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Sample records for assimilating seizure dynamics

  1. Assimilating seizure dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Ghanim; Schiff, Steven J

    2010-05-01

    Observability of a dynamical system requires an understanding of its state-the collective values of its variables. However, existing techniques are too limited to measure all but a small fraction of the physical variables and parameters of neuronal networks. We constructed models of the biophysical properties of neuronal membrane, synaptic, and microenvironment dynamics, and incorporated them into a model-based predictor-controller framework from modern control theory. We demonstrate that it is now possible to meaningfully estimate the dynamics of small neuronal networks using as few as a single measured variable. Specifically, we assimilate noisy membrane potential measurements from individual hippocampal neurons to reconstruct the dynamics of networks of these cells, their extracellular microenvironment, and the activities of different neuronal types during seizures. We use reconstruction to account for unmeasured parts of the neuronal system, relating micro-domain metabolic processes to cellular excitability, and validate the reconstruction of cellular dynamical interactions against actual measurements. Data assimilation, the fusing of measurement with computational models, has significant potential to improve the way we observe and understand brain dynamics. PMID:20463875

  2. Assimilating seizure dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghanim Ullah

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Observability of a dynamical system requires an understanding of its state-the collective values of its variables. However, existing techniques are too limited to measure all but a small fraction of the physical variables and parameters of neuronal networks. We constructed models of the biophysical properties of neuronal membrane, synaptic, and microenvironment dynamics, and incorporated them into a model-based predictor-controller framework from modern control theory. We demonstrate that it is now possible to meaningfully estimate the dynamics of small neuronal networks using as few as a single measured variable. Specifically, we assimilate noisy membrane potential measurements from individual hippocampal neurons to reconstruct the dynamics of networks of these cells, their extracellular microenvironment, and the activities of different neuronal types during seizures. We use reconstruction to account for unmeasured parts of the neuronal system, relating micro-domain metabolic processes to cellular excitability, and validate the reconstruction of cellular dynamical interactions against actual measurements. Data assimilation, the fusing of measurement with computational models, has significant potential to improve the way we observe and understand brain dynamics.

  3. Assimilation Dynamic Network (ADN) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Assimilation Dynamic Network (ADN) is a dynamic inter-processor communication network that spans heterogeneous processor architectures, unifying components,...

  4. [Seizure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Ayumi; Terayama, Yasuo

    2013-06-01

    Seizure is defined as "a strong shrinkage state of the skeletal muscle which is involuntary, and occurs spasmodically" and it is often accompanied by disturbance of consciousness. The typical disease which causes seizure is epilepsy. But there is many conditions causing seizure. Therefore, diagnosis of epilepsy should be careful. Seizure among eldery increases in an era of an aging population in Japan. The risk of recurrence of seizure or epilepsy in elderly is higher than that in youth. In considering of the treatment of seizure among elderly, differential diagnosis from various condition must be done. PMID:23855204

  5. Dynamics of muscle activation during tonic-clonic seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conradsen, Isa; Moldovan, Mihai; Jennum, Poul;

    2013-01-01

    ) of exponentially increasing duration - features that could not be reproduced voluntarily. The last SP was longer in seizures with higher EMG peak frequency whereas the energy of the last clonus was higher in seizures with a short clonic phase. We found specific features of muscle activation dynamics during GTCS...

  6. Optogenetically induced seizure and the longitudinal hippocampal network dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin-Ichiro Osawa

    Full Text Available Epileptic seizure is a paroxysmal and self-limited phenomenon characterized by abnormal hypersynchrony of a large population of neurons. However, our current understanding of seizure dynamics is still limited. Here we propose a novel in vivo model of seizure-like afterdischarges using optogenetics, and report on investigation of directional network dynamics during seizure along the septo-temporal (ST axis of hippocampus. Repetitive pulse photostimulation was applied to the rodent hippocampus, in which channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2 was expressed, under simultaneous recording of local field potentials (LFPs. Seizure-like afterdischarges were successfully induced after the stimulation in both W-TChR2V4 transgenic (ChR2V-TG rats and in wild type rats transfected with adeno-associated virus (AAV vectors carrying ChR2. Pulse frequency at 10 and 20 Hz, and a 0.05 duty ratio were optimal for afterdischarge induction. Immunohistochemical c-Fos staining after a single induced afterdischarge confirmed neuronal activation of the entire hippocampus. LFPs were recorded during seizure-like afterdischarges with a multi-contact array electrode inserted along the ST axis of hippocampus. Granger causality analysis of the LFPs showed a bidirectional but asymmetric increase in signal flow along the ST direction. State space presentation of the causality and coherence revealed three discrete states of the seizure-like afterdischarge phenomenon: 1 resting state; 2 afterdischarge initiation with moderate coherence and dominant septal-to-temporal causality; and 3 afterdischarge termination with increased coherence and dominant temporal-to-septal causality. A novel in vivo model of seizure-like afterdischarge was developed using optogenetics, which was advantageous in its reproducibility and artifact-free electrophysiological observations. Our results provide additional evidence for the potential role of hippocampal septo-temporal interactions in seizure dynamics in vivo

  7. A novel dynamic update framework for epileptic seizure prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Min; Ge, Sunan; Wang, Minghui; Hong, Xiaojun; Han, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Epileptic seizure prediction is a difficult problem in clinical applications, and it has the potential to significantly improve the patients' daily lives whose seizures cannot be controlled by either drugs or surgery. However, most current studies of epileptic seizure prediction focus on high sensitivity and low false-positive rate only and lack the flexibility for a variety of epileptic seizures and patients' physical conditions. Therefore, a novel dynamic update framework for epileptic seizure prediction is proposed in this paper. In this framework, two basic sample pools are constructed and updated dynamically. Furthermore, the prediction model can be updated to be the most appropriate one for the prediction of seizures' arrival. Mahalanobis distance is introduced in this part to solve the problem of side information, measuring the distance between two data sets. In addition, a multichannel feature extraction method based on Hilbert-Huang transform and extreme learning machine is utilized to extract the features of a patient's preseizure state against the normal state. At last, a dynamic update epileptic seizure prediction system is built up. Simulations on Freiburg database show that the proposed system has a better performance than the one without update. The research of this paper is significantly helpful for clinical applications, especially for the exploitation of online portable devices. PMID:25050381

  8. Reconstructing mammalian sleep dynamics with data assimilation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madineh Sedigh-Sarvestani

    Full Text Available Data assimilation is a valuable tool in the study of any complex system, where measurements are incomplete, uncertain, or both. It enables the user to take advantage of all available information including experimental measurements and short-term model forecasts of a system. Although data assimilation has been used to study other biological systems, the study of the sleep-wake regulatory network has yet to benefit from this toolset. We present a data assimilation framework based on the unscented Kalman filter (UKF for combining sparse measurements together with a relatively high-dimensional nonlinear computational model to estimate the state of a model of the sleep-wake regulatory system. We demonstrate with simulation studies that a few noisy variables can be used to accurately reconstruct the remaining hidden variables. We introduce a metric for ranking relative partial observability of computational models, within the UKF framework, that allows us to choose the optimal variables for measurement and also provides a methodology for optimizing framework parameters such as UKF covariance inflation. In addition, we demonstrate a parameter estimation method that allows us to track non-stationary model parameters and accommodate slow dynamics not included in the UKF filter model. Finally, we show that we can even use observed discretized sleep-state, which is not one of the model variables, to reconstruct model state and estimate unknown parameters. Sleep is implicated in many neurological disorders from epilepsy to schizophrenia, but simultaneous observation of the many brain components that regulate this behavior is difficult. We anticipate that this data assimilation framework will enable better understanding of the detailed interactions governing sleep and wake behavior and provide for better, more targeted, therapies.

  9. A Novel Dynamic Update Framework for Epileptic Seizure Prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Han

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Epileptic seizure prediction is a difficult problem in clinical applications, and it has the potential to significantly improve the patients’ daily lives whose seizures cannot be controlled by either drugs or surgery. However, most current studies of epileptic seizure prediction focus on high sensitivity and low false-positive rate only and lack the flexibility for a variety of epileptic seizures and patients’ physical conditions. Therefore, a novel dynamic update framework for epileptic seizure prediction is proposed in this paper. In this framework, two basic sample pools are constructed and updated dynamically. Furthermore, the prediction model can be updated to be the most appropriate one for the prediction of seizures’ arrival. Mahalanobis distance is introduced in this part to solve the problem of side information, measuring the distance between two data sets. In addition, a multichannel feature extraction method based on Hilbert-Huang transform and extreme learning machine is utilized to extract the features of a patient’s preseizure state against the normal state. At last, a dynamic update epileptic seizure prediction system is built up. Simulations on Freiburg database show that the proposed system has a better performance than the one without update. The research of this paper is significantly helpful for clinical applications, especially for the exploitation of online portable devices.

  10. The dynamic radiation environment assimilation model (DREAM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reeves, Geoffrey D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Koller, Josef [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tokar, Robert L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chen, Yue [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Henderson, Michael G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Friedel, Reiner H [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    The Dynamic Radiation Environment Assimilation Model (DREAM) is a 3-year effort sponsored by the US Department of Energy to provide global, retrospective, or real-time specification of the natural and potential nuclear radiation environments. The DREAM model uses Kalman filtering techniques that combine the strengths of new physical models of the radiation belts with electron observations from long-term satellite systems such as GPS and geosynchronous systems. DREAM includes a physics model for the production and long-term evolution of artificial radiation belts from high altitude nuclear explosions. DREAM has been validated against satellites in arbitrary orbits and consistently produces more accurate results than existing models. Tools for user-specific applications and graphical displays are in beta testing and a real-time version of DREAM has been in continuous operation since November 2009.

  11. Assimilating uncertain, dynamic and intermittent streamflow observations in hydrological models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoleni, Maurizio; Alfonso, Leonardo; Chacon-Hurtado, Juan; Solomatine, Dimitri

    2015-09-01

    Catastrophic floods cause significant socio-economical losses. Non-structural measures, such as real-time flood forecasting, can potentially reduce flood risk. To this end, data assimilation methods have been used to improve flood forecasts by integrating static ground observations, and in some cases also remote sensing observations, within water models. Current hydrologic and hydraulic research works consider assimilation of observations coming from traditional, static sensors. At the same time, low-cost, mobile sensors and mobile communication devices are becoming also increasingly available. The main goal and innovation of this study is to demonstrate the usefulness of assimilating uncertain streamflow observations that are dynamic in space and intermittent in time in the context of two different semi-distributed hydrological model structures. The developed method is applied to the Brue basin, where the dynamic observations are imitated by the synthetic observations of discharge. The results of this study show how model structures and sensors locations affect in different ways the assimilation of streamflow observations. In addition, it proves how assimilation of such uncertain observations from dynamic sensors can provide model improvements similar to those of streamflow observations coming from a non-optimal network of static physical sensors. This can be a potential application of recent efforts to build citizen observatories of water, which can make the citizens an active part in information capturing, evaluation and communication, helping simultaneously to improvement of model-based flood forecasting.

  12. Application of statistical dynamical turbulence closures to data assimilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe the development of an accurate yet computationally tractable statistical dynamical closure theory for general inhomogeneous turbulent flows, coined the quasi-diagonal direct interaction approximation closure (QDIA), and its application to problems in data assimilation. The QDIA provides prognostic equations for evolving mean fields, covariances and higher-order non-Gaussian terms, all of which are also required in the formulation of data assimilation schemes for nonlinear geophysical flows. The QDIA is a generalization of the class of direct interaction approximation theories, initially developed by Kraichnan (1959 J. Fluid Mech. 5 497) for isotropic turbulence, to fully inhomogeneous flows and has been further generalized to allow for both inhomogeneous and non-Gaussian initial conditions and long integrations. A regularization procedure or empirical vertex renormalization that ensures correct inertial range spectra is also described. The aim of this paper is to provide a coherent mathematical description of the QDIA turbulence closure and closure-based data assimilation scheme we have labeled the statistical dynamical Kalman filter. The mathematical formalism presented has been synthesized from recent works of the authors with some additional material and is presented in sufficient detail that the paper is of a pedagogical nature.

  13. Variational Data Assimilation Technique in Mathematical Modeling of Ocean Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agoshkov, V. I.; Zalesny, V. B.

    2012-03-01

    Problems of the variational data assimilation for the primitive equation ocean model constructed at the Institute of Numerical Mathematics, Russian Academy of Sciences are considered. The model has a flexible computational structure and consists of two parts: a forward prognostic model, and its adjoint analog. The numerical algorithm for the forward and adjoint models is constructed based on the method of multicomponent splitting. The method includes splitting with respect to physical processes and space coordinates. Numerical experiments are performed with the use of the Indian Ocean and the World Ocean as examples. These numerical examples support the theoretical conclusions and demonstrate the rationality of the approach using an ocean dynamics model with an observed data assimilation procedure.

  14. Nonlinear error dynamics for cycled data assimilation methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate the error dynamics for cycled data assimilation systems, such that the inverse problem of state determination is solved at tk, k = 1, 2, 3, …, with a first guess given by the state propagated via a dynamical system model Mk from time tk−1 to time tk. In particular, for nonlinear dynamical systems Mk that are Lipschitz continuous with respect to their initial states, we provide deterministic estimates for the development of the error ‖ek‖ ≔ ‖x(a)k − x(t)k‖ between the estimated state x(a) and the true state x(t) over time. Clearly, observation error of size δ > 0 leads to an estimation error in every assimilation step. These errors can accumulate, if they are not (a) controlled in the reconstruction and (b) damped by the dynamical system Mk under consideration. A data assimilation method is called stable, if the error in the estimate is bounded in time by some constant C. The key task of this work is to provide estimates for the error ‖ek‖, depending on the size δ of the observation error, the reconstruction operator Rα, the observation operator H and the Lipschitz constants K(1) and K(2) on the lower and higher modes of Mk controlling the damping behaviour of the dynamics. We show that systems can be stabilized by choosing α sufficiently small, but the bound C will then depend on the data error δ in the form c‖Rα‖δ with some constant c. Since ‖Rα‖ → ∞ for α → 0, the constant might be large. Numerical examples for this behaviour in the nonlinear case are provided using a (low-dimensional) Lorenz ‘63 system. (paper)

  15. From cognitive networks to seizures: stimulus evoked dynamics in a coupled cortical network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jaejin; Ermentrout, Bard; Bodner, Mark

    2013-12-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neuropathologies worldwide. Seizures arising in epilepsy or in seizure disorders are characterized generally by uncontrolled spread of excitation and electrical activity to a limited region or even over the entire cortex. While it is generally accepted that abnormal excessive firing and synchronization of neuron populations lead to seizures, little is known about the precise mechanisms underlying human epileptic seizures, the mechanisms of transitions from normal to paroxysmal activity, or about how seizures spread. Further complication arises in that seizures do not occur with a single type of dynamics but as many different phenotypes and genotypes with a range of patterns, synchronous oscillations, and time courses. The concept of preventing, terminating, or modulating seizures and/or paroxysmal activity through stimulation of brain has also received considerable attention. The ability of such stimulation to prevent or modulate such pathological activity may depend on identifiable parameters. In this work, firing rate networks with inhibitory and excitatory populations were modeled. Network parameters were chosen to model normal working memory behaviors. Two different models of cognitive activity were developed. The first model consists of a single network corresponding to a local area of the brain. The second incorporates two networks connected through sparser recurrent excitatory connectivity with transmission delays ranging from approximately 3 ms within local populations to 15 ms between populations residing in different cortical areas. The effect of excitatory stimulation to activate working memory behavior through selective persistent activation of populations is examined in the models, and the conditions and transition mechanisms through which that selective activation breaks down producing spreading paroxysmal activity and seizure states are characterized. Specifically, we determine critical parameters and architectural

  16. Dynamical analogy between epileptic seizures and seismogenic electromagnetic emissions by means of nonextensive statistical mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Eftaxias, Konstantinos; Potirakis, Stelios M; Balasis, George

    2012-01-01

    The field of study of complex systems considers that the dynamics of complex systems are founded on universal principles that may be used to describe a great variety of scientific and technological approaches of different types of natural, artificial, and social systems. Several authors have suggested that earthquake dynamics and neurodynamics can be analyzed within similar mathematical frameworks. Recently, authors have shown that a dynamical analogy supported by scale-free statistics exists between seizures and earthquakes, analysing populations of different seizures and earthquakes, respectively. The purpose of this paper is to suggest a shift in emphasis from the large to the small scale: our analyses focus on a single epileptic seizure generation and the activation of a single fault (earthquake) and not on the statistics of sequences of different seizures and earthquakes. We apply the concepts of the nonextensive statistical physics to support the suggestion that a dynamical analogy exists between the tw...

  17. Interaction between synaptic inhibition and glial-potassium dynamics leads to diverse seizure transition modes in biophysical models of human focal seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Y Ho, E C; Truccolo, Wilson

    2016-10-01

    How focal seizures initiate and evolve in human neocortex remains a fundamental problem in neuroscience. Here, we use biophysical neuronal network models of neocortical patches to study how the interaction between inhibition and extracellular potassium ([K (+)] o ) dynamics may contribute to different types of focal seizures. Three main types of propagated focal seizures observed in recent intracortical microelectrode recordings in humans were modelled: seizures characterized by sustained (∼30-60 Hz) gamma local field potential (LFP) oscillations; seizures where the onset in the propagated site consisted of LFP spikes that later evolved into rhythmic (∼2-3 Hz) spike-wave complexes (SWCs); and seizures where a brief stage of low-amplitude fast-oscillation (∼10-20 Hz) LFPs preceded the SWC activity. Our findings are fourfold: (1) The interaction between elevated [K (+)] o (due to abnormal potassium buffering by glial cells) and the strength of synaptic inhibition plays a predominant role in shaping these three types of seizures. (2) Strengthening of inhibition leads to the onset of sustained narrowband gamma seizures. (3) Transition into SWC seizures is obtained either by the weakening of inhibitory synapses, or by a transient strengthening followed by an inhibitory breakdown (e.g. GABA depletion). This reduction or breakdown of inhibition among fast-spiking (FS) inhibitory interneurons increases their spiking activity and leads them eventually into depolarization block. Ictal spike-wave discharges in the model are then sustained solely by pyramidal neurons. (4) FS cell dynamics are also critical for seizures where the evolution into SWC activity is preceded by low-amplitude fast oscillations. Different levels of elevated [K (+)] o were important for transitions into and maintenance of sustained gamma oscillations and SWC discharges. Overall, our modelling study predicts that the interaction between inhibitory interneurons and [K (+)] o glial buffering under

  18. Dynamic causal modelling of electrographic seizure activity using Bayesian belief updating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooray, Gerald K; Sengupta, Biswa; Douglas, Pamela K; Friston, Karl

    2016-01-15

    Seizure activity in EEG recordings can persist for hours with seizure dynamics changing rapidly over time and space. To characterise the spatiotemporal evolution of seizure activity, large data sets often need to be analysed. Dynamic causal modelling (DCM) can be used to estimate the synaptic drivers of cortical dynamics during a seizure; however, the requisite (Bayesian) inversion procedure is computationally expensive. In this note, we describe a straightforward procedure, within the DCM framework, that provides efficient inversion of seizure activity measured with non-invasive and invasive physiological recordings; namely, EEG/ECoG. We describe the theoretical background behind a Bayesian belief updating scheme for DCM. The scheme is tested on simulated and empirical seizure activity (recorded both invasively and non-invasively) and compared with standard Bayesian inversion. We show that the Bayesian belief updating scheme provides similar estimates of time-varying synaptic parameters, compared to standard schemes, indicating no significant qualitative change in accuracy. The difference in variance explained was small (less than 5%). The updating method was substantially more efficient, taking approximately 5-10min compared to approximately 1-2h. Moreover, the setup of the model under the updating scheme allows for a clear specification of how neuronal variables fluctuate over separable timescales. This method now allows us to investigate the effect of fast (neuronal) activity on slow fluctuations in (synaptic) parameters, paving a way forward to understand how seizure activity is generated.

  19. An Improved Analysis of Forest Carbon Dynamics using Data Assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Mathew; Schwarz, Paul A.; Law, Beverly E.; Kurpius, Meredith R.

    2005-01-01

    There are two broad approaches to quantifying landscape C dynamics - by measuring changes in C stocks over time, or by measuring fluxes of C directly. However, these data may be patchy, and have gaps or biases. An alternative approach to generating C budgets has been to use process-based models, constructed to simulate the key processes involved in C exchange. However, the process of model building is arguably subjective, and parameters may be poorly defined. This paper demonstrates why data assimilation (DA) techniques - which combine stock and flux observations with a dynamic model - improve estimates of, and provide insights into, ecosystem carbon (C) exchanges. We use an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) to link a series of measurements with a simple box model of C transformations. Measurements were collected at a young ponderosa pine stand in central Oregon over a 3-year period, and include eddy flux and soil C02 efflux data, litterfall collections, stem surveys, root and soil cores, and leaf area index data. The simple C model is a mass balance model with nine unknown parameters, tracking changes in C storage among five pools; foliar, wood and fine root pools in vegetation, and also fresh litter and soil organic matter (SOM) plus coarse woody debris pools. We nested the EnKF within an optimization routine to generate estimates from the data of the unknown parameters and the five initial conditions for the pools. The efficacy of the DA process can be judged by comparing the probability distributions of estimates produced with the EnKF analysis vs. those produced with reduced data or model alone. Using the model alone, estimated net ecosystem exchange of C (NEE)= -251 f 197g Cm-2 over the 3 years, compared with an estimate of -419 f 29gCm-2 when all observations were assimilated into the model. The uncertainty on daily measurements of NEE via eddy fluxes was estimated at 0.5gCm-2 day-1, but the uncertainty on assimilated estimates averaged 0.47 g Cm-2 day-1, and

  20. Application of approximate entropy on dynamic characteristics of epileptic absence seizure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Zhou; Ruimei Huang; Ziyi Chen; Xin Chang; Jialong Chen; Lingli Xie

    2012-01-01

    Electroencephalogram signals are time-varying complex electrophysiological signals. Existing studies show that approximate entropy, which is a nonlinear dynamics index, is not an ideal method for electroencephalogram analysis. Clinical electroencephalogram measurements usually contain electrical interference signals, creating additional challenges in terms of maintaining robustness of the analytic methods. There is an urgent need for a novel method of nonlinear dynamical analysis of the electroencephalogram that can characterize seizure-related changes in cerebral dynamics. The aim of this paper was to study the fluctuations of approximate entropy in preictal, ictal, and postictal electroencephalogram signals from a patient with absence seizures, and to improve the algorithm used to calculate the approximate entropy. The approximate entropy algorithm, especially our modified version, could accurately describe the dynamical changes of the brain during absence seizures. We could also demonstrate that the complexity of the brain was greater in the normal state than in the ictal state. The fluctuations of the approximate entropy before epileptic seizures observed in this study can form a goodbasis for further study on the prediction of seizures with nonlinear dynamics.

  1. Dynamics of the employment assimilation of first-generation immigrant men in Sweden: comparing dynamic and static assimilation models with longitudinal data

    OpenAIRE

    Akay, Alpaslan

    2009-01-01

    We analyse the dynamics of employment assimilation of first-generation immigrant men in Sweden using a high-quality, register-based panel data set. It is discussed that when there are significant differences between employment status persistence of immigrants and natives, the standard static assimilation model produces biased predictions for the relative labour market outcomes for immigrants. We find significant persistence of employment status which differs between immigrants and natives, an...

  2. Real-time Detection of Precursors to Epileptic Seizures: Non-Linear Analysis of System Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesaei, Sahar; Sharafat, Ahmad R

    2014-04-01

    We propose a novel approach for detecting precursors to epileptic seizures in intracranial electroencephalograms (iEEG), which is based on the analysis of system dynamics. In the proposed scheme, the largest Lyapunov exponent of the discrete wavelet packet transform (DWPT) of the segmented EEG signals is considered as the discriminating features. Such features are processed by a support vector machine (SVM) classifier to identify whether the corresponding segment of the EEG signal contains a precursor to an epileptic seizure. When consecutive EEG segments contain such precursors, a decision is made that a precursor is in fact detected. The proposed scheme is applied to the Freiburg dataset, and the results show that seizure precursors are detected in a time frame that unlike other existing schemes is very much convenient to patients, with sensitivity of 100% and negligible false positive detection rates.

  3. An evaluation of spindle-shaft seizure accident sequences for the Schenck Dynamic Balancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bott, T.F.; Fischer, S.R.

    1998-11-01

    This study was conducted at the request of the USDOE/AL Dynamic Balancer Project Team to develop a set of representative accident sequences initiated by rapid seizure of the spindle shaft of the Schenck dynamic balancing machine used in the mass properties testing activities in Bay 12-60 at the Pantex Plant. This Balancer is used for balancing reentry vehicles. In addition, the study identified potential causes of possible spindle-shaft seizure leading to a rapid deceleration of the rotating assembly. These accident sequences extend to the point that the reentry vehicle either remains in stable condition on the balancing machine or leaves the machine with some translational and rotational motion. Fault-tree analysis was used to identify possible causes of spindle-shaft seizure, and failure modes and effects analysis identified the results of shearing of different machine components. Cause-consequence diagrams were used to help develop accident sequences resulting from the possible effects of spindle-shaft seizure. To make these accident sequences physically reasonable, the analysts used idealized models of the dynamics of rotating masses. Idealized physical modeling also was used to provide approximate values of accident parameters that lead to branching down different accident progression paths. The exacerbating conditions of balancing machine over-speed and improper assembly of the fixture to the face plate are also addressed.

  4. Sequential assimilation of multi-mission dynamical topography into a global finite-element ocean model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Skachko

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on an accurate estimation of ocean circulation via assimilation of satellite measurements of ocean dynamical topography into the global finite-element ocean model (FEOM. The dynamical topography data are derived from a complex analysis of multi-mission altimetry data combined with a referenced earth geoid. The assimilation is split into two parts. First, the mean dynamic topography is adjusted. To this end an adiabatic pressure correction method is used which reduces model divergence from the real evolution. Second, a sequential assimilation technique is applied to improve the representation of thermodynamical processes by assimilating the time varying dynamic topography. A method is used according to which the temperature and salinity are updated following the vertical structure of the first baroclinic mode. It is shown that the method leads to a partially successful assimilation approach reducing the rms difference between the model and data from 16 cm to 2 cm. This improvement of the mean state is accompanied by significant improvement of temporal variability in our analysis. However, it remains suboptimal, showing a tendency in the forecast phase of returning toward a free run without data assimilation. Both the mean difference and standard deviation of the difference between the forecast and observation data are reduced as the result of assimilation.

  5. Information theoretic measures of network coordination in high-frequency scalp EEG reveal dynamic patterns associated with seizure termination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamoulis, Catherine; Schomer, Donald L; Chang, Bernard S

    2013-08-01

    How a seizure terminates is still under-studied and, despite its clinical importance, remains an obscure phase of seizure evolution. Recent studies of seizure-related scalp EEGs at frequencies >100 Hz suggest that neural activity, in the form of oscillations and/or neuronal network interactions, may play an important role in preictal/ictal seizure evolution (Andrade-Valenca et al., 2011; Stamoulis et al., 2012). However, the role of high-frequency activity in seizure termination, is unknown, if it exists at all. Using information theoretic measures of network coordination, this study investigated ictal and immediate postictal neurodynamic interactions encoded in scalp EEGs from a relatively small sample of 8 patients with focal epilepsy and multiple seizures originating in temporal and/or frontal brain regions, at frequencies ≤ 100 Hz and >100 Hz, respectively. Despite some heterogeneity in the dynamics of these interactions, consistent patterns were also estimated. Specifically, in several seizures, linear or non-linear increase in high-frequency neuronal coordination during ictal intervals, coincided with a corresponding decrease in coordination at frequencies <100 Hz, suggesting a potential interference role of high-frequency activity, to disrupt abnormal ictal synchrony at lower frequencies. These changes in network synchrony started at least 20-30s prior to seizure offset, depending on the seizure duration. Opposite patterns were estimated at frequencies ≤ 100 Hz in several seizures. These results raise the possibility that high-frequency interference may occur in the form of progressive network coordination during the ictal interval, which continues during the postictal interval. This may be one of several possible mechanisms that facilitate seizure termination. In fact, inhibition of pairwise interactions between EEGs by other signals in their spatial neighborhood, quantified by negative interaction information, was estimated at frequencies ≤ 100 Hz

  6. Opinion Dynamics with Heterogeneous Interactions and Information Assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mir Tabatabaei, Seydeh Anahita

    2013-01-01

    In any modern society, individuals interact to form opinions on various topics, including economic, political, and social aspects. Opinions evolve as the result of the continuous exchange of information among individuals and of the assimilation of information distributed by media. The impact of individuals' opinions on each other forms a network,…

  7. Dynamic imaging of coherent sources reveals different network connectivity underlying the generation and perpetuation of epileptic seizures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia Elshoff

    Full Text Available The concept of focal epilepsies includes a seizure origin in brain regions with hyper synchronous activity (epileptogenic zone and seizure onset zone and a complex epileptic network of different brain areas involved in the generation, propagation, and modulation of seizures. The purpose of this work was to study functional and effective connectivity between regions involved in networks of epileptic seizures. The beginning and middle part of focal seizures from ictal surface EEG data were analyzed using dynamic imaging of coherent sources (DICS, an inverse solution in the frequency domain which describes neuronal networks and coherences of oscillatory brain activities. The information flow (effective connectivity between coherent sources was investigated using the renormalized partial directed coherence (RPDC method. In 8/11 patients, the first and second source of epileptic activity as found by DICS were concordant with the operative resection site; these patients became seizure free after epilepsy surgery. In the remaining 3 patients, the results of DICS / RPDC calculations and the resection site were discordant; these patients had a poorer post-operative outcome. The first sources as found by DICS were located predominantly in cortical structures; subsequent sources included some subcortical structures: thalamus, Nucl. Subthalamicus and cerebellum. DICS seems to be a powerful tool to define the seizure onset zone and the epileptic networks involved. Seizure generation seems to be related to the propagation of epileptic activity from the primary source in the seizure onset zone, and maintenance of seizures is attributed to the perpetuation of epileptic activity between nodes in the epileptic network. Despite of these promising results, this proof of principle study needs further confirmation prior to the use of the described methods in the clinical praxis.

  8. Assimilation of geomagnetic observations in dynamical models of the secular variation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. Satellite data contribute to a better description of the secular variation of the main geomagnetic field. To make the best use of that (and upcoming) wealth of data, we consider the possibility to resort to data assimilation, as now routinely used in the fields of meteorology and oceanography. Geomagnetic data assimilation aims at identifying the physics of the Earth's core responsible for the secular variation recorded by satellites and in long-lived, ground observatories. Data assimilation should yield a more accurate forecast of the secular variation, and enable the reanalysis of historical observations. The physics at the heart of our assimilation scheme is based on the assumption that the dynamics responsible for the fast (i.e. interannual) variations of the main magnetic field is quasi-geostrophic. In addition, we describe similarly the magnetic field, in the core interior, using a magnetic flux function, whose dynamics is also two-dimensional. In this presentation, we will focus on the methodological aspects of our assimilation scheme. In particular, we illustrate how the accumulation of successive observations can be used to construct dynamically consistent, time-dependent maps of the magnetic field inside the core.

  9. Dynamic Responses of the Earth's Outer Core to Assimilation of Observed Geomagnetic Secular Variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Weijia; Tangborn, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Assimilation of surface geomagnetic observations and geodynamo models has advanced very quickly in recent years. However, compared to advanced data assimilation systems in meteorology, geomagnetic data assimilation (GDAS) is still in an early stage. Among many challenges ranging from data to models is the disparity between the short observation records and the long time scales of the core dynamics. To better utilize available observational information, we have made an effort in this study to directly assimilate the Gauss coefficients of both the core field and its secular variation (SV) obtained via global geomagnetic field modeling, aiming at understanding the dynamical responses of the core fluid to these additional observational constraints. Our studies show that the SV assimilation helps significantly to shorten the dynamo model spin-up process. The flow beneath the core-mantle boundary (CMB) responds significantly to the observed field and its SV. The strongest responses occur in the relatively small scale flow (of the degrees L is approx. 30 in spherical harmonic expansions). This part of the flow includes the axisymmetric toroidal flow (of order m = 0) and non-axisymmetric poloidal flow with m (is) greater than 5. These responses can be used to better understand the core flow and, in particular, to improve accuracies of predicting geomagnetic variability in future.

  10. A data assimilation tool for the Pagasitikos Gulf ecosystem dynamics: Methods and benefits

    KAUST Repository

    Korres, Gerasimos

    2012-06-01

    Within the framework of the European INSEA project, an advanced assimilation system has been implemented for the Pagasitikos Gulf ecosystem. The system is based on a multivariate sequential data assimilation scheme that combines satellite ocean sea color (chlorophyll-a) data with the predictions of a three-dimensional coupled physical-biochemical model of the Pagasitikos Gulf ecosystem presented in a companion paper. The hydrodynamics are solved with a very high resolution (1/100°) implementation of the Princeton Ocean Model (POM). This model is nested within a coarser resolution model of the Aegean Sea which is part of the Greek POSEIDON forecasting system. The forecast of the Aegean Sea model, itself nested and initialized from a Mediterranean implementation of POM, is also used to periodically re-initalize the Pagatisikos hydrodynamics model using variational initialization techniques. The ecosystem dynamics of Pagasitikos are tackled with a stand-alone implementation of the European Seas Ecosystem Model (ERSEM). The assimilation scheme is based on the Singular Evolutive Extended Kalman (SEEK) filter, in which the error statistics are parameterized by means of a suitable set of Empirical Orthogonal Functions (EOFs).The assimilation experiments were performed for year 2003 and additionally for a 9-month period over 2006 during which the physical model was forced with the POSEIDON-ETA 6-hour atmospheric fields. The assimilation system is validated by assessing the relevance of the system in fitting the data, the impact of the assimilation on non-observed biochemical processes and the overall quality of the forecasts. Assimilation of either GlobColour in 2003 or SeaWiFS in 2006 chlorophyll-a data enhances the identification of the ecological state of the Pagasitikos Gulf. Results, however, suggest that subsurface ecological observations are needed to improve the controllability of the ecosystem in the deep layers. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  11. Neural networks for emulation variational method for data assimilation in nonlinear dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Description of a physical phenomenon through differential equations has errors involved, since the mathematical model is always an approximation of reality. For an operational prediction system, one strategy to improve the prediction is to add some information from the real dynamics into mathematical model. This additional information consists of observations on the phenomenon. However, the observational data insertion should be done carefully, for avoiding a worse performance of the prediction. Technical data assimilation are tools to combine data from physical-mathematics model with observational data to obtain a better forecast. The goal of this work is to present the performance of the Neural Network Multilayer Perceptrons trained to emulate a Variational method in context of data assimilation. Techniques for data assimilation are applied for the Lorenz systems; which presents a strong nonlinearity and chaotic nature.

  12. Assimilative modeling of ionospheric dynamics for nowcasting of HF propagation channels in the presence of TIDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickisch, L. J.; Fridman, Sergey; Hausman, Mark; Kraut, Shawn; Zunich, George

    2016-03-01

    The ionospheric data assimilation algorithm called GPS Ionospheric Inversion (GPSII; pronounced "gypsy") has been extended and employed to model the dynamic ionosphere, including medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances (MS-TIDs). MS-TIDs are characterized by periods of 10-30 min. GPSII can assimilate many forms of ionospheric-related data, including ionogram data and GPS L1/L2 beacon data. For this present effort, GPSII was extended to assimilate propagation time delay, integrated Doppler shift, and angle-of-arrival (AoA) measurements of HF transmissions from known reference points (KRPs). GPSII applies a regularization technique that constrains the solver to find the smoothest 3-D ionosphere model that still reproduces the input data to within their respective errors of measurement. A companion paper documents the development of the assimilation capability for KRPs. In this paper we show test results of the model's performance in reproducing measured AoA variations in the presence of medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances (MS-TIDs) using near vertical incidence skywave data collected at White Sands Missile Range by the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity HFGeo Program Government team. We find that using three KRPs within approximately 50 km of reference/check/nonassimilated transmitters, we can reproduce the measured AoAs of the nonassimilated transmitters to within 1.9° with 90% confidence even in the presence of highly dynamic MS-TIDs.

  13. Multi-modal in vivo imaging of brain blood oxygenation, blood flow and neural calcium dynamics during acute seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringuette, Dene; Jeffrey, Melanie A.; Carlen, Peter L.; Levi, Ofer

    2016-03-01

    Dysfunction of the vascular endothelium has been implicated in the development of epilepsy. To better understand the relation between vascular function and seizure and provide a foundation for interpreting results from functional imaging in chronic disease models, we investigate the relationship between intracellular calcium dynamics and local cerebral blood flow and blood oxygen saturation during acute seizure-like events and pharmacological seizure rescue. To probe the relation between the aforementioned physiological markers in an acute model of epilepsy in rats, we integrated three different optical modalities together with electrophysiological recordings: Laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) was used to study changes in flow speeds, Intrinsic optical signal imaging (IOSI) was used to monitor changes in oxygenated, de-oxygenated, and total hemoglobin concentration, and Calcium-sensitive dye imaging was used to monitor intracellular calcium dynamics. We designed a dedicated cortical flow chamber to remove superficial blood and dye resulting from the injection procedure, which reduced spurious artifacts. The near infrared light used for IOSI and LSCI was delivered via a light pipe integrated with the flow chamber to minimize the effect of fluid surface movement on illumination stability. Calcium-sensitive dye was injected via a glass electrode used for recording the local field potential. Our system allowed us to observe and correlate increases in intracellular calcium, blood flow and blood volume during seizure-like events and provide a quantitative analysis of neurovascular coupling changes associated with seizure rescue via injection of an anti-convulsive agent.

  14. Continuous dynamic assimilation of the inner region data in hydrodynamics modelling: optimization approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. I. Pisnitchenko

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available In meteorological and oceanological studies the classical approach for finding the numerical solution of the regional model consists in formulating and solving a Cauchy-Dirichlet problem. The boundary conditions are obtained by linear interpolation of coarse-grid data provided by a global model. Errors in boundary conditions due to interpolation may cause large deviations from the correct regional solution. The methods developed to reduce these errors deal with continuous dynamic assimilation of known global data available inside the regional domain. One of the approaches of this assimilation procedure performs a nudging of large-scale components of regional model solution to large-scale global data components by introducing relaxation forcing terms into the regional model equations. As a result, the obtained solution is not a valid numerical solution to the original regional model. Another approach is the use a four-dimensional variational data assimilation procedure which is free from the above-mentioned shortcoming. In this work we formulate the joint problem of finding the regional model solution and data assimilation as a PDE-constrained optimization problem. Three simple model examples (ODE Burgers equation, Rossby-Oboukhov equation, Korteweg-de Vries equation are considered in this paper. Numerical experiments indicate that the optimization approach can significantly improve the precision of the regional solution.

  15. Assimilation of geodetic dynamic ocean topography with ensemble based Kalman filter

    OpenAIRE

    Janjic Pfander, Tijana; A. Albertella; Schröter, Jens; R. Savcenko; Rummel, R.; Bosch, W.

    2012-01-01

    We use the geodetic method to obtain the dynamical ocean topography (DOT). This method combines the multi-mission-altimeter sea surface height and the GRACE/GOCE gravity field. Using the new global filtering approach, the spectral consistency of both fields is achieved by filtering the sea surface height and the geoid. The new global filtering approach reduces the artificats near the coast lines. Further, results of assimilation of multi-mission-altimeter data and the GRACE/GOCE g...

  16. Enhancement of xenon dynamical forecasts for PWR guiding systems using variational data assimilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In pressurised water reactors, the concentration of the nuclear fission product xenon-135 can exhibit axial oscillations which have to be controlled for safety reasons, related to spatial oscillations of in-core power. The evolution of the xenon concentration depends non-linearly on the concentration of the fission product iodine-135. This non-linearity represents a challenge for the prediction of oscillations. We investigate two variational data assimilation methods to improve the accuracy of the prediction of the xenon concentration. Data assimilation techniques are widely used in meteorology and oceanography to obtain more precise estimates of initial states. These methods combine all available pieces of information about the system such as the model prediction, a prior estimate of the true state, and physical measurements. The different sources of information are weighted according to their accuracy by the means of error covariance matrices. In our work, we propose one 3DVAR and one 4DVAR scheme for xenon dynamics. These schemes were tested in a twin experiment setting using the CIREP1D simulation code. CIREP1D implements a mono-dimensional coupled model of xenon dynamics, thermal, and thermal-hydraulic processes. Numerical experiments show that the proposed data assimilation schemes improve the accuracy of the xenon forecast. (authors)

  17. Variational Assimilation for Xenon Dynamical Forecasts in Neutronic using Advanced Background Error Covariance Matrix

    CERN Document Server

    Ponçot, Angélique; Bouriquet, Bertrand; Erhard, Patrick; Gratton, Serge; Thual, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Data assimilation method consists in combining all available pieces of information about a system to obtain optimal estimates of initial states. The different sources of information are weighted according to their accuracy by the means of error covariance matrices. Our purpose here is to evaluate the efficiency of variational data assimilation for the xenon induced oscillations forecasts in nuclear cores. In this paper we focus on the comparison between 3DVAR schemes with optimised background error covariance matrix B and a 4DVAR scheme. Tests were made in twin experiments using a simulation code which implements a mono-dimensional coupled model of xenon dynamics, thermal, and thermal-hydraulic processes. We enlighten the very good efficiency of the 4DVAR scheme as well as good results with the 3DVAR one using a careful multivariate modelling of B.

  18. The Los Alamos dynamic radiation environment assimilation model (DREAM) for space weather specification and forecasting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reeves, Geoffrey D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Friedel, Reiner H W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chen, Yue [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Koller, Josef [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Henderson, Michael G [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    The Dynamic Radiation Environment Assimilation Model (DREAM) was developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory to assess, quantify, and predict the hazards from the natural space environment and the anthropogenic environment produced by high altitude nuclear explosions (HANE). DREAM was initially developed as a basic research activity to understand and predict the dynamics of the Earth's Van Allen radiation belts. It uses Kalman filter techniques to assimilate data from space environment instruments with a physics-based model of the radiation belts. DREAM can assimilate data from a variety of types of instruments and data with various levels of resolution and fidelity by assigning appropriate uncertainties to the observations. Data from any spacecraft orbit can be assimilated but DREAM was designed to function with as few as two spacecraft inputs: one from geosynchronous orbit and one from GPS orbit. With those inputs, DREAM can be used to predict the environment at any satellite in any orbit whether space environment data are available in those orbits or not. Even with very limited data input and relatively simple physics models, DREAM specifies the space environment in the radiation belts to a high level of accuracy. DREAM has been extensively tested and evaluated as we transition from research to operations. We report here on one set of test results in which we predict the environment in a highly-elliptical polar orbit. We also discuss long-duration reanalysis for spacecraft design, using DREAM for real-time operations, and prospects for 1-week forecasts of the radiation belt environment.

  19. Altered fMRI connectivity dynamics in temporal lobe epilepsy might explain seizure semiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmut eLaufs

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE can be conceptualized as a network disease. The network can be characterized by inter-regional functional connectivity, i.e. blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD signal correlations between any two region pairs. However, functional connectivity is not constant over time, thus computing correlation at a given time and then at some later time could give different results (non-stationarity. We hypothesized (1 that non-stationarities can be induced by epilepsy (e.g. interictal epileptic activity increasing local signal variance and that (2 these transient events contribute to fluctuations in connectivity leading to pathological functioning, i.e. TLE semiology. We analyzed fMRI data from 27 patients with TLE and 22 healthy controls focusing on EEG-confirmed wake epochs only to protect against sleep-induced connectivity changes. Testing hypothesis (1, we identified brain regions where the BOLD signal variance was significantly greater in TLE than in controls: the temporal pole - including the hippocampus. Taking the latter as the seed region and testing hypothesis (2 we calculated the time-varying interregional correlation values (dynamic functional connectivity to other brain regions and found greater connectivity variance in the TLE than the control group mainly in the precuneus, the supplementary and sensori-motor and the frontal cortices.We conclude that the highest BOLD signal variance in the hippocampi is highly suggestive of a specific epilepsy-related effect. The altered connectivity dynamics in TLE patients might help to explain the hallmark semiological features of dyscognitive seizures including impaired consciousness (precuneus, frontal cortex, sensory disturbance and motor automatisms (sensorimotor cortices, supplementary motor cortex. Accounting for the non-stationarity and state-dependence of functional connectivity are a prerequisite in the search for potential connectivity-derived biomarkers in TLE.

  20. Modeling absence seizure dynamics: implications for basic mechanisms and measurement of thalamocortical and corticothalamic latencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, James A; Robinson, Peter A

    2008-07-01

    A successful physiologically based continuum model of the corticothalamic system is applied to determine the relative contributions of axonal and intrinsic cellular delays to the waveforms of absence seizures. The predicted period of the absence seizure depends linearly on model parameters describing thalamocortical, corticothalamic, intracortical, and synaptodendritic delays, and these dependences are linked to the seizure mechanism by showing how time intervals between peaks in the waveforms depend on the parameters. Counterintuitively, it is found that a peak in the local field potential recorded in the thalamic relay nuclei can precede the peak in the cortical field that drove it, without violating causality, but rendering naive interpretation of time intervals between peaks invalid. We argue that a thalamocortical loop mechanism for absence seizures is consistent with intrathalamic cellular properties being the leading determinant of the frequency of spike-wave discharges in rat genetic models, with the combination of network and cellular properties providing a natural explanation for the lower frequency of human absence seizures. Finally, our results imply that the seizure frequency is not determined by the fastest thalamocortical and corticothalamic fibers, but rather depends on an effective weighted conduction velocity of all pathways present.

  1. Assimilative model for ionospheric dynamics employing delay, Doppler, and direction of arrival measurements from multiple HF channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridman, Sergey V.; Nickisch, L. J.; Hausman, Mark; Zunich, George

    2016-03-01

    We describe the development of new HF data assimilation capabilities for our ionospheric inversion algorithm called GPSII (GPS Ionospheric Inversion). Previously existing capabilities of this algorithm included assimilation of GPS total electron content data as well as assimilation of backscatter ionograms. In the present effort we concentrated on developing assimilation tools for data related to HF propagation channels. Measurements of propagation delay, angle of arrival, and the ionosphere-induced Doppler from any number of known propagation links can now be utilized by GPSII. The resulting ionospheric model is consistent with all assimilated measurements. This means that ray tracing simulations of the assimilated propagation links are guaranteed to be in agreement with measured data within the errors of measurement. The key theoretical element for assimilating HF data is the raypath response operator (RPRO) which describes response of raypath parameters to infinitesimal variations of electron density in the ionosphere. We construct the RPRO out of the fundamental solution of linearized ray tracing equations for a dynamic magnetoactive plasma. We demonstrate performance and internal consistency of the algorithm using propagation delay data from multiple oblique ionograms (courtesy of Defence Science and Technology Organisation, Australia) as well as with time series of near-vertical incidence sky wave data (courtesy of the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity HFGeo Program Government team). In all cases GPSII produces electron density distributions which are smooth in space and in time. We simulate the assimilated propagation links by performing ray tracing through GPSII-produced ionosphere and observe that simulated data are indeed in agreement with assimilated measurements.

  2. Dynamical and Microphysical Retrieval from Simulated Doppler Radar Observations Using the 4DVAR Assimilation Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Xiaoyong; LIU Liping; ZHENG Guoguang

    2005-01-01

    Based on a cloud model and the four-dimensional variational (4DVAR) data assimilation method developed by Sun and Crook (1997), simulated experiments of dynamical and microphysical retrieval from Doppler radar data were performed. The 4DVAR data assimilation technique was applied to a cloud scale model with a warm rain parameterization scheme. The 3D wind, thermodynamical, and microphysical fields were determined by minimizing a cost function, defined by the difference between both radar observed radial velocities and reflectivities and their model predictions. The adjoint of the numerical model was used to provide the gradient of the cost function with respect to the control variables. Experiments have demonstrated that the 4DVAR assimilation method is able to retrieve the detailed structure of wind, thermodynamics, and microphysics by using either dual-Doppler or single-Doppler information. The quality of retrieval depends strongly on the magnitude of constraint with respect to the variables. Retrieving the temperature field,cloud water and water vapor is more difficult than the recovery of the wind field and rainwater. Accurate thermodynamic retrieval requires a longer assimilation period. The inclusion of a background term, even mean fields from a single sounding, helped reduce the retrieval errors. Less accurate velocity fields were obtained when single-Doppler data were used. It was found that the retrieved velocity is sensitive to the location of the retrieval domain relative to the radars while the other fields have very little changes. Two radar volumetric scans are generally adequate for providing the evolution, although the use of additional volumes improves the retrieval. As the amount of the observations decreases, the performance of the retrieval is degraded. However, the missing observations can be compensated by adding a background term to the cost function. The technique is robust to random errors in radial velocity and calibration errors in

  3. Transfer of Real-time Dynamic Radiation Environment Assimilation Model; Research to Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, K. S. F.; Hwang, J.; Shin, D. K.; Kim, G. J.; Morley, S.; Henderson, M. G.; Friedel, R. H.; Reeves, G. D.

    2015-12-01

    Real-time Dynamic Radiation Environment Assimilation Model (rtDREAM) was developed by LANL for nowcast of energetic electrons' flux at the radiation belt to quantify potential risks from radiation damage at the satellites. Assimilated data are from multiple sources including LANL assets (GEO, GPS). For transfer from research to operation of the rtDREAM code, LANL/KSWC/NOAA makes a Memorandum Of Understanding (MOU) on the collaboration between three parts. By this MOU, KWSC/RRA provides all the support for transitioning the research version of DREAM to operations. KASI is primarily responsible for providing all the interfaces between the current scientific output formats of the code and useful space weather products that can be used and accessed through the web. In the second phase, KASI will be responsible in performing the work needed to transform the Van Allen Probes beacon data into "DREAM ready" inputs. KASI will also provide the "operational" code framework and additional data preparation, model output, display and web page codes back to LANL and SWPC. KASI is already a NASA partnering ground station for the Van Allen Probes' space weather beacon data and can here show use and utility of these data for comparison between rtDREAM and observations by web. NOAA has offered to take on some of the data processing tasks specific to the GOES data.

  4. Hypnopompic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, Amer M; Lüders, Hans O

    2010-12-01

    The relationship between epilepsy and sleep is complex and bidirectional. Ictal awakening is probably a common and well-described phenomenon. In this small observational study we describe arousal from sleep as the only, or at least main, manifestation of some epileptic seizures. We coin the term "hypnopompic seizures" to describe this entity. Five patients with intractable epilepsy were monitored by continuous video-electroencephalogram. Four of them had left temporal lobe epilepsy and one patient had generalised epilepsy. Hypnopompic seizures accounted for 30-100% of their seizure types captured during monitoring. All the seizures occurred during stage II sleep and were brief. Hypnopompic seizures are extremely subtle and may be underdiagnosed and underreported. Future larger studies are needed to shed some light on this unique entity and its neuropathophysiology. Epileptologists should be aware of this type of seizure and careful review of electroencephalograms during the transition from sleep to arousal is imperative to capture these seizures. Physicians, patients and families also need to be aware of such a subtle manifestation of seizures. Improved awareness of hypnopompic seizures and subtle seizures, in general, help guide accurate and early diagnosis, thorough monitoring and appropriate management. PMID:21030341

  5. Local changes in neocortical circuit dynamics coincide with the spread of seizures to thalamus in a model of epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubauer, Florian B; Sederberg, Audrey; MacLean, Jason N

    2014-01-01

    During the generalization of epileptic seizures, pathological activity in one brain area recruits distant brain structures into joint synchronous discharges. However, it remains unknown whether specific changes in local circuit activity are related to the aberrant recruitment of anatomically distant structures into epileptiform discharges. Further, it is not known whether aberrant areas recruit or entrain healthy ones into pathological activity. Here we study the dynamics of local circuit activity during the spread of epileptiform discharges in the zero-magnesium in vitro model of epilepsy. We employ high-speed multi-photon imaging in combination with dual whole-cell recordings in acute thalamocortical (TC) slices of the juvenile mouse to characterize the generalization of epileptic activity between neocortex and thalamus. We find that, although both structures are exposed to zero-magnesium, the initial onset of focal epileptiform discharge occurs in cortex. This suggests that local recurrent connectivity that is particularly prevalent in cortex is important for the initiation of seizure activity. Subsequent recruitment of thalamus into joint, generalized discharges is coincident with an increase in the coherence of local cortical circuit activity that itself does not depend on thalamus. Finally, the intensity of population discharges is positively correlated between both brain areas. This suggests that during and after seizure generalization not only the timing but also the amplitude of epileptiform discharges in thalamus is entrained by cortex. Together these results suggest a central role of neocortical activity for the onset and the structure of pathological recruitment of thalamus into joint synchronous epileptiform discharges.

  6. The dynamic nature of assimilation and accommodation procedures in the brains of Chinese-English and English-Chinese bilinguals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yafeng; Peng, Danling; Ding, Guosheng; Qi, Ting; Desroches, Amy S; Liu, Li

    2015-10-01

    The framework of assimilation and accommodation has been proposed to explain the brain mechanisms supporting second language reading acquisition (Perfetti et al. [2007]: Bilingual Lang Cogn 10:131). Assimilation refers to using the procedures of the native language network in the acquisition of a new writing system, whereas accommodation refers to using second language procedures for reading the newly acquired writing system. We investigated assimilation and accommodation patterns in the brains of bilingual individuals by recruiting a group of Chinese-English bilinguals and a group of English-Chinese bilinguals to perform lexical decision tasks in both English and Chinese. The key question was whether the assimilation/accommodation procedures supporting second language reading in the brains of Chinese-English and English-Chinese bilinguals were dynamic, i.e., modulated by proficiency in the second language and perceptual features of the second language's script. Perceptual features of the scripts were manipulated through orthographic degradation by inserting spaces between the radicals of a Chinese character or between the syllables of an English word. This manipulation disrupts the visual configuration of the orthography but does not change its more fundamental design principles. We found that for English-Chinese bilinguals, higher proficiency was associated with greater accommodation, suggesting that the accommodation procedure in a bilingual individual's brain is modulated by second language proficiency. Most interestingly, we found that the assimilation/accommodation effects vanished or diminished when orthographically degraded scripts were processed by both Chinese-English and English-Chinese bilinguals, suggesting that the assimilation/accommodation procedures in a bilingual individual's brain are modulated by perceptual features of orthography. This work therefore offers a new, dynamic perspective for our understanding of the assimilation

  7. Dynamic control of modeled tonic-clonic seizure states with closed-loop stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryce eBeverlin II

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Seizure control using deep brain stimulation (DBS provides an alternative therapy to patients with intractable and drug resistant epilepsy. This paper presents novel DBS stimulus protocols to disrupt seizures. Two protocols are presented: open-loop stimulation and a closed-loop feedback system utilizing measured firing rates to adjust stimulus frequency. Stimulation suppression is demonstrated in a computational model using 3000 excitatory Morris-Lecar model neurons connected with depressing synapses. Cells are connected using second order network topology to simulate network topologies measured in cortical networks. The network spontaneously switches from tonic to clonic as synaptic strengths and tonic input to the neurons decreases. To this model we add periodic stimulation pulses to simulate DBS. Periodic forcing can synchronize or desynchronize an oscillating population of neurons, depending on the stimulus frequency and amplitude. Therefore, it is possible to either extend or truncate the tonic or clonic phases of the seizure. Stimuli applied at the firing rate of the neuron generally synchronize the population while stimuli slightly slower than the firing rate prevent synchronization. We present an adaptive stimulation algorithm that measures the firing rate of a neuron and adjusts the stimulus to maintain a relative stimulus frequency to firing frequency and demonstrate it in a computational model of a tonic-clonic seizure. This adaptive algorithm can affect the duration of the tonic phase using much smaller stimulus amplitudes than the open-loop control.

  8. Insights on radiation belt physics from the dynamics radiation environment assimilation model, DREAM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. The Dynamic Radiation Environment Assimilation Model (DREAM) is a coupled, inner magnetosphere model with modules that include the ring current, the radiation belts, self-consistent global magnetic fields, Kalman filter data assimilation, and customized user applications. DREAM was developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory with the goals of specifying, predicting and understanding the near-Earth space environment. Here we will focus on new understanding of physics of the inner magnetosphere that DREAM has provided and, even more specifically, on the physics of radiation belt acceleration, transport, and loss. One early and important contribution was providing definitive evidence that local acceleration processes acting inside or near geosynchronous orbit are required in order to explain radiation belt dynamics. Another critical process we investigated was loss of radiation belt electrons by radial diffusion or transport to the magnetopause. A critical calculation here is accurate determination of the adiabatic redistribution of particles due to the storm-time ring current (the 'Dst' effect) which can cause both apparent 'loss' of particles at a given satellite. At different times and at different energies, DREAM can determine whether the region outside the trapping boundary acts as a source (the plasma sheet) a sink (the magnetopause) or a combination of both. Another fundamental sink of radiation belt electrons is the atmospheric loss cone where pitch angle scattering can remove electrons trough precipitation. In the final topic for this talk we will describe how we use DREAM to determine the relationship between trapped and precipitating populations and how we relate LEO measurements to high-altitude measurements using observed and modeled characteristics of magnetospheric wave populations.

  9. Obtaining a Pragmatic Representation of Fire Disturbance in Dynamic Vegetation Models by Assimilating Earth Observation Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantzas, Euripides; Quegan, Shaun

    2015-04-01

    Fire constitutes a violent and unpredictable pathway of carbon from the terrestrial biosphere into the atmosphere. Despite fire emissions being in many biomes of similar magnitude to that of Net Ecosystem Exchange, even the most complex Dynamic Vegetation Models (DVMs) embedded in IPCC General Circulation Models poorly represent fire behavior and dynamics, a fact which still remains understated. As DVMs operate on a deterministic, grid cell-by-grid cell basis they are unable to describe a host of important fire characteristics such as its propagation, magnitude of area burned and stochastic nature. Here we address these issues by describing a model-independent methodology which assimilates Earth Observation (EO) data by employing image analysis techniques and algorithms to offer a realistic fire disturbance regime in a DVM. This novel approach, with minimum model restructuring, manages to retain the Fire Return Interval produced by the model whilst assigning pragmatic characteristics to its fire outputs thus allowing realistic simulations of fire-related processes such as carbon injection into the atmosphere and permafrost degradation. We focus our simulations in the Arctic and specifically Canada and Russia and we offer a snippet of how this approach permits models to engage in post-fire dynamics hitherto absent from any other model regardless of complexity.

  10. Improving the representation of fire disturbance in dynamic vegetation models by assimilating satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantzas, E. P.; Quegan, S.; Lomas, M.

    2015-03-01

    Fire provides an impulsive and stochastic pathway for carbon from the terrestrial biosphere to enter the atmosphere. Despite fire emissions being of similar magnitude to Net Ecosystem Exchange in many biomes, even the most complex Dynamic Vegetation Models (DVMs) embedded in General Circulation Models contain poor representations of fire behaviour and dynamics such as propagation and distribution of fire sizes. A model-independent methodology is developed which addresses this issue. Its focus is on the Arctic where fire is linked to permafrost dynamics and on occasion can release great amounts of carbon from carbon-rich organic soils. Connected Component Labeling is used to identify individual fire events across Canada and Russia from daily, low-resolution burned area satellite products, and the results are validated against historical data. This allows the creation of a fire database holding information on area burned and temporal evolution of fires in space and time. A method of assimilating the statistical distribution of fire area into a DVM whilst maintaining its Fire Return Interval is then described. The algorithm imposes a regional scale spatially dependent fire regime on a sub-scale spatially independent model (point model); the fire regime is described by large scale statistical distributions of fire intensity and spatial extent, and the temporal dynamics (fire return intervals) are determined locally. This permits DVMs to estimate many aspects of post-fire dynamics that cannot occur under their current representations of fire, as is illustrated by considering the evolution of land cover, biomass and Net Ecosystem Exchange after a fire.

  11. Improving the representation of fire disturbance in dynamic vegetation models by assimilating satellite data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. P. Kantzas

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Fire provides an impulsive and stochastic pathway for carbon from the terrestrial biosphere to enter the atmosphere. Despite fire emissions being of similar magnitude to Net Ecosystem Exchange in many biomes, even the most complex Dynamic Vegetation Models (DVMs embedded in General Circulation Models contain poor representations of fire behaviour and dynamics such as propagation and distribution of fire sizes. A model-independent methodology is developed which addresses this issue. Its focus is on the Arctic where fire is linked to permafrost dynamics and on occasion can release great amounts of carbon from carbon-rich organic soils. Connected Component Labeling is used to identify individual fire events across Canada and Russia from daily, low-resolution burned area satellite products, and the results are validated against historical data. This allows the creation of a fire database holding information on area burned and temporal evolution of fires in space and time. A method of assimilating the statistical distribution of fire area into a DVM whilst maintaining its Fire Return Interval is then described. The algorithm imposes a regional scale spatially dependent fire regime on a sub-scale spatially independent model (point model; the fire regime is described by large scale statistical distributions of fire intensity and spatial extent, and the temporal dynamics (fire return intervals are determined locally. This permits DVMs to estimate many aspects of post-fire dynamics that cannot occur under their current representations of fire, as is illustrated by considering the evolution of land cover, biomass and Net Ecosystem Exchange after a fire.

  12. Capturing Dynamics in the Power Grid: Formulation of Dynamic State Estimation through Data Assimilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Ning; Huang, Zhenyu; Meng, Da; Elbert, Stephen T.; Wang, Shaobu; Diao, Ruisheng

    2014-03-31

    With the increasing complexity resulting from uncertainties and stochastic variations introduced by intermittent renewable energy sources, responsive loads, mobile consumption of plug-in vehicles, and new market designs, more and more dynamic behaviors are observed in everyday power system operation. To operate a power system efficiently and reliably, it is critical to adopt a dynamic paradigm so that effective control actions can be taken in time. The dynamic paradigm needs to include three fundamental components: dynamic state estimation; look-ahead dynamic simulation; and dynamic contingency analysis (Figure 1). These three components answer three basic questions: where the system is; where the system is going; and how secure the system is against accidents. The dynamic state estimation provides a solid cornerstone to support the other 2 components and is the focus of this study.

  13. Dopey's seizure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, B; Christiaens, F

    1999-06-01

    Angelman syndrome is a neurogenetic condition namely characterized by developmental delay, virtual absence of expressive verbal language, peculiar organization of movement, seizures and happy demeanor. This syndrome has been recognized since 1965, but it seems that Walt Disney presented an original depiction of it in his first full-length animated film, including myoclonic jerks and an apparently generalized tonic-clonic seizure.

  14. Local changes in neocortical circuit dynamics coincide with the spread of seizures to thalamus in a model of epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian B Neubauer

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available During the generalization of epileptic seizures, pathological activity in one brain area recruits distant brain structures into joint synchronous discharges. However, it remains unknown whether specific changes in local circuit activity are related to the aberrant recruitment of anatomically distant structures into epileptiform discharges. Further, it is not known whether aberrant areas recruit or entrain healthy ones into pathological activity. Here we study the dynamics of local circuit activity during the spread of epileptiform discharges in the zero-magnesium in vitro model of epilepsy. We employ high-speed multi-photon imaging in combination with dual whole-cell recordings in acute thalamocortical slices of the juvenile mouse to characterize the generalization of epileptic activity between neocortex and thalamus. We find that, although both structures are exposed to zero-magnesium, the initial onset of focal epileptiform discharge occurs in cortex. This suggests that local recurrent connectivity that is particularly prevalent in cortex is important for the initiation of seizure activity. Subsequent recruitment of thalamus into joint, generalized discharges is coincident with an increase in the coherence of local cortical circuit activity that itself does not depend on thalamus. Finally, the intensity of population discharges is positively correlated between both brain areas. This suggests that during and after seizure generalization not only the timing but also the amplitude of epileptiform discharges in thalamus is entrained by cortex. Together these results suggest a central role of neocortical activity for the onset and the structure of pathological recruitment of thalamus into joint synchronous epileptiform discharges.

  15. Wavelet-based Gaussian-mixture hidden Markov model for the detection of multistage seizure dynamics: A proof-of-concept study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlen Peter L

    2011-04-01

    validated with experimental intracellular electrical recordings of seizures. Conclusions The HMM implementation of a seizure dynamics detector is an improvement over existing approaches using visual detection and complexity measures. The subjectivity involved in partitioning the observed data prior to training can be eliminated. It can also decipher the probabilities of seizure state transitions using the magnitude and rate of change wavelet information of the LFPs.

  16. System characterization of neuronal excitability in the hippocampus and its relevance to observed dynamics of spontaneous seizure-like transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalay, Osbert C.; Serletis, Demitre; Carlen, Peter L.; Bardakjian, Berj L.

    2010-06-01

    Most forms of epilepsy are marked by seizure episodes that arise spontaneously. The low-magnesium/high-potassium (low-Mg2+/high-K+) experimental model of epilepsy is an acute model that produces spontaneous, recurring seizure-like events (SLEs). To elucidate the nature of spontaneous seizure transitions and their relationship to neuronal excitability, whole-cell recordings from the intact hippocampus were undertaken in vitro, and the response of hippocampal CA3 neurons to Gaussian white noise injection was obtained before and after treatment with various concentrations of low-Mg2+/high-K+ solution. A second-order Volterra kernel model was estimated for each of the input-output response pairs. The spectral energy of the responses was also computed, providing a quantitative measure of neuronal excitability. Changes in duration and amplitude of the first-order kernel correlated positively with the spectral energy increase following treatment with low-Mg2+/high-K+ solution, suggesting that variations in neuronal excitability are coded by the system kernels, in part by differences to the profile of the first-order kernel. In particular, kernel duration was more sensitive than amplitude to changes in spectral energy, and correlated more strongly with kernel area. An oscillator network model of the hippocampal CA3 was constructed to investigate the relationship of kernel duration to network excitability, and the model was able to generate spontaneous, recurrent SLEs by increasing the duration of a mode function analogous to the first-order kernel. Results from the model indicated that disruption to the dynamic balance of feedback was responsible for seizure-like transitions and the observed intermittency of SLEs. A physiological candidate for feedback imbalance consistent with the network model is the destabilizing interaction of extracellular potassium and paroxysmal neuronal activation. Altogether, these results (1) validate a mathematical model for epileptiform

  17. Temperature-dependent changes in neuronal dynamics in a patient with an SCN1A mutation and hyperthermia induced seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, C.; Rosch, R. E.; Hughes, E.; Ruben, P. C.

    2016-09-01

    Dravet syndrome is the prototype of SCN1A-mutation associated epilepsies. It is characterised by prolonged seizures, typically provoked by fever. We describe the evaluation of an SCN1A mutation in a child with early-onset temperature-sensitive seizures. The patient carries a heterozygous missense variant (c3818C > T pAla1273Val) in the NaV1.1 brain sodium channel. We compared the functional effects of the variant vs. wild type NaV1.1 using patch clamp recordings from channels expressed in Chinese Hamster Ovary Cells at different temperatures (32, 37, and 40 °C). The variant channels produced a temperature-dependent destabilization of activation and fast inactivation. Implementing these empirical abnormalities in a computational model predicts a higher threshold for depolarization block in the variant, particularly at 40 °C, suggesting a failure to autoregulate at high-input states. These results reveal direct effects of abnormalities in NaV1.1 biophysical properties on neuronal dynamics. They illustrate the value of combining cellular measurements with computational models to integrate different observational scales (gene/channel to patient).

  18. Assimilation of Images

    OpenAIRE

    Vidard, Arthur; Titaud, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    International audience Data assimilation aims at determining as accurately as possible the state of a dynamical system by combining heterogeneous sources of information in an optimal way. Generally speaking, the mathematical methods of data assimilation describe algorithms for forming optimal combinations of observations of a system, a numerical model that describes its evolution, and appropriate prior information. Data assimilation has a long history of application to high-dimensional geo...

  19. Dopey's seizure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, B; Christiaens, F

    1999-06-01

    Angelman syndrome is a neurogenetic condition namely characterized by developmental delay, virtual absence of expressive verbal language, peculiar organization of movement, seizures and happy demeanor. This syndrome has been recognized since 1965, but it seems that Walt Disney presented an original depiction of it in his first full-length animated film, including myoclonic jerks and an apparently generalized tonic-clonic seizure. PMID:10452923

  20. Dynamics of regional brain activity in epilepsy: a cross-disciplinary study on both intracranial and scalp-recorded epileptic seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minadakis, George; Ventouras, Errikos; Gatzonis, Stylianos D.; Siatouni, Anna; Tsekou, Hara; Kalatzis, Ioannis; Sakas, Damianos E.; Stonham, John

    2014-04-01

    Objective. Recent cross-disciplinary literature suggests a dynamical analogy between earthquakes and epileptic seizures. This study extends the focus of inquiry for the applicability of models for earthquake dynamics to examine both scalp-recorded and intracranial electroencephalogram recordings related to epileptic seizures. Approach. First, we provide an updated definition of the electric event in terms of magnitude and we focus on the applicability of (i) a model for earthquake dynamics, rooted in a nonextensive Tsallis framework, (ii) the traditional Gutenberg and Richter law and (iii) an alternative method for the magnitude-frequency relation for earthquakes. Second, we apply spatiotemporal analysis in terms of nonextensive statistical physics and we further examine the behavior of the parameters included in the nonextensive formula for both types of electroencephalogram recordings under study. Main results. We confirm the previously observed power-law distribution, showing that the nonextensive formula can adequately describe the sequences of electric events included in both types of electroencephalogram recordings. We also show the intermittent behavior of the epileptic seizure cycle which is analogous to the earthquake cycles and we provide evidence of self-affinity of the regional electroencephalogram epileptic seizure activity. Significance. This study may provide a framework for the analysis and interpretation of epileptic brain activity and other biological phenomena with similar underlying dynamical mechanisms.

  1. Assimilation of Altimeter Data into a Quasigeostrophic Model of the Gulf Stream System. Part 1; Dynamical Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capotondi, Antonietta; Malanotte-Rizzoli, Paola; Holland, William R.

    1995-01-01

    The dynamical consequences of constraining a numerical model with sea surface height data have been investigated. The model used for this study is a quasigeostrophic model of the Gulf Stream region. The data that have been assimilated are maps of sea surface height obtained as the superposition of sea surface height variability deduced from the Geosat altimeter measurements and a mean field constructed from historical hydrographic data. The method used for assimilating the data is the nudging technique. Nudging has been implemented in such a way as to achieve a high degree of convergence of the surface model fields toward the observations. The assimilation of the surface data is thus equivalent to the prescription of a surface pressure boundary condition. The authors analyzed the mechanisms of the model adjustment and the characteristics of the resultant equilibrium state when the surface data are assimilated. Since the surface data are the superposition of a mean component and an eddy component, in order to understand the relative role of these two components in determining the characteristics of the final equilibrium state, two different experiments have been considered: in the first experiment only the climatological mean field is assimilated, while in the second experiment the total surface streamfunction field (mean plus eddies) has been used. It is shown that the model behavior in the presence of the surface data constraint can be conveniently described in terms of baroclinic Fofonoff modes. The prescribed mean component of the surface data acts as a 'surface topography' in this problem. Its presence determines a distortion of the geostrophic contours in the subsurface layers, thus constraining the mean circulation in those layers. The intensity of the mean flow is determined by the inflow/outflow conditions at the open boundaries, as well as by eddy forcing and dissipation.

  2. Controlling Seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    This article describes how an implantable device could greatly improve the quality of life for people with epilepsy. Gabe Anderson was diagnosed with bilateral heterotopia, a congenital condition that can lead to the onset of complex partial seizures stemming from both hemispheres of the brain. In early 2004, Gabe became one of the first 35…

  3. Development of Dynamic Ground Water Data Assimilation for Quantifying Soil Hydraulic Properties from Remotely Sensed Soil Moisture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongchul Shin

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Several inversion modeling-based approaches have been developed/used to extract soil hydraulic properties (α, n, θres, θsat, Ksat from remotely sensed (RS soil moisture footprints. Hydrological models with shallow ground water (SGW table depths in soils simulate daily root zone soil moisture dynamics based on the extracted soil parameters. The presence of SGW table depths in soils significantly influences model performances; however, SGW table depths are usually unknown in the field, thus, unknown SGW table depths might cause uncertainties in the model outputs. In order to overcome these drawbacks, we developed a dynamic ground water (DGW data assimilation approach that can consider SGW table depths across time for quantifying effective soil hydraulic properties in the unsaturated zone. In order to verify the DGW data assimilation scheme, numerical experiments comprising synthetic and field validation experiments were conducted. For the numerical studies, the Little Washita (LW watershed in Oklahoma and Olney (OLN/Bondville (BOND sites in Illinois were selected as different hydroclimatic regions. For the synthetic conditions, we tested the DGW scheme using various soil textures and vegetation covers with fixed and dynamically changing SGW table depths across time in homogeneous and heterogeneous (layered soil columns. The DGW-based soil parameters matched the observations under various synthetic conditions better than those that only consider fixed ground water (FGW table depths in time. For the field validations, our proposed data assimilation scheme performed well in predicting the soil hydraulic properties and SGW table depths at the point, airborne sensing, and satellite scales, even though uncertainties exist. These findings support the robustness of our proposed DGW approach in application to regional fields. Thus, the DGW scheme could improve the availability and applicability of pixel-scale soil moisture footprints based on satellite

  4. Age-dependent seizures of absence epilepsy and sleep spindles dynamics in WAG/Rij rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubov, Vadim V.; Sitnikova, Evgenia Y.; Pavlov, Alexey N.; Khramova, Marina V.; Koronovskii, Alexey A.; Hramov, Alexander E.

    2015-03-01

    In the given paper, a relation between time-frequency characteristics of sleep spindles and the age-dependent epileptic activity in WAG/Rij rats is discussed. Analysis of sleep spindles based on the continuous wavelet transform is performed for rats of different ages. It is shown that the epileptic activity affects the time-frequency intrinsic dynamics of sleep spindles.

  5. Age-Dependent Increase of Absence Seizures and Intrinsic Frequency Dynamics of Sleep Spindles in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgenia Sitnikova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The risk of neurological diseases increases with age. In WAG/Rij rat model of absence epilepsy, the incidence of epileptic spike-wave discharges is known to be elevated with age. Considering close relationship between epileptic spike-wave discharges and physiologic sleep spindles, it was assumed that age-dependent increase of epileptic activity may affect time-frequency characteristics of sleep spindles. In order to examine this hypothesis, electroencephalograms (EEG were recorded in WAG/Rij rats successively at the ages 5, 7, and 9 months. Spike-wave discharges and sleep spindles were detected in frontal EEG channel. Sleep spindles were identified automatically using wavelet-based algorithm. Instantaneous (localized in time frequency of sleep spindles was determined using continuous wavelet transform of EEG signal, and intraspindle frequency dynamics were further examined. It was found that in 5-months-old rats epileptic activity has not fully developed (preclinical stage and sleep spindles demonstrated an increase of instantaneous frequency from beginning to the end. At the age of 7 and 9 months, when animals developed matured and longer epileptic discharges (symptomatic stage, their sleep spindles did not display changes of intrinsic frequency. The present data suggest that age-dependent increase of epileptic activity in WAG/Rij rats affects intrinsic dynamics of sleep spindle frequency.

  6. Seizures and Teens: Stress, Sleep, & Seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafer, Patricia Osborne

    2007-01-01

    Most parents are used to erratic sleep patterns and mood swings in their teenagers. When these occur in an adolescent with seizures, however, the parent may wonder if sleep and mood problems are related to seizures. Sorting out the cause and effects of sleep in an adolescent with seizures can be confusing. Since stress can be a contributor to both…

  7. An eddy-permitting, dynamically consistent adjoint-based assimilation system for the tropical Pacific: Hindcast experiments in 2000

    KAUST Repository

    Hoteit, Ibrahim

    2010-03-02

    An eddy-permitting adjoint-based assimilation system has been implemented to estimate the state of the tropical Pacific Ocean. The system uses the Massachusetts Institute of Technology\\'s general circulation model and its adjoint. The adjoint method is used to adjust the model to observations by controlling the initial temperature and salinity; temperature, salinity, and horizontal velocities at the open boundaries; and surface fluxes of momentum, heat, and freshwater. The model is constrained with most of the available data sets in the tropical Pacific, including Tropical Atmosphere and Ocean, ARGO, expendable bathythermograph, and satellite SST and sea surface height data, and climatologies. Results of hindcast experiments in 2000 suggest that the iterated adjoint-based descent is able to significantly improve the model consistency with the multivariate data sets, providing a dynamically consistent realization of the tropical Pacific circulation that generally matches the observations to within specified errors. The estimated model state is evaluated both by comparisons with observations and by checking the controls, the momentum balances, and the representation of small-scale features that were not well sampled by the observations used in the assimilation. As part of these checks, the estimated controls are smoothed and applied in independent model runs to check that small changes in the controls do not greatly change the model hindcast. This is a simple ensemble-based uncertainty analysis. In addition, the original and smoothed controls are applied to a version of the model with doubled horizontal resolution resulting in a broadly similar “downscaled” hindcast, showing that the adjustments are not tuned to a single configuration (meaning resolution, topography, and parameter settings). The time-evolving model state and the adjusted controls should be useful for analysis or to supply the forcing, initial, and boundary conditions for runs of other models.

  8. Assimilation of space-based passive microwave soil moisture retrievals and the correction for a dynamic open water fraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. T. Gouweleeuw

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The large observation footprint of low-frequency satellite microwave emissions complicates the interpretation of near-surface soil moisture retrievals. While the effect of sub-footprint lateral heterogeneity is relatively limited under unsaturated conditions, open water bodies, if not accounted for, cause a strong positive bias in the satellite-derived soil moisture retrieval. This bias is generally assumed static and associated with large, continental lakes and coastal areas. Temporal changes in the extent of smaller water bodies as small as a few percent of the sensor footprint size, however, can cause significant and dynamic biases. We analysed the influence of such small open water bodies near-surface soil moisture retrieval data from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for the Earth Observing System (AMSR-E for three areas in Oklahoma, USA. Differences between on-ground observations, model estimates and AMSR-E retrievals were compared to dynamic estimates of open water fraction, one retrieved from a global daily record based on higher frequency AMSR-E data and another derived from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS. The comparisons demonstrates that seasonally varying biases of up to 30 vol.% soil water content can be attributed to the presence of relatively small areas (<5% of open water in or near the sensor footprint. These errors need to be addressed, either through elimination or accurate characterization, if the soil moisture retrievals are to be used effectively in a data assimilation scheme.

  9. Visualization of spatiotemporal energy dynamics of hippocampal neurons by mass spectrometry during a kainate-induced seizure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Sugiura

    Full Text Available We report the use of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI imaging mass spectrometry combined with capillary electrophoresis (CE mass spectrometry to visualize energy metabolism in the mouse hippocampus by imaging energy-related metabolites. We show the distribution patterns of ATP, ADP, and AMP in the hippocampus as well as changes in their amounts and distribution patterns in a murine model of limbic, kainate-induced seizure. As an acute response to kainate administration, we found massive and moderate reductions in ATP and ADP levels, respectively, but no significant changes in AMP levels--especially in cells of the CA3 layer. The results suggest the existence of CA3 neuron-selective energy metabolism at the anhydride bonds of ATP and ADP in the hippocampal neurons during seizure. In addition, metabolome analysis of energy synthesis pathways indicates accelerated glycolysis and possibly TCA cycle activity during seizure, presumably due to the depletion of ATP. Consistent with this result, the observed energy depletion significantly recovered up to 180 min after kainate administration. However, the recovery rate was remarkably low in part of the data-pixel population in the CA3 cell layer region, which likely reflects acute and CA3-selective neural death. Taken together, the present approach successfully revealed the spatiotemporal energy metabolism of the mouse hippocampus at a cellular resolution--both quantitatively and qualitatively. We aim to further elucidate various metabolic processes in the neural system.

  10. Reconstructing three-dimensional reentrant cardiac electrical wave dynamics using data assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, M. J.; LaVigne, N. S.; Scorse, S. T.; Fenton, F. H.; Cherry, E. M.

    2016-01-01

    For many years, reentrant scroll waves have been predicted and studied as an underlying mechanism for cardiac arrhythmias using numerical techniques, and high-resolution mapping studies using fluorescence recordings from the surfaces of cardiac tissue preparations have confirmed the presence of visible spiral waves. However, assessing the three-dimensional dynamics of these reentrant waves using experimental techniques has been limited to verifying stable scroll-wave dynamics in relatively thin preparations. We propose a different approach to recovering the three-dimensional dynamics of reentrant waves in the heart. By applying techniques commonly used in weather forecasting, we combine dual-surface observations from a particular experiment with predictions from a numerical model to reconstruct the full three-dimensional time series of the experiment. Here, we use model-generated surrogate observations from a numerical experiment to evaluate the performance of the ensemble Kalman filter in reconstructing such time series for a discordant alternans state in one spatial dimension and for scroll waves in three dimensions. We show that our approach is able to recover time series of both observed and unobserved variables matching the truth. Where nearby observations are available, the error is reduced below the synthetic observation error, with a smaller reduction with increased distance from observations. Our findings demonstrate that state reconstruction for spatiotemporally complex cardiac electrical dynamics is possible and will lead naturally to applications using real experimental data.

  11. Reconstructing three-dimensional reentrant cardiac electrical wave dynamics using data assimilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, M J; LaVigne, N S; Scorse, S T; Fenton, F H; Cherry, E M

    2016-01-01

    For many years, reentrant scroll waves have been predicted and studied as an underlying mechanism for cardiac arrhythmias using numerical techniques, and high-resolution mapping studies using fluorescence recordings from the surfaces of cardiac tissue preparations have confirmed the presence of visible spiral waves. However, assessing the three-dimensional dynamics of these reentrant waves using experimental techniques has been limited to verifying stable scroll-wave dynamics in relatively thin preparations. We propose a different approach to recovering the three-dimensional dynamics of reentrant waves in the heart. By applying techniques commonly used in weather forecasting, we combine dual-surface observations from a particular experiment with predictions from a numerical model to reconstruct the full three-dimensional time series of the experiment. Here, we use model-generated surrogate observations from a numerical experiment to evaluate the performance of the ensemble Kalman filter in reconstructing such time series for a discordant alternans state in one spatial dimension and for scroll waves in three dimensions. We show that our approach is able to recover time series of both observed and unobserved variables matching the truth. Where nearby observations are available, the error is reduced below the synthetic observation error, with a smaller reduction with increased distance from observations. Our findings demonstrate that state reconstruction for spatiotemporally complex cardiac electrical dynamics is possible and will lead naturally to applications using real experimental data. PMID:26826859

  12. : Seizure onset zone imaging

    OpenAIRE

    David, Olivier; Blauwblomme, Thomas; Job, Anne-Sophie; Chabardès, Stéphan; Hoffmann, Dominique,; Minotti, Lorella; Kahane, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    International audience Stereo-electroencephalography is used to localize the seizure onset zone and connected neuronal networks in surgical candidates suffering from intractable focal epilepsy. The concept of an epileptogenicity index has been proposed recently to represent the likelihood of various regions being part of the seizure onset zone. It quantifies low-voltage fast activity, the electrophysiological signature of seizure onset usually assessed visually by neurologists. Here, we re...

  13. Inhomogeneous cortical synchronization and partial epileptic seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Carolina Vega

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Interictal synchronization clusters have recently been described in several publications using diverse techniques, including neurophysiological recordings and fMRI, in patients suffering from epilepsy. However, little is known about the role of these hyper-synchronous areas during seizures. In this work, we report an analysis of synchronization clusters jointly with several network measures during seizure activity; we then discuss our findings in the context of prior literature. Methods: Subdural activity was recorded by electrocorticography (with sixty electrodes placed at temporal and parietal lobe locations in a patient with temporal lobe epilepsy with partial seizures with and without secondary generalization. Both interictal and ictal activities (during four seizures were investigated and characterized using local synchronization and complex network methodology. The modularity, density of links, average clustering coefficient and average path lengths were calculated to obtain information about the dynamics of the global network. Functional connectivity changes during the seizures were compared with the time-evolution of highly synchronized areas.Results: Our findings reveal temporal changes in local synchronization areas during seizures and a tight relationship between the cortical locations of these areas and the patterns of their evolution over time. Seizure evolution and secondary generalization appear to be driven by two different underlying mechanisms.

  14. Particle Filter-based assimilation algorithms for improved estimation of root-zone soil moisture under dynamic vegetation conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, Karthik; Judge, Jasmeet; Graham, Wendy D.; Monsivais-Huertero, Alejandro

    2011-04-01

    In this study, we implement Particle Filter (PF)-based assimilation algorithms to improve root-zone soil moisture (RZSM) estimates from a coupled SVAT-vegetation model during a growing season of sweet corn in North Central Florida. The results from four different PF algorithms were compared with those from the Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) when near-surface soil moisture was assimilated every 3 days using both synthetic and field observations. In the synthetic case, the PF algorithm with the best performance used residual resampling of the states and obtained resampled parameters from a uniform distribution and provided reductions of 76% in root mean square error (RMSE) over the openloop estimates. The EnKF provided the RZSM and parameter estimates that were closer to the truth than the PF with an 84% reduction in RMSE. When field observations were assimilated, the PF algorithm that maintained maximum parameter diversity offered the largest reduction of 16% in root mean square difference (RMSD) over the openloop estimates. Minimal differences were observed in the overall performance of the EnKF and PF using field observations since errors in model physics affected both the filters in a similar manner, with maximum reductions in RMSD compared to the openloop during the mid and reproductive stages.

  15. Dynamics of Control and Resistance: Reactions to the Modern Policy of Assimilation of the Travellers in Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rune Halvorsen

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available For much of the 20th century, the Norwegian authorities pursued a strict assimilation policy towards Travellers (tatere/ romanifolket and their culture. As was the case in many other countries, Travellers were constructed as "the other" (Riggins 1997, MacLaughlin 1999. When compared to other Western European countries, it is, however, surprising that Norwegian Travellers were seen as such a serious problem and threat during the 20th century. The 1845 census counted 1145 Travellers out of a total population of 1.3 million in Norway (Sundt 1852, SSB 1968: Table 13. A private charity organisation acting on behalf of the state registered 5129 "itinerants" in their archives from 1900 to 1959 (Haave 2000. These were the figures that worried the elites. This paper examines the modern assimilation policy and Travellers' reactions to this policy. In particular the paper analyses the internal relation between the modern assimilation policy and the emergence of collective demands for recognition as an ethnic minority and moral redress among Travellers in the 1990s.

  16. Viruses and febrile seizures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeijl, J.H. van

    2004-01-01

    We conclude that viral infections are the main cause of febrile seizures, with an important role for influenza A, HHV-6 and HHV-7. We showed that several viral infections not only contribute to initial febrile seizures, but also to recurrences. Viruses could not be detected in the CSF of children wi

  17. FEBRILE SEIZURE AND ANEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Talebian

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveConsidering the controversial results in present day literature regarding the relationship between febrile seizures and anemia and the high rate of such seizures in children, this study was conducted to evaluate the association between pediatric febrile seizures and anemia.Material and MethodsIn this case-control study, conducted in 2003, 60 children with febrile seizure(cases and 60 febrile children without seizure(controls were evaluated in the Kashan Shahid Beheshti hospital; all patients were matched for age, sex, type of feeding, and use of supplemental iron. Thirty-six (60% and 39 (65% of the patients in case and control groups respectively were male, and the remaining female. Levels of hemoglobin, hematocrit, and red blood cell indices were determined in all children and Chi-square and Fisher exact tests were used to analyze data.ResultsOf the case group, 13.3% (6 male, 2 female and of controls, 20% (9 male, 3 female of children had anemia (p= 0.327, the condition being more common in male children aged over 6 months. Febrile seizures were found to occur mostly between the ages of 6 to 24 months.ConclusionThe risk of febrile seizure occurrence in anemic children seems to be less than that in children who do not suffer from the condition.Keywords:Febrile seizure, Anemia, Children

  18. Cumulative ozone effect on canopy stomatal resistance and the impact on boundary layer dynamics and CO2 assimilation at the diurnal scale: A case study for grassland in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Super, I.; Vilà-Guerau De Arellano, J.; Krol, M.C.

    2015-01-01

    Biological, chemical, and dynamical processes occurring at the surface strongly interact at diurnal scales. Therefore, this study examines the seasonal ozone impact on stomatal resistance, surface energy balance, boundary layer dynamics, and CO2 assimilation at this (sub)diurnal scale under changing

  19. On the mathematics of data assimilation

    OpenAIRE

    Talagrand, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    The problem of convergence of a “forward-backward” assimilation is considered for the most general dynamical system. Using elementary techniques of stability theory, it is shown that the variation, over one assimilation cycle, of the difference between the assimilating model and the state to be reconstructed is, to the first order, determined by a perfectly defined amplification matrix. This leads to a straightforward criterion for convergence, depending on the eigenvalues of that matrix. Th...

  20. Mechanism of Seizure Termination

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2008-01-01

    Physiological mechanisms contributing to seizure termination and organized according to membranes, synapses, networks, and circuits are reviewed by researchers from Albert Einstein College of Medicine, and Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, New York.

  1. Fibromyalgia and seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatum, William O; Langston, Michael E; Acton, Emily K

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this case-matched study was to determine how frequently fibromyalgia is associated with different paroxysmal neurological disorders and explore the utility of fibromyalgia as a predictor for the diagnosis of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures. The billing diagnosis codes of 1,730 new, non-selected patient encounters were reviewed over a three-year period for an epileptologist in a neurology clinic to identify all patients with historical diagnoses of fibromyalgia. The frequency with which epileptic seizures, psychogenic non-epileptic seizures, and physiological non-epileptic events were comorbid with fibromyalgia was assessed. Age and gender case-matched controls were used for a between-group comparison. Wilcoxon tests were used to analyse interval data, and Chi-square was used to analyse categorical data (pFibromyalgia was retrospectively identified in 95/1,730 (5.5%) patients in this cohort. Females represented 95% of the fibromyalgia sample (age: 53 years; 95% CI: 57, 51). Forty-three percent of those with fibromyalgia had a non-paroxysmal, neurological primary clinical diagnosis, most commonly chronic pain. Paroxysmal events were present in 57% of fibromyalgia patients and 54% of case-matched controls. Among patients with fibromyalgia and paroxysmal disorders, 11% had epileptic seizures, 74% had psychogenic non-epileptic seizures, and 15% had physiological non-epileptic events, compared to case-matched controls with 37% epileptic seizures, 51% psychogenic non-epileptic events, and 12% physiological non-epileptic events (p = 0.009). Fibromyalgia was shown to be a predictor for the diagnosis of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures in patients with undifferentiated paroxysmal spells. However, our results suggest that the specificity and sensitivity of fibromyalgia as a marker for psychogenic non-epileptic seizures in a mixed general neurological population of patients is less than previously described. PMID:27238051

  2. Epileptic Seizures: Quakes of the brain?

    CERN Document Server

    Osorio, Ivan; Sornette, Didier; Milton, John; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2007-01-01

    The concept of universality proposes that dynamical systems with the same power law behaviors are equivalent at large scales. We test this hypothesis on the Earth's crust and the epileptic brain, and discover that power laws also govern the distributions of seizure energies and recurrence times. This robust correspondence is extended over seven statistics, including the direct and inverse Omori laws. We also verify in an animal seizure model the earthquake-driven hypothesis that power law statistics co-exist with characteristic scales, as coupling between constitutive elements increases towards the synchronization regime. These observations point to the universality of the dynamics of coupled threshold oscillators for systems even as diverse as Earth and brain and suggest a general strategy for forecasting seizures, one of neurosciences' grails.

  3. Seizures Induced by Music

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. O. Ogunyemi

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Musicogenic epilepsy is a rare disorder. Much remains to be learned about the electroclinical features. This report describes a patient who has been followed at our institution for 17 years, and was investigated with long-term telemetered simultaneous video-EEG recordings. She began to have seizures at the age of 10 years. She experienced complex partial seizures, often preceded by elementary auditory hallucination and complex auditory illusion. The seizures occurred in relation to singing, listening to music or thinking about music. She also had occasional generalized tonic clonic seizures during sleep. There was no significant antecedent history. The family history was negative for epilepsy. The physical examination was unremarkable. CT and MRI scans of the brain were normal. During long-term simultaneous video-EEG recordings, clinical and electrographic seizure activities were recorded in association with singing and listening to music. Mathematical calculation, copying or viewing geometric patterns and playing the game of chess failed to evoke seizures.

  4. An application of Data Assimilation to a dynamic global vegetation model: fusing CLM(ED) model results with streams of observed data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massoud, Elias; Xu, Chonggang; Fisher, Rosie; Vrugt, Jasper

    2016-04-01

    We implement a data assimilation approach for a Dynamic Global Vegetation Model (DGVM), named the CLM(ED) for its combined strengths of a Community Land Model (CLM) and an implementation of the Ecosystem Demography (ED) concept. This unique model combination allows for scaling the behavior of forest ecosystems by aggregating individual trees into representative "cohorts", and thus allows for the prediction of plant distribution (including stem distribution, mortality, and growth) directly from their given physiological traits. The model is constantly improving as it evolves, as less simple empirical models are used and more physically based ones are included to represent the physiological and biogeochemical processes taking place on the land-air surface. For example, very recently a mechanistic model simulating the photosynthetic capacity was implemented for a better representation of a leaf's nitrogen allocation. Some possible outputs of CLM(ED) include GPP, NPP, LAI, and interestingly, predictions of biome boundaries. In this study, we first conduct a global sensitivity analysis by estimating the range of model parameters from literature. Then, an application of Data Assimilation (DA) is introduced, where we attempt to fuse the model simulations with observed data, such as GPP. The updated system properties achieved through DA allow for better parameterization and more accurate overall predictions of vegetation dynamics. More importantly, this study addresses structural uncertainties within the model, and by combining model estimates with observed measurements, we aim to improve the overall representation of the underlying processes by explicitly pinpointing deficiencies in the model structure. We advocate the use of DA in Earth System Models for many reasons, including the direct benefit linked to the recent availability of ecological data sets, the efficient implementation within models thanks to improvements in computational power, and the proven ability of DA

  5. MMR Vaccination and Febrile Seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Mogens; Hviid, Anders; Madsen, Kreesten Meldgaard;

    2004-01-01

    CONTEXT: The rate of febrile seizures increases following measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccination but it is unknown whether the rate varies according to personal or family history of seizures, perinatal factors, or socioeconomic status. Furthermore, little is known about the long-term outcome...... of febrile seizures following vaccination. OBJECTIVES: To estimate incidence rate ratios (RRs) and risk differences of febrile seizures following MMR vaccination within subgroups of children and to evaluate the clinical outcome of febrile seizures following vaccination. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS......: Incidence of first febrile seizure, recurrent febrile seizures, and subsequent epilepsy. RESULTS: A total of 439,251 children (82%) received MMR vaccination and 17,986 children developed febrile seizures at least once; 973 of these febrile seizures occurred within 2 weeks of MMR vaccination. The RR...

  6. Febrile and other occasional seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bast, T; Carmant, L

    2013-01-01

    Seizures with fever that result from encephalitis or meningitis usually occur late in the course of febrile illness, and are focal and prolonged. Febrile seizures are by far the most common affecting 5% of the population, followed by posttraumatic seizures and those observed in the setting of a toxic, infectious, or metabolic encephalopathy. This chapter reviews the clinical presentation of the three most common forms, due to fever, trauma, and intoxication. Febrile seizures carry no cognitive or mortality risk. Recurrence risk is increased by young age, namely before 1 year of age. Febrile seizures that persist after the age of 6 years are usually part of the syndrome of Generalized epilepsy febrile seizures plus. These febrile seizures have a strong link with epilepsy since non-febrile seizures may occur later in the same patient and in other members of the same family with an autosomal dominant transmission. Complex febrile seizures, i.e., with focal or prolonged manifestations or followed by focal defect, are related to later mesial temporal epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis; risk factors are seizure duration and brain malformation. Prophylactic treatment is usually not required in febrile seizures. Early onset of complex seizures is the main indication for AED prophylaxis. Early posttraumatic seizures, i.e., within the first week, are often focal and indicate brain trauma: contusion, hematoma, 24 hours amnesia, and depressed skull fracture are major factors of posttraumatic epilepsy. Prophylaxis with antiepileptic drugs is not effective. Various psychotropic drugs, including antiepileptics, may cause seizures.

  7. Assortative mixing in functional brain networks during epileptic seizures

    CERN Document Server

    Bialonski, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    We investigate assortativity of functional brain networks before, during, and after one-hundred epileptic seizures with different anatomical onset locations. We construct binary functional networks from multi-channel electroencephalographic data recorded from 60 epilepsy patients, and from time-resolved estimates of the assortativity coefficient we conclude that positive degree-degree correlations are inherent to seizure dynamics. While seizures evolve, an increasing assortativity indicates a segregation of the underlying functional network into groups of brain regions that are only sparsely interconnected, if at all. Interestingly, assortativity decreases already prior to seizure end. Together with previous observations of characteristic temporal evolutions of global statistical properties and synchronizability of epileptic brain networks, our findings may help to gain deeper insights into the complicated dynamics underlying generation, propagation, and termination of seizures.

  8. Prediction of geomagnetic reversals using low-dimensional dynamical models and advanced data assimilation: a feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, A.; Morzfeld, M.; Hulot, G.

    2013-12-01

    For a suitable choice of parameters, the system of three ordinary differential equations (ODE) presented by Gissinger [1] was shown to exhibit chaotic reversals whose statistics compared well with those from the paleomagnetic record. In order to further assess the geophysical relevance of this low-dimensional model, we resort to data assimilation methods to calibrate it using reconstructions of the fluctuation of the virtual axial dipole moment spanning the past 2 millions years. Moreover, we test to which extent a properly calibrated model could possibly be used to predict a reversal of the geomagnetic field. We calibrate the ODE model to the geomagnetic field over the past 2 Ma using the SINT data set of Valet et al. [2]. To this end, we consider four data assimilation algorithms: the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF), a variational method and two Monte Carlo (MC) schemes, prior importance sampling and implicit sampling. We observe that EnKF performs poorly and that prior importance sampling is inefficient. We obtain the most accurate reconstructions of the geomagnetic data using implicit sampling with five data points per assimilation sweep (of duration 5 kyr). The variational scheme performs equally well, but it does not provide us with quantitative information about the uncertainty of the estimates, which makes this method difficult to use for robust prediction under uncertainty. A calibration of the model using the PADM2M data set of Ziegler et al. [3] confirms these findings. We study the predictive capability of the ODE model using statistics computed from synthetic data experiments. For each experiment, we produce 2 Myr of synthetic data (with error levels similar to the ones found in real data), then calibrate the model to this record and then check if this calibrated model can correctly and reliably predict a reversal within the next 10 kyr (say). By performing 100 such experiments, we can assess how reliably our calibrated model can predict a (non

  9. Seizures and epilepsy in cats

    OpenAIRE

    Moore SA

    2014-01-01

    Sarah A Moore Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA Abstract: Seizures are a common presenting complaint in cats, although causes and options for the treatment of seizures in this species have been historically poorly described in the veterinary literature. Seizure manifestation in cats may be different than what is typically seen in dogs, but the underlying causes of seizure activity are the same. These include primary epilepsies, structura...

  10. Seizures Complicating Bacterial Meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The clinical data of 116 patients, 1 month to <5 years of age, admitted for bacterial meningitis, and grouped according to those with and without seizures during hospitalization, were compared in a study at Buddhist Dalin Tzu Chi General Hospital, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and other centers in Taiwan.

  11. Emergence of semiology in epileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvel, Patrick; McGonigal, Aileen

    2014-09-01

    clinical expression, as evidenced, for example, by studies of ictal fear-related behavior (decorrelation of activity between structures inducing "release" phenomena) and of déjà vu (increased synchronization). Studies of functional coupling within networks underlying complex ictal behavior indicate that the clinical semiology of a given seizure depends upon neither the anatomical origin of ictal discharge nor the target areas of its propagation alone but on the dynamic interaction between these. Careful mapping of the ictal network in its full spread offers essential information as to the localization of seizure onset, by deducing that a given network configuration could only be generated by a given area or group of areas.

  12. Assimilating atmosphere reanalysis in coupled data assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huaran; Lu, Feiyu; Liu, Zhengyu; Liu, Yun; Zhang, Shaoqing

    2016-06-01

    This paper tests the idea of substituting the atmospheric observations with atmospheric reanalysis when setting up a coupled data assimilation system. The paper focuses on the quantification of the effects on the oceanic analysis resulted from this substitution and designs four different assimilation schemes for such a substitution. A coupled Lorenz96 system is constructed and an ensemble Kalman filter is adopted. The atmospheric reanalysis and oceanic observations are assimilated into the system and the analysis quality is compared to a benchmark experiment where both atmospheric and oceanic observations are assimilated. Four schemes are designed for assimilating the reanalysis and they differ in the generation of the perturbed observation ensemble and the representation of the error covariance matrix. The results show that when the reanalysis is assimilated directly as independent observations, the root-mean-square error increase of oceanic analysis relative to the benchmark is less than 16% in the perfect model framework; in the biased model case, the increase is less than 22%. This result is robust with sufficient ensemble size and reasonable atmospheric observation quality (e.g., frequency, noisiness, and density). If the observation is overly noisy, infrequent, sparse, or the ensemble size is insufficiently small, the analysis deterioration caused by the substitution is less severe since the analysis quality of the benchmark also deteriorates significantly due to worse observations and undersampling. The results from different assimilation schemes highlight the importance of two factors: accurate representation of the error covariance of the reanalysis and the temporal coherence along each ensemble member, which are crucial for the analysis quality of the substitution experiment.

  13. Voltage synchronizations between multichannel electroencephalograms during epileptic seizures

    CERN Document Server

    Tuncay, Caglar

    2010-01-01

    The underlying dynamics for the electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings from humans but especially epilepsy patients are usually not completely known. However, the ictal activity is claimed to be characterized by synchronous oscillations in the brain voltages in the literature. These time dependent interdependencies (synchronization, coupling) between the EEG voltages from epileptogenic and non epileptogenic brain sites of nineteen focal epileptic patients are investigated in this work. It is found that strong synchronizationdesynchronization events occur in alternation during most of the investigated seizures. Thus, these seizures are detected with considerable sensitivity (71 of the 79 seizures).

  14. Assimilation in multilingual cities

    OpenAIRE

    Ortega, Javier

    2011-01-01

    Using the Public Use Microdata Files of the 2001 and 2006 Canadian Censuses, we study the determinants of the assimilation of language minorities into the city majority language. We show that official minority members (i.e. francophones in English-speaking cities and anglophones in French-speaking cities) assimilate less than the "allophones" (the individuals with a mother tongue other than English or French), and that immigrants generally assimilate less than natives. In addition, the langua...

  15. Galactosemia and phantom absence seizures

    OpenAIRE

    Zeynep Aydin-Özemir; Pinar Tektürk; Zehra Oya Uyguner; Betül Baykan

    2014-01-01

    Generalized and focal seizures can rarely be seen in galactosemia patients, but absence seizures were not reported previously. An 18-year-old male was diagnosed as galactosemia at the age of 8 months. No family history of epilepsy was present. His absence seizures realized at the age of 9 years. Generalized 3-4 Hz spike-wave discharges were identified in his electroencephalography. Homozygous mutation at exon 6 c. 563A > G was identified. The electroencephalogram of his sibling was unremarkab...

  16. The ictal wavefront is the spatiotemporal source of discharges during spontaneous human seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Elliot H.; Liou, Jyun-you; Davis, Tyler S.; Merricks, Edward M.; Kellis, Spencer S.; Weiss, Shennan A.; Greger, Bradley; House, Paul A.; McKhann II, Guy M.; Goodman, Robert R.; Emerson, Ronald G.; Bateman, Lisa M.; Trevelyan, Andrew J.; Schevon, Catherine A.

    2016-01-01

    The extensive distribution and simultaneous termination of seizures across cortical areas has led to the hypothesis that seizures are caused by large-scale coordinated networks spanning these areas. This view, however, is difficult to reconcile with most proposed mechanisms of seizure spread and termination, which operate on a cellular scale. We hypothesize that seizures evolve into self-organized structures wherein a small seizing territory projects high-intensity electrical signals over a broad cortical area. Here we investigate human seizures on both small and large electrophysiological scales. We show that the migrating edge of the seizing territory is the source of travelling waves of synaptic activity into adjacent cortical areas. As the seizure progresses, slow dynamics in induced activity from these waves indicate a weakening and eventual failure of their source. These observations support a parsimonious theory for how large-scale evolution and termination of seizures are driven from a small, migrating cortical area. PMID:27020798

  17. Seizures induced by playing music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherling, W W; Hershman, L M; Miller, J Q; Lee, S I

    1980-09-01

    A 67-year-old organist and minister with diabetes mellitus had stereotyped focal seizures of the left lower face, jaw, and neck. Attacks occurred spontaneously or were induced when he played a specific hymn on the organ. The seizures were not induced by reading, singing, hearing, or playing the hymn silently. The patient had interictal weakness of the left lower face and left side of the tongue. Focal seizures were recorded on an electroencephalogram (EEG) at the right temporofrontal area. This patient illustrates partial seizures induced by playing music. PMID:6775246

  18. Seizure activity post organophosphate exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tattersall, John

    2009-01-01

    Electrographic seizures are a feature of organophosphate anticholinesterase intoxication. Clinical studies of pesticide poisonings suggest that seizures are more common in children than in adults. Since flaccid paralysis, a characteristic sign of organophosphate poisoning, can mask convulsions, the most reliable indicator of seizures is the electroencephalogram, but this has not been widely used in clinical studies. Seizures can rapidly progress to status epilepticus, contributing to mortality and, in survivors, to neuronal damage and neurological impairment. Anticonvulsant drugs can significantly reduce the lethal and toxic effects of these compounds. A benzodiazepine, usually diazepam, is the treatment currently indicated for control of seizures. Animal studies have indicated that the early phase of seizure activity (0-5 min after seizure onset) is purely cholinergic, predominantly involving muscarinic mechanisms. Seizure activity subsequently progresses through mixed cholinergic and noncholinergic modulation (5-40 min) into a final noncholinergic phase. Neuropathology caused by seizures is most likely associated with glutamatergic excitotoxicity. Future prospects for improved treatments include new benzodiazepines, glutamate receptor antagonists, antimuscarinics with additional antiglutamatergic activity and adenosine receptor antagonists.

  19. Seizures and Teens: Using Technology to Develop Seizure Preparedness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafer, Patricia O.; Schachter, Steven C.

    2007-01-01

    Most people learn about seizures from their doctors, but others know only what they have seen on television. Unfortunately, visits to doctor's office aren't long enough to learn all that is needed, and often times, doctors and nurses aren't available to teach this information. Seizures are often represented inaccurately and too dramatically on…

  20. On Variational Data Assimilation in Continuous Time

    CERN Document Server

    Bröcker, Jochen

    2010-01-01

    Variational data assimilation in continuous time is revisited. The central techniques applied in this paper are in part adopted from the theory of optimal nonlinear control. Alternatively, the investigated approach can be considered as a continuous time generalisation of what is known as weakly constrained four dimensional variational assimilation (WC--4DVAR) in the geosciences. The technique allows to assimilate trajectories in the case of partial observations and in the presence of model error. Several mathematical aspects of the approach are studied. Computationally, it amounts to solving a two point boundary value problem. For imperfect models, the trade off between small dynamical error (i.e. the trajectory obeys the model dynamics) and small observational error (i.e. the trajectory closely follows the observations) is investigated. For (nearly) perfect models, this trade off turns out to be (nearly) trivial in some sense, yet allowing for some dynamical error is shown to have positive effects even in th...

  1. Oxygen desaturations triggered by partial seizures: implications for cardiopulmonary instability in epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, A. S.; Ives, J. R.; Goldberger, A. L.; Al-Aweel, I. C.; Krishnamurthy, K. B.; Drislane, F. W.; Schomer, D. L.

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: The occurrence of hypoxemia in adults with partial seizures has not been systematically explored. Our aim was to study in detail the temporal dynamics of this specific type of ictal-associated hypoxemia. METHODS: During long-term video/EEG monitoring (LTM), patients underwent monitoring of oxygen saturation using a digital Spo2 (pulse oximeter) transducer. Six patients (nine seizures) were identified with oxygen desaturations after the onset of partial seizure activity. RESULTS: Complex partial seizures originated from both left and right temporal lobes. Mean seizure duration (+/-SD) was 73 +/- 18 s. Mean Spo2 desaturation duration was 76 +/- 19 s. The onset of oxygen desaturation followed seizure onset with a mean delay of 43 +/- 16 s. Mean (+/-SD) Spo2 nadir was 83 +/- 5% (range, 77-91%), occurring an average of 35 +/- 12 s after the onset of the desaturation. One seizure was associated with prolonged and recurrent Spo2 desaturations. CONCLUSIONS: Partial seizures may be associated with prominent oxygen desaturations. The comparable duration of each seizure and its subsequent desaturation suggests a close mechanistic (possibly causal) relation. Spo2 monitoring provides an added means for seizure detection that may increase LTM yield. These observations also raise the possibility that ictal ventilatory dysfunction could play a role in certain cases of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy in adults with partial seizures.

  2. Using ensemble data assimilation to forecast hydrological flumes

    OpenAIRE

    Amour, I.; Mussa, Z.; Bibov, A.; Kauranne, T.

    2013-01-01

    Data assimilation, commonly used in weather forecasting, means combining a mathematical forecast of a target dynamical system with simultaneous measurements from that system in an optimal fashion. We demonstrate the benefits obtainable from data assimilation with a dam break flume simulation in which a shallow-water equation model is complemented with wave meter measurements. Data assimilation is conducted with a Variational Ensemble Kalman Filter (VEnKF) algorithm. The resu...

  3. An Ensemble Algorithm Based Component for Geomagnetic Data Assimilation

    OpenAIRE

    Zhibin Sun and Weijia Kuang

    2015-01-01

    Geomagnetic data assimilation is one of the most recent developments in geomagnetic studies. It combines geodynamo model outputs and surface geomagnetic observations to provide more accurate estimates of the core dynamic state and provide accurate geomagnetic secular variation forecasting. To facilitate geomagnetic data assimilation studies, we develop a stand-alone data assimilation component for the geomagnetic community. This component is used to calculate the forecast error covariance mat...

  4. Wavelet Approximation in Data Assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangborn, Andrew; Atlas, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Estimation of the state of the atmosphere with the Kalman filter remains a distant goal because of high computational cost of evolving the error covariance for both linear and nonlinear systems. Wavelet approximation is presented here as a possible solution that efficiently compresses both global and local covariance information. We demonstrate the compression characteristics on the the error correlation field from a global two-dimensional chemical constituent assimilation, and implement an adaptive wavelet approximation scheme on the assimilation of the one-dimensional Burger's equation. In the former problem, we show that 99%, of the error correlation can be represented by just 3% of the wavelet coefficients, with good representation of localized features. In the Burger's equation assimilation, the discrete linearized equations (tangent linear model) and analysis covariance are projected onto a wavelet basis and truncated to just 6%, of the coefficients. A nearly optimal forecast is achieved and we show that errors due to truncation of the dynamics are no greater than the errors due to covariance truncation.

  5. [Reflex seizures, cinema and television].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares-Romero, Jesús

    2015-12-16

    In movies and television series are few references to seizures or reflex epilepsy even though in real life are an important subgroup of total epileptic syndromes. It has performed a search on the topic, identified 25 films in which they appear reflex seizures. Most seizures observed are tonic-clonic and visual stimuli are the most numerous, corresponding all with flashing lights. The emotions are the main stimuli in higher level processes. In most cases it is not possible to know if a character suffers a reflex epilepsy or suffer reflex seizures in the context of another epileptic syndrome. The main conclusion is that, in the movies, the reflex seizures are merely a visual reinforcing and anecdotal element without significant influence on the plot. PMID:26662874

  6. [Reflex seizures, cinema and television].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares-Romero, Jesús

    2015-12-16

    In movies and television series are few references to seizures or reflex epilepsy even though in real life are an important subgroup of total epileptic syndromes. It has performed a search on the topic, identified 25 films in which they appear reflex seizures. Most seizures observed are tonic-clonic and visual stimuli are the most numerous, corresponding all with flashing lights. The emotions are the main stimuli in higher level processes. In most cases it is not possible to know if a character suffers a reflex epilepsy or suffer reflex seizures in the context of another epileptic syndrome. The main conclusion is that, in the movies, the reflex seizures are merely a visual reinforcing and anecdotal element without significant influence on the plot.

  7. Predicting epileptic seizures in advance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negin Moghim

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is the second most common neurological disorder, affecting 0.6-0.8% of the world's population. In this neurological disorder, abnormal activity of the brain causes seizures, the nature of which tend to be sudden. Antiepileptic Drugs (AEDs are used as long-term therapeutic solutions that control the condition. Of those treated with AEDs, 35% become resistant to medication. The unpredictable nature of seizures poses risks for the individual with epilepsy. It is clearly desirable to find more effective ways of preventing seizures for such patients. The automatic detection of oncoming seizures, before their actual onset, can facilitate timely intervention and hence minimize these risks. In addition, advance prediction of seizures can enrich our understanding of the epileptic brain. In this study, drawing on the body of work behind automatic seizure detection and prediction from digitised Invasive Electroencephalography (EEG data, a prediction algorithm, ASPPR (Advance Seizure Prediction via Pre-ictal Relabeling, is described. ASPPR facilitates the learning of predictive models targeted at recognizing patterns in EEG activity that are in a specific time window in advance of a seizure. It then exploits advanced machine learning coupled with the design and selection of appropriate features from EEG signals. Results, from evaluating ASPPR independently on 21 different patients, suggest that seizures for many patients can be predicted up to 20 minutes in advance of their onset. Compared to benchmark performance represented by a mean S1-Score (harmonic mean of Sensitivity and Specificity of 90.6% for predicting seizure onset between 0 and 5 minutes in advance, ASPPR achieves mean S1-Scores of: 96.30% for prediction between 1 and 6 minutes in advance, 96.13% for prediction between 8 and 13 minutes in advance, 94.5% for prediction between 14 and 19 minutes in advance, and 94.2% for prediction between 20 and 25 minutes in advance.

  8. Data Assimilation in Marine Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydendall, Jan

    This thesis consists of six research papers published or submitted for publication in the period 2006-2009 together with a summary report. The main topics of this thesis are nonlinear data assimilation techniques and estimation in dynamical models. The focus has been on the nonlinear filtering te...... for the Fokker-Planck equation on a 2 dimensional flexible mesh system. The report details the construction of the finite element solver and investigates the potential benefits of a parallel FORTRAN implementation through a series of experiments....

  9. Displacement Data Assimilation

    CERN Document Server

    Rosenthal, W Steven; Mariano, Arthur J; Restrepo, Juan M

    2016-01-01

    We show that modifying a Bayesian data assimilation scheme by incorporating kinematically-consistent displacement corrections produces a scheme that is demonstrably better at estimating partially observed state vectors in a setting where feature information important. While the displacement transformation is not tied to any particular assimilation scheme, here we implement it within an ensemble Kalman Filter and demonstrate its effectiveness in tracking stochastically perturbed vortices.

  10. NEONATAL SEIZURES: ETIOLOGY AND FREQUENCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Eghbalian

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveThe aim of the present study was to evaluate the etiology and frequency of neonatal seizure in hospitalized neonates.Materials and MethodsIn this descriptive, cross-sectional study, we evaluated 1295 neonates with seizures admitted to neonatal and NICU wards in our center. Data was collected on age, sex, birth weight, serum levels of calcium, glucose, and sodium, CT scan findings, history of maternal opium abuse, blood and cerebrospinal fluid culture, and analyzed using SPSS 13.ResultsOf a total of 1295 patients, 34 (2.62% had seizure. Mean age was 14.03 ± 10.05 days (range, 1 to 29 days; twenty-five (73.5% neonates were boys and 9 (26.5% were girls. Of 34 neonates with neonatal seizures, 12 (35.3%, 11 (32.4%, 9 (26.5%, 7 (20.6%, and 3 (8.8% had hypocalcemia, asphyxia, hypoglycemia, intracranial hemorrhage, and hypernatremia, respectively.Maternal addiction, meningitis, and sepsis were found in 3 (8.8%, 1 (2.9% and 1 (2.9% of neonates, respectively.ConclusionThe incidence rate of neonatal seizure in the neonates in our NICU and neonatal ward was 2.62%. Common causes of seizure in this study included hypocalcemia, asphyxia, hypoglycemia, intracranial hemorrhage, and hypernatremia. Maternal ddiction, meningitis and sepsis had the lowest prevalence.Keywords:Neonate, Seizure, Etiologies.

  11. Cannabidiol Rescues Acute Hepatic Toxicity and Seizure Induced by Cocaine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Rezende Vilela

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cocaine is a commonly abused illicit drug that causes significant morbidity and mortality. The most severe and common complications are seizures, ischemic strokes, myocardial infarction, and acute liver injury. Here, we demonstrated that acute cocaine intoxication promoted seizure along with acute liver damage in mice, with intense inflammatory infiltrate. Considering the protective role of the endocannabinoid system against cell toxicity, we hypothesized that treatment with an anandamide hydrolysis inhibitor, URB597, or with a phytocannabinoid, cannabidiol (CBD, protects against cocaine toxicity. URB597 (1.0 mg/kg abolished cocaine-induced seizure, yet it did not protect against acute liver injury. Using confocal liver intravital microscopy, we observed that CBD (30 mg/kg reduced acute liver inflammation and damage induced by cocaine and prevented associated seizure. Additionally, we showed that previous liver damage induced by another hepatotoxic drug (acetaminophen increased seizure and lethality induced by cocaine intoxication, linking hepatotoxicity to seizure dynamics. These findings suggest that activation of cannabinoid system may have protective actions on both liver and brain induced by cocaine, minimizing inflammatory injury promoted by cocaine, supporting its further clinical application in the treatment of cocaine abuse.

  12. Occipital seizures imitating migraine aura.

    OpenAIRE

    Panayiotopoulos, C P; Sharoqi, I A; Agathonikou, A

    1997-01-01

    Three cases are reported in which symptoms of occipital seizures resembled the visual aura of migraine. Careful recording of the characteristics and timing of such visual effects will often resolve the diagnostic dilemma.

  13. Galactosemia and phantom absence seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynep Aydin-Özemir

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Generalized and focal seizures can rarely be seen in galactosemia patients, but absence seizures were not reported previously. An 18-year-old male was diagnosed as galactosemia at the age of 8 months. No family history of epilepsy was present. His absence seizures realized at the age of 9 years. Generalized 3-4 Hz spike-wave discharges were identified in his electroencephalography. Homozygous mutation at exon 6 c. 563A > G was identified. The electroencephalogram of his sibling was unremarkable. Our aim was to present the long-term follow-up of a patient diagnosed with galactosemia, who had phantom absence seizures and typical 3-4 Hz spike-wave discharges in his electroencephalogram to draw attention to this rare association.

  14. Galactosemia and phantom absence seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin-Özemir, Zeynep; Tektürk, Pınar; Uyguner, Zehra Oya; Baykan, Betül

    2014-01-01

    Generalized and focal seizures can rarely be seen in galactosemia patients, but absence seizures were not reported previously. An 18-year-old male was diagnosed as galactosemia at the age of 8 months. No family history of epilepsy was present. His absence seizures realized at the age of 9 years. Generalized 3-4 Hz spike-wave discharges were identified in his electroencephalography. Homozygous mutation at exon 6 c. 563A > G was identified. The electroencephalogram of his sibling was unremarkable. Our aim was to present the long-term follow-up of a patient diagnosed with galactosemia, who had phantom absence seizures and typical 3-4 Hz spike-wave discharges in his electroencephalogram to draw attention to this rare association. PMID:25624930

  15. Evaluating Data Assimilation Algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Law, K J H

    2011-01-01

    Data assimilation refers to methodologies for the incorporation of noisy observations of a physical system into an underlying model in order to infer the properties of the state of the system (and/or parameters). The model itself is typically subject to uncertainties, in the input data and in the physical laws themselves. This leads naturally to a Bayesian formulation in which the posterior probability distribution of the system state, given the observations, plays a central conceptual role. The aim of this paper is to use this Bayesian posterior probability distribution as a gold standard against which to evaluate various commonly used data assimilation algorithms. A key aspect of geophysical data assimilation is the high dimensionality of the computational model. With this in mind, yet with the goal of allowing an explicit and accurate computation of the posterior distribution in order to facilitate our evaluation, we study the 2D Navier-Stokes equations in a periodic geometry. We compute the posterior prob...

  16. Data assimilation a mathematical introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Law, Kody; Zygalakis, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    This book provides a systematic treatment of the mathematical underpinnings of work in data assimilation, covering both theoretical and computational approaches. Specifically the authors develop a unified mathematical framework in which a Bayesian formulation of the problem provides the bedrock for the derivation, development and analysis of algorithms; the many examples used in the text, together with the algorithms which are introduced and discussed, are all illustrated by the MATLAB software detailed in the book and made freely available online. The book is organized into nine chapters: the first contains a brief introduction to the mathematical tools around which the material is organized; the next four are concerned with discrete time dynamical systems and discrete time data; the last four are concerned with continuous time dynamical systems and continuous time data and are organized analogously to the corresponding discrete time chapters. This book is aimed at mathematical researchers interested in a sy...

  17. Optimality in Data Assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nearing, Grey; Yatheendradas, Soni

    2016-04-01

    It costs a lot more to develop and launch an earth-observing satellite than it does to build a data assimilation system. As such, we propose that it is important to understand the efficiency of our assimilation algorithms at extracting information from remote sensing retrievals. To address this, we propose that it is necessary to adopt completely general definition of "optimality" that explicitly acknowledges all differences between the parametric constraints of our assimilation algorithm (e.g., Gaussianity, partial linearity, Markovian updates) and the true nature of the environmetnal system and observing system. In fact, it is not only possible, but incredibly straightforward, to measure the optimality (in this more general sense) of any data assimilation algorithm as applied to any intended model or natural system. We measure the information content of remote sensing data conditional on the fact that we are already running a model and then measure the actual information extracted by data assimilation. The ratio of the two is an efficiency metric, and optimality is defined as occurring when the data assimilation algorithm is perfectly efficient at extracting information from the retrievals. We measure the information content of the remote sensing data in a way that, unlike triple collocation, does not rely on any a priori presumed relationship (e.g., linear) between the retrieval and the ground truth, however, like triple-collocation, is insensitive to the spatial mismatch between point-based measurements and grid-scale retrievals. This theory and method is therefore suitable for use with both dense and sparse validation networks. Additionally, the method we propose is *constructive* in the sense that it provides guidance on how to improve data assimilation systems. All data assimilation strategies can be reduced to approximations of Bayes' law, and we measure the fractions of total information loss that are due to individual assumptions or approximations in the

  18. [Martin Luther's seizure disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldmann, H

    1989-01-01

    Martin Luther's diseases are well documented, because he used to discuss them freely in his letters. There is also a wealth of evidence through reports by his friends. Most of his diseases were common and well known to the contemporary physicians, who accordingly interpreted them correctly: bladder stones, chronic constipation, hemorrhoids. Luther's death obviously was due to a coronary thrombosis. During the last 19 years of his life, in addition to these "natural diseases", Luther also suffered from recurring attacks of a peculiar symptomatology. Luther himself and his friends considered these seizures to be no "natural disease", but Satan punching his flesh, and he compared them to St. Paul's disease (2. Cor. 12). The first of these attacks occurred on July 6, 1527, when Luther was 43 years of age. It began with a roaring tinnitus in his left ear, which increased dramatically and seemed to occupy the left half of his head. Then a state of sickness and collapse followed, however, consciousness was retained throughout the whole period. After a night's rest all the symptoms had subsided, except the tinnitus, which, from that day on, continued for all the following years in varying intensity. Similar attacks with increase of the tinnitus and vertigo as the leading symptoms, seized Luther at irregular intervals and distressed him extremely. Former investigators of Luther's diseases interpreted these attacks as manifestations of a psychiatric disorder and a chronic inflammatory disease of the middle ear. The present detailed study reveals that it was a typical case of Menière's disease of the left ear manifesting itself more than 330 years before Menière's classical observation.

  19. On Assimilation of English Sounds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘恩华

    2015-01-01

    This paper makes a careful study of assimilation in English speaking, meanwhile a systematic knowledge of assimilation wil be helpful for the pronunciations of English learners, facilitate English fluency and improve listening comprehension.

  20. Osthole suppresses seizures in the mouse maximal electroshock seizure model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luszczki, Jarogniew J; Andres-Mach, Marta; Cisowski, Wojciech; Mazol, Irena; Glowniak, Kazimierz; Czuczwar, Stanislaw J

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the anticonvulsant effects of osthole {[7-methoxy-8-(3-methyl-2-butenyl)-2H-1-benzopyran-2-one]--a natural coumarin derivative} in the mouse maximal electroshock-induced seizure model. The antiseizure effects of osthole were determined at 15, 30, 60, and 120 min after its systemic (i.p.) administration. Time course of anticonvulsant action of osthole revealed that the natural coumarin derivative produced a clear-cut antielectroshock activity in mice and the experimentally-derived ED(50) values for osthole ranged from 259 to 631 mg/kg. In conclusion, osthole suppresses seizure activity in the mouse maximal electroshock-induced seizure model. It may become a novel treatment option following further investigation in other animal models of epilepsy and preclinical studies. PMID:19236860

  1. A novel genetic programming approach for epileptic seizure detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Arpit; Tiwari, Aruna; Krishna, Ramesh; Varma, Vishaal

    2016-02-01

    The human brain is a delicate mix of neurons (brain cells), electrical impulses and chemicals, known as neurotransmitters. Any damage has the potential to disrupt the workings of the brain and cause seizures. These epileptic seizures are the manifestations of epilepsy. The electroencephalograph (EEG) signals register average neuronal activity from the cerebral cortex and label changes in activity over large areas. A detailed analysis of these electroencephalograph (EEG) signals provides valuable insights into the mechanisms instigating epileptic disorders. Moreover, the detection of interictal spikes and epileptic seizures in an EEG signal plays an important role in the diagnosis of epilepsy. Automatic seizure detection methods are required, as these epileptic seizures are volatile and unpredictable. This paper deals with an automated detection of epileptic seizures in EEG signals using empirical mode decomposition (EMD) for feature extraction and proposes a novel genetic programming (GP) approach for classifying the EEG signals. Improvements in the standard GP approach are made using a Constructive Genetic Programming (CGP) in which constructive crossover and constructive subtree mutation operators are introduced. A hill climbing search is integrated in crossover and mutation operators to remove the destructive nature of these operators. A new concept of selecting the Globally Prime offspring is also presented to select the best fitness offspring generated during crossover. To decrease the time complexity of GP, a new dynamic fitness value computation (DFVC) is employed to increase the computational speed. We conducted five different sets of experiments to evaluate the performance of the proposed model in the classification of different mixtures of normal, interictal and ictal signals, and the accuracies achieved are outstandingly high. The experimental results are compared with the existing methods on same datasets, and these results affirm the potential use of

  2. A novel genetic programming approach for epileptic seizure detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Arpit; Tiwari, Aruna; Krishna, Ramesh; Varma, Vishaal

    2016-02-01

    The human brain is a delicate mix of neurons (brain cells), electrical impulses and chemicals, known as neurotransmitters. Any damage has the potential to disrupt the workings of the brain and cause seizures. These epileptic seizures are the manifestations of epilepsy. The electroencephalograph (EEG) signals register average neuronal activity from the cerebral cortex and label changes in activity over large areas. A detailed analysis of these electroencephalograph (EEG) signals provides valuable insights into the mechanisms instigating epileptic disorders. Moreover, the detection of interictal spikes and epileptic seizures in an EEG signal plays an important role in the diagnosis of epilepsy. Automatic seizure detection methods are required, as these epileptic seizures are volatile and unpredictable. This paper deals with an automated detection of epileptic seizures in EEG signals using empirical mode decomposition (EMD) for feature extraction and proposes a novel genetic programming (GP) approach for classifying the EEG signals. Improvements in the standard GP approach are made using a Constructive Genetic Programming (CGP) in which constructive crossover and constructive subtree mutation operators are introduced. A hill climbing search is integrated in crossover and mutation operators to remove the destructive nature of these operators. A new concept of selecting the Globally Prime offspring is also presented to select the best fitness offspring generated during crossover. To decrease the time complexity of GP, a new dynamic fitness value computation (DFVC) is employed to increase the computational speed. We conducted five different sets of experiments to evaluate the performance of the proposed model in the classification of different mixtures of normal, interictal and ictal signals, and the accuracies achieved are outstandingly high. The experimental results are compared with the existing methods on same datasets, and these results affirm the potential use of

  3. SST data assimilation experiments using an adaptive variational method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    An adaptive variational data assimilation method is proposed by Zhu and Kamachi[1]. This method can adaptively adjust the model state without knowing explicitly the model error covariance matrix. The method enables very flexible ways to form some reduced order problems. A proper reduced order problem not only reduces computational burden but also leads to corrections that are more consistent with the model dynamics that trends to produce better forecast. These features make the adaptive variational method a good candidate for SST data assimilation because the model error of an ocean model is usually difficult to estimate. We applied this method to an SST data assimilation problem using the LOTUS data sets and an ocean mixed layer model (Mellor-Yamada level 2.5). Results of assimilation experiments showed good skill of improvement subsurface temperatures by assimilating surface observation alone.

  4. Explosive Blast Neuropathology and Seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Krisztian eKovacs

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI due to explosive blast exposure is a leading combat casualty. It is also implicated as a key contributor to war related mental health diseases. A clinically important consequence of all types of TBI is a high risk for development of seizures and epilepsy. Seizures have been reported in patients who have suffered blast injuries in the Global War on Terror but the exact prevalence is unknown. The occurrence of seizures supports the contention that explosive blast leads to both cellular and structural brain pathology. Unfortunately, the exact mechanism by which explosions cause brain injury is unclear, which complicates development of meaningful therapies and mitigation strategies. To help improve understanding, detailed neuropathological analysis is needed. For this, histopathological techniques are extremely valuable and indispensable. In the following we will review the pathological results, including those from immunohistochemical and special staining approaches, from recent preclinical explosive blast studies.

  5. Temperature, age, and recurrence of febrile seizure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Stuijvenberg (Margriet); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); G. Derksen-Lubsen (Gerarda); H.A. Moll (Henriëtte)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: Prediction of a recurrent febrile seizure during subsequent episodes of fever. DESIGN: Study of the data of the temperatures, seizure recurrences, and baseline patient characteristics that were collected at a randomized placebo controlled trial of ibuprofen s

  6. Risk of Seizure Recurrence with Neurocysticercosis

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2002-01-01

    The risk of seizure recurrence after a first seizure due to neurocysticercosis (NC) was evaluated in a prospective study of 77 patients at the School of Medicine and Research Institute, University of Cuenca, Ecuador, and Columbia University, New York.

  7. Neonatal Seizures. Advances in Mechanisms and Management.

    OpenAIRE

    Glass, HC

    2013-01-01

    Seizures occur in approximately 1–5 per 1,000 live births, and are among the most common neurologic conditions managed by a neonatal neurocritical care service. There are several, age-specific factors that are particular to the developing brain, which influence excitability and seizure generation, response to medications, and impact of seizures on brain structure and function. Neonatal seizures are often associated with serious underlying brain injury such as hypoxia-ischemia, stroke or hemor...

  8. Assimilation in multilingual cities

    OpenAIRE

    Ortega, Javier; Verdugo, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    International audience We characterise how the assimilation patterns of minorities into the strong and the weak language differ in a situation of asymmetric bilingualism. Using large variations in language composition in Canadian cities from the 2001 and 2006 Censuses, we show that the differences in the knowledge of English by immigrant allophones (i.e. the immigrants with a mother tongue other than English and French) in English-majority cities are mainly due to sorting across cities. In...

  9. CASE REPORT: Assimilation of Atlas in Indian Dry Skulls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surekha D Jadhav

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A congenital fusion of the atlas to the base of the occiput is defined as assimilation of atlas. It may produce narrowingof foramen magnum which may compress the spinal cord or brain stem. Rarely, it also results in vertebral artery compression, leading todizziness, seizures and syncope. Multiple variations of partial assimilation have been reported and may involve any aspect of atlantooccipital articulation. Therefore the knowledge of such anomaly is essential for orthopedic, anesthetist, and clinician.Aims and Objectives: Aim of the present study was to find the incidence of assimilation of atlas in Indian dry adult skulls of unknown sex and age for which 150 skulls were examined. Results: Only in one skull, we observed fusion of atlas vertebra with occipital bone. The posterior arch and two superior facets of atlashad completely fused with the occipital condyles. The anterior arch had incompletely fused with occipital bone, showing nonunion inthe midline. Only right transverse process was fused with occipital bone. Conclusions: Assimilation of atlas may cause orthopedic problems and occasionally it produces neurological effects especially when the lumen of foramen magnum is reduced. Therefore, improved knowledge on the fusion of the atlas with the occipital bone is important in clinical practice as it shows multiple variations and combinations.

  10. Types of Seizures Affecting Individuals with TSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... head from injury. Turn on side to keep airway clear. Reassure when consciousness returns. Time the event If single seizure lasted less than 5 minutes, ask the person if hospital evaluation is wanted. If multiple seizures, or if one seizure lasts ...

  11. Seizures after stroke : a prospective clinical study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhanuka A

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is one of the most common causes of epilepsy in elderly. However, there have been very few prospective studies to define the incidence, pattern and outcome of seizures in stroke. Most studies are based on retrospective analysis of hospital records. Hence, we planned this prospective study to see the clinical, radiological and electroencephalographic characteristics of seizures in stroke and their outcome, from a north Indian tertiary care centre. Over a span of approximately 6 years, 269 consecutive patients with stroke were studied and followed up. Thirty-five (13% of these developed seizures, primarily related to stroke, during mean follow up period of 15.9 months. Twenty of these had infarctions while 15 had haemorrhages. Involvement of the cortical region was seen in most of the patients with seizures. In these patients, 86% of the lesions involved cortical areas exclusively or in addition to subcortical areas on CT scan of the brain. Twenty-seven (77% developed early seizures, two third of them had immediate post-stroke seizures. None of the patients with early onset seizures developed recurrent seizures or epilepsy, while 50% of late onset seizures developed epilepsy. No specific EEG pattern was found in those who later developed epilepsy. In the present study, early onset seizures after stroke were rather common and did not affect outcome and did not recur even when not treated with anti-epileptics. Late onset seizures were less common but were associated with recurrent seizures.

  12. Assimilation characteristics of vanadium ferroalloys in liquid steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The assimilation characteristics of various vanadium ferroalloys were identified in a ''dynamic way'' using the load cell technique. The ferrovanadium alloys which have a vanadium content less than 68 wt % belong to class 1 ferroalloys. They utilize a melting mechanism during their assimilation in liquid steel. The ferrovanadium alloys which have a vanadium content greater than 68 wt % belong to class 2 ferroalloys. These follow a dissolution mechanism during their assimilation in liquid steel. Their mass transfer kinetics is at least seven times slower than the previously mentioned ferrovanadium alloys

  13. Snow Radiance Assimilation Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, E. J.; Durand, M. T.; Toure, A.; Margulis, S. A.; Goita, K.; Royer, A.; Lu, H.

    2009-12-01

    Passive microwave-based retrievals of terrestrial snow parameters from satellite observations form a 30-year global record which will continue for the forseeable future. So far, these snow retrievals have been generated primarily by regression-based empirical “inversion” methods based on snapshots in time, and are limited to footprints around 25 km in diameter. Assimilation of microwave radiances into physical land surface models may be used to create a retrieval framework that is inherently self-consistent with respect to model physics as well as a more physically-based approach vs. legacy retrieval/inversion methods. This radiance assimilation approach has been used for years for atmospheric parameters by the operational weather forecasting community with great success, and represents one motivation for our work. A radiance assimilation scheme for snow requires a snowpack land surface model (LSM) coupled to a radiative transfer model (RTM). In previous local-scale studies, Durand, Kim, & Margulis (2008) explored the requirements on LSM model fidelity (i.e., snowpack state information) required in order for the RTM to produce brightness temperatures suitable for radiance assimilation purposes at a local scale, using the well-known Microwave Emission Model for Layered Snowpacks (MEMLS) as the RTM and a combination of Simple SIB (SSiB) and Snow Atmosphere (SAST) as the LSM. They also demonstrated improvement of simulated snow depth through the use of an ensemble Kalman filter scheme at this local scale (2009). This modeling framework reflects another motivation—namely, possibilities for downscaling. Our focus at this stage has been at the local scale where high-quality ground truth data is available in order to evaluate radiance assimilation under a “best case scenario.” The quantitative results then form a benchmark for future assessment of effects such as sparse forcing data, upscaling/downscaling, forest attenuation, and model details. Field data from

  14. Are Epileptic Seizures Quakes of the Brain? An Approach by Means of Nonextensive Tsallis Statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Eftaxias, K; Athanasopoulou, L; Kalimeri, M; Potirakis, S M; Balasis, G

    2011-01-01

    The field of study of complex systems holds that the dynamics of complex systems are founded on universal principles that may used to describe a great variety of scientific and technological approaches of different types of natural, artificial, and social systems. Authors have suggested that earthquake dynamics and neurodynamics can be analyzed within similar mathematical frameworks, a claim further supported by recent evidence. The purpose of this paper is to suggest a shift in emphasis from the large to the small in the search for a dynamical analogy between seizure and earthquake. Our analyses focus on a single epileptic seizure generation and the activation of a single fault (earthquake) and not on the statistics of sequences of different seizures and earthquakes. A central property of the epileptic seizure / earthquake generation is the occurrence of coherent large-scale collective behaviour with very rich structure, resulting from repeated nonlinear interactions among the constituents of the system, res...

  15. Autoregressive Models of Background Errors for Chemical Data Assimilation

    OpenAIRE

    Constantinescu, Emil M.; Chai, Tianfeng; Sandu, Adrian; Gregory R. Carmichael

    2006-01-01

    The task of providing an optimal analysis of the state of the atmosphere requires the development of dynamic data-driven systems that efficiently integrate the observational data and the models. Data assimilation (DA) is the process of adjusting the states or parameters of a model in such a way that its outcome (prediction) is close, in some distance metric, to observed (real) states. It is widely accepted that a key ingredient of successful data assimilation is a realistic estimation of th...

  16. Nonlinear analysis of EEG for epileptic seizures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hively, L.M.; Clapp, N.E.; Daw, C.S.; Lawkins, W.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Eisenstadt, M.L. [Knoxville Neurology Clinic, St. Mary`s Medical Center, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1995-04-01

    We apply chaotic time series analysis (CTSA) to human electroencephalogram (EEG) data. Three epoches were examined: epileptic seizure, non-seizure, and transition from non-seizure to seizure. The CTSA tools were applied to four forms of these data: raw EEG data (e-data), artifact data (f-data) via application of a quadratic zero-phase filter of the raw data, artifact-filtered data (g- data) and that was the residual after subtracting f-data from e-data, and a low-pass-filtered version (h-data) of g-data. Two different seizures were analyzed for the same patient. Several nonlinear measures uniquely indicate an epileptic seizure in both cases, including an abrupt decrease in the time per wave cycle in f-data, an abrupt increase in the Kolmogorov entropy and in the correlation dimension for e-h data, and an abrupt increase in the correlation dimension for e-h data. The transition from normal to seizure state also is characterized by distinctly different trends in the nonlinear measures for each seizure and may be potential seizure predictors for this patient. Surrogate analysis of e-data shows that statistically significant nonlinear structure is present during the non-seizure, transition , and seizure epoches.

  17. Glycolysis in energy metabolism during seizures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Heng Yang; Jiongxing Wu; Ren Guo; Yufen Peng; Wen Zheng; Ding Liu; Zhi Song

    2013-01-01

    Studies have shown that glycolysis increases during seizures, and that the glycolytic metabolite lactic acid can be used as an energy source. However, how lactic acid provides energy for seizures and how it can participate in the termination of seizures remains unclear. We reviewed possible mechanisms of glycolysis involved in seizure onset. Results showed that lactic acid was involved in seizure onset and provided energy at early stages. As seizures progress, lactic acid reduces the pH of tissue and induces metabolic acidosis, which terminates the seizure. The specific mechanism of lactic acid-induced acidosis involves several aspects, which include lactic acid-induced inhibition of the glycolytic enzyme 6-diphosphate kinase-1, inhibition of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor, activation of the acid-sensitive 1A ion channel, strengthening of the receptive mechanism of the inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid, and changes in the intra- and extracellular environment.

  18. Data assimilation in hydrological modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Drecourt, Jean-Philippe; Rosbjerg, Dan

    2004-01-01

    Data assimilation is an invaluable tool in hydrological modelling as it allows to efficiently combine scarce data with a numerical model to obtain improved model predictions. In addition, data assimilation also provides an uncertainty analysis of the predictions made by the hydrological model. In this thesis, the Kalman filter is used for data assimilation with a focus on groundwater modelling. However the developed techniques are general and can be applied also in other modelling domains. Mo...

  19. Assimilation: central and peripheral effects

    OpenAIRE

    Weert, C.M.M. de; Kruysbergen, N.A.W.H. van

    1997-01-01

    Assimilation and contrast have opposite effects: Contrast leads to an increase of perceived differences between neighbouring fields, whereas assimilation leads to a reduction. It is relatively easy to demonstrate these effects, but the precise localisation of these effects in the perceptual system is not yet possible. In an experiment the strength of assimilation effects was modified by adding spatial noise. By varying the localisation in perceived space of the added noise (by presentation of...

  20. Sensitivity of simulated terrestrial carbon assimilation and canopy transpiration to different stomatal conductance and carbon assimilation schemes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Haishan [Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Key Laboratory of Meteorological Disaster of Ministry of Education, Nanjing (China); Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Atlanta, GA (United States); Dickinson, Robert E. [Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Atlanta, GA (United States); The University of Texas at Austin, Department of Geological Sciences, Austin, TX (United States); Dai, Yongjiu [Beijing Normal University, State Key Laboratory of Earth Surface Processes and Resource Ecology, School of Global Change and Earth System Science, Beijing (China); Zhou, Liming [Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2011-03-15

    Accurate simulations of terrestrial carbon assimilation and canopy transpiration are needed for both climate modeling and vegetation dynamics. Coupled stomatal conductance and carbon assimilation (A - g{sub s}) models have been widely used as part of land surface parameterizations in climate models to describe the biogeophysical and biogeochemical roles of terrestrial vegetation. Differences in various A - g{sub s} schemes produce substantial differences in the estimation of carbon assimilation and canopy transpiration, as well as in other land-atmosphere fluxes. The terrestrial carbon assimilation and canopy transpiration simulated by two different representative A - g{sub s} schemes, a simple A-g{sub s} scheme adopted from the treatments of the NCAR model (Scheme I) and a two-big-leaf A - g{sub s} scheme newly developed by Dai et al. (J Clim 17:2281-2299, 2004) (Scheme II), are compared via some sensitivity experiments to investigate impacts of different A - g{sub s} schemes on the simulations. Major differences are found in the estimate of canopy carbon assimilation rate, canopy conductance and canopy transpiration between the two schemes, primarily due to differences in (a) functional forms used to estimate parameters for carbon assimilation sub-models, (b) co-limitation methods used to estimate carbon assimilation rate from the three limiting rates, and (c) leaf-to-canopy scaling schemes. On the whole, the differences in the scaling approach are the largest contributor to the simulation discrepancies, but the different methods of co-limitation of assimilation rate also impact the results. Except for a few biomes, the residual effects caused by the different parameter estimations in assimilation sub-models are relatively small. It is also noted that the two-leaf temperature scheme produces distinctly different sunlit and shaded leaf temperatures but has negligible impacts on the simulation of the carbon assimilation. (orig.)

  1. Regional Ocean Data Assimilation

    KAUST Repository

    Edwards, Christopher A.

    2015-01-03

    This article reviews the past 15 years of developments in regional ocean data assimilation. A variety of scientific, management, and safety-related objectives motivate marine scientists to characterize many ocean environments, including coastal regions. As in weather prediction, the accurate representation of physical, chemical, and/or biological properties in the ocean is challenging. Models and observations alone provide imperfect representations of the ocean state, but together they can offer improved estimates. Variational and sequential methods are among the most widely used in regional ocean systems, and there have been exciting recent advances in ensemble and four-dimensional variational approaches. These techniques are increasingly being tested and adapted for biogeochemical applications.

  2. Integrated Data Assimilation Architecture Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Integrated Data Assimilation Architecture (IDAA) is a middleware architecture that facilitates the incorporation of heterogeneous sensing and control devices...

  3. Integrated Data Assimilation Architecture Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Integrated Data Assimilation Architecture (IDAA) addresses the fundamental problem of command, control, and communications systems interoperability....

  4. Seizure-induced disinhibition of the HPA axis increases seizure susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Toole, Kate K; Hooper, Andrew; Wakefield, Seth; Maguire, Jamie

    2014-01-01

    Stress is the most commonly reported precipitating factor for seizures. The proconvulsant actions of stress hormones are thought to mediate the effects of stress on seizure susceptibility. Interestingly, epileptic patients have increased basal levels of stress hormones, including corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and corticosterone, which are further increased following seizures. Given the proconvulsant actions of stress hormones, we proposed that seizure-induced activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis may contribute to future seizure susceptibility. Consistent with this hypothesis, our data demonstrate that pharmacological induction of seizures in mice with kainic acid or pilocarpine increases circulating levels of the stress hormone, corticosterone, and exogenous corticosterone administration is sufficient to increase seizure susceptibility. However, the mechanism(s) whereby seizures activate the HPA axis remain unknown. Here we demonstrate that seizure-induced activation of the HPA axis involves compromised GABAergic control of CRH neurons, which govern HPA axis function. Following seizure activity, there is a collapse of the chloride gradient due to changes in NKCC1 and KCC2 expression, resulting in reduced amplitude of sIPSPs and even depolarizing effects of GABA on CRH neurons. Seizure-induced activation of the HPA axis results in future seizure susceptibility which can be blocked by treatment with an NKCC1 inhibitor, bumetanide, or blocking the CRH signaling with Antalarmin. These data suggest that compromised GABAergic control of CRH neurons following an initial seizure event may cause hyperexcitability of the HPA axis and increase future seizure susceptibility.

  5. Dynamical Downscaling of Climate Change Impacts on Wind Energy Resources in the Contiguous United States by Using a Limited-Area Model with Scale-Selective Data Assimilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available By using a limited-area model (LAM in combination with the scale-selective data assimilation (SSDA approach, wind energy resources in the contiguous United States (CONUS were downscaled from IPCC CCSM3 global model projections for both current and future climate conditions. An assessment of climate change impacts on wind energy resources in the CONUS region was then conducted. Based on the downscaling results, when projecting into future climate under IPCC’s A1B scenario, the average annual wind speed experiences an overall shift across the CONUS region. From the current climate to the 2040s, the average annual wind speed is expected to increase from 0.1 to 0.2 m s−1 over the Great Plains, Northern Great Lakes Region, and Southwestern United States located southwest of the Rocky Mountains. When projecting into the 2090s from current climate, there is an overall increase in the Great Plains Region and Southwestern United States located southwest of the Rockies with a mean wind speed increase between 0 and 0.1 m s−1, while, the Northern Great Lakes Region experiences an even greater increase from current climate to 2090s than over the first few decades with an increase of mean wind speed from 0.1 to 0.4 m s−1.

  6. Smartphone applications for seizure management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandher, Puneet Singh; Bhullar, Karamdeep Kaur

    2016-06-01

    Technological advancements continue to provide innovative ways of enhancing patient care in medicine. In particular, the growing popularity of smartphone technology has seen the recent emergence of a myriad of healthcare applications (or apps) that promise to help shape the way in which health information is delivered to people worldwide. While limited research already exists on a range of such apps, our study is the first to examine the salient features of smartphone applications as they apply to the area of seizure management. For the purposes of this review, we conducted a search of the official online application stores of the five major smartphone platforms: iPhone, Android, Blackberry, Windows Mobile and Nokia-Symbian. Apps were included if they reported to contain some information or tools relating to seizure management and excluded if they were aimed exclusively at health professionals. A total of 28 applications met these criteria. Overall, we found an increasing number of epilepsy apps available on the smartphone market, but with only a minority offering comprehensive educational information alongside tools such as seizure diaries, medication tracking and/or video recording.

  7. Smartphone applications for seizure management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandher, Puneet Singh; Bhullar, Karamdeep Kaur

    2016-06-01

    Technological advancements continue to provide innovative ways of enhancing patient care in medicine. In particular, the growing popularity of smartphone technology has seen the recent emergence of a myriad of healthcare applications (or apps) that promise to help shape the way in which health information is delivered to people worldwide. While limited research already exists on a range of such apps, our study is the first to examine the salient features of smartphone applications as they apply to the area of seizure management. For the purposes of this review, we conducted a search of the official online application stores of the five major smartphone platforms: iPhone, Android, Blackberry, Windows Mobile and Nokia-Symbian. Apps were included if they reported to contain some information or tools relating to seizure management and excluded if they were aimed exclusively at health professionals. A total of 28 applications met these criteria. Overall, we found an increasing number of epilepsy apps available on the smartphone market, but with only a minority offering comprehensive educational information alongside tools such as seizure diaries, medication tracking and/or video recording. PMID:25038202

  8. Effective actions for statistical data assimilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data assimilation is a problem in estimating the fixed parameters and state of a model of an observed dynamical system as it receives inputs from measurements passing information to the model. Using methods developed in statistical physics, we present effective actions and equations of motion for the mean orbits associated with the temporal development of a dynamical model when it has errors, there is uncertainty in its initial state, and it receives information from noisy measurements. If there are statistical dependences among errors in the measurements they can be included in this approach.

  9. A novel seizure detection algorithm informed by hidden Markov model event states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldassano, Steven; Wulsin, Drausin; Ung, Hoameng; Blevins, Tyler; Brown, Mesha-Gay; Fox, Emily; Litt, Brian

    2016-06-01

    Objective. Recently the FDA approved the first responsive, closed-loop intracranial device to treat epilepsy. Because these devices must respond within seconds of seizure onset and not miss events, they are tuned to have high sensitivity, leading to frequent false positive stimulations and decreased battery life. In this work, we propose a more robust seizure detection model. Approach. We use a Bayesian nonparametric Markov switching process to parse intracranial EEG (iEEG) data into distinct dynamic event states. Each event state is then modeled as a multidimensional Gaussian distribution to allow for predictive state assignment. By detecting event states highly specific for seizure onset zones, the method can identify precise regions of iEEG data associated with the transition to seizure activity, reducing false positive detections associated with interictal bursts. The seizure detection algorithm was translated to a real-time application and validated in a small pilot study using 391 days of continuous iEEG data from two dogs with naturally occurring, multifocal epilepsy. A feature-based seizure detector modeled after the NeuroPace RNS System was developed as a control. Main results. Our novel seizure detection method demonstrated an improvement in false negative rate (0/55 seizures missed versus 2/55 seizures missed) as well as a significantly reduced false positive rate (0.0012 h versus 0.058 h-1). All seizures were detected an average of 12.1 ± 6.9 s before the onset of unequivocal epileptic activity (unequivocal epileptic onset (UEO)). Significance. This algorithm represents a computationally inexpensive, individualized, real-time detection method suitable for implantable antiepileptic devices that may considerably reduce false positive rate relative to current industry standards.

  10. Probabilistic forecasting and Bayesian data assimilation

    CERN Document Server

    Reich, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    In this book the authors describe the principles and methods behind probabilistic forecasting and Bayesian data assimilation. Instead of focusing on particular application areas, the authors adopt a general dynamical systems approach, with a profusion of low-dimensional, discrete-time numerical examples designed to build intuition about the subject. Part I explains the mathematical framework of ensemble-based probabilistic forecasting and uncertainty quantification. Part II is devoted to Bayesian filtering algorithms, from classical data assimilation algorithms such as the Kalman filter, variational techniques, and sequential Monte Carlo methods, through to more recent developments such as the ensemble Kalman filter and ensemble transform filters. The McKean approach to sequential filtering in combination with coupling of measures serves as a unifying mathematical framework throughout Part II. Assuming only some basic familiarity with probability, this book is an ideal introduction for graduate students in ap...

  11. Assimilate Partitioning and Plant Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-Ling Ruan; John W.Patrick; Hans Weber

    2010-01-01

    @@ It has been a pleasure to organize this special issue of Molecular Plant on 'Assimilate Partitioning and Plant Development'. Assimilate, a collective term describing organic carbon (C) and nitrogen (N), is of paramount importance for plant development and realization of crop productivity.

  12. EPSP depression following neocortical seizures in cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nita, Dragos A; Cissé, Youssouf; Timofeev, Igor

    2008-04-01

    To study the possible mechanism(s) underlying unresponsiveness following neocortical seizures, we recorded excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) of cortical neurons evoked by ipsilateral cortical stimulation before and after spontaneous or elicited seizures. Regular-spiking neurons (n = 32) were intracellularly recorded in association area five of cats under ketamine-xylazine or barbiturate anesthesia. Compared with control responses, cortically evoked EPSPs were characterized by decreased amplitude after electrographic seizures. Synaptic responses and intrinsic properties were measured by applying extracellular electrical stimuli followed by intracellular hyperpolarizing current pulses. The input resistance decreased during seizures but quickly recovered to control level after the paroxysms, whereas the amplitude of evoked EPSPs remained lower following seizures, generally for 2-12 min, suggesting that the decreased EPSPs were not due to an alteration of intrinsic response. Data demonstrate a long-lasting decreased synaptic responsiveness following generalized spike-wave seizures slowly recovering in time. PMID:18031546

  13. Visual reflex seizures induced by complex stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zifkin, Benjamin G; Inoue, Yushi

    2004-01-01

    Visual reflex seizures induced by complex stimuli may be triggered by patterned and flashing displays that are now ubiquitous. The seizures may be clinically generalized, but unilateral and bilateral myoclonic attacks also may be triggered, especially in patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy, and recently, clearly focal reflex occipital lobe seizures have been described. Some seizure-triggering properties of video displays can be identified, such as perceived brightness, pattern, flicker frequency, and color. Knowledge of these is useful in planning individual treatment and in designing regulations for screen content of television broadcasts or for other video displays. Some subjects will also be sensitive to cognitive or action-programming activation, especially when playing video games, and this can increase the chance of seizure triggering. Nonspecific factors such as sleep deprivation, prolonged exposure, and drug or alcohol use also may play a role in reflex seizure occurrence. PMID:14706042

  14. Spatial Assimilation in Denmark?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Hans Skifter

    2010-01-01

    In most European countries ethnic minorities have had a tendency to settle in certain parts of cities, and often in social housing, together with other immigrants in so-called multiethnic neighbourhoods. An explanation for this could be low income combined with lack of knowledge of the housing...... market and discrimination, which limits the housing possibilities for ethnic minorities. Another explanation could be that immigrants for different reasons choose to settle in so-called ethnic enclaves where they can find an ethnic social network, which can support them in their new country. In...... traditional research literature about immigration it has been shown that for many immigrants living in enclaves has been a temporary situation. The 'spatial assimilation theory' says that this situation ends when the family has become more integrated in the new society and then moves to other parts of the...

  15. Nonlinear data assimilation

    CERN Document Server

    Van Leeuwen, Peter Jan; Reich, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    This book contains two review articles on nonlinear data assimilation that deal with closely related topics but were written and can be read independently. Both contributions focus on so-called particle filters. The first contribution by Jan van Leeuwen focuses on the potential of proposal densities. It discusses the issues with present-day particle filters and explorers new ideas for proposal densities to solve them, converging to particle filters that work well in systems of any dimension, closing the contribution with a high-dimensional example. The second contribution by Cheng and Reich discusses a unified framework for ensemble-transform particle filters. This allows one to bridge successful ensemble Kalman filters with fully nonlinear particle filters, and allows a proper introduction of localization in particle filters, which has been lacking up to now.

  16. Orgasm Induced Seizures: A Rare Phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaukimath, S P; Patil, P S

    2015-01-01

    A variety of stimuli can cause reflex seizures, Some triggers include light, music and cognitive phenomenon. There are case reports however where the phenomenon of sexual activity has been a trigger for epileptic seizures. Most of these cases reported are in women so far, and were found to be localized to right cerebral hemisphere. We report a case of a 36-year-old male with orgasm-induced seizures, with other atypical features compared to majority of previous reports. PMID:27057393

  17. Moxifloxacin Induced Seizures -A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Jiana Shi; Huimin Xu

    2014-01-01

    Abstract A 73-year-old female patient developed a generalized tonic-clonic seizure on the 6th day after treatment with moxifloxacin 400 mg daily intravenously for appendicitis. This patient had atrial fibrillation and history of a surgery for intracerebral hemorrhage, with impaired renal function and liver function, but without history of seizures. Moxifloxacin was discontinued and switched to cefuroxime. The patient remained seizure-free at discharge four days later. The naranjo adverse drug...

  18. The HBM-PDAF assimilation system for operational forecasts in the North and Baltic Seas

    OpenAIRE

    Nerger, Lars; Loza, Svetlana; Brüning, Thorger; Janssen, Frank

    2014-01-01

    To improve hydrographic forecasts in the North and Baltic Seas, the HIROMB-BOOS Model (HBM) has been coupled with the Parallel Data Assimilation Framework PDAF (http://pdaf.awi.de). The forecast system assimilates satellite sea surface temperature as well as in situ data of temperature and salinity profiles to initialize forecasts up to 5 days. The assimilation uses a fully-featured ensemble Kalman filter, which dynamically estimates the uncertainty of the state estimate with an ensemble mode...

  19. Stability and task complexity: a neural network model of genetic assimilation

    OpenAIRE

    Watson, J.; Geard, N; Wiles, J

    2002-01-01

    Since Hinton and Nowlan introduced the Baldwin effect to the evolutionary computation community, agent-based studies of genetic assimilation have uncovered many details of the dynamic processes involved. In a previous paper, we demonstrated genetic assimilation with a simple food/toxin discrimination task using neural network agents that could evolve their learning rate. The study reported in this paper investigated the genetic assimilation of more complex learning tasks. Kauffman's NK landsc...

  20. Data Assimilation and Model Evaluation Experiment Datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chung-Chieng A.; Qian, Wen; Glenn, Scott M.

    1994-05-01

    The Institute for Naval Oceanography, in cooperation with Naval Research Laboratories and universities, executed the Data Assimilation and Model Evaluation Experiment (DAMÉE) for the Gulf Stream region during fiscal years 1991-1993. Enormous effort has gone into the preparation of several high-quality and consistent datasets for model initialization and verification. This paper describes the preparation process, the temporal and spatial scopes, the contents, the structure, etc., of these datasets.The goal of DAMEE and the need of data for the four phases of experiment are briefly stated. The preparation of DAMEE datasets consisted of a series of processes: 1)collection of observational data; 2) analysis and interpretation; 3) interpolation using the Optimum Thermal Interpolation System package; 4) quality control and re-analysis; and 5) data archiving and software documentation.The data products from these processes included a time series of 3D fields of temperature and salinity, 2D fields of surface dynamic height and mixed-layer depth, analysis of the Gulf Stream and rings system, and bathythermograph profiles. To date, these are the most detailed and high-quality data for mesoscale ocean modeling, data assimilation, and forecasting research. Feedback from ocean modeling groups who tested this data was incorporated into its refinement.Suggestions for DAMEE data usages include 1) ocean modeling and data assimilation studies, 2) diagnosis and theorectical studies, and 3) comparisons with locally detailed observations.

  1. Complex partial seizures: cerebellar metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theodore, W.H.; Fishbein, D.; Deitz, M.; Baldwin, P.

    1987-07-01

    We used positron emission tomography (PET) with (/sup 18/F)2-deoxyglucose to study cerebellar glucose metabolism (LCMRglu) and the effect of phenytoin (PHT) in 42 patients with complex partial seizures (CPS), and 12 normal controls. Mean +/- SD patient LCMRglu was 6.9 +/- 1.8 mg glucose/100 g/min (left = right), significantly lower than control values of 8.5 +/- 1.8 (left, p less than 0.006), and 8.3 +/- 1.6 (right, p less than 0.02). Only four patients had cerebellar atrophy on CT/MRI; cerebellar LCMRglu in these was 5.5 +/- 1.5 (p = 0.054 vs. total patient sample). Patients with unilateral temporal hypometabolism or EEG foci did not have lateralized cerebellar hypometabolism. Patients receiving phenytoin (PHT) at the time of scan and patients with less than 5 years total PHT exposure had lower LCMRglu, but the differences were not significant. There were weak inverse correlations between PHT level and cerebellar LCMRglu in patients receiving PHT (r = -0.36; 0.05 less than p less than 0.1), as well as between length of illness and LCMRglu (r = -0.22; 0.05 less than p less than 0.1). Patients with complex partial seizures have cerebellar hypometabolism that is bilateral and due only in part to the effect of PHT.

  2. Diagnosing Functional Seizures in Children and Adolescent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wichaidit, Bianca Taaning; Rask, Charlotte Ulrikka; Ostergaard, John R

    2014-01-01

    Functional seizures (FS) is a condition where the child experiences seizure-like events, without abnormal electrical discharge as measured by EEG, and with high risk of misdiagnosis. Diagnosing FS contains: 1) video-EEG, 2) anamnestic evaluation, focusing on the presence of psychosocial stressors...

  3. Occipital seizures presenting with bilateral visual loss

    OpenAIRE

    Hadjikoutis S; Sawhney I

    2003-01-01

    Transient visual loss may occur with occipital seizures as an ictal or post-ictal phenomenon. Its duration varies from less than one minute to days, or can be permanent. We describe a 61-year-old man presenting with headache, vomiting and bilateral visual loss. EEG revealed persistent spike discharge in the occipital lobes suggesting occipital seizures. His vision improved with carbamazepine.

  4. ROLE OF MRI IN EVALUATION OF SEIZURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avadhesh Pratap Singh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Seizure is a paroxysmal alteration in neurologic function resulting from abnormal excessive neuronal electrical activity. Epilepsy is a chronic condition characterized by recurrent seizures unprovoked by an acute systemic or neurologic insult.1 An epileptic seizure is a clinical manifestation of abnormal, excessive neuronal activity arising in the grey matter of the cerebral cortex. MATERIALS AND METHODS Prospective studies of 100 patients with clinical impression of seizures were examined by 1.5 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging. RESULT A total of 100 patients satisfying the inclusion criteria were included in the study. The age range of patients was from neonate to elderly with male predominance, male 64 (64% and female 36 (36%. GTCS was the most common clinical diagnosis constituting (80% cases. The common abnormalities were cerebral infarction with gliosis (16%, infections – NCC (7% and tuberculoma (10%, cerebral atrophy (1%, developmental cortical malformations (2%, venous thrombosis (4%, low-grade glioma (9%, meningioma (3%. CONCLUSION MRI is the investigation of choice in patients with seizure disorder. The sensitivity of MRI in detecting abnormalities in patients with seizure disorder is in part associated to the underlying pathologies and by the MRI techniques and experience of the interpreting physician. Accurate diagnosis of the cause of seizure is crucial for finding an effective treatment. With its high spatial resolution, excellent inherent soft tissue contrast, multiplanar imaging capability and lack of ionizing radiation, MR imaging has emerged as a versatile tool in the evaluation of patients with seizure disorder.

  5. Risk of Seizure Recurrence with Neurocysticercosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The risk of seizure recurrence after a first seizure due to neurocysticercosis (NC was evaluated in a prospective study of 77 patients at the School of Medicine and Research Institute, University of Cuenca, Ecuador, and Columbia University, New York.

  6. Transient inhibitory seizures mimicking crescendo TIAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H; Lerner, A

    1990-01-01

    Somatic inhibitory seizures are thought to occur rarely. We describe a patient with somatic inhibitory seizures who initially presented with a clinical picture of crescendo transient ischemic attacks. He did not improve with anticoagulation, but the episodes ceased promptly after the administration of an anticonvulsant.

  7. Effect of Seizure Clustering on Epilepsy Outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available A prospective, long-term population-based study was performed to determine whether seizure clustering (3 or more afebrile seizures during a 24 hour period is associated with drug resistance and increased mortality in childhood-onset epilepsy, in a study at University of Turku, Finland, and the Epilepsy Research Group, Berlin, Germany.

  8. Febrile Seizures: clinical and genetic studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Stuijvenberg (Margriet)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractFebrile seizures are described as a temporary seizure disorder of childhood; the attacks occur by definition in association with fever and are usually accompanied by sudden tonic-clonic muscle contractions and reduced consciousness, usually lasting not longer than 5 to 10 minutes. Accord

  9. Seizures and Epilepsy: Hope through Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... control with their medication. Seizure triggers include alcohol consumption or alcohol withdrawal, dehydration or missing meals, stress, ... treatment of epilepsy was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration ... stimulation or a fast-acting drug to prevent the seizure from occurring. ...

  10. Data assimilation in hydrological modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drecourt, Jean-Philippe

    Data assimilation is an invaluable tool in hydrological modelling as it allows to efficiently combine scarce data with a numerical model to obtain improved model predictions. In addition, data assimilation also provides an uncertainty analysis of the predictions made by the hydrological model...... with model non-linearities and biased errors. A literature review analyzes the most popular techniques and their application in hydrological modelling. Since bias is an important problem in groundwater modelling, two bias aware Kalman filters have been implemented and compared using an artificial test case....... In this thesis, the Kalman filter is used for data assimilation with a focus on groundwater modelling. However the developed techniques are general and can be applied also in other modelling domains. Modelling involves conceptualization of the processes of Nature. Data assimilation provides a way to deal...

  11. Global Land Data Assimilation System

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The goal of the Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS) is to ingest satellite- and ground-based observational data products, using advanced land surface...

  12. Global Data Assimilation System (GDAS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Global Data Assimilation System (GDAS) is the system used by the Global Forecast System (GFS) model to place observations into a gridded model space for the...

  13. WAVE ASSIMILATION AND NUMERICAL PREDICTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    An adjoint variational method for wave data assimilation in the LAGFD-WAM wave model is proposed. The adjoint equation of the wavenumber energy spectrum balance equation is derived. And fortunately, its characteristic equations are the same as those in the LAGFD-WAM wave model. Simple experiments on the functional optimization and assimilation effectiveness during the prediction period indicated that the adjoint variational method is effective for wave assimilation and that the initial optimization of the wave model is important for the short-range wave prediction. All of this is under the assumption that the wind field is accurate, the method is the important first step for combined wind and wave data assimilation systems.

  14. Seizure phenotypes, periodicity, and sleep-wake pattern of seizures in Kcna-1 null mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Samantha; Wallace, Eli; Hwang, Youngdeok; Maganti, Rama

    2016-02-01

    This study was undertaken to describe seizure phenotypes, natural progression, sleep-wake patterns, as well as periodicity of seizures in Kcna-1 null mutant mice. These mice were implanted with epidural electroencephalography (EEG) and electromyography (EMG) electrodes, and simultaneous video-EEG recordings were obtained while animals were individually housed under either diurnal (LD) condition or constant darkness (DD) over ten days of recording. The video-EEG data were analyzed to identify electrographic and behavioral phenotypes and natural progression and to examine the periodicity of seizures. Sleep-wake patterns were analyzed to understand the distribution and onset of seizures across the sleep-wake cycle. Four electrographically and behaviorally distinct seizure types were observed. Regardless of lighting condition that animals were housed in, Kcna-1 null mice initially expressed only a few of the most severe seizure types that progressively increased in frequency and decreased in seizure severity. In addition, a circadian periodicity was noted, with seizures peaking in the first 12h of the Zeitgeber time (ZT) cycle, regardless of lighting conditions. Interestingly, seizure onset differed between lighting conditions where more seizures arose out of sleep in LD conditions, whereas under DD conditions, the majority occurred out of the wakeful state. We suggest that this model be used to understand the circadian pattern of seizures as well as the pathophysiological implications of sleep and circadian disturbances in limbic epilepsies. PMID:26724401

  15. The Role of Seizure-Related SEZ6 as a Susceptibility Gene in Febrile Seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John C. Mulley

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sixty cases of febrile seizures from a Chinese cohort had previously been reported with a strong association between variants in the seizure-related (SEZ 6 gene and febrile seizures. They found a striking lack of genetic variation in their controls. We found genetic variation in SEZ6 at similar levels at the same DNA sequence positions in our 94 febrile seizure cases as in our 96 unaffected controls. Two of our febrile seizure cases carried rare variants predicted to have damaging consequences. Combined with some of the variants from the Chinese cohort, these data are compatible with a role for SEZ6 as a susceptibility gene for febrile seizures. However, the polygenic determinants underlying most cases of febrile seizures with complex inheritance remain to be determined.

  16. Deterministic treatment of model error in geophysical data assimilation

    CERN Document Server

    Carrassi, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes a novel approach for the treatment of model error in geophysical data assimilation. In this method, model error is treated as a deterministic process fully correlated in time. This allows for the derivation of the evolution equations for the relevant moments of the model error statistics required in data assimilation procedures, along with an approximation suitable for application to large numerical models typical of environmental science. In this contribution we first derive the equations for the model error dynamics in the general case, and then for the particular situation of parametric error. We show how this deterministic description of the model error can be incorporated in sequential and variational data assimilation procedures. A numerical comparison with standard methods is given using low-order dynamical systems, prototypes of atmospheric circulation, and a realistic soil model. The deterministic approach proves to be very competitive with only minor additional computational c...

  17. Ethnic goods and immigrant assimilation

    OpenAIRE

    Abdulloev, Ilhom; Epstein, Gil S.; Ira N. Gang

    2014-01-01

    Some immigrants try to keep their ethnicity hidden while others become ever deeply more mired in their home culture. We argue that among immigrants this struggle manifests itself in the ethnic goods they choose to consume. Different types of ethnic goods have vastly different effects on immigrant assimilation. We develop a simple theoretical model useful for capturing the consequences of this struggle, illustrating it with examples of Central Asian assimilation into the Muscovite economy.

  18. Data Assimilation Applications in Hydrology

    OpenAIRE

    Deliu, Ciprian; Giurma, Ion

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we review some data assimilation applications in hydrology and we investigate the benefits of applying the ensemble Kalman filter methods on a specific hydrodynamic model of a river network using the MIKE 11 software. We explore the efects of assimilating measurements from different locations (generated by a reference model) into a model forced with erroneous boundary conditions and also examine the effect of using coloured noise for describing uncertainty in the upstream bounda...

  19. Moxifloxacin Induced Seizures -A Case Report.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiana Shi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A 73-year-old female patient developed a generalized tonic-clonic seizure on the 6th day after treatment with moxifloxacin 400 mg daily intravenously for appendicitis. This patient had atrial fibrillation and history of a surgery for intracerebral hemorrhage, with impaired renal function and liver function, but without history of seizures. Moxifloxacin was discontinued and switched to cefuroxime. The patient remained seizure-free at discharge four days later. The naranjo adverse drug reaction probability scale score was 4, indicating a possible adverse reaction to moxifloxacin. The potential risk factors related to moxifloxacin-induced seizures are discussed. It highlights that preexisting central nervous system disease, elderly female with lower bodyweight and severe renal impairment may be the risk factors involved in moxifloxacin-induced seizures.

  20. Febrile seizures and risk of schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Mogens; Pedersen, Carsten Bøcker; Christensen, Jakob;

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Febrile seizure is a benign condition for most children, but experiments in animals and neuroimaging studies in humans suggest that some febrile seizures may damage the hippocampus, a brain area of possible importance in schizophrenia. METHODS: A population-based cohort of all children...... with schizophrenia. A history of febrile seizures was associated with a 44% increased risk of schizophrenia [relative risk (RR)=1.44; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.07-1.95] after adjusting for confounding factors. The association between febrile seizures and schizophrenia remained virtually unchanged when...... restricting the analyses to people with no history of epilepsy. A history of both febrile seizures and epilepsy was associated with a 204% increased risk of schizophrenia (RR=3.04; 95% CI, 1.36-6.79) as compared with people with no such history. CONCLUSIONS: We found a slightly increased risk of schizophrenia...

  1. Seizure detection algorithms based on EMG signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conradsen, Isa

    Background: the currently used non-invasive seizure detection methods are not reliable. Muscle fibers are directly connected to the nerves, whereby electric signals are generated during activity. Therefore, an alarm system on electromyography (EMG) signals is a theoretical possibility. Objective......: to show whether medical signal processing of EMG data is feasible for detection of epileptic seizures. Methods: EMG signals during generalised seizures were recorded from 3 patients (with 20 seizures in total). Two possible medical signal processing algorithms were tested. The first algorithm was based...... the frequency-based algorithm was efficient for detecting the seizures in the third patient. Conclusion: Our results suggest that EMG signals could be used to develop an automatic seizuredetection system. However, different patients might require different types of algorithms /approaches....

  2. Detection and Prediction of Epileptic Seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duun-Henriksen, Jonas

    monitoring of their brain waves. More specifically, three issues were investigated: The feasibility of automatic seizure prediction, optimization of automatic seizure detection algorithms, and the link between intra- and extracranial EEG. Regarding feasibility of automatic seizure prediction, neither...... seizure prediction algorithms. More promising results were obtained in the investigating of possible use of an outpatient EEG monitoring device for idiopathic generalized epilepsy patients. Combined with an automatic seizure detection algorithm such a device can give an objective account of the paroxysm...... detected without any false positive detections. This was obtained using a generic algorithm on the signals from only a single frontal channel. Applying the same algorithm architecture on EEG data from two outpatient children monitored for approximately three entire days each, the sensitivity was 90...

  3. The Life Time Prevalence of Childhood Seizure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P AlizadehTaheri

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Seizure is the most common pediatric neurologic disorder. Epidemiological studies of childhood epilepsy are of importance to compare incidence and prevalence rates, age distribution, inheritance, seizure types, epilepsy syn­dromes and treatment strategies. Since there is little information about prevalence of childhood seizure in Iran, this study was aimed to determine the life time prevalence of childhood seizure and some of its determining factors in Tehran, Iran."nMethods: In this cross sectional study, 2500 male and female students, aged 12 years or younger, studying in fifth grade of primary schools in district one of Ministry of Education were assessed by filling a preliminary questionnaire. Those who were categorized by the author as having a history of any form of seizure were assessed by a second questionnaire. The clinical form of seizure, the presumptive cause, positive family history and use of anti-convulsant drugs were recorded."nResults: The life time prevalence of seizure was 32/1000 population which was more prevalent in boys .Generalized seizure was the most common clinical form. Approximately 60% of cases reported febrile convulsion as the presumptive cause stated by the physician. Positive family history was reported in 29.6% of cases. Anti epileptic drugs were taken by 54% of students with a positive history of seizure."nConclusion: The results of this study show that the life time prevalence of seizure is relatively high in Iranian community, although the other factors were in concordance with other communities.

  4. Development of an EUV data assimilation technique for plasmasphere modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. The structure of the plasmasphere is strongly controlled by the electric field imposed on the magnetosphere. In order to model the dynamics of the plasmasphere, it is important to know the spatial structure of the electric potential in the inner magnetosphere. However, since it is difficult to know the global electric potential distribution in the magnetosphere due to the lack of observation, it is difficult to grasp the dynamics of the plasmasphere using in-situ measurements. Recently we have developed a data assimilation technique which incorporates a remote observation of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) from the IMAGE satellite into a ring current model. This ENA data assimilation technique provides estimates of the distributions of the ring current ions and electric potential in the inner magnetosphere. The present study is conducted aiming at applying a similar approach for modeling the plasmasphere. We are now engaged in the development of a data assimilation technique for providing estimates of the spatial structures of the plasmasphere and electric potential. The estimation is performed by incorporating remote imaging data of extreme ultra-violet (EUV) from the IMAGE satellite into a simulation model of the plasmasphere. We assume the magnetospheric electric potential distribution to be unknown, and estimate it in the course of the assimilation process. The plasmaspheric ion distribution is estimated according to the estimated electric potential and the plasmasphere simulation model. At present, we are conducting data assimilation experiments using artificial EUV data sets to evaluate the EUV data assimilation approach. The experimental result suggests that the data assimilation of the EUV imaging data provides useful information for understanding the temporal and spatial variations of the plasmasphere.

  5. Randomized, controlled trial of ibuprofen syrup administered during febrile illnesses to prevent febrile seizure recurrences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Stuijvenberg (Margriet); G. Derksen-Lubsen (Gerarda); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); J.D.F. Habbema (Dik); H.A. Moll (Henriëtte)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVES: Febrile seizures recur frequently. Factors increasing the risk of febrile seizure recurrence include young age at onset, family history of febrile seizures, previous recurrent febrile seizures, time lapse since previous seizure <6 months, relativ

  6. Nonepileptic seizures: an updated review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, David L; LaFrance, W Curt

    2016-06-01

    Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) are a functional neurological disorder/conversion disorder subtype, which are neurobehavioral conditions at the interface of neurology and psychiatry. Significant advancements over the past decade have been made in the diagnosis, management, and neurobiological understanding of PNES. This article reviews published PNES research focusing on semiologic features that distinguish PNES from epileptic seizures, consensus diagnostic criteria, the intersection of PNES and other comorbidities, neurobiological studies, evidence-based treatment interventions, and outcome studies. Epidemiology and healthcare utilization studies highlight a continued unmet medical need in the comprehensive care of PNES. Consensus guidelines for diagnostic certainty are based on clinical history, semiology of witnessed typical event(s), and EEG findings. While certain semiologic features may aid in the diagnosis of PNES, the gold standard remains capturing a typical event on video electroencephalography (EEG) showing the absence of epileptiform activity with history and semiology consistent with PNES. Medical-neurologic and psychiatric comorbidities are prevalent in PNES; these should be assessed in diagnostic evaluations and integrated into treatment interventions and prognostic considerations. Several studies, including a pilot, multicenter, randomized clinical trial, have now demonstrated that a cognitive behavioral therapy-informed psychotherapy is an efficacious treatment for PNES, and additional efforts are necessary to evaluate the utility of pharmacologic and other psychotherapy treatments. Neuroimaging studies, while requiring replication, suggest that PNES may occur in the context of alterations within and across sensorimotor, emotion regulation/processing, cognitive control, and multimodal integration brain systems. Future research could investigate similarities and differences between PNES and other somatic symptom disorders. PMID:26996600

  7. Oxaliplatin-Induced Tonic-Clonic Seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad K. Rahal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxaliplatin is a common chemotherapy drug used for colon and gastric cancers. Common side effects are peripheral neuropathy, hematological toxicity, and allergic reactions. A rare side effect is seizures which are usually associated with posterior reversible leukoencephalopathy syndrome (PRES. A 50-year-old male patient presented with severe abdominal pain. CT scan of the abdomen showed acute appendicitis. Appendectomy was done and pathology showed mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma. Adjuvant chemotherapy was started with Folinic acid, Fluorouracil, and Oxaliplatin (FOLFOX. During the third cycle of FOLFOX, the patient developed tonic-clonic seizures. Laboratory workup was within normal limits. EEG and MRI of the brain showed no acute abnormality. The patient was rechallenged with FOLFOX but he had tonic-clonic seizures for the second time. His chemotherapy regimen was switched to Folinic acid, Fluorouracil, and Irinotecan (FOLFIRI. After 5 cycles of FOLFIRI, the patient did not develop any seizures, making Oxaliplatin the most likely culprit for his seizures. Oxaliplatin-induced seizures rarely occur in the absence of PRES. One case report has been described in the literature. We present a rare case of tonic-clonic seizures in a patient receiving Oxaliplatin in the absence of PRES.

  8. Advances in management of neonatal seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesoulis, Zachary A; Mathur, Amit M

    2014-06-01

    Seizures are more common in the neonatal period than any other time in the human lifespan. A high index of suspicion for seizures should be maintained for infants who present with encephalopathy soon after birth, have had a stroke, central nervous system (CNS) infection or intracranial hemorrhage or have a genetic or metabolic condition associated with CNS malformations. Complicating the matter, most neonatal seizures lack a clinical correlate with only subtle autonomic changes and often no clinical indication at all. Over the last three decades, several tools have been developed to enhance the detection and treatment of neonatal seizures. The use of electroencephalography (EEG) and the later development of amplitude-integrated EEG (aEEG), allows for Neurologists and non-Neurologists alike, to significantly increase the sensitivity of seizure detection. When applied to the appropriate clinical setting, time to diagnosis and start of therapy is greatly reduced. Phenobarbital maintains the status of first-line therapy in worldwide use. However, newer anti-epileptic agents such as, levetiracetam, bumetanide, and topiramate are increasingly being applied to the neonatal population, offering the potential for seizure treatment with a significantly better side-effect profile. Seizures in premature infants, continue to confound clinicians and researchers alike. Though the apparent seizure burden is significant and there is an association between seizures and adverse outcomes, the two are not cleanly correlated. Compounding the issue, GABA-ergic anti-epileptic drugs are not only less effective in this age group due to reversed neuronal ion gradients but may cause harm. Selecting an appropriate treatment group remains a challenge. PMID:24796413

  9. Comparison of different assimilation schemes in a sequential Kalman filter assimilation system

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Yajing; Barth, Alexander; Beckers, Jean-Marie

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, four assimilation schemes, including an intermittent assimilation scheme (INT) and three incremental assimilation schemes (IAU 0, IAU 50 and IAU 100), are compared in the same assimilation experiments with a nonlinear ocean circulation model using the Ensemble Kalman Filter as assimilation method. The three IAU schemes differ from each other in the position of the increment update window that has the same size as the assimilation window. 0, 50 and 100 correspond to the degree o...

  10. Effective Assimilation of Global Precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lien, G.; Kalnay, E.; Miyoshi, T.; Huffman, G. J.

    2012-12-01

    Assimilating precipitation observations by modifying the moisture and sometimes temperature profiles has been shown successful in forcing the model precipitation to be close to the observed precipitation, but only while the assimilation is taking place. After the forecast start, the model tends to "forget" the assimilation changes and lose their extra skill after few forecast hours. This suggests that this approach is not an efficient way to modify the potential vorticity field, since this is the variable that the model would remember. In this study, the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) method is used to effectively change the potential vorticity field by allowing ensemble members with better precipitation to receive higher weights. In addition to using an EnKF, two other changes in the precipitation assimilation process are proposed to solve the problems related to the highly non-Gaussian nature of the precipitation variable: a) transform precipitation into a Gaussian distribution based on its climatological distribution, and b) only assimilate precipitation at the location where some ensemble members have positive precipitation. The idea is first tested by the observing system simulation experiments (OSSEs) using SPEEDY, a simplified but realistic general circulation model. When the global precipitation is assimilated in addition to conventional rawinsonde observations, both the analyses and the medium range forecasts are significantly improved as compared to only having rawinsonde observations. The improvement is much reduced when only modifying the moisture field with the same approach, which shows the importance of the error covariance between precipitation and all other model variables. The effect of precipitation assimilation is larger in the Southern Hemisphere than that in the Northern Hemisphere because the Northern Hemisphere analyses are already accurate as a result of denser rawinsonde stations. Assimilation of precipitation using a more comprehensive

  11. Hallervorden-Spatz Syndrome with Seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gothwal, Sunil; Nayan, Swati

    2016-04-01

    Hallervorden-Spatz syndrome is a disorder characterized by dystonia, parkinsonism, and iron accumulation in the brain. The disease is caused by mutations in gene encoding pantothenate kinase 2 (PANK2) and patients have pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration. We present an 8-year-old boy with progressive muscle dystonia, neuroregression, frequent fall and multiple injury marks of different stages. Seizures are rare with PANK2. This child had seizure onset at 4 years of age and seizure free on valproate and levetricetam. The CT scan showed tiger eye appearance and mutations on PANK2 gene. PMID:27303611

  12. Ambroxol-induced focal epileptic seizure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapenta, Leonardo; Morano, Alessandra; Fattouch, Jinane; Casciato, Sara; Fanella, Martina; Giallonardo, Anna Teresa; Di Bonaventura, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that in epileptic patients some compounds and different drugs used for the treatment of comorbidities can facilitate or provoke seizures, this evidence regarding a wide spectrum of pharmacological categories. The potential facilitating factors usually include direct toxic effects or pharmacological interactions of either active ingredients or excipients. We report the case of a patient with drug-resistant epilepsy who experienced focal epileptic seizures, easily and constantly reproducible, after each administration of a cough syrup. This is, to our knowledge, the first electroencephalogram-documented case of focal epileptic seizures induced by cough syrup containing ambroxol as active ingredient. PMID:24824664

  13. Biotelemetry system for Epilepsy Seizure Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, LaCurtise; Bohnert, George W.

    2009-07-02

    The Biotelemetry System for Epilepsy Seizure Control Project developed and tested an automated telemetry system for use in an epileptic seizure prevention device that precisely controls localized brain temperature. This project was a result of a Department of Energy (DOE) Global Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention (GIPP) grant to the Kansas City Plant (KCP), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to partner with Flint Hills Scientific, LLC, Lawrence, KS and Biophysical Laboratory Ltd (BIOFIL), Sarov, Russia to develop a method to help control epileptic seizures.

  14. Chemical Data Assimilation &Optimized Earth Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lary, D.

    2003-04-01

    Issues such as ozone depletion, acid rain, and photochemical smog are all of considerable environmental importance. These issues are studied using the dual approach of observations and numerical modelling. In making balanced assessments of these issues it is vital to make the best use of all the information available to us, both theoretical and observational. This is a non-trivial task. The technique of "data assimilation" is a powerful tool which allows us to address this issue. It is revolutionising the way we can study atmospheric chemistry. Data assimilation allows us to simultaneously make good use of however many observations are available to us, our theoretical understanding, and any apriori information we have, within a mathematical framework. It even allows us to infer information about chemical constituents which are not observed. It is a technique which is set to grow in importance. It is also applicable to any system for which we have both observations, a deterministic model, and estimates of uncertainty. Such applications could be from laboratory kinetics to metabolic pathways. Looking ahead we can envision Data assimilation as part of a Optimized Earth Observation System by developing a dynamic data retrieval control system. The dynamic data retrieval control system will dynamically adapt the what, where, and when for the observations made in an online fashion to maximize information content, minimize uncertainty in characterizing the system’s state vector, and minimize both the required storage and data processing time for a given observation capability (with the possibility of even directing unmanned sub-orbital platforms, drones, to make additional observations). This is particularly desirable to facilitate the dynamic tracking of evolving sharp gradients, for example, those in chemical tracer fields often located at the polar vortex edge, the tropopause and the day-night division. The basic idea is the desire for symbiotic communication to

  15. Neonatal seizures triple the risk of a remote seizure after perinatal ischemic stroke.

    OpenAIRE

    Fox, CK; Glass, HC; Sidney, S; Smith, SE; Fullerton, HJ

    2016-01-01

    To determine incidence rates and risk factors of remote seizure after perinatal arterial ischemic stroke.We retrospectively identified a population-based cohort of children with perinatal arterial ischemic stroke (presenting acutely or in a delayed fashion) from a large Northern Californian integrated health care system. We determined incidence and predictors of a remote seizure (unprovoked seizure after neonatal period, defined as 28 days of life) by survival analyses, and measured epilepsy ...

  16. Impact of Assimilated and Interactive Aerosol on Tropical Cyclogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reale, O.; Lau, K. M.; daSilva, A.; Matsui, T.

    2014-01-01

    This article investigates the impact 3 of Saharan dust on the development of tropical cyclones in the Atlantic. A global data assimilation and forecast system, the NASA GEOS-5, is used to assimilate all satellite and conventional data sets used operationally for numerical weather prediction. In addition, this new GEOS-5 version includes assimilation of aerosol optical depth from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). The analysis so obtained comprises atmospheric quantities and a realistic 3-d aerosol and cloud distribution, consistent with the meteorology and validated against Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) and CloudSat data. These improved analyses are used to initialize GEOS-5 forecasts, explicitly accounting for aerosol direct radiative effects and their impact on the atmospheric dynamics. Parallel simulations with/without aerosol radiative effects show that effects of dust on static stability increase with time, becoming highly significant after day 5 and producing an environment less favorable to tropical cyclogenesis.

  17. Seizures in Adults (Beyond the Basics)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... triggers, such as strong emotions, intense exercise, loud music, or flashing lights. When these triggers are at ... may not believe it because you have no memory of the event. The period following a seizure ...

  18. Seizures and Munchausen Syndrome by Proxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence, morbidity and mortality, diagnosis and management of cases of fabricated seizures and child abuse (Munchausen syndrome by proxy (MSbp are assessed by pediatricians at the University of Wales College of Medicine, Cardiff, UK.

  19. Serum Prolactin in Diagnosis of Epileptic Seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The results of studies in databases and references concerning serum prolactin levels (PRL in patients with suspected seizures were rated for quality and analyzed by members of the Therapeutics Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology.

  20. Seizures associated with Lupus during pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Aoki, Shigeru; KOBAYASHI, Natsuko; Mochimaru, Aya; Takahashi, Tsuneo; Hirahara, Fumiki

    2016-01-01

    Key Clinical Message A sudden flare of previously stable SLE may give rise to CNS lupus. During pregnancy, seizures associated with CNS lupus can cause hypoxic‐ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) in the infant.

  1. Febrile Seizures and Epilepsy: Possible Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... status epilepticus in children: The FEB- STAT Study. Neurology 2012;79:871– 877. 2. Graves RC, Oehler ... Am J Epidemiol 2007;165:911–918. e82 Neurology 79 August 28, 2012 Febrile seizures: Possible outcomes ...

  2. Improving the Horizontal Transport in the Lower Troposphere with Four Dimensional Data Assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    The physical processes involved in air quality modeling are governed by dynamically-generated meteorological model fields. This research focuses on reducing the uncertainty in the horizontal transport in the lower troposphere by improving the four dimensional data assimilation (F...

  3. Storm surge variational assimilation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-li HUANG

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available To eliminate errors caused by uncertainty of parameters and further improve capability of storm surge forecasting, the variational data assimilation method is applied to the storm surge model based on unstructured grid with high spatial resolution. The method can effectively improve the forecasting accuracy of storm surge induced by typhoon through controlling wind drag force coefficient parameter. The model is first theoretically validated with synthetic data. Then, the real storm surge process induced by the TC 0515 typhoon is forecasted by the variational data assimilation model, and results show the feasibility of practical application.

  4. A novel data assimilation model for the plasmasphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikoukar, R.; Bust, G. S.; Murr, D.

    2014-12-01

    We present a novel technique for imaging and data assimilation of the topside ionosphere and plasmasphere. The technique incorporates the SAMI2 model as a physics-based background model for assimilation. The Gauss-Markov Kalman filter technique is used to advance estimates of electron density and background error covariances forward in time. We incorporate regularization techniques in the assimilation algorithm to stabilize the solution in face of limited data perturbation to prevent non-physical altitudinal variation in density estimates due to limited availability of data. The above-the-horizon observations from the Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver onboard Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate (COSMIC) satellites are utilized in the assimilation algorithm. The estimation results show reasonable agreement with in-situ density measurements of Defense Meteorological Satellite Program satellites and Van Allen Probes derived densities during geomagnetically quiet and severe storm-time conditions, respectively. The results demonstrate great potential for the use of assimilation of COSMIC above-the-horizon measurements in monitoring and studying the morphology and dynamics of large-scale structures of the electron density in the topside ionosphere and plasmasphere.

  5. Aging Models of Acute Seizures and Epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly, Kevin M.

    2010-01-01

    Aged animals have been used by researchers to better understand the differences between the young and the aged brain and how these differences may provide insight into the mechanisms of acute seizures and epilepsy in the elderly. To date, there have been relatively few studies dedicated to the modeling of acute seizures and epilepsy in aged, healthy animals. Inherent challenges to this area of research include the costs associated with the purchase and maintenance of older animals and, at tim...

  6. Data Assimilation Cycling for Weather Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Nam; Li, Yongzuo; Fitzpatrick, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    This software package runs the atmospheric model MM5 in data assimilation cycling mode to produce an optimized weather analysis, including the ability to insert or adjust a hurricane vortex. The program runs MM5 through a cycle of short forecasts every three hours where the vortex is adjusted to match the observed hurricane location and storm intensity. This technique adjusts the surrounding environment so that the proper steering current and environmental shear are achieved. MM5cycle uses a Cressman analysis to blend observation into model fields to get a more accurate weather analysis. Quality control of observations is also done in every cycle to remove bad data that may contaminate the analysis. This technique can assimilate and propagate data in time from intermittent and infrequent observations while maintaining the atmospheric field in a dynamically balanced state. The software consists of a C-shell script (MM5cycle.driver) and three FORTRAN programs (splitMM5files.F, comRegrid.F, and insert_vortex.F), and are contained in the pre-processor component of MM5 called "Regridder." The model is first initialized with data from a global model such as the Global Forecast System (GFS), which also provides lateral boundary conditions. These data are separated into single-time files using splitMM5.F. The hurricane vortex is then bogussed in the correct location and with the correct wind field using insert_vortex.F. The modified initial and boundary conditions are then recombined into the model fields using comRegrid.F. The model then makes a three-hour forecast. The three-hour forecast data from MM5 now become the analysis for the next short forecast run, where the vortex will again be adjusted. The process repeats itself until the desired time of analysis is achieved. This code can also assimilate observations if desired.

  7. Genetic effects on sleep/wake variation of seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winawer, Melodie R.; Shih, Jerry; Beck, Erin S.; Hunter, Jessica E.; Epstein, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objective There is a complex bidirectional relationship between sleep and epilepsy. Sleep/wake timing of seizures has been investigated for several individual seizure types and syndromes, but few large-scale studies of the timing of seizures exist in people with varied epilepsy types. In addition, the genetic contributions to seizure timing have not been well studied. Methods Sleep/wake timing of seizures was determined for 1,395 subjects in 546 families enrolled in the Epilepsy Phenome/Genome Project (EPGP). We examined seizure timing among subjects with different epilepsy types, seizure types, epilepsy syndromes, and localization. We also examined the familial aggregation of sleep/wake occurrence of seizures. Results Seizures in nonacquired focal epilepsy (NAFE) were more likely to occur during sleep than seizures in generalized epilepsy (GE), for both convulsive (odds ratio [OR] 5.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.59–7.52) and nonconvulsive seizures (OR 4.2, 95% CI 2.48–7.21). Seizures occurring within 1 h of awakening were more likely to occur in patients with GE than with NAFE for both convulsive (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.54– 3.39) and nonconvulsive (OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.04–2.66) seizures. Frontal onset seizures were more likely than temporal onset seizures to occur during sleep. Sleep/wake timing of seizures in first-degree relatives predicted timing of seizures in the proband. Significance We found that sleep/wake timing of seizures is associated with both epilepsy syndrome and seizure type. In addition, we provide the first evidence for a genetic contribution to sleep/wake timing of seizures in a large group of individuals with common epilepsy syndromes. PMID:26948972

  8. Acute Symptomatic Seizures Caused by Electrolyte Disturbances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardone, Raffaele; Brigo, Francesco; Trinka, Eugen

    2016-01-01

    In this narrative review we focus on acute symptomatic seizures occurring in subjects with electrolyte disturbances. Quite surprisingly, despite its clinical relevance, this issue has received very little attention in the scientific literature. Electrolyte abnormalities are commonly encountered in clinical daily practice, and their diagnosis relies on routine laboratory findings. Acute and severe electrolyte imbalances can manifest with seizures, which may be the sole presenting symptom. Seizures are more frequently observed in patients with sodium disorders (especially hyponatremia), hypocalcemia, and hypomagnesemia. They do not entail a diagnosis of epilepsy, but are classified as acute symptomatic seizures. EEG has little specificity in differentiating between various electrolyte disturbances. The prominent EEG feature is slowing of the normal background activity, although other EEG findings, including various epileptiform abnormalities may occur. An accurate and prompt diagnosis should be established for a successful management of seizures, as rapid identification and correction of the underlying electrolyte disturbance (rather than an antiepileptic treatment) are of crucial importance in the control of seizures and prevention of permanent brain damage. PMID:26754778

  9. Childhood epileptic seizures imitating migraine and encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kravljanac Ružica

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Paroxismal events can resemble epileptic seizures, however, some epileptic seizures, especially benign occipital childhood epilepsies can imitate migraine, cycling vomiting or encephalitis. Objective. The aim of this study was evaluation of clinical and electroencephalographic (EEG features and outcome in children with benign occipital childhood epilepsies. Methods. Investigation included 18 patients with benign occipital childhood epilepsies hospitalized in the period from 2007 to 2010. The diagnosis was based on clinical and EEG characteristics of seizures, while treatment included acute therapy for seizures and chronic antiepileptic drugs. Prognosis was analyzed in terms of neurological outcome and seizure recurrence rate. Results. Benign occipital childhood epilepsy with early onset was diagnosed in 15 children. Vegetative symptoms, mostly ictal vomiting (13, eye deviation and loss of consciousness (13 dominated in the clinical presentation. The most frequent EEG findings showed occipital epileptic discharges. Benign occipital childhood epilepsy with late onset was diagnosed in three cases. Seizures were manifested by visual hallucinations, headache and secondary generalized convulsions. All three patients were administered chronic antiepileptic drugs and had good outcome. Conclusion. In our patients, clinical manifestations of benign occipital epilepsies had some similarities with clinical features of migraine and encephalitis. It could explain misdiagnosis in some of them. Knowledge about main features and differences between each of these disorders is crucial for making appropriate diagnosis.

  10. Data assimilation techniques in modeling ocean processes

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mahadevan, R.; Fernandes, A.A.; Naqvi, S.W.A.

    control theory method are discussed. Application of data assimilation technique to physical problems governed by linear and nonlinear ordinary differential equations are explained. The formulation of data assimilation technique in one-dimensional models...

  11. Data assimilation the ensemble Kalman filter

    CERN Document Server

    Evensen, Geir

    2006-01-01

    Covers data assimilation and inverse methods, including both traditional state estimation and parameter estimation. This text and reference focuses on various popular data assimilation methods, such as weak and strong constraint variational methods and ensemble filters and smoothers.

  12. Millimeter-scale epileptiform spike propagation patterns and their relationship to seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanleer, Ann C.; Blanco, Justin A.; Wagenaar, Joost B.; Viventi, Jonathan; Contreras, Diego; Litt, Brian

    2016-04-01

    Objective. Current mapping of epileptic networks in patients prior to epilepsy surgery utilizes electrode arrays with sparse spatial sampling (∼1.0 cm inter-electrode spacing). Recent research demonstrates that sub-millimeter, cortical-column-scale domains have a role in seizure generation that may be clinically significant. We use high-resolution, active, flexible surface electrode arrays with 500 μm inter-electrode spacing to explore epileptiform local field potential (LFP) spike propagation patterns in two dimensions recorded from subdural micro-electrocorticographic signals in vivo in cat. In this study, we aimed to develop methods to quantitatively characterize the spatiotemporal dynamics of epileptiform activity at high-resolution. Approach. We topically administered a GABA-antagonist, picrotoxin, to induce acute neocortical epileptiform activity leading up to discrete electrographic seizures. We extracted features from LFP spikes to characterize spatiotemporal patterns in these events. We then tested the hypothesis that two-dimensional spike patterns during seizures were different from those between seizures. Main results. We showed that spatially correlated events can be used to distinguish ictal versus interictal spikes. Significance. We conclude that sub-millimeter-scale spatiotemporal spike patterns reveal network dynamics that are invisible to standard clinical recordings and contain information related to seizure-state.

  13. Mozart K.448 listening decreased seizure recurrence and epileptiform discharges in children with first unprovoked seizures: a randomized controlled study

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Lung-Chang; Lee, Mei-Wen; Wei, Ruey-Chang; Mok, Hin-Kiu; Yang, Rei-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Background Increasing numbers of reports show the beneficial effects of listening to Mozart music in decreasing epileptiform discharges as well as seizure frequency in epileptic children. There has been no effective method to reduce seizure recurrence after the first unprovoked seizure until now. In this study, we investigated the effect of listening to Mozart K.448 in reducing the seizure recurrence rate in children with first unprovoked seizures. Methods Forty-eight children who experienced...

  14. The Phonological Assimilation of Borrowing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suleiman, Saleh M.

    Linguistic borrowing from English to Jordanian Arabic at the lexical level is described, focusing on phonology and the extent to which Jordanian Arabic has affected the phonetic structure of English loans assimilated partially or completely into it. Conspicuous distinctive sound features in the two languages that may affect non-native speakers'…

  15. Data assimilation in reservoir management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rommelse, J.R.

    2009-01-01

    The research presented in this thesis aims at improving computer models that allow simulations of water, oil and gas flows in subsurface petroleum reservoirs. This is done by integrating, or assimilating, measurements into physics-bases models. In recent years petroleum technology has developed rapi

  16. Continuous data assimilation with stochastically noisy data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We analyse the performance of a data-assimilation algorithm based on a linear feedback control when used with observational data that contains measurement errors. Our model problem consists of dynamics governed by the two-dimensional incompressible Navier–Stokes equations, observational measurements given by finite volume elements or nodal points of the velocity field and measurement errors which are represented by stochastic noise. Under these assumptions, the data-assimilation algorithm consists of a system of stochastically forced Navier–Stokes equations. The main result of this paper provides explicit conditions on the observation density (resolution) which guarantee explicit asymptotic bounds, as the time tends to infinity, on the error between the approximate solution and the actual solutions which is corresponding to these measurements, in terms of the variance of the noise in the measurements. Specifically, such bounds are given for the limit supremum, as the time tends to infinity, of the expected value of the L2-norm and of the H1 Sobolev norm of the difference between the approximating solution and the actual solution. Moreover, results on the average time error in mean are stated. (paper)

  17. Data Assimilation by delay-coordinate nudging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazo, Diego; Lopez, Juan Manuel; Carrassi, Alberto

    2016-04-01

    A new nudging method for data assimilation, delay-coordinate nudging, is presented. Delay-coordinate nudging makes explicit use of present and past observations in the formulation of the forcing driving the model evolution at each time-step. Numerical experiments with a low order chaotic system show that the new method systematically outperforms standard nudging in different model and observational scenarios, also when using an un-optimized formulation of the delay-nudging coefficients. A connection between the optimal delay and the dominant Lyapunov exponent of the dynamics is found based on heuristic arguments and is confirmed by the numerical results, providing a guideline for the practical implementation of the algorithm. Delay-coordinate nudging preserves the easiness of implementation, the intuitive functioning and the reduced computational cost of the standard nudging, making it a potential alternative especially in the field of seasonal-to-decadal predictions with large Earth system models that limit the use of more sophisticated data assimilation procedures.

  18. Data assimilation applied to a chaotic toy climate

    CERN Document Server

    Harris, Kameron Decker; Hitt, Darren L; Danforth, Christopher M

    2011-01-01

    A simplified model of natural convection, similar to the 1963 Lorenz system, is derived and compared to computational fluid dynamics simulations as a test bed for data assimilation methods. The thermosyphon is represented by a long time flow simulation, which serves as a reference "truth". Forecasts are then made using the Lorenz-like model and synchronized to noisy and limited observations of the truth, a realistic \\textit{in silico} forecasting scenario, using three dimensional variational filtering, the extended Kalman filter, the ensemble square root filter, and the ensemble transform Kalman filter. We find that these data assimilation algorithms successfully couple the simplified model to observations of the computational fluid dynamics simulation and, in fact, can infer dynamics absent from the model.

  19. Seizures and Teens: When Seizures Aren't the Only Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanner, Andres M.; Shafer, Patricia O.

    2006-01-01

    Some teenagers with epilepsy only have to deal with seizures, which can be tough enough, but for other teens, seizures are not the only problem. Parents and caregivers often report changes in their teens' abilities to think clearly, learn in school, or remain focused in class. Mood and other behavioral problems may also be seen. It is critical…

  20. Febrile seizures in Kaduna, north western Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E E Eseigbe

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Febrile seizure is the most common seizure of childhood and has a good prognosis. However its presentation is fraught with poor management, with grave consequences, in our environment. Thus a review of its current status is important. Objective: To review the status of febrile seizures in Kaduna metropolis. Materials and Methods: A review of cases seen in the Department of Paediatrics, 44 Nigeria Army Reference Hospital, Kaduna between June 2008 and June 2010. Results: Out of the 635 cases admitted in the department 17 (2.7% fulfilled the criteria for febrile seizures. There were 11 Males and 6 Females (M: F, 1.8:1. Age range was from 9 months to 5 years with a mean of 2.2 years ± 1.1 and peak age of 3 years. Twelve (70.6% were in the upper social classes (I-III. Fever, convulsion, catarrh and cough were major presenting symptoms. Incidence of convulsion was least on the 1st day of complaint. Fourteen (82.4% of the cases were simple febrile seizures while 3 were complex. There was a positive family history in 5 (29.4% of the cases. Eleven (64.7% had orthodox medication at home, before presentation, 5 (29.4% consulted patient medicine sellers and 7 (41.7% received traditional medication as part of home management. Malaria and acute respiratory infections were the identifiable causes. Standard anti-malaria and anti-biotic therapy were instituted, where indicated. All recovered and were discharged. Conclusion: There was a low prevalence of febrile seizures among the hospitalized children and a poor pre-hospitalization management of cases. It highlighted the need for improved community awareness on the prevention and management of febrile seizures.

  1. Ocean Data Assimilation in Support of Climate Applications: Status and Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stammer, D; Balmaseda, M; Heimbach, P; Köhl, A; Weaver, A

    2016-01-01

    Ocean data assimilation brings together observations with known dynamics encapsulated in a circulation model to describe the time-varying ocean circulation. Its applications are manifold, ranging from marine and ecosystem forecasting to climate prediction and studies of the carbon cycle. Here, we address only climate applications, which range from improving our understanding of ocean circulation to estimating initial or boundary conditions and model parameters for ocean and climate forecasts. Because of differences in underlying methodologies, data assimilation products must be used judiciously and selected according to the specific purpose, as not all related inferences would be equally reliable. Further advances are expected from improved models and methods for estimating and representing error information in data assimilation systems. Ultimately, data assimilation into coupled climate system components is needed to support ocean and climate services. However, maintaining the infrastructure and expertise for sustained data assimilation remains challenging.

  2. Direct variational data assimilation algorithm for atmospheric chemistry data with transport and transformation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penenko, Alexey; Penenko, Vladimir; Nuterman, Roman; Baklanov, Alexander; Mahura, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    Atmospheric chemistry dynamics is studied with convection-diffusion-reaction model. The numerical Data Assimilation algorithm presented is based on the additive-averaged splitting schemes. It carries out ''fine-grained'' variational data assimilation on the separate splitting stages with respect to spatial dimensions and processes i.e. the same measurement data is assimilated to different parts of the split model. This design has efficient implementation due to the direct data assimilation algorithms of the transport process along coordinate lines. Results of numerical experiments with chemical data assimilation algorithm of in situ concentration measurements on real data scenario have been presented. In order to construct the scenario, meteorological data has been taken from EnviroHIRLAM model output, initial conditions from MOZART model output and measurements from Airbase database.

  3. Febrile Seizures: Etiology, Prevalence, and Geographical Variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali DELPISHEH

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite This Article: Delpisheh A, Veisani Y, Sayehmiri K, Fayyazi A. Febrile Seizures: Etiology, Prevalence, and Geographical Variation. Iran J Child Neurol. 2014 Summer; 8(3:30-37. AbstractObjectiveFebrile seizures (FSs are the most common neurological disorder observed in the pediatric age group. The present study provides information about epidemiological and clinical characteristics as well as risk factors associated with FS among Iranian children.Materials & MethodsOn the computerized literature valid databases, the FS prevalence and 95% confidence intervals were calculated using a random effects model. A metaregression analysis was introduced to explore heterogeneity between studies. Data manipulation and statistical analyses were performed using Stata10.ResultsThe important viral or bacterial infection causes of FSs were; recent upper respiratory infection 42.3% (95% CI: 37.2%–47.4%, gastroenteritis21.5% (95% CI: 13.6%–29.4%, and otitis media infections15.2% (95% CI: 9.8%- 20.7% respectively. The pooled prevalence rate of FS among other childhood convulsions was 47.9% (95% CI: 38.8–59.9%. The meta–regression analysis showed that the sample size does not significantly affect heterogeneity for the factor ‘prevalence FS’.ConclusionsAlmost half of all childhood convulsions among Iranian children are associated with Febrile seizure. ReferencesFelipe L, Siqueira M. febrile seizures: update on diagnosis and management. Siqueira LFM. 2010;56 (4:489–92.Oka E, Ishida S, Ohtsuka Y, Ohtahara S. Neuroepidemiological Study of Childhood Epilepsy by Application of International Classification of Epilepsies and Epileptic Syndromes (ILAE, 1989. Epilepsia. 1995;36 (7:658–61.Shi X, Lin Z, Ye X, Hu Y, Zheng F, Hu H. An epidemiological survey of febrile convulsions among pupils in the Wenzhou region. Zhongguo Dang Dai Er Ke Za Zhi. 2012 Feb;14 (2:128–30.Waruiru C, Appleton R. Febrile seizures: an update. Arch Dis Child

  4. Development of a Chinese land data assimilation system: its progress and prospects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The objective of land data assimilation is to merge multi-source observations into the dynamics of land surface model for improving the estimation of land surface states. We have developed a land data assimilation system for China's land territory. In this system, the Common Land Model and Simple Biosphere Model 2 are used to simulate land surface processes. The radiative transfer models of thawed and frozen soil, snow, lake, and vegetation are used as observation operators to transfer model predictions into estimated brightness temperatures. A Monte-Carlo based sequential filter, the ensemble Kalman filter, is implemented as data assimilation method to integrate modeling and observation. The system is capable of assimilating passive microwave remotely sensed data such as special sensor microwave/imager (SSM/I), TRMM microwave imager (TMI), and advanced microwave scanning radiometer enhanced for EOS (AMSRE) and the conventional in situ measurements of soil and snow. A spatiotemporally consistent assimilated dataset for soil moisture, soil temperature, snow and frozen soil, with a spatial resolution of 0.25 degree and temporal resolution of one hour, has been produced. This paper introduces the development of Chinese land data assimilation system and the progress made on data assimilation algorithms, land surface modeling, microwave remote sensing of land surface hydrological variables, and the preparation of atmospheric forcing data. The distinct characteristics and challenges of developing land data assimilation system and the perspectives for future development are also discussed .

  5. An example of Ensemble Kalman Filter data assimilation in a Babcock-Leighton solar dynamo model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikpati, Mausumi; Anderson, Jeffrey L.

    2016-05-01

    Atmospheric and oceanic prediction models have been greatly advanced over the past 40 years by using modern data assimilation techniques. Application of similar techniques in solar models started about 7 years ago. However, acceptance of such techniques by the solar community has been slow to develop. In order to make accurate predictions of solar activity as well as reconstruction of certain model parameters that cannot be directly measured, it will be essential to implement sophisticated data assimilation techniques as used by atmospheric and oceanic models. We will present here an example of parameter reconstruction, namely the time variation in meridional flow-speed, done by assimilating data into a Babcock-Leighton solar dynamo model in the framework of NCAR's Data Assimilation Research Testbed (NCAR-DART). By performing many 'Observing System Simulation Experiments' (OSSEs) we find that an optimally good reconstruction in time series of meridional circulation can be obtained by using 16 ensemble members and assimilating one magnetic observation with less than 40 percent observational error. However, the RMS error in reconstruction reduces with increase in ensemble size, increase in number of observations and decrease in observational error. We also find that assimilation of magnetic field observations taken from low-to-mid latitudes at the surface compared to any other locations produces the best reconstruction. We will close by showing that assimilation cycle of 15 days is optimal; generally a longer assimilation cycle deteriorates the results, but the Dynamo DART system needs a minimum time to develop the dynamics.

  6. Febrile Seizure: Demographic Features and Causative Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed ESMAILI GOURABI

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available How to cite this article: Esmaili Gourabi H, Bidabadi E, Cheraghalipour  F, Aarabi  Y, Salamat F. Febrile Seizure: Demographic Features and Causative Factors. Iran J Child Neurol Autumn 2012; 6(4:33-37.Abstract Objective Because of geographical and periodical variation, we prompted to determine the demographic features and causative factors for febrile seizure in Rasht. Materials & Methods In this cross-sectional study, all 6–month- to 6-year-old children with the diagnosis of febrile seizure admitted to 17 Shahrivar hospital in Rasht, from August, 2009 to August, 2010 were studied. Age, sex, family history of the disease, seizure types, body temperature upon admission and infectious causes of the fever were recorded. All statistical analysis was performed with SPSS software, version 16. Results Of the 214 children (mean age, 25.24±15.40 months, 124 were boys and 109 had a positive family history. Complex seizures were seen in 39 cases. In patients with a complex febrile seizure, 59% had the repetitive type, 20.5% had the focal type and 20.5% had more than 15 minutes duration of seizures. Most of the repetitive seizures (78.3% occurred in patients under 2 years old; the difference between under and over 2-year-old patients was statistically significant (P=0.02. Study results did not show significant differences between the two genders for simple or complex seizures. The mean body temperature upon admission was 38.2±1.32◦C (38.31±0.82 degrees in boys and 38.04±1.78 in girls. Upper respiratory infections were seen in most patients (74.29%. All cases of lower respiratory infections were boys. There was a statistically significant difference between boys and girls in causes of fever. Conclusion Most of the children had a positive family history and the most common causative factor was upper respiratory infection.  References: Huang MC, Huang CC, Thomas K. Febrile convulsions: development and validation of a questionnaire to measure

  7. Assimilate partitioning during reproductive growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leaves having various phyllotactic relationships to fruitlets were labeled for 1 hour with 10/sub r/Ci of 14CO2. Fruitlets were also labeled. Fruitlets did fix 14CO2. Translocation of radioactivity from the peel into the fruit occurred slowly and to a limited extent. No evidence of translocation out of the fruitlets was observed. Assimilate partitioning in avocado was strongly influenced by phyllotaxy. If a fruit and the labeled leaf had the same phyllotaxy then greater than 95% of the radiolabel was present in this fruit. When the fruit did not have the same phyllotaxy as the labeled leaf, the radiolabel distribution was skewed with 70% of the label going to a single adjacent position. Avocado fruitlets exhibit uniform labeling throughout a particular tissue. In avocado, assimilates preferentially move from leaves to fruits with the same phyllotaxy

  8. Snow multivariable data assimilation for hydrological predictions in mountain areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazzi, Gaia; Campo, Lorenzo; Gabellani, Simone; Rudari, Roberto; Castelli, Fabio; Cremonese, Edoardo; Morra di Cella, Umberto; Stevenin, Hervé; Ratto, Sara Maria

    2016-04-01

    The seasonal presence of snow on alpine catchments strongly impacts both surface energy balance and water resource. Thus, the knowledge of the snowpack dynamics is of critical importance for several applications, such as water resource management, floods prediction and hydroelectric power production. Several independent data sources provide information about snowpack state: ground-based measurements, satellite data and physical models. Although all these data types are reliable, each of them is affected by specific flaws and errors (respectively dependency on local conditions, sensor biases and limitations, initialization and poor quality forcing data). Moreover, there are physical factors that make an exhaustive reconstruction of snow dynamics complicated: snow intermittence in space and time, stratification and slow phenomena like metamorphism processes, uncertainty in snowfall evaluation, wind transportation, etc. Data Assimilation (DA) techniques provide an objective methodology to combine observational and modeled information to obtain the most likely estimate of snowpack state. Indeed, by combining all the available sources of information, the implementation of DA schemes can quantify and reduce the uncertainties of the estimations. This study presents SMASH (Snow Multidata Assimilation System for Hydrology), a multi-layer snow dynamic model, strengthened by a robust multivariable data assimilation algorithm. The model is physically based on mass and energy balances and can be used to reproduce the main physical processes occurring within the snowpack: accumulation, density dynamics, melting, sublimation, radiative balance, heat and mass exchanges. The model is driven by observed forcing meteorological data (air temperature, wind velocity, relative air humidity, precipitation and incident solar radiation) to provide a complete estimate of snowpack state. The implementation of an Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) scheme enables to assimilate simultaneously ground

  9. Non-invasive imaging of epileptic seizures in vivo using photoacoustic tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Qizhi; Carney, Paul R; Yuan Zhen; Jiang Huabei [J. Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Liu Zhao [Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Neurology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); Chen Huanxin; Roper, Steven N [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610-0265 (United States)], E-mail: hjiang@bme.ufl.edu

    2008-04-07

    Non-invasive laser-induced photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is an emerging imaging modality that has the potential to image the dynamic function of the brain due to its unique ability of imaging biological tissues with high optical contrast and ultrasound resolution. Here we report the first application of our finite-element-based PAT for imaging of epileptic seizures in an animal model. In vivo photoacoustic images were obtained in rats with focal seizures induced by microinjection of bicuculline, a GABA{sub A} antagonist, into the neocortex. The seizure focus was accurately localized by PAT as confirmed with gold-standard electroencephalogram (EEG). Compared to the existing neuroimaging modalities, PAT not only has the unprecedented advantage of high spatial and temporal resolution in a single imaging modality, but also is portable and low in cost, making it possible to bring brain imaging to the bedside.

  10. Modeling and analyzing non-seizure EEG data for patients with epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawkins, W.F.; Clapp, N.E. Jr.; Daw, C.S.; Hively, L.M.; Protopopescu, V. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Eisenstadt, M.L. [Knoxville Neurology Clinic, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1996-05-01

    We present nonlinear analysis of non-seizure electroencephalogram (EEG) time series data from four epileptic patients. A non-seizure state is a period that is free of any part of an epileptic seizure, including the transition to a fully developed episode. EEG measurements are typically contaminated with a large amount of non- neurophysiological source information, generally called artifact, which arises, for example, from eye movement, muscle tension, and physical motion. The first objective of this study is to gain some insight into how much variability in analysis results to be expected from patients having similar clinical characteristics. The second objective is to investigate the impact of eye movement on the analysis results. A special feature presented here is the introduction and testing of a filter for eye movement artifact. The third objective is to determine if neurophysiological activity as viewed from two adjacent channels appears dynamically to be the same.

  11. Assimilation, Criminality and Ethnic Conflict

    OpenAIRE

    Dasgupta, Indraneel; Mukherjee, Diganta

    2014-01-01

    We examine the consequences, of integrating large minorities into productivity-relevant majority ethno-linguistic norms, for distribution, ethnic conflict and crime. We develop a two-community model where such assimilation generates social gains by: (a) facilitating economic interaction, and (b) dampening religious or racial conflict over symbolic and normative contents of the public sphere. However, integration shifts the distribution of both material and symbolic goods against the minority....

  12. Financial assimilation of immigrants conference

    OpenAIRE

    anonymous

    2003-01-01

    On June 24, the Consumer and Community Affairs division of the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago convened, “An Informed Discussion of the Financial Assimilation of Immigrants” in Des Moines, Iowa. The conference was part of the larger, long-term program by the Chicago Reserve Bank to study the ways and means by which immigrants to the United States access mainstream financial services. This Special Edition of PNV comprises summaries of each of the conference presentations.

  13. Febrile Seizures and Febrile Seizure Syndromes: An Updated Overview of Old and Current Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulhafeez M. Khair

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Febrile seizures are the most common paroxysmal episode during childhood, affecting up to one in 10 children. They are a major cause of emergency facility visits and a source of family distress and anxiety. Their etiology and pathophysiological pathways are being understood better over time; however, there is still more to learn. Genetic predisposition is thought to be a major contributor. Febrile seizures have been historically classified as benign; however, many emerging febrile seizure syndromes behave differently. The way in which human knowledge has evolved over the years in regard to febrile seizures has not been dealt with in depth in the current literature, up to our current knowledge. This review serves as a documentary of how scientists have explored febrile seizures, elaborating on the journey of knowledge as far as etiology, clinical features, approach, and treatment strategies are concerned. Although this review cannot cover all clinical aspects related to febrile seizures at the textbook level, we believe it can function as a quick summary of the past and current sources of knowledge for all varieties of febrile seizure types and syndromes.

  14. Vagus nerve stimulation: predictors of seizure freedom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janszky, J; Hoppe, M; Behne, F; Tuxhorn, I; Pannek, H; Ebner, A

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To identify predictive factors for the seizure-free outcome of vagus nerve stimulation (VNS). Methods: All 47 patients who had undergone VNS implantation at one centre and had at least one year of follow up were studied. They underwent complete presurgical evaluation including detailed clinical history, magnetic resonance imaging, and long term video-EEG with ictal and interictal recordings. After implantation, adjustment of stimulation parameters and concomitant antiepileptic drugs were at the discretion of the treating physician. Results: Mean (SD) age of the patients was 22.7 (11.6) years (range 7 to 53). Six patients (13%) became seizure-free after the VNS implantation. Only two variables showed a significant association with the seizure-free outcome: absence of bilateral interictal epileptiform discharges (IED) and presence of malformation of cortical development (MCD). Epilepsy duration showed a non-significant trend towards a negative association with outcome. By logistic regression analysis, only absence of bilateral IED correlated independently with successful VNS treatment (p<0.01, odds ratio = 29.2 (95% confidence interval, 2.4 to 353)). Bilateral IED (independent or bilateral synchronous) was found in one of six seizure-free patients and in 33 of 41 non-seizure-free patients. When bilateral IED were absent, the sensitivity for seizure-free outcome was 0.83 (0.44 to 0.97), and the specificity was 0.80 (0.66 to 0.90). Conclusions: Bilateral IED was independently associated with the outcome of VNS. These results are preliminary because they were based on a small patient population. They may facilitate prospective VNS studies enrolling larger numbers of patients to confirm the results. PMID:15716532

  15. Adjunctive pregabalin vs gabapentin for focal seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glue, Paul; Friedman, Daniel; Almas, Mary; Yardi, Nandan; Knapp, Lloyd; Pitman, Verne; Posner, Holly B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the comparative safety and adjunctive efficacy of pregabalin and gabapentin in reducing seizure frequency in patients with partial-onset seizures based on prestudy modeling showing superior efficacy for pregabalin. Methods: The design of this comparative efficacy and safety study of pregabalin and gabapentin as adjunctive treatment in adults with refractory partial-onset seizures was randomized, flexible dose, double blind, and parallel group. The study included a 6-week baseline and a 21-week treatment phase. The primary endpoint was the percentage change from baseline in 28-day seizure rate to the treatment phase. Results: A total of 484 patients were randomized to pregabalin (n = 242) or gabapentin (n = 242). Of these, 359 patients (187 pregabalin, 172 gabapentin) completed the treatment phase. The observed median and mean in percentage change from baseline was −58.65 and −47.7 (SD 48.3) for pregabalin and −57.43 and −45.28 (SD 60.6) for gabapentin. For the primary endpoint, there was no significant difference between treatments. The Hodges-Lehman estimated median difference was 0.0 (95% confidence interval −6.0 to 7.0). Safety profiles were comparable and consistent with prior trials. Conclusions: The absence of the anticipated efficacy difference based on modeling of prior, nearly identical trials and the larger-than-expected response rates of the 2 antiepileptic drugs were unexpected. These findings raise questions that are potentially important to consider in future comparative efficacy trials. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00537940. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class II evidence that for patients with partial seizures enrolled in this study, pregabalin is not superior to gabapentin in reducing seizure frequency. Because of the atypical response rates, the results of this study are poorly generalizable to other epilepsy populations. PMID:27521437

  16. Assimilation of remote sensing observations into a sediment transport model of China's largest freshwater lake: spatial and temporal effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Chen, Xiaoling; Lu, Jianzhong; Zhang, Wei

    2015-12-01

    Numerical models are important tools that are used in studies of sediment dynamics in inland and coastal waters, and these models can now benefit from the use of integrated remote sensing observations. This study explores a scheme for assimilating remotely sensed suspended sediment (from charge-coupled device (CCD) images obtained from the Huanjing (HJ) satellite) into a two-dimensional sediment transport model of Poyang Lake, the largest freshwater lake in China. Optimal interpolation is used as the assimilation method, and model predictions are obtained by combining four remote sensing images. The parameters for optimal interpolation are determined through a series of assimilation experiments evaluating the sediment predictions based on field measurements. The model with assimilation of remotely sensed sediment reduces the root-mean-square error of the predicted sediment concentrations by 39.4% relative to the model without assimilation, demonstrating the effectiveness of the assimilation scheme. The spatial effect of assimilation is explored by comparing model predictions with remotely sensed sediment, revealing that the model with assimilation generates reasonable spatial distribution patterns of suspended sediment. The temporal effect of assimilation on the model's predictive capabilities varies spatially, with an average temporal effect of approximately 10.8 days. The current velocities which dominate the rate and direction of sediment transport most likely result in spatial differences in the temporal effect of assimilation on model predictions.

  17. Assimilation of remote sensing observations into a sediment transport model of China's largest freshwater lake: spatial and temporal effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Chen, Xiaoling; Lu, Jianzhong; Zhang, Wei

    2015-12-01

    Numerical models are important tools that are used in studies of sediment dynamics in inland and coastal waters, and these models can now benefit from the use of integrated remote sensing observations. This study explores a scheme for assimilating remotely sensed suspended sediment (from charge-coupled device (CCD) images obtained from the Huanjing (HJ) satellite) into a two-dimensional sediment transport model of Poyang Lake, the largest freshwater lake in China. Optimal interpolation is used as the assimilation method, and model predictions are obtained by combining four remote sensing images. The parameters for optimal interpolation are determined through a series of assimilation experiments evaluating the sediment predictions based on field measurements. The model with assimilation of remotely sensed sediment reduces the root-mean-square error of the predicted sediment concentrations by 39.4% relative to the model without assimilation, demonstrating the effectiveness of the assimilation scheme. The spatial effect of assimilation is explored by comparing model predictions with remotely sensed sediment, revealing that the model with assimilation generates reasonable spatial distribution patterns of suspended sediment. The temporal effect of assimilation on the model's predictive capabilities varies spatially, with an average temporal effect of approximately 10.8 days. The current velocities which dominate the rate and direction of sediment transport most likely result in spatial differences in the temporal effect of assimilation on model predictions. PMID:26199002

  18. Seizures and Praziquantel. A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime R. Torres R.

    1988-12-01

    Full Text Available A 27 year Old male developed seizures after receiving a single 20 mg/kg dose of praziquantel for the treatment of an intestinal Hymenolepis nana infection. On further clinical and laboratorial evaluations, he was found to suffer from an until then asymptomatic parenchymal brain cysticercosis. Praziquantel must be used with caution in those areas where cysticercosis represents a mayor public health problem. The occurrence of unexpected seizures in an individual being treated with the compound, must prompt clinicians to rule out cysticercosis of the CNS.

  19. Febrile Seizures: Etiology, Prevalence, and Geographical Variation

    OpenAIRE

    Delpisheh, Ali; Veisani, Yousef; SAYEHMIRI, Kourosh; FAYYAZI, Afshin

    2014-01-01

    How to Cite This Article: Delpisheh A, Veisani Y, Sayehmiri K, Fayyazi A. Febrile Seizures: Etiology, Prevalence, and Geographical Variation. Iran J Child Neurol. 2014 Summer; 8(3):30-37. AbstractObjectiveFebrile seizures (FSs) are the most common neurological disorder observed in the pediatric age group. The present study provides information about epidemiological and clinical characteristics as well as risk factors associated with FS among Iranian children.Materials & MethodsOn the comp...

  20. Treating seizures and epilepsy with anticoagulants?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola eMaggio

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Thrombin is a serine protease playing an essential role in the blood coagulation cascade. Recent work, however, has identified a novel role for thrombin-mediated signaling pathways in the central nervous system. Binding of thrombin to protease-activated receptors (PARs in the brain appears to have multiple actions affecting both health and disease. Specifically, thrombin has been shown to lead to the onset of seizures via PAR-1 activation. In this perspective article, we review the putative mechanisms by which thrombin causes seizures and epilepsy. We propose a potential role of PAR-1 antagonists and novel thrombin inhibitors as new, possible antiepileptic drugs.

  1. Seizures after intravenous tramadol given as premedication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalit Kumar Raiger

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A 35-year-old, 50-kg female with a history of epilepsy was scheduled for elective breast surgery (fibroadenoma under general anaesthesia. She was given glycopyrrolate 0.2 mg, ondansetron 4 mg and tramadol 100 mg i.v. as premedication. Within 5 min, she had an acute episode of generalised tonic-clonic seizure that was successfully treated with 75 mg thiopentone i.v. and after 30 min, she was given general anaesthesia with endotracheal intubation. Surgery, intra-operative period, extubation and post-operative period were uneventful. We conclude that tramadol may provoke seizures in patients with epilepsy even within the recommended dose range.

  2. Seizures due to high dose camphor ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekin, Hande Gazeteci; Gökben, Sarenur; Serdaroğlu, Gül

    2015-12-01

    Camphor is a cyclic ketone of the hydro aromatic terpene group. Today it is frequently used as a prescription or non-prescription topical antitussive, analgesic, anesthetic and antipruritic agent. Camphor which is considered an innocent drug by parents and physicians is a common household item which can lead to severe poisoning in children even when taken in small amounts. Neurotoxicity in the form of seizures can ocur soon after ingestion. A two-year old female patient who presented with a complaint of generalized tonic-clonic seizures after oral ingestion of camphor is presented. PMID:26884696

  3. 8 CFR 1280.21 - Seizure of aircraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Seizure of aircraft. 1280.21 Section 1280... REGULATIONS IMPOSITION AND COLLECTION OF FINES § 1280.21 Seizure of aircraft. Seizure of an aircraft under the authority of section 239 of the Act and § 1280.2 will not be made if such aircraft is damaged to an...

  4. 28 CFR 0.86 - Seizure of gambling devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Seizure of gambling devices. 0.86 Section... Bureau of Investigation § 0.86 Seizure of gambling devices. The Director, Associate Director, Assistants... General to make seizures of gambling devices (18 U.S.C. 1955(d), 15 U.S.C. 1171 et seq.) and wire or...

  5. Rapidly Learned Identification of Epileptic Seizures from Sonified EEG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Psyche eLoui

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Sonification refers to a process by which data are converted into sound, providing an auditory alternative to visual display. Currently, the prevalent method for diagnosing seizures in epilepsy is by visually reading a patient’s electroencephalogram (EEG. However, sonification of the EEG data provides certain advantages due to the nature of human auditory perception. We hypothesized that human listeners will be able to identify seizures from EEGs using the auditory modality alone, and that accuracy of seizure identification will increase after a short training session. Here we describe an algorithm we have used to sonify EEGs of both seizure and non-seizure activity, followed by a training study in which subjects listened to short clips of sonified EEGs and determine whether each clip was of seizure or normal activity, both before and after a short training session. Results show that before training subjects performed at chance level in differentiating seizures vs. non-seizures, but there was a significant improvement of accuracy after the training session. After training, subjects successfully distinguished seizures from non-seizures using the auditory modality alone. Further analyses using signal detection theory demonstrated improvement in sensitivity and reduction in response bias as a result of training. This study demonstrates the potential of sonified EEGs to be used for the detection of seizures. Future studies will attempt to increase accuracy using novel training and sonification modifications, with the goals of managing, predicting, and ultimately controlling seizures using sonification as a possible biofeedback-based intervention for epilepsy.

  6. Seizure-like activity during fentanyl anesthesia. A case report.

    OpenAIRE

    Webb, M. D.

    1990-01-01

    Fentanyl induced seizures have been described previously in the literature. Clinical observations has labeled the movements seen in fentanyl anesthesia as seizure activity but electroencephalographic studies have not supported this. A case of seizure-like activity after the administration of fentanyl in a 20-year-old female is reported.

  7. Out-of-body experiences associated with seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce eGreyson

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Alterations of consciousness are critical factors in the diagnosis of epileptic seizures. With these alterations in consciousness, some persons report sensations of separating from the physical body, experiences that may in rare cases resemble spontaneous out-of-body experiences. This study was designed to identify and characterize these out-of-body-like subjective experiences associated with seizure activity. 55% of the patients in this study recalled some subjective experience in association with their seizures. Among our sample of 100 patients, 7 reported out-of-body experiences associated with their seizures. We found no differentiating traits that were associated with patients’ reports of out-of-body experiences, in terms of either demographics; medical history, including age of onset and duration of seizure disorder, and seizure frequency; seizure characteristics, including localization, lateralization, etiology, and type of seizure, and epilepsy syndrome; or ability to recall any subjective experiences associated with their seizures. Reporting out-of-body experiences in association with seizures did not affect epilepsy-related quality of life. It should be noted that even in those patients who report out-of-body experiences, such sensations are extremely rare events that do not occur routinely with their seizures. Most patients who reported out-of-body experiences described one or two experiences that occurred an indeterminate number of years ago, which precludes the possibility of associating the experience with the particular characteristics of that one seizure or with medications taken or other conditions at the time.

  8. Drug treatment-related factors of inadequate seizure control.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Handoko, K.B.; Rijkom, JE Zwart-van; Visee, H.F.; Hermens, W.A.; Hekster, Y.A.; Egberts, T.C.G.

    2008-01-01

    To optimize seizure control it is important to identify modifiable factors. We conducted a case-control study to explore to what extent drug treatment-related factors are associated with seizures. Eighty-six patients with epilepsy were evaluated: 45 cases (recently experienced a seizure) and 41 cont

  9. Analysis of the Martian ozone cycle by assimilation of SPICAM observations

    OpenAIRE

    Holmes, J. A.; Lewis, S. R.; Patel, M.R.; Lefèvre, F.; Forget, F.

    2013-01-01

    Observations of ozone, a trace gas on Mars, have the potential to constrain atmospheric dynamical and physical processes. Current Mars Global Circulation Models (MGCMs) are able to represent the photochemistry occuring in the atmosphere, with comparisons to observations used to confine particular species. However, a long term comparison using data assimilation provides a more robust constraint on the model. We have assimilated total-ozone observations from SPICAM into an MGCM to study the Mar...

  10. Immunological perspectives of temporal lobe seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liimatainen, Suvi; Lehtimäki, Kai; Kai, Lehtimäki; Palmio, Johanna; Johanna, Palmio; Alapirtti, Tiina; Tiina, Alapirtti; Peltola, Jukka; Jukka, Peltola

    2013-10-15

    The temporal lobes are affected in many different neurological disorders, such as neurodegenerative diseases, viral and immunological encephalitides, and epilepsy. Both experimental and clinical evidence suggests a different inflammatory response to seizures in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) in comparison to those with extra-TLE (XTLE). Proinflammatory cytokines and several autoantibodies have been shown to be associated with TLE compared to other epilepsy types suggesting the specific role and structure of the temporal lobe. Abundant experience suggests that activation of both innate and adaptive immunity is associated with epilepsy, particularly refractory focal epilepsy. Limbic encephalitis often triggers temporal lobe seizures, and a proportion of these disorders are immune-mediated. Histological evidence shows activation of specific inflammatory pathways in resected temporal lobes of epileptic patients, and certain epileptic disorders have shown increased incidence in patients with autoimmune diseases. Rapid activation of proinflammatory cytokines is observed after single seizures, but there is also evidence of chronic overproduction of cytokines and other inflammatory mediators in patients with TLE, suggesting a neuromodulatory role of inflammation in epilepsy. In this review we summarize current data on the presence and the role of immunological factors in temporal lobe seizures, and their possible involvement in epileptogenesis. PMID:23998423

  11. Simple autonomic seizures and ictal enuresis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenzweig, Ivana; Varga, Edina T; Akeson, Per;

    2011-01-01

    manifestation of the de novo post-traumatic simple autonomic seizures. Source analysis of the ictal epileptiform discharges showed activation of the cortical areas surrounding the right inferior frontal sulcus, adjacent to the lesional zone. The case depicted here further endorses recent neuroimaging studies...

  12. [Classification of epileptic seizures and syndromes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noachtar, S; Rémi, J

    2012-02-01

    Advances in diagnostic and therapeutic options require a revision of the current classification of seizures and epilepsies. Recently, a classification proposal was introduced which reflects the ambivalence of the Internationalen Liga gegen Epilepsie (ILAE). We suggest that epileptology should utilize the same established systematic approach used in clinical neurology.

  13. Cardiac arrhythmias during or after epileptic seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Lende, Marije; Surges, Rainer; Sander, Josemir W; Thijs, Roland D

    2016-01-01

    Seizure-related cardiac arrhythmias are frequently reported and have been implicated as potential pathomechanisms of Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy (SUDEP). We attempted to identify clinical profiles associated with various (post)ictal cardiac arrhythmias. We conducted a systematic search from the first date available to July 2013 on the combination of two terms: ‘cardiac arrhythmias’ and ‘epilepsy’. The databases searched were PubMed, Embase (OVID version), Web of Science and COCHRANE Library. We attempted to identify all case reports and case series. We identified seven distinct patterns of (post)ictal cardiac arrhythmias: ictal asystole (103 cases), postictal asystole (13 cases), ictal bradycardia (25 cases), ictal atrioventricular (AV)-conduction block (11 cases), postictal AV-conduction block (2 cases), (post)ictal atrial flutter/atrial fibrillation (14 cases) and postictal ventricular fibrillation (3 cases). Ictal asystole had a mean prevalence of 0.318% (95% CI 0.316% to 0.320%) in people with refractory epilepsy who underwent video-EEG monitoring. Ictal asystole, bradycardia and AV-conduction block were self-limiting in all but one of the cases and seen during focal dyscognitive seizures. Seizure onset was mostly temporal (91%) without consistent lateralisation. Postictal arrhythmias were mostly found following convulsive seizures and often associated with (near) SUDEP. The contrasting clinical profiles of ictal and postictal arrhythmias suggest different pathomechanisms. Postictal rather than ictal arrhythmias seem of greater importance to the pathophysiology of SUDEP. PMID:26038597

  14. Targeting Pannexin1 Improves Seizure Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, Marcelo F.; Veliskova, Jana; Patel, Naman K.; Lutz, Sarah E.; Caille, Dorothee; Charollais, Anne; Meda, Paolo; Scemes, Eliana

    2011-01-01

    Imbalance of the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate and of the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA is one of several causes of seizures. ATP has also been implicated in epilepsy. However, little is known about the mechanisms involved in the release of ATP from cells and the consequences of the altered ATP signaling during seizures. Pannexin1 (Panx1) is found in astrocytes and in neurons at high levels in the embryonic and young postnatal brain, declining in adulthood. Panx1 forms large-conductance voltage sensitive plasma membrane channels permeable to ATP that are also activated by elevated extracellular K+ and following P2 receptor stimulation. Based on these properties, we hypothesized that Panx1 channels may contribute to seizures by increasing the levels of extracellular ATP. Using pharmacological tools and two transgenic mice deficient for Panx1 we show here that interference with Panx1 ameliorates the outcome and shortens the duration of kainic acid-induced status epilepticus. These data thus indicate that the activation of Panx1 in juvenile mouse hippocampi contributes to neuronal hyperactivity in seizures. PMID:21949881

  15. Targeting pannexin1 improves seizure outcome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo F Santiago

    Full Text Available Imbalance of the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate and of the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA is one of several causes of seizures. ATP has also been implicated in epilepsy. However, little is known about the mechanisms involved in the release of ATP from cells and the consequences of the altered ATP signaling during seizures. Pannexin1 (Panx1 is found in astrocytes and in neurons at high levels in the embryonic and young postnatal brain, declining in adulthood. Panx1 forms large-conductance voltage sensitive plasma membrane channels permeable to ATP that are also activated by elevated extracellular K(+ and following P2 receptor stimulation. Based on these properties, we hypothesized that Panx1 channels may contribute to seizures by increasing the levels of extracellular ATP. Using pharmacological tools and two transgenic mice deficient for Panx1 we show here that interference with Panx1 ameliorates the outcome and shortens the duration of kainic acid-induced status epilepticus. These data thus indicate that the activation of Panx1 in juvenile mouse hippocampi contributes to neuronal hyperactivity in seizures.

  16. Treatment Of Seizures In The Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleem MA

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing life expectancy over the preceding decades and trend towards further increase means that the elderly is now a growing section of the population. Seizures are a particularly common disorder in the age group. Considering that above the age of 50 years, one is prone to suffer from atleast one chromic illness, the interplay between associated medical and neurologic diseases and seizures need to be understood. These comorbidities like hypertension, cerebrovascular accidents, diabetes, renal failure and others not only contribute to seizures, they may also interfere with their appropriate treatment. Seizures, on the other hand, may be the cause of added morbidity like fractures, head injury and poor self esteem which may lead to poor quality of life. In addition, the unique pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and side effect profile of the various antieplileptic drugs in the elderly and the multiple drug interactions, require judicious use along with regular monitoring. However, an ideal antiepileptic drug for the elderly is yet to be found.

  17. Hippocampal kindling: corticosterone modulation of induced seizures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kloet, E.R. de; Cottrell, G.A.; Nyakas, C.; Bohus, B.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of adrenalectomy (ADX) and corticosterone replacement was studied on seizures induced by hippocampal kindling. A complex series of changes occurred in after-discharge (AD) and behavioural depression (BD) during the immediate hours after ADX, culminating at day 1 in markedly decreased AD a

  18. Seizures and Epilepsy in Sotos Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2012-01-01

    Clinicians from the Child Neurology Division, Sapienza University of Rome, and 7 other pediatric neurology centers in Italy report a series of 19 Sotos syndrome (SS) patients with febrile seizures (FS) and/or epilepsy during childhood and a long-term follow-up.

  19. Photosensitivity and visually induced seizures: review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Parra; S. Kalitzin; F.H. Lopes da Silva

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Interest in visually induced seizures has increased in recent years as a result of the increasing number of precipitants in our modern environment. This review addresses new developments in this field with special attention given to the emergence of new diagnostic, therapeutic and

  20. Curcumin inhibits amygdaloid kindled seizures in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Peng; LI Xin; LIN Hao-jie; PENG Wei-feng; LIU Jian-ying; MA Yu; FAN Wei; WANG Xin

    2009-01-01

    Background Curcumin can reduce the severity of seizures induced by kainate acid (KA), but the role of curcumin in amygdaloid kindled models is still unknown. This study aimed to explore the effect of curcumin on the development of kindling in amygdaloid kindled rats.Methods With an amygdaloid kindled Sprague-Dawley (SD) rat model and an electrophysiological method, differentdoses of curcumin (10 mg·kg-1·d-1 and 30 mg·kg-1·d-1as low dose groups, 100 mg·kg-1·d-1 and 300 mg·kg-1·d-1 as high dose groups) were administrated intraperitoneally during the whole kindling days, by comparison with the course of kindling, afterdischarge (AD) thresholds and the number of Ads to reach the stages of class Ⅰ to Ⅴ seizures in the rats between control and experimental groups. One-way or two-way ANOVA and Fisher's least significant difference post hoc test were used for statistical analyses.Results Curcumin (both 100 mg·kg-1·d-1 and 300 mg·kg-1·d-1) significantly inhibited the behavioral seizure development in the (19.80±9.25) and (21.70±9.21) stimulations respectively required to reach the kindled state. Rats treated with 100 mg·kg-1·d-1 curcumin 30 minutes before kindling stimulation showed an obvious increase in the stimulation current intensity required to evoke AD from (703.3±85.9) μA to (960.0±116.5) μA during the progression to class Ⅴ seizures. Rats treated with 300 mg·kg-1·d-1 curcumin showed a significant increase in the stimulation current intensity required to evoke AD from (735.0±65.2) μA to (86±7.093.4) μA during the progression to class Ⅴ seizures. Rats treated with 300 mg·kg-1·d-1 curcumin required much more evoked Ads to reach the stage of class both Ⅳ (as (199.83±12.47) seconds) and Ⅴ seizures (as (210.66±10.68) seconds). Rats treated with 100 mg·kg-1·d-1 curcumin required much more evoked Ads to reach the stage of class V seizures (as (219.56±18.24) seconds). Conclusion Our study suggests that curcumin has a potential

  1. Impact of assimilation window length on diurnal features in a Mars atmospheric analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongjing Zhao

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Effective simulation of diurnal variability is an important aspect of many geophysical data assimilation systems. For the Martian atmosphere, thermal tides are particularly prominent and contribute much to the Martian atmospheric circulation, dynamics and dust transport. To study the Mars diurnal variability and Mars thermal tides, the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Mars Global Climate Model with the 4D-local ensemble transform Kalman filter (4D-LETKF is used to perform an analysis assimilating spacecraft temperature retrievals. We find that the use of a ‘traditional’ 6-hr assimilation cycle induces spurious forcing of a resonantly enhanced semi-diurnal Kelvin waves represented in both surface pressure and mid-level temperature by forming a wave 4 pattern in the diurnal averaged analysis increment that acts as a ‘topographic’ stationary forcing. Different assimilation window lengths in the 4D-LETKF are introduced to remove the artificially induced resonance. It is found that short assimilation window lengths not only remove the spurious resonance, but also push the migrating semi-diurnal temperature variation at 50 Pa closer to the estimated ‘true’ tides even in the absence of a radiatively active water ice cloud parameterisation. In order to compare the performance of different assimilation window lengths, short-term to mid-range forecasts based on the hour 00 and 12 assimilation are evaluated and compared. Results show that during Northern Hemisphere summer, it is not the assimilation window length, but the radiatively active water ice clouds that influence the model prediction. A ‘diurnal bias correction’ that includes bias correction fields dependent on the local time is shown to effectively reduce the forecast root mean square differences between forecasts and observations, compensate for the absence of water ice cloud parameterisation and enhance Martian atmosphere prediction. The implications of these results for

  2. Levetiracetam seizure prophylaxis in craniotomy patients at high risk for postoperative seizures

    OpenAIRE

    Gokhale, Sankalp; Khan, Shariq Ali; Agrawal, Abhishek; Allan H Friedman; McDonagh, David L.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The risk of developing immediate postoperative seizures in patients undergoing supratentorial brain tumor surgery without anti-epileptic drug (AED) prophylaxis is 15-20%. Patients who present with pre-operative seizures and patients with supratentorial meningioma or supratentorial low grade gliomas are at significantly higher risk. There is little data on the efficacy of levetiracetam as a prophylactic AED in the immediate postoperative period (within 7 days of surgery) in these p...

  3. Ensemble Data Assimilation: Algorithms and Software

    OpenAIRE

    Nerger, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Ensemble data assimilation is nowadays applied to various problems to estimate a model state and model parameters by combining the model predictions with observational data. At the Alfred Wegener Institute, the assimilation focuses on ocean-sea ice models and coupled ocean-biogeochemical models. The high dimension of realistic models requires particularly efficient algorithms that are also usable on supercomputers. For the application of such filters, the Parallel Data Assimilation Framework ...

  4. Immigrant Job Search Assimilation in Canada

    OpenAIRE

    Bowlus, Audra J.; Miyairi, Masashi; Robinson, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Immigrant assimilation is a major issue in many countries. While most of the literature studies assimilation through a human capital framework, we examine the role of job search assimilation. To do so, we estimate an equilibrium search model of immigrants operating in the same labor market as natives, where newly arrived immigrants have lower job offer arrival rates than natives but can acquire the same arrival rates according to a stochastic process. Using Canadian panel data, we find substa...

  5. Assimilation and integration of immigrants in Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Aleksynska, Mariya; ALGAN, Yann

    2010-01-01

    This paper documents assimilation of immigrants in European destinations along cultural, civic, and economic dimensions, distinguishing by immigrants' generation, duration of stay, and origin. Based on the European Social Survey, it suggests that assimilation may have multiple facets, and take place at different speed depending on the outcome in question. While assimilation along some economic and cultural outcomes may be correlated, such correlations are not systematic, and imply that progre...

  6. Outline of an Economic Theory of Assimilation

    OpenAIRE

    Schaeffer, Peter V.

    2006-01-01

    In an age of mass immigration, assimilation is critical not only to the success of the immigrants but also to the success of their descendants and of the host society. This paper presents an outline for an economic theory of assimilation based on the assumption that both immigrants and natives invest in assimilation, that both may in fact move in the direction of the "other," and that the notion of "distance" is subjective and reversible.

  7. FEBRILE SEIZURE: RECURRENCE AND RISK FACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. TALEBIAN

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Background:Febrile Convulsion is the most common convulsive disorder in children,occurring in 2 to 4% of the pediatric population and recurring in 30-50% of cases. Considering the varying recurrence rates reported, thisstudy was conducted at the pediatric ward of the Shaheed BeheshtiGeneral Hospital, between 2000-2001 to determine the frequencyof recurrence and related risk factors in children presenting with theirfirst episode of febrile convulsionMaterials & Methods:A two–year cohort study was performed on 50 children presentingwith the first attack of febrile convulsion. Patient demographic dataincluding age, sex, type and duration of seizure, family history offebrile seizure or epilepsy and the interval between fever onset andoccurrence of seizure were recorded in questionnaires. Those patients,for whom prophylactic medication was not administered, werefollowed at three–month intervals for up to one year. Findings werestatistically analyzed using Fisher’s exact testResults:Recurrence was observed in twelve children (24% out of the fifty,being most common in patients aged less than one year (54.4%.Recurrence rates among children with a positive family history offebrile convulsion, presence of complex febrile seizure and positivefamily history of epilepsy were 42.1%, 42.8% and 25% respectively.From among those children with a “less than one hour” intervalbetween fever onset and occurrence of seizure, recurrence occurredin 43-7% of cases, while in those with a “more than one hourinterval”, 14.7% experienced recurrence.Conclusion:Recurrence rates are increased by certain factors including age-belowone year-, positive family history of febrile convulsion, and a “lessthan one hour” interval between time of fever onset and seizureoccurrence.

  8. Evaluation of Seizure Attacks in Patients with Cerebrovascular Accident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahim Koochaki

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The most common reason for seizure in elderly duration is the stroke. This study was conducted aiming to assess the frequency of seizure attack occurrence in those patients. Materials and Methods: This investigation was carried out through a cross-sectional method for one year on 330 patients admitted to the neurology ward as diagnosed with stroke. The required data was collected through the researcher-made questionnaire from the patients suffering from stoke which was diagnosed based on clinical findings, CT-Scan and MRI as required. Results: Among 330 patient suffering from stroke (162 men and 168 women, 48 cases (14.5% were suffering from seizure. Six percent of the patients had early seizure and another 8.5% had late seizure. Among 162 men suffering from the stroke, 32 ones were without seizures and 30 men were suffering the seizure. A number of 150 women out of total 168 ones suffering from the stroke, had no seizure and 18 others had seizures; frequency of seizure occurrence was more in male samples (p=0.044. In the people under 60 year, there were mostly early types of seizure (45% and in the age range above 60 year, it was mostly late type (89.3%. A 68.5% of the patients suffering from the seizure had experienced ischemic stroke. However, the frequency of seizure occurrence in the patients with hemorrhagic stroke was statistically greater (p=0.003. Conclusion: This examination showed that occurrence of seizure attacks in the people with stroke is 14.5% and it is seen more in the hemorrhagic strokes than ischemic ones. The frontoparietal area is the most common location involved and tonic clonic was the most common seizure in the patients suffering from it who have experienced the stroke

  9. Interictal spikes and epileptic seizures: their relationship and underlying rhythmicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karoly, Philippa J; Freestone, Dean R; Boston, Ray; Grayden, David B; Himes, David; Leyde, Kent; Seneviratne, Udaya; Berkovic, Samuel; O'Brien, Terence; Cook, Mark J

    2016-04-01

    We report on a quantitative analysis of electrocorticography data from a study that acquired continuous ambulatory recordings in humans over extended periods of time. The objectives were to examine patterns of seizures and spontaneous interictal spikes, their relationship to each other, and the nature of periodic variation. The recorded data were originally acquired for the purpose of seizure prediction, and were subsequently analysed in further detail. A detection algorithm identified potential seizure activity and a template matched filter was used to locate spikes. Seizure events were confirmed manually and classified as either clinically correlated, electroencephalographically identical but not clinically correlated, or subclinical. We found that spike rate was significantly altered prior to seizure in 9 out of 15 subjects. Increased pre-ictal spike rate was linked to improved predictability; however, spike rate was also shown to decrease before seizure (in 6 out of the 9 subjects). The probability distribution of spikes and seizures were notably similar, i.e. at times of high seizure likelihood the probability of epileptic spiking also increased. Both spikes and seizures showed clear evidence of circadian regulation and, for some subjects, there were also longer term patterns visible over weeks to months. Patterns of spike and seizure occurrence were highly subject-specific. The pre-ictal decrease in spike rate is not consistent with spikes promoting seizures. However, the fact that spikes and seizures demonstrate similar probability distributions suggests they are not wholly independent processes. It is possible spikes actively inhibit seizures, or that a decreased spike rate is a secondary symptom of the brain approaching seizure. If spike rate is modulated by common regulatory factors as seizures then spikes may be useful biomarkers of cortical excitability.media-1vid110.1093/brain/aww019_video_abstractaww019_video_abstract. PMID:26912639

  10. A virtual reality catchment for data assimilation experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalge, Bernd; Rihani, Jehan; Haese, Barbara; Baroni, Gabriele; Erdal, Daniel; Neuweiler, Insa; Hendricks-Franssen, Harrie-Jan; Geppert, Gernot; Ament, Felix; Kollet, Stefan; Cirpka, Olaf; Saavedra, Pablo; Han, Xujun; Attinger, Sabine; Kunstmann, Harald; Vereecken, Harry; Simmer, Clemens

    2016-04-01

    Current data assimilation (DA) systems often lack the possibility to assimilate measurements across compartments to accurately estimate states and fluxes in subsurface-land surface-atmosphere systems (SLAS). In order to develop a new DA framework that is able to realize this cross-compartmental assimilation a comprehensive testing environment is needed. Therefore a virtual reality (VR) catchment is constructed with the Terrestrial System Modeling Platform (TerrSysMP). This catchment mimics the Neckar catchment in Germany. TerrSysMP employs the atmospheric model COSMO, the land surface model CLM and the hydrological model ParFlow coupled with the external coupler OASIS. We will show statistical tests to prove the plausibility of the VR. The VR is running in a fully-coupled mode (subsurface - land surface - atmosphere) which includes the interactions of subsurface dynamics with the atmosphere, such as the effects of soil moisture, which can influence near-surface temperatures, convection patterns or the surface heat fluxes. A reference high resolution run serves as the "truth" from which virtual observations are extracted with observation operators like virtual rain gauges, synoptic stations and satellite observations (amongst others). This effectively solves the otherwise often encountered data scarcity issues with respect to DA. Furthermore an ensemble of model runs at a reduced resolution is performed. This ensemble serves also for open loop runs to be compared with data assimilation experiments. The model runs with this ensemble served to identify sets of parameters that are especially sensitive to changes and have the largest impact on the system. These parameters were the focus of subsequent ensemble simulations and DA experiments. We will show to what extend the VR states can be re-constructed using data assimilation methods with only a limited number of virtual observations available.

  11. Towards Operational Data Assimilation in the North and Baltic Seas with the Parallel Data Assimilation Framework

    OpenAIRE

    Nerger, Lars; Loza, Svetlana; Schröter, Jens; Hiller, Wolfgang; F. Janssen

    2010-01-01

    Within the GMES-related project DeMarine Environment, the operational circulation model of the German Maritime and Hydrographic Agency (BSH) is extended into a data assimilation system. The aim of the data assimilation is to improve the forecast of sea surface height, temperatura, currents and salinity in the North and Baltic Seas. For the data assimilation component, the Parallel Data Assimilation Framework (PDAF, http://pdaf.awi.de) is coupled to the operational circulation model. PDAF prov...

  12. Nerve agent-induced seizures and their pharmacological modulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonough, J.H.; Shih, T.M.; Adams, N.L.; Koviak, T.A.; Cook, L.A.

    1993-05-13

    Intoxication with nerve agents produces prolonged central nervous system seizures (status epilepticus) that can produce irreversible brain pathology (15). This report summarizes our recent findings regarding the neurotransmitter changes that occur in discrete brain regions as a function of seizure duration and the differential effectiveness of anticholinergic, benzodiazepine and excitatory amino acid (EAA) antagonist drugs in terminating soman-induced seizures when given at different times after seizure onset. These results are discussed in relation to a model we have proposed to explain the sequence of electrophysiological, biochemical and neurochemical events and mechanisms controlling nerve agent-induced seizures.

  13. Detection of Epileptic Seizures with Multi-modal Signal Processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conradsen, Isa

    phase of GTC) and simulated seizures. This was valuable information concerning a seizure detection algorithm, and the findings from this research provided evidence for a change in the definition of these seizures by the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE). Our final study presents a novel...... algorithms for these based on uni- or multimodalities. Regarding seizure detection, the highest potential clinical relevance is for the generalized tonic-clonic (GTC) seizures, as these are associated with an increased risk for sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) in unsupervised patients. Several...

  14. Compensation for Complete Assimilation in Speech Perception: The Case of Korean Labial-to-Velar Assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitterer, Holger; Kim, Sahyang; Cho, Taehong

    2013-01-01

    In connected speech, phonological assimilation to neighboring words can lead to pronunciation variants (e.g., "garden bench" [arrow right] "garde'm' bench"). A large body of literature suggests that listeners use the phonetic context to reconstruct the intended word for assimilation types that often lead to incomplete assimilations (e.g., a…

  15. Altimeter data assimilation in the tropical Indian Ocean using water property conserving scheme

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bhasha M Mankad; Rashmi Sharma; Sujit Basu; P K Pal

    2012-02-01

    Altimeter data have been assimilated in an ocean general circulation model using the water property conserving scheme. Two runs of the model have been conducted for the year 2004. In one of the runs, altimeter data have been assimilated sequentially, while in another run, assimilation has been suppressed. Assimilation has been restricted to the tropical Indian Ocean. An assessment of the strength of the scheme has been carried out by comparing the sea surface temperature (SST), simulated in the two runs, with in situ derived as well as remotely sensed observations of the same quantity. It has been found that the assimilation exhibits a significant positive impact on the simulation of SST. The subsurface effect of the assimilation could be judged by comparing the model simulated depth of the 20°C isotherm (hereafter referred to as D20), as a proxy of the thermocline depth, with the same quantity estimated from ARGO observations. In this case also, the impact is noteworthy. Effect on the dynamics has been judged by comparison of simulated surface current with observed current at a moored buoy location, and finally the impact on model sea level forecast in a free run after assimilation has been quantified in a representative example.

  16. Data Assimilation - Advances and Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Brian J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-07-30

    This presentation provides an overview of data assimilation (model calibration) for complex computer experiments. Calibration refers to the process of probabilistically constraining uncertain physics/engineering model inputs to be consistent with observed experimental data. An initial probability distribution for these parameters is updated using the experimental information. Utilization of surrogate models and empirical adjustment for model form error in code calibration form the basis for the statistical methodology considered. The role of probabilistic code calibration in supporting code validation is discussed. Incorporation of model form uncertainty in rigorous uncertainty quantification (UQ) analyses is also addressed. Design criteria used within a batch sequential design algorithm are introduced for efficiently achieving predictive maturity and improved code calibration. Predictive maturity refers to obtaining stable predictive inference with calibrated computer codes. These approaches allow for augmentation of initial experiment designs for collecting new physical data. A standard framework for data assimilation is presented and techniques for updating the posterior distribution of the state variables based on particle filtering and the ensemble Kalman filter are introduced.

  17. SERUM ZINC LEVEL IN PATIENTS WITH SIMPLE FEBRILE SEIZURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad HEYDARIAN

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo evaluate the serum zinc level of the patients with simple febrile seizure and compare them with febrile children without seizure.Materials & MethodsThis prospective case - control study was performed on 60 patients aged 6 months to 6 years from Apr. 2009 to Jan.2010 in Ghaem, Imam Reza and Dr. Sheikh Hospitals in Mashhad. The serum zinc level was assessed and compared between the cases (30 individuals who suffered from simple febrile seizure and the controls (30 individuals who had fever without seizure.ResultsMean serum zinc level was 663.7 µg /l and 758.33  µg /l in the case group and the control group, respectively (PConclusionIt was revealed that the serum level of zinc was significantly lower in children with simple febrile seizure in comparison with febrile children without seizure.Keywords: Simple febrile seizure, children, zinc, CSF (cerebrospinal fluid

  18. Analysis of Seizure EEG in Kindled Epileptic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Sen

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Using wavelet analysis we have detected the presence of chirps in seizure EEG signals recorded from kindled epileptic rats. Seizures were induced by electrical stimulation of the amygdala and the EEG signals recorded from the amygdala were analyzed using a continuous wavelet transform. A time–frequency representation of the wavelet power spectrum revealed that during seizure the EEG signal is characterized by a chirp-like waveform whose frequency changes with time from the onset of seizure to its completion. Similar chirp-like time–frequency profiles have been observed in newborn and adult patients undergoing epileptic seizures. The global wavelet spectrum depicting the variation of power with frequency showed two dominant frequencies with the largest amounts of power during seizure. Our results indicate that a kindling paradigm in rats can be used as an animal model of human temporal lobe epilepsy to detect seizures by identifying chirp-like time–frequency variations in the EEG signal.

  19. Metabolic Disruption in Drosophila Bang-Sensitive Seizure Mutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fergestad, Tim; Bostwick, Bret; Ganetzky, Barry

    2006-01-01

    We examined a number of Drosophila mutants with increased susceptibility to seizures following mechanical or electrical stimulation to better understand the underlying factors that predispose neurons to aberrant activity. Several mutations in this class have been molecularly identified and suggest metabolic disruption as a possible source for increased seizure susceptibility. We mapped the bang-sensitive seizure mutation knockdown (kdn) to cytological position 5F3 and identified citrate synthase as the affected gene. These results further support a role for mitochondrial metabolism in controlling neuronal activity and seizure susceptibility. Biochemical analysis in bang-sensitive mutants revealed reductions in ATP levels consistent with disruption of mitochondrial energy production in these mutants. Electrophysiological analysis of mutants affecting mitochondrial proteins revealed an increased likelihood for a specific pattern of seizure activity. Our data implicate cellular metabolism in regulating seizure susceptibility and suggest that differential sensitivity of neuronal subtypes to metabolic changes underlies distinct types of seizure activity. PMID:16648587

  20. A data assimilation methodology for reconstructing turbulent flows around aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Hiroshi; Yoshizawa, Akira; Ueno, Genta; Obayashi, Shigeru

    2015-02-01

    This paper proposes a new approach for the study of complex turbulent flows of aeronautics that integrates experimental fluid dynamics (EFD), employing methods such as wind tunnel experiments, and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) by using a data assimilation technique. The approach aims at representing complex turbulent flows more properly than conventional EFD and CFD approaches by estimating the proper angle of attack, the proper Mach number, and the proper turbulent viscosity, which are the three uncertainty factors in EFD and CFD. To this end, the ensemble transform Kalman filter (ETKF), a sequential advanced data assimilation method, is employed for the estimation and applied to transonic flows around the RAE 2822 airfoil (two-dimensional flow) and transonic flows around the ONERA M6 wing (three-dimensional flow). The results computed using the angles of attack, Mach numbers, and turbulent viscosities estimated by the ETKF diminish the discrepancies between the results of standard computations and experiments. These findings show the effectiveness of this approach, which combines EFD and CFD using data assimilation to represent complex turbulent flows.

  1. Data Assimilation by Conditioning of Driving Noise on Future Observations

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Wonjung

    2014-08-01

    Conventional recursive filtering approaches, designed for quantifying the state of an evolving stochastic dynamical system with intermittent observations, use a sequence of i) an uncertainty propagation step followed by ii) a step where the associated data is assimilated using Bayes\\' rule. Alternatively, the order of the steps can be switched to i) one step ahead data assimilation followed by ii) uncertainty propagation. In this paper, we apply this smoothing-based sequential filter to systems driven by random noise, however with the conditioning on future observation not only to the system variable but to the driving noise. Our research reveals that, for the nonlinear filtering problem, the conditioned driving noise is biased by a nonzero mean and in turn pushes forward the filtering solution in time closer to the true state when it drives the system. As a result our proposed method can yield a more accurate approximate solution for the state estimation problem. © 1991-2012 IEEE.

  2. Mutations in KPTN Cause Macrocephaly, Neurodevelopmental Delay, and Seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baple, Emma L.; Maroofian, Reza; Chioza, Barry A.; Izadi, Maryam; Cross, Harold E.; Al-Turki, Saeed; Barwick, Katy; Skrzypiec, Anna; Pawlak, Robert; Wagner, Karin; Coblentz, Roselyn; Zainy, Tala; Patton, Michael A.; Mansour, Sahar; Rich, Phillip; Qualmann, Britta; Hurles, Matt E.; Kessels, Michael M.; Crosby, Andrew H.

    2014-01-01

    The proper development of neuronal circuits during neuromorphogenesis and neuronal-network formation is critically dependent on a coordinated and intricate series of molecular and cellular cues and responses. Although the cortical actin cytoskeleton is known to play a key role in neuromorphogenesis, relatively little is known about the specific molecules important for this process. Using linkage analysis and whole-exome sequencing on samples from families from the Amish community of Ohio, we have demonstrated that mutations in KPTN, encoding kaptin, cause a syndrome typified by macrocephaly, neurodevelopmental delay, and seizures. Our immunofluorescence analyses in primary neuronal cell cultures showed that endogenous and GFP-tagged kaptin associates with dynamic actin cytoskeletal structures and that this association is lost upon introduction of the identified mutations. Taken together, our studies have identified kaptin alterations responsible for macrocephaly and neurodevelopmental delay and define kaptin as a molecule crucial for normal human neuromorphogenesis. PMID:24239382

  3. The Race Race: Assimilation in America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balis, Andrea; Aman, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Can race and assimilation be taught? Interdisciplinary pedagogy provides a methodology, context, and use of nontraditional texts culled from American cultural history such as from, theater and historical texts. This approach and these texts prove useful for an examination of race and assimilation in America. The paper describes a course that while…

  4. Prediction of geomagnetic secular variation using data assimilation techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. An important part of geopotential research is to develop models of the time-varying geomagnetic field, not only for scientific use but for practical purposes. The IGRF is the most commonly used model of the field; a very important aspect of this model is the secular variation (SV) model, from which predictions of the field are calculated up to 5 years after the initial epoch. This predictive model is currently calculated from observations alone. Here we propose a new approach, assimilating geomagnetic observations to geodynamo models for SV prediction. Assimilation of measurements and numerical models has been widely used in atmospheric and oceanic studies to better estimate the true dynamical states and to predict more accurately the changes of the observables in future. Similar approaches could be very useful for geomagnetic field modeling, in particular prediction of geomagnetic secular variation (SV) on decadal time scales. We have developed a geomagnetic data assimilation system (MoSSTDAS) to combine geomagnetic field model output for the past 7000 years and our numerical core dynamics model to better constrain the (numerical) core state, and to predict geomagnetic field and secular variations up to 20 years. Our forecast is very accurate. For 5-year forecast, the correlation between the field morphologies at the core-mantle boundary is greater than 99.5% over the 20th century, while the correlation between SVs is larger than 95%. To examine the broad applicability, we are modifying the assimilation process to best emulate the standard practice (e.g. IGRF) in the geomagnetic community, and to benchmark our results with those documented and published in the past.

  5. Local cerebral metabolism during partial seizures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engel, J. Jr.; Kuhl, D.E.; Phelps, M.E.; Rausch, R.; Nuwer, M.

    1983-04-01

    Interictal and ictal fluorodeoxyglucose scans were obtained with positron CT from four patients with spontaneous recurrent partial seizures, one with epilepsia partialis continua, and one with a single partial seizure induced by electrical stimulation of the hippocampus. Ictal metabolic patterns were different for each patient studied. Focal and generalized increased and decreased metabolism were observed. Ictal hypermetabolism may exceed six times the interictal rate and could represent activation of excitatory or inhibitory synapses in the epileptogenic region and its projection fields. Hypometabolism seen on ictal scans most likely reflects postictal depression and may indicate projection fields of inhibited neurons. No quantitative relationship between alterations in metabolism and EEG or behavioral measurements of ictal events could be demonstrated.

  6. Downscaling wind energy resource from mesoscale to microscale model and data assimilating field measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main objective of this research work is to develop and evaluate several coupling methods between operational Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) model and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model and data assimilate the field measurements into the CFD model. To address the problem of high spatial variation of the topography on the domain lateral boundaries between NWP and CFD domain boundaries, 3 methods – translation, extrapolation and Cressman interpolation are used to impose the NWP model data on the CFD domain lateral boundaries. Newtonian relaxation data assimilation technique is used to incorporate the field measurement data into the CFD simulations. These techniques are studied in a complex site located in southern France. Comparison of wind profiles between the CFD simulation, measurements and CFD simulation with data assimilation are discussed. This combination of state-of-the-art techniques in NWP, CFD, and field data assimilation will provide the basis of a more accurate wind resource assessment method

  7. Advanced Data Assimilation for Geosciences : Lecture Notes of the Les Houches School of Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Bocquet, Marc; Cosme, Emmanuel; Cugliandolo, Leticia F

    2014-01-01

    This book gathers notes from lectures and seminars given during a three-week school on theoretical and applied data assimilation held in Les Houches in 2012. Data assimilation aims at determining as accurately as possible the state of a dynamical system by combining heterogeneous sources of information in an optimal way. Generally speaking, the mathematical methods of data assimilation describe algorithms for forming optimal combinations of observations of a system, a numerical model that describes its evolution, and appropriate prior information. Data assimilation has a long history of application to high-dimensional geophysical systems dating back to the 1960s, with application to the estimation of initial conditions for weather forecasts. It has become a major component of numerical forecasting systems in geophysics, and an intensive field of research, with numerous additional applications in oceanography and atmospheric chemistry, with extensions to other geophysical sciences. The physical complexity and ...

  8. Physics of the Brain: Interaction of the Optical-Fiber-Guided Multi-Ultraviolet-Photon Beams with the Epilepsy Topion, (the Seizure Onset Area)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, V. Alexander

    A novel method for the possible prevention of epileptic seizures is proposed, based on the multi-ultraviolet-photon beam interaction with the epilepsy topion, (nonlinear coupling of an ultra high frequency mode to the brain beta phonons). It is hypothesized that epilepsy is a chaotic-dynamics phenomenon: small electrical changes in the epilepsy-topion lead, (within the 10s of milliseconds), to the onset of chaos, (seizure--excessive electrical discharge), and subsequent cascading into adjacent areas. The ultraviolet photons may control the imbalance of sodium and potassium ions and, consequently, may prove to be efficient in the prevention of epileptic seizures. Supported by Nikola Tesla Labs, Stefan University.

  9. Eslicarbazepine acetate for partial-onset seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauchenzauner, Markus; Luef, Gerhard

    2011-12-01

    Eslicarbazepine acetate (ESL), a new voltage-gated sodium channel blocker that is chemically related to carbamazepine and partially metabolized to oxcarbazepine, has attracted attention as results of previous Phase II and III studies demonstrated and confirmed efficacy and tolerability of ESL 800 and 1200 mg once daily as add-on therapy for adult patients with drug-resistant partial-onset seizures. In children, efficacy data point towards a dose-dependent decrease in seizure frequency and tolerability analyses showed a low incidence of mild drug-related adverse effects at 5 and 15 mg/kg/day. The most frequently reported adverse effects were dizziness, somnolence, headache, diplopia, nausea and vomiting. The convenience of once-daily dosing and a short/simple titration regimen in combination with a comparative efficacy and tolerability profile might promote ESL as a valid alternative to the current adjunctive antiepileptic drug therapy armamentarium for drug-resistant partial seizures in adults. Since clinical trials in children and adolescents on ESL efficacy and safety are ongoing and data already published are far from conclusive, the therapeutic value of ESL in this special population has to be established in the near future. PMID:22091592

  10. Post-stroke seizures in consecutive elderly stroke patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yue Chen; Lufang Chen; Yiqing Tao; Maomao Han; Chunlan Cui; Shichao Liu

    2011-01-01

    This prospective study sought to investigate the clinical, radiological and electroencephalographic (EEG) characteristics of seizures in elderly stroke patients, and their outcomes. Over a 2-year study period, 158 consecutive eldedy patients with stroke were examined and followed up. Of these patients, 32 (20%) developed seizures, primarily related to stroke, within a follow up period between 5 months and 2 years. Of these 32 cases, 20 experienced infarctions, and 12 experienced hemorrhages. Involvement of cortical regions was detected in most of the patients exhibiting seizures. In these patients, 44% of the lesions involved cortical areas exclusively or in addition to subcortical areas observed on computed tomography (CT) images. Twenty-five patients (78%)developed early seizures (within 2 weeks after stroke), and half exhibited immediate post-stroke seizures. None of the patients exhibiting early onset seizures developed recurrent seizures or epilepsy, while 57% of late onset seizures (four cases) developed epilepsy. No specific EEG patterns were apparent in those who later developed epilepsy. Overall, early onset seizures after stroke were found to be relatively common, and did not affect outcome. Late onset seizures were less common, but were associated with chronic epilepsy.

  11. Perspectives on seizure clusters: Gaps in lexicon, awareness, and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buelow, Janice M; Shafer, Patricia; Shinnar, Ruth; Austin, Joan; Dewar, Sandra; Long, Lucretia; O'Hara, Kathryn; Santilli, Nancy

    2016-04-01

    Seizure clusters in epilepsy can result in serious outcomes such as missed work or school, postictal psychosis, emergency room visits, or hospitalizations, and yet they are often not included in discussions between health-care professionals (HCPs) and their patients. The purpose of this paper was to describe and compare consumer (patient and caregivers) and professional understanding of seizure clusters and to describe how consumers and HCPs communicate regarding seizure clusters. We reviewed social media discussion sites to explore consumers' understanding of seizure clusters. We analyzed professional (medical) literature to explore the HCPs' understanding of seizure clusters. Major themes were revealed in one or both groups, including: communication about diagnosis; frequency, duration, and time frame; seizure type and pattern; severity; and self-management. When comparing discussions of professionals and consumers, both consumers and clinicians discussed the definition of seizure clusters. Discussions of HCPs were understandably clinically focused, and consumer discussions reflected the experience of seizure clusters; however, both groups struggled with a common lexicon. Seizure cluster events remain a problem associated with serious outcomes. Herein, we outline the lack of a common understanding and recommend the development of a common lexicon to improve communication regarding seizure clusters. PMID:26906403

  12. Epileptic seizures in patients with a posterior circulation infarct

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yüksel Kaplan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of seizures and the clinical features of patients with seizures related to a posterior circulation infarct (POCI. METHODS: We reviewed all ischemic stroke patients admitted to our clinic between January 2011 and January 2012. The patients’ database information was retrospectively analyzed. Fifty-five patients with a POCI were included in the study. We reviewed all patients with epileptic seizures related to a POCI. Age, gender, recurrent stroke, risk factors, etiology, radiographic localization, the seizure type and onset time, and the electroencephalographic findings of patients were evaluated. We excluded all patients who had precipitating conditions during seizures such as taking drugs, acid-base disturbances, electrolyte imbalance, and history of epilepsy. RESULTS: Seizures were observed in four patients (3 male, 1 female with a POCI related epileptic seizures (7.2%. The etiology of strokes was cardiac-embolic in 3 patients and vertebral artery dissection in 1 patient. Seizures occurred in 2 patients as presenting finding, in 1 patient within 7 days, and 1 patient within 28 days. Primary generalized tonic-clonic seizures occurred in 3 patients and simple partial seizures with secondary generalization in 1 patient. Three patients had cerebellum infarction at the left hemisphere. One patient had lateral medullary infarction at the right side. The electroencephalographic findings of patients were normal. CONCLUSION: Studies involving patients with seizures related to a POCI are novel and few in number. Three patients with seizure had cerebellum infarction. The cerebellum in these patients may contribute via different mechanisms over seizure activity.

  13. Assimilation de données: les propriétés asymptotiques du filtre de Kalman d'ensemble

    OpenAIRE

    Tran, Vu Duc

    2009-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the data assimilation methods which combine the dynamical model with the observations. We present the well-known methods: statistical interpolation, variational data assimilation methods and sequential data assimilation methods. We are particularly interested in the Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) which is more and more used in the oceanographic applications. The Ensemble Kalman Filter has been initially proposed as approximation of the Kalman filter in the case of...

  14. A New Approach to Data Assimilation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Bin; ZHAO Ying

    2006-01-01

    A significant attempt to design a timesaving and efficient four-dimensional variational data assimilation dimensional variational data assimilation of mapped observation (3DVM)' is proposed, based on the new concept of mapped observation and the new idea of backward 4DVar. Like the available 4DVar, 3DVM produces an optimal initial condition (IC) that is consistent with the prediction model due to the inclusion of model constraints and best fits the observations in the assimilation window through the model solution trajectory. Different from the 4DVar, the IC derived from 3DVM is located at the end of the assimilation window rather than at the beginning conventionally. This change greatly reduces the computing cost for the new approach, which is almost the same as that of the three-dimensional variational data assimilation (3DVar). Especially, such a change is able to improve assimilation accuracy because it does not need the tangential linear and adjoint approximations to calculate the gradient of cost function. Therefore,in numerical test, the new approach produces better IC than 4DVar does for 72-h simulation of TY9914(Dan), by assimilating the three-dimensional fields of temperature and wind retrieved from the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A) observations. Meanwhile, it takes only 1/7 of the computing cost that the 4DVar requires for the same initialization with the same retrieved data.

  15. 8 CFR 280.21 - Seizure of aircraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Seizure of aircraft. 280.21 Section 280.21... OF FINES § 280.21 Seizure of aircraft. Seizure of an aircraft under the authority of section 239 of the Act and § 280.2 will not be made if such aircraft is damaged to an extent that its value is...

  16. Noradrenergic mechanism in the regulation of seizures in GEPR.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kwang-HoKo; Dong-OokSeo; Jae-RyunRyu; Chan-YoungShin

    2004-01-01

    Genetically epilepsy prone rat (GEPR) is a model of generalized tonic/clonic epilepsy and a useful tool in the understanding of basic mechanisms of human epilepsy. GEPR is susceptible to audiogenic seizure, hyperthermia induced seizure,and has lower threshold for electrical and chemical stimuli. Several strains of GEPR, from GEPR-3 to GEPR-9, are available depending on the degree of the intensity of audiogenic seizure.

  17. Seizure Prediction and Detection via Phase and Amplitude Lock Values

    OpenAIRE

    Mark H Myers; Padmanabha, Akshay; Hossain, Gahangir; de Jongh Curry, Amy L.; Blaha, Charles D.

    2015-01-01

    A robust seizure prediction methodology would enable a “closed-loop” system that would only activate as impending seizure activity is detected. Such a system would eliminate ongoing stimulation to the brain, thereby eliminating such side effects as coughing, hoarseness, voice alteration, and paresthesias (Murphy et al., 1998; Ben-Menachem, 2001), while preserving overall battery life of the system. The seizure prediction and detection algorithm uses Phase/Amplitude Lock Values (PLV/ALV) which...

  18. Seizure Prediction and Detection via Phase and Amplitude Lock Values

    OpenAIRE

    Mark H Myers; Ashay ePadmanabha; Gahangir eHossain; Amy ede Jongh Curry; Blaha, Charles D.

    2016-01-01

    A robust seizure prediction methodology would enable a ‘closed-loop’ system that would only activate as impending seizure activity is detected. Such a system would eliminate ongoing stimulation to the brain, thereby eliminating such side effects as coughing, hoarseness, voice alteration, and paresthesias (Murphy et al., 1998, Ben-Menachem, 2001), while preserving overall battery life of the system. The seizure prediction and detection algorithm uses Phase/Amplitude Lock Values (PLV/ALV) whi...

  19. Surface acoustic wave probe implant for predicting epileptic seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalsami, Nachappa; Kulikov, Stanislav; Osorio, Ivan; Raptis, Apostolos C.

    2012-04-24

    A system and method for predicting and avoiding a seizure in a patient. The system and method includes use of an implanted surface acoustic wave probe and coupled RF antenna to monitor temperature of the patient's brain, critical changes in the temperature characteristic of a precursor to the seizure. The system can activate an implanted cooling unit which can avoid or minimize a seizure in the patient.

  20. A missed orthopaedic injury following a seizure: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Connor-Read Laurence

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Numerous orthopaedic injuries can follow a seizure and are often diagnosed late. This is the first documented case of a missed bilateral anterior shoulder dislocation following a seizure. The possible reasons for the greater incidence of posterior dislocations are examined and why bilateral anterior dislocations following a seizure are so rare. The article discusses the reasons for the delay and highlights potential pitfalls and learning points for junior emergency department doctors.

  1. Febrile Seizure Related with Adenovirus Gastroenteritis: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Arslan, Müjgan; Ermiştekin, Halime; Güngör, Serdal

    2015-01-01

    Febrile seizure is the most common, age-dependant, benign, and fever-related convulsion of childhood. Its pathogenesis is still not clear. Fever causing febrile seizures is usually associated with viral infections, mostly upper respiratory tract infections, otitis media, tonsillitis, or urinary tract infections. The incidence of febrile convulsions during gastroenteritis is lower and gastroenteritis is thought to exert a protective feature in febril seizures. Although the most common pathogen...

  2. Mortality predictors of epilepsy and epileptic seizures among hospitalized elderly

    OpenAIRE

    Telma M.R. de Assis; Aroldo Bacellar; Gersonita Costa; Nascimento, Osvaldo J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy and epileptic seizures are common brain disorders in the elderly and are associated with increased mortality that may be ascribed to the underlying disease or epilepsy-related causes. Objective To describe mortality predictors of epilepsy and epileptic seizures in elderly inpatients.Method Retrospective analysis was performed on hospitalized elderly who had epilepsy or epileptic seizures, from January 2009 to December 2010. One hundred and twenty patients were enrolled.Results The mo...

  3. INTERMITTENT CLONAZEPAM IN THE PREVENTION OF RECURRENT FEBRILE SEIZURES

    OpenAIRE

    Touran MAHMOUDIAN; Omid YAGHINI; Shirin BAJOGHLI

    2010-01-01

    ObjectiveTo evaluate the efficacy and common side effects of intermittent clonazepam in febrile  seizures.Materials & MethodsThis study was an experimental trial designed to determine the efficacy of intermittent clonazepam in febrile seizures .Thirty patients with an age range of 6 months to 5 years (60% male, 40% female) were studied. Children with a history of psychomotor delay, abnormal  neurological examination, a history of antiepileptic drug consumption, and afebrile seizures were excl...

  4. Seizure in later life: an ode to the elderly

    OpenAIRE

    Raminderpal Singh Sibia; Amith Kumar S; Honey Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Background: Seizure disorder and epilepsy are one of the common presenting symptoms to an emergency department for geriatric population. Cerebrovascular accident, metabolic derangement, trauma, neurodegenerative diseases, tumor, infections and psychiatric illnesses add up to the frequent etiological spectrum of seizure in elderly. Objective of current study was to describe clinical and etiological spectrum of seizures in later life. Methods: This retrospective study was conducted from medi...

  5. Predictive factors for generalized seizures after deliberate citalopram overdose

    OpenAIRE

    Waring, W Stephen; Gray, Julie A; Graham, Ann

    2008-01-01

    WHAT IS ALREADY KNOWN ABOUT THIS SUBJECTCitalopram is a common means of self-poisoning in young adults.Generalized seizures are a recognised complication after selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor overdose (including citalopram overdose). WHAT THIS STUDY ADDSThe minimum stated citalopram dose associated with seizures in the absence of co-ingested drugs was 400 mg.Co-ingestion of a tricyclic antidepressant or venlafaxine confers a 15-fold increased risk of seizures.

  6. Camphor poisoning: An unusual cause of seizure in children

    OpenAIRE

    Chaitali Patra; Shatanik Sarkar; Malay Kumar Dasgupta; Amit Das

    2015-01-01

    Camphor is a pleasant-smelling cyclic ketone with propensity to cause neurologic side-effect, especially seizures. We report a case of 1½-year-old child who after inadvertent consumption of camphor, experienced an episode of generalized tonic clonic seizure. This case highlights the importance of enquiring any intake of material (medicinal or otherwise) in every patient presenting with seizure and notifying presence of typical smell, if any.

  7. Camphor poisoning: An unusual cause of seizure in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaitali Patra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Camphor is a pleasant-smelling cyclic ketone with propensity to cause neurologic side-effect, especially seizures. We report a case of 1½-year-old child who after inadvertent consumption of camphor, experienced an episode of generalized tonic clonic seizure. This case highlights the importance of enquiring any intake of material (medicinal or otherwise in every patient presenting with seizure and notifying presence of typical smell, if any.

  8. The Future of Seizure Prediction and Intervention: Closing the loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaraj, Vivek; Lee, Steven; Krook-Magnuson, Esther; Soltesz, Ivan; Benquet, Pascal; Irazoqui, Pedro; Netoff, Theoden

    2014-01-01

    The ultimate goal of epilepsy therapies is to provide seizure control for all patients while eliminating side effects. Improved specificity of intervention through on-demand approaches may overcome many of the limitations of current intervention strategies. This article reviews progress in seizure prediction and detection, potential new therapies to provide improved specificity, and devices to achieve these ends. Specifically, we discuss 1) potential signal modalities and algorithms for seizure detection and prediction, 2) closed-loop intervention approaches, and 3) hardware for implementing these algorithms and interventions. Seizure prediction and therapies maximize efficacy while minimizing side-effects through improved specificity may represent the future of epilepsy treatments. PMID:26035672

  9. Validation of an automated seizure detection algorithm for term neonates

    OpenAIRE

    Mathieson, Sean R; Stevenson, Nathan J.; Low, Evonne; Marnane, William P.; Rennie, Janet M.; Temko, Andrey; Lightbody, Gordon; Geraldine B. Boylan

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to validate the performance of a seizure detection algorithm (SDA) developed by our group, on previously unseen, prolonged, unedited EEG recordings from 70 babies from 2 centres. Methods EEGs of 70 babies (35 seizure, 35 non-seizure) were annotated for seizures by experts as the gold standard. The SDA was tested on the EEGs at a range of sensitivity settings. Annotations from the expert and SDA were compared using event and epoch based metrics. The ef...

  10. Maternal immune activation increases seizure susceptibility in juvenile rat offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Ping; Zhang, Xin-Ting; Li, Jun; Yu, Lin; Wang, Ji-Wen; Lei, Ge-Fei; Sun, Ruo-Peng; Li, Bao-Min

    2015-06-01

    Epidemiological data suggest a relationship between maternal infection and a high incidence of childhood epilepsy in offspring. However, there is little experimental evidence that links maternal infection with later seizure susceptibility in juvenile offspring. Here, we asked whether maternal immune challenge during pregnancy can alter seizure susceptibility and seizure-associated brain damage in adolescence. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or normal saline (NS) on gestational days 15 and 16. At postnatal day 21, seizure susceptibility to kainic acid (KA) was evaluated in male offspring. Four groups were studied, including normal control (NS-NS), prenatal infection (LPS-NS), juvenile seizure (NS-KA), and "two-hit" (LPS-KA) groups. Our results demonstrated that maternal LPS exposure caused long-term reactive astrogliosis and increased seizure susceptibility in juvenile rat offspring. Compared to the juvenile seizure group, animals in the "two-hit" group showed exaggerated astrogliosis, followed by worsened spatial learning ability in adulthood. In addition, prenatal immune challenge alone led to spatial learning impairment in offspring but had no effect on anxiety. These data suggest that prenatal immune challenge causes a long-term increase in juvenile seizure susceptibility and exacerbates seizure-induced brain injury, possibly by priming astroglia. PMID:25982885

  11. Treatment Outcome Of Seizures Associated With Intracranial Cavernous Angiomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nievera Conrad C

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Seizures are among the typical presentations of intracranial cavernous angiomas (ICA. Twenty-one patients (age range: 2 to 53 years treated for seizures associated with ICA between 1983 and 1997 were restrospectively studied to evaluate their outcome following medical or surgical intervention. The mean interval between seizure onset and initial presentation at our institution was 7.6 years. Seizures were simple partial in 3 patients, complex partial in 15 and secondarily generalized tonic-clonic in 13. The commonest site of the lesion was the temporal lobe (52%. Multiple angiomas were observed in 5 (24% patients. Seven (32% patients were medically-managed with antiepileptic therapy and 14 (68% underwent either lesionectomy with resection of the epileptogenic zone (9 patients or temporal lobectomy (5 patients. Mean follow-up time was 4 years (range: 3 months to 14 years. Of the medically-managed patients, 3 (43% remained seizure-free whereas 4 (57% continued to have seizures with an average frequency of one per day. Of the surgically-managed patients, 12 (86% became seizure-free and 2 (14% had no more than two seizures per year. Surgery appears to be extremely effective in the management of seizures associated with ICA and should receive a strong and early consideration in patients who fail medical therapy.

  12. Assimilation of microwave brightness temperatures for soil moisture estimation using particle filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soil moisture plays a significant role in global water cycles. Both model simulations and remote sensing observations have their limitations when estimating soil moisture on a large spatial scale. Data assimilation (DA) is a promising tool which can combine model dynamics and remote sensing observations to obtain more precise ground soil moisture distribution. Among various DA methods, the particle filter (PF) can be applied to non-linear and non-Gaussian systems, thus holding great potential for DA. In this study, a data assimilation scheme based on the residual resampling particle filter (RR-PF) was developed to assimilate microwave brightness temperatures into the macro-scale semi-distributed Variance Infiltration Capacity (VIC) Model to estimate surface soil moisture. A radiative transfer model (RTM) was used to link brightness temperatures with surface soil moisture. Finally, the data assimilation scheme was validated by experimental data obtained at Arizona during the Soil Moisture Experiment 2004 (SMEX04). The results show that the estimation accuracy of soil moisture can be improved significantly by RR-PF through assimilating microwave brightness temperatures into VIC model. Both the overall trends and specific values of the assimilation results are more consistent with ground observations compared with model simulation results

  13. Seizure recurrence after a first febrile convulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laditan, A A

    1994-01-01

    In this study, 140 children aged from 6 months to 6 years who presented with a first febrile convulsion at the King Fahad Hofuf Hospital, Al-Hassa, Saudi Arabia were retrospectively identified. Information about these children was obtained from their medical records covering a follow-up period of 3 years from July 1989 to June 1992. Recurrent febrile convulsions occurred in 60 of them (43%). Relevant risk factors that were observed to be significantly associated with seizure recurrence included an age of less than 18 months (odds ratio [OR] = 3.82; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 9.26, 1.58), an initial febrile convulsion that was complex (OR = 4.41; CI = 9.50, 2.05) and a positive family history of febrile convulsions (OR = 4.12; CI = 10.74; 1.58), while a decreased risk of recurrence occurred with a temperature of over 39 degrees C (OR = 4.60; CI = 9.44; 2.24). There was no association between seizure recurrence and the duration of the initial febrile convulsion (OR = 0.93; CI = 2.33; -2.04) or family history of epilepsy (OR = 0.88; CI = 4.22, -3.27). An important observation in the present study is the close association (ORM-H = 2.36; X2M-H = 9.65) between the development of an afebrile convulsion and seizure recurrence among the group of children with CFC. Anticonvulsant prophylaxis should therefore be considered for children whose initial febrile convulsions are complex in nature. PMID:7880092

  14. Assimilative and non-assimilative color spreading in the watercolor configuration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiji eKimura

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A colored line flanking a darker contour will appear to spread its color onto an area enclosed by the line (watercolor effect. The watercolor effect has been characterized as an assimilative effect, but non-assimilative color spreading has also been demonstrated in the same spatial configuration; e.g., when a black inner contour (IC is paired with a blue outer contour (OC, yellow color spreading can be observed. To elucidate visual mechanisms underlying these different color spreading effects, this study investigated the effects of luminance ratio between the double contours on the induced color by systematically manipulating the IC and OC luminances (Experiment 1 as well as the background luminance (Experiment 2. The results showed that the luminance conditions suitable for assimilative and non-assimilative color spreading were nearly opposite. When the Weber contrast of the IC to the background luminances (IC contrast was smaller than that of the OC (OC contrast, the induced color became similar to the IC color (assimilative spreading. In contrast, when the OC contrast was smaller than or equal to the IC contrast, the induced color became yellow (non-assimilative spreading. Extending these findings, Experiment 3 showed that bilateral color spreading, e.g., assimilative spreading on one side and non-assimilative spreading on the other side, can also be observed in the watercolor configuration. These results suggest that the assimilative and non-assimilative spreading were mediated by different visual mechanisms. The properties of the assimilative spreading are consistent with the model proposed to account for neon color spreading [Grossberg, S. & Mingolla, E. (1985 Percept. Psychophys., 38, 141-171] and extended for the watercolor effect [Pinna, B., & Grossberg, S. (2005 J. Opt. Soc. Am. A, 22, 2207-2221]. However, the present results suggest that additional mechanisms are needed to account for the non-assimilative color spreading.

  15. Scalable sequential data assimilation with the Parallel Data Assimilation Framework PDAF

    OpenAIRE

    Nerger, Lars; Hiller, Wolfgang; Schröter, Jens

    2011-01-01

    Data assimilation applications with high-dimensional numerical models exhibit extreme requirements on computational resources. Good scalability of the assimilation system is necessary to make these applications feasible. Sequential data assimilation methods based on ensemble forecasts, like ensemble-based Kalman filters, provide such good scalability, because the forecast of each ensemble member can be performed independently. However, this parallelism has to be combined with the paralleli...

  16. IS ASSIMILATION THEORY DEAD? THE EFFECT OF ASSIMILATION ON ADOLESCENT WELL-BEING

    OpenAIRE

    Greenman, Emily; Xie, Yu

    2008-01-01

    The relationship between assimilation and the well-being of immigrant children has been the focus of debate in the recent sociological literature. Much of this work has questioned whether classical theories of immigrant adaptation, which assumed assimilation to be an integral part of the process of upward mobility for immigrants, are still applicable to today’s immigrant children. This study reevaluates the applicability of classical assimilation theory with a comprehensive empirical assessme...

  17. Extending NEMO for ensemble data assimilation on supercomputers with the parallel data assimilation framework PDAF

    OpenAIRE

    Nerger, Lars; Kirchgessner, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The NEMO model is a state-of-the-art ocean circulation model. For data assimilation applications with ensemble Kalman filters like the SEEK filter, e.g. for operational ocean forecasting, NEMO is typically run separately from the assimilation algorithm. Thus, NEMO is used to generate a set of restart files on disks that hold the ensemble of model forecasts providing the error covariance matrix information for the ensemble Kalman filter. These files need to be read by a separate assimilation p...

  18. THE SOCIAL CONTEXT OF ASSIMILATION: TESTING IMPLICATIONS OF SEGMENTED ASSIMILATION THEORY*

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Yu; Greenman, Emily

    2011-01-01

    Segmented assimilation theory has been a popular explanation for the diverse experiences of assimilation among new waves of immigrants and their children. While the theory has been interpreted in many different ways, we emphasize its implications for the important role of social context: both processes and consequences of assimilation should depend on the local social context in which immigrants are embedded. We derive empirically falsifiable hypotheses about the interaction effects between s...

  19. Assimilative and non-assimilative color spreading in the watercolor configuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Eiji; Kuroki, Mikako

    2014-01-01

    A colored line flanking a darker contour will appear to spread its color onto an area enclosed by the line (watercolor effect). The watercolor effect has been characterized as an assimilative effect, but non-assimilative color spreading has also been demonstrated in the same spatial configuration; e.g., when a black inner contour (IC) is paired with a blue outer contour (OC), yellow color spreading can be observed. To elucidate visual mechanisms underlying these different color spreading effects, this study investigated the effects of luminance ratio between the double contours on the induced color by systematically manipulating the IC and the OC luminance (Experiment 1) as well as the background luminance (Experiment 2). The results showed that the luminance conditions suitable for assimilative and non-assimilative color spreading were nearly opposite. When the Weber contrast of the IC to the background luminance (IC contrast) was smaller in size than that of the OC (OC contrast), the induced color became similar to the IC color (assimilative spreading). In contrast, when the OC contrast was smaller than or equal to the IC contrast, the induced color became yellow (non-assimilative spreading). Extending these findings, Experiment 3 showed that bilateral color spreading, i.e., assimilative spreading on one side and non-assimilative spreading on the other side, can also be observed in the watercolor configuration. These results suggest that the assimilative and the non-assimilative spreading were mediated by different visual mechanisms. The properties of the assimilative spreading are consistent with the model proposed to account for neon color spreading (Grossberg and Mingolla, 1985) and extended for the watercolor effect (Pinna and Grossberg, 2005). However, the present results suggest that additional mechanisms are needed to account for the non-assimilative color spreading. PMID:25285074

  20. Compensation for complete assimilation in speech perception: The case of Korean labial-to-velar assimilation

    OpenAIRE

    Mitterer, H.; Kim, S.; Cho, T.

    2013-01-01

    In connected speech, phonological assimilation to neighboring words can lead to pronunciation variants (e.g., 'garden bench'→ "gardem bench"). A large body of literature suggests that listeners use the phonetic context to reconstruct the intended word for assimilation types that often lead to incomplete assimilations (e.g., a pronunciation of "garden" that carries cues for both a labial [m] and an alveolar [n]). In the current paper, we show that a similar context effect is observed for an as...

  1. Lipopolysaccharide potentiates hyperthermia-induced seizures

    OpenAIRE

    Eun, Baik-Lin; Abraham, Jayne; Mlsna, Lauren; Kim, Min Jung; Koh, Sookyong

    2015-01-01

    Background Prolonged febrile seizures (FS) have both acute and long-lasting effects on the developing brain. Because FS are often associated with peripheral infection, we aimed to develop a preclinical model of FS that simulates fever and immune activation in order to facilitate the implementation of targeted therapy after prolonged FS in young children. Methods The innate immune activator lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was administered to postnatal day 14 rat (200 μg/kg) and mouse (100 μg/kg) pups...

  2. S100B proteins in febrile seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkonen, Kirsi; Pekkala, Niina; Pokka, Tytti;

    2011-01-01

    S100B protein concentrations correlate with the severity and outcome of brain damage after brain injuries, and have been shown to be markers of blood-brain barrier damage. In children elevated S100B values are seen as a marker of damage to astrocytes even after mild head injuries. S100B proteins...... may also give an indication of an ongoing pathological process in the brain with respect to febrile seizures (FS) and the likelihood of their recurrence. To evaluate this, we measured S100B protein concentrations in serum and cerebrospinal fluid from 103 children after their first FS. 33 children...

  3. ITERATIVE ALGORITHMS FOR DATA ASSIMILATION PROBLEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Iterative algorithms for solving the data assimilation problems are considered, based on the main and adjoint equations. Spectral properties of the control operators of the problem are studied, the iterative algorithms are justified.

  4. Assimilation of ammonia in Paracoccus denitrificans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikes, V; Chválová, H; Mátlová, L

    1991-01-01

    Two pathways serve for assimilation of ammonia in Paracoccus denitrificans. Glutamate dehydrogenase (NADP+) catalyzes the assimilation at a high NH4+ concentration. If nitrate serves as the nitrogen source, glutamate is synthesized by glutamate-ammonia ligase and glutamate synthase (NADPH). At a very low NH4+ concentration, all three enzymes are synthesized simultaneously. No direct relationship exists between glutamate dehydrogenase (NADP+) and glutamate-ammonia ligase in P. denitrificans, while the glutamate synthase (NADPH) activity changes in parallel with that of the latter enzyme. Ammonia does not influence the induction or repression of glutamate dehydrogenase (NADP+). The inner concentration of metabolites indicates a possible repression of glutamate dehydrogenase (NADP+) by the high concentration of glutamine or its metabolic products as in the case when NH4+ is formed by assimilative nitrate reduction. No direct effect of the intermediates of nitrate assimilation on the synthesis of glutamate dehydrogenase (NADP+) was observed. PMID:1688163

  5. Management of potential transuranium assimilation cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review deals primarily with the duties of Health Protection personnel assigned to Savannah River's operatig facilities - as opposed to the role of bioassay and dosimetry specialists - in handling potential transuranium assimilation cases

  6. ERP ASSIMILATION: AN END-USER APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hurbean Luminita

    2013-07-01

    The paper discusses the ERP adoption based on the IT assimilation theory. The ERP lifecycle is associated with the IT assimilation steps. We propose a distribution of these steps along the lifecycle. Derived from the findings in the reviewed literature we will focus the cultural factors, in particular those related to the end-users (determined as a major impact factor in our previous study: Negovan et al., 2011. Our empirical study is centred on the end-users perspective and it tries to determine if and how their behaviour affects the achievement of the ERP assimilation steps. The paper reasons that organizations that understand the IT assimilation steps correlated to the ERP implementation critical factors are more likely to implement and use ERP successfully.

  7. Seizure susceptibility of neuropeptide-Y null mutant mice in amygdala kindling and chemical-induced seizure models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, Harlan E; Yang, Lijuan

    2004-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) administered exogenously is anticonvulsant, and, NPY null mutant mice are more susceptible to kainate-induced seizures. In order to better understand the potential role of NPY in epileptogenesis, the present studies investigated the development of amygdala kindling, post-kindling seizure thresholds, and anticonvulsant effects of carbamazepine and levetiracetam in 129S6/SvEv NPY(+/+) and NPY(-/-) mice. In addition, susceptibility to pilocarpine- and kainate-induced seizures was compared in NPY(+/+) and (-/-) mice. The rate of amygdala kindling development did not differ in the NPY(-/-) and NPY(+/+) mice either when kindling stimuli were presented once daily for at least 20 days, or, 12 times daily for 2 days. However, during kindling development, the NPY(-/-) mice had higher seizure severity scores and longer afterdischarge durations than the NPY(+/+) mice. Post-kindling, the NPY(-/-) mice had markedly lower afterdischarge thresholds and longer afterdischarge durations than NPY (+/+) mice. Carbamazepine and levetiracetam increased the seizure thresholds of both NPY (-/-) and (+/+) mice. In addition, NPY (-/-) mice had lower thresholds for both kainate- and pilocarpine-induced seizures. The present results in amygdala kindling and chemical seizure models suggest that NPY may play a more prominent role in determining seizure thresholds and severity of seizures than in events leading to epileptogenesis. In addition, a lack of NPY does not appear to confer drug-resistance in that carbamazepine and levetiracetam were anticonvulsant in both wild type (WT) and NPY null mutant mice.

  8. DAO's Finite-volume/Physical-space Data Assimilation System: Stratospheric Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    daSilva, Arlindo; Lin, S.-J.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    In this talk we describe the next-generation data assimilation system being developed at NASA's Data Assimilation Office (DAO), with emphasis on the applications to stratospheric forecasts and stratospheric constituent transport. This data assimilation system includes the General Circulation Model jointly developed by the DAO and the Climate and Global Dynamics Division (CGDD) at NCAR. This model is based on the finite-volume dynamical core) developed at DAO with physical parameterizations from the NCAR Climate Community Model. The Physical-space Statistical Analysis System (PSAS) is used to combine a first guess from the NASA-NCAR GCM with observational data to provide an updated estimate of the state of the atmosphere. Case studies for the (northern) Winter of 2000 will be discussed.

  9. Wage and occupational assimilation by skill level

    OpenAIRE

    Alcobendas, Miguel Angel; Rodríguez-Planas, Núria; Vegas, Raquel

    2012-01-01

    While much of the literature on immigrants' assimilation has focused on countries with a large tradition of receiving immigrants and with flexible labor markets, very little is known on how immigrants adjust to other types of host economies. With its severe dual labor market, and an unprecedented immigration boom, Spain presents a quite unique experience to analyze immigrations' assimilation process. Using alternative datasets and methodologies, this paper provides evidence of a differential ...

  10. Effective assimilation of global precipitation: simulation experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Lien, Guo-Yuan; Kalnay, Eugenia; Miyoshi, Takemasa

    2013-01-01

    Past attempts to assimilate precipitation by nudging or variational methods have succeeded in forcing the model precipitation to be close to the observed values. However, the model forecasts tend to lose their additional skill after a few forecast hours. In this study, a local ensemble transform Kalman filter (LETKF) is used to effectively assimilate precipitation by allowing ensemble members with better precipitation to receive higher weights in the analysis. In addition, two other changes i...

  11. On errors in meteorological data assimilation

    OpenAIRE

    Lindskog, Magnus

    2007-01-01

    Data assimilation in Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) optimally blends observations with atmospheric model data in order to obtain the best possible initial state for an atmospheric model prediction. Specification of error characteristics is an important part of data assimilation. This thesis is concerned with representation of background error standard deviations, with handling of observations, and with observation error characteristics. The research includes both the study of basic assimi...

  12. Migration, Friendship Ties, and Cultural Assimilation

    OpenAIRE

    Facchini, Giovanni; Patacchini, Eleonora; Steinhardt, Max

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we contribute to the analysis of the assimilation process of migrants by analyzing the extent to which friendship with natives can be seen as a measure of cultural assimilation and investigating the formation of social ties in the host country. Using novel information from the German Socio-Economic Panel, we find that migrants with a German friend are more similar to natives than those without a local companion along several important dimensions, including concerns about the eco...

  13. Evidence of New Immigrant Assimilation in Canada

    OpenAIRE

    Mary L. Grant

    1999-01-01

    Previous studies of the labour market experience of male immigrants to Canada have uncovered two disturbing trends: declining entry earnings for successive new immigrant cohorts and low assimilation rates. These findings suggest that many of these cohorts may never assimilate. The 1991 Census provides a first look at the immigrant cohorts arriving in the 1980s. These immigrants appear to avoid the plight of their predecessors; entry earnings have stopped falling, and those immigrants arriving...

  14. Employment Assimilation of Immigrants in the Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    Zorlu, Aslan; Hartog, Joop

    2008-01-01

    This discussion Paper led to a publication in International Journal of Population Research , Vol. 2012, article ID 634276. Using two Dutch labour force surveys, employment assimilation of immigrants is examined. We observe marked differences between immigrants by source country. Non-western immigrants never reach parity with native Dutch. Even second generation immigrants never fully catch up. Caribbean immigrants, who share a colonial history with the Dutch, assimilate relatively quick compa...

  15. Immigrants on Welfare: Assimilation and Benefit Substitution

    OpenAIRE

    Ekhaugen, Tyra

    2005-01-01

    Non-western immigrants in Norway are shown to rely heavily on welfare transfers for several years after immigration. While refugee immigrants assimilate slightly out of welfare, other non-western immigrants assimilate rapidly into welfare. Re-migration is selective for both non-western and western immigrants, insofar as the probability of re-migration correlates negatively with the probability of receiving welfare. We argue that previous studies may have reached biased estimates of welfare as...

  16. The heterogeneity in immigrants unhealthy assimilation

    OpenAIRE

    Barbieri, Paolo Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Immigrants upon their arrival in the United States are in better health condition with respect to their American counterpart however such advantage erodes over time. In this paper, we study the heterogeneity of such unhealthy behaviours assimilation among different arrival cohorts. We focus our analysis on binge drinking and cigarette consumption as a proxy for unhealthy behaviour assimilation by immigrants. Regarding binge drinking we show that more recent immigrant cohorts arriv...

  17. Interethnic Marriages and Economic Assimilation of Immigrants

    OpenAIRE

    Kantarevic, Jasmin

    2004-01-01

    This paper examines the relationship between interethnic marriages and economic assimilation among immigrants in the United States. Two competing hypotheses are evaluated: the productivity hypothesis, according to which immigrants married to native-born spouses assimilate faster than comparable immigrants married to foreign-born spouses because spouses play an integral role in the human capital accumulation of their partners; and the selection hypothesis, according to which the relationship b...

  18. The Acceleration of Immigrant Unhealthy Assimilation

    OpenAIRE

    Giuntella, Osea; Stella, Luca

    2016-01-01

    It is well-known that immigrants tend to be healthier than US natives and that this advantage erodes with time spent in the US. However, we know less about the heterogeneity of these trajectories among arrival cohorts. Recent studies have shown that later arrival cohorts of immigrants have lower entry wages and experience less economic assimilation. In this paper, we investigate whether similar cohort effects can be observed in the weight assimilation of immigrants in the US. Focusing on obes...

  19. Data Assimilation: Making Sense of Earth Observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Albert Lahoz

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Climate change, air quality and environmental degradation are important societal challenges for the 21st Century. These challenges require an intelligent response from society, which in turn requires access to information about the Earth System. This information comes from observations and prior knowledge, the latter typically embodied in a model describing relationships between variables of the Earth System. Data assimilation provides an objective methodology to combine observational and model information to provide an estimate of the most likely state and its uncertainty for the whole Earth System. This approach adds value to the observations – by filling in the spatio-temporal gaps in observations; and to the model – by constraining it with the observations. In this review paper we motivate data assimilation as a methodology to fill in the gaps in observational information; illustrate the data assimilation approach with examples that span a broad range of features of the Earth System (atmosphere, including chemistry; ocean; land surface; and discuss the outlook for data assimilation, including the novel application of data assimilation ideas to observational information obtained using Citizen Science. Ultimately, a strong motivation of data assimilation is the many benefits it provides to users. These include: providing the initial state for weather and air quality forecasts; providing analyses and reanalyses for studying the Earth System; evaluating observations, instruments and models; assessing the relative value of elements of the Global Observing System (GOS; and assessing the added value of future additions to the GOS.

  20. An integrative view of mechanisms underlying generalized spike-and-wave epileptic seizures and its implication on optimal therapeutic treatments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boyuan Yan

    Full Text Available Many types of epileptic seizures are characterized by generalized spike-and-wave discharges. In the past, notable effort has been devoted to understanding seizure dynamics and various hypotheses have been proposed to explain the underlying mechanisms. In this paper, by taking an integrative view of the underlying mechanisms, we demonstrate that epileptic seizures can be generated by many different combinations of synaptic strengths and intrinsic membrane properties. This integrative view has important medical implications: the specific state of a patient characterized by a set of biophysical characteristics ultimately determines the optimal therapeutic treatment. Through the same view, we further demonstrate the potentiation effect of rational polypharmacy in the treatment of epilepsy and provide a new angle to resolve the debate on polypharmacy. Our results underscore the need for personalized medicine and demonstrate that computer modeling and simulation may play an important role in assisting the clinicians in selecting the optimal treatment on an individual basis.

  1. Conditioning of the Weak-Constraint 4D-Variational Data Assimilation Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Nancy; El-Said, Adam; Lawless, Amos

    2014-05-01

    Four-dimensional data assimilation (4DVar) has become a standard method in use by major operational weather forecasting centres. The aim of the method is to determine the most likely state of a dynamical system given observations of the system. Under certain statistical assumptions, the maximum a posteriori likelihood Bayesian estimate is obtained as the solution to a weighted nonlinear least squares problem subject to the model equations as strong constraints. The model equations do not provide a perfect representation of the real dynamical system, however, and methods to allow for 'model errors' in the assimilation are a goal of current research. The aim is now to find an optimal estimate of the states over the assimilation window, given the error statistics in the background, observations and model. Various formulations of the weak-constraint objective function can be derived, which possess different characteristics and properties. Here we consider two formulations: one aims to estimate all of the states at each time in the assimilation window; the alternative aims to estimate the initial state and simultaneously the 'model error adjustments' over the assimilation window. We gain insight into the well-posedness of the two formulations, and also the speed of the iteration methods used to solve them, by studying the conditioning of the first order Hessian of the objective function. For our two different formulations of the problem, we derive the structure of the Hessians and establish theoretical bounds on their condition numbers. The behaviour of the conditioning as a function of correlation length-scales, variances and observation configurations is investigated. We show how the conditioning depends on the number of assimilation time steps within a window and hence demonstrate how the different systems behave over longer assimilation windows. We present numerical results to illustrate the behaviour of the two formulations of the problem using simplified models.

  2. Congenital hypothyroidism with seizures: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Vivian Sproul

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Congenital hypothyroidism (CH is defined as thyroid hormone deficiency, present at birth. It is seen in 1:4,000 births and is caused by an anatomical defect, known as thyroid dysgenesis (underdevelopment or unusual location of the thyroid gland, by abnormal biosynthesis of the thyroid hormones (dyshormogenesis, inborn errors of metabolism, genetic mutations or iodine deficiency. If untreated, severe neurological impairment develops. However, newborn screening programs have improved outcomes greatly, through early diagnosis and treatment. Clinical manifestations are often subtle at birth, due to the placental transfer of thyroxine (T4, thus making diagnosis in the first few days of life difficult. Increased levels of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH and low levels of T4 are confirmatory for this disorder. We describe the case of a baby with CH who presented with neonatal seizures: a rare clinical presentation. Our case highlights the need to eliminate CH, as a cause of seizures, so that treatment can be initiated even more promptly to optimize neurological sequelae and outcome.

  3. Assessing Immigrant Assimilation: New Empirical and Theoretical Challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Waters, Mary; Jimenez, Tomas R.

    2005-01-01

    This review examines research on the assimilation of immigrant groups. We review research on four primary benchmarks of assimilation: socioeconomic status, spatial concentration, language assimilation, and intermarriage. The existing literature shows that today's immigrants are largely assimilating into American society along each of these dimensions. This review also considers directions for future research on the assimilation of immigrant groups in new southern and midwestern gateways and h...

  4. POD/DEIM reduced-order strategies for efficient four dimensional variational data assimilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work studies reduced order modeling (ROM) approaches to speed up the solution of variational data assimilation problems with large scale nonlinear dynamical models. It is shown that a key requirement for a successful reduced order solution is that reduced order Karush–Kuhn–Tucker conditions accurately represent their full order counterparts. In particular, accurate reduced order approximations are needed for the forward and adjoint dynamical models, as well as for the reduced gradient. New strategies to construct reduced order based are developed for proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) ROM data assimilation using both Galerkin and Petrov–Galerkin projections. For the first time POD, tensorial POD, and discrete empirical interpolation method (DEIM) are employed to develop reduced data assimilation systems for a geophysical flow model, namely, the two dimensional shallow water equations. Numerical experiments confirm the theoretical framework for Galerkin projection. In the case of Petrov–Galerkin projection, stabilization strategies must be considered for the reduced order models. The new reduced order shallow water data assimilation system provides analyses similar to those produced by the full resolution data assimilation system in one tenth of the computational time

  5. POD/DEIM reduced-order strategies for efficient four dimensional variational data assimilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ştefănescu, R., E-mail: rstefane@vt.edu [Computational Science Laboratory, Department of Computer Science, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24060 (United States); Sandu, A., E-mail: sandu@cs.vt.edu [Computational Science Laboratory, Department of Computer Science, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24060 (United States); Navon, I.M., E-mail: inavon@fsu.edu [The Florida State University, Department of Scientific Computing, Tallahassee, FL 32306 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    This work studies reduced order modeling (ROM) approaches to speed up the solution of variational data assimilation problems with large scale nonlinear dynamical models. It is shown that a key requirement for a successful reduced order solution is that reduced order Karush–Kuhn–Tucker conditions accurately represent their full order counterparts. In particular, accurate reduced order approximations are needed for the forward and adjoint dynamical models, as well as for the reduced gradient. New strategies to construct reduced order based are developed for proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) ROM data assimilation using both Galerkin and Petrov–Galerkin projections. For the first time POD, tensorial POD, and discrete empirical interpolation method (DEIM) are employed to develop reduced data assimilation systems for a geophysical flow model, namely, the two dimensional shallow water equations. Numerical experiments confirm the theoretical framework for Galerkin projection. In the case of Petrov–Galerkin projection, stabilization strategies must be considered for the reduced order models. The new reduced order shallow water data assimilation system provides analyses similar to those produced by the full resolution data assimilation system in one tenth of the computational time.

  6. All together now: Analogies between chimera state collapses and epileptic seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrzejak, Ralph G.; Rummel, Christian; Mormann, Florian; Schindler, Kaspar

    2016-03-01

    Conceptually and structurally simple mathematical models of coupled oscillator networks can show a rich variety of complex dynamics, providing fundamental insights into many real-world phenomena. A recent and not yet fully understood example is the collapse of coexisting synchronous and asynchronous oscillations into a globally synchronous motion found in networks of identical oscillators. Here we show that this sudden collapse is promoted by a further decrease of synchronization, rather than by critically high synchronization. This strikingly counterintuitive mechanism can be found also in nature, as we demonstrate on epileptic seizures in humans. Analyzing spatiotemporal correlation profiles derived from intracranial electroencephalographic recordings (EEG) of seizures in epilepsy patients, we found a pronounced decrease of correlation at the seizure onsets. Applying our findings in a closed-loop control scheme to models of coupled oscillators in chimera states, we succeed in both provoking and preventing outbreaks of global synchronization. Our findings not only advance the understanding of networks of coupled dynamics but can open new ways to control them, thus offering a vast range of potential new applications.

  7. All together now: Analogies between chimera state collapses and epileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrzejak, Ralph G; Rummel, Christian; Mormann, Florian; Schindler, Kaspar

    2016-01-01

    Conceptually and structurally simple mathematical models of coupled oscillator networks can show a rich variety of complex dynamics, providing fundamental insights into many real-world phenomena. A recent and not yet fully understood example is the collapse of coexisting synchronous and asynchronous oscillations into a globally synchronous motion found in networks of identical oscillators. Here we show that this sudden collapse is promoted by a further decrease of synchronization, rather than by critically high synchronization. This strikingly counterintuitive mechanism can be found also in nature, as we demonstrate on epileptic seizures in humans. Analyzing spatiotemporal correlation profiles derived from intracranial electroencephalographic recordings (EEG) of seizures in epilepsy patients, we found a pronounced decrease of correlation at the seizure onsets. Applying our findings in a closed-loop control scheme to models of coupled oscillators in chimera states, we succeed in both provoking and preventing outbreaks of global synchronization. Our findings not only advance the understanding of networks of coupled dynamics but can open new ways to control them, thus offering a vast range of potential new applications.

  8. 19 CFR 162.63 - Arrests and seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Arrests and seizures. 162.63 Section 162.63 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INSPECTION, SEARCH, AND SEIZURE Controlled Substances, Narcotics, and Marihuana §...

  9. 14 CFR 13.17 - Seizure of aircraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Seizure of aircraft. 13.17 Section 13.17... INVESTIGATIVE AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Legal Enforcement Actions § 13.17 Seizure of aircraft. (a) Under... by the Regional Administrator of the region, or by the Chief Counsel, may summarily seize an...

  10. Histamine H1 antagonists and clinical characteristics of febrile seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zolaly MA

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Mohammed A ZolalyDepartment of Pediatrics, College of Medicine, Taibah University, Al-Madinah Al-Munawarah, Kingdom of Saudi ArabiaBackground: The purpose of this study was to determine whether seizure susceptibility due to antihistamines is provoked in patients with febrile seizures.Methods: The current descriptive study was carried out from April 2009 to February 2011 in 250 infants and children who visited the Madinah Maternity and Children's Hospital as a result of febrile convulsions. They were divided into two groups according to administration of antihistamines at the onset of fever.Results: Detailed clinical manifestations were compared between patients with and without administration of antihistamines. The time from fever detection to seizure onset was significantly shorter in the antihistamine group than that in the nonantihistamine group, and the duration of seizures was significantly longer in the antihistamine group than in the nonantihistamine group. No significant difference was found in time from fever detection to seizure onset or seizure duration between patients who received a first-generation antihistamine and those who received a second-generation antihistamine.Conclusion: Due to their central nervous system effects, H1 antagonists should not be administered to patients with febrile seizures and epilepsy. Caution should be exercised regarding the use of histamine H1 antagonists in young infants, because these drugs could potentially disturb the anticonvulsive central histaminergic system.Keywords: antihistamine, nonantihistamine, histamine H1 antagonist, febrile seizures

  11. Seizure Prediction and Detection via Phase and Amplitude Lock Values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Mark H; Padmanabha, Akshay; Hossain, Gahangir; de Jongh Curry, Amy L; Blaha, Charles D

    2016-01-01

    A robust seizure prediction methodology would enable a "closed-loop" system that would only activate as impending seizure activity is detected. Such a system would eliminate ongoing stimulation to the brain, thereby eliminating such side effects as coughing, hoarseness, voice alteration, and paresthesias (Murphy et al., 1998; Ben-Menachem, 2001), while preserving overall battery life of the system. The seizure prediction and detection algorithm uses Phase/Amplitude Lock Values (PLV/ALV) which calculate the difference of phase and amplitude between electroencephalogram (EEG) electrodes local and remote to the epileptic event. PLV is used as the seizure prediction marker and signifies the emergence of abnormal neuronal activations through local neuron populations. PLV/ALVs are used as seizure detection markers to demarcate the seizure event, or when the local seizure event has propagated throughout the brain turning into a grand-mal event. We verify the performance of this methodology against the "CHB-MIT Scalp EEG Database" which features seizure attributes for testing. Through this testing, we can demonstrate a high degree of sensivity and precision of our methodology between pre-ictal and ictal events. PMID:27014017

  12. Seizure Prediction and Detection via Phase and Amplitude Lock Values

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark H Myers

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A robust seizure prediction methodology would enable a ‘closed-loop’ system that would only activate as impending seizure activity is detected. Such a system would eliminate ongoing stimulation to the brain, thereby eliminating such side effects as coughing, hoarseness, voice alteration, and paresthesias (Murphy et al., 1998, Ben-Menachem, 2001, while preserving overall battery life of the system. The seizure prediction and detection algorithm uses Phase/Amplitude Lock Values (PLV/ALV which calculate the difference of phase and amplitude between EEG electrodes local and remote to the epileptic event. PLV is used as the seizure prediction marker and signifies the emergence of abnormal neuronal activations through local neuron populations. PLV/ALVs are used as seizure detection markers to demarcate the seizure event, or when the local seizure event has propagated throughout the brain turning into a grand-mal event. We verify the performance of this methodology against the ‘CHB-MIT Scalp EEG Database’ which features seizure attributes for testing. Through this testing, we can demonstrate a high degree of sensivity and precision of our methodology between pre-ictal and ictal events.

  13. Responding to Seizures (A Cup of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-11-26

    As traumatic as epilepsy can be for the person experiencing seizures, it can be just as troubling for witnesses who want to try and help. In this podcast, Rosemarie Kobau discusses the appropriate way to help someone who is experiencing a seizure.  Created: 11/26/2015 by MMWR.   Date Released: 11/26/2015.

  14. Responding to Seizures (A Minute of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-11-26

    When helping someone with a seizure, it’s important to remain calm. This podcast discusses what to do if you witness someone having a seizure.  Created: 11/26/2015 by MMWR.   Date Released: 11/26/2015.

  15. Effect of berberine on pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Reza Sadeghnia

    2011-09-01

    Results: Intraperitoneal administration of lower doses of berberine (100 and 200 mg/kg had no significant effects on minimal clonic seizures (MCS and generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS latencies, while injection of 400 mg/kg caused significant increase in both MCS and GTCS latencies (p

  16. 27 CFR 478.152 - Seizure and forfeiture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) of the Act, where the firearm or ammunition intended to be used in such offense is involved in a... firearm or ammunition is intended to be used in such offense by the transferor of such firearm or... Exemptions, Seizures, and Forfeitures § 478.152 Seizure and forfeiture. (a) Any firearm or...

  17. The Best Time for EEG Recording in Febrile Seizure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvaneh KARIMZADEH

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The Best Time for EEG Recording in Febrile Seizure Parvaneh KARIMZADEH, Alireza REZAYI*, Mansoureh TOGHA, Farzad AHMADABADI, Hojjat DERAKHSHANFAR, Eznollah AZARGASHB, Fatemeh KHODAEI Abstract How to Cite This Article: Karimzadeh P, Rezayi A, Togha M, Ahmadabadi F, Derakhshanfar H, Azargashb E, Khodaei F. The Best Time for EEG Recording in Febrile Seizure. Iran J Child Neurol. 2014 Winter; 8(1:20-25. Objective Some studies suggest that detection of epileptic discharge is unusual during the first postictal week of febrile seizure and others believe that EEGs carried out on the day of the seizure are abnormal in as many as 88% of the patients. In this study, we intend to compare early and late EEG abnormalities in febrile seizure. Materials & Methods EEG was recorded during daytime sleep, 24-48 hours (early EEG and 2 weeks (late EEG after the seizure in 36 children with febrile seizure (FS, aged between 3 months and 6 years. EEGs that showed generalized or focal spikes, sharp, spike wave complex, and slowing were considered as abnormal EEG. Abnormalities of the first EEG were compared with those of second EEG. Results The most common abnormal epileptiform discharges recorded in the early EEG were slow waves (27.6% and sharp waves in late EEG (36%. Distribution of abnormalities in early and late EEG showed no significant statistical difference. Conclusion The early and late EEG recording had the same results in patient with febrile seizure.

  18. Seizures and Epilepsy and Their Relationship to Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matson, Johnny L.; Neal, Daniene

    2009-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are serious neurodevelopmental disorders which often co-occur with intellectual disabilities. A disorder which is strongly correlated with both of these disabilities are seizures and epilepsy. The purpose of this review was to provide an overview of available research on seizures and epilepsy in the ASD population…

  19. Identification of Srp9 as a febrile seizure susceptibility gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hessel, Ellen V S; de Wit, Marina; Wolterink-Donselaar, Inge G; Karst, Henk; de Graaff, Esther; van Lith, Hein A; de Bruijn, Ewart; de Sonnaville, Sophietje; Verbeek, Nienke E; Lindhout, Dick; de Kovel, Carolien G F; Koeleman, Bobby P C; van Kempen, Marjan; Brilstra, Eva; Cuppen, Edwin; Loos, Maarten; Spijker, Sabine S; Kan, Anne A; Baars, Susanne E; van Rijen, Peter C; Gosselaar, Peter H; Groot Koerkamp, Marian J A; Holstege, Frank C P; van Duijn, Cornelia; Vergeer, Jeanette; Moll, Henriette A; Taubøll, Erik; Heuser, Kjell; Ramakers, Geert M J; Pasterkamp, R Jeroen; van Nieuwenhuizen, Onno; Hoogenraad, Casper C; Kas, Martien J H; de Graan, Pierre N E

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Febrile seizures (FS) are the most common seizure type in young children. Complex FS are a risk factor for mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE). To identify new FS susceptibility genes we used a forward genetic strategy in mice and subsequently analyzed candidate genes in humans. METHODS:

  20. Seizures in Fragile X Syndrome: Characteristics and Comorbid Diagnoses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry-Kravis, Elizabeth; Raspa, Melissa; Loggin-Hester, Lisa; Bishop, Ellen; Holiday, David; Bailey, Donald B., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    A national survey of caregivers of individuals with fragile X syndrome addressed characteristics of epilepsy and co-occurring conditions. Of the 1,394 individuals (1,090 males and 304 females) with the full mutation, 14% of males and 6% of females reported seizures. Seizures were more often partial, began between ages 4 and 10 years, and were…

  1. Temporal epileptic seizures and occupational exposure to solvents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, M; Bælum, Jesper; Bonde, J P

    1994-01-01

    exposure to a mixture of organic solvents (mainly cyclohexanone, white spirit, and isopropanol). Epileptic seizures of temporal type were occurring in relation to solvent exposure. The seizures disappeared shortly after stopping exposure but returned just after a short term re-exposure to cyclohexanone...

  2. Variational data assimilation problem for the Baltic Sea thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharova, Natalia; Agoshkov, Valery; Parmuzin, Eugene

    2015-04-01

    The most versatile and promising technology for solving problems of monitoring and analysis of the natural environment is a four-dimensional variational data assimilation of observation data. In such problems not only the development and justification of algorithms for numerical solution of variational data assimilation problems but the properties of the optimal solution play an important role. In this work the variational data assimilation problems in the Baltic Sea water area were formulated and studied. Numerical experiments on restoring the ocean heat flux and obtaining solution of the system (temperature, salinity, velocity, and sea surface height) in the Baltic Sea primitive equation hydrodynamics model with assimilation procedure were carried out. In the calculations we used daily sea surface temperature observation from Danish meteorological Institute, prepared on the basis of measurements of the radiometer (AVHRR, AATSR and AMSRE) and spectroradiometer (SEVIRI and MODIS). The spatial resolution of the model grid with respect to the horizontal variables amounted to 0.0625x0.03125 degree. The results of the numerical experiments are presented. This study was supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (project 13-01-00753, project 14-01-31195) and project 14-11-00609 by the Russian Science Foundation. References: 1 E.I. Parmuzin, V.I. Agoshkov, Numerical solution of the variational assimilation problem for sea surface temperature in the model of the Black Sea dynamics. Russ. J. Numer. Anal. Math. Modelling (2012) 27, No.1, 69-94 2 Zakharova N.B., Agoshkov V.I., Parmuzin E.I., The new method of ARGO buoys system observation data interpolation. Russian Journal of Numerical Analysis and Mathematical Modelling. Vol. 28, Issue 1, 2013. 3 Zalesny V.B., Gusev A.V., Chernobay S.Yu., Aps R., Tamsalu R., Kujala P., Rytkönen J. The Bal-tic Sea circulation modelling and assessment of marine pollution, Russ. J. Numer. Analysis and Math. Modelling, 2014, V 29

  3. Montelukast reduces seizures in pentylenetetrazol-kindled mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleck, J; Temp, F R; Marafiga, J R; Jesse, A C; Milanesi, L H; Rambo, L M; Mello, C F

    2016-01-01

    Cysteinyl leukotrienes (CysLTs) have been implicated in seizures and kindling; however, the effect of CysLT receptor antagonists on seizure frequency in kindled animals and changes in CysLT receptor expression after pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-induced kindling have not been investigated. In this study, we evaluated whether the CysLT1 inverse agonist montelukast, and a classical anticonvulsant, phenobarbital, were able to reduce seizures in PTZ-kindled mice and alter CysLT receptor expression. Montelukast (10 mg/kg, sc) and phenobarbital (20 mg/kg, sc) increased the latency to generalized seizures in kindled mice. Montelukast increased CysLT1 immunoreactivity only in non-kindled, PTZ-challenged mice. Interestingly, PTZ challenge decreased CysLT2 immunoreactivity only in kindled mice. CysLT1 antagonists appear to emerge as a promising adjunctive treatment for refractory seizures. Nevertheless, additional studies are necessary to evaluate the clinical implications of this research. PMID:26909785

  4. Inter-modality comparisons of seizure focus lateralization in complex partial seizures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anterior temporal lobectomy offers a high chance of seizure-free outcome in patients suffering from drug-refractory complex partial seizure (CPS) originating from the temporal lobe. Other than EEG, several functional and morphologic imaging methods are used to define the spatial seizure origin. The present study was undertaken to compare the merits of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and single-voxel proton MR spectroscopy (MRS) for the lateralization of temporal lobe seizure foci. The clinical charts and imaging data of 43 consecutive CPS patients were reviewed. Based on surface EEG, 31 patients were classified with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE; 25 lateralized, 6 not lateralized) and 12 with non-temporal lobe epilepsy. All were examined by FDG-PET, MRS and MRI within 6 weeks. FDG-PET and MRI were interpreted visually, while the N-acetyl-aspartate to creatine ratio was used for MRS interpretation. One FDG-PET scan was invalid due to seizure activity post injection. The MR spectra could not be evaluated in five cases bilaterally and three cases unilaterally for technical reasons. A total of 15 patients underwent anterior temporal lobectomy. All showed a beneficial postoperative outcome. When the proportions of agreement between FDG-PET (0.77), MRI (0.58) and MRS (0.56) and surface EEG in TLE cases were compared, there were no significant differences (P>0.10). However, FDG-PET showed a significantly higher agreement (0.93) than MRI (0.60; P=0.03) with the side of successful temporal lobectomy. The concordance of MRS with the side of successful temporal lobectomy was intermediate (0.75). When the results of functional and morphologic imaging were combined, no significant differences were found between the rates of agreement of FDG-PET/MRI and MRS/MRI with EEG (0.80 vs 0.68; P=0.50) and with the side of successful temporal lobectomy (0.87 vs 0.92; P=0.50) in TLE cases. However, MRS/MRI showed

  5. Inter-modality comparisons of seizure focus lateralization in complex partial seizures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, P.T.; Cortes-Blanco, A.; Pourdehnad, M.; Desiderio, L.; Jang, S.; Alavi, A. [Pennsylvania Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Levy-Reis, I. [Pennsylvania Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Neurology

    2001-10-01

    Anterior temporal lobectomy offers a high chance of seizure-free outcome in patients suffering from drug-refractory complex partial seizure (CPS) originating from the temporal lobe. Other than EEG, several functional and morphologic imaging methods are used to define the spatial seizure origin. The present study was undertaken to compare the merits of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and single-voxel proton MR spectroscopy (MRS) for the lateralization of temporal lobe seizure foci. The clinical charts and imaging data of 43 consecutive CPS patients were reviewed. Based on surface EEG, 31 patients were classified with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE; 25 lateralized, 6 not lateralized) and 12 with non-temporal lobe epilepsy. All were examined by FDG-PET, MRS and MRI within 6 weeks. FDG-PET and MRI were interpreted visually, while the N-acetyl-aspartate to creatine ratio was used for MRS interpretation. One FDG-PET scan was invalid due to seizure activity post injection. The MR spectra could not be evaluated in five cases bilaterally and three cases unilaterally for technical reasons. A total of 15 patients underwent anterior temporal lobectomy. All showed a beneficial postoperative outcome. When the proportions of agreement between FDG-PET (0.77), MRI (0.58) and MRS (0.56) and surface EEG in TLE cases were compared, there were no significant differences (P>0.10). However, FDG-PET showed a significantly higher agreement (0.93) than MRI (0.60; P=0.03) with the side of successful temporal lobectomy. The concordance of MRS with the side of successful temporal lobectomy was intermediate (0.75). When the results of functional and morphologic imaging were combined, no significant differences were found between the rates of agreement of FDG-PET/MRI and MRS/MRI with EEG (0.80 vs 0.68; P=0.50) and with the side of successful temporal lobectomy (0.87 vs 0.92; P=0.50) in TLE cases. However, MRS/MRI showed

  6. Assimilation of the Microwave Limb Sounder Radiances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wargan, K.; Read, W.; Livesey, N.; Wagner, P.; Nguyen. H.; Pawson, S.

    2012-01-01

    It has been shown that the assimilation of limb-sounder data can significantly improve the representation of ozone in NASA's GEOS Data Assimilation Systems (GEOS-DAS), particularly in the stratosphere. The studies conducted so far utilized retrieved data from the MIPAS, POAM, ILAS and EOS Microwave Limb Sounder (EOS MLS) instruments. Direct assimilation of the radiance data can be seen as the natural next step to those studies. The motivation behind working with radiances is twofold. First, retrieval algorithms use a priori data which are either climatological or are obtained from previous analyses. This introduces additional uncertainty and, in some cases, may lead to "self-contamination"- when the a priori is taken from the same assimilation system in which subsequently ingests the retrieved observations. Second, radiances can be available in near real time thus providing an opportunity for operational assimilation, which could help improve the use of infrared radiance instruments from operational satellite instruments. In this presentation we summarize our ongoing work on an implementation of the assimilation of EOS MLS radiances into the GEOS-5 DAS. This work focuses on assimilation of band 7 brightness temperatures which are sensitive to ozone. Our implementation uses the MLS Callable Forward Model developed by the MLS team at NASA JPL as the observation operator. We will describe our approach and recent results which are not yet final. In particular, we will demonstrate that this approach has a potential to improve the vertical structure of ozone in the lower tropical stratosphere as compared with the retrieved MLS product. We will discuss the computational efficiency of this implementation.

  7. The social context of assimilation: testing implications of segmented assimilation theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yu; Greenman, Emily

    2011-05-01

    Segmented assimilation theory has been a popular explanation for the diverse experiences of assimilation among new waves of immigrants and their children. While the theory has been interpreted in many different ways, we emphasize its implications for the important role of social context: both processes and consequences of assimilation should depend on the local social context in which immigrants are embedded. We derive empirically falsifiable hypotheses about the interaction effects between social context and assimilation on immigrant children's well-being. We then test the hypotheses using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. Our empirical analyses yield two main findings. First, for immigrant adolescents living in non-poverty neighborhoods, we find assimilation to be positively associated with educational achievement and psychological well-being but also positively associated with at-risk behavior. Second, there is little empirical evidence supporting our hypotheses derived from segmented assimilation theory. We interpret these results to mean that future research would be more fruitful focusing on differential processes of assimilation rather than differential consequences of assimilation. PMID:21572546

  8. Zinc chelation reduces hippocampal neurogenesis after pilocarpine-induced seizure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Hee Kim

    Full Text Available Several studies have shown that epileptic seizures increase hippocampal neurogenesis in the adult. However, the mechanism underlying increased neurogenesis after seizures remains largely unknown. Neurogenesis occurs in the subgranular zone (SGZ of the hippocampus in the adult brain, although an understanding of why it actively occurs in this region has remained elusive. A high level of vesicular zinc is localized in the presynaptic terminals of the SGZ. Previously, we demonstrated that a possible correlation may exist between synaptic zinc localization and high rates of neurogenesis in this area after hypoglycemia. Using a lithium-pilocarpine model, we tested our hypothesis that zinc plays a key role in modulating hippocampal neurogenesis after seizure. Then, we injected the zinc chelator, clioquinol (CQ, 30 mg/kg, into the intraperitoneal space to reduce brain zinc availability. Neuronal death was detected with Fluoro Jade-B and NeuN staining to determine whether CQ has neuroprotective effects after seizure. The total number of degenerating and live neurons was similar in vehicle and in CQ treated rats at 1 week after seizure. Neurogenesis was evaluated using BrdU, Ki67 and doublecortin (DCX immunostaining 1 week after seizure. The number of BrdU, Ki67 and DCX positive cell was increased after seizure. However, the number of BrdU, Ki67 and DCX positive cells was significantly decreased by CQ treatment. Intracellular zinc chelator, N,N,N0,N-Tetrakis (2-pyridylmethyl ethylenediamine (TPEN, also reduced seizure-induced neurogenesis in the hippocampus. The present study shows that zinc chelation does not prevent neurodegeneration but does reduce seizure-induced progenitor cell proliferation and neurogenesis. Therefore, this study suggests that zinc has an essential role for modulating hippocampal neurogenesis after seizure.

  9. Automatic multi-modal intelligent seizure acquisition (MISA) system for detection of motor seizures from electromyographic data and motion data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conradsen, Isa; Beniczky, Sándor; Wolf, Peter;

    2012-01-01

    The objective is to develop a non-invasive automatic method for detection of epileptic seizures with motor manifestations. Ten healthy subjects who simulated seizures and one patient participated in the study. Surface electromyography (sEMG) and motion sensor features were extracted as energy...

  10. Why Are Seizures Rare in Rapid Eye Movement Sleep? Review of the Frequency of Seizures in Different Sleep Stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Ng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the formal characterization of sleep stages, there have been reports that seizures may preferentially occur in certain phases of sleep. Through ascending cholinergic connections from the brainstem, rapid eye movement (REM sleep is physiologically characterized by low voltage fast activity on the electroencephalogram, REMs, and muscle atonia. Multiple independent studies confirm that, in REM sleep, there is a strikingly low proportion of seizures (~1% or less. We review a total of 42 distinct conventional and intracranial studies in the literature which comprised a net of 1458 patients. Indexed to duration, we found that REM sleep was the most protective stage of sleep against focal seizures, generalized seizures, focal interictal discharges, and two particular epilepsy syndromes. REM sleep had an additional protective effect compared to wakefulness with an average 7.83 times fewer focal seizures, 3.25 times fewer generalized seizures, and 1.11 times fewer focal interictal discharges. In further studies REM sleep has also demonstrated utility in localizing epileptogenic foci with potential translation into postsurgical seizure freedom. Based on emerging connectivity data in sleep, we hypothesize that the influence of REM sleep on seizures is due to a desynchronized EEG pattern which reflects important connectivity differences unique to this sleep stage.

  11. Efficient Methods to Assimilate Satellite Retrievals Based on Information Content. Part 2; Suboptimal Retrieval Assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joiner, J.; Dee, D. P.

    1998-01-01

    One of the outstanding problems in data assimilation has been and continues to be how best to utilize satellite data while balancing the tradeoff between accuracy and computational cost. A number of weather prediction centers have recently achieved remarkable success in improving their forecast skill by changing the method by which satellite data are assimilated into the forecast model from the traditional approach of assimilating retrievals to the direct assimilation of radiances in a variational framework. The operational implementation of such a substantial change in methodology involves a great number of technical details, e.g., pertaining to quality control procedures, systematic error correction techniques, and tuning of the statistical parameters in the analysis algorithm. Although there are clear theoretical advantages to the direct radiance assimilation approach, it is not obvious at all to what extent the improvements that have been obtained so far can be attributed to the change in methodology, or to various technical aspects of the implementation. The issue is of interest because retrieval assimilation retains many practical and logistical advantages which may become even more significant in the near future when increasingly high-volume data sources become available. The central question we address here is: how much improvement can we expect from assimilating radiances rather than retrievals, all other things being equal? We compare the two approaches in a simplified one-dimensional theoretical framework, in which problems related to quality control and systematic error correction are conveniently absent. By assuming a perfect radiative transfer model and perfect knowledge of radiance and background error covariances, we are able to formulate a nonlinear local error analysis for each assimilation method. Direct radiance assimilation is optimal in this idealized context, while the traditional method of assimilating retrievals is suboptimal because it

  12. Seizure onset detection based on a Uni- or multi-modal intelligent seizure acquisition (UISA/MISA) system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conradsen, Isa; Beniczky, Sandor; Wolf, Peter; Henriksen, Jonas; Sams, Thomas; Sorensen, Helge B D

    2010-01-01

    An automatic Uni- or Multi-modal Intelligent Seizure Acquisition (UISA/MISA) system is highly applicable for onset detection of epileptic seizures based on motion data. The modalities used are surface electromyography (sEMG), acceleration (ACC) and angular velocity (ANG). The new proposed automatic algorithm on motion data is extracting features as "log-sum" measures of discrete wavelet components. Classification into the two groups "seizure" versus "non-seizure" is made based on the support vector machine (SVM) algorithm. The algorithm performs with a sensitivity of 91-100%, a median latency of 1 second and a specificity of 100% on multi-modal data from five healthy subjects simulating seizures. The uni-modal algorithm based on sEMG data from the subjects and patients performs satisfactorily in some cases. As expected, our results clearly show superiority of the multi-modal approach, as compared with the uni-modal one. PMID:21096611

  13. CHOLESTEROL ASSIMILATION BY COMMERCIAL YOGHURT STARTER CULTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Ziarno

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The ability to in vitro cholesterol level reduction in laboratory media has been shown for numerous strains of lactic acid bacteria, but not for all strains of lactic bacteria used in the dairy industry. The aim of this work was the determination of the ability of selected thermophilic lactic acid bacteria to cholesterol assimilation during 24 h culture in MRS broth. Commercial starter cultures showed various ability to cholesterol assimilation from laboratory medium. In case of starter cultures used for production of traditional yoghurt, consisting of Streptococcus salivarius subsp. thermophilus and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, the quantity of assimilated cholesterol did not exceed 27% of its initial contents (0.7 g in 1 dm3. Starter cultures used for bioyoghurt production, containing also probiotic strains (came from Lactobacillus acidophilus species or Bifidobacterium genus assimilated from almost 18% to over 38% of cholesterol. For one monoculture of Lb. acidophilus, cholesterol assimilation ability of 49-55% was observed, despite that the number of bacterial cells in this culture was not different from number of bacteria in other cultures.

  14. Body Packing: From Seizures to Laparotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna M. Janczak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Body packing is a common method for illegal drug trafficking. Complications associated with body packing can be severe and even lead to rapid death. Thus, a timely diagnosis is warranted. As most body packers initially do not show any symptoms, making a correct diagnosis can be rather challenging. We describe a case of a 41-year-old male, who was admitted with an epileptic seizure and who turned out to be a cocaine intoxicated body packer. Due to neurological and cardiovascular deterioration an emergency surgery was performed. Four bags of cocaine could be removed. We discuss the current management regimen in symptomatic and asymptomatic body packers and highlight pearls and pitfalls with diagnosis and treatment.

  15. Resected Brain Tissue, Seizure Onset Zone and Quantitative EEG Measures: Towards Prediction of Post-Surgical Seizure Control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Rummel

    Full Text Available Epilepsy surgery is a potentially curative treatment option for pharmacoresistent patients. If non-invasive methods alone do not allow to delineate the epileptogenic brain areas the surgical candidates undergo long-term monitoring with intracranial EEG. Visual EEG analysis is then used to identify the seizure onset zone for targeted resection as a standard procedure.Despite of its great potential to assess the epileptogenicty of brain tissue, quantitative EEG analysis has not yet found its way into routine clinical practice. To demonstrate that quantitative EEG may yield clinically highly relevant information we retrospectively investigated how post-operative seizure control is associated with four selected EEG measures evaluated in the resected brain tissue and the seizure onset zone. Importantly, the exact spatial location of the intracranial electrodes was determined by coregistration of pre-operative MRI and post-implantation CT and coregistration with post-resection MRI was used to delineate the extent of tissue resection. Using data-driven thresholding, quantitative EEG results were separated into normally contributing and salient channels.In patients with favorable post-surgical seizure control a significantly larger fraction of salient channels in three of the four quantitative EEG measures was resected than in patients with unfavorable outcome in terms of seizure control (median over the whole peri-ictal recordings. The same statistics revealed no association with post-operative seizure control when EEG channels contributing to the seizure onset zone were studied.We conclude that quantitative EEG measures provide clinically relevant and objective markers of target tissue, which may be used to optimize epilepsy surgery. The finding that differentiation between favorable and unfavorable outcome was better for the fraction of salient values in the resected brain tissue than in the seizure onset zone is consistent with growing evidence that

  16. GENERALIZED VARIATIONAL DATA ASSIMILATION METHOD AND NUMERICAL EXPERIMENT FOR NON-DIFFERENTIAL SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄思训; 杜华栋; 韩威

    2004-01-01

    The generalized variational data assimilation for non-differential dynamical systems is studied.There is no tangent linear model for non-differential systems and thus the general adjoint model can not be derived in the traditional way.The weak form of the original system was introduced, and then the generalized adjoint model was derived. The generalized variational data assimilation methods were developed for non-differential low dimensional system and non-differential high dimensional system with global and local observations. Furthermore, ideas in inverse problems are introduced to 4DVAR (Four-dimensional variational) of non-differential partial differential system with local observations.

  17. Failure of adaptive self-organized criticality during epileptic seizure attacks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Meisel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Critical dynamics are assumed to be an attractive mode for normal brain functioning as information processing and computational capabilities are found to be optimal in the critical state. Recent experimental observations of neuronal activity patterns following power-law distributions, a hallmark of systems at a critical state, have led to the hypothesis that human brain dynamics could be poised at a phase transition between ordered and disordered activity. A so far unresolved question concerns the medical significance of critical brain activity and how it relates to pathological conditions. Using data from invasive electroencephalogram recordings from humans we show that during epileptic seizure attacks neuronal activity patterns deviate from the normally observed power-law distribution characterizing critical dynamics. The comparison of these observations to results from a computational model exhibiting self-organized criticality (SOC based on adaptive networks allows further insights into the underlying dynamics. Together these results suggest that brain dynamics deviates from criticality during seizures caused by the failure of adaptive SOC.

  18. Meteorological Data Assimilation by Adaptive Bayesian Optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purser, Robert James

    1992-01-01

    The principal aim of this research is the elucidation of the Bayesian statistical principles that underlie the theory of objective meteorological analysis. In particular, emphasis is given to aspects of data assimilation that can benefit from an iterative numerical strategy. Two such aspects that are given special consideration are statistical validation of the covariance profiles and nonlinear initialization. A new economic algorithm is presented, based on the imposition of a sparse matrix structure for all covariances and precisions held during the computations. It is shown that very large datasets may be accommodated using this structure and a good linear approximation to the analysis equations established without the need to unnaturally fragment the problem. Since the integrity of the system of analysis equations is preserved, it is a relatively straight-forward matter to extend the basic analysis algorithm to one that incorporates a check on the plausibility of the statistical model assumed for background errors--the so-called "validation" problem. Two methods of validation are described within the sparse matrix framework: the first is essentially a direct extension of the Bayesian principles to embrace, not only the regular analysis variables, but also the parameters that determine the precise form of the covariance functions; the second technique is the non-Bayesian method of generalized cross validation adapted for use within the sparse matrix framework. The later part of this study is concerned with the establishment of a consistent dynamical balance within a forecast model--the initialization problem. The formal principles of the modern theory of initialization are reviewed and a critical examination is made of the concept of the "slow manifold". It is demonstrated, in accordance with more complete nonlinear models, that even within a simple three-mode linearized system, the notion that a universal slow manifold exists is untenable. It is therefore argued

  19. Experimenting with the GMAO 4D Data Assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todling, R.; El Akkraoui, A.; Errico, R. M.; Guo, J.; Kim, J.; Kliest, D.; Parrish, D. F.; Suarez, M.; Trayanov, A.; Tremolet, Yannick; Whitaker, J.

    2012-01-01

    The Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO) has been working to promote its prototype four-dimensional variational (4DVAR) system to a version that can be exercised at operationally desirable configurations. Beyond a general circulation model (GeM) and an analysis system, traditional 4DV AR requires availability of tangent linear (TL) and adjoint (AD) models of the corresponding GeM. The GMAO prototype 4DVAR uses the finite-volume-based GEOS GeM and the Grid-point Statistical Interpolation (GSI) system for the first two, and TL and AD models derived ITom an early version of the finite-volume hydrodynamics that is scientifically equivalent to the present GEOS nonlinear GeM but computationally rather outdated. Specifically, the TL and AD models hydrodynamics uses a simple (I-dimensional) latitudinal MPI domain decomposition, which has consequent low scalability and prevents the prototype 4DV AR ITom being used in realistic applications. In the near future, GMAO will be upgrading its operational GEOS GCM (and assimilation system) to use a cubed-sphere-based hydrodynamics. This versions of the dynamics scales to thousands of processes and has led to a decision to re-derive the TL and AD models for this more modern dynamics, thus taking advantage of a two-dimensional MPI decomposition and improved scalability properties. With the aid of the Transformation of Algorithms in FORTRAN (l'AF) automatic adjoint generation tool and some hand-coding, a version of the cubed-sphere-based TL and AD models, with a simplified vertical diffusion scheme, is now available, enabling multiple configurations of standard implementations of 4DV AR in GEOS. Concurrent to this development, collaboration with the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) and the Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL) has allowed GMAO to implement a hybrid-ensemble capability within the GEOS data assimilation system. Both 3Dand 4D-ensemble capabilities are presently available thus allowing

  20. Quantifying Interannual Variability of the UTLS Ozone Using Assimilation of Satellite Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wargan, K.; Pawson, S.; Olsen, M.; Douglass, A.; Witte, J.; Strahan, S.; Bharitia, P. K.

    2012-01-01

    An accurate representation of spatial and temporal variability of the Upper Troposphere Lower Stratosphere (UTLS) ozone is essential for understanding both the tropospheric ozone budget and ozone s contribution to radiative forcing. The complex, dynamically driven structure of trace gas fields in the UTLS presents a challenge to data-based and modelling studies. Small features are not fully resolved in data from limb-sounding instruments such as the Microwave Limb Sounder on EOS-Aura (the EOS-MLS), but are captured in assimilation of those data as vertical structure is added from the assimilated meteorology. This will be demonstrated using a multi-year assimilation of EOS-MLS observations in the Goddard Earth Observing System, Version 5 (GEOS-5) data assimilation system. The results demonstrate the realism of the seasonal and year to year variability of laminar structures in the mid-latitudinal ozone field between years 2005-2007, for which independent validation data are available from the HIRDLS instrument. The analysis is done in the context of the underlying large scale dynamics. The lifetimes of most research instruments are too short for them to be used throughout the duration of long-term (at least 3 decades) reanalyses. For example, the EOS-MLS instrument has operated since mid-2004 until present. By contrast, Solar Backscatter Ultra Violet (SBUV) measurements provide continuous data since late 1978, but their vertical resolution is insufficient to represent the profile shape in the UTLS. Assimilation of these SBUV/2 observations in the GEOS-5 data assimilation system has hitherto not captured a realistic ozone structure in the UTLS, even though transport studies using GEOS-5 wind fields do show such structures. We show that careful construction of the background error covariance structure in GEOS-5 can lead to more realistic UTLS ozone fields when assimilating SBUV/2 observations. The reasoning behind this will be discussed, emphasizing the need to retain

  1. Influence of assimilating transports and in situ data from the Rapid-MOCHA array into the GECCO2 ocean synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhl, Armin

    2015-12-01

    By assimilating information required for the estimation of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) by the Rapid-MOCHA array, we investigate how transports should be constrained. For the period 2004-2011, we find that even the large adjustments in Florida Strait transport (FST) imposed by assimilating FST data do not impact the AMOC strength at 26.5° N while the AMOC away from this section changes due to the baroclinic response. Moreover, the high correlation between the FST and AMOC previously reported cannot be confirmed for this longer period. When assimilating FST and AMOC transports in conjunction, simulated transports can both be brought easily into consistency with the Rapid estimates while the representation of the hydrographic data at the mooring locations improves mainly at the eastern boundary. The dynamical constraint through the equations of motion conditions that the errors of the components are correlated and the total AMOC error is a much smaller than the sum of its components. Although Ekman and mid-ocean transports improve when AMOC is assimilated, the excellent AMOC representation relies on error compensation through adjustments of mainly the Ekman component. Assimilating the mooring data together with FST does not improve the representation of the AMOC. Density information is difficult to extract via assimilating temperature and salinity because of the strong density compensation in the subtropical gyre. Alternatively assimilating density from the mooring data directly was of limited success.

  2. Dark Matter Assimilation into the Baryon Asymmetry

    CERN Document Server

    D'Eramo, Francesco; Thaler, Jesse

    2011-01-01

    Pure singlets are typically disfavored as dark matter candidates, since they generically have a thermal relic abundance larger than the observed value. In this paper, we propose a new dark matter mechanism called "assimilation", which takes advantage of the baryon asymmetry of the universe to generate the correct relic abundance of singlet dark matter. Through assimilation, dark matter itself is efficiently destroyed, but dark matter number is stored in new quasi-stable heavy states which carry the baryon asymmetry. The subsequent annihilation and late-time decay of these heavy states yields (symmetric) dark matter as well as (asymmetric) standard model baryons. We study in detail the case of pure bino dark matter by augmenting the minimal supersymmetric standard model with vector-like chiral multiplets. In the parameter range where this mechanism is effective, the LHC can discover long-lived charged particles which were responsible for assimilating dark matter.

  3. Implicit assimilation for marine ecological models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, B.; Miller, R.; Spitz, Y. H.

    2012-12-01

    We use a new data assimilation method to estimate the parameters of a marine ecological model. At a given point in the ocean, the estimated values of the parameters determine the behaviors of the modeled planktonic groups, and thus indicate which species are dominant. To begin, we assimilate in situ observations, e.g., the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study, the Hawaii Ocean Time-series, and Ocean Weather Station Papa. From there, we estimate the parameters at surrounding points in space based on satellite observations of ocean color. Given the variation of the estimated parameters, we divide the ocean into regions meant to represent distinct ecosystems. An important feature of the data assimilation approach is that it refines the confidence limits of the optimal Gaussian approximation to the distribution of the parameters. This enables us to determine the ecological divisions with greater accuracy.

  4. Data assimilation for air quality models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silver, Jeremy David

    2014-01-01

    -transport models (CTMs). Each of these methods has their limitations: direct measurements provide only data at point locations and may not be representative of a wider area, remotely-sensed data from polar-orbiting satellites cannot investigate diurnal variation, and CTM simulations are often associated...... with higher uncertainties. It is possible, however, to combine information from measurements and models to more accurately estimate the state of the atmosphere using a statistically consistent framework known as “data assimilation”. In this study, three data assimilation schemes are implemented and evaluated....... The data assimilation schemes are coupled to the Danish Eulerian Hemispheric Model (DEHM), a large-scale three-dimensional off-line CTM, and the data ingested were retrievals of atmospheric composition from polar-orbiting satellites. The three assimilation techniques applied were: a three...

  5. INTERMITTENT CLONAZEPAM IN THE PREVENTION OF RECURRENT FEBRILE SEIZURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Touran MAHMOUDIAN

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo evaluate the efficacy and common side effects of intermittent clonazepam in febrile  seizures.Materials & MethodsThis study was an experimental trial designed to determine the efficacy of intermittent clonazepam in febrile seizures .Thirty patients with an age range of 6 months to 5 years (60% male, 40% female were studied. Children with a history of psychomotor delay, abnormal  neurological examination, a history of antiepileptic drug consumption, and afebrile seizures were excluded from the study. Patients received a single dose of prophylactic Clonazepam (0.05 mg/kg/ day on the first day of febrile illness and twice daily during the course of fever.An antipyretic medication (Acetaminophen was advised if fever exceeded 38oC. Patients were followed up for one year after the study inclusion date.ResultsThree patients were excluded from study since they didnot follow the tritment and three patients experienced afebrile seizures. Twenty four patients had 162 febrile episodes during the course of the study and all patients were seizure-free after 1 year.ConclusionClonazepam was 100% effective but lethargy and ataxia were common side effects in patients. Fortunately, their parents continued treatment because they had prior awareness of the  possible side effects of clonazepam. Clonazepam is efficacious as an intermittent therapy for febrile seizures if parents are informed of its side effects.Keywords: recurrent febrile seizures, clonazepam, intermittent prophylaxis

  6. Cocaine-Associated Seizures and Incidence of Status Epilepticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majlesi, Nima DO

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Acute complications from cocaine abuse are commonly treated in the emergency department (ED; one of the most consequential is status epilepticus. The incidence of this complication is not clearly defined in the prior literature on cocaine-associated sequelae. We evaluated the incidence of status epilepticus in patients with seizures secondary to suspected cocaine use.Methods: We performed a retrospective multi-center study of patients with seizures resulting from cocaine use. We identified study subjects at 15 hospitals by record review and conducted a computer-assisted records search to identify patients with seizures for each institution over a four-year period. We selected subjects from this group on the basis of cocaine use and determined the occurrence of status epilepticus among them. Data were collected on each subject using a standardized data collection form.Results: We evaluated 43 patients in the ED for cocaine-associated seizures. Their age range was 17 to 54, with a mean age was 31 years; 53% were male. Of 43 patients, 42 experienced a single tonic-clonic seizure and one developed status epilepticus. All patients had either a history of cocaine use or positive urine drug screen for cocaine.Conclusion: Despite reported cases of status epilepticus with cocaine-induced seizures, the incidence of this complication was unclear based on prior literature. This study shows that most cocaine-associated seizures are self-limited. [West J Emerg Med. 2010; 11(2:157-160.

  7. Seizure in later life: an ode to the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raminderpal Singh Sibia

    2014-08-01

    Methods: This retrospective study was conducted from medical records of 227 cases of elderly subjects presenting with seizure to emergency department, during a period of 3 years (2010-2013. Results: Most common age group involved was 65-75 years. Mean age of subjects included in the study was 68.13 +/- 23.38 years. The most common etiology was cerebrovascular disorders 132 (58.14%, followed by CNS tumor in 16 (07.04%, hypoglycemia in 14 (06.16%, infections 14 (06.16%, substance abuse 12 (05.28% and trauma 10 (04.40%. The most common presentation was with focal seizures, with 119 (52.42% subjects whereas 82 (36.12% presented with generalized tonic clonic seizure, 20 (08.81% with generalized tonic seizure and 05 (02.20% with absence seizures. Conclusion: The present study aims at pointing out the different clinical features and etiologies of geriatric seizures, thereby lets the reader have a head start with the management of an elderly patient presenting with seizure. [Int J Res Med Sci 2014; 2(4.000: 1393-1395

  8. Specification of the Earth's Plasmasphere with Data Assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, A. M.; Koller, J.; Ober, D.; Friedel, R. H.

    2008-12-01

    The plasmasphere is an important component of the intricate web of interacting processes which cause and are space weather. It is the medium of propagation for waves which are responsible for acceleration and decay of the radiation belts, it causes surface charging, and even affects orbital decay. Although the time-scales in the plasmasphere are significantly larger than for many other magnetospheric regions, the plasmasphere still exhibits significant dynamics, and capturing these dynamics is important in predicting the effects of the plasmasphere. In this paper we will discuss using data assimilation techniques to model the plasmasphere. In particular we will explore using a simple plasmasphere model (Ober et al., 1997) in combination with ensemble Kalman filtering techniques (e.g. Evensen, 2003). The ultimate goal is to produce a physics-based model in which only unknown external inputs are adjusted to maximize agreement between model and data. We will discuss data sources as well as progress to date.

  9. Improving Sediment Transport Prediction by Assimilating Satellite Images in a Tidal Bay Model of Hong Kong

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Zhang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Numerical models being one of the major tools for sediment dynamic studies in complex coastal waters are now benefitting from remote sensing images that are easily available for model inputs. The present study explored various methods of integrating remote sensing ocean color data into a numerical model to improve sediment transport prediction in a tide-dominated bay in Hong Kong, Deep Bay. Two sea surface sediment datasets delineated from satellite images from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectra-radiometer (MODIS were assimilated into a coastal ocean model of the bay for one tidal cycle. It was found that remote sensing sediment information enhanced the sediment transport model ability by validating the model results with in situ measurements. Model results showed that root mean square errors of forecast sediment both at the surface layer and the vertical layers from the model with satellite sediment assimilation are reduced by at least 36% over the model without assimilation.

  10. Inflow and initial conditions for direct numerical simulation based on adjoint data assimilation

    OpenAIRE

    Gronskis, A; Heitz, D.; Mémin, E.

    2011-01-01

    A method for generating inflow conditions for direct numerical simulations (DNS) of spatially-developing flows is presented. The proposed method is based on variational data assimilation and adjoint-based optimization. The estimation is conducted through an iterative process involving a forward integration of a given dynamical model followed by a backward integration of an adjoint system defined by the adjoint of the discrete scheme associated to the dynamical system. The ap...

  11. Variational data assimilation for a forced, inertia-free magnetohydrodynamic dynamo model

    OpenAIRE

    Li, K; A. Jackson; Livermore, P. W.

    2014-01-01

    Variational data assimilation (4DVar) is a powerful technique for tuning dynamic models to observations, in order not only to forecast future time evolution of the system, but to make inferences about quantities that are otherwise unconstrained by observation. We apply this technique, well-grounded in meteorology and oceanography, to the Earth's core where incompressible fluid motions in an electrically conducting medium are responsible for magnetic field generation. Our dynamic model's momen...

  12. Correction of deposition predictions with data assimilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Model predictions for rapid assessment and prognosis of possible radiological consequences after an accidental release of radionuclides play an important role in nuclear emergency management. Radiological measurements (e. g., dose rate measurements) can be used to improve such model predictions. This paper describes a method for combining model predictions and measurements (data assimilation) in the deposition model of the European radiological decision support system RODOS. The data assimilation approach is based on the Ensemble Kalman Filter, a Monte Carlo variant of the Kalman filter. (orig.)

  13. Data assimilation approaches in the EURANOS project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaiser, J.C.; Gering, F.; Astrup, Poul;

    2010-01-01

    Within the EURANOS project data assimilation (DA) approaches have been successfully applied in two areas to improve the predictive power of simulation models used in the RODOS and ARGOS decision support systems. For the areas of atmospheric dispersion modelling and of modelling the fate of radio......-nuclides in urban areas the results of demonstration exercises are presented here. With the data assimilation module of the RIMPUFF dispersion code, predictions of the gamma dose rate are corrected with simulated readings of fixed detector stations. Using the DA capabilities of the IAMM package for mapping...

  14. Data assimilation with the ensemble Kalman filter in a numerical model of the North Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponsar, Stéphanie; Luyten, Patrick; Dulière, Valérie

    2016-07-01

    Coastal management and maritime safety strongly rely on accurate representations of the sea state. Both dynamical models and observations provide abundant pieces of information. However, none of them provides the complete picture. The assimilation of observations into models is one way to improve our knowledge of the ocean state. Its application in coastal models remains challenging because of the wide range of temporal and spatial variabilities of the processes involved. This study investigates the assimilation of temperature profiles with the ensemble Kalman filter in 3-D North Sea simulations. The model error is represented by the standard deviation of an ensemble of model states. Parameters' values for the ensemble generation are first computed from the misfit between the data and the model results without assimilation. Then, two square root algorithms are applied to assimilate the data. The impact of data assimilation on the simulated temperature is assessed. Results show that the ensemble Kalman filter is adequate for improving temperature forecasts in coastal areas, under adequate model error specification.

  15. Data assimilation with the ensemble Kalman filter in a numerical model of the North Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponsar, Stéphanie; Luyten, Patrick; Dulière, Valérie

    2016-08-01

    Coastal management and maritime safety strongly rely on accurate representations of the sea state. Both dynamical models and observations provide abundant pieces of information. However, none of them provides the complete picture. The assimilation of observations into models is one way to improve our knowledge of the ocean state. Its application in coastal models remains challenging because of the wide range of temporal and spatial variabilities of the processes involved. This study investigates the assimilation of temperature profiles with the ensemble Kalman filter in 3-D North Sea simulations. The model error is represented by the standard deviation of an ensemble of model states. Parameters' values for the ensemble generation are first computed from the misfit between the data and the model results without assimilation. Then, two square root algorithms are applied to assimilate the data. The impact of data assimilation on the simulated temperature is assessed. Results show that the ensemble Kalman filter is adequate for improving temperature forecasts in coastal areas, under adequate model error specification.

  16. Heavy rainfall prediction applying satellite-based cloud data assimilation over land

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seto, Rie; Koike, Toshio; Rasmy, Mohamed

    2016-08-01

    To optimize flood management, it is crucial to determine whether rain will fall within a river basin. This requires very fine precision in prediction of rainfall areas. Cloud data assimilation has great potential to improve the prediction of precipitation area because it can directly obtain information on locations of rain systems. Clouds can be observed globally by satellite-based microwave remote sensing. Microwave observation also includes information of latent heat and water vapor associated with cloud amount, which enables the assimilation of not only cloud itself but also the cloud-affected atmosphere. However, it is difficult to observe clouds over land using satellite microwave remote sensing, because their emissivity is much lower than that of the land surface. To overcome this challenge, we need appropriate representation of heterogeneous land emissivity. We developed a coupled atmosphere and land data assimilation system with the Weather Research and Forecasting Model (CALDAS-WRF), which can assimilate soil moisture, vertically integrated cloud water content over land, and heat and moisture within clouds simultaneously. We applied this system to heavy rain events in Japan. Results show that the system effectively assimilated cloud signals and produced very accurate cloud and precipitation distributions. The system also accurately formed a consistent atmospheric field around the cloud. Precipitation intensity was also substantially improved by appropriately representing the local atmospheric field. Furthermore, combination of the method and operationally analyzed dynamical and moisture fields improved prediction of precipitation duration. The results demonstrate the method's promise in dramatically improving predictions of heavy rain and consequent flooding.

  17. Radiocarbon isotopic evidence for assimilation of atmospheric CO2 by the seagrass Zostera marina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Watanabe

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Submerged aquatic vegetation assimilates dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC in the water column as a carbon source across its thin cuticle layer. However, it is expected that marine macrophytes also use atmospheric CO2 when exposed to the air during low tide, although assimilation of atmospheric CO2 has never been quantitatively evaluated. Using the radiocarbon isotopic signatures (Δ14C of the seagrass Zostera marina and DIC, we show quantitatively that Z. marina takes up and assimilates atmospheric modern CO2 in a shallow coastal ecosystem. The Δ14C values of the seagrass (−36 to −8‰ were significantly higher than those of aquatic DIC (−45 to −18‰, indicating that the seagrass uses a 14C-rich carbon source (atmospheric CO2, +17‰. A carbon-source mixing model indicated that the seagrass assimilated ~ 46% (mean: 22% of its inorganic carbon as atmospheric CO2. CO2 exchange between the air and the seagrass may be enhanced by the presence of a very thin water film over the air-exposed leaves during low tide. Our radiocarbon isotope analysis, showing assimilation of atmospheric modern CO2 as an inorganic carbon source, offers better understanding of the role of seagrass meadows in coastal carbon dynamics.

  18. Assimilation of Aura Ozone Data and Comparisons with In Situ Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stajner, Ivanka; Wargan, Krzysztof; Pawson, Steven

    2008-01-01

    Ozone data from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) onboard EOS Aura satellite were assimilated into the Goddard Earth Observing System Version 4 (GEOS-4) ozone assimilation system. Comparison of assimilated ozone with ozone sonde and MOZAIC data indicate an agreement within 10% in the lower stratosphere, where dynamical processes dominate. Assimilation of OMI and MLS data improves tropospheric column estimates in the Atlantic region, but leads to an overestimation in the tropical Pacific in comparison with SHADOZ sondes. Transport and data biases are considered in order to understand these discrepancies. Comparisons of assimilated tropospheric ozone columns with ozone sonde data reveal root-mean-square (RMS) differences of 2.9 to 7.2 DU, which are typically smaller than the model-sonde RMS differences. Four different definitions of the tropopause using temperature lapse rate, potential vorticity (PV) and isentropic surfaces or ozone isosurfaces are compared with respect to their global impact on the estimated tropospheric ozone column. The largest sensitivity in the tropospheric ozone column is found near the subtropical jet, where the ozone or PV determined tropopause typically lies below the lapse rate tropopause.

  19. Automatic Epileptic Seizure Onset Detection Using Matching Pursuit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Thomas Lynggaard; Olsen, Ulrich L.; Conradsen, Isa;

    2010-01-01

    An automatic alarm system for detecting epileptic seizure onsets could be of great assistance to patients and medical staff. A novel approach is proposed using the Matching Pursuit algorithm as a feature extractor combined with the Support Vector Machine (SVM) as a classifier for this purpose. The...... combination of Matching Pursuit and SVM for automatic seizure detection has never been tested before, making this a pilot study. Data from red different patients with 6 to 49 seizures are used to test our model. Three patients are recorded with scalp electroencephalography (sEEG) and three with intracranial...

  20. Approach To The First Unprovoked Seizure- PART II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad GHOFRANI

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite This Article: Ghofrani M. Approach To The First Unprovoked Seizure- PART II. Iran J Child Neurol. 2013 Autumn; 7(4:1-5.Abstract The approach to a child who has experienced a first unprovoked generalized tonic-clonic seizure is challenging and at the same time controversial.How to establish the diagnosis, ways and means of investigation and whether treatment is appropriate, are different aspects of this subject. In this writing the above mentioned matters are discussed. References31.Berg AT, Testa FM., Levy SR, Shinnar S. Neuroimaging in children with newly diagnosed epilepsy. A community based study. Pediatrics 2000;106:527-532.32.Shinnar S, Odell C. Treating childhood seizure; when and for how long. In: Shinnar S, Amir N, Branski D (Eds. Childhood seizure. S Karger Basel. 1995. P.100-110.33.Shinnar S, Berg AT, Moshe Sl, et al. Risk of Seizure recurrence following a first unprovoked seizure in childhood; A prospective study. Pediatrics 1990;85:1076-2085.34.Shinnar S, Berg At, Moshe SL, et al. The risk of seizure recurrence after a first unprovoked febrile seizure in childhood: An extended follow up. Pediatrics 1996:98:216-225.35.Hauser WA, Rich SS, Annegers JF, Anderson VE. Seizure recurrence after a first unprovoked seizure: An extended follow up. Neurology 1990;40:1163-1170.36.Stroink H, Brouwer O F, Arts WF, Greets AT, Peter AC, Van Donselaar CA. The First unprovoked, untreated seizure in childhood: A hospital based study of the accuracy of diagnosis, rate of recurrence, and long term outcome after recurrence. Dutch study of epilepsy in childhood. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 1998;64:595-600. 37.Shinnar S, Berg AT, O’Dell C. Newstein D, et al. Predictors of multiple seizure in a cohort of children prospectively followed from the time of their first unprovoked seizure, Ann Neurol 2000; 48:140-147.38.Martinovie Z, Jovic N. Seizure recurrence after a first generalized tonic-clonic seizure in children

  1. On the Assimilation of Tree-Ring-Width Chronologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, Walter; Reich, Sebastian; Cubasch, Ulrich

    2015-04-01

    Data assimilation (DA) of climate proxy records is currently acknowledged as a promising approach to the paleoclimate reconstruction problem, with the potential to bring physical consistency to reconstructed fields. Previous paleo-DA studies have typically assumed a linear relationship between climate forcing and the resulting proxy data, whereas there exist growing evidence of complex, potentially non-linear, proxy formation processes. Accordingly, it appears natural to simulate the proxy response to climate in a more realistic fashion, by way of proxy-specific forward models. Following this train of thought, we investigate the assimilation of the most traditional climate proxy type, Tree-Ring-Width (TRW) chronologies, using the process-based tree-ring growth forward model Vaganov-Shashkin-Lite (VSL) and ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) techniques. Used as observation operator, VSL's formulation implies three compounding, challenging features: (i) time averaging, (ii) "switching recording" of 2 variables and (iii) bounded response windows leading to "thresholded response". DA experiments involving VSL-based pseudo-TRW observations are performed first for a chaotic 2-scale dynamical system, used as a cartoon of the atmosphere-land system, and then for an atmospheric general circulation model of intermediate complexity. Our results reveal that VSL's nonlinearities may considerable deteriorate the performance of EnKF for Time-Averaged (TA) estimation, as compared to the utilization of a TA linear observation operator. Moreover, we show that this assimilation skill loss can be considerably reduced by embedding VSL's formulation into fuzzy logic theory, which fosters new interpretations of tree-ring growth limitation processes.

  2. The Computational Complexity, Parallel Scalability, and Performance of Atmospheric Data Assimilation Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyster, Peter M.; Guo, J.; Clune, T.; Larson, J. W.; Atlas, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The computational complexity of algorithms for Four Dimensional Data Assimilation (4DDA) at NASA's Data Assimilation Office (DAO) is discussed. In 4DDA, observations are assimilated with the output of a dynamical model to generate best-estimates of the states of the system. It is thus a mapping problem, whereby scattered observations are converted into regular accurate maps of wind, temperature, moisture and other variables. The DAO is developing and using 4DDA algorithms that provide these datasets, or analyses, in support of Earth System Science research. Two large-scale algorithms are discussed. The first approach, the Goddard Earth Observing System Data Assimilation System (GEOS DAS), uses an atmospheric general circulation model (GCM) and an observation-space based analysis system, the Physical-space Statistical Analysis System (PSAS). GEOS DAS is very similar to global meteorological weather forecasting data assimilation systems, but is used at NASA for climate research. Systems of this size typically run at between 1 and 20 gigaflop/s. The second approach, the Kalman filter, uses a more consistent algorithm to determine the forecast error covariance matrix than does GEOS DAS. For atmospheric assimilation, the gridded dynamical fields typically have More than 10(exp 6) variables, therefore the full error covariance matrix may be in excess of a teraword. For the Kalman filter this problem can easily scale to petaflop/s proportions. We discuss the computational complexity of GEOS DAS and our implementation of the Kalman filter. We also discuss and quantify some of the technical issues and limitations in developing efficient, in terms of wall clock time, and scalable parallel implementations of the algorithms.

  3. Increased seizure latency and decreased severity of pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures in mice after essential oil administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutroumanidou, Eleni; Kimbaris, Athanasios; Kortsaris, Alexandros; Bezirtzoglou, Eugenia; Polissiou, Moschos; Charalabopoulos, Konstantinos; Pagonopoulou, Olga

    2013-01-01

    The effect of pretreatment with essential oils (EOs) from eight aromatic plants on the seizure latency and severity of pentylenetetrazol- (PTZ-) induced seizures in mice was evaluated. Weight-dependent doses of Rosmarinus officinalis, Ocimum basilicum, Mentha spicata, Mentha pulegium, Lavandula angustifolia, Mentha piperita, Origanum dictamnus, and Origanum vulgare, isolated from the respective aromatic plants from NE Greece, were administered 60 minutes prior to intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of a lethal dose of PTZ to eight respective groups of Balb-c mice. Control group received only one i.p. PTZ injection. Motor and behavioral activity of the animals after EOs administration, development of tonic-clonic seizures, seizure latency and severity, and percentage of survival after PTZ administration were determined for each group. All groups of mice treated with the EOs showed reduced activity and stability after the administration of the oil, except for those treated with O. vulgare (100% mortality after the administration of the oil). After PTZ administration, mice from the different groups showed increased latency and reduced severity of seizures (ranging from simple twitches to complete seizures). Mice who had received M. piperita demonstrated no seizures and 100% survival. The different drastic component and its concentration could account for the diversity of anticonvulsant effects. PMID:23819045

  4. Increased Seizure Latency and Decreased Severity of Pentylenetetrazol-Induced Seizures in Mice after Essential Oil Administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleni Koutroumanidou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of pretreatment with essential oils (EOs from eight aromatic plants on the seizure latency and severity of pentylenetetrazol- (PTZ- induced seizures in mice was evaluated. Weight-dependent doses of Rosmarinus officinalis, Ocimum basilicum, Mentha spicata, Mentha pulegium, Lavandula angustifolia, Mentha piperita, Origanum dictamnus, and Origanum vulgare, isolated from the respective aromatic plants from NE Greece, were administered 60 minutes prior to intraperitoneal (i.p. injection of a lethal dose of PTZ to eight respective groups of Balb-c mice. Control group received only one i.p. PTZ injection. Motor and behavioral activity of the animals after EOs administration, development of tonic-clonic seizures, seizure latency and severity, and percentage of survival after PTZ administration were determined for each group. All groups of mice treated with the EOs showed reduced activity and stability after the administration of the oil, except for those treated with O. vulgare (100% mortality after the administration of the oil. After PTZ administration, mice from the different groups showed increased latency and reduced severity of seizures (ranging from simple twitches to complete seizures. Mice who had received M. piperita demonstrated no seizures and 100% survival. The different drastic component and its concentration could account for the diversity of anticonvulsant effects.

  5. Effect of Immunotherapy on Seizure Outcome in Patients with Autoimmune Encephalitis: A Prospective Observational Registry Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Ick Byun

    Full Text Available To evaluate the seizure characteristics and outcome after immunotherapy in adult patients with autoimmune encephalitis (AE and new-onset seizure.Adult (age ≥18 years patients with AE and new-onset seizure who underwent immunotherapy and were followed-up for at least 6 months were included. Seizure frequency was evaluated at 2-4 weeks and 6 months after the onset of the initial immunotherapy and was categorized as "seizure remission", "> 50% seizure reduction", or "no change" based on the degree of its decrease.Forty-one AE patients who presented with new-onset seizure were analysed. At 2-4 weeks after the initial immunotherapy, 51.2% of the patients were seizure free, and 24.4% had significant seizure reduction. At 6 months, seizure remission was observed in 73.2% of the patients, although four patients died during hospitalization. Rituximab was used as a second-line immunotherapy in 12 patients who continued to have seizures despite the initial immunotherapy, and additional seizure remission was achieved in 66.6% of them. In particular, those who exhibited partial response to the initial immunotherapy had a better seizure outcome after rituximab, with low adverse events.AE frequently presented as seizure, but only 18.9% of the living patients suffered from seizure at 6 months after immunotherapy. Aggressive immunotherapy can improve seizure outcome in patients with AE.

  6. Experimental febrile seizures are precipitated by a hyperthermia-induced respiratory alkalosis

    OpenAIRE

    Schuchmann, Sebastian; Schmitz, Dietmar; Rivera, Claudio; Vanhatalo, Sampsa; Salmen, Benedikt; Mackie, Ken; Sipilä, Sampsa T; Voipio, Juha; Kaila, Kai

    2006-01-01

    Febrile seizures are frequent during early childhood, and prolonged (complex) febrile seizures are associated with an increased susceptibility to temporal lobe epilepsy. The pathophysiological consequences of febrile seizures have been extensively studied in rat pups exposed to hyperthermia. The mechanisms that trigger these seizures are unknown, however. A rise in brain pH is kn...

  7. Diagnostic decision-making after a first and recurrent seizure in adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Askamp, J.; Putten, van M.J.A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The role of EEG after a first seizure has been debated. Epileptiform EEG activity is a good predictor of seizure recurrence, but is reported in only 8-50% of first-seizure adult patients. Even if the EEG is abnormal, the opinions about treatment after a first seizure differ. The role of EEG

  8. Relation between stress-precipitated seizures and the stress response in childhood epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Campen, Jolien S.; Jansen, Floor E.; Pet, Milou A.; Otte, Willem M.; Hillegers, Manon H J; Joels, Marian; Braun, Kees P J

    2015-01-01

    The majority of patients with epilepsy report that seizures are sometimes triggered or provoked. Stress is the most frequently self-reported seizure-precipitant. The mechanisms underlying stress-sensitivity of seizures are currently unresolved. We hypothesized that stress-sensitivity of seizures rel

  9. Multi-modal Intelligent Seizure Acquisition (MISA) system - A new approach towards seizure detection based on full body motion measures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conradsen, Isa; Beniczky, Sándor; Wolf, Peter;

    2009-01-01

    test subjects were used for this pilot project. Each subject simulated 15 seizures and in addition performed some predefined normal activities, during a 4-hour monitoring with electromyography (EMG), accelerometer, magnetometer and gyroscope (AMG), electrocardiography (ECG), electroencephalography (EEG......) and audio and video recording. The results showed that a non-subject specific MISA system developed on data from the modalities: accelerometer (ACM), gyroscope and EMG is able to detect 98% of the simulated seizures and at the same time mistakes only 4 of the normal movements for seizures. If the system...

  10. A new sequential data assimilation method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN YueQi; ZHANG YaoCun; WANG YunFeng; YE Song; FANG HanXian

    2009-01-01

    A new sequential data assimilation method named "Monte Carlo H∞ filter" is Introduced based on H∞ filter technique and Monte Carlo method in this paper. This method applies to nonlinear systems in condition of lacking the statistical properties of observational errors. In order to compare the assimilation capability of Monte Carlo H= filter with that of the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) in solving practical problems caused by temporal correlation or spatial correlation of observational errors, two numerical experiments are performed by using Lorenz (1963) system and shallow-water equations respectively. The result is that the assimilation capability of the new method is better than that of EnKF method. It is also shown that Monte Carlo H∞ filter assimilation method is effective and suitable to nonlinear systems in that it does not depend on the statistical properties of observational errors and has better robustnesa than EnKF method when the statistical properties of observational errors are varying. In addition, for the new method, the smallest level factor founded by search method is flow-dependent.

  11. Epileptiform EEG Discharges and Risk of Epilepsy Following Febrile Seizure

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2013-01-01

    Investigators at Kangnam and Masan Samsung Changwon Hospitals, Korea, studied the relation between epileptiform discharges on the EEG after febrile seizures (FS) and the risk of developing epilepsy and recurrence of FS.

  12. Ontology and Knowledge Management System on Epilepsy and Epileptic Seizures

    CERN Document Server

    Almeida, Pedro; Sales, Francisco; Nogueira, Ana; Dourado, António

    2010-01-01

    A Knowledge Management System developed for supporting creation, capture, storage and dissemination of information about Epilepsy and Epileptic Seizures is presented. We present an Ontology on Epilepsy and a Web-based prototype that together create the KMS.

  13. Moonstruck? The effect of the lunar cycle on seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxendale, Sallie; Fisher, Jennifer

    2008-10-01

    Recent reports on the effects of the lunar cycle on seizure occurrence have yielded mixed results. If the moon phase is influential, we hypothesized that this would be due to the moon's contribution to nocturnal illumination, rather than its waxing or waning state, and that significant correlations would not be apparent if local cloud cover were controlled for. We found a significant negative correlation between the mean number of seizures and the fraction of the moon illuminated by the sun (rho=-0.09, P<0.05) in 1571 seizures recorded in a dedicated epilepsy inpatient unit over 341 days. This correlation disappeared when we controlled for the local clarity of the night sky, suggesting that it is the brightness of the night and the contribution the moon phase makes to nocturnal luminance, rather than the moon phase per se, that may influence the occurrence of epileptic seizures.

  14. Maternal thyroid dysfunction and risk of seizure in the child

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Stine Linding; Laurberg, Peter; Wu, Chunsen;

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid hormones are essential for brain development, and maternal thyroid disease may affect child neurocognitive development. Some types of seizures may also depend upon early exposure of the developing central nervous system, and we hypothesized that maternal thyroid dysfunction could increase...... the risk of seizure in the child. In a Danish population-based study we included 1,699,693 liveborn singletons, and from the Danish National Hospital Register we obtained information on maternal diagnosis of hyper- or hypothyroidism and neonatal seizure, febrile seizure, and epilepsy in the child. Maternal...... diagnosis of thyroid dysfunction before or after birth of the child was registered in two percent of the singleton births. In adjusted analyses, maternal hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism first time diagnosed after birth of the child were associated with a significant increased risk of epilepsy...

  15. Appearing and disappearing CT scan abnormalities and seizures.

    OpenAIRE

    P K Sethi; Kumar, B.R.; Madan, V S; Mohan, V

    1985-01-01

    A group of patients presenting with seizures (focal or generalised) and abnormal CT scans who, on follow up, showed complete resolution of the CT scan changes, without any treatment other than anticonvulsants, are described.

  16. Focal inhibitory seizures: a cause of recurrent transient weakness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Fahmida A; Connor, Steve; Ferner, Rosalie; Leschziner, Guy

    2015-12-01

    Focal seizures are usually manifest with stereotyped positive phenomena. However, seizures may also give negative phenomena, such as paralysis, speech arrest, neglect, atonia and numbness. We report a 39-year-old man with neurofibromatosis 2 who had recurrent stereotyped episodes of weakness affecting his right leg and right arm. His MR scan of brain showed numerous meningiomas, the largest of which was near the vertex, adjacent to the left side of the falx. Interictal electroencephalogram, MR cerebral angiogram and Doppler carotid artery ultrasound scan were normal. He was diagnosed with epilepsy and started on levetiracetam, with no subsequent attacks. We postulate his negative motor seizures related to a meningioma overlying the supplementary negative motor area in the mesial superior frontal gyrus, and discuss diagnostic criteria for inhibitory seizures. PMID:26245512

  17. Recurrent seizures: An unusual manifestation of vitamin B12 deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar S

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The present report highlights an unusual presentation of vitamin B12 deficiency— recurrent seizures in a 26-year-old man. His symptoms responded to parenteral vitamin B12 therapy. The relevant literature is reviewed.

  18. Mapping preictal networks preceding childhood absence seizures using magnetoencephalography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs-Brichford, Eliza; Horn, Paul S; Tenney, Jeffrey R

    2014-10-01

    The electrographic hallmark of childhood absence seizures is 3 Hz generalized spike and wave discharges; however, there is likely a focal thalamic or cortical onset that cannot be detected using scalp electroencephalography (EEG). The purpose of this study was to study the earliest preictal changes in children with absence epilepsy. In this report, magnetoencephalography recordings of 44 absence seizures recorded from 12 children with drug-naïve childhood absence seizures were used to perform time frequency analysis and source localization prior to the onset of the seizures. Evidence of preictal magnetoencephalography frequency changes were detected a mean of 694 ms before the initial spike on the EEG. A consistent pattern of focal sources was present in the frontal cortex and thalamus during this preictal period, but source localization occurred synchronously so that independent activity between the 2 structures could not be distinguished.

  19. Backpropagation Artificial Neural Network To Detect Hyperthermic Seizures In Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Kumar Sinha

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available A three-layered feed-forward back-propagation Artificial Neural Network was used to classify the seizure episodes in rats. Seizure patterns were induced by subjecting anesthetized rats to a Biological Oxygen Demand incubator at 45-47ºC for 30 to 60 minutes. Selected fast Fourier transform data of one second epochs of electroencephalogram were used to train and test the network for the classification of seizure and normal patterns. The results indicate that the present network with the architecture of 40-12-1 (input-hidden-output nodes agrees with manual scoring of seizure and normal patterns with a high recognition rate of 98.6%.

  20. Nitric Oxide Regulates Neurogenesis in the Hippocampus following Seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno P. Carreira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hippocampal neurogenesis is changed by brain injury. When neuroinflammation accompanies injury, activation of resident microglial cells promotes the release of inflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen/nitrogen species like nitric oxide (NO. In these conditions, NO promotes proliferation of neural stem cells (NSC in the hippocampus. However, little is known about the role of NO in the survival and differentiation of newborn cells in the injured dentate gyrus. Here we investigated the role of NO following seizures in the regulation of proliferation, migration, differentiation, and survival of NSC in the hippocampus using the kainic acid (KA induced seizure mouse model. We show that NO increased the proliferation of NSC and the number of neuroblasts following seizures but was detrimental to the survival of newborn neurons. NO was also required for the maintenance of long-term neuroinflammation. Taken together, our data show that NO positively contributes to the initial stages of neurogenesis following seizures but compromises survival of newborn neurons.

  1. Economic and Cultural Assimilation and Integration of Immigration in Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Mariya Aleksynska; Yann Algan

    2010-01-01

    This paper documents assimilation of immigrants in 16 European countries along cultural, civic, and economic dimensions, distinguishing by immigrants’ generation, duration of stay, and origin. It suggests that assimilation may have multiple facets, and take place at different speed depending on the outcome in question. While assimilation along some economic outcomes may be correlated with assimilation along some cultural outcomes, such correlations are not systematic, and imply that progress ...

  2. Assimilation violation and spoken-language processing: A supplementary report

    OpenAIRE

    Weber, A

    2002-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that spoken-language processing is inhibited by violation of obligatory regressive assimilation. Weber (2001) replicated this inhibitory effect in a phoneme-monitoring study examining regressive place assimilation of nasals, but found facilitation for violation of progressive assimilation. German listeners detected the velar fricative [x] more quickly when fricative assimilation was violated (e.g., *[bIxt] or *[blInx@n]) than when no violation occurred (e.g., [baxt...

  3. ASSIMILATION SYSTEM AT DHMZ: DEVELOPMENT AND FIRST VERIFICATION RESULTS

    OpenAIRE

    Stanešić, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Abstract: In this paper, a description of the setup for a local assimilation system for a limited area model, ALADIN (Aire Limiteé Adaptation Dynamique dévelopement InterNational), is given with a comprehensive description of the assimilation techniques used. The assimilation system at DHMZ (Meteorological and Hydrological Service of Croatia) consisted of two parts: the surface assimilation, which was used to change the state of a model land surface variables, and the upper air assimilatio...

  4. Clinical and psychosocial characteristics of children with nonepileptic seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinta Sri

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study is to present a comprehensive profile of clinical and psychosocial characteristics of children with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures and to assess the short-term outcome of these patients. Materials and Methods: The subjects were consecutive cases of children with a diagnosis of nonepileptic seizures (N=17, mean age = 10.7 years, S.D. = 1.26 and two groups of control groups matched on age and sex: true seizure group and healthy controls. All the children were recruited from the out-patient services of the Department of Pediatrics of a tertiary care teaching hospital in North India. Detailed history taking and clinical examination was done in the case of every child. A standard 18 channel EEG was done in all the children and a video EEG was done in 12 cases of children with nonepileptic seizures. The Childhood Psychopathology Measurement Schedule (CPMS and Life Events Scale for Indian Children (LESIC were used to measure the children′s emotional and behavioral functioning at home, and the number of life events and the stress associated with these events in the preceding year and the year before that. Short-term outcome was examined three to six months after the diagnosis of nonepileptic seizures was made. Results: Unresponsiveness without marked motor manifestations was the most common "ictal" characteristic of the nonepileptic seizures. Pelvic thrusting, upper and lower limb movements, head movements, and vocalization were observed in less than one-third of the patients. Increased psychosocial stress and significantly higher number of life events in the preceding year were found to characterize children with nonepileptic seizures, as compared to the two control groups. The nonepileptic seizures and true seizures groups had a higher proportion of children with psychopathology scores in the clinically significant maladjustment range, as compared to those in the healthy control group. A majority of the patients

  5. A flexible Open Data Assimilation framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Velzen, Nils; Ridler, Marc E.; Altaf, Umer; Madsen, Henrik; Heemink, Arnold; Dijkzeul, Johan

    2015-04-01

    Accurate and reliable real-time hydrological forecasts are essential for protection against water-related hazards, operation of infrastructure, and water resources management. Recent advances in radar rainfall estimation and forecasting, numerical weather predictions, satellite and in-situ monitoring, and faster computing facilities are opening up new opportunities in real-time hydrological forecasting. More effective use of the different information sources via data assimilation will provide the basis for producing more accurate and more reliable forecasts. In this regard, development and implementation of robust and computationally efficient data assimilation algorithms that are feasible for real-time applications remains one of the key challenges. The implementation of data assimilation techniques is traditionally in a model specific form. The disadvantage of this approach is the need to have in-depth knowledge of the numerical core computations and it does not allow to freely experiment with data assimilation algorithms and measurement sources without the need of additional programming. We present a more flexible approach to setup a forecasting system. The OpenDA data assimilation framework contains many state of the art data assimilation algorithms to easily set up a forecasting system. The setup of the framework allows users to select and experiment with various algorithms. OpenDA defines an interface between model and data assimilation algorithms. This interface only needs to be implemented once for a particular model. The OpenDA model interface is already implemented for various models. Besides these models it is very easy to couple models that are already implementing the Open Model Interface (OpenMI) to OpenDA using the generic OpenMI-OpenDA coupler. Using a synthetic test case we demonstrate the capabilities of the proposed approach using OpenMI and OpenDA. We use the MIKE SHE distributed and integrated hydrological modeling system to demonstrate how

  6. Strengths and Limitations of Data Assimilation Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schunk, R. W.; Scherliess, L.; Sojka, J. J.; Thompson, D. C.; Zhu, L.

    2006-12-01

    As part of the Global Assimilation of Ionospheric Measurements (USU-GAIM) program, we developed two Kalman filter data assimilation models of the global ionosphere, including Gauss-Markov (GM) and Full Physics (FP) models. Our Gauss-Markov model uses a physics-based ionospheric model and a Kalman filter as a basis for assimilating the measurements. The physics-based model is the Ionosphere Forecast Model (IFM), which is a multi-ion global model that covers the E-region, F-region, and topside from 90 to 1400 km. The GM model has both regional and global capabilities and the output of the model is a 3-dimensional Ne distribution at specified times. With the GM model the ionospheric densities obtained from the IFM constitute a background ionospheric density field on which perturbations are superimposed based on the available data sources and their errors. The density perturbations and the associated errors evolve over time via a statistical Gauss-Markov process. Our full physics data assimilation model is more sophisticated than the Gauss-Markov model. This model is based on a physics-based ionosphere-plasmasphere-polar wind model, which includes six ion species (NO+, O2+, N2+, O+, H+, and He+) and covers the low-mid latitudes from 90 to 20,000 km. In addition to the global Ne distribution, the full physics model also provides global distributions of the self-consistent drivers (neutral winds and composition, electric fields, and particle precipitation). Both models can assimilate in situ electron densities from 4 DMSP satellites, bottomside Ne profiles from 30 ionosondes, slant TECs from up to 1000 ground GPS/TEC receivers, occultation data and line-of-sight UV emissions. The USU-GAIM models are now being widely used, but as with all physics-based data assimilation models, care must be exercised because these models have both strengths and limitations. Some of the important issues relate to the quality, amount and distribution of the data, the ability to obtain

  7. Data assimilation for computing model evidence: The attribution problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrassi, Alberto; Bocquet, Marc; Hannart, Alexis; Ghil, Michael

    2016-04-01

    A new approach potentially useful for near real time, systematic causal attribution of weather and climate-related events is described. The method is purposely designed to allow its operability at meteorological centers by synergizing causal attribution with Data Assimilation (DA) methods usually designed to deal with large nonlinear models. The concept of contextual model evidence is introduced and its link with causal attribution is stressed. It is then shown how contextual model evidence can be obtained as a side-product of the statistical inference performed for the assimilation of data. Three strategies are considered: DA-based ensemble forecasting, filtering and smoothing. The theoretical rationale of this approach is explained along with the advantages, drawbacks and limits of applicability of each strategy depending on the degree of instabilities of the underlying dynamics. The prominent features of a DA-based detection and attribution procedure are discussed. The proposal is illustrated numerically with low-order nonlinear models, and is compared with standard methods for detection and attribution showing promising performance. The convergence of the different DA-based estimates of the model evidence toward the unknown true value is explored numerically in some specific case. The method stresses on the concept of model evidence, and open questions on how to compute and interpret the response to forcing whose effects one wants to contrast with respect to model error and other source of uncertainties. Practical obstacles that need to be addressed to make the proposal readily operational within weather forecasting centers are finally laid out.

  8. The Madden-Julian Oscillation in the NCAR Community Earth System Model Coupled Data Assimilation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, A.; Anderson, J. L.; Moncrieff, M.; Collins, N.; Danabasoglu, G.; Hoar, T.; Karspeck, A. R.; Neale, R. B.; Raeder, K.; Tribbia, J. J.

    2014-12-01

    We present a quantitative evaluation of the simulated MJO in analyses produced with a coupled data assimilation (CDA) framework developed at the National Center for Atmosphere Research. This system is based on the Community Earth System Model (CESM; previously known as the Community Climate System Model -CCSM) interfaced to a community facility for ensemble data assimilation (Data Assimilation Research Testbed - DART). The system (multi-component CDA) assimilates data into each of the respective ocean/atmosphere/land model components during the assimilation step followed by an exchange of information between the model components during the forecast step. Note that this is an advancement over many existing prototypes of coupled data assimilation systems, which typically assimilate observations only in one of the model components (i.e., single-component CDA). The more realistic treatment of air-sea interactions and improvements to the model mean state in the multi-component CDA recover many aspects of MJO representation, from its space-time structure and propagation (see Figure 1) to the governing relationships between precipitation and sea surface temperature on intra-seasonal scales. Standard qualitative and process-based diagnostics identified by the MJO Task Force (currently under the auspices of the Working Group on Numerical Experimentation) have been used to detect the MJO signals across a suite of coupled model experiments involving both multi-component and single-component DA experiments as well as a free run of the coupled CESM model (i.e., CMIP5 style without data assimilation). Short predictability experiments during the boreal winter are used to demonstrate that the decay rates of the MJO convective anomalies are slower in the multi-component CDA system, which allows it to retain the MJO dynamics for a longer period. We anticipate that the knowledge gained through this study will enhance our understanding of the MJO feedback mechanisms across the air

  9. ASPM mutations identified in patients with primary microcephaly and seizures

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, J; Eyaid, W; Mochida, G; Al-Moayyad, F; Bodell, A; Woods, C; Walsh, C

    2005-01-01

    Background: Human autosomal recessive primary microcephaly (MCPH) is a heterogeneous disorder with at least six genetic loci (MCPH1–6), with MCPH5, caused by ASPM mutation, being the most common. Despite the high prevalence of epilepsy in microcephaly patients, microcephaly with frequent seizures has been excluded from the ascertainment of MCPH. Here, we report a pedigree with multiple affected individuals with microcephaly and seizures.

  10. Influences on seizure activity in pregnant women with epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabers, Anne

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated whether referral to a specialized epilepsy clinic prior to pregnancy influences seizure activity during pregnancy. In addition, folic acid supplementation prior to pregnancy as a marker of intent to conceive was used to evaluate whether the use of folic acid at the time......). Seizure deterioration was significantly lower in group 1 than in group 2: 9% versus 32% (Pfolic acid supplements was significantly higher in group 1 (P

  11. Brain Mechanisms of Altered Consciousness in Generalised Seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Seri

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In spite of the inherent difficulties in achieving a biologically meaningful definition of consciousness, recent neurophysiological studies are starting to provide some insight in fundamental mechanisms associated with impaired consciousness in neurological disorders. Generalised seizures are associated with disruption of the default state network, a functional network of discrete brain areas, which include the fronto-parietal cortices. Subcortical contribution through activation of thalamocortical structures, as well as striate nuclei are also crucial to produce impaired consciousness in generalised seizures.

  12. Benign occipital lobe seizures: Natural progression and atypical evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Prithika Chary; Bhuvaneshwari Rajendran

    2013-01-01

    Benign occipital seizure syndromes are benign childhood epilepsy syndromes and are mainly of two types, Panayiotopoulos syndrome, an autonomic epilepsy and idiopathic childhood occipital epilepsy of Gastaut (ICOE-G) including the idiopathic photosensitive occipital lobe epilepsy. Although both these types are categorized as occipital seizures, they are distinct in presentation and management. They can also be tricky to diagnose as visual symptoms may not always be the presenting feature and i...

  13. Automated differentiation between epileptic and non-epileptic convulsive seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beniczky, Sándor; Conradsen, Isa; Moldovan, Mihai;

    2015-01-01

    algorithm: 25 generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCSs) from 11 patients, and 19 episodes of convulsive PNES from 13 patients. The gold standard was the interpretation of the video-electroencephalographic recordings by experts blinded to the EMG results. The algorithm correctly classified 24 GTCSs (96%) and...... 18 PNESs (95%). The overall diagnostic accuracy was 95%. This algorithm is useful for distinguishing between epileptic and psychogenic convulsive seizures....

  14. A case of Hashimoto's encephalopathy presenting with seizures and psychosis

    OpenAIRE

    Min-Joo Lee; Hae-Sang Lee; Jin-Soon Hwang; Da-Eun Jung

    2012-01-01

    Hashimoto’s encephalopathy (HE) is a rare, poorly understood, autoimmune disease characterized by symptoms of acute or subacute encephalopathy associated with increased anti-thyroid antibody levels. Here, we report a case of a 14-year-old girl with HE and briefly review the literature. The patient presented with acute mental changes and seizures, but no evidence of infectious encephalitis. In the acute stage, the seizures did not respond to conventional antiepileptic drugs, including valproic...

  15. Copeptin as a serum biomarker of febrile seizures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Stöcklin

    Full Text Available Accurate diagnosis of febrile seizures in children presenting after paroxysmal episodes associated with fever, is hampered by the lack of objective postictal biomarkers. The aim of our study was to investigate whether FS are associated with increased levels of serum copeptin, a robust marker of arginine vasopressin secretion.This was a prospective emergency-setting cross-sectional study of 161 children between six months and five years of age. Of these, 83 were diagnosed with febrile seizures, 69 had a febrile infection without seizures and nine had epileptic seizures not triggered by infection. Serum copeptin and prolactin levels were measured in addition to standard clinical, neurophysiological, and laboratory assessment.NCT01884766.Circulating copeptin was significantly higher in children with febrile seizures (median [interquartile range] 18.9 pmol/L [8.5-36.6] compared to febrile controls (5.6 pmol/L [4.1-9.4]; p < 0.001, with no differences between febrile and epileptic seizures (21.4 pmol/L [16.1-46.6]; p = 0.728. In a multivariable regression model, seizures were the major determinant of serum copeptin (beta 0.509; p < 0.001, independently of clinical and baseline laboratory indices. The area under the receiver operating curve for copeptin was 0.824 (95% CI 0.753-0.881, significantly higher compared to prolactin (0.667 [0.585-0.742]; p < 0.001. The diagnostic accuracy of copeptin increased with decreasing time elapsed since the convulsive event (at 120 min: 0.879 [0.806-0.932] and at <60 min: 0.975 [0.913-0.997].Circulating copeptin has high diagnostic accuracy in febrile seizures and may be a useful adjunct for accurately diagnosing postictal states in the emergency setting.

  16. A Spectral Based Forecasting Tool of Epileptic Seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hedi Khammari

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available A new approach to recognize and predict succedent epileptic seizure by using single channel electroencephalogram (EEG analysis is proposed. Spectral analysis of a brain time series of the left frontal FP1-F7 (LF scalp location signal is devoted for seizure prediction and analysis. Important findings showing the presence of preictal spectral changes in studied brain signal are described. Spectral features occurring during the preictal epoch are extracted from the application of sliding spectral windows of raw EEG at different moments in time preceding the seizure onset. The same method is then applied to a couple of Intrinsic Mode Functions (IMF1 and IMF2 of the raw EEG (FP1-F7 decomposed by the algorithm of empirical mode decomposition. The main prediction features are derived from the changes of amplitudes, frequency and the number of spikes which are of diagnostic values. The sliding spectral windows were computed to trace the amplitude changes of higher harmonics during time interval preceding the seizure onset. Choosing different moments in time aims to identify the best prediction time of seizure onset. Obviously an early prediction time is always desirable but the seizure may result from an abrupt change and so the spectral 'signs of an imminent seizure occur during a very short prediction time. From another viewpoint, it may be advantageous to consider a successive prediction times showing the increase of spike numbers and the predominance of certain waves rather than others when approaching seizure onset. The common prediction features extracted from the analysis of FP1-F7 signal for both patients were mainly the increasing number of spikes of low frequency waves namely delta and theta waves.

  17. Robust Deep Network with Maximum Correntropy Criterion for Seizure Detection

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Effective seizure detection from long-term EEG is highly important for seizure diagnosis. Existing methods usually design the feature and classifier individually, while little work has been done for the simultaneous optimization of the two parts. This work proposes a deep network to jointly learn a feature and a classifier so that they could help each other to make the whole system optimal. To deal with the challenge of the impulsive noises and outliers caused by EMG artifacts in EEG signals,...

  18. Risk factors for developing epilepsy after neonatal seizures

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Neonatal seizures are the most frequent neurological disorder in the neonatal period. The incidence is reported to be higher than at any other period in life. Because of the unique nature of neonatal brain anatomy, connections and the paradoxical nature of neurotransmitters, seizures in this age group vary in semiology from those in older children. They may cause irreversible changes to the synapses in the immature brain and progress to epilepsy. The aim of the study was to analys...

  19. Rates, Mechanisms, and Implications of Crustal Assimilation in Continental Arcs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dungan, M.; Davidson, J.

    2002-12-01

    Contrary to the limiting constraints postulated by Bowen for the coupled thermal and mass balance implicated in assimilation, many studies [1-6] suggest that multi-stage and multi-component assimilation, abetted by magma mixing, may be volumetrically important and have profound consequences for the chemistry of basaltic and evolved magmas in long-lived continental magmatic systems. The probability of a primitive or evolved basalt arriving at the Earth's surface having undergone perfectly closed-system evolution during passage through 25-60 km of continental crust is vanishingly low. A case-by-case demonstration that the intra-crustal chemical overprint is trivial, or that it can be quantified and subtracted, is an essential step in any evaluation of mantle source-region chemistry and processes based on inversion of continental basalt compositions. In magmatic systems characterized by mafic magma recharge the thermal energy and physical dynamism needed for assimilation are not constrained to come uniquely from one magma batch [7, 8]. Equally important is that assimilation is rarely equivalent to bulk melting of ingested blocks followed by reservoir-wide homogenization. The mechanics of crustal assimilation are governed by grain boundary melting, disaggregation, and dispersal of refractory solids (including xenocryst settling) wherein liberated low-density, incompatible element-enriched partial melts have the capacity to render primitive arc magma batches variably modified, as well as heterogeneous on short length-scales. Evidence that basalts thermally erode surface channels and conduit walls, and new observations constraining the maximum time that some extensively melted xenoliths have resided in their host magmas, indicate that the time required to impose an open-system overprint on a hot basaltic magma (days to yrs) is far shorter than typical repose periods at most arc volcanoes (50-500 yrs). Assimilative recycling of broadly gabbroic arc cumulates has had large

  20. Hippocampal closed-loop modeling and implications for seizure stimulation design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandler, Roman A.; Song, Dong; Hampson, Robert E.; Deadwyler, Sam A.; Berger, Theodore W.; Marmarelis, Vasilis Z.

    2015-10-01

    Objective. Traditional hippocampal modeling has focused on the series of feedforward synapses known as the trisynaptic pathway. However, feedback connections from CA1 back to the hippocampus through the entorhinal cortex (EC) actually make the hippocampus a closed-loop system. By constructing a functional closed-loop model of the hippocampus, one may learn how both physiological and epileptic oscillations emerge and design efficient neurostimulation patterns to abate such oscillations. Approach. Point process input-output models where estimated from recorded rodent hippocampal data to describe the nonlinear dynamical transformation from CA3 → CA1, via the schaffer-collateral synapse, and CA1 → CA3 via the EC. Each Volterra-like subsystem was composed of linear dynamics (principal dynamic modes) followed by static nonlinearities. The two subsystems were then wired together to produce the full closed-loop model of the hippocampus. Main results. Closed-loop connectivity was found to be necessary for the emergence of theta resonances as seen in recorded data, thus validating the model. The model was then used to identify frequency parameters for the design of neurostimulation patterns to abate seizures. Significance. Deep-brain stimulation (DBS) is a new and promising therapy for intractable seizures. Currently, there is no efficient way to determine optimal frequency parameters for DBS, or even whether periodic or broadband stimuli are optimal. Data-based computational models have the potential to be used as a testbed for designing optimal DBS patterns for individual patients. However, in order for these models to be successful they must incorporate the complex closed-loop structure of the seizure focus. This study serves as a proof-of-concept of using such models to design efficient personalized DBS patterns for epilepsy.

  1. Unit Activity of Hippocampal Interneurons before Spontaneous Seizures in an Animal Model of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Toyoda, Izumi; Fujita, Satoshi; Thamattoor, Ajoy K.; Buckmaster, Paul S.

    2015-01-01

    Mechanisms of seizure initiation are unclear. To evaluate the possible roles of inhibitory neurons, unit recordings were obtained in the dentate gyrus, CA3, CA1, and subiculum of epileptic pilocarpine-treated rats as they experienced spontaneous seizures. Most interneurons in the dentate gyrus, CA1, and subiculum increased their firing rate before seizures, and did so with significant consistency from seizure to seizure. Identification of CA1 interneuron subtypes based on firing characteristi...

  2. Randomized, controlled trial of ibuprofen syrup administered during febrile illnesses to prevent febrile seizure recurrences

    OpenAIRE

    van Stuijvenberg, Margriet; Derksen-Lubsen, Gerarda; Steyerberg, Ewout; Habbema, Dik; Moll, Henriëtte

    1998-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVES: Febrile seizures recur frequently. Factors increasing the risk of febrile seizure recurrence include young age at onset, family history of febrile seizures, previous recurrent febrile seizures, time lapse since previous seizure /=38.5 degrees C). Parents were instructed to take the child's rectal temperature immediately when the child seemed ill or feverish and to promptly administer the study medication when the temperature was >/=38.5 degrees C. Doses were to be admi...

  3. Neonatal seizures-part 1: Not everything that jerks, stiffens and shakes is a fit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Anthony R; Pilling, Elizabeth L; Alix, James J P

    2015-08-01

    The neonatal period is the most frequent time of life to have epileptic seizures. However, neonates can also exhibit unusual movements that are not epileptic seizures. Differentiating between epileptic and non-epileptic movements can be difficult. Many neonatal seizures exhibit few or no clinical features at all. This article is for the benefit of paediatric trainees and reviews the published evidence on which neonatal movements are likely to be epileptic seizures and which are not. We also discuss epileptic seizure classification.

  4. Assimilative and non-assimilative color spreading in the watercolor configuration

    OpenAIRE

    Eiji eKimura; Mikako eKuroki

    2014-01-01

    A colored line flanking a darker contour will appear to spread its color onto an area enclosed by the line (watercolor effect). The watercolor effect has been characterized as an assimilative effect, but non-assimilative color spreading has also been demonstrated in the same spatial configuration; e.g., when a black inner contour (IC) is paired with a blue outer contour (OC), yellow color spreading can be observed. To elucidate visual mechanisms underlying these different color spreading effe...

  5. The Parallel Data Assimilation Framework PDAF - a flexible software framework for ensemble data assimilation

    OpenAIRE

    Nerger, Lars; Hiller, Wolfgang; Schröter, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Ensemble filter algorithms can be implemented in a generic way such that they can be applied with various models with only a minimum amount of recoding. This is possible due to the fact that ensemble filters can operate on abstract state vectors and require only limited information about the numerical model and the observational data used for a data assimilation application. To build an assimilation system, the analysis step of a filter algorithm needs to be connected to t...

  6. ROLE OF MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING BRAIN IN EVALUATION OF SEIZURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athira

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: In patients with seizures a dedicated MRI protocol is a useful tool in the detection of an epileptogenic focus, including congenital, neoplastic and degenerative. Resection of these lesions can lead to seizure freedom in most patients. In this context, a prospective study was conducted to evaluate the etiology of seizures using MRI brain. METHODOLOGY: 120 patients presenting with seizures, above the age of 2years, referred to the Department of Radio - diagnosis were included in this study. RESULTS: In this study, the MR examination revealed pathological findi ngs i n 32.50% (39 out of 120 patients which includes: mesial temporal sclerosis - 14.2% (17, cerebral infarct with gliosis - 6.6% (8, meningioma - 2.5% (3, hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy - 1.6% (2, cortical dysplasia - 1.6% (2, tuberous sclerosis - 11.6% (2, nodula r heterotopias - 0.83% (1, neurocysticercosis - 0.83% (1%, metastasis - 0.83% (1, Dyke Davidoff Maison syndrome - 0.83% (1 and Arnold Chiari Malformation 0.83% (1. CONCLUSION: This study concludes that MR imaging plays a pivotal role in the evaluation of pati ents with seizures using a dedicated MRI seizure protocol to confirm or rule out any organic or developmental lesions. The most common abnormality seen in this study was mesial temporal sclerosis.

  7. Combination anticonvulsant treatment of soman-induced seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koplovitz, I; Schulz, S; Shutz, M; Railer, R; Macalalag, R; Schons, M; McDonough, J

    2001-12-01

    These studies investigated the effectiveness of combination treatment with a benzodiazepine and an anticholinergic drug against soman-induced seizures. The anticholinergic drugs considered were biperiden, scopolamine, trihexaphenidyl, and procyclidine; the benzodiazepines were diazepam and midazolam. Male guinea pigs were implanted surgically with cortical screw electrodes. Electrocorticograms were displayed continually and recorded on a computerized electroencephalographic system. Pyridostigmine (0.026 mg x kg(-1), i.m.) was injected as a pretreatment to inhibit red blood cell acetylcholinesterase by 30-40%. Thirty minutes after pyridostigmine, 2 x LD50 (56 microg x kg(-1)) of soman was injected s.c., followed 1 min later by i.m. treatment with atropine (2 mg x kg(-1)) + 2-PAM (25 mg x kg(-1)). Electrographic seizures occurred in all animals. Anticonvulsant treatment combinations were administered i.m. at 5 or 40 min after seizure onset. Treatment consisted of diazepam or midazolam plus one of the above-mentioned anticholinergic drugs. All doses of the treatment compounds exhibited little or no antiseizure efficacy when given individually. The combination of a benzodiazepine and an anticholinergic drug was effective in terminating soman-induced seizure, whether given 5 or 40 min after seizure onset. The results suggest a strong synergistic effect of combining benzodiazepines with centrally active anticholinergic drugs and support the concept of using an adjunct to supplement diazepam for the treatment of nerve-agent-induced seizures.

  8. Seizure Prediction: Science Fiction or Soon to Become Reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freestone, Dean R; Karoly, Philippa J; Peterson, Andre D H; Kuhlmann, Levin; Lai, Alan; Goodarzy, Farhad; Cook, Mark J

    2015-11-01

    This review highlights recent developments in the field of epileptic seizure prediction. We argue that seizure prediction is possible; however, most previous attempts have used data with an insufficient amount of information to solve the problem. The review discusses four methods for gaining more information above standard clinical electrophysiological recordings. We first discuss developments in obtaining long-term data that enables better characterisation of signal features and trends. Then, we discuss the usage of electrical stimulation to probe neural circuits to obtain robust information regarding excitability. Following this, we present a review of developments in high-resolution micro-electrode technologies that enable neuroimaging across spatial scales. Finally, we present recent results from data-driven model-based analyses, which enable imaging of seizure generating mechanisms from clinical electrophysiological measurements. It is foreseeable that the field of seizure prediction will shift focus to a more probabilistic forecasting approach leading to improvements in the quality of life for the millions of people who suffer uncontrolled seizures. However, a missing piece of the puzzle is devices to acquire long-term high-quality data. When this void is filled, seizure prediction will become a reality.

  9. Approach To The First Unprovoked Seizure- PART I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad GHOFRANI

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite This Article: Ghofrani M. Approach To The First Unprovoked Seizure- PART I. Iran J Child Neurol. 2013 Summer; 7(3: 1- 5. The approach to a child who has experienced a first unprovoked generalized tonic-clonic seizure is challenging and at the same time controversial.How to establish the diagnosis, ways and means of investigation and whether treatment is appropriate, are different aspects of this subject.In this writing the above mentioned matters are discussed.References1. Bluvstein JS, Moshe SL. First unprovoked seizure CurrentManagement in child Neurology, third ed. 2005.P.89-92.2. Hirtz D, Berg A, Bettis D, et al. Practice Parameter: treatment of the child with a first unprovoked seizure. American Academy of Neurology 2003;60:166-175.3. Verity GM, Ross EN, Golding J. Epilepsy in the first ten years of life: finding of the child health and education study. Br Med J 1992;305:857-861.4. Camfiled CS, Camfield PB, Gordon K, et al. Incidence of epilepsy in childhood and adolescence: A populationbasedstudy in Nova Scotia from 1977 to 1985. Epilepsia 1996;37:19-23.5. Hauser W, Annegers J, Kurland L. Incidence of epilepsy and unprovoked seizure in Rochester, Minnisota, 1935- 1984. Epilepsia 1993;34:453-468.6. Jallon P, Goumaz M, Haenggeli G, Morabia A. Incidenceof first epileptic seizure in the canton of Geneve Switzerland. Epilepsia 1997;38:547-552.7. Camfiled PR, Camfiled CS. Pediatric Epilepsy: An overview. Swaiman’s pediatric Neurology, 5th ed, 2012. P.703-710.8. Gowers WB. Epilepsy and other chronic convulsive diseases; their causes, symptoms and treatment. London: J&A Churchill,1881. P.242.9. Goddard GV, Mc Intyre DC, Leech CK. A permanent change in brain function resulting from daily electrical stimulation- Exp Neural 1969;25:295-330.10. Berg AT, Shinnar S. Do seizures beget seizure? An assessment of the clinical evidence in human. J ClinicalNeurophysiol 1993: 14: 102-110.11. Wasterlain CG. Recurrent seizures in developing brain

  10. INTERMITTENT CLONAZEPAM IN THE PREVENTION OF RECURRENT FEBRILE SEIZURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BAJOGHLI Shirin MD

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo evaluate the efficacy and common side effects of intermittent clonazepamin febrile seizures.Materials & MethodsThis study was an experimental trial designed to determine the efficacy ofintermittent clonazepam in febrile seizures .Thirty patients with an age rangeof 6 months to 5 years (60% male, 40% female were studied. Children with ahistory of psychomotor delay, abnormal neurological examination, a history ofantiepileptic drug consumption, and afebrile seizures were excluded from thestudy. Patients received a single dose of prophylactic Clonazepam (0.05 mg/kg/day on the first day of febrile illness and twice daily during the course of fever.An antipyretic medication (Acetaminophen was advised if fever exceeded38oC. Patients were followed up for one year after the study inclusion date.ResultsThree patients were excluded from study since they didnot follow the tritmentand three patients experienced afebrile seizures. Twenty four patients had 162febrile episodes during the course of the study and all patients were seizure-freeafter 1 year.ConclusionClonazepam was 100% effective but lethargy and ataxia were common sideeffects in patients. Fortunately, their parents continued treatment because theyhad prior awareness of the possible side effects of clonazepam. Clonazepam isefficacious as an intermittent therapy for febrile seizures if parents are informedof its side effects.

  11. Risk factors for developing seizures after a stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancman, M E; Golimstok, A; Norscini, J; Granillo, R

    1993-01-01

    We evaluated development of seizures in 219 consecutive patients who had ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke. Subjects with transitory ischemic attacks, subarachnoid, subdural, and epidural hemorrhages or those with previous history of epilepsy were excluded. Mean follow-up time was 11.5 months (range 1-72 months). Twenty-two of 219 stroke patients (10.04%) had seizures. Twelve (54.55%) were of early onset (< 1 month after the stroke), and 10 (45.45%) were of late onset. No statistically significant differences were evident between the early- and late-onset seizure group in comparisons of type of stroke, localization, and size of the lesion. Six of 22 patients (27%) had seizure recurrence. Seizures developed in (a) 13 of 183 patients with ischemic stroke (7.1%) and 9 of 36 patients with hemorrhagic stroke (25%) (p = 0.01); (b) 16 of 93 patients with cortical lesions (17%) and 6 of 126 patients with subcortical lesions (4.7%) (p = 0.01); and (c) 14 of 66 patients with a lesion comprising more than one lobe (21.2%) and 8 of 153 patients with a lesion comprising less than one lobe (5.2%) (p < 0.01). We conclude that patients with hemorrhagic stroke, cortical lesions, and lesions involving more than one lobe are at higher risk of developing seizures.

  12. A physiology-based seizure detection system for multichannel EEG.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Ping Shen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Epilepsy is a common chronic neurological disorder characterized by recurrent unprovoked seizures. Electroencephalogram (EEG signals play a critical role in the diagnosis of epilepsy. Multichannel EEGs contain more information than do single-channel EEGs. Automatic detection algorithms for spikes or seizures have traditionally been implemented on single-channel EEG, and algorithms for multichannel EEG are unavailable. METHODOLOGY: This study proposes a physiology-based detection system for epileptic seizures that uses multichannel EEG signals. The proposed technique was tested on two EEG data sets acquired from 18 patients. Both unipolar and bipolar EEG signals were analyzed. We employed sample entropy (SampEn, statistical values, and concepts used in clinical neurophysiology (e.g., phase reversals and potential fields of a bipolar EEG to extract the features. We further tested the performance of a genetic algorithm cascaded with a support vector machine and post-classification spike matching. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We obtained 86.69% spike detection and 99.77% seizure detection for Data Set I. The detection system was further validated using the model trained by Data Set I on Data Set II. The system again showed high performance, with 91.18% detection of spikes and 99.22% seizure detection. CONCLUSION: We report a de novo EEG classification system for seizure and spike detection on multichannel EEG that includes physiology-based knowledge to enhance the performance of this type of system.

  13. Direct assimilation of satellite radiance data in GRAPES variational assimilation system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU GuoFu; XUE JiShan; ZHANG Hua; LIU ZhiQuan; ZHUANG ShiYu; HUANG LiPing; DONG PeiMing

    2008-01-01

    Variational method is capable of dealing with observations that have a complicated nonlinear relation with model variables representative of the atmospheric state, and so make it possible to directly as-similate such measured variables as satellite radiance, which have a nonlinear relation with the model variables. Assimilation of any type of observations requires a corresponding observation operator, which establishes a specific mapping from the space of the model state to the space of observation. This paper presents in detail how the direct assimilation of real satellite radiance data is implemented in the GRAPES-3DVar analysis system. It focuses on all the components of the observation operator for direct assimilation of real satellite radiance data, including a spatial interpolation operator that trans-forms variables from model grid points to observation locations, a physical transformation from model variables to observed elements with different choices of model variables, and a data quality control. Assimilation experiments, using satellite radiances such as NOAA17 AMSU-A and AMSU-B (Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit), are carried out with two different schemes. The results from these experi-ments can be physically understood and clearly reflect a rational effect of direct assimilation of satellite radiance data in GRAPES-3DVar analysis system.

  14. Long-term effects of febrile convulsion on seizure susceptibility in P77PMC rat--resistant to acoustic stimuli but susceptible to kainate-induced seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, D Y; Wu, X R; Pei, Y Q; Zuo, Q H

    1985-06-01

    A new audiogenic seizure (AGS)-susceptible strain of rats (P77PMC) was evaluated as a possible model of human febrile seizures. The long-term effects of experimental febrile seizures were observed. All 30-day-old rat pups exhibited clonic seizures during exposure to an ambient temperature of 45 +/- 0.5 degree C. The mean latency from the beginning of the hyperthermic stimulus to the onset of convulsion was 16.9 +/- 2.2 min. The rats survived this hyperthermic seizure, developed a resistance to acoustic stimulations, but were more susceptible at the age of 50 to 60 days to kainate-induced limbic seizures than controls. The results of this study imply that febrile seizures of developing P77PMC rats can change later seizure susceptibility, and there may be some correlation between febrile convulsion and temporal lobe epilepsy. PMID:3996515

  15. Continuous data assimilation for downscaling large-footprint soil moisture retrievals

    KAUST Repository

    Altaf, M. U.

    2016-01-01

    Soil moisture is a key component of the hydrologic cycle, influencing processes leading to runoff generation, infiltration and groundwater recharge, evaporation and transpiration. Generally, the measurement scale for soil moisture is found to be different from the modeling scales for these processes. Reducing this mismatch between observation and model scales in necessary for improved hydrological modeling. An innovative approach to downscaling coarse resolution soil moisture data by combining continuous data assimilation and physically based modeling is presented. In this approach, we exploit the features of Continuous Data Assimilation (CDA) which was initially designed for general dissipative dynamical systems and later tested numerically on the incompressible Navier-Stokes equation, and the Benard equation. A nudging term, estimated as the misfit between interpolants of the assimilated coarse grid measurements and the fine grid model solution, is added to the model equations to constrain the model’s large scale variability by available measurements. Soil moisture fields generated at a fine resolution by a physically-based vadose zone model (HYDRUS) are subjected to data assimilation conditioned upon coarse resolution observations. This enables nudging of the model outputs towards values that honor the coarse resolution dynamics while still being generated at the fine scale. Results show that the approach is feasible to generate fine scale soil moisture fields across large extents, based on coarse scale observations. Application of this approach is likely in generating fine and intermediate resolution soil moisture fields conditioned on the radiometer-based, coarse resolution products from remote sensing satellites.

  16. In-depth performance analysis of an EEG based neonatal seizure detection algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieson, S.; Rennie, J.; Livingstone, V.; Temko, A.; Low, E.; Pressler, R.M.; Boylan, G.B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe a novel neurophysiology based performance analysis of automated seizure detection algorithms for neonatal EEG to characterize features of detected and non-detected seizures and causes of false detections to identify areas for algorithmic improvement. Methods EEGs of 20 term neonates were recorded (10 seizure, 10 non-seizure). Seizures were annotated by an expert and characterized using a novel set of 10 criteria. ANSeR seizure detection algorithm (SDA) seizure annotations were compared to the expert to derive detected and non-detected seizures at three SDA sensitivity thresholds. Differences in seizure characteristics between groups were compared using univariate and multivariate analysis. False detections were characterized. Results The expert detected 421 seizures. The SDA at thresholds 0.4, 0.5, 0.6 detected 60%, 54% and 45% of seizures. At all thresholds, multivariate analyses demonstrated that the odds of detecting seizure increased with 4 criteria: seizure amplitude, duration, rhythmicity and number of EEG channels involved at seizure peak. Major causes of false detections included respiration and sweat artefacts or a highly rhythmic background, often during intermediate sleep. Conclusion This rigorous analysis allows estimation of how key seizure features are exploited by SDAs. Significance This study resulted in a beta version of ANSeR with significantly improved performance. PMID:27072097

  17. Increased Seizure Latency and Decreased Severity of Pentylenetetrazol-Induced Seizures in Mice after Essential Oil Administration

    OpenAIRE

    Eleni Koutroumanidou; Athanasios Kimbaris; Alexandros Kortsaris; Eugenia Bezirtzoglou; Moschos Polissiou; Konstantinos Charalabopoulos; Olga Pagonopoulou

    2013-01-01

    The effect of pretreatment with essential oils (EOs) from eight aromatic plants on the seizure latency and severity of pentylenetetrazol- (PTZ-) induced seizures in mice was evaluated. Weight-dependent doses of Rosmarinus officinalis, Ocimum basilicum, Mentha spicata, Mentha pulegium, Lavandula angustifolia, Mentha piperita, Origanum dictamnus, and Origanum vulgare, isolated from the respective aromatic plants from NE Greece, were administered 60 minutes prior to intraperitoneal (i.p.) inject...

  18. ANALYSIS OF MAIN REASONS FOR MISTAKES IN DIAGNOSTICS OF EPILEPTIC SEIZURES AND EPILEPTIC SYNDROMES (CLINICAL PECULIARITIES OF EPILEPTIC SEIZURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. B. Mironov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a chronic brain disease that requires long therapy and continuous careful supervision of the status of the patient. In connection with this, both overdiagnosis and underdiagnosis of this disease is extremely dangerous. Overdiagnosis causes ungrounded social "label", limitation in rights, significant decreasing quality of life of the patient, family problems, prescription of long-term anti-epileptic therapy that may cause potential side effects. Underdiagnosis of epilepsy frequently causes further resistance of seizures to therapy, they become more frequent, there appears the possibility of development of epileptic status, life threatening situations, possibility of development of cognitive disorders associated with the disease. A significant progress in epileptology and medical technologies (video electroencephalographic (EEG monitoring, neuroimaging methods, genetic studies that has been marked in recent decades has allowed minimizing errors of physicians. Despite this, certain difficulties still remain in diagnostics of epilepsy. In the author's opinion, there is a range of epileptic seizures visual assessment of which is extremely difficult and is literally impossible without video EEG monitoring. Short, phantom, atypical absences, absences on the outside, epileptic myoclonus of the eyelids with or without absences, myoclonic, tonic, gelastic, focal hyperkinetic seizures, epileptic aura, reversing focal seizures, epileptic spasms, ictal syncopes, negative myoclonus, focal epileptic myoclonus, epileptic seizures arising when closing the eyes, and self-induced seizures can be attributed to such seizures with difficulties in diagnosis. The author reviews each of these types epileptic seizures in details focusing the attention on their diagnostic criteria and characteristics of the clinical and the EEF features that are of utmost importance in the course of performance of differential diagnostics. Own experience of the

  19. Why Are Seizures Rare in Rapid Eye Movement Sleep? Review of the Frequency of Seizures in Different Sleep Stages

    OpenAIRE

    Marcus Ng; Milena Pavlova

    2013-01-01

    Since the formal characterization of sleep stages, there have been reports that seizures may preferentially occur in certain phases of sleep. Through ascending cholinergic connections from the brainstem, rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is physiologically characterized by low voltage fast activity on the electroencephalogram, REMs, and muscle atonia. Multiple independent studies confirm that, in REM sleep, there is a strikingly low proportion of seizures (~1% or less). We review a total of 42 d...

  20. Impacts of XBT, TAO, Altimetry and ARGO Observations on the Tropical Pacific Ocean Data Assimilation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Changxiang; ZHU Jiang; ZHOU Guangqing

    2007-01-01

    This study aims at assessing the relative impacts of four major components of the tropical Pacific Ocean observing system on assimilation of temperature and salinity fields. Observations were collected over a period between January 2001 through June 2003 including temperature data from the expendable bathythermographs (XBT), thermistor data from the Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Tropical Atmosphere-Ocean (TOGA-TAO) mooring array, sea level anomalies from the Topex/Poseidon and Jason-1 altimetry (T/P-J),and temperature and salinity profiles from the Array for Real-time Geostrophic Oceanography (ARGO) floats.An efficient three-dimensional variational analysis-based method was introduced to assimilate the above data into the tropical-Pacific circulation model. To evaluate the impact of the individual component of the observing system, four observation system experiments were carried out. The experiment that assimilated all four components of the observing system was taken as the reference. The other three experiments were implemented by withholding one of the four components. Results show that the spatial distribution of the data influences its relative contribution. XBT observations produce the most distinguished effects on temperature analyses in the off-equatorial region due to the large amount of measurements and high quality.Similarly, the impact of TAO is dominant in the equatorial region due to the focus of the spatial distribution.The Topex/Poseidon-Jason-1 can be highly complementary where the XBT and TAO observations are sparse.The contribution of XBT or TAO on the assimilated salinity is made by the model dynamics because no salinity observations from them are assimilated. Therefore, T/P-J, as a main source for providing salinity data, has been shown to have greater impacts than either XBT or TAO on the salinity analysis. Although ARGO includes the subsurface observations, the relatively smaller number of observation makes it have the smallest

  1. UNIFICATION AND APPLICATIONS OF MODERN OCEANIC/ATMOSPHERIC DATA ASSIMILATION ALGORITHMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAO Fang-li; ZHANG Shao-qing; YUAN Ye-li

    2004-01-01

    The key mathematics and applications of various modern atmospheric/oceanic data assimilation methods including Optimal Interpolation(OI),4-dimensional variational approach(4D-Var)and filters were systematically reviewed and classified.Based on the data assimilation philosophy,I.e.,using model dynamics to extract the observational information,the common character of the problem,such as the probabilistic nature of the evolution of the atmospheric/oceanic system,noisy and irregularly spaced observations,and the advantages and disadvantages of these data assimilation algorithms,were discussed.In the filtering framework,all modern data assimilation algorithms were unified: OI/3D-Var is a stationary filter,4D-Var is a linear(Kalman)filter and an ensemble of Kalman filters is able to construct a nonlinear filter.The nonlinear filter such as the Ensemble Kalman Filter(ENKF),Ensemble Adjustment Kalman Filter(EAKF)and Ensemble Transformation Kalman Filter(ETKF)can,to some extent,account for the non-Gaussian information of the prior distribution from the model.The flow-dependent covariance estimated by an ensemble filter may be introduced to OI and 4D-Var to improve these traditional algorithms.In practice,the performance of algorithms may depend on the specific numerical model and the choice of algorithm may depend on the specific problem.However,the unification of algorithms allows us to establish a unified test system to evaluate these algorithms,which provides more insights into data assimilation philosophies and helps improve data assimilation techniques.

  2. Characteristic strategy of assimilation of various saccharides by Clostridium cellulovorans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inamori, Takako; Aburaya, Shunsuke; Morisaka, Hironobu; Kuroda, Kouichi; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2016-12-01

    Clostridium cellulovorans can effectively assimilate not only cellulose but also hemicellulose by producing cellulosomal and non-cellulosomal enzymes. However, little is known about how C. cellulovorans assimilates various saccharides in media containing polysaccharides and oligosaccharides. In this research, we investigated the property of saccharide incorporation and assimilation by C. cellulovorans. Faster growth in media containing xylan and cellulose was achieved by switching polysaccharides, in which xylan was first assimilated, followed by cellulose. Furthermore, the presence of polysaccharides that can be easily degraded might increase the assimilation rate of lignocellulose by promoting growth. These properties of C. cellulovorans could be suitable for the effective utilization of lignocellulosic biomass.

  3. Zinc Status in Febrile Seizure: A Case-Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MohammadReza SALEHIOMRAN

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite This Article: Salehiomran MR, Mahzari M. Zinc Status in Febrile Seizure: A Case-Control Study. Iran J Child Neurol. 2013 Autumn; 7(4:20-23.ObjectiveFebrile seizure is the most common type of seizure in children. Their incidence is 2-5%. There are different hypotheses about relationship between neurotransmitters and trace elements (such as zinc and febrile seizure. Zinc, asa major element of some enzymes, plays an important role in the central nervous system (CNS and can affect some inhibitory mechanisms of CNS. The aim of the present study was to determine whether there were any changes in serumzinc level in children with febrile seizure in comparison with febrile children without seizure.Materials & MethodsThis case-control study was performed on 100 patients aged 6 months to 6 years.This study was conducted between January and August 2012, on 50 children with febrile seizures (case and 50 febrile children without seizures (control, that were referred to Amirkola Children Hospital (a referral hospital in the northof Iran. Two groups were matched for age and sex. The serum zinc levels in the both groups were determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry method.ResultsThe mean serum zinc level was 0.585±0.166 mg/L and 0.704±0.179 mg/L in the case group and the control group, respectively (p=0.001. The mean serum zinc level was significantly lower in the febrile seizure group compared to thecontrol groups.  ConclusionOur findings revealed that serum zinc level was significantly lower in children with simple febrile seizure in comparison with febrile children without seizure. It can emphasize the hypothesis that there is a relation between serum zinc level and febrile seizure in children. ReferencesVarma RR. Febrile seizures. Indian J Pediatr 2002; 69(8; 697-700.Talebian A, Vakili Z, Talar SA, Kazemi M, Mousavi GA. Assessment of the relation between serum zinc and magnesium levels in children with febrile

  4. Data-assimilation by delay-coordinate nudging

    CERN Document Server

    Pazó, D; López, J M

    2015-01-01

    A new nudging method for data assimilation, delay-coordinate nudging, is presented. Delay-coordinate nudging makes explicit use of present and past observations in the formulation of the forcing driving the model evolution at each time-step. Numerical experiments with a low order chaotic system show that the new method systematically outperforms standard nudging in different model and observational scenarios, also when using an un-optimized formulation of the delay-nudging coefficients. A connection between the optimal delay and the dominant Lyapunov exponent of the dynamics is found based on heuristic arguments and is confirmed by the numerical results, providing a guideline for the practical implementation of the algorithm. Delay-coordinate nudging preserves the easiness of implementation, the intuitive functioning and the reduced computational cost of the standard nudging, making it a potential alternative especially in the field of seasonal-to-decadal predictions with large Earth system models that limit ...

  5. Sample size reduction in groundwater surveys via sparse data assimilation

    KAUST Repository

    Hussain, Z.

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, we focus on sparse signal recovery methods for data assimilation in groundwater models. The objective of this work is to exploit the commonly understood spatial sparsity in hydrodynamic models and thereby reduce the number of measurements to image a dynamic groundwater profile. To achieve this we employ a Bayesian compressive sensing framework that lets us adaptively select the next measurement to reduce the estimation error. An extension to the Bayesian compressive sensing framework is also proposed which incorporates the additional model information to estimate system states from even lesser measurements. Instead of using cumulative imaging-like measurements, such as those used in standard compressive sensing, we use sparse binary matrices. This choice of measurements can be interpreted as randomly sampling only a small subset of dug wells at each time step, instead of sampling the entire grid. Therefore, this framework offers groundwater surveyors a significant reduction in surveying effort without compromising the quality of the survey. © 2013 IEEE.

  6. Nonlinear balance constraints in 3DVAR data assimilation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In many applications of 3DVAR, the balance constraints can be considered via two main approaches: weak constraint method which adds penalty terms to the cost function; and proper definition of the background error covariance matrix with non-zero cross-correlation sub-matrices. The weak constraint approach requires determining the weighting matrices of the penalty terms. The background error covariance approach does not require determining those additional weighting matrices. However, it is only applicable to those linear or linearized balance constraints. A novel approach is proposed based on the background error covariance approach by generalizing the so-called Derber-Bouttier formulation. An assimilation experiment of estimating temperature and salinity from the sea surface dynamic height observation is given to illustrate the proposed treatments of nonlinear balance constraints.

  7. Descriptions of clinical semiology of seizures in literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Peter

    2006-03-01

    Literary texts are an important part of the cultural history of many fields of medicine. Accounts of epilepsy are frequent, and descriptions of seizure semiology are often included with varying detail. This review looks at these, and considers the authors' background knowledge of epilepsy. The first group of writers suffered seizures themselves. Some of them provide remarkable and novel insights into the subjective symptoms and experiences in and around seizures.A second group draws from their own observations of seizures in others who may have been close relatives or fortuitous strangers. Here, the outside view prevails, and seizures may be described with clinical objectiveness. Commonly, the reactions of onlookers become part of the narrative beyond the seizure description. The third group writes from second-hand knowledge, which may be other observer reports, interviews with people with epilepsy or with experts, information being available in dictionaries, medical textbooks and the like. The professional standard of most writers means that the resulting descriptions are quite accurate, but there are also examples of poor use of such information. Many authors' sources are not known, but can be assumed to belong to one of the above categories, and we can sometimes guess. It appears that even authors with no first-hand knowledge are often aware of seizure types other than the most widely known, generalised tonic-clonic, and there is a widespread interest in warnings and how the afflicted respond to them. The quality of an author's fictional account of epilepsy should not be judged from a translation, because specific aspects and the language involved in the description may have been misunderstood by the translator. PMID:16567320

  8. Thalamus lesions in chronic and acute seizure disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tschampa, Henriette J.; Greschus, Susanne; Urbach, Horst [University of Bonn, Department of Radiology (Neuroradiology), Bonn (Germany); Sassen, Robert; Bien, Christian G. [University of Bonn, Department of Epileptology, Bonn (Germany)

    2011-04-15

    Transient signal changes in the pulvinar have been described following status epilepticus. However, we observed persistent thalamus changes after seizures. The purpose of this study was to characterize thalamus changes in patients with seizure disorders and to correlate imaging findings with clinical features. We searched among 5,500 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) exams performed in patients with seizures and identified 43 patients. The MRI scans of these patients were reviewed and correlated with clinical data. We identified four patterns of thalamus lesions: (a) fluid attenuated inversion recovery-hyperintense pulvinar lesions (20 patients), as known from status epilepticus. Ten patients in this group had a status epilepticus. Among the remaining patients, three had frequent seizures and seven had sporadic seizures. Twelve patients had follow-up exams for a median of 11 months. The lesions had persisted in 11/12 cases in the last available exam and were reversible in one case only. In seven cases, cone-shaped thalamus atrophy resulted, (b) linear defects in the medial and anterior thalamus (five patients), accompanied by atrophy of the mamillary body and the fornix in patients with chronic epilepsy, (c) extensive bilateral thalamus lesions in two patients with a syndrome caused by mutation in the mitochondrial polymerase gamma, and (d) other thalamus lesions not associated with the seizure disorder (16 patients). The spectrum of thalamus lesions in patients with seizure disorders is wider than previously reported. Postictal pulvinar lesions can persist and may result in thalamic atrophy. Linear defects in the anterior thalamus are associated with limbic system atrophy. (orig.)

  9. Eslicarbazepine Acetate Monotherapy: A Review in Partial-Onset Seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirley, Matt; Dhillon, Sohita

    2016-04-01

    Eslicarbazepine acetate (Aptiom(®)) is a once-daily, orally administered antiepileptic drug (AED) approved previously in the EU, USA and several other countries for use as adjunctive therapy for the treatment of partial-onset seizures. Based on the findings of two randomized, dose-blinded, conversion-to-monotherapy phase III trials in patients with uncontrolled partial epilepsy, the US license for eslicarbazepine acetate has recently been expanded to include use as monotherapy for partial-onset seizures. The pivotal trials demonstrated that seizure control following conversion from other AEDs was superior for eslicarbazepine acetate monotherapy (1200 or 1600 mg once daily) compared with a pseudo-placebo historical control. Other efficacy outcomes appeared to support the benefit of treatment, with up to 10 % of patients remaining seizure free and up to 46 % of patients experiencing a ≥50 % reduction from baseline in standardized seizure frequency during the monotherapy periods of the trials. Eslicarbazepine acetate monotherapy was generally well tolerated, with most treatment-emergent adverse events being mild to moderate in severity. Its tolerability profile was generally consistent with the established profile of the drug based on its use as adjunctive therapy. Thus, once-daily eslicarbazepine acetate, either as monotherapy or adjunctive therapy, represents a useful option for the treatment of patients with partial-onset seizures. The recent licensing of the drug in the USA as monotherapy expands the range of treatment options for patients with partial-onset seizures and increases the opportunity to tailor therapy to the individual patient. PMID:27055527

  10. Healthcare-seeking behavior after seizures in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bavdekar Sandeep

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hardly any Indian data is available regarding practices employed by parents for preventing injuries and aspiration and controlling convulsions in children. Aims: To describe the health care-seeking behavior and practices employed by parents when a child has convulsions. Settings and Design: Prospective questionnaire-based study in a tertiary care hospital setting. Materials and Methods: Parents of children (age: 1 month -12 years admitted with history of convulsions were enrolled and information regarding demographic characteristics, time lag, preferred health care provider and measures taken in a convulsing child was elicited using a pretested questionnaire. Statistical Analysis Used: Demographic parameters and measures employed described as percentages. Results: One hundred and forty parents were interviewed. Seventy-six children had first episode. Forty-nine of 64 children with subsequent seizures had contact with a health care provider during the previous seizure episode. The median duration of seizures was 10 minutes (Mean: 54.15±366.39 min; but children were brought to the hospital after a median of 2 hours (Mean: 5.22±10.37 h. Measures such as smelling onions, oral administration of cold water, reading religious texts and insertion of mouth gag were employed. Although 45 with previous seizure-related health care contact agreed that they were informed about measures to be taken, none of them could remember more than one measure for preventing injuries and aspiration and controlling seizures. Only four narrated "per-rectal administration of diazepam" as a measure, although only one implemented it. Only four general practitioners used per-rectal diazepam to control seizures. Conclusions: Children with seizures reach health care providers after a considerable delay putting them at higher risk for developing neurological sequel. There is a need to develop appropriate strategies for disseminating information about "first aid

  11. ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE IN CHILDREN WITH NEW-ONSET SEIZURES AND ASTHMA: A PROSPECTIVE STUDY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, David W.; Johnson, Cynthia S.; Austin, Joan K.; Perkins, Susan M.

    2007-01-01

    The study purpose was to compare teacher ratings of academic performance (TRP) over 24 months between children with new-onset seizures (N = 121) and new-onset asthma (N = 54) ages 4 to 14 years. At each data collection point (baseline, 12 months, 24 months), children with seizures were placed into two groups according to their recurrent seizure status (yes/no) during that period. Longitudinal linear mixed models were used to explore differences between the asthma group and the two seizure groups and to identify if differences in TRP in children with seizures were associated with age, gender, or use of medication. In the seizure sample, scores for children in both groups (with and without recurrent seizures) initially declined at 12 months; however, at 24 months, children who did not have recurrent seizures improved while children who continued to have recurrent seizures declined. There was a trend for younger children to decline more than older children. PMID:17293164

  12. Zinc supplementation prolongs the latency of hyperthermia-induced febrile seizures in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydın, L; Erdem, S R; Yazıcı, C

    2016-03-01

    Some studies have shown a relationship between febrile seizures and zinc levels. The lowest dose zinc supplementation in pentylenetetrazole seizure model has a protective effect. But, zinc pretreatment has no effect in maximal electroshock model. However, it is unclear how zinc supplementation affects hyperthermia-induced febrile seizures. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of zinc supplementation on febrile seizures in male Sprague-Dawley rats. The rats were randomly assigned to four groups. Zinc supplementation was commenced 5 days prior to febrile seizure induction by placing the animals in a water bath at 45°C. We measured the rectal temperature and determined the febrile seizure latency, duration, and stage. In the zinc-supplemented group, both the seizure latency and the rectal temperature triggering seizure initiation were significantly higher than in the other groups. We suggest that zinc supplementation can positively modulate febrile seizure pathogenesis in rats.

  13. Effect of S-07 on 14CO2 assimilation and distribution of assimilates during ripening stage of wheat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of S-07 (S-3307, uniconazole) on 14CO2 assimilation and distribution of assimilates during ripening stage of wheat was studied. The experimental results showed that the amount of 14Co2 assimilates in leaves of the wheat plant sprayed with 10∼40 ppm S-07 at heading stage was higher than that of the control. The distribution of 14CO2 assimilates in ear and root of wheat plant increased. It is also found that S-07 treatment made more assimilates transferring from primary stem to tillers

  14. The "textbook Gibson": The assimilation of dissidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costall, Alan; Morris, Paul

    2015-02-01

    We examine how the textbooks have dealt with one of psychology's most eminent dissidents, James Gibson (1904-1979). Our review of more than a hundred textbooks, dating from the 1950s to the present, reveals fundamental and systematic misrepresentations of Gibson. Although Gibson continues to figure in most of the textbooks, his work is routinely assimilated to theoretical positions he emphatically rejected: cue theory, stimulus-response psychology, and nativism. As Gibson's one-time colleague, Ulric Neisser, pointed out, psychologists are especially prone to trying to understand new proposals "by mapping it on to some existing scheme," and warned that when "an idea is really new, that strategy fails" (Neisser, 1990, p. 749). The "Textbook Gibson" is an example of such a failure, and perhaps also of the more general importance of assimilation-"shadow history"-within the actual history of psychology. PMID:25664882

  15. Complexity Computational Environment: Data Assimilation SERVOGrid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnellan, Andrea; Parker, Jay; Fox, Geoffrey; Pierce, Marlon; Rundle, John; McLeod, Dennis

    2004-01-01

    We are using Web (Grid) service technology to demonstrate the assimilation of multiple distributed data sources (a typical data grid problem) into a major parallel high-performance computing earthquake forecasting code. Such a linkage of Geoinformatics with Geocomplexity demonstrates the value of the Solid Earth Research Virtual Observatory (SERVO) Grid concept, and advance Grid technology by building the first real-time large-scale data assimilation grid Here we develop the next steps for both the SERVO concept and the identified need for a Solid Earth problem-solving environment. We use a challenging motivating problem of importance to NASA namely integrating NASA space geodetic observations with numerical simulations of a changing earth.

  16. Data assimilation in integrated hydrological modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jørn

    Integrated hydrological models are useful tools for water resource management and research, and advances in computational power and the advent of new observation types has resulted in the models generally becoming more complex and distributed. However, the models are often characterized by a high...... using both synthetic data and real observations. Groundwater head and stream discharge observations are assimilated in an integrated hydrological model, with the aim of updating the groundwater head, stream discharge and water level, and model parameters. When synthetically generated observations...... degree of parameterization which results in significant model uncertainty which cannot be reduced much due to observations often being scarce and often taking the form of point measurements. Data assimilation shows great promise for use in integrated hydrological models , as it allows for observations...

  17. Global Assimilation of EOS-Aura Data as a Means of Mapping Ozone Distribution in the Lower Stratosphere and Troposphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wargan, Krzysztof; Olsen, M.; Douglass, A.; Witte, J.; Strahan, S.; Livesey, N.

    2012-01-01

    Ozone in the lower stratosphere and the troposphere plays an important role in forcing the climate. However, the global ozone distribution in this region is not well known because of the sparse distribution of in-situ data and the poor sensitivity of satellite based observations to the lowermost of the atmosphere. The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) instruments on EOS-Aura provide information on the total ozone column and the stratospheric ozone profile. This data has been assimilated into NASA s Global Earth Observing System, Version 5 (GEOS-5) data assimilation system (DAS). We will discuss the results of assimilating three years of OMI and MLS data into GEOS-5. This data was assimilated alongside meteorological observations from both conventional sources and satellite instruments. Previous studies have shown that combining observations from these instruments through the Trajectory Tropospheric Ozone Residual methodology (TTOR) or using data assimilation can yield useful, yet low biased, estimates of the tropospheric ozone budget. We show that the assimilated ozone fields in this updated version of GEOS-5 exhibit an excellent agreement with ozone sonde and High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS) data in the lower stratosphere in terms of spatial and temporal variability as well as integrated ozone abundances. Good representation of small-scale vertical features follows from combining the MLS data with the assimilated meteorological fields. We then demonstrate how this information can be used to calculate the Stratosphere - Troposphere Exchange of ozone and its contribution to the tropospheric ozone column in GEOS-5. Evaluations of tropospheric ozone distributions from the assimilation will be made by comparisons with sonde and other in-situ observations.

  18. Uric acid is released in the brain during seizure activity and increases severity of seizures in a mouse model for acute limbic seizures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Thyrion; R. Raedt; J. Portelli; P. van Loo; W.J. Wadman; G. Glorieux; B.N. Lambrecht; S. Janssens; K. Vonck; P. Boon

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence points at an important role of endogenous cell-damage induced pro-inflammatory molecules in the generation of epileptic seizures. Uric acid, under the form of monosodium urate crystals, has shown to have pro-inflammatory properties in the body, but less is known about its role in sei

  19. Reduction of complexity and variational data assimilation

    OpenAIRE

    Maday, Yvon

    2015-01-01

    Reduced basis methods belong to a class of approaches of \\emph{model reduction} for the approximation of the solution of mathematical models involved in many fields of research or decision making and in data assimilation. These approaches allow to tackle, in --- close to --- real time, problems requiring, a priori, a large number of computations by formalizing two steps : one known as "offline stage” that is a preparation step and is quite costly and an ``online stage'' that is used on dema...

  20. Services innovation: assimilation, differentiation, inversion and integration

    OpenAIRE

    Gallouj, FaÏz

    2002-01-01

    This chapter aims to provide a review of the literature on innovation in services and to focus on the analytical strategies carried out in order to fill in the innovation gap in the service economy (i.e. the difference between what the traditional innovation indicators are capable of capturing, and the reality of innovation activities undertaken in a given economy). Four analytical perspectives are distinguished in this chapter, which are labeled: assimilation, differentiation, inversion and ...

  1. Ethnic Persistence, Assimilation and Risk Proclivity

    OpenAIRE

    Bonin, Holger; Constant, Amelie; Tatsiramons, Konstantinos; Zimmermann, Klaus F.

    2007-01-01

    The paper investigates the role of social norms as a determinant of individual attitudes by analyzing risk proclivity reported by immigrants and natives in a unique representative German survey. We employ factor analysis to construct measures of immigrants' ethnic persistence and assimilation. The estimated effect of these measures on risk proclivity suggests that adaptation to the attitudes of the majority population closes the immigrant-native gap in risk proclivity, while stronger commitme...

  2. Immigrants and Gender Roles: Assimilation vs. Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Francine D. Blau

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines evidence on the role of assimilation versus source country culture in influencing immigrant women's behavior in the United States – looking both over time with immigrants' residence in the United States and across immigrant generations. It focuses particularly on labor supply but, for the second generation, also examines fertility and education. We find considerable evidence that immigrant source country gender roles influence immigrant and second generation women's behavi...

  3. National Identity and Immigrants’ Assimilation in France

    OpenAIRE

    Gabin Langevin; Pascaline Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Determination and changes of immigrants' identity resulting from intercultural contacts impact their socio-economic integration. To precisely assess individuals’ identity, we propose a continuous index which aims to overcome interpretation troubles faced by usual measures of ethnic identity. Then, we investigate the determinants of immigrants' ethnic identity in France. We compare our composite and continuous index exhibiting individuals' assimilation with a usual measure of ethnic identity –...

  4. Immigrant Assimilation, Trust and Social Capital

    OpenAIRE

    Cox, James C.; Orman, Wafa Hakim

    2010-01-01

    Trust is a crucial component of social capital. We use an experimental moonlighting game with a representative sample of the U.S. population, oversampling immigrants, to study trust, positive, and negative reciprocity between first-generation immigrants and native-born Americans as a measure of immigrant assimilation. We also survey subjects in order to relate trusting and trustworthy behavior with demographic characteristics and traditional, survey-based measures of social capital. We find t...

  5. Assimilation and cohort effects for German immigrants

    OpenAIRE

    Gundel, Sebastian; Peters, Heiko

    2008-01-01

    Demographic change and the rising demand for highly qualified labor in Germany attracts notice to the analysis of immigration. In addition, the pattern of immigration changed markedly during the past decades. Therefore we use the latest data of the German Socioeconomic Panel up to the year 2006 in order to investigate the economic performance of immigrants. We perform regressions of three pooled cross sections (1986, 1996, 2006) to estimate assimilation and quality of immigrants as reflected ...

  6. Wage Assimilation of Immigrants in Spain

    OpenAIRE

    Zenón Jiménez-Ridruejo; Carlos Borondo Arribas

    2011-01-01

    In this study we quantify the effect of the years of residence in Spain on the earnings of immigrants. We take sex, origin, education and age into account. The results are clearly positive, the longer the length of residence the more earnings, confirming the hypothesis of wage assimilation of immigrants as their human capital is adapted to the Spanish labor market. The information used comes from the Social Security’s Continuous Sample of Working Lives 2007. Additionally, we merge the earning...

  7. Intermarriage and the Economic Assimilation of Immigrants

    OpenAIRE

    Xin Meng; Robert G Gregory

    2005-01-01

    This article investigates the assimilation role of intermarriage between immigrants and natives. Intermarried immigrants earn significantly higher incomes than endogamously married immigrants, even after we take account of human capital endowments and endogeneity of intermarriage. The premium does not appear to be a reward for unobservable individual characteristics. Natives who intermarry do not receive this premium, nor do immigrants who intermarry into another ethnic group. The premium is ...

  8. Precision variational approximations in statistical data assimilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ye

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Data assimilation transfers information from observations of a complex system to physically-based system models with state variables x(t. Typically, the observations are noisy, the model has errors, and the initial state of the model is uncertain, so the data assimilation is statistical. One can thus ask questions about expected values of functions ⟨G(X⟩ on the path X = {x(t0, ..., x(tm} of the model as it moves through an observation window where measurements are made at times {t0, ..., tm}. The probability distribution on the path P(X = exp[−A0(X] determines these expected values. Variational methods seeking extrema of the "action" A0(X, widely known as 4DVar (Talagrand and Courtier, 1987; Evensen, 2009,, are widespread for estimating ⟨G(X ⟩ in many fields of science. In a path integral formulation of statistical data assimilation, we consider variational approximations in a standard realization of the action where measurement and model errors are Gaussian. We (a discuss an annealing method for locating the path X0 giving a consistent global minimum of the action A0(X0, (b consider the explicit role of the number of measurements at each measurement time in determining A0(X0, and (c identify a parameter regime for the scale of model errors which allows X0 to give a precise estimate of ⟨G(X0⟩ with computable, small higher order corrections.

  9. SMAP Data Assimilation at the GMAO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichle, R.; De Lannoy, G.; Liu, Q.; Ardizzone, J.

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission has been providing L-band (1.4 GHz) passive microwave brightness temperature (Tb) observations since April 2015. These observations are sensitive to surface(0-5 cm) soil moisture. Several of the key applications targeted by SMAP, however, require knowledge of deeper-layer, root zone (0-100 cm) soil moisture, which is not directly measured by SMAP. The NASA Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO) contributes to SMAP by providing Level 4 data, including the Level 4 Surface and Root Zone Soil Moisture(L4_SM) product, which is based on the assimilation of SMAP Tb observations in the ensemble-based NASA GEOS-5 land surface data assimilation system. The L4_SM product offers global data every three hours at 9 km resolution, thereby interpolating and extrapolating the coarser- scale (40 km) SMAP observations in time and in space (both horizontally and vertically). Since October 31, 2015, beta-version L4_SM data have been available to the public from the National Snow and Ice Data Center for the period March 31, 2015, to near present, with a mean latency of approx. 2.5 days.

  10. Targeting iron assimilation to develop new antibacterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Timothy L.; Simeonov, Anton

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Since the first application of antibiotics to treat bacterial infections, the development and spread of resistance has been a persistent threat. An ever-evolving pipeline of next-generation therapeutics is required for modern medicine to remain one step ahead of pathogens. Areas covered in this review This review describes recent efforts to develop drugs that interrupt the assimilation of iron by bacteria, a process that is vital to cellular homeostasis and is not currently targeted by antibiotics used in the clinic. We cover the mechanisms through which bacteria acquire iron for their environment and detail efforts to intervene in these processes with small molecule inhibitors that target key steps in these pathways, with a special emphasis on recent advances published during the 2010–2012 period. Expert Opinion For decades, the routes used by bacteria to assimilate iron from host and environmental settings have been the subject of intense study. While numerous investigations have identified inhibitors of these pathways, many have stopped short of translating the in vitro results to in vivo proof of concept experiments. Extension of preliminary findings in this manner to validate the clinical potential of iron assimilation pathways for therapeutic development will significantly increase the impact of the field. PMID:22812521

  11. A new sequential data assimilation method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    A new sequential data assimilation method named "Monte Carlo H ∞ filter" is introduced based on H ∞ filter technique and Monte Carlo method in this paper. This method applies to nonlinear systems in condition of lacking the statistical properties of observational errors. In order to compare the as- similation capability of Monte Carlo H ∞ filter with that of the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) in solving practical problems caused by temporal correlation or spatial correlation of observational errors, two numerical experiments are performed by using Lorenz (1963) system and shallow-water equations re- spectively. The result is that the assimilation capability of the new method is better than that of EnKF method. It is also shown that Monte Carlo H ∞ filter assimilation method is effective and suitable to nonlinear systems in that it does not depend on the statistical properties of observational errors and has better robustness than EnKF method when the statistical properties of observational errors are varying. In addition, for the new method, the smallest level factor founded by search method is flow-dependent.

  12. Impact of SLA assimilation in the Sicily Channel Regional Model: model skills and mesoscale features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Olita

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The impact of the assimilation of MyOcean sea level anomalies along-track data on the analyses of the Sicily Channel Regional Model was studied. The numerical model has a resolution of 1/32° degrees and is capable to reproduce mesoscale and sub-mesoscale features. The impact of the SLA assimilation is studied by comparing a simulation (SIM, which does not assimilate data with an analysis (AN assimilating SLA along-track multi-mission data produced in the framework of MyOcean project. The quality of the analysis was evaluated by computing RMSE of the misfits between analysis background and observations (sea level before assimilation. A qualitative evaluation of the ability of the analyses to reproduce mesoscale structures is accomplished by comparing model results with ocean colour and SST satellite data, able to detect such features on the ocean surface. CTD profiles allowed to evaluate the impact of the SLA assimilation along the water column. We found a significant improvement for AN solution in terms of SLA RMSE with respect to SIM (the averaged RMSE of AN SLA misfits over 2 years is about 0.5 cm smaller than SIM. Comparison with CTD data shows a questionable improvement produced by the assimilation process in terms of vertical features: AN is better in temperature while for salinity it gets worse than SIM at the surface. This suggests that a better a-priori description of the vertical error covariances would be desirable. The qualitative comparison of simulation and analyses with synoptic satellite independent data proves that SLA assimilation allows to correctly reproduce some dynamical features (above all the circulation in the Ionian portion of the domain and mesoscale structures otherwise misplaced or neglected by SIM. Such mesoscale changes also infer that the eddy momentum fluxes (i.e. Reynolds stresses show major changes in the Ionian area. Changes in Reynolds stresses reflect a different pumping of eastward momentum from the eddy to

  13. A variational ensemble scheme for noisy image data assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yin; Robinson, Cordelia; Heitz, Dominique; Mémin, Etienne

    2014-05-01

    Data assimilation techniques aim at recovering a system state variables trajectory denoted as X, along time from partially observed noisy measurements of the system denoted as Y. These procedures, which couple dynamics and noisy measurements of the system, fulfill indeed a twofold objective. On one hand, they provide a denoising - or reconstruction - procedure of the data through a given model framework and on the other hand, they provide estimation procedures for unknown parameters of the dynamics. A standard variational data assimilation problem can be formulated as the minimization of the following objective function with respect to the initial discrepancy, η, from the background initial guess: δ« J(η(x)) = 1∥Xb (x) - X (t ,x)∥2 + 1 tf∥H(X (t,x ))- Y (t,x)∥2dt. 2 0 0 B 2 t0 R (1) where the observation operator H links the state variable and the measurements. The cost function can be interpreted as the log likelihood function associated to the a posteriori distribution of the state given the past history of measurements and the background. In this work, we aim at studying ensemble based optimal control strategies for data assimilation. Such formulation nicely combines the ingredients of ensemble Kalman filters and variational data assimilation (4DVar). It is also formulated as the minimization of the objective function (1), but similarly to ensemble filter, it introduces in its objective function an empirical ensemble-based background-error covariance defined as: B ≡ )(Xb - )T>. (2) Thus, it works in an off-line smoothing mode rather than on the fly like sequential filters. Such resulting ensemble variational data assimilation technique corresponds to a relatively new family of methods [1,2,3]. It presents two main advantages: first, it does not require anymore to construct the adjoint of the dynamics tangent linear operator, which is a considerable advantage with respect to the method's implementation, and second, it enables the handling of a flow

  14. Salvia Officinalis and Cisplatin Effects on Pentylenetetrazole Induced Seizure Threshold

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    Mir Hadi Khayate-Nouri

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Studies have shown that cisplatin have neuropathic effects and Salvia officinalis (SO could have therapeutic effects on nervous system. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of SO hydroalcoholic extract and cisplatin on pentylenetetrazole (PTZ induced seizure in mice. Materials and methods: This is an experimental interventional study. For this purpose first group received normal saline, second group received SO extract, third group received cisplatin, in the fourth group received SO extract plus cisplatin and the subsequent seizure threshold was determined for each group. Results: The results showed that SO extract significantly (p<0.05 increased and in cisplatin group significantly (p<0.05 decreased seizure threshold. Simultaneous uses of cisplatin and SO extract caused to significantly increased seizure threshold (p<0.05 compared with cisplatin group. Conclusion: Considering different types of ingredients in SO extract which have beneficial effects on nervous system, it might be used to reduce cisplatin induced neuropathic effects. It seems that SO extract could be useful in cisplatin-induced seizure but further investigations are needed.

  15. Systemic and neurologic autoimmune disorders associated with seizures or epilepsy.

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    Vincent, Angela; Crino, Peter B

    2011-05-01

    In this article, we review the incidence and significance of seizures in well-established autoimmune disorders, including multiple sclerosis (MS), diabetes mellitus, celiac disease, thyroid disease, and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The five following presentations discuss the incidence and possible pathogenesis of epilepsies that are found in these well-known autoimmune conditions. There is a large body of evidence describing the clinical presentation of seizures with MS and SLE, and showing that refractory epilepsy can complicate these already challenging disorders. However, the mechanisms involved are complex and generally not well understood. Neurologic syndromes, including seizure disorders, can also be a feature of celiac disease (CD) or subclinical CD, sometimes associated with cerebral calcification. The association between type-1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and epilepsy is unclear and requires more definitive epidemiologic analysis, despite the fact that antibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase may provide a link between the two conditions. The association between thyroid disorders and encephalopathies, often termed Hashimoto's encephalopathy, is well known but the pathogenic significance of antithyroid antibodies in this condition is still debated. In general, the relationships between autoimmune mechanisms and seizures in these conditions are unclear; the seizures are likely to be caused by a variety of mechanisms, including ischemia, neuronal damage, and specific and nonspecific immunity. PMID:21542840

  16. The Best Time for EEG Recording in Febrile Seizure

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    Parvaneh KARIMZADEH

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite This Article: Karimzadeh P, Rezayi A, Togha M, Ahmadabadi F, Derakhshanfar H, Azargashb E, Khodaei F. The Best Time for EEG Recording in Febrile Seizure. Iran J Child Neurol. 2014 Winter; 8(1:20-25.ObjectiveSome studies suggest that detection of epileptic discharge is unusual during the first postictal week of febrile seizure and others believe that EEGs carried out on the day of the seizure are abnormal in as many as 88% of the patients. In thisstudy, we intend to compare early and late EEG abnormalities in febrile seizure.Materials & Methods EEG was recorded during daytime sleep, 24-48 hours (early EEG and 2 weeks (late EEG after the seizure in 36 children with febrile seizure (FS, aged between 3 months and 6 years. EEGs that showed generalized or focal spikes, sharp, spike wave complex, and slowing were considered as abnormal EEG.Abnormalities of the first EEG were compared with those of second EEG.ResultsThe most common abnormal epileptiform discharges recorded in the early EEG were slow waves (27.6% and sharp waves in late EEG (36%. Distribution of abnormalities in early and late EEG showed no significant statistical difference.ConclusionThe early and late EEG recording had the same results in patient with febrile seizure. Reference:Hauser WA, Kurland LT. The epidemiology of epilepsy in Rochester, Minnesota, 1935 through 1967. Epilepsia 1975;16(1:1-66.Freeman JM. Febrile seizures: a consensus of their significance, evaluation, and treatment. Pediatrics 1980;66(6:1009.Waruiru C, Appleton R. Febrile seizures: an update. Arch Dis Child 2004;89(8:751-6.ILAE. Guidelines for epidemiologic studies on epilepsy, International League against Epilepsy. Epilepsia 1993;34(4:592-6.Annegers JF, Hauser WA, Shirts SB, Kurland LT. Factors prognostic of unprovoked seizures after febrile convulsions. N Engl J Med 1987;316(9:493-8.Berg AT, Shinnar S, Darefsky AS, Holford TR, Shapiro ED, Salomon ME, et al. Predictors of recurrent febrile

  17. Refractory Seizures in Tramadol Poisoning: A Case Report

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    Mohammad Majidi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tramadol, an analgesic drug abused by opioid addicts, is also abused accidentally or for suicidal purposes. Tramadol poisoning can induce CNS depression, seizures, coma, and ultimately death. Case: In this report, a 30-year-old male was admitted to the emergency department due to suicidal attempt with ingestion of 14000 mg (140 tablet 100 mg of tramadol. He had history of suicidal attempts in past years as well as depression in his past medical history, but he had not abused tramadol and other drugs in his history. There was no history of epilepsy or head trauma in. He presented with generalized seizures two hours post ingestion, and, then, he was referred to hospital four hours later. Generalized seizures were poorly controlled by multiple medications. Due to respiratory arrest, endotracheal tube was inserted and he was admitted to the ICU immediately. At admission, he experienced hypovolemic shock, hypoglycemia, coma, apnea, refractory seizures, muscle spasms, acute respiratory distress syndrome, coagolative disorder, rhabdomyolysis, and acute renal failure. Despite medical managements, he died 38 days after ingestion. Conclusion: In this report, despite using inhalational anesthetic drugs, seizures continued and were very poorly controlled. Cause of death in this patient can be seen as the side effects of tramadol poisoning.

  18. A patient with atonic seizures mimicking transient ischemic attacks

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    Min-Ju Kang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A focal atonic seizure is a partial seizure in which the ictal manifestation consists of paresis of the extremities or muscles on one side of the body, and this phenomenon can easily be misdiagnosed as a transient ischemic attack. An 86-year-old woman visited our hospital complaining of transient right upper extremity weakness lasting for 10 min following an unusual sensation in her chest accompanied by palpitations. On the third hospital day, she again complained of right arm weakness, which progressed to jerky movements of her right extremity accompanied by facial twitching and then generalized into a tonic–clonic seizure. The EEG displayed several interictal spikes in the contralateral temporal area, and the ictal SPECT, analyzed using the SISCOM system, showed an increased signal in both the contralateral superior parietal area and the mesial frontal area. In this case, the patient was diagnosed with focal atonic seizures as the cause of the monolimb weakness, which had been initially misdiagnosed aas transient ischemic attacks. In cases in which a patient presents with monolimb paresis, physicians should consider the possibility of an atonic seizure as the cause.

  19. Augmenting an operational forecasting system for the North and Baltic Seas by in situ T and S data assimilation

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    Losa, Svetlana; Danilov, Sergey; Schröter, Jens; Nerger, Lars; Maßmann, Silvia; Janssen, Frank

    2014-05-01

    In order to improve the hydrography forecast of the North and Baltic Seas, the operational circulation model of the German Federal Maritime and Hydrographic Agency (BSH) has been augmented by a data assimilation (DA) system. The DA system has been developed based on the Singular Evolution Interpolated Kalman (SEIK) filter algorithm (Pham, 1998) coded within the Parallel Data Assimilation Framework (Nerger et al., 2004, Nerger and Hiller, 2012). Previously the only data assimilated were sea surface temperature (SST) measurements obtained with the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) aboard NOAA's polar orbiting satellites. While the quality of the forecast has been significantly improved by assimilating the satellite data (Losa et al., 2012, Losa et al., 2014), assimilation of in situ observational temperature (T) and salinity (S) profiles has allowed for further improvement. Assimilating MARNET time series and CTD and Scanfish measurements, however, required a careful calibration of the DA system with respect to local analysis. The study addresses the problem of the local SEIK analysis accounting for the data within a certain radius. The localisation radius is considered spatially variable and dependent on the system local dynamics. As such, we define the radius of the data influence based on the energy ratio of the baroclinic and barotropic flows. D. T. Pham, J. Verron, L. Gourdeau, 1998. Singular evolutive Kalman filters for data assimilation in oceanography, C. R. Acad. Sci. Paris, Earth and Planetary Sciences, 326, 255-260. L. Nerger, W. Hiller, J. Schröter, 2004. PDAF - The Parallel Data Assimilation Framework: Experiences with Kalman Filtering, In: Zwieflhofer, W., Mozdzynski, G. (Eds.), Use of high performance computing in meteorology: proceedings of the Eleventh ECMWF Workshop on the Use of High Performance Computing in Meteorology. Singapore: World Scientific, Reading, UK, 63-83. L. Nerger, W. Hiller, 2012. Software for Ensemble-based Data

  20. Assimilating scatterometer soil moisture data into conceptual hydrologic models at the regional scale

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    J. Parajka

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the potential of scatterometer data from ERS satellites for improving hydrological simulations in both gauged and ungauged catchments. We compare the soil moisture dynamics simulated by a semidistributed hydrologic model in 320 Austrian catchments with the soil moisture dynamics inferred from the satellite data. The most apparent differences occur in the Alpine areas. Assimilating the scatterometer data into the hydrologic model during the calibration phase improves the relationship between the two soil moisture estimates without any significant decrease in runoff model efficiency. For the case of ungauged catchments, assimilating scatterometer data does not improve the daily runoff simulations but does provide more consistent soil moisture estimates. If the main interest is in obtaining estimates of catchment soil moisture, reconciling the two sources of soil moisture information seems to be of value because of the different error structures.