like MAs. The aim of this study was to describe how team-based primary care affects the experiences of MAs. A secondary aim was to explore variation in these experiences. In late 2014, the authors interviewed 30 MAs from nine primary care practices transitioning to team-based care. Interviews addressed job responsibilities, teamwork, implementation, job satisfaction, and learning. Data were analyzed using a thematic networks approach. Interviews also included closed-ended questions about workload and job satisfaction. Most MAs reported both a higher workload (73%) and a greater job satisfaction (86%) under team-based primary care. Interview data surfaced four mechanisms for these results, which suggested more fulfilling work and greater respect for the MA role: (a) relationships with colleagues, (b) involvement with patients, (c) sense of control, and (d) sense of efficacy. Facilitators and barriers to these positive changes also emerged. Team-based care can provide low-status health care workers with more fulfilling work and strengthen relationships across status lines. The extent of this positive impact may depend on supporting factors at the organization, team, and individual worker levels. To maximize the benefits of team-based care, primary care leaders should recognize the larger role that MAs play under this model and support them as increasingly valuable team members. Contingent on organizational conditions, practices may find MAs who are willing to manage the increased workload that often accompanies team-based care.

  12. Practical analog electronics for technicians

    CERN Document Server

    Kimber, W A

    2013-01-01

    'Practical Analog Electronics for Technicians' not only provides an accessible introduction to electronics, but also supplies all the problems and practical activities needed to gain hands-on knowledge and experience. This emphasis on practice is surprisingly unusual in electronics texts, and has already gained Will Kimber popularity through the companion volume, 'Practical Digital Electronics for Technicians'. Written to cover the Advanced GNVQ optional unit in electronics, this book is also ideal for BTEC National, A-level electronics and City & Guilds courses. Together with 'Practical Digit

  13. Association Between Workarounds and Medication Administration Errors in Bar Code-Assisted Medication Administration : Protocol of a Multicenter Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Veen, Willem; van den Bemt, Patricia Mla; Bijlsma, Maarten; de Gier, Han J; Taxis, Katja

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Information technology-based methods such as bar code-assisted medication administration (BCMA) systems have the potential to reduce medication administration errors (MAEs) in hospitalized patients. In practice, however, systems are often not used as intended, leading to workarounds.

  14. Planning principles for medical assistance of persons who have been overexposured to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gisone, P.; Perez, M.R.; Dubner, D.; Di Trano, J.L.; Rojo, A.

    1995-01-01

    Planning of medical response in radiological accidents or incidents, plays an essential role in facing these sort of events. In the present communication, guidance on the organizational structure for medical assistance of overexposured persons along with a medical interconsult system is proposed. Finally, an integrated system of Radiopathology Groups in Latin America is proposed. (author). 3 refs

  15. Medical Applications of the PHITS Code (3): User Assistance Program for Medical Physics Computation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuta, Takuya; Hashimoto, Shintaro; Sato, Tatsuhiko

    2016-01-01

    DICOM2PHITS and PSFC4PHITS are user assistance programs for medical physics PHITS applications. DICOM2PHITS is a program to construct the voxel PHITS simulation geometry from patient CT DICOM image data by using a conversion table from CT number to material composition. PSFC4PHITS is a program to convert the IAEA phase-space file data to PHITS format to be used as a simulation source of PHITS. Both of the programs are useful for users who want to apply PHITS simulation to verification of the treatment planning of radiation therapy. We are now developing a program to convert dose distribution obtained by PHITS to DICOM RT-dose format. We also want to develop a program which is able to implement treatment information included in other DICOM files (RT-plan and RT-structure) as a future plan.

  16. Costs of medically assisted reproduction treatment at specialized fertility clinics in the Danish public health care system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Terkel; Erb, Karin; Rizvanovic, Amra

    2014-01-01

    To examine the costs to the public health care system of couples in medically assisted reproduction.......To examine the costs to the public health care system of couples in medically assisted reproduction....

  17. Attitudes on euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide among medical students in Athens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontaxakis, Vp; Paplos, K G; Havaki-Kontaxaki, B J; Ferentinos, P; Kontaxaki, M-I V; Kollias, C T; Lykouras, E

    2009-10-01

    Attitudes towards assisted death activities among medical students, the future health gatekeepers, are scarce and controversial. The aims of this study were to explore attitudes on euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide among final year medical students in Athens, to investigate potential differences in attitudes between male and female medical students and to review worldwide attitudes of medical students regarding assisted death activities. A 20- item questionnaire was used. The total number of participants was 251 (mean age 24.7±1.8 years). 52.0% and 69.7% of the respondents were for the acceptance of euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide, respectively. Women's attitudes were more often influenced by religious convictions as well as by the fact that there is a risk that physician-assisted suicide might be misused with certain disadvantaged groups. On the other hand, men more often believed that a request for physician-assisted suicide from a terminally ill patient is prima-facie evidence of a mental disorder, usually depression. Concerning attitudes towards euthanasia among medical students in various countries there are contradictory results. In USA, the Netherlands, Hungary and Switzerland most of the students supported euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide. However, in many other countries such as Norway, Sweden, Yugoslavia, Italy, Germany, Sudan, Malaysia and Puerto Rico most students expressed negative positions regarding euthanasia and physician assisted suicide.

  18. SuperAssist: A User-Assistant Collaborative Environment for the supervision of medical instrument use at home

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blanson Henkemans, O.A.; Neerincx, M.A.; Lindenberg, J.; Mast, C.A.P.G. van der

    2007-01-01

    With the rise of Transmural care, patients increasingly use medical instruments at home. Maintenance and troubleshooting greatly determines the safety and accuracy of these instruments. For the supervision of these complex tasks, we developed a User-Assistant Collaborative Environment (U-ACE). We

  19. Barriers and Facilitators to Expanding Roles of Medical Assistants in Patient-Centered Medical Homes (PCMHs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrante, Jeanne M; Shaw, Eric K; Bayly, Jennifer E; Howard, Jenna; Quest, M Nell; Clark, Elizabeth C; Pascal, Connie

    2018-01-01

    Many primary care practices participating in patient-centered medical home (PCMH) transformation initiatives are expanding the work roles of their medical assistants (MAs). Little is known about attitudes of MAs or barriers and facilitators to these role changes. Secondary data analysis of qualitative cross-case comparison study of 15 New Jersey primary care practices participating in a PCMH project during 2012 to 2013. Observation field notes and in-depth and key informant interviews (with physicians, office managers, staff and care coordinators) were iteratively analyzed using grounded theory. MA roles and responsibilities changed from a mostly reactive role, completing tasks dependent on physician orders during the patient visit and facilitating patient flow through the office, to a more proactive one, conducting previsit planning, engaging in the overall care for patients, and assisting with population management. MAs differed in their attitudes about increased responsibilities, with some welcoming the opportunity to take on expanded roles, others resenting their increased responsibilities, and some expressing insufficient understanding regarding why new tasks and procedures were being implemented. Major barriers to MA role shifts included 1) insufficient understanding of the PCMH concept, 2) lack of time for added responsibilities, 3) additional workload without additional compensation, 4) disparate levels of medical knowledge and training, 5) reluctance of clinicians to delegate tasks, 6) uncertainty in making new workflow changes routine, 7) staff turnover, and 8) change fatigue. MAs were more positive about their role shifts when they 1) understood how their responsibilities fit within broader PCMH practice transformation goals; 2) received formal training in new tasks; 3) had detailed protocols and standing orders; 4) initiated role changes with small, achievable goals; 5) had open communication with clinicians and practice leaders; and 5) received

  20. Radiological control technician: Training program management manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-10-01

    This manual defines and describes the DOE Radiological Control Technician Core Training Program qualification and training process, material development requirements, standards and policies, and administration. The manual applies to Radiological Control Technician Training Programs at all DOE contractor sites

  1. ASSISTED MODELLING OF MOBILE MEDICAL TREATMENT EQUIPMENT, UPPER RESPIRATORY AFFECTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GOANTA Adrian Mihai

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper aims to present some aspects of parametric modelling application in medical engineering, specifically in the design of medical instruments for ENT diseases. The work also contains both stages, how to obtain all parts parametrically and related accessories that are part of a mobile aerosol -generating medical equipment intended for the treatment of the upper respiratory diseases. Also photorealistic visualization capabilities are highlighted with NX Software from Siemens as well as how to obtain the corresponding 2D documentation.

  2. Physician Assisted Suicide: Knowledge and Views of Fifth-Year Medical Students in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schildmann, Jan; Herrmann, Eva; Burchardi, Nicole; Schwantes, Ulrich; Vollmann, Jochen

    2006-01-01

    Suicide and assisted suicide are not criminal acts in Germany. However, attempting suicide may create a legal duty for physicians to try to save a patient's life. This study presents data on medical students' legal knowledge and ethical views regarding physician assisted suicide (PAS). The majority of 85 respondents held PAS to be illegal. More…

  3. Practical digital electronics for technicians

    CERN Document Server

    Kimber, Will

    2013-01-01

    Practical Digital Electronics for Technicians covers topics on analog and digital signals, logic gates, combinational logic, and Karnaugh mapping. The book discusses the characteristics and types of logic families; sequential systems including latch, bistable circuits, counters and shift registers; Schmitt triggers and multivibrators; and MSI combinational logic systems. Display devices, including LED, LCD and dot matrix display; analog and digital conversion; and examples of and equipment for digital fault finding are also considered. The book concludes by providing answers to the questions

  4. Technology-assisted education in graduate medical education: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jwayyed, Sharhabeel; Stiffler, Kirk A; Wilber, Scott T; Southern, Alison; Weigand, John; Bare, Rudd; Gerson, Lowell W

    2011-08-08

    Studies on computer-aided instruction and web-based learning have left many questions unanswered about the most effective use of technology-assisted education in graduate medical education. We conducted a review of the current medical literature to report the techniques, methods, frequency and effectiveness of technology-assisted education in graduate medical education. A structured review of MEDLINE articles dealing with "Computer-Assisted Instruction," "Internet or World Wide Web," "Education" and "Medical" limited to articles published between 2002-2007 in the English language was performed. The two literature searches returned 679 articles; 184 met our inclusion and exclusion criteria. In 87 articles, effectiveness was measured primarily using self-reported results from a survey of subjects. Technology-assisted education was superior to traditional methods in 42 of the 64 direct comparison articles (66%, 95% CI 53-77%). Traditional teaching methods were superior to technology-assisted education in only 3/64 (5%, 95% CI 1-13%). The remaining 19 direct comparison articles showed no difference. A detailed review of the 64 comparative studies (technology-assisted education versus traditional teaching methods) also failed to identify a best method or best uses for technology-assisted education. Technology-assisted education is used in graduate medical education across a variety of content areas and participant types. Knowledge gain was the predominant outcome measured. The majority of studies that directly compared knowledge gains in technology-assisted education to traditional teaching methods found technology-assisted education equal or superior to traditional teaching methods, though no "best methods" or "best use" was found within those studies. Only three articles were specific to Emergency Medicine, suggesting further research in our specialty is warranted.

  5. ASHP statement on the pharmacy technician's role in pharmacy informatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    The American Society of Health- System Pharmacists (ASHP) believes that specially trained pharmacy technicians can assume important supportive roles in pharmacy informatics. These roles include automation and technology systems management, management of projects, training and education, policy and governance, customer service, charge integrity, and reporting. Such roles require pharmacy technicians to gain expertise in information technology (IT) systems, including knowledge of interfaces, computer management techniques, problem resolution, and database maintenance. This knowledge could be acquired through specialized training or experience in a health science or allied scientific field (e.g., health informatics). With appropriate safeguards and supervision, pharmacy technician informaticists (PTIs) will manage IT processes in health-system pharmacy services, ensuring a safe and efficient medication-use process.

  6. Integrating Medical Simulation Into the Physician Assistant Physiology Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lixin; Lopes, John; Zhou, Joseph Yi; Xu, Biao

    2016-12-01

    Medical simulation has recently been used in medical education, and evidence indicates that it is a valuable tool for teaching and evaluation. Very few studies have evaluated the integration of medical simulation in medical physiology education, particularly in PA programs. This study was designed to assess the value of integrating medical simulation into the PA physiology curriculum. Seventy-five students from the PA program at Central Michigan University participated in this study. Mannequin-based simulation was used to simulate a patient with hemorrhagic shock and congestive heart failure to demonstrate the Frank-Starling force and cardiac function curve. Before and after the medical simulation, students completed a questionnaire as a self-assessment. A knowledge test was also delivered after the simulation. Our study demonstrated a significant improvement in student confidence in understanding congestive heart failure, hemorrhagic shock, and the Frank-Starling curve after the simulation. Medical simulation may be an effective way to enhance basic science learning experiences for students and an ideal supplement to traditional, lecture-based teaching in PA education.

  7. 32 CFR 536.80 - Payment of costs, settlements, and judgments related to certain medical malpractice claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... related to certain medical malpractice claims. 536.80 Section 536.80 National Defense Department of... certain medical malpractice claims. (a) General. Costs, settlements, or judgments cognizable under 10 U.S..., paramedic, or other supporting personnel (including medical and dental technicians, nurse assistants...

  8. Training pharmacy technicians to administer immunizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeirnan, Kimberly C; Frazier, Kyle R; Nguyen, Maryann; MacLean, Linda Garrelts

    To evaluate the effectiveness of an immunization training program for pharmacy technicians on technicians' self-reported confidence, knowledge, and number of vaccines administered. A one-group pre- and posttest study was conducted with certified pharmacy technicians from Albertsons and Safeway community pharmacies in Idaho. Thirty pharmacy technicians were recruited to participate in an immunization administration training program comprising a 2-hour home study and a 2-hour live training. Pharmacy technician scores on a 10-question knowledge assessment, responses on a pre- and posttraining survey, and number of immunizations administered in the 6-month period following the training were collected. Twenty-five pharmacy technicians completed the home study and live portions of the immunization training program. All 29 pharmacy technicians who took the home study assessment passed with greater than 70% competency on the first attempt. Technicians self-reported increased confidence with immunization skills between the pretraining survey and the posttraining survey. From December 2016 to May 2017, the technicians administered 953 immunizations with 0 adverse events reported. For the first time, pharmacy technicians have legally administered immunizations in the United States. Trained pharmacy technicians demonstrated knowledge of vaccination procedures and self-reported improved confidence in immunization skills and administered immunizations after participating in a 4-hour training program. Copyright © 2018 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Medication administration errors in assisted living: scope, characteristics, and the importance of staff training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Sheryl; Love, Karen; Sloane, Philip D; Cohen, Lauren W; Reed, David; Carder, Paula C

    2011-06-01

    To compare rates of medication errors committed by assisted living staff with different training and to examine characteristics of errors. Observation of medication preparation and passes, chart review, interviews, and questionnaires. Stratified random sample of 11 assisted living communities in South Carolina (which permits nonnurses to administer medications) and Tennessee (which does not). All staff who prepared or passed medications: nurses (one registered nurse and six licensed practical nurses (LPNs)); medication aides (n=10); and others (n=19), including those with more and less training. Rates of errors related to medication, dose and form, preparation, route, and timing. Medication preparation and administration were observed for 4,957 administrations during 83 passes for 301 residents. The error rate was 42% (20% when omitting timing errors). Of all administrations, 7% were errors with moderate or high potential for harm. The odds of such an error by a medication aide were no more likely than by a LPN, but the odds of one by staff with less training was more than two times as great (odds ratio=2.10, 95% confidence interval=1.27-3.49). A review of state regulations found that 20 states restrict nonnurses to assisting with self-administration of medications. Medication aides do not commit more errors than LPNs, but other nonnurses who administered a significant number of medications and assisted with self-administration committed more errors. Consequently, all staff who handle medications should be trained to the level of a medication aide. © 2011, Copyright the Authors. Journal compilation © 2011, The American Geriatrics Society.

  10. Knowledge Is Power for Medical Assistants: Crystallized and Fluid Intelligence As Predictors of Vocational Knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moehring, Anne; Schroeders, Ulrich; Wilhelm, Oliver

    2018-01-01

    Medical education research has focused almost entirely on the education of future physicians. In comparison, findings on other health-related occupations, such as medical assistants, are scarce. With the current study, we wanted to examine the knowledge-is-power hypothesis in a real life educational setting and add to the sparse literature on medical assistants. Acquisition of vocational knowledge in vocational education and training (VET) was examined for medical assistant students ( n = 448). Differences in domain-specific vocational knowledge were predicted by crystallized and fluid intelligence in the course of VET. A multiple matrix design with 3 year-specific booklets was used for the vocational knowledge tests of the medical assistants. The unique and joint contributions of the predictors were investigated with structural equation modeling. Crystallized intelligence emerged as the strongest predictor of vocational knowledge at every stage of VET, while fluid intelligence only showed weak effects. The present results support the knowledge-is-power hypothesis, even in a broad and more naturalistic setting. This emphasizes the relevance of general knowledge for occupations, such as medical assistants, which are more focused on learning hands-on skills than the acquisition of academic knowledge.

  11. PRESENT AND FUTURE PERSPECTIVES IN INTERNATIONAL MEDICAL ASSISTANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Stadoleanu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Paneuropean development of patients’ rights represent a relatively recent concern, the legislative norms of which aim at granting to patients real-time access to all sorts of medical services. To this end, the European Union implemented a unitary normative professional and juridical background: Directive 2011/24/U.E. on the rights of patients to international treatments. Consequently, the patients are free to choose themselves the suppliers of medical services which do not include hospitalization, without a previous authorisation (country, doctor and medical institution while, in the case of long-term treatments, a principial authorisation will be necessary. In both cases, the carrier of the therapeutic service receives the payment for his actions at the level of those established at national level, the difference being usually payed by the patient.

  12. [Ethical problems of research on medical-assisted reproduction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frontali, N; Zucco, F

    1998-01-01

    Research in the field of assisted reproduction technologies (ART) is today very active internationally and is aimed both at improving success chances of already consolidated techniques (in fact these chances are still considerably low), and at elaborating new methods like ICSI (intracytoplasmic sperm injection), oocyte cryoconservation, ovary tissue cultures. Some other techniques, connected to ART, are here considered, like preimplantation diagnosis, early sex determination, gene therapy in utero and cloning. All these subjects of research are here briefly mentioned in relation to the ethical debate which they have stirred or which they should stir according to the authors. These debates are in part mirrored in the different legislations.

  13. Computer Assisted Instruction in Air Force Medical Training: Preliminary Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-05-01

    Lessons were also taken by personnel who worked in medical areas but who were not PA students. This group included nurses , laboratory and pharmacy...interviewed further about these attitudes, students repeated that they did not have time to watch the animations, work the g; aphs , or wait for text

  14. 22 CFR 71.10 - Emergency medical assistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... general criteria: (1) Adequate treatment cannot or will not be provided by prison authorities or the host government; (2) All reasonable attempts to obtain private resources (prisoner's family, friends, etc.) have... family or friends who might serve as a source of private funds for medical services, and attempt to...

  15. A System Approach to Navy Medical Education and Training. Appendix 36. Competency Curriculum for Operating Room Assistant and Operating Room Technician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-08-31

    and utilization of data Drug allergies , idiosyncrasies Infectious diseases and isolation precautions Musculoskeletal anomalies requiring special...special areas as directed (Conditions) with indirect supervision; using detergent - germicidal solutions and appropriate cleaning equipment (Criteria...maintenance of cleaning equipment Properties, usage and hazards of various detergents and germicides Identification and use of standard O.R. furniture

  16. A medical assistant-based program to promote healthy behaviors in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, Robert L; Mody-Bailey, Priti; Jaén, Carlos Roberto; Gott, Sherrie; Araujo, Sara

    2009-01-01

    Most primary care patients have at least 1 major behavioral risk: smoking, risky drinking, low physical activity, or unhealthy diet. We studied the effectiveness of a medical assistant-based program to identify and refer patients with risk behaviors to appropriate interventions. We undertook a randomized control trial in a practice-based research network. The trial included 864 adult patients from 6 primary care practices. Medical assistants screened patients for 4 risk behaviors and applied behavior-specific algorithms to link patients with interventions. Primary outcomes were improved risk behaviors on standardized assessments. Secondary outcomes included participation in a behavioral intervention and the program's effect on the medical assistants' workflow and job satisfaction. Follow-up data were available for 55% of participants at a mean of 12 months. The medical assistant referral arm referred a greater proportion of patients than did usual care (67.4 vs 21.8%; P effects on program adoption. Engaging more primary care team members to address risk behaviors improved referral rates. More extensive medical assistant training, changes in practice culture, and sustained behavioral interventions will be necessary to improve risk behavior outcomes.

  17. Pediatric radiology for medical-technical radiology assistants/radiologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oppelt, Birgit

    2010-01-01

    The book on pediatric radiology includes the following chapter: differences between adults and children; psycho-social aspects concerning the patient child in radiology; relevant radiation doses in radiology; help for self-help: simple phantoms for image quality estimation in pediatric radiology; general information; immobilization of the patient; pediatric features for radiological settings; traumatology; contrast agents; biomedical radiography; computerized tomography; NMR imaging; diagnostic ultrasonography; handling of stress practical recommendations; medical displays.

  18. Experiences Providing Medical Assistance during the Sewol Ferry Disaster Using Traditional Korean Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Kyeong Han Kim; Soobin Jang; Ju Ah Lee; Bo-Hyoung Jang; Ho-Yeon Go; Sunju Park; Hee-Guen Jo; Myeong Soo Lee; Seong-Gyu Ko

    2017-01-01

    Background. This study aimed to investigate medical records using traditional Korean medicine (TKM) in Sewol Ferry disaster in 2014 and further explore the possible role of traditional medicine in disaster situation. Methods. After Sewol Ferry accident, 3 on-site tents for TKM assistance by the Association of Korean Medicine (AKOM) in Jindo area were installed. The AKOM mobilized volunteer TKM doctors and assistants and dispatched each on-site tent in three shifts within 24 hours. Anyone coul...

  19. Ethics of emergent information and communication technology applications in humanitarian medical assistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Matthew; Pringle, John; Christen, Markus; Eckenwiler, Lisa; Schwartz, Lisa; Davé, Anushree

    2016-07-01

    New applications of information and communication technology (ICT) are shaping the way we understand and provide humanitarian medical assistance in situations of disaster, disease outbreak or conflict. Each new crisis appears to be accompanied by advancements in humanitarian technology, leading to significant improvements in the humanitarian aid sector. However, ICTs raise ethical questions that warrant attention. Focusing on the context of humanitarian medical assistance, we review key domains of ICT innovation. We then discuss ethical challenges and uncertainties associated with the development and application of new ICTs in humanitarian medical assistance, including avoiding harm, ensuring privacy and security, responding to inequalities, demonstrating respect, protecting relationships, and addressing expectations. In doing so, we emphasize the centrality of ethics in humanitarian ICT design, application and evaluation. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Peer-assisted learning in medical school: tutees’ perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, Audrey; Burgess, Annette; Clarke, Antonia J; Mellis, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Peer tutoring offers a valuable method of enhancing students’ learning experience in medical school. Junior students learn from senior peers to reinforce curriculum content in an engaging community environment. The aim of our study was to assess tutees’ perceptions of a formal peer tutoring program at the Central Clinical School of Sydney Medical School. We used the learning theory of the community of practice in order to understand tutees’ perspectives. Patients and methods All Year 1 and Year 2 students within the Central Clinical School were invited to be tutored by Year 3 and Year 4 students, respectively. Tutor pairs taught a group of three to four tutees fortnightly, and the tutorials were largely clinically based. A questionnaire containing 13 closed items and four open-ended questions regarding their experiences in the program was distributed to the tutees. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the data. Results A total of 66 of 101 (65%) Year 1 and Year 2 students took part as tutees and 42 of 106 (40%) students as tutors. The tutees’ response rate was 53% (35/66). Results were largely positive, with 97% of the tutees enjoying the program, 90% showing interest in tutorial topics, 91% feeling a sense of community, 100% wanting to take part next year, 97% finding small groups effective, and 97% and 91% feeling an improved understanding of medical concepts and clinical skills, respectively. Tutees perceived the most useful aspects to be learning and revision and advice from experienced peers. The most frequent suggestion for improvement was to resolve scheduling conflicts. Conclusion Tutees found the peer tutoring program to be valuable in learning and revision, establishing a community, and gaining practical skills and advice through a small-group format. The community of practice framework was useful in identifying these areas of benefit, demonstrating that a peer tutoring program such as this can provide an enhanced learning

  1. Peer-assisted learning in medical school: tutees' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, Audrey; Burgess, Annette; Clarke, Antonia J; Mellis, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Peer tutoring offers a valuable method of enhancing students' learning experience in medical school. Junior students learn from senior peers to reinforce curriculum content in an engaging community environment. The aim of our study was to assess tutees' perceptions of a formal peer tutoring program at the Central Clinical School of Sydney Medical School. We used the learning theory of the community of practice in order to understand tutees' perspectives. All Year 1 and Year 2 students within the Central Clinical School were invited to be tutored by Year 3 and Year 4 students, respectively. Tutor pairs taught a group of three to four tutees fortnightly, and the tutorials were largely clinically based. A questionnaire containing 13 closed items and four open-ended questions regarding their experiences in the program was distributed to the tutees. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the data. A total of 66 of 101 (65%) Year 1 and Year 2 students took part as tutees and 42 of 106 (40%) students as tutors. The tutees' response rate was 53% (35/66). Results were largely positive, with 97% of the tutees enjoying the program, 90% showing interest in tutorial topics, 91% feeling a sense of community, 100% wanting to take part next year, 97% finding small groups effective, and 97% and 91% feeling an improved understanding of medical concepts and clinical skills, respectively. Tutees perceived the most useful aspects to be learning and revision and advice from experienced peers. The most frequent suggestion for improvement was to resolve scheduling conflicts. Tutees found the peer tutoring program to be valuable in learning and revision, establishing a community, and gaining practical skills and advice through a small-group format. The community of practice framework was useful in identifying these areas of benefit, demonstrating that a peer tutoring program such as this can provide an enhanced learning environment for tutees.

  2. Peer-assisted learning in medical school: tutees’ perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menezes A

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Audrey Menezes,1,2 Annette Burgess,1 Antonia J Clarke,1,3 Craig Mellis1 1Central Clinical School, Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney; 2Hornsby Ku-ring-gai Hospital; 3Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia Purpose: Peer tutoring offers a valuable method of enhancing students’ learning experience in medical school. Junior students learn from senior peers to reinforce curriculum content in an engaging community environment. The aim of our study was to assess tutees’ perceptions of a formal peer tutoring program at the Central Clinical School of Sydney Medical School. We used the learning theory of the community of practice in order to understand tutees’ perspectives. Patients and methods: All Year 1 and Year 2 students within the Central Clinical School were invited to be tutored by Year 3 and Year 4 students, respectively. Tutor pairs taught a group of three to four tutees fortnightly, and the tutorials were largely clinically based. A questionnaire containing 13 closed items and four open-ended questions regarding their experiences in the program was distributed to the tutees. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the data. Results: A total of 66 of 101 (65% Year 1 and Year 2 students took part as tutees and 42 of 106 (40% students as tutors. The tutees' response rate was 53% (35/66. Results were largely positive, with 97% of the tutees enjoying the program, 90% showing interest in tutorial topics, 91% feeling a sense of community, 100% wanting to take part next year, 97% finding small groups effective, and 97% and 91% feeling an improved understanding of medical concepts and clinical skills, respectively. Tutees perceived the most useful aspects to be learning and revision and advice from experienced peers. The most frequent suggestion for improvement was to resolve scheduling conflicts. Conclusion: Tutees found the peer tutoring program to be valuable in learning and revision, establishing a community, and

  3. Peculiarities of family doctors' medical assistance for persons with 'Chernobyl syndrome'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margine, Le.; Tintiuc, D.; Grejdeanu, T.; Margine, Lu.; Badan, V.

    2012-01-01

    Medical and social protection and rehabilitation of patients with 'Chernobyl syndrome' is provided by legislation of the Republic of Moldova, which is reflected in a comprehensive action plan for rehabilitation and protection of this category of citizens. This plan includes such medical activities as detailed medical ambulatory and stationary examination, purchase prescription drugs, annual sanatorium treatment, annual compensation recovery in the value of 2 average monthly salaries for health improvement. The role of family doctors' medical assistance for persons suffered due to the accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant is very important in this plan implementation.

  4. Peer assisted learning among Sri Lankan medical undergraduates: a cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Silva, Nipun Lakshitha; Parththipan, Balasundaram; Rodrigo, Chaturaka; Constantine, Godwin; Fernando, Sumadhya Deepika; Rajapakse, Senaka

    2017-11-14

    The objectives of this study were to; (a) evaluate the current practices of peer assisted learning among second year and final year medical students of Faculty of Medicine, University of Colombo, Sri Lanka; (b) identify reasons for engaging in peer assisted learning; (c) identify perceived weaknesses in current learning activities; and (d) determine student characteristics associated with engaging in peer assisted learning. This cross sectional study interviewed two hundred and eighty-four eligible students. Average number of hours spent on peer assisted learning during a week was significantly greater among second year students compared to final year students (15.1 vs. 7.1 h, p learning than male students. In second year, most common method of peer assisted learning was mass lectures offered by batch mates or seniors, while in final year it was group discussions. This reflected a transition to more focused, interactive, active learning among senior students.

  5. Technicians for the Brazilian nuclear power programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins Pinto, C.S.; Spitalnik, J.; Meakins, E.J.; Hurley, I.

    1980-01-01

    The technician has a responsible role to fulfil in nuclear industry, acting as a bridge between the engineer and the skilled worker. Technicians must have sufficient theoretical knowledge to communicate with engineers, and a thorough understanding of technological practice; the nuclear industry demands both theory and practice of a high standard. In Brazil the essential role of the technician in industry is in general recognized. However, the lack of a nationally recognized Nuclear Technician and Nuclear Technologist qualification, as well as a desire of the best technicians to quality as engineers and, in some areas, inadequate salaries has resulted in a shortage of well-trained technicians. A first step to ensure availability of these technicians is to improve their career prospects and status through definition of appropriate career standards and salaries. Practical training by the industry can only be given in factories, plants and construction sites where nuclear work is done. It is proposed to extend apprentice training centres at three sites, to give the most promising students after two years of apprentice training two further years of instruction and practice to qualify as Nuclear Technicians. The training centres are chosen to cover the three sectors of nuclear industry where special training of technicians is important: manufacture and construction; operation and maintenance; and testing and analysis for process control and safety. (author)

  6. The Potential of Nanotechnology in Medically Assisted Reproduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana H. Remião

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Reproductive medicine is a field of science which searches for new alternatives not only to help couples achieve pregnancy and preserve fertility, but also to diagnose and treat diseases which can impair the normal operation of the reproductive tract. Assisted reproductive technology (ART is a set of methodologies applied to cases related to infertility. Despite being highly practiced worldwide, ART presents some challenges, which still require special attention. Nanotechnology, as a tool for reproductive medicine, has been considered to help overcome some of those impairments. Over recent years, nanotechnology approaches applied to reproductive medicine have provided strategies to improve diagnosis and increase specificity and sensitivity. For in vitro embryo production, studies in non-human models have been used to deliver molecules to gametes and embryos. The exploration of nanotechnology for ART would bring great advances. In this way, experiments in non-human models to test the development and safety of new protocols using nanomaterials are very important for informing potential future employment in humans. This paper presents recent developments in nanotechnology regarding impairments still faced by ART: ovary stimulation, multiple pregnancy, and genetic disorders. New perspectives for further use of nanotechnology in reproductive medicine studies are also discussed.

  7. Perception of the Technicians AND Ancillary as of Sickbay Regarding Supervision on the Unit as of Therapeutics Intensity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiano Júlio Silva

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This work is based on the perception of technicians and nursing assistants, in relation to the supervision of nurses examining what type of monitoring that are submitted, if it is in the form of leadership or managerial where we will work the negative points on supervision, evidenced by technical and nursing assistants, in an Intensive Care Unit (ICU. Method: This is a search with the qualitative methodology, which will be developed in the ICU of a public medical institution in Volta Redonda, where the instrument is to search through a questionnaire that will apply to technicians and nursing assistants, the ICU, in the period from July to August 2008. Conclusion: During this study realized that the quality of nursing care, the interaction of the nursing team and communication, can actually be modified with the leadership of the nurse. The need is urgent for change, the nurse not only becomes unsafe for dealing with this team, and makes it whole team is without prejudice, motivated, with that you get a poor service. Descriptors: Nursing and an Intensive Care Unit (ICU.

  8. The Hidden Role of Community Pharmacy Technicians in Ensuring Patient Safety with the Use of E-Prescribing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olufunmilola K. Odukoya

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: It has been reported that supportive personnel, such as pharmacy technicians, are key participants in the use of health information technology. The purpose of this study was to describe how pharmacy technicians use e-prescribing and to explore the characteristics of technicians that support pharmacists in ensuring patient safety. Methods: This was a qualitative study that used observations, interviews, and focus groups to understand the role of pharmacy technicians in e-prescribing. Fourteen pharmacy technicians and 13 pharmacists from five community pharmacies participated. Observations lasted about nine hours in each pharmacy. Follow-up interviews and two separate focus groups were later conducted. Observation field notes and audio recordings were transcribed and thematically analyzed. Results: Pharmacy technicians were primarily responsible for all steps leading up to pharmacist review of the e-prescription and dispensing of medications to the patient. Technician characteristics, including experience, certification status, and knowledge of appropriate medication use, were reported as important factors in supporting a pharmacist’s role in ensuring patient safety with the use of e-prescribing. Conclusion: Study findings indicate that pharmacy technicians have an important role in supporting pharmacists to prevent medication errors. Certain characteristics of pharmacy technicians were identified with the potential to improve the e-prescription medication dispensing process and decrease patient harm through the identification and resolution of errors.

  9. A global picture of pharmacy technician and other pharmacy support workforce cadres

    OpenAIRE

    Koehler, Tamara; Brown, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Understanding how pharmacy technicians and other pharmacy support workforce cadres assist pharmacists in the healthcare system will facilitate developing health systems with the ability to achieve universal health coverage as it is defined in different country contexts. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the present global variety in the technician and other pharmacy support workforce cadres considering; their scope, roles, supervision, education and legal framewo...

  10. Should Health Care Aides Assist With Medications in Long-Term Care?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mubashir Arain PhD

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of the study was to determine whether health care aides (HCAs could safely assist in medication administration in long-term care (LTC. Method: We obtained medication error reports from LTC facilities that involve HCAs in oral medication assistance and we analyzed Resident Assessment Instrument (RAI data from these facilities. Standard ratings of error severity were “no apparent harm,” “minimum harm,” and “moderate harm.” Results: We retrieved error reports from two LTC facilities with 220 errors reported by all health care providers including HCAs. HCAs were involved in 137 (63% errors, licensed practical nurses (LPNs/registered nurses (RNs in 77 (35%, and pharmacy in four (2%. The analysis of error severity showed that HCAs were significantly less likely to cause errors of moderate severity than other nursing staff (2% vs. 7%, chi-square = 5.1, p value = .04. Conclusion: HCAs’ assistance in oral medications in LTC facilities appears to be safe when provided under the medication assistance guidelines.

  11. Pre-use anesthesia machine check; certified anesthesia technician based quality improvement audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Suhaibani, Mazen; Al Malki, Assaf; Al Dosary, Saad; Al Barmawi, Hanan; Pogoku, Mahdhav

    2014-01-01

    Quality assurance of providing a work ready machine in multiple theatre operating rooms in a tertiary modern medical center in Riyadh. The aim of the following study is to keep high quality environment for workers and patients in surgical operating rooms. Technicians based audit by using key performance indicators to assure inspection, passing test of machine worthiness for use daily and in between cases and in case of unexpected failure to provide quick replacement by ready to use another anesthetic machine. The anesthetic machines in all operating rooms are daily and continuously inspected and passed as ready by technicians and verified by anesthesiologist consultant or assistant consultant. The daily records of each machines were collected then inspected for data analysis by quality improvement committee department for descriptive analysis and report the degree of staff compliance to daily inspection as "met" items. Replaced machine during use and overall compliance. Distractive statistic using Microsoft Excel 2003 tables and graphs of sums and percentages of item studied in this audit. Audit obtained highest compliance percentage and low rate of replacement of machine which indicate unexpected machine state of use and quick machine switch. The authors are able to conclude that following regular inspection and running self-check recommended by the manufacturers can contribute to abort any possibility of hazard of anesthesia machine failure during operation. Furthermore in case of unexpected reason to replace the anesthesia machine in quick maneuver contributes to high assured operative utilization of man machine inter-phase in modern surgical operating rooms.

  12. Reliability analysis framework for computer-assisted medical decision systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habas, Piotr A.; Zurada, Jacek M.; Elmaghraby, Adel S.; Tourassi, Georgia D.

    2007-01-01

    We present a technique that enhances computer-assisted decision (CAD) systems with the ability to assess the reliability of each individual decision they make. Reliability assessment is achieved by measuring the accuracy of a CAD system with known cases similar to the one in question. The proposed technique analyzes the feature space neighborhood of the query case to dynamically select an input-dependent set of known cases relevant to the query. This set is used to assess the local (query-specific) accuracy of the CAD system. The estimated local accuracy is utilized as a reliability measure of the CAD response to the query case. The underlying hypothesis of the study is that CAD decisions with higher reliability are more accurate. The above hypothesis was tested using a mammographic database of 1337 regions of interest (ROIs) with biopsy-proven ground truth (681 with masses, 656 with normal parenchyma). Three types of decision models, (i) a back-propagation neural network (BPNN), (ii) a generalized regression neural network (GRNN), and (iii) a support vector machine (SVM), were developed to detect masses based on eight morphological features automatically extracted from each ROI. The performance of all decision models was evaluated using the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analysis. The study showed that the proposed reliability measure is a strong predictor of the CAD system's case-specific accuracy. Specifically, the ROC area index for CAD predictions with high reliability was significantly better than for those with low reliability values. This result was consistent across all decision models investigated in the study. The proposed case-specific reliability analysis technique could be used to alert the CAD user when an opinion that is unlikely to be reliable is offered. The technique can be easily deployed in the clinical environment because it is applicable with a wide range of classifiers regardless of their structure and it requires neither additional

  13. Using an Ishikawa diagram as a tool to assist memory and retrieval of relevant medical cases from the medical literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wong Kam Cheong

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Studying medical cases is an effective way to enhance clinical reasoning skills and reinforce clinical knowledge. An Ishikawa diagram, also known as a cause-and-effect diagram or fishbone diagram, is often used in quality management in manufacturing industries. In this report, an Ishikawa diagram is used to demonstrate how to relate potential causes of a major presenting problem in a clinical setting. This tool can be used by teams in problem-based learning or in self-directed learning settings. An Ishikawa diagram annotated with references to relevant medical cases and literature can be continually updated and can assist memory and retrieval of relevant medical cases and literature. It could also be used to cultivate a lifelong learning habit in medical professionals.

  14. Severe hypoglycaemia requiring the assistance of emergency medical services - frequency, causes and symptoms

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krnačová, V.; Kuběna, Aleš Antonín; Macek, K.; Bezděk, M.; Šmahelová, A.; Vlček, J.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 156, č. 3 (2012), s. 271-277 ISSN 1213-8118 Grant - others:GA UK(CZ) SVV-2010-261-004 Keywords : regression trees * causes * symptoms * incidence * emergency medical service * severe hypoglycaemia Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics Impact factor: 0.990, year: 2012 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2013/E/kubena-severe hypoglycaemia requiring the assistance of emergency medical services - frequency causes and symptoms.pdf

  15. Guidebook on the education and training of technicians for nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The IAEA Guidebook on the Education and Training of Technicians for Nuclear Power aims to assist Member States, especially the developing countries which are in the process of implementing, or intending to implement, a nuclear power programme, to understand and meet their requirements for qualified technicians in the most effective and efficient manner. It specifically seeks to assist policy makers and planners, as well as those designing and implementing education and training programmes. In this Guidebook, technician level occupations include those filled by technicians and higher level technicians (techniciens superieurs or technologists) and also by non-graduate engineers. The Guidebook complements the IAEA Guidebook on Manpower Development for Nuclear Power, as well as the IAEA Guidebook on the Qualification of Nuclear Power Plant Operations Personnel. The key objectives of this Guidebook are to describe: (1) the level and content of conventional education and training which a technician must have before nuclear oriented education and training can begin; (2) the level and content of nuclear oriented education and training; (3) measures to bridge the gap between the education and training acquired by technicians in the national technical schools (i.e. the level attained before upgrading) and the level of education and training qualifications needed for technicians to work in the nuclear power programme (i.e. the level attained after completion of nuclear oriented education and training). Valuable information on the national experiences of IAEA Member States in the education and training of technicians for nuclear power, as well as examples of such education and training from various Member States, are included in IAEA-TECDOC-526, which should be read in conjunction with the present text. 3 refs, 13 figs, 3 tabs

  16. The Attitudes of Medical School Administrators Toward Cost Factors Relating to Computer-Assisted Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Mary Carter; Milner, Stuart D.

    The attitudes of medical school administrators toward six cost factors relevant to the production of sophisticated clinical programs in schools which offer, expect to offer, or do not expect to offer CAI (Computer Assisted Instruction) were identified and compared. The six cost factors were: (1) authorship, (2) incentives, (3) distribution, (4)…

  17. 75 FR 18888 - Mine Rescue Teams and Arrangements for Emergency Medical Assistance and Transportation for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-13

    ... Safety and Health Administration Mine Rescue Teams and Arrangements for Emergency Medical Assistance and... teams for underground coal mines on February 8, 2008. The United Mine Workers of America challenged the... revised its requirements for mine rescue teams for underground coal mines on June 17, 2009. The 2008 mine...

  18. The Allied Health Care Professional's Role in Assisting Medical Decision Making at the End of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Heather

    2012-01-01

    As a patient approaches the end of life, he or she faces a number of very difficult medical decisions. Allied health care professionals, including speech-language pathologists (SLPs) and occupational therapists (OTs), can be instrumental in assisting their patients to make advance care plans, although their traditional job descriptions do not…

  19. Treatment outcome of alcohol use disorder outpatients with or without medically assisted detoxification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merkx, Maarten J. M.; Schippers, Gerard M.; Koeter, Maarten W. J.; de Wildt, Wencke A. J. M.; Vedel, Ellen; Goudriaan, Anna E.; van den Brink, Wim

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the incremental effects of medically assisted detoxification on outpatient treatment for alcohol use disorders. The objective of this study was to compare drinking outcomes in a psychosocial treatment program between two groups of heavy drinking patients who had an alcohol use

  20. Enhancing human-animal relationships through veterinary medical instruction in animal-assisted therapy and animal-assisted activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffer, Caroline Brunsman

    2008-01-01

    Instruction in animal-assisted therapy (AAT) and animal-assisted activities (AAAs) teaches veterinary medical students to confidently and assertively maximize the benefits and minimize the risks of this union of animals and people. Instruction in AAT/AAA also addresses requirements by the American Veterinary Medical Association Council on Education that accredited schools/colleges of veterinary medicine include in their standard curriculum the topics of the human-animal bond, behavior, and the contributions of the veterinarian to the overall public and professional health care teams. Entry-level veterinarians should be prepared to: (1) assure that animals who provide AAT/AAA are healthy enough to visit nursing homes, hospitals, or other institutions; (2) promote behavior testing that selects animals who will feel safe, comfortable, and connected; (3) advise facilities regarding infection control and ways to provide a safe environment where the animals, their handlers, and the people being visited will not be injured or become ill; and (4) advocate for their patients and show compassion for their clients when animals are determined to be inappropriate participants in AAT/AAA programs. This article presents AAT/AAA terminology, ways in which veterinarians can advocate for AAT/AAA, the advantages of being involved in AAT/AAA, a model AAT/AAA practicum from Tuskegee University's School of Veterinary Medicine (TUSVM), and examples of co-curricular activities in AAT/AAA by TUSVM's student volunteers.

  1. A Secure Cloud-Assisted Wireless Body Area Network in Mobile Emergency Medical Care System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chun-Ta; Lee, Cheng-Chi; Weng, Chi-Yao

    2016-05-01

    Recent advances in medical treatment and emergency applications, the need of integrating wireless body area network (WBAN) with cloud computing can be motivated by providing useful and real time information about patients' health state to the doctors and emergency staffs. WBAN is a set of body sensors carried by the patient to collect and transmit numerous health items to medical clouds via wireless and public communication channels. Therefore, a cloud-assisted WBAN facilitates response in case of emergency which can save patients' lives. Since the patient's data is sensitive and private, it is important to provide strong security and protection on the patient's medical data over public and insecure communication channels. In this paper, we address the challenge of participant authentication in mobile emergency medical care systems for patients supervision and propose a secure cloud-assisted architecture for accessing and monitoring health items collected by WBAN. For ensuring a high level of security and providing a mutual authentication property, chaotic maps based authentication and key agreement mechanisms are designed according to the concept of Diffie-Hellman key exchange, which depends on the CMBDLP and CMBDHP problems. Security and performance analyses show how the proposed system guaranteed the patient privacy and the system confidentiality of sensitive medical data while preserving the low computation property in medical treatment and remote medical monitoring.

  2. Clinical support role for a pharmacy technician within a primary care resource center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fera, Toni; Kanel, Keith T; Bolinger, Meghan L; Fink, Amber E; Iheasirim, Serah

    2018-02-01

    The creation of a clinical support role for a pharmacy technician within a primary care resource center is described. In the Primary Care Resource Center (PCRC) Project, hospital-based care transition coordination hubs staffed by nurses and pharmacist teams were created in 6 independent community hospitals. At the largest site, patient volume for targeted diseases challenged the ability of the PCRC pharmacist to provide expected elements of care to targeted patients. Creation of a new pharmacy technician clinical support role was implemented as a cost-effective option to increase the pharmacist's efficiency. The pharmacist's work processes were reviewed and technical functions identified that could be assigned to a specially trained pharmacy technician under the direction of the PCRC pharmacist. Daily tasks performed by the pharmacy technician included maintenance of the patient roster and pending discharges, retrieval and documentation of pertinent laboratory and diagnostic test information from the patient's medical record, assembly of patient medication education materials, and identification of discrepancies between disparate systems' medication records. In the 6 months after establishing the PCRC pharmacy technician role, the pharmacist's completion of comprehensive medication reviews (CMRs) for target patients increased by 40.5% ( p = 0.0223), driven largely by a 42.4% ( p team extended the reach of the pharmacist and allowed more time for the pharmacist to engage patients. Technician support enabled the pharmacist to complete more CMRs and reduced the time required for chart reviews. Copyright © 2018 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Experiences Providing Medical Assistance during the Sewol Ferry Disaster Using Traditional Korean Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyeong Han; Jang, Soobin; Lee, Ju Ah; Jang, Bo-Hyoung; Go, Ho-Yeon; Park, Sunju; Jo, Hee-Guen; Lee, Myeong Soo; Ko, Seong-Gyu

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate medical records using traditional Korean medicine (TKM) in Sewol Ferry disaster in 2014 and further explore the possible role of traditional medicine in disaster situation. After Sewol Ferry accident, 3 on-site tents for TKM assistance by the Association of Korean Medicine (AKOM) in Jindo area were installed. The AKOM mobilized volunteer TKM doctors and assistants and dispatched each on-site tent in three shifts within 24 hours. Anyone could use on-site tent without restriction and TKM treatments including herb medicine were administered individually. The total of 1,860 patients were treated during the periods except for medical assistance on the barge. Most patients were diagnosed in musculoskeletal diseases (66.4%) and respiratory diseases (7.4%) and circulatory diseases (8.4%) followed. The most frequently used herbal medicines were Shuanghe decoction (80 days), Su He Xiang Wan (288 pills), and Wuji powder (73 days). TKM in medical assistance can be helpful to rescue worker or group life people in open shelter when national disasters occur. Therefore, it is important to construct a rapid respond system using TKM resources based on experience.

  4. Experiences Providing Medical Assistance during the Sewol Ferry Disaster Using Traditional Korean Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyeong Han Kim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. This study aimed to investigate medical records using traditional Korean medicine (TKM in Sewol Ferry disaster in 2014 and further explore the possible role of traditional medicine in disaster situation. Methods. After Sewol Ferry accident, 3 on-site tents for TKM assistance by the Association of Korean Medicine (AKOM in Jindo area were installed. The AKOM mobilized volunteer TKM doctors and assistants and dispatched each on-site tent in three shifts within 24 hours. Anyone could use on-site tent without restriction and TKM treatments including herb medicine were administered individually. Results. The total of 1,860 patients were treated during the periods except for medical assistance on the barge. Most patients were diagnosed in musculoskeletal diseases (66.4% and respiratory diseases (7.4% and circulatory diseases (8.4% followed. The most frequently used herbal medicines were Shuanghe decoction (80 days, Su He Xiang Wan (288 pills, and Wuji powder (73 days. Conclusions. TKM in medical assistance can be helpful to rescue worker or group life people in open shelter when national disasters occur. Therefore, it is important to construct a rapid respond system using TKM resources based on experience.

  5. [Targeted screening for HTLV-1 in couples requesting medically assisted reproduction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epelboin, S

    2011-08-01

    Currently there are no guidelines for the targeting of HTLV-1 screening of couples requesting inclusion in an assisted fertility programme. These can be drawn up only if there is a multidisciplinary input allowing for specialist advice on the quantification of risk in the target populations offered help with fertility both in mainland France and the Antilles or French Guyana.In units offering Assisted Reproductive Technics (ART) targeted screening which might reveal a requirement for specific medical management, presents the opposing problems of the need for exhaustive questioning of the couple and that of non-discrimination. If screening is arranged to take place before the couple is taken on for assisted reproduction, then the good practice which is currently recommended and applied for HIV, is a suitable reference model. It remains to define the expected benefits in this branch of medicine where medical responsibility in assisted conception is already highly regulated. Moreover, if any measures are applied in the context of assisted reproduction, this would suggest that similar guidelines should be established for natural conception.

  6. Cloud-assisted mutual authentication and privacy preservation protocol for telecare medical information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chun-Ta; Shih, Dong-Her; Wang, Chun-Cheng

    2018-04-01

     With the rapid development of wireless communication technologies and the growing prevalence of smart devices, telecare medical information system (TMIS) allows patients to receive medical treatments from the doctors via Internet technology without visiting hospitals in person. By adopting mobile device, cloud-assisted platform and wireless body area network, the patients can collect their physiological conditions and upload them to medical cloud via their mobile devices, enabling caregivers or doctors to provide patients with appropriate treatments at anytime and anywhere. In order to protect the medical privacy of the patient and guarantee reliability of the system, before accessing the TMIS, all system participants must be authenticated.  Mohit et al. recently suggested a lightweight authentication protocol for cloud-based health care system. They claimed their protocol ensures resilience of all well-known security attacks and has several important features such as mutual authentication and patient anonymity. In this paper, we demonstrate that Mohit et al.'s authentication protocol has various security flaws and we further introduce an enhanced version of their protocol for cloud-assisted TMIS, which can ensure patient anonymity and patient unlinkability and prevent the security threats of report revelation and report forgery attacks.  The security analysis proves that our enhanced protocol is secure against various known attacks as well as found in Mohit et al.'s protocol. Compared with existing related protocols, our enhanced protocol keeps the merits of all desirable security requirements and also maintains the efficiency in terms of computation costs for cloud-assisted TMIS.  We propose a more secure mutual authentication and privacy preservation protocol for cloud-assisted TMIS, which fixes the mentioned security weaknesses found in Mohit et al.'s protocol. According to our analysis, our authentication protocol satisfies most functionality features

  7. Urinary Concentrations of Phthalate Metabolites and Pregnancy Loss Among Women Conceiving with Medically Assisted Reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messerlian, Carmen; Wylie, Blair J; Mínguez-Alarcón, Lidia; Williams, Paige L; Ford, Jennifer B; Souter, Irene C; Calafat, Antonia M; Hauser, Russ

    2016-11-01

    Animal studies demonstrate that several phthalates are embryofetotoxic and are associated with increased pregnancy loss and malformations. Results from human studies on phthalates and pregnancy loss are inconsistent. We examined pregnancy loss prospectively in relation to urinary phthalate metabolite concentrations among women undergoing medically assisted reproduction. We used data from 256 women conceiving 303 pregnancies recruited between 2004 and 2012 from the Massachusetts General Hospital Fertility Center. We quantified 11 phthalate metabolite concentrations and calculated the molar sum of four di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) metabolites (ΣDEHP). We estimated risk ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals for biochemical loss and total pregnancy loss (assisted reproduction.

  8. Technology and Health Care: Efficiency, Frustration, and Disconnect in the Transition to Electronic Medical Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magsamen-Conrad, Kate; Checton, Maria

    2014-02-01

    This study investigates one medical facility's transition to electronic medical records (becoming "paperless"). We utilized face-to-face interviews to investigate the transition process with one implementer (the vice president of the medical facility) and three stakeholders from one of the four offices (an assistant office manager, a nurse, and a medical technician). We discuss the dominant themes of efficiency, frustration, and disconnect as well as conclusions and implications.

  9. Aplastic anemia in Japanese radiological technicians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitabatake, T.; Watanabe, T.; Saito, A.; Nakamura, M.; Shiohama Hospital, Mie

    1976-01-01

    Among the Japanese radiological technicians, four deaths from aplastic anemia have been reported after 1930. On the other hand, during the period from 1930 to 1960, the population of radiological technicians is estimated to be 74,400 man-years, in which 0.5 aplastic anemias are expected. However, actually three died from aplastic anemia. This difference is statistically significant at the 1% level. While, in the period from 1961 to 1973, the observed value is 1 against 0.7 expected. It is concluded that aplastic anemia had been induced frequently among the Japanese radiological technicians in the era when there was much exposure to occupational radiation. (orig.) [de

  10. Emergency Response to Radiological Accidents and International Medical Assistance in Peru

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez Quijada, R.

    2016-01-01

    Radiological accidents occur despite having implemented safety and protection measures for preventing them. Taking this fact into account the radiological accidents that have occurred in the country were faced through the National Radiological Emergency Plan which was designed for responding to several accidental scenarios. The organization and means for response are included in the plan as well as provisions for international assistance. The emergency plan was applied in four of the radiological accidents with health consequences that have occurred in 20 years of using radioactive sources. Three of these radiological accidents were supported by international assistance in the framework of Convention for Assistance. This assistance was provided mainly in the medical field for treatment of patients but also for dosimetry. As learned from experience, an effective assistance depends on address the real needs of support to put the international efforts in what concern. The paper describes the emergency plan for response to radiological accidents and also a summary of the four radiological accidents happened in Peru is provided as well as some recommendations for applying to international assistance from IAEA. (author)

  11. Assessment of attitudes towards assisted reproduction: a survey among medical students and parous women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkilä, Katri; Länsimies, Esko; Hippeläinen, Maritta; Heinonen, Seppo

    2006-11-01

    The present paper explores attitudes towards different aspects of assisted reproductive technologies among parous women and future doctors (third- and fourth-year medical students). We anonymously surveyed 200 parous women who had at least three infants and had given birth at Kuopio University Hospital, and 200 medical students of Kuopio University. The overall response rate was 45%. Most of the medical students were childless (95.7%), unmarried (63.8%), and younger (24 vs. 35 years) compared with the parous women (p single women. Over 40% of medical students would allow the use of a surrogate mother for lesbian and homosexual couples; the number was under 20% in the group of parous women. Their setting of priorities within the field of reproductive health also showed differences in prostate cancer screening, doctor's appointments for contraception, abortion and menopausal hormone replacement therapy. Medical students take a rather liberal stance on reproductive issues. On the other hand, baseline attitudes among medical students reveal some degree of subjectivism when it comes to allocation of scarce healthcare resources within the field of reproductive health. Medical education faces a challenge in ensuring that future physicians are able to set priorities and balance resources between preventive medicine and management of specific medical conditions, and to base their attitudes on evidence.

  12. Explanatory memorandum on European Community Document -mutual medical assistance in the case of a nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The report lists the Commissions proposals for further action on its suggestion of mutual health assistance in the event of a nuclear accident. These include surveys and studies, further research on the medical treatment of radiation casualties and the methodology of epidemiological investigations, the promotion of contacts between experts and the attempt to assemble a handbook listing facilities and procedures for mutual assistance. The memorandum explains some of the points further under the headings, ministerial responsibility, legal and procedural issues and policy implications. The United Kingdom position is then stated. The UK government welcomes the proposals provided there is no duplication of work already covered by the IAEA Convention on Assistance in the case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency. (U.K.)

  13. Medical Assistant-based care management for high risk patients in small primary care practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freund, Tobias; Peters-Klimm, Frank; Boyd, Cynthia M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with multiple chronic conditions are at high risk of potentially avoidable hospital admissions, which may be reduced by care coordination and self-management support. Medical assistants are an increasingly available resource for patient care in primary care practices. Objective......: To determine whether protocol-based care management delivered by medical assistants improves patient care in patients at high risk of future hospitalization in primary care. Design: Two-year cluster randomized clinical trial. Setting: 115 primary care practices in Germany. Patients: 2,076 patients with type 2...... diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or chronic heart failure and a likelihood of hospitalization in the upper quartile of the population, as predicted by insurance data analysis. Intervention: We compared protocol-based care management including structured assessment, action planning...

  14. Technician Career Opportunities in Engineering Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engineers' Council for Professional Development, New York, NY.

    Career opportunities for engineering technicians are available in the technologies relating to air conditioning, heating, and refrigeration, aviation and aerospace, building construction, chemical engineering, civil engineering, electrical engineering, electronics, industrial engineering, instrumentation, internal combustion engines, mechanical…

  15. Types, Prevalence, and Potential Clinical Significance of Medication Administration Errors in Assisted Living

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Heather M.; Gray, Shelly L.; McCormick, Wayne C.; Sikma, Suzanne K.; Reinhard, Susan; Trippett, Linda Johnson; Christlieb, Carol; Allen, Tiffany

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To describe the types and potential clinical significance of medication administration errors in assisted living (AL). DESIGN Cross-sectional observational study. SETTING This study was conducted in 12 AL settings in three states (Oregon, Washington, and New Jersey). PARTICIPANTS Participants included 29 unlicensed assistive personnel and 510 AL residents. MEASUREMENTS Medication administration observations, chart review, and determination of rates, types, and potential clinical significance of errors using standardized methodology. RESULTS Of 4,866 observations, 1,373 errors were observed (28.2% error rate). Of these, 70.8% were wrong time, 12.9% wrong dose, 11.1% omitted dose, 3.5% extra dose, 1.5% unauthorized drug, and 0.2% wrong drug. Excluding wrong time, the overall error rate dropped to 8.2%. Of the 1,373 errors, three were rated as having potential clinical significance. CONCLUSION A high number of daily medications are given in AL. Wrong time accounted for the majority of the errors. The bulk of the medications are low risk and routine; to promote optimal care delivery, clinicians need to focus on high-risk medications and residents with complex health problems. PMID:18482296

  16. Advanced maternal age: ethical and medical considerations for assisted reproductive technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Brittany J; Hilton, Tara N; Rivière, Raphaël N; Ferraro, Zachary M; Deonandan, Raywat; Walker, Mark C

    2017-01-01

    This review explores the ethical and medical challenges faced by women of advanced maternal age who decide to have children. Assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs) make post-menopausal pregnancy physiologically plausible, however, one must consider the associated physical, psychological, and sociological factors involved. A quasi-systematic review was conducted in PubMed and Ovid using the key terms post-menopause, pregnancy + MeSH terms [donations, hormone replacement therapy, assisted reproductive technologies, embryo donation, donor artificial insemination, cryopreservation]. Overall, 28 papers encompassing two major themes (ethical and medical) were included in the review. There are significant ethical considerations and medical (maternal and fetal) complications related to pregnancy in peri- and post-menopausal women. When examining the ethical and sociological perspective, the literature portrays an overall positive attitude toward pregnancy in advanced maternal age. With respect to the medical complications, the general consensus in the evaluated studies suggests that there is greater risk of complication for spontaneous pregnancy when the mother is older (eg, >35 years old). This risk can be mitigated by careful medical screening of the mother and the use of ARTs in healthy women. In these instances, a woman of advanced maternal age who is otherwise healthy can carry a pregnancy with a similar risk profile to that of her younger counterparts when using donated oocytes.

  17. [Medical students' attitudes towards legalisation of euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordstrand, Magnus Andreas; Nordstrand, Sven Jakob; Materstvedt, Lars Johan; Nortvedt, Per; Magelssen, Morten

    2013-11-26

    We wished to investigate prevailing attitudes among future doctors regarding legalisation of euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide. This issue is important, since any legalisation of these practices would confer a completely new role on doctors. Attitudes were identified with the aid of a questionnaire-based survey among medical students in their 5th and 6th year of study in the four Norwegian medical schools. Altogether 531 students responded (59.5% of all students in these cohorts). Of these, 102 (19%) were of the opinion that euthanasia should be legalised in the case of terminal illness, 164 (31%) responded that physician-assisted suicide should be permitted for this indication, while 145 (28%) did not know. A minority of the respondents would permit euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide in other situations. Women and those who reported that religion was important to them were less positive than men to permitting euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide. In most of the situations described, the majority of the students in this survey rejected legalisation. Opinions are more divided in the case of terminal illness, since a larger proportion is in favour of legalisation and more respondents are undecided.

  18. [Euthanasia and/or medically assisted suicide: Reflection on the new responsibility of the hospital pharmacist].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boissinot, L; Benamou, M; Léglise, P; Mancret, R-C; Huchon-Bécel, D

    2014-03-01

    Concern about euthanasia and medically assisted suicide is currently growing around the world and particularly in France. Though not authorized at present in France, the role of hospital pharmacist in this issue needs to be discussed. This article aims to gather medical and legal literature of European Union member states on these issues and particularly in France. To propose a practical thinking on the possible role of hospital pharmacist. Among European Union, euthanasia and/or assisted suicide have already been introduced in some member states' laws. In France, Leonetti law currently sets the legal framework for the management of end of life. To address the society's demand on these issues, French President F. Hollande made two ethics committees responsible for working on it. Both were mainly against euthanasia and assisted suicide. Though a bit forgotten in this debate, hospital pharmacist needs to be associated in the thinking, as the main "drug-keeper". Indeed, guidelines are necessary to outline and ensure a safe drug use, complying with professional ethics, if lethal doses are voluntarily prescribed. Pharmaceutical work is in constant evolution and is addressing new issues still unanswered, including assisted suicide and euthanasia. French pharmaceutical authorities should seize upon them, in order to guarantee pharmaceutical ethics. These practices, if authorized by law, should remain exceptional, and law strictly enforced. The pharmacist could be one of these "lawkeepers". Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Evaluating the benefit of introducing medical clerks as transcriptionists to assist physicians in outpatient clinics: a quantitative analysis of medical records by counting characters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasahara, Satoko; Yoshizaki, Kayoko; Yamashita, Teppei; Takeda, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluates the effects of the medical clerks introduced to reduce physicians' workloads in outpatient clinics by assisting with their documentation processes (e.g., the production of electronic medical records (EMRs)). The volume of information written in narrative text in EMRs from 2007 (pre-introduction of medical clerks) to 2012 (post-introduction) was measured by counting Japanese characters. The total number of medical records for analysis was 1,577. The average number of characters in EMRs increased from before the introduction of medical clerks to afterwards regardless of the types of documents (subjective or objective data) or visits (first or second visits). We conclude that introducing medical clerks improves the quantity of outpatients' medical records and that such a character-counting method is useful for evaluating the benefit of the introduction of medical clerks to assist physicians.

  20. The medical department in military operations other than war. Part II: Medical Civic Assistance Program in Southeast Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, M S; Ryals, P

    1999-09-01

    It is a short trip by air from Bangkok, Thailand, to Phnom Penh, Cambodia, but a dramatic contrast. A Medical Civic Assistance Program (MEDCAP) visit was conducted in conjunction with Exercise Flash Canoe 97, the first U.S. Navy mission to Cambodia in more than 22 years. Nearly 3,000 patients were seen by the MEDCAP team members. Medical and dental care, medications, educational materials, and training were provided. The mission was an exceptional training opportunity for U.S. Medical Department personnel, who learned to function outside of the hospital and clinic environment and to deal with limited logistic backup, austere field conditions, a hostile environment, and an overwhelming number of patients, many of them with infectious diseases. Cambodia lacks public health infrastructure and has uncertain communications, difficult travel conditions, and an unstable political climate. Using the planning checklists described in Part I, the team completed the "in-country" part of the mission with minimal logistic and support problems, maximizing the effectiveness of the health care providers. The MEDCAP is an important instrument of U.S. foreign policy and friendship with other peoples.

  1. Measures against radiation disaster/terrorism and radiation emergency medical assistance team

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tominaga, Takako; Akashi, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    The probability of occurrence of radiological terrorism and disaster in Japan is not low. For this reason, preparations for coping with the occurrence of radiological terrorism should be an urgent issue. This paper describes the radiation medical system and the threat of radiological terrorism and disaster in Japan, and introduces the Radiation Emergency Medical Assistance Team (REMAT), one of the radiation accident/disaster response organizations at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences. Radiation exposure medical systems in Japan are constructed only in the location of nuclear facilities and adjacent prefectures. These medical systems have been developed only for the purpose of medical correspondence at the time of nuclear disaster, but preparations are not made by assuming measures against radiological terrorism. REMAT of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences is obligated to dispatch persons to the requesting prefecture to support radiation medical care in case of nuclear disaster or radiation accident. The designation of nuclear disaster orientated hospitals in each region, and the training of nuclear disaster medical staffing team were also started, but preparations are not enough. In addition to enhancing and strengthening experts, specialized agencies, and special forces dealing with radiological terrorism, it is essential to improve regional disaster management capacity and terrorism handling capacity. (A.O.)

  2. Measuring clinical outcomes of animal-assisted therapy: impact on resident medication usage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lust, Elaine; Ryan-Haddad, Ann; Coover, Kelli; Snell, Jeff

    2007-07-01

    To measure changes in medication usage of as-needed, psychoactive medications and other select as-needed medication usage as a result of a therapy dog residing in the rehabilitation facility. Additional measures are participants' thoughts and feelings on quality-of-life factors. One group, pretest, post-test. Residential rehabilitation facility. Convenience sample, N = 58 residents living at the facility. A certified, trained therapy dog. Changes in as-needed medication usage for the following categories: analgesics, psychoactive medications, and laxatives, as well as changes in vital sign measurements of blood pressure, pulse, respiration rate, and body weight. Additionally, changes in the residents' perception of quality-of-life factors. One of the three monitored drug classes, analgesia, revealed a decrease in medication usage (mean = 2.6, standard deviation [SD] +/- 6.90, P = 0.017), and one of four monitored vital signs, pulse, showed a decrease (mean = 5.8, SD +/-7.39, P = 0.000) in study participants exposed to the therapy dog. Positive changes were reported in study participants' quality of life. The benefits to human welfare as a result of the presence of a therapy dog have the potential to decrease medication usage for certain conditions in long-term care patients as well as decrease costs. Pharmacist involvement in animal-assisted therapy has the potential to make unique and measurable improvements to best patient care.

  3. The impact of patient assistance programs and the 340B Drug Pricing Program on medication cost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellon, Yelba M; Bazargan-Hejazi, Shahrzad; Masatsugu, Miles; Contreras, Roberto

    2014-02-01

    Patient assistance programs and the 340B Drug Pricing Program promise to improve the financial stability, better serve vulnerable patients, and decrease the burden of cost for uninsured patients. Our objective is to examine the financial impact that PAPs and the 340B Program have on improving medication cost. Retrospective analysis of medication dispensary data. Dispensary data for uninsured patients obtaining medications at 2 community health centers were collected from February 1 to February 29, 2012. Uninsured patients were divided into 2 samples: (1) patients receiving PAP medications and (2) patients receiving 340B medications. The main outcome measured was the patient's cost savings. Cost savings were calculated based on the amount a medication would have cost had it been purchased by patients at prices found on Epocrates software (drugstore.com). A paired sample t test model using continuous variables was utilized to calculate confidence intervals. A total of 1420 PAP and 2772 340B individual medications were dispensed to uninsured patients in February 2012. For patients receiving PAP medications the mean ± standard deviation (SD) for age = 52 ± 10. Average cost was $0.11 (95% CI, $0.04-$0.17) and average savings was $617.36 (95% Cl, $581.32-$653.40). For patients receiving 340B medications the mean ±SD for age = 50 ± 14. Average cost was $11.50 (95% CI, $10.55-$12.45). Average saving was $62.31 (95% CI, $57.99-$66.63). PAPs and 340B provide significant medication savings for uninsured patient. More research is needed to establish "best practices" for the successful integration of PAPs.

  4. Costs of medically assisted reproduction treatment at specialized fertility clinics in the Danish public health care system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Terkel; Erb, Karin; Rizvanovic, Amra

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To examine the costs to the public health care system of couples in medically assisted reproduction. Design. Longitudinal cohort study of infertile couples initiating medically assisted reproduction treatment. Setting. Specialized public fertility clinics in Denmark. Sample. Seven...... hundred and thirty-nine couples having no child at study entry and with data on kind of treatment and live birth (yes/no) for each treatment attempt at the specialized public fertility clinic. Methods. Treatment data for medically assisted reproduction attempts conducted at the public fertility clinics...... or not – were estimated at 6607€. Costs per live birth of women relatively modest. The results can be generalized...

  5. Investigating laparoscopic psychomotor skills in veterinarians and veterinary technicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilkenny, Jessica; Santarossa, Amanda; Mrotz, Victoria; Walker, Meagan; Monaghan, Dominique; Singh, Ameet

    2017-04-01

    To determine the influence of age, year of graduation, and video game experience on baseline laparoscopic psychomotor skills. Cross-sectional. Licensed veterinarians (n = 38) and registered veterinary technicians (VTs) (n = 49). A laparoscopic box trainer was set up at the 2016 Ontario Veterinary Medical Association (OVMA) and the 2016 Ontario Association of Veterinary Technicians (OAVT) conferences held in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Participants volunteered to perform a single repetition of a peg transfer (PT) exercise. Participants were given a short demonstration of the PT task prior to testing. A Spearman's rank correlation (r s ) was used to identify associations between baseline psychomotor skills and self-reported surgical and non-surgical experiences collected via survey. Mann-Whitney U tests were used to compare PT scores in veterinarians and VTs. A P-value of  .05). Veterinary technicians that frequently used chopsticks scored higher than those without chopstick experience (P = .04). Age and year of graduation correlated inversely, while self-reported VG experience correlated positively with laparoscopic psychomotor skills of veterinarians, when assessed on a simulator. The use of chopsticks may contribute to the acquisition of psychomotor skills in VTs. © 2017 The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  6. Appendices to the guidebook on the education and training of technicians for nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-10-01

    The current publication, a supplement to the IAEA Guidebook on the Education and Training of Technicians for Nuclear Power, in conjunction with which it should be read, aims to assist Member States, especially the developing countries which are in the process of implementing, or intending to implement, a nuclear power programme, to understand and meet their requirements for qualified technicians in the most effective and efficient manner. It specifically seeks to assist policy makers and planners, as well as those designing and implementing education and training programmes. The Guidebook and this TECDOC complement the IAEA Guidebook on Manpower Development for Nuclear Power, as well as the IAEA Guidebook on the Qualification of Nuclear Power Plant Operations Personnel. This TECDOC supplements the Guidebook with valuable information on the national experience of IAEA Member States in the education and training of technicians for nuclear power, as well as examples of such education and training from various Member States. Figs and tabs

  7. Peer-assisted learning--beyond teaching: How can medical students contribute to the undergraduate curriculum?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furmedge, Daniel S; Iwata, Kazuya; Gill, Deborah

    2014-09-01

    Peer-assisted learning (PAL) has become increasingly popular over recent years with many medical schools now formally incorporating peer-teaching programs into the curriculum. PAL has a sound evidence base with benefit to both peer-teacher and peer-learner. Aside from in teaching delivery, empowering students to develop education in its broadest sense has been much less extensively documented. Five case studies with supportive evaluation evidence illustrate the success of a broad range of peer-led projects in the undergraduate medical curriculum, particularly where these have been embedded into formal teaching practices. These case studies identify five domains of teaching and support of learning where PAL works well: teaching and learning, resource development, peer-assessment, education research and evaluation and mentoring and support. Each case offers ways of engaging students in each domain. Medical students can contribute significantly to the design and delivery of the undergraduate medical program above and beyond the simple delivery of peer-assisted "teaching". In particular, they are in a prime position to develop resources and conduct research and evaluation within the program. Their participation in all stages enables them to feel involved in course development and education of their peers and ultimately leads to an increase in student satisfaction.

  8. Attrition in a clinical laboratory technician associate degree program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blume, W M; Krefetz, R G

    1997-01-01

    To determine the reasons for attrition in a clinical laboratory technician-associate degree program, a retrospective study was done on classes entering from 1987 to 1992. Suggestions are made to increase retention. The medical laboratory department at the Community College of Philadelphia in Pennsylvania. There were 43,987 students enrolled for the 1993 to 1994 academic year; 17,846 full time equivalents at the college. Clinical laboratory technician students averaged 26.2 years and were 26% male and 74% female, which closely paralleled the college. The ethnic make-up of the clinical laboratory technician classes was 54% White, 32% African American, 11% Asian, and 3% Latin American, compared to 48% African American, 36% White, 10% Asian, and 6% Latin American students in the college. A retrospective study was performed to evaluate attrition rates for the classes entering the clinical laboratory technician program at the Community College of Philadelphia from 1987 to 1992. Reasons for this attrition were tabulated and evaluated. One hundred twenty-nine students entered the program and 75 graduated, producing an attrition rate of 42%. There were 6 categories of reasons given for not completing the program: academic difficulties, dislike of the laboratory science field, family problems, financial problems, substance abuse, and other problems not specified. Because 80% of the attrition was due to poor academic performance and a dislike of the field, several changes are being made in the Community College of Philadelphia's retention program. An enhanced orientation will be given to all students, and students will be required to visit a hospital laboratory. Early faculty intervention and peer counseling for students with poor academic performance will be instituted.

  9. Seventh Medical Image Computing and Computer Assisted Intervention Conference (MICCAI 2012)

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, Karol; Nielsen, Poul; Computational Biomechanics for Medicine : Models, Algorithms and Implementation

    2013-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges for mechanical engineers is to extend the success of computational mechanics to fields outside traditional engineering, in particular to biology, biomedical sciences, and medicine. This book is an opportunity for computational biomechanics specialists to present and exchange opinions on the opportunities of applying their techniques to computer-integrated medicine. Computational Biomechanics for Medicine: Models, Algorithms and Implementation collects the papers from the Seventh Computational Biomechanics for Medicine Workshop held in Nice in conjunction with the Medical Image Computing and Computer Assisted Intervention conference. The topics covered include: medical image analysis, image-guided surgery, surgical simulation, surgical intervention planning, disease prognosis and diagnostics, injury mechanism analysis, implant and prostheses design, and medical robotics.

  10. Adoption of computer-assisted learning in medical education: the educators' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schifferdecker, Karen E; Berman, Norm B; Fall, Leslie H; Fischer, Martin R

    2012-11-01

    Computer-assisted learning (CAL) in medical education has been shown to be effective in the achievement of learning outcomes, but requires the input of significant resources and development time. This study examines the key elements and processes that led to the widespread adoption of a CAL program in undergraduate medical education, the Computer-assisted Learning in Paediatrics Program (CLIPP). It then considers the relative importance of elements drawn from existing theories and models for technology adoption and other studies on CAL in medical education to inform the future development, implementation and testing of CAL programs in medical education. The study used a mixed-methods explanatory design. All paediatric clerkship directors (CDs) using CLIPP were recruited to participate in a self-administered, online questionnaire. Semi-structured interviews were then conducted with a random sample of CDs to further explore the quantitative results. Factors that facilitated adoption included CLIPP's ability to fill gaps in exposure to core clinical problems, the use of a national curriculum, development by CDs, and the meeting of CDs' desires to improve teaching and student learning. An additional facilitating factor was that little time and effort were needed to implement CLIPP within a clerkship. The quantitative findings were mostly corroborated by the qualitative findings. This study indicates issues that are important in the consideration and future exploration of the development and implementation of CAL programs in medical education. The promise of CAL as a method of enhancing the process and outcomes of medical education, and its cost, increase the need for future CAL funders and developers to pay equal attention to the needs of potential adopters and the development process as they do to the content and tools in the CAL program. Important questions that remain on the optimal design, use and integration of CAL should be addressed in order to adequately inform

  11. The practical training of students - x-ray technicians and requirements to mentors in clinical bases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagova, P; Boninska, N.; Jovchev, D.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: Training of X-ray technicians in Bulgaria takes place in the Medical Colleges to Medical Universities. It's purpose is providing professional training of students in the area of diagnostic imaging, nuclear medicine and radiotherapy. Practical training is based on the scientific and theoretical knowledge and skills and is organized in pedagogic environment, adequate to regularities for a gradual formation of practical skills and habits. The practical training and pre-graduation internship are performed in 1895 from total of 3810 hours, which represents about fifty percent of all training of X-ray technicians. Students are in groups of 2-4 students. Practical training is organized, accomplished and monitored by the teacher training practice with the help of a mentor in the clinical base. Purpose: To present the tasks of practical training of students - X-ray technicians and the requirements for the personal characteristics and activity of mentors. Materials and methods: Documentary method has been used. Literature and normative documents related to the practical training of students in 'X-ray technician' of Medical Colleges have been studied. The job descriptions of senior clinical X-ray technicians have been examined carefully. Results: By analyzing literature sources, we have structured the tasks of practical training and pre-graduation internship of students - X-ray technicians, also we have described the requirements for personal qualities of mentors and systematize the activities they perform. Conclusion: Practical training plays an important role in adaptation of young X-ray technicians to the conditions of medical work, improving their skills and habits, and to the development of specific practical skills for being able to respond to emergency conditions and to solve complicated practical situations. The mentor is the supervisor and the controller of interns who helps this happen through his own example, qualities and attitudes towards

  12. Physician-assisted suicide, euthanasia and palliative sedation: attitudes and knowledge of medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anneser, Johanna; Jox, Ralf J; Thurn, Tamara; Borasio, Gian Domenico

    2016-01-01

    In November 2015, the German Federal Parliament voted on a new legal regulation regarding assisted suicide. It was decided to amend the German Criminal Code so that any "regular, repetitive offer" (even on a non-profit basis) of assistance in suicide would now be considered a punishable offense. On July 2, 2015, a date which happened to be accompanied by great media interest in that it was the day that the first draft of said law was presented to Parliament, we surveyed 4th year medical students at the Technical University Munich on "physician-assisted suicide," "euthanasia" and "palliative sedation," based on a fictitious case vignette study. The vignette study described two versions of a case in which a patient suffered from a nasopharyngeal carcinoma (physical suffering subjectively perceived as being unbearable vs. emotional suffering). The students were asked about the current legal norms for each respective course of action as well as their attitudes towards the ethical acceptability of these measures. Out of 301 students in total, 241 (80%) participated in the survey; 109 answered the version 1 questionnaire (physical suffering) and 132 answered the version 2 questionnaire (emotional suffering). The majority of students were able to assess the currently prevailing legal norms on palliative sedation (legal) and euthanasia (illegal) correctly (81.2% and 93.7%, respectively), while only a few students knew that physician-assisted suicide, at that point in time, did not constitute a criminal offense. In the case study that was presented, 83.3% of the participants considered palliative sedation and the simultaneous withholding of artificial nutrition and hydration as ethically acceptable, 51.2% considered physician-assisted suicide ethically legitimate, and 19.2% considered euthanasia ethically permissible. When comparing the results of versions 1 and 2, a significant difference could only be seen in the assessment of the legality of palliative sedation: it was

  13. Old, older and too old: age limits for medically assisted fatherhood?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braverman, Andrea Mechanick

    2017-02-01

    How old is too old to be a father? Can you be a little bit older or "old-ish" to be a dad without being considered an "older dad"? At some point, does one simply become too old to be a father? Unless a man requires medical assistance in family building, that answer has historically turned solely on his opportunity to have a willing female partner of reproductive age. As with so many other aspects of family building, assisted reproductive technologies have transformed the possibilities for-and spawned heated debates about-maternal age. Much attention has been given to this contentious topic for potential mothers, with many programs putting age-related limitations in place for their female patients. This article considers whether there should also be limits-and how we should approach that question-for men who require and seek medical assistance to become fathers. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Costs of medically assisted reproduction treatment at specialized fertility clinics in the Danish public health care system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Terkel; Erb, Karin; Rizvanovic, Amra

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To examine the costs to the public health care system of couples in medically assisted reproduction. Design. Longitudinal cohort study of infertile couples initiating medically assisted reproduction treatment. Setting. Specialized public fertility clinics in Denmark. Sample. Seven...... or not – were estimated at 6607€. Costs per live birth of women initiation were 9338€ and 15 040€ for women ≥35 years. Conclusion. The public costs for live births after conception with medically assisted reproduction treatment are relatively modest. The results can be generalized...... hundred and thirty-nine couples having no child at study entry and with data on kind of treatment and live birth (yes/no) for each treatment attempt at the specialized public fertility clinic. Methods. Treatment data for medically assisted reproduction attempts conducted at the public fertility clinics...

  15. A global picture of pharmacy technician and other pharmacy support workforce cadres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koehler, Tamara; Brown, A.

    a b s t r a c t Introduction: Understanding how pharmacy technicians and other pharmacy support workforce cadres assist pharmacists in the healthcare system will facilitate developing health systems with the ability to achieve universal health coverage as it is defined in different country contexts.

  16. ASSESSMENT OF KNOWLEDGE AND ATTITUDE OF COMPUTER ASSISTED LEARNING AMONG MEDICAL STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravish

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: It is going truth globally that the medical course in medical college students are developed via computer mediated learning.1 Utilization of both the range upon online messages options must create study exciting, monetization, and likely as hired. We Hypothesized that survey will facilitate to permit us to be able to blueprint some on this necessary condition among my medical students and also to improve our study facilities a lot of automatically. A set of closed ended problems remained displayed on departmental website, to evaluate their computer skills and talents and their own assessment in computer and internet skills helping in learning. In the beginning months of 1st year MBBS college students 2014-15 batch taken up voluntarily to the study through MCQs questions provided to them in the form of departmental website. A batch of 50 college students surveyed on 3 different days. Although 80% students were confident with the operational skills of the computer, the opinion regarding the usage of computers for web based learning activities was not uniform i.e., 55% of the participants felt uncomfortable with web assisted activity in comparison to paper based activity. However, 49% were of the opinion that paper based activity might become redundant and websites will take over books in the future. Expansion on computer-assisted study requires traditional changes as well as thoughtful strategic planning, resource giving, staff benefits, Edutainment promotion by multidisciplinary working, and efficient quality control.

  17. Natural fertility, infertility and the role of medically assisted reproduction: The knowledge amongst women of reproductive age in North Queensland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Nicole K; Coffey, Anne; Woods, Cindy; de Costa, Caroline

    2018-04-16

    The demand for medically assisted reproduction continues to increase, with more women encountering challenges with fertility. Due to misconceptions and gaps in knowledge, women are often unaware of the risks related to delayed childbearing. Lack of understanding of natural fertility, infertility and the role of medically assisted reproduction can lead to emotional suffering and changes in family plans. To assess the understanding and knowledge that women of reproductive age in North Queensland have regarding natural fertility, infertility and the role of medically assisted reproduction. Data were collected from 120 women (30 nurses, 30 teachers, 30 university students and 30 Technical and Further Education students) via the distribution of a structured questionnaire. Participants were surveyed in person about their personal plans and opinions, knowledge about natural fertility, infertility and medically assisted reproduction, and their preferred source of information. Participants demonstrated suboptimal knowledge levels throughout all sections of the questionnaire, in particular when asked about medically assisted reproduction. When asked to identify their main source of information, 'friends and family' was the most popular choice. Results from this North Queensland study add to the existing international literature, highlighting the widespread nature of the problem. Without adequate understanding of natural fertility, the risks of infertility, and the role and limitations of medically assisted reproduction, women make uninformed decisions. Development of local reproductive health education programs need to be instigated in response. © 2018 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  18. Advanced maternal age: ethical and medical considerations for assisted reproductive technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harrison BJ

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Brittany J Harrison,1 Tara N Hilton,1 Raphaël N Rivière,1 Zachary M Ferraro,1–3 Raywat Deonandan,4 Mark C Walker1–3,51Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada; 2Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, University of Ottawa, The Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, ON, Canada; 3Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, The Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, ON, Canada; 4University of Ottawa Interdisciplinary School of Health Sciences, Ottawa, ON, Canada; 5Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Newborn Care, The Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, ON, CanadaObjectives: This review explores the ethical and medical challenges faced by women of advanced maternal age who decide to have children. Assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs make post-menopausal pregnancy physiologically plausible, however, one must consider the associated physical, psychological, and sociological factors involved.Methods: A quasi-systematic review was conducted in PubMed and Ovid using the key terms post-menopause, pregnancy + MeSH terms [donations, hormone replacement therapy, assisted reproductive technologies, embryo donation, donor artificial insemination, cryopreservation]. Overall, 28 papers encompassing two major themes (ethical and medical were included in the review.Conclusion: There are significant ethical considerations and medical (maternal and fetal complications related to pregnancy in peri- and post-menopausal women. When examining the ethical and sociological perspective, the literature portrays an overall positive attitude toward pregnancy in advanced maternal age. With respect to the medical complications, the general consensus in the evaluated studies suggests that there is greater risk of complication for spontaneous pregnancy when the mother is older (eg, >35 years old. This risk can be mitigated by careful medical screening of the mother and the use of ARTs in healthy women. In these instances, a woman of advanced maternal age who is otherwise healthy can carry a

  19. Pneumoconiosis and exposures of dental laboratory technicians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rom, W.N.; Lockey, J.E.; Lee, J.S.; Kimball, A.C.; Bang, K.M.; Leaman, H.; Johns, R.E. Jr.; Perrota, D.; Gibbons, H.L.

    1984-01-01

    One hundred and seventy-eight dental laboratory technicians and 69 non-exposed controls participated in an epidemiological respiratory study. Eight technicians who had a mean of 28 years grinding nonprecious metal alloys were diagnosed as having a simple pneumoconiosis by chest radiograph. Mean values for per cent predicted FVC and FEV1 were reduced among male nonsmoker technicians compared to male nonsmoker controls; after controlling for age, there was also a reduction in spirometry with increasing work-years. An industrial hygiene survey was conducted in 13 laboratories randomly selected from 42 laboratories stratified by size and type of operation in the Salt Lake City, Utah metropolitan area. Personal exposures to beryllium and cobalt exceeded the Threshold Limit Values (TLVs) in one laboratory. Occupational exposures in dental laboratories need to be controlled to prevent beryllium-related lung disorders as well as simple pneumoconiosis

  20. Successful Nicotine Intake in Medical Assisted Use of E-Cigarettes: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacifici, Roberta; Pichini, Simona; Graziano, Silvia; Pellegrini, Manuela; Massaro, Giuseppina; Beatrice, Fabio

    2015-07-08

    The electronic cigarette (e-cig) has gained popularity as an aid in smoking cessation programs mainly because it maintains the gestures and rituals of tobacco smoking. However, it has been shown in inexperienced e-cig users that ineffective nicotine delivery can cause tobacco craving that could be responsible for unsuccessful smoking reduction/cessation. Moreover, the incorrect use of an e-cig could also led to potential nicotine overdosage and intoxication. Medically assisted training on the proper use of an e-cig plus behavioral support for tobacco dependence could be a pivotal step in avoiding both issues. We performed an eight-month pilot study of adult smokers who started e-cig use after receiving a multi-component medically assisted training program with monitoring of nicotine intake as a biomarker of correct e-cig use. Participants were tested during follow-up for breath carbon monoxide (CO), plasma cotinine and trans-3'-hydroxycotinine, and number of tobacco cigarettes smoked. At the end of the first, fourth, and eighth month of follow-up, 91.1, 73.5, and 76.5% of participants respectively were e-cig users ('only e-cig' and 'dual users'). They showed no significant variation in plasma cotinine and trans-3'-hydroxycotinine with respect to the start of the study when they smoked only tobacco cigarettes, but a significant reduction in breath CO. The proposed medically assisted training program of e-cig use led to a successful nicotine intake, lack of typical cigarette craving and overdosage symptoms and a significant decrease in the biomarker of cigarette combustion products.

  1. Successful Nicotine Intake in Medical Assisted Use of E-Cigarettes: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Pacifici

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The electronic cigarette (e-cig has gained popularity as an aid in smoking cessation programs mainly because it maintains the gestures and rituals of tobacco smoking. However, it has been shown in inexperienced e-cig users that ineffective nicotine delivery can cause tobacco craving that could be responsible for unsuccessful smoking reduction/cessation. Moreover, the incorrect use of an e-cig could also led to potential nicotine overdosage and intoxication. Medically assisted training on the proper use of an e-cig plus behavioral support for tobacco dependence could be a pivotal step in avoiding both issues. We performed an eight-month pilot study of adult smokers who started e-cig use after receiving a multi-component medically assisted training program with monitoring of nicotine intake as a biomarker of correct e-cig use. Participants were tested during follow-up for breath carbon monoxide (CO, plasma cotinine and trans-3’-hydroxycotinine, and number of tobacco cigarettes smoked. At the end of the first, fourth, and eighth month of follow-up, 91.1, 73.5, and 76.5% of participants respectively were e-cig users (‘only e-cig’ and ‘dual users’. They showed no significant variation in plasma cotinine and trans-3’-hydroxycotinine with respect to the start of the study when they smoked only tobacco cigarettes, but a significant reduction in breath CO. The proposed medically assisted training program of e-cig use led to a successful nicotine intake, lack of typical cigarette craving and overdosage symptoms and a significant decrease in the biomarker of cigarette combustion products.

  2. Applications of computer assisted surgery and medical robotics at the ISSSTE, México: preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosso, José Luis; Pohl, Mauricio; Jimenez, Juan Ramon; Valdes, Raquel; Yañez, Oscar; Medina, Veronica; Arambula, Fernando; Padilla, Miguel Angel; Marquez, Jorge; Gastelum, Alfonso; Mosso, Alejo; Frausto, Juan

    2007-01-01

    We present the first results of four projects of a second phase of a Mexican Project Computer Assisted Surgery and Medical Robotics, supported by the Mexican Science and Technology National Council (Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología) under grant SALUD-2002-C01-8181. The projects are being developed by three universities (UNAM, UAM, ITESM) and the goal of this project is to integrate a laboratory in a Hospital of the ISSSTE to give service to surgeons or clinicians of Endoscopic surgeons, urologist, gastrointestinal endoscopist and neurosurgeons.

  3. Technical assistance for Meharry Medical College Energy Efficiency Project. Final project status and technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-05-08

    This report presents the results of a program to provide technical assistance to Meharry Medical College. The purpose of the program is to facilitate Meharry`s effort to finance a campus-wide facility retrofit. The US Department of Energy (USDOE) funded the program through a grant to the Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development (TECD). The University of Memphis-Technology and Energy Services (UM-TES), under contract to TECD, performed program services. The report has three sections: (1) introduction; (2) project definition, financing, and participants; and (3) opportunities for federal participation.

  4. A role for doctors in assisted dying? An analysis of legal regulations and medical professional positions in six European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosshard, G; Broeckaert, B; Clark, D; Materstvedt, L J; Gordijn, B; Müller-Busch, H C

    2008-01-01

    To analyse legislation and medical professional positions concerning the doctor's role in assisted dying in western Europe, and to discuss their implications for doctors. This paper is based on country-specific reports by experts from European countries where assisted dying is legalised (Belgium, The Netherlands), or openly practiced (Switzerland), or where it is illegal (Germany, Norway, UK). Laws on assisted dying in The Netherlands and Belgium are restricted to doctors. In principle, assisted suicide (but not euthanasia) is not illegal in either Germany or Switzerland, but a doctor's participation in Germany would violate the code of professional medical conduct and might contravene of a doctor's legal duty to save life. The Assisted Dying for the Terminally Ill Bill proposed in the UK in 2005 focused on doctors, whereas the Proposal on Assisted Dying of the Norwegian Penal Code Commission minority in 2002 did not. Professional medical organisations in all these countries except The Netherlands maintain the position that medical assistance in dying conflicts with the basic role of doctors. However, in Belgium and Switzerland, and for a time in the UK, these organisations dropped their opposition to new legislation. Today, they regard the issue as primarily a matter for society and politics. This "neutral" stance differs from the official position of the Royal Dutch Medical Association which has played a key role in developing the Dutch practice of euthanasia as a "medical end-of-life decision" since the 1970s. A society moving towards an open approach to assisted dying should carefully identify tasks to assign exclusively to medical doctors, and distinguish those possibly better performed by other professions.

  5. Developing Knowledge Representation in Emergency Medical Assistance by Using Semantic Web Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manica, Heloise; Rocha, Cristiano C.; Todesco, José Leomar; Dantas, M. A. R.

    In this research, a knowledge-based architecture for a mobile emergency medical assistance system is presented. It is based on the France SAMU model and dopts the ontology and mobile computing approaches. The contribution is characterized for providing routines and medical protocol specifications for specialists through the use of their natural language, collecting elements from this language to develop an ontology domain, and using a semantic cache for an enhanced utilization of mobile devices. A prototype of the proposal was implemented in order to support specialists during a day-to-day basis considering knowledge engineering aided by mobile computing techniques. These differentiated characteristics have proved to be successfully at early experiments utilizing the implemented prototype.

  6. Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: Scope of Practice for the Dietetic Technician, Registered.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    The Scope of Practice for the Dietetic Technician, Registered provides standards and tools to guide competence in performing nutrition and dietetics practice. Composed of statutory and individual components, the DTR's scope of practice is determined by state statute and the DTR's education, training, credentialing, and demonstrated and documented competence in practice. The Scope of Practice for the Dietetic Technician, Registered reflects the Academy's position on the DTR scope of practice and the essential technical assistance role of the DTR in providing safe timely person-centered care for the delivery of quality food and nutrition services.

  7. The effectiveness of a computer-assisted instruction programme on communication skills of medical specialists in oncology.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulsman, R.L.; Ros, W.J.G.; Winnubst, J.A.M.; Bensing, J.M.

    2002-01-01

    Although doctor-patient communication is important in health care, medical specialists are generally not well trained in communication skills. Conventional training programmes are generally time consuming and hard to fit into busy working schedules of medical specialists. A computer-assisted

  8. Association Between Workarounds and Medication Administration Errors in Bar Code-Assisted Medication Administration: Protocol of a Multicenter Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Veen, Willem; van den Bemt, Patricia Mla; Bijlsma, Maarten; de Gier, Han J; Taxis, Katja

    2017-04-28

    Information technology-based methods such as bar code-assisted medication administration (BCMA) systems have the potential to reduce medication administration errors (MAEs) in hospitalized patients. In practice, however, systems are often not used as intended, leading to workarounds. Workarounds may result in MAEs that may harm patients. The primary aim is to study the association of workarounds with MAEs in the BCMA process. Second, we will determine the frequency and type of workarounds and MAEs and explore the potential risk factors (determinants) for workarounds. This is a multicenter prospective study on internal medicine and surgical wards of 4 Dutch hospitals using BCMA systems to administer medication. We will include a total of 6000 individual drug administrations using direct observation to collect data. The project was funded in 2014 and enrollment was completed at the end of 2016. Data analysis is under way and the first results are expected to be submitted for publication at the end of 2017. If an association between workarounds and MAEs is established, this information can be used to reduce the frequency of MAEs. Information on determinants of workarounds can aid in a focused approach to reduce workarounds and thus increase patient safety. Netherlands Trial Register NTR4355; http://www.trialregister.nl/trialreg/admin/rctview.asp?TC=4355 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6pqTLxc6i). ©Willem van der Veen, Patricia MLA van den Bemt, Maarten Bijlsma, Han J de Gier, Katja Taxis. Originally published in JMIR Research Protocols (http://www.researchprotocols.org), 28.04.2017.

  9. Experience of a Korean Disaster Medical Assistance Team in Sri Lanka after the South Asia Tsunami

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Young Ho; Shin, Sang Do; Kim, Kyu Seok; Kwon, Woon Yong

    2006-01-01

    On 26 December 2004, a huge tsunami struck the coasts of South Asian countries and it resulted in 29,729 deaths and 16,665 injuries in Sri Lanka. This study characterizes the epidemiology, clinical data and time course of the medical problems seen by a Korean disaster medical assistance team (DMAT) during its deployment in Sri Lanka, from 2 to 8 January 2005. The team consisting of 20 surgical and medical personnel began to provide care 7 days after tsunami in the southern part of Sri Lanka, the Matara and Hambantota districts. During this period, a total of 2,807 patients visited our field clinics with 3,186 chief complaints. Using the triage and refer system, we performed 3,231 clinical examinations and made 3,259 diagnoses. The majority of victims had medical problems (82.4%) rather than injuries (17.6%), and most conditions (92.1%) were mild enough to be discharged after simple management. There were also substantial needs of surgical managements even in the second week following the tsunami. Our study also suggests that effective triage system, self-sufficient preparedness, and close collaboration with local authorities may be the critical points for the foreign DMAT activity. PMID:16479081

  10. Anatomy teaching assistants: facilitating teaching skills for medical students through apprenticeship and mentoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachman, Nirusha; Christensen, Kevin N; Pawlina, Wojciech

    2013-01-01

    Significant increase in the literature regarding "residents as teachers" highlights the importance of providing opportunities and implementing guidelines for continuing medical education and professional growth. While most medical students are enthusiastic about their future role as resident-educators, both students and residents feel uncomfortable teaching their peers due to the lack of necessary skills. However, whilst limited and perhaps only available to select individuals, opportunities for developing good teaching practice do exist and may be identified in courses that offer basic sciences. The Department of Anatomy, College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic offers a teaching assistant (TA) elective experience to third- and fourth-year medical students through integrated apprenticeship and mentoring during the human structure didactic block. This article, aims to describe a curriculum for a TA elective within the framework of a basic science course through mentoring and apprenticeship. Opportunities for medical students to become TAs, process of TAs' recruitment, mentoring and facilitation of teaching and education research skills, a method for providing feedback and debriefing are described. Developing teaching practice based on apprenticeship and mentoring lends to more accountability to both TA's and course faculty by incorporating universal competencies to facilitate the TA experience.

  11. Clinical profile of hospitalized children provided with urgent assistance from a medical emergency team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinney, Sharon; Tibballs, James; Johnston, Linda; Duke, Trevor

    2008-06-01

    The purpose of this work was to describe the frequency, characteristics, and outcomes of critical events and hospitalized children requiring medical emergency team review. We conducted an audit of prospectively collected medical emergency team forms and a retrospective review of medical charts during an 18-month period at a tertiary pediatric hospital in Australia. Critical events were defined as cardiac arrest, endotracheal intubation on the ward, reversal of analgesia or sedation, fluid resuscitation at >/=40 mL/kg, hyponatremia (serum sodium level of /=155 mmol/L), hypoglycemia (glucose level of metabolic acidosis (pH medical emergency team calls (10.6 calls per 1000 hospital admissions and 2.0 calls per 1000 patient-days). Forty-two percent of calls were for infants <1 year old. Preexisting chronic disease was common, with 20% having a chronic underlying neurologic disorder. Forty-four percent of the children were postoperative. The mortality rate of the 172 children was 7.6% in the hospital and 13.4% within 1 year. Thirty-three children had a critical event, with reversal of analgesia being the most common event (n = 11). Postoperative children were more frequently seen in the critical-event group (64% vs 40%). Hospital and 1-year mortality rates were higher for children who had a critical event (16.1% vs 22.6%, respectively) than those who did not (5.7% vs 11.3%). Chronic and complex illnesses were prevalent among children provided with urgent medical assistance from the medical emergency team in a tertiary hospital. Children in the postoperative phase were overrepresented among those with a critical event. A critical event significantly increased the risk of hospital mortality. Greater knowledge of high-risk groups is required to further improve outcomes for hospitalized children.

  12. [Extension of assisted reproductive technologies with donor sperm (ARTD) to non-medical indications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouannet, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    In France as in other countries, more and more single women and lesbian couples wish to become mothers. To carry through their parenting project they may consult a physician in France and often go abroad in order to get Assisted Reproductive Technologies with donor sperm (ARTD). Should ARTD be available to those women in France? The physician has not to take the decision. In such situations ARTD has no medical indication or contraindication. This assisted procreation raises many questions on children development and well-being. The results of studies made in other countries are often reassuring but their methodologies do not allow any conclusion to be drawn and grey areas persist. Therefore it should be necessary to develop a research effort in the field as it recently started in France. Would ARTD access to women without a male partner be legalized, the law should respect the ethical principles of non-payment and anonymity associated with donation of all body components. In any case, it should also allow an efficient medical care to be performed to ensure under the best conditions the well-being of the children and their mothers.

  13. Ethics and regulation of inter-country medically assisted reproduction: a call for action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalev, Carmel; Moreno, Adi; Eyal, Hedva; Leibel, Michal; Schuz, Rhona; Eldar-Geva, Talia

    2016-01-01

    The proliferation of medically assisted reproduction (MAR) for the treatment of infertility has brought benefit to many individuals around the world. But infertility and its treatment continue to be a cause of suffering, and over the past decade, there has been a steady growth in a new global market of inter-country medically assisted reproduction (IMAR) involving 'third-party' individuals acting as surrogate mothers and gamete donors in reproductive collaborations for the benefit of other individuals and couples who wish to have children. At the same time there is evidence of a double standard of care for third-party women involved in IMAR, violations of human rights of children and women, and extreme abuses that are tantamount to reproductive trafficking. This paper is the report of an inter-disciplinary working group of experts who convened in Israel to discuss the complex issues of IMAR. In Israel too IMAR practices have grown rapidly in recent years, mainly because of restrictions on access to domestic surrogacy for same sex couples and a chronically insufficient supply of egg cells for the treatment of couples and singles in need. Drawing upon local expertise, the paper describes documented practices that are harmful, suggests principles of good practice based on an ethic of care, and calls for action at the international, national and professional levels to establish a human rights based system of international governance for IMAR based on three regulatory models: public health monitoring, inter-country adoption, and trafficking in human beings, organs and tissues.

  14. Needs assessment: are Disaster Medical Assistance Teams up for the challenge of a pediatric disaster?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mace, Sharon E; Bern, Andrew I

    2007-09-01

    Pediatric patients are likely victims in a disaster and are more vulnerable in a disaster than adults, yet they have been essentially overlooked in disaster management according to the Pediatric Institute of Medicine Report. We did a needs assessment of Disaster Medical Assistance Teams regarding pediatric issues. Results were as follows: pediatric patients comprise a significant percentage of disaster victims (up to 85% in one disaster), and deficiencies were noted in the curriculum/training/resources. The percentage of time pediatric topics were missing from the curriculum was as follows: airway, 16%; trauma, 33%; disaster triage, 36%; burns, 42%; pain management, 42%; mental health, 45%; patient scenarios, 45%. The percentage of time pediatric equipment was missing was as follows: airway, 16%; intravenous lines, 37%; cervical collars, 38%; medicines, 38%; Broselow tape, 46%; backboards, 62%. Pediatric patients were included in disaster drills 63% of the time. Only 33% had pediatric protocols other than JumpSTART. A need to improve the pediatric components of Disaster Medical Assistance Teams was identified.

  15. Medical conditions among Iraqi refugees in Jordan: data from the United Nations Refugee Assistance Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carone, Marco; Al-Saedy, Huda; Nyce, Sayre; Ghosn, Jad; Mutuerandu, Timothy; Black, Robert E

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine the range and burden of health services utilization among Iraqi refugees receiving health assistance in Jordan, a country of first asylum. Methods Medical conditions, diagnosed in accordance with the tenth revision of the International classification of diseases, were actively monitored from 1January to 31December 2010 using a pilot centralized database in Jordan called the Refugee Assistance Information System. Findings There were 27 166 medical visits by 7642 Iraqi refugees (mean age: 37.4 years; 49% male; 70% from Baghdad; 6% disabled; 3% with a history of torture). Chronic diseases were common, including essential hypertension (22% of refugees), visual disturbances (12%), joint disorders (11%) and type II diabetes mellitus (11%). The most common reasons for seeking acute care were upper respiratory tract infection (11%), supervision of normal pregnancy (4%) and urinary disorders (3%). The conditions requiring the highest number of visits per refugee were cerebrovascular disease (1.46 visits), senile cataract (1.46) and glaucoma (1.44). Sponsored care included 31 747 referrals or consultations to a specialty service, 18 432 drug dispensations, 2307 laboratory studies and 1090 X-rays. The specialties most commonly required were ophthalmology, dentistry, gynaecology and orthopaedic surgery. Conclusion Iraqi refugees in countries of first asylum and resettlement require targeted health services, health education and sustainable prevention and control strategies for predominantly chronic diseases. PMID:22690034

  16. Medical conditions among Iraqi refugees in Jordan: data from the United Nations Refugee Assistance Information System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateen, Farrah J; Carone, Marco; Al-Saedy, Huda; Nyce, Sayre; Ghosn, Jad; Mutuerandu, Timothy; Black, Robert E

    2012-06-01

    To determine the range and burden of health services utilization among Iraqi refugees receiving health assistance in Jordan, a country of first asylum. Medical conditions, diagnosed in accordance with the tenth revision of the International classification of diseases, were actively monitored from 1 January to 31 December 2010 using a pilot centralized database in Jordan called the Refugee Assistance Information System. There were 27 166 medical visits by 7642 Iraqi refugees (mean age: 37.4 years; 49% male; 70% from Baghdad; 6% disabled; 3% with a history of torture). Chronic diseases were common, including essential hypertension (22% of refugees), visual disturbances (12%), joint disorders (11%) and type II diabetes mellitus (11%). The most common reasons for seeking acute care were upper respiratory tract infection (11%), supervision of normal pregnancy (4%) and urinary disorders (3%). The conditions requiring the highest number of visits per refugee were cerebrovascular disease (1.46 visits), senile cataract (1.46) and glaucoma (1.44). Sponsored care included 31 747 referrals or consultations to a specialty service, 18 432 drug dispensations, 2307 laboratory studies and 1090 X-rays. The specialties most commonly required were ophthalmology, dentistry, gynaecology and orthopaedic surgery. Iraqi refugees in countries of first asylum and resettlement require targeted health services, health education and sustainable prevention and control strategies for predominantly chronic diseases.

  17. Engineering and Technician Enrollments--Fall 1969.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engineers Joint Council, New York, NY. Engineering Manpower Commission.

    Engineering and technician enrollments for Fall 1969 are reported for associate and bachelor's degree programs in engineering technology and industrial technology, and for engineering degrees at the bachelor's, master's, and doctor's levels. Statistical tables were produced by a computer analysis of data from 269 engineering schools and 558 other…

  18. Assisted Living Facilities, Locations of Assisted Living Facilities identifed visually and placed on the Medical Multi-Hazard Mitigation layer., Published in 2006, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, Noble County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Assisted Living Facilities dataset current as of 2006. Locations of Assisted Living Facilities identifed visually and placed on the Medical Multi-Hazard Mitigation...

  19. Development and clinical evaluation of medical robot assisted photodynamic therapy of port wine stains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xing-tao; Duan, Xing-guang; Huang, Qiang; Bian, Gui-bin; Zhao, Hong-hua; Huang, Nai-yan; Gu, Ying; Tang, Xiao-ying

    2011-03-01

    Port wine stains (PWS) are a kind of skin disease for which photodynamic therapy (PDT) has already achieved good results. With manual operation of clinical PDT, the laser density is uneven and laser irradiation of the lesion is arbitrary and non-uniform. In addition, lengthy manual operation tires doctors; thus a robot system has been developed to assist them. First, a novel medical manipulator consisting of five passive joints (robot arm) and two active joints (robot wrist) was developed to automatically improve the uniformity of laser irradiation. Second, image processing of the lesion was introduced. Third, kinematics and path planning of the robot were analysed, and safety precautions were introduced. Then, accuracy tests of the robot wrist and robot system were conducted separately before clinical application. Finally, a total of 50 PWS cases were treated using the robot system. The clinical outcomes and comparison of non-parametric values were employed to evaluate the robot system. The accuracies of the robot wrist and robot system were shown to meet the requirements of clinical PDT treatment. The robot system performed successfully in 50 PWS cases. Doctors can devote more energy to clinical judgments during treatment with the assistance of the robot system. All the PWS have shown different degrees of improvement. The results show that the robot system is useful in assisting doctors for the PDT treatment of PWS. The experiments show the feasibility and usefulness of the robot system in assisting doctors giving PDT treatment for PWS. The robot system can lighten the load on doctors and improve the therapeutic effect. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Use of a patient assistant to facilitate medical visits for Latino patients with low health literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarfaty, Mona; Turner, Christine Hurley; Damotta, Elizabeth

    2005-08-01

    In the face of limited resources, evidence-based prioritization is needed to maximize the reach of health services for the underserved. A medical referral project that referred low income uninsured individuals to discounted appointments with office-based doctors found that some Latino patients had difficulty in taking advantage of these appointments. These individuals appeared to face barriers beyond the cultural and linguistic barriers faced by most patients in the project. One additional bilingual staff person, a Patient Assistant, was hired to facilitate doctor visits by these patients. The Patient Assistant performed the duties of a navigator, trouble shooter, and interpreter--and assisted with communications. The project staff derived a screening question to encourage patients to identify themselves as those who would need the help of the Patient Assistant. These patients were subsequently questioned in a waiting room survey designed to characterize them. The characteristics of these patients were compared with a comparison group of project patients. The target group and the comparison group differed in their levels of education. Sixty percent of the target group had less than 4 years of schooling compared to 13% of the comparison group. The target group was comprised entirely of immigrants from South and Central America. This report underscores the conclusions of the recent report of the Institute of Medicine on the problem of health literacy--patients' ability to understand and act in their own interest--and highlights the needs of Latin American immigrants who are burdened by cultural and linguistic barriers, low health literacy, and minimal education.

  1. An in-depth examination into pharmacy technician worklife through an organizational behavior framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desselle, Shane P

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacy technicians are a vital part of the health care workforce. Little is known about perceptions of their own work environment that would engender more effective recruitment, retention, and management strategies by pharmacists and employers. The purpose of this study was to gain a greater understanding of certified pharmacy technician worklife. Specific objectives included the identification of themes of worklife phenomena to assist with the development of appropriate responses by other pharmacy stakeholders and to ascertain the contribution of various factors engendering or discouraging career commitment of pharmacy technicians. Semi-structured in-depth interviews were carried out with a convenience sample of pharmacy technicians in one U.S. state, who varied by their work settings and level of experience. The interview guide and corresponding participant responses were framed from around an organizational cultural basis rooted in organizational behavior theory. Notes from the interviews were analyzed thematically using directed content analysis. Four primary themes emerged, including: career impetus, job responsibilities, quality of work life, and equitable partnership. The data revealed pharmacy technicians' need for self-actualization and recognition of the value they bring to the organization. The participants identified primary responsibilities that contribute to their sense of worth and those that if not managed adequately potentially detract from their well-being and effectiveness. Findings in regard to rate of pay corroborate previous work on wages as both an intrinsic and extrinsic motivator. Pharmacy technicians seek equity among each other (their peers) and in a mutually beneficial relationship with their employing organization. This study provides the impetus for interventions and further study that should serve to enhance pharmacy technician effectiveness, quality of work life, and longevity in an emerging profession. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier

  2. Are Dutch patients willing to be seen by a physician assistant instead of a medical doctor?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuilman Luppo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The employment of physician assistants (PAs is a strategy to improve access to care. Since the new millennium, a handful of countries have turned to PAs as a means to bridge the growing gap between the supply and demand of medical services. However, little is known about this new workforce entity from the patient’s perspective. The objective of this study was to assess the willingness of Dutch patients to be treated by a PA or a medical doctor (MD under various time constraints and semi-urgent medical scenarios. Methods A total of 450 Dutch adults were recruited to act as surrogate patients. A convenience sample was drawn from patients in a medical office waiting room in a general hospital awaiting their appointments. Each participant was screened to be naive as to what a PA and a nurse practitioner are and then read a definition of a PA and an MD. One of three medical scenarios was assigned to the participants in a patterned 1-2-3 strategy. Patients were required to make a trade-off decision of being seen after 1 hour by a PA or after 4 hours by a doctor. This forced-choice method continued with the same patient two more times with 30 minutes and 4 hours and another one of 2 hours versus 4 hours for the PA and MD, respectively. Results Surrogate patients chose the PA over the MD 96 % to 98 % of the time (depending on the scenario. No differences emerged when analysed by gender, age, or parenthood status. Conclusion Willingness to be seen by a PA was tested a priori to determine whether surrogate Dutch patients would welcome this new health-care provider. The findings suggest that employing PAs, at least in concept, may be an acceptable strategy for improving access to care with this population.

  3. Comparing Burnout Across Emergency Physicians, Nurses, Technicians, and Health Information Technicians Working for the Same Organization

    OpenAIRE

    Schooley, Benjamin; Hikmet, Neset; Tarcan, Menderes; Yorgancioglu, Gamze

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Studies on the topic of burnout measure the effects of emotional exhaustion (EE), depersonalization (DP) (negative or cynical attitudes toward work), and reduced sense of personal accomplishment (PA). While the prevalence of burnout in practicing emergency medicine (EM) professionals has been studied, little is known of the prevalence and factors across physicians, nurses, technicians, and health information technicians working for the same institution. The aim of this study was to a...

  4. Disaster medical assistance teams after earthquakes in iran: propose a localized model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Mohsen; Salehnia, M Hossein

    2013-09-01

    In the past 10 years, 13 fatal earthquakes have occurred in Iran and led to death of 30,000 people whom most of them were killed in the earlier hours of the disaster. Disaster Medical Assistance Teams are groups of trained medical and non-medical personnel with various combinations that on the optimal conditions are deployed just within 8 hours of notification and are able to work self-sufficiently for at least 72 hours without any outside help and can treat up to 250 patients per day. Currently there are no such rapid-response teams in case of unexpected events in Iran, which causes the responses to such disasters, not to be organized or practiced. For instance, there were many rescue forces in 2003 Bam earthquake but not enough skilled ones to cope with; consequently they themselves became a problem in crisis management instead of solving the problem. IN THIS STUDY, WE HAVE INVESTIGATED WHICH OF THE FOLLOWING IS MORE EFFICIENT: changing the size and combination of the team depending on the type of disaster and environmental conditions or, determine a fixed combination team. Totally, several reasons for dynamic combination and size of the teams are presented. later, earthquake disaster is divided into 3 phases in terms of time including the acute phase (1(st) to 4(th) day after disaster), the sub-acute phase (5(th) to 14(th)day) and the recovery phase (after the 14(th) day), and finally the appropriate team combinations in every phases are offered. Regarding to introduction and considering the existing statistics in different legal Iranian resources and by division of the earthquake disaster to three phases including acute phase (1st to the 4th day after disaster), sub-acute phase (5th to 14th day) and recovery phase (after the 14th day). The countries pioneer in disaster medical assistance teams, now are inclined to deploy different teams consistent with each kind of disasters or with other effective components on the combination of system. Every disaster has its

  5. Medical Infrared Thermography assistance in the surgical treatment of axillary Hidradenitis Suppurativa: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polidori, G; Renard, Y; Lorimier, S; Pron, H; Derruau, S; Taiar, R

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this case report is to highlight for the first time the way Medical Infrared Thermography can be a helpful tool to assist the surgeon in the surgical treatment of Hidradenitis Suppurativa inflammatory disease. A 36-year-old man with a 7-year history of Hidradenitis Suppurativa presented inflammatory nodules in the left axilla area corresponding to Hurley stage II. Choice is made to surgically treat this patient using a wide excision protocol combined with a postoperative second intention healing. For the study purpose, an IR FLIR SC620 camera (FLIR Systems, Wilsonville, OR), having a high resolution pixel detector of 640×480 pixels for greater accuracy and higher resolution, has been used. For the first time in the literature, this case report on HS disease supports the idea that real-time medical infrared thermography may be helpful in establishing the true extent of disease preoperatively in the surgical room and in a similar manner, that this technique allows the surgeon to ensure all diseased lesions are removed during surgery. At least, medical infrared thermography seems to be a powerful tool to control the final wide surgical wound, in order to minimize recurrence risk of such a disease. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Job Analysis Techniques for Restructuring Health Manpower Education and Training in the Navy Medical Department. Attachment 4. Clinic QPCB Task Sort for Clinical Physician Assistants--Dermatology, ENT, Opththalmology, Orthopedics, and Urology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technomics, Inc., McLean, VA.

    This publication is Attachment 4 of a set of 16 computer listed QPCB task sorts, by career level, for the entire Hospital Corps and Dental Technician fields. Statistical data are presented in tabular form for a detailed listing of job duties for clinical physician assistants. (BT)

  7. Physician-assisted suicide, euthanasia and palliative sedation: attitudes and knowledge of medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anneser, Johanna

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: In November 2015, the German Federal Parliament voted on a new legal regulation regarding assisted suicide. It was decided to amend the German Criminal Code so that any “regular, repetitive offer” (even on a non-profit basis of assistance in suicide would now be considered a punishable offense. On July 2, 2015, a date which happened to be accompanied by great media interest in that it was the day that the first draft of said law was presented to Parliament, we surveyed 4th year medical students at the Technical University Munich on “physician-assisted suicide,” “euthanasia” and “palliative sedation,” based on a fictitious case vignette study. Method: The vignette study described two versions of a case in which a patient suffered from a nasopharyngeal carcinoma (physical suffering subjectively perceived as being unbearable vs. emotional suffering. The students were asked about the current legal norms for each respective course of action as well as their attitudes towards the ethical acceptability of these measures.Results: Out of 301 students in total, 241 (80% participated in the survey; 109 answered the version 1 questionnaire (physical suffering and 132 answered the version 2 questionnaire (emotional suffering. The majority of students were able to assess the currently prevailing legal norms on palliative sedation (legal and euthanasia (illegal correctly (81.2% and 93.7%, respectively, while only a few students knew that physician-assisted suicide, at that point in time, did not constitute a criminal offense. In the case study that was presented, 83.3% of the participants considered palliative sedation and the simultaneous withholding of artificial nutrition and hydration as ethically acceptable, 51.2% considered physician-assisted suicide ethically legitimate, and 19.2% considered euthanasia ethically permissible. When comparing the results of versions 1 and 2, a significant difference could only be seen in the

  8. Validation of an Improved Computer-Assisted Technique for Mining Free-Text Electronic Medical Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duz, Marco; Marshall, John F; Parkin, Tim

    2017-06-29

    The use of electronic medical records (EMRs) offers opportunity for clinical epidemiological research. With large EMR databases, automated analysis processes are necessary but require thorough validation before they can be routinely used. The aim of this study was to validate a computer-assisted technique using commercially available content analysis software (SimStat-WordStat v.6 (SS/WS), Provalis Research) for mining free-text EMRs. The dataset used for the validation process included life-long EMRs from 335 patients (17,563 rows of data), selected at random from a larger dataset (141,543 patients, ~2.6 million rows of data) and obtained from 10 equine veterinary practices in the United Kingdom. The ability of the computer-assisted technique to detect rows of data (cases) of colic, renal failure, right dorsal colitis, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use in the population was compared with manual classification. The first step of the computer-assisted analysis process was the definition of inclusion dictionaries to identify cases, including terms identifying a condition of interest. Words in inclusion dictionaries were selected from the list of all words in the dataset obtained in SS/WS. The second step consisted of defining an exclusion dictionary, including combinations of words to remove cases erroneously classified by the inclusion dictionary alone. The third step was the definition of a reinclusion dictionary to reinclude cases that had been erroneously classified by the exclusion dictionary. Finally, cases obtained by the exclusion dictionary were removed from cases obtained by the inclusion dictionary, and cases from the reinclusion dictionary were subsequently reincluded using Rv3.0.2 (R Foundation for Statistical Computing, Vienna, Austria). Manual analysis was performed as a separate process by a single experienced clinician reading through the dataset once and classifying each row of data based on the interpretation of the free

  9. Understanding Transgender and Medically Assisted Gender Transition: Feminism as a Critical Resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Jamie Lindemann

    2016-11-01

    Feminism has fought the trivialization of women's experiences, championed women's security, and insisted on respect for women's choices. In so doing, feminism has developed important perspectives on the complicated connections between what gender means as it plays itself in people's lives, and the inequalities of power and authority that structure much of human experience. Here, I put a few of these perspectives into contact with an issue where the interactions of gender and power are squarely in play: medicine's role in assisting gender transitioning generally and, specifically, the enduring controversy between medicine and many transgender people about the pathologization of transgender and the role of clinicians as gatekeepers to gender-transition interventions. © 2016 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.

  10. Peer-assisted learning (PAL) in undergraduate medical education: An overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann-Werner, Anne; Gramer, Regina; Erschens, Rebecca; Nikendei, Christoph; Wosnik, Annette; Griewatz, Jan; Zipfel, Stephan; Junne, Florian

    2017-04-01

    Peer-assisted learning (PAL) has a long tradition and is nowadays implemented in the curricula of most medical faculties. Besides traditional areas of application like problem-based learning, anatomy, or CPR, more and more departments and institutes have established PAL as part of their everyday teaching. This narrative review provides some background information and basic definitions of PAL. It offers an overview on features and determinants as well as underlying learning theories and developments in PAL. In addition, motives for implementation are highlighted followed by a comparison of advantages and disadvantages. After outlining aspects of quality management including the training of tutors and the evaluation and acceptance of PAL formats, this review concludes with an outlook on how PAL can proceed into the future and where further research is necessary. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  11. FIFA Women's World Cup 2011: pre-competition medical assessment of female referees and assistant referees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Dagmar I; Bizzini, Mario; Feddermann, Nina; Junge, Astrid; Dvorak, Jiri

    2013-02-01

    Precompetition screening was implemented for male referees during the 2010 Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA) Word Cup. In contrast, female football referees have been neglected in this respect although they experience similar physical work loads compared to male referees. The standardised football-specific pre-competition medical assessment (PCMA) was performed in 51 referees and assistant referees selected for the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup. Family history for sudden cardiac death (SCD) was positive in four referees (7.8%), but cardiac examinations did not reveal any pathological findings. Training-unrelated ECG changes were identified in three referees (5.9%), all without correlates in echocardiography or clinical examination. Most common echocardiography findings (66.6%, n=34) were asymptomatic tricuspid and mitral regurgitations. During the present screening, no elite female referee was identified being at risk for SCD, and no referee had to be excluded from participating in the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup.

  12. Medical image computing and computer-assisted intervention - MICCAI 2006. Pt. 1. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, R. [Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark). Informatics and Mathematical Modelling; Nielsen, M. [IT Univ. of Copenhagen (Denmark); Sporring, J. (eds.) [Copenhagen Univ. (Denmark). Dept. of Computer Science

    2006-07-01

    The two-volume set LNCS 4190 and LNCS 4191 constitute the refereed proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Medical Image Computing and Computer-Assisted Intervention, MICCAI 2006, held in Copenhagen, Denmark in October 2006. The program committee carefully selected 39 revised full papers and 193 revised poster papers from 578 submissions for presentation in two volumes, based on a rigorous peer reviews. The first volume includes 114 contributions related to bone shape analysis, robotics and tracking, segmentation, analysis of diffusion tensor MRI, shape analysis and morphometry, simulation and interaction, robotics and intervention, cardio-vascular applications, image analysis in oncology, brain atlases and segmentation, cardiac motion analysis, clinical applications, and registration. The second volume collects 118 papers related to segmentation, validation and quantitative image analysis, brain image processing, motion in image formation, image guided clinical applications, registration, as well as brain analysis and registration. (orig.)

  13. Medical image computing and computer-assisted intervention - MICCAI 2006. Pt. 2. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, R. [Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark). Informatics and Mathematical Modelling; Nielsen, M. [IT Univ. of Copenhagen (Denmark); Sporring, J. (eds.) [Copenhagen Univ. (Denmark). Dept. of Computer Science

    2006-07-01

    The two-volume set LNCS 4190 and LNCS 4191 constitute the refereed proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Medical Image Computing and Computer-Assisted Intervention, MICCAI 2006, held in Copenhagen, Denmark in October 2006. The program committee carefully selected 39 revised full papers and 193 revised poster papers from 578 submissions for presentation in two volumes, based on a rigorous peer reviews. The first volume includes 114 contributions related to bone shape analysis, robotics and tracking, segmentation, analysis of diffusion tensor MRI, shape analysis and morphometry, simulation and interaction, robotics and intervention, cardio-vascular applications, image analysis in oncology, brain atlases and segmentation, cardiac motion analysis, clinical applications, and registration. The second volume collects 118 papers related to segmentation, validation and quantitative image analysis, brain image processing, motion in image formation, image guided clinical applications, registration, as well as brain analysis and registration. (orig.)

  14. Medical image computing and computer-assisted intervention - MICCAI 2006. Pt. 2. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, R.; Sporring, J.

    2006-01-01

    The two-volume set LNCS 4190 and LNCS 4191 constitute the refereed proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Medical Image Computing and Computer-Assisted Intervention, MICCAI 2006, held in Copenhagen, Denmark in October 2006. The program committee carefully selected 39 revised full papers and 193 revised poster papers from 578 submissions for presentation in two volumes, based on a rigorous peer reviews. The first volume includes 114 contributions related to bone shape analysis, robotics and tracking, segmentation, analysis of diffusion tensor MRI, shape analysis and morphometry, simulation and interaction, robotics and intervention, cardio-vascular applications, image analysis in oncology, brain atlases and segmentation, cardiac motion analysis, clinical applications, and registration. The second volume collects 118 papers related to segmentation, validation and quantitative image analysis, brain image processing, motion in image formation, image guided clinical applications, registration, as well as brain analysis and registration. (orig.)

  15. Medical image computing and computer-assisted intervention - MICCAI 2006. Pt. 1. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, R.; Sporring, J.

    2006-01-01

    The two-volume set LNCS 4190 and LNCS 4191 constitute the refereed proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Medical Image Computing and Computer-Assisted Intervention, MICCAI 2006, held in Copenhagen, Denmark in October 2006. The program committee carefully selected 39 revised full papers and 193 revised poster papers from 578 submissions for presentation in two volumes, based on a rigorous peer reviews. The first volume includes 114 contributions related to bone shape analysis, robotics and tracking, segmentation, analysis of diffusion tensor MRI, shape analysis and morphometry, simulation and interaction, robotics and intervention, cardio-vascular applications, image analysis in oncology, brain atlases and segmentation, cardiac motion analysis, clinical applications, and registration. The second volume collects 118 papers related to segmentation, validation and quantitative image analysis, brain image processing, motion in image formation, image guided clinical applications, registration, as well as brain analysis and registration. (orig.)

  16. Medication Assisted Treatment Research with Criminal Justice Populations: Challenges of Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Michael S.; Kinlock, Timothy W.; Miller, Patrice M.

    2011-01-01

    Creating, implementing and evaluating substance abuse interventions, especially medication-assisted treatments, for prisoners, parolees, and probationers with histories of heroin addiction is an especially challenging endeavor because of the difficulty in coordinating and achieving cooperation among diverse criminal justice, substance abuse treatment, research, and social service agencies, each with its own priorities and agenda. In addition, there are special rules that must be followed when conducting research with criminal justice-involved populations, particularly prisoners. The following case studies will explore the authors’ experience of over 10 years conducting pharmacotherapy research using methadone, buprenorphine, and naltrexone with criminal justice populations. The major obstacles and how they were overcome are presented. Finally, recommendations are provided with regard to implementing and conducting research with criminal justice populations. PMID:22086665

  17. Medication-assisted treatment research with criminal justice populations: challenges of implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Michael S; Kinlock, Timothy W; Miller, Patrice M

    2011-01-01

    Creating, implementing and evaluating substance abuse interventions, especially medication-assisted treatments, for prisoners, parolees, and probationers with histories of heroin addiction is an especially challenging endeavor because of the difficulty in coordinating and achieving cooperation among diverse criminal justice, substance abuse treatment, research, and social service agencies, each with its own priorities and agenda. In addition, there are special rules that must be followed when conducting research with criminal justice-involved populations, particularly prisoners. The following case studies will explore the authors' experience of over 10 years conducting pharmacotherapy research using methadone, buprenorphine, and naltrexone with criminal justice populations. The major obstacles and how they were overcome are presented. Finally, recommendations are provided with regard to implementing and conducting research with criminal justice populations. 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Suffering and medicalization at the end of life: The case of physician-assisted dying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsoho, Hadi; Fishman, Jennifer R; Wright, David Kenneth; Macdonald, Mary Ellen

    2016-12-01

    'Suffering' is a central discursive trope for the right-to-die movement. In this article, we ask how proponents of physician-assisted dying (PAD) articulate suffering with the role of medicine at the end of life within the context of a decriminalization and legalization debate. We draw upon empirical data from our study of Carter v. Canada, the landmark court case that decriminalized PAD in Canada in 2015. We conducted in-depth interviews with 42 key participants of the case and collected over 4000 pages of legal documents generated by the case. In our analysis of the data, we show the different ways proponents construct relationships between suffering, mainstream curative medicine, palliative care, and assisted dying. Proponents see curative medicine as complicit in the production of suffering at the end of life; they lament a cultural context wherein life-prolongation is the moral imperative of physicians who are paternalistic and death-denying. Proponents further limit palliative care's ability to alleviate suffering at the end of life and even go so far as to claim that in some instances, palliative care produces suffering. Proponents' articulation of suffering with both mainstream medicine and palliative care might suggest an outright rejection of a place for medicine at the end of life. We further find, however, that proponents insist on the involvement of physicians in assisted dying. Proponents emphasize how a request for PAD can set in motion an interactive therapeutic process that alleviates suffering at the end of life. We argue that the proponents' articulation of suffering with the role of medicine at the end of life should be understood as a discourse through which one configuration of end-of-life care comes to be accepted and another rejected, a discourse that ultimately does not challenge, but makes productive use of the larger framework of the medicalization of dying. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Patterns of relating between physicians and medical assistants in small family medicine offices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder, Nancy C; Jacobson, C Jeffrey; Bolon, Shannon K; Fixler, Joseph; Pallerla, Harini; Busick, Christina; Gerrety, Erica; Kinney, Dee; Regan, Saundra; Pugnale, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The clinician-colleague relationship is a cornerstone of relationship-centered care (RCC); in small family medicine offices, the clinician-medical assistant (MA) relationship is especially important. We sought to better understand the relationship between MA roles and the clinician-MA relationship within the RCC framework. We conducted an ethnographic study of 5 small family medicine offices (having relationships. MA career motivations comprised interest in health care, easy training/workload, and customer service orientation. Clinician-MA relationships were influenced by how MAs and clinicians respond to their perceptions of MA clinical competence (illustrated predominantly by comparing MAs with nurses) and organizational structure. We propose a model, trust and verify, to describe the structure of the clinician-MA relationship. This model is informed by clinicians' roles in hiring and managing MAs and the social familiarity of MAs and clinicians. Within the RCC framework, these findings can be seen as previously undefined constraints and freedoms in what is known as the Complex Responsive Process of Relating between clinicians and MAs. Improved understanding of clinician-MA relationships will allow a better appreciation of how clinicians and MAs function in family medicine teams. Our findings may assist small offices undergoing practice transformation and guide future research to improve the education, training, and use of MAs in the family medicine setting.

  20. [Literature review and state of the art of the Italian law on medically assisted reproduction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, G; Delbon, P; Conti, A; Sirignano, A

    2015-01-01

    This article analyzes the current situation of medically assisted reproduction in Italy after the promulgation of Law 40 in 2004. This law is actually completely different from the origin version. The controversial points like reproduction for couples who bear genetic diseases, prohibition of heterologous fertilization, cryoconservation of the embryos, obligation to perform just one and contemporaneous implant of all the embryos produced, are today definitively erased. This new situation is due to the jurisprudence of the Italian Courts but especially to the changes introduced by the European Court of Human Rights and by the questions of constitutionality raised by some Italian Courts. After analysis of the legislation, the views of various authors are compared, and the weaknesses and strong points of the law are considered from the point of view of legal medicine, science and bioethics. After ten years of operation of this law Italy has returned to a situation that existed before the law. In fact the old law was only full of prohibitions. Now is possible to do heterologous fertilization and this article photographs the current situation of hospitals for assisted procreation in Italy. The work also comments on procreative tourism, a direct consequence of this law, and on the status of women, who must be the subject and not the object of the legislation.

  1. MANAGEMENT OF NURSING ASSISTANCE: CASE STUDY IN A MEDICAL CLINIC IN A UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Gonçalves Rodrigues

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available It was aimed to show a case study about the management of nursing assistance. This paper is descriptive, a case study. As its source of study, the medical clinic in a school-hospital in Montes Claros, Minas Gerais was chosen. For the management, tools as Matrix SWOT, 5W2H and Protocol Forms of Risk Prevention were used in the management of caring in nursing. The tools and the results reached through the tools were contextualized in the light of literature, in which highlights the relevance of these tools. Through its use, it is possible to promote improvements in the given assistance to clients, once it shows opportunities, threats, strengths, weaknesses and the risk analysis in which the people involved in the care are exposed. In this way, it is needed that the tools are more and more utilized in the daily routine of the nursing work, and that this joins forces with the leadership and the management of care.

  2. Regulating Lesbian Motherhood: Gender, Sexuality and Medically Assisted Reproduction in Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tânia Cristina Machado

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This article analyses juridical discourses about Medically Assisted Reproduction (MAR in Portugal, focusing specifically on the access of lesbians to this type of intervention. Empirical data refer to an exploratory research that combined the analysis of legislation with non-directive interviews to five judges from Family and Juvenile Courts of Law of the Northern Region of Portugal. One argues that the representation of motherhood present in the law reinforces and reproduces normative sexuality and femininity while simultaneously justifies the exclusion of lesbians from MAR. As such, although Portuguese legislation emerges as a mechanism of partial deregulation of the gender regime since it appears to weaken the practical and causal association between sexuality and procreation, in fact, it ends up reinforcing dominant ideas of femininity and family. As for the judges who were interviewed, their representations of motherhood are broad enough to encompass medically assisted motherhood and/or motherhood accomplished within a lesbian couple. This is achieved through a process of normalisation of the lesbian and/or of lesbian motherhood, which may resort to five different assumptions: (i parenthood as a desire inherent to every human being; (ii motherhood as a defining element of femininity; (iii motherhood as a project framed by a stable conjugal relationship; (iv lesbian motherhood as something that can be accomplished through “natural” means; (v parenthood as a mechanism of social reproduction of the gender regime. These assumptions are differently combined and support different positions regarding lesbian motherhood: although some judges seem to concur with the preservation of heteronormativity, most favour legal changes to encompass other models of sexuality and family.

  3. Job Satisfaction among Turkish Business Aviation Technicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tevfik Uyar

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The most applicable models in safety management put the human factors, employers’ attitudes and behaviors at the center. This study reports an investigation of job satisfaction among business aviation technicians. A demographic information form and Job Satisfaction Survey (JSS were used to collect data from 44 individuals. Data was analyzed using ANOVA and Student’s t-test. Our results show that there is significant difference in total job satisfaction levels with regard to marital status while other personal factors are not related to the total job satisfaction levels. However several sub dimensions of job satisfaction are affected by the workers’ military or civilian origin, their training background, types of companies they work in or their license category. No difference is found in age and position groups. Secondly, study shows that technicians are the most satisfied from the nature of their work, while they are the least satisfied by operational procedures.

  4. "Learning about Your Residents": How Assisted Living Residence Medication Aides Decide to Administer Pro Re Nata Medications to Persons with Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carder, Paula C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This study identified how unlicensed staff members decide to administer medications prescribed pro re nata (PRN) to residents of assisted living (AL) settings designated for persons with dementia. Theories of knowledge, including explicit and implicit knowledge, discretion, and judgment, guided the analysis. Design and Methods: Data were…

  5. A busca da graduação em enfermagem como opção dos técnicos e auxiliares de enfermagem La búsqueda del pre grado en enfermería como opción de los técnicos y auxiliares de enfermería Undergratuate nursing education as an option for nursing technicians and assistants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neuma Vital Julca Medina

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo teve como objetivo apreender os motivos que levam técnicos e auxiliares de enfermagem a buscarem a graduação nesta profissão. Realizado em um hospital escola, na cidade de São Paulo, sob a perspectiva da pesquisa qualitativa e como metodologia, a História Oral Temática e a Análise Categorial Temática. Deste trabalho participaram onze colaboradores: três técnicas de enfermagem e oito auxiliares de enfermagem.Este estudio tuvo como objetivo, conocer los motivos que influenciaron al técnico y auxiliar de enfermería a graduarse, a nivel superior, en su misma profesión. Fue realizado en un hospital docente de la ciudad de San Pablo, bajo la perspectiva de la investigación cualitativa y como metodología, la historia oral temática y el análisis de categoría temática. Paticiparon once colaboradores, siendo tres técnicos de enfermería y ocho auxiliares de enfermería.The aim of this study was to understand the reasons that lead both nursing technicians and assistants to enter undergraduate nursing programs. This study was carried out in a teaching hospital in the city of Sao Paulo, under a qualitative research perspective, and the methodologies adopted were the Thematic Oral History and the Thematic Categorical Analysis. There were eleven participants: three nursing technicians and eight nursing assistants.

  6. Productivity assessment of physician assistants and nurse practitioners in oncology in an academic medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moote, Marc; Nelson, Ron; Veltkamp, Robin; Campbell, Darrell

    2012-05-01

    Demand for oncologists will increase dramatically over the next 15 years. Physician assistants (PAs) and Nurse practitioners (NPs) have been identified as one solution to meet the projected shortages in oncology. It has previously been reported that 56% of oncologists work with PAs and NPs, more than two thirds of whom believe it benefits their practice with some noted productivity advantages. The purpose of this study was to quantify the productivity of PAs and NPs working in oncology in an academic medical center. A 2-week self-reported time study was performed in a single large academic medical center. Services were categorized as billable, bundled, care facilitation, administrative, and other based on time spent performing services in each category. Current procedural terminology codes were used to determine the economic value of services provided. A total of 54 PAs and NPs were included in the final analysis. PAs and NPs reported similar clinical activities. Overall, there was high variability noted in terms of productivity, notably with PA/NP direct billable revenue. Opportunities were identified to improve utilization of oncology PAs and NPs, with suggestions for future research related to PA and NP productivity tracking. Productivity measurement for PAs and NPs can be challenging. To our knowledge, this is the first study that quantifies PA and NP productivity in oncology according to known economic indicators such as charges and work relative value units.

  7. Medication-assisted treatment for opioid use disorders in correctional settings: an ethics review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Ariel S; Peters, Roger H

    2014-11-01

    Opioid use disorders are a pressing health concern that disproportionately impacts the United States (U.S.) correctional population. Medication-assisted treatment (MAT) is an evidence-based standard of care for opioid use disorders. Despite its availability in the community, MAT and MAT medications (buprenorphine and methadone) are largely unavailable and/or inaccessible for the treatment of opioid use disorders in U.S. prisons and jails. Given that the ethical principles have served as justification for limiting access to MAT on "moral" grounds, this article examines the implications of current correctional policies through the ethical principles of: (1) beneficence/non-maleficence; (2) distributive justice (equivalence-of-care); and (3) autonomy (informed consent). Special attention is paid to the five components of informed consent (capacity, disclosure, understanding, voluntariness, and access), as this facet has been used most often to justify policies that limit access to MAT in the past. Findings highlight that these core ethical principles support the adoption of correctional policies that include MAT. Furthermore, our findings demonstrate that autonomy is maximized during the informed consent process when MAT is available as a treatment option. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Clinical outcome of elderly peritoneal dialysis patients with assisted care in a single medical centre: a 25 year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chi-Hung; Shu, Kuo-Hsiung; Chuang, Ya-Wen; Huang, Shih-Ting; Chou, Ming-Chih; Chang, Horng-Rong

    2013-06-01

    Peritoneal dialysis (PD) is an alternative treatment for elderly patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). In Taiwan, non-professional personnel are employed to provide assisted care for elderly patients. Whether assisted care is appropriate for elderly patients is unknown. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the outcomes of assisted care in a single centre. This is a retrospective cohort study in a single medical centre. The outcomes were derived from the assessment of patient survival, technique survival and peritonitis incidence between self-care patients and assisted-care patients. From 1984 to 2010, there were 138 elderly PD patients at Taichung Veterans General Hospital, of which 70% were assisted-care patients and 30% self-care patients. The mean duration of PD survival was 49.2 months in self-care patients, which was significantly longer than the 17.0 months of assisted-care patients (P self-care patients had a lower risk in both patient survival (Hazard Ratio 0.15; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.2-0.94, P care patients. Type of assistance was not a risk factor for PD-related peritonitis. Our elderly assisted care had patients had a poorer survival and technique survival rates than those of the self-care patients. We argue that this is because early recognition of medical deterioration and early medical intervention are necessary for a better outcome for elderly PD patients. © 2013 The Authors. Nephrology © 2013 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  9. Knowledge and attitudes about smoking cessation among pharmacy technicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zillich, Alan J; Aquilino, Mary L; Farris, Karen B

    2004-01-01

    To evaluate the knowledge and attitudes of pharmacy technicians before and after attending a continuing education program about smoking cessation. A pre/post survey of a single group. Two statewide meetings of the Iowa Pharmacy Association. Pharmacy technicians. One 2-hour continuing education (CE) course about smoking cessation for pharmacy technicians. Changes in scores before and after the CE sessions among three domains (knowledge, efficacy, and outcome) of a validated survey instrument. Fifty-one technicians completed both the presession and postsession questionnaire. For the three survey domains, technicians' knowledge (P = .034), efficacy (P < .001), and outcome (P < .001) showed significant improvement between the presession and postsession surveys (Wilcoxon signed rank test). Pharmacy technicians who attended a CE program on smoking cessation improved their knowledge, attitudes, and self-confidence in helping smokers quit. Additional research should be conducted to test the role of pharmacy technicians in smoking cessation promotion.

  10. Emergency Medical Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... need help right away, you should use emergency medical services. These services use specially trained people and ... emergencies, you need help where you are. Emergency medical technicians, or EMTs, do specific rescue jobs. They ...

  11. Risk of poor neonatal outcome at term after medically assisted reproduction: a propensity score-matched study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ensing, Sabine; Abu-Hanna, Ameen; Roseboom, Tessa J.; Repping, Sjoerd; van der Veen, Fulco; Mol, Ben Willem J.; Ravelli, Anita C. J.

    2015-01-01

    To study risk of birth asphyxia and related morbidity among term singletons born after medically assisted reproduction (MAR). Population cohort study. Not applicable. A total of 1,953,932 term singleton pregnancies selected from a national registry for 1999-2011. None. Primary outcome Apgar score

  12. Risk of poor neonatal outcome at term after medically assisted reproduction: a propensity score-matched study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ensing, Sabine; Abu-Hanna, Ameen; Roseboom, Tessa J; Repping, Sjoerd; van der Veen, Fulco; Mol, Ben Willem J; Ravelli, Anita C J

    2015-08-01

    To study risk of birth asphyxia and related morbidity among term singletons born after medically assisted reproduction (MAR). Population cohort study. Not applicable. A total of 1,953,932 term singleton pregnancies selected from a national registry for 1999-2011. None. Primary outcome Apgar score Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. 2014-2017. How medically assisted reproduction changed in Italy. A short comparative synthesis with European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malvasi, A; Signore, F; Napoletano, S; Bruti, V; Sestili, C; Di Luca, N M

    2017-01-01

    More than ten years after law n. 40 of February 19, 2004 became effective, regulation on medically assisted reproduction has dramatically changed outlook. The authors report on the steps that led to these changes through Courts' rulings, the Supreme Court's verdicts and the European Court of Human Rights' decisions, as well as ministerial regulations and guidelines concerning medically assisted reproduction. The aforementioned jurisprudential evolution was set to reach a new balance between the embryo's right to its own dignity and the woman's right to health and freedom of self-determination in reproduction. No court ruling denies that embryos have also to be safeguarded. In fact, there are still numerous prohibitions, including using embryos for experimental purposes. Judges aim primarily at avoiding that embryos' rights overcome the right to parenthood. The authors review the legislation of the various European countries: some have adopted a legislation to regulate medically assisted reproduction, while others have developed in this field some recommendations or guidelines. This is why they call for enactment of a European law governing the implementation/operational methods of medically assisted reproduction in order to avoid the scourge of procreative tourism to countries that have a more permissive law.

  14. ESHRE guideline: routine psychosocial care in infertility and medically assisted reproduction-a guide for fertility staff

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gameiro, S.; Boivin, J.; Dancet, E.; de Klerk, C.; Emery, M.; Lewis-Jones, C.; Thorn, P.; van den Broeck, U.; Venetis, C.; Verhaak, C. M.; Wischmann, T.; Vermeulen, N.

    2015-01-01

    Based on the best available evidence in the literature, what is the optimal management of routine psychosocial care at infertility and medically assisted reproduction (MAR) clinics? Using the structured methodology of the Manual for the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology (ESHRE)

  15. ESHRE guideline: routine psychosocial care in infertility and medically assisted reproduction-a guide for fertility staffdagger

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gameiro, S.; Boivin, J.; Dancet, E.; Klerk, C. de; Emery, M.; Lewis-Jones, C.; Thorn, P.; Broeck, U. Van den; Venetis, C.; Verhaak, C.M.; Wischmann, T.; Vermeulen, N.

    2015-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: Based on the best available evidence in the literature, what is the optimal management of routine psychosocial care at infertility and medically assisted reproduction (MAR) clinics? SUMMARY ANSWER: Using the structured methodology of the Manual for the European Society of Human

  16. Nuclear magnetic resonance tomography for medical-technical radiology assistants and radiologists; Magnetresonanztomografie fuer MTRA/RT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trzebiatowski, Elisabeth [MVZ Hanserad Radiologie, Hamburg (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    The textbook on NMR tomography for medical-technical radiology assistants and radiologists covers the following issues: (1) Before the NMR examination; (2) Physical background; (3) Angiography; (4) Measurements; (5) The NMR imaging facility; (6) Parameter planning; (7) Examination of different anatomical regions: head/neck, spinal cord, abdomen, thorax, extremities; (8) Selection of indications: head/neck, spinal cord, abdomen, thorax, extremities.

  17. A comparison of physicians and medical assistants in interpreting verbal autopsy interviews for allocating cause of neonatal death in Matlab, Bangladesh: can medical assistants be considered an alternative to physicians?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Objective This study assessed the agreement between medical physicians in their interpretation of verbal autopsy (VA) interview data for identifying causes of neonatal deaths in rural Bangladesh. Methods The study was carried out in Matlab, a rural sub-district in eastern Bangladesh. Trained persons conducted the VA interview with the mother or another family member at the home of the deceased. Three physicians and a medical assistant independently reviewed the VA interviews to assign causes of death using the International Classification of Diseases - Tenth Revision (ICD-10) codes. A physician assigned cause was decided when at least two physicians agreed on a cause of death. Cause-specific mortality fraction (CSMF), kappa (k) statistic, sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive values were applied to compare agreement between the reviewers. Results Of the 365 neonatal deaths reviewed, agreement on a direct cause of death was reached by at least two physicians in 339 (93%) of cases. Physician and medical assistant reviews of causes of death demonstrated the following levels of diagnostic agreement for the main causes of deaths: for birth asphyxia the sensitivity was 84%, specificity 93%, and kappa 0.77. For prematurity/low birth weight, the sensitivity, specificity, and kappa statistics were, respectively, 53%, 96%, and 0.55, for sepsis/meningitis they were 48%, 98%, and 0.53, and for pneumonia they were 75%, 94%, and 0.51. Conclusion This study revealed a moderate to strong agreement between physician- assigned and medical assistant- assigned major causes of neonatal death. A well-trained medical assistant could be considered an alternative for assigning major causes of neonatal deaths in rural Bangladesh and in similar settings where physicians are scarce and their time costs more. A validation study with medically confirmed diagnosis will improve the performance of VA for assigning cause of neonatal death. PMID:20712906

  18. Changing Roles of Librarians and Library Technicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norene James

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available What significant changes are librarians and library technicians experiencing in their roles? A survey put forward across Canada to librarians and library technicians addressing this question was conducted in February 2014. Eight hundred eighty-two responses were obtained from librarians, defined as MLIS graduates, and library technicians, defined as graduates from a two-year library diploma program. Respondents needed to have been employed in the last two years in these roles and students of either an MLIS or LIT program were also welcome to participate. The results suggest that both librarians and library technicians perceive their roles as growing in scope and complexity and that the lines of responsibility are blurring. A majority of respondents indicated that they perceive a change in their roles in the past five years and commented on what the perceived changes were. Librarian and library technician roles may be shifting away from what may be viewed as traditional or clearly defined responsibilities and both librarians and library technicians may be taking on new tasks as well as experiencing task overlap. All library staff will need to be fluid, adaptable, and open to change. Library school curricula and workplace training need to incorporate the development of these competencies. Quels sont les changements importants éprouvés par les bibliothécaires et les bibliotechniciens dans leurs rôles? Un sondage mené en février de 2014 a posé cette question aux bibliothécaires et aux bibliotechniciens dans tout le Canada. On a reçu huit-cent quatre-vingt-deux réponses des bibliothécaires, définis comme étant diplômés en MSIB, et les bibliotechniciens, définis comme étant diplômés d’un programme de deux ans en bibliotechnique. Les sondés devaient avoir travaillé au cours des deux dernières années dans ces fonctions et les étudiants d’un programme MSIB ou de bibliothéconomie/ sciences de l’information pouvaient aussi y

  19. Nontraditional roles for certified pharmacy technicians in a pharmaceutical company.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Stacey M; Gilmour, Christine; McCracken, David; Shane, Korban; Matsuura, Gary

    2006-01-01

    To describe nontraditional roles for Certified Pharmacy Technicians (CPhTs) within pharmaceutical industry. Drug information department within a large biotechnology/pharmaceutical organization. The Medical Communications department within Genentech uses a skills-mix staffing model in which employees with varying educational and training backgrounds work as a team on meeting the informational needs of consumers and health professionals who contact the company. One position within the department is that of Medical Communications Associate, responsible primarily for managing product inquiries. Medical Communications Associates have degrees in life sciences or an equivalent combination of education and experience, including a minimum of 2 years of related experience in the health care industry. Currently, four of the seven Medical Communications Associates in the department are CPhTs. Not applicable. Ability to recruit CPhTs for Medical Communications Associate positions, and job satisfaction of those hired into these positions. Critical basic skills needed for the Medical Communications Associate position include strong computer literacy, ability to multitask, and ability to work in an environment with frequent interruptions. Strong oral and written communications skills, customer service skills, ability to deal with stressful situations, product-specific knowledge, ability to work on a daily basis with Medical Communications Pharmacists, and knowledge of medical terminology are also important. The skills set of CPhTs matches these requirements, as evidenced by the experiences of the four staff members who have worked in the department for a total of 17 person-years. This nontraditional role for CPhTs can be rewarding and beneficial to all, affording an unique opportunity within the pharmaceutical industry. The skill set and experience of CPhTs can be used in the nontraditional pharmacy practice setting of drug information.

  20. Microprocessor based systems for the higher technician

    CERN Document Server

    Vears, RE

    2013-01-01

    Microprocessor Based Systems for the Higher Technician provides coverage of the BTEC level 4 unit in Microprocessor Based Systems (syllabus U80/674). This book is composed of 10 chapters and concentrates on the development of 8-bit microcontrollers specifically constructed around the Z80 microprocessor. The design cycle for the development of such a microprocessor based system and the use of a disk-based development system (MDS) as an aid to design are both described in detail. The book deals with the Control Program Monitor (CP/M) operating system and gives background information on file hand

  1. Mechanical technology for higher engineering technicians

    CERN Document Server

    Black, Peter

    1972-01-01

    Mechanical Technology for Higher Engineering Technicians deals with the mechanics of machines, thermodynamics, and mechanics of fluids. This book presents discussions and examples that deal with the strength of materials, technology of machines, and techniques used by professional engineers. The book explains the strain energy of torsion, coil springs, and the effects of axial load. The author also discusses the forces that produce bending, shearing, and bending combined with direct stress, as well as beams subjected to a uniform bending moment or simply supported beams with concentrated non-c

  2. Peer-Assisted History-Taking Groups: A Subjective Assessment of their Impact Upon Medical Students' Interview Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keifenheim, Katharina Eva; Petzold, Ernst Richard; Junne, Florian; Erschens, Rebecca Sarah; Speiser, Natalie; Herrmann-Werner, Anne; Zipfel, Stephan; Teufel, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Among the clinical skills needed by all physicians, history taking is one of the most important. The teaching model for peer-assisted history-taking groups investigated in the present study consists of small-group courses in which students practice conducting medical interviews with real patients. The purpose of this pilot study was to investigate the expectations, experiences, and subjective learning progress of participants in peer-assisted history-taking groups. Methods: The 42 medical student participants completed a 4-month, peer-assisted, elective history-taking course, which both began and ended with a subjective assessment of their interview skills by way of a pseudonymized questionnaire. Measures comprised the students' self-assessment of their interview skills, their expectations of, and their experiences with the course and especially with the peer tutors. Results: Medical students' most important motivations in attending peer-assisted history-taking groups were becoming able to complete a structured medical interview, to mitigate difficult interviewing situations, and to address patients' emotional demands appropriately. By the end of the course, students' self-assessment of both their interview skills and management of emotional issues improved significantly. Students especially benefitted from individual feedback regarding interview style and relationship formation, as well as generally accepted and had their expectations met by peer tutors. Conclusions: To meet the important learning objectives of history-taking and management of emotional issues, as well as self-reflection and reflection of student-patient interactions, students in the field greatly appreciate practicing medical interviewing in small, peer-assisted groups with real patients. At the same time, peer tutors are experienced to be helpful and supportive and can help students to overcome inhibitions in making contact with patients.

  3. Dizygotic twin pregnancies after medically assisted reproduction and after natural conception: maternal and perinatal outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensdorp, Alexandra J; Hukkelhoven, Chantal W; van der Veen, Fulco; Mol, Ben W J; Lambalk, Cornelis B; van Wely, Madelon

    2016-08-01

    To compare maternal and perinatal outcomes in dizygotic twin pregnancies conceived after medically assisted reproduction (MAR) with outcomes after natural conception (NC). Nationwide registry based study. Academic medical center. Primiparous women who delivered opposite sex twins between January 2000 and December 2012 in the Netherlands, comprising dizygotic twin pregnancies: 6,694 women, 470 after ovulation induction (OI), 511 after intrauterine insemination with controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (IUI-COH), 2,437 after in vitro fertilization (IVF) with intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), and 3,276 after NC. None. Multivariable logistic regression and generalized linear mixed models to evaluate differences in outcomes: maternal outcomes of hypertension, preeclampsia, preterm delivery, hemorrhage, and delivery mode, perinatal outcomes including small for gestational age (SGA) with birth weight <10th percentile, birth weight <1,500 g, 5-minute Apgar score <7, admission to neonatal intensive care unit, congenital anomalies, and perinatal mortality. We found no statistically significant differences in maternal or perinatal outcomes after OI compared with NC. Women pregnant after IVF-ICSI had a lower risk for hypertension (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 0.74; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.66-0.83) compared with women pregnant after NC. After IUI-COH more children had Apgar scores <7 (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 1.38; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.05-1.81) and perinatal mortality rates were higher (aOR 1.56; 95% CI, 1.04-2.33) compared with NC. We found no differences in perinatal outcomes after IVF-ICSI compared with NC. Overall, maternal and perinatal risks other than those due to multiplicity are similar for twin pregnancies conceived after MAR and after NC. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Outcomes of a Pharmacist-Managed Heart Failure Medication Titration Assistance Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Shubha; Kansal, Mayank; Kondos, George T; Groo, Vicki

    2018-02-01

    National guidelines recommend angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors or angiotensin-receptor blockers (ARBs) and β-blockers (BBs) at target doses for morbidity and mortality benefits in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF); regardless, titration of these therapies in practice remains suboptimal. We implemented an outpatient pharmacist-managed HFrEF medication titration assistance clinic (MTAC) at one institution to improve titration for general cardiology (GC) patients. To evaluate MTAC impact by determining the proportion of patients on target or maximum tolerated ACE inhibitor/ARB and BB doses. A retrospective chart review of adult patients with documented ejection fraction ≤40% managed in the MTAC or GC from 2011 to 2013 was conducted. HFrEF medication regimens were collected at initial visit and months 1, 2, 3, 6, 9, and 12 to assess titration. Target doses were defined per guideline or dose at which ejection fraction recovered during the study. Maximum tolerated doses were defined as the highest dose patients tolerated without physiological limitations. Of 148 patients, the MTAC managed 51 and GC managed 97. At baseline, 90% of MTAC versus 82% of GC patients were prescribed ACE inhibitors/ARBs and BBs. In the MTAC, 4% were at target or maximum tolerated doses compared with 32% of GC patients ( P < 0.001). At 12 months, 95% of patients in the MTAC and 87% in GC were prescribed ACE inhibitors/ARBs and BBs. Of those prescribed ACE inhibitors/ARBs and BBs, 64% in the MTAC versus 40% in GC reached target or maximum tolerated doses ( P = 0.01). The pharmacist-managed MTAC increased the proportion of patients on optimal HFrEF therapies and are a resource for GC patients.

  5. Trainable NLG for Data to Portuguese - With application to a Medication Assistant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Casimiro Pereira

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available New equipments, such as smartphones and tablets, are changing human computer interaction. These devices present several challenges, especially due to their small screen and keyboard. In order to use text and voice in multimodal interaction, it is essential to deploy modules to translate the internal information of the applications into sentences or texts, in order to display it on screen or synthesize it. Also, these modules must generate phrases and texts in the user's native language; the development should not require considerable resources; and the outcome of the generation should achieve a good degree of variability.Our main objective is to propose, implement and evaluate a method of data conversion to Portuguese which can be developed with a minimum of time and knowledge, but without compromising the necessary variability and quality of what is generated. The developed system, for a Medication Assistant, is intended to create descriptions, in natural language, of medication to be taken. Motivated by recent results, we opted for an approach based on machine translation, with models trained on a small parallel corpus.For that, a new corpus was created. With it, two variants of the system were trained: phrase-based translation and syntax-based translation. The two variants were evaluated by automatic measurements -- BLEU and Meteor -- and by humans. The results showed that a phrase-based approach produced better results than a syntax-based one: human evaluators evaluated 60% of phrase-based responses as good, or very good, compared to only 46% of syntax-based responses. Considering the corpus size, we judge this value (60% as good.

  6. Social-economic profile of asthmatic patients assisted at a Nucleus of Integrated Medical Assistance - doi:10.5020/18061230.2008.p180

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anisia Torquilho Praxedes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the social-economic profile of asthmatic patients who use the health services rendered by the Nucleus of Integrated Medical Assistance (NAMI, in Fortaleza- Ce. Methods: This descriptive, retrospective and cross-sectional study, of a quantitative approach, had a sample comprised by 40 asthmatic patients assisted at NAMI during the period of April to May, 2006. The data collection was accomplished by means of a standard semi-structured interview, with open and closed questions. Results: The age range between 0 to 5 years old represented the greater percentage of patients, thus obtaining 60.0% of the answered questionnaires. According to social-economic conditions, 55.0% were illiterate or were learning to read, 75.0% were using some drug prescribed at NAMI, 72.5% fully ignored the disease, 52.5% recognized the factors that triggered the asthmatic crisis and 55.0% said having often crisis. Seventy per cent (70.0% of the interviewed showed some difficulty related to the use of the drugs; 47.5% referred having different problems related to the access to the medications. Conclusion: By the analysis of the determined social-economic profile of asthmatics patients assisted at NAMI, it is concluded that great part of them are people with little instruction, due to the social exclusion in which they are found; being the majority of them children of female gender. NCT00722657

  7. Medical Assistance in Dying in Canada: An Ethical Analysis of Conscientious and Religious Objections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christie, Timothy

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Supreme Court of Canada (SCC has ruled that the federal government is required to remove the provisions of the Criminal Code of Canada that prohibit medical assistance in dying (MAID. The SCC has stipulated that individual physicians will not be required to provide MAID should they have a religious or conscientious objection. Therefore, the pending legislative response will have to balance the rights of the patients with the rights of physicians, other health care professionals, and objecting institutions. Objective: The objective of this paper is to critically assess, within the Canadian context, the moral probity of individual or institutional objections to MAID that are for either religious or conscientious reasons. Methods: Deontological ethics and the Doctrine of Double Effect. Results: The religious or conscientious objector has conflicting duties, i.e., a duty to respect the “right to life” (section 7 of the Charter and a duty to respect the tenets of his or her religious or conscientious beliefs (protected by section 2 of the Charter. Conclusion: The discussion of religious or conscientious objections to MAID has not explicitly considered the competing duties of the conscientious objector. It has focussed on the fact that a conscientious objection exists and has ignored the normative question of whether the duty to respect one’s conscience or religion supersedes the duty to respect the patient’s right to life.

  8. Mental Health Communications Skills Training for Medical Assistants in Pediatric Primary Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jonathan D.; Wissow, Lawrence S.; Cook, Benjamin L.; Longway, Shaina; Caffery, Emily; Pefaure, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Paraprofessional medical assistants (MAs) could help to promote pediatric primary care as a source of mental health services, particularly among patient populations who receive disparate mental health care. This project piloted a brief training to enhance the ability of MAs to have therapeutic encounters with Latino families who have mental health concerns in pediatric primary care. The evaluation of the pilot found that MAs were able to master most of the skills taught during the training, which improved their ability to have patient-centered encounters with families during standardized patient visits coded with the Roter Interaction Analysis System. Parents interviewed one and six months following the training were more than twice as willing as parents interviewed one month before the training to discuss mental health concerns with MAs and they had better perceptions of their interactions with MAs (all p training, 10.2% of parents discussed a mental health concern with the MA but not the physician; this never happened six months after training. This pilot provides preliminary evidence that training MAs holds potential to supplement other educational and organizational interventions aimed at improving mental health services in pediatric primary care but further research is necessary to test this type of training in other settings and among different patient populations. PMID:23070564

  9. Nurse leaders' role in medical assistance in dying: A relational ethics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiele, Tracy; Dunsford, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    Recent changes to the Criminal Code of Canada have resulted in the right of competent adult Canadians to request medical assistance in dying (MAID). Healthcare professionals now can participate if the individual meets specific outlined criteria. There remains confusion and lack of knowledge about the specific role of nurses in MAID. MAID is a controversial topic and nurses may be faced with the challenge of balancing the duty to provide routine care, with moral reservations about MAID. The role of a nursing leader is to support nurses by ensuring they have the knowledge they require to care for patients requesting the service, whether or not the nurse is directly involved in the MAID process. The moral dilemmas raised by MAID provide an opportunity to look at a relational ethics approach to nursing leadership both for MAID and other difficult situations that arise in nursing practice. Relational ethics is a framework that proposes that the ethical moments in healthcare are based on relationships and fostering growth, healing, and health through the foundational concepts of mutual respect, engagement, embodiment, and environment. This article will use a relational ethics framework to examine how nursing leadership can support nurses who care for patients requesting MAID.

  10. Heroin refusal self-efficacy and preference for medication-assisted treatment after inpatient detoxification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, Shannon R; Bailey, Genie L; Anderson, Bradley J; Stein, Michael D

    2017-10-01

    An individual's self-efficacy to refuse using heroin in high-risk situations is believed to minimize the likelihood for relapse. However, among individuals completing inpatient heroin detoxification, perceived refusal self-efficacy may also reduce one's perceived need for medication-assisted treatment (MAT), an effective and recommended treatment for opioid use disorder. In the current study, we examined the relationship between heroin refusal self-efficacy and preference for MAT following inpatient detoxification. Participants (N=397) were interviewed at the start of brief inpatient opioid detoxification. Multiple logistic regression was used to estimate the adjusted association of background characteristics, depressed mood, and perceived heroin refusal self-efficacy with preference for MAT. Controlling for other covariates, depressed mood and lower perceived refusal self-efficacy were associated with a significantly greater likelihood of expressing preference for MAT (versus no MAT). Perceived ability to refuse heroin after leaving detox is inversely associated with a heroin user's desire for MAT. An effective continuum of care model may benefit from greater attention to patient's perceived refusal self-efficacy during detoxification which may impact preference for MAT and long-term recovery. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. [Pharmacologic stimulation of ejaculation with midodrine hydrochloride (Gutron) for medically assisted reproduction in spinal injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staerman, F; Bryckaert, P E; Youinou, Y; Colin, J; Brandt, B; Lardennois, B

    2001-12-01

    Midodrine hydrochloride (Gutron) is proposed to induce ejaculation in spinal injury patients desiring paternity as an alternative to vibromassage, electrostimulated ejaculation and surgical collection of spermatozoa. The authors report their experience in 10 spinal injury patients. 14 trials of pharmacologically-induced ejaculation were performed in a context of medically assisted reproduction (MAR) in 10 spinal injury patients (7 with paraplegia > T11; 1 with paraplegia Gutron was administered by slow i.v. infusion. Spermatozoa were collected during antegrade ejaculation and/or in previously alkalinised urine. Ejaculation was obtained in 10 cases (71.4%), either antegrade (7 cases), or retrograde (3 cases). The 4 failures corresponded to ejaculation failure in 3 cases and adverse effects of Gutron (hypertension) in 1 case. However, storage of spermatozoa could be performed in only 4 cases (40%), as pyospermia or severe necrospermia were observed in 6 cases. Midodrine hydrochloride gives good results in terms of ejaculation in spinal injury patients. However, the quality of semen collected is often poor due to the long interval since the initial trauma. Midodrine hydrochloride, ideally used after antibiotic treatment, can nevertheless constitute an alternative to other techniques.

  12. FELASA recommendations for the education and training of laboratory animal technicians: category A: report of the Federation of European Laboratory Animal Science Associations Working Group on Education of Animal Technicians (Category A) accepted by the FELASA Board of Management.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weiss Convenor, J.; Bukelskiene, V.; Chambrier, P.; Ferrari, L.; Meulen, M. van der; Moreno, M.; Mulkens, F.G.G.F.M.; Sigg, H.; Yates, N.

    2010-01-01

    The future laboratory animal technician in Europe will be provided with three different levels of education. All candidates have to start with an introductory course to reach level A0. At this level (A0) they will be able to assist in the laboratory animal facility by undertaking limited specific

  13. 45 CFR 233.145 - Expiration of medical assistance programs under titles I, IV-A, X, XIV and XVI of the Social...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Social Security Act for aid or assistance in the form of medical or any other type of remedial care for... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Expiration of medical assistance programs under titles I, IV-A, X, XIV and XVI of the Social Security Act. 233.145 Section 233.145 Public Welfare...

  14. Radiological control technician implementing continuing training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Killand, B.

    1993-01-01

    The Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) has developed and is implementing a continuing training program for RCTs. This program was designed to meet the requirements of the DOE and Hanford Site Radiological Control Manual. The program is scheduled on a biennial (two year), six cycle format, where each cycle is seventeen weeks in length. This enables the technician to be in the classroom three times per year, for an average of four days each cycle. Content emphasis is placed on: academics review; lessons learned; new equipment and procedures; practical skills training; and oral board preparation. Academic reviews provide refresher training on core and site academics in both lecture and overview formats. During the first five cycles, an average of six lessons are presented. A preparatory exam is administered along with a quiz covering previous cycles. The sixth cycle is dedicated to an academic review of all previous lesson content, the final comprehensive exam, and the oral examination boards. In conjunction with continuing training, technicians receive additional company required training, providing a substantial cost savings to WHC. WHC employs approximately 300 RCTs

  15. Preparing technicians for engineering materials technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, James A.; Metzloff, Carlton H.

    1990-01-01

    A long held principle is that for every engineer and scientist there is a need for ten technicians to maximize the efficiency of the technology team for meeting needs of industry and government. Developing an adequate supply of technicians to meet the requirements of the materials related industry will be a challenge and difficult to accomplish. A variety of agencies feel the need and wish to support development of engineering materials technology programs. In a joint effort among Battelle Laboratories, the Department of Energy (DOE) and Northwest College and University Association for Science (NORCUS), the development of an engineering materials technology program for vocational programs and community colleges for the Pacific Northwest Region was recently completed. This effort has implications for a national model. The model Associate of Applied Science degree in Engineering Materials Technology shown provides a general structure. It purposely has course titles which need delimiting while also including a core of courses necessary to develop cognitive, affective and psychomotor skills with the underlining principles of math, science and technology so students have job entry skills, and so that students can learn about and adapt to evolving technology.

  16. Added value of sending photograph in diagnosing a medical disease declared at sea: experience of the French Tele-Medical Assistance Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehours, Emilie; Saccavini, Alexandre; Roucolle, Pierre; Roux, Patrick; Bounes, Vincent

    2017-01-01

    The maritime medical tele-consultation carried out by a doctor from the Toulouse Tele-Medical Assistance Service is currently based on tele-consultation using radiotelegraphy and the complementary transmission of data (photographs, electrocardiogram) via the Internet. In a previous article, we presented the benefits of photograph transmission for trauma management in isolated areas. Through this new series of cases, we wanted to expose the aspect of the medical pathologies and the contribution of sending photographs in their management. Case 1. Myocardial infarction. Case 2. Toxic epidermal necrolysis. Case 3. Tooth abscess. Case 4. Shingles. Case 5. Junctional tachycardia. The tele-transmission of photographs provides a real diagnostic and follow-up tool for patients suffering from medical pathologies. The constant increase in the number of tele-consultations with the exchange of photographs shows its necessity and the interest of the participants in the development of these technologies.

  17. Italian law on medically assisted reproduction: do women's autonomy and health matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riezzo, Irene; Neri, Margherita; Bello, Stefania; Pomara, Cristoforo; Turillazzi, Emanuela

    2016-07-23

    In Italy in 2004, a very restrictive law was passed on medically assisted reproduction (MAR) (Law 40/2004) that placed Italy at the most conservative end of the European spectrum. The law was widely criticized and many couples seeking MAR brought their cases before the Italian Civil Courts with regard to pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), donor insemination and the issue of consent. Ten years on, having suffered the blows of the Italian Constitutional Court, little remains of law 40/2004. In 2009, the Constitutional Court declared the maximum limit of the number of embryos to be produced and transferred for each cycle (i.e. three), as stated in the original version of the law, to be constitutionally illegitimate. In 2014, the same Court declared as unconstitutional the ban on donor insemination, thus opening the way to heterologous assisted reproduction. Heterologous MAR is therefore perfectly legitimate in Italy. Finally, in 2015 a further ruling by the Constitutional Court granted the right to access MAR to couples who are fertile but carriers of genetic diseases. However, there is still much room for criticism. Many couples and groups are still, in fact, excluded from MAR. Same-sex couples, single women and those of advanced reproductive age are, at the present time, discriminated against in that Italian law denies these subjects access to MAR. The history of Law 40/2004 has been a particularly troubled one. Numerous rulings have, over the years, dismantled much of a law constructed in violation of the rights and autonomy of women and couples. However, a number of troubling issues still exist from what is left of the law and the debate is still open at national and transnational level regarding some of the contradictions and gaps in the law highlighted in this article. Only by abolishing the final prohibitions and adopting more liberal views on these controversial yet crucial issues will Law 40/2004 become what it should have been from the start, i.e. a

  18. Health Sciences Information Tools 2000: a cooperative health sciences library/public school information literacy program for medical assistant students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spang, L; Marks, E; Adams, N

    1998-10-01

    Educating diverse groups in how to access, use, and evaluate information available through information technologies is emerging as an essential responsibility for health sciences librarians in today's complex health care system. One group requiring immediate attention is medical assistants. Projections indicate that medical assistant careers will be among the fastest growing occupations in the twenty-first century. The expanding use and importance of information in all health care settings requires that this workforce be well versed in information literacy skills. But, for public school vocational education staff charged with educating entry level workers to meet this specialized demand, the expense of hiring qualified professionals and acquiring the sophisticated technology necessary to teach such skills poses a dilemma. Health Sciences Information Tools 2000, a cooperative work-study information literacy program jointly formulated by the Wayne State University's Shiffman Medical Library and the Detroit Public Schools' Crockett Career and Technical Center, demonstrates that cooperation between the health sciences library and the public school is a mutually beneficial and constructive solution. This article describes the background, goals, curriculum, personnel, costs, and evaluation methods of Tools 2000. The Shiffman-Crockett information literacy program, adaptable to a variety of library settings, is an innovative means of preparing well-trained high school vocational education students for beginning level medical assistant positions as well as further education in the health care field.

  19. Men Who Have Sex With Men in Peru: Acceptability of Medication-Assisted Therapy for Treating Alcohol Use Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Shan-Estelle; Vagenas, Panagiotis; Konda, Kelika A; Clark, Jesse L; Lama, Javier R; Gonzales, Pedro; Sanchez, Jorge; Duerr, Ann C; Altice, Frederick L

    2017-07-01

    In Peru, the HIV epidemic is concentrated in men who have sex with men (MSM) and transgender women (TGW). Multiple studies correlate alcohol use disorders (AUDs) with risky sexual behaviors among Peruvian MSM. Qualitative research was used to inform a clinical trial on the acceptability of medication-assisted therapies to assist management of AUDs and improve antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence among MSM/TGW in Peru. Three focus groups involving HIV-infected or HIV-uninfected MSM/TGW ( n = 26) with AUDs (AUDIT ≥ 8) were transcribed, translated from Spanish into English, and analyzed using thematic content analysis. Despite having an AUD, participants considered themselves "social" drinkers, minimized their drinking behaviors, and differed about whether or not alcohol problems could be treated. Participants expressed skepticism about medication for treating AUDs. Three concepts emerged as necessary components of a treatment program for alcohol problems: cost, family support, and the potential to drink less alcohol without attaining total abstinence. This study reveals important areas of education to increase potential acceptability of a medication for treating AUDs among MSM/TGW. Given the social conditions and knowledge base of the participants, medication-assisted therapies using naltrexone may be a beneficial strategy for MSM with AUDs.

  20. Health Sciences Information Tools 2000: a cooperative health sciences library/public school information literacy program for medical assistant students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spang, L; Marks, E; Adams, N

    1998-01-01

    Educating diverse groups in how to access, use, and evaluate information available through information technologies is emerging as an essential responsibility for health sciences librarians in today's complex health care system. One group requiring immediate attention is medical assistants. Projections indicate that medical assistant careers will be among the fastest growing occupations in the twenty-first century. The expanding use and importance of information in all health care settings requires that this workforce be well versed in information literacy skills. But, for public school vocational education staff charged with educating entry level workers to meet this specialized demand, the expense of hiring qualified professionals and acquiring the sophisticated technology necessary to teach such skills poses a dilemma. Health Sciences Information Tools 2000, a cooperative work-study information literacy program jointly formulated by the Wayne State University's Shiffman Medical Library and the Detroit Public Schools' Crockett Career and Technical Center, demonstrates that cooperation between the health sciences library and the public school is a mutually beneficial and constructive solution. This article describes the background, goals, curriculum, personnel, costs, and evaluation methods of Tools 2000. The Shiffman-Crockett information literacy program, adaptable to a variety of library settings, is an innovative means of preparing well-trained high school vocational education students for beginning level medical assistant positions as well as further education in the health care field. PMID:9803297

  1. Radiological Control Technician: Phase 2, Core/site practical training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-10-01

    This volume provides a description of the guidelines, qualification in radiological instrumentation, qualification in radiological protection, and qualification in emergency preparedness for radiological control technicians

  2. Radiological Control Technician: Phase 1, Site academic training lesson plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-10-01

    This volume provides lesson plans for training radiological control technicians. Covered here is basic radiological documentation, counting errors, dosimetry, environmental monitoring, and radiation instruments

  3. Impact of pharmacist discharge medication therapy counseling and disease state education: Pharmacist Assisting at Routine Medical Discharge (project PhARMD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarangarm, Preeyaporn; London, Matthew S; Snowden, Stanley S; Dilworth, Thomas J; Koselke, Lisa R; Sanchez, Christian O; D'Angio, Richard; Ray, Gretchen

    2013-01-01

    Many patients experience adverse events after discharge; numerous are medication related and preventable. The objective of this study is to evaluate the impact of pharmacist medication counseling and disease education at discharge. Pharmacist Assisting at Routine Medical Discharge is a prospective study of English- or Spanish-speaking adults discharged from internal medicine. Control patients received usual hospital discharge care; intervention patients received usual care with discharge counseling and a follow-up phone call. Evaluated outcomes included the following: 30-day hospital reutilization (combined readmissions/emergency department visits), pharmacist interventions, predictors for hospital utilization, patient satisfaction, and primary medication adherence. In all, 279 patients were enrolled: 139 in the control and 140 in the intervention group. Pharmacists made 198 interventions. The rate of hospital reutilization was 20.7% and similar between the intervention and control groups. Patients receiving the pharmacist intervention demonstrated improved primary medication adherence and increased patient satisfaction. Pharmacist-provided discharge counseling resulted in medication interventions, improved patient satisfaction, and increased medication adherence.

  4. Pressure ulcer occurrence following the great East Japan Earthquake: observations from a disaster medical assistance team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Tomoya; Ichioka, Shigeru

    2012-04-01

     Persons with limited mobility are at risk for pressure ulcers. The development of pressure ulcers following earthquakes has been reported secondary to disaster-related spinal cord injury. In the aftermath of the Great East Japan Earthquake, members of a disaster medical assistance team (DMAT), which included plastic surgeons and wound, ostomy, and continence (WOC) nurses working in acute care hospitals, temporary clinics, evacuation centers, and the community noticed an increase in the number of requests for pressure ulcer care. A review of hospital records and verbal reports from the community suggested that the incidence of Stage III and Stage IV pressure ulcers was 7.7% in an acute care hospital and 26.4% in home care patients - almost 10 times higher than the normal reported incidence in Japan. Patients were mostly elderly and did not have spinal cord injuries. Alternating-pressure air mattresses stopped working, alternative pressure-redistribution devices could not be delivered, caregivers could not reach the homebound, and evacuation centers did not have enough mattresses. It is believed that the high percentage of elderly living in the affected areas of Japan, combined with limited resources, manpower, and the absence of utilities, increased the number of persons with deep pressure ulcers. Following natural disasters, DMAT wound care specialists can make important contributions to the prevention of these wounds while providing much-needed care to prevent pressure ulcer-related complications. Clinician observations suggest that the risk of pressure-related injuries following a natural disaster is high, especially among the elderly.

  5. Community decision-making about critical access hospitals: lessons learned from Montana's Medical Assistance Facility Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shreffler, M J; Capalbo, S M; Flaherty, R J; Heggem, C

    1999-01-01

    Limited-service hospitals have been used as a means of maintaining health care services in rural communities with full-service hospitals at risk of closure. The Medical Assistance Facility (MAF) limited-service hospital model has been implemented in 12 communities in Montana and has been evaluated by the Health Care Financing Administration as a viable alternative to a full-service hospital in frontier communities. The 1997 federal Critical Access Hospital (CAH) legislation is the most recent nationwide alternative for maintaining health care in rural communities, and it incorporates many of the features of the MAF model. The purpose of this study was to examine rural community decision making regarding MAF conversion from the perspectives of key informants who were involved in the decision-making process. A descriptive multiple case study design was used. Data were obtained through interviews with community members during site visits. The research focused on identification of local issues that were influential in the decision to convert to or reopen as an MAF, features of the MAF model that made it a locally acceptable alternative, and elements that characterized the decision-making process. The issues found to be influential in the conversion decision and the features that made the MAF locally acceptable were those that made the provision of basic services more stable and sustainable. The study suggests that programs to maintain health care services in isolated communities should allow for and encourage an expanded role for nonphysician providers. The lessons learned from the communities included in this study are instructive to rural communities nationwide that are considering a CAH as well as to policy-makers, researchers, and regional and national health care decision makers.

  6. State-Targeted Funding and Technical Assistance to Increase Access to Medication Treatment for Opioid Use Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Amanda J; Andrews, Christina M; Grogan, Colleen M; Pollack, Harold A; D'Aunno, Thomas; Humphreys, Keith; Friedmann, Peter D

    2018-04-01

    As the United States grapples with an opioid epidemic, expanding access to effective treatment for opioid use disorder is a major public health priority. Identifying effective policy tools that can be used to expand access to care is critically important. This article examines the relationship between state-targeted funding and technical assistance and adoption of three medications for treating opioid use disorder: oral naltrexone, injectable naltrexone, and buprenorphine. This study draws from the 2013-2014 wave of the National Drug Abuse Treatment System Survey, a nationally representative, longitudinal study of substance use disorder treatment programs. The sample includes data from 695 treatment programs (85.5% response rate) and representatives from single-state agencies in 49 states and Washington, D.C. (98% response rate). Logistic regression was used to examine the relationships of single-state agency targeted funding and technical assistance to availability of opioid use disorder medications among treatment programs. State-targeted funding was associated with increased program-level adoption of oral naltrexone (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]=3.14, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.49-6.60, p=.004) and buprenorphine (AOR=2.47, 95% CI=1.31-4.67, p=.006). Buprenorphine adoption was also correlated with state technical assistance to support medication provision (AOR=1.18, 95% CI=1.00-1.39, p=.049). State-targeted funding for medications may be a viable policy lever for increasing access to opioid use disorder medications. Given the historically low rates of opioid use disorder medication adoption in treatment programs, single-state agency targeted funding is a potentially important tool to reduce mortality and morbidity associated with opioid disorders and misuse.

  7. Methods for training radiochemical technicians at ORNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parrott, J.R.; Nicol, R.G.

    The training of personnel to carry out radiochemical operations at ORNL is a formidable and recurrent task since programs are constantly shifting. It is essential that provisions be made for the routine retraining of these personnel if they are to make effective contributions on a continuing basis. Training methods are described that have emerged as a result of thirty years experience in a variety of radiochemical pilot-plant programs. Emphasis is placed on training programs for technicians for the 233 U Processing Facility since essentially all aspects of radiochemical operations are encountered in this facility. These programs have included operations performed in glove boxes, hot-cell manipulator work handling high-neutron-emitting isotopes, and the entire spectrum of remote solvent extraction operations. (U.S.)

  8. Benefits of photograph transmission for trauma management in isolated areas: cases from the French tele-medical assistance service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehours, Emilie; Tourneret, Marie-Laure; Roux, Patrick; Tabarly, Julien

    2016-01-01

    French maritime tele-medical assistance is currently performed by a telephone consultation associated with complementary transmission of data (photographs, electrocardiograms, etc.) over the internet. Five case reports are presented to illustrate how photo transmission is useful to managing initial care and monitoring isolated patients. Case reports included: Case 1: management of a hand burn; Case 2: management of a finger wound; Case 3: management of an ocular foreign body; Case 4: management of a subungual haematoma; Case 5: management of phlegmon. In conclusions, photo transmission improves our practice of maritime tele-medical medicine. New high-definition technologies will help in the development of videoconferences on ships.

  9. [The medical assistance of Swedish Red Cross Field Hospital in Busan during and after the Korean war].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jiwook

    2010-06-30

    After the outbreak of the Korean war, the Kingdom of Sweden, a permanent neutral nation, dispatched the Swedish Red Cross Field Hospital(SRCFH) instead of armed forces for humanitarian support to the allied forces in South Korea. The Hospital consisted of about 170 Swedes, all volunteers. From the early part of the Korean War, SRCFH took part in the medical assistance in Busan. When the frontline advanced to northern Korea, the number of inflowing casualties to this field hospital decreased. At that time, earnest medical aid for civilians commenced, and many Koreans were treated in available beds in SRCFH. After the armistice in July 1953, SRCFH became the Swedish Hospital in Busan, serving not only the military but also civilians, and continued its humanitarian mission until April 1957 for the Korean who were suffering from a collapsed medical system in the midst of war. When the Hospital returned to Sweden, it had treated over two million patients from twenty countries, including wounded UN allied force, Korean (south and north), Chinese prisoner of war and Korean civilian. Moreover, it left a transformative legacy, the National Medical Center in Seoul which was established in collaboration with other Scandinavian countries who dispatched medical assistance during the Korean War.

  10. Competências na formação de Técnicos de Enfermagem para implementar a Sistematização da Assistência de Enfermagem Competencias em la formación de Técnicos de Enfermería para implementar la Sistematización de la Atención de Enfermería Competencies in the education of Nursing Technicians to implement the Nursing Care Systematization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréa de Mello Pereira da Cruz

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Trata-se de pesquisa qualitativa, exploratória e descritiva, com o objetivo geral de conhecer, considerando a perspectiva do técnico de enfermagem que atua em hospital universitário, as competências desenvolvidas durante sua formação para implementar a Sistematização da Assistência de Enfermagem (SAE. A coleta e análise das informações ocorreram por meio de grupo focal, com técnicos de enfermagem e da análise de conteúdo. Emergiram duas categorias temáticas: A participação do técnico de enfermagem na SAE e As competências na formação do técnico de enfermagem. Cada qual recebeu duas sub-categorias: Concepção da SAE e (Des Valorização da SAE, e Competência técnico-científica e Competência na relação interpessoal, respectivamente. Constatou-se que a SAE necessita ser compartilhada, discutida e divulgada entre os profissionais de enfermagem, para que eles se reconheçam protagonistas de sua metodologia e tomem ciência de que suas práticas determinam os resultados.Se trata de una investigación cualitativa, exploratoria y descriptiva, con el objetivo general de conocer, considerando la perspectiva de técnicos de enfermería que actúan en un hospital universitario, las competencias desarrolladas en su formación para implementar la Sistematización de la Atención de Enfermería (SAE. La recolección y análisis de los datos se efectuó a través de grupo focal con técnicos de enfermería y análisis de contenido. Surgieron dos categorías temáticas, La participación del técnico de Enfermería en la SAE y Las competencias en la formación del Técnico de Enfermería, cada una de ellas con dos subcategorías, Concepción de la SAE y (Des Valorización de la SAE; Competencia técnico-científica y Competencia en la relación interpersonal, respectivamente. Se constató que la SAE necesita ser compartida, discutida y divulgada entre los profesionales de la Enfermería para que los mismos perciban que son los

  11. Condutas adotadas por técnicos de enfermagem após ocorrência de erros de medicação Conductas adoptadas por técnicos de enfermería después de ocurrir errores de medicación Conducts adopted by nursing technicians after the occurrence of medication errors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jânia Oliveira Santos

    2010-06-01

    divulgación y el fortalecimiento de medidas preventivas.OBJECTIVE: To identify and to analyze the adopted conducts by nursing technicians after the occurrence of medication errors. METHODS: Is a descriptive and qualitative study, conducted with 23 nursing technicians, in the University Hospital in Goiania, GO. The data were collected through structured interviews that were recorded and then analyzed according to Bardin concepts. RESULTS: The analysis produced two categories: adopting conducts related to informing the error (to doctors, to nurses, recording and, not communicating the error and adopting conducts related to the patient (patient observation, monitoring and, minimizing consequences. CONCLUSION: This study highlights the need, that the health institutions have, of adopting a culture of transparency related to medication errors with the creation of policies and standardization of reports, dissemination of the information and strengthening preventive measures.

  12. Social Workers’ Knowledge and Perceptions of Effectiveness and Acceptability of Medication Assisted Treatment of Substance Use Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Bride, Brian E.; Abraham, Amanda J.; Kintzle, Sara; Roman, Paul M.

    2013-01-01

    Data from a national study of 345 privately-funded, community-based substance use disorder (SUD) treatment centers was used to investigate social workers’ knowledge, perceptions of effectiveness, and perceptions of the acceptability of medication assisted treatments (MATs) for SUDs. Results reveal the importance of exposure to MATs for social workers to develop a knowledge base regarding the effectiveness of various pharmacological agents. Results also underline the importance of social worke...

  13. Barriers to the implementation of medication-assisted treatment for substance use disorders: The importance of funding policies and medical infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, Hannah K.; Abraham, Amanda J.; Oser, Carrie B.

    2011-01-01

    Despite growing interest in the use of evidence-based treatment practices, adoption of pharmacotherapies for treating substance use disorders (SUDs) remains modest. Using data from telephone interviews with 250 administrators of publicly funded SUD treatment programs, this study estimated a model of adoption of medication assisted treatment (MAT) for SUDs and examined the relative importance of regulatory, cultural, medical resource, patient-level, and funding barriers to MAT implementation. MAT-adopting programs had significantly greater medical resources, as measured by the employment of physicians and nurses, than non-adopting programs. Administrators of non-adopting programs were asked to rate the importance of 18 barriers to MAT implementation. The most strongly endorsed barriers were regulatory prohibitions due to the program’s lack of medical staff, funding barriers to implementing MAT, and lack of access to medical personnel with expertise in delivering MAT. Barriers related to insufficient information about MAT and unsupportive staff attitudes were not widely endorsed. These findings suggest that efforts to promote the implementation of MAT that are inattentive to funding barriers and weaknesses in medical infrastructure may achieve sub-optimal results. PMID:21371752

  14. Nurses leadership evaluation by nursing aides and technicians according to the 360-degree feedback method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana Ofélia Llapa-Rodriguez

    Full Text Available Objective: to assess the leadership of nurses of a maternity hospital according to the nursing aides and technicians and the 360-degree feedback method. Method: a descriptive, cross-sectional study. The population was 19 nurses and 96 nursing aides and assistants. Data were collected from May 2010 to July 2011 using a questionnaire based on the 360-degree method. Results: the nurses mentioned having a favourable performance in the four studied categories. The nursing aides and technicians disagreed with the recorded leadership performance of the nurses in the category "Communication" and "Support environment." The responses for the category "Role Model" were favourable in all items, especially PAPEL18. In "Management Style", the highest favourable rating was 79% for GESTAO16. Conclusion: the categories "Communication" and "Support Environment" revealed a greater fragility of the nurses in comparison to the categories "Role Model" and "Management Style".

  15. [Nurses leadership evaluation by nursing aides and technicians according to the 360-degree feedback method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llapa-Rodriguez, Eliana Ofélia; de Oliveira, Júlian Katrin Albuquerque; Lopes Neto, David; de Aguiar Campos, Maria Pontes

    2015-12-01

    to assess the leadership of nurses of a maternity hospital according to the nursing aides and technicians and the 360-degree feedback method. a descriptive, cross-sectional study. The population was 19 nurses and 96 nursing aides and assistants. Data were collected from May 2010 to July 2011 using a questionnaire based on the 360-degree method. the nurses mentioned having a favourable performance in the four studied categories. The nursing aides and technicians disagreed with the recorded leadership performance of the nurses in the category "Communication" and "Support environment." The responses for the category "Role Model" were favourable in all items, especially PAPEL18. In "Management Style", the highest favourable rating was 79% for GESTAO16. the categories "Communication" and "Support Environment" revealed a greater fragility of the nurses in comparison to the categories "Role Model" and "Management Style".

  16. Pneumoconiosis and respiratory problems in dental laboratory technicians: Analysis of 893 dental technicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilek Ergün

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To explore the rate of pneumoconiosis in dental technicians (DTP and to evaluate the risk factors. Material and Methods: Data of 893 dental technicians, who were admitted to our hospital in the period January 2007–May 2012, from 170 dental laboratories were retrospectively examined. Demographic data, respiratory symptoms, smoking status, work duration, working fields, exposure to sandblasting, physical examination findings, chest radiographs, pulmonary function tests and high-resolution computed tomography results were evaluated. Results: Dental technicians’ pneumoconiosis rate was 10.1% among 893 cases. The disease was more common among males and in those exposed to sandblasting who had 77-fold higher risk of DTP. The highest profusion subcategory was 3/+ (according to the International Labour Organization (ILO 2011 standards and the large opacity rate was 13.3%. Conclusions: To the best of our knowledge, it was the largest DTP case series (N = 893/90 in the literature in English. Health screenings should be performed regularly for the early diagnosis of pneumoconiosis, which is an important occupational disease for dental technicians.

  17. Pharmacy technicians' attitudes about their roles in Iowa public safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjos, Andrea L; Andreski, Michael T

    2015-01-01

    To describe and apply a model for combining self-assessed frequency and criticality for pharmacy technicians' roles and to evaluate similarities and differences between attitudes toward public safety in various practice settings. Cross-sectional mail survey of randomly selected pharmacy technicians in one state. Iowa in fall 2012. 1,000 registered technicians. Mail survey with option for online completion. Scored ratings related to perceptions of frequency and criticality of roles. Technicians rated role frequency on a scale from 1 (not responsible) to 6 (daily) and role criticality on a scale from 1 (no importance) to 4 (extremely important). A weighted relative importance score was ranked to show importance of the role considering frequency and criticality together. The response rate was 25.81%. Ratings for frequency were correlated to ratings for criticality for 22 of 23 roles. A Mann-Whitney U test found a difference between ambulatory technicians and hospital technicians. A visual matrix of a dual-scaled analysis showed both groups' role ratings to be positively linearly related. Hospital technicians showed wider discrimination in their ratings for some roles than for others. Perceived role frequency and criticality can be considered together to contextualize the practice environment. The data suggest a relationship between perceived frequency of role performed and perception of a role's criticality. The study found differences between how technicians from various practice settings perceive their roles.

  18. Fiber Optics Technician. Curriculum Research Project. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittington, Herschel K.

    A study examined the role of technicians in the fiber optics industry and determined those elements that should be included in a comprehensive curriculum to prepare fiber optics technicians for employment in the Texas labor market. First the current literature, including the ERIC database and equipment manufacturers' journals were reviewed. After…

  19. [Assisted suicide in Germany: medical diagnoses and personal reasons of 117 decedents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruns, F; Blumenthal, S; Hohendorf, G

    2016-02-01

    In Germany both scientific and public debates on physician assisted suicide often focus on patients with unbearable suffering in terminal condition. Proponents of physician assisted suicide bring forward the argument that there are end-of-life situations where only assisted suicide can bring relief from intolerable pain, dyspnea or other symptoms. But does focusing on unbearable symptoms in terminal condition reflect the reality of assisted suicide? Our data from 117 assisted suicides in Germany indicates that the reasons for assisted suicide are more complex than the current debate in Germany suggests. We analyzed diagnoses and reasons that prompted patients to suicide with the help of the German right-to-die organization "Sterbehilfe Deutschland" (StHD) between 2010 and 2013. 118 case reports of assisted suicide published by StHD were evaluated retrospectively. Between 2010 and 2013 StHD provided assistance in 118 suicides. 71 % of the deceased were women. 67 % were aged 70 years or older. 25,6 % suffered from metastasized cancer, 20,5 % had a severe neurological disease. 23 % suffered from age-associated diseases or disability. 14,5 % of the decedents had a predominant psychiatric diagnose, 7,7 % were physically and mentally healthy. The main reasons for suicide were loss of life perspective in the face of a severe disease (29 %), fear of care dependency (23,9 %), weariness of life without any severe disease (20,5 %). Only 12,8 % named non-treatable symptoms as a reason. Loss of life perspective in the face of a severe disease, fear of long-term care and weariness of life without any severe disease rather than unbearable suffering of non-treatable symptoms seem to be the most common reasons for members of StHD to commit suicide. These empirical findings should be mentioned in future debates on assisted suicide in Germany. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. HIV-serodiscordant couples desiring a child: 'treatment as prevention,' preexposure prophylaxis, or medically assisted procreation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabileau, Guillaume; Schwarzinger, Michael; Flores, Juan; Patrat, Catherine; Luton, Dominique; Epelboin, Sylvie; Mandelbrot, Laurent; Matheron, Sophie; Yazdanpanah, Yazdan

    2015-09-01

    We sought to assess the residual risk of HIV transmission, cost, and cost-effectiveness of various strategies that can help fertile HIV-uninfected female/HIV-1-infected male on combination antiretroviral therapy with plasma HIV RNA <50 copies/mL couples to have a child: (1) unprotected sexual intercourse (treatment as prevention); (2) treatment as prevention limited to fertile days (targeting fertile days); (3) treatment as prevention with preexposure prophylaxis (tenofovir/emtricitabine); (4) treatment as prevention and preexposure prophylaxis limited to fertile days; or (5) medically assisted procreation (MAP). This was a model-based, cost-effectiveness analysis performed from a French societal perspective. Input parameters derived from international literature included: 85% probability of live births in different strategies, 0.0083%/mo HIV transmission risk with unprotected vaginal intercourse, 1% HIV mother-to-child transmission rate, and 4.4% birth defect risk related to combination antiretroviral therapy when the mother is infected at conception. Targeting fertile days and preexposure prophylaxis were estimated to decrease the risk of HIV transmission by 80% and 67%, respectively, and by 93.4% for preexposure prophylaxis limited to fertile days (the relative risk of transmission considering the combination of both strategies assuming to be (1-80%)*(1-67%) = 16.6% in basecase). Tenofovir/emtricitabine monthly cost was set at €540. The HIV transmission risk was highest with treatment as prevention and lowest for MAP (5.4 and 0.0 HIV-infected women/10,000 pregnancies, respectively). Targeting fertile days was more effective than preexposure prophylaxis (0.9 vs 1.8) and associated with lowest costs. Preexposure prophylaxis limited to fertile days was more effective than targeting fertile days (0.3 vs 0.9) with a cost-effectiveness ratio of €1,130,000/life year saved; MAP cost-effectiveness ratio when compared with preexposure prophylaxis limited to fertile

  1. Near-peer-assisted learning (NPAL) in undergraduate medical students and their perception of having medical interns as their near peer teacher.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aba Alkhail, Bahaa

    2015-04-01

    A near-peer-assisted learning term (NPAL) is "a trainee one or more years senior to another trainee". The current study is aiming to determine the pattern of NPAL activities, to compare its effect on student's course achievement score and to determine the perception of students regarding having near-peer clinical teaching from their fellow medical interns. A total of 189 third year medical students participated in the study. The study questionnaire contains three sections. The first is the focus group section, self-administered questions and lastly quality control section. Trained staff helped in conducting the data collection. Clinical teaching with mentoring was experienced by 116 students (61.4%) from their assigned interns in the early clinical experience course. The results of the study showed higher course achievement grades for students who experienced mentoring with clinical teaching compared to those students who experienced mentoring only, but it did not reach statistical significance. The study also found that most medical students acknowledged and agree that their near peers medical interns could provide unique input in helping them mastering clinical and communication skills competencies, the average percent for the seven opinion questions of the response agree combined with strongly agree was 62%. In conclusion, third year medical students recognize the unique and important role of near peer teaching in under graduate medical education and its importance for their professional development. NPAL strategy should be encouraged and used in other medical schools. The benefits of NPAL to peer teacher and in late clinical medical years needed to be investigated in future studies.

  2. Productivity Assessment of Physician Assistants and Nurse Practitioners in Oncology in an Academic Medical Center

    OpenAIRE

    Moote, Marc; Nelson, Ron; Veltkamp, Robin; Campbell, Darrell

    2012-01-01

    Productivity measurement for physician assistants and nurse practitioners can be challenging. This study quantifies their productivity in oncology according to economic indicators such as charges and work relative value units.

  3. Experiences of Living With Opioid Dependence: An Interview Study Among Individuals Participating in Medication-Assisted Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melin, Ylva; Eklund, Margita; Lindgren, Britt-Marie

    2017-01-01

    In order to describe experiences of living with opioid dependence, thirteen interviews were conducted with people participating in medication-assisted treatment. The results showed that living with opioid dependence is about the two-faced drug. The participant's past was a constant burden in life, and the drug filled a spiritual emptiness. The participant's described a life in chaos and pain, and furthermore, a life without dignity and in alienation. Opioid dependence means great suffering. Having a holistic view and by gaining an understanding of the complexities of opioid dependence, healthcare professionals can provide nonjudgmental and respectful treatment.

  4. Social Workers’ Knowledge and Perceptions of Effectiveness and Acceptability of Medication Assisted Treatment of Substance Use Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bride, Brian E.; Abraham, Amanda J.; Kintzle, Sara; Roman, Paul M.

    2012-01-01

    Data from a national study of 345 privately-funded, community-based substance use disorder (SUD) treatment centers was used to investigate social workers’ knowledge, perceptions of effectiveness, and perceptions of the acceptability of medication assisted treatments (MATs) for SUDs. Results reveal the importance of exposure to MATs for social workers to develop a knowledge base regarding the effectiveness of various pharmacological agents. Results also underline the importance of social workers’ perceptions of effectiveness in forming opinions regarding the acceptability of the use of MATs in SUD treatment. Lastly, a 12-step orientation towards treatment has a negative influence on social workers’ opinions regarding the acceptability of MATs. PMID:23301934

  5. Social workers' knowledge and perceptions of effectiveness and acceptability of medication assisted treatment of substance use disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bride, Brian E; Abraham, Amanda J; Kintzle, Sara; Roman, Paul M

    2013-01-01

    Data from a national study of 345 privately funded, community-based substance use disorder (SUD) treatment centers were used to investigate social workers' knowledge, perceptions of effectiveness, and perceptions of the acceptability of medication assisted treatments (MATs) for SUDs. Results reveal the importance of exposure to MATs for social workers to develop a knowledge base regarding the effectiveness of various pharmacological agents. Results also underline the importance of social workers' perceptions of effectiveness in forming opinions regarding the acceptability of the use of MATs in SUD treatment. Lastly, a 12-Step orientation toward treatment has a negative influence on social workers' opinions regarding the acceptability of MATs.

  6. Humanitarian and medical challenges of assisting new refugees in Lebanon and Iraq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Abu Sa’Da

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The massive and continuing flows of Syrian and Palestinian refugees to Syria’s neighbours have shown the limitations of humanitarian practice and present new challenges for medical and humanitarian interventions.

  7. Computerized Decision Support Improves Medication Review Effectiveness : An Experiment Evaluating the STRIP Assistant's Usability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulendijk, Michiel C; Spruit, Marco R; Drenth-van Maanen, A Clara; Numans, Mattijs E; Brinkkemper, Sjaak; Jansen, Paul A F; Knol, Wilma

    BACKGROUND: Polypharmacy poses threats to patients' health. The Systematic Tool to Reduce Inappropriate Prescribing (STRIP) is a drug optimization process for conducting medication reviews in primary care. To effectively and efficiently incorporate this method into daily practice, the STRIP

  8. The effects of medical factors on transfer deficits in Public Assistance in Japan: a quantile regression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Masayoshi

    2011-12-01

    In countries where local governments are heavily involved in financing health care for the indigent, regional disparities in local revenues may adversely affect the access of the poor to medical care. It is thus important to examine how central governments provide funds for such local medical needs. In Japan, local governments finance all medical costs for the poor through their Public Assistance (PA) programs. Using the unique mechanism of the Japanese system of central grants, I construct a measure of "transfer deficit" which shows the portion of the PA expenditures that fails to be secured by the central grants. The distribution of such a measure provides important information to assess the regional equity in financing local programs. The results suggest a compromise on the regional equity in financing medical care for the indigent. Then, I explore the determinants of the deficit measure by performing a quantile regression analysis. Since no effects of potential determinants imply that the central grants well accommodate changes in local needs, finding such effects helps evaluate the performance of the transfer system. The results shows that, among others, the number of PA households and the factors related to mental illness of PA recipients have positive impacts that attenuate toward the top of the conditional quantile of the transfer deficit. I elaborate on plausible causes of such attenuating responses.

  9. Manganese oxide nanoparticle-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry for medical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Taira, Kenji Kitajima, Hikaru Katayanagi, Eiichiro Ichiishi and Yuko Ichiyanagi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We prepared and characterized manganese oxide magnetic nanoparticles (d =5.6 nm and developed nanoparticle-assited laser desorption/ionization (nano-PALDI mass spectrometry. The nanoparticles had MnO2 and Mn2O3 cores conjugated with hydroxyl and amino groups, and showed paramagnetism at room temperature. The nanoparticles worked as an ionization assisting reagent in mass spectroscopy. The mass spectra showed no background in the low m/z. The nanoparticles could ionize samples of peptide, drug and proteins (approx. 5000 Da without using matrix, i.e., 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB, 4-hydroxy-α-cinnamic acid (CHCA and liquid matrix, as conventional ionization assisting reagents. Post source decay spectra by nano-PALDI mass spectrometry will yield information of the chemical structure of analytes.

  10. A System Approach to Navy Medical Education and Training. Appendix 34. Competency Curriculum for Orthopedic Assistant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-08-31

    Observation and Direction of Orthopedic Nursing MODULE 3: TURNING PATIENT ON SPECIAL ORTHOPEDIC EQUIPMENT TASKS a. Turn patient on circo -electric bed b...Turn patient on Stryker frame PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVE (Stimulus) Upon physician’s orders (Behavior) The ORTHA will turn patient on circo -electric bed...or Stryker frame (Conditions) With indirect supervision and assistance; using appropriate equipment for circo -electric bed or Stryker frame (Criteria

  11. Targeted simulation and education to improve cardiac arrest recognition and telephone assisted CPR in an emergency medical communication centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardeland, Camilla; Skåre, Christiane; Kramer-Johansen, Jo; Birkenes, Tonje S; Myklebust, Helge; Hansen, Andreas E; Sunde, Kjetil; Olasveengen, Theresa M

    2017-05-01

    Recognition of cardiac arrest and prompt activation time by emergency medical dispatch are key process measures that have been associated with improved survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). The aim of this study is to improve recognition of OHCA and time to initiation of telephone assisted chest compressions in an emergency medical communication centre (EMCC). A prospective, interventional study implementing targeted interventions in an EMCC. Interventions included: (1) lectures focusing on agonal breathing and interrogation strategy (2) simulation training (3) structured dispatcher feedback (4) web-based telephone assisted CPR training program. All ambulance-confirmed OHCA calls in the study period were assessed and relevant process and result measures were recorded pre- and post-intervention. Cardiac arrest was reported as (1) recognised, (2) not recognised or (3) delayed recognition. We included 331 and 230 calls pre- and post-intervention, respectively. Recognition of cardiac arrest improved significantly after intervention (89 vs. 95%, p=0.024). Delayed recognition was significantly reduced (21 vs. 6%, p>0.001), as was misinterpretation of agonal breathing (25 vs. 10%, pquality metrics can facilitate development of targeted education and training. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. 16th International Conference on Medical Image Computing and Computer Assisted Intervention

    CERN Document Server

    Klinder, Tobias; Li, Shuo

    2014-01-01

    This book contains the full papers presented at the MICCAI 2013 workshop Computational Methods and Clinical Applications for Spine Imaging. The workshop brought together researchers representing several fields, such as Biomechanics, Engineering, Medicine, Mathematics, Physics and Statistic. The works included in this book present and discuss new trends in those fields, using several methods and techniques in order to address more efficiently different and timely applications involving signal and image acquisition, image processing and analysis, image segmentation, image registration and fusion, computer simulation, image based modelling, simulation and surgical planning, image guided robot assisted surgical and image based diagnosis.

  13. Investigation of Japan Disaster Medical Assistance Team response guidelines assuming catastrophic damage from a Nankai Trough earthquake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anan, Hideaki; Kondo, Hisayoshi; Akasaka, Osamu; Oshiro, Kenichi; Nakamura, Mitsunobu; Kiyozumi, Tetsuro; Yamada, Norihiko; Homma, Masato; Morino, Kazuma; Nakayama, Shinichi; Otomo, Yasuhiro; Koido, Yuichi

    2017-07-01

    Transporting critically ill patients outside of disaster-affected areas for treatment is an important activity of Japan Disaster Medical Assistance Teams (DMATs). We investigated whether this activity is possible after possible catastrophic damage from a Nankai Trough earthquake. Japan was divided into three areas based on the level of predicted damage (definitely, possibly, and non-affected areas). A survey of DMATs and the locations of emergency base hospitals and intensive care units (ICUs) in each area was carried out, and the ability to support disaster areas was investigated. Next, a survey of wide-area medical transport by Self-Defense Force aircraft and the medical transport abilities of helicopter ambulances was carried out. The numbers of ICU beds in each area were compared, and the capacity to accept patients was investigated. Finally, subjects for further study were examined. The number of DMATs that could be sent from non-affected areas was insufficient. The number of patients that can be transported by Self-Defense Force aircraft and helicopter ambulance during the first 3 days was determined to be 1,443. The number of patients that can be accepted by ICUs in non-affected areas was insufficient. A system needs to be developed to provide medical treatment for critically ill patients within disaster areas during the acute phase. This will require DMAT operational reforms and the creation of logistics systems such as the supply of resources for earthquake-reinforced hospitals. In addition to patient transport, systems to provide medical care inside disaster-affected areas are needed.

  14. Chemistry technician performance evaluation program Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shawver, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    The Arizona Nuclear Power Project (ANPP), a three-reactor site located 50 miles west of Phoenix, Arizona, has developed and implemented a program for evaluating individual chemistry technician analytical performance on a routine basis. About 45 chemistry technicians are employed at the site, 15 at each operating unit. The technicians routinely perform trace level analyses for impurities of concern to PWRs. Each month a set of blind samples is provided by an outside vendor. The blind samples contain 16 parameters which are matrixed to approximate the PWR's primary and secondary cycles. Nine technicians receive the samples, three from each operating unit, and perform the required analyses. Acceptance criteria for successful performance on the blind parameters is based on the values found in the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) Document 83-016, Revision 2, August 1989, Chemistry Quality Control Program. The goal of the program is to have each technician demonstrate acceptable performance on each of 16 analytical parameters. On completion of each monthly set, a summary report of all of the analytical results for the sample set is prepared. From the summary report, analytical bias can be detected, technician performance is documented, and overall laboratory performance can be evaluated. The program has been very successful at satisfying the INPO requirement that the analytical performance of each individual technician should be checked on at least a six-month frequency for all important parameters measured. This paper describes the program as implemented at the Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station and provides a summary report and trend and bias graphs for illustrative purposes

  15. Education to reduce potentially harmful medication use among residents of assisted living facilities: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitkälä, Kaisu H; Juola, Anna-Liisa; Kautiainen, Hannu; Soini, Helena; Finne-Soveri, U Harriet; Bell, J Simon; Björkman, Mikko

    2014-12-01

    The objectives of this study were (1) to investigate the effect of nurse training on the use of potentially harmful medications; and (2) to explore the effect of nurse training on residents' health-related quality of life (HRQoL), health service utilization, and mortality. A randomized controlled trial. In total, 227 residents in 20 wards of assisted living facilities in Helsinki were recruited. The 20 wards were randomized into those in which (1) staff received two 4-hour training sessions on appropriate medication treatment (intervention group), and (2) staff received no additional training and continued to provide routine care (control group). Two 4-hour interactive training sessions for nursing staff based on constructive learning theory to recognize potentially harmful medications and corresponding adverse drug events. Use of potentially harmful medications, HRQoL assessed using the 15 dimensional instrument of health-related quality of life, health service utilization, and mortality assessed at baseline, and 6 and 12 months. During the 12-month follow-up, the mean number of potentially harmful medications decreased in the intervention wards [-0.43, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.71 to -0.15] but remained constant in the control wards (+0.11, 95% CI -0.09 to +0.31) (P = .004, adjusted for age, sex, and comorbidities). HRQoL declined more slowly in the intervention wards (-0.038 (95% CI -0.054 to -0.022) than in the control wards (-0.072 (95% CI -0.089 to -0.055) (P = .005, adjusted for age, sex, and comorbidities). Residents of the intervention wards had significantly less hospital days (1.4 days/person/year, 95% CI 1.2-1.6) than in the control wards (2.3 days/person/year; 95% CI 2.1-2.7) (relative risk 0.60, 95% CI 0.49-0.75, P assisted living facilities. Copyright © 2014 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The debate about physician assistance in dying: 40 years of unrivalled progress in medical ethics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Søren

    2015-01-01

    Some issues in medical ethics have been present throughout the history of medicine, and thus provide us with an opportunity to ascertain: (1) whether there is progress in medical ethics; and (2) what it means to do good medical ethics. One such perennial issue is physician assistance in dying (PAD). This paper provides an account of the PAD debate in this journal over the last 40 years. It concludes that there is some (but limited) progress in the debate. The distinctions, analogies and hypothetical examples have proliferated, as have empirical studies, but very little has changed in terms of the basic arguments. The paper further argues that many of the contributions to the debate fail to engage fully with the concerns people have about the legal introduction of PAD in the healthcare system, perhaps because many of the contributions sit on the borderline between academic analysis and social activism. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  17. Using augmented reality as a clinical support tool to assist combat medics in the treatment of tension pneumothoraces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Kenneth L; Doswell, Jayfus T; Fashola, Olatokunbo S; Debeatham, Wayne; Darko, Nii; Walker, Travelyan M; Danner, Omar K; Matthews, Leslie R; Weaver, William L

    2013-09-01

    This study was to extrapolate potential roles of augmented reality goggles as a clinical support tool assisting in the reduction of preventable causes of death on the battlefield. Our pilot study was designed to improve medic performance in accurately placing a large bore catheter to release tension pneumothorax (prehospital setting) while using augmented reality goggles. Thirty-four preclinical medical students recruited from Morehouse School of Medicine performed needle decompressions on human cadaver models after hearing a brief training lecture on tension pneumothorax management. Clinical vignettes identifying cadavers as having life-threatening tension pneumothoraces as a consequence of improvised explosive device attacks were used. Study group (n = 13) performed needle decompression using augmented reality goggles whereas the control group (n = 21) relied solely on memory from the lecture. The two groups were compared according to their ability to accurately complete the steps required to decompress a tension pneumothorax. The medical students using augmented reality goggle support were able to treat the tension pneumothorax on the human cadaver models more accurately than the students relying on their memory (p augmented reality group required more time to complete the needle decompression intervention (p = 0.0684), this did not reach statistical significance. Reprint & Copyright © 2013 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  18. Designated Medical Directors for Emergency Medical Services: Recruitment and Roles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slifkin, Rebecca T.; Freeman, Victoria A.; Patterson, P. Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Context: Emergency medical services (EMS) agencies rely on medical oversight to support Emergency Medical Technicians (EMTs) in the provision of prehospital care. Most states require EMS agencies to have a designated medical director (DMD), who typically is responsible for the many activities of medical oversight. Purpose: To assess rural-urban…

  19. [Education required for next generation of clinical laboratory technicians: from perspective of three-year educational institutions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sando, Masaru

    2014-05-01

    Considering the education required for the next generation of clinical laboratory technicians in terms of elements necessary for the technicians, it is generally important for them to be "needed in the medical field", and the three-year educational institutions for training them are expected to nurture technicians who can work with "skills of immediate use." Herein, the phrase "skills of immediate use" does not simply signify knowledge and techniques, but signifies skills including behavior as medical staff. In addition, "growth potential" permitting continuous growth with self-education and aspiration for improvement after gaining employment is of significance. We refer to the "skills of immediate use" and the "growth potential" integrally as "Genba-ryoku(on-site capabilities)", and have striven for improvement in those capabilities as a basic educational policy of our school. In any period, the medical field needs medical staff who can perform greetings, cleaning, etc., as sound practices and who are well-mannered. It is my belief that educational institutions have to fulfill their mission by nurturing medical staff who possess "toughness to work unaided" as well as a "gentle mind."

  20. Recent developments in genetics and medically assisted reproduction: from research to clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, J C; Aittomäki, K; Borry, P; Cornel, M C; de Wert, G; Dondorp, W; Geraedts, J; Gianaroli, L; Ketterson, K; Liebaers, I; Lundin, K; Mertes, H; Morris, M; Pennings, G; Sermon, K; Spits, C; Soini, S; van Montfoort, A P A; Veiga, A; Vermeesch, J R; Viville, S; Macek, M

    2018-01-01

    Two leading European professional societies, the European Society of Human Genetics and the European Society for Human Reproduction and Embryology, have worked together since 2004 to evaluate the impact of fast research advances at the interface of assisted reproduction and genetics, including their application into clinical practice. In September 2016, the expert panel met for the third time. The topics discussed highlighted important issues covering the impacts of expanded carrier screening, direct-to-consumer genetic testing, voiding of the presumed anonymity of gamete donors by advanced genetic testing, advances in the research of genetic causes underlying male and female infertility, utilisation of massively parallel sequencing in preimplantation genetic testing and non-invasive prenatal screening, mitochondrial replacement in human oocytes, and additionally, issues related to cross-generational epigenetic inheritance following IVF and germline genome editing. The resulting paper represents a consensus of both professional societies involved.

  1. Rules and economic features connected with adoption and medical assisted reproduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemion Braho

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this brief study is to analyze the phenomenon of adoption and the assisted reproductive technologies, not from a social point of view as experts often do, but on an economic point of view. This could be possible analyzing first of all the laws regulating these “markets” and the influence of this regulation on the economic aspects. Although it could seem immoral to study this social aspects connected with filiation, we know that the social desire of some parents or some individuals to have children and their possibility is oriented by laws, economic possibilities and economy in general. This study is based on an empirical methodology, taking as study-case Italy and trying not to give any ethic orientation.

  2. Wireless Sensors Grouping Proofs for Medical Care and Ambient Assisted-Living Deployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trček, Denis

    2016-01-02

    Internet of Things (IoT) devices are rapidly penetrating e-health and assisted living domains, and an increasing proportion among them goes on the account of computationally-weak devices, where security and privacy provisioning alone are demanding tasks, not to mention grouping proofs. This paper, therefore, gives an extensive analysis of such proofs and states lessons learnt to avoid possible pitfalls in future designs. It sticks with prudent engineering techniques in this field and deploys in a novel way the so called non-deterministic principle to provide not only grouping proofs, but (among other) also privacy. The developed solution is analyzed by means of a tangible metric and it is shown to be lightweight, and formally for security.

  3. Wireless Sensors Grouping Proofs for Medical Care and Ambient Assisted-Living Deployment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Trček

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Internet of Things (IoT devices are rapidly penetrating e-health and assisted living domains, and an increasing proportion among them goes on the account of computationally-weak devices, where security and privacy provisioning alone are demanding tasks, not to mention grouping proofs. This paper, therefore, gives an extensive analysis of such proofs and states lessons learnt to avoid possible pitfalls in future designs. It sticks with prudent engineering techniques in this field and deploys in a novel way the so called non-deterministic principle to provide not only grouping proofs, but (among other also privacy. The developed solution is analyzed by means of a tangible metric and it is shown to be lightweight, and formally for security.

  4. Adopting evidence-based medically assisted treatments in substance abuse treatment organizations: roles of leadership socialization and funding streams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Terry C; Davis, Carolyn D; Roman, Paul M

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the organizational adoption of medically assisted treatments (MAT) for substance use disorders (SUDs) in a representative sample of 555 US for-profit and not-for-profit treatment centers. The study examines organizational adoption of these treatments in an institutionally contested environment that traditionally has valued behavioral treatment, using sociological and resource dependence frameworks. The findings indicate that socialization of leadership, measured by formal clinical education, is related to the adoption of MAT. Funding patterns also affect innovation adoption, with greater adoption associated with higher proportions of earned income from third party fees for services, and less adoption associated with funding from criminal justice sources. These findings may generalize to other social mission-oriented organizations where innovation adoption may be linked to private and public benefit values inherent in the type of socialization of leadership and different patterns of funding support.

  5. Medical assistance to civilians during peacekeeping operations: wielding the double-edged sword.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reade, M C

    Peacekeeping operations have become the main operational activity of the armed forces of the developed world over the past 10 years--a trend which appears likely to continue. Peacekeepers often remain deployed long after the armed conflict has ceased to help reconstruct civilian infrastructure. It is often possible to use the excess capacity of medical support units deployed with military forces to provide help to the local population. While this is appropriate immediately after a conflict when civilian clinics are overwhelmed, in the more prolonged reconstruction phase the seemingly simple clinical imperative to treat as many patients as possible becomes more complex.

  6. ESHRE Task Force on Ethics and Law 23: medically assisted reproduction in singles, lesbian and gay couples, and transsexual people†.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Wert, G; Dondorp, W; Shenfield, F; Barri, P; Devroey, P; Diedrich, K; Tarlatzis, B; Provoost, V; Pennings, G

    2014-09-01

    This Task Force document discusses ethical issues arising with requests for medically assisted reproduction from people in what may be called 'non-standard' situations and relationships. The document stresses that categorically denying access to any of these groups cannot be reconciled with a human rights perspective. If there are concerns about the implications of assisted reproduction on the wellbeing of any of the persons involved, including the future child, a surrogate mother or the applicants themselves, these concerns have to be considered in the light of the available scientific evidence. When doing so it is important to avoid the use of double standards. More research is needed into the psychosocial implications of raising children in non-standard situations, especially with regard to single women, male homosexual couples and transsexual people. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Physician-assisted suicide of patients with dementia. A medical ethical analysis with a special focus on patient autonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gather, Jakov; Vollmann, Jochen

    2013-01-01

    For many years there has been a controversial international debate on physician-assisted suicide (PAS). While proponents of PAS regularly refer to the unbearable suffering and the right of self-determination of incurably ill patients, critics often warn about the diverse risks of abuse. In our article, we aim to present ethical arguments for and against PAS for patients in an early stage of dementia. Our focus shall be on ethical questions of autonomy, conceptual and empirical findings on competence and the assessment of mental capacity to make health care decisions. While the capacity to make health care decisions represents an ethically significant precondition for PAS, it becomes more and more impaired in the course of the dementia process. We present conditions that should be met in order to ethically justify PAS for patients with dementia. From both a psychiatric and an ethical perspective, a thorough differential diagnosis and an adequate medical and psychosocial support for patients with dementia considering PAS and their relatives should be guaranteed. If, after due deliberation, the patient still wishes assistance with suicide, a transparent and documented assessment of competence should be conducted by a professional psychiatrist. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Pleural malignant mesothelioma in dental laboratory technicians: A case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mensi, Carolina; Ciullo, Francesco; Barbieri, Gino Pietro; Riboldi, Luciano; Somigliana, Anna; Rasperini, Giulio; Pesatori, Angela Cecilia; Consonni, Dario

    2017-05-01

    Asbestos was used in dentistry as a binder in periodontal dressings and as lining material for casting rings and crucible. However, until now, only one case of malignant mesothelioma with occupational exposure to asbestos in dental practice has been reported. We present 4 pleural mesotheliomas out of 5344 cases identified in Lombardy, Italy, in 2000-2014. Three men had been working as dental laboratory technicians, with asbestos exposure for 10, 34, and 4 years, and one woman had been helping her husband for 30 years in manufacturing dental prostheses. The men described the use of asbestos as a lining material for casting rings, while the woman was not able to confirm this use. We confirm the association of malignant mesothelioma with dental technician work. Dental technicians suffering from mesothelioma should be questioned about past occupational asbestos exposure. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Epidemiology of aplastic anemia in Japanese radiological technicians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitabatake, Takashi; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi; Saito, Akira; Nakamura, Minoru.

    1976-01-01

    Among Japanese radiological technicians, four deaths from aplastic anemia have been recorded. Based on this fact, some epidemiological considerations are tried. During the period from 1930 to 1960, the population of radiological technicians is estimated to be 74,400 man-years, in which 0.5 aplastic anemias are expected. However actually three died from aplastic anemia. This difference is statistically significant at the 1% level. On the other hand, in the period from 1961 to 1973, the observed value is 1 against 0.7 expected. It is concluded that aplastic anemia had been frequently induced among Japanese radiological technicians in the era when there was much exposure to occupational radiation. (auth.)

  10. Addressing cost barriers to medications: a survey of patients requesting financial assistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grande, David; Lowenstein, Margaret; Tardif, Madeleine; Cannuscio, Carolyn

    2014-12-01

    Given that many patients with chronic diseases face cost-related barriers to care, we evaluated patients' views on which providers (both physicians and nonphysicians) to involve and which methods to use to screen for those barriers. We also examined patients' preferences for how physicians consider cost-efficacy trade-offs in decisions. A national survey of 1400 randomly sampled adults with a chronic disease seeking financial assistance (842 respondents). Participants rated their comfort with various providers and tools for identifying cost barriers. Then they rated a randomly assigned clinical vignette that described how a clinical decision was made in the context of a cost-efficacy tradeoff. Vignettes depicted 3 decision types: cost-conscious physician, cost-indifferent physician, or patient-directed. Comfort was rated from 1 to 10-ratings above 7 indicated high comfort. More respondents reported high comfort with physicians screening for cost barriers (81.1%) than with pharmacists (74.8%; P=.002), nurses (69.4%; Pbarriers using administrative records, more respondents reported higher comfort with doctors' offices (58.8%) than with insurance companies (53.3%; P=.03), but similar levels of comfort compared to pharmacies (62.1%; P=.17). Participants favored "patient-directed" decisions with physician input (odds ratio, 4.64; 95% CI, 3.14-6.84; Pbarrier screening approaches, but most favor direct conversations with their doctor and shared decision making in decisions involving cost-efficacy trade-offs.

  11. Biomimetic nanocrystalline apatite coatings synthesized by Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation for medical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visan, A. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma, and Radiation Physics, 409 Atomistilor Street, RO-77125, MG-36, Magurele-Ilfov (Romania); Grossin, D. [CIRIMAT – Carnot Institute, University of Toulouse, ENSIACET, 4 Allée Emile Monso, 31030 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Stefan, N.; Duta, L.; Miroiu, F.M. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma, and Radiation Physics, 409 Atomistilor Street, RO-77125, MG-36, Magurele-Ilfov (Romania); Stan, G.E. [National Institute of Materials Physics, RO-077125, Magurele-Ilfov (Romania); Sopronyi, M.; Luculescu, C. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma, and Radiation Physics, 409 Atomistilor Street, RO-77125, MG-36, Magurele-Ilfov (Romania); Freche, M.; Marsan, O.; Charvilat, C. [CIRIMAT – Carnot Institute, University of Toulouse, ENSIACET, 4 Allée Emile Monso, 31030 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Ciuca, S. [Politehnica University of Bucharest, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Bucharest (Romania); Mihailescu, I.N., E-mail: ion.mihailescu@inflpr.ro [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma, and Radiation Physics, 409 Atomistilor Street, RO-77125, MG-36, Magurele-Ilfov (Romania)

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • We report the deposition by MAPLE of biomimetic apatite coatings on Ti substrates. • This is the first report of MAPLE deposition of hydrated biomimetic apatite films. • Biomimetic apatite powder was synthesized by double decomposition process. • Non-apatitic environments, of high surface reactivity, are preserved post-deposition. • We got the MAPLE complete transfer as thin film of a hydrated, delicate material. -- Abstract: We report the deposition by Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation (MAPLE) technique of biomimetic nanocrystalline apatite coatings on titanium substrates, with potential application in tissue engineering. The targets were prepared from metastable, nanometric, poorly crystalline apatite powders, analogous to mineral bone, synthesized through a biomimetic approach by double decomposition process. For the deposition of thin films, a KrF* excimer laser source was used (λ = 248 nm, τ{sub FWHM} ≤ 25 ns). The analyses revealed the existence, in synthesized powders, of labile non-apatitic mineral ions, associated with the formation of a hydrated layer at the surface of the nanocrystals. The thin film analyses showed that the structural and chemical nature of the nanocrystalline apatite was prevalently preserved. The perpetuation of the non-apatitic environments was also observed. The study indicated that MAPLE is a suitable technique for the congruent transfer of a delicate material, such as the biomimetic hydrated nanohydroxyapatite.

  12. Homoaffective parentage--specifically, a matter of medically assisted reproduction: a parallel between Brazil and Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Marianna

    2011-09-01

    In the field of homosexuality an issue still excessively polemical is the one concerning the possibility of paternity or maternity (biological or adoptive) as a right to be exercised by homosexuals. An even more controversial issue is that of homosexuals' access to assisted reproductive techniques. Carrying out an analysis of two countries, Brazil and Portugal face this with opposite approaches in legislation and legal doctrine. In Brazil, the issue is not legislatively regulated. In Portugal, there is regulatory law. The question that arises is: what is better an extremely reductive and discriminatory law or a true legal vacuum? Several questions may be raised in this context. The first one is: is there indeed a right to parenthood? What to say about surrogacy? In these cases is the commandment of the child's best interest being heeded, which is the vector for any decision relating to an infant or teenager? Differences of understanding will always exist, especially in such a sensitive field as Family Law. But one fact must be accepted: any resolution and legislation in this context must be based on the principle of the best interests of the - born or unborn - child and other constitutional principles as equality, freedom, non-discrimination and human dignity, forgetting the prejudice rooted in society and the unfounded conjectures of homophobic judgments.

  13. Essential math and calculations for pharmacy technicians

    CERN Document Server

    Reddy, Indra K

    2003-01-01

    Working with Roman and Arabic NumeralsUsing Fractions and Decimals in Pharmacy MathUsing Ratios, Proportions and Percentages in Dosage CalculationsApplying Systems of MeasurementsInterpreting Medication OrdersIdentifying Prescription Errors and OmissionsWorking with Liquid Dosage FormsWorking with Solid Dosage FormsAdjusting IsotonicityWorking with Buffer and Ionization ValuesDealing with ReconstitutionsDetermining Milliequivalent StrengthsCalculating Caloric Values Determining IV Flow RatesWorking with Insulin and Heparin ProductsAppendices: A: Working with Temperature ConversionsB: Working with Capsule Dosage FormsC: Dealing with Pediatric Dosages D: Understanding Essential Business Math.

  14. Hydraulics and pneumatics a technician's and engineer's guide

    CERN Document Server

    Parr, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Nearly all industrial processes require objects to be moved, manipulated or subjected to some sort of force. Such movements and manipulations are frequently accomplished by means of devices driven by liquids (hydraulics) or air (pneumatics), the subject of this book. Hydraulics and Pneumatics is written by a practicing process control engineer as a guide to the successful operation of hydraulic and pneumatic systems for all engineers and technicians working with them. Keeping mathematics and theory to a minimum, this practical guide is thorough but accessible to technicians without a

  15. Model-based formalization of medical knowledge for context-aware assistance in laparoscopic surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katić, Darko; Wekerle, Anna-Laura; Gärtner, Fabian; Kenngott, Hannes G.; Müller-Stich, Beat P.; Dillmann, Rüdiger; Speidel, Stefanie

    2014-03-01

    The increase of technological complexity in surgery has created a need for novel man-machine interaction techniques. Specifically, context-aware systems which automatically adapt themselves to the current circumstances in the OR have great potential in this regard. To create such systems, models of surgical procedures are vital, as they allow analyzing the current situation and assessing the context. For this purpose, we have developed a Surgical Process Model based on Description Logics. It incorporates general medical background knowledge as well as intraoperatively observed situational knowledge. The representation consists of three parts: the Background Knowledge Model, the Preoperative Process Model and the Integrated Intraoperative Process Model. All models depend on each other and create a concise view on the surgery. As a proof of concept, we applied the system to a specific intervention, the laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy.

  16. Costs of medically assisted reproduction treatment at specialized fertility clinics in the Danish public health care system: results from a 5-year follow-up cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Terkel; Erb, Karin; Rizvanovic, Amra; Ziebe, Søren; Mikkelsen Englund, Anne L; Hald, Finn; Boivin, Jacky; Schmidt, Lone

    2014-01-01

    To examine the costs to the public health care system of couples in medically assisted reproduction. Longitudinal cohort study of infertile couples initiating medically assisted reproduction treatment. Specialized public fertility clinics in Denmark. Seven hundred and thirty-nine couples having no child at study entry and with data on kind of treatment and live birth (yes/no) for each treatment attempt at the specialized public fertility clinic. Treatment data for medically assisted reproduction attempts conducted at the public fertility clinics were abstracted from medical records. Flow diagrams were drawn for different standard treatment cycles and direct costs at each stage in the flow charts were measured and valued by a bottom-up procedure. Indirect costs were distributed to each treatment cycle on the basis of number of visits as basis. Costs were adjusted to 2012 prices using a constructed medical price index. Live birth, costs. Total costs per live birth in 2012 prices were estimated to 10,755€. Costs per treated couple - irrespective of whether the treatment was terminated by a live birth or not - were estimated at 6607€. Costs per live birth of women assisted reproduction treatment are relatively modest. The results can be generalized to public fertility treatment in Denmark and to other public treatment settings with similar limitations in numbers of public treatment cycles offered. © 2013 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  17. The mCME Project: A Randomized Controlled Trial of an SMS-Based Continuing Medical Education Intervention for Improving Medical Knowledge among Vietnamese Community Based Physicians' Assistants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J Gill

    Full Text Available Community health workers (CHWs provide critical services to underserved populations in low and middle-income countries, but maintaining CHW's clinical knowledge through formal continuing medical education (CME activities is challenging and rarely occurs. We tested whether a Short Message Service (SMS-based mobile CME (mCME intervention could improve medical knowledge among a cadre of Vietnamese CHWs (Community Based Physician's Assistants-CBPAs who are the leading providers of primary medical care for rural underserved populations.The mCME Project was a three arm randomized controlled trial. Group 1 served as controls while Groups 2 and 3 experienced two models of the mCME intervention. Group 2 (passive model participants received a daily SMS bullet point, and were required to reply to the text to acknowledge receipt; Group 3 (interactive model participants received an SMS in multiple choice question format addressing the same thematic area as Group 2, entering an answer (A, B, C or D in their response. The server provided feedback immediately informing the participant whether the answer was correct. Effectiveness was based on standardized examination scores measured at baseline and endline (six months later. Secondary outcomes included job satisfaction and self-efficacy.638 CBPAs were enrolled, randomized, and tested at baseline, with 592 returning at endline (93.7%. Baseline scores were similar across all three groups. Over the next six months, participation of Groups 2 and 3 remained high; they responded to >75% of messages. Group 3 participants answered 43% of the daily SMS questions correctly, but their performance did not improve over time. At endline, the CBPAs reported high satisfaction with the mCME intervention, and deemed the SMS messages highly relevant. However, endline exam scores did not increase over baseline, and did not differ between the three groups. Job satisfaction and self-efficacy scores also did not improve. Average

  18. The mCME Project: A Randomized Controlled Trial of an SMS-Based Continuing Medical Education Intervention for Improving Medical Knowledge among Vietnamese Community Based Physicians' Assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Christopher J; Le Ngoc, Bao; Halim, Nafisa; Nguyen Viet, Ha; Larson Williams, Anna; Nguyen Van, Tan; McNabb, Marion; Tran Thi Ngoc, Lien; Falconer, Ariel; An Phan Ha, Hai; Rohr, Julia; Hoang, Hai; Michiel, James; Nguyen Thi Thanh, Tam; Bird, Liat; Pham Vu, Hoang; Yeshitla, Mahlet; Ha Van, Nhu; Sabin, Lora

    2016-01-01

    Community health workers (CHWs) provide critical services to underserved populations in low and middle-income countries, but maintaining CHW's clinical knowledge through formal continuing medical education (CME) activities is challenging and rarely occurs. We tested whether a Short Message Service (SMS)-based mobile CME (mCME) intervention could improve medical knowledge among a cadre of Vietnamese CHWs (Community Based Physician's Assistants-CBPAs) who are the leading providers of primary medical care for rural underserved populations. The mCME Project was a three arm randomized controlled trial. Group 1 served as controls while Groups 2 and 3 experienced two models of the mCME intervention. Group 2 (passive model) participants received a daily SMS bullet point, and were required to reply to the text to acknowledge receipt; Group 3 (interactive model) participants received an SMS in multiple choice question format addressing the same thematic area as Group 2, entering an answer (A, B, C or D) in their response. The server provided feedback immediately informing the participant whether the answer was correct. Effectiveness was based on standardized examination scores measured at baseline and endline (six months later). Secondary outcomes included job satisfaction and self-efficacy. 638 CBPAs were enrolled, randomized, and tested at baseline, with 592 returning at endline (93.7%). Baseline scores were similar across all three groups. Over the next six months, participation of Groups 2 and 3 remained high; they responded to >75% of messages. Group 3 participants answered 43% of the daily SMS questions correctly, but their performance did not improve over time. At endline, the CBPAs reported high satisfaction with the mCME intervention, and deemed the SMS messages highly relevant. However, endline exam scores did not increase over baseline, and did not differ between the three groups. Job satisfaction and self-efficacy scores also did not improve. Average times spent

  19. Evaluation of a Pilot Medication-Assisted Therapy Program in Kazakhstan: Successes, Challenges, and Opportunities for Scaleup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azizbek A. Boltaev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Study Aims. Evaluate the quality and effectiveness of the medication-assisted therapy (MAT pilot in Kazakhstan and review implementation context and related challenges. Methods. We performed a desk review of MAT policy and program documents and reviewed medical records at three MAT sites in Kazakhstan. MAT patients (n=93 were interviewed to assess their perceptions of the program and its impact on their health, criminal, drug use, and HIV risk related behaviors as well as expenditures on nonprescribed psychoactive drugs. Persons injecting drugs who are not in treatment, MAT program staff, and other stakeholders were interviewed to obtain their perspectives on MAT. Results. Legislation supports introducing MAT as a standard of care for treatment of opioid dependence; however, its progress has been hampered by active opposition. Inadequate access and coverage, insufficient supply management, scarce infrastructure of narcological facilities, limited opportunities for staff development, and restrictive methadone dispensing policies compromise the quality of the intervention and limit its potential benefits. There were significant reductions in criminal, drug use, and HIV risk related behaviors in patients receiving MAT. Conclusions. The MAT pilot in Kazakhstan demonstrated its feasibility and effectiveness in the local context and is recommended for scaleup throughout the country.

  20. The Evolution of Legislation in the Field of Medically Assisted Reproduction and Embryo Stem Cell Research in European Union Members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Paolo Busardò

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Medically Assisted Reproduction (MAR, involving in vitro fertilisation (IVF, and research on embryos have created expectation to many people affected by infertility; at the same time it has generated a surplus of laws and ethical and social debates. Undoubtedly, MAR represents a rather new medical field and constant developments in medicine and new opportunities continue to defy the attempt to respond to those questions. In this paper, the authors reviewed the current legislation in the 28 EU member states trying to evaluate the different legislation paths adopted over the last 15 years and highlighting those EU countries with no specific legislation in place and MAR is covered by a general health Law and those countries in which there are no laws in this field but only “guidelines.” The second aim of this work has been to compare MAR legislation and embryo research in EU countries, which derive from different origins ranging from an extremely prohibitive approach versus a liberal one, going through a cautious regulatory approach.

  1. Effects of the medication nursing assistant role on nurse job satisfaction and stress in long-term care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Margaret J

    2008-01-01

    Long-term care nurses continue to struggle with increasing workloads, fulfilling regulatory requirements and limited staffing resources. One method of impacting the workload is the introduction of the new medication nursing assistant (MNA) role to alleviate the nurse from prolonged time intervals spent administering medications. An early step in MNA role implementation is to evaluate its impact by comparing agencies using the MNA and those not using the role. This article presents findings from a mixed method study examining the efficacy of the MNA role in relationship to job satisfaction and the degree of perceived stress experienced by long-term care nurses. Ninety-one nurses employed at 2 large New Hampshire facilities responded. Findings offer empirical evidence supporting the use of the MNA to reduce job stress and increase satisfaction for licensed nurses. The MNA role is accepted by nurse leaders and viewed as a benefit. Findings also support a correlation between empowerment and decision making in the nursing environment with levels of nurse satisfaction.

  2. Factors impacting upon timely and adequate allocation of prehospital medical assistance and resources to cardiac arrest patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardeland, Camilla; Sunde, Kjetil; Ramsdal, Helge; Hebbert, Susan R; Soilammi, Linda; Westmark, Fredrik; Nordum, Fredrik; Hansen, Andreas E; Steen-Hansen, Jon E; Olasveengen, Theresa M

    2016-12-01

    Explore, understand and address issues that impact upon timely and adequate allocation of prehospital medical assistance and resources to out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients. Mixed-methods design obtaining data for one year in three emergency medical communication centres (EMCC); Oslo-Akershus (OA), Vestfold-Telemark (VT) and Østfold (Ø). Data collection included quantitative data from analysis of dispatch logs, ambulance records and audio files. Qualitative data were collected through in-depth interviews and non-participant observations. OA-, VT- and Ø-EMCC responded to 1095 OHCAs and 579 of these calls were included for further analysis (333, 143 and 103, respectively). There were significant site differences in their recognition of OHCA (89, 94 and 78%, respectively, pmisinterpretation of agonal breathing. Interviews and observations revealed individual differences in protocol use, interrogation strategy and assessment of breathing. Use of protocol was only part of decision making, dispatchers trusted their own clinical experience and intuition, and used assumptions about the patient and the situation as part of decision making. Agonal breathing continues to be the main barrier to recognition of cardiac arrest. Individual differences among dispatchers' strategies can directly impact on performance, mainly due to the wide definition of cardiac arrest and lack of uniform tools for assessment of breathing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Making environmental health interesting for medical students-internet assisted facilitated collaborative learning approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudharsanam, Manni Balasubramaniam

    2014-01-01

    Topics on environmental health are usually neglected by students and it is necessary for them to learn this area with a public health perspective as environment plays a vital role in multi-factorial causation of diseases. Hence there is a need for alternative teaching/learning methods to facilitate students in acquiring the required knowledge. To increase the student interest and enhance their participation in acquiring knowledge in public health perspective of environmental health. Teaching Objectives/Learning Were: At the end of the session students should know the importance of air as an environmental factor in disease causation in special reference to public health hazards, the major sources of air pollution, major pollutants causing the health hazards, the way to measure pollutants and control them. The whole class of students was divided into two batches and one session was planned for each batch. Each batch was divided into six small groups. The groups were given task of exploring the internet on the different topics mentioned in the learning objectives. All the students were asked to explore, compile information and collectively prepare a presentation and present their findings based on their reviews. Students' feedback was collected at the end of each session. Eighty five percent of them were clear about the learning objectives and interested about internet learning. Most of them gave a positive opinion about the newer teaching learning method. Internet assisted group study served as a valuable alternative, innovative, and interesting tool to teach and learn the environmental health as revealed by students' feedback.

  4. Job dynamics of veterinary professionals in an academic research institution. II. Veterinary technician attendance, absenteeism, and pay distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerkamp, Michael J

    2006-09-01

    To understand and better manage attendance and overtime for a team of veterinary technicians, a retrospective analysis of the attendance and time card records was done over a 2-y period. The findings show that veterinary technicians were in the workplace for a combination of straight time and overtime hours for approximately 89% of all compensated hours. The remainder of paid compensation was for vacation (4%), holidays (4%), and sick leave (3%). This team of veterinary technicians earned significantly more overtime hours, as much as 9% of total annual compensated hours, than the reported 3% standard for animal resources programs nationwide. The majority of overtime hours (61%) were for assigned weekend and holiday duty and after-hours veterinary medical emergencies. Veterinary technicians expended sick leave at 75% of the amount accrued and at a statistically significantly rate 65% higher than the national average for unscheduled absences for hourly personnel in animal resources programs. Because the direct cost of absenteeism may exceed 645 dollars per employee annually and because work inappropriately done at premium pay outside of business hours is a controllable expense, sound management of attendance and overtime is important in cost containment for animal resources programs.

  5. Assistive technology and veterans with severe disabilities: examining the relationships among race, personal factors, medical support, income support, and use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alston, Reginald; Lewis, Allen; Loggins, Shondra

    2014-10-01

    Examine the relationship among assistive technology (AT), race, and other demographic characteristics (eg, sex, educational attainment, and employment status), medical coverage, as well as government support for veterans with severe disabilities. Data were analyzed from the Rehabilitation Services Administration-911 dataset collected in the United States in 2012. Descriptive and multivariate analyses were performed. Among veterans with severe disabilities, factors that increased AT usage for European Americans (EAs) and African Americans (AAs) were employment, medical coverage (eg, access to private insurance and Medicare), government support (eg, Supplemental Security Income or Social Security Disability Income), and having a sensory type of disability. Having a mental disability was associated with decreased use of AT for EAs and AAs. Whereas EAs) had more factors associated with a decreased likelihood of using AT, AAs had more factors associated with an increased likelihood. For EA veterans with severe disabilities, receiving Medicaid, veteran benefits, and Workers' Compensation were associated with a decreased likelihood of using AT. AA veterans with severe disabilities were 60% less likely to use AT compared with EAs. Racial differences between AAs and EAs were observed in the use of AT by veterans with severe disabilities based on sex, education, employment status, medical coverage, and government support. AAs were generally less likely to use AT; however, greater exposure to resources such as employment, insurance, and government income support partially explained the differential AT use between EAs and AAs. Future policies and research should address these racial disparities in veterans with severe disabilities to promote equitable AT use and healthy functioning.

  6. Implementation of the ALERT algorithm, a new dispatcher-assisted telephone cardiopulmonary resuscitation protocol, in non-Advanced Medical Priority Dispatch System (AMPDS) Emergency Medical Services centres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stipulante, Samuel; Tubes, Rebecca; El Fassi, Mehdi; Donneau, Anne-Francoise; Van Troyen, Barbara; Hartstein, Gary; D'Orio, Vincent; Ghuysen, Alexandre

    2014-02-01

    Early bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a key factor in improving survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). The ALERT (Algorithme Liégeois d'Encadrement à la Réanimation par Téléphone) algorithm has the potential to help bystanders initiate CPR. This study evaluates the effectiveness of the implementation of this protocol in a non-Advanced Medical Priority Dispatch System area. We designed a before and after study based on a 3-month retrospective assessment of victims of OHCA in 2009, before the implementation of the ALERT protocol in Liege emergency medical communication centre (EMCC), and the prospective evaluation of the same 3 months in 2011, immediately after the implementation. At the moment of the call, dispatchers were able to identify 233 OHCA in the first period and 235 in the second. Victims were predominantly male (59%, both periods), with mean ages of 64.1 and 63.9 years, respectively. In 2009, only 9.9% victims benefited from bystander CPR, this increased to 22.5% in 2011 (p<0.0002). The main reasons for protocol under-utilisation were: assistance not offered by the dispatcher (42.3%), caller physically remote from the victim (20.6%). Median time from call to first compression, defined here as no flow time, was 253s in 2009 and 168s in 2011 (NS). Ten victims were admitted to hospital after ROSC in 2009 and 13 in 2011 (p=0.09). From the beginning and despite its under-utilisation, the ALERT protocol significantly improved the number of patients in whom bystander CPR was attempted. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. NORD's Patient Assistance Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ctx@rarediseases.org Fax: 1-203-517-0978 Cushing’s Disease | Accepting Applications Medical Assistance Co-Pay Assistance Premium Assistance Medication Assistance Contact: 1-855-864-4018 Email: cushings@rarediseases.org Fax: 1-203-517-0978 Cutaneuos ...

  8. Assisting cytopathology training in medically under-resourced countries: defining the problems and establishing solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, A S; Geddie, W; Zarka, M; Sayed, S; Kalebi, A; Wright, C A; Banjo, A; Desai, M; Kaaya, E

    2012-03-01

    Cytology is able to deliver rapid accurate diagnoses with minimal equipment and laboratory infrastructure at minimal cost, and this is especially so for fine needle biopsy (FNB), which is a powerful diagnostic tool in medically resource-poor environments, where histopathology laboratories are small in number and poorly supported financially. The crucial element in the development of cytology services is to train a sufficient number of well trained cytopathologists and cytotechnologists to create a 'critical mass' of personnel who not only provide routine diagnostic services, but also can train an ever expanding number of pathologists, cytotechnologists, and health workers. A review of practical programs to train cytopathologists and cytotechnologists in their own countries will be presented, including a recent series of FNB and cytology tutorials run in sub Saharan Africa. The need for local cytopathology programs and the potential for both local and visiting cytopathologists to provide a faculty will be discussed, as well as a range of possible programs which can bring African pathologists and trainee pathologists to Western institutions for periods of their training. Ideally, the regional Societies of Cytology, including the recently formed West African Society of Cytology, will establish their own diagnostic protocols, training programs, syllabuses, examinations and accreditation and career pathways for both cytopathologists and cytotechnologists, and organize tutorials where they will invite overseas faculty to contribute. Crucially, these new societies will empower cytopathologists and cytotechnologists to approach health services and governments to state the need for cytology services as a cost-effective accurate diagnostic service that enhances patient care. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Students as Technicians: Screening Newborns for Cystic Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusky, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    In this activity, freshman college students learn biotechnology techniques while playing the role of a laboratory technician. They perform simulations of three diagnostic tests used to screen newborns for cystic fibrosis. By performing an ELISA, a PCR analysis, and a conductivity test, students learn how biotechnology techniques can be used to…

  10. 40 CFR 82.40 - Technician training and certification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Technician training and certification. 82.40 Section 82.40 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PROTECTION OF STRATOSPHERIC OZONE Servicing of Motor Vehicle Air Conditioners § 82.40...

  11. Pedagogical Strategies for Training Future Technicians in American Aviation Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazyura, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    The article is devoted to the question of improvement of quality and efficiency of professional training of future technicians in aviation industry in the American educational establishments. Main attention is paid to the studies of pedagogical technologies, which are used for the sake of qualitative and efficient training of specialists of…

  12. Are further education opportunities for emergency care technicians ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. A recent review of emergency care education and training in South Africa resulted in the creation of a new 2-year, 240-credit National Qualifications Framework (NQF) level 6 Emergency Care Technician (ECT) qualification. The National Department of Health (NDoH) view ECTs as 'mid-level workers' in the ...

  13. An Integration of Math with Auto Technician Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela, Hector

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the development of the contextualized math, the course design, student teaching and daily interaction with the students, and the implementation aspects of the research project designed to develop contextualized mathematics and integrate it into the Auto Technician courses. The applied math curriculum was integrated into…

  14. Scheduling technicians and tasks in a telecommunications company

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cordeau, J. F.; Laporte, G.; Pasin, F.

    2010-01-01

    This paper proposes a construction heuristic and an adaptive large neighborhood search heuristic for the technician and task scheduling problem arising in a large telecommunications company. This problem was solved within the framework of the 2007 challenge set up by the French Operational Research...

  15. Curriculum for Energy Use and Conservation Technicians. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull Daniel M.

    A project designed a national curriculum model for Energy Conservation-and-Use Technicians (ECUTs) and developed and tested instructional materials for use in the courses. The two-year postsecondary ECUT curriculum was designed to provide an interdisciplinary technical base (electrical, mechanical, thermal, and fluidal principles) and technical…

  16. National Apprenticeship and Training Standards for Orthotic and Prosthetic Technicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Orthotic and Prosthetic Association, Washington, DC.

    The booklet sets forth the National Apprenticeship and Training Standards for the one-year apprenticeship program for orthotic and/or prosthetic technicians, as developed and recommended by the American Orthotic and Prosthetic Association. Standards in various areas--such as qualifications for apprenticeship, hours of work, salaries, records,…

  17. Fighting Illiteracy--The Role of Library Technicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Sheila

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the need for adult literacy programs and ways in which public libraries may commit their resources to fighting illiteracy. Increased use of library technicians to act as liaison between students, tutors, and the library is advocated as a means of personalizing and enhancing programs. (CLB)

  18. Communication Technician: Apprenticeship Course Outline. Apprenticeship and Industry Training. 2209

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberta Advanced Education and Technology, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The graduate of the Communication Technician apprenticeship program is a certified journeyperson who will be able to: (1) supervise, train and coach apprentices; (2) use a thorough knowledge of electrical and electronic theory and its application to communication and associated equipment used in the telecommunication industry; (3) understand…

  19. Computer-assisted teaching of skin flap surgery: validation of a mobile platform software for medical students.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David P de Sena

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a multimedia software application for mobile platforms to assist in the teaching and learning process of design and construction of a skin flap. Traditional training in surgery is based on learning by doing. Initially, the use of cadavers and animal models appeared to be a valid alternative for training. However, many conflicts with these training models prompted progression to synthetic and virtual reality models. Fifty volunteer fifth- and sixth-year medical students completed a pretest and were randomly allocated into two groups of 25 students each. The control group was exposed for 5 minutes to a standard text-based print article, while the test group used multimedia software describing how to fashion a rhomboid flap. Each group then performed a cutaneous flap on a training bench model while being evaluated by three blinded BSPS (Brazilian Society of Plastic Surgery board-certified surgeons using the OSATS (Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skill protocol and answered a post-test. The text-based group was then tested again using the software. The computer-assisted learning (CAL group had superior performance as confirmed by checklist scores (p<0.002, overall global assessment (p = 0.017 and post-test results (p<0.001. All participants ranked the multimedia method as the best study tool. CAL learners exhibited better subjective and objective performance when fashioning rhomboid flaps as compared to those taught with standard print material. These findings indicate that students preferred to learn using the multimedia method.

  20. Analysis of pharmaceutical assistance in the Taquari Valley, Rio Grande do Sul: profile of service users and access to medication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Kauffmann

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Pharmaceutical assistance concerns actions developed by the pharmacist and other professionals with the purpose of promoting, protecting and restoring health. Medications are an essential tool in this process that focuses on the access to, and the rational use of, drugs. This study is aimed at evaluating the Pharmaceutical Assistance provided by Municipal Health Offices in the Taquari Valley, Rio Grande do Sul. For this purpose, 2,794 users of public pharmacies were interviewed and data was analyzed using descriptive statistics. The users of the public pharmacies were mainly female and individuals with low educational level and income. On average, 2.41 drugs were prescribed per medical prescription and 1.72 of these were procured. Out of the total medicines prescribed, 76.5% were listed in the municipal standard drug list (SDL. Medication was prescribed by its generic name in 81.8% of the prescriptions. Antibiotics and injections were prescribed in 11.9% and 4.0% of the prescriptions, respectively. Users' access to information is partial, which can impair adherence to the treatment. Thus, it is possible to conclude that review of the service is necessary for it to be effective.A Assistência Farmacêutica se preocupa com ações desenvolvidas pelo farmacêutico ou outros profissionais com o propósito de promover, proteger e restaurar a saúde. Medicamentos são ferramentas essenciais nesse processo, que se concentra no acesso e no uso racional de fármacos. Este estudo objetivou a avaliação da Assitência Farmacêutica suprida pela Secretaria Municipal da Saúde no Vale do Taquari, no Rio Grande do Sul. Com esse propósito, 2.794 usuários das farmácias públicas foram entrevistados e analisaram-se os dados usando estatística descritiva. Os usuários das farmácias públicas eram, principalmente, mulheres e indivíduos com baixo nível educacional e financeiro. Na média, 2,41 fármacos eram prescritos por prescrição médica e 1,72 destes

  1. Medical Assistant-Based Care Management for High-Risk Patients in Small Primary Care Practices: A Cluster Randomized Clinical Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freund, T.; Peters-Klimm, F.; Boyd, C.M.; Mahler, C.; Gensichen, J.; Erler, A.; Beyer, M.; Gondan, M.; Rochon, J.; Gerlach, F.M.; Szecsenyi, J.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with multiple chronic conditions are at high risk for potentially avoidable hospitalizations, which may be reduced by care coordination and self-management support. Medical assistants are an increasingly available resource for patient care in primary care practices. OBJECTIVE:

  2. Posttraumatic stress disorder, anxiety and depression following pregnancies conceived through fertility treatments : the effects of medically assisted conception on postpartum well-being

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warmelink, J Catja; Stramrood, Claire A I; Paarlberg, K Marieke; Haisma, Hinke H; Vingerhoets, A J J M; Schultz, Willibrord C M Weijmar; van Pampus, Maria G

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the postpartum prevalence of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), anxiety and depression in women who conceived via medically assisted conception (MAC) and women who conceived naturally. STUDY DESIGN: All women (n = 907) who delivered under supervision of four independent

  3. Identification of medically relevant species of arthroconidial yeasts by use of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolecka, A.; Khayhan, K.; Groenewald, M.; Theelen, B.; Arabatzis, M.; Velegraki, A.; Kostrzewa, M.; Mares, M.; Taj-Aldeen, S.J.; Boekhout, T.

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) was used for an extensive identification study of arthroconidial yeasts, using 85 reference strains from the CBS-KNAW yeast collection and 134 clinical isolates collected from medical centers in Qatar,

  4. A new standard for multidisciplinary health and safety technicians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trinoskey, P.A.; Fry, L.A.; Egbert, W.F.

    2000-01-01

    Over the last two decades, a significant trend in health and safety has been toward greater specialization. However, compartmentalization of health and safety disciplines often leads to an inequity in resources, especially when appropriations overemphasize one risk to the detriment of others. For example, overemphasis on radiological safety can create an imbalance in overall worker protection. A multidisciplinary technical can help restore the balance and provide for a healthier and safer work environment. The key advantages of a multidisciplinary health and safety technician include: Broad coverage of the work area by one technician, More diverse use of the technician pool, Better coverage for off-shift or nonstandard hours, Balance of risks because all hazards are considered, Integrated emergency response, Ownership, Less time of identify the correct person with the requisite skills. We have developed a new standard that establishes the training and related qualifications for a multidisciplinary health and safety technician. The areas of training and qualification that are addressed include elements of industrial hygiene, industrial safety, fire protection, electrical safety, construction safety, and radiation safety. The initial core training program ensures that individuals are trained to the performance of requirements of the job. Initial training is in five areas: Fundamentals, Hazard recognition, Hazard assessment, Hazards controls, Hazards minimization. Core training is followed by formal qualification on specific tasks, including ventilation surveys, air monitoring, noise assessments, radiological monitoring, area inspections, work-area setups, and work coverage. The new standard addresses not only training topics and requirements, but also guidance to ensure that performance objectives are met. The standard applies to technicians, supervisors, technologists, and six specialty areas, including academic institutions and decontamination and decommissioning

  5. Recovery Act: Training Program Development for Commercial Building Equipment Technicians

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leah Glameyer

    2012-07-12

    The overall goal of this project has been to develop curricula, certification requirements, and accreditation standards for training on energy efficient practices and technologies for commercial building technicians. These training products will advance industry expertise towards net-zero energy commercial building goals and will result in a substantial reduction in energy use. The ultimate objective is to develop a workforce that can bring existing commercial buildings up to their energy performance potential and ensure that new commercial buildings do not fall below their expected optimal level of performance. Commercial building equipment technicians participating in this training program will learn how to best operate commercial buildings to ensure they reach their expected energy performance level. The training is a combination of classroom, online and on-site lessons. The Texas Engineering Extension Service (TEEX) developed curricula using subject matter and adult learning experts to ensure the training meets certification requirements and accreditation standards for training these technicians. The training targets a specific climate zone to meets the needs, specialized expertise, and perspectives of the commercial building equipment technicians in that zone. The combination of efficient operations and advanced design will improve the internal built environment of a commercial building by increasing comfort and safety, while reducing energy use and environmental impact. Properly trained technicians will ensure equipment operates at design specifications. A second impact is a more highly trained workforce that is better equipped to obtain employment. Organizations that contributed to the development of the training program include TEEX and the Texas Engineering Experiment Station (TEES) (both members of The Texas A&M University System). TEES is also a member of the Building Commissioning Association. This report includes a description of the project

  6. Developing and Evaluating Medical Humanities Problem-Based Learning Classes Facilitated by the Teaching Assistants Majored in the Liberal Arts: A Longitudinal Crossover Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Fen-Yu; Shieh, Jeng-Yi; Kao, Tze-Wah; Wu, Chau-Chung; Chu, Tzong-Shinn; Chen, Yen-Yuan

    2016-02-01

    Although medical humanities courses taught by teachers from nonmedical backgrounds are not unusual now, few studies have compared the outcome of medical humanities courses facilitated by physicians to that by teaching assistants majored in the liberal arts. The objectives of this study were to (1) analyze the satisfaction of medical students with medical humanities problem-based learning (PBL) classes facilitated by nonmedical teaching assistants (TAF) majored in the liberal arts, and those facilitated by the attending physicians (APF) and (2) examine the satisfaction of medical students with clinical medicine-related and clinical medicine-unrelated medical humanities PBL classes.A total of 123 medical students, randomly assigned to 16 groups, participated in this study. There were 16 classes in the course: 8 of them were TAF classes; and the others were APF classes. Each week, each group rotated from 1 subject of the 16 subjects of PBL to another subject. All of the 16 groups went through all the 16 subjects in the 2013 spring semester. We examined the medical students' satisfaction with each class, based on a rating score collected after each class was completed, using a scale from 0 (the lowest satisfaction) to 100 (the highest satisfaction). We also conducted multivariate linear regression analysis to examine the association between the independent variables and the students' satisfaction.Medical students were more satisfied with the TAF (91.35 ± 7.75) medical humanities PBL classes than APF (90.40 ± 8.42) medical humanities PBL classes (P = 0.01). Moreover, medical students were more satisfied with the clinical medicine-unrelated topics (92.00 ± 7.10) than the clinical medicine-related topics (90.36 ± 7.99) in the medical humanities PBL course (P = 0.01).This medical humanities PBL course, including nonmedical subjects and topics, and nonmedical teaching assistants from the liberal arts as class facilitators, was satisfactory. This

  7. Logistic support provided to Australian disaster medical assistance teams: results of a national survey of team members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitken, Peter; Leggat, Peter; Harley, Hazel; Speare, Richard; Leclercq, Muriel

    2012-01-01

    Background It is likely that calls for disaster medical assistance teams (DMATs) continue in response to international disasters. As part of a national survey, the present study was designed to evaluate the Australian DMAT experience and the need for logistic support. Methods Data were collected via an anonymous mailed survey distributed via State and Territory representatives on the Australian Health Protection Committee, who identified team members associated with Australian DMAT deployments from the 2004 Asian Tsunami disaster. Results The response rate for this survey was 50% (59/118). Most of the personnel had deployed to the South East Asian Tsunami affected areas. The DMAT members had significant clinical and international experience. There was unanimous support for dedicated logistic support with 80% (47/59) strongly agreeing. Only one respondent (2%) disagreed with teams being self sufficient for a minimum of 72 hours. Most felt that transport around the site was not a problem (59%; 35/59), however, 34% (20/59) felt that transport to the site itself was problematic. Only 37% (22/59) felt that pre-deployment information was accurate. Communication with local health providers and other agencies was felt to be adequate by 53% (31/59) and 47% (28/59) respectively, while only 28% (17/59) felt that documentation methods were easy to use and reliable. Less than half (47%; 28/59) felt that equipment could be moved easily between areas by team members and 37% (22/59) that packaging enabled materials to be found easily. The maximum safe container weight was felt to be between 20 and 40 kg by 58% (34/59). Conclusions This study emphasises the importance of dedicated logistic support for DMAT and the need for teams to be self sufficient for a minimum period of 72 hours. There is a need for accurate pre deployment information to guide resource prioritisation with clearly labelled pre packaging to assist access on site. Container weights should be restricted to between

  8. Job satisfaction, stress and burnout in anaesthetic technicians in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluger, M T; Bryant, J

    2008-03-01

    Anaesthetic technicians play a key role in the operating room, yet little is known about their levels of job satisfaction or workplace stress. A blinded, confidential single mail-out survey was posted to anaesthetic technicians in New Zealand. The survey consisted of demographic information, a job satisfaction survey, the Maslach Burnout Inventory and the Short Form 12. At total of 154 forms were returned (51% response rate). Respondents worked predominantly in public hospitals and many had duties outside the operating room. Job satisfaction was related to teamwork, practical nature of work and patient contact, while dissatisfaction was related to lack of respect from nurses and limited career pathway. High to moderate levels of emotional exhaustion (48%), depersonalisation (39%) and low levels of personal accomplishment (58%) were indicators of burnout. The Short Form 12 revealed high levels of physical impairment in 24% and emotional impairment in 35% of respondents. These data suggest that work is needed to evaluate anaesthetic assistants' job structure and actively manage their important physical and emotional sequelae.

  9. Impact of physician assistants on the outcomes of patients with acute myelogenous leukemia receiving chemotherapy in an academic medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glotzbecker, Brett E; Yolin-Raley, Deborah S; DeAngelo, Daniel J; Stone, Richard M; Soiffer, Robert J; Alyea, Edwin P

    2013-09-01

    Inpatient academic medical center care historically has been delivered by faculty physicians in conjunction with physicians in training (house officers [HOs]). Alternative staffing models have emerged secondary to American Counsel for Graduate Medical Education work-hour restrictions. The purpose of this study was to assess the quality of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) care provided by a physician assistant (PA) service compared with a traditional model. Data were retrospectively collected on patients admitted with AML for reinduction chemotherapy from 2008 to 2012. Primary outcome measures were inpatient mortality and length of stay (LOS). Secondary measures included readmissions, intensive care unit (ICU) transfers, consults requested, and radiologic studies ordered. Ninety-five patients with AML were reviewed. Forty-seven patients (49.5%) were admitted to the HO service, and 48 patients (50.5%) were admitted to the PA service. Demographic data were similar between services. LOS was significantly different between the services, with a mean of 36.8 days with the HO model compared with 30.9 days with the PA service (P=.03). The 14-day readmission rate also differed significantly; it was 10.6% (five of 47 patients) and zero for the HO and PA models, respectively (P=.03). The mean number of consults with the HO model was 2.11 (range, zero to five) versus 1.47 (range, zero to four) with the PA service (P=.03). Mortality and ICU transfers were not significantly different. The data demonstrate equivalent mortality and ICU transfers, with a decrease in LOS, readmission rates, and consults for patients cared for in the PA service. This suggests that the PA service is associated with increased operational efficiency and decreased health service use without compromising health care outcomes.

  10. An informatics-based tool to assist researchers in initiating research at an academic medical center: Vanderbilt Customized Action Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulley, Jill M; Harris, Paul A; Yarbrough, Tonya; Swafford, Jonathan; Edwards, Terri; Bernard, Gordon R

    2010-01-01

    The regulatory review and approval process is a significant part of the workflow associated with initiating clinical and translational research projects. Ambiguity concerning submission requirements and expected times associated with the review process can create additional work for research teams and ultimately delay important scientific projects. In an effort to provide assistance to investigators, we have developed an online interactive interface which elicits basic study characteristics for a single project and subsequently produces a list of required administrative applications needed for approval along with clear instructions concerning expectations from the research team. This system, the Vanderbilt Customized Action Plan (V-CAP), was launched in October 2006 and has been well received by researchers. In this article, the authors present (1) the V-CAP project design, (2) a reference workflow associated with Vanderbilt policies and regulations, (3) the V-CAP metrics of use by Vanderbilt research teams, and (4) a list of recommendations for other academic centers considering a similar systems-based approach for helping researchers efficiently navigate processes related to regulatory approval. The informatics-systems-based approach of the V-CAP is scalable to other academic medical centers and may serve as a useful model to help researchers navigate the complexity of the regulatory approvals process.

  11. "I Kicked the Hard Way. I Got Incarcerated." Withdrawal from Methadone During Incarceration and Subsequent Aversion to Medication Assisted Treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maradiaga, Jeronimo A; Nahvi, Shadi; Cunningham, Chinazo O; Sanchez, Jennifer; Fox, Aaron D

    2016-03-01

    Incarceration is a common experience for individuals with opioid use disorder, including those receiving medication assisted treatments (MAT), such as buprenorphine or methadone. In the United States, MAT is rarely available during incarceration. We were interested in whether challenges with methadone maintenance treatment during incarceration affected subsequent attitudes toward MAT following release. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 21 formerly incarcerated individuals with opioid use disorder in community substance abuse treatment settings. Interviews were audio recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using a grounded theory approach. Themes that emerged upon iterative readings of transcripts were discussed by the research team. The three main themes relating to methadone were: 1) rapid dose reduction during incarceration; 2) discontinuity of methadone during incarceration; and 3) post incarceration aversion to methadone. Participants who received methadone maintenance treatment prior to incarceration reported severe and prolonged withdrawal symptoms from rapid dose reductions or disruption of their methadone treatment during incarceration. The severe withdrawal during incarceration contributed to a subsequent aversion to methadone and adversely affected future decisions regarding reengagement in MAT. Though MAT is the most efficacious treatment for opioid use disorder, current penal policy, which typically requires cessation of MAT during incarceration, may dissuade individuals with opioid use disorder from considering and engaging in MAT after release from incarceration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Training nuclear technicians in two-year, post-secondary educational programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hull, D.M.; Roney, M.W.

    1975-01-01

    An available and economical supply to future manpower requirements for various types of nuclear technicians can be met by developing and/or restructuring two-year, post-secondary programs at local educational institutions. The Technical Education Research Centers program is under contract from the U.S. Office of Education to delineate the job requirements and develop curricula and instructional materials for two-year, post-secondary training of nuclear technicians. Six job categories have been identified along with corresponding tasks which the technician performs. These categories are: Reactor Operator, Nuclear Instrumentation Technician, Nuclear QA/QC Technician, Radiochemistry Technician, Radiation Protection Technician and Nuclear Medicine Technician. For the first five categories curricula have been established, courses have been described, and instructional materials are being written

  13. Development of Career Opportunities for Technicians in the Nuclear Medicine Field, Phase I. Interim Report Number 1: Survey of Job Characteristics, Manpower Needs and Training Resources, July 1969.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technical Education Research Center, Cambridge, MA.

    Phase I of a multiphase research program in progress at the Technical Education Research Center, Inc., was conducted to analyze needs and resources in terms of job performance tasks, career opportunities, and training requirements for nuclear medical technicians. Data were gathered through personal interviews with 203 persons, mostly physicians,…

  14. Risk assessment and comparative effectiveness of left ventricular assist device and medical management in ambulatory heart failure patients: design and rationale of the ROADMAP clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Joseph G; Boyle, Andrew J; O'Connell, John B; Horstmanshof, Douglas A; Haas, Donald C; Slaughter, Mark S; Park, Soon J; Farrar, David J; Starling, Randall C

    2015-02-01

    Mechanical circulatory support is now a proven therapy for the treatment of patients with advanced heart failure and cardiogenic shock. The role for this therapy in patients with less severe heart failure is unknown. The objective of this study is to examine the impact of mechanically assisted circulation using the HeartMate II left ventricular assist device in patients who meet current US Food and Drug Administration-defined criteria for treatment but are not yet receiving intravenous inotropic therapy. This is a prospective, nonrandomized clinical trial of 200 patients treated with either optimal medical management or a mechanical circulatory support device. This trial will be the first prospective clinical evaluation comparing outcomes of patients with advanced ambulatory heart failure treated with either ongoing medical therapy or a left ventricular assist device. It is anticipated to provide novel insights regarding relative outcomes with each treatment and an understanding of patient and provider acceptance of the ventricular assist device therapy. This trial will also provide information regarding the risk of events in "stable" patients with advanced heart failure and guidance for the optimal timing of left ventricular assist device therapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Technician turnover and absenteeism in public residential facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaharia, E S; Baumeister, A A

    1978-05-01

    Residential institutions have historically had problems attracting and retaining reliable unskilled personnel to fill technician-level positions. Even though there is little empirical evidence to support a relationship between staff stability and resident habilitation, there assuredly are such effects. A first step toward assessing these effects, and toward controlling costly technician withdrawal behavior (specifically, turnover and absenteeism), is the use of a common set of measures. The precipitants of employee withdrawal may be categorized into three areas that are subject to empirical investigation and intervention: extra-institutional factors, intra-institutional management, and factors surrounding the individual worker. Predictive research, for selection purposes, has not yielded much information that would be of use to administrators. Traditional and more recent explanations were reviewed and some direction suggested for further research.

  16. Digitizing the Facebow: A Clinician/Technician Communication Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalman, Les; Chrapka, Julia; Joseph, Yasmin

    2016-01-01

    Communication between the clinician and the technician has been an ongoing problem in dentistry. To improve the issue, a dental software application has been developed--the Virtual Facebow App. It is an alternative to the traditional analog facebow, used to orient the maxillary cast in mounting. Comparison data of the two methods indicated that the digitized virtual facebow provided increased efficiency in mounting, increased accuracy in occlusion, and lower cost. Occlusal accuracy, lab time, and total time were statistically significant (Pcommunication.

  17. Music without musicians ... but with scientists, technicians and computer companies

    OpenAIRE

    Parolini, Giuditta

    2017-01-01

    Dieser Beitrag ist mit Zustimmung des Rechteinhabers aufgrund einer (DFG geförderten) Allianz- bzw. Nationallizenz frei zugänglich. This publication is with permission of the rights owner freely accessible due to an Alliance licence and a national licence (funded by the DFG, German Research Foundation) respectively. In the early days of music technologies the collaboration between musicians, scientists, technicians and equipment producers was very close. How did this collaboration devel...

  18. Results of the 2015 National Certified Pharmacy Technician Workforce Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desselle, Shane P; Holmes, Erin R

    2017-07-01

    The results of the 2015 National Certified Pharmacy Technician Workforce Survey are described. A survey was e-mailed to a randomized sample of 5,000 certified pharmacy technicians (CPhTs) throughout the United States, with response reminders employed. Survey items eliciting demographic and work characteristics and work life attitudes were generated from the literature and qualitative interviews. This study aimed to describe job satisfaction, sources of stress, profession and employer commitment, education and training, and reasons for entry into the profession among CPhTs and determine relationships between those variables and CPhTs' level of involvement in various work activities, with particular attention paid to differences in practice setting. Frequency statistics, correlation analysis, and means testing were used to meet study objectives and identify significant differences. A total of 516 CPhTs currently working as a pharmacy technician responded to the survey. The CPhTs reported high levels of involvement in more traditional activities but less involvement in those that involve greater cognitive load. Respondents reported moderate levels of job satisfaction and commitment and somewhat high levels of stress overall. Most CPhTs chose to be a pharmacy technician because they desired to enter a healthcare field and help people and were recruited. CPhTs derived benefit from all aspects of education and training evaluated and most from on-the-job training. Perceived value of education and training was associated with higher satisfaction and commitment and with lower stress. There were a number of differences in these work life attitudes across practice settings and by involvement in various job functions. The results of the survey indicated that job satisfaction and commitment were moderate and that stress levels were somewhat high among CPhTs. There were a number of differences in work life attitudes across practice settings and by involvement in various job

  19. Training needs analysis for engineering technicians in Oman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mughairi, Abdulkarim Sultan

    This thesis examines the transition from the Omani Colleges of Technology (CT) to employment of its engineering graduates. It arises out of concerns that the transition to the labour market for engineering graduate is problematical. The research was carried out to identify the knowledge, skills, and abilities (KSA) of engineering technicians required in the Omani market place. The aim is to provide local curriculum designers in the Colleges of Technology with sufficient information about the required KSA in order to create and enhance the engineering curriculum so that it has greater capacity to meet the needs of a variety of stakeholders and of employers in particular. This in turn has the potential to bridge the gap between what is presently taught and what the workplace demands. Personnel psychologists identify views concerning the skills that are required for different jobs. One of these is based on the assumption that quite different skills are required in different jobs (SCANS, 1990). This view generates approaches within job analysis: the worker-oriented and the task-oriented approaches. This research uses Position Analysis Questionnaire (PAQ), which is a worker-oriented job analysis instrument, to investigate the KSA required to perform some of the engineering technician jobs in Omani industries. In addition, semi-structured interviews were used to investigate the factors that either hinder or entirely prevent the new graduates from Colleges of Technology from being accepted in the workforce pool. The major research findings concern the dimensions of knowledge, skills, and abilities of six engineering technician job titles and the major factors that hinder or (prevent) the technical college graduates from being accepted in the market place in Oman. These findings would definitely help design better transition route and bridge the gap between the CT technicians engineering programmes and the workplace demands.

  20. Radiological Control Technician: Phase 1, Site academic training study guides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-10-01

    This volume is a study guide for training Radiological Control Technicians. Provided herein are support materials for learning radiological documentation, communication systems, counting errors and statistics, dosimetry, contamination control, airborne sampling program methods, respiratory protection, radiological source control, environmental monitoring, access control and work area setup, radiological work coverage, shipment and receipt for radioactive material, radiological incidents and emergencies, personnel decontamination, first aid, radiation survey instrumentation, contamination monitoring, air sampling, and counting room equipment

  1. DEGREE OF AWARENESS OF SOFT RELINING MATERIALS BY DENTAL TECHNICIANS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilian Hristov

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the current investigation is to analyze the dental-technicians’ awareness of the soft relining materials, their characteristics, advantages, shortcomings and methods for relining. Materials and methods: For the purpose of this investigation a standard questionnaire has been presented. A direct survey method, documentary and statistical method, as well as graphical methods, including tables, charts, graphics and figures, were used. Data were analysed with the help of IBM SPSS Statistics (ver. 19. Results: One hundred and eight dental technicians were included in the survey, evenly distributed by gender. Removable and fixed prosthodontics is the most commonly mentioned spheres of dental activities. Almost all included in the investigation point out the laboratory relining method as the most frequently used. Acrylic and silicone SRM are the most used groups of relining materials. Change of colour and hardness are the most frequently noticed shortcomings of these materials. The majority of the dental technicians declare that they have never done replacement of SRM or the relining has lasted more than a year. Discussion: The correlation between the age and the years of labour service among the participants is quite obvious. Most of them start working soon after their graduation. Removable prosthodontics is among the priorities for the majority of the labs. Conclusion: Although their unambiguous advantages, the soft relining materials have lots of shortcomings as well. The major problems are connected with their change of colour and hardness. Nevertheless, the dental technicians find them useful and reliable in overcoming specific prosthetic problems.

  2. Direct-to-consumer advertising of success rates for medically assisted reproduction: a review of national clinic websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Jack; Vail, Andy; Roberts, Stephen A

    2017-01-12

    To establish how medically assisted reproduction (MAR) clinics report success rates on their websites. Websites of private and NHS clinics offering in vitro fertilisation (IVF) in the UK. We identified clinics offering IVF using the Choose a Fertility Clinic facility on the website of the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA). Of 81 clinics identified, a website could not be found for 2, leaving 79 for inclusion in the analysis. Outcome measures reported by clinic websites. The numerator and denominator included in the outcome measure were of interest. 53 (67%) websites reported their performance using 51 different outcome measures. It was most common to report pregnancy (83% of these clinics) or live birth rates (51%). 31 different ways of reporting pregnancy and 9 different ways of reporting live birth were identified. 11 (21%) reported multiple birth or pregnancy rates. 1 clinic provided information on adverse events. It was usual for clinics to present results without relevant contextual information such as sample size, reporting period, the characteristics of patients and particular details of treatments. Many combinations of numerator and denominator are available for the purpose of reporting success rates for MAR. The range of reporting options available to clinics is further increased by the possibility of presenting results for subgroups of patients and for different time periods. Given the status of these websites as advertisements to patients, the risk of selective reporting is considerable. Binding guidance is required to ensure consistent, informative reporting. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  3. Implementing a bar-code assisted medication administration system: effects on the dispensing process and user perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaranayake, N R; Cheung, S T D; Cheng, K; Lai, K; Chui, W C M; Cheung, B M Y

    2014-06-01

    We assessed the effects of a bar-code assisted medication administration system used without the support of computerised prescribing (stand-alone BCMA), on the dispensing process and its users. The stand-alone BCMA system was implemented in one ward of a teaching hospital. The number of dispensing steps, dispensing time and potential dispensing errors (PDEs) were directly observed one month before and eight months after the intervention. Attitudes of pharmacy and nursing staff were assessed using a questionnaire (Likert scale) and interviews. Among 1291 and 471 drug items observed before and after the introduction of the technology respectively, the number of dispensing steps increased from five to eight and time (standard deviation) to dispense one drug item by one staff personnel increased from 0.8 (0.09) to 1.5 (0.12) min. Among 2828 and 471 drug items observed before and after the intervention respectively, the number of PDEs increased significantly (Ptechnology decreased significantly (P=0.003 and P=0.004 respectively) among users who participated in the before (N=16) and after (N=16) questionnaires surveys. Among the interviewees, pharmacy staff felt that the system offered less benefit to the dispensing process (9/16). Nursing staff perceived the system as useful in improving the accuracy of drug administration (7/10). Implementing a stand-alone BCMA system may slow down and complicate the dispensing process. Nursing staff believe the stand-alone BCMA system could improve the drug administration process but pharmacy staff believes the technology would be more helpful if supported by computerised prescribing. However, periodical assessments are needed to identify weaknesses in the process after implementation, and all users should be educated on the benefits of using this technology. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Regulation on the training-schools and institutions for radiation-technicians and x-ray technicians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The regulation, in accordance with the Law on X-ray technicians (Law No. 227, 1951), controls and makes rules of the establishment and activities of schools and institutions for those technicians as above mentioned, with intent to secure prescribed qualifications and capabilities of said technicians. Such schools and institutions shall get the designation by relevant ministers of the government who have the power to supervise them, namely the Education Minister and the Minister for Health and Welfare (Article 2). Articles 4 and 4(2) prescribe the standards for the relevant ministers to make the designation of those schools and institutions, in relation to the school years, curriculums, teachers, equipments, etc. According to the standards, those schools and institutions may be of 3-year, 2-year on one-year course according to the required attainment level of students who enters them. The minimum requirement of the attainment is the secondary-school certificates for the 3-year course. The relevant ministers may require such reports from, and give such instructions to those schools and institutions as they consider necessary, and may revoke their designation when such a school on institution has become incompliant with above mentioned standards (Articles 6 and 7). (Matsushima, A.)

  5. The impact of threshold language assistance programming on the accessibility of mental health services for persons with limited English proficiency in the Medi-Cal setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClellan, Sean R; Wu, Frances M; Snowden, Lonnie R

    2012-06-01

    Title VI of the 1964 Civil Rights Act prohibits federal funds recipients from providing care to limited English proficiency (LEP) persons more limited in scope or lower in quality than care provided to others. In 1999, the California Department of Mental Health implemented a "threshold language access policy" to meet its Title VI obligations. Under this policy, Medi-Cal agencies must provide language assistance programming in a non-English language where a county's Medical population contains either 3000 residents or 5% speakers of that language. We examine the impact of threshold language policy-required language assistance programming on LEP persons' access to mental health services by analyzing the county-level penetration rate of services for Russian, Spanish, and Vietnamese speakers across 34 California counties, over 10 years of quarterly data. Exploiting a time series with nonequivalent control group study design, we studied this phenomena using linear regression with random county effects to account for trends over time. Threshold language policy-required assistance programming led to an immediate and significant increase in the penetration rate of mental health services for Russian (8.2, P language speaking persons. Threshold language assistance programming was effective in increasing mental health access for Russian and Vietnamese, but not for Spanish-speaking LEP persons.

  6. A computer-based medical record system and personal digital assistants to assess and follow patients with respiratory tract infections visiting a rural Kenyan health centre

    OpenAIRE

    Diero, Lameck; Rotich, Joseph K; Bii, John; Mamlin, Burke W; Einterz, Robert M; Kalamai, Irene Z; Tierney, William M

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Clinical research can be facilitated by the use of informatics tools. We used an existing electronic medical record (EMR) system and personal data assistants (PDAs) to assess the characteristics and outcomes of patients with acute respiratory illnesses (ARIs) visiting a Kenyan rural health center. Methods We modified the existing EMR to include details on patients with ARIs. The EMR database was then used to identify patients with ARIs who were prospectively followed up by...

  7. ESHRE guideline: routine psychosocial care in infertility and medically assisted reproduction-a guide for fertility staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gameiro, S; Boivin, J; Dancet, E; de Klerk, C; Emery, M; Lewis-Jones, C; Thorn, P; Van den Broeck, U; Venetis, C; Verhaak, C M; Wischmann, T; Vermeulen, N

    2015-11-01

    Based on the best available evidence in the literature, what is the optimal management of routine psychosocial care at infertility and medically assisted reproduction (MAR) clinics? Using the structured methodology of the Manual for the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology (ESHRE) Guideline Development, 120 recommendations were formulated that answered the 12 key questions on optimal management of routine psychosocial care by all fertility staff. The 2002 ESHRE Guidelines for counselling in infertility has been a reference point for best psychosocial care in infertility for years, but this guideline needed updating and did not focus on routine psychosocial care that can be delivered by all fertility staff. This guideline was produced by a group of experts in the field according to the 12-step process described in the ESHRE Manual for Guideline Development. After scoping the guideline and listing a set of 12 key questions in PICO (Patient, Intervention, Comparison and Outcome) format, thorough systematic searches of the literature were conducted; evidence from papers published until April 2014 was collected, evaluated for quality and analysed. A summary of evidence was written in a reply to each of the key questions and used as the basis for recommendations, which were defined by consensus within the guideline development group (GDG). Patient and additional clinical input was collected during the scoping and the review phase of the guideline development. The guideline group, comprising psychologists, two medical doctors, a midwife, a patient representative and a methodological expert, met three times to discuss evidence and reach consensus on the recommendations. 120 recommendations that aim at guiding fertility clinic staff in providing optimal evidence-based routine psychosocial care to patients dealing with infertility and MAR. The guideline is written in two sections. The first section describes patients' preferences regarding the psychosocial

  8. Improvements in State and Local Planning for Mass Dispensing of Medical Countermeasures: The Technical Assistance Review Program, United States, 2007-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renard, Paul G; Vagi, Sara J; Reinold, Chris M; Silverman, Brenda L; Avchen, Rachel N

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate and describe outcomes of state and local medical countermeasure preparedness planning, which is critical to ensure rapid distribution and dispensing of a broad spectrum of life-saving medical assets during a public health emergency. We used 2007 to 2014 state and local data collected from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Technical Assistance Review. We calculated descriptive statistics from 50 states and 72 local Cities Readiness Initiative jurisdictions that participated in the Technical Assistance Review annually. From 2007 to 2014, the average overall Technical Assistance Review score increased by 13% for states and 41% for Cities Readiness Initiative jurisdictions. In 2014, nearly half of states achieved the maximum possible overall score (100), and 94% of local Cities Readiness Initiative jurisdictions achieved a score of 90 or more. Despite challenges, effective and timely medical countermeasure distribution and dispensing is possible with appropriate planning, staff, and resources. However, vigilance in training, exercising, and improving plans from lessons learned in a sustained, coordinated way is critical to ensure continued public health preparedness success.

  9. A System Approach to Navy Medical Education and Training. Appendix 39. Competency Curriculum for Physical Therapy Assistant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-08-31

    Amputee Rehabilitation ...... . . . . . . . . 32 1. Preprosthetic Care . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 2...THERAPY ASSISTANT (PTA) COMPETENCY UNIT IV: AMPUTEE REHABILITATION This unit includes the following modules: Number Title 1 Preprosthetic Caree ...Training II ............ 37 32 lA ICompetency: PHYSICAL THERAPY ASSISTANT (PTA) Unit IV: Amputee Rehabilitation MODULE 1: PREPROSTHETIC CARE TASKS

  10. Views of United States Physicians and Members of the American Medical Association House of Delegates on Physician-assisted Suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, Simon N.; Brown, Byron W.; Brody, Howard; Alcser, Kirsten H.; Bachman, Jerald G.; Greely, Henry T.

    2001-01-01

    Ascertained the views of physicians and physician leaders toward legalization of physician-assisted suicide. Results indicated members of AMA House of Delegates strongly oppose physician-assisted suicide, but rank-and-file physicians show no consensus either for or against its legalization. Although the debate is adversarial, most physicians are…

  11. A System Approach to Navy Medical Education and Training. Appendix 14. Field Medical Technician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-08-31

    ABNORMAL SCUNCSf.E. IRALESWHEEZEPONCHI 13 IOBSERVE FOR/REPORT CHARACTEPISTICS OF CCUGH 14 IOBSERVE/RECORD OR DESCRIBE CHARACTERISTICS OF SPUTUM, MUCUS ...WATrR AREA INFESTATIn. SURVFYS, E.G. SNAILS , MOSQUITOES 28 IPRrVIDE ADVICE ON CONSTcUCTICN CF WATER PUPIFICATInN SYSTEM I 29 ICONSTRUCT WATEP

  12. The effectiveness of a computer-assisted instruction programme on communication skills of medical specialists in oncology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulsman, Robert L.; Ros, Wynand J. G.; Winnubst, Jacques A. M.; Bensing, Jozien M.

    2002-01-01

    Background Although doctor-patient communication is important in health care, medical specialists are generally not well trained in communication skills. Conventional training programmes are generally time consuming and hard to fit into busy working schedules of medical specialists. A

  13. Snapshot of cobalt, chromium and nickel exposure in dental technicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettelarij, Jolinde; Nilsson, Sara; Midander, Klara; Lidén, Carola; Julander, Anneli

    2016-12-01

    It is not fully understood where and how people are exposed to sensitizing metals. Much can be learnt from studying occupational settings where metals are handled. To quantify cobalt (Co), chromium (Cr) and nickel (Ni) exposure on the skin and in the air, and urine levels, in dental technicians working with tools and alloys that may result in skin and respiratory exposure. The metal skin dose was quantified with acid wipe sampling in dental technicians (n = 13). Air exposure was monitored by personal air sampling. Spot urine samples were collected for 24 h. Metals were analysed with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Before work, Co was detected on the skin of 10 participants (0.00025-0.0039 µg/cm 2 ), and Cr (0.00051-0.011 µg/cm 2 ) and Ni (0.0062-0.15 µg/cm 2 ) on the skin of all participants. After a 2-h period without hand washing, CoCr-exposed participants had more Co on the skin (p = 0.004) than non-CoCr-exposed participants. Co was found in 10 air samples (0.22-155 µg/m 3 ), Cr in nine (0.43-71 µg/m 3 ), and Ni in four (0.48-3.7 µg/m 3 ). Metal urine concentrations were considered to be normal. Dental technicians were exposed to Co, Cr and Ni on the skin and through the air, which was not reflected in the urine concentrations in this study. Cobalt skin doses may potentially elicit allergic contact dermatitis and cause sensitization. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Cooperative educational project for optical technicians utilizing amateur telescope making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Ray

    2004-01-01

    In the modern optical shop, technicians are typically skilled machine operators who work on only one phase of the manufacture for each and every component. The product is designed, specified, methodized, scheduled and integrated by people off the shop floor. Even at the component level, the people inside the shop usually see only one stage of completion. In an effort to make the relevance of their work visible; to demonstrate competence to their peers; to gain appreciation for the work of others; and to give them a meaningful connection with the functions of optical systems, I created "The Telescope Project" for my former employer. I invited those interested to participate in an after-hours, partially subsidized project to build telescopes for themselves. The ground-rules included that we would all make the same design (thus practicing consensus and configuration management); that we would all work on every phase (thus learning from each other); and that we would obtain our parts by random lot at the end (thus making quality assurance a personal issue). In the process the participating technicians learned about optical theory, design, tolerancing, negotiation, scheduling, purchasing, fabrication, coating and assembly. They developed an appreciation for each other's contributions and a broader perspective on the consequences of their actions. In the end, each obtained a high-quality telescope for his or her personal use. Several developed an abiding love for astronomy. The project generated much interest from technicians who didn"t initially choose to participate. In this paper I describe the project in detail.

  15. Development of a Training Program for Commercial Building Technicians

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinholm, Rod

    2013-05-31

    This project focused on developing and deploying a comprehensive program of 22 training modules, including certification requirements, and accreditation standards for commercial building technicians, to help achieve the full savings potential of energy efficient buildings, equipment, and systems. This curriculum extended the currently available commercial building technician programs -- training a labor force in a growing market area focused on energy efficiency. The program helps to remove a major market impediment to low energy/zero energy commercial building system acceptance, namely a lack of operating personnel capable of handling more complex high efficiency systems. The project developed a training curriculum for commercial building technicians, with particular focus on high-efficiency building technology, and systems. In Phase 1, the project team worked collaboratively in developing a draft training syllabus to address project objectives. The team identified energy efficiency knowledge gaps in existing programs and plans and plans to address the gaps with either modified or new curricula. In Phase 2, appropriate training materials were developed to meet project objectives. This material was developed for alternative modes of delivery, including classroom lecture materials, e-learning elements, video segments, exercises, and hands-on training elements. A Certification and Accreditation Plan and a Commercialization and Sustainability Plan were also investigated and developed. The Project Management Plan was updated quarterly and provided direction on the management approaches used to accomplish the expected project objectives. GTI project management practices tightly coordinate project activities using management controls to deliver optimal customer value. The project management practices include clear scope definition, schedule/budget tracking, risk/issue resolution and team coordination.

  16. Guidelines for training and qualification of radiological protection technicians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-08-01

    These guidelines, used in combination with plant-specific job analysis, provide the framework for a training and qualification program for radiological protection technicians at nuclear power plants. Radiological protection technicians are defined as those individuals, both plant and contractor, who will be engaged in the evaluation of radiological conditions in the nuclear plant and the implementation of the necessary radiological safety measures as they apply to nuclear plant workers and members of the general public. An important aspect of this work is recognizing and handling unusual situations involving radioactivity, including incidents related to degraded core conditions. These guidelines incorporate the results of an industry-wide job analysis and task analysis (JTA) combined with industry operating experience review. However, the industry-wide analyses did not identify all important academic and fundamental knowledge and skills. Further in-depth analysis by subject matter experts produced additional knowledge and skills that were added to these guidelines. All utilities should use these guidelines in conjunction with plant-specific and industry-wide JTA results to develop or validate their radiological protection technician training program. Plant-specific information should be used to establish appropriate training program content. This plant-specific information should reflect unique job duties, equipment, operating experience, and trainee entry-level qualifications. Revisions to these guidelines should be reviewed for applicability and incorporated into the training program using each utility's training system development (TSD) procedures. Plant-specific job analysis and task analysis data is essential to the development of performance-based training programs. These analyses are particularly useful in selecting tasks for training and in developing on-the-job training (OJT), laboratory training, and mock-up training. Qualification programs based on these

  17. A hot particle training program for health physics technicians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, M.J.; Lewis, M.M.; Rigby, W.F.; Warnock, R.V.

    1988-01-01

    The measures that are needed to detect and control hot particles (irradiated fuel fragments and activated stellite particles) are quite different from the normal routine at nuclear power pants, and as a result, special training is needed. This article outlines the development of the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station's Hot Particle Training Program for Health Physics Technicians, including the job and task analysis, the training objectives, the training materials, and the implementation and evaluation of the training program. In this paper the management, attitudinal, and technical goals of the training program are presented along with examples of training objectives and excerpts from the student handbook

  18. Hydraulics and pneumatics a technician's and engineer's guide

    CERN Document Server

    Parr, Andrew

    1991-01-01

    Hydraulics and Pneumatics: A Technician's and Engineer's Guide provides an introduction to the components and operation of a hydraulic or pneumatic system. This book discusses the main advantages and disadvantages of pneumatic or hydraulic systems.Organized into eight chapters, this book begins with an overview of industrial prime movers. This text then examines the three different types of positive displacement pump used in hydraulic systems, namely, gear pumps, vane pumps, and piston pumps. Other chapters consider the pressure in a hydraulic system, which can be quickly and easily controlled

  19. [The place, role and importance of emergency medical care in the Serbian health care system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikić-Sovilj, Ljiljana

    2009-01-01

    Emergency medical assistance is immediate, the current medical support that is provided hurted person to avoid any possible harmful consequences for his life and health. Emergency medical aid is part of the health care system that is rarely thought, but is still expected to be available always and continuously in case of need. Emergency medical assistance should always be available throughout the territory where people live, because there is no adequate replacement. Emergency Medical Services and emergency medical transportation services are health care that is provided in terms of all persons in the state of medical urgency. In urgent or emergency conditions, health care can be provided on the site of injuries and disease or health institution. Cases of medical urgency are ranked by degrees. The first and most difficult level of medical urgency indicate all urgent pathological conditions, diseases, injuries and poisoning, which occur in the workplace and public places. To expect medical team of emergency medical assistance at the scene intervened medical urgency, it is necessary to make call it. Call the phone number refers to the 94. Call sent to this number to receive orderly dispatcher. Dispatchers are employees who perform their work in the dispatching center. They appear in the phone number 94, made the assessment and screening calls, worry about the degree of urgency, and the absorption team, which team is the nearest place of the event. After received calls they send expert medical teams to the place of accident. In the dispatching center work always doctor and medical technician. Emergency medical care cases is a great professional and educational challenge and imposes a constant need in education of doctors and the whole emergency medical teams. Education of all employees in the state of emergency care is required continualy and for students too to receive new knowledge in the field of medical urgency by various professional purposes.

  20. The Role of the U.S. Army Medical Department in Domestic Disaster Assistance Operations. Lessons Learned from Hurricane Andrew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-04-15

    Hurricane Andrew , which struck South Dade County, Florida on the morning of 24 August 1992, was the ’worst natural disaster ever to hit the United...and Medical). The study also addresses the Army Medical Department’s role in the Hurricane Andrew operations and closes with a review of the medically

  1. Using medical imaging for the detection of adverse events ("incidents") during the utilization of left ventricular assist devices in adult patients with advanced heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Friedrich; Krabatsch, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Ventricular assist devices (VAD) are used for mechanical support of the terminally failing heart. Failure of these life supporting systems can be fatal. Early and reliable detection of any upcoming problems is mandatory and is crucial for the outcome. Medical imaging methods are described within this review, which are not only essential for diagnosis of typically VAD-related complications but also for the detection or verification of technical issues. Within this review the utilization of medical imaging equipment for the diagnosis of technical malfunctions or damages of implanted system components is discussed. A newly developed specialized acoustic imaging method for pump thrombosis detection will also be described along with the most common VAD-related medical complications and their respective imaging methods and the limitations induced by the use of the VAD-system.

  2. Development and Evaluation of a Continuing Education Program for Nursing Technicians at a Pediatric Cardiac Intensive Care Unit in a Developing Country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borim, Bruna Cury; Croti, Ulisses A; Silveira, Patricia C; De Marchi, Carlos H; Moscardini, Airton C; Hickey, Patricia; Jenkins, Kathy

    2017-11-01

    The nursing profession faces continuous transformations demonstrating the importance of professional continuing education to extend knowledge following technological development without impairing quality of care. Nursing assistants and technicians account for nearly 80% of nursing professionals in Brazil and are responsible for uninterrupted patient care. Extensive knowledge improvement is needed to achieve excellence in nursing care. The objective was to develop and evaluate a continuing education program for nursing technicians at a pediatric cardiac intensive care unit (PCICU) using a virtual learning environment entitled EDUCATE. From July to September 2015, a total of 24 nursing technicians working at the PCICU at a children's hospital located in the northwestern region of São Paulo state (Brazil) fully participated in the continuing education program developed in a virtual learning environment using Wix platform, allowing access to video classes and pre- and post-training theoretical evaluation questionnaires outside the work environment. The evaluation tools recorded participants' knowledge evolution, technological difficulties, educational, and overall rating. Knowledge development was descriptively presented as positive in more than 66.7%. Content and training were considered "excellent" by most participants and 90% showed an interest in the use of technological resources. Technical difficulties were found and quickly resolved by 40% of participants including Internet access, login, and lack of technical expertise. The continuing education program using a virtual learning environment positively contributed to the improvement in theoretical knowledge of nursing technicians in PCICU.

  3. CERN's Technician Training Experience notches up another success!

    CERN Multimedia

    Stephanie Hills

    2015-01-01

    The programme was set up almost three years ago to help address a Europe-wide shortage of highly skilled technicians, with the participants gaining valuable skills and experience in an international environment. It’s clear that the programme works: some of the technician fellows who have taken part are being snapped up by major science projects and the high-tech industry.   Going underground: Fay Chicken at work in ATLAS. Fay Chicken (see UK news from CERN 59) has just accepted a job offer from the European Spallation Source in Sweden, where she will be working in the detector development team: “I’m also going to be setting up a new workshop where prototype detectors will be built. When I went to Lund, I was shown a big, empty room – it’s up to me to equip it!” This level of responsibility is a big step up for Fay, but there is no doubt that her time at CERN has both built her confidence to take on the role, and convinced ESS th...

  4. Theoretical bases of the socioeducational intervention of youth technicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myrte MONSENY MARTÍNEZ

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to deepen in the educational dimension of youth policies as well as in pedagogical professionals who develop it: the youth technicians. That is why we present the findings of recent study developed in the doctoral program «Education and Society» at the UAB, which analyzes the application of these policies in the Girona area during the last legislature, through the prism innovative and integrative theoretical framework that combines different perspectives directly linked to youth policy and more specifically to the definition that makes them in the National Youth Plan of Catalonia. These theoretical perspectives are: the biographical approach (Casal et al., 2006; the theory of communities of practice (Wenger, 2001; and the perspective of young-adult partnership, also known as adult as allies (Checkoway, 1996. This analysis is allowing us to build theoretical and practical bases for the guidance of the intervention of technicians, expanding their conceptual referents, and recognition of their work, aiming to improve the deployment a positive impact on young people themselves.

  5. Job analysis of nuclear power reactor health physics technicians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, L.T.; Mazour, T.J.; Clark, P.V.; Todd, R.C.; Marotta, F.J.

    1984-06-01

    This report describes a project, an industry-wide Job Analysis of Nuclear Power Reactor Health Physics Technicians (HPTs), conducted by Brookhaven National Laboratory and Analysis and Technology, Inc. to provide the industry with job-performance data that can be used in systematically defining training programs in terms of required job functions responsibilities, and performance standards. The job-analysis methodology is consistent with that used by the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) in similar industry-wide projects and includes administration of over 850 job task questionnaires to utility and contractor Health Physics Technicians throughout the country. Data collected includes task performance (difficulty, importance, and frequency) and industry-wide demographics (job levels, experience, education, and training). The results of this project discussed herein include model job descriptions for HPT positions, summaries of HPT experience, education, and training, industry-wide task listings with task-performance characteristics, and recommendations of selected tasks as a basis for HPT training development. Finally, potential future applications of the data base by utility and contractor organizations in training program development and evaluation and personnel qualifications are discussed

  6. Medical Management of Pump-Related Thrombosis in Patients with Continuous-Flow Left Ventricular Assist Devices: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Geetanjali; Epperla, Narendranath; Muppidi, Vijayadershan; Sahr, Natasha; Pan, Amy; Simpson, Pippa; Baumann Kreuziger, Lisa

    Pump thrombosis is a dreaded complication of left ventricular assist devices (LVADs). We completed a systematic review to evaluate the efficacy and complications associated with medical management of LVAD thrombosis. Databases were searched using the terms "vad*" or "ventricular assist device" or "heart assist device" and "thrombus" or "thrombosis" or "thromboembolism." Of 2,383 manuscripts, 49 articles met the inclusion criteria. The risk of partial or no resolution of LVAD thrombosis did not significantly differ between thrombolytic and nonthrombolytic regimens (odds ratio [OR], 0.48; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.20-1.16). When response to therapy was evaluated based on pump type, there were no significant differences in how patients with a HeartMate II or HeartWare ventricular assist device responded to thrombolytic or nonthrombolytic treatment. Pooled risk of major bleeding in the thrombolytic group was 29% (95% CI, 0.17-0.44) and 12% (95% CI, 0.01-0.57) in the nonthrombolytic group. Odds of death did not differ between thrombolytic and nonthrombolytic regimens (OR, 1.28; 95% CI, 0.42-3.89). Although thrombolytic and nonthrombolytic treatment similarly resolved LVAD thrombosis, major hemorrhage may be increased with the use of thrombolysis. Randomized clinical trials comparing thrombolytic and nonthrombolytic treatment of LVAD thrombosis are needed to establish the most effective and safe option for patients who are not surgical candidates.

  7. How do laboratory technicians perceive their role in the tuberculosis diagnostic process? A cross-sectional study among laboratory technicians in health centers of Central Java Province, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widjanarko, Bagoes; Widyastari, Dyah Anantalia; Martini, Martini; Ginandjar, Praba

    2016-01-01

    Detection of acid-fast bacilli in respiratory specimens serves as an initial pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) diagnosis. Laboratories are the essential and fundamental part of all health systems. This study aimed to describe how laboratory technicians perceived their own self and work. This included perceived self-efficacy, perceived role, perceived equipment availability, perceived procedures, perceived reward and job, and perceived benefit of health education, as well as level of knowledge and attitudes related to work performance of laboratory technicians. This was a cross-sectional quantitative study involving 120 laboratory technicians conducted in Central Java. Interviews and observation were conducted to measure performance and work-related variables. Among 120 laboratory technicians, 43.3% showed fairly good performance. They complied with 50%-75% of all procedures, including sputum collection, laboratory tools utilization, sputum smearing, staining, smear examination, grading of results, and universal precaution practice. Perceived role, perceived self-efficacy, and knowledge of laboratory procedures were significantly correlated to performance, besides education and years of working as a laboratory technician. Perceived equipment availability was also significantly correlated to performance after the education variable was controlled. Most of the laboratory technicians believed that they have an important role in TB patients' treatment and should display proper self-efficacy in performing laboratory activities. The result may serve as a basic consideration to develop a policy for enhancing motivation of laboratory technicians in order to improve the TB control program.

  8. Summaries of the 40. Scientific Assembly of Polish Chemical Society and Association of Engineers and Technicians of Chemical Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    Annual 40. Scientific Assembly of Polish Chemical Society and Association of Engineers and Technicians of Chemical Industry has been held in Gdansk on 22-26 September 1997. The most valuable scientific results obtained in Polish Laboratories have been presented in 22 main sections and 7 symposia directed especially at following subjects: analytical chemistry, biochemistry, solid state chemistry and material science, physical chemistry, heteroorganic and coordination chemistry, medical and pharmaceutical chemistry, metalorganic chemistry, inorganic and organic chemistry, polymers chemistry, chemistry and environment protection, theoretical chemistry, chemical didactics, photochemistry, radiation chemistry and chemical kinetics, chemical engineering, catalysis, crystallochemistry, chemical technology, electrochemistry, and instrumental methods

  9. Astronaut L. Gordon Cooper is assisted into his spacecraft for tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    1963-01-01

    NASA and McDonnell Aircraft Corp. spacecraft technicians assist Astronaut L. Gordon Cooper into his spacecraft prior to undergoing tests in the altitude chamber. These tests are used to determine the operating characteristcs of the overall environmental control system.

  10. Role of the chemical engineering technician in applied research related to tritium separation from aqueous effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, S.D.

    1978-01-01

    Applied research and development activities related to the removal of tritium from aqueous effluent streams have presented broad opportunities to the chemical engineering technician for professional growth. Technician job activities involve operating complex analytical instrumentation and constructing, maintaining, and operating experimental electrolysis apparatus. The technician is a member of a professional team including scientific, engineering, and other technical personnel and as such is expected to exercise creative thought. Proximity of a large university and availability of formalized ''in house'' training courses provide incentives for technicians to broaden their academic base concurrent with their work involvement

  11. Shoulder function and work disability after decompression surgery for subacromial impingement syndrome: a randomised controlled trial of physiotherapy exercises and occupational medical assistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svendsen, Susanne W; Christiansen, David H; Haahr, Jens Peder; Andrea, Linda C; Frost, Poul

    2014-06-21

    Surgery for subacromial impingement syndrome is often performed in working age and postoperative physiotherapy exercises are widely used to help restore function. A recent Danish study showed that 10% of a nationwide cohort of patients retired prematurely within two years after surgery. Few studies have compared effects of different postoperative exercise programmes on shoulder function, and no studies have evaluated workplace-oriented interventions to reduce postoperative work disability. This study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of physiotherapy exercises and occupational medical assistance compared with usual care in improving shoulder function and reducing postoperative work disability after arthroscopic subacromial decompression. The study is a mainly pragmatic multicentre randomised controlled trial. The trial is embedded in a cohort study of shoulder patients referred to public departments of orthopaedic surgery in Central Denmark Region. Patients aged ≥18-≤63 years, who still have shoulder symptoms 8-12 weeks after surgery, constitute the study population. Around 130 participants are allocated to: 1) physiotherapy exercises, 2) occupational medical assistance, 3) physiotherapy exercises and occupational medical assistance, and 4) usual care. Intervention manuals allow individual tailoring. Primary outcome measures include Oxford Shoulder Score and sickness absence due to symptoms from the operated shoulder. Randomisation is computerised with allocation concealment by randomly permuted block sizes. Statistical analyses will primarily be performed according to the intention-to-treat principle. The paper presents the rationale, design, methods, and operational aspects of the Shoulder Intervention Project (SIP). SIP evaluates a new rehabilitation approach, where physiotherapy and occupational interventions are provided in continuity of surgical episodes of care. If successful, the project may serve as a model for rehabilitation of surgical shoulder

  12. Computer-Assisted Learning in Anatomy at the International Medical School in Debrecen, Hungary: A Preliminary Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kish, Gary; Cook, Samuel A.; Kis, Greta

    2013-01-01

    The University of Debrecen's Faculty of Medicine has an international, multilingual student population with anatomy courses taught in English to all but Hungarian students. An elective computer-assisted gross anatomy course, the Computer Human Anatomy (CHA), has been taught in English at the Anatomy Department since 2008. This course focuses on an…

  13. Understanding the Intersection of Individual Needs and Choices with Organizational Practices: The Case of Medication Management in Assisted Living

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carder, Paula C.; Zimmerman, Sheryl; Schumacher, John G.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Making choices about everyday activities is a normal event for many adults. However, when an adult moves into an assisted living (AL) community, making choices becomes complicated by perceived needs and community practices. This study examines the relationship between choice and need in the context of practices, using medication…

  14. Current issues in medically assisted reproduction and genetics in Europe: research, clinical practice, ethics, legal issues and policy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harper, J.C.; Geraedts, J.; Borry, P.; Cornel, M.C.; Dondorp, W.; Gianaroli, L.; Harton, G.; Milachich, T.; Kaariainen, H.; Liebaers, I.; Morris, M.; Sequeiros, J.; Sermon, K.; Shenfield, F.O.; Skirton, H.; Soini, S.; Spits, C.; Veiga, A.; Vermeesch, J.R.; Viville, S.; de Wert, G.; Macek, M.

    2013-01-01

    In March 2005, a group of experts from the European Society of Human Genetics and European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology met to discuss the interface between genetics and assisted reproductive technology (ART), and published an extended background paper, recommendations and two

  15. Current issues in medically assisted reproduction and genetics in Europe: research, clinical practice, ethics, legal issues and policy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harper, J.; Geraedts, J.; Borry, P.; Cornel, M.C.; Dondorp, W.J.; Gianaroli, L.; Harton, G.; Milachich, T.; Kaariainen, H.; Liebaers, I.; Morris, M.; Sequeiros, J.; Sermon, K.; Shenfield, F.; Skirton, H.; Soini, S.; Spits, C.; Veiga, A.; Vermeesch, J.R.; Viville, S.; de Wert, G.; Macek, M.

    2014-01-01

    Study question: How has the interface between genetics and assisted reproduction technology (ART) evolved since 2005? Summary answer: The interface between ART and genetics has become more entwined as we increase our understanding about the genetics of infertility and we are able to perform more

  16. Qual deficiência?: perícia médica e assistência social no Brasil Which disability?: medical evaluation and social assistance in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debora Diniz

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo analisa o conceito de deficiência adotado pela principal política de transferência de renda para a população portadora de deficiência no Brasil, o Benefício de Prestação Continuada (BPC. O estudo contrasta os critérios de seleção regulamentados pelo programa aos critérios utilizados pelos médicos peritos encarregados de avaliar e selecionar os beneficiários do programa. Foi realizada uma pesquisa por amostra com 16% do total de médicos peritos no Brasil. O objetivo do questionário foi avaliar a qualidade das instruções, dos formulários e dos procedimentos relativos à elegibilidade das pessoas deficientes ao benefício. Os resultados mostram que há uma divergência entre os critérios formais que regulamentam o BPC e a prática pericial dos médicos que apontam para um alargamento do conceito de deficiência para a inclusão de beneficiários com doenças genéticas, crônicas e infecciosas graves.This article examines the concept of disability adopted by the most important cash transfer program targeting the disabled population in Brazil, the Continuous Cash Benefit (Benefício de Prestação Continuada - BPC. The study compares the eligibility criteria established by law and the criteria used by medical examiners in the beneficiary selection process. The data are from a sample survey of 16% of the medical examiners working in the program. The questionnaire aims to assess the instructions, forms, and procedures for selecting disabled beneficiaries. The results show a discrepancy between the formal program criteria and actual practice by the examiners, suggesting an expanded concept of disability aimed at including beneficiaries with genetic, chronic, and severe infectious diseases.

  17. The Validity of Subjects in Korean Dental Technicians' Licensing Examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woong-chul Kim

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available This study prepared a basic framework for the development and improvement of Korean Dental Technicians' Licensing Examination, based on actual test questions. A peer review was conducted to ensure relevance to current practices in dental technology. For the statistical analysis, 1000 dental laboratory technicians were selected; specialists in dental laboratory technology (laboratory owners, educators, etc. were involved in creating valid and reliable questions. Results indicated that examination subjects should be divided into three categories: basic dental laboratory theory, dental laboratory specialties, and a practical examination. To ensure relevance to current practice, there should be less emphasis on basic dental laboratory theory, including health-related laws, and more emphasis on dental laboratory specialties. Introduction to dental anatomy should be separated from oral anatomy and tooth morphology; and fixed prosthodontics should be separated from crown and bridge technology and dental ceramics technology. Removable orthodontic appliance technology should be renamed 'orthodontic laboratory technology'. There should be less questions related to health related law, oral anatomy, dental hygiene, dental materials science and inlay, while the distribution ratio of questions related to tooth morphology should be maintained. There should be a decrease in the distribution ratio of questions related to crown and bridge technology, dental ceramics technology, complete dentures and removable partial dentures technology, and orthodontic laboratory technology. In the practical examination, the current multiple choice test should be replaced with tooth carving using wax or plaster. In dental laboratory specialties, subjects related to contemporary dental laboratory technology should be included in the test items.

  18. Hazard-evaluation and technical-assistance report HETA 90-122-l2073, technical assistance to San Francisco General Hospital and Medical Center, San Francisco, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moss, C.E.; Seitz, T.

    1990-10-01

    In response to a request from the Director of the Environmental Health and Safety Department of the San Francisco General Hospital and Medical Center, located in San Francisco, California, an evaluation was undertaken of possible hazardous working conditions at that site. Concern existed about exposures to hazards while operating the germicidal lamp at the facility. Germicidal lamps were used to disinfect the air in tuberculosis and aerosolized pentamidine clinics. The workers wore no protective eye wear. All rooms used a 30 watt germicidal lamp. Lower wattage bulbs in the smaller rooms would have reduced occupational ultraviolet (UV) exposure. Reflectance levels of UV radiation were quite high and varied. Worker exposure to germicidal lamp UV levels was dependent on many factors, some of the most important ones being the position of the bulb in the room, age of the bulb, obstruction of the UV radiation by objects near the bulb, and the height of the worker. While there are no consensus guidelines available on ventilation systems designed for areas where germicidal lamps are used, the provision of good room air distribution and mixing is recommended to prevent stagnant air conditions or short circuiting of supply air within the room. Bulb changers need to be aware of the need for protective clothing and gloves for protection from both the UV radiation levels as well as possible glass breakage.

  19. Improving the Process of Enteral Nutrition Preparation With Milk Technicians: Perceptions of Cost, Time, and Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Whitney W; Cunningham, Craig A; Brandon, Debra H; Hoehn, Valerie; Carter, Brigit

    2016-04-01

    Neonatal intensive care nurses have historically been responsible for preparing enteral feedings--a costly and time-consuming process that may require leaving the bedside. To address these concerns, the Milk Technician Program was implemented at a major military treatment facility. Milk technicians were specially trained and responsible for handling, storing, and preparing enteral feeds. To determine effectiveness of the Milk Technician Program, changes in length of time required to first attain full feeds, cost of feeding preparation, adherence to feeding preparation procedures, and nurse and milk technician role variables were evaluated. A pre-/postdesign was used to compare length of time to full enteral feedings and cost. A plan-do-study-act design was used to evaluate protocol adherence and to identify and evaluate nurse and milk technician role variables. Data were collected via surveys, direct observations, and retrospective chart reviews to determine the overall effectiveness of this intervention. The average time for extremely and very preterm infants (milk technician adherence to preparation procedures was 95.5%. Most nurses reported that the program saved time (97%) and all milk technicians reported improved job satisfaction. Nurses expressed concerns about accuracy and safety of preparation. Milk technicians reported concerns with communication, supplies, and lack of perceived support. Milk technicians offer significant benefit to infants and nurses in the neonatal intensive care unit, including reducing time for infants to reach full feeds, saving nurses' time, and reducing costs. Further research is needed to identify ideal educational backgrounds for milk technicians and to directly measure the effect of milk technicians on hospital length of stay and infant growth parameters.

  20. A history of the INTERNIST-1 and Quick Medical Reference (QMR) computer-assisted diagnosis projects, with lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R A

    2010-01-01

    The INTERNIST-1/Quick Medical Reference (QMR) diagnostic decision support project spans four decades, from 1971-onward. This paper describes the history of the project and details insights gained of relevance to the general clinical and informatics communities.

  1. Comparison of the effect of medical assistants versus certified athletic trainers on patient volumes and revenue generation in a sports medicine practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecha, Forrest Q; Xerogeanes, John W; Karas, Spero G; Himes, Megan E; Mines, Brandon A

    2013-07-01

    Research has shown increases in efficiency and productivity by using physician extenders (PEs) in medical practices. Certified athletic trainers (ATCs) that work as PEs in primary care sports medicine and orthopaedic practices improve clinic efficiency. When compared with a medical assistant (MA), the use of an ATC as a PE in a primary care sports medicine practice will result in an increase in patient volume, charges, and collections. Cross-sectional study. For 12 months, patient encounters, charges, and collections were obtained for the practices of 2 primary care sports medicine physicians. Each physician was assisted by an ATC for 6 months and by an MA for 6 months. Eighty full clinic days were examined for each physician. Statistically significant increases were found in all measured parameters for the ATC compared with the MA. Patient encounters increased 18% to 22% per day, and collections increased by 10% to 60% per day. ATCs can optimize orthopaedic sports medicine practice by increasing patient encounters, charges, and collections. Orthopaedic practices can be more efficient by using ATCs or MAs as PEs.

  2. A computer-based medical record system and personal digital assistants to assess and follow patients with respiratory tract infections visiting a rural Kenyan health centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diero, Lameck; Rotich, Joseph K; Bii, John; Mamlin, Burke W; Einterz, Robert M; Kalamai, Irene Z; Tierney, William M

    2006-04-10

    Clinical research can be facilitated by the use of informatics tools. We used an existing electronic medical record (EMR) system and personal data assistants (PDAs) to assess the characteristics and outcomes of patients with acute respiratory illnesses (ARIs) visiting a Kenyan rural health center. We modified the existing EMR to include details on patients with ARIs. The EMR database was then used to identify patients with ARIs who were prospectively followed up by a research assistant who rode a bicycle to patients' homes and entered data into a PDA. A total of 2986 clinic visits for 2009 adult patients with respiratory infections were registered in the database between August 2002 and January 2005; 433 patients were selected for outcome assessments. These patients were followed up in the villages and assessed at 7 and 30 days later. Complete follow-up data were obtained on 381 patients (88%) and merged with data from the enrollment visit's electronic medical records and subsequent health center visits to assess duration of illness and complications. Symptoms improved at 7 and 30 days, but a substantial minority of patients had persistent symptoms. Eleven percent of patients sought additional care for their respiratory infection. EMRs and PDA are useful tools for performing prospective clinical research in resource constrained developing countries.

  3. A computer-based medical record system and personal digital assistants to assess and follow patients with respiratory tract infections visiting a rural Kenyan health centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamlin Burke W

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical research can be facilitated by the use of informatics tools. We used an existing electronic medical record (EMR system and personal data assistants (PDAs to assess the characteristics and outcomes of patients with acute respiratory illnesses (ARIs visiting a Kenyan rural health center. Methods We modified the existing EMR to include details on patients with ARIs. The EMR database was then used to identify patients with ARIs who were prospectively followed up by a research assistant who rode a bicycle to patients' homes and entered data into a PDA. Results A total of 2986 clinic visits for 2009 adult patients with respiratory infections were registered in the database between August 2002 and January 2005; 433 patients were selected for outcome assessments. These patients were followed up in the villages and assessed at 7 and 30 days later. Complete follow-up data were obtained on 381 patients (88% and merged with data from the enrollment visit's electronic medical records and subsequent health center visits to assess duration of illness and complications. Symptoms improved at 7 and 30 days, but a substantial minority of patients had persistent symptoms. Eleven percent of patients sought additional care for their respiratory infection. Conclusion EMRs and PDA are useful tools for performing prospective clinical research in resource constrained developing countries.

  4. Medicaid program; third party liability for medical assistance; FFP rates for skilled professional medical personnel and supporting staff; and sources of state share of financial participation--HCFA. Proposed rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-06-04

    These proposed regulations would--(1) Broaden the scope of services for which a State must collect from third parties the cost of medical assistance furnished to Medicaid recipients, remove the specific requirements for the terms of cooperative agreements for third party collections, and revise the methods of paying claims involving third party liability; (2) Clarify criteria used in determining whether skilled professional medical personnel and supporting staff involved in the administration of the Medicaid program quality for 75 percent Federal matching; and (3) Clarify policy to permit public and private donations to be used as a State's share of financial participation in the entire Medicaid program, instead of only for training expenditures. The proposed amendments would clarify policy and reduce program expenditures.

  5. The Relationship of Academic Courses to Skills Required of Automobile Repair Technicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, Stephen H.

    2013-01-01

    The primary objective was to show the important need of academic skills, specifically general education coursework, to the effectiveness of the technician's expertise in the field of automobile repair. Additionally, I emphasized that one of the keys to the quality of the technician's education is the method of instruction analyzed through…

  6. Advances and results of the educative project: Implementation of the career of 'Technician in Radiological protection'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vizuet G, J.; Suarez, G.; Sanchez C, M.

    2003-01-01

    In this work the obtained advances and achievements during the impartment of the technician career in radiological protection are presented. This is carried out in the 'Justo Sierra' Technological High School Center of San Mateo Atenco, Estado de Mexico, and has for objective the formation of professional-technicians. (Author)

  7. Chemical Science and Technology I. A Study Guide of the Science and Engineering Technician Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballinger, Jack T.; Wolf, Lawrence J.

    This study guide is part of an interdisciplinary program of studies entitled the Science and Engineering Technician (SET) Curriculum. This curriculum integrates elements from the disciplines of chemistry, physics, mathematics, mechanical technology, and electronic technology with the objective of training technicians in the use of electronic…

  8. Functions, Analytic Geometry, Probability and Statistics. A Study Guide of the Science and Engineering Technician Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melton, Roger

    This study guide is part of an interdisciplinary course entitled the Science and Engineering Technician (SET) Curriculum. The course integrates elements from the disciplines of chemistry, physics, mathematics, mechanical technology, and electronic technology, with the objective of training technicians in the use of electronic instruments and their…

  9. A System Approach to Navy Medical Education and Training. Appendix 31. Competency Curriculum for Ear, Nose and Throat Assistant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-08-31

    mirror/reflected light I Use/action of medications and cautery agents Use of silver nitrate cautery sticks and anterior nasal packingi Suctioning...Conditions) Using cup/glass of solution, e.g., saltwater, mouthwash (Consequence) Aid in treatment of throat infections (Next Action) Determine need for

  10. Introducing systematic dispatcher-assisted cardiopulmonary resuscitation (telephone-CPR) in a non-Advanced Medical Priority Dispatch System (AMPDS): implementation process and costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dami, Fabrice; Fuchs, Vincent; Praz, Laurent; Vader, John-Paul

    2010-07-01

    In order to improve the quality of our Emergency Medical Services (EMS), to raise bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation rates and thereby meet what is becoming a universal standard in terms of quality of emergency services, we decided to implement systematic dispatcher-assisted or telephone-CPR (T-CPR) in our medical dispatch center, a non-Advanced Medical Priority Dispatch System. The aim of this article is to describe the implementation process, costs and results following the introduction of this new "quality" procedure. This was a prospective study. Over an 8-week period, our EMS dispatchers were given new procedures to provide T-CPR. We then collected data on all non-traumatic cardiac arrests within our state (Vaud, Switzerland) for the following 12 months. For each event, the dispatchers had to record in writing the reason they either ruled out cardiac arrest (CA) or did not propose T-CPR in the event they did suspect CA. All emergency call recordings were reviewed by the medical director of the EMS. The analysis of the recordings and the dispatchers' written explanations were then compared. During the 12-month study period, a total of 497 patients (both adults and children) were identified as having a non-traumatic cardiac arrest. Out of this total, 203 cases were excluded and 294 cases were eligible for T-CPR. Out of these eligible cases, dispatchers proposed T-CPR on 202 occasions (or 69% of eligible cases). They also erroneously proposed T-CPR on 17 occasions when a CA was wrongly identified (false positive). This represents 7.8% of all T-CPR. No costs were incurred to implement our study protocol and procedures. This study demonstrates it is possible, using a brief campaign of sensitization but without any specific training, to implement systematic dispatcher-assisted cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a non-Advanced Medical Priority Dispatch System such as our EMS that had no prior experience with systematic T-CPR. The results in terms of T-CPR delivery

  11. Diabetes Medication Assistance Service: the pharmacist's role in supporting patient self-management of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Bernadette; Armour, Carol; Lee, Mary; Song, Yun Ju; Stewart, Kay; Peterson, Greg; Hughes, Jeff; Smith, Lorraine; Krass, Ines

    2011-06-01

    To evaluate the capacity and effectiveness of trained community pharmacists in delivering the Diabetes Medication Assistance Service (DMAS) via (1) number and types of self-management support interventions (SMSIs); (2) number of goals set and attained by patients and (3) patient outcomes (glycaemic control, medication adherence and satisfaction). Pharmacists (n=109) from 90 community pharmacies in Australia were trained and credentialed to deliver the DMAS. The training focused on developing pharmacists' knowledge and skills in supporting patients' diabetes self-management. A total of 387 patients completed the trial. The mean number of SMSIs per patient was 35 (SD ±31) and the majority (87%) had at least one documented goal that was fully or partially attained. There were significant health benefits for patients including improved glycaemic control and a reduced risk of non-adherence to medications. Over 90% of DMAS patients reported improvements in their knowledge about diabetes self-management. The DMAS provides self management support in the community pharmacy for people with T2DM which may result in improved clinical outcomes. Given appropriate training in diabetes care and behavior change strategies, community pharmacists can offer programs which provide self-management support to their patients with T2DM and improve their health outcomes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of specific resistance training on forearm pain and work disability in industrial technicians: cluster randomised controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Louis; Jakobsen, Markus D; Pedersen, Mogens Theisen

    2012-01-01

    To determine the effect of specific resistance training on forearm pain and work disability in industrial technicians.......To determine the effect of specific resistance training on forearm pain and work disability in industrial technicians....

  13. Senior Laboratory Animal Technician | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The Laboratory Animal Sciences Program (LASP) provides exceptional quality animal care and technical support services for animal research performed at the National Cancer Institute at the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research. LASP executes this mission by providing a broad spectrum of state-of-the-art technologies and services that are focused on the design, generation, characterization and application of genetically engineered and biological animal models of human disease, which are aimed at the development of targeted diagnostics and therapies. LASP contributes to advancing human health, developing new treatments, and improving existing treatments for cancer and other diseases while ensuring safe and humane treatment of animals. KEY ROLES/RESPONSIBILITIES The Senior Laboratory Animal Technician will be responsible for: Daily tasks associated with the care, breeding and treatment of research animals for experimental purposes Management of rodent breeding colonies consisting of multiple, genetically complex strains and associated record keeping and database management Colony management procedures including: tail clipping, animal identification, weaning Data entry consistent with complex colony management Collection of routine diagnostic samples Coordinating shipment of live animals and specimens Performing rodent experimental procedures including basic necropsy and blood collection Observation and recording of physical signs of animal health Knowledge of safe working practices using chemical carcinogen and biological hazards Work schedule may include weekend and holiday hours This position is in support of the Center for Cancer Research (CCR).

  14. Senior Laboratory Animal Technician | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The Laboratory Animal Sciences Program (LASP) provides exceptional quality animal care and technical support services for animal research performed at the National Cancer Institute at the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research. LASP executes this mission by providing a broad spectrum of state-of-the-art technologies and services that are focused on the design, generation, characterization and application of genetically engineered and biological animal models of human disease, which are aimed at the development of targeted diagnostics and therapies. LASP contributes to advancing human health, developing new treatments, and improving existing treatments for cancer and other diseases while ensuring safe and humane treatment of animals. Key Roles/Responsibilities The Senior Laboratory Animal Technician will be responsible for: Daily tasks associated with the care, breeding and treatment of research animals for experimental purposes Management of rodent breeding colonies consisting of multiple, genetically complex strains and associated record keeping and database management Colony management procedures including: tail clipping, animal identification, weaning Data entry consistent with complex colony management Collection of routine diagnostic samples Coordinating shipment of live animals and specimens Performing rodent experimental procedures including basic necropsy and blood collection Observation and recording of physical signs of animal health Knowledge of safe working practices using chemical carcinogen and biological hazards Work schedule may include weekend and holiday hours

  15. Management perceptions of the Health Physics Technician job

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazour, T.J.; Marotta, F.J.

    1985-12-01

    In 1984, an industry-wide job analysis of nuclear power reactor Health Physics Technicians (HPTs) was completed. These results provided the basis for job descriptions, industry-wide task listings and recommendations for task selections for further analysis and formal training. A total of 389 tasks were identified and reviewed by 850 HPTs representing 39 plants and 6 vendor companies. Constructive criticism of the HPT job analysis focused on the fact that HPT supervisors and managers were not included in the survey. Concerns were addressed that these supervisors/managers might have a divergent perception of the HPT job that could lead to different conclusions than those that were originally drawn. The only way to confirm (or deny) this hypothesis was to verify the results of the job analysis of HPTs by also surveying radiation protection management personnel. A total of 19 HPT supervisors/managers completed the same survey that had been used for HPT job incumbents. They were asked to rate each task on the basis of their job incumbents' performance of the task. Of the 1161 ratings (389 tasks each with a rating for frequency, difficulty, and importance), only 37 of the ratings differed between the HPTs and the HPT supervisors/managers (at the 99% confidence level)

  16. A case study in the globalization of medical education: assisting overseas-born students at the University of Melbourne.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawthorne, Lesleyanne; Minas, I Harry; Singh, Bruce

    2004-03-01

    Over the past decade there has been a remarkable increase in ethnic diversity among Australian medical students. This phenomenon has been driven by two forces: the disproportionate school-level academic success achieved by first-generation migrant and refugee-origin youth, and the rapid globalization of Australia's tertiary education system, in a context where reduced government funding has accelerated the development of 'academic capitalism' (Slaughter & Leslie, 1997 ). This paper briefly examines each trend, prior to exploring select pedagogical implications of these changes for the University of Melbourne, the destination of choice by 2001 for 30% of all international students electing to study medicine in Australia. Two key questions are addressed: (1) What are the potential problems in delivering Western-style medical education to culturally and linguistically disparate groups?; (2) What model of international student support has been developed by the Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences at the University of Melbourne? The paper suggests the model may have potential relevance for other universities, in the context of the accelerating globalization of medical education.

  17. Establishing a Research and Evaluation Capability for the Joint Medical Education and Training Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    www.rand.org as a public service of the RAND Corporation. CHILDREN AND FAMILIES EDUCATION AND THE ARTS ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT HEALTH AND HEALTH CARE...Advanced Dental Laboratory • Allergy/Immunology • Animal Care Specialist • Armed Forces Basic Medical Technician • Basic Dental Laboratory • Behavioral ...Preventive Dentistry • Preventive Medicine • Radiography Specialist • Respiratory Therapy Technician • Surgical Technologist • Urology Technician

  18. Toward a US Army Pacific (USARPAC) rapid deployment medical component in support of Human Assistance/Disaster Relief (HA/DR) operations: challenges with "Going in Light".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Ralph J

    2016-01-01

    This article reports the exploratory development and study efforts regarding the viability of a novel "going-in light" or "Going Light" medical component in support of US Army Pacific (USARPAC) Humanitarian Assistance/Disaster Relief (HA/DR) missions, namely, a BLU-MED ® incremental modular equipment package along with a Rapid Deployment Medical Team (RDMT). The study was conducted to uncover a way for the U.S. Army to: (1) better medically support the greater U.S. military Pacific Command, (2) prepare the Army for Pacific HA/DR contingencies, and (3) imprint a swift presence and positive contribution to Pacific HA/DR operations. The findings were derived from an intensive quasi-Military Decision Making Planning (MDMP) process, specifically, the Oracle Delphi. This process was used to: (1) review a needs assessment on the profile of disasters in general and the Pacific in particular and (2) critically examine the viability and issues surrounding a Pacific HA/DR medical response of going in light and incrementally. The Pacific area of operations contains 9 of 15 countries most at risk for disasters in the most disaster-prone region of the world. So, it is not a matter of whether a major, potentially large-scale lethal disaster will occur but rather when. Solid empirical research has shown that by every outcome measured Joint Forces (Army, Navy, Air Force, and Marines) medical HA/DR operations have been inordinately successful and cost-effective when they employed U.S. Army medical assets inland near disasters' kinetic impact and combined sister services' logistical support and expertise. In this regard, USARPAC has the potential to go in light and successfully fill a vital HA/DR medical response gap with the RDMT and a BLU-MED ® . However, initially going in fast and light and expanding and contracting as the situation dictates comes with subsequent challenges as briefly described herein that must be addressed. The challenges to going in light are not

  19. Mutant frequency of radiotherapy technicians appears to be associated with recent dose of ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messing, K.; Ferraris, J.; Bradley, W.E.; Swartz, J.; Seifert, A.M. (Universite du Quebec a Montreal (Canada))

    1989-10-01

    The frequency of hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) mutants among peripheral T-lymphocytes of radiotherapy technicians primarily exposed to 60Co was measured by the T-cell cloning method. Mutant frequencies of these technicians in 1984 and 1986 were significantly higher than those of physiotherapy technicians who worked in a neighboring service, and correlated significantly with thermoluminescence dosimeter readings recorded during the 6 mo preceding mutant frequency determination. Correlations decreased when related to dose recorded over longer time intervals. HPRT mutant frequency determination in peripheral lymphocytes is a good measure of recently received biologically effective radiation dose in an occupationally exposed population.

  20. Mutant frequency of radiotherapy technicians appears to be associated with recent dose of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messing, K.; Ferraris, J.; Bradley, W.E.; Swartz, J.; Seifert, A.M.

    1989-01-01

    The frequency of hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) mutants among peripheral T-lymphocytes of radiotherapy technicians primarily exposed to 60Co was measured by the T-cell cloning method. Mutant frequencies of these technicians in 1984 and 1986 were significantly higher than those of physiotherapy technicians who worked in a neighboring service, and correlated significantly with thermoluminescence dosimeter readings recorded during the 6 mo preceding mutant frequency determination. Correlations decreased when related to dose recorded over longer time intervals. HPRT mutant frequency determination in peripheral lymphocytes is a good measure of recently received biologically effective radiation dose in an occupationally exposed population

  1. [Legal issues of physician-assisted euthanasia. Part III--Passive euthanasia, comparison of international legislation, conclusions for medical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laux, Johannes; Röbel, Andreas; Parzeller, Markus

    2013-01-01

    The generic term "passive euthanasia" includes different issues dealing with the omission, discontinuation or termination of life-sustaining or life-prolonging medical treatments. The debate around passive euthanasia focuses on the constitutional right of self-determination of every human being on the one hand and the constitutional mandate of the State to protect human life on the other. Issues of passive euthanasia always require a differentiated approach. Essentially, it comes down to the following: In Germany, the human right of self-determination includes the right to prohibit the performance of life-sustaining treatments, even if this leads to the death of the patient. A physician who does not take life-sustaining treatment measures because this is the free will expressed by the patient is not subject to prosecution. On the other hand, if the physician treats the patient against his will, this can be deemed a punishable act of bodily injury. The patient's will is decisive even if his concrete state of health does no longer allow him to freely express his will. In the Patient's Living Will Act of 2009, the German legislator clarified the juridical assessment of such constellations being of particular relevance in practice. A written living will of a person in which he requests to take or not to take certain medical treatment measures in case that he is no longer able to make the decision himself shall be binding for the people involved in the process of medical treatment. If there is no living will, the supposed will of the patient shall be relevant. In its judgment in the "Putz case", the German Federal Court of Justice ruled in 2010 that actions terminating a life-sustaining treatment that does not correspond to the patient's will must be limited to letting an already ongoing disease process run its course. In this context it is not important, however, whether treatment is discontinued by an active act or by omission. Under certain circumstances, the

  2. Current issues in medically assisted reproduction and genetics in Europe: research, clinical practice, ethics, legal issues and policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Joyce; Geraedts, Joep; Borry, Pascal; Cornel, Martina C; Dondorp, Wybo J; Gianaroli, Luca; Harton, Gary; Milachich, Tanya; Kääriäinen, Helena; Liebaers, Inge; Morris, Michael; Sequeiros, Jorge; Sermon, Karen; Shenfield, Françoise; Skirton, Heather; Soini, Sirpa; Spits, Claudia; Veiga, Anna; Vermeesch, Joris Robert; Viville, Stéphane; de Wert, Guido; Macek, Milan

    2014-08-01

    How has the interface between genetics and assisted reproduction technology (ART) evolved since 2005? The interface between ART and genetics has become more entwined as we increase our understanding about the genetics of infertility and we are able to perform more comprehensive genetic testing. In March 2005, a group of experts from the European Society of Human Genetics and European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology met to discuss the interface between genetics and ART and published an extended background paper, recommendations and two Editorials. An interdisciplinary workshop was held, involving representatives of both professional societies and experts from the European Union Eurogentest2 Coordination Action Project. In March 2012, a group of experts from the European Society of Human Genetics, the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology and the EuroGentest2 Coordination Action Project met to discuss developments at the interface between clinical genetics and ART. As more genetic causes of reproductive failure are now recognized and an increasing number of patients undergo testing of their genome prior to conception, either in regular health care or in the context of direct-to-consumer testing, the need for genetic counselling and PGD may increase. Preimplantation genetic screening (PGS) thus far does not have evidence from RCTs to substantiate that the technique is both effective and efficient. Whole genome sequencing may create greater challenges both in the technological and interpretational domains, and requires further reflection about the ethics of genetic testing in ART and PGD/PGS. Diagnostic laboratories should be reporting their results according to internationally accepted accreditation standards (ISO 15189). Further studies are needed in order to address issues related to the impact of ART on epigenetic reprogramming of the early embryo. The legal landscape regarding assisted reproduction is evolving, but still remains very

  3. Speech interaction strategies for a humanoid assistant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stüker Sebastian

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of SecondHands, a H2020 project, is to design a robot that can offer help to a maintenance technician in a proactive manner. The robot is to act as a second pair of hands that can assist the technician when he is in need of help. In order for the robot to be of real help to the technician, it needs to understand his needs and follow his commands. Interaction via speech is a crucial part of this. Due to the nature of the situation in which the interactions take place, often the technician needs to speak to the robot when under stress performing strenuous physical labor, the classical turn based interaction schemes need to be transformed into dialogue systems that perform stream processing, anticipating user intentions, correcting itself as more information become available, in order to be able to respond in a rapid manner. In order to meet these demands, we are developing low-latency streaming based automatic speech recognition systems in combination with recurrent neural network based Natural Language Understanding systems that perform slot filling and intent recognition in order for the robot to provide assistance in a rapid manner, that can be partly based on speculative classifications that are then being refined as more speech becomes available.

  4. Assisted reproduction involving gestational surrogacy: an analysis of the medical, psychosocial and legal issues: experience from a large surrogacy program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dar, Shir; Lazer, Tal; Swanson, Sonja; Silverman, Jan; Wasser, Cindy; Moskovtsev, Sergey I; Sojecki, Agata; Librach, Clifford L

    2015-02-01

    What are the medical, psychosocial and legal aspects of gestational surrogacy (GS), including pregnancy outcomes and complications, in a large series? Meticulous multidisciplinary teamwork, involving medical, legal and psychosocial input for both the intended parent(s) (IP) and the gestational carrier (GC), is critical to achieve a successful GS program. Small case series have described pregnancy rates of 17-50% for GS. There are no large case series and the medical, legal and psychological aspects of GS have not been addressed in most of these studies. To our knowledge, this is the largest reported GS case series. A retrospective cohort study was performed. Data were collected from 333 consecutive GC cycles between 1998 and 2012. There were 178 pregnancies achieved out of 333 stimulation cycles, including fresh and frozen transfers. The indications for a GC were divided into two groups. Those who have 'failed to carry', included women with recurrent implantation failure (RIF), recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL) and previous poor pregnancy outcome (n = 96; 132 cycles, pregnancy rate 50.0%). The second group consisted of those who 'cannot carry' including those with severe Asherman's syndrome, uterine malformations/uterine agenesis and maternal medical diseases (n = 108, 139 cycles, pregnancy rate 54.0%). A third group, of same-sex male couples and single men, were analyzed separately (n = 52, 62 cycles, pregnancy rate 59.7%). In 49.2% of cycles, autologous oocytes were used and 50.8% of cycles involved donor oocytes. The 'failed to carry' group consisted of 96 patients who underwent 132 cycles at a mean age of 40.3 years. There were 66 pregnancies (50.0%) with 17 miscarriages (25.8%) and 46 confirmed births (34.8%). The 'cannot carry pregnancy' group consisted of 108 patients who underwent 139 cycles at a mean age of 35.9 years. There were 75 pregnancies (54.0%) with 15 miscarriages (20.0%) and 56 confirmed births (40.3%). The pregnancy, miscarriage and live birth

  5. Screening for homelessness among individuals initiating medication-assisted treatment for opioid use disorder in the Veterans Health Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachhuber, Marcus A; Roberts, Christopher B; Metraux, Stephen; Montgomery, Ann Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of homelessness and risk for homelessness among veterans with opioid use disorder initiating treatment. Addiction treatment programs operated by the US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). All veterans initiating treatment with methadone or buprenorphine for opioid use disorder between October 1, 2013 and September 30, 2014 (n = 2,699) who were administered the VA's national homelessness screener. Self-reported homelessness or imminent risk of homelessness. The prevalence of homelessness was 10.2 percent and 5.3 percent were at risk for homelessness. Compared to male veterans, women veterans were less likely to report homelessness (8.9 percent vs 10.3 percent) but more likely to be at risk (11.8 percent vs 4.9 percent). By age group, veterans aged 18-34 and 45-54 years most frequently reported homelessness (12.0 and 11.7 percent, respectively) and veterans aged 45-54 and 55-64 years most frequently reported risk for homelessness (6.5 and 6.8 percent, respectively). The prevalence of homelessness in this population is approximately 10 times that of the general veteran population accessing care at VA. Screening identified a substantial number of veterans who could benefit from VA housing assistance and had not received it recently. Programs to address veteran homelessness should engage with veterans seeking addiction treatment. Integration of homelessness services into addiction treatment settings may, in turn, improve outcomes.

  6. The effectiveness of medical assistant health coaching for low-income patients with uncontrolled diabetes, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia: protocol for a randomized controlled trial and baseline characteristics of the study population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willard-Grace, Rachel; DeVore, Denise; Chen, Ellen H; Hessler, Danielle; Bodenheimer, Thomas; Thom, David H

    2013-02-23

    Many patients with chronic disease do not reach goals for management of their conditions. Self-management support provided by medical assistant health coaches within the clinical setting may help to improve clinical outcomes, but most studies to date lack statistical power or methodological rigor. Barriers to large scale implementation of the medical assistant coach model include lack of clinician buy-in and the absence of a business model that will make medical assistant health coaching sustainable. This study will add to the evidence base by determining the effectiveness of health coaching by medical assistants on clinical outcomes and patient self-management, by assessing the impact of health coaching on the clinician experience, and by examining the costs and potential savings of health coaching. This randomized controlled trial will evaluate the effectiveness of clinic-based medical assistant health coaches to improve clinical outcomes and self-management skills among low-income patients with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes, hypertension, or hyperlipidemia. A total of 441 patients from two San Francisco primary care clinics have been enrolled and randomized to receive a health coach (n = 224) or usual care (n = 217). Patients participating in the health coaching group will receive coaching for 12 months from medical assistants trained as health coaches. The primary outcome is a change in hemoglobin A1c, systolic blood pressure, or LDL cholesterol among patients with uncontrolled diabetes, hypertension and hyperlipidemia, respectively. Self-management behaviors, perceptions of the health care team and clinician, BMI, and chronic disease self-efficacy will be measured at baseline and after 12 months. Clinician experience is being assessed through surveys and qualitative interviews. Cost and utilization data will be analyzed through cost-predictive models. Medical assistants are an untapped resource to provide self-management support for patients with uncontrolled

  7. Estimate of the exposition to the ionizing radiation of the medical veterinarians and its assistants in radiology examinations veterinary medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, G.; Braz, D.; Lopez, R.; Mauricia, C.; Barroso, R.

    2006-01-01

    The absorbed ionizing radiation outside of the permissible limits, can cause biological damages e, therefore it must necessarily be monitored. The dosimetry thermoluminescent is a technique very used to detect expositions in operators, therefore they are sensible crystals the ionizing radiation and allows to evaluate if the dose of radiation is or not below of the restriction levels. In scientific literature many information do not exist on the exposition of a medical veterinarian, with this do not have many data of the individual monitoring of these workers, becoming the work it important for posterior studies. Ahead of this, it was carried through measured of the doses, using the thermoluminescence dosemeters LiF: Mg, Cu, P (TLD-100 H) in the position of the crystalline lens, thyroid, hand and thorax, in three clinics of radiology veterinary medicine, different, having the objective to determine the dose distribution that the workers of radiology veterinary medicine are submitted in one day of work. (authors)

  8. Estimate of the exposition to the ionizing radiation of the medical veterinarians and its assistants in radiology examinations veterinary medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, G.; Braz, D.; Lopez, R. [Rio de Janeiro Univ. Federal, COPPE (Brazil); Mauricia, C. [Rio de Janeiro Univ. Federal, Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (Brazil); Barroso, R. [Rio de Janeiro Univ. Federal, Universidade Estadual do Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2006-07-01

    The absorbed ionizing radiation outside of the permissible limits, can cause biological damages e, therefore it must necessarily be monitored. The dosimetry thermoluminescent is a technique very used to detect expositions in operatorserefore they are sensible crystals the ionizing radiation and allows to evaluate if the dose of radiation is or not below of the restriction levels. In scientific literature many information do not exist on the exposition of a medical veterinarian, with this do not have many data of the individual monitoring of these workers, becoming the work it important for posterior studies. Ahead of this, it was carried through measured of the doses, using the thermoluminescence dosemeters LiF: Mg, Cu, P (TLD-100 H) in the position of the crystalline lens, thyroid, hand and thorax, in three clinics of radiology veterinary medicine, different, having the objective to determine the dose distribution that the workers of radiology veterinary medicine are submitted in one day of work. (authors)

  9. Safety and Efficacy of Medically Performed Tongue Piercing in People with Tetraplegia for Use with Tongue-Operated Assistive Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbrook, Jaimee; Minocha, Julia; Rowles, Diane; Nardone, Beatrice; West, Dennis; Kim, Jeonghee; Bruce, Joy; Roth, Elliot. J; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2015-01-01

    Background: Individuals with high-level spinal cord injuries need effective ways to perform activities. Objectives: To develop and test a medically supervised tongue-piercing protocol and the wearing of a magnet-containing tongue barbell for use with the Tongue Drive System (TDS) in persons with tetraplegia. Methods: Volunteers with tetraplegia underwent initial screening sessions using a magnet glued on the tongue to activate and use the TDS. This was followed by tongue piercing, insertion of a standard barbell, a 4-week healing period, and an exchange of the standard barbell for a magnet-containing barbell. This was then used twice weekly for 6 to 8 weeks to perform computer tasks, drive a powered wheelchair, accomplish in-chair weight shifts, and dial a phone. Symptoms of intraoral dysfunction, change in tongue size following piercing, and subjective assessment of receiving and wearing a magnet-containing tongue barbell and its usability with the TDS were evaluated. Results: Twenty-one volunteers underwent initial trial sessions. Thirteen had their tongues pierced. One individual’s barbell dislodged during healing resulting in tongue-tract closure. Twelve had the barbell exchanged for a magnet-containing barbell. One subject withdrew for unrelated issues. Eleven completed the TDS testing sessions and were able to complete the assigned tasks. No serious adverse events occurred related to wearing or using a tongue barbell to operate the TDS. Conclusions: Using careful selection criteria and a medically supervised piercing protocol, no excess risk was associated with tongue piercing and wearing a tongue barbell in people with tetraplegia. Participants were able to operate the TDS. PMID:25762861

  10. Safety and efficacy of medically performed tongue piercing in people with tetraplegia for use with tongue-operated assistive technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laumann, Anne; Holbrook, Jaimee; Minocha, Julia; Rowles, Diane; Nardone, Beatrice; West, Dennis; Kim, Jeonghee; Bruce, Joy; Roth, Elliot J; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with high-level spinal cord injuries need effective ways to perform activities. To develop and test a medically supervised tongue-piercing protocol and the wearing of a magnet-containing tongue barbell for use with the Tongue Drive System (TDS) in persons with tetraplegia. Volunteers with tetraplegia underwent initial screening sessions using a magnet glued on the tongue to activate and use the TDS. This was followed by tongue piercing, insertion of a standard barbell, a 4-week healing period, and an exchange of the standard barbell for a magnet-containing barbell. This was then used twice weekly for 6 to 8 weeks to perform computer tasks, drive a powered wheelchair, accomplish in-chair weight shifts, and dial a phone. Symptoms of intraoral dysfunction, change in tongue size following piercing, and subjective assessment of receiving and wearing a magnet-containing tongue barbell and its usability with the TDS were evaluated. Twenty-one volunteers underwent initial trial sessions. Thirteen had their tongues pierced. One individual's barbell dislodged during healing resulting in tongue-tract closure. Twelve had the barbell exchanged for a magnet-containing barbell. One subject withdrew for unrelated issues. Eleven completed the TDS testing sessions and were able to complete the assigned tasks. No serious adverse events occurred related to wearing or using a tongue barbell to operate the TDS. Using careful selection criteria and a medically supervised piercing protocol, no excess risk was associated with tongue piercing and wearing a tongue barbell in people with tetraplegia. Participants were able to operate the TDS.

  11. "For Their Own Good": A Response to Popular Arguments Against Permitting Medical Assistance in Dying (MAID) where Mental Illness Is the Sole Underlying Condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembo, Justine; Schuklenk, Udo; Reggler, Jonathan

    2018-01-01

    Canada is approaching its federal government's review of whether patients should be eligible for medical assistance in dying (MAID) where mental illness is the sole underlying medical condition, and when "natural death" is not "reasonably foreseeable". For those opposed, arguments involve the following themes: capacity, value of life, vulnerability, stigma, irremediability, and the role of physicians. It has also been suggested that those who are able-bodied should have to kill themselves, even though suicide may be painful, lonely, and violent. Opponents of MAID for severe, refractory suffering due to mental illness imply that it is acceptable to remove agency from such patients on paternalistic grounds. After years of efforts to destigmatise mental illness, these kinds of arguments effectively declare all patients with mental illness, regardless of capacity, unable to make considered choices for themselves. The current paper argues that decisions about capacity must be made on an individual-patient basis. Given the rightful importance granted to respect for patient autonomy in liberal democracies, the wholesale removal of agency advocated by opponents of a permissive MAID regime is difficult to reconcile with Canadian constitutional values.

  12. Identification of medically relevant species of arthroconidial yeasts by use of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolecka, Anna; Khayhan, Kantarawee; Groenewald, Marizeth; Theelen, Bart; Arabatzis, Michael; Velegraki, Aristea; Kostrzewa, Markus; Mares, Mihai; Taj-Aldeen, Saad J; Boekhout, Teun

    2013-08-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) was used for an extensive identification study of arthroconidial yeasts, using 85 reference strains from the CBS-KNAW yeast collection and 134 clinical isolates collected from medical centers in Qatar, Greece, and Romania. The test set included 72 strains of ascomycetous yeasts (Galactomyces, Geotrichum, Saprochaete, and Magnusiomyces spp.) and 147 strains of basidiomycetous yeasts (Trichosporon and Guehomyces spp.). With minimal preparation time, MALDI-TOF MS proved to be an excellent diagnostic tool that provided reliable identification of most (98%) of the tested strains to the species level, with good discriminatory power. The majority of strains were correctly identified at the species level with good scores (>2.0) and seven of the tested strains with log score values between 1.7 and 2.0. The MALDI-TOF MS results obtained were consistent with validated internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and/or large subunit (LSU) ribosomal DNA sequencing results. Expanding the mass spectrum database by increasing the number of reference strains for closely related species, including those of nonclinical origin, should enhance the usefulness of MALDI-TOF MS-based diagnostic analysis of these arthroconidial fungi in medical and other laboratories.

  13. Identification of Medically Relevant Species of Arthroconidial Yeasts by Use of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolecka, Anna; Khayhan, Kantarawee; Groenewald, Marizeth; Theelen, Bart; Arabatzis, Michael; Velegraki, Aristea; Kostrzewa, Markus; Mares, Mihai; Taj-Aldeen, Saad J.

    2013-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) was used for an extensive identification study of arthroconidial yeasts, using 85 reference strains from the CBS-KNAW yeast collection and 134 clinical isolates collected from medical centers in Qatar, Greece, and Romania. The test set included 72 strains of ascomycetous yeasts (Galactomyces, Geotrichum, Saprochaete, and Magnusiomyces spp.) and 147 strains of basidiomycetous yeasts (Trichosporon and Guehomyces spp.). With minimal preparation time, MALDI-TOF MS proved to be an excellent diagnostic tool that provided reliable identification of most (98%) of the tested strains to the species level, with good discriminatory power. The majority of strains were correctly identified at the species level with good scores (>2.0) and seven of the tested strains with log score values between 1.7 and 2.0. The MALDI-TOF MS results obtained were consistent with validated internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and/or large subunit (LSU) ribosomal DNA sequencing results. Expanding the mass spectrum database by increasing the number of reference strains for closely related species, including those of nonclinical origin, should enhance the usefulness of MALDI-TOF MS-based diagnostic analysis of these arthroconidial fungi in medical and other laboratories. PMID:23678074

  14. Multidisciplinary training program to create new breed of radiation monitor: the health and safety technician

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vance, W.F.

    1979-01-01

    A multidiscipline training program established to create a new monitor, theHealth and Safety Technician, is described. The training program includes instruction in fire safety, explosives safety, industrial hygiene, industrial safety, health physics, and general safety practices

  15. [Competencies in the education of nursing technicians to implement the nursing care systematization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cruz, Andrea de Mello Pereira; Almeida, Miriam de Abreu

    2010-12-01

    This is a qualitative, exploratory and descriptive study whose general objective was to learn, considering the perspective of the nursing technician who works in school hospitals, the competencies developed during their educational process to implement the Nursing Care Systematization (NCS). Data collection and analysis were carried out through a focal group, with content analysis and nursing technicians. Two thematic categories emerged: The participation of the nursing technician in the NCS and The competencies in the education of the nursing technician. Each one received two subcategories: Conception of the NCS and (De)valuation of the NCS, Technical-scientific competency and Competency in the interpersonal relationship, respectively. It was observed that the NCS must be shared, discussed and made public among nursing professionals, so that they may acknowledge themselves as the leading actors of their methodology and be aware that their practices determine the results.

  16. The Development of a Skills Standard for Hazardous Materials Management Technology Technicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, James; Bear, Robert L.

    1995-01-01

    A multifaceted program, Goals 2000: Educate America," has as one of its top priorities the development of skills standards for certain key occupations. This articles examines the development of standards for Hazardous Materials Management Technology technicians. (LZ)

  17. Time to pregnancy among Danish laboratory technicians who were a part of the National Birth Cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Jin Liang; Knudsen, Lisbeth E; Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The Danish National Birth Cohort was used to examine whether laboratory work was associated with reduced fecundity. METHODS: Self-reported data on laboratory work and waiting time to pregnancy (0-2, 3-5, 6-12 and > 12 months) were used for 829 female laboratory technicians interviewed...... in 1997-2003. Altogether 6250 female teachers formed the reference group. A discrete-time survival analysis with a complementary log-log link was applied to estimate the fecundability ratio between the exposed and unexposed women, with adjustment for maternal age, gravidity, smoking, prepregnancy body...... mass index, and paternal job. RESULTS: No difference in time to pregnancy was found between the laboratory technicians and teachers or between the laboratory technicians with different exposures. The adjusted fecundability ratio for the laboratory technicians was 0.94 [95% confidence interval (95% CI...

  18. Inter-Rater Reliability of Historical Data Collected by Non-Medical Research Assistants and Physicians in Patients with Acute Abdominal Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mills, Angela M

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: In many academic emergency departments (ED, physicians are asked to record clinical data for research that may be time consuming and distracting from patient care. We hypothesized that non-medical research assistants (RAs could obtain historical information from patients with acute abdominal pain as accurately as physicians.METHODS: Prospective comparative study conducted in an academic ED of 29 RAs to 32 resident physicians (RPs to assess inter-rater reliability in obtaining historical information in abdominal pain patients. Historical features were independently recorded on standardized data forms by a RA and RP blinded to each others' answers. Discrepancies were resolved by a third person (RA who asked the patient to state the correct answer on a third questionnaire, constituting the "criterion standard." Inter-rater reliability was assessed using kappa statistics (kappa and percent crude agreement (CrA.RESULTS: Sixty-five patients were enrolled (mean age 43. Of 43 historical variables assessed, the median agreement was moderate (kappa 0.59 [Interquartile range 0.37-0.69]; CrA 85.9% and varied across data categories: initial pain location (kappa 0.61 [0.59-0.73]; CrA 87.7%, current pain location (kappa 0.60 [0.47-0.67]; CrA 82.8%, past medical history (kappa 0.60 [0.48-0.74]; CrA 93.8%, associated symptoms (kappa 0.38 [0.37-0.74]; CrA 87.7%, and aggravating/alleviating factors (kappa 0.09 [-0.01-0.21]; CrA 61.5%. When there was disagreement between the RP and the RA, the RA more often agreed with the criterion standard (64% [55-71%] than the RP (36% [29-45%].CONCLUSION: Non-medical research assistants who focus on clinical research are often more accurate than physicians, who may be distracted by patient care responsibilities, at obtaining historical information from ED patients with abdominal pain.

  19. A method for the efficient and effective evaluation of contract health physics technicians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkdoll, S.C.; Conley, T.A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that Wolf Creek has developed a method for efficiently training contract health physics technicians. The time allotted for training contractors prior to a refueling and maintenance outage is normally limited to a few days. Therefore, it was necessary to develop a systematic method to evaluate prior experience as well as practical skills and knowledge. In addition, instruction in the particular methodologies used at Wolf Creek hadto be included with methods for evaluating technician comprehension

  20. Survey on the use of CAD-CAM technology by UK and Irish dental technicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwell, E; Nesbit, M; Petridis, H

    2017-05-12

    Statement of the problem Digital workflows (CAD/CAM) have been introduced in dentistry during recent years. No published information exists on dental technicians' use and reporting of this technology.Purpose The aim of this cross sectional survey was to identify the extent digital technology has infiltrated the workplace and to investigate the factors affecting the use of CAD-CAM technology by dental laboratory technicians within Ireland and the UK.Materials and methods A web-based questionnaire was composed (Opinio, Object Planet Inc. Oslo, Norway) and distributed to UK and Irish dental technicians. Answers to all questions were anonymous and grouped such that general information was gathered initially, followed by branching of the survey into two sections depending on whether or not the respondent worked with CAD-CAM technology. Results were compiled and statistical analysis (Fisher's Exact test, SPSS, IBM, Armonk, New York, USA) was performed in order to investigate any correlation between various demographic variables and the answers provided.Results The survey was distributed to 760 UK technicians and 77 Irish technicians. The total number of completed surveys was 105, which yielded a total response rate of 14%. Most technicians reported using some form of CAD/CAM aspect in the workflow, and this was more significant for technicians working in large laboratories. Most training received was company-led. Large laboratories were also significantly correlated with less outsourcing of CAD/CAM work and a change in dental material use leading to the increase of zirconia and the decrease of noble alloys. Dental technicians did not report any significant change in working relationships and staffing as a result of CAD/CAM incorporation. High initial investment cost was the most common reason quoted from non-users, along with the lack of such technology in their working environment.

  1. A technician-delivered 'virtual clinic' for triaging low-risk glaucoma referrals

    OpenAIRE

    Kotecha, A.; Brookes, J.; Foster, P. J.

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study is to describe the outcomes of a technician-delivered glaucoma referral triaging service with ‘virtual review’ of resultant data by a consultant ophthalmologist. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The Glaucoma Screening Clinic reviewed new optometrist or GP-initiated glaucoma suspect referrals into a specialist ophthalmic hospital. Patients underwent testing by three ophthalmic technicians in a dedicated clinical facility. Data were reviewed at a different ti...

  2. Impact of a pre-clinical skills course with Peer Assisted Learning (PAL on preparedness and confidence levels of medical students in Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl Snyder

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Many benefits of pre-clinical medical skills training have been documented in technologically advanced nations, and in the past decade these courses have been introduced to developing countries. Curriculum that can prepare and build confidence in medical students must be cost effective, evidence-based, and culturally sensitive in places where there are severe resource limitations. In 2013, an initial pre-clinical skills course without assessments was introduced to medical students in Zambia. Later that year, a more developed course was launched to a second cohort integrating Peer Assisted Learning (PAL and assessments. These trainers were prepared in advance with instructions in standardized skills, learning theory, effective feedback techniques, and use of rubrics to insure good inter-rater reliability in teaching and assessments. Methods: A quantitative study surveyed 108 students utilizing convenience sampling and a written questionnaire. Data collected compared preparedness and confidence in performing clinical skills of the intervention cohorts with the control group (medical students who preceded pre-clinical skills training. Results: Preparedness responses increased from 36.1% of the students in the control group to 90.9% in the intervention group who had been exposed to the PAL course with assessments (p value <0.001. Student confidence levels in history taking, physical exam skills, procedures, and the application of critical thinking skills diagnostically also showed improvement from 11.5-29.5% range in the control group to 77.3-86.4% range in the PAL cohort (p value <0.001. Conclusions: Exposure to pre-clinical training program especially utilizing PAL with assessments had a positive impact on the sense of preparedness and confidence levels for medical students beginning their clinical training years at the University of Zambia. Integration of PAL influenced academic development, clinical procedural standardization

  3. [Results of two surveys of immigrants and natives in Southeast Spain: health, use of services, and need for medical assistance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tormo, María-José; Salmerón, Diego; Colorado-Yohar, Sandra; Ballesta, Mónica; Dios, Sofía; Martínez-Fernández, Carmen; Pérez-Flores, Domingo; García-Pérez, Vicenta; Palomar, Joaquín A; Torres, Alberto M; Navarro, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    To compare the self-perceived health, use of health services and unmet need for health care (UNHC) among immigrants and native populations of Southeast Spain. Cross-sectional study of two representative samples of 1150 immigrants, and 1303 native participants from the National Health Survey. A single database was created with specific weights for each sample, and prevalence ratios (PR) were estimated by multivariate regression. Moroccans, Ecuadorians and Eastern Europeans (EE) reported poorer health than the native population (PRs [CI95%]: 2.45 [1.91-3.15]; 1.51 [1.28-1.79] and 1.44 [1.08-1.93], respectively). Immigrants made greater use of emergencies that natives (except for EE) and had lower use of medication. Moroccan showed the greatest difference in the frequency of UNHC (PR [CI95%]:12.20 [5.25 - 28.37]), mainly because of working limitations (46%). The health status and use of health services among immigrants differ significantly from those of natives. Results highlight the higher frequency of UNHC among immigrants, especially high in Moroccans.

  4. Results of two surveys of immigrants and natives in Southeast Spain: health, use of services, and need for medical assistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María José Tormo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To compare the self-perceived health, use of health services and unmet need for health care (UNHC among immigrants and native populations of Southeast Spain. Materials and methods. Cross-sectional study of two representative samples of 1150 immigrants, and 1303 native participants from the National Health Survey. A single database was created with specific weights for each sample, and prevalence ratios (PR were estimated by multivariate regression. Results. Moroccans, Ecuadorians and Eastern Europeans (EE reported poorer health than the native population (PRs [CI95%]: 2.45 [1.91-3.15]; 1.51 [1.28-1.79] and 1.44 [1.08-1.93], respectively. Immigrants made greater use of emergencies that natives (except for EE and had lower use of medication. Moroccan showed the greatest difference in the frequency of UNHC (PR [CI95%]:12.20 [5.25 - 28.37], mainly because of working limitations (46%. Conclusions. The health status and use of health services among immigrants differ significantly from those of natives. Results highlight the higher frequency of UNHC among immigrants, especially high in Moroccans.

  5. New Zealand dental technicians and continuing education: findings from a qualitative survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Vivienne R; Pang, Lilian C Y; Aarts, John M

    2012-06-01

    Under the 2003 Health Practitioners Competence Assurance (HPCA) Act, New Zealand registered dental technicians are subject to mandatory Continuing Professional Development (CPD) requirements. Internationally, little published literature has examined dental technicians' perspectives of CPD and CPD needs, and there is no published literature relating to the New Zealand context. Available research highlights the importance of CPD for maintaining high professional standards, ensuring patient safety, allowing dental technicians to keep abreast of current research and technological advances, fostering peer networks, and promoting job satisfaction. In 2009, an online open-ended questionnaire was developed to examine New Zealand dental and clinical dental technicians' perspectives of CPD and their perceived CPD needs. In total, 45 New Zealand registered dental technicians responded. Questionnaire responses provided rich qualitative insights into dental technicians' wide-ranging perceptions of CPD, factors that make CPD involvement more or less difficult and more or less desirable, and ways in which CPD access and relevance might be improved. This paper discusses the survey findings in the light of the existing literature on CPD and in relation to the unique New Zealand regulatory environment. It highlights the factors which respondents identified as shaping their CPD decisions, barriers to CPD engagement, perceived CPD needs, suggestions as to how the current CPD system could be improved, and areas for future research.

  6. Training and qualification of health and safety technicians at a national laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egbert, W.F.; Trinoskey, P.A.

    1994-10-01

    Over the last 30 years, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has successfully implemented the concept of a multi-disciplined technician. LLNL Health and Safety Technicians have responsibilities in industrial hygiene, industrial safety, health physics, as well as fire, explosive, and criticality safety. One of the major benefits to this approach is the cost-effective use of workers who display an ownership of health and safety issues which is sometimes lacking when responsibilities are divided. Although LLNL has always promoted the concept of a multi-discipline technician, this concept is gaining interest within the Department of Energy (DOE) community. In November 1992, individuals from Oak Ridge Institute of Science and Education (ORISE) and RUST Geotech, joined by LLNL established a committee to address the issues of Health and Safety Technicians. In 1993, the DOE Office of Environmental, Safety and Health, in response to the Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board Recommendation 91-6, stated DOE projects, particularly environmental restoration, typically present hazards other than radiation such as chemicals, explosives, complex construction activities, etc., which require additional expertise by Radiological Control Technicians. They followed with a commitment that a training guide would be issued. The trend in the last two decades has been toward greater specialization in the areas of health and safety. In contrast, the LLNL has moved toward a generalist approach integrating the once separate functions of the industrial hygiene and health physics technician into one function

  7. Outcomes of medical malpractice claims in assisted reproductive technology over a 10-year period from a single carrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letterie, Gerard

    2017-04-01

    Medical malpractice claims vary by specialty. Contributory factors to malpractice in reproductive endocrinology and infertility (REI) are not well defined. We sought to determine claims' frequency, basis of claims, and outcomes of settled claims in REI. This is a retrospective, descriptive review of 10 years of claims. The setting is private practices. Claims were monitored within one malpractice carrier between 2006 and 2015 covering 10 practices and 184,015 IVF cycles. Total claims, basis of claims, and indemnity paid were evaluated. There were 176 incidents resulting in 30 settled claims with indemnity payments in 21. Categories of claims settled included misdiagnosis (N = 4), lack of informed consent (N = 5), embryology errors (N = 8), and surgical complications (N = 4). Total and average awards were $15,062,000 and $717,238, respectively. Misdiagnosis and lack of informed consent had highest total award amount at $11,583,000 accounting for 76% of award dollars. The two highest awards were $4.5 million and $3.0 million for cancer and genetic misdiagnosis, respectively. Excluding these two awards, payments totaled $7,562,000, ranged from $6000 to $900,000 and averaged $170,363. Errors in handling of embryos were highest in frequency accounting for 38% of claims paid for a total of $1,593,000 with average payment of $199,188. Settlements for surgical complications totaled $1,855,000 and averaged $463,750 per claim. Misdiagnosis and lack of informed consent are the highest award categories. Embryology lab errors are the most frequent causes of claims with the lowest award per settlement. The average cost for claims settled is relatively high compared to settlements in other specialties.

  8. Training, abilities, role and responsibilities of the technician in treatment planning or 'dosimetrist' in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchheit, Isabelle; Angles, Damien; Marchesi, Vincent; Fau, Pierre; Aubignac, Leone; Palisson, Jeremy; Lacornerie, Thomas; Baron, Pierre-Louis; Popoff, Romain; Llagostera, Camille; Buffard, Edwige; Sarrazin, Thierry; Le Du, Dominique; Estivalet, Andre; Tchong, Bruno; Marcie, Serge; Guerin, Lucie; Parent, Laure

    2013-09-01

    As the creation of treatment plans in radiotherapy (commonly named dosimetry) has become a crucial task in the treatment process, and has been historically performed by the medical physician, it may be delegated to other professionals and there is therefore a need of creation of a profession: the technician in treatment planning or dosimetrist. In order to better define this profession, its role and its education and training requirements, this document describes its role, its required knowledge, abilities and capacities (general knowledge, knowledge in anatomy, oncology and imagery, in radiation production, in ballistic and preparation, in radiotherapy, in breath-based feedback, in body irradiation, in radiation protection, in delimitation of organs at risk, and in administrative issues). The different training levels are indicated: initial training, continuous training, and validation of prior experience. The legal framework and organisational issues are addressed in terms of delegation and responsibility

  9. Abstracts Book of 41. Scientific Assembly of Polish Chemical Society and Association of Engineers and Technicians of Chemical Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    Scientific Assembly of Polish Chemical Society and Association of Engineers and Technicians of Chemical Industry is the most important scientific forum of Polish Chemists. The state of the art in many basic, fundamental and applied investigations has been presented and discussed. The following scientific sessions and microsymposia have been proposed: theoretical chemistry; molecular interactions; metal compounds - chemical, physical, electronic and biological aspects; catalysis and surface physico-chemistry; polymers - radiochemistry, modifications, physics and analytical methods; organic and bioorganic chemistry; physico-chemistry of condensed matter; chemical metallurgy; environmental protection; inorganic technology; chemistry and technology of coal; radiation chemistry; analytical chemistry; chemical engineering; young scientists forum; chemical didactics; petrochemistry; energetic materials; membranes and membrane processes; medical chemistry

  10. Risk assessment of medically assisted reproduction and advanced maternal ages in the development of Prader-Willi syndrome due to UPD(15)mat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, K; Murakami, N; Fukami, M; Kagami, M; Nagai, T; Ogata, T

    2016-05-01

    Recent studies have suggested that disomic oocyte-mediated uniparental disomy 15 (UPD(15)mat) is increased in patients with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) born after medically assisted reproduction (MAR). However, it remains unknown whether the increase is primarily due to MAR procedure itself or advanced maternal childbearing ages as a predisposing factor for the disomic oocyte production. To examine this matter, we studied 122 naturally conceived PWS patients (PWS-NC group) and 13 MAR-conceived patients (PWS-MAR group). The relative frequency of disomic oocyte-mediated UPD(15)mat was significantly higher in PWS-MAR group than in PWS-NC group (7/13 vs 20/122, p = 0.0045), and the maternal childbearing ages were significantly higher in PWS-MAR group than in PWS-NC group [median (range), 38 (26-45) vs 30 (19-42), p = 0.0015]. However, the logistic regression analysis revealed no significant association between the occurrence of disomic oocyte-mediated UPD(15)mat and MAR, after adjusting for childbearing age (p = 0.25). Consistent with this, while the frequency of assisted reproductive technology (ART)-conceived livebirths was higher in the PWS patients than in the Japanese general population (6.4% vs 1.1%, p = 0.00018), the distribution of childbearing ages was significantly skewed to the increased ages in the PWS patients (p < 2.2 × 10(-16) ). These results argue against a positive association of MAR procedure itself with the development of UPD(15)mat. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Impact of pharmacists assisting with prescribing and undertaking medication review on oxycodone prescribing and supply for patients discharged from surgical wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, T; Taylor, S E; Hardidge, A; Findakly, D; Aminian, P; Elliott, R A

    2017-10-01

    Overprescribing of oxycodone is a contributor to the epidemic of prescription opioid misuse and deaths. Practice models to optimize oxycodone prescribing and supply need to be evaluated. We explored the impact of pharmacist-assisted discharge prescribing and medication review on oxycodone prescribing and supply for patients discharged from surgical wards. A retrospective audit was conducted on two surgical inpatient wards following a 16-week prospective pre- and post-intervention study. During the pre-intervention period, discharge prescriptions were prepared by hospital doctors and then reviewed by a ward pharmacist (WP) before being dispensed. Post-intervention, prescriptions were prepared by a project pharmacist in consultation with hospital doctors and then reviewed by a WP and dispensed. Proportion of patients who were prescribed, and proportion supplied, oxycodone on discharge; Median amount (milligrams) of oxycodone prescribed and supplied, for patients who were prescribed and supplied at least one oxycodone-containing preparation, respectively. A total of 320 and 341 patients were evaluated pre- and post-intervention, respectively. Pre-intervention, 75.6% of patients were prescribed oxycodone; after WP review, 60.3% were supplied oxycodone (P<.01); the median amount both prescribed and supplied was 100 milligrams/patient. Post-intervention, 68.6% of patients were prescribed oxycodone; after WP review, 57.8% were supplied oxycodone (P<.01); median amount prescribed and supplied was 50 milligrams/patient (difference in amount prescribed and supplied: 50 milligrams, P<.01). WP review of doctor-prepared prescriptions reduced the proportion of patients who were supplied oxycodone but not the amount supplied/patient. Having a pharmacist assist with prescribing reduced the amount of oxycodone supplied. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Organ donation after medical assistance in dying or cessation of life-sustaining treatment requested by conscious patients: the Canadian context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allard, Julie; Fortin, Marie-Chantal

    2017-09-01

    In June 2016, following the decision of the Supreme Court of Canada to decriminalise assistance in dying, the Canadian government enacted Bill C-14, legalising medical assistance in dying (MAID). In 2014, the province of Quebec had passed end-of-life care legislation making MAID available as of December 2015. The availability of MAID has many implications, including the possibility of combining this practice with organ donation through the controlled donation after cardiac death (cDCD) protocol. cDCD most often occurs in cases where the patient has a severe neurological injury but does not meet all the criteria for brain death. The donation is subsequent to the decision to withdraw life-sustaining treatment (LST). Cases where patients are conscious prior to the withdrawal of LST are unusual, and have raised doubts as to the acceptability of removing organs from individuals who are not neurologically impaired and who have voluntarily chosen to die. These cases can be compared with likely scenarios in which patients will request both MAID and organ donation. In both instances, patients will be conscious and competent. Organ donation in such contexts raises ethical issues regarding respect for autonomy, societal pressure, conscientious objections and the dead-donor rule. In this article, we look at relevant policies in other countries and examine the ethical issues associated with cDCD in conscious patients who choose to die. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  13. Patient-Reported Health-Related Quality of Life Is a Predictor of Outcomes in Ambulatory Heart Failure Patients Treated With Left Ventricular Assist Device Compared With Medical Management: Results From the ROADMAP Study (Risk Assessment and Comparative Effectiveness of Left Ventricular Assist Device and Medical Management).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stehlik, Josef; Estep, Jerry D; Selzman, Craig H; Rogers, Joseph G; Spertus, John A; Shah, Keyur B; Chuang, Joyce; Farrar, David J; Starling, Randall C

    2017-06-01

    The prospective observational ROADMAP study (Risk Assessment and Comparative Effectiveness of Left Ventricular Assist Device and Medical Management) demonstrated that ambulatory advanced heart failure patients selected for left ventricular assist device (LVAD) were more likely to be alive at 1 year on original therapy with ≥75-m improvement in 6-minute walk distance compared with patients assigned to optimal medical management. Whether baseline health-related quality of life (hrQoL) resulted in a heterogeneity of this treatment benefit is unknown. Patient-reported hrQoL was assessed with EuroQol questionnaire and visual analogue scale (VAS). We aimed to identify predictors of event-free survival and survival with acceptable hrQoL (VAS≥60). LVAD patients had significant improvement in 3 of 5 EuroQol dimensions ( P management. Among patients with baseline VASmanagement patients compared with those assigned to LVAD (58±7% versus 82±5%; P =0.004). No such difference was seen if baseline VAS was ≥55 (70±7% versus 75±9%; P =0.79). Survival on original therapy with acceptable quality of life was also more likely with LVAD versus optimal medical management if baseline VAS was quality of life at the time of LVAD implantation. Patient-reported hrQoL should be integrated into decision making concerning the use and timing of LVAD therapy in heart failure patients who are symptom limited but remain ambulatory. URL: http://www.ClinicalTrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01452802. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. IAEA Technical Co-operation activities: Asia and the Pacific. Workshop on training nuclear laboratory technicians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roeed, S.S.

    1976-01-01

    The workshop was held to exchange information on existing facilities and programmes in Asia and the Pacific for training nuclear laboratory technicians, to identify future training needs and to assess the need for IAEA's involvement in this field. As the participants outlined the requirements for nuclear laboratory technician training and the facilities available in their respective countries, it became evident that, in addition to the training of radioisotope laboratory technicians, they also wished to review the need for technician training for the operation of nuclear power plants and industrial application of atomic energy. The terms of reference of the workshop were extended accordingly. The opening address by Chang Suk Lee, the Korean Vice Minister of Science and Technology, noted the valuable contribution to quality control and other industrial uses that nuclear techniques have made in his country. He also reviewed the application of nuclear techniques in Korean agriculture and medicine. The participants explored various forms of co-operation that could be established between countries of the region. Exchange programmes, not only for students but also for expert teachers, and the exchange or loan of equipment were suggested. It was felt that some generalized training courses could be organized on a regional basis, and two countries advocated the setting up of a regional training centre. One suggestion was to arrange regional training courses in special fields that would move from one country to another. The need was felt for periodic regional meetings on training methods, course content and other questions relating to training of laboratory technicians. The IAEA was requested to act as a clearinghouse for information on available training facilities in the region and to advise on the curricula for technician training courses. The Agency was also asked to organize short courses for the training of instructors of technicians in the various fields of atomic

  15. Current status of implant prosthetics in Japan: a survey among certified dental lab technicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagiwara, Yoshiyuki; Narita, Tatsuya; Shioda, Yohei; Iwasaki, Keisuke; Ikeda, Takayuki; Namaki, Shunsuke; Salinas, Thomas J

    2015-12-01

    There are many implant cases in which dental technicians take initiative with regard to the design of implant prostheses, and to a certain extent, this area of care is one in which dentists do not necessarily play the leading role. Moreover, inadequate communication between dental technicians and dentists and insufficient instructions for technicians has been highlighted as issues in the past. The purpose of this questionnaire is to improve the quality of implant prostheses and thereby contribute to patient service by clarifying, among other aspects of treatment, problem areas and considerations in the fabrication of implant prostheses, conceptual-level knowledge, and awareness of prosthodontics on the part of the dentists in charge of treatment and methods for preventing prosthetic complications. A cross-sectional survey was given to 120 certified dental technicians. To facilitate coverage of a broad range of topics, we classified the survey content into the following four categories and included detailed questions for (1) the conditions under which implant technicians work, (2) implant fixed prostheses, (3) implant overdentures, and (4) prosthetic complications. Out of 120 surveys sent, 74 technicians responded resulting in a response rate of 61.6%. This survey served to clarify the current state of implant prosthodontics, issues, and considerations in the fabrication of implant prostheses, and the state of prosthetic complications and preventive initiatives, all from a laboratory perspective. The results of this survey suggested that, to fabricate prostheses with a high level of predictability, functional utility, and aesthetic satisfaction, it is necessary to reaffirm the importance for dentists to increase their prosthetic knowledge and work together with dental technicians to develop comprehensive treatment plans, implement an organized approach to prosthesis design, and accomplish occlusal reconstruction.

  16. A System Approach to Navy Medical Education and Training. Appendix 16. Aviation Technician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-08-31

    8732 DT Repair 8752 DT Prosthetic , Basic 8753 Ur Prosthetic , Advanced 8765 DT Maxillofacial Prosthetic vii RESPONSE BOOKLET INSTRUCTIONS * To...OF VISION# LIMB GO TO RIG4T HAND PAGE ;lIHT PAG~E 06 ~ AVIATIrN TASK Rf)KLET ITASK NO. ENTER PFSPONSES TO STATE-ENTS 6ELCW IN RIGHT SID CF PAGE 0O...IRESUSCITATOPI 21 IRESPIRATOR, EMERSON 22 IAMBU BAG (HOPE BAG) 23 (RESPIRATOR BIRD Z4 (ICE COLLARS/PACKS j 25 IMEAT LAMP II GO TO RIGHT HAND PAGE P IGHT PAGE

  17. A System Approach to Navy Medical Education and Training. Appendix 19. Dermatology Technician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-08-31

    26 IEXAMINE FOR SYMPTOMS OF EXTERNAL FUNGAL INFECTIONS, E.G. IRINGWORM 1 27 IFXAMINE FOR PRESENCE OF/OR CONTACT WITH LICE, FLEAS, TICKS, ILEACHES1 28...37 IMAKE PRELIMINARY DIAGNOSIS OF IMPETIGO 38 IMAKE PRELIMINARY DIAGNOSIS OF TOXIC DERMATOSIS 39 IMAKE PRELIMINARY DIAGNOSIS OF FUNGAL SKIN INFECTION...43 1EXCISE POLYP 44 rEXCISE SEBACEOUS CYST/LIPOMA 45 IEXTRACT SEBACEOUS MATERIAL FROM COMEOO 46 PREMOVE INGROWN NAIL 47 IFREEZE WART WITH LIQUID

  18. A System Approach to Navy Medical Education and Training. Appendix 10. Operating Room Technician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-08-31

    IPELVIC EXENTEPATION SCRUB 33 IPELVIC EXENTERATION CIRCULATF 34 IAMPUTATION OF CERVIX SCRUB 35 IAMPUTATION OF CERVIX CIRCULATE 31, IEXCISION OVARIAN...FC:Y C I~ E.. 4 10171’A 07O IN!,FR OC’jLAR CPFGN BEOOY k S IE !VALOF INNER OCULAR FCREIG,, [!3ooy 6 IRFPAIP OF PROLAPSED IRIS SC Ut.J2 7 IREPAIrP OF

  19. A System Approach to Navy Medical Education and Training. Appendix 5. Neuropsychiatric Technician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-08-31

    REPORT SYMPTOMS OF SINUS BLOCKAGE 8 IEXAMINE MOUTH AND PHARYNX FOR LESIONS, SORES, LEUKOPLAKIA 9 OBSERVE FOR/REPORT SYMPTOMS OF INFECTION OF ORAL MUCOSAt...E.G. IBTHRUSH 10 IOBSERVE FOR/REPORT SYMPTOMS OF CARIES, SIMPLE AND ADVANCED 1L ,EXAMINE FOR/REPORT SYMPTOMS OF ORAL ABSCESS 12 IOBSERVE FOR/REPORT... ORAL , 1INJECTION 31 OBSERVE FOR/REPORT SYMPTOMS OF DRUG/CHEMICAL INGESTION I(POISONINGI 32 1OBSERVE FOR/REPORT SYMPTOMS OF DRUG DEPENDENCY, E.Ge

  20. A System Approach to Navy Medical Education and Training. Appendix 21. Orthopedic Technician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-08-31

    RESPONSE BOOKLET .. . . . . .. . . . .----------------------------------- ------------ - - - ----- 26 ICALCULATE/PLAN ORAL FLUID RESTRICTIONS 27 EXAMINE...MOUTH AND PHARYNX FOR LESIONS, SORES, LEUKOPLAKIA 28 OBSERVE FOR/REPORT SYMPTOMS OF CARIES, SIMPLE ANO AOVANCED 29 (OBSERVE FOR/REPORT SYMPTOMS OF...PERIODONTAL ABSCESS 30 (OBSERVE FOR/REPORT SYMPTOMS OF DENTURE IRRITATION 31 IOBSERVE FOR/REPORT SYMPTOMS OF INFECTION OF ORAL 4UCOSAP E.G. ITHRUSH 32

  1. A System Approach to Navy Medical Education and Training. Appendix 22. Otolaryngology Technician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-08-31

    PRELIMINARY DIAGNOSIS OF EXTERNAL EAR INFECTION 15 IMAKE PRELIMINARY DIAGNOSIS OF OTITIS MEDIA 16 IMAKE PRELIMINARY DIAGNOSIS OF RUPTURED EAR DRUM 17 IMAKE...EXTERNAL FUNGAL INFECTIONS, E.G. IRINGWORM 30 lEXAMINE FOR PRESENCE OF/OR CONTACT WITH LICE, FLEAS, TICKS, ILEACHES 31 1EXAMINE ANIMAL OR HUMAN BITES 32

  2. A System Approach to Navy Medical Education and Training. Appendix 20. Ophthalmology Technician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-08-31

    PATIENT/FAMILY 41 INSTRUCT PATIENT ON CARE AND USE OF CONTACT LENSES 42 1EXPLAIN X-RAY PROCEDURES TO PATIENT 43 ITAKE BLOOD PRESSURE 44 ICHECK RADIAL...20 IINSERT/REMOVE GLASS EYE/ CONTACT LENSES II 21 )ASCERTAIN IF PATIENT HAS BEEN PREPPED FOR TEST/TREATMENT IPROCEDURE 22 IPICK UP/DELIVER SPECIMENS 23...RESPONSES TO STATEMENTS BELOW IN LEFT SIJl OF PIGE O, I O PESPONSE BO’lKLET I I IRIJECTOMY SCRUA 2 IRIDECTOMY CP.CJL4TF 3 REPAIR 3F SCLERAL LACERATION

  3. A System Approach to Navy Medical Education and Training. Appendix 13. Dental Technician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-08-31

    REMOVE WAX FROM THE MOULD I. 42 IDE-FLASK DENTURES 43 IPACK FLASK WITH ACRYLIC RESIN 44 IFABRICATE OCCLUSION RIMS 45 IFABRICATE ORTHODONTIC APPLIANCE... DENTURES WITH ACRYLIC /POLYMERS so IPREPARE BY ALIGNING PARTIAL/COMPLETE DENTURES FOR REPAIRS TURN PAGE LEFT PAGE 12 DENTAL TASK BOOKLET I TASK NO. I...SYMPTOMS OF DENTURE IRRITATION 22 IOBSERVE FOR/REPORT SYMPTOMS OF PERICORONITIS 23 IOBSERVE FOR/REPORT SYMPTOMS OF SUPERNUMERARY TEETH 24 IOBSERVE FOR

  4. A System Approach to Navy Medical Education and Training. Appendix 24. Equipment Repair Technician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-08-31

    1AUDIOMETER, MANUAL 6 lEVACUATOR, ORAL CAVITY 7 lEJECTOR FOR DENTURE FLASK 8 (AMALGAMATOR9 ELECTRIC, DENTAL 9 IAMALGAM DISPENSING UNIT 10 1PROCESSOR... ACRYLIC PACO 11 1ELECTROPLATER (SILVER, GOLD AND COPPER) 12 IPANOREX X-RAY UNIT I{ 13 ICASTING MACHINE, CHROME COBALT 14 ICASTING MACHINE, DENTAL METALS...RESIN, DENTURE 37 IKNIFE, COMPOUND 38 IPLIERS, DENTAL, ALL TYPES 39 IBRUSH, SCRATCH, DENTAL I 1 40 IBRUSH, FIBER, ROTARY WHEEL 41 IHEAT GUN I I 42

  5. Administrative Guide for the Flight Surgeon and the Aeromedical Technician: Performing Medical Examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-12-01

    anyone who had tuberculosis a. Person lived with, length of time, results and frequency of x-rays on examinee. b. Example: Mother with tuberculosis ...prslonged exertion (athletic exercise), subsided following short rest period, NCNS. 59. Paralysis (including infantile ) a. Dx, date, cause (if applicable...manifested by joint swelling, moderately severe, minimal disability, treated with physical therapy, last occurred 1972. 78. Tuberculosis a. Dx, date

  6. Enriched adhesion of talc/ZnO nanocomposites on cotton fabric assisted by aloe-vera for bio-medical application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selvakumar, D.; Yogamalar, N. R.; Jayavel, R., E-mail: rjvel@annauniv.edu [Centre for Nanoscience and Technology, Anna University, Chennai – 600025 (India); Thenammai, A. N.; Hemamalini, R. [Department of Physics, Queen Mary’s College, Chennai – 600004 (India)

    2015-06-24

    Synthesis and characterization of talc/ZnO nanocomposites with the assistance of aloe-vera are investigated by structural and morphological studies. The crystal structure and the phase analysis of ZnO and talc are characterized and confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The average crystallite size estimation from the Scherrer formula and the particle size analysis clearly predicts that the size of the ZnO declines when aloe-vera is used as a capping molecule in comparison to the commercially available ZnO. The reduced crystallite size of ZnO renders a stable cohesion with the talc composition and the presence of distinct functional group pyridines/ammonia in the synthesized nanocomposites enriches the good adhesion between the as-synthesized material and cotton fabric. The adhesion and homogeneous distribution of talc/ZnO nanocomposites on the cotton fabric are inferred from the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) results. The basic studies and characterizations would pave way for futuristic bio-medical application.

  7. Enriched adhesion of talc/ZnO nanocomposites on cotton fabric assisted by aloe-vera for bio-medical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selvakumar, D.; Yogamalar, N. R.; Jayavel, R.; Thenammai, A. N.; Hemamalini, R.

    2015-01-01

    Synthesis and characterization of talc/ZnO nanocomposites with the assistance of aloe-vera are investigated by structural and morphological studies. The crystal structure and the phase analysis of ZnO and talc are characterized and confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The average crystallite size estimation from the Scherrer formula and the particle size analysis clearly predicts that the size of the ZnO declines when aloe-vera is used as a capping molecule in comparison to the commercially available ZnO. The reduced crystallite size of ZnO renders a stable cohesion with the talc composition and the presence of distinct functional group pyridines/ammonia in the synthesized nanocomposites enriches the good adhesion between the as-synthesized material and cotton fabric. The adhesion and homogeneous distribution of talc/ZnO nanocomposites on the cotton fabric are inferred from the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) results. The basic studies and characterizations would pave way for futuristic bio-medical application

  8. Enriched adhesion of talc/ZnO nanocomposites on cotton fabric assisted by aloe-vera for bio-medical application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvakumar, D.; Thenammai, A. N.; Yogamalar, N. R.; Hemamalini, R.; Jayavel, R.

    2015-06-01

    Synthesis and characterization of talc/ZnO nanocomposites with the assistance of aloe-vera are investigated by structural and morphological studies. The crystal structure and the phase analysis of ZnO and talc are characterized and confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The average crystallite size estimation from the Scherrer formula and the particle size analysis clearly predicts that the size of the ZnO declines when aloe-vera is used as a capping molecule in comparison to the commercially available ZnO. The reduced crystallite size of ZnO renders a stable cohesion with the talc composition and the presence of distinct functional group pyridines/ammonia in the synthesized nanocomposites enriches the good adhesion between the as-synthesized material and cotton fabric. The adhesion and homogeneous distribution of talc/ZnO nanocomposites on the cotton fabric are inferred from the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) results. The basic studies and characterizations would pave way for futuristic bio-medical application.

  9. La filiation et l’aide médicale à la procréation Filiation and medical assistance to procreation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Cadoret

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available L’aide médicale à la procréation permet une procréation aussi proche que possible du processus naturel de fabrication d’un enfant en s’appuyant sur les éléments de base de la procréation, substances (sperme et ovule. A partir de cette base technique, chaque société va dire les combinaisons obligatoires pour aboutir à une filiation et transcrire une donnée naturelle de la procréation en une donnée sociale. Comment se passe cette transcription ? Que nous dit-elle du passage de la transformation du corps et de la sexualité en parenté ? Y aurait-il d’autres montages possibles de la filiation ?Medical assistance to procreation allows for procreation which is as close as possible from the natural process of the making of a child by relying on basic elements of procreation i.e. substances (sperm and ovum. From this technical basis, every society determines the combinations required to establish a filiation and transcribes a natural data of procreation into a social data. How is this transcription produced? What does it tell us about the transformation of the body and sexuality into parenthood? Would there be other possible constructions of the filiation?

  10. An informatics-based tool to assist researchers in initiating research at an academic medical center: Vanderbilt Customized Action Plan (V-CAP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulley, Jill M.; Harris, Paul A.; Yarbrough, Tonya; Swafford, Jonathan; Edwards, Terri; Bernard, Gordon R.

    2013-01-01

    The regulatory review and approval process is a significant part of the workflow associated with initiating clinical and translational research projects. Ambiguity concerning submission requirements and expected times associated with the review process can create additional work for research teams and ultimately delay important scientific projects. In an effort to provide assistance to investigators, we have developed an online interactive interface which elicits basic study characteristics for a single project and subsequently produces a list of required administrative applications needed for approval along with clear instructions concerning expectations from the research team. This system, the Vanderbilt Customized Action Plan (V-CAP), was launched in October, 2006 and been used extensively. The informatics systems-based approach is scalable to other academic medical centers and the authors report details concerning: (1) V-CAP project design; (2) a reference workflow associated with Vanderbilt policies and regulations; (3) V-CAP metrics of use by Vanderbilt research teams; and (4) a list of recommendations for other academic centers considering a similar systems-based approach for helping researchers efficiently navigate processes related to regulatory approval. PMID:20042844

  11. Predicting substance-abuse treatment providers' communication with clients about medication assisted treatment: a test of the theories of reasoned action and planned behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberto, Anthony J; Shafer, Michael S; Marmo, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to determine if the theory of reasoned action (TRA) and theory of planned behavior (TPB) can retrospectively predict whether substance-abuse treatment providers encourage their clients to use medicated-assisted treatment (MAT) as part of their treatment plan. Two-hundred and ten substance-abuse treatment providers completed a survey measuring attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behavioral control, intentions, and behavior. Results indicate that substance-abuse treatment providers have very positive attitudes, neutral subjective norms, somewhat positive perceived behavioral control, somewhat positive intentions toward recommending MAT as part of their clients' treatment plan, and were somewhat likely to engage in the actual behavior. Further, the data fit both the TRA and TPB, but with the TPB model having better fit and predictive power for this target audience and behavior. The theoretical and practical implications for the developing messages for substance-abuse treatment providers and other health-care professionals who provide treatment to patients with substance use disorders are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A Grounded Theory Study of Aircraft Maintenance Technician Decision-Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norcross, Robert

    Aircraft maintenance technician decision-making and actions have resulted in aircraft system errors causing aircraft incidents and accidents. Aircraft accident investigators and researchers examined the factors that influence aircraft maintenance technician errors and categorized the types of errors in an attempt to prevent similar occurrences. New aircraft technology introduced to improve aviation safety and efficiency incur failures that have no information contained in the aircraft maintenance manuals. According to the Federal Aviation Administration, aircraft maintenance technicians must use only approved aircraft maintenance documents to repair, modify, and service aircraft. This qualitative research used a grounded theory approach to explore the decision-making processes and actions taken by aircraft maintenance technicians when confronted with an aircraft problem not contained in the aircraft maintenance manuals. The target population for the research was Federal Aviation Administration licensed aircraft and power plant mechanics from across the United States. Nonprobability purposeful sampling was used to obtain aircraft maintenance technicians with the experience sought in the study problem. The sample population recruitment yielded 19 participants for eight focus group sessions to obtain opinions, perceptions, and experiences related to the study problem. All data collected was entered into the Atlas ti qualitative analysis software. The emergence of Aircraft Maintenance Technician decision-making themes regarding Aircraft Maintenance Manual content, Aircraft Maintenance Technician experience, and legal implications of not following Aircraft Maintenance Manuals surfaced. Conclusions from this study suggest Aircraft Maintenance Technician decision-making were influenced by experience, gaps in the Aircraft Maintenance Manuals, reliance on others, realizing the impact of decisions concerning aircraft airworthiness, management pressures, and legal concerns

  13. The effect of bundling medication-assisted treatment for opioid addiction with mHealth: study protocol for a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafson, David H; Landucci, Gina; McTavish, Fiona; Kornfield, Rachel; Johnson, Roberta A; Mares, Marie-Louise; Westergaard, Ryan P; Quanbeck, Andrew; Alagoz, Esra; Pe-Romashko, Klaren; Thomas, Chantelle; Shah, Dhavan

    2016-12-12

    Opioid dependence has devastating and increasingly widespread consequences and costs, and the most common outcome of treatment is early relapse. People who inject opioids are also at disproportionate risk for contracting the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV). This study tests an approach that has been shown to improve recovery rates: medication along with other supportive services (medication-assisted treatment, or MAT) against MAT combined with a smartphone innovation called A-CHESS (MAT + A-CHESS). This unblinded study will randomly assign 440 patients to receive MAT + A-CHESS or MAT alone. Eligible patients will meet criteria for having an opioid use disorder of at least moderate severity and will be taking methadone, injectable naltrexone, or buprenorphine. Patients with A-CHESS will have smartphones for 16 months; all patients will be followed for 24 months. The primary outcome is the difference between patients in the two arms in percentage of days using illicit opioids during the 24-month intervention. Secondary outcomes are differences between patients receiving MAT + A-CHESS versus MAT in other substance use, quality of life, retention in treatment, health service use, and, related to HIV and HCV, screening and testing rates, medication adherence, risk behaviors, and links to care. We will also examine mediators and moderators of the effects of MAT + A-CHESS. We will measure variables at baseline and months 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, and 24. At each point, patients will respond to a 20- to 30-min phone survey; urine screens will be collected at baseline and up to twice a month thereafter. We will use mixed-effects to evaluate the primary and secondary outcomes, with baseline scores functioning as covariates, treatment condition as a between-subject factor, and the outcomes reflecting scores for a given assessment at the six time points. Separate analyses will be conducted for each outcome. A-CHESS has been shown to

  14. Fully automatic CAD design of the occlusal morphology of partial crowns compared to dental technicians' design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litzenburger, Andreas P; Hickel, Reinhard; Richter, Maria J; Mehl, Albert C; Probst, Florian A

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the occlusal morphology of partial crown reconstructions made by dental technicians with reconstructions made by a fully automatic software process (biogeneric tooth model) in relation to the original natural tooth shape. Stone replicas of natural teeth were measured three-dimensionally before preparing inlay and onlay cavities for ceramic restorations (n = 5). For each preparation, five reconstructions (in total n = 25) were made by five dental technicians. Additionally, reconstructions were calculated automatically by a software based on the biogeneric tooth model (Cerec 3D). In order to compare the two different kinds of reconstruction, an objective metrical similarity measure (shape similarity value, SSV) based on calculated volumes between compared datasets was used. In 22 of 25 cases, the reconstructions made by the CAD software were closer to the original situation than the reconstructions made by the technicians. Mean average SSV of reconstructions made by the technicians (310.2 ± 78.8 μm) was significantly higher (p dental technicians. The adjustment of a dental restoration to fit the morphology of surrounding tooth structures, still presents challenges for the dentist.

  15. Characterization of Low Back Pain in Pilots and Maintenance Technicians on a Commercial Airline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajardo Rodriguez, Hugo A; Ortiz Mayorga, Viviana A

    2016-09-01

    Lower back pain (LBP) is the most common complaint worldwide and the leading cause of disability in the workplace. In Colombia there are no epidemiological data on low back pain in aviation. This study aimed to characterize lower back pain in pilots and maintenance technicians in a Colombian commercial airline. Information was collected from the total population in a Colombian commercial airline in Bogota during the period from 2011 to 2013 using a voluntary survey which requested demographics, occupational (LEST survey) factors, back pain, and chronic pain (chronic pain grade scale). The prevalence rate of LBP in pilot respondents was 71% and the factors associated previously have belonged to the military forces: occupational exposure to physical load and work time. Chronic low back pain was at a prevalence of 49%. The prevalence of LBP in maintenance technicians was 65%. Associated factors were again similar to military forces and included mental workload. Chronic pain had a prevalence of 65%. Factors associated with chronic low back pain were the technicians' time in office and physical load. The prevalence of lower back pain in pilots is similar to that presented in the airline world population. In the case of maintenance technicians, the prevalence was higher than those found in other similar groups, but very similar to prevalences presented in different business industries, including the transport sector. Fajardo Rodriguez HA, Ortiz Mayorga VA. Characterization of low back pain in pilots and maintenance technicians on a commercial airline. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2016; 87(9):795-799.

  16. THE ROLE OF SCHOOL TECHNICIANS IN PROMOTING SCIENCE THROUGH PRACTICAL WORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne T. Helliar

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This is a review of the role of practical work in UK’s secondary school science lessons, the impact that practical work has in the promotion of science, the challenges created through use of non-specialist science teachers and a possible additional role for science technicians. The paper considers how improved deployment of suitably experienced school science technicians and their recognition, by schools’ management, for their involvement in the delivery of training in the use of practical work, for less experienced teachers, could benefit schools and their students. This together with its companion paper endeavours to show how the more effective use of practical work and technicians can encourage more students to select science at higher, non-compulsory levels.

  17. Oral health technicians in Brazilian primary health care: potentials and constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, Dulce Maria Lucena de; Tomita, Nilce Emy; Machado, Maria de Fátima Antero Sousa; Martins, Cleide Lavieri; Frazão, Paulo

    2014-07-01

    Different perspectives on the role of mid-level workers in health care might represent a constraint to health policies. This study aimed to investigate how different agents view the participation of oral health technicians in direct activities of oral healthcare with the goal of understanding the related symbolic dispositions. Theoretical assumptions related to inter-professional collaboration and conflicts in the field of healthcare were used for this analysis. A researcher conducted 24 in-depth interviews with general dental practitioners, oral health technicians and local managers. The concepts of Pierre Bourdieu supported the data interpretation. The results indicated inter-professional relations marked by collaboration and conflict that reflect an action space related to different perspectives of primary care delivery. They also unveiled the symbolic devices related to the participation of oral health technicians that represent a constraint to the implementation of oral health policy, thus reducing the potential of primary health care in Brazil.

  18. Metabolic syndrome and occupation: Any association? Prevalence among auto technicians and school teachers in South West Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akintunde, Adeseye A; Oloyede, Taiwo W

    2017-11-01

    To determine occupational association with metabolic syndrome among auto technicians and school teachers. One hundred and sixty six subjects were selected for this study. Clinical data was obtained while laboratory investigations including plasma glucose and lipid profile were performed. Statistical analysis was done with SPSS 20.0. Pauto technicians. Mean serum triglycerides was significantly higher among auto-technicians compared to school teachers in this study. The prevalence of some conventional cardiovascular risk factors was significantly higher among auto-technicians compared to school teachers: Impaired blood glucose (9.6% vs. 1.2%, pauto-technicians. Based on the WHO and the Harmonized criteria, metabolic syndrome was more frequent among auto-technicians compared to school teachers. (8.4% vs. 1.2% and 19.3% vs. 7.2% respectively, pauto technicians despite their high level of physical activity, exertion and education compared to teachers. This may be related to the increased occupational exposure to organic and inorganic materials from dust particles, oil and oil related matter and particulate matter among auto technicians. Prompt definitive evaluation of this concept and appropriate health education to encourage safety mechanism can reduce this burden of metabolic syndrome among auto technicians in Nigeria. Copyright © 2016 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The practice of medical radiology. 4. rev. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laubenberger, T.

    1986-01-01

    This book is intended for physicians, medical students, X-ray medical technicians, and medical technicians in general, and presents a concise but nevertheless comprehensive introduction to the practice of medical radiology. This 4th edition has been enriched by information on new imaging techniques and an outline of digital radiography and NMR imaging. The chapter on radiotherapy has been fully revised and extended to cover the current state of the art. Special attention has been given to the explanation of regulations and technical methods for better radiation protection. Physicians will find an introduction to radiation protection instructions. (orig./HP) [de

  20. An analysis of Japan Disaster Medical Assistance Team (J-DMAT) deployments in comparison with those of J-DMAT's counterpart in the United States (US-DMAT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuse, Akira; Yokota, Hiroyuki

    2010-12-01

    Lessons learned from the Great Hanshin-Awaji earthquake of 1995 underscored the necessity of establishing Disaster Medical Assistance Teams (DMATs) in Japan, and in 2005, the Japanese government's Central Disaster Prevention Council revised its Basic Disaster Management Plan to include full deployment of DMATs in disaster areas. Defining a DMAT as a trained, mobile, self-contained medical team that can act in the acute phase of a disaster (48 to 72 hours after its occurrence) to provide medical treatment in the devastated area, the revised plan called for the training of DMAT personnel for rapid deployment to any area of the country hit by a disaster. This paper presents descriptive data on the number and types of missions carried out by Japan DMAT (J-DMAT) in its first 5 years, and clarifies how J-DMAT differs from its counterpart in the United States (US-DMAT). The DMAT that the present authors belong to has been deployed for 2 natural disasters and 1 man-made disaster, and the operations carried out during these deployments are analyzed. Reports on J-DMAT activities published from 2004 through 2009 by the Japanese Association for Disaster Medicine are also included in the analysis. After training courses for J-DMAT personnel started in fiscal 2004, J-DMATs were deployed for 8 disasters in a period of 4 years. Five of these were natural disasters, and 3 man-made. Of the 5 natural disasters, 3 were earthquakes, and of the 3 man-made disasters, 2 were derailment accidents. Unlike in the United States, where hurricanes and floods account for the greatest number of DMAT deployments, earthquakes cause the largest number of disasters in Japan. Because Japan is small in comparison with the US (Japan has about 1/25 the land area of the US), most J-DMATs head for devastated areas by car from their respective hospitals. This is one reason why J-DMATs are smaller and more agile than US-DMATs. Another difference is that J-DMATs' activities following earthquakes involve